WorldWideScience

Sample records for survey involving students

  1. Involving International Student Teams in GPS and GRS Surveys to Study Cryospheric Change in Greenland and the Colorado Front Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzfeld, U. C.; Mayer, H.

    2009-12-01

    In the course of research programs to develop a methodology for the study of microtopography of ice and snow surfaces, we placed a strong emphasis on the involvement of students. This project provided the opportunity to engage students in every step from building the instrument through development of the data processing, the actual field measurements, processing of the resultant data, their evaluation and interpretation to the final publication in scientific journals. The development of the Glacier Roughness Sensor (GRS) incorporating Global Positioning System (GPS) technology and the fieldwork on the Greenland Inland Ice were particularly fascinating and instructive for students. In a related snow-hydrological research project on Niwot Ridge in the Colorado Front Range, we involved students in two season-long measurement campaigns in a high alpine environment. Students from the Universität Trier, Germany, and the University of Colorado Boulder participated in this project to learn about the value of international collaboration in science. Funding was provided by Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Antarctic and Arctic Program) and the U.S. National Science Foundation (Hydrological Sciences Program). Students participated in preparatory classes and field camps, selected their own research projects and received university credit towards their degrees in geography or environmental sciences. All student participants in the MICROTOP projects have gone on to higher university education and become professionally exceptionally successful. Students setting up camp on the Greenland Ice Sheet during expedition MICROTOP 99.

  2. Radiologic science students' perceptions of parental involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuBose, Cheryl; Barymon, Deanna; Vanderford, Virginia; Hensley, Chad; Shaver, Gary

    2014-01-01

    A new generation of students is in the classroom, and they are not always alone. Helicopter parents, those who hover around the student and attempt to ease life's challenges, are accompanying the students to radiologic science programs across the nation. To determine radiologic science students' perception regarding their parents' level of involvement in their lives. A survey focused on student perceptions of parental involvement inside and outside of the academic setting was completed by 121 radiologic science students at 4 institutional settings. The analysis demonstrates statistically significant relationships between student sex, age, marital status, and perceived level of parental involvement. In addition, as financial support increases, students' perception of the level of parental involvement also increases. Radiologic science students want their parents to be involved in their higher education decisions. Research indicates that students with involved parents are more successful, and faculty should be prepared for increased parental involvement in the future. Radiologic science students perceive their parents to be involved in their academic careers. Ninety-five percent of respondents believe that the financial support of their parent or parents contributes to their academic success. Sixty-five percent of participants are content with their parents' current level of involvement, while 11% wish their parents were more involved in their academic careers.

  3. Influence of Involvement in Sports on Students' Involvement in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to establish whether students' involvement in sports activities affected their involvement in academic activities. Data were collected using a self-administered questionnaire and analysed using percentages and means. Spearman's correlation coefficient was used to test the hypotheses that guided ...

  4. Increasing Student Involvement in IEPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan-Spohn, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the author proposes that students who led their Individual Education Program (IEP) meetings were better informed about their own disabilities, rights, and accommodations, and that the act of leading the meeting resulted in improved self-advocacy and self-confidence. Also, in understanding their list of accommodations and…

  5. Improving Student Performance through Parent Involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steventon, Candace E.

    A personalized parenting program was implemented to address poor academic performance and low self-esteem of high school students. Student records, the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory, the Behavior Evaluation Scale, and teacher surveys were employed to identify and measure academic and/or self-perception growth. Parents participated in an 8-week…

  6. The evidence-based practice profiles of academic and clinical staff involved in pre-registration nursing students' education: a cross sectional survey of US and UK staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upton, Penney; Scurlock-Evans, Laura; Williamson, Kathleen; Rouse, Joanne; Upton, Dominic

    2015-01-01

    Competency in evidence-based practice (EBP) is a requirement for graduate nurses. Despite a growing body of research exploring the EBP profiles of students, little research has explored the EBP profiles of nurse educators. To explore: the differences/similarities in the EBP profiles of US and UK clinical and academic faculty; the barriers nurse educators experience when teaching EBP; the impact of postgraduate education on EBP profile and; what nurse educators perceive "success" in implementing and teaching EBP to be. A cross-sectional online survey design was employed. Two Universities delivering undergraduate nursing education in the US and UK, in partnership with large hospital systems, small community hospitals, community settings, and independent sector health organisations. Eighty-one nurse educators working in academic and clinical contexts in the US and UK (US academic=12, US clinical=17, UK academic=9, UK clinical=43) were recruited opportunistically. Participants were emailed a weblink to an online survey, comprising demographic questions, the Evidence-Based Practice Questionnaire and open-ended questions about EBP barriers, facilitators and successes. Quantitative results indicated that academic faculty scored significantly higher on knowledge and skills of EBP, than clinical faculty, but revealed no other significant differences on EBP use or attitudes, or between US and UK professionals. Participants with postgraduate training scored significantly higher on EBP knowledge/skills, but not EBP attitudes or use. Qualitative findings identified key themes relating to EBP barriers and facilitators, including: Evidence-, organisational-, and teaching-related issues. Perceptions of successes in EBP were also described. Nurse educators working in the UK and US face similar EBP barriers to teaching and implementation, but view it positively and use it frequently. Clinical staff may require extra support to maintain their EBP knowledge and skills in

  7. Medical student involvement in website development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Benjamin P; Gorrindo, Tristan L; Patel, Sanjay G; McTigue, Michael P; Rodgers, Scott M; Miller, Bonnie M

    2009-07-01

    The digital management of educational resources and information is becoming an important part of medical education. At Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, two medical students sought to create a website for all medical students to act as each student's individual homepage. Using widely available software and database technology, a highly customized Web portal, known as the VMS Portal, was created for medical students. Access to course material, evaluations, academic information, and community assets were customized for individual users. Modular features were added over the course of a year in response to student requests, monitoring of usage habits, and solicitation of direct student feedback. During the first 742 days of the VMS Portal's release, there were 209,460 student login sessions (282 average daily). Of 348 medical students surveyed (71% response rate), 84% agreed or strongly agreed that 'consolidated student resources made their lives easier' and 82% agreed or strongly agreed that their needs were represented by having medical students design and create the VMS Portal. In the VMS Portal project, medical students were uniquely positioned to help consolidate, integrate, and develop Web resources for peers. As other medical schools create and expand digital resources, the valuable input and perspective of medical students should be solicited.

  8. Student Involvement in Learning and School Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Lorin W.

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the relationship between selected student characteristics, student involvement in learning, and achievement. Both naturalistic (n = 28, 27) and experimental studies were conducted. In the experimental study, two classes (n = 29, 26) learned a sequence of matrix arithmetic by mastery learning strategies.…

  9. Occupational risk involving students of health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Éder Oliveira Rocha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the social representations of occupational risks involving students in the area of health. Method: Exploratory research with 160 students from nursing, medicine and dentistry, through interviews. The data were processed in ALCESTE 4.8 and lexical analysis done by descending hierarchical classification. Results: In four semantic classes, namely: occupational risks involving students in the area of health, the work environment and occupational risks, exposure to accidents with sharps and adoption of standard precautions as biosecurity measures. Conclusion: Students healthcare represent occupational risks, such as a concern for the prevention of cross infection in the workplace, should both professionals and students of health, adopt standard precautions and biosecurity measures in the environment work.

  10. Involvement of Students in E-Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Ya, Marwa; Aziz, Sheikha A.; Mohyuddin, Muhammad Raheel; Al Balushi, Nabila

    2017-01-01

    The involvement of E-learning activities for students in the classroom play an important role in the teaching and learning process. In this paper, the authors describe how we collected information from 3-different Colleges/Universities in Oman forming an online study with regard to the use of internet, e-library, online book access, and…

  11. Multiple Surveys of Students and Survey Fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Stephen R.; Whitcomb, Michael E.; Weitzer, William H.

    2004-01-01

    This chapter reviews the literature on survey fatigue and summarizes a research project that indicates that administering multiple surveys in one academic year can significantly suppress response rates in later surveys. (Contains 4 tables.)

  12. A Survey of Industrial Involvement in Open Source

    OpenAIRE

    Røsdal, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    This thesis presents the results of an explorative survey of industrial involvement in open source. The survey is performed in collaboration with participants from the European ITEA project, COSI (Co-development using inner & Open source in Software Intensive products). The survey was performed to explore aspects of industrial involvement in open source, as industrial management of open source project, industrial use of open source components, related development, and communication processes,...

  13. School Liability: Student to Student Injuries Involving Students with Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettenhausen, Sherrie

    In the absence of immunity, courts have held schools and school personnel liable for personal injury by a student with a disability that resulted from negligent failure to provide a reasonable safe environment, failure to warn of known hazards, or failure to provide adequate supervision. Case law is presented to demonstrate the extent that school…

  14. Parent Involvement and Student Performance: The Influence of School Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeal, Ralph B., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    Researchers focusing on parent involvement continue to concentrate their efforts on the relationship between involvement and student performance in isolation of the school context in which involvement occurs. This research outlines an ecology of involvement and how this social context affects parent involvement and student performance. Relying on…

  15. psycho-social correlates of students' involvement in secret cults

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF EKWUEME

    as constituting general threat to peace in institutions of higher learning. (Fawole ... involvement in secret cults, and to investigate if peer group do influence students involvement in secret cults. .... be of benefit to students, teachers, parents,.

  16. Helicopter Parents Help Students, Survey Finds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipka, Sara

    2007-01-01

    Helicopter parents, notorious for hovering over their college-age children, may actually help students thrive, according to this year's National Survey of Student Engagement. Students whose parents intervene on their behalf--38 percent of freshmen and 29 percent of seniors--are more active in and satisfied with college, says the monstrous annual…

  17. MENTAL HEALTH AND UNIVERSITY STUDENTS: SURVEY

    OpenAIRE

    Woodgate, Roberta

    2014-01-01

    We want to learn from university students about your experiences and perspectives on mental health and well-being in the context of being a student. Your input can help us develop evidence-based intervention programs that can help address the mental health needs of students. This survey should take 15-20 minutes to complete.

  18. The Class of 2011 Student Survey Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Association of Colleges and Employers (NJ3), 2011

    2011-01-01

    Based on responses from 20,000 college seniors nationwide, "The Class of 2011 Student Survey Report" gives you hard numbers "plus" the analysis you need to develop your college recruiting strategy and build your brand among college students. Align your recruiting strategies tactics with students' wants, needs, attitudes, and behaviors--you'll get…

  19. Comparing International and American Students: Involvement in College Life and Overall Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ji; Cole, Darnell

    2017-01-01

    Using longitudinal survey data, this study compares 191 international and 409 American students' involvement in college life, the extent to which the involvement is influenced by race/ethnicity, gender, and language background, and the extent to which the involvement influences overall satisfaction. Major findings include: International and…

  20. Sexual harassment of students - survey results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrijević Aleksandra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to present results of the survey on sexual harassment of students of the Faculty of Special Education and Rehabilitation, University of Belgrade. It starts with presenting and discussing different definitions of the term ‘sexual harassment’. Afterwards, a brief overview of available surveys on this subject is provided. Results of the surveys completed so far show that this kind of students’ victimization in educational institutions is frequent in all parts of the world, regardless of the economic, ethnic and religious grounds. The aim of the survey conducted at the Faculty of Special Education and Rehabilitation (FASPER was to identify the prevalence and characteristics of sexual harassment among undergraduate students, as well as possible forms of assistance and support to students who experience sexual harassment. A survey was conducted by the students of FASPER during April and May 2014 on a sample of 147 students of all four years of undergraduate studies. For data collection a victimization survey was used. The survey results suggested that sexual harassment of students of FASPER is prevalent, while it only manifests itself in a form of verbal harassment with a sexual connotation. Female students are more exposed to harassment than male students, but we need to interpret this finding with a caution due to the fact that a sample was mostly consisted of female respondents. According to the students’ opinion, possible solutions for preventing and eliminating sexual harassment of students of FASPER are education of students and employees, adoption of rules for protection of students from this kind of victimization and establishment of support service for students who experience victimization by sexual harassment.

  1. Involving Students in Developing Math Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapke, Tina

    2017-01-01

    Many studies have claimed that traditional testing actually promotes students' use of superficial approaches to learning. When preparing to take tests, students typically memorize and cram rather than understanding the material and gaining new perspectives. This article describes how the author recast traditional tests by having students take a…

  2. Field classes: key to involve and attract students to soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muggler, Cristine Carole; Cardoso, Irene Maria; da Silva Lopes, Angelica

    2015-04-01

    Soil genesis is a subject taught to students of Agrarian Sciences and Geography at the Federal University of Viçosa in Minas Gerais, Brazil. Each semester 200 to 250 students inscribe for it. It is organized as the first 60 hours course on soils for 1st and 2nd year's students. The course has a distinct pedagogical approach, which is based on Paulo Freire's education principles, known as socio constructivism. In such approach, learning environments and materials are prepared to stimulate dialogues and exchange of knowledge between students themselves, strengthening that their role is crucial to their own learning. During the course, students have different types of practical classes: indoors, in a class room or at the Earth Sciences museum and outdoors, in the field. In the class room they have the opportunity to handle materials -minerals, rocks, soils and maps-, follow demonstrations and perform small experiments. The classes given in the museum intend a broadening of the subjects approached in theoretical and practical classes. In the field classes the students are organized in small groups with the task to investigate soil formation by observation and description of geology, landscape, land use, soil expositions and some of the soil properties. Attracting students to soils involves looking at meanings and perceptions related to soils they bring with themselves and follow this up to sensitize and create awareness about their importance. With this aim, it is also included, as part of the evaluation, a final voluntary presentation that many of the students do. The presentation can be a song, a poem, a sketch or whatever they propose and create. Many of the presentations bring topics related to the new perception about soils they get during the semester and to ideas or questions raised in the field classes. A survey with the students showed that field classes are by far the preferred classes and they are considered more dynamic. Since students have less and less

  3. Homework Involvement and Academic Achievement of Native and Immigrant Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez, Natalia; Regueiro, Bibiana; Epstein, Joyce L; Piñeiro, Isabel; Díaz, Sara M; Valle, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Homework is a debated issue in society and its relationship with academic achievement has been deeply studied in the last years. Nowadays, schools are multicultural stages in which students from different cultures and ethnicities work together. In this sense, the present study aims to compare homework involvement and academic achievement in a sample of native and immigrant students, as well as to study immigrant students' relationship between homework involvement and Math achievement. The sample included 1328 students, 10-16 years old from Spanish families (85.6%) or immigrant students or students of immigrant origin (14.4%) from South America, Europe, Africa, and Asia. The study was developed considering three informants: elementary and secondary students, their parents and their teachers. Results showed higher involvement in homework in native students than in immigrant. Between immigrants students, those who are more involved in homework have better academic achievement in Math at secondary grades. There weren't found gender differences on homework involvement, but age differences were reported. Immigrant students are less involved in homework at secondary grades that students in elementary grades. The study highlights the relevance of homework involvement in academic achievement in immigrant students.

  4. Substance use by college students: the role of intrinsic versus extrinsic motivation for athletic involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockafellow, Bradley D; Saules, Karen K

    2006-09-01

    Certain types of athletic involvement may confer risk for substance use by college students. This study investigated whether motivational factors play a role in the relationship between athletic involvement and substance use. Intercollegiate athletes (n=98) and exercisers (n=120) were surveyed about substance use and motivation for athletic involvement. Athletes and exercisers who were extrinsically motivated had significantly higher rates of alcohol use than their intrinsically motivated counterparts. Results suggest that college students who are extrinsically motivated for involvement in physical activity/athletics--particularly those involved in team sports--may be in need of targeted prevention efforts. ((c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Involvement of school students in fights with weapons: prevalence and associated factors in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Melo, Alice Cristina Medeiros; Garcia, Leila Posenato

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Violence, as well as other behaviors, is often intensified during adolescence and early adulthood. The objective of this study is estimate the prevalence of Brazilian school students involvement in fights with weapons and to analyze the associated factors. Methods This is a cross-sectional study using data from the National School Student Health Survey conducted in 2012 with 9th grade elementary school students attending 2842 schools in all 27 Brazilian Federative Units. T...

  6. mba.com Prospective Students Survey. 2015 Survey Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Gregg

    2015-01-01

    This 2015 "mba.com Prospective Students Survey Report" explores the motivations, career goals, preferred program types, financial choices, decision time lines, and intended study destinations of individuals interested in pursuing a graduate management education. Findings analyzed in the report represent responses from nearly 12,000…

  7. The effectiveness of student involvement in decision- making and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    universities in South-West Nigeria.1The research findings indicate that there is a significant relationship ... the management-student relationship and teaching effectiveness. .... involvement to accomplish the university's mission through its strategic plan. ..... Students should remain in the classroom and not get involved in the.

  8. Involving Students in Residence Halls in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, S. Raymond; Chan, Rebecca; Lee, Esther

    2016-01-01

    This article reports a study based on A. W. Astin's (1984) involvement theory applied in residence halls at a public university in Hong Kong, China. The resident students who were involved as participants or student leaders in this study were found to be better developed in terms of leadership, career development, multicultural experience,…

  9. Surveys of Students Challenge "Helicopter Parent" Stereotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Stories of "helicopter parents" abound. But several longtime student-affairs officials agree that while helicopter parents are real, their numbers--and behaviors--have been exaggerated. Parental involvement on campus, they say, is usually more of a help than a headache, for students and colleges alike. Some officials believe colleges must do even…

  10. Peer Involvement in University Students' Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zlatka Cugmas

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the correlations between peer involvement in students’ education and their self-perception, attachment style, relationships with peers, personality and well-being. We used the Inventory of parent and peer attachment (Armsden & Greenberg, 1987, Relationship questionnaire (Bartholomew & Horowitz, 1991, Questionnaire of the subjects’ self-perceptions (Cugmas, 2012 and The big five questionnaire (BFQ; Caprara et al, 2002. We developed the questionnaires of peer involvement and subjects’ well-being. Positive relationships with peers, secure attachment style, positive self-perceptions, some personal characteristics and well-being were positively associated with peer support, and negatively with peer pressure.

  11. CPL - a way to increase student's commitment, involvement and collaboration?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Velling, Louise Ærthøj; Larsen, Mette Yde

    students and lecturers indicated that CPL as didactics is difficult directly to adapt in teaching in higher educational level. However, the evaluation indicated that some elements from CPL contributed in a positive way by increasing student’s involvement and commitment. Also a better collaboration between...... the students was indicated as well as a strengthened social environment in the class. Based on the experiment, our hypothesis is that the chosen 3 CPL activities will increase the students commitment and involvement in the lectures as well as provide the students with better collaborative competencies....

  12. KPI Student Satisfaction Survey, 2001. Executive Summary Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan Coll. (Ontario).

    The KPI (Key Performance Indicators) Student Satisfaction Survey is a paper-based survey distributed to all students in Ontario's Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology. The results of the Sheridan College survey for 2001 are presented in this report. The student population at Sheridan for the winter 2001 survey was 9,134. A total of 6,566…

  13. Students' Involvement in Faculty Research: Ethical and Methodological Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda M. Ferguson

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Faculty who engage students as participants in their qualitative research often encounter methodological and ethical problems. Ethical issues arise from the fiduciary relationship between faculty and their students, and violations of that relationship occur when the educator has a dual role as researcher with those students. Methodological issues arise from research designs to address these ethical issues. This conflict is particularly evident in faculty research on pedagogy in their own disciplines, for which students are necessary as participants but are captive in the relationship. In this article, the authors explore the issues of double agency when faculty involve students as participants in their research.

  14. The Effect of Doctoral Students' Background, Involvement, and Perception of Growth on Their Intention To Persist. ASHE Annual Meeting Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghihi, Foroozandeh; Ethington, Corinna A.

    This study examined the extent to which an individual doctoral student's characteristics and involvement in the academic and social life of the department influences the student's perception of growth and development during graduate school, and thus the student's persistence in pursuing a graduate degree. The study surveyed doctoral students…

  15. Interaction as 'involvement' in writing for students: a corpus linguistic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Interaction as 'involvement' in writing for students: a corpus linguistic analysis of a key readability feature. E Hilton Hubbard. Abstract. The rapid change in the demographics of South Africa's tertiary level student population over the last decade — and most specifically the huge increase in those who have to study at a ...

  16. Student-Involved Data Use: Establishing the Evidence Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimerson, Jo Beth; Reames, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    In this conceptual paper, we map the research terrain on what we term "student-involved data use" (SIDU)--that is, the practice of having students track, chart, and analyze their own data in formal and structured ways. Drawing on peer-reviewed research as well as practitioner-oriented literature, social media, and district websites, we…

  17. Factors Responsible for Students' Involvement in Internet Fraud as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Internet fraud is one of the most rapidly increasing forms of cybercrime. It has become rampant among students generally because they make use of different Internet devices in schools. The purpose of this study was to examine the factors responsible for students' involvement in Internet fraud as expressed by tertiary ...

  18. Playing Goffman's Information Game: A Classroom Activity Involving Student Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Charles Allan

    2017-01-01

    Goffman's dramaturgical approach is frequently used to introduce undergraduate students to the sociological understanding of human interaction. While a number of scholars have designed engaging student activities that highlight Goffman's approach, most of these activities tend to involve atypical embarrassing interactions or norm-breaking…

  19. Homework Involvement among Hong Kong Primary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Vicky C. W.

    2009-01-01

    One component of the curriculum reform in Hong Kong focuses on the use of homework in consolidating learning, deepening understanding and constructing knowledge. This study examines the profile of Hong Kong primary school students' homework involvement, and investigates the relationships between time involvement and academic attributes, namely…

  20. Shaping Students' Civic Commitments: The Influence of College Cocurricular Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trolian, Teniell L.; Barnhardt, Cassie L.

    2017-01-01

    Drawing on social capital theory, this study examines the extent to which several college cocurricular involvement experiences during college contribute to students' civic commitments toward social and political involvement at the end of college. Results are based on longitudinal data from the Wabash National Study of Liberal Arts Education and…

  1. District nurses' involvement in mental health: an exploratory survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soo; Knight, Denise

    2006-04-01

    This article reports on a survey of district nurses' involvement in mental health interventions in one county. Seventy-nine questionnaires were sent and 46 were returned. Descriptive analysis was carried out using statistical software. The DNs reported encountering a wide range of mental health issues and interventions in practice: dementia, anxiety and depression featured highly. Over half (55%) of the respondents reported involvement in bereavement counselling, and 28% and 23% of respondents reported encountering anxiety management, and problem solving and alcohol advice respectively. A large proportion, however, reported no involvement in mental health interventions. Among the psychiatric professionals, district nurses tended to have most frequent contacts with social workers. GPs were the most likely person to whom DNs made referrals, followed by community psychiatric nurses. Despite the apparent awareness of the values of psychosocial interventions, DNs were equally influenced by the medical model of treatment. In order to realize the potential contribution of district nurses in mental health interventions, there is a need for primary care teams to foster a closer working relationship with mental health specialist services.

  2. [Medical students and psychiatry. A survey of students' opinion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giberti, F; Corsini, G; Rovida, S

    1994-06-01

    In the last years research on the didactics of Psychiatry and opinions of medical students on Psychiatry has gained great interest. The authors think that this research could be useful for the improvement of didactics, for better understanding the meanings of professional choice, the identity of psychiatrist and their relationship with colleagues in other medical field. The goal of this research work was a preliminary survey of Genoese University Medical Student's opinions about psychiatry didactics, and choice of specialization. A questionnaire was submitted to all the students who passed Clinical Psychiatry examination in the period from November 1987 to December 1988. The students were divided in two randomized groups: the first group of students (224) was submitted to the questionnaire immediately after Clinical Psychiatry examination; while to the second group of students (66) the questionnaire was mailed. The aim of the questions was to assess the student's opinions on psychiatry, psychoanalysis, psychotherapy, the career they wanted to take up, and the difficulties of studying psychiatry: 69% of the students of the first group and 42% of the students of the second group answered the questionnaire. Female students answered that they preferred psychiatric specialization more than their male colleagues did, but the difference has no statistical importance. In most cases, the students who answered that they have taken into account psychiatry as a choice of specialisation, are more interested in medical specialties (primary care, etc.) than in surgical specialties. Most of the medical students declare some emotional troubles (anxiety, sleeplessness, problem in social relations).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Hispanic/Latino College Student Involvement in Student Organization Leadership Roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, Barry Slade

    2009-01-01

    The study examined attributes associated with Hispanic/Latino college student involvement in student organization leadership roles. The study helped identify attributes that active and involved Hispanic/Latino students felt were most important to them and their leadership roles. The roles that peer influence, role model influence, extraversion,…

  4. Heterosexual and nonheterosexual young university students' involvement in traditional and cyber forms of bullying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wensley, Kate; Campbell, Marilyn

    2012-12-01

    Research has consistently found that school students who do not identify as self-declared completely heterosexual are at increased risk of victimization by bullying from peers. This study examined heterosexual and nonheterosexual university students' involvement in both traditional and cyber forms of bullying, as either bullies or victims. Five hundred twenty-eight first-year university students (M=19.52 years old) were surveyed about their sexual orientation and their bullying experiences over the previous 12 months. The results showed that nonheterosexual young people reported higher levels of involvement in traditional bullying, both as victims and perpetrators, in comparison to heterosexual students. In contrast, cyberbullying trends were generally found to be similar for heterosexual and nonheterosexual young people. Gender differences were also found. The implications of these results are discussed in terms of intervention and prevention of the victimization of nonheterosexual university students.

  5. Participatory action research: involving students in parent education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Cathrine; Wu, Cynthia; Lam, Winsome

    2014-01-01

    Competition for scarce clinical placements has increased requiring new and innovative models to be developed to meet the growing need. A participatory action research project was used to provide a community nursing clinical experience of involvement in parent education. Nine Hong Kong nursing students self-selected to participate in the project to implement a parenting program called Parenting Young Children in a Digital World. Three project cycles were used: needs identification, skills development and program implementation. Students were fully involved in each cycle's planning, action and reflection phase. Qualitative and quantitative data were collected to inform the project. The overall outcome of the project was the provision of a rich and viable clinical placement experience that created significant learning opportunities for the students and researchers. This paper will explore the student's participation in this PAR project as an innovative clinical practice opportunity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Parent involvement and student academic performance: a multiple mediational analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topor, David R; Keane, Susan P; Shelton, Terri L; Calkins, Susan D

    2010-01-01

    Parent involvement in a child's education is consistently found to be positively associated with a child's academic performance. However, there has been little investigation of the mechanisms that explain this association. The present study examines two potential mechanisms of this association: the child's perception of cognitive competence and the quality of the student-teacher relationship. This study used a sample of 158 seven-year-old participants, their mothers, and their teachers. Results indicated a statistically significant association between parent involvement and a child's academic performance, over and above the impact of the child's intelligence. A multiple mediation model indicated that the child's perception of cognitive competence fully mediated the relation between parent involvement and the child's performance on a standardized achievement test. The quality of the student-teacher relationship fully mediated the relation between parent involvement and teacher ratings of the child's classroom academic performance. Limitations, future research directions, and implications for public policy initiatives are discussed.

  7. Student involvement and research for the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginniff, M.E.

    1980-01-01

    Nuclear engineering is one of the modern and rapidly advancing technologies. Those already involved in it are continually updating their knowledge to keep abreast of the developments. Of course the sound basic principles of engineering still apply but the scene of application can be transformed in a few years. In fact, because of this, many engineers from more traditional industries often express the view that presently the total range of nuclear engineering is research and development. How can students be trained for such a rapidly advancing technology. Is not the answer early involvement. Effective early involvement for students can only come about by the close co-operation and involvement of the staff of universities and industry. The theme is developed. (author)

  8. Blended learning in ethics education: a survey of nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Li-Ling

    2011-05-01

    Nurses are experiencing new ethical issues as a result of global developments and changes in health care. With health care becoming increasingly sophisticated, and countries facing challenges of graying population, ethical issues involved in health care are bound to expand in quantity and in depth. Blended learning rather as a combination of multiple delivery media designed to promote meaningful learning. Specifically, this study was focused on two questions: (1) the students' satisfaction and attitudes as members of a scenario-based learning process in a blended learning environment; (2) the relationship between students' satisfaction ratings of nursing ethics course and their attitudes in the blended learning environment. In total, 99 senior undergraduate nursing students currently studying at a public nursing college in Taiwan were invited to participate in this study. A cross-sectional survey design was adopted in this study. The participants were asked to fill out two Likert-scale questionnaire surveys: CAAS (Case Analysis Attitude Scale), and BLSS (Blended Learning Satisfaction Scale). The results showed what students felt about their blended learning experiences - mostly items ranged from 3.27-3.76 (the highest score is 5). Another self-assessment of scenario analysis instrument revealed the mean scores ranged from 2.87-4.19. Nearly 57.8% of the participants rated the course 'extremely helpful' or 'very helpful.' This study showed statistically significant correlations (r=0.43) between students' satisfaction with blended learning and case analysis attitudes. In addition, results testified to a potential of the blended learning model proposed in this study to bridge the gap between students and instructors and the one between students and their peers, which are typical of blended learning, and to create meaningful learning by employing blended pedagogical consideration in the course design. The use of scenario instruction enables students to develop critical

  9. Communicating Research Through Student Involvement in Phenological Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrow, E. B.; Kopplin, M.; Gazal, R. M.; Robin, J. H.; Boger, R. A.

    2011-12-01

    and students. Phenological studies by the Mat-Su Career and Technical High School students helped scientists working with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, to determine the best time for an aerial survey of bald eagle nests in the Matanuska Susitna Valley in Alaska. GLOBE student phenological data have also been used as part of a doctoral student dissertation, included in presentations at professional meetings and peer- reviewed scientific papers. Pre- and post- engagement assessment data have indicated a significant increase in content knowledge and science skills of pre-college students who have engaged in phenology investigations. Phenological investigations meet educational standards, help students understand the Earth as a system, do not require expensive equipment, and enable students across the globe to learn science by doing science.

  10. Counselling needs of students involved in indiscipline as expressed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study therefore examined the counselling needs of students involved in indiscipline as expressed by teachers. The descriptive research design was adopted and a simple random sampling technique was employed in selecting the respondents for the study. Data analysis was carried out using descriptive and inferential ...

  11. Ten Projects to Involve Your Students Directly in French.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lent, Peter C.

    1981-01-01

    Proposes 10 activities to provide French classes of all levels with a broad spectrum of language projects involving direct and active use of French including students polling each other, skits based on television commercials, geographical "show and tell," cooking French dishes, writing a monthly newspaper, and field trips. (BK)

  12. Final Year Faculty of Education Students' Views Concerning Parent Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, E. Nihal

    2014-01-01

    This study has aimed to determine the knowledge, skills, and views held by pre-service teachers attending different teacher training programs about parent involvement. A total of 520 4th year students receiving education in primary school teaching and in branch teaching programs participated in the study. Data were collected by the "Parent…

  13. 7 CFR 210.12 - Student, parent and community involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS NATIONAL SCHOOL LUNCH PROGRAM Requirements for School Food Authority Participation § 210.12 Student, parent and community involvement. (a) General... general community in activities to enhance the Program. (b) Food service management companies. School food...

  14. Extradyadic Involvement, Narcissism, and Callousness in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crass, Suzanne L.; Terranova, Andrew M.

    2018-01-01

    The relationship between narcissism, callousness, and extradyadic involvement (EDI), has been understudied. It was anticipated that callousness and narcissism would be associated with increased likelihood of engaging in an EDI and less distress about having engaged in the EDI. Participants (268 college students; 75% female; mean age of 20 years…

  15. Social Involvement and Commuter Students: The First-Year Student Voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Kerri-Lee D.

    2007-01-01

    This qualitative study explores the nature of undergraduate commuter students' social involvement with peers during the transitional first six months of their university experience. Focus group interviews with 46 participants provided a student perspective of the role of social interactions in students' transition to university life. Findings…

  16. Toward Digital Citizenship: Examining Factors Affecting Participation and Involvement in the Internet Society among Higher Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Zahrani, Abdulrahman

    2015-01-01

    The current study aims to understand digital citizenship, based on the assumptions of Ribble (2014), by examining factors affecting participation and involvement in the Internet virtual societies among higher education students. A quantitative approach using a survey questionnaire was implemented. The participants were 174 students from the…

  17. Effects of Exposure to Environmental Groups on Student Awareness of Environmental Issues and Their Desire to Be Locally Involved

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Ann M.

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated changes in high school students' awareness of environmental issues and their intent to be involved with local environmental groups after attendance at an environmental fair that exposed them to local environmental groups. A comparison of prefair and postfair surveys given to students indicated a highly significant increase…

  18. Involvement of school students in fights with weapons: prevalence and associated factors in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Cristina Medeiros Melo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Violence, as well as other behaviors, is often intensified during adolescence and early adulthood. The objective of this study is estimate the prevalence of Brazilian school students involvement in fights with weapons and to analyze the associated factors. Methods This is a cross-sectional study using data from the National School Student Health Survey conducted in 2012 with 9th grade elementary school students attending 2842 schools in all 27 Brazilian Federative Units. The outcome studied was involvement in fights with firearms and/or cold weapons in the 30 days prior to the interview. Poisson regression was used to estimate the prevalence ratios and 95 % confidence intervals (95 % CI. The analyses were stratified by sex. Results Fifty seven thousand and eighty nine female students and 52,015 male students were included; the prevalence of their involvement in fights with weapons was 7.2 (95 % CI 6.9–7.5 and 13.8 (95 % CI 13.4–14.3, respectively. In the adjusted analysis the factors associated with male student involvement in fights with weapons were: being older, working, having smoked a cigarette, consumed alcoholic beverages and illicit drugs recently, insomnia, not having any close friends, skipping classes without parental supervision, having suffered aggression from a family member, reporting feeling unsafe on the way to or from school and/or at school. The same associated factors were found among female students in addition to not living with their father and/or mother and having suffered bullying. There was no association with type of school in either sex. Conclusion Involvement in fights with weapons was greater among older male students. Health-risk behaviors, mental health characteristics, parental supervision and context of violence also showed association with the outcomes.

  19. Principals' Opinions on the Role of Speech-Language Pathologists Serving Students with Communication Disorders Involved in Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritzman, Mitzi J.; Sanger, Dixie

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to survey the opinions of principals concerning the role of speech-language pathologists (SLPs) serving students with communication disorders who have been involved in violence. Method: A mixed methods design involving 678 questionnaires was mailed to elementary, middle, and high school principals in a…

  20. Workplace violence experienced by nursing students: A UK survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, Stephen; Üzar Özçetin, Yeter Sinem; Russell-Westhead, Michele

    2016-06-01

    To appreciate the nature and scope of workplace violence amongst a sample of the UK nursing student population during clinical placement and to recommend strategies universities can implement to successfully manage the impact. Workplace violence is defined as a violent act(s) directed toward workers and can include physical, psychological or verbal behaviour. It is prevalent in nursing and causes victims work-based stress that can affect not only the individual but also the quality of care. Similar negative experiences amongst students can have a direct impact on the development of future professional skills. This study employed a cross-sectional survey design. Questions were uploaded in the format of a commercial internet survey provider (SurveyMonkey.com) and distributed across a sample of nursing schools in the UK. The survey was voluntary and employed a validated tool to assess workplace violence and was based on a similar study in Australia. The number of respondents was 657. This paper reports on the quantitative results. Nearly half of the students (42.18%) indicated they had experienced bullying/harassment in the past year while on clinical placement. One-third (30.4%) had witnessed bullying/harassment of other students and 19.6% of incidents involved a qualified nurse. The unwanted behaviours made some students consider leaving nursing (19.8%). Some respondents said the standard of patient care (12.3%) and their work with others (25.9%) were negatively affected. Workplace violence can influence nursing students' attitude toward the profession and their level of satisfaction with the work. Whilst it was reassuring to note that the majority of the participants knew where/how to report, only one fifth had actively reported an episode of bullying/harassment. Current students are the nurses and leaders of the future and have a key role in shaping the culture of generations to come. Universities and clinical providers need to work together to reduce the

  1. A Multilevel, Statewide Investigation of School District Anti-Bullying Policy Quality and Student Bullying Involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gower, Amy L; Cousin, Molly; Borowsky, Iris W

    2017-03-01

    Although nearly all states in the United States require school districts to adopt anti-bullying policies, little research examines the effect of these policies on student bullying and health. Using a statewide sample, we investigated associations between the quality of school district anti-bullying policies and student bullying involvement and adjustment. School district anti-bullying policies (N = 208) were coded for their quality based on established criteria. District-level data were combined with student reports of bullying involvement, emotional distress, and school connectedness from a state surveillance survey of 6th, 9th, and 12th grade students (N = 93,437). Results indicated that policy quality was positively related to bullying victimization. Furthermore, students reporting frequent perpetration/victimization who also attended districts with high-quality policies reported more emotional distress and less school connectedness compared with students attending districts with low quality policies. Although statistically significant, the magnitude of these associations was small. Having a high-quality school district anti-bullying policy is not sufficient to reduce bullying and protect bullying-involved young people. Future studies examining policy implementation will inform best practices in bullying prevention. © 2017, American School Health Association.

  2. Parental involvement in homework: relations with parent and student achievement-related motivational beliefs and achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonida, Eleftheria N; Cortina, Kai S

    2014-09-01

    Parental involvement in homework is a home-based type of involvement in children's education. Research and theory suggest that it is beneficial for learning and achievement under certain conditions and for particular groups of individuals. The study examined whether different types of parents' involvement in homework (autonomy support, control, interference, cognitive engagement) (1) are predicted by their mastery and performance goals for their child and their beliefs of the child's academic efficacy, and (2) predict student achievement goal orientations, efficacy beliefs, and achievement. Grade-level differences were also investigated. The sample consisted of 282 elementary school (5th grade) and junior high school students (8th grade) and one of their parents. Surveys were used for data collection. Structural equation modelling was applied for data analysis. (1) Autonomy support during homework was predicted by parent mastery goal, parents' control and interference by their performance goal and perceptions of child efficacy, and cognitive engagement as supplementary to homework by parent perceptions of child efficacy. (2) Parental autonomy support, control, and interference were differentially associated with student mastery and performance goal orientations, whereas parent cognitive engagement was associated with student efficacy beliefs. (3) The structural model was the same for elementary and junior high school students but the latent means for a number of variables were different. Different types of parental involvement in homework were associated with different outcomes with parent autonomy support to be the most beneficial one. © 2014 The British Psychological Society.

  3. [Epidemiological evaluation of soft drinks consumption--students surveys].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chłapowska, Joanna; Pawlaczyk-Kamieńska, Tamara

    2012-01-01

    Non carious lesions, including erosion changes, are becoming increasingly apparent. There are multiple factors involved in the etiology of dental erosion i.a. acids in commercially available drinks. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of soft drink consumption that promote dental erosion among young adults. The 266 subjects were asked to fill in a questionnaire. The questionnaire inquired questions about consumption of drinks favouring tooth erosion. The students declared frequent drinking of isotonic drinks, energetic drinks, fizzy drinks and coca-cola type drinks. On the basis of a survey of Poznań University of Medical Sciences students it can be determined, that they have relatively high risk of dental erosion. To minimize the risk of dental erosion occurrence in young population there is a need to disseminate knowledge about the etiology.

  4. Monitoring undergraduate student needs and activities at Experimental Biology: APS pilot survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Nicole L; Ilatovskaya, Daria V; Matyas, Marsha L

    2017-06-01

    Life science professional societies play important roles for undergraduates in their fields and increasingly offer membership, fellowships, and awards for undergraduate students. However, the overall impacts of society-student interactions have not been well studied. Here, we sought to develop and test a pilot survey of undergraduate students to determine how they got involved in research and in presenting at the Experimental Biology (EB) meeting, what they gained from the scientific and career development sessions at the meeting, and how the American Physiological Society (APS) can best support and engage undergraduate students. This survey was administered in 2014 and 2015 to undergraduate students who submitted physiology abstracts for and attended EB. More than 150 students responded (38% response rate). Respondents were demographically representative of undergraduate students majoring in life sciences in the United States. Most students (72%) became involved in research through a summer research program or college course. They attended a variety of EB sessions, including poster sessions and symposia, and found them useful. Undergraduate students interacted with established researchers at multiple venues. Students recommended that APS provide more research fellowships (25%) and keep in touch with students via both e-mail (46%) and social media (37%). Our results indicate that APS' EB undergraduate activities are valued by students and are effective in helping them have a positive scientific meeting experience. These results also guided the development of a more streamlined survey for use in future years. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  5. The Relationship Among Teaching Methods, Student Characteristics, and Student Involvement in Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Lorin W.; Soctt, Corinne C.

    1978-01-01

    Individual students tend to benefit differently from different teaching methods; however, when little or nothing is known of the entering students' characteristics regarding learning involvement, the high school teacher would be wise to use the classroom discourse method of teaching. (JD)

  6. Parent Involvement Practices of High-Achieving Elementary Science Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Samara Susan

    This study addressed a prevalence of low achievement in science courses in an urban school district in Georgia. National leaders and educators have identified the improvement of science proficiency as critical to the future of American industry. The purpose of this study was to examine parent involvement in this school district and its contribution to the academic achievement of successful science students. Social capital theory guided this study by suggesting that students achieve best when investments are made into their academic and social development. A collective case study qualitative research design was used to interview 9 parent participants at 2 elementary schools whose children scored in the exceeds category on the Science CRCT. The research questions focused on what these parents did at home to support their children's academic achievement. Data were collected using a semi-structured interview protocol and analyzed through the categorical aggregation of transcribed interviews. Key findings revealed that the parents invested time and resources in 3 practices: communicating high expectations, supporting and developing key skills, and communicating with teachers. These findings contribute to social change at both the local and community level by creating a starting point for teachers, principals, and district leaders to reexamine the value of parent input in the educational process, and by providing data to support the revision of current parent involvement policies. Possibilities for further study building upon the findings of this study may focus on student perceptions of their parents' parenting as it relates to their science achievement.

  7. Consumer and community involvement in health and medical research: evaluation by online survey of Australian training workshops for researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Anne; Alpers, Kirsten; Heyworth, Jane; Phuong, Cindy; Hanley, Bec

    2016-01-01

    In Australia, since 2009, the Consumer and Community Involvement Program (formerly the Consumer and Community Participation Program) has developed and run workshops to help people working in health and medical research involve more consumers (patients) and community members (the public) in their research. In 2012, workshop attendees were invited to do an online survey to find out the effect, if any, that attending a workshop had on their awareness of and attitudes to consumer and community involvement. They were also asked about changes in their behaviour when it came to the involvement of consumers and the community in their work. The study found that, for people who answered the survey, more than double the number found consumer and community involvement very relevant after attending a workshop, compared with the number who thought that before attending one. Also, amongst those who answered the survey, 94 % thought that the workshop increased their understanding about involvement. Background There is limited evidence of the benefits of providing training workshops for researchers on how to involve consumers (patients) and the community (public) in health and medical research. Australian training workshops were evaluated to contribute to the evidence base. The key objective was to evaluate the impact of the workshops in increasing awareness of consumer and community involvement; changing attitudes to future implementation of involvement activities and influencing behaviour in the methods of involvement used. A secondary objective was to use a formal evaluation survey to build on the anecdotal feedback received from researchers about changes in awareness, attitudes and behaviours. Methods The study used a cross-sectional, online survey of researchers, students, clinicians, administrators and members of non-government organisations who attended Consumer and Community Involvement Program training workshops between 2009 and 2012 to ascertain changes to awareness

  8. Engineering surveying theory and examination problems for students

    CERN Document Server

    Schofield, W

    2013-01-01

    Engineering Surveying: Theory and Examination Problems for Students, Volume 1, Third Edition discusses topics concerning engineering surveying techniques and instrumentations. The book is comprised of eight chapters that cover several concerns in engineering survey. Chapter 1 discusses the basic concepts of surveying. Chapter 2 deals with simple and precise leveling, while Chapter 3 covers earthworks. The book also talks about the theodolite and its applications, and then discusses optical distance measurement. Curves, underground and hydrographic surveying, and aspects of dimensional control

  9. Analysis of pharmacy student motivators and deterrents for professional organization involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Erin; Wascher, Molly; Kier, Karen

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine motivators and deterrents impacting a student pharmacist's decision to join professional organizations. The goal was to create a list of meaningful factors that organizations can use for membership recruitment. This descriptive study utilized a blinded electronic survey sent to eight accredited pharmacy schools in Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, Indiana, Illinois, and Kentucky. The survey assessed motivating and hindering factors, as well as demographic data. Eight-hundred fifty-six students completed the survey, a 15.05% participation rate. Professional development and networking were the top two endorsed motivational factors, selected as significant by 88.0% and 87.5% respectively. Upon chi-square analysis, networking (pmotivating factors with which membership was found to be significantly influenced. Networking and involvement opportunities were more significant for members while scholarships were a greater motivator among nonmembers. Time required for involvement and cost were the most commonly selected hindrances with 78% and 76% respectively identifying these as significant barriers. The hindering factor found to be significantly different between active members and nonmembers was bylaws/rules of the organization (p=0.032), with non-members rating this as a greater consideration than current members. Multiple factors contribute to a student's decision to join a professional organization. Those active members find greater significance in networking involvement opportunities. Non-member students found scholarships more motivating and recognize bylaws as a consideration for membership more than current members. These results emphasize the multifactorial nature of membership and may direct future membership initiatives. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Parental involvement and bullying among middle-school students in North Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdirahman, H; Fleming, L C; Jacobsen, K H

    2013-03-01

    Bullying, especially in developing countries, has not been much examined, especially the influence of parents on the risk of being bullied. The aim of this study was to determine whether active parenting is associated with reduced peer victimization among middle-school students in North Africa. A secondary analysis of data from more than 13,000 middle-school students who participated in the Global School-based Student Health Survey (GSHS) in Egypt, Libya, Morocco and Tunisia between 2006 and 2008, was conducted using multiple logistic regression models. About 60% of students in Egypt and one-third of students in Libya, Morocco and Tunisia reported having been bullied in the past month. In all 4 countries, boys reported more peer victimization than girls. In Egypt, Morocco and Tunisia, students who reported that their parents checked their homework, were understanding, and knew how the student spent free time had a reduced likelihood of peer victimization but this association was not significant in Libya. Interventions for reducing bullying should consider the positive impact of involved parents.

  11. 1980-81 Graduate Student Survey. AIP Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Susanne D.

    Results of the 1980-81 Graduate Student Survey of physics and astronomy students are presented. Information is presented on the following: employment offers for new physics masters and doctorate recipients, 1976-81; characteristics of the graduate physics student population, 1980-81, including sex, citizenship, professional society membership,…

  12. Academic Advising at UNO. Report of the 1991 Student Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, A. E.

    1991-01-01

    A study was done of student perception of academic advising at the University of Nebraska, Omaha (UNO). The study surveyed 638 students who participated in the early registration process for the Fall 1991 semester. Of those students, 269 were men and 369 were women and 8.3 percent were members of a minority group. The study instrument was the…

  13. The Academic Ethics of Graduate Business Students: A Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Bob S.

    1995-01-01

    Survey responses from 207 of 313 graduate business students revealed that 80% had engaged in at least 1 of 15 unethical practices. No relationship appeared between ethical behavior/attitudes and student characteristics. Despite their self-perception as more ethical than undergraduates, graduate students had similar frequency of unethical behavior…

  14. Student involvement as a vehicle for empowerment: a case study of the student platform for engineering education development

    KAUST Repository

    Delaine, David A.; Seif-Naraghi, Sonya B.; Al-Haque, Shahed; Wojewoda, Nicolò ; Meninato, Yvonne; DeBoer, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the mission, structure and outputs of one organisation, the Student Platform for Engineering Education Development (SPEED), as a case study for how student-led organisations can use student involvement to promote and sustain

  15. A Descriptive Study: Parental Opinion and Teacher-Student Perceptions Regarding Parents' Involvement in Their Children's Education and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Maria A.; Karr-Kidwell, PJ

    Using surveys and data from the Dallas Public School District (Texas), this study examined the perceptions of parents, students, and teachers about parents' involvement in their children's education and development. In addition, academic achievement at the two study schools was examined. At one school (School A), 63 of 100 parents surveyed…

  16. A longitudinal online interprofessional education experience involving family nurse practitioner students and pharmacy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Andrea; Broeseker, Amy; Cunningham, Jill; Cortes, Cyndi; Beall, Jennifer; Bigham, Amy; Chang, Jongwha

    2017-03-01

    Interprofessional education (IPE) continues to gain traction worldwide. Challenges integrating IPE into health profession programmes include finding convenient times, meeting spaces, and level-appropriate assignments for each profession. This article describes the implementation of a 21-month prospective cohort study pilot programme for the Master of Science in nursing family nurse practitioner (FNP) and doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) students at a private university in the United States. This IPE experience utilised a blended approach for the learning activities; these students had initial and final sessions where they met face-to-face, with asynchronous online activities between these two sessions. The online assignments, discussions, and quizzes during the pilot programme involved topics such as antimicrobial stewardship, hormone replacement therapy, human papilloma virus vaccination, prenatal counselling, emergency contraception, and effects of the Affordable Care Act on practice. The results suggested that the FNP students held more favourable attitudes about online IPE and that the PharmD students reported having a clearer understanding of their own roles and those of the other participating healthcare students. However, the students also reported wanting more face-to-face interaction during their online IPE experience. Implications from this study suggest that effective online IPE can be supported by ensuring educational parity between students regarding the various topics discussed and a consistent approach of the required involvement for all student groups is needed. In addition, given the students desire for more face-to-face interaction, it may be beneficial to offer online IPE activities for a shorter time period. It is anticipated that this study may inform other programmes that are exploring innovative approaches to provide IPE to promote effective collaboration in patient care.

  17. Student Engagement: Developing a Conceptual Framework and Survey Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Gerald F.; Heller, Nathan A.; Burch, Jana J.; Freed, Rusty; Steed, Steve A.

