WorldWideScience

Sample records for survey involving students

  1. Student Confidence & Student Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebesniak, Amy L.; Heaton, Ruth M.

    2010-01-01

    The author always felt that her classroom was missing something. Although she was incorporating the NCTM Standards in her math classroom, she longed to use other teaching strategies to deepen students' understanding of the "how"as well as the "why." The author wanted "and needed" to implement cooperative learning into her classroom. The biggest…

  2. 2010 Student Survey. Research Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Association of Colleges and Employers (NJ1), 2010

    2010-01-01

    The National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) conducts an annual survey of college students to identify: (1) how students approach the job market as they near graduation; (2) how responsive the market is to the graduating students; (3) the resources students use to seek their first full-time job after getting their degree; and (4) the…

  3. Survey of foreign graduate students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Peter M.

    In the 1983 American Institute of Physics (AIP) Graduate Student Survey, the issue of foreign versus national students in U.S. graduate programs was explored. In the past decade, the number of entering graduate students from foreign nations in American universities has risen from about 600 to about 1100, an increase from 23% in 1973 to 40% in 1983 of all entering physics graduate students in the United States. There are more than 10,000 graduate students in physics in the United StatesThe benefits, or lack thereof, of having foreign graduate students raises a number of philosophical points. Like all students, foreign students learn from academic programs; but at high competitive levels, they contribute as well. The essence of growth in any academic program is described by the creativity supplied by ever incoming students. In an academically competitive system the question of foreign students displacing U.S. students in graduate programs has no definition. On the other hand, what about the graduate job market after graduation? Some would point to the return of foreign graduates to their homeland as an example of U.S. education efforts not benefitting U.S. society, at least directly. Others worry about foreign graduates flooding the U.S. job market.

  4. Increasing Student Involvement in IEPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan-Spohn, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the author proposes that students who led their Individual Education Program (IEP) meetings were better informed about their own disabilities, rights, and accommodations, and that the act of leading the meeting resulted in improved self-advocacy and self-confidence. Also, in understanding their list of accommodations and…

  5. Increasing Student Involvement in IEPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan-Spohn, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the author proposes that students who led their Individual Education Program (IEP) meetings were better informed about their own disabilities, rights, and accommodations, and that the act of leading the meeting resulted in improved self-advocacy and self-confidence. Also, in understanding their list of accommodations and…

  6. Students Involved in Animal Breeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirela Emilia Cadar

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In last decade, Romanian agriculture does not follow entirely the European and programs as concerns land exploitation and animal farming (SAPARD. Restrictive development projects (POS-MEDIU, POS-DRU, POS-CCE were active only in large private farms, which represent only 10.7% of the total registered farms in Romania. Was used a questionnaire for 36 students of our faculty, which have animal farms in 7 counties in Northwest of Transylvania. The study want to put into evidence the current problems of farmers in conditions of some private farms with small and middle number of animals. As small farms, they do not obtain important productions because of financial resource absence, limited professional education and absence of association in bigger exploitation farms. In these situations, the government must react providing a legal frame for rural agricultural development, supporting and supervising these small exploitations.

  7. Multiple Surveys of Students and Survey Fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Stephen R.; Whitcomb, Michael E.; Weitzer, William H.

    2004-01-01

    This chapter reviews the literature on survey fatigue and summarizes a research project that indicates that administering multiple surveys in one academic year can significantly suppress response rates in later surveys. (Contains 4 tables.)

  8. Differences in Work, Levels of Involvement, and Academic Performance between Residential and Commuter Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfano, Halley J.; Eduljee, Nina B.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between work, levels of involvement and academic performance between residential and commuter students. One hundred and eight undergraduate students at a private college in the Northeast were surveyed. Surveys aimed at examining work and levels of involvement were administered to the…

  9. Survey of Parents in a Predominately Latino Elementary School to Determine Factors that Affect Parental Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodenstab, Tracy

    2012-01-01

    Present research has shown that parental involvement has a large effect on student achievement. The current study utilized both casual-comparative and correlation methodology and identified variables that influence parental involvement. A review of literature with respect to parental involvement was presented. The study utilized survey data from…

  10. Involving students in experimental design: three approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeal, A P; Silverthorn, D U; Stratton, D B

    1998-12-01

    Many faculty want to involve students more actively in laboratories and in experimental design. However, just "turning them loose in the lab" is time-consuming and can be frustrating for both students and faculty. We describe three different ways of providing structures for labs that require students to design their own experiments but guide the choices. One approach emphasizes invertebrate preparations and classic techniques that students can learn fairly easily. Students must read relevant primary literature and learn each technique in one week, and then design and carry out their own experiments in the next week. Another approach provides a "design framework" for the experiments so that all students are using the same technique and the same statistical comparisons, whereas their experimental questions differ widely. The third approach involves assigning the questions or problems but challenging students to design good protocols to answer these questions. In each case, there is a mixture of structure and freedom that works for the level of the students, the resources available, and our particular aims.

  11. Students' Difficulties with Equations involving Circuit Elements

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Jing

    2016-01-01

    We discuss an investigation exploring students' difficulties with equations involving resistance, capacitance and inductance. We find that introductory physics students have great difficulty understanding, e.g., how the resistance of an ohmic resistor can be written in terms of the potential difference across it and the current through it, but it does not change when the potential difference across the resistor is varied. Similar confusions arose in problems relating to capacitors and inductors. We discuss these difficulties with equations in the context of introductory physics students' performance on questions about circuit elements both in the free-response and multiple-choice formats.

  12. Students Questioning Students (SQS): A Technique to Invite Students' Involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Judith S.

    1988-01-01

    Gifted/talented secondary-school students used the Students Questioning Students method in their mathematics classes. The method stimulated higher-order thinking, made students more attentive listeners, and improved their public speaking self-confidence. The paper offers suggestions for implementing the method and includes three pages of letters…

  13. Student Involvement in Individualized Education Program Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Test, David W.; Mason, Christine; Hughes, Carolyn; Konrad, Moira; Neale, Melia; Wood, Wendy M.

    2004-01-01

    We conducted a review of the literature to investigate interventions designed to increase students' involvement in their individualized education program (IEP) process. Sixteen studies were identified and analyzed in terms of six variables: purpose, participants/setting, design, dependent variables, independent variable, and results. Our findings…

  14. College Student Responses to Web and Paper Surveys: Does Mode Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carini, Robert M.; Hayek, John C.; Kuh, George D.; Kennedy, John M.; Ouimet, Judith A.

    2003-01-01

    Examined the responses of 58,288 college students to 8 scales involving 53 items from the National Survey of Student Engagement to gauge whether individuals respond differently to surveys administered via the Web and paper. Found that mode effects were generally small; however, students who completed the Web-based survey responded more favorably…

  15. Individualized transition support plans for students with intellectual disabilities : implications for involvement of the students and the parents

    OpenAIRE

    Mizutani, Yumi

    2003-01-01

    The present study conserned the student involvement in transition planning, and the partnership among students, their parents, and teachers in Japanese special high schools for students with intellectual disabilities. First, characteristics and problems in current practice of their involvement in individualized plans for instruction and career guidance at Japanese special high schools nationwide (N=220) were surveyed by the questionnaire. It was found that teachers for students with intellect...

  16. The Class of 2011 Student Survey Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Association of Colleges and Employers (NJ3), 2011

    2011-01-01

    Based on responses from 20,000 college seniors nationwide, "The Class of 2011 Student Survey Report" gives you hard numbers "plus" the analysis you need to develop your college recruiting strategy and build your brand among college students. Align your recruiting strategies tactics with students' wants, needs, attitudes, and behaviors--you'll get…

  17. The Class of 2011 Student Survey Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Association of Colleges and Employers (NJ3), 2011

    2011-01-01

    Based on responses from 20,000 college seniors nationwide, "The Class of 2011 Student Survey Report" gives you hard numbers "plus" the analysis you need to develop your college recruiting strategy and build your brand among college students. Align your recruiting strategies tactics with students' wants, needs, attitudes, and behaviors--you'll get…

  18. A Study of Lipscomb University Students' Internet Use and Involvement in Extracurricular Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Samuel Aarron

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze Lipscomb University students' Internet use and involvement in extracurricular activities. A survey of students at Lipscomb University was conducted. As confirmed by the data the research was able to determine that the type of extracurricular activity a student participates in most often is related to the…

  19. Parent Involvement and Student Performance: The Influence of School Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeal, Ralph B., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    Researchers focusing on parent involvement continue to concentrate their efforts on the relationship between involvement and student performance in isolation of the school context in which involvement occurs. This research outlines an ecology of involvement and how this social context affects parent involvement and student performance. Relying on…

  20. Comparing International and American Students: Involvement in College Life and Overall Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ji; Cole, Darnell

    2017-01-01

    Using longitudinal survey data, this study compares 191 international and 409 American students' involvement in college life, the extent to which the involvement is influenced by race/ethnicity, gender, and language background, and the extent to which the involvement influences overall satisfaction. Major findings include: International and…

  1. The 2015 Student Academic Experience Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Alex; Soilemetzidis, Ioannis; Hillman, Nick

    2015-01-01

    The Higher Education Policy Institute and Higher Education Academy (HEPI-HEA) "Student Academic Experience Survey" has been running since 2006 and is now a fixture in the policy landscape. Its focus on what students get, how hard they work, and what they think of their experience makes it even more useful at a time of high fees and…

  2. mba.com Prospective Students Survey. 2015 Survey Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Gregg

    2015-01-01

    This 2015 "mba.com Prospective Students Survey Report" explores the motivations, career goals, preferred program types, financial choices, decision time lines, and intended study destinations of individuals interested in pursuing a graduate management education. Findings analyzed in the report represent responses from nearly 12,000…

  3. A national survey of medical student suicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jacklyn; Kumar, Shelley; Nelson, Elizabeth; Harris, Toi; Coverdale, John

    2014-10-01

    Because there is no current information on medical student suicides, the authors surveyed US medical schools about deaths by suicide of medical students from June 2006 to July 2011. In spring through summer of 2012, the authors sent electronic surveys to the 133 accredited US allopathic medical schools at the time, excluding Puerto Rican schools. The 15-item survey included questions about deaths by suicide and deaths by means other than suicide. In the case of a reported suicide, the survey obtained information regarding demographic characteristics and method of suicide. The 90 responding schools (response rate 69 %) reported a total of six suicides (four males, two females; five Caucasians, one Asian) from July 2006 to June 2011. Two deaths by suicide occurred in first year, two in second year, and two in third year. Two of the suicides occurred by gunshot, two by hanging, one by overdose, and for one, the cause of death was unknown. Three of the six students left a suicide note. Although the number and rate of suicides among medical students may be lower than a prior survey that was conducted more than 15 years ago, these data affirm the importance of suicide prevention programs for medical students.

  4. Field classes: key to involve and attract students to soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muggler, Cristine Carole; Cardoso, Irene Maria; da Silva Lopes, Angelica

    2015-04-01

    Soil genesis is a subject taught to students of Agrarian Sciences and Geography at the Federal University of Viçosa in Minas Gerais, Brazil. Each semester 200 to 250 students inscribe for it. It is organized as the first 60 hours course on soils for 1st and 2nd year's students. The course has a distinct pedagogical approach, which is based on Paulo Freire's education principles, known as socio constructivism. In such approach, learning environments and materials are prepared to stimulate dialogues and exchange of knowledge between students themselves, strengthening that their role is crucial to their own learning. During the course, students have different types of practical classes: indoors, in a class room or at the Earth Sciences museum and outdoors, in the field. In the class room they have the opportunity to handle materials -minerals, rocks, soils and maps-, follow demonstrations and perform small experiments. The classes given in the museum intend a broadening of the subjects approached in theoretical and practical classes. In the field classes the students are organized in small groups with the task to investigate soil formation by observation and description of geology, landscape, land use, soil expositions and some of the soil properties. Attracting students to soils involves looking at meanings and perceptions related to soils they bring with themselves and follow this up to sensitize and create awareness about their importance. With this aim, it is also included, as part of the evaluation, a final voluntary presentation that many of the students do. The presentation can be a song, a poem, a sketch or whatever they propose and create. Many of the presentations bring topics related to the new perception about soils they get during the semester and to ideas or questions raised in the field classes. A survey with the students showed that field classes are by far the preferred classes and they are considered more dynamic. Since students have less and less

  5. Sport Involvement and Educational Outcomes of High School Students: A Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Seunghyun; Feltz, Deborah L.; Kietzmann, Laura A.; Diemer, Matthew A.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the relations among sport involvement and social and personal influences on high school students' educational expectations and attainment, using National Education Longitudinal Survey-88. Athletic engagement, educational expectations of significant others, peer support for academics, parental involvement in academics, and…

  6. Substance use by college students: the role of intrinsic versus extrinsic motivation for athletic involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockafellow, Bradley D; Saules, Karen K

    2006-09-01

    Certain types of athletic involvement may confer risk for substance use by college students. This study investigated whether motivational factors play a role in the relationship between athletic involvement and substance use. Intercollegiate athletes (n=98) and exercisers (n=120) were surveyed about substance use and motivation for athletic involvement. Athletes and exercisers who were extrinsically motivated had significantly higher rates of alcohol use than their intrinsically motivated counterparts. Results suggest that college students who are extrinsically motivated for involvement in physical activity/athletics--particularly those involved in team sports--may be in need of targeted prevention efforts. ((c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Homework Involvement and Academic Achievement of Native and Immigrant Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez, Natalia; Regueiro, Bibiana; Epstein, Joyce L; Piñeiro, Isabel; Díaz, Sara M; Valle, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Homework is a debated issue in society and its relationship with academic achievement has been deeply studied in the last years. Nowadays, schools are multicultural stages in which students from different cultures and ethnicities work together. In this sense, the present study aims to compare homework involvement and academic achievement in a sample of native and immigrant students, as well as to study immigrant students' relationship between homework involvement and Math achievement. The sample included 1328 students, 10-16 years old from Spanish families (85.6%) or immigrant students or students of immigrant origin (14.4%) from South America, Europe, Africa, and Asia. The study was developed considering three informants: elementary and secondary students, their parents and their teachers. Results showed higher involvement in homework in native students than in immigrant. Between immigrants students, those who are more involved in homework have better academic achievement in Math at secondary grades. There weren't found gender differences on homework involvement, but age differences were reported. Immigrant students are less involved in homework at secondary grades that students in elementary grades. The study highlights the relevance of homework involvement in academic achievement in immigrant students.

  8. Surveying and Researching on Medical Freshman Student Academic Involvement Based on the Effective Measure of Education Process%以教育过程有效测量为基础的医学新生学业参与调查与思考

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    焦光源; 胡正娟

    2016-01-01

    Students academic involvement in this study is divided into rule-oriented involvement, procedural involvement, and independent involvement. Through the survey and research on medical freshman to understand the status and problems of freshmen academic involvement. The study introduces three aspects to improve the rate of student academic involvement as follows: to regularize students’ learning behavior, to stimulate students' learning motivation, and to improve students' independent learning ability.%本研究将学生学业参与划分为规则性参与、过程性参与和自主性参与3个维度。通过对医学院校新生学业参与现状的调查研究,了解医学院校新生学业参与的现状及存在的问题,提出从规范学生学习行为、激发学生学习动机、提高学生自主学习能力3个方面来提升医学院校新生的学业参与度。

  9. KPI Student Satisfaction Survey, 2001. Executive Summary Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan Coll. (Ontario).

    The KPI (Key Performance Indicators) Student Satisfaction Survey is a paper-based survey distributed to all students in Ontario's Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology. The results of the Sheridan College survey for 2001 are presented in this report. The student population at Sheridan for the winter 2001 survey was 9,134. A total of 6,566…

  10. Community Involvement and Disadvantaged Students: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettles, Saundra Murray

    1991-01-01

    Community involvement is conceptualized as a typology of the following processes of social change: (1) conversion; (2) mobilization; (3) allocation of resources; and (4) instruction. The effects of these forms of involvement are considered in a review of 13 evaluations of programs for disadvantaged youth involving the community. (SLD)

  11. Homework Involvement and Academic Achievement of Native and Immigrant Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez, Natalia; Regueiro, Bibiana; Epstein, Joyce L.; Piñeiro, Isabel; Díaz, Sara M.; Valle, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Homework is a debated issue in society and its relationship with academic achievement has been deeply studied in the last years. Nowadays, schools are multicultural stages in which students from different cultures and ethnicities work together. In this sense, the present study aims to compare homework involvement and academic achievement in a sample of native and immigrant students, as well as to study immigrant students’ relationship between homework involvement and Math achievement. The sample included 1328 students, 10–16 years old from Spanish families (85.6%) or immigrant students or students of immigrant origin (14.4%) from South America, Europe, Africa, and Asia. The study was developed considering three informants: elementary and secondary students, their parents and their teachers. Results showed higher involvement in homework in native students than in immigrant. Between immigrants students, those who are more involved in homework have better academic achievement in Math at secondary grades. There weren’t found gender differences on homework involvement, but age differences were reported. Immigrant students are less involved in homework at secondary grades that students in elementary grades. The study highlights the relevance of homework involvement in academic achievement in immigrant students. PMID:27757097

  12. Student Microwave Experiments Involving the Doppler Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, F. Neff; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Described is the use of the Doppler Effect with microwaves in the measurement of the acceleration due to gravity of falling objects. The experiments described add to the repertoire of quantitative student microwave experiments. (Author/DS)

  13. Surveying Students' Understanding of Quantum Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Chandralekha

    2016-01-01

    Development of conceptual multiple-choice tests related to a particular physics topic is important for designing research-based learning tools to reduce the difficulties. We explore the difficulties that the advanced undergraduate and graduate students have with non-relativistic quantum mechanics of one particle in one spatial dimension. We developed a research-based conceptual multiple-choice survey that targets these issues to obtain information about the common difficulties and administered it to more than a hundred students from seven different institutions. The issues targeted in the survey include the set of possible wavefunctions, bound and scattering states, quantum measurement, expectation values, the role of the Hamiltonian, time-dependence of wavefunction and time-dependence of expectation value. We find that the advanced undergraduate and graduate students have many common difficulties with these concepts and that research-based tutorials and peer-instruction tools can significantly reduce these d...

  14. Removing the College Involvement "Research Asterisk": Identifying and Rethinking Predictors of American Indian College Student Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, John L.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify campus environmental predictors of American Indian college student involvement. The American Indian research asterisk, or not including American Indian data, has prevailed over student development research for decades. As a result, student affairs professionals have been limited in their ability to develop…

  15. Student Involvement in the Egyptian Quality Assurance System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elassy, Noha

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to study the extent and the quality of student involvement in the quality assurance process (QAP) in Egyptian higher education institutions (HEIs). Design/methodology/approach: In this study, two qualitative methods were used to explore the extent and the quality of student involvement; these were focus groups…

  16. Parental Involvement in Schooling, Classroom Environment and Student Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamski, Aurora; Fraser, Barry J.; Peiro, Maria M.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated relationships between students' perceptions of parental involvement in schooling, their Spanish classroom environment and student outcomes (attitudes and achievement). Modified Spanish versions of the What Is Happening In this Class?, Test of Spanish-Related Attitudes-L[subscript 1], a parental involvement questionnaire and a…

  17. Effectively Involving Faculty in the Assessment of Student Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson Laird, Thomas F.; Smallwood, Robert; Niskode-Dossett, Amanda Suniti; Garver, Amy K.

    2009-01-01

    The formal assessment of student engagement, as it has developed in recent years, is not necessarily a faculty-driven activity. Most faculty members who teach undergraduates are involved in the informal assessment of student engagement by taking attendance, observing student behaviors or expressions in class, providing feedback on assignments, and…

  18. Student and teacher perceptions of a school involvement intervention program

    OpenAIRE

    Sabiston, Claire

    2009-01-01

    A secondary school student enrolled in an intervention program for lower-achieving students reported positive affective, motivational, and cognitive experiences indicative of involvement and flow. Interview data revealed greater support for positive experiences related to extrinsic factors of improved grades and volume of work completed than to challenging activities that matched skills. Autonomy-supportive classroom practices appear to promote involvement through allowing students flexibilit...

  19. 2012 mba.com Prospective Students Survey. Survey Report. The GMAC[R] Survey Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Gregg

    2012-01-01

    This 2012 mba.com Prospective Students Survey Report explores the motivations, behaviors, program choices, and intended career outcomes of individuals who expressed a desire to further their education in a graduate business program. More than 16,000 prospective business school students who registered on mba.com shared their opinions, preferences,…

  20. The Myth of the "Green Student": Student Involvement in Australian University Sustainability Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, L.; More, E.; Avery, G. C.

    2014-01-01

    The paper questions the prevalence of "green students" and their impact on decision-making in sustainability programmes in Australian universities. While the universities studied provide numerous opportunities for student involvement in sustainability programmes, comparatively few students actually become involved, making student impact…

  1. Counseling the Occult-Involved Student: Guidelines and Suggestions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, Karla D.

    1993-01-01

    Contends that counselors working with public school students needs to be aware of the four main levels of involvement in the occult (fun-and-games, dabblers, serious involvement, and criminal involvement). Each of the four levels is described, warning signs are identified, and the counselor's role is explained as one of support and prevention. (NB)

  2. CPL - a way to increase student's commitment, involvement and collaboration?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Velling, Louise Ærthøj; Larsen, Mette Yde

    2015-01-01

    students and lecturers indicated that CPL as didactics is difficult directly to adapt in teaching in higher educational level. However, the evaluation indicated that some elements from CPL contributed in a positive way by increasing student’s involvement and commitment. Also a better collaboration between...... the students was indicated as well as a strengthened social environment in the class. Based on the experiment, our hypothesis is that the chosen 3 CPL activities will increase the students commitment and involvement in the lectures as well as provide the students with better collaborative competencies....

  3. Increased Student Achievement through Parental Involvement and Increased Student Responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boberg, Tim; Carpenter, Kerry; Haiges, Shelley; Lundsgaard, Barb

    This action research project addressed the problem of missing assignments among fourth- and fifth-graders at a school in northern Illinois. In order to document the extent to which students lacked responsibility for turning in daily assignments, the teacher-researchers kept track of missing assignments for each student and grade book records for 6…

  4. Project-Based Learning Involving Sensory Panelists Improves Student Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yee Ming

    2015-01-01

    Project-based, collaborative learning is an effective teaching method when compared to traditional cognitive learning. The purpose of this study was to assess student learning after the completion of a final meal project that involved a group of sensory panelists. A paper survey was conducted among 73 senior nutrition and dietetics students…

  5. A survey of veterinarian involvement in zoonotic disease prevention practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipton, Beth A; Hopkins, Sharon G; Koehler, Jane E; DiGiacomo, Ronald F

    2008-10-15

    To determine the extent to which practicing veterinarians in King County, Washington, engaged in commonly recommended practices for the prevention of zoonotic diseases. Cross-sectional survey. Sample Population-Licensed veterinarians practicing clinical medicine in King County, Washington. A survey was sent between September and November 2006 to 454 licensed veterinarians practicing clinical medicine in King County. 370 valid responses were received. A high proportion (280/362 [77%]) of respondents agreed that it was very important for veterinarians to educate clients on zoonotic disease prevention, but only 43% (158/367) reported that they had initiated discussions about zoonotic diseases with clients on a daily basis, and only 57% (203/356) indicated that they had client educational materials on zoonotic diseases available in their practices. Thirty-one percent (112/360) of respondents indicated that there were no written infection-control guidelines for staff members in the practice, and 28% (105/371) reported having been infected with a zoonotic disease in practice. Results illustrated that veterinarians recognize their important role in zoonotic disease prevention and suggested that veterinarians would welcome stronger partnerships with public health agencies and other health professionals in this endeavor. Methods to increase veterinarians' involvement in zoonotic disease prevention include discussing zoonotic diseases more frequently with clients, physicians, and public health agencies; encouraging higher risk individuals to discuss zoonotic diseases; having educational materials on zoonotic diseases available for clients; improving infection-control practices; and ensuring that continuing education courses on zoonotic diseases are regularly available.

  6. Students' Involvement in Faculty Research: Ethical and Methodological Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda M. Ferguson

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Faculty who engage students as participants in their qualitative research often encounter methodological and ethical problems. Ethical issues arise from the fiduciary relationship between faculty and their students, and violations of that relationship occur when the educator has a dual role as researcher with those students. Methodological issues arise from research designs to address these ethical issues. This conflict is particularly evident in faculty research on pedagogy in their own disciplines, for which students are necessary as participants but are captive in the relationship. In this article, the authors explore the issues of double agency when faculty involve students as participants in their research.

  7. Blended learning in ethics education: a survey of nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Li-Ling

    2011-05-01

    Nurses are experiencing new ethical issues as a result of global developments and changes in health care. With health care becoming increasingly sophisticated, and countries facing challenges of graying population, ethical issues involved in health care are bound to expand in quantity and in depth. Blended learning rather as a combination of multiple delivery media designed to promote meaningful learning. Specifically, this study was focused on two questions: (1) the students' satisfaction and attitudes as members of a scenario-based learning process in a blended learning environment; (2) the relationship between students' satisfaction ratings of nursing ethics course and their attitudes in the blended learning environment. In total, 99 senior undergraduate nursing students currently studying at a public nursing college in Taiwan were invited to participate in this study. A cross-sectional survey design was adopted in this study. The participants were asked to fill out two Likert-scale questionnaire surveys: CAAS (Case Analysis Attitude Scale), and BLSS (Blended Learning Satisfaction Scale). The results showed what students felt about their blended learning experiences - mostly items ranged from 3.27-3.76 (the highest score is 5). Another self-assessment of scenario analysis instrument revealed the mean scores ranged from 2.87-4.19. Nearly 57.8% of the participants rated the course 'extremely helpful' or 'very helpful.' This study showed statistically significant correlations (r=0.43) between students' satisfaction with blended learning and case analysis attitudes. In addition, results testified to a potential of the blended learning model proposed in this study to bridge the gap between students and instructors and the one between students and their peers, which are typical of blended learning, and to create meaningful learning by employing blended pedagogical consideration in the course design. The use of scenario instruction enables students to develop critical

  8. Teaching Approaches and Student Involvement in Learning to Write

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyeongheui Kim

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the relationship between teaching approaches and the learning involvement of students from Korea in US college level classes by examining what these students did to complete writing assignments required for classes and what approaches professors adopted to assist students with English writing. It also examined how and why their involvement changed from active to less involvement to withdrawal or passive involvement to active involvement. In other words, this study examined how much professors’ teaching approaches influenced students’ attitudes towards English writing. Korean students who grew up in a culture where the whole society regards teachers highly expected more from their professors and were more dependent on professors. It appears that study participants’ English language proficiency also played a role in their dependency on their professors. There was a gap between these students’ expectations for professors and some of their professors’ teaching approaches. Also, there was some professors’ bias perceived by study participants, whether intentional or not, against non-native English speaking students and minority students, which disappointed and frustrated study participants and influenced these students’ degrees of involvement in learning.

  9. Heterosexual and nonheterosexual young university students' involvement in traditional and cyber forms of bullying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wensley, Kate; Campbell, Marilyn

    2012-12-01

    Research has consistently found that school students who do not identify as self-declared completely heterosexual are at increased risk of victimization by bullying from peers. This study examined heterosexual and nonheterosexual university students' involvement in both traditional and cyber forms of bullying, as either bullies or victims. Five hundred twenty-eight first-year university students (M=19.52 years old) were surveyed about their sexual orientation and their bullying experiences over the previous 12 months. The results showed that nonheterosexual young people reported higher levels of involvement in traditional bullying, both as victims and perpetrators, in comparison to heterosexual students. In contrast, cyberbullying trends were generally found to be similar for heterosexual and nonheterosexual young people. Gender differences were also found. The implications of these results are discussed in terms of intervention and prevention of the victimization of nonheterosexual university students.

  10. Enhancing professionalism among engineering students through involvements in technical societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sreejita; Samineni, Anvesh; Mandal, Subhamoy; Murari, Bhaskar Mohan

    2015-08-01

    A student chapter can be considered to be a miniature enterprise; however without the latter's major financial risks. Involvement in the student chapter of a professional society like IEEE at undergraduate level plays a pivotal role in the overall professional development of the student by keeping the students informed about the various career possibilities. A student chapter shapes the hitherto naive students into industry ready professionals and to suitable candidates for some of the best grad schools worldwide. This assertion has been discussed in-depth taking the example of IEEE EMBS Student Branch chapter of VIT University. It has been described how the entire process, - starting from inception of an idea to its materialization in to an activity, has shaped the volunteers and participants into better professionals.

  11. Surveying Graduate Students' Attitudes and Approaches to Problem Solving

    CERN Document Server

    Mason, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Students' attitudes and approaches to problem solving in physics can profoundly influence their motivation to learn and development of expertise. We developed and validated an Attitudes and Approaches to Problem Solving survey by expanding the Attitudes towards Problem Solving survey of Marx and Cummings and administered it to physics graduate students. Comparison of their responses to the survey questions about problem solving in their own graduate level courses vs. problem solving in the introductory physics courses provides insight into their expertise in introductory and graduate level physics. The physics graduate students' responses to the survey questions were also compared with those of introductory physics and astronomy students and physics faculty. We find that, even for problem solving in introductory physics, graduate students' responses to some survey questions are less expert-like than those of the physics faculty. Comparison of survey responses of graduate students and introductory students for...

  12. Shaping Students' Civic Commitments: The Influence of College Cocurricular Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trolian, Teniell L.; Barnhardt, Cassie L.

    2017-01-01

    Drawing on social capital theory, this study examines the extent to which several college cocurricular involvement experiences during college contribute to students' civic commitments toward social and political involvement at the end of college. Results are based on longitudinal data from the Wabash National Study of Liberal Arts Education and…

  13. 2011 Montana Youth Risk Behavior Survey: Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montana Office of Public Instruction, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This report presents the 2011 Montana Youth Risk Behavior Survey high school student frequency distributions for students with disabilities. These frequency distributions are based upon surveys with 1,672 high school students with disabilities in Montana during February of 2011. Frequency distributions may not total 1,672 due to nonresponse and…

  14. Business School Deans on Student Academic Dishonesty: A Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Bob S.; Weible, Rick J.; Olmosk, Kurt E.

    2010-01-01

    While students and, to a lesser extent, faculty have been surveyed about the student academic dishonesty issue, deans have been virtually ignored. This paper reports the results of an online survey of business school deans on the issue. Deans' perceptions of the level of student academic dishonesty in their schools were much lower than the levels…

  15. Business School Deans on Student Academic Dishonesty: A Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Bob S.; Weible, Rick J.; Olmosk, Kurt E.

    2010-01-01

    While students and, to a lesser extent, faculty have been surveyed about the student academic dishonesty issue, deans have been virtually ignored. This paper reports the results of an online survey of business school deans on the issue. Deans' perceptions of the level of student academic dishonesty in their schools were much lower than the levels…

  16. A survey of Canadian interprofessional student-run free clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Enoch; Hu, Tina

    2017-09-01

    Student-run free clinics (SRFCs) have existed in Canada since 1971, providing interprofessional healthcare to underserved populations. SRFCs are seen as vehicles for socially accountable health professional education. Literature on how Canadian SRFC function is lacking. Web-based surveys were sent to student leaders from Canadian SRFCs regarding their 2014 activities. All six fully-functioning SRFCs responded reporting on the following: services provided, professions involved, governing structure, funding sources, clients seen, types of care sought, students and preceptors involved, as well as perceived strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats. In 2014, 2,159 clients were provided clinical care at Canadian SRFCs. The most common reasons for visiting included pain and infection. Strengths identified include autonomy, ability to adapt to client needs, serving the underserved, and real-world interprofessional teamwork. Weaknesses reported include high student and preceptor turnover. Threats include securing funding and liability coverage. Since there is little literature on Canadian SRFCs, we compared our results with United States (US) based SRFCs. Canadian SRFCs share core values with US-based SRFCs and report similar strengths and challenges. However, Canadian SRFCs differ in scope and appear to provide care for more acute concerns. Data from studies of US-based SRFCs may not be immediately applicable to Canadian SRFCs. Studies evaluating Canadian SRFCs are needed.

  17. Participatory action research: involving students in parent education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Cathrine; Wu, Cynthia; Lam, Winsome

    2014-01-01

    Competition for scarce clinical placements has increased requiring new and innovative models to be developed to meet the growing need. A participatory action research project was used to provide a community nursing clinical experience of involvement in parent education. Nine Hong Kong nursing students self-selected to participate in the project to implement a parenting program called Parenting Young Children in a Digital World. Three project cycles were used: needs identification, skills development and program implementation. Students were fully involved in each cycle's planning, action and reflection phase. Qualitative and quantitative data were collected to inform the project. The overall outcome of the project was the provision of a rich and viable clinical placement experience that created significant learning opportunities for the students and researchers. This paper will explore the student's participation in this PAR project as an innovative clinical practice opportunity.

  18. Focusing on the Sophomores: Characteristics Associated with the Academic and Social Involvement of Second-Year College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xueli; Kennedy-Phillips, Lance

    2013-01-01

    Research has long suggested that an optimal level of involvement in academic and social activities positively affects student development and outcomes. However, many second-year students experience the "sophomore slump." For this study, guided by both prior literature and theoretical perspectives, a survey instrument was developed to…

  19. Toward Digital Citizenship: Examining Factors Affecting Participation and Involvement in the Internet Society among Higher Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Zahrani, Abdulrahman

    2015-01-01

    The current study aims to understand digital citizenship, based on the assumptions of Ribble (2014), by examining factors affecting participation and involvement in the Internet virtual societies among higher education students. A quantitative approach using a survey questionnaire was implemented. The participants were 174 students from the…

  20. [Epidemiological evaluation of soft drinks consumption--students surveys].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chłapowska, Joanna; Pawlaczyk-Kamieńska, Tamara

    2012-01-01

    Non carious lesions, including erosion changes, are becoming increasingly apparent. There are multiple factors involved in the etiology of dental erosion i.a. acids in commercially available drinks. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of soft drink consumption that promote dental erosion among young adults. The 266 subjects were asked to fill in a questionnaire. The questionnaire inquired questions about consumption of drinks favouring tooth erosion. The students declared frequent drinking of isotonic drinks, energetic drinks, fizzy drinks and coca-cola type drinks. On the basis of a survey of Poznań University of Medical Sciences students it can be determined, that they have relatively high risk of dental erosion. To minimize the risk of dental erosion occurrence in young population there is a need to disseminate knowledge about the etiology.

  1. Parent involvement and student academic performance: a multiple mediational analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topor, David R; Keane, Susan P; Shelton, Terri L; Calkins, Susan D

    2010-01-01

    Parent involvement in a child's education is consistently found to be positively associated with a child's academic performance. However, there has been little investigation of the mechanisms that explain this association. The present study examines two potential mechanisms of this association: the child's perception of cognitive competence and the quality of the student-teacher relationship. This study used a sample of 158 seven-year-old participants, their mothers, and their teachers. Results indicated a statistically significant association between parent involvement and a child's academic performance, over and above the impact of the child's intelligence. A multiple mediation model indicated that the child's perception of cognitive competence fully mediated the relation between parent involvement and the child's performance on a standardized achievement test. The quality of the student-teacher relationship fully mediated the relation between parent involvement and teacher ratings of the child's classroom academic performance. Limitations, future research directions, and implications for public policy initiatives are discussed.

  2. Communicating Research Through Student Involvement in Phenological Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrow, E. B.; Kopplin, M.; Gazal, R. M.; Robin, J. H.; Boger, R. A.

    2011-12-01

    and students. Phenological studies by the Mat-Su Career and Technical High School students helped scientists working with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, to determine the best time for an aerial survey of bald eagle nests in the Matanuska Susitna Valley in Alaska. GLOBE student phenological data have also been used as part of a doctoral student dissertation, included in presentations at professional meetings and peer- reviewed scientific papers. Pre- and post- engagement assessment data have indicated a significant increase in content knowledge and science skills of pre-college students who have engaged in phenology investigations. Phenological investigations meet educational standards, help students understand the Earth as a system, do not require expensive equipment, and enable students across the globe to learn science by doing science.

  3. Engineering surveying theory and examination problems for students

    CERN Document Server

    Schofield, W

    2013-01-01

    Engineering Surveying: Theory and Examination Problems for Students, Volume 1, Third Edition discusses topics concerning engineering surveying techniques and instrumentations. The book is comprised of eight chapters that cover several concerns in engineering survey. Chapter 1 discusses the basic concepts of surveying. Chapter 2 deals with simple and precise leveling, while Chapter 3 covers earthworks. The book also talks about the theodolite and its applications, and then discusses optical distance measurement. Curves, underground and hydrographic surveying, and aspects of dimensional control

  4. Ten Projects to Involve Your Students Directly in French.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lent, Peter C.

    1981-01-01

    Proposes 10 activities to provide French classes of all levels with a broad spectrum of language projects involving direct and active use of French including students polling each other, skits based on television commercials, geographical "show and tell," cooking French dishes, writing a monthly newspaper, and field trips. (BK)

  5. Final Year Faculty of Education Students' Views Concerning Parent Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, E. Nihal

    2014-01-01

    This study has aimed to determine the knowledge, skills, and views held by pre-service teachers attending different teacher training programs about parent involvement. A total of 520 4th year students receiving education in primary school teaching and in branch teaching programs participated in the study. Data were collected by the "Parent…

  6. Higher Education and Students with Orthopedic Disabilities: A Survey Instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Delar K.

    A survey instrument is presented that was used in a national survey of 160 colleges and universities to explore facilities and services to students with orthopedic disabilities. The survey contains 33 items that focus on the following areas: structural accessibility, academic accessibility, dorm-living, and recreational opportunities. The total…

  7. Just Another Student Survey?--Point-of-Contact Survey Feedback Enhances the Student Experience and Lets Researchers Gather Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, Warren; Boyd, William; Boyd, Wendy; Hellmundt, Suzi

    2017-01-01

    When student surveys are conducted within university environments, one outcome of feedback to the researcher is that it provides insight into the potential ways that curriculum can be modified and how content can be better delivered. However, the benefit to the current students undertaking the survey is not always evident. By modifying Biggs'…

  8. Social Support, Religious Involvement and Alcohol Use among Students at a Conservative Religious University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Wendy E

    2017-05-24

    The misuse of alcohol among college students remains a significant public health concern in the United States. Excessive drinking among college students has been linked to numerous negative consequences, including rape, impaired academic performance, absenteeism from work and school and damaged social relations. This study examined whether religious involvement and social support played a role in reducing the frequency of alcohol use. A non-random convenience sample of 364 students from a larger study of 760 college students-18 years old and older-were recruited over a 2 month period. The survey used in this study consisted of 124 items and collected information on areas such as substance misuse, sexual activity, use of pornography, relationships, personal religious practices, and social support. A descriptive analysis and chi-square were performed to determine if there was a relationship between frequency of alcohol use and gender, marital status, student class, GPA, religion, ethnicity and age. Linear regression was conducted to determine if social support and religious involvement were predictors of frequency of alcohol misuse. Multivariate regression analysis was used for predicting religious involvement when including social support while controlling for gender, age, ethnicity and grade. The present study revealed that religious involvement was a predictor for reduced frequency of alcohol use, while social support was not a predictor of lower frequency of alcohol use.

  9. Academic Advising at UNO. Report of the 1991 Student Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, A. E.

    1991-01-01

    A study was done of student perception of academic advising at the University of Nebraska, Omaha (UNO). The study surveyed 638 students who participated in the early registration process for the Fall 1991 semester. Of those students, 269 were men and 369 were women and 8.3 percent were members of a minority group. The study instrument was the…

  10. Factors involved in selection of a career in surgery and orthopedics for medical students in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollias, C; Banza, L; Mkandawire, N

    2010-03-01

    There is a critical shortage of Orthopedic Surgeons in Malawi as well as all countries in sub-Saharan Africa. To date, there is no published literature that has investigated surgical or Orthopedic career selection amongst African medical trainees. With the goal of facilitating recruitment into Surgery and Orthopedics in Malawi, we explored the key aspects of Malawian Medical Students' choice of careers in surgical disciplines. An on-line survey of all students in clinical years at the College of Medicine in Blantyre, Malawi was performed. The survey was anonymous and constructed de novo by a stringent process including Item Generation, Item reduction, Survey composition, Pre-testing, Assessment of Validity by a recognized survey expert, Pilot testing in on-line format by several Malawian Medical Students, and then formal survey testing. Surgery was the most popular specialty choice among the medical trainees (46%). General Surgery was the popular surgical specialty (27%), followed by Neurosurgery (22%) and Orthopedics (19%). The majority of students (67%) feared occupational exposure to HIV but this did not appear to be a factor in specialty choice (p = 0.9). Students with Orthopedic mentors were significantly more likely to choose Orthopedics as their first choice surgical specialty (p = 0.01). Despite limited resources and surgeons in sub-Saharan Africa, surgical specialties are desirable career choices. This is the first evaluation of factors involved in surgical or Orthopedic career selection in any African context. Future initiatives to improve exposure and mentorship in Orthopedics are fundamental to recruitment into the specialty.

  11. Surveying students' conceptual knowledge of electricity and magnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, David P.; O'Kuma, Thomas L.; Hieggelke, Curtis J.; Van Heuvelen, Alan

    2001-07-01

    The Conceptual Survey of Electricity and Magnetism (CSEM) was developed to assess students' knowledge about topics in electricity and magnetism. The survey is a 32-question, multiple-choice test that can be used as both a pretest and posttest. During four years of testing and refinement, the survey has been given in one form or another to more than 5000 introductory physics students at 30 different institutions. Typical pretest results are that students in calculus-based courses get 31% of the questions correct and student's in algebra/trigonometry-based courses average 25% correct. Posttest correct results only rise to 47% and 44%, respectively. From analysis of student responses, a number of student difficulties in electricity and magnetism are indicated.

  12. Bowie State University Student Support Services Admitted Student Survey 1991.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Wanda E.

    TRIO programs offer support services to students beginning at the 7th grade and continuing through to graduate school. Student Support Services projects provide instruction, tutoring, counseling, learning skills, and writing skills to primarily low income and first generation or disabled college students. Student Support Services projects are…

  13. Parent Involvement Practices of High-Achieving Elementary Science Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Samara Susan

    This study addressed a prevalence of low achievement in science courses in an urban school district in Georgia. National leaders and educators have identified the improvement of science proficiency as critical to the future of American industry. The purpose of this study was to examine parent involvement in this school district and its contribution to the academic achievement of successful science students. Social capital theory guided this study by suggesting that students achieve best when investments are made into their academic and social development. A collective case study qualitative research design was used to interview 9 parent participants at 2 elementary schools whose children scored in the exceeds category on the Science CRCT. The research questions focused on what these parents did at home to support their children's academic achievement. Data were collected using a semi-structured interview protocol and analyzed through the categorical aggregation of transcribed interviews. Key findings revealed that the parents invested time and resources in 3 practices: communicating high expectations, supporting and developing key skills, and communicating with teachers. These findings contribute to social change at both the local and community level by creating a starting point for teachers, principals, and district leaders to reexamine the value of parent input in the educational process, and by providing data to support the revision of current parent involvement policies. Possibilities for further study building upon the findings of this study may focus on student perceptions of their parents' parenting as it relates to their science achievement.

  14. The Impact of Lottery Incentives on Student Survey Response Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Stephen R.; Whitcomb, Michael E.

    2003-01-01

    A controlled experiment tested the effects of lottery incentives using a prospective college applicant Web survey, with emails sent to more than 9,000 high school students. Found minimal effect of postpaid incentives for increasing levels of incentive. (EV)

  15. Survey on aspiration and expectations of high school students

    OpenAIRE

    Carvalho, José-Raimundo; Magnac, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    In this document, we review the main characteristics of the survey undertaken in Ceara in 2014 among students of public and private high schools and regarding their characteristics and behavior relative to the choice of college and undergraduate degrees.

  16. Student Teacher Attitudes regarding Their Experiences in Student Teaching: A Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanes, Edward C.; And Others

    A survey was made of student teachers in the Secondary Education Program at Western Kentucky University to determine their attitudes regarding their student teaching experience. Responses to a 25 item questionnaire were obtained from 123 students. The findings showed that: (1) Most student teachers were highly positive in their rating of the…

  17. Drinking among medical students: a questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, D J; Beales, I L

    1989-07-01

    To assess the prevalence of drinking among medical students a questionnaire on smoking, exercise, drinking, and weight was distributed among the students available. A total of 260 replies were received from an estimated available population of 350 students (134 men and 126 women). The mean alcohol consumption obtained by a quantity-frequency measure was 20.5 units/week for male students and 14.6 units/week for female students. Retrospective diary reports showed mean (SE) consumptions of 18 (2) units/week for men (n = 134) and 11 (1) units/week for women (n = 126). Consumption among the men closely matched consumption among men matched for age in the general population. Women, however, drank more than women matched for age. Male and female medical students exceeded the suggested maximum for their sex in equal proportions. Quantity-frequency data showed that 31 (23%) men drank over 35 units/week and 28 (22%) women drank over 21 units/week. Of the 59 students exceeding these limits, 51 responded positively to a standard screening questionnaire for alcohol abuse. Forty students reported that they might have a drinking problem, and 138 reported that alcohol had affected their academic performance at some time; 17 of these were affected frequently. The students suggested sensible maximum consumption figures for health education. Smoking was associated with heavy drinking, especially among the women. These results suggest that some medical students are compromising their future health and their academic performance through excessive drinking.

  18. Parental involvement and bullying among middle-school students in North Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdirahman, H; Fleming, L C; Jacobsen, K H

    2013-03-01

    Bullying, especially in developing countries, has not been much examined, especially the influence of parents on the risk of being bullied. The aim of this study was to determine whether active parenting is associated with reduced peer victimization among middle-school students in North Africa. A secondary analysis of data from more than 13,000 middle-school students who participated in the Global School-based Student Health Survey (GSHS) in Egypt, Libya, Morocco and Tunisia between 2006 and 2008, was conducted using multiple logistic regression models. About 60% of students in Egypt and one-third of students in Libya, Morocco and Tunisia reported having been bullied in the past month. In all 4 countries, boys reported more peer victimization than girls. In Egypt, Morocco and Tunisia, students who reported that their parents checked their homework, were understanding, and knew how the student spent free time had a reduced likelihood of peer victimization but this association was not significant in Libya. Interventions for reducing bullying should consider the positive impact of involved parents.

  19. Why They Come: SSATB Survey of Parents of Incoming Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Independent School, 2015

    2015-01-01

    What motivates families to consider an independent private school education and ultimately make the commitment to enroll their children? The Secondary School Admission Test Board (SSATB) surveyed 2,300 parents of private school-bound students in 2014 to answer this question. Based on the results of the survey, this brief article highlights five of…

  20. The HEPI-HEA Student Academic Experience Survey 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soilemetzidis, Ioannis; Bennett, Paul; Buckley, Alex; Hillman, Nick; Stoakes, Geoff

    2014-01-01

    This survey continues a series of similar surveys conducted for the Higher Education Policy Institute (HEPI) since 2006; this year it's been done in partnership with the HEA. It investigates the learning and teaching experiences of students, including: (1) satisfaction with courses; (2) reasons for dissatisfaction; (3) experience of…

  1. Student Engagement: Developing a Conceptual Framework and Survey Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Gerald F.; Heller, Nathan A.; Burch, Jana J.; Freed, Rusty; Steed, Steve A.

