WorldWideScience

Sample records for survey instrument results

  1. Economic instruments for obesity prevention: results of a scoping review and modified delphi survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LaFrance Jeffrey

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comprehensive, multi-level approaches are required to address obesity. One important target for intervention is the economic domain. The purpose of this study was to synthesize existing evidence regarding the impact of economic policies targeting obesity and its causal behaviours (diet, physical activity, and to make specific recommendations for the Canadian context. Methods Arksey and O'Malley's (2005 methodological framework for conducting scoping reviews was adopted for this study and this consisted of two phases: 1 a structured literature search and review, and 2 consultation with experts in the research field through a Delphi survey and an in-person expert panel meeting in April 2010. Results Two key findings from the scoping review included 1 consistent evidence that weight outcomes are responsive to food and beverage prices. The debate on the use of food taxes and subsidies to address obesity should now shift to how best to address practical issues in designing such policies; and 2 very few studies have examined the impact of economic instruments to promote physical activity and clear policy recommendations cannot be made at this time. Delphi survey findings emphasised the relatively modest impact any specific economic instrument would have on obesity independently. Based on empirical evidence and expert opinion, three recommendations were supported. First, to create and implement an effective health filter to review new and current agricultural polices to reduce the possibility that such policies have a deleterious impact on population rates of obesity. Second, to implement a caloric sweetened beverage tax. Third, to examine how to implement fruit and vegetable subsidies targeted at children and low income households. Conclusions In terms of economic interventions, shifting from empirical evidence to policy recommendation remains challenging. Overall, the evidence is not sufficiently strong to provide clear policy

  2. Ergonomics and design of laparoscopic instruments: results of a survey among laparoscopic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Veelen, M A; Meijer, D W

    1999-12-01

    This study determined which types of laparoscopic instruments are most often used in Europe, why they are being used, and what problems exist while using the instruments. The handles were also evaluated according to ergonomic design criteria. A questionnaire was send to 62 experienced surgeons in 19 countries. The laparoscopic instruments were divided into four groups: instruments with similar functionality and handgrip model were grouped together. Eight questions were asked for every group about the type of instrument (disposable, reusable, or semireusable), the type of handle, the reason for using a specific instrument, and the experience of discomfort while using the instrument. The handles of the instruments of the group that were associated with the greatest discomfort were ergonomically evaluated on eight aspects (dimensions, angles, and control). Half of the questionnaires were returned. In every group, about 80% of the instruments the surgeons employed were reusable. The chief reason for using a specific type was the good cost-quality of the product and satisfying experiences with other products of the brand. The discomfort was pressure on thumb and fingers (scissors handle) and fixating the tip (ratchet). The handle of the instruments that causes the most discomfort met only three of the eight ergonomic requirements. Most of the laparoscopic instruments employed by surgeons in Europe are reusable. A significant number of the instruments cause discomfort. These instruments do not meet standard ergonomic requirements.

  3. The Calern Asteroid Polarimetric Survey using the Torino polarimeter: assessment of instrument performances and first scientific results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devogèle, M.; Cellino, A.; Bagnulo, S.; Rivet, J. P.; Bendjoya, P.; Abe, L.; Pernechele, C.; Massone, G.; Vernet, D.; Tanga, P.; Dimur, C.

    2017-03-01

    A new polarimeter based on the wedged double Wollaston concept has been built at the Torino Observatory and installed on a 1-m telescope at the Calern observing station of the Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur, France. Its main purpose is to carry out a polarimetric survey of minor Solar system objects, which is called the Calern Asteroid Polarimetric Survey. In this paper, we describe the new Torino polarimeter and the results of preliminary scientific validation tests. A number of standard stars with known polarization states, as well as a number of asteroids for which the polarimetric properties are known, have been observed in order to assess the instrument's accuracy. The instrumental polarization has been found to be stable within a few 10-4 units. A total of 124 new polarimetric observation of 78 asteroids are presented. In the case of asteroids already observed in the past, the new data are in agreement with available phase-polarization curves with error bars smaller than most previously published data. We also present data for 21 asteroids that have never been observed before in polarimetry.

  4. Results of a healthcare worker (HCW) survey on environmental awareness as an instrument for the preparation of an environmental report for the University Medicine Greifswald.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiden, Jens-Uwe; Kramer, Axel; Bornewasser, Manfred; Lemanski, Sandra; Below, Harald

    2011-01-01

    Environmental reporting is increasingly important for medical facilities. Currently, hospitals can determine the content of an environmental report as they see fit. To examine the utility and scope of an employee survey as an instrument for the preparation of an environmental report at the University Hospital Greifswald. For this purpose a questionnaire was developed with a focus on environmental behaviour and the significance attached to the protection of the environment. The employees of the University Medicine Greifswald attach an unexpectedly high significance to the protection of the environment. Based on this finding, this potential should be used to promote the optimal implementation of ecological-economic behaviour within the University Medicine. An employee survey is a useful instrument in the preparation of an environmental report.

  5. Development of the physician satisfaction survey instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soo Hoo, W E; Ramer, L

    1998-01-01

    Continuous quality improvement (CQI) activities depend on valid and reliable instruments to generate data. An evaluation of internal and external customer satisfaction is one of the pillars of the CQI process. This article describes the development of a valid and reliable instrument for measuring physicians' satisfaction with the orthopedic nursing units at a major medical trauma center. The physician satisfaction survey instrument was found to be internally consistent (alpha = .95). Confirmatory factor analysis revealed that 68% of the variance in physician satisfaction scores (eigenvalue = 8.14) was explained by using a single-factor model.

  6. Instrumentation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Journal Scope:Instrumentation is a high quality open access peer reviewed research journal.Authors are solicited to contribute to these journals by submitting articles that illustrate most up-to-date research results,projects,surveying works and industrial experiences that describe significant advances in the instrumental science.The mission of the Instrumentation is

  7. Retirement Applicant Satisfaction Survey Results

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — This dataset contains information about the Retirement Applicant Survey (RAS). The survey measured satisfaction results with the retirement application process. The...

  8. Membership Survey Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis M Bowie

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In an effort to gather feedback from Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS members, the Executive sent out a survey to the membership and received replies from approximately one-third of the membership. This was an attempt to look at the role of the CTS and what the members wanted from the CTS.

  9. Instrumentation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    Journal Scope:Instrumentation is a high quality open access peer reviewed research journal.Authors are solicited to contribute to these journals by submitting articles that illustrate most up-to-date research results,projects,surveying works and industrial experiences that describe significant advances in the instrumental science.The mission of the Instrumentation is to provide a platform for the researchers,academicians,

  10. The Undergraduate Instrumental Analysis Course: A Survey of Available Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggett, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    Reports results of a survey in which 110 universities were selected to respond to questions regarding approximate age and cost of the instruments used in three major areas: separations, spectroscopy, and electroanalysis. Respondents (N=41) also indicated which pieces of equipment were used in undergraduate courses or were used for research. (CS)

  11. Bulletin Survey - Early Results

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    There was a good response to our questionnaire on the Bulletin (around 450 so far). Many thanks to all of you - your views are invaluable to us. Pending publication of the full figures, which will give latecomers time to take part in the survey, here we give here answers some of your most frequent comments. Thank you for the many warm tributes and messages of encouragement we received. We also received criticisms about the way information is handled in the Bulletin and on its circulation. In today's issue we reply to these two points. Why is the Bulletin politically correct ? Many respondents reproach the Bulletin for a lack of objectivity and for being too politically correct to the point of being a propaganda organ. It is true that the Bulletin is not a newspaper, but rather a bulletin of communication (like SLAC's Beam Line). What is the difference ? A newspaper is objectively independent of the subjects it reports on, and when its reporters write stories they dig around for information from all parties...

  12. Star Formation & Stellar Evolution: Future Surveys & Instrumentation

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, C J

    2015-01-01

    The next generation of multi-object spectrographs (MOS) will deliver comprehensive surveys of the Galaxy, Magellanic Clouds and nearby dwarfs. These will provide us with the vast samples, spanning the full extent of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, that are needed to explore the chemistry, history and dynamics of their host systems. Further ahead, the Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs) will have sufficient sensitivity and angular resolution to extend stellar spectroscopy well beyond the Local Group, opening-up studies of the chemical evolution of galaxies across a broad range of galaxy types and environments. In this contribution I briefly reflect on current and future studies of stellar populations, and introduce plans for the MOSAIC instrument for the European ELT.

  13. Technical evaluation of available state of Nevada survey instruments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-02-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is reviewing the survey research studies completed by Mountain West Research (1987-1989) for the state of Nevada`s Nuclear Waste Project Office. In this research, 14 survey instruments were used to seek data on whether perceptions of risk could be associated with the possible siting of a high-level radioactive waste repository in Nevada and could be a dominant source of potential, significant, adverse economic impacts. This report presents results from phase 1 of the review, in which ANL contracted with the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) at the University of Chicago to evaluate the technical merits of the nine survey instruments that ANL had been able to acquire. The scope of NORC`s work was limited to rating the questions and stating their strengths and weaknesses. NORC concluded that the surveys could provide valuable data about risk perceptions and potential behavioral responses. NORC identified a few minor problems with a number of questions and the calculated response rates but claimed these problems would probably not have any major biasing effect. The NORC evaluation would have been more complete if the terms used in the questionnaires had been defined, all survey instruments had been acquired, and all data had been made available to the public.

  14. Instrumentation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Journal Scope:Instrumentation is a high quality open access peer reviewed research journal,Authors are solicited to contribute to these journals by submitting articles that illustrate most up-to-date research results,projects,surveying works and industrial

  15. Higher Education and Students with Orthopedic Disabilities: A Survey Instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Delar K.

    A survey instrument is presented that was used in a national survey of 160 colleges and universities to explore facilities and services to students with orthopedic disabilities. The survey contains 33 items that focus on the following areas: structural accessibility, academic accessibility, dorm-living, and recreational opportunities. The total…

  16. Urbis: Instrument ofr local environmental survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borst, H.C.

    2000-01-01

    TNO has developed a GIS based instrument, named Urbis, which makes it possible to assess the noise situation in a municipality or region as a whole, with a high level of detail. On the basis of activity or emission data (road-traffic intensities, acoustical reports, etc.), noise loads are calculated

  17. Survey of instrumentation for environmental monitoring: major update. Volume 3. Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-09-01

    This is the third volume of a four-volume (seven-part) series, the culmination of a comprehensive survey of instrumentation for environmental monitoring. Consideration is given to instruments and techniques presently in use and to those developed for other purposes but having possible applications to radiation monitoring. The results of the survey are given as descriptions of the physical and operating characteristics of available instruments, critical comparisons among instrumentation methods, and recommendations of promising methodology and development of new instrumentation. Information is also given regarding the pollutants to be monitored, their characteristics and forms, their sources and pathways, their effects on the ecosystem, and the means of controlling them through process and regulatory controls. The discussion is presented under sections entitled radiation sources; instrumentation: by type of radiation or instrument type; and, instrumentation for specific radionuclides. (JGB)

  18. Development of an RDECOM Workforce Motivational Survey Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    compensation and workplace environment structure to motivate the target generational workforce demographic to improve productivity. The deliverables from this...factors. We developed a closed-loop survey instrument and analysis methodology to identify distinct generational workforce motivational factors. Nine...United States Army Research Development and Engineering Command (RDECOM) supervisory engineers, General Schedule (GS) 14 and 15, reviewed the survey

  19. Inertial instrument system for aerial surveying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, R.H.; Chapman, W.H.; Hanna, W.F.; Mongan, C.E.; Hursh, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    An inertial guidance system for aerial surveying has been developed under contract to the U.S. Geological Survey. This prototype system, known as the aerial profiling of terrain (APT) system, is designed to determine continuously the positions of points along an aircraft flight path, or the underlying terrain profile, to an accuracy of + or - 0.5 ft (15 cm) vertically and + or - 2 ft (61 cm) horizontally. The system 's objective thus is to accomplish, from a fixed-wing aircraft, what would traditionally be accomplished from ground-based topographic surveys combined with aerial photography and photogrammetry. The two-part strategy for measuring the terrain profile entails: (1) use of an inertial navigator for continuous determination of the three-coordinate position of the aircraft, and (2) use of an eye-safe pulsed laser profiler for continuous measurement of the vertical distance from aircraft to land surface, so that the desired terrain profile can then be directly computed. The APT system, installed in a DeHavilland Twin Otter aircraft, is typically flown at a speed of 115 mph (105 knots) at an altitude of 2,000 ft (610 m) above the terrain. Performance-evaluation flights have shown that the vertical and horizontal accuracy specifications are met. (USGS)

  20. Survey Instrument Validity Part I: Principles of Survey Instrument Development and Validation in Athletic Training Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Laura J.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Instrument validation is an important facet of survey research methods and athletic trainers must be aware of the important underlying principles. Objective: To discuss the process of survey development and validation, specifically the process of construct validation. Background: Athletic training researchers frequently employ the use of…

  1. [Survey of analytical works for drugs at emergency and critical care centers with high-performance instruments provided by the Ministry of Health and Welfare (at present: Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare) in fiscal 1998--continuation of survey with 2008 survey results as point of reference].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Takeshi; Tominaga, Aya; Nozawa, Mayu; Unei, Hiroko; Hatano, Yayoi; Fujita, Yuji; Iseki, Ken; Hori, Yasushi

    2013-09-01

    In a 2008 survey of the 73 emergency and critical care centers around the nation that were equipped with the drug and chemical analytical instrument provided by the Ministry of Welfare (currently the Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare) in 1998, 36 of those facilities were using the analytical instruments. Of these 36 facilities, a follow-up survey of the 17 facilities that recorded 50 or analyses per year. Responses were gained from 16 of the facilities and we learned that of those, 14 facilities (87.5%) were conducting analyses using the instrument. There was a positive mutual correlation between the annual number of cases of the 14 facilities conducting analyses with the instrument and the number of work hours. Depending on the instrument in use, average analytical instrument parts and maintenance expenses were roughly three million yen and consumables required a maximum three million yen for analysis of 51-200 cases per year. From this, we calculate that such expenses can be covered under the allowed budget for advanced emergency and critical care centers of 5,000 NHI points (1 point = 10 yen). We found there were few facilities using the instrument for all 15 of the toxic substances recommended for testing by the Japanese Society for Clinical Toxicology. There tended to be no use of the analytical instrument for compounds with no toxicology cases. However, flexible responses were noted at each facility in relation to frequently analyzed compounds. It is thought that a reevaluation of compounds subject to analysis is required.

  2. [French residents' training in instrumental deliveries: A national survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunier, C; Raimond, E; Dupont, A; Pelissier, A; Bonneau, S; Gabriel, R; Graesslin, O

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate French residents in Obstetrics and Gynaecology's training in instrumental deliveries in 2015. We conducted a national descriptive survey among 758 residents between December 2014 and January 2015. Respondents were invited by email to specify their University Hospital, their current university term, the number of instrumental deliveries performed by vacuum extractor, forceps or spatulas, and whether they made systematic ultrasound exams before performing the extraction. Response rate was 34.7 % (n=263). There were important differences between regions in terms of type of instruments used. Vacuum extractor was the most commonly used instrument for instrumental deliveries by French residents (56.9 %), more than forceps (25.2 %) and spatulas (17.9 %). At the end of the residency, all the residents had been trained in instrumental deliveries with at least two instruments. The training of difficult techniques as well as their perfect control is required for instrumental deliveries. Yet, we are forced to note that there are substantial differences in the French residents' training in instrumental deliveries depending on their region. So, teaching at least two techniques seems essential as well as improving the training capacities and standardizing practices. A greater systematization of the teaching of the mechanics and obstetric techniques might be a solution to be considered too. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Initial Blackbeard power survey results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, T.; Devenport, J.; Holden, D.

    1996-06-01

    The Blackbeard broadband VHF radio receiver is in low-earth orbit aboard the ALEXIS satellite. The receiver has been used to measure the transmitted power in four VHF bands (55.2-75.8, 28.0-94.8, 132.3-152.2, and 107.7-166.0 MHz) over quiet and noisy parts of the earth. The authors present the results of the survey and discuss their implications. They find that there are remote ocean areas over which the observed spectrum is largely free of man-made interference, but that the spectrum over most of the earth is dominated by broadcast VHF signals. The signal characteristics observed over a given area are quite constant when observed at different times of day and at intervals of several weeks to months. It appears that in many cases the bulk of the signal power is coming from a small number of sources.

  4. Z-Spec: A broadband spectrometer for millimeter-wave astrophysics---Instrument development and results of a molecular line survey of nearby star-forming galaxy NGC 253

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earle, Lieko

    We have built Z-Spec, a broadband spectrometer for millimeter-wave astrophysics. The instrument's instantaneous bandwidth of 185-305 GHz covers the entire 1 millimeter atmospheric transmission window with a moderate resolving power ( R = n/Dn) of 250-350. The spectrometer employs a novel architecture called WaFIRS (Waveguide Far-Infrared Spectrometer) which confines the light propagation for a curved diffraction grating within a parallel-plate waveguide, resulting in a minimum mechanical envelope. An array of 160 silicon- nitride micromesh bolometers is cooled to 60 mK via an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) backed by a closed-cycle 3 He- 4 He sorption pump refrigerator. Z-Spec's compact design serves as a concept demonstration for a future far-infrared spectrometer aboard a cold telescope in space. Routine observations with Z-Spec from the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory on Mauna Kea have been conducted since April 2006, and the instrument currently achieves good sensitivities that are within a factor of two of the photon background limit set by the atmosphere and telescope. Z-Spec's primary science objectives are to determine the redshifts of faint submillimeter galaxies using the 12 CO rotational ladder, and to conduct systematic line surveys of local galaxies. The millimeter waveband hosts low- to mid- J rotational transitions for several molecular species which trace the dense interstellar gas associated with active star formation. Z-Spec's bandwidth offers a unique advantage over the traditional single-dish heterodyne approach: the spectral lines and the corresponding continua are all observed simultaneously, greatly reducing relative uncertainties in flux calibration and line-to-continuum ratios. The starburst galaxy NGC 253 was observed with Z-Spec in November 2006, for a total integration of 3.49 hours over two nights. NGC 253 is one of the brightest neighbors outside the Local Group of galaxies and its compact nuclear region is a site of

  5. Survey instruments used in clinical and epidemiological research on waterpipe tobacco smoking: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunukula Sameer K

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The primary objective was to systematically review the medical literature for instruments validated for use in epidemiological and clinical research on waterpipe smoking. Methods We searched the following databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, and ISI the Web of Science. We selected studies using a two-stage duplicate and independent screening process. We included papers reporting on the development and/or validation of survey instruments to measure waterpipe tobacco consumption or related concepts. Two reviewers used a standardized and pilot tested data abstraction form to collect data from each eligible study using a duplicate and independent screening process. We also determined the percentage of observational studies assessing the health effects of waterpipe tobacco smoking and the percentage of studies of prevalence of waterpipe tobacco smoking that have used validated survey instruments. Results We identified a total of five survey instruments. One instrument was designed to measure knowledge, attitudes, and waterpipe use among pregnant women and was shown to have internal consistency and content validity. Three instruments were designed to measure waterpipe tobacco consumption, two of which were reported to have face validity. The fifth instrument was designed to measure waterpipe dependence and was rigorously developed and validated. One of the studies of prevalence and none of the studies of health effects of waterpipe smoking used validated instruments. Conclusions A number of instruments for measuring the use of and dependence on waterpipe smoking exist. Future research should study content validity and cross cultural adaptation of these instruments.

  6. MedlinePlus Survey Results 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/survey/index.html MedlinePlus Survey Results 2015 To use the sharing features on ... government sites in the "Information/News" category. Other survey question responses: What best describes your role in ...

  7. Applications of Calendar Instruments in Social Surveys: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glasner, T.J.; Vaart, van der W.

    2009-01-01

    Retrospective reports in survey interviews and questionnaires are subject to many types of recall error, which affect completeness, consistency, and dating accuracy. Concerns about this problem have led to the development of so-called calendar instruments, or timeline techniques. These aided recall

  8. Antisocial sport behaviors survey: instrument development and initial validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, Miranda P; Hoar, Sharleen

    2015-04-01

    The development of a self-report instrument to measure antisocial sport behavior, labeled the Antisocial Sport Behavior Survey (ASBS), among large and diverse samples of athletes is reported. Grounded in the social cognitive theory of moral thought and action (Bandura, 1991) and interpersonal theory (Horowitz, 2004), this instrument was developed and tested in accordance with the traditions of construct validity and classical test theory (Gehlback & Brinkworth, 2011). In Phase 1, 272 college-aged competitive sport participants confirmed a theoretical structure of antisocial sport behavior including eight factors (hypercompetitive, intimidating, antagonistic, disrespectful, exploitable, overly accommodating, abetting, and melodramatic). Phase 2 reports on item development and the response structure of the instrument. In Phase 3, evidence of structural validity and external validity for the ASBS was established with 340 college-aged competitive sport participants. The ASBS presents as a promising new instrument to advance understanding of antisocial sport behavior acts committed by competitive athletes.

  9. Instrument and Survey Analysis Technical Report: Program Implementation Survey. Technical Report #1112

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald

    2011-01-01

    This technical document provides guidance to educators on the creation and interpretation of survey instruments, particularly as they relate to an analysis of program implementation. Illustrative examples are drawn from a survey of educators related to the use of the easyCBM learning system. This document includes specific sections on…

  10. Fast Plasma Instrument for MMS: Data Compression Simulation Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrie, A.; Adrian, M. L.; Yeh, P.; Winkert, G.; Lobell, J.; Vinas, A. F.; Simpson, D. G.

    2009-12-01

    Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission will study small-scale reconnection structures and their rapid motions from closely spaced platforms using instruments capable of high angular, energy, and time resolution measurements. To meet these requirements, the Fast Plasma Instrument (FPI) consists of eight (8) identical half top-hat electron sensors and eight (8) identical ion sensors and an Instrument Data Processing Unit (IDPU). The sensors (electron or ion) are grouped into pairs whose 6° x 180° fields-of-view (FOV) are set 90° apart. Each sensor is equipped with electrostatic aperture steering to allow the sensor to scan a 45° x 180° fan about the its nominal viewing (0° deflection) direction. Each pair of sensors, known as the Dual Electron Spectrometer (DES) and the Dual Ion Spectrometer (DIS), occupies a quadrant on the MMS spacecraft and the combination of the eight electron/ion sensors, employing aperture steering, image the full-sky every 30-ms (electrons) and 150-ms (ions), respectively. To probe the diffusion regions of reconnection, the highest temporal/spatial resolution mode of FPI results in the DES complement of a given spacecraft generating 6.5-Mb s-1 of electron data while the DIS generates 1.1-Mb s-1 of ion data yielding an FPI total data rate of 6.6-Mb s-1. The FPI electron/ion data is collected by the IDPU then transmitted to the Central Data Instrument Processor (CIDP) on the spacecraft for science interest ranking. Only data sequences that contain the greatest amount of temporal/spatial structure will be intelligently down-linked by the spacecraft. Currently, the FPI data rate allocation to the CIDP is 1.5-Mb s-1. Consequently, the FPI-IDPU must employ data/image compression to meet this CIDP telemetry allocation. Here, we present updated simulations of the CCSDS 122.0-B-1 algorithm-based compression of the FPI-DES electron data as well as the FPI-DIS ion data. Compression analysis is based upon a seed of re-processed Cluster

  11. Results from an absolute gravity survey in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumberge, M. A.; Faller, J. E.; Gschwind, J.

