WorldWideScience

Sample records for survey mission mesur

  1. Euclid Space Mission: building the sky survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tereno, I.; Carvalho, C. S.; Dinis, J.; Scaramella, R.; Amiaux, J.; Burigana, C.; Cuillandre, J. C.; da Silva, A.; Derosa, A.; Maiorano, E.; Maris, M.; Oliveira, D.; Franzetti, P.; Garilli, B.; Gomez-Alvarez, P.; Meneghetti, M.; Wachter, S.; Wachter

    2014-05-01

    The Euclid space mission proposes to survey 15000 square degrees of the extragalactic sky during 6 years, with a step-and-stare technique. The scheduling of observation sequences is driven by the primary scientific objectives, spacecraft constraints, calibration requirements and physical properties of the sky. We present the current reference implementation of the Euclid survey and on-going work on survey optimization.

  2. Euclid Space Mission: building the sky survey

    CERN Document Server

    Tereno, I; Dinis, J; Scaramella, R; Amiaux, J; Burigana, C; Cuillandre, J C; da Silva, A; Derosa, A; Maiorano, E; Maris, M; Oliveira, D; Franzetti, P; Garilli, B; Gomez-Alvarez, P; Meneghetti, M; Wachter, S

    2015-01-01

    The Euclid space mission proposes to survey 15000 square degrees of the extragalactic sky during 6 years, with a step-and-stare technique. The scheduling of observation sequences is driven by the primary scientific objectives, spacecraft constraints, calibration requirements and physical properties of the sky. We present the current reference implementation of the Euclid survey and on-going work on survey optimization.

  3. All Sky Survey Mission Observing Scenario Strategy

    CERN Document Server

    Spangelo, Sara C; Unwin, Stephen C; Bock, Jamie J

    2014-01-01

    This paper develops a general observing strategy for missions performing all-sky surveys, where a single spacecraft maps the celestial sphere subject to realistic constraints. The strategy is flexible such that targeted observations and variable coverage requirements can be achieved. This paper focuses on missions operating in Low Earth Orbit, where the thermal and stray-light constraints due to the Sun, Earth, and Moon result in interacting and dynamic constraints. The approach is applicable to broader mission classes, such as those that operate in different orbits or that survey the Earth. First, the instrument and spacecraft configuration is optimized to enable visibility of the targeted observations throughout the year. Second, a constraint-based high-level strategy is presented for scheduling throughout the year subject to a simplified subset of the constraints. Third, a heuristic-based scheduling algorithm is developed to assign the all-sky observations over short planning horizons. The constraint-based...

  4. Euclid mission: building of a reference survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiaux, J.; Scaramella, R.; Mellier, Y.; Altieri, B.; Burigana, C.; Da Silva, Antonio; Gomez, P.; Hoar, J.; Laureijs, R.; Maiorano, E.; Magalhães Oliveira, D.; Renk, F.; Saavedra Criado, G.; Tereno, I.; Auguères, J. L.; Brinchmann, J.; Cropper, M.; Duvet, L.; Ealet, A.; Franzetti, P.; Garilli, B.; Gondoin, P.; Guzzo, L.; Hoekstra, H.; Holmes, R.; Jahnke, K.; Kitching, T.; Meneghetti, M.; Percival, W.; Warren, S.

    2012-09-01

    Euclid is an ESA Cosmic-Vision wide-field-space mission which is designed to explain the origin of the acceleration of Universe expansion. The mission will investigate at the same time two primary cosmological probes: Weak gravitational Lensing (WL) and Galaxy Clustering (in particular Baryon Acoustic Oscillations, BAO). The extreme precision requested on primary science objectives can only be achieved by observing a large number of galaxies distributed over the whole sky in order to probe the distribution of dark matter and galaxies at all scales. The extreme accuracy needed requires observation from space to limit all observational biases in the measurements. The definition of the Euclid survey, aiming at detecting billions of galaxies over 15 000 square degrees of the extragalactic sky, is a key parameter of the mission. It drives its scientific potential, its duration and the mass of the spacecraft. The construction of a Reference Survey derives from the high level science requirements for a Wide and a Deep survey. The definition of a main sequence of observations and the associated calibrations were indeed a major achievement of the Definition Phase. Implementation of this sequence demonstrated the feasibility of covering the requested area in less than 6 years while taking into account the overheads of space segment observing and maneuvering sequence. This reference mission will be used for sizing the spacecraft consumables needed for primary science. It will also set the framework for optimizing the time on the sky to fulfill the primary science and maximize the Euclid legacy.

  5. Euclid Mission: building of a Reference Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Amiaux, J; Mellier, Y; Altieri, B; Burigana, C; Da Silva, A; Gomez, P; Hoar, J; Laureijs, R; Maiorano, E; Oliveira, D Magalhaes; Renk, F; Criado, G Saavedra; Tereno, I; Augueres, J L; Brinchmann, J; Cropper, M; Duvet, L; Ealet, A; Franzetti, P; Garilli, B; Gondoin, P; Guzzo, L; Hoekstra, H; Holmes, R; Jahnke, K; Kitching, T; Meneghetti, M; Percival, W; Warren, S

    2012-01-01

    Euclid is an ESA Cosmic-Vision wide-field-space mission which is designed to explain the origin of the acceleration of Universe expansion. The mission will investigate at the same time two primary cosmological probes: Weak gravitational Lensing (WL) and Galaxy Clustering (in particular Baryon Acoustic Oscillations, BAO). The extreme precision requested on primary science objectives can only be achieved by observing a large number of galaxies distributed over the whole sky in order to probe the distribution of dark matter and galaxies at all scales. The extreme accuracy needed requires observation from space to limit all observational biases in the measurements. The definition of the Euclid survey, aiming at detecting billions of galaxies over 15 000 square degrees of the extragalactic sky, is a key parameter of the mission. It drives its scientific potential, its duration and the mass of the spacecraft. The construction of a Reference Survey derives from the high level science requirements for a Wide and a De...

  6. Étude du détecteur de traces de l'expérience NEMO3. Simulation de la mesure de l'ultra-faible radioactivité en ${208}^TL$ des sources de l'expérience NEMO3 candidates à la double désintégration $\\beta$ sans émission de neutrino

    CERN Document Server

    Errahmane, K

    2001-01-01

    Étude du détecteur de traces de l'expérience NEMO3. Simulation de la mesure de l'ultra-faible radioactivité en ${208}^TL$ des sources de l'expérience NEMO3 candidates à la double désintégration $\\beta$ sans émission de neutrino

  7. Shuttle Imaging Radar Survey Mission C

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Abstract: Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C (SIR-C) was part of an imaging radar system that was flown on board two Space Shuttle flights (9 - 20 April, 1994 and 30...

  8. Shuttle Imaging Radar Survey Mission C

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C (SIR-C) was part of an imaging radar system that was flown on board two Space Shuttle flights (9 - 20 April, 1994 and 30 September - 11...

  9. DYNAMIC: A Decadal Survey and NASA Roadmap Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxton, L. J.; Oberheide, J.

    2016-12-01

    In this talk we will review the DYNAMIC mission science and implementation plans. DYNAMIC is baselined as a two satellite mission to delineate the dynamical behavior and structure of the ionosphere, thermosphere and mesosphere system. DYNAMIC was considered the top priority in the Decadal Survey upper atmosphere missions by the AIMI panel. The NASA Heliophysics Roadmap recommended that consideration be given to flying DYNAMIC as the STP 5 (next STP mission) rather than IMAP given the time-lag between the Decadal Survey recommendations and the flight of the STP 5 mission. It certainly seems as though STP 5 will be the IMAP mission. In that case what is the status of DYNAMIC? DYNAMIC could be STP 6 or some portion of the DYNAMIC mission could be executed as the next MidEx mission. In this talk we discuss the DYNAMIC science questions and goals and how they might be addressed. We note that DYNAMIC is not a mission just for the space community. DYNAMIC will enable new groundbased investigations and provide a global context for the long and rich history of groundbased observations of the dynamical state of the ITM system. Issues include: How and to what extent do waves and tides in the lower atmosphere contribute to the variability and mean state of the IT system? [Mission driver: Must have two spacecraft separated in local solar time in near polar orbits] How does the AIM system respond to outside forcing? [Mission Driver: Must measure high latitude inputs] How do neutral-plasma interactions produce neutral and ionospheric density changes over regional and global scales? [Mission Driver: Must measure all major species (O, N2, O2, H, He) and their ions] What part of the IT response occurs in the form of aurorally generated waves? [Mission Driver: Must measure small and mesoscale phenomena at high latitudes] What is the relative importance of thermal expansion, upwelling and advection in defining total mass density changes? [Mission Driver: Must determine the mid

  10. The NASA Decadal Survey Aerosol, Cloud, Ecosystems Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClain, Charles R.; Bontempi, Paula; Maring, Hal

    2011-01-01

    In 2007, the National Academy of Sciences delivered a Decadal Survey (Earth Science and Applications from Space: National Imperatives for the Next Decade and Beyond) for NASA, NOAA, and USGS, which is a prioritization of future satellite Earth observations. The recommendations included 15 missions (13 for NASA, two for NOAA), which were prioritized into three groups or tiers. One of the second tier missions is the Aerosol, Cloud, (ocean) Ecosystems (ACE) mission, which focuses on climate forcing, cloud and aerosol properties and interactions, and ocean ecology, carbon cycle science, and fluxes. The baseline instruments recommended for ACE are a cloud radar, an aerosol/cloud lidar, an aerosol/cloud polarimeter, and an ocean radiometer. The instrumental heritage for these measurements are derived from the Cloudsat, CALIPSO, Glory, SeaWiFS and Aqua (MODIS) missions. In 2008, NASA HQ, lead by Hal Maring and Paula Bontempi, organized an interdisciplinary science working group to help formulate the ACE mission by refining the science objectives and approaches, identifying measurement (satellite and field) and mission (e.g., orbit, data processing) requirements, technology requirements, and mission costs. Originally, the disciplines included the cloud, aerosol, and ocean biogeochemistry communities. Subsequently, an ocean-aerosol interaction science working group was formed to ensure the mission addresses the broadest range of science questions possible given the baseline measurements, The ACE mission is a unique opportunity for ocean scientists to work closely with the aerosol and cloud communities. The science working groups are collaborating on science objectives and are defining joint field studies and modeling activities. The presentation will outline the present status of the ACE mission, the science questions each discipline has defined, the measurement requirements identified to date, the current ACE schedule, and future opportunities for broader community

  11. La mesure du danger

    CERN Document Server

    Manceron, Vanessa; Revet, Sandrine

    2014-01-01

    La mesure du danger permet d’explorer des dangers de nature aussi diverse que la délinquance, la pollution, l’écueil maritime, la maladie ou l’attaque sorcellaire, l’extinction d’espèces animales ou végétales, voire de la Planète tout entière. Au croisement de la sociologie, de l’anthropologie et de l’histoire, les différents articles analysent les pratiques concrètes de mesure pour tenter de comprendre ce qui se produit au cours de l’opération d’évaluation du danger sans préjuger de la nature de celui-ci. L’anthropologie a contribué à la réflexion sur l’infortune en s’intéressant aux temporalités de l’après : maladies, catastrophes, pandémies, etc. et en cherchant à rendre compte de l’expérience des victimes, de leur vie ordinaire bouleversée, de la recomposition du quotidien. Elle s’intéresse aussi aux autres types de mesures, les savoirs incorporés, qui reposent sur l’odorat, la vue ou le toucher et ceux qui ressortent d’une épistémologie « non ...

  12. The infrared all-sky survey mission AKARI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Hiroshi

    The AKARI, Japanese infrared astronomical satellite, was launched on 2006 February 21 and started the observation in May of the same year. It has performed the all-sky survey at 6 wavelength bands in the midand far-infrared, as well as more than 5,000 pointing observations, during the main mission period lasted until the liquid helium exhaustion on 2007 August 26. The all-sky survey covered more than 90 % of the entire sky with much higher spatial resolution than the IRAS catalogues. First version of AKARI infrared source catalogue will be released in 2009. In the pointing observation, a wide variety of objects, from the solar-system objects to the cosmologically distant galaxies, were observed systematically in near to far infrared. The early results of the pointing observations has been published recently. We are now preparing the post-helium mission where the pointing observations only in the near-infrared wavelength range are be performed with the cooling by the Stirling-cycle coolers. It has been confirmed that the sensitivity of the near-infrared array is kept high, although its operation temperature is higher than that in the liquid-helium cooling. Here we report the overview of the mission, and highlights of the scientific results as well as the observation plan of the post-helium mission planned to start from April 2008.

  13. Mission Status for the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricker, George R.; TESS Science Team

    2017-01-01

    The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) will discover thousands of exoplanets in orbit around the brightest stars in the sky. TESS will monitor ~ 200,000 pre-selected bright stars in the solar neighborhood for temporary drops in brightness caused by planetary transits. This first-ever spaceborne all-sky transit survey will identify planets ranging from Earth-sized to gas giants, around a wide range of stellar types and orbital distances.TESS stars will typically be 30 — 100 times brighter than those surveyed by the Kepler satellite; thus, TESS planets will be far easier to characterize with follow-up observations. For the first time it will be possible to study the masses, sizes, densities, orbits, and atmospheres of a large cohort of small planets, including a sample of rocky worlds in the habitable zones of their host stars.An additional data product from the TESS mission will be full frame images (FFI) with a cadence of 30 minutes. These FFI will provide precise photometric information for every object within the 2300 square degree instantaneous field of view of the TESS cameras. In total, more than 30 million stars and galaxies brighter than magnitude I=16 will be precisely photometered during the two-year prime mission. In principle, the lunar-resonant TESS orbit could provide opportunities for an extended mission lasting more than a decade.The baselined long duration survey by TESS of regions surrounding the North and South Ecliptic Poles will provide prime exoplanet targets for characterization with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), as well as other large ground-based and space-based telescopes of the future.TESS will issue data releases every 4 months, inviting immediate community-wide efforts to study the new planets, as well as commensal survey candidates from the FFI. A NASA Guest Investigator program is planned for TESS. The TESS legacy will be a catalog of the nearest and brightest main-sequence stars hosting transiting exoplanets

  14. US Decadal Survey Outer Solar System Missions: Trajectory Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilker, T. R.; Atkinson, D. H.; Strange, N. J.; Landau, D.

    2012-04-01

    The report of the US Planetary Science Decadal Survey (PSDS), released in draft form March 7, 2011, identifies several mission concepts involving travel to high-priority outer solar system (OSS) destinations. These include missions to Europa and Jupiter, Saturn and two of its satellites, and Uranus. Because travel to the OSS involves much larger distances and larger excursions out of the sun's gravitational potential well than inner solar system (ISS) missions, transfer trajectories for OSS missions are stronger drivers of mission schedule and resource requirements than for ISS missions. Various characteristics of each planet system, such as obliquity, radiation belts, rings, deep gravity wells, etc., carry ramifications for approach trajectories or trajectories within the systems. The maturity of trajectory studies for each of these destinations varies significantly. Europa has been the focus of studies for well over a decade. Transfer trajectory options from Earth to Jupiter are well understood. Current studies focus on trajectories within the Jovian system that could reduce the total mission cost of a Europa orbiter mission. Three missions to the Saturn system received high priority ratings in the PSDS report: two flagship orbital missions, one to Titan and one to Enceladus, and a Saturn atmospheric entry probe mission for NASA's New Frontiers Program. The Titan Saturn System Mission (TSSM) studies of 2007-2009 advanced our understanding of trajectory options for transfers to Saturn, including solar electric propulsion (SEP) trajectories. But SEP trajectories depend more on details of spacecraft and propulsion system characteristics than chemical trajectories, and the maturity of SEP trajectory search tools has not yet caught up with chemical trajectory tools, so there is still more useful research to be done on Saturn transfers. The TSSM studies revealed much about Saturn-orbiting trajectories that yield efficient and timely delivery to Titan or Enceladus

  15. Japanese infrared survey mission IRIS (ASTRO-F)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Hiroshi

    1998-08-01

    The IR Imaging Survey (IRIS) is the second IR astronomy mission of the Institute of Space and Astronomical Science (ISAS). The IRIS is a 70 cm cooled telescope dedicated for IR sky survey. This project has been approved as ISAS's 21st science mission 'ASTRO-F', and prototype model development has been ongoing since 1997. The IRIS will be launched with ISAS's launch vehicle M-V, into a sun-synchronous polar orbit with an altitude of 750 km. The IRIS telescope has a 70 cm aperture and is cooled to 6K using Stirling-cycle coolers and liquid helium. The primary and secondary mirrors are light-weight mirrors make of silicon carbide. Two focal- plane instruments are installed. One is the far-IR surveyor (FIS) which will survey the entire sky in the wavelength range from 50 to 200 micron with angular resolutions of 30- 50 arcsec. The other focal-plane instrument is the IR camera (IRC). It employs large-format detector arrays and will take deep images of selected sky regions in the near and mid IR range. The field of view of the IRC is 10 arcmin and the spatial resolution is approximately 2 arcsec. The IRIS has much higher sensitivity than that of the IRAS survey. The detection limits are 1-100 micro Jy in the near-MID IR and 10-100 mJy in the far IR. With the IRIS survey, great progress is expected in the research on evolution of galaxies, formation of stars and planets, dark matter and brown dwarfs. The IRIS is now scheduled to be launched in early 2003.

  16. Instruments de mesure en acoustique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarnov, Viggo; Jacobsen, Finn

    2008-01-01

    La mesure en acoustique fait appel à des instruments qui mesurent, d'une part la pression, d'autre part l'intensité du signal. Ce dossier présentera, notamment, deux appareils spécialisés : les sonomètres et les microphones. Il abordera l'ensemble des informations majeures à connaître sur les...

  17. 31 CFR 560.537 - Authorization of certain survey or assessment missions in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... assessment missions in Iran. 560.537 Section 560.537 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to... certain survey or assessment missions in Iran. (a) Subject to the conditions of paragraphs (b), (c), and... missions in Iran related to the planning or preparation for the provision of humanitarian support to...

  18. The Lunar Occultation Observer (LOCO) -- A Nuclear Astrophysics All-Sky Survey Mission Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R. S.; Bonamente, M.; Burgess, J. M.; Jenke, P.; Lawrence, D. J.; O'Brien, S.; Orr, M. R.; Paciesas, W. S.; Young, C. A.

    2009-03-01

    The Lunar Occultation Observer (LOCO) is a new γ-ray astrophysics mission concept expected to have unprecedented sensitivity in the nuclear regime. Operating in lunar orbit, LOCO will utilize lunar occultation imaging to survey and probe the cosmos.

  19. A Survey of Cost Estimating Methodologies for Distributed Spacecraft Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, Veronica L.; Le Moigne, Jacqueline; de Weck, Oliver L.

    2016-01-01

    Satellite constellations and Distributed Spacecraft Mission (DSM) architectures offer unique benefits to Earth observation scientists and unique challenges to cost estimators. The Cost and Risk (CR) module of the Tradespace Analysis Tool for Constellations (TAT-C) being developed by NASA Goddard seeks to address some of these challenges by providing a new approach to cost modeling, which aggregates existing Cost Estimating Relationships (CER) from respected sources, cost estimating best practices, and data from existing and proposed satellite designs. Cost estimation through this tool is approached from two perspectives: parametric cost estimating relationships and analogous cost estimation techniques. The dual approach utilized within the TAT-C CR module is intended to address prevailing concerns regarding early design stage cost estimates, and offer increased transparency and fidelity by offering two preliminary perspectives on mission cost. This work outlines the existing cost model, details assumptions built into the model, and explains what measures have been taken to address the particular challenges of constellation cost estimating. The risk estimation portion of the TAT-C CR module is still in development and will be presented in future work. The cost estimate produced by the CR module is not intended to be an exact mission valuation, but rather a comparative tool to assist in the exploration of the constellation design tradespace. Previous work has noted that estimating the cost of satellite constellations is difficult given that no comprehensive model for constellation cost estimation has yet been developed, and as such, quantitative assessment of multiple spacecraft missions has many remaining areas of uncertainty. By incorporating well-established CERs with preliminary approaches to approaching these uncertainties, the CR module offers more complete approach to constellation costing than has previously been available to mission architects or Earth

  20. Wide-Field Surveys from the SNAP Mission

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, A

    2002-01-01

    The Supernova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) is a proposed space-borne observatory that will survey the sky with a wide-field optical/near-infrared (NIR) imager. The images produced by SNAP will have an unprecedented combination of depth, solid-angle, angular resolution, and temporal sampling. For 16 months each, two 7.5 square-degree fields will be observed every four days to a magnitude depth of AB=27.7 in each of the SNAP filters, spanning 3500-17000\\AA. Co-adding images over all epochs will give AB=30.3 per filter. In addition, a 300 square-degree field will be surveyed to AB=28 per filter, with no repeated temporal sampling. Although the survey strategy is tailored for supernova and weak gravitational lensing observations, the resulting data will support a broad range of auxiliary science programs.

  1. Exosystem Modeling for Mission Simulation and Survey Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savransky, Dmitry

    are shown to be useful in calculating the probabilities of planetary detection. Using this capability, we create a framework for simulating whole direct imaging planet-finding missions, incorporating detailed instrument models, observatory operations, and an automated algorithm for observation scheduling. This framework is used in a series of case studies to evaluate the capabilities of multiple proposed missions. Finally, we show how the same modeling framework used to generate the mission simulations can also be used, with the formalism of dynamic filtering, for data analysis and data set synthesis.

  2. Monte Carlo Analysis as a Trajectory Design Driver for the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickel, Craig; Parker, Joel; Dichmann, Don; Lebois, Ryan; Lutz, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) will be injected into a highly eccentric Earth orbit and fly 3.5 phasing loops followed by a lunar flyby to enter a mission orbit with lunar 2:1 resonance. Through the phasing loops and mission orbit, the trajectory is significantly affected by lunar and solar gravity. We have developed a trajectory design to achieve the mission orbit and meet mission constraints, including eclipse avoidance and a 30-year geostationary orbit avoidance requirement. A parallelized Monte Carlo simulation was performed to validate the trajectory after injecting common perturbations, including launch dispersions, orbit determination errors, and maneuver execution errors. The Monte Carlo analysis helped identify mission risks and is used in the trajectory selection process.

  3. MESURE DE LA PERFORMANCE GLOBALE DES ENTREPRISES

    OpenAIRE

    Renaud, Angèle; Berland, Nicolas

    2007-01-01

    International audience; L'engagement des entreprises dans le développement durable consiste à conjuguer performance et responsabilité. La performance financière ne suffit plus à apprécier la performance d'une entreprise. Dès lors, les entreprises doivent mesurer leurs progrès à partir d'une performance plus globale incluant, en dehors de la dimension économique, des dimensions sociale et environnementale. A présent, comment mesurer cette performance globale ? Existe-il des outils de mesure gl...

  4. Trajectory Design to Mitigate Risk on the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dichmann, Donald

    2016-01-01

    The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) will employ a highly eccentric Earth orbit, in 2:1 lunar resonance, reached with a lunar flyby preceded by 3.5 phasing loops. The TESS mission has limited propellant and several orbit constraints. Based on analysis and simulation, we have designed the phasing loops to reduce delta-V and to mitigate risk due to maneuver execution errors. We have automated the trajectory design process and use distributed processing to generate and to optimize nominal trajectories, check constraint satisfaction, and finally model the effects of maneuver errors to identify trajectories that best meet the mission requirements.

  5. The Mission Accessible Near-Earth Objects Survey (MANOS): photometric results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirouin, Audrey; Moskovitz, Nicholas; Binzel, Richard; Christensen, Eric J.; DeMeo, Francesca; Person, Michael J.; Polishook, David; Thomas, Cristina; Trilling, David E.; Willman, Mark; Hinkle, Mary L.; Burt, Brian; Avner, Dan

    2016-10-01

    The Mission Accessible Near-Earth Object Survey (MANOS) is a physical characterization survey of Near-Earth Objects (NEOs) to provide physical data for several hundred mission accessible NEOs across visible and near-infrared wavelengths. Using a variety of 1-m to 8-m class telescopes, we observe 5 to 10 newly discovered sub-km NEOs per month in order to derive their rotational properties and taxonomic class.Rotational data can provide useful information about physical properties, like shape, surface heterogeneity/homogeneity, density, internal structure, and internal cohesion. Here, we present results of the MANOS photometric survey for more than 200 NEOs. We report lightcurves from our first three years of observing and show objects with rotational periods from a couple of hours down to a few seconds. MANOS found the three fastest rotators known to date with rotational periods below 20s. A physical interpretation of these ultra-rapid rotators is that they are bound through a combination of cohesive and/or tensile strength rather than gravity. Therefore, these objects are important to understand the internal structure of NEOs. Rotational properties are used for statistical study to constrain overall properties of the NEO population. We also study rotational properties according to size, and dynamical class. Finally, we report a sample of NEOs that are fully characterized (lightcurve and visible spectra) as the most suitable candidates for a future robotic or human mission. Viable mission targets are objects with a rotational period >1h, and a delta-v lower than 12 km/s. Assuming the MANOS rate of object characterization, and the current NEO population estimates by Tricarico (2016), and by Harris and D'Abramo (2015), 10,000 to 1,000,000 NEOs with diameters between 10m and 1km are expected to be mission accessible. We acknowledge funding support from NASA NEOO grant number NNX14AN82G, and NOAO survey program.

  6. The Joint Milli-Arcsecond Pathfinder Survey (JMAPS): Mission Overview and Attitude Sensing Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Dorland, Bryan N; Dugan, Zachary; nessy, Gregory S Hen-

    2009-01-01

    The Joint Milliarcsecond Pathfinder Survey (JMAPS) is a Department of Navy bright star astrometric all-sky survey scheduled for launch in the 2012 timeframe. Mission objectives include a complete update of star positions for the 2015 epoch to accuracy levels of 1 milliarcsecond (5 nano-radians) for bright stars, as well as demonstration of 10 milliarcsecond attitude determination capability and 50 milli-arcsecond attitude control on-orbit. In the following paper, we describe the general instrument design and expected performance. We also discuss the new mission capabilities enabled by the unprecedented attitude determination accuracy of such an instrument, and focus specifically on the application to long distance (50,000-100,00 km) formation flying and solar system navigation.

  7. The Gaia Era: synergy between space missions and ground based surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Vallenari, A

    2008-01-01

    The Gaia mission is expected to provide highly accurate astrometric, photometric, and spectroscopic measurements for about $10^9$ objects. Automated classification of detected sources is a key part of the data processing. Here a few aspects of the Gaia classification process are presented. Information from other surveys at longer wavelengths, and from follow-up ground based observations will be complementary to Gaia data especially at faint magnitudes, and will offer a great opportunity to understand our Galaxy.

  8. The Mission Accessible Near-Earth Objects Survey (MANOS): first photometric results

    CERN Document Server

    Thirouin, A; Binzel, R P; Christensen, E; DeMeo, F E; Person, M J; Polishook, D; Thomas, C A; Trilling, D; Willman, M; Hinkle, M; Burt, B; Avner, D; Aceituno, F J

    2016-01-01

    The Mission Accessible Near-Earth Objects Survey (MANOS) aims to physically characterize sub-km Near-Earth Objects (NEOs). We report first photometric results from the survey which began in August, 2013. Photometric observations were performed using 1 m to 4 m class telescopes around the world. We present rotational periods and lightcurve amplitudes for 86 sub-km NEOs, though in some cases, only lower limits are provided. Our main goal is to obtain lightcurves for small NEOs (typically, sub-km objects) and estimate their rotational periods, lightcurve amplitudes, and shapes. These properties are used for statistical study to constrain overall properties of the NEO population. A weak correlation seems to indicate that smaller objects are more spherical than the larger ones. We also report 7 NEOs that are fully characterized (lightcurve and visible spectra) as the most suitable candidates for a future human or robotic mission. Viable mission targets are objects fully characterized, with a Delta_v(NHATS) 1h. Ass...

  9. The Rapid Response Radiation Survey (R3S) Mission Using the HISat Conformal Satellite Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Nathanael

    2015-01-01

    The Rapid Response Radiation Survey (R3S) experiment, designed as a quick turnaround mission to make radiation measurements in LEO, will fly as a hosted payload in partnership with NovaWurks using their Hyper-integrated Satlet (HiSat) architecture. The need for the mission arises as the Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionization Radiation for Aviation Safety (NAIRAS) model moves from a research effort into an operational radiation assessment tool. The data collected by R3S, in addition to the complementary data from a NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) atmospheric balloon mission entitled Radiation Dosimetry Experiment (RaDX), will validate exposure prediction capabilities of NAIRAS. This paper discusses the development of the R3S experiment as made possible by use of the HiSat architecture. The system design and operational modes of the experiment are described, as well as the experiment interfaces to the HiSat satellite via the user defined adapter (UDA) provided by NovaWurks. This paper outlines the steps taken by the project to execute the R3S mission in the 4 months of design, build, and test. Finally, description of the engineering process is provided, including the use of facilitated rapid/concurrent engineering sessions, the associated documentation, and the review process employed.

  10. MESUR: metrics from scholarly usage of resources

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    The MESUR project is constructing a large-scale semantic model of the scholarly community that seamlessly integrates a wide range of bibliographic, citation and usage data. Functioning as a reference data set, this model is analyzed to characterize the intricate networks of typed relationships that exist in the scholarly community. The resulting ...

  11. The Mission Accessible Near-Earth Objects Survey (MANOS): spectroscopy results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Cristina A.; Moskovitz, Nicholas; Hinkle, Mary L.; Mommert, Michael; Polishook, David; Thirouin, Audrey; Binzel, Richard; Christensen, Eric J.; DeMeo, Francesca E.; Person, Michael J.; Trilling, David E.; Willman, Mark; Burt, Brian

    2016-10-01

    The Mission Accessible Near-Earth Object Survey (MANOS) is an ongoing physical characterization survey to build a large, uniform catalog of physical properties including lightcurves and visible wavelength spectroscopy. We will use this catalog to investigate the global properties of the small NEO population and identify individual objects that can be targets of interest for future exploration. To accomplish our goals, MANOS uses a wide variety of telescopes (1-8m) in both the northern and southern hemispheres. We focus on targets that have been recently discovered and operate on a regular cadence of remote and queue observations to enable rapid characterization of small NEOs. Targets for MANOS are selected based on three criteria: mission accessibility, size, and observability. With our resources, we observe 5-10 newly discovered sub-km NEOs per month. MANOS has been operating for three years and we have observed over 500 near-Earth objects in that time.We will present results from the spectroscopy component of the MANOS program. Visible wavelength spectra are obtained using DeVeny on the Discovery Channel Telescope (DCT), Goodman on the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) telescope, and GMOS on Gemini North and South. Over 300 NEO spectra have been obtained during our program. We will present preliminary results from our spectral sample. We will discuss the compositional diversity of the small NEO population and how the observed NEOs compare to the meteorite population.MANOS is funded by the NASA Near-Earth Object Observations program.

  12. MESUR metrics from scholarly usage of resources

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; Van de Sompel, Herbert

    2007-01-01

    Usage data is increasingly regarded as a valuable resource in the assessment of scholarly communication items. However, the development of quantitative, usage-based indicators of scholarly impact is still in its infancy. The Digital Library Research & Prototyping Team at the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Research library has therefore started a program to expand the set of usage-based tools for the assessment of scholarly communication items. The two-year MESUR project, funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, aims to define and validate a range of usage-based impact metrics, and issue guidelines with regards to their characteristics and proper application. The MESUR project is constructing a large-scale semantic model of the scholarly community that seamlessly integrates a wide range of bibliographic, citation and usage data. Functioning as a reference data set, this model is analyzed to characterize the intricate networks of typed relationships that exist in the scholarly community. The resulting c...

  13. Low Delta-V Near-Earth Asteroids: a survey of suitable targets for space missions

    CERN Document Server

    Ieva, S; Perna, D; Barucci, M A; Bernardi, F; Fornasier, S; De Luise, F; Perozzi, E; Rossi, A; Brucato, J R

    2014-01-01

    In the last decades Near-Earth Objects (NEOs) have become very important targets to study, since they can give us clues to the formation, evolution and composition of the Solar System. In addition, they may represent either a threat to humankind, or a repository of extraterrestrial resources for suitable space-borne missions. Within this framework, the choice of next-generation mission targets and the characterisation of a potential threat to our planet deserve special attention. To date, only a small part of the 11,000 discovered NEOs have been physically characterised. From ground and space-based observations one can determine some basic physical properties of these objects using visible and infrared spectroscopy. We present data for 13 objects observed with different telescopes around the world (NASA-IRTF, ESO-NTT, TNG) in the 0.4 - 2.5 um spectral range, within the NEOSURFACE survey (http://www.oa-roma.inaf.it/planet/NEOSurface.html). Objects are chosen from among the more accessible for a rendez-vous mis...

  14. The level and determinants of mission statement use: a questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmidt, Sebastian; Prinzie, Anita; Heene, Aimé

    2008-10-01

    Although mission statements are one of the most popular management instruments, little is known about the nature and direction of the presumed relationship between mission statements and organizational performance. In particular, empirical insights into the degree of mission statement use by individual organizational members are insufficient. We address the observed knowledge gap by (a) measuring the level of mission statement use (e.g., explaining the mission statement, making linkages to extant programs or practices, communicating enthusiasm, and adapting the mission statement to the personal work situation) by individual organizational members, and (b) identifying the antecedents that influence mission statement use. Questionnaires were used to collect data from a sample of 510 nurses from three Flemish hospitals. Mission statement use was measured by means of Fairhurst's Management of Meaning Scale. Antecedents of mission statement use were derived from the Theory of Planned Behavior and the mission statement literature. The findings indicate that mission statement use is low on average. Attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control, and formal involvement in mission statement communication proved to be significant determinants of mission statement use and accounted for 43% of the variance. The results of the conducted regression analyses indicate that nurses (a) who have a positive attitude towards the mission statement, (b) who perceive pressure from superiors and colleagues to use the mission statement, (c) who feel they are in control of performing such behavior, and (d) who are formally involved in the mission statement communication processes are more likely to use the mission statement. Furthermore, the results indicated that demographic characteristics are not associated with mission statement use. To effectively increase mission statement use, investments should focus on redesigning a work environment that stresses the importance of the

  15. Post-Mission Quality Assurance Procedure for Survey-Grade Mobile Mapping Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerstinga, A. P.; Friess, P.

    2016-06-01

    Mobile Mapping Systems (MMS) consist of terrestrial-based moving platforms that integrate a set of imaging sensors (typically digital cameras and laser scanners) and a Position and Orientation System (POS), designed to collect data of the surrounding environment. MMS can be classified as "mapping-grade" or "survey-grade" depending on the system's attainable accuracy. Mapping-grade MMS produce geospatial data suitable for GIS applications (e.g., asset management) while survey-grade systems should satisfy high-accuracy applications such as engineering/design projects. The delivered accuracy of an MMS is dependent on several factors such as the accuracy of the system measurements and calibration parameters. It is critical, especially for survey-grade systems, to implement a robust Quality Assurance (QA) procedure to ensure the achievement of the expected accuracy. In this paper, a new post-mission QA procedure is presented. The presented method consists of a fully-automated self-calibration process that allows for the estimation of corrections to the system calibration parameters (e.g., boresight angles and lever-arm offsets relating the lidar sensor(s) to the IMU body frame) as well as corrections to the system measurements (e.g., post-processed trajectory position and orientation, scan angles and ranges). As for the system measurements, the major challenge for MMS is related to the trajectory determination in the presence of multipath signals and GNSS outages caused by buildings, underpasses and high vegetation. In the proposed self-calibration method, trajectory position errors are properly modelled while utilizing an efficient/meaningful trajectory segmentation technique. The validity of the proposed method is demonstrated using a dataset collected under unfavorable GNSS conditions.

  16. Can the Future EnMAP Mission Contribute to Urban Applications? A Literature Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Müller

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available With urban populations and their footprints growing globally, the need to assess the dynamics of the urban environment increases. Remote sensing is one approach that can analyze these developments quantitatively with respect to spatially and temporally large scale changes. With the 2015 launch of the spaceborne EnMAP mission, a new hyperspectral sensor with high signal-to-noise ratio at medium spatial resolution, and a 21 day global revisit capability will become available. This paper presents the results of a literature survey on existing applications and image analysis techniques in the context of urban remote sensing in order to identify and outline potential contributions of the future EnMAP mission. Regarding urban applications, four frequently addressed topics have been identified: urban development and planning, urban growth assessment, risk and vulnerability assessment and urban climate. The requirements of four application fields and associated image processing techniques used to retrieve desired parameters and create geo-information products have been reviewed. As a result, we identified promising research directions enabling the use of EnMAP for urban studies. First and foremost, research is required to analyze the spectral information content of an EnMAP pixel used to support material-based land cover mapping approaches. This information can subsequently be used to improve urban indicators, such as imperviousness. Second, we identified the global monitoring of urban areas as a promising field of investigation taking advantage of EnMAP’s spatial coverage and revisit capability. However, owing to the limitations of EnMAPs spatial resolution for urban applications, research should also focus on hyperspectral resolution enhancement to enable retrieving material information on sub-pixel level.

  17. The Full-sky Astrometric Mapping Explorer - An optical, astrometric survey mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, S. D.; Germain, M. E.; Greene, T. P.; Harris, F. H.; Harris, H. C.; Johnson, M. S.; Johnston, K. J.; Monet, D. G.; Murison, M. A.; Phillips, J. D.; Reasenberg, R. D.; Seidelmann, P. K.; Urban, S. E.; Vassar, R. H.

    1999-12-01

    The Full-sky Astrometric Mapping Explorer (FAME) is a NASA MIDEX mission scheduled for launch in 2004. It will perform an all sky, astrometric survey with unprecedented accuracy. FAME will determine the positions, parallaxes, proper motions, and photometry of 40,000,000 stars with visual band magnitudes 5 DSS colors. FAME will enable a wide range of scientific investigations using its large, rich database of information on stellar properties. It will: * Calibrate the zero point of the extragalactic distance scale to 1% * Determine absolute luminosities of a wide range of spectral types * Detect a meaningful statistical sample of companion stars, brown dwarfs, and giant planets * Enable studies of the kinematics of our galaxy, including the effect of dark matter in the disk * Characterize stellar variability of a large sample of stars at the 0.1% level * Define a rigid optical reference frame for future scientific endeavors FAME is evolved from design concepts from the Hipparcos mission, using current CCD technology to observe more and fainter stars. Like Hipparcos, FAME has a compound mirror consisting of two flats angled relative to each other. The compound mirror feeds the two fields of view separated by the ``basic angle'' into a common telescope. The two fields of view are used to control the growth of stochastic errors in determining the relative separations of stars. FAME is a joint development effort of the U.S. Naval Observatory, the Naval Research Laboratory, Lockheed Martin Missiles and Space Advanced Technology Center, and the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory. Funding for FAME is provided by the NASA Office of Space Science through the Explorer program managed by Goddard Space Flight Center. Additional funding has been provided by the U.S. Navy. http://www.usno.navy.mil/fame

  18. The X-Ray Surveyor mission concept study: forging the path to NASA astrophysics 2020 decadal survey prioritization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskin, Jessica; Özel, Feryal; Vikhlinin, Alexey

    2016-07-01

    The X-Ray Surveyor mission concept is unique among those being studied for prioritization in the NASA Astrophysics 2020 Decadal Survey. The X-Ray Surveyor mission will explore the high-energy Universe; providing essential and complimentary observations to the Astronomy Community. The NASA Astrophysics Roadmap (Enduring Quests, Daring Visions) describes the need for an X-Ray Observatory that is capable of addressing topics such as the origin and growth of the first supermassive black holes, galaxy evolution and growth of the cosmic structure, and the origin and evolution of the stars that make up our Universe. To address these scientifically compelling topics and more, an Observatory that exhibits leaps in capability over that of previous X-Ray Observatories in needed. This paper describes the current status of the X-Ray Surveyor Mission Concept Study and the path forward, which includes scientific investigations, technology development, and community participation.

  19. The X-Ray Surveyor Mission Concept Study: Forging the Path to NASA Astrophysics 2020 Decadal Survey Prioritization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskin, Jessica; Ozel, Feryal; Vikhlinin, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    The X-Ray Surveyor mission concept is unique among those being studied for prioritization in the NASA Astrophysics 2020 Decadal Survey. The X-Ray Surveyor mission will explore the high-energy Universe; providing essential and complimentary observations to the Astronomy Community. The NASA Astrophysics Roadmap (Enduring Quests, Daring Visions) describes the need for an X-Ray Observatory that is capable of addressing topics such as the origin and growth of the first supermassive black holes, galaxy evolution and growth of the cosmic structure, and the origin and evolution of the stars that make up our Universe. To address these scientifically compelling topics and more, an Observatory that exhibits leaps in capability over that of previous X-Ray Observatories in needed. This paper describes the current status of the X-Ray Surveyor Mission Concept Study and the path forward, which includes scientific investigations, technology development, and community participation.

  20. Radiation shielding aspects for long manned mission to space: Criteria, survey study, and preliminary model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sztejnberg Manuel

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The prospect of manned space missions outside Earth's orbit is limited by the travel time and shielding against cosmic radiation. The chemical rockets currently used in the space program have no hope of propelling a manned vehicle to a far away location such as Mars due to the enormous mass of fuel that would be required. The specific energy available from nuclear fuel is a factor of 106 higher than chemical fuel; it is therefore obvious that nuclear power production in space is a must. On the other hand, recent considerations to send a man to the Moon for a long stay would require a stable, secured and safe source of energy (there is hardly anything beyond nuclear power that would provide a useful and reliably safe sustainable supply of energy. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA anticipates that the mass of a shielding material required for long travel to Mars is the next major design driver. In 2006 NASA identified a need to assess and evaluate potential gaps in existing knowledge and understanding of the level and types of radiation critical to astronauts' health during the long travel to Mars and to start a comprehensive study related to the shielding design of a spacecraft finding the conditions for the mitigation of radiation components contributing to the doses beyond accepted limits. In order to reduce the overall space craft mass, NASA is looking for the novel, multi-purpose and multi-functional materials that will provide effective shielding of the crew and electronics on board. The Laboratory for Neutronics and Geometry Computation in the School of Nuclear Engineering at Purdue University led by Prof. Tatjana Jevremović began in 2004 the analytical evaluations of different lightweight materials. The preliminary results of the design survey study are presented in this paper.

  1. Tools to Support the Reuse of Software Assets for the NASA Earth Science Decadal Survey Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattmann, Chris A.; Downs, Robert R.; Marshall, James J.; Most, Neal F.; Samadi, Shahin

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Earth Science Data Systems (ESDS) Software Reuse Working Group (SRWG) is chartered with the investigation, production, and dissemination of information related to the reuse of NASA Earth science software assets. One major current objective is to engage the NASA decadal missions in areas relevant to software reuse. In this paper we report on the current status of these activities. First, we provide some background on the SRWG in general and then discuss the group s flagship recommendation, the NASA Reuse Readiness Levels (RRLs). We continue by describing areas in which mission software may be reused in the context of NASA decadal missions. We conclude the paper with pointers to future directions.

  2. Social media in public diplomacy : survey on the social media communication of the Finnish missions abroad

    OpenAIRE

    Nurmi, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Today, social media is changing the way people communicate by giving the influence to the hands of the people. For organizations, it means that the issues of stakeholders are the focus of the communication, not the organizations. The question no longer is whether to use social media in public relations, but how to use it. In this research the social media communication of the Finnish missions abroad is studied. The missions have implemented social media as a part of their communication m...

  3. A multi-resolution, multi-epoch low radio frequency survey of the Kepler K2 mission Campaign 1 field

    CERN Document Server

    Tingay, S J; Wayth, R B; Intema, H; Jagannathan, P; Mooley, K

    2016-01-01

    We present the first dedicated radio continuum survey of a Kepler K2 mission field, Field 1 covering the North Galactic Cap. The survey is wide field, contemporaneous, multi-epoch, and multi-resolution in nature and was conducted at low radio frequencies between 140 and 200 MHz. The multi-epoch and ultra wide field (but relatively low resolution) part of the survey was provided by 15 nights of observation with the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) over a period of approximately a month, contemporaneous with K2 observations of the field. The multi-resolution aspect of the survey was provided by the low resolution (4') MWA imaging, complemented by non-contemporaneous but much higher resolution (20") observations using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT). The survey is therefore sensitive to the details of radio structures across a wide range of angular scales. Consistent with other recent low radio frequency surveys, no significant radio transients or variables were detected in the survey. The resulting so...

  4. The Lunar Occultation Observer (LOCO) - A Nuclear Astrophysics All-Sky Survey Mission Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R. S.; Bonamente, M.; Burgess, J. M.; Harmon, B. A.; Jenke, P.; Lawrence, D. J.; O'Brien, S.; Orr, M. R.; Paciesas, W. S.; Young, C. A.

    2008-07-01

    The Lunar Occultation Observer (LOCO) is a new lunar-based concept to probe the nuclear astrophysics regime. It will be a pioneering mission in high-energy astrophysics: the first to employ occultation as the principle detection and imaging method.

  5. Why do patients receive care from a short-term medical mission? Survey study from rural Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel, Micaela M; Chen, Joy C; Woo, Russell K; Siegler, Nora; Maldonado-Sifuentes, Francisco A; Carlos-Ochoa, Jehidy S; Cardona-Diaz, Andy R; Uribe-Leitz, Tarsicio; Siegler, Dennis; Weiser, Thomas G; Yang, George P

    2017-07-01

    Hospital de la Familia was established to serve the indigent population in the western highlands of Guatemala and has a full-time staff of Guatemalan primary care providers supplemented by short-term missions of surgical specialists. The reasons for patients seeking surgical care in this setting, as opposed to more consistent care from local institutions, are unclear. We sought to better understand motivations of patients seeking mission-based surgical care. Patients presenting to the obstetric and gynecologic, plastic, ophthalmologic, general, and pediatric surgical clinics at the Hospital de la Familia from July 27 to August 6, 2015 were surveyed. The surveys assessed patient demographics, surgical diagnosis, location of home, mode of travel, and reasons for seeking care at this facility. Of 252 patients surveyed, 144 (59.3%) were female. Most patients reported no other medical condition (67.9%, n = 169) and no consistent income (83.9%, n = 209). Almost half (44.9%, n = 109) traveled >50 km to receive care. The most common reasons for choosing care at this facility were reputation of high quality (51.8%, n = 130) and affordability (42.6%, n = 102); the least common reason was a lack of other options (6.4%, n = 16). Despite long travel distances and the availability of other options, reputation and affordability were primarily cited as the most common reasons for choosing to receive care at this short-term surgical mission site. Our results highlight that although other surgical options may be closer and more readily available, reputation and cost play a large role in choice of patients seeking care. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Wide-Field InfraRed Survey Telescope (WFIRST) Mission and Synergies with LISA and LIGO-Virgo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, N.; Spergel, D.

    2015-01-01

    The Wide-Field InfraRed Survey Telescope (WFIRST) is a NASA space mission in study for launch in 2024. It has a 2.4 m telescope, wide-field IR instrument operating in the 0.7 - 2.0 micron range and an exoplanet imaging coronagraph instrument operating in the 400 - 1000 nm range. The observatory will perform galaxy surveys over thousands of square degrees to J=27 AB for dark energy weak lensing and baryon acoustic oscillation measurements and will monitor a few square degrees for dark energy SN Ia studies. It will perform microlensing observations of the galactic bulge for an exoplanet census and direct imaging observations of nearby exoplanets with a pathfinder coronagraph. The mission will have a robust and wellfunded guest observer program for 25% of the observing time. WFIRST will be a powerful tool for time domain astronomy and for coordinated observations with gravitational wave experiments. Gravitational wave events produced by mergers of nearby binary neutron stars (LIGO-Virgo) or extragalactic supermassive black hole binaries (LISA) will produce electromagnetic radiation that WFIRST can observe.

  7. A Survey of the Principal Works Published by Peking Lazarist Mission Press during 1931–1951

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiang Lei

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to the renowned Peking Pei – T’ang Library, Peking Lazarist Mission Press (or Pei T’ang Press has received so little attention that it almost fades into oblivion. Founded and Backed by the French Lazaristes in 1864, Pei T’ang Press, surviving the rejection of Christianity in the late Qing dynasty and the turmoil in the early Republic of China, emerged as the most influential publisher in the modern locality of Peking, only to be submerged by the radical changes after 1949, thus winding up its eventful existence of 90 years in 1956. As a follow – up to Catalogue des principaux ouvrages sortis des presses des Lazaristes à Pékin de 1864 à 1930 by Joseph van den Brandt, this study aimes to reconstuct the printing events of Pei T’ang Press during the period of 1931 – 1951. Annales de la Congrégation de la Mission and Le Bulletin Catholique de Pekin are heavily drawn on and, whenever possible, the physical items or the microfilms are carefully consulted. Selective interviews with the surving employees of the Press also bears testimony to this important period in the history of Pei Tang Press. [Article content in Chinese

  8. Surveying and Monitoring of Cultural Heritage: The Role of COSMO-SkyMed Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacco, Patrizia; Battagliere, Maria Libera; Daraio, Maria Girolamo; Coletta, Alessandro

    2016-08-01

    Early applications of SAR in archaeology date back to the 1980s and, although being mainly demonstrative experimentations, they enabled numerous important discoveries. With the development of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) in terms of multi-band, multi- polarization and high-resolution data, space radar remote sensing for archaeology has become a potential field for research. Although the archaeological detection capability of this technology has so far not been fully assessed, the advent of Very High Resolution (VHR) space borne SAR sensors, such as Italian COSMO- SkyMed, offered advanced mapping capability at high resolution for archaeology investigations. This paper aims to give an overview of the contribution provided by the COSMO-SkyMed mission in the framework of specific projects in which SAR X-band data have been exploited for the monitoring and the management of cultural and archeological heritage, showing some obtained results.

  9. MESURE NON INVASIVE DU DÉBIT AORTIQUE PAR VOIE OESOPHAGIÈNNE

    OpenAIRE

    Lavandier, B.; Cathignol, D.; Muchada, R.; Fady, J.; Birer, A.

    1990-01-01

    Depuis plusieurs années nous avons montré la faisabilité et l'intérêt clinique de la débitmétrie aortique par voie oesophagienne. Une amélioration importante de cette méthode a été apportée par le développement d'un nouveau type de débitmètre associant un imageur T.M. et un vélocimètre Doppler à émission pulsée. Afin de pouvoir mesurer simultanément et de façon continue le diamètre de l'aorte et la vitesse du flux sanguin aussi bien chez l'adulte que chez l'enfant (à l'aide d'une sonde oesoph...

  10. Technology Readiness Level (TRL) Advancement of the MSPI On-Board Processing Platform for the ACE Decadal Survey Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingree, Paula J.; Werne, Thomas A.; Bekker, Dmitriy L.; Wilson, Thor O.

    2011-01-01

    The Xilinx Virtex-5QV is a new Single-event Immune Reconfigurable FPGA (SIRF) device that is targeted as the spaceborne processor for the NASA Decadal Survey Aerosol-Cloud-Ecosystem (ACE) mission's Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (MSPI) instrument, currently under development at JPL. A key technology needed for MSPI is on-board processing (OBP) to calculate polarimetry data as imaged by each of the 9 cameras forming the instrument. With funding from NASA's ESTO1 AIST2 Program, JPL is demonstrating how signal data at 95 Mbytes/sec over 16 channels for each of the 9 multi-angle cameras can be reduced to 0.45 Mbytes/sec, thereby substantially reducing the image data volume for spacecraft downlink without loss of science information. This is done via a least-squares fitting algorithm implemented on the Virtex-5 FPGA operating in real-time on the raw video data stream.

  11. Les mesures de métrologie pour le CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Cherif, A

    2008-01-01

    Le projet CLIC est en tout point un défi technique majeur ; c?est le cas également pour la mesure dimensionnelle. Quels sont les équipements et les méthodes qui permettent de caractériser les pièces avec une incertitude de mesure aussi réduite que possible, vu les tolérances micrométriques imposées ? Afin de répondre à cette question, une veille technologique a été maintenue sur une longue période. Les acteurs relevants ont été contactés pour bénéficier d?une ouverture sur les dernières avancées dans le domaine. Différentes techniques ont été étudiées et comparées telles que la digitalisation, la tomographie X, la mesure tridimensionnelle. L'assemblage de haute précision des composants est aussi primordial. Sa mise en ?uvre sous un microscope optique ou à l'aide d'une machine tridimensionnelle est en cours d?étude. L'exposé traitera aussi de la mesure de rugosité, un domaine où nous disposons de moyens adaptés aux exigences spécifiques du projet.

  12. The Rapid Response Radiation Survey (R3S) Mission Using the HiSat Conformal Satellite Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Nathanael A.; Norman, Ryan B.; Soto, Hector L.; Stewart, Victor A.; Jones, Mark L.; Kowalski, Matthew C.; Ben Shabat, Adam; Gough, Kerry M.; Stavely, Rebecca L.; Shim, Alex C.; hide

    2015-01-01

    The Rapid Response Radiation Survey (R3S) experiment, designed as a quick turnaround mission to make radiation measurements in Low Earth Orbit (LEO), will fly as a hosted payload in partnership with NovaWurks using their Hyper-integrated Satlet (HISat) architecture. The need for the mission arises as the Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionization Radiation for Aviation Safety (NAIRAS) model moves from a research effort into an operational radiation assessment tool. Currently, airline professionals are the second largest demographic of radiation workers and to date their radiation exposure is undocumented in the USA. The NAIRAS model seeks to fill this information gap. The data collected by R3S, in addition to the complementary data from a NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) atmospheric balloon mission entitled Radiation Dosimetry Experiment (RaD-X), will validate exposure prediction capabilities of NAIRAS. The R3S mission collects total dose and radiation spectrum measurements using a Teledyne µDosimeter and a Liulin-6SA2 LED spectrometer. These two radiation sensors provide a cross correlated radiometric measurement in combination with the Honeywell HMR2300 Smart Digital Magnetometer. The magnetometer assesses the Earth's magnetic field in the LEO environment and allows radiation dose to be mapped as a function of the Earth's magnetic shielding. R3S is also unique in that the radiation sensors will be exposed on the outer surface of the spacecraft, possibly making this the first measurements of the LEO radiation environment with bare sensors. Viability of R3S as an extremely fast turnaround mission is due, in part, to the nature of the robust, well-defined interfaces of the conformal satellite HiSat Architecture. The HiSat architecture, which was developed with the support of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency's (DARPA's) Phoenix Program, enabled the R3S system to advance from the first concept to delivery of preliminary design review (PDR) level documents in

  13. Rover imaging system for the Mars rover/sample return mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-02-01

    In the past year, the conceptual design of a panoramic imager for the Mars Environmental Survey (MESUR) Pathfinder was finished. A prototype camera was built and its performace in the laboratory was tested. The performance of this camera was excellent. Based on this work, we have recently proposed a small, lightweight, rugged, and highly capable Mars Surface Imager (MSI) instrument for the MESUR Pathfinder mission. A key aspect of our approach to optimization of the MSI design is that we treat image gathering, coding, and restoration as a whole, rather than as separate and independent tasks. Our approach leads to higher image quality, especially in the representation of fine detail with good contrast and clarity, without increasing either the complexity of the camera or the amount of data transmission. We have made significant progress over the past year in both the overall MSI system design and in the detailed design of the MSI optics. We have taken a simple panoramic camera and have upgraded it substantially to become a prototype of the MSI flight instrument. The most recent version of the camera utilizes miniature wide-angle optics that image directly onto a 3-color, 2096-element CCD line array. There are several data-taking modes, providing resolution as high as 0.3 mrad/pixel. Analysis tasks that were performed or that are underway with the test data from the prototype camera include the following: construction of 3-D models of imaged scenes from stereo data, first for controlled scenes and later for field scenes; and checks on geometric fidelity, including alignment errors, mast vibration, and oscillation in the drive system. We have outlined a number of tasks planned for Fiscal Year '93 in order to prepare us for submission of a flight instrument proposal for MESUR Pathfinder.

  14. The Space Interferometry Mission Astrometric Grid Giant-Star Survey. I. Stellar Parameters and Radial Velocity Variability

    CERN Document Server

    Bizyaev, D; Cunha, K; Geisler, D; Gieren, W; Majewski, S R; Pardo, C D; Patterson, R J; Smith, V V; Suntzeff, N B; Arenas, Jose; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Cunha, Katia; Geisler, Doug; Gieren, Wolfgang; Majewski, Steven R.; Pardo, Cecilia Del; Patterson, Richard J.; Smith, Verne V.; Suntzeff, Nicholas B.

    2005-01-01

    We present results from a campaign of multiple epoch echelle spectroscopy of relatively faint (V = 9.5-13.5 mag) red giants observed as potential astrometric grid stars for the Space Interferometry Mission (SIM PlanetQuest). Data are analyzed for 775 stars selected from the Grid Giant Star Survey spanning a wide range of effective temperatures (Teff), gravities and metallicities. The spectra are used to determine these stellar parameters and to monitor radial velocity (RV) variability at the 100 m/s level. The degree of RV variation measured for 489 stars observed two or more times is explored as a function of the inferred stellar parameters. The percentage of radial velocity unstable stars is found to be very high -- about 2/3 of our sample. It is found that the fraction of RV-stable red giants (at the 100 m/s level) is higher among stars with Teff \\sim 4500 K, corresponding to the calibration-independent range of infrared colors 0.59 < (J-K_s)_0 < 0.73. A higher percentage of RV-stable stars is found ...

  15. La mesure du travail dans la famille : création, définition et mesure du travail parental

    OpenAIRE

    Marie-Agnès Barrère-Maurisson

    2012-01-01

    Comment les transformations de la famille, mais aussi celles de l'emploi, ont-elles conduit à de nouvelles pratiques, spécifiques et distinctes du travail domestique à proprement parler, autour de la prise en charge des enfants par la famille ? Commant ce travail particulier, le parental, a-t-il pu être isolé et défini ? Comment a-t-il été évalué, en référence à quelle mesure étalon, et pourquoi ?.

  16. MESUR: USAGE-BASED METRICS OF SCHOLARLY IMPACT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BOLLEN, JOHAN [Los Alamos National Laboratory; RODRIGUEZ, MARKO A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; VAN DE SOMPEL, HERBERT [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-01-30

    The evaluation of scholarly communication items is now largely a matter of expert opinion or metrics derived from citation data. Both approaches can fail to take into account the myriad of factors that shape scholarly impact. Usage data has emerged as a promising complement to existing methods o fassessment but the formal groundwork to reliably and validly apply usage-based metrics of schlolarly impact is lacking. The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation funded MESUR project constitutes a systematic effort to define, validate and cross-validate a range of usage-based metrics of schlolarly impact by creating a semantic model of the scholarly communication process. The constructed model will serve as the basis of a creating a large-scale semantic network that seamlessly relates citation, bibliographic and usage data from a variety of sources. A subsequent program that uses the established semantic network as a reference data set will determine the characteristics and semantics of a variety of usage-based metrics of schlolarly impact. This paper outlines the architecture and methodology adopted by the MESUR project and its future direction.

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radio continuum survey of Kepler K2 mission Field 1 (Tingay+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tingay, S. J.; Hancock, P. J.; Wayth, R. B.; Intema, H.; Jagannathan, P.; Mooley, K.

    2016-10-01

    We describe contemporaneous observations of K2 Field 1 with the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) and historical (from 2010-2012) observations from the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR) Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) Sky Survey (TGSS; http://tgss.ncra.tifr.res.in/), via the TGSS Alternative Data Release 1 (ADR1; Intema et al. 2016, in prep.). The MWA and GMRT are radio telescopes operating at low radio frequencies (approximately 140-200MHz for the work described here). K2 mission Campaign 1 was conducted on Field 1 (center at R.A.=11:35:45.51; decl.=+01:25:02.28; J2000), covering the North Galactic Cap, between 2014 May 30 and August 21. The parameters of MWA observations are described in Table1, showing the 15 observations conducted over a period of approximately one month in 2014 June and July. All observations were made in a standard MWA imaging mode with a 30.72MHz bandwidth consisting of 24 contiguous 1.28MHz "coarse channels", each divided into 32 "fine channels" each of 40kHz bandwidth (total of 768 fine channels across 30.72MHz). The temporal resolution of the MWA correlator output was set to 0.5s. All observations were made in full polarimetric mode, with all Stokes parameters formed from the orthogonal linearly polarized feeds. Observations were made at two center frequencies, 154.88 and 185.60MHz, with two 296s observations of the K2 field at each frequency on each night of observation, accompanied by observations of one of three calibrators (Centaurus A, Virgo A, or Hydra A) at each frequency, with 112s observations. The observed fields were tracked, and thus, due to the fixed delay settings available to point the MWA primary beam, the tracked R.A. and decl. changes slightly between different observations (always a very small change compared to the MWA field of view). The total volume of MWA visibility data processed was approximately 2.2TB. A full survey of the radio sky at 150MHz as visible from the Giant Metrewave Radio (GMRT) was

  18. Exoplanet Exploration Program Analysis Group (ExoPAG) Report to Paul Hertz Regarding Large Mission Concepts to Study for the 2020 Decadal Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Gaudi, B Scott; Apai, Daniel; Bendek, Eduardo; Boss, Alan; Breckinridge, James B; Ciardi, David R; Cowan, Nicolas B; Danchi, William C; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn; Fortney, Jonathan J; Greene, Thomas P; Kaltenegger, Lisa; Kasting, James F; Leisawitz, David T; Leger, Alain; Lille, Charles F; Lisman, Douglas P; Lo, Amy S; Malbet, Fabian; Mandell, Avi M; Meadows, Victoria S; Mennesson, Bertrand; Nemati, Bijan; Plavchan, Peter P; Rinehart, Stephen A; Roberge, Aki; Serabyn, Eugene; Shaklan, Stuart B; Shao, Michael; Stapelfeldt, Karl R; Stark, Christopher C; Swain, Mark; Taylor, Stuart F; Turnbull, Margaret C; Turner, Neal J; Turyshev, Slava G; Unwin, Stephen C; Walkowicz, Lucianne M; ExoPAG, on behalf of the

    2016-01-01

    This is a joint summary of the reports from the three Astrophysics Program Analysis Groups (PAGs) in response to the "Planning for the 2020 Decadal Survey" charge given by the Astrophysics Division Director Paul Hertz. This joint executive summary contains points of consensus across all three PAGs. Additional findings specific to the individual PAGs are reported separately in the individual reports. The PAGs concur that all four large mission concepts identified in the white paper as candidates for maturation prior to the 2020 Decadal Survey should be studied in detail. These include the Far-IR Surveyor, the Habitable-Exoplanet Imaging Mission, the UV/Optical/IR Surveyor, and the X-ray Surveyor. This finding is predicated upon assumptions outlined in the white paper and subsequent charge, namely that 1) major development of future large flagship missions under consideration are to follow the implementation phases of JWST and WFIRST; 2) NASA will partner with the European Space Agency on its L3 Gravitational W...

  19. Glass-Cockpit Pilot Subjective Ratings of Predictive Information, Collocation, and Mission Status Graphics: An Analysis and Summary of the Future Focus of Flight Deck Research Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolone, Anthony; Trujillo, Anna

    2002-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has been researching ways to improve flight crew decision aiding for systems management. Our current investigation is how to display a wide variety of aircraft parameters in ways that will improve the flight crew's situation awareness. To accomplish this, new means are being explored that will monitor the overall health of a flight and report the current status of the aircraft and forecast impending problems to the pilots. The initial step in this research was to conduct a survey addressing how current glass-cockpit commercial pilots would value a prediction of the status of critical aircraft systems. We also addressed how this new type of data ought to be conveyed and utilized. Therefore, two other items associated with predictive information were also included in the survey. The first addressed the need for system status, alerts and procedures, and system controls to be more logically grouped together, or collocated, on the flight deck. The second idea called for the survey respondents opinions on the functionality of mission status graphics; a display methodology that groups a variety of parameters onto a single display that can instantaneously convey a complete overview of both an aircraft's system and mission health.

  20. ``Astrophysique sur Mesure'', E-learning in Astronomy and Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosser, Benoît; Delsanti, Audrey; Guillaume, Damien; Balança, Christian; Balkowski, Chantal

    2011-06-01

    ``Astrophysique sur Mesure'' (astrophysics made-to-measure) is a set of e-learning programmes started 4 years ago at the Paris Observatory. In order to deliver attractive and efficient programmes, we have added many multimedia tools to usual lectures: animations, Java applets. The programmes are presented on two different platforms. The first one offers the content of all the lectures in free access. A second platform with restricted access is provided to registered students taking part in the e-learning program and benefiting from the help of tutors. The development of these programs helps to increase the sphere of influence of astronomy taught at the Paris Observatory, hence to increase the presence of astronomy in various degree courses. Instead of teaching classical astronomy lectures to a happy few, we can bring astronomy and astrophysics to a wider audience.

  1. Concept of a small satellite for sub-MeV and MeV all sky survey: the CAST mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Ichinohe, Yuto; Takeda, Shin'ichiro; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Kamae, Tuneyoshi; Kokubun, Motohide; Takashima, Takeshi; Tashiro, Makoto; Tamagawa, Toru; Terada, Yukikatsu; Nomachi, Masaharu; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Makishima, Kazuo; Mizuno, Tsunefumi; Mitani, Takefumi; Yoshimitsu, Tetsuo; Watanabe, Shin

    2012-09-01

    MeV and sub-MeV energy band from ~200 keV to ~2 MeV contains rich information of high-energy phenomena in the universe. The CAST (Compton Telescope for Astro and Solar Terrestrial) mission is planned to be launched at the end of 2010s, and aims at providing all-sky map in this energy-band for the first time. It is made of a semiconductor Compton telescope utilizing Si as a scatterer and CdTe as an absorber. CAST provides allsky sub-MeV polarization map for the first time, as well. The Compton telescope technology is based on the design used in the Soft Gamma-ray Detector (SGD) onboard ASTRO-H, characterized by its tightly stacked semiconductor layers to obtain high Compton reconstruction efficiency. The CAST mission is currently planned as a candidate for the small scientific satellite series in ISAS/JAXA, weighting about 500 kg in total. Scalable detector design enables us to consider other options as well. Scientific outcome of CAST is wide. It will provide new information from high-energy sources, such as AGN and/or its jets, supernova remnants, magnetors, blackhole and neutron-star binaries and others. Polarization map will tell us about activities of jets and reflections in these sources, as well. In addition, CAST will simultaneously observe the Sun, and depending on its attitude, the Earth.

  2. The LBTI Hunt for Observable Signatures of Terrestrial Systems (HOSTS) Survey: a Key NASA Science Program on the Road to Exoplanet Imaging Missions (SPIE Proceedings 2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danchi, William C.; Bailey, V.; Defrere, D.; Haniff, C.; Hinz, P.; Kennedy, G.; Mennesson, B.; Millan-Gabet, R.; Rieke, G.; Roberge, Aki; Serabyn, E.; Skemer, A.; Stapelfeldt, K.; Weinberger, A.; Wyatt, M.

    2014-01-01

    Telescope Interferometer (LBTI) will survey nearby stars for faint exozodiacal dust (exozodi). This warm circumstellar dust, analogous to the interplanetary dust found in the vicinity of the Earth in our own system, is produced in comet breakups and asteroid collisions. Emission and or scattered light from the exozodi will be the major source of astrophysical noise for a future space telescope aimed at direct imaging and spectroscopy of terrestrial planets (exo- Earths) around nearby stars. About 20 of nearby field stars have cold dust coming from planetesimals at large distances from the stars (Eiroa et al. 2013, AA, 555, A11; Siercho et al. 2014, ApJ, 785, 33). Much less is known about exozodi; current detection limits for individual stars are at best 500 times our solar system's level (aka. 500 zodi). LBTI-HOSTS will be the first survey capable of measuring exozodi at the 10 zodi level (3). Detections of warm dust will also reveal new information about planetary system architectures and evolution. We will describe the motivation for the survey and progress on target selection, not only the actual stars likely to be observed by such a mission but also those whose observation will enable sensible extrapolations for stars that will not be observed with LBTI. We briefly describe the detection of the debris disk around Crv, which is the first scientific result from the LBTI coming from the commissioning of the instrument in December 2013, shortly after the first time the fringes were stabilized.

