WorldWideScience

Sample records for survey laboratory methods

  1. Survey of sexually transmitted disease laboratory methods in US Army laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-eun; Nauschuetz, William; Jordan, Nikki; Lindler, Luther; Steece, Richard; Pfau, Esther; Gaydos, Joel

    2010-01-01

    Sexually transmitted diseases, in particular Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae, are ranked as the top 2 most commonly notified disease in the US Army. Although surveillance programs are in place to capture event data, no routine STD surveillance program captures laboratory test information. To evaluate laboratory testing practices/methodologies in US Army laboratories in 2007, a questionnaire was distributed to all 38 US Army laboratories. The results of the survey were compared across Army installations to US civilian public health laboratories. Of 38 survey recipients, 35 (92.1%) completed the survey. Overall, 78.6% of C. trachomatis and 77.2% of N. gonorrhoeae specimens were tested by nucleic acid amplification tests. In addition, 48.6% used culture as a method of N. gonorrhoeae testing. Testing for genital herpes, trichomonas, bacterial vaginosis, syphilis, human papillomavirus, and/or premalignant/malignant cervical cells was performed by 33 of the 35 laboratories. A high proportion of US Army laboratories are using NAAT technology for C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae testing. A more comprehensive questionnaire may be needed to accurately describe the type and volume of other STD tests. Despite the difference in survey data acquisition between the US civilian public health laboratory survey and the US Army laboratory survey, broad comparisons such as test types were able to be made. Future surveys should be extended to other US military services and should include both civilian and military laboratories.

  2. Surveying technologists: a novel method for establishing productivity standards in a clinical haematology laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jatoi, A; Jaromin, R; Grzybek, D; Nguyen, P L

    1997-01-01

    Personnel costs comprise the largest clinical laboratory expense. Yet standards to judge the productivity of personnel have not been established. A survey of the authors' own personnel was conducted to derive productivity standards in the Clinical Hematology Laboratory at the Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. Technologists were asked how many white blood cell differentials they could perform in an eight-hour shift. Differential productivity was tracked before and after the survey. Of the respondents, 100 per cent failed to meet their own expectations of productivity. Nine technologists were tracked both before and after the survey was mailed and manifested a significant increase in productivity. These results suggest that technologists are objective in their assessment of their own productivity, that their opinions might be a resource for establishing productivity standards within the laboratory, and that such surveys may serve as motivational tools to augment productivity.

  3. A survey of methods used for antimicrobial susceptibility testing in veterinary diagnostic laboratories in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dargatz, David A; Erdman, Matthew M; Harris, Beth

    2017-09-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a serious threat to animal and human health worldwide, requiring a collaborative, holistic approach. The U.S. Government has developed a national strategy to address antimicrobial resistance, with one component being to monitor antimicrobial resistance in agricultural settings. We developed a survey to collect information about antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) from the veterinary diagnostic laboratory community in the United States, assessing current practices and technologies and determining how AST information is shared. Of the 132 surveys administered, 52 (39%) were returned. Overall, responding laboratories conducted susceptibility tests on 98,788 bacterial isolates in 2014, with Escherichia coli being the most common pathogen tested across all animal species. The 2 most common AST methods employed were the disk diffusion method (71%) and the Sensititre platform broth microdilution system (59%). Laboratories primarily used the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) VET-01 standard (69%) and the automatically calculated interpretations provided by the commercial AST systems (61%) for interpreting their AST data. Only 22% of laboratories published AST data on a periodic basis, usually via annual reports published on the laboratory's website or through peer-reviewed journals for specific pathogens. Our results confirm that disk diffusion and broth microdilution remain the standard AST methods employed by U.S. veterinary diagnostic laboratories, and that CLSI standards are commonly used for interpreting AST results. This information will help determine the most efficient standardized methodology for future surveillance. Furthermore, the current infrastructure within laboratories, once harmonized, will help provide a mechanism for conducting national surveillance programs.

  4. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; arsenic speciation in natural-water samples using laboratory and field methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbarino, John R.; Bednar, Anthony J.; Burkhardt, Mark R.

    2002-01-01

    Analytical methods for the determination of arsenite [As(III)], arsenate [As(V)], dimethylarsinate (DMA), monomethylarsonate (MMA), and roxarsone in filtered natural-water samples are described. Various analytical methods can be used for the determination, depending on the arsenic species being determined. Arsenic concentration is determined by using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) as an arsenic-specific detector for all methods. Laboratory-speciation methods are described that use an ion chromatographic column to separate the arsenic species; the column length, column packing, and mobile phase are dependent on the species of interest. Regardless of the separation technique, the arsenic species are introduced into plasma by eithe rpneumatic nebulization or arsine generation. Analysis times range from 2 to 8 minutes and method detection limits range from 0.1 to 0.6 microgram-arsenic per liter (ug-As/L), 10 to 60 picograms absolute (for a 100-microliter injection), depending on the arsenic species determined and the analytical method used. A field-generation specciation method also is described that uses a strong anion exchange cartridge to separate As(III) from As(V) in the field. As(III) in the eluate and the As(V) in the cartridge extract are determined by direct nebulization ICP-MS. Methylated arsenic species that also are retained on the cartridge will positively bias As(V) results without further laboratory separations. The method detection limit for field speciation is 0.3 ug-As/L. The distribution of arsenic species must be preserved in the field to eliminate changes caused by photochemical oxidation or metal oxyhydroxide precipitation. Preservation techniques, such as refrigeration, the addition of acides, or the additoin of ethylene-diaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and the effects of ambient light were tested. Of the preservatives evaluated, EDTA was found to work best with the laboratory- and field-speciation methods for all sample

  5. Active and passive seismic methods for characterization and monitoring of unstable rock masses: field surveys, laboratory tests and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombero, Chiara; Baillet, Laurent; Comina, Cesare; Jongmans, Denis; Vinciguerra, Sergio

    2016-04-01

    Appropriate characterization and monitoring of potentially unstable rock masses may provide a better knowledge of the active processes and help to forecast the evolution to failure. Among the available geophysical methods, active seismic surveys are often suitable to infer the internal structure and the fracturing conditions of the unstable body. For monitoring purposes, although remote-sensing techniques and in-situ geotechnical measurements are successfully tested on landslides, they may not be suitable to early forecast sudden rapid rockslides. Passive seismic monitoring can help for this purpose. Detection, classification and localization of microseismic events within the prone-to-fall rock mass can provide information about the incipient failure of internal rock bridges. Acceleration to failure can be detected from an increasing microseismic event rate. The latter can be compared with meteorological data to understand the external factors controlling stability. On the other hand, seismic noise recorded on prone-to-fall rock slopes shows that the temporal variations in spectral content and correlation of ambient vibrations can be related to both reversible and irreversible changes within the rock mass. We present the results of the active and passive seismic data acquired at the potentially unstable granitic cliff of Madonna del Sasso (NW Italy). Down-hole tests, surface refraction and cross-hole tomography were carried out for the characterization of the fracturing state of the site. Field surveys were implemented with laboratory determination of physico-mechanical properties on rock samples and measurements of the ultrasonic pulse velocity. This multi-scale approach led to a lithological interpretation of the seismic velocity field obtained at the site and to a systematic correlation of the measured velocities with physical properties (density and porosity) and macroscopic features of the granitic cliff (fracturing, weathering and anisotropy). Continuous

  6. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; in-bottle acid digestion of whole-water samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, G.L.; Fishman, M. J.; Garbarino, J.R.

    1996-01-01

    Water samples for trace-metal determinations routinely have been prepared in open laboratories. For example, the U.S. Geological Survey method I-3485-85 (Extraction Procedure, for Water- Suspended Sediment) is performed in a laboratory hood on a laboratory bench without any special precautions to control airborne contamination. This method tends to be contamination prone for several trace metals primarily because the samples are transferred, acidified, digested, and filtered in an open laboratory environment. To reduce trace-metal contamination of digested water samples, procedures were established that rely on minimizing sample-transfer steps and using a class-100 clean bench during sample filtration. This new procedure involves the following steps: 1. The sample is acidified with HCl directly in the original water-sample bottle. 2. The water-sample bottle with the cap secured is heated in a laboratory oven. 3. The digestate is filtered in a class-100 laminar-flow clean bench. The exact conditions used (that is, oven temperature, time of heating, and filtration methods) for this digestion procedure are described. Comparisons between the previous U.S Geological Survey open-beaker method I-3485-85 and the new in-bottle procedure for synthetic and field-collected water samples are given. When the new procedure is used, blank concentrations for most trace metals determined are reduced significantly.

  7. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory : determination of nonpurgeable suspended organic carbon by wet-chemical oxidation and infrared spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Mark R.; Kammer, James A.; Jha, Virendra K.; O'Mara-Lopez, Peggy G.; Woodworth, Mark T.

    1997-01-01

    Precision and accuracy results are described for the determination of nonpurgeable suspended organic carbon (SOC) by silver-filter filtration, wet-chemical oxidation, and infrared determination of hte resulting carbon dioxide (CO2) used at the U.S. Geological Survey's nationalWater Quality Laboratory. An aliquot of raw water isfiltered through a 0.45-micrometer silver filter. The trapped organic material is oxidized using phosphoric acid and potassium persulfate in a scaled glass ampule,and the rseulting CO2 is measured by an infrared CO2 detector. The amount of CO3 is proportional to the concentration of chemically oxidizable nonpurgeable organic carbon in the sample. The SOC method detection limit for routine analysis is 0.2 milligram per liter. The average percent recovery is 97.1 percent and the average standard deviation is 11 percent.

  8. Stirling laboratory research engine survey report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, J. W.; Hoehn, F. W.

    1979-01-01

    As one step in expanding the knowledge relative to and accelerating the development of Stirling engines, NASA, through the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), is sponsoring a program which will lead to a versatile Stirling Laboratory Research Engine (SLRE). An objective of this program is to lay the groundwork for a commercial version of this engine. It is important to consider, at an early stage in the engine's development, the needs of the potential users so that the SLRE can support the requirements of educators and researchers in academic, industrial, and government laboratories. For this reason, a survey was performed, the results of which are described.

  9. Laboratory Learning in a Research Methods Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Knapp

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory-based learning is increasingly considered to be an integral component of undergraduate education. However, students do not always perceive the value of laboratory learning in the college classroom. The current research sought to create an effective laboratory learning environment within a research methods course and to assess students’ perceptions of this approach at the end of one semester. This article reports the findings for two studies; in Study 1, a survey was given to 17 criminal justice, health care management and advocacy, and psychology students. In a subsequent semester, challenges from Study 1 were addressed, and the same survey (i.e., Study 2 was given to 20 criminal justice and psychology majors. Across both samples, students’ responses to the laboratory learning paradigm were generally positive, yet concerns and challenges were identified. Future research should attempt to address these concerns and to assess objective student outcomes, such as grades in the course.

  10. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; processing, taxonomy, and quality control of benthic macroinvertebrate samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulton, Stephen R.; Carter, James L.; Grotheer, Scott A.; Cuffney, Thomas F.; Short, Terry M.

    2000-01-01

    Qualitative and quantitative methods to process benthic macroinvertebrate (BMI) samples have been developed and tested by the U.S. Geological Survey?s National Water Quality Laboratory Biological Group. The qualitative processing method is based on visually sorting a sample for up to 2 hours. Sorting focuses on attaining organisms that are likely to result in taxonomic identifications to lower taxonomic levels (for example, Genus or Species). Immature and damaged organisms are also sorted when they are likely to result in unique determinations. The sorted sample remnant is scanned briefly by a second person to determine if obvious taxa were missed. The quantitative processing method is based on a fixed-count approach that targets some minimum count, such as 100 or 300 organisms. Organisms are sorted from randomly selected 5.1- by 5.1-centimeter parts of a gridded subsampling frame. The sorted remnant from each sample is resorted by a second individual for at least 10 percent of the original sort time. A large-rare organism search is performed on the unsorted remnant to sort BMI taxa that were not likely represented in the sorted grids. After either qualitatively or quantitatively sorting the sample, BMIs are identified by using one of three different types of taxonomic assessment. The Standard Taxonomic Assessment is comparable to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Rapid Bioassessment Protocol III and typically provides Genus- or Species-level taxonomic resolution. The Rapid Taxonomic Assessment is comparable to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Rapid Bioassessment Protocol II and provides Familylevel and higher taxonomic resolution. The Custom Taxonomic Assessment provides Species-level resolution whenever possible for groups identified to higher taxonomic levels by using the Standard Taxonomic Assessment. The consistent use of standardized designations and notes facilitates the interpretation of BMI data within and among water-quality studies

  11. Whole-building systems integration laboratory survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawley, D.B. (American Consulting Engineers Council, Washington, DC (USA). Research and Management Foundation)

    1989-09-01

    This report was prepared for the Pacific Northwest Laboratory as a subcontracted activity by the Research Management Foundation of the American Consulting Engineers Council. The objective of the survey reported herein was to independently assess the need for a Building System Integration Laboratory from the viewpoint of academicians in the field of building science. The subcontractor-developed questionnaire was sent to 200 professors of architecture and engineering at US universities. In view of this diverse population, the 10% rate of return on the questionnaire was considered acceptable. Although the responses probably do not reflect an unbiased summary of the collective perceptions of the original population surveyed, they do provide a valid insight into the interests and concerns of the academic community with respect to building sciences issues.

  12. Multi-laboratory survey of qPCR enterococci analysis method performance in U.S. coastal and inland surface waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugland, Richard A; Siefring, Shawn; Varma, Manju; Oshima, Kevin H; Sivaganesan, Mano; Cao, Yiping; Raith, Meredith; Griffith, John; Weisberg, Stephen B; Noble, Rachel T; Blackwood, A Denene; Kinzelman, Julie; Anan'eva, Tamara; Bushon, Rebecca N; Stelzer, Erin A; Harwood, Valarie J; Gordon, Katrina V; Sinigalliano, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) has become a frequently used technique for quantifying enterococci in recreational surface waters, but there are several methodological options. Here we evaluated how three method permutations, type of mastermix, sample extract dilution and use of controls in results calculation, affect method reliability among multiple laboratories with respect to sample interference. Multiple samples from each of 22 sites representing an array of habitat types were analyzed using EPA Method 1611 and 1609 reagents with full strength and five-fold diluted extracts. The presence of interference was assessed three ways: using sample processing and PCR amplifications controls; consistency of results across extract dilutions; and relative recovery of target genes from spiked enterococci in water sample compared to control matrices with acceptable recovery defined as 50 to 200%. Method 1609, which is based on an environmental mastermix, was found to be superior to Method 1611, which is based on a universal mastermix. Method 1611 had over a 40% control assay failure rate with undiluted extracts and a 6% failure rate with diluted extracts. Method 1609 failed in only 11% and 3% of undiluted and diluted extracts analyses. Use of sample processing control assay results in the delta-delta Ct method for calculating relative target gene recoveries increased the number of acceptable recovery results. Delta-delta tended to bias recoveries from apparent partially inhibitory samples on the high side which could help in avoiding potential underestimates of enterococci--an important consideration in a public health context. Control assay and delta-delta recovery results were largely consistent across the range of habitats sampled, and among laboratories. The methodological option that best balanced acceptable estimated target gene recoveries with method sensitivity and avoidance of underestimated enterococci densities was Method 1609 without extract

  13. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; determination of methylene blue active substances by spectrophotometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Mark R.; Cinotto, Pete J.; Frahm, Galen W.; Woodworth, Mark T.; Pritt, Jeffrey W.

    1995-01-01

    A method for the determination of methylene blue active substances in whole-water samples by liquid-liquid extraction and spectrophotometric detection is described. Sulfate and sulfonate-based surfectants are reacted with methylene blue to form a blue-colored complex. The complex is extracted into chloroform, back-washed with an acidified phosphate-based buffer solution, and measured against external standards with a probe spectrophotometer. The method detection limt for routine analysis is 0.02 milligram per liter. The precision is plus/minus 10 percent relative standard deviation. The positive bias from nitrate and chloride and U.S. Geological Survey method O-3111-83 for methylene blue active substances is minized by adding a back-washing step.

  14. 2010 Ecological Survey of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chamness, Michele A.; Perry, Christopher; Downs, Janelle L.; Powell, Sylvia D.

    2011-02-16

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) oversees and manages the DOE contract for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), a DOE Office of Science multi-program laboratory located in Richland, Washington. PNSO is responsible for ensuring that all activities conducted on the PNNL Site comply with applicable laws, policies, and DOE orders. The DOE Pacific Northwest Site Office Cultural and Biological Resources Management Plan (DOE/PNSO 2008) addresses the requirement for annual surveys and monitoring for species of concern and to identify and map invasive species. In addition to the requirement for an annual survey, proposed project activities must be reviewed to assess any potential environmental consequences of conducting the project. The assessment process requires a thorough understanding of the resources present, the potential impacts of a proposed action to those resources, and the ultimate consequences of those actions. The PNNL Site is situated on the southeastern corner of the DOE Hanford Site, located at the north end of the city of Richland in south-central Washington. The site is bordered on the east by the Columbia River, on the west by Stevens Drive, and on the north by the Hanford Site 300 Area (Figure 1). The environmental setting of the PNNL Site is described in Larson and Downs (2009). There are currently two facilities on the PNNL Site: the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), and the recently completed Physical Sciences Facility (PSF). This report describes the results of the annual survey of the biological resources found on the undeveloped portions of the PNNL Site in 2010. A brief description of the methods PNNL ecologists used to conduct the surveys and the results of the surveys are presented. Actions taken to fully delineate noxious weed populations discovered in 2009 and efforts in 2010 to control those weeds also are described. Appendix A provides a list of plant and

  15. Field methods and quality-assurance plan for water-quality activities and water-level measurements, U.S. Geological Survey, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomay, Roy C.; Maimer, Neil V.; Wehnke, Amy J.

    2014-01-01

    Water-quality activities and water-level measurements by the personnel of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Project Office coincide with the USGS mission of appraising the quantity and quality of the Nation’s water resources. The activities are carried out in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Idaho Operations Office. Results of the water-quality and hydraulic head investigations are presented in various USGS publications or in refereed scientific journals and the data are stored in the National Water Information System (NWIS) database. The results of the studies are used by researchers, regulatory and managerial agencies, and interested civic groups. In the broadest sense, quality assurance refers to doing the job right the first time. It includes the functions of planning for products, review and acceptance of the products, and an audit designed to evaluate the system that produces the products. Quality control and quality assurance differ in that quality control ensures that things are done correctly given the “state-of-the-art” technology, and quality assurance ensures that quality control is maintained within specified limits.

  16. 2011 Annual Ecological Survey: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, James M.; Chamness, Michele A.

    2012-02-27

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) oversees and manages the DOE contract for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), a DOE Office of Science multi-program laboratory located in Richland, Washington. PNSO is responsible for ensuring that all activities conducted on the PNNL site comply with applicable laws, policies, and DOE Orders. The DOE Pacific Northwest Site Office Cultural and Biological Resources Management Plan (DOE/PNSO 2008) addresses the requirement for annual surveys and monitoring for species of concern and to identify and map invasive species. In addition to the requirement for an annual survey, proposed project activities must be reviewed to assess any potential environmental consequences of conducting the project. The assessment process requires a thorough understanding of the resources present, the potential impacts of a proposed action to those resources, and the ultimate consequences of those actions. The PNNL site is situated on the southeastern corner of the DOE Hanford Site, located at the north end of the city of Richland in south-central Washington. The site is bordered on the east by the Columbia River, on the west by Stevens Drive, and on the north by the Hanford Site 300 Area (Figure 1). The environmental setting of the PNNL site is described in Larson and Downs (2009). There are currently two facilities on the PNNL site: the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory and the Physical Sciences Facility. This report describes the annual survey of biological resources found on the undeveloped upland portions of the PNNL site. The annual survey is comprised of a series of individual field surveys conducted on various days in late May and throughout June 2011. A brief description of the methods PNNL ecologists used to conduct the baseline surveys and a summary of the results of the surveys are presented. Appendix A provides a list of plant and animal species identified in the

  17. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; determination of selected carbamate pesticides in water by high-performance liquid chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, S.L.; Johnson, S.M.

    1994-01-01

    As part of its primary responsibility concerning water as a national resource, the U.S. Geological Survey collects and analyzes samples of ground water and surface water to determine water quality. This report describes the method used since June 1987 to determine selected total-recoverable carbamate pesticides present in water samples. High- performance liquid chromatography is used to separate N-methyl carbamates, N-methyl carbamoyloximes, and an N-phenyl carbamate which have been extracted from water and concentrated in dichloromethane. Analytes, surrogate compounds, and reference compounds are eluted from the analytical column within 25 minutes. Two modes of analyte detection are used: (1) a photodiode-array detector measures and records ultraviolet-absorbance profiles, and (2) a fluorescence detector measures and records fluorescence from an analyte derivative produced when analyte hydrolysis is combined with chemical derivatization. Analytes are identified and confirmed in a three-stage process by use of chromatographic retention time, ultraviolet (UV) spectral comparison, and derivatization/fluorescence detection. Quantitative results are based on the integration of single-wavelength UV-absorbance chromatograms and on comparison with calibration curves derived from external analyte standards that are run with samples as part of an instrumental analytical sequence. Estimated method detection limits vary for each analyte, depending on the sample matrix conditions, and range from 0.5 microgram per liter to as low as 0.01 microgram per liter. Reporting levels for all analytes have been set at 0.5 microgram per liter for this method. Corrections on the basis of percentage recoveries of analytes spiked into distilled water are not applied to values calculated for analyte concentration in samples. These values for analyte concentrations instead indicate the quantities recovered by the method from a particular sample matrix.

  18. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Ames Laboratory, Ames, Iowa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-03-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings of the first phase of the environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Ames Laboratory, conducted April 18 through 22, 1988. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team members are being supplied by private contractors. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the Ames Laboratory. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at the Ames Laboratory, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis (S A) Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The S A plan is being developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. When S A is completed, the results will be incorporated into the Ames Laboratory Environmental Survey findings for inclusion in the Environmental Survey Summary Report. 60 refs., 13 figs., 20 tabs.

  19. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; determination of low-level silver by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damrau, D.L.

    1993-01-01

    Increased awareness of the quality of water in the United States has led to the development of a method for determining low levels (0.2-5.0 microg/L) of silver in water samples. Use of graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry provides a sensitive, precise, and accurate method for determining low-level silver in samples of low ionic-strength water, precipitation water, and natural water. The minimum detection limit determined for low-level silver is 0.2 microg/L. Precision data were collected on natural-water samples and SRWS (Standard Reference Water Samples). The overall percent relative standard deviation for natural-water samples with silver concentrations more than 0.2 microg/L was less than 40 percent throughout the analytical range. For the SRWS with concentrations more than 0.2 microg/L, the overall percent relative standard deviation was less than 25 percent throughout the analytical range. The accuracy of the results was determined by spiking 6 natural-water samples with different known concentrations of the silver standard. The recoveries ranged from 61 to 119 percent at the 0.5-microg/L spike level. At the 1.25-microg/L spike level, the recoveries ranged from 92 to 106 percent. For the high spike level at 3.0 microg/L, the recoveries ranged from 65 to 113 percent. The measured concentrations of silver obtained from known samples were within the Branch of Quality Assurance accepted limits of 1 1/2 standard deviations on the basis of the SRWS program for Inter-Laboratory studies.

  20. Laboratory method used for bioremediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carman, M. Leslie; Taylor, Robert T.

    2000-01-01

    An improved method for in situ microbial filter bioremediation having increasingly operational longevity of an in situ microbial filter emplaced into an aquifer. A method for generating a microbial filter of sufficient catalytic density and thickness, which has increased replenishment interval, improved bacteria attachment and detachment characteristics and the endogenous stability under in situ conditions. A system for in situ field water remediation.

  1. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-11-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings of the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), conducted June 15 through 26, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. The team includes outside experts supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with ANL. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. The on-site phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at ANL, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis (S A) Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The S A Plan will be executed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). When completed, the S A results will be incorporated into the Argonne National Laboratory Environmental Survey findings for inclusion in the Environmental Survey Summary Report. 75 refs., 24 figs., 60 tabs.

  2. Survey of laboratory-acquired infections around the world in biosafety level 3 and 4 laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurtz, N; Papa, A; Hukic, M; Di Caro, A; Leparc-Goffart, I; Leroy, E; Landini, M P; Sekeyova, Z; Dumler, J S; Bădescu, D; Busquets, N; Calistri, A; Parolin, C; Palù, G; Christova, I; Maurin, M; La Scola, B; Raoult, D

    2016-08-01

    Laboratory-acquired infections due to a variety of bacteria, viruses, parasites, and fungi have been described over the last century, and laboratory workers are at risk of exposure to these infectious agents. However, reporting laboratory-associated infections has been largely voluntary, and there is no way to determine the real number of people involved or to know the precise risks for workers. In this study, an international survey based on volunteering was conducted in biosafety level 3 and 4 laboratories to determine the number of laboratory-acquired infections and the possible underlying causes of these contaminations. The analysis of the survey reveals that laboratory-acquired infections have been infrequent and even rare in recent years, and human errors represent a very high percentage of the cases. Today, most risks from biological hazards can be reduced through the use of appropriate procedures and techniques, containment devices and facilities, and the training of personnel.

  3. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-10-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), conducted September 14 through 25, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual participants for the Survey team are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with Fermilab. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations performed at Fermilab, and interviews with site personnel. 110 refs., 26 figs., 41 tabs.

  4. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-06-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) conducted April 6 through 17, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with BNL. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at BNL, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing specific environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the BNL Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the BNL Survey. 80 refs., 24 figs., 48 tabs.

  5. Method of Analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey California District Sacramento Laboratory-- Determination of Dissolved Organic Carbon in Water by High Temperature Catalytic Oxidation, Method Validation, and Quality-Control Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Susan M.; Fram, Miranda S.; Crepeau, Kathryn L.

    2003-01-01

    An analytical method has been developed for the determination of dissolved organic carbon concentration in water samples. This method includes the results of the tests used to validate the method and the quality-control practices used for dissolved organic carbon analysis. Prior to analysis, water samples are filtered to remove suspended particulate matter. A Shimadzu TOC-5000A Total Organic Carbon Analyzer in the nonpurgeable organic carbon mode is used to analyze the samples by high temperature catalytic oxidation. The analysis usually is completed within 48 hours of sample collection. The laboratory reporting level is 0.22 milligrams per liter.

  6. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-12-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the Department of Energy (DOE) Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), conducted December 1 through 19, 1986. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with LLNL. The Survey covers all environmental media all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations performed at LLNL, and interviews with site personnel. A Sampling and Analysis Plan was developed to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during performance of on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by a DOE National Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the LLNL Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the LLNL Survey. 70 refs., 58 figs., 52 tabs.,

  7. Trends in Laboratory Diagnostic Methods in Periodontology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beáta Bolerázska

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a summary of current knowledge on the laboratory diagnosis of periodontitis. It focuses on the theoretical foundations and is supplemented with new knowledge. It subsequently describes specifically the laboratory diagnosis methods of periodontitis: the protein expression of inflammation, oral microbiology and molecular diagnostics. Periodontitis is a serious disease worldwide and its confirmed association with systemic diseases means its severity is increasing. Its laboratory diagnosis has the potential to rise to the level of clinical and diagnostic imaging. The transfer of diagnostic methods from laboratory to clinical use is increasingly used in the prevention and monitoring of the exacerbation and treatment of periodontal disease, as well as of its impact on systemic disease.

  8. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; determination of chromium in water by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLain, B.J.

    1993-01-01

    Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry is a sensitive, precise, and accurate method for the determination of chromium in natural water samples. The detection limit for this analytical method is 0.4 microg/L with a working linear limit of 25.0 microg/L. The precision at the detection limit ranges from 20 to 57 percent relative standard deviation (RSD) with an improvement to 4.6 percent RSD for concentrations more than 3 microg/L. Accuracy of this method was determined for a variety of reference standards that was representative of the analytical range. The results were within the established standard deviations. Samples were spiked with known concentrations of chromium with recoveries ranging from 84 to 122 percent. In addition, a comparison of data between graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry and direct-current plasma atomic emission spectrometry resulted in suitable agreement between the two methods, with an average deviation of +/- 2.0 microg/L throughout the analytical range.

  9. Development, Evaluation and Use of a Student Experience Survey in Undergraduate Science Laboratories: The Advancing Science by Enhancing Learning in the Laboratory Student Laboratory Learning Experience Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrie, Simon C.; Bucat, Robert B.; Buntine, Mark A.; Burke da Silva, Karen; Crisp, Geoffrey T.; George, Adrian V.; Jamie, Ian M.; Kable, Scott H.; Lim, Kieran F.; Pyke, Simon M.; Read, Justin R.; Sharma, Manjula D.; Yeung, Alexandra

    2015-07-01

    Student experience surveys have become increasingly popular to probe various aspects of processes and outcomes in higher education, such as measuring student perceptions of the learning environment and identifying aspects that could be improved. This paper reports on a particular survey for evaluating individual experiments that has been developed over some 15 years as part of a large national Australian study pertaining to the area of undergraduate laboratories-Advancing Science by Enhancing Learning in the Laboratory. This paper reports on the development of the survey instrument and the evaluation of the survey using student responses to experiments from different institutions in Australia, New Zealand and the USA. A total of 3153 student responses have been analysed using factor analysis. Three factors, motivation, assessment and resources, have been identified as contributing to improved student attitudes to laboratory activities. A central focus of the survey is to provide feedback to practitioners to iteratively improve experiments. Implications for practitioners and researchers are also discussed.

  10. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; determination of the total phosphorus by a Kjeldahl digestion method and an automated colorimetric finish that includes dialysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Charles J.; Truitt, Earl P.

    1992-01-01

    A method to determine total phosphorus (TP) in the same digests prepared for total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN) determinations is desribed. The batch, high-temperature (block digester), HG(II)-catalyzed digestion step is similar to U.S. Geological Survey methods I-2552-85/I-4552-85 and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency method 365.4 except that sample and reagent volumes are halved. Prepared digests are desolvated at 220 degrees Celsius and digested at 370 degrees Celsius in separate block digesters set at these temperatures, rather than in a single, temperature-programmed block digester. This approach is used in the method escribed here, which permits 40 calibrants, reference waters, and smaples to be digested and resolvated in about an hour. Orthophosphate ions originally present in samples, along with those released during the digestion step, are determined colorimetrically at a rate of 90 tests per hour by an automated version of the phosphoantimonylmolybdenum blue procedure. About 100 microliters of digest are required per determination. The upper concentration limit is 2 milligrams per liter (mg/L) with a method detection limt of 0.01 mg/L. Repeatability for a sample containing approximately 1.6 mg/L of TP in a high suspended-solids matrix is 0.7 percent. Between-day precision for the same sample is 5.0 percent. A dialyzer in the air-segmented continuous flow analyzer provides on-line digest cleanup, eliminated particulates that otherwise would interfere in the colorimetric finish. An single-channel analyzer can process the resolvated digests from two pairs of block digesters each hour. Paired t-test analysis of TP concentrations for approximately 1,600 samples determined by the new method (U.S. Geologial Survey methods I-2610-91 and I-4610-91) and the old method (U.S. Geological Survey methods I-2600-85 and I-4600-85) revealed positive bias in the former of 0.02 to 0.04 mg/L for surface-water samples in agreement with previous studies. Concentrations of total

  11. Sandia National Laboratories, California proposed CREATE facility environmental baseline survey.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catechis, Christopher Spyros

    2013-10-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, Environmental Programs completed an environmental baseline survey (EBS) of 12.6 acres located at Sandia National Laboratories/California (SNL/CA) in support of the proposed Collaboration in Research and Engineering for Advanced Technology and Education (CREATE) Facility. The survey area is comprised of several parcels of land within SNL/CA, County of Alameda, California. The survey area is located within T 3S, R 2E, Section 13. The purpose of this EBS is to document the nature, magnitude, and extent of any environmental contamination of the property; identify potential environmental contamination liabilities associated with the property; develop sufficient information to assess the health and safety risks; and ensure adequate protection for human health and the environment related to a specific property.

  12. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to present the preliminary findings made during the Environmental Survey, February 22--29, 1988, at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) in Berkeley, California. The University of California operates the LBL facility for DOE. The LBL Survey is part of the larger DOE-wide Environmental Survey announced by Secretary John S. Herrington on September 18, 1985. The purpose of this effort is to identify, via no fault'' baseline Surveys, existing environmental problems and areas of environmental risk at DOE facilities, and to rank them on a DOE wide basis. This ranking will enable DOE to more effectively establish priorities for addressing environmental problems and allocate the resources necessary to correct them. Because the Survey is no fault'' and is not an audit,'' it is not designed to identify specific isolated incidents of noncompliance or to analyze environmental management practices. Such incidents and/or management practices will, however, be used in the Survey as a means of identifying existing and potential environmental problems. The LBL Survey was conducted by a multidisciplinary team of technical specialists headed and managed by a Team Leader and Assistant Team Leader from DOE's Office of Environmental Audit. A complete list of the LBL Survey participants and their affiliations is provided in Appendix A. 80 refs., 27 figs., 37 tabs.

  13. Current practice in laboratory diagnostics of autoimmune diseases in Croatia. 
Survey of the Working group for laboratory diagnostics of autoimmune diseases of the Croatian Society of Medical Biochemistry and Laboratory Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuna, Andrea Tešija; Đerek, Lovorka; Kozmar, Ana; Drvar, Vedrana

    2016-01-01

    Introduction With the trend of increasing incidence of autoimmune diseases, laboratories are faced with exponential growth of the requests for tests relating the diagnosis of these diseases. Unfortunately, the lack of laboratory personnel experienced in this specific discipline of laboratory diagnostic, as well as an unawareness of a method limitation often results in confusion for clinicians. The aim was to gain insight into number and type of Croatian laboratories that perform humoral diagnostics with the final goal to improve and harmonize laboratory diagnostics of autoimmune diseases in Croatia. Materials and methods In order to get insight into current laboratory practice two questionnaires, consisting of 42 questions in total, were created. Surveys were conducted using SurveyMonkey application and were sent to 88 medical biochemistry laboratories in Croatia for the first survey. Out of 33 laboratories that declared to perform diagnostic from the scope, 19 were selected for the second survey based on the tests they pleaded to perform. The survey comprised questions regarding autoantibody hallmarks of systemic autoimmune diseases while regarding organ-specific autoimmune diseases was limited to diseases of liver, gastrointestinal and nervous system. Results Response rate was high with 80 / 88 (91%) laboratories which answered the first questionnaire, and 19 / 19 (1.0) for the second questionnaire. Obtained results of surveys indicate high heterogeneity in the performance of autoantibody testing among laboratories in Croatia. Conclusions Results indicate the need of creating recommendations and algorithms in order to harmonize the approach to laboratory diagnostics of autoimmune diseases in Croatia.

  14. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-01-01

    This report contains the preliminary findings based on the first phase of an Environmental Survey at the Department of Energy (DOE) Sandia National Laboratories Livermore (SNLL), located at Livermore, California. The Survey is being conducted by DOE's Office of Environment, Safety and Health. The SNLL Survey is a portion of the larger, comprehensive DOE Environmental Survey encompassing all major operating facilities of DOE. The DOE Environmental Survey is one of a series of initiatives announced on September 18, 1985, by Secretary of Energy, John S. Herrington, to strengthen the environmental, safety, and health programs and activities within DOE. The purpose of the Environmental Survey is to identify, via a no fault'' baseline Survey of all the Department's major operating facilities, environmental problems and areas of environmental risk. The identified problem areas will be prioritized on a Department-wide basis in order of importance in 1989. The findings in this report are subject to modification based on the results from the Sampling and Analysis Phase of the Survey. The findings are also subject to modification based on comments from the Albuquerque Operations Office concerning the technical accuracy of the findings. The modified preliminary findings and any other appropriate changes will be incorporated into an Interim Report. The Interim Report will serve as the site-specific source for environmental information generated by the Survey, and ultimately as the primary source of information for the DOE-wide prioritization of environmental problems in the Survey Summary Report. 43 refs., 21 figs., 24 tabs.

  15. Environmental survey at Lucas Heights Research Laboratories, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, E.L.; Looz, T.

    1995-04-01

    Results are presented of the environmental survey conducted in the neighbourhood of the Lucas Heights Research Laboratories during 1993. No activity which could have originated from these laboratories was found in samples collected from possible human food chains. All low-level liquid and gaseous waste discharges were within authorised limits. The maximum possible annual dose to the general public from airborne discharges during this period is estimated to be less than 0.01 mSv, which is one per cent of the dose limit for long term exposure that is recommended by the National Health and Medical Research Council. A list of previous environmental survey reports is attached. 22 refs., 21 tabs., 4 figs.

  16. Environmental survey at Lucas Heights Research Laboratories, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, E.L.; Looz, T.

    1995-04-01

    Results are presented of the environmental survey conducted in the neighbourhood of the Lucas Heights Research Laboratories during 1993. No activity which could have originated from these laboratories was found in samples collected from possible human food chains. All low-level liquid and gaseous waste discharges were within authorised limits. The maximum possible annual dose to the general public from airborne discharges during this period is estimated to be less than 0.01 mSv, which is one per cent of the dose limit for long term exposure that is recommended by the National Health and Medical Research Council. A list of previous environmental survey reports is attached. 22 refs., 21 tabs., 4 figs.

  17. [Bacterial identification methods in the microbiology laboratory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bou, Germán; Fernández-Olmos, Ana; García, Celia; Sáez-Nieto, Juan Antonio; Valdezate, Sylvia

    2011-10-01

    In order to identify the agent responsible of the infectious process and understanding the pathogenic/pathological implications, clinical course, and to implement an effective antimicrobial therapy, a mainstay in the practice of clinical microbiology is the allocation of species to a microbial isolation. In daily routine practice microbiology laboratory phenotypic techniques are applied to achieve this goal. However, they have some limitations that are seen more clearly for some kinds of microorganism. Molecular methods can circumvent some of these limitations, although its implementation is not universal. This is due to higher costs and the level of expertise required for thei implementation, so molecular methods are often centralized in reference laboratories and centers. Recently, proteomics-based methods made an important breakthrough in the field of diagnostic microbiology and will undoubtedly have a major impact on the future organization of the microbiology services. This paper is a short review of the most noteworthy aspects of the three bacterial identification methods described above used in microbiology laboratories. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  18. Survey of Anomaly Detection Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, B

    2006-10-12

    This survey defines the problem of anomaly detection and provides an overview of existing methods. The methods are categorized into two general classes: generative and discriminative. A generative approach involves building a model that represents the joint distribution of the input features and the output labels of system behavior (e.g., normal or anomalous) then applies the model to formulate a decision rule for detecting anomalies. On the other hand, a discriminative approach aims directly to find the decision rule, with the smallest error rate, that distinguishes between normal and anomalous behavior. For each approach, we will give an overview of popular techniques and provide references to state-of-the-art applications.

  19. Methods of analysis by the U. S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; determination of pesticides in water by graphitized carbon-based solid-phase extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlong, Edward T.; Anderson, Bruce D.; Werner, Stephen L.; Soliven, Paul P.; Coffey, Laura J.; Burkhardt, Mark R.

    2001-01-01

    In 1996, the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory (NWQL) developed and implemented a graphitized carbon-based solid-phase extraction and high-performance liquid chromatographic analytical method to determine polar pesticide concentrations in surface- and ground-water samples. Subsequently, the NWQL developed a complementary analysis that uses high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry to detect, identify, and quantify polar pesticides and pesticide metabolites in filtered water at concentrations as low as 10 nanograms per liter. This new method was designed to improve sensitivity and selectivity over the prior method, and to reduce known interferences from natural organic matter. In this new method, pesticides are extracted from filtered water samples by useing a 0.5-gram graphitized carbon-based solid-phase extraction cartridge, eluted from the cartridge, and concentrations determined by using high-perforance liquid chromatography with elecrospray ionization-mass spectrometry. The upper concentratoin limit is 1.000 microgram per liter (ug/L) for most compounds. Single-operator method detection limits in organic-free water samples fortified with pesticdes at a concentration of 0.025 ug/L ranged from 0.0019 to 0.022 ug/L for all compunds in the method. The grand mean (mean of mean recoveries for individual compounds) recoveries in organic-free water samples ranged from 72 to 89 percent, fortified wit hpesticides at three concentrations between 0.025 and 0.5 ug/L. Grand mean recoveries in ground- and surface-water samples ranged from 46 to 119 percent, also fortified with pesticies at three concentrations between 0.025 and 0.5 ug/L. Long-term recoveries from reagent water spikes were used to demonstrate that 38 of 65 compounds can be reported without qualification of the quantitative result across the analytical range of the method. The remaining 27 are reported with qualified estimates of concentration because of greater variability

  20. Analytic Validation of Immunohistochemistry Assays: New Benchmark Data From a Survey of 1085 Laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Lauren N; Volmar, Keith E; Nowak, Jan A; Fatheree, Lisa A; Souers, Rhona J; Fitzgibbons, Patrick L; Goldsmith, Jeffrey D; Astles, J Rex; Nakhleh, Raouf E

    2017-09-01

    - A cooperative agreement between the College of American Pathologists (CAP) and the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention was undertaken to measure laboratories' awareness and implementation of an evidence-based laboratory practice guideline (LPG) on immunohistochemical (IHC) validation practices published in 2014. - To establish new benchmark data on IHC laboratory practices. - A 2015 survey on IHC assay validation practices was sent to laboratories subscribed to specific CAP proficiency testing programs and to additional nonsubscribing laboratories that perform IHC testing. Specific questions were designed to capture laboratory practices not addressed in a 2010 survey. - The analysis was based on responses from 1085 laboratories that perform IHC staining. Ninety-six percent (809 of 844) always documented validation of IHC assays. Sixty percent (648 of 1078) had separate procedures for predictive and nonpredictive markers, 42.7% (220 of 515) had procedures for laboratory-developed tests, 50% (349 of 697) had procedures for testing cytologic specimens, and 46.2% (363 of 785) had procedures for testing decalcified specimens. Minimum case numbers were specified by 85.9% (720 of 838) of laboratories for nonpredictive markers and 76% (584 of 768) for predictive markers. Median concordance requirements were 95% for both types. For initial validation, 75.4% (538 of 714) of laboratories adopted the 20-case minimum for nonpredictive markers and 45.9% (266 of 579) adopted the 40-case minimum for predictive markers as outlined in the 2014 LPG. The most common method for validation was correlation with morphology and expected results. Laboratories also reported which assay changes necessitated revalidation and their minimum case requirements. - Benchmark data on current IHC validation practices and procedures may help laboratories understand the issues and influence further refinement of LPG recommendations.

  1. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory : evaluation of alkaline persulfate digestion as an alternative to Kjeldahl digestion for determination of total and dissolved nitrogen and phosphorus in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Charles J.; Kryskalla, Jennifer R.

    2003-01-01

    Alkaline persulfate digestion was evaluated and validated as a more sensitive, accurate, and less toxic alternative to Kjeldahl digestion for routine determination of nitrogen and phosphorus in surface- and ground-water samples in a large-scale and geographically diverse study conducted by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) between October 1, 2001, and September 30, 2002. Data for this study were obtained from about 2,100 surface- and ground-water samples that were analyzed for Kjeldahl nitrogen and Kjeldahl phosphorus in the course of routine operations at the USGS National Water Quality Laboratory (NWQL). These samples were analyzed independently for total nitrogen and total phosphorus using an alkaline persulfate digestion method developed by the NWQL Methods Research and Development Program. About half of these samples were collected during nominally high-flow (April-June) conditions and the other half were collected during nominally low-flow (August-September) conditions. The number of filtered and whole-water samples analyzed from each flow regime was about equal.By operational definition, Kjeldahl nitrogen (ammonium + organic nitrogen) and alkaline persulfate digestion total nitrogen (ammonium + nitrite + nitrate + organic nitrogen) are not equivalent. It was necessary, therefore, to reconcile this operational difference by subtracting nitrate + nitrite concentra-tions from alkaline persulfate dissolved and total nitrogen concentrations prior to graphical and statistical comparisons with dissolved and total Kjeldahl nitrogen concentrations. On the basis of two-population paired t-test statistics, the means of all nitrate-corrected alkaline persulfate nitrogen and Kjeldahl nitrogen concentrations (2,066 paired results) were significantly different from zero at the p = 0.05 level. Statistically, the means of Kjeldahl nitrogen concentrations were greater than those of nitrate-corrected alkaline persulfate nitrogen concentrations. Experimental evidence strongly

  2. The Bell Laboratories (13)CO Survey Longitude-Velocity Maps

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Y; Kim, H G; Moon, D; Lee, Youngung

    2001-01-01

    A survey is presented of the Galactic plane in the J=1-0 transition of (13)CO. About 73,000 spectra were obtained with the 7 m telescope at Bell Laboratories over a ten-year period. The coverage of survey is (l, b) = (-5 to 117, -1 to +1), or 244 square degrees, with a grid spacing of 3' for |b| 0.5. The data presented here have been resampled onto a 3' grid. For 0.68 km/s channels, the rms noise level of the survey is 0.1 K on the $T_R^*$ scale. The raw data have been transformed into FITS format, and all the reduction processes, such as correcting for emission in the reference positions, baseline removal and interpolation were conducted within IRAF using the FCRAO task package and additional programs. The reduced data are presented here in the form of longitude-velocity color maps at each latitude. These data allow identification and classification of molecular clouds with masses in excess of ~ 1,000 solar masses throughout the first quadrant of the Galaxy. Spiral structure is manifested by the locations o...

  3. Methods of bicycle users’ survey

    OpenAIRE

    Tokmylenko, Olena

    2015-01-01

    The paper provides a review of data collection methods that can be used for bicycling modeling and planning. The review includes fifteen international studies that use different methods of data collection. The main advantages and disadvantages of each method are listed and the recommendations on when to use particular method are provided.

  4. Faculty perspectives of the undergraduate laboratory: A survey of faculty goals for the laboratory and comparative analysis of responses using statistical techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruck, Aaron D.

    Qualitative research methods were used in a previous study to discover the goals of faculty members teaching undergraduate laboratories. Assertions about the goals and the unique characteristics of innovative lab programs were developed from categories that emerged from the interviews. The purpose of the present research was to create a survey instrument to measure the prevalence of these themes and faculty goals for undergraduate laboratories with a national sample. This was achieved through a two-stage process that utilized a pilot survey to determine the factor structure and reduce the number of survey items to a manageable size. Once the number of survey questions was reduced, the full survey was given to a national sample of undergraduate laboratory faculty. The 312 responses to the survey were then analyzed using factor analysis. Comparative analyses were conducted using analysis of variance (ANOVA). This dissertation focuses on the processes involved in the creation of this survey and the subsequent analyses of the data the survey produced. The results of these analyses and the implications of this research will also be discussed.

  5. Customer Satisfaction Survey With Clinical Laboratory and Phlebotomy Services at a Tertiary Care Unit Level

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Koh, Young Rae; Kim, Shine Young; Kim, In Suk; Chang, Chulhun L; Lee, Eun Yup; Son, Han Chul; Kim, Hyung Hoi

    2014-01-01

    We performed customer satisfaction surveys for physicians and nurses regarding clinical laboratory services, and for outpatients who used phlebotomy services at a tertiary care unit level to evaluate...

  6. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; determination of organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls in bottom sediment by dual capillary-column gas chromatography with electron-capture detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, William T.; Connor, Brooke F.; Furlong, Edward T.; Vaught, Deborah G.; Merten, Leslie M.

    1995-01-01

    A method for the determination of 30 individual organochlorine pesticides, total toxaphene, and total polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in bottom sediment is described. The method isolates the pesticides and PCBs by solvent extraction with dichlorobenzene, removes inorganic sulfur, large naturally occurring molecules, and other unwanted interferences by gel permeation chromatography, and further cleans up and class fractionates the extract using adsorption chromatography. The com- pounds then are instrumentally determined using dual capillary-column gas chromatography with electron-capture detection. Reporting limits range from 1 to 5 micrograms per kilogram for 30 individual pesticides, 50 micrograms per kilogram for total PCBs, and 200 micrograms per kilogram for total toxaphene. The method also is designed to allow the simultaneous isolation of 79 other semivolatile organic compounds from the sediment, which are separately quantified using gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection. The method was developed in support of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment program.

  7. 大理某医院检验报告单的带菌情况调查及消毒方法研究%Survey on the Rates and Species of Bacterial Contamination of Laboratory Sheets and Disinfection Methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董立文; 王菲; 沈彩玲; 张秀丹; 陆绍花; 王涛

    2011-01-01

    目的:对医院检验报告单的带菌情况进行调查及消毒方法研究。方法:先直接涂抹检验报告单取样培养。检验报告单采用紫外线消毒法、甲醛熏蒸消毒法、戊二醛熏蒸消毒法、微波消毒法消毒后,再涂抹检验报告单取样后接种培养。结果:紫外线消毒法,消毒前共生长菌292株,消毒后共长菌146株,消毒灭菌率为50%;甲醛熏蒸消毒法,消毒前共生长菌121株,消毒后共长菌76株,消毒灭菌率为37.19%;戊二醛熏蒸消毒法,未消毒共生长菌125株,消毒后共长菌60株,消毒灭菌率为52%;微波消毒法,消毒前共生长菌550株,消毒后共长菌189株,消毒灭菌率为65.64%。结论:微波消毒法是消毒检验报告单的较好方法。%Objective: To investigate the rates of bacterial contamination of laboratory sheets and relevant disinfection methods.Method: Laboratory sheets were sampled directly and bacteria were cultured in medium,and then laboratory sheets were disinfected by using different sterile techniques including ultraviolet sterilization,formaldehyde fumigation sterilization,glutaric dialdehyde fumigation method and microwave.Finally,those laboratory sheets were sampled directly again and bacteria were cultured again.Results: Two hundred and ninety-two strains bacteria grew on culture medium before ultraviolet sterilization and 146 strains after;the sterilization rate was 50%.There were 121 strains bacteria before formaldehyde fumigation sterilization and 76 strains after;the sterilization rate was 37.19%.There were 125 strains before glutaric dialdehyde fumigation sterilization and 60 strains after;the sterilization rate was 52%.There were 550 strains bacteria before Microwave sterilization and 189 strains after;the sterilization rate was 65.64%.Conclusion: Microwave sterilization showed better sterilization rate in laboratory sheets sterilization.

  8. Y-STR frequency surveying method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willuweit, Sascha; Caliebe, Amke; Andersen, Mikkel Meyer;

    2011-01-01

    reached a new quality with the establishment of the comprehensive neatly quality-controlled reference database YHRD. Grounded on such unrivalled empirical material from hundreds of populations studies the core assumption of the Haplotype Frequency Surveying Method originally described 10 years ago can...... be tested and improved. Here we provide new approaches to calculate the parameters used in the frequency surveying method: a maximum likelihood estimation of the regression parameters (r1, r2, s1 and s2) and a revised Frequency Surveying framework with variable binning and a database preprocessing to take...

  9. Methods of Analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory - Determination of Wastewater Compounds by Polystyrene-Divinylbenzene Solid-Phase Extraction and Capillary-Column Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaugg, Steven D.; Smith, Steven G.; Schroeder, Michael P.; Barber, Larry B.; Burkhardt, Mark R.

    2002-01-01

    A method for the determination of 67 compounds typically found in domestic and industrial wastewater is described. The method was developed in response to increasing concern over the impact of endocrine-disrupting chemicals in wastewater on aquatic organisms. This method also may be useful for evaluating the impact of combined sanitary and storm-sewer overflow on the water quality of urban streams. The method focuses on the determination of compounds that are an indicator of wastewater or that have been chosen on the basis of their endocrine-disrupting potential or toxicity. These compounds include the alkylphenol ethoxylate nonionic surfactants and their degradates, food additives, fragrances, antioxidants, flame retardants, plasticizers, industrial solvents, disinfectants, fecal sterols, polycyclicaromatic hydrocarbons, and high-use domestic pesticides. Water samples are filtered to remove suspended particulate matter and then are extracted by vacuum through disposable solid-phase cartridges that contain polystyrene-divinylbenzene resin. Cartridges are dried with nitrogen gas, and then sorbed compounds are eluted with dichloromethane-diethyl ether (4:1) and determined by capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Recoveries in reagent-water samples fortified at 4 micrograms per liter averaged 74 percent ? 7 percent relative standard deviation for all method compounds. Initial method detection limits for single-component compounds (excluding hormones and sterols) averaged 0.15 microgram per liter. Samples are preserved by filtration, the addition of 60 grams NaCl, and storage at 4 degrees Celsius. The laboratory has established a sample-holding time (prior to sample extraction) of 14 days from the date of sample collection until a statistically accepted method can be used to determine the effectiveness of these sample-preservation procedures.

  10. Basic Laboratory Safety and General Survey of The Turkish Laboratory Safety Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meral Karaman

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Clinical and research laboratory employees have to face various hazards and biological risk factors in the working environment due to laboratory structures and regulations. In order to protect personnelfrom these occupational hazards and laboratory acquired infections, basic microbiological practices which are the major factors of biosafety concept should be well known, appropriate and safe laboratory equipments (primary barriers should be used and functional working areas (secondary barriers should be designed. We have limited data regarding biosafety profiles of the laboratories and laboratory staff in our country. Nevertheless, in the light of the existing studies, it is thought that technical and infrastructural facilities are inadequate and also biosafety levels and related applications are either not well known or not properly carried out by the staff. Implementing theoretically accepted basic microbiological practices, a certain quality and cosciousness level of the staff, continuous in-service training are important factors of a safe and efficient working environment in the laboratories.

  11. Survey and analysis of materials research and development at selected federal laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, J.E.; Fink, C.R.

    1984-04-01

    This document presents the results of an effort to transfer existing, but relatively unknown, materials R and D from selected federal laboratories to industry. More specifically, recent materials-related work at seven federal laboratories potentially applicable to improving process energy efficiency and overall productiviy in six energy-intensive manufacturing industries was evaluated, catalogued, and distributed to industry representatives to gauge their reaction. Laboratories surveyed include: Air Force Wright Aeronautical Laboratories Material Laboratory (AFWAL). Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), National Aeronautics and Space Administration Marshall Flight Center (NASA Marshall), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), and Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). Industries included in the effort are: aluminum, cement, paper and allied products, petroleum, steel and textiles.

  12. Survey of 2014 behavioral management programs for laboratory primates in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Kate C

    2016-07-01

    The behavioral management of laboratory nonhuman primates in the United States has not been thoroughly characterized since 2003. This article presents the results of a survey behavioral management programs at 27 facilities and covering a total of 59,636 primates, 27,916 housed in indoor cages and 31,720 in group enclosures. The survey included questions regarding program structure, implementation, and methodology associated with social housing, positive reinforcement training, positive human interaction, exercise enclosures, and several categories of inanimate enrichment. The vast majority of laboratory primates are housed socially (83%). Since 2003, the proportion of indoor-housed primates reported to be housed singly has fallen considerably, from 59% to 35% in the facilities surveyed. The use of social housing remains significantly constrained by: 1) research protocol requirements, highlighting the value of closely involved IACUCs for harmonizing research and behavioral management; and 2) the unavailability of compatible social partners, underscoring the necessity of objective analysis of the methods used to foster and maintain compatibility. Positive reinforcement training appears to have expanded and is now used at all facilities responding to the survey. The use of enrichment devices has also increased in the participating facilities. For most behavioral management techniques, concerns over the possibility of negative consequences to animals are expressed most frequently for social housing and destructible enrichment, while skepticism regarding efficacy is limited almost exclusively to sensory enrichment. Behavioral management program staffing has expanded over time in the facilities surveyed, due not only to increased numbers of dedicated behavioral management technicians but also to greater involvement of animal care technicians, suggesting an increase in the integration of behavioral care into animal husbandry. Broad awareness of common practice may assist

  13. Laboratory methods for enhanced oil recovery core floods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, E.P.; Bala, G.A.; Thomas, C.P.

    1994-03-01

    Current research at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is investigating microbially enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) systems for application to oil reservoirs. Laboratory corefloods are invaluable in developing technology necessary for a field application of MEOR. Methods used to prepare sandstone cores for experimentation, coreflooding techniques, and quantification of coreflood effluent are discussed in detail. A technique to quantify the small volumes of oil associated with laboratory core floods is described.

  14. [Resistance of gonococci in the Netherlands; results of a survey of medical microbiology laboratories].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Loo, I H M; Spaargaren, J; van de Laar, M J W

    2005-05-28

    To collect information about the incidence ofgonorrhoea and gonococcal resistance in the Netherlands. A questionnaire was sent to 39 medical microbiology laboratories to obtain information on current diagnostics and the susceptibility testing method, and on the number of positive results and the susceptibility pattern of gonococcal isolates in 2002 and 2003 (up to and including November). 32 laboratories participated in this survey. 13 laboratories used culture alone and 19 laboratories used culture and/or a molecular test. Gonorrhoea was diagnosed 2,666 times in 2002 and 2,190 times in 2003, with an incidence of 33.5 and 27.0 per 100,000 inhabitants, respectively. The rate of resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics (penicillin and amoxicillin) was 12.2% and 10.7% in 2002 and 2003, respectively, and the rates of resistance to tetracycline were 18.5% and 20.6%. An increase in the resistance to quinolones was observed from 6.6% in 2002 to 9.5% in 2003. Resistance to cephalosporins was low (0.5% in 2002 and 1.2% in 2003). Furthermore, regional differences in susceptibility were found within the Netherlands. The observed gonococcal incidence and resistance form the basis for a gonorrhoea prevention and treatment programme in the Netherlands.

  15. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; determination of pesticides in water by C-18 solid-phase extraction and capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with selected-ion monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaugg, Steven D.; Sandstrom, Mark W.; Smith, Steven G.; Fehlberg, Kevin M.

    1995-01-01

    A method for the isolation of 41 pesticides and pesticide metabolites in natural-water samples using C-18 solid-phase extraction and determination by capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with selected-ion monitoring is described. Water samples are filtered to remove suspended particulate matter and then are pumped through disposable solid-phase extraction columns containing octadecyl-bonded porous silica to extract the pesticides. The columns are dried using carbon dioxide or nitrogen gas, and adsorbed pesticides are removed from the columns by elution with 3.0 milliliters of hexane-isopropanol (3:1). Extracted pesticides are determined by capillary- column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with selected-ion monitoring of three characteristic ions. The upper concentration limit is 4 micrograms per liter (g/L) for most pesticides, with the exception of widely used corn herbicides--atrazine, alachlor, cyanazine, and metolachlor--which have upper concentration limits of 20 g/L. Single- operator method detection limits in reagent-water samples range from 0.001 to 0.018 g/L. Average short-term single-operator precision in reagent- water samples is 7 percent at the 0.1- and 1.0-g/L levels and 8 percent at the 0.01-g/L level. Mean recoveries in reagent-water samples are 73 percent at the 0.1- and 1.0-g/L levels and 83 percent at the 0.01-g/L level. The estimated holding time for pesticides after extraction on the solid-phase extraction columns was 7 days. An optional on-site extraction procedure allows for samples to be collected and processed at remote sites where it is difficult to ship samples to the laboratory within the recommended pre-extraction holding time.

  16. Survey of Electronic Payment Methods and Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Havinga, Paul J.M.; Smit, Gerard J.M.; Helme, Arne

    1996-01-01

    In this paper an overview of electronic payment methods and systems is given. This survey is done as part of the Moby Dick project. Electronic payment systems can be grouped into three broad classes: traditional money transactions, digital currency and creditdebit payments. Such payment systems have

  17. Customer satisfaction survey with clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services at a tertiary care unit level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Young Rae; Kim, Shine Young; Kim, In Suk; Chang, Chulhun L; Lee, Eun Yup; Son, Han Chul; Kim, Hyung Hoi

    2014-09-01

    We performed customer satisfaction surveys for physicians and nurses regarding clinical laboratory services, and for outpatients who used phlebotomy services at a tertiary care unit level to evaluate our clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services. Thus, we wish to share our experiences with the customer satisfaction survey for clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services. Board members of our laboratory designed a study procedure and study population, and developed two types of questionnaire. A satisfaction survey for clinical laboratory services was conducted with 370 physicians and 125 nurses by using an online or paper questionnaire. The satisfaction survey for phlebotomy services was performed with 347 outpatients who received phlebotomy services by using computer-aided interviews. Mean satisfaction scores of physicians and nurses was 58.1, while outpatients' satisfaction score was 70.5. We identified several dissatisfactions with our clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services. First, physicians and nurses were most dissatisfied with the specimen collection and delivery process. Second, physicians and nurses were dissatisfied with phlebotomy services. Third, molecular genetic and cytogenetic tests were found more expensive than other tests. This study is significant in that it describes the first reference survey that offers a survey procedure and questionnaire to assess customer satisfaction with clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services at a tertiary care unit level.

  18. Manual of analytical methods for the Industrial Hygiene Chemistry Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greulich, K.A.; Gray, C.E. (comp.)

    1991-08-01

    This Manual is compiled from techniques used in the Industrial Hygiene Chemistry Laboratory of Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The procedures are similar to those used in other laboratories devoted to industrial hygiene practices. Some of the methods are standard; some, modified to suit our needs; and still others, developed at Sandia. The authors have attempted to present all methods in a simple and concise manner but in sufficient detail to make them readily usable. It is not to be inferred that these methods are universal for any type of sample, but they have been found very reliable for the types of samples mentioned.

  19. A survey of modal synthesis methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, G. C.; Hurty, W. C.; Collins, J. D.

    1971-01-01

    Several modal synthesis procedures for the dynamic analysis of largy composite structural systems are surveyed. The matrix formulation of the free-free modal synthesis procedures is presented. Also given are schematic flow charts of the analysis procedure used in three prominent methods. The advantages and disadvantages of several modal synthesis methods for different classes of structural problems are presented in order to enable the engineer to select the best procedure for his particular type of problem.

  20. Survey of emissivity measurement by radiometric methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honner, M; Honnerová, P

    2015-02-01

    A survey of the state of the art in the field of spectral directional emissivity measurements by using radiometric methods is presented. Individual quantity types such as spectral, band, or total emissivity are defined. Principles of emissivity measurement by various methods (direct and indirect, and calorimetric and radiometric) are discussed. The paper is focused on direct radiometric methods. An overview of experimental setups is provided, including the design of individual parts such as the applied reference sources of radiation, systems of sample clamping and heating, detection systems, methods for the determination of surface temperature, and procedures for emissivity evaluation.

  1. National Cooperative Soil Survey (NCSS) Laboratory Data, NCSS Lab Data Mart Point Dataset

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Agriculture — This layer represents the National Cooperative Soil Survey laboratory data of soil properties for soil samples taken at sites or points on the Earth’s globe – mainly...

  2. Methods of the National Nutrition Survey 1999

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Resano-Pérez Elsa

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the methods and analyses of the 1999 National Nutrition Survey (NNS-99. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The 1999 National Nutrition Survey (NNS-99 is a probabilistic survey with nationwide representativity. The NNS-99 included four regions and urban and rural areas of Mexico. The last sampling units were households, selected through stratified cluster sampling. The study population consisted of children under five years of age, school-age children (6-11 years, and women of childbearing age (12-49 years. Data were collected on anthropometric measurements, hemoglobin levels, morbidity and its determinants, and socioeconomic and demographic characteristics. In addition, data on diet and micronutrients intakes (iron, zinc, vitamin A, folic acid, vitamin C, and iodine were obtained in a sub-sample of subjects. RESULTS: The response rate for the NNS-99 was 82.3%; the non-response rate was 5.9% and the remaining did not participate due to uninhabited houses. CONCLUSIONS: This survey updates the information on nutritional status in Mexico and should serve as the basis for food and nutrition policy-making and priority program design.