    1983-01-01

    Using the recently completed JTLA absolute gravity meter, we made a survey of twelve sites in the United States. Over a period of eight weeks, the instrument was driven a total distance of nearly 20,000 km to sites in California, New Mexico, Colorado, Wyoming, Maryland and Massachusetts. The time spent in carrying out a measurement at a single location was typically one day. We report the results of the measurements in this survey along with earlier measurements made with the instrument, discuss the measurement accuracy and compare our results with other measurements. Previously announced in STAR as N83-20480

  12. Human factors survey of advanced instrumentation and controls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    A survey oriented towards identifying the human factors issues in regard to the use of advanced instrumentation and controls (I C) in the nuclear industry was conducted. A number of United States (US) and Canadian nuclear vendors and utilities were participants in the survey. Human factors items, subsumed under the categories of computer-generated displays (CGD), controls, organizational support, training, and related topics, were discussed. The survey found the industry to be concerned about the human factors issues related to the implementation of advanced I C. Fifteen potential human factors problems were identified. They include: the need for an advanced I C guideline equivalent to NUREG-0700; a role change in the control room from operator to supervisor; information overload; adequacy of existing training technology for advanced I C; and operator acceptance and trust. 11 refs., 1 tab.

  13. Literature survey results: Topical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willson, W.G.; Ness, R.O.; Hendrikson, J.G.; Entzminger, J.A.; Jha, M.; Sinor, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    This report reviews mild gasification processes with respect to processing conditions and configurations. Special emphasis was placed on processes which could be commercialized within five years. Detailed market information was provided by J.E. Sinor concerning markets and economic considerations of the various processing steps. Processing areas studied include coal cleaning; mild gasification; and upgrading of the char, condensables, and hydrocarbon gases. Pros and cons in the different processing areas as well as ''gaps'' in pertinent data were identified and integrated into a detailed process development program. The report begins with a summary of the market assessment and an evaluation of the co-product. The impacts of feed materials and operating parameters--including coal rank, heating rate, pressure, agglomeration, temperature, and feed gas composition--on the co- products and processes were evaluated through a literature survey. Recommendations were made as to the preferred product specifications and operating parameters for a commercial plant. A literature review of mild gasification processes was conducted and evaluated with regard to product specification and operating parameters. Two candidate processes were chosen and discussed in detail with respect to scale-up feasibility. Recommendations were then made to process development needs to further consideration of the two processes. 129 refs., 33 figs., 16 tabs.

  14. Preventive maintenance instrumentation results in Spanish nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curiel, M. [Logistica y Acondicionamientos Industriales SAU, Sorolla Center, local 10, Av. de las Cortes Valencianas No. 58, 46015 Valencia (Spain); Palomo, M. J.; Verdu, G. [ISIRYM, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, Valencia (Spain); Arnaldos, A., E-mail: m.curiel@lainsa.co [TITANIA Servicios Tecnologicos SL, Sorolla Center, local 10, Av. de las Cortes Valencianas No. 58, 46015 Valencia (Spain)

    2010-10-15

    This paper is a recompilation of the most significance results in relation to the researching in preventive and predictive maintenance in critical nuclear instrumentation for power plant operation, which it is being developed by Logistica y Acondicionamientos Industriales and the Isirym Institute of the Polytechnic University of Valencia. Instrumentation verification and test, it is a priority of the power plants control and instrumentation department's technicians. These procedures are necessary information for the daily power plant work. It is performed according to different procedures and in different moments of the fuel cycle depending on the instrumentation critical state and the monitoring process. Normally, this study is developed taking into account the instantaneous values of the instrumentation measures and, after their conversion to physical magnitude, they are analyzed according to the power plant operation point. Moreover, redundant sensors measurements are taken into consideration to the equipment and/or power plant monitoring. This work goes forward and it is in advanced to the instrument analysis as it is, independently of the operation point, using specific signal analysis techniques for preventive and predictive maintenance, with the object to obtain not only information about possible malfunctions, but the degradation scale presented in the instrument or in the system measured. We present seven real case studies of Spanish nuclear power plants each of them shall give a significant contribution to problem resolution and power plant performance. (Author)

  15. Weak Lensing from Space I: Instrumentation and Survey Strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhodes, Jason; Refregier, Alexandre; Massey, Richard; Albert, Justin; Bacon, David; Bernstein, Gary; Ellis, Richard; Jain, Bhuvnesh; Kim, Alex; Lampton, Mike; McKay, Tim; Akerlof, C.; Aldering, G.; Amanullah, R.; Astier, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bebek, C.; Bergstrom, L.; Bercovitz, J.; Bester, M.; Bonissent, A.; Bower, C.; Carithers, W.; Commins, E.; Day, C.; Deustua, S.; DiGennaro, R.; Ealet, A.; Eriksson, M.; Fruchter, A.; Genat, J.-F.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D.; Harris, S.; Harvey, P.; Heetderks, H.; Holland, S.; Huterer, D.; Karcher, A.; Kolbe, W.; Kreiger, B.; Lafever, R.; Lamoureux, J.; Levi, M.; Devin, D.; Linder, E.; Loken, S.; Malina, R.; McKee, S.; Miquel, R.; Mortsell, E.; Mostek, N.; Mufson, S.; Musser, J.; Nugent, P.; Oluseyi, H.; Pain, R.; Palaio, N.; Pankow, D.; Perlmutter, S.; Pratt, R.; Prieto, E.; Robinson, K.; Roe, N.; Sholl, M.; Schubnell, M.; Smadja, G.; Smoot, G.; Spadafora, A.; Tarle, G.; Tomasch, A.; von der Lippe, H.; Vincent, D.; Walder, J.-P.; Wang, G.

    2003-04-23

    A wide field space-based imaging telescope is necessary to fully exploit the technique of observing dark matter via weak gravitational lensing. This first paper in a three part series outlines the survey strategies and relevant instrumental parameters for such a mission. As a concrete example of hardware design, we consider the proposed Supernova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP). Using SNAP engineering models, we quantify the major contributions to this telescope's Point Spread Function (PSF). These PSF contributions are relevant to any similar wide field space telescope. We further show that the PSF of SNAP or a similar telescope will be smaller than current ground-based PSFs, and more isotropic and stable over time than the PSF of the Hubble Space Telescope. We outline survey strategies for two different regimes - a ''wide'' 300 square degree survey and a ''deep'' 15 square degree survey that will accomplish various weak lensing goals including statistical studies and dark matter mapping.

  16. Lateral Violence in Nursing Survey: Instrument Development and Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynne S. Nemeth

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available An examination of the psychometric properties of the Lateral Violence in Nursing Survey (LVNS, an instrument previously developed to measure the perceived incidence and severity of lateral violence (LV in the nursing workplace, was carried out. Conceptual clustering and principal components analysis were used with survey responses from 663 registered nurses and ancillary nursing staff in a southeastern tertiary care medical center. Where appropriate, Cronbach’s alpha (α evaluated internal consistency. The prevalence/severity of lateral violence items constitute two distinct subscales (LV by self and others with Cronbach’s alpha of 0.74 and 0.86, respectively. The items asking about potential causes of LV are unidimensional and internally consistent (alpha = 0.77 but there is no conceptually coherent theme underlying the various causes. Respondents rating a potential LV cause as “major” scored higher on both prevalence/severity subscales than those rating it a “minor” cause or not a cause. Subsets of items on the LVNS are internally reliable, supporting construct validity. Revisions of the original LVNS instrument will improve its use in future work.

  17. ASHA Survey of Health Curriculum Needs: Survey Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Livingston S.; Thier, Herbert D.

    The results of a survey conducted by the Ad hoc Committee to Study the Needs and Problems of the Classroom Teacher in Curriculum Development are reported. Questionnaires were sent to members of the American School Health Association (ASHA). The survey was composed of four sections: (1) background information on demographic data, institutional…

  18. Measuring Quality of Life: A New and Practical Survey Instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenley, James R.; Greenberg, Jan Steven; Brown, Roger

    1997-01-01

    Presents a new, short, self-administered questionnaire that assesses the quality of life in seven areas. Evidence for the reliability and validity of the questionnaire was based on data gathered from 971 clients; results indicate instrument reliability. The questionnaire features low-cost administration and valid psychometric properties. (RJM)

  19. Using Moodle as On-line Survey Instrument in Medical Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan ISTRATE

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the principal issues in any university community is the lack of communication between community categories – leadership, administration, teaching staff and students. Sometimes is important to know in a short time the opinion of one particular group, without investing a lot of resources and without being extremely formal. The aim of this study was to test if an open-source platform – Moodle – can be used for quick surveys inside the Faculty of Medicine, UMF “Iuliu Hatieganu” Cluj-Napoca community. For this, on existing Moodle platform was installed one specific survey instrument – a questionnaire module and a survey containing a real life issue to the students of Faculty of Medicine was launched. The researchers have focused on how the specific problems of a survey - preparing of the survey, the survey process and the analysis of the results can be handle in Moodle. The pilot survey was a success; the conclusion of the study was that Moodle can be used as on-line survey instrument for that community.

  20. Preventive maintenance instrumentation results in Spanish nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palomo Anaya, M. Jose; Verdu Martin, Gumersindo, E-mail: mpalomo@iqn.upv.es, E-mail: gverdu@iqn.upv.es [ISIRYM Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Arnaldos Gonzalvez, Adoracion, E-mail: a.arnaldos@titaniast.com [TITANIA Servicios Tecnologicos SL, Valencia (Spain); Nieva, Marcelino Curiel, E-mail: m.curiel@lainsa.com [Logistica y Acondicionamientos Industriales SAU (LAINSA), Valencia (Spain)

    2011-07-01

    This paper is a recompilation of the most significant results in relation to the researching in Preventive and Predictive Maintenance in critical nuclear instrumentation for power plant operation, which it is being developed by Logistica y Acondicionamientos Industriales and The Isirym Institute of the Polytechnic University of Valencia. Instrumentation verification and test, it is a priority of the Power Plants Control and Instrumentation Department technicians. These procedures are necessary information for the daily power plant work. It is performed according to different procedures and in different moments of the fuel cycle depending on the instrumentation critical state and the monitoring process. Normally, this study is developed taking into account the instantaneous values of the instrumentation measures and, after their conversion to physical magnitude, they are analyzed according to the power plant operation point. Moreover, redundant sensors measurements are taken into consideration to the equipment and/or power plant monitoring. This work goes forward and it is in advanced to the instrument analysis as it is, independently of the operation point, using specific signal analysis techniques for preventive and predictive maintenance, with the aim to obtain not only information about possible malfunctions, but the degradation scale presented in the instrument or in the system measured. We present seven real case studies of Spanish Nuclear Power Plants each of them shall give a significant contribution to problem resolution and power plant performance: Fluctuations in sensor lines (case 1), Air presence in feed water lines (case 2), Root valve partially closed (case 3), Sensor malfunctions (case 4), Electrical source malfunctions (case 5), RTD malfunctions (case 6) and LPRM malfunctions (case 7). (author)

  1. Star Formation and Stellar Evolution: Future Surveys and Instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, C. J.

    2016-10-01

    The next generation of multi-object spectrographs (MOS) will deliver comprehensive surveys of the Galaxy, Magellanic Clouds and nearby dwarfs. These will provide us with the vast samples, spanning the full extent of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, that are needed to explore the chemistry, history and dynamics of their host systems. Further ahead, the Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs) will have sufficient sensitivity and angular resolution to extend stellar spectroscopy well beyond the Local Group, opening-up studies of the chemical evolution of galaxies across a broad range of galaxy types and environments. In this contribution I briefly reflect on current and future studies of stellar populations, and introduce plans for the MOSAIC instrument for the European ELT.

  2. New hydrologic instrumentation in the U.S. Geological Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latkovich, V.J.; Shope, W.G.; ,

    1991-01-01

    New water-level sensing and recording instrumentation is being used by the U.S. Geological Survey for monitoring water levels, stream velocities, and water-quality characteristics. Several of these instruments are briefly described. The Basic Data Recorder (BDR) is an electronic data logger, that interfaces to sensor systems through a serial-digital interface standard (SDI-12), which was proposed by the data-logger industry; the Incremental Shaft Encoder is an intelligent water-level sensor, which interfaces to the BDR through the SDI-12; the Pressure Sensor is an intelligent, nonsubmersible pressure sensor, which interfaces to the BDR through the SDI-12 and monitors water levels from 0 to 50 feet; the Ultrasonic Velocity Meter is an intelligent, water-velocity sensor, which interfaces to the BDR through the SDI-12 and measures the velocity across a stream up to 500 feet in width; the Collapsible Hand Sampler can be collapsed for insertion through holes in the ice and opened under the ice to collect a water sample; the Lighweight Ice Auger, weighing only 32 pounds, can auger 6- and 8-inch holes through approximately 3.5 feet of ice; and the Ice Chisel has a specially hardened steel blade and 6-foot long, hickory D-handle.

  3. Results obtained by geodetic instruments of SELENE (KAGUYA)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KAWANO; Nobuyuki; VRAD/RSAT; Team; LALT; Team

    2010-01-01

    Japanese lunar explorer SELENE (KAGUYA) was equipped with 14 instruments for various measurements of the Moon. Three of these instruments took geodetic measurements of the Moon. These were two sub-satellites and a laser altimeter. The main results obtained by the instruments are: (1) precise orbit determination with an accuracy of ten meters by Doppler and same-beam VLBI; (2) the first precise gravity fields on the lunar far side by 4-way Doppler measurements; (3) the first topography in latitudes higher than 86 degrees; (4) a global map of the gravity anomaly by using the global topography and the global gravity fields; (5) a global map of the lunar crustal thickness and (6) an illumination rate map in the north and south polar regions.

  4. Planck 2015 results: II. Low Frequency Instrument data processings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ade, P. A R; Aghanim, N.; Ashdown, M.;

    2016-01-01

    We present an updated description of the Planck Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) data processing pipeline, associated with the 2015 data release. We point out the places where our results and methods have remained unchanged since the 2013 paper and we highlight the changes made for the 2015 release...

  5. Predictions for surveys with the SPICA Mid-infrared Instrument

    CERN Document Server

    Bonato, M; Cai, Z -Y; De Zotti, G; Bressan, A; Wada, T; Kohno, K; Maiolino, R; Gruppioni, C; Pozzi, F; Lapi, A

    2015-01-01

    We present predictions for number counts and redshift distributions of galaxies detectable in continuum and in emission lines with the Mid-infrared (MIR) Instrument (SMI) proposed for the Space Infrared Telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics (SPICA). We have considered 24 MIR fine-structure lines, four Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) bands (at 6.2, 7.7, 8.6 and 11.3$\\mu$m) and two silicate bands (in emission and in absorption) at 9.7$\\mu$m and 18.0$\\mu$m. Six of these lines are primarily associated with Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs), the others with star formation. A survey with the SMI spectrometers of 1 hour integration per field-of-view (FoV) over an area of $1\\,\\hbox{deg}^2$ will yield $5\\,\\sigma$ detections of $\\simeq 140$ AGN lines and of $\\simeq 5.2\\times10^{4}$ star-forming galaxies, $\\simeq 1.6\\times10^{4}$ of which will be detected in at least two lines. The combination of a shallow ($20.0\\,\\hbox{deg}^{2}$, $1.4\\times10^{-1}$ h integration per FoV) and a deep survey ($6.9\\times10^{-3}\\,\\hbox...

  6. Site survey instrumentation for the National New Technology Telescope (NNTT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, F. F.; Morse, D. A.; Poczulp, G. A.

    1988-10-01

    The characterization of atmospheric turbulence at and above the two candidate sites for the 15 m National New Technology Telescope (NNTT) has required the development of specialized measurement techniques. The equipment used to measure astronomical seeing, microthermals, water vapor, and temperature is discussed, along with sample data and calibration results. By use of instruments with overlapping altitude coverage, it has been possible to 'bookkeep' qualitatively all of the sources of innate degradation, especially near the ground.

  7. Planck 2013 results. VI. High Frequency Instrument data processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Armitage-Caplan, C.

    2013-01-01

    We describe the processing of the 531 billion raw data samples from the High Frequency Instrument (HFI), which we performed to produce six temperature maps from the first 473 days of Planck-HFI survey data. These maps provide an accurate rendition of the sky emission at 100, 143,217, 353, 545......, these two high frequency channels are calibrated to within 5% and the 353 GHz channel to the percent level. The 100 and217 GHz channels, which together with the 143 GHz channel determine the high-multipole part of the CMB power spectrum (50 ..., and 857 GHz with an angular resolution ranging from 9.07 to 4.06. The detector noise per (effective) beam solid angle is respectively,10, 6 , 12, and 39 µK in the four lowest HFI frequency channels (100-353 GHz) and 13 and 14 kJy sr-1 in the 545 and 857 GHz channels. Relativeto the 143 GHz channel...

  8. Planck early results. VI. The High Frequency Instrument data processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bucher, M.; Castex, G.; Colley, J.-M.

    2011-01-01

    We describe the processing of the 336 billion raw data samples from the High Frequency Instrument (HFI) which we performed to produce six temperature maps from the first 295 days of Planck-HFI survey data. These maps provide an accurate rendition of the sky emission at 100, 143, 217, 353, 545...... and 857 GHz with an angular resolution ranging from 9.9 to 4.4′. The white noise level is around 1.5 μK degree or less in the 3 main CMB channels (100-217 GHz). The photometric accuracy is better than 2% at frequencies between 100 and 353 GHz and around 7% at the two highest frequencies. The maps created...... to be of high quality and we expect that with further refinements of the data processing we should be able to achieve, or exceed, the science goals of the Planck project. © ESO, 2011....

  9. The cosmic infrared background experiment (CIBER): instrumentation and first results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemcov, M.; Battle, J.; Bock, J.; Cooray, A.; Hristov, V.; Keating, B.; Lee, D. H.; Levenson, L.; Mason, P.; Matsumoto, T.; Matsuura, S.; Nam, U. W.; Renbarger, T.; Sullivan, I.; Tsumura, K.; Wada, T.

    2010-07-01

    Ultraviolet emission from the first generation of stars in the Universe ionized the intergalactic medium in a process which was completed by z ~ 6; the wavelength of these photons has been redshifted by (1 + z) into the near infrared today and can be measured using instruments situated above the Earth's atmosphere. First flying in February 2009, the Cosmic Infrared Background ExpeRiment (CIBER) comprises four instruments housed in a single reusable sounding rocket borne payload. CIBER will measure spatial anisotropies in the extragalactic IR background caused by cosmological structure from the epoch of reionization using two broadband imaging instruments, make a detailed characterization of the spectral shape of the IR background using a low resolution spectrometer, and measure the absolute brightness of the Zodiacal light foreground with a high resolution spectrometer in each of our six science fields. The scientific motivation for CIBER and details of its first and second flight instrumentation will be discussed. First flight results on the color of the zodiacal light around 1 μm and plans for the future will also be presented.

  10. Statistical literacy and sample survey results

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlevey, Lynn; Sullivan, Charles

    2010-10-01

    Sample surveys are widely used in the social sciences and business. The news media almost daily quote from them, yet they are widely misused. Using students with prior managerial experience embarking on an MBA course, we show that common sample survey results are misunderstood even by those managers who have previously done a statistics course. In general, they fare no better than managers who have never studied statistics. There are implications for teaching, especially in business schools, as well as for consulting.

  11. The XXL survey: first results and future

    CERN Document Server

    Pierre, M; Birkinshaw, M; Chiappetti, L; Ettori, S; Evrard, A; Faccioli, L; Gastaldello, F; Giles, P; Horellou, C; Iovino, A; Koulouridis, E; Lidman, C; Brun, A Le; Maughan, B; Maurogordato, S; McCarthy, I; Miyazaki, S; Pacaud, F; Paltani, S; Plionis, M; Reiprich, T; Sadibekova, T; Smolcic, V; Snowden, S; Surdej, J; Tsirou, M; Vignali, C; Willis, J; Alis, S; Altieri, B; Baran, N; Benoist, C; Bongiorno, A; Bremer, M; Butler, A; Cappi, A; Caretta, C; Ciliegi, P; Clerc, N; Corasaniti, P S; Coupon, J; Delhaize, J; Delvecchio, I; Democles, J; Desai, Sh; Devriendt, J; Dubois, Y; Eckert, D; Elyiv, A; Farahi, A; Ferrari, C; Fotopoulou, S; Forman, W; Georgantopoulos, I; Guglielmo, V; Huynh, M; Jerlin, N; Jones, Ch; Lavoie, S; Fevre, J -P Le; Lieu, M; Kilbinger, M; Marulli, F; Mantz, A; McGee, S; Melin, J -B; Melnyk, O; Moscardini, L; Novak, M; Piconcelli, E; Poggianti, B; Pomarede, D; Pompei, E; Ponman, T; Ceja, M E Ramos; Ranalli, P; Rapetti, D; Raychaudhury, S; Ricci, M; Rottgering, H; Sahlén, M; Sauvageot, J -L; Schimd, C; Sereno, M; Smith, G P; Umetsu, K; Valageas, P; Valotti, A; Valtchanov, I; Veropalumbo, A; Ascaso, B; Barnes, D; De Petris, M; Durret, F; Donahue, M; Ithana, M; Jarvis, M; Johnston-Hollitt, M; Kalfountzou, E; Kay, S; La Franca, F; Okabe, N; Muzzin, A; Rettura, A; Ricci, F; Ridl, J; Risaliti, G; Takizawa, M; Thomas, P; Truong, N

    2016-01-01

    The XXL survey currently covers two 25 sq. deg. patches with XMM observations of ~10ks. We summarise the scientific results associated with the first release of the XXL data set, that occurred mid 2016. We review several arguments for increasing the survey depth to 40 ks during the next decade of XMM operations. X-ray (z1 cluster density. It will eventually constitute a reference study and an ideal calibration field for the upcoming eROSITA and Euclid missions.

  12. Instruments of the Marketing Mix in Non-Governmental Organizations – the Results of Empirical Research

    OpenAIRE

    Kwak, Wioletta

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the article is to present the instruments of the marketing mix of NGOs in light of empirical research. Marketing mix is the set of instruments for the implementation of marketing strategies of the organization. The paper presents selected results of research on the role of marketing strategies of non-profit organizations in creating value for stakeholders. In the literature one can find different concepts of “marketing mix”, for example, “4P”, “5P”, “7P”, “4C”. The survey results a...

  13. The Spectral Results of the FIRAS Instrument on COBE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fixsen, Dale J.; Mather, John C.

    2002-01-01

    The Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) spectral results of the FIRAS instrument are summarized. Some questions that have been raised about the calibration accuracy are also addressed. Finally we comment on the potential for major improvements with new measurement approaches. The measurement of the deviation of the CMB spectrum from a 2.725 plus or minus 0.001 K blackbody form made by the COBE-FIRAS could be improved by two orders of magnitude.

  14. National wildlife refuge visitor survey results: 2010/2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, Natalie R.; Dietsch, Alia M.; Don Carolos, Andrew W.; Miller, Holly M.; Koontz, Lynne M.; Solomon, Adam N.

    2012-01-01

    refuges during 2010/2011 and contain the following information: * Synopsis: Brief summary of the survey results. * Introduction: An overview of the Refuge System and the goals of the national surveying effort. * Methods: The procedures for the national surveying effort, including selecting refuges, developing the survey instrument, contacting visitors, and guidance for interpreting the results. * Survey Results: Key findings from the survey, including: - Visitor and trip characteristics - Visitors opinions about refuges - Visitor opinions about alternative transportation - Visitor opinions about climate change * Conclusion * References Individual results for each of the 53 participating refuges are available at http://pubs.usgs.gov/ds/643/ as part of USGS Data Series 643.

  15. The ALFA ZOA Deep Survey: First Results

    CERN Document Server

    McIntyre, Travis P; Minchin, Robert F; Momjian, Emmanuel; Butcher, Zhon

    2015-01-01

    The Arecibo L-Band Feed Array Zone of Avoidance (ALFA ZOA) Deep Survey is the deepest and most sensitive blind Hi survey undertaken in the ZOA. ALFA ZOA Deep will cover about 300 square degrees of sky behind the Galactic plane in both the inner (30 deg < l < 75 deg; b < |2 deg|) and outer (175 deg < l < 207 deg; -2 deg < b < +1 deg) Galaxy, using the Arecibo Radio Telescope. First results from the survey have found 61 galaxies within a 15 square degree area centered on l = 192 deg and b = -2 deg. The survey reached its expected sensitivity of rms = 1 mJy at 9 km/s channel resolution, and is shown to be complete above integrated flux, F_HI = 0.5 Jy km/s. The positional accuracy of the survey is 28 arcsec and detections are found out to a recessional velocity of nearly 19,000 km/s. The survey confirms the extent of the Orion and Abell 539 clusters behind the plane of the Milky Way and discovers expansive voids, at 10,000 km/s and 18,000 km/s. 26 detections (43%) have a counterpart in the li...