  3. Le temps mesurable, réversible, insaisissable ?

    CERN Document Server

    Fink, Martin; Leduc , Michèle

    2016-01-01

    Depuis l'Antiquité, la nature du temps a fasciné nombre de grands penseurs. Cet ouvrage expose ce que la physique est capable de dire aujourd'hui sur le sujet. La mesure du temps, ou plus exactement celle d'une durée, se fait grâce à des horloges atomiques dont l'exactitude peut atteindre une seconde sur plusieurs milliards d'années. Nous décrivons la façon dont s'effectue le transfert du temps qui permet la synchronisation d'horloges en différents points de la Terre ou de l'espace au milliardième de seconde près, ou même mieux. Les relativités, restreinte et générale, ont bouleversé notre conception du temps et ont un impact considérable sur certains problèmes de la vie quotidienne comme l'utilisation du GPS. On abandonne l'idée d'un temps absolu, le temps devient multiple et insaisissable, et peut-être même une illusion. Enfin la flèche du temps, ou l'irréversibilité, implique que les phénomènes physiques se déroulent toujours dans un sens déterminé, en relation avec la croissan...

  4. ASPIRE: A Data Reduction Project for the Japanese Astro-F Far-Infrared All-Sky Survey; its value to SIRTF, SOFIA, FIRST and other missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, M. M.; Moseley, S. H.; Nakagawa, T.; Matsumoto, T.; Shibai, H.; ASPIRE Collaboration

    1999-12-01

    The ASPIRE mission will provide the international astronomical community with data from an unbiased all-sky survey by the Far Infrared Surveyer (FIS) onboard the Japanese Astro-F (IRIS) satellite. An all-sky survey is very efficient in producing scientific results. It allows to detect intrinsically rare objects that would be missed by limited sky surveys. ASPIRE will provide target lists in time for efficient follow-up pointed observations with narrow field-of-view telescopes like SIRTF, SOFIA and FIRST at a low cost to the US community. The Astro-F satellite contains a 70 cm telescope cooled to 6 K with super-fluid liquid helium and Stirling-cycle coolers. The FIS instrument uses state-of-the-art 2D stressed and unstressed Ge:Ge detector arrays and cold readout electronics. Astro-F is scheduled to be launched in August 2003 by an ISAS M-V rocket into a sun-synchronous polar orbit at an altitude of 750 km. The FIS operates between 50-200μm at a diffraction limited spatial resolution of 30-50 " in four bands at sensitivities of approximately 18, 25, 110, and 90 mJy between 50-70, 50-110, 150-200, and 110-200 μm . These sensitivities are up to 20x higher than IRAS. The final data products will consist of point source catalogs, images and small scale maps. We expect to detect in excess of 10 million far-IR sources, from solar system objects to ultra-luminous galaxies at cosmological distances. The science objectives include important astrophysical topics, like large scale structure, evolution of galaxies, systematic investigation of the star formation process, and the evolution of planets and brown dwarfs.

  5. Campaign 9 of the K2 Mission: Observational Parameters, Scientific Drivers, and Community Involvement for a Simultaneous Space- and Ground-based Microlensing Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Calen B.; Poleski, Radosław; Penny, Matthew; Street, Rachel A.; Bennett, David P.; Hogg, David W.; Gaudi, B. Scott; K2 Campaign 9 Microlensing Science Team; Zhu, W.; Barclay, T.; Barentsen, G.; Howell, S. B.; Mullally, F.; Udalski, A.; Szymański, M. K.; Skowron, J.; Mróz, P.; Kozłowski, S.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Soszyński, I.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pawlak, M.; OGLE Project, The; Sumi, T.; Abe, F.; Asakura, Y.; Barry, R. K.; Bhattacharya, A.; Bond, I. A.; Donachie, M.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Hirao, Y.; Itow, Y.; Koshimoto, N.; Li, M. C. A.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Nagakane, M.; Ohnishi, K.; Oyokawa, H.; Rattenbury, N.; Saito, To.; Sharan, A.; Sullivan, D. J.; Tristram, P. J.; Yonehara, A.; MOA Collaboration; Bachelet, E.; Bramich, D. M.; Cassan, A.; Dominik, M.; Figuera Jaimes, R.; Horne, K.; Hundertmark, M.; Mao, S.; Ranc, C.; Schmidt, R.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I. A.; Tsapras, Y.; Wambsganss, J.; RoboNet Project, The; Bozza, V.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Calchi Novati, S.; Ciceri, S.; D'Ago, G.; Evans, D. F.; Hessman, F. V.; Hinse, T. C.; Husser, T.-O.; Mancini, L.; Popovas, A.; Rabus, M.; Rahvar, S.; Scarpetta, G.; Skottfelt, J.; Southworth, J.; Unda-Sanzana, E.; The MiNDSTEp Team; Bryson, S. T.; Caldwell, D. A.; Haas, M. R.; Larson, K.; McCalmont, K.; Packard, M.; Peterson, C.; Putnam, D.; Reedy, L.; Ross, S.; Van Cleve, J. E.; K2C9 Engineering Team; Akeson, R.; Batista, V.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; Beichman, C. A.; Bryden, G.; Ciardi, D.; Cole, A.; Coutures, C.; Foreman-Mackey, D.; Fouqué, P.; Friedmann, M.; Gelino, C.; Kaspi, S.; Kerins, E.; Korhonen, H.; Lang, D.; Lee, C.-H.; Lineweaver, C. H.; Maoz, D.; Marquette, J.-B.; Mogavero, F.; Morales, J. C.; Nataf, D.; Pogge, R. W.; Santerne, A.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Suzuki, D.; Tamura, M.; Tisserand, P.; Wang, D.

    2016-12-01

    K2's Campaign 9 (K2C9) will conduct a ˜3.7 deg2 survey toward the Galactic bulge from 2016 April 22 through July 2 that will leverage the spatial separation between K2 and the Earth to facilitate measurement of the microlens parallax {π }{{E}} for ≳ 170 microlensing events. These will include several that are planetary in nature as well as many short-timescale microlensing events, which are potentially indicative of free-floating planets (FFPs). These satellite parallax measurements will in turn allow for the direct measurement of the masses of and distances to the lensing systems. In this article we provide an overview of the K2C9 space- and ground-based microlensing survey. Specifically, we detail the demographic questions that can be addressed by this program, including the frequency of FFPs and the Galactic distribution of exoplanets, the observational parameters of K2C9, and the array of resources dedicated to concurrent observations. Finally, we outline the avenues through which the larger community can become involved, and generally encourage participation in K2C9, which constitutes an important pathfinding mission and community exercise in anticipation of WFIRST.

  6. Portable Tester Friction (PFT). Mesures du coefficient de frottement dynamique de revêtements de sol

    OpenAIRE

    Marchal, P.; Jacques, M.

    2014-01-01

    Le Portable Tester Friction (PFT) est un appareil destiné à mesurer le coefficient de frottement dynamique d’un revêtement de sol en laboratoire et sur site. Ce document décrit le protocole de mesure avec le PFT et les résultats de mesures effectuées sur un panel de quinze revêtements de sol de caractéristiques différentes (matériaux, états de surface) réalisées en présence de deux polluants (huile et solution d’eau). Le PFT présente une très bonne sensibilité et une très bonne répétabilité. ...

  7. Mesure optimale de tilt et déplacement d'un faisceau gaussien

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaubert, V.; Treps, N.; Fabre, C.; Harb, C.; Lam, P. K.; Bachor, H.

    2006-10-01

    Nous réalisons une expérience de mesure optimale de petits déplacements d'un faisceau gaussien TEM{00}, basée sur une détection homodyne employant un oscillateur local TEM{10}. Nous montrons une amélioration de 56% du signal détecté par rapport à une détection à deux zones. Ce nouveau dispositif permet également de mesurer de façon optimale de petites valeurs de tilt, la quantité conjuguée du déplacement. Enfin, nous montrons que la compression du mode TEM{10} du faisceau incident permet une mesure de déplacement au delà de la limite quantique standard.

  8. Gas mission; Mission gaz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This preliminary report analyses the desirable evolutions of gas transport tariffing and examines some questions relative to the opening of competition on the French gas market. The report is made of two documents: a synthesis of the previous report with some recommendations about the tariffing of gas transport, about the modalities of network access to third parties, and about the dissociation between transport and trade book-keeping activities. The second document is the progress report about the opening of the French gas market. The first part presents the European problem of competition in the gas supply and its consequences on the opening and operation of the French gas market. The second part presents some partial syntheses about each topic of the mission letter of the Ministry of Economics, Finances and Industry: future evolution of network access tariffs, critical analysis of contractual documents for gas transport and delivery, examination of auxiliary services linked with the access to the network (modulation, balancing, conversion), consideration about the processing of network congestions and denied accesses, analysis of the metering dissociation between the integrated activities of gas operators. Some documents are attached in appendixes: the mission letter from July 9, 2001, the detailed analysis of the new temporary tariffs of GdF and CFM, the offer of methane terminals access to third parties, the compatibility of a nodal tariffing with the presence of three transport operators (GdF, CFM and GSO), the contract-type for GdF supply, and the contract-type for GdF connection. (J.S.)

  9. Early aerial photography and contributions to Digital Earth - The case of the 1921 Halifax air survey mission in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werle, D.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents research into the military and civilian history, technological development, and practical outcomes of aerial photography in Canada immediately after the First World War. The collections of early aerial photography in Canada and elsewhere, as well as the institutional and practical circumstances and arrangements of their creation, represent an important part of remote sensing heritage. It is argued that the digital rendition of the air photos and their representation in mosaic form can make valuable contributions to Digital Earth historic inquiries and mapping exercises today. An episode of one of the first urban surveys, carried out over Halifax, Nova Scotia, in 1921, is highlighted and an air photo mosaic and interpretation key is presented. Using the almost one hundred year old air photos and a digitally re-assembled mosaic of a substantial portion of that collection as a guide, a variety of features unique to the post-war urban landscape of the Halifax peninsula are analysed, illustrated, and compared with records of past and current land use. The pan-chromatic air photo ensemble at a nominal scale of 1:5,000 is placed into the historical context with contemporary thematic maps, recent air photos, and modern satellite imagery. Further research opportunities and applications concerning early Canadian aerial photography are outlined.

  10. MESURE DE LA QUALITE DE LA DIVULGATION SOCIETALE DES ENTREPRISES FRANCAISES

    OpenAIRE

    Ben Rhouma, Amel

    2006-01-01

    International audience; Le propos de ce papier est de présenter quelques résultats empiriques concernant la mesure du niveau et de la qualité de la divulgation sociétale. Notre outil de mesure est une grille de codage similaire à celle de Wiseman (1982) et Cormier et Magnan (1999 et 2003) et adaptée au contexte légal et réglementaire français, les résultats montrent qu'il y a une progression dans le niveau et la qualité de divulgation sociétale des entreprises françaises.

  11. Qualification de l’instrumentation pour des mesures nanométriques

    CERN Document Server

    Bernard, E

    2009-01-01

    Prise en main de l’instrumentation dédiée aux mesures de vibrations dans le domaine du nanomètre et mise en service de nouveaux capteurs. Développement de l’acquisition des données sous Labview, et analyse des signaux dans le domaine fréquentiel sous Matlab.

  12. Differential measurement of the earth's magnetic field by nuclear magnetic resonance; Mesure differentielle du champ magnetique terrestre par resonance magnetique nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robach, F. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, 38 - Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-07-01

    MNR transducers using proton dynamic polarisation allows to convert into a phase measurement any variation of the earth magnetic field. There exist several versions of the instrument corresponding to various models of MNR transducers, which the author analyses in detail, devoting an important place to influence of their alignment with respect to the earth's magnetic field. The sensibility obtained is of one hundredth of a gamma over a bandwidth of (0-0,1 Hz). - This instrument is designed for measuring field gradients in airborne magnetic surveying, for detecting nearly magnetic anomalies, and for distinguishing between nearly and distant magnetic phenomena. (author) [French] L'emploi de capteurs, bases sur la resonance magnetique nucleaire des protons en presence de polarisation dynamique, permet de traduire une difference de champ magnetique terrestre en une mesure de phase. L'appareil existe sous plusieurs versions avec des capteurs de modeles differents dont l'auteur fait une analyse detaillee en accordant une part importante a l'influence de l'orientation des capteurs par rapport au champ magnetique terrestre. La sensibilite est de 1/100 {gamma} pour une bande passante de (0 - 0,1 Hz). Cet appareil s'applique a la mesure du gradient en prospection magnetique aeroportee, a la detection d'anomalies magnetiques proches, a la differentiation d'effets magnetiques proches et lointains. (auteur)

  13. Planning, implementation, and scientific goals of the Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS) field mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toon, Owen B.; Maring, Hal; Dibb, Jack; Ferrare, Richard; Jacob, Daniel J.; Jensen, Eric J.; Luo, Z. Johnny; Mace, Gerald G.; Pan, Laura L.; Pfister, Lenny; Rosenlof, Karen H.; Redemann, Jens; Reid, Jeffrey S.; Singh, Hanwant B.; Thompson, Anne M.; Yokelson, Robert; Minnis, Patrick; Chen, Gao; Jucks, Kenneth W.; Pszenny, Alex

    2016-05-01

    The Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS) field mission based at Ellington Field, Texas, during August and September 2013 employed the most comprehensive airborne payload to date to investigate atmospheric composition over North America. The NASA ER-2, DC-8, and SPEC Inc. Learjet flew 57 science flights from the surface to 20 km. The ER-2 employed seven remote sensing instruments as a satellite surrogate and eight in situ instruments. The DC-8 employed 23 in situ and five remote sensing instruments for radiation, chemistry, and microphysics. The Learjet used 11 instruments to explore cloud microphysics. SEAC4RS launched numerous balloons, augmented AErosol RObotic NETwork, and collaborated with many existing ground measurement sites. Flights investigating convection included close coordination of all three aircraft. Coordinated DC-8 and ER-2 flights investigated the optical properties of aerosols, the influence of aerosols on clouds, and the performance of new instruments for satellite measurements of clouds and aerosols. ER-2 sorties sampled stratospheric injections of water vapor and other chemicals by local and distant convection. DC-8 flights studied seasonally evolving chemistry in the Southeastern U.S., atmospheric chemistry with lower emissions of NOx and SO2 than in previous decades, isoprene chemistry under high and low NOx conditions at different locations, organic aerosols, air pollution near Houston and in petroleum fields, smoke from wildfires in western forests and from agricultural fires in the Mississippi Valley, and the ways in which the chemistry in the boundary layer and the upper troposphere were influenced by vertical transport in convective clouds.

  14. Mesure et retroaction sur un qubit multi-niveaux en electrodynamique quantique en circuit non lineair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boissonneault, Maxime

    L'electrodynamique quantique en circuit est une architecture prometteuse pour le calcul quantique ainsi que pour etudier l'optique quantique. Dans cette architecture, on couple un ou plusieurs qubits supraconducteurs jouant le role d'atomes a un ou plusieurs resonateurs jouant le role de cavites optiques. Dans cette these, j'etudie l'interaction entre un seul qubit supraconducteur et un seul resonateur, en permettant cependant au qubit d'avoir plus de deux niveaux et au resonateur d'avoir une non-linearite Kerr. Je m'interesse particulierement a la lecture de l'etat du qubit et a son amelioration, a la retroaction du processus de mesure sur le qubit de meme qu'a l'etude des proprietes quantiques du resonateur a l'aide du qubit. J'utilise pour ce faire un modele analytique reduit que je developpe a partir de la description complete du systeme en utilisant principalement des transfprmations unitaires et une elimination adiabatique. J'utilise aussi une librairie de calcul numerique maison permettant de simuler efficacement l'evolution du systeme complet. Je compare les predictions du modele analytique reduit et les resultats de simulations numeriques a des resultats experimentaux obtenus par l'equipe de quantronique du CEASaclay. Ces resultats sont ceux d'une spectroscopie d'un qubit supraconducteur couple a un resonateur non lineaire excite. Dans un regime de faible puissance de spectroscopie le modele reduit predit correctement la position et la largeur de la raie. La position de la raie subit les decalages de Lamb et de Stark, et sa largeur est dominee par un dephasage induit par le processus de mesure. Je montre que, pour les parametres typiques de l'electrodynamique quantique en circuit, un accord quantitatif requiert un modele en reponse non lineaire du champ intra-resonateur, tel que celui developpe. Dans un regime de forte puissance de spectroscopie, des bandes laterales apparaissent et sont causees par les fluctuations quantiques du champ electromagnetique

  15. Dispositif de mesure calorimétrique des pertes dans les condensateurs de puissance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seguin, B.; Gosse, J. P.

    1997-02-01

    A calorimetric technique is used to measure the power losses in capacitors. The power dissipated in the component is measured as the difference between the heat powers delivered by a temperature regulation when the capacitor is energetized or not. The original feature of the apparatus lies in the use of the isothermal calorimetry and in the measurement of an electrical power, in condradistinction with previous and dissatisfacting attempts based on the measurement of a temperature increase. The result is an improvement of the accuracy and sensibility of the apparatus which can be used to determine the equivalent series resistance of capacitors having very low losses. Measurements realized on a polypropylene capacitor and a sinusoidal applied voltage have allowed us to separate the ohmic losses from the dielectric ones and to study their variations with temperature. Une technique de calorimétrie isotherme est appliquée à la mesure des pertes électriques dans les condensateurs. La puissance calorifique dissipée par le composant est mesurée comme la différence des puissances de chauffe délivrées par une régulation de température quand le condensateur est hors tension ou sous tension. L'originalité du dispositif réside dans l'utilisation du principe de calorimétrie isotherme et dans la nature de la grandeur physique mesurée qui est une puissance électrique alors que les tentatives antérieures de mesures calorimétriques reposaient sur la mesure d'une élévation de température. Il en résulte une amélioration de la précision et de la sensibilité de ce type d'appareillage qui peut être employé pour caractériser la résistance série équivalente des condensateurs à très faibles pertes. Une série de mesures, réalisée sur un condensateur au polypropylène soumis à une tension sinusoïdale, a permis de séparer les pertes ohmiques des pertes diélectriques et d'étudier leurs variations avec la température.

  16. Une methode simple pour la mesure de l'evapotranspiration reelle a l'echelle de la parcelle

    OpenAIRE

    1981-01-01

    Après avoir passé en revue les différentes méthodes de mesure de l’évapotranspiration réelle, qu’il s’agisse des méthodes directes telles que la pesée ou la mesure du stock en eau du sol ou des méthodes indirectes telles que la méthode du rapport de Bowen et la méthode aérodynamique combinée, on développe une méthode de mesure simple cherchant à allier les avantages de la méthode du rapport de Bowen (deux niveaux de mesure dans l’air seulement) et ceux de la méthode aérodynamique combinée...

  17. Souci du social et action publique sur mesure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand Ravon

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available L’engagement dans la lutte contre les problèmes sociaux s’est transformé. Avec l’individualisation et la territorialisation du traitement public des problèmes sociaux, se pose de plus en plus nettement la question d’une action publique de proximité, intersubjective. Mais plutôt que de renvoyer immédiatement les raisons de cette action publique sur mesure à une critique de la psychologisation des rapports sociaux ou du déclin des institutions, il s’agit de l’analyser comme une expérience publique, avec son lot d’actions et d’affects, de convictions et d’inquiétudes, de ressources et de préoccupations. La notion de souci s’impose alors pour tenir ce double mouvement de l’engagement, entre agir et subir, des épreuves qui nous conduisent dans l’action aux attentes qui nous y maintiennent. À partir de plusieurs exemples de formation de problèmes sociaux, l’article décline alors le souci des acteurs dans deux directions. D’une part, le souci de soi est analysé comme un engagement public au sens d’un travail d’orientation de soi dans un monde incertain via la reprise d’expériences sociales négatives. D’autre part, le souci commun est envisagé comme une « communauté de charge », c’est-à-dire comme un collectif d’action publique fondé non pas à partir de propriétés communes mais à partir d’affects partagés.“Concern” in the social sphere and public action adapted to the client: singular and critical public experience of social problemsCommitment in the struggle against social problems has changed. Along with the individualisation and territorial decentralisation of the public treatment of social problems, the question of very local and intersubjective public action has come more and more into focus. But rather than immediately relegating the reasons for this tailor-made version of social action to a critique of the increasing influence of psychological methods in social relations

  18. Comment mesurer correctement la PA chez les patients hémodialysés?

    OpenAIRE

    VANDERWECKENE, Pauline; Saint-Remy, Annie; Krzesinski, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Objectifs : Le contrôle de la pression artérielle (PA) chez le patient hémodialysé (HD) est un enjeu majeur en raison des résultats controversés sur les risques cardiovasculaires qui y sont associés. Cependant, la mesure de la PA dans cette population est difficile à appréhender au vu de sa grande variabilité. L’exactitude des mesures péridialytiques (enregistrées dans l’unité d’HD pendant la séance) est souvent remise en question. L’objectif de notre étude est d’établir la contribution et l...

  19. La mesure de la pression artérielle : écueils et chausse-trapes

    OpenAIRE

    Rorive, Georges; Dubois, Bernard; Saint-Remy, Annie

    2002-01-01

    La mesure de la pression artérielle est probablement l'acte médical le plus souvent réalisé et certainement un des moins fiables. L'introduction de la mesure ambulatoire de la pression artérielle a permis d'identifier l'importance de l'effet consultatio et, par là, de définir l'hypertension de "la blouse blanche". Celle-ci se définit comme une pression artérielle pathologique à la consultation et strictement normale en dehors. Si on la définit de cette manière, cette pathologie ne s'accompagn...

  20. SURVEY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    SURVEY er en udbredt metode og benyttes inden for bl.a. samfundsvidenskab, humaniora, psykologi og sundhedsforskning. Også uden for forskningsverdenen er der mange organisationer som f.eks. konsulentfirmaer og offentlige institutioner samt marketingsafdelinger i private virksomheder, der arbejder...... med surveys. Denne bog gennemgår alle surveyarbejdets faser og giver en praktisk indføring i: • design af undersøgelsen og udvælgelse af stikprøver, • formulering af spørgeskemaer samt indsamling og kodning af data, • metoder til at analysere resultaterne...

  1. Mesures magnétiques du dipôle BHN 45 pour le projet AD

    CERN Document Server

    Cornuet, D; CERN. Geneva. SPS and LEP Division

    1999-01-01

    La machine AC (Antiproton Collector) transformée en machine de décélérationd'antiprotons est appelée AD (Antiproton Decelerator). Pour vérifierle comportement de la machine à basse énergie et pendant la décélération, des mesures magnétiques ont été entreprises sur l'un des dipôles, le BHN 45.

  2. Design and Fabrication of a Breadboard, Fully Conductively Cooled, 2-Micron, Pulsed Laser for the 3-D Winds Decadal Survey Mission Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Design and fabricate a space-qualifiable, fully conductively cooled, 2-micron pulsed laser breadboard meeting the projected 3-D Winds mission requirements. Utilize...

  3. The Euclid mission design

    CERN Document Server

    Racca, Giuseppe D; Stagnaro, Luca; Salvignol, Jean Christophe; Alvarez, Jose Lorenzo; Criado, Gonzalo Saavedra; Venancio, Luis Gaspar; Short, Alex; Strada, Paolo; Boenke, Tobias; Colombo, Cyril; Calvi, Adriano; Maiorano, Elena; Piersanti, Osvaldo; Prezelus, Sylvain; Rosato, Pierluigi; Pinel, Jacques; Rozemeijer, Hans; Lesna, Valentina; Musi, Paolo; Sias, Marco; Anselmi, Alberto; Cazaubiel, Vincent; Vaillon, Ludovic; Mellier, Yannick; Amiaux, Jerome; Berthe, Michel; Sauvage, Marc; Azzollini, Ruyman; Cropper, Mark; Pottinger, Sabrina; Jahnke, Knud; Ealet, Anne; Maciaszek, Thierry; Pasian, Fabio; Zacchei, Andrea; Scaramella, Roberto; Hoar, John; Kohley, Ralf; Vavrek, Roland; Rudolph, Andreas; Schmidt, Micha

    2016-01-01

    Euclid is a space-based optical/near-infrared survey mission of the European Space Agency (ESA) to investigate the nature of dark energy, dark matter and gravity by observing the geometry of the Universe and on the formation of structures over cosmological timescales. Euclid will use two probes of the signature of dark matter and energy: Weak gravitational Lensing, which requires the measurement of the shape and photometric redshifts of distant galaxies, and Galaxy Clustering, based on the measurement of the 3-dimensional distribution of galaxies through their spectroscopic redshifts. The mission is scheduled for launch in 2020 and is designed for 6 years of nominal survey operations. The Euclid Spacecraft is composed of a Service Module and a Payload Module. The Service Module comprises all the conventional spacecraft subsystems, the instruments warm electronics units, the sun shield and the solar arrays. In particular the Service Module provides the extremely challenging pointing accuracy required by the sc...

  4. New mission for surveying, mapping and geomatics in Smart Earth era%智慧地球时代测绘地理信息学的新使命

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李德仁; 姚远; 邵振峰

    2012-01-01

    本文首先指出智慧地球是数字地球、物联网和云计算等有机的融合,随后分析了智慧地球的主要特性,并重点阐述了智慧地球时代测绘地理信息学的新使命.作者认为我们已经从绘制地形图为主的小测绘发展成为当今以地理空间信息服务为主的大测绘,现在必须抓住机遇,不失时机地拓展智慧地球时代测绘地理信息学的新使命,将传统测绘提升为能够实时、智能地采集和处理海量空间数据、提供空间信息和知识服务的智慧测绘新阶段.%This paper first pointed out that Smart Earth is consisted of Digital Earth, Internet of Thing9( IOT) , and cloud computing. Next, il analyzed the main features of Smart Earth and focused on the new missions of surveying, mapping and geomatics in the Smart Earth era. The authors believed that we have walked through the so called "small surveying and mapping" that mainly serves topographic maps, and developed into the so called "big surveying and mapping", the services of geospatial information. At present, we should seize the opportunity and expand new mission of surveying, mapping and geomatics in the Smart Earth era, and make surveying and mapping upgraded to smart surveying and mapping stage which could facilitate real-time intelligence collecting and processing massive spatial data, in order to provide service of spatial information and knowledge.

  5. Titan Saturn System Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reh, Kim R.

    2009-01-01

    Titan is a high priority for exploration, as recommended by NASA's 2006 Solar System Exploration (SSE) Roadmap. NASA's 2003 National Research Council (NRC) Decadal Survey and ESA's Cosmic Vision Program Themes. Recent revolutionary Cassini-Huygens discoveries have dramatically escalated interest in Titan as the next scientific target in the outer solar system. This study demonstrates that an exciting Titan Saturn System Mission (TSSM) that explores two worlds of intense astrobiological interest can be initiated now as a single NASA/ESA collaboration.

  6. LabINRS. Mesures en laboratoire du coefficient de frottement dynamique de revêtements de sol

    OpenAIRE

    Marchal, P.; Jacques, M.

    2014-01-01

    Le LabINRS est un banc d’essai de laboratoire destiné à mesurer le coefficient de frottement dynamique d’un revêtement de sol. Ce document décrit le protocole de mesures avec le LabINRS et les résultats de mesures effectuées sur un panel de quinze revêtements de sol de caractéristiques différentes (matériaux, états de surface) réalisées en présence de deux polluants (huile et solution d’eau). Le LabINRS présente une sensibilité élevée et une très bonne répétabilité. Ces résultats ont été comp...

  7. Réduction de bruit quantique spatiale et mesures de petits déplacements en optique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treps, N.; Maître, A.; Fabre, C.; Andersen, U.; Buchler, B.; Lame, P. K.; Bachor, H. A.

    2002-06-01

    L'étude des images optiques au niveau quantique nécessite de prendre en compte la structure multimode transverse de la lumière. Dans le cas particulier d'une mesure de position d'un faisceau lumineux effectuée par un détecteur à deux zone, on montre qu'il est nécessaire, si on veut améliorer la précision des mesures en réduisant le bruit quantique de la lumière, d'utiliser deux modes transverses. Nous présentons la première réalisation expérimentale d'une réduction de bruit spatiale, ce qui nous permet ensuite d'effectuer des mesures de petits déplacements sous la limite quantique standard.

  8. La mesure en éducation, un outil au service du politique

    OpenAIRE

    Agulhon, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    La statistique scolaire prétend rendre compte des processus complexes qui travaillent les institutions. Les organismes internationaux incitent les États à produire ces éléments de mesure, de comparaison et de mise en concurrence des systèmes scolaires, plus encore ces quinze dernières années. Chaque État a cependant construit un système d’information qui correspond aux formes d’évaluation qu’il veut donner à son projet éducatif. En France, ce système centralisé et très productif vise le suivi...

  9. Quelle mesure des effets du travail sur la santé ?

    OpenAIRE

    Bercot, Régine

    2012-01-01

    Nous envisagerons la maladie comme un processus engagé en vue d'une adaptation à un nouvel équilibre et la santé, non comme une absence de maladie, mais comme un processus de construction du bien être engageant le cadre social et les individus. Nous interrogerons la question de la mesure de la santé au travail en nous centrant sur l'enquête Sumer. Le travail est potentiellement générateur de bien être et de souffrance. Après avoir rappelé les grandes lignes de construction de cette enquête no...

  10. The Ulysses mission: An introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsden, R.G. [Space Science Dept. of ESA, Estec, Noordwijk (Netherlands)

    1996-11-01

    On 30 September 1995, Ulysses completed its initial, highly successful, survey of the polar regions of the heliosphere in both southern and northern hemispheres, thereby fulfilling its prime mission. The results obtained to date are leading to a revision of many earlier ideas concerning the solar wind and the heliosphere. Now embarking on the second phase of the mission, Ulysses will continue along its out-of-ecliptic flight path for another complete orbit of the Sun. In contrast to the high-latitude phase of the prime mission, which occurred near solar minimum, the next polar passes (in 2000 and 2001) will take place when the Sun is at its most active.

  11. Public Progress, Data Management and the Land Grant Mission: A Survey of Agriculture Researchers' Practices and Attitudes at Two Land-Grant Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Peter; Eaker, Christopher; Swauger, Shea; Davis, Miriam L. E. Steiner

    2016-01-01

    This article reports results from a survey about data management practices and attitudes sent to agriculture researchers and extension personnel at the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture (UTIA) and the College of Agricultural Sciences and Warner College of Natural Resources at Colorado State University. Results confirm agriculture…

  12. Developpement de mesures non destructives, par ondes ultrasonores, d'epaisseurs de fronts de solidification dans les reacteurs metallurgiques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floquet, Jimmy

    Dans les cuves d'electrolyse d'aluminium, le milieu de reaction tres corrosif attaque les parois de la cuve, ce qui diminue leur duree de vie et augmente les couts de production. Le talus, qui se forme sous l'effet des pertes de chaleur qui maintiennent un equilibre thermique dans la cuve, sert de protection naturelle a la cuve. Son epaisseur doit etre controlee pour maximiser cet effet. Advenant la resorption non voulue de ce talus, les degats generes peuvent s'evaluer a plusieurs centaines de milliers de dollars par cuve. Aussi, l'objectif est de developper une mesure ultrasonore de l'epaisseur du talus, car elle serait non intrusive et non destructive. La precision attendue est de l'ordre du centimetre pour des mesures d'epaisseurs comprenant 2 materiaux, allant de 5 a 20 cm. Cette precision est le facteur cle permettant aux industriels de controler l'epaisseur du talus de maniere efficace (maximiser la protection des parois tout en maximisant l'efficacite energetique du procede), par l'ajout d'un flux thermique. Cependant, l'efficacite d'une mesure ultrasonore dans cet environnement hostile reste a demontrer. Les travaux preliminaires ont permis de selectionner un transducteur ultrasonore a contact ayant la capacite a resister aux conditions de mesure (hautes temperatures, materiaux non caracterises...). Differentes mesures a froid (traite par analyse temps-frequence) ont permis d'evaluer la vitesse de propagation des ondes dans le materiau de la cuve en graphite et de la cryolite, demontrant la possibilite d'extraire l'information pertinente d'epaisseur du talus in fine. Fort de cette phase de caracterisation des materiaux sur la reponse acoustique des materiaux, les travaux a venir ont ete realises sur un modele reduit de la cuve. Le montage experimental, un four evoluant a 1050 °C, instrumente d'une multitude de capteurs thermique, permettra une comparaison de la mesure intrusive LVDT a celle du transducteur, dans des conditions proches de la mesure

  13. Survey of European and Major ISC Facilities for Supporting Mars and Sample Return Mission Aerothermodynamics and Tests Required for Thermal Protection System and Dynamic Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathilde Bugel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the frame of future sample return missions to Mars, asteroids, and comets, investigated by the European Space Agency, a review of the actual aerodynamics and aerothermodynamics capabilities in Europe for Mars entry of large vehicles and high-speed Earth reentry of sample return capsule has been undertaken. Additionally, capabilities in Canada and Australia for the assessment of dynamic stability, as well as major facilities for hypersonic flows available in ISC, have been included. This paper provides an overview of European current capabilities for aerothermodynamics and testing of thermal protection systems. This assessment has allowed the identification of the needs in new facilities or upgrade of existing ground tests for covering experimentally Mars entries and Earth high-speed reentries as far as aerodynamics, aerothermodynamics, and thermal protection system testing are concerned.

  14. General Mission Analysis Tool (GMAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Steven P. (Compiler)

    2016-01-01

    This is a software tutorial and presentation demonstrating the application of the General Mission Analysis Tool (GMAT) to the critical design phase of NASA missions. The demonstration discusses GMAT basics, then presents a detailed example of GMAT application to the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) mission. Other examples include OSIRIS-Rex. This talk is a combination of existing presentations; a GMAT basics and overview, and technical presentations from the TESS and OSIRIS-REx projects on their application of GMAT to critical mission design. The GMAT basics slides are taken from the open source training material. The OSIRIS-REx slides are from a previous conference presentation. The TESS slides are a streamlined version of the CDR package provided by the project with SBU and ITAR data removed by the TESS project.

  15. Landsat Data Continuity Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2012-01-01

    The Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM) is a partnership formed between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to place the next Landsat satellite in orbit in January 2013. The Landsat era that began in 1972 will become a nearly 41-year global land record with the successful launch and operation of the LDCM. The LDCM will continue the acquisition, archiving, and distribution of multispectral imagery affording global, synoptic, and repetitive coverage of the Earth's land surfaces at a scale where natural and human-induced changes can be detected, differentiated, characterized, and monitored over time. The mission objectives of the LDCM are to (1) collect and archive medium resolution (30-meter spatial resolution) multispectral image data affording seasonal coverage of the global landmasses for a period of no less than 5 years; (2) ensure that LDCM data are sufficiently consistent with data from the earlier Landsat missions in terms of acquisition geometry, calibration, coverage characteristics, spectral characteristics, output product quality, and data availability to permit studies of landcover and land-use change over time; and (3) distribute LDCM data products to the general public on a nondiscriminatory basis at no cost to the user.

  16. Mesure du rayonnement naturel pour la modélisation de la température des organes : application aux fruits

    OpenAIRE

    Marquier, André; Adam, Boris; Guilioni, Lydie; Saudreau, Marc; Chelle, Michaël; Sinoquet, Herve

    2009-01-01

    Cet article présente une expérimentation mise en place dans un projet innovant du département Environnement et agronomie (EA). Nous développons, plus particulièrement les principes de la mesure du rayonnement naturel à l’aide d’un bilanmètre de chez Kipp & Zonen : les capteurs qui le constituent, les grandeurs mesurées et les précautions à prendre lors de son utilisation notamment dans le domaine de l’infrarouge thermique. Ensuite nous montrons l’intérêt de telles mesures lors de la validatio...

  17. The SPICA mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibthorpe, B.; Helmich, F.; Roelfsema, P.; Kaneda, H.; Shibai, H.

    2016-05-01

    SPICA is a mid and far-infrared space mission to be submitted as a candidate to ESA's fifth medium class mission call, due in early 2016. This will be a joint project between ESA and JAXA, with ESA taking the lead role. If selected, SPICA will launch in ˜2029 and operate for a goal lifetime of 5 years. The spacecraft will house a 2.5 m telescope actively cooled to 8 K, providing unprecedented sensitivity at mid-far infrared wavelengths. The low background environment and wavelength coverage provided by SPICA will make it possible to conduct detailed spectroscopic surveys of sources in both the local and distant Universe, deep into the most obscured regions. Using these data the evolution of galaxies over a broad and continuous range of cosmic time can be studied, spanning the era of peak star forming activity. SPICA will also provide unique access to, among others, the deep-lying water-ice spectral features and HD lines within planet forming discs. SPICA will conduct an extensive survey of both planet forming discs and evolved planetary systems, with the aim of providing the missing link between planet formation models and the large number of extrasolar planetary systems now being discovered.

  18. Heat Capacity Mapping Mission: 1978-1980

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — NASA's Heat Capacity Mapping Mission (HCMM) project collected Earth data in the visible and thermal bands between April 1978 and September 1980. This was an...

  19. Heat Capacity Mapping Mission: 1978-1980

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — NASA's Heat Capacity Mapping Mission (HCMM) project collected Earth data in the visible and thermal bands between April 1978 and September 1980. This was an...

  20. Mesure ambulatoire de la pression artérielle, son utilité en pratique quotidienne

    OpenAIRE

    Krzesinski, Jean-Marie

    1994-01-01

    Si la nécessité du traitement de l'hypertension artérielle est un fait accepté de façon universelle, la question à propos des niveaux de pression artérielle qui méritent une intervention reste débattue. Cette difficulté trouve son origine dans une telle variabilité de la pression artérielle que les mesures au cabinet de consultation représentent seulement une vue limitée de son réel profil sur 24 heures. Le développement d'enregistreurs portatifs de la pression artérielle par méthode non i...

  1. Pas d'image fiable de notre atmosphère sans mesures depuis le sol !

    OpenAIRE

    Mazière, M.; De Backer, H.; Mahieu, Emmanuel; Vander Auwera, J.; Bader, Whitney; V. De Bock; Desmet, F.; Foldes, T; Gielen, C.; Hendrick, F.; Hermans, C.; B. Langerock; Lejeune, Bernard; Mangold, A.; Tudorie, M

    2014-01-01

    Nous sommes actuellement confrontés à une atmosphère en évolution : les concentrations de ce qu’on appelle les gaz à effet de serre augmentent, la quantité d’ozone stratosphérique diminue, en particulier au-dessus de l’Antarctique où elle forme chaque année un ‘trou’ dans la couche d’ozone, et l’air n’est pas tous les jours très sain... Comment pouvons-nous détecter et surveiller ces changements pour, si nécessaire, prendre des mesures pour tenter de les contrecarrer ?...

  2. Réseau de capteurs sans fils : Application à la mesure de vibrations

    OpenAIRE

    NGUYEN VAN PHU, C

    2006-01-01

    Les progrès des techniques électroniques rendent possible le concept de mise en réseau de capteurs intelligents sans fils. Sur cette base matérielle, se sont développées diverses plate formes sans fils dont le Mote est un exemple. La particularité du Mote est qu'il a servi de support au développement d'un système d'exploitation innovant pour réseaux de capteurs sans fils, TinyOS, qui depuis a été porté sur d'autres capteurs. Le Mote est présenté ainsi qu'une application de mesure sur un pont ...

  3. Capteurs monopodes pour mesures accélérométriques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaite, R.; Valentin, J.-P.

    1993-08-01

    A new design for accelerometric measurements sensors is described. It uses a plate vibrating in thickness shear mode, maintained by the means of a single holder located at the crystal edge. This mounting does cancel the mechanical and thermal stresses which generally modify the sensor output signal. So the ratio signal/noise of a thickness shear accelerometer is improved and the intrinsic sensitivity is multiplied by a factor 40, by comparison with the sensitivity of a thickness shear plate bonded by the means of two opposite holders. Un nouveau dispositif destiné aux mesures d'accélération est présenté. Il met en œuvre une lame vibrant en cisaillement d'épaisseur, fixée à sa structure de maintien par l'intermédiaire d'une unique liaison. Ce montage permet d'éliminer les contraintes mécaniques et thermiques qui perturbent habituellement le signal de mesure, et qui sont liées soit au montage des éléments du capteur, soit aux variations rapides de température qui interviennent lors de la mise en fonctionnement du capteur. Le rapport signal/bruit d'un accéléromètre à lame vibrant en cisaillement d'épaisseur s'en trouve amélioré et la sensibilité à l'accélération est multipliée par un facteur 40, comparée à celle d'un capteur qui serait constitué d'une lame vibrant en cisaillement d'épaisseur, fixée par deux liaisons diamétralement opposées.

  4. Campaign 9 of the $K2$ Mission: Observational Parameters, Scientific Drivers, and Community Involvement for a Simultaneous Space- and Ground-based Microlensing Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Henderson, Calen B; Street, Rachel A; Bennett, David P; Hogg, David W; Poleski, R; Barclay, T; Barentsen, G; Howell, S B; Udalski, A; Szymański, M K; Skowron, J; Mróz, P; Kozłowski, S; Wyrzykowski, Ł; Pietrukowicz, P; Soszyński, I; Ulaczyk, K; Pawlak, M; Sumi, T; Abe, F; Asakura, Y; Barry, R K; Bhattacharya, A; Bond, I A; Donachie, M; Freeman, M; Fukui, A; Hirao, Y; Itow, Y; Koshimoto, N; Li, M C A; Ling, C H; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Muraki, Y; Nagakane, M; Ohnishi, K; Oyokawa, H; Rattenbury, N; Saito, To; Sharan, A; Sullivan, D J; Tristram, P J; Yonehara, A; Bachelet, E; Bramich, D A; Cassan, A; Dominik, M; Jaimes, R Figuera; Horne, K; Hundertmark, M; Mao, S; Ranc, C; Schmidt, R; Snodgrass, C; Steele, I A; Tsapras, Y; Wambsganss, J; Akeson, R; Batista, V; Beaulieu, J -P; Beichman, C A; Bozza, V; Bryden, G; Ciardi, D; Cole, A; Coutures, C; Dong, S; Foreman-Mackey, D; Fouqué, P; Gaudi, B S; Kerins, E; Korhonen, H; Jørgensen, U; Lang, D; Lineweaver, C; Marquette, J -B; Mogavero, Federico; Morales, J C; Nataf, D; Pogge, R W; Santerne, A; Shvartzvald, Y; Suzuki, D; Tamura, M; Tisserand, P; Wang, D; Zhu, W

    2016-01-01

    $K2$'s Campaign 9 ($K2$C9) will conduct a $\\sim$3.4 deg$^{2}$ survey toward the Galactic bulge from 7/April through 1/July of 2016 that will leverage the spatial separation between $K2$ and the Earth to facilitate measurement of the microlens parallax $\\pi_{\\rm E}$ for $\\gtrsim$120 microlensing events, including several planetary in nature as well as many short-timescale microlensing events, which are potentially indicative of free-floating planets (FFPs). These satellite parallax measurements will in turn allow for the direct measurement of the masses of and distances to the lensing systems. In this white paper we provide an overview of the $K2$C9 space- and ground-based microlensing survey. Specifically, we detail the demographic questions that can be addressed by this program, including the frequency of FFPs and the Galactic distribution of exoplanets, the observational parameters of $K2$C9, and the array of ground-based resources dedicated to concurrent observations. Finally, we outline the avenues throug...

  5. Comparaison instrumentale de la mesure des précipitations en climat méditerranéen semi-aride

    OpenAIRE

    Brunel, Jean-Pierre

    1986-01-01

    La pluie est un élément important du cycle de l'eau mesuré à l'aide d'appareils très divers. A partir des données d'une station agrométéorologique du Nord de la Tunisie (zone semi-aride), il est montré dans quelles proportions peuvent varier les précipitations mesurées par différents capteurs. L'influence du vent est mise en évidence dans l'écart observé entre pluie mesurée au sol et pluie mesurée au-dessus du sol. (Résumé d'auteur)

  6. The WAXS/WFXT Mission

    CERN Document Server

    Chincarini, G L

    1999-01-01

    I present the science goals and give a brief summary of the Wide Angle X-ray survey with a Wide Field X-ray Telescope (WAXS/WFXT) mission proposal (Phase A) which will be submitted to the Italian Space Agency (ASI) following the call for proposal under the Small Satellite program. The text points out the uniqueness of the mission for the study of the evolution of clusters of galaxies and of the Large-Scale Structure at large redshifts and for the study of the Milky Way. I present, furthermore, the successful result of the metrology of the first wide field X-ray optics ever made.

  7. The CHEOPS Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broeg, Christopher; benz, willy; fortier, andrea; Ehrenreich, David; beck, Thomas; cessa, Virginie; Alibert, Yann; Heng, Kevin

    2015-12-01

    The CHaracterising ExOPlanet Satellite (CHEOPS) is a joint ESA-Switzerland space mission dedicated to search for exoplanet transits by means of ultra-high precision photometry. It is expected to be launch-ready at the end of 2017.CHEOPS will be the first space observatory dedicated to search for transits on bright stars already known to host planets. It will have access to more than 70% of the sky. This will provide the unique capability of determining accurate radii for planets for which the mass has already been estimated from ground-based radial velocity surveys and for new planets discovered by the next generation ground-based transits surveys (Neptune-size and smaller). The measurement of the radius of a planet from its transit combined with the determination of its mass through radial velocity techniques gives the bulk density of the planet, which provides direct insights into the structure and/or composition of the body. In order to meet the scientific objectives, a number of requirements have been derived that drive the design of CHEOPS. For the detection of Earth and super-Earth planets orbiting G5 dwarf stars with V-band magnitudes in the range 6 ≤ V ≤ 9 mag, a photometric precision of 20 ppm in 6 hours of integration time must be reached. This time corresponds to the transit duration of a planet with a revolution period of 50 days. In the case of Neptune-size planets orbiting K-type dwarf with magnitudes as faint as V=12 mag, a photometric precision of 85 ppm in 3 hours of integration time must be reached. To achieve this performance, the CHEOPS mission payload consists of only one instrument, a space telescope of 30 cm clear aperture, which has a single CCD focal plane detector. CHEOPS will be inserted in a low Earth orbit and the total duration of the CHEOPS mission is 3.5 years (goal: 5 years).The presentation will describe the current payload and mission design of CHEOPS, give the development status, and show the expected performances.

  8. Climate Benchmark Missions: CLARREO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wielicki, Bruce A.; Young, David F.

    2010-01-01

    CLARREO (Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory) is one of the four Tier 1 missions recommended by the recent NRC decadal survey report on Earth Science and Applications from Space (NRC, 2007). The CLARREO mission addresses the need to rigorously observe climate change on decade time scales and to use decadal change observations as the most critical method to determine the accuracy of climate change projections such as those used in the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC AR4). A rigorously known accuracy of both decadal change observations as well as climate projections is critical in order to enable sound policy decisions. The CLARREO mission accomplishes this critical objective through highly accurate and SI traceable decadal change observations sensitive to many of the key uncertainties in climate radiative forcings, responses, and feedbacks that in turn drive uncertainty in current climate model projections. The same uncertainties also lead to uncertainty in attribution of climate change to anthropogenic forcing. The CLARREO breakthrough in decadal climate change observations is to achieve the required levels of accuracy and traceability to SI standards for a set of observations sensitive to a wide range of key decadal change variables. These accuracy levels are determined both by the projected decadal changes as well as by the background natural variability that such signals must be detected against. The accuracy for decadal change traceability to SI standards includes uncertainties of calibration, sampling, and analysis methods. Unlike most other missions, all of the CLARREO requirements are judged not by instantaneous accuracy, but instead by accuracy in large time/space scale average decadal changes. Given the focus on decadal climate change, the NRC Decadal Survey concluded that the single most critical issue for decadal change observations was their lack of accuracy and low confidence in

  9. Mission analysis of photovoltaic solar energy conversion. Volume II. Survey of near-term (1976--1985) civilian applications in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rattin, E. J.

    1977-03-01

    The purpose of this market study was to identify and evaluate potential terrestrial civilian photovoltaic applications in the U.S. which were most likely to contribute significantly to the growth of near-term (to 1985) markets. A survey was conducted which led to the identification of many potential applications for photovoltaic power. These applications were subjected to a screening process which selected about 50 application groupings with considerable promise as near-term markets for photovoltaic arrays. For 21 of these 50 promising application groups, it was possible to make quantitative market estimates that totaled 13 MW/sub pk/ in projected annual array sales in 1985. The markets associated with the remaining 29 groups could not be quantitatively evaluated because of lack of an adequate existing data base and because the primary research required in order to provide such a data base was not feasible within the resources available in the study. If the average size of the markets associated with the unquantified groups, however, is comparable to the average for the quantified cases, then the total non-military U.S. market for arrays may well exceed 25 MW/sub pk//year in 1985. Foreign and U.S. military markets should add significantly to this total. In fact, the consensus of the photovoltaic industry representatives who were contacted is that the total foreign market over the near term may be several times as large as the domestic one.

  10. Les fondements de la mesure du temps comment les fréquences atomiques règlent le monde

    CERN Document Server

    Audoin, Claude

    1998-01-01

    La mesure du temps fondée sur des propriétés atomiques est née en 1955, avec le premier étalon de fréquence à jet de césium. Depuis, les horloges atomiques ne cessent de progresser et sont au coeur de nombreuses activités, telles que les comparaisons de temps, l'unification mondiale de l'heure ou la recherche en astronomie, géodésie, géophysique, télécommunications, etc. Cet ouvrage fournira des réponses détaillées au lecteur intéressé par la mesure du temps appliquée aux divers domaines cités.

  11. Mission Statements--Rhetoric, Reality, or Road Map to Success?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeling, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Mission statements are expected elements of business plans and corporate communications. Yet, practice in creating them and monitoring their impact varies and skeptics wonder about their usefulness. A survey of business literature provides a context for school library mission statements. Mission statements define the nature, purpose, and role of…

  12. Absolute measurement of {beta} emitters with a 4 {pi} counter; Mesure absolue des emetteurs {beta} au compteur 4 {pi}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Gallic, Y. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1959-06-15

    The object of this work is to investigate the conditions under which the activity of {beta}-emitting radionuclides may be measured with a maximum of precision, and as a result to study the relevant corrections. The various problems relating to activity measurements with a 4 {pi} counter have been examined successively: - comparison of 4 {pi}, GM and proportional counters; - study of the preparation of sources; - corrections on the counting of sources; - self-absorption; - correction for absorption. The precision obtained on these measurements varies from 1.2 to 3 per cent, with the result that the 4 {pi} counter can be considered a very satisfactory calibration instrument. (author) [French] Le but de ce travail est de rechercher les conditions permettant d'obtenir avec le maximum de precision, la mesure de l'activite des radionuclides se desintegrant par emission et par consequent d'etudier les corrections qui s'y rapportent. Nous avons examine successivement les differents problemes se rapportant aux mesures d'activite au compteur 4 {pi}: - Comparaison des compteurs 4 {pi}, GM et proportionnel; - etude de la preparation des sources; - corrections sur la numeration des sources; - auto-absorption; - correction d'absorption. La precision obtenue dans ces mesures, variant de 1,2 a 3 pour cent, on peut donc considerer le compteur 4 {pi} comme un instrument d'etalonnage tres satisfaisant. (auteur)

  13. Missions and Moral Judgement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushnell, Amy Turner

    2000-01-01

    Addresses the history of Spanish-American missions, discussing the view of missions in church history, their role in the Spanish conquest, and the role and ideas of Herbert E. Bolton. Focuses on differences among Spanish borderlands missions, paying particular attention to the Florida missions. (CMK)

  14. It Takes a Village. Collaborative Outer Planet Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rymer, A. M.; Turtle, E. P.; Hofstadter, M. D.; Simon, A. A.; Hospodarsky, G. B.

    2017-01-01

    A mission to one or both of our local Ice Giants (Uranus and Neptune) emerged as a high priority in the most recent Planetary Science Decadal Survey and was also specifically mentioned supportively in the Heliophysics Decadal Survey. In 2016, NASA convened a science definition team to study ice giant mission concepts in more detail. Uranus and Neptune represent the last remaining planetary type in our Solar System to have a dedicated orbiting mission. The case for a Uranus mission has been made eloquently in the Decadal Surveys. Here we summarize some of the major drivers that lead to enthusiastic support for an Ice Giant mission in general, and use the example of a Uranus Mission concept to illustrate opportunities such a mission might provide for cross-division collaboration and cost-sharing.

  15. The EXIST Mission Concept Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Gerald J.; Grindlay, J.; Hong, J.

    2008-01-01

    EXIST is a mission designed to find and study black holes (BHs) over a wide range of environments and masses, including: 1) BHs accreting from binary companions or dense molecular clouds throughout our Galaxy and the Local Group, 2) supermassive black holes (SMBHs) lying dormant in galaxies that reveal their existence by disrupting passing stars, and 3) SMBHs that are hidden from our view at lower energies due to obscuration by the gas that they accrete. 4) the birth of stellar mass BHs which is accompanied by long cosmic gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) which are seen several times a day and may be associated with the earliest stars to form in the Universe. EXIST will provide an order of magnitude increase in sensitivity and angular resolution as well as greater spectral resolution and bandwidth compared with earlier hard X-ray survey telescopes. With an onboard optical-infra red (IR) telescope, EXIST will measure the spectra and redshifts of GRBs and their utility as cosmological probes of the highest z universe and epoch of reionization. The mission would retain its primary goal of being the Black Hole Finder Probe in the Beyond Einstein Program. However, the new design for EXIST proposed to be studied here represents a significant advance from its previous incarnation as presented to BEPAC. The mission is now less than half the total mass, would be launched on the smallest EELV available (Atlas V-401) for a Medium Class mission, and most importantly includes a two-telescope complement that is ideally suited for the study of both obscured and very distant BHs. EXIST retains its very wide field hard X-ray imaging High Energy Telescope (HET) as the primary instrument, now with improved angular and spectral resolution, and in a more compact payload that allows occasional rapid slews for immediate optical/IR imaging and spectra of GRBs and AGN as well as enhanced hard X-ray spectra and timing with pointed observations. The mission would conduct a 2 year full sky survey in

  16. The Europa Jupiter System Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrix, A. R.; Clark, K.; Erd, C.; Pappalardo, R.; Greeley, R. R.; Blanc, M.; Lebreton, J.; van Houten, T.

    2009-05-01

    Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) will be an international mission that will achieve Decadal Survey and Cosmic Vision goals. NASA and ESA have concluded a joint study of a mission to Europa, Ganymede and the Jupiter system with orbiters developed by NASA and ESA; contributions by JAXA are also possible. The baseline EJSM architecture consists of two primary elements operating in the Jovian system: the NASA-led Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO), and the ESA-led Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO). The JEO mission has been selected by NASA as the next Flagship mission to the out solar system. JEO and JGO would execute an intricately choreographed exploration of the Jupiter System before settling into orbit around Europa and Ganymede, respectively. JEO and JGO would carry eleven and ten complementary instruments, respectively, to monitor dynamic phenomena (such as Io's volcanoes and Jupiter's atmosphere), map the Jovian magnetosphere and its interactions with the Galilean satellites, and characterize water oceans beneath the ice shells of Europa and Ganymede. EJSM will fully addresses high priority science objectives identified by the National Research Council's (NRC's) Decadal Survey and ESA's Cosmic Vision for exploration of the outer solar system. The Decadal Survey recommended a Europa Orbiter as the highest priority outer planet flagship mission and also identified Ganymede as a highly desirable mission target. EJSM would uniquely address several of the central themes of ESA's Cosmic Vision Programme, through its in-depth exploration of the Jupiter system and its evolution from origin to habitability. EJSM will investigate the potential habitability of the active ocean-bearing moons Europa and Ganymede, detailing the geophysical, compositional, geological and external processes that affect these icy worlds. EJSM would also explore Io and Callisto, Jupiter's atmosphere, and the Jovian magnetosphere. By understanding the Jupiter system and unraveling its history, the

  17. Mesure de la concentration absolue de SiO parspectroscopie d'absorption UV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coursimault, F.; Motret, O.; Viladrosa, R.; Pouvesle, J. M.

    2003-06-01

    Le but de cette étude est de développer un diagnostic de mesure de concentration de Si0 adapté à un procédé industriel de dépôt d'oxydes de silicium sur polymères par décharge a barrière diélectrique atmosphérique (DBD). Deux méthodes spectroscopiques basées sur des techniques d'absorption et d'auto-absorption ont été développées. La concentration de Si0 a été estimée par ajustement des spectres synthétiques calculés sur les spectres expérimentaux. Ces deux méthodes permettent de suivre l'évolution temporelle de Si0 durant les phases de décharge et de post-décharge.

  18. Mission design options for human Mars missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooster, Paul D.; Braun, Robert D.; Ahn, Jaemyung; Putnam, Zachary R.

    Trajectory options for conjunction-class human Mars missions are examined, including crewed Earth-Mars trajectories with the option for abort to Earth, with the intent of serving as a resource for mission designers. An analysis of the impact of Earth and Mars entry velocities on aeroassist systems is included, and constraints are suggested for interplanetary trajectories based upon aeroassist system capabilities.

  19. Detection of Porous and Permeable Formations: From Laboratory Measurements to Seismic Measurements Détection des formations poreuses et perméables : des mesures de laboratoire aux mesures sismiques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari J.L.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a seismic processing method which shows that it is possible to extract new attributes from seismic sections, leading to a better understanding of the distribution of the porous and permeable bodies. The attributes are also used to detect the impermeable layers. The methodology is based on laboratory experiments which have shown that a formation permeability indicator can be obtained via the computation of 4 input data: P-wave frequency and attenuation, porosity and specific surface. The procedure has been firstly conducted in acoustic logging to estimate permeability of porous layers and to detect water inflows [Mari et al. (2011 Phys. Chem. Earth 36, 17, 1438-1449]. In seismic, the processing is performed in order to measure these parameters. The analytic signal is used to compute the instantaneous frequency and attenuation (Q factor. The porosity and specific surface are computed from seismic impedances obtained by acoustic inversion of the migrated seismic sections. The input parameters are used to compute a new index named Ik-Seis factor (Indicator (I of permeability (k from acoustic or seismic (Seis data. The potential of the proposed procedure is demonstrated via a field case, both in full waveform acoustic logging and in seismic surveying. The example shows that the Ik-Seis factor can be used to map both the distribution of the permeable bodies in the carbonate formations and the non permeable shaly layers associated with the Callovo-Oxfordian claystone. Dans le but d’avoir une meilleure comprehension de la distribution des corps poreux et permeables d’une formation geologique, nous montrons que de nouveaux attributs peuvent etre extraits des donnees sismiques. Les attributs peuvent etre egalement utilises pour detecter les niveaux impermeables. La methodologie est basee sur des mesures experimentales effectuees en laboratoire, qui ont montre qu’un indicateur de permeabilite peut etre obtenu a partir de quatre grandeurs

  20. Aimant PS: controle de l'etat des sertissages internes des PFW mesures effectues surl'ensemble des aimants du PS pendant le grand arret 2004/2006

    CERN Document Server

    Ottaviani, J

    2005-01-01

    Les sertissages (douilles), utilisés pour raccorder les méplats du circuit principal des PFW à leurs câbles d’alimentation, présentent parfois des défauts de réalisation qui entraînent une résistance électrique anormale. Pour mettre en évidence ces défauts, la résistance des 4 sertissages des nappes polaires est mesurée. Les nappes sont alimentées avec un courant efficace nominal de 80A.Les mesures sont effectuées entre le bornier de connexions des 4 câbles d’alimentation des PFW et les circuits auxiliaires correspondants (Pick-ups brasés sur les enroulements). De ces mesures (câble d’alimentation et une courte partie du circuit principal) est déduite la valeur de la résistance du sertissage qui en assure la liaison. A la mesure des résistances des sertissages des nappes polaires supérieures s’ajoute la résistance des câbles qui assurent la liaison entre borniers. Dans le cadre de la rénovation des aimants du PS, les 100 unités on été mesurées.

  1. Cubesat Gravity Field Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burla, Santoshkumar; Mueller, Vitali; Flury, Jakob; Jovanovic, Nemanja

    2016-04-01

    CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE missions have been successful in the field of satellite geodesy (especially to improve Earth's gravity field models) and have established the necessity towards the next generation gravity field missions. Especially, GRACE has shown its capabilities beyond any other gravity field missions. GRACE Follow-On mission is going to continue GRACE's legacy which is almost identical to GRACE mission with addition of laser interferometry. But these missions are not only quite expensive but also takes quite an effort to plan and to execute. Still there are few drawbacks such as under-sampling and incapability of exploring new ideas within a single mission (ex: to perform different orbit configurations with multi satellite mission(s) at different altitudes). The budget is the major limiting factor to build multi satellite mission(s). Here, we offer a solution to overcome these drawbacks using cubesat/ nanosatellite mission. Cubesats are widely used in research because they are cheaper, smaller in size and building them is easy and faster than bigger satellites. Here, we design a 3D model of GRACE like mission with available sensors and explain how the Attitude and Orbit Control System (AOCS) works. The expected accuracies on final results of gravity field are also explained here.

  2. The third mission

    OpenAIRE

    Francisco José GARCÍA-PEÑALVO

    2016-01-01

    The editorial of this first issue of volume 17, corresponding to 2016, is devoted to the university-business-society relationships that is usually known as Third Mission of the University or the knowledge transfer mission.

  3. Dangerosité, longues peines de prison et mesures préventives en Allemagne

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axel Dessecker

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available S’appuyant sur les statistiques des condamnations officielles en Allemagne, notre article entend donner un aperçu de l’évolution historique de la peine d’emprisonnement à perpétuité, de la détention préventive ainsi que des ordonnances de détention en milieu hospitalier pour personnes souffrant de troubles mentaux. En Allemagne, la peine d’emprisonnement à perpétuité est actuellement la punition la plus sévère, mais son rôle était moins important du temps de la peine capitale. La détention préventive et les ordonnances de détention en milieu hospitalier sont, elles, toutes deux perçues comme des mesures préventives dont la durée d’exécution apparaît d’emblée indéterminée. Alors que la question des détentions préventives est largement débattue aujourd’hui, les condamnations prononcées par les cours ont légèrement augmenté. Quant aux ordonnances, elles semblent toujours plus nombreuses.The article gives an overview on the historical development of life sentences, preventive detention, and hospital orders for mentally disordered offenders in Germany on the basis of official conviction statistics. The life sentence is the most severe punishment today, while its role was less important as long as capital punishment existed. Preventive detention and hospital orders both are viewed as preventive measures, and they are indefinite from the beginning. While preventive detention is widely discussed today, convictions by the courts have been increasing from a low level. The level of hospital orders is much higher today. Full Text

  4. Dangerosité, longues peines de prison et mesures préventives en Allemagne

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axel Dessecker

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available S’appuyant sur les statistiques des condamnations officielles en Allemagne, notre article entend donner un aperçu de l’évolution historique de la peine d’emprisonnement à perpétuité, de la détention préventive ainsi que des ordonnances de détention en milieu hospitalier pour personnes souffrant de troubles mentaux. En Allemagne, la peine d’emprisonnement à perpétuité est actuellement la punition la plus sévère, mais son rôle était moins important du temps de la peine capitale. La détention préventive et les ordonnances de détention en milieu hospitalier sont, elles, toutes deux perçues comme des mesures préventives dont la durée d’exécution apparaît d’emblée indéterminée. Alors que la question des détentions préventives est largement débattue aujourd’hui, les condamnations prononcées par les cours ont légèrement augmenté. Quant aux ordonnances, elles semblent toujours plus nombreuses.The article gives an overview on the historical development of life sentences, preventive detention, and hospital orders for mentally disordered offenders in Germany on the basis of official conviction statistics. The life sentence is the most severe punishment today, while its role was less important as long as capital punishment existed. Preventive detention and hospital orders both are viewed as preventive measures, and they are indefinite from the beginning. While preventive detention is widely discussed today, convictions by the courts have been increasing from a low level. The level of hospital orders is much higher today. Full Text

  5. 2016 Science Mission Directorate Technology Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seablom, Michael S.

    2017-01-01

    The role of the Science Mission Directorate (SMD) is to enable NASA to achieve its science goals in the context of the nation's science agenda. SMD's strategic decisions regarding future missions and scientific pursuits are guided by agency goals, input from the science community including the recommendations set forth in the National Research Council (NRC) decadal surveys and a commitment to preserve a balanced program across the major science disciplines. Toward this end, each of the four SMD science divisions -- Heliophysics, Earth Science, Planetary Science, and Astrophysics -- develops fundamental science questions upon which to base future research and mission programs.

  6. Mission of Librarian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reşit Sarıgül

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This article is a review of the book titled “Mission of Librarian” authored by Jose Ortega y Gasset and translated into Turkish by M. Turker Acaroğlu. The book, which is published by  İstanbul Branch of Turkish Librarians’ Association, explains mission, professional mission and mission of librarian in the future. The book also includes an interview with M. Turker Acaroğlu.

  7. Threads of Mission Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavin, Thomas R.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the many parts of the JPL mission planning process that the project manager has to work with. Some of them are: NASA & JPL's institutional requirements, the mission systems design requirements, the science interactions, the technical interactions, financial requirements, verification and validation, safety and mission assurance, and independent assessment, review and reporting.

  8. Mission operations management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocco, David A.

    1994-01-01

    Redefining the approach and philosophy that operations management uses to define, develop, and implement space missions will be a central element in achieving high efficiency mission operations for the future. The goal of a cost effective space operations program cannot be realized if the attitudes and methodologies we currently employ to plan, develop, and manage space missions do not change. A management philosophy that is in synch with the environment in terms of budget, technology, and science objectives must be developed. Changing our basic perception of mission operations will require a shift in the way we view the mission. This requires a transition from current practices of viewing the mission as a unique end product, to a 'mission development concept' built on the visualization of the end-to-end mission. To achieve this change we must define realistic mission success criteria and develop pragmatic approaches to achieve our goals. Custom mission development for all but the largest and most unique programs is not practical in the current budget environment, and we simply do not have the resources to implement all of our planned science programs. We need to shift our management focus to allow us the opportunity make use of methodologies and approaches which are based on common building blocks that can be utilized in the space, ground, and mission unique segments of all missions.

  9. Mesure par conductimetrie de la receptivite aux maladies fongiques et du niveau de resistance induite par elicitation. Etude sur 3 modeles experimentaux

    OpenAIRE

    Molot, P.M.; Mas, P.; Pivot, V; Bruneteau, M; Staron, T; Ferriere, H.; Lemaire, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    L’appréciation des dégâts parasitaires, souvent difficile à évaluer, peut être effectuée par des mesures conductimétriques; en effet, les cellules altérées libèrent davantage d’électrolytes que les cellules saines dans le milieu extérieur, dont on mesure la conductance. Cette méthode peut être utilisée dans différents cas, notamment lorsqu’il y a attaque au niveau racinaire. On mesure alors la conductance de l’eau dans laquelle baignent des racines contaminées (piment - Phytophthora capsici, ...

  10. Translation balance for measuring magnetic susceptibilities at high or low temperatures (1962); Balance de translation pour la mesure des susceptibilites magnetiques a haute ou basse temperature (1962)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaise, A.; Peuch, M.A. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1962-07-01

    A translation balance is described for the measurement of the magnetic susceptibilities of liquids or solids in the temperature range from 1.7 to 1400 deg. K. Measurements are made within a magnetic field adjustable from 3400 to 16000 oersteds, in any desired atmosphere. Susceptibilities between 10{sup -8} and 10{sup -4} u.e.m. C.G.S., can be measured. (authors) [French] La balance de translation decrite ici permet la mesure des susceptibilites magnetiques des liquides ou des solides dans la gamme de temperature allant de 1,7 a 1400 deg. K. Les mesures sont effectuees dans un champ magnetique ajustable de 3400 a 16000 oersteds, sous atmosphere controlee. La gamme des mesures de susceptibilite s'etend de 10{sup -8} a 10{sup -4} u.e.m. C.G.S. (auteurs)

  11. Conception et mesures du capital-marque des marques de distributeurs : une application au secteur de la grande distribution

    OpenAIRE

    Jara, Magali

    2008-01-01

    Ce papier tente de définir et de mesurer une première partie du cadre conceptuel du capital-marque des MDD (marques de distributeurs). Pour ce faire, les travaux de Keller (1993) ainsi que les apports théoriques des recherches sur les services dans le secteur de la distribution sont mobilisés. Puis, le modèle conceptuel est précisé par des entretiens individuels de consommateurs. Après une analyse de contenu, un modèle principal du capital-marque des MDD est proposé ajoutant les dimensions d'...