    2015-01-01

    Student engagement is considered to be among the better predictors of learning, yet there is growing concern that there is no consensus on the conceptual foundation. The authors propose a conceptualization of student engagement grounded in A. W. Astin's (1984) Student Involvement Theory and W. A. Kahn's (1990) employee engagement research where…

  18. Research Attitudes and Involvement among Medical Students and Students of Allied Health Occupations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delin, Catherine R.

    1994-01-01

    Medicine has a long research tradition, whereas allied health areas have only recently become involved in research. A questionnaire study was conducted to investigate the attitudes to research of a total of 314 students of medicine, dentistry, occupational therapy, physiotherapy, and nursing courses on the city campuses of two South Australian…

  19. A Survey of Secondary School Students' Reading Strategy Use ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A Survey of Secondary School Students' Reading Strategy Use, Teachers' ... Jimma Zone as well as their English teachers' perceived use of reading strategies ... 16 items that deal with the reading strategies they use when they teach reading ...

  20. The Impact of Lottery Incentives on Student Survey Response Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Stephen R.; Whitcomb, Michael E.

    2003-01-01

    A controlled experiment tested the effects of lottery incentives using a prospective college applicant Web survey, with emails sent to more than 9,000 high school students. Found minimal effect of postpaid incentives for increasing levels of incentive. (EV)

  1. Student Participation and Parental Involvement in Relation to Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niia, Anna; Almqvist, Lena; Brunnberg, Elinor; Granlund, Mats

    2015-01-01

    This study shows that students, teachers, and parents in Swedish schools ascribe differing meanings and significance to students' participation in school in relation to academic achievement. Students see participation as mainly related to social interaction and not academic achievement, whilst teachers view students' participation as more closely…

  2. Characterizing Parents’ and School Staff’s Involvement with Student Attendance from the Perspective of School Staff in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norimasa Itakura

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the relations between parents and various school staff involvement, and student attendance across time from the viewpoint of school staff in Japan. In addition, student attendance characteristics were classified to investigate potential differences among students related to time and involvement of parents and staff. The research participants were Japanese elementary, junior, and senior high school staff (N = 206 who consented to participate in the survey. All participants were sampled from various areas of Japan and recruited through a web-based survey. Data were collected by the polling organization Internet Research Service MELLINKS (Tokyo, Japan, through their web panel (see www.mellinks.co.jp. The results indicated that during the early period of support, there was no positive correlation between class teachers’ involvement and students’ attendance. However, during the late period of support, it had a positive correlation. Surprisingly, the school nurses’ involvement was critical even in the early periods. Furthermore, in the late period, the results of ANOVAs assessing difference among the student attendance categories showed that maintaining and recovery types had higher scores of parents’ and class teachers’ involvement than non-maintaining and declining types. This study suggests that flexibility of collaboration among parents and various school staff across time is an important component to support student attendance.

  3. The American College Student Cell Phone Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuel, Richard C.

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on a study of cell phone use among college students. This group is considered particularly important because college students tend to be among the first to try new technology, are the group most likely to innovate new ways of using existing technology, and are most vocal about what they need and/or want to see changed…

  4. Survey Regarding the Competence and Interest towards Research of Romanian University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demjén, Beátrix-Aletta; Ciascai, Liliana

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to find out the respondents' opinion regarding their abilities and interest towards research. The survey was carried out on a sample of 51 respondents that are involved in research activities in the universities of origin. The participants are students from Faculties of Real and Applied Sciences. The results highlight…

  5. Alcohol use and related consequences among students with varying levels of involvement in college athletics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leichliter, J S; Meilman, P W; Presley, C A; Cashin, J R

    1998-05-01

    Alcohol use, binge drinking, and substance abuse-related consequences among students with varying levels of participation in intercollegiate athletics were examined. Between October 1994 and May 1996, 51,483 students at 125 institutions answered questions about their involvement in athletics, ranging from noninvolvement to participant to leadership positions, on the long form of the Core Alcohol and Drug Survey. In comparisons with nonathletes, both male and female athletes consumed significantly more alcohol per week, engaged in binge drinking more often, and suffered more adverse consequences from their substance use. No support was found for the hypothesis that athletic leaders were more responsible than other team participants in using alcohol. Male team leaders appeared to be at significantly greater risk than female team leaders; they also consumed more alcohol, binged more often, and suffered more consequences than other team members.

  6. A Survey of Current Computer Information Science (CIS) Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Los Rios Community Coll. District, Sacramento, CA. Office of Institutional Research.

    This document is a survey designed to be completed by current students of Computer Information Science (CIS) in the Los Rios Community College District (LRCCD), which consists of three community colleges: American River College, Cosumnes River College, and Sacramento City College. The students are asked about their educational goals and how…

  7. A survey of drug abuse problems among students of selected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of the study was to survey drug abuse problems among students of selected secondary schools in Ile-Ife in Osun State. Specifically, the study was to find out the reasons for drug abuse among students. The major instrument used to collect needed information was the questionnaire which was distributed to ...

  8. A survey of university students' vitamin D-related knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Shaunessey; Irwin, Jennifer D; Johnson, Andrew M

    2015-01-01

    To survey Canadian university students' vitamin D-related knowledge. Undergraduate university students (n = 1,088) were surveyed as to their vitamin D-related knowledge, including its sources, health benefits, and recommended intake. Overall, students answered 29% of questions correctly on the knowledge test. In addition, the overall test was subdivided into 3 subtests, and students scored 26% on vitamin D source knowledge, 23% on factors affecting vitamin D levels, and 37% on health effects of vitamin D. Only 8% of participants correctly identified the recommended vitamin D intake; 14% correctly identified the amount of time in the sun required to produce adequate vitamin D. These results suggest that Canadian university students have poor knowledge concerning vitamin D. Program planners should consider improving vitamin D knowledge as a component of future health promotion programs for university students. Copyright © 2015 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Student Attitudes Regarding Ebooks: A Survey with cost savings implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Bialaszewski

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Students were surveyed regarding usage of ebooks. Findings demonstrate that their propensity to using Ebooks increases as costs decrease, Tecnological advancements have led to ebooks being more than a written text displayed in digital format as web sites provide more up to date information. Also, licensing changes such as Creative Commons allow for more data to be accessible for students allowing for more student research opportunity.

  10. Enhancing Student Outcomes through Mentoring, Peer Counselling and Parental Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sottie, Cynthia Akorfa; Dubus, Nicole; Sossou, Marie-Antoinette

    2013-01-01

    The government of Ghana has designed various initiatives to achieve the Millennium Development Goals on education and the Education for All goals. Despite these initiatives, student outcomes continue to be poorer than desired. Although access to education has improved, student dropout remains a problem and student scores on achievement tests…

  11. The impact of self-concept and college involvement on the first-year success of medical students in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ying-Xue; Ou, Chun-Quan; Zhao, Zhi-Tao; Wan, Cheng-Song; Guo, Cui; Li, Li; Chen, Ping-Yan

    2015-03-01

    Students' first-year academic success plays a critical role on their overall development in college, which implies the need to concentrate on identifying ways to improve students' first-year academic success. Different from most research on the subject, this study attempted to combine the sociological perspective of college impact with a psychological perspective to synthetically explore the causal relationship of specific types of self-concept and college involvement with academic success of medical students. A longitudinal study was conducted using 519 matriculates at a medical university in mainland China. We conducted the Cooperative Institutional Research Program freshmen survey and the Your First College Year survey to collect data of the pre-college and college academic and social self-concept, college involvement components, and some input characteristics. The academic success was measured by the first-year grade point average. A pathway analysis was conducted and showed the following results. Having high academic self-concept, being engaged in class and putting effort in homework or study directly contributes to increasing college achievement. Students' pre-college achievement and self-concept, faculty interaction, and homework involvement positively affected students' college academic self-concept development, which indirectly improved average grade point. These findings contribute to our understanding of a student's ability to interact with his or her collegiate environment and to experience academic success.

  12. Conscientious objection in medical students: a questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Sophie Lm

    2012-01-01

    To explore attitudes towards conscientious objections among medical students in the UK. Medical students at St George's University of London, Cardiff University, King's College London and Leeds University were emailed a link to an anonymous online questionnaire, hosted by an online survey company. The questionnaire contained nine questions. A total of 733 medical students responded. Nearly half of the students in this survey stated that they believed in the right of doctors to conscientiously object to any procedure. Demand for the right to conscientiously object is greater in Muslim medical students when compared with other groups of religious medical students. Abortion continues to be a contentious issue among medical students and this may contribute to the looming crisis in abortion services over the coming years. This project sheds some light on how future doctors view some of their ethical rights and obligations. Using empirical evidence, it reveals that conscientious objection is an issue in the UK medical student body today. These data could help anticipate problems that may arise when these medical students qualify and practise medicine in the community. Clearer guidance is needed for medical students about the issue of conscientious objection at medical school.

  13. National survey describing and quantifying students with communication needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andzik, Natalie R; Schaefer, John M; Nichols, Robert T; Chung, Yun-Ching

    2018-01-01

    Research literature has yet to quantify and describe how students with complex communication needs are supported in the classroom and how special educators are being prepared to offer support. This study sought out special educators to complete a survey about their students with complex communication needs. Over 4,000 teachers representing 50 states reported on the communicative and behavioral characteristics of 15,643 students. Teachers described the training they have received and instructional approaches they used. The majority of students were reported to use speech as their primary communication mode. Over half of students utilizing alternative and augmentative communication (AAC) were reported to have non-proficient communication. Teacher training varied across respondents as well as the supports they used to support these students in the classroom. The majority of students with disabilities using AAC when communicating across the nation are not proficiently communicating. Implications and recommendations will be discussed.

  14. Practicing Professional Values: Factors Influencing Involvement in Social Work Student Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martindale, Dorothy; Olate, René; Anderson, Keith A.

    2017-01-01

    One of the most promising avenues for the development of professional values is involvement in professional student organizations. A convenience sample of baccalaureate social work students (n = 482) was drawn from 15 institutions. Regression analyses revealed several predictors of involvement in social work student organizations, including…

  15. Nursing students' prosocial motivation: does it predict professional commitment and involvement in the job?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesje, Kjersti

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated how prosocial motivation reported by nursing students in their final year of academic studies relates to career commitment and job involvement three years after graduation. Most studies investigating nurses' prosocial motivation for choosing the nursing profession examine only their prosocial motivation for entering nursing training; they do not investigate whether this motivation is associated with job involvement or commitment to the profession. A longitudinal survey design was used. The present longitudinal study included 160 nurses. In their final academic year of spring 2007, the nurses received a questionnaire about their motivation for entering nursing. Three years after graduation, spring 2010, they received another questionnaire about their level of job involvement and career commitment. The results showed that prosocial motivation measured in their last academic year was related to career commitment three years after graduation, but unrelated to job involvement. The results indicated that prosocial motivation is important in identifying with the profession but not necessarily for personal involvement in the job. The study gives important knowledge on how a commonly reported motivation for entering nursing relates to the nurses' attitudes about their work life. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. A Phenomenological Study of Parental Involvement and the Undergraduate College Student Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, David Michael

    2013-01-01

    Parents highly involved in the academic lives of their college-going children have become increasingly common and yet the effect of such involvement on students is poorly understood by student services administrators and faculty. The purpose of this study was to better define the phenomenon of parental involvement in college through an…

  17. Developing Students' Mathematical Skills Involving Order of Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali Rahman, Ernna Sukinnah; Shahrill, Masitah; Abbas, Nor Arifahwati; Tan, Abby

    2017-01-01

    This small-scale action research study examines the students' ability in using their mathematical skills when performing order of operations in numerical expressions. In this study, the "hierarchy-of-operators triangle" by Ameis (2011) was introduced as an alternative BODMAS approach to help students in gaining a better understanding…

  18. Newspapers in Science Education: A Study Involving Sixth Grade Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Ching-San; Wang, Yun-Fei

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the learning performance of sixth grade elementary school students using newspapers in science teaching. A quasi-experimental design with a single group was used in this study. Thirty-three sixth grade elementary school students participated in this study. The research instruments consisted of three…

  19. Developmental Outcomes of College Students' Involvement in Leadership Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cress, Christine M.; Astin, Helen S.; Zimmerman-Oster, Kathleen; Burkhardt, John C.

    2001-01-01

    Using longitudinal data from 875 students, assesses whether student participation in leadership education and training programs has an impact on educational and personal development. Results indicate that leadership participants showed growth in civic responsibility, leadership skills, multicultural awareness, understanding of leadership theories,…

  20. The effectiveness of Family Science and Technology Workshops on parental involvement, student achievement, and student curiosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosten, Lora Bechard

    The literature suggests that parental involvement in schools results in positive changes in students and that schools need to provide opportunities for parents to share in the learning process. Workshops are an effective method of engaging parents in the education of their children. This dissertation studies the effects of voluntary Family Science and Technology Workshops on elementary children's science interest and achievement, as well as on parents' collaboration in their child's education. The study involved 35 second and third-grade students and their parents who volunteered to participate. The parental volunteers were randomly assigned to either the control group (children attending the workshops without a parent) or the treatment group (children attending the workshops with a parent). The study was conducted in the Fall of 1995 over a four-week period. The Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to determine the effects of the workshops on children's science achievement and science curiosity, as well as on parents' involvement with their child's education. The study revealed that there was no significant statistical difference at the.05 level between the treatment/control groups in children's science achievement or science curiosity, or in parent's involvement with their children's education. However, the study did focus parental attention on effective education and points the way to more extensive research in this critical learning area. This dual study, that is, the effects of teaching basic technology to young students with the support of their parents, reflects the focus of the Salve Regina University Ph.D. program in which technology is examined in its effects on humans. In essence, this program investigates what it means to be human in an age of advanced technology.

  1. Using Service-Learning to Educate Students about Stakeholder Involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth Walter Honadle

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Using Lee’s definition of service-learning as “an instructional method in which students learn course content by actively participating in thoughtfully organized service experiences related to that content”, this article offers a case of action-oriented service- learning. It shows one way to combine traditional teaching methods with an action-oriented approach to service-learning that benefits both the community and imparts critical know-how into the education of planning students. Through service-learning students acquire valuable skills and also increase their competence as practitioners and increase their confidence in their field in a way that nurtures their abilities and provides minimal risk to the clientele because the students are working under the guidance of faculty. As previous research from diverse fields have shown, service-learning benefits the students and the groups they encounter through their projects. KEYWORDSservice-learning, civic engagement, community development

  2. Students' perceptions of their learning experiences: A repeat regional survey of healthcare students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamshire, Claire; Barrett, Neil; Langan, Mark; Harris, Edwin; Wibberley, Christopher

    2017-02-01

    Student experience is an international concern and recent research has focused on initiatives to improve students' learning experiences and ultimately reduce attrition levels. To determine similarities and differences between students' perceptions of their learning experiences between 2011 and 2015 in relation to campus-based learning, placement-based learning and personal circumstances. A repeat online survey in 2011 and 2015; using a questionnaire developed from thematic analysis of narrative interviews with a subsample of the target population. Nine universities in the North West of England. A total of 1080 students completed the survey in 2011 and 1983 students in 2015 from a target population of all students studying on commissioned pre-registration healthcare education programmes. An online survey was made available to all undergraduate students studying on Health Education funded programmes within the region and survey respondents were invited to give demographic information and rate their agreement to statements on four-point Likert-type responses. Responses to a repeat survey of healthcare studying in the North West of England in 2015 were strikingly similar overall to those of an original 2011 survey. Although the students were positive overall about their experiences, a number were dissatisfied with some aspects of their experiences - particularly in relation to initial support on campus and whilst studying on placement. Four years on from the original survey, despite a considerable investment in improving students' experiences across the region, there appears to be little change in students' perceptions of their learning experiences CONCLUSION: In the short-term monitoring of student experience needs to be continued; and links to attrition (potential or actual) noted and acted upon. However, given that attrition from these courses has been a long-term problem and the complexity of its resolution a recurrent finding in the literature; new ways of framing

  3. Students' Perceptions of and Experiences With Educational Technology: A Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royal, Kenneth; Hedgpeth, Mari-Wells; McWhorter, Dan

    2016-05-18

    It is generally assumed that incoming students in medical education programs will be better equipped for the "digital age" given their younger age and an educational upbringing in which technology was seemingly omnipresent. In particular, many assume that today's medical students are more likely to hold positive attitudes and increased comfortability with technology and possess greater information technology (IT) skills. The purpose of this study was to compare responses of incoming veterinary medical students to a series of IT-related questions contained in a common questionnaire over the course of a 10-year period (2005-2015) to discern whether students' attitudes have improved and uses and comfortability with technology have increased as anticipated. A survey measuring attitudes and preferences, computing experience, and technology ownership was administered each year for the past 10 years to incoming veterinary medical students at a large veterinary school in the United States. Students' responses to survey items were compared at 3 data points (2005, 2010, and 2015). Today's incoming veterinary medical students tend to indicate the same desire to improve skills using spreadsheets and web page design as incoming students from 10 years ago. It seems that despite technological advances and increased exposure to such applications and skills, there remains a challenge for students to "keep up" with the ever evolving technology. Moreover, although students continue to report they are very comfortable with using a computer (and related devices), many use their computers as typewriters or word processors, as opposed to a means for performing more advanced computing functions. In general, today's medical students are not expert computer users as many assume. Despite an upbringing in a digitized world, many students still lack many basic computing skills.

  4. Segmenting Student Markets with a Student Satisfaction and Priorities Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borden, Victor M. H.

    1995-01-01

    A market segmentation analysis of 872 university students compared 2 hierarchical clustering procedures for deriving market segments: 1 using matching-type measures and an agglomerative clustering algorithm, and 1 using the chi-square based automatic interaction detection. Results and implications for planning, evaluating, and improving academic…

  5. Non-Response in Student Surveys: The Role of Demographics, Engagement and Personality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Stephen R.; Whitcomb, Michael E.

    2005-01-01

    What causes a student to participate in a survey? This paper looks at participation across multiple surveys to understand survey non-response; by using multiple surveys we minimize the impact of survey salience. Students at a selective liberal arts college were administered four different surveys throughout the 2002-2003 academic year, and we use…

  6. The survey regarding sports and exercise of Keio University students

    OpenAIRE

    野口, 和行; 近藤, 明彦; 加藤, 大仁; 山内, 賢

    2009-01-01

    We conducted a survey of "College Students' Attitude toward Sports and Exercise" using students of all facilities and grades in Keio University. The purpose of this report is 1) to compare the amount of sports and exercise across facilities and grades, 2) to analyze frequencies, amount of time, and attitudes regarding different types of sports and exercise activities, 3) to examine attitudes toward and reasoning of no exercise, and 4) to examine their preference of activities in their free ti...

  7. Particulate Air Contamination in Puerto Rico: A Student Involvement Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Richard R.

    1979-01-01

    Describes a research project undertaken by physics undergraduate students to monitor particulate air contamination in Ponce, Puerto Rico, and to determine the meteorological factors which contribute to it. (GA)

  8. Involving Medical Students in Informed Consent: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiapponi, Costanza; Meyer, Frank; Jannasch, Olof; Arndt, Stephan; Stübs, Patrick; Bruns, Christiane J

    2015-09-01

    Studies have reported that patients often sign consent documents without understanding the content. Written paperwork, audio-visual materials, and decision aids have shown to consistently improve patients' knowledge. How informed consent should be taken is not properly taught at most universities in Germany. In this cross-sectional study, we investigated how much information about their procedure our patients retain. In particular, it should be elucidated whether an additional conversation between patients and properly prepared medical students shortly before surgery as an adjunct to informed consent can be introduced as a new teaching unit aimed to increase the understanding of surgery by patients and students. Informed consent of all patients had been previously obtained by three surgical residents 1-3 days in advance. All patients had received a copy of their consent form. The same residents developed assessment forms for thyroidectomy, laparoscopic cholecystectomy, umbilical hernia repair, and Lichtenstein procedure for inguinal hernia, respectively, containing 3-4 major common complications (e.g., bile duct injury, hepatic artery injury, stone spillage, and retained stones for laparoscopic cholecystectomy) and briefed the medical students before seeing the patients. Structured one-to-one interviews between students (n = 9) and patients (n = 55) based on four different assessment forms were performed and recorded by students. Both patients and students were asked to assess the new teaching unit using a short structured questionnaire. Although 100% of patients said at the beginning of their interview to have understood and memorized the risks of their imminent procedure, 5.8% (3/55) were not even able to indicate the correct part of the body where the incision would take place. Only 18.2% (10/55) of the patients were able to mention 2 or more complications, and 45.3% (25/55) could not even recall a single one. 96.4% (53/55) of the patients and 100% (9/9) of the

  9. Public attitudes toward practice by medical students: a nationwide survey in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Kyoko; Sakuma, Mio; Seki, Susumu; Morimoto, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    It is essential for medical students to interact directly with patients. However, patients may be reluctant to be seen by medical students in settings in which they may also be seen by senior staff. To understand patients' attitudes toward practice by medical students and consider the factors involved in obtaining patients' cooperation, we conducted a nationwide cross-sectional survey. We randomly selected 2,400 adult participants from all over Japan. Trained research assistants inquired about participants' experiences and attitudes toward practice by medical students using a questionnaire. We compared differences in attitudes between participants who were accepting of practice by medical students and those who were not, as well as differences between participants who had experienced practice by a medical student versus those who had not. A total of 1,109 (46%) participants were included in the study. Eleven percent (117/1109) of the participants had experienced practice by a medical student. One fourth of participants were accepting of practice by medical students, and experienced participants were significantly more likely to be accepting of practice by medical students than inexperienced participants (45% vs. 24%, ppractice by medical students among accepting participants with previous experiences included "polite," "kind," and "hard-working." Fifty-nine percent (637/1088) of participants indicated that they would request a senior staff member's supervision when being seen by a medical student. The present nationwide survey suggests that education emphasizing bedside manner may be effective in promoting patients' cooperation of medical students. In addition, providing information to patients about medical students and efforts to increase supervision during clinical clerkship should be emphasized to foster the public's cooperation.

  10. Trial and evaluation of assertion training involving nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishina, Yuko; Tanigaki, Shizuko

    2013-09-01

    The concept of assertion and conceptual/practical methods of assertion (assertiveness) training were originally developed in the United States and Europe. These principles were embraced and adapted in Japan in 1970's. However, only a few studies relating to assertion (assertiveness) have been undertaken thus far in Japan, especially so in the domain of nursing students in comparison with other countries. The purpose of this study was to design and implement assertion training with nursing students and to clarify its effects. The participants were all volunteers, invited from a class of 3rd year nursing students. Ten students (intervention group) participated in the assertion training comprised of five sessions in February 2006. Fifty-six students (control group) were participated only in the questionnaire. Both groups were asked to complete the same questionnaire twice, before and after the assertion training. The questionnaire measured levels of assertiveness, social skills, self-esteem, social support and satisfaction with university life. The results and variances, both before and after assertion training, between the intervention group and the control group were analyzed. The effectiveness of the assertion training was determined by changes in pre and post training questionnaire scores. The scores for social skills in the control group had a tendency to decline while the scores for social skills in the intervention group remained constant. Although there were no statistically significant results in the intervention group, the present study highlights areas appropriate for further study.

  11. Disordered gambling, type of gambling and gambling involvement in the British Gambling Prevalence Survey 2007

    OpenAIRE

    LaPlante, Debi A.; Nelson, Sarah E.; LaBrie, Richard A.; Shaffer, Howard J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between types of gambling and disordered gambling, with and without controlling for gambling involvement (i.e. the number of types of games with which respondents were involved during the past 12 months). Methods: We completed a secondary data analysis of the 2007 British Gambling Prevalence Survey (BGPS), which collected data in England, Scotland and Wales between September 2006 and March 2007. The sample included 9003 re...

  12. The Influence of Student Experiences on Post-Graduation Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschberg, Joe; Lye, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    This study attempts to establish the extent to which in-class teaching quality instruments can be used to predict post-graduation survey results. It examines the responses for the Good Teaching Scale of the Course Experience Questionnaire administered to 10,433 students who completed their studies at a major Australian tertiary institution from…

  13. Religiousness and Stress among College Students: A Survey Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Walter E.; King, Michael

    1990-01-01

    Examined how current religious preference, attendance at religious services, importance of religion, and Christian rebirth were related to perceived stress among college students (N=195) in a communitywide survey. Found no association between any of the religiousness variables and perceived stress. (Author/ABL)

  14. A Survey of Gender Biases of Freshman Students toward Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaer, Barbara; And Others

    1991-01-01

    A survey of 724 freshman engineering orientation students investigated the significance of 5 literature-cited barriers to women's success in engineering--sexual discrimination, financial concerns, academic comfort, career awareness, and locus of control. Significant main effects were found for gender but not ethnic group. The instrument is…

  15. A Socratic Method for Surveying Students' Readiness to Study Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansfield, William D.

    2013-01-01

    Before beginning a series of presentations on evolution, it would be prudent to survey the general level of students' understanding of prerequisite basic concepts of reproduction, heredity, ontology, and phenotypic diversity so that teachers can avoid devoting time to well-known subjects of general knowledge and can spend more time on subjects…

  16. Knowledge and attitudes toward vaccination: A survey of Serbian students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvjetkovic, Smiljana J; Jeremic, Vida Lj; Tiosavljevic, Danijela V

    Since vaccination coverage in Serbia has been decreasing and health professionals have been identified as the most important factor in making decisions about immunization, vaccination knowledge and attitudes of students, especially medical students, are of particular interest. A cross-sectional survey was carried out on three groups of 509 Belgrade University students (medical, law and engineering students). The data were collected using an on-line questionnaire posted to student groups and included the Vaccine Knowledge Questionnaire and Attitudes Toward Vaccination Scale. This survey also included questions about demographic characteristics and perceived negative experiences. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed. There was a significant difference in the Vaccine Knowledge score (F=40.48, pstudents. Medical students (N=251, Mean=4.47, SD=1.71) had significantly higher mean knowledge scores than did law (N=128, Mean=2.80, SD=1.56) or engineering students (N=130, Mean=3.98, SD=1.81). Compared with the law (Mean=49.77, SD=10.23) and engineering students (Mean=57.62, SD=12.21), medical students (Mean=59.52, SD=9.62) also had significantly higher attitude scores (F=37.56, pstudents toward immunization. However, some knowledge gaps were identified. Multivariate analysis showed that those who had better vaccine knowledge, those who studies medicine, those who attended at university for more years, and those who do not know someone who had a negative experience with vaccines were more likely to have positive attitudes toward vaccination. Considering the growing vaccination hesitance in the general population, this is an important result that indicates that medical students are possible important participants in future public health campaigns. A strong association between vaccine knowledge and attitudes implies recommendations to introduce a specialized vaccination curriculum at both the undergraduate and graduate levels of medical study. Copyright © 2017 The

  17. App Use in Psychiatric Education: A Medical Student Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Cecilia; Kolli, Venkata

    2017-02-01

    The objective of the study is to understand and appraise app use by medical students during their clerkships. Following Creighton University IRB approval, a voluntary and anonymous paper-based, 15-question survey was distributed to third-year medical students. Data were analyzed using Microsoft Excel. Of 112 medical students available, 76.7% (86) participated in the survey. All participants owned a smartphone or tablet with 84.9% using Apple iOS, followed by 12.8% using Android platform. Students reported using the fewest number of apps during surgery, psychiatry, and obstetrics and gynecology clerkships. The largest number of apps were used during the internal medicine rotation (70.3%). The three most popular apps were Epocrates, UpToDate, and UWorld. The most common uses for these apps were as references during the clerkship, followed by improving knowledge, and test taking. Perceived major benefits included accessibility (96% of student respondents) and interactivity (39.5%). Common apps used during the psychiatry clerkship included UpToDate (71%), Epocrates (51%), and Medscape (43%). Despite less frequent app use during their psychiatry clerkship, 90% felt there was a utility for educational apps in psychiatric education. Consistent with the previous literature on medical students preferring educational apps, students suggest developers focus on question bank-type apps, followed by clinical support-focused and self-directed case-based learning apps for psychiatry clerkship learning. Educators should factor these modes of educational delivery into future educational app development. This survey shows a high degree of smartphone and tablet use among medical students, and they attest to mobile phone app utility in psychiatric education.

  18. Instructor Reputation: An Expectancy Relationship Involving Student Ratings and Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Raymond P.

    1979-01-01

    Instructor expressiveness and lecture content were combined with instructor reputation in a 2 X 2 X 2 factorial design to assess interaction effects. Results indicated that reputation interacted with expressiveness but not content, in which students rated positive, high-expressive instructors more favorably than negative, high-expressive…

  19. College Environment, Student Involvement, and Intellectual Development: Evidence in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Xianglan; Liu, Jinlan; Bai, Yin

    2017-01-01

    China's higher education system has been marked by dramatic growth since 1999. In response to calls for quality assurance, substantial efforts have been made to improve collegiate environments and enhance student learning. However, only limited empirical research has been conducted to investigate the effects of the college environment on student…

  20. Collateral Informant Assessment in Alcohol Use Research Involving College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagman, Brett T.; Cohn, Amy M.; Noel, Nora E.; Clifford, Patrick R.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This study examined the associations between college students' self-reported alcohol use and corresponding collateral reports and identified factors that influence agreement between both sets of reports. Participants/Methods: Subject-collateral pairs (N = 300) were recruited from undergraduate psychology courses. Results: Data yielded…

  1. Teachers' Views of Issues Involving Students' Mental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeser, Robert W.; Midgley, Carol

    1997-01-01

    Examined elementary teachers' views regarding students' mental health needs. Found that almost all believed that addressing these needs was part of their role but also felt somewhat burdened by this responsibility. Sense of efficacy and reported use of task-focused instruction were negatively associated with feelings of burden. Teachers were good…

  2. Strategies, Not Solutions: Involving Students in Problem Solving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Kuster, Lee N.

    1984-01-01

    Defines problem solving, discusses the use of problems developed by students that are relevant to their own lives, presents examples of practical mathematics problems that deal with local situations, discusses fringe benefits of this type of problem solving, and addresses teachers' concern that this method consumes too much time. (MBR)

  3. Cooperation Between Schools of Pharmacy and Dentistry: A Survey of Educational Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oksas, Richard M.

    1978-01-01

    To meet the needs of dental patients for pharmaceutical services, dental schools have upgraded their emphasis in teaching pharmacology and the professional associations have developed liaison between each other. This survey examines the nature and extent of pharmacy colleges' involvement with dentistry. (LBH)

  4. Motivations for Involvement: An Empirical Test of Parents of Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Callen E.

    2011-01-01

    Parents of students in special education have greater barriers to parent involvement than parents of students in general education. Little is known, however, about the factors that facilitate or impede involvement practices for this group. This study investigated the extent to which the motivational factors from Hoover-Dempsey and Sandler's (2005)…

  5. Students in a School Environment: A Project Focused on Family Involvement of At-Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denney, Pat

    2011-01-01

    This project examined family involvement of at risk students in mid-west communities. The purpose of this project was to study the affect of family involvement on at-risk student achievement. The redefining of the perception of America has resulted in a crisis of academic performance in the traditionally slow-changing education systems. This topic…

  6. Student Involvement in Wellness Policies: A Study of Pennsylvania Local Education Agencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jomaa, Lamis H.; McDonnell, Elaine; Weirich, Elaine; Hartman, Terryl; Jensen, Leif; Probart, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Explore student-involvement goals in local wellness policies (LWPs) of local education agencies (LEAs) in Pennsylvania (PA) and investigate associations with LEA characteristics. Design: An observational study that helped examine student-involvement goals. Setting: Public PA LEAs. Participants: LWPs submitted by 539 PA public LEAs. Main…

  7. The Impact of Motivation to Lead on College Students' Cocurricular Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepper, Robert C.

    2009-01-01

    This exploratory research examined the impact of motivation to lead on college students' cocurricular involvement. The question driving this research was: Is motivation to lead a predictor of cocurricular student involvement? A 52-item questionnaire that included the Motivation to Lead Self-Report Questionnaire (Chan & Drasgow, 2001) was used to…

  8. Parental Involvement in Middle School Predicting College Attendance for First-Generation Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Khanh; Rush, Ryan A.

    2016-01-01

    Using data from the National Education Longitudinal Study, this report examined the relationship between parental involvement in eighth grade and college attendance by eight years after high school for students whose parents have no college education (i.e., first-generation students; n = 1,358) in comparison to students whose parents have some…

  9. Students' Perceptions of Parental and Teacher Academic Involvement: Consequences on Achievement Goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regner, Isabelle; Loose, Florence; Dumas, Florence

    2009-01-01

    The present study examined whether students' perceptions of two major facets of parental and teacher academic involvement (i.e., academic support and academic monitoring), contribute to the process of students' achievement goals adoption. French junior high-school students completed two questionnaires assessing first their perceptions of parental…

  10. A Correlational Study of Extracurricular Involvement and Homework Performance of Third Grade Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Rachel; Moulden, Ryan

    2011-01-01

    There are many opportunities for students to participate in nonacademic activities. These activities can include: sports, clubs, private lessons, and religious activities. Participation in these activities enriches students' lives by encouraging social skills. Yet, if students are involved in activities requiring many hours of participation, does…

  11. Homework Involvement and Functions: Perceptions of Hong Kong Chinese Primary School Students and Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Vicky C. W.; Chan, Raymond M. C.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the perceptions of Chinese students and parents in Hong Kong on homework involvement, assignment type and homework functions. The relationships of homework perceptions to student and parent attributes are also assessed. The sample includes 1393 pairs of students and their parents from 36 primary schools in Hong Kong. Findings…

  12. Attitudes Toward Bile Extraction From Living Bears: Survey of Citizens and Students in Beijing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhao; Jiang, Zhigang; Yang, Aifang; Xu, Bingbing; Fang, Hongxia; Xie, Zongping; Li, Ning; Li, Chunwang; Meng, Zhibin; Zeng, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Bear bile is a traditional Chinese medicine that has been used for millennia. Several arguments support and oppose the use of bear farming in terms of conservation and nonhuman animal welfare. This study involved designing a questionnaire and surveying a random sample of general citizens and college students in Beijing to elicit their attitudes on bile extraction from living bears. Older people and people with lower education levels used more bear bile medicines. In total, 29.47% (n = 204) of citizens and 23.14% (n = 81) of students surveyed used bear bile medicine since 1990. Students were less willing to use bear bile medicines than citizens (p bears; anti for short) was significantly higher than that for the red side (support the extraction of bile from living bears; pro for short; p bears.

  13. Polydrug use among college students in Brazil: a nationwide survey

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira,Lúcio Garcia de; Alberghini,Denis Guilherme; Santos,Bernardo dos; Andrade,Arthur Guerra de

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To estimate the frequency of polydrug use (alcohol and illicit drugs) among college students and its associations with gender and age group. Methods: A nationwide sample of 12,544 college students was asked to complete a questionnaire on their use of drugs according to three time parameters (lifetime, past 12 months, and last 30 days). The co-use of drugs was investigated as concurrent polydrug use (CPU) and simultaneous polydrug use (SPU), a subcategory of CPU that involves the ...

  14. Comparative Study of Parental Involvement and Private Tuition regarding Educational Attainment of Students

    OpenAIRE

    Malik Amer Atta; Shabnam Razzaq Khan; Shehla Sheikh; Fahmida Akbar

    2014-01-01

    This research work was focused on the “comparative study of parental involvement and private tuition regarding educational attainments of students at secondary school level”. A sample of 80 students of 10th class from ten different secondary schools was taken. To analyze the results t-test was used. In this comparison it was conducted that parental involvement turn out significant effect on student educational attainments as compared to private tuition. On the bases of results researcher has ...

  15. Understanding Why Students Participate in Multiple Surveys: Who are the Hard-Core Responders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Stephen R.; Whitcomb, Michael E.

    2004-01-01

    What causes a student to participate in a survey? This paper looks at survey response across multiple surveys to understand who the hard-core survey responders and non-responders are. Students at a selective liberal arts college were administered four different surveys throughout the 2002-2003 academic year, and we use the number of surveys…

  16. Survey on a sleep habits for university and high school students.

    OpenAIRE

    林, 光緒; 堀, 忠雄

    1988-01-01

    A survey was performed on 466 high school students and 403 university students. 86% of high school students and 89% of university students estimated their customary sleep time to be 6-8 hours. Although there was no significant difference between high school students and university students with awake time, bed time was later for university students than high school students. So that sleep time was shorter for university students. Also there was more regular sleepers for high school students a...

  17. Teaching child and adolescent psychiatry to undergraduate medical students - A survey in German-speaking countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Reiner; Frank, Florian

    2010-07-24

    To conduct a survey about teaching child and adolescent psychiatry to undergraduate medical students in German-speaking countries. A questionnaire was sent to the 33 academic departments of child and adolescent psychiatry in Germany, Austria, and the German-speaking part of Switzerland. All departments responded. For teaching knowledge, the methods most commonly reported were lectures and case presentations. The most important skills to be taught were thought to be how to assess psychopathology in children and how to assess families. For elective courses, the departments reported using a wide range of teaching methods, many with active involvement of the students. An average of 34 hours per semester is currently allocated by the departments for teaching child and adolescent psychiatry to medical students. Required courses are often taught in cooperation with adult psychiatry and pediatrics. Achievement of educational objectives is usually assessed with written exams or multiple-choice tests. Only a minority of the departments test the achievement of skills. Two ways of improving education in child and adolescent psychiatry are the introduction of elective courses for students interested in the field and participation of child and adolescent psychiatrists in required courses and in longitudinal courses so as to reach all students. Cooperation within and across medical schools can enable departments of child and adolescent psychiatry, despite limited resources, to become more visible and this specialty to become more attractive to medical students. Compared to the findings in earlier surveys, this survey indicates a trend towards increased involvement of academic departments of child and adolescent psychiatry in training medical students.

  18. University students and HIV in Namibia: an HIV prevalence survey and a knowledge and attitude survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Beer, Ingrid H; Gelderblom, Huub C; Schellekens, Onno; Gaeb, Esegiel; van Rooy, Gert; McNally, Alta; Wit, Ferdinand W; Tobias, Rinke de Wit F

    2012-02-22

    With an overall adult HIV prevalence of 15.3%, Namibia is facing one of the largest HIV epidemics in Africa. Young people aged 20 to 34 years constitute one of the groups at highest risk of HIV infection in Namibia. However, little is known about the impact of HIV on this group and its access to healthcare. The purpose of this study was to estimate HIV prevalence, to assess the knowledge of and attitudes towards HIV/AIDS, and to assess access to healthcare among university students in Namibia. We assessed HIV/AIDS knowledge and attitudes, HIV prevalence and access to healthcare among students at the Polytechnic of Namibia and the University of Namibia. HIV prevalence was tested through anonymous oral fluid-based tests. Half (n = 2790/5568) of the university students and 45% (n = 2807/6302) of the Polytechnic students participated in the knowledge and attitudes surveys. HIV/AIDS knowledge was reasonable, except for misperceptions about transmission. Awareness of one's own HIV status and risks was low. In all, 55% (n = 3055/5568) of university students and 58% (n = 3680/6302) of Polytechnic students participated in the HIV prevalence survey; 54 (1.8%) university students and 103 (2.8%) Polytechnic students tested HIV positive. Campus clinics were not the major providers of healthcare to the students. Meaningful strategies addressing the gap between knowledge, attitude and young people's perception of risk of HIV acquisition should be implemented. HIV prevalence among Namibian university students appears relatively low. Voluntary counselling and testing should be stimulated. Efforts should be made to increase access to healthcare through the campus clinics.

  19. Parents involvement in cyber bullying experience of middle school students

    OpenAIRE

    Hrnčić, Jasna; Lončar, Nina

    2017-01-01

    Cyber bullying has been widespread among youth during the last few decades, sometimes with deadly consequences. This type of violence remains too often out of adult's control since for many parents and teachers Internet and social media still represent an unknown territory. The objective of the current study is the analysis of the scope of parental involvement in children's online experience and their peer cyber bullying experience, and the analysis of connection between these two phenomena. ...

  20. Burnout risk in medical students in Spain using the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Student Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galán, Fernando; Sanmartín, Arturo; Polo, Juan; Giner, Lucas

    2011-04-01

    It is questionable whether the Maslach Burnout is suitable for studying burnout prevalence in preclinical medical students because many questions are patient-centered and the students have little or no contact with patients. Among factors associated with burnout in medical students, the gender shows conflicting results. The first aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of the risk of burnout in medical students in preclinical and clinical years of training, using the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Student Survey, specifically designed and validated to assess the burnout in university students, and secondly, to investigate the association between gender and burnout subscales. A cross-sectional study was carried out in a sample of 270 Spanish medical students-176 (65%) in the third year and 94 (35%) in the sixth year of training-using the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Student Survey questionnaire. Internal consistencies (Cronbach's alpha) for the three subscales on the whole sample were as follows: for exhaustion 0.78, cynicism 0.78, and efficacy 0.71. Moreover, the prevalence of burnout risk was significantly higher in sixth-year students 35 (37.5%) compared with students in third year of training 26 (14.8%) (χ(2) test, p burnout subscales. The Maslach Burnout Inventory-Student Survey overcame difficulties encountered when students have little or no contact with patients. Our findings show that the risk of burnout prevalence doubled from the third year to sixth year of training and that gender was not significantly associated with any of the subscales of burnout.

  1. Quality of Life Among Dental Students: A Survey Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andre, Amanda; Pierre, Gaelle C; McAndrew, Maureen

    2017-10-01

    Quality of life is a complex construct that affects the overall life satisfaction, emotional well-being, and functioning of individuals. The aim of our study was to assess the quality of life of dental students at one U.S. dental school, using the World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL)-BREF, a multi-dimensional, cross-cultural, validated, and reliable survey instrument. Of the 1,437 students invited to participate, 401 students responded, but 17 were excluded because of missing data. The final sample consisted of 384 students for an overall response rate of 27%: response rates by year were first year 32.6%, second year 16.9%, third year 26.6%, and fourth year 24.0%. The results showed that the responding students rated their overall quality of life as good. The Physical Health domain had the highest mean score, while the Psychological domain had the lowest. Females reported higher quality of life than males in the Social Relationships domain. Single students were found to have a lower perceived quality of life than married students. Older students were found to have lower perceived quality of life in the Physical Health and Environment domains. Physical Health domain scores were significantly higher for fourth-year than first-year respondents, while Psychological domain scores were significantly lower for third-year than first-year respondents. Further research is needed to explore the effect of dental school on the quality of life of dental students. Targeted programs to impact students' quality of life at various points in the curriculum may be beneficial.

  2. Medical Student Education in State Psychiatric Hospitals: A Survey of US State Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurenberg, Jeffry R; Schleifer, Steven J; Kennedy, Cheryl; Walker, Mary O; Mayerhoff, David

    2016-04-01

    State hospitals may be underutilized in medical education. US state psychiatric hospitals were surveyed on current and potential psychiatry medical student education. A 10-item questionnaire, with multiple response formats, was sent to identified hospitals in late 2012. Ninety-seven of 221 hospitals contacted responded. Fifty-three (55%) reported current medical student education programs, including 27 clinical clerkship rotations. Education and training in other disciplines was prevalent in hospitals both with and without medical students. The large majority of responders expressed enthusiasm about medical education. The most frequent reported barrier to new programs was geographic distance from the school. Limited resources were limiting factors for hospitals with and without current programs. Only a minority of US state hospitals may be involved in medical student education. While barriers such as geographic distance may be difficult to overcome, responses suggest opportunities for expanding medical education in the state psychiatric hospitals.

  3. Effect of scaffolding on helping introductory physics students solve quantitative problems involving strong alternative conceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shih-Yin; Singh, Chandralekha

    2015-12-01

    It is well known that introductory physics students often have alternative conceptions that are inconsistent with established physical principles and concepts. Invoking alternative conceptions in the quantitative problem-solving process can derail the entire process. In order to help students solve quantitative problems involving strong alternative conceptions correctly, appropriate scaffolding support can be helpful. The goal of this study is to examine how different scaffolding supports involving analogical problem-solving influence introductory physics students' performance on a target quantitative problem in a situation where many students' solution process is derailed due to alternative conceptions. Three different scaffolding supports were designed and implemented in calculus-based and algebra-based introductory physics courses involving 410 students to evaluate the level of scaffolding needed to help students learn from an analogical problem that is similar in the underlying principles involved but for which the problem-solving process is not derailed by alternative conceptions. We found that for the quantitative problem involving strong alternative conceptions, simply guiding students to work through the solution of the analogical problem first was not enough to help most students discern the similarity between the two problems. However, if additional scaffolding supports that directly helped students examine and repair their knowledge elements involving alternative conceptions were provided, e.g., by guiding students to contemplate related issues and asking them to solve the targeted problem on their own first before learning from the analogical problem provided, students were more likely to discern the underlying similarities between the problems and avoid getting derailed by alternative conceptions when solving the targeted problem. We also found that some scaffolding supports were more effective in the calculus-based course than in the algebra

  4. Experiential learning in high energy physics: a survey of students at the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camporesi, Tiziano; Catalano, Gelsomina; Florio, Massimo; Giffoni, Francesco

    2017-03-01

    More than 36 000 students and post-docs will be involved until 2025 in research at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) mainly through international collaborations. To what extent they value the skills acquired? Do students expect that their learning experience will have an impact on their professional future? By drawing from earlier literature on experiential learning, we have designed a survey of current and former students at LHC. To quantitatively measure the students’ perceptions, we compare the salary expectations of current students with the assessment of those now employed in different jobs. Survey data are analysed by ordered logistic regression models, which allow multivariate statistical analyses with limited dependent variables. Results suggest that experiential learning at LHC positively correlates with both current and former students’ salary expectations. Those already employed clearly confirm the expectations of current students. At least two not mutually exclusive explanations underlie the results. First, the training at LHC is perceived to provide students valuable skills, which in turn affect the salary expectations; secondly, the LHC research experience per se may act as signal in the labour market. Respondents put a price tag on their learning experience, a ‘LHC salary premium’ ranging from 5% to 12% compared with what they would have expected for their career without such an experience at CERN.

  5. Family involvement in medical decision-making: Perceptions of nursing and psychology students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itzhaki, Michal; Hildesheimer, Galya; Barnoy, Sivia; Katz, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Family members often rely on health care professionals to guide and support them through the decision-making process. Although family involvement in medical decisions should be included in the preservice curriculum for the health care professions, perceptions of students in caring professions on family involvement in medical decision-making have not yet been examined. To examine the perceptions of nursing and psychology students on family involvement in medical decision-making for seriously ill patients. A descriptive cross-sectional design was used. First year undergraduate nursing and psychology students studying for their Bachelor of Arts degree were recruited. Perceptions were assessed with a questionnaire constructed based on the Multi-Attribute Utility Theory (MAUT), which examines decision-maker preferences. The questionnaire consisted of two parts referring to the respondent once as the patient and then as the family caregiver. Questionnaires were completed by 116 nursing students and 156 psychology students. Most were of the opinion that family involvement in decision-making is appropriate, especially when the patient is incapable of making decisions. Nursing students were more inclined than psychology students to think that financial, emotional, and value-based considerations should be part of the family's involvement in decision-making. Both groups of students perceived the emotional consideration as most acceptable, whereas the financial consideration was considered the least acceptable. Nursing and psychology students perceive family involvement in medical decision-making as appropriate. In order to train students to support families in the process of decision-making, further research should examine Shared Decision-Making (SDM) programs, which involve patient and clinician collaboration in health care decisions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Construction and Validation of the Student-Athlete Environmental and Academic Orientation Survey (SEAOS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullenbach, Lauren E.; Green, Gary T.

    2016-01-01

    Many surveys exist that measure environmental orientations, yet few measure learning outcomes, such as self-efficacy, and even fewer specifically target student-athletes. Hence, this study created a survey, named the Student-Athlete Environmental and Academic Orientation Survey (SEAOS), which measured student-athletes' environmental attitudes,…

  7. The Value of the Subinternship: A Survey of Fourth Year Medical Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric H. Green, MD MSc

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although the subinternship is often regarded as an important part of many fourth year curricula it is rarely studied. Purpose: We aimed to understand the how well the subinternship prepared medical students to perform core clinical skills. Methods: Senior medical students at Boston University School of Medicine rated their perception of the effectiveness of the subinternship and “medical school overall” in preparing them to perform core clinical skills using a written survey. Results: Overall, 69% (101 of students responded. Students believe that the subinternship prepares them to perform most key skills involved in day-to-day medical care. However, students feel less prepared by either their subinternship or overall medical school experience to carry out some complex patient communication skills including delivering “bad news” and discussing end-of-life wishes. Conclusions: The subinternship appears to be effective in preparing students for many of the challenges they will face as an intern and beyond. However, students identified several complex communication skills that could be addressed in part by the subinternship for which they felt unprepared. Student learning would likely be enhanced by creating a longitudinal program to teach these higher-level communication skills during medical school and by integrating practice and feedback of these skills into the subinternship

  8. Involvement in Community Extension Program of Business Administration Students in one Higher Education Institution in the Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jo-Anne May A. Rubio

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Conducting community service is about relationship on building communities. It is designed for personal and social development. The researchers conduct this investigation to assess the Community Extension program of the College of Business Administration (CBA in one Private Higher Education Institution in the Philippines. The descriptive method of research utilizing the normative survey technique was employed in the study. The results of the study revealed that majority of the respondents are first year level and from Bachelor of Science in Business Administration. It also shows that there are students who are not involve in any organization of the college. This study further shows that community extension program of the college was well implemented. Students were well involved in the said activities. The students can expect benefits that will help them grow to a more productive and efficient students and member of the community. Moreover, there are also some expected problems in joining this kind of activity like funds, location and the logistics. The extension programs may continue to move on and reach out for the sustainable development of the students and community.