  16. The Pedemis Instrument: operation and APG field results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrowes, Benjamin E.; Grzegorczyk, Tomasz M.; Shibitidze, Fridon; Fernández, Pablo; O'Neill, Kevin

    2013-06-01

    Pedemis (PortablE Decoupled Electromagnetic Induction Sensor) is a time-domain man-portable electromagnetic induction (EMI) instrument with the intended purpose of improving the detection and classification of UneXploded Ordnance (UXO). Pedemis sports nine coplanar transmitters (the Tx assembly) and nine triaxial receivers held in a fixed geometry with respect to each other (the Rx assembly) but with that Rx assembly physically decoupled from the Tx assembly allowing flexible data acquisition modes and deployment options. Such flexibility is expected to be instrumental in non-trivial terrains exhibiting either an abundant vegetation or being highly contaminated by large or dense clutter. Before validating the sensor in such challenging configurations, however, Pedemis was taken to Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD, for its first test site validation. We describe Pedemis, including its operation and data acquisition modes along with our Aberdeen Proving Ground results.

  17. The ALFA ZOA Deep Survey: First Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, T. P.; Henning, P. A.; Minchin, R. F.; Momjian, E.; Butcher, Z.

    2015-07-01

    The Arecibo L-band Feed Array Zone of Avoidance (ALFA ZOA) Deep Survey is the deepest and most sensitive blind H i survey undertaken in the ZOA. ALFA ZOA Deep will cover about 300 square degrees of sky behind the Galactic Plane in both the inner (30^\\circ ≤slant l≤slant 75^\\circ ;b≤slant | 2^\\circ | ) and outer (175^\\circ ≤slant l≤slant 207^\\circ ;-2^\\circ ≤slant b≤slant +1^\\circ ) Galaxy, using the Arecibo Radio Telescope. First results from the survey have found 61 galaxies within a 15 square degree area centered on l=192^\\circ and b = -2°. The survey reached its expected sensitivity of rms = 1 mJy at 9 km s-1 channel resolution, and is shown to be complete above integrated flux, FHi = 0.5 Jy km s-1. The positional accuracy of the survey is 28″ and detections are found out to a recessional velocity of nearly 19,000 km s-1. The survey confirms the extent of the Orion and Abell 539 clusters behind the plane of the Milky Way and discovers expansive voids, at 10,000 and 18,000 km s-1. Twenty-six detections (43%) have a counterpart in the literature, but only two of these have known redshifts. Counterparts are 20% less common beyond vhel = 10,000 km s-1 and 33% less common at extinctions higher than AB = 3.5 mag. The ALFA ZOA Deep survey is able to probe large scale structure beyond redshifts that even the most modern wide-angle surveys have been able to detect in the ZOA at any wavelength.

  18. Survey Instrument Validity Part II: Validation of a Survey Instrument Examining Athletic Trainers' Knowledge and Practice Beliefs Regarding Exertional Heat Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Laura J.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this article is to discuss the process of developing and validating an instrument to investigate an athletic trainer's attitudes and behaviors regarding the recognition and treatment of exertional heat stroke. Background: Following up from our initial paper, which discussed the process of survey instrument design and…

  19. NREL Partnership Survey - FY 2016 Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-09-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conducts an annual partnership satisfaction survey in which we ask our clients to rate NREL in a number of areas. As a national laboratory, the principal areas we focus on include value, timeliness, quality, price, and capabilities. This fact sheet shows the results of a survey with 300 customers responding to 11 questions using ratings that vary from 'strongly agree' to 'strongly disagree.' In FY 16, 100% of the scores improved or were equal to FY 15 numbers.

  20. Geothermal industry employment: Survey results & analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2005-09-01

    The Geothermal Energy Association (GEA) is ofteh asked about the socioeconomic and employment impact of the industry. Since available literature dealing with employment involved in the geothermal sector appeared relatively outdated, unduly focused on certain activities of the industry (e.g. operation and maintenance of geothermal power plants) or poorly reliable, GEA, in consultation with the DOE, decided to conduct a new employment survey to provide better answers to these questions. The main objective of this survey is to assess and characterize the current workforce involved in geothermal activities in the US. Several initiatives have therefore been undertaken to reach as many organizations involved in geothermal activities as possible and assess their current workforce. The first section of this document describes the methodology used to contact the companies involved in the geothermal sector. The second section presents the survey results and analyzes them. This analysis includes two major parts. The first part analyzes the survey responses, presents employment numbers that were captured and describes the major characteristics of the industry that have been identified. The second part of the analysis estimates the number of workers involved in companies that are active in the geothermal business but did not respond to the survey or could not be reached. Preliminary conclusions and the study limits and restrictions are then presented. The third section addresses the potential employment impact related to manufacturing and construction of new geothermal power facilities. Indirect and induced economic impacts related with such investment are also investigated.

  1. Parents' childhood fever management: community survey and instrument development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Anne; Edwards, Helen; Fraser, Jenny

    2008-08-01

    This paper is a report of a study to explore Australian parents' knowledge, beliefs, practices and information sources about fever management and develop a scale to measure parents' fever management practices. Parental fever phobia and overuse of antipyretics to reduce fever continue. No scales to measure parents' fever management practices are available. A community-based, postal survey was carried out in 2005 with 401 Australian parents of well children aged 6 months-5 years. Respondents were recruited through advertising (48.4%), face-to-face (26.4%) and snowball (24.4%) methods. A 33-item instrument was developed; construct and content validity were determined by an expert panel and item reliability by test-retest. Moderate fever (40.0 +/- 1.0 degrees C) was reported to be harmful (88%), causing febrile convulsions (77.7%). Usual practices targeted temperature reduction, antipyretic administration (87.8%), temperature monitoring (52.5%). Fewer evidence-based practices, such as encouraging fluids (49.0%) and light clothing (43.8%), were reported. Positive changes over time (36.4%) included less concern and delayed or reduced antipyretic use. Negative practice changes (22.7%) included greater concern and increased antipyretic use. Medical advice was sought for illness symptoms (48.7%) and high (37.4%) or persistent (41.5%) fevers. Fever management was learnt from doctors, family and friends and working experience, while receiving conflicting information (41.9%) increased concerns and created uncertainty about best practice. Parents need consistent evidence-based information about childhood fever management. The Parental Fever Management Scale requires further testing with different populations and in different cultures and healthcare systems to evaluate its usefulness in nursing practice and research.

  2. Planck 2013 results. VI. High Frequency Instrument data processing

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P.A.R.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A.J.; Barreiro, R.B.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J.J.; Bond, J.R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F.R.; Boulanger, F.; Bowyer, J.W.; Bridges, M.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R. -R.; Chen, X.; Chiang, L. -Y; Chiang, H.C.; Christensen, P.R.; Church, S.; Clements, D.L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L.P.L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B.P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R.D.; Davis, R.J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J. -M.; Désert, F. -X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J.M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T.A.; Eriksen, H.K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A.A.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Girard, D.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K.M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J.E.; Hansen, F.K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Herent, O.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S.R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W.A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hou, Z.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K.M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, T.R.; Jaffe, A.H.; Jones, W.C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T.S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R.J.; Lawrence, C.R.; Jeune, M. Le; Leonardi, R.; Leroy, C.; Lesgourgues, J.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P.B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P.M.; Macías-Pérez, J.F.; MacTavish, C.J.; Maffei, B.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D.J.; Martin, P.G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P.R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Mottet, S.; Munshi, D.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C.B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H.U.; North, C.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Orieux, F.; Osborne, S.; Oxborrow, C.A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G.W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J.P.; Racine, B.; Reach, W.T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rusholme, B.; Sanselme, L.; Santos, D.; Sauvé, A.; Savini, G.; Shellard, E.P.S.; Spencer, L.D.; Starck, J. -L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J.A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Techene, S.; Terenzi, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vibert, L.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L.A.; Wandelt, B.D.; White, S.D.M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2014-01-01

    We describe the processing of the 531 billion raw data samples from the High Frequency Instrument (hereafter HFI), which we performed to produce six temperature maps from the first 473 days of Planck-HFI survey data. These maps provide an accurate rendition of the sky emission at 100, 143, 217, 353, 545, and 857 GHz with an angular resolution ranging from 9.7 to 4.6 arcmin. The detector noise per (effective) beam solid angle is respectively, 10, 6, 12 and 39 microKelvin in HFI four lowest frequency channel (100--353 GHz) and 13 and 14 kJy/sr for the 545 and 857 GHz channels. Using the 143 GHz channel as a reference, these two high frequency channels are intercalibrated within 5% and the 353 GHz relative calibration is at the percent level. The 100 and 217 GHz channels, which together with the 143 GHz channel determine the high-multipole part of the CMB power spectrum (50 < l <2500), are intercalibrated at better than 0.2 %.

  3. Planck early results. VI. The High Frequency Instrument data processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planck HFI Core Team; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Ansari, R.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Banday, A. J.; Bartelmann, M.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bock, J. J.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bradshaw, T.; Bucher, M.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Castex, G.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chen, X.; Chiang, C.; Church, S.; Clements, D. L.; Colley, J.-M.; Colombi, S.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Cressiot, C.; Crill, B. P.; Crook, M.; de Bernardis, P.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Désert, F.-X.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dunkley, J.; Efstathiou, G.; Filliard, C.; Forni, O.; Fosalba, P.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Girard, D.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gispert, R.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Griffin, M.; Guyot, G.; Haissinski, J.; Harrison, D.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hills, R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Kaplan, J.; Kneissl, R.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lange, A. E.; Lasenby, A.; Lavabre, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Le Jeune, M.; Leroy, C.; Lesgourgues, J.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; MacTavish, C. J.; Maffei, B.; Mandolesi, N.; Mann, R.; Marleau, F.; Marshall, D. J.; Masi, S.; Matsumura, T.; McAuley, I.; McGehee, P.; Melin, J.-B.; Mercier, C.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Mortlock, D.; Murphy, A.; Nati, F.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; North, C.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Osborne, S.; Pajot, F.; Patanchon, G.; Peacocke, T.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Ponthieu, N.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Reach, W. T.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Riazuelo, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rusholme, B.; Saha, R.; Santos, D.; Savini, G.; Schaefer, B. M.; Shellard, P.; Spencer, L.; Starck, J.-L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Thum, C.; Torre, J.-P.; Touze, F.; Tristram, M.; van Leeuwen, F.; Vibert, L.; Vibert, D.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; White, S. D. M.; Wiesemeyer, H.; Woodcraft, A.; Yurchenko, V.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.

    2011-12-01

    We describe the processing of the 336 billion raw data samples from the High Frequency Instrument (HFI) which we performed to produce six temperature maps from the first 295 days of Planck-HFI survey data. These maps provide an accurate rendition of the sky emission at 100, 143, 217, 353, 545 and 857 GHz with an angular resolution ranging from 9.9 to 4.4'. The white noise level is around 1.5 μK degree or less in the 3 main CMB channels (100-217 GHz). The photometric accuracy is better than 2% at frequencies between 100 and 353 GHz and around 7% at the two highest frequencies. The maps created by the HFI Data Processing Centre reach our goals in terms of sensitivity, resolution, and photometric accuracy. They are already sufficiently accurate and well-characterised to allow scientific analyses which are presented in an accompanying series of early papers. At this stage, HFI data appears to be of high quality and we expect that with further refinements of the data processing we should be able to achieve, or exceed, the science goals of the Planck project. Corresponding author: F. R. Bouchet, e-mail: bouchet@iap.fr

  4. Planck Early Results: The High Frequency Instrument data processing

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P A R; Ansari, R; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Aumont, J; Banday, A J; Bartelmann, M; Bartlett, J G; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bock, J J; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Boulanger, F; Bradshaw, T; Bucher, M; Cardoso, J -F; Castex, G; Catalano, A; Challinor, A; Chamballu, A; Chary, R -R; Chen, X; Chiang, C; Church, S; Clements, D L; Colley, J -M; Colombi, S; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Cressiot, C; Crill, B P; Crook, M; de Bernardis, P; Delabrouille, J; Delouis, J -M; Désert, F -X; Dolag, K; Dole, H; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Dunkley, J; Efstathiou, G; Filliard, C; Forni, O; Fosalba, P; Ganga, K; Giard, M; Girard, D; Giraud-Héraud, Y; Gispert, R; Górski, K M; Gratton, S; Griffin, M; Guyot, G; Haissinski, J; Harrison, D; Helou, G; Henrot-Versillé, S; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Hildebrandt, S R; Hills, R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Huffenberger, K M; Jaffe, A H; Jones, W C; Kaplan, J; Kneissl, R; Knox, L; Kunz, M; Lagache, G; Lamarre, J -M; Lange, A E; Lasenby, A; Lavabre, A; Lawrence, C R; Jeune, M Le; Leroy, C; Lesgourgues, J; Lewis, A; Macías-Pérez, J F; MacTavish, C J; Maffei, B; Mandolesi, N; Mann, R; Marleau, F; Marshall, D J; Masi, S; Matsumura, T; McAuley, I; McGehee, P; Melin, J -B; Mercier, C; Mitra, S; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Mortlock, D; Murphy, A; Nati, F; Netterfield, C B; N\\orgaard-Nielsen, H U; North, C; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Osborne, S; Pajot, F; Patanchon, G; Peacocke, T; Pearson, T J; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Ponthieu, N; Prézeau, G; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Reach, W T; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Riazuelo, A; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Roudier, G; Rowan-Robinson, M; Rusholme, B; Saha, R; Santos, D; Savini, G; Schaefer, B M; Shellard, P; Spencer, L; Starck, J -L; Stolyarov, V; Stompor, R; Sudiwala, R; Sunyaev, R; Sutton, D; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Thum, C; Torre, J -P; Touze, F; Tristram, M; Van Leeuwen, F; Vibert, L; Vibert, D; Wandelt, B D; White, S D M; Wiesemeyer, H; Woodcraft, A; Yurchenko, V; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A

    2011-01-01

    We describe the processing of the 334 billion raw data samples from the High Frequency Instrument (hereafter HFI) which we performed to produce six temperature maps from the first 295 days of Planck-HFI survey data. These maps provide an accurate rendition of the sky emission at 100, 143, 217, 353, 545 and 857GHz with an angular resolution ranging from 9.9 to 4.4 arcmin. The white noise level is around 1.5 microK.degree or less in the 3 main CMB channels (100-217GHz). The photometric accuracy is better than 2% at frequencies lower or equal to 353GHz, and around 7% at the two highest frequencies. The maps created by the HFI Data Processing Centre reach our goals in terms of sensitivity, resolution, and photometric accuracy. They are already sufficiently accurate and well-characterised to allow scientific analyses which are presented in an accompanying series of early papers. At this stage, HFI data appears to be of high quality and we expect that with further refinements of the data processing we should be abl...

  5. Surveying Instruments: Their History and Classroom Use. National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, Yearbook 19 [1947].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiely, Edmond R.

    The first four chapters trace the history of surveying instruments from beginnings in Egypt, China, and Babylonia to Greece and Rome, then Europe, Islam, and India and finally in the Renaissance in Europe. The organization of these chapters is generally by the major areas of leveling instruments, right-angle instruments, staff combinations, and…

  6. Evaluation of a Brief Survey Instrument for Assessing Subtle Differences in Cognitive Function Among Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotwal, Ashwin A; Schumm, Philip; Kern, David W; McClintock, Martha K; Waite, Linda J; Shega, Joseph W; Huisingh-Scheetz, Megan J; Dale, William

    2015-01-01

    Most measures of cognitive function used in large-scale surveys of older adults have limited ability to detect subtle differences across cognitive domains, and standard clinical instruments are impractical to administer in general surveys. The Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) can address this need, but has limitations in a survey context. Therefore, we developed a survey adaptation of the MoCA, called the MoCA-SA, and describe its psychometric properties in a large national survey. Using a pretest sample of older adults (n=120), we reduced MoCA administration time by 26%, developed a model to accurately estimate full MoCA scores from the MoCA-SA, and tested the model in an independent clinical sample (n=93). The validated 18-item MoCA-SA was then administered to community-dwelling adults aged 62 to 91 as part of the National Social life Health and Aging Project Wave 2 sample (n=3196). In National Social life Health and Aging Project Wave 2, the MoCA-SA had good internal reliability (Cronbach α=0.76). Using item-response models, survey-adapted items captured a broad range of cognitive abilities and functioned similarly across sex, education, and ethnic groups. Results demonstrate that the MoCA-SA can be administered reliably in a survey setting while preserving sensitivity to a broad range of cognitive abilities and similar performance across demographic subgroups.

  7. Results of the recent TDA member survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-10-01

    This article fully outlines active TDA members' responses to the various questions posed by the recent membership survey. Every effort was made to ensure the accuracy of the results. To this end, a professional research firm was employed to cross tabulate answers and analyze the data. A thorough reading will provide you with the TDA members' perspective on a wide range of important dental issues.

  8. Simple instruments used in monitoring SID and some new results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zuo; Hao, Yongqiang; Zhang, Donghe; Xiao, Saiguan; Huang, Weiquan

    Sudden Ionospheric Disturbances are well known and commonly discussed topics. Some simple ground equipment was designed and used for monitoring continuously the effects of SIDs, especially, SWF and SFD. Besides SIDs, They also reflect clearly the acoustic gravity waves in different scale and Spread-F and these data are important supplementary to the traditional ionosonde records. It is of significance in understanding physical essentials of the ionospheric disturbances and applications in SID warning. In this paper, the designing of the instruments is given and results are discussed in detail. The results showed very clearly not only immediate effects of solar flare, but also the phenomena of ionospheric responses to Typhoon, great earthquake and volcano eruption, role of acoustic-gravity waves in seeding Spread-F.

  9. Results of the staff survey: your priorities

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

    This is the first in a series of articles which will give some details about the results of the Staff Association staff survey To know your priorities and the evolution of your concerns over the last decade we study how, in each of our latest three surveys, you chose from a list of 15 items the five most important and classified them by assigning them a priority, from the most important to the fifth most important. The list of fifteen items, and a short description, follows. Career evolution (classification, level of recruitment, advancement, promotion) Salary level Family policy (recognition of partners, allowances, school fees, kindergarten, nursery, crèche, parental leave) Health insurance Non-residence and international indemnity Annual salary adjustment (cost variation index) Contract policy (duration, recruitment, award of IC, conditions of the beginning and ending of the contract) Motivation at work (interest, team, supervision, mobility, reward scheme) Pensions (retirement, disability, o...

  10. Planck 2015 results. II. Low Frequency Instrument data processings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Battaglia, P.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Castex, G.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Christensen, P. R.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fergusson, J.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschet, C.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kisner, T. S.; Knoche, J.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Morisset, N.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oppermann, N.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Peel, M.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rocha, G.; Romelli, E.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Türler, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vassallo, T.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Watson, R.; Wehus, I. K.; Wilkinson, A.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-09-01

    We present an updated description of the Planck Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) data processing pipeline, associated with the 2015 data release. We point out the places where our results and methods have remained unchanged since the 2013 paper and we highlight the changes made for the 2015 release, describing the products (especially timelines) and the ways in which they were obtained. We demonstrate that the pipeline is self-consistent (principally based on simulations) and report all null tests. For the first time, we present LFI maps in Stokes Q and U polarization. We refer to other related papers where more detailed descriptions of the LFI data processing pipeline may be found if needed.

  11. Measuring teamwork in health care settings: a review of survey instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Melissa A; Nembhard, Ingrid M; Edmondson, Amy C

    2015-04-01

    Teamwork in health care settings is widely recognized as an important factor in providing high-quality patient care. However, the behaviors that comprise effective teamwork, the organizational factors that support teamwork, and the relationship between teamwork and patient outcomes remain empirical questions in need of rigorous study. To identify and review survey instruments used to assess dimensions of teamwork so as to facilitate high-quality research on this topic. We conducted a systematic review of articles published before September 2012 to identify survey instruments used to measure teamwork and to assess their conceptual content, psychometric validity, and relationships to outcomes of interest. We searched the ISI Web of Knowledge database, and identified relevant articles using the search terms team, teamwork, or collaboration in combination with survey, scale, measure, or questionnaire. We found 39 surveys that measured teamwork. Surveys assessed different dimensions of teamwork. The most commonly assessed dimensions were communication, coordination, and respect. Of the 39 surveys, 10 met all of the criteria for psychometric validity, and 14 showed significant relationships to nonself-report outcomes. Evidence of psychometric validity is lacking for many teamwork survey instruments. However, several psychometrically valid instruments are available. Researchers aiming to advance research on teamwork in health care should consider using or adapting one of these instruments before creating a new one. Because instruments vary considerably in the behavioral processes and emergent states of teamwork that they capture, researchers must carefully evaluate the conceptual consistency between instrument, research question, and context.

  12. National wildlife refuge visitor survey 2012--Individual refuge results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietsch, Alia M.; Sexton, Natalie R.; Koontz, Lynne M.; Conk, Shannon J.

    2013-01-01

    The National Wildlife Refuge System (Refuge System), established in 1903 and managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), is the leading network of protected lands and waters in the world dedicated to the conservation of fish, wildlife and their habitats. There are 560 national wildlife refuges and 38 wetland management districts nationwide, encompassing more than 150 million acres. The Refuge System attracts nearly 45 million visitors annually, including 34.8 million people who observe and photograph wildlife, 9.6 million who hunt and fish, and nearly 675,000 teachers and students who use refuges as outdoor classrooms. Understanding visitor perceptions of refuges and characterizing their experiences on refuges are critical elements of managing these lands and meeting the goals of the Refuge System. The Service collaborated with the U.S. Geological Survey to conduct a national survey of visitors regarding their experiences on national wildlife refuges. The purpose of the survey was to better understand visitor experiences and trip characteristics, to gauge visitors’ levels of satisfaction with existing recreational opportunities, and to garner feedback to inform the design of programs and facilities. The survey results will inform performance, planning, budget, and communications goals. Results will also inform Comprehensive Conservation Plans (CCPs), visitor services, and transportation planning processes. This Data Series consists of 25 separate data files. Each file describes the results of the survey for an individual refuge and contains the following information: • Introduction: An overview of the Refuge System and the goals of the national surveying effort. • Methods: The procedures for the national surveying effort, including selecting refuges, developing the survey instrument, contacting visitors, and guidance for interpreting the results.• Refuge Description: A brief description of the refuge location, acreage, purpose, recreational

  13. PRIMitive Asteroids Spectroscopic Survey - PRIMASS: First Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Leon, Julia; Pinilla-Alonso, Noemi; Campins, Humberto; Lorenzi, Vania; Licandro, Javier; Morate, David; Tanga, Paolo; Cellino, Alberto; Delbo, Marco

    2015-11-01

    NASA OSIRIS-REx and JAXA Hayabusa 2 sample-return missions have targeted two near-Earth asteroids: (101955) Bennu and (162173) 1999 JU3, respectively. These are primitive asteroids that are believed to originate in the inner belt, where five distinct sources have been identified: four primitive collisional families (Polana, Erigone, Sulamitis, and Clarissa), and a population of low-albedo and low-inclination background asteroids. Identifying and characterizing the populations from which these two NEAs might originate will enchance the science return of the two missions.With this main objective in mind, we initiated in 2010 a spectroscopic survey in the visible and the near-infrared to characterize the primitive collisional families in the inner belt and the low-albedo background population. This is the PRIMitive Asteroids Spectroscopic Survey - PRIMASS. So far we have obtained more than 200 spectra using telescopes located at different observatories. PRIMASS uses a variety of ground based facilities. Most of the spectra have been obtained using the 10.4m Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC), and the 3.6m Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG), both located at the El Roque de los Muchachos Observatory (La Palma, Spain), and the 3.0m NASA Infrared Telescope Facility on Mauna Kea (Hawai, USA).We present the first results from our on-going survey (de Leon et al. 2015; Pinilla-Alonso et al. 2015; Morate et al. 2015), focused on the Polana and the Erigone primitive families, with visible and near-infrared spectra of more than 200 objects, most of them with no previous spectroscopic data. Our survey is already the largest database of primitive asteroids spectra, and we keep obtaining data on the Sulamitis and the Clarissa families, as well as on the background low-albedo population.