  12. The Lunar Occultation Observer (LOCO) mission concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Richard S.

    2007-09-01

    The hard X-ray sky has tremendous potential for future discoveries and is one of the last electromagnetic regimes without a sensitive all-sky survey. A new approach to such a survey is to utilize the Moon as an occulting disk. The Lunar Occultation Observer (LOCO) mission concept, based on this Lunar Occultation Technique (LOT) and incorporating advanced inorganic scintillators as a detection medium, represents a sensitive and cost effective option for NASA's Beyond Einstein Black Hole Finder Probe or a future Explorer-class mission. We present the motivating factors for the LOT, outline developmental details and simulation results, as well as give preliminary estimates for source detection sensitivity.

  13. NMFS Reef Survey Forms

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Reef Environmental Survey Project (REEF) mission to educate and enlist divers in the conservation of marine habitats is accomplished primarily through its Fish...

  14. Contrôlabilité : Suivi des mesures de CFL réalisées avec des pneumatiques AIPCR 07 et ASTM 07

    OpenAIRE

    Cerezo, Véronique; CENTRE D'ETUDES TECHNIQUES DE L'EQUIPEMENT DE LYON - CETE LYON; LABORATOIRE REGIONAL DES PONTS ET CHAUSSEES DE LYON - CETE DE LYON - LRPC LYON

    2010-01-01

    L'étude a pour objet l'étude du comportement des pneumatiques ASTM 07 et AIPCR 07 par rapport à celui des pneus standards d'essais AIPCR 98 utilisés pour les mesures de coefficient de frottement longitudinal. Tout d'abord, les pneumatiques ASTM 07 et AIPCR 07 semblent plus tendres que les pneus AIPCR 98. Il est nécessaire de les laisser vieillir quelques temps afin de revenir à des niveaux équivalents à ceux des pneus AIPCR 98 utilisés depuis une dizaine d'années en France pour les mesures de...

  15. Mesure de la fraction d'evenements a quatre quarks dans les desintegrations multihadroniques du boson Z au LEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Eric

    Cette thèse propose de tester la Chromodynamique Quantique (QCD) en effectuant une mesure précise d'une des trois constantes fondamentales du groupe de symétrie SU(3) utilisé pour décrire la physique des interactions fortes. Cette constante fondamentale, appelée TF, est reliée à certains états finaux spécifiques des désintégrations du Z0. Ces états apparaissent sous forme de perturbations du deuxième ordre en as et sont illustrés par des diagrammes de Feynman. À cet ordre, la chromodynamique prévoit deux types de diagrammes de Feynman distincts; le premier contient, un quark, un antiquark et deux gluons, et le second, deux quarks et deux antiquarks. La constante TF est directement proportionnelle à la fraction d'événements à deux quarks et deux antiquarks qui est l'objet de notre mesure. Notre mesure est fondée sur l'étude des événements à quatre partons dans l'état final. Ces quatre partons, en s'hadronisant, produisent quatre jets de particules qui peuvent être détectés expérimentalement et identifiés à l'aide d'algorithmes de reconstruction des jets. Des observables angulaires nous permettent de faire une discrimination parmi les états finaux de la désintégration du Z0, et ainsi déterminer la valeur de la fraction d'événements à deux quarks et deux antiquarks fq. Cette fraction peut s'exprimer par le rapport de la fraction observée expérimentalement fexq sur la fraction théorique fthq , R4q=fex qfthq. Afin d'améliorer la mesure de cette fraction et de diminuer le bruit causé par une contamination des événements d'ordres supérieurs, nous avons développe une méthode d'extrapolation. Cette méthode s'appuie sur la caractérisation de l'espace de phase des événements, exprimée par les paramètres yij. Les mesures de R4q que nous obtenons sont: R4q=2,27+0,29 -0,56 à l'aide d'une méthode conventionnelle avec la condition de sélection y34 > 0,020 > y45, et R4q=1,22+0,56 -0,71 à l'aide de notre méthode d

  16. Ongoing Mars Missions: Extended Mission Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurek, Richard; Diniega, Serina; Crisp, Joy; Fraeman, Abigail; Golombek, Matt; Jakosky, Bruce; Plaut, Jeff; Senske, David A.; Tamppari, Leslie; Thompson, Thomas W.; Vasavada, Ashwin R.

    2016-10-01

    Many key scientific discoveries in planetary science have been made during extended missions. This is certainly true for the Mars missions both in orbit and on the planet's surface. Every two years, ongoing NASA planetary missions propose investigations for the next two years. This year, as part of the 2016 Planetary Sciences Division (PSD) Mission Senior Review, the Mars Odyssey (ODY) orbiter project submitted a proposal for its 7th extended mission, the Mars Exploration Rover (MER-B) Opportunity submitted for its 10th, the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) for its 4th, and the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity rover and the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MVN) orbiter for their 2nd extended missions, respectively. Continued US participation in the ongoing Mars Express Mission (MEX) was also proposed. These missions arrived at Mars in 2001, 2004, 2006, 2012, 2014, and 2003, respectively. Highlights of proposed activities include systematic observations of the surface and atmosphere in twilight (early morning and late evening), building on a 13-year record of global mapping (ODY); exploration of a crater rim gully and interior of Endeavour Crater, while continuing to test what can and cannot be seen from orbit (MER-B); refocused observations of ancient aqueous deposits and polar cap interiors, while adding a 6th Mars year of change detection in the atmosphere and the surface (MRO); exploration and sampling by a rover of mineralogically diverse strata of Mt. Sharp and of atmospheric methane in Gale Crater (MSL); and further characterization of atmospheric escape under different solar conditions (MVN). As proposed, these activities follow up on previous discoveries (e.g., recurring slope lineae, habitable environments), while expanding spatial and temporal coverage to guide new detailed observations. An independent review panel evaluated these proposals, met with project representatives in May, and made recommendations to NASA in June 2016. In this

  17. JPL Mission Bibliometrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppin, Ann

    2013-01-01

    For a number of years ongoing bibliographies of various JPL missions (AIRS, ASTER, Cassini, GRACE, Earth Science, Mars Exploration Rovers (Spirit & Opportunity)) have been compiled by the JPL Library. Mission specific bibliographies are compiled by the Library and sent to mission scientists and managers in the form of regular (usually quarterly) updates. Charts showing publications by years are periodically provided to the ASTER, Cassini, and GRACE missions for supporting Senior Review/ongoing funding requests, and upon other occasions as a measure of the impact of the missions. Basically the Web of Science, Compendex, sometimes Inspec, GeoRef and Aerospace databases are searched for the mission name in the title, abstract, and assigned keywords. All get coded for journal publications that are refereed publications.

  18. The STEREO Mission

    CERN Document Server

    2008-01-01

    The STEREO mission uses twin heliospheric orbiters to track solar disturbances from their initiation to 1 AU. This book documents the mission, its objectives, the spacecraft that execute it and the instruments that provide the measurements, both remote sensing and in situ. This mission promises to unlock many of the mysteries of how the Sun produces what has become to be known as space weather.

  19. The Rosetta mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Matt; Altobelli, Nicolas; Martin, Patrick; Buratti, Bonnie J.; Choukroun, Mathieu

    2016-10-01

    The Rosetta Mission is the third cornerstone mission the ESA programme Horizon 2000. The aim of the mission is to map the comet 67-P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko by remote sensing, to examine its environment insitu and its evolution in the inner solar system. The lander Philae is the first device to land on a comet and perform in-situ science on the surface. Following its launch in March 2004, Rosetta underwent 3 Earth and 1 Mars flybys to achieve the correct trajectory to capture the comet, including flybys of asteroid on 2867 Steins and 21 Lutetia. For June 2011- January 2014 the spacecraft passed through a period of hibernation, due to lack of available power for full payload operation and following successful instrument commissioning, successfully rendezvoused with the comet in August 2014. Following an intense period of mapping and characterisation, a landing site for Philae was selected and on 12 November 2014, Philae was successfully deployed. Rosetta then embarked on the main phase of the mission, observing the comet on its way into and away from perihelion in August 2015. At the time of writing the mission is planned to terminate with the Rosetta orbiter impacting the comet surface on 30 September 2016. This presentation will provide a brief overview of the mission and its science. The first author is honoured to give this talk on behalf of all Rosetta mission science, instrument and operations teams, for it is they who have worked tirelessly to make this mission the success it is.

  20. Mission Medical Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson-Throop, Kathy A.; Joe, John C.; Follansbee, Nicole M.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of the Mission Medical Information System (MMIS). The topics include: 1) What is MMIS?; 2) MMIS Goals; 3) Terrestrial Health Information Technology Vision; 4) NASA Health Information Technology Needs; 5) Mission Medical Information System Components; 6) Electronic Medical Record; 7) Longitudinal Study of Astronaut Health (LSAH); 8) Methods; and 9) Data Submission Agreement (example).

  1. The SPICA mission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sibthorpe, B.; Helmich, F.; Roelfsema, P.; Kaneda, H.; Shibai, H.; Simon, R.; Schaaf, R.; Stutzki, J,

    2016-01-01

    SPICA is a mid and far-infrared space mission to be submitted as a candidate to ESA's fifth medium class mission call, due in early 2016. This will be a joint project between ESA and JAXA, with ESA taking the lead role. If selected, SPICA will launch in ˜2029 and operate for a goal lifetime of 5 yea

  2. KEEL for Mission Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-06

    cognitive technology for application in automotive , industrial automation, medical, military, governmental, enterprise software and electronic gaming...evaluate risks or develop and test new tactics and strategies. This paper separates Mission Planning Software into two domains: 1. Rendering of the...simplest form, Mission Planning is the process of evaluating information in the form of risks (threats) and rewards (opportunities) to most appropriately

  3. Bering Mission Navigation Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Betto, Maurizio; Jørgensen, John Leif; Jørgensen, Peter Siegbjørn

    2003-01-01

    "Bering", after the name of the famous Danish explorer, is a near Earth object (NEO) and main belt asteroids mapping mission envisaged by a consortium of Danish universities and research institutes. To achieve the ambitious goals set forth by this mission, while containing the costs and risks...

  4. The Pioneer Venus Missions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Mountain View, CA. Ames Research Center.

    This document provides detailed information on the atmosphere and weather of Venus. This pamphlet describes the technological hardware including the probes that enter the Venusian atmosphere, the orbiter and the launch vehicle. Information is provided in lay terms on the mission profile, including details of events from launch to mission end. The…

  5. Heat Capacity Mapping Mission Digital Source: 1978-1980

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — NASA's Heat Capacity Mapping Mission (HCMM) project collected Earth data in the visible and thermal bands between April 1978 and September 1980. This was an...

  6. Heat Capacity Mapping Mission Digital Source: 1978-1980

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — NASA's Heat Capacity Mapping Mission (HCMM) project collected Earth data in the visible and thermal bands between April 1978 and September 1980. This was an...

  7. La mesure des performances corporelles extraordinaires dans les métiers du sport, du luxe et de l’art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Héas

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available La mesure des performances est aujourd’hui omniprésente dans les sports. Cette quantification corporelle n’étonne plus outre mesure. Elle est devenue sociologique. Les affaires de dopage ne fragilisent pas cette tendance. Les performances sportives de l’élite mondiale sont devenues très éloignées de ce que le commun des mortels peut envisager. Elles sont incroyables et pourtant réelles. Parfois, une fraction de seconde seulement sépare le bonheur de la victoire de la désillusion d’une défaite. En dehors des arènes sportives, d’autres performances sont réalisées. C’est le cas par exemple des équilibristes, des «nez» dans de nombreux secteurs (viniculture, cosmétique, etc., des contorsionnistes, des imitateurs, etc. A travers 21 entretiens, nous esquissons l’étendue des performances réalisées, donc leurs mesures multiples. Comment ces performances, le plus souvent chiffrées (en nombre de fragrances testées par jour, en minutes d’équilibre maintenu sur un rouleau, etc., sont-elles vécues? Les exercices et les excès corporels sont devenus leur quotidien, la mesure, leur étalon… qu’ils tentent de maintenir ou de varier avec l’âge, à mesure que leurs capacités déclinent.

  8. Techniques for the measurement of the contamination of air; Technique de mesure de la contamination de l'air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labeyrie, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1960-07-01

    This lecture has been given at the International Symposium of Riso 1959. Methods for measuring radioactive content of the atmosphere are described, and main results found at Saclay are given, for the following contaminants: Rn, Tn and their daughter, H-3, C-14, A-41, Kr-85, I-131, and fission products as a whole. (author) [French] Ce texte est celui d'une conference-rapport prononcee au Colloque International de Riso en 1959. On indique les techniques de mesures de la contamination radioactive de l'atmosphere et les principaux resultats obtenus jusqu'ici au CEA pour: Rn et Tn et leurs derives, H-3, C-14, A-41, Kr-85, I-131, et l'ensemble des produits de fission. (auteur)

  9. Radiation measurements in the reactors G 2 and G 3; Mesures de rayonnement aupres des piles G 2 - G 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chassany, J.Ph.; Estournel, R. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Centre de Production de Plutonium, Marcoule (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    The results are given of numerous radiation measurements: - for the various working sites - for the various zones (circuit room,etc) - during the discharging operations - far various active materials (CO{sub 2}, plugs etc). They show that in general the protection has been suitably designed and that the majority of radio-protection problems are due to the elements activated in the pile and transported outside the vessel. (authors) [French] Les resultats de nombreuses mesures d'irradiation sont donnes - pour les differents lieux de travail - pour diverses zones (salle de tuyauteries, etc.) - pendant les operations de dechargement - pour differents materiaux actives (CO{sub 2}, bouchons, etc.) Ils montrent que les protections ont ete en general correctement dimensionnees et que la majorite des problemes de radioprotection est constituee par les elements actives dans la pile, transportes a l'exterieur du caisson. (auteurs)

  10. Mesure de la qualité des services d’enseignement et restructuration des secteurs éducatifs

    OpenAIRE

    Vinokur, Annie

    2012-01-01

    L’article de Romuald Normand a décrit la genèse, aux États-Unis, du mouvement de mobilisation des technologies de mesure de la qualité pour rationaliser la pédagogie scolaire sur le modèle industriel. Ce modèle tend maintenant à s’étendre à l’évaluation de la qualité des producteurs de services d’enseignement et à se déployer à l’échelle mondiale dans le but d’accroître l’efficacité des secteurs éducatifs et de réguler leur transnationalisation. On tente ici d’en montrer la fonctionnalité – m...

  11. Evaluation mécanique d'une dalle précontrainte par mesure de la courbure

    OpenAIRE

    COLLIN, B; TONNOIR, B

    2001-01-01

    L'évaluation mécanique d'un ouvrage d'art a été réalisée en utilisant conjointement, et pour la première fois sur une dalle isostatique en béton précontraint, deux prototypes de courburemètre du réseau des LPC. Cette évaluation s'est appuyée sur des mesures, faites en plusieurs sections, des variations de courbure causées par la circulation sur l'ouvrage d'un convoi de caractéristiques connues. D'un point de vue pratique, la facilité d'utilisation des courburemètres, simplement posés sur la c...

  12. Initial performance of the NEOWISE reactivation mission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mainzer, A.; Bauer, J.; Masiero, J.; Eisenhardt, P.; Fabinsky, B.; Heinrichsen, I.; Liu, F. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Cutri, R. M.; Beck, R.; Conrow, T.; Dailey, J.; Fajardo-Acosta, S.; Fowler, J.; Gelino, C.; Grillmair, C.; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Masci, F. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Grav, T. [Planetary Science Institute, Tucson, AZ (United States); Clarkson, P.; Kendall, M., E-mail: amainzer@jpl.nasa.gov [Ball Aerospace and Technology Center, Boulder, CO (United States); and others

    2014-09-01

    NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) spacecraft has been brought out of hibernation and has resumed surveying the sky at 3.4 and 4.6 μm. The scientific objectives of the NEOWISE reactivation mission are to detect, track, and characterize near-Earth asteroids and comets. The search for minor planets resumed on 2013 December 23, and the first new near-Earth object (NEO) was discovered 6 days later. As an infrared survey, NEOWISE detects asteroids based on their thermal emission and is equally sensitive to high and low albedo objects; consequently, NEOWISE-discovered NEOs tend to be large and dark. Over the course of its three-year mission, NEOWISE will determine radiometrically derived diameters and albedos for ∼2000 NEOs and tens of thousands of Main Belt asteroids. The 32 months of hibernation have had no significant effect on the mission's performance. Image quality, sensitivity, photometric and astrometric accuracy, completeness, and the rate of minor planet detections are all essentially unchanged from the prime mission's post-cryogenic phase.

  13. Recce mission planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, Andrew M.

    2000-11-01

    The ever increasing sophistication of reconnaissance sensors reinforces the importance of timely, accurate, and equally sophisticated mission planning capabilities. Precision targeting and zero-tolerance for collateral damage and civilian casualties, stress the need for accuracy and timeliness. Recent events have highlighted the need for improvement in current planning procedures and systems. Annotating printed maps takes time and does not allow flexibility for rapid changes required in today's conflicts. We must give aircrew the ability to accurately navigate their aircraft to an area of interest, correctly position the sensor to obtain the required sensor coverage, adapt missions as required, and ensure mission success. The growth in automated mission planning system capability and the expansion of those systems to include dedicated and integrated reconnaissance modules, helps to overcome current limitations. Mission planning systems, coupled with extensive integrated visualization capabilities, allow aircrew to not only plan accurately and quickly, but know precisely when they will locate the target and visualize what the sensor will see during its operation. This paper will provide a broad overview of the current capabilities and describe how automated mission planning and visualization systems can improve and enhance the reconnaissance planning process and contribute to mission success. Think about the ultimate objective of the reconnaissance mission as we consider areas that technology can offer improvement. As we briefly review the fundamentals, remember where and how TAC RECCE systems will be used. Try to put yourself in the mindset of those who are on the front lines, working long hours at increasingly demanding tasks, trying to become familiar with new operating areas and equipment, while striving to minimize risk and optimize mission success. Technical advancements that can reduce the TAC RECCE timeline, simplify operations and instill Warfighter

  14. The LISA Pathfinder mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonucci, F.; Armano, M.; Audley, H.; Auger, G.; Benedetti, M.; Binetruy, P.; Bogenstahl, J.; Bortoluzzi, D.; Bosetti, P.; Brandt, N.; Caleno, M.; Cañizares, P.; Cavalleri, A.; Cesa, M.; Chmeissani, M.; Conchillo, A.; Congedo, G.; Cristofolini, I.; Cruise, M.; Danzmann, K.; De Marchi, F.; Diaz-Aguilo, M.; Diepholz, I.; Dixon, G.; Dolesi, R.; Dunbar, N.; Fauste, J.; Ferraioli, L.; Ferrone, V.; Fichter, W.; Fitzsimons, E.; Freschi, M.; García Marin, A.; García Marirrodriga, C.; Gerndt, R.; Gesa, L.; Gilbert, F.; Giardini, D.; Grimani, C.; Grynagier, A.; Guillaume, B.; Guzmán, F.; Harrison, I.; Heinzel, G.; Hernández, V.; Hewitson, M.; Hollington, D.; Hough, J.; Hoyland, D.; Hueller, M.; Huesler, J.; Jennrich, O.; Jetzer, P.; Johlander, B.; Karnesis, N.; Killow, C.; Llamas, X.; Lloro, I.; Lobo, A.; Maarschalkerweerd, R.; Madden, S.; Mance, D.; Mateos, I.; McNamara, P. W.; Mendes, J.; Mitchell, E.; Monsky, A.; Nicolini, D.; Nicolodi, D.; Nofrarias, M.; Pedersen, F.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Plagnol, E.; Prat, P.; Racca, G. D.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Reiche, J.; Romera Perez, J. A.; Robertson, D.; Rozemeijer, H.; Sanjuan, J.; Schleicher, A.; Schulte, M.; Shaul, D.; Stagnaro, L.; Strandmoe, S.; Steier, F.; Sumner, T. J.; Taylor, A.; Texier, D.; Trenkel, C.; Tu, H.-B.; Vitale, S.; Wanner, G.; Ward, H.; Waschke, S.; Wass, P.; Weber, W. J.; Ziegler, T.; Zweifel, P.

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we describe the current status of the LISA Pathfinder mission, a precursor mission aimed at demonstrating key technologies for future space-based gravitational wave detectors, like LISA. Since much of the flight hardware has already been constructed and tested, we will show that performance measurements and analysis of these flight components lead to an expected performance of the LISA Pathfinder which is a significant improvement over the mission requirements, and which actually reaches the LISA requirements over the entire LISA Pathfinder measurement band.

  15. Mesure Objective De L'attenuation et De L'effet D'occlusion Des Protecteurs Auditifs a Partir Des Potentiels Evoques Stationnaires et Multiples =

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentin, Olivier

    Selon l'Organisation mondiale de la sante, le nombre de travailleurs exposes quotidiennement a des niveaux de bruit prejudiciables a leur audition est passe de 120 millions en 1995 a 250 millions en 2004. Meme si la reduction du bruit a la source devrait etre toujours privilegiee, la solution largement utilisee pour lutter contre le bruit au travail reste la protection auditive individuelle. Malheureusement, le port des protecteurs auditifs n'est pas toujours respecte par les travailleurs car il est difficile de fournir un protecteur auditif dont le niveau d'attenuation effective est approprie a l'environnement de travail d'un individu. D'autre part, l'occlusion du canal auditif induit une modification de la perception de la parole, ce qui cree un inconfort incitant les travailleurs a retirer leurs protecteurs. Ces deux problemes existent parce que les methodes actuelles de mesure de l'effet d'occlusion et de l'attenuation sont limitees. Les mesures objectives basees sur des mesures microphoniques intra-auriculaires ne tiennent pas compte de la transmission directe du son a la cochlee par conduction osseuse. Les mesures subjectives au seuil de l'audition sont biaisees a cause de l'effet de masquage aux basses frequences induit par le bruit physiologique. L'objectif principal de ce travail de these de doctorat est d'ameliorer la mesure de l'attenuation et de l'effet d'occlusion des protecteurs auditifs intra-auriculaires. L'approche generale consiste a : (i) verifier s'il est possible de mesurer l'attenuation des protecteurs auditifs grâce au recueil des potentiels evoques stationnaires et multiples (PEASM) avec et sans protecteur auditif (protocole 1), (ii) adapter cette methodologie pour mesurer l'effet d'occlusion induit par le port de protecteur auditifs intra-auriculaires (protocole 2), et (iii) valider chaque protocole par l'intermediaire de mesures realisees sur sujets humains. Les resultats du protocole 1 demontrent que les PEASM peuvent etre utilises pour

  16. Jovian Tour Design for Orbiter and Lander Missions to Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campagnola, Stefano; Buffington, Brent B.; Petropoulos, Anastassios E.

    2013-01-01

    Europa is one of the most interesting targets for solar system exploration, as its ocean of liquid water could harbor life. Following the recommendation of the Planetary Decadal Survey, NASA commissioned a study for a flyby mission, an orbiter mission, and a lander mission. This paper presents the moon tours for the lander and orbiter concepts. The total delta v and radiation dose would be reduced by exploiting multi-body dynamics and avoiding phasing loops in the Ganymede-to- Europa transfer. Tour 11-O3, 12-L1 and 12-L4 are presented in details and their performaces compared to other tours from previous Europa mission studies.

  17. Uganda Mission PRS

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — A web-based performance reporting system that is managed by IBI that interfaces with the Mission's GIS database that supports USAID/Uganda and its implementing...

  18. STS-83 Mission Insignia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The crew patch for NASA's STS-83 mission depicts the Space Shuttle Columbia launching into space for the first Microgravity Sciences Laboratory 1 (MSL-1) mission. MSL-1 investigated materials science, fluid dynamics, biotechnology, and combustion science in the microgravity environment of space, experiments that were conducted in the Spacelab Module in the Space Shuttle Columbia's cargo bay. The center circle symbolizes a free liquid under microgravity conditions representing various fluid and materials science experiments. Symbolic of the combustion experiments is the surrounding starburst of a blue flame burning in space. The 3-lobed shape of the outermost starburst ring traces the dot pattern of a transmission Laue photograph typical of biotechnology experiments. The numerical designation for the mission is shown at bottom center. As a forerunner to missions involving International Space Station (ISS), STS-83 represented the hope that scientific results and knowledge gained during the flight will be applied to solving problems on Earth for the benefit and advancement of humankind.

  19. The Prisma Hyperspectra Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loizzo, R.; Ananasso, C.; Guarini, R.; Lopinto, E.; Candela, L.; Pisani, A. R.

    2016-08-01

    PRISMA (PRecursore IperSpettrale della Missione Applicativa) is an Italian Space Agency (ASI) hyperspectral mission currently scheduled for the lunch in 2018. PRISMA is a single satellite placed on a sun- synchronous Low Earth Orbit (620 km altitude) with an expected operational lifetime of 5 years. The hyperspectral payload consists of a high spectral resolution (VNIR-SWIR) imaging spectrometer, optically integrated with a medium resolution Panchromatic camera. PRISMA will acquire data on areas of 30 km Swath width and with a Ground Sampling Distance (GSD) of 30 m (hyperspectral) and of 5 m Panchromatic (PAN). The PRISMA Ground Segment will be geographically distributed between Fucino station and ASI Matera Space Geodesy Centre and will include the Mission Control Centre, the Satellite Control Centre and the Instrument Data Handling System. The science community supports the overall lifecycle of the mission, being involved in algorithms definition, calibration and validation activities, research and applications development.

  20. Athena Mission Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Herder, Jan-Willem; Piro, Luigi; Rau, Arne

    2015-09-01

    The optimization of the Athena mission, the ESA's large X-ray observatory for 2028, is a key challenge. Critical elements for achieving the scientific performances are obviously the two instruments and the optics. However, additional aspects related to the overall mission performances are crucial as well, including the particle background environment (separate presentation), the calibration, the response time to Target of Opportunity requests, the functionality of the science ground segment, and the available high-quality data analysis tools. In addition, the full performance of the satellite will be modeled by an end-to-end simulator. In this presentation we will give an overview of the various systems and also present the Mock Observing Plan that is used to optimize the mission. The work presented in this contribution is based on a collective effort of the Athena science community and is coordinated by the Athena Mission Performance Working Group.

  1. Doing mission inclusively

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-06-24

    Jun 24, 2016 ... language, rituals, rules, values, and other religious and cultural settings. ... This article posits that Christians, while being in the world, are not of this world. ..... is at the heart of all Christian missions, a core competence of.

  2. Autonomous Mission Operations Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Future human spaceflight missions will occur with crews and spacecraft at large distances, with long communication delays, to the Earth. The one-way light-time delay...

  3. Galileo Mission Science Briefing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-07-01

    The first of two tapes of the Galileo Mission Science press briefing is presented. The panel is moderated by George Diller from the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Public Affairs Office. The participants are John Conway, the director of Payload and operations at Kennedy; Donald E. Williams, Commander of STS-43, the shuttle mission which will launch the Galileo mission; John Casani, the Deputy Assistant Director of Flight Projects at the Jet Propulsion Lab (JPL); Dick Spehalski, Galileo Project Manager at JPL; and Terrence Johnson, Galileo Project Scientist at JPL. The briefing begins with an announcement of the arrival of the Galileo Orbiter at KSC. The required steps prior to the launch are discussed. The mission trajectory and gravity assists from planetary and solar flybys are reviewed. Detailed designs of the orbiter are shown. The distance that Galileo will travel from the sun precludes the use of solar energy for heat. Therefore Radioisotope heater units are used to keep the equipment at operational temperature. A video of the arrival of the spacecraft at KSC and final tests and preparations is shown. Some of the many science goals of the mission are reviewed. Another video showing an overview of the Galileo mission is presented. During the question and answer period, the issue of the use of plutonium on the mission is broached, which engenders a review of the testing methods used to ensure the safety of the capsules containing the hazardous substance. This video has actual shots of the orbiter, as it is undergoing the final preparations and tests for the mission.

  4. NEEMO 7 undersea mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirsk, Robert; Williams, David; Anvari, Mehran

    2007-02-01

    The NEEMO 7 mission was the seventh in a series of NASA-coordinated missions utilizing the Aquarius undersea habitat in Florida as a human space mission analog. The primary research focus of this mission was to evaluate telementoring and telerobotic surgery technologies as potential means to deliver medical care to astronauts during spaceflight. The NEEMO 7 crewmembers received minimal pre-mission training to perform selected medical and surgical procedures. These procedures included: (1) use of a portable ultrasound to locate and measure abdominal organs and structures in a crewmember subject; (2) use of a portable ultrasound to insert a small needle and drain into a fluid-filled cystic cavity in a simulated patient; (3) surgical repair of two arteries in a simulated patient; (4) cystoscopy and use of a ureteral basket to remove a renal stone in a simulated patient; and (5) laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a simulated patient. During the actual mission, the crewmembers performed the procedures without or with telementoring and telerobotic assistance from experts located in Hamilton, Ontario. The results of the NEEMO 7 medical experiments demonstrated that telehealth interventions rely heavily on a robust broadband, high data rate telecommunication link; that certain interventional procedures can be performed adequately by minimally trained individuals with telementoring assistance; and that prior clinical experience does not always correlate with better procedural performance. As space missions become longer in duration and take place further from Earth, enhancement of medical care capability and expertise will be required. The kinds of medical technologies demonstrated during the NEEMO 7 mission may play a significant role in enabling the human exploration of space beyond low earth orbit, particularly to destinations such as the Moon and Mars.

  5. Bering Mission Navigation Method

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    "Bering", after the name of the famous Danish explorer, is a near Earth object (NEO) and main belt asteroids mapping mission envisaged by a consortium of Danish universities and research institutes. To achieve the ambitious goals set forth by this mission, while containing the costs and risks, "Bering" sports several new technological enhancements and advanced instruments under development at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU). The autonomous on-board orbit determination method is part...

  6. The spacelab scientific missions: A comprehensive bibliography of scientific publications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torr, Marsha (Compiler)

    1995-01-01

    November 1993 represented the 10-year anniversary of the flight of Spacelab 1 mission, with the first precursor mission (OSTA-1) being launched 2 years earlier. Since that time, a total of 27 Shuttle missions has been flown, using the Spacelab system as a facility for conducting scientific research in space. The missions flown to date have allowed a total of approximately 500 Principle Investigator class investigations to be conducted in orbit. These investigations have constituted major scientific efforts in astronomy/astrophysics, atmospheric science, Earth observation, life sciences, microgravity science, and space plasma physics. An initial survey of the scientific products gleaned from Spacelab missions already flown was sent to the Principle Investigators. In that survey, information was gathered from the investigators on the scientific highlights of their investigations and statistical measurements of overall success -- such as papers published. This document is a compilation of the papers that have been published to date in referred literature.

  7. The LISA Pathfinder Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Paul

    2013-04-01

    LISA Pathfinder, the second of the European Space Agency's Small Missions for Advanced Research in Technology (SMART), is a dedicated technology validation mission for future interferometric spaceborne gravitational wave observatories, for example the proposed eLISA mission. The technologies required for eLISA are many and extremely challenging. This coupled with the fact that some flight hardware cannot be fully tested on ground due to Earth-induced noise, led to the implementation of the LISA Pathfinder mission to test the critical eLISA technologies in a flight environment. LISA Pathfinder essentially mimics one arm of the eLISA constellation by shrinking the 1 million kilometre armlength down to a few tens of centimetres, giving up the sensitivity to gravitational waves, but keeping the measurement technology: the distance between the two test masses is measured using a laser interferometric technique similar to one aspect of the eLISA interferometry system. The scientific objective of the LISA Pathfinder mission consists then of the first in-flight test of low frequency gravitational wave detection metrology. Here I will present an overview of the mission, focusing on scientific and technical goals, followed by the current status of the project.

  8. The Joint Dark Energy Mission (JDEM) Omega

    CERN Document Server

    Gehrels, Neil

    2010-01-01

    [JDEM-Omega is one of the three concepts that contributed to the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) mission advocated by the Astro2010 Decadal Survey. It is the concept on which the recommended observatory configuration is based.] The Joint Dark Energy Mission (JDEM) is a space-based observatory designed to perform precision measurements of the nature of dark energy in the Universe. It will make an order of magnitude progress in measuring the equation of state parameters of the Universe of most importance for understanding dark energy. JDEM-Omega is a wide-field space telescope operating in the near infrared. Dark energy measurements will be made via large surveys of galaxies and supernova monitoring. These will be an order of magnitude larger surveys than currently available and will provide enormous catalogs of astrophysical objects for many communities ranging from solar system to galaxy to galaxies/clusters to cosmology. JDEM-Omega is a mission concept collaboratively developed by NASA and the ...

  9. Robotic Mission Simulation Tool Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Energid Technologies proposes a software tool to predict robotic mission performance and support supervision of robotic missions even when environments and...

  10. EXIST Mission Design Concept and Technology Program

    CERN Document Server

    Grindlay, J E; Gehrels, N; Harrison, F A; Hong, J

    2002-01-01

    The Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope (EXIST) is a proposed very large area coded aperture telescope array, incorporating 8m^2 of pixellated Cd-Zn-Te (CZT) detectors, to conduct a full-sky imaging and temporal hard x-ray (10-600 keV) survey each 95min orbit. With a sensitivity (5sigma, 1yr) of ~0.05mCrab (10-150 keV), it will extend the ROSAT soft x-ray (0.5-2.5keV) and proposed ROSITA medium x-ray (2-10 keV) surveys into the hard x-ray band and enable identification and study of sources ~10-20X fainter than with the ~15-100keV survey planned for the upcoming Swift mission. At ~100-600 keV, the ~1mCrab sensitivity is 300X that achieved in the only previous (HEAO-A4, non-imaging) all-sky survey. EXIST will address a broad range of key science objectives: from obscured AGN and surveys for black holes on all scales, which constrain the accretion history of the universe, to the highest sensitivity and resolution studies of gamma-ray bursts it will conduct as the Next Generation Gamma-Ray Burst mission. We ...

  11. Mission to the Solar System: Exploration and Discovery. A Mission and Technology Roadmap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulkis, S. (Editor); Stetson, D. S. (Editor); Stofan, E. R. (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    Solar System exploration addresses some of humanity's most fundamental questions: How and when did life form on Earth? Does life exist elsewhere in the Solar System or in the Universe? - How did the Solar System form and evolve in time? - What can the other planets teach us about the Earth? This document describes a Mission and Technology Roadmap for addressing these and other fundamental Solar System Questions. A Roadmap Development Team of scientists, engineers, educators, and technologists worked to define the next evolutionary steps in in situ exploration, sample return, and completion of the overall Solar System survey. Guidelines were to "develop aa visionary, but affordable, mission and technology development Roadmap for the exploration of the Solar System in the 2000 to 2012 timeframe." The Roadmap provides a catalog of potential flight missions. (Supporting research and technology, ground-based observations, and laboratory research, which are no less important than flight missions, are not included in this Roadmap.)

  12. NASA's Planetary Science Missions and Participations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, James

    2016-04-01

    another instrument. This was a tremendously successful activity leading to another similar call for instrument proposals for the Europa mission that is currently under definition by NASA. Europa mission instruments will be used to conduct high priority scientific investigations addressing the science goals for the moon's exploration outlined in the National Resource Council's Planetary Decadal Survey, Vision and Voyages (2011). The selection of these instruments will be announced in the late spring or early summer. International partnerships are an excellent, proven way of amplifying the scope and sharing the science results of a mission otherwise implemented by an individual space agency. The exploration of the Solar System is uniquely poised to bring planetary scientists, worldwide, together under the common theme of understanding the origin, evolution, and bodies of our solar neighborhood. In the past decade we have witnessed great examples of international partnerships that made various missions the success they are known for today. As Director of Planetary Science at NASA I will continue to seek cooperation with our strong international partners in support of planetary missions.

  13. NASA's Planetary Science Missions and Participations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daou, Doris; Green, James L.

    2017-04-01

    instrument. This was a tremendously successful activity leading to another similar call for instrument proposals for the Europa mission. Europa mission instruments will be used to conduct high priority scientific investigations addressing the science goals for the moon's exploration outlined in the National Resource Council's Planetary Decadal Survey, Vision and Voyages (2011). International partnerships are an excellent, proven way of amplifying the scope and sharing the science results of a mission otherwise implemented by an individual space agency. The exploration of the Solar System is uniquely poised to bring planetary scientists, worldwide, together under the common theme of understanding the origin, evolution, and bodies of our solar neighborhood. In the past decade we have witnessed great examples of international partnerships that made various missions the success they are known for today. The Planetary Science Division at NASA continues to seek cooperation with our strong international partners in support of planetary missions.

  14. Using the General Mission Analysis Tool (GMAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Steven P.; Conway, Darrel J.; Parker, Joel

    2017-01-01

    This is a software tutorial and presentation demonstrating the application of the General Mission Analysis Tool (GMAT). These slides will be used to accompany the demonstration. The demonstration discusses GMAT basics, then presents a detailed example of GMAT application to the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) mission. This talk is a combination of existing presentations and material; system user guide and technical documentation; a GMAT basics and overview, and technical presentations from the TESS projects on their application of GMAT to critical mission design. The GMAT basics slides are taken from the open source training material. The TESS slides are a streamlined version of the CDR package provided by the project with SBU and ITAR data removed by the TESS project. Slides for navigation and optimal control are borrowed from system documentation and training material.

  15. NASA's Missions for Exoplanet Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unwin, Stephen

    2014-05-01

    Exoplanets are detected and characterized using a range of observational techniques - including direct imaging, astrometry, transits, microlensing, and radial velocities. Each technique illuminates a different aspect of exoplanet properties and statistics. This diversity of approach has contributed to the rapid growth of the field into a major research area in only two decades. In parallel with exoplanet observations, major efforts are now underway to interpret the physical and atmospheric properties of exoplanets for which spectroscopy is now possible. In addition, comparative planetology probes questions of interest to both exoplanets and solar system studies. In this talk I describe NASA's activities in exoplanet research, and discuss plans for near-future missions that have reflected-light spectroscopy as a key goal. The WFIRST-AFTA concept currently under active study includes a major microlensing survey, and now includes a visible light coronagraph for exoplanet spectroscopy and debris disk imaging. Two NASA-selected community-led teams are studying probe-scale (spectroscopy. These concepts complement existing NASA missions that do exoplanet science (such as transit spectroscopy and debris disk imaging with HST and Spitzer) or are under development (survey of nearby transiting exoplanets with TESS, and followup of the most important targets with transit spectroscopy on JWST), and build on the work of ground-based instruments such as LBTI and observing with HIRES on Keck. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Copyright 2014. California Institute of Technology. Government sponsorship acknowledged.

  16. Hybrid Lyot Coronagraph for the ACCESS Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trauger, J.; ACCESS Science and Engineering Team

    2010-10-01

    We report the design and fabrication of hybrid focal-plane masks for Lyot coronagraphy, supported this year by NASA's Technology Demonstration for Exoplanet Missions (TDEM) program. These masks are composed of thickness-profiled metallic and dielectric thin films, and manufactured by vacuum deposition on a glass substrate. Hybrid masks are in principle band-limited in both the real and imaginary parts of the complex amplitude characteristics, providing the theoretical basis for mathematically perfect starlight suppression. Together with a deformable mirror for control of wavefront phase, these masks achieve contrast levels of 2e-10 at inner working angles of 3 lambda/D, over spectral bandwidths of 20% or more, and with throughput efficiencies of 60%. We evaluate the science potential of these coronagaph masks in the context of ACCESS, a representative exoplanet mission concept. ACCESS is one of four medium-class concepts studied in 2008-2009 under NASA's Astrophysics Strategic Mission Concepts Study program. In a nutshell, the ACCESS study seeks the most capable medium-class coronagraphic mission that is possible with high-readiness telescope, instrument, and spacecraft technologies available today. The ACCESS study compared the performance of four major coronagraph architectures. It defined a conceptual space observatory platform as the "level playing field" for comparisons among coronagraph types. And it used laboratory validation of the representative coronagraph types as a second "level playing field" for assessing coronagraph hardware readiness. ACCESS identifies a class of scientifically compelling mission concepts built upon mature (TRL6+) subsystem technologies, and evaluates science reach of a medium-class coronagraph mission. Using current high-TRL technologies, the ACCESS minimum science program surveys the nearest 120+ AFGK stars for exoplanet systems, and surveys the majority of those for exozodiacal dust to the level of 1 zodi at 3 AU. Discoveries are

  17. Vitesse moyenne d'un écoulement à surface libre à partir de mesures des vitesses de surface par une méthode LSPIV

    OpenAIRE

    Rion, Guillaume

    2017-01-01

    Ce travail de fin d'études a pour but d'évaluer la précision d'une technique de mesure non intrusive de vitesse de surface : la LSPIV. Le principe de cette technique de mesure est basé sur l'analyse de séquences d'images horodatées. La LSPIV, acronyme de "Large Scale Particle Image Velocimetry" repose sur l'identification du déplacement de traceurs visibles à la surface de l'eau. Une vitesse de surface est déduite du déplacement de particules entre deux images successives et de l'intervalle d...

  18. Mesures in situ et à haute fréquence de la chimie d’un cours d’eau par spectrophotométrie UV-visible

    OpenAIRE

    Faucheux, Mikaël; Fovet, Ophélie

    2014-01-01

    La variabilité de la chimie d’un cours d’eau se manifeste sur des périodes courtes comme l’événement de crue (quelques heures), mais aussi plus longues, saisonnières, pluriannuelles et décennales. La mesure en continu de la qualité de l’eau est délicate. Les méthodes classiques et standardisées se basent sur des prélèvements d’eau dont les concentrations sont ensuite mesurées en laboratoire. Les contraintes liées au prélèvement, au stockage et aux coûts limitent donc fortement l’accès à des s...

  19. Mesure des fluctuations de température dans un résonateur équipant un système thermoacoustique

    OpenAIRE

    Poignand, Gaëlle; Berson, Arganthaël; Blanc Benon, Philippe; Comte-Bellot, Geneviève; Jondeau, Emmanuel

    2010-01-01

    National audience; Dans les systèmes thermoacoustiques, les fluctuations de température présentent un caractère fortement non-linéaire aux extrémités du stack. La connaissance de ces fluctuations est essentielle dans la détermination et l'optimisation des transferts de chaleur entre le stack et les échangeurs de chaleur et demande la mise au point de nouvelles méthodes de mesure. Cette étude présente une méthode de mesures des fluctuations de température le long d'un résonateur thermoacoustiq...

  20. Mesure de l'inconnexe d'une fonction aléatoire (théorie de la prévisibilité)

    OpenAIRE

    Ravussin, Pierre Emile; Baatard, François

    2008-01-01

    La notion de mesure d'une grandeur physique est définie au sens de la mécanique aléatoire. Les équations générales de l'hydrodynamique sont données en exemple. Un modèle mathématique de prévision basé sur des mesures physiques est formulé, tout d'abord dans un cas à une dimension, puis dans un champ tridimensionnel de vecteurs turbulents. § 1 Introduction. Dès 1966, j'ai été chargé dans le cadre du groupe E.P.U.L. - I.S.M., comprenant le service de la protection de l'air (Dr. A. Junod) et la ...

  1. KuaFu Mission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Lidong; TU Chuanyi; Schwenn Rainer; Donovan Eric; Marsch Eckart; WANG Jingsong; ZHANG Yongwei; XIAO Zuo

    2006-01-01

    The KuaFu mission-Space Storms, Aurora and Space Weather Explorer-is an "L1+Polar" triple satellite project composed of three spacecraft: KuaFu-A will be located at L1 and have instruments to observe solar EUV and FUV emissions, and white-light Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs), and to measure radio waves, the local plasma and magnetic field,and high-energy particles. KuaFuB1 and KuaFu- B2 will bein polar orbits chosen to facilitate continuous 24 hours a day observation of the north polar Aurora Oval. The KuaFu mission is designed to observe the complete chain of disturbances from the solar atmosphere to geospace, including solar flares, CMEs, interplanetary clouds, shock waves, and their geo-effects, such as magnetospheric sub-storms and magnetic storms, and auroral activities. The mission may start at the next solar maximum (launch in about 2012), and with an initial mission lifetime of two to three years. KuaFu data will be used for the scientific study of space weather phenomena, and will be used for space weather monitoring and forecast purposes. The overall mission design, instrument complement, and incorporation of recent technologies will target new fundamental science, advance our understanding of the physical processes underlying space weather, and raise the standard of end-to-end monitoring of the Sun-Earth system.

  2. Mesures de procédure spéciales et respect des droits de l'homme Rapport général

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vervaele, J.A.E.

    2009-01-01

    Le but du rapport général est de mener une analyse comparative des rapports nationaux en vue de présenter les processus de transformation des systèmes de justice pénale internes, en particulier du procès pénal, étant donné que des mesures procédurales spéciales sont introduites pour appréhender le t

  3. Mission Command: Elasticity, Equilibrium, Culture, and Intent

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    nouveau point d’équilibre C2. Afin d’être en mesure de fonctionner efficacement d’une façon adaptative, les organisations militaires doivent élaborer...Establishing common intent: The key to co-ordinated military action. In Allan English (ed.), Leadership and Command and the Operational Art : Canadian

  4. Mission design for the infrared astronomical satellite /IRAS/

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundy, S. A.; Mclaughlin, W. I.; Pouw, A.

    1979-01-01

    IRAS, a joint United States, Netherlands, United Kingdom astronomical satellite, is scheduled to be launched early in 1981 with the purpose of completing an all-sky survey in the infrared wavelengths from 8 to 120 microns and to observe objects of special interest. The mission design is driven by thermal constraints primarily determined by the Sun and Earth; the orbit and survey strategy must be chosen so as to satisfy the mission requirements before the cryogenic system is depleted of its liquid helium. Computer graphics help the designer choose valid survey strategies and evaluate resulting sky coverage.

  5. The PROBA-3 Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukov, Andrei

    2016-07-01

    PROBA-3 is the next ESA mission in the PROBA line of small technology demonstration satellites. The main goal of PROBA-3 is in-orbit demonstration of formation flying techniques and technologies. The mission will consist of two spacecraft together forming a giant (150 m long) coronagraph called ASPIICS (Association of Spacecraft for Polarimetric and Imaging Investigation of the Corona of the Sun). The bigger spacecraft will host the telescope, and the smaller spacecraft will carry the external occulter of the coronagraph. ASPIICS heralds the next generation of solar coronagraphs that will use formation flying to observe the inner corona in eclipse-like conditions for extended periods of time. The occulter spacecraft will also host the secondary payload, DARA (Davos Absolute RAdiometer), that will measure the total solar irradiance. PROBA-3 is planned to be launched in 2019. The scientific objectives of PROBA-3 will be discussed in the context of other future solar and heliospheric space missions.

  6. The Hinode Mission

    CERN Document Server

    Sakurai, Takashi

    2009-01-01

    The Solar-B satellite was launched in 2006 by the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (ISAS/JAXA), and was renamed Hinode ('sunrise' in Japanese). Hinode carries three instruments: the X-ray telescope (XRT), the EUV imaging spectrometer (EIS), and the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT). These instruments were developed by ISAS/JAXA in cooperation with the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan as domestic partner, and NASA and the Science and Technology Facilities Council (UK) as international partners. ESA and the Norwegian Space Center have been providing a downlink station. The Hinode (Solar-B) Mission gives a comprehensive description of the Hinode mission and its instruments onboard. This book is most useful for researchers, professionals, and graduate students working in the field of solar physics, astronomy, and space instrumentation. This is the only book that carefully describes the details of the Hinode mission; it is richly illustrated with full-color ima...

  7. Athena Mission Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumb, D.

    2016-07-01

    Athena has been selected by ESA for its second large mission opportunity of the Cosmic Visions programme, to address the theme of the Hot and Energetic Universe. Following the submission of a proposal from the community, the technical and programmatic aspects of the mission design were reviewed in ESA's Concurrent Design Facility. The proposed concept was deemed to betechnically feasible, but with potential constraints from cost and schedule. Two parallel industry study contracts have been conducted to explore these conclusions more thoroughly, with the key aim of providing consolidated inputs to a Mission Consolidation Review that was conducted in April-May 2016. This MCR has recommended a baseline design, which allows the agency to solicit proposals for a community provided payload. Key design aspects arising from the studies are described, and the new reference design is summarised.

  8. Mesure asymétrie avant-arriere des quarks lourds a LEP1 avec le détecteur OPAL

    CERN Document Server

    Lafoux, H

    A partir de l'ensemble des données accumulées par OPAL au cours de la première phase de fonctionnement du LEP, nous avons mesuré l'asymétrie avant-arrière des quarks b et c au voisinage du pic du Zo. Utilisant une méthode traditionnelle, basée sur la détection des leptons produits dans les désintégrations semi-leptoniques des hadrons lourds, nous avons cherché à optimiser chaque étape de la mesure, en mettant en œuvre les algorithmes les plus appropriés. Le recours aux réseaux de neurones artificiels s'est en particulier avéré d'une grande utilité lorsque le problème à résoudre impliquait la prise en compte simultanée de multiples sources d'informations, d'origine et de nature très variées. Nos résultats sont en bon accord avec ceux des autres mesures effectuées à LEP et compatibles avec les prédictions du Modèle Standard pour un quark top de 174 ± 31 GeV/c2 et un boson de Higgs de masse comprise entre 60 et 1000 GeV/c2

  9. Electronic temperature measurement on the deca II plasma using the Bremsstrahlung; Mesure de la temperature electronique du plasma de deca II par etude du rayonnement de freinage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumas, A. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-06-01

    The electronic temperature of the DECA II machine's plasma is determined by studying the Bremsstrahlung. Two types of detectors are used for this measurement, a set scintillator-photo-multiplicator and a photoelectric effect detector with a massive silver target. The method used is the classical 'absorbent method', The absorbents used are thin formvar foils whose thickness is between 600 and 12 500 angstrom. The measurements done in two different working conditions of the DECA II machine have given: Te {approx_equal} 200 eV in the first case and Te {approx_equal} 70 eV in the second case. (author) [French] Nous avons determine la temperature electronique du plasma de la machine DECA II par l'etude du rayonnement de freinage. Pour cette mesure nous avons utilise deux types de detecteurs: des ensembles scintillateur-photomultiplicateur et un detecteur a effet photoelectrique a cible massive en argent. La methode utilisee pour cette mesure est la classique methode des absorbants. Nous avons utilise des feuilles de format tres mince (de 600 a 12 500 angstrom) comme absorbant. Les mesures faites dans deux regimes de travail differents de la machine DECA II nous ont conduit a: Te {approx_equal} 200 eV dans un cas et Te {approx_equal} eV dans l'autre cas. (auteur)

  10. Aspects et mesure de la qualité de vie : évolution et renouvellement des tableaux de bord métropolitains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre J. Hamel

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available La mesure de la qualité de vie à l’intérieur des espaces urbains préoccupe les administrations publiques depuis nombre d’années. Cet article passe en revue les modèles de mesure de la qualité de vie développés par les métropoles canadiennes. Il s’interroge sur l’évolution de ces modèles de mesure et sur leur capacité à rendre compte des différentes problématiques désormais associées à la notion de qualité de vie comme le développement social, l’environnement, la société du risque, les ambiances urbaines ou la compétitivité urbaine.For a number of years now, government bodies at all levels have been concerned with measuring quality of life within urban areas. This paper reviews the models used by Canada’s metropolises to measure quality of life. It examines how the models have evolved and their capacity to consider various issues which have become associated with the notion of quality of life, such as social development, environment, risk society, urban surroundings, or urban competitiveness.

  11. Mesure des stades de developpement du sapin baumier (Abies balsamea [L.] Mill.) par teledetection des maxima locaux sur images a tres haute resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demers, Alain

    L'objectif principal de cette these est d'identifier les parametres cles pour lier le developpement morphologique de la cime du sapin baumier (Abies balsamea [L.] Mill.) aux patrons de reflectance qu'elle genere sur une image aerienne a haute resolution. La quantite et la distribution spatiale des aiguilles dans le sapin dependent de la structure des branches. Un mecanisme de ramification particulier (la reiteration) ressort comme le parametre cle pour lier l'augmentation de la biomasse foliaire et la forme de la branche. Les reiterats forment des agglomerats de feuillage qui engendrent des inegalites dans les patrons de reflectance de la cime. La reflectance est plus elevee ou il y a une forte concentration de reiterats (maximum local). On demontre que le developpement du sapin baumier se mesure au moyen de l'analyse des maxima locaux de la cime sur une image. La biomasse de l'arbre se mesure par la teledetection et l'analyse des patrons de reflectance de la cime, c'est-a-dire la mesure du niveau de reiteration par le decompte des maxima locaux de la cime. Cette etude demontre qu'il est possible de proceder a l'inventaire du volume de bois d'un peuplement par la teledetection de l'architecture des arbres.

  12. CALCUL DU DEPHASAGE A LA REFLEXION ET DES INDICES OPTIQUES DE L’ALLIAGE AMORPHE PD30Y70 A PARTIR DE LA MESURE DE SA REFLEXION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H BELBAH

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Les couches minces de l’alliage amorphe de composition Pd30Y70 sont déposées par pulvérisation cathodique sur des substrats en silice, sous un vide de 10-7 Torr. Les couches obtenues sont opaques et par conséquent leur transmission est nulle. Le spectre de réflexion de Pd30Y70  est mesuré dans le domaine d’énergie entre 0,5 et 6,2 eV. Cette mesure sert au calcul du déphasage à la réflexion de l’alliage à partir de l’intégrale de Kramers-Kronig. Les valeurs mesurées de la réflexion et les valeurs calculées du déphasage à la réflexion permettent de remonter aux constantes optiques (indices de réfraction et d’extinction de l’alliage et à sa structure électronique à partir des spectres d’absorption optique calculés. Le spectre d’absorption optique de Pd30Y70 amorphe est dominé par deux structures dont l’une est due aux états 4d de Pd centrée autour de 4 eV et l’autre aux états 4d de Y aux basses énergies.

  13. Search and Rescue Mission Using Multicopters

    OpenAIRE

    Steen, Thor Audun

    2014-01-01

    Search and rescue operations can greatly benefit from the use of autonomous unmanned aerial systems to survey the environment and collect evidence about the positions of missing persons. This thesis considers the design of an autonomous multicopter system for use in a search and rescue mission. The ArduPilot Mega is used as the autopilot and is presented together with detailed information about the utilized hardware and software. The design of a low- level control interface is implemented as ...

  14. The ALEXIS mission recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloch, J.; Armstrong, T.; Dingler, B.; Enemark, D.; Holden, D.; Little, C.; Munson, C.; Priedhorsky, B.; Roussel-Dupre, D.; Smith, B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Warner, R.; Dill, B.; Huffman, G.; McLoughlin, F.; Mills, R.; Miller, R. [AeroAstro, Inc., Herndon, VA (United States)

    1994-03-01

    The authors report the recovery of the ALEXIS small satellite mission. ALEXIS is a 113-kg satellite that carries an ultrasoft x-ray telescope array and a high-speed VHF receiver/digitizer (BLACKBEARD), supported by a miniature spacecraft bus. It was launched by a Pegasus booster on 1993 April 25, but a solar paddle was damaged during powered flight. Initial attempts to contact ALEXIS were unsuccessful. The satellite finally responded in June, and was soon brought under control. Because the magnetometer had failed, the rescue required the development of new attitude control-techniques. The telemetry system has performed nominally. They discuss the procedures used to recover the ALEXIS mission.

  15. MIV Project: Mission scenario

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravazzotti, Mariolina T.; Jørgensen, John Leif; Thuesen, Gøsta

    1997-01-01

    Under the ESA contract #11453/95/NL/JG(SC), aiming at assessing the feasibility of Rendez-vous and docking of unmanned spacecrafts, a msiision scenario was defined. This report describes the secquence of manouvres and task allocations for such missions.......Under the ESA contract #11453/95/NL/JG(SC), aiming at assessing the feasibility of Rendez-vous and docking of unmanned spacecrafts, a msiision scenario was defined. This report describes the secquence of manouvres and task allocations for such missions....

  16. The Asteroid Impact Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnelli, Ian; Galvez, Andres; Mellab, Karim

    2016-04-01

    The Asteroid Impact Mission (AIM) is a small and innovative mission of opportunity, currently under study at ESA, intending to demonstrate new technologies for future deep-space missions while addressing planetary defense objectives and performing for the first time detailed investigations of a binary asteroid system. It leverages on a unique opportunity provided by asteroid 65803 Didymos, set for an Earth close-encounter in October 2022, to achieve a fast mission return in only two years after launch in October/November 2020. AIM is also ESA's contribution to an international cooperation between ESA and NASA called Asteroid Impact Deflection Assessment (AIDA), consisting of two mission elements: the NASA Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART) mission and the AIM rendezvous spacecraft. The primary goals of AIDA are to test our ability to perform a spacecraft impact on a near-Earth asteroid and to measure and characterize the deflection caused by the impact. The two mission components of AIDA, DART and AIM, are each independently valuable but when combined they provide a greatly increased scientific return. The DART hypervelocity impact on the secondary asteroid will alter the binary orbit period, which will also be measured by means of lightcurves observations from Earth-based telescopes. AIM instead will perform before and after detailed characterization shedding light on the dependence of the momentum transfer on the asteroid's bulk density, porosity, surface and internal properties. AIM will gather data describing the fragmentation and restructuring processes as well as the ejection of material, and relate them to parameters that can only be available from ground-based observations. Collisional events are of great importance in the formation and evolution of planetary systems, own Solar System and planetary rings. The AIDA scenario will provide a unique opportunity to observe a collision event directly in space, and simultaneously from ground-based optical and

  17. STS-65 Mission Insignia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Designed by the mission crew members, the STS-65 insignia features the International Microgravity Lab (IML)-2 mission and its Spacelab module which flew aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia. IML-2 is reflected in the emblem by two gold stars shooting toward the heavens behind the IML lettering. The Space Shuttle Columbia is depicted orbiting the logo and reaching off into space, with Spacelab on an international quest for a better understanding of the effects of space flight on materials processing and life sciences.

  18. Towards A Shared Mission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staunstrup, Jørgen; Orth Gaarn-Larsen, Carsten

    A mission shared by stakeholders, management and employees is a prerequisite for an engaging dialog about the many and substantial changes and challenges currently facing universities. Too often this essen-tial dialog reveals mistrust and misunderstandings about the role and outcome of the univer......A mission shared by stakeholders, management and employees is a prerequisite for an engaging dialog about the many and substantial changes and challenges currently facing universities. Too often this essen-tial dialog reveals mistrust and misunderstandings about the role and outcome...

  19. Magellan: mission summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, R S; Pettengill, G H

    1991-04-12

    The Magellan radar mapping mission is in the process of producing a global, high-resolution image and altimetry data set of Venus. Despite initial communications problems, few data gaps have occurred. Analysis of Magellan data is in the initial stages. The radar system data are of high quality, and the planned performance is being achieved in terms of spatial resolution and geometric and radiometric accuracy. Image performance exceeds expectations, and the image quality and mosaickability are extremely good. Future plans for the mission include obtaining gravity data, filling gaps in the initial map, and conducting special studies with the radar.

  20. Mission Operations Assurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faris, Grant

    2012-01-01

    Integrate the mission operations assurance function into the flight team providing: (1) value added support in identifying, mitigating, and communicating the project's risks and, (2) being an essential member of the team during the test activities, training exercises and critical flight operations.

  1. The Gaia mission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collaboration, Gaia; Prusti, T.; de Bruijne, J. H. J.; Brown, A. G. A.; Vallenari, A.; Babusiaux, C.; Bailer-Jones, C. A. L.; Bastian, U.; Biermann, M.; Evans, D. W.; Eyer, L.; Jansen, F.; Jordi, C.; Klioner, S. A.; Lammers, U.; Lindegren, L.; Luri, X.; Mignard, F.; Milligan, D. J.; Panem, C.; Poinsignon, V.; Pourbaix, D.; Randich, S.; Sarri, G.; Sartoretti, P.; Siddiqui, H. I.; Soubiran, C.; Valette, V.; van Leeuwen, F.; Walton, N. A.; Aerts, C.; Arenou, F.; Cropper, M.; Drimmel, R.; Høg, E.; Katz, D.; Lattanzi, M. G.; O'Mullane, W.; Grebel, E. K.; Holland, A. D.; Huc, C.; Passot, X.; Bramante, L.; Cacciari, C.; Castañeda, J.; Chaoul, L.; Cheek, N.; De Angeli, F.; Fabricius, C.; Guerra, R.; Hernández, J.; Jean-Antoine-Piccolo, A.; Masana, E.; Messineo, R.; Mowlavi, N.; Nienartowicz, K.; Ordóñez-Blanco, D.; Panuzzo, P.; Portell, J.; Richards, P. J.; Riello, M.; Seabroke, G. M.; Tanga, P.; Thévenin, F.; Torra, J.; Els, S. G.; Gracia-Abril, G.; Comoretto, G.; Garcia-Reinaldos, M.; Lock, T.; Mercier, E.; Altmann, M.; Andrae, R.; Astraatmadja, T. L.; Bellas-Velidis, I.; Benson, K.; Berthier, J.; Blomme, R.; Busso, G.; Carry, B.; Cellino, A.; Clementini, G.; Cowell, S.; Creevey, O.; Cuypers, J.; Davidson, M.; De Ridder, J.; de Torres, A.; Delchambre, L.; Dell'Oro, A.; Ducourant, C.; Frémat, Y.; García-Torres, M.; Gosset, E.; Halbwachs, J. -L; Hambly, N. C.; Harrison, D. L.; Hauser, M.; Hestroffer, D.; Hodgkin, S. T.; Huckle, H. E.; Hutton, A.; Jasniewicz, G.; Jordan, S.; Kontizas, M.; Korn, A. J.; Lanzafame, A. C.; Manteiga, M.; Moitinho, A.; Muinonen, K.; Osinde, J.; Pancino, E.; Pauwels, T.; Petit, J. -M; Recio-Blanco, A.; Robin, A. C.; Sarro, L. M.; Siopis, C.; Smith, M.; Smith, K. W.; Sozzetti, A.; Thuillot, W.; van Reeven, W.; Viala, Y.; Abbas, U.; Abreu Aramburu, A.; Accart, S.; Aguado, J. J.; Allan, P. M.; Allasia, W.; Altavilla, G.; Álvarez, M. A.; Alves, J.; Anderson, R. I.; Andrei, A. H.; Anglada Varela, E.; Antiche, E.; Antoja, T.; Antón, S.; Arcay, B.; Atzei, A.; Ayache, L.; Bach, N.; Baker, S. G.; Balaguer-Núñez, L.; Barache, C.; Barata, C.; Barbier, A.; Barblan, F.; Baroni, M.; Barrado y Navascués, D.; Barros, M.; Barstow, M. A.; Becciani, U.; Bellazzini, M.; Bellei, G.; Bello García, A.; Belokurov, V.; Bendjoya, P.; Berihuete, A.; Bianchi, L.; Bienaymé, O.; Billebaud, F.; Blagorodnova, N.; Blanco-Cuaresma, S.; Boch, T.; Bombrun, A.; Borrachero, R.; Bouquillon, S.; Bourda, G.; Bouy, H.; Bragaglia, A.; Breddels, M. A.; Brouillet, N.; Brüsemeister, T.; Bucciarelli, B.; Budnik, F.; Burgess, P.; Burgon, R.; Burlacu, A.; Busonero, D.; Buzzi, R.; Caffau, E.; Cambras, J.; Campbell, H.; Cancelliere, R.; Cantat-Gaudin, T.; Carlucci, T.; Carrasco, J. M.; Castellani, M.; Charlot, P.; Charnas, J.; Charvet, P.; Chassat, F.; Chiavassa, A.; Clotet, M.; Cocozza, G.; Collins, R. S.; Collins, P.; Costigan, G.; Crifo, F.; Cross, N. J. G.; Crosta, M.; Crowley, C.; Dafonte, C.; Damerdji, Y.; Dapergolas, A.; David, P.; David, M.; De Cat, P.; de Felice, F.; de Laverny, P.; De Luise, F.; De March, R.; de Martino, D.; de Souza, R.; Debosscher, J.; del Pozo, E.; Delbo, M.; Delgado, A.; Delgado, H. E.; di Marco, F.; Di Matteo, P.; Diakite, S.; Distefano, E.; Dolding, C.; Dos Anjos, S.; Drazinos, P.; Durán, J.; Dzigan, Y.; Ecale, E.; Edvardsson, B.; Enke, H.; Erdmann, M.; Escolar, D.; Espina, M.; Evans, N. W.; Eynard Bontemps, G.; Fabre, C.; Fabrizio, M.; Faigler, S.; Falcão, A. J.; Farràs Casas, M.; Faye, F.; Federici, L.; Fedorets, G.; Fernández-Hernández, J.; Fernique, P.; Fienga, A.; Figueras, F.; Filippi, F.; Findeisen, K.; Fonti, A.; Fouesneau, M.; Fraile, E.; Fraser, M.; Fuchs, J.; Furnell, R.; Gai, M.; Galleti, S.; Galluccio, L.; Garabato, D.; García-Sedano, F.; Garé, P.; Garofalo, A.; Garralda, N.; Gavras, P.; Gerssen, J.; Geyer, R.; Gilmore, G.; Girona, S.; Giuffrida, G.; Gomes, M.; González-Marcos, A.; González-Núñez, J.; González-Vidal, J. J.; Granvik, M.; Guerrier, A.; Guillout, P.; Guiraud, J.; Gúrpide, A.; Gutiérrez-Sánchez, R.; Guy, L. P.; Haigron, R.; Hatzidimitriou, D.; Haywood, M.; Heiter, U.; Helmi, A.; Hobbs, D.; Hofmann, W.; Holl, B.; Holland, G.; Hunt, J. A. S.; Hypki, A.; Icardi, V.; Irwin, M.; Jevardat de Fombelle, G.; Jofré, P.; Jonker, P. G.; Jorissen, A.; Julbe, F.; Karampelas, A.; Kochoska, A.; Kohley, R.; Kolenberg, K.; Kontizas, E.; Koposov, S. E.; Kordopatis, G.; Koubsky, P.; Kowalczyk, A.; Krone-Martins, A.; Kudryashova, M.; Kull, I.; Bachchan, R. K.; Lacoste-Seris, F.; Lanza, A. F.; Lavigne, J. -B; Le Poncin-Lafitte, C.; Lebreton, Y.; Lebzelter, T.; Leccia, S.; Leclerc, N.; Lecoeur-Taibi, I.; Lemaitre, V.; Lenhardt, H.; Leroux, F.; Liao, S.; Licata, E.; Lindstrøm, H. E. P.; Lister, T. A.; Livanou, E.; Lobel, A.; Löffler, W.; López, M.; Lopez-Lozano, A.; Lorenz, D.; Loureiro, T.; MacDonald, I.; Magalhães Fernandes, T.; Managau, S.; Mann, R. G.; Mantelet, G.; Marchal, O.; Marchant, J. M.; Marconi, M.; Marie, J.; Marinoni, S.; Marrese, P. M.; Marschalkó, G.; Marshall, D. J.; Martín-Fleitas, J. M.; Martino, M.; Mary, N.; Matijevič, G.; Mazeh, T.; McMillan, P. J.; Messina, S.; Mestre, A.; Michalik, D.; Millar, N. R.; Miranda, B. M. H.; Molina, D.; Molinaro, R.; Molinaro, M.; Molnár, L.; Moniez, M.; Montegriffo, P.; Monteiro, D.; Mor, R.; Mora, A.; Morbidelli, R.; Morel, T.; Morgenthaler, S.; Morley, T.; Morris, D.; Mulone, A. F.; Muraveva, T.; Musella, I.; Narbonne, J.; Nelemans, G.; Nicastro, L.; Noval, L.; Ordénovic, C.; Ordieres-Meré, J.; Osborne, P.; Pagani, C.; Pagano, I.; Pailler, F.; Palacin, H.; Palaversa, L.; Parsons, P.; Paulsen, T.; Pecoraro, M.; Pedrosa, R.; Pentikäinen, H.; Pereira, J.; Pichon, B.; Piersimoni, A. M.; Pineau, F. -X; Plachy, E.; Plum, G.; Poujoulet, E.; Prša, A.; Pulone, L.; Ragaini, S.; Rago, S.; Rambaux, N.; Ramos-Lerate, M.; Ranalli, P.; Rauw, G.; Read, A.; Regibo, S.; Renk, F.; Reylé, C.; Ribeiro, R. A.; Rimoldini, L.; Ripepi, V.; Riva, A.; Rixon, G.; Roelens, M.; Romero-Gómez, M.; Rowell, N.; Royer, F.; Rudolph, A.; Ruiz-Dern, L.; Sadowski, G.; Sagristà Sellés, T.; Sahlmann, J.; Salgado, J.; Salguero, E.; Sarasso, M.; Savietto, H.; Schnorhk, A.; Schultheis, M.; Sciacca, E.; Segol, M.; Segovia, J. C.; Segransan, D.; Serpell, E.; Shih, I. -C; Smareglia, R.; Smart, R. L.; Smith, C.; Solano, E.; Solitro, F.; Sordo, R.; Soria Nieto, S.; Souchay, J.; Spagna, A.; Spoto, F.; Stampa, U.; Steele, I. A.; Steidelmüller, H.; Stephenson, C. A.; Stoev, H.; Suess, F. F.; Süveges, M.; Surdej, J.; Szabados, L.; Szegedi-Elek, E.; Tapiador, D.; Taris, F.; Tauran, G.; Taylor, M. B.; Teixeira, R.; Terrett, D.; Tingley, B.; Trager, S. C.; Turon, C.; Ulla, A.; Utrilla, E.; Valentini, G.; van Elteren, A.; Van Hemelryck, E.; van Leeuwen, M.; Varadi, M.; Vecchiato, A.; Veljanoski, J.; Via, T.; Vicente, D.; Vogt, S.; Voss, H.; Votruba, V.; Voutsinas, S.; Walmsley, G.; Weiler, M.; Weingrill, K.; Werner, D.; Wevers, T.; Whitehead, G.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Yoldas, A.; Žerjal, M.; Zucker, S.; Zurbach, C.; Zwitter, T.; Alecu, A.; Allen, M.; Allende Prieto, C.; Amorim, A.; Anglada-Escudé, G.; Arsenijevic, V.; Azaz, S.; Balm, P.; Beck, M.; Bernstein, H. -H; Bigot, L.; Bijaoui, A.; Blasco, C.; Bonfigli, M.; Bono, G.; Boudreault, S.; Bressan, A.; Brown, S.; Brunet, P. -M; Bunclark, P.; Buonanno, R.; Butkevich, A. G.; Carret, C.; Carrion, C.; Chemin, L.; Chéreau, F.; Corcione, L.; Darmigny, E.; de Boer, K. S.; de Teodoro, P.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Delle Luche, C.; Domingues, C. D.; Dubath, P.; Fodor, F.; Frézouls, B.; Fries, A.; Fustes, D.; Fyfe, D.; Gallardo, E.; Gallegos, J.; Gardiol, D.; Gebran, M.; Gomboc, A.; Gómez, A.; Grux, E.; Gueguen, A.; Heyrovsky, A.; Hoar, J.; Iannicola, G.; Isasi Parache, Y.; Janotto, A. -M; Joliet, E.; Jonckheere, A.; Keil, R.; Kim, D. -W; Klagyivik, P.; Klar, J.; Knude, J.; Kochukhov, O.; Kolka, I.; Kos, J.; Kutka, A.; Lainey, V.; LeBouquin, D.; Liu, C.; Loreggia, D.; Makarov, V. V.; Marseille, M. G.; Martayan, C.; Martinez-Rubi, O.; Massart, B.; Meynadier, F.; Mignot, S.; Munari, U.; Nguyen, A. -T; Nordlander, T.; Ocvirk, P.; O'Flaherty, K. S.; Olias Sanz, A.; Ortiz, P.; Osorio, J.; Oszkiewicz, D.; Ouzounis, A.; Palmer, M.; Park, P.; Pasquato, E.; Peltzer, C.; Peralta, J.; Péturaud, F.; Pieniluoma, T.; Pigozzi, E.; Poels, J.; Prat, G.; Prod'homme, T.; Raison, F.; Rebordao, J. M.; Risquez, D.; Rocca-Volmerange, B.; Rosen, S.; Ruiz-Fuertes, M. I.; Russo, F.; Sembay, S.; Serraller Vizcaino, I.; Short, A.; Siebert, A.; Silva, H.; Sinachopoulos, D.; Slezak, E.; Soffel, M.; Sosnowska, D.; Straižys, V.; ter Linden, M.; Terrell, D.; Theil, S.; Tiede, C.; Troisi, L.; Tsalmantza, P.; Tur, D.; Vaccari, M.; Vachier, F.; Valles, P.; Van Hamme, W.; Veltz, L.; Virtanen, J.; Wallut, J. -M; Wichmann, R.; Wilkinson, M. I.; Ziaeepour, H.; Zschocke, S.