  9. An exploration of service user involvement in the assessment of students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naylor, S.; Harcus, J.; Elkington, M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: This paper is an exploration of service user involvement in assessing first year diagnostic radiography students' ability to practise and interact with the public safely prior to attending placement. Service users took the role of patients during a simulation exercise undertaken in a general X-ray room. In recent years the importance of involving service users in all aspects of healthcare has been promoted; this includes being involved in the education of healthcare workers. The evaluation of service user involvement in the education of healthcare workers is limited, as is any literature about service user involvement outside nursing, mental health, and social work. Method: Feedback was obtained via email and face to face via a focus group from academic staff, service users and students using open questions. Results: The benefits of service user involvement were that it made the exercise more relevant and meaningful. It was perceived as a valuable exercise for the students to interact with service users in terms of developing, and for assessing, patient care, communication and positioning skills. The service users valued the experience. Issues highlighted include travel to the venue and the physical demands on the service user. Concerns highlighted by previous authors of preparation of the service users for their role, and remuneration had been addressed prior to the exercise. Conclusion: There is increasing diversity in the ways in which service users are involved in education. Service user involvement as patients in a simulation exercise for student assessment was deemed successful in this setting. - Highlights: • There is limited literature about service user involvement outside nursing, mental health and social work. • There are benefits to involving service users in the assessment of student diagnostic radiographers. • There are challenges to involving service users in the assessment of student diagnostic radiographers

  10. Taking a Second Look: Following Surveys with Student's Descriptions of the Culture of Aggression in a Middle School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Nicholson

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes a research study on aggressive behaviour among students in middle school. The study was initiated in response to concern about agressive behaviour held by the school administration. A survey on aggressive behaviour was administered and followed by interviews with a sample of students. Student interviews highlighted a number of very important issues to consider when assessing and responding to aggressive behaviour in a school: school crowding , the playing out of dominant masculinity, involving students in finding solutions to identified problems, and considering the role of the whole school culture in sustaining agressive behaviour.

  11. Motivation of French medical students to pursue surgical careers: results of national survey of 1742 students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefèvre, Jeremie H; Karila, Laurent; Kerneis, Solen; Rouprêt, Morgan

    2010-06-01

    Analyze the aspirations and personal motivations behind the choice of surgical specialties in a large sample of students in their 6th year of medical school. In December 2008, 2588 students participated in a nation-wide mock exam, before taking the National Ranking Exam. When they looked for their grades on the web, the students were prompted to answer a questionnaire containing socio-demographic questions concerning their choice and motivation to pursue a career in a surgical specialty. The survey called also for listing the three main factors (out of a list of 11) motivating their choice. Students originated from 39 medical schools. Of the 2588 students, 1427 (55%) were women. The response rate to the questionnaire was 1742/2588=67%. Two hundred and twenty students (13%) did not express any specific professional orientation. Of the 1522 responses obtained, 522 students wanted to become surgeons. Gender was a determining factor as 44% of male students (n=252) versus 29% of female students wanted to become a surgeon; Pprivate practice (n=280, 18%) and life style (n=175, 11%) were the motivations most often cited to back their choice. One third of medical students want to become surgeons. Feminization, life style and income are the principal factors influencing the choice of the type of surgical subspecialization. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. School Belonging of Adolescents: The Role of Teacher-Student Relationships, Peer Relationships and Family Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uslu, Fatma; Gizir, Sidika

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the extent to which teacher-student relationships, peer relationships, and family involvement can be used to predict a sense of school belonging among adolescents, according to gender. The sample of the study consists of 815 students enrolled in nine state primary schools in the central districts of Mersin, Turkey. The data was…

  13. Student Belief and Involvement in the Paranormal and Performance in Introductory Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messer, Wayne S.; Griggs, Richard A.

    1989-01-01

    Assesses student belief and involvement in 10 paranormal phenomena. Findings show 99 percent of the sample expressed belief in at least one. Students expressing these beliefs achieved significantly lower course grades. Discusses instructor's role in combating unfounded beliefs and fostering critical thinking. (NL)

  14. Parental Involvement in the Musical Education of Violin Students: Suzuki and "Traditional" Approaches Compared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugeja, Clare

    2009-01-01

    This article investigates parental involvement in the musical education of violin students and the changing role of the parents' across the learning process. Two contexts were compared, one emphasising the Suzuki methodology and the other a "traditional" approach. Students learning "traditionally" are typically taught note reading from the…

  15. ADHD Coaching with College Students: Exploring the Processes Involved in Motivation and Goal Completion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevatt, Frances; Smith, Shannon M.; Diers, Sarah; Marshall, Diana; Coleman, Jennifer; Valler, Emilee; Miller, Nathan

    2017-01-01

    College students with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) often experience increased academic difficulties, which can negatively impact graduation rates, employment, self-esteem, and mental health. ADHD coaching assists students with ADHD to reduce such difficulties. The present study evaluated the processes involved in ADHD coaching…

  16. Students' Involvement in Social Networking and Attitudes towards Its Integration into Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umoh, Ukeme Ekpedeme; Etuk, Etuk Nssien

    2016-01-01

    The study examined Students' Involvement in Social Networking and attitudes towards its Integration into Teaching. The study was carried out in the University of Uyo, Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria. The population of the study consisted of 17,618 undergraduate students enrolled into full time degree programmes in the University of Uyo for 2014/2015…

  17. A Reliable Sounding Board: Parent Involvement in Students' Academic and Career Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Andrew N.

    2008-01-01

    With concern over parental involvement in students' academic lives on the rise, research is needed to provide guidance for advisors and parents. In this article, student-parent interactions about academic and career decisions are examined. Data come from the Brown University Office of Institutional Research and semi-structured interviews with…

  18. Calculus Limits Involving Infinity: The Role of Students' Informal Dynamic Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Steven R.

    2015-01-01

    Few studies on calculus limits have centred their focus on student understanding of limits at infinity or infinite limits that involve continuous functions (as opposed to discrete sequences). This study examines student understanding of these types of limits using both pure mathematics and applied-science functions and formulas. Seven calculus…

  19. An Investigation of Student Involvement in IEP Meetings in Suffolk County, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurgens, Matthew A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the possible barriers as to why student involvement in IEP meetings has not been occurring in the past and to subsequently suggest further action and research as to how to potentially combat these barriers so students with disabilities in Suffolk County, Long Island can begin to be offered these kinds of…

  20. Undergraduate Research Involving Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students in Interdisciplinary Science Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd Pagano

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Scientific undergraduate research in higher education often yields positive outcomes for student and faculty member participants alike, with underrepresented students often showing even more substantial gains (academic, professional, and personal as a result of the experience. Significant success can be realized when involving deaf and hard-of-hearing (d/hh undergraduate students, who are also vastly underrepresented in the sciences, in interdisciplinary research projects. Even d/hh Associate degree level students and those in the first two years of their postsecondary careers can contribute to, and benefit from, the research process when faculty mentors properly plan/design projects. We discuss strategies, including the dissemination/communication of research results, for involving these students in research groups with different communication dynamics and share both findings of our research program and examples of successful chemical and biological research projects that have involved d/hh undergraduate students. We hope to stimulate a renewed interest in encouraging diversity and involving students with disabilities into higher education research experiences globally and across multiple scientific disciplines, thus strengthening the education and career pipeline of these students.

  1. Survey of master's gerontology students spanning over 40 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinari, Victor; Ellis, Michelle L

    2014-01-01

    The University of South Florida's master's degree in gerontology is a long-established program that focuses on a multidisciplinary approach to population aging. This study identifies graduate students' needs in preparation for a professional career in gerontology. An online survey was distributed to graduates and those currently enrolled (N = 56) in order to better understand expectations for the program, identify outcomes of graduation, and obtain program recommendations for future students. The program's 40 year history was well represented with participants ranging from the first graduating class to current students. Results indicated high satisfaction in students' expectations of the program, educational experience, and assessment of faculty. Further, 68% of graduates reported success in gaining age-related employment shortly after graduation. However, students echoed well-known barriers in gerontology, reporting tough competition for jobs versus those with licensure, and challenges in promoting their nonclinical gerontology degree to employers. Respondents recommended more applied coursework and assistance with career planning to enhance employment opportunities upon graduation. Implications of these findings are discussed in further detail.

  2. Polydrug use among college students in Brazil: a nationwide survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Lúcio Garcia de; Alberghini, Denis Guilherme; Santos, Bernardo dos; Andrade, Arthur Guerra de

    2013-01-01

    To estimate the frequency of polydrug use (alcohol and illicit drugs) among college students and its associations with gender and age group. A nationwide sample of 12,544 college students was asked to complete a questionnaire on their use of drugs according to three time parameters (lifetime, past 12 months, and last 30 days). The co-use of drugs was investigated as concurrent polydrug use (CPU) and simultaneous polydrug use (SPU), a subcategory of CPU that involves the use of drugs at the same time or in close temporal proximity. Almost 26% of college students reported having engaged in CPU in the past 12 months. Among these students, 37% had engaged in SPU. In the past 30 days, 17% college students had engaged in CPU. Among these, 35% had engaged in SPU. Marijuana was the illicit drug mostly frequently used with alcohol (either as CPU or SPU), especially among males. Among females, the most commonly reported combination was alcohol and prescribed medications. A high proportion of Brazilian college students may be engaging in polydrug use. College administrators should keep themselves informed to be able to identify such use and to develop educational interventions to prevent such behavior.

  3. ICU Bedside Nurses' Involvement in Palliative Care Communication: A Multicenter Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Wendy G; Puntillo, Kathleen; Boyle, Deborah; Barbour, Susan; Turner, Kathleen; Cimino, Jenica; Moore, Eric; Noort, Janice; MacMillan, John; Pearson, Diana; Grywalski, Michelle; Liao, Solomon; Ferrell, Bruce; Meyer, Jeannette; O'Neil-Page, Edith; Cain, Julia; Herman, Heather; Mitchell, William; Pantilat, Steven

    2016-03-01

    Successful and sustained integration of palliative care into the intensive care unit (ICU) requires the active engagement of bedside nurses. To describe the perspectives of ICU bedside nurses on their involvement in palliative care communication. A survey was designed, based on prior work, to assess nurses' perspectives on palliative care communication, including the importance and frequency of their involvement, confidence, and barriers. The 46-item survey was distributed via e-mail in 2013 to bedside nurses working in ICUs across the five academic medical centers of the University of California, U.S. The survey was sent to 1791 nurses; 598 (33%) responded. Most participants (88%) reported that their engagement in discussions of prognosis, goals of care, and palliative care was very important to the quality of patient care. A minority reported often discussing palliative care consultations with physicians (31%) or families (33%); 45% reported rarely or never participating in family meeting discussions. Participating nurses most frequently cited the following barriers to their involvement in palliative care communication: need for more training (66%), physicians not asking their perspective (60%), and the emotional toll of discussions (43%). ICU bedside nurses see their involvement in discussions of prognosis, goals of care, and palliative care as a key element of overall quality of patient care. Based on the barriers participants identified regarding their engagement, interventions are needed to ensure that nurses have the education, opportunities, and support to actively participate in these discussions. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Survey of pharmacy involvement in hospital medication reconciliation programs across the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory R Stein

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study is to conduct a review of pertinent literature, assess pharmacy involvement in medication reconciliation, and offer insight into best practices for hospitals to implement and enhance their medication reconciliation programs. Method: Pharmacists in hospitals nationwide were asked to complete an anonymous survey via the American College of Clinical Pharmacy online database. The multiple choice survey analyzed the roles that healthcare professionals play in medication reconciliation programs at hospitals. Results: Of the survey responses received, 32/91 (35% came from pharmacists at hospitals with a pharmacy-led medication reconciliation program. Of these pharmacy-led programs, 17/32 (53% have a dedicated pharmacist or pharmacy staff to perform medication reconciliation. Conclusion: A comprehensive review of literature suggests that pharmacy involvement has the potential to reduce medication reconciliation errors and may improve patient satisfaction. Focused, full-time medication reconciliation pharmacists can help hospitals save time and money, improve outcomes, and meet higher standards issued by the Joint Commission. Data obtained in this study show the extent to which pharmacists contribute to achieving these goals in healthcare systems nationwide. This baseline study provides a strong case for hospitals to implement a pharmacy-led medication reconciliation program.

  5. The effect of safety training involving non-destructive testing among students at specialized vocational high schools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim Young Khi; Han, Eun Ok; Choi, Yoon Seok

    2017-01-01

    By examining the safety issues involved in on-site training sessions conducted at specialized vocational high schools, and by analyzing the effects of non-destructive testing (NDT) safety training, this study aims to contribute to ensuring the general safety of high school students. Students who expressed an interest in participation were surveyed regarding current NDT training practices, as well as NDT safety training. A total of 361 students from 4 schools participated in this study; 37.7% (136 students) were from the Seoul metropolitan area and 62.3% (225 students) were from other areas. Of the respondents, 2.2% (8 students) reported having engaged in NDT. As a result of safety training, statistically significant improvements were observed in most areas, except for individuals with previous NDT experience. The areas of improvement included safety awareness, acquisition of knowledge, subjective knowledge levels, objective knowledge levels, and adjustments to existing personal attitudes. Even at absolutely necessary observation-only training sessions, it is crucial that sufficient safety training and additional safety measures be adequately provided

  6. The effect of safety training involving non-destructive testing among students at specialized vocational high schools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim Young Khi [Dept. of Radiological Science, Gachon University, Inchon (Korea, Republic of); Han, Eun Ok; Choi, Yoon Seok [Dept. of Education amd Research, Korea Academy of Nuclear Safety, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    By examining the safety issues involved in on-site training sessions conducted at specialized vocational high schools, and by analyzing the effects of non-destructive testing (NDT) safety training, this study aims to contribute to ensuring the general safety of high school students. Students who expressed an interest in participation were surveyed regarding current NDT training practices, as well as NDT safety training. A total of 361 students from 4 schools participated in this study; 37.7% (136 students) were from the Seoul metropolitan area and 62.3% (225 students) were from other areas. Of the respondents, 2.2% (8 students) reported having engaged in NDT. As a result of safety training, statistically significant improvements were observed in most areas, except for individuals with previous NDT experience. The areas of improvement included safety awareness, acquisition of knowledge, subjective knowledge levels, objective knowledge levels, and adjustments to existing personal attitudes. Even at absolutely necessary observation-only training sessions, it is crucial that sufficient safety training and additional safety measures be adequately provided.

  7. Preparing for Success: One Institution's Aspirational and Student Focused Response to the National Student Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, Abbi; Oxley, Anne; Helm, Paul; Bradley, Sally

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes quality enhancement (QE) focused response to the 2006 National Student Survey (NSS) by a post-1992 Higher Education Institution. Recognising the increasing importance of the NSS to a wide range of stakeholders, the University established a task team to explore, from a QE perspective, why the institution received particular…

  8. Student Attitudes and Preferences toward an E-Mentoring Program: A Survey of Journalism Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switzer, Jamie; Switzer, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    Advances in information and communication technologies (ICTs) provide new opportunities for mentoring, eliminating the need for a synchronous meeting. We report the findings of a survey that measured university student perceptions of the roles and expectations of online mentors and the likelihood of using an online mentor if given the opportunity.…

  9. Men Nursing Students: How They Perceive Their Situation...A Student Surveys His Classmates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogness, Hal

    1976-01-01

    Men nurse stereotypes (former corpsmen, homosexuals, or those seeking administrative positions) were challenged by results of an open-ended questionnaire survey of 15 male nursing students. In addition to the role conflicts all nurses experience, men in nursing face: isolation and loneliness, lack of role models, and others' stereotyped ideas.…

  10. Parent Perceptions of Parent Involvement with Elementary-Aged Students with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Holly

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to explore parent perceptions concerning their involvement in their children's special education. The goal of this study was to better understand why some parents become involved while others do not. Survey methodology was utilized to determine parent perceptions of (a) levels of parent and children's participation…

  11. Does Business Model Affect CSR Involvement? A Survey of Polish Manufacturing and Service Companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzanna Katarzyna Witek-Hajduk

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The study explores links between types of business models used by companies and their involvement in CSR. As the main part of our conceptual framework we used a business model taxonomy developed by Dudzik and Witek-Hajduk, which identifies five types of models: traditionalists, market players, contractors, distributors, and integrators. From shared characteristics of the business model profiles, we proposed that market players and integrators will show significantly higher levels of involvement in CSR than the three other classes of companies. Among other things, both market players and integrators relied strongly on building own brand value and fostering harmonious supply channel relations, which served as a rationale for our hypothesis. The data for the study were obtained through a combined CATI and CAWI survey on a group of 385 managers of medium and large enterprises. The sample was representative for the three Polish industries of chemical manufacturing, food production, and retailing. Statistical methods included confirmatory factor analysis and one-way ANOVA with contrasts and post hoc tests. The findings supported our hypothesis, showing that market players and integrators were indeed more engaged in CSR than other groups of firms. This may suggest that managers in control of these companies could bolster the integrity of their business models by increasing CSR involvement. Another important contribution of the study was to propose and validate a versatile scale for assessing CSR involvement, which showed measurement invariance for all involved industries.

  12. Predictors and Outcomes of Parental Involvement with High School Students in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumow, Lee; Lyutykh, Elena; Schmidt, Jennifer A.

    2011-01-01

    Demographic and psychological predictors of parent involvement with their children's science education both at home and at school were examined during high school. Associations between both types of parent involvement and numerous academic outcomes were tested. Data were collected from 244 high school students in 12 different science classrooms…

  13. Involvement in Transition Planning Meetings among High School Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Megan M.; Taylor, Julie Lounds; Urbano, Richard C.; Hodapp, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Although students with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are least likely to attend and participate in transition planning meetings, little is known about factors related to their involvement. Using a national data set, we conducted regressions to identify predictors of the involvement of 320 youth with ASD. Attendance positively related to higher…

  14. The Relationship between Parental Involvement and Student Achievement in the U.S. Virgin Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Felix

    2014-01-01

    Although many studies have been conducted on the relationship between parental involvement and student achievement, the effect of parental involvement in the U.S. Virgin Islands had not been substantiated empirically. It should not be assumed that research conducted in the United States or other geographic areas will necessarily apply to the…

  15. Modeling the Relations among Parental Involvement, School Engagement and Academic Performance of High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Alwan, Ahmed F.

    2014-01-01

    The author proposed a model to explain how parental involvement and school engagement related to academic performance. Participants were (671) 9th and 10th graders students who completed two scales of "parental involvement" and "school engagement" in their regular classrooms. Results of the path analysis suggested that the…

  16. Parental Involvement as a Mediator of Academic Performance among Special Education Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores de Apodaca, Roberto; Gentling, Dana G.; Steinhaus, Joanna K.; Rosenberg, Elena A.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined parental involvement as a mediator of the academic performance of middle school students with special needs. The study built on the different types of parental involvement theorized by Epstein and colleagues (2002) and studied empirically by Fan and Chen (2001). Using a specially developed questionnaire, a sample of 82 parents…

  17. The Role of Parental Involvement in the Autonomy Development of Traditional-Age College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullaty, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Increased parental involvement in higher education has led to a rise in the number of parent interactions with university faculty and staff. The purpose of this study was to explore how parental involvement influences the process of college student autonomy development and to examine the implications of this process for college administrators.…

  18. The Investigation of Research-Based Home Parental Involvement Practices, Parental Style, and Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colson, Myron Jamal

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the relationship of home parental involvement practices, parental style and student achievement. Dimensions of parental involvement practices are parental instruction, parental reinforcement, parental modeling, and parental encouragement. Dimensions of parental style are authoritarian, permissive, and…

  19. Family Involvement and Parent-Teacher Relationships for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbacz, S. Andrew; McIntyre, Laura Lee; Santiago, Rachel T.

    2016-01-01

    Family educational involvement and parent--teacher relationships are important for supporting student outcomes and have unique implications for families of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). However, little research has examined child and family characteristics among families of children with ASD as predictors of family involvement and…

  20. A Web-based survey on students' conceptions of 'accident'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Danilo; Hohgraefe Neto, Guilherme; Grando, Elisa; Siqueira, Pauline Z; Lunkes, Roberta P; Pietrobeli, João Leonardo; Marzola, Norma Regina; Goldani, Marcelo Z

    2009-12-01

    To report the implementation of an open source web survey application and a case study of its first utilisation, particularly as to aspects of logistics and response behaviour, in a survey of Brazilian university students' conceptions about injury causing events. We developed an original application capable of recruiting respondents, sending personal e-mail invitations, storing responses and exporting data. Students of medical, law, communication and education schools were asked about personal attributes and conceptions of the term accident, as to associations and preventability. The response rate was 34.5%. Half of the subjects responded by the second day, 66.3% during the first week. Subjects around 4.2% (95% CI 3.3-5.4) refused to disclose religious persuasion, and 19.2% (95% CI 17.2-21.3) refused to disclose political persuasion, whereas only 2.8% (95% CI 2.1-3.8), on average, refused to answer questions on conceptions and attitudes. There was no significant difference between early and late respondents in respect to selected attributes and conceptions of accident (P-value varied from 0.145 to 0.971). The word accident evoked the notion of preventability to 85.1% (95% CI 83.2 to 87.0) of the subjects, foreseeability to 50.3% (95% CI 47.7-53.0), fatality to 15.1% (95% CI 13.3-17.1) and intentionality to 2.3% (95% CI 1.6-3.2). Web surveying university students' conceptions about injuries is feasible in a middle-income country setting, yielding response rates similar to those found in the literature.

  1. Exploring high school science students' perceptions of parental involvement in their education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mji, Andile; Mbinda, Zoleka

    2005-08-01

    This exploratory study describes high school students' perceptions of their parents' involvement in their education and in relation to school achievement. A new 12-item Parental Involvement Scale was used to measure parents' involvement in curricular and extracurricular activities and using exploratory analyses to estimate the scale's properties. Exploratory analysis resulted in the reduction of the 12 items to 8, with an internal consistency (Cronbach alpha) .82. Grade 12 science students indicated that their less educated parents were involved in activities pertaining to their learning; however, high perceived parental involvement in curricular activities was related to low achievement. It is recommended that further exploratory analyses be undertaken to examine the reported two-dimensional model of the Parental Involvement Scale.

  2. What determines medical students' career preference for general practice residency training?: a multicenter survey in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ie, Kenya; Murata, Akiko; Tahara, Masao; Komiyama, Manabu; Ichikawa, Shuhei; Takemura, Yousuke C; Onishi, Hirotaka

    2018-01-01

    Few studies have systematically explored factors affecting medical students' general practice career choice. We conducted a nationwide multicenter survey (Japan MEdical Career of Students: JMECS) to examine factors associated with students' general practice career aspirations in Japan, where it has been decided that general practice will be officially acknowledged as a new discipline. From April to December 2015, we distributed a 21-item questionnaire to final year medical students in 17 medical schools. The survey asked students about their top three career preferences from 19 specialty fields, their demographics and their career priorities. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine the effect of each item. A total of 1264 responses were included in the analyses. The top three specialty choice were internal medicine: 833 (65.9%), general practice: 408 (32.3%), and pediatrics: 372 (29.4%). Among demographic factors, "plan to inherit other's practice" positively associated with choosing general practice, whereas "having physician parent" had negative correlation. After controlling for potential confounders, students who ranked the following items as highly important were more likely to choose general practice: "clinical diagnostic reasoning (adjusted odds ratio (aOR): 1.65, 95% CI 1.40-1.94)", "community-oriented practice (aOR: 1.33, 95% CI 1.13-1.57)", and" involvement in preventive medicine (aOR: 1.18, 95% CI 1.01-1.38)". On the contrary, "acute care rather than chronic care", "mastering advanced procedures", and "depth rather than breadth of practice" were less likely to be associated with general practice aspiration. Our nationwide multicenter survey found several features associated with general practice career aspirations: clinical diagnostic reasoning; community-oriented practice; and preventive medicine. These results can be fundamental to future research and the development of recruitment strategies.

  3. Student involvement as a vehicle for empowerment: a case study of the student platform for engineering education development

    KAUST Repository

    Delaine, David A.

    2010-08-01

    This paper examines the mission, structure and outputs of one organisation, the Student Platform for Engineering Education Development (SPEED), as a case study for how student-led organisations can use student involvement to promote and sustain student self-efficacy in an academic field. SPEED attracts young people to engineering through student participation in engineering education (EE). SPEED is a global, non-profit student organisation that functions as an interdisciplinary network to diversify dialogue, stimulate change and impact the development of EE and its effect on society. SPEED is directly attracting young people to engineering in various ways: the organisation of its keynote event, the Global Student Forum; facilitating interactions between globally minded, socially inclined engineers with aspirations to change the world; and through the global dissemination of SPEED\\'s work and practices through broad and relevant channels. Short-term outcomes are highlighted here. This case study can serve as a model for student engagement and involvement in other disciplines. © 2010 SEFI.

  4. Assessing medical students' perceptions of patient safety: the medical student safety attitudes and professionalism survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Joshua M; Etchegaray, Jason M; Williams, S Tyler; Berger, David H; Bell, Sigall K; Thomas, Eric J

    2014-02-01

    To develop and test the psychometric properties of a survey to measure students' perceptions about patient safety as observed on clinical rotations. In 2012, the authors surveyed 367 graduating fourth-year medical students at three U.S. MD-granting medical schools. They assessed the survey's reliability and construct and concurrent validity. They examined correlations between students' perceptions of organizational cultural factors, organizational patient safety measures, and students' intended safety behaviors. They also calculated percent positive scores for cultural factors. Two hundred twenty-eight students (62%) responded. Analyses identified five cultural factors (teamwork culture, safety culture, error disclosure culture, experiences with professionalism, and comfort expressing professional concerns) that had construct validity, concurrent validity, and good reliability (Cronbach alphas > 0.70). Across schools, percent positive scores for safety culture ranged from 28% (95% confidence interval [CI], 13%-43%) to 64% (30%-98%), while those for teamwork culture ranged from 47% (32%-62%) to 74% (66%-81%). They were low for error disclosure culture (range: 10% [0%-20%] to 27% [20%-35%]), experiences with professionalism (range: 7% [0%-15%] to 23% [16%-30%]), and comfort expressing professional concerns (range: 17% [5%-29%] to 38% [8%-69%]). Each cultural factor correlated positively with perceptions of overall patient safety as observed in clinical rotations (r = 0.37-0.69, P safety behavioral intent item. This study provided initial evidence for the survey's reliability and validity and illustrated its applicability for determining whether students' clinical experiences exemplify positive patient safety environments.

  5. Development, Evaluation and Use of a Student Experience Survey in Undergraduate Science Laboratories: The Advancing Science by Enhancing Learning in the Laboratory Student Laboratory Learning Experience Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrie, Simon C.; Bucat, Robert B.; Buntine, Mark A.; Burke da Silva, Karen; Crisp, Geoffrey T.; George, Adrian V.; Jamie, Ian M.; Kable, Scott H.; Lim, Kieran F.; Pyke, Simon M.; Read, Justin R.; Sharma, Manjula D.; Yeung, Alexandra

    2015-07-01

    Student experience surveys have become increasingly popular to probe various aspects of processes and outcomes in higher education, such as measuring student perceptions of the learning environment and identifying aspects that could be improved. This paper reports on a particular survey for evaluating individual experiments that has been developed over some 15 years as part of a large national Australian study pertaining to the area of undergraduate laboratories-Advancing Science by Enhancing Learning in the Laboratory. This paper reports on the development of the survey instrument and the evaluation of the survey using student responses to experiments from different institutions in Australia, New Zealand and the USA. A total of 3153 student responses have been analysed using factor analysis. Three factors, motivation, assessment and resources, have been identified as contributing to improved student attitudes to laboratory activities. A central focus of the survey is to provide feedback to practitioners to iteratively improve experiments. Implications for practitioners and researchers are also discussed.

  6. Program Director as Webmaster? Analysis of 131 Anesthesiology Department Web Sites and Program Director Web Site Involvement and Opinion Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshpayeh, Negin; Lee, Howard; Berger, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    The last formal review of academic anesthesiology department Web sites (ADWs) for content was conducted in 2009. ADWs have been rated as very important by medical students in researching residency training programs; however, the rapid evolution of sites require that descriptive statistics must be more current to be considered reliable. We set out to provide an updated overview of ADW content and to better understand residency program directors' (PD) role and comfort with ADWs. Two independent reviewers (ND and HL) analyzed all 131 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) accredited ADWs. A binary system (Yes/No) was used to determine which features were present. Reviewer reliability was confirmed with inter-rater reliability and percentage agreement calculation. Additionally, a blinded electronic survey (Survey Monkey, Portland, OR) was sent to anesthesiology residency PDs via electronic mail investigating the audiences for ADWs, the frequency of updates and the degree of PD involvement. 13% of anesthesiology departments still lack a Web site with a homepage with links to the residency program and educational offerings (18% in 2009). Only half (55%) of Web sites contain information for medical students, including clerkship information. Furthermore, programs rarely contain up-to-date calendars (13%), accreditation cycle lengths (11%), accreditation dates (7%) or board pass rates (6%). The PD survey, completed by 42 of 131 PDs, noted a correlation (r = 0.36) between the number of years as PD and the frequency of Web site updates - less experienced PDs appear to update their sites more frequently (p = 0.03). Although 86% of PDs regarded a Web site as "very" important in recruitment, only 9% felt "very" comfortable with the skills required to advertise and market a Web site. Despite the overall increase in ADW content since 2009, privacy concerns, limited resources and time constraints may prevent PDs from providing the most up-to-date Web sites for

  7. The medical student as a patient: attitudes towards involvement in the quality and safety of health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Rachel E; Joshi, Devavrata; Patel, Krishan; Briggs, M; Vincent, Charles A

    2013-10-01

    In recent years, factors that affect patients' willingness and ability to participate in safety-relevant behaviours have been investigated. However, how trained healthcare professionals or medical students would feel participating in safety-relevant behaviours as a patient in hospital remains largely unexplored. To investigate medical students' willingness to participate in behaviours related to the quality and safety of their health care. A cross-sectional exploratory study using a survey that addressed willingness to participate in different behaviours recommended by current patient safety initiatives. Three types of interactional behaviours (asking factual or challenging questions, notifying doctors or nurses of errors/problems) and three non-interactional behaviours (choosing a hospital based on the safety record, bringing medicines and a list of allergies into hospital, and reporting an error to a national reporting system) were assessed. One hundred and seventy-nine medical students from an inner city London teaching hospital participated in the study. Students' willingness to participate was affected (P interactional behaviours) whether the patient was engaging in the specific action with a doctor or nurse. Students were least willing to ask 'challenging' questions to doctors and nurses and to report errors to a national reporting system. Doctors' and nurses' encouragement appeared to increase self-reported willingness to participate in behaviours where baseline willingness was low. Similar to research on lay patient populations; medical students do not view involvement in safety-related behaviours equally. Interventions should be tailored at encouraging students to participate in behaviours they are less inclined to take on an active role in. Future research is required to examine students' motivations for participation in this important but heavily under-researched area. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Accidental poisoning in childhood: a multicentre survey. 2. The role of packaging in accidents involving medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiseman, H M; Guest, K; Murray, V S; Volans, G N

    1987-07-01

    To assess the effectiveness of child-resistant closures (CRCs) and unit dose packaging in preventing childhood poisoning with medications, a survey by 14 hospitals of accidental suspected poisoning in children under 5-years-old, was compared with a survey of a representative sample of households with children under 5 living in the catchment areas of the hospitals. Nine hundred and thirty-eight medications thought to have been ingested by 877 children were compared with 5827 medications found in households with children. The relationship between availability of packs or medications in the home and their involvement in accidents was quantified by means of an Accident Association Index (AAI). A low AAI indicated that the involvement of a pack or medication was less than expected from availability and therefore safe. A high AAI indicated that involvement was greater than expected and therefore unsafe. Medications involved in suspected poisoning were most frequently packed in containers without CRCs (63%) or transparent blisters (20%); both had high AAIs. CRCs, strips, sachets and opaque blisters had low AAIs. Analgesics, expectorants and gastrointestinal medications, had low AAIs, while oral contraceptives, hypnotics, sedative/tranquillizers, antidepressants, anticonvulsants, anti-emetics, and anti-infectives had high AAIs. Prescription medications were more frequently involved in accidents than over-the-counter (OTC) medications and had a higher AAI. Comparison of the AAIs of different kinds of medication in each of their various pack types showed that safe packaging reduced the risk from medications which had a high average AAI. Only 40% of medications were in their normal storage place at the time of the accident. Medicine and bathroom cabinets, and kitchen cupboards and drawers were the safest places to store medications. Handbags, fridges, and shelves or ledges in the bathroom were the most unsafe places. No pack had a low AAI when stored on open shelves

  9. Radiographer involvement in mammography image interpretation: A survey of United Kingdom practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culpan, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is most often diagnosed using x-ray mammography. Traditionally mammography images have been interpreted and reported by medically qualified practitioners – radiologists. Due to radiologist workforce shortages in recent years some non-medical practitioners, radiographers, now interpret and report mammography images. The aims of this survey were to describe the characteristics and practices of radiographers who interpret and report mammography images in NHS hospitals in the UK, and in particular to establish the extent of their practice beyond low-risk asymptomatic screening cases. This service evaluation demonstrated that UK radiographers are interpreting and reporting images across the full spectrum of clinical indications for mammography including: low-risk population screening, symptomatic, annual surveillance, family history and biopsy/surgical cases. The survey revealed that radiographers are involved in a diverse range of single and double reading practices where responsibility for diagnostic decision making is shared or transferred between radiologists and/or other radiographers. Comparative analysis of sub-group data suggested that there might be differences in the characteristics and practices of radiographers who interpret only low-risk screening mammograms and those who interpret and report a wider range of cases. The findings of this survey provide a platform for further research to investigate how and why the roles and responsibilities of radiographers who interpret and report mammograms vary between organisations, between practitioners and across different examinations. Further research is also needed to explore the implications of variation in practice for patients, practitioners and service providers. - Highlights: • UK radiographers interpret mammograms across the full spectrum of clinical indications. • UK radiographers are involved in a wide range of single/double mammography reading practices. • Characteristics required for

  10. Psychologists involved in cancer palliative care in Japan: A nationwide survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Kasumi; Iwamitsu, Yumi; Matsubara, Mei; Oba, Akira; Hirai, Kei; Morita, Tatsuya; Kizawa, Yoshiyuki

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify, using a nationwide survey, what is perceived as necessary knowledge and skills for psychologists involved in cancer palliative care in Japan, the expectations of medical staff members, and the degree to which these expectations are met. We conducted a questionnaire survey of psychologists involved in cancer palliative care. A total of 419 psychologists from 403 facilities were asked to fill out the questionnaire and return it anonymously. Some 401 psychologists (89 males, 310 females, and 2 unspecified; mean age, 37.2 ± 9.5 years) responded about necessary knowledge and skills for psychologists working in cancer palliative care, the necessity for training, expectations at their current workplace, and the degree to which expectations are met. More than 90% of participants responded that many kinds of knowledge and skills related to the field of cancer palliative care are necessary. Over 80% of participants indicated a necessity for training related to these knowledge and skills. Although more than 50% (range, 50.1-85.8%) of participants responded that such services as "cooperation with medical staff within a hospital," "handling patients for whom psychological support would be beneficial," and "assessment of patients' mental state" were expected at their workplace, fewer than 60% (31.4-56.9%) responded that they actually performed these roles. Our results show that many psychologists in cancer palliative care feel unable to respond to the expectations at their current workplace and that they require more adequate knowledge and skills related to cancer palliative care to work effectively. No other nationwide surveys have generated this type of information in Japan, so we believe that the results of our study are uniquely important.

  11. We love our school toilets: involving primary school students in improving their school toilets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senior, Elizabeth

    2014-03-01

    This article reports on the planning, implementation and evaluation of an intervention to improve school students' experience of using the school toilet in a primary school in Melbourne, Australia. 20 students from grades 2-6 participated in focus groups, to discuss what they valued about the school and raise awareness of issues they were not happy about. A common theme from all of the focus groups was that students reported avoiding use of the school toilets. Using the ideas generated from the focus groups, the student council (with input from staff), developed a self-administered pre- and post-test questionnaire. This was given to 220 students in grades 1-4, aged 6-10 years. Improvements suggested by the students were made to the toilet block, and then a post-test was administered. Independent t tests were conducted. The pre-test indicated that 71% of girls and 65% of boys feared the behaviour of other students in the toilet. Overwhelmingly, the qualitative comments focused on poor student behaviour in the toilets, with lack of privacy due to student misbehaviour mentioned in 90% of the comments. After the toilets were revamped, the greatest gains were made in students' attitudes toward the toilets, with a 37% increase in students who indicated they now liked the toilet facility. Incidents of vandalism also decreased; however, student misconduct in the toilets was still regarded as a problem. Involving students in refurbishing their toilets improved how students viewed the toilets and reduced vandalism; however, a different intervention is required to change inappropriate behaviours in the toilet.

  12. What Do K-12 Teachers Think about Including Student Surveys in Their Performance Ratings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dretzke, Beverly J.; Sheldon, Timothy D.; Lim, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated K-12 teachers' opinions about the use of student surveys as a component of a teacher evaluation system. Surveys were administered to teachers at the beginning of the school year and again in the spring. Analyses of teachers' responses on the fall survey indicated tentative support for the inclusion of student feedback in…

  13. Delaware School Climate Survey--Student: Its Factor Structure, Concurrent Validity, and Reliability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bear, George G.; Gaskins, Clare; Blank, Jessica; Chen, Fang Fang

    2011-01-01

    The Delaware School Climate Survey-Student (DSCS-S) was developed to provide schools with a brief and psychometrically sound student survey for assessing school climate, particularly the dimensions of social support and structure. Confirmatory factor analyses, conducted on a sample of 11,780 students in 85 schools, showed that a bifactor model…

  14. National Student Feedback Surveys in Distance Education: An Investigation at the UK Open University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashby, Alison; Richardson, John T. E.; Woodley, Alan

    2011-01-01

    National student feedback surveys are administered in a number of countries, and several of these encompass both campus-based and distance learning students. The UK Open University achieves a high ranking in the annual National Student Survey (NSS), but there are some anomalies in the results. The NSS questionnaire was administered to three…

  15. Quality of Academic Advising at UNO: Results of Student and Faculty Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ESS Reports, 1988

    1988-01-01

    This report presents the results of a student/faculty survey on the academic advising process at the University of Nebraska at Omaha, and highlights issues in improving the advising process. The survey included 195 recent graduates, 269 existing students, and 207 faculty and professional advisors. The study found that 70.8% of students were…

  16. Parent Educational Involvement in Middle School: Longitudinal Influences on Student Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbacz, S. Andrew; Zerr, Argero A.; Dishion, Thomas J.; Seeley, John R.; Stormshak, Elizabeth A.

    2017-01-01

    The present study examined influences of 6th grade student-reported parent educational involvement on early adolescent peer group affiliations at 7th and 8th grade. In addition, student gender and ethnicity were explored as possible moderators. Drawn from a large effectiveness trial, participants in this study were 5,802 early adolescents across twenty middle schools in the Northwest region of the United States. Findings suggested that specifically parent’s educational involvement in 6th grade predicted increases in positive peer affiliation, when controlling for a general score of parent monitoring practices. The relation between parent educational involvement and peer affiliation varied by student ethnicity but not by gender. Findings suggest the social benefits of parent’s engagement with the school context on early adolescent development. PMID:29731534

  17. Parent Educational Involvement in Middle School: Longitudinal Influences on Student Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbacz, S Andrew; Zerr, Argero A; Dishion, Thomas J; Seeley, John R; Stormshak, Elizabeth A

    2018-05-01

    The present study examined influences of 6 th grade student-reported parent educational involvement on early adolescent peer group affiliations at 7 th and 8 th grade. In addition, student gender and ethnicity were explored as possible moderators. Drawn from a large effectiveness trial, participants in this study were 5,802 early adolescents across twenty middle schools in the Northwest region of the United States. Findings suggested that specifically parent's educational involvement in 6 th grade predicted increases in positive peer affiliation, when controlling for a general score of parent monitoring practices. The relation between parent educational involvement and peer affiliation varied by student ethnicity but not by gender. Findings suggest the social benefits of parent's engagement with the school context on early adolescent development.

  18. Involving postgraduate's students in undergraduate small group teaching promotes active learning in both

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Ruchi; Modi, Jyoti Nath; Vyas, Rashmi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lecture is a common traditional method for teaching, but it may not stimulate higher order thinking and students may also be hesitant to express and interact. The postgraduate (PG) students are less involved with undergraduate (UG) teaching. Team based small group active learning method can contribute to better learning experience. Aim: To-promote active learning skills among the UG students using small group teaching methods involving PG students as facilitators to impart hands-on supervised training in teaching and managerial skills. Methodology: After Institutional approval under faculty supervision 92 UGs and 8 PGs participated in 6 small group sessions utilizing the jigsaw technique. Feedback was collected from both. Observations: Undergraduate Feedback (Percentage of Students Agreed): Learning in small groups was a good experience as it helped in better understanding of the subject (72%), students explored multiple reading resources (79%), they were actively involved in self-learning (88%), students reported initial apprehension of performance (71%), identified their learning gaps (86%), team enhanced their learning process (71%), informal learning in place of lecture was a welcome change (86%), it improved their communication skills (82%), small group learning can be useful for future self-learning (75%). Postgraduate Feedback: Majority performed facilitation for first time, perceived their performance as good (75%), it was helpful in self-learning (100%), felt confident of managing students in small groups (100%), as facilitator they improved their teaching skills, found it more useful and better identified own learning gaps (87.5%). Conclusions: Learning in small groups adopting team based approach involving both UGs and PGs promoted active learning in both and enhanced the teaching skills of the PGs. PMID:26380201

  19. High school students' posttraumatic symptoms, substance abuse and involvement in violence in the aftermath of war.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiff, Miriam; Pat-Horenczyk, Ruth; Benbenishty, Rami; Brom, Danny; Baum, Naomi; Astor, Ron Avi

    2012-10-01

    This study examined one-year after effects of exposure to war events on adolescents' Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms (PTS) and risk behaviors (substance use and involvement in school violence). In addition, it addressed two potential vulnerability factors: at the micro level, it examined whether childhood trauma raised the vulnerability of Israeli adolescents to PTS and risk behaviors when exposed to war events. At the macro level, we explored whether ethnicity, i.e., being an Israeli Arab, is a vulnerability factor to PTS and risk behaviors. We used a representative sample of 7th to 11th grade students from the north of Israel that included 4151 students: 1800 Jewish (54.4% boys) and 2351 Arab (41.5% boys). We assessed exposure to war events and childhood traumatic events, PTS and PTSD, substance use (alcohol, cannabis, Ecstasy) and involvement in school violence. The findings revealed extensive exposure to war events among both Jewish and Arab students. A year after the war, its effects on adolescents were still manifested in PTS, and involvement in school violence and substance use. Exposure to child physical abuse was associated with higher levels of PTS symptoms, substance use and involvement in violence. Exposure to other traumatic events was also associated with greater PTS symptoms and involvement in violence but not with greater substance use. Arab students were a more vulnerable population. They reported higher PTS symptoms, more cannabis use and greater involvement in school violence than Jewish students. However, exposure to war events had similar effects on both Arab and Jewish students. We conclude that war effects include a broad range of psychological distress and risk behaviors that last long after the war ends, especially among youth who have experienced childhood trauma and high exposure to war-related stressors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The image ofan ideal psychiatrist inthe eyes of medical students, patients and doctors involved inpsychiatric care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Margulska

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the study was to determine differences in the image of ideal psychiatrist (IIP among patients, doctors involved in psychiatric care and medical students and also between individuals with different work experience (doctors vs. students. The psychiatrist’s personality seems an important factor in supporting therapeutic process; therefore it is worth searching for the patient’s needs. Materials and methods: Three groups participated in the study: patients of the psychiatric units, medical students of 6th year and psychiatrists. The Gough and Heilbrun ACL (Adjective Check List – based on Mur‑ ray’s theory of needs – was used to assess IIP. Results: Data analysis revealed statistically significant differences among patients, doctors and students involving five scales: Nurturance, Aggression, Change, Succorance and Deference. Patients had lower scores on Change scale than doctors and higher scores on the Nurturance, Succurance and Deference than stu‑ dents. Psychiatrists had higher scores on Nurturance and Deference scale and lower score on Aggression scale than students. Conclusions: The findings showed differences in the expectations of patients compared to those of students and doctors. The most significant difference that was observed involved the Change. It may indicate that patients prefer order, conventional approach and stability in psychiatrist’s personality traits more commonly than doctors. Study findings suggest that work experience has impact on IIP: with increasing work experience, opinion about IIP comes closer to patients’ expectations.

  1. Beyond the Bake Sale: Fundraising and Professional Experience for Students Involved in an Information Systems Student Chapter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Johnny; Carpenter, Don; Slauson, Gayla Jo; Skinner, Joe; Nash, Cole

    2012-01-01

    Fundraising traditionally involves selling. This paper explores the merits of selling technology services provided by a technology oriented student club to members of a campus community. This club activity puts into practice learning theories presented in the literature. Beyond fundraising, this activity yields many additional benefits to the…

  2. Midwifery students' evaluation of team-based academic assignments involving peer-marking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parratt, Jenny A; Fahy, Kathleen M; Hastie, Carolyn R

    2014-03-01

    Midwives should be skilled team workers in maternity units and in group practices. Poor teamwork skills are a significant cause of adverse maternity care outcomes. Despite Australian and International regulatory requirements that all midwifery graduates are competent in teamwork, the systematic teaching and assessment of teamwork skills is lacking in higher education. How do midwifery students evaluate participation in team-based academic assignments, which include giving and receiving peer feedback? First and third year Bachelor of Midwifery students who volunteered (24 of 56 students). Participatory Action Research with data collection via anonymous online surveys. There was general agreement that team based assignments; (i) should have peer-marking, (ii) help clarify what is meant by teamwork, (iii) develop communication skills, (iv) promote student-to-student learning. Third year students strongly agreed that teams: (i) are valuable preparation for teamwork in practice, (ii) help meet Australian midwifery competency 8, and (iii) were enjoyable. The majority of third year students agreed with statements that their teams were effectively coordinated and team members shared responsibility for work equally; first year students strongly disagreed with these statements. Students' qualitative comments substantiated and expanded on these findings. The majority of students valued teacher feedback on well-developed drafts of the team's assignment prior to marking. Based on these findings we changed practice and created more clearly structured team-based assignments with specific marking criteria. We are developing supporting lessons to teach specific teamwork skills: together these resources are called "TeamUP". TeamUP should be implemented in all pre-registration Midwifery courses to foster students' teamwork skills and readiness for practice. Copyright © 2013 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Analysis of College Students' Personal Health Information Activities: Online Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sujin; Sinn, Donghee; Syn, Sue Yeon

    2018-04-20

    With abundant personal health information at hand, individuals are faced with a critical challenge in evaluating the informational value of health care records to keep useful information and discard that which is determined useless. Young, healthy college students who were previously dependents of adult parents or caregivers are less likely to be concerned with disease management. Personal health information management (PHIM) is a special case of personal information management (PIM) that is associated with multiple interactions among varying stakeholders and systems. However, there has been limited evidence to understand informational or behavioral underpinning of the college students' PHIM activities, which can influence their health in general throughout their lifetime. This study aimed to investigate demographic and academic profiles of college students with relevance to PHIM activities. Next, we sought to construct major PHIM-related activity components and perceptions among college students. Finally, we sought to discover major factors predicting core PHIM activities among college students we sampled. A Web survey was administered to collect responses about PHIM behaviors and perceptions among college students from the University of Kentucky from January through March 2017. A total of 1408 college students were included in the analysis. PHIM perceptions, demographics, and academic variations were used as independent variables to predict diverse PHIM activities using a principal component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical regression analyses (SPSS v.24, IBM Corp, Armonk, NY, USA). Majority of the participants were female (956/1408, 67.90%), and the age distribution of this population included an adequate representation of college students of all ages. The most preferred health information resources were family (612/1408, 43.47%), health care professionals (366/1408, 26.00%), friends (27/1408, 1.91%), and the internet (157/1408, 11.15%). Organizational or

  4. Attitudes of nursing staff towards involvement in medical end-of-life decisions: a national survey study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albers, G.; Francke, A.L.; Veer, A.J.E. de; Bilsen, J.; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, B.D.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate nursing staff attitudes towards involvement and role in end-of-life decisions (ELD) and the relationships with sociodemographic and work-related characteristics. Methods: Survey study among nationally representative Dutch research sample consisting of care professionals.

  5. Attitudes of nursing staff towards involvement in medical end-of-life decisions: A national survey study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albers, G.; Francke, A.L.; de Veer, A.J.E.; Bilsen, J.; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, B.D.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate nursing staff attitudes towards involvement and role in end-of-life decisions (ELDs) and the relationships with sociodemographic and work-related characteristics. Methods: Survey study among nationally representative Dutch research sample consisting of care professionals.