  14. Survey Instruments for Knowledge, Skills, Attitudes and Behaviour Related to Evidence-based Practice in Occupational Therapy: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Helen; Siegfried, Nandi; Jelsma, Jennifer

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate, through a systematic review, assessment instruments for evidence-based practice (EBP). The specific objectives were to (1) identify survey instruments testing EBP knowledge, skills, attitudes and behaviour; (2) determine the attributes measured by each instrument; (3) evaluate the psychometric properties of the instruments; and (4) evaluate the methodological quality of the instruments. Using the Cochrane approach, searches were conducted in Pubmed, EBSCOHost and Scopus from inception to February 2014. Papers were screened by two independent assessors, and data were extracted by one researcher. Forty papers reporting 34 instruments met the inclusion criteria and were included in the qualitative synthesis. Most instruments measured EBP behaviour (n = 33) and attitudes (n = 21). This review provides a single source of information to enable researchers to select the most robust descriptive instruments to measure EBP learner attributes. Instruments used only with occupational therapists may have resulted in some instruments being missed. For further research, it is recommended that attention is given to developing objective instruments with a focus on knowledge and skills. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Development and validation of a survey instrument for assessing prescribers' perception of computerized drug-drug interaction alerts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Kai; Fear, Kathleen; Chaffee, Bruce W; Zimmerman, Christopher R; Karls, Edward M; Gatwood, Justin D; Stevenson, James G; Pearlman, Mark D

    2011-12-01

    To develop a theoretically informed and empirically validated survey instrument for assessing prescribers' perception of computerized drug-drug interaction (DDI) alerts. The survey is grounded in the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology and an adapted accident causation model. Development of the instrument was also informed by a review of the extant literature on prescribers' attitude toward computerized medication safety alerts and common prescriber-provided reasons for overriding. To refine and validate the survey, we conducted a two-stage empirical validation study consisting of a pretest with a panel of domain experts followed by a field test among all eligible prescribers at our institution. The resulting survey instrument contains 28 questionnaire items assessing six theoretical dimensions: performance expectancy, effort expectancy, social influence, facilitating conditions, perceived fatigue, and perceived use behavior. Satisfactory results were obtained from the field validation; however, a few potential issues were also identified. We analyzed these issues accordingly and the results led to the final survey instrument as well as usage recommendations. High override rates of computerized medication safety alerts have been a prevalent problem. They are usually caused by, or manifested in, issues of poor end user acceptance. However, standardized research tools for assessing and understanding end users' perception are currently lacking, which inhibits knowledge accumulation and consequently forgoes improvement opportunities. The survey instrument presented in this paper may help fill this methodological gap. We developed and empirically validated a survey instrument that may be useful for future research on DDI alerts and other types of computerized medication safety alerts more generally.

  16. [Summary of results from the national surveys].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passos, Afonso Dinis Costa; Silveira, Antônio Carlos

    2011-01-01

    This article aims to correlate the main results of three large national surveys on Chagas disease (entomologic, seroprevalence and electrocardiographic) carried out in Brazil from late 1970's to early 1980's, which served as baseline for definition of the control measures adopted in the country. The proportion of infected people was much higher in areas where Triatoma infestans, the most efficient vector of Chagas disease among the five principal species involved in transmission at that time, was predominant. Similar result was observed in places where Triatoma sordida was dispersed, mainly in the country's central region, which corresponds to its native area. This finding is due to the coincidence observed in the geographic distribution of both vectors, since T. sordida is not considered to play an important role in transmission. In the Northeastern semi-arid, endemic area for Triatoma brasiliensis and Triatoma pseudomaculata, rates of human infection were much lower, although both vectors may have some relevance in the maintenance of the disease. As for areas with Panstrongylus megistus, human infection varied according to the levels of domiciliation. Whenever domiciled, like in the humid northeastern coastal area, its involvement in transmission can be clearly demonstrated. In some parts of Bahia State it represented the exclusive vector of the disease. Based upon the results of the seroprevalence survey an electrocardiographic study was carried out in 11 Brazilian states, which showed marked differences in the presence of cardiac alterations when comparing different areas of the country.

  17. Work-nonwork interference: Preliminary results on the psychometric properties of a new instrument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eileen Koekemoer

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Recently, a new work-nonwork interference instrument was developed to measure the interference between work and nonwork roles in the South African context (Koekemoer, Mostert & Rothmann, 2010. However, no information is available on the psychometric properties of this instrument.Research purpose: The objectives of this study were to investigate the internal validity (construct, discriminant and convergent validity, reliability and external validity (relationship with theoretically relevant variables, including job characteristics, home characteristics, burnout, ill health and life satisfaction of the instrument.Motivation for the study: Work-family interaction is a key topic receiving significant research attention. In order to facilitate comparison across work-family studies, the use of psychometrically sound instruments is of great importance.Research design, approach and method: A cross-sectional survey design was used for the target population of married employees with children working at a tertiary institution in the North West province (n = 366. In addition to the new instrument, job characteristics, home characteristics, burnout, ill health and life satisfaction were measured.Main findings: The results provided evidence for construct, discriminant and convergent validity, reliability and significant relations with external variables.Practical/managerial implications: The new instrument can be used by researchers and managers as a test under development to investigate the interference between work and different nonwork roles (i.e. parental role, spousal role, work role, domestic role and specific relations with antecedents (e.g. job/home characteristics and well-being (e.g. burnout, ill health and life satisfaction.Contribution/value-add: This study provides preliminary information on the psychometric properties of a new instrument that measures the interference between work and nonwork.

  18. Designing, Testing, and Validating an Attitudinal Survey on an Environmental Topic: A Groundwater Pollution Survey Instrument for Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacosta-Gabari, Idoya; Fernandez-Manzanal, Rosario; Sanchez-Gonzalez, Dolores

    2009-01-01

    Research in environmental attitudes' assessment has significantly increased in recent years. The development of specific attitude scales for specific environmental problems has often been proposed. This paper describes the Groundwater Pollution Test (GPT), a 19-item survey instrument using a Likert-type scale. The survey has been used with…

  19. Designing, Testing, and Validating an Attitudinal Survey on an Environmental Topic: A Groundwater Pollution Survey Instrument for Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacosta-Gabari, Idoya; Fernandez-Manzanal, Rosario; Sanchez-Gonzalez, Dolores

    2009-01-01

    Research in environmental attitudes' assessment has significantly increased in recent years. The development of specific attitude scales for specific environmental problems has often been proposed. This paper describes the Groundwater Pollution Test (GPT), a 19-item survey instrument using a Likert-type scale. The survey has been used with…

  20. Unrecorded wideband instrumentation reference tape feasibility study: Frequency response results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hust, D. R.

    1980-03-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine signal response variations when a variety of wideband instrumentation magnetic tapes is used on a cross section of recorder/reproducer systems. Data for the investigation were collected by transmitting a set of eight sample test tapes to participating data recording/reproducing facilities for the purpose of making data measurements. Data collected represent measurements made with 16 different recorder/reproducer systems at 11 different testing facilities located throughout the United States. The data-collection process involved approximately 2 years of testing. The originating/coordinating facility was the Pacific Missile Test Center, Point Mugu, California. The test results indicated the following: all of the sample test tapes exhibited bidirectional performance within the limits of measurement repeatability; overall system stability was better in the low-band regions than in the upper-band regions; and the overall relative frequency response of the sample test tapes did not change appreciably during the 2 year investigative period. The most significant result of the test measurements is that at least 90% of the frequency response values were within + or - 2.0 dB at all frequencies. Machine stability factors such as azimuth, equalizer, and gain changes had more effect on data variability than did magnetic tape or tape speed. The use of a reference tape system is recommended as a method to assure that relative frequency response variations will be less than or equal to + or - 2.0 dB.

  1. BUSINESS SURVEYS-EVALUATION INSTRUMENT OF THE EUROPEAN ECONOMIC CLIMATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SECAREANU CONSTANTIN

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Business surveys or conjuncture surveys are specific statiostical researches, but complementary to traditional, official statistics.While official statistics provide quantitive information regardin the level,structure and evolution of varied economic process and phenomena, business surveys offer quality information, essential to the short term evolutional analysis of economic indicators: the diagnosis of the current situation, the timely detection of inflexion points within the economic cycle and the rapid estimation of short term tendencies of the main macroeconomic indicators (the dynamics of the gross domestic product, the index of industrial production, etc.

  2. Language Awareness Surveys: A Rationale and Three Instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belanger, Joe

    Noting that language study (one leg of the traditional English tripod of language, literature, and composition) has received mixed attention internationally and is almost forgotten in North America, this paper presents a rationale for researching language awareness and three instruments that can be used in such research. The paper begins with…

  3. The Application of Surveying Biochemistry Light Instrument in the Reaction System of Starch with Mn3+

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gu Zhengbiao; Wu Jiagen

    2000-01-01

    The possibility of the application of Surveying Biochemistry Light Instrument (SBLI) in the reaction system of starch with Mn3+was studied. The results showed: neither starch nor initiator(Mn3+) could produce light because no factor that could produce light existed in them. But starch could produce light when it was acted by Mn3 + and the intensity of light depended on the kind and concentration of starch, the amount of Mn3 +, the temperature and pH of the reaction system. In addition, the intensity of light decreased with the reaction time because of the gradual disappearance of starch free radicals.

  4. The Electron Drift Instrument on Cluster: overview of first results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Paschmann

    Full Text Available EDI measures the drift velocity of artificially injected electron beams. From this drift velocity, the perpendicular electric field and the local magnetic field gradients can be deduced when employing different electron energies. The technique requires the injection of two electron beams at right angles to the magnetic field and the search for those directions within the plane that return the beams to their associated detectors after one or more gyrations. The drift velocity is then derived from the directions of the two beams and/or from the difference in their times-of-flight, measured via amplitude-modulation and coding of the emitted electron beams and correlation with the signal from the returning electrons. After careful adjustment of the control parameters, the beam recognition algorithms, and the onboard magnetometer calibrations during the commissioning phase, EDI is providing excellent data over a wide range of conditions. In this paper, we present first results in a variety of regions ranging from the polar cap, across the magnetopause, and well into the magnetosheath.

    Key words. Electron drift velocity (electric fields; plasma convection; instruments and techniques

  5. Emetophobia: preliminary results of an internet survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipsitz, J D; Fyer, A J; Paterniti, A; Klein, D F

    2001-01-01

    Through electronic mail, we surveyed members of an internet support group for emetophobia (fear of vomiting). Respondents were 50 women and 6 men with a mean age of 31 years. Results suggest that, for this sample, emetophobia is a disorder of early onset and chronic course, with highly persistent and intrusive symptoms. Emetophobia is implicated in social, home-marital, and occupational impairment and it causes significant constriction of leisure activities. Nearly half of women avoided or delayed becoming pregnant. About three quarters of respondents have eating rituals or significantly limit the foods they eat. Respondents describe other problems such as depression, panic attacks, social anxiety, compulsions, and frequent history of childhood separation anxiety.

  6. Addressing Tobacco in Managed Care: Results of the 2002 Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol McPhillips-Tangum

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction In the United States, tobacco use is the leading preventable cause of death and disease. The health and cost consequences of tobacco dependence have made treatment and prevention of tobacco use a key priority among multiple stakeholders, including health plans, insurers, providers, employers, and policymakers. In 2002, the third survey of tobacco control practices and policies in health plans was conducted by America’s Health Insurance Plans’ technical assistance office as part of the Addressing Tobacco in Managed Care (ATMC program. Methods The ATMC survey was conducted in the spring of 2002 via mail, e-mail, and fax. A 19-item survey instrument was developed and pilot-tested. Of the 19 items, 12 were the same as in previous years, four were modified to collect more detailed data on areas of key interest, and three were added to gain information about strategies to promote smoking cessation. The sample for the survey was drawn from the 687 plans listed in the national directory of member and nonmember health plans in America's Health Insurance Plans. Results Of the 246 plans in the sample, 152 plans (62% representing more than 43.5 million health maintenance organization members completed the survey. Results show that health plans are using evidence-based programs and clinical guidelines to address tobacco use. Compared to ATMC survey data collected in 1997 and 2000, the 2002 ATMC survey results indicate that more health plans are providing full coverage for first-line pharmacotherapies and telephone counseling for smoking cessation. Plans have also shown improvement in their ability to identify at least some members who smoke. Similarly, a greater percentage of plans are employing strategies to address smoking cessation during the postpartum period to prevent smoking relapse and during pediatric visits to reduce or eliminate children’s exposure to environmental tobacco smoke. Conclusion The results of the 2002 ATMC survey

  7. The SAMI Galaxy Survey: instrument specification and target selection

    CERN Document Server

    Bryant, J J; Robotham, A S G; Croom, S M; Driver, S P; Drinkwater, M J; Lorente, N P F; Cortese, L; Scott, N; Colless, M; Schaefer, A; Taylor, E N; Konstantopoulos, I S; Allen, J T; Baldry, I; Barnes, L; Bauer, A E; Bland-Hawthorn, J; Bloom, J V; Brooks, A M; Brough, S; Cecil, G; Couch, W; Croton, D; Davies, R; Ellis, S; Fogarty, L M R; Foster, C; Glazebrook, K; Goodwin, M; Green, A; Gunawardhana, M L; Hampton, E; Ho, I -T; Hopkins, A M; Kewley, L; Lawrence, J S; Leon-Saval, S G; Leslie, S; Lewis, G; Liske, J; Lopez-Sanchez, A R; Mahajan, S; Medling, A M; Metcalfe, N; Meyer, M; Mould, J; Obreschkow, D; O'Toole, S; Pracy, M; Richards, S N; Shanks, T; Sharp, R; Sweet, S M; Thomas, A D; Tonini, C; Walcher, C J

    2014-01-01

    The SAMI Galaxy Survey will observe 3400 galaxies with the Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral-field spectrograph (SAMI) on the Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT) in a 3-year survey which began in 2013. We present the throughput of the SAMI system, the science basis and specifications for the target selection, the survey observation plan and the combined properties of the selected galaxies. The survey includes four volume limited galaxy samples based on cuts in a proxy for stellar mass, along with low-stellar mass dwarf galaxies all selected from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey. The GAMA regions were selected because of the vast array of ancillary data available, including ultraviolet through to radio bands. These fields are on the celestial equator at 9, 12, and 14.5 hours, and cover a total of 144 square degrees (in GAMA-I). Higher density environments are also included with the addition of eight clusters. The clusters have spectroscopy from 2dFGRS and SDSS and photometry in regions covered by the Slo...

  8. Results from the Science Instrument Definition Team for the Gondola for High Altitude Planetary Science Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanover, Nancy J.; Aslam, Shahid; DiSanti, Michael A.; Hibbitts, Charles A.; Honniball, Casey I.; Paganini, Lucas; Parker, Alex; Skrutskie, Michael F.; Young, Eliot F.

    2016-10-01

    The Gondola for High Altitude Planetary Science (GHAPS) is an observing asset under development by NASA's Planetary Science Division that will be hosted on stratospheric balloon missions intended for use by the broad planetary science community. GHAPS is being designed in a modular fashion to interface to a suite of instruments as called for by science needs. It will operate at an altitude of 30+ km and will include an optical telescope assembly with a 1-meter aperture and a pointing stability of approximately 1 arcsecond with a flight duration of ~100 days. The spectral grasp of the system is envisaged to include wavelengths spanning the near-ultraviolet to near/mid-infrared (~0.3-5 µm) and possibly to longer wavelengths.The GHAPS Science Instrument Definition Team (SIDT) was convened in May 2016 to define the scope of science investigations, derive the science requirements and instrument concepts for GHAPS, prioritize the instruments according to science priorities that address Planetary Science Decadal Survey questions, and generate a report that is broadly disseminated to the planetary science community. The SIDT examined a wide range of solar system targets and science questions, focusing on unique measurements that could be made from a balloon-borne platform to address high-priority planetary science questions for a fraction of the cost of space missions. The resulting instrument concepts reflect unique capabilities offered by a balloon-borne platform (e.g., observations at spectral regions inaccessible from the ground due to telluric absorption, diffraction-limited imaging, and long duration uninterrupted observations of a target). We discuss example science cases that can be addressed with GHAPS and describe a notional instrument suite that can be used by guest observers to pursue decadal-level science questions.

  9. A Survey on Web Search Results Personalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blessy Thomas

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available  Web is a huge information repository covering almost every topic, in which a human user could be interested. As the size and richness of information on the web increases, diversity and complexity of the tasks users tries to perform also increases. With the overwhelming volume of information on the web, the task of finding relevant information related to a specific query or topic is becoming increasingly difficult. Now a day’s commonly used task on internet is web search. User gets variety of related information for their queries. To provide more relevant and effective results to user, Personalization technique is used. Personalized web search refer to search information that is tailored specifically to a person’s interests by incorporating information about query provided. Two general types of approaches to personalizing search results are modifying user’s query and re-ranking search results. Several personalized web search techniques based on web contents, web link structure, browsing history, user profiles and user queries. This paper is to represent survey on various techniques of personalization

  10. School Leadership Preparation and Practice Survey Instruments and Their Uses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pounder, Diana

    2012-01-01

    This article addresses the leadership preparation line of inquiry developed in the past decade by the University Council for Educational Administration/Learning and Teaching in Educational Leadership Special Interest Group Taskforce on Evaluating Leadership Preparation Programs, and it particularly addresses the series of survey instruments…

  11. Planck early results. V. The Low Frequency Instrument data processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    León-Tavares, J.; Falvella, M.C.; Stompor, R.

    2011-01-01

    We describe the processing of data from the Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) used in production of the Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalogue (ERCSC). In particular, we discuss the steps involved in reducing the data from telemetry packets to cleaned, calibrated, time-ordered data (TOD) and ...

  12. Planck early results. V. The Low Frequency Instrument data processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    León-Tavares, J.; Falvella, M.C.; Stompor, R.;

    2011-01-01

    We describe the processing of data from the Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) used in production of the Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalogue (ERCSC). In particular, we discuss the steps involved in reducing the data from telemetry packets to cleaned, calibrated, time-ordered data (TOD) and ...

  13. Field results of antifouling techniques for optical instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strahle, W.J.; Hotchkiss, F.S.; Martini, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    An anti-fouling technique is developed for the protection of optical instruments from biofouling which leaches a bromide compound into a sample chamber and pumps new water into the chamber prior to measurement. The primary advantage of using bromide is that it is less toxic than the metal-based antifoulants. The drawback of the bromide technique is also discussed.

  14. Survey of instrumentation used for monitoring metals in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinby-Hunt, M.S.

    1978-06-01

    A study was conducted of instrumentation used to determine metals in water. Several of the techniques most commonly used for analysis and routine determinations of metals in water are shown in Table 1. They are atomic absorption spectroscopy, both flame and flameless, atomic emission spectroscopy using conventional flame sources and inductively-coupled plasma sources, and ultraviolet-visible absorption techniques. Other less frequently employed methods are x-ray fluorescence analysis using both photon and charged particle excitation with energy-dispersive and wavelength-dispersive spectral analysis. Also electrochemical techniques and activation analysis are studied.

  15. The New Mexico Tech Extrasolar Spectroscopic Survey Instrument (NESSI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creech-Eakman, Michelle J.; Jurgenson, C.; Vasisht, G.; Swain, M.; Boston, P.; Santoro, F.

    2010-01-01

    We present the design and scientific objectives behind NESSI, a near-infrared spectroscopic purpose-built for studying exoplanet atmospheres. This instrument is being designed and assembled by a team of scientists and engineers at New Mexico Tech (NMT), the Magdalena Ridge Observatory (MRO) and NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab (JPL), and is scheduled for deployment in late 2010 at the MRO 2.4m telescope. NESSI's unique design is driven by recent space and ground-based NIR spectroscopy of exoplanet atmospheres by members of our team. Optimization of the instrument to achieve 0.01% relative accuracies in spectra of exoplanetary molecular constituents requires careful attention to certain design features and a new technical approach. We present an overview of NESSI's design, including the four major subassemblies: 1) a field derotator, 2) a reimaging module, 3) an optical guiding module, and 4) a multi-object spectrograph subassembly. We also present an overview of our science program specifically designed to build the community of exoplanet researchers and students in NM. The financial support of our team and NESSI itself have been made possible by a NM NASA EPSCoR grant, matching funds from the NMT administration, and internal support for the NESSI hardware from Dr. Van Romero, NMT's Research Vice-President.

  16. Cold vacuum chamber for diagnostics: Instrumentation and first results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstl, S.; Voutta, R.; Casalbuoni, S.; Grau, A. W.; Holubek, T.; de Jauregui, D. Saez; Bartolini, R.; Cox, M. P.; Longhi, E. C.; Rehm, G.; Schouten, J. C.; Walker, R. P.; Sikler, G.; Migliorati, M.; Spataro, B.

    2014-10-01

    For a proper design of the cryogenic layout of superconducting insertion devices it is necessary to take into account the heat load from the beam to the cold beam tube. In order to measure and possibly understand the beam heat load to a cold bore, a cold vacuum chamber for diagnostics (COLDDIAG) has been built. COLDDIAG is designed in a flexible way, to allow its installation in different light sources. In order to study the beam heat load and the influence of the cryosorbed gas layer, the instrumentation comprises temperature sensors, pressure gauges, and mass spectrometers as well as retarding field analyzers with which it is possible to measure the beam heat load, total pressure, and gas content as well as the flux of particles hitting the chamber walls. In this paper we describe the experimental equipment, the installation of COLDDIAG in the Diamond Light Source and selected examples of the measurements performed to show the capabilities of this unique instrument.

  17. Challenging patient safety culture: survey results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellings, Johan; Schrooten, Ward; Klazinga, Niek; Vleugels, Arthur

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to measure patient safety culture in five Belgian general hospitals. Safety culture plays an important role in the approach towards greater patient safety in hospitals. The Patient Safety Culture Hospital questionnaire was distributed hospital-wide in five general hospitals. It evaluates ten patient safety culture dimensions and two outcomes. The scores were expressed as the percentage of positive answers towards patient safety for each dimension. The survey was conducted from March through November 2005. In total, 3,940 individuals responded (overall response rate = 77 per cent), including 2,813 nurses and assistants, 462 physicians, 397 physiotherapists, laboratory and radiology assistants, social workers and 64 pharmacists and pharmacy assistants. The dimensional positive scores were found to be low to average in all the hospitals. The lowest scores were "hospital management support for patient safety" (35 per cent), "non-punitive response to error" (36 per cent), "hospital transfers and transitions" (36 per cent), "staffing" (38 per cent), and "teamwork across hospital units" (40 per cent). The dimension "teamwork within hospital units" generated the highest score (70 per cent). Although the same dimensions were considered problematic in the different hospitals, important variations between the five hospitals were observed. A comprehensive and tailor-made plan to improve patient safety culture in these hospitals can now be developed. Results indicate that important aspects of the patient safety culture in these hospitals need improvement. This is an important challenge to all stakeholders wishing to improve patient safety.

  18. Planck 2013 results. II. The Low Frequency Instrument data processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aghanim, N.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.

    2013-01-01

    We describe the data processing pipeline of the Planck Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) data processing centre (DPC) to create and characterize full-sky maps based on the first 15.5 months of operations at 30, 44, and 70 GHz. In particular, we discuss the various steps involved in reducing the data...... using Jupiter transits, which are also used for the geometrical calibration of the focal plane....