    2015-01-01

    Student engagement is considered to be among the better predictors of learning, yet there is growing concern that there is no consensus on the conceptual foundation. The authors propose a conceptualization of student engagement grounded in A. W. Astin's (1984) Student Involvement Theory and W. A. Kahn's (1990) employee engagement research where…

  2. Student Engagement: Developing a Conceptual Framework and Survey Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Gerald F.; Heller, Nathan A.; Burch, Jana J.; Freed, Rusty; Steed, Steve A.

    2015-01-01

    Student engagement is considered to be among the better predictors of learning, yet there is growing concern that there is no consensus on the conceptual foundation. The authors propose a conceptualization of student engagement grounded in A. W. Astin's (1984) Student Involvement Theory and W. A. Kahn's (1990) employee engagement research where…

  3. An Examination of the Influence of Clicker Technology on College Student Involvement and Recall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaterlaus, J. Mitch; Beckert, Troy E.; Fauth, Elizabeth B.; Teemant, Boyd

    2012-01-01

    Educators in a variety of disciplines have used clicker technology to engage college students in the learning process. This study investigated the influence of clicker technology on student recall and student involvement in higher education. Student Involvement Theory was used to inform and guide this research. Student recall was evaluated using…

  4. Graduate Students' Pay and Benefits Vary Widely, Survey Shows

    Science.gov (United States)

    June, Audrey Williams

    2008-01-01

    Graduate students face an array of choices when evaluating compensation-and-benefits packages that make comparisons difficult. A "Chronicle" survey shows that the offers to teaching assistants and research assistants vary widely. Some institutions cover 100 percent of graduate students' tuition, while others waive only a portion. It is possible to…

  5. Ego Network Analysis of Upper Division Physics Student Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewe, Eric

    2017-01-01

    We present the analysis of student networks derived from a survey of upper division physics students. Ego networks focus on the connections that center on one person (the ego). The ego networks in this talk come from a survey that is part of an overall project focused on understanding student retention and persistence. The theory underlying this work is that social and academic integration are essential components to supporting students continued enrollment and ultimately graduation. This work uses network analysis as a way to investigate the role of social and academic interactions in retention and persistence decisions. We focus on student interactions with peers, on mentoring interactions with physics department faculty, and on engagement in physics groups and how they influence persistence. Our results, which are preliminary, will help frame the ongoing research project and identify ways in which departments can support students. This work supported by NSF grant #PHY 1344247.

  6. Tendencies of Comprehension and Acceptance of Theory of Evolution: A Study Involving Students from the Faculties of Education and Theology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilen, Kadir; Ercan, Orhan

    2016-01-01

    The current study aimed to identify the views of students from the Faculty of Education and the Faculty of Theology from the University of Kahramanmaras Sutcu Imam regarding their comprehension and acceptance of the theory of evolution. A survey model was used involving a quantitative research design. The working group of the study was composed of…

  7. Student Attitudes Regarding Ebooks: A Survey with cost savings implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Bialaszewski

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Students were surveyed regarding usage of ebooks. Findings demonstrate that their propensity to using Ebooks increases as costs decrease, Tecnological advancements have led to ebooks being more than a written text displayed in digital format as web sites provide more up to date information. Also, licensing changes such as Creative Commons allow for more data to be accessible for students allowing for more student research opportunity.

  8. Student Engagement in Law School: Enhancing Student Learning. Annual Survey Results, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law School Survey of Student Engagement, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Law School Survey of Student Engagement (LSSSE) focuses on activities that affect learning in law school. The results in this year's survey show how law students use their time, what they think about their legal training, and what law schools can do to improve engagement and learning. The selected results reported in this study are based on…

  9. The organizational culture. A students' survey

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dana Adriana Lupsa-Tataru

    2016-01-01

      The paper is focused on presenting the main results of a study conducted on a sample of 300 students from a university remaining anonymous, regarding their attitudes and opinions about the values...

  10. Non-Response in Student Surveys: The Role of Demographics, Engagement and Personality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Stephen R.; Whitcomb, Michael E.

    2005-01-01

    What causes a student to participate in a survey? This paper looks at participation across multiple surveys to understand survey non-response; by using multiple surveys we minimize the impact of survey salience. Students at a selective liberal arts college were administered four different surveys throughout the 2002-2003 academic year, and we use…

  11. A longitudinal online interprofessional education experience involving family nurse practitioner students and pharmacy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Andrea; Broeseker, Amy; Cunningham, Jill; Cortes, Cyndi; Beall, Jennifer; Bigham, Amy; Chang, Jongwha

    2017-03-01

    Interprofessional education (IPE) continues to gain traction worldwide. Challenges integrating IPE into health profession programmes include finding convenient times, meeting spaces, and level-appropriate assignments for each profession. This article describes the implementation of a 21-month prospective cohort study pilot programme for the Master of Science in nursing family nurse practitioner (FNP) and doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) students at a private university in the United States. This IPE experience utilised a blended approach for the learning activities; these students had initial and final sessions where they met face-to-face, with asynchronous online activities between these two sessions. The online assignments, discussions, and quizzes during the pilot programme involved topics such as antimicrobial stewardship, hormone replacement therapy, human papilloma virus vaccination, prenatal counselling, emergency contraception, and effects of the Affordable Care Act on practice. The results suggested that the FNP students held more favourable attitudes about online IPE and that the PharmD students reported having a clearer understanding of their own roles and those of the other participating healthcare students. However, the students also reported wanting more face-to-face interaction during their online IPE experience. Implications from this study suggest that effective online IPE can be supported by ensuring educational parity between students regarding the various topics discussed and a consistent approach of the required involvement for all student groups is needed. In addition, given the students desire for more face-to-face interaction, it may be beneficial to offer online IPE activities for a shorter time period. It is anticipated that this study may inform other programmes that are exploring innovative approaches to provide IPE to promote effective collaboration in patient care.

  12. STUDENTS CONFLICTOLOGICAL COMPETENCE ASSESSMENT INVOLVED INTO PSYCHOLOGICAL AND PEDAGOGICAL MONITORING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yakovleva I. P.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the investigation is students’ conflictological competence assessment method elaboration. The methodological foundations are system approach (considered the pedagogical monitoring as education quality management component, personal oriented approach (focused the educational process on student persona, competence oriented approach (oriented the educational process to personally-professional abilities formation which integrated the knowledge, skills, motives, values and ability to their control and quality measurement approach (we have considered the conflictological competence preparedness as a multi-criterion parameter. The theoretical foundations are socially-philosophic works dedicated to students’ conflictological competence formation, and pedagogical works, dedicated to education quality management. The normative foundations of investigation are Law “About Education” (2012, state educational standards for vocational training (2009, “Strategy of state youth policy in Russian Federation”, state program “Patriotic education of Russian Federation citizens during 2011-2015”. The methods of investigation are scientific literature and pedagogical practice analysis, survey, modeling, pedagogical monitoring, quality measurement and complex systems polyvalent analysis

  13. The effects of interactive (TIPS) homework on family involvement and science achievement of middle grade students

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Voorhis, Frances Landis

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the effects of interactive and non-interactive science homework assignments on family involvement in homework, homework completion and accuracy, student science achievement, and student and parent attitudes about science. Most previous research on homework has examined what parental involvement results naturally, without prompts or instruction from teachers. In contrast, this study experimentally examined the effects of teacher prompts to parents for involvement in their children's homework. Two hundred and fifty-three students from 10 classes of sixth and eighth grade students participated in the study that lasted 18 weeks of the school year. Six classes of students completed the TIPS (Teachers Involve Parents In Schoolwork) interactive homework assignments, and four classes completed the non-interactive assignments that contained the same content and questions as the TIPS assignments. TIPS students received instructions to involve a parent or other family partner in certain sections of the homework assignment. ATIPS students received the same assignment with no instruction to involve another person. Results indicated that TIPS students more often involved parents in their science homework assignments than ATIPS students. However, TIPS science students reported no more parental involvement in homework than ATIPS students in subjects not assigning interactive homework. Therefore, the TIPS instructions elicited more parental involvement in homework than the ATIPS assignments. TIPS students did not differ from ATIPS students in the percent of homework returned or accuracy. Students who rated the homework more positively and involved families regularly returned more homework assignments than students who did not do so. TIPS students did earn significantly higher science report card grades than ATIPS students after controlling for background variables, teacher effects, and percent of homework returned. Exploratory analyses of

  14. Surveying students' understanding of quantum mechanics in one spatial dimension

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    Zhu, Guangtian

    2016-01-01

    We explore the difficulties that advanced undergraduate and graduate students have with non-relativistic quantum mechanics of a single particle in one spatial dimension. To investigate these difficulties we developed a conceptual survey and administered it to more than 200 students at 10 institutions. The issues targeted in the survey include the set of possible wavefunctions, bound and scattering states, quantum measurement, expectation values, the role of the Hamiltonian, and the time-dependence of the wavefunction and expectation values. We find that undergraduate and graduate students have many common difficulties with these concepts and that research-based tutorials and peer-instruction tools can significantly reduce these difficulties. The findings also suggest that graduate quantum mechanics courses may not be effective at helping students to develop a better conceptual understanding of these topics, partly because such courses mainly focus on quantitative assessments.

  15. Religious Involvement and Perceptions of Control: Evidence from the Miami-Dade Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascoe, Anita E; Hill, Terrence D; Mossakowski, Krysia N; Johnson, Robert J

    2016-06-01

    This study uses data collected through the 2011 Miami-Dade Health Survey (n = 444) to test whether religious involvement is associated with three distinct control beliefs. Regression results suggest that people who exhibit high levels of religious involvement tend to report higher levels of the sense of control, self-control, and the health locus of control than respondents who exhibit low levels of religious involvement. Although this study suggests that religious involvement can promote perceptions of control over one's own life, this pattern is apparently concentrated at the high end of the distribution for religious involvement, indicating a threshold effect.

  16. Survey: The opinion of Romanian students about studying abroad

    OpenAIRE

    Leila BARDAªUC

    2014-01-01

    The current paper focuses on an online study (survey) performed on Romanian students from within the country or abroad, with internet access, regarding their opinions on the possibility on following a study program abroad, the advantages and/or disadvantages that they see by choosing this option. The study started after an observation of late mobility trends that show a massive emigration rate of young Romanians and had as an objective stating the main reasons that determine students to choos...

  17. Student Opinion Survey, 1976. Research Report: BCC 1-77.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagle, Norman

    A student opinion survey was administered to a sample of 1,100 students at Bronx Community College (BCC) in 1976. Respondent ethnicity distribution was 46.2% black, 29.1% hispanic, 17.0% white, 1.5% Oriental, and 6.3% other. More than half of the respondents were in either liberal arts and music (42.8%) or business curricula (21.8%). Results…

  18. Students' Perceptions of and Experiences With Educational Technology: A Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royal, Kenneth; Hedgpeth, Mari-Wells; McWhorter, Dan

    2016-05-18

    It is generally assumed that incoming students in medical education programs will be better equipped for the "digital age" given their younger age and an educational upbringing in which technology was seemingly omnipresent. In particular, many assume that today's medical students are more likely to hold positive attitudes and increased comfortability with technology and possess greater information technology (IT) skills. The purpose of this study was to compare responses of incoming veterinary medical students to a series of IT-related questions contained in a common questionnaire over the course of a 10-year period (2005-2015) to discern whether students' attitudes have improved and uses and comfortability with technology have increased as anticipated. A survey measuring attitudes and preferences, computing experience, and technology ownership was administered each year for the past 10 years to incoming veterinary medical students at a large veterinary school in the United States. Students' responses to survey items were compared at 3 data points (2005, 2010, and 2015). Today's incoming veterinary medical students tend to indicate the same desire to improve skills using spreadsheets and web page design as incoming students from 10 years ago. It seems that despite technological advances and increased exposure to such applications and skills, there remains a challenge for students to "keep up" with the ever evolving technology. Moreover, although students continue to report they are very comfortable with using a computer (and related devices), many use their computers as typewriters or word processors, as opposed to a means for performing more advanced computing functions. In general, today's medical students are not expert computer users as many assume. Despite an upbringing in a digitized world, many students still lack many basic computing skills.

  19. The impact of self-concept and college involvement on the first-year success of medical students in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ying-Xue; Ou, Chun-Quan; Zhao, Zhi-Tao; Wan, Cheng-Song; Guo, Cui; Li, Li; Chen, Ping-Yan

    2015-03-01

    Students' first-year academic success plays a critical role on their overall development in college, which implies the need to concentrate on identifying ways to improve students' first-year academic success. Different from most research on the subject, this study attempted to combine the sociological perspective of college impact with a psychological perspective to synthetically explore the causal relationship of specific types of self-concept and college involvement with academic success of medical students. A longitudinal study was conducted using 519 matriculates at a medical university in mainland China. We conducted the Cooperative Institutional Research Program freshmen survey and the Your First College Year survey to collect data of the pre-college and college academic and social self-concept, college involvement components, and some input characteristics. The academic success was measured by the first-year grade point average. A pathway analysis was conducted and showed the following results. Having high academic self-concept, being engaged in class and putting effort in homework or study directly contributes to increasing college achievement. Students' pre-college achievement and self-concept, faculty interaction, and homework involvement positively affected students' college academic self-concept development, which indirectly improved average grade point. These findings contribute to our understanding of a student's ability to interact with his or her collegiate environment and to experience academic success.

  20. PHYSICAL ACTIVITY LEVEL AMONG UNIVERSITY STUDENTS: A CROSS SECTIONAL SURVEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshini Rajappan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Physical inactivity is the fourth leading risk factor for global mortality. Physical inactivity levels are rising in developing countries and Malaysia is of no exception. Malaysian Adult Nutrition Survey 2003 reported that the prevalence of physical inactivity was 39.7% and the prevalence was higher for women (42.6% than men (36.7%. In Malaysia, the National Health and Morbidity Survey 2006 reported that 43.7% (5.5 million of Malaysian adults were physically inactive. These statistics show that physically inactive is an important public health concern in Malaysia. College students have been found to have poor physical activity habits. The objective of this study was to identify the physical activity level among students of Asia Metropolitan University (AMU in Malaysia. Materials and Methods: The study design was a cross sectional survey. A total of 100 participants comprising of 50 male and 50 female students were selected for the study by means of convenience sampling. International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ short form was used to identify the physical activity level. Results: A greater percentage of males (56% showed high physical activity level than females (24%. In contrast, females showed high percentage of low physical activity level. Students in the age range of 22-25 years depicted more percentage (43.5% of high physical activity level. When comparison of physical activity levels were done among different races, Indian students showed greater percentage (61.8% of high physical activity level. Furthermore, students who were underweight and overweight had 50% and 46.7% of high physical activity levels respectively which are greater than the values observed in normal body weight students. Conclusion: The physical activity level among students was found satisfactory although the percentage of low level of physical activity was found higher in female students.

  1. Segmenting Student Markets with a Student Satisfaction and Priorities Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borden, Victor M. H.

    1995-01-01

    A market segmentation analysis of 872 university students compared 2 hierarchical clustering procedures for deriving market segments: 1 using matching-type measures and an agglomerative clustering algorithm, and 1 using the chi-square based automatic interaction detection. Results and implications for planning, evaluating, and improving academic…

  2. Segmenting Student Markets with a Student Satisfaction and Priorities Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borden, Victor M. H.

    1995-01-01

    A market segmentation analysis of 872 university students compared 2 hierarchical clustering procedures for deriving market segments: 1 using matching-type measures and an agglomerative clustering algorithm, and 1 using the chi-square based automatic interaction detection. Results and implications for planning, evaluating, and improving academic…

  3. Global Problems and College Education: A Survey of Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bybee, Rodger W.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    College students identified air quality, world hunger, and war technology as the most important of 12 global problems (presented to them during a survey) and indicated that problems will become worse by the year 2000. Implications of findings for curriculum and instruction are addressed. (JN)

  4. Oceans of Opportunity: Partnerships to Increase Minority Student Involvement in the Marine Geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pride, C.; Christensen, B.

    2007-12-01

    The Oceans of Opportunity program to increase involvement of traditionally under-represented students in the marine geosciences is in its final phase of track 1 funding from NSF. The program employs a tiered approach to research, teaching and outreach activities to enhance the K-12 to graduate pipeline. Partner institutions include Savannah State University, an HBCU in coastal Georgia; Adelphi University serving a minority population from NYC; the Georgia State University Bio-Bus serving the metro-Atlanta area; and the Joint Oceanographic Institutions. The Oceans of Opportunity education pipeline includes 1) service learning activities implemented by SSU marine science majors in partner public schools with high minority enrollment; 2) outreach by the Georgia State University Bio-Bus to Savannah area schools; 3) expansion of the SSU geoscience curriculum; and 4) development of activities based on models of ODP cores for use in both outreach and college teaching. Service learning through SSU classes has permitted contact with a large number of K-12 students. More than 1000 predominantly African-American K-12 students completed hands-on lessons on plate tectonics and plankton contributors to marine sediments in the two years of this program under the guidance of HBCU science majors. Lessons on use of the marine sediment and fossil record as proxies in paleoclimatic studies using replicas of ODP cores were delivered to 600 students in the Savannah school system and about 2000 visitors to the Georgia Aquarium in Atlanta. The marine geoscience lessons delivered at the high school level resulted in greater test score improvement when the topic had already been thoroughly introduced by the teacher. A survey of science attitudes of the high school students (n=419) indicates African-American high school students have low levels of enjoyment of and interest in the sciences. In addition, more female than male African-American students are enrolling in science courses and

  5. Student Involvement as a Vehicle for Empowerment: A Case Study of the Student Platform for Engineering Education Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaine, David A.; Seif-Naraghi, Sonya B.; Al-Haque, Shahed; Wojewoda, Nicolo; Meninato, Yvonne; DeBoer, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the mission, structure and outputs of one organisation, the Student Platform for Engineering Education Development (SPEED), as a case study for how student-led organisations can use student involvement to promote and sustain student self-efficacy in an academic field. SPEED attracts young people to engineering through student…

  6. Implementing Project Based Survey Research Skills to Grade Six ELP Students with "The Survey Toolkit" and "TinkerPlots"[R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Thomas, Jr.

    2011-01-01

    "Survey Toolkit Collecting Information, Analyzing Data and Writing Reports" (Walsh, 2009a) is discussed as a survey research curriculum used by the author's sixth grade students. The report describes the implementation of "The Survey Toolkit" curriculum and "TinkerPlots"[R] software to provide instruction to students learning a project based…

  7. Implementing Project Based Survey Research Skills to Grade Six ELP Students with "The Survey Toolkit" and "TinkerPlots"[R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Thomas, Jr.

    2011-01-01

    "Survey Toolkit Collecting Information, Analyzing Data and Writing Reports" (Walsh, 2009a) is discussed as a survey research curriculum used by the author's sixth grade students. The report describes the implementation of "The Survey Toolkit" curriculum and "TinkerPlots"[R] software to provide instruction to students learning a project based…

  8. Nursing students' prosocial motivation: does it predict professional commitment and involvement in the job?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesje, Kjersti

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated how prosocial motivation reported by nursing students in their final year of academic studies relates to career commitment and job involvement three years after graduation. Most studies investigating nurses' prosocial motivation for choosing the nursing profession examine only their prosocial motivation for entering nursing training; they do not investigate whether this motivation is associated with job involvement or commitment to the profession. A longitudinal survey design was used. The present longitudinal study included 160 nurses. In their final academic year of spring 2007, the nurses received a questionnaire about their motivation for entering nursing. Three years after graduation, spring 2010, they received another questionnaire about their level of job involvement and career commitment. The results showed that prosocial motivation measured in their last academic year was related to career commitment three years after graduation, but unrelated to job involvement. The results indicated that prosocial motivation is important in identifying with the profession but not necessarily for personal involvement in the job. The study gives important knowledge on how a commonly reported motivation for entering nursing relates to the nurses' attitudes about their work life. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Understanding Why Students Participate in Multiple Surveys: Who are the Hard-Core Responders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Stephen R.; Whitcomb, Michael E.

    2004-01-01

    What causes a student to participate in a survey? This paper looks at survey response across multiple surveys to understand who the hard-core survey responders and non-responders are. Students at a selective liberal arts college were administered four different surveys throughout the 2002-2003 academic year, and we use the number of surveys…

  10. App Use in Psychiatric Education: A Medical Student Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Cecilia; Kolli, Venkata

    2017-02-01

    The objective of the study is to understand and appraise app use by medical students during their clerkships. Following Creighton University IRB approval, a voluntary and anonymous paper-based, 15-question survey was distributed to third-year medical students. Data were analyzed using Microsoft Excel. Of 112 medical students available, 76.7% (86) participated in the survey. All participants owned a smartphone or tablet with 84.9% using Apple iOS, followed by 12.8% using Android platform. Students reported using the fewest number of apps during surgery, psychiatry, and obstetrics and gynecology clerkships. The largest number of apps were used during the internal medicine rotation (70.3%). The three most popular apps were Epocrates, UpToDate, and UWorld. The most common uses for these apps were as references during the clerkship, followed by improving knowledge, and test taking. Perceived major benefits included accessibility (96% of student respondents) and interactivity (39.5%). Common apps used during the psychiatry clerkship included UpToDate (71%), Epocrates (51%), and Medscape (43%). Despite less frequent app use during their psychiatry clerkship, 90% felt there was a utility for educational apps in psychiatric education. Consistent with the previous literature on medical students preferring educational apps, students suggest developers focus on question bank-type apps, followed by clinical support-focused and self-directed case-based learning apps for psychiatry clerkship learning. Educators should factor these modes of educational delivery into future educational app development. This survey shows a high degree of smartphone and tablet use among medical students, and they attest to mobile phone app utility in psychiatric education.

  11. Why Don't Our Students Respond? Understanding Declining Participation in Survey Research among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschepikow, William K.

    2012-01-01

    Declining response rates among college students threaten the effectiveness of survey research at institutions of higher education. The purpose of this qualitative study was to understand the conditions that promote participation in survey research among this population. The researcher identified three themes through this study. First, participants…

  12. Why Don't Our Students Respond? Understanding Declining Participation in Survey Research among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschepikow, William K.

    2012-01-01

    Declining response rates among college students threaten the effectiveness of survey research at institutions of higher education. The purpose of this qualitative study was to understand the conditions that promote participation in survey research among this population. The researcher identified three themes through this study. First, participants…

  13. Medical student career survey--vascular surgery awareness initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goltz, Christopher J; Bachusz, Rebecca C; Mancini, Eric; Rits, Yevgeniy; Mattos, Mark A; Rubin, Jeffrey R

    2013-02-01

    The objectives of this survey were to identify medical students' general knowledge of vascular surgery as a career choice on entrance to medical school, and how student perspectives change during their exposure to clinical disciplines. Furthermore, we sought to determine which factors may influence the choice of a particular career path, and to apply this knowledge to improve the recruitment process of medical students into the specialty of vascular surgery. A one-time anonymous questionnaire consisting of 21 open and multiple-choice questions was distributed to first- (MS1), second- (MS2), and third-year (MS3) medical students at a large single-campus medical school. Responses were collected and subjected to analysis. Three hundred thirty-eight medical students responded to the survey (110 MS1, 126 MS2, and 102 MS3). Two hundred thirty-six MS1 and MS2 students had no clinical exposure to vascular surgery. Of 102 MS3 students having completed a general surgery rotation, 38 had exposure to vascular surgery. Of MS1 and MS2 students, 49% would consider vascular surgery. An additional 19% were willing to consider vascular surgery if the length of training was reduced. Twenty-six percent of the clinical students rotated on a vascular surgery service during their clinical general surgery rotation, of which 78% reported a positive experience. Only 26% (10 of 38) still considered vascular surgery as a career at the MS3 level. Thirty-four percent of students would consider vascular surgery if the training was reduced from 7 to 5 years. However, only 5% of MS1 and MS2 (11 of 236) and 9% of MS3 (9 of 102) students were aware of the 0 + 5 training program. As students advanced in medical school, lifestyle (31% MS1 vs. 63% MS3, P training (19% MS1 and 2 vs. 34% MS3, P factor in their career choice decision making. Medical students have minimal knowledge of vascular surgery on entry to medical school; however, many are willing to consider vascular surgery as a career. Lack of

  14. Practicing Professional Values: Factors Influencing Involvement in Social Work Student Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martindale, Dorothy; Olate, René; Anderson, Keith A.

    2017-01-01

    One of the most promising avenues for the development of professional values is involvement in professional student organizations. A convenience sample of baccalaureate social work students (n = 482) was drawn from 15 institutions. Regression analyses revealed several predictors of involvement in social work student organizations, including…

  15. Bilingual communication methods, text versus video, to increase parent involvement and science fair project student achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clevenson, Rhonda Suzanne

    This research examined the responses of families to bilingual communication methods, text versus video, designed to facilitate school to home communication to increase parent involvement and seventh grade student achievement in the science fair project. Using an experimental design, 161 families were randomly selected to receive either a two part informational text or video series during the science fair unit taught at a culturally diverse urban middle school. The bilingual informational materials were created and produced by the staff at the research site. Measures were taken to make sure all families could access the informational materials and innovations such as a special travel envelope and reminding procedures aided data collection. Surveys measuring variables on a Likert scale with spaces for comments were collected from the parents and students. An interrater reliability study was completed to measure the agreement of the two teachers who used a grading checklist to score science fair project achievement. Quantitative methods including ANOVA and MLR were used to examine the data in terms of student achievement and the communication method (text or video), audience (students and parents), and the anticipated outcome (parent help). Nonparametric and qualitative data analyses were used to explore how families used and responded to the informational materials. Significant results were that the video communication method was positively associated with student achievement on the science fair project. Significant main effects were observed for the student characteristics, educational services (general and special education, and English as a Second Language), and previous achievement in science, and the parent characteristics, previous experience with science fair projects, primary viewing language (English or Spanish), and expectations for student achievement. Student achievement was not significantly related to the amount or usefulness of parent help. The amount

  16. Disordered gambling, type of gambling and gambling involvement in the British Gambling Prevalence Survey 2007

    OpenAIRE

    LaPlante, Debi A.; Nelson, Sarah E.; LaBrie, Richard A.; Shaffer, Howard J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between types of gambling and disordered gambling, with and without controlling for gambling involvement (i.e. the number of types of games with which respondents were involved during the past 12 months). Methods: We completed a secondary data analysis of the 2007 British Gambling Prevalence Survey (BGPS), which collected data in England, Scotland and Wales between September 2006 and March 2007. The sample included 9003 re...

  17. The Influence of Involvement with Faculty and Mentoring on the Self-Efficacy and Academic Achievement of African American and Latino College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFreitas, Stacie Craft; Bravo, Antonio, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    African American and Latino college students were surveyed to examine the influence of involvement with faculty and mentoring on self-efficacy and academic achievement. It was hypothesized that involvement with faculty and mentoring were related to greater academic achievement. It was suggested that the relationship of these factors was mediated…

  18. Fall 2001 Cabrillo College Student Survey & Comparisons with Spring 1999 Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borden, Richard; Cassada, Judy; Luan, Jing

    This survey of students at Cabrillo College contains feedback on a variety of subject matters ranging from quality of general educational courses, cultural diversity, fairness of grading and preparation for further study or for the workplace. Responses were subjected to statistical significance testing and compared with results from the 1999…

  19. The Role of Perceived Parental Over-Involvement in Student Test Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadach, Eran; Ganor-Miller, Orit

    2013-01-01

    The effects of perceived parental over-involvement on students' level of test anxiety were examined in two studies. In study 1, parental over-involvement scale was developed. The sample comprised 105 male and female undergraduate college students between the ages of 21 and 26. The scale contained two aspects of parental over-involvement: parental…

  20. The Influence of Psychosocial Factors on Bullying Involvement of Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Chad A.; Forber-Pratt, Anjali J.; Espelage, Dorothy L.; Aragon, Steven R.

    2013-01-01

    The involvement of students with disabilities within the bullying dynamic has been recognized as a pressing issue within the nation's schools. Unfortunately, few studies have examined the psychosocial outcomes related to the bullying involvement of students with disabilities. However, involvement in bullying has been linked to negative short-…

  1. The effectiveness of student involvement in decisionmaking and university leadership: A comparative analysis of 12 universities in South-west Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adesoji A. Oni

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This study examines student involvement in university leadership and decision-makingand its impacts on leadership effectiveness in universities in Nigeria. The study uses adescriptive survey conducted among students and staff in all 12 of the public and privateuniversities in South-West Nigeria.1 The research findings indicate that there is a significantrelationship between student involvement in decision-making and leadership effectiveness.It also reveals that there are significant differences between decision-making with studentinvolvement and decision-making without student involvement. Conversely, no significantdifference was found in leadership effectiveness between decision-making in public andprivate universities. The study finally reveals that there is a significant relationship betweenthe management-student relationship and teaching effectiveness. The results therefore showthat, for leadership and teaching effectiveness to be improved in Nigerian universities,provision should be made for the adequate involvement of students in decision-making onimportant matters relating to university administration.

  2. Tobacco use among Iranian dental students: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshavarz, H; Khami, M R; Jafari, A; Virtanen, J I

    2013-08-01

    A national survey was conducted to provide up-to-date data on current and ever use of tobacco among Iranian dental students. All 4th-year students of 8 randomly selected dental schools were surveyed anonymously in December 2010 using the Global Health Professions Student Survey questionnaire. Of 325 participants, 54.2% were ever users of tobacco products (73.0% of males versus 44.4% of females); 50.8% had used waterpipes, 34.2% cigarettes and 9.3% other products. The most common age at first use was 20-24 years for both sexes. Current tobacco use was reported by 20.6% of respondents, cigarette smoking by 10.8% and waterpipe smoking by 15.8%. Regression models showed that current cigarette and waterpipe smoking were significantly associated with male sex but not with type of dental school (state/private). Current waterpipe smoking was also associated with age at first experience. In view of the important role of dentists in tobacco control, the prevention of tobacco use should be stressed among Iranian dental students.

  3. Students' Involvement in Faculty Research: Ethical and Methodological Issues

    OpenAIRE

    Ferguson, Linda M; Olive Yonge; Florence Myrick

    2004-01-01

    Faculty who engage students as participants in their qualitative research often encounter methodological and ethical problems. Ethical issues arise from the fiduciary relationship between faculty and their students, and violations of that relationship occur when the educator has a dual role as researcher with those students. Methodological issues arise from research designs to address these ethical issues. This conflict is particularly evident in faculty research on pedagogy in their own disc...

  4. University students and HIV in Namibia: an HIV prevalence survey and a knowledge and attitude survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Beer Ingrid H

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With an overall adult HIV prevalence of 15.3%, Namibia is facing one of the largest HIV epidemics in Africa. Young people aged 20 to 34 years constitute one of the groups at highest risk of HIV infection in Namibia. However, little is known about the impact of HIV on this group and its access to healthcare. The purpose of this study was to estimate HIV prevalence, to assess the knowledge of and attitudes towards HIV/AIDS, and to assess access to healthcare among university students in Namibia. Methods We assessed HIV/AIDS knowledge and attitudes, HIV prevalence and access to healthcare among students at the Polytechnic of Namibia and the University of Namibia. HIV prevalence was tested through anonymous oral fluid-based tests. Results Half (n = 2790/5568 of the university students and 45% (n = 2807/6302 of the Polytechnic students participated in the knowledge and attitudes surveys. HIV/AIDS knowledge was reasonable, except for misperceptions about transmission. Awareness of one's own HIV status and risks was low. In all, 55% (n = 3055/5568 of university students and 58% (n = 3680/6302 of Polytechnic students participated in the HIV prevalence survey; 54 (1.8% university students and 103 (2.8% Polytechnic students tested HIV positive. Campus clinics were not the major providers of healthcare to the students. Conclusions Meaningful strategies addressing the gap between knowledge, attitude and young people's perception of risk of HIV acquisition should be implemented. HIV prevalence among Namibian university students appears relatively low. Voluntary counselling and testing should be stimulated. Efforts should be made to increase access to healthcare through the campus clinics.

  5. Teaching child and adolescent psychiatry to undergraduate medical students - A survey in German-speaking countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Florian

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To conduct a survey about teaching child and adolescent psychiatry to undergraduate medical students in German-speaking countries. Methods A questionnaire was sent to the 33 academic departments of child and adolescent psychiatry in Germany, Austria, and the German-speaking part of Switzerland. Results All departments responded. For teaching knowledge, the methods most commonly reported were lectures and case presentations. The most important skills to be taught were thought to be how to assess psychopathology in children and how to assess families. For elective courses, the departments reported using a wide range of teaching methods, many with active involvement of the students. An average of 34 hours per semester is currently allocated by the departments for teaching child and adolescent psychiatry to medical students. Required courses are often taught in cooperation with adult psychiatry and pediatrics. Achievement of educational objectives is usually assessed with written exams or multiple-choice tests. Only a minority of the departments test the achievement of skills. Conclusions Two ways of improving education in child and adolescent psychiatry are the introduction of elective courses for students interested in the field and participation of child and adolescent psychiatrists in required courses and in longitudinal courses so as to reach all students. Cooperation within and across medical schools can enable departments of child and adolescent psychiatry, despite limited resources, to become more visible and this specialty to become more attractive to medical students. Compared to the findings in earlier surveys, this survey indicates a trend towards increased involvement of academic departments of child and adolescent psychiatry in training medical students.

  6. Survey on the perception of urology as a specialty by medical students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soojin; Farrokhyar, Forough; Braga, Luis H.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Upon inquiring with medical students and urologists across Canada, it is evident that urology is perceived as a male-dominant specialty, among other stereotypes. These misperceptions may hamper the recruitment of the best and brightest trainees. With that in mind, we surveyed medical students at our institution to obtain an objective assessment of their perception of urology and to determine the cause for misperceptions. Methods: A 25-factor, validated, anonymous, cross-sectional, self-reported, electronic survey was sent to all medical students at McMaster University to assess their perception of urology. The survey was piloted among students and educational leaders to optimize face and content validity, and minimize measurement bias. Six variables (years in training, role model, a family member or friend in urology, gender, and exposure) were selected a priori and entered into a logistic regression model to determine factors associated with a positive impression of the specialty. Results: The overall response rate was 70%. Of the respondents, 66% had no exposure to urology and 61% found the amount of exposure to be inadequate. Urology staff and resident involvement in education was considered to be poor by over 30% of medical students. Over 70% perceived urology to be a specialty with a great gender imbalance. On multivariate analysis, exposure to urology was the most important factor (purology exposure and poor staff and resident involvement in undergraduate education were seen as potential causes for misperceptions of the specialty. Increasing exposure to urology, encouraging female students, constant effort to approach senior students, and providing mentorship are found to be important factors in establishing a positive perception of urology PMID:27800058

  7. Patients' Perception toward Medical Students' Involvement in Their Surgical Care: Single Center Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Talal Al-Khatib; Sanaa Bin Othman; Basem El-Deek

    2016-01-01

    ...% thought that medical students performed minor procedures in the theatre. Conclusion. Patients underestimated the importance of medical students' attendance and involvement in theatre compared to bedside teaching and outpatient clinics...

  8. The effectiveness of Family Science and Technology Workshops on parental involvement, student achievement, and student curiosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosten, Lora Bechard

    The literature suggests that parental involvement in schools results in positive changes in students and that schools need to provide opportunities for parents to share in the learning process. Workshops are an effective method of engaging parents in the education of their children. This dissertation studies the effects of voluntary Family Science and Technology Workshops on elementary children's science interest and achievement, as well as on parents' collaboration in their child's education. The study involved 35 second and third-grade students and their parents who volunteered to participate. The parental volunteers were randomly assigned to either the control group (children attending the workshops without a parent) or the treatment group (children attending the workshops with a parent). The study was conducted in the Fall of 1995 over a four-week period. The Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to determine the effects of the workshops on children's science achievement and science curiosity, as well as on parents' involvement with their child's education. The study revealed that there was no significant statistical difference at the.05 level between the treatment/control groups in children's science achievement or science curiosity, or in parent's involvement with their children's education. However, the study did focus parental attention on effective education and points the way to more extensive research in this critical learning area. This dual study, that is, the effects of teaching basic technology to young students with the support of their parents, reflects the focus of the Salve Regina University Ph.D. program in which technology is examined in its effects on humans. In essence, this program investigates what it means to be human in an age of advanced technology.

  9. PORTFOLIO INVOLVED INTO STUDENTS PERSONALLY-PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT MONITORING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. GREBENNIKOV

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern evaluation activity in education is oriented to students personal achievements that’s may be reflected in different portfolio variants. In article we show the advantages of student personally-professional abilities and competencies assessment based on authentic representative portfolio. We show, that the portfolio if students competencies assessment method, students learning-vocational activity control technology and higher educational establishment informational - educational environment e-learning resources increasing factor. To accordance of author’s opinion, the portfolio using allowed to solve many didactical problems, as student competencies evaluation method and learning-vocational activity control technology. The most important is students support in personallyprofessional self-determination and sociallyprofessional competence regulative component formation, because this component is determined the students preparedness to skills and knowledge’s successful management, and to permanent personallyprofessional improving etc. The portfolio formation interrelated with learning-investigate, scientificinvestigate and scientific-practical students activity, because the students investigate activity integrated the creativity, analysis, self-control, independence, personal cognitive activity self-organization, skills of purposes and problems formation, generating of its solving methods. Its quantity evaluation is important scientific and applied problem. The students achievements in learning-investigate, scientific-investigate and scientific-practical students activity is practical criterion of his knowledge’s completeness, students investigate competence components and parameter if students individual achievements in investigate activity. The elaborated students’ evaluation method as creative independent self-controlled persona may be used in portfolio technology for individual educational

  10. Using Service-Learning to Educate Students about Stakeholder Involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth Walter Honadle

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Using Lee’s definition of service-learning as “an instructional method in which students learn course content by actively participating in thoughtfully organized service experiences related to that content”, this article offers a case of action-oriented service- learning. It shows one way to combine traditional teaching methods with an action-oriented approach to service-learning that benefits both the community and imparts critical know-how into the education of planning students. Through service-learning students acquire valuable skills and also increase their competence as practitioners and increase their confidence in their field in a way that nurtures their abilities and provides minimal risk to the clientele because the students are working under the guidance of faculty. As previous research from diverse fields have shown, service-learning benefits the students and the groups they encounter through their projects. KEYWORDSservice-learning, civic engagement, community development

  11. PRESS40: a project for involving students in active seismic risk mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnaba, Carla; Contessi, Elisa; Rosa Girardi, Maria

    2016-04-01

    To memorialize the anniversary of the 1976 Friuli earthquake, the Istituto Statale di Istruzione Superiore "Magrini Marchetti" in Gemona del Friuli (NE Italy), with the collaboration of the Istituto Nazionale di Oceanografia e di Geofisica Sperimentale (OGS), has promoted the PRESS40 Project (Prevenzione Sismica nella Scuola a 40 anni dal terremoto del Friuli, that in English sounds like "Seismic Prevention at School 40 years later the Friuli earthquake"). The project has developed in the 2015-2016 school year, starting from the 40th anniversary of the Friuli earthquake, and it aims to disseminate historical memory, seismic culture and awareness of seismic safety in the young generations, too often unconscious of past experiences, as recent seismic hazard perception tests have demonstrated. The basic idea of the PRESS40 Project is to involve the students in experimental activities to be active part of the seismic mitigation process. The Project is divided into two main parts, the first one in which students learn-receive knowledge from researchers, and the second one in which they teach-bring knowledge to younger students. In the first part of the project, 75 students of the "Magrini Marchetti" school acquired new geophysical data, covering the 23 municipalities from which they come from. These municipalities represent a wide area affected by the 1976 Friuli earthquake. In each locality a significant site was examined, represented by a school area. At least, 127 measurements of ambient noise have been acquired. Data processing and interpretation of all the results are still going on, under the supervision of OGS researchers.The second part of the project is planned for the early spring, when the students will present the results of geophysical survey to the younger ones of the monitored schools and to the citizens in occasion of events to commemorate the 40th anniversary of the Friuli earthquake.

  12. Impact of Prosocial Behavioral Involvement on School Violence Perpetration Among African American Middle School and High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDade, Rhyanne S; King, Keith A; Vidourek, Rebecca A; Merianos, Ashley L

    2017-01-04

    The purpose of this study was to examine factors associated with school violence perpetration among African American youth. African American students in 7th through 12th grade (n = 7488) in schools within one Metropolitan area completed the Pride National Drug Survey. Chi square analyses revealed school violence perpetration significantly differed based on grade and prosocial behavioral involvement. Students in 7th-8th grade (54.7%) were more likely to engage in school violence in comparison to 9th-12th grade students (48.8%). Students with low prosocial behavior (52.8%) involvement were more likely than their counterparts (48.9%) to engage in school violence perpetration. Logistic regression also indicated females and 9th-12th students with low prosocial behavior involvement were significantly less likely than their counterparts to engage in school violence. Findings should be considered by health educators and prevention specialists when developing programs and efforts to prevent in school violence perpetration among African American students.

  13. Student Involvement in and Information about a University Strike

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Robert G.; Marcuse, F. L.

    1972-01-01

    The present study was directed toward studying the relationship for male and female students between participation in a collective social action and the amount of information they possessed about that action-in this instance a university strike. (Author)

  14. Experiential learning in high energy physics: a survey of students at the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camporesi, Tiziano; Catalano, Gelsomina; Florio, Massimo; Giffoni, Francesco

    2017-03-01

    More than 36 000 students and post-docs will be involved until 2025 in research at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) mainly through international collaborations. To what extent they value the skills acquired? Do students expect that their learning experience will have an impact on their professional future? By drawing from earlier literature on experiential learning, we have designed a survey of current and former students at LHC. To quantitatively measure the students’ perceptions, we compare the salary expectations of current students with the assessment of those now employed in different jobs. Survey data are analysed by ordered logistic regression models, which allow multivariate statistical analyses with limited dependent variables. Results suggest that experiential learning at LHC positively correlates with both current and former students’ salary expectations. Those already employed clearly confirm the expectations of current students. At least two not mutually exclusive explanations underlie the results. First, the training at LHC is perceived to provide students valuable skills, which in turn affect the salary expectations; secondly, the LHC research experience per se may act as signal in the labour market. Respondents put a price tag on their learning experience, a ‘LHC salary premium’ ranging from 5% to 12% compared with what they would have expected for their career without such an experience at CERN.

  15. Parental Involvement, Is It Real? A Study of Viewpoints Promoting Parental Involvement That Enhances Student Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucker, Lorretta Faye

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative case study was to explore the motives, practices, attitudes, and barriers of parental involvement as recognized by administrators and teachers in southwest Tennessee in order to improve the school-home and community relationship in southwest Tennessee. This study investigated the benefits of parental involvement and…

  16. Students' community health service delivery: experiences of involved parties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greeff, M; van der Walt, E; Strydom, C; Wessels, C; Schutte, P J

    2009-03-01

    For several years the School of Nursing Science and the School of Psychosocial Behavioural Science, of a specific university, have been offering health care services in response to some of the health needs of a disadvantaged community as part of their students' experiential learning. However, these health care services were rendered independently by these two schools, implying that no feedback system existed to evaluate the worth and quality of these student-rendered health care services. The objectives of this research were to explore and describe the experiences of senior nursing and social work students, the experiences of health service delivery organisations concerned and the experiences of the disadvantaged community members receiving such health care services, as well as to investigate which communication models were apparent with regard to the major factors within health communication. An exploratory descriptive qualitative research design was used. Focus group discussions were held, interviews were conducted and field notes taken. Focus group discussions and interviews were transcribed and analysed by the research team to determine themes and sub-themes using the open coding technique. The results of the three groups showed similarities. The health service delivery organisations also identified a communication barrier, although the students were prepared to bridge it. The health service delivery organisations and the community felt positive towards the students and what they offered to the organisations and to the patients. A greater need for multi-disciplinary team work was recognised by al parties concerned. Recommendations focus on improved student accompaniment by lecturers; extending health care delivery to include a multi-disciplinary team approach by students; as well as improving the delivery of health care services.

  17. Student involvement as a vehicle for empowerment: a case study of the student platform for engineering education development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaine, David A.; Seif-Naraghi, Sonya B.; Al-Haque, Shahed; Wojewoda, Nicolò; Meninato, Yvonne; DeBoer, Jennifer

    2010-08-01

    This paper examines the mission, structure and outputs of one organisation, the Student Platform for Engineering Education Development (SPEED), as a case study for how student-led organisations can use student involvement to promote and sustain student self-efficacy in an academic field. SPEED attracts young people to engineering through student participation in engineering education (EE). SPEED is a global, non-profit student organisation that functions as an interdisciplinary network to diversify dialogue, stimulate change and impact the development of EE and its effect on society. SPEED is directly attracting young people to engineering in various ways: the organisation of its keynote event, the Global Student Forum; facilitating interactions between globally minded, socially inclined engineers with aspirations to change the world; and through the global dissemination of SPEED's work and practices through broad and relevant channels. Short-term outcomes are highlighted here. This case study can serve as a model for student engagement and involvement in other disciplines.

  18. 78 FR 15800 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Exchange Student Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-12

    ... Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Exchange Student Survey ACTION: Notice of request for public... INFORMATION: Title of Information Collection: ECA Exchange Student Surveys. OMB Control Number: none. Type of...: SV2012-0007 (Foreign Exchange students) and SV2012-0010 (U.S. Exchange students). Respondents: Exchange...

  19. 77 FR 75251 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: ECA Exchange Student Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-19

    ... Notice of Proposed Information Collection: ECA Exchange Student Surveys ACTION: Notice of request for...: ] Title of Information Collection: ECA Exchange Student Surveys. OMB Control Number: None. Type of Request...: SV2012-0007 (Foreign Exchange students) and SV2012-0010 (U.S. Exchange students). Respondents: Exchange...