  3. The Laboratory Course Assessment Survey: A Tool to Measure Three Dimensions of Research-Course Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corwin, Lisa A; Runyon, Christopher; Robinson, Aspen; Dolan, Erin L

    2015-01-01

    Course-based undergraduate research experiences (CUREs) are increasingly being offered as scalable ways to involve undergraduates in research. Yet few if any design features that make CUREs effective have been identified. We developed a 17-item survey instrument, the Laboratory Course Assessment Survey (LCAS), that measures students' perceptions of three design features of biology lab courses: 1) collaboration, 2) discovery and relevance, and 3) iteration. We assessed the psychometric properties of the LCAS using established methods for instrument design and validation. We also assessed the ability of the LCAS to differentiate between CUREs and traditional laboratory courses, and found that the discovery and relevance and iteration scales differentiated between these groups. Our results indicate that the LCAS is suited for characterizing and comparing undergraduate biology lab courses and should be useful for determining the relative importance of the three design features for achieving student outcomes. © 2015 L. A. Corwin et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2015 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  4. Quality-assurance results for routine water analysis in US Geological Survey laboratories, water year 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, T.J.; Ludtke, A.S.; Krizman, T.L.

    1994-01-01

    The US. Geological Survey operates a quality- assurance program based on the analyses of reference samples for the National Water Quality Laboratory in Arvada, Colorado, and the Quality of Water Service Unit in Ocala, Florida. Reference samples containing selected inorganic, nutrient, and low ionic-strength constituents are prepared and disguised as routine samples. The program goal is to determine precision and bias for as many analytical methods offered by the participating laboratories as possible. The samples typically are submitted at a rate of approximately 5 percent of the annual environmental sample load for each constituent. The samples are distributed to the laboratories throughout the year. Analytical data for these reference samples reflect the quality of environmental sample data produced by the laboratories because the samples are processed in the same manner for all steps from sample login through data release. The results are stored permanently in the National Water Data Storage and Retrieval System. During water year 1991, 86 analytical procedures were evaluated at the National Water Quality Laboratory and 37 analytical procedures were evaluated at the Quality of Water Service Unit. An overall evaluation of the inorganic (major ion and trace metal) constituent data for water year 1991 indicated analytical imprecision in the National Water Quality Laboratory for 5 of 67 analytical procedures: aluminum (whole-water recoverable, atomic emission spectrometric, direct-current plasma); calcium (atomic emission spectrometric, direct); fluoride (ion-exchange chromatographic); iron (whole-water recoverable, atomic absorption spectrometric, direct); and sulfate (ion-exchange chromatographic). The results for 11 of 67 analytical procedures had positive or negative bias during water year 1991. Analytical imprecision was indicated in the determination of two of the five National Water Quality Laboratory nutrient constituents: orthophosphate as phosphorus and

  5. Final Report Bald and Golden Eagle Territory Surveys for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fratanduono, M. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-11-25

    Garcia and Associates (GANDA) was contracted by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to conduct surveys for bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) and golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) at Site 300 and in the surrounding area out to 10-miles. The survey effort was intended to document the boundaries of eagle territories by careful observation of eagle behavior from selected viewing locations throughout the study area.

  6. The Laboratory Course Assessment Survey: A Tool to Measure Three Dimensions of Research-Course Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corwin, Lisa A.; Runyon, Christopher; Robinson, Aspen; Dolan, Erin L.

    2015-01-01

    Course-based undergraduate research experiences (CUREs) are increasingly being offered as scalable ways to involve undergraduates in research. Yet few if any design features that make CUREs effective have been identified. We developed a 17-item survey instrument, the Laboratory Course Assessment Survey (LCAS), that measures students' perceptions…

  7. Perceptions of a medical microbiology service: a survey of laboratory users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, M S

    1995-01-01

    AIM--To ascertain the perception of laboratory users regarding the quality of the medical microbiology services in a district general hospital. METHODS--Detailed questionnaires were circulated to all clinicians in the locality, with headings covering the quality of medical advice provided, the availability of information on specimen collection, format of request forms, specimen transport arrangements, turnaround times, the quality and need for interpretative advice, and the overall impression of the quality of the services provided. RESULTS--Two hundred and thirty five replies were received, giving a response rate of 69%. Transportation of specimens and communication of reports were identified as priority areas for improvement. The overall quality of the service was perceived as satisfactory, although areas were identified where substantial improvements could be made, some at little or no cost to the laboratory. CONCLUSIONS--The survey focused clinicians' attention on the service, raised the profile of the laboratory, and resulted in improved communications and a better understanding of customer needs. Overall, the exercise was felt to be extremely useful, and worthwhile repeating to gauge the effect of the changes instituted as a result. PMID:8537489

  8. Improvement of analytical capabilities of neutron activation analysis laboratory at the Colombian Geological Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrado, G.; Cañón, Y.; Peña, M.; Sierra, O.; Porras, A.; Alonso, D.; Herrera, D. C.; Orozco, J.

    2016-07-01

    The Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) laboratory at the Colombian Geological Survey has developed a technique for multi-elemental analysis of soil and plant matrices, based on Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) using the comparator method. In order to evaluate the analytical capabilities of the technique, the laboratory has been participating in inter-comparison tests organized by Wepal (Wageningen Evaluating Programs for Analytical Laboratories). In this work, the experimental procedure and results for the multi-elemental analysis of four soil and four plant samples during participation in the first round on 2015 of Wepal proficiency test are presented. Only elements with radioactive isotopes with medium and long half-lives have been evaluated, 15 elements for soils (As, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Fe, K, La, Na, Rb, Sb, Sc, Th, U and Zn) and 7 elements for plants (Br, Co, Cr, Fe, K, Na and Zn). The performance assessment by Wepal based on Z-score distributions showed that most results obtained |Z-scores| ≤ 3.

  9. Application of Sampling Methods to Geological Survey

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@There are two kinds of research methods in geological observation study. One is the remote-sensing observation. The other is the partial sampling method extensively used in every stage of the geological work, for example, in arranging the lines and points of geologic survey, and in arranging the exploration engineering. Three problems may occur in practical application of the sampling method: (1) Though we use the partial sampling method in geological work, we must make use of many labor powers, materials and money to accomplish the geological task. Is the method we use appropriate to some special geological task? (2) How many samples or observation points should be appropriate to the geological research?

  10. AGILE METHODS AND QUALITY _ A SURVEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BODJE N'Kauh Nathan-Regis

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Agile software processes, such as extreme programming (XP, Scrum, Lean, etc., rely on best practices that are considered to improve software development quality. It can be said that best practices aim to induce software quality assurance (SQA into the project at hand. Some researchers of agile methods claim that because of the very nature of such methods, quality in agile software projects should be a natural outcome of the applied method. As a consequence, agile quality is expected to be more or less embedded in the agile software processes. Many reports support and evangelize the advantages of agile methods with respect to quality assurance, Is it so ? An ambitious goal of this paper is to present work done to understand how quality is or should be handled. This paper as all survey papers attempt to summarize and organizes research results in the field of software engineering, precisely for the topic of agile methods related to software quality.

  11. Survey of environmental enhancement programs for laboratory primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Kate C; Weed, James L; Crockett, Carolyn M; Bloomsmith, Mollie A

    2007-04-01

    Animal welfare regulations in the United States require that nonhuman primate environmental enhancement plans be made in accordance with currently accepted professional standards; however, little information is available for quantifying common practice. Here we report the results of a 2003 survey that was sent to individuals overseeing enrichment programs at a variety of primate research institutions. The surveys requested information on program administration and management, implementation standards, procedures, and constraints pertaining to major categories of environmental enrichment, as well as intervention plans for animals exhibiting behavioral pathologies. Data were obtained on the management of 35,863 primates in 22 facilities. Behavioral scientists performed program oversight at the majority of facilities. Most programs reported recent changes, most commonly due to external site visits, and least commonly resulting from internal review. Most facilities' institutional animal care and use committees (IACUCs) included of individuals with behavioral expertise, and about two-thirds reported that enrichment issues could influence research protocol design. While most primates were reported to be housed socially (73%), social housing for indoor-housed primates appears to have changed little over the past 10 years. Research protocol issues and social incompatibility were commonly cited constraints. Implementation of feeding, manipulanda, and structural enrichment was relatively unconstrained, and contributions to these aspects of behavioral management generally included individuals in a wide variety of positions within a facility. In contrast, enrichment devices were used on a less widespread basis within facilities, and positive reinforcement programs that involved dedicated trainers were rare. We suggest that altering the role of the IACUC would be a productive avenue for increasing the implementation of social housing, and that an emphasis on prevention rather

  12. Variability of ethics education in laboratory medicine training programs: results of an international survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruns, David E; Burtis, Carl A; Gronowski, Ann M; McQueen, Matthew J; Newman, Anthony; Jonsson, Jon J

    2015-03-10

    Ethical considerations are increasingly important in medicine. We aimed to determine the mode and extent of teaching of ethics in training programs in clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine. We developed an on-line survey of teaching in areas of ethics relevant to laboratory medicine. Reponses were invited from directors of training programs who were recruited via email to leaders of national organizations. The survey was completed by 80 directors from 24 countries who directed 113 programs. The largest numbers of respondents directed postdoctoral training of scientists (42%) or physicians (33%), post-masters degree programs (33%), and PhD programs (29%). Most programs (82%) were 2years or longer in duration. Formal training was offered in research ethics by 39%, medical ethics by 31%, professional ethics by 24% and business ethics by 9%. The number of reported hours of formal training varied widely, e.g., from 0 to >15h/year for research ethics and from 0 to >15h for medical ethics. Ethics training was required and/or tested in 75% of programs that offered training. A majority (54%) of respondents reported plans to add or enhance training in ethics; many indicated a desire for online resources related to ethics, especially resources with self-assessment tools. Formal teaching of ethics is absent from many training programs in clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine, with heterogeneity in the extent and methods of ethics training among the programs that provide the training. A perceived need exists for online training tools, especially tools with self-assessment components. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Implementation of 5S Method for Ergonomic Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dila Sari, Amarria; Ilma Rahmillah, Fety; Prabowo Aji, Bagus

    2017-06-01

    This article discusses 5S implementation in Work System Design and Ergonomic Laboratory, Department of Industrial Engineering, Islamic University of Indonesia. There are some problems related to equipment settings for activity involving students such as files which is accumulated over the previous year practicum, as well as the movement of waste in the form of time due to the placement of goods that do not fit. Therefore, this study aims to apply the 5S method in DSK & E laboratory to facilitate the work processes and reduce waste. The project is performed by laboratory management using 5S methods in response to continuous improvement (Kaizen). Moreover, some strategy and suggestions are promoted to impose 5S system within the laboratory. As a result, the tidiness and cleanliness can be achieved that lead to the great performance of laboratory users. Score assessment before implementing 5S DSKE laboratory is at 64 (2.56) while the score after implementation is 32 (1.28) and shows an improvement of 50%. This has implications for better use in the laboratory area, save time when looking for tools and materials due to its location and good visual control, as well as improving the culture and spirit of ‘5S’ on staff regarding better working environment

  14. A survey of Asian life scientists :the state of biosciences, laboratory biosecurity, and biosafety in Asia.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaudioso, Jennifer Marie

    2006-02-01

    Over 300 Asian life scientists were surveyed to provide insight into work with infectious agents. This report provides the reader with a more complete understanding of the current practices employed to study infectious agents by laboratories located in Asian countries--segmented by level of biotechnology sophistication. The respondents have a variety of research objectives and study over 60 different pathogens and toxins. Many of the respondents indicated that their work was hampered by lack of adequate resources and the difficulty of accessing critical resources. The survey results also demonstrate that there appears to be better awareness of laboratory biosafety issues compared to laboratory biosecurity. Perhaps not surprisingly, many of these researchers work with pathogens and toxins under less stringent laboratory biosafety and biosecurity conditions than would be typical for laboratories in the West.

  15. Safety in the Chemical Laboratory: Tested Disposal Methods for Chemical Wastes from Academic Laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, M. A.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Describes procedures for disposing of dichromate cleaning solution, picric acid, organic azides, oxalic acid, chemical spills, and hydroperoxides in ethers and alkenes. These methods have been tested under laboratory conditions and are specific for individual chemicals rather than for groups of chemicals. (JN)

  16. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (X-10), Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-07-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), X-10 site, conducted August 17 through September 4, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team specialists are outside experts supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with ORNL. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. The on-site phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at ORNL, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by a DOE National Laboratory or a support contractor. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the Environmental Survey Interim Report for ORNL. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the ORNL Survey. 120 refs., 68 figs., 71 tabs.

  17. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-01-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), conducted March 29, 1987 through April 17, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are outside experts being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the LANL. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. The on-site phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at the LANL, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the LANL Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the Survey for the LANL. 65 refs., 68 figs., 73 tabs.

  18. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research, Davis, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-03-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) at the University of California, Davis (UC Davis), conducted November 16 through 20, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the LEHR. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation, and is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations at the LEHR and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by a DOE National Laboratory or a support contractor. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the Environmental Survey Interim Report for the LEHR at UC Davis. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the LEHR Survey. 75 refs., 26 figs., 23 tabs.

  19. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-05-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings of the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), conducted June 13 through 17, 1988. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Team members are being provided by private contractors. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with PPPL. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at PPPL, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis (S A) Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environment problems identified during its on-site activities. The S A plan is being developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. When completed, the S A results will be incorporated into the PPPL Survey findings for inclusion in the Environmental Survey Summary Report. 70 refs., 17 figs., 21 tabs.

  20. Towards harmonisation of critical laboratory result management - review of the literature and survey of australasian practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Ca; Horvath, Ar

    2012-11-01

    Timely release and communication of critical test results may have significant impact on medical decisions and subsequent patient outcomes. Laboratories therefore have an important responsibility and contribution to patient safety. Certification, accreditation and regulatory bodies also require that laboratories follow procedures to ensure patient safety, but there is limited guidance on best practices. In Australasia, no specific requirements exist in this area and critical result reporting practices have been demonstrated to be heterogeneous worldwide.Recognising the need for agreed standards and critical limits, the AACB started a quality initiative to harmonise critical result management throughout Australasia. The first step toward harmonisation is to understand current laboratory practices. Fifty eight Australasian laboratories responded to a survey and 36 laboratories shared their critical limits. Findings from this survey are compared to international practices reviewed in various surveys conducted elsewhere. For the successful operation of a critical result management system, critical tests and critical limits must be defined in collaboration with clinicians. Reporting procedures must include how critical results are identified; who can report and who can receive critical results; what is an acceptable timeframe within which results must be delivered or, if reporting fails, what escalation procedures should follow; what communication channels or systems should be used; what should be recorded and how; and how critical result procedures should be maintained and evaluated to assess impact on outcomes.In this paper we review the literature of current standards and recommendations for critical result management. Key elements of critical result reporting are discussed in view of the findings of various national surveys on existing laboratory practices, including data from our own survey in Australasia. Best practice recommendations are made that laboratories

  1. Laboratory diagnostic methods, system of quality and validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ašanin Ružica

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available It is known that laboratory investigations secure safe and reliable results that provide a final confirmation of the quality of work. Ideas, planning, knowledge, skills, experience, and environment, along with good laboratory practice, quality control and reliability of quality, make the area of biological investigations very complex. In recent years, quality control, including the control of work in the laboratory, is based on international standards and is used at that level. The implementation of widely recognized international standards, such as the International Standard ISO/IEC 17025 (1 and the implementing of the quality system series ISO/IEC 9000 (2 have become the imperative on the grounds of which laboratories have a formal, visible and corresponding system of quality. The diagnostic methods that are used must constantly yield results which identify the animal as positive or negative, and the precise status of the animal is determined with a predefined degree of statistical significance. Methods applied on a selected population reduce the risk of obtaining falsely positive or falsely negative results. A condition for this are well conceived and documented methods, with the application of the corresponding reagents, and work with professional and skilled staff. This process requires also a consistent implementation of the most rigorous experimental plans, epidemiological and statistical data and estimations, with constant monitoring of the validity of the applied methods. Such an approach is necessary in order to cut down the number of misconceptions and accidental mistakes, for a referent population of animals on which the validity of a method is tested. Once a valid method is included in daily routine investigations, it is necessary to apply constant monitoring for the purpose of internal quality control, in order adequately to evaluate its reproducibility and reliability. Consequently, it is necessary at least twice yearly to conduct

  2. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory : determination of organophosphate pesticides in whole water by continuous liquid-liquid extraction and capillary-column gas chromatography with flame photometric detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Virendra K.; Wydoski, Duane S.

    2003-01-01

    A method for the isolation of 20 parent organophosphate pesticides and 5 organophosphate pesticide degradates from natural-water samples is described. Compounds are extracted from water samples with methylene chloride using a continuous liquid-liquid extractor for 6 hours. The solvent is evaporated using heat and a flow of nitrogen to a volume of 1 milliliter and solvent exchanged to ethyl acetate. Extracted compounds are determined by capillary-column gas chromatography with flame photometric detection. Single-operator derived method detection limits in three water-matrix samples ranged from 0.003 to 0.009 microgram per liter. Method performance was validated by spiking all compounds in three different matrices at three different concentrations. Eight replicates were analyzed at each concentration in each matrix. Mean recoveries of most method compounds spiked in surface-water samples ranged from 54 to 137 percent and those in ground-water samples ranged from 40 to 109 percent for all pesticides. Recoveries in reagent-water samples ranged from 42 to 104 percent for all pesticides. The only exception was O-ethyl-O-methyl-S-propylphosphorothioate, which had variable recovery in all three matrices ranging from 27 to 79 percent. As a result, the detected concentration of O-ethyl-O-methyl-S-propylphosphorothioate in samples is reported in this method with an estimated remark code. Based on the performance issue, two more compounds, disulfoton and ethion monoxon, also will be reported in this method with an estimated remark code. Estimated-value compounds, which are ?E-coded? in the data base, do not meet the performance criteria for unqualified quantification, but are retained in the method because the compounds are important owing to high use or potential environmental effects and because analytical performance has been consistent and reproducible.

  3. THE METHODS OF LABORATORY DIAGNOSTICS OF THE GENITOURINARY TRICHOMONIASIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Makhlay

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The laboratory diagnostics of trichomoniasis is strongly recommended for the diagnosis confirmation. The current review summarizes information concerning diagnostic methods directed to identification of this protozoa by morphology, to detection of antigens of T. vaginalis as well as specific antibodies and pathogen DNA. The existing problems in the interpretation of results and information about the efficacy of each method in the patient’s testing algorithm are discussed in the article.

  4. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; determination of chlorinated pesticides in aquatic tissue by capillary-column gas chromatography with electron-capture detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiker, Thomas J.; Madsen, J.E.; Deacon, J.R.; Foreman, W.T.

    1995-01-01

    A method for the determination of chlorinated organic compounds in aquatic tissue by dual capillary-column gas chromatography with electron-capture detection is described. Whole-body-fish or corbicula tissue is homogenized, Soxhlet extracted, lipid removed by gel permeation chromatography, and fractionated using alumina/silica adsorption chromatography. The extracts are analyzed by dissimilar capillary-column gas chromatography with electron-capture detection. The method reporting limits are 5 micrograms per kilogram (μg/kg) for chlorinated compounds, 50 μg/kg for polychlorinated biphenyls, and 200 μg/kg for toxaphene.

  5. Methods of analysis and quality-assurance practices of the U.S. Geological Survey organic laboratory, Sacramento, California; determination of pesticides in water by solid-phase extraction and capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crepeau, Kathryn L.; Domagalski, Joseph L.; Kuivila, Kathryn M.

    1994-01-01

    Analytical method and quality-assurance practices were developed for a study of the fate and transport of pesticides in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta and the Sacramento and San Joaquin River. Water samples were filtered to remove suspended parti- culate matter and pumped through C-8 solid-phase extraction cartridges to extract the pesticides. The cartridges were dried with carbon dioxide, and the pesticides were eluted with three 2-milliliter aliquots of hexane:diethyl ether (1:1). The eluants were analyzed using capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in full-scan mode. Method detection limits for analytes determined per 1,500-milliliter samples ranged from 0.006 to 0.047 microgram per liter. Recoveries ranged from 47 to 89 percent for 12 pesticides in organic-free, Sacramento River and San Joaquin River water samples fortified at 0.05 and 0.26 microgram per liter. The method was modified to improve the pesticide recovery by reducing the sample volume to 1,000 milliliters. Internal standards were added to improve quantitative precision and accuracy. The analysis also was expanded to include a total of 21 pesticides. The method detection limits for 1,000-milliliter samples ranged from 0.022 to 0.129 microgram per liter. Recoveries ranged from 38 to 128 percent for 21 pesticides in organic-free, Sacramento River and San Joaquin River water samples fortified at 0.10 and 0.75 microgram per liter.

  6. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; comparison of a nitric acid in-bottle digestion procedure to other whole-water digestion procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbarino, John R.; Hoffman, Gerald L.

    1999-01-01

    A hydrochloric acid in-bottle digestion procedure is used to partially digest wholewater samples prior to determining recoverable elements by various analytical methods. The use of hydrochloric acid is problematic for some methods of analysis because of spectral interference. The inbottle digestion procedure has been modified to eliminate such interference by using nitric acid instead of hydrochloric acid in the digestion. Implications of this modification are evaluated by comparing results for a series of synthetic whole-water samples. Results are also compared with those obtained by using U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (1994) (USEPA) Method 200.2 total-recoverable digestion procedure. Percentage yields that use the nitric acid inbottle digestion procedure are within 10 percent of the hydrochloric acid in-bottle yields for 25 of the 26 elements determined in two of the three synthetic whole-water samples tested. Differences in percentage yields for the third synthetic whole-water sample were greater than 10 percent for 16 of the 26 elements determined. The USEPA method was the most rigorous for solubilizing elements from particulate matter in all three synthetic whole-water samples. Nevertheless, the variability in the percentage yield by using the USEPA digestion procedure was generally greater than the in-bottle digestion procedure, presumably because of the difficulty in controlling the digestion conditions accurately.

  7. Methods of analysis by the U. S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory - determination of organonitrogen herbicides in water by solid-phase extraction and capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with selected-ion monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandstrom, Mark W.; Wydoski, Duane S.; Schroeder, Michael P.; Zamboni, Jana L.; Foreman, William T.

    1992-01-01

    A method for the isolation of organonitrogen herbicides from natural water samples using solid-phase extraction and analysis by capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with selected-ion monitoring is described. Water samples are filtered to remove suspended particulate matter and then are pumped through disposable solid-phase extraction cartridges containing octadecyl-bonded porous silica to remove the herbicides. The cartridges are dried using carbon dioxide, and adsorbed herbicides are removed from the cartridges by elution with 1.8 milliliters of hexaneisopropanol (3:1). Extracts of the eluants are analyzed by capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with selected-ion monitoring of at least three characteristic ions. The method detection limits are dependent on sample matrix and each particular herbicide. The method detection limits, based on a 100-milliliter sample size, range from 0.02 to 0.25 microgram per liter. Recoveries averaged 80 to 115 percent for the 23 herbicides and 2 metabolites in 1 reagent-water and 2 natural-water samples fortified at levels of 0.2 and 2.0 micrograms per liter.

  8. Analysis of laboratory compaction methods of roller compacted concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trtík, Tomáš; Chylík, Roman; Bílý, Petr; Fládr, Josef

    2017-09-01

    Roller-Compacted Concrete (RCC) is an ordinary concrete poured and compacted with machines typically used for laying of asphalt road layers. One of the problems connected with this technology is preparation of representative samples in the laboratory. The aim of this work was to analyse two methods of preparation of RCC laboratory samples with bulk density as the comparative parameter. The first method used dynamic compaction by pneumatic hammer. The second method of compaction had a static character. The specimens were loaded by precisely defined force in laboratory loading machine to create the same conditions as during static rolling (in the Czech Republic, only static rolling is commonly used). Bulk densities obtained by the two compaction methods were compared with core drills extracted from real RCC structure. The results have shown that the samples produced by pneumatic hammer tend to overestimate the bulk density of the material. For both compaction methods, immediate bearing index test was performed to verify the quality of compaction. A fundamental difference between static and dynamic compaction was identified. In static compaction, initial resistance to penetration of the mandrel was higher, after exceeding certain limit the resistance was constant. This means that the samples were well compacted just on the surface. Specimens made by pneumatic hammer actively resisted throughout the test, the whole volume was uniformly compacted.

  9. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; extraction of nitroaromatic compounds from water by polystyrene divinylbenzene cartridge and determination by high-performance liquid chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindley, C.E.; Burkhardt, M.R.; DeRusseau, S.N.

    1994-01-01

    Organic explosives are determined in samples of ground water and surface water with emphasis on identifying and quantifying trinitrotoluene (TNT) metabolites. Water samples are filtered to remove suspended particulate material and passed through a polystyrene divinylbenzene-packed cartridge by a vacuum-extraction system. The target analytes subsequently are eluted with acetonitrile. A high-performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC) equipped with a photodiode-array detector is used for sample analysis. Analytes are separated on an octadecylsilane column using a methanol, water, and acetonitrile gradient elution. The compounds 2,4- and 2,6-dinitrotoluene are separated through an independent, isocratic elution. Method detection limits, on the basis of a 1-liter sample size, range from 0.11 to 0.32 microgram per liter. Recoveries averaged from 71 to 101 percent for 13 analytes in one set of HPLC-grade water fortified at about 1 microgram per liter. The method is limited to use by analysts experienced in handling explosive materials. (USGS)

  10. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; determination of semivolatile organic compounds in bottom sediment by solvent extraction, gel permeation chromatographic fractionation, and capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlong, E.T.; Vaught, D.G.; Merten, L.M.; Foreman, W.T.; Gates, Paul M.

    1996-01-01

    A method for the determination of 79 semivolatile organic compounds (SOCs) and 4 surrogate compounds in soils and bottom sediment is described. The SOCs are extracted from bottom sediment by solvent extraction, followed by partial isolation using high-performance gel permeation chromatography (GPC). The SOCs then are qualitatively identified and quantitative concentrations determined by capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). This method also is designed for an optional simultaneous isolation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine (OC) insecticides, including toxaphene. When OCs and PCBs are determined, an additional alumina- over-silica column chromatography step follows GPC cleanup, and quantitation is by dual capillary- column gas chromatography with electron-capture detection (GC/ECD). Bottom-sediment samples are centrifuged to remove excess water and extracted overnight with dichloromethane. The extract is concentrated, centrifuged, and then filtered through a 0.2-micrometer polytetrafluoro-ethylene syringe filter. Two aliquots of the sample extract then are quantitatively injected onto two polystyrene- divinylbenzene GPC columns connected in series. The SOCs are eluted with dichloromethane, a fraction containing the SOCs is collected, and some coextracted interferences, including elemental sulfur, are separated and discarded. The SOC-containing GPC fraction then is analyzed by GC/MS. When desired, a second aliquot from GPC is further processed for OCs and PCBs by combined alumina-over-silica column chromatography. The two fractions produced in this cleanup then are analyzed by GC/ECD. This report fully describes and is limited to the determination of SOCs by GC/MS.

  11. Antifungal susceptibility testing method for resource constrained laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan S

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In resource-constrained laboratories of developing countries determination of antifungal susceptibility testing by NCCLS/CLSI method is not always feasible. We describe herein a simple yet comparable method for antifungal susceptibility testing. Methods: Reference MICs of 72 fungal isolates including two quality control strains were determined by NCCLS/CLSI methods against fluconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole, amphotericin B and cancidas. Dermatophytes were also tested against terbinafine. Subsequently, on selection of optimum conditions, MIC was determined for all the fungal isolates by semisolid antifungal agar susceptibility method in Brain heart infusion broth supplemented with 0.5% agar (BHIA without oil overlay and results were compared with those obtained by reference NCCLS/CLSI methods. Results: Comparable results were obtained by NCCLS/CLSI and semisolid agar susceptibility (SAAS methods against quality control strains. MICs for 72 isolates did not differ by more than one dilution for all drugs by SAAS. Conclusions: SAAS using BHIA without oil overlay provides a simple and reproducible method for obtaining MICs against yeast, filamentous fungi and dermatophytes in resource-constrained laboratories.

  12. Laboratory Diagnosis of Syphilis: A Survey to Examine the Range of Tests Used in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond SW. Tsang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory diagnosis of syphilis has undergone major changes in the past decade with the introduction of immunoassays and recombinant Treponema pallidum antigens as screening tools for syphilis infection. To address this change in laboratory practice, a national syphilis laboratory working group was established with members from the Public Health Agency of Canada, provincial public health laboratories across the country as well as sexually transmitted infection researchers, clinicians and epidemiologists. This working group aims to examine how the use of newer immunoassays will affect syphilis diagnosis, surveillance and disease management. To provide a baseline for this work, an e-mail survey was conducted in the fall of 2009 to determine current laboratory practices for syphilis diagnosis in Canada. The most commonly used tests were rapid plasma reagin, enzyme immunoassay, T pallidum passive particle agglutination, venereal disease research laboratory, fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption, line immunoassay and polymerase chain reaction with 92%, 36%, 32%, 20%, 12%, 12% and 12% of the responding laboratories reporting using these tests, respectively. The ultimate goal of this working group will be to update laboratory guidelines for the diagnosis of syphilis, and to identify syphilis surveillance and research priorities in Canada.

  13. Laboratory diagnosis of syphilis: A survey to examine the range of tests used in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Raymond Sw; Radons, Sandra Michelle; Morshed, Muhammad

    2011-01-01

    Laboratory diagnosis of syphilis has undergone major changes in the past decade with the introduction of immunoassays and recombinant Treponema pallidum antigens as screening tools for syphilis infection. To address this change in laboratory practice, a national syphilis laboratory working group was established with members from the Public Health Agency of Canada, provincial public health laboratories across the country as well as sexually transmitted infection researchers, clinicians and epidemiologists. This working group aims to examine how the use of newer immunoassays will affect syphilis diagnosis, surveillance and disease management. To provide a baseline for this work, an e-mail survey was conducted in the fall of 2009 to determine current laboratory practices for syphilis diagnosis in Canada. The most commonly used tests were rapid plasma reagin, enzyme immunoassay, T pallidum passive particle agglutination, venereal disease research laboratory, fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption, line immunoassay and polymerase chain reaction with 92%, 36%, 32%, 20%, 12%, 12% and 12% of the responding laboratories reporting using these tests, respectively. The ultimate goal of this working group will be to update laboratory guidelines for the diagnosis of syphilis, and to identify syphilis surveillance and research priorities in Canada.

  14. A Survey of Established Veterinary Clinical Skills Laboratories from Europe and North America: Present Practices and Recent Developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilly, Marc; Read, Emma K; Baillie, Sarah

    2017-05-23

    Developing competence in clinical skills is important if graduates are to provide entry-level care but it is dependent on having had sufficient hands-on practice. Clinical skills laboratories provide opportunities for students to learn on simulators and models in a safe environment and to supplement training with animals. Interest in facilities for developing veterinary clinical skills has increased in recent years as many veterinary colleges face challenges in training their students with traditional methods alone. For the present study, we designed a survey to gather information from established veterinary clinical skills laboratories with the aim of assisting others considering opening or expanding their own facility. Data were collated from 16 veterinary colleges in North America and Europe about the uses of their laboratory, the building and associated facilities, and the staffing, budgets, equipment, and supporting learning resources. The findings indicated that having a dedicated veterinary clinical skills laboratory is a relatively new initiative and that colleges have adopted a range of approaches to implementing and running the laboratory, teaching, and assessments. Major strengths were the motivation and positive characteristics of the staff involved, providing open access and supporting self-directed learning. However, respondents widely recognized the increasing demands placed on the facility to provide more space, equipment, and staff. There is no doubt that veterinary clinical skills laboratories are on the increase and provide opportunities to enhance student learning, complement traditional training, and benefit animal welfare.

  15. A method for addressing differences in concentrations of fipronil and three degradates obtained by two different laboratory methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Charles G.; Martin, Jeffrey D.

    2017-07-21

    In October 2012, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) began measuring the concentration of the pesticide fipronil and three of its degradates (desulfinylfipronil, fipronil sulfide, and fipronil sulfone) by a new laboratory method using direct aqueous-injection liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (DAI LC–MS/MS). This method replaced the previous method—in use since 2002—that used gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The performance of the two methods is not comparable for fipronil and the three degradates. Concentrations of these four chemical compounds determined by the DAI LC–MS/MS method are substantially lower than the GC/MS method. A method was developed to correct for the difference in concentrations obtained by the two laboratory methods based on a methods comparison field study done in 2012. Environmental and field matrix spike samples to be analyzed by both methods from 48 stream sites from across the United States were sampled approximately three times each for this study. These data were used to develop a relation between the two laboratory methods for each compound using regression analysis. The relations were used to calibrate data obtained by the older method to the new method in order to remove any biases attributable to differences in the methods. The coefficients of the equations obtained from the regressions were used to calibrate over 16,600 observations of fipronil, as well as the three degradates determined by the GC/MS method retrieved from the USGS National Water Information System. The calibrated values were then compared to over 7,800 observations of fipronil and to the three degradates determined by the DAI LC–MS/MS method also retrieved from the National Water Information System. The original and calibrated values from the GC/MS method, along with measures of uncertainty in the calibrated values and the original values from the DAI LC–MS/MS method, are provided in an accompanying data release.

  16. Laboratory procedures for the diagnosis of tuberculosis: a survey in ten Italian Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luisa Moro

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of laboratories performing tuberculosis (TB diagnostic procedures were investigated in ten Italian Regions, through a mailed questionnaire. Three hundred and eighty laboratories answered (70.8% response rate, 250 of which performed directly at least one TB diagnostic procedure. Standard criteria concerning microscopy, culture, identification, and drug susceptibility testing were frequently not satisfied, particularly those related to the volume of activity (32% of laboratories performing microscopy examined < 10 samples and 36% of those performing culture performed < 20 cultures per week, processing time, biosafety requirements and participation to internal/external quality control programs. The survey's results highlight the need to promote the adoption of standardized procedures and to centralize the mycobacteriology testing in a reduced number of high quality laboratories, in order to improve diagnostic accuracy, resource management and quality of surveillance data.

  17. From customer satisfaction survey to corrective actions in laboratory services in a university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oja, Paula I; Kouri, Timo T; Pakarinen, Arto J

    2006-12-01

    To find out the satisfaction of clinical units with laboratory services in a university hospital, to point out the most important problems and defects in services, to carry out corrective actions, and thereafter to identify the possible changes in satisfaction. and Senior physicians and nurses-in-charge of the clinical units at Oulu University Hospital, Finland. Customer satisfaction survey using a questionnaire was carried out in 2001, indicating the essential aspects of laboratory services. Customer-specific problems were clarified, corrective actions were performed, and the survey was repeated in 2004. In 2001, the highest dissatisfaction rates were recorded for computerized test requesting and reporting, turnaround times of tests, and the schedule of phlebotomy rounds. The old laboratory information system was not amenable to major improvements, and it was renewed in 2004-05. Several clinical units perceived turnaround times to be long, because the tests were ordered as routine despite emergency needs. Instructions about stat requesting were given to these units. However, no changes were evident in the satisfaction level in the 2004 survey. Following negotiations with the clinics, phlebotomy rounds were re-scheduled. This resulted in a distinct increase in satisfaction in 2004. Satisfaction survey is a screening tool that identifies topics of dissatisfaction. Without further clarifications, it is not possible to find out the specific problems of customers and to undertake targeted corrective actions. Customer-specific corrections are rarely seen as improvements in overall satisfaction rates.

  18. Comparison of Satellite Surveying to Traditional Surveying Methods for the Resources Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, B. P.; Osborne, V. J.; Kruger, M. L.

    Modern ground-based survey methods involve detailed survey, which provides three-space co-ordinates for surveyed points, to a high level of accuracy. The instruments are operated by surveyors, who process the raw results to create survey location maps for the subject of the survey. Such surveys are conducted for a location or region and referenced to the earth global co- ordinate system with global positioning system (GPS) positioning. Due to this referencing the survey is only as accurate as the GPS reference system. Satellite survey remote sensing utilise satellite imagery which have been processed using commercial geographic information system software. Three-space co-ordinate maps are generated, with an accuracy determined by the datum position accuracy and optical resolution of the satellite platform.This paper presents a case study, which compares topographic surveying undertaken by traditional survey methods with satellite surveying, for the same location. The purpose of this study is to assess the viability of satellite remote sensing for surveying in the resources industry. The case study involves a topographic survey of a dune field for a prospective mining project area in Pakistan. This site has been surveyed using modern surveying techniques and the results are compared to a satellite survey performed on the same area.Analysis of the results from traditional survey and from the satellite survey involved a comparison of the derived spatial co- ordinates from each method. In addition, comparisons have been made of costs and turnaround time for both methods.The results of this application of remote sensing is of particular interest for survey in areas with remote and extreme environments, weather extremes, political unrest, poor travel links, which are commonly associated with mining projects. Such areas frequently suffer language barriers, poor onsite technical support and resources.

  19. The diagnosis of Pneumocystis Carinii pneumonia by new laboratory methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahimifard N

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available The object of this study was to find a suitable staining method for P.carinii. This parasite is not easily stained and clinical signs are not specific for the diagnosis of P.carinii pneumonia and therefore optimal laboratory methods for observing the organism are extremely valuable. In all 17 new conventional and modified staining techniques were used on lung impression smears and tissue section of sprague Dawley Rat treated with cortisone. Of these methods modified methylene blue 1 & 2, modified cresy violet 1, 2, 3, 4 modified Gram, modified Giemsa 2 and modified Griedley techniques have not previously been reported. After comparing readability of the slides, ease of performances, rapidity, availability and sensitivity of these 17 techniques for the diagnosis of P.carinii pneumonia, modified toluidine blue 01 & 2, modified methylene blue 1 & 2 and modified cresyl violet 3, 4 are suggested as the methods of choice for the rapid diagnosis of P.carinii pneumonia.

  20. Field issues for the plan and operation of the laboratory component of the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuillan, G M; Gunter, E W; Lannom, L

    1990-11-01

    The design of the laboratory component of a mobile examination survey such as the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey requires that the physical limitation of the mobile examination center be balanced against the requirements of the laboratory analyses needed to fulfill the goals of the survey. In order to include an analysis in the survey, the scientific merit of the laboratory test must be established and a consensus must be reached on the appropriateness of the technology for the six years of the survey. The public health importance of the analysis and the subsequent results are also evaluated before inclusion into the laboratory protocol. Finally, the feasibility of incorporating the analysis into the protocol is reviewed. The laboratory component of NHANES III is discussed, addressing these points with descriptions of the reasons for inclusion and exclusion of key analytes.

  1. Laboratory Studies for Planetary Sciences. A Planetary Decadal Survey White Paper Prepared by the American Astronomical Society (AAS) Working Group on Laboratory Astrophysics (WGLA)

    CERN Document Server

    Gudipati, The AAS WGLA: Murthy; Brickhouse, Nancy; Cowan, John; Drake, Paul; Federman, Steven; Ferland, Gary; Frank, Adam; Haxton, Wick; Herbst, Eric; Mumma, Michael; Salama, Farid; Savin, Daniel Wolf; Ziurys, Lucy

    2009-01-01

    The WGLA of the AAS (http://www.aas.org/labastro/) promotes collaboration and exchange of knowledge between astronomy and planetary sciences and the laboratory sciences (physics, chemistry, and biology). Laboratory data needs of ongoing and next generation planetary science missions are carefully evaluated and recommended in this white paper submitted by the WGLA to Planetary Decadal Survey.

  2. Epidemiology of candidemia in Latin America: a laboratory-based survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio Nucci

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The epidemiology of candidemia varies depending on the geographic region. Little is known about the epidemiology of candidemia in Latin America. METHODS: We conducted a 24-month laboratory-based survey of candidemia in 20 centers of seven Latin American countries. Incidence rates were calculated and the epidemiology of candidemia was characterized. RESULTS: Among 672 episodes of candidemia, 297 (44.2% occurred in children (23.7% younger than 1 year, 36.2% in adults between 19 and 60 years old and 19.6% in elderly patients. The overall incidence was 1.18 cases per 1,000 admissions, and varied across countries, with the highest incidence in Colombia and the lowest in Chile. Candida albicans (37.6%, C. parapsilosis (26.5% and C. tropicalis (17.6% were the leading agents, with great variability in species distribution in the different countries. Most isolates were highly susceptible to fluconazole, voriconazole, amphotericin B and anidulafungin. Fluconazole was the most frequent agent used as primary treatment (65.8%, and the overall 30-day survival was 59.3%. CONCLUSIONS: This first large epidemiologic study of candidemia in Latin America showed a high incidence of candidemia, high percentage of children, typical species distribution, with C. albicans, C. parapsilosis and C. tropicalis accounting for the majority of episodes, and low resistance rates.

  3. Epidemiology of Candidemia in Latin America: A Laboratory-Based Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nucci, Marcio; Queiroz-Telles, Flavio; Alvarado-Matute, Tito; Tiraboschi, Iris Nora; Cortes, Jorge; Zurita, Jeannete; Guzman-Blanco, Manuel; Santolaya, Maria Elena; Thompson, Luis; Sifuentes-Osornio, Jose; Echevarria, Juan I.; Colombo, Arnaldo L.

    2013-01-01

    Background The epidemiology of candidemia varies depending on the geographic region. Little is known about the epidemiology of candidemia in Latin America. Methods We conducted a 24-month laboratory-based survey of candidemia in 20 centers of seven Latin American countries. Incidence rates were calculated and the epidemiology of candidemia was characterized. Results Among 672 episodes of candidemia, 297 (44.2%) occurred in children (23.7% younger than 1 year), 36.2% in adults between 19 and 60 years old and 19.6% in elderly patients. The overall incidence was 1.18 cases per 1,000 admissions, and varied across countries, with the highest incidence in Colombia and the lowest in Chile. Candida albicans (37.6%), C. parapsilosis (26.5%) and C. tropicalis (17.6%) were the leading agents, with great variability in species distribution in the different countries. Most isolates were highly susceptible to fluconazole, voriconazole, amphotericin B and anidulafungin. Fluconazole was the most frequent agent used as primary treatment (65.8%), and the overall 30-day survival was 59.3%. Conclusions This first large epidemiologic study of candidemia in Latin America showed a high incidence of candidemia, high percentage of children, typical species distribution, with C. albicans, C. parapsilosis and C. tropicalis accounting for the majority of episodes, and low resistance rates. PMID:23527176

  4. We’re Working On It: Transferring the Sloan Digital Sky Survey from Laboratory to Library

    OpenAIRE

    Ashley E. Sands; Christine L. Borgman; Sharon Traweek; Wynholds, Laura A.

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on the transfer of a massive scientific dataset from a national laboratory to a university library, and from one kind of workforce to another. We use the transfer of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) archive to examine the emergence of a new workforce for scientific research data management. Many individuals with diverse educational backgrounds and domain experience are involved in SDSS data management: domain scientists, computer scientists, software and systems engin...

  5. Study and survey of assembling parameters to a radioactive source production laboratory used to verify equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauglitz, Erica; Nagatomy, Helio Rissei; Moura, Eduardo S.; Zeituni, Carlos Alberto; Hilario, Katia A. Fonseca; Rostelato, Maria Elisa C.M., E-mail: egauglitz@ipen.b, E-mail: elisaros@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Karam Junior, Dib, E-mail: dib.karan@usp.b [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Escola de Artes, Ciencias e Humanidades

    2009-07-01

    This paper presents the survey of parameters for the installation and implementation of a laboratory for radioactive sources production at immobilized resin. These sources are used in nuclear medicine for verification of dose calibrators, as the standard guidelines of the National Commission of Nuclear CNEN-NE-3.05 'Radioprotection and safety requirements for nuclear medicine services.' The radioisotopes used for this purpose are: Co-57, Cs-137 and Ba-133, with activities of 185 MBq, 9.3 MBq and 5.4 MBq, respectively. The parameters for the assembly of the laboratory shall be defined according to guidelines that guide the deployment of radiochemical laboratories and standards of the National Commission of Nuclear Energy. (author)

  6. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: laboratory detection methods in use in the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Humphreys, H

    2002-01-01

    There is no universally agreed laboratory protocol for the detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and hence a variety of approaches are used. As part of an all-island survey of MRSA in the Republic of Ireland (the South) and Northern Ireland (the North), a questionnaire was circulated to 14 participating laboratories in the North and 49 in the South, to determine the methods used to isolate MRSA from clinical specimens, identify S. aureus and test for susceptibility to methicillin. Almost two-thirds (64%) of laboratories in the North but only 16% of laboratories in the South use enrichment culture. There is heavy reliance on commercial kits to confirm the identification of S. aureus in the South but all laboratories in the North use the staphylocoagulase test. More than 90% of all laboratories use a disc method for susceptibility testing and 71% of laboratories in the North supplement this with the E-test; however, a range of methicillin disk concentrations are in use. There is a need to review current laboratory methods used to detect MRSA, with follow-up audit on their implementation. Additional resources may be needed in some laboratories to comply with revised guidelines, and reference facilities are required to assess new commercially available techniques and to confirm the identification of unusual or difficult strains.

  7. The role of laboratory dissection training in neurosurgical residency: results of a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kshettry, Varun R; Mullin, Jeffrey P; Schlenk, Richard; Recinos, Pablo F; Benzel, Edward C

    2014-11-01

    Work hour restrictions and current quality, financial, and legal concerns have reduced resident operative volume and autonomy. Although laboratory (cadaveric or animal) dissection has a rich history in neurosurgery, its current role in resident training is unclear. Recent literature suggests educators have looked to simulation to accelerate the learning curve of acquiring neurosurgical technical skills. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence, characteristics, and extent of laboratory dissection in neurosurgical residency programs in the United States. A survey was sent to program directors of all 100 neurosurgical residency programs in the United States. Response rate was 65%. Most programs (93.8%) incorporate laboratory dissection into resident training. Most programs have 1-3 (36.1%) or 4-6 (39.3%) sessions annually. Residents in postgraduate years 2-6 (85.2%-93.4%) most commonly participate. The most common topics are cranial approaches (100%), spinal approaches (88.5%), spine instrumentation (80.3%), and endoscopy (50.8%). Thirty-one (47.7%) programs use artificial physical model or virtual reality simulators; the most common simulators are endoscopy (15.4%), microvascular anastomosis (13.8%), and endovascular (10.8%). Only 8 programs (13.1%) formally grade dissection skills. Educators (95.4%) believe laboratory dissection is an integral component of training and no respondent believed simulation could currently provide greater educational benefit than laboratory dissection. Most (89.2%) respondents would support a national "suggested" dissection curriculum and manual. In neurosurgical resident education, laboratory dissection is widely used; however, significant variation exists. Nonetheless, program directors believe laboratory dissection plays an integral role in neurosurgical training and is currently associated with greater educational benefit than simulation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Effective Laboratory Method of Chromite Content Estimation in Reclaimed Sands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignaszak Z.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an original method of measuring the actual chromite content in the circulating moulding sand of foundry. This type of material is applied for production of moulds. This is the case of foundry which most frequently perform heavy casting in which for the construction of chemical hardening mould is used, both the quartz sand and chromite sand. After the dry reclamation of used moulding sand, both types of sands are mixed in various ratios resulting that in reclaimed sand silos, the layers of varying content of chromite in mixture are observed. For chromite recuperation from the circulating moulding sand there are applied the appropriate installations equipped with separate elements generating locally strong magnetic field. The knowledge of the current ratio of chromite and quartz sand allows to optimize the settings of installation and control of the separation efficiency. The arduous and time-consuming method of determining the content of chromite using bromoform liquid requires operational powers and precautions during using this toxic liquid. It was developed and tested the new, uncomplicated gravimetric laboratory method using powerful permanent magnets (neodymium. The method is used in the production conditions of casting for current inspection of chromite quantity in used sand in reclamation plant.

  9. A NEW METHOD FOR INCREASING PRECISIONIN SURVEY SAMPLING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯士雍; 邹国华

    2001-01-01

    This paper proposes a new method for increasing the precision in survey sampling, i.e., a method combining sampling with prediction. The two cases where auxiliary information is or not available are considered. A numerical example is given.

  10. Study on Laboratory Method for Refining of SR Diesel Fuel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Junling; Zheng Tinglu; Han Zhaping

    2006-01-01

    The method for refining the straight-run diesel fuel was studied in laboratory scale in order to make the acid number of diesel fraction comply with the standard while removing the naphthenic acids contained in diesel without causing environmental pollution. After comparing the effect of refining using three solvents, the isopropyl alcohol-HOA was specified as the best solvent. Meanwhile, the relationship between the acid number of diesel fraction and the amount of solvent used and the relationship between the concentration of solvent and temperature and the stability of diesel in terms of its acid number were also investigated. Experimental results had shown that when the mass fraction of the HOA-IPA solvent was 20% at a dosage of 17 mL of the solvent and a temperature of 30℃, the acid number of the refined diesel fraction was 0.015 mg KOH/g with a good stability of acidity in the diesel traction.

  11. Automation of the National Water Quality Laboratories, U. S. Geological Survey. I. Description of laboratory functions and definition of the automation project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, W.F.; Ames, H.S.

    1977-07-01

    In January 1976, the Water Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey asked Lawrence Livermore Laboratory to conduct a feasibility study for automation of the National Water Quality (NWQ) Laboratory in Denver, Colorado (formerly Denver Central Laboratory). Results of the study were published in the Feasibility Study for Automation of the Central Laboratories, Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, Rept. UCRL-52001 (1976). Because the present system for processing water samples was found inadequate to meet the demands of a steadily increasing workload, new automation was recommended. In this document we present details necessary for future implementation of the new system, as well as descriptions of current laboratory automatic data processing and analytical facilities to better define the scope of the project and illustrate what the new system will accomplish. All pertinent inputs, outputs, and other operations that define the project are shown in functional designs.

  12. Automation of the National Water Quality Laboratories, U. S. Geological Survey. I. Description of laboratory functions and definition of the automation project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, W.F.; Ames, H.S.

    1977-07-01

    In January 1976, the Water Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey asked Lawrence Livermore Laboratory to conduct a feasibility study for automation of the National Water Quality (NWQ) Laboratory in Denver, Colorado (formerly Denver Central Laboratory). Results of the study were published in the Feasibility Study for Automation of the Central Laboratories, Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, Rept. UCRL-52001 (1976). Because the present system for processing water samples was found inadequate to meet the demands of a steadily increasing workload, new automation was recommended. In this document we present details necessary for future implementation of the new system, as well as descriptions of current laboratory automatic data processing and analytical facilities to better define the scope of the project and illustrate what the new system will accomplish. All pertinent inputs, outputs, and other operations that define the project are shown in functional designs.

  13. A Survey on the Gastrointestinal Parasites of Rabbit and Guinea Pig in a Laboratory Animal House

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motamedi, G.,

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available There is documented evidence that infection in laboratory animals can often influence the outcome of experiments. All infections, apparent or inapparent, are likely to increase biological variability. As a research project concerning the diversity and distribution of parasites of rabbit and guinea pig in a conventional laboratory animal house, about 87 rabbits (from 700 and 105 guinea pigs (from 1500 were selected randomly from a Research, Production & Breeding of Laboratory Animals Department. Samples were collected between 19.02.2010 and 20.05.2011. The samples and animals were examined by dissection and flotation methods. In this study only one species of nematodes (Passalorus ambiguus: 6.9%; one species of protozoa (Eimeria spp.: 21.8% in rabbits and one species of nematodes (Paraspidodera Uncinata: 24.7%; one species of protozoa (Balantidium coli: 11.4% in guinea pigs were identified. However, there was not any cestodes or trematodes identified from this group of laboratory animals.

  14. Publication bias in laboratory animal research: a survey on magnitude, drivers, consequences and potential solutions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerben ter Riet

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Publication bias jeopardizes evidence-based medicine, mainly through biased literature syntheses. Publication bias may also affect laboratory animal research, but evidence is scarce. OBJECTIVES: To assess the opinion of laboratory animal researchers on the magnitude, drivers, consequences and potential solutions for publication bias. And to explore the impact of size of the animals used, seniority of the respondent, working in a for-profit organization and type of research (fundamental, pre-clinical, or both on those opinions. DESIGN: Internet-based survey. SETTING: All animal laboratories in The Netherlands. PARTICIPANTS: Laboratory animal researchers. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S: Median (interquartile ranges strengths of beliefs on 5 and 10-point scales (1: totally unimportant to 5 or 10: extremely important. RESULTS: Overall, 454 researchers participated. They considered publication bias a problem in animal research (7 (5 to 8 and thought that about 50% (32-70 of animal experiments are published. Employees (n = 21 of for-profit organizations estimated that 10% (5 to 50 are published. Lack of statistical significance (4 (4 to 5, technical problems (4 (3 to 4, supervisors (4 (3 to 5 and peer reviewers (4 (3 to 5 were considered important reasons for non-publication (all on 5-point scales. Respondents thought that mandatory publication of study protocols and results, or the reasons why no results were obtained, may increase scientific progress but expected increased bureaucracy. These opinions did not depend on size of the animal used, seniority of the respondent or type of research. CONCLUSIONS: Non-publication of "negative" results appears to be prevalent in laboratory animal research. If statistical significance is indeed a main driver of publication, the collective literature on animal experimentation will be biased. This will impede the performance of valid literature syntheses. Effective, yet efficient systems should be explored to

  15. Radiological survey support activities for the decommissioning of the Ames Laboratory Research Reactor Facility, Ames, Iowa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wynveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Sholeen, C.M.; Justus, A.L.; Flynn, K.F.

    1984-09-01

    At the request of the Engineering Support Division of the US Department of Energy-Chicago Operations Office and in accordance with the programmatic overview/certification responsibilities of the Department of Energy Environmental and Safety Engineering Division, the Argonne National Laboratory Radiological Survey Group conducted a series of radiological measurements and tests at the Ames Laboratory Research Reactor located in Ames, Iowa. These measurements and tests were conducted during 1980 and 1981 while the reactor building was being decontaminated and decommissioned for the purpose of returning the building to general use. The results of these evaluations are included in this report. Although the surface contamination within the reactor building could presumably be reduced to negligible levels, the potential for airborne contamination from tritiated water vapor remains. This vapor emmanates from contamination within the concrete of the building and should be monitored until such time as it is reduced to background levels. 2 references, 8 figures, 6 tables.

  16. Performance Audit of the U.S. Geological Survey, Energy Resource Program Inorganic Geochemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luppens, James A.; Janke, Louis G.; McCord, Jamey D.; Bullock, John H.; Brazeau, Lisa; Affronter, Ronald H.

    2007-01-01

    A performance audit of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Energy Resource Program (ERP) Inorganic Geochemistry Laboratory (IGL) was conducted between August, 2003 and October, 2005. The goals were to ensure that a high level of analytical performance was maintained and identify any areas that could be enhanced. The audit was subdivided into three phases. Phase 1 was a preliminary assessment of current performance based on recent performance on CANSPEX samples. IGL performance was also compared to laboratories world-wide with similar scope. Phase 2 consisted of the implementation of the recommended changes made in Phase 1. Phase 3 of the audit consisted of a reassessment effort to evaluate the effectiveness of the recommendations made in the Phase 1 and an on-site audit of the laboratory facilities. Phases 1 and 3 required summary reports that are included in Appendices A and B of this report. The audit found that the IGL was one of the top two laboratories compared for trace element analyses. Several recommendations to enhance performance on major and minor elemental parameters were made and implemented. Demonstrated performance improvements as a result of the recommended changes were documented. Several initiatives to sustain the performance improvements gained from the audit have been implemented.

  17. Special case waste located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory facilities: Survey report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forgy, J.R. Jr.

    1995-11-01

    Between October 1994 and October 1995, a data base was established at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to provide a current inventory of the radioactive waste materials, located at ORNL, for which the US Department of Energy (DOE) has no definite planned disposal alternatives. DOE refers to these waste materials as special case waste. To assist ORNL and DOE management in future planning, an inventory system was established and a baseline inventory prepared. This report provides the background of the ORNL special case waste survey project, as well as special case waste category definitions, both current and anticipated sources and locations of special case waste materials, and the survey and data management processes. Special case waste will be that waste material which, no matter how much practical characterization, treatment, and packaging is made, will never meet the acceptance criteria for permanent disposal at ORNL, and does not meet the criteria at a currently planned off-site permanent disposal facility.

  18. ESO Diffuse Interstellar Bands Large Exploration Survey (EDIBLES) - Merging Observations and Laboratory Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Farid

    2016-01-01

    laboratory facilities, MIS and COSmIC, that have been developed for this study and discuss the findings resulting from the comparison of the laboratory data with high resolution, high S/N ratio astronomical observations. MIS stands for Matrix Isolation Spectroscopy, a well-proven technique for isolating cold molecular species in inert solid environments. COSmIC stands for Cosmic Simulation Chamber. It combines a supersonic free jet expansion with discharge plasma and high-sensitivity cavity ringdown spectroscopy and time-of-flight mass spectrometry detection tools for the generation and the detection of cold, isolated gas-phase molecules and ions under experimental conditions that closely mimic interstellar conditions. The column densities of the individual neutral PAH molecules and ions probed in these surveys are derived from the comparison of these unique laboratory data with high resolution, high S/N ratio astronomical observations. The comparisons of astronomical and laboratory data lead to clear and unambiguous conclusions regarding the expected abundances for PAHs of various sizes and charge states in the interstellar environments probed in the surveys. Band profile comparisons between laboratory and astronomical spectra lead to information regarding the molecular structures and characteristics associated with the DIB carriers in the corresponding lines-of-sight. These quantitative surveys of neutral and ionized PAHs in the optical range open the way for unambiguous quantitative searches of PAHs and complex organics in a variety of interstellar and circumstellar environments.

  19. Special-Status Plant Species Surveys and Vegetation Mapping at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preston, R E

    2006-10-03

    This report presents the results of Jones & Stokes special-status plant surveys and vegetation mapping for the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Special-status plant surveys were conducted at Site 300 in April to May 1997 and in March to April 2002. Eight special-status plants were identified at Site 300: large-flowered fiddleneck, big tarplant, diamond-petaled poppy, round-leaved filaree, gypsum-loving larkspur, California androsace, stinkbells, and hogwallow starfish. Maps identifying the locations of these species, a discussion of the occurrence of these species at Site 300, and a checklist of the flora of Site 300 are presented. A reconnaissance survey of the LLNL Livermore Site was conducted in June 2002. This survey concluded that no special-status plants occur at the Livermore Site. Vegetation mapping was conducted in 2001 at Site 300 to update a previous vegetation study done in 1986. The purpose of the vegetation mapping was to update and to delineate more precisely the boundaries between vegetation types and to map vegetation types that previously were not mapped. The vegetation map is presented with a discussion of the vegetation classification used.

  20. A preliminary survey of the National Wetlands Inventory as mapped for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hampton, N.L.; Rope, R.C.; Glennon, J.M.; Moor, K.S.

    1995-02-01

    Approximately 135 areas within the boundaries of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) have been mapped as wetland habitat as part of the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) National Wetlands Inventory (NWI). A preliminary survey of these wetlands was conducted to examine their general characteristics and status, to provide an estimation of relative ecological importance, to identify additional information needed to complete ecological characterization of important INEL wetlands, and to identify high priority wetland areas on the INEL. The purpose of the survey was to provide information to support the preparation of the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ER&WM) Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Information characterizing general vegetation, hydrology, wildlife use, and archaeology was collected at 105 sample sites on the INEL. Sites representing NWI palustrine, lacustrine, and riverine wetlands (including manmade), and areas unmapped or unclassified by the NWI were included in the sample. The field information was used to develop a preliminary ranking of relative ecological importance for each wetland visited during this survey. Survey limitations are identified.

  1. Streamlining and automation of radioanalytical methods at a commercial laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harvey, J.T.; Dillard, J.W. [IT Corp., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Through the careful planning and design of laboratory facilities and incorporation of modern instrumentation and robotics systems, properly trained and competent laboratory associates can efficiently and safely handle radioactive and mixed waste samples. This paper addresses the potential improvements radiochemistry and mixed waste laboratories can achieve utilizing robotics for automated sample analysis. Several examples of automated systems for sample preparation and analysis will be discussed.

  2. METHODS IN THE POST-METHODS ERA. REPORT ON AN INTERNATIONAL SURVEY ON LANGUAGE TEACHING METHODS'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Liu

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Do methods still have a place in 21" century language teaching? To answer this question, an international survey was conducted in the surnmer of 1999. A sample of 800 language teachers world-wide randomly drawn from 17,800 TESOLers were each given a 2-page survey. The return rate was 58.5% with the actual usable data set of448, which was analyzed by using both descriptive and inferential statistics. Among the ten commonly recognized teaching methods surveyed, both the Communicative Language Teaching Approach and an eclectic method seem to have the highest rate in familiarity, preference, and use. But when multiple factors, such as teaching contexts, instructional settings, learners' proficiency levels, class size, teaching experience and educational backgrounds of the teachers, and the status of being a native or nonnative English speaking professional were taken into consideration, various patterns and themes emerged. One interesting finding is that Grammar Translation is still used in EFL contexts, in larger classes, and with learners at low proficiency levels, though the ratio between the actual use of this method and teachers' preference does not match. Based on the results of the survey, a new theoretical framework is proposed to conceptualize language teaching methods in the post-methods era.

  3. A survey of mixed finite element methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brezzi, F.

    1987-01-01

    This paper is an introduction to and an overview of mixed finite element methods. It discusses the mixed formulation of certain basic problems in elasticity and hydrodynamics. It also discusses special techniques for solving the discrete problem.