  6. "Sleepiness" is serious in adolescence: Two surveys of 3235 Canadian students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogilvie Robert

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence is growing that sleep problems in adolescents are significant impediments to learning and negatively affect behaviour, attainment of social competence and quality of life. The objectives of the study were to determine the level of sleepiness among students in high school, to identify factors to explain it, and to determine the association between sleepiness and performance in both academic and extracurricular activities Methods A cross-sectional survey of 2201 high school students in the Hamilton Wentworth District School Board and the Near North District School Board in Ontario was conducted in 1998/9. A similar survey was done three years later involving 1034 students in the Grand Erie District School Board in the same Province. The Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS was used to measure sleepiness and we also assessed the reliability of this tool for this population. Descriptive analysis of the cohort and information on various measures of performance and demographic data were included. Regression analysis, using the generalised estimating equation (GEE, was utilized to investigate factors associated with risk of sleepiness (ESS>10. Results Seventy per cent of the students had less than 8.5 hours weeknight sleep. Bedtime habits such as a consistent bedtime routine, staying up late or drinking caffeinated beverages before bed were statistically significantly associated with ESS, as were weeknight sleep quantity and gender. As ESS increased there was an increase in the proportion of students who felt their grades had dropped because of sleepiness, were late for school, were often extremely sleepy at school, and were involved in fewer extracurricular activities. These performance measures were statistically significantly associated with ESS. Twenty-three percent of the students felt their grades had dropped because of sleepiness. Most students (58–68% reported that they were "really sleepy" between 8 and 10 A

  7. "Sleepiness" is serious in adolescence: two surveys of 3235 Canadian students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Edward S; Powles, A C Peter; Thabane, Lehana; O'Brien, Susan; Molnar, Danielle Sirriani; Trajanovic, Nik; Ogilvie, Robert; Shapiro, Colin; Yan, Mi; Chilcott-Tanser, Lisa

    2006-05-02

    Evidence is growing that sleep problems in adolescents are significant impediments to learning and negatively affect behaviour, attainment of social competence and quality of life. The objectives of the study were to determine the level of sleepiness among students in high school, to identify factors to explain it, and to determine the association between sleepiness and performance in both academic and extracurricular activities A cross-sectional survey of 2201 high school students in the Hamilton Wentworth District School Board and the Near North District School Board in Ontario was conducted in 1998/9. A similar survey was done three years later involving 1034 students in the Grand Erie District School Board in the same Province. The Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) was used to measure sleepiness and we also assessed the reliability of this tool for this population. Descriptive analysis of the cohort and information on various measures of performance and demographic data were included. Regression analysis, using the generalised estimating equation (GEE), was utilized to investigate factors associated with risk of sleepiness (ESS>10). Seventy per cent of the students had less than 8.5 hours weeknight sleep. Bedtime habits such as a consistent bedtime routine, staying up late or drinking caffeinated beverages before bed were statistically significantly associated with ESS, as were weeknight sleep quantity and gender. As ESS increased there was an increase in the proportion of students who felt their grades had dropped because of sleepiness, were late for school, were often extremely sleepy at school, and were involved in fewer extracurricular activities. These performance measures were statistically significantly associated with ESS. Twenty-three percent of the students felt their grades had dropped because of sleepiness. Most students (58-68%) reported that they were "really sleepy" between 8 and 10 A.M. Sleep deprivation and excessive daytime sleepiness were common

  8. Ten-Structure as Strategy of Addition 1-20 by Involving Spatial Structuring Ability for First Grade Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmah, Ummy; Putri, Ratu Ilma Indra; Somakim

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to design learning activities that can support students to develop strategies for the addition of number 1 to 20 in the first grade by involving students' spatial structuring ability. This study was conducted in Indonesia by involving 27 students. In this paper, one of three activities is discussed namely ten-box activity.…

  9. Post-Primary Students' Images of Mathematics: Findings from a Survey of Irish Ordinary Level Mathematics Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Ciara; Stynes, Martin; O'Donoghue, John

    2016-01-01

    A questionnaire survey was carried out as part of a PhD research study to investigate the image of mathematics held by post-primary students in Ireland. The study focused on students in fifth year of post-primary education studying ordinary level mathematics for the Irish Leaving Certificate examination--the final examination for students in…

  10. The Pulsar Search Collaboratory: Involving High School Students in Astronomical Research -- A Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Rachel; Heatherly, S.; McLauglin, M.; Lorimer, D.

    2010-01-01

    The National Science Foundation funded "Pulsar Search Collaboratory” project is a collaboration between the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Green Bank, WV and West Virginia University aimed at provoking interest in Science-Technology-Engineering-Math (STEM) careers and increasing scientific and information technology literacy among high-school students within the state and region. Over the initial three-year phase of this program, 60 high-school teachers at schools throughout region and over 300 students will be involved in the search for new pulsars and transient objects by analyzing over 30 TB of data collected by the Green Bank Telescope in 2007. Although training is provided to teachers and student leaders via a summer workshop, additional students may join the program, learning from their peers how to conduct the data analysis. We are now in the second year of the PSC and we present a progress report from the first year of the PSC. We will summarize our approaches to implementing this challenging project, including the use of online tools to communicate with and sustain interest among the student teams, and the development of a unique graphical database through which students access and analyze pulsar plots. We will present the student results including one astronomical discovery as well as statistics on the plots that students have analyzed, including distribution among schools, number of known pulsars found, and RFI detection. Finally we will present evaluation results and lessons learned from the first year of the PSC. These include results from pre/post testing of teachers and students that show changes in student interest in STEM careers resulting from the PSC, and statistics on student participation.

  11. Nursing students' clinical competencies: a survey on clinical education objectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrigoni, C; Grugnetti, A M; Caruso, R; Gallotti, M L; Borrelli, P; Puci, M

    2017-01-01

    Developing clearly defined competencies and identifying strategies for their measurement remain unfortunately a critical aspect of nursing training. In the current international context, which continues to be characterised by deep economic crisis, universities have a fundamental role to play in redefining the educational goals to respond to the expectations of certain geographical areas of interest, as underscored in the Bologna Process (Joint Declaration of the European Ministers of Education Convened in Bologna 19 June 1999). The aim of this observational study was to examine the clinical learning context of nursing students using a tool developed by a team of teachers for the analysis of clinical learning. Redefinition of the clinical learning objectives with reference to the competencies set out in the questionnaire validated by Venturini et al. (2012) and the subsequent use of the tool created by the team of teachers for students in the first, second and third-year courses of the 2013/14 academic year, covering all the internships called for in those years. All nursing students enrolled in the first, second and third year of the nursing undergraduate degree program at the University of Pavia (no. 471) participated in this survey. A total of 1,758 clinical internships were carried out: 461 for the first year, 471 for the second year and 826 for the third year. Setting objectives, beginning with the educational offerings in the several clinical contexts, represents a strong point for this process. The results highlight a level of heterogeneity and complexity intrinsic to the University of Pavia educational system, characterized by clinical settings with different clinical levels (Research hospital and other traditional hospitals) that offering different levels of training. The use of the self-evaluation form for clinical learning made it possible to perform real-time observations of the training activities of the entire student body. An educational model

  12. Extent of Parental Involvement in Improving the Students' Levels in Special Education Programs in Kuwait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shammari, Zaid; Yawkey, Thomas D.

    2008-01-01

    This research study investigates the degree to which parental involvement impacts students' levels in special education programs in Kuwait. More specifically, this research discusses several scientific methods for research included within the significance of the study and research questions for this study. Research methods and results using a…

  13. Involvement of Working Memory in College Students' Sequential Pattern Learning and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundey, Shannon M. A.; De Los Reyes, Andres; Rowan, James D.; Lee, Bern; Delise, Justin; Molina, Sabrina; Cogdill, Lindsay

    2013-01-01

    When learning highly organized sequential patterns of information, humans and nonhuman animals learn rules regarding the hierarchical structures of these sequences. In three experiments, we explored the role of working memory in college students' sequential pattern learning and performance in a computerized task involving a sequential…

  14. Parent Involvement and the Impact on Student Achievement in Grades 2-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, Yvonne Marie

    2013-01-01

    This quantitative research study examined the relationship between student achievement in reading and mathematics on the STAR (Standardized Test for the Assessment of Reading and Mathematics) and parent involvement in specific character development activities. The research design was quantitative in nature and conducted in two similar elementary…

  15. Negligent Liability Issues Involving Colleges and Students: Does an Ethic of Caring Heighten Institutional Liability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckham, Joseph; Pearson, Douglas

    This paper--part of a collection of 54 papers from the 48th annual conference of the Education Law Association held in November 2002--addresses the question of how and to what extent institutions of higher learning could be held liable for negligence involving students. The paper is, mainly, a review of recent case law related to the liability of…

  16. The Relationship between Academic Stress and Two Aspects of Father Involvement among University Student Fathers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masciadrelli, Brian P.; Milardo, Robert M.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the associations between academic stress experienced by university student fathers and the behavioral and cognitive involvement these fathers had with their children. Fifty-three fathers enrolled in university classes and residing with at least one child less than 12 years of age responded to questionnaire measures of…

  17. An Examination of Involvement and Socially Responsible Leadership Development of Black Students Attending Predominantly White Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCurtis, Bridget R.

    2012-01-01

    There has been an identifiable decline in moral decision making and socially responsible behaviors in society based on recent national events such as Enron and the Bernie Madoff scandal (Arvedlund, 2009; Doran, 2004). This study attempts to address this leadership crisis by examining college student involvement and leadership experiences that may…

  18. Collegiate Diversity Experiences and Students' Views Regarding Social and Political Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Eugene T., III; Trolian, Teniell L.

    2015-01-01

    Using data from the Wabash National Study of Liberal Arts Education, this study examines the relationship between engagement in diversity experiences during college and student attitudes about the importance of being socially and politically involved at the end of their fourth year of college. Findings suggest a positive link between…

  19. Parents' and Teachers' Perspectives Regarding Parental Involvement and Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Christi Nelson

    2017-01-01

    The U.S. government has stated in federal guidelines that parents must be involved in their children's education in order for student achievement to increase. For more than 5 years, a small rural middle school in Mississippi was designated a low-performing school due to its failure to achieve the required standards for quality distribution index…

  20. The influence of peer affiliation and student activities on adolescent drug involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, J E

    1996-01-01

    This study examined the importance of students' academic performance level and extracurricular activities as predictors of drug involvement relative to peer influence. Social development theory provided the theoretical rational for the study. Data were obtained from 2,229 randomly selected students in the eighth, tenth, and twelfth grades from seventeen school districts in northeastern Ohio. At all three grade levels, involvement in extracurricular activities and academic level were significantly correlated with students' gateway and hard drug use. Consistent with prior research, the strongest correlate of gateway and hard drug use across all grade levels was affiliation with drug-using friends. Having a job after school was marginally related to self-reported gateway drug use at grade level ten. Multiple regression analysis revealed that extracurricular involvement and academic performance level make small, but unique contributions to the prediction of adolescents' gateway drug use beyond affiliation with drug-using peers at all three grade levels. The findings of this study suggest that students' academic performance and extracurricular involvements are significantly related to adolescent gateway and hard drug use, but have less predictive significance relative to peer relationships.

  1. Psycho-social correlates of students' involvement in secret cults and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study focuses on the premise of incessant havoc being perpetrated by adherents of secret cults in the country's institution of higher learning. These cult groups terrorize fellow students, intimidate members of campus communities in various ways and are often involved in crimes like rape, burglary, thuggery, stealing, ...

  2. Relations of Parenting Style and Parental Involvement with Ninth-Grade Students' Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulson, Sharon E.

    1994-01-01

    Compared adolescents' and parents' perceptions of maternal and paternal demandingness, responsiveness, and parental involvement with schooling. Found that adolescents' reports of parenting correlated only moderately with parents' reports. Adolescents', but not parents', reports of parenting predicted students' achievement outcome, with parental…

  3. Foreign students as a resource of skilled workforce in the region (on materials of sociological survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubinskaya Eteri, D.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Scientific and technical revolution leads to permanent changes in the structure of social production. As a consequence, in employment increased the demand for specialists in a specific profile, depending on the development of science and industry at this stage. Russian post-industrial economy is impossible without a sufficient number of qualified professionals required by the economy. One of the effective ways to ensure country qualified professionals is foreign graduates who have received after graduation the opportunity to stay and work in the labor market of the host country. The paper presents results of sociological survey of international students in the Southern Federal University. The objectives of the survey was to determine the migration attractiveness of the Rostov region, conditions of adaptation and integration of foreign students, as well as identifying the prospects of their involvement in the regional labour market after receiving education. On the basis of generalization of the results in the paper drawn conclusions, given recommendations for improving conditions to attract of foreign students at the regional level.

  4. The involvement of student teachers in the development of language learning tasks. Lessons from the ETALAGE project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koet, T.; Žogla, I.; Rutka, L.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper I report a small experiment about the involvement of student teachers as well as experienced professionals in the development of language learning tasks. I argue that involving student teachers as well as experienced professionals may yield better results than involving experienced

  5. Alcohol- and Drug-Involved Driving in the United States: Methodology for the 2007 National Roadside Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacey, John H.; Kelley-Baker, Tara; Voas, Robert B.; Romano, Eduardo; Furr-Holden, C. Debra; Torres, Pedro; Berning, Amy

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the methodology used in the 2007 U.S. National Roadside Survey to estimate the prevalence of alcohol- and drug-impaired driving and alcohol- and drug-involved driving. This study involved randomly stopping drivers at 300 locations across the 48 continental U.S. states at sites selected through a stratified random sampling…

  6. University Physics Students' Use of Models in Explanations of Phenomena Involving Interaction between Metals and Electromagnetic Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redfors, Andreas; Ryder, Jim

    2001-01-01

    Examines third year university physics students' use of models when explaining familiar phenomena involving interaction between metals and electromagnetic radiation. Concludes that few students use a single model consistently. (Contains 27 references.) (DDR)

  7. Why parents and children consent to become involved in medical student teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinnock, Ralph; Weller, Jennifer; Shulruf, Boaz; Jones, Rhys; Reed, Peter; Mizutani, Satomi

    2011-04-01

    Clinical experience in paediatrics is essential for medical undergraduates. This is the first study, of which we are aware, to examine why children of different ages admitted acutely to hospital and their parents agree to become involved in medical student teaching. We wanted to establish whether they considered that they needed to give consent before seeing medical students, whether this was routinely sought and what influenced their decisions. Data were collected using questionnaires and semi-structured interviews of parents and children. Questionnaires were completed by 105 parents of children less than 6 years old, and 34 children between 10 years and 15 years old and their parents. Interviews were conducted with 32 children between the ages of 6 and 10 years and their parents. Most parents and children consider that they have a responsibility to teaching but must always be asked for consent. They were motivated by altruism, but fear of emotional distress or pain can lead them to refuse. Younger children may not be able to give reasons for not wanting to see a medical student but sometimes have firm views, which must be respected. Having seen a medical student previously did influence children's or parents' opinions. Most children who have seen a medical student were prepared to see students again. Medical students can be reassured that parents and children admitted acutely to a children's hospital have a positive attitude to student involvement and are prepared to help them learn clinical skills, but consent must always be obtained and the child's perspective must always be considered. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2011 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  8. The Role of Student Involvement and Perceptions of Integration in a Causal Model of Student Persistence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Joseph B.; Milem, Jeffrey F.

    1999-01-01

    This study refined and applied an integrated model of undergraduate persistence (accounting for both behavioral and perceptual components) to examine first-year retention at a private, highly selective research university. Results suggest that including behaviorally based measures of involvement improves the model's explanatory power concerning…

  9. Academic dishonesty in higher education: students' perceptions and involvement in an African institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saana, Sixtus Bieranye Bayaa Martin; Ablordeppey, Ephraim; Mensah, Napoleon Jackson; Karikari, Thomas K

    2016-04-25

    Integrity in academic work is a critical benchmark of every profession. For this reason, special attention should be devoted to addressing academic dishonesty (AD) in higher education to prevent the potential transfer of these practices to the workplace. In order to effectively address AD in Africa, further information about correlates of, and barriers to, the effectiveness of existing AD-controlling measures is needed. In Ghana, little is known about AD from the perspective of students. Here, we present a first report of Ghanaian undergraduate students' self-reported understanding of, and support for, institutional AD regulations, their involvement in specific dishonest behaviours, as well as their motivation factors. Approximately 92% of respondents said they were aware of institutional regulations on AD. However, only 31% rated their understanding as high. Respondents believed that their lecturers had better understanding of, and support for, these regulations than the students (p academic load and pressure to please family and guardians were the leading causes of AD. Cheating during examinations and inappropriately sharing answers in the preparation of assignments were some of the highly-occurring forms of AD. Respondents believed that copying colleagues' work without their permission was a serious offense but doing so with their permission was not. Our findings suggest that the sampled students consent to cheating-they believed that they committed no misconduct once the parties involved had agreed on the act. Considering these misconceptions, institutions should do more to help their students better understand the different forms of AD and how to avoid them.

  10. On the awareness of radiation protection. A questionnaire survey of junior college students of radiological technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kayamori, Ryo; Togashi, Atsuhiko; Yamazaki, Yoshihiro; Inakoshi, Hideki

    2002-01-01

    A questionnaire survey on the awareness of radiation protection was conducted to improve our curriculum of radiation protection education, which seems to be important for the safe administrative control systems and handling techniques of radiation. A total of 426 students answered our questionnaire during the period of 1994 to 1999. They were 80 first-year, 114 second-year and 232 third-year students. The facility values of 4 questions on the influence of radiation to a human body were 50.2%, 30.3%, 28.9% and 7.0%. There was no statistically significant difference among different age groups. The facility values of 3 questions on the dose limitation of occupation exposure were 50.5% (on the effective dose equivalent), 36.4% (on the tissue dose equivalent to skin), and 40.9% (on the crystalline lens). On safe handling of radiation, only 35.7% of students correctly answered that they use a plastic board to protect themselves from β-ray, while 77.0% correctly answered the question on the decontamination method of radioactive substance from the skin. The results show the students' lack of knowledge on radiation protection. Those involved in basic science education and radiation protection education, therefore, need to clarify their teaching content and offer explicit explanations on the proper dose of radiation, effects to exposure dose, interaction between different materials and radiation. (author)

  11. Survey of Education, Engineering, and Information Technology Students Knowledge of Green Computing in Nigerian University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tajudeen Ahmed Shittu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of computer system is growing rapidly and there is growing concern on the environmental hazard associated with its use. Thus, the need for every user’s to possess the knowledge of using computer in an environmental friendly manner.  This study therefore, investigated the knowledge of green computing possessed by university students in Nigeria. To achieve this, survey method was employed to carry out the study. The study involved students from three schools (Computer Science, Engineering, and Education. Purposive sampling method was used to draw three hundred (300 respondents that volunteer to answer the questionnaire administered for gathering the data of the study. The instrument used was adapted but modify and subjected to pilot testing to ascertain its validity and internal consistency. The reliability of the instrument showed a .75 Cronbach alpha level.  The first research question was answer with descriptive statistic (perecentage.  T-test and ANOVA was used to answer question two and three. The findings showed that the students do not possess adequate knowledge on conscious use of computing system. Also, the study showed that there is no significant difference in the green computing knowledge possesses among male and female as well as among student from the three schools. Based on these findings, the study suggested among other an aggressive campaign on green computing among university communities.

  12. Vision Survey of the Nnamdi Azikiwe University Medical Students

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Eye disorders, medical students, Nigeria ... Refractive error was defined as >0.5 diopters (D) in the student's better eye. ... students with positive family history (risk ratio - 3.88). .... ocular symptoms associated with ametropia and.

  13. Suicide Prevention Exposure, Awareness, and Knowledge Survey (SPEAKS) - Student

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The SPEAKS- student dataset contains individual level information from a sample of college students on GLS funded campuses. These data include student demographics,...

  14. A Survey of the Duties and Job Performance of Student Assistants in Access Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolppanen, Bradley P.; Derr, Janice

    2009-01-01

    The results of a recently conducted Web-based survey of Access Services department supervisors are presented in this article. The survey, which was completed by 94 respondents, identified 19 core tasks completed by student assistants and further found a high overall approval of student assistant job performance. The information generated by the…

  15. A Survey of Former Nursing (RN and LVN) Students. Summary Findings of Respondents District-Wide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glyer, Culver-Betty

    In fall 2001 staff of the Los Rios Community College District Office of Institutional Research collaborated with occupational deans, academic deans, and faculty to develop and administer a survey of former nursing (RN and LVN) students. The survey was designed to determine how well courses had met the needs of former nursing students who earned…

  16. Association of Sleep Groups and Sleep Survey Results of High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Stephen A.; MacDonald, Lawrence; Frost, Frederica C.

    2006-01-01

    In January 2003 the High School Late Start Committee of the Northville Public Schools sent surveys to all families, faculty, and middle and high school students. The descriptive results of this survey can be found at www.northville.k12.mi.us/hr/late_start_committee_surveysummary.htm. This study focuses on the responses of the high school students,…

  17. Super-Diversity and Foreign-Born Students in Academic Libraries: A Survey Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarillo, Frans

    2018-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a survey study of foreign-born students' use of academic and public libraries. The researcher administered the survey at a public liberal arts college in the fall of 2014. The analysis shows that foreign-born students use both public and academic libraries with great frequency for academic tasks. Variables such as…

  18. Engaging nurse aide students to develop a survey to improve enrollment and retention in college.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Jamie Kamailani; Hernandez, Jesika Y; Braun, Kathryn L

    2011-01-01

    Students from lower socioeconomic status (SES) backgrounds have historically experienced high rates of college dropout. Surveys often are used to assess supports and barriers (SB) to college enrollment and completion, and findings drive the design of interventions to improve student recruitment and retention. However, standard surveys may not include questions that solicit the breadth of issues facing low-income minority individuals. We used community-based participatory research (CBPR) principles to develop an SB survey to better reflect the concerns of rural, first-generation college students in Hawai'i. An advisory panel (AP) of students and community partners guided the work. The literature informed the first draft of the SB survey. Then we worked with students who had successfully completed a vocational Nurse Aide (NA) Training Program (NATP) course to refine four versions of the SB survey through multiple cycles of online survey review and focus groups. The final product included questions in new areas and differently phrased questions in standard areas (e.g., transportation, dependent care, housing, financial aid) to better capture reasons for students dropping out. The survey has proven useful as a student assessment tool, and findings are being used by instructors, counselors, and community partners to add resources and modify programs to increase student success in community college. Findings confirm the usefulness of engaging target partners in tool development. An enhanced understanding of SB of students from underrepresented groups will help to improve college recruitment and retention interventions.

  19. Transfer students in STEM majors at a Midwestern University: Academic and social involvement factors that influence student success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Carlos

    There is soon-to-be a shortage of qualified U.S. workers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). As a result, many science-related jobs are being filled by technically-skilled foreign workers. If the U.S wants to maintain its global economic leadership, then it must ensure a continuous growth of highly-trained individuals in STEM disciplines. Therefore, American institutions of higher education, including community colleges, must identify potential factors that contribute to the lack of interest in STEM majors, as well as the low rate of success of students who enter STEM majors but struggle to finish their degrees. The purpose of this study was to ascertain the perceptions of community college transfer students who are pursuing bachelor degrees in STEM majors at Iowa State University (ISU). What were their transfer experiences and what influenced their academic success in STEM. Participants were encouraged to share their transfer experiences while at the community college as well as their experiences on the ISU campus. They were also asked about their level of academic involvement, their relationships with faculty, and their participation in peer group activities prior to and after transferring. The research design included both quantitative and qualitative components, which provided an in-depth look at the experiences of STEM non-engineering and engineering students. Quantitative data include students' background characteristics, demographic information, and college activities at the community college and ISU. Qualitative data were used to illuminate students' overall transfer experience and their successful journey in STEM fields. The combination of quantitative and qualitative methods allowed a better understanding of the strategies students put into practice once they transfer from a community college to a four-year institution in pursuit of a STEM bachelor's degree. The results of this study suggest that there is an association among the

  20. The Psychometric Characteristics of Maslach Burnout Inventory Student Survey: A Study Students of Isfahan University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeinab Rostami

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: In order to fill the gap of tool for measurement of student burnout in Iran, this study was performed on the 238 female students of Isfahan university that were selected by simple random sampling. Materials and Methods: The inventory is including 15 items and three subscales. Data were presented by analytical and descriptive statistic and draw table. In order to determine reliability of MBI-SS were used internal consistency method and test-retest. Results: Coefficient Cronbach's alpha for the exhaustion, cynicism and academic efficacy respectively was 88, 90, 84 (p<0.05 and showed good internal consistency. Also test-retest reliability about 4 weeks later, obtaining a reliability coefficient of 89, 84 and 67 (p<0.01 respectively for exhaustion, cynicism and academic efficacy. Principle component factor analysis with exploration method with warimax rotation was used to determine construct validity. In order to check the concurrent validity and divergent validity of this inventory were used respectively from the University Student Depression Inventory and the researcher made of scale interest to academic filed and coefficients for the exhaustion, cynicism and academic efficacy respectively were obtained -21, -53, -32 (p<0.01. Also concurrent validity for exhaustion, cynicism and academic efficacy respectively were obtained 74, 68 and 50 (p<0.01. Conclusion: This finding was that the Maslach burnout inventory-student survey is a valid and reliable instrument to measure academic burnout girls.

  1. Student Teachers’ Proof Schemes on Proof Tasks Involving Inequality: Deductive or Inductive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosyidi, A. H.; Kohar, A. W.

    2018-01-01

    Exploring student teachers’ proof ability is crucial as it is important for improving the quality of their learning process and help their future students learn how to construct a proof. Hence, this study aims at exploring at the proof schemes of student teachers in the beginning of their studies. Data were collected from 130 proofs resulted by 65 Indonesian student teachers on two proof tasks involving algebraic inequality. To analyse, the proofs were classified into the refined proof schemes level proposed by Lee (2016) ranging from inductive, which only provides irrelevant inferences, to deductive proofs, which consider addressing formal representation. Findings present several examples of each of Lee’s level on the student teachers’ proofs spanning from irrelevant inferences, novice use of examples or logical reasoning, strategic use examples for reasoning, deductive inferences with major and minor logical coherence, and deductive proof with informal and formal representation. Besides, it was also found that more than half of the students’ proofs coded as inductive schemes, which does not meet the requirement for doing the proof for the proof tasks examined in this study. This study suggests teacher educators in teacher colleges to reform the curriculum regarding proof learning which can accommodate the improvement of student teachers’ proving ability from inductive to deductive proof as well from informal to formal proof.

  2. Undergraduate Student Involvement in International Research - The IRES Program at MAX-lab, Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briscoe, William; O'Rielly, Grant; Fissum, Kevin

    2014-03-01

    Undergraduate students associated with The George Washington University and UMass Dartmouth have had the opportunity to participate in nuclear physics research as a part of the PIONS@MAXLAB Collaboration performing experiments at MAX-lab at Lund University in Sweden. This project has supported thirteen undergraduate students during 2009 - 2011. The student researchers are involved with all aspects of the experiments performed at the laboratory, from set-up to analysis and presentation at national conferences. These experiments investigate the dynamics responsible for the internal structure of the nucleon through the study of pion photoproduction off the nucleon and high-energy Compton scattering. Along with the US and Swedish project leaders, members of the collaboration (from four different countries) have contributed to the training and mentoring of these students. This program provides students with international research experiences that prepare them to operate successfully in a global environment and encourages them to stay in areas of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) that are crucial for our modern, technology-dependent society. We will present the history, goals and outcomes in both physics results and student success that have come from this program. This work supported by NSF OISE/IRES award 0553467.

  3. A Survey to Determine Decision-Making Styles of Working Paramedics and Student Paramedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, J L; Bienkowski, A; Travers, A H; Calder, L A; Walker, M; Tavares, W; Croskerry, P

    2016-05-01

    Two major processes underlie human decision-making: experiential (intuitive) and rational (conscious) thinking. The predominant thinking process used by working paramedics and student paramedics to make clinical decisions is unknown. A survey was administered to ground ambulance paramedics and to primary care paramedic students. The survey included demographic questions and the Rational Experiential Inventory-40, a validated psychometric tool involving 40 questions. Twenty questions evaluated each thinking style: 10 assessed preference and 10 assessed ability to use that style. Responses were provided on a five-point Likert scale, with higher scores indicating higher affinity for the style in question. Analysis included both descriptive statistics and t tests to evaluate differences in thinking style. The response rate was 88.4% (1172/1326). Paramedics (n=904) had a median age of 36 years (IQR 29-42) and most were male (69.5%) and primary or advanced care paramedics (PCP=55.5%; ACP=32.5%). Paramedic students (n=268) had a median age of 23 years (IQR 21-26), most were male (63.1%) and had completed high school (31.7%) or an undergraduate degree (25.4%) prior to paramedic training. Both groups scored their ability to use and favourability toward rational thinking significantly higher than experiential thinking. The mean score for rational thinking was 3.86/5 among paramedics and 3.97/5 among paramedic students (prational over experiential thinking. This information adds to our current knowledge on paramedic decision-making and is potentially important for developing continuing education and clinical support tools.

  4. Involvement of consumers in studies run by the Medical Research Council Clinical Trials Unit: Results of a survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vale Claire L

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We aimed to establish levels of consumer involvement in randomised controlled trials (RCTs, meta-analyses and other studies carried out by the UK Medical Research Council (MRC Clinical Trials Unit across the range of research programs, predominantly in cancer and HIV. Methods Staff responsible for studies that were included in a Unit Progress Report (MRC CTU, April 2009 were asked to complete a semi-structured questionnaire survey regarding consumer involvement. This was defined as active involvement of consumers as partners in the research process and not as subjects of that research. The electronic questionnaires combined open and closed questions, intended to capture quantitative and qualitative information on whether studies had involved consumers; types of activities undertaken; recruitment and support; advantages and disadvantages of involvement and its perceived impact on aspects of the research. Results Between October 2009 and April 2010, 138 completed questionnaires (86% were returned. Studies had been conducted over a 20 year period from 1989, and around half were in cancer; 30% in HIV and 20% were in other disease areas including arthritis, tuberculosis and blood transfusion medicine. Forty-three studies (31% had some consumer involvement, most commonly as members of trial management groups (TMG [88%]. A number of positive impacts on both the research and the researcher were identified. Researchers generally felt involvement was worthwhile and some felt that consumer involvement had improved the credibility of the research. Benefits in design and quality, trial recruitment, dissemination and decision making were also perceived. Researchers felt they learned from consumer involvement, albeit that there were some barriers. Conclusions Whilst most researchers identified benefits of involving consumers, most of studies included in the survey had no involvement. Information from this survey will inform the development

  5. Involvement of consumers in studies run by the Medical Research Council Clinical Trials Unit: results of a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vale, Claire L; Thompson, Lindsay C; Murphy, Claire; Forcat, Silvia; Hanley, Bec

    2012-01-13

    We aimed to establish levels of consumer involvement in randomised controlled trials (RCTs), meta-analyses and other studies carried out by the UK Medical Research Council (MRC) Clinical Trials Unit across the range of research programs, predominantly in cancer and HIV. Staff responsible for studies that were included in a Unit Progress Report (MRC CTU, April 2009) were asked to complete a semi-structured questionnaire survey regarding consumer involvement. This was defined as active involvement of consumers as partners in the research process and not as subjects of that research. The electronic questionnaires combined open and closed questions, intended to capture quantitative and qualitative information on whether studies had involved consumers; types of activities undertaken; recruitment and support; advantages and disadvantages of involvement and its perceived impact on aspects of the research. Between October 2009 and April 2010, 138 completed questionnaires (86%) were returned. Studies had been conducted over a 20 year period from 1989, and around half were in cancer; 30% in HIV and 20% were in other disease areas including arthritis, tuberculosis and blood transfusion medicine. Forty-three studies (31%) had some consumer involvement, most commonly as members of trial management groups (TMG) [88%]. A number of positive impacts on both the research and the researcher were identified. Researchers generally felt involvement was worthwhile and some felt that consumer involvement had improved the credibility of the research. Benefits in design and quality, trial recruitment, dissemination and decision making were also perceived. Researchers felt they learned from consumer involvement, albeit that there were some barriers. Whilst most researchers identified benefits of involving consumers, most of studies included in the survey had no involvement. Information from this survey will inform the development of a unit policy on consumer involvement, to guide future

  6. Survey and Thought on Graduates’ Repayment Awareness of Student Loan in Agricultural Universities and Colleges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    To find out graduates’ repayment awareness of student loan,we conducted a questionnaire survey for those graduates who applied for student loan in Zhongkai University of Agriculture and Engineering.The survey has following results.First,the national student loan plays an important role in assisting poor students in finishing their study.Second,graduates value social function of personal credit.Third,trustworthiness education activities carried out by colleges and universities are effective.Fourth,economic income is a major factor of graduates repaying capital with interest.Fifth,bank’s student loan management system is not perfect.Sixth,the national student loan system remains to be improved.In line with these results,we put forward five countermeasures and suggestions:strengthen the trustworthiness education of students;standardize the credit investigation management of students’ personal credit;establish student information management mechanism;standardize banks’ payment reminder administration behavior;and perfect national student loan system.

  7. An exploratory survey of eating behaviour patterns in adolescent students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arata, A; Battini, V; Chiorri, C; Masini, B

    2010-12-01

    Empirical research has always treated adolescents' eating habits from a variable-centered perspective, but this approach may miss the configurations of eating behaviours that uniquely describe discrete groups of individuals. The aim of this study was to investigate prototypical patterns of eating habits in a large sample of Italian adolescents and their behavioural and psychological correlates. Data were gathered from 1388 students (F=60%, mean age 14.90±1.34 yrs), who were asked to fill in an original questionnaire surveying dietary habits, body weight attitudes, body image, sport activities and sources of information about food. Perfectionism, self-esteem, self-efficacy and care for food were also assessed as well-known psychological risk factors for Eating Disorders. Five prototypical eating behaviour patterns were identified through cluster analysis. Cluster membership was associated (pgender, age and age- and gender-correct BMI percentile, perceived relevance of physical appearance in achieving success in life; one's weight and body image evaluation, dieting, physical activity, self-efficacy, self-esteem and care for food. Clusters did not differ in perfectionism score and in frequency of consulting different sources of information about food and weight, except in the case of dieticians. The identification of prototypical eating habits patterns revealed a large range of wrong eating attitudes and behaviours among Italian adolescents. Such data suggest the need to develop and implement adequate prevention programs.

  8. Peer Assessment for Construction Management and Quantity Surveying Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia McLaughlin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Students undertaking the Bachelor of ConstructionManagement degree course at RMIT University, Melbourne,qualify for registration with the Australian Institute ofQuantity Surveyors (AIQS and the Australian Institute ofBuilding (AIB upon graduation. Over the past decade thedegree course has been constantly upgraded and altered inline with recommendations from professional bodies such asthese and other industry partners. In 1994 the Departmentof Building and Construction Economics re-assesseda range of subjects including the first year technologysubjects. Out of the review a problem-based integratedlearning unit was developed and tested. This unit has nowbeen in place for ten years.Quantity surveying and construction management likemost other professions in the construction industryrequire teamwork and advanced consultation skills. Theseskills may be learnt through experience but there isconsiderable evidence that these skills can be taught in theundergraduate years. Therefore in line with team-basedapproaches used in industry and professional constructionsettings, this year a new assessment model - peerassessment - will be applied to the problem-based learningunit. This paper describes the procedures and processesused to introduce the change and examines the theoreticalbase upon which the model was developed.

  9. Involving Effectively Teachers and Students in the Life Cycle of an Intelligent Tutoring System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Virvou

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper highlights the important role that teachers and students may play in the life cycle of an intelligent tutoring system. In this research, we have developed a system called “EasyMath”, a tutoring system for Algebra that incorporates intelligence. One of the primary aims of EasyMath is to make it useful in school classrooms. This is why, school teachers of mathematics and their students have been involved throughout the life cycle of EasyMath. The system was developed following the rational unified process, an object-oriented methodology for developing software through multiple iterations. The design of EasyMath has been based on the results of an empirical study that was conducted at schools and the resulting product was evaluated by school teachers as well as students.

  10. Parent Involvement on School Committees as Social Capital to Improve Student Achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravik Karsidi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study explores how the participation of parents on school committees improves student achievement. In decentralized education systems like the one in Indonesia, parents’ participation has become a focal point for improving the quality of education. The data for this study were collected using questionnaires distributed to 250 students in state senior high schools, selected by quota-purposive sampling. The qualitative findings of this research are threefold: most parents participated in student learning only by providing material aspects, such as tuition and books; most parents had a misconception that it was the school that should solely be responsible for the education of their children; busy parents tended to ignore the progress of their children’s learning. In order to create social capital for their children, parents need to be active in the learning process, cooperate with school officials, and get involved in the planning of social activities.

  11. Involvement of Student Teachers and Pupils in Designing and Manipulating Virtual Learning Environments Impacts Reading Achievements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Zaretsky

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The research is aimed at investigating the involvement of student teachers and pupils in designing and manipulating virtual learning environment and its impact on reading achievements through action research. In order to understand the connection between the real and virtual worlds, the design of such simulations is based on applying the virtual environment to the real world as much as possible. The objects were taken from the pupils’ everyday environment and unique motivation. The researcher taught the method to 30 student teachers. Such procedures were held among different populations. The findings showed that as the student teachers practiced the simulation design through the PowerPoint Software, it became clear to them how the computer can be implemented in their practical work. Consequently, their presentations became highly animated, and applied to the pupils

  12. The gender gap in student engagement: The role of teachers' autonomy support, structure, and involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lietaert, Sofie; Roorda, Debora; Laevers, Ferre; Verschueren, Karine; De Fraine, Bieke

    2015-12-01

    The gender gap in education in favour of girls is a widely known phenomenon. Boys generally have higher dropout rates, obtain lower grades, and show lower engagement. Insight into factors related to these academic outcomes could help to address the gender gap. This study investigated, for Dutch language classes, (1) how boys and girls differ in behavioural engagement, (2) which teacher support dimensions (autonomy support, structure, involvement) may explain gender differences in engagement (mediation hypothesis), and (3) whether and which of these teacher support dimensions matter more for boys' as opposed to girls' engagement (moderation or differential effects hypothesis). A total of 385 Grade 7 students and their 15 language teachers participated in this study. Teacher support was assessed through student reports. Student engagement was measured using student, teacher, and observer reports. By means of structural equation modelling, the mediating role of the teacher support dimensions for gender differences in behavioural engagement was tested. The potential differential role of the teacher support dimensions for boys' and girls' engagement was investigated through multigroup analysis. Boys were less engaged than girls and reported lower support from their teacher. Autonomy support and involvement partially mediated the relationship between gender and behavioural engagement. Autonomy support was demonstrated to be a protective factor for boys' engagement but not for girls'. Structure and involvement contributed equally to engagement for both sexes. Although involvement and autonomy support partly explained the gender gap in engagement (mediation hypothesis), more support was found for differential effects of autonomy support on boys' versus girls' engagement (differential effects hypothesis). © 2015 The British Psychological Society.

  13. Facebook + Moodle : environments to foster student´s involvement in distance learning

    OpenAIRE

    Messias, Inês; Morgado, Lina

    2014-01-01

    Conferência Internacional realizada em Sevilha de 17-19 de novembro de 2014 Web 2.0 has changed our daily lives, and is now part of our society, both professionally and for entertainment. As Education changes, accompanying society, it has evolved to become more personal, focused on knowledge, reflexive, socially connected and involved, as to include not only the digital natives, but also the digital immigrants [1]. Students are now acquiring skills and competences that allow th...

  14. Consistency of Students' Conceptions of Wave Propagation: Findings from a Conceptual Survey in Mechanical Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tongchai, Apisit; Sharma, Manjula Devi; Johnston, Ian D.; Arayathanitkul, Kwan; Soankwan, Chernchok

    2011-01-01

    We recently developed a multiple-choice conceptual survey in mechanical waves. The development, evaluation, and demonstration of the use of the survey were reported elsewhere [A. Tongchai et al. Int. J. Sci. Educ. 31 2437 (2009)]. We administered the survey to 902 students from seven different groups ranging from high school to second year…

  15. Probing University Students' Pre-Knowledge in Quantum Physics with QPCS Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asikainen, Mervi A.

    2017-01-01

    The study investigated the use of Quantum Physics Conceptual Survey (QPCS) in probing student understanding of quantum physics. Altogether 103 Finnish university students responded to QPCS. The mean scores of the student responses were calculated and the test was evaluated using common five indices: Item difficulty index, Item discrimination…

  16. Math Manipulatives for Students with Severe Intellectual Disability: A Survey of Special Education Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Bree Ann; Stanger, Carol

    2017-01-01

    A survey was conducted with 86 teachers across 10 states regarding their students' ease of use of physical manipulatives incorporated with implementing evidence-based early numeracy instruction. The majority of respondents indicated significant student accessibility barriers. Specifically, 75% of respondents had students with tactile defensiveness…

  17. Using interactive graphical and technological strategies for EFL reading comprehension: A case study involving engineering students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Valeska Barraza

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative study engaged a group of engineering students in the use of interactive graphical and technological strategies called IGOs (interactive, graphic organisers software in order to improve their level of EFL reading comprehension. The learners were asked to use three different types of IGOs, causes and effects, a sequence of events and pros and cons. Data was gathered through an opinion’s survey with the intention of collecting and evaluating the students’ perceptions on the use of the IGOs software. Findings revealed that most of the learners answered positively. Students also expressed they wanted more opportunities to use this software; because they not only could improve their scores but also, they enjoyed the experience they had using the new strategies software.

  18. Midwifery students experience of teamwork projects involving mark-related peer feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastie, Carolyn R; Fahy, Kathleen M; Parratt, Jenny A; Grace, Sandra

    2016-06-01

    Lack of teamwork skills among health care professionals endangers patients and enables workplace bullying. Individual teamwork skills are increasingly being assessed in the undergraduate health courses but rarely defined, made explicit or taught. To remedy these deficiencies we introduced a longitudinal educational strategy across all three years of the Bachelor of Midwifery program. To report on students' experiences of engaging in team based assignments which involved mark-related peer feedback. Stories of midwifery students' experiences were collected from 17 participants across the three years of the degree. These were transcribed and analysed thematically and interpreted using feminist collaborative conversations. Most participants reported being in well-functioning teams and enjoyed the experience; they spoke of 'we' and said 'Everyone was on Board'. Students in poorly functioning teams spoke of 'I' and 'they'. These students complained about the poor performance of others but they didn't speak up because they 'didn't want to make waves' and they didn't have the skills to be able to confidently manage conflict. All participants agreed 'Peer-related marks cause mayhem'. Teamwork skills should be specifically taught and assessed. These skills take time to develop. Students, therefore, should be engaged in a teamwork assignment in each semester of the entire program. Peer feedback should be moderated by the teacher and not directly related to marks. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The Relationship of Student Involvement in Political Organizations to Self-Reported Capacities for Socially Responsible Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogendorp, Melanie Beth

    2012-01-01

    This research investigated the relationship between college students' political involvement and their capacities for socially responsible leadership, including which student characteristics, precollege experiences, and collegiate experiences contributed to these capacities. Political involvement was defined as participation in co-curricular,…

  20. An Investigation into the Involvement of California Central Valley High School Students with Disabilities in the IEP Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Cheryle Ann

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the involvement of California Central Valley high school students with disabilities in the Individual Education Plan (IEP) process. Specifically, this study investigated the involvement of students with disabilities in the development of the IEP and IEP meetings. In addition, this study explored the…

  1. The Student Storm Survey©: College Students' Thoughts on Their University's Response to a Natural Disaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Gary T.; Boudreaux, Monique; Boudreaux, Dwight L.; Soignier, R. D.; Folse, Earl; Frias, Tracey; Soper, Barlow

    2014-01-01

    Hurricanes Gustav and Ike devastated the region that our University serves. Near the start of the semester, only one of the ten scheduled class days could be completed and administrators asked students and faculty to "continue the learning process" online via Blackboard©, our Electronic Delivery System (EDS). The Student Storm Survey©…

  2. The Relationship between Religious Commitment, Religious Involvement and Empathy with Aggression Among High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Farhanfar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study has been done to determine the effect of religious commitment and religious involvement with aggression and as a mediator variable empathy was considered. This is a descriptive - correlational study and the population was all high school students of Isfahan. The sample consisted of 321 high school students that were selected by cluster random multi-stage sampling method. Data were collected using Aggression Questionnaire (Rhine, 2006, Worthington Religious Commitment (2003, Hill and Hood Religious Involvement (1999, David Empathy (1983 and Demographic ascertained Questionnaire. For Statistical Analysis, Correlation Pierson, regression analysis and structural equation method was applied. Achieved results showed that the direct effect of religious commitment on the empathy of 0/07 and the direct effect of religious involvement on empathy: /025, (P≥0/0/1, while the indirect effect of religious commitment on -/0 0231 aggression and indirect effects of religious devotion is an aggression- 54/21 representing the inverse relationship between commitment an inverse relationship between religious commitment and religious involvement by the aggression and Results of structural equation modeling show that the model has appropriate fitting based on fitting indicators (P≥0/0/1. Although, the effect of religious commitment on empathy was not confirmed.

  3. Using Quality Circles to Enhance Student Involvement and Course Quality in a Large Undergraduate Food Science and Human Nutrition Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, S. J.; Parmer, M. S.; Bohn, D. M.

    2005-01-01

    Large undergraduate classes are a challenge to manage, to engage, and to assess, yet such formidable classes can flourish when student participation is facilitated. One method of generating authentic student involvement is implementation of quality circles by means of a Student Feedback Committee (SFC), which is a volunteer problem-solving and…

  4. How to Involve Students in an Online Course: A Redesigned Online Pedagogy of Collaborative Learning and Self-Regulated Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chia-Wen

    2013-01-01

    In an online course, students learn independently in the virtual environment without teacher's on-the-spot support. However, many students are addicted to the Internet which is filled with a plethora of shopping websites, online games, and social networks (e.g. Facebook). To help keep students focused on and involved in online or blended…

  5. Consumer and community involvement in health and medical research: evaluation by online survey of Australian training workshops for researchers

    OpenAIRE

    McKenzie, Anne; Alpers, Kirsten; Heyworth, Jane; Phuong, Cindy; Hanley, Bec

    2016-01-01

    Plain English Summary In Australia, since 2009, the Consumer and Community Involvement Program (formerly the Consumer and Community Participation Program) has developed and run workshops to help people working in health and medical research involve more consumers (patients) and community members (the public) in their research. In 2012, workshop attendees were invited to do an online survey to find out the effect, if any, that attending a workshop had on their awareness of and attitudes to con...

  6. Unconventional medical practices among Ghanaian students: A university-based survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razak Mohammed Gyasi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Research on unconventional medical practices among students has proliferated lately in the global space, hitherto, little is known explicitly in Ghana. This paper teases out insights for recent utilisation patterns of traditional medical therapies at Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST, Ghana. A sample of 754, randomly selected undergraduates were involved in a retrospective cross-sectional survey. Data were analysed using multivariate logistic regression and Pearson's χ2 test with p < 0.05 as significant. Overall prevalence of traditional therapies consumption was 89.1% in the last 12 months. Herbal-based products (67%, prayer healing (15% and body-mind therapies (11% were principally used and, accessed through purchases from pharmacy shops (29% and encounter with faith healers (26%. Although students' knowledge on traditional therapies was acquired through family members (50% and media (23%, literary materials remained significant information routes for Science related students compared to the Non-science related counterparts (p < 0.001. Pursuing Non-science-related programme [odds ratio (OR 6.154 (95% confidence interval (CI 3.745–10.111; p < 0.001] and having Christian faith [OR 2.450 (95% CI 1.359–4.415; p = 0.003] were strongly associated with students' traditional therapies use. Although students exhibited positive attitude towards unconventional therapies, there is an urgent need to validate the quality of traditional therapies through randomised clinical trials and regulatory practices to ensure quality control. Health forces should intensify efforts towards intercultural health care system in Ghana.

  7. Associations between Electronic Media Use and Involvement in Violence, Alcohol and Drug Use among United States High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denniston, Maxine

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We identified associations between time spent watching television and time spent playing video or computer games or using computers and involvement in interpersonal violence, alcohol and drug use in a nationally representative sample of United States high school students.Methods: We analyzed data from the 2007 national Youth Risk Behavior Survey. Exposure variables were time spent watching television and time spent playing computer or video games or using computers (hereafter denoted as “computer/video game use” on an average school day; outcome variables included multiple measures assessing involvement in violence and alcohol or drug use. Chi-square tests were used to identify statistically significant associations between each exposure variable and each of the outcome variables. We used logistic regression to obtain crude odds ratios for outcome variables with a significant chi-square p-value and to obtain adjusted odds ratios controlling for sex, race, and grade in school.Results: Overall, 35.4% (95% CI=33.1%-37.7% of students reported frequent television (TV use and 24.9% (95% CI=22.9%-27.0% reported frequent computer/video game use. A number of risk behaviors, including involvement in physical fights and initiation of alcohol use before age 13, were significantly associated with frequent TV use or frequent computer/video game use, even after controlling for sex, race/ethnicity and grade.Conclusion: Findings highlight the need for additional research to better understand the mechanisms by which electronic media exposure and health-risk behaviors are associated and for the development of strategies that seek to understand how the content and context (e.g., watching with peers, having computer in common area of media use influence risk behaviors among youth. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(3:310-315.

  8. From Local to EXtreme Environments (FLEXE) Student-Scientist Online Forums: hypothesis-based research examining ways to involve scientists in effective science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goehring, L.; Carlsen, W.; Fisher, C. R.; Kerlin, S.; Trautmann, N.; Petersen, W.

    2011-12-01

    Science education reform since the mid-1990's has called for a "new way of teaching and learning about science that reflects how science itself is done, emphasizing inquiry as a way of achieving knowledge and understanding about the world" (NRC, 1996). Scientists and engineers, experts in inquiry thinking, have been called to help model these practices for students and demonstrate scientific habits of mind. The question, however, is "how best to involve these experts?" given the very real challenges of limited availability of scientists, varying experience with effective pedagogy, widespread geographic distribution of schools, and the sheer number of students involved. Technology offers partial solutions to enable Student-Scientist Interactions (SSI). The FLEXE Project has developed online FLEXE Forums to support efficient, effective SSIs, making use of web-based and database technology to facilitate communication between students and scientists. More importantly, the FLEXE project has approached this question of "how best to do this?" scientifically, combining program evaluation with hypothesis-based research explicitly testing the effects of such SSIs on student learning and attitudes towards science. FLEXE Forums are designed to showcase scientific practices and habits of mind through facilitated interaction between students and scientists. Through these Forums, students "meet" working scientists and learn about their research and the environments in which they work. Scientists provide students with intriguing "real-life" datasets and challenge students to analyze and interpret the data through guiding questions. Students submit their analyses to the Forum, and scientists provide feedback and connect the instructional activity with real-life practice, showcasing their activities in the field. In the FLEXE project, Forums are embedded within inquiry-based instructional units focused on essential learning concepts, and feature the deep-sea environment in contrast

  9. Sexual behavior of medical students: A single institutional survey ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    %). Condom utilization amongst the sexually active was high (65%) and similar among male and female students (71.3% vs. 51.9% respectively, p = 0.08). Conclusion: There exists safe sexual practice among medical students in our setting.