  20. A Scale to Measure College Student Relationship Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whatley, Mark; Little, Gelena M.; Knox, David

    2006-01-01

    The Relationship Involvement Scale was created to allow individuals to identify the degree to which they are involved in a relationship. The developed scale includes norms, reliability, and validity and was completed by a total of 306 undergraduates at two southern universities. While there were no significant differences between women and men on…

  1. The Value of the Subinternship: A Survey of Fourth Year Medical Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric H. Green, MD MSc

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although the subinternship is often regarded as an important part of many fourth year curricula it is rarely studied. Purpose: We aimed to understand the how well the subinternship prepared medical students to perform core clinical skills. Methods: Senior medical students at Boston University School of Medicine rated their perception of the effectiveness of the subinternship and “medical school overall” in preparing them to perform core clinical skills using a written survey. Results: Overall, 69% (101 of students responded. Students believe that the subinternship prepares them to perform most key skills involved in day-to-day medical care. However, students feel less prepared by either their subinternship or overall medical school experience to carry out some complex patient communication skills including delivering “bad news” and discussing end-of-life wishes. Conclusions: The subinternship appears to be effective in preparing students for many of the challenges they will face as an intern and beyond. However, students identified several complex communication skills that could be addressed in part by the subinternship for which they felt unprepared. Student learning would likely be enhanced by creating a longitudinal program to teach these higher-level communication skills during medical school and by integrating practice and feedback of these skills into the subinternship

  2. Trial and Evaluation of Assertion Training Involving Nursing Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishina, Yuko; Tanigaki, Shizuko

    2013-01-01

    Background The concept of assertion and conceptual/practical methods of assertion (assertiveness) training were originally developed in the United States and Europe. These principles were embraced and adapted in Japan in 1970’s. However, only a few studies relating to assertion (assertiveness) have been undertaken thus far in Japan, especially so in the domain of nursing students in comparison with other countries. The purpose of this study was to design and implement assertion training with nursing students and to clarify its effects. Methods The participants were all volunteers, invited from a class of 3rd year nursing students. Ten students (intervention group) participated in the assertion training comprised of five sessions in February 2006. Fifty-six students (control group) were participated only in the questionnaire. Both groups were asked to complete the same questionnaire twice, before and after the assertion training. The questionnaire measured levels of assertiveness, social skills, self-esteem, social support and satisfaction with university life. The results and variances, both before and after assertion training, between the intervention group and the control group were analyzed. The effectiveness of the assertion training was determined by changes in pre and post training questionnaire scores. Results The scores for social skills in the control group had a tendency to decline while the scores for social skills in the intervention group remained constant. Conclusion Although there were no statistically significant results in the intervention group, the present study highlights areas appropriate for further study. PMID:24174705

  3. The Relationship between Parental Involvement and Mathematics Achievement for Students with Visual Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnall, Michele Capella; Cavenaugh, Brenda S.; Giesen, J. Martin

    2012-01-01

    The effect of parental involvement on achievement has received a significant amount of research attention in the general student population, but surprisingly very little research has been conducted in this area for students with disabilities. This study investigated the association between parental involvement (both at home and at school) and…

  4. Motivations for Involvement: An Empirical Test of Parents of Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Callen E.

    2011-01-01

    Parents of students in special education have greater barriers to parent involvement than parents of students in general education. Little is known, however, about the factors that facilitate or impede involvement practices for this group. This study investigated the extent to which the motivational factors from Hoover-Dempsey and Sandler's (2005)…

  5. Taking a Second Look: Following Surveys with Student's Descriptions of the Culture of Aggression in a Middle School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Nicholson

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes a research study on aggressive behaviour among students in middle school. The study was initiated in response to concern about agressive behaviour held by the school administration. A survey on aggressive behaviour was administered and followed by interviews with a sample of students. Student interviews highlighted a number of very important issues to consider when assessing and responding to aggressive behaviour in a school: school crowding , the playing out of dominant masculinity, involving students in finding solutions to identified problems, and considering the role of the whole school culture in sustaining agressive behaviour.

  6. Students' Perceptions of Parental and Teacher Academic Involvement: Consequences on Achievement Goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regner, Isabelle; Loose, Florence; Dumas, Florence

    2009-01-01

    The present study examined whether students' perceptions of two major facets of parental and teacher academic involvement (i.e., academic support and academic monitoring), contribute to the process of students' achievement goals adoption. French junior high-school students completed two questionnaires assessing first their perceptions of parental…

  7. Parental Involvement in Middle School Predicting College Attendance for First-Generation Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Khanh; Rush, Ryan A.

    2016-01-01

    Using data from the National Education Longitudinal Study, this report examined the relationship between parental involvement in eighth grade and college attendance by eight years after high school for students whose parents have no college education (i.e., first-generation students; n = 1,358) in comparison to students whose parents have some…

  8. Beyond the Classroom: Involving Students with Disabilities in Extracurricular Activities at Levy Middle School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Pam; And Others

    Six students in a special education classroom at Levy Middle School (Syracuse, New York) became involved in a variety of after-school activities with nondisabled students. The students participated in the school computer club, cross-country skiing, volleyball, stage crew, intramural basketball, the Spanish Club, and after-school programs at two…

  9. Developing Professional Skills in Undergraduate Engineering Students through Cocurricular Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Dara R.; Bagiati, Aikaterini; Sarma, Sanjay

    2017-01-01

    As nations have sought to keep pace with rapid technological innovation, governments have renewed their focus on science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education, with emphasis on developing both technical and non-technical skills in STEM students. This article examines which engineering-relevant skills may be developed by…

  10. Understanding Patterns of Commitment: Student Motivation for Community Service Involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Susan R.; Hill, Kathleen E.

    2003-01-01

    This constructivist study investigated college student perceptions of their motivations to participate in community service in high school and college. Data from interviews were analyzed using a grounded theory approach and revealed that patterns of commitment are mediated by early socialization experiences, the influence of peers, and by how…

  11. Improvement in South African Students' Outlook Due to Music Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Michael M.; Devroop, Karendra; Getz, Laura

    2015-01-01

    In the spring of 2009, we started a concert band programme at a high school in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. In the fall of 2011, we returned to the school to measure the impact of participating in a concert band on the students' attitude and outlook. During our initial and return visits, we measured feelings of self-esteem, optimism, positive…

  12. Spiritual Dynamics Involved with Overseas Student Teaching: A Qualitative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firmin, Michael W.; Firmin, Ruth L.; MacKay, Brenda B.

    2009-01-01

    We present the results of a qualitative, phenomenological research study that explored the spiritual dynamics of 13 overseas student teachers. Overall, participants in our sample described spiritual growth on two levels. First, they related that spiritual development often followed an inside-out pattern. In explaining this phenomenon, students…

  13. Collateral Informant Assessment in Alcohol Use Research Involving College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagman, Brett T.; Cohn, Amy M.; Noel, Nora E.; Clifford, Patrick R.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This study examined the associations between college students' self-reported alcohol use and corresponding collateral reports and identified factors that influence agreement between both sets of reports. Participants/Methods: Subject-collateral pairs (N = 300) were recruited from undergraduate psychology courses. Results: Data yielded…

  14. Parental Involvement with College Students in Germany, Hong Kong, Korea, and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fingerman, Karen L.; Cheng, Yen-Pi; Kim, Kyungmin; Fung, Helene H.; Han, Gyounghae; Lang, Frieder R.; Lee, Wonkyung; Wagner, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    Rates of college attendance have increased throughout the world. This study asked whether students across nations experience high involvement with parents (frequent contact and support) and how satisfied they are with parental involvement. College students from four major Western and Asian economies participated: Germany (n = 458), Hong Kong (n = 276), Korea (n = 257), and the United States (n = 310). Consistent with solidarity theory, students across nations reported frequent contact with parents and receiving several forms of social support (e.g., practical, emotional, and advice) every month. Multilevel models revealed Asian students received more frequent parental support than German or US students, but were less satisfied with that support. Students in Hong Kong resided with parents more often and gave more support to parents than students in other cultures. Discussion focuses on cultural (i.e., filial obligation) and structural (i.e., coresidence) factors explaining parental involvement. PMID:27594722

  15. Survey of master's gerontology students spanning over 40 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinari, Victor; Ellis, Michelle L

    2014-01-01

    The University of South Florida's master's degree in gerontology is a long-established program that focuses on a multidisciplinary approach to population aging. This study identifies graduate students' needs in preparation for a professional career in gerontology. An online survey was distributed to graduates and those currently enrolled (N = 56) in order to better understand expectations for the program, identify outcomes of graduation, and obtain program recommendations for future students. The program's 40 year history was well represented with participants ranging from the first graduating class to current students. Results indicated high satisfaction in students' expectations of the program, educational experience, and assessment of faculty. Further, 68% of graduates reported success in gaining age-related employment shortly after graduation. However, students echoed well-known barriers in gerontology, reporting tough competition for jobs versus those with licensure, and challenges in promoting their nonclinical gerontology degree to employers. Respondents recommended more applied coursework and assistance with career planning to enhance employment opportunities upon graduation. Implications of these findings are discussed in further detail.

  16. An Australian survey of parent involvement in intervention for childhood speech sound disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugden, Eleanor; Baker, Elise; Munro, Natalie; Williams, A Lynn; Trivette, Carol M

    2017-08-17

    To investigate how speech-language pathologists (SLPs) report involving parents in intervention for phonology-based speech sound disorders (SSDs), and to describe the home practice that they recommend. Further aims were to describe the training SLPs report providing to parents, to explore SLPs' beliefs and motivations for involving parents in intervention, and to determine whether SLPs' characteristics are associated with their self-reported practice. An online survey of 288 SLPs working with SSD in Australia was conducted. The majority of SLPs (96.4%) reported involving parents in intervention, most commonly in providing home practice. On average, these tasks were recommended to be completed five times per week for 10 min. SLPs reported training parents using a range of training methods, most commonly providing opportunities for parents to observe the SLP conduct the intervention. SLPs' place of work and years of experience were associated with how they involved and trained parents in intervention. Most (95.8%) SLPs agreed or strongly agreed that family involvement is essential for intervention to be effective. Parent involvement and home practice appear to be intricately linked within intervention for phonology-based SSDs in Australia. More high-quality research is needed to understand how to best involve parents within clinical practice.

  17. Programmatic assessment of student experiences using a longitudinal survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Draugalis JR

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this study was to gather longitudinal data on a pharmacy class cohort concerning programmatic components as well as develop a profile of student experiences as they progress through the curriculum.Methods: The Class of 2006 (n = 67 completed a 2 page instrument at the conclusion of the first 3 professional years (PY concerning hours spent in various activities, overall quality of various programmatic components, relationships with others in the college, and employment information. During senior week, a more extensive exit survey was administered.Results: At the conclusion of PY1, 56.5% of the class was working as a pharmacy intern. By PY3 this increased to 88.1% with a decrease to 65.7% in the final year. The hourly range of hours worked followed the same pattern. The rating of Dean’s Office Staff and interactions with faculty members remained constant across all 4 years. In the final exit survey the 2 lowest rated program components were the quality of the interaction with assigned faculty advisor and the availability of professional electives. There was no difference across the professional years for the quality of relationships with staff or faculty; however, the mean rating of the quality of relationships with other students was higher for PY4 when compared to PY1.Conclusions: College faculty, administrators, and committees have used the information gathered from students in program assessment and enhancement efforts. Longitudinal data collection allows for tracking of changes and interventions.

  18. Polydrug use among college students in Brazil: a nationwide survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lúcio Garcia de Oliveira

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To estimate the frequency of polydrug use (alcohol and illicit drugs among college students and its associations with gender and age group. Methods: A nationwide sample of 12,544 college students was asked to complete a questionnaire on their use of drugs according to three time parameters (lifetime, past 12 months, and last 30 days. The co-use of drugs was investigated as concurrent polydrug use (CPU and simultaneous polydrug use (SPU, a subcategory of CPU that involves the use of drugs at the same time or in close temporal proximity. Results: Almost 26% of college students reported having engaged in CPU in the past 12 months. Among these students, 37% had engaged in SPU. In the past 30 days, 17% college students had engaged in CPU. Among these, 35% had engaged in SPU. Marijuana was the illicit drug mostly frequently used with alcohol (either as CPU or SPU, especially among males. Among females, the most commonly reported combination was alcohol and prescribed medications. Conclusions: A high proportion of Brazilian college students may be engaging in polydrug use. College administrators should keep themselves informed to be able to identify such use and to develop educational interventions to prevent such behavior.

  19. Student Engagement at Independent Schools: Results from the 2014 High School Survey of Student Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Amada

    2015-01-01

    Fifty-nine NAIS member schools participated in the second year of a three-year pilot study sponsored by the National Association of Independent Schools (NAIS) and the NAIS Commission on Accreditation on the use of HSSSE -- the High School Survey of Student Engagement, administered by Indiana University. HSSSE is designed to investigate the…

  20. A Critical Review of the Involvement of Teachers and Students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nekky Umera

    is a requirement even for science-based subjects. Because of the ... Compare the methods and approaches used by teachers in rural and urban settings ... Clearly, there are advantages here in having a team of teachers involved, but there is a ...

  1. Development, Evaluation and Use of a Student Experience Survey in Undergraduate Science Laboratories: The Advancing Science by Enhancing Learning in the Laboratory Student Laboratory Learning Experience Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrie, Simon C.; Bucat, Robert B.; Buntine, Mark A.; Burke da Silva, Karen; Crisp, Geoffrey T.; George, Adrian V.; Jamie, Ian M.; Kable, Scott H.; Lim, Kieran F.; Pyke, Simon M.; Read, Justin R.; Sharma, Manjula D.; Yeung, Alexandra

    2015-07-01

    Student experience surveys have become increasingly popular to probe various aspects of processes and outcomes in higher education, such as measuring student perceptions of the learning environment and identifying aspects that could be improved. This paper reports on a particular survey for evaluating individual experiments that has been developed over some 15 years as part of a large national Australian study pertaining to the area of undergraduate laboratories-Advancing Science by Enhancing Learning in the Laboratory. This paper reports on the development of the survey instrument and the evaluation of the survey using student responses to experiments from different institutions in Australia, New Zealand and the USA. A total of 3153 student responses have been analysed using factor analysis. Three factors, motivation, assessment and resources, have been identified as contributing to improved student attitudes to laboratory activities. A central focus of the survey is to provide feedback to practitioners to iteratively improve experiments. Implications for practitioners and researchers are also discussed.

  2. Baccalaureate nursing students' breastfeeding knowledge: a descriptive survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spear, Hila J

    2006-05-01

    This descriptive survey study assessed the breastfeeding knowledge of junior and senior baccalaureate nursing students (N=80) who had successfully completed their obstetric nursing course. With a possible perfect knowledge score of 100, participants' scores ranged from 35 to 85 with a sample mean score of 60. Surprisingly, most (85%) did not know that breastfeeding is recommended for the first year of an infant's life, and only five participants knew the proper management of mastitis. Well over one third (41.3%) of the participants opposed breastfeeding in public. Findings reveal the need to strengthen both the didactic and clinical components of the obstetric course curriculum. The acquisition of breastfeeding knowledge at the student level will better equip novice nurses to provide more effective breastfeeding counsel and support for childbearing women and to promote the achievement of the breastfeeding objectives of both the United States and the World Health Organization.

  3. Blood donor motivation: a survey of minority college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswalt, R; Gordon, J

    1993-06-01

    Ninety-five percent of all blood donors are Caucasian. To investigate why minorities are under-represented as blood donors, a random sample of 120 minority college students were surveyed about attitudes and behavior regarding blood donations. This sample of minority students had donated blood at the same rate (33%) and for the same positive motivation (altruism) and negative motivations (for those who did not donate--fear, medical excuses, didn't think of it, no time) as Caucasian donors. The low rate of blood donations by minorities is not due to their membership in ethnic groups per se, but to other variables such as education and socioeconomic level. A recruitment strategy based on the results of this study is presented.

  4. Survey of pharmacy involvement in hospital medication reconciliation programs across the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory R Stein

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study is to conduct a review of pertinent literature, assess pharmacy involvement in medication reconciliation, and offer insight into best practices for hospitals to implement and enhance their medication reconciliation programs. Method: Pharmacists in hospitals nationwide were asked to complete an anonymous survey via the American College of Clinical Pharmacy online database. The multiple choice survey analyzed the roles that healthcare professionals play in medication reconciliation programs at hospitals. Results: Of the survey responses received, 32/91 (35% came from pharmacists at hospitals with a pharmacy-led medication reconciliation program. Of these pharmacy-led programs, 17/32 (53% have a dedicated pharmacist or pharmacy staff to perform medication reconciliation. Conclusion: A comprehensive review of literature suggests that pharmacy involvement has the potential to reduce medication reconciliation errors and may improve patient satisfaction. Focused, full-time medication reconciliation pharmacists can help hospitals save time and money, improve outcomes, and meet higher standards issued by the Joint Commission. Data obtained in this study show the extent to which pharmacists contribute to achieving these goals in healthcare systems nationwide. This baseline study provides a strong case for hospitals to implement a pharmacy-led medication reconciliation program.

  5. Involving students in a blended course via teacher's initiation in Web-enhanced collaborative learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chia-Wen

    2010-10-01

    Teachers of application software in Taiwan have traditionally applied disjointed and out-of-context examples in their teaching, which usually result in ineffective learning outcomes. A Web-enhanced, collaborative learning approach was therefore adopted to help students become involved in a course more positively. Additionally, the teacher provided initiation, establishing the essential knowledge and required skills for students at the beginning of the course in order to help students climb the learning curve. The results showed that students who received Web-enhanced collaborative learning with initiation were significantly more involved than those who did not receive the initiation. Moreover, findings also revealed that the initiation contributed to significant increases in students' involvement at the end of the course. The implications for teachers, schools, and scholars who plan to provide Web-based learning for their students are also discussed.

  6. Effect of scaffolding on helping introductory physics students solve quantitative problems involving strong alternative conceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shih-Yin; Singh, Chandralekha

    2015-12-01

    It is well known that introductory physics students often have alternative conceptions that are inconsistent with established physical principles and concepts. Invoking alternative conceptions in the quantitative problem-solving process can derail the entire process. In order to help students solve quantitative problems involving strong alternative conceptions correctly, appropriate scaffolding support can be helpful. The goal of this study is to examine how different scaffolding supports involving analogical problem-solving influence introductory physics students' performance on a target quantitative problem in a situation where many students' solution process is derailed due to alternative conceptions. Three different scaffolding supports were designed and implemented in calculus-based and algebra-based introductory physics courses involving 410 students to evaluate the level of scaffolding needed to help students learn from an analogical problem that is similar in the underlying principles involved but for which the problem-solving process is not derailed by alternative conceptions. We found that for the quantitative problem involving strong alternative conceptions, simply guiding students to work through the solution of the analogical problem first was not enough to help most students discern the similarity between the two problems. However, if additional scaffolding supports that directly helped students examine and repair their knowledge elements involving alternative conceptions were provided, e.g., by guiding students to contemplate related issues and asking them to solve the targeted problem on their own first before learning from the analogical problem provided, students were more likely to discern the underlying similarities between the problems and avoid getting derailed by alternative conceptions when solving the targeted problem. We also found that some scaffolding supports were more effective in the calculus-based course than in the algebra

  7. Clinical incidents involving students on placement: an analysis of incident reports to identify potential risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaida, J E; Maloney, S; Lo, K; Morgan, P

    2015-06-01

    Students are sometimes involved in incidents during clinical training. To the authors' knowledge, no quantitative studies of incidents specifically involving physiotherapy students on clinical placement are available in the literature. A retrospective audit (2008 to 2011) of incident reports involving physiotherapy students was conducted to identify the nature and features of incidents. The study aimed to determine if injuries to a student or patient were more or less likely when the supervisor was in close proximity, and whether students with lower academic performance in their preclinical semester were more likely to be involved in an incident. There were 19 care-delivery-related and three equipment-related incidents. There were no incidents of violent, aggressive or demeaning behaviour towards students. The incident rate was 9.0/100,000 student-hours for third-year students and 6.8/100,000 student-hours for fourth-year students. The majority of incidents (55%) occurred from 11 am to 12-noon and from 3 pm to 3.30 pm. Incidents more often resulted in patient or student injury when the supervisor was not in close proximity (approximately 50% vs approximately 20%), although the difference was not significant (P=0.336). The academic results of students involved in incidents were equivalent to the whole cohort in their preclinical semester {mean 75 [standard deviation (SD) 6] vs 76 (SD 7); P=0.488}. The unexpected temporal clustering of incidents warrants further investigation. Student fatigue may warrant attention as a potential contributor; however, contextual factors, such as staff workload, along with organisational systems, structures and procedures may be more relevant. The potential relationship between supervisor proximity and injury also warrants further exploration. The findings of the present study should be integrated into clinical education curricula and communicated to clinical educators. Copyright © 2014 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by

  8. A Survey of Postsecondary Education Programs for Students with Intellectual Disabilities in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigal, Meg; Hart, Debra; Weir, Cate

    2012-01-01

    The authors present findings from a 2009 survey of postsecondary education (PSE) programs for students with an intellectual disability (ID) conducted in the United States. The survey was designed to collect descriptive information on characteristics and practices of existing PSE programs for students with an ID. The survey consisted of 63 items…

  9. Surveying college introductory physics students' attitudes and approaches to problem solving

    CERN Document Server

    Mason, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Students' attitudes and approaches to problem solving in physics can greatly impact their actual problem solving practices and also influence their motivation to learn and ultimately the development of expertise. We developed and validated an attitudes and approaches to problem solving (AAPS) survey and administered it to students in the introductory physics courses in a typical large research university in the US. Here, we discuss the development and validation of the survey and analysis of the student responses to the survey questions in introductory physics courses. The introductory physics students' responses to the survey questions were also compared with those of physics faculty members and physics PhD students. We find that introductory students are in general less expert-like than the physics faculty members and PhD students. Moreover, on some AAPS survey questions, the responses of students and faculty have unexpected trends. Those trends were interpreted via in

  10. A survey of energy drink consumption patterns among college students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carpenter-Aeby Tracy

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Energy drink consumption has continued to gain in popularity since the 1997 debut of Red Bull, the current leader in the energy drink market. Although energy drinks are targeted to young adult consumers, there has been little research regarding energy drink consumption patterns among college students in the United States. The purpose of this study was to determine energy drink consumption patterns among college students, prevalence and frequency of energy drink use for six situations, namely for insufficient sleep, to increase energy (in general, while studying, driving long periods of time, drinking with alcohol while partying, and to treat a hangover, and prevalence of adverse side effects and energy drink use dose effects among college energy drink users. Methods Based on the responses from a 32 member college student focus group and a field test, a 19 item survey was used to assess energy drink consumption patterns of 496 randomly surveyed college students attending a state university in the Central Atlantic region of the United States. Results Fifty one percent of participants (n = 253 reported consuming greater than one energy drink each month in an average month for the current semester (defined as energy drink user. The majority of users consumed energy drinks for insufficient sleep (67%, to increase energy (65%, and to drink with alcohol while partying (54%. The majority of users consumed one energy drink to treat most situations although using three or more was a common practice to drink with alcohol while partying (49%. Weekly jolt and crash episodes were experienced by 29% of users, 22% reported ever having headaches, and 19% heart palpitations from consuming energy drinks. There was a significant dose effect only for jolt and crash episodes. Conclusion Using energy drinks is a popular practice among college students for a variety of situations. Although for the majority of situations assessed, users consumed one

  11. Involvement in Community Extension Program of Business Administration Students in one Higher Education Institution in the Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jo-Anne May A. Rubio

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Conducting community service is about relationship on building communities. It is designed for personal and social development. The researchers conduct this investigation to assess the Community Extension program of the College of Business Administration (CBA in one Private Higher Education Institution in the Philippines. The descriptive method of research utilizing the normative survey technique was employed in the study. The results of the study revealed that majority of the respondents are first year level and from Bachelor of Science in Business Administration. It also shows that there are students who are not involve in any organization of the college. This study further shows that community extension program of the college was well implemented. Students were well involved in the said activities. The students can expect benefits that will help them grow to a more productive and efficient students and member of the community. Moreover, there are also some expected problems in joining this kind of activity like funds, location and the logistics. The extension programs may continue to move on and reach out for the sustainable development of the students and community.

  12. Does Business Model Affect CSR Involvement? A Survey of Polish Manufacturing and Service Companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzanna Katarzyna Witek-Hajduk

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The study explores links between types of business models used by companies and their involvement in CSR. As the main part of our conceptual framework we used a business model taxonomy developed by Dudzik and Witek-Hajduk, which identifies five types of models: traditionalists, market players, contractors, distributors, and integrators. From shared characteristics of the business model profiles, we proposed that market players and integrators will show significantly higher levels of involvement in CSR than the three other classes of companies. Among other things, both market players and integrators relied strongly on building own brand value and fostering harmonious supply channel relations, which served as a rationale for our hypothesis. The data for the study were obtained through a combined CATI and CAWI survey on a group of 385 managers of medium and large enterprises. The sample was representative for the three Polish industries of chemical manufacturing, food production, and retailing. Statistical methods included confirmatory factor analysis and one-way ANOVA with contrasts and post hoc tests. The findings supported our hypothesis, showing that market players and integrators were indeed more engaged in CSR than other groups of firms. This may suggest that managers in control of these companies could bolster the integrity of their business models by increasing CSR involvement. Another important contribution of the study was to propose and validate a versatile scale for assessing CSR involvement, which showed measurement invariance for all involved industries.

  13. A Survey Comparison of Career Motivations of Social Work and Business Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basham, Randall E.; Buchanan, F. Robert

    2009-01-01

    This survey provides valuable insight for social work educators into the goals and career intentions of working students who pursue master's degrees in social work, as compared to master's degrees in business. Social work graduate students were surveyed and compared to business graduate students in terms of their motivations for seeking advanced…

  14. A Survey Comparison of Career Motivations of Social Work and Business Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basham, Randall E.; Buchanan, F. Robert

    2009-01-01

    This survey provides valuable insight for social work educators into the goals and career intentions of working students who pursue master's degrees in social work, as compared to master's degrees in business. Social work graduate students were surveyed and compared to business graduate students in terms of their motivations for seeking advanced…

  15. 2011 Montana Youth Risk Behavior Survey: American Indian Students in Urban Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montana Office of Public Instruction, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This report presents the 2011 Montana Youth Risk Behavior Survey high school student frequency distributions for American Indian students in urban schools. These frequency distributions are based upon surveys with 808 high school American Indian students in urban schools during February of 2011. Frequency distributions may not total 808 due to…

  16. 2011 Montana Youth Risk Behavior Survey: American Indian Students on or near a Reservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montana Office of Public Instruction, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This report presents the 2011 Montana Youth Risk Behavior Survey high school student frequency distributions for American Indian students on or near a reservation. These frequency distributions are based upon surveys with 720 high school American Indian students on or near a reservation in Montana during February of 2011. Frequency distributions…

  17. Quality of Academic Advising at UNO: Results of Student and Faculty Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ESS Reports, 1988

    1988-01-01

    This report presents the results of a student/faculty survey on the academic advising process at the University of Nebraska at Omaha, and highlights issues in improving the advising process. The survey included 195 recent graduates, 269 existing students, and 207 faculty and professional advisors. The study found that 70.8% of students were…

  18. Family involvement in medical decision-making: Perceptions of nursing and psychology students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itzhaki, Michal; Hildesheimer, Galya; Barnoy, Sivia; Katz, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Family members often rely on health care professionals to guide and support them through the decision-making process. Although family involvement in medical decisions should be included in the preservice curriculum for the health care professions, perceptions of students in caring professions on family involvement in medical decision-making have not yet been examined. To examine the perceptions of nursing and psychology students on family involvement in medical decision-making for seriously ill patients. A descriptive cross-sectional design was used. First year undergraduate nursing and psychology students studying for their Bachelor of Arts degree were recruited. Perceptions were assessed with a questionnaire constructed based on the Multi-Attribute Utility Theory (MAUT), which examines decision-maker preferences. The questionnaire consisted of two parts referring to the respondent once as the patient and then as the family caregiver. Questionnaires were completed by 116 nursing students and 156 psychology students. Most were of the opinion that family involvement in decision-making is appropriate, especially when the patient is incapable of making decisions. Nursing students were more inclined than psychology students to think that financial, emotional, and value-based considerations should be part of the family's involvement in decision-making. Both groups of students perceived the emotional consideration as most acceptable, whereas the financial consideration was considered the least acceptable. Nursing and psychology students perceive family involvement in medical decision-making as appropriate. In order to train students to support families in the process of decision-making, further research should examine Shared Decision-Making (SDM) programs, which involve patient and clinician collaboration in health care decisions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Influenza knowledge, attitude, and behavior survey for grade school students: design and novel assessment methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koep, Tyler H; Huskins, W Charles; Clemens, Christal; Jenkins, Sarah; Pierret, Chris; Ekker, Stephen C; Enders, Felicity T

    2014-12-01

    Despite the fact infectious diseases can spread readily in grade schools, few studies have explored prevention in this setting. Additionally, we lack valid tools for students to self-report knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors. As part of an ongoing study of a curriculum intervention to promote healthy behaviors, we developed and evaluated age-appropriate surveys to determine students' understanding of influenza prevention. Surveys were adapted from adolescent and adult influenza surveys and administered to students in grades 2-5 (ages 7-11) at two Rochester public schools. We assessed student understanding by analyzing percent repeatability of 20 survey questions and compared percent "don't know" (DK) responses across grades, gender, and race. Questions thought to be ambiguous after early survey administration were investigated in student focus groups, modified as appropriate, and reassessed. The response rate across all surveys was >87%. Survey questions were well understood; 16 of 20 questions demonstrated strong pre/post repeatability (>70%). Only 1 question showed an increase in DK response for higher grades (p survey questions and improved measures of understanding in the final survey administration. Grade-school students' knowledge, attitudes and behavior toward influenza prevention can be assessed using surveys. Quantitative and qualitative analysis may be used to assess participant understanding and refine survey development for pediatric survey instruments. These methods may be used to assess the repeatability and validity of surveys to assess the impact of health education interventions in young children.

  20. Undergraduate Research Involving Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students in Interdisciplinary Science Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd Pagano

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Scientific undergraduate research in higher education often yields positive outcomes for student and faculty member participants alike, with underrepresented students often showing even more substantial gains (academic, professional, and personal as a result of the experience. Significant success can be realized when involving deaf and hard-of-hearing (d/hh undergraduate students, who are also vastly underrepresented in the sciences, in interdisciplinary research projects. Even d/hh Associate degree level students and those in the first two years of their postsecondary careers can contribute to, and benefit from, the research process when faculty mentors properly plan/design projects. We discuss strategies, including the dissemination/communication of research results, for involving these students in research groups with different communication dynamics and share both findings of our research program and examples of successful chemical and biological research projects that have involved d/hh undergraduate students. We hope to stimulate a renewed interest in encouraging diversity and involving students with disabilities into higher education research experiences globally and across multiple scientific disciplines, thus strengthening the education and career pipeline of these students.

  1. Increasing Student Involvement through Residence Hall Lifestyle Assignments and Developmental Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Mark J.; Noftsinger, John B.

    1994-01-01

    This study investigated the usefulness of three dormitory lifestyle assignments (male-only, female-only, co-ed) in promoting student participation in residence hall activities at James Madison University (Virginia). Results showed assignment to coeducational dormitories fostered more and varied student involvement than did male-only or female-only…

  2. Students' Involvement in Social Networking and Attitudes towards Its Integration into Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umoh, Ukeme Ekpedeme; Etuk, Etuk Nssien

    2016-01-01

    The study examined Students' Involvement in Social Networking and attitudes towards its Integration into Teaching. The study was carried out in the University of Uyo, Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria. The population of the study consisted of 17,618 undergraduate students enrolled into full time degree programmes in the University of Uyo for 2014/2015…

  3. Relationship of Purchasing, Brand, and Self Involvement with Advertising Interactions and Beliefs among Malaysian Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaprasad, Jyotika

    A study examined Malaysian students' involvement with purchasing, with branded products, and with themselves as well as their responses to and beliefs about advertising, by ethnic group. Subjects, 387 students at a university in Penang, Malaysia, completed questionnaires measuring their responses to advertising. Results indicated a relatively high…

  4. Student Performance Predictors Involving Numerically Based Subject Matter: Lecture versus Web Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidry, Krisandra

    2013-01-01

    This study examines whether student performance predictors in a numerically based lecture course are similar to those for the web version of the same course. A numerically based course involves quantitative concepts and requires mathematical calculations. Data were collected from students taking a financial management class at a medium sized state…

  5. Middle-Class Parental Involvement in the Summer Activities of Four Elementary Students: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Iva B.; Chappell, Manya; Johnson, Susan; Ngassam, Marlise DePaul

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we explore middle-class parental involvement in summer activities of four elementary students. Many researchers discuss summer programs initiated by institutions, but fail to explain how parents' availability, experiences, and related criteria affect student summer activities. From our interviews, observations, and artifacts, we…

  6. Student Belief and Involvement in the Paranormal and Performance in Introductory Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messer, Wayne S.; Griggs, Richard A.

    1989-01-01

    Assesses student belief and involvement in 10 paranormal phenomena. Findings show 99 percent of the sample expressed belief in at least one. Students expressing these beliefs achieved significantly lower course grades. Discusses instructor's role in combating unfounded beliefs and fostering critical thinking. (NL)

  7. Calculus Limits Involving Infinity: The Role of Students' Informal Dynamic Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Steven R.

    2015-01-01

    Few studies on calculus limits have centred their focus on student understanding of limits at infinity or infinite limits that involve continuous functions (as opposed to discrete sequences). This study examines student understanding of these types of limits using both pure mathematics and applied-science functions and formulas. Seven calculus…

  8. Post-traumatic Stress and Growth Among Medical Student Volunteers After the March 2011 Disaster in Fukushima, Japan: Implications for Student Involvement with Future Disasters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, David; Prioleau, Phoebe; Taku, Kanako; Naruse, Yu; Sekine, Hideharu; Maeda, Masaharu; Yabe, Hirooki; Katz, Craig; Yanagisawa, Robert

    2016-06-01

    The March 2011 "triple disaster" (earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear accident) had a profound effect on northern Japan. Many medical students at Fukushima Medical University volunteered in the relief effort. We aimed to investigate the nature of students' post-disaster involvement and examine the psychological impact of their experiences using a survey containing elements from the Davidson Trauma Scale and Posttraumatic Growth Inventory. We collected 494 surveys (70 % response rate), of which 132 students (26.7 %) had volunteered. Volunteers were more likely to be older, have witnessed the disaster in person, had their hometowns affected, and had a family member or close friend injured. In the month after 3/11, volunteers were more likely to want to help, feel capable of helping, and report an increased desire to become a physician. Both in the month after 3/11 and the most recent month before the survey, there were no significant differences in distressing symptoms, such as confusion, anger, or sadness, between volunteers and non-volunteers. Volunteers reported a significantly higher level of posttraumatic growth than non-volunteers. Participating in a greater variety of volunteer activities was associated with a higher level of posttraumatic growth, particularly in the Personal Strength domain. There may be self-selection in some criteria, since students who were likely to be resistant to confusion/anxiety/sadness may have felt more capable of helping and been predisposed to volunteer. However, participation in post-disaster relief efforts did not appear to have a harmful effect on medical students, an important consideration for mobilizing volunteers after future disasters.

  9. Effect of Student Vulnerability on Perceptions of Teacher-Student Sexual Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromuth, Mary Ellen; Mackey, Amber L.; Wilson, Amy

    2010-01-01

    This study explored whether the vulnerability of an adolescent student affected perceptions of teacher sexual misconduct. Respondents (150 male and 150 female undergraduates) read scenarios depicting teacher sexual misconduct varied by respondent gender, gender dyad (male teacher-female student and female teacher-male student), and three levels of…

  10. Calculus limits involving infinity: the role of students' informal dynamic reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Steven R.

    2015-01-01

    Few studies on calculus limits have centred their focus on student understanding of limits at infinity or infinite limits that involve continuous functions (as opposed to discrete sequences). This study examines student understanding of these types of limits using both pure mathematics and applied-science functions and formulas. Seven calculus students' approaches to understanding, calculating, and interpreting answers to these types of limits are examined. The dynamic reasoning used by these students led to good justifications and meaningful interpretations of their answers. On the other hand, when students engaged less with dynamic reasoning, they struggled more and made less reasonable interpretations of their answers. Furthermore, dynamic reasoning helped the students in this study overcome previously documented pitfalls and encouraged covariational reasoning. The applied-science contexts at times helped the students engage in dynamic reasoning.

  11. "Sleepiness" is serious in adolescence: Two surveys of 3235 Canadian students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogilvie Robert

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence is growing that sleep problems in adolescents are significant impediments to learning and negatively affect behaviour, attainment of social competence and quality of life. The objectives of the study were to determine the level of sleepiness among students in high school, to identify factors to explain it, and to determine the association between sleepiness and performance in both academic and extracurricular activities Methods A cross-sectional survey of 2201 high school students in the Hamilton Wentworth District School Board and the Near North District School Board in Ontario was conducted in 1998/9. A similar survey was done three years later involving 1034 students in the Grand Erie District School Board in the same Province. The Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS was used to measure sleepiness and we also assessed the reliability of this tool for this population. Descriptive analysis of the cohort and information on various measures of performance and demographic data were included. Regression analysis, using the generalised estimating equation (GEE, was utilized to investigate factors associated with risk of sleepiness (ESS>10. Results Seventy per cent of the students had less than 8.5 hours weeknight sleep. Bedtime habits such as a consistent bedtime routine, staying up late or drinking caffeinated beverages before bed were statistically significantly associated with ESS, as were weeknight sleep quantity and gender. As ESS increased there was an increase in the proportion of students who felt their grades had dropped because of sleepiness, were late for school, were often extremely sleepy at school, and were involved in fewer extracurricular activities. These performance measures were statistically significantly associated with ESS. Twenty-three percent of the students felt their grades had dropped because of sleepiness. Most students (58–68% reported that they were "really sleepy" between 8 and 10 A

  12. Student Engagement in Law School: Preparing 21st Century Lawyers. Annual Survey Results, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law School Survey of Student Engagement, 2008

    2008-01-01

    The Law School Survey of Student Engagement (LSSSE) documents dimensions of quality in legal education and provides information about law student participation in effective educational activities that law schools and other organizations can use to improve student learning. The insights into the law school student experience reported in this study…

  13. Transfer Student Questionnaire: Results of 1973 Survey. Special Report 74-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holahan, Carole K.; Kelley, H. Paul

    To obtain a demographic description of University of Texas at Austin (U.T. Austin) transfer students, to investigate transfer students' evaluations of the university and of their previous college, and to compare transfer students with non-transfer undergraduate students, 1,365 responses to a questionnaire were analyzed. The survey explored student…

  14. A Survey of Tuition-Free English Major Students' Use of Language Learning Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jianfeng

    2013-01-01

    In order to have a clear understanding of the differences between tuition-free students and non-tuition-free students in the strategies they employ and to prepare for the conduction of the Language Learning Strategy Course to the two groups of students, the author decided to conduct a survey as to the students' current use of language learning…

  15. Getting Students REALLY Involved in Design and Construction--Are You Mad?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Gareth; Watson, Alison

    2011-01-01

    Involve students in the design and construction stages of new schools?--"Are you serious?" "Leave it to the experts", "We don't have time--the programme is very tight", "What do they know?", "They'll get in the way!", "It's not our job!" are still responses from some involved with design…

  16. Involvement in Transition Planning Meetings among High School Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Megan M.; Taylor, Julie Lounds; Urbano, Richard C.; Hodapp, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Although students with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are least likely to attend and participate in transition planning meetings, little is known about factors related to their involvement. Using a national data set, we conducted regressions to identify predictors of the involvement of 320 youth with ASD. Attendance positively related to higher…

  17. Predictors and Outcomes of Parental Involvement with High School Students in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumow, Lee; Lyutykh, Elena; Schmidt, Jennifer A.

    2011-01-01

    Demographic and psychological predictors of parent involvement with their children's science education both at home and at school were examined during high school. Associations between both types of parent involvement and numerous academic outcomes were tested. Data were collected from 244 high school students in 12 different science classrooms…

  18. Parental Involvement as a Mediator of Academic Performance among Special Education Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores de Apodaca, Roberto; Gentling, Dana G.; Steinhaus, Joanna K.; Rosenberg, Elena A.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined parental involvement as a mediator of the academic performance of middle school students with special needs. The study built on the different types of parental involvement theorized by Epstein and colleagues (2002) and studied empirically by Fan and Chen (2001). Using a specially developed questionnaire, a sample of 82 parents…

  19. Modeling the Relations among Parental Involvement, School Engagement and Academic Performance of High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Alwan, Ahmed F.

    2014-01-01

    The author proposed a model to explain how parental involvement and school engagement related to academic performance. Participants were (671) 9th and 10th graders students who completed two scales of "parental involvement" and "school engagement" in their regular classrooms. Results of the path analysis suggested that the…

  20. The Relationship between Parental Involvement and Student Achievement in the U.S. Virgin Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Felix

    2014-01-01

    Although many studies have been conducted on the relationship between parental involvement and student achievement, the effect of parental involvement in the U.S. Virgin Islands had not been substantiated empirically. It should not be assumed that research conducted in the United States or other geographic areas will necessarily apply to the…

  1. Together yet Separate: Students' Associating Amounts of Change in Quantities Involved in Rate of Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Heather L.

    2015-01-01

    This paper extends work about quantitative reasoning related to covarying quantities involved in rate of change. It reports a multiple case study of three students' reasoning about quantities involved in rate of change when working on tasks incorporating multiple representations of covarying quantities. When interpreting relationships between…

  2. Another Look at College Student's Ratings of Course Quality: Data from Penn State Student Surveys in Three Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willits, Fern; Brennan, Mark

    2017-01-01

    This study assessed the relationships of student attributes, course characteristics and course outcomes to college students' ratings of course quality in three types of settings. The analysis utilised data from online surveys of samples of college students conducted in 2011 and 2012 at the Pennsylvania State University. Included in the analysis…

  3. Predictors of healthcare professionals' attitudes towards family involvement in safety-relevant behaviours: a cross-sectional factorial survey study.

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Rachel; Savvopoulou, M; Shergill, R; Shergill, S; Schwappach, David

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To investigate predictors of healthcare professionals' (HCPs) attitudes towards family involvement in safety-relevant behaviours. DESIGN A cross-sectional fractional factorial survey that assessed HCPs' attitudes towards family involvement in two error scenarios relating to hand hygiene and medication safety. Each survey comprised two randomised vignettes that described the potential error, how the family member communicated with the HCP about the error and how the HCP ...

  4. Effect of Scaffolding on Helping Introductory Physics Students Solve Quantitative Problems Involving Strong Alternative Conceptions

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Shih-Yin

    2016-01-01

    It is well-known that introductory physics students often have alternative conceptions that are inconsistent with established physical principles and concepts. Invoking alternative conceptions in quantitative problem-solving process can derail the entire process. In order to help students solve quantitative problems involving strong alternative conceptions correctly, appropriate scaffolding support can be helpful. The goal of this study is to examine how different scaffolding supports involving analogical problem solving influence introductory physics students' performance on a target quantitative problem in a situation where many students' solution process is derailed due to alternative conceptions. Three different scaffolding supports were designed and implemented in calculus-based and algebra-based introductory physics courses to evaluate the level of scaffolding needed to help students learn from an analogical problem that is similar in the underlying principles but for which the problem solving process i...

  5. Student involvement as a vehicle for empowerment: a case study of the student platform for engineering education development

    KAUST Repository

    Delaine, David A.

    2010-08-01

    This paper examines the mission, structure and outputs of one organisation, the Student Platform for Engineering Education Development (SPEED), as a case study for how student-led organisations can use student involvement to promote and sustain student self-efficacy in an academic field. SPEED attracts young people to engineering through student participation in engineering education (EE). SPEED is a global, non-profit student organisation that functions as an interdisciplinary network to diversify dialogue, stimulate change and impact the development of EE and its effect on society. SPEED is directly attracting young people to engineering in various ways: the organisation of its keynote event, the Global Student Forum; facilitating interactions between globally minded, socially inclined engineers with aspirations to change the world; and through the global dissemination of SPEED\\'s work and practices through broad and relevant channels. Short-term outcomes are highlighted here. This case study can serve as a model for student engagement and involvement in other disciplines. © 2010 SEFI.

  6. Nursing students' clinical competencies: a survey on clinical education objectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrigoni, C; Grugnetti, A M; Caruso, R; Gallotti, M L; Borrelli, P; Puci, M

    2017-01-01

    Developing clearly defined competencies and identifying strategies for their measurement remain unfortunately a critical aspect of nursing training. In the current international context, which continues to be characterised by deep economic crisis, universities have a fundamental role to play in redefining the educational goals to respond to the expectations of certain geographical areas of interest, as underscored in the Bologna Process (Joint Declaration of the European Ministers of Education Convened in Bologna 19 June 1999). The aim of this observational study was to examine the clinical learning context of nursing students using a tool developed by a team of teachers for the analysis of clinical learning. Redefinition of the clinical learning objectives with reference to the competencies set out in the questionnaire validated by Venturini et al. (2012) and the subsequent use of the tool created by the team of teachers for students in the first, second and third-year courses of the 2013/14 academic year, covering all the internships called for in those years. All nursing students enrolled in the first, second and third year of the nursing undergraduate degree program at the University of Pavia (no. 471) participated in this survey. A total of 1,758 clinical internships were carried out: 461 for the first year, 471 for the second year and 826 for the third year. Setting objectives, beginning with the educational offerings in the several clinical contexts, represents a strong point for this process. The results highlight a level of heterogeneity and complexity intrinsic to the University of Pavia educational system, characterized by clinical settings with different clinical levels (Research hospital and other traditional hospitals) that offering different levels of training. The use of the self-evaluation form for clinical learning made it possible to perform real-time observations of the training activities of the entire student body. An educational model

  7. Survey of opinion of secondary school students on organ donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaheen, F A; Souqiyyeh, M Z; Al-Attar, B; Jaralla, A; Al Swailem, A R

    1996-01-01

    We conducted a survey of opinion of a sample of senior high school students in Saudi Arabia to evaluate their awareness of the importance of organ donation and concept of brain death. There were 839 students from nine schools, 745 males and 94 females. The participants were not primed about these topics before answering the questionnaire, which was answered at school. The study group declared the level of education of the parents. Twenty three percent knew about the Saudi Center for Organ Transplantation, but 61% could only guess its function. Fifty eight percent could not differentiate between "natural 11 death and brain death and 93% were not aware of how to document it. Elaboration on these questions showed variable explanations. Sixty eight percent agreed to donate organs of relatives in case of brain death, and 91% would donate a kidney to their relatives. However, 38% agreed to donate organs of their own to organ failure patients other then relatives. Thirty five percent knew about the organ donation cards, but only 12% carried them, and only 48% would consent to include the word "donor" on their driving licenses. Forty two percent knew about the opinion of Islamic religion toward organ donation. Thirty one percent agreed to send patients for organ transplantation abroad due to their belief that transplantation technology in Saudi Arabia is lacking, There were no significant differences in the answers according to schools, gender, students of different curricula, having a friend or relative with organ failure, or the level of the education of the parents. This study suggests the great need for education of the new generation about the importance of organ donation and the concept of brain death. We believe that including these topics in the curricula of schools would help disseminating this knowledge to the public in Saudi Arabia.