  4. High heterogeneity in methods used for the laboratory confirmation of pertussis diagnosis among European countries, 2010: integration of epidemiological and laboratory surveillance must include standardisation of methodologies and quality assurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Q; Barkoff, A M; Mertsola, J; Glismann, S; Bacci, S

    2012-08-09

    Despite extensive childhood immunisation, pertussis remains one of the world’s leading causes of vaccine preventable deaths. The current methods used for laboratory diagnosis of pertussis include bacterial culture, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) serology. We conducted a questionnaire survey to identify variations in the laboratory methods and protocols used among participating countries included in the European surveillance network for vaccine-preventable diseases(EUVAC.NET). In February 2010, we performed the survey using a web-based questionnaire and sent it to the country experts of 25 European Union countries,and two European Economic Area (EEA) countries,Norway and Iceland. The questionnaire consisted of 37 questions which covered both general information on surveillance methods and detailed laboratory methods used. A descriptive analysis was performed.Questionnaires were answered by all 27 contacted countries. Nineteen countries had pertussis reference laboratories at the national level; their functions varied from performing diagnosis to providing technical advice for routine microbiology laboratories. Culture,PCR and serology were used in 17, 18 and 20 countries,respectively. For PCR, nine laboratories used insertion sequence IS481 as the target gene, which is present in multiple copies in the Bordetella pertussis genome and thus has a greater sensitivity over single copy targets, but has been proved not to be specific for B.pertussis. Antibodies directed against pertussis toxin(PT) are specific for B. pertussis infections. For ELISA serology, only 13 countries’ laboratories used purified PT as coating antigen and 10 included World Health Organization (WHO) or Food and Drug Administration (FDA) reference sera in their tests. This present survey shows that methods used for laboratory confirmation of pertussis differ widely among European countries and that there is a great heterogeneity of the reference

  5. Survey: interpolation methods in medical image processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, T M; Gönner, C; Spitzer, K

    1999-11-01

    Image interpolation techniques often are required in medical imaging for image generation (e.g., discrete back projection for inverse Radon transform) and processing such as compression or resampling. Since the ideal interpolation function spatially is unlimited, several interpolation kernels of finite size have been introduced. This paper compares 1) truncated and windowed sinc; 2) nearest neighbor; 3) linear; 4) quadratic; 5) cubic B-spline; 6) cubic; g) Lagrange; and 7) Gaussian interpolation and approximation techniques with kernel sizes from 1 x 1 up to 8 x 8. The comparison is done by: 1) spatial and Fourier analyses; 2) computational complexity as well as runtime evaluations; and 3) qualitative and quantitative interpolation error determinations for particular interpolation tasks which were taken from common situations in medical image processing. For local and Fourier analyses, a standardized notation is introduced and fundamental properties of interpolators are derived. Successful methods should be direct current (DC)-constant and interpolators rather than DC-inconstant or approximators. Each method's parameters are tuned with respect to those properties. This results in three novel kernels, which are introduced in this paper and proven to be within the best choices for medical image interpolation: the 6 x 6 Blackman-Harris windowed sinc interpolator, and the C2-continuous cubic kernels with N = 6 and N = 8 supporting points. For quantitative error evaluations, a set of 50 direct digital X rays was used. They have been selected arbitrarily from clinical routine. In general, large kernel sizes were found to be superior to small interpolation masks. Except for truncated sinc interpolators, all kernels with N = 6 or larger sizes perform significantly better than N = 2 or N = 3 point methods (p cubic 6 x 6 interpolator with continuous second derivatives, as defined in (24), can be recommended for most common interpolation tasks. It appears to be the fastest

  6. Perceptions of a medical microbiology service: a survey of laboratory users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, M S

    1995-10-01

    To ascertain the perception of laboratory users regarding the quality of the medical microbiology services in a district general hospital. Detailed questionnaires were circulated to all clinicians in the locality, with headings covering the quality of medical advice provided, the availability of information on specimen collection, format of request forms, specimen transport arrangements, turnaround times, the quality and need for interpretative advice, and the overall impression of the quality of the services provided. Two hundred and thirty five replies were received, giving a response rate of 69%. Transportation of specimens and communication of reports were identified as priority areas for improvement. The overall quality of the service was perceived as satisfactory, although areas were identified where substantial improvements could be made, some at little or no cost to the laboratory. The survey focused clinicians' attention on the service, raised the profile of the laboratory, and resulted in improved communications and a better understanding of customer needs. Overall, the exercise was felt to be extremely useful, and worthwhile repeating to gauge the effect of the changes instituted as a result.

  7. A survey of quantum Lyapunov control methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Shuang; Meng, Fangfang

    2013-01-01

    The condition of a quantum Lyapunov-based control which can be well used in a closed quantum system is that the method can make the system convergent but not just stable. In the convergence study of the quantum Lyapunov control, two situations are classified: nondegenerate cases and degenerate cases. For these two situations, respectively, in this paper the target state is divided into four categories: the eigenstate, the mixed state which commutes with the internal Hamiltonian, the superposition state, and the mixed state which does not commute with the internal Hamiltonian. For these four categories, the quantum Lyapunov control methods for the closed quantum systems are summarized and analyzed. Particularly, the convergence of the control system to the different target states is reviewed, and how to make the convergence conditions be satisfied is summarized and analyzed.

  8. A survey of real face modeling methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoyue; Dai, Yugang; He, Xiangzhen; Wan, Fucheng

    2017-09-01

    The face model has always been a research challenge in computer graphics, which involves the coordination of multiple organs in faces. This article explained two kinds of face modeling method which is based on the data driven and based on parameter control, analyzed its content and background, summarized their advantages and disadvantages, and concluded muscle model which is based on the anatomy of the principle has higher veracity and easy to drive.

  9. Authentication Methods in Cloud Computing: A Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnoush Babaeizadeh

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a review on the various methods of authentication in cloud environment. Authentication plays an important role in security of Cloud Computing (CC. It protects Cloud Service Providers (CSP against various types of attacks, where the aim is to verify a user’s identity when a user wishes to request services from cloud servers. There are multiple authentication technologies that verify the identity of a user before granting access to resources.

  10. Methods for integrated use of fisheries research survey information in understanding marine fish population ecology and better management advice : improving methods for evaluation of research survey information under consideration of survey fish detection and catch efficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nielsen, J.R.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The thesis developed and improved methods for the integrated analysis of different types of fishery independent research surveys (trawl surveys, acoustic surveys, hydrographical surveys, and gillnet surveys) to study the distribution, density, abundance, migration and

  11. Application of Situation Survey Method in Industrial Design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    倪晓琳

    2014-01-01

    in the industrial design method, basic user research methods can be divided into many forms, this paper mainly analyzes the situation of the survey method. And mainly from the four aspects of context, collaboration, explain and focus to be explained, and illustrated.

  12. Survey of prevalence of overweight body condition in laboratory-housed cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Sharon A; Leslie, Ken E; Pearl, David L; Fournier, Jocelyn; Turner, Patricia V

    2010-07-01

    Excessive weight gain has been reported to occur in captive cynomolgus macaques with little to no change in diet. Overweight body condition can result in development of hyperglycemia and type 2 diabetes and should be avoided. The purpose of this survey was to assess the prevalence of overweight cynomolgus macaques in North American research facilities, including breeding colonies and short-term and long-term facilities, and to describe current methods used to assess body condition. The survey consisted of 51 questions covering animal population demographics, body weight and body condition scoring, feeding, and behavior. Voluntary participants included veterinarians and animal care managers. Respondents from 13 facilities completed the survey, and information was collected on 17,500 cynomolgus macaques. The majority of surveyed facilities housed juvenile and young adult macaques. The reported prevalence of overweight (greater than 10% of ideal body weight) animals ranged between 0% and 20% and reportedly was more frequent in animals younger than 10 y. Most facilities had weight reduction strategies in place. Despite these programs, a significant proportion of animals were reported as being overweight. The results of this survey demonstrate that most North American facilities housing cynomolgus macaques recognize the importance of tracking body condition regularly. However, implementing effective weight reduction programs may be difficult in captive housing environments. Because of the potential for adverse health effects, facilities should have a means of regularly tracking body weight as well as an action plan for managing overweight animals.

  13. Survey of subsurface treatment technologies for environmental restoration sites at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGrath, Lucas K.; Ho, Clifford Kuofei; Wright, Jerome L.

    2003-08-01

    This report provides a survey of remediation and treatment technologies for contaminants of concern at environmental restoration (ER) sites at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico. The sites that were evaluated include the Tijeras Arroyo Groundwater, Technical Area V, and Canyons sites. The primary contaminants of concern at these sites include trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene (PCE), and nitrate in groundwater. Due to the low contaminant concentrations (close to regulatory limits) and significant depths to groundwater ({approx}500 feet) at these sites, few in-situ remediation technologies are applicable. The most applicable treatment technologies include monitored natural attenuation and enhanced bioremediation/denitrification to reduce the concentrations of TCE, PCE, and nitrate in the groundwater. Stripping technologies to remove chlorinated solvents and other volatile organic compounds from the vadose zone can also be implemented, if needed.

  14. Mesocarnivore Surveys on Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300, Alameda and San Joaquin Counties, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, H O; Smith, D A; Cypher, B L; Kelly, P A; Woollett, J S

    2004-11-16

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), operated under cooperative agreement between the University of California and the U. S. Department of Energy, administers and operates an approximately 11 mi{sup 2} (28 km{sup 2}) test site in the remote hills at the northern end of the South Coast Ranges of Central California (Figure 1). Known as Site 300, this expanse of rolling hills and canyons supports a diverse array of grassland communities typical of lowland central California. The facility serves a variety of functions related to testing non-nuclear explosives, lasers, and weapons subsystems. The primary purpose of this project was to determine the presence of any mesocarnivores on Site 300 that use the property for foraging, denning, and other related activities. The surveys occurred from mid-September to mid-October, 2002.

  15. U.S. Geological Survey geohydrologic studies and monitoring at the Idaho National Laboratory, southeastern Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomay, Roy C.

    2017-09-14

    BackgroundThe U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) geohydrologic studies and monitoring at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is an ongoing, long-term program. This program, which began in 1949, includes hydrologic monitoring networks and investigative studies that describe the effects of waste disposal on water contained in the eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP) aquifer and the availability of water for long-term consumptive and industrial use. Interpretive reports documenting study findings are available to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors; other Federal, State, and local agencies; private firms; and the public at https://id.water.usgs.gov/INL/Pubs/index.html. Information contained within these reports is crucial to the management and use of the aquifer by the INL and the State of Idaho. USGS geohydrologic studies and monitoring are done in cooperation with the DOE Idaho Operations Office.

  16. Problems and Recommendations for Rural Statistics and Survey Methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chengjun; ZHANG

    2014-01-01

    With constant deepening of the reform and opening-up,national economic system has changed from planned economy to market economy,and rural survey and statistics remain in a difficult transition period. In this period,China needs transforming original statistical mode according to market economic system. All levels of government should report and submit a lot and increasing statistical information. Besides,in this period,townships,villages and counties are faced with old and new conflicts. These conflicts perplex implementation of rural statistics and survey and development of rural statistical undertaking,and also cause researches and thinking of reform of rural statistical and survey methods.

  17. The National Criminal Justice Treatment Practices survey: multilevel survey methods and procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taxman, Faye S; Young, Douglas W; Wiersema, Brian; Rhodes, Anne; Mitchell, Suzanne

    2007-04-01

    The National Criminal Justice Treatment Practices (NCJTP) survey provides a comprehensive inquiry into the nature of programs and services provided to adult and juvenile offenders involved in the justice system in the United States. The multilevel survey design covers topics such as the mission and goals of correctional and treatment programs; organizational climate and culture for providing services; organizational capacity and needs; opinions of administrators and staff regarding rehabilitation, punishment, and services provided to offenders; treatment policies and procedures; and working relationships between correctional and other agencies. The methodology generates national estimates of the availability of programs and services for offenders. This article details the methodology and sampling frame for the NCJTP survey, response rates, and survey procedures. Prevalence estimates of juvenile and adult offenders under correctional control are provided with externally validated comparisons to illustrate the veracity of the methodology. Limitations of the survey methods are also discussed.

  18. Checklist and "Pollard Walk" butterfly survey methods on public lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, Ronald A.; Austin, Jane E.; Newton, Wesley E.

    1998-01-01

    Checklist and “Pollard Walk” butterfly survey methods were contemporaneously applied to seven public sites in North Dakota during the summer of 1995. Results were compared for effect of method and site on total number of butterflies and total number of species detected per hour. Checklist searching produced significantly more butterfly detections per hour than Pollard Walks at all sites. Number of species detected per hour did not differ significantly either among sites or between methods. Many species were detected by only one method, and at most sites generalist and invader species were more likely to be observed during checklist searches than during Pollard Walks. Results indicate that checklist surveys are a more efficient means for initial determination of a species list for a site, whereas for long-term monitoring the Pollard Walk is more practical and statistically manageable. Pollard Walk transects are thus recommended once a prairie butterfly fauna has been defined for a site by checklist surveys.

  19. Rapid Methods for the Laboratory Identification of Pathogenic Microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-01

    and to Well no. 2 (control), a drop of PBS was added. The Boerner slide was placed on a Venereal Disease Research Laboratory ( VDRL ) rotary shaker for 5...34° . o..- -’ . = . - 1 .o - I5 . - w ’ - -. *9 . - . - _ - . r-- ’ * -- ’- -. . . . J1 M slide was placed on the VDRL shaker for 10 min and read

  20. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho and Component Development and Integration Facility, Butte, Montana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-09-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings of the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF), conducted September 14 through October 2, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. The team includes outside experts supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the INEL and CDIF. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. The on-site phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations' carried on at the INEL and the CDIF, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis (S A) Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The S A Plan will be executed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. When completed, the S A results will be incorporated into the INEL/CDIF Survey findings for inclusion into the Environmental Survey Summary Report. 90 refs., 95 figs., 77 tabs.

  1. Methods for Evaluating Respondent Attrition in Web-Based Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochheimer, Camille J; Sabo, Roy T; Krist, Alex H; Day, Teresa; Cyrus, John; Woolf, Steven H

    2016-11-22

    Electronic surveys are convenient, cost effective, and increasingly popular tools for collecting information. While the online platform allows researchers to recruit and enroll more participants, there is an increased risk of participant dropout in Web-based research. Often, these dropout trends are simply reported, adjusted for, or ignored altogether. To propose a conceptual framework that analyzes respondent attrition and demonstrates the utility of these methods with existing survey data. First, we suggest visualization of attrition trends using bar charts and survival curves. Next, we propose a generalized linear mixed model (GLMM) to detect or confirm significant attrition points. Finally, we suggest applications of existing statistical methods to investigate the effect of internal survey characteristics and patient characteristics on dropout. In order to apply this framework, we conducted a case study; a seventeen-item Informed Decision-Making (IDM) module addressing how and why patients make decisions about cancer screening. Using the framework, we were able to find significant attrition points at Questions 4, 6, 7, and 9, and were also able to identify participant responses and characteristics associated with dropout at these points and overall. When these methods were applied to survey data, significant attrition trends were revealed, both visually and empirically, that can inspire researchers to investigate the factors associated with survey dropout, address whether survey completion is associated with health outcomes, and compare attrition patterns between groups. The framework can be used to extract information beyond simple responses, can be useful during survey development, and can help determine the external validity of survey results.

  2. Collaborative Testing in Practical Laboratories: An Effective Teaching-Learning Method in Histology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuping; Li, Enzhong

    2016-01-01

    This article presents an experimental teaching and learning program used in histology with first-year students in the second term in the Faculty of Biology at Huanghuai University, China. Eighty-six students were divided randomly into two groups (n=43 per group). Tests were conducted at the end of each practical laboratory (10 laboratories in total) in which collaborative testing was used in the experimental group and traditional testing in the control group. To assess achievement, a final examination in histology was carried out at the end of the course. To determine students' attitude to the teaching styles, a questionnaire survey was conducted at the end of the term. Results showed that students preferred the collaborative testing format. In the experimental group, students' scores were significantly higher than those of students in the control group in final examinations. These findings indicate that collaborative testing enhances student learning and understanding of the material taught, and suggest that collaborative testing is an effective teaching-learning method in histology.

  3. Rapid laboratory method for the detection of chlorine in water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savić Jasmina Z.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of chlorine detection in water by using of amperometric sensor with dialysis membrane was investigated. The sensor consists of platinum cathode and silver anode, which were immersed in electrolyte whose pH was controlled. The calibration diagrams were constructed for different electrolytes and polarization potentials. The detection limit of 0.1 mg/dm3 was obtained, middle value of sensor sensitivity was approximatelly 14 nA/mgdm'3 and response time was less than 1 s for designed amperometric sensor in laboratory conditions.

  4. Cardiac lesions and initial laboratory data in Kawasaki disease: a nationwide survey in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwabara, Masanari; Yashiro, Mayumi; Kotani, Kazuhiko; Tsuboi, Satoshi; Ae, Ryusuke; Nakamura, Yosikazu; Yanagawa, Hiroshi; Kawasaki, Tomisaku

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac lesions, such as coronary dilatation, aneurysms, narrowing, myocardial infarction, and valvular lesions, sometimes occur in Kawasaki disease, but most studies have only evaluated cardiac lesions in the later phase of the disease. This study was undertaken to clarify the related factors between cardiac lesions and laboratory data in the initial phase of Kawasaki disease. We conducted a cross-sectional study using data for 26 691 patients from the 22nd nationwide survey of Kawasaki disease in Japan, the observation period of which was from January 2011 through December 2012. We excluded patients with recurrent Kawasaki disease and who were more than seven days from the start of symptoms at admission. We analyzed 23 155 cases (13 353 boys; mean age: 923 ± 734 days) with available laboratory data for white blood cell count, platelet count, serum albumin, and C-reactive protein (CRP). Cardiac lesions were detected in 984 cases (656 boys and 328 girls); lesions were classified as coronary dilatation (764 cases), coronary aneurysm (40), giant coronary aneurysm (6), coronary narrowing (3), and valvular lesions (204). The significant related factors of initial coronary dilatation were male sex (odds ratio [OR] 1.73), older age (OR per 100 days increase 1.03), higher platelet count (OR per 10 000 cells/µL increase 1.006), lower albumin (OR per 1 g/dL increase 0.66), and higher CRP (OR per 1 mg/dL increase 1.02). The factors related to coronary aneurysm were higher platelet count (OR 1.01) and lower albumin (OR 0.34). No factors were significantly related to giant coronary aneurysm. The related factors of valvular lesions were age (OR 0.98), and higher CRP (OR 1.05). Clinicians should consider male sex, older age, higher platelet count, lower albumin levels, and higher CRP levels when assessing risk of cardiac lesions in the initial phase of Kawasaki disease.

  5. A survey of infrared and visual image fusion methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xin; Jiang, Qian; Yao, Shaowen; Zhou, Dongming; Nie, Rencan; Hai, Jinjin; He, Kangjian

    2017-09-01

    Infrared (IR) and visual (VI) image fusion is designed to fuse multiple source images into a comprehensive image to boost imaging quality and reduce redundancy information, which is widely used in various imaging equipment to improve the visual ability of human and robot. The accurate, reliable and complementary descriptions of the scene in fused images make these techniques be widely used in various fields. In recent years, a large number of fusion methods for IR and VI images have been proposed due to the ever-growing demands and the progress of image representation methods; however, there has not been published an integrated survey paper about this field in last several years. Therefore, we make a survey to report the algorithmic developments of IR and VI image fusion. In this paper, we first characterize the IR and VI image fusion based applications to represent an overview of the research status. Then we present a synthesize survey of the state of the art. Thirdly, the frequently-used image fusion quality measures are introduced. Fourthly, we perform some experiments of typical methods and make corresponding analysis. At last, we summarize the corresponding tendencies and challenges in IR and VI image fusion. This survey concludes that although various IR and VI image fusion methods have been proposed, there still exist further improvements or potential research directions in different applications of IR and VI image fusion.

  6. Using the Case Survey Method To Analyze Policy Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Robert K.; Heald, Karen A.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a case study survey method that allows an analyst to aggregate (by means of a closed-ended questionnaire) the case study experiences and to assess the quality of each case study in a reliable and replicable manner. (Author/IRT)

  7. Project-Based Learning in Undergraduate Environmental Chemistry Laboratory: Using EPA Methods to Guide Student Method Development for Pesticide Quantitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Eric J.; Pauls, Steve; Dick, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Presented is a project-based learning (PBL) laboratory approach for an upper-division environmental chemistry or quantitative analysis course. In this work, a combined laboratory class of 11 environmental chemistry students developed a method based on published EPA methods for the extraction of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and its…

  8. Antimicrobial Testing Methods & Procedures Developed by EPA's Microbiology Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    We develop antimicrobial testing methods and standard operating procedures to measure the effectiveness of hard surface disinfectants against a variety of microorganisms. Find methods and procedures for antimicrobial testing.

  9. Customer Satisfaction Survey of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Technical Assistance Partners -- FY 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conger, Robin L.; Spanner, Gary E.

    2011-11-02

    The businesses that have utilized PNNL's Technology Assistance Program were sent a survey to solicit feedback about the program and to determine what, if any, outcomes resulted from the assistance provided. As part of its small business outreach, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) offers technology assistance to businesses with fewer than 500 employees throughout the nation and to businesses of any size in the 2 counties that contain the Hanford site. Upon request, up to 40 staff-hours of a researcher's time can be provided to address technology issues at no charge to the requesting firm. During FY 2011, PNNL completed assistance for 54 firms. Topics of the technology assistance covered a broad range, including environment, energy, industrial processes, medical, materials, computers and software, and sensors. In FY 2011, PNNL's Technology Assistance Program (TAP) was funded by PNNL Overheads. Over the past 16 years, the Technology Assistance Program has received total funding of nearly $2.8 million from several federal and private sources.

  10. Biological variables for the site survey of surface ecosystems - existing data and survey methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kylaekorpi, Lasse; Berggren, Jens; Larsson, Mats; Liberg, Maria; Rydgren, Bernt [SwedPower AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2000-06-01

    In the process of selecting a safe and environmentally acceptable location for the deep level repository of nuclear waste, site surveys will be carried out. These site surveys will also include studies of the biota at the site, in order to assure that the chosen site will not conflict with important ecological interests, and to establish a thorough baseline for future impact assessments and monitoring programmes. As a preparation to the site survey programme, a review of the variables that need to be surveyed is conducted. This report contains the review for some of those variables. For each variable, existing data sources and their characteristics are listed. For those variables for which existing data sources are inadequate, suggestions are made for appropriate methods that will enable the establishment of an acceptable baseline. In this report the following variables are reviewed: Fishery, Landscape, Vegetation types, Key biotopes, Species (flora and fauna), Red-listed species (flora and fauna), Biomass (flora and fauna), Water level, water retention time (incl. water body and flow), Nutrients/toxins, Oxygen concentration, Layering, stratification, Light conditions/transparency, Temperature, Sediment transport, (Marine environments are excluded from this review). For a major part of the variables, the existing data coverage is most likely insufficient. Both the temporal and/or the geographical resolution is often limited, which means that complementary surveys must be performed during (or before) the site surveys. It is, however, in general difficult to make exact judgements on the extent of existing data, and also to give suggestions for relevant methods to use in the site surveys. This can be finally decided only when the locations for the sites are decided upon. The relevance of the different variables also depends on the environmental characteristics of the sites. Therefore, we suggest that when the survey sites are selected, an additional review is

  11. Use of laboratory tests to guide initiation of autologous hematopoietic progenitor cell collection by apheresis: results from the multicenter hematopoietic progenitor cell collection by Apheresis Laboratory Trigger Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makar, Robert S; Padmanabhan, Anand; Kim, Haewon C; Anderson, Christina; Sugrue, Michele W; Linenberger, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Limited literature describes the value of laboratory "triggers" to guide collection of peripheral blood (PB) hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) by apheresis [HPC(A)]. We used a web-based survey to determine which parameters are used to initiate autologous HPC(A) collection in adult and pediatric patients and to identify common practice patterns. Members of the AABB Cellular Therapy Product Collection and Clinical Practices Subsection and the American Society for Apheresis HPC Donor Subcommittee drafted and developed relevant survey questions. A web link to the survey was distributed by electronic newsletter or email. Responses from 67 programs that perform autologous HPC(A) collections, including academic medical centers (n = 46), blood centers (n = 10), community hospitals (n = 5), and a variety of other medical institutions (n = 6), were analyzed. Ninety-three percent (62/67) of programs used a laboratory parameter to initiate HPC(A) collection. In both adult (40/54, 74%) and pediatric (29/38, 76%) patients, the PB CD34+ cell count was the most common parameter used to initiate HPC(A) collection. The median PB CD34+ trigger value was 10/μL for both patient populations. Among centers routinely using the PB CD34+ cell count to initiate apheresis, 51% (22/43) first sent the test before the patient presented for collection. Although more than 90% of centers used a laboratory test to trigger apheresis in cytokine-mobilized (44/48) or chemomobilized patients (50/53), only 57% (30/53) used a laboratory trigger if the patient was mobilized with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor plus plerixafor. Forty-two percent (21/50) of programs that routinely measured the PB CD34+ count before collection and discontinued further HPC(A) collection based on product CD34+ cell yield also stopped if the PB CD34+ value before apheresis was considered too low to proceed. Most programs use the PB CD34+ cell count to trigger autologous HPC(A) collection. Some centers also use this

  12. Formal methods for industrial critical systems a survey of applications

    CERN Document Server

    Margaria-Steffen, Tiziana

    2012-01-01

    "Today, formal methods are widely recognized as an essential step in the design process of industrial safety-critical systems. In its more general definition, the term formal methods encompasses all notations having a precise mathematical semantics, together with their associated analysis methods, that allow description and reasoning about the behavior of a system in a formal manner.Growing out of more than a decade of award-winning collaborative work within the European Research Consortium for Informatics and Mathematics, Formal Methods for Industrial Critical Systems: A Survey of Applications presents a number of mainstream formal methods currently used for designing industrial critical systems, with a focus on model checking. The purpose of the book is threefold: to reduce the effort required to learn formal methods, which has been a major drawback for their industrial dissemination; to help designers to adopt the formal methods which are most appropriate for their systems; and to offer a panel of state-of...

  13. Laboratory Diagnostics Market in East Africa: A Survey of Test Types, Test Availability, and Test Prices in Kampala, Uganda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee F Schroeder

    Full Text Available Diagnostic laboratory tests are routinely defined in terms of their sensitivity, specificity, and ease of use. But the actual clinical impact of a diagnostic test also depends on its availability and price. This is especially true in resource-limited settings such as sub-Saharan Africa. We present a first-of-its-kind report of diagnostic test types, availability, and prices in Kampala, Uganda.Test types (identity and availability were based on menus and volumes obtained from clinical laboratories in late 2011 in Kampala using a standard questionnaire. As a measure of test availability, we used the Availability Index (AI. AI is the combined daily testing volumes of laboratories offering a given test, divided by the combined daily testing volumes of all laboratories in Kampala. Test prices were based on a sampling of prices collected in person and via telephone surveys in 2015.Test volumes and menus were obtained for 95% (907/954 of laboratories in Kampala city. These 907 laboratories offered 100 different test types. The ten most commonly offered tests in decreasing order were Malaria, HCG, HIV serology, Syphilis, Typhoid, Urinalysis, Brucellosis, Stool Analysis, Glucose, and ABO/Rh. In terms of AI, the 100 tests clustered into three groups: high (12 tests, moderate (33 tests, and minimal (55 tests availability. 50% and 36% of overall availability was provided through private and public laboratories, respectively. Point-of-care laboratories contributed 35% to the AI of high availability tests, but only 6% to the AI of the other tests. The mean price of the most commonly offered test types was $2.62 (range $1.83-$3.46.One hundred different laboratory test types were in use in Kampala in late 2011. Both public and private laboratories were critical to test availability. The tests offered in point-of-care laboratories tended to be the most available tests. Prices of the most common tests ranged from $1.83-$3.46.

  14. Laboratory Diagnostics Market in East Africa: A Survey of Test Types, Test Availability, and Test Prices in Kampala, Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Lee F; Elbireer, Ali; Jackson, J Brooks; Amukele, Timothy K

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic laboratory tests are routinely defined in terms of their sensitivity, specificity, and ease of use. But the actual clinical impact of a diagnostic test also depends on its availability and price. This is especially true in resource-limited settings such as sub-Saharan Africa. We present a first-of-its-kind report of diagnostic test types, availability, and prices in Kampala, Uganda. Test types (identity) and availability were based on menus and volumes obtained from clinical laboratories in late 2011 in Kampala using a standard questionnaire. As a measure of test availability, we used the Availability Index (AI). AI is the combined daily testing volumes of laboratories offering a given test, divided by the combined daily testing volumes of all laboratories in Kampala. Test prices were based on a sampling of prices collected in person and via telephone surveys in 2015. Test volumes and menus were obtained for 95% (907/954) of laboratories in Kampala city. These 907 laboratories offered 100 different test types. The ten most commonly offered tests in decreasing order were Malaria, HCG, HIV serology, Syphilis, Typhoid, Urinalysis, Brucellosis, Stool Analysis, Glucose, and ABO/Rh. In terms of AI, the 100 tests clustered into three groups: high (12 tests), moderate (33 tests), and minimal (55 tests) availability. 50% and 36% of overall availability was provided through private and public laboratories, respectively. Point-of-care laboratories contributed 35% to the AI of high availability tests, but only 6% to the AI of the other tests. The mean price of the most commonly offered test types was $2.62 (range $1.83-$3.46). One hundred different laboratory test types were in use in Kampala in late 2011. Both public and private laboratories were critical to test availability. The tests offered in point-of-care laboratories tended to be the most available tests. Prices of the most common tests ranged from $1.83-$3.46.

  15. Observations on a laboratory method for submerged acetic fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LOPEZ, A; JOHNSON, L W; WOOD, C B

    1961-09-01

    Submerged acetic fermentation experiments were performed for the purpose of determining the conditions under which this type of fermentation should be conducted under laboratory conditions. The apparatus used consisted of a set of glass tubes provided with air spargers. Acetobacter acetigenum was found to be the most suitable bacterium among six Acetobacter compared under submerged acetic fermentation conditions in a synthetic medium. Statistically significant different rates of fermentation were observed in acetators that were identical in construction, fermentation medium, and aeration characteristics. Extremely long growth lag periods and complete absence of growth were often observed when starting fermentations. The causes of this behavior were investigated. It was found that it was not produced by lack of nutrients or by presence of a bacteriophage. Different kinds of bacterial starters were studied and compared. Cultures maintained in a liquid medium were reliable starters with a short growth lag period. Liquid medium cultures maintained their good starter characteristics after periods of storage of up to 11 weeks at 40 F (4 C).

  16. Laboratory investigation of novel oil recovery method for carbonate reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yousef, A.A.; Al-Saleh, S.; Al-Kaabi, A.; Al-Jawfi, M. [Saudi Aramco, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    2010-07-01

    This paper described a core flooding laboratory study conducted using composite rock samples from a carbonate reservoir. The aim of the study was to investigate the impact of salinity and ionic composition on oil, brine and rock interactions. Experimental parameters and procedures were designed to replicate reservoir conditions and current field injection practices. Results of the study demonstrated that alterations in the salinity and ionic composition of injected water can have a significant impact on the wettability of the rock surface. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies confirmed that injecting different salinity slugs of seawater in carbonate core samples can cause a significant alteration in the surface charges of the rock, and lead to increased interactions with water molecules. The constant reduction of pressure drop across the composite cores with the injection of different diluted versions of water also provided proof of brine, oil and rock alterations. Results of the study indicated that the driving mechanism for waterflooding recovery processes is wettability alteration, which can be triggered by alterations in carbonate rock surface charges, and improvements in the connectivity between rock pore systems that coexist in carbonate rock samples. 41 refs., 8 tabs., 16 figs.

  17. The IMACS Cluster Building Survey. I. Description of the Survey and Analysis Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Oemler,, Augustus; Gladders, Michael G; Rigby, Jane R; Bai, Lei; Kelson, Daniel; Villanueva, Edward; Fritz, Jacopo; Rieke, George; Poggianti, Bianca M; Vulcani, Benedetta

    2013-01-01

    The IMACS Cluster Building Survey uses the wide field spectroscopic capabilities of the IMACS spectrograph on the 6.5m Baade Telescope to survey the large-scale environment surrounding rich intermediate-redshift clusters of galaxies. The goal is to understand the processes which may be transforming star-forming field galaxies into quiescent cluster members as groups and individual galaxies fall into the cluster from the surrounding supercluster. This first paper describes the survey: the data taking and reduction methods. We provide new calibrations of star formation rates derived from optical and infrared spectroscopy and photometry. We demonstrate that there is a tight relation between the observed star formation rate per unit B luminosity, and the ratio of the extinctions of the stellar continuum and the optical emission lines. With this, we can obtain accurate extinction-corrected colors of galaxies. Using these colors as well as other spectral measures, we determine new criteria for the existence of ongo...

  18. Prenotification, Incentives, and Survey Modality: An Experimental Test of Methods to Increase Survey Response Rates of School Principals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Robin Tepper; Jacob, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Teacher and principal surveys are among the most common data collection techniques employed in education research. Yet there is remarkably little research on survey methods in education, or about the most cost-effective way to raise response rates among teachers and principals. In an effort to explore various methods for increasing survey response…

  19. Prenotification, Incentives, and Survey Modality: An Experimental Test of Methods to Increase Survey Response Rates of School Principals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Robin Tepper; Jacob, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Teacher and principal surveys are among the most common data collection techniques employed in education research. Yet there is remarkably little research on survey methods in education, or about the most cost-effective way to raise response rates among teachers and principals. In an effort to explore various methods for increasing survey response…

  20. Laboratory test methods for combustion stability properties of solid propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, L. D.; Brown, R. S.

    1992-01-01

    An overview is presented of experimental methods for determining the combustion-stability properties of solid propellants. The methods are generally based on either the temporal response to an initial disturbance or on external methods for generating the required oscillations. The size distribution of condensed-phase combustion products are characterized by means of the experimental approaches. The 'T-burner' approach is shown to assist in the derivation of pressure-coupled driving contributions and particle damping in solid-propellant rocket motors. Other techniques examined include the rotating-valve apparatus, the impedance tube, the modulated throat-acoustic damping burner, and the magnetic flowmeter. The paper shows that experimental methods do not exist for measuring the interactions between acoustic velocity oscillations and burning propellant.

  1. A Survey of Various Object Oriented Requirement Engineering Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anandi Mahajan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In current years many industries have been moving to the use of object-oriented methods for the development of large scale information systems The requirement of Object Oriented approach in the development of software systems is increasing day by day. This paper is basically a survey paper on various Object-oriented requirement engineering methods. This paper contains a summary of the available Object-oriented requirement engineering methods with their relative advantages and disadvantages. On next, several features have been proposed. These features are the characteristics of a good model of Object-oriented requirement engineering.

  2. Publication bias in laboratory animal research: a survey on magnitude, drivers, consequences and potential solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riet, G. ter; Korevaar, D.A.; Leenaars, M.; Sterk, P.J.; Noorden, C.J. van; Bouter, L.M.; Lutter, R.; Oude Elferink, R.P.; Hooft, L.

    2012-01-01

    CONTEXT: Publication bias jeopardizes evidence-based medicine, mainly through biased literature syntheses. Publication bias may also affect laboratory animal research, but evidence is scarce. OBJECTIVES: To assess the opinion of laboratory animal researchers on the magnitude, drivers, consequences a

  3. A retrospective survey of the use of laboratory tests to simulate internal combustion engine materials tribology problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blau, P.J.

    1992-12-31

    Progress in the Field of tribology strongly parallels, and has always been strongly driven by, developments and needs in transportation and related industries. Testing of candidate materials for internal combustion engine applications has historically taken several routes: (1) replacement of parts in actual engines subjected to daily use, (2) testing in special, instrumented test engines, (3) and simulative testing in laboratory tribometers using relatively simple specimens. The advantages and disadvantages of each approach are reviewed using historical examples. A four-decade, retrospective survey of the tribomaterials literature focused on the effectiveness of laboratory simulations for engine materials screening. Guidelines for designing and ducting successful tribology laboratory simulations will be discussed. These concepts were used to design a valve wear simulator at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  4. Yeast identification in the clinical microbiology laboratory: phenotypical methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freydiere, A M; Guinet, R; Boiron, P

    2001-02-01

    Emerging yeast pathogens are favoured by increasing numbers of immunocompromised patients and by certain current medical practices. These yeasts differ in their antifungal drug susceptibilities, and rapid species identification is imperative. A large variety of methods have been developed with the aim of facilitating rapid, accurate yeast identification. Significant recent commercial introductions have included species-specific direct enzymatic colour tests, differential chromogenic isolation plates, direct immunological tests, and enhanced manual and automated biochemical and enzymatic panels. Chromogenic isolation media demonstrate better detection rates of yeasts in mixed cultures than traditional media, and allow the direct identification of Candida albicans by means of colony colour. Comparative evaluation of rapid methods for C. albicans identification, including the germ tube test, shows that chromogenic media may be economically advantageous. Accurate tests for single species include the Bichrolatex Albicans and Krusei Color tests, both immunologically based, as well as the Remel Rapid Trehalose Assimilation Broth for C. glabrata. Among broad-spectrum tests, the RapID Yeast Plus system gives same-day identification of clinical yeasts, but performance depends on inoculum density and geographic isolate source. The API 20 C AUX system is considered a reference method, but newer systems such as Auxacolor and Fungichrom are as accurate and are more convenient. Among automated systems, the ID 32 C strip, the Vitek Yeast Biochemical Card and the Vitek 2 ID-YST system correctly identify >93% of common yeasts, but the ID-YST is the most accurate with uncommon yeasts, including C. dubliniensis. Spectroscopic methods such as Fourier transformed-infrared spectroscopy offer potential advantages for the future. Overall, the advantages of rapid yeast identification methods include relative simplicity and low cost. For all rapid methods, meticulous, standardized

  5. METHODS OF TSUNAMI DETECTION AND OF POST-TSUNAMI SURVEYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kurkin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In our paper we describe some of the methods of the last 25 years which have been used extensively to examine and register tsunami traces - particularly by satellite imaging of coastal zones before and after a tsunami has struck, thus assessing quickly the extent of coastal inundation over large areas without the need of a site visit. Nearly all countries bordering oceans, seas and bodies of water have established digital systems of water level registration in the range of tsunami waves. In this article we describe methods of tsunami detection and runup measurements, some based on our own participation in post-tsunami surveys. Also, we discuss the possibility of using robotic systems to survey tsunami traces in hard-to- reach places.

  6. ORGANIZATION AND METHOD FOR THE REMOTE LABORATORY WORK OF GENERAL TECHNICAL DISCIPLINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfia Sh. Salakhova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the important problem – use of distant technologies in engineering education in the laboratory experiments. The role of distant experiment in the modern engineering education is discussed. The authors consider structure of the distant system to real experiments control and the method of realization distant laboratory work in the educational process. The analysis of distant laboratory work effectiveness is discussed. 

  7. Country Risk Analysis: A Survey of the Quantitative Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Hiranya K Nath

    2008-01-01

    With globalization and financial integration, there has been rapid growth of international lending and foreign direct investment (FDI). In view of this emerging trend, country risk analysis has become extremely important for the international creditors and investors. This paper briefly discusses the concepts and definitions, and presents a survey of the quantitative methods that are used to address various issues related to country risk. It also gives a summary review of selected empirical st...

  8. Rapid Mapping Method Based on Free Blocks of Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xianwen; Wang, Huiqing; Wang, Jinling

    2016-06-01

    While producing large-scale larger than 1:2000 maps in cities or towns, the obstruction from buildings leads to difficult and heavy tasks of measuring mapping control points. In order to avoid measuring the mapping control points and shorten the time of fieldwork, in this paper, a quick mapping method is proposed. This method adjusts many free blocks of surveys together, and transforms the points from all free blocks of surveys into the same coordinate system. The entire surveying area is divided into many free blocks, and connection points are set on the boundaries between free blocks. An independent coordinate system of every free block is established via completely free station technology, and the coordinates of the connection points, detail points and control points in every free block in the corresponding independent coordinate systems are obtained based on poly-directional open traverses. Error equations are established based on connection points, which are determined together to obtain the transformation parameters. All points are transformed from the independent coordinate systems to a transitional coordinate system via the transformation parameters. Several control points are then measured by GPS in a geodetic coordinate system. All the points can then be transformed from the transitional coordinate system to the geodetic coordinate system. In this paper, the implementation process and mathematical formulas of the new method are presented in detail, and the formula to estimate the precision of surveys is given. An example has demonstrated that the precision of using the new method could meet large-scale mapping needs.

  9. A Survey on Formal Methods for Web Service Composition

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Web Service Composition creates new composite Web Services from existing Web Services which embodies the added values of Web Service technology and is a key technology to solve cross-organizational business process integrations. We do a survey on formal methods for Web Service Composition in the following way. Through analyses of Web Service Composition, we establish a reference model called RM-WSComposition to capture elements of Web Service Composition. Based on the RM-WSComposition, issues...

  10. We’re Working On It: Transferring the Sloan Digital Sky Survey from Laboratory to Library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley E. Sands

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This article reports on the transfer of a massive scientific dataset from a national laboratory to a university library, and from one kind of workforce to another. We use the transfer of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS archive to examine the emergence of a new workforce for scientific research data management. Many individuals with diverse educational backgrounds and domain experience are involved in SDSS data management: domain scientists, computer scientists, software and systems engineers, programmers, and librarians. These types of positions have been described using terms such as research technologist, data scientist, e-science professional, data curator, and more. The findings reported here are based on semi-structured interviews, ethnographic participant observation, and archival studies from 2011-2013. The library staff conducting the data storage and archiving of the SDSS archive faced two performance problems. The preservation specialist and the system administrator worked together closely to discover and implement solutions to the slow data transfer and verification processes. The team overcame these slow-downs by problem solving, working in a team, and writing code. The library team lacked the astronomy domain knowledge necessary to meet some of their preservation and curation goals. The case study reveals the variety of expertise, experience, and individuals essential to the SDSS data management process. A variety of backgrounds and educational histories emerge in the data managers studied. Teamwork is necessary to bring disparate expertise together, especially between those with technical and domain education. The findings have implications for data management education, policy and relevant stakeholders. This article is part of continuing research on Knowledge Infrastructures.

  11. Novel Methods for Development of Cell Factories and Laboratory Simultations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Mads

    of thousands of genomic sites simultaneously. We demonstrated the feasibility of the method by inserting T7 promoters upstream of 2587 operons in E. coli, and validating the resulting cell library by deep sequencing. The method makes large-scale mutagenesis projects possible at a cost between 10x to more than...... fluorescence-activated cell sorting and deep DNA sequencing. Based on this data, we developed an algorithm (EMOPEC), which enables efficient modulation of the expression level of any chromosomally encoded gene in E. coli, by changing only a few bases in the SD sequence. We tested the algorithm by modulating 6...... ALE-acquired alleles in random combinations into the ancestral strain, and competition between these engineered strains was used to identify causative mutations by selection at 42 °C and subsequent deep sequencing of several selected clones. Interestingly, most of the identified key genes differed...

  12. Field and laboratory methods in human milk research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Elizabeth M; Aiello, Marco O; Fujita, Masako; Hinde, Katie; Milligan, Lauren; Quinn, E A

    2013-01-01

    Human milk is a complex and variable fluid of increasing interest to human biologists who study nutrition and health. The collection and analysis of human milk poses many practical and ethical challenges to field workers, who must balance both appropriate methodology with the needs of participating mothers and infants and logistical challenges to collection and analysis. In this review, we address various collection methods, volume measurements, and ethical considerations and make recommendations for field researchers. We also review frequently used methods for the analysis of fat, protein, sugars/lactose, and specific biomarkers in human milk. Finally, we address new technologies in human milk research, the MIRIS Human Milk Analyzer and dried milk spots, which will improve the ability of human biologists and anthropologists to study human milk in field settings.

  13. Laboratory testing for von Willebrand's disease: an assessment of current diagnostic practice and efficacy by means of a multi-laboratory survey. RCPA Quality Assurance Program (QAP) in Haematology Haemostasis Scientific Advisory Panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favaloro, E J; Smith, J; Petinos, P; Hertzberg, M; Koutts, J

    1999-10-01

    We report an evaluation of current laboratory practice for the diagnosis of von Willebrand's disease (VWD) by means of a multilaboratory survey. This assessment was undertaken with the RCPA Quality Assurance Program (QAP) in Haematology, which covers a wide geographic area encompassing Australia, New Zealand and Asia. A total of 25 laboratories actively involved in testing for VWD were selected to participate in a sample testing assessment exercise. Samples comprised 10 plasmas: (i) a normal plasma pool (in duplicate), (ii) this pool diluted to 50% (in duplicate), (iii) a normal individual (X1), (iv) severe Type 1 VWD (X1), (v) Type 2B VWD (x2 unrelated donors), (vi) Type 3 VWD (x1), (vii) Type 2A VWD (x1). Laboratories were asked to perform all tests available to them in order to establish a laboratory diagnosis of VWD, and then to comment on the possibility or otherwise of VWD. Overall findings indicated a wide variation in test practice, in the effectiveness of various test procedures in detecting VWD, and in the ability of various composite test panels to identify type 2 VWD subtypes. Firstly, while all laboratories (n = 25) performed tests for FVIII:C activity, von Willebrand factor 'antigen' (VWF:Ag) and a functional VWF assay [using the ristocetin cofactor assay (VWF:RCo; n = 23) and/or the collagen binding assay (VWF:CBA; n = 12)], only three laboratories carried out VWF:Multimer analysis. Secondly, for the three quantitative VWF assays, 10/25 (40%) laboratories performed all three, whereas 15/25 (60%) performed only two [VWF:Ag and VWF:RCo (n = 13); VWF:Ag and VWF:CBA (n = 2)]. Thirdly, a variety of assay methodologies were evident for VWF:Ag [ELISA, electro-immuno diffusion (EID), latex immuno-assay (LIA), and VIDAS assay] and VWF:RCo (platelet agglutination/'aggregometry' and a 'functional VWF:RCo-alternative' ELISA assay). Between method analysis for the quantitative VWF assays showed that the VWF:RCo yielded the greatest degree of inter-laboratory

  14. Techniques for Surveying Urban Active Faults by Seismic Methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Mingcai; Gao Jinghua; Liu Jianxun; Rong Lixin

    2005-01-01

    Using the seismic method to detect active faults directly below cities is an irreplaceable prospecting technique. The seismic method can precisely determine the fault position. Seismic method itself can hardly determine the geological age of fault. However, by considering in connection with the borehole data and the standard geological cross-section of the surveyed area, the geological age of reflected wave group can be qualitatively (or semi-quantitatively)determined from the seismic depth profile. To determine the upper terminal point of active faults directly below city, it is necessary to use the high-resolution seismic reflection technique.To effectively determine the geometric feature of deep faults, especially to determine the relation between deep and shallow fracture structures, the seismic reflection method is better than the seismic refraction method.

  15. LABORATORY METHODS FOR DIAGNOSIS OF TUBERCULOSIS- THE APPROACH AND CHALLENGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta A K

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB remains a major global health problem, particularly in many of the developing countries including India. Some of the factors that have substantially contributed to the number of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR- TB and extensively drug resistant tuberculosis (XDR- TB cases both in general and among HIV infected persons are- the delay in the diagnosis as well as delayed determination in the drug susceptibility of the isolated organism. In the present article, an attempt has been made to review various techniques/methods available for the diagnosis of tuberculosis and their applications along with the advantages and disadvantages/ limitations.

  16. Method for Predicting Void Ratio and Triaxial Friction Angle from Laboratory CPT at Shallow Depths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kim André; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    In this report an investigation of the relationship between the tip resistance, qc of a laboratory CPT-probe versus the relative density, Dr and friction angle, ∏ of Aalborg University Sand No. 0 is carried out. A method for estimating the relative density and the triaxial friction angle from...... the cone resistance of the laboratory probe is proposed. The suggested method deals with the fact that the friction angle is depended of the stress level especially at low stresses. The method includes a calibration of the cone resistance from the laboratory CPT at shallow depths i.e. low values of d...

  17. Two laboratory methods for the calibration of GPS speed meters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yin; Sun, Qiao; Du, Lei; Yu, Mei; Bai, Jie

    2015-01-01

    The set-ups of two calibration systems are presented to investigate calibration methods of GPS speed meters. The GPS speed meter calibrated is a special type of high accuracy speed meter for vehicles which uses Doppler demodulation of GPS signals to calculate the measured speed of a moving target. Three experiments are performed: including simulated calibration, field-test signal replay calibration, and in-field test comparison with an optical speed meter. The experiments are conducted at specific speeds in the range of 40-180 km h-1 with the same GPS speed meter as the device under calibration. The evaluation of measurement results validates both methods for calibrating GPS speed meters. The relative deviations between the measurement results of the GPS-based high accuracy speed meter and those of the optical speed meter are analyzed, and the equivalent uncertainty of the comparison is evaluated. The comparison results justify the utilization of GPS speed meters as reference equipment if no fewer than seven satellites are available. This study contributes to the widespread use of GPS-based high accuracy speed meters as legal reference equipment in traffic speed metrology.

  18. Walk-through survey report: control technology for fermentation processes at Wyeth Laboratories, Inc. , West Chester, Pennsylvania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, K.F.

    1985-10-01

    A walk-through survey was conducted at Wyeth Laboratories, Incorporated, West Chester, Pennsylvania in November, 1983. The purpose of the survey was to evaluate the control technology for the fermentation processes. The facility produced penicillin-V and penicillin-G using the microbial strain Penicillium-chrysogenum. Medical examinations were available for fermentation and extraction process workers. Safety shoes and glasses and disposable dust respirators were provided. The author concludes that Wyeth has in operation an apparently effective system of control measures.

  19. A survey of macromycete diversity at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Bandelier National Monument, and Los Alamos County; A preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarmie, N.; Rogers, F.J. [Mycology Associates, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    1997-11-01

    The authors have completed a 5-year survey (1991--1995) of macromycetes found in Los Alamos County, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Bandelier National Monument. The authors have compiled a database of 1,048 collections, their characteristics, and identifications. The database represents 123 (98%) genera and 175 (73%) species reliably identified. Issues of habitat loss, species extinction, and ecological relationships are addressed, and comparisons with other surveys are made. With this baseline information and modeling of this baseline data, one can begin to understand more about the fungal flora of the area.

  20. Standard Test Method for Laboratory Aging of Sandwich Constructions

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1999-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of the resistance of sandwich panels to severe exposure conditions as measured by the change in selected properties of the material after exposure. The exposure cycle to which the specimen is subjected is an arbitrary test having no correlation with natural weathering conditions. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The inch-pound units given may be approximate. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  1. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) procedure compendium. Volume 4, Organic methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-01

    This interim notice covers the following: extractable organic halides in solids, total organic halides, analysis by gas chromatography/Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy, hexadecane extracts for volatile organic compounds, GC/MS analysis of VOCs, GC/MS analysis of methanol extracts of cryogenic vapor samples, screening of semivolatile organic extracts, GPC cleanup for semivolatiles, sample preparation for GC/MS for semi-VOCs, analysis for pesticides/PCBs by GC with electron capture detection, sample preparation for pesticides/PCBs in water and soil sediment, report preparation, Florisil column cleanup for pesticide/PCBs, silica gel and acid-base partition cleanup of samples for semi-VOCs, concentrate acid wash cleanup, carbon determination in solids using Coulometrics` CO{sub 2} coulometer, determination of total carbon/total organic carbon/total inorganic carbon in radioactive liquids/soils/sludges by hot persulfate method, analysis of solids for carbonates using Coulometrics` Model 5011 coulometer, and soxhlet extraction.

  2. Studying Landslide Displacements in Megamendung (Indonesia Using GPS Survey Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasanuddin Z. Abidin

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Landslide is one of prominent geohazards that frequently affects Indonesia, especially in the rainy season. It destroys not only environment and property, but usually also causes deaths. Landslide monitoring is therefore very crucial and should be continuously done. One of the methods that can have a contribution in studying landslide phenomena is repeated GPS survey method. This paper presents and discusses the operational performances, constraints and results of GPS surveys conducted in a well known landslide prone area in West Java (Indonesia, namely Megamendung, the hilly region close to Bogor. Three GPS surveys involving 8 GPS points have been conducted, namely on April 2002, May 2003 and May 2004, respectively. The estimated landslide displacements in the area are relatively quite large in the level of a few dm to a few m. Displacements up to about 2-3 m were detected in the April 2002 to May 2003 period, and up to about 3-4 dm in the May 2003 to May 2004 period. In both periods, landslides in general show the northwest direction of displacements. Displacements vary both spatially and temporally. This study also suggested that in order to conclude the existence of real and significant displacements of GPS points, the GPS estimated displacements should be subjected to three types of testing namely: the congruency test on spatial displacements, testing on the agreement between the horizontal distance changes with the predicted direction of landslide displacement, and testing on the consistency of displacement directions on two consecutive periods.

  3. Microbiological safety and quality of Mozzarella cheese assessed by the microbiological survey method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losito, Francesca; Arienzo, Alyexandra; Bottini, Giorgia; Priolisi, Francesca Romana; Mari, Alberto; Antonini, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Dairy products are characterized by reduced shelf life because they are an excellent growth medium for a wide range of microorganisms. For this reason, it is important to monitor the microbiological quality of dairy products and, in particular, the total viable count and concentration of Escherichia coli, as they are indicators of the hygienic state of these products. In addition, in dairy products such as Mozzarella cheese, it is important to monitor the concentration of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), as they are the major components of starter cultures used in cheese production, contributing to the taste and texture of fermented products and inhibiting food spoilage bacteria by producing growth-inhibiting substances. For these reasons, to ensure the quality and safety of their products, cheese makers should monitor frequently, during fresh cheese production, the concentration of LAB and spoilage bacteria. However, usually, small- to medium-size dairy factories do not have an internal microbiological laboratory and external laboratories of analysis are often too expensive and require several days for the results. Compared with traditional methods, the microbiological survey (MBS) method developed by Roma Tre University (Rome, Italy) allows faster and less-expensive microbiological analyses to be conducted wherever they are necessary, without the need for a microbiological laboratory or any instrumentation other than MBS vials and a thermostat. In this paper, we report the primary validation of the MBS method to monitor LAB concentration in Mozzarella cheese and the analysis, using the MBS method, of total viable count, E. coli, and LAB concentrations in the production line of Mozzarella cheese as well as during the shelf life of the product stored at 20°C. The results obtained indicate that the MBS method may be successfully used by small- to medium-size dairy factories that do not have an internal microbiological laboratory. Using the MBS method, these dairy

  4. A Computational Method for 3D Anisotropic Travel-time Tomography of Rocks in the Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghofranitabari, Mehdi; Young, R. Paul

    2013-04-01

    True triaxial loading in the laboratory applies three principal stresses on a cubic rock specimen. Elliptical anisotropy and distributed heterogeneities are introduced in the rock due to closure and opening of the pre-existing cracks and creation and growth of the new aligned cracks. The rock sample is tested in a Geophysical Imaging Cell that is armed with an Acoustic Emission monitoring system which can perform transducer to transducer velocity surveys to image velocity structure of the sample during the experiment. Ultrasonic travel-time tomography as a non-destructive method outfits a map of wave propagation velocity in the sample in order to detect the uniformly distributed or localised heterogeneities and provide the spatial variation and temporal evolution of induced damages in rocks at various stages of loading. The rock sample is partitioned into cubic grid cells as model space. Ray-based tomography method measuring body wave travel time along ray paths between pairs of emitting and receiving transducers is used to calculate isotropic ray-path segment matrix elements (Gij) which contain segment lengths of the ith ray in the jth cell in three dimensions. Synthetic P wave travel times are computed between pairs of transducers in a hypothetical isotropic heterogeneous cubic sample as data space along with an error due to precision of measurement. 3D strain of the squeezed rock and the consequent geometrical deformation is also included in computations for further accuracy. Singular Value Decomposition method is used for the inversion from data space to model space. In the next step, the anisotropic ray-path segment matrix and the corresponded data space are computed for hypothetical anisotropic heterogeneous samples based on the elliptical anisotropic model of velocity which is obtained from the real laboratory experimental data. The method is examined for several different synthetic heterogeneous models. An "Inaccuracy factor" is utilized to inquire the

  5. Effects of Conceptual Systems and Instructional Methods on General Chemistry Laboratory Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Lance E.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of three instructional methods and conceptual systems orientation on achievement in a freshman general chemistry laboratory course. Traditional approach, learning cycle, and computer simulations are discussed. (KR)

  6. Comparison of pencil-type ionization chamber calibration results and methods between dosimetry laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hourdakis, Costas J; Büermann, Ludwig; Ciraj-Bjelac, Olivera; Csete, Istvan; Delis, Harry; Gomola, Igor; Persson, Linda; Novak, Leos; Petkov, Ivailo; Toroi, Paula

    2016-01-01

    A comparison of calibration results and procedures in terms of air kerma length product, PKL, and air kerma, K, was conducted between eight dosimetry laboratories. A pencil-type ionization chamber (IC), generally used for computed tomography dose measurements, was calibrated according to three calibration methods, while its residual signal and other characteristics (sensitivity profile, active length) were assessed. The results showed that the "partial irradiation method" is the preferred method for the pencil-type IC calibration in terms of PKL and it could be applied by the calibration laboratories successfully. Most of the participating laboratories achieved high level of agreement (>99%) for both dosimetry quantities (PKL and K). Estimated relative standard uncertainties of comparison results vary among laboratories from 0.34% to 2.32% depending on the quantity, beam quality and calibration method applied. Detailed analysis of the assigned uncertainties have been presented and discussed.

  7. Molecular Spectroscopy in Space: Discovering New Molecules from Line Surveys and Laboratory Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cernicharo, Jose

    2016-06-01

    The increasing sensitivity offered by the new generation of radio astronomical receivers and radio telescopes (single dishes and radio interferometers) has provided an enormous impact in our capacity to study the molecular content of interstellar and circumstellar clouds. Astronomers face now the challenging problem of interpreting the thousands of lines detected in hot cores which arise from isotopologues and vibrationally excited states of most known molecules. Although all strong features have been already assigned to abundant species, many of the lines still pending to be assigned could arise from very abundant molecular species having low dipole moment and/or very large partition functions. The only way to address this problem in astrophysics is through a close collaboration between astrophysicists and laboratory spectroscopists. In this talk I am going to present the results obtained over the last 10 years in interpreting the line surveys of Orion gathered with the 30m IRAM radio telescope and with ALMA. The most recent molecule found in this cloud is methyl isocyanate, CH3NCO, for which near 400 lines have been found in Oriona in the 80-280 GHz domain. This molecule has an abundance only a factor 5-20 below that of the well-known species HNCO and CH3CN. The molecule has been also found towards the giant cloud SgrB2b in the galactic center. Finally, I will present the case of the submillimeter spectrum of the carbon-rich evolved star IRC+10216 in which we have recently found Si2C with an abundance similar to SiC2. Our recent ALMA observations in a narrow band of 20 GHz around 265 GHz show near 200 features corresponding to the J=3-2 transition of hot HCN (vibrational levels up to 11000 cm-1). In addition to HCN lines, a forest of several hundreds of U lines dominates the spectrum. Most of these lines arise from molecules that condensate very quickly into dust grainsc. aJ. Cernicharo, Z.Kisiel, B.Tercero, et al., A&A 587, L4 (2016). bD.T. Halfen, V

  8. Mapping collapsed columns in coal mines utilizing Microtremor Survey Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, P.F.; Li, C.J.; Ling, S.Q.; Zhang, Y.B.; Hou, Z.; Sun, Y.J. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China)

    2009-07-15

    Collapsed columns post one of the deadly safety risks to coal miners. Therefore, how to effectively map collapsed columns has become an urgent business matter for improving coal mine safety and coal production. This article documents the first application of the microtremor survey method to map geological hazards in the coal mining areas. Our results demonstrated the usefulness and effectiveness of the method, primarily due to the sensitivity of shear waves to the low-velocity collapsed columns. In the 2002 working region within the Shanxi Lu'an Zhangcun coal mine area, both the S-wave velocity structure inverted using the simple-point inversion method and the apparent S-wave velocity section obtained using the 2D microtremor profiling method clearly display the known collapsed columns. The collapsed column positions displayed in the 2D microtremor section are consistent with those seen from the tunnel, having a boundary error approximately 10 m. The microtremor method has been proved a very effective and useful geophysical tool to improve coal mining safety, because of the following characteristics: (1) high resolution, (2) no need of using the artificial source, (3) convenient and low-cost field data acquisition, and (4) little effect from local cultural structures. The microtremor survey method is also technically superior to any other geophysical method in detecting or mapping these low or high S-wave velocity anomalies. Therefore, it has a bright future in many geological and geophysical applications, such as investigation of coal seam structures and collapsed columns underneath villages.

  9. Survey of blood cultures methods in Italy in 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Goglio

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis is a serious clinical condition, associated with high mortality despite advanced modern medical treatment. Traditionally, the detection and identification of bacteria and fungi circulating in the blood-stream is based on blood cultures. A number of factors influence the yield of blood culture, most of them concerning the microbiologist skill and the laboratory organization. In order to collect information about the practices and procedures used for the detection of microrganisms in blood cultures in the italian laboratory (lab, an e-mail with the invitation to participate in the survey was sent to 2000 members of the Italian Association of Clinical Microbiology. Responses were received from 100 lab, located from all over the country (in 18/20 italian regions. The results presented hereby concern specimen collection, culture techniques, rapid identification and susceptibility testing, laboratory organization, relationships with physicians. In summary, most lab use automated systems (96%, the bottles are incubated immediately during public holidays in 72/96 lab (75% and in 49/97 lab at night (50.5%, the lenght of incubation was 5 or 7 days in 93% of the lab, although it is common to extend the incubation period when brucellosis (74 lab, endocarditis (49 lab, systemic mycosis (33 lab is suspected. A wide variety of media are employed for subcultures. All lab process the positive bottles at least once a day, while only in 42 of 81 (51.9% lab the positive blood are processed on holiday. Communication between clinicians and microbiologist include: distribution of specimen collection guidelines (96/100 lab, availability to microbiologist of patients’ clinical situation (77/96 lab, 80.2%, and adding to report the microbiologist’ suggestion (75/98 lab, 76.5%. The results, compared with those collected with a similar questionnaire in 2001, show a greater adherence to guidelines: the number of bottles examined by lab yearly is almost doubled

  10. A Survey of Methods for Gas-Lift Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kashif Rashid

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a survey of methods and techniques developed for the solution of the continuous gas-lift optimization problem over the last two decades. These range from isolated single-well analysis all the way to real-time multivariate optimization schemes encompassing all wells in a field. While some methods are clearly limited due to their neglect of treating the effects of inter-dependent wells with common flow lines, other methods are limited due to the efficacy and quality of the solution obtained when dealing with large-scale networks comprising hundreds of difficult to produce wells. The aim of this paper is to provide an insight into the approaches developed and to highlight the challenges that remain.

  11. Method of analysis and quality-assurance practices for determination of pesticides in water by solid-phase extraction and capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry at the U.S. Geological Survey California District Organic Chemistry Laboratory, 1996-99

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crepeau, Kathryn L.; Baker, Lucian M.; Kuivila, Kathryn M.

    2000-01-01

    A method of analysis and quality-assurance practices were developed to study the fate and transport of pesticides in the San Francisco Bay-Estuary by the U.S. Geological Survey. Water samples were filtered to remove suspended-particulate matter and pumped through C-8 solid-phase extraction cartridges to extract the pesticides. The cartridges were dried with carbon dioxide and the pesticides were eluted with three cartridge volumes of hexane:diethyl ether (1:1) solution. The eluants were analyzed using capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in full-scan mode. Method detection limits for pesticides ranged from 0.002 to 0.025 microgram per liter for 1-liter samples. Recoveries ranged from 44 to 140 percent for 25 pesticides in samples of organic-free reagent water and Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta and Suisun Bay water fortified at 0.05 and 0.50 microgram per liter. The estimated holding time for pesticides after extraction on C-8 solid-phase extraction cartridges ranged from 10 to 257 days.