  10. A Survey of Teachers' and Principals' Practices and Challenges in Fostering New Immigrant Parent Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Shelley Stagg; Ladky, Mary

    2007-01-01

    This research, using questionnaire and interview data, examined practices and challenges of educators in areas of southern Ontario in fostering immigrant parents' support for their children's literacy. Results showed that teachers learn about the language and culture of their students, modify homework assigned to their ESL students, and encourage…

  11. An Exploratory Survey of Student Perspectives Regarding Search Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshare, Khaled; Miller, Don; Wenger, James

    2005-01-01

    This study explored college students' perceptions regarding their use of search engines. The main objective was to determine how frequently students used various search engines, whether advanced search features were used, and how many search engines were used. Various factors that might influence student responses were examined. Results showed…

  12. How Do Student Prior Achievement and Homework Behaviors Relate to Perceived Parental Involvement in Homework?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José C. Núñez

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated how students’ prior achievement is related to their homework behaviors (i.e., time spent on homework, homework time management, and amount of homework, and to their perceptions of parental involvement in homework (i.e., parental control and parental support. A total of 1250 secondary students from 7 to 10th grade participated in the study. Structural equation models were fitted to the data, compared, and a partial mediation model was chosen. The results indicated that students’ prior academic performance was significantly associated with both of the students’ homework variables, with direct and indirect results linking achievement and homework behaviors with perceived parental control and support behaviors about homework. Low-achieving students, in particular, perceived more parental control of homework in the secondary grades. These results, together with those of previous research, suggest a recursive relationship between secondary school students’ achievement and their perceptions of parental involvement in homework, which represents the process of student learning and family engagement over time. Study limitations and educational implications are discussed.

  13. Bone marrow involvement by lymphoproliferative disorders after renal transplantation: PTLD. Int. Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Izadi

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: Renal recipients with BM PTLD represent worse outcome and more unfavorable histopathological phenomenon than in other organ involvements. Moreover, a concomitant PTLD involvement site in liver was found which necessitates full hepatic evaluation for a potential complication by the disease in renal recipients whose BM is involved.

  14. 2008 Key Student Outcomes Indicators for BC Diploma, Associate Degree, and Certificate Programs: Survey Results by Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ministry of Advanced Education and Labour Market Development, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The BC Diploma, Associate Degree, and Certificate Student Outcomes (DACSO) Survey (formerly the BC College and Institute Student Outcomes Survey) collects and disseminates information about former students' post-secondary experiences and their subsequent labour market and further education experiences. The survey is administered annually to former…

  15. An Examination of the Effects of Parental Involvement/Intervention on Student Development at the College/University Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touchette, Timothy M.

    2013-01-01

    This doctoral thesis contributes to the literature on helicopter parents, and their relation to student development theory. A secondary examination of approximately 1800 randomized results from the 2007 National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) was tested using the following statistical tests: Mann-Whitney Test, Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test,…

  16. [The knowledge, involvement and feelings of students graduating in medicine, nursing and psychology about orthothanasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Luís Roberto Gonçalves; Menezes, Mariana Pires; Gradvohl, Silvia Mayumi Obana

    2013-09-01

    Orthothanasia involves the suspension of medical procedures for terminal phase patients, which leads to a natural death, relieving the symptoms that cause suffering. In this process, professionals such as physicians, nurses and psychologists, interact with patients and their families. Therefore, it is desirable that during undergraduate studies these professionals should take subjects geared to handle this aspect. The scope of this qualitative study was to evaluate the awareness with respect to orthothanasia of undergraduates in medicine, nursing and psychology courses in a university. Trigger questions in semi-structured interviews were conducted with 22 students. The interviews were recorded and transcribed for content analysis and core identification themes. Three categories were identified: knowledge about orthothanasia; who should be involved in this process; and feelings experienced when facing death. The data revealed that students have scant knowledge about the subject, consider the family involvement in the orthothanasia decision to be important and they do not feel prepared to deal with death situations. The conclusion points to the need to change the focus on the end-of-life issue in the undergraduate courses in the area of health care in order to prepare the future professional adequately.

  17. Academic anxiety, academic procrastination, and parental involvement in students and their parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milgram, N; Toubiana, Y

    1999-09-01

    The study investigated the relationship between academic anxiety and procrastination in children and parents, and parents' direct involvement in their children's schoolwork. Children reported their current anxiety and procrastination and parents reported their anxiety and procrastination when they were children (a measure of indirect influence on their children's schoolwork habits), and on their current involvement in their children's schoolwork (a measure of direct influence). Self-report measures were administered to 354 Israeli adolescents (ages 13, 14, and 16) and their parents. Students were less anxious about homework than the other academic assignments. Older adolescents were less anxious about their schoolwork overall and procrastinated more than younger on homework. Parents of late adolescents were less involved in their children's schoolwork than parents of younger adolescents. Parents participated equally in school-related interactions that demanded high investment of time and effort, but mothers engaged more than fathers in low investment activities. These direct and indirect parental influences on their children's procrastination were of low magnitude overall, but appeared relatively stronger for mothers. The more students were anxious about preparing for examinations and writing papers, the more they procrastinated on these assignments, confirming the appraisal-anxiety avoidance (AAA) model. The inverse relationship of anxiety and procrastination with regard to homework led to our making a post hoc distinction between task-centred and consequence-centred anxiety.

  18. Parent and Family Involvement in Education: Results from the National Household Education Surveys Program of 2016. First Look. NCES 2017-102

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuiggan, Meghan; Megra, Mahi

    2017-01-01

    This report presents findings from the Parent and Family Involvement in Education Survey of the National Household Education Surveys Program of 2016 (NHES:2016). The Parent and Family Involvement in Education Survey collected data on children enrolled in public or private school for kindergarten through 12th grade or homeschooled for these grades.…

  19. Stress, positive psychology and the National Student Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Gibbons, Chris

    2012-01-01

    The aim was to explore the predictive ability of sources of stress and a range of dispositional and coping behaviours on student satisfaction and motivation. Most research exploring sources of stress and coping in students construes stress as psychological distress, with little attempt to consider positive experiences of stress. A questionnaire was administered to 120 first-year UK psychology students. Questions were asked which measured sources of stress when rated as likely to contribute to...

  20. A Survey of Internet Access and Use by Students of Library and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A Survey of Internet Access and Use by Students of Library and Information Science ... access and utilize Internet facilities, level of search skills, reasons for use of Internet, ... Data collected for the study was analyzed using descriptive statistics.

  1. Students and Instant Messaging: Survey on Current Use and Demands for Higher Education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Bakker, Gijs; Sloep, Peter; Jochems, Wim

    2008-01-01

    De Bakker, G., Sloep, P. B., & Jochems, W. M. G. (2007). Students and instant messaging: survey on current use and demands for higher education. Research in Learning Technology (ALT-J), 15(2), 143-153.

  2. Survey of rabies vaccination status of Queensland veterinarians and veterinary students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, D; Foyle, L; Cobbold, R; Speare, R

    2018-05-01

    To determine the rabies vaccination status of Queensland veterinarians and veterinary students and their perception of zoonotic risk from Australian bat lyssavirus (ABLV). Cross-sectional questionnaire surveys. Questionnaires were sent by post in 2011 to veterinary surgeons registered in Queensland, to final-year veterinary students at James Cook University via SurveyMonkey® in 2013 and to final-year veterinary students at James Cook University and University of Queensland via SurveyMonkey® in 2014. The response rate for registered veterinarians was 33.5% and for veterinary students 33.3% and 30% in 2013 and 2014, respectively. Of the 466 registered veterinary surgeons, 147 (31.5%) had been vaccinated, with 72 (15.5%) currently vaccinated. For veterinary students the rabies vaccination rate was 20.0% (4/20) and 13.0% (6/46) in the 2013 and 2014 surveys, respectively. More than 95% of veterinary students had received the mandatory Q fever vaccine. Both veterinarians and students regarded bats and horses as high-risk species for zoonoses. Queensland veterinarians and veterinary students have low levels of protection against ABLV. Although incidents of ABLV spilling over from a bat to a domestic mammal are likely to remain rare, they pose a significant human health and occupational risk given the outcome of infection in humans is high consequence. Principals of veterinary practices and veterinary authorities in Australia should implement a policy of rabies vaccination for clinical staff and veterinary students. © 2018 Australian Veterinary Association.

  3. Parental training and involvement in sexuality education for students who are deaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, K O; Getch, Y Q

    2001-07-01

    The study examined whether schools for the deaf were providing services to assist parents in communicating with their children about sexuality (including sexual signs) and whether parents were involved in the sexuality education curriculum within their child's school. The Sexuality Curriculum Questionnaire for Educators of Students Who Are Deaf (Getch & Gabriel, 1998) was completed by 71 educators teaching sexuality curricula in schools for the deaf across the United States. Results indicated that parents were more likely to be involved in approval and development of their children's sexuality education than to receive assistance with sexuality education from the schools. Although the level of parental participation in curriculum development and approval is encouraging, the number of parents actually participating in curriculum development and approval remains low.

  4. Survey on the awareness of Czechoslovak students on energy and the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blazek, Jaroslav

    1993-01-01

    The Nuclear Information Centre in Prague took part in the international project surveying the knowledge and opinion of secondary school students. The survey was performed on the initiative of the Japan Atomic Energy Relations Organization (JAERO). It took place in June 1992 simultaneously in seven countries: Japan, France, Germany, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom and Czechoslovakia. The survey was aimed at finding out the level of acquaintance of secondary school students with issues of the environment, and at determining the attitude of the young to nuclear power. In Czechoslovakia 1030 students aged between 15 and 18 took part in the survey. The questionnaire contained 17 basic questions and a number of more detailed questions. Because of the amount of evaluated answers not all results are given here. The complete evaluation of the survey was handed over to JAERO

  5. How can students contribute? A qualitative study of active student involvement in development of technological learning material for clinical skills training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraldseid, Cecilie; Friberg, Febe; Aase, Karina

    2016-01-01

    Policy initiatives and an increasing amount of the literature within higher education both call for students to become more involved in creating their own learning. However, there is a lack of studies in undergraduate nursing education that actively involve students in developing such learning material with descriptions of the students' roles in these interactive processes. Explorative qualitative study, using data from focus group interviews, field notes and student notes. The data has been subjected to qualitative content analysis. Active student involvement through an iterative process identified five different learning needs that are especially important to the students: clarification of learning expectations, help to recognize the bigger picture, stimulation of interaction, creation of structure, and receiving context- specific content. The iterative process involvement of students during the development of new technological learning material will enhance the identification of important learning needs for students. The use of student and teacher knowledge through an adapted co-design process is the most optimal level of that involvement.

  6. Reliability and validity of the Safe Routes to school parent and student surveys

    OpenAIRE

    McDonald, Noreen C; Dwelley, Amanda E; Combs, Tabitha S; Evenson, Kelly R; Winters, Richard H

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The purpose of this study is to assess the reliability and validity of the U.S. National Center for Safe Routes to School's in-class student travel tallies and written parent surveys. Over 65,000 tallies and 374,000 parent surveys have been completed, but no published studies have examined their measurement properties. Methods Students and parents from two Charlotte, NC (USA) elementary schools participated. Tallies were conducted on two consecutive days using a hand-raisi...

  7. Parent and Family Involvement in Education, from the National Household Education Surveys Program of 2012. First Look. NCES 2013-028.Rev

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, Amber; Stark, Patrick; Redford, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    This report presents data on students in the United States attending kindergarten through grade 12. The main focus of the report is on parent and family involvement in the students' education during the 2011-12 school year as reported by the students' parents. It also includes the percentage of students who participated in selected family…

  8. Parent and Family Involvement in Education, from the National Household Education Surveys Program of 2012. First Look. NCES 2013-028

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, Amber; Stark, Patrick; Redford, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    This report presents data on students in the United States attending kindergarten through grade 12. The main focus of the report is on parent and family involvement in the students' education during the 2011-12 school year as reported by the students' parents. It also includes the percentage of students who participated in family activities, as…

  9. Nursing students motivation toward their studies – a survey study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilsson Kerstin EL

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study focuses on Swedish nursing students' motivation toward their studies during their three year academic studies. Earlier studies show the importance of motivation for study commitment and result. The aim was to analyze nursing students' estimation of their degree of motivation during different semester during their education and to identify reasons for the degree of motivation. Methods A questionnaire asking for scoring motivation and what influenced the degree of motivation was distributed to students enrolled in a nursing programme. 315 students who studied at different semesters participated. Analyzes were made by statistical calculation and content analysis. Results The mean motivation score over all semesters was 6.3 (ranked between 0–10 and differed significantly during the semesters with a tendency to lower score during the 5th semester. Students (73/315 with motivation score 6 reported positive opinions to becoming a nurse (125/234, organization of the programme and attitude to the studies. The mean score value for the motivation ranking differed significantly between male (5.8 and female (6.8 students. Conclusion Conclusions to be drawn are that nursing students mainly grade their motivation positive distributed different throughout their entire education. The main motivation factor was becoming a nurse. This study result highlights the need of understanding the students' situation and their need of tutorial support.

  10. Survey of Students' Opinions as a Strategy for Improving Lerner ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RPO

    education levels, the deschoolers have accused the school of teaching a hidden .... course, preparation for vocation and further education equally ranked high in the preferences of the both male and female students. However, while ... suggest that students are concerned about the personality and moral rectitude of their.

  11. Vision survey of the Nnamdi Azikiwe University medical students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To determine the ocular problems of 1st‑year preclinical medical students at the Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Nnewi Campus, Nnewi, Nigeria. Materials and Methods: All registered 1st‑year preclinical medical students were examined in October 2008. Ocular investigation included filling out self‑administered ...

  12. Personality and professional commitment of students in nursing, social work, and teaching: A comparative survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesje, Kjersti

    2016-01-01

    Nurses are often portrayed as possessing specific traits and dispositions associated with care and empathy. The assumption has been that possessing these traits makes nurses competent, engaged, and well suited to their job. This proposition has been mostly normative, and few studies have investigated how this plays out empirically. The aims of this study were to investigate (a) whether possessing a personality trait related to empathy and care was more common among nursing students than students in teaching and social work programs and (b) whether nursing students possessing an affirming personality trait judged themselves to be more suited to their future work - understood as commitment to the profession - than students in teaching and social work. A cross-sectional survey design was used. All first-year students attending seven Norwegian universities and university colleges were invited to participate in the study. Of the 1675 students who participated in the survey, 527 were nursing students, 668 were students in teaching, and 480 were social work students. A response rate of 65 percent was achieved. The survey was conducted by Oslo and Akershus University College in the autumn of 2012. Data collection methods included both a paper-and-pencil questionnaire and an online survey. Instruments used included Blau's Career Commitment Scale and Orlinsky and Rønnestad's Interpersonal Adjective Scale. Analysis of variance and regression analysis were performed on the data. Nursing students did not differ from students in teaching and social work programs in terms of the degree of affirming personality trait. Furthermore, the regression analysis revealed an equally strong association between having an affirming personality trait and being committed to the profession among all these student groups. The results of this study indicate that the narrative of nursing students as individuals who possess a special personality characteristic does not entirely reflect reality

  13. Learning style preferences of Australian accelerated postgraduate pre-registration nursing students: A cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Lisa; Copnell, Beverley; Butler, Ashleigh E; Lau, Rosalind

    2018-01-01

    Graduate entry programs leading to registration are gaining momentum in nursing. These programs attract student cohorts with professional, cultural, gender and age diversity. As a consequence of this diversity, such accelerated programs challenge traditional pedagogical methods used in nursing and require different approaches. To date, however, there has been limited research on the learning styles of students undertaking these programs to inform academics involved in their delivery. Kolb's Experiential Learning model has been used widely in a variety of educational settings because it is based on the theory of experiential learning. More recently VARK (Visual, Aural, Read/write and Kinaesthetic) model has become popular. The aim of this study was to investigate the learning styles of two cohorts of graduate entry nursing students undertaking an accelerated masters-level program. This was a cross-sectional survey of two cohorts of Master of Nursing Practice students enrolled at a large Australian university. The students were more inclined toward converging (practical) and least toward concrete experience (experiencing) learning styles. The majority of students were more inclined toward kinaesthetic and least toward aural learning style. Findings have implications for academics engaged in teaching graduate entry nursing students. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. An International Survey of Veterinary Students to Assess Their Use of Online Learning Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gledhill, Laura; Dale, Vicki H M; Powney, Sonya; Gaitskell-Phillips, Gemma H L; Short, Nick R M

    Today's veterinary students have access to a wide range of online resources that support self-directed learning. To develop a benchmark of current global student practice in e-learning, this study measured self-reported access to, and use of, these resources by students internationally. An online survey was designed and promoted via veterinary student mailing lists and international organizations, resulting in 1,070 responses. Analysis of survey data indicated that students now use online resources in a wide range of ways to support their learning. Students reported that access to online veterinary learning resources was now integral to their studies. Almost all students reported using open educational resources (OERs). Ownership of smartphones was widespread, and the majority of respondents agreed that the use of mobile devices, or m-learning, was essential. Social media were highlighted as important for collaborating with peers and sharing knowledge. Constraints to e-learning principally related to poor or absent Internet access and limited institutional provision of computer facilities. There was significant geographical variation, with students from less developed countries disadvantaged by limited access to technology and networks. In conclusion, the survey provides an international benchmark on the range and diversity in terms of access to, and use of, online learning resources by veterinary students globally. It also highlights the inequalities of access among students in different parts of the world.

  15. Librarian involvement in a nutrition undergraduate research course: preparing nutrition students for evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Susan C; Penumetcha, Meera

    2010-01-01

    Given the foundational importance of literature searching skills to later stages of research and, ultimately, evidence-based practice, the authors wanted to assess a unique strategy for teaching such skills. This pilot study describes the results of an undergraduate nutrition research course in which a librarian lead several class sessions. The goal of this study was to assess students' perceptions, attitudes and use of research literature and resources before and after a course partially taught by a librarian. Twenty-seven students enrolled in an undergraduate Introduction to Research course at Georgia State University were given pre- and post-test questionnaires at the beginning and end of a course that included three librarian-led class sessions. Most of the results indicate that the repeated involvement of a librarian enriched this particular undergraduate research course. By the end of the course, students were more comfortable in libraries and with using library resources; they used the campus library more frequently; they were more confident in their ability to find high-quality information on nutrition-related topics and identify strengths and weaknesses of different information sources; and they felt they gained skills that will help them achieve their educational and career goals.

  16. City College of San Francisco 1997 Sexual Harassment Student Opinion Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    City Coll. of San Francisco, CA. Office of Institutional Research, Planning and Grants.

    This document describes the findings of a 1997 sexual harassment student opinion survey conducted at City College of San Francisco. Survey questions were jointly developed by the Sexual Harassment Prevention Sub-Committee of the Diversity Advisory Committee and the Office of Research and Planning, approved by the College Advisory Council, and…

  17. AVETH follow-up survey on salary and duties of ETH doctoral students

    OpenAIRE

    Schalko, Isabella; Jacob, Romain; Kuzmanovska, Irena

    2017-01-01

    The present survey was conducted as a follow-up of the AVETH survey in 2014. Based on 1′052 completed answers this report summarizes the current employment situation and the corresponding opinion of doctoral students at ETH Zurich about their salary rate and additional duties.

  18. A Survey of Former Drafting & Engineering Design Technology Students. Summary Findings of Respondents District-Wide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glyer-Culver, Betty

    In fall 2001 staff of the Los Rios Community College District Office of Institutional Research collaborated with occupational deans, academic deans, and faculty to develop and administer a survey of former Drafting and Engineering Design Technology students. The survey was designed to determine how well courses had met the needs of former drafting…

  19. A Study of Student Completion Strategies in a Likert-Type Course Evaluation Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, Nick

    2017-01-01

    This article investigates the motivations and strategies employed by respondents to a Likert-style course evaluation at a UK university. These attitude surveys, generating large amounts of quantitative data, are commonly used in quality assurance procedures across UK higher education institutions. Similar student survey results are now scrutinised…

  20. Selecting a Free Web-Hosted Survey Tool for Student Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbeck, Matt

    2014-01-01

    This study provides marketing educators a review of free web-based survey services and guidance for student use. A mixed methods approach started with online searches and metrics identifying 13 free web-hosted survey services, described as demonstration or project tools, and ranked using popularity and importance web-based metrics. For each…

  1. The InVEST Volcanic Concept Survey: Exploring Student Understanding about Volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parham, Thomas L., Jr.; Cervato, Cinzia; Gallus, William A., Jr.; Larsen, Michael; Hobbs, Jon; Stelling, Pete; Greenbowe, Thomas; Gupta, Tanya; Knox, John A.; Gill, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    Results from the Volcanic Concept Survey (VCS) indicated that many undergraduates do not fully understand volcanic systems and plate tectonics. During the 2006 academic year, a ten-item conceptual survey was distributed to undergraduate students enrolled in Earth science courses at five U.S. colleges and universities. A trained team of graders…

  2. A Questionnaire Survey On Use Of The Internet By Students Of The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was carried out to examine use of Internet by students of the University of Ibadan, Nigeria\\'s premier higher educational institution. Adopting a sample survey research design, systematic sampling was used to select 560 students who are resident in the main campus hostels, and data was collected from the ...

  3. A Survey of the Reading Habit of Exchange Students of Government ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The focus of this paper is on "a survey of the reading habit of exchange students of Government Secondary School and Queen Elizabeth School, Ilorin Kwara State". The students were drawn from seventeen states in Northern Nigeria. Causes of the low reading habit were identified, highlighted and the effects on their ...

  4. Surveys Assessing Students' Attitudes toward Statistics: A Systematic Review of Validity and Reliability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Meaghan M.; Beran, Tanya; Hecker, Kent G.

    2012-01-01

    Students with positive attitudes toward statistics are likely to show strong academic performance in statistics courses. Multiple surveys measuring students' attitudes toward statistics exist; however, a comparison of the validity and reliability of interpretations based on their scores is needed. A systematic review of relevant electronic…

  5. A Comprehensive Survey on Student Perceptions of Cyberbullying at a Major Metropolitan University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawler, James P.; Molluzzo, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Cyberbullying is a concern for any college or university. Digital harassment incidents are featured daily in the news. The authors of this study examine the perceptions of students on cyberbullying at a major metropolitan university. From the findings of a student survey, the authors learn of high levels of perceptions on incidents as an issue but…

  6. A Survey Study Examining Teachers' Perceptions in Teaching Refugee and Immigrant Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurbegovic, Dajana

    2016-01-01

    There is limited research around best practices in working with refugee and immigrant students. Since teachers spend the majority of the school day with students, their insights about how best to serve these populations of children and adolescents is critical. This dissertation study conducted an online survey study with 139 elementary school…

  7. A New Measurement and Ranking System for the UK National Student Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canning, John

    2015-01-01

    Despite numerous criticisms of the UK National Student Survey (NSS) institutional managers still strongly support its use in informing student choice, quality and assurance and quality enhancement activities. This article outlines a granular and nuanced benchmarking system for the NSS which provides both a "raw" score (weighted student…

  8. Engineers as Information Processors: A Survey of US Aerospace Engineering Faculty and Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Maurita Peterson; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Reports on survey results from 275 faculty and 640 students, predominantly in the aerospace engineering field, concerning their behaviors about the appropriation and dissemination of information. Indicates that, as information processors, aerospace faculty and students are "information naive." Raises questions about the efficacy of…

  9. Social Networking in School Psychology Training Programs: A Survey of Faculty and Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Andy V.; Goforth, Anisa N.; Segool, Natasha; Burt, Isaac

    2014-01-01

    The increasing use of social networking sites has become an emerging focus in school psychology training, policy, and research. The purpose of the current study is to present data from a survey on social networking among faculty and graduate students in school psychology training programs. A total of 110 faculty and 112 graduate students in school…

  10. Surveying Turkish High School and University Students' Attitudes and Approaches to Physics Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balta, Nuri; Mason, Andrew J.; Singh, Chandralekha

    2016-01-01

    Students' attitudes and approaches to physics problem solving can impact how well they learn physics and how successful they are in solving physics problems. Prior research in the U.S. using a validated Attitude and Approaches to Problem Solving (AAPS) survey suggests that there are major differences between students in introductory physics and…

  11. Improving Students' Learning through School Autonomy: Evidence from the International Civic and Citizenship Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paletta, Angelo

    2014-01-01

    This article investigates the effect of school autonomy on multiple measures of student achievement, combining the individual data of the students participating in the International Civics and Citizenship Survey with their results in the national high stakes standardized tests at the end of eighth grade administered by the Italian National…

  12. Assessing study skills among university students: an Iranian survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didarloo, Alireza; Khalkhali, Hamid Reza

    2014-05-05

    Numerous studies have revealed that study skills have a constructive role on the academic performance of students, in addition to educational quality, student' intelligence, and their affective characteristics. This study aims to examine study skills and the factors influencing them among the health sciences students of Urmia University of Medical Sciences in Iran. This was a cross-sectional study carried out from May to November 2013. A total of 340 Urmia health sciences students were selected using a simple sampling method. Data were collected using the Study Skills Assessment Questionnaire of Counseling Center of Houston University and analyzed with descriptive and analytical statistics. The mean and standard deviation of the students' study skills were 172.5±23.2, out of a total score of 240. Around 1.2% of the study skills were weak; 86.8%, moderate; and 12%, good. Among the study skills, the scores of time management, and memory and concentration were better than the others. Also, there was a significant positive correlation between study skills scores and the students' family housing status and academic level (Pstudy skills, these were not sufficient and far from good. Improving and promoting the study skills of university students require the designing and implementing of education programs for study strategies. Therefore, decision makers and planners in the educational areas of universities should consider the topic described above.

  13. Correlates of sunscreen use among high school students: a cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coups Elliot J

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adolescents put themselves at risk of later skin cancer development and accelerated photo-aging due to their high rates of ultraviolet radiation exposure and low rates of skin protection. The purpose of the current study was to determine which of the Integrative Model constructs are most closely associated with sunscreen use among high school students. Methods The current study of 242 high school students involved a survey based on the Integrative Model including demographic and individual difference factors, skin protection-related beliefs and outcome evaluations, normative beliefs, self-efficacy, sunscreen cues and availability, intentions, and sunscreen use. Our analyses included multiple linear regressions and bootstrapping to test for mediation effects. Results Sunscreen use was significantly associated with female gender, greater skin sensitivity, higher perceived sunscreen benefits, higher skin protection importance, more favorable sunscreen user prototype, stronger skin protection norms, greater perceived skin protection behavioral control, and higher sunscreen self-efficacy. Intentions to use sunscreen mediated the relationships between most skin protection-related beliefs and sunscreen use. Conclusions The current study identified specific variables that can be targeted in interventions designed to increase sunscreen use among adolescents.

  14. Why medical students choose psychiatry - a 20 country cross-sectional survey

    OpenAIRE

    Farooq, Kitty; Lydall, Gregory J; Malik, Amit; Ndetei, David M; Bhugra, Dinesh

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recruitment to psychiatry is insufficient to meet projected mental health service needs world-wide. We report on the career plans of final year medical students from 20 countries, investigating factors identified from the literature which influence psychiatric career choice. METHODS: Cross sectional electronic or paper survey. Subjects were final year medical students at 46 medical schools in participating countries. We assessed students' career intentions, motivations, medical sc...

  15. Demonstrating the unit hydrograph and flow routing processes involving active student participation - a university lecture experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Karsten; Burgholzer, Reinhard; Klotz, Daniel; Wesemann, Johannes; Herrnegger, Mathew

    2018-05-01

    The unit hydrograph (UH) has been one of the most widely employed hydrological modelling techniques to predict rainfall-runoff behaviour of hydrological catchments, and is still used to this day. Its concept is based on the idea that a unit of effective precipitation per time unit (e.g. mm h-1) will always lead to a specific catchment response in runoff. Given its relevance, the UH is an important topic that is addressed in most (engineering) hydrology courses at all academic levels. While the principles of the UH seem to be simple and easy to understand, teaching experiences in the past suggest strong difficulties in students' perception of the UH theory and application. In order to facilitate a deeper understanding of the theory and application of the UH for students, we developed a simple and cheap lecture theatre experiment which involved active student participation. The seating of the students in the lecture theatre represented the hydrological catchment in its size and form. A set of plastic balls, prepared with a piece of magnetic strip to be tacked to any white/black board, each represented a unit amount of effective precipitation. The balls are evenly distributed over the lecture theatre and routed by some given rules down the catchment to the catchment outlet, where the resulting hydrograph is monitored and illustrated at the black/white board. The experiment allowed an illustration of the underlying principles of the UH, including stationarity, linearity, and superposition of the generated runoff and subsequent routing. In addition, some variations of the experimental setup extended the UH concept to demonstrate the impact of elevation, different runoff regimes, and non-uniform precipitation events on the resulting hydrograph. In summary, our own experience in the classroom, a first set of student exams, as well as student feedback and formal evaluation suggest that the integration of such an experiment deepened the learning experience by active

  16. Expanding Demand for Online Higher Education: Surveying Prospective Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Richard

    2007-01-01

    The Eduventures survey examined next-generation demand for online postsecondary education, assessing online experience, delivery mode and marketing channels preferences, and perceptions of price, quality and location, identifying key takeaways in each area.

  17. The Academic Differences between Students Involved in School-Based Robotics Programs and Students Not Involved in School-Based Robotics Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koumoullos, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This research study aimed to identify any correlation between participation in afterschool robotics at the high school level and academic performance. Through a sample of N = 121 students, the researcher examined the grades and attendance of students who participated in a robotics program in the 2011-2012 school year. The academic record of these…

  18. Human Genetic Engineering: A Survey of Student Value Stances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Sara McCormack; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Assesses the values of high school and college students relative to human genetic engineering and recommends that biology educators explore instructional strategies merging human genetic information with value clarification techniques. (LS)

  19. EXAMINATION OF ACHIEVEMENT RELATIONS AND MOTIVATION OF 7th GRADE STUDENTS FOR INVOLVEMENT IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION CLASSES

    OpenAIRE

    Dragoljub Višnjić; Dragan Martinović; Jelena Ilić; Živorad Marković

    2010-01-01

    The relations of students achievement and motivation for involvement in PE classes were examined in a sample of 247 seventh-grade elementary school students of both sexes. The independent variables in the study were: sex, general success of the previous grade, PE grade, students’ opinion on sufficiency of knowledge acquired through instruction process, students’ involvement in sport. The scale for measurement of motivation consisted of 29 items obtained by adaptation of the Scale for measurem...

  20. Feasibility online survey to estimate physical activity level among the students studying professional courses: a cross-sectional online survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudha, Bhumika; Samuel, Asir John; Narkeesh, Kanimozhi

    2018-02-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate the physical activity (PA) level among the professional college students in North India. One hundred three professional college students in the age group of 18-25 years were recruited by simple random sampling for this cross-sectional online survey. The survey was advertised on the social networking sites (Facebook, WhatsApp) through a link www.surveymonkey.com/r/MG-588BY. A Short Form of International Physical Activity Questionnaire was used for this survey study. The questionnaire included total 8 questions on the basis of previous 7 days. The questionnaire consists of 3 main categories which were vigorous, moderate and high PA. Time spent in each activity level was multiplied with the metabolic equivalent of task (MET), which has previously set to 8.0 for vigorous activity, 4.0 for moderate activity, 3.3 for walking, and 1.5 for sitting. By multiplying MET with number of days and minutes performed weekly, amount of each activity level was calculated and measured as MET-min/wk. Further by adding MET minutes for each activity level, total MET-min/wk was calculated. Total number of 100 students participated in this study, and it was shown that all professional course students show different levels in PA. The total PA level among professional college students, which includes, physiotherapy, dental, medical, nursing, lab technician, pharmacy, management, law, engineering, were 434.4 (0-7,866), 170.3 (0-1,129), 87.7 (0-445), 102.8 (0-180), 469 (0-1,164), 0 (0-0), 645 (0-1,836), 337 (0-1,890), 396 (0-968) MET-min/wk respectively. PA levels among professional college students in North India have been established.

  1. Leadership development at university: Comparing student leaders with different levels of involvement in a leadership education program

    OpenAIRE

    Vogt, Krista Lee

    2007-01-01

    This study examined how students’ leadership behaviours are related to both their personal leadership experience and their involvement in a leadership education program. The context of the study was the University of Guelph’s Certificate in Leadership program. The Student Leadership Practices Inventory (LPI) was administered to 33 student leaders who did not participate in the Leadership Certificate and 14 students who were at various levels of completion of the Certificate. No significant di...

  2. Students’ oral involvement in the Chinese university classroom: A comparison between classes of Chinese and international students

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Abid Malik; Guoyuan Sang

    2017-01-01

    The current research investigates the notion that Chinese students are orally less involved in the classroom as compared to international students. Most of the previous research on this topic focuses on the Chinese students in English language classes or those studying in other countries where the language barrier and foreign culture might influence such behaviour. Using observations, this research compares two Chinese and two international classes in a Chinese university to investigate this ...

  3. Examining Student Attitudes in Introductory Physics via the Math Attitude and Expectations Survey (MAX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemingway, Deborah; Eichenlaub, Mark; Losert, Wolfgang; Redish, Edward F.

    2017-01-01

    Student often face difficulties with using math in science, and this exploratory project seeks to address the underlying mechanisms that lead to these difficulties. This mixed-methods project includes the creation of two novel assessment surveys, the Mathematical Epistemic Games Survey (MEGS) and the Math Attitude and Expectations Survey (MAX). The MAX, a 30-question Likert-scale survey, focuses on the attitudes towards using mathematics of the students in a reformed introductory physics course for the life sciences (IPLS) which is part of the National Experiment in Undergraduate Education (NEXUS/Physics) developed at the University of Maryland (UMD). Preliminary results from the MAX are discussed with specific attention given to students' attitudes towards math and physics, opinions about interdisciplinarity, and the usefulness of physics in academic settings as well as in professional biological research and modern medicine settings.

  4. Developing a magnetism conceptual survey and assessing gender differences in student understanding of magnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Singh, Chandralekha

    2012-02-01

    We discuss the development of a research-based conceptual multiple-choice survey of magnetism. We also discuss the use of the survey to investigate gender differences in students' difficulties with concepts related to magnetism. We find that while there was no gender difference on the pre-test. However, female students performed significantly worse than male students when the survey was given as a post-test in traditionally taught calculus-based introductory physics courses with similar results in both the regular and honors versions of the course. In the algebra-based courses, the performance of female and male students has no statistical difference on the pre-test or the post-test.

  5. [Questionnaire survey of musician's dystonia among students of a music college].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konaka, Kuni; Mochizuki, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    Musician's dystonia is known as a task specific dystonia. Though it is thought to occur during a long course of repetitive performance, the actual circumstances that precipitate this condition are not clear. According to factual reports this disease is not commonly known, probably because many of these patients may not have been visiting a hospital. We prepared a questionnaire and did a survey among the students of a music college. This is the first questionnaire survey aimed at finding out the prevalence of musician's dystonia among the students of music. Among the 480 participants of this survey, 29% of the students had knowledge of this disorder and 1.25% of the students had dystonia while performing music.

  6. National Household Education Surveys Program of 2012: Data File User's Manual. Parent and Family Involvement in Education Survey. Early Childhood Program Participation Survey. NCES 2015-030

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhee, C.; Bielick, S.; Masterton, M.; Flores, L.; Parmer, R.; Amchin, S.; Stern, S.; McGowan, H.

    2015-01-01

    The 2012 National Household Education Surveys Program (NHES:2012) Data File User's Manual provides documentation and guidance for users of the NHES:2012 data files. The manual provides information about the purpose of the study, the sample design, data collection procedures, data processing procedures, response rates, imputation, weighting and…

  7. Sexual behavior of medical students: A single institutional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniyam, C A; Agaba, P A; Agaba, E I

    2010-06-01

    We investigated the sexual practices of medical students as they are positioned to serve as peer educators in the fight against HIV/AIDS. This was a cross sectional study, where self- administered questionnaires were distributed to consenting 4(th) to 6(th) year medical students in Jos, Nigeria with a view of elucidating information regarding sexual practices and condom utilization. Safe sex practice was defined as the use of condoms and being in a monogamous relationship. Of a total of 400 questionnaires distributed, 365 respondents (249 males and 116 females) had adequate data for analysis. A large proportion (62%) of our students have never had sex before and less than 30% of them are sexually active. Only 6.1% had multiple sexual partners and homosexuality was uncommon (1.9%). Condom utilization amongst the sexually active was high (65%) and similar among male and female students (71.3% vs. 51.9% respectively, p = 0.08). There exists safe sexual practice among medical students in our setting. This group could be recruited as peer educators in the war against HIV/AIDS.

  8. The Effects of Survey Timing on Student Evaluation of Teaching Measures Obtained Using Online Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estelami, Hooman

    2015-01-01

    Teaching evaluations are an important measurement tool used by business schools in gauging the level of student satisfaction with the educational services delivered by faculty. The growing use of online teaching evaluations has enabled educational administrators to expand the time period during which student evaluation of teaching (SET) surveys…

  9. From student to citizen: a survey of students from the People's Republic of China (PRC) in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, M C; Liu, X

    1998-01-01

    "This article is a survey of students from the People's Republic of China (PRC) who arrived in Australia after 1986 and were still there in 1992.... The article provides statistics and analysis on the motivation of these students, their education and family backgrounds and their present conditions and aspirations. The article also addresses issues such as Australia's education export and immigration policies, the dilemma between political and economic refugees in terms of human rights and the impact of the 1989 Tiananmem Square massacre on PRC students in Australia at the time." (EXCERPT)

  10. Relationships between Perceived Parental Involvement in Homework, Student Homework Behaviors, and Academic Achievement: Differences among Elementary, Junior High, and High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, J. C.; Suárez, N.; Rosário, P.; Vallejo, G.; Valle, A.; Epstein, J. L.

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to produce a deeper understanding of the relationship between perceived parental homework involvement (i.e., parental homework control and parental homework support), student homework behaviors (i.e., time spend on homework completion, time management, and amount of homework completed), and student academic achievement. Using…

  11. A Modified Model of College Student Persistence: Exploring the Relationship between Astin's Theory of Involvement and Tinto's Theory of Student Departure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milem, Jeffrey F.; Berger, Joseph B.

    1997-01-01

    Provides insight into first-year undergraduate persistence by using behavioral measures--based on Alexander Astin's theory of involvement--to further understanding of Tinto's theory of student departure. Findings support the use of an integrated model in which student behaviors and perceptions interact to influence the development of academic and…

  12. Exploring the meaning of parental involvement in physical education for students with developmental disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Jihoun; Hodge, Samuel R

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological inquiry was to explore the experiences and meaning of parental involvement in physical education from the perspectives of the parents of students with developmental disabilities. The stories of four mothers of elementary aged children (3 boys, 1 girl), two mothers and one couple (mother and father) of secondary-aged youth (1 girl, 2 boys) with developmental disabilities, were gathered by using interviews, photographs, school documents, and the researcher's journal. Bronfenbrenner's (2005) ecological system theory provided a conceptual framework to interpret the findings of this inquiry. Three themes emerged from thematic analysis: being an advocate for my child, understanding the big picture, and collaborative partnerships undeveloped in GPE. The findings lend additional support to the need for establishing collaborative partnerships in physical education between home and school environments (An & Goodwin, 2007; Tekin, 2011).

  13. Findings From the INANE Survey on Student Papers Submitted to Nursing Journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Maureen Shawn; Newland, Jamesetta A; Owens, Jacqueline K

    Nursing students are often encouraged or required to submit scholarly work for consideration for publication but most manuscripts or course assignment papers do not meet journal standards and consume valuable resources from editors and peer reviewers. The International Academy of Nursing Editors (INANE) is a group of nurse editors and publishers dedicated to promoting best practices in publishing in the nursing literature. In August 2014, editors at INANE's annual meeting voiced frustrations over multiple queries, poorly written student papers, and lack of proper behavior in following through. This article describes the findings of a survey distributed to INANE members to seek feedback about submissions by students. Fifty-three (53) members responded to an online anonymous survey developed by the INANE Student Papers Work Group. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics for Likert-type questions and content analysis of open-ended questions. Quantitative data revealed that most editors reported problems with student papers across all levels of graduate programs. Six themes emerged from the qualitative data: submissions fail to follow author guidelines; characteristics of student submissions; lack of professional behavior from students; lack of professional behavior from faculty; editor responses to student submissions; and faculty as mentors. These themes formed the basis for recommendations and strategies to improve student scholarly writing. Overall, editors endorsed supporting new scholars in the publication process but faculty engagement was integral to student success. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Knowledge of medical students on National Health Care System: A French multicentric survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feral-Pierssens, A-L; Jannot, A-S

    2017-09-01

    Education on national health care policy and costs is part of our medical curriculum explaining how our health care system works. Our aim was to measure French medical students' knowledge about national health care funding, costs and access and explore association with their educational and personal background. We developed a web-based survey exploring knowledge on national health care funding, access and costs through 19 items and measured success score as the number of correct answers. We also collected students' characteristics and public health training. The survey was sent to undergraduate medical students and residents from five medical universities between July and November 2015. A total of 1195 students from 5 medical universities responded to the survey. Most students underestimated the total amount of annual medical expenses, hospitalization costs and the proportion of the general population not benefiting from a complementary insurance. The knowledge score was not associated with medical education level. Three students' characteristics were significantly associated with a better knowledge score: male gender, older age, and underprivileged status. Medical students have important gaps in knowledge regarding national health care funding, coverage and costs. This knowledge was not associated with medical education level but with some of the students' personal characteristics. All these results are of great concern and should lead us to discussion and reflection about medical and public health training. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. INVOLVING STUDENTS IN RESEARCH AS A FORM OF INTEGRATION OF ENGINEERING WITH MATHEMATICAL EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor M. Fedoseyev

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: questions of integration of mathematical with engineering training in educational process of higher education institution are explored. The existing technologies of the integrated training are analyzed, and the project-oriented direction is distinguished. Research involving students as an organisational and methodical form of training bachelors of the technical speciali sations is discussed. Materials and Methods: results of article are based on researches of tendencies of development of technical and mathematical education, works on the theory and methodology of pedagogical integration, methodology of mathematics and technical science. Methods of historical and pedagogical research, analytical, a method of mathematical modeling were used. Results: the main content of the paper is to make discussion of experience in developing and using integrated educational tasks in real educational process. Discussion is based on a specific technological assignment including a number of mathematical tasks used as a subject of research for students. In the assignment a special place is allocated to the questions reflecting the interplay of a technical task with a mathematical method of research highlighting the objective significance of mathematics as a method to solve engineering problems. Discussion and Conclusions: the paper gives reasons to conditions for using research work with students as an organisational and methodical form of integrated training in mathematics. In realisation of educational technology it is logical to apply the method of projects. It is necessary to formulate a task as an engineering project: to set an engineering objective of research, to formulate specifications; to differentiate between engineering and mathematical tasks of the project, to make actual interrelations between them; the mathematical part of the project has to be a body of research; assessment of the project must be carried out not only accounting for

  16. Validity and Reliability of the Alcohol, Smoking, and Substance Involvement Screening Test (ASSIST) in University Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiburcio Sainz, Marcela; Rosete-Mohedano, Ma Guadalupe; Natera Rey, Guillermina; Martínez Vélez, Nora Angélica; Carreño García, Silvia; Pérez Cisneros, Daniel

    2016-03-02

    The Alcohol, Smoking and Substance Involvement Screening Test (ASSIST), developed by the World Health Organization (WHO), has been used successfully in many countries, but there are few studies of its validity and reliability for the Mexican population. The objective of this study was to determine the psychometric properties of the self-administered ASSIST test in university students in Mexico. This was an ex post facto non-experimental study with 1,176 undergraduate students, the majority women (70.1%) aged 18-23 years (89.5%) and single (87.5%). To estimate concurrent validity, factor analysis and tests of reliability and correlation were carried out between the subscale for alcohol and AUDIT, those for tobacco and the Fagerström Test, and those for marijuana and DAST-20. Adequate reliability coefficients were obtained for ASSIST subscales for tobacco (alpha = 0.83), alcohol (alpha = 0.76), and marijuana (alpha = 0.73). Significant correlations were found only with the AUDIT (r = 0.71) and the alcohol subscale. The best balance of sensitivity and specificity of the alcohol subscale (83.8% and 80%, respectively) and the largest area under the ROC curve (81.9%) was found with a cutoff score of 8. The self-administered version of ASSIST is a valid screening instrument to identify at-risk cases due to substance use in this population.

  17. How do medical student journals fare? A global survey of journals run by medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamri, Yassar

    2016-01-01

    Medical students have made significant contributions to the medical and scientific fields in the past. Today, medical students still contribute to biomedical research; however, they often face disappointment from journals when trying to publish their findings. This led to the development of medical student journals, which take a more "student-friendly" approach. This article reviews the current medical student journals published in English and sheds light on current trends and challenges.

  18. The use of parent involved take-home science activities during student teaching: Understanding the challenges of implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarazinski, Jill

    The purpose of this study was to identify student teachers use and implementation of Science in a Bag when it was no longer a required course-based assessment. This take-home science activity acted as the elaboration component of the 5Es lesson teacher candidates designed and taught in the classroom, utilized household items, and directly involved parents in their child's education. The purposeful sample was comprised of six teacher candidates during their student teaching practicum, the last semester of the childhood education teacher certification program. This collective case study centered on student teachers' use of the focused activity, Science in a Bag, in order to gain knowledge of challenges faced in applying take-home science kits and working with parents. Data collection was comprised of student teacher and parent interviews, candidate reflections, as well as in-class observations and discussions carried out during weekly seminars. Data collection occurred throughout the seven-week student teaching practicum. The four research questions were: 1) What factors do teacher candidates identify as interfering with their ability to implement Science in a Bag during student teaching placements? 2) What factors do teacher candidates identify as enhancing their ability to carry out Science in a Bag? 3) What forms of support do teacher candidates believe are important to their success in implementing Science in a Bag during student teaching? 4) How do teacher candidates deal with obstacles when implementing Science in a Bag? Despite the fact that no student teacher was prohibited from implementing Science in a Bag, the level to which candidates valued and utilized this instructional strategy varied compared to how they were taught and practiced it during the science methods course. Some student teachers attempted to hide their feelings toward Science in a Bag, however their actions revealed that they were simply carrying out the instructional strategy because they

  19. Developing a Survey to Determine Student Perceptions of Readiness at the Beginning of an Educational Leadership Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Michael D.; Gratto, John

    2015-01-01

    In this study, researchers developed a survey to determine student perceptions of readiness prior to entering an educational leadership program. The researchers analyzed and established the reliability and validity of the survey created to understand student readiness as they enter the program. The information garnered from this survey will help…

  20. Involvement of Machine Learning for Breast Cancer Image Classification: A Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Nahid, Abdullah-Al; Kong, Yinan

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the largest causes of women’s death in the world today. Advance engineering of natural image classification techniques and Artificial Intelligence methods has largely been used for the breast-image classification task. The involvement of digital image classification allows the doctor and the physicians a second opinion, and it saves the doctors’ and physicians’ time. Despite the various publications on breast image classification, very few review papers are available w...

  1. Evaluating effectiveness of small group information literacy instruction for Undergraduate Medical Education students using a pre- and post-survey study design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClurg, Caitlin; Powelson, Susan; Lang, Eddy; Aghajafari, Fariba; Edworthy, Steven

    2015-06-01

    The Undergraduate Medical Education (UME) programme at the University of Calgary is a three-year programme with a strong emphasis on small group learning. The purpose of our study was to determine whether librarian led small group information literacy instruction, closely integrated with course content and faculty participation, but without a hands on component, was an effective means to convey EBM literacy skills. Five 15-minute EBM information literacy sessions were delivered by three librarians to 12 practicing physician led small groups of 15 students. Students were asked to complete an online survey before and after the sessions. Data analysis was performed through simple descriptive statistics. A total of 144 of 160 students responded to the pre-survey, and 112 students answered the post-survey. Instruction in a small group environment without a mandatory hands on component had a positive impact on student's evidence-based information literacy skills. Students were more likely to consult a librarian and had increased confidence in their abilities to search and find relevant information. Our study demonstrates that student engagement and faculty involvement are effective tools for delivering information literacy skills when working with students in a small group setting outside of a computer classroom. © 2015 Health Libraries Group.

  2. Marketing Universities: A Survey of Student Recruitment Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Patrick E.; McGarrity, Richard A.

    1978-01-01

    Admissions officers of 350 private colleges and universities were surveyed to ascertain their understanding of the term "marketing," current use of promotional (advertising and personal selling) activities, market segmentation approaches, and their product (i.e., academic programs) development and differentiation strategies. The mail questionnaire…

  3. Conducting Sanitary Surveys of Water Supply Systems. Student Workbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976

    This workbook is utilized in connection with a 40-hour course on sanitary surveys of water supply systems for biologists, chemists, and engineers with experience as a water supply evaluator. Practical training is provided in each of the 21 self-contained modules. Each module outlines the purpose, objectives and content for that section. The course…

  4. Perceived Immune Status and Sleep : A Survey among Dutch Students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donners, Anouk A M T; Tromp, Marilou D P; Garssen, Johan; Roth, Thomas; Verster, Joris C

    2015-01-01

    Reduced immune functioning may have a negative impact on sleep and health, and vice versa. A survey among Dutch young adults (18-35 years old) was administered to collect information on perception of reduced immunity and its relationship to sleep disorders, sleep duration, and quality. Sleep

  5. A national benchmarking survey of student counselling centres/units ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study further found that the majority of counselling centres/units had one or more staff members with specialised training in areas such as HIV/AIDS counselling, sexual abuse counselling and multicultural counselling. In 2007, these counselling centres/units saw on average 18 per cent of enrolled students as ...