  8. Connectedness and suicidal ideation among adolescents involved with child welfare: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Amy S; Fulginiti, Anthony; Finno-Velasquez, Megan

    2015-04-01

    Using data from the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being, this study examined the relationship between connectedness in major social domains (i.e., caregiver, peers, deviant peers, and school) and suicidal ideation among adolescents (11-17 years old) investigated by child welfare agencies (N=995). Weighted logistic regression models were used to evaluate the relationships between connectedness variables and suicidal ideation, after adjusting for covariates. Youths with a stronger connection to caregivers were much less likely to report suicidal ideation, whereas youths with stronger deviant peer relationships were significantly more likely to report suicidal ideation. Significant associations found between primary caregiver and deviant peer connectedness and suicidal ideation highlight the need for attentive consideration of these relationships when working with this highly vulnerable population. Identifying domain-specific connectedness factors related to suicidal ideation presents an opportunity for the development of targeted early intervention for child welfare-involved youths.

  9. Developing minds of tomorrow: exploring students' strategies involved in the generalization of linear patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Areej IsamBarham

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The study investigates students' strategies involved in the generalization of "linear patterns". The study followed thequalitative research approach by conducting task-based interviews with twenty-nine primary second grade students fromdifferent high, intermediate and low ability levels. Results of the study presented several strategies involved in thegeneralization of the patterns including visual, auditory, mental, finger counting, verbal counting, and traditional (paper andpencil strategies. The findings revealed that the type of the assigned pattern (simple or complex and the type of the structureof the pattern itself (increasing or decreasing play a big role for students' strategies involved to either discover the rule of thepattern or to extend it. However, students in early ages could master several skills and choose appropriate procedures to dealwith patterns, which indicate that they could develop their algebraic thinking from early stages. Findings of the study alsorevealed that using different senses, using the idea of coins, using the numbers line, recognizing musical sounds, using concretematerials like fingers, applying different visual and mental strategies, and even applying traditional calculations could helpstudents to work with “linear patterns". It is recommended that teachers introduce different strategies and procedures inteaching patterns to meet the needs of students as different learners, give them the opportunities to develop their thinkingstrategies and explore their thoughts. More research is recommended to explore students' strategies involved in thegeneralization of different kinds of patters at different stages.

  10. A Survey of the Duties and Job Performance of Student Assistants in Access Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolppanen, Bradley P.; Derr, Janice

    2009-01-01

    The results of a recently conducted Web-based survey of Access Services department supervisors are presented in this article. The survey, which was completed by 94 respondents, identified 19 core tasks completed by student assistants and further found a high overall approval of student assistant job performance. The information generated by the…

  11. The MetLife Survey of the American Teacher: Preparing Students for College and Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    MetLife, Inc., 2011

    2011-01-01

    "The MetLife Survey of the American Teacher: Preparing Students for College and Careers" was conducted by Harris Interactive and is the twenty-seventh in a series sponsored annually by MetLife since 1984 to give voice to those closest to the classroom. This MetLife Survey examines the priority that all students graduate from high school prepared…

  12. The MetLife Survey of the American Teacher: Collaborating for Student Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    MetLife, Inc., 2010

    2010-01-01

    "The MetLife Survey of the American Teacher: Collaborating for Student Success (2009)" was conducted by Harris Interactive and is twenty-sixth in a series sponsored by MetLife since 1984 to give voice to those closest to the classroom. This "MetLife Survey" examines the views of teachers, principals and students about respective roles and…

  13. Graduate Students Library Satisfaction Survey: Miller F. Whittaker Library, South Carolina State University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agingu, Beatrice O.; Johnson, Minnie M.

    This article reports the findings of a library user satisfaction survey of graduate students conducted by the library staff at South Carolina State University. The survey evaluated the effectiveness of the library's programs, resources, and services in meeting the informational needs of graduate students at this institution. The objectives of the…

  14. Student Engagement in Law School: In Class and Beyond. Annual Survey Results, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law School Survey of Student Engagement, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The Law School Survey of Student Engagement (LSSSE) focuses on activities related to effective learning in law school. The results of this year's survey show how law students use their time and what they think about their legal education experience, while simultaneously providing guidance to law schools seeking to improve engagement and learning.…

  15. Distinguishing the Influences of Father's and Mother's Involvement on Adolescent Academic Achievement: Analyses of Taiwan Education Panel Survey Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hsien-Yuan; Zhang, Dalun; Kwok, Oi-Man; Li, Yan; Ju, Song

    2011-01-01

    Using a sample drawn from Taiwan, this study evaluated the role of mother and father involvement in adolescent academic achievement. The participants were drawn from the Taiwan Education Panel Survey (TEPS) and consisted of 8,108 adolescents who studied seventh grade in 2001. Father and mother involvement related to academic achievement was…

  16. We love our school toilets: involving primary school students in improving their school toilets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senior, Elizabeth

    2014-03-01

    This article reports on the planning, implementation and evaluation of an intervention to improve school students' experience of using the school toilet in a primary school in Melbourne, Australia. 20 students from grades 2-6 participated in focus groups, to discuss what they valued about the school and raise awareness of issues they were not happy about. A common theme from all of the focus groups was that students reported avoiding use of the school toilets. Using the ideas generated from the focus groups, the student council (with input from staff), developed a self-administered pre- and post-test questionnaire. This was given to 220 students in grades 1-4, aged 6-10 years. Improvements suggested by the students were made to the toilet block, and then a post-test was administered. Independent t tests were conducted. The pre-test indicated that 71% of girls and 65% of boys feared the behaviour of other students in the toilet. Overwhelmingly, the qualitative comments focused on poor student behaviour in the toilets, with lack of privacy due to student misbehaviour mentioned in 90% of the comments. After the toilets were revamped, the greatest gains were made in students' attitudes toward the toilets, with a 37% increase in students who indicated they now liked the toilet facility. Incidents of vandalism also decreased; however, student misconduct in the toilets was still regarded as a problem. Involving students in refurbishing their toilets improved how students viewed the toilets and reduced vandalism; however, a different intervention is required to change inappropriate behaviours in the toilet.

  17. A Grounded Theory Study of the Mentoring Process Involved With Undergraduate Athletic Training Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitney, William A; Ehlers, Greg G

    2004-12-01

    OBJECTIVE: To gain insight regarding the mentoring processes involving students enrolled in athletic training education programs and to create a mentoring model. DESIGN AND SETTING: We conducted a grounded theory study with students and mentors currently affiliated with 1 of 2 of the athletic training education programs accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs. PARTICIPANTS: Sixteen interviews were conducted, 13 with athletic training students and 3 with individuals identified as mentors. The students ranged in age from 20 to 24 years, with an average of 21.6 years. The mentors ranged from 24 to 38 years of age, with an average of 33.3 years. Participants were purposefully selected based on theoretic sampling and availability. DATA ANALYSIS: The transcribed interviews were analyzed using open-, axial-, and selective-coding procedures. Member checks, peer debriefings, and triangulation were used to ensure trustworthiness. RESULTS: Students who acknowledged having a mentor overwhelmingly identified their clinical instructor in this role. The open-coding procedures produced 3 categories: (1) mentoring prerequisites, (2) interpersonal foundations, and (3) educational dimensions. Mentoring prerequisites included accessibility, approachability, and protege initiative. Interpersonal foundations involved the mentor and protege having congruent values, trust, and a personal relationship. The educational dimensions category involved the mentor facilitating knowledge and skill development, encouraging professional perspectives, and individualizing learning. Although a student-certified athletic trainer relationship can be grounded in either interpersonal or educational aspects, the data support the occurrence of an authentic mentoring relationship when the dimensions coalesced. CONCLUSIONS: Potential mentors must not only be accessible but also approachable by a prospective protege. Mentoring takes initiative on behalf of a student and

  18. High school students' posttraumatic symptoms, substance abuse and involvement in violence in the aftermath of war.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiff, Miriam; Pat-Horenczyk, Ruth; Benbenishty, Rami; Brom, Danny; Baum, Naomi; Astor, Ron Avi

    2012-10-01

    This study examined one-year after effects of exposure to war events on adolescents' Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms (PTS) and risk behaviors (substance use and involvement in school violence). In addition, it addressed two potential vulnerability factors: at the micro level, it examined whether childhood trauma raised the vulnerability of Israeli adolescents to PTS and risk behaviors when exposed to war events. At the macro level, we explored whether ethnicity, i.e., being an Israeli Arab, is a vulnerability factor to PTS and risk behaviors. We used a representative sample of 7th to 11th grade students from the north of Israel that included 4151 students: 1800 Jewish (54.4% boys) and 2351 Arab (41.5% boys). We assessed exposure to war events and childhood traumatic events, PTS and PTSD, substance use (alcohol, cannabis, Ecstasy) and involvement in school violence. The findings revealed extensive exposure to war events among both Jewish and Arab students. A year after the war, its effects on adolescents were still manifested in PTS, and involvement in school violence and substance use. Exposure to child physical abuse was associated with higher levels of PTS symptoms, substance use and involvement in violence. Exposure to other traumatic events was also associated with greater PTS symptoms and involvement in violence but not with greater substance use. Arab students were a more vulnerable population. They reported higher PTS symptoms, more cannabis use and greater involvement in school violence than Jewish students. However, exposure to war events had similar effects on both Arab and Jewish students. We conclude that war effects include a broad range of psychological distress and risk behaviors that last long after the war ends, especially among youth who have experienced childhood trauma and high exposure to war-related stressors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The Longitudinal Process of Early Parent Involvement on Student Achievement: A Path Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Momoko; Englund, Michelle M; Warner-Richter, Mallory N; Reynolds, Arthur J

    2013-01-01

    This longitudinal study investigated the process whereby early parent involvement in preschool effects student achievement from kindergarten through 6(th) grade. Participants were 1,539 low-income, mainly African American children and their mothers, in the Chicago Longitudinal Study. Program children (N = 989) received one or two years of the Child-Parent Center (CPC) program - a preschool intervention that strongly promoted parents' development of parent involvement skills within the school and at home. Children from similar backgrounds who did not attend the CPC, but participated in available local resources (e.g. day care), were obtained as a comparison group (N = 550). Path analysis revealed an interactive process between parent involvement, academic achievement, and children's motivation. Early parent involvement directly influenced kindergarten achievement, which in turn influenced first grade student motivation. Highly motivated children then encouraged parents to continue involvement. The cyclic nature of this process across elementary school was observed. The model accounted for 61% of the variance in 6(th) grade achievement. Findings suggest that early parent involvement promoted in the CPC program, sets the stage for subsequent parent involvement, student motivation, and academic achievement throughout early and middle childhood.

  20. Queer Student Leaders: An Exploratory Case Study of Identity Development and LGBT Student Involvement at a Midwestern Research University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renn, Kristen A.; Bilodeau, Brent

    2005-01-01

    Using the first phase of a longitudinal study of student leaders of the 2002 Midwest Bi-, Lesbian, Gay, Transgender and Allies College Conference (MBLGTACC), the authors explore the intersections of involvement in identity-specific leadership activities and development of LGBT/Queer identity. LGBT leadership experiences appear to have contributed…

  1. Suicide Prevention Exposure, Awareness, and Knowledge Survey (SPEAKS) - Student

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The SPEAKS- student dataset contains individual level information from a sample of college students on GLS funded campuses. These data include student demographics,...

  2. Involving carers in the teaching, learning and assessment of masters students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSherry, Robert; Duggan, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Involving patients and carers in teaching, learning and assessment focuses the students on person-centred care by providing the opportunity to listen to, and reflect on, the perspective of patient and/or carer and also allows the students the opportunity to work in partnership with them to effect meaningful change. This paper presents an example at Teesside University where two informal carers have been involved as partners in the programme team of The Master of Arts in Advancing Practice over the past four years. In year two of the programme, the student is required to work within their organisation and governance policies to identify, implement and evaluate a practice development change project. Involving carers at critical points throughout the year has enriched, supported and challenged the students' learning. Evaluation has highlighted the role that carers can play in bringing a new dimension to the students' learning experience. The authors believe that direct involvement of this kind has much potential for other programmes in improving health and social care education which, in turn, will improve health and social care services. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. The image ofan ideal psychiatrist inthe eyes of medical students, patients and doctors involved inpsychiatric care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Margulska

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the study was to determine differences in the image of ideal psychiatrist (IIP among patients, doctors involved in psychiatric care and medical students and also between individuals with different work experience (doctors vs. students. The psychiatrist’s personality seems an important factor in supporting therapeutic process; therefore it is worth searching for the patient’s needs. Materials and methods: Three groups participated in the study: patients of the psychiatric units, medical students of 6th year and psychiatrists. The Gough and Heilbrun ACL (Adjective Check List – based on Mur‑ ray’s theory of needs – was used to assess IIP. Results: Data analysis revealed statistically significant differences among patients, doctors and students involving five scales: Nurturance, Aggression, Change, Succorance and Deference. Patients had lower scores on Change scale than doctors and higher scores on the Nurturance, Succurance and Deference than stu‑ dents. Psychiatrists had higher scores on Nurturance and Deference scale and lower score on Aggression scale than students. Conclusions: The findings showed differences in the expectations of patients compared to those of students and doctors. The most significant difference that was observed involved the Change. It may indicate that patients prefer order, conventional approach and stability in psychiatrist’s personality traits more commonly than doctors. Study findings suggest that work experience has impact on IIP: with increasing work experience, opinion about IIP comes closer to patients’ expectations.

  4. Analysis of Survey Data on First-Year Students at Our University (2)

    OpenAIRE

    木下, 栄二

    2014-01-01

    Through an annual survey of all freshmen at this university, we gather excellent data on our students. One purpose of this project is to analyze and utilize this data, which is useful for investigating changes among our students. Here, we have analyzed survey data gathered from 2004 to 2010. In this paper, we report on analysis results regarding changes in student economic situation and reading activity. We hope that this information will be helpful to our faculties and sections, and of use i...

  5. Promoting Student Involvement with Environmental Laboratory Experiments in a General Microbiology Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loretta Brancaccio Taras

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This is a descriptive study of a series of laboratory exercises on environmental microbiology carried out by students in a general microbiology course during eight of the twelve weeks of the semester. The revised laboratory component is predicated upon seawater and sediment samples collected by student pairs using marine sampling equipment on a field trip aboard a research vessel. Two longitudinal studies were performed: assay for antibiotic production from isolated actinomycetes and construction and observation of Winogradsky columns. Two additional experiments: culturing microalgae and water testing for coliforms also used the samples collected by the students. The advantages of long-term, challenging laboratory experiences actively involving the students in group process, self-direction, and scientific practices are discussed. Also considered are development of laboratory skills, scientific competencies, and students’ self-confidence in carrying out such environmental investigations. Plans for future assessment of student learning are presented.

  6. Promoting Student Involvement with Environmental Laboratory Experiments in a General Microbiology Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loretta Brancaccio Taras

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available This is a descriptive study of a series of laboratory exercises on environmental microbiology carried out by students in a general microbiology course during eight of the twelve weeks of the semester. The revised laboratory component is predicated upon seawater and sediment samples collected by student pairs using marine sampling equipment on a field trip aboard a research vessel. Two longitudinal studies were performed: assay for antibiotic production from isolated actinomycetes and construction and observation of Winogradsky columns. Two additional experiments: culturing microalgae and water testing for coliforms also used the samples collected by the students. The advantages of long-term, challenging laboratory experiences actively involving the students in group process, self-direction, and scientific practices are discussed. Also considered are development of laboratory skills, scientific competencies, and students’ self-confidence in carrying out such environmental investigations. Plans for future assessment of student learning are presented.

  7. Survey and Thought on Graduates’ Repayment Awareness of Student Loan in Agricultural Universities and Colleges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    To find out graduates’ repayment awareness of student loan,we conducted a questionnaire survey for those graduates who applied for student loan in Zhongkai University of Agriculture and Engineering.The survey has following results.First,the national student loan plays an important role in assisting poor students in finishing their study.Second,graduates value social function of personal credit.Third,trustworthiness education activities carried out by colleges and universities are effective.Fourth,economic income is a major factor of graduates repaying capital with interest.Fifth,bank’s student loan management system is not perfect.Sixth,the national student loan system remains to be improved.In line with these results,we put forward five countermeasures and suggestions:strengthen the trustworthiness education of students;standardize the credit investigation management of students’ personal credit;establish student information management mechanism;standardize banks’ payment reminder administration behavior;and perfect national student loan system.

  8. Peer Assessment for Construction Management and Quantity Surveying Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia McLaughlin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Students undertaking the Bachelor of ConstructionManagement degree course at RMIT University, Melbourne,qualify for registration with the Australian Institute ofQuantity Surveyors (AIQS and the Australian Institute ofBuilding (AIB upon graduation. Over the past decade thedegree course has been constantly upgraded and altered inline with recommendations from professional bodies such asthese and other industry partners. In 1994 the Departmentof Building and Construction Economics re-assesseda range of subjects including the first year technologysubjects. Out of the review a problem-based integratedlearning unit was developed and tested. This unit has nowbeen in place for ten years.Quantity surveying and construction management likemost other professions in the construction industryrequire teamwork and advanced consultation skills. Theseskills may be learnt through experience but there isconsiderable evidence that these skills can be taught in theundergraduate years. Therefore in line with team-basedapproaches used in industry and professional constructionsettings, this year a new assessment model - peerassessment - will be applied to the problem-based learningunit. This paper describes the procedures and processesused to introduce the change and examines the theoreticalbase upon which the model was developed.

  9. Student Perceptions of Religion and Campus. (A Survey: Fall Semester, 1981.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutledge, Mark; Haymes, Steven

    Perceptions and attitudes of University of New Mexico (UNM) students regarding the university, their church, and the campus ministry were surveyed in fall 1981 through telephone interviews. All of the 40 students were affiliated with the United Methodist Church. Most students (82.5 percent) were members of some church, and most attended one or…

  10. Results of the Fall 1984 Survey of Napa Valley College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedlander, Jack; Gocke, Sharon

    In November 1984, a study was conducted at Napa Valley College (NVC) to assess student satisfaction with the college's programs and services. An in-class survey was completed by 835 day and evening students enrolled in credit classes during the fall 1984 semester. Study findings included the following: (1) most students were attending NVC to…

  11. A Survey of the Situation of College Students' Occupational Self-Determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iupitov, A. V.; Zotov, A. A.

    1998-01-01

    Investigates the situation of students' professional self-determination through a survey of 147 students within history and biology at Kemerovo State University (Russia) focusing on the students' motivations for choosing their future work after the university, self-assessments of academic progress, and perspectives of finding future employment.…

  12. Probing University Students' Pre-Knowledge in Quantum Physics with QPCS Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asikainen, Mervi A.

    2017-01-01

    The study investigated the use of Quantum Physics Conceptual Survey (QPCS) in probing student understanding of quantum physics. Altogether 103 Finnish university students responded to QPCS. The mean scores of the student responses were calculated and the test was evaluated using common five indices: Item difficulty index, Item discrimination…

  13. Student Perceptions of Religion and Campus. (A Survey: Fall Semester, 1981.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutledge, Mark; Haymes, Steven

    Perceptions and attitudes of University of New Mexico (UNM) students regarding the university, their church, and the campus ministry were surveyed in fall 1981 through telephone interviews. All of the 40 students were affiliated with the United Methodist Church. Most students (82.5 percent) were members of some church, and most attended one or…

  14. British Medical Undergraduates in 1975: A Student Survey in 1975 Compared with 1966

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnan, S. P. B.

    1976-01-01

    Part of the findings of a postal survey of medical students pertaining to the students' background, attitudes to the course, and career preferences. Increases in women students, the lack of broadening of social class background, and continued unfavorable attitudes toward community medicine, sociology, and psychology are shown. (LBH)

  15. The Students' Survey of Education for Sustainable Development Competencies: A Comparison among Faculties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biasutti, Michele; Surian, Alessio

    2012-01-01

    The paper reports research employing a quantitative approach to investigating the competences of university students about educating for sustainable development (ESD). Participants were 467 bachelor students of the following five areas: social sciences, educational sciences, applied sciences, engineering and health sciences. The Student Survey of…

  16. SURVEY OF DENTAL STUDENTS' ATTITUDE REGARDING ORIENTAL MEDICINE/COMPLEMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE: COMPARISON BETWEEN TWO JAPANESE DENTAL SCHOOLS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameyama, Atsushi; Toda, Kazuo

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to examine the impact of "curricula for undergraduate education in oriental medicine (OM)/complementary and alternative medicine (CAM)" on student awareness of OM. A questionnaire survey was conducted involving the Nagasaki University School of Dentistry (NUSD), a university that implements education in OM as part of its undergraduate curriculum, and Tokyo Dental College (TDC), which does not teach OM. The third- and fifth-year students of both NUSD and TDC underwent the anonymous questionnaire survey, which included questions regarding their knowledge of OM and CAM, interests in these subjects, and their opinions on the necessity of teaching OM in the undergraduate dental education, and the results were collected for analysis. Whereas 33% of 5(th) year NUSD students had knowledge of OM/CAM was 33%, only 10% of 5(th) year TDC students reported knowledge on the subject. 69% of 5(th) year NUSD students interested in OM/CAM, while 5(th) year TDC students who interest them were only 45%. Although 77% of 5(th) year NUSD students were in favor of OM education implemented in the Faculty of Dentistry, the percentages of TDC students of that were smaller (46% in 3(rd) year and 48% in 5(th) year). Whereas 26% of 5(th) year TDC students did not recognize the necessity of oriental medicine education, only one 5(th) year NUSD student (2%) did not so. Introduction of education in OM in the undergraduate dental education program helps students to increase their interests in dental clinical applications.

  17. The Longitudinal Process of Early Parent Involvement on Student Achievement: A Path Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Hayakawa, Momoko; Englund, Michelle M.; Warner-Richter, Mallory N.; Reynolds, Arthur J.

    2013-01-01

    This longitudinal study investigated the process whereby early parent involvement in preschool effects student achievement from kindergarten through 6th grade. Participants were 1,539 low-income, mainly African American children and their mothers, in the Chicago Longitudinal Study. Program children (N = 989) received one or two years of the Child-Parent Center (CPC) program – a preschool intervention that strongly promoted parents' development of parent involvement skills within the school an...

  18. Ten-Structure as Strategy of Addition 1-20 by Involving Spatial Structuring Ability for First Grade Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmah, Ummy; Putri, Ratu Ilma Indra; Somakim

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to design learning activities that can support students to develop strategies for the addition of number 1 to 20 in the first grade by involving students' spatial structuring ability. This study was conducted in Indonesia by involving 27 students. In this paper, one of three activities is discussed namely ten-box activity.…

  19. Service user involvement in giving mental health students feedback on placement: A participatory action research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speers, Janey; Lathlean, Judith

    2015-09-01

    Although the drive to engage service users in service delivery, research and education has mainstream acceptance, it is not easy to achieve meaningful involvement. The contribution that could potentially be made by users whilst accessing services is often overlooked. This study involved stakeholders (mentors, service users and a lecturer) working together to design, evaluate and refine a system enabling students to seek feedback from service users. The feedback concerned mental health students' interpersonal skills and occurred whilst on practice placement. This research aimed to explore the experiences of those concerned when nine students attempted to learn from rather than about service users. A 2-year study, encompassing five cycles of participatory action research (PAR). A small island community in the British Isles, adopting UK standards for pre-registration nurse education. Data came from interviews with service users and mentors and a series of reflective group discussions with students who volunteered to try out the feedback mechanism. The deliberations of the PAR stakeholder group informed the research cycles and added to the data, which were subject to thematic analysis. Findings indicated that service users volunteering to give feedback had unanimously positive experiences. Students' experience lay on a continuum: those with a stronger sense of self were more willing and able to ask for feedback than less confident students. Cultural adjustment to the role change needed was challenging, requiring self-awareness and courage. Over time, all students achieved deep learning and, for some, learning appeared transformative. Although contextual, the study concluded that the feedback initiative encouraged the development of more equitable relationships, in which mental health nurses respected the expertise of service users. This potentially benefits student development, recovery-orientated practice, service users and HEIs searching for meaningful ways to

  20. Proximity morality in medical school – medical students forming physician morality "on the job": Grounded theory analysis of a student survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sallin Karl

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The value of ethics education have been questioned. Therefore we did a student survey on attitudes about the teaching of ethics in Swedish medical schools. Methods Questionnaire survey on attitudes to ethics education with 409 Swedish medical students participating. We analyzed > 8000 words of open-ended responses and multiple-choice questions using classic grounded theory procedures. Results In this paper we suggest that medical students take a proximity morality stance towards their ethics education meaning that they want to form physician morality "on the job". This involves comprehensive ethics courses in which quality lectures provide "ethics grammar" and together with attitude exercises and vignette reflections nurture tutored group discussions. Goals of forming physician morality are to develop a professional identity, handling diversity of religious and existential worldviews, training students described as ethically naive, processing difficult clinical experiences, and desisting negative role modeling from physicians in clinical or teaching situations, some engaging in "ethics suppression" by controlling sensitive topic discussions and serving students politically correct attitudes. Conclusion We found that medical students have a proximity morality attitude towards ethics education. Rather than being taught ethics they want to form their own physician morality through tutored group discussions in comprehensive ethics courses.

  1. Proximity morality in medical school--medical students forming physician morality "on the job": grounded theory analysis of a student survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thulesius, Hans O; Sallin, Karl; Lynoe, Niels; Löfmark, Rurik

    2007-08-06

    The value of ethics education have been questioned. Therefore we did a student survey on attitudes about the teaching of ethics in Swedish medical schools. Questionnaire survey on attitudes to ethics education with 409 Swedish medical students participating. We analyzed > 8000 words of open-ended responses and multiple-choice questions using classic grounded theory procedures. In this paper we suggest that medical students take a proximity morality stance towards their ethics education meaning that they want to form physician morality "on the job". This involves comprehensive ethics courses in which quality lectures provide "ethics grammar" and together with attitude exercises and vignette reflections nurture tutored group discussions. Goals of forming physician morality are to develop a professional identity, handling diversity of religious and existential worldviews, training students described as ethically naive, processing difficult clinical experiences, and desisting negative role modeling from physicians in clinical or teaching situations, some engaging in "ethics suppression" by controlling sensitive topic discussions and serving students politically correct attitudes. We found that medical students have a proximity morality attitude towards ethics education. Rather than being taught ethics they want to form their own physician morality through tutored group discussions in comprehensive ethics courses.

  2. Surveying Turkish high school and university student attitudes and approaches to physics problem solving

    CERN Document Server

    Balta, Nuri; Singh, Chandralekha

    2016-01-01

    Student attitudes and approaches to problem solving can impact how well they learn physics. Prior research in the US using a validated Attitude and Approaches to Problem Solving (AAPS) survey suggests that there are major differences between students in introductory physics and astronomy courses and physics experts in terms of their attitudes and approaches to physics problem solving. Here we discuss the validation, administration and analysis of data for the Turkish version of the AAPS survey for high school and university students in Turkey. After the validation and administration of the Turkish version of the survey, the analysis of the data was conducted by grouping the data by grade level, school type, and gender. While there are no statistically significant differences between the averages of various groups on the survey, overall, the university students in Turkey were more expert-like than vocational high school students. On an item by item basis, there are statistically differences between the average...

  3. Students' Involvement in Authentic Modelling Practices as Contexts in Chemistry Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prins, Gjalt T.; Bulte, Astrid M. W.; van Driel, Jan H.; Pilot, Albert

    2009-11-01

    In science education students should come to understand the nature and significance of models. A promising strategy to achieve this goal is using authentic modelling practices as contexts for meaningful learning of models and modelling. An authentic practice is defined as professionals working with common motives and purposes, pertaining to a similar type of procedure and applying relevant knowledge on the modelling issue they work on. In this study we evaluate whether the use of authentic practices initiates adequate students’ involvement. This was done by investigating students’ interests, ownership, familiarity and complexity. In addition, we evaluated students’ expressed modelling procedures in response to the modelling issues. We designed learning tasks which were enacted by a focus group of students. Three primary data sources were used to collect data. Firstly, a group discussion was organised in which students’ reflected on both authentic practices. Secondly, students filled in written questionnaires containing items on affective and cognitive aspects. Thirdly, the realised modelling procedures by students were analysed. The results show that students’ involvement was successfully initiated, evidenced by motivated students, willingness to continue and the completeness and quality of the realised modelling procedures. The design of the learning tasks proved to be successful in realising this involvement. The results obtained in this study support the strategy of using authentic modelling practices as contexts for meaningful learning of models and modelling.

  4. Involvement of consumers in studies run by the Medical Research Council Clinical Trials Unit: Results of a survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vale Claire L

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We aimed to establish levels of consumer involvement in randomised controlled trials (RCTs, meta-analyses and other studies carried out by the UK Medical Research Council (MRC Clinical Trials Unit across the range of research programs, predominantly in cancer and HIV. Methods Staff responsible for studies that were included in a Unit Progress Report (MRC CTU, April 2009 were asked to complete a semi-structured questionnaire survey regarding consumer involvement. This was defined as active involvement of consumers as partners in the research process and not as subjects of that research. The electronic questionnaires combined open and closed questions, intended to capture quantitative and qualitative information on whether studies had involved consumers; types of activities undertaken; recruitment and support; advantages and disadvantages of involvement and its perceived impact on aspects of the research. Results Between October 2009 and April 2010, 138 completed questionnaires (86% were returned. Studies had been conducted over a 20 year period from 1989, and around half were in cancer; 30% in HIV and 20% were in other disease areas including arthritis, tuberculosis and blood transfusion medicine. Forty-three studies (31% had some consumer involvement, most commonly as members of trial management groups (TMG [88%]. A number of positive impacts on both the research and the researcher were identified. Researchers generally felt involvement was worthwhile and some felt that consumer involvement had improved the credibility of the research. Benefits in design and quality, trial recruitment, dissemination and decision making were also perceived. Researchers felt they learned from consumer involvement, albeit that there were some barriers. Conclusions Whilst most researchers identified benefits of involving consumers, most of studies included in the survey had no involvement. Information from this survey will inform the development

  5. Second Language Learning in Campaign Organisations: Means for Endorsing Students' Social Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papageorgiou, Ira

    2012-01-01

    The provision of second language courses is a means through which campaign organisations promoting a more egalitarian, integrated and inclusive society are trying to achieve their aims. It is expected that, through these classes, migrant students will be enabled to break their isolation and to become more socially involved. This paper explores…

  6. The Relationship between Academic Stress and Two Aspects of Father Involvement among University Student Fathers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masciadrelli, Brian P.; Milardo, Robert M.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the associations between academic stress experienced by university student fathers and the behavioral and cognitive involvement these fathers had with their children. Fifty-three fathers enrolled in university classes and residing with at least one child less than 12 years of age responded to questionnaire measures of…

  7. Parental Involvement, Selected Student Attributes, and Learning Outcomes in Instrumental Music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdzinski, Stephen F.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses relationships among selected aspects of parental involvement as they relate to the cognitive, affective, and performance outcomes of instrumental music students. Discovers that for cognitive musical and musical performance outcomes parental influence is strongest at the elementary level. For affective outcomes parental involvement…

  8. The Effects of Parental Involvement on Students' Academic Self-Efficacy, Engagement and Intrinsic Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Weihua; Williams, Cathy M.

    2010-01-01

    This research examined whether various dimensions of parental involvement predicted 10th-grade students' motivation (engagement, self-efficacy towards maths and English, intrinsic motivation towards maths and English) using data from the Educational Longitudinal Study of 2002 (ELS 2002). Results showed that both parents' educational aspiration for…

  9. An Examination of Involvement and Socially Responsible Leadership Development of Black Students Attending Predominantly White Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCurtis, Bridget R.

    2012-01-01

    There has been an identifiable decline in moral decision making and socially responsible behaviors in society based on recent national events such as Enron and the Bernie Madoff scandal (Arvedlund, 2009; Doran, 2004). This study attempts to address this leadership crisis by examining college student involvement and leadership experiences that may…

  10. Involvement of Working Memory in College Students' Sequential Pattern Learning and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundey, Shannon M. A.; De Los Reyes, Andres; Rowan, James D.; Lee, Bern; Delise, Justin; Molina, Sabrina; Cogdill, Lindsay

    2013-01-01

    When learning highly organized sequential patterns of information, humans and nonhuman animals learn rules regarding the hierarchical structures of these sequences. In three experiments, we explored the role of working memory in college students' sequential pattern learning and performance in a computerized task involving a sequential…

  11. School Engagement and Parental Involvement: The Case of Cross-Border Students in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Celeste Y. M.; Cheung, Alan C. K.

    2014-01-01

    The primary purpose of this paper is to examine the mutual relationship between school engagement of cross-border students (CBS) from Malaysia in Singapore and parental involvement in education. Focus-group interviews were conducted with school personnel, CBS and their non-local counterparts to provide a comprehensive understanding of the…

  12. Relations of Parenting Style and Parental Involvement with Ninth-Grade Students' Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulson, Sharon E.

    1994-01-01

    Compared adolescents' and parents' perceptions of maternal and paternal demandingness, responsiveness, and parental involvement with schooling. Found that adolescents' reports of parenting correlated only moderately with parents' reports. Adolescents', but not parents', reports of parenting predicted students' achievement outcome, with parental…

  13. Involvement of Working Memory in College Students' Sequential Pattern Learning and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundey, Shannon M. A.; De Los Reyes, Andres; Rowan, James D.; Lee, Bern; Delise, Justin; Molina, Sabrina; Cogdill, Lindsay

    2013-01-01

    When learning highly organized sequential patterns of information, humans and nonhuman animals learn rules regarding the hierarchical structures of these sequences. In three experiments, we explored the role of working memory in college students' sequential pattern learning and performance in a computerized task involving a sequential…

  14. The Relationship between Academic Stress and Two Aspects of Father Involvement among University Student Fathers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masciadrelli, Brian P.; Milardo, Robert M.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the associations between academic stress experienced by university student fathers and the behavioral and cognitive involvement these fathers had with their children. Fifty-three fathers enrolled in university classes and residing with at least one child less than 12 years of age responded to questionnaire measures of…

  15. Involving Immigrant Parents of Students with Disabilities in the Educational Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hassan, Suha; Gardner, Ralph, III

    2002-01-01

    This article discusses the barriers that limit school participation by immigrant parents of students with disabilities, including language differences, lack of information, negative educational experiences, unfamiliarity with the U.S. educational practices, cultural differences, and differing views regarding involvement in schools. Strategies are…

  16. Relations of Parenting Style and Parental Involvement with Ninth-Grade Students' Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulson, Sharon E.

    1994-01-01

    Compared adolescents' and parents' perceptions of maternal and paternal demandingness, responsiveness, and parental involvement with schooling. Found that adolescents' reports of parenting correlated only moderately with parents' reports. Adolescents', but not parents', reports of parenting predicted students' achievement outcome, with parental…

  17. Understanding Today's Students: Entry-Level Science Student Involvement in Academic Dishonesty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Lynda P.; Nelson, Rodney K.; Tichenor, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Academic dishonesty and its implications to learning within and outside of the academic arena are of historical concern to college faculty. Faculty generally associate actions and attitudes displayed in the academic environment as indicators of behavior throughout the student's life. As technology and societal changes occur, student…

  18. Understanding Today's Students: Entry-Level Science Student Involvement in Academic Dishonesty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Lynda P.; Nelson, Rodney K.; Tichenor, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Academic dishonesty and its implications to learning within and outside of the academic arena are of historical concern to college faculty. Faculty generally associate actions and attitudes displayed in the academic environment as indicators of behavior throughout the student's life. As technology and societal changes occur, student…

  19. Mental Health Issues Facing a Diverse Sample of College Students: Results from the College Student Mental Health Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soet, Johanna; Sevig, Todd

    2006-01-01

    Over the past 5 years there has been increased attention given to mental health issues on college and university campuses across the country. However, few research efforts have been conducted to systematically investigate the mental health of college students. The College Student Mental Health Survey was undertaken as a first step towards gaining…

  20. The Student Storm Survey©: College Students' Thoughts on Their University's Response to a Natural Disaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Gary T.; Boudreaux, Monique; Boudreaux, Dwight L.; Soignier, R. D.; Folse, Earl; Frias, Tracey; Soper, Barlow

    2014-01-01

    Hurricanes Gustav and Ike devastated the region that our University serves. Near the start of the semester, only one of the ten scheduled class days could be completed and administrators asked students and faculty to "continue the learning process" online via Blackboard©, our Electronic Delivery System (EDS). The Student Storm Survey©…

  1. Digital Literacy Development of Students Involved in an ICT Educational Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana, Maria Graciela Badilla; Pujol, Meritxell Cortada

    The impact of the Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) has become the core of a change that involves most of the society fields, consequently the technological and informational literacy are essential requirements in education. The research is a quasi-experimental and ex-post-facto study in schools from Spain. The aim was to describe and analyze the involvement showed by 219 students who participated in a development of ICT's Project named Ponte dos Brozos. The research objective was to respond if the students who usually worked with ICT, had better knowledge and management with computing tools, and if they are better prepared in researching and selecting information. Results showed that students who have a higher contact with ICTs know about the technology and how to use it, also better knowledge and control of the computer and operative systems, a high information management level trough the Internet, although their literacy in information is devoid.

  2. Students' Self-Esteem in an Asian Educational System: The Contribution of Parental Involvement and Parental Investment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Esther Sui-chu

    2003-01-01

    Seeks to identify factors related to parental involvement and investment having the greatest impact on the self-esteem of Hong Kong middle-school students. Finds, for example, that the effect of parental involvement on student's self-esteem is greater than that of parental investment, with home-based involvement having the strongest effect. Draws…

  3. The involvement of student teachers in the development of language learning tasks. Lessons from the ETALAGE project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Koet

    2011-01-01

    In this paper I report a small experiment about the involvement of student teachers as well as experienced professionals in the development of language learning tasks. I argue that involving student teachers as well as experienced professionals may yield better results than involving experienced pro

  4. The involvement of student teachers in the development of language learning tasks. Lessons from the ETALAGE project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koet, T.; Žogla, I.; Rutka, L.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper I report a small experiment about the involvement of student teachers as well as experienced professionals in the development of language learning tasks. I argue that involving student teachers as well as experienced professionals may yield better results than involving experienced pro

  5. 2008 Key Student Outcomes Indicators for BC Diploma, Associate Degree, and Certificate Programs: Survey Results by Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ministry of Advanced Education and Labour Market Development, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The BC Diploma, Associate Degree, and Certificate Student Outcomes (DACSO) Survey (formerly the BC College and Institute Student Outcomes Survey) collects and disseminates information about former students' post-secondary experiences and their subsequent labour market and further education experiences. The survey is administered annually to former…

  6. 2008 Key Student Outcomes Indicators for BC Diploma, Associate Degree, and Certificate Programs: Survey Results by Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ministry of Advanced Education and Labour Market Development, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The BC Diploma, Associate Degree, and Certificate Student Outcomes (DACSO) Survey (formerly the BC College and Institute Student Outcomes Survey) collects and disseminates information about former students' post-secondary experiences and their subsequent labour market and further education experiences. The survey is administered annually to former…

  7. Stress and mental health problems in 1st year medical students: a survey of two medical colleges in Kanpur, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivendra Jena

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Incidence of stress among medical students has been reported to be between high and very high. Medical students in pre-clinical phase are more likely to develop psychological distress than medical students in clinical phase. It may affect academic performance and lead to anxiety, depression and substance abuse. Methods: First year students of one government medical college and one private medical college of Kanpur, Uttar Pradesh, India, were surveyed to find out stress and mental health problems shortly after their admission. Results: The two colleges showed difference in the frequencies of a number of factors- current stress, sleep problem, sad mood, both parents working, parents giving sufficient time, non-participation in extra-curricular activities, sharing problem with their families, having break-up in a romantic relationship and poor relationships with classmates and roommate. More students of the government medical college reported to have current stress compared to the students of the private medical college. While all students of the government medical who had stress since admission did not recover from it, 55.56% of students of the private medical college recovered from it at the time of our survey. Conclusion: a Psychiatry Department of every medical college should be involved in screening 1st year students having stress and mental health problems and managing them. b Medical education should be imparted in more relaxed and fun filled manner to help students cope with the long and difficult course. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(1.000: 130-134

  8. University Physics Students' Use of Models in Explanations of Phenomena Involving Interaction between Metals and Electromagnetic Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redfors, Andreas; Ryder, Jim

    2001-01-01

    Examines third year university physics students' use of models when explaining familiar phenomena involving interaction between metals and electromagnetic radiation. Concludes that few students use a single model consistently. (Contains 27 references.) (DDR)

  9. The involvement of student teachers in the development of language learning tasks. Lessons from the ETALAGE project

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    In this paper I report a small experiment about the involvement of student teachers as well as experienced professionals in the development of language learning tasks. I argue that involving student teachers as well as experienced professionals may yield better results than involving experienced professionals only. I also argue that the close cooperation of student teachers, novice teachers and experienced language teachers in intergenerational learning groups as well as the close cooperation...

  10. Student Use of Communication Technologies--Parent/Guardian Survey Report. Survey Research Center Report 2010/8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julka, Ashley; Stehr, Grady; Parks, Denise; Trechter, David

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain a better understanding of how middle school students and their parents are using technologies and what programs citizens of Wisconsin might need with respect to these technologies. During the month of February 2010, staff from the Survey Research Center (SRC) at the University of Wisconsin-River Falls, Lori…

  11. An Exploratory Survey of Student Perspectives Regarding Search Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshare, Khaled; Miller, Don; Wenger, James

    2005-01-01

    This study explored college students' perceptions regarding their use of search engines. The main objective was to determine how frequently students used various search engines, whether advanced search features were used, and how many search engines were used. Various factors that might influence student responses were examined. Results showed…

  12. An Exploratory Survey of Student Perspectives Regarding Search Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshare, Khaled; Miller, Don; Wenger, James

    2005-01-01

    This study explored college students' perceptions regarding their use of search engines. The main objective was to determine how frequently students used various search engines, whether advanced search features were used, and how many search engines were used. Various factors that might influence student responses were examined. Results showed…

  13. Academic dishonesty in higher education: students' perceptions and involvement in an African institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saana, Sixtus Bieranye Bayaa Martin; Ablordeppey, Ephraim; Mensah, Napoleon Jackson; Karikari, Thomas K

    2016-04-25

    Integrity in academic work is a critical benchmark of every profession. For this reason, special attention should be devoted to addressing academic dishonesty (AD) in higher education to prevent the potential transfer of these practices to the workplace. In order to effectively address AD in Africa, further information about correlates of, and barriers to, the effectiveness of existing AD-controlling measures is needed. In Ghana, little is known about AD from the perspective of students. Here, we present a first report of Ghanaian undergraduate students' self-reported understanding of, and support for, institutional AD regulations, their involvement in specific dishonest behaviours, as well as their motivation factors. Approximately 92% of respondents said they were aware of institutional regulations on AD. However, only 31% rated their understanding as high. Respondents believed that their lecturers had better understanding of, and support for, these regulations than the students (p academic load and pressure to please family and guardians were the leading causes of AD. Cheating during examinations and inappropriately sharing answers in the preparation of assignments were some of the highly-occurring forms of AD. Respondents believed that copying colleagues' work without their permission was a serious offense but doing so with their permission was not. Our findings suggest that the sampled students consent to cheating-they believed that they committed no misconduct once the parties involved had agreed on the act. Considering these misconceptions, institutions should do more to help their students better understand the different forms of AD and how to avoid them.

  14. The methods that college students use to answer questions about stereochemistry involving spatial ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strange de Soria, Luise Ethelyn

    Introduction. The research problem investigated involved determining the spatial techniques used by students when they solved problems relating to stereochemistry using both traditional and non-traditional techniques. The main reason for undertaking this study was to determine how to help students invoke their spatial ability in solving problems during their organic chemistry courses. The project allowed students to generate their own understanding of the material, to gain experience in order to increase their knowledge, and to be actively involved in the learning process in order for true understanding to take place. Methods. The qualitative methodology for the project included a background questionnaire and the Purdue Visualization of Rotations Exam to determine the five students to be interviewed. The class participated in three multimedia lectures, an in-class assignment, and an on-line homework activity, which allowed multiple ways of incorporating the material. These activities included hand-drawing structures, making non-traditional models as well as traditional models, and computer related exercises that required differing aspects of spatial ability and engagement. Five students participated in an individual and small group interview in which rotation ability as well as visualization ability was assessed using physical molecular models as well as computer models. Results. This study is significant for the field of science education and chemistry because it determined that students with varying levels of spatial ability preferred different tools and used different skills when answering questions about stereochemistry that require spatial ability. There was a pronounced difference in the ability of low and high spatial ability students to draw and make structures that required three-dimensional aspects. A distinct preference for working with the physical model kit over the computer-enhanced program was also noted. An online resource for instructors and

  15. Factored Scales for the Personal Health Survey with Schizophrenics, Alcoholics, Felons, Unmarried Mothers, and College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pishkin, Vladimir; Thorne, Frederick C.

    1978-01-01

    Employed the Personal Health Survey (PHS) to study patterns of symptomology related to physical and mental health in a population of 730 Ss, which consisted of five groups: felons, hospitalized alcoholics, unmarried mothers, college students and institutionalized schizophrenics. (Editor)

  16. IDENTIFYING RELATIONSHIP INVOLVING LEARNING STYLES AND PROBLEM SOLVING SKILLS AMONG VOCATIONAL STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mimi Mohaffyza Mohamad

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between students’ learning styles and problem solving skills among students in Building Construction Course at Vocational School. This study also investigated the differences between the students’ type of learning styles and their ability to solve the problem using their creative thinking. A survey was carried out on 68 vocational students in Building Construction Course from two Vocational Schools. Felder-Soloman’s Index of Learning Styles (ILS and elements of creative thinking in problem solving for Vocational Education were the tools used in this study. Creative thinking in problem solving elements was categorized from the subject specification used in Building Construction curriculum. In brief, the ILS have five dimension; Processing, Perception, Input, Understanding and Perception. The results show that the Input style dominates the learning styles of Building Construction’s students in Vocational School and manipulating idea is the dominant creative thinking elements to solve the problem which students preferred. In conclusion, type of students’ learning styles will influence how they can cater their learning to improve their academic achievement and how they can use their creativity to solve the problem in actual situation in Building Construction work. However, learning styles are not main indicator to predict how students excellent are.