  12. The IMACS Cluster Building Survey. I. Description of the Survey and Analysis Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oemler Jr., Augustus; Dressler, Alan; Gladders, Michael G.; Rigby, Jane R.; Bai, Lei; Kelson, Daniel; Villanueva, Edward; Fritz, Jacopo; Rieke, George; Poggianti, Bianca M.; hide

    2013-01-01

    The IMACS Cluster Building Survey uses the wide field spectroscopic capabilities of the IMACS spectrograph on the 6.5 m Baade Telescope to survey the large-scale environment surrounding rich intermediate-redshift clusters of galaxies. The goal is to understand the processes which may be transforming star-forming field galaxies into quiescent cluster members as groups and individual galaxies fall into the cluster from the surrounding supercluster. This first paper describes the survey: the data taking and reduction methods. We provide new calibrations of star formation rates (SFRs) derived from optical and infrared spectroscopy and photometry. We demonstrate that there is a tight relation between the observed SFR per unit B luminosity, and the ratio of the extinctions of the stellar continuum and the optical emission lines.With this, we can obtain accurate extinction-corrected colors of galaxies. Using these colors as well as other spectral measures, we determine new criteria for the existence of ongoing and recent starbursts in galaxies.

  13. Survey: interpolation methods for whole slide image processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roszkowiak, L; Korzynska, A; Zak, J; Pijanowska, D; Swiderska-Chadaj, Z; Markiewicz, T

    2017-02-01

    Evaluating whole slide images of histological and cytological samples is used in pathology for diagnostics, grading and prognosis . It is often necessary to rescale whole slide images of a very large size. Image resizing is one of the most common applications of interpolation. We collect the advantages and drawbacks of nine interpolation methods, and as a result of our analysis, we try to select one interpolation method as the preferred solution. To compare the performance of interpolation methods, test images were scaled and then rescaled to the original size using the same algorithm. The modified image was compared to the original image in various aspects. The time needed for calculations and results of quantification performance on modified images were also compared. For evaluation purposes, we used four general test images and 12 specialized biological immunohistochemically stained tissue sample images. The purpose of this survey is to determine which method of interpolation is the best to resize whole slide images, so they can be further processed using quantification methods. As a result, the interpolation method has to be selected depending on the task involving whole slide images.

  14. 两种方法对上海及周边地区实验大小鼠螺杆菌携带情况的调查%An Epidemiological Survey of Helicobacter spp.in Laboratory Mice and Rats in the Area around Shanghai by Two Detection Methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁聪; 冯洁; 谢建云; 高诚; 胡建华

    2011-01-01

    Objective To identity the prevalence of Helicobacter spp. Infection in laboratory mice and laboratory rats in the area around Shanghai, and provide reference and basis for the establishment of Chinese laboratory animals grades and monitoring standards. Methods A total of 352 mice (101 clean grade mice,251 SPF grade mice) and 101 rat (69 clean grade rats, 32 SPF grade rats) obtained from the area around Shanghai were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR).88 mice (clean grade mice,62 SPF grade mice) and 165 rats (84 clean grade rats,81 SPF grade rats) were detected by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Next,the positive rate of the two methods in 88 mice and 101rats were compared. Results PCR detecting percentage in mice and rats were as follows: the average positive rate of mice was 35. 8% (126/352) .among them,the positive rates of clean grade rats and SPF grade mice were 51.5% (52/101)and 29. 5% (74/251 ) .respectively. The average positive rates of rats were 70. 3% (71/101 ) .among them,the positive rate of clean grade and SPF grade were 69. 6% (48/69) and 71. 9% (23/32) .respectively. ELISA detecting percentage in mice and rats as follows;the average positive rate of mice were 15. 9% (14/88) , among them, the positive rates of clean grade and SPF grade mice were 19. 2% (5/26) and 14. 5% (9/62) .respectively. The average positive rate of rats was 52. 7% (87/165), among them, the positive rates of clean grade and SPF grade rats were 53. 6% (45/84) and 51. 9% (42/81), respectively. The positive rates of 88 mice tested by PCR were 72.7% (64/88) and by ELISA 15.9% (14/88). The positive rates of 101 rats detected by PCR were 70.3% (71/101) and by ELISA 49.5% (50/101). Conclusions Helicobacter spp. Infection exists in laboratory mice and laboratory rats in the area around Shanghai. The PCR assay of feces is more sensitive than the examination of the serum antibody against Helicobacter spp.%目的 了解上海及周边地区实验小鼠、大鼠螺杆菌

  15. Multi-laboratory testing of a screening method for world trade center (WTC) collapse dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosati, Jacky A; Bern, Amy M; Willis, Robert D; Blanchard, Fredrick T; Conner, Teri L; Kahn, Henry D; Friedman, David

    2008-02-15

    The September 11, 2001 attack on the World Trade Center (WTC) covered a large area of downtown New York City with dust and debris. This paper describes the testing of an analytical method designed to evaluate whether sampled dust contains dust that may have originated from the collapse of the WTC. Using dust samples collected from locations affected and not affected (referred to as 'background' locations) by the collapse, a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis method was developed to screen for three materials that are believed to be present in large quantities in WTC dusts: slag wool, concrete, and gypsum. An inter-laboratory evaluation of the method was implemented by having eight laboratories analyze a number of 'blind' dust samples, consisting of confirmed background dust and confirmed background dust spiked with varying amounts of dust affected by the WTC collapse. The levels of gypsum and concrete in the spiked samples were indistinguishable from the levels in the background samples. Measurements of slag wool in dust demonstrated potential for distinguishing between spiked and background samples in spite of considerable within and between laboratory variability. Slag wool measurements appear to be sufficiently sensitive to distinguish dust spiked with 5% WTC-affected dust from 22 out of 25 background dust samples. Additional development work and inter-laboratory testing of the slag wool component will be necessary to improve the precision and accuracy of the method and reduce inter- and intra-laboratory variability from levels observed in the inter-laboratory evaluation.

  16. Comparison of a New Cobinamide-Based Method to a Standard Laboratory Method for Measuring Cyanide in Human Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swezey, Robert; Shinn, Walter; Green, Carol; Drover, David R.; Hammer, Gregory B.; Schulman, Scott R.; Zajicek, Anne; Jett, David A.; Boss, Gerry R.

    2013-01-01

    Most hospital laboratories do not measure blood cyanide concentrations, and samples must be sent to reference laboratories. A simple method is needed for measuring cyanide in hospitals. The authors previously developed a method to quantify cyanide based on the high binding affinity of the vitamin B12 analog, cobinamide, for cyanide and a major spectral change observed for cyanide-bound cobinamide. This method is now validated in human blood, and the findings include a mean inter-assay accuracy of 99.1%, precision of 8.75% and a lower limit of quantification of 3.27 µM cyanide. The method was applied to blood samples from children treated with sodium nitroprusside and it yielded measurable results in 88 of 172 samples (51%), whereas the reference laboratory yielded results in only 19 samples (11%). In all 19 samples, the cobinamide-based method also yielded measurable results. The two methods showed reasonable agreement when analyzed by linear regression, but not when analyzed by a standard error of the estimate or paired t-test. Differences in results between the two methods may be because samples were assayed at different times on different sample types. The cobinamide-based method is applicable to human blood, and can be used in hospital laboratories and emergency rooms. PMID:23653045

  17. What We Mean by Scope and Methods: A Survey of Undergraduate Scope and Methods Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Charles C.; Thies, Cameron G.

    2009-01-01

    Self-reflective political scientists have extensively reviewed the history of the discipline and argued over its future, but to date there has been little effort to systematically survey undergraduate scope and methods courses (for an exception see Thies and Hogan 2005). This lack of data leaves the discipline unable to assess how much we are…

  18. Laboratory development of methods for centralized treatment of liquid low-level waste at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, W.D.; Bostick, D.T.; Burgess, M.W.; Taylor, P.A.; Perona, J.J.; Kent, T.E.

    1994-10-01

    Improved centralized treatment methods are needed in the management of liquid low-level waste (LLLW) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). LLLW, which usually contains radioactive contaminants at concentrations up to millicurie-per-liter levels, has accumulated in underground storage tanks for over 10 years and has reached a volume of over 350,000 gal. These wastes have been collected since 1984 and are a complex mixture of wastes from past nuclear energy research activities. The waste is a highly alkaline 4-5 M NaNO{sub 3} solution with smaller amounts of other salts. This type of waste will continue to be generated as a consequence of future ORNL research programs. Future LLLW (referred to as newly generated LLLW or NGLLLW) is expected to a highly alkaline solution of sodium carbonate and sodium hydroxide with a smaller concentration of sodium nitrate. New treatment facilities are needed to improve the manner in which these wastes are managed. These facilities must be capable of separating and reducing the volume of radioactive contaminants to small stable waste forms. Treated liquids must meet criteria for either discharge to the environment or solidification for onsite disposal. Laboratory testing was performed using simulated waste solutions prepared using the available characterization information as a basis. Testing was conducted to evaluate various methods for selective removal of the major contaminants. The major contaminants requiring removal from Melton Valley Storage Tank liquids are {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs. Principal contaminants in NGLLLW are {sup 9O}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, and {sup 106}Ru. Strontium removal testing began with literature studies and scoping tests with several ion-exchange materials and sorbents.

  19. A comparison of 2 laboratory methods to test dental unit waterline water quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porteous, Nuala; Sun, Yuyu; Dang, Shichien; Schoolfield, John

    2013-11-01

    The performance of 2 American Public Health Association standard laboratory methods, the R2A spread plate and the SimPlate(TM) for heterotrophic plate count, for quantifying heterotrophic microorganisms in dental waterline samples was evaluated. Microbial counts were underestimated on SimPlate(TM) compared with R2A, and the results indicated a poor correlation between the 2 methods.

  20. Evaluation of a Modified Keller Method in a Biochemistry Laboratory Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Lance E.

    1982-01-01

    Describes a modified Keller plan for teaching a biochemistry laboratory course and evaluates the method's effectiveness by comparing results of students using Keller plan (N=17) to students receiving traditional instruction (N=16). Results suggest the modified Keller plan is a successful instructional method for the course. (Author/SK)

  1. A comparison of two laboratory methods to test dental unit waterline water quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porteous, Nuala; Sun, Yuyu; Dang, Shichien; Schoolfield, John

    2013-01-01

    The performance of two APHA standard laboratory methods, the R2A spread plate and the SimPlate™ for heterotrophic plate count (HPC), for quantifying heterotrophic microorganisms in dental waterline samples was evaluated. Microbial counts were underestimated on SimPlate™ compared with R2A and the results indicated a poor correlation between the two methods. PMID:24054735

  2. A Manual of Simplified Laboratory Methods for Operators of Wastewater Treatment Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerhold, Arnold F., Ed.; Bennett, Ernest C., Ed.

    This manual is designed to provide the small wastewater treatment plant operator, as well as the new or inexperienced operator, with simplified methods for laboratory analysis of water and wastewater. It is emphasized that this manual is not a replacement for standard methods but a guide for plants with insufficient equipment to perform analyses…

  3. An Enzymatic Clinical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment Incorporating an Introduction to Mathematical Method Comparison Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duxbury, Mark

    2004-01-01

    An enzymatic laboratory experiment based on the analysis of serum is described that is suitable for students of clinical chemistry. The experiment incorporates an introduction to mathematical method-comparison techniques in which three different clinical glucose analysis methods are compared using linear regression and Bland-Altman difference…

  4. Flotation of Mineral and Dyes: A Laboratory Experiment for Separation Method Molecular Hitchhikers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappon, Tim; Sylvestre, Jarrett A.; Rappon, Manit

    2016-01-01

    Flotation as a method of separation is widely researched and is applied in many industries. It has been used to address a wide range of environmental issues including treatment of wastewater, recovery of heavy metals for recycling, extraction of minerals in mining, and so forth. This laboratory attempts to show how such a simple method can be used…

  5. Validation of a laboratory method for evaluating dynamic properties of reconstructed equine racetrack surfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob J Setterbo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Racetrack surface is a risk factor for racehorse injuries and fatalities. Current research indicates that race surface mechanical properties may be influenced by material composition, moisture content, temperature, and maintenance. Race surface mechanical testing in a controlled laboratory setting would allow for objective evaluation of dynamic properties of surface and factors that affect surface behavior. OBJECTIVE: To develop a method for reconstruction of race surfaces in the laboratory and validate the method by comparison with racetrack measurements of dynamic surface properties. METHODS: Track-testing device (TTD impact tests were conducted to simulate equine hoof impact on dirt and synthetic race surfaces; tests were performed both in situ (racetrack and using laboratory reconstructions of harvested surface materials. Clegg Hammer in situ measurements were used to guide surface reconstruction in the laboratory. Dynamic surface properties were compared between in situ and laboratory settings. Relationships between racetrack TTD and Clegg Hammer measurements were analyzed using stepwise multiple linear regression. RESULTS: Most dynamic surface property setting differences (racetrack-laboratory were small relative to surface material type differences (dirt-synthetic. Clegg Hammer measurements were more strongly correlated with TTD measurements on the synthetic surface than the dirt surface. On the dirt surface, Clegg Hammer decelerations were negatively correlated with TTD forces. CONCLUSIONS: Laboratory reconstruction of racetrack surfaces guided by Clegg Hammer measurements yielded TTD impact measurements similar to in situ values. The negative correlation between TTD and Clegg Hammer measurements confirms the importance of instrument mass when drawing conclusions from testing results. Lighter impact devices may be less appropriate for assessing dynamic surface properties compared to testing equipment designed to simulate hoof

  6. Real life turnaround time of blood cultures in the clinical microbiology laboratory: results of the first Italian survey, May 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Arena

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims: Blood culture (BC results are essential to guide antimicrobial chemotherapy for patients with sepsis. However, BC is a time-consuming exam, which can take several days. Reducing BCs turn around time (TAT could impact on multiple outcome parameters and TAT monitoring is an important tool for measurement of microbiology laboratory performance. The aim of this study was to provide an overview of BC TATs among Italian microbiology laboratories. Materials and methods: Five laboratories collected and recorded, for a month period, date and time of the BC processing events. Cumulative TATs were analysed using the GraphPad software. Results: Participating laboratories reported data from 302 sepsis episodes. The median time from when the BC system produced a positive signal until Gram-stain results were reported was 7.6 hours. A rapid molecular identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST was performed in 26.5% of BCs. Mean TAT for identification report was significantly lower when a molecular approach was adopted (12 vs. 28.7 hours, P<0.001. Similarly, results of the molecular AST were obtained more than 24 hours in advance compared with phenotypic AST (mean 13.2 vs. 47.6, P<0.001. TATs from BC positivity of laboratories opened 7 days/week were not significantly lower than those of laboratories opened 6 days/week. Conclusions: BC is a time-consuming exam, however, molecular identification and AST methods can drastically reduce time to results. The lack of difference between TATs observed for laboratories working 7 days/week and 6 days/week, coupled with a high rate of BCs turning positive during the night enable to conclude that the most urgent measure to reduce TATs is the expansion of laboratory regular duty hours.

  7. Training practices of cell processing laboratory staff : Analysis of a survey by the Alliance for Harmonization of Cellular Therapy Accreditation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keever-Taylor, Carolyn A.; Slaper-Cortenbach, Ineke; Celluzzi, Christina; Loper, Kathy; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Schwartz, Joseph; Mcgrath, Eoin; Eldridge, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background aims: Methods for processing products used for hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) transplantation must ensure their safety and efficacy. Personnel training and ongoing competency assessment is critical to this goal. Here we present results from a global survey of methods used by a

  8. Risk Assessment Techniques and Survey Method for COTS Components

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Rashmi

    2012-01-01

    The Rational Unified Process a software engineering process is gaining popularity nowadays. RUP delivers best software practices for component software Development life cycle It supports component based software development. Risk is involved in every component development phase .neglecting those risks sometimes hampers the software growth and leads to negative outcome. In Order to provide appropriate security and protection levels, identifying various risks is very vital. Therefore Risk identification plays a very crucial role in the component based software development This report addresses incorporation of component based software development cycle into RUP phases, assess several category of risk encountered in the component based software. It also entails a survey method to identify the risk factor and evaluating the overall severity of the component software development in terms of the risk. Formula for determining risk prevention cost and finding the risk probability is also been included. The overall go...

  9. A SURVEY ON METHODS OF UNDERGRADUATE PHARMACOLOGY TEACHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MOHANBABU AMBERKAR, LALIT MOHAN, MEENA KUMARI, BAIRY K.L

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of pharmacology to choose and prescribe drugs is a major challenge encountered by medical practitioners. A number of initiatives have been carried out to improve the teaching of pharmacology and applied therapeutics.Material & methods-A survey was conducted on medical students,pursuing pharmacology at Kasturba Medical College,Manipal,during the month of August 2010,to obtain information regarding students attitude towards Pharmacology. Result-Two hundred and fourteen students participated.The total median score was 56 (maximum score 80.Majority of them suggested to have more problem based learning than didactic lectures and to have integrated teaching with other clinical subjects. Suggestions to improve pharmacology teaching were noted.Conclusion-The findings of the study would be of interest to medical educators in modifying undergraduate pharmacology teaching programme

  10. Institutional practices and policies in acid-base testing: a self reported Croatian survey study on behalf of the Croatian society of medical biochemistry and laboratory medicine Working Group for acid-base balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukić, Lora; Šimundić, Ana-Maria

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this survey study was to assess the current practices and policies in use related to the various steps in the blood gas testing process, across hospital laboratories in Croatia. Materials and methods: First questionnaire was sent by email to all medical biochemistry laboratories (N = 104) within general, specialized and clinical hospitals and university hospital centres to identify laboratories which perform blood gas analysis. Second questionnaire with detailed questions about sample collection, analysis and quality control procedures, was sent only to 47 laboratories identified by the first survey. Questionnaire was designed as combination of questions and statements with Likert scale. Third questionnaire was sent to all participating laboratories (N=47) for additional clarification for either indeterminate or unclear answers. Results: Blood gas analysis is performed in 47/104 hospital laboratories in Croatia. In 25/41 (0.61) of the laboratories capillary blood gas sampling is the preferred sample type for adult patient population, whereas arterial blood sample is preferentially used in only 5/44 laboratories (0.11). Blood sampling and sample processing for capillary samples is done almost always by laboratory technicians (36/41 and 37/44, respectively), whereas arterial blood sampling is almost always done by the physician (24/29) and only rarely by a nurse (5/28). Sample acceptance criteria and sample analysis are in accordance with international recommendations for majority of laboratories. 43/44 laboratories participate in the national EQA program. POCT analyzers are installed outside of the laboratory in 20/47 (0.43) institutions. Laboratory staff is responsible for education and training of ward personnel, quality control and instrument maintenance in only 12/22, 11/20 and 9/20 institutions, respectively. Conclusions: Practices related to collection and analysis for blood gases in Croatia are not standardised and vary substantially

  11. A survey of numerical methods for shock physics applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertel, E.S. Jr.

    1997-10-01

    Hydrocodes or more accurately, shock physics analysis packages, have been widely used in the US Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories and elsewhere around the world for over 30 years. Initial applications included weapons effects studies where the pressure levels were high enough to disregard the material strength, hence the term hydrocode. Over the last 30 years, Sandia has worked extensively to develop and apply advanced hydrocodes to armor/anti-armor interactions, warhead design, high explosive initiation, and nuclear weapon safety issues. The needs of the DOE have changed over the last 30 years, especially over the last decade. A much stronger emphasis is currently placed on the details of material deformation and high explosive initiation phenomena. The hydrocodes of 30 years ago have now evolved into sophisticated analysis tools that can replace testing in some situations and complement it in all situations. A brief history of the development of hydrocodes in the US will be given. The author also discusses and compares the four principal methods in use today for the solution of the conservation equations of mass, momentum, and energy for shock physics applications. The techniques discussed are the Eulerian methods currently employed by the Sandia multi-dimensional shock physics analysis package known as CTH; the element based Lagrangian method currently used by codes like DYNA; the element free Lagrangian method (also known as smooth particle hydrodynamics) used by codes like the Los Alamos code SPHINX; and the Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian methods used by codes like the Lawrence Livermore code CALE or the Sandia code ALEGRA.

  12. New Survey Methods : Tools to Dig for Gold

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.G. de Jong (Martijn)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractSurveys are widely used by scholars, companies, and public policymakers to generate invaluable insights. Despite the popularity of surveys, there are several biases that can affect the validity of self-reported data. In his inaugural address, Martijn de Jong discusses how new survey

  13. Student Reciprocal Peer Teaching as a Method for Active Learning: An Experience in an Electrotechnical Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-García, Miguel A.; Moreda, Guillermo P.; Hernández-Sánchez, Natalia; Valiño, Vanesa

    2012-10-01

    Active learning is one of the most efficient mechanisms for learning, according to the psychology of learning. When students act as teachers for other students, the communication is more fluent and knowledge is transferred easier than in a traditional classroom. This teaching method is referred to in the literature as reciprocal peer teaching. In this study, the method is applied to laboratory sessions of a higher education institution course, and the students who act as teachers are referred to as "laboratory monitors." A particular way to select the monitors and its impact in the final marks is proposed. A total of 181 students participated in the experiment, experiences with laboratory monitors are discussed, and methods for motivating and training laboratory monitors and regular students are proposed. The types of laboratory sessions that can be led by classmates are discussed. This work is related to the changes in teaching methods in the Spanish higher education system, prompted by the Bologna Process for the construction of the European Higher Education Area

  14. An easy, rapid and inexpensive method to monitor tributyltin (TBT) toxicity in the laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Andreia; Moreira, Rafael; Mendo, Sónia

    2014-05-01

    Tributyltin (TBT) contamination remains a major problem worldwide. Many laboratories are committed to the development of remediation methodologies that could help reduce the negative impact of this compound in the environment. Furthermore, it is important to have at hand simple methodologies for evaluating TBT toxicity in the laboratory, besides the use of complex and costly analytical instrumentation. With that purpose, a method was adapted that is based on the inhibition of growth of an indicator strain, Micrococcus luteus ATCC 9341, under TBT. Different types of matrices, of TBT concentrations and sample treatments were tested. The results herein reported show that the bioassay method can be applied for both aqueous and soil samples and also for a high range of TBT concentrations (at least up to 500 μmol/L). Besides being cheap and easy to perform, it can be performed in any laboratory. Additionally, one possible application of the method to monitor TBT degradation is presented as an example.

  15. METHODS OF LABORATORY ANIMALS" CARCASSES COLLECTION, STORAGE AND DESTRUCTION IN ISFAHAN UNIVERSITY OF MEDICAL SCIENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N SHAMANSOURI

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Environmental problems due to hazardous wastes production are increasing everyday. Laboratories of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences produce hazardous wastes in their daily research avtivities. These hazardous wastes are produced from laboratory animals" carcasses, which were used in educational and research activities. These carcasses are mixed with other wastes while they are contaminated with pathogenic organisms, toxic and chemical agents. These wastes can contaminate environment and threaten human s health. So, carcasses produced in laboratories should be collected and handle with a specific method in order to destruct in an incinerator. Methods: In this study, methods of collection, storge and destruction of laboratory animals" carcasses in Isfahan university of medical Sciences were evaluated during four months. Specific questionnaires were used for data collection. The mean weight of carcasses of each labratories, produced within a week, were calculated. DRE (Destruction and Removal Efficacy in different Temperatures in the incinerator were calculated. Results: Mean weight of laboratory animals" carcasses produced during a week in all the laboratories were 20kg. DRE in the incinerator were 9S.39% in 750.C temperature during 1 hour, 94.20% in 850°c temperature during 30 minutes, 94.10% in 950°c temperature during 20 minutes and 94.80% in 1000°c temperature during 15 minutes. Discussion: According to laboratory animals" carcasses contamination with pathogenic organisms, toxic and chemical agents, present methods of collection, storage and destruction aren"t standard and healthy. Also, due to low amout of carcasses daily production, everyday destruction of these carcasses isn"t economic. As a result, carcasses produced everyday should be stored in a collecting box under zero temperature and destruct at the end of the week in the designed incinerator in 1000°c temperature .

  16. European survey on laboratory preparedness, response and diagnostic capacity for crimean-congo haemorrhagic fever, 2012

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.D. Fernandez-Garcia (Maria Dolores); A. Negredo; A. Papa (Anna); O. Donoso-Mantke; M. Niedrig; H. Zeller; A. Tenorio; L. Franco (Leticia); S.W. Aberle (Stephan W.); M. van Esbroeck (M.); I. Christova; A. Markotic (Alemka); I.-C. Kurolt (Ivan-Christian); H. Zelena (Hana); I. Golovljova; D. Pannetier (Delphine); R. Charrel (Remi); J. Schmidt-Chanasit (Jonas); R. Wölfel (Roman); A. Papa (Anna); M.R. Capobianchi (Maria Rosaria); X. Jakupi (Xhevat); J. Storozenko (Jelena); A. Griskevicius (Algis); G. Bosevska (Golubinka); C. Muscat (Clive); M. Schutten (Martin); S.G. Dudman (Susanne Gjeruldsen); M.J. Alves (M. João); C.S. Ceianu; A. Platonov (Alexander); B. Bozovic (Bojana); B. Klempa; T. Avsic (Tatjana); A. Tenorio; Å. Lundkvist (Åke); P. Cherpillod (Pascal); G. Korukluoglu; D.W.G. Brown (D. W G); T. Brooks (Tim)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractCrimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is an infectious viral disease that has (re-)emerged in the last decade in south-eastern Europe, and there is a risk for further geographical expansion to western Europe. Here we report the results of a survey covering 28 countries, conducted in 20

  17. A Rapid Spectrophotometric Screening Method for 2,4-dinitroanisole in Laboratory Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    insensitive munitions: Aquatic ecotoxicological exposures using 2,4-Dinitroanisole. ERDC/EL TR-13-2. Vicksburg, MS: U.S. Army Engineer Research and...alternative for ecotoxicology testing to quickly quantify DNAN in solution using commonly available instrumentation. This new method uses a...accessible screening detection method was desired for ecotoxicology testing. Such a method would benefit laboratory toxicological assessments, which require

  18. Carcinogenicity of residual fuel oils by nonbiological laboratory methods: annotated bibliography. Part I. Laboratory methods of analysis. Part II. Analysis results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cichorz, R. S.

    1976-04-09

    Recent emphases have been directed by Federal government regulatory agencies and other research groups on the carcinogenic effects of certain aromatic hydrocarbon components in naturally occurring petroleum products. These are used in plant operations, and underline the importance of evaluating environments. Since Rocky Flats Plant uses large quantities of fuel oil, the author was prompted to undertake a search of the chemical literature. Articles and accounts of studies were reviewed on nonbiological laboratory methods for determining the carcinogenicity of residual fuel oils and related high-boiling petroleum fractions. The physical and chemical methods involve the separation or measurement (or both) of polynuclear aromatic constituents which generally are responsible for the carcinogenic effects. Thus, the author suggests that the total carcinogenic activity of any petroleum product may not be due to a specific potent carcinogen, but rather to the cumulative effect of several individually weak carcinogens. The literature search is presented as an annotated bibliography, current as of January 1, 1975, and includes significant parts of the studies along with the total number of other references found when the citation was examined in its entirety. Part I deals with laboratory chemical and physical methods of determining carcinogenicity or polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (or both) in residual fuel oils and contains ten entries. Part II includes the results of testing specific fuel oils for carcinogenic constituents and contains eleven entries. An author index and subject categories are included.

  19. Regional and supraregional biochemistry services in Scotland: a survey of hospital laboratory users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, M J; Dryburgh, F J; Shepherd, J

    1994-05-01

    To ascertain the views of Scottish hospital laboratory users on aspects of regional and supraregional biochemical services offered by the Institute of Biochemistry at Glasgow Royal Infirmary. A questionnaire was circulated asking questions or inviting opinions under various headings, including current patterns of usage of the services provided, availability of information on specimen collection requirements and reference ranges, current arrangements for transport of specimens, turnaround times for delivery of reports, layout and content of request and report forms, quantity and quality of interpretive advice, potential changes in laboratory services, and overall impression of the services provided. Opportunities were provided for free text comment. The questionnaire was circulated in 1992 to heads of department in 23 Scottish hospital biochemistry laboratories. Twenty one replies were received. Services used widely included trace metals/vitamins (n = 20) and specialised endocrine tests (n = 19). Other services also used included specialised lipid tests (n = 13), toxicology (n = 12), thyroid function tests (n = nine), and tumour markers (n = eight). Fifteen laboratories used one or more of the services at least weekly. Most (n = 20) welcomed the idea of a handbook providing information on specimen collection and reference ranges. Nine identified loss of specimens as a problem. Other perceived problems included the absence of reference ranges from report forms, quantity and quality of interpretive advice, and turnaround times of some tests. Overall impressions of the service(s) offered were very good (n = 12); adequate (n = seven); poor (n = one). Useful information was obtained about patterns of use and transport arrangements. Areas identified as requiring follow up included provision of information, alternative ways of communicating reports, and improvement in quantity and quality of interpretive advice.

  20. Laboratory Tests Turnaround Time in Outpatient and Emergency Patients in Nigeria: Results of A Physician Survey on Point of Care Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolodeoku J

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory analytical turnaround time is a well-recognised indicator of how well a laboratory is performing and is sometimes regarded as the benchmark for laboratory performance. Methods: Total 104 doctors in public and private health institutions in Nigeria, spread across all six geo-political zones participated in survey requesting information on their experience with laboratory turnaround times in emergency situations (emergency room, special care baby unit, intensive care unit, dialysis unit and outpatient situations (general medicine and diabetes. Results: The average turnaround time in hours was 5.12, 8.35, 7.32 and 8.33 for the emergency room, special care baby unit, intensive care unit and dialysis unit, respectively. For the outpatient situations, the average turnaround time in hours was 10.74 and 15.70 hours for the diabetes and general medical outpatients. The median range (hours and modal range (hours for: the emergency room was 2-4 and <2; the special care baby unit was 4-8 and 4-8; the intensive care unit was 2-4 and 2-4; the dialysis unit was 4-8 and 4-8. The median range (hours and modal range (hours for: the general outpatient clinic was 12-24 and 12-24; the diabetic clinic was 4-8 and 12-24 hours. Conclusion: These turnaround time results are quite consistent with published data from other countries. However, there is some measure of improvement that is required in some areas to reduce the laboratory turnaround in the emergency situations. This could be overcome with the introduction of more point of care testing devices into emergency units.

  1. A New Robust Method for Mobile Robot Multifloor Navigation in Distributed Life Science Laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali A. Abdulla

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A new robust method is proposed for multifloor navigation in distributed Life Science Laboratories. This method proposes a solution for many technical issues including (a mapping and localization with ceiling landmarks and a StarGazer module for achieving an accurate and low cost multifloor navigation system, (b a new method for path planning to navigate across multiple floor environments called backbone method and embedded transportation management system, (c elevator environment handler with the necessary procedures to interact with the elevator presenting a new approach for elevator entry button and internal buttons detection, and (d communication system to get an expandable network; this method utilizes a TCP/IP network for the communication. Many experiments in real Life Science Laboratories proved the efficient performance of the developed multifloor navigation system in life science environment.

  2. 3-Dimensional and Interactive Istanbul University Virtual Laboratory Based on Active Learning Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ince, Elif; Kirbaslar, Fatma Gulay; Yolcu, Ergun; Aslan, Ayse Esra; Kayacan, Zeynep Cigdem; Alkan Olsson, Johanna; Akbasli, Ayse Ceylan; Aytekin, Mesut; Bauer, Thomas; Charalambis, Dimitris; Gunes, Zeliha Ozsoy; Kandemir, Ceyhan; Sari, Umit; Turkoglu, Suleyman; Yaman, Yavuz; Yolcu, Ozgu

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a 3-dimensional interactive multi-user and multi-admin IUVIRLAB featuring active learning methods and techniques for university students and to introduce the Virtual Laboratory of Istanbul University and to show effects of IUVIRLAB on students' attitudes on communication skills and IUVIRLAB. Although…

  3. Customer satisfaction in anatomic pathology. A College of American Pathologists Q-Probes study of 3065 physician surveys from 94 laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarbo, Richard J; Nakhleh, Raouf E; Walsh, Molly

    2003-01-01

    Measurement of physicians' and patients' satisfaction with laboratory services has recently become a requirement of health care accreditation agencies in the United States. To our knowledge, this is the first customer satisfaction survey of anatomic pathology services to provide a standardized tool and benchmarks for subsequent measures of satisfaction. This Q-Probes study assessed physician satisfaction with anatomic pathology laboratory services and sought to determine characteristics that correlate with a high level of physician satisfaction. In January 2001, each laboratory used standardized survey forms to assess physician customer satisfaction with 10 specific elements of service in anatomic pathology and an overall satisfaction rating based on a scale of rankings from a 5 for excellent to a 1 for poor. Data from up to 50 surveys returned per laboratory were compiled and analyzed by the College of American Pathologists. A general questionnaire collected information about types of services offered and each laboratory's quality assurance initiatives to determine characteristics that correlate with a high level of physician satisfaction. Hospital-based laboratories in the United States (95.8%), as well as others from Canada and Australia. Ninety-four voluntary subscriber laboratories in the College of American Pathologists Q-Probes quality improvement program participated in this survey. Roughly 70% of respondents were from hospitals with occupied bedsizes of 300 or less, 65% were private nonprofit institutions, just over half were located in cities, one third were teaching hospitals, and 19% had pathology residency training programs. Overall physician satisfaction with anatomic pathology and 10 selected aspects of the laboratory service (professional interaction, diagnostic accuracy, pathologist responsiveness to problems, pathologist accessibility for frozen section, tumor board presentations, courtesy of secretarial and technical staff, communication of

  4. Survey of biomedical and environental data bases, models, and integrated computer systems at Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murarka, I.P.; Bodeau, D.J.; Scott, J.M.; Huebner, R.H.

    1978-08-01

    This document contains an inventory (index) of information resources pertaining to biomedical and environmental projects at Argonne National Laboratory--the information resources include a data base, model, or integrated computer system. Entries are categorized as models, numeric data bases, bibliographic data bases, or integrated hardware/software systems. Descriptions of the Information Coordination Focal Point (ICFP) program, the system for compiling this inventory, and the plans for continuing and expanding it are given, and suggestions for utilizing the services of the ICFP are outlined.

  5. Enhancing Field Research Methods with Mobile Survey Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    This paper assesses the experience of undergraduate students using mobile devices and a commercial application, iSurvey, to conduct a neighborhood survey. Mobile devices offer benefits for enhancing student learning and engagement. This field exercise created the opportunity for classroom discussions on the practicalities of urban research, the…

  6. Understanding Sample Surveys: Selective Learning about Social Science Research Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currin-Percival, Mary; Johnson, Martin

    2010-01-01

    We investigate differences in what students learn about survey methodology in a class on public opinion presented in two critically different ways: with the inclusion or exclusion of an original research project using a random-digit-dial telephone survey. Using a quasi-experimental design and data obtained from pretests and posttests in two public…

  7. Enhancing Field Research Methods with Mobile Survey Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    This paper assesses the experience of undergraduate students using mobile devices and a commercial application, iSurvey, to conduct a neighborhood survey. Mobile devices offer benefits for enhancing student learning and engagement. This field exercise created the opportunity for classroom discussions on the practicalities of urban research, the…

  8. Understanding Sample Surveys: Selective Learning about Social Science Research Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currin-Percival, Mary; Johnson, Martin

    2010-01-01

    We investigate differences in what students learn about survey methodology in a class on public opinion presented in two critically different ways: with the inclusion or exclusion of an original research project using a random-digit-dial telephone survey. Using a quasi-experimental design and data obtained from pretests and posttests in two public…

  9. Statistical and Mathematical Methods for Synoptic Time Domain Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahabal, Ashish A.; SAMSI Synoptic Surveys Time Domain Working Group

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in detector technology, electronics, data storage, and computation have enabled astronomers to collect larger and larger datasets, and moreover, pose interesting questions to answer with those data. The complexity of the data allows data science techniques to be used. These have to be grounded in sound techniques. Identify interesting mathematical and statistical challenges and working on their solutions is one of the aims of the year-long ‘Statistical, Mathematical and Computational Methods for Astronomy (ASTRO)’ program of SAMSI. Of the many working groups that have been formed, one is on Synoptic Time Domain Surveys. Within this we have various subgroups discussing topics such as Designing Statistical Features for Optimal Classification, Scheduling Observations, Incorporating Unstructured Information, Detecting Outliers, Lightcurve Decomposition and Interpolation, Domain Adaptation, and also Designing a Data Challenge. We will briefly highlight some of the work going on in these subgroups along with their interconnections, and the plans for the near future. We will also highlight the overlaps with the other SAMSI working groups and also indicate how the wider astronomy community can both participate and benefit from the activities.

  10. A Survey on Banknote Recognition Methods by Various Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Woo; Hong, Hyung Gil; Kim, Ki Wan; Park, Kang Ryoung

    2017-02-08

    Despite a decrease in the use of currency due to the recent growth in the use of electronic financial transactions, real money transactions remain very important in the global market. While performing transactions with real money, touching and counting notes by hand, is still a common practice in daily life, various types of automated machines, such as ATMs and banknote counters, are essential for large-scale and safe transactions. This paper presents studies that have been conducted in four major areas of research (banknote recognition, counterfeit banknote detection, serial number recognition, and fitness classification) in the accurate banknote recognition field by various sensors in such automated machines, and describes the advantages and drawbacks of the methods presented in those studies. While to a limited extent some surveys have been presented in previous studies in the areas of banknote recognition or counterfeit banknote recognition, this paper is the first of its kind to review all four areas. Techniques used in each of the four areas recognize banknote information (denomination, serial number, authenticity, and physical condition) based on image or sensor data, and are actually applied to banknote processing machines across the world. This study also describes the technological challenges faced by such banknote recognition techniques and presents future directions of research to overcome them.

  11. Laboratory methods of evaluating tomato resistance to late blight (Phytophthora infestans (Mont. de Bary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Horodecka

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the presented investigations was to determine uniform laboratory methods of evaluating horizontal resistance of tomatoes to late blight. It was found that the best tests were infecting whole plants at the 5-leaf stage and infecting leaves removed from the middle part of the shoot. The best method of testing the resistance of fruit to infection was instilling a suspension of spores on the calyx with the sepals left in place.

  12. THE METHODS OF LABORATORY DIAGNOSTICS OF UROGENITAL INFECTIONS ASSOCIATED WITH MYCOPLASMA HOMINIS AND UREAPLASMA SPP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Zarucheynova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Wide distribution of urogenital mycoplasmas in the population, the high frequency of carrier state and a long asymptomatic course of disease, the lack of specific clinical symptoms making the diagnosis impossible without using of special laboratory tests. The review focuses on indications for mycoplasma infection screening and for an appointmentof antibiotic therapy. The most commonly used laboratory diagnostic methods of urogenital infections, associated with Mycoplasma hominis and Ureaplasma spp., with their characteristics, advantages and disadvantages are described.

  13. Inter-laboratory comparison of methods to measure androstenone in pork fat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampuero Kragten, S; Verkuylen, B; Dahlmans, H; Hortos, M; Garcia-Regueiro, J A; Dahl, E; Andresen, O; Feitsma, H; Mathur, P K; Harlizius, B

    2011-08-01

    Today, different analytical methods are used by different laboratories to quantify androstenone in fat tissue. This study shows the comparison of methods used routinely in different laboratories for androstenone quantification: Time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay in Norwegian School of Veterinary Science (NSVS; Norway), gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry in Co-operative Central Laboratory (CCL; The Netherlands) and in Institut de Recerca i Tecnologia Agroalimentàries (IRTA; Spain), and high-pressure liquid chromatography in Agroscope Liebefeld-Posieux Research Station (ALP; Switzerland). In a first trial, a set of adipose tissue (AT) samples from 53 entire males was sent to CCL, IRTA and NSVS for determination of androstenone concentration. The average androstenone concentration (s.d.) was 2.47 (2.10) μg/g at NSVS, 1.31 (0.98) μg/g at CCL and 0.62 (0.52) μg/g at IRTA. Despite the large differences in absolute values, inter-laboratory correlations were high, ranging from 0.82 to 0.92. A closer look showed differences in the preparation step. Indeed, different matrices were used for the analysis: pure fat at NSVS, melted fat at CCL and AT at IRTA. A second trial was organised in order to circumvent the differences in sample preparation. Back fat samples from 10 entire males were lyophilised at the ALP labortary in Switzerland and were sent to the other laboratories for androstenone concentration measurement. The average concentration (s.d.) of androstenone in the freeze-dried AT samples was 0.87 (0.52), 1.03 (0.55), 0.84 (0.46) and 0.99 (0.67) μg/g at NSVS, CCL, IRTA and ALP, respectively, and the pairwise correlations between laboratories ranged from 0.92 to 0.97. Thus, this study shows the influence of the different sample preparation protocols, leading to major differences in the results, although still allowing high inter-laboratory correlations. The results further highlight the need for method standardisation and inter-laboratory ring tests for

  14. Survey of the diagnostic retooling process in national TB reference laboratories, with special focus on rapid speciation tests endorsed by WHO in 2007.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanne C van Kampen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Successful integration of new diagnostics in national tuberculosis (TB control programs, also called 'retooling', is highly dependent on operational aspects related to test availability, accessibility and affordability. This survey aimed to find out whether recommendations to use new diagnostics lead to successful retooling in high TB endemic countries, using immunochromatographic tests (ICTs for TB culture speciation as a case study. ICTs are recommended to accurately confirm the presence of bacteria of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in liquid culture isolates. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Questionnaires were sent to national TB reference laboratories (NRLs in 42 high TB endemic countries to address their access to information on ICT implementation, logistics related to availability, accessibility and affordability of ICTs, and testing algorithms. Results from 16 responding countries indicated that half of the NRLs were aware of the contents of WHO guidance documents on liquid culture and ICT implementation, as well as their eligibility for a negotiated pricing agreement for ICT procurement. No major issues with availability and accessibility of ICTs were raised. When asked about testing algorithms, ICTs were not used as stand-alone or first test for TB culture identification as recommended by WHO. CONCLUSIONS: The low response rate was a limitation of this survey and together with NRLs managers' unawareness of global guidance, suggests a lack of effective communication between partners of the global laboratory network and NRLs. TB tests could become more affordable to high TB endemic countries, if the possibility to negotiate lower prices for commercial products is communicated to them more successfully. NRLs need additional guidance to identify where available technologies can be most usefully implemented and in what order, taking into account long-term laboratory strategies.

  15. A Survey of Formal Methods for Intelligent Swarms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truszkowski, Walt; Rash, James; Hinchey, Mike; Rouff, Chrustopher A.

    2004-01-01

    cutting edge in system correctness, and requires higher levels of assurance than other (traditional) missions that use a single or small number of spacecraft that are deterministic in nature and have near continuous communication access. One of the highest possible levels of assurance comes from the application of formal methods. Formal methods are mathematics-based tools and techniques for specifying and verifying (software and hardware) systems. They are particularly useful for specifying complex parallel systems, such as exemplified by the ANTS mission, where the entire system is difficult for a single person to fully understand, a problem that is multiplied with multiple developers. Once written, a formal specification can be used to prove properties of a system (e.g., the underlying system will go from one state to another or not into a specific state) and check for particular types of errors (e.g., race or livelock conditions). A formal specification can also be used as input to a model checker for further validation. This report gives the results of a survey of formal methods techniques for verification and validation of space missions that use swarm technology. Multiple formal methods were evaluated to determine their effectiveness in modeling and assuring the behavior of swarms of spacecraft using the ANTS mission as an example system. This report is the first result of the project to determine formal approaches that are promising for formally specifying swarm-based systems. From this survey, the most promising approaches were selected and are discussed relative to their possible application to the ANTS mission. Future work will include the application of an integrated approach, based on the selected approaches identified in this report, to the formal specification of the ANTS mission.

  16. Evaluation of the Total Design Method in a survey of Japanese dentists

    OpenAIRE

    Ishihara Chikako; Yoshida Toshiko; Milgrom Peter; Nakai Yukie; Shimono Tsutomu

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background This study assessed the application of the Total Design Method (TDM) in a mail survey of Japanese dentists. The TDM was chosen because survey response rates in Japan are unacceptably low and the TDM had previously been used in a general population survey. Methods Four hundred and seventy eight dentist members of the Okayama Medical and Dental Practitioner's Association were surveyed. The nine-page, 27-item questionnaire covered dentist job satisfaction, physical practice, ...

  17. Method to intercalibrate sunphotometer constants using an integrating sphere as a light source in the laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhengqiang; Goloub, Philippe; Blarel, Luc; Yang, Benyong; Li, Kaitao; Podvin, Thierry; Li, Donghui; Xie, Yisong; Chen, Xingfeng; Gu, Xingfa; Zheng, Xiaobing; Li, Jianjun; Catalfamo, Maxime

    2013-04-10

    A calibration method is introduced to transfer calibration constants from the reference to secondary sunphotometers using a laboratory integrating sphere as a light source, instead of the traditional transferring approach performed at specific calibration sites based on sunlight. The viewing solid angle and spectral response effects of the photometer are taken into account in the transfer, and thus the method can be applied to different types of sunphotometers widely used in the field of atmospheric observation. A laboratory experiment is performed to illustrate this approach for four types of CIMEL CE318 sunphotometers belonging to the aerosol robotic network (AERONET). The laboratory calibration method shows an average difference of 1.4% from the AERONET operational calibration results, while a detailed error analysis suggests that the uncertainty agrees with the estimation and could be further improved. Using this laboratory calibration approach is expected to avoid weather influences and decrease data interruption due to operationally required periodic calibration operations. It also provides a basis for establishing a network including different sunphotometers for worldwide aerosol measurements, based on a single standard calibration reference.

  18. METHODS OF EXPERIMENTAL VERIFICATION OF STEINER THEOREM IN PHYSICAL PRACTICUM AND LABORATORY WORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zharilkasin Iskakov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the technique of laboratory work on experimental verification of Steiner’s Theorem in laboratory conditions is developed. To do this, specially designed experimental device was used. The main part of such device is a simple physical pendulum, swinging freely about the axis of suspension, consisting of a cylindrical disc set on a thin rod. To determine the moment of inertia of cylindrical body about the axis of vibrations, property of a physical quantity additivity was used. When processing experimental results, functional approximation by a least squares method was applied; as a result, the empirical expression of Steiner’s Theorem was achieved. Results of experimental studies were very close to the results of theoretical calculations. Laboratory work can be easily repeated for a body of arbitrary shape. The methodology used can be recommended for physical practicum in universities as an effective and easy way of experimental verification of Steiner’s theorem.

  19. Musical preferences and learning outcome of medical students in cadaver dissection laboratory: A Nigerian survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anyanwu, G E; Nto, J N; Agu, A U; Ekezie, J; Esom, E A

    2016-11-01

    Background music has been reported to enhance learning in the cadaver dissection laboratory. This study was designed to determine the impact of various forms of musical genre and some of their characteristics on students' learning outcome in the dissection laboratory. Some selected musical genre in vocal and non-vocal forms and at different tempi and volume were played as background music (BM) to 253 Medical and Dental students during various sessions of cadaver dissection. Psychological Stress assessment was done using Psychological stress measure-9. Participants love for music, preferred musical genre and other musical characteristics were assessed. The impact of the various musical genre and their characteristics on learning was done via written examination on the region dissected during each musical session. A positive relationship was noted between students' preference for musical genre during leisure with their preference for BM during private study time (Pmusical genre on some selected learning factors. Country and Classical music gave the highest positive impact on the various learning factors in CDL followed by R&B. No significant difference was noted between the cognitive values of vocal and non-vocal music. Classical music most effectively reduced the stress induced by dissection in the CDL while Reggae and High life musical genre created a more stressful environment than regular background noise (Pmusical genre and their various characteristics. The inability to isolate the particular musical genre with these desired properties could account for the controversies in the reports of the role of music in academic environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Remote sensing methods for power line corridor surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matikainen, Leena; Lehtomäki, Matti; Ahokas, Eero; Hyyppä, Juha; Karjalainen, Mika; Jaakkola, Anttoni; Kukko, Antero; Heinonen, Tero

    2016-09-01

    To secure uninterrupted distribution of electricity, effective monitoring and maintenance of power lines are needed. This literature review article aims to give a wide overview of the possibilities provided by modern remote sensing sensors in power line corridor surveys and to discuss the potential and limitations of different approaches. Monitoring of both power line components and vegetation around them is included. Remotely sensed data sources discussed in the review include synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images, optical satellite and aerial images, thermal images, airborne laser scanner (ALS) data, land-based mobile mapping data, and unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) data. The review shows that most previous studies have concentrated on the mapping and analysis of network components. In particular, automated extraction of power line conductors has achieved much attention, and promising results have been reported. For example, accuracy levels above 90% have been presented for the extraction of conductors from ALS data or aerial images. However, in many studies datasets have been small and numerical quality analyses have been omitted. Mapping of vegetation near power lines has been a less common research topic than mapping of the components, but several studies have also been carried out in this field, especially using optical aerial and satellite images. Based on the review we conclude that in future research more attention should be given to an integrated use of various data sources to benefit from the various techniques in an optimal way. Knowledge in related fields, such as vegetation monitoring from ALS, SAR and optical image data should be better exploited to develop useful monitoring approaches. Special attention should be given to rapidly developing remote sensing techniques such as UAVs and laser scanning from airborne and land-based platforms. To demonstrate and verify the capabilities of automated monitoring approaches, large tests in various environments

  1. Controlling population evolution in the laboratory to evaluate methods of historical inference.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Mardulyn

    Full Text Available Natural populations of known detailed past demographic history are extremely valuable to evaluate methods of historical inference, yet are extremely rare. As an alternative approach, we have generated multiple replicate microsatellite data sets from laboratory-cultured populations of a gonochoric free-living nematode, Caenorhabditis remanei, that were constrained to pre-defined demographic histories featuring different levels of migration among populations or bottleneck events of different magnitudes. These data sets were then used to evaluate the performances of two recently developed population genetics methods, BayesAss+, that estimates recent migration rates among populations, and Bottleneck, that detects the occurrence of recent bottlenecks. Migration rates inferred by BayesAss+ were generally over-estimates, although these were often included within the confidence interval. Analyses of data sets simulated in-silico, using a model mimicking the laboratory experiments, produced less biased estimates of the migration rates, and showed increased efficiency of the program when the number of loci and sampled genotypes per population was higher. In the replicates for which the pre-bottleneck laboratory-cultured populations did not significantly depart from a mutation/drift equilibrium, an important assumption of the program Bottleneck, only a portion of the bottleneck events were detected. This result was confirmed by in-silico simulations mirroring the laboratory bottleneck experiments. More generally, our study demonstrates the feasibility, and highlights some of the limits, of the approach that consists in generating molecular genetic data sets by controlling the evolution of laboratory-reared nematode populations, for the purpose of validating methods inferring population history.

  2. Intensive archaeological survey of the proposed Savannah River Ecology Laboratory Conference Center and Educational Facility, Savannah River Site, Aiken County, South Carolina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephenson, K.; Crass, D.C.; Sassaman, K.E.

    1993-02-01

    Documented in this report are the methods and results of an intensive archaeological survey for the proposed University of Georgia Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) Conference Center and Educational Facility on the DOE Savannah River Site (SRS). Archaeological investigations conducted by the Savannah River Archaeological Research Program (SRARP) on the 70-acre project area and associated rights-of-way consisted of subsurface testing at two previously recorded sites and the discovery of one previously unrecorded site. The results show that 2 sites contain archaeological remains that may yield significant information about human occupations in the Aiken Plateau and are therefore considered eligible for nomination to the National Register of Historic Places. Adverse impacts to these sites can be mitigated through avoidance.

  3. A Comprehensive Subcellular Proteomic Survey of Salmonella Grown under Phagosome-Mimicking versus Standard Laboratory Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Roslyn N.; Sanford, James A.; Park, Jea H.; Deatherage, Brooke L.; Champion, Boyd L.; Smith, Richard D.; Heffron, Fred; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2012-06-01

    Towards developing a systems-level pathobiological understanding of Salmonella enterica, we performed a subcellular proteomic analysis of this pathogen grown under standard laboratory and infection-mimicking conditions in vitro. Analysis of proteins from cytoplasmic, inner membrane, periplasmic, and outer membrane fractions yielded coverage of over 30% of the theoretical proteome. Confident subcellular location could be assigned to over 1000 proteins, with good agreement between experimentally observed location and predicted/known protein properties. Comparison of protein location under the different environmental conditions provided insight into dynamic protein localization and possible moonlighting (multiple function) activities. Notable examples of dynamic localization were the response regulators of two-component regulatory systems (e.g., ArcB, PhoQ). The DNA-binding protein Dps that is generally regarded as cytoplasmic was significantly enriched in the outer membrane for all growth conditions examined, suggestive of moonlighting activities. These observations imply the existence of unknown transport mechanisms and novel functions for a subset of Salmonella proteins. Overall, this work provides a catalog of experimentally verified subcellular protein location for Salmonella and a framework for further investigations using computational modeling.

  4. A Comprehensive Subcellular Proteomic Survey of Salmonella Grown under Phagosome-Mimicking versus Standard Laboratory Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roslyn N. Brown

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Towards developing a systems-level pathobiological understanding of Salmonella enterica, we performed a subcellular proteomic analysis of this pathogen grown under standard laboratory and phagosome-mimicking conditions in vitro. Analysis of proteins from cytoplasmic, inner membrane, periplasmic, and outer membrane fractions yielded coverage of 25% of the theoretical proteome. Confident subcellular location could be assigned to over 1000 proteins, with good agreement between experimentally observed location and predicted/known protein properties. Comparison of protein location under the different environmental conditions provided insight into dynamic protein localization and possible moonlighting (multiple function activities. Notable examples of dynamic localization were the response regulators of two-component regulatory systems (e.g., ArcB and PhoQ. The DNA-binding protein Dps that is generally regarded as cytoplasmic was significantly enriched in the outer membrane for all growth conditions examined, suggestive of moonlighting activities. These observations imply the existence of unknown transport mechanisms and novel functions for a subset of Salmonella proteins. Overall, this work provides a catalog of experimentally verified subcellular protein locations for Salmonella and a framework for further investigations using computational modeling.

  5. SRC-I demonstration plant analytical laboratory methods manual. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klusaritz, M.L.; Tewari, K.C.; Tiedge, W.F.; Skinner, R.W.; Znaimer, S.

    1983-03-01

    This manual is a compilation of analytical procedures required for operation of a Solvent-Refined Coal (SRC-I) demonstration or commercial plant. Each method reproduced in full includes a detailed procedure, a list of equipment and reagents, safety precautions, and, where possible, a precision statement. Procedures for the laboratory's environmental and industrial hygiene modules are not included. Required American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) methods are cited, and ICRC's suggested modifications to these methods for handling coal-derived products are provided.

  6. The National Criminal Justice Treatment Practices survey: Multilevel survey methods and procedures⋆

    OpenAIRE

    Taxman, Faye S.; Young, Douglas W.; Wiersema, Brian; Rhodes, Anne; Mitchell, Suzanne

    2007-01-01

    The National Criminal Justice Treatment Practices (NCJTP) survey provides a comprehensive inquiry into the nature of programs and services provided to adult and juvenile offenders involved in the justice system in the United States. The multilevel survey design covers topics such as the mission and goals of correctional and treatment programs; organizational climate and culture for providing services; organizational capacity and needs; opinions of administrators and staff regarding rehabilita...

  7. New method for rearing Spodoptera frugiperda in laboratory shows that larval cannibalism is not obligatory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherre Sade Bezerra Da Silva

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available New method for rearing Spodoptera frugiperda in laboratory shows that larval cannibalism is not obligatory. Here we show, for the first time, that larvae of the fall armyworm (FAW, Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae, can be successfully reared in a cohort-based manner with virtually no cannibalism. FAW larvae were reared since the second instar to pupation in rectangular plastic containers containing 40 individuals with a surprisingly ca. 90% larval survivorship. Adult females from the cohort-based method showed fecundity similar to that already reported on literature for larvae reared individually, and fertility higher than 99%, with the advantage of combining economy of time, space and material resources. These findings suggest that the factors affecting cannibalism of FAW larvae in laboratory rearings need to be reevaluated, whilst the new technique also show potential to increase the efficiency of both small and mass FAW rearings.

  8. Standard test method for laboratory evaluation of magnesium sacrificial anode test specimens for underground applications

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1997-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a laboratory procedure that measures the two fundamental performance properties of magnesium sacrificial anode test specimens operating in a saturated calcium sulfate, saturated magnesium hydroxide environment. The two fundamental properties are electrode (oxidation potential) and ampere hours (Ah) obtained per unit mass of specimen consumed. Magnesium anodes installed underground are usually surrounded by a backfill material that typically consists of 75 % gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O), 20 % bentonite clay, and 5 % sodium sulfate (Na2SO4). The calcium sulfate, magnesium hydroxide test electrolyte simulates the long term environment around an anode installed in the gypsum-bentonite-sodium sulfate backfill. 1.2 This test method is intended to be used for quality assurance by anode manufacturers or anode users. However, long term field performance properties may not be identical to property measurements obtained using this laboratory test. Note 1—Refer to Terminology G 15 for terms used ...

  9. Laboratory and tentative interstellar detection of trans-methyl formate using the publicly available Green Bank Telescope PRIMOS survey

    CERN Document Server

    Neill, Justin L; Zaleski, Daniel P; Steber, Amanda L; Pate, Brooks H; Lattanzi, Valerio; Spezzano, Silvia; McCarthy, Michael C; Remijan, Anthony J

    2012-01-01

    The rotational spectrum of the higher-energy trans conformational isomer of methyl formate has been assigned for the first time using several pulsed-jet Fourier transform microwave spectrometers in the 6-60 GHz frequency range. This species has also been sought toward the Sagittarius B2(N) molecular cloud using the publicly available PRIMOS survey from the Green Bank Telescope. We detect seven absorption features in the survey that coincide with laboratory transitions of trans-methyl formate, from which we derive a column density of 3.1 (+2.6, -1.2) \\times 10^13 cm-2 and a rotational temperature of 7.6 \\pm 1.5 K. This excitation temperature is significantly lower than that of the more stable cis conformer in the same source but is consistent with that of other complex molecular species recently detected in Sgr B2(N). The difference in the rotational temperatures of the two conformers suggests that they have different spatial distributions in this source. As the abundance of trans-methyl formate is far higher ...

  10. Biologic surveys for the Sandia National Laboratories, Coyote Canyon Test Complex, Kirtland Air Force Base, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, R.M. [4115 Allen Dr., Kingsville, TX (United States); Knight, P.J. [Marron and Associates, Inc., Corrales, NM (United States)

    1994-05-25

    This report provides results of a comprehensive biologic survey performed in Coyote Canyon Test Complex (CCTC), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Bernalillo County, New Mexico, which was conducted during the spring and summer of 1992 and 1993. CCTC is sited on land owned by the Department of Energy (DOE) and Kirtland Air Force Base and managed by SNL. The survey covered 3,760 acres of land, most of which is rarely disturbed by CCTC operations. Absence of grazing by livestock and possibly native ungulates, and relative to the general condition of private range lands throughout New Mexico, and relative to other grazing lands in central New Mexico. Widely dispersed, low intensity use by SNL as well as prohibition of grazing has probably contributed to abundance of special status species such as grama grass cactus within the CCTC area. This report evaluates threatened and endangered species found in the area, as well as comprehensive assessment of biologic habitats. Included are analyses of potential impacts and mitigative measures designed to reduce or eliminate potential impacts. Included is a summary of CCTC program and testing activities.

  11. Deployable laboratory response to influenza pandemic; PCR assay field trials and comparison with reference methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy J J Inglis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The influenza A/H1N1/09 pandemic spread quickly during the Southern Hemisphere winter in 2009 and reached epidemic proportions within weeks of the official WHO alert. Vulnerable population groups included indigenous Australians and remote northern population centres visited by international travellers. At the height of the Australian epidemic a large number of troops converged on a training area in northern Australia for an international exercise, raising concerns about their potential exposure to the emerging influenza threat before, during and immediately after their arrival in the area. Influenza A/H1N1/09 became the dominant seasonal variant and returned to Australia during the Southern winter the following year. METHODS: A duplex nucleic acid amplification assay was developed within weeks of the first WHO influenza pandemic alert, demonstrated in northwestern Australia shortly afterwards and deployed as part of the pathology support for a field hospital during a military exercise during the initial epidemic surge in June 2009. RESULTS: The nucleic acid amplification assay was twice as sensitive as a point of care influenza immunoassay, as specific but a little less sensitive than the reference laboratory nucleic acid amplification assay. Repetition of the field assay with blinded clinical samples obtained during the 2010 winter influenza season demonstrated a 91.7% congruence with the reference laboratory method. CONCLUSIONS: Rapid in-house development of a deployable epidemic influenza assay allowed a flexible laboratory response, effective targeting of limited disease control resources in an austere military environment, and provided the public health laboratory service with a set of verification tools for resource-limited settings. The assay method was suitable for rapid deployment in time for the 2010 Northern winter.

  12. Handbook of biodiversity methods: survey, evaluation and monitoring

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hill, David A

    2005-01-01

    ... is the requirement for a comprehensive biodiversity audit. For those needing to undertake such audits, this Handbook provides standard procedures for planning and conducting a survey of any terrestrial or freshwater species or habitat and for evaluating the data so as to determine its local, national and international significance. Organised in three parts, the Handb...

  13. Time-resolved Rocking Curve Measurement Method using Laboratory X-ray Source

    OpenAIRE

    林, 雄二郎; 佐藤, 真伸; 古賀, 三井; 佃, 昇; 蔵元, 英一

    2005-01-01

    Fast x-ray detectors and fast signal processing devices have enabled to measure time dependence of x-ray diffraction intensity. Using a fast x-ray detection system, we have developed a time-resolved measurement method of rocking curves with a laboratory x-ray source. The method has been demonstrated for time-resolved rocking curves from an ultrasound-vibrated silicon crystal in MHz range. The measured rocking curves have been consistent with simulated curves based on the dynamical diffraction...

  14. Comparison of Laboratory and Field Methods for Determining the Quasi-Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity of Soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faybishenko, Boris

    1997-08-01

    Laboratory and field ponded infiltration tests in quasi-saturated soils (containing entrapped air) exhibit the same three-stage temporal variability for the flow rate and hydraulic conductivity. However, the values for the hydraulic conductivity may differ by as much as two orders of magnitude due to differences in the geometry and physics of flow when different laboratory and field methods are applied. The purpose of this paper is to investigate this variability using a comparison of results of ponded infiltration tests conducted under laboratory conditions using confined cores, with results of field tests conducted using partially isolated cores and double-ring infiltrometers. Under laboratory conditions in confined cores, during the firs stage, the water flux decreases over time because entrapped air plugs the largest pores in the soils; during the second stage, the quasi-saturated hydraulic conductivity increases by one to two orders of magnitude, essentially reaching the saturated hydraulic conductivity, when entrapped air is discharged from the soils; during the third stage, the hydraulic conductivity decreases to minimum values due to sealing of the soil surface and the effect of biofilms sealing the pores within the wetted zone. Under field conditions, the second stage is only partially developed, and when the surface sealing process begins, the hydraulic pressure drops below the air entry value, thereby causing atmospheric air to enter the soils. As a result, the soils become unsaturated with a low hydraulic conductivity, and the infiltration rate consequently decreases. Contrary to the laboratory experiments in confined cores, the saturated hydraulic conductivity cannot be reached under field conditions. In computations of infiltration one has to take into account the variations in the quasi-saturated and unsaturated hydraulic conductivities, moisture and entrapped air content, and the hydraulic gradient in the quasi-saturated or unsaturated soils.