  19. Medical Simulation Practices 2010 Survey Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrindle, Jeffrey J.

    2011-01-01

    Medical Simulation Centers are an essential component of our learning infrastructure to prepare doctors and nurses for their careers. Unlike the military and aerospace simulation industry, very little has been published regarding the best practices currently in use within medical simulation centers. This survey attempts to provide insight into the current simulation practices at medical schools, hospitals, university nursing programs and community college nursing programs. Students within the MBA program at Saint Joseph's University conducted a survey of medical simulation practices during the summer 2010 semester. A total of 115 institutions responded to the survey. The survey resus discuss overall effectiveness of current simulation centers as well as the tools and techniques used to conduct the simulation activity

  20. The Multi-sensor Airborne Radiation Survey (MARS) Instrument

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fast, James E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Aalseth, Craig E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Asner, David M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bonebrake, Christopher A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Day, Anthony R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dorow, Kevin E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Fuller, Erin S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Glasgow, Brian D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hossbach, Todd W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hyronimus, Brian J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jensen, Jeffrey L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Johnson, Kenneth I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jordan, David V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Morgen, Gerald P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Morris, Scott J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mullen, O Dennis [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Myers, Allan W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pitts, W. Karl [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rohrer, John S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Runkle, Robert C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Seifert, Allen [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Shergur, Jason M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stave, Sean C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Tatishvili, Gocha [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Thompson, Robert C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Todd, Lindsay C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Warren, Glen A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Willett, Jesse A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wood, Lynn S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-01-11

    The Multi-sensor Airborne Radiation Survey (MARS) project has developed a new single cryostat detector array design for high purity germanium (HPGe) gama ray spectrometers that achieves the high detection efficiency required for stand-off detection and actionable characterization of radiological threats. This approach, we found, is necessary since a high efficiency HPGe detector can only be built as an array due to limitations in growing large germanium crystals. Moreover, the system is ruggedized and shock mounted for use in a variety of field applications, including airborne and maritime operations.

  1. Early results from the Whisper instrument on Cluster: An overview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Decreau, P.M.E.; Fergeau, P.; Krasnoselskikh, V.

    2001-01-01

    The Whisper instrument yields two data sets: (i) the electron density determined via the relaxation sounder, and (ii) the spectrum of natural plasma emissions in the frequency band 2-80 kHz. Both data sets allow for the three-dimensional exploration of the magnetosphere by the Cluster mission...... in normal telemetry mode and 0.3 s in burst mode telemetry, respectively. Recorded on board the four spacecraft, the Whisper density data set forms a reference for other techniques measuring the electron population. We give examples of Whisper density data used to derive the vector gradient, and estimate...

  2. Victim support services in Serbia: Survey results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ćopić Sanja

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available From September 1, 2006 to June 1, 2007, within the project "Development of victim support services in Serbia", Victimology Society of Serbia has conducted a survey on organizations in Serbia that are offering support to victims of crime. Aims of the survey were: to identify organizations that are supporting victims of crime either within state institutions and non-governmental organizations; to collect and analyze the data that might be useful for victims, and also to make directory of victim support services in Serbia. The sample encompassed 188 organizations from 55 towns in Serbia. The aim of this paper is point out, through the analysis of the data obtained through the survey, to which extent victims of crime in general, and of some forms of crime in particular can get support in Serbia, which organizations are offering support, what form of support and in which way. .

  3. EARLINET instrument intercomparison campaigns: overview on strategy and results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandinger, Ulla; Freudenthaler, Volker; Baars, Holger; Amodeo, Aldo; Engelmann, Ronny; Mattis, Ina; Groß, Silke; Pappalardo, Gelsomina; Giunta, Aldo; D'Amico, Giuseppe; Chaikovsky, Anatoli; Osipenko, Fiodor; Slesar, Alexander; Nicolae, Doina; Belegante, Livio; Talianu, Camelia; Serikov, Ilya; Linné, Holger; Jansen, Friedhelm; Apituley, Arnoud; Wilson, Keith M.; de Graaf, Martin; Trickl, Thomas; Giehl, Helmut; Adam, Mariana; Comerón, Adolfo; Muñoz-Porcar, Constantino; Rocadenbosch, Francesc; Sicard, Michaël; Tomás, Sergio; Lange, Diego; Kumar, Dhiraj; Pujadas, Manuel; Molero, Francisco; Fernández, Alfonso J.; Alados-Arboledas, Lucas; Bravo-Aranda, Juan Antonio; Navas-Guzmán, Francisco; Guerrero-Rascado, Juan Luis; José Granados-Muñoz, María; Preißler, Jana; Wagner, Frank; Gausa, Michael; Grigorov, Ivan; Stoyanov, Dimitar; Iarlori, Marco; Rizi, Vincenco; Spinelli, Nicola; Boselli, Antonella; Wang, Xuan; Lo Feudo, Teresa; Perrone, Maria Rita; De Tomasi, Ferdinando; Burlizzi, Pasquale

    2016-03-01

    This paper introduces the recent European Aerosol Research Lidar Network (EARLINET) quality-assurance efforts at instrument level. Within two dedicated campaigns and five single-site intercomparison activities, 21 EARLINET systems from 18 EARLINET stations were intercompared between 2009 and 2013. A comprehensive strategy for campaign setup and data evaluation has been established. Eleven systems from nine EARLINET stations participated in the EARLINET Lidar Intercomparison 2009 (EARLI09). In this campaign, three reference systems were qualified which served as traveling standards thereafter. EARLINET systems from nine other stations have been compared against these reference systems since 2009. We present and discuss comparisons at signal and at product level from all campaigns for more than 100 individual measurement channels at the wavelengths of 355, 387, 532, and 607 nm. It is shown that in most cases, a very good agreement of the compared systems with the respective reference is obtained. Mean signal deviations in predefined height ranges are typically below ±2 %. Particle backscatter and extinction coefficients agree within ±2 × 10-4 km-1 sr-1 and ± 0.01 km-1, respectively, in most cases. For systems or channels that showed larger discrepancies, an in-depth analysis of deficiencies was performed and technical solutions and upgrades were proposed and realized. The intercomparisons have reinforced confidence in the EARLINET data quality and allowed us to draw conclusions on necessary system improvements for some instruments and to identify major challenges that need to be tackled in the future.

  4. Education Law Texts Usage: Survey Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Kathleen A.; Zirkel, Perry A.

    1998-01-01

    Identifies the textbooks professors use in education law courses, based on a survey of 110 members of the Education Law Association during 1996-97. Almost half preferred Alexander and Alexander's "American School Law," with McCarthy and Caqmbron-McCabe's "Public School Law" a close second. Only 44% required or suggested additional nontextbook…

  5. First results from the Herschel Gould Belt Survey in Taurus

    CERN Document Server

    Kirk, J M; Palmeirim, P; Andre, Ph; Griffin, M J; Hargrave, P J; Konyves, V; Bernard, J P; Nutter, D J; Sibthorpe, B; Di Francesco, J; Abergel, A; Arzoumanian, D; Benedettini, M; Bontemps, S; Elia, D; Hennemann, M; Hill, T; Men'shchikov, A; Motte, F; Nguyen-Luong, Q; Peretto, N; Pezzuto, S; Rygl, K L J; Sadavoy, S I; Schisano, E; Schneider, N; Testi, L; White, G

    2013-01-01

    The whole of the Taurus region (a total area of 52 sq. deg.) has been observed by the Herschel SPIRE and PACS instruments at wavelengths of 70, 160, 250, 350 and 500 {\\mu}m as part of the Herschel Gould Belt Survey. In this paper we present the first results from the part of the Taurus region that includes the Barnard 18 and L1536 clouds. A new source-finding routine, the Cardiff Source-finding AlgoRithm (CSAR), is introduced, which is loosely based on CLUMPFIND, but that also generates a structure tree, or dendrogram, which can be used to interpret hierarchical clump structure in a complex region. Sources were extracted from the data using the hierarchical version of CSAR and plotted on a mass-size diagram. We found a hierarchy of objects with sizes in the range 0.024-2.7 pc. Previous studies showed that gravitationally bound prestellar cores and unbound starless clumps appeared in different places on the mass-size diagram. However, it was unclear whether this was due to a lack of instrumental dynamic range ...

  6. Planck 2013 results. II. Low Frequency Instrument data processing

    CERN Document Server

    Aghanim, N; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Atrio-Barandela, F; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bobin, J; Bock, J J; Bonaldi, A; Bonavera, L; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Bridges, M; Bucher, M; Burigana, C; Butler, R C; Cappellini, B; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Chamballu, A; Chen, X; Chiang, L -Y; Christensen, P R; Church, S; Colombi, S; Colombo, L P L; Crill, B P; Cruz, M; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Falvella, M C; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Franceschi, E; Gaier, T C; Galeotta, S; Ganga, K; Giard, M; Giardino, G; Giraud-Héraud, Y; Gjerløw, E; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Hansen, F K; Hanson, D; Harrison, D; Henrot-Versillé, S; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hornstrup, A; Hovest, W; Huffenberger, K M; Jaffe, T R; Jaffe, A H; Jewell, J; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Kangaslahti, P; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kiiveri, K; Kisner, T S; Knoche, J; Knox, L; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lähteenmäki, A; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Lattanzi, M; Laureijs, R J; Lawrence, C R; Leach, S; Leahy, J P; Leonardi, R; Lesgourgues, J; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Lindholm, V; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maggio, G; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Maris, M; Marshall, D J; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Matthai, F; Mazzotta, P; Meinhold, P R; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Mitra, S; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Moss, A; Munshi, D; Naselsky, P; Natoli, P; Netterfield, C B; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; O'Dwyer, I J; Osborne, S; Paci, F; Pagano, L; Paladini, R; Paoletti, D; Partridge, B; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Peel, M; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Pierpaoli, E; Pietrobon, D; Plaszczynski, S; Platania, P; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Popa, L; Poutanen, T; Pratt, G W; Prézeau, G; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Reach, W T; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Ricciardi, S; Riller, T; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Rossetti, M; Roudier, G; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Salerno, E; Sandri, M; Santos, D; Scott, D; Seiffert, M D; Shellard, E P S; Spencer, L D; Starck, J -L; Stolyarov, V; Stompor, R; Sureau, F; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Tavagnacco, D; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Tuovinen, J; Türler, M; Umana, G; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Varis, J; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Vittorio, N; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Watson, R; Wehus, I K; White, S D M; Wilkinson, A; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2014-01-01

    We describe the data processing pipeline of the Planck Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) data processing centre (DPC) to create and characterize full-sky maps based on the first 15.5 months of operations at 30, 44 and 70 GHz. In particular, we discuss the various steps involved in reducing the data, starting from telemetry packets through to the production of cleaned, calibrated timelines and calibrated frequency maps. Data are continuously calibrated using the modulation induced on the mean temperature of the cosmic microwave background radiation by the proper motion of the spacecraft. Sky signals other than the dipole are removed by an iterative procedure based on simultaneous fitting of calibration parameters and sky maps. Noise properties are estimated from time-ordered data after the sky signal has been removed, using a generalized least square map-making algorithm. A destriping code (Madam) is employed to combine radiometric data and pointing information into sky maps, minimizing the variance of correlated...

  7. In-flight degradation results for the UARS SOLSTICE instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Thomas N.; Rottman, Gary J.

    1998-10-01

    The Solar Stellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment is a three channel spectrometer designed for measuring the solar UV irradiance from 119 to 420 nm with a spectral resolution of 0.1 to 0.3 nm. The three channels are designated as the G, F, and N channels that cover the 119-190 nm, 170-320 nm, and 280-420 nm regions respectively. The SOLSTICE is aboard the NASA Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) which was launched on September 12, 1991. The degradation of the SOLSTICE sensitivity is primarily tracked in-flight by measuring a set of bright, early-type stars with the same optics and detectors and by only changing slit sizes and integration times. While the Sun changes by 1 percent in the near UV and by as much as a factor of 2 in the far UV, early-type main sequence stars are not expected to change by more than 1 percent in the UV for long time periods. The ensemble average of the SOLSTICE stellar observation indicate that these stars are indeed stable to 2 percent or better. Since the launch of UARS, the SOLSTICE sensitivity has decreased by a few percent per year. We attribute the degradation primarily to again effects for the photomultiplier tubes for all three channels and to diffusion between layers in the broadband interference filters for the F and N channels. There also appears degradation for the G channel diffraction grating related to excessive heating of the grating on a few days during the UARS mission. There appears only minor degradation associated with optical contamination, mainly because of the strict use of low-outgassing materials in the SOLSTICE instrument and maintenance of class 10,000 clean rooms and oil-free vacuum systems for all pre-flight testing of the SOLSTICE instrument.

  8. Development of the Reasonable Accommodation Factor Survey: Results and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shengli; MacDonald-Wilson, Kim L.; Fabian, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was (a) to explore the latent factors in the "Reasonable Accommodation Factor Survey" (RAFS) instrument and (b) to compare scores on the latent factors of the RAFS by participant's role. Eight latent factors were identified through an exploratory factor analysis with orthogonal rotation. The reliability tests…

  9. Two valuation questions in one survey: Is it a recipe for sequencing and instrument context effects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraud, K.L.; Loomis, J.B.; Johnson, R.L.

    1999-01-01

    Economic theory suggests that willingness to pay for two goods independently offered should remain unchanged when the survey instrument changes slightly. Four survey treatments consisting of comprehensive good and a subset of that good were used. The surveys alternated in the question ordering and in the embedded good which accompanied the comprehensive good. We tested for sequencing and instrument context effects using both a combined and split sample designs. In the combined sample case we found some evidence to sequencing effects in the data containing the first subset good. Likelihood ratio tests indicated that sequencing did not effect scale or location of parameters. In the test for instrument context effects, evidence was found indicating context does effect willingness to pay estimates.

  10. Instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decreton, M

    2001-04-01

    SCK-CEN's research and development programme on instrumentation involves the assessment and the development of sensitive measurement systems used within a radiation environment. Particular emphasis is on the assessment of optical fibre components and their adaptability to radiation environments. The evaluation of ageing processes of instrumentation in fission plants, the development of specific data evaluation strategies to compensate for ageing induced degradation of sensors and cable performance form part of these activities. In 2000, particular emphasis was on in-core reactor instrumentation applied to fusion, accelerator driven and water-cooled fission reactors. This involved the development of high performance instrumentation for irradiation experiments in the BR2 reactor in support of new instrumentation needs for MYRRHA, and for diagnostic systems for the ITER reactor.

  11. Planck 2013 results. II. Low Frequency Instrument data processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planck Collaboration; Aghanim, N.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bridges, M.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Cappellini, B.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chen, X.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Crill, B. P.; Cruz, M.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falvella, M. C.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Gaier, T. C.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jewell, J.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Kangaslahti, P.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kisner, T. S.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leach, S.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Morisset, N.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Naselsky, P.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; O'Dwyer, I. J.; Osborne, S.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Peel, M.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Platania, P.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Robbers, G.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Salerno, E.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Starck, J.-L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Türler, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Varis, J.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Watson, R.; Wehus, I. K.; White, S. D. M.; Wilkinson, A.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2014-11-01

    We describe the data processing pipeline of the Planck Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) data processing centre (DPC) to create and characterize full-sky maps based on the first 15.5 months of operations at 30, 44, and 70 GHz. In particular, we discuss the various steps involved in reducing the data, from telemetry packets through to the production of cleaned, calibrated timelines and calibrated frequency maps. Data are continuously calibrated using the modulation induced on the mean temperature of the cosmic microwave background radiation by the proper motion of the spacecraft. Sky signals other than the dipole are removed by an iterative procedure based on simultaneous fitting of calibration parameters and sky maps. Noise properties are estimated from time-ordered data after the sky signal has been removed, using a generalized least squares map-making algorithm. A destriping code (Madam) is employed to combine radiometric data and pointing information into sky maps, minimizing the variance of correlated noise. Noise covariance matrices, required to compute statistical uncertainties on LFI and Planck products, are also produced. Main beams are estimated down to the ≈- 20 dB level using Jupiter transits, which are also used for the geometrical calibration of the focal plane.

  12. Planck Early Results: The Low Frequency Instrument data processing

    CERN Document Server

    Zacchei, A; Baccigalupi, C; Bersanelli, M; Bonaldi, A; Bonavera, L; Burigana, C; Butler, R C; Cuttaia, F; de Zotti, G; Dick, J; Frailis, M; Galeotta, S; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gregorio, A; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Knoche, J; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lawrence, C R; Leach, S; Leahy, J P; López-Caniego, M; Mandolesi, N; Maris, M; Matthai, F; Meinhold, P R; Mennella, A; Morgante, G; Morisset, N; Natoli, P; Pasian, F; Perrotta, F; Polenta, G; Poutanen, T; Reinecke, M; Ricciardi, S; Rohlfs, R; Sandri, M; Suur-Uski, A -S; Tauber, J A; Tavagnacco, D; Terenzi, L; Tomasi, M; Valiviita, J; Villa, F; Zonca, A; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartlett, J G; Bartolo, N; Bedini, L; Bennett, K; Binko, P; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Bremer, M; Cabella, P; Cappellini, B; Chen, X; Colombo, L; Cruz, M; Curto, A; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Gasperis, G; de Rosa, A; de Troia, G; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Donzelli, S; Dörl, U; Efstathiou, G; En\\sslin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Falvella, M C; Finelli, F; Franceschi, E; Gaier, T C; Gasparo, F; Génova-Santos, R T; Giardino, G; Gómez, F; Gruppuso, A; Hansen, F K; Hell, R; Herranz, D; Hovest, W; Jewell, J; Juvela, M; Kisner, T S; Knox, L; Lähteenmäki, A; Lamarre, J -M; Leonardi, R; León-Tavares, J; Lilje, P B; Lubin, P M; Maggio, G; Marinucci, D; Martínez-González, E; Massardi, M; Matarrese, S; Meharga, M T; Melchiorri, A; Migliaccio, M; Mitra, S; Moss, A; N\\orgaard-Nielsen, H U; Pagano, L; Paladini, R; Paoletti, D; Partridge, B; Pearson, D; Pettorino, V; Pietrobon, D; Prézeau, G; Procopio, P; Puget, J -L; Quercellini, C; Rachen, J P; Rebolo, R; Robbers, G; Rocha, G; Rubi\; Salerno, E; Savelainen, M; Scott, D; Seiffert, M D; Silk, J I; Smoot, G F; Sternberg, J; Stivoli, F; Stompor, R; Tofani, G; Tuovinen, J; Türler, M; Umana, G; Vielva, P; Vittorio, N; Vuerli, C; Wade, L A; Watson, R; White, S D M; Wilkinson, A

    2011-01-01

    We describe the data processing pipeline employed by the Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) Data Processing Centre (DPC) to create and characterize the frequency maps used by the ERCSC (Early Release Compact Source Catalogue) first product of Planck to become public. In particular, we discuss the various steps involved in reducing the data, starting from telemetry (TM)packets through to the production of cleaned calibrated timelines and calibrated frequency maps. Data are continuously calibrated using the modulation induced on the mean temperature of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation by the proper motion of the spacecraft. The sky signals other than the dipole are removed by an iterative procedure based on simultaneous fitting of calibration parameters and sky maps. Noise properties are estimated from time-ordered data where the sky signal is removed using a Generalized Least Square map-making algorithm. The measured 1/f noise knee-frequencies range from \\sim 100 mHz at 30 GHz to a few tens of mHz at 70 G...

  13. Planck early results. V. The Low Frequency Instrument data processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacchei, A.; Maino, D.; Baccigalupi, C.; Bersanelli, M.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Cuttaia, F.; de Zotti, G.; Dick, J.; Frailis, M.; Galeotta, S.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Knoche, J.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leach, S.; Leahy, J. P.; López-Caniego, M.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Matthai, F.; Meinhold, P. R.; Mennella, A.; Morgante, G.; Morisset, N.; Natoli, P.; Pasian, F.; Perrotta, F.; Polenta, G.; Poutanen, T.; Reinecke, M.; Ricciardi, S.; Rohlfs, R.; Sandri, M.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Tomasi, M.; Valiviita, J.; Villa, F.; Zonca, A.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Bartolo, N.; Bedini, L.; Bennett, K.; Binko, P.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bremer, M.; Cabella, P.; Cappellini, B.; Chen, X.; Colombo, L.; Cruz, M.; Curto, A.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Gasperis, G.; de Rosa, A.; de Troia, G.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Donzelli, S.; Dörl, U.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falvella, M. C.; Finelli, F.; Franceschi, E.; Gaier, T. C.; Gasparo, F.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Giardino, G.; Gómez, F.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Hell, R.; Herranz, D.; Hovest, W.; Huynh, M.; Jewell, J.; Juvela, M.; Kisner, T. S.; Knox, L.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Leonardi, R.; León-Tavares, J.; Lilje, P. B.; Lubin, P. M.; Maggio, G.; Marinucci, D.; Martínez-González, E.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Meharga, M. T.; Melchiorri, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Moss, A.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Pagano, L.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pearson, D.; Pettorino, V.; Pietrobon, D.; Prézeau, G.; Procopio, P.; Puget, J.-L.; Quercellini, C.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Robbers, G.; Rocha, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Salerno, E.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Silk, J. I.; Smoot, G. F.; Sternberg, J.; Stivoli, F.; Stompor, R.; Tofani, G.; Toffolatti, L.; Tuovinen, J.; Türler, M.; Umana, G.; Vielva, P.; Vittorio, N.; Vuerli, C.; Wade, L. A.; Watson, R.; White, S. D. M.; Wilkinson, A.

    2011-12-01

    We describe the processing of data from the Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) used in production of the Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalogue (ERCSC). In particular, we discuss the steps involved in reducing the data from telemetry packets to cleaned, calibrated, time-ordered data (TOD) and frequency maps. Data are continuously calibrated using the modulation of the temperature of the cosmic microwave background radiation induced by the motion of the spacecraft. Noise properties are estimated from TOD from which the sky signal has been removed using a generalized least square map-making algorithm. Measured 1/f noise knee-frequencies range from ~100 mHz at 30 GHz to a few tens of mHz at 70GHz. A destriping code (Madam) is employed to combine radiometric data and pointing information into sky maps, minimizing the variance of correlated noise. Noise covariance matrices required to compute statistical uncertainties on LFI and Planck products are also produced. Main beams are estimated down to the ≈-10dB level using Jupiter transits, which are also used for geometrical calibration of the focal plane. Corresponding author: A. Zacchei, e-mail: zacchei@oats.inaf.it

  14. Discounting in intergenerational investment appraisal - Survey results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Foltyn-Zarychta

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Appraising projects with intergenerational effects is a complex task, incorporating the issue of bringing future impacts to present value. This is usually achieved by applying the discount factor. However, the choice of discount rate to intergenerational context faces multiple technical and moral problems. The paper analyses a theoretical rationale behind the concept of intergenerational discount rate and preliminary assessment of intergenerational discount rate level in Poland based on survey done in 2012 among Finance & Insurance Faculty students at University of Economics in Katowice showing the decline in the value of discount rates with time.

  15. Measuring social exclusion in routine public health surveys: construction of a multidimensional instrument.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Addi P L van Bergen

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Social exclusion is considered a major factor in the causation and maintenance of health inequalities, but its measurement in health research is still in its infancy. In the Netherlands the Institute for Social Research (SCP developed an instrument to measure the multidimensional concept of social exclusion in social and economic policy research. Here, we present a method to construct a similar measure of social exclusion using available data from public health surveys. METHODS: Analyses were performed on data from the health questionnaires that were completed by 20,877 adults in the four largest cities in the Netherlands. From each of the four questionnaires we selected the items that corresponded to those of the SCP-instrument. These were entered into a nonlinear canonical correlation analysis. The measurement properties of the resulting indices and dimension scales were assessed and compared to the SCP-instrument. RESULTS: The internal consistency of the indices and most of the dimension scales were adequate and the internal structure of the indices was as expected. Both generalisabiliy and construct validity were good: in all datasets strong associations were found between the index and a number of known risk factors of social exclusion. A limitation of content validity was that the dimension "lack of normative integration" could not be measured, because no relevant items were available. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that a measure for social exclusion can be constructed with available health questionnaires. This provides opportunities for application in public health surveillance systems in the Netherlands and elsewhere in the world.