  17. Transfer students in STEM majors at a Midwestern University: Academic and social involvement factors that influence student success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Carlos

    There is soon-to-be a shortage of qualified U.S. workers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). As a result, many science-related jobs are being filled by technically-skilled foreign workers. If the U.S wants to maintain its global economic leadership, then it must ensure a continuous growth of highly-trained individuals in STEM disciplines. Therefore, American institutions of higher education, including community colleges, must identify potential factors that contribute to the lack of interest in STEM majors, as well as the low rate of success of students who enter STEM majors but struggle to finish their degrees. The purpose of this study was to ascertain the perceptions of community college transfer students who are pursuing bachelor degrees in STEM majors at Iowa State University (ISU). What were their transfer experiences and what influenced their academic success in STEM. Participants were encouraged to share their transfer experiences while at the community college as well as their experiences on the ISU campus. They were also asked about their level of academic involvement, their relationships with faculty, and their participation in peer group activities prior to and after transferring. The research design included both quantitative and qualitative components, which provided an in-depth look at the experiences of STEM non-engineering and engineering students. Quantitative data include students' background characteristics, demographic information, and college activities at the community college and ISU. Qualitative data were used to illuminate students' overall transfer experience and their successful journey in STEM fields. The combination of quantitative and qualitative methods allowed a better understanding of the strategies students put into practice once they transfer from a community college to a four-year institution in pursuit of a STEM bachelor's degree. The results of this study suggest that there is an association among the

  18. Developing a Magnetism Conceptual Survey and Assessing Gender Differences in Student Understanding of Magnetism

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    Li, Jing

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the development of a research-based conceptual multiple-choice survey related to magnetism. We also discuss the use of the survey to investigate gender differences in students' difficulties with concepts related to magnetism. We find that while there was no gender difference on the pre-test, female students performed significantly worse than male students when the survey was given as a post-test in traditionally taught calculus-based introductory physics courses (similar results in both the regular and honors versions of the course). In the algebra-based courses, the performance of the female students and the male students has no statistical difference in the pre-test or the post-test.

  19. [Survey of current conditions regarding awareness of the nutritional role of supplements for pharmacy students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Rumiko; Sakamoto, Youko; Nishizawa, Tomoko; Iguchi, Shin; Yamaoka, Yumiko

    2007-09-01

    Various nutritional supplements have become available in recent years. However, health problems resulting from the misuse of these supplements are on the rise, and have been attributed to a lack of knowledge among consumers. In addition, a survey of university students revealed that approximately 20% of students erroneously considered nutritionally balanced supplements as substitutes for meals. Given this background, we conducted a questionnaire survey of first- and fourth-year students at the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences at Kobe Gakuin University with the objective of elucidating factors such as the awareness of supplements among pharmacy students and whether these students had a superior understanding of supplements compared to the general student population. Awareness of supplements among students was determined in terms of the degrees of emphasis on meals and supplements in nutritional intake. The proportion of students who essentially believed that "nutritionally balanced supplements can be used as substitutes for meals" did not significantly differ between pharmacy students and the general student population. In addition, only 30% of students had an accurate understanding of supplements. Following graduation, pharmacy students may become pharmacists and thus be responsible for providing directions regarding usage of supplements. These findings suggest that in order to nurture professional pharmacists, it is necessary to first implement practical nutrition education and consumer education to promote healthier dietary habits among the students themselves.

  20. Prioritizing Student Skill Development in the Small College Literature Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalata, Kristianne

    2016-01-01

    This essay describes the successes and challenges of skills-based literature survey courses in the small liberal arts college setting of Westminster College (New Wilmington, PA). It considers the overall purpose of the survey in the skills-based English curriculum and then focuses on the integration of literary theory and creative writing as means…

  1. Knowledge of Orthodontics as a Dental Specialty: A Preliminary Survey among LASUCOM Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adegbite, KO; Ogunbanjo, BO; Ajisafe, OA; Adeniyi, AA

    2012-01-01

    Background: Awareness of malocclusion and the need to make corrections has increasingly becomes prevalent among our population. However, very few patients have presented in the orthodontic clinics with referrals from medical practitioners, an indication that the primary caregivers may be deficient in the knowledge of orthodontic practice. Objective: To assess the knowledge of orthodontics and the awareness of the effects of malocclusion on the general well-being, among medical students at the Lagos State University College of Medicine (LASUCOM). Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted using a self-administered questionnaire. A total of 85 medical students in the institution participated in the study. Data entry and analysis was done using Epi info version 3.5. Frequency counts were generated for all variables and measures of central tendency for numerical variables. Results: All participants were medical students. Majority (75.3%) were in their clinical years while 24.7% were in their preclinical years. Only 45.9% of the respondents had heard of the term “orthodontics” and only 20% correctly answered that orthodontics involves malocclusion and its management. Concerning the treatment procedures used in orthodontic clinics, 54.1% of them selected rearrangement of teeth. When asked to identify the appliances used in orthodontics, 49.4% selected dentures, 40% selected removable appliances, and 57.7% selected braces. Most of the respondents (81.2%) agreed that as medical doctors they would refer patients for orthodontic care, while 3.5% were undecided and 15.3% disagreed. Conclusion: The medical students surveyed had limited knowledge of orthodontics as a specialty and also knew very little about the impact of malocclusion on the well-being of the individual. They would, therefore, benefit from basic education in orthodontics to stimulate their interest in the specialty and improve their ability to refer patients appropriately. PMID:23209984

  2. A Study of Student Completion Strategies in a Likert-Type Course Evaluation Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, Nick

    2017-01-01

    This article investigates the motivations and strategies employed by respondents to a Likert-style course evaluation at a UK university. These attitude surveys, generating large amounts of quantitative data, are commonly used in quality assurance procedures across UK higher education institutions. Similar student survey results are now scrutinised…

  3. Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Surveys of Dental Student Values: Limitations of Cross-Sectional Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakumura, Joseph S.

    Surveys of dental student values are described that were designed to assess value ratings by four dental classes in 1976, annual value ratings of a freshman class as they progressed through their four year program, and the usefulness of the cross-sectional design versus the longitudinal design. Each of the two surveys, which were conducted by the…

  4. Continuous Quality Improvement in Student Affairs: A Survey of Staff Opinions on the Work Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaney, Gary D.; Osit, Carla J.

    1998-01-01

    Analyzes the results of a survey which queried student affairs staff members about their opinions on the importance of and their satisfaction with 37 aspects of their work environments. Discusses results of the survey and addresses efforts to improve the work climate. (Contains 18 references.) (Author/GCP)

  5. Faculty beliefs, perceptions, and level of community involvement in their research: a survey at one urban academic institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg-Freeman, Clara; Kass, Nancy; Gielen, Andrea; Tracey, Patricia; Bates-Hopkins, Barbara; Farfel, Mark

    2010-12-01

    Health researchers are increasingly interested in how best to engage communities in their health-related research studies. To help determine how researchers have interacted with community members in their research, we conducted a survey of full-time faculty from the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions regarding researchers' beliefs and experiences with community-based research. Approximately 41% of respondents who conducted human subject studies had enrolled local residents in their research. Researchers whose studies were based in the surrounding community were significantly more likely to involve community members in all stages of their research (e.g., selection of the problem, project planning, data collection, interpretation and dissemination of results, or developing an intervention) than were faculty whose studies enrolled community members as research participants but whose studies were not set in the community. Over 90% of all faculty respondents agree that community involvement improves the relevance of their research, although almost 60% had not done so. Most faculty value community involvement, but they want more institutional support for such activities and they seek better skills to involve community. Few studies have surveyed researchers who enroll community members as research participants to document practices regarding community involvement in the research process. Given that the majority (73.6%) of faculty responded that they intend to include local residents in their upcoming studies, future research to evaluate interventions designed to facilitate community involvement, especially in the inner city, would help stakeholders identify best practices for involving and engaging communities in health research.

  6. Personality and professional commitment of students in nursing, social work, and teaching: A comparative survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesje, Kjersti

    2016-01-01

    Nurses are often portrayed as possessing specific traits and dispositions associated with care and empathy. The assumption has been that possessing these traits makes nurses competent, engaged, and well suited to their job. This proposition has been mostly normative, and few studies have investigated how this plays out empirically. The aims of this study were to investigate (a) whether possessing a personality trait related to empathy and care was more common among nursing students than students in teaching and social work programs and (b) whether nursing students possessing an affirming personality trait judged themselves to be more suited to their future work - understood as commitment to the profession - than students in teaching and social work. A cross-sectional survey design was used. All first-year students attending seven Norwegian universities and university colleges were invited to participate in the study. Of the 1675 students who participated in the survey, 527 were nursing students, 668 were students in teaching, and 480 were social work students. A response rate of 65 percent was achieved. The survey was conducted by Oslo and Akershus University College in the autumn of 2012. Data collection methods included both a paper-and-pencil questionnaire and an online survey. Instruments used included Blau's Career Commitment Scale and Orlinsky and Rønnestad's Interpersonal Adjective Scale. Analysis of variance and regression analysis were performed on the data. Nursing students did not differ from students in teaching and social work programs in terms of the degree of affirming personality trait. Furthermore, the regression analysis revealed an equally strong association between having an affirming personality trait and being committed to the profession among all these student groups. The results of this study indicate that the narrative of nursing students as individuals who possess a special personality characteristic does not entirely reflect reality

  7. Factors influencing dental students' specialty choice: a survey of ten graduating classes at one institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jane H; Kinnunen, Taru H; Zarchy, Marisa; Da Silva, John D; Chang, Brian Myung W; Wright, Robert F

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to survey ten graduating classes at Harvard School of Dental Medicine regarding students' specialty choice and factors influencing that choice. Students were surveyed once in 2008 (for the Classes of 2007-11) and again in 2013 (for the Classes of 2012-16). A prior article reported results regarding students' interest in and experiences with prosthodontics; this article presents results regarding their interest in all dental specialties and factors influencing those interests. Of a total 176 students in the Classes of 2012-16, 143 responded to the survey, for a response rate of 81%, compared to a 95% response rate (167 of total 176 students) for the Classes of 2007-11. The results showed that orthodontics was the most popular specialty choice, followed by oral and maxillofacial surgery. From the 2008 to the 2013 survey groups, there was an increase in the percentages of students planning to pursue oral and maxillofacial surgery, pediatric dentistry, and postdoctoral general dentistry. The educational debt these students expected to accrue by graduation also increased. The largest percentage of students chose "enjoyment of providing the specialty service" as the factor most influencing their specialty choice. "Prior dental school experience" and "faculty influence" were greater influences for students pursuing specialties than those pursuing postdoctoral general dentistry. Increased interest in particular disciplines may be driven by high debt burdens students face upon graduation. Factors related to mentoring especially influenced students pursuing specialties, demonstrating the importance of student experiences outside direct patient care for exposure to the work of specialists beyond the scope of predoctoral training. This finding suggests that dental schools should increase mentoring efforts to help students make career decisions based not on financial burden but rather on personal interest in the specialty, which is likely to have a

  8. Involvement of Student Teachers and Pupils in Designing and Manipulating Virtual Learning Environments Impacts Reading Achievements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Zaretsky

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The research is aimed at investigating the involvement of student teachers and pupils in designing and manipulating virtual learning environment and its impact on reading achievements through action research. In order to understand the connection between the real and virtual worlds, the design of such simulations is based on applying the virtual environment to the real world as much as possible. The objects were taken from the pupils’ everyday environment and unique motivation. The researcher taught the method to 30 student teachers. Such procedures were held among different populations. The findings showed that as the student teachers practiced the simulation design through the PowerPoint Software, it became clear to them how the computer can be implemented in their practical work. Consequently, their presentations became highly animated, and applied to the pupils

  9. Space Weather Monitoring for the IHY: Involving Students Worldwide in the Research Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherrer, D.; Burress, B.; Ross, K.

    2008-06-01

    Our project explores how new methods of space weather data collection and networks of instruments can lead to innovative and exciting ways of involving audiences in the research process. We describe our space weather monitors, being distributed to high school students and universities worldwide for the International Heliophysical Year. The project includes a centralized data collection site, accessible to anyone with or without a monitor. Classroom materials, developed in conjunction with the Chabot Space & Science Center in California, are designed to introduce teachers and students to the Sun, space weather, the Earth's ionosphere, and how to use monitor data to encourage students to undertake "hands-on" research and gain experience with real scientific data. For more information, see \\url{http://sid-stanford.edu}.

  10. Bone marrow involvement by lymphoproliferative disorders after renal transplantation: PTLD. Int. Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Izadi

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: Renal recipients with BM PTLD represent worse outcome and more unfavorable histopathological phenomenon than in other organ involvements. Moreover, a concomitant PTLD involvement site in liver was found which necessitates full hepatic evaluation for a potential complication by the disease in renal recipients whose BM is involved.

  11. The gender gap in student engagement: The role of teachers' autonomy support, structure, and involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lietaert, Sofie; Roorda, Debora; Laevers, Ferre; Verschueren, Karine; De Fraine, Bieke

    2015-12-01

    The gender gap in education in favour of girls is a widely known phenomenon. Boys generally have higher dropout rates, obtain lower grades, and show lower engagement. Insight into factors related to these academic outcomes could help to address the gender gap. This study investigated, for Dutch language classes, (1) how boys and girls differ in behavioural engagement, (2) which teacher support dimensions (autonomy support, structure, involvement) may explain gender differences in engagement (mediation hypothesis), and (3) whether and which of these teacher support dimensions matter more for boys' as opposed to girls' engagement (moderation or differential effects hypothesis). A total of 385 Grade 7 students and their 15 language teachers participated in this study. Teacher support was assessed through student reports. Student engagement was measured using student, teacher, and observer reports. By means of structural equation modelling, the mediating role of the teacher support dimensions for gender differences in behavioural engagement was tested. The potential differential role of the teacher support dimensions for boys' and girls' engagement was investigated through multigroup analysis. Boys were less engaged than girls and reported lower support from their teacher. Autonomy support and involvement partially mediated the relationship between gender and behavioural engagement. Autonomy support was demonstrated to be a protective factor for boys' engagement but not for girls'. Structure and involvement contributed equally to engagement for both sexes. Although involvement and autonomy support partly explained the gender gap in engagement (mediation hypothesis), more support was found for differential effects of autonomy support on boys' versus girls' engagement (differential effects hypothesis). © 2015 The British Psychological Society.

  12. [HIV prevention and adolescents: a sample survey on Italian high school students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valli, Rudi; Luzi, Anna Maria; Bianconi, Mara; Camoni, Laura; Colucci, Anna; Frati, Annarosa; Gallo, Pietro; Rosa, Enrica; D'Agostini, Anna

    2002-01-01

    This article resulted from a survey carried out by some researchers of the Telefono Verde AIDS (TVA-National AIDS Help-Line) of the Istituto Superiore di Sanità, with the collaboration of some colleagues of the Segreteria per le Attività Culturali. It is also a summary of strategies of intervention against HIV/AIDS for young people implemented by the Italian Ministry of Health. The study was developed within the context of the workshops on HIV/AIDS education carried out since 1995 by some researchers of TVA. These workshops fall within some other initiatives arranged by the Segreteria per le Attività Culturali for the diffusion of scientific and technological information. Our study aimed at assessing the level of knowledge on HIV/AIDS among some different high-school students. Data processing points out a widespread and quite good level of knowledge on HIV/AIDS in general and particularly on ways of transmission and prevention measures. Results obtained could not be generalized because the sample involved in the survey represented a privileged target, already sensitive to the issues concerning HIV infection and AIDS dealt with in the context of specific teaching programmes.

  13. What Are Students Hearing about Online Searching? A Survey of Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Juleigh Muirhead; Silverman, Susan

    1989-01-01

    Student requests for online searching often show that faculty members have suggested inappropriate searches. A survey of faculty that examined their use of online searching in research and their communications to students about this research method is described, and ways in which librarians might improve the situation are suggested. The…

  14. Improving Students' Learning through School Autonomy: Evidence from the International Civic and Citizenship Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paletta, Angelo

    2014-01-01

    This article investigates the effect of school autonomy on multiple measures of student achievement, combining the individual data of the students participating in the International Civics and Citizenship Survey with their results in the national high stakes standardized tests at the end of eighth grade administered by the Italian National…

  15. The questionnaire survey of the necessity of oral English presentation in university students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何新

    2013-01-01

    The oral presentation plays an important role in the English language teaching. However, some students seems pay lit le at ention to it. This paper attempts to elaborate the significance of the oral presentation and make a questionnaire survey among university students in order to understand how to improve the forms of the oral presentation.

  16. Attitudes of Pakistani Medical Students Towards Psychiatry as a Prospective Career: A Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Ehsan Ullah; Siddiqi, Mohammad Naim; Dogar, Imtiaz; Hamrani, Mohammad Munir; Yousafzai, Abdul Wahab; Zuberi, Saman

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Pakistan is facing a shortage of psychiatrists; there are about 350 psychiatrists in a country of 150 million. Medical specialty choice surveys of medical students have approached this issue from various angles. The authors' objective is to explore the attitudes of Pakistani medical students toward psychiatry as their future career.…

  17. Examining the Cultural Validity of a College Student Engagement Survey for Latinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Ebelia; Mobley, Michael; Coryell, Gayle; Yu, En-Hui; Martinez, Gladys

    2013-01-01

    Using critical race theory and quantitative criticalist stance, this study examines the construct validity of an engagement survey, "Student Experiences in the Research University" (SERU) for Latino college students through exploratory factor analysis. Results support the principal seven-factor SERU model. However subfactors exhibited…

  18. A Comprehensive Survey on Student Perceptions of Cyberbullying at a Major Metropolitan University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawler, James P.; Molluzzo, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Cyberbullying is a concern for any college or university. Digital harassment incidents are featured daily in the news. The authors of this study examine the perceptions of students on cyberbullying at a major metropolitan university. From the findings of a student survey, the authors learn of high levels of perceptions on incidents as an issue but…

  19. A Study of Student Participation and Nonparticipation in Prelecture Electronic Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Vincent C. H.; Chow, Danny S. L.

    2013-01-01

    Student nonparticipation in electronic surveys represents a challenge to educators as it may impact significantly on the implementation or evaluation of the associated teaching activities. We here study the student evaluation of a pedagogical project consisting of prelecture online polling followed by linked revision lectures. This investigation…

  20. Surveying Turkish High School and University Students' Attitudes and Approaches to Physics Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balta, Nuri; Mason, Andrew J.; Singh, Chandralekha

    2016-01-01

    Students' attitudes and approaches to physics problem solving can impact how well they learn physics and how successful they are in solving physics problems. Prior research in the U.S. using a validated Attitude and Approaches to Problem Solving (AAPS) survey suggests that there are major differences between students in introductory physics and…

  1. University Students and AIDS: Some Findings from Three Surveys--1989, 1990 and 1992.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Ineke; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Presents three surveys conducted at the University of Puerto Rico concerning college students' AIDS knowledge and their sexual and preventive behaviors. Findings show students had knowledge of how HIV is transmitted, but they also harbored misconceptions about ways the disease can spread. These misconceptions coupled with the machismo attitude…

  2. Shedding Light on District Issues. 1991-92 Surveys of Students, Staff, and Graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spano, Sedra G.

    In 1991-92, over 50,000 surveys were administered to high school students, elementary school and secondary school teachers and administrators, elementary school students' parents, and graduates from the Austin (Texas) Independent School District (AISD). Parent responses are not published in this report, which discusses the following parameters:…

  3. Social Networking in School Psychology Training Programs: A Survey of Faculty and Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Andy V.; Goforth, Anisa N.; Segool, Natasha; Burt, Isaac

    2014-01-01

    The increasing use of social networking sites has become an emerging focus in school psychology training, policy, and research. The purpose of the current study is to present data from a survey on social networking among faculty and graduate students in school psychology training programs. A total of 110 faculty and 112 graduate students in school…

  4. Reading Attitudes of Middle School Students: Results of a U.S. Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Michael C.; Conradi, Kristin; Lawrence, Camille; Jang, Bong Gee; Meyer, J. Patrick

    2012-01-01

    To examine the current state of reading attitudes among middle school students in the United States, a survey was developed and administered to 4,491 students in 23 states plus the District of Columbia. The instrument comprised four subscales measuring attitudes toward: recreational reading in print settings, recreational reading in digital…

  5. Reading Attitudes of Middle School Students: Results of a U.S. Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Michael C.; Conradi, Kristin; Lawrence, Camille; Jang, Bong Gee; Meyer, J. Patrick

    2012-01-01

    To examine the current state of reading attitudes among middle school students in the United States, a survey was developed and administered to 4,491 students in 23 states plus the District of Columbia. The instrument comprised four subscales measuring attitudes toward: recreational reading in print settings, recreational reading in digital…

  6. The Arizona Home Language Survey: The Identification of Students for ELL Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenberg, Claude; Rutherford-Quach, Sara

    2010-01-01

    Assuring that English language learners (ELLs) receive the services to which they have a right requires accurately identifying those students. Virtually all states identify ELLs in a two-step process. First, parents fill out a home language survey. Second, students in whose homes a language other than English is spoken and who therefore might…

  7. A Tentative Survey of Rejection Act by Minority Ethnic College Students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王静

    2009-01-01

    English is the third language for the minority ethnic students. Whether this nature influences them in their English leaning is worthy of study. Basing on Brown&Levinson's face theory,this survey focuses on howthe minority ethnic college students perform rejection act in English.

  8. "Activities of Older Adults" Survey: Tapping into Student Views of the Elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurtele, Sandy K.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes an exercise used in a life span developmental psychology course to tap into undergraduates' perceptions of activities of the elderly. Students were asked to generate items to be included in a hypothetical Activities of Older Adults survey (to be administered to people 65 years and older). Responses from 1,340 students over a…

  9. University Students and AIDS: Some Findings from Three Surveys--1989, 1990 and 1992.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Ineke; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Presents three surveys conducted at the University of Puerto Rico concerning college students' AIDS knowledge and their sexual and preventive behaviors. Findings show students had knowledge of how HIV is transmitted, but they also harbored misconceptions about ways the disease can spread. These misconceptions coupled with the machismo attitude…

  10. A Survey of Students' Views of Supervision at Unisa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, S.

    2011-01-01

    This study is framed by self-efficacy theory (SET). It aimed to determine successful research students' views of supervisory practices they had experienced. The research design was an embedded design. A questionnaire determined the views of 52 students in one college at Unisa on the support they received for successful experiences; the influence…

  11. Information Behavior of Community College Students: A Survey of Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Leanna

    2009-01-01

    A literature review of articles discussing the information behavior of community college students finds that most of the literature focuses on what libraries and librarians can do to teach community college students information literacy. The articles discuss learning communities, bibliographic instruction, and information technology. Although…

  12. Vision Survey of the Nnamdi Azikiwe University Medical Students

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    treatment of any ocular disease that may impede optimal academic pursuit. Keywords: Eye ... Refractive error was defined as >0.5 diopters (D) in the student's better eye. ... eyes of the students. The clinical diagnosis is shown in Table 3. Ninety.

  13. A Preliminary Report on the Anthropology Department Student Ratings Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillmore, G. M.; Amoss, Panela

    The Department of Anthropology and the Educational Assessment Center (EAC) cooperated in a project to assess the effect of certain variables on student ratings of instruction. For this purpose, the entire teaching faculty of the department was requested by the department's Teaching Effectiveness committee to administer the EAC Student Ratings Form…

  14. From Local to EXtreme Environments (FLEXE) Student-Scientist Online Forums: hypothesis-based research examining ways to involve scientists in effective science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goehring, L.; Carlsen, W.; Fisher, C. R.; Kerlin, S.; Trautmann, N.; Petersen, W.

    2011-12-01

    Science education reform since the mid-1990's has called for a "new way of teaching and learning about science that reflects how science itself is done, emphasizing inquiry as a way of achieving knowledge and understanding about the world" (NRC, 1996). Scientists and engineers, experts in inquiry thinking, have been called to help model these practices for students and demonstrate scientific habits of mind. The question, however, is "how best to involve these experts?" given the very real challenges of limited availability of scientists, varying experience with effective pedagogy, widespread geographic distribution of schools, and the sheer number of students involved. Technology offers partial solutions to enable Student-Scientist Interactions (SSI). The FLEXE Project has developed online FLEXE Forums to support efficient, effective SSIs, making use of web-based and database technology to facilitate communication between students and scientists. More importantly, the FLEXE project has approached this question of "how best to do this?" scientifically, combining program evaluation with hypothesis-based research explicitly testing the effects of such SSIs on student learning and attitudes towards science. FLEXE Forums are designed to showcase scientific practices and habits of mind through facilitated interaction between students and scientists. Through these Forums, students "meet" working scientists and learn about their research and the environments in which they work. Scientists provide students with intriguing "real-life" datasets and challenge students to analyze and interpret the data through guiding questions. Students submit their analyses to the Forum, and scientists provide feedback and connect the instructional activity with real-life practice, showcasing their activities in the field. In the FLEXE project, Forums are embedded within inquiry-based instructional units focused on essential learning concepts, and feature the deep-sea environment in contrast

  15. Associations between Electronic Media Use and Involvement in Violence, Alcohol and Drug Use among United States High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denniston, Maxine

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We identified associations between time spent watching television and time spent playing video or computer games or using computers and involvement in interpersonal violence, alcohol and drug use in a nationally representative sample of United States high school students.Methods: We analyzed data from the 2007 national Youth Risk Behavior Survey. Exposure variables were time spent watching television and time spent playing computer or video games or using computers (hereafter denoted as “computer/video game use” on an average school day; outcome variables included multiple measures assessing involvement in violence and alcohol or drug use. Chi-square tests were used to identify statistically significant associations between each exposure variable and each of the outcome variables. We used logistic regression to obtain crude odds ratios for outcome variables with a significant chi-square p-value and to obtain adjusted odds ratios controlling for sex, race, and grade in school.Results: Overall, 35.4% (95% CI=33.1%-37.7% of students reported frequent television (TV use and 24.9% (95% CI=22.9%-27.0% reported frequent computer/video game use. A number of risk behaviors, including involvement in physical fights and initiation of alcohol use before age 13, were significantly associated with frequent TV use or frequent computer/video game use, even after controlling for sex, race/ethnicity and grade.Conclusion: Findings highlight the need for additional research to better understand the mechanisms by which electronic media exposure and health-risk behaviors are associated and for the development of strategies that seek to understand how the content and context (e.g., watching with peers, having computer in common area of media use influence risk behaviors among youth. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(3:310-315.

  16. An Investigation into the Involvement of California Central Valley High School Students with Disabilities in the IEP Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Cheryle Ann

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the involvement of California Central Valley high school students with disabilities in the Individual Education Plan (IEP) process. Specifically, this study investigated the involvement of students with disabilities in the development of the IEP and IEP meetings. In addition, this study explored the…

  17. An Investigation into the Involvement of California Central Valley High School Students with Disabilities in the IEP Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Cheryle Ann

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the involvement of California Central Valley high school students with disabilities in the Individual Education Plan (IEP) process. Specifically, this study investigated the involvement of students with disabilities in the development of the IEP and IEP meetings. In addition, this study explored the…

  18. Using Quality Circles to Enhance Student Involvement and Course Quality in a Large Undergraduate Food Science and Human Nutrition Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, S. J.; Parmer, M. S.; Bohn, D. M.

    2005-01-01

    Large undergraduate classes are a challenge to manage, to engage, and to assess, yet such formidable classes can flourish when student participation is facilitated. One method of generating authentic student involvement is implementation of quality circles by means of a Student Feedback Committee (SFC), which is a volunteer problem-solving and…

  19. Social Consciousness of Low-Income College Students in Taiwan: The Effects of Socioeconomic Status and Collegiate Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ching-Ling

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the socioeconomic status (SES), collegiate involvement, and social consciousness of low-income college students (LICSs) and higher-income college students (HICSs) in Taiwan. The study analyzed 1,453 LICSs and 1,453 HICSs from 156 colleges in Taiwan. The results showed that the two student groups exhibited different SESs and…

  20. How to Involve Students in an Online Course: A Redesigned Online Pedagogy of Collaborative Learning and Self-Regulated Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chia-Wen

    2013-01-01

    In an online course, students learn independently in the virtual environment without teacher's on-the-spot support. However, many students are addicted to the Internet which is filled with a plethora of shopping websites, online games, and social networks (e.g. Facebook). To help keep students focused on and involved in online or blended…

  1. Using Quality Circles to Enhance Student Involvement and Course Quality in a Large Undergraduate Food Science and Human Nutrition Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, S. J.; Parmer, M. S.; Bohn, D. M.

    2005-01-01

    Large undergraduate classes are a challenge to manage, to engage, and to assess, yet such formidable classes can flourish when student participation is facilitated. One method of generating authentic student involvement is implementation of quality circles by means of a Student Feedback Committee (SFC), which is a volunteer problem-solving and…

  2. How to Involve Students in an Online Course: A Redesigned Online Pedagogy of Collaborative Learning and Self-Regulated Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chia-Wen

    2013-01-01

    In an online course, students learn independently in the virtual environment without teacher's on-the-spot support. However, many students are addicted to the Internet which is filled with a plethora of shopping websites, online games, and social networks (e.g. Facebook). To help keep students focused on and involved in online or blended…

  3. Midwifery students experience of teamwork projects involving mark-related peer feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastie, Carolyn R; Fahy, Kathleen M; Parratt, Jenny A; Grace, Sandra

    2016-06-01

    Lack of teamwork skills among health care professionals endangers patients and enables workplace bullying. Individual teamwork skills are increasingly being assessed in the undergraduate health courses but rarely defined, made explicit or taught. To remedy these deficiencies we introduced a longitudinal educational strategy across all three years of the Bachelor of Midwifery program. To report on students' experiences of engaging in team based assignments which involved mark-related peer feedback. Stories of midwifery students' experiences were collected from 17 participants across the three years of the degree. These were transcribed and analysed thematically and interpreted using feminist collaborative conversations. Most participants reported being in well-functioning teams and enjoyed the experience; they spoke of 'we' and said 'Everyone was on Board'. Students in poorly functioning teams spoke of 'I' and 'they'. These students complained about the poor performance of others but they didn't speak up because they 'didn't want to make waves' and they didn't have the skills to be able to confidently manage conflict. All participants agreed 'Peer-related marks cause mayhem'. Teamwork skills should be specifically taught and assessed. These skills take time to develop. Students, therefore, should be engaged in a teamwork assignment in each semester of the entire program. Peer feedback should be moderated by the teacher and not directly related to marks. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Correlating student knowledge and confidence using a graded knowledge survey to assess student learning in a general microbiology classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favazzo, Lacey; Willford, John D; Watson, Rachel M

    2014-12-01

    Knowledge surveys are a type of confidence survey in which students rate their confidence in their ability to answer questions rather than answering the questions. These surveys have been discussed as a tool to evaluate student in-class or curriculum-wide learning. However, disagreement exists as to whether confidence is actually an accurate measure of knowledge. With the concomitant goals of assessing content-based learning objectives and addressing this disagreement, we present herein a pretest/posttest knowledge survey study that demonstrates a significant difference correctness on graded test questions at different levels of reported confidence in a multi-semester timeframe. Questions were organized into Bloom's taxonomy, allowing for the data collected to further provide statistical analyses on strengths and deficits in various levels of Bloom's reasoning with regard to mean correctness. Collectively, students showed increasing confidence and correctness in all levels of thought but struggled with synthesis-level questions. However, when students were only asked to rate confidence and not answer the accompanying test questions, they reported significantly higher confidence than the control group which was asked to do both. This indicates that when students do not attempt to answer questions, they have significantly greater confidence in their ability to answer those questions. Additionally, when students rate only confidence without answering the question, resolution across Bloom's levels of reasoning is lost. Based upon our findings, knowledge surveys can be an effective tool for assessment of both breadth and depth of knowledge, but may require students to answer questions in addition to rating confidence to provide the most accurate data.

  5. A survey on the effects of parents' involvement on schoolchildren educational background

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnaz Hemmati Noedoust Gilani

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Today, there is no doubt that parents can significantly improve educational level by their cooperation in schools. Parents are capable of executing different value-added activities and share their knowledge and experiences with school officials. In this survey, we performed an empirical survey in three provinces of Iran from economically rich to poor. We have chosen 450 committees out of 150 schools. In each province, we have selected 50 schools in different levels from elementary to high school. In our survey, there were 311 people who non-committee, 187 were principals, 738 were members of different committees, 28 were responsible and 25 were from other specialist people. In summary, there were about 1289 participants in this survey. The results of our survey indicate that parents can substantially contribute to schools to increase their capabilities through sharing their knowledge and expertise. However, according to experts, school officials do not strongly believe that the presence of parents can solve any problem and they mostly disagree to share their duties with parents.

  6. Examining Student Attitudes in Introductory Physics via the Math Attitude and Expectations Survey (MAX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemingway, Deborah; Eichenlaub, Mark; Losert, Wolfgang; Redish, Edward F.

    2017-01-01

    Student often face difficulties with using math in science, and this exploratory project seeks to address the underlying mechanisms that lead to these difficulties. This mixed-methods project includes the creation of two novel assessment surveys, the Mathematical Epistemic Games Survey (MEGS) and the Math Attitude and Expectations Survey (MAX). The MAX, a 30-question Likert-scale survey, focuses on the attitudes towards using mathematics of the students in a reformed introductory physics course for the life sciences (IPLS) which is part of the National Experiment in Undergraduate Education (NEXUS/Physics) developed at the University of Maryland (UMD). Preliminary results from the MAX are discussed with specific attention given to students' attitudes towards math and physics, opinions about interdisciplinarity, and the usefulness of physics in academic settings as well as in professional biological research and modern medicine settings.

  7. The Relationships among Racial Identity, Perceived Ethnic Fit, and Organizational Involvement for African American Students at a Predominantly White University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavous, Tabbye M.

    2000-01-01

    Investigated African American students' perceptions of the fit between their ethnic cultures and their predominantly white college environments. Students provided demographic data, described campus organizations in which they participated, and completed surveys on ideology, centrality, and perceived ethnic fit. Both racial ideology and centrality…

  8. [Questionnaire survey of musician's dystonia among students of a music college].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konaka, Kuni; Mochizuki, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    Musician's dystonia is known as a task specific dystonia. Though it is thought to occur during a long course of repetitive performance, the actual circumstances that precipitate this condition are not clear. According to factual reports this disease is not commonly known, probably because many of these patients may not have been visiting a hospital. We prepared a questionnaire and did a survey among the students of a music college. This is the first questionnaire survey aimed at finding out the prevalence of musician's dystonia among the students of music. Among the 480 participants of this survey, 29% of the students had knowledge of this disorder and 1.25% of the students had dystonia while performing music.

  9. Can Student Populations in Developing Countries Be Reached by Online Surveys? The Case of the National Service Scheme Survey (N3S) in Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Arnim; Meuleman, Bart; Oshodi, Abdul-Gafar Tobi; Schroyens, Maarten

    2017-01-01

    This article tackles the question whether it is a viable strategy to conduct online surveys among university students in developing countries. By documenting the methodology of the National Service Scheme Survey conducted in Ghana, we set out to answer three questions: (1) How can a sample of university students be obtained? (2) How can students…

  10. A phenomenographic analysis of first-year engineering students' experiences with problems involving multiple possible solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dringenberg, Emily A.

    Engineers are expected to solve problems that are ill-structured. These problems are presented with a lack of necessary information and allow for different ways of engaging with the problem; they are open-ended and involve multiple possible solutions with multiple means of evaluation. In order to allow maximum time for students to develop skills for solving such problems, undergraduate engineering programs can introduce such problems during the first year of students' education, in the form of cornerstone design tasks. This provides students with more opportunities to develop their ability to engage with ill-structured problems, which are characteristic of engineering work. Researchers have documented variation within both the behavior and perceptions of students' early experiences with design problems. General themes include novice-like design behavior, discomfort with lack of information, difficulty with problem scoping, and resistance to ambiguity. To build on these generalizations of students' experiences, a more thorough understanding of the variation in how students experience this phenomenon of engaging with ill-structured problems is needed to design effective learning environments. This work presents the qualitatively different ways that engineering students experience problems with multiple possible solutions during their first year of engineering studies. Using phenomenography as the methodological framework, data were collected through in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 27 first-year engineering students. The iterative, phenomenographic analysis resulted in seven descriptive categories for the ways participants experienced problems involving multiple possible solutions. The names of these categories represent the different foci of the students' experiences: completion, transition, iteration, organization, collaboration, reasoning, and growth. These categories are organized along two crucial dimensions of variation: reaction to ambiguity and role

  11. A Survey of Teachers' and Students' Perception of Sexual ...

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    User

    Sexual harassment in Nigeria's universities appears to be under-researched and even less reported .... parents as just part of life. Denial, dismissal and ... the impact of sexual harassment on students' academic performance. This section was ...

  12. Human Genetic Engineering: A Survey of Student Value Stances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Sara McCormack; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Assesses the values of high school and college students relative to human genetic engineering and recommends that biology educators explore instructional strategies merging human genetic information with value clarification techniques. (LS)

  13. Empathy in Korean medical students: Findings from a nationwide survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyung Hye; Roh, Hyerin; Suh, Dae Hun; Hojat, Mohammadreza

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies on empathy in Korean medical students were conducted on small populations or with different scales of measurement, resulting in low representativeness and generalisability of the findings. To evaluate empathy in Korean medical students throughout the country and to make suggestions to improve empathy. The Jefferson Scale of Empathy (JSE) (Korean) was used, and the impact of sex, age, the medical school admission system, and grade of the respondents was investigated. We analyzed 5343 questionnaires and found a mean empathy score of 105.9 ± 12.8. Females and post-baccalaureate students had higher scores as compared with their counterparts. There was a significant difference between the admission systems after controlling for gender. Students from higher grade levels had lower scores than those from the lower grade levels. The JSE score of Korean medical students was lower than that of students in Western countries. The difference of gender and medical school admission system should be considered, and capability to apply empathy to clinical practice should be focused upon in medical training.

  14. INVOLVEMENT OF PERSONS WITH DISABILITY IN THE EDUCATION OF SOCIAL WORK STUDENTS

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    Anita Džombić

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of a research conducted with the persons with disability included in the teaching process at the Department of Social Work in Zagreb. The participants of the research were persons with disability who, for a number of years, have been participating as exterior collaborators in the education process of social work students as lecturers from the practice or field instructors in associations in which the students complete their placements. The aim of the research was to gain insight into the perception and the experience of participation of the persons with disability in the teaching process in the field of social work. The data were gathered during conversations in the focus group. The analysis of participants’ statements reveal four categories related to different themes of user involvement in the education process: (1 Experience of user participation in the teaching process; (2 Importance of personal user experience which the users wish to convey to the students; (3 User review of the quality of teaching; (4 Recommendations for a better involvement of users in the teaching process

  15. How Do Student Prior Achievement and Homework Behaviors Relate to Perceived Parental Involvement in Homework?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, José C.; Epstein, Joyce L.; Suárez, Natalia; Rosário, Pedro; Vallejo, Guillermo; Valle, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated how students’ prior achievement is related to their homework behaviors (i.e., time spent on homework, homework time management, and amount of homework), and to their perceptions of parental involvement in homework (i.e., parental control and parental support). A total of 1250 secondary students from 7 to 10th grade participated in the study. Structural equation models were fitted to the data, compared, and a partial mediation model was chosen. The results indicated that students’ prior academic performance was significantly associated with both of the students’ homework variables, with direct and indirect results linking achievement and homework behaviors with perceived parental control and support behaviors about homework. Low-achieving students, in particular, perceived more parental control of homework in the secondary grades. These results, together with those of previous research, suggest a recursive relationship between secondary school students’ achievement and their perceptions of parental involvement in homework, which represents the process of student learning and family engagement over time. Study limitations and educational implications are discussed. PMID:28798702

  16. Surveying Turkish high school and university students' attitudes and approaches to physics problem solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balta, Nuri; Mason, Andrew J.; Singh, Chandralekha

    2016-06-01

    Students' attitudes and approaches to physics problem solving can impact how well they learn physics and how successful they are in solving physics problems. Prior research in the U.S. using a validated Attitude and Approaches to Problem Solving (AAPS) survey suggests that there are major differences between students in introductory physics and astronomy courses and physics experts in terms of their attitudes and approaches to physics problem solving. Here we discuss the validation, administration, and analysis of data for the Turkish version of the AAPS survey for high school and university students in Turkey. After the validation and administration of the Turkish version of the survey, the analysis of the data was conducted by grouping the data by grade level, school type, and gender. While there are no statistically significant differences between the averages of various groups on the survey, overall, the university students in Turkey were more expertlike than vocational high school students. On an item by item basis, there are statistically differences between the averages of the groups on many items. For example, on average, the university students demonstrated less expertlike attitudes about the role of equations and formulas in problem solving, in solving difficult problems, and in knowing when the solution is not correct, whereas they displayed more expertlike attitudes and approaches on items related to metacognition in physics problem solving. A principal component analysis on the data yields item clusters into which the student responses on various survey items can be grouped. A comparison of the responses of the Turkish and American university students enrolled in algebra-based introductory physics courses shows that on more than half of the items, the responses of these two groups were statistically significantly different, with the U.S. students on average responding to the items in a more expertlike manner.

  17. The Effects of Survey Timing on Student Evaluation of Teaching Measures Obtained Using Online Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estelami, Hooman

    2015-01-01

    Teaching evaluations are an important measurement tool used by business schools in gauging the level of student satisfaction with the educational services delivered by faculty. The growing use of online teaching evaluations has enabled educational administrators to expand the time period during which student evaluation of teaching (SET) surveys…

  18. Culturally diverse health care students' experiences with teaching strategies in Finland: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitkajarvi, Marianne; Eriksson, Elina; Pitkala, Kaisu

    2013-06-01

    All over the world, current health care students come from a variety of cultural, linguistic and educational backgrounds. Their expectations and learning needs vary, yet little is known about how our current education system meets their needs. The purpose of this study was to explore culturally diverse health care students' experiences of teaching strategies in polytechnic faculties of health care in Finland. Specifically, we aimed to compare how international students and Finnish students experience the same curriculum. A cross sectional survey. Ten polytechnic faculties of health care in Finland offering English-Language-Taught Degree Programmess (ELTDPs). 283 students studying nursing, public health nursing, or physiotherapy in English. Of these, 166 were international students and 112 were Finnish students. The data were collected using a questionnaire designed specifically for this study. The survey included items grouped into seven dimensions: 1. concreteness of theoretical instruction, 2. encouragement of student activity, 3. use of skills labs, 4. variation among teaching strategies, 5. assessment, 6. interaction in the English-Language-Taught Degree Programmes, and 7. approach to diversity in the English-Language-Taught Degree Programmes. The most positive experiences for all students were with the approach to cultural diversity and the concreteness of theoretical instruction, whereas the most negative experiences were with assessment. International students' experiences were more positive than Finnish students' in the following dimensions: encouragement of student activity (p=0.005), variation among teaching strategies (p<0.001), and assessment (p<0.001). Compared to the Finnish students, more than double the number of international students were dissatisfied with their lives (p<0.001). The implications for education include the strengthening teachers' leadership role in small group activities, providing individual and detailed feedback, and ensuring

  19. [A survey of information literacy for undergraduate students in the department of radiological technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohba, Hisateru; Matsutani, Hideya; Kashiwakura, Ikuo

    2009-01-20

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the information literacy of undergraduate students and problems in information education. An annual questionnaire survey was carried out by an anonymous method from 2003 to 2006. The survey was intended for third-year students in the Department of Radiological Technology. The questionnaire items were as follows: (1) ownership of a personal computer (PC), (2) usage purpose and frequency of PC operation, (3) operation frequency and mechanism of the Internet, and (4) IT terminology. The response rate was 100% in each year. The ratio of PC possession exceeded 80%. The ratio of students who replied "nearly every day" for the use of a PC and the Internet increased twofold and threefold in four years, respectively. More than 70% of students did not understand the mechanism of the Internet, and more than 60% of students did not know about TCP/IP. In the future, we need to consider information literacy education in undergraduate education.

  20. Evaluating effectiveness of small group information literacy instruction for Undergraduate Medical Education students using a pre- and post-survey study design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClurg, Caitlin; Powelson, Susan; Lang, Eddy; Aghajafari, Fariba; Edworthy, Steven

    2015-06-01

    The Undergraduate Medical Education (UME) programme at the University of Calgary is a three-year programme with a strong emphasis on small group learning. The purpose of our study was to determine whether librarian led small group information literacy instruction, closely integrated with course content and faculty participation, but without a hands on component, was an effective means to convey EBM literacy skills. Five 15-minute EBM information literacy sessions were delivered by three librarians to 12 practicing physician led small groups of 15 students. Students were asked to complete an online survey before and after the sessions. Data analysis was performed through simple descriptive statistics. A total of 144 of 160 students responded to the pre-survey, and 112 students answered the post-survey. Instruction in a small group environment without a mandatory hands on component had a positive impact on student's evidence-based information literacy skills. Students were more likely to consult a librarian and had increased confidence in their abilities to search and find relevant information. Our study demonstrates that student engagement and faculty involvement are effective tools for delivering information literacy skills when working with students in a small group setting outside of a computer classroom. © 2015 Health Libraries Group.

  1. DISTANT IN-COMPANY FOREIGN LANGUAGE LEARNING INVOLVING UNIVERSITY STUDENTS-TUTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfiya Rafisovna Masalimova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The peculiarities of distant in-company occupation-oriented foreign language learning technology for oil industry professionals under the conditions of business and education integration in the framework of corporate education and its implementing via Electron Corporate University is taken into consideration in this article. The technology proposed suggests university students as tutors and moderators involving in on-line forums for in-company foreign language learning of oil industry professionals. The purpose of this technology is its dual focus: On the one hand, it is directed on of enterprises experts’ foreign language competence forming, on the other hand-on students competence improving. Such online interaction between students, teachers and specialists of the company also contributes to students’ career path realization, to enterprises cultural norms accumulation, all the participants corporate culture forming. Steps and stages for its development ensuring integrity and continuity of oil industry professionals language learning are suggested and its major blocks or modules are presented and its advantages in managing, pedagogic, personal and economic aspect are revealed and presented as for company representatives so for university teachers and students.

  2. [The knowledge, involvement and feelings of students graduating in medicine, nursing and psychology about orthothanasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Luís Roberto Gonçalves; Menezes, Mariana Pires; Gradvohl, Silvia Mayumi Obana

    2013-09-01

    Orthothanasia involves the suspension of medical procedures for terminal phase patients, which leads to a natural death, relieving the symptoms that cause suffering. In this process, professionals such as physicians, nurses and psychologists, interact with patients and their families. Therefore, it is desirable that during undergraduate studies these professionals should take subjects geared to handle this aspect. The scope of this qualitative study was to evaluate the awareness with respect to orthothanasia of undergraduates in medicine, nursing and psychology courses in a university. Trigger questions in semi-structured interviews were conducted with 22 students. The interviews were recorded and transcribed for content analysis and core identification themes. Three categories were identified: knowledge about orthothanasia; who should be involved in this process; and feelings experienced when facing death. The data revealed that students have scant knowledge about the subject, consider the family involvement in the orthothanasia decision to be important and they do not feel prepared to deal with death situations. The conclusion points to the need to change the focus on the end-of-life issue in the undergraduate courses in the area of health care in order to prepare the future professional adequately.

  3. Students' epistemologies about experimental physics: Validating the Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey for Experimental Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Wilcox, Bethany R

    2015-01-01

    Student learning in instructional physics labs represents a growing area of research that includes investigations of students' beliefs and expectations about the nature of experimental physics. To directly probe students' epistemologies about experimental physics and support broader lab transformation efforts at the University of Colorado Boulder (CU) and elsewhere, we developed the Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey for Experimental Physics (E-CLASS). Previous work with this assessment has included establishing the accuracy and clarity of the instrument through student interviews and preliminary testing. Several years of data collection at multiple institutions has resulted in a growing national data set of student responses. Here, we report on results of the analysis of these data to investigate the statistical validity and reliability of the E-CLASS as a measure of students' epistemologies for a broad student population. We find that the E-CLASS demonstrates an acceptable level of both validi...