  6. Student Entrepreneurship in Hungary: Selected Results Based on GUESSS Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea S. Gubik

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study investigates students’ entrepreneurial activities and aims to answer questions regarding to what extent do students utilize the knowledge gained during their studies and the personal connections acquired at universities, as well as what role a family business background plays in the development of students’ business start-ups. Research Design & Methods: This paper is based on the database of the GUESSS project investigates 658 student entrepreneurs (so-called ‘active entrepreneurs’ who have already established businesses of their own. Findings: The rate of self-employment among Hungarian students who study in tertiary education and consider themselves to be entrepreneurs is high. Motivations and entrepreneurial efforts differ from those who owns a larger company, they do not necessarily intend to make an entrepreneurial path a career option in the long run. A family business background and family support play a determining role in entrepreneurship and business start-ups, while entrepreneurial training and courses offered at higher institutions are not reflected in students’ entrepreneurial activities. Implications & Recommendations: Universities should offer not only conventional business courses (for example, business planning, but also new forms of education so that students meet various entrepreneurial tasks and problems, make decisions in different situations, explore and acquaint themselves with entrepreneurship. Contribution & Value Added: The study provides literature overview of youth entrepreneurship, describes the main characteristics of students’ enterprises and contributes to understanding the factors of youth entrepreneurship.

  7. Smartwatches as a Learning Tool: A Survey of Student Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davie, Neil; Hilber, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Both teachers and students of language learning are keen to make use of new technologies to enhance their learning. At the latest, the launch of the Apple Watch has made the general public aware of the smartwatch and the possibilities, at least according to the marketing hype, that these wearable computers offer. The sales of smartwatches are…

  8. The Civil Behavior of Students: A Survey of School Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Keely; Caldarella, Paul; Crook-Lyon, Rachel E.; Young, K. Richard

    2010-01-01

    Many authors regard education as a way of increasing civility in society, and some have implemented interventions to improve civility in schools. However, very little empirical data exist on the extent and nature of students' civil behavior. The present study systematically gathered data from 251 school professionals regarding their perceptions of…

  9. Pharmacy Students' Attitude and Future Career Choices: A survey of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pharmacy as a health profession has major responsibilities and contributions in maintaining health of the society. Thus, pharmacists have to maintain professional behaviour and attitude that is worthy of the respect the public has for the profession. Studies on pharmacy students' attitude and career choice are important to ...

  10. The survey of American college students computer technology preferences & purchasing plans

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    This report presents data from a survey of more than 400 American college students.  The report presents data on student computer ownership of both PCs and laptops, purchasing plans for PCs and laptops, as well as purchasing plans for cell phones and digital cameras.  The report also provides details on how student finance their computer purchases, how much money comes from parents or guardians, and how much from the student themselves, or from their parties.  In addition to data on PCs the report provides detailed info on use of popular word processing packages such as Word, WordPerfect and Open Office.

  11. Exploring the attitudes of medical faculty members and students in Pakistan towards plagiarism: a cross sectional survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathore, Farooq Azam; Zia, Ahmad Marjan; Mavrinac, Martina; Farooq, Fareeha

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The objective of this survey was to explore the attitudes towards plagiarism of faculty members and medical students in Pakistan. Methods. The Attitudes Toward Plagiarism questionnaire (ATP) was modified and distributed among 550 medical students and 130 faculty members in 7 medical colleges of Lahore and Rawalpindi. Data was entered in the SPSS v.20 and descriptive statistics were analyzed. The questionnaire was validated by principal axis factoring analysis. Results. Response rate was 93% and 73%, respectively. Principal axis factoring analysis confirmed one factor structure of ATP in the present sample. It had an acceptable Cronbach’s alpha value of 0.73. There were 421 medical students (218 (52%) female, 46% 3rd year MBBS students, mean age of 20.93 ± 1.4 years) and 95 faculty members (54.7% female, mean age 34.5 ± 8.9 years). One fifth of the students (19.7%) trained in medical writing (19.7%), research ethics (25.2%) or were currently involved in medical writing (17.6%). Most of the faculty members were demonstrators (66) or assistant professors (20) with work experience between 1 and 10 years. Most of them had trained in medical writing (68), research ethics (64) and were currently involved in medical writing (64). Medical students and faculty members had a mean score of 43.21 (7.1) and 48.4 (5.9) respectively on ATP. Most of the respondents did not consider that they worked in a plagiarism free environment and reported that self-plagiarism should not be punishable in the same way as plagiarism. Opinion regarding leniency in punishment of younger researchers who were just learning medical writing was divided. Conclusions. The general attitudes of Pakistani medical faculty members and medical students as assessed by ATP were positive. We propose training in medical writing and research ethics as part of the under and post graduate medical curriculum. PMID:26157615

  12. Using peer-mediated instruction to support communication involving a student with autism during mathematics activities: A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Paulo; Alant, Erna

    2018-01-01

    This study employed an A-B singled subject design to explore the extent to which a peer-mediated intervention supported a first-grade student with autism's usage both in purpose and frequency of a speech-generating device (SGD) during mathematics activities. The intervention involved teaching a peer without a disability to encourage the student with autism to use the SGD during partnered mathematics activities. Our analysis involved visual and descriptive examination of trends and patterns over time, and comparison of means between and within phases. We found during the course of this study that (1) the student with autism's level of overall communication, which included the relevancy of these communicative behaviors, increased; (2) the student with autism's level of spontaneous communication acts increased; and (3) the peer became more independent with supporting the student with autism's communication. Implications for future research and practice are provided.

  13. Assessment of burnout in veterinary medical students using the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Educational Survey: a survey during two semesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chigerwe, Munashe; Boudreaux, Karen A; Ilkiw, Jan E

    2014-11-28

    Burnout among veterinary students can result from known stressors in the absence of a support system. The objectives of this study were to evaluate use of the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Educator Survey (MBI-ES) to assess burnout in veterinary students and evaluate the factors that predict the MBI-ES scores. The MBI-ES was administered to first (Class of 2016) and second year (Class of 2015) veterinary medical students during the 2012-2013 academic year in the fall and spring semesters. Factor analysis and test reliability for the survey were determined. Mean scores for the subscales determining burnout namely emotional exhaustion (EE), depersonalization (DP) and lack of personal accomplishment (PA) were calculated for both classes in the 2 semesters. Multiple regression analysis was performed to evaluate other factors that predict the MBI-ES scores. A non-probability sampling method was implemented consisting of a voluntary sample of 170 and 123 students in the fall and spring semesters, respectively. Scores for EE, DP and PA were not different between the 2 classes within the same semester. Mean ± SD scores for EE, DP and PA for the fall semester were 22.9 ± 9.6, 5.0 ± 4.8 and 32.3 ± 6.7, respectively. Mean ± SD scores for EE, DP and PA the spring semester were 27.8 ± 10.7, 6.5 ± 6.1and 31.7 ± 6.8, respectively. The EE score was higher in spring compared to fall while DP and PA scores were not different between the 2 semesters. Living arrangements specifically as to whether or not a student lived with another veterinary medical students was the only variable significantly associated with the MBI-ES scores. Students in this study had moderate levels of burnout based on the MBI-ES scores. The MBI-ES was an acceptable instrument for assessing burnout in veterinary medical students. The EE scores were higher in the spring semester as compared to the fall semester. Thus students in the first and second years of veterinary school under the current curriculum

  14. Involving students in real-world research: a pilot study for teaching public health and research skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Nick

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is some evidence that medical students consider population health issues less important than other domains in the health sciences and attitudes to this field may become more negative as training progresses. A need to improve research skills among medical students has also been suggested. Therefore we piloted an integrative teaching exercise that combined teaching of research skills and public health, with real-world research. Methods Third year medical students at the University of Otago (Dunedin, New Zealand filled in a questionnaire on their housing conditions and health. The students were given the results of the survey to discuss in a subsequent class. Student response to this teaching exercise was assessed using a Course Evaluation Questionnaire. Results Of the 210 students in the class, 136 completed the Course Evaluation Questionnaire (65%. A majority of those who responded (77% greatly supported or supported the use of the survey and seminar discussion for future third year classes. Most (70% thought that the session had made them more aware and concerned about societal problems, and 72% felt that they now had an improved understanding of the environmental determinants of health. Students liked the relevance and interaction of the session, but thought it could be improved by the inclusion of small group discussion. The findings of the students' housing and health were considered by the tutors to be of sufficient value to submit to a scientific journal and are now contributing to community action to improve student housing in the city. Conclusion In this pilot study it was feasible to integrate medical student teaching with real-world research. A large majority of the students responded favourably to the teaching exercise and this was generally successful in raising the profile of public health and research. This approach to integrated teaching/research should be considered further in health sciences training and

  15. Reliability and validity of the Safe Routes to school parent and student surveys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evenson Kelly R

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study is to assess the reliability and validity of the U.S. National Center for Safe Routes to School's in-class student travel tallies and written parent surveys. Over 65,000 tallies and 374,000 parent surveys have been completed, but no published studies have examined their measurement properties. Methods Students and parents from two Charlotte, NC (USA elementary schools participated. Tallies were conducted on two consecutive days using a hand-raising protocol; on day two students were also asked to recall the previous days' travel. The recall from day two was compared with day one to assess 24-hour test-retest reliability. Convergent validity was assessed by comparing parent-reports of students' travel mode with student-reports of travel mode. Two-week test-retest reliability of the parent survey was assessed by comparing within-parent responses. Reliability and validity were assessed using kappa statistics. Results A total of 542 students participated in the in-class student travel tally reliability assessment and 262 parent-student dyads participated in the validity assessment. Reliability was high for travel to and from school (kappa > 0.8; convergent validity was lower but still high (kappa > 0.75. There were no differences by student grade level. Two-week test-retest reliability of the parent survey (n = 112 ranged from moderate to very high for objective questions on travel mode and travel times (kappa range: 0.62 - 0.97 but was substantially lower for subjective assessments of barriers to walking to school (kappa range: 0.31 - 0.76. Conclusions The student in-class student travel tally exhibited high reliability and validity at all elementary grades. The parent survey had high reliability on questions related to student travel mode, but lower reliability for attitudinal questions identifying barriers to walking to school. Parent survey design should be improved so that responses clearly indicate

  16. Reliability and validity of the Safe Routes to school parent and student surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Noreen C; Dwelley, Amanda E; Combs, Tabitha S; Evenson, Kelly R; Winters, Richard H

    2011-06-08

    The purpose of this study is to assess the reliability and validity of the U.S. National Center for Safe Routes to School's in-class student travel tallies and written parent surveys. Over 65,000 tallies and 374,000 parent surveys have been completed, but no published studies have examined their measurement properties. Students and parents from two Charlotte, NC (USA) elementary schools participated. Tallies were conducted on two consecutive days using a hand-raising protocol; on day two students were also asked to recall the previous days' travel. The recall from day two was compared with day one to assess 24-hour test-retest reliability. Convergent validity was assessed by comparing parent-reports of students' travel mode with student-reports of travel mode. Two-week test-retest reliability of the parent survey was assessed by comparing within-parent responses. Reliability and validity were assessed using kappa statistics. A total of 542 students participated in the in-class student travel tally reliability assessment and 262 parent-student dyads participated in the validity assessment. Reliability was high for travel to and from school (kappa > 0.8); convergent validity was lower but still high (kappa > 0.75). There were no differences by student grade level. Two-week test-retest reliability of the parent survey (n=112) ranged from moderate to very high for objective questions on travel mode and travel times (kappa range: 0.62-0.97) but was substantially lower for subjective assessments of barriers to walking to school (kappa range: 0.31-0.76). The student in-class student travel tally exhibited high reliability and validity at all elementary grades. The parent survey had high reliability on questions related to student travel mode, but lower reliability for attitudinal questions identifying barriers to walking to school. Parent survey design should be improved so that responses clearly indicate issues that influence parental decision making in regards to their

  17. Attitudes towards mental illness of nursing students in a Baccalaureate programme in Jamaica: a questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, J; Stennett, R

    2015-10-01

    There is longstanding evidence of nurses demonstrating negative attitudes towards people with mental illness. Student nurses' fear or discomfort with mentally ill patients results in poorer outcomes for patients and students' dissatisfaction with their experience of mental health nursing. There is evidence of negative attitudes towards mental illness in the Jamaican society; however, no studies have explored whether these attitudes are held by nursing students. The aim of the study was to examine the attitudes of nursing students towards mental illness. A questionnaire survey was conducted with a convenience sample of 143 third-year nursing students who were enrolled in a baccalaureate programme. Data were collected using the Attitudes Towards Acute Mental Health Scale (ATAMHS). A response rate of 71% was achieved for the survey. The findings indicated that the student nurses held an overall negative attitude towards mental illness, with a general perception that mentally ill people are dangerous. The student nurses were divided in their opinions in a number of areas, suggesting a possible conflict of opinions. Negative attitudes towards mental illness impact client outcomes and the career choices made by nurses. This study provides baseline data within the Jamaican context that adds to the evidence on nursing students' attitude to mental illness. Further research is needed to explore whether nursing education and clinical experience enables student nurses in Jamaica to develop a more positive attitude towards mental illness and mental health nursing and whether cultural factors contribute to negative attitudes. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. [Satisfaction survey in general hospital personnel involved in blood transfusion: implementation of the ISO 9001: 2000 standard].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chord-Auger, S; de Bouchony, E Tron; Moll, M-C; Boudart, D; Folléa, G

    2004-07-01

    As part of its policy of constant quality improvement, Etablissement Français du Sang (EFS) des Pays de la Loire (Pays de la Loire Regional blood transfusion institution) carried out a satisfaction survey among the hospital personnel involved in prescribing and using immuno-hematological tests and labile blood products. The polling tool selected by agreement between the hospital management and quality assurance department was a questionnaire that permitted item rating and free commentary. It addressed the personnel's perception of the quality of erythrocyte immuno-hematological (EIH) testing and of the products administered, as well as their perception of the quality of communications with the local EFS. The questionnaire was sent to 26 physicians and 32 senior nurses in 15 hospital departments. The reply rate was 60% and expressed a 85% overall satisfaction level. Dissatisfaction causes were more specifically analysed, the main one involving labile blood product distribution in emergency situations. A joint undertaking by the EFS and the hospital led to the implementation of corrective measures, including the writing and implementation of a common standard operating procedure for emergency transfusion management. The results obtained demonstrated the feasibility of this type of survey and the interest, to a blood transfusion centre and the hospital personnel involved in transfusion, of assessing their very own perception of service quality.

  19. Satisfaction survey in general hospital personnel involved in blood transfusion: implementation of the ISO 9001: 2000 standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chord-Auger, S; Tron de Bouchony, E; Moll, M C; Boudart, D; Folléa, G

    2004-10-01

    As part of its policy of constant quality improvement, Etablissement francais du sang (EFS) des pays de la Loire (Pays de la Loire Regional Blood Transfusion Centre) carried out a satisfaction survey among the hospital personnel involved in prescribing and using immunohaematological tests and labile blood products (LBP). The polling tool selected by agreement between the Saint Nazaire's hospital management and Quality Assurance (QA) Department was a questionnaire that permitted item rating and free commentary. It addressed the personnel's perception of the quality of erythrocyte immunohaematological (EIH) testing and of the products administered, as well as their perception of the quality of communications with the local EFS. The questionnaire was sent to 26 physicians and 32 senior nurses in 15 hospital departments. The reply rate was 60% and expressed an 85% overall satisfaction level. Dissatisfaction causes were more specifically analysed, the main one involving LBP distribution in emergency situations. A joint undertaking by the EFS and the hospital led to the implementation of corrective measures, including the writing and implementation of a common standard operating procedure for emergency transfusion management. The results obtained demonstrated the feasibility of this type of survey and the interest, to a blood transfusion centre and the hospital personnel involved in transfusion, of assessing their very own perception of service quality.

  20. Involvement of Machine Learning for Breast Cancer Image Classification: A Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah-Al Nahid

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is one of the largest causes of women’s death in the world today. Advance engineering of natural image classification techniques and Artificial Intelligence methods has largely been used for the breast-image classification task. The involvement of digital image classification allows the doctor and the physicians a second opinion, and it saves the doctors’ and physicians’ time. Despite the various publications on breast image classification, very few review papers are available which provide a detailed description of breast cancer image classification techniques, feature extraction and selection procedures, classification measuring parameterizations, and image classification findings. We have put a special emphasis on the Convolutional Neural Network (CNN method for breast image classification. Along with the CNN method we have also described the involvement of the conventional Neural Network (NN, Logic Based classifiers such as the Random Forest (RF algorithm, Support Vector Machines (SVM, Bayesian methods, and a few of the semisupervised and unsupervised methods which have been used for breast image classification.

  1. Involvement of Machine Learning for Breast Cancer Image Classification: A Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahid, Abdullah-Al; Kong, Yinan

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the largest causes of women's death in the world today. Advance engineering of natural image classification techniques and Artificial Intelligence methods has largely been used for the breast-image classification task. The involvement of digital image classification allows the doctor and the physicians a second opinion, and it saves the doctors' and physicians' time. Despite the various publications on breast image classification, very few review papers are available which provide a detailed description of breast cancer image classification techniques, feature extraction and selection procedures, classification measuring parameterizations, and image classification findings. We have put a special emphasis on the Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) method for breast image classification. Along with the CNN method we have also described the involvement of the conventional Neural Network (NN), Logic Based classifiers such as the Random Forest (RF) algorithm, Support Vector Machines (SVM), Bayesian methods, and a few of the semisupervised and unsupervised methods which have been used for breast image classification.

  2. Internet addiction in Greek medical students: an online survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsimtsiou, Zoi; Haidich, Anna-Bettina; Spachos, Dimitris; Kokkali, Stamatia; Bamidis, Panagiotis; Dardavesis, Theodoros; Arvanitidou, Malamatenia

    2015-06-01

    The authors investigated the prevalence of Internet addiction (IA) in undergraduate medical students to identify possible associations with sociodemographics and Internet habits. All students at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki School of Medicine, Greece, were invited to complete the online Internet Addiction Test (IAT) along with sociodemographics and preferences on Internet activities. The authors received 585 responses after three reminders (23.5 % response rate). Mild IA was found in 24.5 %, moderate in 5.4 %, and severe in 0.2 %. In multivariable analysis, the odds to develop IA were increased with visits in Internet cafes (Odds Ratio [OR] 3.49, 95 % Confidence Interval [CI]: 1.45, 8.46), the use of Facebook (OR 2.43, 95 % CI: 1.35, 4.38), Twitter (OR 2.45, 95 % CI: 1.37, 4.39), and online games (OR 1.95, 95 % CI: 1.29, 2.94). Using e-mails seemed to be protective against IA (OR 0.59, 95 % CI: 0.37, 0.94). This is the first IA prevalence study in a European medical school. Early-detection systems and other ways to help students with pathological behaviors should be developed.

  3. Using a Virtual Tablet Machine to Improve Student Understanding of the Complex Processes Involved in Tablet Manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, Sofia; Sjöström, Hans-Erik; Englund, Claire

    2016-06-25

    Objective. To develop and implement a virtual tablet machine simulation to aid distance students' understanding of the processes involved in tablet production. Design. A tablet simulation was created enabling students to study the effects different parameters have on the properties of the tablet. Once results were generated, students interpreted and explained them on the basis of current theory. Assessment. The simulation was evaluated using written questionnaires and focus group interviews. Students appreciated the exercise and considered it to be motivational. Students commented that they found the simulation, together with the online seminar and the writing of the report, was beneficial for their learning process. Conclusion. According to students' perceptions, the use of the tablet simulation contributed to their understanding of the compaction process.

  4. Expanding the Reach of Physics-Engaging Students in Interdisciplinary Research Involving complex, real-world situation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bililign, Solomon

    2014-03-01

    Physics plays a very important role in most interdisciplinary efforts and can provide a solid foundation for students. Retention of students in STEM areas can be facilitated by enhanced interdisciplinary education and research since students are strongly attracted to research with societal relevance and show increasing enthusiasm about problems that have practical consequences. One such area of research is a collaborative Earth System Science. The Earth System is dynamic and complex. It is comprised of diverse components that interact. By providing students the opportunities to work in interdisciplinary groups on a problem that reflects a complex, real-world situation they can see the linkages between components of the Earth system that encompass climate and all its components (weather precipitation, temperature, etc.) and technology development and deployment of sensors and sensor networks and social impacts. By involving students in the creation of their own personalized professional development plan, students are more focused and engaged and are more likely to remain in the program.

  5. Problem drinking among at-risk college students: The examination of Greek involvement, freshman status, and history of mental health problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Haley S; Klanecky, Alicia K; McChargue, Dennis E

    2018-02-06

    Scarce research has examined the combined effect of mental health difficulties and demographic risk factors such as freshman status and Greek affiliation in understanding college problem drinking. The current study is interested in looking at the interaction among freshman status, Greek affiliation, and mental health difficulties. Undergraduate students (N = 413) from a private and public Midwestern university completed a large online survey battery between January 2009 and April 2013. Data from both schools were aggregated for the analyses. After accounting for gender, age, and school type, the three-way interaction indicated that the highest drinking levels were reported in freshman students who reported a history of mental health problems although were not involved in Greek life. Findings are discussed in the context of perceived social norms, as well as alcohol-related screenings and intervention opportunities on college campuses.

  6. Motivations to play specifically predict excessive involvement in massively multiplayer online role-playing games: evidence from an online survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanetta Dauriat, Francesca; Zermatten, Ariane; Billieux, Joël; Thorens, Gabriel; Bondolfi, Guido; Zullino, Daniele; Khazaal, Yasser

    2011-01-01

    Several studies have linked massively multiplayer online role-playing games (MMORPGs) with possible problematic usage or internet addiction. The main goal of the present study was to assess links between motivations to play in MMORPGs and addictive involvement in such types of games. A total of 696 gamers responded to an online survey. Five distinct motivations to play were identified in gamers: achievement, socializing, immersion, relaxing and escaping. Multiple regression analysis revealed that addictive MMORPG use patterns are predicted by achievement, escapism and socializing motives. Gender was also a significant predictor of problematic involvement in MMORPGs. Moreover, addictive MMORPG use positively correlated with the weekly time devoted to playing MMORPGs. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Alcohol- and Drug-Involved Driving in the United States: Methodology for the 2007 National Roadside Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacey, John H.; Kelley-Baker, Tara; Voas, Robert B.; Romano, Eduardo; Furr-Holden, C. Debra; Torres, Pedro; Berning, Amy

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the methodology used in the 2007 U.S. National Roadside Survey to estimate the prevalence of alcohol- and drug-impaired driving and alcohol- and drug-involved driving. This study involved randomly stopping drivers at 300 locations across the 48 continental U.S. states at sites selected through a stratified random sampling procedure. Data were collected during a 2-hour Friday daytime session at 60 locations and during 2-hour nighttime weekend periods at 240 locations. Both self-report and biological measures were taken. Biological measures included breath alcohol measurements from 9,413 respondents, oral fluid samples from 7,719 respondents, and blood samples from 3,276 respondents. PMID:21997324

  8. Surveying Medical Students to Gauge Library Use and Plan for a New Medical Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronoff, Nell

    2016-01-01

    In spring 2015, a 45-question survey was e-mailed to 585 medical students at the University at Buffalo (UB) in order to gauge their use of library spaces, resources, equipment, and services at UB's Health Sciences Library and plan for a library space located within a new medical school building. Students' self-reported use of the library during the academic year is presented along with the features they would like to see in their ideal library space. The responses generated in the survey are a barometer of current use and will be used in the planning process.

  9. EXAMINATION OF ACHIEVEMENT RELATIONS AND MOTIVATION OF 7th GRADE STUDENTS FOR INVOLVEMENT IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION CLASSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragoljub Višnjić

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The relations of students achievement and motivation for involvement in PE classes were examined in a sample of 247 seventh-grade elementary school students of both sexes. The independent variables in the study were: sex, general success of the previous grade, PE grade, students’ opinion on sufficiency of knowledge acquired through instruction process, students’ involvement in sport. The scale for measurement of motivation consisted of 29 items obtained by adaptation of the Scale for measurement of motives of sports’ achievement. Correlation analysis, multiple regression analysis and chi square test were preformed. It was established that male students manifested higher motivation that the females. The assumptions: that females will have better PE grades that the male students; that students’ success was negatively related to involvement in sport; that PE grade was connected to involvement in sport; that general success was negatively related to students’ involvement in PE and that PE grade is positively related to students’ motivation for involvement in instruction, were not confirmed.

  10. A Survey on the Color of Interior Design for University Students

    OpenAIRE

    Takata, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to clarify the actual conditions of the color on interior design for university students. At first, the author carried out the questionnaire survey in order to grasp the characteristics of respondents and their consciousness of interior and color design. Based on the results of the questionnaire survey, the relationship between the characteristics of respondents and their consciousness was studied. Especially, the influence of the respondents' academic grade and t...

  11. Traffic Accidents Involving Cyclists Identifying Causal Factors Using Questionnaire Survey, Traffic Accident Data, and Real-World Observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikawa, Shoko; Hirose, Toshiya; Aomura, Shigeru; Matsui, Yasuhiro

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to clarify the mechanism of traffic accidents involving cyclists. The focus is on the characteristics of cyclist accidents and scenarios, because the number of traffic accidents involving cyclists in Tokyo is the highest in Japan. First, dangerous situations in traffic incidents were investigated by collecting data from 304 cyclists in one city in Tokyo using a questionnaire survey. The survey indicated that cyclists used their bicycles generally while commuting to work or school in the morning. Second, the study investigated the characteristics of 250 accident situations involving cyclists that happened in the city using real-world bicycle accident data. The results revealed that the traffic accidents occurred at intersections of local streets, where cyclists collided most often with vehicles during commute time in the morning. Third, cyclists' behavior was observed at a local street intersection in the morning in the city using video pictures. In one hour during the morning commute period, 250 bicycles passed through the intersection. The results indicated that one of the reasons for traffic accidents involving cyclists might be the combined effect of low visibility, caused by the presence of box-like building structures close to the intersections, and the cyclists' behavior in terms of their velocity and no confirming safety. It was observed that, on average, bicycle velocity was 3.1 m/s at the initial line of an intersection. The findings from this study could be useful in developing new technologies to improve cyclist safety, such as alert devices for cyclists and vehicle drivers, wireless communication systems between cyclists and vehicle drivers, or advanced vehicles with bicycle detection and collision mitigation systems.

  12. Validation of the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey for Estimating Burnout in Dental Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montiel-Company, José María; Subirats-Roig, Cristian; Flores-Martí, Pau; Bellot-Arcís, Carlos; Almerich-Silla, José Manuel

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the validity and reliability of the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS) as a tool for assessing the prevalence and level of burnout in dental students in Spanish universities. The survey was adapted from English to Spanish. A sample of 533 dental students from 15 Spanish universities and a control group of 188 medical students self-administered the survey online, using the Google Drive service. The test-retest reliability or reproducibility showed an Intraclass Correlation Coefficient of 0.95. The internal consistency of the survey was 0.922. Testing the construct validity showed two components with an eigenvalue greater than 1.5, which explained 51.2% of the total variance. Factor I (36.6% of the variance) comprised the items that estimated emotional exhaustion and depersonalization. Factor II (14.6% of the variance) contained the items that estimated personal accomplishment. The cut-off point for the existence of burnout achieved a sensitivity of 92.2%, a specificity of 92.1%, and an area under the curve of 0.96. Comparison of the total dental students sample and the control group of medical students showed significantly higher burnout levels for the dental students (50.3% vs. 40.4%). In this study, the MBI-HSS was found to be viable, valid, and reliable for measuring burnout in dental students. Since the study also found that the dental students suffered from high levels of this syndrome, these results suggest the need for preventive burnout control programs.

  13. Perceived Immune Status and Sleep: A Survey among Dutch Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anouk A. M. T. Donners

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Reduced immune functioning may have a negative impact on sleep and health, and vice versa. A survey among Dutch young adults (18–35 years old was administered to collect information on perception of reduced immunity and its relationship to sleep disorders, sleep duration, and quality. Sleep disorders were assessed with the SLEEP-50 questionnaire subscales of sleep apnea, insomnia, circadian rhythm disorder, and daily functioning. Dutch young adults (N = 574 completed the survey. Among them, subjects (N = 209; 36.4% reported perceived reduced immunity. Relative to those with a normal immune status, subjects reporting reduced immunity had significantly higher scores (p=0.0001 on sleep apnea (2.6 versus 3.6, insomnia (5.1 versus 6.8, and circadian rhythm disorder (2.1 versus 2.7. Subjects reporting reduced immunity also had significantly poorer daily functioning scores (5.4 versus 7.6, p=0.0001. No differences were observed in total sleep time, but those reporting reduced immunity had significantly poorer ratings of sleep quality (6.8 versus 7.2, p=0.0001. Our findings suggest that perceived reduced immunity is associated with sleep disturbances, impaired daily functioning, and a poorer sleep quality. Experimental studies including the assessment of immune biomarkers and objective measures of sleep (polysomnography should confirm the current observations.

  14. CAFES 2009 New Student Survey Report. Survey Research Center Report 2010/3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speerstra, Mandy; Trechter, David

    2010-01-01

    During Academic Day, September 1, 2009, incoming freshmen and transfer students in the College of Agriculture, Food and Environmental Sciences (CAFES) were asked to complete a one-page questionnaire designed to find out: (1) how they learned about UW-River Falls as an option for their tertiary education; (2) what factors most influenced their…

  15. Radioactive waste management: exploratory survey among Rio de Janeiro state university students

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Danielle Monegalha; Almeida, Ivan Pedro Salati de, E-mail: drodrigues@cnen.gov.b, E-mail: ivsalati@cnen.gov.b [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Social approval is a fundamental part of the site selection process of a radioactive waste repository. Such approval requires the involvement of the local community in the decision-making process and is deemed essential to the success of an enterprise of this kind. A major problem when it comes to nuclear energy is the poor knowledge on the issue among the general population. For effective participation in the decision-making process, the community of the candidate site should be well informed on nuclear issues, because efficient community interaction depends on the level of knowledge of their citizens on the subject. One way to identify this level of knowledge is through opinion polls on attitudes and beliefs regarding the use of nuclear energy and on radioactive waste. In the European Union research is carried out periodically seeking to know people's opinion about their participation in the decision-making process. In order to assess in a preliminary way the attitude on this matter of university students of the state of Rio de Janeiro, the research method used in the European Union was adapted and subsequently applied to a sample of 200 students from public and private universities within the state. The results indicate that the majority of respondents, though possessing little information on nuclear issues, would like to participate in the decision-making process for site selection of a low and intermediate level radioactive waste repository, if that repository was to be built close to their living area. The collected data also identifies the sources of information that are considered trustworthy by the surveyed sample. Although exploratory, this research provides guidelines for future work to be developed within the scope of the site selection for a radioactive waste repository in Brazil. (author)

  16. Radioactive waste management: exploratory survey among Rio de Janeiro state university students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, Danielle Monegalha; Almeida, Ivan Pedro Salati de

    2011-01-01

    Social approval is a fundamental part of the site selection process of a radioactive waste repository. Such approval requires the involvement of the local community in the decision-making process and is deemed essential to the success of an enterprise of this kind. A major problem when it comes to nuclear energy is the poor knowledge on the issue among the general population. For effective participation in the decision-making process, the community of the candidate site should be well informed on nuclear issues, because efficient community interaction depends on the level of knowledge of their citizens on the subject. One way to identify this level of knowledge is through opinion polls on attitudes and beliefs regarding the use of nuclear energy and on radioactive waste. In the European Union research is carried out periodically seeking to know people's opinion about their participation in the decision-making process. In order to assess in a preliminary way the attitude on this matter of university students of the state of Rio de Janeiro, the research method used in the European Union was adapted and subsequently applied to a sample of 200 students from public and private universities within the state. The results indicate that the majority of respondents, though possessing little information on nuclear issues, would like to participate in the decision-making process for site selection of a low and intermediate level radioactive waste repository, if that repository was to be built close to their living area. The collected data also identifies the sources of information that are considered trustworthy by the surveyed sample. Although exploratory, this research provides guidelines for future work to be developed within the scope of the site selection for a radioactive waste repository in Brazil. (author)

  17. 2015 American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology (AACN) student affairs committee survey of neuropsychology trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside, Douglas M; Guidotti Breting, Leslie M; Butts, Alissa M; Hahn-Ketter, Amanda E; Osborn, Katie; Towns, Stephanie J; Barisa, Mark; Santos, Octavio A; Smith, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    Surveys of practicing neuropsychologists have been conducted for years; however, there have been no comprehensive surveys of neuropsychology trainees, which may result in important issues being overlooked by the profession. This survey assessed trainees' experiences in areas such as student debt, professional development, and training satisfaction. Survey items were written by a task force of the AACN Student Affairs Committee (SAC), and neuropsychology trainees were recruited via neuropsychology-focused listservs. In total, 344 trainees completed the survey (75% female) and included participants from every region of the US and Canada. Based on the survey questions, nearly half of all trainees (47%) indicated financial factors were the greatest limitation in their training. Student debt had a bimodal distribution; 32.7% had minimal debt, but 45% had debt >$100,000. In contrast, expected starting salaries were modest, but consistent with findings ($80-100,000). While almost all trainees intended to pursue board certification (97% through ABPP), many were 'not at all' or only 'somewhat' familiar with the process. Results indicated additional critical concerns beyond those related to debt and lack of familiarity with board certification procedures. The results will inform SAC conference programming and the profession on the current 'state of the trainees' in neuropsychology.

  18. Factors affecting UK medical students' decision to train in urology: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, Nithish; Ahmed, Kamran; Challacombe, Ben

    2016-10-01

    Our aim was to understand the specific factors which influence medical students' choice to train in urology, in order to attract the best and the brightest into the specialty during a challenging time for surgical training in the United Kingdom A cross-sectional web-based survey was generated to evaluate: 1) perceptions of urology; 2) attitudes about urology as a career; 3) exposure to urology at medical school; and 4) proficiency in common urological procedures. The survey was sent to all 33 medical schools in the UK and advertised to all medical students. The survey received 488 responses were received from 14 medical schools; 59.8% of respondents did not consider a career in urology. Factors affecting a career choice in urology included: 1) year of study; 2) male gender; 3) favorable perceptions of urology; 4) favorable attitudes about urology as a career; 5) more hours of urology teaching in preclinical years; 6) attendance at urology theatre sessions; 7) confidence in performing urological procedures; and 8) more attempts at male catheterization. The commonest reason for not considering urology was inadequate exposure to urology. Students in Year 3 were more likely to consider urology than final-year students, due to multifactorial reasons. Year of study is a novel factor affecting students' consideration of urology as a career. This paper clearly shows that early and sustained exposure to urology positively correlated with considering a career in urology. Urologists must be more active in promoting the specialty to medical students.

  19. Survey Development to Assess College Students' Perceptions of the Campus Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowers, Morgan F; Colby, Sarah; Greene, Geoffrey W; Pickett, Mackenzie; Franzen-Castle, Lisa; Olfert, Melissa D; Shelnutt, Karla; Brown, Onikia; Horacek, Tanya M; Kidd, Tandalayo; Kattelmann, Kendra K; White, Adrienne A; Zhou, Wenjun; Riggsbee, Kristin; Yan, Wangcheng; Byrd-Bredbenner, Carol

    2017-11-01

    We developed and tested a College Environmental Perceptions Survey (CEPS) to assess college students' perceptions of the healthfulness of their campus. CEPS was developed in 3 stages: questionnaire development, validity testing, and reliability testing. Questionnaire development was based on an extensive literature review and input from an expert panel to establish content validity. Face validity was established with the target population using cognitive interviews with 100 college students. Concurrent-criterion validity was established with in-depth interviews (N = 30) of college students compared to surveys completed by the same 30 students. Surveys completed by college students from 8 universities (N = 1147) were used to test internal structure (factor analysis) and internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha). After development and testing, 15 items remained from the original 48 items. A 5-factor solution emerged: physical activity (4 items, α = .635), water (3 items, α = .773), vending (2 items, α = .680), healthy food (2 items, α = .631), and policy (2 items, α = .573). The mean total score for all universities was 62.71 (±11.16) on a 100-point scale. CEPS appears to be a valid and reliable tool for assessing college students' perceptions of their health-related campus environment.

  20. [A retrospective survey of childhood corporal punishment by school teachers in students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing-qi; Wu, Chun-mei; Dunne, Michael P; Ma, Yu-xia; Chen, Bo; Liang, Yi-huai; Cheng, Ya-jie

    2006-01-01

    To ascertain the prevalence of childhood corporal punishment by teachers in students, to explore the influencing factors and associations between childhood corporal punishment and psychological problems. Five hundred and twenty-eight students from a college and a technical secondary school in Hebei province were surveyed by self-administered questionnaire anonymously in Dec. 2004. The questionnaire used for this survey mainly included (1) general demographic information; (2) 5 forms of childhood corporal punishments, in this study, cases of teachers' corporal punishments were defined as those who answered positively one or more of the 5 questions relating to childhood corporal punishment by school teachers occurring before the age of 16 years; (3) Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90); (4) Youth Risk Behaviours. Overall, 57.6% of students reported having been corporally punished at least one time, one of four forms of corporal punishment by teachers before age of 16 years, the four forms corporal punishment were non-contact corporal punishment, e.g., running for punishment, repeat-doing homework many times for punishment, standing for punishment, kneel down for punishment, not allowing to eat, sending outside in winter, etc. (53.4%), hitting/kicking/pushing very hard with open hands/fist/feet/other part of body (16.1%), beating with an object (10.2%), and locking in a small compartment/tying with rope (0.2%). No students reported having been choked, or burned/scalded, or stabbed with a sharp object by the teachers. Males had a significantly higher overall prevalence rate than females (66.4% vs. 46.6%, chi(2) = 21.01, P = 0.000). There was no statistically significant association between a history of childhood corporal punishment and the three other demographic indicators, which included residence region (rural and non-rural area) prior to 16 years of age, parental education level, and whether the respondent lived in a single or multiple children family. Compared with their

  1. Sport Education as a Curriculum Approach to Student Learning of Invasion Games: Effects on Game Performance and Game Involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farias, Cláudio; Valério, Carla; Mesquita, Isabel

    2018-03-01

    The teaching and learning of games and sport-based activities has historically been the dominant form of the physical education curricula. With an interest in providing to students meaningful and culturally situated sporting experiences, Sport Education is probably the most implemented and researched pedagogical model worldwide. However, although there is considerable evidence that the model as a curriculum approach can benefit the development of social goals and healthy sport behaviors, not a single study as to date examined students' game-play development beyond participation in single and isolated teaching units. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine students' development of Game Performance and Game Involvement during participation in three consecutive Sport Education seasons of invasion games. The participants were an experienced physical education teacher and one seventh-grade class totaling 26 students (10 girls and 16 boys). Using the Game Performance Assessment Instrument (Oslin et al., 1998), pre-test to post-tests measures of students' Game Performance and Game Involvement were collected during their participation in basketball (20 lessons), handball (16 lessons), and football (18 lessons) units. Inter-group differences and pre-test to post-test improvements within each season were analyzed through 2 (time) x group (sport) repeated measures ANOVA tests. There were found significant pre-test to post-test improvements in Game Performance and Game Involvement in the second (handball) and third (football) seasons, but not in the first season (basketball). Students' Game Performance and Involvement scores of handball and football were significantly higher than their scores while playing basketball. The opportunity for an extended engagement in game-play activities and prolonged membership of students in the same teams throughout three consecutive seasons of Sport Education were key to the outcomes found. The specific configurations of the game

  2. First year nursing students use of social media within education: Results of a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Ann M; Devis, Kate; LeMoine, Gayle; Crouch, Sarah; South, Nicole; Hossain, Rosa

    2018-02-01

    Social media rapidly disseminates information but is a controversial learning platform in nurse education. This study aimed to explore how students viewed the use of Twitter, and other social media, in their first year of a nursing degree. The aim of this study was to evaluate first year student nurses' use of social media, before and after commencing a pre-registration programme, where Twitter was used in a module. A cross-sectional approach using a descriptive survey was completed. An online survey, that included Likert scale and open questions, was open for one month in 2016. All students on Nursing Undergraduate Degrees, in Adult, Child and Mental Health, who were in the first year of their programme were eligible to participate. 121 students took part with a response rate of 32%. Most students were positive about using social media as they found it an engaging way to promote discussion and share information. Students use of Twitter changed in the first year with 19.8% using it once or more per week on commencement of the programme which increased to 45.5%; other social media platforms remained static. Most students (57.8%) understood the purpose of using Twitter although 14% reported that it was not used within their module; thus, not all students gained experience of using the social media. 81% of students said that using Twitter had been beneficial to increase awareness of nursing issues within their course. However, there were areas that students found difficult such as time, and not knowing what to say. The study suggests that teaching about social media, and incorporating it into learning activities, may be beneficial for students. However, more research into the subject using an experimental design to assess changes over time would be useful. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Established and outsider relations among students involved in a health promotion intervention in a Danish high school

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Stine Frydendal; Ottesen, Laila; Thing, Lone Friis

    2016-01-01

    The paper considers a study in a Danish high school in which students were involved in enhancing physical activity in their own school. International research points out that adolescents are not as physically active as recommended. Moreover, studies show that maintaining health promotion interven......The paper considers a study in a Danish high school in which students were involved in enhancing physical activity in their own school. International research points out that adolescents are not as physically active as recommended. Moreover, studies show that maintaining health promotion...... and the importance of theoretical pointers to insure that the researcher does not lose herself in the research field. Elias unfolds this methodological approach in “The Established and the Outsiders.” By applying this conceptualization, this study shows that some of the involved students found their role...... and their identity as “sports-students” difficult, and it compromised their social life in the school, which relates to aspects that does not always correspond with the current health norms. The paper discusses the relations between the involved students and the other students in the school, and what consequences...

  4. Comparison of Responses on the 1994 Biennial Student Survey by the Consumer and Hospitality Services Division and Overall Students of the Milwaukee Area Technical College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Advincula-Carpenter, Marietta M.

    To gather curriculum planning information, the Research, Planning and Development Division of Milwaukee Area Technical College (MATC) conducts student surveys biennially. Responses of 579 MATC students enrolled in consumer and hospitality services division (CHSD) programs to the 1994 survey were compared with those of the 5,071 students…

  5. Student beliefs and learning environments: Developing a survey of factors related to conceptual change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanrahan, Mary

    1994-12-01

    This paper presents a model for the type of classroom environment believed to facilitate scientific conceptual change. A survey based on this model contains items about students' motivational beliefs, their study approach and their perceptions of their teacher's actions and learning goal orientation. Results obtained from factor analyses, correlations and analyses of variance, based on responses from 113 students, suggest that an empowering interpersonal teacher-student relationship is related to a deep approach to learning, a positive attitude to science, and positive self-efficacy beliefs, and may be increased by a constructivist approach to teaching.

  6. Erasmus Students' Involvement in Quality Enhancement of Erasmus+ Mobility through Digital Ethnography and ErasmusShouts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemencic, Manja; Žnidaršic, Martin; Vavpetic, Anže; Martinc, Matej

    2017-01-01

    Erasmus+ is one of the European Union's flagship programs which supports short-term international student mobility within Europe as one of its primary purposes. Erasmus students are uniquely well placed to compare educational processes of their home and host institutions, the learning environments and student life conditions. They are so far…

  7. Home Environment as Strong Determinant in Academic Involvement of Female Students in Dhekia Gram Panchayat of Saltora C.D. Block, Bankura District

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayanika Sarkar

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Education is a learnt behaviour, which shapes and moulds the nature of a human being by transforming him/her into a human resource and helps in social progress. Children start learning in the lap of their parents. They are bought up by accumulating the knowledge gained from the interaction with the family members. This interaction varies from one family to another. Even when they start going to an institution for the formal education, home environment leaves an influence on his/her attitude towards education. In addition to institutional influence, proper understanding of the impact of home environment is essential for taking due care in development of human resource. Backwardness of the female students in different hierarchies of the educational sector is a major concern in India as well as in West Bengal since a very long period. In spite of ample efforts to increase the rate of enrolment and to develop the quality of education in both national and state level, the progress in terms of actual involvement in educational activities is not up to the mark in many cases. In the light of this background, a grass-root level study has been conducted to understand the role of home environment on determining the academic involvement of the female students belonging to different hierarchies of tribe-caste continuum in a rural context of Bankura District, West Bengal. It aims to identify the major components of home environment, which determine the level of cohort specific academic involvement in the type of families from different social background. In order to retrieve various perspectives on their home environment, we surveyed female students reading in VIII —XII and belonging to the age group 13 to 18 years. From the micro level analysis, it has been found that caste and tribal identity based disparity as well as family type wise differences in level of academic involvement (LAI is profound in the study area. Home environment is having a significant

  8. A systematic review of the evidence on service user involvement in interpersonal skills training of mental health students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, J; Watkins, M; Gilbert, A; Rawlinson, J

    2013-08-01

    Service user involvement has become a common feature of education programmes for mental health students. However, little is known about the effects of this type of education on the interpersonal skills of students taking part. This paper reports findings from a systematic review that formed part of a wider investigation into service user involvement in teaching interpersonal skills. The review aimed to locate and assess the quality of the published evidence relating to the effects of service user involvement on mental health students interpersonal skills and to synthesize results, using a definition of interpersonal skill that includes attitudes, empathy and skills as its key components. Results from this study indicate that the quality of evidence in this area is poor. However, sufficient synthesis of the evidence base was possible to allow conclusions and recommendations for both research and practice. Conclusions were that the involvement of service users in this area is both acceptable and valuable for students and had specific impacts on attitudes, empathy and skills. Some difficulties and reservations about the style of involvement are discussed. Recommendations for the conduct of future research are also made. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. The relation between perceived parental involvement and academic achievement: the roles of Taiwanese students' academic beliefs and filial piety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Wen; Ho, Hsiu-Zu

    2012-01-01

    The excellent academic performance among East-Asian students has drawn international attention from educators and psychologists. However, the process that underlies student academic achievement for this particular group has rarely been documented. The present study examines how the relation between perceived parental involvement and Taiwanese students' academic achievement is mediated by student academic beliefs (i.e., beliefs about effort, academic self-concept, and perceived control). The study further explores whether this mediating effect varies with types of filial piety. Participants were 468 first-year students from colleges and universities in Taiwan. Multiple-group mediating models were analyzed using structural equation modeling (SEM). Results indicated that, for the Taiwanese sample, students' academic beliefs mediated the relation between perceived parental involvement and academic achievement. Furthermore, the mediational effect was significant for the reciprocal filial type, but not for the authoritarian filial type. The importance of the quality of the parent-child relationship and the internalization process related to children's assumptions of their parents' educational values indicate the need for a contextual view when examining predictors of student academic achievement.

  10. Utilization of information technology in medical education: a questionnaire survey of students in a Malaysian institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurjahan, M I; Lim, T A; Yeong, S W; Foong, A L S; Ware, J

    2002-12-01

    The objective of this survey was to obtain a self-reported assessment of the use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) by medical students at the International Medical University, Malaysia. Students' perceived skills and extent of usage of ICT were evaluated using a questionnaire. Chi-square analysis were performed to ascertain the association between variables. Further statistical testing using Chi-square test for trend was done when one of the variables was ordered, and Spearman rank correlation when both variables were ordered. Overall, (98%) of students responded to the questionnaire. Twenty seven students (5.7%) did not use a computer either in the university or at home. Most students surveyed reported adequate skills at word processing (55%), e-mailing (78%) and surfing the internet (67%). The results suggests that in order to increase the level of computer literacy among medical students, positive steps would need to be taken, for example the formal inclusion of ICT instruction in the teaching of undergraduate medicine. This will enhance medical students' ability to acquire, appraise, and use information in order to solve clinical and other problems quickly and efficiently in the course of their studies, and more importantly when they graduate.

  11. French validation of the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Student Survey (MBI-SS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faye-Dumanget, Christine; Carré, Julie; Le Borgne, Margaux; Boudoukha, Pr Abdel Halim

    2017-12-01

    Several international studies have been conducted on student burnout. To contribute to the clinical examination as well as research on the mental health of students, the MBI-SS (Maslach Burnout Inventory-Student Survey) has been validated and used in different countries but not in French. The aim of this study is to examine the validity of the 3-dimensional model of the French version of the MBI-SS, which is characterized by emotional "Emotional Exhaustion" (EE); "Cynicism" (CY); and low scores in "Academic Efficacy" (AE). A total of 667 university students were questioned to study the 3-dimensional structure of the French translation of the MBI-SS. The results validate the 3-dimensional structure of the MBI-SS and indicate satisfactory psychometric values. It is concluded that the MBI-SS can be used to assess burnout in French students. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Financial attitudes, knowledge, and habits of chiropractic students: A descriptive survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorence, Julie; Lawrence, Dana J.; Salsbury, Stacie A.; Goertz, Christine M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Our purpose was to describe the financial knowledge, habits and attitudes of chiropractic students. Methods: We designed a cross-sectional survey to measure basic financial knowledge, current financial habits, risk tolerance, and beliefs about future income among 250 students enrolled in business courses at one US chiropractic college. Descriptive statistical analyses were performed. Results: We received 57 questionnaires (23% response rate). Most respondents would accumulate over $125,000 in student loan debt by graduation. Financial knowledge was low (mean 77%). Most respondents (72%) scored as average financial risk takers. Chiropractic students reported recommended short-term habits such as having checking accounts (90%) and health insurance (63%) or paying monthly bills (88%) and credit cards (60%). Few saved money for unplanned expenses (39%) or long-term goals (26%), kept written budgets (32%), or had retirement accounts (19%). Conclusion: These chiropractic students demonstrated inadequate financial literacy and did not engage in many recommended financial habits. PMID:24587498

  13. International medical students – a survey of perceived challenges and established support services at medical faculties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huhn, D.