  15. Removal of Heavy Metals from Liquid Laboratory Waste Using Precipitation and Adsorption Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nastiti Siswi Indrasti

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Liquid laboratory waste (such as residue of Chemical Oxygen Demand/COD analysis contains high concentration of heavy metals (mercury/Hg, silver/Ag and chrome/Cr and has a high potential to pollute the environment. The liquid waste generated by laboratories is generally in small quantity, but it is extremely toxic. It is urgently in need to find out an appropriate method to reduce the problems according to the liquid waste characteristics. In this research work, precipitation and adsorption methods were evaluated to remove Hg, Ag and Cr from liquid laboratory waste, covering determination of optimum process conditions, levels of removal and achievable treated waste quality. Results showed that a Cr removal of 97% was obtained by pH 10, and Hg and Ag removals of 97-99% were reached by pH 12. Although heavy metals removals using precipitation was very significant, but the concentration of heavy metals in the treated waste was still high (0.73-2.62 mg/L and need for further treatment. Applying activated carbon adsorption for further treatment of the effluent reduced dissolved heavy metals to 0-0.05 mg/L, depending on the type of heavy metals as well as the type and dosing of activated carbon.

  16. Techniques of body composition assessment: a review of laboratory and field methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, D R; Heyward, V H

    1999-06-01

    Body composition is one of the major health-related components of fitness. Thus, it is important for health and fitness professionals to have a general understanding of the most commonly used techniques for assessing body composition. This review presents the developmental background and underlying principles and theory of four laboratory (hydrodensitometry, air displacement plethysmography, isotope dilution, and dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry) and four field (bioelectrical impedance analysis, near-infrared interactance, skinfolds, and anthropometry) methods of body composition assessment. In addition to a description of the methods, the validity, and reliability, strengths, and limitations of each measurement tool are examined. Highlights of the laboratory methods include the relatively new Bod Pod air displacement device, which is a promising assessment tool more convenient than hydrodensitometry but still lacking substantial validity testing and the ability of dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry to measure regional composition making it an attractive method for clinicians. Advancements in segmental and multifrequency bioelectrical impedance for compartmental analysis have enhanced the value of this field method, but research continues to show that commercially available near-infrared interactance units are invalid. With this knowledge, the clinician and researcher should be able to make an informed decision regarding the most appropriate measurement device for their body composition assessments.

  17. Application of PCR-based methods for diagnosis of intestinal parasitic infections in the clinical laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verweij, Jaco J

    2014-12-01

    For many years PCR- and other DNA-based methods of pathogen detection have been available in most clinical microbiology laboratories; however, until recently these tools were not routinely exploited for the diagnosis of parasitic infections. Laboratories were initially reluctant to implement PCR as incorporation of such assays within the algorithm of tools available for the most accurate diagnosis of a large variety of parasites was unclear. With regard to diagnosis of intestinal parasitic infections, the diversity of parasites that one can expect in most settings is far less than the parasitological textbooks would have you believe, hence developing a simplified diagnostic triage is feasible. Therefore the classical algorithm based on population, patient groups, use of immuno-suppressive drugs, travel history etc. is also applicable to decide when to perform and which additional techniques are to be used, if a multiplex PCR panel is used as a first-line screening diagnostic.

  18. Meeting report: discussions and preliminary findings on extracellular RNA measurement methods from laboratories in the NIH Extracellular RNA Communication Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Louise C.; Abdel-Mageed, Asim B.; Adelson, P. David; Arango, Jorge; Balaj, Leonora; Breakefield, Xandra; Carlson, Elizabeth; Carter, Bob S.; Majem, Blanca; Chen, Clark C.; Cocucci, Emanuele; Danielson, Kirsty; Courtright, Amanda; Das, Saumya; Elmageed, Zakaria Y. Abd; Enderle, Daniel; Ezrin, Alan; Ferrer, Marc; Freedman, Jane; Galas, David; Gandhi, Roopali; Huentelman, Matthew J.; Van Keuren-Jensen, Kendall; Kalani, Yashar; Kim, Yong; Krichevsky, Anna M.; Lai, Charles; Lal-Nag, Madhu; Laurent, Clara D.; Leonardo, Trevor; Li, Feng; Malenica, Ivana; Mondal, Debasis; Nejad, Parham; Patel, Tushar; Raffai, Robert L.; Rubio, Renee; Skog, Johan; Spetzler, Robert; Sun, Jie; Tanriverdi, Kahraman; Vickers, Kasey; Wang, Liang; Wang, Yaoyu; Wei, Zhiyun; Weiner, Howard L.; Wong, David; Yan, Irene K.; Yeri, Ashish; Gould, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular RNAs (exRNAs) have been identified in all tested biofluids and have been associated with a variety of extracellular vesicles, ribonucleoprotein complexes and lipoprotein complexes. Much of the interest in exRNAs lies in the fact that they may serve as signalling molecules between cells, their potential to serve as biomarkers for prediction and diagnosis of disease and the possibility that exRNAs or the extracellular particles that carry them might be used for therapeutic purposes. Among the most significant bottlenecks to progress in this field is the lack of robust and standardized methods for collection and processing of biofluids, separation of different types of exRNA-containing particles and isolation and analysis of exRNAs. The Sample and Assay Standards Working Group of the Extracellular RNA Communication Consortium is a group of laboratories funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health to develop such methods. In our first joint endeavour, we held a series of conference calls and in-person meetings to survey the methods used among our members, placed them in the context of the current literature and used our findings to identify areas in which the identification of robust methodologies would promote rapid advancements in the exRNA field. PMID:26320937

  19. Meeting report: discussions and preliminary findings on extracellular RNA measurement methods from laboratories in the NIH Extracellular RNA Communication Consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise C. Laurent

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular RNAs (exRNAs have been identified in all tested biofluids and have been associated with a variety of extracellular vesicles, ribonucleoprotein complexes and lipoprotein complexes. Much of the interest in exRNAs lies in the fact that they may serve as signalling molecules between cells, their potential to serve as biomarkers for prediction and diagnosis of disease and the possibility that exRNAs or the extracellular particles that carry them might be used for therapeutic purposes. Among the most significant bottlenecks to progress in this field is the lack of robust and standardized methods for collection and processing of biofluids, separation of different types of exRNA-containing particles and isolation and analysis of exRNAs. The Sample and Assay Standards Working Group of the Extracellular RNA Communication Consortium is a group of laboratories funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health to develop such methods. In our first joint endeavour, we held a series of conference calls and in-person meetings to survey the methods used among our members, placed them in the context of the current literature and used our findings to identify areas in which the identification of robust methodologies would promote rapid advancements in the exRNA field.

  20. Resampling approach for determination of the method for reference interval calculation in clinical laboratory practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, Igor Y; Wilson, Andrew R; Delgado, Julio C

    2010-08-01

    Reference intervals (RI) play a key role in clinical interpretation of laboratory test results. Numerous articles are devoted to analyzing and discussing various methods of RI determination. The two most widely used approaches are the parametric method, which assumes data normality, and a nonparametric, rank-based procedure. The decision about which method to use is usually made arbitrarily. The goal of this study was to demonstrate that using a resampling approach for the comparison of RI determination techniques could help researchers select the right procedure. Three methods of RI calculation-parametric, transformed parametric, and quantile-based bootstrapping-were applied to multiple random samples drawn from 81 values of complement factor B observations and from a computer-simulated normally distributed population. It was shown that differences in RI between legitimate methods could be up to 20% and even more. The transformed parametric method was found to be the best method for the calculation of RI of non-normally distributed factor B estimations, producing an unbiased RI and the lowest confidence limits and interquartile ranges. For a simulated Gaussian population, parametric calculations, as expected, were the best; quantile-based bootstrapping produced biased results at low sample sizes, and the transformed parametric method generated heavily biased RI. The resampling approach could help compare different RI calculation methods. An algorithm showing a resampling procedure for choosing the appropriate method for RI calculations is included.

  1. Is laboratory medicine ready for the era of personalized medicine? A survey addressed to laboratory directors of hospitals/academic schools of medicine in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malentacchi, Francesca; Mancini, Irene; Brandslund, Ivan; Vermeersch, Pieter; Schwab, Matthias; Marc, Janja; van Schaik, Ron H N; Siest, Gerard; Theodorsson, Elvar; Pazzagli, Mario; Di Resta, Chiara

    2015-06-01

    Developments in "-omics" are creating a paradigm shift in laboratory medicine leading to personalized medicine. This allows the increase in diagnostics and therapeutics focused on individuals rather than populations. In order to investigate whether laboratory medicine is ready to play a key role in the integration of personalized medicine in routine health care and set the state-of-the-art knowledge about personalized medicine and laboratory medicine in Europe, a questionnaire was constructed under the auspices of the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFLM) and the European Society of Pharmacogenomics and Personalised Therapy (ESPT). The answers of the participating laboratory medicine professionals indicate that they are aware that personalized medicine can represent a new and promising health model, and that laboratory medicine should play a key role in supporting the implementation of personalized medicine in the clinical setting. Participants think that the current organization of laboratory medicine needs additional/relevant implementations such as (i) new technological facilities in -omics; (ii) additional training for the current personnel focused on the new methodologies; (iii) incorporation in the laboratory of new competencies in data interpretation and counseling; and (iv) cooperation and collaboration among professionals of different disciplines to integrate information according to a personalized medicine approach.

  2. Concordance and discordance of sequence survey methods for molecular epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Nallar, Eduardo; Hasan, Nur A; Cebula, Thomas A; Colwell, Rita R; Robison, Richard A; Johnson, W Evan; Crandall, Keith A

    2015-01-01

    The post-genomic era is characterized by the direct acquisition and analysis of genomic data with many applications, including the enhancement of the understanding of microbial epidemiology and pathology. However, there are a number of molecular approaches to survey pathogen diversity, and the impact of these different approaches on parameter estimation and inference are not entirely clear. We sequenced whole genomes of bacterial pathogens, Burkholderia pseudomallei, Yersinia pestis, and Brucella spp. (60 new genomes), and combined them with 55 genomes from GenBank to address how different molecular survey approaches (whole genomes, SNPs, and MLST) impact downstream inferences on molecular evolutionary parameters, evolutionary relationships, and trait character associations. We selected isolates for sequencing to represent temporal, geographic origin, and host range variability. We found that substitution rate estimates vary widely among approaches, and that SNP and genomic datasets yielded different but strongly supported phylogenies. MLST yielded poorly supported phylogenies, especially in our low diversity dataset, i.e., Y. pestis. Trait associations showed that B. pseudomallei and Y. pestis phylogenies are significantly associated with geography, irrespective of the molecular survey approach used, while Brucella spp. phylogeny appears to be strongly associated with geography and host origin. We contrast inferences made among monomorphic (clonal) and non-monomorphic bacteria, and between intra- and inter-specific datasets. We also discuss our results in light of underlying assumptions of different approaches.

  3. Concordance and discordance of sequence survey methods for molecular epidemiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Castro-Nallar

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The post-genomic era is characterized by the direct acquisition and analysis of genomic data with many applications, including the enhancement of the understanding of microbial epidemiology and pathology. However, there are a number of molecular approaches to survey pathogen diversity, and the impact of these different approaches on parameter estimation and inference are not entirely clear. We sequenced whole genomes of bacterial pathogens, Burkholderia pseudomallei, Yersinia pestis, and Brucella spp. (60 new genomes, and combined them with 55 genomes from GenBank to address how different molecular survey approaches (whole genomes, SNPs, and MLST impact downstream inferences on molecular evolutionary parameters, evolutionary relationships, and trait character associations. We selected isolates for sequencing to represent temporal, geographic origin, and host range variability. We found that substitution rate estimates vary widely among approaches, and that SNP and genomic datasets yielded different but strongly supported phylogenies. MLST yielded poorly supported phylogenies, especially in our low diversity dataset, i.e., Y. pestis. Trait associations showed that B. pseudomallei and Y. pestis phylogenies are significantly associated with geography, irrespective of the molecular survey approach used, while Brucella spp. phylogeny appears to be strongly associated with geography and host origin. We contrast inferences made among monomorphic (clonal and non-monomorphic bacteria, and between intra- and inter-specific datasets. We also discuss our results in light of underlying assumptions of different approaches.

  4. A Survey of Functional Behavior Assessment Methods Used by Behavior Analysts in Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Anthony C.; Pratt, Leigh A.; Normand, Matthew P.

    2015-01-01

    To gather information about the functional behavior assessment (FBA) methods behavior analysts use in practice, we sent a web-based survey to 12,431 behavior analysts certified by the Behavior Analyst Certification Board. Ultimately, 724 surveys were returned, with the results suggesting that most respondents regularly use FBA methods, especially…

  5. A Method for Surveying Control Network Optimization Based on Reliability Properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhenglu; DENG Yong; LUO Changlin

    2007-01-01

    Surveying control network optimization design is related to standards,such as precision,reliability,sensitivity and the cost,and these standards are related closely to each other.A new method for surveying control network simulation optimization design is proposed.This method is based on the inner reliability index of the observation values.

  6. The effect of laboratory and lecture teaching methods on cognitive achievement in integrated science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odubunmi, Olagunju; Balogun, T. A.

    A sample of 210 class-two (grade 8) students from six randomly selected classes from six Nigerian schools was divided into two (experimental and control) groups. Using materials from some units of the Nigerian Integrated Science Project (NISP), the experimental group was taught by a laboratory method while the control group was taught by the lecture method. Data were collected using an Achievement Test for Integrated Science Students developed by the authors and student ability was measured by tests secured from the Department of Teacher Education, University of Ibadan. In analyzing the data, an analysis of covariance was employed. T-test statistics were also used to determine significant difference between means of different groups.High achievers of both groups had identical achievement, but the low achievers in the experimental group performed better than their counterparts in the control group. While the study showed that males in this study prefer laboratory method to lecture method when compared with their female counterparts, the study also revealed that females in the control classes performed better than males of the same group.

  7. Stream life of spawning pink salmon and the method of escapement enumeration by aerial survey: Draft

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Aerial surveys are currently used as the method tor escapement enumeration of pink salmon throughout Alaska. Other escapement enumeration methods cannot be...

  8. Clinical and laboratory survey of 65 Chinese patients with Leigh syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Yan-ling; QI Zhao-yue; ZHANG Yue-hua; JIANG Yu-wu; BAO Xin-hua; QIN Jiong; WU Xi-ru; SUN Fang; ZHANG Yao; QIAN Ning; YUAN Yun; WANG Zhao-xia; QI Yu; XIAO Jiang-xi; WANG Xiao-ying

    2006-01-01

    Background Leigh syndrome is an inherited neurodegenerative disease that emerges in infancy and childhood and presents with a clinically heterogeneous variety of neuromuscular and non-neuromuscular disorders. It can result from the inheritance of mutations in either nuclear or mitochondrial DNA. In the current study, we performed a retrospective study in 65 patients in order to investigate the clinical and genetic characteristics of Leigh syndrome in Chinese patients.Methods Sixty-five unrelated cases (35 men and 30 women) who were hospitalized in the past 12 years were reviewed. Diagnosis was based on both the clinical presentation and the characteristic neuropathologic findings of bilateral symmetric necrotizing lesions in the basal ganglia and brain stem as detected using cranial computed tomography (CT) scan or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The differential diagnosis of organic acidurias and fatty acid β-oxidation defects were performed. Specific point mutations and deletions in mitochondrial DNA (T8993G, T8993C, T9176C, A8344G, A3243G) were screened by PCR-restriction analysis and Southern blot.The SURF1 gene was sequenced. Skeletal muscle biopsies were performed in 17 (26.2%) of the patients. The diagnosis was confirmed by autopsy in 6 (9.2%) patients.Results The patients had various forms of metabolic encephalomyopathy. Fifty-nine (90.8%) of the patients had the typical neuroradiological features of Leigh syndrome, including symmetrical necrotizing lesions scattered within the basal ganglia, thalamus and brain stem. Twenty (30.8%) patients were confirmed by genetic,biochemical analysis and autopsy. Specific point mutations in mitochondrial DNA were found in 5 cases (7.7%).Of these, the A8344G mutation was detected in 2 patients. The T8993G, T8993C, and A3243G point mutations were identified in 3 other patients, respectively. SURF1 mutations associated with cytochrome c oxidase deficiency were identified in 8 (12.3%) families by DNA sequencing. A G604C

  9. Electric resistivity and seismic refraction tomography: a challenging joint underwater survey at Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ronczka

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Tunnelling below water passages is a challenging task in terms of planning, pre-investigation and construction. Fracture zones in the underlying bedrock lead to low rock quality and thus reduced stability. For natural reasons, they tend to be more frequent at water passages. Ground investigations that provide information on the subsurface are necessary prior to the construction phase, but these can be logistically difficult. Geophysics can help close the gaps between local point information by producing subsurface images. An approach that combines seismic refraction tomography and electrical resistivity tomography has been tested at the Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL. The aim was to detect fracture zones in a well-known but logistically challenging area from a measuring perspective. The presented surveys cover a water passage along part of a tunnel that connects surface facilities with an underground test laboratory. The tunnel is approximately 100 m below and 20 m east of the survey line and gives evidence for one major and several minor fracture zones. The geological and general test site conditions, e.g. with strong power line noise from the nearby nuclear power plant, are challenging for geophysical measurements. Co-located positions for seismic and ERT sensors and source positions are used on the 450 m underwater section of the 700 m profile. Because of a large transition zone that appeared in the ERT result and the missing coverage of the seismic data, fracture zones at the southern and northern parts of the underwater passage cannot be detected by separated inversion. Synthetic studies show that significant three-dimensional (3-D artefacts occur in the ERT model that even exceed the positioning errors of underwater electrodes. The model coverage is closely connected to the resolution and can be used to display the model uncertainty by introducing thresholds to fade-out regions of medium and low resolution. A structural

  10. Electric resistivity and seismic refraction tomography: a challenging joint underwater survey at Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronczka, Mathias; Hellman, Kristofer; Günther, Thomas; Wisén, Roger; Dahlin, Torleif

    2017-06-01

    Tunnelling below water passages is a challenging task in terms of planning, pre-investigation and construction. Fracture zones in the underlying bedrock lead to low rock quality and thus reduced stability. For natural reasons, they tend to be more frequent at water passages. Ground investigations that provide information on the subsurface are necessary prior to the construction phase, but these can be logistically difficult. Geophysics can help close the gaps between local point information by producing subsurface images. An approach that combines seismic refraction tomography and electrical resistivity tomography has been tested at the Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL). The aim was to detect fracture zones in a well-known but logistically challenging area from a measuring perspective. The presented surveys cover a water passage along part of a tunnel that connects surface facilities with an underground test laboratory. The tunnel is approximately 100 m below and 20 m east of the survey line and gives evidence for one major and several minor fracture zones. The geological and general test site conditions, e.g. with strong power line noise from the nearby nuclear power plant, are challenging for geophysical measurements. Co-located positions for seismic and ERT sensors and source positions are used on the 450 m underwater section of the 700 m profile. Because of a large transition zone that appeared in the ERT result and the missing coverage of the seismic data, fracture zones at the southern and northern parts of the underwater passage cannot be detected by separated inversion. Synthetic studies show that significant three-dimensional (3-D) artefacts occur in the ERT model that even exceed the positioning errors of underwater electrodes. The model coverage is closely connected to the resolution and can be used to display the model uncertainty by introducing thresholds to fade-out regions of medium and low resolution. A structural coupling cooperative inversion

  11. 2001-2002 Wet Season Branchiopod Survey Report, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Site 300, Alameda and San Joaquin Counties, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, W; Woollett, J

    2004-11-16

    Condor County Consulting on behalf of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has performed wet season surveys for listed branchiopods at Site 300, located in eastern Alameda County and western San Joaquin County. LLNL is collecting information for the preparation of an EIS covering ongoing explosives testing and related activities on Site 300. Related activities include maintenance of fire roads and annual control burns of approximately 607 hectares (1500 acres). Control burns typically take place on the northern portion of the site. Because natural branchiopod habitat is sparse on Site 300, it is not surprising that listed branchiopods were not observed during this 2001-2002 wet season survey. Although the site is large, a majority of it has topography and geology that precludes the formation of static seasonal pools. Even the relatively gentle topography of the northern half of the site contains few areas where water pools for more than two weeks. The rock outcrops found on the site did not provide suitable habitat for listed branchiopods. Most of the habitat available to branchiopods on the site is puddles that form in roadbeds and dry quickly. The one persistent pool on the site, the larger of the two modified vernal pools and the only one to fill this season, is occupied by two branchiopod species that require long-lived pools to reach maturity. In short, there is little habitat available on the site for branchiopods and most of the habitat present is generally too short-lived to support the branchiopod species that do occur at Site 300.

  12. New rationales and methods for quantitative dream research outside the laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domhoff, G W; Schneider, A

    1998-06-15

    Laboratory studies of dreams are now at a low ebb, but past laboratory studies provide a basis for the belief that some kinds of non laboratory studies, those that focus strictly on dream content, may be useful for scientific purposes. Further, the collection of Most Recent Dreams from individuals in specific types of groups, along with the use of dream journals from individuals, can supply the necessary sample sizes needed for reliable findings (100-125 for groups, 75-100 for individuals). An Excel 5 spreadsheet has improved the accuracy and speed of data analysis with the well established and widely used Hall/Van de Castle coding system and is available on the World Wide Web. A bar graph called the h-profile, based on percentage deviations from norms and generated automatically by the Excel 5 spreadsheet, makes it much easier to grasp comparisons of different groups or individuals on many content indicators. Findings with the Hall/Van de Castle system showing age, gender, individual, and cross-cultural similarities and differences suggest that these new methods of data collection and analysis provide a valid and low-budget way to further the understanding of dream content.

  13. Insight into the dynamics of granular column collapse using Discrete Element Methods and laboratory experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Hugo; Mangeney, Anne; Farin, Maxime; Richard, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    The mechanical behavior of granular flows is still an open issue. In particular, quantitative agreement between the detailed dynamics of the flow and laboratory experiments is necessary to better constrain the performance and limits of the models. We propose here to compare quantitatively the flow profiles and the force during granular column collapse simulated using Discrete Element Models and laboratory experiments. These small scale experiments are performed with dry granular material released initially from a cylinder on a sloping plane. The flow profiles and the acoustic signal generated by the granular impacts and stresses on the plane are recorded systematically [Farin et al., 2015]. These experiments are simulated using the Discrete Element Method Modys [Richard et al., 2000]. We show that the effect of the removing gate should be taken into account in the model in order to quantatively reproduce the flow dynamics. Furthermore we compare the simulated and observed acoustic signals that are generated by the fluctuating stresses exerted by the grains on the substrate in different frequency bands. [1] P. Richard et Luc Oger. 2000 Etude de la géométrie de milieux granulaires modèles tridimensionnels par simulation numérique. [2] Farin, M., Mangeney, A., Toussaint, R., De Rosny, J., Shapiro, N., Dewez, T., Hibert, C., Mathon, C., Sedan, O., Berger. 2015, Characterization of rockfalls from seismic signal: insights from laboratory experiments

  14. The Brazilian Amazon Region Eye Survey: Design and Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomão, Solange R; Furtado, João Marcello; Berezovsky, Adriana; Cavascan, Nívea N; Ferraz, Alberto N; Cohen, Jacob M; Muñoz, Sergio; Belfort, Rubens

    2017-08-01

    To describe the study design, operational strategies, procedures, and baseline characteristics of the Brazilian Amazon Region Eye Survey (BARES), a population-based survey of the prevalence and causes of distance and near visual impairment and blindness in older adults residing in the city of Parintins. Cluster sampling, based on geographically defined census sectors, was used for cross-sectional random sampling of persons 45 years and older from urban and rural areas. Subjects were enumerated through a door-to-door survey and invited for measurement of uncorrected, presenting and best-corrected visual acuity and an ocular examination. Of 9931 residents (5878 urban and 4053 rural), 2384 individuals (1410 urban and 974 rural) were eligible and 2041 (1180 urban and 861 rural) had a clinical examination (response rate 85.6%). The majority of participants were female (1041, 51.0%); the average age was 59.9 ± 11.1 years (60.2 ± 11.2 years for urban and 59.4 ± 11.1 years for rural); 1360 (66.6%) had primary schooling or less (58.1% in urban and 78.4% in rural) and 57.8% were resident in urban areas. The age distribution between sexes was similar (p = 0.178). Both sex and age distributions of the sample were comparable to that of the Brazilian Amazon Region population. The BARES cohort will provide information about the prevalence and causes of near and distance vision in this underprivileged and remote population in Brazil.

  15. Horvitz-Thompson survey sample methods for estimating large-scale animal abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, M.D.; Garton, E.O.

    1994-01-01

    Large-scale surveys to estimate animal abundance can be useful for monitoring population status and trends, for measuring responses to management or environmental alterations, and for testing ecological hypotheses about abundance. However, large-scale surveys may be expensive and logistically complex. To ensure resources are not wasted on unattainable targets, the goals and uses of each survey should be specified carefully and alternative methods for addressing these objectives always should be considered. During survey design, the impoflance of each survey error component (spatial design, propofiion of detected animals, precision in detection) should be considered carefully to produce a complete statistically based survey. Failure to address these three survey components may produce population estimates that are inaccurate (biased low), have unrealistic precision (too precise) and do not satisfactorily meet the survey objectives. Optimum survey design requires trade-offs in these sources of error relative to the costs of sampling plots and detecting animals on plots, considerations that are specific to the spatial logistics and survey methods. The Horvitz-Thompson estimators provide a comprehensive framework for considering all three survey components during the design and analysis of large-scale wildlife surveys. Problems of spatial and temporal (especially survey to survey) heterogeneity in detection probabilities have received little consideration, but failure to account for heterogeneity produces biased population estimates. The goal of producing unbiased population estimates is in conflict with the increased variation from heterogeneous detection in the population estimate. One solution to this conflict is to use an MSE-based approach to achieve a balance between bias reduction and increased variation. Further research is needed to develop methods that address spatial heterogeneity in detection, evaluate the effects of temporal heterogeneity on survey

  16. EPA Contract Laboratory Program Statement of Work for Inorganic Superfund Methods Multi-Media, Multi-Concentration ISM02.2

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document contains analytical methods for the analysis of metals and cyanide in environmental samples. It also contains contractual requirements for laboratories participating in Superfund's Contract Laboratory Program.

  17. EPA Contract Laboratory Program Statement of Work for Inorganic Superfund Methods Multi-Media, Multi-Concentration ISM02.3

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document contains analytical methods for the analysis of metals and cyanide in environmental samples. It also contains contractual requirements for laboratories participating in Superfund's Contract Laboratory Program.

  18. Laboratory Evaluation of Air Flow Measurement Methods for Residential HVAC Returns for New Instrument Standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Iain [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Stratton, Chris [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-08-01

    This project improved the accuracy of air flow measurements used in commissioning California heating and air conditioning systems in Title 24 (Building and Appliance Efficiency Standards), thereby improving system performance and efficiency of California residences. The research team at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory addressed the issue that typical tools used by contractors in the field to test air flows may not be accurate enough to measure return flows used in Title 24 applications. The team developed guidance on performance of current diagnostics as well as a draft test method for use in future evaluations. The study team prepared a draft test method through ASTM International to determine the uncertainty of air flow measurements at residential heating ventilation and air conditioning returns and other terminals. This test method, when finalized, can be used by the Energy Commission and other entities to specify required accuracy of measurement devices used to show compliance with standards.

  19. Laboratory Methods for the Measurement of Pollutants in Water and Waste Effluents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballinger, Dwight G.

    1971-01-01

    The requirement for accurate, precise, and rapid analytical procedures for the examination of water and waste samples requires the use of a variety of instruments. The instrumentation in water laboratories includes atomic absorption, UV-visible. and infrared spectrophotometers, automatic colorimetric analyzers, gas chromatographs and mass spectrometers. Because of the emphasis on regulatory action, attention is being directed toward quality control of analytical results. Among the challenging problems are the differentiation of metallic species in water at nanogram concentrations, rapid measurement of free cyanide and free ammonia, more sensitive methods for arsenic and selenium and improved characterization of organic contaminants.

  20. A Survey of Formal Methods in Software Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørner, Dines

    2012-01-01

    need for multi-language formalisation (Petri Nets, MSC, StateChart, Temporal Logics); the sociology of university and industry acceptance of formal methods; the inevitability of the use of formal software development methods; while referring to seminal monographs and textbooks on formal methods....

  1. The Swift UVOT Stars Survey: I. Methods and Test Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Siegel, Michael H; Linevsky, Jacquelyn S; Bond, Howard E; Holland, Stephen T; Hoversten, Erik A; Berrier, Joshua L; Breeveld, Alice A; Brown, Peter J; Gronwall, Caryl A

    2014-01-01

    We describe the motivations and background of a large survey of nearby stel- lar populations using the Ultraviolet Optical Telescope (UVOT) aboard the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Mission. UVOT, with its wide field, NUV sensitivity, and 2.3 spatial resolution, is uniquely suited to studying nearby stellar populations and providing insight into the NUV properties of hot stars and the contribution of those stars to the integrated light of more distant stellar populations. We review the state of UV stellar photometry, outline the survey, and address problems spe- cific to wide- and crowded-field UVOT photometry. We present color-magnitude diagrams of the nearby open clusters M 67, NGC 188, and NGC 2539, and the globular cluster M 79. We demonstrate that UVOT can easily discern the young- and intermediate-age main sequences, blue stragglers, and hot white dwarfs, pro- ducing results consistent with previous studies. We also find that it characterizes the blue horizontal branch of M 79 and easily identifies a known post-...

  2. The swift UVOT stars survey. I. Methods and test clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegel, Michael H.; Porterfield, Blair L.; Linevsky, Jacquelyn S.; Bond, Howard E.; Hoversten, Erik A.; Berrier, Joshua L.; Gronwall, Caryl A. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Holland, Stephen T. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Breeveld, Alice A. [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, Surrey RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Brown, Peter J., E-mail: siegel@astro.psu.edu, E-mail: blp14@psu.edu, E-mail: heb11@psu.edu, E-mail: caryl@astro.psu.edu, E-mail: sholland@stsci.edu, E-mail: aab@mssl.ucl.ac.uk, E-mail: grbpeter@yahoo.com [George P. and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Texas A. and M. University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 4242 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    We describe the motivations and background of a large survey of nearby stellar populations using the Ultraviolet Optical Telescope (UVOT) on board the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Mission. UVOT, with its wide field, near-UV sensitivity, and 2.″3 spatial resolution, is uniquely suited to studying nearby stellar populations and providing insight into the near-UV properties of hot stars and the contribution of those stars to the integrated light of more distant stellar populations. We review the state of UV stellar photometry, outline the survey, and address problems specific to wide- and crowded-field UVOT photometry. We present color–magnitude diagrams of the nearby open clusters M67, NGC 188, and NGC 2539, and the globular cluster M79. We demonstrate that UVOT can easily discern the young- and intermediate-age main sequences, blue stragglers, and hot white dwarfs, producing results consistent with previous studies. We also find that it characterizes the blue horizontal branch of M79 and easily identifies a known post-asymptotic giant branch star.

  3. Is laboratory medicine ready for the era of personalized medicine? A survey addressed to laboratory directors of hospitals/academic schools of medicine in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malentacchi, F.; Mancini, I.; Brandslund, I.

    2015-01-01

    the implementation of personalized medicine in the clinical setting. Participants think that the current organization of laboratory medicine needs additional/relevant implementations such as (i) new technological facilities in -omics; (ii) additional training for the current personnel focused on the new...... methodologies; (iii) incorporation in the laboratory of new competencies in data interpretation and counseling; and (iv) cooperation and collaboration among professionals of different disciplines to integrate information according to a personalized medicine approach....

  4. Surveying immigrants without sampling frames - evaluating the success of alternative field methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichel, David; Morales, Laura

    2017-01-01

    This paper evaluates the sampling methods of an international survey, the Immigrant Citizens Survey, which aimed at surveying immigrants from outside the European Union (EU) in 15 cities in seven EU countries. In five countries, no sample frame was available for the target population. Consequently, alternative ways to obtain a representative sample had to be found. In three countries 'location sampling' was employed, while in two countries traditional methods were used with adaptations to reach the target population. The paper assesses the main methodological challenges of carrying out a survey among a group of immigrants for whom no sampling frame exists. The samples of the survey in these five countries are compared to results of official statistics in order to assess the accuracy of the samples obtained through the different sampling methods. It can be shown that alternative sampling methods can provide meaningful results in terms of core demographic characteristics although some estimates differ to some extent from the census results.

  5. [Team approaches to critical bleeding (massive bleeding and transfusion) - chairmen's introductory remarks. Questionnaire survey on current status of hospital clinical laboratories evaluating critical hemorrhage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kino, Shuichi; Suwabe, Akira

    2014-12-01

    In 2007, "the Guidelines for Actions against Intraoperative Critical Hemorrhage" were established by the Japanese Society of Anaesthesiologists and the Japanese Society of Blood transfusion and Cell Therapy. The documentation of in-hospital procedures for critical hemorrhage, especially about how to select RBC units, has widely standardized hospital practice. Patients with intraoperative critical hemorrhage sometimes suffer from massive blood loss. In this situation, some patients develop coagulopathy. To treat them, we need to evaluate their coagulation status based on laboratory test results. So, we performed a nationwide questionnaire survey on the current status of hospital clinical laboratories evaluating critical hemorrhage. From the results of this survey, it was recommended that central hospital laboratories should try to reduce the turn-around time required to test for coagulation parameters as much as possible for appropriate substitution therapy. (Review).

  6. Use of TD ABC method for cost management in an accredited laboratory for physical and chemical testiry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živković-Gabaldo Aleksandra N.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Accreditation of a laboratory is verification of the competence of a laboratory regarding methods and procedures applied, personnel, the equipment used and working conditions. The main goal is establishment of customer trust in accuracy and precision of laboratory test results. Accredited laboratory has more specific costs than laboratory which is not accredited. To survive on the market, regardless the laboratory is independent or it is a part of a bigger system, the laboratory needs to establish resource management, especially effective cost management. Cost management describes approaches and short-term and long-term management activities, which make value for the customer, according to his known, reported or obligatory requirements and needs. In modern approach, there are different methods for cost calculation. One of them is ABC (Activity-Based Costing method which adds activity costs to products and services trough activities needed for their finalization. In this paper, there is presented improved ABC method for obračun costs, affirmed as activity based cost calculation based on time - TD ABC (Time-Driven Activity-Based Costing. The method uses time as a primary base for costs allocation on products, porudžbine, customers. This is the way for simpler and less expansive getting of information's about costs. This paper describes TD ABC method implemented in accredited Laboratory for physical and chemical testing, which is a part of company Galenika Fitofarmacija a.d. The scope of testing in this laboratory are pesticide materials, meaning technical substances and finished products, within quality control for different internal customers. By using TD ABC method it is possible to define real costs, generated during the laboratory testing, and also effectiveness of specific activities in this process.

  7. Evans blue as a simple method to discriminate mosquitoes' feeding choice on small laboratory animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciel, Ceres; Fujita, André; Gueroni, Daniele I; Ramos, Anderson D; Capurro, Margareth L; Sá-Nunes, Anderson

    2014-01-01

    Temperature, humidity, vision, and particularly odor, are external cues that play essential roles to mosquito blood feeding and oviposition. Entomological and behavioral studies employ well-established methods to evaluate mosquito attraction or repellency and to identify the source of the blood meal. Despite the efficacy of such methods, the costs involved in the production or acquisition of all parts, components and the chemical reagents involved are unaffordable for most researchers from poor countries. Thus, a simple and relatively low-cost method capable of evaluating mosquito preferences and the blood volume ingested is desirable. By using Evans blue (EB) vital dye and few standard laboratory supplies, we developed and validated a system capable of evaluating mosquito's choice between two different host sources of blood. EB-injected and PBS-injected mice submitted to a number of situations were placed side by side on the top of a rounded recipient covered with tulle fabric and containing Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. Homogenates from engorged mosquitoes clearly revealed the blood source (EB- or PBS-injected host), either visually or spectrometrically. This method was able to estimate the number of engorded mosquitoes, the volume of blood ingested, the efficacy of a commercial repellent and the attractant effects of black color and human sweat. Despite the obvious limitations due to its simplicity and to the dependence of a live source of blood, the present method can be used to assess a number of host variables (diet, aging, immunity, etc) and optimized for several aspects of mosquito blood feeding and vector-host interactions. Thus, it is proposed as an alternative to field studies, and it could be used for initial screenings of chemical compound candidates for repellents or attractants, since it replicates natural conditions of exposure to mosquitoes in a laboratory environment.

  8. Evans Blue as a Simple Method to Discriminate Mosquitoes’ Feeding Choice on Small Laboratory Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciel, Ceres; Fujita, André; Gueroni, Daniele I.; Ramos, Anderson D.; Capurro, Margareth L.; Sá-Nunes, Anderson

    2014-01-01

    Background Temperature, humidity, vision, and particularly odor, are external cues that play essential roles to mosquito blood feeding and oviposition. Entomological and behavioral studies employ well-established methods to evaluate mosquito attraction or repellency and to identify the source of the blood meal. Despite the efficacy of such methods, the costs involved in the production or acquisition of all parts, components and the chemical reagents involved are unaffordable for most researchers from poor countries. Thus, a simple and relatively low-cost method capable of evaluating mosquito preferences and the blood volume ingested is desirable. Principal Findings By using Evans blue (EB) vital dye and few standard laboratory supplies, we developed and validated a system capable of evaluating mosquito’s choice between two different host sources of blood. EB-injected and PBS-injected mice submitted to a number of situations were placed side by side on the top of a rounded recipient covered with tulle fabric and containing Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. Homogenates from engorged mosquitoes clearly revealed the blood source (EB- or PBS-injected host), either visually or spectrometrically. This method was able to estimate the number of engorded mosquitoes, the volume of blood ingested, the efficacy of a commercial repellent and the attractant effects of black color and human sweat. Significance Despite the obvious limitations due to its simplicity and to the dependence of a live source of blood, the present method can be used to assess a number of host variables (diet, aging, immunity, etc) and optimized for several aspects of mosquito blood feeding and vector-host interactions. Thus, it is proposed as an alternative to field studies, and it could be used for initial screenings of chemical compound candidates for repellents or attractants, since it replicates natural conditions of exposure to mosquitoes in a laboratory environment. PMID:25333369

  9. Evans blue as a simple method to discriminate mosquitoes' feeding choice on small laboratory animals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceres Maciel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Temperature, humidity, vision, and particularly odor, are external cues that play essential roles to mosquito blood feeding and oviposition. Entomological and behavioral studies employ well-established methods to evaluate mosquito attraction or repellency and to identify the source of the blood meal. Despite the efficacy of such methods, the costs involved in the production or acquisition of all parts, components and the chemical reagents involved are unaffordable for most researchers from poor countries. Thus, a simple and relatively low-cost method capable of evaluating mosquito preferences and the blood volume ingested is desirable. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By using Evans blue (EB vital dye and few standard laboratory supplies, we developed and validated a system capable of evaluating mosquito's choice between two different host sources of blood. EB-injected and PBS-injected mice submitted to a number of situations were placed side by side on the top of a rounded recipient covered with tulle fabric and containing Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. Homogenates from engorged mosquitoes clearly revealed the blood source (EB- or PBS-injected host, either visually or spectrometrically. This method was able to estimate the number of engorded mosquitoes, the volume of blood ingested, the efficacy of a commercial repellent and the attractant effects of black color and human sweat. SIGNIFICANCE: Despite the obvious limitations due to its simplicity and to the dependence of a live source of blood, the present method can be used to assess a number of host variables (diet, aging, immunity, etc and optimized for several aspects of mosquito blood feeding and vector-host interactions. Thus, it is proposed as an alternative to field studies, and it could be used for initial screenings of chemical compound candidates for repellents or attractants, since it replicates natural conditions of exposure to mosquitoes in a laboratory environment.

  10. Gingival displacement methods used by dental professionals: A survey

    OpenAIRE

    S V Giridhar Reddy; M.Bharathi; B. Vinod; K Rajeev Kumar Reddy; N Simhachalam Reddy

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the present study was to identify the methods used by dental professionals for gingival displacement before making impressions for fixed prostheses. Materials and Methods: A printed questionnaire was distributed to over 600 dentists at a National Dental Conference held in Hyderabad. The questionnaire was designed to know the preferred method of gingival displacement, medicament used, frequency of performing gingival displacement, etc. The results were analyzed and represented ...

  11. Morphological methods for design of modular systems (a survey)

    CERN Document Server

    Levin, Mark Sh

    2012-01-01

    The article addresses morphological approaches to design of modular systems. The following methods are briefly described: (i) basic version of morphological analysis (MA), (ii) modification of MA as method of closeness to ideal point(s), (iii reducing of MA to linear programming, (iv) multiple choice problem, (v) quadratic assignment problem, (vi) Pareto-based MA (i.e., revelation of Pareto-efficient solutions), (vii) Hierarchical Morphological Multicriteria Design (HMMD) approach, and (viii) Hierarchical Morphological Multicriteria Design (HMMD) approach based on fuzzy estimates. The above-mentioned methods are illustrated by schemes, models, and illustrative examples. An additional realistic example (design of GSM network) is presented to illustrate main considered methods.

  12. Trypsin-Based Laboratory Methods and Carboxypeptidase Activation Peptide in Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kylanpaa-Back ML

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis is a common disease varying widely in severity. At present, there is no "gold standard" for the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. Currently, the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis is based on measurements of serum amylase and/or lipase activity, which are considered unsatisfactory due to their low level of accuracy. Early identification of acute pancreatitis and especially detection of patients with a severe form of the disease is of utmost importance. Premature intrapancreatic activation of trypsinogen is a crucial early event in the pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis. The conversion of trypsinogen to active trypsin is mediated by the release of its activation peptide (TAP. The active trypsin is then able to activate other pancreatic zymogens (i.e. procarboxypeptidase leading to tissue damage and eventually to autodigestion of the pancreas. To improve the laboratory diagnostics of AP, new methods have been developed to measure this primary pancreatic proteolytic insult. Here we review the current knowledge and clinical implications of trypsin based laboratory methods and carboxypeptidase activation peptide (CAPAP in the diagnosis and severity assessment of acute pancreatitis.

  13. Rapid method to screen resistance of potato plants against Myzus persicae (Homoptera: Aphididae) in the laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roux, Vincent; Saguez, Julien; Vincent, Charles; Giordanengo, Philippe

    2004-12-01

    With the objective to develop a potato, Solanum tuberosum L., resistance program against aphids, we propose a rapid screening method with Myzus persicae (Sulzer) in the laboratory. We aimed to optimize the duration of the whole procedure and to decrease the frequency of measurements. In a first experiment, intrinsic rate of natural increase (r(m)) values were compared between adult aphids reared throughout their entire life and adults reared only during a period equivalent to their prereproductive period. No significant differences were observed. In a second experiment, four groups of aphids were distinguished according to the sampling frequency, i.e., those whose biological parameters were evaluated every single, second, third, and fourth day. Except for the fourth-day experiment, the r(m) values estimated on aphids reared on the three potato lines were not significantly different whatever sampling frequency of single, second, or third day used to check aphids. Thus, screening efforts in laboratory can be largely optimized by evaluating adult aphids only during a period equivalent to their prereproductive period and assessing M. persicae populations every third day. Our method is reliable and adapted to screen a large number of potato plants against M. persicae because it allows an average 70% reduction in the time required for the whole experimental process.

  14. Laparoscopic skill laboratory in urological surgery: tools and methods for resident training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio C. M. Torricelli

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Laparoscopy has certainly brought considerable benefits to patients, but laparoscopic surgery requires a set of skills different from open surgery, and learning in the operating room may increase surgical time, and even may be harmful to patients. Several training programs have been developed to decrease these potential prejudices. PURPOSES: to describe the laparoscopic training program for urological residents of the "Hospital das Clinicas" of the Sao Paulo Medical School, to report urological procedures that are feasible in dry and wet labs, and to perform a critical analysis of the cost-benefit relation of advanced laparoscopic skills laboratory. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The laparoscopic skill lab has two virtual simulators, three manual simulators, and four laparoscopic sets for study with a porcine model. The urology residents during their first year attend classes in the virtual and manual simulator and helps the senior urological resident in activities carried out with the laparoscopic sets. During the second year, the urological resident has six periods per week, each period lasting four hours, to perform laparoscopic procedures with a porcine model. Results: In a training program of ten weeks, one urological resident performs an average of 120 urological procedures. The most common procedures are total nephrectomy (30%, bladder suture (30%, partial nephrectomy (10%, pyeloplasty (10%, ureteral replacement or transuretero anastomosis (10%, and others like adrenalectomy, prostatectomy, and retroperitoneoscopy. These procedures are much quicker and caused less morbidity. CONCLUSION: Laparoscopic skills laboratory is a good method for achieving technical ability.

  15. Survey of Existing and Promising New Methods of Surface Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-04-01

    labor-intensive methods of applying protective coating system at ambient temperatures during or after fabrication. 3.2.16 Explosives The detonation of...34. Ingenieria Naval, Vol. 44, pp. 5, 1976. 45. Conn, A. F., and Rudy, S. L., “Parameters for Ship Hull Cleaning Using Cavitating Water Jet Method

  16. QS-21 Adjuvant: Laboratory-Scale Purification Method and Formulation Into Liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Livia; Barnier-Quer, Christophe; Collin, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    QS-21, a saponin extracted from the tree Quillaja saponaria Molina, is a vaccine adjuvant which has been shown to elicit robust antibody and cell-mediated immune responses in a variety of preclinical and clinical studies [1]. Its purification from the natural source is a lengthy and difficult process. The commercially available saponin mixture Quil-A(®) is a fraction of the bark extract containing a variety of saponins, including QS-21. In order to facilitate access to QS-21 at laboratory-scale amounts, we propose here a method of purification of QS-21 starting from Quil-A(®). In addition, we describe a protocol to appropriately formulate QS-21 into cholesterol-containing, neutral liposomes which are known to decrease QS-21's hemolytic activity while retaining the adjuvant effect. Methods for the physicochemical characterization of purified QS-21 and of the QS-21/liposome formulations are also described.

  17. Laboratory Detection and Analysis of Organic Compounds in Rocks Using HPLC and XRD Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragoi, D.; Kanik, I.; Bar-Cohen, Y.; Sherrit, S.; Tsapin, A.; Kulleck, J.

    2004-01-01

    In this work we describe an analytical method for determining the presence of organic compounds in rocks, limestone, and other composite materials. Our preliminary laboratory experiments on different rocks/limestone show that the organic component in mineralogical matrices is a minor phase on order of hundreds of ppm and can be better detected using high precision liquid chromatography (HPLC). The matrix, which is the major phase, plays an important role in embedding and protecting the organic molecules from the harsh Martian environment. Some rocks bear significant amounts of amino acids therefore, it is possible to identify these phases using powder x-ray diffraction (XRD) by crystallizing the organic. The method of detection/analysis of organics, in particular amino acids, that have been associated with life will be shown in the next section.

  18. Laboratory Detection and Analysis of Organic Compounds in Rocks Using HPLC and XRD Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragoi, D.; Kanik, I.; Bar-Cohen, Y.; Sherrit, S.; Tsapin, A.; Kulleck, J.

    2004-01-01

    In this work we describe an analytical method for determining the presence of organic compounds in rocks, limestone, and other composite materials. Our preliminary laboratory experiments on different rocks/limestone show that the organic component in mineralogical matrices is a minor phase on order of hundreds of ppm and can be better detected using high precision liquid chromatography (HPLC). The matrix, which is the major phase, plays an important role in embedding and protecting the organic molecules from the harsh Martian environment. Some rocks bear significant amounts of amino acids therefore, it is possible to identify these phases using powder x-ray diffraction (XRD) by crystallizing the organic. The method of detection/analysis of organics, in particular amino acids, that have been associated with life will be shown in the next section.

  19. The diet board: welfare impacts of a novel method of dietary restriction in laboratory rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasanen, I H E; Inhilä, K J; Vainio, O M

    2009-01-01

    Laboratory rats are commonly fed ad libitum (AL). Moderate dietary restriction (DR) decreases mortality and morbidity when compared with AL feeding, but there are several obstacles to the implementation of DR. Traditional methods of restricted feeding disrupt normal diurnal eating rhythms...... and are not compatible with group housing. We have designed a novel method, the diet board, to restrict the feeding of group-housed rats. Animals fed from the diet board had 15% lower body weight than the AL-fed animals at the age of 17 weeks. The welfare effects of diet board feeding were assessed by comparing...... to solve the health problems associated with AL feeding, while allowing the rats to be group-housed and to maintain their normal diurnal eating rhythms. The diet board can also be seen as a functional cage furniture item, dividing the cage into compartments and thus increasing the structural complexity...

  20. Indomethacin nanocrystals prepared by different laboratory scale methods: effect on crystalline form and dissolution behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martena, Valentina; Censi, Roberta [University of Camerino, School of Pharmacy (Italy); Hoti, Ela; Malaj, Ledjan [University of Tirana, Department of Pharmacy (Albania); Di Martino, Piera, E-mail: piera.dimartino@unicam.it [University of Camerino, School of Pharmacy (Italy)

    2012-12-15

    The objective of this study is to select very simple and well-known laboratory scale methods able to reduce particle size of indomethacin until the nanometric scale. The effect on the crystalline form and the dissolution behavior of the different samples was deliberately evaluated in absence of any surfactants as stabilizers. Nanocrystals of indomethacin (native crystals are in the {gamma} form) (IDM) were obtained by three laboratory scale methods: A (Batch A: crystallization by solvent evaporation in a nano-spray dryer), B (Batch B-15 and B-30: wet milling and lyophilization), and C (Batch C-20-N and C-40-N: Cryo-milling in the presence of liquid nitrogen). Nanocrystals obtained by the method A (Batch A) crystallized into a mixture of {alpha} and {gamma} polymorphic forms. IDM obtained by the two other methods remained in the {gamma} form and a different attitude to the crystallinity decrease were observed, with a more considerable decrease in crystalline degree for IDM milled for 40 min in the presence of liquid nitrogen. The intrinsic dissolution rate (IDR) revealed a higher dissolution rate for Batches A and C-40-N, due to the higher IDR of {alpha} form than {gamma} form for the Batch A, and the lower crystallinity degree for both the Batches A and C-40-N. These factors, as well as the decrease in particle size, influenced the IDM dissolution rate from the particle samples. Modifications in the solid physical state that may occur using different particle size reduction treatments have to be taken into consideration during the scale up and industrial development of new solid dosage forms.

  1. Indomethacin nanocrystals prepared by different laboratory scale methods: effect on crystalline form and dissolution behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martena, Valentina; Censi, Roberta; Hoti, Ela; Malaj, Ledjan; Di Martino, Piera

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this study is to select very simple and well-known laboratory scale methods able to reduce particle size of indomethacin until the nanometric scale. The effect on the crystalline form and the dissolution behavior of the different samples was deliberately evaluated in absence of any surfactants as stabilizers. Nanocrystals of indomethacin (native crystals are in the γ form) (IDM) were obtained by three laboratory scale methods: A (Batch A: crystallization by solvent evaporation in a nano-spray dryer), B (Batch B-15 and B-30: wet milling and lyophilization), and C (Batch C-20-N and C-40-N: Cryo-milling in the presence of liquid nitrogen). Nanocrystals obtained by the method A (Batch A) crystallized into a mixture of α and γ polymorphic forms. IDM obtained by the two other methods remained in the γ form and a different attitude to the crystallinity decrease were observed, with a more considerable decrease in crystalline degree for IDM milled for 40 min in the presence of liquid nitrogen. The intrinsic dissolution rate (IDR) revealed a higher dissolution rate for Batches A and C-40-N, due to the higher IDR of α form than γ form for the Batch A, and the lower crystallinity degree for both the Batches A and C-40-N. These factors, as well as the decrease in particle size, influenced the IDM dissolution rate from the particle samples. Modifications in the solid physical state that may occur using different particle size reduction treatments have to be taken into consideration during the scale up and industrial development of new solid dosage forms.

  2. LABORATORY EVALUATION OF AIR FLOW MEASUREMENT METHODS FOR RESIDENTIAL HVAC RETURNS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Iain; Stratton, Chris

    2015-02-01

    This project improved the accuracy of air flow measurements used in commissioning California heating and air conditioning systems in Title 24 (Building and Appliance Efficiency Standards), thereby improving system performance and efficiency of California residences. The research team at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory addressed the issue that typical tools used by contractors in the field to test air flows may not be accurate enough to measure return flows used in Title 24 applications. The team developed guidance on performance of current diagnostics as well as a draft test method for use in future evaluations. The series of tests performed measured air flow using a range of techniques and devices. The measured air flows were compared to reference air flow measurements using inline air flow meters built into the test apparatus. The experimental results showed that some devices had reasonable results (typical errors of 5 percent or less) but others had much bigger errors (up to 25 percent). Because manufacturers’ accuracy estimates for their equipment do not include many of the sources of error found in actual field measurements (and replicated in the laboratory testing in this study) it is essential for a test method that could be used to determine the actual uncertainty in this specific application. The study team prepared a draft test method through ASTM International to determine the uncertainty of air flow measurements at residential heating ventilation and air conditioning returns and other terminals. This test method, when finalized, can be used by the Energy Commission and other entities to specify required accuracy of measurement devices used to show compliance with standards.

  3. A Modified Method for Measuring Root Iron Reductase Activity Under Normal Laboratory Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Shao-Jian; HE Yun-Feng; TANG Cai-Xian; Y. MASAOKA

    2005-01-01

    Based on the strong chelating property of bathophenanthroline disulfonic acid (BPDS) with Fe(Ⅱ), root Fe(Ⅲ) chelate reductase activity is usually measured with a spectrophotometer using MES (2-morpholinoethanesulfonic acid) or HEPES (2-(4-(2-Hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazinyl) ethanesulfonic acid) buffer in the dark because of high autoreduction rate of Fe(Ⅲ)in the presence of light. However, the exclusion of light is inconvenient, especially when analyzing a large number of samples. The objective of this study was to develop a new method for determination of root reductase activity under normal laboratory conditions using a suitable buffer composition and Fe(Ⅲ) concentration to eliminate the autoreduction of Fe(Ⅲ). A modified method using a Tris (2-amino-2-hydroxymethyl-1,3-propanediol) buffer at pH 7.5 instead of MES or HEPES buffer and a decreased FeEDTA (Fe ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid) concentration of 50 μmol L-1 was developed. The autoreduction of Fe(Ⅲ) using the Tris buffer was undetectable for temperatures at 4 and 28 ℃ and was also much lower than that using the other buffers even with sunlight during measurement of Fe(Ⅲ) reduction.Furthermore, the differences in Fe(Ⅲ) reductase activity among 5 plant species and 14 red clover cultivars (Trifolium pratense L.) could be easily detected with the modified method. The method developed in this study to measure root Fe chelate reductase activity was not only effective and reliable but also easily managed under normal laboratory light conditions.

  4. A Survey of Methods of Teaching Mathematics. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovach, L. D.

    Several methods of teaching college-level mathematics sequences are examined for their advantages, disadvantages, and costs. Materials considered include textbooks, film sequences, videotaped lectures, and individualized teaching machines. (SD)

  5. A survey of occlusion detection method for visual object

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张世辉

    2016-01-01

    Occlusion problem is one of the challenging issues in vision field for a long time , and the occlu-sion phenomenon of visual object will be involved in many vision research fields .Once the occlusion occurs in a visual system , it will affect the effects of object recognition , tracking, observation and operation , so detecting occlusion autonomously should be one of the abilities for an intelligent vision system .The research on occlusion detection method for visual object has increasingly attracted atten-tions of scholars .First, the definition and classification of the occlusion problem are presented . Then, the characteristics and deficiencies of the occlusion detection methods based on the intensity image and the depth image are analyzed respectively , and the existing occlusion detection methods are compared.Finally, the problems of existing occlusion detection methods and possible research directions are pointed out .

  6. Workshop on Survey Methods in Education Research: Facilitator's Guide and Resources. REL 2017-214

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walston, Jill; Redford, Jeremy; Bhatt, Monica P.

    2017-01-01

    This Workshop on Survey Methods in Education Research tool consists of a facilitator guide and workshop handouts. The toolkit is intended for use by state or district education leaders and others who want to conduct training on developing and administering surveys. The facilitator guide provides materials related to various phases of the survey…

  7. The new surveying method of studying the internal layer's deformation law

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁明

    2001-01-01

    This thesis illustrates the method and precision of employing analytical photogrammetry to carry out similar materials model experiment in surveying the displacement of surveying points and analyzing the deformation law of rock layersand earth's surface according to the results in the studying the deformation law of the earth's surface caused by extracting mine coal underground.

  8. The new surveying method of studying the internal layers deformation law

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Ming

    2001-01-01

    This thesis illustrates the method and precision of employing analytica l photogrammetry to carry out similar materials model experiment in surveying th e displacement of surveying points and analyzing the deformation law of rock lay ersand earths surface according to the results in the studying the deformation law of the earths surface caused by extracting mine coal underground.

  9. Laboratory and field validation of a Cry1Ab protein quantitation method for water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strain, Katherine E; Whiting, Sara A; Lydy, Michael J

    2014-10-01

    The widespread planting of crops expressing insecticidal proteins derived from the soil bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) has given rise to concerns regarding potential exposure to non-target species. These proteins are released from the plant throughout the growing season into soil and surface runoff and may enter adjacent waterways as runoff, erosion, aerial deposition of particulates, or plant debris. It is crucial to be able to accurately quantify Bt protein concentrations in the environment to aid in risk analyses and decision making. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is commonly used for quantitation of Bt proteins in the environment; however, there are no published methods detailing and validating the extraction and quantitation of Bt proteins in water. The objective of the current study was to optimize the extraction of a Bt protein, Cry1Ab, from three water matrices and validate the ELISA method for specificity, precision, accuracy, stability, and sensitivity. Recovery of the Cry1Ab protein was matrix-dependent and ranged from 40 to 88% in the validated matrices, with an overall method detection limit of 2.1 ng/L. Precision among two plates and within a single plate was confirmed with a coefficient of variation less than 20%. The ELISA method was verified in field and laboratory samples, demonstrating the utility of the validated method. The implementation of a validated extraction and quantitation protocol adds consistency and reliability to field-collected data regarding transgenic products.

  10. Field and laboratory arsenic speciation methods and their application to natural-water analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednar, A.J.; Garbarino, J.R.; Burkhardt, M.R.; Ranville, J.F.; Wildeman, T.R.

    2004-01-01

    The toxic and carcinogenic properties of inorganic and organic arsenic species make their determination in natural water vitally important. Determination of individual inorganic and organic arsenic species is critical because the toxicology, mobility, and adsorptivity vary substantially. Several methods for the speciation of arsenic in groundwater, surface-water, and acid mine drainage sample matrices using field and laboratory techniques are presented. The methods provide quantitative determination of arsenite [As(III)], arsenate [As(V)], monomethylarsonate (MMA), dimethylarsinate (DMA), and roxarsone in 2-8min at detection limits of less than 1??g arsenic per liter (??g AsL-1). All the methods use anion exchange chromatography to separate the arsenic species and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry as an arsenic-specific detector. Different methods were needed because some sample matrices did not have all arsenic species present or were incompatible with particular high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) mobile phases. The bias and variability of the methods were evaluated using total arsenic, As(III), As(V), DMA, and MMA results from more than 100 surface-water, groundwater, and acid mine drainage samples, and reference materials. Concentrations in test samples were as much as 13,000??g AsL-1 for As(III) and 3700??g AsL-1 for As(V). Methylated arsenic species were less than 100??g AsL-1 and were found only in certain surface-water samples, and roxarsone was not detected in any of the water samples tested. The distribution of inorganic arsenic species in the test samples ranged from 0% to 90% As(III). Laboratory-speciation method variability for As(III), As(V), MMA, and DMA in reagent water at 0.5??g AsL-1 was 8-13% (n=7). Field-speciation method variability for As(III) and As(V) at 1??g AsL-1 in reagent water was 3-4% (n=3). ?? 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A survey of spectrum prediction methods in cognitive radio networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jianwei; Li, Yanling

    2017-04-01

    Spectrum prediction technology is an effective way to solve the problems of processing latency, spectrum access, spectrum collision and energy consumption in cognitive radio networks. Spectral prediction technology is divided into three categories according to its nature, namely, spectral prediction method based on regression analysis, spectrum prediction method based on Markov model and spectrum prediction method based on machine learning. By analyzing and comparing the three kinds of prediction models, the author hopes to provide some reference for the later researchers. In this paper, the development situation, practical application and existent problems of three kinds of forecasting models are analyzed and summarized. On this basis, this paper discusses the development trend of the next step.

  12. An Inquiry-Based Laboratory Module to Promote Understanding of the Scientific Method and Bacterial Conjugation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie B. Berkmen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Students are engaged and improve their critical thinking skills in laboratory courses when they have the opportunity to design and conduct inquiry-based experiments that generate novel results. A discovery-driven project for a microbiology, genetics, or multidisciplinary research laboratory course was developed to familiarize students with the scientific method. In this multi-lab module, students determine whether their chosen stress conditions induce conjugation and/or cell death of the model BSL-1 Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis. Through consultation of the primary literature, students identify conditions or chemicals that can elicit DNA damage, the SOS response, and/or cellular stress.  In groups, students discuss their selected conditions, develop their hypotheses and experimental plans, and formulate their positive and negative controls. Students then subject the B. subtilis donor cells to the stress conditions, mix donors with recipients to allow mating, and plate serial dilutions of the mixtures on selective plates to measure how the treatments affect conjugation frequency and donor cell viability.  Finally, students analyze and discuss their collective data in light of their controls. The goals of this module are to encourage students to be actively involved in the scientific process while contributing to our understanding of the conditions that stimulate horizontal gene transfer in bacteria.

  13. The Buffer and Backfill Handbook. Part 1: Definitions, basic relationships and laboratory methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pusch, Roland [Geodevelopment AB, Lund (Sweden)

    2002-04-01

    Part 1 of this Handbook is focused on description of fundamental issues of soil physical and chemical arts and on soil mechanical definitions and relationships. Part 2 comprises a material data basis including also preparation and field testing methods. Part 3 provides a collection of physical and mathematical models and examples of how they can and should be applied. The present document, which has been prepared by Geodevelopment AB in co-operation with Scandia Consult AB and Clay Technology AB, Sweden, and with TVO, Finland, makes up Part 1. Most of the data and information emanate from the work that Geodevelopment AB and Clay Technology AB have performed for SKB but a number of results from experiments made in and for other organizations have been included as well. A significant number of experimental procedures and ways of characterizing buffers and backfills are included. The experience from the comprehensive international Stripa Project, concerning both systematic material investigations in the laboratory and the full-scale field experiments, has contributed significantly to this report. However, similar and additional information gained from later work in SKB's Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory and from NAGRA and also from other waste-isolation projects have helped to make this document of assumed international interest.