  16. Instrument Testing and First Results From the MOBB Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhrhammer, R.; Romanowicz, B.; Neuhauser, D.; Stakes, D.; McGill, P.; Ramirez, T.

    2002-12-01

    and the mass position signals indicate that the instruments are progressively settling. Preliminary analysis of data retrieved during the 2002 summer and fall dives will be presented. In particular, we will discuss long period background seismic noise and how it correlates with signals recorded on the current-meter and DPG, leading to possible improvements.

  17. Instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decreton, M

    2002-04-01

    SCK-CEN's R and D programme on instrumentation involves the development of advanced instrumentation systems for nuclear applications as well as the assessment of the performance of these instruments in a radiation environment. Particular emphasis is on the use of optical fibres as umbilincal links of a remote handling unit for use during maintanance of a fusion reacor, studies on the radiation hardening of plasma diagnostic systems; investigations on new instrumentation for the future MYRRHA accelerator driven system; space applications related to radiation-hardened lenses; the development of new approaches for dose, temperature and strain measurements; the assessment of radiation-hardened sensors and motors for remote handling tasks and studies of dose measurement systems including the use of optical fibres. Progress and achievements in these areas for 2001 are described.

  18. Instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decreton, M

    2000-07-01

    SCK-CEN's research and development programme on instrumentation aims at evaluating the potentials of new instrumentation technologies under the severe constraints of a nuclear application. It focuses on the tolerance of sensors to high radiation doses, including optical fibre sensors, and on the related intelligent data processing needed to cope with the nuclear constraints. Main achievements in these domains in 1999 are summarised.

  19. Dental Management Survey Brazil (DMS-BR): creation and validation of a management instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Paola Sampaio; Martins, Ismar Eduardo; Biazevic, Maria Gabriela Haye; Silva, Paulo Roberto da; Michel-Crosato, Edgard

    2017-04-10

    Questionnaires for the assessment of knowledge and self-perception can be useful to diagnose what a dentist knows about management and administration. The aim of the present study was to create and validate the Dental Management Survey Brazil (DMS-BR) scale, based on meetings with experts in the field. After having elaborated the first version, 10 audits were performed in dental offices in order to produce the final version, which included nine dimensions: location, patient, finance, marketing, competition, quality, staff, career, and productivity. The accuracy of the instrument was measured by intrarater and interrater reliability. In the validation phase, 247 Brazilian dentists answered a web-based questionnaire. The data were processed using Stata 13.0 and the significance level was set at 95%. The instrument had intrarater and interrater reliability (ICC-0.93 and 0.94). The overall average of respondents for the DMS-BR scale was 3.77 (SD = 0.45). Skewness and kurtosis were below absolute values 3 and 7, respectively. Internal validity measured by Cronbach's alpha was 0.925 and the correlation of each dimension with the final result of the DMS-BR ranged between 0.606 and 0.810. Correlation with the job satisfaction scale was 0.661. The SEM data ranged between 0.80 and 0.56. The questionnaire presented satisfactory indicators of dentists' self-perception about management and administration activities.

  20. Development and validation of a survey instrument to measure children's advertising literacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozendaal, E.; Opree, S.J.; Buijzen, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and validate a survey measurement instrument for children's advertising literacy. Based on the multidimensional conceptualization of advertising literacy by 0056"> Rozendaal, Lapierre, Van Reijmersdal, and Buijzen (2011), 39 items were created to measure two d

  1. Establishing Educational Priorities through the Illinois Problems Index. Survey Instruments [and] User's Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois State Board of Education, Springfield.

    The Illinois Problems Index (IPI), a process with supporting survey instruments, enables local school districts to assess and evaluate the adequacy of current programs and services and plan improvements where problems exist. A User's Manual provides a step-by-step "walk through" of the process, while permitting alternative techniques for…

  2. Development and validation of a survey instrument to measure children's advertising literacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozendaal, E.; Opree, S.J.; Buijzen, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and validate a survey measurement instrument for children's advertising literacy. Based on the multidimensional conceptualization of advertising literacy by 0056"> Rozendaal, Lapierre, Van Reijmersdal, and Buijzen (2011), 39 items were created to measure two

  3. New results from the Herschel Reference Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boselli, A.

    2013-11-01

    The Herschel Reference Survey is a SPIRE guaranteed time key project aimed at studying the properties of the interstellar medium of a K-band selected, volume-limited (15 ≤ D ≤ 25 Mpc) complete sample of 322 galaxies spanning a large range in morphological type and stellar mass. We study the far infrared colours of the late-type galaxies of the cluster with the purpose of tracing with an empirical approach the relationships between the shape of the observed spectral energy distribution (SED) and different physical parameters such as the star formation rate, the birthrate parameter (or specific star formation rate), here taken as a tracer of the hardness of the inciding radiation, the intensity of the ionising and non ionising radiation, the metallicity and the Hα and FUV attenuation. We also show that the far infrared shape of the SED cannot be fitted with a modified black body with a fixed grain emissivity parameter β. All this analysis is a brief summary of a work presented in Boselli_etal. (2012).

  4. Comparing NICU teamwork and safety climate across two commonly used survey instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Profit, Jochen; Lee, Henry C; Sharek, Paul J; Kan, Peggy; Nisbet, Courtney C; Thomas, Eric J; Etchegaray, Jason M; Sexton, Bryan

    2016-12-01

    Measurement and our understanding of safety culture are still evolving. The objectives of this study were to assess variation in safety and teamwork climate and in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) setting, and compare measurement of safety culture scales using two different instruments (Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ) and Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPSC)). Cross-sectional survey study of a voluntary sample of 2073 (response rate 62.9%) health professionals in 44 NICUs. To compare survey instruments, we used Spearman's rank correlation coefficients. We also compared similar scales and items across the instruments using t tests and changes in quartile-level performance. We found significant variation across NICUs in safety and teamwork climate scales of SAQ and HSOPSC (pteamwork scales (teamwork climate and teamwork within units) of the two instruments correlated strongly (safety r=0.72, pteamwork r=0.67, p<0.001). However, the means and per cent agreements for all scale scores and even seemingly similar item scores were significantly different. In addition, comparisons of scale score quartiles between the two instruments revealed that half of the NICUs fell into different quartiles when translating between the instruments. Large variation and opportunities for improvement in patient safety culture exist across NICUs. Important systematic differences exist between SAQ and HSOPSC such that these instruments should not be used interchangeably. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  5. Diamond mosaic crystals for neutron instrumentation: First experimental results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freund, A.K., E-mail: kafreund@free.f [Via Cordis, 92 Rue Abbe de l' Epee, F-33000 Bordeaux (France); Institut Max von Laue-Paul Langevin, B.P. 156, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex (France); Gsell, S.; Fischer, M.; Schreck, M. [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Augsburg, D-86135 Augsburg (Germany); Andersen, K.H.; Courtois, P. [Institut Max von Laue-Paul Langevin, B.P. 156, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex (France); Borchert, G. [Forschungsneutronenquelle FRM2, D-85747 Garching (Germany); Skoulatos, M. [Helmholtz Center Berlin for Materials and Energy, D-14109 Berlin (Germany)

    2011-04-01

    Diamond single crystals were recently proposed as monochromators of unprecedented performance (Freund, 2009). In the present paper we describe how diamond crystals with a suitable mosaic spread can be produced using a specific plasma CVD technique. Up to 2 mm thick samples with an average mosaic spread of 0.2{sup o} have been produced. We report on X- and gamma-ray characterisation checking the uniformity of the mosaic structure and present the results of a first study regarding the neutron reflection properties of this outstanding material. These promising results show that the diamond diffraction properties are not too far from the theoretical expectations. For example, 34% peak reflectivity has been obtained for a 1 mm thick crystal at 1 A wavelength.

  6. PRES 2013: Results from the Postgraduate Research Experience Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Paul; Turner, Gosia

    2013-01-01

    This document outlines the results of the "2013 Postgraduate Research Experience Survey" ("PRES"), where 48,401 replies were received from 122 participating institutions. Redeveloped for 2013, our biennial survey is the only national survey to gather insight from postgraduate research students about their learning and…

  7. PRES 2013: Results from the Postgraduate Research Experience Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Paul; Turner, Gosia

    2013-01-01

    This document outlines the results of the "2013 Postgraduate Research Experience Survey" ("PRES"), where 48,401 replies were received from 122 participating institutions. Redeveloped for 2013, our biennial survey is the only national survey to gather insight from postgraduate research students about their learning and…

  8. Planck 2015 results. II. Low Frequency Instrument data processing

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P A R; Ashdown, M; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Ballardini, M; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartolo, N; Basak, S; Battaglia, P; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bonaldi, A; Bonavera, L; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Bucher, M; Burigana, C; Butler, R C; Calabrese, E; Cardoso, J -F; Castex, G; Catalano, A; Chamballu, A; Christensen, P R; Colombi, S; Colombo, L P L; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Ducout, A; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Elsner, F; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Fergusson, J; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Franceschet, C; Franceschi, E; Frejsel, A; Galeotta, S; Galli, S; Ganga, K; Giard, M; Giraud-Héraud, Y; Gjerløw, E; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Hansen, F K; Hanson, D; Harrison, D L; Henrot-Versillé, S; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hornstrup, A; Hovest, W; Huffenberger, K M; Hurier, G; Jaffe, A H; Jaffe, T R; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kiiveri, K; Kisner, T S; Knoche, J; Krachmalnicoff, N; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lähteenmäki, A; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Lattanzi, M; Lawrence, C R; Leahy, J P; Leonardi, R; Lesgourgues, J; Levrier, F; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; Lindholm, V; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maggio, G; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Mangilli, A; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Mazzotta, P; McGehee, P; Meinhold, P R; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Mitra, S; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Moss, A; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Netterfield, C B; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Oppermann, N; Paci, F; Pagano, L; Paoletti, D; Partridge, B; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Pearson, T J; Peel, M; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Pettorino, V; Piacentini, F; Pierpaoli, E; Pietrobon, D; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Pratt, G W; Prézeau, G; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renzi, A; Rocha, G; Romelli, E; Rosset, C; Rossetti, M; Roudier, G; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Santos, D; Savelainen, M; Scott, D; Seiffert, M D; Shellard, E P S; Spencer, L D; Stolyarov, V; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Tavagnacco, D; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Tuovinen, J; Türler, M; Umana, G; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vassallo, T; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Watson, R; Wehus, I K; Wilkinson, A; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2015-01-01

    We present an updated description of the Planck Low Frequency (LFI) data processing pipeline, associated with the 2015 data release. We point out the places in which our results and methods have remained unchanged since the 2013 paper and we highlight the changes made for the 2015 release, describing the products (especially timelines) and the ways in which they were obtained. We demonstrate that the pipeline is self-consistent (principally based on simulations) and report all null tests. We refer to other related papers where more detailed descriptions on the LFI data processing pipeline may be found if needed.

  9. The OMEGA Instrument on board Mars Express: First Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellucci, G.; Altieri, F.; Bibring, J. P.; OMEGA Team

    OMEGA (Observatoire pour la Mineralogie, l'Eau, le Glace e l'Activité) is a visible and near infrared mapping spectrometer, operating in the spectral range (0.35 - 5.1 μm). Combining imagery and spectrometry, OMEGA is designed to provide the mineralogical and molecular composition of the surface and atmosphere of Mars through the spectral analysis of the diffused solar light and surface thermal emission. OMEGA will provide a global coverage at medium resolution (2 to 5 km) of the entire surface of Mars from altitudes 1500 to 4000 km, and high resolution (Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario, Rome, Italy) and IKI (Institute for Space Research, Moscow, Russia). In this paper we present the first results after few months from starting of its observations.

  10. Instruments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buehrer, W. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1996-12-31

    The present paper mediates a basic knowledge of the most commonly used experimental techniques. We discuss the principles and concepts necessary to understand what one is doing if one performs an experiment on a certain instrument. (author) 29 figs., 1 tab., refs.

  11. Medical Radioisotope Data Survey: 2002 Preliminary Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siciliano, Edward R.

    2004-06-23

    A limited, but accurate amount of detailed information about the radioactive isotopes used in the U.S. for medical procedures was collected from a local hospital and from a recent report on the U.S. Radiopharmaceutical Markets. These data included the total number of procedures, the specific types of procedures, the specific radioisotopes used in these procedures, and the dosage administered per procedure. The information from these sources was compiled, assessed, pruned, and then merged into a single, comprehensive and consistent set of results presented in this report. (PIET-43471-TM-197)

  12. Understanding Teachers' Conceptions of Classroom Inquiry With a Teaching Scenario Survey Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Nam-Hwa; Orgill, Marykay; Crippen, Kent J.

    2008-08-01

    A survey instrument using everyday teaching scenarios was developed to measure teacher conceptions of inquiry. Validity of the instrument was established by comparing responses for a group of secondary teachers to narrative writing and group discussion. Participating teachers used only three of the five essential features of inquiry detailed in the standards documents (NRC 2000) when expressing their ideas of classroom inquiry. The features of ‘evaluating explanations in connection with scientific knowledge’ and ‘communicating explanations’ were rarely mentioned. These missing components indicate a gap between the teachers’ conceptions of inquiry and the ideals of the reform movement.

  13. The Global Oscillation Network Group site survey, 2: Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Frank; Fischer, George; Forgach, Suzanne; Grier, Jennifer; Leibacher, John W.; Jones, Harrison P.; Jones, Patricia B.; Kupke, Renate; Stebbins, Robin T.; Clay, Donald W.

    1994-01-01

    The Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) Project will place a network of instruments around the world to observe solar oscillations as continuously as possible for three years. The Project has now chosen the six network sites based on analysis of survey data from fifteen sites around the world. The chosen sites are: Big Bear Solar Observatory, California; Mauna Loa Solar Observatory, Hawaii; Learmonth Solar Observatory, Australia; Udaipur Solar Observatory, India; Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife; and Cerro Tololo Interamerican Observatory, Chile. Total solar intensity at each site yields information on local cloud cover, extinction coefficient, and transparency fluctuations. In addition, the performance of 192 reasonable networks assembled from the individual site records is compared using a statistical principal components analysis. An accompanying paper descibes the analysis methods in detail; here we present the results of both the network and individual site analyses. The selected network has a duty cycle of 93.3%, in good agreement with numerical simulations. The power spectrum of the network observing window shows a first diurnal sidelobe height of 3 x 10(exp -4) with respect to the central component, an improvement of a factor of 1300 over a single site. The background level of the network spectrum is lower by a factor of 50 compared to a single-site spectrum.

  14. Temperature performance of portable radiation survey instruments used for environmental monitoring and clean-up activities in Fukushima

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saegusa, Jun; Yanagisawa, Kayo; Hasumi, Atsushi; Shimizu, Takenori; Uchita, Yoshiaki

    2017-08-01

    Following the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident in March 2011, extensive radiation monitoring and environmental clean-up activities have been conducted throughout the Fukushima region. Outside air temperatures there reach 40 °C in summer and -20 °C in winter, which are beyond the quoted operational range of many radiation survey instruments. Herein, temperature performance of four types of portable Japanese radiation survey instruments widely used in Fukushima was experimentally investigated using a temperature-controlled chamber. They included two ionization chamber type instruments, Fuji NHA1 and Aloka ICS-323C, and two NaI(Tl) scintillation type ones, Fuji NHC7 and Aloka TCS-172B. Experimental results showed significantly diverse characteristics on the temperature dependences from one type of instrument to another. For example, NHA1 overestimated the ambient dose-equivalent rate by as much as 17% at -30 °C and 10% at 40 °C, whereas the TCS-172B readings underestimated the rate by 30% at -30 °C and 7% at 40 °C.

  15. Assessing the ESSENCE Biosurveillance System: Results of a User Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    ESSENCE BIOSURVEILLANCE SYSTEM: RESULTS OF A USER SURVEY by Randi M. Korman March 2011 Thesis Advisor: Ron Fricker Second Reader: James...COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE: Assessing the ESSENCE Biosurveillance System: Results of a User Survey 6. AUTHOR(S) Randi M. Korman 5... Biosurveillance , ESSENCE, NMPHC, Surveillance System, Survey 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF REPORT Unclassified 18. SECURITY

  16. The QUIJOTE CMB Experiment: status and first results with the multi-frequency instrument

    CERN Document Server

    López-Caniego, M; Aguiar, M; Génova-Santos, R; Gómez-Reñasco, F; Gutierrez, C; Herreros, J M; Hoyland, R J; López-Caraballo, C; Santos, A E Pelaez; Poidevin, F; Rubiño-Martín, J A; de la Rosa, V Sanchez; Tramonte, D; Vega-Moreno, A; Viera-Curbelo, T; Vignaga, R; Martínez-González, E; Barreiro, R B; Casaponsa, B; Casas, F J; Diego, J M; Fernández-Cobos, R; Herranz, D; Ortiz, D; Vielva, P; Artal, E; Aja, B; Cagigas, J; Cano, J L; de la Fuente, L; Mediavilla, A; Terán, J V; Villa, E; Piccirillo, L; Battye, R; Blackhurst, E; Brown, M; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; Dickinson, C; Grainge, K; Harper, S; Maffei, B; McCulloch, M; Melhuish, S; Pisano, G; Watson, R A; Hobson, M; Lasenby, A; Saunders, R; Scott, P

    2014-01-01

    The QUIJOTE (Q-U-I JOint Tenerife) CMB Experiment is designed to observe the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background and other Galactic and extragalactic signals at medium and large angular scales in the frequency range of 10-40 GHz. The first of the two QUIJOTE telescopes and the multi-frequency (10-20 GHz) instrument have been in operation since November 2012. In 2014 a second telescope and a new instrument at 30GHz will be ready for commissioning, and an additional instrument at 40 GHz is in its final design stages. After three years of effective observations, the data obtained by these telescopes and instruments will have the required sensitivity to detect a primordial gravitational-wave component if the tensor-to-scalar ratio is larger than r = 0.05. At the moment, we have completed half of the wide Galactic survey with the multi-frequency instrument covering 18 000 square degrees of the Northern hemisphere. When we finish this survey in early 2014, we shall have reached approximately 14{\\mu}K pe...

  17. The Mathematics Attitudes and Perceptions Survey: an instrument to assess expert-like views and dispositions among undergraduate mathematics students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Code, Warren; Merchant, Sandra; Maciejewski, Wes; Thomas, Matthew; Lo, Joseph

    2016-08-01

    One goal of an undergraduate education in mathematics is to help students develop a productive disposition towards mathematics. A way of conceiving of this is as helping mathematical novices transition to more expert-like perceptions of mathematics. This conceptualization creates a need for a way to characterize students' perceptions of mathematics in authentic educational settings. This article presents a survey, the Mathematics Attitudes and Perceptions Survey (MAPS), designed to address this need. We present the development of the MAPS instrument and its validation on a large (N = 3411) set of student data. Results from various MAPS implementations corroborate results from analogous instruments in other STEM disciplines. We present these results and highlight some in particular: MAPS scores correlate with course grades; students tend to move away from expert-like orientations over a semester or year of taking a mathematics course; and interactive-engagement type lectures have less of a negative impact, but no positive impact, on students' overall orientations than traditional lecturing. We include the MAPS instrument in this article and suggest ways in which it may deepen our understanding of undergraduate mathematics education.

  18. Integrated alarm annunciation and entry control systems -- Survey results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clever, J.J.; Arakaki, L.H.; Monaco, F.M.; Juarros, L.E.; Quintana, G.R.

    1993-10-01

    This report provides the results and analyses of a detailed survey undertaken in Summer 1993 to address integrated intrusion detection alarm annunciation and entry control system issues. This survey was undertaken as a first attempt toward beginning to answer questions about integrated systems and commercial capabilities to meet or partially meet US Department of Energy (DOE) site needs.

  19. Assessing the Learning Environment for Medical Students: An Evaluation of a Novel Survey Instrument in Four Medical Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pololi, Linda H; Evans, Arthur T; Nickell, Leslie; Reboli, Annette C; Coplit, Lisa D; Stuber, Margaret L; Vasiliou, Vasilia; Civian, Janet T; Brennan, Robert T

    2017-06-01

    A practical, reliable, and valid instrument is needed to measure the impact of the learning environment on medical students' well-being and educational experience and to meet medical school accreditation requirements. From 2012 to 2015, medical students were surveyed at the end of their first, second, and third year of studies at four medical schools. The survey assessed students' perceptions of the following nine dimensions of the school culture: vitality, self-efficacy, institutional support, relationships/inclusion, values alignment, ethical/moral distress, work-life integration, gender equity, and ethnic minority equity. The internal reliability of each of the nine dimensions was measured. Construct validity was evaluated by assessing relationships predicted by our conceptual model and prior research. Assessment was made of whether the measurements were sensitive to differences over time and across institutions. Six hundred and eighty-six students completed the survey (49 % women; 9 % underrepresented minorities), with a response rate of 89 % (range over the student cohorts 72-100 %). Internal consistency of each dimension was high (Cronbach's α 0.71-0.86). The instrument was able to detect significant differences in the learning environment across institutions and over time. Construct validity was supported by demonstrating several relationships predicted by our conceptual model. The C-Change Medical Student Survey is a practical, reliable, and valid instrument for assessing the learning environment of medical students. Because it is sensitive to changes over time and differences across institution, results could potentially be used to facilitate and monitor improvements in the learning environment of medical students.

  20. Advanced Camera for Surveys Instrument Handbook for Cycle 25 v. 16.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, R. J.

    2017-01-01

    The Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS), a third-generation instrument, was installed in the Hubble Space Telescope during Servicing Mission 3B, on March 7, 2002. Its primary purpose was to increase HST imaging discovery efficiency by about a factor of 10, with a combination of detector area and quantum efficiency that surpasses previous instruments. ACS has three independent cameras that have provided wide-field, high resolution, and ultraviolet imaging capabilities respectively, using a broad assortment of filters designed to address a large range of scientific goals. In addition, coronagraphic, polarimetric, and grism capabilities have made the ACS a versatile and powerful instrument. The ACS Instrument Handbook, which is maintained by the ACS Team at STScI, descr ibes the instrument properties, performance, operations, and calibration. It is the basic technical reference manual for the instrument, and should be used with other documents (listed in Table 1.1) for writing Phase I proposals, detailed Phase II programs, and for data analysis. (See Figure 1.1). In May 2009, Servicing Mission 4 (SM4) successfully restored the ACS Wide Field Camera (WFC) to regular service after its failure in January 2007. Unfortunately, the ACS High Resolution Camera (HRC) was not restored to operation during SM4, so it cannot be proposed for new observations. Nevertheless, this handbook retains description of the HRC to support analysis of archived observations. The ACS Solar Blind Channel (SBC) was unaffected by the January 2007 failure of WFC and HRC. The SBC has remained in steady operation, and was not serviced during SM4. It remains available for new observations.

  1. The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI): Science from the DESI Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenstein, Daniel; DESI Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) will enable an ambitious redshift survey to probe dark energy by the baryon acoustic oscillation and redshift-space distortion methods. The same data set will serve numerous other goals in cosmology and astrophysics. Using a new 5000-fiber instrument and 8 square degree field of view at the Mayall telescope, the DESI survey plans to cover 14,000 square degrees and about 25 million high-redshift objects. The targets include 4M luminous red galaxies (redshift 0.4-1.0), 18M emission line galaxies (redshift 0.6-1.6), and 2.4M quasars, including 0.7M Lyman-alpha forest sight lines. With this, DESI can map the expansion history of the Universe to redshift 3, achieving unprecedented performance from the baryon acoustic oscillation method. We will describe the present state of the survey design and the cosmological forecasts for dark energy, inflation, and neutrino physics. We also give an update on the DESI Science Collaboration.