    2016-01-01

    Gaia is a cornerstone mission in the science programme of the EuropeanSpace Agency (ESA). The spacecraft construction was approved in 2006, following a study in which the original interferometric concept was changed to a direct-imaging approach. Both the spacecraft and the payload were built by Euro

  2. Inspiration is "Mission Critical"

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, D. W.; DeVore, E.; Lebofsky, L.

    2014-07-01

    In spring 2013, the President's budget proposal restructured the nation's approach to STEM education, eliminating ˜$50M of NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) funding with the intent of transferring it to the Dept. of Education, National Science Foundation, and Smithsonian Institution. As a result, Education and Public Outreach (EPO) would no longer be a NASA mission requirement and funds that had already been competed, awarded, and productively utilized were lost. Since 1994, partnerships of scientists, engineers, and education specialists were required to create innovative approaches to EPO, providing a direct source of inspiration for today's youth that may now be lost. Although seldom discussed or evaluated, "inspiration" is the beginning of lasting education. For decades, NASA's crewed and robotic missions have motivated students of all ages and have demonstrated a high degree of leverage in society. Through personal experiences we discuss (1) the importance of inspiration in education, (2) how NASA plays a vital role in STEM education, (3) examples of high-leverage educational materials showing why NASA should continue embedding EPO specialists within mission teams, and (4) how we can document the role of inspiration. We believe that personal histories are an important means of assessing the success of EPO. We hope this discussion will lead other people to document similar stories of educational success and perhaps to undertake longitudinal studies of the impact of inspiration.

  3. The LISA Pathfinder Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armano, M.; Audley, H.; Auger, G.; Baird, J.; Binetruy, P.; Born, M.; Bortoluzzi, D.; Brandt, N.; Bursi, A.; Caleno, M.; Cavalleri, A.; Cesarini, A.; Cruise, M.; Danzmann, K.; Diepholz, I.; Dolesi, R.; Dunbar, N.; Ferraioli, L.; Ferroni, V.; Fitzsimons, E.; Freschi, M.; Gallegos, J.; García Marirrodriga, C.; Gerndt, R.; Gesa, L. I.; Gibert, F.; Giardini, D.; Giusteri, R.; Grimani, C.; Harrison, I.; Heinzel, G.; Hewitson, M.; Hollington, D.; Hueller, M.; Huesler, J.; Inchauspé, H.; Jennrich, O.; Jetzer, P.; Johlander, B.; Karnesis, N.; Kaune, B.; Korsakova, N.; Killow, C.; Lloro, I.; Maarschalkerweerd, R.; Madden, S.; Mance, D.; Martín, V.; Martin-Porqueras, F.; Mateos, I.; McNamara, P.; Mendes, J.; Mendes, L.; Moroni, A.; Nofrarias, M.; Paczkowski, S.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Petiteau, A.; Pivato, P.; Plagnol, E.; Prat, P.; Ragnit, U.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Reiche, J.; Romera Perez, J. A.; Robertson, D.; Rozemeijer, H.; Russano, G.; Sarra, P.; Schleicher, A.; Slutsky, J.; Sopuerta, C. F.; Sumner, T.; Texier, D.; Thorpe, J.; Trenkel, C.; Tu, H. B.; Vetrugno, D.; Vitale, S.; Wanner, G.; Ward, H.; Waschke, S.; Wass, P.; Wealthy, D.; Wen, S.; Weber, W.; Wittchen, A.; Zanoni, C.; Ziegler, T.; Zweifel, P.

    2015-05-01

    LISA Pathfinder (LPF), the second of the European Space Agency's Small Missions for Advanced Research in Technology (SMART), is a dedicated technology validation mission for future spaceborne gravitational wave detectors, such as the proposed eLISA mission. LISA Pathfinder, and its scientific payload - the LISA Technology Package - will test, in flight, the critical technologies required for low frequency gravitational wave detection: it will put two test masses in a near-perfect gravitational free-fall and control and measure their motion with unprecedented accuracy. This is achieved through technology comprising inertial sensors, high precision laser metrology, drag-free control and an ultra-precise micro-Newton propulsion system. LISA Pathfinder is due to be launched in mid-2015, with first results on the performance of the system being available 6 months thereafter. The paper introduces the LISA Pathfinder mission, followed by an explanation of the physical principles of measurement concept and associated hardware. We then provide a detailed discussion of the LISA Technology Package, including both the inertial sensor and interferometric readout. As we approach the launch of the LISA Pathfinder, the focus of the development is shifting towards the science operations and data analysis - this is described in the final section of the paper

  4. The Lobster Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthelmy, Scott

    2011-01-01

    I will give an overview of the Goddard Lobster mission: the science goals, the two instruments, the overall instruments designs, with particular attention to the wide-field x-ray instrument (WFI) using the lobster-eye-like micro-channel optics.

  5. Mission from Mars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dindler, Christian; Eriksson, Eva; Iversen, Ole Sejer

    2005-01-01

    In this paper a particular design method is propagated as a supplement to existing descriptive approaches to current practice studies especially suitable for gathering requirements for the design of children's technology. The Mission from Mars method was applied during the design of an electronic...

  6. Robust UAV Mission Planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, L.; Dollevoet, T; Barros, A.I.; Monsuur, H.

    2011-01-01

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) can provide significant contributions to information gathering in military missions. UAVs can be used to capture both full motion video and still imagery of specific target locations within the area of interest. In order to improve the effectiveness of a reconnaissanc

  7. Robust UAV mission planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, L.; Dollevoet, T.; Barros, A.I.; Monsuur, H.

    2011-01-01

    Unmanned Areal Vehicles (UAVs) can provide significant contributions to information gathering in military missions. UAVs can be used to capture both full motion video and still imagery of specific target locations within the area of interest. In order to improve the effectiveness of a reconnaissance

  8. Robust UAV Mission Planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Evers (Lanah); T.A.B. Dollevoet (Twan); A.I. Barros (Ana); H. Monsuur (Herman)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractUnmanned Areal Vehicles (UAVs) can provide significant contributions to information gathering in military missions. UAVs can be used to capture both full motion video and still imagery of specific target locations within the area of interest. In order to improve the effectiveness of a re

  9. Robust UAV Mission Planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, L.; Dollevoet, T.; Barros, A.I.; Monsuur, H.

    2014-01-01

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) can provide significant contributions to information gathering in military missions. UAVs can be used to capture both full motion video and still imagery of specific target locations within the area of interest. In order to improve the effectiveness of a reconnaissanc

  10. EOS Aura Mission Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guit, William J.

    2015-01-01

    This PowerPoint presentation will discuss EOS Aura mission and spacecraft subsystem summary, recent and planned activities, inclination adjust maneuvers, propellant usage lifetime estimate. Eric Moyer, ESMO Deputy Project Manager-Technical (code 428) has reviewed and approved the slides on April 30, 2015.

  11. The Gaia mission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collaboration, Gaia; Prusti, T.; de Bruijne, J. H. J.; Brown, A. G. A.; Vallenari, A.; Babusiaux, C.; Bailer-Jones, C. A. L.; Bastian, U.; Biermann, M.; Evans, D. W.; Eyer, L.; Jansen, F.; Jordi, C.; Klioner, S. A.; Lammers, U.; Lindegren, L.; Luri, X.; Mignard, F.; Milligan, D. J.; Panem, C.; Poinsignon, V.; Pourbaix, D.; Randich, S.; Sarri, G.; Sartoretti, P.; Siddiqui, H. I.; Soubiran, C.; Valette, V.; van Leeuwen, F.; Walton, N. A.; Aerts, C.; Arenou, F.; Cropper, M.; Drimmel, R.; Høg, E.; Katz, D.; Lattanzi, M. G.; O'Mullane, W.; Grebel, E. K.; Holland, A. D.; Huc, C.; Passot, X.; Bramante, L.; Cacciari, C.; Castañeda, J.; Chaoul, L.; Cheek, N.; De Angeli, F.; Fabricius, C.; Guerra, R.; Hernández, J.; Jean-Antoine-Piccolo, A.; Masana, E.; Messineo, R.; Mowlavi, N.; Nienartowicz, K.; Ordóñez-Blanco, D.; Panuzzo, P.; Portell, J.; Richards, P. J.; Riello, M.; Seabroke, G. M.; Tanga, P.; Thévenin, F.; Torra, J.; Els, S. G.; Gracia-Abril, G.; Comoretto, G.; Garcia-Reinaldos, M.; Lock, T.; Mercier, E.; Altmann, M.; Andrae, R.; Astraatmadja, T. L.; Bellas-Velidis, I.; Benson, K.; Berthier, J.; Blomme, R.; Busso, G.; Carry, B.; Cellino, A.; Clementini, G.; Cowell, S.; Creevey, O.; Cuypers, J.; Davidson, M.; De Ridder, J.; de Torres, A.; Delchambre, L.; Dell'Oro, A.; Ducourant, C.; Frémat, Y.; García-Torres, M.; Gosset, E.; Halbwachs, J. -L; Hambly, N. C.; Harrison, D. L.; Hauser, M.; Hestroffer, D.; Hodgkin, S. T.; Huckle, H. E.; Hutton, A.; Jasniewicz, G.; Jordan, S.; Kontizas, M.; Korn, A. J.; Lanzafame, A. C.; Manteiga, M.; Moitinho, A.; Muinonen, K.; Osinde, J.; Pancino, E.; Pauwels, T.; Petit, J. -M; Recio-Blanco, A.; Robin, A. C.; Sarro, L. M.; Siopis, C.; Smith, M.; Smith, K. W.; Sozzetti, A.; Thuillot, W.; van Reeven, W.; Viala, Y.; Abbas, U.; Abreu Aramburu, A.; Accart, S.; Aguado, J. J.; Allan, P. M.; Allasia, W.; Altavilla, G.; Álvarez, M. A.; Alves, J.; Anderson, R. I.; Andrei, A. H.; Anglada Varela, E.; Antiche, E.; Antoja, T.; Antón, S.; Arcay, B.; Atzei, A.; Ayache, L.; Bach, N.; Baker, S. G.; Balaguer-Núñez, L.; Barache, C.; Barata, C.; Barbier, A.; Barblan, F.; Baroni, M.; Barrado y Navascués, D.; Barros, M.; Barstow, M. A.; Becciani, U.; Bellazzini, M.; Bellei, G.; Bello García, A.; Belokurov, V.; Bendjoya, P.; Berihuete, A.; Bianchi, L.; Bienaymé, O.; Billebaud, F.; Blagorodnova, N.; Blanco-Cuaresma, S.; Boch, T.; Bombrun, A.; Borrachero, R.; Bouquillon, S.; Bourda, G.; Bouy, H.; Bragaglia, A.; Breddels, M. A.; Brouillet, N.; Brüsemeister, T.; Bucciarelli, B.; Budnik, F.; Burgess, P.; Burgon, R.; Burlacu, A.; Busonero, D.; Buzzi, R.; Caffau, E.; Cambras, J.; Campbell, H.; Cancelliere, R.; Cantat-Gaudin, T.; Carlucci, T.; Carrasco, J. M.; Castellani, M.; Charlot, P.; Charnas, J.; Charvet, P.; Chassat, F.; Chiavassa, A.; Clotet, M.; Cocozza, G.; Collins, R. S.; Collins, P.; Costigan, G.; Crifo, F.; Cross, N. J. G.; Crosta, M.; Crowley, C.; Dafonte, C.; Damerdji, Y.; Dapergolas, A.; David, P.; David, M.; De Cat, P.; de Felice, F.; de Laverny, P.; De Luise, F.; De March, R.; de Martino, D.; de Souza, R.; Debosscher, J.; del Pozo, E.; Delbo, M.; Delgado, A.; Delgado, H. E.; di Marco, F.; Di Matteo, P.; Diakite, S.; Distefano, E.; Dolding, C.; Dos Anjos, S.; Drazinos, P.; Durán, J.; Dzigan, Y.; Ecale, E.; Edvardsson, B.; Enke, H.; Erdmann, M.; Escolar, D.; Espina, M.; Evans, N. W.; Eynard Bontemps, G.; Fabre, C.; Fabrizio, M.; Faigler, S.; Falcão, A. J.; Farràs Casas, M.; Faye, F.; Federici, L.; Fedorets, G.; Fernández-Hernández, J.; Fernique, P.; Fienga, A.; Figueras, F.; Filippi, F.; Findeisen, K.; Fonti, A.; Fouesneau, M.; Fraile, E.; Fraser, M.; Fuchs, J.; Furnell, R.; Gai, M.; Galleti, S.; Galluccio, L.; Garabato, D.; García-Sedano, F.; Garé, P.; Garofalo, A.; Garralda, N.; Gavras, P.; Gerssen, J.; Geyer, R.; Gilmore, G.; Girona, S.; Giuffrida, G.; Gomes, M.; González-Marcos, A.; González-Núñez, J.; González-Vidal, J. J.; Granvik, M.; Guerrier, A.; Guillout, P.; Guiraud, J.; Gúrpide, A.; Gutiérrez-Sánchez, R.; Guy, L. P.; Haigron, R.; Hatzidimitriou, D.; Haywood, M.; Heiter, U.; Helmi, A.; Hobbs, D.; Hofmann, W.; Holl, B.; Holland, G.; Hunt, J. A. S.; Hypki, A.; Icardi, V.; Irwin, M.; Jevardat de Fombelle, G.; Jofré, P.; Jonker, P. G.; Jorissen, A.; Julbe, F.; Karampelas, A.; Kochoska, A.; Kohley, R.; Kolenberg, K.; Kontizas, E.; Koposov, S. E.; Kordopatis, G.; Koubsky, P.; Kowalczyk, A.; Krone-Martins, A.; Kudryashova, M.; Kull, I.; Bachchan, R. K.; Lacoste-Seris, F.; Lanza, A. F.; Lavigne, J. -B; Le Poncin-Lafitte, C.; Lebreton, Y.; Lebzelter, T.; Leccia, S.; Leclerc, N.; Lecoeur-Taibi, I.; Lemaitre, V.; Lenhardt, H.; Leroux, F.; Liao, S.; Licata, E.; Lindstrøm, H. E. P.; Lister, T. A.; Livanou, E.; Lobel, A.; Löffler, W.; López, M.; Lopez-Lozano, A.; Lorenz, D.; Loureiro, T.; MacDonald, I.; Magalhães Fernandes, T.; Managau, S.; Mann, R. G.; Mantelet, G.; Marchal, O.; Marchant, J. M.; Marconi, M.; Marie, J.; Marinoni, S.; Marrese, P. M.; Marschalkó, G.; Marshall, D. J.; Martín-Fleitas, J. M.; Martino, M.; Mary, N.; Matijevič, G.; Mazeh, T.; McMillan, P. J.; Messina, S.; Mestre, A.; Michalik, D.; Millar, N. R.; Miranda, B. M. H.; Molina, D.; Molinaro, R.; Molinaro, M.; Molnár, L.; Moniez, M.; Montegriffo, P.; Monteiro, D.; Mor, R.; Mora, A.; Morbidelli, R.; Morel, T.; Morgenthaler, S.; Morley, T.; Morris, D.; Mulone, A. F.; Muraveva, T.; Musella, I.; Narbonne, J.; Nelemans, G.; Nicastro, L.; Noval, L.; Ordénovic, C.; Ordieres-Meré, J.; Osborne, P.; Pagani, C.; Pagano, I.; Pailler, F.; Palacin, H.; Palaversa, L.; Parsons, P.; Paulsen, T.; Pecoraro, M.; Pedrosa, R.; Pentikäinen, H.; Pereira, J.; Pichon, B.; Piersimoni, A. M.; Pineau, F. -X; Plachy, E.; Plum, G.; Poujoulet, E.; Prša, A.; Pulone, L.; Ragaini, S.; Rago, S.; Rambaux, N.; Ramos-Lerate, M.; Ranalli, P.; Rauw, G.; Read, A.; Regibo, S.; Renk, F.; Reylé, C.; Ribeiro, R. A.; Rimoldini, L.; Ripepi, V.; Riva, A.; Rixon, G.; Roelens, M.; Romero-Gómez, M.; Rowell, N.; Royer, F.; Rudolph, A.; Ruiz-Dern, L.; Sadowski, G.; Sagristà Sellés, T.; Sahlmann, J.; Salgado, J.; Salguero, E.; Sarasso, M.; Savietto, H.; Schnorhk, A.; Schultheis, M.; Sciacca, E.; Segol, M.; Segovia, J. C.; Segransan, D.; Serpell, E.; Shih, I. -C; Smareglia, R.; Smart, R. L.; Smith, C.; Solano, E.; Solitro, F.; Sordo, R.; Soria Nieto, S.; Souchay, J.; Spagna, A.; Spoto, F.; Stampa, U.; Steele, I. A.; Steidelmüller, H.; Stephenson, C. A.; Stoev, H.; Suess, F. F.; Süveges, M.; Surdej, J.; Szabados, L.; Szegedi-Elek, E.; Tapiador, D.; Taris, F.; Tauran, G.; Taylor, M. B.; Teixeira, R.; Terrett, D.; Tingley, B.; Trager, S. C.; Turon, C.; Ulla, A.; Utrilla, E.; Valentini, G.; van Elteren, A.; Van Hemelryck, E.; van Leeuwen, M.; Varadi, M.; Vecchiato, A.; Veljanoski, J.; Via, T.; Vicente, D.; Vogt, S.; Voss, H.; Votruba, V.; Voutsinas, S.; Walmsley, G.; Weiler, M.; Weingrill, K.; Werner, D.; Wevers, T.; Whitehead, G.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Yoldas, A.; Žerjal, M.; Zucker, S.; Zurbach, C.; Zwitter, T.; Alecu, A.; Allen, M.; Allende Prieto, C.; Amorim, A.; Anglada-Escudé, G.; Arsenijevic, V.; Azaz, S.; Balm, P.; Beck, M.; Bernstein, H. -H; Bigot, L.; Bijaoui, A.; Blasco, C.; Bonfigli, M.; Bono, G.; Boudreault, S.; Bressan, A.; Brown, S.; Brunet, P. -M; Bunclark, P.; Buonanno, R.; Butkevich, A. G.; Carret, C.; Carrion, C.; Chemin, L.; Chéreau, F.; Corcione, L.; Darmigny, E.; de Boer, K. S.; de Teodoro, P.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Delle Luche, C.; Domingues, C. D.; Dubath, P.; Fodor, F.; Frézouls, B.; Fries, A.; Fustes, D.; Fyfe, D.; Gallardo, E.; Gallegos, J.; Gardiol, D.; Gebran, M.; Gomboc, A.; Gómez, A.; Grux, E.; Gueguen, A.; Heyrovsky, A.; Hoar, J.; Iannicola, G.; Isasi Parache, Y.; Janotto, A. -M; Joliet, E.; Jonckheere, A.; Keil, R.; Kim, D. -W; Klagyivik, P.; Klar, J.; Knude, J.; Kochukhov, O.; Kolka, I.; Kos, J.; Kutka, A.; Lainey, V.; LeBouquin, D.; Liu, C.; Loreggia, D.; Makarov, V. V.; Marseille, M. G.; Martayan, C.; Martinez-Rubi, O.; Massart, B.; Meynadier, F.; Mignot, S.; Munari, U.; Nguyen, A. -T; Nordlander, T.; Ocvirk, P.; O'Flaherty, K. S.; Olias Sanz, A.; Ortiz, P.; Osorio, J.; Oszkiewicz, D.; Ouzounis, A.; Palmer, M.; Park, P.; Pasquato, E.; Peltzer, C.; Peralta, J.; Péturaud, F.; Pieniluoma, T.; Pigozzi, E.; Poels, J.; Prat, G.; Prod'homme, T.; Raison, F.; Rebordao, J. M.; Risquez, D.; Rocca-Volmerange, B.; Rosen, S.; Ruiz-Fuertes, M. I.; Russo, F.; Sembay, S.; Serraller Vizcaino, I.; Short, A.; Siebert, A.; Silva, H.; Sinachopoulos, D.; Slezak, E.; Soffel, M.; Sosnowska, D.; Straižys, V.; ter Linden, M.; Terrell, D.; Theil, S.; Tiede, C.; Troisi, L.; Tsalmantza, P.; Tur, D.; Vaccari, M.; Vachier, F.; Valles, P.; Van Hamme, W.; Veltz, L.; Virtanen, J.; Wallut, J. -M; Wichmann, R.; Wilkinson, M. I.; Ziaeepour, H.; Zschocke, S.

    2016-01-01

    Gaia is a cornerstone mission in the science programme of the EuropeanSpace Agency (ESA). The spacecraft construction was approved in 2006, following a study in which the original interferometric concept was changed to a direct-imaging approach. Both the spacecraft and the payload were built by

  12. Planetary cubesats - mission architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousquet, Pierre W.; Ulamec, Stephan; Jaumann, Ralf; Vane, Gregg; Baker, John; Clark, Pamela; Komarek, Tomas; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre; Yano, Hajime

    2016-07-01

    Miniaturisation of technologies over the last decade has made cubesats a valid solution for deep space missions. For example, a spectacular set 13 cubesats will be delivered in 2018 to a high lunar orbit within the frame of SLS' first flight, referred to as Exploration Mission-1 (EM-1). Each of them will perform autonomously valuable scientific or technological investigations. Other situations are encountered, such as the auxiliary landers / rovers and autonomous camera that will be carried in 2018 to asteroid 1993 JU3 by JAXA's Hayabusas 2 probe, and will provide complementary scientific return to their mothership. In this case, cubesats depend on a larger spacecraft for deployment and other resources, such as telecommunication relay or propulsion. For both situations, we will describe in this paper how cubesats can be used as remote observatories (such as NEO detection missions), as technology demonstrators, and how they can perform or contribute to all steps in the Deep Space exploration sequence: Measurements during Deep Space cruise, Body Fly-bies, Body Orbiters, Atmospheric probes (Jupiter probe, Venus atmospheric probes, ..), Static Landers, Mobile landers (such as balloons, wheeled rovers, small body rovers, drones, penetrators, floating devices, …), Sample Return. We will elaborate on mission architectures for the most promising concepts where cubesat size devices offer an advantage in terms of affordability, feasibility, and increase of scientific return.

  13. Mission from Mars:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dindler, Christian; Eriksson, Eva; Iversen, Ole Sejer

    2005-01-01

    In this paper a particular design method is propagated as a supplement to existing descriptive approaches to current practice studies especially suitable for gathering requirements for the design of children's technology. The Mission from Mars method was applied during the design of an electronic...

  14. MIV Project: Mission scenario

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravazzotti, Mariolina T.; Jørgensen, John Leif; Thuesen, Gøsta;

    1997-01-01

    Under the ESA contract #11453/95/NL/JG(SC), aiming at assessing the feasibility of Rendez-vous and docking of unmanned spacecrafts, a msiision scenario was defined. This report describes the secquence of manouvres and task allocations for such missions....

  15. The Phoenix Mars Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamppari, Leslie K.; Smith, Peter H.

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation details the Phoenix Mission which was designed to enhance our understanding of water and the potential for habitability on the north polar regions of Mars. The slides show the instruments and the robotics designed to scrape Martian surface material, and analyze it in hopes of identifying water in the form of ice, and other chemicals.

  16. Mesures de contrôle en psychiatrie : impacts cliniques et juridiques de la recherche interprétative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EMMANUELLE BERNHEIM

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available L’utilisation des mesures de contrôle (isolement et contention est une pratique très controversée en psychiatrie, tant sur les plans thérapeutique que légal. Le projet de recherche dont il est question dans cet article vise à mettre au jour l’expérience subjective des infirmières et des patients, dans un objectif d’amélioration des pratiques cliniques. La valorisation du discours des patients, à travers une posture épistémologique interprétative, se heurte aux exigences peu adaptées de comités d’éthique de la recherche habitués aux caractéristiques de la recherche positiviste. Pourtant, c’est par la mise au jour des expériences des usagers que des progrès, tant au niveau clinique que juridique, ont pu être faits dans le passé. Aujourd’hui, la recherche doit servir à redonner une place aux patients, non seulement au sein de l’hôpital, mais également au sein de la société.

  17. La thèse de Feldstein-Horioka: Ue mesure de la mobilité internationale du capital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Sousa Andrade Alberto Joao

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available (portugalski Nous présentons la thèse de Feldstein-Horioka (F-H sur la mobilité du capital et les développements qu’elle a suscités. Il s’agit d’une thèse qui est très ouverte à la possibilité de réfutation et dont l’histoire illustre bien la pensée méthodologique nonnaïve de Karl Popper: les discussions sur sa réfutation, en parallèle avec les tentatives de consolidation ("d’immunisation", au sens de K. Popper, ont conduit à de nouvelles lectures sur la mobilité du capital. Ces efforts de consolidation (d’ "immunization" ont conduit cette thèse à intégrer des nouvelles méthodologies économétriques et à changer partiellement son objet, en mesurant aussi la soutenabilité externe. La thèse de F-H constitue un cas exemplaire d’intégration de l’analyse théorique et d’analyse empirique.

  18. The nuclear quadrupole moment mesured with Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance NQR : Principle and definition

    CERN Document Server

    Belfkir, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear quadruple moment is a fundamental character associated to the nuclei, this moment is related to the not purely spherical distribution in the nuclei, indeed its measure allows us to survey the geometric deformation of the nuclei of its spherical shape. The measurement methods of the quadruple moment is to study the electrical energy hyperfine interaction between the quadruple moment and the electric field gradient due to atomics electrons, one of the methods is the nuclear quadruple resonance NQR which is observed at the transitions between energy levels splits by the effect of the quadruple interaction and induced by a radio frequency field.

  19. The OCO-3 MIssion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldering, A.; Kaki, S.; Crisp, D.; Gunson, M. R.

    2013-12-01

    For the OCO-3 mission, NASA has approved a proposal to install the OCO-2 flight spare instrument on the International Space Station (ISS). The OCO-3 mission on ISS will have a key role in delivering sustained, global, scientifically-based, spaceborne measurements of atmospheric CO2 to monitor natural sources and sinks as part of NASA's proposed OCO-2/OCO-3/ASCENDS mission sequence and NASA's Climate Architecture. The OCO-3 mission will contribute to understanding of the terrestrial carbon cycle through enabling flux estimates at smaller spatial scales and through fluorescence measurements that will reduce the uncertainty in terrestrial carbon flux measurements and drive bottom-up land surface models through constraining GPP. The combined nominal missions of both OCO-2 and OCO-3 will likely span a complete El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) cycle, a key indicator of ocean variability. In addition, OCO-3 may allow investigation of the high-frequency and wavenumber structures suggested by eddying ocean circulation and ecosystem dynamics models. Finally, significant growth of urban agglomerations is underway and projected to continue in the coming decades. With the city mode sampling of the OCO-3 instrument on ISS we can evaluate different sampling strategies aimed at studying anthropogenic sources and demonstrate elements of a Greenhouse Gas Information system, as well as providing a gap-filler for tracking trends in the fastest-changing anthropogenic signals during the coming decade. In this presentation, we will describe our science objectives, the overall approach of utilization of the ISS for OCO-3, and the unique features of XCO2 measurements from ISS.

  20. The Mothership Mission Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, S. M.; DiCorcia, J. D.; Bonin, G.; Gump, D.; Lewis, J. S.; Foulds, C.; Faber, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Mothership is considered to be a dedicated deep space carrier spacecraft. It is currently being developed by Deep Space Industries (DSI) as a mission concept that enables a broad participation in the scientific exploration of small bodies - the Mothership mission architecture. A Mothership shall deliver third-party nano-sats, experiments and instruments to Near Earth Asteroids (NEOs), comets or moons. The Mothership service includes delivery of nano-sats, communication to Earth and visuals of the asteroid surface and surrounding area. The Mothership is designed to carry about 10 nano-sats, based upon a variation of the Cubesat standard, with some flexibility on the specific geometry. The Deep Space Nano-Sat reference design is a 14.5 cm cube, which accommodates the same volume as a traditional 3U CubeSat. To reduce cost, Mothership is designed as a secondary payload aboard launches to GTO. DSI is offering slots for nano-sats to individual customers. This enables organizations with relatively low operating budgets to closely examine an asteroid with highly specialized sensors of their own choosing and carry out experiments in the proximity of or on the surface of an asteroid, while the nano-sats can be built or commissioned by a variety of smaller institutions, companies, or agencies. While the overall Mothership mission will have a financial volume somewhere between a European Space Agencies' (ESA) S- and M-class mission for instance, it can be funded through a number of small and individual funding sources and programs, hence avoiding the processes associated with traditional space exploration missions. DSI has been able to identify a significant interest in the planetary science and nano-satellite communities.

  1. The Double Star mission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The Double Star Programme (DSP was first proposed by China in March, 1997 at the Fragrant Hill Workshop on Space Science, Beijing, organized by the Chinese Academy of Science. It is the first mission in collaboration between China and ESA. The mission is made of two spacecraft to investigate the magnetospheric global processes and their response to the interplanetary disturbances in conjunction with the Cluster mission. The first spacecraft, TC-1 (Tan Ce means "Explorer", was launched on 29 December 2003, and the second one, TC-2, on 25 July 2004 on board two Chinese Long March 2C rockets. TC-1 was injected in an equatorial orbit of 570x79000 km altitude with a 28° inclination and TC-2 in a polar orbit of 560x38000 km altitude. The orbits have been designed to complement the Cluster mission by maximizing the time when both Cluster and Double Star are in the same scientific regions. The two missions allow simultaneous observations of the Earth magnetosphere from six points in space. To facilitate the comparison of data, half of the Double Star payload is made of spare or duplicates of the Cluster instruments; the other half is made of Chinese instruments. The science operations are coordinated by the Chinese DSP Scientific Operations Centre (DSOC in Beijing and the European Payload Operations Service (EPOS at RAL, UK. The spacecraft and ground segment operations are performed by the DSP Operations and Management Centre (DOMC and DSOC in China, using three ground station, in Beijing, Shanghai and Villafranca.

  2. NASA's Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abell, P. A.; Mazanek, D. D.; Reeves, D. M.; Chodas, P. W.; Gates, M. M.; Johnson, L. N.; Ticker, R. L.

    2017-01-01

    Mission Description and Objectives: NASA's Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM) consists of two mission segments: 1) the Asteroid Redirect Robotic Mission (ARRM), a robotic mission to visit a large (greater than approximately 100 meters diameter) near-Earth asteroid (NEA), collect a multi-ton boulder from its surface along with regolith samples, and return the asteroidal material to a stable orbit around the Moon; and 2) the Asteroid Redirect Crewed Mission (ARCM), in which astronauts will explore and investigate the boulder and return to Earth with samples. The ARRM is currently planned to launch at the end of 2021 and the ARCM is scheduled for late 2026.

  3. Defining Space Mission Architects for the Smaller Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, C.

    1999-01-01

    The definition of the Space Mission Architect (SMA) must be clear in both technical and human terms if we expect to train and/or to find people needed to architect the numbers of smaller missions expected in the future.

  4. Sentinel-2 Mission status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoersch, Bianca; Colin, Olivier; Gascon, Ferran; Arino, Olivier; Spoto, Francois; Marchese, Franco; Krassenburg, Mike; Koetz, Benjamin

    2016-04-01

    Copernicus is a joint initiative of the European Commission (EC) and the European Space Agency (ESA), designed to establish a European capacity for the provision and use of operational monitoring information for environment and security applications. Within the Copernicus programme, ESA is responsible for the development of the Space Component, a fully operational space-based capability to supply earth-observation data to sustain environmental information Services in Europe. The Sentinel missions are Copernicus dedicated Earth Observation missions composing the essential elements of the Space Component. In the global Copernicus framework, they are complemented by other satellites made available by third-parties or by ESA and coordinated in the synergistic system through the Copernicus Data-Access system versus the Copernicus Services. The Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission provides continuity to services relying on multi-spectral high-resolution optical observations over global terrestrial surfaces. Sentinel-2 capitalizes on the technology and the vast experience acquired in Europe and the US to sustain the operational supply of data for services such as forest monitoring, land cover changes detection or natural disasters management. The Sentinel-2 mission offers an unprecedented combination of the following capabilities: ○ Systematic global coverage of land surfaces: from 56°South to 84°North, coastal waters and Mediterranean sea; ○ High revisit: every 5 days at equator under the same viewing conditions with 2 satellites; ○ High spatial resolution: 10m, 20m and 60m; ○ Multi-spectral information with 13 bands in the visible, near infra-red and short wave infra-red part of the spectrum; ○ Wide field of view: 290 km. The data from the Sentinel-2 mission are available openly and freely for all users with online easy access since December 2015. The presentation will give a status report on the Sentinel-2 mission, and outlook for the remaining ramp-up Phase, the

  5. The Sentinel-3 Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berruti, B.; Mavrocordatos, C.

    2010-12-01

    The Sentinel-3 Operational Mission is part of the Global Monitoring for Environment and Security (GMES) initiative, which was established to support Europe's goals regarding sustainable development and global governance of the environment by providing timely and quality data, information, services and knowledge. The series of Sentinel-3 satellites will ensure global, frequent and near-realtime ocean, ice and land monitoring, with the provision of observation data in routine, long term (20 years of operations) and continuous fashion, with a consistent quality and a very high level of availability. The first launch is expected in 2013. Currently half way through the development phase of the project, this paper presents the consolidated Sentinel-3 design and expected performances related to the different mission objectives (ocean colour, altimetry, surface temperature, land). The operational concept and key system performances are also addressed, as well as the satellite and instruments design. Finally, the schedule for the remaining development is presented.

  6. The THEMIS Mission

    CERN Document Server

    Burch, J. L

    2009-01-01

    The THEMIS mission aims to determine the trigger and large-scale evolution of substorms by employing five identical micro-satellites which line up along the Earth's magnetotail to track the motion of particles, plasma, and waves from one point to another and for the first time, resolve space-time ambiguities in key regions of the magnetosphere on a global scale. The primary goal of THEMIS is to elucidate which magnetotail process is responsible for substorm onset at the region where substorm auroras map: (i) local disruption of the plasma sheet current (current disruption) or (ii) the interaction of the current sheet with the rapid influx of plasma emanating from reconnection. The probes also traverse the radiation belts and the dayside magnetosphere, allowing THEMIS to address additional baseline objectives. This volume describes the mission, the instrumentation, and the data derived from them.

  7. Asteroid Kinetic Impactor Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesley, Steven

    2015-08-01

    Asteroid impact missions can be carried out as a relatively low-cost add-ons to most asteroid rendezvous missions and such impact experiments have tremendous potential, both scientifically and in the arena of planetary defense.The science returns from an impactor demonstration begin with the documentation of the global effects of the impact, such as changes in orbit and rotation state, the creation and dissipation of an ejecta plume and debris disk, and morphological changes across the body due to the transmission of seismic waves, which might induce landslides and toppling of boulders, etc. At a local level, an inspection of the impact crater and ejecta blanket reveals critical material strength information, as well as spectral differences between the surface and subsurface material.From the planetary defense perspective, an impact demonstration will prove humankind’s capacity to alter the orbit of a potentially threatening asteroid. This technological leap comes in two parts. First, terminal guidance systems that can deliver an impactor with small errors relative to the ~100-200 meter size of a likely impactor have yet to be demonstrated in a deep space environment. Second, the response of an asteroid to such an impact is only understood theoretically due to the potentially significant dependence on the momentum carried by escaping ejecta, which would tend to enhance the deflection by tens of percent and perhaps as much as a factor of a few. A lack of validated understanding of momentum enhancement is a significant obstacle in properly sizing a real-world impactor deflection mission.This presentation will describe the drivers for asteroid impact demonstrations and cover the range of such concepts, starting with ESA’s pioneering Don Quijote mission concept and leading to a brief description of concepts under study at the present time, including the OSIRIS-REx/ISIS, BASiX/KIX and AIM/DART (AIDA) concepts.

  8. Deep Blue Mission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The Chinese Navy dispatches ships to the Gulf of Aden on a second escort mission, marking its growing strength in the face of more diverse challenges Elarly in the morning of April 23, crew- imembers from the Chinese Navy’s second escort fleet in the Gulf of Aden Igathered on deck and saluted to the east, paying their respects to the motherland in celebration of the 60th anniversary of the Chinese Navy. This fleet,

  9. Space VLBI Mission: VSOP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Yasuhiro; Hirabayashi, Hisashi; Kobayashi, Hideyuki; Shibata, Katsunori M.; Umemoto, Tomofumi; Edwards, P. G.

    2001-03-01

    We succeeded in performing space VLBI observations using the VLBI satellite HALCA (VSOP satellite), launched in February, 1997 aboard the first M-V rocket developed by ISAS. The mission is led by ISAS and NAO, with the collaborations from CRL, NASA, NRAO, and other institutes and observatories in Europe, Australia, Canada, South-Africa, and China, We succeeded to make a lot of observations and to get the new features from the active galaxies, the cosmic jets, and other astronomical objects.

  10. A Somalia mission experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahomed, Zeyn; Moolla, Muhammad; Motara, Feroza; Laher, Abdullah

    2012-06-28

    Reports about The Horn of Africa Famine Crisis in 2011 flooded our news bulletins and newspapers. Yet the nations of the world failed to respond and alleviate the unfolding disaster. In August 2011, the Gift of the Givers Foundation mobilised what was to become the largest humanitarian mission ever conducted by an African organisation. Almost a year later, the effort continues, changing the face of disaster medicine as we know it.

  11. A Mars 1984 mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    Mission objectives are developed for the next logical step in the investigation of the local physical and chemical environments and the search for organic compounds on Mars. The necessity of three vehicular elements: orbiter, penetrator, and rover for in situ investigations of atmospheric-lithospheric interactions is emphasized. A summary report and committee recommendations are included with the full report of the Mars Science Working Group.

  12. Cyber Network Mission Dependencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-18

    Technology applications 12 5 VMs allow one host to belong to multiple VLANs 14 6 Asset recommendation system mockup 15 7 Perturbative mapping may...extended list of critical assets based on communications patterns and software dependencies. Once vulnerabilities have been assessed, AMMO produces a...status of not just network machines, but also software tools, network connections, server room conditions, and many other mission parameters. From this

  13. The Gaia mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaia Collaboration; Prusti, T.; de Bruijne, J. H. J.; Brown, A. G. A.; Vallenari, A.; Babusiaux, C.; Bailer-Jones, C. A. L.; Bastian, U.; Biermann, M.; Evans, D. W.; Eyer, L.; Jansen, F.; Jordi, C.; Klioner, S. A.; Lammers, U.; Lindegren, L.; Luri, X.; Mignard, F.; Milligan, D. J.; Panem, C.; Poinsignon, V.; Pourbaix, D.; Randich, S.; Sarri, G.; Sartoretti, P.; Siddiqui, H. I.; Soubiran, C.; Valette, V.; van Leeuwen, F.; Walton, N. A.; Aerts, C.; Arenou, F.; Cropper, M.; Drimmel, R.; Høg, E.; Katz, D.; Lattanzi, M. G.; O'Mullane, W.; Grebel, E. K.; Holland, A. D.; Huc, C.; Passot, X.; Bramante, L.; Cacciari, C.; Castañeda, J.; Chaoul, L.; Cheek, N.; De Angeli, F.; Fabricius, C.; Guerra, R.; Hernández, J.; Jean-Antoine-Piccolo, A.; Masana, E.; Messineo, R.; Mowlavi, N.; Nienartowicz, K.; Ordóñez-Blanco, D.; Panuzzo, P.; Portell, J.; Richards, P. J.; Riello, M.; Seabroke, G. M.; Tanga, P.; Thévenin, F.; Torra, J.; Els, S. G.; Gracia-Abril, G.; Comoretto, G.; Garcia-Reinaldos, M.; Lock, T.; Mercier, E.; Altmann, M.; Andrae, R.; Astraatmadja, T. L.; Bellas-Velidis, I.; Benson, K.; Berthier, J.; Blomme, R.; Busso, G.; Carry, B.; Cellino, A.; Clementini, G.; Cowell, S.; Creevey, O.; Cuypers, J.; Davidson, M.; De Ridder, J.; de Torres, A.; Delchambre, L.; Dell'Oro, A.; Ducourant, C.; Frémat, Y.; García-Torres, M.; Gosset, E.; Halbwachs, J.-L.; Hambly, N. C.; Harrison, D. L.; Hauser, M.; Hestroffer, D.; Hodgkin, S. T.; Huckle, H. E.; Hutton, A.; Jasniewicz, G.; Jordan, S.; Kontizas, M.; Korn, A. J.; Lanzafame, A. C.; Manteiga, M.; Moitinho, A.; Muinonen, K.; Osinde, J.; Pancino, E.; Pauwels, T.; Petit, J.-M.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Robin, A. C.; Sarro, L. M.; Siopis, C.; Smith, M.; Smith, K. W.; Sozzetti, A.; Thuillot, W.; van Reeven, W.; Viala, Y.; Abbas, U.; Abreu Aramburu, A.; Accart, S.; Aguado, J. J.; Allan, P. M.; Allasia, W.; Altavilla, G.; Álvarez, M. A.; Alves, J.; Anderson, R. I.; Andrei, A. H.; Anglada Varela, E.; Antiche, E.; Antoja, T.; Antón, S.; Arcay, B.; Atzei, A.; Ayache, L.; Bach, N.; Baker, S. G.; Balaguer-Núñez, L.; Barache, C.; Barata, C.; Barbier, A.; Barblan, F.; Baroni, M.; Barrado y Navascués, D.; Barros, M.; Barstow, M. A.; Becciani, U.; Bellazzini, M.; Bellei, G.; Bello García, A.; Belokurov, V.; Bendjoya, P.; Berihuete, A.; Bianchi, L.; Bienaymé, O.; Billebaud, F.; Blagorodnova, N.; Blanco-Cuaresma, S.; Boch, T.; Bombrun, A.; Borrachero, R.; Bouquillon, S.; Bourda, G.; Bouy, H.; Bragaglia, A.; Breddels, M. A.; Brouillet, N.; Brüsemeister, T.; Bucciarelli, B.; Budnik, F.; Burgess, P.; Burgon, R.; Burlacu, A.; Busonero, D.; Buzzi, R.; Caffau, E.; Cambras, J.; Campbell, H.; Cancelliere, R.; Cantat-Gaudin, T.; Carlucci, T.; Carrasco, J. M.; Castellani, M.; Charlot, P.; Charnas, J.; Charvet, P.; Chassat, F.; Chiavassa, A.; Clotet, M.; Cocozza, G.; Collins, R. S.; Collins, P.; Costigan, G.; Crifo, F.; Cross, N. J. G.; Crosta, M.; Crowley, C.; Dafonte, C.; Damerdji, Y.; Dapergolas, A.; David, P.; David, M.; De Cat, P.; de Felice, F.; de Laverny, P.; De Luise, F.; De March, R.; de Martino, D.; de Souza, R.; Debosscher, J.; del Pozo, E.; Delbo, M.; Delgado, A.; Delgado, H. E.; di Marco, F.; Di Matteo, P.; Diakite, S.; Distefano, E.; Dolding, C.; Dos Anjos, S.; Drazinos, P.; Durán, J.; Dzigan, Y.; Ecale, E.; Edvardsson, B.; Enke, H.; Erdmann, M.; Escolar, D.; Espina, M.; Evans, N. W.; Eynard Bontemps, G.; Fabre, C.; Fabrizio, M.; Faigler, S.; Falcão, A. J.; Farràs Casas, M.; Faye, F.; Federici, L.; Fedorets, G.; Fernández-Hernández, J.; Fernique, P.; Fienga, A.; Figueras, F.; Filippi, F.; Findeisen, K.; Fonti, A.; Fouesneau, M.; Fraile, E.; Fraser, M.; Fuchs, J.; Furnell, R.; Gai, M.; Galleti, S.; Galluccio, L.; Garabato, D.; García-Sedano, F.; Garé, P.; Garofalo, A.; Garralda, N.; Gavras, P.; Gerssen, J.; Geyer, R.; Gilmore, G.; Girona, S.; Giuffrida, G.; Gomes, M.; González-Marcos, A.; González-Núñez, J.; González-Vidal, J. J.; Granvik, M.; Guerrier, A.; Guillout, P.; Guiraud, J.; Gúrpide, A.; Gutiérrez-Sánchez, R.; Guy, L. P.; Haigron, R.; Hatzidimitriou, D.; Haywood, M.; Heiter, U.; Helmi, A.; Hobbs, D.; Hofmann, W.; Holl, B.; Holland, G.; Hunt, J. A. S.; Hypki, A.; Icardi, V.; Irwin, M.; Jevardat de Fombelle, G.; Jofré, P.; Jonker, P. G.; Jorissen, A.; Julbe, F.; Karampelas, A.; Kochoska, A.; Kohley, R.; Kolenberg, K.; Kontizas, E.; Koposov, S. E.; Kordopatis, G.; Koubsky, P.; Kowalczyk, A.; Krone-Martins, A.; Kudryashova, M.; Kull, I.; Bachchan, R. K.; Lacoste-Seris, F.; Lanza, A. F.; Lavigne, J.-B.; Le Poncin-Lafitte, C.; Lebreton, Y.; Lebzelter, T.; Leccia, S.; Leclerc, N.; Lecoeur-Taibi, I.; Lemaitre, V.; Lenhardt, H.; Leroux, F.; Liao, S.; Licata, E.; Lindstrøm, H. E. P.; Lister, T. A.; Livanou, E.; Lobel, A.; Löffler, W.; López, M.; Lopez-Lozano, A.; Lorenz, D.; Loureiro, T.; MacDonald, I.; Magalhães Fernandes, T.; Managau, S.; Mann, R. G.; Mantelet, G.; Marchal, O.; Marchant, J. M.; Marconi, M.; Marie, J.; Marinoni, S.; Marrese, P. M.; Marschalkó, G.; Marshall, D. J.; Martín-Fleitas, J. M.; Martino, M.; Mary, N.; Matijevič, G.; Mazeh, T.; McMillan, P. J.; Messina, S.; Mestre, A.; Michalik, D.; Millar, N. R.; Miranda, B. M. H.; Molina, D.; Molinaro, R.; Molinaro, M.; Molnár, L.; Moniez, M.; Montegriffo, P.; Monteiro, D.; Mor, R.; Mora, A.; Morbidelli, R.; Morel, T.; Morgenthaler, S.; Morley, T.; Morris, D.; Mulone, A. F.; Muraveva, T.; Musella, I.; Narbonne, J.; Nelemans, G.; Nicastro, L.; Noval, L.; Ordénovic, C.; Ordieres-Meré, J.; Osborne, P.; Pagani, C.; Pagano, I.; Pailler, F.; Palacin, H.; Palaversa, L.; Parsons, P.; Paulsen, T.; Pecoraro, M.; Pedrosa, R.; Pentikäinen, H.; Pereira, J.; Pichon, B.; Piersimoni, A. M.; Pineau, F.-X.; Plachy, E.; Plum, G.; Poujoulet, E.; Prša, A.; Pulone, L.; Ragaini, S.; Rago, S.; Rambaux, N.; Ramos-Lerate, M.; Ranalli, P.; Rauw, G.; Read, A.; Regibo, S.; Renk, F.; Reylé, C.; Ribeiro, R. A.; Rimoldini, L.; Ripepi, V.; Riva, A.; Rixon, G.; Roelens, M.; Romero-Gómez, M.; Rowell, N.; Royer, F.; Rudolph, A.; Ruiz-Dern, L.; Sadowski, G.; Sagristà Sellés, T.; Sahlmann, J.; Salgado, J.; Salguero, E.; Sarasso, M.; Savietto, H.; Schnorhk, A.; Schultheis, M.; Sciacca, E.; Segol, M.; Segovia, J. C.; Segransan, D.; Serpell, E.; Shih, I.-C.; Smareglia, R.; Smart, R. L.; Smith, C.; Solano, E.; Solitro, F.; Sordo, R.; Soria Nieto, S.; Souchay, J.; Spagna, A.; Spoto, F.; Stampa, U.; Steele, I. A.; Steidelmüller, H.; Stephenson, C. A.; Stoev, H.; Suess, F. F.; Süveges, M.; Surdej, J.; Szabados, L.; Szegedi-Elek, E.; Tapiador, D.; Taris, F.; Tauran, G.; Taylor, M. B.; Teixeira, R.; Terrett, D.; Tingley, B.; Trager, S. C.; Turon, C.; Ulla, A.; Utrilla, E.; Valentini, G.; van Elteren, A.; Van Hemelryck, E.; van Leeuwen, M.; Varadi, M.; Vecchiato, A.; Veljanoski, J.; Via, T.; Vicente, D.; Vogt, S.; Voss, H.; Votruba, V.; Voutsinas, S.; Walmsley, G.; Weiler, M.; Weingrill, K.; Werner, D.; Wevers, T.; Whitehead, G.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Yoldas, A.; Žerjal, M.; Zucker, S.; Zurbach, C.; Zwitter, T.; Alecu, A.; Allen, M.; Allende Prieto, C.; Amorim, A.; Anglada-Escudé, G.; Arsenijevic, V.; Azaz, S.; Balm, P.; Beck, M.; Bernstein, H.-H.; Bigot, L.; Bijaoui, A.; Blasco, C.; Bonfigli, M.; Bono, G.; Boudreault, S.; Bressan, A.; Brown, S.; Brunet, P.-M.; Bunclark, P.; Buonanno, R.; Butkevich, A. G.; Carret, C.; Carrion, C.; Chemin, L.; Chéreau, F.; Corcione, L.; Darmigny, E.; de Boer, K. S.; de Teodoro, P.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Delle Luche, C.; Domingues, C. D.; Dubath, P.; Fodor, F.; Frézouls, B.; Fries, A.; Fustes, D.; Fyfe, D.; Gallardo, E.; Gallegos, J.; Gardiol, D.; Gebran, M.; Gomboc, A.; Gómez, A.; Grux, E.; Gueguen, A.; Heyrovsky, A.; Hoar, J.; Iannicola, G.; Isasi Parache, Y.; Janotto, A.-M.; Joliet, E.; Jonckheere, A.; Keil, R.; Kim, D.-W.; Klagyivik, P.; Klar, J.; Knude, J.; Kochukhov, O.; Kolka, I.; Kos, J.; Kutka, A.; Lainey, V.; LeBouquin, D.; Liu, C.; Loreggia, D.; Makarov, V. V.; Marseille, M. G.; Martayan, C.; Martinez-Rubi, O.; Massart, B.; Meynadier, F.; Mignot, S.; Munari, U.; Nguyen, A.-T.; Nordlander, T.; Ocvirk, P.; O'Flaherty, K. S.; Olias Sanz, A.; Ortiz, P.; Osorio, J.; Oszkiewicz, D.; Ouzounis, A.; Palmer, M.; Park, P.; Pasquato, E.; Peltzer, C.; Peralta, J.; Péturaud, F.; Pieniluoma, T.; Pigozzi, E.; Poels, J.; Prat, G.; Prod'homme, T.; Raison, F.; Rebordao, J. M.; Risquez, D.; Rocca-Volmerange, B.; Rosen, S.; Ruiz-Fuertes, M. I.; Russo, F.; Sembay, S.; Serraller Vizcaino, I.; Short, A.; Siebert, A.; Silva, H.; Sinachopoulos, D.; Slezak, E.; Soffel, M.; Sosnowska, D.; Straižys, V.; ter Linden, M.; Terrell, D.; Theil, S.; Tiede, C.; Troisi, L.; Tsalmantza, P.; Tur, D.; Vaccari, M.; Vachier, F.; Valles, P.; Van Hamme, W.; Veltz, L.; Virtanen, J.; Wallut, J.-M.; Wichmann, R.; Wilkinson, M. I.; Ziaeepour, H.; Zschocke, S.

    2016-11-01

    Gaia is a cornerstone mission in the science programme of the EuropeanSpace Agency (ESA). The spacecraft construction was approved in 2006, following a study in which the original interferometric concept was changed to a direct-imaging approach. Both the spacecraft and the payload were built by European industry. The involvement of the scientific community focusses on data processing for which the international Gaia Data Processing and Analysis Consortium (DPAC) was selected in 2007. Gaia was launched on 19 December 2013 and arrived at its operating point, the second Lagrange point of the Sun-Earth-Moon system, a few weeks later. The commissioning of the spacecraft and payload was completed on 19 July 2014. The nominal five-year mission started with four weeks of special, ecliptic-pole scanning and subsequently transferred into full-sky scanning mode. We recall the scientific goals of Gaia and give a description of the as-built spacecraft that is currently (mid-2016) being operated to achieve these goals. We pay special attention to the payload module, the performance of which is closely related to the scientific performance of the mission. We provide a summary of the commissioning activities and findings, followed by a description of the routine operational mode. We summarise scientific performance estimates on the basis of in-orbit operations. Several intermediate Gaia data releases are planned and the data can be retrieved from the Gaia Archive, which is available through the Gaia home page. http://www.cosmos.esa.int/gaia

  14. The Juno Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Juno mission is the second mission in NASA's New Frontiers program. Launched in August 2011, Juno arrives at Jupiter in July 2016. Juno science goals include the study of Jupiter's origin, interior structure, deep atmosphere, aurora and magnetosphere. Jupiter's formation is fundamental to the evolution of our solar system and to the distribution of volatiles early in the solar system's history. Juno's measurements of the abundance of Oxygen and Nitrogen in Jupiter's atmosphere, and the detailed maps of Jupiter's gravity and magnetic field structure will constrain theories of early planetary development. Juno's orbit around Jupiter is a polar elliptical orbit with perijove approximately 5000 km above the visible cloud tops. The payload consists of a set of microwave antennas for deep sounding, magnetometers, gravity radio science, low and high energy charged particle detectors, electric and magnetic field radio and plasma wave experiment, ultraviolet imaging spectrograph, infrared imager and a visible camera. The Juno design enables the first detailed investigation of Jupiter's interior structure, and deep atmosphere as well as the first in depth exploration of Jupiter's polar magnetosphere. The Juno mission design, science goals, and measurements related to the origin of Jupiter will be presented.

  15. Mars Exploration Rover mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisp, Joy A.; Adler, Mark; Matijevic, Jacob R.; Squyres, Steven W.; Arvidson, Raymond E.; Kass, David M.

    2003-10-01

    In January 2004 the Mars Exploration Rover mission will land two rovers at two different landing sites that show possible evidence for past liquid-water activity. The spacecraft design is based on the Mars Pathfinder configuration for cruise and entry, descent, and landing. Each of the identical rovers is equipped with a science payload of two remote-sensing instruments that will view the surrounding terrain from the top of a mast, a robotic arm that can place three instruments and a rock abrasion tool on selected rock and soil samples, and several onboard magnets and calibration targets. Engineering sensors and components useful for science investigations include stereo navigation cameras, stereo hazard cameras in front and rear, wheel motors, wheel motor current and voltage, the wheels themselves for digging, gyros, accelerometers, and reference solar cell readings. Mission operations will allow commanding of the rover each Martian day, or sol, on the basis of the previous sol's data. Over a 90-sol mission lifetime, the rovers are expected to drive hundreds of meters while carrying out field geology investigations, exploration, and atmospheric characterization. The data products will be delivered to the Planetary Data System as integrated batch archives.

  16. Multi-Mission SDR Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Wireless transceivers used for NASA space missions have traditionally been highly custom and mission specific. Programs such as the GRC Space Transceiver Radio...

  17. Mission Critical Occupation (MCO) Charts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — Agencies report resource data and targets for government-wide mission critical occupations and agency specific mission critical and/or high risk occupations. These...

  18. Scientific Value of a Saturn Atmospheric Probe Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon-Miller, A. A.; Lunine, J. I.; Atreya, S. K.; Spilker, T. R.; Coustenis, A.; Atkinson, D. H.

    2012-01-01

    Atmospheric entry probe mISSions to the giant planets can uniquely discriminate between competing theories of solar system formation and the origin and evolution of the giant planets and their atmospheres. This provides for important comparative studies of the gas and ice giants, and to provide a laboratory for studying the atmospheric chemistries, dynamics, and interiors of all the planets including Earth. The giant planets also represent a valuable link to extrasolar planetary systems. As outlined in the recent Planetary Decadal Survey, a Saturn Probe mission - with a shallow probe - ranks as a high priority for a New Frontiers class mission [1].

  19. Exomars Mission Achievements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecomte, J.; Juillet, J. J.

    2016-12-01

    ExoMars is the first step of the European Space Agency's Aurora Exploration Programme. Comprising two missions, the first one launched in 2016 and the second one to be launched in 2020, ExoMars is a program developed in a broad ESA and Roscosmos co-operation, with significant contribution from NASA that addresses the scientific question of whether life ever existed on Mars and demonstrate key technologies for entry, descent, landing, drilling and roving on the Martian surface . Thales Alenia Space is the overall prime contractor of the Exomars program leading a large industrial team The Spacecraft Composite (SCC), consisting of a Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO) and an EDL (Entry Descend and Landing) Demonstrator Module (EDM) named Schiaparelli, has been launched on 14 March 2016 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome by a Proton Launcher. The two modules will separate on 16 October 2016 after a 7 months cruise. The TGO will search for evidence of methane and other atmospheric gases that could be signatures of active biological or geological processes on Mars and will provide communications relay for the 2020 surface assets. The Schiaparelli module will prove the technologies required to safely land a payload on the surface of Mars, with a package of sensors aimed to support the reconstruction of the flown trajectory and the assessment of the performance of the EDL subsystems. For the second Exomars mission a space vehicle composed of a Carrier Module (CM) and a Descent Module (DM), whose Landing Platform (LP) will house a Rover, will begin a 7 months long trip to Mars in August 2020. In 2021 the Descent Module will be separated from the Carrier to carry out the entry into the planet's atmosphere and subsequently make the Landing Platform and the Rover land gently on the surface of Mars. While the LP will continue to measure the environmental parameters of the landing site, the Rover will begin exploration of the surface, which is expected to last 218 Martian days (approx. 230 Earth

  20. Solar sail mission design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leipold, M.

    2000-02-01

    The main subject of this work is the design and detailed orbit transfer analysis of space flight missions with solar sails utilizing solar pressure for primary propulsion. Such a sailcraft requires ultra-light weight, gossamer-like deployable structures and materials in order to effectively utilize the transfer of momentum of solar photons. Different design concepts as well as technological elements for solar sails are considered, and an innovative design of a deployable sail structure including new methods for sail folding and unfolding is presented. The main focus of this report is on trajectory analysis, simulation and optimization of planetocentric as well as heliocentric low-thrust orbit transfers with solar sails. In a parametric analysis, geocentric escape spiral trajectories are simulated and corresponding flight times are determined. In interplanetary space, solar sail missions to all planets in our solar system as well as selected minor bodies are included in the analysis. Comparisons to mission concepts utilizing chemical propulsion as well as ion propulsion are included in order to assess whether solar sailing could possibly enhance or even enable this mission. The emphasis in the interplanetary mission analysis is on novel concepts: a unique method to realize a sun-synchronous Mercury orbiter, fast missions to the outer planets and the outer heliosphere applying a ''solar photonic assist'', rendezvous and sample return missions to asteroids and comets, as well as innovative concepts to reach unique vantage points for solar observation (''Solar Polar Orbiter'' and ''Solar Probe''). Finally, a propellant-less sailcraft attitude control concept using an external torque due to solar pressure is analyzed. Examples for sail navigation and control in circular Earth orbit applying a PD-control algorithm are shown, illustrating the maneuverability of a sailcraft. (orig.) [German] Gegenstand dieser

  1. 75 FR 6178 - Mission Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-08

    ...), thermal coal, and palm oil exports for bio fuel, dominate energy exports. Sound fiscal and monetary.... Mission Statement Secretarial Indonesia Clean Energy Business Development Mission May 23-25, 2010. Mission... to Jakarta, Indonesia May 23-25, 2010 to discuss market development policies and promote U.S. exports...

  2. Landsat ETM Mission Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The USGS Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center archive holds data collected by the Landsat suite of satellites, beginning with Landsat 1 in 1972. All...

  3. The Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugebauer, G.; Habing, H. J.; Van Duinen, R.; Aumann, H. H.; Beichman, C. A.; Baud, B.; Beintema, D. A.; Boggess, N.; Clegg, P. E.; De Jong, T.

    1984-01-01

    The Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) consists of a spacecraft and a liquid helium cryostat that contains a cooled IR telescope. The telescope's focal plane assembly is cooled to less than 3 K, and contains 62 IR detectors in the survey array which are arranged so that every source crossing the field of view can be seen by at least two detectors in each of four wavelength bands. The satellite was launched into a 900 km-altitude near-polar orbit, and its cryogenic helium supply was exhausted on November 22, 1983. By mission's end, 72 percent of the sky had been observed with three or more hours-confirming scans, and 95 percent with two or more hours-confirming scans. About 2000 stars detected at 12 and 25 microns early in the mission, and identified in the SAO (1966) catalog, have a positional uncertainty ellipse whose axes are 45 x 9 arcsec for an hours-confirmed source.