  4. Post-primary students' images of mathematics: findings from a survey of Irish ordinary level mathematics students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Ciara; Stynes, Martin; O'Donoghue, John

    2016-10-01

    A questionnaire survey was carried out as part of a PhD research study to investigate the image of mathematics held by post-primary students in Ireland. The study focused on students in fifth year of post-primary education studying ordinary level mathematics for the Irish Leaving Certificate examination - the final examination for students in second-level or post-primary education. At the time this study was conducted, ordinary level mathematics students constituted approximately 72% of Leaving Certificate students. Students were aged between 15 and 18 years. A definition for 'image of mathematics' was adapted from Lim and Wilson, with image of mathematics hypothesized as comprising attitudes, beliefs, self-concept, motivation, emotions and past experiences of mathematics. A questionnaire was composed incorporating 84 fixed-response items chosen from eight pre-established scales by Aiken, Fennema and Sherman, Gourgey and Schoenfeld. This paper focuses on the findings from the questionnaire survey. Students' images of mathematics are compared with regard to gender, type of post-primary school attended and prior mathematical achievement.

  5. Conducting Sanitary Surveys of Water Supply Systems. Student Workbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976

    This workbook is utilized in connection with a 40-hour course on sanitary surveys of water supply systems for biologists, chemists, and engineers with experience as a water supply evaluator. Practical training is provided in each of the 21 self-contained modules. Each module outlines the purpose, objectives and content for that section. The course…

  6. Teaching Writing to Middle School Students: A National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Steve; Capizzi, Andrea; Harris, Karen R.; Hebert, Michael; Morphy, Paul

    2014-01-01

    A random sample of language arts, social studies, and science middle school teachers from the United States were surveyed about their preparation to teach writing, beliefs about responsibilities for teaching writing, use of evidence-based writing practices, assessment of writing, use of technology, and adaptations for struggling writers. The…

  7. Engaging Students in Survey Design and Data Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sole, Marla A.

    2015-01-01

    Every day, people use data to make decisions that affect their personal and professional lives, trusting that the data are correct. Many times, however, the data are inaccurate, as a result of a flaw in the design or methodology of the survey used to collect the data. Researchers agree that only questions that are clearly worded, unambiguous, free…

  8. Description of Cognitive and Competence Processes Involved in the Levels of Reading Comprehension in College Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Romel Yáñez Botello

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This is a descriptive research whose main objective was to describe the cognitive processes involved in reading and its relation to different levels of reading comprehension. For doing so, it was chosen a sample of 124 college students of Bogotá city. Participants- men and women between 16 and 30 years old- were studying first semester of psychology. The Evaluation Test for Reading Comprehension by Arenas (2007 was applied in order to describe cognitive operations. Moreover, results related to comprehension levels were analyzed through the Rasch Model. Besides, the Angof Methodology was used to specify the competence levels. It was concluded that there are five levels of reading comprehension. It must be said that most of the students were classified in the literal and inferential reading levels. Finally, the findings and limitations of the research were discussed.

  9. Nursing student medication errors involving tubing and catheters: a descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Zane Robinson; Hicks, Rodney W; Altmiller, Geralyn; Bicknell, Patricia

    2009-08-01

    This retrospective case study examined reports (N=27) of medication errors made by nursing students involving tubing and catheter misconnections. Characteristics of misconnection errors included attributes of events recorded on MEDMARX error reports of the United States Pharmacopeia. Two near miss errors or Category B errors (medication error occurred, did not reach patient) were identified, with 21 Category C medication errors (occurred, with no resulting patient harm), and four Category D errors (need for increased patient monitoring, no patient harm) reported. Reported intravenous tubing errors were more frequent than other type of tubing errors and problems with clamps were present in 12 error reports. Registered nurses discovered most of the errors; some were implicated in the mistakes along with the students.

  10. A post rotation survey of medical students attitude to radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeyekun, A A

    2003-12-01

    The objective of the study is to determine the effect of a three-week radiology rotation on the attitudes and knowledge of medical students about the specialty. It was found that the students believed in the relevance of radiology in the medical school curriculum and its importance to future medical practice. There was acceptable level of awareness of radiation protection. However, the rotation failed to change the misconception of Radiologists enormous workload with resultant bias to the specialty. It is concluded that the rotation had a mixed effect on student's knowledge and perception of radiology. This finding is comparable with other studies done in industrialized countries. Measures aimed at improving the unfavourable attitudes are suggested.

  11. Menstrual problems in university students: an electronic mail survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasakis, E; Kingman, C E; Lee, C A; Economides, D L; Kadir, R A

    2008-01-01

    To establish the prevalence of menstrual-related problems among university students. A questionnaire regarding gynecological, bleeding and family history was sent by electronic mail (e-mail) to all female students attending University College London (UCL). A total of 767 students aged 18-39 years replied; 71% had a regular menstrual cycle. One in three (n = 264) had received some treatment for their menstrual periods (such as the combined oral contraceptive pill or simple analgesia). Those with heavy or painful periods were more likely to feel that their menstrual problems had a substantial impact on their academic and social life; however, even among those with light periods, one in every four females felt that their life was considerably affected. A considerable prevalence of menstrual-related problems was demonstrated among this young healthy population. Additionally, the use of e-mail could present potential benefits as a research medium for this kind of study.

  12. The survey of American college students computer technology preferences & purchasing plans

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    This report presents data from a survey of more than 400 American college students.  The report presents data on student computer ownership of both PCs and laptops, purchasing plans for PCs and laptops, as well as purchasing plans for cell phones and digital cameras.  The report also provides details on how student finance their computer purchases, how much money comes from parents or guardians, and how much from the student themselves, or from their parties.  In addition to data on PCs the report provides detailed info on use of popular word processing packages such as Word, WordPerfect and Open Office.

  13. A survey of health professions students for knowledge, attitudes, and confidence about tuberculosis, 2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catanzaro Antonino

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2003 the NIH perceived a need to strengthen teaching about tuberculosis (TB to health professions students. The National Tuberculosis Curriculum Consortium (NTCC was funded to meet this need. The purpose of this study was to survey students enrolled in NTCC schools prior to NTCC-developed educational materials being made available to faculty. Methods A self-administered survey for students in NTCC schools to establish a baseline level of knowledge, attitudes, and confidence about tuberculosis. Results 1480/2965 (50% students in 28 programs in 20 NTCC schools completed the survey. If public health students are eliminated from totals (only 61 respondents of 765 public health students, the overall response proportion for the seven clinically-related disciplines was 64.5%. The majority (74% were in schools of medicine (MD/DO, undergraduate nursing (BSN, and pharmacy (PharmD; others were in programs for physician assistants (PA, advanced practice nursing (NP/APN, respiratory therapy (RT, clinical laboratory sciences (MT/CLS, and public health (MPH. Almost 90% had attended at least one lecture about TB. Although 91.4% knew TB was transmitted via aerosols, about one-third did not know the method for administering tuberculin, or that Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG vaccine was not a contraindication to TB skin testing. Fewer than two-thirds knew that about 10% of people in the U.S.A. who have latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI and a normal immune system will develop TB disease, or that BCG is not part of the routine vaccination program in the U.S.A. because it complicates surveillance for new TB infection. Conclusion There is room for improvement in knowledge, attitudes, and confidence about TB by health professions students surveyed. The NTCC-developed educational products may be used by faculty to improve student performance to be assessed with future surveys.

  14. Reliability and validity of the Safe Routes to school parent and student surveys

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    Evenson Kelly R

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study is to assess the reliability and validity of the U.S. National Center for Safe Routes to School's in-class student travel tallies and written parent surveys. Over 65,000 tallies and 374,000 parent surveys have been completed, but no published studies have examined their measurement properties. Methods Students and parents from two Charlotte, NC (USA elementary schools participated. Tallies were conducted on two consecutive days using a hand-raising protocol; on day two students were also asked to recall the previous days' travel. The recall from day two was compared with day one to assess 24-hour test-retest reliability. Convergent validity was assessed by comparing parent-reports of students' travel mode with student-reports of travel mode. Two-week test-retest reliability of the parent survey was assessed by comparing within-parent responses. Reliability and validity were assessed using kappa statistics. Results A total of 542 students participated in the in-class student travel tally reliability assessment and 262 parent-student dyads participated in the validity assessment. Reliability was high for travel to and from school (kappa > 0.8; convergent validity was lower but still high (kappa > 0.75. There were no differences by student grade level. Two-week test-retest reliability of the parent survey (n = 112 ranged from moderate to very high for objective questions on travel mode and travel times (kappa range: 0.62 - 0.97 but was substantially lower for subjective assessments of barriers to walking to school (kappa range: 0.31 - 0.76. Conclusions The student in-class student travel tally exhibited high reliability and validity at all elementary grades. The parent survey had high reliability on questions related to student travel mode, but lower reliability for attitudinal questions identifying barriers to walking to school. Parent survey design should be improved so that responses clearly indicate

  15. Exploring the attitudes of medical faculty members and students in Pakistan towards plagiarism: a cross sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathore, Farooq Azam; Waqas, Ahmed; Zia, Ahmad Marjan; Mavrinac, Martina; Farooq, Fareeha

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The objective of this survey was to explore the attitudes towards plagiarism of faculty members and medical students in Pakistan. Methods. The Attitudes Toward Plagiarism questionnaire (ATP) was modified and distributed among 550 medical students and 130 faculty members in 7 medical colleges of Lahore and Rawalpindi. Data was entered in the SPSS v.20 and descriptive statistics were analyzed. The questionnaire was validated by principal axis factoring analysis. Results. Response rate was 93% and 73%, respectively. Principal axis factoring analysis confirmed one factor structure of ATP in the present sample. It had an acceptable Cronbach's alpha value of 0.73. There were 421 medical students (218 (52%) female, 46% 3rd year MBBS students, mean age of 20.93 ± 1.4 years) and 95 faculty members (54.7% female, mean age 34.5 ± 8.9 years). One fifth of the students (19.7%) trained in medical writing (19.7%), research ethics (25.2%) or were currently involved in medical writing (17.6%). Most of the faculty members were demonstrators (66) or assistant professors (20) with work experience between 1 and 10 years. Most of them had trained in medical writing (68), research ethics (64) and were currently involved in medical writing (64). Medical students and faculty members had a mean score of 43.21 (7.1) and 48.4 (5.9) respectively on ATP. Most of the respondents did not consider that they worked in a plagiarism free environment and reported that self-plagiarism should not be punishable in the same way as plagiarism. Opinion regarding leniency in punishment of younger researchers who were just learning medical writing was divided. Conclusions. The general attitudes of Pakistani medical faculty members and medical students as assessed by ATP were positive. We propose training in medical writing and research ethics as part of the under and post graduate medical curriculum.

  16. Exploring the attitudes of medical faculty members and students in Pakistan towards plagiarism: a cross sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farooq Azam Rathore

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The objective of this survey was to explore the attitudes towards plagiarism of faculty members and medical students in Pakistan.Methods. The Attitudes Toward Plagiarism questionnaire (ATP was modified and distributed among 550 medical students and 130 faculty members in 7 medical colleges of Lahore and Rawalpindi. Data was entered in the SPSS v.20 and descriptive statistics were analyzed. The questionnaire was validated by principal axis factoring analysis.Results. Response rate was 93% and 73%, respectively. Principal axis factoring analysis confirmed one factor structure of ATP in the present sample. It had an acceptable Cronbach’s alpha value of 0.73. There were 421 medical students (218 (52% female, 46% 3rd year MBBS students, mean age of 20.93 ± 1.4 years and 95 faculty members (54.7% female, mean age 34.5 ± 8.9 years. One fifth of the students (19.7% trained in medical writing (19.7%, research ethics (25.2% or were currently involved in medical writing (17.6%. Most of the faculty members were demonstrators (66 or assistant professors (20 with work experience between 1 and 10 years. Most of them had trained in medical writing (68, research ethics (64 and were currently involved in medical writing (64. Medical students and faculty members had a mean score of 43.21 (7.1 and 48.4 (5.9 respectively on ATP. Most of the respondents did not consider that they worked in a plagiarism free environment and reported that self-plagiarism should not be punishable in the same way as plagiarism. Opinion regarding leniency in punishment of younger researchers who were just learning medical writing was divided.Conclusions. The general attitudes of Pakistani medical faculty members and medical students as assessed by ATP were positive. We propose training in medical writing and research ethics as part of the under and post graduate medical curriculum.

  17. Exploring the attitudes of medical faculty members and students in Pakistan towards plagiarism: a cross sectional survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathore, Farooq Azam; Zia, Ahmad Marjan; Mavrinac, Martina; Farooq, Fareeha

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The objective of this survey was to explore the attitudes towards plagiarism of faculty members and medical students in Pakistan. Methods. The Attitudes Toward Plagiarism questionnaire (ATP) was modified and distributed among 550 medical students and 130 faculty members in 7 medical colleges of Lahore and Rawalpindi. Data was entered in the SPSS v.20 and descriptive statistics were analyzed. The questionnaire was validated by principal axis factoring analysis. Results. Response rate was 93% and 73%, respectively. Principal axis factoring analysis confirmed one factor structure of ATP in the present sample. It had an acceptable Cronbach’s alpha value of 0.73. There were 421 medical students (218 (52%) female, 46% 3rd year MBBS students, mean age of 20.93 ± 1.4 years) and 95 faculty members (54.7% female, mean age 34.5 ± 8.9 years). One fifth of the students (19.7%) trained in medical writing (19.7%), research ethics (25.2%) or were currently involved in medical writing (17.6%). Most of the faculty members were demonstrators (66) or assistant professors (20) with work experience between 1 and 10 years. Most of them had trained in medical writing (68), research ethics (64) and were currently involved in medical writing (64). Medical students and faculty members had a mean score of 43.21 (7.1) and 48.4 (5.9) respectively on ATP. Most of the respondents did not consider that they worked in a plagiarism free environment and reported that self-plagiarism should not be punishable in the same way as plagiarism. Opinion regarding leniency in punishment of younger researchers who were just learning medical writing was divided. Conclusions. The general attitudes of Pakistani medical faculty members and medical students as assessed by ATP were positive. We propose training in medical writing and research ethics as part of the under and post graduate medical curriculum. PMID:26157615

  18. Smartwatches as a Learning Tool: A Survey of Student Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davie, Neil; Hilber, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Both teachers and students of language learning are keen to make use of new technologies to enhance their learning. At the latest, the launch of the Apple Watch has made the general public aware of the smartwatch and the possibilities, at least according to the marketing hype, that these wearable computers offer. The sales of smartwatches are…

  19. Student Entrepreneurship in Hungary: Selected Results Based on GUESSS Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea S. Gubik

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study investigates students’ entrepreneurial activities and aims to answer questions regarding to what extent do students utilize the knowledge gained during their studies and the personal connections acquired at universities, as well as what role a family business background plays in the development of students’ business start-ups. Research Design & Methods: This paper is based on the database of the GUESSS project investigates 658 student entrepreneurs (so-called ‘active entrepreneurs’ who have already established businesses of their own. Findings: The rate of self-employment among Hungarian students who study in tertiary education and consider themselves to be entrepreneurs is high. Motivations and entrepreneurial efforts differ from those who owns a larger company, they do not necessarily intend to make an entrepreneurial path a career option in the long run. A family business background and family support play a determining role in entrepreneurship and business start-ups, while entrepreneurial training and courses offered at higher institutions are not reflected in students’ entrepreneurial activities. Implications & Recommendations: Universities should offer not only conventional business courses (for example, business planning, but also new forms of education so that students meet various entrepreneurial tasks and problems, make decisions in different situations, explore and acquaint themselves with entrepreneurship. Contribution & Value Added: The study provides literature overview of youth entrepreneurship, describes the main characteristics of students’ enterprises and contributes to understanding the factors of youth entrepreneurship.

  20. Survey of Students' Opinions as a Strategy for Improving Lerner ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RPO

    The idea of motivating the students is irritating to the new Romantics .... punctuality in attendance to classes topped the list for the boys (75%), the girls seem to be .... Discussion*. • Role play. • Lecture. • Dramatization. • Community of inquiry.

  1. Thai nursing students' experiences when attending real life situations involving cardiac life support: A Phenomenological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matchim, Yaowarat; Kongsuwan, Waraporn

    2015-12-01

    During the last few years, manikin simulations have been used for cardiac life support training procedures in medical and nursing education. However, some nursing students have experienced attending real events involving cardiac life support during their clinical practice. This study aims to describe the meaning of experience of Thai nursing students when attending real situations of cardiac life support. A hermeneutic phenomenological study was used. Third and fourth year bachelor of nursing students at a university in the southern region of Thailand who had the experience of attending real situation of cardiac life support were purposely selected as the informants. The data were generated from individual in-depth interviews with eighteen nursing students. Van Manen's approach was used to analyze the data. Trustworthiness was established using the criteria set out by Lincoln and Guba. Essential themes situated in the context of the four existential grounds of body, time, space, and relation emerged. These were: being worried and fearful while desiring to participate in cardiac life support procedures; enhancing self value; knowing each moment is meaningful for one's life; having time to understand the reality of life; being in a small corner; appreciating such opportunities and the encouragement given by nurses and the healthcare team; and feeling empathy. Besides learning in classrooms and practicing in labs, experiencing real situations is beneficial for nursing students in learning cardiac life support. This study provides information that can be used for clinical teaching management in the topics relating to cardiac life support. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. International Student Expectations on International Student Advisers' Competence : Through questionnaires survey

    OpenAIRE

    潘, 建秀

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify international student expectations of international student adviser competence. The conclusions were made though the results of the questionnaires aiming at international students. The "100,000 International Students to Japan"- Project was established in 2003, in order to attract qualified students from abroad and improve the hosting policy in current Japanese educational industry. The approaches to training and placing the advisers for international s...

  3. How do medical student journals fare? A global survey of journals run by medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamri, Yassar

    2016-01-01

    Medical students have made significant contributions to the medical and scientific fields in the past. Today, medical students still contribute to biomedical research; however, they often face disappointment from journals when trying to publish their findings. This led to the development of medical student journals, which take a more "student-friendly" approach. This article reviews the current medical student journals published in English and sheds light on current trends and challenges.

  4. Do Veterinary Students See a Need for More In-Course Discussion? A Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasch, Cindy; Haimerl, Peggy; Heuwieser, Wolfgang; Arlt, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Rather than merely transferring information, veterinary education should stimulate and motivate students and encourage them to think. Currently in veterinary education, most curricula use the method of frontal teaching (e.g., in lectures). A student-centered critical approach to information is rarely used. Our research sought to determine if students consider in-course discussion useful and if sufficient possibilities for discussion are provided and supported by their lecturers. In December 2013, we conducted a survey of fourth-year students. Specifically, we wanted to know if students consider in-course discussion about course content useful for successful learning and if students wish to have more opportunities for discussion during class time. Finally, we wanted to identify barriers that limit the students' motivation and ability to engage in discussion of course content. In total, 105 students completed the survey. The majority of students agreed or strongly agreed that clinical topics should be discussed during class time. Frequently stated reasons were improved learning (85.7%) and the opportunity to look at topics from different perspectives (92.4%). In conclusion, we found a considerable dearth of and request for discussion within veterinary education. In light of these findings, we emphasize the need for new teaching strategies that promote independent thinking and critical questioning. We suggest the implementation of more discussion opportunities in well considered and moderated settings in veterinary teaching.

  5. Developing and testing a student-focussed teaching evaluation survey for university instructors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginns, Paul; Barrie, Simon

    2009-06-01

    This paper describes a process for developing a student-focussed survey to gather teaching- and learning-related feedback from university students and examines the psychometric properties of a short survey for confidential feedback to lecturers in higher education regarding teaching. Analyses were performed at the level of individual respondents and on teacher-average responses. Principal component and exploratory factor analyses at both levels indicated a single underlying lecturing effectiveness factor. Scale scores had high internal consistency. The items and subsequent scale were also consistent in terms of interrater reliability, i.e., the average consistency of ratings of an individual lecturer. Finally, at both levels of analysis, strong correlations between responses to each item and an overall rating provided support for the concurrent validity of the items. These analyses provide initial evidence of the suitability of the survey for gathering confidential student feedback on lecturing effectiveness.

  6. Simulation in Medical Student Education: Survey of Clerkship Directors in Emergency Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Heitz, Corey; Eyck, Raymond Ten; Smith, Michael; Fitch, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The objective of this study is to identify (1) the current role of simulation in medical student emergency medicine (EM) education; (2) the challenges to initiating and sustaining simulation-based programs; and (3) educational advances to meet these challenges. Methods We solicited members of the Clerkship Directors in Emergency Medicine (CDEM) e-mail list to complete a Web-based survey addressing the use of simulation in both EM clerkships and preclinical EM curricula. Survey el...

  7. Simulation in Medical Student Education: Survey of the Clerkship Directors in Emergency Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Fitch; Michael Smith; Raymond Ten Eyck; Corey Heitz

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The objective of this study is to identify (1) the current role of simulation in medical student emergency medicine (EM) education; (2) the challenges to initiating and sustaining simulationbased programs; and (3) educational advances to meet these challenges. Methods: We solicited members of the Clerkship Directors in Emergency Medicine (CDEM) e-mail list to complete a Web-based survey addressing the use of simulation in both EM clerkships and preclinical EM curricula. Survey ...

  8. Moving from Misinformation Derived from Public Attitude Surveys on Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage toward Realistic Stakeholder Involvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malone, Elizabeth L.; Dooley, James J.; Bradbury, Judith A.

    2010-03-01

    Stakeholder involvement can include many activities, from providing information on a website to one-on-one conversations with people confronting an issue in their community. For carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) a major tool of SI to date has been the survey. Recent surveys and other research into stakeholder involvement focused on the nascent commercial deployment of CCS technologies have provided valuable information about the state of general knowledge and attitudes toward these technologies. Most importantly, these research efforts reveal that the general public has relatively little knowledge about CCS. Given this lack of knowledge with respect to the concept of CCS let alone first-hand experiential knowledge derived from seeing these technologies deployed in local communities this paper critiques the methodology and results of the survey research. Then the framing of SI in CCS is examined, including the assumption that clear stakeholder acceptance is a realistic goal and that the public has a decisive say in choosing the energy technologies of the present and the future. Finally, a broader suite of SI activities is recommended as more suited to realistic and contextual goals.

  9. Surveying Space Scientists' Attitudes, Involvement, and Needs in Education and Public Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grier, J.; Buxner, S.; Schneider, N. M.

    2014-12-01

    Empowering scientists in education and public outreach (E/PO) activities is an important component of the work of the NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) E/PO Forums. This work includes understanding the attitudes of scientists towards E/PO, why they do or do not engage in E/PO activities, and what resources and professional development they need to be the most efficient in their E/PO efforts. The Planetary Science E/PO Forum has conducted both surveys and interviews of space scientists regarding E/PO to ascertain how they (the Forum) and the professional societies to which those scientists belong, can help to meet their needs in E/PO. Specifically, a recent series of semi-structured interviews with members of the American Astronomical Society Division of Planetary Sciences (AAS-DPS) has helped pinpoint specific areas that can be addressed. This presentation will discuss our survey methods, responses to questions, and compare those to previous research. We will describe new products and other resources developed in response to expressed needs, as well as offer information to continue the conversation about how professional societies can better meet the needs of their members in E/PO.

  10. Internet addiction in Greek medical students: an online survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsimtsiou, Zoi; Haidich, Anna-Bettina; Spachos, Dimitris; Kokkali, Stamatia; Bamidis, Panagiotis; Dardavesis, Theodoros; Arvanitidou, Malamatenia

    2015-06-01

    The authors investigated the prevalence of Internet addiction (IA) in undergraduate medical students to identify possible associations with sociodemographics and Internet habits. All students at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki School of Medicine, Greece, were invited to complete the online Internet Addiction Test (IAT) along with sociodemographics and preferences on Internet activities. The authors received 585 responses after three reminders (23.5 % response rate). Mild IA was found in 24.5 %, moderate in 5.4 %, and severe in 0.2 %. In multivariable analysis, the odds to develop IA were increased with visits in Internet cafes (Odds Ratio [OR] 3.49, 95 % Confidence Interval [CI]: 1.45, 8.46), the use of Facebook (OR 2.43, 95 % CI: 1.35, 4.38), Twitter (OR 2.45, 95 % CI: 1.37, 4.39), and online games (OR 1.95, 95 % CI: 1.29, 2.94). Using e-mails seemed to be protective against IA (OR 0.59, 95 % CI: 0.37, 0.94). This is the first IA prevalence study in a European medical school. Early-detection systems and other ways to help students with pathological behaviors should be developed.

  11. Surveying Medical Students to Gauge Library Use and Plan for a New Medical Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronoff, Nell

    2016-01-01

    In spring 2015, a 45-question survey was e-mailed to 585 medical students at the University at Buffalo (UB) in order to gauge their use of library spaces, resources, equipment, and services at UB's Health Sciences Library and plan for a library space located within a new medical school building. Students' self-reported use of the library during the academic year is presented along with the features they would like to see in their ideal library space. The responses generated in the survey are a barometer of current use and will be used in the planning process.

  12. Measuring Model-Based High School Science Instruction: Development and Application of a Student Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulmer, Gavin W.; Liang, Ling L.

    2013-02-01

    This study tested a student survey to detect differences in instruction between teachers in a modeling-based science program and comparison group teachers. The Instructional Activities Survey measured teachers' frequency of modeling, inquiry, and lecture instruction. Factor analysis and Rasch modeling identified three subscales, Modeling and Reflecting, Communicating and Relating, and Investigative Inquiry. As predicted, treatment group teachers engaged in modeling and inquiry instruction more than comparison teachers, with effect sizes between 0.55 and 1.25. This study demonstrates the utility of student report data in measuring teachers' classroom practices and in evaluating outcomes of a professional development program.

  13. Librarian involvement in a nutrition undergraduate research course: preparing nutrition students for evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Susan C; Penumetcha, Meera

    2010-01-01

    Given the foundational importance of literature searching skills to later stages of research and, ultimately, evidence-based practice, the authors wanted to assess a unique strategy for teaching such skills. This pilot study describes the results of an undergraduate nutrition research course in which a librarian lead several class sessions. The goal of this study was to assess students' perceptions, attitudes and use of research literature and resources before and after a course partially taught by a librarian. Twenty-seven students enrolled in an undergraduate Introduction to Research course at Georgia State University were given pre- and post-test questionnaires at the beginning and end of a course that included three librarian-led class sessions. Most of the results indicate that the repeated involvement of a librarian enriched this particular undergraduate research course. By the end of the course, students were more comfortable in libraries and with using library resources; they used the campus library more frequently; they were more confident in their ability to find high-quality information on nutrition-related topics and identify strengths and weaknesses of different information sources; and they felt they gained skills that will help them achieve their educational and career goals.

  14. 2015 American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology (AACN) student affairs committee survey of neuropsychology trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside, Douglas M; Guidotti Breting, Leslie M; Butts, Alissa M; Hahn-Ketter, Amanda E; Osborn, Katie; Towns, Stephanie J; Barisa, Mark; Santos, Octavio A; Smith, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    Surveys of practicing neuropsychologists have been conducted for years; however, there have been no comprehensive surveys of neuropsychology trainees, which may result in important issues being overlooked by the profession. This survey assessed trainees' experiences in areas such as student debt, professional development, and training satisfaction. Survey items were written by a task force of the AACN Student Affairs Committee (SAC), and neuropsychology trainees were recruited via neuropsychology-focused listservs. In total, 344 trainees completed the survey (75% female) and included participants from every region of the US and Canada. Based on the survey questions, nearly half of all trainees (47%) indicated financial factors were the greatest limitation in their training. Student debt had a bimodal distribution; 32.7% had minimal debt, but 45% had debt >$100,000. In contrast, expected starting salaries were modest, but consistent with findings ($80-100,000). While almost all trainees intended to pursue board certification (97% through ABPP), many were 'not at all' or only 'somewhat' familiar with the process. Results indicated additional critical concerns beyond those related to debt and lack of familiarity with board certification procedures. The results will inform SAC conference programming and the profession on the current 'state of the trainees' in neuropsychology.

  15. Alcohol mixed with energy drinks: methodology and design of the Utrecht Student Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Haan, Lydia; de Haan, Hein A; Olivier, Berend; Verster, Joris C

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the methodology of the Utrecht Student Survey. This online survey was conducted in June 2011 by 6002 students living in Utrecht, The Netherlands. The aim of the survey was to determine the potential impact of mixing alcoholic beverages with energy drinks on overall alcohol consumption and alcohol-related consequences. In contrast to most previous surveys conducted on this topic, the current survey used a more appropriate within-subject design, comparing the alcohol consumption of individuals who consume alcohol mixed with energy drinks on occasions. Specifically, a comparison was conducted to examine the occasions during which these individuals consume this mixture versus occasions during which they consume alcohol alone. In addition to energy drinks, the consumption of other non-alcoholic mixers was also assessed when combined with alcoholic beverages. Furthermore, the reasons for consuming energy drinks alone or in combination with alcohol were investigated, and were compared to reasons for mixing alcohol with other non-alcoholic beverages. Finally, personality characteristics and the level of risk-taking behavior among the individuals were also assessed to explore their relationship with alcohol consumption. The Utrecht Student Survey will be replicated in the USA, Australia, and the UK. Results will be pooled, but also examined for possible cross-cultural differences. PMID:23118547

  16. Perceptions of Intimate Partner Violence: a cross sectional survey of surgical residents and medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Mathews

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intimate partner violence (IPV is an important health issue. Many medical students and residents have received training relating to IPV, but previous studies show that many students feel that their training has been inadequate. Our objective was to assess the knowledge, attitudes and perceptions about IPV among university medical students and surgical residents. METHODS: We administered an online survey to a sample of Ontario medical students and surgical residents. The survey instrument was a modified version of the Provider Survey. RESULTS: Two hundred medical students and surgical residents participated in the survey (response rate: 29%. Misperceptions about IPV among respondents included the following: 1 victims must get something from the abusive relationships (18.2%, 2 physicians should not interfere with a couple’s conflicts (21%, 3 asking about IPV risks offending patients (45%, 4 Victims choose to be victims (11.1%, 5 it usually takes ‘two to tango’ (18.3%, and 6 some patients’ personalities cause them to be abused (41.1%. The majority of respondents (75.0% believed identifying IPV was very relevant to clinical practice. The majority of medical students (91.2% and surgical residents (96.9% estimated the IPV prevalence in their intended practice to be 10% or less. Most of the medical students (84% and surgical residents (60% felt that their level of training on IPV was inadequate and over three quarters of respondents (77.2% expressed a desire to receive additional education and training on IPV. CONCLUSIONS: There are misconceptions among Canadian medical students and surgical residents about intimate partner violence. These misconceptions may stem from lack of education and personal discomfort with the issue or from other factors such as gender. Curricula in medical schools and surgical training programs should appropriately emphasize educational opportunities in the area of IPV.

  17. Validation of the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey for Estimating Burnout in Dental Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montiel-Company, José María; Subirats-Roig, Cristian; Flores-Martí, Pau; Bellot-Arcís, Carlos; Almerich-Silla, José Manuel

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the validity and reliability of the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS) as a tool for assessing the prevalence and level of burnout in dental students in Spanish universities. The survey was adapted from English to Spanish. A sample of 533 dental students from 15 Spanish universities and a control group of 188 medical students self-administered the survey online, using the Google Drive service. The test-retest reliability or reproducibility showed an Intraclass Correlation Coefficient of 0.95. The internal consistency of the survey was 0.922. Testing the construct validity showed two components with an eigenvalue greater than 1.5, which explained 51.2% of the total variance. Factor I (36.6% of the variance) comprised the items that estimated emotional exhaustion and depersonalization. Factor II (14.6% of the variance) contained the items that estimated personal accomplishment. The cut-off point for the existence of burnout achieved a sensitivity of 92.2%, a specificity of 92.1%, and an area under the curve of 0.96. Comparison of the total dental students sample and the control group of medical students showed significantly higher burnout levels for the dental students (50.3% vs. 40.4%). In this study, the MBI-HSS was found to be viable, valid, and reliable for measuring burnout in dental students. Since the study also found that the dental students suffered from high levels of this syndrome, these results suggest the need for preventive burnout control programs.

  18. Satisfaction survey in general hospital personnel involved in blood transfusion: implementation of the ISO 9001: 2000 standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chord-Auger, S; Tron de Bouchony, E; Moll, M C; Boudart, D; Folléa, G

    2004-10-01

    As part of its policy of constant quality improvement, Etablissement francais du sang (EFS) des pays de la Loire (Pays de la Loire Regional Blood Transfusion Centre) carried out a satisfaction survey among the hospital personnel involved in prescribing and using immunohaematological tests and labile blood products (LBP). The polling tool selected by agreement between the Saint Nazaire's hospital management and Quality Assurance (QA) Department was a questionnaire that permitted item rating and free commentary. It addressed the personnel's perception of the quality of erythrocyte immunohaematological (EIH) testing and of the products administered, as well as their perception of the quality of communications with the local EFS. The questionnaire was sent to 26 physicians and 32 senior nurses in 15 hospital departments. The reply rate was 60% and expressed an 85% overall satisfaction level. Dissatisfaction causes were more specifically analysed, the main one involving LBP distribution in emergency situations. A joint undertaking by the EFS and the hospital led to the implementation of corrective measures, including the writing and implementation of a common standard operating procedure for emergency transfusion management. The results obtained demonstrated the feasibility of this type of survey and the interest, to a blood transfusion centre and the hospital personnel involved in transfusion, of assessing their very own perception of service quality.

  19. [Satisfaction survey in general hospital personnel involved in blood transfusion: implementation of the ISO 9001: 2000 standard].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chord-Auger, S; de Bouchony, E Tron; Moll, M-C; Boudart, D; Folléa, G

    2004-07-01

    As part of its policy of constant quality improvement, Etablissement Français du Sang (EFS) des Pays de la Loire (Pays de la Loire Regional blood transfusion institution) carried out a satisfaction survey among the hospital personnel involved in prescribing and using immuno-hematological tests and labile blood products. The polling tool selected by agreement between the hospital management and quality assurance department was a questionnaire that permitted item rating and free commentary. It addressed the personnel's perception of the quality of erythrocyte immuno-hematological (EIH) testing and of the products administered, as well as their perception of the quality of communications with the local EFS. The questionnaire was sent to 26 physicians and 32 senior nurses in 15 hospital departments. The reply rate was 60% and expressed a 85% overall satisfaction level. Dissatisfaction causes were more specifically analysed, the main one involving labile blood product distribution in emergency situations. A joint undertaking by the EFS and the hospital led to the implementation of corrective measures, including the writing and implementation of a common standard operating procedure for emergency transfusion management. The results obtained demonstrated the feasibility of this type of survey and the interest, to a blood transfusion centre and the hospital personnel involved in transfusion, of assessing their very own perception of service quality.

  20. Radioactive waste management: exploratory survey among Rio de Janeiro state university students

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Danielle Monegalha; Almeida, Ivan Pedro Salati de, E-mail: drodrigues@cnen.gov.b, E-mail: ivsalati@cnen.gov.b [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Social approval is a fundamental part of the site selection process of a radioactive waste repository. Such approval requires the involvement of the local community in the decision-making process and is deemed essential to the success of an enterprise of this kind. A major problem when it comes to nuclear energy is the poor knowledge on the issue among the general population. For effective participation in the decision-making process, the community of the candidate site should be well informed on nuclear issues, because efficient community interaction depends on the level of knowledge of their citizens on the subject. One way to identify this level of knowledge is through opinion polls on attitudes and beliefs regarding the use of nuclear energy and on radioactive waste. In the European Union research is carried out periodically seeking to know people's opinion about their participation in the decision-making process. In order to assess in a preliminary way the attitude on this matter of university students of the state of Rio de Janeiro, the research method used in the European Union was adapted and subsequently applied to a sample of 200 students from public and private universities within the state. The results indicate that the majority of respondents, though possessing little information on nuclear issues, would like to participate in the decision-making process for site selection of a low and intermediate level radioactive waste repository, if that repository was to be built close to their living area. The collected data also identifies the sources of information that are considered trustworthy by the surveyed sample. Although exploratory, this research provides guidelines for future work to be developed within the scope of the site selection for a radioactive waste repository in Brazil. (author)

  1. CAFES 2009 New Student Survey Report. Survey Research Center Report 2010/3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speerstra, Mandy; Trechter, David

    2010-01-01

    During Academic Day, September 1, 2009, incoming freshmen and transfer students in the College of Agriculture, Food and Environmental Sciences (CAFES) were asked to complete a one-page questionnaire designed to find out: (1) how they learned about UW-River Falls as an option for their tertiary education; (2) what factors most influenced their…

  2. CAFES 2009 New Student Survey Report. Survey Research Center Report 2010/3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speerstra, Mandy; Trechter, David

    2010-01-01

    During Academic Day, September 1, 2009, incoming freshmen and transfer students in the College of Agriculture, Food and Environmental Sciences (CAFES) were asked to complete a one-page questionnaire designed to find out: (1) how they learned about UW-River Falls as an option for their tertiary education; (2) what factors most influenced their…

  3. Segmenting Business Students Using Cluster Analysis Applied to Student Satisfaction Survey Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Allen

    2009-01-01

    This paper demonstrates a new application of cluster analysis to segment business school students according to their degree of satisfaction with various aspects of the academic program. The resulting clusters provide additional insight into drivers of student satisfaction that are not evident from analysis of the responses of the student body as a…

  4. U.S. Army Survey of Nurses and Nursing Students: Sampling Frame and Survey Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-08-01

    Actions taken include involving nurses more in the clinical decision process, providing nurses a greater degree of autonomy , and increasing wages...Anesthesia Nursing (RNA) o Maternal-child 0 Psychiatric-mental health o Midwifery 0 Family practice "o Geriatrics/Gerontology 0 Critical care "o Medical...meaningful 0 More autonomy 0 More involving 0 More interesting 0 Other 18. How much influence did each of the following have on your decision to pursue a

  5. Parental Involvement, Interest in Schooling and Science Achievement of Junior Secondary School Students in Ogun State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olatoye, R. A.; Ogunkola, B. J.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the relative and combined influences of parental involvement and interest in schooling on science achievement of selected Junior Secondary School students in Ogun State, Nigeria. Twelve secondary schools were selected from the four administrative divisions of the State. A sample of 360 students participated in the study and…

  6. The Academic Differences between Students Involved in School-Based Robotics Programs and Students Not Involved in School-Based Robotics Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koumoullos, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This research study aimed to identify any correlation between participation in afterschool robotics at the high school level and academic performance. Through a sample of N = 121 students, the researcher examined the grades and attendance of students who participated in a robotics program in the 2011-2012 school year. The academic record of these…

  7. The Academic Differences between Students Involved in School-Based Robotics Programs and Students Not Involved in School-Based Robotics Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koumoullos, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This research study aimed to identify any correlation between participation in afterschool robotics at the high school level and academic performance. Through a sample of N = 121 students, the researcher examined the grades and attendance of students who participated in a robotics program in the 2011-2012 school year. The academic record of these…

  8. [Pharmacists' Behavior in Clinical Practice: Results from a Questionnaire Survey of Pharmacy Students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakada, Akiko; Akagawa, Keiko; Yamamoto, Hitomi; Kato, Yasuhisa; Yamamoto, Toshinori

    2016-01-01

    A questionnaire survey was performed to obtain pharmacy students' impressions of pharmacists' behavior, to classify these based on professionalism, and to analyze the relationship between these experiences and students' satisfaction with their clinical practice in Japan. The questionnaire was answered by 327 5th-year pharmacy school students upon completing clinical practice at community pharmacies from 2011 to 2012. They rated their satisfaction with their clinical practice using a 6-point Likert scale, and provided descriptions of their experience such as, "This health provider is professional", or "What a great person he/she is as a health provider". We counted the words and then categorized the responses into 10 traits, as defined by the American Pharmaceutical Association Academy of Students of Pharmacy-American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, Council of Deans Task Force on Professionalism 1999, using text mining. We analyzed the relationship between their experiences with respectful persons, and satisfaction, using the Mann-Whitney U-test (significance level<0.05). Most students (337 of 364, 92.6%) reported experiences with respectful health providers. These students experienced significantly more satisfaction than did other students (p<0.001). We analyzed 343 sentences written by 261 students, using text mining analysis after excluding unsuitable responses. The word most used was "patient" (121 times). Many students noted their impression that the pharmacists had answered patients' questions. Of the 10 trait categories, "professional knowledge and skills" was mentioned most often (151 students).

  9. Learning to care: medical students' reported value and evaluation of palliative care teaching involving meeting patients and reflective writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgstrom, Erica; Morris, Rachel; Wood, Diana; Cohn, Simon; Barclay, Stephen

    2016-11-25

    Over recent years there has been an increase in teaching of both palliative care and reflective practice in UK medical schools. The palliative care teaching at the University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine is multi-faceted and involves students writing reflective essays after individually meeting patients approaching the end of life during their final year general practice and hospital medicine placements. This paper draws on two studies examining this teaching element to analyse what the students found valuable about it and to comment on the practice of meeting patients and subsequent reflective writing. Two studies have explored students' perceptions of these course components. The first was a thematic analysis of 234 reflective essays from 123 students written in 2007-2008, including examining what students wrote about the exercise itself. The second project involved a semi-structured questionnaire that students completed anonymously; this paper reports on the free text elements of that study [sample size =107]. Since similar themes were found in both studies, the coding structures from each project were compared and combined, enabling triangulation of the findings around what the students found valuable from the palliative care teaching involving meeting patients and reflective writing. Overall, students reported that these components of the palliative care teaching are valuable. Four main themes were identified as aspects that students valued: (1) dedicated time with patients, (2) learning about wider elements of treatment and holistic care, (3) practicing communication skills, and (4) learning about themselves through reflective writing. Some students expressed a dislike for having to formally write a reflective essay. It is possible to arrange for all of the medical students to individually meet at least two patients receiving palliative or end of life care. Students found these encounters valuable and many wrote about the benefit of formally

  10. Relationships between Perceived Parental Involvement in Homework, Student Homework Behaviors, and Academic Achievement: Differences among Elementary, Junior High, and High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, J. C.; Suárez, N.; Rosário, P.; Vallejo, G.; Valle, A.; Epstein, J. L.

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to produce a deeper understanding of the relationship between perceived parental homework involvement (i.e., parental homework control and parental homework support), student homework behaviors (i.e., time spend on homework completion, time management, and amount of homework completed), and student academic achievement. Using…

  11. Are nursing students engaged in learning? A secondary analysis of data from the National Survey of Student Engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popkess, Ann M; McDaniel, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Evidence in higher education supports the practice of active learning as a method of promoting student engagement among college students that has positive effects on problem solving, critical thinking, and persistence. No studies have been reported that evaluate the undergraduate nursing students' level of engagement in college compared with other majors. The purpose of this study was to determine if differences exist between levels of nursing students' engagement and those of education and other health professional students as measured by the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE). The NSSE is a self-reporting instrument consisting of 70 items measuring level of academic challenge; student interactions with faculty; supportiveness of the campus environment; participation in active and collaborative learning; and enriching educational experiences. Using a descriptive, correlation design, the study incorporated a secondary analysis of NSSE data collected from freshmen and seniors during 2003. Selected demographic data (freshman or senior status) and NSSE data measuring five benchmarks of engagement were analyzed using ANOVA and t-tests to determine relationships. Freshmen were found to be less engaged than seniors on four of five benchmarks. Nursing and other health profession majors perceived themselves to be significantly less engaged in active and collaborative learning than education majors. Nursing students perceived themselves as significantly more academically challenged than their peers in education and other health professions. Results indicate that although nursing students are engaged in rigorous curricula, they do not perceive themselves to be engaged in student-centered and interactive pedagogies. Implications for further research exploring potential barriers surrounding active and collaborative learning strategies are discussed.

  12. The use of parent involved take-home science activities during student teaching: Understanding the challenges of implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarazinski, Jill

    The purpose of this study was to identify student teachers use and implementation of Science in a Bag when it was no longer a required course-based assessment. This take-home science activity acted as the elaboration component of the 5Es lesson teacher candidates designed and taught in the classroom, utilized household items, and directly involved parents in their child's education. The purposeful sample was comprised of six teacher candidates during their student teaching practicum, the last semester of the childhood education teacher certification program. This collective case study centered on student teachers' use of the focused activity, Science in a Bag, in order to gain knowledge of challenges faced in applying take-home science kits and working with parents. Data collection was comprised of student teacher and parent interviews, candidate reflections, as well as in-class observations and discussions carried out during weekly seminars. Data collection occurred throughout the seven-week student teaching practicum. The four research questions were: 1) What factors do teacher candidates identify as interfering with their ability to implement Science in a Bag during student teaching placements? 2) What factors do teacher candidates identify as enhancing their ability to carry out Science in a Bag? 3) What forms of support do teacher candidates believe are important to their success in implementing Science in a Bag during student teaching? 4) How do teacher candidates deal with obstacles when implementing Science in a Bag? Despite the fact that no student teacher was prohibited from implementing Science in a Bag, the level to which candidates valued and utilized this instructional strategy varied compared to how they were taught and practiced it during the science methods course. Some student teachers attempted to hide their feelings toward Science in a Bag, however their actions revealed that they were simply carrying out the instructional strategy because they

  13. Oral health behavior patterns among Tanzanian university students: a repeat cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åstrøm, Anne Nordrehaug; Masalu, Joyce Rose

    2001-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study examines oral health behavioral trends and the development of sociodemographic differences in oral health behaviors among Tanzanian students between 1999 and 2000. METHODS: The population targeted was students attending the Muhimbili University College of Health Sciences (MUCHS) at the University of Dar es Salaam (UDSM), Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Cross-sectional surveys were conducted and a total of 635 and 981 students, respectively, completed questionnaires in 1999 and 2001. RESULTS: Cross-tabulation analyses revealed that in 1999, the rates of abstinence from tobacco use, and of soft drink consumption, regular dental checkups, and intake of chocolate/candy were 84%, 51%, 48%, and 12%, respectively, among students of urban origin and 83%, 29%, 37%, and 5% among their rural counterparts. The corresponding rates in 2001 were 87%, 56%, 50%, and 9% among urban students and 84%, 44%, 38%, and 4% among rural ones. Multiple logistic regression analyses controlling for sex, age, place of origin, educational level, year of survey, and their interaction terms revealed a significant increase in the rate of soft drink consumption, implementation of oral hygiene measures, and abstinence from tobacco use between 1999 and 2001. Social inequalities observed in 1999, with urban students being more likely than their rural counterparts to take soft drinks and go for regular dental checkups, had leveled off by 2001. CONCLUSION: This study provides initial evidence of oral health behavioral trends, that may be utilized in the planning of preventive programs among university students in Tanzania.