  14. Coliform bacteria in New Jersey domestic wells: influence of geology, laboratory, and method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherholt, Thomas B; Bousenberry, Raymond T; Carter, Gail P; Korn, Leo R; Louis, Judith B; Serfes, Michael E; Waller, Debra A

    2013-01-01

    Following passage of the New Jersey Private Well Testing Act, 50,800 domestic wells were tested between 2002 and 2007 for the presence of total coliform (TC) bacteria. Wells containing TC bacteria were further tested for either fecal coliform or Escherichia coli (FC/E. coli) bacteria. Analysis of the data, generated by 39 laboratories, revealed that the rate of coliform detections in groundwater (GW) was influenced by the laboratory and the method used, and also by geology. Based on one sample per well, TC and FC/E. coli were detected in wells located in bedrock 3 and 3.7 times more frequently, respectively, than in wells located in the unconsolidated strata of the Coastal Plain. In bedrock, detection rates were higher in sedimentary rock than in igneous or metamorphic rock. Ice-age glaciers also influenced detection rates, most likely by removing material in some areas and depositing thick layers of unconsolidated material in other areas. In bedrock, coliform bacteria were detected more often in wells with a pH of 3 to 6 than in wells with a pH of 7 to 10 whereas the reverse was true in the Coastal Plain. TC and FC/E. coli bacteria were detected in 33 and 9.5%, respectively, of sedimentary rock wells with pH 3 to 6. Conversely, for Coastal Plain wells with pH 3 to 6, detection rates were 4.4% for TC and 0.6% for FC/E. coli.

  15. Advocacy for the Archives and History Office of the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory: Stages and Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deken, Jean Marie; /SLAC

    2009-06-19

    Advocating for the good of the SLAC Archives and History Office (AHO) has not been a one-time affair, nor has it been a one-method procedure. It has required taking time to ascertain the current and perhaps predict the future climate of the Laboratory, and it has required developing and implementing a portfolio of approaches to the goal of building a stronger archive program by strengthening and appropriately expanding its resources. Among the successful tools in the AHO advocacy portfolio, the Archives Program Review Committee has been the most visible. The Committee and the role it serves as well as other formal and informal advocacy efforts are the focus of this case study My remarks today will begin with a brief introduction to advocacy and outreach as I understand them, and with a description of the Archives and History Office's efforts to understand and work within the corporate culture of the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. I will then share with you some of the tools we have employed to advocate for the Archives and History Office programs and activities; and finally, I will talk about how well - or badly - those tools have served us over the past decade.

  16. Consequences of CCD imperfections for cosmology determined by weak lensing surveys: From laboratory measurements to cosmological parameter bias

    CERN Document Server

    Okura, Yuki; May, Morgan; Plazas, Andrés A; Tamagawa, Toru

    2016-01-01

    Weak gravitational lensing causes subtle changes in the apparent shapes of galaxies due to the bending of light by the gravity of foreground masses. By measuring the shapes of large numbers of galaxies (millions in recent surveys, up to tens of billions in future surveys) we can infer the parameters that determine cosmology. Imperfections in the detectors used to record images of the sky can introduce changes in the apparent shape of galaxies, which in turn can bias the inferred cosmological parameters. In this paper we consider the effect of two widely discussed sensor imperfections: tree-rings, due to impurity gradients which cause transverse electric fields in the Charge-Coupled Devices (CCD), and pixel-size variation, due to periodic CCD fabrication errors. These imperfections can be observed when the detectors are subject to uniform illumination (flat field images). We develop methods to determine the spurious shear and convergence (due to the imperfections) from the flat-field images. We calculate how t...

  17. Alternative methods for internal quality control in research laboratories for environmental analysis: a programme for the performance evaluation of equipment, methods and staff

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieling, J.; Bakkeren, H.A.; Peters, R.J.B.; Gils, W.J.C.G. van; Leer, E.W.B. de; Mulder, S.A.; Burg, P.A. van der; Renesse van Duivenbode, J.A.D. van

    1994-01-01

    In analytical research laboratories, the problem of quality assurance is more difficult to solve than in laboratories devoted exclusively to routine analysis: the former usually have to deal with a much greater variety of samples and may have to develop entirely new methods of analysis. For research

  18. Cross-continental comparison of national food consumption survey methods--a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Keyzer, Willem; Bracke, Tatiana; McNaughton, Sarah A; Parnell, Winsome; Moshfegh, Alanna J; Pereira, Rosangela A; Lee, Haeng-Shin; van't Veer, Pieter; De Henauw, Stefaan; Huybrechts, Inge

    2015-05-13

    Food consumption surveys are performed in many countries. Comparison of results from those surveys across nations is difficult because of differences in methodological approaches. While consensus about the preferred methodology associated with national food consumption surveys is increasing, no inventory of methodological aspects across continents is available. The aims of the present review are (1) to develop a framework of key methodological elements related to national food consumption surveys, (2) to create an inventory of these properties of surveys performed in the continents North-America, South-America, Asia and Australasia, and (3) to discuss and compare these methodological properties cross-continentally. A literature search was performed using a fixed set of search terms in different databases. The inventory was completed with all accessible information from all retrieved publications and corresponding authors were requested to provide additional information where missing. Surveys from ten individual countries, originating from four continents are listed in the inventory. The results are presented according to six major aspects of food consumption surveys. The most common dietary intake assessment method used in food consumption surveys worldwide is the 24-HDR (24 h dietary recall), occasionally administered repeatedly, mostly using interview software. Only three countries have incorporated their national food consumption surveys into continuous national health and nutrition examination surveys.

  19. Mobile phones are a viable option for surveying young Australian women: a comparison of two telephone survey methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Bette

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Households with fixed-line telephones have decreased while mobile (cell phone ownership has increased. We therefore sought to examine the feasibility of recruiting young women for a national health survey through random digit dialling mobile phones. Methods Two samples of women aged 18 to 39 years were surveyed by random digit dialling fixed and mobile numbers. We compared participation rates and responses to a questionnaire between women surveyed by each contact method. Results After dialling 5,390 fixed-lines and 3,697 mobile numbers, 140 and 128 women were recruited respectively. Among women contacted and found to be eligible, participation rates were 74% for fixed-lines and 88% for mobiles. Taking into account calls to numbers where eligibility was unknown (e.g. unanswered calls the estimated response rates were 54% and 45% respectively. Of women contacted by fixed-line, 97% reported having a mobile while 61% of those contacted by mobile reported having a fixed-line at home. After adjusting for age, there were no significant differences between mobile-only and fixed-line responders with respect to education, residence, and various health behaviours; however compared to those with fixed-lines, mobile-only women were more likely to identify as Indigenous (OR 4.99, 95%CI 1.52-16.34 and less likely to live at home with their parents (OR 0.09, 95%CI 0.03-0.29. Conclusions Random digit dialling mobile phones to conduct a health survey in young Australian women is feasible, gives a comparable response rate and a more representative sample than dialling fixed-lines only. Telephone surveys of young women should include mobile dialling.

  20. A Survey of Procedural Methods for Terrain Modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smelik, R.M.; Kraker, J.K. de; Groenewegen, S.A.; Tutenel, T.; Bidarra, R.

    2009-01-01

    Procedural methods are a promising but underused alternative to manual content creation. Commonly heard drawbacks are the randomness of and the lack of control over the output and the absence of integrated solutions, although more recent publications increasingly address these issues. This paper sur

  1. A Survey of Methods in the Human Potential Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Fredric

    1977-01-01

    Training methods which affect the mind, body consciousness, values, and purpose of life, according to this article, include biofeedback, extrasensory perception, Yoga, transcendental meditation, and Zen. The article describes some elements common to these systems, lists a number of the systems with their costs, and gives some considerations in…

  2. A Survey of Methods in the Human Potential Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Fredric

    1977-01-01

    Training methods which affect the mind, body consciousness, values, and purpose of life, according to this article, include biofeedback, extrasensory perception, Yoga, transcendental meditation, and Zen. The article describes some elements common to these systems, lists a number of the systems with their costs, and gives some considerations in…

  3. Suitability of the echo-time-shift method as laboratory standard for thermal ultrasound dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuhrmann, Tina; Georg, Olga; Haller, Julian; Jenderka, Klaus-Vitold

    2017-03-01

    Ultrasound therapy is a promising, non-invasive application with potential to significantly improve cancer therapies like surgery, viro- or immunotherapy. This therapy needs faster, cheaper and more easy-to-handle quality assurance tools for therapy devices as well as possibilities to verify treatment plans and for dosimetry. This limits comparability and safety of treatments. Accurate spatial and temporal temperature maps could be used to overcome these shortcomings. In this contribution first results of suitability and accuracy investigations of the echo-time-shift method for two-dimensional temperature mapping during and after sonication are presented. The analysis methods used to calculate time-shifts were a discrete frame-to-frame and a discrete frame-to-base-frame algorithm as well as a sigmoid fit for temperature calculation. In the future accuracy could be significantly enhanced by using continuous methods for time-shift calculation. Further improvements can be achieved by improving filtering algorithms and interpolation of sampled diagnostic ultrasound data. It might be a comparatively accurate, fast and affordable method for laboratory and clinical quality control.

  4. The Implementation of a New Method of Student Assessment in a Pathogenic Bacteriology Laboratory Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Frances Hite

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A new case study method of assessment was developed to challenge advanced undergraduate biology majors interested in medical careers and allied health professions. This method is an alternative to traditional "unknown" identifications used in many microbiology laboratories. Students used various biochemical tests and selective media throughout the course to identify organisms cultured from their own bodies. In preparing a final assessment for the course, an assignment was developed to challenge the students to apply what they had learned in a medically relevant setting. Also of importance was the elimination of further biochemical testing by these students and prevention of contact with strict pathogens in this lab, due to budget and safety constraints, respectively. Each student was provided with a clinical specimen data record sheet and additional information about their "diseased patient". Students used analytical skills and critical thinking, as well as knowledge gained throughout the semester, to logically deduce the causative agent of disease in the mock patients. Students were required to: (i describe the steps in this logical deduction, (ii provide a brief overview of the characteristics and virulence factors of the organism(s, (iii investigate all disease(s caused by the organism, (iv describe symptomology of the patient in detail, and (v investigate disease treatment and prevention methods. The final assignment involved library and Internet research and culminated in a written report, which further developed writing and communication skills. Detailed descriptions of and materials for this assignment are provided along with an overall evaluation of this method after implementation.

  5. Study of the comprehension of the scientific method by members of a university health research laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlamaque-Neto, A C; Santos, G R; Lisbôa, L M; Goldim, J R; Machado, C L B; Matte, U; Giugliani, R

    2012-02-01

    In Brazil, scientific research is carried out mainly at universities, where professors coordinate research projects with the active participation of undergraduate and graduate students. However, there is no formal program for the teaching/learning of the scientific method. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the comprehension of the scientific method by students of health sciences who participate in scientific projects in an academic research laboratory. An observational descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted using Edgar Morin complexity as theoretical reference. In a semi-structured interview, students were asked to solve an abstract logical puzzle - TanGram. The collected data were analyzed using the hermeneutic-dialectic analysis method proposed by Minayo and discussed in terms of the theoretical reference of complexity. The students' concept of the scientific method is limited to participation in projects, stressing the execution of practical procedures as opposed to scientific thinking. The solving of the TanGram puzzle revealed that the students had difficulties in understanding questions and activities focused on subjects and their processes. Objective answers, even when dealing with personal issues, were also reflected on the students' opinions about the characteristics of a successful researcher. Students' difficulties concerning these issues may affect their scientific performance and result in poorly designed experiments. This is a preliminary study that should be extended to other centers of scientific research.

  6. Study of the comprehension of the scientific method by members of a university health research laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.C. Burlamaque-Neto

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In Brazil, scientific research is carried out mainly at universities, where professors coordinate research projects with the active participation of undergraduate and graduate students. However, there is no formal program for the teaching/learning of the scientific method. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the comprehension of the scientific method by students of health sciences who participate in scientific projects in an academic research laboratory. An observational descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted using Edgar Morin complexity as theoretical reference. In a semi-structured interview, students were asked to solve an abstract logical puzzle - TanGram. The collected data were analyzed using the hermeneutic-dialectic analysis method proposed by Minayo and discussed in terms of the theoretical reference of complexity. The students’ concept of the scientific method is limited to participation in projects, stressing the execution of practical procedures as opposed to scientific thinking. The solving of the TanGram puzzle revealed that the students had difficulties in understanding questions and activities focused on subjects and their processes. Objective answers, even when dealing with personal issues, were also reflected on the students’ opinions about the characteristics of a successful researcher. Students’ difficulties concerning these issues may affect their scientific performance and result in poorly designed experiments. This is a preliminary study that should be extended to other centers of scientific research.

  7. Comparison between active (pumped) and passive (diffusive) sampling methods for formaldehyde in pathology and histology laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun Gyung; Magrm, Rana; Kusti, Mohannad; Kashon, Michael L; Guffey, Steven; Costas, Michelle M; Boykin, Carie J; Harper, Martin

    2017-01-01

    This study was to determine occupational exposures to formaldehyde and to compare concentrations of formaldehyde obtained by active and passive sampling methods. In one pathology and one histology laboratories, exposure measurements were collected with sets of active air samplers (Supelco LpDNPH tubes) and passive badges (ChemDisk Aldehyde Monitor 571). Sixty-six sample pairs (49 personal and 17 area) were collected and analyzed by NIOSH NMAM 2016 for active samples and OSHA Method 1007 (using the manufacturer's updated uptake rate) for passive samples. All active and passive 8-hr time-weighted average (TWA) measurements showed compliance with the OSHA permissible exposure limit (PEL-0.75 ppm) except for one passive measurement, whereas 78% for the active and 88% for the passive samples exceeded the NIOSH recommended exposure limit (REL-0.016 ppm). Overall, 73% of the passive samples showed higher concentrations than the active samples and a statistical test indicated disagreement between two methods for all data and for data without outliers. The OSHA Method cautions that passive samplers should not be used for sampling situations involving formalin solutions because of low concentration estimates in the presence of reaction products of formaldehyde and methanol (a formalin additive). However, this situation was not observed, perhaps because the formalin solutions used in these laboratories included much less methanol (3%) than those tested in the OSHA Method (up to 15%). The passive samplers in general overestimated concentrations compared to the active method, which is prudent for demonstrating compliance with an occupational exposure limit, but occasional large differences may be a result of collecting aerosolized droplets or splashes on the face of the samplers. In the situations examined in this study the passive sampler generally produces higher results than the active sampler so that a body of results from passive samplers demonstrating compliance with the

  8. Perceived barriers in accessing dental care among patients attending dental institute using decision-making trial and evaluation laboratory method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravneet Malhi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Utilization of dental service is a concept of expressing the extent of interaction between the service provider and the people for whom it is indented. However, one of the major issues in social welfare is the equitable provision of these services to the population. Aim: To determine the perceived barriers affecting access to the dental services in the dental institute. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in the dental institute during the month of February in the year 2014 using decision-making trial and evaluation laboratory (DEMATEL method. The study sample included the 364 subjects. The required data were collected using a specially designed and pretested questionnaire. The data were analyzed using SPSS 18.0 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA and MATLAB 7.6.0. The mean, standard deviations were used to describe the data, and inferential statistics included one-way ANOVA and DEMATEL. Results: The five determinants of cost, inconvenience, fear, organization, and patient-dentist relationship were determined as barriers to access dental services. Based on subjects′ responses to the questions, the cost (54.75% agreed or strongly agreed was identified as the most important factor affecting the access to dental health care followed by dentist-patient relationship (48.57%, inconvenience (36.55%, fear (23.70%, and organization (14.02%. The difference was found to be statistically significant (P = 0.0001. When the hierarchy of the affecting and affected factors was calculated, based on the factor analysis by using DEMATEL method, the cost (R−J = 0.16 and organization (R−J = 1.15, were certain affecting determinant which influenced the access to dental services and inconvenience. Conclusion: The major barriers to oral health care utilization among our patients were cost, fear, and organization. Policymakers, administrators, and insurance organizations have a major role. Hence, the policies should be fair and

  9. A Survey of Structured and Object-Oriented Software Specification Methods and Techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieringa, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    This article surveys techniques used in structured and object-oriented software specification methods. The techniques are classified as techniques for the specification of external interaction and internal decomposition. The external specification techniques are further subdivided into techniques fo

  10. Experimental methods: Extra-laboratory experiments extending the reach of experimental economics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Charness, G.; Gneezy, U.; Kuhn, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    We propose a new organizing scheme for classifying types of experiments. In addition to the standard categories of laboratory and field experiments, we suggest a new category: "extra-laboratory experiments." These are experiments that have the same spirit as laboratory experiments, but are conducted

  11. Experimental methods: Extra-laboratory experiments extending the reach of experimental economics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Charness, G.; Gneezy, U.; Kuhn, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    We propose a new organizing scheme for classifying types of experiments. In addition to the standard categories of laboratory and field experiments, we suggest a new category: "extra-laboratory experiments." These are experiments that have the same spirit as laboratory experiments, but are conducted

  12. A Survey of Cloud Migration Methods: A Comparison and Proposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khadija SABIRI

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Along with the significant advantages of cloud computing paradigm, the number of enterprises, which expect to move a legacy system towards a cloud, is steadily increasing. Unfortunately, this move is not straightforward. There are many challenges to take up. The applications are often written with the outdated technologies. While some enterprises redevelop applications with a specific Cloud provider in mind, others try to move the legacy systems, either because the organization wants to keep the past investments, or because the legacy systems hold important data. Migrating the legacy systems to the Cloud introduces technical and business challenges. This paper aims to study deeply and to compare existing Cloud migration methods, based on Model Driven Engineering (MDE approach to highlight the strengths and weaknesses of each one. Finally, we have proposed a Cloud legacy system Migration Method relied on Architecture Driven Modernization (ADM, and explained its working process.

  13. EFFECTIVENESS OF MRSA DETECTION METHODS IN THE LABORATORY PRACTICE – A BRIEF REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neli M. Ermenlieva

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA are bacteria, responsible for severe and hard-to-manage infections in human. They are resistant to beta-lactam antibiotics – penicillins (methicillin, dicloxacillin, nafcillin, and oxacillin, cephalosporins and carbapenems, but can also be resistant to the new-generation MRSA-active cephalosporins (such as ceftaroline or other groups of antibiotics, including aminoglycosides, macrolides, clindamycin, amphenicols, quinolones and tetracyclines. MRSA bacteria are pandemic and are often isolated in medical practice and nosocomial infections. The MRSA detection is a challenge to any clinical microbiology laboratory and demands implementation of strict protocols for active screening. While more expensive molecular techniques have the potential of offering highly sensitive and rapid results, the cultural methods require longer time but can achieve a comparable sensitivity for lower price.

  14. Laboratory Evaluation of Air Flow Measurement Methods for Residential HVAC Returns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Iain; Stratton, Chris

    2015-07-01

    This project improved the accuracy of air flow measurements used in commissioning California heating and air conditioning systems in Title 24 (Building and Appliance Efficiency Standards), thereby improving system performance and efficiency of California residences. The research team at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory addressed the issue that typical tools used by contractors in the field to test air flows may not be accurate enough to measure return flows used in Title 24 applications. The team developed guidance on performance of current diagnostics as well as a draft test method for use in future evaluations. The series of tests performed measured air flow using a range of techniques and devices. The measured air flows were compared to reference air flow measurements using inline air flow meters built into the test apparatus. The experimental results showed that some devices had reasonable results (typical errors of 5 percent or less) but others had much bigger errors (up to 25 percent).

  15. METHODICS, SOFTWARE AND LABORATORY EQUIPMENT FOR AN INNOVATIVE ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING DISCIPLINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.S. Petrushin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Development of innovative electrical engineering discipline «Electric Machines in Mechatronic Systems» in order to improve the training of specialists of electrical engineering specialty. Methodology. The proposed project concerns the educational reforms that promote the intensification of the educational process. Results. The structure of interactive educational and training complex, which is a computer learning tool in the form of software and methodical support, as well as data and knowledge bases and consists of functionally related multimedia learning systems, interactive learning, automated control of the learning process. Originality. To offer online training and research facilities, guidelines for laboratory and computational and graphic works. Practical value. Increase the knowledge of students of educational material related to the discipline of innovation «Electric Machines in Mechatronic Systems».

  16. Laboratory and field methods for measurement of hyphal uptake of nutrients in soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schweiger, P.F.; Jakobsen, I.

    2000-01-01

    Experimental systems for measuring nutrient transport by arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi in soil are described. The systems generally include two soil compartments that are separated by fine nylon mesh. Both roots and root-external hyphae grow in one compartment, but only hyphae are fine enough...... to grow through the mesh into the other compartment. Application of tracer isotopes to the soil of this hyphal compartment can be used to measure nutrient uptake by plants via AM fungal hyphae. Use of compartmented systems is discussed with particular reference to phosphorus, which is the mineral nutrient...... transported in the largest quantity by AM fungi. Laboratory and field applications of the compartmentation methodology are presented with emphasis on the functioning of native AM fungal communities. Advantages and limitations of the method are considered and future important research directions are discussed...

  17. White Paper on Multicarrier Excitation of Multipactor Breakdown: A Survey of Current Methods and Research Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-18

    AEROSPACE REPORT NO. TOR-2015-02548 White Paper on Multicarrier Excitation of Multipactor Breakdown: A Survey of Current Methods and...voltage phenomena where the verification power level is chosen such that the maximum instantaneous operational voltage in the component is excited . In...analysis methods under investigation for multicarrier excitation threshold prediction based on a survey of the research literature. In general, this

  18. Instructional Methods for Neuroscience in Nurse Anesthesia Graduate Programs: A Survey of Educational Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-10-01

    i INSTRUCTIONAL METHODS FOR NEUROSCIENCE IN NURSE ANESTHESIA GRADUATE PROGRAMS : A SURVEY OF EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS Michael R. Sanchez APPROVED... GRADUATE PROGRAMS : A SURVEY OF EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Michael R...certifies that the use of any copyrighted material in the thesis entitled: Instructional methods for neuroscience in nurse anesthesia graduate programs : A

  19. Analysis of tuberculosis prevalence surveys: new guidance on best-practice methods

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND An unprecedented number of nationwide tuberculosis (TB) prevalence surveys will be implemented between 2010 and 2015, to better estimate the burden of disease caused by TB and assess whether global targets for TB control set for 2015 are achieved. It is crucial that results are analysed using best-practice methods. OBJECTIVE To provide new theoretical and practical guidance on best-practice methods for the analysis of TB prevalence surveys, including analyses at the individual as w...

  20. Use of field and laboratory methods for estimating unsaturated hydraulic properties under different land-use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Siltecho

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Adequate water management is required to improve the efficiency and sustainability of agricultural systems when water is scarce or over-abundant, especially in the case of land-use changes. In order to quantify, to predict and eventually to control water and solute transport into soil, soil hydraulic properties need to be determined precisely. As their determination is often tedious, expensive and time-consuming, many alternative field and laboratory techniques are now available. The aim of this study was to determine unsaturated soil hydraulic properties under different land-uses and to compare the results obtained with different measurement methods (Beerkan, Disk infiltrometer, Evaporation, pedotransfer function. The study has been realised on a tropical sandy soil in a mini watershed in NE Thailand. The experimental plots were positioned in a rubber tree plantation in different positions along a slope, in ruzi grass pasture and in an original forest site. Non parametric statistics demonstrated that van Genuchten unsaturated soil parameters (Ks, α and n, were significantly different according to the measurement methods employed whereas location was not a significant discriminating factor when all methods were considered together. However within each method, parameters n and α were statistically different according to the sites. These parameters were used with Hydrus1D for a one year simulation and computed pressure head did not show noticeable differences for the various sets of parameters, highlighting the fact that for modelling, any of these measurement method could be employed. The choice of the measurement method would therefore be motivated by the simplicity, robustness and its low cost.

  1. A falling-pressure method for measuring air permeability of asphalt in laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hailong; Jiao, Jiu Jimmy; Luk, Mario

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a simple analytical solution for estimating air permeability using the test data obtained by a falling-pressure method in laboratory. The perimeter of the column-shaped sample is fixed in a steel cylinder with the upper sample surface open to the atmosphere. The lower surface of the sample and the cylinder form an air chamber. A water manometer is connected to the air chamber to measure the air pressure inside after the chamber is pressurized. The data of pressure versus time in the air chamber are recorded and analyzed. An approximate analytical solution is derived to describe the pressure-time relationship in the air chamber. The air permeability can be easily estimated using the approximate analytical solution based on the linear least-squares fitting to the recorded pressure-time test data. This method is used to estimate the falling-pressure test data of 15 asphalt samples. The agreement between the test data and the analytical prediction is satisfactory for all the samples. To investigate the error caused by the approximate analytical solution, the air permeabilities are also estimated based on fully numerical solutions. The permeability values obtained from analytical and numerical solutions are very close. The maximum relative error is less than 6% for samples with more than five pressure-time records. A quantitative condition is given under which the analytical solution applies with negligible estimation error. Compared with the common, steady-state method for measuring air permeability, the falling-pressure method has its advantages such as simplicity and economy. The steady-state method has to measure the air flux through the sample, while the falling-pressure method does not.

  2. Use of field and laboratory methods for estimating unsaturated hydraulic properties under different land uses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siltecho, S.; Hammecker, C.; Sriboonlue, V.; Clermont-Dauphin, C.; Trelo-ges, V.; Antonino, A. C. D.; Angulo-Jaramillo, R.

    2015-03-01

    Adequate water management is required to improve the efficiency and sustainability of agricultural systems when water is scarce or over-abundant, especially in the case of land use changes. In order to quantify, to predict and eventually to control water and solute transport into soil, soil hydraulic properties need to be determined precisely. As their determination is often tedious, expensive and time-consuming, many alternative field and laboratory techniques are now available. The aim of this study was to determine unsaturated soil hydraulic properties under different land uses and to compare the results obtained with different measurement methods (Beerkan, disc infiltrometer, evaporation, pedotransfer function). The study has been realized on a tropical sandy soil in a mini-watershed in northeastern Thailand. The experimental plots were positioned in a rubber tree plantation in different positions along a slope, in ruzi grass pasture and in an original forest site. Non-parametric statistics demonstrated that van Genuchten unsaturated soil parameters (Ks, α and n) were significantly different according to the measurement methods employed, whereas the land use was not a significant discriminating factor when all methods were considered together. However, within each method, parameters n and α were statistically different according to the sites. These parameters were used with Hydrus1D for a 1-year simulation and computed pressure head did not show noticeable differences for the various sets of parameters, highlighting the fact that for modeling, any of these measurement methods could be employed. The choice of the measurement method would therefore be motivated by the simplicity, robustness and its low cost.

  3. Use of field and laboratory methods for estimating unsaturated hydraulic properties under different land-use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siltecho, S.; Hammecker, C.; Sriboonlue, V.; Clermont-Dauphin, C.; Trelo-ges, V.; Antonino, A. C. D.; Angulo-Jaramillo, R.

    2014-06-01

    Adequate water management is required to improve the efficiency and sustainability of agricultural systems when water is scarce or over-abundant, especially in the case of land-use changes. In order to quantify, to predict and eventually to control water and solute transport into soil, soil hydraulic properties need to be determined precisely. As their determination is often tedious, expensive and time-consuming, many alternative field and laboratory techniques are now available. The aim of this study was to determine unsaturated soil hydraulic properties under different land-uses and to compare the results obtained with different measurement methods (Beerkan, Disk infiltrometer, Evaporation, pedotransfer function). The study has been realised on a tropical sandy soil in a mini watershed in NE Thailand. The experimental plots were positioned in a rubber tree plantation in different positions along a slope, in ruzi grass pasture and in an original forest site. Non parametric statistics demonstrated that van Genuchten unsaturated soil parameters (Ks, α and n), were significantly different according to the measurement methods employed whereas location was not a significant discriminating factor when all methods were considered together. However within each method, parameters n and α were statistically different according to the sites. These parameters were used with Hydrus1D for a one year simulation and computed pressure head did not show noticeable differences for the various sets of parameters, highlighting the fact that for modelling, any of these measurement method could be employed. The choice of the measurement method would therefore be motivated by the simplicity, robustness and its low cost.

  4. Application of the Common Offset Seismic Reflection Method to Urban Active Fault Surveys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Baojin; Ji Jifa; Xu Zhaofan; Yuan Hongke; Liao Xu; Bai Yun; Wan Bo

    2007-01-01

    The method and principle of common offset seismic surveys as well as the field data gathering and processing technique were introduced briefly. Through two urban active fault survey examples in Fuzhou and Shenyang, the efficiency and limitation of using the common offset seismic reflection technique to carry out urban active fault surveys were probed. The results show that this technique has the properties of high resolving power, better reconstruction of subsurface structures, and real-time analyzing and interpretation of investigation results on site. This method can be used to quickly locate objects under investigation accurately in the areas with thinner Quaternary overburdens and strong bedrock interface fluctuations.

  5. A survey on critical factors influencing new advertisement methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naser Azad

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Soft drink beverages are important part of many people’s foods and many prefer soft drink to water when they have dinner. Therefore, this business model can be considered as the longest lasting sector for many years and there has been not much change in these products. However, new methods of advertisement play important role for increasing market share. In this paper, we study the impact of new methods of advertisement in product development. The proposed study of this paper designs a questionnaire for one of Iranian soft drink producers, which consisted of 274 questions in Likert scale and uses factor analysis (FA to analyze the results. The study selects 250 people who live in city of Tehran, Iran and Cronbach alpha has been calculated as 0.88, which is well above the minimum desirable limit. According to our results, there were six important factors impacting in product development, including modern advertisement techniques, emotional impact, strategy of market leadership, pricing strategy, product life chain and supply entity. The most important factor loading in these six components include impact of social values, persuading unaware and uninformed customers, ability to monopolizing in production, improving pricing techniques, product life cycle and negative impact of high advertisement.

  6. A Survey on Web Spam Detection Methods: Taxonomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shekoofeh Ghiam

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Web spam refers to some techniques, which try to manipulate search engine ranking algorithms in orderto raise web page position in search engine results. In the best case, spammers encourage viewers to visittheir sites, and provide undeserved advertisement gains to the page owner. In the worst case, they usemalicious contents in their pages and try to install malware on the victim’s machine. Spammers use threekinds of spamming techniques to get higher score in ranking. These techniques are Link basedtechniques, hiding techniques and Content-based techniques. Existing spam pages cause distrust tosearch engine results. This not only wastes the time of visitors, but also wastes lots of search engineresources. Hence spam detection methods have been proposed as a solution for web spam in order toreduce negative effects of spam pages. Experimental results show that some of these techniques areworking well and can find spam pages more accurate than the others. This paper classifies web spamtechniques and the related detection methods.

  7. Surveying the citizen science landscape: an exploration of the design, delivery and impact of citizen science through the lens of the Open Air Laboratories (OPAL) programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Linda; Fradera, Roger; Riesch, Hauke; Lakeman-Fraser, Poppy

    2016-07-22

    This paper provides a short introduction to the topic of citizen science (CS) identifying the shift from the knowledge deficit model to more inclusive, participatory science. It acknowledges the benefits of new technology and the opportunities it brings for mass participation and data manipulation. It focuses on the increase in interest in CS in recent years and draws on experience gained from the Open Air Laboratories (OPAL) programme launched in England in 2007. The drivers and objectives for OPAL are presented together with background information on the partnership, methods and scales. The approaches used by researchers ranged from direct public participation in mass data collection through field surveys to research with minimal public engagement. The supporting services focused on education, particularly to support participants new to science, a media strategy and data services. Examples from OPAL are used to illustrate the different approaches to the design and delivery of CS that have emerged over recent years and the breadth of opportunities for public participation the current landscape provides. Qualitative and quantitative data from OPAL are used as evidence of the impact of CS. While OPAL was conceived ahead of the more recent formalisation of approaches to the design, delivery and analysis of CS projects and their impact, it nevertheless provides a range of examples against which to assess the various benefits and challenges emerging in this fast developing field.

  8. A Comparison between Survey and Verbal Choice Methods of Identifying Potential Reinforcers among Employees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder, David A; Therrien, Kelly; Wine, Byron

    2006-01-01

    Two methods of assessing preference for stimuli (i.e., potential reinforcers) were compared for adult administrative assistant employees. During Phase 1, a survey method and a verbal choice method of assessing preference for 6 stimuli were administered. During Phase 2, a coupon system was used to determine which categories of stimuli actually…

  9. National Survey on Access, Use and Promotion of Rational Use of Medicines (PNAUM): household survey component methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengue, Sotero Serrate; Bertoldi, Andréa Dâmaso; Boing, Alexandra Crispim; Tavares, Noemia Urruth Leão; Pizzol, Tatiane da Silva Dal; Oliveira, Maria Auxiliadora; Arrais, Paulo Sérgio Dourado; Ramos, Luiz Roberto; Farias, Mareni Rocha; Luiza, Vera Lucia; Bernal, Regina Tomie Ivata; de Barros, Aluísio Jardim Dornellas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To describe methodological aspects of the household survey National Survey on Access, Use and Promotion of Rational Use of Medicines (PNAUM) related to sampling design and implementation, the actual obtained sample, instruments and fieldwork. METHODS A cross-sectional, population-based study with probability sampling in three stages of the population living in households located in Brazilian urban areas. Fieldwork was carried out between September 2013 and February 2014. The data collection instrument included questions related to: information about households, residents and respondents; chronic diseases and medicines used; use of health services; acute diseases and events treated with drugs; use of contraceptives; use of pharmacy services; behaviors that may affect drug use; package inserts and packaging; lifestyle and health insurance. RESULTS In total, 41,433 interviews were carried out in 20,404 households and 576 urban clusters corresponding to 586 census tracts distributed in the five Brazilian regions, according to eight domains defined by age and gender. CONCLUSIONS The results of the survey may be used as a baseline for future studies aiming to assess the impact of government action on drug access and use. For local studies using a compatible method, PNAUM may serve as a reference point to evaluate variations in space and population. With a comprehensive evaluation of drug-related aspects, PNAUM is a major source of data for a variety of analyses to be carried out both at academic and government level. PMID:27982381

  10. National Survey on Access, Use and Promotion of Rational Use of Medicines (PNAUM: household survey component methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sotero Serrate Mengue

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To describe methodological aspects of the household survey National Survey on Access, Use and Promotion of Rational Use of Medicines (PNAUM related to sampling design and implementation, the actual obtained sample, instruments and fieldwork. METHODS A cross-sectional, population-based study with probability sampling in three stages of the population living in households located in Brazilian urban areas. Fieldwork was carried out between September 2013 and February 2014. The data collection instrument included questions related to: information about households, residents and respondents; chronic diseases and medicines used; use of health services; acute diseases and events treated with drugs; use of contraceptives; use of pharmacy services; behaviors that may affect drug use; package inserts and packaging; lifestyle and health insurance. RESULTS In total, 41,433 interviews were carried out in 20,404 households and 576 urban clusters corresponding to 586 census tracts distributed in the five Brazilian regions, according to eight domains defined by age and gender. CONCLUSIONS The results of the survey may be used as a baseline for future studies aiming to assess the impact of government action on drug access and use. For local studies using a compatible method, PNAUM may serve as a reference point to evaluate variations in space and population. With a comprehensive evaluation of drug-related aspects, PNAUM is a major source of data for a variety of analyses to be carried out both at academic and government level.

  11. A Delphi Method Analysis to Create an Emergency Medicine Educational Patient Satisfaction Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kory S. London

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Feedback on patient satisfaction (PS as a means to monitor and improve performance in patient communication is lacking in residency training. A physician’s promotion, compensation and job satisfaction may be impacted by his individual PS scores, once he is in practice. Many communication and satisfaction surveys exist but none focus on the emergency department setting for educational purposes. The goal of this project was to create an emergency medicine-based educational PS survey with strong evidence for content validity. Methods: We used the Delphi Method (DM to obtain expert opinion via an iterative process of surveying. Questions were mined from four PS surveys as well as from group suggestion. The DM analysis determined the structure, content and appropriate use of the tool. The group used four-point Likert-type scales and Lynn’s criteria for content validity to determine relevant questions from the stated goals. Results: Twelve recruited experts participated in a series of seven surveys to achieve consensus. A 10-question, single-page survey with an additional page of qualitative questions and demographic questions was selected. Thirty one questions were judged to be relevant from an original 48-question list. Of these, the final 10 questions were chosen. Response rates for individual survey items was 99.5%. Conclusion: The DM produced a consensus survey with content validity evidence. Future work will be needed to obtain evidence for response process, internal structure and construct validity.

  12. Assessing the oral health of an ageing population: methods, challenges and predictors of survey participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Debora C; Brillant, Martha G S; Clovis, Joanne B; McNally, Mary E; Filiaggi, Mark J; Kotzer, Robert D; Lawrence, Herenia P

    2012-01-01

    Assessing the oral health of an ageing population: methods, challenges and predictors of survey participation Objectives To examine predictors of participation and to describe the methodological considerations of conducting a two-stage population-based oral health survey. Methods An observational, cross-sectional survey (telephone interview and clinical oral examination) of community-dwelling adults aged 45–64 and ≥65 living in Nova Scotia, Canada was conducted. Results The survey response rate was 21% for the interview and 13.5% for the examination. A total of 1141 participants completed one or both components of the survey. Both age groups had higher levels of education than the target population; the age 45–64 sample also had a higher proportion of females and lower levels of employment than the target population. Completers (participants who completed interview and examination) were compared with partial completers (who completed only the interview), and stepwise logistic regression was performed to examine predictors of completion. Identified predictors were as follows: not working, post-secondary education and frequent dental visits. Conclusion Recruitment, communications and logistics present challenges in conducting a province-wide survey. Identification of employment, education and dental visit frequency as predictors of survey participation provide insight into possible non-response bias and suggest potential for underestimation of oral disease prevalence in this and similar surveys. This potential must be considered in analysis and in future recruitment strategies. PMID:21916953

  13. Laboratory and numerical evaluation of borehole methods for subsurface horizontal flow characterization.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedler, William H. (Radon Abatement Systems, Inc., Golden, CO); Jepsen, Richard Alan (Sandia National Laboratories, Carlsbad, NM)

    2003-08-01

    The requirement to accurately measure subsurface groundwater flow at contaminated sites, as part of a time and cost effective remediation program, has spawned a variety of flow evaluation technologies. Validation of the accuracy and knowledge regarding the limitations of these technologies are critical for data quality and application confidence. Leading the way in the effort to validate and better understand these methodologies, the US Army Environmental Center has funded a multi-year program to compare and evaluate all viable horizontal flow measurement technologies. This multi-year program has included a field comparison phase, an application of selected methods as part of an integrated site characterization program phase, and most recently, a laboratory and numerical simulator phase. As part of this most recent phase, numerical modeling predictions and laboratory measurements were made in a simulated fracture borehole set-up within a controlled flow simulator. The scanning colloidal borescope flowmeter (SCBFM) and advanced hydrophysical logging (NxHpL{trademark}) tool were used to measure velocities and flow rate in a simulated fractured borehole in the flow simulator. Particle tracking and mass flux measurements were observed and recorded under a range of flow conditions in the simulator. Numerical models were developed to aid in the design of the flow simulator and predict the flow conditions inside the borehole. Results demonstrated that the flow simulator allowed for predictable, easily controlled, and stable flow rates both inside and outside the well. The measurement tools agreed well with each other over a wide range of flow conditions. The model results demonstrate that the Scanning Colloidal Borescope did not interfere with the flow in the borehole in any of the tests. The model is capable of predicting flow conditions and agreed well with the measurements and observations in the flow simulator and borehole. Both laboratory and model results showed a

  14. 2014-2016 Avian Point Count and Migration Surveys at Site 300 for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fratanduono, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-04-14

    The primary goals of the surveys were to: 1) collect minutes of bird activity within Site 300, 2) consider relative abundance of the different bird species occurring within the Site, 3) collect behavioral information, and 4) provide compelling evidence to determine the status of the Site as a migration corridor or migration stopover site. To this end, two survey types were conducted: avian point counts were conducted on a monthly basis from February 2014 through January 2016 and migration surveys were conducted over two three-month periods from September 2014 through November 2014, and September 2015 through November 2015. These two surveys types provided the opportunity to observe avian species in a variety of conditions across a two year period. Whenever possible or relevant, the observations of either survey were used to inform and complement the observations of the other survey in pursuit of the above goals. Both survey types are described below.

  15. Surveyance of disease frequency in a population by linkage to diagnostic laboratory databases. A system for monitoring the incidences of hyper- and hypothyroidism as part of the Danish iodine supplementation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Inge Bülow; Laurberg, Peter; Arnfred, Terkel; Knudsen, Nils; Jørgensen, Torben; Perrild, Hans; Ovesen, Lars

    2002-03-01

    In Denmark an increase in iodine intake through salt iodization has been introduced in 1998. In parallel a program for surveyance of thyroid diseases in the population was developed as recommended by UNICEF and WHO. To develop and evaluate a computer based system to identify and register new cases of hyper- and hypothyroidism in a well defined cohort, by linkage to diagnostic laboratory databases. (1) Two sub cohorts for monitoring were defined (n=535,859), and evaluated to minimize loss of new cases. Collaboration was established with laboratories covering thyroid hormone analyses in the cohort; (2) a diagnostic algorithm was defined and evaluated against clinical practice; (3) evaluation of the laboratory methods employed by the four participating laboratories, to ensure they would reach the same diagnosis in a patient; (4) a register database was developed which used data imported from the laboratory databases to automatically identify previously unknown cases of hyper- and hypothyroidism and record diagnostic activity in the area. All parts of the registration were carefully evaluated. We describe for the first time a computer based system for prospective measuring the incidence rate of hyper- and hypothyroidism. The system is particularly useful for monitoring of iodine supplementation programmes.

  16. A survey about methods dedicated to epistasis detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clément eNiel

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available During the past decade, findings of genome-wide association studies (GWAS improved our knowledge and understanding of disease genetics. To date, thousands of SNPs have been associated to diseases and other complex traits. Statistical analysis typically looks for association between a phenotype and a SNP taken individually via single-locus tests. However, geneticists admit this is an oversimplified approach to tackle the complexity of underlying biological mechanisms. Interaction between SNPs, namely epistasis, must be considered. Unfortunately, epistasis detection gives rise to analytic challenges since analyzing every SNP combination is at present impractical at a genome-wide scale. In this review, we will present the main strategies recently proposed to detect epistatic interactions, along with their operating principle. Some of these methods are exhaustive, such as multifactor dimensionality reduction, likelihood ratio-based tests or receiver operating characteristic curve analysis; some are non-exhaustive, such as machine learning techniques (random forests, Bayesian networks or combinatorial optimization approaches (ant colony optimization, computational evolution system.

  17. Iterative Outlier Removal: A Method for Identifying Outliers in Laboratory Recalibration Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrinello, Christina M; Grams, Morgan E; Sang, Yingying; Couper, David; Wruck, Lisa M; Li, Danni; Eckfeldt, John H; Selvin, Elizabeth; Coresh, Josef

    2016-07-01

    Extreme values that arise for any reason, including those through nonlaboratory measurement procedure-related processes (inadequate mixing, evaporation, mislabeling), lead to outliers and inflate errors in recalibration studies. We present an approach termed iterative outlier removal (IOR) for identifying such outliers. We previously identified substantial laboratory drift in uric acid measurements in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study over time. Serum uric acid was originally measured in 1990-1992 on a Coulter DACOS instrument using an uricase-based measurement procedure. To recalibrate previous measured concentrations to a newer enzymatic colorimetric measurement procedure, uric acid was remeasured in 200 participants from stored plasma in 2011-2013 on a Beckman Olympus 480 autoanalyzer. To conduct IOR, we excluded data points >3 SDs from the mean difference. We continued this process using the resulting data until no outliers remained. IOR detected more outliers and yielded greater precision in simulation. The original mean difference (SD) in uric acid was 1.25 (0.62) mg/dL. After 4 iterations, 9 outliers were excluded, and the mean difference (SD) was 1.23 (0.45) mg/dL. Conducting only one round of outlier removal (standard approach) would have excluded 4 outliers [mean difference (SD) = 1.22 (0.51) mg/dL]. Applying the recalibration (derived from Deming regression) from each approach to the original measurements, the prevalence of hyperuricemia (>7 mg/dL) was 28.5% before IOR and 8.5% after IOR. IOR is a useful method for removal of extreme outliers irrelevant to recalibrating laboratory measurements, and identifies more extraneous outliers than the standard approach. © 2016 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  18. A Comparison of Web-Based and Paper-Based Survey Methods: Testing Assumptions of Survey Mode and Response Cost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenlaw, Corey; Brown-Welty, Sharon

    2009-01-01

    Web-based surveys have become more prevalent in areas such as evaluation, research, and marketing research to name a few. The proliferation of these online surveys raises the question, how do response rates compare with traditional surveys and at what cost? This research explored response rates and costs for Web-based surveys, paper surveys, and…

  19. A Comparison of Web-Based and Paper-Based Survey Methods: Testing Assumptions of Survey Mode and Response Cost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenlaw, Corey; Brown-Welty, Sharon

    2009-01-01

    Web-based surveys have become more prevalent in areas such as evaluation, research, and marketing research to name a few. The proliferation of these online surveys raises the question, how do response rates compare with traditional surveys and at what cost? This research explored response rates and costs for Web-based surveys, paper surveys, and…

  20. Relevance of JAK2V617F positivity to hematological diseases - survey of samples from a clinical genetics laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Wanting T

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background JAK2V617F is found in the majority of patients with Ph- myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs and has become a valuable marker for diagnosis of MPNs. However, it has also been found in many other hematological diseases, and some studies even detected the presence of JAK2V617F in normal blood samples. This casts doubt on the primary role of JAK2V617F in the pathogenesis of MPNs and its diagnostic value. Methods In the present study, we analyzed JAK2V617F positivity with 232 normal blood samples and 2663 patient blood, bone marrow, and amniotic fluid specimens obtained from a clinical genetics laboratory by using a simple DNA extraction method and a sensitive nested allele-specific PCR strategy. Results We found JAK2V617F present in the majority (78% of MPN patients and in a small fraction (1.8-8.7% of patients with other specific hematological diseases but not at all in normal healthy donors or patients with non-hematological diseases. We also revealed associations of JAK2V617F with novel as well as known chromosomal abnormalities. Conclusions Our study suggests that JAK2V617F positivity is associated with specific hematological malignancies and is an excellent diagnostic marker for MPNs. The data also indicate that the nested allele-specific PCR method provides clinically relevant information and should be conducted for all cases suspected of having MPNs as well as for other related diseases.

  1. Dispatching the wandering mind? Toward a laboratory method for cuing "spontaneous" off-task thought

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer C. McVay

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive psychologists and neuroscientists study most phenomena of attention by measuring subjects’ overt responses to discrete environmental stimuli that can be manipulated to test competing theories. The mind-wandering experience, however, cannot be locally instigated by cleverly engineered stimuli. Investigators must therefore rely on correlational and observational methods to understand subjects’ flow of thought, which is only occasionally and indirectly monitored. In an effort toward changing this state of affairs, we present four experiments that develop a method for inducing mind-wandering episodes – on demand – in response to task-embedded cues. In an initial laboratory session, subjects described their personal goals and concerns across several life domains (amid some filler questionnaires. In a second session, 48 hours later, subjects completed a go/no-go task in which they responded to the perceptual features of words; unbeknownst to subjects, some stimulus words were presented in triplets to represent the personal concerns they had described in session 1. Thought probes appearing shortly after these personal-goal triplets indicated that, compared to control triplets, priming subjects’ concerns increased mind-wandering rate by about 3 – 4%. We argue that this small effect is, nonetheless, a promising development toward the pursuit of an experimentally informed, theory-driven science of mind wandering.

  2. Dispatching the wandering mind? Toward a laboratory method for cuing "spontaneous" off-task thought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVay, Jennifer C; Kane, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive psychologists and neuroscientists study most phenomena of attention by measuring subjects' overt responses to discrete environmental stimuli that can be manipulated to test competing theories. The mind wandering experience, however, cannot be locally instigated by cleverly engineered stimuli. Investigators must therefore rely on correlational and observational methods to understand subjects' flow of thought, which is only occasionally and indirectly monitored. In an effort toward changing this state of affairs, we present four experiments that develop a method for inducing mind wandering episodes-on demand-in response to task-embedded cues. In an initial laboratory session, subjects described their personal goals and concerns across several life domains (amid some filler questionnaires). In a second session, 48 h later, subjects completed a go/no-go task in which they responded to the perceptual features of words; unbeknownst to subjects, some stimulus words were presented in triplets to represent the personal concerns they had described in session 1. Thought probes appearing shortly after these personal-goal triplets indicated that, compared to control triplets, priming subjects' concerns increased mind wandering rate by about 3-4%. We argue that this small effect is, nonetheless, a promising development toward the pursuit of an experimentally informed, theory-driven science of mind wandering.

  3. [An evaluation of the effectiveness of laboratory diagnostic methods for brucellosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandara, B; Zheludkov, M M; Chernysheva, M I

    1994-01-01

    The diagnostic value of bacteriological and serological methods for the laboratory diagnosis of brucellosis was studied. In the analysis of milk and cheese specimens Brucella cultures were isolated and differentiated as B.melitensis, biovar I, and B.abortus, biovar 4. In 25.6% of cases B.melitensis culture, biovar 1, was isolated from the blood of persons suspected for brucellosis. The isolation of B.melitensis culture from milk showed that this infective agent migrated from small animals to cattle, which was indicative of a high risk of human infection in the state of Zacatecas, Mexico. The comparative evaluation of serological diagnostic methods (the agglutination test in test tubes, Huddleson's slide test, the acidic rose bengal test and the 2-mercaptoethanol test) showed high sensitivity of rapid tests (Huddleson's test and the rose bengal test in 93.7% and 87.9% of cases respectively). The 2-mercaptoethanol test which gave positive results in 63.8% of cases provided additional information characterizing the course of infections process.

  4. Utilization of a molecular serotyping method for Salmonella enterica in a routine laboratory in Alberta Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrato, Christina; Chui, Linda; King, Robin; Louie, Marie

    2017-04-01

    Salmonella is one of the most common enteric pathogens related to foodborne illness. Alberta's Provincial Laboratory for Public Health (ProvLab) provides Outbreak and Surveillance support by performing serotyping. The Check&Trace Salmonella™ (CTS) assay (Check-Points, Netherlands), a commercial DNA microarray system, can determine the serotype designation of a Salmonella isolate with automated interpretation. Here we evaluate 1028 Salmonella isolates of human clinical or environmental sources in Alberta, Canada with the CTS assay. CTS was able to assign a serovar to 98.7% of the most frequently occurring human clinical strains in Alberta (82.5% overall), and 71.7% of isolates which were inconclusive by conventional methods. There was 99.7% concordance in environmental isolates. The CTS database has potential to expand to identify rare serovars. With the anticipated shift to molecular methods for identification, CTS provides an easy transition and demonstrates ease-of-use and reduces the turn-around-time of a reported result significantly compared to classical serotyping.

  5. [Essential procedure and key methods for survey of traditional knowledge related to Chinese materia medica resources].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Gong; Huang, Lu-qi; Xue, Da-yuan; Zhang, Xiao-bo

    2014-12-01

    The survey of traditional knowledge related to Chinese materia medica resources is the important component and one of the innovative aspects of the fourth national survey of the Chinese materia medica resources. China has rich traditional knowledge of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and the comprehensive investigation of TCM traditional knowledge aims to promote conservation and sustainable use of Chinese materia medica resources. Building upon the field work of pilot investigations, this paper introduces the essential procedures and key methods for conducting the survey of traditional knowledge related to Chinese materia medica resources. The essential procedures are as follows. First is the preparation phrase. It is important to review all relevant literature and provide training to the survey teams so that they have clear understanding of the concept of traditional knowledge and master key survey methods. Second is the field investigation phrase. When conducting field investigations, survey teams should identify the traditional knowledge holders by using the 'snowball method', record the traditional knowledge after obtaining prior informed concerned from the traditional knowledge holders. Researchers should fill out the survey forms provided by the Technical Specification of the Fourth National Survey of Chinese Materia Medica Resources. Researchers should pay particular attention to the scope of traditional knowledge and the method of inheriting the knowledge, which are the key information for traditional knowledge holders and potential users to reach mutual agreed terms to achieve benefit sharing. Third is the data compilation and analysis phrase. Researchers should try to compile and edit the TCM traditional knowledge in accordance with intellectual property rights requirements so that the information collected through the national survey can serve as the basic data for the TCM traditional knowledge database. The key methods of the survey include regional

  6. Educational area for learning of optics and technologies: union of open laboratories of ideas, methods and practices (OLIMP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivashchenko, Maksim; Bodrov, Kirill; Tolstoba, Nadezhda

    2016-09-01

    The paper deals with the concept of creating the union of Open Laboratories of Ideas, Methods and Practices (OLIMP). It describes the structure designed to simplify the relationship, such as business incubators, start-up accelerators, small innovative enterprises, fabrication laboratories and student centers. We consider their advantages and disadvantages for the specific audience of students and enthusiasts who do not have funding for their own projects. The experience of interaction between the Open Laboratories of Ideas, Methods and Practices and the Student Research Laboratory for Optical Engineering shows the relative impact of structures on each other and the value of using such interaction in the learning process. The paper also addresses issues such as: the motivation of students, enthusiasm for the direction the lab participants identify and maintain the initiatives, profiling in the design, scientific, commercial, social sphere.

  7. Inter-laboratory comparisons of hexenuronic acid measurements in kraft eucalyptus pulps using a UV-Vis spectroscopic method

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.Y. Zhu; H.F Zhou; Chai X.S.; Donna Johannes; Richard Pope; Cristina Valls; M. Blanca Roncero

    2014-01-01

    An inter-laboratory comparison of a UV-Vis spectroscopic method (TAPPI T 282 om-13 “Hexeneuronic acid content of chemical pulp”) for hexeneuronic acid measurements was conducted using three eucalyptus kraft pulps. The pulp samples were produced in a laboratory at kappa numbers of approximately 14, 20, and 35. The hexeneuronic acid contents of the three pulps were...

  8. Preparing investigation of methods for surveying tree seed demands among farmers in Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabæk, Anders

    demand pattern in Tanzania, Uganda and Nicaragua are discussed and a choice of strategy for an extensive survey of seed demand and supply in Tanzania is made. Different data collection methods and tools, e.g. quantitative and qualitative surveys and rapid rural appraisals, are described in detail...... and preferences among private farmers in Tanzania. A framework for investigating seed demand and supply is outlined. The role of a national tree seed project in a seed supply sector is discussed and data requirements for strategy on seed procurement and tree improvement are outlined. Earlier surveys on seed......Insufficient seed supplies is often a major constraint on tree planting activities in developing countries. A central problem is to assess the actual demands for tree seed. This report shall, as a part of a PhD-study, prepare an investigation of different methods for surveying tree seed demands...

  9. Toward a quality guide to facilitate the transference of analytical methods from research to testing laboratories: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisetty, Krisnha; Gumede, Njabulo Joyfull; Escuder-Gilabert, Laura; Sagrado, Salvador

    2009-01-01

    At present, there is no single viewpoint that defines QA strategies in analytical chemistry. On the other hand, there are no unique protocols defining a set of analytical tasks and decision criteria to be performed during the method development phase (e.g., by a single research laboratory) in order to facilitate the transference to the testing laboratories intending to adapt, validate, and routinely use this method. This study proposes general criteria, a priori valid for any developed method, recommended as a provisional quality guide containing the minimum internal tasks necessary to publish new analytical method results. As an application, the selection of some basic internal quality tasks and the corresponding accepted criteria are adapted to a concrete case study: indirect differential pulse polarographic determination of nitrate in water samples according to European Commission requisites. Extra tasks to be performed by testing laboratories are also outlined.

  10. Seismic refraction surveys in Bernburg, Germany: an application of the generalized reciprocal and phantoming method

    OpenAIRE

    Horrent, Catherine; Brouyère, Serge; Demanet, Donat; Michiels, Thierry; Jongmans, Denis

    1997-01-01

    The paper presents a case study of a seismic refraction survey in Bernburg, Germany. The interpretation was made using the GRM method and phantoming concept. The aim of the survey was to map the depth of the bed-rock over a distance of 2 km. The survey was divided into five linear profiles ranging from 150 to 640 metres in length. The resulting interpreted sections show substantial variations in velocity (1300 to 4500 m/s) and depth (5 to 18 m) of bed-rock. Correlation with existing boreholes...

  11. SURVEY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    SURVEY er en udbredt metode og benyttes inden for bl.a. samfundsvidenskab, humaniora, psykologi og sundhedsforskning. Også uden for forskningsverdenen er der mange organisationer som f.eks. konsulentfirmaer og offentlige institutioner samt marketingsafdelinger i private virksomheder, der arbejder...... med surveys. Denne bog gennemgår alle surveyarbejdets faser og giver en praktisk indføring i: • design af undersøgelsen og udvælgelse af stikprøver, • formulering af spørgeskemaer samt indsamling og kodning af data, • metoder til at analysere resultaterne...

  12. A literature survey of private sector methods of determining personal financial responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    Bodzin, Martin Bradley

    1988-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited Credit grantors and employers have two clearly established methods-- judgmental and empirically derived--of determining personal financial responsibility that can be used as a basis for accepting or rejecting credit or job applicants. This thesis is a literature survey and analysis of those methods. The foundations of the two methods are examined and models of the empirically derived method are discussed. The pa...

  13. Comparative Study of the Sensitivity of Different Diagnostic Methods for the Laboratory Diagnosis of Buruli Ulcer Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herbinger, Karl-Heinz; Adjei, Ohene; Awua-Boateng, Nana-Yaa; Nienhuis, Willemien A.; Kunaa, Letitia; Siegmund, Vera; Nitschke, Joerg; Thompson, William; Klutse, Erasmus; Agbenorku, Pius; Schipf, Alexander; Reu, Simone; Racz, Paul; Fleischer, Bernhard; Beissner, Marcus; Fleischmann, Erna; Helfrich, Kerstin; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Loescher, Thomas; Bretzel, Gisela

    2009-01-01

    Background. Several diagnostic laboratory methods are available for case confirmation of Buruli ulcer disease. This study assessed the sensitivity of various diagnostic tests in relation to clinical presentation of the disease, type of diagnostic specimen, and treatment history. Methods. Swab sample

  14. Advancing internal erosion monitoring using seismic methods in field and laboratory studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, Minal L.

    This dissertation presents research involving laboratory and field investigation of passive and active methods for monitoring and assessing earthen embankment infrastructure such as dams and levees. Internal erosion occurs as soil particles in an earthen structure migrate to an exit point under seepage forces. This process is a primary failure mode for dams and levees. Current dam and levee monitoring practices are not able to identify early stages of internal erosion, and often the result is loss of structure utility and costly repairs. This research contributes to innovations for detection and monitoring by studying internal erosion and monitoring through field experiments, laboratory experiments, and social and political framing. The field research in this dissertation included two studies (2009 and 2012) of a full-scale earthen embankment at the IJkdijk in the Netherlands. In both of these tests, internal erosion occurred as evidenced by seepage followed by sand traces and boils, and in 2009, eventual failure. With the benefit of arrays of closely spaced piezometers, pore pressure trends indicated internal erosion near the initiation time. Temporally and spatially dense pore water pressure measurements detected two pore water pressure transitions characteristic to the development of internal erosion, even in piezometers located away from the backward erosion activity. At the first transition, the backward erosion caused anomalous pressure decrease in piezometers, even under constant or increasing upstream water level. At the second transition, measurements stabilized as backward erosion extended further upstream of the piezometers, as shown in the 2009 test. The transitions provide an indication of the temporal development and the spatial extent of backward erosion. The 2012 IJkdijk test also included passive acoustic emissions (AE) monitoring. This study analyzed AE activity over the course of the 7-day test using a grid of geophones installed on the

  15. Comparing Coral Reef Survey Methods. Unesco Reports in Marine Science No. 21 Report of a Regional Unesco/UNEP Workshop on Coral Reef Survey Management and Assessment Methods in Asia and the Pacific (Phuket, Thailand, December 13-17, 1982).

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France). Div. of Marine Sciences.

    This report includes nine papers prepared for a workshop on coral reef survey management and assessment methods in Asia and the Pacific. The papers are: "A Contrast in Methodologies between Surveying and Testing" (Charles Birkeland); "Coral Reef Survey Methods in the Andaman Sea" (Hansa Chansang); "A Review of Coral Reef…

  16. Comparing Coral Reef Survey Methods. Unesco Reports in Marine Science No. 21 Report of a Regional Unesco/UNEP Workshop on Coral Reef Survey Management and Assessment Methods in Asia and the Pacific (Phuket, Thailand, December 13-17, 1982).

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France). Div. of Marine Sciences.

    This report includes nine papers prepared for a workshop on coral reef survey management and assessment methods in Asia and the Pacific. The papers are: "A Contrast in Methodologies between Surveying and Testing" (Charles Birkeland); "Coral Reef Survey Methods in the Andaman Sea" (Hansa Chansang); "A Review of Coral Reef…

  17. Laboratory Generation of Solitary Waves:An Inversion Technique to Improve Available Methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.Romano; M.Guerrini; G.Bellotti; 琚烈红

    2014-01-01

    Solitary waves are often used in laboratory experiments to study tsunamis propagation and interaction with coasts. However, the experimental shape of the waves may differ from the theoretical one. In this paper, a correction technique aiming at minimizing the discrepancies between the two profiles is presented. Laboratory experiments reveal their effectiveness in correcting the experimental shape of solitary waves, mainly for low nonlinearities.

  18. Mixed Methods Student Evaluation of an Online Systemic Human Anatomy Course with Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attardi, Stefanie M.; Choi, Suwhan; Barnett, John; Rogers, Kem A.

    2016-01-01

    A fully online section of an existing face-to-face (F2F) systemic human anatomy course with a prosection laboratory was offered for the first time in 2012-2013. Lectures for F2F students (N = 365) were broadcast in both live and archived format to online students (N = 40) using virtual classroom software. Laboratories were delivered online by a…

  19. Comparative analysis of different survey methods for monitoring fish assemblages in coastal habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Duncan G.L.; McIver, Reba; Schmidt, Allison L.; Thériault, Marie-Hélène; Boudreau, Monica; Courtenay, Simon C.; Lotze, Heike K.