  4. The Polarized Radiation Imaging and Spectroscopy Mission

    CERN Document Server

    André, Philippe; Banday, Anthony; Barbosa, Domingos; Barreiro, Belen; Bartlett, James; Bartolo, Nicola; Battistelli, Elia; Battye, Richard; Bendo, George; Benoȋt, Alain; Bernard, Jean-Philippe; Bersanelli, Marco; Béthermin, Matthieu; Bielewicz, Pawel; Bonaldi, Anna; Bouchet, François; Boulanger, François; Brand, Jan; Bucher, Martin; Burigana, Carlo; Cai, Zhen-Yi; Camus, Philippe; Casas, Francisco; Casasola, Viviana; Castex, Guillaume; Challinor, Anthony; Chluba, Jens; Chon, Gayoung; Colafrancesco, Sergio; Comis, Barbara; Cuttaia, Francesco; D'Alessandro, Giuseppe; Da Silva, Antonio; Davis, Richard; de Avillez, Miguel; de Bernardis, Paolo; de Petris, Marco; de Rosa, Adriano; de Zotti, Gianfranco; Delabrouille, Jacques; Désert, François-Xavier; Dickinson, Clive; Diego, Jose Maria; Dunkley, Joanna; Enßlin, Torsten; Errard, Josquin; Falgarone, Edith; Ferreira, Pedro; Ferrière, Katia; Finelli, Fabio; Fletcher, Andrew; Fosalba, Pablo; Fuller, Gary; Galli, Silvia; Ganga, Ken; García-Bellido, Juan; Ghribi, Adnan; Giard, Martin; Giraud-Héraud, Yannick; Gonzalez-Nuevo, Joaquin; Grainge, Keith; Gruppuso, Alessandro; Hall, Alex; Hamilton, Jean-Christophe; Haverkorn, Marijke; Hernandez-Monteagudo, Carlos; Herranz, Diego; Jackson, Mark; Jaffe, Andrew; Khatri, Rishi; Kunz, Martin; Lamagna, Luca; Lattanzi, Massimiliano; Leahy, Paddy; Lesgourgues, Julien; Liguori, Michele; Liuzzo, Elisabetta; Lopez-Caniego, Marcos; Macias-Perez, Juan; Maffei, Bruno; Maino, Davide; Mangilli, Anna; Martinez-Gonzalez, Enrique; Martins, Carlos J.A.P.; Masi, Silvia; Massardi, Marcella; Matarrese, Sabino; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Melin, Jean-Baptiste; Mennella, Aniello; Mignano, Arturo; Miville-Deschênes, Marc-Antoine; Monfardini, Alessandro; Murphy, Anthony; Naselsky, Pavel; Nati, Federico; Natoli, Paolo; Negrello, Mattia; Noviello, Fabio; O'Sullivan, Créidhe; Paci, Francesco; Pagano, Luca; Paladino, Rosita; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Paoletti, Daniela; Peiris, Hiranya; Perrotta, Francesca; Piacentini, Francesco; Piat, Michel; Piccirillo, Lucio; Pisano, Giampaolo; Polenta, Gianluca; Pollo, Agnieszka; Ponthieu, Nicolas; Remazeilles, Mathieu; Ricciardi, Sara; Roman, Matthieu; Rosset, Cyrille; Rubino-Martin, Jose-Alberto; Salatino, Maria; Schillaci, Alessandro; Shellard, Paul; Silk, Joseph; Starobinsky, Alexei; Stompor, Radek; Sunyaev, Rashid; Tartari, Andrea; Terenzi, Luca; Toffolatti, Luigi; Tomasi, Maurizio; Trappe, Neil; Tristram, Matthieu; Trombetti, Tiziana; Tucci, Marco; Van de Weijgaert, Rien; Van Tent, Bartjan; Verde, Licia; Vielva, Patricio; Wandelt, Ben; Watson, Robert; Withington, Stafford; Cabrera, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    PRISM (Polarized Radiation Imaging and Spectroscopy Mission) was proposed to ESA in May 2013 as a large-class mission for investigating within the framework of the ESA Cosmic Vision program a set of important scientific questions that require high resolution, high sensitivity, full-sky observations of the sky emission at wavelengths ranging from millimeter-wave to the far-infrared. PRISM's main objective is to explore the distant universe, probing cosmic history from very early times until now as well as the structures, distribution of matter, and velocity flows throughout our Hubble volume. PRISM will survey the full sky in a large number of frequency bands in both intensity and polarization and will measure the absolute spectrum of sky emission more than three orders of magnitude better than COBE FIRAS. The aim of this Extended White Paper is to provide a more detailed overview of the highlights of the new science that will be made possible by PRISM

  5. The Aerosol, Clouds and Ecosystem (ACE) Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeberl, M.; Remer, L.; Kahn, R.; Starr, D.; Hildebrand, P.; Colarco, P.; Diner, D.; Vane, D.; Im, E.; Behrenfeld, M.; Stephens, G.; Maring, H.; Bontempi, P.; Martins, J. V.

    2008-12-01

    The Aerosol, Clouds and Ecosystem (ACE) Mission is a second tier Decadal Survey mission designed to characterize the role of aerosols in climate forcing, especially their impact on precipitation and cloud formation. ACE also includes ocean biosphere measurements (chlorophyll and dissolved organic materials) which will be greatly improved by simultaneous measurements of aerosols. The nominal ACE payload includes lidar and multiangle spectropolarimetric polarimetric measurements of aerosols, radar measurements of clouds and multi-band spectrometer for the measurement of ocean ecosystems. An enhancement to ACE payload under consideration includes µ-wave radiometer measurements of cloud ice and water outside the nadir path of the radar/lidar beams. This talk will cover ACE instrument and science options, updates on the science team definition activity and science potential.

  6. High speed pulsed magnetic fields measurements, using the Faraday effect; Mesures de champs magnetiques pulses rapides a l'aide de l'effet Faraday

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillet, A. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-12-01

    For these measures, the information used is the light polarization plane rotation induced by the magnetic field in a glass probe. This rotation is detected using a polarizer-analyzer couple. The detector is a photomultiplier used with high-current and pulsed light. In a distributed magnet (gap: 6 x 3 x 3 cm) magnetic fields to measure are 300 gauss, lasting 0.1 {mu}s, with rise times {<=} 35 ns, repetition rate: 1/s. An oscilloscope is used to view the magnetic field from the P.M. plate signal. The value of the field is computed from a previous static calibration. Magnetic fields from 50 to 2000 gauss (with the probe now used) can be measured to about 20 gauss {+-} 5 per cent, with a frequency range of 30 MHz. (author) [French] Pour faire de telles mesures, on utilise comme information la rotation du plan de polarisation de la lumiere provoquee par le champ magnetique dans une sonde en verre. On detecte cette rotation au moyen d'un polariseur et d'un analyseur, qui sont regles a 45 deg. pour conserver un phenomene lineaire. Le detecteur est un photomultiplicateur travaillant en fort courant en lumiere pulsee. Dans un aimant distribue d'entrefer 6 x 3 x 3 cm, on obtient des champs magnetiques a mesurer de 300 gauss, durant 0.1 {mu}s, avec des temps de montee {<=} 35 ns; au taux de 1 fois par seconde. L'observation du champ se fait sur oscilloscope a partir du signal de plaque du P.M. La valeur absolue du champ est obtenue au moyen d'un etalonnage statique prealable. On peut ainsi mesurer a 20 gauss et {+-} 5 pour cent pres environ des champs magnetiques de 50 a 2000 gauss (avec la sonde actuelle) et avec une bande passante de 30 MHz. (auteur)

  7. The Mars Pathfinder Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golombek, M. P.

    1996-09-01

    The Mars Pathfinder mission is a Discovery class mission that will place a small lander and rover on the surface of Mars on July 4, 1997. The Pathfinder flight system is a single small lander, packaged within an aeroshell and back cover with a back-pack-style cruise stage. The vehicle will be launched, fly independently to Mars, and enter the atmosphere directly on approach behind the aeroshell. The vehicle is slowed by a parachute and 3 small solid rockets before landing on inflated airbags. Petals of a small tetrahedron shaped lander open up, to right the vehicle. The lander is solar powered with batteries and will operate on the surface for up to a year, downlinking data on a high-gain antenna. Pathfinder will be the first mission to use a rover, with 3 imagers and an alpha proton X-ray spectrometer, to characterize the rocks and soils in a landing area over hundreds of square meters on Mars, which will provide a calibration point or "ground truth" for orbital remote sensing observations. The rover (includes a series of technology experiments), the instruments (including a stereo multispectral surface imager on a pop up mast and an atmospheric structure instrument-surface meteorology package) and the telemetry system will allow investigations of: the surface morphology and geology at meter scale, the petrology and geochemistry of rocks and soils, the magnetic properties of dust, soil mechanics and properties, a variety of atmospheric investigations and the rotational and orbital dynamics of Mars. Landing downstream from the mouth of a giant catastrophic outflow channel, Ares Vallis, offers the potential of identifying and analyzing a wide variety of crustal materials, from the ancient heavily cratered terrain, intermediate-aged ridged plains and reworked channel deposits, thus allowing first-order scientific investigations of the early differentiation and evolution of the crust, the development of weathering products and early environments and conditions on Mars.

  8. Enabling the human mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosley, John

    The duplication of earth conditions aboard a spacecraft or planetary surface habitat requires 60 lb/day/person of food, potable and hygiene water, and oxygen. A 1000-day mission to Mars would therefore require 30 tons of such supplies per crew member in the absence of a closed-cycle, or regenerative, life-support system. An account is given of the development status of regenerative life-support systems, as well as of the requisite radiation protection and EVA systems, the health-maintenance and medical care facilities, zero-gravity deconditioning measures, and planetary surface conditions protection.

  9. The ARTEMIS mission

    CERN Document Server

    Angelopoulos, Vassilis

    2014-01-01

    The ARTEMIS mission was initiated by skillfully moving the two outermost Earth-orbiting THEMIS spacecraft into lunar orbit to conduct unprecedented dual spacecraft observations of the lunar environment. ARTEMIS stands for Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence and Electrodynamics of the Moon's Interaction with the Sun. Indeed, this volume discusses initial findings related to the Moon’s magnetic and plasma environments and the electrical conductivity of the lunar interior. This work is aimed at researchers and graduate students in both heliophysics and planetary physics. Originally published in Space Science Reviews, Vol. 165/1-4, 2011.

  10. NEAR Shoemaker spacecraft mission operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdridge, Mark E.

    2002-01-01

    On 12 February 2001, Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) Shoemaker became the first spacecraft to land on a small body, 433 Eros. Prior to that historic event, NEAR was the first-ever orbital mission about an asteroid. The mission presented general challenges associated with other planetary space missions as well as challenges unique to an inaugural mission around a small body. The NEAR team performed this operations feat with processes and tools developed during the 4-year-long cruise to Eros. Adding to the success of this historic mission was the cooperation among the NEAR science, navigation, guidance and control, mission design, and software teams. With clearly defined team roles, overlaps in responsibilities were minimized, as were the associated costs. This article discusses the processes and systems developed at APL that enabled the success of NEAR mission operations.

  11. LA MESURE DE LA CREATION DE VALEUR ORGANISATIONNELLE : LE CAS D'UNE ENTREPRISE DU SECTEUR DE LA GESTION DE PATRIMOINE

    OpenAIRE

    Cappelletti, Laurent; Khouatra, Djamel

    2002-01-01

    International audience; Cette communication présente une méthode de mesure de la création de valeur organisationnelle d'une entreprise, à partir d'une étude de cas consistant en une recherche-intervention conduite de 1999 à 2000. L'hypothèse centrale qui est développée est que la création de valeur organisationnelle contribue à la création de valeur économique future.

  12. Mesures de contraintes in-situ. Méthode de relaxation des carottes Measuring in-Situ Stresses. Relaxation Method with Core Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perreau P.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Dans cet article, on se propose de présenter les premiers résultats de l'étude de la méthode d'évaluation des contraintes par mesure de déformations différées d'une carotte après son extraction. Le travail correspondant a été réalisé dans le cadre du projet ARTEP Fracturation hydraulique . Les principes de cette méthode et les quelques éléments d'interprétation récemment publiés dans la littérature sont exposés dans un premier temps. Les résultats de deux campagnes de mesures sur deux puits de la SNEA-P (Soudron, novembre 1985 et Lanot, juillet 1986 sont ensuite présentés. Ces essais ont mis en évidence que les déformations différées d'une carotte dues au relachement des contraintes sont effectivement mesurables. Cependant, une interprétation quantitative de ces mesures nécessite une amélioration des conditions expérimentales (stabilisation thermique, stabilisation de l'état de saturation. This article describes the first results of research on a method of evaluating stresses by measuring the differred deformations of a core sample after it has been extracted. The corresponding research was done within the framework of an ARTEP project on Hydraulic Fracturing . The principles of this method and several interpretation aspects published recently in the literature are described in the first part. Then the results of two measurement campaigns using two SNEA-P wells (Soudron in November 1985 and Lanot in July 1986 are described. These tests revealed that the differed deformations of a core sample due to the relaxing of stresses can effectively be measured. However, a quantitative interpretation of these measurements requires an improvement to be made in the experimental conditions (thermal stabilization, stabilization of the state of saturation.

  13. Etude en laboratoire des performances de l'appareil DiSCmini pour la mesure des aérosols submicroniques

    OpenAIRE

    Bau, Sébastien; Witschger, O.

    2015-01-01

    En plus de la composition chimique, la taille des particules et la concentration sont parmi les principaux paramètres utilisés pour caractériser l'exposition aux nanoparticules dispersées dans l'air. Pour évaluer les expositions professionnelles, l'utilisation d’instruments de mesure en temps réel sont recommandés dans les stratégies récentes publiées. Parmi les dispositifs portables individuels permettant d’évaluer l'exposition aux aérosols de nanoparticules en milieu de travail, le DiSCmini...

  14. The Value of Participating Scientists on NASA Planetary Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prockter, Louise; Aye, Klaus-Michael; Baines, Kevin; Bland, Michael T.; Blewett, David T.; Brandt, Pontus; Diniega, Serina; Feaga, Lori M.; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Y McSween, Harry; Neal, Clive; Paty, Carol S.; Rathbun, Julie A.; Schmidt, Britney E.

    2016-10-01

    NASA has a long history of supporting Participating Scientists on its planetary missions. On behalf of the NASA Planetary Assessment/Analysis Groups (OPAG, MEPAG, VEXAG, SBAG, LEAG and CAPTEM), we are conducting a study about the value of Participating Scientist programs on NASA planetary missions, and how the usefulness of such programs might be maximized.Inputs were gathered via a community survey, which asked for opinions about the value generated by the Participating Scientist programs (we included Guest Investigators and Interdisciplinary Scientists as part of this designation), and for the experiences of those who've held such positions. Perceptions about Participating Scientist programs were sought from the entire community, regardless of whether someone had served as a Participating Scientist or not. This survey was distributed via the Planetary Exploration Newsletter, the Planetary News Digest, the DPS weekly mailing, and the mailing lists for each of the Assessment/Analysis Groups. At the time of abstract submission, over 185 community members have responded, giving input on more than 20 missions flown over three decades. Early results indicate that the majority of respondents feel that Participating Scientist programs represent significant added value for NASA planetary missions, increasing the science return and enhancing mission team diversity in a number of ways. A second survey was prepared for input from mission leaders such as Principal Investigators and Project Scientists.Full results of this survey will be presented, along with recommendations for how NASA may wish to enhance Participating Scientist opportunities into its future missions. The output of the study will be a white paper, which will be delivered to NASA and made available to the science community and other interested groups.

  15. Water Cycle Missions for the Next Decade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houser, P. R.

    2013-12-01

    The global water cycle describes the circulation of water as a vital and dynamic substance in its liquid, solid, and vapor phases as it moves through the atmosphere, oceans and land. Life in its many forms exists because of water, and modern civilization depends on learning how to live within the constraints imposed by the availability of water. The scientific challenge posed by the need to observe the global water cycle is to integrate in situ and space-borne observations to quantify the key water-cycle state variables and fluxes. The vision to address that challenge is a series of Earth observation missions that will measure the states, stocks, flows, and residence times of water on regional to global scales followed by a series of coordinated missions that will address the processes, on a global scale, that underlie variability and changes in water in all its three phases. The accompanying societal challenge is to foster the improved use of water data and information as a basis for enlightened management of water resources, to protect life and property from effects of extremes in the water cycle. A major change in thinking about water science that goes beyond its physics to include its role in ecosystems and society is also required. Better water-cycle observations, especially on the continental and global scales, will be essential. Water-cycle predictions need to be readily available globally to reduce loss of life and property caused by water-related natural hazards. Building on the 2007 Earth Science Decadal Survey, NASA's Plan for a Climate-Centric Architecture for Earth Observations and Applications from Space , and the 2012 Chapman Conference on Remote Sensing of the Terrestrial Water Cycle, a workshop was held in April 2013 to gather wisdom and determine how to prepare for the next generation of water cycle missions in support of the second Earth Science Decadal Survey. This talk will present the outcomes of the workshop including the intersection between

  16. Calvin and mission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobus (Kobus P. Labuschagne

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available It has often been stated or implied that John Calvin and the Reformers in general were indifferent to or even against mission. The aim of this study is to point out that this understanding is not a true version of the facts. A thorough examination of the theology and actions of John Calvin, evaluated against the background of his times and world, reveals that he was firmly committed to spreading the Gospel of Jesus Christ, the Lord. Also the theological insights of Calvin and the Reformers not only provided the crucial theological basis to support the future massive missionary expansion of Protestant churches, but necessitate for all times Church mission as a sure consequence of their theology. Calvin’s theology can indeed be described as an ‘essentially missionary theology’. In the heart of Calvin’s theological thinking clearly features the doctrine of justifi cation – because medieval man’s concern for salvation needed to be answered.

  17. Apollo 11 Mission Commemorated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    2009-07-01

    On 24 July 1969, 4 days after Apollo 11 Mission Commander Neil Armstrong and Lunar Module Eagle Pilot Eugene “Buzz” Aldrin had become the first people to walk on the Moon, they and Apollo 11 Command Module Pilot Michael Collins peered through a window of the Mobile Quarantine Facility on board the U.S.S. Hornet following splashdown of the command module in the central Pacific as U.S. President Richard Nixon told them, “This is the greatest week in the history of the world since the creation.” Forty years later, the Apollo 11 crew and other Apollo-era astronauts gathered at several events in Washington, D. C., to commemorate and reflect on the Apollo program, that mission, and the future of manned spaceflight. “I don’t know what the greatest week in history is,” Aldrin told Eos. “But it was certainly a pioneering opening the door. With the door open when we touched down on the Moon, that was what enabled humans to put many more footprints on the surface of the Moon.”

  18. EU Universities’ Mission Statements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liudmila Arcimaviciene

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In the last 10 years, a highly productive space of metaphor analysis has been established in the discourse studies of media, politics, business, and education. In the theoretical framework of Conceptual Metaphor Theory and Critical Discourse Analysis, the restored metaphorical patterns are especially valued for their implied ideological value as realized both conceptually and linguistically. By using the analytical framework of Critical Metaphor Analysis and procedurally employing Pragglejaz Group’s Metaphor Identification Procedure, this study aims at analyzing the implied value of the evoked metaphors in the mission statements of the first 20 European Universities, according to the Webometrics ranking. In this article, it is proposed that Universities’ mission statements are based on the positive evaluation of the COMMERCE metaphor, which does not fully correlate with the ideological framework of sustainability education but is rather oriented toward consumerism in both education and society. Despite this overall trend, there are some traceable features of the conceptualization reflecting the sustainability approach to higher education, as related to freedom of speech, tolerance, and environmental concerns. Nonetheless, these are suppressed by the metaphoric usages evoking traditional dogmas of the conservative ideology grounded in the concepts of the transactional approach to relationship, competitiveness for superiority, the importance of self-interest and strength, and quantifiable quality.

  19. The Gaia mission

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2016-01-01

    Gaia is a cornerstone mission in the science programme of the European Space Agency (ESA). The spacecraft construction was approved in 2006, following a study in which the original interferometric concept was changed to a direct-imaging approach. Both the spacecraft and the payload were built by European industry. The involvement of the scientific community focusses on data processing for which the international Gaia Data Processing and Analysis Consortium (DPAC) was selected in 2007. Gaia was launched on 19 December 2013 and arrived at its operating point, the second Lagrange point of the Sun-Earth-Moon system, a few weeks later. The commissioning of the spacecraft and payload was completed on 19 July 2014. The nominal five-year mission started with four weeks of special, ecliptic-pole scanning and subsequently transferred into full-sky scanning mode. We recall the scientific goals of Gaia and give a description of the as-built spacecraft that is currently (mid-2016) being operated to achieve these goals. We...

  20. OMV mission simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cok, Keith E.

    1989-01-01

    The Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) will be remotely piloted during rendezvous, docking, or proximity operations with target spacecraft from a ground control console (GCC). The real-time mission simulator and graphics being used to design a console pilot-machine interface are discussed. A real-time orbital dynamics simulator drives the visual displays. The dynamics simulator includes a J2 oblate earth gravity model and a generalized 1962 rotating atmospheric and drag model. The simulator also provides a variable-length communication delay to represent use of the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) and NASA Communications (NASCOM). Input parameter files determine the graphics display. This feature allows rapid prototyping since displays can be easily modified from pilot recommendations. A series of pilot reviews are being held to determine an effective pilot-machine interface. Pilots fly missions with nominal to 3-sigma dispersions in translational or rotational axes. Console dimensions, switch type and layout, hand controllers, and graphic interfaces are evaluated by the pilots and the GCC simulator is modified for subsequent runs. Initial results indicate a pilot preference for analog versus digital displays and for two 3-degree-of-freedom hand controllers.

  1. STS-78 Mission Insignia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The STS-78 patch links past with present to tell the story of its mission and science through a design imbued with the strength and vitality of the 2-dimensional art of North America's northwest coast Indians. Central to the design is the space Shuttle whose bold lines and curves evoke the Indian image for the eagle, a native American symbol of power and prestige as well as the national symbol of the United States. The wings of the Shuttle suggest the wings of the eagle whose feathers, indicative of peace and friendship in Indian tradition, are captured by the U forms, a characteristic feature of Northwest coast Indian art. The nose of the Shuttle is the strong downward curve of the eagle's beak, and the Shuttle's forward windows, the eagle's eyes, represented through the tapered S forms again typical of this Indian art form. The basic black and red atoms orbiting the mission number recall the original NASA emblem while beneath, utilizing Indian ovoid forms, the major mission scientific experiment package LMS (Life and Materials Sciences) housed in the Shuttle's cargo bay is depicted in a manner reminiscent of totem-pole art. This image of a bird poised for flight, so common to Indian art, is counterpointed by an equally familiar Tsimshian Indian symbol, a pulsating sun with long hyperbolic rays, the symbol of life. Within each of these rays are now encased crystals, the products of this mission's 3 major, high-temperature materials processing furnaces. And as the sky in Indian lore is a lovely open country, home of the Sun Chief and accessible to travelers through a hole in the western horizon, so too, space is a vast and beckoning landscape for explorers launched beyond the horizon. Beneath the Tsimshian sun, the colors of the earth limb are appropriately enclosed by a red border representing life to the Northwest coast Indians. The Indian colors of red, navy blue, white, and black pervade the STS-78 path. To the right of the Shuttle-eagle, the constellation

  2. Comprehensive measurements in 4 {pi} geometry for radio-active samples having a low {beta}-activity (1962); Ensemble de mesure'en geometrie 4 {pi} pour echantillons radioactifs de faible activite {beta} (1962)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colomer, J.; Valentin, M. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-07-01

    The realisation is described of a comprehensive measurement system having low background noise and, as well as a lead-wall protection, an electronic protection made up of a plastic scintillator placed in anticoincidence with the 4 {pi} counter used for making the measurements. The apparatus is described and its performance discussed. (authors) [French] Realisation d'un ensemble de mesures ayant un faible bruit de fond en utilisant en plus d'une protection par murs de Pb, une protection electronique constituee par un scintillateur plastique mis en ainticoincidence avec le compteur 4 {pi} utilise pour faire les mesures. L'appareillage est decrit et ses performances discutees. (auteurs)

  3. Mesures de déplacements en dynamique par lumière structurée. Compte-rendu d'expérimentations du 27-28 mars 2007

    OpenAIRE

    Muzet, Valérie; MALEK, Mokrane; Cottineau, Louis Marie

    2007-01-01

    L'objectif de cette étude était d'étudier le comportement du capteur optique implanté sur un poids lourd par des essais sur site et de mesurer les vibrations en différents points du camion. Les mesures de vibrations devant permettre à la fois de rechercher les zones les plus appropriées pour le montage des capteurs optiques et de définir les vibrations à éliminer par le montage qui fixera le capteur optique sur le camion

  4. Erreurs induites par l’utilisation d’un capteur de grande taille, un ceptomètre par exemple, pour calculer un coefficient d’extinction à partir de la mesure des rayonnements transmis sous une culture

    OpenAIRE

    Tournebize, Régis; Cornet, Denis; BONHOMME, Raymond

    2010-01-01

    L’estimation des rayonnements solaires interceptés par une culture est une donnée devenue courante en agronomie pour évaluer sa production. Cette estimation est le plus souvent faite à partir de la seule mesure de l’indice foliaire LAI et l’utilisation d’un coefficient d’extinction des rayonnements K. Ce coefficient K est souvent évalué à partir de mesures ponctuelles de l’indice foliaire et de la fraction des rayonnements solaires transmis sous une culture TR, en utilisant la for...

  5. General Mission Analysis Tool (GMAT): Mission, Vision, and Business Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Steven P.

    2007-01-01

    The Goal of the GMAT project is to develop new space trajectory optimization and mission design technology by working inclusively with ordinary people, universities businesses and other government organizations; and to share that technology in an open and unhindered way. GMAT's a free and open source software system; free for anyone to use in development of new mission concepts or to improve current missions, freely available in source code form for enhancement or future technology development.

  6. Laboratory Analysis of Acoustic Emission Associated with the Hydraulic Fracturing of Sandstone Samples. The Problem of Fracture Location Étude au laboratoire de l'émission acoustique associée à la fracturation hydraulique d'échantillons de grès. Le problème de la localisation de la fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deflandre J. P.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic emission associated with the hydraulic fracturing of sandstone samples (dry or saturated was investigated in the laboratory. The emission sources were located by triangulation from the differences in arrival time of the compressional wave at four sensors. On this experimental scale, the attenuation and dispersion factors, and the anisotropic character of the medium influence the choice of the method for measuring Delta t. For the same reason, the time measurements must be corrected for instrumentation effects. The velocity anisotropy of the medium is also taken into account for a simple geometric representation (ellipsoid. A comparison of the location results with the survey of the fracture after the test shows that the emission sources are located in the fracture plane. The tests also reveal a close correlation between acoustic activity and fracture behavior. The initiation and propagation of the fracture are accompanied by few events only, whereas the closure is characterized by very strong acoustic activity. Two types of event were observed, and those corresponding to the propagation of the fracture appear to confirm a tensile fracture mode. L'émission acoustique associée à la fracturation hydraulique d'échantillons de grès (secs ou saturés a été étudiée au laboratoire. Les sources d'émission sont localisées par triangulation à partir des différences de temps d'arrivée de l'onde de compression sur quatre capteurs. A cette échelle expérimentale, les phénomènes d'atténuation et de dispersion ainsi que le caractère anisotrope du milieu influent sur le choix de la méthode de mesure des Delta t. Pour cette même raison, les mesures de temps doivent être corrigées des effets de l'instrumentation. L'anisotropie de vitesse du milieu est également prise en compte dans le cas d'une représentation géométrique simple (ellipsoïde. La comparaison des résultats de la localisation avec le relevé de la fracture après l

  7. UK Mission to CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    At the end of June, nine experts from UK industry visited CERN to study techniques for developing distributed computing systems and to look at some specific applications. In a packed three-day programme, almost 40 CERN experts presented a comprehensive survey of achievements.

  8. Phobos Sample Return mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelenyi, Lev; Zakharov, A.; Martynov, M.; Polischuk, G.

    Very mysterious objects of the Solar system are the Martian satellites, Phobos and Deimos. Attempt to study Phobos in situ from an orbiter and from landers have been done by the Russian mission FOBOS in 1988. However, due to a malfunction of the onboard control system the landers have not been delivered to the Phobos surface. A new robotics mission to Phobos is under development now in Russia. Its main goal is the delivery of samples of the Phobos surface material to the Earth for laboratory studies of its chemical, isotopic, mineral composition, age etc. Other goals are in situ studies of Phobos (regolith, internal structure, peculiarities in orbital and proper rotation), studies of Martian environment (dust, plasma, fields). The payload includes a number of scientific instruments: gamma and neutron spectrometers, gaschromatograph, mass spectrometers, IR spectrometer, seismometer, panoramic camera, dust sensor, plasma package. To implement the tasks of this mission a cruise-transfer spacecraft after the launch and the Earth-Mars interplanetary flight will be inserted into the first elliptical orbit around Mars, then after several corrections the spacecraft orbit will be formed very close to the Phobos orbit to keep the synchronous orbiting with Phobos. Then the spacecraft will encounter with Phobos and will land at the surface. After the landing the sampling device of the spacecraft will collect several samples of the Phobos regolith and will load these samples into the return capsule mounted at the returned vehicle. This returned vehicle will be launched from the mother spacecraft and after the Mars-Earth interplanetary flight after 11 monthes with reach the terrestrial atmosphere. Before entering into the atmosphere the returned capsule will be separated from the returned vehicle and will hopefully land at the Earth surface. The mother spacecraft at the Phobos surface carrying onboard scientific instruments will implement the "in situ" experiments during an year

  9. SOHO Mission Science Briefing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Footage shows the SOHO Mission Pre-Launch Science Briefing. The moderator of the conference is Fred Brown, NASA/GSFC Public Affairs, introduces the panel members. Included are Professor Roger Bonnet, Director ESA Science Program, Dr. Wesley Huntress, Jr., NASA Associate Administrator for Space Science and Dr. Vicente Domingo, ESA SOHO Project Scientist. Also present are several members from the SOHO Team: Dr. Richard Harrison, Art Poland, and Phillip Scherrer. The discussions include understanding the phenomena of the sun, eruption of gas clouds into the atmosphere, the polishing of the mirrors for the SOHO satellite, artificial intelligence in the telescopes, and the launch and operating costs. The panel members are also seen answering questions from various NASA Centers and Paris.

  10. The Planck mission

    CERN Document Server

    Bouchet, François R

    2014-01-01

    These lecture from the 100th Les Houches summer school on "Post-planck cosmology" of July 2013 discuss some aspects of the Planck mission, whose prime objective was a very accurate measurement of the temperature anisotropies of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). We announced our findings a few months ago, on March 21$^{st}$, 2013. I describe some of the relevant steps we took to obtain these results, sketching the measurement process, how we processed the data to obtain full sky maps at 9 different frequencies, and how we extracted the CMB temperature anisotropies map and angular power spectrum. I conclude by describing some of the main cosmological implications of the statistical characteristics of the CMB we found. Of course, this is a very much shortened and somewhat biased view of the \\Planck\\ 2013 results, written with the hope that it may lead some of the students to consult the original papers.

  11. The INTEGRAL mission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkler, C.; Courvoisier, T.J.L.; Di Cocco, G.

    2003-01-01

    The ESA observatory INTEGRAL (International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory) is dedicated to the fine spectroscopy (2.5 keV FWHM @ 1 MeV) and fine imaging (angular resolution: 12 arcmin FWHM) of celestial gamma-ray sources in the energy range 15 keV to 10 MeV with concurrent source monitoring......-angular resolution imaging (15 keV-10 MeV). Two monitors, JEM-X (Lund et al. 2003) in the (3-35) keV X-ray band, and OMC (Mas-Hesse et al. 2003) in optical Johnson V-band complement the payload. The ground segment includes the Mission Operations Centre at ESOC, ESA and NASA ground stations, the Science Operations...

  12. The Messenger Mission to Mercury

    CERN Document Server

    Domingue, D. L

    2007-01-01

    NASA’s MESSENGER mission, launched on 3 August, 2004 is the seventh mission in the Discovery series. MESSENGER encounters the planet Mercury four times, culminating with an insertion into orbit on 18 March 2011. It carries a comprehensive package of geophysical, geological, geochemical, and space environment experiments to complete the complex investigations of this solar-system end member, which begun with Mariner 10. The articles in this book, written by the experts in each area of the MESSENGER mission, describe the mission, spacecraft, scientific objectives, and payload. The book is of interest to all potential users of the data returned by the MESSENGER mission, to those studying the nature of the planet Mercury, and by all those interested in the design and implementation of planetary exploration missions.

  13. Descope of the ALIA mission

    CERN Document Server

    Gong, Xuefei; Xu, Shengnian; Amaro-Seoane, Pau; Bai, Shan; Bian, Xing; Cao, Zhoujian; Chen, Gerui; Chen, Xian; Ding, Yanwei; Dong, Peng; Gao, Wei; Heinzel, Gerhard; Li, Ming; Li, Shuo; Liu, Fukun; Luo, Ziren; Shao, Mingxue; Spurzem, Rainer; Sun, Baosan; Tang, Wenlin; Wang, Yan; Xu, Peng; Yu, Pin; Yuan, Yefei; Zhang, Xiaomin; Zhou, Zebing

    2014-01-01

    The present work reports on a feasibility study commissioned by the Chinese Academy of Sciences of China to explore various possible mission options to detect gravitational waves in space alternative to that of the eLISA/LISA mission concept. Based on the relative merits assigned to science and technological viability, a few representative mission options descoped from the ALIA mission are considered. A semi-analytic Monte Carlo simulation is carried out to understand the cosmic black hole merger histories starting from intermediate mass black holes at high redshift as well as the possible scientific merits of the mission options considered in probing the light seed black holes and their coevolution with galaxies in early Universe. The study indicates that, by choosing the armlength of the interferometer to be three million kilometers and shifting the sensitivity floor to around one-hundredth Hz, together with a very moderate improvement on the position noise budget, there are certain mission options capable ...

  14. STS-40 Mission Insignia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    The STS-40 patch makes a contemporary statement focusing on human beings living and working in space. Against a background of the universe, seven silver stars, interspersed about the orbital path of Columbia, represent the seven crew members. The orbiter's flight path forms a double-helix, designed to represent the DNA molecule common to all living creatures. In the words of a crew spokesman, ...(the helix) affirms the ceaseless expansion of human life and American involvement in space while simultaneously emphasizing the medical and biological studies to which this flight is dedicated. Above Columbia, the phrase Spacelab Life Sciences 1 defines both the Shuttle mission and its payload. Leonardo Da Vinci's Vitruvian man, silhouetted against the blue darkness of the heavens, is in the upper center portion of the patch. With one foot on Earth and arms extended to touch Shuttle's orbit, the crew feels, he serves as a powerful embodiment of the extension of human inquiry from the boundaries of Earth to the limitless laboratory of space. Sturdily poised amid the stars, he serves to link scentists on Earth to the scientists in space asserting the harmony of efforts which produce meaningful scientific spaceflight missions. A brilliant red and yellow Earth limb (center) links Earth to space as it radiates from a native American symbol for the sun. At the frontier of space, the traditional symbol for the sun vividly links America's past to America's future, the crew states. Beneath the orbiting Shuttle, darkness of night rests peacefully over the United States. Drawn by artist Sean Collins, the STS 40 Space Shuttle patch was designed by the crewmembers for the flight.

  15. Hayabusa2 Mission Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Sei-ichiro; Tsuda, Yuichi; Yoshikawa, Makoto; Tanaka, Satoshi; Saiki, Takanao; Nakazawa, Satoru

    2017-07-01

    The Hayabusa2 mission journeys to C-type near-Earth asteroid (162173) Ryugu (1999 JU3) to observe and explore the 900 m-sized object, as well as return samples collected from the surface layer. The Haybusa2 spacecraft developed by Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) was successfully launched on December 3, 2014 by an H-IIA launch vehicle and performed an Earth swing-by on December 3, 2015 to set it on a course toward its target Ryugu. Hayabusa2 aims at increasing our knowledge of the early history and transfer processes of the solar system through deciphering memories recorded on Ryugu, especially about the origin of water and organic materials transferred to the Earth's region. Hayabusa2 carries four remote-sensing instruments, a telescopic optical camera with seven colors (ONC-T), a laser altimeter (LIDAR), a near-infrared spectrometer covering the 3-μm absorption band (NIRS3), and a thermal infrared imager (TIR). It also has three small rovers of MINERVA-II and a small lander MASCOT (Mobile Asteroid Surface Scout) developed by German Aerospace Center (DLR) in cooperation with French space agency CNES. MASCOT has a wide angle imager (MasCam), a 6-band thermal radiator (MARA), a 3-axis magnetometer (MasMag), and a hyperspectral infrared microscope (MicrOmega). Further, Hayabusa2 has a sampling device (SMP), and impact experiment devices which consist of a small carry-on impactor (SCI) and a deployable camera (DCAM3). The interdisciplinary research using the data from these onboard and lander's instruments and the analyses of returned samples are the key to success of the mission.

  16. La socialisation au travail comme indicateur de développement professionnel : analyse des approches basées sur la mesure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Martineau

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Cet article porte sur un aspect particulier du développement professionnel c’est-à-dire la socialisation professionnelle (ou organisationnelle. Plus spécifiquement, ce sont certains des aspects méthodologiques des recherches qui sont ici étudiés. Ainsi, les auteurs conduisent une réflexion critique sur les différents outils de mesure les plus utilisés dans les recherches sur la socialisation professionnelle. Les principales insuffisances des recherches sont identifiées et des pistes de perfectionnement des outils sont esquissées. Ils s’interrogent par ailleurs sur la pertinence des approches basées sur la mesure du processus de socialisation professionnelle.This article focuses on a particular aspect of professional development which is professional or organizational socialization. More specifically, some methodological aspects of research on professional socialization are studied here. Thus, the authors conduct a critical analysis on the various measurement tools used in the research on professional socialization. The main shortcomings of the research are identified and possible development tools are outlined. In addition, they also question the relevance of the approaches based on the measure of the process of professional socialization.

  17. Measurements of spectral indices in homogeneous multiplying media; Mesures d'indices de spectre dans les milieux multiplicateurs homogenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruna, J.G.; Brunet, J.P.; Clouet D' Orval, Ch.; Verriere, Ph.; Kremser, J.; Moret-Bailly, J.; Tellier, H. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    Methods for computation of spectra in light water are developed at Saclay and it is interesting to carry out at the same time experimental studies of simple media such as solutions of fissionable salts which allow quite direct comparisons with computed values. The spectral indices measurements were made with two small fission chambers, one containing deposited plutonium, the other deposited uranium 235. Their response, when neutron spectrum is modified, allows to study the epithermal part of the flux. The media studied with these chambers are fissionable solutions (of plutonium or 90 per cent enriched uranium) which were made critical in bare cylindrical geometry in the Alecto reactor. If the ratio of the chambers is normalized to unity in a Maxwell spectrum, then the noted variation of the ratio of the counts Pu chamber/ U{sup 235} chamber reaches 1,4 in the range of the studied concentrations. (authors) [French] Des calculs de spectres dans l'eau legere sont mis au point a Saclay et il est interessant de mener parallelement des etudes experimentale sur des milieux simples tels que des solutions de sels fissiles, qui permettent des comparaisons tres directes avec les valeurs calculees. On a choisi d'effectuer des mesures d' 'indices de spectres' a l'aide de de deux petites chambres a fission contenant des depots, l'une de plutonium, l'autre d'uranium 235. Leur reponse lorsque le spectre des neutrons est modifie permet d'etudier la partie epithermique du flux. Les milieux etudies a l'aide de ces chambres sont des solutions fissiles (plutonium ou uranium enrichi a 90 pour cent) rendus critiques, en geometrie cylindrique nue, dans le reacteur Alecto. Si le rapport des chambres est normalise a un dans un spectre de Maxwell, la variation constatee du rapport des comptages chambre Pu/ chambre U{sup 235} atteint, dans les gammes de concentrations etudiees, 1,4. (auteurs)

  18. Swarming UAVs mission design strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kuo-Chi

    2007-04-01

    This paper uses a behavioral hierarchy approach to reduce the mission solution space and make the mission design easier. A UAV behavioral hierarchy is suggested, which is derived from three levels of behaviors: basic, individual and group. The individual UAV behavior is a combination of basic, lower level swarming behaviors with priorities. Mission design can be simplified by picking the right combination of individual swarming behaviors, which will emerge the needed group behaviors. Genetic Algorithm is used in both lower-level basic behavior design and mission design.

  19. Resistivity measurements using a direct current induction method (1963); Mesure de resistivite par la methode d'induction en courant continu (1963)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delaplace, J.; Hillairet, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    The conventional methods for measuring electrical resistivities necessitate the fixing of electrical contacts on the sample either mechanically or by soldering. Furthermore it is also necessary to carry,out the measurements on low cross-section samples which are not always easy to obtain. Our direct-current induction method on the other hand requires no contacts and can easily be applied to samples of large cross-section. The sample is placed in a uniform magnetic field; at the moment when the current is cut, eddy currents appear in the sample which tend to oppose the disappearance of the field. The way in which the magnetic flux decreases in the sample makes it possible to determine the resistivity of the material. This method has been applied to samples having diameters of between 1 and 30 mm in the case of metals which are good conductors. It gives a value for the local resistivity and makes it possible to detect any variation along a sample. The measurements can be carried out at all temperature from a few degrees absolute to 500 deg. C. We have used the induction method to follow the purification of beryllium by zone-melting; it is in effect possible to estimate the purity of a material by resistivity measurements. We have measured the resistivity along each bar treated by the zone-melting technique and have thus, localised the purest section. High temperature measurements have been carried out on uranium carbide and on iron-aluminium alloys. This method constitutes an interesting means of investigation the resistivity of solid materials. Its accuracy and rapidity make it particularly adapted both to fundamental research and to production control. (authors) [French] Les methodes classiques de mesure de resistivite electrique imposent la realisation sur l'echantillon de contacts electriques obtenus soit mecaniquement, soit par soudure. En outre, elles demandent, le plus souvent, d'effectuer les mesures sur des echantillons de faible section qu

  20. Simulation of Mission Phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlstrom, Nicholas Mercury

    2016-01-01

    This position with the Simulation and Graphics Branch (ER7) at Johnson Space Center (JSC) provided an introduction to vehicle hardware, mission planning, and simulation design. ER7 supports engineering analysis and flight crew training by providing high-fidelity, real-time graphical simulations in the Systems Engineering Simulator (SES) lab. The primary project assigned by NASA mentor and SES lab manager, Meghan Daley, was to develop a graphical simulation of the rendezvous, proximity operations, and docking (RPOD) phases of flight. The simulation is to include a generic crew/cargo transportation vehicle and a target object in low-Earth orbit (LEO). Various capsule, winged, and lifting body vehicles as well as historical RPOD methods were evaluated during the project analysis phase. JSC core mission to support the International Space Station (ISS), Commercial Crew Program (CCP), and Human Space Flight (HSF) influenced the project specifications. The simulation is characterized as a 30 meter +V Bar and/or -R Bar approach to the target object's docking station. The ISS was selected as the target object and the international Low Impact Docking System (iLIDS) was selected as the docking mechanism. The location of the target object's docking station corresponds with the RPOD methods identified. The simulation design focuses on Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GNC) system architecture models with station keeping and telemetry data processing capabilities. The optical and inertial sensors, reaction control system thrusters, and the docking mechanism selected were based on CCP vehicle manufacturer's current and proposed technologies. A significant amount of independent study and tutorial completion was required for this project. Multiple primary source materials were accessed using the NASA Technical Report Server (NTRS) and reference textbooks were borrowed from the JSC Main Library and International Space Station Library. The Trick Simulation Environment and User

  1. The PLATO 2.0 Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godolt, Mareike; Rauer, Heike; Plato Consortium

    2015-07-01

    The CHaracterising ExOPlanet Satellite (CHEOPS) is a joint ESA-Switzerland space mission dedicated to search for exoplanet transits by means of ultra-high precision photometry. It is expected to be launch-ready at the end of 2017. CHEOPS will be the first space observatory dedicated to search for transits on bright stars already known to host planets. It will have access to more than 70% of the sky. This will provide the unique capability of determining accurate radii for planets for which the mass has already been estimated from ground-based spectroscopic surveys and for new planets discovered by the next generation ground-based transits surveys (Neptune-size and smaller). The measurement of the radius of a planet from its transit combined with the determination of its mass through radial velocity techniques gives the bulk density of the planet, which provides direct insights into the structure and/or composition of the body. In order to meet the scientific objectives, a number of requirements have been derived that drive the design of CHEOPS. For the detection of Earth and super-Earth planets orbiting G5 dwarf stars with V-band magnitudes in the range 6 V 9 mag, a photometric precision of 20 ppm in 6 hours of integration time must be reached. This time corresponds to the transit duration of a planet with a revolution period of 50 days. In the case of Neptune-size planets orbiting K-type dwarf with magnitudes as faint as V=12 mag, a photometric precision of 85 ppm in 3 hours of integration time must be reached. The CHEOPS mission payload consists of only one instrument, a space telescope of 30 cm clear aperture, which has a single CCD focal plane detector. The total required duration of the CHEOPS mission is estimated to be 3.5 years (goal: 5 years).

  2. ERIC: Mission, Structure, and Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Jane B.

    2001-01-01

    Provides an overview of the mission, structure, and resource base of the Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC). Highlights include problems in meeting the information needs of a wide variety of educational practitioners as part of the mission; structure, based on organizational decentralization; and resources that are limited by…

  3. Mission Assurance: Issues and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-15

    JFQ), Summer 1995. [9] Alberts , C.J. & Dorofee, A.J., “Mission Assurance Analysis Protocol (MAAP): Assessing Risk in Complex Environments... CAMUS : Automatically Mapping Cyber Assets to Missions and Users,” Proc. of the 2010 Military Communications Conference (MILCOM 2009), 2009. [23

  4. Second generation Mars landed missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, J.; Rivellini, T.; Sabahi, D.; Thurman, S.; Eisen, H.

    2000-01-01

    This paper addresses some of the candidate missions being considered for the next generation projects, discusses the new approaches being developed to implement safe and accurate entry, descent and landing to the Martian surface, and describes the rover technology that enables the long distance and duration surface mission.

  5. Mission Dolores and Jim Corbin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaton, Moss, Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Written by history students at Gary High School, Gary, Texas, this issue includes two articles relevant to East Texas history. "Mission Dolores and Jim Corbin," (Moss Heaton and others) is a summary of material presented by Professor James Corbin about the early Spanish presence in East Texas. The first attempt at setting up a mission was in 1690…

  6. ESA CHEOPS mission: development status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rando, N.; Asquier, J.; Corral Van Damme, C.; Isaak, K.; Ratti, F.; Safa, F.; Southworth, R.; Broeg, C.; Benz, W.

    2016-07-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA) Science Programme Committee (SPC) selected CHEOPS (Characterizing Exoplanets Satellite) in October 2012 as the first S-class mission (S1) within the Agency's Scientific Programme, targeting launch readiness by the end of 2017. The CHEOPS mission is devoted to the first-step characterization of known exoplanets orbiting bright stars, to be achieved through the precise measurement of exo-planet radii using the technique of transit photometry. It is implemented as a partnership between ESA and a consortium of Member States led by Switzerland. CHEOPS is considered as a pilot case for implementing "small science missions" in ESA with the following requirements: science driven missions selected through an open Call for missions (bottom-up process); spacecraft development schedule much shorter than for M and L missions, in the range of 4 years; and cost-capped missions to ESA with possibly higher Member States involvement than for M or L missions. The paper describes the CHEOPS development status, focusing on the performed hardware manufacturing and test activities.

  7. The WEAVE disk dynamics survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Famaey, B.; Antoja, T.; Romero-Gomez, M.; Siebert, A.; Babusiaux, C.; Di Matteo, P.; Figueras, F.; Fragkoudi, F.; Garzon-Lopez, F.; Gonzalez-Fernandez, C.; Martinez-Valpuesta, I.; Monari, G.; Mor-Crespo, R.; Hill, V.

    2016-12-01

    WEAVE is the next-generation wide-field survey facility for the William Herschel Telescope. It consists of a multi-object fibre spectrograph with a 2°-diameter field of view that can obtain ˜ 1000 spectra simultaneously. The "WEAVE Galactic Archaeology survey" is the survey focused on the Milky Way, as a complement to the Gaia space mission, and will start operating in early 2018. This survey is subdivided in four sub-surveys, among which the "WEAVE disk dynamics survey". This survey plans to measure the radial velocities (and abundances as far as possible) of ˜ 10^6 stars with magnitude 15speed? -, as well as (iii) about their influence on secular processes such as stellar radial migration are essential elements for a better understanding of the chemo-dynamical evolution of our Galaxy, and of galaxies in general. This survey is designed to answer these questions.

  8. Aimant PS - Contrôle de l'Etat de 28 Sertissages Internes des PFW - Mesures Effectuées pendant le Grand Arrêt 2003/2004

    CERN Document Server

    Ottaviani, J

    2004-01-01

    Les sertissages (douilles), utilisés pour raccorder les méplats du circuit principal des PFW à leurs câbles d'alimentation, présentent parfois des défauts de réalisation qui entraînent une résistance électrique anormale. Pour mettre en évidence ces défauts, on mesure la résistance des 4 sertissages des nappes polaires. Les nappes sont alimentées avec un courant efficace nominal de 80A. On effectue les mesures entre le bornier de connexions des 4 câbles d'alimentation des PFW et les circuits auxiliaires correspondants (Pick-ups brasés sur les enroulements). De ces mesures (câble d'alimentation et une courte partie du circuit principal), on en déduit la valeur de la résistance du sertissage qui en assure la liaison. A la mesure des résistances des sertissages des nappes polaires supérieures s'ajoute la résistance des câbles qui assurent la liaison entre borniers.

  9. Lidiam - direct-link computer for the photo measurement apparatus of a bubble chamber; Lidiam - liaison directe d'une calculatrice aux appareils de mesure de photos de chambre a bulles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deler, B. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    The treatment of bubble chamber pictures can be considerably improved by connecting conventional measuring machines to a small computer providing continuous control of the later as well as the immediate detection of errors and their immediate corrections. The computer will also perform first processing of the measured data. In addition the system described will improve the effective yield of each apparatus and facilitates the control of the data. A description is given here of the apparatus and of some future extensions. (author) [French] L'exploitation des cliches de chambre a bulles peut etre sensiblement amelioree par la jonction directe des appareils de mesure a une calculatrice qui permettra la detection immediate des erreurs et leurs corrections, le controle continu des appareils et un premier traitement des evenements mesures. De plus, le rendement effectif des appareils de mesure sera notablement augmente et la gestion ainsi que l'exploitation des mesures grandement facilitees. Nous presentons ici la description d'un dispositif de ce genre ainsi que les projets d'extensions envisagees.

  10. Disruptive Propulsive Technologies for European Space Missions

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Advanced space technologies have been reviewed and analysed in view of heavy interplanetary missions of interest for Europe and European industry capabilities. Among the missions of interest: o Heavy robotic missions to outer planets, o Asteroid deflection missions, o Interplanetary manned mission (at longer term). These missions involve high speed increments, generally beyond the capability of chemical propulsion (except if gravitational swing-by can be used). For missions bey...

  11. UNAIDS: mission and roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    The UN has responded to the ongoing AIDS crisis by creating a new Joint UN Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS). UNAIDS is the AIDS program of six UN agencies (UNICEF; the Development Programme; the Population Fund; the Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization; the World Health Organization, and the World Bank). The mission of UNAIDS is to lead a multisectoral effort to prevent HIV transmission, provide care and support, alleviate the impact of the epidemic, and reduce vulnerability to HIV/AIDS. Thus, UNAIDS will operate in the areas of policy development and research, technical support, and advocacy. UNAIDS has had an executive director since January 1995, and a formal review of its strategic plan was scheduled for November 1995. At the country level, country representatives of the various agencies that make up UNAIDS will meet regularly to plan, program, and evaluate their HIV/AIDS activities. UNAIDS staff will be available to aid the country efforts. While UNAIDS will assume most of the global-level activities of its six cosponsor agencies, each agency will integrate HIV/AIDS considerations into their ongoing efforts.

  12. COSMOS 2044 Mission: Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grindeland, R. E.; Ballard, R. W.; Connol, J. P.; Vasques, M. F.

    1992-01-01

    The COSMOS 2044 spaceflight was the ninth Soviet-International joint mission dedicated to space biomedicine and the seventh in which the United States has participated. The unmanned Vostok vehicle carried 10 rats and two rhesus monkeys on its 14-day voyage. This spaceflight yielded an unprecedented bounty of data on physiological responses to the microgravity environment. The tissues studied and the numbers and types of studies performed by members of the international science community constituted a new record. Many of the results obtained by the approximately 80 American scientists who participated are reported in the series of COSMOS 2044 papers in this issue. Descriptions of the spaceflight and animal procedures are detailed elsewhere. The broad goals of the space biomedical program are threefold. The first is to characterize qualitatively and quantitatively the biological responses to the microgravity environment, be they adaptive or pathological. The second goal is to clarify the physiological-biochemical mechanisms mediating the responses to microgravity. The third goal of this program is to use the space environment as a tool to better understand adaptive and disease processes in terrestrial organisms.

  13. Draft Mission Plan Amendment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-09-01

    The Department of Energy`s Office Civilian Radioactive Waste Management has prepared this document to report plans for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program, whose mission is to manage and dispose of the nation`s spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste in a manner that protects the health and safety of the public and of workers and the quality of the environment. The Congress established this program through the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. Specifically, the Congress directed us to isolate these wastes in geologic repositories constructed in suitable rock formations deep beneath the surface of the earth. In the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987, the Congress mandated that only one repository was to be developed at present and that only the Yucca Mountain candidate site in Nevada was to be characterized at this time. The Amendments Act also authorized the construction of a facility for monitored retrievable storage (MRS) and established the Office of the Nuclear Waste Negotiator and the Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board. After a reassessment in 1989, the Secretary of Energy restructured the program, focusing the repository effort scientific evaluations of the Yucca Mountain candidate site, deciding to proceed with the development of an MRS facility, and strengthening the management of the program. 48 refs., 32 figs.

  14. The Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abell, P. A.; Mazanek, D. D.; Reeves, D. M.; Chodas, P. W.; Gates, M. M.; Johnson, L. N.; Ticker, R. L.

    2016-01-01

    To achieve its long-term goal of sending humans to Mars, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) plans to proceed in a series of incrementally more complex human spaceflight missions. Today, human flight experience extends only to Low-Earth Orbit (LEO), and should problems arise during a mission, the crew can return to Earth in a matter of minutes to hours. The next logical step for human spaceflight is to gain flight experience in the vicinity of the Moon. These cis-lunar missions provide a "proving ground" for the testing of systems and operations while still accommodating an emergency return path to the Earth that would last only several days. Cis-lunar mission experience will be essential for more ambitious human missions beyond the Earth- Moon system, which will require weeks, months, or even years of transit time.

  15. Multi-mission Satellite Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamilkowski, M. L.; Teter, M. A.; Grant, K. D.; Dougherty, B.; Cochran, S.

    2015-12-01

    NOAA's next-generation environmental satellite, the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) replaces the current Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES). JPSS satellites carry sensors which collect meteorological, oceanographic, climatological, and solar-geophysical observations of the earth, atmosphere, and space. The first JPSS satellite was launched in 2011 and is currently NOAA's primary operational polar satellite. The JPSS ground system is the Common Ground System (CGS), and provides command, control, and communications (C3) and data processing (DP). A multi-mission system, CGS provides combinations of C3/DP for numerous NASA, NOAA, DoD, and international missions. In preparation for the next JPSS satellite, CGS improved its multi-mission capabilities to enhance mission operations for larger constellations of earth observing satellites with the added benefit of streamlining mission operations for other NOAA missions. CGS's multi-mission capabilities allows management all of assets as a single enterprise, more efficiently using ground resources and personnel and consolidating multiple ground systems into one. Sophisticated scheduling algorithms compare mission priorities and constraints across all ground stations, creating an enterprise schedule optimized to mission needs, which CGS executes to acquire the satellite link, uplink commands, downlink and route data to the operations and data processing facilities, and generate the final products for delivery to downstream users. This paper will illustrate the CGS's ability to manage multiple, enterprise-wide polar orbiting missions by demonstrating resource modeling and tasking, production of enterprise contact schedules for NOAA's Fairbanks ground station (using both standing and ad hoc requests), deconflicting resources due to ground outages, and updating resource allocations through dynamic priority definitions.

  16. Burrell-Optical-Kepler Survey (BOKS) I: Survey Description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldmeier, John J.; Howell, S.; Harding, P.; Mihos, C.; Rudick, C.; Sherry, W.; Lee, T.; Knox, C.; Ciardi, D.; von Braun, K.; Everett, M.; Proctor, M.; van Belle, G.

    2006-12-01

    The Burrell Optical Kepler Survey (BOKS) is a ground-based, high cadence, stellar variability survey over a portion of the planned science field for the Kepler mission. The survey was carried out at the 0.6m Burrell Schmidt telescope, with an observed field size of 1.36 square degrees. Over 60,000 stars were observed within the BOKS field in the SDSS r-band spanning a time period of 39 days, with a 4.5 minute cadence. We give a basic description of the survey, and calculate the observability function for stellar variablity of different types.

  17. Photoconductivité et photoémission de diamant(s) sous irradiation XUV femtoseconde

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudin, J.; Geoffroy, G.; Guizard, S.; Esnouf, S.; Olevano, V.; Petite, G.; Klimentov, S. M.; Pivovarov, P. A.; Garnov, S. V.; Carre, B.; Martin, P.; Belsky, A.

    2005-06-01

    Nous décrivons une étude des propriétés de photoconductivité (PC) induite dans différents types de diamants (monocristaux de type IIa et couches CVD) par des impulsions femtosecondes XUV (jusqu'à l'harmonique 19 du laser titane/saphir). En complément de ces études, les spectres de photoémission de ces échantillons ont aussi été étudiés (harmoniques 13 à 27). En fonction de l'ordre de l'harmonique, on constate que le signal de PC augmente tout d'abord (harmoniques 9 à 13) puis diminue au delà. Si l'augmentation s'interprète aisément comme résultant de phénomènes de multiplication par collisions inélastiques, la diminution ultérieure n'a pas pour le moment d'explication. Les mesures de spectre de photoémission suggèrent un effet important de la relaxation par émission de plasmons. Enfin, nous avons réalisé le premier calcul ab-initio de la durée de vie des porteurs tenant compte des interactions électron-électron, à l'aide d'une approche de théorie quantique à plusieurs corps de type GW. Au voisinage du gap, on observe un comportement proche de celui d'un liquide de Fermi. A plus haute énergie on observe des déviations à ce comportement, provenant d'effets de structure de bande d'une part, et d'excitations de plasmons d'autre part.

  18. Sentinel-3 Mission Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, U.; Berruti, B.; Donlon, C.; Frerick, J.; Mavrocordatos, C.; Nieke, J.; Seitz, B.; Stroede, J.; Rebhan, H.

    2009-04-01

    The series of Sentinel-3 satellites will provide global, frequent and near-realtime ocean, ice and land monitoring. Sentinel-3 will be particularly devoted to the provision of observation data in routine, long term (20 years of operations) and continuous fashion with a consistent quality and a very high level of availability. It will continue the successful observations of similar predecessor instruments onboard Envisat from 2012 onwards. The Ocean and Land Colour Instrument (OLCI) is based on the Envisat MEdium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer Instrument (MERIS) instrument. It fulfils ocean-colour and land-cover objectives with a larger swath and additional spectral bands. The Sea and Land Surface Temperature radiometer (SLSTR) is based on Envisat's Advanced Along Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR). SLSTR has a double-scanning mechanism, yielding a wider swath and a complete overlap with OLCI. This enables the generation of a synergy product with a total of 30 spectral bands, fully co-registered for new and innovative ocean and land products. The topography mission has the primary objective of providing accurate, closely spaced altimetry measurements from a high-inclination orbit with a long repeat cycle. It will complement the Jason ocean altimeter series monitoring mid-scale circulation and sea levels. The altimeter will be operated in two different modes, a classical low resolution mode and a synthetic aperture mode similar to CryoSat for increased along-track resolution and improved performance. Accompanying the altimeter will be a Precise Orbit Determination system and microwave radiometer (MWR) for removing the errors related to the altimeter signals being delayed by water vapour in the atmosphere. The altimeter will track over a variety of surfaces: Open ocean, coastal zones, sea ice and inland waters. The conceptual designs of the major instruments and their basic performance parameters will be introduced together with the expected accuracies of the main

  19. Mission to the Trojan Asteroids: lessons learned during a JPL Planetary Science Summer School mission design exercise

    CERN Document Server

    Diniega, Serina; Balcerski, Jeffrey; Carande, Bryce; Diaz-Silva, Ricardo A; Fraeman, Abigail A; Guzewich, Scott D; Hudson, Jennifer; Nahm, Amanda L; Potter-McIntyre, Sally; Route, Matthew; Urban, Kevin D; Vasisht, Soumya; Benneke, Bjoern; Gil, Stephanie; Livi, Roberto; Williams, Brian; Budney, Charles J; Lowes, Leslie L; 10.1016/j.pss.2012.11.011

    2013-01-01

    The 2013 Planetary Science Decadal Survey identified a detailed investigation of the Trojan asteroids occupying Jupiter's L4 and L5 Lagrange points as a priority for future NASA missions. Observing these asteroids and measuring their physical characteristics and composition would aid in identification of their source and provide answers about their likely impact history and evolution, thus yielding information about the makeup and dynamics of the early Solar System. We present a conceptual design for a mission to the Jovian Trojan asteroids: the Trojan ASteroid Tour, Exploration, and Rendezvous (TASTER) mission, that is consistent with the NASA New Frontiers candidate mission recommended by the Decadal Survey and the final result of the 2011 NASA-JPL Planetary Science Summer School. Our proposed mission includes visits to two Trojans in the L4 population: a 500 km altitude fly-by of 1999 XS143, followed by a rendezvous with and detailed observations of 911 Agamemnon at orbital altitudes of 1000 - 100 km over ...

  20. The Advanced Compton Telescope Mission

    CERN Document Server

    Boggs, S E; Ryan, J; Aprile, E; Gehrels, N; Kippen, M; Leising, M; Oberlack, U; Wunderer, C; Zych, A; Bloser, P; Harris, M; Hoover, A; Klimenk, A; Kocevski, D; McConnell, M; Milne, P; Novikova, E I; Phlips, B; Polsen, M; Sturner, S; Tournear, D; Weidenspointner, G; Wulf, E; Zoglauer, A; Baring, M; Beacom, J; Bildsten, L; Dermer, C; Hartmann, D; Hernanz, M; Smith, D; Starrfield, S; Boggs, Steven E.; Kurfess, James; Ryan, James; Aprile, Elena; Gehrels, Neil; Kippen, Marc; Leising, Mark; Oberlack, Uwe; Wunderer, Cornelia; Zych, Allen; Bloser, Peter; Harris, Michael; Hoover, Andrew; Klimenk, Alexei; Kocevski, Dan; Connell, Mark Mc; Milne, Peter; Novikova, Elena I.; Phlips, Bernard; Polsen, Mark; Sturner, Steven; Tournear, Derek; Weidenspointner, Georg; Wulf, Eric; Zoglauer, Andreas; Baring, Matthew; Beacom, John; Bildsten, Lars; Dermer, Charles; Hartmann, Dieter; Hernanz, Margarita; Smith, David; Starrfield, Sumner

    2006-01-01

    The Advanced Compton Telescope (ACT), the next major step in gamma-ray astronomy, will probe the fires where chemical elements are formed by enabling high-resolution spectroscopy of nuclear emission from supernova explosions. During the past two years, our collaboration has been undertaking a NASA mission concept study for ACT. This study was designed to (1) transform the key scientific objectives into specific instrument requirements, (2) to identify the most promising technologies to meet those requirements, and (3) to design a viable mission concept for this instrument. We present the results of this study, including scientific goals and expected performance, mission design, and technology recommendations.

  1. Pratique de la mesure ambulatoire de la pression artérielle à Brazzaville (Congo): données préliminaires

    OpenAIRE

    Ikama, Stéphane Méo; Nsitou, Bernice Mesmer; Makani, Jospin; Ellenga-Mbolla, Bertrand; Ondze-Kafata, Louis Igor; Mongo-Ngamami, Solange Flore; Nkalla-Lambi, Mûnka; Gombet, Thierry Raoul; Kimbally-Kaky, Gisèle

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Évaluer l'apport de la MAPA dans la prise en charge de l'hypertension artérielle à Brazzaville. Méthodes Cette étude transversale descriptive a été menée à Brazzaville entre janvier 2011 et décembre 2013 (soit 36 mois). Elle a inclus une série consécutive de 1040 patients ayant bénéficié d'une Mesure Ambulatoire de la Pression Artérielle. Nous avons utilisé le TONOPORT V et le logiciel Cardiosoft 6.51 de GE Health Care, respectivement pour l'enregistrement et l'analyse des donnée...

  2. Application expérimentale du bilan de puissance réactive à la mesure de l'anche de saxophone

    OpenAIRE

    Boutillon, Xavier; Gibiat, V.

    1994-01-01

    La notion de bilan de puissance réactive permet de lier le fonctionnement d'une anche modélisée par un ressort à celui du résonateur qu'elle excite. Un instrument à anche simple ne joue pas exactement sur les fréquences des pics d'impédance. Chaque partiel du tuyau absorbe donc (ou fournit) une puissance réactive. Leur somme algébrique est égale à celle fournie par le ressort qui représente l'anche. Sur le plan expérimental, nous avons mesuré le spectre de pression interne d'un saxophone et s...

  3. Mesure de la Polarisation des Lambda Produits dans les Collisions Positron-Electron AU Lep a L'aide du Detecteur Opal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenplas, Denis

    Le Modele Standard est le cadre theorique general qui, jusqu'a present, a permis l'interpretation de tous les resultats experimentaux en physique des hautes energies. Cette theorie decrit, entre autres, la production d'une paire de particules elementaires, formee d'un quark et d'un antiquark, a partir de la desintegration de l'un des bosons mediateurs de l'interaction faible, le Z^0. Cependant, dans ce cas precis, la transformation subsequente des quarks primaires en particules reelles, un processus appele hadronisation, n'est decrite qu'a l'aide de modeles phenomenologiques. Afin de sonder les mecanismes de l'hadronisation, cette these presente la mesure du transfert du spin d'un quark etrange primaire a une particule appelee Lambda lors des desintegrations hadroniques du Z^0. L'etude a ete realisee dans le cadre de la collaboration OPAL, une des quatre experiences menees au collisionneur LEP, la ou des electrons et des positrons sont acceleres jusqu'a une energie commune, sqrt{s} = {rm E_ {cm}}, voisine de l'energie de production du rm Z^0, M_{Z ^0} egale a 91.3 GeV. La theorie electrofaible precise la direction du spin, c'est-a-dire la polarisation, d'un quark etrange primaire provenant de la desintegration d'un Z ^0. Quant a lui, le modele des quarks etablit que l'orientation du spin d'un Lambda est directement reliee a la polarisation du quark etrange dont il provient. La question est de determiner dans quelle mesure la polarisation du quark primaire est transmise au Lambda a la suite du processus de l'hadronisation, decrit dans le cadre de la ChromoDynamique Quantique. Une estimation, qui tient compte de tous ces differents aspects theoriques, evalue a 30% la polarisation des Lambda dont l'impulsion est superieure a 15 GeV/c. La mesure experimentale de la polarisation repose sur l'identification des Lambda a partir de la reconstitution de la desintegration Lambdato ppi^-. Ce processus, qui se deroule par le biais de l'interaction faible, viole la parite car

  4. Etablissement de tests permettant de mesurer l'impact sur les performances de la sécurisation d'IPv6 par IPsec

    OpenAIRE

    Bernard, Nicolas

    2002-01-01

    Magistère d'Informatique et Modélisation. Rapport de stage.; Ce document explique comment s'effectue la sécurisation des réseaux IPv6 à l'aide du protocole IPsec. Il présente, dans le contexte du système FreeBSD, comment est réalisée l'implémentation d'IPsec, sa configuration statique et dynamique. Il décrit ensuite les différents outils de mesure de performance utilisés et leur portage sur IPv6. Il présente enfin les résultats des tests réalisés au sein du laboratoire.

  5. Mesure du taux de couverture du sol pour estimer les principales caractéristiques d’une culture de colza avant montaison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denoroy Pascal

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available L’étude de paramètres biologiques en expérimentation au champ est fastidieuse et les mesures directes sur échantillons de plantes induisent des problèmes pratiques, en particulier pour le suivi hivernal des cultures (durée du prélèvement, conservation, rapidité de traitement…, qui limitent leur utilisation à un petit nombre d’essais. Aussi, en général, peu de mesures sont réalisées en cours de végétation et, si on dispose de résultats finals, on n’a guère d’informations quantitatives intermédiaires, en particulier sur la dynamique d’installation de la culture. Ces informations permettraient pourtant de mieux analyser les sources de variation des résultats par une analyse de différents processus de la croissance : mise en place de la surface foliaire, accumulation de la matière sèche, absorption des minéraux… Il serait donc utile de disposer de méthodes permettant d’estimer des variables d’état biologiques en cours de culture tout en minimisant le temps et les moyens nécessaires au recueil des données. Ce qui suit fait état des résultats obtenus dans une étude concernant l’intérêt d’utiliser de simples photographies verticales pour estimer diverses grandeurs caractérisant une culture de colza au stade rosette. Ces travaux font suite à des résultats publiés précédemment, d’une part, sur blé [1] et d’autre part, sur maïs et betterave [2].