  2. The CFH Optical PDCS Survey (COP) First results

    CERN Document Server

    Adami, C; Mazure, A; Castander, F J; Nichol, R; Ulmer, M P; Postman, M; Lubin, L M

    1999-01-01

    We present the first results of the COP survey about the reality of the PDCS clusters, about their velocity dispersions and dynamic and about the periodicity of the structures along the line of sight.

  3. NABat 2014 survey results : Baca National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report is on the 2014 NABat survey results from Baca National Wildlife Refuge. The North American Bat Monitoring Program (NABat) is a national program to...

  4. Results of the global survey on Voluntary Sustainability Standards

    OpenAIRE

    Lernoud, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Results of the global survey on Voluntary Sustainability Standards: - Voluntary Sustainability Standards (VSS) area worldwide and selected commodities - Cocoa: Area growth by VSS 2008-2014 - Growth of VSS compliant area worldwide 2008-2013 (selected crops)

  5. Logistics Management In Nigeria: Some Survey Results | Ojadi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Logistics Management In Nigeria: Some Survey Results. ... During the last few years the word logistics has become a more frequently used word in the business ... materials management and distribution processes into a logistics supply chain.

  6. Robo-AO: Initial results from the first autonomous laser guide star adaptive optics instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddle, R. L.; Baranec, C.; Law, N. M.; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Tendulkar, S.; Hogstrom, K.; Bui, K.; Burse, M.; Chordia, P.; Das, H.; Dekany, R.; Kulkarni, S.; Punnadi, S.; Smith, R.

    2014-12-01

    Large surveys are discovering thousands of objects which require further characterization at high angular resolution. The demands on space-based observatories and large telescopes with AO systems leave them generally unavailable for large high angular resolution surveys. To address this gap, we have developed Robo-AO, the first robotic laser AO system, as an economical and efficient imaging instrument for 1-3 m class telescopes. Observations of over 200 stellar objects per night have routinely been performed, with target-to-target observation overheads of less than 1.5 minutes. Scientific programs of several thousands of targets can be executed in mere weeks, and Robo-AO has already completed the three largest AO surveys to date.

  7. New Instruments for Survey: on Line Softwares for 3d Recontruction from Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fratus de Balestrini, E.; Guerra, F.

    2011-09-01

    3d scanning technologies had a significant development and have been widely used in documentation of cultural, architectural and archeological heritages. Modern methods of three-dimensional acquiring and modeling allow to represent an object through a digital model that combines visual potentialities of images (normally used for documentation) to the accuracy of the survey, becoming at the same time support for the visualization that for metric evaluation of any artefact that have an historical or artistic interest, opening up new possibilities for cultural heritage's fruition, cataloging and study. Despite this development, because of the small catchment area and the 3D laser scanner's sophisticated technologies, the cost of these instruments is very high and beyond the reach of most operators in the field of cultural heritages. This is the reason why they have appeared low-cost technologies or even free, allowing anyone to approach the issues of acquisition and 3D modeling, providing tools that allow to create three-dimensional models in a simple and economical way. The research, conducted by the Laboratory of Photogrammetry of the University IUAV of Venice, of which we present here some results, is intended to figure out whether, with Arc3D, it is possible to obtain results that can be somehow comparable, in therms of overall quality, to those of the laser scanner, and/or whether it is possible to integrate them. They were carried out a series of tests on certain types of objects, models made with Arc3D, from raster images, were compared with those obtained using the point clouds from laser scanner. We have also analyzed the conditions for an optimal use of Arc3D: environmental conditions (lighting), acquisition tools (digital cameras) and type and size of objects. After performing the tests described above, we analyzed the patterns generated by Arc3D to check what other graphic representations can be obtained from them: orthophotos and drawings. The research

  8. NEW INSTRUMENTS FOR SURVEY: ON LINE SOFTWARES FOR 3D RECONTRUCTION FROM IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Fratus de Balestrini

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available 3d scanning technologies had a significant development and have been widely used in documentation of cultural, architectural and archeological heritages. Modern methods of three-dimensional acquiring and modeling allow to represent an object through a digital model that combines visual potentialities of images (normally used for documentation to the accuracy of the survey, becoming at the same time support for the visualization that for metric evaluation of any artefact that have an historical or artistic interest, opening up new possibilities for cultural heritage's fruition, cataloging and study. Despite this development, because of the small catchment area and the 3D laser scanner's sophisticated technologies, the cost of these instruments is very high and beyond the reach of most operators in the field of cultural heritages. This is the reason why they have appeared low-cost technologies or even free, allowing anyone to approach the issues of acquisition and 3D modeling, providing tools that allow to create three-dimensional models in a simple and economical way. The research, conducted by the Laboratory of Photogrammetry of the University IUAV of Venice, of which we present here some results, is intended to figure out whether, with Arc3D, it is possible to obtain results that can be somehow comparable, in therms of overall quality, to those of the laser scanner, and/or whether it is possible to integrate them. They were carried out a series of tests on certain types of objects, models made with Arc3D, from raster images, were compared with those obtained using the point clouds from laser scanner. We have also analyzed the conditions for an optimal use of Arc3D: environmental conditions (lighting, acquisition tools (digital cameras and type and size of objects. After performing the tests described above, we analyzed the patterns generated by Arc3D to check what other graphic representations can be obtained from them: orthophotos and drawings

  9. Burrell-Optical-Kepler Survey (BOKS) II: Early Variability Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Steve B.; Feldmeier, J.; von Braun, K.; Everett, M.; Mihos, C.; Harding, P.; Knox, C.; Sherry, W.; Lee, T.; Ciardi, D.; Rudick, C.; Proctor, M.; van Belle, G.

    2006-12-01

    We present preliminary results for the photometric time-series data obtained with the BOKS survey (see BOKS I poster Feldmeier et al.). The BOKS survey covers about 1 square degree in the constellation of Cygnus. We obtained nearly 2000 SDSS r-band images spanning a total time period of 39 days. Each point source in our BOKS survey is also present in the single epoch, 7-color photometric survey catalogue being produced by the NASA Discovery program Kepler mission. Light curves of approximately 60,000 point sources, spanning r=14 to 20, are examined and discussed. We will present variability demographics for the BOKS survey including characterization of the light curves into variable classes based on type, color, amplitude, and any extra-solar planet transit candidates.

  10. The Impact of Repeated Lying on Survey Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Chesney

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the effects on results of participants completing a survey more than once, a phenomenon known as farming. Using data from a real social science study as a baseline, three strategies that participants might use to farm are studied by Monte Carlo simulation. Findings show that farming influences survey results and can cause both statistical hypotheses testing Type I (false positive and Type II (false negative errors in unpredictable ways.

  11. National wildlife refuge visitor survey 2010/2011: Individual refuge results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, Natalie R.; Dietsch, Alia M.; Don Carlos, Andrew W.; Koontz, Lynne M.; Solomon, Adam N.; Miller, Holly M.

    2012-01-01

    The National Wildlife Refuge System (Refuge System), established in 1903 and managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), is the leading network of protected lands and waters in the world dedicated to the conservation of fish, wildlife and their habitats. There are 556 national wildlife refuges and 38 wetland management districts nationwide, encompassing more than 150 million acres. The Refuge System attracts more than 45 million visitors annually, including 25 million people per year to observe and photograph wildlife, over 9 million to hunt and fish, and more than 10 million to participate in educational and interpretation programs. Understanding visitors and characterizing their experiences on national wildlife refuges are critical elements of managing these lands and meeting the goals of the Refuge System. The Service collaborated with the U.S. Geological Survey to conduct a national survey of visitors regarding their experiences on national wildlife refuges. The survey was conducted to better understand visitor needs and experiences and to design programs and facilities that respond to those needs. The survey results will inform Service performance planning, budget, and communications goals. Results will also inform Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCPs), Visitor Services, and Transportation Planning processes. This data series consists of 53 separate data files. Each file describes the results of the survey for an individual refuge and contains the following information: * Introduction: An overview of the Refuge System and the goals of the national surveying effort. * Methods: The procedures for the national surveying effort, including selecting refuges, developing the survey instrument, contacting visitors, and guidance for interpreting the results. * Refuge Description: A brief description of the refuge location, acreage, purpose, recreational activities, and visitation statistics, including a map (where available) and refuge website link

  12. Men's responses to HPV test results: development of a theory-based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, Ellen M; Buhi, Eric R; Baldwin, Julie; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Vadaparampil, Susan; Abrahamsen, Martha; Vamos, Cheryl A; Kolar, Stephanie; Chandler, Rasheeta; Anstey, Erica Hesch; Giuliano, Anna

    2009-01-01

    To develop and perform psychometric testing on an instrument designed to assess cognitive/emotional responses among men receiving HPV testing. Men enrolled in an HPV natural history study (N = 139) completed a computer-assisted survey instrument based on Leventhal's parallel processing/common-sense model. Data were analyzed using SPSS and Mplus. Reliability analyses resulted in Cronbach alpha of 0.72 (knowledge), 0.86 (perceived threat), 0.83 (self-efficacy), and 0.55 (response efficacy). A revised measurement model exhibited evidence of construct validity, as indicated by acceptable model fit statistics. To our knowledge, this is the only validated instrument assessing men's reactions to an HPV test result.

  13. GASS: The Parkes Galactic All-Sky Survey. Update: improved correction for instrumental effects and new data release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalberla, P. M. W.; Haud, U.

    2015-06-01

    Context. The Galactic All-Sky Survey (GASS) is a survey of Galactic atomic hydrogen (H i) emission in the southern sky observed with the Parkes 64-m Radio Telescope. The first data release (GASS I) concerned survey goals and observing techniques, the second release (GASS II) focused on stray radiation and instrumental corrections. Aims: We seek to remove the remaining instrumental effects and present a third data release. Methods: We use the HEALPix tessellation concept to grid the data on the sphere. Individual telescope records are compared with averages on the nearest grid position for significant deviations. All averages are also decomposed into Gaussian components with the aim of segregating unacceptable solutions. Improved priors are used for an iterative baseline fitting and cleaning. In the last step we generate 3D FITS data cubes and examine them for remaining problems. Results: We have removed weak, but systematic baseline offsets with an improved baseline fitting algorithm. We have unraveled correlator failures that cause time dependent oscillations; errors cause stripes in the scanning direction. The remaining problems from radio frequency interference (RFI) are spotted. Classifying the severeness of instrumental errors for each individual telescope record (dump) allows us to exclude bad data from averages. We derive parameters that allow us to discard dumps without compromising the noise of the resulting data products too much. All steps are reiterated several times: in each case, we check the Gaussian parameters for remaining problems and inspect 3D FITS data cubes visually. We find that in total ~1.5% of the telescope dumps need to be discarded in addition to ~0.5% of the spectral channels that were excluded in GASS II. Conclusions: The new data release (GASS III) facilitates data products with improved quality. A new web interface, compatible with the previous version, is available for download of GASS III FITS cubes and spectra.

  14. [Utilization of CAP Survey, Based on Questionnaire Results from Survey Participants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Akiko; Ohno, Hiroie

    2015-08-01

    The survey provided by the College of American Pathologists (CAP) is chosen as one of the proficiency testing programs in Japan, and, recently, the numbers of participating facilities have increased. CAP provides 754 programs, and more than 1,000 tests were provided in 2014. Materials are translated as the "CAP global inter-laboratory comparison program" under the instruction of the Japanese Society of Laboratory Medicine (JSLM) selected from CAP surveys in Japan, and 68 programs and 261 items are provided. The total number of participating facilities was 174. CAP itself and the other services CAP provides are not well-known, while recognition of "the CAP survey as the proficiency test" has increased. The question "What is CAP and the CAP survey" was analyzed as a result of the questionnaire surveys conducted in 2014, and the advantage of the CAP survey and how to utilize it were considered. A questionnaire survey was conducted about the CAP survey for Japanese participants in 2014. Fifty-three questions were asked about their satisfaction level, intended use, and improvement. Eighty replies were analyzed. As a result, most CAP survey participants are satisfied. They intend to mainly use the CAP survey for their quality control. Furthermore, they can continuously monitor their systems throughout all testing phases as the survey has numbers of shipments a year and several specimens per each mailing. This helps in laboratory performance improvement. The Evaluation and Participant Summary (PSR) also effectively improves the laboratories' performance. CAP-accredited laboratories are required to participate in all survey programs concerning the test menu which they provide. Therefore, they have become accustomed to reviewing the evaluation and performing self-evaluation with a high usage rate of the Evaluation and PSR of the CAP survey. The questionnaire proved that performing the CAP survey properly enhanced the laboratories' quality control, and this meets the

  15. Creation and Use of a Survey Instrument for Comparing Mobile Computing Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macri, Jennifer M.; Lee, Paul P.; Silvey, Garry M.; Lobach, David F.

    2005-01-01

    Both personal digital assistants (PDAs) and tablet computers have emerged to facilitate data collection at the point of care. However, little research has been reported comparing these mobile computing devices in specific care settings. In this study we present an approach for comparing functionally identical applications on a Palm operating system-based PDA and a Windows-based tablet computer for point-of-care documentation of clinical observations by eye care professionals when caring for patients with diabetes. Eye-care professionals compared the devices through focus group sessions and through validated usability surveys. This poster describes the development and use of the survey instrument used for comparing mobile computing devices. PMID:16779327

  16. Understanding nature's particle accelerators using high energy gamma-ray survey instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeysekara, Anushka Udara

    Nature's particle accelerators, such as Pulsars, Pulsar Wind Nebulae, Active Galactic Nuclei and Supernova Remnants accelerate charged particles to very high energies that then produce high energy photons. The particle acceleration mechanisms and the high energy photon emission mechanisms are poorly understood phenomena. These mechanisms can be understood either by studying individual sources in detail or, alternatively, using the collective properties of a sample of sources. Recent development of GeV survey instruments, such as Fermi-LAT, and TeV survey instruments, such as Milagro, provides a large sample of high energy gamma-ray flux measurements from galactic and extra-galactic sources. In this thesis I provide constraints on GeV and TeV radiation mechanisms using the X-ray-TeV correlations and GeV-TeV correlations. My data sample was obtained from three targeted searches for extragalactic sources and two targeted search for galactic sources, using the existing Milagro sky maps. The first extragalactic candidate list consists of Fermi-LAT GeV extragalactic sources, and the second extragalactic candidate list consists of TeVCat extragalactic sources that have been detected by Imaging Atmospheric Cerenkov Telescopes (IACTs). In both extragalactic candidate lists Markarian 421 was the only source detected by Milagro. A comparison between the Markarian 421 time-averaged flux, measured by Milagro, and the flux measurements of transient states, measured by IACTs, is discussed. The third extragalactic candidate list is a list of potential TeV emitting BL Lac candidates that was synthesized using X-ray observations of BL Lac objects and a Synchrotron Self-Compton model. Milagro's sensitivity was not sufficient to detect any of those candidates. However, the 95% confidence flux upper limits of those sources were above the predicted flux. Therefore, these results provide evidence to conclude that the Synchrotron Self-Compton model for BL Lac objects is still a viable

  17. Gemini Planet Imager Exoplanet Survey: Key Results Two Years Into The Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchis, Franck; Rameau, Julien; Nielsen, Eric L.; De Rosa, Robert J.; Esposito, Thomas; Draper, Zachary H.; Macintosh, Bruce; Graham, James R.; GPIES

    2016-10-01

    The Gemini Planet Imager Exoplanet Survey (GPIES) is targeting 600 young, nearby stars using the GPI instrument. We report here on recent results obtained with this instrument from our team.Rameau et al. (ApJL, 822 2, L2, 2016) presented astrometric monitoring of the young exoplanet HD 95086 b obtained with GPI between 2013 and 2016. Efficient Monte Carlo techniques place preliminary constraints on the orbital parameters of HD 95086 b. Under the assumption of a coplanar planet-disk system, the periastron of HD 95086 b is beyond 51 AU. Therefore, HD 95086 b cannot carve the entire gap inferred from the measured infrared excess in the SED of HD 95086. Additional photometric and spectroscopic measurements reported by de Rosa et al. (2016, apJ, in press) showed that the spectral energy distribution of HD 95086 b is best fit by low temperature (T~800-1300 K), low surface gravity spectra from models which simulate high photospheric dust content. Its temperature is typical to L/T transition objects, but the spectral type is poorly constrained. HD 95086 b is an important exoplanet to test our models of atmospheric properties of young extrasolar planets.Direct detections of debris disk are keys to infer the collisional past and understand the formation of planetary systems. Two debris disks were recently studied with GPI:- Draper et al. (submitted to ApJ, 2016) show the resolved circumstellar debris disk around HD 111520 at a projected range of ~30-100 AU using both total and polarized H-band intensity. Structures in the disks such as a large brightness asymmetry and symmetric polarization fraction are seen. Additional data would confirm if a large disruption event from a stellar fly-by or planetary perturbations altered the disk density- Esposito et al. (submitted to ApJ, 2016) combined Keck NIRC2 data taken at 1.2-2.3 microns and GPI 1.6 micron total intensity and polarized light detections that probes down to projected separations less than 10 AU to show that the HD

  18. Speak Up Speak Out Coalition Survey Results | Science ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comprehensive planning is a visionary planning process that integrates community values and land use policy. The Mayor of Duluth, Minnesota, directed the inclusion of two new values into the City’s comprehensive planning process to direct the community’s future, process: health and fairness. In order to understand the meanings of health and fairness that residents of the city hold, the Community Planning Department included questions in a city-wide survey of planning priorities. As a community organization reviewed the survey results that would inform the new directives, they realized that overburdened communities were underrepresented in the survey responses. To address this deficiency, the community organization asked the City of Duluth if they could conduct a survey of the underrepresented voices to ensure their input was included in the process. The Health in All Policies Coalition contacted the USEPA Office of Research and Development in Duluth, MN at the advice of the Planning Department. The support USEPA provided ensured that the Coalition could make recommendations to the City of Duluth based on systematically collected and analyzed data. This presentation will share the results of the survey. This presentation of the Speak Up Speak Out survey data represents support for local decision-making, technical assistance and data analysis. The data were collected and analyzed through advice and consultation with USEPA Office of Research and Development, an

  19. Assessing or Reaffirming Accreditation Criteria for the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS): Development of an Alumni Survey Instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, William L.; Johnson, Annabel M.

    The "Criteria for Accreditation" (1991) and reaffirmation published by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools were validated through a survey of alumni. The criteria were developed to assist institutions in evaluating their effectiveness. In all, 2,300 survey instruments were mailed to college alumni in the United States. Of…

  20. Predicting Student Performance in Web-Based Distance Education Courses Based on Survey Instruments Measuring Personality Traits and Technical Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Two common web-based surveys, "Is Online Learning Right for Me?' and "What Technical Skills Do I Need?", were combined into a single survey instrument and given to 228 on-campus and 83 distance education students. The students were enrolled in four different classes (business, computer information services, criminal justice, and…

  1. Psychometric properties of the Dutch version of the hospital-level consumer assessment of health plans survey (R) instrument

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O.A. Arah; A.H.A. ten Asbroek; D.M.J. Delnoij; J.S. de Koning; P.J.A. Stam; A.H. Poll; B. Vriens; P.F. Schmidt; N.S. Klazinga

    2006-01-01

    Objectives. To assess the reliability and validity of a translated version of the American Hospital-level Consumer Assessment of Health Plans Survey (R) (H-CAHPS) instrument for use in Dutch health care. Data Sources/Study Setting. Primary survey data from adults aged 18 years or more who were recen

  2. Diversity and Demographics of Zooarchaeologists: Results from a Digital Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne E. Pilaar Birch

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Nearly 25 years ago, a “Zooarchaeology Practitioner Survey” was distributed via conventional mail to individuals in the USA and Canada and received 122 responses over a period of several months in 1991. Now, a revised “Demographics in Zooarchaeology Survey” provides an update to  those data and assesses the current state of the field. The 2014 survey remained open for 3 months and received 288 responses from practitioners worldwide. Global participation was made possible by hosting the survey online. Key findings of the 1991 survey included disparities in employment rank for women despite similar levels of degree level attainment as men, a point which the 2014 survey sought to investigate. This trend appears to persist for those without the PhD and at the highest levels of income for those holding a PhD. In addition, the recent survey asked participants about their racial or ethnic identity in order to evaluate the demographic diversity of the discipline beyond sex, age, and nationality. Data regarding topical and geographic research area were also collected and reflect a subtle bias towards working with mammals and a focus on research questions grounded in prehistory in Europe and North America, followed by Australia and Southwest Asia. Results are compared with those of the earlier survey and membership information from the International Council for Archaeozoology.

  3. The Green Bank Northern Celestial Cap Pulsar Survey - I: Survey Description, Data Analysis, and Initial Results

    CERN Document Server

    Stovall, K; Ransom, S M; Archibald, A M; Banaszak, S; Biwer, C M; Boyles, J; Dartez, L P; Day, D; Ford, A J; Flanigan, J; Garcia, A; Hessels, J W T; Hinojosa, J; Jenet, F A; Kaplan, D L; Karako-Argaman, C; Kaspi, V M; Kondratiev, V I; Leake, S; Lorimer, D R; Lunsford, G; Martinez, J G; Mata, A; McLaughlin, M A; Roberts, M S E; Rohr, M D; Siemens, X; Stairs, I H; van Leeuwen, J; Walker, A N; Wells, B L

    2014-01-01

    We describe an ongoing search for pulsars and dispersed pulses of radio emission, such as those from rotating radio transients (RRATs) and fast radio bursts (FRBs), at 350 MHz using the Green Bank Telescope. With the Green Bank Ultimate Pulsar Processing Instrument, we record 100 MHz of bandwidth divided into 4,096 channels every 81.92 $\\mu s$. This survey will cover the entire sky visible to the Green Bank Telescope ($\\delta > -40^\\circ$, or 82% of the sky) and outside of the Galactic Plane will be sensitive enough to detect slow pulsars and low dispersion measure ($<$30 $\\mathrm{pc\\,cm^{-3}}$) millisecond pulsars (MSPs) with a 0.08 duty cycle down to 1.1 mJy. For pulsars with a spectral index of $-$1.6, we will be 2.5 times more sensitive than previous and ongoing surveys over much of our survey region. Here we describe the survey, the data analysis pipeline, initial discovery parameters for 62 pulsars, and timing solutions for 5 new pulsars. PSR J0214$+$5222 is an MSP in a long-period (512 days) orbit a...

  4. First Results from the KPNO International Spectroscopic Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzer, J. J.; Gronwall, C.; KISS Team

    1997-12-01

    We present preliminary results of our initial selection of emission-line galaxy candidates from the KPNO International Spectroscopic Survey (KISS) project. KISS is a wide-field survey for extragalactic emission-line objects being carried out with the Burrell Schmidt at Kitt Peak. It combines the classical objective-prism technique for finding strong-lined star-forming galaxies and AGNs with the use of CCD detectors and automated reduction software to enhance and stream-line the survey process. With its good depth plus significant areal coverage, KISS will be a powerful tool for the study of activity in galaxies. Our first survey strip covers 102 square degrees across the North Galactic Cap. The data consist of deep (to B = 20) objective-prism images, deep direct images in both B and V, and small-format photometric calibration images of each field. The objective-prism data cover two spectral regions: red spectra which include the Hα line, and blue spectra with the [O III]lambda 5007 line. Only results from analyzing the red spectra are presented here. The survey technique used for KISS is extremely successful. Our red spectra yield an average of 18 emission-line galaxy candidates per square degree, which is 180 times higher than the Markarian survey and 32 times the surface density of the Gallego et al. survey. Our direct images provide accurate photometry for all candidates, while rough redshifts and line strengths can be measured from the objective-prism spectra. We present an analysis of the completeness limits of the survey as well as the physical characteristics of the candidate galaxies, such as their luminosity, color, and redshift distributions. Examples of newly discovered emission-line galaxies are shown. The selection function of the survey can be accurately determined from the survey data, allowing us to utilize this large sample for performing statistical studies such as the determination of luminosity functions (B band and Hα ) and measurement of the

  5. Design of and initial results from a highly instrumented reactor for atmospheric chemistry (HIRAC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. R. Glowacki

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The design of a Highly Instrumented Reactor for Atmospheric Chemistry (HIRAC is described and initial results obtained from HIRAC are presented. The ability of HIRAC to perform in-situ laser-induced fluorescence detection of OH and HO2 radicals with the Fluorescence Assay by Gas Expansion (FAGE technique establishes it as internationally unique for a chamber of its size and pressure/temperature variable capabilities. In addition to the FAGE technique, HIRAC features a suite of analytical instrumentation, including: a multipass FTIR system; a conventional gas chromatography (GC instrument and a GC instrument for formaldehyde detection; and NO/NO2, CO, O3, and H2O vapour analysers. Ray tracing simulations and measurements of the blacklamp flux have been utilized to develop a detailed model of the radiation field within HIRAC. Comparisons between the analysers and the FTIR coupled to HIRAC have been performed, and HIRAC has also been used to investigate pressure dependent kinetics of the chlorine atom reaction with ethene and the reaction of O3 and t-2-butene. The results obtained are in good agreement with literature recommendations and Master Chemical Mechanism predictions. HIRAC thereby offers a highly instrumented platform with the potential for: (1 high precision kinetics investigations over a range of atmospheric conditions; (2 detailed mechanism development, significantly enhanced according to its capability for measuring radicals; and (3 field instrument intercomparison, calibration, development, and investigations of instrument response under a range of atmospheric conditions.