    2016-01-01

    Coastal ecosystems are among the most productive yet increasingly threatened marine ecosystems worldwide. Particularly vegetated habitats, such as eelgrass (Zostera marina) beds, play important roles in providing key spawning, nursery and foraging habitats for a wide range of fauna. To properly assess changes in coastal ecosystems and manage these critical habitats, it is essential to develop sound monitoring programs for foundation species and associated assemblages. Several survey methods exist, thus understanding how different methods perform is important for survey selection. We compared two common methods for surveying macrofaunal assemblages: beach seine netting and underwater visual census (UVC). We also tested whether assemblages in shallow nearshore habitats commonly sampled by beach seines are similar to those of nearby eelgrass beds often sampled by UVC. Among five estuaries along the Southern Gulf of St. Lawrence, Canada, our results suggest that the two survey methods yield comparable results for species richness, diversity and evenness, yet beach seines yield significantly higher abundance and different species composition. However, sampling nearshore assemblages does not represent those in eelgrass beds despite considerable overlap and close proximity. These results have important implications for how and where macrofaunal assemblages are monitored in coastal ecosystems. Ideally, multiple survey methods and locations should be combined to complement each other in assessing the entire assemblage and full range of changes in coastal ecosystems, thereby better informing coastal zone management. PMID:27018396

  20. Comparative analysis of different survey methods for monitoring fish assemblages in coastal habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Duncan G L; Eddy, Tyler D; McIver, Reba; Schmidt, Allison L; Thériault, Marie-Hélène; Boudreau, Monica; Courtenay, Simon C; Lotze, Heike K

    2016-01-01

    Coastal ecosystems are among the most productive yet increasingly threatened marine ecosystems worldwide. Particularly vegetated habitats, such as eelgrass (Zostera marina) beds, play important roles in providing key spawning, nursery and foraging habitats for a wide range of fauna. To properly assess changes in coastal ecosystems and manage these critical habitats, it is essential to develop sound monitoring programs for foundation species and associated assemblages. Several survey methods exist, thus understanding how different methods perform is important for survey selection. We compared two common methods for surveying macrofaunal assemblages: beach seine netting and underwater visual census (UVC). We also tested whether assemblages in shallow nearshore habitats commonly sampled by beach seines are similar to those of nearby eelgrass beds often sampled by UVC. Among five estuaries along the Southern Gulf of St. Lawrence, Canada, our results suggest that the two survey methods yield comparable results for species richness, diversity and evenness, yet beach seines yield significantly higher abundance and different species composition. However, sampling nearshore assemblages does not represent those in eelgrass beds despite considerable overlap and close proximity. These results have important implications for how and where macrofaunal assemblages are monitored in coastal ecosystems. Ideally, multiple survey methods and locations should be combined to complement each other in assessing the entire assemblage and full range of changes in coastal ecosystems, thereby better informing coastal zone management.

  1. Chemistry Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: To conduct fundamental studies of highway materials aimed at understanding both failure mechanisms and superior performance. New standard test methods are...

  2. Comparing two survey methods of measuring health-related indicators: Lot Quality Assurance Sampling and Demographic Health Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anoke, Sarah C; Mwai, Paul; Jeffery, Caroline; Valadez, Joseph J; Pagano, Marcello

    2015-12-01

    Two common methods used to measure indicators for health programme monitoring and evaluation are the demographic and health surveys (DHS) and lot quality assurance sampling (LQAS); each one has different strengths. We report on both methods when utilised in comparable situations. We compared 24 indicators in south-west Uganda, where data for prevalence estimations were collected independently for the two methods in 2011 (LQAS: n = 8876; DHS: n = 1200). Data were stratified (e.g. gender and age) resulting in 37 comparisons. We used a two-sample two-sided Z-test of proportions to compare both methods. The average difference between LQAS and DHS for 37 estimates was 0.062 (SD = 0.093; median = 0.039). The average difference among the 21 failures to reject equality of proportions was 0.010 (SD = 0.041; median = 0.009); among the 16 rejections, it was 0.130 (SD = 0.010, median = 0.118). Seven of the 16 rejections exhibited absolute differences of 0.10 and 0.20 (mean = 0.261, SD = 0.083). There is 75.7% agreement across the two surveys. Both methods yield regional results, but only LQAS provides information at less granular levels (e.g. the district level) where managerial action is taken. The cost advantage and localisation make LQAS feasible to conduct more frequently, and provides the possibility for real-time health outcomes monitoring. © 2015 The Authors. Tropical Medicine & International Health Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Dynamic stiffness and transmissibility of commercially available wheelchair cushions using a laboratory test method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmin Garcia-Mendez, BS

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Evidence suggests that wheelchair (WC users are exposed to unhealthy levels of vibration during WC use. Health risks associated with vibration exposure include vertebral disc degeneration and back pain, which may consequently decrease the function and independence of WC users. Some evidence suggests that the cushions used in WCs may amplify vibrations, although conclusive evidence has not been presented in the literature. This study evaluated and compared the transmissibility of commercially available WC cushions with two laboratory test methods: (1 direct measurement of transmissibility while human subjects propelled a WC over a road course with different cushions and (2 characterization of cushions with a material testing system (MTS combined with mathematical models of the apparent mass of the human body. Results showed that although dynamic characterization of WC cushions is possible with an MTS, the results did not correlate well with the transmissibility obtained in the WC road course. Significant differences were found for transmissibility among the cushions tested, with the air-based cushions having lower transmissibility than the foam- or gel-based cushions.

  4. Consistency among methods of assessing concerns about the Los Alamos National Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Joanna

    2003-01-24

    In making environmental remediation and restoration decisions, risk assessors and managers need to take into account the environmental concerns of people living around an industrial facility, as well as those residing in the general region. Yet such information is usually anecdotal rather than quantitative, and rarely compares perceptions among different alternatives methods. The concerns of individuals living in Santa Fe, NM, near the Department of Energy's Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) were characterized. On an open-ended question, the public's greatest concerns were for contamination (35%), ecological health (16%) and human health (14%). When asked to rate their level of concern from a list of possible concerns, people rated accidents/spills and storage of additional nuclear material the highest, and changes in property values the lowest. Unexpectedly, ethnicity, education, and income did not explain variations in ratings for most concerns about LANL. There was generally agreement between the concerns expressed on the ratings and on the open-ended question, although on the latter individuals expressed concern for larger issues, rather than specific issues. Preferences for future land use reflected their concerns for maintaining a safety buffer of an ecosystem around the site.

  5. Development of a laboratory method to predict rapidly the availability of radiocaesium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singleton, D.L.; Livens, F.R.; Beresford, N.A.; Howard, B.J.; Barnett, C.L. (Institute of Terrestrial Ecology, Grange-on-Sands (United Kingdom). Merlewood Research Station); Mayes, R.W. (Macaulay Land Use Research Inst., Roslin (United Kingdom)); Segal, M.G. (Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food, London (United Kingdom))

    1992-03-01

    A simple extraction procedure has been developed to assess rapidly the probable extent of the transfer of radiocaesium into ruminant food products soon after a nuclear accident. The in vitro extractions were validated against true absorption measurements of different forms of radiocaesium in the sheep gut. Extractions were performed on a range of different radiocaesium sources. Some of these sources were artificial (ionic radiocaesium adsorbed onto bentonite, silica spheres and filter-papers) and others were environmentally contaminated (silt from the Ravenglass Estuary contaminated by effluent from British Nuclear Fuels Limited (BNFL) Sellafield, and upland grass and heather contaminated by Chernobyl fallout). Laboratory experiments concentrated primarily on the use of simple inorganic extractants in competitive ion-exchange processes. Of the reagents used, 0.1 mol dm{sup -3} stable caesium chloride solution was the most effective extractant. The proportion of radiocaesium extracted by 0.1 mol dm{sup -3} caesium chloride correlated well with measurements of true absorption. Extracting radiocaesium using 0.1 mol dm{sup -3} caesium chloride proved to be an inexpensive and rapid method of predicting the availability of radiocaesium for absorption in the ruminant gut, giving results within 24 h. Further extractions were carried out using cellulase/pepsin simulated digestions and ovine rumen fluid. Results suggested that the availability of radiocaesium from some inorganic sources may be underestimated using such techniques. (author).

  6. Development of a laboratory method to predict rapidly the availability of radiocaesium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, D L; Livens, F R; Beresford, N A; Howard, B J; Barnett, C L; Mayes, R W; Segal, M G

    1992-03-01

    A simple extraction procedure has been developed to assess rapidly the probable extent of the transfer of radiocaesium into ruminant food products soon after a nuclear accident. The in vitro extractions were validated against true absorption measurements of different forms of radiocaesium in the sheep gut. Extractions were performed on a range of different radiocaesium sources. Some of these sources were artificial (ionic radiocaesium adsorbed onto bentonite, silica spheres and filter-papers) and others were environmentally contaminated [silt from the Ravenglass Estuary contaminated by effluent from British Nuclear Fuels Limited (BNFL) Sellafield, and upland grass and heather contaminated by Chernobyl fallout]. Laboratory experiments concentrated primarily on the use of simple inorganic extractants in competitive ion-exchange processes. Of the reagents used, 0.1 mol dm-3 stable caesium chloride solution was the most effective extractant. The proportion of radiocaesium extracted by 0.1 mol dm-3 caesium chloride correlated well with measurements of true absorption. Extracting radiocaesium using 0.1 mol dm-3 caesium chloride proved to be an inexpensive and rapid method of predicting the availability of radiocaesium for absorption in the ruminant gut, giving results within 24 h. Further extractions were carried out using cellulase/pepsin simulated digestions and ovine rumen fluid. Results suggested that the availability of radiocaesium from some inorganic sources may be underestimated using such techniques.

  7. A loop-mediated isothermal amplification method for a differential identification of Taenia tapeworms from human: application to a field survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkouawa, Agathe; Sako, Yasuhito; Li, Tiaoying; Chen, Xingwang; Nakao, Minoru; Yanagida, Tetsuya; Okamoto, Munehiro; Giraudoux, Patrick; Raoul, Francis; Nakaya, Kazuhiro; Xiao, Ning; Qiu, Jiamin; Qiu, Dongchuan; Craig, Philip S; Ito, Akira

    2012-12-01

    In this study, we applied a loop-mediated isothermal amplification method for identification of human Taenia tapeworms in Tibetan communities in Sichuan, China. Out of 51 proglottids recovered from 35 carriers, 9, 1, and 41 samples were identified as Taenia solium, Taenia asiatica and Taenia saginata, respectively. Same results were obtained afterwards in the laboratory, except one sample. These results demonstrated that the LAMP method enabled rapid identification of parasites in the field surveys, which suggested that this method would contribute to the control of Taenia infections in endemic areas.

  8. Geophysical surveys combined with laboratory soil column experiments to identify and explore risk areas for soil and water pollution in feedlots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espejo-Pérez, Antonio Jesus; Sainato, Claudia Mabel; Jairo Márquez-Molina, John; Giráldez, Juan Vicente; Vanderlinden, Karl

    2014-05-01

    Changes of land use without a correct planning may produce its deterioration with their social, economical and environmental irreversible consequences over short to medium time range. In Argentina, the expansion of soybean fields induced a reduction of the area of pastures dedicated to stockbreeding. As cattle activity is being progressively concentrated on small pens, at feedlots farms, problems of soil and water pollution, mainly by nitrate, have been detected. The characterization of the spatial and temporal variability of soil water content is very important because the mostly advective transport of solutes. To avoid intensive soil samplings, very expensive, one has to recur to geophysical exploration methods. The objective of this work was to identify risk areas within a feedlot of the NW zone of Buenos Aires Province, in Argentina through geophysical methods. The surveys were carried out with an electromagnetic induction profiler EMI-400 (GSSI) and a Time domain Reflectometry (TDR) survey of depth 0-0.10 m with soil sampling and measurement of moisture content with gravimetric method (0-1.0 m). Several trenches were dug inside the pens and also at a test site, where texture, apparent density, saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks), electrical conductivity of the saturation paste extract and organic matter content (OM) were measured. The water retention curves for these soils were also determined. At one of the pens undisturbed soil columns were extracted at 3 locations. Laboratory analysis for 0-1.0 m indicated that soil texture was classified as sandy loam, average organic matter content (OM) was greater than 2.3% with low values of apparent density in the first 10 cm. The range of spatial dependence of data suggested that the number of soil samples could be reduced. Soil apparent electrical conductivity (ECa) and soil moisture were well correlated and indicated a clear spatial pattern in the corrals. TDR performance was acceptable to identify the spatial

  9. The transient divided bar method for laboratory measurements of thermal properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bording, Thue S.; Nielsen, Søren B.; Balling, Niels

    2016-12-01

    Accurate information on thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of materials is of central importance in relation to geoscience and engineering problems involving the transfer of heat. Several methods, including the classical divided bar technique, are available for laboratory measurements of thermal conductivity, but much fewer for thermal diffusivity. We have generalized the divided bar technique to the transient case in which thermal conductivity, volumetric heat capacity and thereby also thermal diffusivity are measured simultaneously. As the density of samples is easily determined independently, specific heat capacity can also be determined. The finite element formulation provides a flexible forward solution for heat transfer across the bar, and thermal properties are estimated by inverse Monte Carlo modelling. This methodology enables a proper quantification of experimental uncertainties on measured thermal properties and information on their origin. The developed methodology was applied to various materials, including a standard ceramic material and different rock samples, and measuring results were compared with results applying traditional steady-state divided bar and an independent line-source method. All measurements show highly consistent results and with excellent reproducibility and high accuracy. For conductivity the obtained uncertainty is typically 1-3 per cent, and for diffusivity uncertainty may be reduced to about 3-5 per cent. The main uncertainty originates from the presence of thermal contact resistance associated with the internal interfaces in the bar. These are not resolved during inversion and it is imperative that they are minimized. The proposed procedure is simple and may quite easily be implemented to the many steady-state divided bar systems in operation. A thermally controlled bath, as applied here, may not be needed. Simpler systems, such as applying temperature-controlled water directly from a tap, may also be applied.

  10. Contribution of laboratory methods in diagnosing clinically suspected ocular toxoplasmosis in Brazilian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattos, Cinara C B; Meira, Cristina S; Ferreira, Ana I C; Frederico, Fábio B; Hiramoto, Roberto M; Almeida, Gildásio C; Mattos, Luiz C; Pereira-Chioccola, Vera L

    2011-07-01

    This prospective study evaluated the value of laboratorial diagnosis in ocular toxoplasmosis analyzing peripheral blood samples from a group of Brazilian patients by immunologic and molecular methods. We analyzed blood samples from 184 immunocompetent patients with ocular disorders divided into 2 groups: Group I, composed of samples from 49 patients with ocular toxoplasmosis diagnosed by clinical features; Group II, samples from 135 patients with other ocular diseases. Samples were assayed by conventional polymerase chain reaction (cnPCR), real-time PCR (qPCR) for Toxoplasma gondii, indirect immunofluorescence reaction (IF), avidity test (crude tachyzoite lysate as antigen), and excreted-secreted tachyzoite proteins as antigen (ESA-ELISA). cnPCR and qPCR profiles were concordant in all samples. Positive PCR was shown in 40.8% of group I patients. The majority of the positive blood samples (75%) were taken from patients with toxoplasmic retinochoroiditis scars, and the others (25%), from patients with retinal exudative lesions. Despite that 86 of the 135 patients from Group II had asymptomatic toxoplasmosis, all DNA blood samples had negative PCR. Concordant results were shown in the data obtained by serologic methods. Around 24% of the patients with ocular toxoplasmosis had high antibody titers determined by ESA-ELISA and IF. Anti-ESA antibodies are shown principally in patients with active infection. Collectively, these data demonstrate the presence of tachyzoites in the blood of patients with chronic infection, supporting the idea of recurrent disease. Circulating parasites in blood of immunocompetent individuals may be associated with the reactivation of the ocular disease.

  11. Laboratory Techniques in Geology: Embedding Analytical Methods into the Undergraduate Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baedke, S. J.; Johnson, E. A.; Kearns, L. E.; Mazza, S. E.; Gazel, E.

    2014-12-01

    Paid summer REU experiences successfully engage undergraduate students in research and encourage them to continue to graduate school and scientific careers. However these programs only accommodate a limited number of students due to funding constraints, faculty time commitments, and limited access to needed instrumentation. At JMU, the Department of Geology and Environmental Science has embedded undergraduate research into the curriculum. Each student fulfilling a BS in Geology or a BA in Earth Science completes 3 credits of research, including a 1-credit course on scientific communication, 2 credits of research or internship, followed by a presentation of that research. Our department has successfully acquired many analytical instruments and now has an XRD, SEM/EDS, FTIR, handheld Raman, AA, ion chromatograph, and an IRMS. To give as many students as possible an overview to the scientific uses and operation methods for these instruments, we revived a laboratory methods course that includes theory and practical use of instrumentation at JMU, plus XRF sample preparation and analysis training at Virginia Tech during a 1-day field trip. In addition to practical training, projects included analytical concepts such as evaluating analytical vs. natural uncertainty, determining error on multiple measurements, signal-to-noise ratio, and evaluating data quality. State funding through the 4-VA program helped pay for analytical supplies and support for students to complete research projects over the summer or during the next academic year using instrumentation from the course. This course exemplifies an alternative path to broadening participation in undergraduate research and creating stronger partnerships between PUI's and research universities.

  12. An UAV scheduling and planning method for post-disaster survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, G. Q.; Zhou, X. G.; Yin, J.; Xiao, Q. Y.

    2014-11-01

    Annually, the extreme climate and special geological environments lead to frequent natural disasters, e.g., earthquakes, floods, etc. The disasters often bring serious casualties and enormous economic losses. Post-disaster surveying is very important for disaster relief and assessment. As the Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) remote sensing with the advantage of high efficiency, high precision, high flexibility, and low cost, it is widely used in emergency surveying in recent years. As the UAVs used in emergency surveying cannot stop and wait for the happening of the disaster, when the disaster happens the UAVs usually are working at everywhere. In order to improve the emergency surveying efficiency, it is needed to track the UAVs and assign the emergency surveying task for each selected UAV. Therefore, a UAV tracking and scheduling method for post-disaster survey is presented in this paper. In this method, Global Positioning System (GPS), and GSM network are used to track the UAVs; an emergency tracking UAV information database is built in advance by registration, the database at least includes the following information, e.g., the ID of the UAVs, the communication number of the UAVs; when catastrophe happens, the real time location of all UAVs in the database will be gotten using emergency tracking method at first, then the traffic cost time for all UAVs to the disaster region will be calculated based on the UAVs' the real time location and the road network using the nearest services analysis algorithm; the disaster region is subdivided to several emergency surveying regions based on DEM, area, and the population distribution map; the emergency surveying regions are assigned to the appropriated UAV according to shortest cost time rule. The UAVs tracking and scheduling prototype is implemented using SQLServer2008, ArcEnginge 10.1 SDK, Visual Studio 2010 C#, Android, SMS Modem, and Google Maps API.

  13. The Jamaica asthma and allergies national prevalence survey: rationale and methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwards Nancy C

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Asthma is a significant public health problem in the Caribbean. Prevalence surveys using standardized measures of asthma provide valid prevalence estimates to facilitate regional and international comparisons and monitoring of trends. This paper describes methods used in the Jamaica Asthma and Allergies National Prevalence Survey, challenges associated with this survey and strategies used to overcome these challenges. Methods/Design An island wide, cross-sectional, community-based survey of asthma, asthma symptoms and allergies was done among adults and children using the European Community Respiratory Health Survey Questionnaire for adults and the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Children. Stratified multi-stage cluster sampling was used to select 2, 163 adults aged 18 years and older and 2, 017 children aged 2-17 years for the survey. The Kish selection table was used to select one adult and one child per household. Data analysis accounted for sampling design and prevalence estimates were weighted to produce national estimates. Discussion The Jamaica Asthma and Allergies National Prevalence Survey is the first population- based survey in the Caribbean to determine the prevalence of asthma and allergies both in adults and children using standardized methods. With response rates exceeding 80% in both groups, this approach facilitated cost-effective gathering of high quality asthma prevalence data that will facilitate international and regional comparison and monitoring of asthma prevalence trends. Another unique feature of this study was the partnership with the Ministry of Health in Jamaica, which ensured the collection of data relevant for decision-making to facilitate the uptake of research evidence. The findings of this study will provide important data on the burden of asthma and allergies in Jamaica and contribute to evidence-informed planning of comprehensive asthma management and education programs.

  14. Quality-assurance data for routine water analysis in the National Water-Quality Laboratory of the US Geological Survey for water year 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucey, K.J.

    1989-01-01

    The US Geological Survey maintains a quality assurance program based on the analysis of reference samples for its National Water Quality Laboratory located in Denver, Colorado. Reference samples containing selected inorganic, nutrient, and precipitation (low-level concentration) constituents are prepared at the Survey 's Water Quality Services Unit in Ocala, Florida, disguised as routine samples, and sent daily or weekly, as appropriate, to the laboratory through other Survey offices. The results are stored permanently in the National Water Data Storage and Retrieval System (WATSTORE), the Survey 's database for all water data. These data are analyzed statistically for precision and bias. An overall evaluation of the inorganic major ion and trace metal constituent data for water year 1988 indicated a lack of precision in the National Water Quality Laboratory for the determination of 8 out of 58 constituents: calcium (inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry), fluoride, iron (atomic absorption spectrometry), iron (total recoverable), magnesium (atomic absorption spectrometry), manganese (total recoverable), potassium, and sodium (inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry). The results for 31 constituents had positive or negative bias during water year 1988. A lack of precision was indicated in the determination of three of the six nutrient constituents: nitrate plus nitrite nitrogen as nitrogen, nitrite nitrogen as nitrogen, and orthophosphate as phosphorus. A biased condition was indicated in the determination of ammonia nitrogen as nitrogen, ammonia plus organic nitrogen as nitrogen, and nitrate plus nitrite nitrogen as nitrogen. There was acceptable precision in the determination of all 10 constituents contained in precipitation samples. Results for ammonia nitrogen as nitrogen, sodium, and fluoride indicated a biased condition. (Author 's abstract)

  15. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF GLUCOMETER AND LABORATORY GLUCOSE OXIDASE METHOD FOR THE ESTIMATION OF BLOOD GLUCOSE LEVELS IN NEONATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harish

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION : Hypoglycemia is one of the most common metabolic problems encountered in neonates. Hypoglycemia in neonates can be symptomatic and asymptomatic. Hypoglycemia is known to be associated with brain dysfunction and neuromotor developmental retardation. The gl ucose oxidase method used in the laboratory for determining the blood glucose concentration is precise and specific for glucose. As it is usually performed in the main laboratory, the results are not available quickly enough for timely appropriate manageme nt. The glucometers are often used for blood glucose estimation in NICU. Many studies have shown that their results co - relate well with the laboratory measured glucose levels in the normoglycemic and hyperglycemic range but are not satisfactory in the lowe r range. OBJECTIVES: This is a prospective study done to determine the efficacy of glucometer in estimation of blood glucose levels in neonates in comparison with the laboratory values. METHOD S : 250 neonates admitted in NICU, KIMS hospital, Bangalore with varied symptomatology were enrolled in this study. Blood glucose estimation was done by glucometer and laboratory method using the same venous sample at the time of admission. For the last 50 cases glucometer estimation of capillary blood was also done. St atistical analysis was done by using Pearson correlation. Hypoglycemia was defined as blood glucose level 45mg%[0.756] and when the value is <45mg%, there is just a moderate correlation[0.417] . Though the pick - up rate of hypoglycemia by venous blood glucometer [28%] was slightly better compared to the capillary blood glucometer value [22%] , the overa ll pick - up rate of hypoglycemia by glucometer is very low compared to the laboratory method [56%]. CONCLUSION : The glucometer as a sole measuring device to screen neonatal hypoglycemia is not satisfactory and confirmation with the laboratory measurements o f plasma glucose is still of up most importance.

  16. Screening biological methods for laboratory scale stabilization of fine fraction from landfill mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mönkäre, Tiina J; Palmroth, Marja R T; Rintala, Jukka A

    2017-02-01

    Increasing interest for the landfill mining and the amount of fine fraction (FF) in landfills (40-70% (w/w) of landfill content) mean that sustainable treatment and utilization methods for FF are needed. For this study FF (mined from a municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill operated from 1967 to 1989. FF, which resembles soil, was stabilized in laboratory scale reactors in two phases: first, anaerobically for 101days and second, for 72days using four different methods: anaerobic with the addition of moisture (water) or inoculum (sewage sludge) and aerobic with continuous water washing, with, or without, bulking material. The aim was to evaluate the effect on the stability of mined FF, which has been rarely reported, and to study the quality and quantity of gas and leachate produced during the stabilization experiment. The study showed that aerobic treatment reduced respiration activity (final values 0.9-1.1mgO2/gTS) and residual methane potential (1.1LCH4/kgTS) better than anaerobic methods (1.8-2.3mg O2/g TS and 1.3-2.4L CH4/kg TS, respectively). Bulking material mixed in FF in one aerobic reactor had no effect on the stability of FF. The benefit of anaerobic treatment was the production of methane, which could be utilized as energy. Even though the inoculum addition increased methane production from FF about 30%, but the methane production was still relatively low (in total 1.5-1.7L CH4/kg TS). Continuous water washing was essential to remove leachable organic matter and soluble nutrients from FF, while increasing the volume of leachate collected. In the aerobic treatment, nitrogen was oxidized into nitrite and nitrate and then washed out in the leachate. Both anaerobic and aerobic methods could be used for FF stabilization. The use of FF, in landscaping for example, is possible because its nutrient content (4gN/kg TS and 1g P/kg TS) can increase the nutrient content of soil, but this may have limitations due to the possible presence of heavy metal and other

  17. Identifying reasons for delays in acute hospitals using the Day-of-Care Survey method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Erica; King, Andrew; Mathieson, Alex; Woodcock, Thomas; Watkin, Simon W

    2015-04-01

    This paper describes a new tool called 'Day-of-Care Survey', developed to assess inpatient delays in acute hospitals. Using literature review, iterative testing and feedback from professional groups, a national multidisciplinary team developed the survey criteria and methodology. Review teams working in pairs visited wards and used case records and bedside charts to assess the patient's status against severity of illness and service intensity criteria. Patients who did not meet the survey criteria for acute care were identified and delays were categorised. From March 2012 to December 2013, nine acute hospitals across Scotland, Australia and England were surveyed. A total of 3,846 adult general inpatient beds (excluding intensive care and maternity) were reviewed. There were 145 empty beds at the time of surveys across the nine sites, with 270 definite discharges planned on the day of the survey. The total number of patients not meeting criteria for acute care was 798/3,431 (23%, range 18-28%). Six factors accounted for 61% (490/798) of the reasons why patients not meeting acute care criteria remained in hospital. This survey gives important insights into the challenges of managing inpatient flow using system level information as a method to target interventions designed to address delay.

  18. Application effectiveness of the microtremor survey method in the exploration of geothermal resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Baoqing; Xu, Peifen; Ling, Suqun; Du, Jianguo; Xu, Xueqiu; Pang, Zhonghe

    2017-10-01

    Geophysical techniques are critical tools of geothermal resource surveys. In recent years, the microtremor survey method, which has two branch techniques (the microtremor sounding technique and the two-dimensional (2D) microtremor profiling technique), has become a common method for geothermal resource exploration. The results of microtremor surveys provide important deep information for probing structures of geothermal storing basins and researching the heat-controlling structures, as well as providing the basis for drilling positions of geothermal wells. In this paper, the southern Jiangsu geothermal resources area is taken as a study example. By comparing the results of microtremor surveys and drilling conclusions, and analyzing microtremor survey effectiveness, and geological and technical factors such as observation radius and sampling frequency, we study the applicability of the microtremor survey method and the optimal way of working with this method to achieve better detection results. A comparative study of survey results and geothermal drilling results shows that the microtremor sounding technique effectively distinguishes sub-layers and determines the depth of geothermal reservoirs in the area with excellent layer conditions. The error of depth is generally no more than 8% compared with the results of drilling. It detects deeper by adjusting the size of the probing radius. The 2D microtremor profiling technique probes exactly the buried structures which display as low velocity anomalies in the apparent velocity profile of the S-wave. The anomaly is the critical symbol of the 2D microtremor profiling technique to distinguish and explain the buried geothermal structures. 2D microtremor profiling results provide an important basis for locating exactly the geothermal well and reducing the risk of drilling dry wells.

  19. New land-based method for surveying sandy shores and extracting DEMs: the INSHORE system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, Paulo; Cunha, Telmo R; Matias, Ana; Gama, Cristina; Bernardes, Cristina; Ferreira, Oscar

    2011-11-01

    The INSHORE system (INtegrated System for High Operational REsolution in shore monitoring) is a land-base survey system designed and developed for the specific task of monitoring the evolution in time of sandy shores. This system was developed with two main objectives: (1) to produce highly accurate 3D coordinates of surface points (in the order of 0.02 to 0.03 m); and (2) to be extremely efficient in surveying a beach stretch of several kilometres. Previous tests have demonstrated that INSHORE systems fulfil such objectives. Now, the usefulness of the INSHORE system as a survey tool for the production of Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) of sandy shores is demonstrated. For this purpose, the comparison of DEMs obtained with the INSHORE system and with other relevant survey techniques is presented. This comparison focuses on the final DEM accuracy and also on the survey efficiency and its impact on the costs associated with regular monitoring programmes. The field survey method of the INSHORE system, based on profile networks, has a productivity of about 30 to 40 ha/h, depending on the beach surface characteristics. The final DEM precision, after interpolation of the global positioning system profile network, is approximately 0.08 to 0.12 m (RMS), depending on the profile network's density. Thus, this is a useful method for 3D representation of sandy shore surfaces and can permit, after interpolation, reliable calculations of volume and other physical parameters.

  20. [Data validation methods and discussion on Chinese materia medica resource survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue; Ma, Wei-Feng; Zhang, Xiao-Bo; Zhu, Shou-Dong; Guo, Lan-Ping; Wang, Xing-Xing

    2013-07-01

    From the beginning of the fourth national survey of the Chinese materia medica resources, there were 22 provinces have conducted pilots. The survey teams have reported immense data, it put forward the very high request to the database system construction. In order to ensure the quality, it is necessary to check and validate the data in database system. Data validation is important methods to ensure the validity, integrity and accuracy of census data. This paper comprehensively introduce the data validation system of the fourth national survey of the Chinese materia medica resources database system, and further improve the design idea and programs of data validation. The purpose of this study is to promote the survey work smoothly.

  1. Assessment of laboratory methods used in the diagnosis of congenital toxoplasmosis after maternal treatment with spiramycin in pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background The different laboratory methods used in the diagnosis of congenital toxoplasmosis have variable sensitivity and specificity. There is no evidence to prove that maternal treatment reduces the risk of fetal infection. The purpose of this study was to assess methods for the confirmation of congenital toxoplasmosis after maternal treatment with spiramycin during pregnancy, and to evaluate the effect of this treatment on clinical manifestations of the disease in newborns (NB). Methods ...

  2. A Penny for Your Thoughts: A Survey of Methods for Eliciting Beliefs

    OpenAIRE

    K. Schlag; Tremewan, J.; van der Weele, J.

    2013-01-01

    Incentivized methods for eliciting subjective probabilities in economic experiments present the subject with risky choices or bets that encourage truthful reporting. We discuss the most prominent elicitation methods and their underlying assumptions, provide theoretical comparisons, and propose some extensions to the standard framework. In addition, we survey the empirical literature on the performance of these elicitation methods in actual experiments, considering also practical issues of imp...

  3. A survey of sequential Monte Carlo methods for economics and finance

    OpenAIRE

    Creal, D.D.

    2009-01-01

    This paper serves as an introduction and survey for economists to the field of sequential Monte Carlo methods which are also known as particle filters. Sequential Monte Carlo methods are simulation based algorithms used to compute the high-dimensional and/or complex integrals that arise regularly in applied work. These methods are becoming increasingly popular in economics and finance; from dynamic stochastic general equilibrium models in macro-economics to option pricing. The objective of th...

  4. EPA Region 6 Laboratory Method Specific Analytical Capabilities with Sample Concentration Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA Region 6 Environmental Services Branch (ESB) Laboratory is capable of analyzing a wide range of samples with concentrations ranging for low part-per trillion (ppt) to low percent () levels, depending on the sample matrix.

  5. Do targeted written comments and the rubric method of delivery affect performance on future human physiology laboratory reports?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Zachary S; Wilds, Gabriel P; Mangum, Joshua E; Hocker, Austin D; Dawson, Sierra M

    2016-09-01

    We investigated how students performed on weekly two-page laboratory reports based on whether the grading rubric was provided to the student electronically or in paper form and the inclusion of one- to two-sentence targeted comments. Subjects were registered for a 289-student, third-year human physiology class with laboratory and were randomized into four groups related to rubric delivery and targeted comments. All students received feedback via the same detailed grading rubric. At the end of the term, subjects provided consent and a self-assessment of their rubric viewing rate and preferences. There were no differences in laboratory report scores between groups (P = 0.86), although scores did improve over time (P < 0.01). Students receiving targeted comments self-reported viewing their rubric more often than students that received no comments (P = 0.02), but the viewing rate was independent of the rubric delivery method (P = 0.15). Subjects with high rubric viewing rates did not have higher laboratory report grades than subjects with low viewing rates (P = 0.64). When asked about their preference for the future, 43% of respondents preferred the same method again (electronic or paper rubric) and 25% had no preference. We conclude that although student laboratory report grades improved over time, the rate and degree of improvement were not related to rubric delivery method or to the inclusion of targeted comments.

  6. Estimation of reactive surface area using a combined method of laboratory analyses and digital image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jin; Kong, Xiang-Zhao; Saar, Martin O.

    2017-04-01

    Fluid-rock interactions play an important role in the engineering processes such as chemical stimulation of enhanced geothermal systems and carbon capture, utilization, and storage. However, these interactions highly depend on the accessible reactive surface area of the minerals that are generally poorly constrained for natural geologic samples. In particular, quantifying surface area of each reacting mineral within whole rock samples is challenging due to the heterogeneous distribution of minerals and pore space. In this study, detailed laboratory analyses were performed on sandstone samples from deep geothermal sites in Lithuania. We measure specific surface area of whole rock samples using a gas adsorption method (so-called B.E.T.) with N2 at a temperature of 77.3K. We also quantify their porosity and pore size distribution by a Helium gas pycnometer and a Hg porosimetry, respectively. Rock compositions are determined by a combination of X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and quantitative scanning electron microscopy (SEM) - Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), which are later geometrically mapped on images of two-dimensional SEM- Backscattered electrons (BSE) with a resolution of 1.2 μm and three-dimensional micro-CT with a resolution of 10.3 μm to produce a digital mineral map for further constraining the accessibility of reactive minerals. Moreover, we attempt to link the whole rock porosity, pore size distribution, and B.E.T. specific surface area with the digital mineral maps. We anticipate these necessary analyses to provide in-depth understanding of fluid sample chemistry from later hydrothermal reactive flow-through experiments on whole rock samples at elevated pressure and temperature.

  7. Improving survey methods in sero-epidemiological studies of injecting drug users: a case example of two cross sectional surveys in Serbia and Montenegro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simić Milena

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the prevalence of HIV or HCV in injecting drug users (IDUs in Serbia and Montenegro. We measured prevalence of antibodies to HIV (anti-HIV and hepatitis C virus (anti-HCV, and risk factors for anti-HCV, in community-recruited IDUs in Belgrade and Podgorica, and determined the performance of a parallel rapid HIV testing algorithm. Methods Respondent driven sampling and audio-computer assisted survey interviewing (ACASI methods were employed. Dried blood spots were collected for unlinked anonymous antibody testing. Belgrade IDUs were offered voluntary confidential rapid HIV testing using a parallel testing algorithm, the performance of which was compared with standard laboratory tests. Predictors of anti-HCV positivity and the diagnostic accuracy of the rapid HIV test algorithm were calculated. Results Overall population prevalence of anti-HIV and anti-HCV in IDUs were 3% and 63% respectively in Belgrade (n = 433 and 0% and 22% in Podgorica (n = 328. Around a quarter of IDUs in each city had injected with used needles and syringes in the last four weeks. In both cities anti-HCV positivity was associated with increasing number of years injecting (eg Belgrade adjusted odds ratio (AOR 5.6 (95% CI 3.2–9.7 and Podgorica AOR 2.5 (1.3–5.1 for ≥ 10 years v 0–4 years, daily injecting (Belgrade AOR 1.6 (1.0–2.7, Podgorica AOR 2.1 (1.3–5.1, and having ever shared used needles/syringes (Belgrade AOR 2.3 (1.0–5.4, Podgorica AOR 1.9 (1.4–2.6. Half (47% of Belgrade participants accepted rapid HIV testing, and there was complete concordance between rapid test results and subsequent confirmatory laboratory tests (sensitivity 100% (95%CI 59%–100%, specificity 100% (95%CI 98%–100%. Conclusion The combination of community recruitment, ACASI, rapid testing and a linked diagnostic accuracy study provide enhanced methods for conducting blood borne virus sero-prevalence studies in IDUs. The relatively high

  8. Experimental Methods to Evaluate Science Utility Relative to the Decadal Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widergren, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    The driving factor for competed missions is the science that it plans on performing once it has reached its target body. These science goals are derived from the science recommended by the most current Decadal Survey. This work focuses on science goals in previous Venus mission proposals with respect to the 2013 Decadal Survey. By looking at how the goals compare to the survey and how much confidence NASA has in the mission's ability to accomplish these goals, a method was created to assess the science return utility of each mission. This method can be used as a tool for future Venus mission formulation and serves as a starting point for future development of create science utility assessment tools.

  9. Establishing survey validity and reliability for American Indians through "think aloud" and test-retest methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauge, Cindy Horst; Jacobs-Knight, Jacque; Jensen, Jamie L; Burgess, Katherine M; Puumala, Susan E; Wilton, Georgiana; Hanson, Jessica D

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to use a mixed-methods approach to determine the validity and reliability of measurements used within an alcohol-exposed pregnancy prevention program for American Indian women. To develop validity, content experts provided input into the survey measures, and a "think aloud" methodology was conducted with 23 American Indian women. After revising the measurements based on this input, a test-retest was conducted with 79 American Indian women who were randomized to complete either the original measurements or the new, modified measurements. The test-retest revealed that some of the questions performed better for the modified version, whereas others appeared to be more reliable for the original version. The mixed-methods approach was a useful methodology for gathering feedback on survey measurements from American Indian participants and in indicating specific survey questions that needed to be modified for this population.

  10. Gene doctoring: a method for recombineering in laboratory and pathogenic Escherichia coli strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penn Charles W

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Homologous recombination mediated by the λ-Red genes is a common method for making chromosomal modifications in Escherichia coli. Several protocols have been developed that differ in the mechanisms by which DNA, carrying regions homologous to the chromosome, are delivered into the cell. A common technique is to electroporate linear DNA fragments into cells. Alternatively, DNA fragments are generated in vivo by digestion of a donor plasmid with a nuclease that does not cleave the host genome. In both cases the λ-Red gene products recombine homologous regions carried on the linear DNA fragments with the chromosome. We have successfully used both techniques to generate chromosomal mutations in E. coli K-12 strains. However, we have had limited success with these λ-Red based recombination techniques in pathogenic E. coli strains, which has led us to develop an enhanced protocol for recombineering in such strains. Results Our goal was to develop a high-throughput recombineering system, primarily for the coupling of genes to epitope tags, which could also be used for deletion of genes in both pathogenic and K-12 E. coli strains. To that end we have designed a series of donor plasmids for use with the λ-Red recombination system, which when cleaved in vivo by the I-SceI meganuclease generate a discrete linear DNA fragment, allowing for C-terminal tagging of chromosomal genes with a 6 × His, 3 × FLAG, 4 × ProteinA or GFP tag or for the deletion of chromosomal regions. We have enhanced existing protocols and technologies by inclusion of a cassette conferring kanamycin resistance and, crucially, by including the sacB gene on the donor plasmid, so that all but true recombinants are counter-selected on kanamycin and sucrose containing media, thus eliminating the need for extensive screening. This method has the added advantage of limiting the exposure of cells to the potential damaging effects of the λ-Red system, which can lead

  11. Methods of Gas Phase Capture of Iodine from Fuel Reprocessing Off-Gas: A Literature Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daryl Haefner

    2007-02-01

    A literature survey was conducted to collect information and summarize the methods available to capture iodine from fuel reprocessing off-gases. Techniques were categorized as either wet scrubbing or solid adsorbent methods, and each method was generally described as it might be used under reprocessing conditions. Decontamination factors are quoted only to give a rough indication of the effectiveness of the method. No attempt is made to identify a preferred capture method at this time, although activities are proposed that would provide a consistent baseline that would aid in evaluating technologies.

  12. 2002-2003 Wet Season Branchiopod Survey Report, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Site 300, Alameda and San Joaquin Counties, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, W; Woollett, J

    2004-11-16

    Condor Country Consulting conducted surveys for listed branchiopods in the 2002-2003 wet season to complete requirements of the Guidelines (USFWS 1996) used to determine the distribution of federally-listed branchiopods within the study area. The first survey was performed during the previous wet season (2001-2002). The 2002-2003 wet season survey, combined with the previous season's survey, is intended to provide LLNL with information that will assist them in determining the effects of the proposed action on federally listed branchiopods and provide information useful in the preparation of the associated environmental documentation. It is also expected to satisfy the survey requirements of the USFWS. For the purpose of this report, the term branchiopod refers specifically to phyllopodous branchiopods and not cladocerans. Fairy shrimp, tadpole shrimp, and clam shrimp are all categorized as phyllopodous branchiopods and are currently the only members of the Class Branchiopoda that contain species that are listed under the federal Endangered Species Act. Although cladocerans are branchiopods and were found on the site, they are only referred to by the Order in this report because they are not the target species of this study.

  13. Visual surveys of cetaceans conducted in the Bering, Chukchi, and Beaufort Seas by Alaska Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Mammal Laboratory from 2010-08-25 to 2015-09-28 (NCEI Accession 0137906)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — As part of several inter-agency agreements between the National Marine Mammal Laboratory (NMML) and the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), visual surveys of...

  14. North Pacific right whale aerial surveys conducted in the southeastern Bering Sea by the Alaska Fisheries Scientific Center, National Marine Mammal Laboratory from 2008-07-24 to 2009-08-25 (NCEI Accession 0135767)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — As part of an inter-agency agreement between the National Marine Mammal Laboratory and the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, aerial surveys of the North Aleutian...

  15. AFSC/NMML/CCEP: Gray whale survey and sightings ranging from California to Kodiak Island, Alaska conducted by the Marine Mammal Laboratory from 1993-07-05 to 2014-10-24

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gray whale (Eschrichtius robustus) survey and sightings data from 1993 - 2014 collected by the Marine Mammal Laboratories' California Current Ecosystem Program...

  16. Gray whale survey and sightings ranging from California to Kodiak Island, Alaska conducted by the National Marine Mammal Laboratory from 1993-07-05 to 2014-10-24 (NCEI Accession 0145636)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gray whale (Eschrichtius robustus) survey and sightings data from 1993 - 2014 collected by the National Marine Mammal Laboratories' California Current Ecosystem...

  17. GLYCOHEMOGLOBIN - COMPARISON OF 12 ANALYTICAL METHODS, APPLIED TO LYOPHILIZED HEMOLYSATES BY 101 LABORATORIES IN AN EXTERNAL QUALITY ASSURANCE PROGRAM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WEYKAMP, CW; PENDERS, TJ; MUSKIET, FAJ; VANDERSLIK, W

    1993-01-01

    Stable lyophilized ethylenediaminetetra-acetic acid (EDTA)-blood haemolysates were applied in an external quality assurance programme (SKZL, The Netherlands) for glycohaemoglobin assays in 101 laboratories using 12 methods. The mean intralaboratory day-to-day coefficient of variation (CV), calculate

  18. Survey of laboratory findings in suspected cases of bovine spongiform encephalopathy in Denmark from 1990 to 2000

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerholm, J.S.; Tegtmeier, C.L.; Nielsen, T.K.

    2002-01-01

    . A total of 176 submissions were made, mostly from bovines with neurological disorders and mainly during the last 3 years of this period. Lesions or other laboratory findings consistent with severe neurological disorders were found in 115 cases. The most frequent diagnosis was encephalic 41 p listeriosis...

  19. Scientific publications in laboratory medicine from mainland China, Hong Kong and Taiwan: A ten-year survey of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ding-Hua; Cui, Wei; Yao, Yun-Tai; Jiang, Qi-Qi

    2010-10-09

    We investigated scientific publications in laboratory medicine originating from mainland China, Hong Kong and Taiwan over the past 10 years. The information about articles published in the included journals were determined by computer-searching on PubMed and data were extracted independently and analyzed in relation to the number of articles. From 2000 to 2009 there were 1166 articles published in laboratory medicine journals from the major Chinese regions (mainland China, Hong Kong and Taiwan). This exceeded Japan, Germany, the United Kingdom and France from 2005 onwards. Also, the number of articles from mainland China exceeded those from Hong Kong and Taiwan from 2004 onwards. The average impact factor (IF) from Hong Kong ranked the first, followed by mainland China, and then Taiwan. Clinica Chimica Acta seems to be the most popular laboratory medicine journal among Chinese authors. Over the past 10 years, Chinese authors have been more and more active in the field of laboratory medicine. Mainland China seems to have caught up to Hong Kong and Taiwan regarding publication of papers in this field. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Examining Stress in Graduate Assistants: Combining Qualitative and Quantitative Survey Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzola, Joseph J.; Walker, Erin J.; Shockley, Kristen M.; Spector, Paul E.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to employ qualitative and quantitative survey methods in a concurrent mixed model design to assess stressors and strains in graduate assistants. The stressors most frequently reported qualitatively were work overload, interpersonal conflict, and organizational constraints; the most frequently reported psychological…

  1. Random Qualitative Validation: A Mixed-Methods Approach to Survey Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Duzer, Eric

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce the process and value of Random Qualitative Validation (RQV) in the development and interpretation of survey data. RQV is a method of gathering clarifying qualitative data that improves the validity of the quantitative analysis. This paper is concerned with validity in relation to the participants'…

  2. Analysis of method of polarization surveying of water surface oil pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukov, B. S.

    1979-01-01

    A method of polarization surveying of oil films on the water surface is analyzed. Model calculations of contrasted oil and water obtained with different orientations of the analyzer are discussed. The model depends on the spectral range, water transparency and oil film, and the selection of observational direction.

  3. Examining Stress in Graduate Assistants: Combining Qualitative and Quantitative Survey Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzola, Joseph J.; Walker, Erin J.; Shockley, Kristen M.; Spector, Paul E.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to employ qualitative and quantitative survey methods in a concurrent mixed model design to assess stressors and strains in graduate assistants. The stressors most frequently reported qualitatively were work overload, interpersonal conflict, and organizational constraints; the most frequently reported psychological…

  4. Evaluation of the Total Design Method in a survey of Japanese dentists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishihara Chikako

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study assessed the application of the Total Design Method (TDM in a mail survey of Japanese dentists. The TDM was chosen because survey response rates in Japan are unacceptably low and the TDM had previously been used in a general population survey. Methods Four hundred and seventy eight dentist members of the Okayama Medical and Dental Practitioner's Association were surveyed. The nine-page, 27-item questionnaire covered dentist job satisfaction, physical practice, and dentist and patient characteristics. Respondents to the first mailing or the one-week follow-up postcard were defined as early responders; others who responded were late responders. Responder bias was assessed by examining age, gender and training. Results The overall response rate was 46.7% (223/478. The response rates by follow-up mailing were, 18% after the first mailing, 35.4% after the follow-up postcard, 42.3% after the second mailing, and 46.7% after the third mailing. Respondents did not differ from non-respondents in age or gender, nor were there differences between early and late responders. Conclusion The application of TDM in this survey of Japanese dentists produced lower rates of response than expected from previous Japanese and US studies.

  5. Software engineering methods and standards used int he sloan digital sky survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petravick, D.; Berman, E.; Gurbani, V.; Nicinski, T.; Pordes, R.; Rechenmacher, R.; Sergey, G. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States); Lupton, R.H. [Princeton Univ., Observatory, Princeton, New Jersey (United States). Dept. of Astrophysics

    1995-04-01

    We present an integrated science software development environment, code maintenance and support system for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) now being actively used throughout the collaboration. The SDSS is a collaboration between the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, the Institute for Advanced Study, The Japan Promotion Group, Johns Hopkins University, Princeton University, The United States Naval Observatory, the University of Chicago, and the University of Washington. The SDSS will produce a five-color imaging survey of 1/4 of the sky about the north galactic cap and image 10{sup 8} Stars, 10{sup 8} galaxies, and 10{sup 5} Quasars. Spectra will be obtained for 10{sup 6} galaxies and 10{sup 5} Quasars as well. The survey will utilize a dedicated 2.5 meter telescope at the Apache Point Observatory in New Mexico. Its imaging camera will hold 54 Charge-Coupled Devices (CADS). The SDSS will take five years to complete, acquiring well over 12 TB of data.

  6. Survey of systems safety analysis methods and their application to nuclear waste management systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelto, P.J.; Winegardner, W.K.; Gallucci, R.H.V.

    1981-11-01

    This report reviews system safety analysis methods and examines their application to nuclear waste management systems. The safety analysis methods examined include expert opinion, maximum credible accident approach, design basis accidents approach, hazard indices, preliminary hazards analysis, failure modes and effects analysis, fault trees, event trees, cause-consequence diagrams, G0 methodology, Markov modeling, and a general category of consequence analysis models. Previous and ongoing studies on the safety of waste management systems are discussed along with their limitations and potential improvements. The major safety methods and waste management safety related studies are surveyed. This survey provides information on what safety methods are available, what waste management safety areas have been analyzed, and what are potential areas for future study.

  7. Identification of atypical Aeromonas salmonicida : Inter-laboratory evaluation and harmonization of methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Inger; Gudmundsdottir, B.K.; Helgason, S.;

    1998-01-01

    The atypical isolates of Aeromonas salmonicida are becoming increasingly important as the frequency of isolation of bacteria belonging to this group continues to rise. The primary object of this study was to compare and evaluate the results obtained in various laboratories concerning the biochemi......The atypical isolates of Aeromonas salmonicida are becoming increasingly important as the frequency of isolation of bacteria belonging to this group continues to rise. The primary object of this study was to compare and evaluate the results obtained in various laboratories concerning...

  8. Applications of numerical optimization methods to helicopter design problems - A survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, H.

    1985-01-01

    A survey of applications of mathematical programming methods is used to improve the design of helicopters and their components. Applications of multivariable search techniques in the finite dimensional space are considered. Five categories of helicopter design problems are considered: (1) conceptual and preliminary design, (2) rotor-system design, (3) airframe structures design, (4) control system design, and (5) flight trajectory planning. Key technical progress in numerical optimization methods relevant to rotorcraft applications are summarized.

  9. Applications of numerical optimization methods to helicopter design problems: A survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, H.

    1984-01-01

    A survey of applications of mathematical programming methods is used to improve the design of helicopters and their components. Applications of multivariable search techniques in the finite dimensional space are considered. Five categories of helicopter design problems are considered: (1) conceptual and preliminary design, (2) rotor-system design, (3) airframe structures design, (4) control system design, and (5) flight trajectory planning. Key technical progress in numerical optimization methods relevant to rotorcraft applications are summarized.

  10. A survey on Fourier analysis methods for solving the compressible Navier-Stokes equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DANCHIN; Raphaёl

    2012-01-01

    Fourier analysis methods and in particular techniques based on Littlewood-Paley decomposition and paraproduct have known a growing interest recently for the study of nonlinear evolutionary equations.In this survey paper,we explain how these methods may be implemented so as to study the compresible Navier-Stokes equations in the whole space.We shall investigate both the initial value problem in critical Besov spaces and the low Mach number asymptotics.

  11. Procedure for Surveying a Station in the U.S. Army Research Laboratory Transonic Experimental Facility Spark Shadowgraph Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    shadowgraph, survey, spark range, theodolite , fiducial system 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT UU 18. NUMBER OF PAGES...6 Figure 6. Theodolite mounted on tripod...7 Figure 7. Theodolite optical plummet lined up with benchmark center marks. ..............................8 Figure 8. Micrometer adjustable plates

  12. Evaluation of a wide-sky survey method for EAS experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Taoli; Liu, Maoyuan; Cui, Shuwang; Hou, Zhengtao

    2012-12-01

    Several ground-based extensive air shower (EAS) experiments such as As γ and Milagro have observed that CRs show large scale anisotropy in the TeV energy region with an amplitude of about 0.1%. The amplitude of anisotropy is so weak that we have to deal carefully with potential errors introduced by analysis methods. In this paper, we discuss a method based on χ2-iteration algorithm for wide sky survey analysis in the use of equi-zenith angle method with large sample data. The results show that χ2-iteration method leads to accurate and reasonable results in the case of large scale anisotropy in data samples.

  13. A Laboratory Exercise to Determine Human ABO Blood Type by Noninvasive Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Michael P.; Detzel, Stephen M.

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphisms and their association with diseases and nondisease phenotypes is of growing importance in human biology studies. In this laboratory exercise, students determine the genetic basis for their ABO blood type; however, no blood is drawn. Students isolate genomic DNA from buccal mucosa cells that are present…

  14. An Improved Method of Presenting Laboratory Demonstrations in Physiology and Pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Michael H.; Oliver, Jack W.

    1979-01-01

    The use of a laboratory demonstration and discussion period in physiology and pharmacology instruction at the Univeristy of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine is described. The advantages for instruction include lower costs, fewer personnel and animals required, less time required in the curriculum, and increased student attention in class.…

  15. A Framework for Laboratory Pre-Work Based on the Concepts, Tools and Techniques Questioning Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntula, J.; Sharma, M. D.; Johnston, I.; Chitaree, R.

    2011-01-01

    Learning in the laboratory is different from learning in other contexts because students have to engage with various aspects of the practice of science. They have to use many skills and knowledge in parallel--not only to understand the concepts of physics but also to use the tools and analyse the data. The question arises, how to best guide…

  16. A Laboratory Exercise to Determine Human ABO Blood Type by Noninvasive Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Michael P.; Detzel, Stephen M.

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphisms and their association with diseases and nondisease phenotypes is of growing importance in human biology studies. In this laboratory exercise, students determine the genetic basis for their ABO blood type; however, no blood is drawn. Students isolate genomic DNA from buccal mucosa cells that are present…

  17. Standard methods for maintaining adult Apis mellifera in cages under in vitro laboratory conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Williams, G.R.; Alaux, C.; Costa, C.; Csaki, C.; Steen, van der J.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Adult honey bees are maintained in vitro in laboratory cages for a variety of purposes. For example, researchers may wish to perform experiments on honey bees caged individually or in groups to study aspects of parasitology, toxicology, or physiology under highly controlled conditions, or they may c

  18. Advanced methods for teaching electronic-nose technologies to diagnosticians and clinical laboratory technicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alphus D. Wilson

    2012-01-01

    Electronic-detection technologies and instruments increasingly are being utilized in the biomedical field to perform a wide variety of clinical operations and laboratory analyses to facilitate the delivery of health care to patients. The introduction of improved electronic instruments for diagnosing diseases and for administering treatments has required new training of...

  19. Quantification of Soil Physical Properties by Using X-Ray Computerized Tomography (CT) and Standard Laboratory (STD) Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maria Ambert Sanchez

    2003-12-12

    The implementation of x-ray computerized tomography (CT) on agricultural soils has been used in this research to quantify soil physical properties to be compared with standard laboratory (STD) methods. The overall research objective was to more accurately quantify soil physical properties for long-term management systems. Two field studies were conducted at Iowa State University's Northeast Research and Demonstration Farm near Nashua, IA using two different soil management strategies. The first field study was conducted in 1999 using continuous corn crop rotation for soil under chisel plow with no-till treatments. The second study was conducted in 2001 and on soybean crop rotation for the same soil but under chisel plow and no-till practices with wheel track and no-wheel track compaction treatments induced by a tractor-manure wagon. In addition, saturated hydraulic (K{sub s}) conductivity and the convection-dispersion (CDE) model were also applied using long-term soil management systems only during 2001. The results obtained for the 1999 field study revealed no significant differences between treatments and laboratory methods, but significant differences were found at deeper depths of the soil column for tillage treatments. The results for standard laboratory procedure versus CT method showed significant differences at deeper depths for the chisel plow treatment and at the second lower depth for no-till treatment for both laboratory methods. The macroporosity distribution experiment showed significant differences at the two lower depths between tillage practices. Bulk density and percent porosity had significant differences at the two lower depths of the soil column. The results obtained for the 2001 field study showed no significant differences between tillage practices and compaction practices for both laboratory methods, but significant differences between tillage practices with wheel track and no-wheel compaction treatments were found along the soil

  20. Percent body fat estimations in college women using field and laboratory methods: a three-compartment model approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalbo Vincent J

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methods used to estimate percent body fat can be classified as a laboratory or field technique. However, the validity of these methods compared to multiple-compartment models has not been fully established. This investigation sought to determine the validity of field and laboratory methods for estimating percent fat (%fat in healthy college-age women compared to the Siri three-compartment model (3C. Methods Thirty Caucasian women (21.1 ± 1.5 yrs; 164.8 ± 4.7 cm; 61.2 ± 6.8 kg had their %fat estimated by BIA using the BodyGram™ computer program (BIA-AK and population-specific equation (BIA-Lohman, NIR (Futrex® 6100/XL, a quadratic (SF3JPW and linear (SF3WB skinfold equation, air-displacement plethysmography (BP, and hydrostatic weighing (HW. Results All methods produced acceptable total error (TE values compared to the 3C model. Both laboratory methods produced similar TE values (HW, TE = 2.4%fat; BP, TE = 2.3%fat when compared to the 3C model, though a significant constant error (CE was detected for HW (1.5%fat, p ≤ 0.006. The field methods produced acceptable TE values ranging from 1.8 – 3.8 %fat. BIA-AK (TE = 1.8%fat yielded the lowest TE among the field methods, while BIA-Lohman (TE = 2.1%fat and NIR (TE = 2.7%fat produced lower TE values than both skinfold equations (TE > 2.7%fat compared to the 3C model. Additionally, the SF3JPW %fat estimation equation resulted in a significant CE (2.6%fat, p ≤ 0.007. Conclusion Data suggest that the BP and HW are valid laboratory methods when compared to the 3C model to estimate %fat in college-age Caucasian women. When the use of a laboratory method is not feasible, NIR, BIA-AK, BIA-Lohman, SF3JPW, and SF3WB are acceptable field methods to estimate %fat in this population.

  1. Web-based Survey Data Collection With Peer Support and Advocacy Organizations: Implications of Participatory Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrow, Laysha; Penney, Darby; Stuart, Elizabeth; Leaf, Phillip J

    2017-01-01

    The 2012 National Survey of Peer-Run Organizations is one of the first to survey a nationally representative sample of mental health peer-run organizations, nonprofit venues for support and advocacy which are defined by people with psychiatric histories being in positions of authority and control. This paper describes data collection methods and demonstrates how participatory strategies to involve people with psychiatric histories intersected with Internet research to achieve study aims. People with psychiatric histories were involved in designing and implementing a web-based survey to collect data on peer-run organizations' operations and views on national policy. Participatory approaches were used throughout design, data collection analysis, and dissemination. The extensive involvement of people with psychiatric histories in project design and implementation were important strategies that contributed to this study's success.

  2. Evaluation of a bioluminescence method, contact angle measurements and topography for testing the cleanability of plastic surfaces under laboratory conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redsven, I.; Kymäläinen, H.-R.; Pesonen-Leinonen, E.; Kuisma, R.; Ojala-Paloposki, T.; Hautala, M.; Sjöberg, A.-M.

    2007-04-01

    Detection of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) by bioluminescence is used, for instance, in the food industry and in hospitals to assess the hygiene status of surfaces. The aim of this laboratory study was to investigate the feasibility of the ATP method for estimating the cleanability of resilient floor coverings from biological soil. The surfaces were worn using a Soiling and Wearing Drum Tester, and soiled and cleaned with an Erichsen Washability and Scrubbing Resistance Tester. In the laboratory test carried out with the bioluminescence method, most of the new and worn floor coverings that were biologically soiled were cleaned efficiently. According to this study, the semiquantitative ATP screening method can be used for hygiene monitoring of flooring materials. No correlation was found between cleanability and contact angles or surface topography measured using a profilometer. However, by revealing local irregularities and damage on surfaces, scanning electron micrographs appeared useful in explaining differences in cleanability.

  3. Using Reinterview and Reconciliation Methods to Design and Evaluate Survey Questions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy E. Morton

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Conducting reinterviews is an effective method to estimate and reduce response errors in interview surveys. As part of the School Health Policies and Programs Study 2000 (SHPPS, RTI used reinterview methods to assist in designing and evaluating survey questions. Reinterviews were conducted in the field test with selected respondents to identify discrepancies between the original interviews and reinterviews. Reconciliation interviews were then conducted to determine the reasons for the discrepancies in terms of comprehension, recall, encoding, response options, or other problems. In this paper, we describe the design of the reinterview and reconciliation study and discuss the implications of using these methods for questionnaire design and evaluation, specifically in comparison to cognitive interviewing.

  4. Deformation Study of Papandayan Volcano using GPS Survey Method and Its Correlation with Seismic Data Observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina A. Sarsito

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Papandayan volcano located in the southern part of Garut regency, around 70 km away from Bandung city, West Java. Many methods carried out to monitoring the activities of volcano, both continuously or periodically, one of the monitoring method is periodically GPS survey. Basically those surveys are carried out to understand the pattern and velocity of displacement which occurred in the volcano body, both horizontally and vertically, and also others deformation elements such as; translation, rotation and dilatation. The Mogi modeling was also used to determine the location and volume of the pressure source which caused deformation of volcano body. By comparing seismic activity and the deformation reveal from GPS measurement, before, during and after eruption, it could be understood there is a correlation between the seismicity and its deformation. These studies is hoping that GPS measurement in Papandayan volcano could be one of supported method to determine the volcano activities, at least in Papandayan volcano.

  5. Diversity surveys of soil bacterial community by cultivation-based methods and molecular fingerprinting techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Hai-feng; QI Hong-yan; ZHANG Hong-xun

    2004-01-01

    By combining the cultivation methods with molecular fingerprinting techniques, the diversity surveys of soil bacterial community in 13 areas of China were carried out. The cultivable heterotrophic diversity was investigated by colony morphology on solid LB medium. Genetic diversity was measured as bands on denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis(DGGE) by the extraction and purification of the total soil DNA, and amplification of bacterial 16S rDNA fragments by polymerase chain reaction ( PCR). The Shannon-Wiener indices of diversity (H), richness (S)and evenness( EH ) were employed to estimate the diversity of soil bacterial community. The results showed that there was an obvious diversification existed in soil from the different areas. However, the genetic diversity estimated by PCR-DGGE can provide more comprehensive information on bacterial community than the cultivation-based methods. Therefore, it is suggested to combine the traditional methods with genetic fingerprinting techniques to survey and estimate soil bacterial diversity.

  6. GPR survey, as one of the best geophysical methods for social and industrial needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernov, Anatolii

    2016-04-01

    This paper is about ways and methods of applying non-invasive geophysical method - Ground penetrating radar (GPR) survey in different spheres of science, industry, social life and culture. Author would like to show that geological methods could be widely used for solving great variety of industrial, human safety and other problems. In that article, we take GPR survey as an example of such useful geophysical methods. It is a fact that investigation of near surface underground medium is important process, which influence on development of different spheres of science and social life: investigation of near surface geology (layering, spreading of rock types, identification of voids, etc.), hydrogeology (depth to water horizons, their thickness), preparation step for construction of roads and buildings (civil geology, engineering geology), investigation of cultural heritage (burial places, building remains,...), ecological investigations (land slides, variation in underground water level, etc.), glaciology. These tasks can be solved by geological methods, but as usual, geophysical survey takes a lot of time and energy (especially electric current and resistivity methods, seismic survey). Author claims that GPR survey can be performed faster than other geophysical surveys and results of GPR survey are informative enough to make proper conclusions. Some problems even cannot be solved without GPR. For example, identification of burial place (one of author's research objects): results of magnetic and electric resistivity tomography survey do not contain enough information to identify burial place, but according to anomalies on GPR survey radarograms, presence of burial place can be proven. Identification of voids and non-magnetic objects also hardly can be done by another non-invasive geophysics surveys and GPR is applicable for that purpose. GPR can be applied for monitoring of dangerous processes in geological medium under roads, buildings, parks and other places of human

  7. Population survey sampling methods in a rural African setting: measuring mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byass Peter

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Population-based sample surveys and sentinel surveillance methods are commonly used as substitutes for more widespread health and demographic monitoring and intervention studies in resource-poor settings. Such methods have been criticised as only being worthwhile if the results can be extrapolated to the surrounding 100-fold population. With an emphasis on measuring mortality, this study explores the extent to which choice of sampling method affects the representativeness of 1% sample data in relation to various demographic and health parameters in a rural, developing-country setting. Methods Data from a large community based census and health survey conducted in rural Burkina Faso were used as a basis for modelling. Twenty 1% samples incorporating a range of health and demographic parameters were drawn at random from the overall dataset for each of seven different sampling procedures at two different levels of local administrative units. Each sample was compared with the overall 'gold standard' survey results, thus enabling comparisons between the different sampling procedures. Results All sampling methods and parameters tested performed reasonably well in representing the overall population. Nevertheless, a degree of variation could be observed both between sampling approaches and between different parameters, relating to their overall distribution in the total population. Conclusion Sample surveys are able to provide useful demographic and health profiles of local populations. However, various parameters being measured and their distribution within the sampling unit of interest may not all be best represented by a particular sampling method. It is likely therefore that compromises may have to be made in choosing a sampling strategy, with costs, logistics the intended use of the data being important considerations.