  6. Measurement of the electronic density of ionised media by hyper frequency methods; Mesure de la densite electronique des milieux ionises par des methodes hyperfrequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Consoli, T. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1960-07-01

    Within the limits of the I.N.S.T.N. courses on plasmas, this analytical study summarizes the articles quoted in the references on hyper-frequency techniques for the measurement of electronic density of an ionised gas. It is neither exhaustive nor complete and further details may be obtained by referring to the works mentioned. The first part, devoted to the theoretical side, concert the propagation of electromagnetic waves ionised media and the excitation of stationary raves in electromagnetic cavities. The second part deals with the measurement techniques themselves. It includes those techniques which hare become classic, and also more recent ones being developed in various laboratories and in the Service of Applied Physics at Saclay. (author) [French] Dans le cadre des cours sur les plasmas a l'l.N.S.T. cette etude d'analyse resume les articles cites en bibliographie sur les techniques hyperfrequences pour la mesure de la densite electronique d'un gas ionise. Elle n'est ni exhaustive, ni complete. Pour plus de details on voudra bien se rapporter aux travaux mentionnes. La premiere partie consacree a des rappels theoriques, concerne la propagation des ondes electromagnetiques dans les milieux ionises et sur l'excitation d'ondes stationnaires dans les cavites electromagnetiques. La seconde se rapporte aux techniques de mesures proprement dites. On a fait figurer dans cette partie des techniques devenues classiques et celles plus recentes en cours d'etudes dans divers laboratoires et au Service de Physique Appliquee a SACLAY. (auteur)

  7. NASA's Near Earth Asteroid Scout Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Les; McNutt, Leslie; Castillo-Rogez, Julie

    2017-01-01

    NASA is developing solar sail propulsion for a near-term Near Earth Asteroid (NEA) reconnaissance mission and laying the groundwork for their future use in deep space science and exploration missions. The NEA Scout mission, funded by NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems Program and managed by NASA MSFC, will use the sail as primary propulsion allowing it to survey and image one or more NEA's of interest for possible future human exploration. NEA Scout uses a 6U cubesat (to be provided by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory), an 86 m2 solar sail and will weigh less than 14 kilograms. The solar sail for NEA Scout will be based on the technology developed and flown by the NASA NanoSail-D and The Planetary Society's Lightsail-A. Four 7 m stainless steel booms wrapped on two spools (two overlapping booms per spool) will be motor deployed and pull the sail from its stowed volume. The sail material is an aluminized polyimide approximately 3 microns thick. NEA Scout will launch on the Space Launch System (SLS) first mission in 2018 and deploy from the SLS after the Orion spacecraft is separated from the SLS upper stage. The NEA Scout spacecraft will stabilize its orientation after ejection using an onboard cold-gas thruster system. The same system provides the vehicle Delta-V sufficient for a lunar flyby. After its first encounter with the moon, the 86 m2 sail will deploy, and the sail characterization phase will begin. A mechanical Active Mass Translation (AMT) system, combined with the remaining ACS propellant, will be used for sail momentum management. Once the system is checked out, the spacecraft will perform a series of lunar flybys until it achieves optimum departure trajectory to the target asteroid. The spacecraft will then begin its two year-long cruise. About one month before the asteroid flyby, NEA Scout will pause to search for the target and start its approach phase using a combination of radio tracking and optical navigation. The solar sail will provide

  8. General Mission Analysis Tool (GMAT) Mathematical Specifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Steve

    2007-01-01

    The General Mission Analysis Tool (GMAT) is a space trajectory optimization and mission analysis system developed by NASA and private industry in the spirit of the NASA Mission. GMAT contains new technology and is a testbed for future technology development.

  9. Low cost test bed tool development for validation of mission control events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanez, L.; Cervantes, D.; Tatge, L.

    2003-01-01

    The Cassini Program is one of the last large interplanetary spacecraft missions. It is a joint effort between the European Space Agency, the Italian Space Agency and NASA.The U.S. portion of the mission is managed for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). The primary mission is to survey the complex Saturnian system and release the ESA-Huygens probe at Titan. The success of the Cassini Mission has been largely due its many simulation test beds and its rigorous test program.

  10. Requirements for Value of Information (VoI) calculation over mission specifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelis, James R.

    2017-05-01

    Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) operations center on providing relevant situational understanding to military commanders and analysts to facilitate decision-making for execution of mission tasks. However, limitations exist in tactical-edge environments on the ability to disseminate digital materials to analysts and decision makers. This work investigates novel methods to calculate of Value of Information tied to digital materials (termed information objects) for consumer use, based on interpretation of mission specifications. Followed by a short survey of related VoI calculation efforts, discussion is provided on mission-centric VoI calculation for digital materials via adoption of the preexisting Missions and Means Framework model.

  11. Mission Critical: Preventing Antibiotic Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... file Error processing SSI file Mission Critical: Preventing Antibiotic Resistance Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Can you ... spp. So, what can we do to prevent antibiotic resistance in healthcare settings? Patients, healthcare providers, healthcare facility ...

  12. Mission Level Autonomy for USSV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntsberger, Terry; Stirb, Robert C.; Brizzolara, Robert

    2011-01-01

    On-water demonstration of a wide range of mission-proven, advanced technologies at TRL 5+ that provide a total integrated, modular approach to effectively address the majority of the key needs for full mission-level autonomous, cross-platform control of USV s. Wide baseline stereo system mounted on the ONR USSV was shown to be an effective sensing modality for tracking of dynamic contacts as a first step to automated retrieval operations. CASPER onboard planner/replanner successfully demonstrated realtime, on-water resource-based analysis for mission-level goal achievement and on-the-fly opportunistic replanning. Full mixed mode autonomy was demonstrated on-water with a seamless transition between operator over-ride and return to current mission plan. Autonomous cooperative operations for fixed asset protection and High Value Unit escort using 2 USVs (AMN1 & 14m RHIB) were demonstrated during Trident Warrior 2010 in JUN 2010

  13. Urinary albumin in space missions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cirillo, Massimo; De Santo, Natale G; Heer, Martina

    2002-01-01

    Proteinuria was hypothesized for space mission but research data are missing. Urinary albumin, as index of proteinuria, was analyzed in frozen urine samples collected by astronauts during space missions onboard MIR station and on ground (control). Urinary albumin was measured by a double antibody...... radioimmunoassay. On average, 24h urinary albumin was 27.4% lower in space than on ground; the difference was statistically significant. Low urinary albumin excretion could be another effect of exposure to weightlessness (microgravity)....

  14. Urinary albumin in space missions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cirillo, Massimo; De Santo, Natale G; Heer, Martina

    2002-01-01

    Proteinuria was hypothesized for space mission but research data are missing. Urinary albumin, as index of proteinuria, was analyzed in frozen urine samples collected by astronauts during space missions onboard MIR station and on ground (control). Urinary albumin was measured by a double antibody...... radioimmunoassay. On average, 24h urinary albumin was 27.4% lower in space than on ground; the difference was statistically significant. Low urinary albumin excretion could be another effect of exposure to weightlessness (microgravity)....

  15. KEPLER Mission: development and overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borucki, William J

    2016-03-01

    The Kepler Mission is a space observatory launched in 2009 by NASA to monitor 170,000 stars over a period of four years to determine the frequency of Earth-size and larger planets in and near the habitable zone of Sun-like stars, the size and orbital distributions of these planets, and the types of stars they orbit. Kepler is the tenth in the series of NASA Discovery Program missions that are competitively-selected, PI-directed, medium-cost missions. The Mission concept and various instrument prototypes were developed at the Ames Research Center over a period of 18 years starting in 1983. The development of techniques to do the 10 ppm photometry required for Mission success took years of experimentation, several workshops, and the exploration of many 'blind alleys' before the construction of the flight instrument. Beginning in 1992 at the start of the NASA Discovery Program, the Kepler Mission concept was proposed five times before its acceptance for mission development in 2001. During that period, the concept evolved from a photometer in an L2 orbit that monitored 6000 stars in a 50 sq deg field-of-view (FOV) to one that was in a heliocentric orbit that simultaneously monitored 170,000 stars with a 105 sq deg FOV. Analysis of the data to date has detected over 4600 planetary candidates which include several hundred Earth-size planetary candidates, over a thousand confirmed planets, and Earth-size planets in the habitable zone (HZ). These discoveries provide the information required for estimates of the frequency of planets in our galaxy. The Mission results show that most stars have planets, many of these planets are similar in size to the Earth, and that systems with several planets are common. Although planets in the HZ are common, many are substantially larger than Earth.

  16. Rosetta mission operations for landing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accomazzo, Andrea; Lodiot, Sylvain; Companys, Vicente

    2016-08-01

    The International Rosetta Mission of the European Space Agency (ESA) was launched on 2nd March 2004 on its 10 year journey to comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko and has reached it early August 2014. The main mission objectives were to perform close observations of the comet nucleus throughout its orbit around the Sun and deliver the lander Philae to its surface. This paper describers the activities at mission operations level that allowed the landing of Philae. The landing preparation phase was mainly characterised by the definition of the landing selection process, to which several parties contributed, and by the definition of the strategy for comet characterisation, the orbital strategy for lander delivery, and the definition and validation of the operations timeline. The definition of the landing site selection process involved almost all components of the mission team; Rosetta has been the first, and so far only mission, that could not rely on data collected by previous missions for the landing site selection. This forced the teams to include an intensive observation campaign as a mandatory part of the process; several science teams actively contributed to this campaign thus making results from science observations part of the mandatory operational products. The time allocated to the comet characterisation phase was in the order of a few weeks and all the processes, tools, and interfaces required an extensive planning an validation. Being the descent of Philae purely ballistic, the main driver for the orbital strategy was the capability to accurately control the position and velocity of Rosetta at Philae's separation. The resulting operations timeline had to merge this need of frequent orbit determination and control with the complexity of the ground segment and the inherent risk of problems when doing critical activities in short times. This paper describes the contribution of the Mission Control Centre (MOC) at the European Space Operations Centre (ESOC) to this

  17. Social Tagging of Mission Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Jeffrey S.; Wallick, Michael N.; Joswig, Joseph C.; Powell, Mark W.; Torres, Recaredo J.; Mittman, David S.; Abramyan, Lucy; Crockett, Thomas M.; Shams, Khawaja S.; Fox, Jason M.; Pyrzak, Guy; Vaughn, Michael B.

    2010-01-01

    Mars missions will generate a large amount of data in various forms, such as daily plans, images, and scientific information. Often, there is a semantic linkage between images that cannot be captured automatically. Software is needed that will provide a method for creating arbitrary tags for this mission data so that items with a similar tag can be related to each other. The tags should be visible and searchable for all users. A new routine was written to offer a new and more flexible search option over previous applications. This software allows users of the MSLICE program to apply any number of arbitrary tags to a piece of mission data through a MSLICE search interface. The application of tags creates relationships between data that did not previously exist. These tags can be easily removed and changed, and contain enough flexibility to be specifically configured for any mission. This gives users the ability to quickly recall or draw attention to particular pieces of mission data, for example: Give a semantic and meaningful description to mission data; for example, tag all images with a rock in them with the tag "rock." Rapidly recall specific and useful pieces of data; for example, tag a plan as"driving template." Call specific data to a user s attention; for example, tag a plan as "for:User." This software is part of the MSLICE release, which was written in Java. It will run on any current Windows, Macintosh, or Linux system.

  18. A review of Spacelab mission management approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craft, H. G., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The Spacelab development program is a joint undertaking of the NASA and ESA. The paper addresses the initial concept of Spacelab payload mission management, the lessons learned, and modifications made as a result of the actual implementation of Spacelab Mission 1. The discussion covers mission management responsibilities, program control, science management, payload definition and interfaces, integrated payload mission planning, integration requirements, payload specialist training, payload and launch site integration, payload flight/mission operations, and postmission activities. After 3.5 years the outlined overall mission manager approach has proven to be most successful. The approach does allow the mission manager to maintain the lowest overall mission cost.

  19. Propriétés d'un fil quantique connecté à des fils de mesure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safi, Inès.

    étique. Afin d'identifier les flux d'électrons incident et transmis, des fils intermédiaires sans interactions sont introduits, et le système global est traité comme un liquide de Tomonaga-Luttinger inhomogène. La transmission du flux est parfaite dans la limite stationnaire : un électron incident est transmis en une série de charges partielles spatialement séparées dont la somme vaut l'unité. Il est par ailleurs remarquable que les parties charge et spin transmises restent séparées dans le fil externe sans interactions. La conductance est déduite de la transmission parfaite suivant un argument analogue à celui de l'approche de diffusion. Elle peut aussi être reliée exactement à la transmission en modélisant les réservoirs par un potentiel électrostatique externe fixé. Elle est donc égale à e2/h pour une portée finie arbitraire des interactions. Ce résultat de conductance a été confirmé par des observations expérimentales récentes sur les fils quantiques (Tarucha et al. et Yacoby et al.) dont la conductance présente un plateau à e2/h dans la limite balistique (haute température). Ceci contredit le consensus général jusque-là admis, prédisant en particulier une réduction de la conductance par des interactions répulsives qui devient encore plus importante pour des interactions à longue portée. Le transport dynamique est développé en présence des contacts. La conservation globale de la charge est assurée en tenant compte d'une grille avoisinante. Les coefficients de conductance dynamiques sont exprimés en fonction de la transmission et de la réflexion des plasmons, qui dépendent eux-mêmes des interactions. Il est possible d'étendre cette approche à des fils de mesure avec interactions, quoique des hypothèses supplémentaires sont nécessaires. Par ailleurs, dans le cas usuel d'interactions invariantes par translation, ce travail en donne une revue relativement complète, en suivant des méthodes différentes et en d

  20. Europa Clipper: A Multiple Flyby Mission Concept to Explore Europa's Habitability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, G. W.; Pappalardo, R. T.; Prockter, L. M.; Senske, D. A.; Vance, S. D.

    2012-09-01

    Europa is a potentially habitable world that is likely to be geologically and chemically active today. Many well-defined and focused science questions regarding past and present habitability may be addressed by exploring Europa. The National Research Council's 2011 Planetary Decadal Survey placed Europa science among its highest priorities, but noted that the budget profile for the Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO) mission concept, which was prioritized in the Survey, was incompatible with NASA's projected planetary science budget. Thus, NASA initiated a study to consider more fiscally viable Europa mission scenarios. Among the options considered, a multipleflyby mission concept (now named the "Europa Clipper") was found to have exceptional science merit while also meeting the challenge from NASA and the Decadal Survey for a reduced-scope Europa mission relative to JEO.

  1. A Survey of Missions for Unmanned Undersea Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    m (3.3 ft) Batteries 81 lithium thionyl chloride D-cellsa Communication Cellular; Iridium satellite; GpS endurance nominal speed: 0.25 m/s (0.5 kt...ft) Batteries 52 lithium sulfuryl chloride D-cells Communication Orbcomm satellite; GpS navigation endurance nominal speed: 0.25 m/s (0.5 kt) range...Subsystems and technologies 49 ure after relatively few cycles. More recently, vehicles have used lithium primary batteries , which are not rechargeable

  2. Trajectory-Based Visual Localization in Underwater Surveying Missions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoni Burguera

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a new vision-based localization system applied to an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV with limited sensing and computation capabilities. The traditional EKF-SLAM approaches are usually expensive in terms of execution time; the approach presented in this paper strengthens this method by adopting a trajectory-based schema that reduces the computational requirements. The pose of the vehicle is estimated using an extended Kalman filter (EKF, which predicts the vehicle motion by means of a visual odometer and corrects these predictions using the data associations (loop closures between the current frame and the previous ones. One of the most important steps in this procedure is the image registration method, as it reinforces the data association and, thus, makes it possible to close loops reliably. Since the use of standard EKFs entail linearization errors that can distort the vehicle pose estimations, the approach has also been tested using an iterated Kalman filter (IEKF. Experiments have been conducted using a real underwater vehicle in controlled scenarios and in shallow sea waters, showing an excellent performance with very small errors, both in the vehicle pose and in the overall trajectory estimates.

  3. Trajectory-based visual localization in underwater surveying missions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burguera, Antoni; Bonin-Font, Francisco; Oliver, Gabriel

    2015-01-14

    We present a new vision-based localization system applied to an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) with limited sensing and computation capabilities. The traditional EKF-SLAM approaches are usually expensive in terms of execution time; the approach presented in this paper strengthens this method by adopting a trajectory-based schema that reduces the computational requirements. The pose of the vehicle is estimated using an extended Kalman filter (EKF), which predicts the vehicle motion by means of a visual odometer and corrects these predictions using the data associations (loop closures) between the current frame and the previous ones. One of the most important steps in this procedure is the image registration method, as it reinforces the data association and, thus, makes it possible to close loops reliably. Since the use of standard EKFs entail linearization errors that can distort the vehicle pose estimations, the approach has also been tested using an iterated Kalman filter (IEKF). Experiments have been conducted using a real underwater vehicle in controlled scenarios and in shallow sea waters, showing an excellent performance with very small errors, both in the vehicle pose and in the overall trajectory estimates.

  4. Status and path forward for the large ultraviolet/optical/infrared surveyor (LUVOIR) mission concept study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooke, Julie A.; Roberge, Aki; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn D.; Mandell, Avi M.; Bolcar, Matthew R.; Rioux, Norman M.; Perez, Mario R.; Smith, Erin C.

    2016-07-01

    In preparation of the 2020 Astrophysics Decadal Survey, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has commenced a process for the astronomical community to study several large mission concepts leveraging the lessons learned from past Decadal Surveys. This will enable the Decadal Survey committee to make more informed recommendations to NASA on its astrophysics science and mission priorities with respect to cost and risk. Four astrophysics large mission concepts were identified. Each of them had a Science and Technology Definition Teem (STDT) chartered to produce scientifically compelling, feasible, and executable design reference mission (DRM) concepts to present to the 2020 Decadal Survey. In addition, The Aerospace Corporation will perform an independent cost and technical evaluation (CATE) of each of these mission concept studies in advance of the 2020 Decadal Survey, by interacting with the STDTs to provide detailed technical details on certain areas for which "deep dives" are appropriate. This paper presents the status and path forward for one of the four large mission concepts, namely, the Large UltraViolet, Optical, InfraRed surveyor (LUVOIR).

  5. MITA: An Italian minisatellite for small missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falvella, M. C.; Crisconio, M.; Lupi, T.; Sabatini, P.; Valentini, G.; Viola, F.

    On July 15th 2000 the first MITA (Italian Advanced Technology Minisatellite) was launched from Plesetsk (Russia) by a Cosmos rocket as a piggy-back of the CHAMP satellite. The main purpose of the first MITA mission is its in-flight validation. Furthermore the scientific payload NINA-2 of INFN (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare) and the technological payload MTS-AOMS (Micro Tech Sensor for Attitude and Orbit Measurement System) were embarked. The NINA-2 goal is the survey of galactic and solar cosmic rays at 450 km altitude. MTS is an ESA multi-tasking autonomous sensor based on Active Pixel Sensor (star and horizon sensor), Angular Rate Sensor and Magnetic Field Sensor. In this paper the main MITA bus characteristics are reported, together with the description of the launch and the first commissioning phase. The first mission nominal orbit is circular, with a 450 Km altitude and a 87° inclination. The satellite attitude is nadir pointing, 3 axes stabilised. Spacecraft mass is 169.9 Kg. Two fixed solar panels provide an average power of 85 W EOL. The configuration of the satellite main body is based on a cubic shape module, made of Aluminium beams and honeycomb panels. The Mission Control Center is placed in Rome, while the TT&C stations are in Cordoba (Argentina) and, only during the commissioning phase, in Malindi (Kenia); Malindi TT&C station will then be replaced by Fucino (Italy). Since the contacts between spacecraft and the TT&C stations do not occur every orbit, the satellite on board S/W was designed in order to reach the nominal mode without telecommand from ground.

  6. Enceladus Environmental Explorer (EVE): A Mission Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, M. J.; Amador, E. S.; Carrier, B. L.; Albuja, A.; Bapst, J.; Cahill, K. R. S.; Ebersohn, F.; Gainey, S.; Gartrelle, G.; Greenberger, R. N.; Hale, J. M.; Johnston, S.; Olivares, J.; Parcheta, C. E.; Sheehan, J. P.; Thorpe, A. K.; Zareh, S. K.

    2014-12-01

    Enceladus is an intriguing planetary body, which possibly has the ingredients needed for life. Further, it has numerous (over 100) continuously erupting geysers that eject material into the atmosphere which provide a unique opportunity to sample the body's internal chemistry from orbit. At JPL's Planetary Science Summer School, Team X and a group of students developed a mission concept to directly sample Enceladus' plumes. The mission, named Enceladus Environmental Explorer (EVE), follows NASA's Planetary Science Decadal survey and would assess the potential habitability of Saturn's icy satellite through analysis of the chemistry of the subsurface ocean and the nature of the organic chemistry in the plume. EVE would look at geological and geophysical surface processes of Enceladus by investigating the heat output of Enceladus, plumes' mechanics, the extent of the liquid subsurface reservoir(s), and gravitational variation. The EVE mission concept aimed for a January 2023 launch on an Atlas 551 class launch vehicle and would arrive at Saturn July 2031. A two-year-long Saturn moon tour would allow sufficient deceleration to permit a polar orbital insertion around Enceladus in March 2035, remaining stable for 54 weeks of observation. The proposed instrument payload includes: 1) SUb MilliMeter Enceladus Radiometer (SUMMER; equivalent to Rosetta MIRO), 2) Enceladus Dust and Gas Experiment (EDGE; an enhanced version of Rosetta COSIMA), 3) MAGnetometer for Ionic Concentration (MAGIC; equivalent to MMS/ InSIGHT magnetometer), 4) Visual Imaging Camera with Topographic Observational Resolution (VICTOR) and 5) Enceladus Radio Gravity Science (ERGS). Our suggested orbital timeline would allow the most comprehensive dataset yet collected of a moon in the outer solar system, mapping the entire surface twice with SUMMER and VICTOR, while sampling the plume directly 232 times with EDGE. MAGIC would also provide over a year of sampling of the magnetic field variations from orbit

  7. The Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abell, Paul; Gates, Michele; Johnson, Lindley; Chodas, Paul; Mazanek, Dan; Reeves, David; Ticker, Ronald

    2016-07-01

    To achieve its long-term goal of sending humans to Mars, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) plans to proceed in a series of incrementally more complex human spaceflight missions. Today, human flight experience extends only to Low-Earth Orbit (LEO), and should problems arise during a mission, the crew can return to Earth in a matter of minutes to hours. The next logical step for human spaceflight is to gain flight experience in the vicinity of the Moon. These cis-lunar missions provide a "proving ground" for the testing of systems and operations while still accommodating an emergency return path to the Earth that would last only several days. Cis-lunar mission experience will be essential for more ambitious human missions beyond the Earth-Moon system, which will require weeks, months, or even years of transit time. In addition, NASA has been given a Grand Challenge to find all asteroid threats to human populations and know what to do about them. Obtaining knowledge of asteroid physical properties combined with performing technology demonstrations for planetary defense provide much needed information to address the issue of future asteroid impacts on Earth. Hence the combined objectives of human exploration and planetary defense give a rationale for the Asteroid Re-direct Mission (ARM). Mission Description: NASA's ARM consists of two mission segments: 1) the Asteroid Redirect Robotic Mission (ARRM), the first robotic mission to visit a large (greater than ~100 m diameter) near-Earth asteroid (NEA), collect a multi-ton boulder from its surface along with regolith samples, demonstrate a planetary defense technique, and return the asteroidal material to a stable orbit around the Moon; and 2) the Asteroid Redirect Crewed Mission (ARCM), in which astronauts will take the Orion capsule to rendezvous and dock with the robotic vehicle, conduct multiple extravehicular activities to explore the boulder, and return to Earth with samples. NASA's proposed

  8. Space mechanisms needs for future NASA long duration space missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusaro, Robert L.

    1991-01-01

    Future NASA long duration missions will require high performance, reliable, long lived mechanical moving systems. In order to develop these systems, high technology components, such as bearings, gears, seals, lubricants, etc., will need to be utilized. There has been concern in the NASA community that the current technology level in these mechanical component/tribology areas may not be adequate to meet the goals of long duration NASA mission such as Space Exploration Initiative (SEI). To resolve this concern, NASA-Lewis sent a questionnaire to government and industry workers (who have been involved in space mechanism research, design, and implementation) to ask their opinion if the current space mechanisms technology (mechanical components/tribology) is adequate to meet future NASA Mission needs and goals. In addition, a working group consisting of members from each NASA Center, DoD, and DOE was established to study the technology status. The results of the survey and conclusions of the working group are summarized.

  9. Object classification and outliers analysis in the forthcoming Gaia mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordóñez-Blanco, D.; Arcay, B.; Dafonte, C.; Manteiga, M.; Ulla, A.

    2010-12-01

    Astrophysics is evolving towards the rational optimization of costly observational material by the intelligent exploitation of large astronomical databases from both terrestrial telescopes and spatial mission archives. However, there has been relatively little advance in the development of highly scalable data exploitation and analysis tools needed to generate the scientific returns from these large and expensively obtained datasets. Among the upcoming projects of astronomical instrumentation, Gaia is the next cornerstone ESA mission. The Gaia survey foresees the creation of a data archive and its future exploitation with automated or semi-automated analysis tools. This work reviews some of the work that is being developed by the Gaia Data Processing and Analysis Consortium for the object classification and analysis of outliers in the forthcoming mission.

  10. Study on Earth Radiation Budget mission scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dlhopolsky, R.; Hollmann, R.; Mueller, J.; Stuhlmann, R. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Atmosphaerenphysik

    1997-12-31

    The goal of this study is to study optimized satellite configurations for observation of the radiation balance of the earth. We present a literature survey of earth radiation budget missions and instruments. We develop a parametric tool to simulate realistic multiple satellite mission scenarios. This tool is a modular computer program which models satellite orbits and scanning operation. We use Meteosat data sampled at three hour intervals as a database to simulate atmospheric scenes. Input variables are satellite equatorial crossing time and instrument characteristics. Regional, zonal and global monthly averages of shortwave and longwave fluxes for an ideal observing system and several realistic satellite scenarios are produced. Comparisons show that the three satellite combinations which have equatorial crossing times at midmorning, noon and midafternoon provide the best shortwave monitoring. Crossing times near sunrise and sunset should be avoided for the shortwave. Longwave diurnal models are necessary over and surfaces and cloudy regions, if there are only two measurements made during daylight hours. We have found in the shortwave inversion comparison that at least 15% of the monthly regional errors can be attributed to the shortwave anisotropic models used. (orig.) 68 refs.

  11. Euclid - an ESA Medium Class Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joachimi, B.

    2016-10-01

    Euclid is an ESA Medium Class mission in the Cosmic Visions program to be launched in 2020. With its 1.2 m telescope, Euclid is going to survey 15,000 deg2 of extragalactic sky in a broad optical band with outstanding image quality fit for weak gravitational lensing measurements. It will also provide near-infrared slitless spectroscopy of more than 107 emission-line galaxies with the main goal of measuring galaxy clustering. Imaging in three near-infrared bands by Euclid will be complemented by ground-based follow-up in optical bands to supply high-quality photometric redshift estimates out to z=2. In combination, its primary cosmological science drivers, weak gravitational lensing and galaxy clustering, will yield unprecedented constraints on the properties of dark matter and dark energy, as well as the validity of Einstein gravity on large scales. Euclid's rich datasets will facilitate further cosmological probes such as statistics of galaxy clusters or the study of galactic dark matter haloes, and a vast array of legacy science. In the following a brief overview on the Euclid mission and its key science is provided.

  12. Gravitacijske satelitske misije : Satellite gravity missions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medžida Mulić

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Sila teže se smatra osnovnom fizikalnom silom u prirodi. Savremene satelitske misije: CHAMP, GRACE i GOCE omogućile su dobivanje globalnih modela polja sile teže s veoma visokom tačnošću, kao i njegovih prostornih i temporalnih varijacija. U ovom radu istaknuti su ciljevi, karakteristike i rezultati navedenih misija, te iznesena očekivanja u budućnosti, kao i njihov značaj i doprinos za geodetsku praksu kao i istraživanja u oblasti geodezije, geofizike i hidrologije. : Gravity is considered as the basic physical force in the nature. Modern satellite missions: CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE allowed modeling of the global gravity field with very high accuracy, as well as its spatial and temporal variations. This paper describes the main objectives, characteristics, the latest results of these missions, as well as the expectations of the future observations, and their importance and contributions for the surveying and geodetic practice, and scientific achievements as well, in geodesy, geophysics and hydrology.

  13. Mesure par interférométrie laser du mouvement d'une particule proche d'une paroi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assou, Y.; Joyeux, D.; Azouni, A.; Feuillebois, F.

    1991-02-01

    , et l'alignement de la sphère dans le montage optique sont relativement peu critiques. Les sphères utilisées sont des billes de roulements à billes, de 4 et 5 × 10^{-3} m de diamètre. La précision sur le déplacement de la sphère est de l'ordre de 2 × 10^{-8} m. Le signal d'interférence est digitalisé et stocké dans un micro-ordinateur. Le traitement des données permet alors d'obtenir le coefficient de frottement f^T_zz de la sphère en mouvement tout près de la paroi. La variation de f^T_zz avec l'intervalle sans dimension \\varepsilon (rapport de l'intervalle entre la sphère et la paroi au rayon de la sphère) permet de distinguer trois régions: (i) Une région où \\varepsilon est petit mais au moins 10 fois plus grand que la rugosité non dimensionnelle (rapport de l'échelle de la rugosité au rayon de la sphère) ; le résultat expérimental est alors en très bon accord avec la formule f^T_zz = 1/\\varepsilon démontrée en théorie de la lubrification, formule valable pour une sphère lisse. (ii) Lorsque \\varepsilon décroît pour devenir de l'ordre de grandeur de la rugosité non dimensionnelle, le coefficient de frottement est alors inférieur à Il E. La technique ouvre ainsi une nouvelle voie à l'étude des effets de rugosité en hydrodynamique. (iii) La technique permet de mesurer des intervalles de l'ordre de 10^{-8} m et pourrait ainsi être utilisée dans l'étude des forces à courte portée.

  14. Advances in Robotic, Human, and Autonomous Systems for Missions of Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Anthony R.; Briggs, Geoffrey A.; Glass, Brian J.; Pedersen, Liam; Kortenkamp, David M.; Wettergreen, David S.; Nourbakhsh, I.; Clancy, Daniel J.; Zornetzer, Steven (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Space exploration missions are evolving toward more complex architectures involving more capable robotic systems, new levels of human and robotic interaction, and increasingly autonomous systems. How this evolving mix of advanced capabilities will be utilized in the design of new missions is a subject of much current interest. Cost and risk constraints also play a key role in the development of new missions, resulting in a complex interplay of a broad range of factors in the mission development and planning of new missions. This paper will discuss how human, robotic, and autonomous systems could be used in advanced space exploration missions. In particular, a recently completed survey of the state of the art and the potential future of robotic systems, as well as new experiments utilizing human and robotic approaches will be described. Finally, there will be a discussion of how best to utilize these various approaches for meeting space exploration goals.

  15. Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM) space to ground mission data architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Jack L.; Ames, J.A.; Williams, J.; Patschke, R.; Mott, C.; Joseph, J.; Garon, H.; Mah, G.

    2012-01-01

    The Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM) is a scientific endeavor to extend the longest continuous multi-spectral imaging record of Earth's land surface. The observatory consists of a spacecraft bus integrated with two imaging instruments; the Operational Land Imager (OLI), built by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corporation in Boulder, Colorado, and the Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS), an in-house instrument built at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). Both instruments are integrated aboard a fine-pointing, fully redundant, spacecraft bus built by Orbital Sciences Corporation, Gilbert, Arizona. The mission is scheduled for launch in January 2013. This paper will describe the innovative end-to-end approach for efficiently managing high volumes of simultaneous realtime and playback of image and ancillary data from the instruments to the reception at the United States Geological Survey's (USGS) Landsat Ground Network (LGN) and International Cooperator (IC) ground stations. The core enabling capability lies within the spacecraft Command and Data Handling (C&DH) system and Radio Frequency (RF) communications system implementation. Each of these systems uniquely contribute to the efficient processing of high speed image data (up to 265Mbps) from each instrument, and provide virtually error free data delivery to the ground. Onboard methods include a combination of lossless data compression, Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) data formatting, a file-based/managed Solid State Recorder (SSR), and Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) forward error correction. The 440 Mbps wideband X-Band downlink uses Class 1 CCSDS File Delivery Protocol (CFDP), and an earth coverage antenna to deliver an average of 400 scenes per day to a combination of LGN and IC ground stations. This paper will also describe the integrated capabilities and processes at the LGN ground stations for data reception using adaptive filtering, and the mission operations approach fro- the LDCM

  16. Mission Mangalam scheme: Ex ploring the opportunities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Pallavi A. Upadhyay*,

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Mission Mangalam has been launched by the Gujarat Government in 2010.It is an integrated poverty alleviation approach and an initiative to empower women. Mission Mangalam is helping women to earn their livelihood and to become independent. These Sakhimandals are linked to banks to fulfill the requirement of fund. Sakhimandals get financial assistance from banks. Some of the core benefits of the scheme can be linked with the health sector as well; Objectives (1 To review the scheme of Mission Mangalam (2 To explore the possibility of health linkage with the scheme (3 To study the perception of beneficiaries and their socio- demographic profile; Methodology: A cross sectional study. Samplesize-152 women members of Sakhimandals in Saraspur ward. Health of all the members of Mandals of Saraspur was checked by the Ahmedabad Municipal Corporation. Women of Sakhimandals were interviewed to understand their perception about the scheme as well as about any other health benefit they have experienced for themselves or their family members. 3 Additionally, Community based survey of 50 BPL families was carried out to assess the proportion of families covered under the scheme of Mission Mangalam. Results: Mean age of these women (n=152 was 31.81 years with SD=6.74. Education of maximum number 71(47% of women was up to secondary. Mean income was 5460 Rs/month with SD=1840 .Mean of number of family members is 5.4. 109 (72% women are residing in chali area. 98(64% women were told about this scheme by social worker, others were told about the scheme by her friend or UCD official. Paired t test was carried out to find increase in Hb levels of the beneficiary women. It was found to be significant (p=0.007, t=15.64. Age of women is associated with habit to save money. (p=0.003. There are only 22 (44% out of 50 families visited, who have at least one member enrolled under the scheme. More stringent efforts for universal coverage have to be made by

  17. PARIS to Hektor, A Mission to the Jovian Trojan Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, R. E.; Ensworth, C. B.; McNutt, R. L.; Ostdiek, P. H.; Prockter, L. M.

    2005-12-01

    PARIS (Planetary Access with Radioisotope Ion-drive System) spacecraft enable a new class of missions to the outer solar system. The high power-to-mass ratio of new radioisotope power systems enables New-Frontiers class missions that carry a significant a science payload to new destinations. The PARIS spacecraft take advantage of the high-efficiency of Stirling radioisotope generators (SRGs) or new thermoelectric converters to provide the power for an electric propulsion system. These low-thrust missions launched to a high C3 are especially effective for exploring objects in shallow gravity wells. The Jovian Trojan asteroids are very primitive bodies located near the Jovian L4 and L5 Lagrange points and are discussed as targets in the Solar System Decadal Survey. There are estimated to be more than 105 Jovian Trojans greater than 1 km in diameter. We consider a PARIS mission that can reach the asteroids in less than 5 years, orbit 624 Hektor, the largest of the Jovian Trojans, and go on to orbit at least one other nearby object. The candidate payload for this mission includes wide-field and narrow-field cameras, a UV-Vis-IR spectrograph, gamma-ray and neutron spectrometers, and plasma and energetic particle spectrometers. About 900 W of power are required. The launch mass would be slightly less than 1000 kg. The generation power sources with a specific power of > 8W/kg.

  18. Se déplacer en voiture à Boston : essai de mesure de circulation en temps réel par usage des floating car data (données flottantes automobiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gérald Billard

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Comment mesurer les temps de trajets réels des automobilistes dans les métropoles américaines ? Tout en introduisant la problématique de l’adaptation de l’urbanisme aux nouveaux enjeux de la mobilité aux États-Unis, cet article a pour objectif simple d’exposer une méthodologie développée afin de mesurer l’accessibilité d’un lieu donné. L’originalité de cette méthode est l’exploitation des données en ligne fournies en temps réel par le site TomTom.

  19. Appareillage automatisé de mesure simultanée du pouvoir thermoélectrique et de la conductivité électrique. Application à l'étude de couches polymères semi-conductrices

    OpenAIRE

    Moliton, André; Ratier, Bernard; Moreau, C.; Froyer, G.

    1991-01-01

    Nous présentons dans cet article un système de mesure simultanée de la conductivité σ, et du pouvoir thermoélectrique S : il permet des mesures en fonction de la température (entre 130 K et 360 K) dans le cas de couches semi-conductrices relativement fragiles. A titre d'application, nous indiquons les résultats que nous avons obtenus dans le cas de couches polymères (PPP) implantées avec des ions sodium: alors que seule une semi-conduction par défaut est générée par de fortes énergies d'impla...

  20. No Mission, No Money: No Money, No Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durel, John W.

    2010-01-01

    Museum leaders around the country are in the midst of examining and changing their business models in response to new economic realities. Museum educators have an opportunity to play a leading role in this endeavor. To do so educators must understand the relationship between money and mission. For too long there has been a belief that the…

  1. The ASTRO-H Mission

    OpenAIRE

    高橋, 忠幸; Takahashi, Tadayuki; 満田, 和久; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Kelley, Richard; ASTRO-H team

    2010-01-01

    The joint JAXA/NASA ASTRO-H mission is the sixth in a series of highly successful X-ray missions initiated by the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS) The planned launch date is 2014. ASTRO-H will investigate the physics of the high-energy universe by performing high-resolution, highthroughput spectroscopy with moderate spatial resolution over the 0.3 - 600 keV energy range. ASTRO-H is a combination of wide band X-ray spectroscopy (3 - 80 keV) provided by multi-layer coating, f...

  2. The NeXT Mission

    OpenAIRE

    Takahashi, T.; Kelley, R; Mitsuda, K.; Kunieda, H.; Petre, R.; White, N; Dotani, T.; Fujimoto, R.; Fukazawa, Y.; Hayashida, K.; Ishida, M.; Ishisaki, Y; Kokubun, M.; Makishima, K.; K. Koyama

    2008-01-01

    The NeXT (New exploration X-ray Telescope), the new Japanese X-ray Astronomy Satellite following Suzaku, is an international X-ray mission which is currently planed for launch in 2013. NeXT is a combination of wide band X-ray spectroscopy (3 - 80 keV) provided by multi-layer coating, focusing hard X-ray mirrors and hard X-ray imaging detectors, and high energy-resolution soft X-ray spectroscopy (0.3 - 10 keV) provided by thin-foil X-ray optics and a micro-calorimeter array. The mission will a...

  3. SpinSat Mission Ground Truth Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    SpinSat Mission Ground Truth Characterization Andrew Nicholas, Ted Finne, Ivan Galysh, Anthony Mai, Jim Yen Naval Research Laboratory, Washington...mission overview, ground truth characterization and unique SSA observation opportunities of the mission. 1. MISSION CONCEPT The Naval Research...2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE SpinSat Mission Ground Truth Characterization 5a. CONTRACT

  4. ASTRO-F : Infrared Imaging Surveyor (IRIS) Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onaka, T.

    The ASTRO-F (also known as Infrared Imaging Surveyor: IRIS) is the second infrared satellite mission of the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan to be launched early 2004 with the M-V rocket and is planned as a second generation infrared sky survey mission. It has a 67-cm aperture telescope and is cooled by 170-liter liquid helium and Stirling-cycle coolers. Two scientific instruments share the focal plane. The infrared camera (IRC) covers 2 to 26 μm range with large two-dimensional arrays in the imaging and low-resolution spectroscopic modes and will perform deep sky surveys of selected areas of the sky with a wide field of view (10' × 10') at unprecedented sensitivity. The far-infrared Surveyor (FIS), consisting of an imaging scanner and a Fourier transform spectrometer, covers 50 to 200 μm range and makes a whole sky survey in four far-infrared bands, which is higher by more than 10 in sensitivity (20 110 mJy), better by several in the spatial resolution (30'' 50''), and longer in the spectral coverage (200 μm) than IRAS. A brief description and the current status of the ASTRO-F mission are presented.

  5. Vapour pressure studies of uranium dioxide UO{sub 2} by the effusion method; Mesure de la tension de vapeur du bioxyde d'uranium UO{sub 2} par la methode d'effusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohse, R.W. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-07-01

    A high temperature apparatus for vapour pressure measurements by Knudsen effusion method is described. Sample is heated in a tungsten cell in an electronic bombardment furnace. Several critical factors affecting the accuracy of measurements such as: - temperature distribution and measurement in the effusion cell, - CLAUSING factor and molecular flow, - compatibility between cell material and sample heated, are discussed with careful attention. Vapour pressure of UO{sub 2} has been studied between 2200 and 2800 K. Experimental points fit a curve expressed by: logP{sub mm} = 12.4264 - (3.3184/T * 10{sup 4}/T) which is in good agreement with previous results of literature. (author) [French] On decrit un appareil destine a la mesure des tensions de vapeur par la methode d'effusion de KNUDSEN. L'echantillon contenu dans une cellule en tungstene est chauffe par bombardement electronique. Apres examen critique des divers facteurs affectant l'exactitude des mesures, a savoir: - homogeneite et mesure de la temperature dans la cellule d'effusion, - facteur de 'CLAUSING' et loi de distribution en cosinus des molecules effusees, - compatibilite a chaud entre le materiau de la cellule et le materiau etudie. On a procede a la mesure de la tension de vapeur de UO{sub 2} qui est relativement bien connue. Entre 2200 et 2800 K les points experimentaux se placent sur une courbe: logP{sub mm} = 12.4264 - (3.3184/T * 10{sup 4}/T) en bon accord avec les valeurs citees dans la litterature. (auteur)

  6. Planet Detection: The Kepler Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Jon M.; Smith, Jeffrey C.; Tenenbaum, Peter; Twicken, Joseph D.; Van Cleve, Jeffrey

    2012-03-01

    , only ˜0.5% will exhibit transits. By observing such a large number of stars, Kepler is guaranteed to produce a robust null result in the unhappy event that no Earth-size planets are detected in or near the habitable zone. Such a result would indicate that worlds like ours are extremely rare in the Milky Way galaxy and perhaps the cosmos, and that we might be solitary sojourners in the quest to answer the age-old question: "Are we alone?" Kepler is an audacious mission that places rigorous demands on the science pipeline used to process the ever-accumulating, large amount of data and to identify and characterize the minute planetary signatures hiding in the data haystack. Kepler observes over 160,000 stars simultaneously over a field of view (FOV) of 115 square degrees with a focal plane consisting of 42 charge-coupled devices‡ (CCDs), each of which images 2.75 square degrees of sky onto 2200×1024 pixels. The photometer, which contains the CCD array, reads out each CCD every 6.54 s [10,11] and co-adds the images for 29.4 min, called a long cadence (LC) interval. Due to storage and bandwidth constraints, only the pixels of interest, those that contain images of target stars, are saved onboard the solid-state recorder (SSR), which can store 66+ days of data. An average of 32 pixels per star is allowed for up to 170,000 stellar target definitions. In addition, a total of 512 targets are sampled at 58.85-s short cadence (SC) intervals, permitting further characterization of the planet-star systems for the brighter stars with a Kepler magnitude,* Kp, brighter than 12 (Kp improve the science pipeline’s ability to identify and remove instrumental signatures from the light curves while minimizing distortion of astrophysical signals in the data and preventing the introduction of additional noise that may mask small transit features. The chapter concludes with some thoughts about the future of large transit surveys in the context of the Kepler experience.

  7. Generating an optimal target list for a space mission dedicated to transit spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zingales, Tiziano

    2016-10-01

    Nowadays several space missions and ground-based surveys discovered more than 3000 exoplanets. The characterization of their atmospheres is necessary to understand how were they formed, how do they evolve, how are they affected by starlight, stellar winds and other fundamental questions. ARIEL and Twinkle are two dedicated space mission for the study of exoplanetary atmospheres. ARIEL is one the three candidates for the next ESA medium class mission expected to be launched in 2026. Twinkle, proposed to be launched in 2019, is a small, low-cost mission. In order to draft the target lists of the two missions, it is important to look for the best targets that can be observed with the instrumentationassembled on the two satellites. The final lists have to take into account both the number of already known exoplanets and the number of existing exoplanets still not discovered (thanks to the Kepler space mission we can estimate the occurrence rate of exoplanets around the stars, Fressin et al, 2013). Future space missions (GAIA, Cheops, PLATO, Kepler II and TESS) and ground-based surveys will deliver many new exoplanets in the next decade. For this reason a trustworthy target list of exoplanets for a space mission planned to be launched in 2026 (or 2019) needs to take intoaccount a more complete list than the currently available.

  8. Debiasing the NEOWISE Cryogenic Mission Comet Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, James M.; Grav, Tommy; Fernández, Yanga R.; Mainzer, A. K.; Kramer, Emily A.; Masiero, Joseph R.; Spahr, Timothy; Nugent, C. R.; Stevenson, Rachel A.; Meech, Karen J.; Cutri, Roc M.; Lisse, Carey M.; Walker, Russell; Dailey, John W.; Rosser, Joshua; Krings, Phillip; Ruecker, Kinjal; Wright, Edward L.; the NEOWISE Team

    2017-08-01

    We use NEOWISE data from the four-band and three-band cryogenic phases of the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer mission to constrain size distributions of the comet populations and debias measurements of the short- and long-period comet (LPC) populations. We find that the fit to the debiased LPC population yields a cumulative size-frequency distribution (SFD) power-law slope (β) of -1.0 ± 0.1, while the debiased Jupiter-family comet (JFC) SFD has a steeper slope with β = -2.3 ± 0.2. The JFCs in our debiased sample yielded a mean nucleus size of 1.3 km in diameter, while the LPCs’ mean size is roughly twice as large, 2.1 km, yielding mean size ratios ( / ) that differ by a factor of 1.6. Over the course of the 8 months of the survey, our results indicate that the number of LPCs passing within 1.5 au are a factor of several higher than previous estimates, while JFCs are within the previous range of estimates of a few thousand down to sizes near 1.3 km in diameter. Finally, we also observe evidence for structure in the orbital distribution of LPCs, with an overdensity of comets clustered near 110° inclination and perihelion near 2.9 au that is not attributable to observational bias.

  9. Alternatives to imprisonment: opportunities and problems in Germany / Mesures alternatives à l’incarcération : opportunités et problèmes en Allemagne

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahr Alexander

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available L'articolo fornisce una breve panoramica sulla normativa tedesco in materia di misure alternative alla detenzione. Vengono successivamente presentati i dati statistici relativi agli istituti penitenziari tedeschi e gli autori riflettono sulle problematiche principali della situazione attuale delle carceri tedesche. Inoltre, sulla base di dati statistici e di esempi pratici, l'articolo presenta una panoramica complessiva sulle misure alternative in Germania e sullo stato dell’arte della ricerca. Infine, gli autori sottolineano il ruolo e la prospettiva delle vittime, arrivando alla conclusione che una serie di iniziative e di progetti sono già stati avviati, ma che è ancora troppo presto per poter giungere a delle conclusioni. Cet article donne un aperçu du cadre juridique allemand des mesures alternatives à l’incarcération. Des données statistiques sur les prison allemandes et sur les détenus sont ensuite présentées. Les auteurs s’interrogent sur certains des principaux problèmes liés à la situation actuelle des prisons allemandes. De plus, cet article donne un aperçu global des mesures alternatives en Allemagne par le biais de données statistiques et d’exemples concrets. S’ensuit l’état des évaluations scientifiques et de la recherche. Enfin, les auteurs valorisent le rôle et la perspective des victimes, toutefois dans leurs conclusions ils soulignent que nombreux sont les programmes et les initiatives déjà commencés, mais qu’il est cependant encore trop tôt pour dresser un bilan. The article provides a short overview on the German legal framework regarding alternatives to imprisonment. Then statistical data about German prisons and their inmates are presented and the authors reflect on some major problems of the contemporary situation in German prisons. Furthermore, the article gives a comprehensive overview on alternative measures in Germany by statistical data and examples from the practice. Then the state

  10. Pollution odorante par les moteurs Diesel. Mesure des odeurs d'échappement Odorous Pollution by Diesel Engines. Measuring Exhaust Odors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Degobert P.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Les études de mesure d'odeur Diesel ont commencé en 1956 aux États-Unis, en particulier pour réduire le niveau odorant des autobus. Cet article expose d'abord les mécanismes de formation des odorants puis les études américaines, qui ont abouti en 1973 à l'odorimètre Arthur D. Little, basé sur l'analyse par chromatographie liquide de l'échappement, et ses corrélations avec les données sensorielles recueillies dans des conditions particulières. Les économies d'énergie dans les villes européennes entraînent un accroissement du nombre de véhicules Diesel, ce qui peut amener un niveau odorant incompatible avec le bien-être. C'est pourquoi l'Institut Français du Pétrole (IFP étudie actuellement les odeurs Diesel, pour mettre au point des méthodes de mesure fiables, partant de la chromatographie liquide type Arthur D. Little (ADL et de l'évaluation sensorielle. Les résultats actuels montrent qu'à moins de progrès importants en analyse chimique, l'évaluation sensorielle reste la méthode la plus fiable. Les perspectives futures basées sur l'olfactomètre différentiel Mac Leod sont présentées. Research was beg un in the United States in 1956 on the medsurementof diesel engine odors, and especially on reducing the odor from diesel city buses. This article begins by describing the mechanisms of odor formation and then goes on ta, review US research which resulted in the Arthur D. Little odormeter in 1973, based on a liquid chromatography analysis of exhaust and its corrélations with sensory data gathered under specific conditions. Energy conservation in European cities is tending ta, increase the number of diesel vehicles and possibly ta, create an odor level that is incompatible with humal well-being. This is why Institut Français du Pétrole (IFP is now investigating diesel eng ine odors for the purpose of developing reliable measuring methods based on liquid chromatography of the Arthur D. Little (ADl type and on

  11. Les principes distributifs des mesures d’insertion des jeunes à l’épreuve du longitudinal Youth integration measures and their criteria tested by a longitudinal approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Léa Lima

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available La sélection des bénéficiaires des mesures d’action sociale relève d’un problème éthique qui fait l’objet d’une intense activité cognitive et normative de la part d’acteurs publics outillés par l’expertise. Or, l’examen historique des principes distributifs mobilisés dans les politiques d’insertion des jeunes donne à voir la reformulation des référentiels de l’action publique dans un cadre longitudinal ainsi que ses effets sur les présupposés éthiques des politiques. Le principe de discrimination positive consistant à redistribuer les chances d’insertion en faveur des jeunes les moins formés a été énoncé au sein d’une représentation instantanéiste de l’insertion des jeunes. Il perd de sa validité avec l’institutionnalisation des trajectoires. L’éthique de l’accompagnement du parcours qui devient dominante dans les années 1990 perd de vue les inégalités entre groupes de niveau de formation au profit d’une démarche d’organisation de carrières ascendantes permises par les mesures d’action sociale disponibles.Targeting social programs is an ethical problem for administrators. Therefore, they develop an intense cognitive and normative activity with the help of experts in economics. The history of how funds are allocated in support of youth integration policies shows the longitudinal reframing of public policy and its impact on ethical principles. The principle of affirmative action consisting in redistributing offers among less qualified youth has been formulated according to a static representation of youth integration. It loses its validity with the institutionalization of individual itineraries. The ethic of pathway support that became dominant in the 1990s lost sight of the inequality between groups levels of qualification no longer appeared relevant and gave way to the organization of upwardly mobile careers made possible by the social programs at hand.

  12. Magnetic Satellite Missions and Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils; Kotsiaros, Stavros

    2011-01-01

    for exploring the Earth’s magnetic field from space. In this chapter we discuss characteristics of satellites measuring the geomagnetic field and report on past, present and upcoming magnetic satellite missions. We conclude with some basics about space magnetic gradiometry as a possible path for future...

  13. Gravitational-wave Mission Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcnamara, Paul; Jennrich, Oliver; Stebbins, Robin T.

    2014-01-01

    In November 2013, ESA selected the science theme, the "Gravitational Universe," for its third large mission opportunity, known as L3, under its Cosmic Vision Programme. The planned launch date is 2034. ESA is considering a 20% participation by an international partner, and NASA's Astrophysics Division has indicated an interest in participating. We have studied the design consequences of a NASA contribution, evaluated the science benefits and identified the technology requirements for hardware that could be delivered by NASA. The European community proposed a strawman mission concept, called eLISA, having two measurement arms, derived from the well studied LISA (Laser Interferometer Space Antenna) concept. The US community is promoting a mission concept known as SGO Mid (Space-based Gravitational-wave Observatory Mid-sized), a three arm LISA-like concept. If NASA were to partner with ESA, the eLISA concept could be transformed to SGO Mid by the addition of a third arm, augmenting science, reducing risk and reducing non-recurring engineering costs. The characteristics of the mission concepts and the relative science performance of eLISA, SGO Mid and LISA are described. Note that all results are based on models, methods and assumptions used in NASA studies

  14. New Horizons Mission to Pluto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Luis G.

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the trajectory that will take the New Horizons Mission to Pluto. Included are photographs of the spacecraft, the launch vehicle, the assembled vehicle as it is being moved to the launch pad and the launch. Also shown are diagrams of the assembled parts with identifying part names.

  15. The Europa Ocean Discovery mission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, B.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Chyba, C.F. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Abshire, J.B. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Greenbelt, MD (United States). Goddard Space Flight Center] [and others

    1997-06-01

    Since it was first proposed that tidal heating of Europa by Jupiter might lead to liquid water oceans below Europa`s ice cover, there has been speculation over the possible exobiological implications of such an ocean. Liquid water is the essential ingredient for life as it is known, and the existence of a second water ocean in the Solar System would be of paramount importance for seeking the origin and existence of life beyond Earth. The authors present here a Discovery-class mission concept (Europa Ocean Discovery) to determine the existence of a liquid water ocean on Europa and to characterize Europa`s surface structure. The technical goal of the Europa Ocean Discovery mission is to study Europa with an orbiting spacecraft. This goal is challenging but entirely feasible within the Discovery envelope. There are four key challenges: entering Europan orbit, generating power, surviving long enough in the radiation environment to return valuable science, and complete the mission within the Discovery program`s launch vehicle and budget constraints. The authors will present here a viable mission that meets these challenges.

  16. LISA Pathfinder: mission and status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonucci, F.; Armano, M.; Audley, H.; Auger, G.; Benedetti, M.; Binetruy, P.; Boatella, C.; Bogenstahl, J.; Bortoluzzi, D.; Bosetti, P.; Caleno, M.; Cavalleri, A.; Cesa, M.; Chmeissani, M.; Ciani, G.; Conchillo, A.; Congedo, G.; Cristofolini, I.; Cruise, M.; Danzmann, K.; De Marchi, F.; Diaz-Aguilo, M.; Diepholz, I.; Dixon, G.; Dolesi, R.; Dunbar, N.; Fauste, J.; Ferraioli, L.; Fertin, D.; Fichter, W.; Fitzsimons, E.; Freschi, M.; García Marin, A.; García Marirrodriga, C.; Gerndt, R.; Gesa, L.; Gilbert, F.; Giardini, D.; Grimani, C.; Grynagier, A.; Guillaume, B.; Guzmán, F.; Harrison, I.; Heinzel, G.; Hewitson, M.; Hollington, D.; Hough, J.; Hoyland, D.; Hueller, M.; Huesler, J.; Jeannin, O.; Jennrich, O.; Jetzer, P.; Johlander, B.; Killow, C.; Llamas, X.; Lloro, I.; Lobo, A.; Maarschalkerweerd, R.; Madden, S.; Mance, D.; Mateos, I.; McNamara, P. W.; Mendes, J.; Mitchell, E.; Monsky, A.; Nicolini, D.; Nicolodi, D.; Nofrarias, M.; Pedersen, F.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Perreca, A.; Plagnol, E.; Prat, P.; Racca, G. D.; Rais, B.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Reiche, J.; Romera Perez, J. A.; Robertson, D.; Rozemeijer, H.; Sanjuan, J.; Schleicher, A.; Schulte, M.; Shaul, D.; Stagnaro, L.; Strandmoe, S.; Steier, F.; Sumner, T. J.; Taylor, A.; Texier, D.; Trenkel, C.; Tombolato, D.; Vitale, S.; Wanner, G.; Ward, H.; Waschke, S.; Wass, P.; Weber, W. J.; Zweifel, P.

    2011-05-01

    LISA Pathfinder, the second of the European Space Agency's Small Missions for Advanced Research in Technology (SMART), is a dedicated technology demonstrator for the joint ESA/NASA Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission. The technologies required for LISA are many and extremely challenging. This coupled with the fact that some flight hardware cannot be fully tested on ground due to Earth-induced noise led to the implementation of the LISA Pathfinder mission to test the critical LISA technologies in a flight environment. LISA Pathfinder essentially mimics one arm of the LISA constellation by shrinking the 5 million kilometre armlength down to a few tens of centimetres, giving up the sensitivity to gravitational waves, but keeping the measurement technology: the distance between the two test masses is measured using a laser interferometric technique similar to one aspect of the LISA interferometry system. The scientific objective of the LISA Pathfinder mission consists then of the first in-flight test of low frequency gravitational wave detection metrology. LISA Pathfinder is due to be launched in 2013 on-board a dedicated small launch vehicle (VEGA). After a series of apogee raising manoeuvres using an expendable propulsion module, LISA Pathfinder will enter a transfer orbit towards the first Sun-Earth Lagrange point (L1). After separation from the propulsion module, the LPF spacecraft will be stabilized using the micro-Newton thrusters, entering a 500 000 km by 800 000 km Lissajous orbit around L1. Science results will be available approximately 2 months after launch.

  17. The Europa Clipper Mission Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappalardo, Robert; Goldstein, Barry; Magner, Thomas; Prockter, Louise; Senske, David; Paczkowski, Brian; Cooke, Brian; Vance, Steve; Wes Patterson, G.; Craft, Kate

    2014-05-01

    A NASA-appointed Science Definition Team (SDT), working closely with a technical team from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and the Applied Physics Laboratory (APL), recently considered options for a future strategic mission to Europa, with the stated science goal: Explore Europa to investigate its habitability. The group considered several mission options, which were fully technically developed, then costed and reviewed by technical review boards and planetary science community groups. There was strong convergence on a favored architecture consisting of a spacecraft in Jupiter orbit making many close flybys of Europa, concentrating on remote sensing to explore the moon. Innovative mission design would use gravitational perturbations of the spacecraft trajectory to permit flybys at a wide variety of latitudes and longitudes, enabling globally distributed regional coverage of the moon's surface, with nominally 45 close flybys at altitudes from 25 to 100 km. We will present the science and reconnaissance goals and objectives, a mission design overview, and the notional spacecraft for this concept, which has become known as the Europa Clipper. The Europa Clipper concept provides a cost-efficient means to explore Europa and investigate its habitability, through understanding the satellite's ice and ocean, composition, and geology. The set of investigations derived from the Europa Clipper science objectives traces to a notional payload for science, consisting of: Ice Penetrating Radar (for sounding of ice-water interfaces within and beneath the ice shell), Topographical Imager (for stereo imaging of the surface), ShortWave Infrared Spectrometer (for surface composition), Neutral Mass Spectrometer (for atmospheric composition), Magnetometer and Langmuir Probes (for inferring the satellite's induction field to characterize an ocean), and Gravity Science (to confirm an ocean).The mission would also include the capability to perform reconnaissance for a future lander

  18. IntroductionThe Cluster mission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Fehringer

    Full Text Available The Cluster mission, ESA’s first cornerstone project, together with the SOHO mission, dating back to the first proposals in 1982, was finally launched in the summer of 2000. On 16 July and 9 August, respectively, two Russian Soyuz rockets blasted off from the Russian cosmodrome in Baikonour to deliver two Cluster spacecraft, each into their proper orbit. By the end of August 2000, the four Cluster satellites had reached their final tetrahedral constellation. The commissioning of 44 instruments, both individually and as an ensemble of complementary tools, was completed five months later to ensure the optimal use of their combined observational potential. On 1 February 2001, the mission was declared operational. The main goal of the Cluster mission is to study the small-scale plasma structures in three dimensions in key plasma regions, such as the solar wind, bow shock, magnetopause, polar cusps, magnetotail and the auroral zones. With its unique capabilities of three-dimensional spatial resolution, Cluster plays a major role in the International Solar Terrestrial Program (ISTP, where Cluster and the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO are the European contributions. Cluster’s payload consists of state-of-the-art plasma instrumentation to measure electric and magnetic fields from the quasi-static up to high frequencies, and electron and ion distribution functions from energies of nearly 0 eV to a few MeV. The science operations are coordinated by the Joint Science Operations Centre (JSOC, at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (UK, and implemented by the European Space Operations Centre (ESOC, in Darmstadt, Germany. A network of eight national data centres has been set up for raw data processing, for the production of physical parameters, and their distribution to end users all over the world. The latest information on the Cluster mission can be found at http://sci.esa.int/cluster/.

  19. MIOSAT Mission Scenario and Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostara, C.; Dionisio, C.; Sgroi, G.; di Salvo, A.

    2008-08-01

    MIOSAT ("Mssione Ottica su microSATellite") is a low-cost technological / scientific microsatellite mission for Earth Observation, funded by Italian Space Agency (ASI) and managed by a Group Agreement between Rheinmetall Italia - B.U. Spazio - Contraves as leader and Carlo Gavazzi Space as satellite manufacturer. Several others Italians Companies, SME and Universities are involved in the development team with crucial roles. MIOSAT is a microsatellite weighting around 120 kg and placed in a 525 km altitude sun-synchronuos circular LEO orbit. The microsatellite embarks three innovative optical payloads: Sagnac multi spectral radiometer (IFAC-CNR), Mach Zehender spectrometer (IMM-CNR), high resolution pancromatic camera (Selex Galileo). In addition three technological experiments will be tested in-flight. The first one is an heat pipe based on Marangoni effect with high efficiency. The second is a high accuracy Sun Sensor using COTS components and the last is a GNSS SW receiver that utilizes a Leon2 processor. Finally a new generation of 28% efficiency solar cells will be adopted for the power generation. The platform is highly agile and can tilt along and cross flight direction. The pointing accuracy is in the order of 0,1° for each axe. The pointing determination during images acquisition is definition, highlighting trade-offs for mission implementation. MIOSAT mission design has been constrained from challenging requirements in terms of satellite mass, mission lifetime, instrument performance, that have implied the utilization of satellite agility capability to improve instruments performance in terms of S/N and resolution. The instruments provide complementary measurements that can be combined in effective ways to exploit new applications in the fields of atmosphere composition analysis, Earth emissions, antropic phenomena, etc. The Mission is currently in phase B and the launch is planned for 2011.

  20. Shuttle Radar Topography Mission 1 Arc and 3 Arc Second Digital Terrain Elevation Data - National Geospatial Data Asset (NGDA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) was a partnership between NASA and the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA). Flown aboard the NASA Space...

  1. NASA Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM3) Global 3 arc-second - National Geospatial Data Asset (NGDA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The first release of Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) data was provided in 1-degree digital elevation model (DEM) tiles from the USGS 2003. The data was...

  2. NASA Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM3) Global 1 arc-second - National Geospatial Data Asset (NGDA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The first release of Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) data was provided in 1-degree digital elevation model (DEM) tiles from the USGS 2003. The data was...

  3. Shuttle Radar Topography Mission 1 Arc-Second Digital Terrain Elevation Data - Global - National Geospatial Data Asset (NGDA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) was a partnership between NASA and the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA). Flown aboard the NASA Space...

  4. Shuttle Radar Topography Mission 1 Arc-Second Digital Terrain Elevation Data - Global - National Geospatial Data Asset (NGDA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) was a partnership between NASA and the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA). Flown aboard the NASA Space Shuttle...

  5. NASA Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM3) Water Body Shapefiles and Raster Files - National Geospatial Data Asset (NGDA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The first release of Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) data was provided in 1-degree digital elevation model (DEM) tiles from the USGS 2003. The data was...

  6. Shuttle Radar Topography Mission 1 Arc-Second Digital Terrain Elevation Data - Global - National Geospatial Data Asset (NGDA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) was a partnership between NASA and the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA). Flown aboard the NASA Space Shuttle...

  7. NASA Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM3) Global 1 arc-second number - National Geospatial Data Asset (NGDA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The first release of Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) data was provided in 1-degree digital elevation model (DEM) tiles from the USGS 2003. The data was...

  8. NASA Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM3) Global 30 arc-second - National Geospatial Data Asset (NGDA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The first release of Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) data was provided in 1-degree digital elevation model (DEM) tiles from the USGS 2003. The data was...

  9. Shuttle Radar Topography Mission 1 Arc and 3 Arc Second Digital Terrain Elevation Data - National Geospatial Data Asset (NGDA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) was a partnership between NASA and the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA). Flown aboard the NASA Space Shuttle...

  10. Mission Applications Support at NASA: Coastal Applications of SWOT Mission Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, M. M.; Peterson, C. A.; Chao, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission is an international collaboration of two scientific communities focused on a better understanding of the world's oceans and its terrestrial surface waters. SWOT will produce the first global survey of Earth's surface water by measuring sea surface height and the heights, slopes, and inundated areas of rivers, lakes, and wetlands. These coastal, lake and river measurements will be useful for monitoring the hydrologic cycle, flooding, and climate impacts of a changing environment. NASA and their French, Canadian and the United Kingdom space agency partners are developing new wide swath altimetry technology that will cover most of the world's ocean and surface freshwater bodies, and will have the capability to make observations with unprecedented resolution compared to existing technologies and will have the capability of measuring how water bodies change over time. Along with existing altimetry datasets, simulated SWOT data sets are being planned to assess the quality and potential value of anticipated SWOT measurements to both oceanography and hydrology applications. With the surface water measurements anticipated from SWOT, a broad range of applications may inform coastal managers and marine operators of offshore conditions and currents relevant to their regions. One study proposed to the NASA ASP would highlight coastal and estuary applications potential of the future SWOT mission. This study would promote the use of remote sensing measurements to improve the understanding, monitoring and management of estuaries and deltas for a broad range of users. In addition, the AirSWOT airborne mission to demonstrate the wide swath technology of SWOT is providing preliminary data products in inland and coastal regions that may be useful for early assessment by users of the future value of SWOT. NASA's Applied Sciences Program (ASP), along with the international SWOT project teams, is supporting a program that promotes

  11. Multiple Space Debris Collecting Mission -- Optimal Mission Planning

    CERN Document Server

    Cerf, Max

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of planning successive Space Debris Collecting missions so that they can be achieved at minimal cost by a generic vehicle. The problem mixes combinatorial optimization to select and order the debris among a list of candidates, and continuous optimization to fix the rendezvous dates and to define the minimum fuel orbital maneuvers. The solution method proposed consists in three stages. Firstly the orbital transfer problem is simplified by considering a generic transfer strategy suited either to a high thrust or a low thrust vehicle. A response surface modelling is built by solving the reduced problem for all pairs of debris and for discretized dates, and storing the results in cost matrices. Secondly a simulated annealing algorithm is applied to find the optimal mission planning. The cost function is assessed by interpolation on the response surface based on the cost matrices. This allows the convergence of the simulated algorithm in a limited computation time, yielding an opti...