  14. Oral health behavior patterns among Tanzanian university students: a repeat cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Åstrøm Anne

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose This study examines oral health behavioral trends and the development of sociodemographic differences in oral health behaviors among Tanzanian students between 1999 and 2000. Methods The population targeted was students attending the Muhimbili University College of Health Sciences (MUCHS at the University of Dar es Salaam (UDSM, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Cross-sectional surveys were conducted and a total of 635 and 981 students, respectively, completed questionnaires in 1999 and 2001. Results Cross-tabulation analyses revealed that in 1999, the rates of abstinence from tobacco use, and of soft drink consumption, regular dental checkups, and intake of chocolate/candy were 84%, 51%, 48%, and 12%, respectively, among students of urban origin and 83%, 29%, 37%, and 5% among their rural counterparts. The corresponding rates in 2001 were 87%, 56%, 50%, and 9% among urban students and 84%, 44%, 38%, and 4% among rural ones. Multiple logistic regression analyses controlling for sex, age, place of origin, educational level, year of survey, and their interaction terms revealed a significant increase in the rate of soft drink consumption, implementation of oral hygiene measures, and abstinence from tobacco use between 1999 and 2001. Social inequalities observed in 1999, with urban students being more likely than their rural counterparts to take soft drinks and go for regular dental checkups, had leveled off by 2001. Conclusion This study provides initial evidence of oral health behavioral trends, that may be utilized in the planning of preventive programs among university students in Tanzania.

  15. Sexual intercourse among adolescent students of Santa Marta, Colombia: a cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Augusto Ceballos

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Among teenagers, the prevalence of sexual intercourse (SI varies from one country to another, and within the same country- from region to region. Information regarding SI in teenagers is unknown for a representative portion of students in Santa Marta, Colombia.Objective: To determine the prevalence and factors associated with SI in middle- and high-school students from public and private schools from urban and rural zones.Method: A statistical sample provided by an anonymous survey of a group of students. Logistic regression was used to control confounders associated with students having had sexual intercourse in his/her lifetime.Results: A total of 3575 students, all grades and socioeconomic status, answered the survey. The mean age was 13.6 (SD=1.9, mean years of schooling was 8.2 years (SD=1.6, and 57% were girls. A group of 804 (22.5% students affirmed to having had SI. Having had SI was associated with being male (OR=8.5, alcohol drinking (OR=4.3, cannabis use (OR=4.2, cigarette smoking (OR=2.8, being older (OR=1.7, attending private school (OR=1.3, and being in a higher grade (OR=1.2.Conclusions: Among the students twenty-five percent reported having had SI. This is associated with unhealthy habits such as consumption of alcohol, cannabis and cigarettes.

  16. Sexual intercourse among adolescent students of Santa Marta, Colombia: a cross-sectional survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Augusto Ceballos

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Among teenagers, the prevalence of sexual intercourse (SI varies from one country to another, and inside the same country, it varies from region to region. Information regarding SI in teenagers is unknown for a representative portion of students in Santa Marta, Colombia. Objective: To determinate the prevalence and factors associated with SI in middle-and high-school students from public and private schools from urban and rural zones. Method: A statistical sample provided by an anonymous survey done to a group of students. Logistic regression was used to control confounders associated with the fact of the student having had SI in his/her lifetime. Results: A total of 3,575 students, all grades and socioeconomic status, answered the survey. The mean age was 13.6 (SD=1.9, mean scholarship was 8.2 years (SD=1.6, and 57% were girls. A group of 804 (22.5% students accepted having had SI. The having had SI was associated with being a boy (OR=8.5, alcohol drinking (OR=4.3, cannabis use (OR=4.2, cigarette smoking (OR=2.8, being older (OR=1.7, attending to private school (OR=1.3, and higher scholarship (OR=1.2. Conclusions: Twenty-five percent of the students reported having had SI. This is associated with unhealthy habits such as alcohol, cannabis and cigarettes consumption.

  17. Survey of the Importance of Professional Behaviors among Medical Students, Residents, and Attending Physicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morreale, Mary K.; Balon, Richard; Arfken, Cynthia L.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The authors compared the importance of items related to professional behavior among medical students rotating through their psychiatry clerkship, psychiatry residents, and attending psychiatrists. Method: The authors sent an electronic survey with 43 items (rated on the scale 1: Not at All Important; to 5: Very Important) to medical…

  18. Testing the Canon: Student Responses to Texts by Medieval Women in English Literature Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Ann R.

    While there has been a great deal of debate about enlarging the canon, less attention has been paid to how students respond to "new" literary figures such as Margery Kempe and Julian of Norwich, or to how instructors should incorporate them into an already cramped literature survey course. Instructors must consider some questions that…

  19. Rancho Santiago College Student Satisfaction Survey. Research, Planning, Resource Development Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slark, Julie; Pham, Nga

    In spring 1991, in-class surveys were completed by 1,495 students enrolled in a random sample of courses at the Santa Ana and Orange campuses of Rancho Santiago College (RSC) to determine their attitudes about RSC and its programs and services. Study results included the following: (1) most respondents were "satisfied" or "very satisfied" with the…

  20. A Planned Survey Course in British Commonwealth Literature for American College Students. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Robert T.

    To encourage the teaching of British Commonwealth literature to American university students, a broad ranging survey course was designed in which the material was thematically organized. A great body of literature from the 13 countries was scrutinized in order to select 147 representative poems and short stories for an anthology. An effective…

  1. NASA Langley Research Center HBCU/OMU program: 1990 student support survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, R. L.; Tiwari, Surendra N.

    1991-01-01

    The results of a survey of students who are receiving support through the Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Other Minority Universities are given. Information is given on the race, sex, ethnic distribution, grade point average distribution, and target degree distribution.

  2. Support Services for Higher Degree Research Students: A Survey of Three Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Pujitha; Woodman, Karen; Taji, Acram; Travelyan, James; Samani, Shamim; Sharda, Hema; Narayanaswamy, Ramesh; Lucey, Anthony; Sahama, Tony; Yarlagadda, Prasad K. D. V.

    2016-01-01

    A survey was conducted across three Australian universities to identify the types and format of support services available for higher degree research (HDR, or MA and Ph.D.) students. The services were classified with regards to availability, location and accessibility. A comparative tool was developed to help institutions categorise their services…

  3. Engaging Students in Survey Research Projects across Research Methods and Statistics Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovekamp, William E.; Soboroff, Shane D.; Gillespie, Michael D.

    2017-01-01

    One innovative way to help students make sense of survey research has been to create a multifaceted, collaborative assignment that promotes critical thinking, comparative analysis, self-reflection, and statistical literacy. We use a short questionnaire adapted from the Higher Education Research Institute's Cooperative Institutional Research…

  4. Be My Guest: A Survey of Mass Communication Students' Perception of Guest Speakers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merle, Patrick F.; Craig, Clay

    2017-01-01

    The use of guest speakers as a pedagogical technique across disciplines at the college level is hardly novel. However, empirical assessment of journalism and mass communication students' perceptions of this practice has not previously been conducted. To fill this gap, this article presents results from an online survey specifically administered to…

  5. Counseling Instruction in the Online Classroom: A Survey of Student and Faculty Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicco, Gina

    2012-01-01

    This article will review the design, procedures, and results of a recent study conducted to survey the perceptions of counseling students and professionals regarding the delivery of counseling instruction in online courses. Few studies have addressed the appropriateness, effectiveness, and evaluation procedures of counseling skills instruction via…

  6. Teacher Trust in Leadership, Professional Learniing Community, and Student Achievement: An Analysis of Statewide Survey Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogg, Troy S.

    2013-01-01

    The foundation of positive interpersonal relationships is trust and such relationships are needed for professional collaboration and learning to take place. Building trust, then, must be important in order to meet organizational goals and impact student success. The purpose of this survey research was to examine the relationship among teachers'…

  7. The Mechanical Waves Conceptual Survey: An Analysis of University Students' Performance, and Recommendations for Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barniol, Pablo; Zavala, Genaro

    2017-01-01

    The Mechanical Waves Conceptual Survey (MWCS), presented in 2009, is the most important test to date that has been designed to evaluate university students' understanding of four main topics: propagation, superposition, reflection, and standing waves. In a literature review, we detected a significant need for a study that uses this test as an…

  8. The Mechanical Waves Conceptual Survey: An Analysis of University Students' Performance, and Recommendations for Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barniol, Pablo; Zavala, Genaro

    2017-01-01

    The Mechanical Waves Conceptual Survey (MWCS), presented in 2009, is the most important test to date that has been designed to evaluate university students' understanding of four main topics: propagation, superposition, reflection, and standing waves. In a literature review, we detected a significant need for a study that uses this test as an…

  9. Engaging Students in Survey Research Projects across Research Methods and Statistics Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovekamp, William E.; Soboroff, Shane D.; Gillespie, Michael D.

    2017-01-01

    One innovative way to help students make sense of survey research has been to create a multifaceted, collaborative assignment that promotes critical thinking, comparative analysis, self-reflection, and statistical literacy. We use a short questionnaire adapted from the Higher Education Research Institute's Cooperative Institutional Research…

  10. Exploring E-Learning Acceptance among University Students in Thailand: A National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Timothy; Ruangrit, Nammon; Khlaisang, Jintavee; Thammetar, Thapanee; Sunphakitjumnong, Kobkul

    2014-01-01

    This study surveys the e-learning acceptance of university students in Thailand. One thousand nine hundred and eighty-one (1,981) participants completed the E-Learning Acceptance Measure (Teo, 2010) which measures three constructs that predict e-learning acceptance (tutor quality, perceived usefulness, and facilitating conditions). Data analysis…

  11. A/Political Education: A Survey of Quebec Students' Perceptions of Their Citizenship Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier-Sylvester, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    This survey of 370 recent high school graduates reveals that history and citizenship courses in Quebec focus on cultural and religious viewpoints, favour a transmission approach to learning, and fail to connect the political process to students' concerns and interests. Without a clear conception of citizenship as a reference point, this curriculum…

  12. The Non-Participation Survey: Understanding Why High School Students Choose Not to Eat School Lunch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asperin, Amelia Estepa; Nettles, Mary Frances; Carr, Deborah H.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this project was to develop and validate a survey that will enable school nutrition (SN) directors and managers to identify and address issues affecting the non-participation of high school students in the National School Lunch Program (NSLP). Methods: The research was conducted in two phases. Qualitative data…

  13. A survey on education in cariology for undergraduate dental students in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulte, A.G.; Buchalla, W.; Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M.; Amaechi, B.T.; Sampaio, F.; Vougiouklakis, G.; Pitts, N.B.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the survey was to collect relevant information about education in cariology for dental undergraduate students in Europe. The ORCA/ADEE cariology curriculum group prepared a questionnaire that was mailed in 2009 to 179 European dental schools. One hundred and twenty-three dental schools (7

  14. Survey of the Importance of Professional Behaviors among Medical Students, Residents, and Attending Physicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morreale, Mary K.; Balon, Richard; Arfken, Cynthia L.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The authors compared the importance of items related to professional behavior among medical students rotating through their psychiatry clerkship, psychiatry residents, and attending psychiatrists. Method: The authors sent an electronic survey with 43 items (rated on the scale 1: Not at All Important; to 5: Very Important) to medical…

  15. Traffic Accidents Involving Cyclists Identifying Causal Factors Using Questionnaire Survey, Traffic Accident Data, and Real-World Observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikawa, Shoko; Hirose, Toshiya; Aomura, Shigeru; Matsui, Yasuhiro

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to clarify the mechanism of traffic accidents involving cyclists. The focus is on the characteristics of cyclist accidents and scenarios, because the number of traffic accidents involving cyclists in Tokyo is the highest in Japan. First, dangerous situations in traffic incidents were investigated by collecting data from 304 cyclists in one city in Tokyo using a questionnaire survey. The survey indicated that cyclists used their bicycles generally while commuting to work or school in the morning. Second, the study investigated the characteristics of 250 accident situations involving cyclists that happened in the city using real-world bicycle accident data. The results revealed that the traffic accidents occurred at intersections of local streets, where cyclists collided most often with vehicles during commute time in the morning. Third, cyclists' behavior was observed at a local street intersection in the morning in the city using video pictures. In one hour during the morning commute period, 250 bicycles passed through the intersection. The results indicated that one of the reasons for traffic accidents involving cyclists might be the combined effect of low visibility, caused by the presence of box-like building structures close to the intersections, and the cyclists' behavior in terms of their velocity and no confirming safety. It was observed that, on average, bicycle velocity was 3.1 m/s at the initial line of an intersection. The findings from this study could be useful in developing new technologies to improve cyclist safety, such as alert devices for cyclists and vehicle drivers, wireless communication systems between cyclists and vehicle drivers, or advanced vehicles with bicycle detection and collision mitigation systems.

  16. Predictors of healthcare professionals’ attitudes towards family involvement in safety-relevant behaviours: a cross-sectional factorial survey study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Rachel; Savvopoulou, M; Shergill, R; Shergill, S; Schwappach, D

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To investigate predictors of healthcare professionals’ (HCPs) attitudes towards family involvement in safety-relevant behaviours. Design A cross-sectional fractional factorial survey that assessed HCPs’ attitudes towards family involvement in two error scenarios relating to hand hygiene and medication safety. Each survey comprised two randomised vignettes that described the potential error, how the family member communicated with the HCP about the error and how the HCP responded to the family member’s question. Setting 5 teaching hospitals in London, the Midlands and York. HCPs were approached on a range of medical and surgical wards. Participants 160 HCPs (73 doctors; 87 nurses) aged between 21 and 65 years (mean 37) 102 were female. Outcome measures HCP approval of family member’s behaviour; HCP reaction to the family member; anticipated effects on the family member–HCP relationship; HCP support for being questioned about hand hygiene/medication; affective rating responses. Results HCPs supported family member's intervening (88%) but only 41% agreed this would have positive effects on the family member/HCP relationship. Across vignettes and error scenarios the strongest predictors of attitudes were how the HCP (in the scenario) responded to the family member and whether an error actually occurred. Doctors (vs nurses) provided systematically more positive affective ratings to the vignettes. Conclusions Important predictors of HCPs’ attitudes towards family members’ involvement in patient safety have been highlighted. In particular, a discouraging response from HCP’s decreased support for family members being involved and had strong perceived negative effects on the family member/HCP relationship. PMID:25186154

  17. Patient and dental student responses to a survey about AIDS in the dental setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaker, H J; Gobetti, J P; Green, T G

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to gain information about patients' and dental students' attitudes concerning AIDS and dentistry. Opinions of patients and students at a Midwestern dental school were surveyed. The dental students' responses were not as consistent as the patient responses. Both groups felt there was a risk to patients and dentists of HIV infection. Both groups had confidence in the CDC infection control guidelines. The patient responses to the testing questions were significantly more positive than the student responses. The patients responded positively to the concept that healthcare professionals had the right to ask patients to be tested and to being required to be tested if a healthcare provider is accidentally stuck by a needle used on a patient. The dental students were more cautious with both issues. Patients would use knowledge about a healthcare provider's HIV status and the office treatment of AIDS patients to determine if they should continue treatment at that dental office.

  18. Exploring the meaning of parental involvement in physical education for students with developmental disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Jihoun; Hodge, Samuel R

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological inquiry was to explore the experiences and meaning of parental involvement in physical education from the perspectives of the parents of students with developmental disabilities. The stories of four mothers of elementary aged children (3 boys, 1 girl), two mothers and one couple (mother and father) of secondary-aged youth (1 girl, 2 boys) with developmental disabilities, were gathered by using interviews, photographs, school documents, and the researcher's journal. Bronfenbrenner's (2005) ecological system theory provided a conceptual framework to interpret the findings of this inquiry. Three themes emerged from thematic analysis: being an advocate for my child, understanding the big picture, and collaborative partnerships undeveloped in GPE. The findings lend additional support to the need for establishing collaborative partnerships in physical education between home and school environments (An & Goodwin, 2007; Tekin, 2011).

  19. Math Achievement in Early Adolescence: The Role of Parental Involvement, Teachers' Behavior, and Students' Motivational Beliefs about Math

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levpuscek, Melita Puklek; Zupancic, Maja

    2009-01-01

    Contributions of parental involvement in educational pursuits as well as math teachers' classroom behavior to students' motivation and performance in math were investigated. By the end of the first school term, 365 Slovene eighth graders reported on their parents' academic involvement (pressure, support, and help) and their math teachers' behavior…

  20. Predicting Student Performance in Web-Based Distance Education Courses Based on Survey Instruments Measuring Personality Traits and Technical Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Two common web-based surveys, "Is Online Learning Right for Me?' and "What Technical Skills Do I Need?", were combined into a single survey instrument and given to 228 on-campus and 83 distance education students. The students were enrolled in four different classes (business, computer information services, criminal justice, and…

  1. Survey of High School Students' Perceptions about Their iPod Use, Knowledge of Hearing Health, and Need for Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danhauer, Jeffrey L.; Johnson, Carole E.; Dunne, Aislinn F.; Young, Matthew D.; Rotan, Suzanne N.; Snelson, Tasha A.; Stockwell, Jennifer S.; McLain, Michelle J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: High school students' knowledge about hearing health and their perceptions of how they use personal listening devices (PLDs) including iPods were surveyed to determine the need, content, and preferred format for educational outreach to them. Method: This study was a descriptive convenience survey of students at a California high school.…

  2. Students' Motivations for Choosing (Or Not) to Study Portuguese: A Survey of Beginning-Level University Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, Blair E.; de Almeida Oliveira, Desirée

    2014-01-01

    Although previous literature has discussed ways of promoting the study of Portuguese, to our knowledge no study has ever directly surveyed students to ascertain why they chose to learn the language. This study reports on a survey of the motivations of first- and second-year Portuguese students to study the language, and contrasts their motivations…

  3. A Study of General Education Astronomy Students' Understandings of Cosmology. Part I. Development and Validation of Four Conceptual Cosmology Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Colin S.; Prather, Edward E.; Duncan, Douglas K.

    2011-01-01

    This is the first in a series of five articles describing a national study of general education astronomy students' conceptual and reasoning difficulties with cosmology. In this paper, we describe the process by which we designed four new surveys to assess general education astronomy students' conceptual cosmology knowledge. These surveys focused…

  4. Involving students in real-world research: a pilot study for teaching public health and research skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Nick

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is some evidence that medical students consider population health issues less important than other domains in the health sciences and attitudes to this field may become more negative as training progresses. A need to improve research skills among medical students has also been suggested. Therefore we piloted an integrative teaching exercise that combined teaching of research skills and public health, with real-world research. Methods Third year medical students at the University of Otago (Dunedin, New Zealand filled in a questionnaire on their housing conditions and health. The students were given the results of the survey to discuss in a subsequent class. Student response to this teaching exercise was assessed using a Course Evaluation Questionnaire. Results Of the 210 students in the class, 136 completed the Course Evaluation Questionnaire (65%. A majority of those who responded (77% greatly supported or supported the use of the survey and seminar discussion for future third year classes. Most (70% thought that the session had made them more aware and concerned about societal problems, and 72% felt that they now had an improved understanding of the environmental determinants of health. Students liked the relevance and interaction of the session, but thought it could be improved by the inclusion of small group discussion. The findings of the students' housing and health were considered by the tutors to be of sufficient value to submit to a scientific journal and are now contributing to community action to improve student housing in the city. Conclusion In this pilot study it was feasible to integrate medical student teaching with real-world research. A large majority of the students responded favourably to the teaching exercise and this was generally successful in raising the profile of public health and research. This approach to integrated teaching/research should be considered further in health sciences training and

  5. Sex Survey about university students of UPF (from 20 to 27 years old

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Maté

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present survey was to assess the level of sexual knowledge, attitudes and practice of university students, adult young people from 20 to 27 years old and to identify if there was any significant difference in terms of age and sexual activity with other surveys. The survey was undertaken in which data were collected from 838 students who attended the third and four course of their graduate in Humanities. Differences between answers by sex were tested using Pearson’s χ2 test. The study established that behaviour, knowledge, attitudes and practice of the universitary students vary by sex in some regards. The fi rst sexual relationships is around they have 15,4 years old and no statistically significant difference was found between sex. The average of the starter interesting about sex is around 13,5 years old and a statistically signifi cant difference was found between sex, the average of boys is 12,7 years old and girls 13,7. People who were sexually active are satisfi ed and show is so important to their wellbeing. Majority use contraceptive methods in the last relationship and the same percentage use the condom in order to avoid sexually transmitted diseases. The study confirmed that there are 21% the students don’t use any method to avoid sexually transmitted diseases. Our conclusion is both, the knowledge and attitudes of students necessarily required appropriate sex education in the secondary school.

  6. A survey of interventional radiology awareness among final-year medical students in a European country.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Leong, Sum

    2009-07-01

    Interventional radiology (IR) is a rapidly expanding specialty that is facing the challenges of turf wars and personnel shortages. Appropriate exposure of medical students to this field can be vital to recruitment of potential future trainees or referring physicians. The aim of this study was to determine the knowledge and views of final-year medical students in a single EU country regarding various aspects of IR. An electronic survey was sent via e-mail to all final-year medical students in a European country. The students were given a month to respond to the questionnaire. A total of 234 students of 675 (34.5%) replied to the survey. Of the respondents, 35% had previously completed an attachment to the radiology department. The majority of students (63%) thought their knowledge in radiology in general was poor. The percentage of students who correctly identified procedures performed by interventional radiologists was 69% for Hickman line insertion, 79% for fibroid embolization, and 67.5% for lower limb angioplasty. Sixty percent, 30%, and 47% thought that interventional radiologists perform cardiac angioplasties, perform arterial bypasses, and create AV fistulas, respectively. Forty-nine percent felt that interventional radiologists are surgically trained. Eighty-three percent of students were first made aware of angioplasty by a cardiologist. Thirty-one percent thought that interventional radiologists do ward rounds, 24% thought that interventional radiologists have admitting rights, and 26% felt that interventional radiologists run an outpatient practice. A significant number of students (76%) thought that the job prospects in IR are good or excellent but only 40.5% were willing to consider a career in IR. In conclusion, this study indicates that IR remains a nascent but attractive specialty to the majority of medical students. Further development of the existing informal undergraduate curriculum to address shortcomings will ensure that IR continues to attract

  7. Validity and Reliability of the Alcohol, Smoking, and Substance Involvement Screening Test (ASSIST) in University Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiburcio Sainz, Marcela; Rosete-Mohedano, Ma Guadalupe; Natera Rey, Guillermina; Martínez Vélez, Nora Angélica; Carreño García, Silvia; Pérez Cisneros, Daniel

    2016-03-02

    The Alcohol, Smoking and Substance Involvement Screening Test (ASSIST), developed by the World Health Organization (WHO), has been used successfully in many countries, but there are few studies of its validity and reliability for the Mexican population. The objective of this study was to determine the psychometric properties of the self-administered ASSIST test in university students in Mexico. This was an ex post facto non-experimental study with 1,176 undergraduate students, the majority women (70.1%) aged 18-23 years (89.5%) and single (87.5%). To estimate concurrent validity, factor analysis and tests of reliability and correlation were carried out between the subscale for alcohol and AUDIT, those for tobacco and the Fagerström Test, and those for marijuana and DAST-20. Adequate reliability coefficients were obtained for ASSIST subscales for tobacco (alpha = 0.83), alcohol (alpha = 0.76), and marijuana (alpha = 0.73). Significant correlations were found only with the AUDIT (r = 0.71) and the alcohol subscale. The best balance of sensitivity and specificity of the alcohol subscale (83.8% and 80%, respectively) and the largest area under the ROC curve (81.9%) was found with a cutoff score of 8. The self-administered version of ASSIST is a valid screening instrument to identify at-risk cases due to substance use in this population.

  8. International medical students – a survey of perceived challenges and established support services at medical faculties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huhn, D.; Junne, F.; Zipfel, S.; Duelli, R.; Resch, F.; Herzog, W.; Nikendei, C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Medical students with a non-German background face several challenges during their studies. Besides support given by foreign student offices further specific projects for international students have been developed and are offered by medical faculties. However, so far, neither a systematic survey of the faculties’ perceived problems nor of the offered support exists. Method: All study deaneries of medical faculties in Germany were contacted between April and October 2013 and asked for their participation in a telephone interview. Interview partners were asked about 1.) The percentage of non-German students at the medical faculty; 2.) The perceived difficulties and problems of foreign students; 3.) The offers for non-German students; and 4.) The specification of further possibilities of support. Given information was noted, frequencies counted and results interpreted via frequency analysis. Results: Only 39% of the medical faculties could give detailed information about the percentage of non-German students. They reported an average share of 3.9% of students with an EU migration background and 4.9% with a non-EU background. Most frequently cited offers are student conducted tutorials, language courses and tandem-programs. The most frequently reported problem by far is the perceived lack of language skills of foreign students at the beginning of their studies. Suggested solutions are mainly the development of tutorials and the improvement of German medical terminology. Discussion: Offers of support provided by medical faculties for foreign students vary greatly in type and extent. Support offered is seen to be insufficient in coping with the needs of the international students in many cases. Hence, a better coverage of international students as well as further research efforts to the specific needs and the effectiveness of applied interventions seem to be essential. PMID:25699112

  9. International medical students – a survey of perceived challenges and established support services at medical faculties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huhn, D.

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Medical students with a non-German background face several challenges during their studies. Besides support given by foreign student offices further specific projects for international students have been developed and are offered by medical faculties. However, so far, neither a systematic survey of the faculties’ perceived problems nor of the offered support exists.Method: All study deaneries of medical faculties in Germany were contacted between April and October 2013 and asked for their participation in a telephone interview. Interview partners were asked about 1. The percentage of non-German students at the medical faculty; 2. The perceived difficulties and problems of foreign students; 3. The offers for non-German students; and 4. The specification of further possibilities of support. Given information was noted, frequencies counted and results interpreted via frequency analysis.Results: Only 39% of the medical faculties could give detailed information about the percentage of non-German students. They reported an average share of 3.9% of students with an EU migration background and 4.9% with a non-EU background. Most frequently cited offers are student conducted tutorials, language courses and tandem-programs. The most frequently reported problem by far is the perceived lack of language skills of foreign students at the beginning of their studies. Suggested solutions are mainly the development of tutorials and the improvement of German medical terminology.Discussion: Offers of support provided by medical faculties for foreign students vary greatly in type and extent. Support offered is seen to be insufficient in coping with the needs of the international students in many cases. Hence, a better coverage of international students as well as further research efforts to the specific needs and the effectiveness of applied interventions seem to be essential.

  10. Perceptions of Parent Involvement in Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePlanty, Jennifer; Coulter-Kern, Russell; Duchane, Kim A.

    2007-01-01

    The authors sought to understand the types of parent involvement that teachers, parents, and students believe affect the academic achievement of adolescent learners at the junior high school level. Research that included focus groups, interviews, and surveys indicated that teachers and students believed that parent involvement at school was…

  11. What Behaviours Do Students Consider Academically Dishonest? Findings from a Survey of Canadian Undergraduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurdi, Rozzet; Hage, H. Sam; Chow, Henry P. H.

    2012-01-01

    This paper identifies those behaviours that students perceive to be academically dishonest and sheds light on several demographic, academic and situational factors that predict students' perceptions of academic dishonesty. Data for this investigation were obtained through self-administered questionnaires from a sample of 321 undergraduate students…

  12. On the Utter Irrelevance of LPL Graduate Students An Unbiased Survey by Steward Observatory Graduate Students

    CERN Document Server

    Charfman, J J; Eriksen, K A; Knierman, K; Leistra, A; Mamajek, E; Monkiewicz, J; Moustakas, J; Murphy, J; Rigby, J R; Young, P A

    2002-01-01

    We present a new analysis of the irrelevance of Lunar and Planetary Laboratory (LPL) graduate students at the University of Arizona. Based on extensive Monte Carlo simulations we find that the actual number of useful results from LPL graduate students is $0\\pm0.01 (5\\sigma)$. Their irrelevance quotient far surpasses that of string theorists.

  13. Development and initial validation of a survey to assess students' self-efficacy in medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artino, Anthony R; Dong, Ting; DeZee, Kent J; Gilliland, William R; Waechter, Donna M; Cruess, David F; Durning, Steven J

    2012-09-01

    Self-efficacy is a personal belief in one's capability to successfully execute the behaviors necessary to attain designated types of performances. Sometimes described as task-specific self-confidence, self-efficacy is a key component in many contemporary theories of motivation and learning. The purpose of this study was to develop a survey for measuring students' medical skills self-efficacy and to collect reliability and validity evidence for the instrument. A secondary purpose was to explore differences in students' self-efficacy from year 1 of medical school to year 4. We created 19 survey items based on the 6 core competencies of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, and we collected data from 304 medical students. Results from an exploratory factor analysis suggested three interpretable factors: patient care self-efficacy (eight items, Cronbach's alpha = 0.92), interpersonal skills self-efficacy (three items, Cronbach's alpha = 0.76), and evidence-based medicine self-efficacy (three items, Cronbach's alpha = 0.79). We then compared students' self-efficacy at different stages of training using a one-way multivariate analysis of variance. Consistent with our expectations, we found several statistically significant differences, suggesting students' self-efficacy increased considerably from year 1 of medical school to year 4, F(9, 725) = 30.58, p students' medical skills self-efficacy during undergraduate medical education. Practical implications and future directions are discussed.

  14. Student nurses' motivation to choose gerontological nursing as a career in China: a survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Min; Cheng, Cheng; Tian, Yan; Fan, Xiuzhen

    2015-07-01

    The world's population is aging, and the need for nurses is increasing. Working with older adults, however, has always been an unpopular career choice among student nurses. It is important to understand student nurses' motivation for choosing gerontological nursing as a career. The purpose of this study was to examine the motivation for choosing gerontological nursing as a career and to identify the associated factors among student nurses. Cross-sectional survey. Participants were last-semester student nurses from 7 universities offering nursing undergraduate programs in Shandong, China. Of the 1290 student nurses, 916 completed the survey (a response rate of 71.0%). The outcome variable was the motivation to choose gerontological nursing as a career. This was measured using a motivation questionnaire that included expectancy and value subscales. Other instruments included the Chinese version of the Facts on Aging Quiz I, the Geriatrics Attitudes Scale, the Anxiety about Aging Scale, a clinical practice environment questionnaire and a self-administered general information questionnaire. Student nurses' expectancy and value aspects of motivation for choosing gerontological nursing as a career were both at a moderate level; the highest value they held was of personal interest. Clinical practice environment, anxiety about aging and the attitudes about geriatrics were the main factors influencing student nurses' motivation to choose gerontological nursing as a career in China. It is imperative for nurse educators to improve the gerontological nursing clinical practice environment for student nurses. Moreover, cultivating student nurses' positive attitudes about geriatrics and relieving anxiety about aging could be beneficial. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Factors affecting residency rank-listing: A Maxdiff survey of graduating Canadian medical students

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    Forgie Melissa

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Canada, graduating medical students consider many factors, including geographic, social, and academic, when ranking residency programs through the Canadian Residency Matching Service (CaRMS. The relative significance of these factors is poorly studied in Canada. It is also unknown how students differentiate between their top program choices. This survey study addresses the influence of various factors on applicant decision making. Methods Graduating medical students from all six Ontario medical schools were invited to participate in an online survey available for three weeks prior to the CaRMS match day in 2010. Max-Diff discrete choice scaling, multiple choice, and drop-list style questions were employed. The Max-Diff data was analyzed using a scaled simple count method. Data for how students distinguish between top programs was analyzed as percentages. Comparisons were made between male and female applicants as well as between family medicine and specialist applicants; statistical significance was determined by the Mann-Whitney test. Results In total, 339 of 819 (41.4% eligible students responded. The variety of clinical experiences and resident morale were weighed heavily in choosing a residency program; whereas financial incentives and parental leave attitudes had low influence. Major reasons that applicants selected their first choice program over their second choice included the distance to relatives and desirability of the city. Both genders had similar priorities when selecting programs. Family medicine applicants rated the variety of clinical experiences more importantly; whereas specialty applicants emphasized academic factors more. Conclusions Graduating medical students consider program characteristics such as the variety of clinical experiences and resident morale heavily in terms of overall priority. However, differentiation between their top two choice programs is often dependent on social/geographic factors

  16. Established and Outsider relations among students involved in a Health promotion intervention in a Danish high school

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Stine Frydendal; Ottesen, Laila; Thing, Lone Friis

    Established and the Outsiders” (Elias and Scotson, 1994). The study shows that some of the “health ambassador”-students found this role and their identity as “sports-students” difficult. They felt that this identity sometimes compromised their social life in the school, which relates to aspects that doesn......Established and outsider relations among students involved in a health promotion intervention in a Danish high school. Stine Frydendal Nielsen1, Laila Ottesen2, Lone Friis Thing2, 1Rysensteen Gymnasium, 2University of Copenhagen The paper considers a study in a Danish high school in which students......’t always correspond with the current health norms (Thing and Ottesen, 2013). Based on “The Established and the Outsiders”, the paper discusses the role of these students in a health promotion intervention. It explores the relations between the “health ambassador”-students and the other students...

  17. Using a Virtual Tablet Machine to Improve Student Understanding of the Complex Processes Involved in Tablet Manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, Sofia; Sjöström, Hans-Erik; Englund, Claire

    2016-06-25

    Objective. To develop and implement a virtual tablet machine simulation to aid distance students' understanding of the processes involved in tablet production. Design. A tablet simulation was created enabling students to study the effects different parameters have on the properties of the tablet. Once results were generated, students interpreted and explained them on the basis of current theory. Assessment. The simulation was evaluated using written questionnaires and focus group interviews. Students appreciated the exercise and considered it to be motivational. Students commented that they found the simulation, together with the online seminar and the writing of the report, was beneficial for their learning process. Conclusion. According to students' perceptions, the use of the tablet simulation contributed to their understanding of the compaction process.

  18. A national survey of international electives for medical students in Japan: 2009-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishigori, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Osamu; Sugimoto, Naomi; Kitamura, Kiyoshi; McMahon, Graham T

    2012-01-01

    International electives can provide experiences for medical students to learn about health systems and foster critical self-reflection. So far, little is known about the status of Japanese students' engagement in international electives. We sought to provide information about the internationalization of Japanese medical education by clarifying the current situations of international electives. We undertook a cross-sectional national 17-item questionnaire survey of program officers in all medical schools in Japan in February 2010. Sixty-five (81.3%) of 80 Japanese medical schools responded to the questionnaire. 462 Japanese medical students (3% of all students in their clinical years) travelled to North America (45.5%), Asia (25.0%), or Western Europe (24.4%) to study abroad. The number of students who participated in international electives was significantly increased when academic credit was available (median 6 vs. 1, p students, p students were evaluated by means of written assignment on return. About 3% of Japanese medical students participate in international clinical exchanges. Academic credit and institutional affiliations appear to promote greater utilization of international exchange opportunities.

  19. German medical students´ exposure and attitudes toward pharmaceutical promotion: A cross-sectional survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnke, Kristine; Kremer, Marcel Stephan; Schmidt, Carsten Oliver; Kochen, Michael M.; Chenot, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Early contact of medical students with pharmaceutical promotion has been shown in many international studies. We assessed the frequency and places of contact of German medical students to pharmaceutical promotion and examined their attitudes toward pharmaceutical promotional activities. Methods: This cross-sectional survey was based on a self-developed questionnaire. It was distributed to all clinical students at the University of Goettingen Medical School in 2010. A 4-point rating scale was used to assess the attitudes toward different statements regarding pharmaceutical promotion. Results: The overall response rate was 55% (702/1287). The proportion of students with direct contact to pharmaceutical sales representatives increased from 21% in the first clinical year up to 77% in the final year. 60% were contacted during their elective clerkship. 80% had accepted promotional gifts. 86% stated their prescribing behavior to be unsusceptible to the influence of accepting promotional gifts. However, 35% of the unsusceptible students assumed doctors to be susceptible. Almost all (90%) reported that dealing with pharmaceutical promotion was never addressed during lectures and 65% did not feel well prepared for interactions with the pharmaceutical industry. 19% agreed to prohibit contacts between medical students and the pharmaceutical industry. Conclusions: German medical students get in contact with pharmaceutical promotion early and frequently. There is limited awareness for associated conflicts of interests. Medical schools need to regulate contacts and incorporate the topic in their curriculum to prepare students for interactions with the pharmaceutical industry. PMID:25228934

  20. An Examination of the Flipped Classroom Approach on College Student Academic Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCallum, Shelly; Schultz, Janel; Sellke, Kristen; Spartz, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Colleges and universities remain attentive to developing and supporting ways to foster student academic success. These efforts have taken on more importance as student success, commonly measured by student learning achievement, has failed to meet expectations. For colleges and universities, the flipped classroom represents a student-centered…

  1. Evaluation of the medical student research programme in Norwegian medical schools. A survey of students and supervisors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tømmerås Karin

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Medical Student Research Programme is a national education and grant scheme for medical students who wish to carry out research in parallel with their studies. The purpose of the programme is to increase recruitment of people with a standard medical degree to medical research. The Research Programme was established in 2002 and underwent a thorough evaluation during the spring of 2007. The evaluation should investigate if the programme had fulfilled its objectives of increased recruitment to medical research, in addition to the students' and supervisors' satisfaction of the programme, and unwanted differences between the universities. Methods Data was collected from students, supervisors and administrative staff via web-based questionnaires. Information about admission, implementation, results achieved and satisfaction was analysed and compared between the four Norwegian medical schools. In addition, the position of the scheme in relation to the national Quality Reform of Higher Education was analysed. Results At the end of 2006, the Medical Student Research Programme had recruited 265 medical students to research. These consisted of 214 active students, 35 who had completed their studies and only 17 who had dropped out. Both students and supervisors were generally very satisfied with the scheme, including the curriculum, the results achieved and the administrative service. The majority of students wanted to continue their research towards a PhD and, of those who had completed the Medical Student Research Programme, practically all had published one or several scientific papers. The survey showed only small differences between the four medical schools, despite their choice of somewhat different solutions in terms of administration and organisation. The Medical Student Research Programme satisfies the majority of the demands of the Quality Reform, however as an integrated research programme aimed at a PhD it presupposes

  2. A survey of the ways master's level nursing students learn the research process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, F L; Timmons, M E

    1999-03-01

    Because of the need for advanced practice nurses to perform more outcome measurement, a survey was conducted in the fall of 1997 to determine how master's level students learned the research process. Three hundred four surveys were mailed to schools with master's programs, and 222 were returned for a return rate of 73%. Sixty-six percent of the programs surveyed required a thesis and/or a research project. However, there was great variation in the research projects. A comprehensive examination was used to measure research ability by 36 programs (16%), either in conjunction with a thesis or research project or alone. One hundred forty-six programs (66%) offered only one option, be it a thesis, research project, comprehensive examination, or the many other alternative activities described by respondents. Seventy-six programs (34%) offered a variety of options from which students could select. The major differences between the thesis and the research project were related to three issues: a) the nature of the supervision; b) whether the activity was an individual or group project; and c) the amount of participation of the students. Because of the variability of expectations and the ways students are taught research, it was recommended nurse educators determine whether master's level nurse graduates were prepared to conduct outcome measurement and whether the means used to teach the research process were effective considering that endeavor.

  3. A SURVEY OF THE ENGLISH READING HABITS OF EFL STUDENTS IN INDONESIA

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    Erna Iftanti

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This article investigated the English reading habits of Indonesian students of EFL. The data were collected through a questionnaire survey and interview validation. The questionnaires were distributed to 546 EFL college students in East Java. Based on the statistical analysis of the data, it is concluded that although the students have read English since elementary school, they do not indicate to have good English reading habits. Only few of them are identified to have good English reading habits as suggested by their eagerness to regularly spend time reading various types of English texts and their high motivation to read English for pleasure. The EFL students read English for some purposes, i.e. for school assignments, for pleasure, and for knowledge and English skills improvement. Their positive belief about reading does not motivate them to read English for pleasure; rather, it is school assignments that appear to be their biggest motivation.

  4. Nursing students perceptions of desirable leadership qualities in nurse preceptors: a descriptive survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilembo, Melanie; Monterosso, Leanne

    2008-02-01

    There is a paucity of literature examining the context of leadership within the clinical preceptor/undergraduate nursing student relationship and the relevance of this to the clinical learning environment. This study used a mixed methodological survey approach to explore the leadership qualities in nurse preceptors that are considered desirable and contribute to positive practicum experiences from the perspective of 23 undergraduate nurses. Findings showed students both want and need leadership from their preceptors in order to develop psychomotor skill competency and to experience orientation to the real world of nursing care. Gaining insight into the leadership qualities that students perceive as desirable to enhance the practical experience is vital since that practical experience is viewed as the making or breaking of many students and influences retention in undergraduate education and within the profession post registration.

  5. Report of a mental health survey among Chinese international students at Yale University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xuesong; Han, Xuemei; Luo, Qianlai; Jacobs, Selby; Jean-Baptiste, Michel

    2013-01-01

    To examine the prevalence of depression and anxiety symptoms in Chinese international students, to identify factors that might be associated with these 2 symptom complexes, and to investigate their perception of mental health issues and counseling services. Chinese students (N = 130) at Yale University. Participants completed an anonymous online survey in fall 2009. Forty-five percent reported symptoms of depression, and 29% reported symptoms of anxiety. A self-evaluation of poor current health, a poor relationship with one's advisor, and a low exercise regimen were associated with a higher prevalence of depression and anxiety symptoms. Twenty-seven percent of responders were not aware of the availability of mental health and counseling services on campus. This study suggests that efforts should be made to improve the relationship between students and their advisors and to enhance the awareness of and the accessibility to mental health and counseling services to improve the mental health of Chinese international students.

  6. Cigarette demand is responsive to higher prices: findings from a survey of University students in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweis, Nadia J; Cherukupalli, Rajeev

    2016-11-01

    To estimate the price elasticity of cigarette demand for university students aged 18-24 years in Jordan. Questions from the Global Adult Tobacco Survey were adapted and administered to students from 10 public universities in Jordan in 2014. A two-part econometric model of cigarette demand was estimated. Nearly one-third of university students in Jordan smoke, purchasing 33.2 packs per month and paying 1.70 Jordanian dinars on average (US$2.40) for a pack of 20 cigarettes. The price elasticity of cigarette demand was estimated to be -1.15. Higher taxes may be particularly effective in reducing smoking among University students in Jordan. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  7. A survey of medical students to assess their exposure to and knowledge of renal transplantation

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    Weale Andrew R

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Within the field of renal transplantation there is a lack of qualified and trainee surgeons and a shortage of donated organs. Any steps to tackle these issues should, in part, be aimed at future doctors. Methods A questionnaire was distributed to final year students at a single medical school in the UK to assess their exposure to and knowledge of renal transplantation. Results Although 46% of responding students had examined a transplant recipient, only 14% had ever witnessed the surgery. Worryingly, 9% of students believed that xenotransplantation commonly occurs in the UK and 35% were unable to name a single drug that a recipient may need to take. Conclusions This survey demonstrates a lack of exposure to, and knowledge of, the field of renal transplantation. Recommendations to address the problems with the recruitment of surgeons and donation of organs, by targeting medical students are made.

  8. Survey of the Prevalence of Burnout, Stress, Depression, and the Use of Supports by Medical Students at One School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Elaine; Eddins-Folensbee, Florence; Coverdale, John

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The authors determined the prevalence of stress, depression, and burnout in medical students and the resources used by students in one school to alleviate psychological distress. Methods: A survey was administered to 526 students in the first 3 years of medical school (336 responders; response rate: 70%) at one institution, using a…

  9. Effect of Supervised Students' Involvement on Diagnostic Accuracy in Hospitalized Medical Patients — A Prospective Controlled Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herter, Dorothea Adelheid; Wagner, Robert; Holderried, Friederike; Fenik, Yelena; Riessen, Reimer; Weyrich, Peter; Celebi, Nora

    2012-01-01

    Background During internships most medical students engage in history taking and physical examination during evaluation of hospitalized patients. However, the students' ability for pattern recognition is not as developed as in medical experts and complete history taking is often not repeated by an expert, so important clues may be missed. On the other hand, students' history taking is usually more extensive than experts' history taking and medical students discuss their findings with a Supervisor. Thus the effect of student involvement on diagnostic accuracy is unclear. We therefore compared the diagnostic accuracy for patients in the medical emergency department with and without student involvement in the evaluation process. Methodology/Principal Findings Patients in the medical emergency department were assigned to evaluation by either a supervised medical student or an emergency department physician. We only included patients who were admitted to our hospital and subsequently cared for by another medical team on the ward. We compared the working diagnosis from the emergency department with the discharge diagnosis. A total of 310 patients included in the study were cared for by 41 medical students and 21 emergency department physicians. The working diagnosis was changed in 22% of the patients evaluated by physicians evaluation and in 10% of the patients evaluated by supervised medical students (p = .006). There was no difference in the expenditures for diagnostic procedures, length of stay in the emergency department or patient comorbidity complexity level. Conclusion/Significance Involvement of closely supervised medical students in the evaluation process of hospitalized medical patients leads to an improved diagnostic accuracy compared to evaluation by an emergency department physician alone. PMID:22984578

  10. Effect of supervised students' involvement on diagnostic accuracy in hospitalized medical patients--a prospective controlled study.

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    Dorothea Adelheid Herter

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: During internships most medical students engage in history taking and physical examination during evaluation of hospitalized patients. However, the students' ability for pattern recognition is not as developed as in medical experts and complete history taking is often not repeated by an expert, so important clues may be missed. On the other hand, students' history taking is usually more extensive than experts' history taking and medical students discuss their findings with a Supervisor. Thus the effect of student involvement on diagnostic accuracy is unclear. We therefore compared the diagnostic accuracy for patients in the medical emergency department with and without student involvement in the evaluation process. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Patients in the medical emergency department were assigned to evaluation by either a supervised medical student or an emergency department physician. We only included patients who were admitted to our hospital and subsequently cared for by another medical team on the ward. We compared the working diagnosis from the emergency department with the discharge diagnosis. A total of 310 patients included in the study were cared for by 41 medical students and 21 emergency department physicians. The working diagnosis was changed in 22% of the patients evaluated by physicians evaluation and in 10% of the patients evaluated by supervised medical students (p = .006. There was no difference in the expenditures for diagnostic procedures, length of stay in the emergency department or patient comorbidity complexity level. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Involvement of closely supervised medical students in the evaluation process of hospitalized medical patients leads to an improved diagnostic accuracy compared to evaluation by an emergency department physician alone.