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Medical students with a non-German background face several challenges during their studies. Besides support given by foreign student offices further specific projects for international students have been developed and are offered by medical faculties. However, so far, neither a systematic survey of the faculties’ perceived problems nor of the offered support exists.Method: All study deaneries of medical faculties in Germany were contacted between April and October 2013 and asked for their participation in a telephone interview. Interview partners were asked about 1. The percentage of non-German students at the medical faculty; 2. The perceived difficulties and problems of foreign students; 3. The offers for non-German students; and 4. The specification of further possibilities of support. Given information was noted, frequencies counted and results interpreted via frequency analysis.Results: Only 39% of the medical faculties could give detailed information about the percentage of non-German students. They reported an average share of 3.9% of students with an EU migration background and 4.9% with a non-EU background. Most frequently cited offers are student conducted tutorials, language courses and tandem-programs. The most frequently reported problem by far is the perceived lack of language skills of foreign students at the beginning of their studies. Suggested solutions are mainly the development of tutorials and the improvement of German medical terminology.Discussion: Offers of support provided by medical faculties for foreign students vary greatly in type and extent. Support offered is seen to be insufficient in coping with the needs of the international students in many cases. Hence, a better coverage of international students as well as further research efforts to the specific needs and the effectiveness of applied interventions seem to be essential.

  14. International medical students – a survey of perceived challenges and established support services at medical faculties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huhn, D.; Junne, F.; Zipfel, S.; Duelli, R.; Resch, F.; Herzog, W.; Nikendei, C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Medical students with a non-German background face several challenges during their studies. Besides support given by foreign student offices further specific projects for international students have been developed and are offered by medical faculties. However, so far, neither a systematic survey of the faculties’ perceived problems nor of the offered support exists. Method: All study deaneries of medical faculties in Germany were contacted between April and October 2013 and asked for their participation in a telephone interview. Interview partners were asked about 1.) The percentage of non-German students at the medical faculty; 2.) The perceived difficulties and problems of foreign students; 3.) The offers for non-German students; and 4.) The specification of further possibilities of support. Given information was noted, frequencies counted and results interpreted via frequency analysis. Results: Only 39% of the medical faculties could give detailed information about the percentage of non-German students. They reported an average share of 3.9% of students with an EU migration background and 4.9% with a non-EU background. Most frequently cited offers are student conducted tutorials, language courses and tandem-programs. The most frequently reported problem by far is the perceived lack of language skills of foreign students at the beginning of their studies. Suggested solutions are mainly the development of tutorials and the improvement of German medical terminology. Discussion: Offers of support provided by medical faculties for foreign students vary greatly in type and extent. Support offered is seen to be insufficient in coping with the needs of the international students in many cases. Hence, a better coverage of international students as well as further research efforts to the specific needs and the effectiveness of applied interventions seem to be essential. PMID:25699112

  15. International medical students--a survey of perceived challenges and established support services at medical faculties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huhn, D; Junne, F; Zipfel, S; Duelli, R; Resch, F; Herzog, W; Nikendei, C

    2015-01-01

    Medical students with a non-German background face several challenges during their studies. Besides support given by foreign student offices further specific projects for international students have been developed and are offered by medical faculties. However, so far, neither a systematic survey of the faculties' perceived problems nor of the offered support exists. All study deaneries of medical faculties in Germany were contacted between April and October 2013 and asked for their participation in a telephone interview. Interview partners were asked about 1.) The percentage of non-German students at the medical faculty; 2.) The perceived difficulties and problems of foreign students; 3.) The offers for non-German students; and 4.) The specification of further possibilities of support. Given information was noted, frequencies counted and results interpreted via frequency analysis. Only 39% of the medical faculties could give detailed information about the percentage of non-German students. They reported an average share of 3.9% of students with an EU migration background and 4.9% with a non-EU background. Most frequently cited offers are student conducted tutorials, language courses and tandem-programs. The most frequently reported problem by far is the perceived lack of language skills of foreign students at the beginning of their studies. Suggested solutions are mainly the development of tutorials and the improvement of German medical terminology. Offers of support provided by medical faculties for foreign students vary greatly in type and extent. Support offered is seen to be insufficient in coping with the needs of the international students in many cases. Hence, a better coverage of international students as well as further research efforts to the specific needs and the effectiveness of applied interventions seem to be essential.

  16. Turking Statistics: Student-Generated Surveys Increase Student Engagement and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitley, Cameron T.; Dietz, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    Thirty years ago, Hubert M. Blalock Jr. published an article in "Teaching Sociology" about the importance of teaching statistics. We honor Blalock's legacy by assessing how using Amazon Mechanical Turk (MTurk) in statistics classes can enhance student learning and increase statistical literacy among social science gradaute students. In…

  17. Counseling Instruction in the Online Classroom: A Survey of Student and Faculty Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicco, Gina

    2012-01-01

    This article will review the design, procedures, and results of a recent study conducted to survey the perceptions of counseling students and professionals regarding the delivery of counseling instruction in online courses. Few studies have addressed the appropriateness, effectiveness, and evaluation procedures of counseling skills instruction via…

  18. A Survey of School Psychologists' Practices for Identifying Mentally Retarded Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wodrich, David L.; Barry, Christine T.

    1991-01-01

    Surveyed school psychologists regarding identification of mentally retarded students. The Wechsler scales were the most frequently used tests for deriving intelligence quotient scores, which together with adaptive behavior scale scores were rated as most influential in identification-placement decisions. The Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales were…

  19. Students and recorded lectures: survey on current use and demands for higher education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorissen, Pierre; Van Bruggen, Jan; Jochems, Wim

    2012-01-01

    Gorissen, P., Van Bruggen, J., & Jochems, W. M. G. (2012). Students and recorded lectures: survey on current use and demands for higher education. Research In Learning Technology, 20(3). doi:10.3402/rlt.v20i0.17299

  20. Testing the Canon: Student Responses to Texts by Medieval Women in English Literature Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Ann R.

    While there has been a great deal of debate about enlarging the canon, less attention has been paid to how students respond to "new" literary figures such as Margery Kempe and Julian of Norwich, or to how instructors should incorporate them into an already cramped literature survey course. Instructors must consider some questions that…

  1. Psychometric Properties of the School Attitude Assessment Survey-Revised with International Baccalaureate High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedrick, Robert F.; Shaunessy-Dedrick, Elizabeth; Suldo, Shannon M.; Ferron, John M.

    2015-01-01

    In two studies (ns = 312 and 1,149) with 9- to 12-grade students in pre-International Baccalaureate (IB) and IB Diploma programs, we evaluated the reliability, factor structure, measurement invariance, and criterion-related validity of the scores from the School Attitude Assessment Survey-Revised (SAAS-R). Reliabilities of the five SAAS-R subscale…

  2. Support Services for Higher Degree Research Students: A Survey of Three Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Pujitha; Woodman, Karen; Taji, Acram; Travelyan, James; Samani, Shamim; Sharda, Hema; Narayanaswamy, Ramesh; Lucey, Anthony; Sahama, Tony; Yarlagadda, Prasad K. D. V.

    2016-01-01

    A survey was conducted across three Australian universities to identify the types and format of support services available for higher degree research (HDR, or MA and Ph.D.) students. The services were classified with regards to availability, location and accessibility. A comparative tool was developed to help institutions categorise their services…

  3. Medical Students' Experiences with Addicted Patients: A Web-Based Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midmer, Deana; Kahan, Meldon; Wilson, Lynn

    2008-01-01

    Project CREATE was an initiative to strengthen undergraduate medical education in addictions. As part of a needs assessment, forty-six medical students at Ontario's five medical schools completed a bi-weekly, interactive web-based survey about addiction-related learning events. In all, 704 unique events were recorded, for an average of 16.7…

  4. Engaging Students in Survey Research Projects across Research Methods and Statistics Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovekamp, William E.; Soboroff, Shane D.; Gillespie, Michael D.

    2017-01-01

    One innovative way to help students make sense of survey research has been to create a multifaceted, collaborative assignment that promotes critical thinking, comparative analysis, self-reflection, and statistical literacy. We use a short questionnaire adapted from the Higher Education Research Institute's Cooperative Institutional Research…

  5. A survey on education in cariology for undergraduate dental students in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulte, A.G.; Buchalla, W.; Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M.; Amaechi, B.T.; Sampaio, F.; Vougiouklakis, G.; Pitts, N.B.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the survey was to collect relevant information about education in cariology for dental undergraduate students in Europe. The ORCA/ADEE cariology curriculum group prepared a questionnaire that was mailed in 2009 to 179 European dental schools. One hundred and twenty-three dental schools

  6. Be My Guest: A Survey of Mass Communication Students' Perception of Guest Speakers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merle, Patrick F.; Craig, Clay

    2017-01-01

    The use of guest speakers as a pedagogical technique across disciplines at the college level is hardly novel. However, empirical assessment of journalism and mass communication students' perceptions of this practice has not previously been conducted. To fill this gap, this article presents results from an online survey specifically administered to…

  7. Exploring E-Learning Acceptance among University Students in Thailand: A National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Timothy; Ruangrit, Nammon; Khlaisang, Jintavee; Thammetar, Thapanee; Sunphakitjumnong, Kobkul

    2014-01-01

    This study surveys the e-learning acceptance of university students in Thailand. One thousand nine hundred and eighty-one (1,981) participants completed the E-Learning Acceptance Measure (Teo, 2010) which measures three constructs that predict e-learning acceptance (tutor quality, perceived usefulness, and facilitating conditions). Data analysis…

  8. A Survey on the Reading Habits among Colleges of Education Students in the Information Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatiloro, Oluwayemisi Florence; Adesola, Oyekola Adebimpe; Hameed, Bilkis Alaba; Adewumi, Oseni Muinat

    2017-01-01

    Reading is the gateway to success in education. It is the heartbeat of all courses offered in institutions. It is therefore crucial to investigate Colleges of Education students reading habits and how to improve the skill. The study was a descriptive survey with a validated questionnaire on "Reading Habits among Colleges of Education students…

  9. Hit by a Perfect Storm? Art & Design in the National Student Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorke, Mantz; Orr, Susan; Blair, Bernadette

    2014-01-01

    There has long been the suspicion amongst staff in Art & Design that the ratings given to their subject disciplines in the UK's National Student Survey are adversely affected by a combination of circumstances--a "perfect storm". The "perfect storm" proposition is tested by comparing ratings for Art & Design with those…

  10. The Use of Online Social Networks by Polish Former Erasmus Students: A Large-Scale Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryla, Pawel

    2014-01-01

    There is an increasing role of online social networks in the life of young Poles. We conducted a large-scale survey among Polish former Erasmus students. We have received 2450 completed questionnaires from alumni of 115 higher education institutions all over Poland. 85.4% of our respondents reported they kept in touch with their former Erasmus…

  11. Counselor Educators and Students with Problems of Professional Competence: A Survey and Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown-Rice, Kathleen; Furr, Susan

    2016-01-01

    A total of 370 counselor educators in CACREP-accredited [Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs] programs were surveyed to determine their knowledge of master's students' problems of professional competence (PPC) and their perception of roadblocks that affect gatekeeping practices. Findings suggest that educators…

  12. Irregular bedtime and nocturnal cellular phone usage as risk factors for being involved in bullying: a cross-sectional survey of Japanese adolescents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamoru Tochigi

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: A number of studies have tried to identify risk factors for being involved in bullying in order to help developing preventive measures; however, to our knowledge, no study has investigated the effect of nocturnal lifestyle behavior such as sleep pattern or cellular phone usage. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the relationship between school bullying and sleep pattern or nocturnal cellular phone usage in adolescents. The effect of school size on school bullying was also examined. METHODS: Data from the cross-sectional survey of psychopathologies conducted for 19,436 Japanese students from 45 public junior high schools (7(th-9(th grade and 28 senior high schools (10(th-12(th grade were analyzed. RESULTS: Bullying status was significantly associated with irregular bedtime (OR = 1.23 and 1.41 for pure bullies and bully-victims, respectively and e-mail exchange or calling after lights-out (OR = 1.53 and 1.31 for pure bullies and bully-victims, respectively after controlling domestic violence and substance usage. In addition, school size was significantly associated with the increased risk of bullying in junior high school students (OR = 1.13 for bully-victims. CONCLUSIONS: The present results suggested that sleep pattern and nocturnal cellular phone usage might be risk factors for being involved in school bullying in adolescents. Although further accumulation of data is needed, progressive trend towards nocturnal lifestyle and increasing usage of cellular phone might impair the well-being of adolescents. School-based interventions for lifestyle including sleep pattern and cellular phone usage may be encouraged to reduce school bullying.

  13. A survey of interventional radiology awareness among final-year medical students in a European country.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Leong, Sum

    2009-07-01

    Interventional radiology (IR) is a rapidly expanding specialty that is facing the challenges of turf wars and personnel shortages. Appropriate exposure of medical students to this field can be vital to recruitment of potential future trainees or referring physicians. The aim of this study was to determine the knowledge and views of final-year medical students in a single EU country regarding various aspects of IR. An electronic survey was sent via e-mail to all final-year medical students in a European country. The students were given a month to respond to the questionnaire. A total of 234 students of 675 (34.5%) replied to the survey. Of the respondents, 35% had previously completed an attachment to the radiology department. The majority of students (63%) thought their knowledge in radiology in general was poor. The percentage of students who correctly identified procedures performed by interventional radiologists was 69% for Hickman line insertion, 79% for fibroid embolization, and 67.5% for lower limb angioplasty. Sixty percent, 30%, and 47% thought that interventional radiologists perform cardiac angioplasties, perform arterial bypasses, and create AV fistulas, respectively. Forty-nine percent felt that interventional radiologists are surgically trained. Eighty-three percent of students were first made aware of angioplasty by a cardiologist. Thirty-one percent thought that interventional radiologists do ward rounds, 24% thought that interventional radiologists have admitting rights, and 26% felt that interventional radiologists run an outpatient practice. A significant number of students (76%) thought that the job prospects in IR are good or excellent but only 40.5% were willing to consider a career in IR. In conclusion, this study indicates that IR remains a nascent but attractive specialty to the majority of medical students. Further development of the existing informal undergraduate curriculum to address shortcomings will ensure that IR continues to attract

  14. Swine Flu: Knowledge, Attitude, and Practices Survey of Medical and Dental Students of Karachi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Fariha; Khan, Mohammad O; Ali, Mukarram

    2018-01-09

    Introduction Pakistan is extremely susceptible to an influenza outbreak, as it shares borders with the most affected countries, namely China and India. The medical and dental students come into direct contact with the affected population and should be aware of the risk factors and signs and symptoms pertaining to swine influenza virus (SIV). Hence, this survey was conducted to assess the knowledge, perceptions and self-care practices of the medical and dental students with regards to this pandemic. Methods A descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted to evaluate the swine flu-related knowledge, attitudes and practices of the medical and dental students at various institutions in Karachi, Pakistan. We approached 613 students that were available on the dates of this survey, keeping a medical to dental student ratio of 75:25. All students from first to final year comprised of the study population, and no internists or medical personnel were included. The questionnaire was divided into three sections, namely knowledge, attitudes and, practices. All questions were based on a multiple choice format. The data were entered and interpreted using the IBM Statistical Package for the Social Sciences 23.0 (IBM Corp., Armonk, New York). Results The majority of the students were aware that the swine flu is a transmittable disease (n=485, 80.8%). Most students identified the signs and symptoms correctly; however, diarrhea (15.5%) and vomiting (32.2%) were the least correct answers (n=93, n=193 respectively). Most of the preventative measures were reported accurately by the participants. Despite this, only 15.5% students (n=93) reported the use of a facemask when suffering from fever, cough and a runny nose. Conclusion There is a dire need for the routine integration of the awareness and management programs in the medical and dental schools. There exists a gap between the policy and practice, and it is high time we bridge the divide. The students should also be vaccinated

  15. A Survey of Interventional Radiology Awareness Among Final-Year Medical Students in a European Country

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leong, Sum; Keeling, Aoife N.; Lee, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Interventional radiology (IR) is a rapidly expanding specialty that is facing the challenges of turf wars and personnel shortages. Appropriate exposure of medical students to this field can be vital to recruitment of potential future trainees or referring physicians. The aim of this study was to determine the knowledge and views of final-year medical students in a single EU country regarding various aspects of IR. An electronic survey was sent via e-mail to all final-year medical students in a European country. The students were given a month to respond to the questionnaire. A total of 234 students of 675 (34.5%) replied to the survey. Of the respondents, 35% had previously completed an attachment to the radiology department. The majority of students (63%) thought their knowledge in radiology in general was poor. The percentage of students who correctly identified procedures performed by interventional radiologists was 69% for Hickman line insertion, 79% for fibroid embolization, and 67.5% for lower limb angioplasty. Sixty percent, 30%, and 47% thought that interventional radiologists perform cardiac angioplasties, perform arterial bypasses, and create AV fistulas, respectively. Forty-nine percent felt that interventional radiologists are surgically trained. Eighty-three percent of students were first made aware of angioplasty by a cardiologist. Thirty-one percent thought that interventional radiologists do ward rounds, 24% thought that interventional radiologists have admitting rights, and 26% felt that interventional radiologists run an outpatient practice. A significant number of students (76%) thought that the job prospects in IR are good or excellent but only 40.5% were willing to consider a career in IR. In conclusion, this study indicates that IR remains a nascent but attractive specialty to the majority of medical students. Further development of the existing informal undergraduate curriculum to address shortcomings will ensure that IR continues to attract

  16. [Survey regarding mental health conditions of high school students and attitudes of students and their teachers toward students' mental health issues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Isao; Fujii, Chiyo; Fukuzawa, Ayako

    2013-01-01

    We administered a self-reporting questionnaire survey regarding the mental health conditions of high school students and attitudes of students and their teachers toward students' mental health issues. In addition, we discussed the requirements for high school students' mental health support system. The subjects were 3,312 students and 208 teachers in four Shizuoka prefectural public high schools in 2009. University Personality Inventory (UPI) is usually conducted to assess university students' mental state and is a questionnaire that high school students can answer easily. Therefore, we adopted UPI for this survey. UPI was composed of 56 unhealthy and 4 healthy condition items. High school students completed the UPI and determined the sum of unhealthy condition items; a higher score indicated a poorer mental health status. The average UPI score of all students (n = 3,312) was 12.7 points, and that of females (n = 1,217)was 15.2 points, which was significantly higher than the 11.3 points of males (n = 2,095). Those with scores > or = 30 points (7.5%), which was more than half of the maximum score, were designated as the High Score (HS) group and considered to have poor mental health. Those with scores of > or = 40 (1.4%) seemed to have very poor mental health, and there was concern that they may be suffering from psychosis. Our observations indicated that HS students were likely to avoid seeking help regarding mental health issues, which was especially true for male HS students. The majority of students chose their friends and parents as advisers, but HS students were significantly more likely to choose advisers who were engaged in jobs related to medical work. Students in both the HS and non-HS groups who did not wish to consult anyone else about their mental conditions wanted to be approached by those around them. High school teachers hesitated to intervene with mentally disturbed students and attempted to resolve problems within the school. Thus, it appears

  17. Medical Students' Empathy for Vulnerable Groups: Results From a Survey and Reflective Writing Assignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellbery, Caroline; Saunders, Pamela A; Kureshi, Sarah; Visconti, Adam

    2017-12-01

    As medical education curricula increasingly acknowledge the contributions of the social determinants of health to individual health, new methods of engaging students in the care of vulnerable groups are needed. Empathy is one way to connect students with patients, but little is known about how to nurture students' empathy on behalf of populations. This study examined the relationship between individual and social empathy as groundwork for cultivating students' empathy for vulnerable groups. In 2014-2015, first-year medical students completed the Social Empathy Index at the start and end of a two-semester population health course, and they completed a reflective writing assignment exploring the challenges of caring for vulnerable patients. Pre- and posttest mean survey scores were compared, and reflective writing assignments were analyzed for themes concerning social empathy. Data from 130 students were analyzed. Scores for the contextual understanding of systemic barriers domain increased significantly. There was a trend toward increased cumulative social empathy scores that did not reach statistical significance. Students' essays revealed three themes relating to individual empathy as the foundation for social empathy; civic and moral obligations; and the role of institutional practices in caring for vulnerable groups. This study extends understanding of empathy beyond care for the individual to include care for vulnerable groups. Thus, social empathy may function as a valuable concept in developing curricula to support students' commitment to care for the underserved. Educators first need to address the many barriers students cited that impede both individual and social empathy.

  18. Students views of integrating web-based learning technology into the nursing curriculum - A descriptive survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Audrey; Timmins, Fiona

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes students' experiences of a Web-based innovation at one university. This paper reports on the first phase of this development where two Web-based modules were developed. Using a survey approach (n=44) students' access to and use of computer technology were explored. Findings revealed that students' prior use of computers and Internet technologies was higher than previously reported, although use of databases was low. Skills in this area increased during the programme, with a significant rise in database, email, search engine and word processing use. Many specific computer skills were learned during the programme, with high numbers reporting ability to deal adequately with files and folders. Overall, the experience was a positive one for students. While a sense of student isolation was not reported, as many students kept in touch by phone and class attendance continued, some individual students did appear to isolate themselves. This teaching methodology has much to offer in the provision of convenient easy to access programmes that can be easily adapted to the individual lifestyle. However, student support mechanisms need careful consideration for students who are at risk of becoming isolated. Staff also need to supported in the provision of this methodology and face-to-face contact with teachers for some part of the programme is preferable.

  19. The Contributions of Student Organization Involvement to Students' Self-Assessments of Their Leadership Traits and Relational Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lois J.; Chenoweth, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Many business schools designate leadership as a learning outcome for their undergraduates, but the question of how to teach leadership is challenging. Results of this study showed that students who were engaged in extracurricular student organizations rated themselves higher on both leadership traits and behaviors than those who were not involved…

  20. Parental involvement and kangaroo care in European neonatal intensive care units: a policy survey in eight countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallás-Alonso, Carmen R; Losacco, Valentina; Maraschini, Alice; Greisen, Gorm; Pierrat, Veronique; Warren, Inga; Haumont, Dominique; Westrup, Björn; Smit, Bert J; Sizun, Jacques; Cuttini, Marina

    2012-09-01

    To compare, in a large representative sample of European neonatal intensive care units, the policies and practices regarding parental involvement and holding babies in the kangaroo care position as well as differences in the tasks mothers and fathers are allowed to carry out. Prospective multicenter survey. Neonatal intensive care units in eight European countries (Belgium, Denmark, France, Italy, The Netherlands, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom). Patients were not involved in this study. None. A structured questionnaire was mailed to 362 units (response rate 78%); only units with ≥50 very-low-birth-weight annual admissions were considered for this study. Facilities for parents such as reclining chairs near the babies' cots, beds, and a dedicated room were common, but less so in Italy and Spain. All units in Sweden, Denmark, the United Kingdom, and Belgium reported encouraging parental participation in the care of the babies, whereas policies were more restrictive in Italy (80% of units), France (73%), and Spain (41%). Holding babies in the kangaroo care position was widespread. However, in the United Kingdom, France, Italy, and Spain, many units applied restrictions regarding its frequency (sometimes or on parents request only, rather than routinely), method (conventional rather than skin-to-skin), and clinical conditions (especially mechanical ventilation and presence of umbilical lines) that would prevent its practice. In these countries, fathers were routinely offered kangaroo care less frequently than mothers (p involvement as well as the role played by mothers and fathers varied within and between countries.

  1. Sex Survey about university students of UPF (from 20 to 27 years old

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Maté

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present survey was to assess the level of sexual knowledge, attitudes and practice of university students, adult young people from 20 to 27 years old and to identify if there was any significant difference in terms of age and sexual activity with other surveys. The survey was undertaken in which data were collected from 838 students who attended the third and four course of their graduate in Humanities. Differences between answers by sex were tested using Pearson’s χ2 test. The study established that behaviour, knowledge, attitudes and practice of the universitary students vary by sex in some regards. The fi rst sexual relationships is around they have 15,4 years old and no statistically significant difference was found between sex. The average of the starter interesting about sex is around 13,5 years old and a statistically signifi cant difference was found between sex, the average of boys is 12,7 years old and girls 13,7. People who were sexually active are satisfi ed and show is so important to their wellbeing. Majority use contraceptive methods in the last relationship and the same percentage use the condom in order to avoid sexually transmitted diseases. The study confirmed that there are 21% the students don’t use any method to avoid sexually transmitted diseases. Our conclusion is both, the knowledge and attitudes of students necessarily required appropriate sex education in the secondary school.

  2. Prevalence of tobacco use and perceptions of student health professionals about cessation training: results from Global Health Professions Students Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreeramareddy, Chandrashekhar T; Ramakrishnareddy, N; Rahman, Mahbubur; Mir, Imtiyaz Ali

    2018-05-26

    Health professionals play an important role in providing advice to their patients about tobacco prevention and cessation. Health professionals who use tobacco may be deterred from providing cessation advice and counselling to their patients. We aimed to provide prevalence estimates of tobacco use among student health professionals and describe their attitudes towards tobacco cessation training. Country-wise aggregate data from the Global Health Professions Student Survey on 'c urrent cigarette smoking' (smoking cigarettes on 1 or more days during the past 30 days), and ' curren t use of tobacco products other than cigarettes' (chewing tobacco, snuff, bidis, cigars or pipes, 1 or more days during the past 30 days) were analysed. For each WHO region, we estimated mean prevalence rates of tobacco use weighted by the population of the sampling frame and aggregate proportions for ' health professionals' role' and ' cessation training' indicators using ' metaprop ' command on Stata V.11. A total of 107 527 student health professionals participated in 236 surveys done in four health profession disciplines spanning 70 countries with response rates ranging from 40% to 100%. Overall, prevalence of smoking was highest in European countries (20% medical and 40% dental students) and the Americas (13% pharmacy to 23% dental students). Other tobacco use was higher in eastern Mediterranean (10%-23%) and European countries (7%-13%). In most WHO regions, ≥70% of the students agreed that health professionals are role models, and have a role in advising about smoking cessation to their patients and the public. Only ≤33% of all student health professionals in most WHO regions (except 80% dental students in the Eastern Mediterranean region) had received formal training on smoking cessation approaches and ≥80% of all students agreed that they should receive formal cessation training. Tobacco control should take place together with medical educators to discourage tobacco use among

  3. Survey on the knowledge of Laotian high school students on nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusa, Noritaka

    2017-01-01

    This study conducted a survey to gather information on the knowledge of Laotian high school students on nuclear energy. This study prepared an original 11-pages textbook that briefly introduced nuclear energy and related matters in Lao. One hundred high school students belonging to a public high school with a good reputation in Savannakhet Province were requested to read the textbook approximately in a half day to tell subjective impression on the amount of prior knowledge on the contents of each section. The survey revealed the knowledge of the high school students on the nuclear energy and related matters was quite limited although the official textbooks used in the secondary education in Laos contain quite a few explanations on structure of atom, chemical and nuclear reaction, structure of nuclear power plants, the chain and fusion reactions, and so on. (author)

  4. A Study of General Education Astronomy Students' Understandings of Cosmology. Part I. Development and Validation of Four Conceptual Cosmology Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Colin S.; Prather, Edward E.; Duncan, Douglas K.

    2011-01-01

    This is the first in a series of five articles describing a national study of general education astronomy students' conceptual and reasoning difficulties with cosmology. In this paper, we describe the process by which we designed four new surveys to assess general education astronomy students' conceptual cosmology knowledge. These surveys focused…

  5. Students' Motivations for Choosing (Or Not) to Study Portuguese: A Survey of Beginning-Level University Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, Blair E.; de Almeida Oliveira, Desirée

    2014-01-01

    Although previous literature has discussed ways of promoting the study of Portuguese, to our knowledge no study has ever directly surveyed students to ascertain why they chose to learn the language. This study reports on a survey of the motivations of first- and second-year Portuguese students to study the language, and contrasts their motivations…

  6. A Survey of Former Business Students (General Business, Management, Marketing, Real Estate). Summary Findings of Respondents District-Wide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glyer-Culver, Betty

    In fall 2002 staff of the Los Rios Community College District (LRCCD) Office of Institutional Research collaborated with occupational deans, academic deans, and faculty to develop and administer a survey of former business students. The survey was designed to determine how well courses had met the needs of former business students in the areas of…

  7. International study for an international career: a survey of the motivations and aspirations of international students in the UK

    OpenAIRE

    Packwood, Helen; Findlay, Allan; McCollum, David

    2015-01-01

    There are currently 435,000 international students studying in UK Universities. This paper investigates the forces driving student mobility and the relationship between student migration and future mobility plans. The research, based on a survey of over 3000 international students and interviews with senior staff in International Offices at ten UK Universities confirms the importance of understanding international student mobility as part of wider mobility trajectories.

  8. The Relationship between School Belonging, Sibling Aggression and Bullying Involvement: Implications for Students with and without Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Chad A.; Simpson, Cynthia G.; Ellis, Stephanie K.

    2016-01-01

    Bullying is grounded in the interactions between an individual and complex social-ecological systems. Therefore, bullying involvement is not just confined to the classroom or school. Recent research suggests that sibling aggression may be a predictor for peer-level aggression. These findings may be more relevant for students with disabilities…

  9. Taking on the Perspective of the Other: Understanding Parents' and Teachers' Perceptions of Parent Involvement in Students' Educational Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Rene M.

    2011-01-01

    Parent involvement is considered a vital educational factor that is associated with students' academic success. Engaging parents in the educational process is a challenge confronting many school districts across the United States. This is a significant problem for schools in low socioeconomic communities where lack of resources for parents and…

  10. Digital preservation of cultural and scientific heritage: involving university students to raise awareness of its importance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Redweik

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Cultural heritage is a relevant issue in contemporary society. While its preservation is a challenge, its dissemination, can contribute for an economic balance between costs and benefits.  Scientific  heritage  can  be  considered  as  a  special domain  of  cultural  heritage, not yet sought  by  the  mass  tourism, but worth being preserved as the roots of today’s knowledge.  Considering  that  university  students  of  engineering  and computer  science traditionally  do  not  address cultural or scientific heritage issues in their syllabus, and that they constitute a layer of young citizens that will come to be influential  in  the  future  of  society,  an  effort  was  undertaken  to  focus  on  this  theme  in  disciplines  of  different  courses, allying  the  learning  of  technical  skills  with  the  natural  interest  of  younger  people  for  3D  and  animation  for  the  profit  of heritage. The goal was to raise the awareness of this particular group to the importance of maintaining heritage issues, in particular,  in  a  virtual  way,  both  for  documentation  and  for  divulgating  their  existence.  Raising  funds  for  buildings’ restoration, attracting the public to visit buildings and collections that are outside the usual tourism routes, contributing to revenue  generation,  or  allowing  virtual  visits  of  not  accessible  issues,  complementing  physical  visits  on  site,  were  the general  aims of  the  proposed  projects.  A survey was undertaken under the participating students to evaluate how the projects influenced their attitude towards heritage. The obtained feedback was very positive: 76% agreed that the project alerted them for the importance of preserving historical and cultural heritage, while 72% considered it was interesting that the topic of digital cultural heritage was used for the assessments of

  11. Evaluation of the medical student research programme in Norwegian medical schools. A survey of students and supervisors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tømmerås Karin

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Medical Student Research Programme is a national education and grant scheme for medical students who wish to carry out research in parallel with their studies. The purpose of the programme is to increase recruitment of people with a standard medical degree to medical research. The Research Programme was established in 2002 and underwent a thorough evaluation during the spring of 2007. The evaluation should investigate if the programme had fulfilled its objectives of increased recruitment to medical research, in addition to the students' and supervisors' satisfaction of the programme, and unwanted differences between the universities. Methods Data was collected from students, supervisors and administrative staff via web-based questionnaires. Information about admission, implementation, results achieved and satisfaction was analysed and compared between the four Norwegian medical schools. In addition, the position of the scheme in relation to the national Quality Reform of Higher Education was analysed. Results At the end of 2006, the Medical Student Research Programme had recruited 265 medical students to research. These consisted of 214 active students, 35 who had completed their studies and only 17 who had dropped out. Both students and supervisors were generally very satisfied with the scheme, including the curriculum, the results achieved and the administrative service. The majority of students wanted to continue their research towards a PhD and, of those who had completed the Medical Student Research Programme, practically all had published one or several scientific papers. The survey showed only small differences between the four medical schools, despite their choice of somewhat different solutions in terms of administration and organisation. The Medical Student Research Programme satisfies the majority of the demands of the Quality Reform, however as an integrated research programme aimed at a PhD it presupposes

  12. Evaluation of the medical student research programme in Norwegian medical schools. A survey of students and supervisors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunskaar, Steinar; Breivik, Jarle; Siebke, Maje; Tømmerås, Karin; Figenschau, Kristian; Hansen, John-Bjarne

    2009-01-01

    Background The Medical Student Research Programme is a national education and grant scheme for medical students who wish to carry out research in parallel with their studies. The purpose of the programme is to increase recruitment of people with a standard medical degree to medical research. The Research Programme was established in 2002 and underwent a thorough evaluation during the spring of 2007. The evaluation should investigate if the programme had fulfilled its objectives of increased recruitment to medical research, in addition to the students' and supervisors' satisfaction of the programme, and unwanted differences between the universities. Methods Data was collected from students, supervisors and administrative staff via web-based questionnaires. Information about admission, implementation, results achieved and satisfaction was analysed and compared between the four Norwegian medical schools. In addition, the position of the scheme in relation to the national Quality Reform of Higher Education was analysed. Results At the end of 2006, the Medical Student Research Programme had recruited 265 medical students to research. These consisted of 214 active students, 35 who had completed their studies and only 17 who had dropped out. Both students and supervisors were generally very satisfied with the scheme, including the curriculum, the results achieved and the administrative service. The majority of students wanted to continue their research towards a PhD and, of those who had completed the Medical Student Research Programme, practically all had published one or several scientific papers. The survey showed only small differences between the four medical schools, despite their choice of somewhat different solutions in terms of administration and organisation. The Medical Student Research Programme satisfies the majority of the demands of the Quality Reform, however as an integrated research programme aimed at a PhD it presupposes access to PhD courses before the

  13. Pain and Pain Management Among University Students: Online Survey and Web-Based Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Mimi Mun Yee; Tang, Angel; Budnick, Andrea; Ng, Shamay Sheung Mei; Yeung, Suey Shuk Yu

    2017-05-01

    Pain is common among university students. Unrelieved pain has adverse impacts on their quality of life. In this study, a pain management Web site was developed to distribute an online survey and provide Web-based pain education to university students. Participants were recruited from eight universities in Hong Kong using snowball sampling. The online survey included 37 items examining pain situations, pain management strategies, knowledge about self-medication, and demographic data of the participants. A total of 387 students participated and over 90 percent of them reported pain in the past 6 months. Around one-third of participants did not take any action to manage their pain. Pharmacological method was the most common strategy for students to relieve pain (37.2 percent). The use of over-the-counter (OTC) drug for pain relief was high (n = 214). However, OTC drug knowledge score was significantly higher among health-related group than nonhealth-related group (p education and completed the evaluation on its usefulness. Nonhealth-related students reported significantly higher scores of self-perceived usefulness for the online education than the health-related students (p online education program in the future.

  14. Student experiences of participating in five collaborative blended learning courses in Africa and Asia: a survey.

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    Atkins, Salla; Yan, Weirong; Meragia, Elnta; Mahomed, Hassan; Rosales-Klintz, Senia; Skinner, Donald; Zwarenstein, Merrick

    2016-01-01

    As blended learning (BL; a combination of face-to-face and e-learning methods) becomes more commonplace, it is important to assess whether students find it useful for their studies. ARCADE HSSR and ARCADE RSDH (African Regional Capacity Development for Health Systems and Services Research; Asian Regional Capacity Development for Research on Social Determinants of Health) were unique capacity-building projects, focusing on developing BL in Africa and Asia on issues related to global health. We aimed to evaluate the student experience of participating in any of five ARCADE BL courses implemented collaboratively at institutions from Africa, Asia, and Europe. A post-course student survey with 118 students was conducted. The data were collected using email or through an e-learning platform. Data were analysed with SAS, using bivariate and multiple logistic regression. We focused on the associations between various demographic and experience variables and student-reported overall perceptions of the courses. In total, 82 students responded to the survey. In bivariate logistic regression, the course a student took [ p =0.0067, odds ratio (OR)=0.192; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.058-0.633], male gender of student ( p =0.0474, OR=0.255; 95% CI: 0.066-0.985), not experiencing technical problems ( p learning component to their studies. In contrast, perceiving the assessment as adequate was associated with a worse perception of overall usefulness. In a multiple regression, the course, experiencing no technical problems, and perceiving the discussion as adequate remained significantly associated with a more positively rated perception of the usefulness of the online component of the blended courses. The results suggest that lack of technical problems and functioning discussion forums are of importance during BL courses focusing on global health-related topics. Through paying attention to these aspects, global health education could be provided using BL approaches to student

  15. The future of optometric practice? The results of a survey of optometrists and optometry students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Morton W; Woodruff, Chris; Hardigan, Patrick C

    2004-10-01

    There is an apparent increase in the number of private optometry practices that are closing due to a lack of interested buyers. We examined some of the factors that influence the market for optometry practices in a survey of practicing optometrists and third- and fourth-year optometry students. Optometrists in six states, and students at four schools and colleges of optometry, completed a mailed or faxed survey regarding attitudes toward optometric practice, including fair/reasonable compensation for a new optometrist, the value of optometric practices, and preferred mode of practice on graduation. Doctors and students differed significantly in the amount of money they reported as fair/reasonable compensation for a recently graduated optometrist joining a practice. Comparing students to doctors in specific categories of compensation, students chose a higher fair/reasonable compensation compared to doctors. Students were more likely than doctors to choose >$70,000 as fair/reasonable compensation, while doctors were more likely than students to choose $40,000 to $69,000. Doctors tended to overvalue their practices for the purpose of selling the practice when using percentage of gross income as a valuation method. Students' choices for mode of practice changed dramatically from their ideal when taking their current financial situation into consideration. Students were more likely to choose corporate practice as their preferred practice mode when considering their current financial situation than when not restricted. There are many factors that affect the value and marketability of an optometric practice. In order to sell a practice, the owner must consider the effects of the needs and desires of recently graduated optometrists.

  16. Student nurses' motivation to choose gerontological nursing as a career in China: a survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Min; Cheng, Cheng; Tian, Yan; Fan, Xiuzhen

    2015-07-01

    The world's population is aging, and the need for nurses is increasing. Working with older adults, however, has always been an unpopular career choice among student nurses. It is important to understand student nurses' motivation for choosing gerontological nursing as a career. The purpose of this study was to examine the motivation for choosing gerontological nursing as a career and to identify the associated factors among student nurses. Cross-sectional survey. Participants were last-semester student nurses from 7 universities offering nursing undergraduate programs in Shandong, China. Of the 1290 student nurses, 916 completed the survey (a response rate of 71.0%). The outcome variable was the motivation to choose gerontological nursing as a career. This was measured using a motivation questionnaire that included expectancy and value subscales. Other instruments included the Chinese version of the Facts on Aging Quiz I, the Geriatrics Attitudes Scale, the Anxiety about Aging Scale, a clinical practice environment questionnaire and a self-administered general information questionnaire. Student nurses' expectancy and value aspects of motivation for choosing gerontological nursing as a career were both at a moderate level; the highest value they held was of personal interest. Clinical practice environment, anxiety about aging and the attitudes about geriatrics were the main factors influencing student nurses' motivation to choose gerontological nursing as a career in China. It is imperative for nurse educators to improve the gerontological nursing clinical practice environment for student nurses. Moreover, cultivating student nurses' positive attitudes about geriatrics and relieving anxiety about aging could be beneficial. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Developing study habits inventory for secondary level students in Nepal: A psycho-educational survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Aryal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-one standardized non-repeated 1-5 rank order questionnaires were administered to 480 students from twelve districts of Nepal. Twenty-four schools (12 governments and 12 private and ten boys and ten girls of average level from each school were chosen randomly for the survey. The questionnaires covered the six different areas of studies e.g. foundation of the study, hardworking, interpersonal relationship, study habits, study skills and study related problems. This study found noticeable similarities and differences in various issues related to study habit among government and private schools students. About 50 percent Nepalese students like to study in silent and free of an interrupted room. For 36.25 percent Nepalese students qualified teachers and effective teaching methods are the major factors that determine the effective study habits. About 28.95 percent Nepalese students believe that aim and future vision is the key motivating factors for the effective study habits . According to the 36.04 percent Nepalese students the major problems they are facing in the school is unhygienic environment . About 36.87 percent Nepalese students believe that encouragement from the teachers and parents play an important role to proceed ahead even in repeated failure (Table-5. About 39.58 percent Nepalese students are eagerly seeking to be counseled how they can improve their study habits. The survey has found that most of the Nepalese students spend daily two to three hours for the house related works. They should know how to invest their time according to the importance of the task .

  18. Medical Student Experiences on Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry Rotations: A Nationwide Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Fremonta; Abbasi, Omair; Kasick, David; Lee, Kewchang; Pelic, Christine; Zinser, Jennifer; Harris, Thomas; Funk, Margo

    Consultation-liaison (C-L) psychiatry clerkship rotations may improve medical students' understanding of psychiatric principles relevant to the settings in which they will ultimately practice. This study aimed to characterize students' experiences on C-L rotations. This cross-sectional survey study, sponsored by the Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine Subcommittee on Medical Student Education, was conducted at 5 US medical schools between 2012 and 2016. After the C-L rotation, students completed a voluntary 17-item survey. A total of 235 surveys were collected (mean response rate = 92%). The most frequently endorsed benefit of C-L was learning to manage psychiatric disorders in the context of medical illness (89%). The most frequently endorsed drawback was inconsistent/excessively variable workload (40%). Overall, 82% of respondents recommended C-L to other students; 80% reported that the ideal clerkship would include exposure to both C-L and inpatient psychiatry. Overall, 38% reported that their C-L experience increased their interest in psychiatry as a career. Effect of C-L on interest in psychiatry did not differ by study site, age, sex, clerkship length, or time spent on C-L. Respondents who noted more positive role-modeling on C-L compared to other clerkship rotations were more likely to report increased interest in a psychiatry career (odds ratio = 2.70). Most medical students perceive C-L rotations favorably. Positive role modeling may increase their consideration of psychiatry specialization. The findings that C-L rotation length did not correlate with attitudes and that most students preferred exposure to both inpatient and C-L psychiatry suggest that C-L exposure can beneficially be integrated into core clerkships containing other elements. Copyright © 2018 The Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Mental disorders among college students in the World Health Organization World Mental Health Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auerbach, R P; Alonso, J; Axinn, W G; Cuijpers, P; Ebert, D D; Green, J G; Hwang, I; Kessler, R C; Liu, H; Mortier, P; Nock, M K; Pinder-Amaker, S; Sampson, N A; Aguilar-Gaxiola, S; Al-Hamzawi, A; Andrade, L H; Benjet, C; Caldas-de-Almeida, J M; Demyttenaere, K; Florescu, S; de Girolamo, G; Gureje, O; Haro, J M; Karam, E G; Kiejna, A; Kovess-Masfety, V; Lee, S; McGrath, J J; O'Neill, S; Pennell, B-E; Scott, K; Ten Have, M; Torres, Y; Zaslavsky, A M; Zarkov, Z; Bruffaerts, R

    2016-10-01

    Although mental disorders are significant predictors of educational attainment throughout the entire educational career, most research on mental disorders among students has focused on the primary and secondary school years. The World Health Organization World Mental Health Surveys were used to examine the associations of mental disorders with college entry and attrition by comparing college students (n = 1572) and non-students in the same age range (18-22 years; n = 4178), including non-students who recently left college without graduating (n = 702) based on surveys in 21 countries (four low/lower-middle income, five upper-middle-income, one lower-middle or upper-middle at the times of two different surveys, and 11 high income). Lifetime and 12-month prevalence and age-of-onset of DSM-IV anxiety, mood, behavioral and substance disorders were assessed with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI). One-fifth (20.3%) of college students had 12-month DSM-IV/CIDI disorders; 83.1% of these cases had pre-matriculation onsets. Disorders with pre-matriculation onsets were more important than those with post-matriculation onsets in predicting subsequent college attrition, with substance disorders and, among women, major depression the most important such disorders. Only 16.4% of students with 12-month disorders received any 12-month healthcare treatment for their mental disorders. Mental disorders are common among college students, have onsets that mostly occur prior to college entry, in the case of pre-matriculation disorders are associated with college attrition, and are typically untreated. Detection and effective treatment of these disorders early in the college career might reduce attrition and improve educational and psychosocial functioning.

  20. Factors affecting residency rank-listing: A Maxdiff survey of graduating Canadian medical students

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    Forgie Melissa

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Canada, graduating medical students consider many factors, including geographic, social, and academic, when ranking residency programs through the Canadian Residency Matching Service (CaRMS. The relative significance of these factors is poorly studied in Canada. It is also unknown how students differentiate between their top program choices. This survey study addresses the influence of various factors on applicant decision making. Methods Graduating medical students from all six Ontario medical schools were invited to participate in an online survey available for three weeks prior to the CaRMS match day in 2010. Max-Diff discrete choice scaling, multiple choice, and drop-list style questions were employed. The Max-Diff data was analyzed using a scaled simple count method. Data for how students distinguish between top programs was analyzed as percentages. Comparisons were made between male and female applicants as well as between family medicine and specialist applicants; statistical significance was determined by the Mann-Whitney test. Results In total, 339 of 819 (41.4% eligible students responded. The variety of clinical experiences and resident morale were weighed heavily in choosing a residency program; whereas financial incentives and parental leave attitudes had low influence. Major reasons that applicants selected their first choice program over their second choice included the distance to relatives and desirability of the city. Both genders had similar priorities when selecting programs. Family medicine applicants rated the variety of clinical experiences more importantly; whereas specialty applicants emphasized academic factors more. Conclusions Graduating medical students consider program characteristics such as the variety of clinical experiences and resident morale heavily in terms of overall priority. However, differentiation between their top two choice programs is often dependent on social/geographic factors

  1. A survey of the use of electronic scientific information resources among medical and dental students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aarnio Matti

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate medical and dental students' utilization of electronic information resources. Methods A web survey sent to 837 students (49.9% responded. Results Twenty-four per cent of medical students and ninteen per cent of dental students searched MEDLINE 2+ times/month for study purposes, and thiry-two per cent and twenty-four per cent respectively for research. Full-text articles were used 2+ times/month by thirty-three per cent of medical and ten per cent of dental students. Twelve per cent of respondents never utilized either MEDLINE or full-text articles. In multivariate models, the information-searching skills among students were significantly associated with use of MEDLINE and full-text articles. Conclusion Use of electronic resources differs among students. Forty percent were non-users of full-text articles. Information-searching skills are correlated with the use of electronic resources, but the level of basic PC skills plays not a major role in using these resources. The student data shows that adequate training in information-searching skills will increase the use of electronic information resources.

  2. The Parents' and Teachers' Supports Role on Students' Involvement in Scouting Program and Entrepreneurial Values--Longitudinal Studies on Students in Jombang, East Java, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prianto, Agus

    2016-01-01

    Extracurricular activities are those that fall outside the realm of the normal curriculum of school. Extracurricular activities exist for all students. And generally, benefits of extracurricular activities shall be as follows: learning time management and prioritizing; getting involved in diverse interests; learning about long term commitments;…

  3. Framing patient consent for student involvement in pelvic examination: a dual model of autonomy.

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    Carson-Stevens, Andrew; Davies, Myfanwy M; Jones, Rhiain; Chik, Aiman D Pawan; Robbé, Iain J; Fiander, Alison N

    2013-11-01

    Patient consent has been formulated in terms of radical individualism rather than shared benefits. Medical education relies on the provision of patient consent to provide medical students with the training and experience to become competent doctors. Pelvic examination represents an extreme case in which patients may legitimately seek to avoid contact with inexperienced medical students particularly where these are male. However, using this extreme case, this paper will examine practices of framing and obtaining consent as perceived by medical students. This paper reports findings of an exploratory qualitative study of medical students and junior doctors. Participants described a number of barriers to obtaining informed consent. These related to misunderstandings concerning student roles and experiences and insufficient information on the nature of the examination. Participants reported perceptions of the negative framing of decisions on consent by nursing staff where the student was male. Potentially coercive practices of framing of the decision by senior doctors were also reported. Participants outlined strategies they adopted to circumvent patients' reasons for refusal. Practices of framing the information used by students, nurses and senior doctors to enable patients to decide about consent are discussed in the context of good ethical practice. In the absence of a clear ethical model, coercion appears likely. We argue for an expanded model of autonomy in which the potential tension between respecting patients' autonomy and ensuring the societal benefit of well-trained doctors is recognised. Practical recommendations are made concerning information provision and clear delineations of student and patient roles and expectations.