  12. Organizational Mission and Revenue Diversification among Non-profit Sports Clubs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Breuer

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The beneficial effects of diversified income portfolios are well documented in previous research on non-profit organizations. This study examines how different types of organizational missions affect the level of revenue diversification of organizations in one industry, a question that was neglected in previous research. Based on contingency theory, it is assumed that different missions are associated with different funding sources. Since missions can be complementary or conflicting, specific attention needs to be paid to the combination of missions. The sport sector is chosen as an empirical setting because non-profit sports clubs can have various missions while their overall purpose is promoting sport. Panel data from a nationwide survey of non-profit sports clubs in Germany are used for the analysis. The regression results show that revenue diversification is significantly determined by organizational mission. Historically, typical mission statements like promoting elite sport, tradition, conviviality, non-sport programs, and youth sport have a positive effect on revenue diversification, while clubs with a commercial orientation and a focus on leisure and health sport have more concentrated revenues. The findings have implications for club management in the sense that some missions are associated with higher financial risk and that the combination of missions should be chosen carefully.

  13. Mission Operations Control Room Activities during STS-2 mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    Mission Operations Control Room (MOCR) activities during STS-2 mission. Overall view of the MOCR in the Johnson Space Center's Mission Control Center. At far right is Eugene F. Kranz, Deputy Director of Flight Operations. At the flight director console in front of Kranz's FOD console are Flight Directors M.P. Frank, Neil B. Hutchinson and Donald R. Puddy as well as others (39506); Wide-angle view of flight controllers in the MOCR. Clifford E. Charlesworth, JSC Deputy Director, huddles with several flight directors for STS-2 at the flight director console. Kranz, is at far right of frame (39507); Dr. Christopher C. Kraft, Jr., JSC Director, center, celebrates successful flight and landing of STS-2 with a cigar in the MOCR. He is flanked by Dr. Maxime A Faget, left, Director of Engineering and Development, and Thomas L. Moser, of the Structures and Mechanics Division (39508); Flight Director Donald R. Puddy, near right, holds replica of the STS-2 insignia. Insignias on the opposite wall

  14. Trajectory Design Considerations for Exploration Mission 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawn, Timothy F.; Gutkowski, Jeffrey P.; Batcha, Amelia L.

    2017-01-01

    Exploration Mission 1 (EM-1) will be the first mission to send an uncrewed Orion vehicle to cislunar space in 2018, targeted to a Distant Retrograde Orbit (DRO). Analysis of EM-1 DRO mission opportunities in 2018 help characterize mission parameters that are of interest to other subsystems (e.g., power, thermal, communications, flight operations, etc). Subsystems request mission design trades which include: landing lighting, addition of an Orion main engine checkout burn, and use of auxiliary thruster only cases. This paper examines the evolving trade studies that incorporate subsystem feedback and demonstrate the feasibility of these constrained mission trajectory designs and contingencies.

  15. Thermal, intermediate and fast neutron flux measurements using activation detectors; Mesure des flux de neutrons thermiques, intermediaires et rapides au moyen de detecteurs par activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brisbois, J.; Lott, M.; Manent, G. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    The problem of neutron flux measurements using activation detectors is studied in the particular case of protection research. It is shown how it possible, it is possible, using a known thermal flux, to organise a coherent calibration system for all the detectors. The rapid neutron detectors are calibrated with respect to a reference detector (phosphorus) in a natural uranium converter; the intermediate neutron detectors with respect to gold in the axial channel of ZOE. This method makes it possible to minimise the errors due to the activation cross-sections. A brief description is given of the counting room of the Pile Safety Study Service, as well of the practical utilisation characteristics of the counters employed. (authors) [French] Le probleme de la mesure des flux de neutrons au moyen de detecteurs par activation est etudie dans le cas particulier des etudes de protections. On montre comment, a partir d'un flux thermique connu, on peut organiser un systeme coherent d'etalonnage de tous les detecteurs. Les detecteurs de neutrons rapides sont etalonnes par rapport a un detecteur de reference (phosphore) dans un convertisseur en uranium naturel; les detecteurs de neutrons intermediaires, par rapport a l'or dans le canal axial de ZOE, Cette methode permet de minimiser les erreurs dues aux sections efficaces d'activation. On decrit sommairement la salle de comptage du Service d'Etudes de Protections de Piles et on indique les caracteristiques d'emploi pratique des detecteurs utilises. (auteurs)

  16. Measurement of the absolute values of cross-sections in neutron photoproduction (1962); Mesure de sections efficaces de photoproduction de neutrons en valeur absolue (1962)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuhl, C. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1962-07-01

    The absolute values of photoneutrons production cross-sections for the case of intermediate and heavy nuclei (lanthanium, cerium, tantalum, gold, lead and bismuth) are determined with an error of 15 per cent. The results obtained agree with theories in which the giant resonance is explained by the collective motion of the protons against the neutrons. The effect of the nuclear deformation on the shape of the giant resonance is seen in the case of Ta{sup 181}, it will be possible to determine the quadrupole momenta of deformed nuclei with a good accuracy when we shall increase the statistics of measurements. (author) [French] Les sections efficaces de production de photoneutrons par divers noyaux moyens et lourds (lanthane, cerium, tantale, or, plomb et bismuth) sont determinees en valeur absolue avec une erreur relative de 15 pour cent. Les resultats obtenus s'accordent avec les theories qui interpretent la resonance geante par un mouvement collectif des protons par rapport aux neutrons. L'influence de la deformation du noyau sur la forme de la resonance geante est soulignee dans le cas de {sup 181}Ta pour lequel elle se decompose en deux pics. Une amelioration de la statistique des mesures permettra de determiner les moments quadrupolaires des noyaux deformes avec une meilleure precision. (auteur)

  17. UTILISATION DES DONNEES SATELLITAIRES POUR L’ESTIMATION DU COEFFICIENT DE REFLECTANCE BIDIRECTIONNELLE REEL A L’AIDE DE MESURES SATELLITAIRES.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S TOURTA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available La télédétection est l’ensemble des connaissances et techniques utilisées pour déterminer les caractéristiques physiques d’objets par des mesures effectuées à distance, sans contact matériel avec ceux-ci. La télédétection  englobe tout le processus qui consiste à capter et à enregistrer l’énergie d’un rayonnement électromagnétique émis ou réfléchi, à traiter et à analyser l’information, pour ensuite mettre en application cette information. Le rayonnement solaire est atténué par les différents constituants atmosphériques tels que les molécules, les aérosols, les gaz, les gouttelettes nuageuses ou les cristaux de glace. Le but de ce travail est l’estimation du coefficient de réflectance bidirectionnelle sur le site de TAMANRASSET, en utilisant le modèle analytique à bande large, pour les trois heurs de prise  d’images à pleine résolution, 9h00, 12h00, 15h00 temps universel, et pour des jours de ciel clair à année 1999.

  18. Emirates Mars Mission (EMM) Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharaf, Omran; Amiri, Sarah; AlMheiri, Suhail; Alrais, Adnan; Wali, Mohammad; AlShamsi, Zakareyya; AlQasim, Ibrahim; AlHarmoodi, Khuloud; AlTeneiji, Nour; Almatroushi, Hessa; AlShamsi, Maryam; AlAwadhi, Mohsen; McGrath, Michael; Withnell, Pete; Ferrington, Nicolas; Reed, Heather; Landin, Brett; Ryan, Sean; Pramann, Brian

    2017-04-01

    United Arab Emirates (UAE) has entered the space exploration race with the announcement of Emirates Mars Mission (EMM), the first Arab Islamic mission to another planet, in 2014. Through this mission, UAE is to send an unmanned probe, called Hope probe, to be launched in summer 2020 and reach Mars by 2021 to coincide with UAE's 50th anniversary. Through a sequence of subsequent maneuvers, the spacecraft will enter a large science orbit that has a periapsis altitude of 20,000 km, an apoapsis altitude of 43,000 km, and an inclination of 25 degrees. The mission is designed to (1) characterize the state of the Martian lower atmosphere on global scales and its geographic, diurnal and seasonal variability, (2) correlate rates of thermal and photochemical atmospheric escape with conditions in the collisional Martian atmosphere, and (3) characterize the spatial structure and variability of key constituents in the Martian exosphere. These objectives will be met by four investigations with diurnal variability on sub-seasonal timescales which are (1) determining the three-dimensional thermal state of the lower atmosphere, (2) determining the geographic and diurnal distribution of key constituents in the lower atmosphere, (3) determining the abundance and spatial variability of key neutral species in the thermosphere, and (4) determining the three-dimensional structure and variability of key species in the exosphere. EMM will collect these information about the Mars atmospheric circulation and connections through a combination of three distinct instruments that image Mars in the visible, thermal infrared and ultraviolet wavelengths and they are the Emirates eXploration Imager (EXI), the Emirates Mars InfraRed Spectrometer (EMIRS), and the EMM Mars Ultraviolet Spectrometer (EMUS). EMM has passed its Mission Concept Review (MCR), System Requirements Review (SRR), System Design Review (SDR), and Preliminary Design Review (PDR) phases. The mission is led by Emiratis from Mohammed

  19. Apport d'une approche géostatique dans l'interprétation des mesures de diagraphies différées Enhancing Well Log Interpretation by Using a Geostatistical Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis A.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Nous proposons d'étudier et d'interpréter les données diagraphiques issues de macro-dispositifs en tenant compte, pour chaque mesure, du volume investi. Les macrodispositifs, en raison de leur géométrie, ont un effet intégrateur important sur la mesure diagraphique. Ceci se traduit pour ces dispositifs par une définition ou résolution verticale médiocre. De plus, dans la plupart des cas, le pas d'échantillonnage de la mesure le long du forage est inférieur à la résolution verticale de l'outil : les volumes investis se chevauchent, d'où des données qui ne sont plus additives. Une approche géostatistique des données diagraphiques nous permet d'étudier l'influence de l'effet intégrateur de l'outil sur la valeur de la mesure et de proposer trois méthodes de régularisation des données. Leur objectif est de rendre les données additives par une transformation des supports de mesure (volumes investis. Nous montrerons ainsi par une étude sur des signaux réels et synthétiques puis par l'intermédiaire d'une interprétation combinée de plusieurs diagraphies, qu'une simple régularisation des supports de mesure permet d'une part d'obtenir une information plus rigoureuse avec la mesure diagraphique, et d'autre part d'accroître les possibilités des macrodispositifs et tout particulièrement leur résolution verticale. We propose to study macro logging techniques data by taking into account for each measure the volume affected by the physical process. The volume of sediment affected by a measure carried out with a logging tool (sonic logs, density logs, etc. depends on the nature of the surrounding formations and on the setting of the instrument. The various parameters which influence the measurement are: the source-detector spacing, the spacing between detectors, the sampling interval along a well, and the volume of material considered (the measured entity. Depending on the tool, the measured entity can be either cylindrical

  20. Artificial intelligence for the EChO mission planning tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Piquer, Alvaro; Ribas, Ignasi; Colomé, Josep

    2015-12-01

    The Exoplanet Characterisation Observatory (EChO) has as its main goal the measurement of atmospheres of transiting planets. This requires the observation of two types of events: primary and secondary eclipses. In order to yield measurements of sufficient Signal-to-Noise Ratio to fulfil the mission objectives, the events of each exoplanet have to be observed several times. In addition, several criteria have to be considered to carry out each observation, such as the exoplanet visibility, its event duration, and no overlapping with other tasks. It is expected that a suitable mission plan increases the efficiency of telescope operation, which will represent an important benefit in terms of scientific return and operational costs. Nevertheless, to obtain a long term mission plan becomes unaffordable for human planners due to the complexity of computing the huge number of possible combinations for finding an optimum solution. In this contribution we present a long term mission planning tool based on Genetic Algorithms, which are focused on solving optimization problems such as the planning of several tasks. Specifically, the proposed tool finds a solution that highly optimizes the defined objectives, which are based on the maximization of the time spent on scientific observations and the scientific return (e.g., the coverage of the mission survey). The results obtained on the large experimental set up support that the proposed scheduler technology is robust and can function in a variety of scenarios, offering a competitive performance which does not depend on the collection of exoplanets to be observed. Specifically, the results show that, with the proposed tool, EChO uses 94% of the available time of the mission, so the amount of downtime is small, and it completes 98% of the targets.

  1. Woven TPS Enabling Missions Beyond Heritage Carbon Phenolic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stackpoole, Margaret M.; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Feldman, Jay D.

    2013-01-01

    NASAs Office of the Chief Technologist (OCT) Game Changing Division recently funded an effort to advance a Woven TPS (WTPS) concept. WTPS is a new approach to producing TPS architectures that uses precisely engineered 3D weaving techniques to customize material characteristics needed to meet specific missions requirements for protecting space vehicles from the intense heating generated during atmospheric entry. Using WTPS, sustainable, scalable, mission-optimized TPS solutions can be achieved with relatively low life cycle costs compared with the high costs and long development schedules currently associated with material development and certification. WTPS leverages the mature state-of-the-art weaving technology that has evolved from the textile industry to design TPS materials with tailorable performance. Currently, missions anticipated encountering heat fluxes in the range of 1500 4000 Wcm2 and pressures greater than 1.5 atm are limited to using fully dense Carbon Phenolic. However, fully dense carbon phenolic is only mass efficient at higher heat fluxes g(reater than 4000 Wcm2), and current mission designs suffer this mass inefficiency for lack of an alternative mid-density TPS. WTPS not only bridges this mid-density TPS gap but also offers a replacement for carbon phenolic, which itself requires a significant and costly redevelopment effort to re-establish its capability for use in the high heat flux missions recently prioritized in the NRC Decadal survey, including probe missions to Venus, Saturn and Neptune. This presentation will overview the WTPS concept and present some results from initial testing completed comparing WTPS architectures to heritage carbon phenolic.

  2. Monte Carlo Analysis as a Trajectory Design Driver for the TESS Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickel, Craig; Lebois, Ryan; Lutz, Stephen; Dichmann, Donald; Parker, Joel

    2016-01-01

    The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) will be injected into a highly eccentric Earth orbit and fly 3.5 phasing loops followed by a lunar flyby to enter a mission orbit with lunar 2:1 resonance. Through the phasing loops and mission orbit, the trajectory is significantly affected by lunar and solar gravity. We have developed a trajectory design to achieve the mission orbit and meet mission constraints, including eclipse avoidance and a 30-year geostationary orbit avoidance requirement. A parallelized Monte Carlo simulation was performed to validate the trajectory after injecting common perturbations, including launch dispersions, orbit determination errors, and maneuver execution errors. The Monte Carlo analysis helped identify mission risks and is used in the trajectory selection process.

  3. Mission Success for Combustion Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, Karen J.

    2004-01-01

    This presentation describes how mission success for combustion experiments has been obtained in previous spaceflight experiments and how it will be obtained for future International Space Station (ISS) experiments. The fluids and combustion facility is a payload planned for the ISS. It is composed of two racks: the fluids Integrated rack and the Combustion INtegrated Rack (CIR). Requirements for the CIR were obtained from a set of combustion basis experiments that served as surrogates for later experiments. The process for experiments that fly on the ISS includes proposal selection, requirements and success criteria definition, science and engineering reviews, mission operations, and postflight operations. By following this process, the microgravity combustion science program has attained success in 41 out of 42 experiments.

  4. White Label Space GLXP Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, A.

    2012-09-01

    This poster presents a lunar surface mission concept and corresponding financing approach developed by the White Label Space team, an official competitor in the Google Lunar X PRIZE. The White Label Space team's origins were in the European Space Agency's ESTEC facility in the Netherlands. Accordingly the team's technical headquarters are located just outside ESTEC in the Space Business Park. The team has active partners in Europe, Japan and Australia. The team's goal is to provide a unique publicity opportunity for global brands to land on the moon and win the prestigious Google Lunar X PRIZE. The poster presents the main steps to achieve this goal, the cost estimates for the mission, describes the benefits to the potential sponsors and supporters, and details the progress achieved to date.

  5. The Solar Spectroscopy Explorer Mission

    CERN Document Server

    Bookbinder, Jay

    2010-01-01

    The Solar Spectroscopy Explorer (SSE) concept is conceived as a scalable mission, with two to four instruments and a strong focus on coronal spectroscopy. In its core configuration it is a small strategic mission ($250-500M) built around a microcalorimeter (an imaging X-ray spectrometer) and a high spatial resolution (0.2 arcsec) EUV imager. SSE puts a strong focus on the plasma spectroscopy, balanced with high resolution imaging - providing for break-through imaging science as well as providing the necessary context for the spectroscopy suite. Even in its smallest configuration SSE provides observatory class science, with significant science contributions ranging from basic plasma and radiative processes to the onset of space weather events. The basic configuration can carry an expanded instrument suite with the addition of a hard X-ray imaging spectrometer and/or a high spectral resolution EUV instrument - significantly expanding the science capabilities. In this configuration, it will fall at the small end...

  6. The GAMMA-400 Space Mission

    CERN Document Server

    Cumani, P; Bonvicini, V; Topchiev, N P; Adriani, O; Aptekar, R L; Arkhangelskaja, I V; Arkhangelskiy, A I; Bergstrom, L; Berti, E; Bigongiari, G; Bobkov, S G; Boezio, M; Bogomolov, E A; Bonechi, S; Bongi, M; Bottai, S; Castellini, G; Cattaneo, P W; Dedenko, G L; De Donato, C; Dogiel, V A; Gorbunov, M S; Gusakov, Yu V; Hnatyk, B I; Kadilin, V V; Kaplin, V A; Kaplun, A A; Kheymits, M D; Korepanov, V E; Larsson, J; Leonov, A A; Loginov, V A; Longo, F; Maestro, P; Marrocchesi, P S; Menshenin, A L; Mikhailov, V V; Mocchiutti, E; Moiseev, A A; Mori, N; Moskalenko, I V; Naumov, P Yu; Papini, P; Pearce, M; Picozza, P; Popov, A V; Rappoldi, A; Ricciarini, S; Runtso, M F; Ryde, F; Serdin, O V; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Suchkov, S I; Tavani, M; Taraskin, A A; Tiberio, A; Tyurin, E M; Ulanov, M V; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Vasilyev, G I; Yurkin, Yu T; Zampa, N; Zirakashvili, V N; Zverev, V G

    2015-01-01

    GAMMA-400 is a new space mission which will be installed on board the Russian space platform Navigator. It is scheduled to be launched at the beginning of the next decade. GAMMA-400 is designed to study simultaneously gamma rays (up to 3 TeV) and cosmic rays (electrons and positrons from 1 GeV to 20 TeV, nuclei up to 10$^{15}$-10$^{16}$ eV). Being a dual-purpose mission, GAMMA-400 will be able to address some of the most impelling science topics, such as search for signatures of dark matter, cosmic-rays origin and propagation, and the nature of transients. GAMMA-400 will try to solve the unanswered questions on these topics by high-precision measurements of the Galactic and extragalactic gamma-ray sources, Galactic and extragalactic diffuse emission and the spectra of cosmic-ray electrons + positrons and nuclei, thanks to excellent energy and angular resolutions.

  7. Mission design for LISA Pathfinder

    CERN Document Server

    Landgraf, M; Kemble, S

    2004-01-01

    Here we describe the mission design for SMART-2/LISA Pathfinder. The best trade-off between the requirements of a low-disturbance environment and communications distance is found to be a free-insertion Lissajous orbit around the first co-linear Lagrange point of the Sun-Earth system L1, 1.5x 10^6 km from Earth. In order to transfer SMART-2/LISA Pathfinder from a low Earth orbit, where it will be placed by a small launcher, the spacecraft carries out a number of apogee-raise manoeuvres, which ultimatively place it to a parabolic escape trajectory towards L1. The challenges of the design of a small mission are met, fulfilling the very demanding technology demonstration requirements without creating excessive requirements on the launch system or the ground segment.

  8. Java Mission Evaluation Workstation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettinger, Ross; Watlington, Tim; Ryley, Richard; Harbour, Jeff

    2006-01-01

    The Java Mission Evaluation Workstation System (JMEWS) is a collection of applications designed to retrieve, display, and analyze both real-time and recorded telemetry data. This software is currently being used by both the Space Shuttle Program (SSP) and the International Space Station (ISS) program. JMEWS was written in the Java programming language to satisfy the requirement of platform independence. An object-oriented design was used to satisfy additional requirements and to make the software easily extendable. By virtue of its platform independence, JMEWS can be used on the UNIX workstations in the Mission Control Center (MCC) and on office computers. JMEWS includes an interactive editor that allows users to easily develop displays that meet their specific needs. The displays can be developed and modified while viewing data. By simply selecting a data source, the user can view real-time, recorded, or test data.

  9. ESA's SMART-1 Mission: Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racca, G.; Foing, B. H.; SMART-1 Project Team

    SMART-1 is the first of Small Missions for Advanced Research and Technology as part of ESA science programme ``Cosmic Vision''. Its objective is to demonstrate Solar Electric Primary Propulsion (SEP) for future Cornerstones (such as Bepi-Colombo) and to test new technologies for spacecraft and instruments. The spacecraft has been launched on 27 sept. 2003, as an Ariane-5 auxiliary passenger. SMART-1 orbit pericenter is now outside the inner radiation belt. The current status of SMART-1 will be given at the symposium. After a 15 month cruise with primary SEP, the SMART-1 mission is to orbit the Moon for a nominal period of six months, with possible extension. The spacecraft will carry out a complete programme of scientific observations during the cruise and in lunar orbit.

  10. Skylab mission report, third visit

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-01-01

    An evaluation is presented of the operational and engineering aspects of the third Skylab visit, including information on the performance of the command and service module and the experiment hardware, the crew's evaluation of the visit, and other visit-related areas of interest such as biomedical observations. The specific areas discussed are contained in the following: (1) solar physics and astrophysics investigations; (2) Comet Kohoutek experiments; (3) medical experiments; (4) earth observations, including data for the multispectral photographic facility, the earth terrain camera, and the microwave radiometer/scattermometer and altimeter; (5) engineering and technology experiments; (6) food and medical operational equipment; (7) hardware and experiment anomalies; and (8) mission support, mission objectives, flight planning, and launch phase summary. Conclusions discussed as a result of the third visit to Skylab involve the advancement of the sciences, practical applications, the durability of man and systems in space, and spaceflight effectiveness and economy.

  11. New ESA Earth Explorer Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herland, E.

    2006-12-01

    The European Space Agency has recently selected a set of six mission candidates for its next Earth Explorer Core mission. This mission will be launched in the beginning of the next decade, and will contribute significantly to Earth science in addition to the already approved six missions in the programme. The scientific priorities for the call for proposals were the global water cycle, the global carbon cycle, atmospheric chemistry and the human element in the Earth system. The presentation will outline the scientific objectives of each of the six mission proposals, and in particular address the potential contribution to the water and energy cycle research and CEOP. The six mission proposals are: BIOMASS global measurements of forest biomass. The measurement is accomplished by a space-borne P-band synthetic aperture polarimetric radar. The technique is mainly based on the measurement of the cross- polar backscattering coefficient, from which forest biomass is directly retrieved. Also uses multipolarization measurements and interferometry. The studies for this mission will include comparative studies to measure terrestrial biomass using P- or L-band and consideration of alternative implementations using L-band. TRAQ TRopospheric composition and Air Quality: Monitoring of air quality and long-range transport of air pollutants. A new synergistic sensor concept for process studies, particularly with respect to aerosol-cloud interactions. Focus on the rate of air quality change on regional and global scales, the strength and distribution of sources and sinks of tropospheric trace gases and aerosols influencing air quality, and the role of tropospheric composition in global change. Carries imaging spectrometers in the range from ultraviolet to short-wave infrared. PREMIER PRocess Exploration through Measurements of Infrared and millimetre-wave Emitted Radiation: Aims at understanding processes that link trace gases, radiation, chemistry and climate in the atmosphere

  12. LISA Pathfinder: mission and status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonucci, F; Cavalleri, A; Congedo, G [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Trento and INFN, Gruppo Collegato di Trento, 38050 Povo, Trento (Italy); Armano, M [European Space Astronomy Centre, European Space Agency, Villanueva de la Canada, 28692 Madrid (Spain); Audley, H; Bogenstahl, J; Danzmann, K [Albert-Einstein-Institut, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik und Universitaet Hannover, 30167 Hannover (Germany); Auger, G; Binetruy, P [APC UMR7164, Universite Paris Diderot, Paris (France); Benedetti, M [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dei Materiali e Tecnologie Industriali, Universita di Trento and INFN, Gruppo Collegato di Trento, Mesiano, Trento (Italy); Boatella, C [CNES, DCT/AQ/EC, 18 Avenue Edouard Belin, 31401 Toulouse, Cedex 9 (France); Bortoluzzi, D; Bosetti, P; Cristofolini, I [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica e Strutturale, Universita di Trento and INFN, Gruppo Collegato di Trento, Mesiano, Trento (Italy); Caleno, M; Cesa, M [European Space Technology Centre, European Space Agency, Keplerlaan 1, 2200 AG Noordwijk (Netherlands); Chmeissani, M [IFAE, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Ciani, G [Department of Physics, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-8440 (United States); Conchillo, A [ICE-CSIC/IEEC, Facultat de Ciencies, E-08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Cruise, M, E-mail: Paul.McNamara@esa.int [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2011-05-07

    LISA Pathfinder, the second of the European Space Agency's Small Missions for Advanced Research in Technology (SMART), is a dedicated technology demonstrator for the joint ESA/NASA Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission. The technologies required for LISA are many and extremely challenging. This coupled with the fact that some flight hardware cannot be fully tested on ground due to Earth-induced noise led to the implementation of the LISA Pathfinder mission to test the critical LISA technologies in a flight environment. LISA Pathfinder essentially mimics one arm of the LISA constellation by shrinking the 5 million kilometre armlength down to a few tens of centimetres, giving up the sensitivity to gravitational waves, but keeping the measurement technology: the distance between the two test masses is measured using a laser interferometric technique similar to one aspect of the LISA interferometry system. The scientific objective of the LISA Pathfinder mission consists then of the first in-flight test of low frequency gravitational wave detection metrology. LISA Pathfinder is due to be launched in 2013 on-board a dedicated small launch vehicle (VEGA). After a series of apogee raising manoeuvres using an expendable propulsion module, LISA Pathfinder will enter a transfer orbit towards the first Sun-Earth Lagrange point (L1). After separation from the propulsion module, the LPF spacecraft will be stabilized using the micro-Newton thrusters, entering a 500 000 km by 800 000 km Lissajous orbit around L1. Science results will be available approximately 2 months after launch.

  13. DARWIN mission proposal to ESA

    CERN Document Server

    Leger, Alain

    2007-01-01

    The discovery of extra-solar planets is one of the greatest achievements of modern astronomy. There are now more than 200 such objects known, and the recent detection of planets with masses approximately 5 times that of Earth demonstrates that extra-solar planets of low mass exist. In addition to providing a wealth of scientific information on the formation and structure of planetary systems, these discoveries capture the interest of both scientists and the wider public with the profound prospect of the search for life in the Universe. We propose an L-type mission, called Darwin, whose primary goal is the study of terrestrial extrasolar planets and the search for life on them. By its very nature, Darwin advances the first Grand Theme of ESA Cosmic Vision. Accomplishing the mission objectives will require collaborative science across disciplines ranging from planet formation and atmospheres to chemistry and biology, and these disciplines will reap profound rewards from their contributions to the Darwin mission...

  14. The Van Allen Probes mission

    CERN Document Server

    Burch, James

    2014-01-01

    This collection of articles provides broad and detailed information about NASA’s Van Allen Probes (formerly known as the Radiation Belt Storm Probes) twin-spacecraft Earth-orbiting mission. The mission has the objective of achieving predictive understanding of the dynamic, intense, energetic, dangerous, and presently unpredictable belts of energetic particles that are magnetically trapped in Earth’s space environment above the atmosphere. It documents the science of the radiation belts and the societal benefits of achieving predictive understanding. Detailed information is provided about the Van Allen Probes mission design, the spacecraft, the science investigations, and the onboard instrumentation that must all work together to make unprecedented measurements within a most unforgiving environment, the core of Earth’s most intense radiation regions.
 This volume is aimed at graduate students and researchers active in space science, solar-terrestrial interactions and studies of the up...

  15. Tandem-X Mission Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zink, M.

    2015-04-01

    TanDEM-X (TerraSAR-X add-on for Digital Elevation Measurements) is an innovative formation flying radar mission that opens a new era in spaceborne radar remote sensing. Its primary objective is the acquisition of a global Digital Elevation Model (DEM) with unprecedented accuracy (12 m horizontal resolution and 2 m relative height accuracy). This goal is achieved by extending the TerraSAR-X synthetic aperture radar (SAR) mission by a second TerraSAR-X like satellite, TanDEM-X (TDX). Both satellites fly in close orbit formation of a few hundred meters distance, and the resulting large single-pass SAR interferometer features flexible baseline selection enabling the acquisition of highly accurate cross-track interferograms not impacted by temporal decorrelation and atmospheric disturbances. Beyond the global DEM, several secondary mission objectives based on along-track interferometry as well as new bistatic and multistatic SAR techniques have been defined. Since 2010 both satellites have been operated in close formation to map all land surfaces at least twice and difficult terrain even up to four times. While data acquisition for the DEM generation will be concluded by the end of 2014 it is expected to complete the processing of the global DEM in the second half of 2016.

  16. The ASTRO-H Mission

    CERN Document Server

    Takahashi, Tadayuki; Kelley, Richard; Aharonian, Felix; Akimoto, Fumie; Allen, Steve; Anabuki, Naohisa; Angelini, Lorella; Arnaud, Keith; Awaki, Hisamitsu; Bamba, Aya; Bando, Nobutaka; Bautz, Mark; Blandford, Roger; Boyce, Kevin; Brown, Greg; Chernyakova, Maria; Coppi, Paolo; Costantini, Elisa; Cottam, Jean; Crow, John; de Plaa, Jelle; de Vries, Cor; Herder, Jan-Willem den; DiPirro, Michael; Done, Chris; Dotani, Tadayasu; Ebisawa, Ken; Enoto, Teruaki; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Fabian, Andrew; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Funk, Stefan; Furuzawa, Akihiro; Galeazzi, Massimiliano; Gandhi, Poshak; Gendreau, Keith; Gilmore, Kirk; Haba, Yoshito; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Hatsukade, Isamu; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Hiraga, Junko; Hirose, Kazuyuki; Hornschemeier, Ann; Hughes, John; Hwang, Una; Iizuka, Ryo; Ishibashi, Kazunori; Ishida, Manabu; Ishimura, Kosei; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Isobe, Naoki; Ito, Masayuki; Iwata, Naoko; Kaastra, Jelle; Kallman, Timothy; Kamae, Tuneyoshi; Katagiri, Hideaki; Kataoka, Jun; Katsuda, Satoru; Kawaharada, Madoka; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Kawasaki, Shigeo; Khangaluyan, Dmitry; Kilbourne, Caroline; Kinugasa, Kenzo; Kitamoto, Shunji; Kitayama, Tetsu; Kohmura, Takayoshi; Kokubun, Motohide; Kosaka, Tatsuro; Kotani, Taro; Koyama, Katsuji; Kubota, Aya; Kunieda, Hideyo; Laurent, Philippe; Lebrun, Francois; Limousin, Olivier; Loewenstein, Michael; Long, Knox; Madejski, Grzegorz; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Makishima, Kazuo; Markevitch, Maxim; Matsumoto, Hironori; Matsushita, Kyoko; McCammon, Dan; Miller, Jon; Mineshige, Shin; Minesugi, Kenji; Miyazawa, Takuya; Mizuno, Tsunefumi; Mori, Koji; Mori, Hideyuki; Mukai, Koji; Murakami, Hiroshi; Murakami, Toshio; Mushotzky, Richard; Nakagawa, Yujin; Nakagawa, Takao; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Nakamori, Takeshi; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Namba, Yoshiharu; Nomachi, Masaharu; Dell, Steve O'; Ogawa, Hiroyuki; Ogawa, Mina; Ogi, Keiji; Ohashi, Takaya; Ohno, Masanori; Ohta, Masayuki; Okajima, Takashi; Ota, Naomi; Ozaki, Masanobu; Paerels, Frits; Paltani, Stéphane; Parmer, Arvind; Petre, Robert; Pohl, Martin; Porter, Scott; Ramsey, Brian; Reynolds, Christopher; Sakai, Shin-ichiro; Sambruna, Rita; Sato, Goro; Sato, Yoichi; Serlemitsos, Peter; Shida, Maki; Shimada, Takanobu; Shinozaki, Keisuke; Shirron, Peter; Smith, Randall; Sneiderman, Gary; Soong, Yang; Stawarz, Lukasz; Sugita, Hiroyuki; Szymkowiak, Andrew; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Takei, Yoh; Tamagawa, Toru; Tamura, Takayuki; Tamura, Keisuke; Tanaka, Takaaki; Tanaka, Yasuo; Tanaka, Yasuyuki; Tashiro, Makoto; Tawara, Yuzuru; Terada, Yukikatsu; Terashima, Yuichi; Tombesi, Francesco; Tomida, Hiroshi; Tozuka, Miyako; Tsuboi, Yoko; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Tsuru, Takeshi; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Uchiyama, Hideki; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Uno, Shinichiro; Urry, Meg; Watanabe, Shin; White, Nicholas; Yamada, Takahiro; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Yamasaki, Noriko; Yamauchi, Makoto; Yamauchi, Shigeo; Yatsu, Yoichi; Yonetoku, Daisuke; Yoshida, Atsumasa

    2010-01-01

    The joint JAXA/NASA ASTRO-H mission is the sixth in a series of highly successful X-ray missions initiated by the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS). ASTRO-H will investigate the physics of the high-energy universe by performing high-resolution, high-throughput spectroscopy with moderate angular resolution. ASTRO-H covers very wide energy range from 0.3 keV to 600 keV. ASTRO-H allows a combination of wide band X-ray spectroscopy (5-80 keV) provided by multilayer coating, focusing hard X-ray mirrors and hard X-ray imaging detectors, and high energy-resolution soft X-ray spectroscopy (0.3-12 keV) provided by thin-foil X-ray optics and a micro-calorimeter array. The mission will also carry an X-ray CCD camera as a focal plane detector for a soft X-ray telescope (0.4-12 keV) and a non-focusing soft gamma-ray detector (40-600 keV) . The micro-calorimeter system is developed by an international collaboration led by ISAS/JAXA and NASA. The simultaneous broad bandpass, coupled with high spectral reso...

  17. The ASTRO-H Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotani, Tadayasu; Takahashi, Tadayuki

    2012-07-01

    ASTRO-H, the new Japanese X-ray Astronomy Satellite following Suzaku, is an international X-ray mission, planed for launch in 2014. ASTRO-H is a combination of wide band X-ray spectroscopy (3 - 80 keV) provided by focusing hard X-ray mirrors and hard X-ray imaging detectors, and high energy-resolution soft X-ray spectroscopy (0.3 - 10 keV) provided by thin-foil X-ray optics and a micro-calorimeter array. The mission will also carry an X-ray CCD camera as a focal plane detector for a soft X-ray telescope and a non-focusing soft gamma-ray detector based on a narrow-FOV semiconductor Compton Camera. With these instruments, ASTRO-H covers very wide energy range from 0.3 keV to 600 keV. The simultaneous broad band pass, coupled with high spectral resolution of super massive Black Holes in Active Galactic Nuclei; trace the growth history of the largest structures in the Universe; provide insights into the behavior of material in extreme gravitational fields; trace particle acceleration structures in clusters of galaxies and SNRs; and investigate the detailed physics of jets. In this presentation, we will describe the mission, scientific goal and the recent progress of the project.

  18. UAV Mission Planning: From Robust to Agile

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, L.; Barros, A.I.; Monsuur, H.; Wagelmans, A.

    2015-01-01

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) are important assets for information gathering in Intelligence Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) missions. Depending on the uncertainty in the planning parameters, the complexity of the mission and its constraints and requirements, different planning methods might

  19. Low Energy Mission Planning Toolbox Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Low Energy Mission Planning Toolbox is designed to significantly reduce the resources and time spent on designing missions in multi-body gravitational...

  20. NASA's Human Mission to a Near-Earth Asteroid: Landing on a Moving Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jeffrey H.; Lincoln, William P.; Weisbin, Charles R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a Bayesian approach for comparing the productivity and cost-risk tradeoffs of sending versus not sending one or more robotic surveyor missions prior to a human mission to land on an asteroid. The expected value of sample information based on productivity combined with parametric variations in the prior probability an asteroid might be found suitable for landing were used to assess the optimal number of spacecraft and asteroids to survey. The analysis supports the value of surveyor missions to asteroids and indicates one launch with two spacecraft going simultaneously to two independent asteroids appears optimal.

  1. NASA's Human Mission to a Near-Earth Asteroid: Landing on a Moving Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jeffrey H.; Lincoln, William P.; Weisbin, Charles R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a Bayesian approach for comparing the productivity and cost-risk tradeoffs of sending versus not sending one or more robotic surveyor missions prior to a human mission to land on an asteroid. The expected value of sample information based on productivity combined with parametric variations in the prior probability an asteroid might be found suitable for landing were used to assess the optimal number of spacecraft and asteroids to survey. The analysis supports the value of surveyor missions to asteroids and indicates one launch with two spacecraft going simultaneously to two independent asteroids appears optimal.

  2. Euclid space mission: a cosmological challenge for the next 15 years

    CERN Document Server

    Scaramella, R; Amiaux, J; Burigana, C; Carvalho, C S; Cuillandre, J C; da Silva, A; Dinis, J; Derosa, A; Maiorano, E; Franzetti, P; Garilli, B; Maris, M; Meneghetti, M; Tereno, I; Wachter, S; Amendola, L; Cropper, M; Cardone, V; Massey, R; Niemi, S; Hoekstra, H; Kitching, T; Miller, L; Schrabback, T; Semboloni, E; Taylor, A; Viola, M; Maciaszek, T; Ealet, A; Guzzo, L; Jahnke, K; Percival, W; Pasian, F; Sauvage, M

    2015-01-01

    Euclid is the next ESA mission devoted to cosmology. It aims at observing most of the extragalactic sky, studying both gravitational lensing and clustering over $\\sim$15,000 square degrees. The mission is expected to be launched in year 2020 and to last six years. The sheer amount of data of different kinds, the variety of (un)known systematic effects and the complexity of measures require efforts both in sophisticated simulations and techniques of data analysis. We review the mission main characteristics, some aspects of the the survey and highlight some of the areas of interest to this meeting

  3. Nouvelles: KEK: B pour BELLE; NA48 mesure la violation directe de CP; LEL: le laser à électrons libres dépasse le kilowatt; Le LEP à 100 pour 100; Tour d'honneur au RHIC; Mesures de précision; Etude sur les modes de gestion du village planétaire; Conférence PANIC99 à Uppsala; Rencontre électron-noyau à HERA; LPP, Doubna célèbre une décennie; Les physiciens auscultent le photon; Aimants chauds venus du froid

    CERN Multimedia

    1999-01-01

    Nouvelles: KEK: B pour BELLE; NA48 mesure la violation directe de CP; LEL: le laser à électrons libres dépasse le kilowatt; Le LEP à 100 pour 100; Tour d'honneur au RHIC; Mesures de précision; Etude sur les modes de gestion du village planétaire; Conférence PANIC99 à Uppsala; Rencontre électron-noyau à HERA; LPP, Doubna célèbre une décennie; Les physiciens auscultent le photon; Aimants chauds venus du froid

  4. [Issues of biomedical support of explorations missions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potapov, A N; Sinyak, Yu E; Petrov, V M

    2013-01-01

    Sine qua non for piloted exploration missions is a system of biomedical support. The future system will be considerably different from the analogous systems applied in current orbital missions. The reason is the challenging conditions in expeditions to remote space. In a mission to Mars, specifically, these are high levels of radiation, hypomagnetic environment, alternation of micro- and hypogravity, very long mission duration and autonomy. The paper scrutinizes the major issues of medical support to future explorers of space.

  5. Exploration Missions to Host Small Payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirtain, Jonathan; Pelfrey, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    The next-generation heavy launch vehicle, the Space Launch System (SLS), will provide the capability to deploy small satellites during the trans-lunar phase of the exploration mission trajectory. We will describe the payload mission concept of operations, the payload capacity for the SLS, and the payload requirements. Exploration Mission 1, currently planned for launch in December 2017, will be the first mission to carry such payloads on the SLS.

  6. Trajectory Design for the Europa Clipper Mission Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffington, Brent

    2014-01-01

    Europa is one of the most scientifically intriguing targets in planetary science due to its potential suitability for extant life. As such, NASA has funded the California Institute of Technology Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory to jointly determine and develop the best mission concept to explore Europa in the near future. The result of nearly 4 years of work--the Europa Clipper mission concept--is a multiple Europa flyby mission that could efficiently execute a number of high caliber science investigations to meet Europa science priorities specified in the 2011 NRC Decadal Survey, and is capable of providing reconnaissance data to maximize the probability of both a safe landing and access to surface material of high scientific value for a future Europa lander. This paper will focus on the major enabling component for this mission concept--the trajectory. A representative trajectory, referred to as 13F7-A21, would obtain global-regional coverage of Europa via a complex network of 45 flybys over the course of 3.5 years while also mitigating the effects of the harsh Jovian radiation environment. In addition, 5 Ganymede and 9 Callisto flybys would be used to manipulate the trajectory relative to Europa. The tour would reach a maximum Jovicentric inclination of 20.1 deg. have a deterministic (Delta)V of 164 m/s (post periapsis raise maneuver), and a total ionizing dose of 2.8 Mrad (Si).

  7. The Trojans' Odyssey space mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamy, P.; Vernazza, P.; Groussin, O.; Poncy, J.; Martinot, V.; Hinglais, E.; Bell, J.; Cruikshank, D.; Helbert, J.; Marzari, F.; Morbidelli, A.; Rosenblatt, P.

    2011-10-01

    In our present understanding of the Solar System, small bodies (asteroids, Jupiter Trojans, comets and TNOs) are the most direct remnants of the original building blocks that formed the planets. Jupiter Trojan and Hilda asteroids are small primitive bodies located beyond the "snow line", around respectively the L4 and L5 Lagrange points of Jupiter at 5.2 AU (Trojans) and in the 2:3 mean-motion resonance with Jupiter near 3.9 AU (Hildas). They are at the crux of several outstanding and still conflicting issues regarding the formation and evolution of the Solar System. They hold the potential to unlock the answers to fundamental questions about planetary migration, the late heavy bombardment, the formation of the Jovian system, the origin and evolution of trans-neptunian objects, and the delivery of water and organics to the inner planets. The proposed Trojans' Odyssey mission is envisioned as a reconnaissance, multiple flyby mission aimed at visiting several objects, typically five Trojans and one Hilda. It will attempt exploring both large and small objects and sampling those with any known differences in photometric properties. The orbital strategy consists in a direct trajectory to one of the Trojan swarms. By carefully choosing the aphelion of the orbit (typically 5.3 AU), the trajectory will offer a long arc in the swarm thus maximizing the number of flybys. Initial gravity assists from Venus and Earth will help reducing the cruise to 7 years as well as the ?V needed for injection thus offering enough capacity to navigate among Trojans. This solution further opens the unique possibility to flyby a Hilda asteroid when leaving the Trojan swarm. During the cruise phase, a Main Belt Asteroid could be targeted if requiring a modest ?V. The specific science objectives of the mission will be best achieved with a payload that will perform high-resolution panchromatic and multispectral imaging, thermal-infrared imaging/ radiometry, near- and mid-infrared spectroscopy

  8. The Europa Clipper mission concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappalardo, Robert; Lopes, Rosaly

    Jupiter's moon Europa may be a habitable world. Galileo spacecraft data suggest that an ocean most likely exists beneath Europa’s icy surface and that the “ingredients” necessary for life (liquid water, chemistry, and energy) could be present within this ocean today. Because of the potential for revolutionizing our understanding of life in the solar system, future exploration of Europa has been deemed an extremely high priority for planetary science. A NASA-appointed Science Definition Team (SDT), working closely with a technical team from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and the Applied Physics Laboratory (APL), recently considered options for a future strategic mission to Europa, with the stated science goal: Explore Europa to investigate its habitability. The group considered several mission options, which were fully technically developed, then costed and reviewed by technical review boards and planetary science community groups. There was strong convergence on a favored architecture consisting of a spacecraft in Jupiter orbit making many close flybys of Europa, concentrating on remote sensing to explore the moon. Innovative mission design would use gravitational perturbations of the spacecraft trajectory to permit flybys at a wide variety of latitudes and longitudes, enabling globally distributed regional coverage of the moon’s surface, with nominally 45 close flybys at altitudes from 25 to 100 km. We will present the science and reconnaissance goals and objectives, a mission design overview, and the notional spacecraft for this concept, which has become known as the Europa Clipper. The Europa Clipper concept provides a cost-efficient means to explore Europa and investigate its habitability, through understanding the satellite’s ice and ocean, composition, and geology. The set of investigations derived from these science objectives traces to a notional payload for science, consisting of: Ice Penetrating Radar (for sounding of ice-water interfaces

  9. Mechanical design of the Mars Pathfinder mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisen, Howard Jay; Buck, Carl W.; Gillis-Smith, Greg R.; Umland, Jeffrey W.

    1997-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder mission and the Sojourner rover is reported on, with emphasis on the various mission steps and the performance of the technologies involved. The mechanical design of mission hardware was critical to the success of the entry sequence and the landing operations. The various mechanisms employed are considered.

  10. COMS normal operation for Earth Observation mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Young-Min

    2012-09-01

    Communication Ocean Meteorological Satellite (COMS) for the hybrid mission of meteorological observation, ocean monitoring, and telecommunication service was launched onto Geostationary Earth Orbit on June 27, 2010 and it is currently under normal operation service since April 2011. The COMS is located on 128.2° East of the geostationary orbit. In order to perform the three missions, the COMS has 3 separate payloads, the meteorological imager (MI), the Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI), and the Ka-band antenna. Each payload is dedicated to one of the three missions, respectively. The MI and GOCI perform the Earth observation mission of meteorological observation and ocean monitoring, respectively. For this Earth observation mission the COMS requires daily mission commands from the satellite control ground station and daily mission is affected by the satellite control activities. For this reason daily mission planning is required. The Earth observation mission operation of COMS is described in aspects of mission operation characteristics and mission planning for the normal operation services of meteorological observation and ocean monitoring. And the first year normal operation results after the In-Orbit-Test (IOT) are investigated through statistical approach to provide the achieved COMS normal operation status for the Earth observation mission.

  11. The Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, David H.; Hoffman, Tom L.; Havens, Glen G.

    2013-01-01

    The Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission, launched in September 2011, successfully completed its Primary Science Mission in June 2012 and is currently in Extended Mission operations. Competitively selected under a NASA Announcement of Opportunity in December 2007, GRAIL is a Discovery Program mission subject to a mandatory project cost cap. The purpose of the mission is to precisely map the gravitational field of the Moon to reveal its internal structure from crust to core, determine its thermal evolution, and extend this knowledge to other planets. The mission uses twin spacecraft flying in tandem to provide the gravity map. The GRAIL Flight System, consisting of the spacecraft and payload, was developed based on significant heritage from previous missions such an experimental U.S. Air Force satellite, the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) mission, and the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission. The Mission Operations System (MOS) was based on high-heritage multimission operations developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Lockheed Martin. Both the Flight System and MOS were adapted to meet the unique challenges posed by the GRAIL mission design. This paper summarizes the implementation challenges and accomplishments of getting GRAIL ready for launch. It also discusses the in-flight challenges and experiences of operating two spacecraft, and mission results.

  12. CHEOPS: A transit photometry mission for ESA's small mission programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Queloz D.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Ground based radial velocity (RV searches continue to discover exoplanets below Neptune mass down to Earth mass. Furthermore, ground based transit searches now reach milli-mag photometric precision and can discover Neptune size planets around bright stars. These searches will find exoplanets around bright stars anywhere on the sky, their discoveries representing prime science targets for further study due to the proximity and brightness of their host stars. A mission for transit follow-up measurements of these prime targets is currently lacking. The first ESA S-class mission CHEOPS (CHaracterizing ExoPlanet Satellite will fill this gap. It will perform ultra-high precision photometric monitoring of selected bright target stars almost anywhere on the sky with sufficient precision to detect Earth sized transits. It will be able to detect transits of RV-planets by photometric monitoring if the geometric configuration results in a transit. For Hot Neptunes discovered from the ground, CHEOPS will be able to improve the transit light curve so that the radius can be determined precisely. Because of the host stars' brightness, high precision RV measurements will be possible for all targets. All planets observed in transit by CHEOPS will be validated and their masses will be known. This will provide valuable data for constraining the mass-radius relation of exoplanets, especially in the Neptune-mass regime. During the planned 3.5 year mission, about 500 targets will be observed. There will be 20% of open time available for the community to develop new science programmes.

  13. "Suntelligence" Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to the American Academy of Dermatology's "Suntelligence" sun-smart survey. Please answer the following questions to measure ... be able to view a ranking of major cities suntelligence based on residents' responses to this survey. ...

  14. The Infrared Astronomical Mission AKARI

    CERN Document Server

    Murakami, H; Barthel, P; Clements, D L; Cohen, M; Doi, Y; Enya, K; Figueredo, E; Fujishiro, N; Fujiwara, H; Fujiwara, M; García-Lario, P; Goto, T; Hasegawa, S; Hibi, Y; Hirao, T; Hiromoto, N; Hong, S S; Imai, K; Ishigaki, M; Ishiguro, M; Ishihara, D; Ita, Y; Jeong, W -S; Jeong, K S; Kaneda, H; Kataza, H; Kawada, M; Kawai, T; Kawamura, A; Kessler, M F; Kester, Do; Kii, T; Kim, D C; Kim, W; Kobayashi, H; Koo, B C; Kwon, S M; Lee, H M; Lorente, R; Makiuti, S; Matsuhara, H; Matsumoto, T; Matsuo, H; Matsuura, S; Müller, T G; Murakami, N; Nagata, H; Nakagawa, T; Naoi, T; Narita, M; Noda, M; Oh, S H; Ohnishi, A; Ohyama, Y; Okada, Y; Okuda, H; Oliver, S; Onaka, T; Ootsubo, T; Oyabu, S; Pak, S; Park, Y S; Pearson, C P; Rowan-Robinson, M; Saitô, T; Sakon, I; Salama, A; Sato, S; Savage, R S; Serjeant, S; Shibai, H; Shirahata, M; Sohn, J J; Suzuki, T; Takagi, T; Takahashi, H; Tanabé, T; Takeuchi, T T; Takita, S; Thomson, M; Uemizu, K; Ueno, M; Usui, F; Verdugo, E; Wada, T; Wang, L; Watabe, T; Watarai, H; White, G J; Yamamura, I; Yamauchi, C; Yasuda, A

    2007-01-01

    AKARI, the first Japanese satellite dedicated to infrared astronomy, was launched on 2006 February 21, and started observations in May of the same year. AKARI has a 68.5 cm cooled telescope, together with two focal-plane instruments, which survey the sky in six wavelength bands from the mid- to far-infrared. The instruments also have the capability for imaging and spectroscopy in the wavelength range 2 - 180 micron in the pointed observation mode, occasionally inserted into the continuous survey operation. The in-orbit cryogen lifetime is expected to be one and a half years. The All-Sky Survey will cover more than 90 percent of the whole sky with higher spatial resolution and wider wavelength coverage than that of the previous IRAS all-sky survey. Point source catalogues of the All-Sky Survey will be released to the astronomical community. The pointed observations will be used for deep surveys of selected sky areas and systematic observations of important astronomical targets. These will become an additional ...

  15. Orbiter, Flyby and Lander Mission Concepts for Investigating Europa's Habitability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prockter, L. M.

    2012-04-01

    Coauthors: R. T. Pappalardo (1), F. Bagenal (2), A. C. Barr (3), B. G. Bills (1), D. L. Blaney (1), D. D. Blankenship (4), W. Brinckerhoff (5), J. E. P. Connerney (5), K. Hand (1), T. Hoehler (6), W. Kurth (7), M. McGrath (8), M. Mellon (9), J. M. Moore (6), D. A. Senske (1), E. Shock (10), D. E. Smith (11), T. Gavin (1), G. Garner (1), T. Magner (12), B. C. Cooke (1), R. Crum (1), V. Mallder (12), L. Adams (12), K. Klaasen (1), G. W. Patterson (12), and S. D. Vance (1); 1: Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, USA; 2: University of Colorado, Boulder, CO, USA; 3: Brown University, Providence, RI, USA; 4: University of Texas Institute for Geophysics, Austin, TX, USA; 5: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, USA; 6: NASA Ames Research Center, Mountain View, CA, USA; 7: University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA; 8: NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL, USA; 9: Southwest Research Institute, Boulder, CO, USA; 10: Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA; 11: Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA; 12: Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD, USA. Introduction: Assessment of Europa's habitability requires understanding whether the satellite possesses the three "ingredients" for life: water, chemistry, and energy. The National Research Council's Planetary Decadal Survey [1] placed an extremely high priority on Europa science but noted that the budget profile for the Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO) mission concept [2] is incompatible with NASA's projected planetary science budget. Thus, in April 2011, NASA enlisted a small Europa Science Definition Team (ESDT) to consider Europa mission options that might be more feasible over the next decade from a programmatic perspective. The ESDT has studied three Europa mission concepts: a Europa orbiter, a Europa multiple-flyby mission, and a Europa lander. These share an overarching goal: Explore Europa to investigate its habitability

  16. Survey Says

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Susan K.

    2005-01-01

    Survey Says is a lesson plan designed to teach college students how to access Internet resources for valid data related to the sexual health of young people. Discussion questions based on the most recent available data from two national surveys, the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance-United States, 2003 (CDC, 2004) and the National Survey of…

  17. Astrometric surveys: Solving the Milky Way puzzle with Gaia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown A.G.A.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In this contribution I provide a brief summary of ongoing and future astrometric surveys and then focus on presenting the current status and expected scientific performance of the Gaia mission, scheduled for launch in 2013.

  18. Mission Design of the Dutch-Chinese FAST Micro-Satellite Mission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maessen, D.C.; Guo, J.; Gill, E.; Laan, E.; Moon, S.; Zheng, G.T.

    2009-01-01

    The paper treats the mission design for the Dutch-Chinese FAST (Formation for Atmospheric Science and Technology demonstration) mission. The space segment of the 2.5 year mission consists out of two formation flying micro-satellites. During the mission, new technologies will be demonstrated and, usi

  19. Mission Design of the Dutch-Chinese FAST Micro-Satellite Mission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maessen, D.C.; Guo, J.; Gill, E.; Laan, E.; Moon, S.; Zheng, G.T.

    2009-01-01

    The paper treats the mission design for the Dutch-Chinese FAST (Formation for Atmospheric Science and Technology demonstration) mission. The space segment of the 2.5 year mission consists out of two formation flying micro-satellites. During the mission, new technologies will be demonstrated and, usi

  20. The Pan-STARRS Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Kenneth C.; Pan-STARRS Team

    2016-01-01

    The 4 year Pan-STARRS1 Science Mission has now completed and the final data processing and database ingest is underway. We expect to have the public release of the PS1 Survey data at approximately the time of the AAS Meeting. The full data set, including catalogs (150 Terabyte database), images (2 Petabytes), and metadata, will be available from the STScI MASTarchive. The Pan-STARRS1 Surveys include: (1) The 3pi Steradian Survey, (2) The Medium Deep survey of 10 PS1 footprints (7 sq deg each) spaced around the sky; (3) A solar system survey of the ecliptic optimized for the discovery of Near Earth Objects, (4) a Stellar Transit Survey in the galactic bulge; and (5) a time domain Survey of M31. The characteristics of the Pan-STARRS1 Surveys will be presented, including image quality, depth, cadence, and coverage. Science results span most fields of astronomy from Near Earth Objects to cosmology. The 2nd mission, the Pan-STARRS NEO Survey, is currently underway on PS1 and it will be supplemented by PS2 observations as PS2 becomes fully operational. We will also report on the status of PS2 and the prospects for future wide field surveys in the Northern Hemisphere. The Pan-STARRS1 Surveys have been made possible through contributions of the Institute for Astronomy of the University of Hawaii; the Pan-STARRS Project Office; the Max-Planck Society and its participating institutes: the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Heidelberg and the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Garching; The Johns Hopkins University; Durham University; the University of Edinburgh; Queen's University Belfast; the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network Incorporated; the National Central University of Taiwan; the Space Telescope Science Institute; the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under Grant No. NNX08AR22G issued through the Planetary Science Division of the NASA Science Mission Directorate; the National

  1. Project Prometheus and Future Entry Probe Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilker, Thomas R.

    2005-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on project Prometheus and future entry probe missions is shown. The topics include: 1) What Is Project Prometheus?; 2) What Capabilities Can Project Prometheus Offer? What Mission Types Are Being Considered?; 3) Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO); 4) How Are Mission Opportunities Changing?; 5) Missions Of Interest a Year Ago; 6) Missions Now Being Considered For Further Study; 7) Galileo-Style (Conventional) Probe Delivery; 8) Galileo-Style Probe Support; 9) Conventional Delivery and Support of Multiple Probes; 10) How Entry Probe Delivery From an NEP Vehicle Is Different; and 11) Concluding Remarks.

  2. NEOWISE Reactivation Mission Year Two: Asteroid Diameters and Albedos

    CERN Document Server

    Nugent, C R; Bauer, J; Cutri, R M; Kramer, E A; Grav, T; Masiero, J; Sonnett, S; Wright, E L

    2016-01-01

    The Near-Earth Object Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (NEOWISE) mission continues to detect, track, and characterize minor planets. We present diameters and albedos calculated from observations taken during the second year since the spacecraft was reactivated in late 2013. These include 207 near-Earth asteroids and 8,885 other asteroids. $84\\%$ of the near-Earth asteroids did not have previously measured diameters and albedos by the NEOWISE mission. Comparison of sizes and albedos calculated from NEOWISE measurements with those measured by occultations, spacecraft, and radar-derived shapes shows accuracy consistent with previous NEOWISE publications. Diameters and albedos fall within $ \\pm \\sim20\\%$ and $\\pm\\sim40\\%$, 1-sigma, respectively, of those measured by these alternate techniques. NEOWISE continues to preferentially discover near-Earth objects which are large ($>100$ m), and have low albedos.

  3. The Planning and Execution of NASA’s Strategic Science Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisk, Lennard A.

    2014-08-01

    Strategic science missions are NASA’s largest and most challenging satellite missions, with costs well in excess of $1 billion, e.g. Mars Science Laboratory and the James Webb Space Telescope. These missions must be endorsed, with high priority, by the Decadal Survey process of the National Research Council (NRC), and are the most difficult ones for the NRC to properly estimate the final cost. Strategic missions are requirement driven missions, in which the requirements, often very challenging, are fixed and the ultimate cost is adjusted to meet the fixed requirements. This should be contrasted with smaller cost-capped missions, where the cost is fixed and the requirements adjusted. Strategic missions, by definition, have the most technical and management challenges. Ironically, the most challenging technologies of strategic missions have usually been done very well, since they get the most management attention, whereas on-orbit problems are usually associated with the less challenging technologies, which get less management attention, e.g. the Hubble mirror.

  4. Étude de l’induction optique d’une émission laser DFB dans les scintillateurs organiques en vue d’une mesure active des rayonnements ionisants.

    OpenAIRE

    Michel, Maugan

    2014-01-01

    Transducers used for nuclear measurements are divided into two groups. The first one is made of detectors based on the movement of charged carriers created during the interaction of ionizing radiation with materials (ionization chambers, semiconductors, etc.). The second comprises scintillating materials which emit light following such interaction.The present work aims at shifting the current paradigm in order to achieve an active measurement of the interactions between particles and sensor. ...

  5. De la mesure des émissions des gaz à effet de serre à celle du service de régulation du climat, les traductions de l'indicateur carbone

    OpenAIRE

    Paillet, Y.; Bouleau, G.

    2016-01-01

    The direct or indirect quantification of services provided by ecosystems requires the production of indicators. We investigated the construction and the use of an indicator of climate change regulation service, the so-called “carbon indicator”, with a special focus on the data that were processed to calculate and inform it (notably for forest ecosystems) and on the mechanisms that allowed this indicator to be accepted both in ecosystem services science and policy. We based our app...

  6. Human Mars Missions: Cost Driven Architecture Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, Benjamin

    1998-01-01

    This report investigates various methods of reducing the cost in space transportation systems for human Mars missions. The reference mission for this task is a mission currently under study at NASA. called the Mars Design Reference Mission, characterized by In-Situ propellant production at Mars. This study mainly consists of comparative evaluations to the reference mission with a view to selecting strategies that would reduce the cost of the Mars program as a whole. One of the objectives is to understand the implications of certain Mars architectures, mission modes, vehicle configurations, and potentials for vehicle reusability. The evaluations start with year 2011-2014 conjunction missions which were characterized by their abort-to-the-surface mission abort philosophy. Variations within this mission architecture, as well as outside the set to other architectures (not predicated on an abort to surface philosophy) were evaluated. Specific emphasis has been placed on identifying and assessing overall mission risk. Impacts that Mars mission vehicles might place upon the Space Station, if it were to be used as an assembly or operations base, were also discussed. Because of the short duration of this study only on a few propulsion elements were addressed (nuclear thermal, cryogenic oxygen-hydrogen, cryogenic oxygen-methane, and aerocapture). Primary ground rules and assumptions were taken from NASA material used in Marshall Space Flight Center's own assessment done in 1997.

  7. Magnetic Satellite Missions and Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils; Kotsiaros, Stavros

    2011-01-01

    Although the first satellite observations of the Earth’s magnetic field were already taken more than 50 years ago, continuous geomagnetic measurements from space are only available since 1999. The unprecedented time-space coverage of this recent data set opened revolutionary new possibilities...... for exploring the Earth’s magnetic field from space. In this chapter we discuss characteristics of satellites measuring the geomagnetic field and report on past, present and upcoming magnetic satellite missions. We conclude with some basics about space magnetic gradiometry as a possible path for future...... exploration of Earth’s magnetic field with satellites....

  8. Kepler planet-detection mission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borucki...[], William J.; Koch, David; Buchhave, Lars C. Astrup

    2010-01-01

    The Kepler mission was designed to determine the frequency of Earth-sized planets in and near the habitable zone of Sun-like stars. The habitable zone is the region where planetary temperatures are suitable for water to exist on a planet’s surface. During the first 6 weeks of observations, Kepler...... is one of the lowest-density planets (~0.17 gram per cubic centimeter) yet detected. Kepler-5b, -6b, and -8b confirm the existence of planets with densities lower than those predicted for gas giant planets....

  9. Mesures experimentales de l'impact des revetements hydrophobeset superhydrophobes sur la trainee et la portance d'un profil aerodynamique propre et glace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villeneuve, Eric

    Ce projet, realise a la demande du Laboratoire International des Materiaux Antigivre, a pour but de mesurer et definir experimentalement l'impact de revetements hydrophobes sur les coefficients de trainee et de portance d'un profil NACA 0012. Pour ce faire, la balance aerodynamique du LIMA devait tout d'abord etre amelioree afin d'offrir une sensibilite suffisante pour realiser le projet. Plusieurs ameliorations ont ete faites, comme le changement des cellules de charge, la diminution du nombre de cellules de charge, le changement du cadre de la balance, etc. Une fois ces ameliorations terminees, la reproductibilite, l'exactitude et la sensibilite ont ete valides afin de s'assurer de la fiabilite des resultats offerts par la balance. Pour les angles d'attaque etudies avec les revetements, soient -6° et 0°, la balance a une reproductibilite de +/-2,06% a 360 000 de nombre de Reynolds. Pour valider la sensibilite, des essais a -6° et 0° d'angle d'attaque et des nombres de Reynolds de 360 000 et 500 000 ont ete faits avec des papiers sables. Les resultats de ces essais ont permis de, tracer des courbes de tendances du coefficient de trainee du NACA 0012 en fonction de la rugosite de surface et d'etablir la valeur de la sensibilite de la balance a +/-8 mu m. Cinq revetements populaires ont ete choisis pour l'experimentation, soient le Wearlon, le Staclean, le Hirec, le Phasebreak ainsi que le Nusil. Les revetements sont soumis aux memes conditions experimentales que les papiers sables, et une rugosite equivalente est trouvee par extrapolation des resultats. Cependant, les rugosites equivalentes de surfaces different entre -6° et 0°. Les essais avec le Staclean et le Hirec donnent des coefficients de trainee equivalent a ceux avec l'aluminium, alors que le Wearlon, le Nusil et le Phasebreak donnent une augmentation du coefficient de trainee de 13%, 17% et 25% respectivement par rapport a l'aluminium. Pour les coefficients de portance, la balance ne detecte pas l

  10. Crew Transportation System Design Reference Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mango, Edward J.

    2015-01-01

    Contains summaries of potential design reference mission goals for systems to transport humans to andfrom low Earth orbit (LEO) for the Commercial Crew Program. The purpose of this document is to describe Design Reference Missions (DRMs) representative of the end-to-end Crew Transportation System (CTS) framework envisioned to successfully execute commercial crew transportation to orbital destinations. The initial CTS architecture will likely be optimized to support NASA crew and NASA-sponsored crew rotation missions to the ISS, but consideration may be given in this design phase to allow for modifications in order to accomplish other commercial missions in the future. With the exception of NASA’s mission to the ISS, the remaining commercial DRMs are notional. Any decision to design or scar the CTS for these additional non-NASA missions is completely up to the Commercial Provider. As NASA’s mission needs evolve over time, this document will be periodically updated to reflect those needs.

  11. [Hospital: values expressed as a mission].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anunciação, Alan Lira da; Zoboli, Elma

    2008-01-01

    The hospital, as a unique type of social organization requires elevated values for management. This paper shows the result of a documented, qualitative, exploratory and descriptive survey about hospitals and their value statements. Identify values expected for hospitals by a search of literature; identify values expressed by hospitals on their web pages and compare results of both. Critical reading of theses, books and articles. A bibliographic search was carried out on BVS (Health Virtual Library) using keywords such as ethics and healthcare management. The values stated by hospitals on web pages were found in sections such as social responsibility, mission, view, principles, and our values. The categories care, healthcare management and accountability were defined after content analysis of empirical data. Values stated by hospitals on web pages express social expectations for an organization that deals with issues as elevated as health and life. Although hospitals have a bureaucratic and organizational structure that resembles those of business enterprises, they are different due to their 'duties to patients' rights and life. Healthcare managers, as well as health professionals, must imprint an ethical attitude on their job and daily work. Only such an attitude will permit patients to trust the hospital and its services.

  12. Conclusions from the image analysis of the VSOP Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Dodson, R.; Fomalont, E.; Wiik, K.

    2009-01-01

    In February 1997, the Japanese radio astronomy satellite HALCA was launched to provide the space-bourne element for the VLBI Space Observatory Programme (VSOP) mission. A significant fraction of the mission time was to be dedicated to the VSOP Survey of bright compact Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) at 5 GHz, which was lead by ISAS. The VSOP Survey Sources are an unbiased dataset of 294 targets, of which 82% were successfully observed. These are now undergoing statistical analysis to tease out t...

  13. Integrated payload and mission planning, phase 3. Volume 1: Integrated payload and mission planning process evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapp, T. P.; Davin, D. E.

    1977-01-01

    The integrated payload and mission planning process for STS payloads was defined, and discrete tasks which evaluate performance and support initial implementation of this process were conducted. The scope of activity was limited to NASA and NASA-related payload missions only. The integrated payload and mission planning process was defined in detail, including all related interfaces and scheduling requirements. Related to the payload mission planning process, a methodology for assessing early Spacelab mission manager assignment schedules was defined.

  14. Développement d'outils de mesure pour l'amélioration du procédé d'impression offset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boumaïza, K.; Baudin, G.; Catusse, R.; Viallet, A.