  8. INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY OF THE SPRU LOWER LEVEL HILLSIDE AREA AT THE KNOLLS ATOMIC POWER LABORATORY NISKAYUNA, NEW YORK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harpenau, Evan M.; Weaver, Phyllis C.

    2012-06-06

    During August 10, 2011 through August 19, 2011, and October 23, 2011 through November 4, 2011, ORAU/ORISE conducted verification survey activities at the Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) site that included in-process inspections, surface scans, and soil sampling of the Lower Level Hillside Area. According to the Type-B Investigation Report, Sr-90 was the primary contributor to the majority of the activity (60 times greater than the Cs-137 activity). The evaluation of the scan data and sample results obtained during verification activities determined that the primary radionuclide of concern, Sr-90, was well below the agreed upon soil cleanup objective (SCO) of 30 pCi/g for the site. However, the concentration of Cs-137 in the four judgmental samples collected in final status survey (FSS) Units A and B was greater than the SCO. Both ORAU and aRc surveys identified higher Cs-137 concentrations in FSS Units A and B; the greatest concentrations were indentified in FSS Unit A.

  9. SAMPLING AND ANALYTICAL METHOD FOR GEOCHEMICAL SURVEY OF DISSOLVED GASES IN BRACKISH THERMAL WATERS

    OpenAIRE

    Liotta, Marcello; Martelli, Mauro

    2011-01-01

    Dissolved gases are often utilized in geochemical studies for investigating hydrothermal and/or magmatic contributions to shallow aquifers. Between the several methods applied for analyzing dissolved gases in water, the head space equilibration technique is probably the most used because it does not require any strain before or during the water sampling in the field and can be adapted to various aims in the laboratory, with multispecies analysis by common gas chromatography. This type of tech...

  10. Analysis Methods for Water Quality Evaluation, Applied in Environmental Laboratory, ICIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROMAN Cecilia

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Due to human activities, global scale pollution of the environment has increased significantly in the last twocenturies. In the last decades, it was acknowledged that population health is strictly connected with environment quality.As the influence of anthropogenic factors on water sources quality increased, the water quality assessment has a rolethat’s become more and more important. Laboratory for Environment Analysis (LAM from Research Institute forAnalytical Instrumentation is accredited according to the SR EN ISO/CEI 17025:2005, by Romanian AccreditationAssociation and has all the required resourced for quality analysis of environmental samples. Analytical techniquesused in the Laboratory for Environment Analysis for water quality determination are: Gas Chromatography, LiquidChromatography, Ion Chromatography, Flame or Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometry, Inductively CoupledOptical Emission Spectrometry, UV/VIS Spectrophotometry, pHmetry, Potentiometry, Conductometry, Titrimetry andGravimetry.

  11. A writing-intensive, methods-based laboratory course for undergraduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colabroy, Keri L

    2011-01-01

    Engaging undergraduate students in designing and executing original research should not only be accompanied by technique training but also intentional instruction in the critical analysis and writing of scientific literature. The course described here takes a rigorous approach to scientific reading and writing using primary literature as the model while simultaneously integrating laboratory instruction on basic enzyme purification and characterization, followed by 6 weeks of laboratory dedicated to student-designed original research projects. In the preparation and execution of their original projects, students engage in analysis of the primary literature, proposal writing, peer review, manuscript preparation, and oral presentation. The result is a comprehensive and challenging course that teaches third- and fourth-year undergraduates what it means to "think and work like a scientist." Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Comparison of Blood Glucose Values Using Two Glucose Meters and Standard Laboratory Method in Hospitalized Patients in a Teaching Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shima Aghakachoei

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease with a worldwide prevalence and its complications can be prevented with close monitoring of blood glucose. Quality of blood glucose monitoring utilizing glucometers in Iranian hospitalized patients has not been well published in the literature. We evaluated the accuracy and consistency of the results of two devices compared with the standard laboratory method used for measuring glucose levels in a teaching hospital.Methods: In this study 100 patients with the average age of 57.5 ±17.7 years were randomly selected from 19 wards and their blood glucose were simultaneously measured using Accu-Chek Active®(1 and Cleverchek®(2 (commonly used in the wards and the conventional laboratory method. Calibration was performed on both devices.Results: Absolute Mean Difference of the devices 1 and 2 from the laboratory values were 24.3±2.4,and 38.5±4.5, respectively (P: 0.003. Correlation coefficient of the obtained values by glucometers1 and 2 with lab, were 0.82 and 0.52, respectively. Calibration of the devices showed that device 1 was the most consistent device with the laboratory values, and Pearson correlation coefficient between the obtained values as a result of four reiterations for each sample in each device showed that the highest coefficient belonged to the device 1 and the least belonged to the device 2 used in the Ear, Nose, and Throat Departments.Conclusion: The device 2 used in different wards of the hospital must be calibrated periodically. Furthermore, the device 1 generated closest results to the ones obtained through the laboratory.

  13. Fabrication Method for Laboratory-Scale High-Performance Membrane Electrode Assemblies for Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassin, Megan B; Garsany, Yannick; Gould, Benjamin D; Swider-Lyons, Karen E

    2017-01-03

    Custom catalyst-coated membranes (CCMs) and membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) are necessary for the evaluation of advanced electrocatalysts, gas diffusion media (GDM), ionomers, polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs), and electrode structures designed for use in next-generation fuel cells, electrolyzers, or flow batteries. This Feature provides a reliable and reproducible fabrication protocol for laboratory scale (10 cm(2)) fuel cells based on ultrasonic spray deposition of a standard Pt/carbon electrocatalyst directly onto a perfluorosulfonic acid PEM.

  14. Implementation and Methods of Project Learning in Quantity Surveying Firms: Barriers, Enablers and Success Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamzah Abdul-Rahman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Learning from project is vital for organizations to achieve competition and to survive in a dynamic environment. However, learning is not an easy task because there is no specific way for learning from projects. Besides, the practice of project learning and transfer knowledge to the firm’s level is still vague, specifically in the construction milieu. Approach: A questionnaire survey was conducted targeted quantity surveying firms in Malaysia, attempted to identify methods of learning from projects and implement this approach successfully. Interviews with experts in construction projects were conducted to expand and validate the results of the survey. Results: The findings indicated that on-the-job training is the preferable method to learn from construction project in quantity surveying firms. In addition, top management support and employee participants are the main enablers/barriers of project learning implementation. While, top management support found to be the main key success factor of project learning implementation. Conclusion/Recommendations: Determining barriers and enablers of learning showed how construction organization could implement learning from project successfully. This adds a practical tool of promoting learning in the field of organizational learning in construction. Results can be replicated in different industries to observe the disparity in each setting.

  15. Short assessment of the Big Five: robust across survey methods except telephone interviewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Frieder R; John, Dennis; Lüdtke, Oliver; Schupp, Jürgen; Wagner, Gert G

    2011-06-01

    We examined measurement invariance and age-related robustness of a short 15-item Big Five Inventory (BFI-S) of personality dimensions, which is well suited for applications in large-scale multidisciplinary surveys. The BFI-S was assessed in three different interviewing conditions: computer-assisted or paper-assisted face-to-face interviewing, computer-assisted telephone interviewing, and a self-administered questionnaire. Randomized probability samples from a large-scale German panel survey and a related probability telephone study were used in order to test method effects on self-report measures of personality characteristics across early, middle, and late adulthood. Exploratory structural equation modeling was used in order to test for measurement invariance of the five-factor model of personality trait domains across different assessment methods. For the short inventory, findings suggest strong robustness of self-report measures of personality dimensions among young and middle-aged adults. In old age, telephone interviewing was associated with greater distortions in reliable personality assessment. It is concluded that the greater mental workload of telephone interviewing limits the reliability of self-report personality assessment. Face-to-face surveys and self-administrated questionnaire completion are clearly better suited than phone surveys when personality traits in age-heterogeneous samples are assessed.

  16. Improving herpetological surveys in eastern North America using the environmental DNA method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacoursière-Roussel, Anaïs; Dubois, Yohann; Normandeau, Eric; Bernatchez, Louis

    2016-11-01

    Among vertebrates, herpetofauna has the highest proportion of declining species. Detection of environmental DNA (eDNA) is a promising method towards significantly increasing large-scale herpetological conservation efforts. However, the integration of eDNA results within a management framework requires an evaluation of the efficiency of the method in large natural environments and the calibration of eDNA surveys with the quantitative monitoring tools currently used by conservation biologists. Towards this end, we first developed species-specific primers to detect the wood turtle (Glyptemys insculpta) a species at risk in Canada, by quantitative PCR (qPCR). The rate of eDNA detection obtained by qPCR was also compared to the relative abundance of this species in nine rivers obtained by standardized visual surveys in the Province of Québec (Canada). Second, we developed multi-species primers to detect North American amphibian and reptile species using eDNA metabarcoding analysis. An occurrence index based on the distribution range and habitat type was compared with the eDNA metabarcoding dataset from samples collected in seven lakes and five rivers. Our results empirically support the effectiveness of eDNA metabarcoding to characterize herpetological species distributions. Moreover, detection rates provided similar results to standardized visual surveys currently used to develop conservation strategies for the wood turtle. We conclude that eDNA detection rates may provide an effective semiquantitative survey tool, provided that assay calibration and standardization is performed.

  17. Detailed characterizations of the new Mines Douai comparative reactivity method instrument via laboratory experiments and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michoud, V.; Hansen, R. F.; Locoge, N.; Stevens, P. S.; Dusanter, S.

    2015-08-01

    The hydroxyl (OH) radical is an important oxidant in the troposphere, which controls the lifetime of most air quality- and climate-related trace gases. However, there are still uncertainties concerning its atmospheric budget, and integrated measurements of OH sinks have been valuable to improve this aspect. Among the analytical tools used for measuring total OH reactivity in ambient air, the comparative reactivity method (CRM) is spreading rapidly in the atmospheric community. However, measurement artifacts have been highlighted for this technique, and additional work is needed to fully characterize them. In this study, we present the new Mines Douai CRM instrument, with an emphasis on the corrections that need to be applied to ambient measurements of total OH reactivity. Measurement artifacts identified in the literature have been investigated, including (1) a correction for a change in relative humidity between the measurement steps leading to different OH levels, (2) the formation of spurious OH in the sampling reactor when hydroperoxy radicals (HO2) react with nitrogen monoxide (NO), (3) not operating the CRM under pseudo-first-order kinetics, and (4) the dilution of ambient air inside the reactor. The dependences of these artifacts on various measurable parameters, such as the pyrrole-to-OH ratio and the bimolecular reaction rate constants of ambient trace gases with OH, have also been studied. Based on these observations, parameterizations are proposed to correct ambient OH reactivity measurements. On average, corrections of 5.2 ± 3.2, 9.2 ± 15.7, and 8.5 ± 5.8 s-1 were respectively observed for (1), (2) and (3) during a field campaign performed in Dunkirk, France (summer 2014). Numerical simulations have been performed using a box model to check whether experimental observations mentioned above are consistent with our understanding of the chemistry occurring in the CRM reactor. Two different chemical mechanisms have been shown to reproduce the magnitude

  18. Random Sampling of Quantum States: a Survey of Methods. And Some Issues Regarding the Overparametrized Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maziero, Jonas

    2015-12-01

    The numerical generation of random quantum states (RQS) is an important procedure for investigations in quantum information science. Here, we review some methods that may be used for performing that task. We start by presenting a simple procedure for generating random state vectors, for which the main tool is the random sampling of unbiased discrete probability distributions (DPD). Afterwards, the creation of random density matrices is addressed. In this context, we first present the standard method, which consists in using the spectral decomposition of a quantum state for getting RQS from random DPDs and random unitary matrices. In the sequence, the Bloch vector parametrization method is described. This approach, despite being useful in several instances, is not in general convenient for RQS generation. In the last part of the article, we regard the overparametrized method (OPM) and the related Ginibre and Bures techniques. The OPM can be used to create random positive semidefinite matrices with unit trace from randomly produced general complex matrices in a simple way that is friendly for numerical implementations. We consider a physically relevant issue related to the possible domains that may be used for the real and imaginary parts of the elements of such general complex matrices. Subsequently, a too fast concentration of measure in the quantum state space that appears in this parametrization is noticed.

  19. Random sampling of quantum states: a survey of methods and some issues regarding the Overparametrized Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maziero, Jonas, E-mail: jonas.maziero@ufsm.br [Universidade Federal de Santa Maria (UFSM), Santa Maria, RS (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica

    2015-12-15

    The numerical generation of random quantum states (RQS) is an important procedure for investigations in quantum information science. Here, we review some methods that may be used for performing that task. We start by presenting a simple procedure for generating random state vectors, for which the main tool is the random sampling of unbiased discrete probability distributions (DPD). Afterwards, the creation of random density matrices is addressed. In this context, we first present the standard method, which consists in using the spectral decomposition of a quantum state for getting RQS from random DPDs and random unitary matrices. In the sequence, the Bloch vector parametrization method is described. This approach, despite being useful in several instances, is not in general convenient for RQS generation. In the last part of the article, we regard the overparametrized method (OPM) and the related Ginibre and Bures techniques. The OPM can be used to create random positive semidefinite matrices with unit trace from randomly produced general complex matrices in a simple way that is friendly for numerical implementations. We consider a physically relevant issue related to the possible domains that may be used for the real and imaginary parts of the elements of such general complex matrices. Subsequently, a too fast concentration of measure in the quantum state space that appears in this parametrization is noticed. (author)

  20. A Survey of Symplectic and Collocation Integration Methods for Orbit Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Brandon A.; Anderson, Rodney L.

    2012-01-01

    Demands on numerical integration algorithms for astrodynamics applications continue to increase. Common methods, like explicit Runge-Kutta, meet the orbit propagation needs of most scenarios, but more specialized scenarios require new techniques to meet both computational efficiency and accuracy needs. This paper provides an extensive survey on the application of symplectic and collocation methods to astrodynamics. Both of these methods benefit from relatively recent theoretical developments, which improve their applicability to artificial satellite orbit propagation. This paper also details their implementation, with several tests demonstrating their advantages and disadvantages.

  1. Field survey and laboratory tests on composite materials case of GRP (Glass Fiber Reinforced Polyester tubes for water suply

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu Hariga

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In the Moldova land, were made two lines of water adduction, having 6000 m length and 40 m slope, or 1/150 slope. The water supply component tubes were disposed under the plant: The tubes are made of glass – reinforced thermosetting plastics (GRP. After about 180 days of operation, one of the lines showed severe deterioration of the quality pipe components. This paper deals with some laboratory tests in order to detect the failure cases of the pipelines components.

  2. Defining Arthritis for Public Health Surveillance: Methods and Estimates in Four US Population Health Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Louise B; Cisternas, Miriam G; Greenlund, Kurt J; Giles, Wayne; Hannan, Casey; Helmick, Charles G

    2017-03-01

    To determine the variability of arthritis prevalence in 4 US population health surveys. We estimated annualized arthritis prevalence in 2011-2012, among adults age ≥20 years, using 2 definition methods, both based on self-report: 1) doctor-/health care provider-diagnosed arthritis in the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey (BRFSS), National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), and Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS); and 2) three arthritis definitions based on International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) criteria in MEPS (National Arthritis Data Workgroup on Arthritis and Other Rheumatic Conditions [NADW-AORC], Clinical Classifications Software [CCS], and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC]). Diagnosed arthritis prevalence percentages using the surveys were within 3 points of one another (BRFSS 26.2% [99% confidence interval (99% CI) 26.0-26.4], MEPS 26.1% [99% CI 25.0-27.2], NHIS 23.5% [99% CI 22.9-24.1], NHANES 23.0% [99% CI 19.2-26.8]), and those using ICD-9-CM were within 5 percentage points of one another (CCS 25.8% [99% CI 24.6-27.1]; CDC 28.3% [99% CI 27.0-29.6]; and NADW-AORC 30.7% [99% CI 29.4-32.1]). The variation in the estimated number (in millions) affected with diagnosed arthritis was 7.8 (BRFSS 58.5 [99% CI 58.1-59.1], MEPS 59.3 [99% CI 55.6-63.1], NHANES 51.5 [99% CI 37.2-65.5], and NHIS 52.6 [99% CI 50.9-54.4]), and using ICD-9-CM definitions it was 11.1 (CCS 58.7 [99% CI 54.5-62.9], CDC 64.3 [99% CI 59.9-68.6], and NADW 69.9 [99% CI 65.2-74.5]). Most (57-70%) reporting diagnosed arthritis also reported ICD-9-CM arthritis; respondents reporting diagnosed arthritis were older than those meeting ICD-9-CM definitions. Proxy response status affected arthritis prevalence differently across surveys. Public health practitioners and decision makers are frequently charged with choosing a single number to represent arthritis

  3. The use of qualitative methods to inform Delphi surveys in core outcome set development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, T; Williamson, P; Callery, P; Jones, L L; Mathers, J; Jones, J; Young, B; Calvert, M

    2016-05-04

    Core outcome sets (COS) help to minimise bias in trials and facilitate evidence synthesis. Delphi surveys are increasingly being used as part of a wider process to reach consensus about what outcomes should be included in a COS. Qualitative research can be used to inform the development of Delphi surveys. This is an advance in the field of COS development and one which is potentially valuable; however, little guidance exists for COS developers on how best to use qualitative methods and what the challenges are. This paper aims to provide early guidance on the potential role and contribution of qualitative research in this area. We hope the ideas we present will be challenged, critiqued and built upon by others exploring the role of qualitative research in COS development. This paper draws upon the experiences of using qualitative methods in the pre-Delphi stage of the development of three different COS. Using these studies as examples, we identify some of the ways that qualitative research might contribute to COS development, the challenges in using such methods and areas where future research is required. Qualitative research can help to identify what outcomes are important to stakeholders; facilitate understanding of why some outcomes may be more important than others, determine the scope of outcomes; identify appropriate language for use in the Delphi survey and inform comparisons between stakeholder data and other sources, such as systematic reviews. Developers need to consider a number of methodological points when using qualitative research: specifically, which stakeholders to involve, how to sample participants, which data collection methods are most appropriate, how to consider outcomes with stakeholders and how to analyse these data. A number of areas for future research are identified. Qualitative research has the potential to increase the research community's confidence in COS, although this will be dependent upon using rigorous and appropriate

  4. Performance of human fecal anaerobe-associated PCR-based assays in a multi-laboratory method evaluation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layton, Blythe A.; Cao, Yiping; Ebentier, Darcy L.; Hanley, Kaitlyn; Ballesté, Elisenda; Brandão, João; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N.; Converse, Reagan; Farnleitner, Andreas H.; Gentry-Shields, Jennifer; Gourmelon, Michèle; Lee, Chang Soo; Lee, Jiyoung; Lozach, Solen; Madi, Tania; Meijer, Wim G.; Noble, Rachel; Peed, Lindsay; Reischer, Georg H.; Rodrigues, Raquel; Rose, Joan B.; Schriewer, Alexander; Sinigalliano, Chris; Srinivasan, Sangeetha; Stewart, Jill; ,; Laurie, C.; Wang, Dan; Whitman, Richard; Wuertz, Stefan; Jay, Jenny; Holden, Patricia A.; Boehm, Alexandria B.; Shanks, Orin; Griffith, John F.

    2013-01-01

    A number of PCR-based methods for detecting human fecal material in environmental waters have been developed over the past decade, but these methods have rarely received independent comparative testing in large multi-laboratory studies. Here, we evaluated ten of these methods (BacH, BacHum-UCD, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (BtH), BsteriF1, gyrB, HF183 endpoint, HF183 SYBR, HF183 Taqman®, HumM2, and Methanobrevibacter smithii nifH (Mnif)) using 64 blind samples prepared in one laboratory. The blind samples contained either one or two fecal sources from human, wastewater or non-human sources. The assay results were assessed for presence/absence of the human markers and also quantitatively while varying the following: 1) classification of samples that were detected but not quantifiable (DNQ) as positive or negative; 2) reference fecal sample concentration unit of measure (such as culturable indicator bacteria, wet mass, total DNA, etc); and 3) human fecal source type (stool, sewage or septage). Assay performance using presence/absence metrics was found to depend on the classification of DNQ samples. The assays that performed best quantitatively varied based on the fecal concentration unit of measure and laboratory protocol. All methods were consistently more sensitive to human stools compared to sewage or septage in both the presence/absence and quantitative analysis. Overall, HF183 Taqman® was found to be the most effective marker of human fecal contamination in this California-based study.

  5. [The method of personal interaction laboratories applied to groups of married couples].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Upegui, P

    1975-03-01

    The aim of Personal Interaction Laboratories is not to overcome or to solve any marriage problem or maladjustment. They provide an intense, quick experience, in which the participants get a rare chance to examine the way they are interacting with each other's partner, and the degree of mutual adaptation. A peculiar atmosphere of trust and reliability is usually created in the group, and grows steadily according to the increasing willingness of all members to share a higher degree of intimacy. This climate allows for deep emotional exchanges through which persons and couples gain a fresh view of themselves, allowing a long lasting drive for improving their life patterns. This report briefs the results of four Laboratories for married couples sponsored by the Human Welfare Foundation ("Fundación para el Bienestar Humano"), at Medellín-Colombia, in 1971 and 1972; they included 8, 10, 6 and 12 couples, that is, 36 in all. Participation in the Laboratories was set on a strictly voluntary basis; information was provided to personnel of the main industrial and commercial corporations, and interested prospective candidates applied for admission. The couples were selected according to their socio-economical level (medium and lower-medium), their educational background (at least two years of high school), and their lack of apparent mental symptoms. A special country resort was selected for the Laboratories, in order to guarantee adequate isolation for the group and no possible contacts with the familiar environment. Sessions were started on Wednesdays at 8 pm and closed on Sundays at 1.30 pm. The available time was completely devoted to Laboratory activities, allowing only short breaks for meals. T-group sessions took most of the time. They were given special attention, being at the core of group development. Each session was 90 to 120 minutes long; a total of nine were programmed. There were complementary activities, such as lectures on marriage counseling, group

  6. Area balance method for calculation of air interchange in fire-resesistance testing laboratory for building products and constructions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sargsyan Samvel Volodyaevich

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Fire-resistance testing laboratory for building products and constructions is a production room with a substantial excess heat (over 23 W/m . Significant sources of heat inside the aforementioned laboratory are firing furnace, designed to simulate high temperature effects on structures and products of various types in case of fire development. The excess heat production in the laboratory during the tests is due to firing furnaces. The laboratory room is considered as an object consisting of two control volumes (CV, in each of which there may be air intake and air removal, pollutant absorption or emission. In modeling air exchange conditions the following processes are being considered: the processes connected with air movement in the laboratory room: the jet stream in a confined space, distribution of air parameters, air motion and impurity diffusion in the ventilated room. General upward ventilation seems to be the most rational due to impossibility of using local exhaust ventilation. It is connected with the peculiarities of technological processes in the laboratory. Air jets spouted through large-perforated surface mounted at the height of 2 m from the floor level, "flood" the lower control volume, entrained by natural convective currents from heat sources upward and removed from the upper area. In order to take advantage of the proposed method of the required air exchange calculation, you must enter additional conditions, taking into account the provision of sanitary-hygienic characteristics of the current at the entrance of the service (work area. Exhaust air containing pollutants (combustion products, is expelled into the atmosphere by vertical jet discharge. Dividing ventilated rooms into two control volumes allows describing the research process in a ventilated room more accurately and finding the air exchange in the lab room during the tests on a more reasonable basis, allowing to provide safe working conditions for the staff without

  7. Modeling Open Software Architectures of Robot Controllers: A Brief Survey of Modeling Methods and Developing Methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Openness is one of the features of modern robot controllers. Although many modeling technologies have been discussed to model and develop open robot controllers, the focus is always on modeling methodologies. Meanwhile, the relations between the former and the latter are usually ignored. According to the general software architecture of open robot controllers, this paper discusses modeling and developing methods. And the relationships between the typical ones are also analyzed.

  8. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Pre-project Rare Plant and Wildlife Surveys For the Pit 7 Drainage Diversion and Groundwater Extraction and Treatment Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paterson, L; Woollett, J

    2007-07-17

    In January 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) released the final Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Environmental Remediation at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Site 300 Pit 7 Complex. At the same time, the Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC) released the final Negative Declaration and Initial Study covering the Pit 7 remediation. No substantial adverse effect on wildlife species of concern was anticipated from the project. However, it was proposed that wildlife surveys should be conducted prior to construction because species locations and breeding areas could potentially change by the time construction activities began. Although no known populations of rare or endangered/threatened plant species were known to occur within the project impact area at the time these documents were released, rare plants listed by the California Native Plant Society had been observed in the vicinity. As such, both DOE and DTSC proposed that plant surveys would be undertaken at the appropriate time of year to determine if rare plants would be impacted by project construction. This document provides the results of wildlife and rare plant surveys taken prior to the start of construction at the Pit 7 Complex.

  9. ASSESSMENT OF HYDROMORPHOLOGICAL CONDITIONS OF URBAN STREAMS WITH URBAN RIVER SURVEY METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Marek Hamerla

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the paper some aspects of potential use of the Urban River Survey (URS method for hydro-morphological assessment of urban river channels/corridors in Poland are discussed, includingthe URS aspects and criteria. The URS aspects/criteria take into account the specificity of urban watercourse omitted both in the RHS (River Habitat Survey which is more prevalent in Europe, and in Polish MHR method. The URS can be used to classify urban watercourses according to their ecological status, as well as in building scenarios of possible reclamation/restoration activities. The watercourse monitoring with the use of URS can be an important element of the local urban catchment management.

  10. Results of detailed ground geophysical surveys for locating and differentiating waste structures in waste management area 'A' at Chalk River Laboratories, Ontario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomsons, D.K.; Street, P.J.; Lodha, G.S

    1999-07-01

    Waste Management Area 'A' (WMA 'A'), located in the outer area of the Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) was in use as a waste burial site from 1946 to 1955. Waste management structures include debris-filled trenches, concrete bunkers and miscellaneous contaminated solid materials, and ditches and pits used for liquid dispersal. In order to update historical records, it was proposed to conduct detailed ground geophysical surveys to define the locations of waste management structures in WMA 'A', assist in planning of the drilling and sampling program to provide ground truth for the geophysics investigation and to predict the nature and locations of unknown/undefined shallow structures. A detailed ground geophysical survey grid was established with a total of 127 grid lines, oriented NNE and spaced one metre apart. The geophysical surveys were carried out during August and September, 1996. The combination of geophysical tools used included the Geonics EM61 metal detector, the GSM-19 magnetometer/gradiometer and a RAMAC high frequency ground penetrating radar system. The geophysical surveys were successful in identifying waste management structures and in characterizing to some extent, the composition of the waste. The geophysical surveys are able to determine the presence of most of the known waste management structures, especially in the western and central portions of the grid which contain the majority of the metallic waste. The eastern portion of the grid has a completely different geophysical character. While historical records show that trenches were dug, they are far less evident in the geophysical record. There is clear evidence for a trench running between lines 30E and 63E at 70 m. There are indications from the radar survey of other trench-like structures in the eastern portion. EM61 data clearly show that there is far less metallic debris in the eastern portion. The geophysical surveys were also successful in identifying

  11. Use and perceived helpfulness of smoking cessation methods: results from a population survey of recent quitters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perez Donna

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increasing rates of smoking cessation is one of the most effective measures available to improve population health. To advance the goal of increasing successful cessation at the population level, it is imperative that we understand more about smokers' use of cessation methods, as well as the helpfulness of those methods in real-world experiences of quitting. In this survey of recent quitters, we simultaneously examined rates of use and perceived helpfulness of various cessation methods. Methods Recent quitters (within 12 months; n = 1097 completed a telephone survey including questions relating to 13 cessation methods. Indices of use and perceived helpfulness for each method were plotted in a quadrant analysis. Socio-demographic differences were explored using bivariate and multivariate analyses. Results From the quadrant analysis, cold turkey, NRT and gradual reduction before quitting had high use and helpfulness; GP advice had high use and lower helpfulness. Prescribed medication and online programs had low use but high helpfulness. Remaining methods had low use and helpfulness. Younger quitters were more likely to use unassisted methods such as cold turkey; older or less educated quitters were more likely to use assisted methods such as prescribed medication or advice from a general practitioner. Conclusions The majority of recent quitters quit cold turkey or cut down before quitting, and reported that these methods were helpful. Efforts to influence population smoking prevalence should attempt to provide support and motivation for smokers choosing these methods, in addition to assessing the effectiveness and accessibility of other methods for smokers who need or choose them.

  12. Laboratory-scale evaluation of various sampling and analytical methods for determining mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agbede, R.O.; Bochan, A.J.; Clements, J.L. [Advanced Technology Systems, Inc., Monroeville, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-11-01

    Comparative bench-scale mercury sampling method tests were performed at the Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. (ATS) laboratories for EPA Method 101A, EPA Method 29 and the Ontario Hydro Method. Both blank and impinger spiking experiments were performed. The experimental results show that the ambient level of mercury in the ATS laboratory is at or below the detection limit (10 ng Hg) as measured by a cold vapor atomic absorption spectrophotometer (CVAAS) which was used to analyze the mercury samples. From the mercury spike studies, the following observations and findings were made. (a) The recovery of mercury spikes using EPA Method 101A was 104%. (b) The Ontario Hydro Method retains about 90% of mercury spikes in the first absorbing solution but has a total spike retention of 106%. As a result, the test data shows possible migration of spiked mercury from the first impinger solution (KCI) to the permanganate impingers. (c) For the EPA Method 29 solutions, when only the peroxide impingers were spiked, mercury recoveries were 65.6% for the peroxide impingers, 0.1% for the knockout impinger and 32.8% for the permanganate impingers with an average total mercury recovery of 98.4%. At press time, data was still being obtained for both the peroxide and permanganate impinger solution spikes. This and other data will be available at the presentation.

  13. Methods and representativeness of a European survey in children and adolescents: the KIDSCREEN study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    von Rueden Ursula

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of the present study was to compare three different sampling and questionnaire administration methods used in the international KIDSCREEN study in terms of participation, response rates, and external validity. Methods Children and adolescents aged 8–18 years were surveyed in 13 European countries using either telephone sampling and mail administration, random sampling of school listings followed by classroom or mail administration, or multistage random sampling of communities and households with self-administration of the survey materials at home. Cooperation, completion, and response rates were compared across countries and survey methods. Data on non-respondents was collected in 8 countries. The population fraction (PF, respondents in each sex-age, or educational level category, divided by the population in the same category from Eurostat census data and population fraction ratio (PFR, ratio of PF and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals were used to analyze differences by country between the KIDSCREEN samples and a reference Eurostat population. Results Response rates by country ranged from 18.9% to 91.2%. Response rates were highest in the school-based surveys (69.0%–91.2%. Sample proportions by age and gender were similar to the reference Eurostat population in most countries, although boys and adolescents were slightly underrepresented (PFR Conclusion School-based sampling achieved the highest overall response rates but also produced slightly more biased samples than the other methods. The results suggest that the samples were sufficiently representative to provide reference population values for the KIDSCREEN instrument.

  14. A method of measuring the [α/Fe] ratios from the spectra of the LAMOST survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ji; Han, Chen; Xiang, Mao-Sheng; Shi, Jian-Rong; Zhao, Jing-Kun; Liu, Xiao-Wei; Zhang, Hua-Wei; Yuan, Hai-Bo; Ci, Xuan; Zhang, Xiao-Feng; Wang, Yue-Xiang; Huang, Yang; Zhang, Yong; Hou, Yong-Hui; Wang, Yue-Fei; Cao, Zi-Huang

    2016-07-01

    The [α/Fe] ratios in stars are good tracers to probe the formation history of stellar populations and the chemical evolution of the Galaxy. The spectroscopic survey of LAMOST provides a good opportunity to determine [α/Fe] of millions of stars in the Galaxy. We present a method of measuring the [α/Fe] ratios from LAMOST spectra using the template-matching technique of the LSP3 pipeline. We use three test samples of stars selected from the ELODIE and MILES libraries, as well as the LEGUE survey to validate our method. Based on the test results, we conclude that our method is valid for measuring [α/Fe] from low-resolution spectra acquired by the LAMOST survey. Within the range of the stellar parameters T eff = [5000, 7500] K, log g = [1.0, 5.0] dex and [Fe/H]= [-1.5, +0.5] dex, our [α/Fe] measurements are consistent with values derived from high-resolution spectra, and the accuracy of our [α/Fe] measurements from LAMOST spectra is better than 0.1 dex with spectral signal-to-noise higher than 20.

  15. A fast method for quantifying observational selection effects in asteroid surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedicke, Robert; Bolin, Bryce; Granvik, Mikael; Beshore, Ed

    2016-03-01

    We present a fast method to calculate an asteroid survey's 'bias' - essentially a correction factor from the observed number of objects to the actual number in the population. The method builds upon the work of Jedicke and Metcalfe (Jedicke, R., Metcalfe, T.S. [1998]. Icaurs 131, 245-260) and Granvik et al. (Granvik, M., Vaubaillon, J., Jedicke, R. [2012]. Icarus 218, 262-277) and essentially efficiently maps out the phase space of orbit elements that can appear in a field-of-view. It does so by 'integrating' outwards in geocentric distance along a field's boresite from the topocentric location of the survey and calculating the allowable angular elements for each desired combination of semi-major axis, eccentricity and inclination. We then use a contour algorithm to map out the orbit elements that place an object at the edge of the field-of-view. We illustrate the method's application to calculate the bias correction for near Earth Objects detected with the Catalina Sky Survey (Christensen, E. et al. [2012]. AAS/Division for Planetary Sciences Meeting Abstracts, vol. 44, p. 210.13; Larson, S. et al. [1998]. Bulletin of the American Astronomical Society, vol. 30, p. 1037).

  16. National Survey on Access, Use and Promotion of Rational Use of Medicines (PNAUM): household survey component methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengue, Sotero Serrate; Bertoldi, Andréa Dâmaso; Boing, Alexandra Crispim; Tavares, Noemia Urruth Leão; Pizzol, Tatiane da Silva Dal; Oliveira, Maria Auxiliadora; Arrais, Paulo Sérgio Dourado; Ramos, Luiz Roberto; Farias, Mareni Rocha; Luiza, Vera Lucia; Bernal, Regina Tomie Ivata; Barros, Aluísio Jardim Dornellas de

    2016-12-01

    To describe methodological aspects of the household survey National Survey on Access, Use and Promotion of Rational Use of Medicines (PNAUM) related to sampling design and implementation, the actual obtained sample, instruments and fieldwork. A cross-sectional, population-based study with probability sampling in three stages of the population living in households located in Brazilian urban areas. Fieldwork was carried out between September 2013 and February 2014. The data collection instrument included questions related to: information about households, residents and respondents; chronic diseases and medicines used; use of health services; acute diseases and events treated with drugs; use of contraceptives; use of pharmacy services; behaviors that may affect drug use; package inserts and packaging; lifestyle and health insurance. In total, 41,433 interviews were carried out in 20,404 households and 576 urban clusters corresponding to 586 census tracts distributed in the five Brazilian regions, according to eight domains defined by age and gender. The results of the survey may be used as a baseline for future studies aiming to assess the impact of government action on drug access and use. For local studies using a compatible method, PNAUM may serve as a reference point to evaluate variations in space and population. With a comprehensive evaluation of drug-related aspects, PNAUM is a major source of data for a variety of analyses to be carried out both at academic and government level. Descrever aspectos metodológicos do inquérito domiciliar da Pesquisa Nacional sobre Acesso, Utilização e Promoção do Uso Racional de Medicamentos (PNAUM) quanto ao desenho e implementação da amostragem e da amostra efetivamente obtida, seus instrumentos e implementação do campo. Estudo transversal de base populacional com amostra probabilística em três estágios da população residente nos domicílios localizados na zona urbana do Brasil. O trabalho de campo foi

  17. An inter-laboratory trial of the unified BARGE bioaccessibility method for arsenic, cadmium and lead in soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wragg, Joanna [British Geological Survey, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Cave, Mark, E-mail: mrca@bgs.ac.uk [British Geological Survey, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Basta, Nick [School of Environment and Natural Resources, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, 43210-1085 (United States); Brandon, Esther [National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven (Netherlands); Casteel, Stan [College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, 65205 (United States); Denys, Sebastien [INERIS, Parc Technologique Alata, Verneuil-en-Halatte (France); Gron, Christian [DHI Water Environment Health, Horsholm (Denmark); Oomen, Agnes [National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven (Netherlands); Reimer, Kenneth [Environmental Sciences Group, Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Tack, Karine [INERIS, Parc Technologique Alata, Verneuil-en-Halatte (France); Van de Wiele, Tom [Laboratory of Microbial Ecology and Technology, University of Ghent, Ghent (Belgium)

    2011-09-01

    The Bioaccessibility Research Group of Europe (BARGE) has carried out an inter-laboratory trial of a proposed harmonised in vitro physiologically based ingestion bioaccessibility procedure for soils, called the Unified BARGE Method (UBM). The UBM includes an initial saliva phase and simulated stomach and intestine compartments. The trial involved the participation of seven laboratories (five European and two North American) providing bioaccessibility data for As (11 samples), Cd (9 samples) and Pb (13 samples) using soils with in vivo relative bioavailability data measured using a swine model. The results of the study were compared with benchmark criteria for assessing the suitability of the UBM to provide data for human health risk assessments. Mine waste and slag soils containing high concentrations of As caused problems of poor repeatability and reproducibility which were alleviated when the samples were run at lower soil to solution ratios. The study showed that the UBM met the benchmark criteria for both the stomach and stomach and intestine phase for As. For Cd, three out of four criteria were met for the stomach phase but only one for the stomach and intestine phase. For Pb two, out of four criteria were met for the stomach phase and none for the stomach and intestine phase. However, the study recommends tighter control of pH in the stomach phase extraction to improve between-laboratory variability, more reproducible in vivo validation data and that a follow up inter-laboratory trial should be carried out.

  18. Using mark–recapture distance sampling methods on line transect surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Louise M.; Borchers, David L.; Jenkins, Kurt J.; Marques, Tigao A

    2014-01-01

    Mark–recapture distance sampling (MRDS) methods are widely used for density and abundance estimation when the conventional DS assumption of certain detection at distance zero fails, as they allow detection at distance zero to be estimated and incorporated into the overall probability of detection to better estimate density and abundance. However, incorporating MR data in DS models raises survey and analysis issues not present in conventional DS. Conversely, incorporating DS assumptions in MR models raises issues not present in conventional MR. As a result, being familiar with either conventional DS methods or conventional MR methods does not on its own put practitioners in good a position to apply MRDS methods appropriately. This study explains the sometimes subtly different varieties of MRDS survey methods and the associated concepts underlying MRDS models. This is done as far as possible without giving mathematical details – in the hope that this will make the key concepts underlying the methods accessible to a wider audience than if we were to present the concepts via equations.

  19. Aerodynamic aircraft design methods and their notable applications: Survey of the activity in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Kozo; Takanashi, Susumu

    1991-01-01

    An overview of aerodynamic aircraft design methods and their recent applications in Japan is presented. A design code which was developed at the National Aerospace Laboratory (NAL) and is in use now is discussed, hence, most of the examples are the result of the collaborative work between heavy industry and the National Aerospace Laboratory. A wide variety of applications in transonic to supersonic flow regimes are presented. Although design of aircraft elements for external flows are the main focus, some of the internal flow applications are also presented. Recent applications of the design code, using the Navier Stokes and Euler equations in the analysis mode, include the design of HOPE (a space vehicle) and Upper Surface Blowing (USB) aircraft configurations.

  20. Internal Medicine Resident Engagement with a Laboratory Utilization Dashboard: Mixed Methods Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtzman, Gregory; Dine, Jessica; Epstein, Andrew; Gitelman, Yevgenly; Leri, Damien; Patel, Miltesh S; Ryskina, Kyra

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this study was to measure internal medicine resident engagement with an electronic medical record-based dashboard providing feedback on their use of routine laboratory tests relative to service averages. From January 2016 to June 2016, residents were e-mailed a snapshot of their personalized dashboard, a link to the online dashboard, and text summarizing the resident and service utilization averages. We measured resident engagement using e-mail read-receipts and web-based tracking. We also conducted 3 hour-long focus groups with residents. Using grounded theory approach, the transcripts were analyzed for common themes focusing on barriers and facilitators of dashboard use. Among 80 residents, 74% opened the e-mail containing a link to the dashboard and 21% accessed the dashboard itself. We did not observe a statistically significant difference in routine laboratory ordering by dashboard use, although residents who opened the link to the dashboard ordered 0.26 fewer labs per doctor-patient-day than those who did not (95% confidence interval, -0.77 to 0.25; = 0 .31). While they raised several concerns, focus group participants had positive attitudes toward receiving individualized feedback delivered in real time. © 2017 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  1. Adapting high-throughput screening methods and assays for biocontainment laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Lynn; Tigabu, Bersabeh; White, E Lucile; Bostwick, Robert; Tower, Nichole; Bukreyev, Alexander; Rockx, Barry; LeDuc, James W; Noah, James W

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) has been integrated into the drug discovery process, and multiple assay formats have been widely used in many different disease areas but with limited focus on infectious agents. In recent years, there has been an increase in the number of HTS campaigns using infectious wild-type pathogens rather than surrogates or biochemical pathogen-derived targets. Concurrently, enhanced emerging pathogen surveillance and increased human mobility have resulted in an increase in the emergence and dissemination of infectious human pathogens with serious public health, economic, and social implications at global levels. Adapting the HTS drug discovery process to biocontainment laboratories to develop new drugs for these previously uncharacterized and highly pathogenic agents is now feasible, but HTS at higher biosafety levels (BSL) presents a number of unique challenges. HTS has been conducted with multiple bacterial and viral pathogens at both BSL-2 and BSL-3, and pilot screens have recently been extended to BSL-4 environments for both Nipah and Ebola viruses. These recent successful efforts demonstrate that HTS can be safely conducted at the highest levels of biological containment. This review outlines the specific issues that must be considered in the execution of an HTS drug discovery program for high-containment pathogens. We present an overview of the requirements for HTS in high-level biocontainment laboratories.

  2. Molecular-based mycobacterial identification in a clinical laboratory setting: a comparison of two methods.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donnell, N

    2012-01-01

    Many mycobacterial species are pathogenic to humans, with infection occurring worldwide. Infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a well-described global phenomenon, but other mycobacterial species are increasingly shown to be the cause of both pulmonary and extrapulmonary infection and are managed differently from M. tuberculosis infection. Rapid and accurate differentiation of mycobacterial species is, therefore, critical to guide timely and appropriate therapeutic and public health management. This study evaluates two commercially available DNA strip assays, the Genotype Common Mycobacteria (CM) assay (Hain Lifescience, Nehren, Germany) and the Speed-oligo Mycobacteria assay (Vircell, Spain) for their usefulness in a clinical laboratory setting. Both assays were evaluated on 71 clinical mycobacterial isolates, previously identified using Gen-Probe AccuProbe and through a UK mycobacteriology reference laboratory, as well as 29 non-mycobacterial isolates. Concordant results were obtained for 98% of isolates using both assays. The sensitivity was 97% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 93.3-100%) for the CM assay and 98.6% (95% CI: 95.9-100%) for the Speed-oligo assay. Overall, both assays proved to be useful tools for rapid and sensitive mycobacterial species identification, although interpretation of results was easier with the CM assay. Finally, results were available within one day, compared to current identification times which range between seven days and four weeks.

  3. Searching transients in large-scale surveys. A method based on the Abbe value

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowlavi, N.

    2014-08-01

    Aims: A new method is presented to identify transient candidates in large-scale surveys based on the variability pattern in their light curves. Methods: The method is based on the Abbe value, Ab, that estimates the smoothness of a light curve, and on a newly introduced value called the excess Abbe and denoted excessAb, that estimates the regularity of the light curve variability pattern over the duration of the observations. Results: Based on simulated light curves, transients are shown to occupy a specific region in the {diagram} diagram, distinct from sources presenting pulsating-like features in their light curves or having featureless light curves. The method is tested on real light curves taken from EROS-2 and OGLE-II surveys in a 0.50° × 0.17° field of the sky in the Large Magellanic Cloud centered at RA(J2000) = 5h25m56.5s and Dec(J2000) = -69d29m43.3s. The method identifies 43 EROS-2 transient candidates out of a total of 1300 variable stars, and 19 more OGLE-II candidates, 10 of which do not have any EROS-2 variable star matches and which would need further confirmation to assess their reliability. The efficiency of the method is further tested by comparing the list of transient candidates with known Be stars in the literature. It is shown that all Be stars known in the studied field of view with detectable bursts or outbursts are successfully extracted by the method. In addition, four new transient candidates displaying bursts and/or outbursts are found in the field, of which at least two are good new Be candidates. Conclusions: The new method proves to be a potentially powerful tool to extract transient candidates from large-scale multi-epoch surveys. The better the photometric measurement uncertainties are, the cleaner the list of detected transient candidates is. In addition, the diagram diagram is shown to be a good diagnostic tool to check the data quality of multi-epoch photometric surveys. A trend of instrumental and/or data reduction origin

  4. Corrosion Screening of EV31A Magnesium and Other Magnesium Alloys using Laboratory-Based Accelerated Corrosion and Electro-Chemical Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Corrosion Screening of EV31A Magnesium and Other Magnesium Alloys Using Laboratory-Based Accelerated Corrosion and Electro-chemical Methods...originator. Army Research Laboratory Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005-5066 ARL-TR-6899 July 2014 Corrosion Screening of EV31A...Magnesium and Other Magnesium Alloys Using Laboratory-Based Accelerated Corrosion and Electro-chemical Methods Brian E. Placzankis, Joseph P

  5. Searching transients in large-scale surveys. A method based on the Abbe value

    CERN Document Server

    Mowlavi, Nami

    2014-01-01

    (Abridged) A new method is presented to identify transient candidates in large-scale surveys based on the variability pattern in their light curves. The method is based on the Abbe value, that estimates the smoothness of a light curve, and on a newly introduced value called the excess Abbe that estimates the regularity of the light curve variability pattern over the duration of the observations. Based on simulated light curves, transients are shown to occupy a specific region in the Abbe versus Excess Abbe diagram, distinct from sources presenting pulsating-like features in their light curves or having featureless light curves. The method is tested on real light curves taken from EROS-2 and OGLE-II surveys in a 0.50deg x 0.17deg field of the sky in the LMC. The method identifies 43 EROS-2 transient candidates out of a total of ~1300 variable stars, and 19 more OGLE-II candidates. The efficiency of the method is further tested by comparing the list of transient candidates with known Be stars in the literature....

  6. Integration of infrared thermography and high-frequency electromagnetic methods in archaeological surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Maio, Rosa; Meola, Carosena; Fedi, Maurizio; Carlomagno, Giovanni Maria

    2010-05-01

    voids and/or degraded zones, water content mapping, location of reinforcing bars and metal elements in concrete structures. The attention of this work is focused on the integration of both techniques for inspection of architectonic structures. First, an integration of techniques is performed in laboratory by considering an ad hoc specimen with insertion of anomalies. Then, the techniques are used for the inspection in situ of some important Italian archaeological sites, such as Pompei (Naples) and Nora (Cagliari). In the first site, the exploration is devoted to the analysis of wall decoration of the architectonical complex of Villa Imperiale with the aim to support the hypothesis that attributes the Villa to Imperial property as well as to evaluate the state of conservation of frescoes and underneath structure. As main findings, the applied techniques allows for detection of hidden previous decorative layers and for discrimination of different types of paint used as well as for identification of areas damaged by ingression in-depth of moisture and/or by disaggregation of the constituent materials. In the archaeological area of Nora, instead, the prospecting is devised to the evaluation of the state of degradation of two significant buildings of the ancient site: the temple and the theatre. Due to the very high horizontal and vertical resolution of the performed surveys, detailed physical anomaly maps of the investigated structures are obtained. Large portions of the masonry walls appear interested by decomposition of the mortar binding the stone blocks, which sometimes propagates along the whole stone wall. The information coming from a joint interpretation of IRT and GPR data allows detailed 3D images of the two investigated buildings, which are useful for future restoration planning.

  7. Resampling method for applying density-dependent habitat selection theory to wildlife surveys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia Tardy

    Full Text Available Isodar theory can be used to evaluate fitness consequences of density-dependent habitat selection by animals. A typical habitat isodar is a regression curve plotting competitor densities in two adjacent habitats when individual fitness is equal. Despite the increasing use of habitat isodars, their application remains largely limited to areas composed of pairs of adjacent habitats that are defined a priori. We developed a resampling method that uses data from wildlife surveys to build isodars in heterogeneous landscapes without having to predefine habitat types. The method consists in randomly placing blocks over the survey area and dividing those blocks in two adjacent sub-blocks of the same size. Animal abundance is then estimated within the two sub-blocks. This process is done 100 times. Different functional forms of isodars can be investigated by relating animal abundance and differences in habitat features between sub-blocks. We applied this method to abundance data of raccoons and striped skunks, two of the main hosts of rabies virus in North America. Habitat selection by raccoons and striped skunks depended on both conspecific abundance and the difference in landscape composition and structure between sub-blocks. When conspecific abundance was low, raccoons and striped skunks favored areas with relatively high proportions of forests and anthropogenic features, respectively. Under high conspecific abundance, however, both species preferred areas with rather large corn-forest edge densities and corn field proportions. Based on random sampling techniques, we provide a robust method that is applicable to a broad range of species, including medium- to large-sized mammals with high mobility. The method is sufficiently flexible to incorporate multiple environmental covariates that can reflect key requirements of the focal species. We thus illustrate how isodar theory can be used with wildlife surveys to assess density-dependent habitat selection

  8. Application of synthetic peptides in development of a serologic method for laboratory diagnosis of schistosomiasis mansoni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward José de Oliveira

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The immunoreactivity of seven peptides synthesized from Schistosoma mansoni proteins, was evaluated by dot-blot and ELISA assays using two different sensitization methodologies. The best results were obtained on wells of the Costar 3590 microplates coated with peptides P1, P2, P3, P6, and P7 using conventional methodology. The signals increased considerably (p < 0.0003 on wells sensitized with P1 to P6 using alternative methodology. In contrast, the well coated with peptide P7 presented lower signal when compared with conventional methodology (p = 0.0019. These results, establish the basis for the application of synthetic peptides for laboratory diagnosis of schistosomiasis mansoni.

  9. Laboratory and field verification of a method to estimate the extent of petroleum biodegradation in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Gregory S; Hardenstine, Jeffery H; Liu, Bo; Uhler, Allen D

    2012-08-07

    We describe a new and rapid quantitative approach to assess the extent of aerobic biodegradation of volatile and semivolatile hydrocarbons in crude oil, using Shushufindi oil from Ecuador as an example. Volatile hydrocarbon biodegradation was both rapid and complete-100% of the benzene, toluene, xylenes (BTEX) and 98% of the gasoline-range organics (GRO) were biodegraded in less than 2 days. Severe biodegradation of the semivolatile hydrocarbons occurred in the inoculated samples with 67% and 87% loss of the diesel-range hydrocarbons (DRO) in 3 and 20 weeks, respectively. One-hundred percent of the naphthalene, fluorene, and phenanthrene, and 46% of the chrysene in the oil were biodegraded within 3 weeks. Percent depletion estimates based on C(30) 17α,21β(H)-hopane (hopane) underestimated the diesel-range organics (DRO) and USEPA 16 priority pollutant PAH losses in the most severely biodegraded samples. The C(28) 20S-triaromatic steroid (TAS) was found to yield more accurate depletion estimates, and a new hopane stability ratio (HSR = hopane/(hopane + TAS)) was developed to monitor hopane degradation in field samples. Oil degradation within field soil samples impacted with Shushufindi crude oil was 83% and 98% for DRO and PAH, respectively. The gas chromatograms and percent depletion estimates indicated that similar levels of petroleum degradation occurred in both the field and laboratory samples, but hopane degradation was substantially less in the field samples. We conclude that cometabolism of hopane may be a factor during rapid biodegradation of petroleum in the laboratory and may not occur to a great extent during biodegradation in the field. We recommend that the hopane stability ratio be monitored in future field studies. If hopane degradation is observed, then the TAS percent depletion estimate should be computed to correct for any bias that may result in petroleum depletion estimates based on hopane.

  10. Intercomparison of the GOS approach, superposition T-matrix method, and laboratory measurements for black carbon optical properties during aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Cenlin; Takano, Yoshi; Liou, Kuo-Nan; Yang, Ping; Li, Qinbin; Mackowski, Daniel W.

    2016-11-01

    We perform a comprehensive intercomparison of the geometric-optics surface-wave (GOS) approach, the superposition T-matrix method, and laboratory measurements for optical properties of fresh and coated/aged black carbon (BC) particles with complex structures. GOS and T-matrix calculations capture the measured optical (i.e., extinction, absorption, and scattering) cross sections of fresh BC aggregates, with 5-20% differences depending on particle size. We find that the T-matrix results tend to be lower than the measurements, due to uncertainty in theoretical approximations of realistic BC structures, particle property measurements, and numerical computations in the method. On the contrary, the GOS results are higher than the measurements (hence the T-matrix results) for BC radii 100 nm. We find good agreement (differences methods in asymmetry factors for various BC sizes and aggregating structures. For aged BC particles coated with sulfuric acid, GOS and T-matrix results closely match laboratory measurements of optical cross sections. Sensitivity calculations show that differences between the two methods in optical cross sections vary with coating structures for radii 100 nm. We find small deviations (≤10%) in asymmetry factors computed from the two methods for most BC coating structures and sizes, but several complex structures have 10-30% differences. This study provides the foundation for downstream application of the GOS approach in radiative transfer and climate studies.

  11. A computer-based ``laboratory`` course in mathematical methods for science and engineering: The Legendre Polynomials module. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silbar, R.R. [WhistleSoft, Inc., Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    1998-09-28

    WhistleSoft, Inc., proposed to convert a successful pedagogical experiment into multimedia software, making it accessible to a much broader audience. A colleague, Richard J. Jacob, has been teaching a workshop course in mathematical methods at Arizona State University (ASU) for lower undergraduate science majors. Students work at their own pace through paper-based tutorials containing many exercises, either with pencil and paper or with computer tools such as spreadsheets. These tutorial modules cry out for conversion into an interactive computer-based tutorial course that is suitable both for the classroom and for self-paced, independent learning. WhistleSoft has made a prototype of one such module, Legendre Polynomials, under Subcontract (No F97440018-35) with the Los Alamos Laboratory`s Technology Commercialization Office for demonstration and marketing purposes.

  12. Preparation of vitamin E loaded nanocapsules by the nanoprecipitation method: from laboratory scale to large scale using a membrane contactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khayata, N; Abdelwahed, W; Chehna, M F; Charcosset, C; Fessi, H

    2012-02-28

    Vitamin E or α-tocopherol is widely used as a strong antioxidant in many medical and cosmetic applications, but is rapidly degraded, because of its light, heat and oxygen sensitivity. In this study, we applied the nanoprecipitation method to prepare vitamin E-loaded nanocapsules, at laboratory-scale and pilot-scale. We scaled-up the preparation of nanocapsule with the membrane contactor technique. The effect of several formulation variables on the vitamin E-loaded nanocapsules properties (mean diameter, zeta potential, and drug entrapment efficiency) was investigated. The optimized formulation at laboratory-scale and pilot-scale lead to the preparation of vitamin E-loaded nanocapsules with mean diameter of 165 and 172 nm, respectively, and a high encapsulation efficiency (98% and 97%, respectively).

  13. Virtual and super - virtual refraction method: Application to synthetic data and 2012 of Karangsambung survey data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugraha, Andri Dian; Adisatrio, Philipus Ronnie

    2013-09-01

    Seismic refraction survey is one of geophysical method useful for imaging earth interior, definitely for imaging near surface. One of the common problems in seismic refraction survey is weak amplitude due to attenuations at far offset. This phenomenon will make it difficult to pick first refraction arrival, hence make it challenging to produce the near surface image. Seismic interferometry is a new technique to manipulate seismic trace for obtaining Green's function from a pair of receiver. One of its uses is for improving first refraction arrival quality at far offset. This research shows that we could estimate physical properties such as seismic velocity and thickness from virtual refraction processing. Also, virtual refraction could enhance the far offset signal amplitude since there is stacking procedure involved in it. Our results show super - virtual refraction processing produces seismic image which has higher signal-to-noise ratio than its raw seismic image. In the end, the numbers of reliable first arrival picks are also increased.

  14. Survey on methods of increasing the efficiency of extended state disturbance observers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madoński, R; Herman, P

    2015-05-01

    This survey presents various methods of improving the overall estimation quality in the class of extended state observers (ESO), which estimate not only the conventional states of the system, but the acting disturbance as well. This type of observers is crucial in forming the active disturbance rejection control structure (ADRC), where the precision of online perturbation reconstruction and cancellation directly influences the robustness of the closed-loop control system. Various aspects of the observer-based disturbance estimation/rejection loop are covered by this work and divided into three categories, related with observer: structure, tuning, and working conditions. The survey is dedicated to researchers and practitioners who are interested in increasing the efficiency of their ADRC-based governing schemes.

  15. The Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey. VIII. A Mid-Infrared Kinematic Distance Discrimination Method

    CERN Document Server

    Ellsworth-Bowers, Timothy P; Rosolowsky, Erik; Mairs, Steven; Evans, Neal J; Battersby, Cara; Ginsburg, Adam; Shirley, Yancy L; Bally, John

    2013-01-01

    We present a new distance estimation method for dust-continuum-identified molecular cloud clumps. Recent (sub-)millimeter Galactic plane surveys have cataloged tens of thousands of these objects, but detailed study of their physical properties requires robust distance determinations. We derive Bayesian distance probability density functions (DPDFs) for 770 objects from the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey in the longitude range 7.5 < l < 65. The DPDF formalism is based on kinematic distances, and uses external data sets to place prior distance probabilities to resolve the kinematic distance ambiguity (KDA) for objects in the inner Galaxy. We present priors related to the mid-infrared absorption of dust in dense molecular regions and the Galactic distribution of molecular gas. By assuming a numerical model of Galactic mid-infrared emission and simple radiative transfer, we match the morphology of millimeter thermal dust emission with mid-infrared absorption to compute a prior DPDF for distance discriminatio...

  16. Statistical Methods for Detecting Stellar Occultations by Kuiper Belt Objects the Taiwanese-American Occultation Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Liang, C L; De Pater, I; Alcock, C B; Axelrod, T; Wang, A; Liang, Chyng-Lan; Rice, John A.; Pater, Imke de; Alcock, Charles; Axelrod, Tim; Wang, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    The Taiwanese-American Occultation Survey (TAOS) will detect objects in the Kuiper Belt, by measuring the rate of occultations of stars by these objects, using an array of three to four 50cm wide-field robotic telescopes. Thousands of stars will be monitored, resulting in hundreds of millions of photometric measurements per night. To optimize the success of TAOS, we have investigated various methods of gathering and processing the data and developed statistical methods for detecting occultations. In this paper we discuss these methods. The resulting estimated detection efficiencies will be used to guide the choice of various operational parameters determining the mode of actual observation when the telescopes come on line and begin routine observations. In particular we show how real-time detection algorithms may be constructed, taking advantage of having multiple telescopes. We also discuss a retrospective method for estimating the rate at which occultations occur.

  17. Experimental innovations in surface science a guide to practical laboratory methods and instruments

    CERN Document Server

    Yates, John T

    2015-01-01

    This book is a new edition of a classic text on experimental methods and instruments in surface science. It offers practical insight useful to chemists, physicists, and materials scientists working in experimental surface science. This enlarged second edition contains almost 300 descriptions of experimental methods. The more than 50 active areas with individual scientific and measurement concepts and activities relevant to each area are presented in this book. The key areas covered are: Vacuum System Technology, Mechanical Fabrication Techniques, Measurement Methods, Thermal Control, Delivery of Adsorbates to Surfaces, UHV Windows, Surface Preparation Methods, High Area Solids, Safety. The book is written for researchers and graduate students.

  18. THE BOLOCAM GALACTIC PLANE SURVEY. VIII. A MID-INFRARED KINEMATIC DISTANCE DISCRIMINATION METHOD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellsworth-Bowers, Timothy P.; Glenn, Jason; Battersby, Cara; Ginsburg, Adam; Bally, John [CASA, University of Colorado, UCB 389, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Rosolowsky, Erik [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia Okanagan, 3333 University Way, Kelowna, BC V1V 1V7 (Canada); Mairs, Steven [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, 3800 Finnerty Road, Victoria, BC V8P 1A1 (Canada); Evans, Neal J. II [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, 1 University Station C1400, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Shirley, Yancy L., E-mail: timothy.ellsworthbowers@colorado.edu [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2013-06-10

    We present a new distance estimation method for dust-continuum-identified molecular cloud clumps. Recent (sub-)millimeter Galactic plane surveys have cataloged tens of thousands of these objects, plausible precursors to stellar clusters, but detailed study of their physical properties requires robust distance determinations. We derive Bayesian distance probability density functions (DPDFs) for 770 objects from the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey in the Galactic longitude range 7. Degree-Sign 5 {<=} l {<=} 65 Degree-Sign . The DPDF formalism is based on kinematic distances, and uses any number of external data sets to place prior distance probabilities to resolve the kinematic distance ambiguity (KDA) for objects in the inner Galaxy. We present here priors related to the mid-infrared absorption of dust in dense molecular regions and the distribution of molecular gas in the Galactic disk. By assuming a numerical model of Galactic mid-infrared emission and simple radiative transfer, we match the morphology of (sub-)millimeter thermal dust emission with mid-infrared absorption to compute a prior DPDF for distance discrimination. Selecting objects first from (sub-)millimeter source catalogs avoids a bias towards the darkest infrared dark clouds (IRDCs) and extends the range of heliocentric distance probed by mid-infrared extinction and includes lower-contrast sources. We derive well-constrained KDA resolutions for 618 molecular cloud clumps, with approximately 15% placed at or beyond the tangent distance. Objects with mid-infrared contrast sufficient to be cataloged as IRDCs are generally placed at the near kinematic distance. Distance comparisons with Galactic Ring Survey KDA res