  4. Involving Students in a Collaborative Project to Help Discover Inexpensive, Stable Materials for Solar Photoelectrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anunson, Paige N.; Winkler, Gates R.; Winkler, Jay R.; Parkinson, Bruce A.; Christus, Jennifer D. Schuttlefield

    2013-01-01

    In general, laboratory experiments focus on traditional chemical disciplines. While this approach allows students the ability to learn and explore fundamental concepts in a specific area, it does not always encourage students to explore interdisciplinary science. Often little transfer of knowledge from one area to another is observed, as students…

  5. Involved and Focused? Students' Perceptions of Institutional Identity, Personal Goal Orientation and Levels of Campus Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Joseph R.; McCarthy, Brendan J.; Milner, Lauren A.

    2009-01-01

    The present study explores the relationship between students' perception of their institution's mission identity, personal goal orientation tendencies, and the extent to which they engage in mission-driven activities. Goal orientation research categorizes student motivations in three ways: mastery orientation (MO), performance-approach (PAp)…

  6. In Peer Matters, Teachers Matter: Peer Group Influences on Students' Engagement Depend on Teacher Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollet, Justin W.; Kindermann, Thomas A.; Skinner, Ellen A.

    2017-01-01

    This study focused on the joint effects of teachers and peer groups as predictors of change in students' engagement during the first year of middle school, when the importance of peer relationships normatively increases and the quality of teacher-student relationships typically declines. To explore cumulative and contextualized joint effects, the…

  7. Which Space? Whose Space? An Experience in Involving Students and Teachers in Space Design

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    Casanova, Diogo; Di Napoli, Roberto; Leijon, Marie

    2018-01-01

    To date, learning spaces in higher education have been designed with little engagement on the part of their most important users: students and teachers. In this paper, we present the results of research carried out in a UK university. The research aimed to understand how students and teachers conceptualise learning spaces when they are given the…

  8. Facebook and Classroom Group Work: A Trial Study Involving University of Botswana Advanced Oral Presentation Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magogwe, Joel M.; Ntereke, Beauty; Phetlhe, Keith R.

    2015-01-01

    In the 21st century, the use of information technology in the classroom is advancing rapidly, especially in higher education. The Internet, through social networking, has made it possible for students to learn and teachers to teach outside the classroom walls. Facebook in particular has made it possible for students to interact and communicate…

  9. Exploring the Relationship between Student Involvement in GEAR UP and Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Renea F.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between GEAR UP academic support services and student achievement. GEAR UP is an evidence-based college readiness program. This study focused on a subset of academic support services designed to impact student achievement including: academic mentoring, math tutoring, English tutoring, study…

  10. The Attitudes of Different Partners Involved in Higher Education towards Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polo Sánchez, M. Tamara; Fernández-Jiménez, Carolina; Fernández Cabezas, María

    2018-01-01

    In this article we analyse the inclusion of students with disabilities in the field of university attendance, emphasising the importance of attitudes of teachers as well as the rest of the university community as a whole for inclusion to be successful. The effect of variables of gender, education and training and contact with students with…

  11. Action-Oriented Democratic Outcomes: The Impact of Student Involvement with Campus Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuniga, Ximena; Williams, Elizabeth A.; Berger, Joseph B.

    2005-01-01

    This study examines whether college students' participation in diversity-related experiences instills motivation to take actions for a diverse democracy. Results suggest that interactions with diverse peers, participation in diversity-related courses, and activities inside and outside residence halls inspire students to challenge their own…

  12. School Radio: The Attention and Involvement of Teenage Pupils and Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Charles

    1978-01-01

    Considers the problems of gaining the attention of students in the 12 to 20 age group when listening to radio as a class activity. Preparations for listening to radio in school, listener motivation, acceptable programs, teacher and student activities, and supporting visual materials are discussed. (JEG)

  13. A Multilevel, Statewide Investigation of School District Anti-Bullying Policy Quality and Student Bullying Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gower, Amy L.; Cousin, Molly; Borowsky, Iris W.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Although nearly all states in the United States require school districts to adopt anti-bullying policies, little research examines the effect of these policies on student bullying and health. Using a statewide sample, we investigated associations between the quality of school district anti-bullying policies and student bullying…

  14. Facilitating Students' Conceptual Change and Scientific Reasoning Involving the Unit of Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chin-Quen; She, Hsiao-Ching

    2010-01-01

    This article reports research from a 3 year digital learning project to unite conceptual change and scientific reasoning in the learning unit of combustion. One group of students had completed the course combining conceptual change and scientific reasoning. The other group of students received conventional instruction. In addition to the…

  15. Active Involvement of Students in the Learning Process of the American Health Care System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, Sylvie

    1997-01-01

    Over 200 pharmacy students in a University of Georgia class on the American health care system engaged in debates on health care issues, discussed newspaper articles, conducted client home visits, analyzed county health statistics, and completed exercises on pharmacists' compensation and health care planning. Most participating students responded…

  16. Enjoyment Fosters Engagement: The Key to Involving Middle School Students in Physical Education and Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pharez, Emily S.

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the challenges faced by a middle school teacher who inherited a recreation-based physical education program in which students had been accustomed to choosing what they wanted to do. Stressing the importance of implementing a standards-based program in which students of all skill levels and activity preferences were able to…

  17. Relation between Students' Involvement and Teacher Management Strategies in French "Difficult" Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vors, Olivier; Gal-Petitfaux, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Background: Since 2010, French secondary schools with a high proportion of students in academic difficulty benefit from a compensatory education policy called "Ecoles Colleges et Lycees pour l'Ambition, l'Innovation et la Reussite" (ECLAIR). These students tend to behave poorly and frequently disengage from learning tasks, and thus one…

  18. GRADING: Involving Students in a Time-saving Solution to the Homework Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafi, Mohammad

    1989-01-01

    A procedure where homework assignments are collected, graded, and returned each week is suggested. Students were used to grade each other's homework against copies of the solutions according to criteria established at the beginning of the course. Student response has been positive. (MVL)

  19. Engineering students' and faculty perceptions of teaching methods and the level of faculty involvement that promotes academic success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpilo, Lacy N.

    Student academic success is a top priority of higher education institutions in the United States and the trend of students leaving school prior to finishing their degree is a serious concern. Accountability has become a large part of university and college ratings and perceived success. Retention is one component of the accountability metrics used by accreditation agencies. In addition, there are an increasing number of states allocating funds based in part on retention (Seidman, 2005). Institutions have created initiatives, programs, and even entire departments to address issues related to student academic success to promote retention. Universities and colleges have responded by focusing on methods to retain and better serve students. Retention and student academic success is a primary concern for high education institutions; however, engineering education has unique retention issues. The National Science Board (2004) reports a significant decline in the number of individuals in the United States who are training to become engineers, despite the fact that the number of jobs that utilize an engineering background continues to increase. Engineering education has responded to academic success issues by changing curriculum and pedagogical methods (Sheppard, 2001). This descriptive study investigates the perception of engineering students and faculty regarding teaching methods and faculty involvement to create a picture of what is occurring in engineering education. The population was the engineering students and faculty of Colorado State University's College of Engineering. Data from this research suggests that engaging teaching methods are not being used as often as research indicates they should and that there is a lack of student-faculty interaction outside of the classroom. This research adds to the breadth of knowledge and understanding of the current environment of engineering education. Furthermore, the data allows engineering educators and other higher

  20. Nursing Student Loan Debt: A Secondary Analysis of the National Student Nurses' Association Annual Survey of New Graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeg, Veronica D; Mancino, Diane J

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe nursing student loan debt and financial choices from a secondary analysis of the National Student Nurses Association Annual New Graduate Survey. The findings in the secondary analysis show loan debt incurred by nursing students comparable to loan debt reported recently for all new college graduates in general. However, comparing types of programs and types of schools yielded clear variations. More than one-third of new graduates who reported having loans to repay were unemployed; more than one-quarter of those who worked part-time and one-quarter of those who worked full-time to finance their education were unemployed; and almost one-third of students whose parents had paid for their education were unemployed. New graduates from for-profit schools were more likely to report they had accumulated high debt to pay for school than all new graduates combined. Nursing students enter the job market with substantial financial debt that may impact their future. Educators and policymakers need to address these growing concerns to sustain a healthy supply of nurses.

  1. A SURVEY OF THE ENGLISH READING HABITS OF EFL STUDENTS IN INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erna Iftanti

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This article investigated the English reading habits of Indonesian students of EFL. The data were collected through a questionnaire survey and interview validation. The questionnaires were distributed to 546 EFL college students in East Java. Based on the statistical analysis of the data, it is concluded that although the students have read English since elementary school, they do not indicate to have good English reading habits. Only few of them are identified to have good English reading habits as suggested by their eagerness to regularly spend time reading various types of English texts and their high motivation to read English for pleasure. The EFL students read English for some purposes, i.e. for school assignments, for pleasure, and for knowledge and English skills improvement. Their positive belief about reading does not motivate them to read English for pleasure; rather, it is school assignments that appear to be their biggest motivation.

  2. [Hearing the impact of MP3 on a survey of middle school students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhan; Li, Zonghua; Chen, Yang; He, Ya; Chunyu, Xiujie; Wang, Fangyuan; Zhang, Pengzhi; Gao, Lei; Qiu, Shuping; Liu, Shunli; Qiao, Li; Qiu, Jianhua

    2011-02-01

    To understand the usage of MP3 and effects on hearing of middle school students in Xi'an, and discuss controlling strategies. Stratified random cluster sampling method was used in the 1567 middle school students in Xi'an through questionnaire survey, ear examination and hearing examination, data were analysed by the SPSS13.0 statistical software. 1) The rate of holding MP3 in the middle school students was 85.2%. Average daily use time was (1.41 +/- 1.11) h. 2) The noise group of pure tone hearing threshold was significantly higher compared with the control group (PMP3. 3) The detection rate of symptoms increased with the increasing use of MP3. The usage of MP3 can harm hearing in middle school students, which can result in neurasthenic syndrome.

  3. A survey of medical students to assess their exposure to and knowledge of renal transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weale Andrew R

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Within the field of renal transplantation there is a lack of qualified and trainee surgeons and a shortage of donated organs. Any steps to tackle these issues should, in part, be aimed at future doctors. Methods A questionnaire was distributed to final year students at a single medical school in the UK to assess their exposure to and knowledge of renal transplantation. Results Although 46% of responding students had examined a transplant recipient, only 14% had ever witnessed the surgery. Worryingly, 9% of students believed that xenotransplantation commonly occurs in the UK and 35% were unable to name a single drug that a recipient may need to take. Conclusions This survey demonstrates a lack of exposure to, and knowledge of, the field of renal transplantation. Recommendations to address the problems with the recruitment of surgeons and donation of organs, by targeting medical students are made.

  4. Cigarette demand is responsive to higher prices: findings from a survey of University students in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweis, Nadia J; Cherukupalli, Rajeev

    2016-11-01

    To estimate the price elasticity of cigarette demand for university students aged 18-24 years in Jordan. Questions from the Global Adult Tobacco Survey were adapted and administered to students from 10 public universities in Jordan in 2014. A two-part econometric model of cigarette demand was estimated. Nearly one-third of university students in Jordan smoke, purchasing 33.2 packs per month and paying 1.70 Jordanian dinars on average (US$2.40) for a pack of 20 cigarettes. The price elasticity of cigarette demand was estimated to be -1.15. Higher taxes may be particularly effective in reducing smoking among University students in Jordan. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  5. Parent Involvement: Investigating the Parent-Child Relationship in Millennial College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzolato, Jane Elizabeth; Hicklen, Sherrell

    2011-01-01

    There is evidence of a surge in parent involvement in postsecondary education, and some scholarship suggests that this high level of parent involvement may inhibit epistemological development. Despite these claims, there is little empirical evidence on the level or impact of parent involvement during the college years. The aim of this research was…

  6. Medical education changes students' attitudes on psychiatry: survey among medical students in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flajsman, Ana Medic; Degmecic, Dunja; Pranjkovic, Tamara; Rogulja, Stanislav; Bošnjak, Dina; Kuzman, Martina Rojnic

    2017-12-01

    In Croatia, psychiatric disorders are the leading group of disorders by days of hospitalization and they are in second place according to the number of hospitalizations in the period of working age. Nevertheless, psychiatry in Croatia, as well as in the world, is one of the least attractive specialties for medical students. In this paper we determined the impact of compulsory education in psychiatry on the attitudes of medical students of the fourth year of the Zagreb school of medicine and Osijek school of medicine. We tested attitudes toward psychiatry, psychiatric treatment and attitudes toward seeking professional psychological help using questionnaires that were filled out twice, at the beginning of psychiatry placement and at the end of psychiatry placement. Questionnaires were completed by 239 students from the Zagreb school of medicine and Faculty of medicine Osijek (response rate 78.4%). After the placement, students had significantly more positive attitudes about psychiatry and psychiatric treatment, as well as the attitudes toward seeking professional psychological help. Attitudes towards psychiatry, seeking psychological help and attitude towards psychiatric medication and psychotherapy correlated with the evaluation of the quality of psychiatric education. Additional forms of education in psychiatry should be offered, in order to maintain and increase the impact of education on students' attitudes.

  7. A National Longitudinal Survey of Medical Students' Intentions to Practice Among the Underserved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Thomas F; Ham, Sandra A; Hart, Theodore G; Curlin, Farr A; Yoon, John D

    2018-01-01

    To explore students' intentions to practice in medically underserved areas. In January 2011, 960 third-year medical students from 24 MD-granting U.S. medical schools were invited to participate in a survey on their intention to practice in a medically underserved area. A follow-up survey was sent to participants in September 2011. Covariates included student demographics, medical school characteristics, environmental exposures, work experiences, sense of calling, and religious characteristics. Adjusted response rates were 564/919 (61.4%, first survey) and 474/564 (84.0%, follow-up survey). Among fourth-year medical students, an estimated 34.3% had an intention to practice among the underserved. In multivariate logistic regression modeling, predictors for intentions to practice among the underserved included growing up in an underserved setting (odds ratio [OR] range: 2.96-4.81), very strong sense of calling (OR range: 1.86-3.89), and high medical school social mission score (in fourth year: OR = 2.34 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.31-4.21]). International experience was associated with favorable change of mind in the fourth year (OR = 2.86 [95% CI, 1.13-7.24]). High intrinsic religiosity was associated with intentions to practice primary care in underserved settings (in fourth year: OR = 2.29 [95% CI = 1.13-4.64]). Growing up in medically underserved settings, work experience in religiously affiliated organizations, very strong sense of calling, and high medical school social mission score were associated with intentions to practice in underserved areas. Lack of formative educational experiences may dissuade students from considering underserved practice.

  8. Survey of the Prevalence of Burnout, Stress, Depression, and the Use of Supports by Medical Students at One School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Elaine; Eddins-Folensbee, Florence; Coverdale, John

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The authors determined the prevalence of stress, depression, and burnout in medical students and the resources used by students in one school to alleviate psychological distress. Methods: A survey was administered to 526 students in the first 3 years of medical school (336 responders; response rate: 70%) at one institution, using a…

  9. Do you think it's a disease? a survey of medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erueti Chrissy

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The management of medical conditions is influenced by whether clinicians regard them as "disease" or "not a disease". The aim of the survey was to determine how medical students classify a range of conditions they might encounter in their professional lives and whether a different name for a condition would influence their decision in the categorisation of the condition as a 'disease' or 'not a disease'. Methods We surveyed 3 concurrent years of medical students to classify 36 candidate conditions into "disease" and "non-disease". The conditions were given a 'medical' label and a (lay label and positioned where possible in alternate columns of the survey. Results The response rate was 96% (183 of 190 students attending a lecture: 80% of students concurred on 16 conditions as "disease" (eg diabetes, tuberculosis, and 4 as "non-disease" (eg baldness, menopause, fractured skull and heat stroke. The remaining 16 conditions (with 21-79% agreement were more contentious (especially obesity, infertility, hay fever, alcoholism, and restless leg syndrome. Three pairs of conditions had both a more, and a less, medical label: the more medical labels (myalgic encephalomyelitis, hypertension, and erectile dysfunction were more frequently classified as 'disease' than the less medical (chronic fatigue syndrome, high blood pressure, and impotence, respectively, significantly different for the first two pairs. Conclusions Some conditions excluded from the classification of "disease" were unexpected (eg fractured skull and heat stroke. Students were mostly concordant on what conditions should be classified as "disease". They were more likely to classify synonyms as 'disease' if the label was medical. The findings indicate there is still a problem 30 years on in the concept of 'what is a disease'. Our findings suggest that we should be addressing such concepts to medical students.

  10. Specialty preferences and motivating factors: A national survey on medical students from five uae medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulrahman, Mahera; Makki, Maryam; Shaaban, Sami; Al Shamsi, Maryam; Venkatramana, Manda; Sulaiman, Nabil; Sami, Manal M; Abdelmannan, Dima K; Salih, AbdulJabbar M A; AlShaer, Laila

    2016-01-01

    Workforce planning is critical for being able to deliver appropriate health service and thus is relevant to medical education. It is, therefore, important to understand medical students' future specialty choices and the factors that influence them. This study was conducted to identify, explore, and analyze the factors influencing specialty preferences among medical students of the United Arab Emirates (UAE). A multiyear, multicenter survey of medical student career choice was conducted with all five UAE medical schools. The questionnaire consisted of five sections. Chi-squared tests, regression analysis, and stepwise logistic regression were performed. The overall response rate was 46% (956/2079). Factors that students reported to be extremely important when considering their future career preferences were intellectual satisfaction (87%), work-life balance (71%), having the required talent (70%), and having a stable and secure future (69%). The majority of students (60%) preferred internal medicine, surgery, emergency medicine, or family Medicine. The most common reason given for choosing a particular specialty was personal interest (21%), followed by flexibility of working hours (17%). The data show that a variety of factors inspires medical students in the UAE in their choice of a future medical specialty. These factors can be used by health policymakers, university mentors, and directors of residency training programs to motivate students to choose specialties that are scarce in the UAE and therefore better serve the health-care system and the national community.

  11. Religion as a protective factor against drug use among brazilian university students: a national survey

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    Fernanda Carolina Gomes

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relationship between religiosity and drug use among Brazilian university students. METHODS: This manuscript is part of the "First Nationwide Survey on the Use of Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drugs among College Students in the 27 Brazilian State Capitals". In this study, 12,595 university students were divided into two groups according to their attendance at religious services: frequent attenders (FR; 39.1% and non-frequent attenders (NFR; 60.8%. Subsequently, we analyzed their responses to a structured, anonymous questionnaire on drug use and other behaviors. Individual multivariate logistic regression models tested the association between religiosity and drug use (alcohol, tobacco, marijuana and at least one illicit drug. RESULTS: Drug use over the last 30 days was higher among NFR students even after controlling for demographic variables. NFR students were more likely to use alcohol OR = 2.52; 95% CI: 2.08-3.06, tobacco (2.83; 2.09-3.83, marijuana (2.09; 1.39-3.11 and at least one illicit drug (1.42; 1.12-1.79 compared to FR students. CONCLUSION: Religiosity was found to be a strongly protective factor against drug use among Brazilian university students. However, more studies are needed to identify the mechanisms by which religiosity exerts this protective influence.

  12. How do bioethics teachers in Japan cope with ethical disagreement among healthcare university students in the classroom? A survey on educators in charge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itai, K; Asai, A; Tsuchiya, Y; Onishi, M; Kosugi, S

    2006-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to demonstrate how educators involved in the teaching of bioethics to healthcare university students in Japan would cope with ethical disagreement in the classroom, and to identify factors influencing them. Methods A cross sectional survey was conducted using self administered questionnaires mailed to a sample of university faculty in charge of bioethics curriculum for university healthcare students. Results A total of 107 usable questionnaires were returned: a response rate of 61.5%. When facing ethical disagreement in the classroom, coping behaviour differed depending on the topic of discussion, was influenced by educators' individual clear ethical attitudes regarding the topic of discussion, and was independent of many respondents' individual and social backgrounds. Among educators, it was commonly recognised that the purpose of bioethics education was to raise the level of awareness of ethical problems, to provide information about and knowledge of those issues, to raise students' sensitivity to ethical problems, and to teach students methods of reasoning and logical argument. Yet, despite this, several respondents considered the purpose of bioethics education to be to influence students about normative ethical judgments. There was no clear relationship, however, between ways of coping with ethical disagreement and educators' sense of the purpose of bioethics education. Conclusions This descriptive study suggests that educators involved in bioethics education for healthcare university students in Japan coped in various ways with ethical disagreement. Further research concerning ethical disagreement in educational settings is needed to provide better bioethics education for healthcare students. PMID:16648283

  13. Organizational Member Involvement in Physical Activity Coalitions across the United States: Development and Testing of a Novel Survey Instrument for Assessing Coalition Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornstein, Daniel B.; Pate, Russell R.; Beets, Michael W.; Saunders, Ruth P.; Blair, Steven N.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Coalitions are often composed of member organizations. Member involvement is thought to be associated with coalition success. No instrument currently exists for evaluating organizational member involvement in physical activity coalitions. This study aimed to develop a survey instrument for evaluating organizational member involvement…

  14. Academic Libraries, Facebook and MySpace, and Student Outreach: A Survey of Student Opinion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, Ruth Sara

    2009-01-01

    This study surveyed 366 Valparaiso University freshmen to discover their feelings about librarians using Facebook and MySpace as outreach tools. The vast majority of respondents had online social network profiles. Most indicated that they would be accepting of library contact through those Web sites, but a sizable minority reacted negatively to…

  15. Methods and Techniques. Student Involvement in the Production of Teaching Aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernau, C.

    1984-01-01

    Indicates that teaching materials used in industrialized countries are not appropriate and often cannot be adapted for the use in developing countries. Having students help with production of teaching aids increases their motivation for using them. (JOW)

  16. Designing and Evaluating an Interprofessional Experiential Course Series Involving Medical and Pharmacy Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dueñas, Gladys G.; Zanoni, Aileen; Grover, Anisha B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To prepare first-year and second-year pharmacy and medical students to build effective collaborative health care teams by participating in an interprofessional experiential 6-semester course series. Design. An interprofessional experiential course series was designed using a variety of teaching methods to achieve both interprofessional and experiential learning outcomes. A standardized objective behavioral assessment was developed to measure team performance of interprofessional communication and teamwork. In addition, student perceptions were measured using a validated instrument. Assessment. A majority of teams demonstrated appropriate competence with respect to interprofessional communication and teamwork. Additionally, a majority of students expressed positive perceptions of interprofessional collaboration with respect to teamwork, roles and responsibilities, and patient outcomes. Conclusion. An interprofessional experiential course series can be successfully implemented to achieve both interprofessional and experiential learning outcomes. Highly collaborative teams and positive student perceptions provide evidence of achievement of interprofessional education learning outcomes. PMID:27402988

  17. Campus sustainability and natural area stewardship: student involvement in adaptive comanagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne E. Krasny

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available University campus sustainability initiatives have proliferated over the last decade. We contend that such initiatives benefit from applying conceptual frameworks to help understand and guide their activities and from a focus on campus open space and natural areas management. Informed by an adaptive comanagement framework encompassing social learning, social capital, and shared action, we used semistructured interviews to examine student participation in the immediate response and longer-term policy formulation following a crisis that occurred in a campus natural area. Students exhibited social learning as demonstrated by reflection and the integration of new ideas through discussions with administrators and peers, as well as social capital through increased social trust, which led to a shift in perspective regarding norms of student-administrator interactions. Further, students participated in shared action, such as posting warning signs in dangerous areas, and importantly, through their contributions to longer-term campus natural area safety and recreational access policy. Three conditions explain student engagement in the adaptive comanagement process: the presence of a pre-existing student organization that had built bonding social capital and was committed to campus natural area stewardship, openness to multiple stakeholder viewpoints and commitment to action on the part of the university administration, and the presence of a crisis that spurred emotions and action. Based on these findings, we assert that student organizations can contribute to an adaptive comanagement process and that such a process is consistent with university and campus sustainability values related to the importance of student engagement, mental health, and learning.

  18. Mental health status among Japanese medical students: a cross-sectional survey of 20 universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsu, Tadahiro; Kaneita, Yoshitaka; Osaki, Yoneatsu; Kokaze, Akatsuki; Ochiai, Hirotaka; Shirasawa, Takako; Nanri, Hinako; Ohida, Takashi

    2014-12-01

    The purposes of this study were to evaluate the mental health status of Japanese medical students and to examine differences based on gender, as well as on university type and location, using the results of a nationwide survey. Between December 2006 and March 2007, we conducted a questionnaire survey among fourth-year medical students at 20 randomly selected medical schools in Japan. The data from 1,619 students (response rate: 90.6%; male: 1,074; female: 545) were analyzed. We used the Japanese version of the 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) to measure mental health status. Poor mental health status (GHQ-12 score of 4 points or higher) was observed in 36.6% and 48.8% of the male and female medical students, respectively. The ratio of the age-adjusted prevalence of poor mental health status in female versus male medical students was 1.33 (95% confidence interval: 1.10-1.62). The universities were categorized into two groups based on the university type (national/public: 15 vs. private: 5) or location (in a large city: 7 vs. in a local city: 13 cities). The prevalence of poor mental health status in both men and women differed between these groups, although not significantly. The GHQ-12 scores in men significantly differed between the categorized groups of universities. These results suggest that adequate attention must be paid to the mental health of medical students, especially females, and that a system for providing mental health care for medical students must be established in the context of actual conditions at each university.

  19. Development of the Quantitative Reasoning Items on the National Survey of Student Engagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber D. Dumford

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As society’s needs for quantitative skills become more prevalent, college graduates require quantitative skills regardless of their career choices. Therefore, it is important that institutions assess students’ engagement in quantitative activities during college. This study chronicles the process taken by the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE to develop items that measure students’ participation in quantitative reasoning (QR activities. On the whole, findings across the quantitative and qualitative analyses suggest good overall properties for the developed QR items. The items show great promise to explore and evaluate the frequency with which college students participate in QR-related activities. Each year, hundreds of institutions across the United States and Canada participate in NSSE, and, with the addition of these new items on the core survey, every participating institution will have information on this topic. Our hope is that these items will spur conversations on campuses about students’ use of quantitative reasoning activities.

  20. Substance use among medical students in Barcelona (Spain). A comparison with previous surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, M E; Cami, J

    1986-11-01

    During the academic year 1983-1984, a survey on drug consumption was conducted among medical students in Barcelona. There was a high proportion of smokers in both sexes. Alcohol consumption was four times higher among men than women; high proof beverages were becoming the most common drinks. Coffee was the caffeine drink consumed by almost the whole population studied. Although cannabis derivatives had been tried at least once by almost all the students, regular consumers were almost non-existent. Amphetamine consumption was restricted to examination periods. The use of opiates, cocaine, hallucinogens, and solvents was rare for the sample. Results from this study are compared with those from similar surveys conducted 5 and 10 years ago.

  1. How to build institutionalization on students: a pilot experiment on a didactical design of addition and subtraction involving negative integers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuadiah, N. F.; Suryadi, D.; Turmudi

    2018-05-01

    This study focuses on the design of a didactical situation in addition and subtraction involving negative integers at the pilot experiment phase. As we know, negative numbers become an obstacle for students in solving problems related to them. This study aims to create a didactical design that can assist students in understanding the addition and subtraction. Another expected result in this way is that students are introduced to the characteristics of addition and subtraction of integers. The design was implemented on 32 seventh grade students in one of the classes in a junior secondary school as the pilot experiment. Learning activities were observed thoroughly including the students’ responses that emerged during the learning activities. The written documentation of the students was also used to support the analysis in the learning activities. The results of the analysis showed that this method could help the students perform a large number of integer operations that could not be done with a number line. The teacher’s support as a didactical potential contract was still needed to encourage institutionalization processes. The results of the design analysis used as the basis of the revision are expected to be implemented by the teacher in the teaching experiment.

  2. Learning clinical skills in the simulation suite: the lived experiences of student nurses involved in peer teaching and peer assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramm, Dianne; Thomson, Anna; Jackson, Andrew

    2015-06-01

    The benefits of peer teaching and assessment are well documented within nurse education literature. However, research to date has predominantly focused on the advantages and disadvantages for the inexperienced learner, with a dearth of knowledge relating to the perceptions of senior nursing students involved in teaching their peers. This study sought to investigate the student experience of taking part in a peer teaching and assessment initiative to include the perceptions of both first year nursing students and second/third year participants. Data were collected via open-ended questionnaires and analysed with qualitative 'Framework' analysis. This initiative received a generally positive response both from students being taught and also from those acting as facilitators. Perceived benefits included the social learning experience, development of teaching skills, self-awareness and the opportunity to communicate both good and bad news. Suggestions for improvement included additional time working in small groups, specific supplementary learning materials and the introduction of peer teaching and assessment into other areas of the Adult Nursing Programme. Peer teaching and assessment principles represent valuable strategies which can be utilised in nurse education to develop clinical skills and prepare nurses for real-life scenarios. Further research needs to investigate how to enhance the student learning experience and to fully exploit the potential for simulated experience to prepare students for their future role as registered nurses in clinical practice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Exploring the characteristics, global distribution and reasons for retraction of published articles involving human research participants: a literature survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guowei; Kamel, Mariam; Jin, Yanling; Xu, Michael Kuan; Mbuagbaw, Lawrence; Samaan, Zainab; Levine, Mitchell Ah; Thabane, Lehana

    2018-01-01

    Article retraction is a measure taken by journals or authors where there is evidence of research misconduct or error, redundancy, plagiarism or unethical research. Recently, the retraction of scientific publications has been on the rise. In this survey, we aimed to describe the characteristics and distribution of retracted articles and the reasons for retractions. We searched retracted articles on the PubMed database and Retraction Watch website from 1980 to February 2016. The primary outcomes were the characteristics and distribution of retracted articles and the reasons for retractions. The secondary outcomes included how article retractions were handled by journals and how to improve the journal practices toward article retractions. We included 1,339 retracted articles. Most retracted articles had six authors or fewer. Article retraction was most common in the USA (26%), Japan (11%) and Germany (10%). The main reasons for article retraction were misconduct (51%, n = 685) and error (14%, n = 193). There were 66% (n = 889) of retracted articles having male senior or corresponding authors. Of the articles retracted after August 2010, 63% (n = 567) retractions were reported on Retraction Watch. Large discrepancies were observed in the ways that different journals handled article retractions. For instance, articles were completely withdrawn from some journals, while in others, articles were still available with no indication of retraction. Likewise, some retraction notices included a detailed account of the events that led to article retraction, while others only consisted of a statement indicating the article retraction. The characteristics, geographic distribution and reasons for retraction of published articles involving human research participants were examined in this survey. More efforts are needed to improve the consistency and transparency of journal practices toward article retractions.

  4. Prevalence and Correlates of Cyberbullying Perpetration. Findings from a German Representative Student Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Marie Christine Bergmann; Dirk Baier

    2018-01-01

    Based on a survey of 9512 ninth-grade students conducted in Lower Saxony in 2013, this paper examines the prevalence of cyberbullying perpetration and the correlates of this behavior. Binary logistic multilevel regression was used in order to analyze correlates of sexual and psychological cyberbully perpetration. In the preceding semester, 2.4% of the adolescents were perpetrators of psychological cyberbullying and 0.4% bullied someone online sexually. Low levels of empathy, frequent consumpt...

  5. Survey on Aesthetic Vulvovaginal Procedures: What do PortugueseDoctors andMedical Students Think?

    OpenAIRE

    Vieira-Baptista, Pedro; Lima-Silva, Joana; Fonseca-Moutinho, José; Monteiro, Virgínia; Águas, Fernanda

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess themedical doctors andmedical students’ opinion regarding the evidence and ethical background of the performance of vulvovaginal aesthetic procedures (VVAPs). Methods Cross-sectional online survey among 664 Portuguese medical doctors and students. Results Most participants considered that there is never or there rarely is amedical reason to perform: vulvar whitening (85.9% [502/584]); hymenoplasty (72.0% [437/607]); mons pubis liposuction (71.6% [426/595]); ...

  6. Attitudes toward plagiarism among pharmacy and medical biochemistry students – cross-sectional survey study

    OpenAIRE

    Pupovac, Vanja; Bilic-Zulle, Lidija; Mavrinac, Martina; Petrovecki, Mladen

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Plagiarism is one of the most frequent and serious forms of misconduct in academic environment. The cross-sectional survey study was done with aim to explore the attitudes toward plagiarism. Materials and methods: First year students of Faculty of Pharmacy and Medical Biochemistry, University of Zagreb, Croatia (N = 146) were anonymously tested using Attitude toward Plagiarism (ATP) questionnaire. The questionnaire is composed of 29 statements on a 5 point Likert scale, (1 - ...

  7. THE SURVEY OF ATTITUDES OF STUDENTS OF MANAGEMENT TOWARD TRAVEL TOUR PRICES

    OpenAIRE

    Lubomir Karas; Martina Ferencova

    2010-01-01

    When choosing travel tours several factors play an important role such as a destination, purpose of travel tour, the agency's reputation, mode of transportation, accommodation, food, but price and any discounts. This article discusses the survey of attitudes of students of Faculty of Management University of Presov in Presov toward travel tour prices. Príspevok vznikol ako sucast riesenia grantoveho projektu VEGA C. 1/0876/10.

  8. Factors Affecting Learning Among Undergraduate Nursing Students: Cross-Sectional Survey

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    Linu Sara George

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nursing education expects the students to be competent enough to render quality care for their patients in hospital as well as community setting. To reach the level of expected competency, the students must undergo vigorous training during their undergraduate education. The learning experience of the students is influenced by many factors. Aim: To identify the factors, affecting learning as perceived by the students. Materials and Methods: This descriptive survey was conducted among 414 undergraduate nursing students enrolled in selected Nursing Colleges. Background information was collected using Demographic Proforma and the factors affecting learning were identified using Likert Scale. Factors were identified by exploratory factor analysis using extraction method of principal component analysis with varimax rotation. Results: Majority (73.7% of the samples were between 22-25 years of age, 93.2% were females, most (38.9% were studying in the fourth year of nursing, 50% of the students enrolled in the study had chosen nursing as a career due to job security in future, 58.7% students did not spent time every day for their studies and majority (89.1% had English as their medium of instruction in Pre-university college. Factor analysis identified five factors (Learning environment, Supportive services, Teacher characteristics, Learner challenges and Personal factors that affect the student learning. Conclusion: From the present study it can be concluded that perception of students do have an influence on factors affecting learning. The study findings will help the faculty members to bring in changes for the best learning outcome.

  9. Post-concussion driving behaviors and opinions: A survey of collegiate student-athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Julianne D; Lynall, Robert C; Lempke, Landon Bryce; Weber, Michelle L; Devos, Hannes

    2018-05-08

    Post-concussion driving restrictions are eminent, but we lack understanding of current behaviors and opinions about driving following concussion among populations at risk of concussion. We aimed to describe post-concussion driving behaviors and opinions among collegiate student-athletes. Student-athletes completed a survey (response rate=45.3%, 223/492) regarding their post-concussion driving behaviors and opinions. Response frequencies and percentages are presented. Student-athletes self-reported a total of 169 lifetime concussions (0.76±1.02 each). Of the 169 concussions, 52.1% (88/169) were diagnosed and 52.7% (89/169) occurred while the student-athlete possessed a valid driver's license. Student-athletes refrained from driving following 43.8% (39/89) of the concussive events. Student-athletes that refrained most commonly did so for only 24-48 hours (20.5%, 8/39) and because a health care provider advised them to (33.3%: 13/39). Student-athletes most commonly reported that they would feel "very unsafe" driving a car immediately following injury (38.4%, 84/219). When asked whether driving restrictions would influence your decision to report the injury to a health care provider, 7.9% reported that it "definitely would" (17/214), 26.6% "probably would" (57/214), 17.8% "neutral" (38/214), 24.8% "probably would not" (53/214), and 22.9% "definitely would not" (49/214). Despite generally believing that driving immediately following a concussion is unsafe, a majority of student-athletes did not refrain from driving at any point following their previous concussions. Post-concussion driving restrictions may have some influence on student-athletes' decisions to report the injury to a health care provider. Health care providers play a critical role in post-concussion driving restriction, but lack standardized recommendations to guide their care.

  10. Why medical students choose psychiatry - a 20 country cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, Kitty; Lydall, Gregory J; Malik, Amit; Ndetei, David M; Bhugra, Dinesh

    2014-01-15

    Recruitment to psychiatry is insufficient to meet projected mental health service needs world-wide. We report on the career plans of final year medical students from 20 countries, investigating factors identified from the literature which influence psychiatric career choice. Cross sectional electronic or paper survey. Subjects were final year medical students at 46 medical schools in participating countries. We assessed students' career intentions, motivations, medical school teaching and exposure to psychiatry. We assessed students' attitudes and personality factors. The main outcome measure was likelihood of specializing in psychiatry. Multilevel logistic regression was used to examine the joint effect of factors upon the main outcome. 2198 of 9135 (24%) of students responded (range 4 to 91%) across the countries. Internationally 4.5% of students definitely considered psychiatry as a career (range 1 to 12%). 19% of students (range 0 to 33%) were "quite likely", and 25% were "definitely not" considering psychiatry. Female gender, experience of mental/physical illness, media portrayal of doctors, and positive attitudes to psychiatry, but not personality factors, were associated with choosing psychiatry. Quality of psychiatric placement (correlation coefficient = 0.22, p school, experience of psychiatric enrichment activities (special studies modules and university psychiatry clubs), experience of acutely unwell patients and perceived clinical responsibility were all associated with choice of psychiatry.Multilevel logistic regression revealed six factors associated with students choosing psychiatry: importance of own vocation, odds ratio (OR) 3.01, 95% CI 1.61 to 5.91, p school, OR 10.8 (5.38 to 21.8, p student selection and psychiatry teaching which affect career choice. Addressing these factors may improve recruitment to psychiatry internationally.

  11. A National Radiation Oncology Medical Student Clerkship Survey: Didactic Curricular Components Increase Confidence in Clinical Competency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagadeesan, Vikrant S. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Raleigh, David R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, University of California–San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Koshy, Matthew; Howard, Andrew R.; Chmura, Steven J. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Golden, Daniel W., E-mail: dgolden@radonc.uchicago.edu [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Students applying to radiation oncology residency programs complete 1 or more radiation oncology clerkships. This study assesses student experiences and perspectives during radiation oncology clerkships. The impact of didactic components and number of clerkship experiences in relation to confidence in clinical competency and preparation to function as a first-year radiation oncology resident are evaluated. Methods and Materials: An anonymous, Internet-based survey was sent via direct e-mail to all applicants to a single radiation oncology residency program during the 2012-2013 academic year. The survey was composed of 3 main sections including questions regarding baseline demographic information and prior radiation oncology experience, rotation experiences, and ideal clerkship curriculum content. Results: The survey response rate was 37% (70 of 188). Respondents reported 191 unique clerkship experiences. Of the respondents, 27% (19 of 70) completed at least 1 clerkship with a didactic component geared towards their level of training. Completing a clerkship with a didactic component was significantly associated with a respondent's confidence to function as a first-year radiation oncology resident (Wilcoxon rank–sum P=.03). However, the total number of clerkships completed did not correlate with confidence to pursue radiation oncology as a specialty (Spearman ρ P=.48) or confidence to function as a first year resident (Spearman ρ P=.43). Conclusions: Based on responses to this survey, rotating students perceive that the majority of radiation oncology clerkships do not have formal didactic curricula. Survey respondents who completed a clerkship with a didactic curriculum reported feeling more prepared to function as a radiation oncology resident. However, completing an increasing number of clerkships does not appear to improve confidence in the decision to pursue radiation oncology as a career or to function as a radiation oncology resident. These

  12. A national radiation oncology medical student clerkship survey: didactic curricular components increase confidence in clinical competency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagadeesan, Vikrant S; Raleigh, David R; Koshy, Matthew; Howard, Andrew R; Chmura, Steven J; Golden, Daniel W

    2014-01-01

    Students applying to radiation oncology residency programs complete 1 or more radiation oncology clerkships. This study assesses student experiences and perspectives during radiation oncology clerkships. The impact of didactic components and number of clerkship experiences in relation to confidence in clinical competency and preparation to function as a first-year radiation oncology resident are evaluated. An anonymous, Internet-based survey was sent via direct e-mail to all applicants to a single radiation oncology residency program during the 2012-2013 academic year. The survey was composed of 3 main sections including questions regarding baseline demographic information and prior radiation oncology experience, rotation experiences, and ideal clerkship curriculum content. The survey response rate was 37% (70 of 188). Respondents reported 191 unique clerkship experiences. Of the respondents, 27% (19 of 70) completed at least 1 clerkship with a didactic component geared towards their level of training. Completing a clerkship with a didactic component was significantly associated with a respondent's confidence to function as a first-year radiation oncology resident (Wilcoxon rank-sum P=.03). However, the total number of clerkships completed did not correlate with confidence to pursue radiation oncology as a specialty (Spearman ρ P=.48) or confidence to function as a first year resident (Spearman ρ P=.43). Based on responses to this survey, rotating students perceive that the majority of radiation oncology clerkships do not have formal didactic curricula. Survey respondents who completed a clerkship with a didactic curriculum reported feeling more prepared to function as a radiation oncology resident. However, completing an increasing number of clerkships does not appear to improve confidence in the decision to pursue radiation oncology as a career or to function as a radiation oncology resident. These results support further development of structured didactic

  13. A National Radiation Oncology Medical Student Clerkship Survey: Didactic Curricular Components Increase Confidence in Clinical Competency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagadeesan, Vikrant S.; Raleigh, David R.; Koshy, Matthew; Howard, Andrew R.; Chmura, Steven J.; Golden, Daniel W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Students applying to radiation oncology residency programs complete 1 or more radiation oncology clerkships. This study assesses student experiences and perspectives during radiation oncology clerkships. The impact of didactic components and number of clerkship experiences in relation to confidence in clinical competency and preparation to function as a first-year radiation oncology resident are evaluated. Methods and Materials: An anonymous, Internet-based survey was sent via direct e-mail to all applicants to a single radiation oncology residency program during the 2012-2013 academic year. The survey was composed of 3 main sections including questions regarding baseline demographic information and prior radiation oncology experience, rotation experiences, and ideal clerkship curriculum content. Results: The survey response rate was 37% (70 of 188). Respondents reported 191 unique clerkship experiences. Of the respondents, 27% (19 of 70) completed at least 1 clerkship with a didactic component geared towards their level of training. Completing a clerkship with a didactic component was significantly associated with a respondent's confidence to function as a first-year radiation oncology resident (Wilcoxon rank–sum P=.03). However, the total number of clerkships completed did not correlate with confidence to pursue radiation oncology as a specialty (Spearman ρ P=.48) or confidence to function as a first year resident (Spearman ρ P=.43). Conclusions: Based on responses to this survey, rotating students perceive that the majority of radiation oncology clerkships do not have formal didactic curricula. Survey respondents who completed a clerkship with a didactic curriculum reported feeling more prepared to function as a radiation oncology resident. However, completing an increasing number of clerkships does not appear to improve confidence in the decision to pursue radiation oncology as a career or to function as a radiation oncology resident. These results

  14. Correlating Parental Involvement and Mathematics Achievement of African American Eighth-Grade Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyerinde, Bolanle Adenike

    2014-01-01

    Low involvement of African American parents in middle school education is a concern in a school district in the southeastern United States. The purpose of this quantitative study was to investigate the relationships between the explanatory variables of parental involvement, socioeconomic status, and level of education, and the achievement of…

  15. Parent Involvement, Academic Achievement and the Role of Student Attitudes and Behaviors as Mediators

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeal, Ralph B., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Previous research shows inconsistent relationships between parent involvement and academic achievement and often asks why such inconsistencies occur. The research proposes a theoretical model that separates parent involvement into those practices linking parents to children and those practices linking parents to other adults in the school…

  16. The Relationship between Principals' Perceptions of Parent Involvement and Student Academic Achievement in Title I Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaston, Sean Maurice

    2013-01-01

    The role of the "principal" in encouraging and supporting parent involvement has not received as much research attention as it would seem to merit. While the recent literature on parent involvement is extensive, virtually none are devoted to investigating the impact of school leadership, particularly the function of the principal on…

  17. Mental disorders among college students in the WHO World Mental Health Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auerbach, Randy P.; Alonso, Jordi; Axinn, William G.; Cuijpers, Pim; Ebert, David D.; Green, Jennifer Greif; Hwang, Irving; Kessler, Ronald C.; Liu, Howard; Mortier, Philippe; Nock, Matthew K.; Pinder-Amaker, Stephanie; Sampson, Nancy A.; Aguilar-Gaxiola, Sergio; Al-Hamzawi, Ali; Andrade, Laura H.; Benjet, Corina; Caldas-de-Almeida, José Miguel; Demyttenaere, Koen; Florescu, Silvia; de Girolamo, Giovanni; Gureje, Oye; Haro, Josep Maria; Karam, Elie G.; Kiejna, Andrzej; Kovess-Masfety, Viviane; Lee, Sing; McGrath, John J.; O’Neill, Siobhan; Pennell, Beth-Ellen; Scott, Kate; ten Have, Margreet; Torres, Yolanda; Zaslavsky, Alan M.; Zarkov, Zahari; Bruffaerts, Ronny

    2016-01-01

    Background Although mental disorders are significant predictors of educational attainment throughout the entire educational career, most research on mental disorders among students has focused on the primary and secondary school years. Methods The World Health Organization World Mental Health Surveys were used to examine the associations of mental disorders with college entry and attrition by comparing college students (n = 1,572) and nonstudents in the same age range (18–22; n = 4,178), including nonstudents who recently left college without graduating (n = 702) based on surveys in 21 countries (4 low/lower-middle income, 5 upper middle-income, 1 lower-middle or upper-middle at the times of two different surveys, and 11 high income). Lifetime and 12-month prevalence and age-of-onset of DSM-IV anxiety, mood, behavioural and substance disorders were assessed with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Results One-fifth (20.3%) of college students had 12-month DSM-IV/CIDI disorders. 83.1% of these cases had pre-matriculation onsets. Disorders with pre-matriculation onsets were more important than those with post-matriculation onsets in predicting subsequent college attrition, with substance disorders and, among women, major depression the most important such disorders. Only 16.4% of students with 12-month disorders received any 12-month healthcare treatment for their mental disorders. Conclusions Mental disorders are common among college students, have onsets that mostly occur prior to college entry, in the case of pre-matriculation disorders are associated with college attrition, and are typically untreated. Detection and effective treatment of these disorders early in the college career might reduce attrition and improve educational and psychosocial functioning. PMID:27484622

  18. Survey of college students' MP3 listening: Habits, safety issues, attitudes, and education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Alicia; Krishnamurti, Sridhar

    2010-06-01

    To survey listening habits and attitudes of typical college students who use MP3 players and to investigate possible safety issues related to MP3 player listening. College students who were frequent MP3 player users (N = 428) filled out a 30-item online survey. Specific areas probed by the present survey included frequency and duration of MP3 player use, MP3 player volume levels used, types of earphones used, typical environments in which MP3 player was worn, specific activities related to safety while listening to MP3 players, and attitudes toward MP3 player use. The majority of listeners wore MP3 players for less than 2 hr daily at safe volume levels. About one third of respondents reported being distracted while wearing an MP3 player, and more than one third of listeners experienced soreness in their ears after a listening session. About one third of respondents reported occasionally using their MP3 players at maximum volume levels. Listeners indicated willingness to (a) reduce volume levels, (b) decrease listening duration, and (c) buy specialized earphones to conserve their hearing. The study found concerns regarding the occasional use of MP3 players at full volume and reduced environmental awareness among some college student users.

  19. Established and Outsider relations among students involved in a Health promotion intervention in a Danish high school

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Stine Frydendal; Ottesen, Laila; Thing, Lone Friis

    Established and outsider relations among students involved in a health promotion intervention in a Danish high school. Stine Frydendal Nielsen1, Laila Ottesen2, Lone Friis Thing2, 1Rysensteen Gymnasium, 2University of Copenhagen The paper considers a study in a Danish high school in which students...... that maintaining health promotion interventions is difficult (Laitakari et al 1996). Therefore, in contemporary health promotion research, there is an increasing demand for enhancing active participation by the community (Haug, Torsheim, and Samdal, 2009). The study is based on the interpretative and process......-oriented methodology developed by Baur and Ernst (2011). They base this approach on Elias’ argument on involvement and detachment (Elias 1956) and the importance of theoretical pointers to insure that the researcher doesn’t loose herself in the research field. Elias unfolds this methodological approach in “The...

  20. The use of virtual microscopy and a wiki in pathology education: Tracking student use, involvement, and response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leifer, Zev

    2015-01-01

    The pathology laboratory course at the New York College of Podiatric Medicine involves the use of Virtual Microscopy. The students can scan the whole slide, section by section, and zoom in or out. Using the advantages of digital pathology, the students can, in addition, access the slide collections from other medical schools and put up normal histology (control) slides side-by-side with the pathology. They can cut and paste and preserve the region of interest that they find. They can edit and annotate their slides. A wiki was created (http://pathlab2014.wikifoundry.com)for the Class of 2014. The students saved, edited and uploaded their slides. In the wiki format, other students could comment, further edit, and even delete the slides. The students studied Basic Mechanisms and System Pathology. During this time, they saved, edited, shared, and uploaded their slides to the wiki. These were available in one full presentation and were also grouped into 16 albums. They were available to all. Student access was followed by Google analytics. At the end of the course, a questionnaire was distributed, assessing their impression of the wiki format and soliciting strengths and weaknesses. The use of a wiki has a number of important advantages in pathology education. It trains the students in the more sophisticated skills that they will use as professional pathologists or as clinicians: (1) Telepathology-it enables them to share slides and discuss observations. (2) Archiving and retrieval - It models the challenge faced by hospitals, diagnostic labs and physicians in maintaining a collection of slides in a form that is easily accessible. (3) Image analysis-familiarity with the wiki format allows them to jump easily to capturing and storing images found in the literature or in a pathologist's report. Experience with the use of a wiki in pathology education has been quite satisfactory from both the faculty and the student's point of view.