    1999-03-01

    The offset printing process rests primarily on the balance between ink and damping solution. However, this balance remains difficult to realize. The corresponding wastes of time and into consumable (ink, paper and damping solution) are harmful for the industrialist, the consumer and the environment. The main feature of this work is to control and thus to optimize these flux. With this intention, two optical sensors functioning in reflection were developed. A laser with receiving photodiode for the control of damping solution film thickness, and an optical fiber related to a photoelectric sensor for control of ink film thickness. The current study aims at the calibration of these two sensors for respectively the control of water and ink flux in the offset press. Le procédé d'impression offset repose essentiellement sur l'équilibre entre la solution de mouillage et l'encre. Toutefois, cet équilibre reste une tâche difficile à réaliser. Les pertes en temps et en consommables (encre, papier, solution de mouillage) correspondantes sont nuisibles à la fois pour l'industriel, le consommateur et l'environnement. L'objectif de ce travail est de contrôler et donc d'optimiser ces flux pour un tirage donné. Pour ce faire, deux capteurs de type optique fonctionnant en réflexion ont été développés. Un laser avec photodiode réceptrice pour le contrôle du film de solution de mouillage, et une fibre optique liée à un capteur photoélectrique pour le contrôle du film d'encre. L'étude actuelle vise la mise en ouvre et l'étalonnage de ces deux capteurs pour la mesure et le contrôle des films respectifs d'eau et d'encre dans la presse offset.

  15. The infrared astronomical satellite AKARI: overview, highlights of the mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Hiroshi; Matsuhara, Hideo

    2008-07-01

    The AKARI, Japanese infrared astronomical satellite, is a 68.5 cm cooled telescope with two focal-plane instruments providing continuous sky scan at six wavelength bands in mid- and far-infrared. The instruments also have capabilities of imaging and spectroscopy in the wavelength range 2-180 μm in the pointing observations occasionally inserted into the continuous survey. AKARI was launched on 21st Feb. 2006, and has performed the all-sky survey as well as 5380 pointing observations until the liquid helium exhaustion on 26th Aug. 2007. The all sky survey covers more than 90 percent of the entire sky with higher spatial resolutions and sensitivities than the IRAS. First version of the infrared source catalogue will be released in 2009. Here we report the overview of the mission, highlights on the scientific results as well as the performance of the focal-plane instruments. We also present the observation plan with the near infrared camera during the post-helium mission phase started in June 2008.

  16. Voyage to Troy: A mission concept for the exploration of the Trojan asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikia, S.; Das, A.; Laipert, F.; Dapkus, C.; Kendall, J.; Bowling, T.; Steckloff, J.; Holbert, S.; Graves, K.; Anthony, T.; Bobick, R.; Huang, Y.; Stuart, J.; Longuski, J.; Minton, D.

    2014-07-01

    The Trojan asteroids, located at Jupiter's L4 and L5 Lagrange points, are a potential source of insights into long-standing questions on the origin and early history of the Solar System. The 2013 Planetary Science Decadal Survey recommends a Trojan Tour and Rendezvous mission as high-priority among medium-class missions. A dedicated mission to the Trojan asteroids could confirm or refute multiple theories to correctly explain the Trojan asteroids' current location, characteristics, and behavior. In-depth and conclusive evidence for the Trojan asteroids' internal and external make-up as well as dynamical behavior hav been challenging due to limitations of ground- and space-based observations. Notwithstanding these limitations, it has been inferred that there are two distinct sub- populations that are distinguishable in visible and near-infrared spectra (redder and less red) within the swarms. These spectral groupings have not yet been conclusively linked to physical characteristics (e.g. size) or other observed parameters (e.g. albedo) of the primordial bodies. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory's concept studies for Decadal Survey evaluated three concepts for missions to Trojan asteroids: each utilizing chemical- solar-electric, and radioisotope-electric for propulsion. Both Solar and Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generators were considered for power [2]. We present a new conceptual mission to explore the Trojan asteroids that achieves the science goals prioritized in the 2013 Planetary Science Decadal Survey. The proposed mission aims to study both a redder and less red asteroid for the surface mineralogical and elemental composition, state of surface regolith, evidence and consequences of external modification processes such as collisional evolution, space weathering, and irradiation. Some potential targets in the L4 Greek camp currently under consideration for this mission include Achilles, Hektor and Agamemnon (redder) and Eurybates, Deipylos and Kalchas (less

  17. TEAM SELLING AND CUSTOMER SATISFACTION IN THE MISSION CRITICAL SECTOR: A CASE STUDY OF EYP MISSION CRITICAL FACILITIES INC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy J. CRADER

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the relationships between selling teams (STs and customer satisfaction within the mission critical power design industry. The literature indicates that STs, which are considered a state of the art sales model, deserved further research. The SERVQUAL survey was used to measure customer satisfaction with EYP Mission Critical’s most strategic customers. The difference in customer satisfaction for customers serviced by STs and traditional sales personnel were compared. The investigation found support indicating that a ST approach had a positive relationship to increased customer satisfaction levels. Based on the results of the study, it is recommended that sales leaders within the specialized service industry consider a ST approach when formulating future revenue growth and relationship strategy.

  18. Potential large missions enabled by NASA's space launch system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Hopkins, Randall C.; Schnell, Andrew; Smith, David A.; Jackman, Angela; Warfield, Keith R.

    2016-07-01

    Large space telescope missions have always been limited by their launch vehicle's mass and volume capacities. The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) was specifically designed to fit inside the Space Shuttle and the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is specifically designed to fit inside an Ariane 5. Astrophysicists desire even larger space telescopes. NASA's "Enduring Quests Daring Visions" report calls for an 8- to 16-m Large UV-Optical-IR (LUVOIR) Surveyor mission to enable ultra-high-contrast spectroscopy and coronagraphy. AURA's "From Cosmic Birth to Living Earth" report calls for a 12-m class High-Definition Space Telescope to pursue transformational scientific discoveries. NASA's "Planning for the 2020 Decadal Survey" calls for a Habitable Exoplanet Imaging (HabEx) and a LUVOIR as well as Far-IR and an X-Ray Surveyor missions. Packaging larger space telescopes into existing launch vehicles is a significant engineering complexity challenge that drives cost and risk. NASA's planned Space Launch System (SLS), with its 8 or 10-m diameter fairings and ability to deliver 35 to 45-mt of payload to Sun-Earth-Lagrange-2, mitigates this challenge by fundamentally changing the design paradigm for large space telescopes. This paper reviews the mass and volume capacities of the planned SLS, discusses potential implications of these capacities for designing large space telescope missions, and gives three specific mission concept implementation examples: a 4-m monolithic off-axis telescope, an 8-m monolithic on-axis telescope and a 12-m segmented on-axis telescope.

  19. The next Landsat satellite; the Landsat Data Continuity Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irons, James R.; Dwyer, John L.; Barsi, Julia A.

    2012-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Department of Interior United States Geological Survey (USGS) are developing the successor mission to Landsat 7 that is currently known as the Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM). NASA is responsible for building and launching the LDCM satellite observatory. USGS is building the ground system and will assume responsibility for satellite operations and for collecting, archiving, and distributing data following launch. The observatory will consist of a spacecraft in low-Earth orbit with a two-sensor payload. One sensor, the Operational Land Imager (OLI), will collect image data for nine shortwave spectral bands over a 185 km swath with a 30 m spatial resolution for all bands except a 15 m panchromatic band. The other instrument, the Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS), will collect image data for two thermal bands with a 100 m resolution over a 185 km swath. Both sensors offer technical advancements over earlier Landsat instruments. OLI and TIRS will coincidently collect data and the observatory will transmit the data to the ground system where it will be archived, processed to Level 1 data products containing well calibrated and co-registered OLI and TIRS data, and made available for free distribution to the general public. The LDCM development is on schedule for a December 2012 launch. The USGS intends to rename the satellite "Landsat 8" following launch. By either name a successful mission will fulfill a mandate for Landsat data continuity. The mission will extend the almost 40-year Landsat data archive with images sufficiently consistent with data from the earlier missions to allow long-term studies of regional and global land cover change.

  20. The Cassini-Huygens mission

    CERN Document Server

    The joint NASA-ESA Cassini-Huygens mission promises to return four (and possibly more) years of unparalleled scientific data from the solar system’s most exotic planet, the ringed, gas giant, Saturn. Larger than Galileo with a much greater communication bandwidth, Cassini can accomplish in a single flyby what Galileo returned in a series of passes. Cassini explores the Saturn environment in three dimensions, using gravity assists to climb out of the equatorial plane to look down on the rings from above, to image the aurora and to study polar magnetospheric processes such as field-aligned currents. Since the radiation belt particle fluxes are much more benign than those at Jupiter, Cassini can more safely explore the inner regions of the magnetosphere. The spacecraft approaches the planet closer than Galileo could, and explores the inner moons and the rings much more thoroughly than was possible at Jupiter. This book is the second volume, in a three volume set, that describes the Cassini/Huygens mission. Thi...

  1. Global Precipitation Mission Visualization Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwaller, Mathew

    2011-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Mission (GPM) software provides graphic visualization tools that enable easy comparison of ground- and space-based radar observations. It was initially designed to compare ground radar reflectivity from operational, ground-based, S- and C-band meteorological radars with comparable measurements from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite's precipitation radar instrument. This design is also applicable to other groundbased and space-based radars, and allows both ground- and space-based radar data to be compared for validation purposes. The tool creates an operational system that routinely performs several steps. It ingests satellite radar data (precipitation radar data from TRMM) and groundbased meteorological radar data from a number of sources. Principally, the ground radar data comes from national networks of weather radars (see figure). The data ingested by the visualization tool must conform to the data formats used in GPM Validation Network Geometry-matched data product generation. The software also performs match-ups of the radar volume data for the ground- and space-based data, as well as statistical and graphical analysis (including two-dimensional graphical displays) on the match-up data. The visualization tool software is written in IDL, and can be operated either in the IDL development environment or as a stand-alone executable function.

  2. Ravens satellite mission concept study

    CERN Document Server

    Donovan, Eric F

    2011-01-01

    The concept for Ravens satellite mission was proposed in response to a CSA AO for potential Canadian mission contributions to the International Living With a Star (ILWS) program. Ravens was conceived of to fill an important gap in the ILWS program: global imaging. Ravens will build on the heritage of world-class global imaging carried out in Canada. It would do much more than provide global observations to complete the system level capabilities of ILWS. Ravens would be comprised of two satellites on elliptical polar orbits, relatively phased on those orbits to provide the first-ever continuous (ie., 24 hours per day 7 days per week) global imaging of the northern hemisphere auroral and polar cap regions. This would provide the first-ever unbroken sequences of global images of the auroral response during long duration geomagnetic processes like storms and steady magnetospheric convection events. Ravens could track the spatio-temporal evolution of the global electron and proton auroral distribution, and would o...

  3. The NeXT Mission

    CERN Document Server

    Takahashi, T; Mitsuda, K; Kunieda, H; Petre, R; White, N; Dotani, T; Fujimoto, R; Fukazawa, Y; Hayashida, K; Ishida, M; Ishisaki, Y; Kokubun, M; Makishima, K; Koyama, K; Madejski, G M; Mori, K; Mushotzky, R; Nakazawa, K; Ogasaka, Y; Ohashi, T; Ozaki, M; Tajima, H; Tashiro, M; Terada, Y; Tsunemi, H; Tsuru, T G; Ueda, Y; Yamasaki, N; Watanabe, S

    2008-01-01

    The NeXT (New exploration X-ray Telescope), the new Japanese X-ray Astronomy Satellite following Suzaku, is an international X-ray mission which is currently planed for launch in 2013. NeXT is a combination of wide band X-ray spectroscopy (3 - 80 keV) provided by multi-layer coating, focusing hard X-ray mirrors and hard X-ray imaging detectors, and high energy-resolution soft X-ray spectroscopy (0.3 - 10 keV) provided by thin-foil X-ray optics and a micro-calorimeter array. The mission will also carry an X-ray CCD camera as a focal plane detector for a soft X-ray telescope and a non-focusing soft gamma-ray detector. With these instruments, NeXT covers very wide energy range from 0.3 keV to 600 keV. The micro-calorimeter system will be developed by international collaboration lead by ISAS/JAXA and NASA. The simultaneous broad bandpass, coupled with high spectral resolution of Delta E ~ 7 eV by the micro-calorimeter will enable a wide variety of important science themes to be pursued.

  4. DUAL Gamma-Ray Mission

    CERN Document Server

    Boggs, S; von Ballmoos, P; Takahashi, T; Gehrels, N; Tueller, J; Baring, M; Beacom, J; Diehl, R; Greiner, J; Grove, E; Hartmann, D; Hernanz, M; Jean, P; Johnson, N; Kanbach, G; Kippen, M; Knödlseder, J; Leising, M; Madejski, G; McConnell, M; Milne, P; Motohide, K; Nakazawa, K; Oberlack, U; Phlips, B; Ryan, J; Skinner, G; Starrfield, S; Tajima, H; Wulf, E; Zoglauer, A; Zych, A

    2010-01-01

    Gamma-ray astronomy presents an extraordinary scientific potential for the study of the most powerful sources and the most violent events in the Universe. In order to take full advantage of this potential, the next generation of instrumentation for this domain will have to achieve an improvement in sensitivity over present technologies of at least an order of magnitude. The DUAL mission concept takes up this challenge in two complementary ways: a very long observation of the entire sky, combined with a large collection area for simultaneous observations of Type Ia SNe. While the Wide-Field Compton Telescope (WCT) accumulates data from the full gamma-ray sky (0.1-10 MeV) over the entire mission lifetime, the Laue-Lens Telescope (LLT) focuses on 56Co emission from SNe Ia (0.8-0.9 MeV), collecting gamma-rays from its large area crystal lens onto the WCT. Two separated spacecraft flying in formation will maintain the DUAL payloads at the lens' focal distance.

  5. Mission and ethics in Galatians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobus Kok

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article, it is investigated how the concepts identity, ethics and ethos interrelate, and how the ethics of the Pauline communities in Galatians functioned against the background of the missionary context of the early church. The author argued that the missionary dimension originated in the context of the missio Dei, and that God called Paul as a missionary to be taken up in the latter. The missionary process did not end with Paul, but was designed to be carried further by believers who should be, by their very nature, missionary. In the process, the author investigated how the transformation of identity (the understanding of self, God and others leads to the creation of ethical values and how it is particularised in different socioreligious and cultural contexts in the development of the early church. The author argued that there is an implicit missionary dimension in the ethics of Paul in Galatians. In the process, it is argued that those who want to speak of ethics should make something of mission, and those who speak of mission in Galatians, should speak about the role of identity, ethics and ethos in the letter.

  6. The Sentinel-2 Mission Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gascon, Ferran

    2012-04-01

    In the framework of the Global Monitoring for Environment and Security (GMES) programme, the European Space Agency (ESA) in partnership with the European Commission (EC) is developing the Sentinel-2 optical imaging mission devoted to the operational monitoring of land and coastal areas. This system will deliver a new generation of optical data products designed to directly feed downstream services acting in several domains such as land management, agricultural industry, forestry, food security, or disaster control management following floods, volcanic eruptions, landslides, etc. The Sentinel-2 mission designed to generate products with accurate radiometric and geometric performances (including multi-temporal imagery co-registration). To maximize the products suitability and readiness to downstream usage for the majority of applications, the Sentinel-2 PDGS will systematically generate and archive Level-1C products, which will provide Top of Atmosphere (TOA) reflectance images, orthorectified using a global DEM and UTM projection. A Level-1B product will also be available for expert users and will provide the radiometrically corrected pixels in sensor geometry with the geometric model appended. Finally, a complementary atmospheric correction and enhanced cloud screening algorithm is being prototyped in parallel with the goal of providing some initial capabilities to the users, by means of a specific software toolbox operated on their platforms, to translate the Level-1C TOA reflectance image into Bottom of Atmosphere (BOA) reflectance.

  7. Science and Measurement Requirements for a Plant Physiology and Functional Types Mission: Measuring the Composition, Function and Health of Global Land and Coastal Ocean Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Robert O.; Rogez, Francois; Green, Rob; Ungar, Steve; Knox, Robert; Asner, Greg; Muller-Karger, Frank; Bissett, Paul; Chekalyuk, Alex; Dierssen, Heidi; Gamon, John; Hook, Simon; Meister, Gerhard; Middleton, Betsy; Ollinger, Scott; Roberts, Dar; Siegel, Dave; Townsend, Phil; Saatchi, Sassan; Unstin, Susan; Turner, Woody; Wickland, Diane; Bontempi, Paula; Emanuel, Bill

    2007-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the proposed Plant Physiology and Functional Types (PPFT) Mission. The National Academy of Sciences Decadal Survey, placed a critical priority on a Mission to observe distribution and changes in ecosystem functions. The PPFT satellite mission provides the essential measurements needed to assess drivers of change in biodiversity and ecosystem services that affect human welfare. The presentation reviews the science questions that the mission will be designed to answer, the science rationale, the science measurements, the mission concept, the planned instrumentation, the calibration method, and key signal to noise ratios and uniformity requirements.

  8. CMBPol Mission Concept Study: A Mission to Map our Origins

    CERN Document Server

    Baumann, Daniel; Dodelson, Scott; Dunkley, Joanna; Fraisse, Aurélien A; Jackson, Mark G; Kogut, Al; Krauss, Lawrence M; Smith, Kendrick M; Zaldarriaga, Matias

    2008-01-01

    Quantum mechanical metric fluctuations during an early inflationary phase of the universe leave a characteristic imprint in the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). The amplitude of this signal depends on the energy scale at which inflation occurred. Detailed observations by a dedicated satellite mission (CMBPol) therefore provide information about energy scales as high as $10^{15}$ GeV, twelve orders of magnitude greater than the highest energies accessible to particle accelerators, and probe the earliest moments in the history of the universe. This summary provides an overview of a set of studies exploring the scientific payoff of CMBPol in diverse areas of modern cosmology, such as the physics of inflation, gravitational lensing and cosmic reionization, as well as foreground science and removal .

  9. Mission objectives and scientific rationale for the magnetometer mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langel, R. A.

    1991-12-01

    Based on a review of the characteristics of the geomagnetic field, objectives for the magnetic portion of the ARISTOTELES mission are: (1) To derive a description of the main magnetic field and its secular variation. (2) To investigate the correlation between the geomagnetic field and variations in the length of day. (3) To study properties of the fluid core. (4) To study the conductivity of the mantle. (5) To model the state and evolution of the crust and upper lithosphere. (6) To measure and characterize field aligned currents and ionospheric currents and to understand their generation mechanisms and their role in energy coupling in the interplanetary-magnetospheric-ionospheric systems. Procedures for these investigations are outlined.

  10. Calcul numérique accéléré de mesures de performance sur les modèles Markoviens appliqués aux systèmes informatiques et de télécommunications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaddar, A.; Sinno, N.

    2005-05-01

    La complexité du phénomène de files d'attente dans les systèmes informatiques et télécommunications nécessite leur simulation par des modèles Markoviens pour les mesures de performance, mesure des délais d'attente au niveau des routeurs pour le modèle informatique et l'étude de la gestion des appels téléphoniques pour le modèle des circuits téléphoniques. L'optimisation des méthodes numériques de résolution des équations relatives à ces deux modèles va permettre d' ídentifier les critères de convergence rapide vers les états stationnaires correspondant à ces mesures.

  11. An Improved Airborne Wind Measurement Technique for the NAE (National Aeronautical Establishment) Twin Otter (Nouvelle Methode De Mesure Du Vent En Vol a Bord Du Twin Otter De L’ena)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-11-01

    filtre de Kalman , laquelle rdsout ce probl~me et permet de mesurer le vent avec une exactitude sup6rieure A celle des anciennes m6thodes. D’apr6s les...premiers r6sultats bases sur ’application d’un filtre de Kalman aux donn6es des essaip en vol du Twin Otter, il semble qu’il soit possible d’obtenir...actually degrading wind computation accuracy compared with older techniques. A new wind measurement technique, based on a Kalman filter integrated

  12. Comet nucleus and asteroid sample return missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    Three Advanced Design Projects have been completed this academic year at Penn State. At the beginning of the fall semester the students were organized into eight groups and given their choice of either a comet nucleus or an asteroid sample return mission. Once a mission had been chosen, the students developed conceptual designs. These were evaluated at the end of the fall semester and combined into three separate mission plans, including a comet nucleus same return (CNSR), a single asteroid sample return (SASR), and a multiple asteroid sample return (MASR). To facilitate the work required for each mission, the class was reorganized in the spring semester by combining groups to form three mission teams. An integration team consisting of two members from each group was formed for each mission so that communication and information exchange would be easier among the groups. The types of projects designed by the students evolved from numerous discussions with Penn State faculty and mission planners at the Johnson Space Center Human/Robotic Spacecraft Office. Robotic sample return missions are widely considered valuable precursors to manned missions in that they can provide details about a site's environment and scientific value. For example, a sample return from an asteroid might reveal valuable resources that, once mined, could be utilized for propulsion. These missions are also more adaptable when considering the risk to humans visiting unknown and potentially dangerous locations, such as a comet nucleus.

  13. Chandrayaan-1: India's first planetary science mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath Goswami, Jitendra

    A new initiative of the Indian Space Research Organization to have dedicated Space Science Missions led to two major missions that are currently in progress: Astrosat and Chandrayaan-1, the latter being the first planetary science mission of the country. The spadework for this mission started about ten years back and culminated in late 2003 with the official endorsement for the mission. This remote sensing mission, to be launched in early next year, is expected to further our understanding of the origin and evolution of the Moon based on a chemical, mineralogical and topographic study of the lunar surface at spatial and spectral resolutions much better than those for previous and other currently planned lunar missions. The Chandrayaan-1 mission is also international in character and will have an array of Indian instruments as well as several instruments from abroad some of which will have very strong Indian collaboration. This talk will provide a brief overview of our present understanding of the Moon, the science objectives of the Chandrayaan-1 mission and how we hope to achieve these from the data to be obtained by the various instruments on board the mission. A possible road map for Indian planetary exploration programme in the context of the International scenario will be presented at the end.

  14. Space Launch System Mission Flexibility Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monk, Timothy; Holladay, Jon; Sanders, Terry; Hampton, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    The Space Launch System (SLS) is envisioned as a heavy lift vehicle that will provide the foundation for future beyond low Earth orbit (LEO) missions. While multiple assessments have been performed to determine the optimal configuration for the SLS, this effort was undertaken to evaluate the flexibility of various concepts for the range of missions that may be required of this system. These mission scenarios include single launch crew and/or cargo delivery to LEO, single launch cargo delivery missions to LEO in support of multi-launch mission campaigns, and single launch beyond LEO missions. Specifically, we assessed options for the single launch beyond LEO mission scenario using a variety of in-space stages and vehicle staging criteria. This was performed to determine the most flexible (and perhaps optimal) method of designing this particular type of mission. A specific mission opportunity to the Jovian system was further assessed to determine potential solutions that may meet currently envisioned mission objectives. This application sought to significantly reduce mission cost by allowing for a direct, faster transfer from Earth to Jupiter and to determine the order-of-magnitude mass margin that would be made available from utilization of the SLS. In general, smaller, existing stages provided comparable performance to larger, new stage developments when the mission scenario allowed for optimal LEO dropoff orbits (e.g. highly elliptical staging orbits). Initial results using this method with early SLS configurations and existing Upper Stages showed the potential of capturing Lunar flyby missions as well as providing significant mass delivery to a Jupiter transfer orbit.

  15. NEOWISE REACTIVATION MISSION YEAR ONE: PRELIMINARY ASTEROID DIAMETERS AND ALBEDOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nugent, C. R.; Cutri, R. M. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Mainzer, A.; Masiero, J.; Bauer, J.; Kramer, E.; Sonnett, S.; Stevenson, R. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Grav, T. [Planetary Science Institute, Tucson, AZ (United States); Wright, E. L., E-mail: cnugent@ipac.caltech.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2015-12-01

    We present preliminary diameters and albedos for 7956 asteroids detected in the first year of the NEOWISE Reactivation mission. Of those, 201 are near-Earth asteroids and 7755 are Main Belt or Mars-crossing asteroids. 17% of these objects have not been previously characterized using the Near-Earth Object Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, or “NEOWISE” thermal measurements. Diameters are determined to an accuracy of ∼20% or better. If good-quality H magnitudes are available, albedos can be determined to within ∼40% or better.

  16. Printable Spacecraft: Flexible Electronic Platforms for NASA Missions. Phase One

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Kendra (Principal Investigator); Van Buren, David (Principal Investigator)

    2012-01-01

    Phase One objectives. Then an overview of the general field of printed electronics is provided, including manufacturing approaches, commercial drivers, and the current state of integrated systems. The bulk of the report contains the results and findings of Phase One organized into four sections: a survey of components required for a printable spacecraft, technology roadmaps considerations, science mission and engineering applications, and potential risks and challenges of the technology.

  17. The infrared astronomical mission AKARI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Murakami, Hiroshi; Baba, Hajime; Barthel, Peter; Clements, David L.; Cohen, Martin; Doi, Yasuo; Enya, Keigo; Figueredo, Elysandra; Fujishiro, Naofumi; Fujiwara, Hideaki; Fujiwara, Mikio; Garcia-Lario, Pedro; Goto, Tomotsugu; Hasegawa, Sunao; Hibi, Yasunori; Hirao, Takanori; Hiromoto, Norihisa; Hong, Seung Soo; Imai, Koji; Ishigaki, Miho; Ishiguro, Masateru; Ishihara, Daisuke; Ita, Yoshifusa; Jeong, Woong-Seob; Jeong, Kyung Sook; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Kataza, Hirokazu; Kawada, Mitsunobu; Kawai, Toshihide; Kawamura, Akiko; Kessler, Martin F.; Kester, Do; Kii, Tsuneo; Kim, Dong Chan; Kim, Wjung; Kobayashi, Hisato; Koo, Bon Chul; Kwon, Suk Minn; Lee, Hyung Mok; Lorente, Rosario; Makiuti, Sin'itirou; Matsuhara, Hideo; Matsumoto, Toshio; Matsuo, Hiroshi; Matsuura, Shuji; Mueller, Thomas G.; Murakami, Noriko; Nagata, Hirohisa; Nakagawa, Takao; Naoi, Takahiro; Narita, Masanao; Noda, Manabu; Oh, Sang Hoon; Ohnishi, Akira; Ohyama, Youichi; Okada, Yoko; Okuda, Haruyuki; Oliver, Sebastian; Onaka, Takashi; Ootsubo, Takafumi; Oyabu, Shinki; Pak, Sojong; Park, Yong-Sun; Pearson, Chris P.; Rowan-Robinson, Michael; Saito, Toshinobu; Sakon, Itsuki; Salama, Alberto; Sato, Shinji; Savage, Richard S.; Serjeant, Stephen; Shibai, Hiroshi; Shirahata, Mai; Sohn, Jungjoo; Suzuki, Toyoaki; Takagi, Toshinobu; Takahashi, Hidenori; Tanabe, Toshihiko; Takeuchi, Tsutomu T.; Takita, Satoshi; Thomson, Matthew; Uemizu, Kazunori; Ueno, Munetaka; Usui, Fumihiko; Verdugo, Eva; Wada, Takehiko; Wang, Lingyu; Watabe, Toyoki; Watarai, Hidenori; White, Glenn J.; Yamamura, Issei; Yamauchi, Chisato; Yasuda, Akiko

    2007-01-01

    AKARI, the first Japanese satellite dedicated to infrared astronomy, was launched on 2006 February 21, and started observations in May of the same year. AKARI has a 68.5 cm cooled telescope, together with two focal-plane instruments, which survey the sky in six wavelength bands from mid- to far-infr

  18. The infrared astronomical mission AKARI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Murakami, Hiroshi; Baba, Hajime; Barthel, Peter; Clements, David L.; Cohen, Martin; Doi, Yasuo; Enya, Keigo; Figueredo, Elysandra; Fujishiro, Naofumi; Fujiwara, Hideaki; Fujiwara, Mikio; Garcia-Lario, Pedro; Goto, Tomotsugu; Hasegawa, Sunao; Hibi, Yasunori; Hirao, Takanori; Hiromoto, Norihisa; Hong, Seung Soo; Imai, Koji; Ishigaki, Miho; Ishiguro, Masateru; Ishihara, Daisuke; Ita, Yoshifusa; Jeong, Woong-Seob; Jeong, Kyung Sook; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Kataza, Hirokazu; Kawada, Mitsunobu; Kawai, Toshihide; Kawamura, Akiko; Kessler, Martin F.; Kester, Do; Kii, Tsuneo; Kim, Dong Chan; Kim, Wjung; Kobayashi, Hisato; Koo, Bon Chul; Kwon, Suk Minn; Lee, Hyung Mok; Lorente, Rosario; Makiuti, Sin'itirou; Matsuhara, Hideo; Matsumoto, Toshio; Matsuo, Hiroshi; Matsuura, Shuji; Mueller, Thomas G.; Murakami, Noriko; Nagata, Hirohisa; Nakagawa, Takao; Naoi, Takahiro; Narita, Masanao; Noda, Manabu; Oh, Sang Hoon; Ohnishi, Akira; Ohyama, Youichi; Okada, Yoko; Okuda, Haruyuki; Oliver, Sebastian; Onaka, Takashi; Ootsubo, Takafumi; Oyabu, Shinki; Pak, Sojong; Park, Yong-Sun; Pearson, Chris P.; Rowan-Robinson, Michael; Saito, Toshinobu; Sakon, Itsuki; Salama, Alberto; Sato, Shinji; Savage, Richard S.; Serjeant, Stephen; Shibai, Hiroshi; Shirahata, Mai; Sohn, Jungjoo; Suzuki, Toyoaki; Takagi, Toshinobu; Takahashi, Hidenori; Tanabe, Toshihiko; Takeuchi, Tsutomu T.; Takita, Satoshi; Thomson, Matthew; Uemizu, Kazunori; Ueno, Munetaka; Usui, Fumihiko; Verdugo, Eva; Wada, Takehiko; Wang, Lingyu; Watabe, Toyoki; Watarai, Hidenori; White, Glenn J.; Yamamura, Issei; Yamauchi, Chisato; Yasuda, Akiko

    2007-01-01

    AKARI, the first Japanese satellite dedicated to infrared astronomy, was launched on 2006 February 21, and started observations in May of the same year. AKARI has a 68.5 cm cooled telescope, together with two focal-plane instruments, which survey the sky in six wavelength bands from mid- to

  19. Assessing planetary protection and contamination control technologies for planetary science missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauchamp, Patricia; Belz, Andrea

    Planetary protection and organic contamination control, like many technologically rich areas, continually progress. As a result of the 2011 Planetary Science Decadal Survey Report, Vision and Voyages for Planetary Science in the Decade 2013-2022, the future focus is now on proposed Mars sample return missions. In addition to Mars exploration we now have the exciting possibility of a potential mission to the outer planets, most likely Europa. This paper reassesses planetary protection and organic contamination control technologies, which were evaluated in 2005, and provides updates based on new science results, technology development, and programmatic priorities. The study integrates information gathered from interviews of a number of National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and European Space Agency (ESA) scientists, systems engineers, planetary protection engineers, and consultants, as well as relevant documents, and focuses on the technologies and practices relevant to the current project mission set as presented in the 2011 Planetary Science Decadal Survey. This paper provides the status of planetary protection and contamination control technologies as they apply to potential future missions, and provides findings and recommendations to improve our capabilities as we further explore our solar system. It has become clear that linking planetary protection and contamination control requirements and processes together early in mission development and spacecraft design is key to keeping mission costs in check and returning high-quality samples that are free from biological and organic contaminants.

  20. Bone Metabolism on ISS Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S. M.; Heer, M. A.; Shackelford, L. C.; Zwart, S. R.

    2014-01-01

    Spaceflight-induced bone loss is associated with increased bone resorption (1, 2), and either unchanged or decreased rates of bone formation. Resistive exercise had been proposed as a countermeasure, and data from bed rest supported this concept (3). An interim resistive exercise device (iRED) was flown for early ISS crews. Unfortunately, the iRED provided no greater bone protection than on missions where only aerobic and muscular endurance exercises were available (4, 5). In 2008, the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED), a more robust device with much greater resistance capability, (6, 7) was launched to the ISS. Astronauts who had access to ARED, coupled with adequate energy intake and vitamin D status, returned from ISS missions with bone mineral densities virtually unchanged from preflight (7). Bone biochemical markers showed that while the resistive exercise and adequate energy consumption did not mitigate the increased bone resorption, bone formation was increased (7, 8). The typical drop in circulating parathyroid hormone did not occur in ARED crewmembers. In 2014, an updated look at the densitometry data was published. This study confirmed the initial findings with a much larger set of data. In 42 astronauts (33 male, 9 female), the bone mineral density response to flight was the same for men and women (9), and those with access to the ARED did not have the typical decrease in bone mineral density that was observed in early ISS crewmembers with access to the iRED (Figure 1) (7). Biochemical markers of bone formation and resorption responded similarly in men and women. These data are encouraging, and represent the first in-flight evidence in the history of human space flight that diet and exercise can maintain bone mineral density on long-duration missions. However, the maintenance of bone mineral density through bone remodeling, that is, increases in both resorption and formation, may yield a bone with strength characteristics different from those

  1. Space Mission : Y3K

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    ESA and the APME are hosting a contest for 10 - 15 year olds in nine European countries (Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom). The contest is based on an interactive CD ROM, called Space Mission: Y3K, which explores space technology and shows some concrete uses of that technology in enhancing the quality of life on Earth. The CD ROM invites kids to join animated character Space Ranger Pete on an action-packed, colourful journey through space. Space Ranger Pete begins on Earth: the user navigates around a 'locker room' to learn about synthetic materials used in rocket boosters, heat shields, space suits and helmets, and how these materials have now become indispensable to everyday life. From Earth he flies into space and the user follows him from the control room in the spacecraft to a planet, satellites and finally to the International Space Station. Along the way, the user jots down clues that he or she discovers in this exploration, designing an imaginary space community and putting together a submission for the contest. The lucky winners will spend a weekend training as "junior astronauts" at the European Space Centre in Belgium (20-22 April 2001). They will be put through their astronaut paces, learning the art of space walking, running their own space mission, piloting a space capsule and re-entering the Earth's atmosphere. The competition features in various youth media channels across Europe. In the UK, popular BBC Saturday morning TV show, Live & Kicking, will be launching the competition and will invite viewers to submit their space community designs to win a weekend at ESC. In Germany, high circulation children's magazine Geolino will feature the competition in the January issue and on their internet site. And youth magazine ZoZitDat will feature the competition in the Netherlands throughout February. Space Mission: Y3K is part of an on-going partnership between the ESA's Technology Transfer

  2. TerraSAR-X mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werninghaus, Rolf

    2004-01-01

    The TerraSAR-X is a German national SAR- satellite system for scientific and commercial applications. It is the continuation of the scientifically and technologically successful radar missions X-SAR (1994) and SRTM (2000) and will bring the national technology developments DESA and TOPAS into operational use. The space segment of TerraSAR-X is an advanced high-resolution X-Band radar satellite. The system design is based on a sound market analysis performed by Infoterra. The TerraSAR-X features an advanced high-resolution X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar based on the active phased array technology which allows the operation in Spotlight-, Stripmap- and ScanSAR Mode with various polarizations. It combines the ability to acquire high resolution images for detailed analysis as well as wide swath images for overview applications. In addition, experimental modes like the Dual Receive Antenna Mode allow for full-polarimetric imaging as well as along track interferometry, i.e. moving target identification. The Ground Segment is optimized for flexible response to (scientific and commercial) User requests and fast image product turn-around times. The TerraSAR-X mission will serve two main goals. The first goal is to provide the strongly supportive scientific community with multi-mode X-Band SAR data. The broad spectrum of scientific application areas include Hydrology, Geology, Climatology, Oceanography, Environmental Monitoring and Disaster Monitoring as well as Cartography (DEM Generation) and Interferometry. The second goal is the establishment of a commercial EO-market in Europe which is driven by Infoterra. The commercial goal is the development of a sustainable EO-business so that the e.g. follow-on systems can be completely financed by industry from the profit. Due to its commercial potential, the TerraSAR-X project will be implemented based on a public-private partnership with the Astrium GmbH. This paper will describe first the mission objectives as well as the

  3. I satelliti della missione EROS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano De Corso

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available EROS mission satellitesThe EROS (Earth Remote Observation Satellite constellation is property of ImageSat International N.V. an international company and a commercial provider of high-resolution, satellite earth-imagery collected by its Earth Remote Observation Satellite. EROS A is equipped with a camera whose focal plane of CCD (Charge Coupled Device detectors produces a standard image resolution of 1.9 meters. EROS B slightly larger and similar in appearance to EROS A, the new satellite has superior capabilities, including a larger camera of CCD/ TDI type (Charge Coupled Device/Time Delay Integration, with standard panchromatic resolution of 0.70 m at an altitude of about 500 km, a larger on-board recorder, improved pointing accuracy and a faster data communication link.

  4. Cassini Mission Sequence Subsystem (MSS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alland, Robert

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes my work with the Cassini Mission Sequence Subsystem (MSS) team during the summer of 2011. It gives some background on the motivation for this project and describes the expected benefit to the Cassini program. It then introduces the two tasks that I worked on - an automatic system auditing tool and a series of corrections to the Cassini Sequence Generator (SEQ_GEN) - and the specific objectives these tasks were to accomplish. Next, it details the approach I took to meet these objectives and the results of this approach, followed by a discussion of how the outcome of the project compares with my initial expectations. The paper concludes with a summary of my experience working on this project, lists what the next steps are, and acknowledges the help of my Cassini colleagues.

  5. The SSETI-express Mission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alminde, Lars; Bisgaard, Morten; Melville, N.

    provides a description of the organisation behind the project and the mission of the satellite. Further it provides a technical overview of both the space segment and the ground segment together with key lessons learnt from the process of building a student satellite with widely distributed teams.......In January 2004 a group of students met at the European Space Technology and Research Centre (ESTEC) in Holland to discuss the feasibility of building a micro-satellite, dubbed SSETI-Express, from parts derived from other student satellite projects and launch it within one and a half year....... The project is an initiative under the ESA Education Department and the Student Space Exploration and Technology Initiative (SSETI)[3], an European student organisation. The satellite is currently scheduled for launch on the 30th of June 2005 atop a "Cosmos" launch vehicle from Plesetsk in Russia. This paper...

  6. Solar sail Engineering Development Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, H. W.

    1981-01-01

    Since photons have momentum, a useful force can be obtained by reflecting sunlight off of a large, low mass surface (most likely a very thin metal-coated plastic film) and robbing the light of some of its momentum. A solar sail Engineering Development Mission (EDM) is currently being planned by the World Space Foundation for the purpose of demonstrating and evaluating solar sailing technology and to gain experience in the design and operation of a spacecraft propelled by sunlight. The present plan is for the EDM spacecraft to be launched (sail stowed) in a spin-stabilized configuration into an initial elliptical orbit with an apogee of 36,000 km and a perigee of a few hundred kilometers. The spacecraft will then use its own chemical propulsion system to raise the perigee to at least 1,200 km. The deployed sail will have an area of 880 sq m and generate a solar force of about 0.007 N.

  7. Job Orders (Ordres de mission)

    CERN Multimedia

    FI Department

    2005-01-01

    Please note that individual job orders and continuous job orders (valid for one calendar year, i.e. from 1st January to 31st December) must henceforth be completed via EDH and approved by the Department Leader concerned (or the person appointed by him via EDHAdmin). Once approved, the form must be printed and kept for the duration of the mission by the driver to whom the job order is issued. You will find the icon for this document on the EDH Desktop, as well as on-line help on how to use it. In emergencies, paper copies of individual job orders (SCEM 54.50.20.168.5) may be issued outside normal working hours by the Fire Brigade (Meyrin Site, Building 65). Organisation & Procedures, FI Department, Tel. 73905 Relations with the Host States Service, Tel. 72848

  8. Aquarius/SAC-D mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Amit; Caruso, Daniel; Lagerloef, Gary; Torrusio, Sandra; Durham, David; Falcon, Carlos

    2008-10-01

    Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) is a key parameter in the global water cycle but it is not yet monitored from space. Conventional in situ SSS sampling is too sparse to give the global view of salinity variability that a remote sensing satellite can provide. The Aquarius/SAC-D Mission will make pioneering space-based measurements of global SSS with the precision, resolution, and coverage needed to characterize salinity variations (spatial and temporal), investigate the linkage between ocean circulation, the Earth's water cycle, and climate variability. It is being jointly developed by NASA and the Space Agency of Argentina, the Comision Nacional de Actividades Espaciales (CONAE). The Project is currently in implementation phase with the flight Aquarius Instrument undergoing environmental testing at NASA-JPL/Caltech in California, USA and the SAC-D instruments and spacecraft development undergoing at CONAE/INVAP facilities in Argentina. Aquarius/SAC-D launch is scheduled for May 2010.

  9. The Global Precipitation Measurement Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Gail

    2014-05-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission's Core satellite, scheduled for launch at the end of February 2014, is well designed estimate precipitation from 0.2 to 110 mm/hr and to detect falling snow. Knowing where and how much rain and snow falls globally is vital to understanding how weather and climate impact both our environment and Earth's water and energy cycles, including effects on agriculture, fresh water availability, and responses to natural disasters. The design of the GPM Core Observatory is an advancement of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM)'s highly successful rain-sensing package [3]. The cornerstone of the GPM mission is the deployment of a Core Observatory in a unique 65o non-Sun-synchronous orbit to serve as a physics observatory and a calibration reference to improve precipitation measurements by a constellation of 8 or more dedicated and operational, U.S. and international passive microwave sensors. The Core Observatory will carry a Ku/Ka-band Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) and a multi-channel (10-183 GHz) GPM Microwave Radiometer (GMI). The DPR will provide measurements of 3-D precipitation structures and microphysical properties, which are key to achieving a better understanding of precipitation processes and improving retrieval algorithms for passive microwave radiometers. The combined use of DPR and GMI measurements will place greater constraints on possible solutions to radiometer retrievals to improve the accuracy and consistency of precipitation retrievals from all constellation radiometers. Furthermore, since light rain and falling snow account for a significant fraction of precipitation occurrence in middle and high latitudes, the GPM instruments extend the capabilities of the TRMM sensors to detect falling snow, measure light rain, and provide, for the first time, quantitative estimates of microphysical properties of precipitation particles. The GPM Core Observatory was developed and tested at NASA

  10. The first Spacelab mission. [payload management functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, R. E., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The purpose of Spacelab, an Orbiter-mounted NASA/ESA laboratory, is to include in the Space Transportation System (STS) a payload carrier with maximum flexibility to accommodate multidisciplinary scientific payloads. The major Spacelab configurations obtained by combination of two basic elements, the module and pallet, are described along with the anticipated program of experiments and payloads, and mission management general concept. The first Spacelab 7-day mission is scheduled for flight in the second half of 1980, with the primary objective being to verify system performance capabilities. Detailed attention is given to the payload mission management responsibilities for the first flight, including program control, science management, payload interfaces, integrated payload mission planning, integration requirements, payload specialist training, payload integration, launch site integration, payload flight/mission operations, and postmission activities. The Spacelab configuration (including the long module and one pallet) and the overall schedule for this mission are presented.

  11. The first Spacelab mission. [payload management functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, R. E., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The purpose of Spacelab, an Orbiter-mounted NASA/ESA laboratory, is to include in the Space Transportation System (STS) a payload carrier with maximum flexibility to accommodate multidisciplinary scientific payloads. The major Spacelab configurations obtained by combination of two basic elements, the module and pallet, are described along with the anticipated program of experiments and payloads, and mission management general concept. The first Spacelab 7-day mission is scheduled for flight in the second half of 1980, with the primary objective being to verify system performance capabilities. Detailed attention is given to the payload mission management responsibilities for the first flight, including program control, science management, payload interfaces, integrated payload mission planning, integration requirements, payload specialist training, payload integration, launch site integration, payload flight/mission operations, and postmission activities. The Spacelab configuration (including the long module and one pallet) and the overall schedule for this mission are presented.

  12. The XXL survey: first results and future

    CERN Document Server

    Pierre, M; Birkinshaw, M; Chiappetti, L; Ettori, S; Evrard, A; Faccioli, L; Gastaldello, F; Giles, P; Horellou, C; Iovino, A; Koulouridis, E; Lidman, C; Brun, A Le; Maughan, B; Maurogordato, S; McCarthy, I; Miyazaki, S; Pacaud, F; Paltani, S; Plionis, M; Reiprich, T; Sadibekova, T; Smolcic, V; Snowden, S; Surdej, J; Tsirou, M; Vignali, C; Willis, J; Alis, S; Altieri, B; Baran, N; Benoist, C; Bongiorno, A; Bremer, M; Butler, A; Cappi, A; Caretta, C; Ciliegi, P; Clerc, N; Corasaniti, P S; Coupon, J; Delhaize, J; Delvecchio, I; Democles, J; Desai, Sh; Devriendt, J; Dubois, Y; Eckert, D; Elyiv, A; Farahi, A; Ferrari, C; Fotopoulou, S; Forman, W; Georgantopoulos, I; Guglielmo, V; Huynh, M; Jerlin, N; Jones, Ch; Lavoie, S; Fevre, J -P Le; Lieu, M; Kilbinger, M; Marulli, F; Mantz, A; McGee, S; Melin, J -B; Melnyk, O; Moscardini, L; Novak, M; Piconcelli, E; Poggianti, B; Pomarede, D; Pompei, E; Ponman, T; Ceja, M E Ramos; Ranalli, P; Rapetti, D; Raychaudhury, S; Ricci, M; Rottgering, H; Sahlén, M; Sauvageot, J -L; Schimd, C; Sereno, M; Smith, G P; Umetsu, K; Valageas, P; Valotti, A; Valtchanov, I; Veropalumbo, A; Ascaso, B; Barnes, D; De Petris, M; Durret, F; Donahue, M; Ithana, M; Jarvis, M; Johnston-Hollitt, M; Kalfountzou, E; Kay, S; La Franca, F; Okabe, N; Muzzin, A; Rettura, A; Ricci, F; Ridl, J; Risaliti, G; Takizawa, M; Thomas, P; Truong, N

    2016-01-01

    The XXL survey currently covers two 25 sq. deg. patches with XMM observations of ~10ks. We summarise the scientific results associated with the first release of the XXL data set, that occurred mid 2016. We review several arguments for increasing the survey depth to 40 ks during the next decade of XMM operations. X-ray (z1 cluster density. It will eventually constitute a reference study and an ideal calibration field for the upcoming eROSITA and Euclid missions.

  13. A Mission to Earth's Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, P.

    2016-12-01

    The last few decades have witnessed extraordinary progress on Earth's deep interior, particularly for Earth's core. Notable examples include seismic detection of fine structure and heterogeneity from the CMB to the depths of the inner core; improved constraints on the thermal regime and critical physical properties; direct experimental access to core pressures and temperatures; partial resolution of geomagnetic history into the deep past, new cosmochemical constraints on core formation, plus a first-order solution of the dynamo problem. Nevertheless, many fundamental questions about Earth's core remain unanswered, representing significant impediments to further understanding, not just of the Earth system, but also the interiors of other planets. A partial list of unsolved problems includes the composition of the core especially its light element inventory, the nature of heterogeneity in the core and its dynamical significance, quantifying heat and mass exchanges between core and mantle, the record of core evolution exemplified by inner core nucleation and the magnetic superchron cycle, and the role of core formation in governing Earth history. A more concerted and better-focused interdisciplinary effort is needed to resolve these long-standing problems, one that is comparable in its scale and structure to a planetary exploration mission. Such a Mission to Earth's Center would foster technological developments aimed specifically at these questions, such as seismic arrays designed for imaging the core, experimental capability for determining the phase diagram of the core, resolution of geomagnetic history into the deep past, plus next-generation dynamical models for the mantle, the core, and their interaction.

  14. THE JEM-EUSO MISSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Bertaina

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The JEM-EUSO mission explores the origin of the extreme energy cosmic rays (EECRs above 50EeV and explores the limits of the fundamental physics, through the observations of their arrival directions and energies. It is designed to open a new particle astronomy channel. This superwide-field (60 degrees telescope with a diameter of about 2.5m looks down from space onto the night sky to detect near UV photons (330 ÷ 400nm, both fluorescent and Cherenkov photons emitted from the giant air showers produced by EECRs. The arrival direction map with more than five hundred events will tell us the origin of the EECRs and allow us to identify the nearest EECR sources with known astronomical objects. It will allow them to be examined in other astronomical channels. This is likely to lead to an  nderstanding of the acceleration mechanisms perhaps producing discoveries in astrophysics and/or fundamental physics. The comparison of the energy spectra among the spatially resolved individual sources will help to clarify the acceleration/emission mechanism, and also finally confirm the Greisen–Zatsepin–Kuz’min process for the validation of Lorentz invariance up to γ ~ 1011. Neutral components (neutrinos and gamma rays can also be detected as well, if their fluxes are high enough. The JEM-EUSO mission is planned to be launched by a H2B rocket about 2017 and transferred to ISS by H2 Transfer Vehicle (HTV. It will be attached to the Exposed Facility external experiment platform of “KIBO”.

  15. Agile: From Software to Mission Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimble, Jay; Shirley, Mark; Hobart, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    To maximize efficiency and flexibility in Mission Operations System (MOS) design, we are evolving principles from agile and lean methods for software, to the complete mission system. This allows for reduced operational risk at reduced cost, and achieves a more effective design through early integration of operations into mission system engineering and flight system design. The core principles are assessment of capability through demonstration, risk reduction through targeted experiments, early test and deployment, and maturation of processes and tools through use.

  16. The Scots abroad: migration and mission

    OpenAIRE

    Ross, Kenneth R.

    2013-01-01

    Kenneth Ross’s essay begins with an overview of the migration of the Scots round the world in the age of colonialism. He then examines this more closely, exploring the relationship between migration and missions in the diaspora church. Beginning with mission-migrant relations in Malawi, Ross then points to more general, more deeply-rooted tensions arising in the Scottish diaspora, reflected in the conflicting interests of expatriate churches and mission agencies. Publisher PDF

  17. GSFC Safety and Mission Assurance Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Michael P.

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's approach to safety and mission assurance. The contents include: 1) NASA GSFC Background; 2) Safety and Mission Assurance Directorate; 3) The Role of SMA-D and the Technical Authority; 4) GSFC Mission assurance Requirements; 5) GSFC Systems Review Office (SRO); 6) GSFC Supply Chain Management Program; and 7) GSFC ISO9001/AS9100 Status Brief.

  18. Component Verification and Certification in NASA Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannakopoulou, Dimitra; Penix, John; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Software development for NASA missions is a particularly challenging task. Missions are extremely ambitious scientifically, have very strict time frames, and must be accomplished with a maximum degree of reliability. Verification technologies must therefore be pushed far beyond their current capabilities. Moreover, reuse and adaptation of software architectures and components must be incorporated in software development within and across missions. This paper discusses NASA applications that we are currently investigating from these perspectives.

  19. The Space Missions WAXS/WFXT and SWIFT New Targets for the VLT

    CERN Document Server

    Chincarini, G L

    1999-01-01

    At OAB we were, during the year 1998, deeply involved in planning two important space missions for which very large ground based telescopes, VLT in particular, would play a very large and important role in the optical followup. The study of the first mission, Wide Angle X-ray Survey using a Wide Field X-ray Telescope, was coordinated by the Observatory of Brera, involved mainly Italian industries and resulted in a proposal to the Italian Space Agency under the Small Satellite Program. The second mission, SWIFT, has been coordinated and directed by the Goddard Space Flight Center and resulted in the submission of a proposal to NASA under the MIDEX program. The science goal of this mission is the detection and study of the Gamma-ray bursts.

  20. Tank waste remediation system (TWRS) mission analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieck, R.H.

    1996-10-03

    The Tank Waste Remediation System Mission Analysis provides program level requirements and identifies system boundaries and interfaces. Measures of success appropriate to program level accomplishments are also identified.

  1. Rapid Automated Mission Planning System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation is an automated UAS mission planning system that will rapidly identify emergency (contingency) landing sites, manage contingency routing, and...

  2. Cassini Solstice Mission Maneuver Experience: Year Two

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrieta, Juan; Ballard, Christopher G.; Hahn, Yungsun

    2012-01-01

    The Cassini Spacecraft was launched in October 1997 on a mission to observe Saturn and its moons; it entered orbit around Saturn in July 2004 for a nominal four-year Prime Mission, later augmented by two extensions: the Equinox Mission, from July 2008 through September 2010, and the Solstice Mission, from October 2010 through September 2017. This paper provides an overview of the maneuver activities from August 2011 through June 2012 which include the design of 38 Orbit Trim Maneuvers--OTM-288 through OTM-326-- for attaining 14 natural satellite encounters: seven with Titan, six with Enceladus, and one with Dione.

  3. Cassini Solstice Mission Maneuver Experience: Year One

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Sean V.; Arrieta, Juan; Ballard, Christopher G.; Hahn, Yungsun; Stumpf, Paul W.; Valerino, Powtawche N.

    2011-01-01

    The Cassini-Huygens spacecraft began its four-year Prime Mission to study Saturn's system in July 2004. Two tour extensions followed: a two-year Equinox Mission beginning in July 2008 and a seven-year Solstice Mission starting in September 2010. This paper highlights Cassini maneuver activities from June 2010 through June 2011, covering the transition from the Equinox to Solstice Mission. This interval included 38 scheduled maneuvers, nine targeted Titan flybys, three targeted Enceladus flybys, and one close Rhea flyby. In addition, beyond the demanding nominal navigation schedule, numerous unforeseen challenges further complicated maneuver operations. These challenges will be discussed in detail.

  4. NASA Laboratory Analysis for Manned Exploration Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krihak, Michael K.; Shaw, Tianna E.

    2014-01-01

    The Exploration Laboratory Analysis (ELA) project supports the Exploration Medical Capability Element under the NASA Human Research Program. ELA instrumentation is identified as an essential capability for future exploration missions to diagnose and treat evidence-based medical conditions. However, mission architecture limits the medical equipment, consumables, and procedures that will be available to treat medical conditions during human exploration missions. Allocated resources such as mass, power, volume, and crew time must be used efficiently to optimize the delivery of in-flight medical care. Although commercial instruments can provide the blood and urine based measurements required for exploration missions, these commercial-off-the-shelf devices are prohibitive for deployment in the space environment. The objective of the ELA project is to close the technology gap of current minimally invasive laboratory capabilities and analytical measurements in a manner that the mission architecture constraints impose on exploration missions. Besides micro gravity and radiation tolerances, other principal issues that generally fail to meet NASA requirements include excessive mass, volume, power and consumables, and nominal reagent shelf-life. Though manned exploration missions will not occur for nearly a decade, NASA has already taken strides towards meeting the development of ELA medical diagnostics by developing mission requirements and concepts of operations that are coupled with strategic investments and partnerships towards meeting these challenges. This paper focuses on the remote environment, its challenges, biomedical diagnostics requirements and candidate technologies that may lead to successful blood-urine chemistry and biomolecular measurements in future space exploration missions.

  5. Autolanding for Sample Return Missions Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Future NASA and commercial missions will increasingly target destinations with challenging topography and limited communication including unmapped asteroids, comets,...

  6. An Imaging X-Ray Polarimetry Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Bellazini, Ronaldo; Costa, Enrico; Ramsey, Brian; O'Dell, Steve; Elsner, Ronald; Pavlov, George; Matt, Giorgio; Kaspi, Victoria; Tennant, Allyn; Coppi, Paolo; Wu, Kinwah; Siegmund, Oswald

    2008-01-01

    Technical progress both in x-ray optics and in polarization-sensitive x-ray detectors, which our groups have pioneered, enables a scientifically powerful---yet inexpensive---dedicated mission for imaging x-ray polarimetry. Such a mission is sufficiently sensitive to measure x-ray (linear) polarization for a broad range of cosmic sources --particularly those involving neutron stars, stellar black holes, and supermassive black holes (active galactic nuclei). We describe the technical elements, discuss a mission concept, and synopsize the important physical and astrophysical questions such a mission would address.

  7. Sustainable, Reliable Mission-Systems Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neil, Graham; Orr, James K.; Watson, Steve

    2007-01-01

    A mission-systems architecture, based on a highly modular infrastructure utilizing: open-standards hardware and software interfaces as the enabling technology is essential for affordable and sustainable space exploration programs. This mission-systems architecture requires (a) robust communication between heterogeneous system, (b) high reliability, (c) minimal mission-to-mission reconfiguration, (d) affordable development, system integration, and verification of systems, and (e) minimal sustaining engineering. This paper proposes such an architecture. Lessons learned from the Space Shuttle program and Earthbound complex engineered system are applied to define the model. Technology projections reaching out 5 years are mde to refine model details.

  8. ESPA for Lunar and Science Missions Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA mission planning in the next decade includes small spacecraft and secondary flight opportunities on Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicles (EELVs), specifically...

  9. An Imaging X-Ray Polarimetry Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Bellazini, Ronaldo; Costa, Enrico; Ramsey, Brian; O'Dell, Steve; Elsner, Ronald; Pavlov, George; Matt, Giorgio; Kaspi, Victoria; Tennant, Allyn; hide

    2008-01-01

    Technical progress both in x-ray optics and in polarization-sensitive x-ray detectors, which our groups have pioneered, enables a scientifically powerful---yet inexpensive---dedicated mission for imaging x-ray polarimetry. Such a mission is sufficiently sensitive to measure x-ray (linear) polarization for a broad range of cosmic sources --particularly those involving neutron stars, stellar black holes, and supermassive black holes (active galactic nuclei). We describe the technical elements, discuss a mission concept, and synopsize the important physical and astrophysical questions such a mission would address.

  10. GEOSTAR-II: A Prototype Water Vapor Imager/Sounder for the Path Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaier, Todd; Lambrigtsen, Bjorn; Kangaslahti, Pekka; Lim, Boon; Tanner, Alan; Harding, Dennis; Owen, Heather; Soria, Mary; ODwyer, Ian; Ruf, Christopher; Miller, Ryan; Block, Bruce; Flynn, Michael; Whitaker, Sterling

    2011-01-01

    We describe the development and progress of the GeoSTAR-II risk reduction activity for the NASA Earth Science Decadal Survey PATH Mission. The activity directly addresses areas of technical risk including the system design, low noise receiver production, sub-array development, signal distribution and digital signal processing.

  11. On the detectability of solar-like oscillations with the NASA TESS mission

    CERN Document Server

    Campante, Tiago L

    2016-01-01

    The upcoming NASA TESS mission will perform an all-sky survey for planets transiting bright nearby stars. In addition, its excellent photometric precision will enable asteroseismology of solar-type and red-giant stars. We apply a newly developed detection test along a sequence of stellar evolutionary tracks in order to predict the detectability of solar-like oscillations with TESS.

  12. University-Firm Interactions in Brazil: Beyond Human Resources and Training Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapini, Marcia Siqueira; Chiarini, Tulio; Bittencourt, Pablo Felipe

    2015-01-01

    The motivation for this article comes from the proposition in the literature that Latin American universities are detached from the research needs of the productive sector and that they limit their role to the human resources and training missions. The authors investigated the Brazilian scenario, using data from a survey conducted in 2008-2009…

  13. Cost Analysis of U.S. Navy Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Relief Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    underwater topography of the area. This situation would strongly increase the value in sending a Hydrographic Survey Ship (T-AGS) to investigate the...such as drones may be valuable assets in the HA/DR mission. Providing a model for how many may be required may assist future planners in their

  14. University-Firm Interactions in Brazil: Beyond Human Resources and Training Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapini, Marcia Siqueira; Chiarini, Tulio; Bittencourt, Pablo Felipe

    2015-01-01

    The motivation for this article comes from the proposition in the literature that Latin American universities are detached from the research needs of the productive sector and that they limit their role to the human resources and training missions. The authors investigated the Brazilian scenario, using data from a survey conducted in 2008-2009…

  15. The Sustainable Strategy for Small and Medium Sized Enterprises: The Relationship between Mission Statements and Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ethem Duygulu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The study aims to contribute to the literature by empirically examining the relationship between small and medium sized enterprises’ (SMEs mission statements and their performance in sustainable strategy formulation. Although it seems that there is a relatively vast amount of research with regard to mission statements of companies, very few studies have focused on the relationship between mission statements and performance. When these few studies are taken into consideration, it is difficult to reach any overall conclusion since their findings are mixed and inconclusive. To achieve this aim, 3034 SMEs operating in organized industrial zones in Turkey were examined via a survey approach. In order to investigate the relationships among the variables, nine categories of mission statements as independent variables and four performance indicators (financial, market, production, and overall as dependent variables were analyzed through logistic regression. This study identified three mission components, (1 survival, growth, and profit; (2 philosophy and values; and (3 public image, as the common independent variables in explaining the performance of SMEs. Survival, growth, and profit is the most frequently observed mission component regardless of the subsector differentiation in the entire sample, which reflects the significance of business sustainability for SMEs in the Turkish manufacturing context. Besides, among all performance indicators, SMEs’ market performance was found to be the lowest when compared to other performance indicators (financial, production, overall. Although the firms were placed in different manufacturing subsectors, similar mission statements were highlighted so that the discourse similarity might be considered as evidence of isomorphism characteristics for SMEs.

  16. The Space Launch System and Missions to the Outer Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaus, Kurt K.; Post, Kevin

    2015-11-01

    Introduction: America’s heavy lift launch vehicle, the Space Launch System, enables a variety of planetary science missions. The SLS can be used for most, if not all, of the National Research Council’s Planetary Science Decadal Survey missions to the outer planets. The SLS performance enables larger payloads and faster travel times with reduced operational complexity.Europa Clipper: Our analysis shows that a launch on the SLS would shorten the Clipper mission travel time by more than four years over earlier mission concept studies.Jupiter Trojan Tour and Rendezvous: Our mission concept replaces Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generators (ASRGs) in the original design with solar arrays. The SLS capability offers many more target opportunities.Comet Surface Sample Return: Although in our mission concept, the SLS launches later than the NRC mission study (November 2022 instead of the original launch date of January 2021), it reduces the total mission time, including sample return, by two years.Saturn Apmospheric Entry Probe: Though Saturn arrivial time remains the same in our concept as the arrival date in the NRC study (2034), launching on the SLS shortens the mission travel time by three years with a direct ballistic trajectory.Uranus Orbiter with Probes: The SLS shortens travel time for an Uranus mission by four years with a Jupiter swing-by trajectory. It removes the need for a solar electric propulsion (SEP) stage used in the NRC mission concept study.Other SLS Science Mission Candidates: Two other mission concepts we are investigating that may be of interest to this community are the Advanced Technology Large Aperature Space Telescope (ATLAST) and the Interstellar Explorer also referred to as the Interstellar Probe.Summary: The first launch of the SLS is scheduled for 2018 followed by the first human launch in 2021. The SLS in its evolving configurations will enable a broad range of exploration missions which will serve to recapture the enthusiasm and

  17. BOLAS: A Canadian-US Ionospheric Tether Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyc, George; Vigneron, Frank; Jablonski, Alexander; James, H. Gordon; Carrington, Connie; Rupp, Charles

    1997-01-01

    Everyday, international broadcasters, ships, and aircraft use a naturally conducting atmospheric layer, the ionosphere, to reflect communications signals over the Earth's horizon. A better understanding of this layer, with its irregularities, instabilities, and dynamics, would improve communications transmission and reception. This atmospheric layer is also a lens that can distort signal transmissions from communications, navigation, and surveillance satellites. The ionosphere over Canada and other high latitude countries can carry large currents and is particularly dynamic, so that a scientific understanding of this layer is critical. The BOLAS (Bistatic Observations using Low Altitude Satellites) mission would characterize reflective and transmissive properties of the ionosphere by flying two satellites, each with identical HF receivers, dipole antennas, particle probes, and GPS receivers. The satellites would be connected by a non-conducting tether to maintain a 100 m separation, and would cartwheel in the orbit plane to spatially survey the ionosphere. The six-month mission would fly in a high inclination, 350 x 600 km orbit, and would be active during passes over the auroral region of Canada. This paper discusses the system requirements and architecture, spacecraft and operations concepts, and mission design, as well as team organization, international cooperation and the scientific and technological benefits that are expected.

  18. MEGA - Medium Energy Gamma-ray Astronomy Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, J. M.; Bloser, P. F.; Macri, J. R.; McConnell, M. L.; Ajello, M.; Andritschke, R.; Kanbach, G.; Schoenfelder, V.; Zoglauer, A.; Hunter, S. D.; Kurfess, J. D.; Phlips, B.; Strickman, M.; Wulf, E.; Hartmann, D.; Miller, R.; Paciesas, W.; Zych, A. D.; Kippen, R. M.; Vestrand, W. T.; Cherry, M. L.; Guzik, T. G.; Stacy, J. G.; Wefel, J. P.; Reglero, V.; Di Cocco, G.; Cravens, J.

    2004-12-01

    The Medium Energy Gamma-ray Astronomy (MEGA) telescope concept will soon be proposed as a MIDEX mission. This mission would enable a sensitive all-sky survey of the medium-energy gamma-ray sky (0.3 - 50 MeV) and bridge the huge sensitivity gap between the COMPTEL and OSSE experiments on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, the SPI and IBIS instruments on INTEGRAL, and the visionary Advanced Compton Telescope (ACT) mission. The scientific goals include, among other things, compiling a much larger catalog of sources in this energy range, performing far deeper searches for supernovae, better measuring the galactic continuum and line emissions, and identifying the components of the cosmic diffuse gamma-ray emission. MEGA will accomplish these goals using a tracker made of Si strip detector (SSD) planes surrounded by a dense high-Z calorimeter. At lower photon energies (below 30 MeV), the design is sensitive to Compton interactions, with the SSD system serving as a scattering medium that also detects and measures the Compton recoil energy deposit. If the energy of the recoil electron is sufficiently high (> 2 MeV) its momentum vector can also be measured. At higher photon energies (above 10 MeV), the design is sensitive to pair production events, with the SSD system measuring the tracks of the electron and positron. A prototype instrument has been developed and calibrated, and is currently being prepared for a scientific balloon flight.

  19. Simulation Studies of Satellite Laser CO2 Mission Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawa, Stephan Randy; Mao, J.; Abshire, J. B.; Collatz, G. J.; Sun X.; Weaver, C. J.

    2011-01-01

    Results of mission simulation studies are presented for a laser-based atmospheric CO2 sounder. The simulations are based on real-time carbon cycle process modeling and data analysis. The mission concept corresponds to ASCENDS as recommended by the US National Academy of Sciences Decadal Survey. Compared to passive sensors, active (lidar) sensing of CO2 from space has several potentially significant advantages that hold promise to advance CO2 measurement capability in the next decade. Although the precision and accuracy requirements remain at unprecedented levels of stringency, analysis of possible instrument technology indicates that such sensors are more than feasible. Radiative transfer model calculations, an instrument model with representative errors, and a simple retrieval approach complete the cycle from "nature" run to "pseudodata" CO2. Several mission and instrument configuration options are examined, and the sensitivity to key design variables is shown. Examples are also shown of how the resulting pseudo-measurements might be used to address key carbon cycle science questions.

  20. The K2 Mission: Characterization and Early results

    CERN Document Server

    Howell, Steve B; Haas, Michael; Still, Martin; Barclay, Thomas; Mullally, Fergal; Troeltzsch, John; Aigrain, Suzanne; Bryson, Stephen T; Caldwell, Doug; Chaplin, William J; Cochran, William D; Huber, Daniel; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Miglio, Andrea; Najita, Joan R; Smith, Marcie; Twicken, J D; Fortney, Jonathan J

    2014-01-01

    The K2 mission will make use of the Kepler spacecraft and its assets to expand upon Kepler's groundbreaking discoveries in the fields of exoplanets and astrophysics through new and exciting observations. K2 will use an innovative way of operating the spacecraft to observe target fields along the ecliptic for the next 2-3 years. Early science commissioning observations have shown an estimated photometric precision near 400 ppm in a single 30 minute observation, and a 6-hour photometric precision of 80 ppm (both at V=12). The K2 mission offers simultaneous observation of thousands of objects at a precision far better than is achievable from the ground. Ecliptic fields will be observed for approximately 75-days enabling a unique exoplanet survey which fills the gaps in duration and sensitivity between the Kepler and TESS missions, and offers pre-launch exoplanet target identification for JWST transit spectroscopy. Astrophysics observations with K2 will include studies of young open clusters, bright stars, galaxi...