  11. EXAMINATION OF ACHIEVEMENT RELATIONS AND MOTIVATION OF 7th GRADE STUDENTS FOR INVOLVEMENT IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION CLASSES

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    Dragoljub Višnjić

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The relations of students achievement and motivation for involvement in PE classes were examined in a sample of 247 seventh-grade elementary school students of both sexes. The independent variables in the study were: sex, general success of the previous grade, PE grade, students’ opinion on sufficiency of knowledge acquired through instruction process, students’ involvement in sport. The scale for measurement of motivation consisted of 29 items obtained by adaptation of the Scale for measurement of motives of sports’ achievement. Correlation analysis, multiple regression analysis and chi square test were preformed. It was established that male students manifested higher motivation that the females. The assumptions: that females will have better PE grades that the male students; that students’ success was negatively related to involvement in sport; that PE grade was connected to involvement in sport; that general success was negatively related to students’ involvement in PE and that PE grade is positively related to students’ motivation for involvement in instruction, were not confirmed.

  12. "Pimping" in Pharmacy Education: A Survey and Comparison of Student and Faculty Views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Eric A; Miesner, Andrew R; Beckett, Emily A; Grady, Sarah E

    2017-01-01

    "Pimping" is an informal teaching technique that is widely used in medical education. Pimping is characterized by questioning the learner with the intent of reinforcing clinical hierarchy. To date, there are no studies of the use of pimping in pharmacy education. To describe the use of pimping as a teaching method in pharmacy education and to compare student and faculty perceptions of this technique. Faculty and fourth-year PharmD (P4) students from 2 colleges of pharmacy were invited to participate in a survey about experiences and perceptions of pimping. Faculty and P4 surveys each contained up to 17 items to assess personal experiences, utilization, perceived risks and benefits, and preferences regarding the role of the technique in pharmacy education. The response rate was 49.5% (159 of 321). Of faculty, 74.1% reported they had been pimped in their training, but less than half (45.8%) use pimping themselves. Similarly, 73.7% of students reported that they had been pimped at some time in their pharmacy education. Students nearly equally viewed their experiences as positive (35.3%) versus negative (38.2%). Responses were similar between faculty and students recommending that the method should be avoided entirely ( P = .259), used sparingly ( P = .072), or used consistently ( P = .309). Perceived benefits and risks of pimping were similar between faculty and students, but there were many differences in rationales offered by faculty versus students' perceived rationales. Pimping is common in pharmacy education and its use is controversial. The perceived rationale for use of pimping differs, which may undermine student/faculty relationships.

  13. Do you think it's a disease? a survey of medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erueti Chrissy

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The management of medical conditions is influenced by whether clinicians regard them as "disease" or "not a disease". The aim of the survey was to determine how medical students classify a range of conditions they might encounter in their professional lives and whether a different name for a condition would influence their decision in the categorisation of the condition as a 'disease' or 'not a disease'. Methods We surveyed 3 concurrent years of medical students to classify 36 candidate conditions into "disease" and "non-disease". The conditions were given a 'medical' label and a (lay label and positioned where possible in alternate columns of the survey. Results The response rate was 96% (183 of 190 students attending a lecture: 80% of students concurred on 16 conditions as "disease" (eg diabetes, tuberculosis, and 4 as "non-disease" (eg baldness, menopause, fractured skull and heat stroke. The remaining 16 conditions (with 21-79% agreement were more contentious (especially obesity, infertility, hay fever, alcoholism, and restless leg syndrome. Three pairs of conditions had both a more, and a less, medical label: the more medical labels (myalgic encephalomyelitis, hypertension, and erectile dysfunction were more frequently classified as 'disease' than the less medical (chronic fatigue syndrome, high blood pressure, and impotence, respectively, significantly different for the first two pairs. Conclusions Some conditions excluded from the classification of "disease" were unexpected (eg fractured skull and heat stroke. Students were mostly concordant on what conditions should be classified as "disease". They were more likely to classify synonyms as 'disease' if the label was medical. The findings indicate there is still a problem 30 years on in the concept of 'what is a disease'. Our findings suggest that we should be addressing such concepts to medical students.

  14. Sense of belonging in secondary schools: a survey of LGB and heterosexual students in Flanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aerts, Saskia; Van Houtte, Mieke; Dewaele, Alexis; Cox, Nele; Vincke, John

    2012-01-01

    This study focuses on differences in sense of belonging between lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) and heterosexual students. Data from 1,745 secondary school students were collected with an online survey. Step-wise multiple regression analyses was used to investigate the relationship between sexual orientation and sense of school belonging. The results show that sexual orientation has an impact on sense of belonging for girls, but not for boys. Perceived discrimination and LGB friendliness of the school appeared to be important indicators of sense of belonging for all the respondents, irrespective of their sexual orientation.

  15. Organizational member involvement in physical activity coalitions across the United States: development and testing of a novel survey instrument for assessing coalition functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornstein, Daniel B; Pate, Russell R; Beets, Michael W; Saunders, Ruth P; Blair, Steven N

    2015-06-01

    Coalitions are often composed of member organizations. Member involvement is thought to be associated with coalition success. No instrument currently exists for evaluating organizational member involvement in physical activity coalitions. This study aimed to develop a survey instrument for evaluating organizational member involvement in physical activity coalitions. The study was carried out in three phases: (a) developing a draft survey, (b) assessing the content validity of the draft survey, and (c) assessing the underlying factor structure, reliability, and validity of the survey. A cross-sectional design was employed. In Phase 1, a team of experts in survey development produced a draft survey. In Phase 2, the content validity of the draft survey was evaluated by a panel of individuals with expertise in physical activity coalitions. In Phase 3, the survey was administered to 120 individuals on local-, state-, and national-level physical activity coalitions. Responses were subjected to an exploratory factor analysis in order to determine the survey's underlying factor structure, reliability, and validity. Phases 1 and 2yielded a survey instrument with demonstrated content validity. Phase 3 yielded a three-factor model with three subscales: Strategic Alignment, Organizational Alignment, and Providing Input. Each subscale demonstrated high internal consistency reliability and construct validity. The survey instrument developed here demonstrated sound psychometric properties and provides new insight into organizational member involvement in physical activity coalitions. This instrument may be an important tool in developing a more complete picture of coalition functioning in physical activity coalitions specifically and health-based coalitions overall. © 2014 Society for Public Health Education.

  16. ASPECT: A Survey to Assess Student Perspective of Engagement in an Active-Learning Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, Benjamin L; Eddy, Sarah L; Wener-Fligner, Leah; Freisem, Karen; Grunspan, Daniel Z; Theobald, Elli J; Timbrook, Jerry; Crowe, Alison J

    2017-01-01

    The primary measure used to determine relative effectiveness of in-class activities has been student performance on pre/posttests. However, in today's active-learning classrooms, learning is a social activity, requiring students to interact and learn from their peers. To develop effective active-learning exercises that engage students, it is important to gain a more holistic view of the student experience in an active-learning classroom. We have taken a mixed-methods approach to iteratively develop and validate a 16-item survey to measure multiple facets of the student experience during active-learning exercises. The instrument, which we call Assessing Student Perspective of Engagement in Class Tool (ASPECT), was administered to a large introductory biology class, and student responses were subjected to exploratory factor analysis. The 16 items loaded onto three factors that cumulatively explained 52% of the variation in student response: 1) value of activity, 2) personal effort, and 3) instructor contribution. ASPECT provides a rapid, easily administered means to measure student perception of engagement in an active-learning classroom. Gaining a better understanding of students' level of engagement will help inform instructor best practices and provide an additional measure for comprehensively assessing the impact of different active-learning strategies. © 2017 B. L. Wiggins, S. L. Eddy, et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2017 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  17. Established and outsider relations among students involved in a health promotion intervention in a Danish high school

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Stine Frydendal; Ottesen, Laila; Thing, Lone Friis

    2016-01-01

    The paper considers a study in a Danish high school in which students were involved in enhancing physical activity in their own school. International research points out that adolescents are not as physically active as recommended. Moreover, studies show that maintaining health promotion interven......The paper considers a study in a Danish high school in which students were involved in enhancing physical activity in their own school. International research points out that adolescents are not as physically active as recommended. Moreover, studies show that maintaining health promotion...... and the importance of theoretical pointers to insure that the researcher does not lose herself in the research field. Elias unfolds this methodological approach in “The Established and the Outsiders.” By applying this conceptualization, this study shows that some of the involved students found their role...... and their identity as “sports-students” difficult, and it compromised their social life in the school, which relates to aspects that does not always correspond with the current health norms. The paper discusses the relations between the involved students and the other students in the school, and what consequences...

  18. The Effects of Student Involvement and College Environment on Students' Learning and Living Experience at World-Class Research Universities in China: A Comparative Case Study of the University of Hong Kong (HKU) and Shanghai Jiao Tong University (SJTU)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Roy Yew-Hung

    2011-01-01

    This comparative research examined the effects of student involvement and college environment on students' learning and living experience delivered by two aspiring world-class universities in Hong Kong and Shanghai. Few studies have shown how the levels of student involvement and college environment can benefit students at world-class institution.…

  19. Substance use among medical students in Barcelona (Spain). A comparison with previous surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, M E; Cami, J

    1986-11-01

    During the academic year 1983-1984, a survey on drug consumption was conducted among medical students in Barcelona. There was a high proportion of smokers in both sexes. Alcohol consumption was four times higher among men than women; high proof beverages were becoming the most common drinks. Coffee was the caffeine drink consumed by almost the whole population studied. Although cannabis derivatives had been tried at least once by almost all the students, regular consumers were almost non-existent. Amphetamine consumption was restricted to examination periods. The use of opiates, cocaine, hallucinogens, and solvents was rare for the sample. Results from this study are compared with those from similar surveys conducted 5 and 10 years ago.

  20. Development of the Quantitative Reasoning Items on the National Survey of Student Engagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber D. Dumford

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As society’s needs for quantitative skills become more prevalent, college graduates require quantitative skills regardless of their career choices. Therefore, it is important that institutions assess students’ engagement in quantitative activities during college. This study chronicles the process taken by the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE to develop items that measure students’ participation in quantitative reasoning (QR activities. On the whole, findings across the quantitative and qualitative analyses suggest good overall properties for the developed QR items. The items show great promise to explore and evaluate the frequency with which college students participate in QR-related activities. Each year, hundreds of institutions across the United States and Canada participate in NSSE, and, with the addition of these new items on the core survey, every participating institution will have information on this topic. Our hope is that these items will spur conversations on campuses about students’ use of quantitative reasoning activities.

  1. The Survey Two Decades of Prevalence Studies among Iran University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Sarrami

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: the main purpose of this research was to collect and survey the prevalence studies of drug misuse and psychotropic drugs that have been done sporadically among university students from 1374 to 1392. Up to now, no survey of data has been done on these researches. Method: library has been the method of this research and 37 researches were analyzed. Findings: methodologically, the results show that many prevalence studies are with major faults. Conclusion: the studies show that less attention has been given to prevalence studies of drug addiction and useful interventions in university students. However, the rate of addiction during 2 decades has been stable cigar, hookah take the first and second places and alcohol, opium, hashish and heroine come respectively.

  2. Does Parental Involvement Matter for Student Achievement and Mental Health in High School?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming-Te; Sheikh-Khalil, Salam

    2014-01-01

    Parental involvement in education remains important for facilitating positive youth development. This study conceptualized parental involvement as a multidimensional construct--including school-based involvement, home-based involvement, and academic socialization--and examined the effects of different types of parental involvement in 10th grade on…

  3. Academic Libraries, Facebook and MySpace, and Student Outreach: A Survey of Student Opinion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, Ruth Sara

    2009-01-01

    This study surveyed 366 Valparaiso University freshmen to discover their feelings about librarians using Facebook and MySpace as outreach tools. The vast majority of respondents had online social network profiles. Most indicated that they would be accepting of library contact through those Web sites, but a sizable minority reacted negatively to…

  4. Comparison of Smoking, Drinking, and Marijuana Use between Students Present or Absent on the Day of a School-Based Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovet, Pascal; Viswanathan, Bharathi; Faeh, David; Warren, Wick

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this population-based survey was to compare the prevalence of selected risk behaviors between students present or absent on the day of a school-based survey. The study population was a representative sample of all students of secondary schools in the Seychelles (Indian Ocean). Students absent on the day of the survey were traced and…

  5. Mental health status among Japanese medical students: a cross-sectional survey of 20 universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsu, Tadahiro; Kaneita, Yoshitaka; Osaki, Yoneatsu; Kokaze, Akatsuki; Ochiai, Hirotaka; Shirasawa, Takako; Nanri, Hinako; Ohida, Takashi

    2014-12-01

    The purposes of this study were to evaluate the mental health status of Japanese medical students and to examine differences based on gender, as well as on university type and location, using the results of a nationwide survey. Between December 2006 and March 2007, we conducted a questionnaire survey among fourth-year medical students at 20 randomly selected medical schools in Japan. The data from 1,619 students (response rate: 90.6%; male: 1,074; female: 545) were analyzed. We used the Japanese version of the 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) to measure mental health status. Poor mental health status (GHQ-12 score of 4 points or higher) was observed in 36.6% and 48.8% of the male and female medical students, respectively. The ratio of the age-adjusted prevalence of poor mental health status in female versus male medical students was 1.33 (95% confidence interval: 1.10-1.62). The universities were categorized into two groups based on the university type (national/public: 15 vs. private: 5) or location (in a large city: 7 vs. in a local city: 13 cities). The prevalence of poor mental health status in both men and women differed between these groups, although not significantly. The GHQ-12 scores in men significantly differed between the categorized groups of universities. These results suggest that adequate attention must be paid to the mental health of medical students, especially females, and that a system for providing mental health care for medical students must be established in the context of actual conditions at each university.

  6. A systematic review of the evidence on service user involvement in interpersonal skills training of mental health students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, J; Watkins, M; Gilbert, A; Rawlinson, J

    2013-08-01

    Service user involvement has become a common feature of education programmes for mental health students. However, little is known about the effects of this type of education on the interpersonal skills of students taking part. This paper reports findings from a systematic review that formed part of a wider investigation into service user involvement in teaching interpersonal skills. The review aimed to locate and assess the quality of the published evidence relating to the effects of service user involvement on mental health students interpersonal skills and to synthesize results, using a definition of interpersonal skill that includes attitudes, empathy and skills as its key components. Results from this study indicate that the quality of evidence in this area is poor. However, sufficient synthesis of the evidence base was possible to allow conclusions and recommendations for both research and practice. Conclusions were that the involvement of service users in this area is both acceptable and valuable for students and had specific impacts on attitudes, empathy and skills. Some difficulties and reservations about the style of involvement are discussed. Recommendations for the conduct of future research are also made.

  7. Attitudes towards fibromyalgia: A survey of Canadian chiropractic, naturopathic, physical therapy and occupational therapy students

    OpenAIRE

    Badwall Parminder; Kulkarni Abhaya V; Busse Jason W; Guyatt Gordon H

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background The frequent use of chiropractic, naturopathic, and physical and occupational therapy by patients with fibromyalgia has been emphasized repeatedly, but little is known about the attitudes of these therapists towards this challenging condition. Methods We administered a cross-sectional survey to 385 senior Canadian chiropractic, naturopathic, physical and occupational therapy students in their final year of studies, that inquired about attitudes towards the diagnosis and ma...

  8. Demography as Destiny: The Role of Parental Involvement and Mathematics Course Taking Patterns among 9th Grade Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degner, Kate M.

    2013-01-01

    This study uses data from the National Center of Education Statistics (NCES) High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HLS:09). Parent responses to the Parent Involvement survey, given as part of the NCES study were considered, along with their child's socio-economic status (SES) and self-reported level of mathematics course enrollment during…

  9. A national radiation oncology medical student clerkship survey: Didactic curricular components increase confidence in clinical competency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagadeesan, Vikrant S.; Raleigh, David R.; Koshy, Matthew; Howard, Andrew R.; Chmura, Steven J.; Golden, Daniel W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives Students applying to radiation oncology residency programs complete one or more radiation oncology clerkships. This study assesses student experiences and perspectives during radiation oncology clerkships. The impact of didactic components and number of clerkship experiences in relation to confidence in clinical competency and preparation to function as a first year radiation oncology resident are evaluated. Methods and Materials An anonymous, internet-based survey was sent via direct e-mail to all applicants to a single radiation oncology residency program during the 2012–2013 academic year. The survey was composed of three main sections including questions regarding baseline demographic information and prior radiation oncology experience, rotation experiences, and ideal clerkship curriculum content. Results The survey response rate was 37% (70/188). Respondents reported 191 unique clerkship experiences. 27% of respondents (19/70) completed at least one clerkship with a didactic component geared towards their level of training. Completing a clerkship with a didactic component was significantly associated with a respondent’s confidence to function as a first- year radiation oncology resident (Wilcoxon rank-sum p = 0.03). However, the total number of clerkships completed did not correlate with confidence to pursue radiation oncology as a specialty (Spearman’s rho p = 0.48) or confidence to function as a first year resident (Spearman’s rho p = 0.43). Conclusions Based on responses to this survey, rotating students perceive that the majority of radiation oncology clerkships do not have formal didactic curricula. Survey respondents who completed a clerkship with a didactic curriculum reported feeling more prepared to function as a radiation oncology resident. However, completing an increasing number of clerkships does not appear to improve confidence in the decision to pursue radiation oncology as a career or to function as a radiation

  10. A National Radiation Oncology Medical Student Clerkship Survey: Didactic Curricular Components Increase Confidence in Clinical Competency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagadeesan, Vikrant S. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Raleigh, David R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, University of California–San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Koshy, Matthew; Howard, Andrew R.; Chmura, Steven J. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Golden, Daniel W., E-mail: dgolden@radonc.uchicago.edu [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Students applying to radiation oncology residency programs complete 1 or more radiation oncology clerkships. This study assesses student experiences and perspectives during radiation oncology clerkships. The impact of didactic components and number of clerkship experiences in relation to confidence in clinical competency and preparation to function as a first-year radiation oncology resident are evaluated. Methods and Materials: An anonymous, Internet-based survey was sent via direct e-mail to all applicants to a single radiation oncology residency program during the 2012-2013 academic year. The survey was composed of 3 main sections including questions regarding baseline demographic information and prior radiation oncology experience, rotation experiences, and ideal clerkship curriculum content. Results: The survey response rate was 37% (70 of 188). Respondents reported 191 unique clerkship experiences. Of the respondents, 27% (19 of 70) completed at least 1 clerkship with a didactic component geared towards their level of training. Completing a clerkship with a didactic component was significantly associated with a respondent's confidence to function as a first-year radiation oncology resident (Wilcoxon rank–sum P=.03). However, the total number of clerkships completed did not correlate with confidence to pursue radiation oncology as a specialty (Spearman ρ P=.48) or confidence to function as a first year resident (Spearman ρ P=.43). Conclusions: Based on responses to this survey, rotating students perceive that the majority of radiation oncology clerkships do not have formal didactic curricula. Survey respondents who completed a clerkship with a didactic curriculum reported feeling more prepared to function as a radiation oncology resident. However, completing an increasing number of clerkships does not appear to improve confidence in the decision to pursue radiation oncology as a career or to function as a radiation oncology resident. These

  11. The relation between perceived parental involvement and academic achievement: the roles of Taiwanese students' academic beliefs and filial piety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Wen; Ho, Hsiu-Zu

    2012-01-01

    The excellent academic performance among East-Asian students has drawn international attention from educators and psychologists. However, the process that underlies student academic achievement for this particular group has rarely been documented. The present study examines how the relation between perceived parental involvement and Taiwanese students' academic achievement is mediated by student academic beliefs (i.e., beliefs about effort, academic self-concept, and perceived control). The study further explores whether this mediating effect varies with types of filial piety. Participants were 468 first-year students from colleges and universities in Taiwan. Multiple-group mediating models were analyzed using structural equation modeling (SEM). Results indicated that, for the Taiwanese sample, students' academic beliefs mediated the relation between perceived parental involvement and academic achievement. Furthermore, the mediational effect was significant for the reciprocal filial type, but not for the authoritarian filial type. The importance of the quality of the parent-child relationship and the internalization process related to children's assumptions of their parents' educational values indicate the need for a contextual view when examining predictors of student academic achievement.

  12. Themed Residential Learning Communities: The Importance of Purposeful Faculty and Staff Involvement and Student Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, William; Eighmy, Myron

    2012-01-01

    This study examined three themed residential learning communities and their impact on students' satisfaction with their overall university experience, residence hall living experience, residence hall learning experience, their interactions with residence hall student staff, and the students' academic experience. The researchers were specifically…

  13. Themed Residential Learning Communities: The Importance of Purposeful Faculty and Staff Involvement and Student Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, William; Eighmy, Myron

    2012-01-01

    This study examined three themed residential learning communities and their impact on students' satisfaction with their overall university experience, residence hall living experience, residence hall learning experience, their interactions with residence hall student staff, and the students' academic experience. The researchers were specifically…

  14. Effect of Learning Communities on Student Attitudes and Corresponding Behaviors: "A Mediated Test of Involvement Theory"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonilla, Daniel; Buch, Kimberly K.; Johnson, Cindy Wolf

    2013-01-01

    Learning communities are small pre-selected student groups based on a common interest with a variety of goals related to student outcomes. Previous research has shown robust effects of learning community participation on student success outcomes, but little is known about the mechanisms which may mediate these effects. The current study analyzed…

  15. Mental disorders among college students in the WHO World Mental Health Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auerbach, Randy P.; Alonso, Jordi; Axinn, William G.; Cuijpers, Pim; Ebert, David D.; Green, Jennifer Greif; Hwang, Irving; Kessler, Ronald C.; Liu, Howard; Mortier, Philippe; Nock, Matthew K.; Pinder-Amaker, Stephanie; Sampson, Nancy A.; Aguilar-Gaxiola, Sergio; Al-Hamzawi, Ali; Andrade, Laura H.; Benjet, Corina; Caldas-de-Almeida, José Miguel; Demyttenaere, Koen; Florescu, Silvia; de Girolamo, Giovanni; Gureje, Oye; Haro, Josep Maria; Karam, Elie G.; Kiejna, Andrzej; Kovess-Masfety, Viviane; Lee, Sing; McGrath, John J.; O’Neill, Siobhan; Pennell, Beth-Ellen; Scott, Kate; ten Have, Margreet; Torres, Yolanda; Zaslavsky, Alan M.; Zarkov, Zahari; Bruffaerts, Ronny

    2016-01-01

    Background Although mental disorders are significant predictors of educational attainment throughout the entire educational career, most research on mental disorders among students has focused on the primary and secondary school years. Methods The World Health Organization World Mental Health Surveys were used to examine the associations of mental disorders with college entry and attrition by comparing college students (n = 1,572) and nonstudents in the same age range (18–22; n = 4,178), including nonstudents who recently left college without graduating (n = 702) based on surveys in 21 countries (4 low/lower-middle income, 5 upper middle-income, 1 lower-middle or upper-middle at the times of two different surveys, and 11 high income). Lifetime and 12-month prevalence and age-of-onset of DSM-IV anxiety, mood, behavioural and substance disorders were assessed with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Results One-fifth (20.3%) of college students had 12-month DSM-IV/CIDI disorders. 83.1% of these cases had pre-matriculation onsets. Disorders with pre-matriculation onsets were more important than those with post-matriculation onsets in predicting subsequent college attrition, with substance disorders and, among women, major depression the most important such disorders. Only 16.4% of students with 12-month disorders received any 12-month healthcare treatment for their mental disorders. Conclusions Mental disorders are common among college students, have onsets that mostly occur prior to college entry, in the case of pre-matriculation disorders are associated with college attrition, and are typically untreated. Detection and effective treatment of these disorders early in the college career might reduce attrition and improve educational and psychosocial functioning. PMID:27484622

  16. A survey on perception of homoeopathic undergraduate students towards learning environment in an Indian scenario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhranil Saha

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims – This research was an attempt to understand the views of students of homoeopathic undergraduate schools in West Bengal, India and to identify areas of strength and weakness in the learning environment. Methodology – An institutional, cross-sectional, observational study was carried out involving 430 students in May, 2013 in two Government homoeopathic medical colleges in West Bengal, India. A seven-item close-ended questionnaire with four point Likert scale was used to determine students’ perceptions of the learning environment, intellectual climate and teacher-student relationship in homoeopathic schools. The questionnaire generated seven subscales – flexibility, student to student interaction, emotional climate, supportiveness, meaningful experience, organization, and breadth of interest. Results – 46.5% of students belonged to rural areas and Bengali was the mother tongue of 93.7% students. 39.5% preferred Bengali as the medium of instruction and group study was preferable to 77.9% students. 47.7% students were dissatisfied with the teaching process and 79.8% preferred the use of multimedia over conventional classroom teaching. Flexibility remained low (mean=1.9, SD=0.9; meaningful experience (theoretical teaching score was high (mean=2.6, SD=0.9. Scores did not vary significantly (P>0.05 across the pre-clinical and clinical students, but few subscales produced significant differences individually among students of different years. Internal consistency scores of the scale remained questionable (Cronbach’s α 0.310-0.446; however, the scale showed acceptable test-retest reliability (Cohen’s κ 0.680-0.838. Conclusions – This study emphasized the areas requiring improvement in homoeopathic school environment based on students’ perspective. Changes in curriculum, faculty and infrastructure should be planned to improve students’ satisfaction.

  17. How neuroscience is taught to North American dental students: results of the Basic Science Survey Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Douglas J; Clarkson, Mackenzie J; Hutchins, Bob; Lambert, H Wayne

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine how North American dental students are taught neuroscience during their preclinical dental education. This survey represents one part of a larger research project, the Basic Science Survey Series for Dentistry, which covers all of the biomedical science coursework required of preclinical students in North American dental schools. Members of the Section on Anatomical Sciences of the American Dental Education Association assembled, distributed, and analyzed the neuroscience survey, which had a 98.5 percent response from course directors of the sixty-seven North American dental schools. The eighteen-item instrument collected demographic data on the course directors, information on the content in each course, and information on how neuroscience content is presented. Findings indicate that 1) most neuroscience instruction is conducted by non-dental school faculty members; 2) large content variability exists between programs; and 3) an increase in didactic instruction, integrated curricula, and use of computer-aided instruction is occurring. It is anticipated that the information derived from the survey will help guide neuroscience curricula in dental schools and aid in identifying appropriate content.

  18. The Contributions of Student Organization Involvement to Students' Self-Assessments of Their Leadership Traits and Relational Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lois J.; Chenoweth, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Many business schools designate leadership as a learning outcome for their undergraduates, but the question of how to teach leadership is challenging. Results of this study showed that students who were engaged in extracurricular student organizations rated themselves higher on both leadership traits and behaviors than those who were not involved…

  19. Survey of ethical issues reported by Indian medical students: basis for design of a new curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Anuradha; George, Kuryan; T, Arul Dhas; Pulimood, Anna Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Education in ethics is now a formal part of the undergraduate medical curriculum. However, most courses are structured around principles and case studies more appropriate to western countries. The cultures and practices of countries like India differ from those of western countries. It is, therefore, essential that our teaching should address the issues which are the most relevant to our setting. An anonymised, questionnaire-based, cross-sectional survey of medical students was carried out to get a picture of the ethical problems faced by students in India. The data were categorised into issues related to professional behaviour and ethical dilemmas. Unprofessional behaviour was among the issues reported as a matter of concern by a majority of the medical students. The survey highlights the need to design the curriculum in a way that reflects the structure of medical education in India, where patients are not always considered socio-culturally equal by students or the medical staff. This perspective must underpin any further efforts to address education in ethics in India.

  20. Why medical students choose psychiatry - a 20 country cross-sectional survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Recruitment to psychiatry is insufficient to meet projected mental health service needs world-wide. We report on the career plans of final year medical students from 20 countries, investigating factors identified from the literature which influence psychiatric career choice. Methods Cross sectional electronic or paper survey. Subjects were final year medical students at 46 medical schools in participating countries. We assessed students’ career intentions, motivations, medical school teaching and exposure to psychiatry. We assessed students’ attitudes and personality factors. The main outcome measure was likelihood of specializing in psychiatry. Multilevel logistic regression was used to examine the joint effect of factors upon the main outcome. Results 2198 of 9135 (24%) of students responded (range 4 to 91%) across the countries. Internationally 4.5% of students definitely considered psychiatry as a career (range 1 to 12%). 19% of students (range 0 to 33%) were “quite likely”, and 25% were “definitely not” considering psychiatry. Female gender, experience of mental/physical illness, media portrayal of doctors, and positive attitudes to psychiatry, but not personality factors, were associated with choosing psychiatry. Quality of psychiatric placement (correlation coefficient = 0.22, p choice of psychiatry. Multilevel logistic regression revealed six factors associated with students choosing psychiatry: importance of own vocation, odds ratio (OR) 3.01, 95% CI 1.61 to 5.91, p career choice. Addressing these factors may improve recruitment to psychiatry internationally. PMID:24422951

  1. Educational technology for millennial dental hygiene students: a survey of U.S. dental hygiene programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beebe, Catherine R R; Gurenlian, JoAnn R; Rogo, Ellen J

    2014-06-01

    A growing body of literature suggests that today's learners have changed and education must change as well since Millennial generation students expect technology to be used in their coursework. This study sought to determine what educational technology is being used in U.S. dental hygiene programs, what student and faculty perceptions are of the effectiveness of technology, and what barriers exist to implementing educational technology. A stratified random sample of 120 entry-level dental hygiene programs nationwide were invited to participate in a survey. Fourteen programs participated, yielding a pool of 415 potential individual participants; out of those, eighty-four student and thirty-eight faculty respondents were included in the analysis, a total of 122. Results were analyzed using descriptive statistics and a Mann-Whitney U test (p<0.05). Faculty and student respondents agreed on the effectiveness of educational technology in all areas except clickers and wikis. The faculty members tended to rate the effectiveness of educational technology higher than did the students. The greatest perceived barrier to implementing technology was technical difficulties. This study suggests that support services should be available to faculty and students to ensure successful implementation of technology. Dental hygiene educators have adopted many types of educational technology, but more data are needed to determine best practices.

  2. Information Needs and Information Seeking Behavior of Foreign Students in University of Delhi: A Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K P Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to investigate the information needs and information seeking behavior of foreign students. A survey method was used for the undertaken study. The data were collected using a structured questionnaire, self-administered to 120 foreign students (60 males & 60 females with 88 (47 males & 41 females returns. The research is limited to post-graduate, M.Phil. and Ph.D. foreign students in University of Delhi. It was found that post-graduate students need information regarding their program of study while research scholars need information for writing research articles and for doing their research work. Most of them seek information through the internet. Research scholars used electronic resources such as databases, e-journals and e-theses and dissertations. 88.6% of the respondents also use books for seeking information. Their use of the library is limited with complaints about library staff and too few computer terminals. The present study will be helpful in designing new systems and services for the foreign students so that their information needs can be fulfilled easily. Further, findings of the study indicate that how the library professionals should assist foreign students to accomplish their information needs.

  3. The importance of teaching communication in dental education. A survey amongst dentists, students and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woelber, J P; Deimling, D; Langenbach, D; Ratka-Krüger, P

    2012-02-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the subjective importance of teaching communication in the dental curriculum by conducting a survey amongst dentists, students and patients. Three questionnaires about communication-related issues were developed in which different questions could be rated on a five-point Likert scale. These questions included the subjective importance of the dental team's friendliness, an elaborated consultation, modern office equipment or the dentist's technical skills. Seven hundred and twenty-nine questionnaires were completed [233 by dentists (32%), 310 by students (43%) and 185 by patients (25%)]. Eighty-seven percentage of the dentists, 84% of the students and 84% of the patients supported an integration of communicational issues in dental education; 94.7% of the dentists and 77.2% of the patients attached vital importance to the dentist-patient relationship regarding the therapeutic outcomes. Dentists with prior communicational training experience would spend significantly (Pimportance of integrating aspects of communication in dental education.

  4. The factorial validity of the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Student Survey in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qiao; Schaufeli, Wilmar B

    2009-10-01

    The dimensional structure of the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Student Survey (MBI-SS) was investigated using data collected from three samples of Chinese students in two high schools, a university, and a nursing school, respectively (total N = 1,499; 36% males, 64% females; M age 19.0 yr., SD = 1.3). Single group Confirmatory Factor Analyses corroborated the hypothesized three-factor model for the composite sample as well as for the three independent samples. Subsequent multigroup analyses revealed that the three-dimensional structure of the MBI-SS is partially invariant across three samples. It is concluded that the MBI-SS can be used to assess burnout in Chinese students.

  5. Student experiences of participating in five collaborative blended learning courses in Africa and Asia: a survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Salla; Yan, Weirong; Meragia, Elnta; Mahomed, Hassan; Rosales-Klintz, Senia; Skinner, Donald; Zwarenstein, Merrick

    2016-01-01

    Background As blended learning (BL; a combination of face-to-face and e-learning methods) becomes more commonplace, it is important to assess whether students find it useful for their studies. ARCADE HSSR and ARCADE RSDH (African Regional Capacity Development for Health Systems and Services Research; Asian Regional Capacity Development for Research on Social Determinants of Health) were unique capacity-building projects, focusing on developing BL in Africa and Asia on issues related to global health. Objective We aimed to evaluate the student experience of participating in any of five ARCADE BL courses implemented collaboratively at institutions from Africa, Asia, and Europe. Design A post-course student survey with 118 students was conducted. The data were collected using email or through an e-learning platform. Data were analysed with SAS, using bivariate and multiple logistic regression. We focused on the associations between various demographic and experience variables and student-reported overall perceptions of the courses. Results In total, 82 students responded to the survey. In bivariate logistic regression, the course a student took [p=0.0067, odds ratio (OR)=0.192; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.058–0.633], male gender of student (p=0.0474, OR=0.255; 95% CI: 0.066–0.985), not experiencing technical problems (pstudent needs (p=0.0036, OR=0.165; 95% CI: 0.049–0.555) were found to be associated with a more positive perception of BL, as measured by student rating of the overall helpfulness of the e-learning component to their studies. In contrast, perceiving the assessment as adequate was associated with a worse perception of overall usefulness. In a multiple regression, the course, experiencing no technical problems, and perceiving the discussion as adequate remained significantly associated with a more positively rated perception of the usefulness of the online component of the blended courses. Discussion The results suggest that lack of technical

  6. Survey of US Veterinary Students on Communicating with Limited English Proficient Spanish-Speaking Pet Owners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, Ruth E; Beck, Alan; Glickman, Larry T; Litster, Annette; Widmar, Nicole J Olynk; Moore, George E

    2015-01-01

    Veterinary schools and colleges generally include communication skills training in their professional curriculum, but few programs address challenges resulting from language gaps between pet owners and practitioners. Due to shifting US demographics, small animal veterinary practices must accommodate an increasing number of limited English proficient (LEP) Spanish-speaking pet owners (SSPOs). A national survey was conducted to assess the interest and preparedness of US veterinary students to communicate with LEP SSPOs when they graduate. This online survey, with more than 2,000 first-, second-, and third-year US veterinary students, revealed that over 50% of students had worked at a practice or shelter that had LEP Spanish-speaking clients. Yet fewer than 20% of these students described themselves as prepared to give medical information to an LEP SSPO. Over three-fourths of respondents agreed that communication with LEP SSPOs was important for veterinarians in general, and two-thirds agreed that communication with LEP SSPOs was important for themselves personally. Ninety percent of students who described themselves as conversant in Spanish agreed that they would be able to communicate socially with SSPOs, while only 55% said they would be able to communicate medically with such clients. Overall, two-thirds of students expressed interest in taking Spanish for Veterinary Professionals elective course while in school, with the strongest interest expressed by those with advanced proficiency in spoken Spanish. Bridging language gaps has the potential to improve communication with LEP SSPOs in the veterinary clinical setting and to improve patient care, client satisfaction, and the economic health of the veterinary profession.

  7. Robust resilience and substantial interest: a survey of pharmacological cognitive enhancement among university students in the UK and Ireland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilina Singh

    Full Text Available Use of 'smart drugs' among UK students is described in frequent media reports as a rapidly increasing phenomenon. This article reports findings from the first large-scale survey of pharmacological cognitive enhancement (PCE among students in the UK and Ireland. Conducted from February to September 2012, a survey of a convenience sample of 877 students measured PCE prevalence, attitudes, sources, purposes and ethics. Descriptive and logistic regression statistical methods were used to analyse the data. Lifetime prevalence of PCE using modafinil, methylphenidate or Adderall was under 10%, while past regular and current PCE users of these substances made up between 0.3%-4% of the survey population. A substantial majority of students was unaware of and/or uninterested in PCE; however about one third of students were interested in PCE. PCE users were more likely to be male, British and older students; predictors of PCE use included awareness of other students using PCEs, ADHD symptomatology, ethical concerns, and alcohol and cannabis use. The survey addresses the need for better evidence about PCE prevalence and practices among university students in the UK. We recommend PCE-related strategies for universities based on the survey findings.

  8. Building a Graduate Professional Culture: A Case for Student Involvement in Developing and Sustaining an Adult Education Graduate Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crew, Edith; Lewis, John L.

    A proposed approach to the generation of a graduate professional culture is grounded in the planned, systematic involvement of students in developing and sustaining a graduate adult education program. The approach has a conceptual basis in the works of Jahns and Urbano (1986), who presented a framework of developmental stages toward completion of…

  9. Who Can Help Working Students? The Impact of Graduate School Involvement and Social Support on School-Work Facilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyland, Rebecca L.; Winkel, Doan E.; Lester, Scott W.; Hanson-Rasmussen, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    A significant number of employees attend graduate school, and the impact of the student role may be substantial and valuable to the work-life literature. In this study the authors examine whether psychological involvement in graduate school increases school-work facilitation. Further, they suggest that employers and graduate schools can provide…

  10. The Relationship between School Belonging, Sibling Aggression and Bullying Involvement: Implications for Students with and without Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Chad A.; Simpson, Cynthia G.; Ellis, Stephanie K.

    2016-01-01

    Bullying is grounded in the interactions between an individual and complex social-ecological systems. Therefore, bullying involvement is not just confined to the classroom or school. Recent research suggests that sibling aggression may be a predictor for peer-level aggression. These findings may be more relevant for students with disabilities…

  11. Crazy Ideas: Student Involvement in Negotiating and Implementing the Physical Education Curriculum in the Irish Senior Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howley, Donal; Tannehill, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine senior cycle students views on their involvement in a process of curriculum negotiation and implementation and how the methodologies they experienced affected their investment in and ownership of the physical education curriculum. The study was conducted in an urban co-educational comprehensive school. The…

  12. Kindergarten Teachers' Beliefs about Students' Knowledge of Print Literacy and Parental Involvement in Children's Print Literacy Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Jacqueline

    2010-01-01

    This research was an exploratory study in a large city in central Canada that examined kindergarten teachers' beliefs about students' knowledge of print literacy, as well as their beliefs about parental involvement with children in print literacy activities. The role of families' socioeconomic status was examined in relation to teachers' beliefs.…

  13. A Tangled Web of Terms: The Overlap and Unique Contribution of Involvement, Engagement, and Integration to Understanding College Student Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf-Wendel, Lisa; Ward, Kelly; Kinzie, Jillian

    2009-01-01

    Established theories and constructs long associated with student success, including involvement, engagement, and integration, provide common language and a body of knowledge to inform understanding of the challenges currently facing higher education. This paper examines how the theories and terms have evolved, explores how the terms are currently…

  14. The Status of Parental Notification Policy and Practice for Students Involved with Alcohol Abuse at a Private University in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaore, Augusta; Olaore, Israel

    2016-01-01

    Parental notification policies and practices have been found to reduce alcohol and drug use at universities in the United States of America. This study examined the status of parental notification policy and practice at a faith-based private university in Nigeria for students involved with alcohol use. The study revealed that the absence of a…

  15. Digital preservation of cultural and scientific heritage: involving university students to raise awareness of its importance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Redweik

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Cultural heritage is a relevant issue in contemporary society. While its preservation is a challenge, its dissemination, can contribute for an economic balance between costs and benefits.  Scientific  heritage  can  be  considered  as  a  special domain  of  cultural  heritage, not yet sought  by  the  mass  tourism, but worth being preserved as the roots of today’s knowledge.  Considering  that  university  students  of  engineering  and computer  science traditionally  do  not  address cultural or scientific heritage issues in their syllabus, and that they constitute a layer of young citizens that will come to be influential  in  the  future  of  society,  an  effort  was  undertaken  to  focus  on  this  theme  in  disciplines  of  different  courses, allying  the  learning  of  technical  skills  with  the  natural  interest  of  younger  people  for  3D  and  animation  for  the  profit  of heritage. The goal was to raise the awareness of this particular group to the importance of maintaining heritage issues, in particular,  in  a  virtual  way,  both  for  documentation  and  for  divulgating  their  existence.  Raising  funds  for  buildings’ restoration, attracting the public to visit buildings and collections that are outside the usual tourism routes, contributing to revenue  generation,  or  allowing  virtual  visits  of  not  accessible  issues,  complementing  physical  visits  on  site,  were  the general  aims of  the  proposed  projects.  A survey was undertaken under the participating students to evaluate how the projects influenced their attitude towards heritage. The obtained feedback was very positive: 76% agreed that the project alerted them for the importance of preserving historical and cultural heritage, while 72% considered it was interesting that the topic of digital cultural heritage was used for the assessments of

  16. Students with Special Needs: A Health Risk Behavior Comparison of Montana High School Students Based on Special Education Assistance. 2011 Montana Youth Risk Behavior Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montana Office of Public Instruction, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The Montana Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) is administered by the Montana Office of Public Instruction every two years to students in grades 7 through 12. The purpose of the survey is to help monitor the prevalence of behaviors that not only influence youth health, but also put youth at risk for the most significant health and social problems…

  17. Using Simulation to Improve First-Year Pharmacy Students' Ability to Identify Medication Errors Involving the Top 100 Prescription Medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atayee, Rabia S; Awdishu, Linda; Namba, Jennifer

    2016-06-25

    Objective. To evaluate first-year pharmacy students' ability to identify medication errors involving the top 100 prescription medications. Design. In the first quarter of a 3-quarter pharmacy self-care course, a didactic lecture on the most common prescribing and dispensing prescription errors was presented to first-year pharmacy students (P1) in preparation for a prescription review simulation done individually and as a group. In the following quarter, they were given a formal prescription review workshop before a second simulation involving individual and group review of a different set of prescriptions. Students were evaluated based on the number of correctly checked prescriptions and a self-assessment of their confidence in reviewing prescriptions. Assessment. All 63 P1 students completed the prescription review simulations. The individual scores did not significantly change, but group scores improved from 79 (16.2%) in the fall quarter to 98.6 (4.7%) in the winter quarter. Students perceived improvement of their prescription checking skills, specifically in their ability to fill a prescription on their own, identify prescribing and dispensing errors, and perform pharmaceutical calculations. Conclusion. A prescription review module consisting of a didactic lecture, workshop and simulation-based methods to teach prescription analysis was successful at improving first year pharmacy students' knowledge, confidence, and application of these skills.

  18. The student perspective on RN-Plus-10 legislation: a survey of associate degree and diploma nursing program students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maneval, Rhonda E; Teeter, Marilyn M

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on a survey of associate degree and diploma nursing students in Pennsylvania designed to elicit their future educational goals and opinions regarding proposed educational advancement legislation. Results indicated the majority of respondents (86.3 percent) planned to pursue the bachelor's degree in nursing; most (94.8 percent) hoped to be enrolled in a BSN program within four years of graduation. The majority (78.9 percent) indicated that even if they were mandated to complete the bachelor's degree in nursing within 10 years, they would still enroll in their current associate degree or diploma program. Asked if 10 years is a reasonable amount of time to complete the BSN, 79.4 percent agreed it is. If money were not an obstacle, 95.8 percent of participants indicated they would pursue a BSN or higher. The results of this survey suggest that the vast majority of associate degree and diploma nursing students value and hope to pursue higher education in nursing.

  19. Increasing Student Success in Large Survey Science Courses via Supplemental Instruction in Learning Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Eric Jon; Nossal, S.; Watson, L.; Timbie, P.

    2010-05-01

    Large introductory astronomy and physics survey courses can be very challenging and stressful. The University of Wisconsin-Madison Physics Learning Center (PLC) reaches about 10 percent of the students in four introductory physics courses, algebra and calculus based versions of both classical mechanics and electromagnetism. Participants include those potentially most vulnerable to experiencing isolation and hence to having difficulty finding study partners as well as students struggling with the course. They receive specially written tutorials, conceptual summaries, and practice problems; exam reviews; and most importantly, membership in small groups of 3 - 8 students which meet twice per week in a hybrid of traditional teaching and tutoring. Almost all students who regularly participate in the PLC earn at least a "C,” with many earning higher grades. The PLC works closely with other campus programs which seek to increase the participation and enhance the success of underrepresented minorities, first generation college students, and students from lower-income circumstances; and it is well received by students, departmental faculty, and University administration. The PLC staff includes physics education specialists and research scientists with a passion for education. However, the bulk of the teaching is conducted by undergraduates who are majoring in physics, astronomy, mathematics, engineering, and secondary science teaching (many have multiple majors). The staff train these enthusiastic students, denoted Peer Mentor Tutors (PMTs) in general pedagogy and mentoring strategies, as well as the specifics of teaching the physics covered in the course. The PMTs are among the best undergraduates at the university. While currently there is no UW-Madison learning center for astronomy courses, establishing one is a possible future direction. The introductory astronomy courses cater to non-science majors and consequently are less quantitative. However, the basic structure

  20. [Student's use of illicit drugs: a survey in a preventive health service].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morvan, Y; Rouvier, J; Olié, J-P; Lôo, H; Krebs, M-O

    2009-12-01

    The use of illicit drugs by students and the possible psychological repercussions in this population of young adults is an important public health issue. While some data in the literature suggest a relationship between cannabis and the occurrence of mental health disorders, and in particular psychotic illnesses, epidemiologic surveys have shown that cannabis is the most consumed illicit drug in France. To carry out a quantitative and qualitative epidemiological investigation of substance use within a student population seen during their mandatory preventive health visit at the University medical facility. Students were asked to take part in an investigation of their substance consumption and their individual experiences with cannabis in particular. Personality autoquestionnaires were performed and the psychotomimetic effects of cannabis were investigated with substance use within a student population seen during their mandatory preventive health visit at the University medical facility. A total of 3,807 students took part in the survey with a response rate of approximately 50%. Preliminary results relating to a subsample of this study are presented here (n = 880, mean age 20 years, 65% women). 44% of the students consumed cannabis at least once in their life. The prevalence of regular consumption in students (at least once a week) was of 18%, 11% had periods of daily or close to daily consumptions, and 13% used cannabis in the last month. For each of the drugs cocaine, ecstasy (MDMA), and mushrooms (psilocybin) the prevalence of experimentation (at least once) was 5% for cocaine, 4% for ecstasy and mushrooms, and for LSD the rate was 1,5%. Other evaluated substances had a prevalence of consumption lower than 1%. For the first cannabis consumptions, a majority of students state to felt "pleasant" effects: relaxation (71%) and euphoria (53%). 13% state to have felt effects of anxiety or sadness. 25% admit having had difficulties of expression, 24% memory deficits, 35