  6. Measuring determinants of career satisfaction of anesthesiologists: validation of a survey instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonso, Anoushka M; Diaz, James H; Scher, Corey S; Beyl, Robbie A; Nair, Singh R; Kaye, Alan David

    2013-06-01

    To measure the parameter of job satisfaction among anesthesiologists. Survey instrument. Academic anesthesiology departments in the United States. 320 anesthesiologists who attended the annual meeting of the ASA in 2009 (95% response rate). The anonymous 50-item survey collected information on 26 independent demographic variables and 24 dependent ranked variables of career satisfaction among practicing anesthesiologists. Mean survey scores were calculated for each demographic variable and tested for statistically significant differences by analysis of variance. Questions within each domain that were internally consistent with each other within domains were identified by Cronbach's alpha ≥ 0.7. P-values ≤ 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Cronbach's alpha analysis showed strong internal consistency for 10 dependent outcome questions in the practice factor-related domain (α = 0.72), 6 dependent outcome questions in the peer factor-related domain (α = 0.71), and 8 dependent outcome questions in the personal factor-related domain (α = 0.81). Although age was not a variable, full-time status, early satisfaction within the first 5 years of practice, working with respected peers, and personal choice factors were all significantly associated with anesthesiologist job satisfaction. Improvements in factors related to job satisfaction among anesthesiologists may lead to higher early and current career satisfaction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The Influence of Instrumented Striker Configuration on the Results of Dynamic Toughness Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucon, E.

    2008-09-15

    Several studies are available on the influence of the edge radius of instrumented strikers (ASTM - 8 mm or ISO - 2 mm) on the results of both non instrumented and instrumented Charpy tests. This paper investigates the effect of using either a 2 mm or a 8 mm striker when performing dynamic toughness tests at impact loading rates on precracked Charpy specimens. Existing data from tests run in the ductile-to-brittle region (dynamic Master Curve reference temperature) and in the upper shelf regime (ductile initiation fracture toughness and crack resistance curves) have been analyzed. The results show that 2 mm strikers tend to yield lower cleavage fracture toughness in the transition region (although the effect cannot be considered statistically significant), whereas the influence of striker configuration is negligible in the upper shelf regime when data are generated using the low-blow multiple-specimen technique.

  8. San Francisco Estuary Midwinter Waterfowl Survey: 2012 Survey Results and Trend Analysis (1981-2012)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report provides results of the 2012 San Francisco Estuary Midwinter Waterfowl Survey and presents an analysis of trends in waterfowl counts from 1981-2012. The...

  9. THE TIME DOMAIN SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY: VARIABLE SELECTION AND ANTICIPATED RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morganson, Eric; Green, Paul J. [Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Anderson, Scott F.; Ruan, John J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Myers, Adam D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Eracleous, Michael; Brandt, William Nielsen [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Laboratory, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Kelly, Brandon [Department of Physics, Broida Hall, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-9530 (United States); Badenes, Carlos [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Pittsburgh Particle Physics, Astrophysics and Cosmology Center (PITT PACC), University of Pittsburgh, 3941 O’Hara St, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Bañados, Eduardo [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Blanton, Michael R. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Bershady, Matthew A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, 475 N. Charter St., Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Borissova, Jura [Instituto de Física y Astronomía, Universidad de Valparaíso, Av. Gran Bretaña 1111, Playa Ancha, Casilla 5030, and Millennium Institute of Astrophysics (MAS), Santiago (Chile); Burgett, William S. [GMTO Corp, Suite 300, 251 S. Lake Ave, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Chambers, Kenneth, E-mail: emorganson@cfa.harvard.edu [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); and others

    2015-06-20

    We present the selection algorithm and anticipated results for the Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey (TDSS). TDSS is an Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS)-IV Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS) subproject that will provide initial identification spectra of approximately 220,000 luminosity-variable objects (variable stars and active galactic nuclei across 7500 deg{sup 2} selected from a combination of SDSS and multi-epoch Pan-STARRS1 photometry. TDSS will be the largest spectroscopic survey to explicitly target variable objects, avoiding pre-selection on the basis of colors or detailed modeling of specific variability characteristics. Kernel Density Estimate analysis of our target population performed on SDSS Stripe 82 data suggests our target sample will be 95% pure (meaning 95% of objects we select have genuine luminosity variability of a few magnitudes or more). Our final spectroscopic sample will contain roughly 135,000 quasars and 85,000 stellar variables, approximately 4000 of which will be RR Lyrae stars which may be used as outer Milky Way probes. The variability-selected quasar population has a smoother redshift distribution than a color-selected sample, and variability measurements similar to those we develop here may be used to make more uniform quasar samples in large surveys. The stellar variable targets are distributed fairly uniformly across color space, indicating that TDSS will obtain spectra for a wide variety of stellar variables including pulsating variables, stars with significant chromospheric activity, cataclysmic variables, and eclipsing binaries. TDSS will serve as a pathfinder mission to identify and characterize the multitude of variable objects that will be detected photometrically in even larger variability surveys such as Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.

  10. The Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey: Variable Selection and Anticipated Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morganson, Eric; Green, Paul J.; Anderson, Scott F.; Ruan, John J.; Myers, Adam D.; Eracleous, Michael; Kelly, Brandon; Badenes, Carlos; Bañados, Eduardo; Blanton, Michael R.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Borissova, Jura; Brandt, William Nielsen; Burgett, William S.; Chambers, Kenneth; Draper, Peter W.; Davenport, James R. A.; Flewelling, Heather; Garnavich, Peter; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Isler, Jedidah C.; Kaiser, Nick; Kinemuchi, Karen; Kudritzki, Rolf P.; Metcalfe, Nigel; Morgan, Jeffrey S.; Pâris, Isabelle; Parvizi, Mahmoud; Poleski, Radosław; Price, Paul A.; Salvato, Mara; Shanks, Tom; Schlafly, Eddie F.; Schneider, Donald P.; Shen, Yue; Stassun, Keivan; Tonry, John T.; Walter, Fabian; Waters, Chris Z.

    2015-06-01

    We present the selection algorithm and anticipated results for the Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey (TDSS). TDSS is an Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS)-IV Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS) subproject that will provide initial identification spectra of approximately 220,000 luminosity-variable objects (variable stars and active galactic nuclei across 7500 deg2 selected from a combination of SDSS and multi-epoch Pan-STARRS1 photometry. TDSS will be the largest spectroscopic survey to explicitly target variable objects, avoiding pre-selection on the basis of colors or detailed modeling of specific variability characteristics. Kernel Density Estimate analysis of our target population performed on SDSS Stripe 82 data suggests our target sample will be 95% pure (meaning 95% of objects we select have genuine luminosity variability of a few magnitudes or more). Our final spectroscopic sample will contain roughly 135,000 quasars and 85,000 stellar variables, approximately 4000 of which will be RR Lyrae stars which may be used as outer Milky Way probes. The variability-selected quasar population has a smoother redshift distribution than a color-selected sample, and variability measurements similar to those we develop here may be used to make more uniform quasar samples in large surveys. The stellar variable targets are distributed fairly uniformly across color space, indicating that TDSS will obtain spectra for a wide variety of stellar variables including pulsating variables, stars with significant chromospheric activity, cataclysmic variables, and eclipsing binaries. TDSS will serve as a pathfinder mission to identify and characterize the multitude of variable objects that will be detected photometrically in even larger variability surveys such as Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.

  11. First Results of The Konkoly Blazhko Survey II

    CERN Document Server

    Sódor, Á; Molnár, L; Szeidl, B; Hurta, Zs; Bakos, G Á; Hartman, J; Béky, B; Noyes, R W; Sasselov, D; Mazeh, T; Bartus, J; Belucz, B; Hajdu, G; Kővári, Zs; Kun, E; Nagy, I; Posztobányi, K; Smitola, P; Vida, K

    2012-01-01

    The two parts of the Konkoly Blazhko Survey (KBS I and II) are introduced. The most important preliminary findings of the second part are presented in comparison to the results of the first part. Two interesting cases of very strong modulation from the KBS II are also shown.

  12. First Results from the Polar Environment and Science (POLES) Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, L.

    2016-12-01

    Despite President Obama's well-publicized excursion to Kotzebue in 2015 - the first presidential visit to the US Arctic - most of the public remains unaware that their country has any inhabited Arctic territory. This striking result emerged from two nationwide surveys in 2016 that assessed public knowledge and perceptions about the changing polar regions. Other questions tested knowledge about polar geography and conditions, sought perceptions on the importance of global impacts such as sea level or extreme weather, and asked for opinions about trusted information sources (scientists, TV news, websites, etc.) and preferred mitigation policies. With an oversampling of Alaska residents, the POLES survey allows comparisons between perceptions of Alaska residents (including rural Alaska) and people from the other 49 states. It also supports analysis of relationships among knowledge, opinions, information sources, and individual respondent characteristics. We take a first look at results, analysis and interpretation of this unique new polar-oriented survey. Image: "Which country has territory with thousands of people living north of the Arctic Circle? US, China, Estonia, Britain, or none of these?" Graph shows results from a July 2016 pretest with 523 interviews; full results from two nationwide surveys, including Alaska/49-state comparisons, will be presented at AGU.

  13. The Curriculum in Quantitative Analysis: Results of a Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, David C.; Grossman, William E. L.

    1987-01-01

    Reports on the results of a survey of college level instructors of quantitative analysis courses. Discusses what topics are taught in such courses, how much weight is given to these topics, and which experiments are used in the laboratory. Poses some basic questions about the curriculum in quantitative analysis. (TW)

  14. SSL Adoption by Museums: Survey Results, Analysis, and Recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrin, T. E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Druzik, J. R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Miller, N. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-11-01

    DOE Solid-State Lighting GATEWAY report that summarizes the results of a survey of the museum community regarding conversions to SSL in museums. Responses provided real-world insight into how LEDs are being incorporated into museums, and what successes and hurdles have been encountered in the process.

  15. Exploratory visualization software for reporting environmental survey results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, P; Arnot, C; Bastin, L; Dykes, J

    2001-08-01

    Environmental surveys yield three principal products: maps, a set of data tables, and a textual report. The relationships between these three elements, however, are often cumbersome to present, making full use of all the information in an integrated and systematic sense difficult. The published paper report is only a partial solution. Modern developments in computing, particularly in cartography, GIS, and hypertext, mean that it is increasingly possible to conceive of an easier and more interactive approach to the presentation of such survey results. Here, we present such an approach which links map and tabular datasets arising from a vegetation survey, allowing users ready access to a complex dataset using dynamic mapping techniques. Multimedia datasets equipped with software like this provide an exciting means of quick and easy visual data exploration and comparison. These techniques are gaining popularity across the sciences as scientists and decision-makers are presented with increasing amounts of diverse digital data. We believe that the software environment actively encourages users to make complex interrogations of the survey information, providing a new vehicle for the reader of an environmental survey report.

  16. Procedures, Resources and Selected Results of the Deep Ecliptic Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buie, M. W.; Millis, R. L.; Wasserman, L. H.; Elliot, J. L.; Kern, S. D.; Clancy, K. B.; Chiang, E. I.; Jordan, A. B.; Meech, K. J.; Wagner, R. M.; Trilling, D. E.

    2003-06-01

    The Deep Ecliptic Survey is a project whose goal is to survey a large area of the near-ecliptic region to a faint limiting magnitude (R ~ 24) in search of objects in the outer solar system. We are collecting a large homogeneous data sample from the Kitt Peak Mayall 4-m and Cerro Tololo Blanco 4-m telescopes with the Mosaic prime-focus CCD cameras. Our goal is to collect a sample of 500 objects with good orbits to further our understanding of the dynamical structure of the outer solar system. This survey has been in progress since 1998 and is responsible for 272 designated discoveries as of March 2003. We summarize our techniques, highlight recent results, and describe publically available resources.

  17. Results of an Internet survey of myoelectric prosthetic hand users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pylatiuk, Christian; Schulz, Stefan; Döderlein, Leonhard

    2007-12-01

    The results of a survey of 54 persons with upper limb amputations who anonymously completed a questionnaire on an Internet homepage are presented. The survey ran for four years and the participants were divided into groups of females, males, and children. It was found that the most individuals employ their myoelectric hand prosthesis for 8 hours or more. However, the survey also revealed a high level of dissatisfaction with the weight and the grasping speed of the devices. Activities for which prostheses should be useful were stated to include handicrafts, personal hygiene, using cutlery, operation of electronic and domestic devices, and dressing/undressing. Moreover, additional functions, e.g., a force feedback system, independent movements of the thumb, the index finger, and the wrist, and a better glove material are priorities that were identified by the users as being important improvements the users would like to see in myoelectric prostheses.

  18. Radiologists' Usage of Social Media: Results of the RANSOM Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranschaert, Erik R; Van Ooijen, Peter M A; McGinty, Geraldine B; Parizel, Paul M

    2016-08-01

    The growing use of social media is transforming the way health care professionals (HCPs) are communicating. In this changing environment, it could be useful to outline the usage of social media by radiologists in all its facets and on an international level. The main objective of the RANSOM survey was to investigate how radiologists are using social media and what is their attitude towards them. The second goal was to discern differences in tendencies among American and European radiologists. An international survey was launched on SurveyMonkey ( https://www.surveymonkey.com ) asking questions about the platforms they prefer, about the advantages, disadvantages, and risks, and about the main incentives and barriers to use social media. A total of 477 radiologists participated in the survey, of which 277 from Europe and 127 from North America. The results show that 85 % of all survey participants are using social media, mostly for a mixture of private and professional reasons. Facebook is the most popular platform for general purposes, whereas LinkedIn and Twitter are more popular for professional usage. The most important reason for not using social media is an unwillingness to mix private and professional matters. Eighty-two percent of all participants are aware of the educational opportunities offered by social media. The survey results underline the need to increase radiologists' skills in using social media efficiently and safely. There is also a need to create clear guidelines regarding the online and social media presence of radiologists to maximize the potential benefits of engaging with social media.

  19. The Gaia spectrophotometric standard stars survey -II. Instrumental effects of six ground-based observing campaigns

    CERN Document Server

    Altavilla, G; Pancino, E; Galleti, S; Ragaini, S; Bellazzini, M; Cocozza, G; Bragaglia, A; Carrasco, J M; Castro, A; Di Fabrizio, L; Federici, L; Figueras, F; Gebran, M; Jordi, C; Masana, E; Schuster, W; Valentini, G; Voss, H

    2015-01-01

    The Gaia SpectroPhotometric Standard Stars (SPSS) survey started in 2006, it was awarded almost 450 observing nights, and accumulated almost 100,000 raw data frames, with both photometric and spectroscopic observations. Such large observational effort requires careful, homogeneous, and automated data reduction and quality control procedures. In this paper, we quantitatively evaluate instrumental effects that might have a significant (i.e.,$\\geq$1%) impact on the Gaia SPSS flux calibration. The measurements involve six different instruments, monitored over the eight years of observations dedicated to the Gaia flux standards campaigns: DOLORES@TNG in La Palma, EFOSC2@NTT and ROSS@REM in La Silla, CAFOS@2.2m in Calar Alto, BFOSC@Cassini in Loiano, and LaRuca@1.5m in San Pedro Martir. We examine and quantitatively evaluate the following effects: CCD linearity and shutter times, calibration frames stability, lamp flexures, second order contamination, light polarization, and fringing. We present methods to correct ...

  20. Mechanical Design of NESSI: New Mexico Tech Extrasolar Spectroscopic Survey Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Fernando G.; Olivares, Andres M.; Salcido, Christopher D.; Jimenez, Stephen R.; Jurgenson, Colby A.; Hrynevych, Michael A.; Creech-Eakman, Michelle J.; Boston, Penny J.; Schmidt, Luke M.; Bloemhard, Heather; Rodeheffer, Dan; Vaive, Genevieve; Vasisht, Gautam; Swain, Mark R.; Deroo, Pieter

    2011-01-01

    NESSI: the New Mexico Tech Extrasolar Spectroscopic Survey Instrument is a ground-based multi-object spectrograph that operates in the near-infrared. It will be installed on one of the Nasmyth ports of the Magdalena Ridge Observatory (MRO) 2.4-meter Telescope sited in the Magdalena Mountains, about 48 km west of Socorro-NM. NESSI operates stationary to the telescope fork so as not to produce differential flexure between internal opto-mechanical components during or between observations. An appropriate mechanical design allows the instrument alignment to be highly repeatable and stable for both short and long observation timescales, within a wide-range of temperature variation. NESSI is optically composed of a field lens, a field de-rotator, re-imaging optics, an auto-guider and a Dewar spectrograph that operates at LN2 temperature. In this paper we report on NESSI's detailed mechanical and opto-mechanical design, and the planning for mechanical construction, assembly, integration and verification.

  1. Design, performance, and early results from extremely high Doppler precision instruments in a global network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Jian; Zhao, Bo; Groot, John; Chang, Liang; Varosi, Frank; Wan, Xiaoke; Powell, Scott; Jiang, Peng; Hanna, Kevin; Wang, Ji; Pais, Rohan; Liu, Jian; Dou, Liming; Schofield, Sidney; McDowell, Shaun; Costello, Erin; Delgado-Navarro, Adriana; Fleming, Scott; Lee, Brian; Bollampally, Sandeep R.; Bosman, Troy; Jakeman, Hali; Fletcher, Adam; Marquez, Gabriel

    2010-07-01

    We report design, performance and early results from two of the Extremely High Precision Extrasolar Planet Tracker Instruments (EXPERT) as part of a global network for hunting for low mass planets in the next decade. EXPERT is a combination of a thermally compensated monolithic Michelson interferometer and a cross-dispersed echelle spectrograph for extremely high precision Doppler measurements for nearby bright stars (e.g., 1m/s for a V=8 solar type star in 15 min exposure). It has R=18,000 with a 72 micron slit and a simultaneous coverage of 390-694 nm. The commissioning results show that the instrument has already produced a Doppler precision of about 1 m/s for a solar type star with S/N~100 per pixel. The instrument has reached ~4 mK (P-V) temperature stability, ~1 mpsi pressure stability over a week and a total instrument throughput of ~30% at 550 nm from the fiber input to the detector. EXPERT also has a direct cross-dispersed echelle spectroscopy mode fed with 50 micron fibers. It has spectral resolution of R=27,000 and a simultaneous wavelength coverage of 390-1000 nm.

  2. The First Results from the DESK Survey (Abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, J.; KELT Team

    2016-06-01

    (Abstract only) Young stellar objects (YSOs) are typically surrounded by protoplanetary circumstellar disks. One way to probe the size, mass, and composition of these disks is to observe a star being eclipsed by its own disk. So far only a few of these events have been discovered and analyzed in the literature. New wide-field time domain surveys are an ideal tool to search for rare eclipse events, depending on the coverage, cadence, and baseline of the survey. The Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope (KELT) exoplanet survey covers a large portion of the sky, including a significant fraction of the galactic plane. Using time-series photometry from KELT we are looking for disk-eclipsing events, specifically in young stellar associations. To date, we have discovered three previously unknown large dimming events around the young stars RW Aurigae, V409 Tau, and TYC 2505-672-1. We attribute the dimming of RW Aurigae to its tidally disrupted disk, while for V409 Tau the dimming is interpreted to be caused by a feature, possibly a warp or perturbation, in its nearly edge-on circumstellar disk. TYC 2505-672-1 appears to be similar to epsilon Aurigae, with an M-giant being eclipsed every ~69 years by a white dwarf with an accretion disk surrounding it. I will describe our results and discuss how we are planning to search for these kinds of objects in future surveys such as LSST.

  3. FIRST, a fibered aperture masking instrument. I. First on-sky test results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huby, E.; Perrin, G.; Marchis, F.; Lacour, S.; Kotani, T.; Duchêne, G.; Choquet, E.; Gates, E. L.; Woillez, J. M.; Lai, O.; Fédou, P.; Collin, C.; Chapron, F.; Arslanyan, V.; Burns, K. J.

    2012-05-01

    Aims: In this paper we present the first on-sky results with the fibered aperture masking instrument FIRST. Its principle relies on the combination of spatial filtering and aperture masking using single-mode fibers, a novel technique that is aimed at high dynamic range imaging with high angular resolution. Methods: The prototype has been tested with the Shane 3-m telescope at Lick Observatory. The entrance pupil is divided into sub-pupils feeding single-mode fibers. The flux injection into the fibers is optimized by a segmented mirror. The beams are spectrally dispersed and recombined in a non-redundant exit configuration in order to retrieve all contrasts and phases independently. Results: The instrument works at visible wavelengths between 600 nm and 760 nm and currently uses nine of the 30 43 cm sub-apertures constituting the full pupil. First fringes were obtained on Vega and Deneb. Stable closure phases were measured with standard deviations on the order of 1 degree. Closure phase precision can be further improved by addressing some of the remaining sources of systematic errors. While the number of fibers used in the experiment was too small to reliably estimate visibility amplitudes, we have measured closure amplitudes with a precision of 10% in the best case. Conclusions: These first promising results obtained under real observing conditions validate the concept of the fibered aperture masking instrument and open the way for a new type of ground-based instrument working in the visible. The next steps of the development will be to improve the stability and the sensitivity of the instrument in order to achieve more accurate closure phase and visibility measurements, and to increase the number of sub-pupils to reach full pupil coverage.

  4. Planck 2015 results: VIII. High Frequency Instrument data processing: Calibration and maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adam, R.; Ade, P. A R; Aghanim, N.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the processing applied to the cleaned, time-ordered information obtained from the Planck High Frequency Instrument (HFI) with the aim of producing photometrically calibrated maps in temperature and (for the first time) in polarization. The data from the entire 2.5-year HFI...... mission include almost five full-sky surveys. HFI observes the sky over a broad range of frequencies, from 100 to 857 GHz. To obtain the best accuracy on the calibration over such a large range, two different photometric calibration schemes have been used. The 545 and 857 GHz data are calibrated using...... models of planetary atmospheric emission. The lower frequencies (from 100 to 353 GHz) are calibrated using the time-variable cosmological microwave background dipole, which we call the orbital dipole. This source of calibration only depends on the satellite velocity with respect to the solar system...

  5. Navy Professional Reading Program: Results of the 2007 Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-01

    books were also the most common genre for four of the five groups. The single most common genre for Junior Enlisted was Science Fiction (11...Chicago, IL, SPSS, 2007. Uriell, Z. A., & Burress, L. (2007). Results of the 2005 Pregnancy and Parenthood Survey (NPRST-AB-07-5). Millington, TN...attributable to any single individual. PARTICIPATION: Completion of this questionnaire is entirely voluntary. Failure to respond to any of the questions

  6. Results of the 2005 Pregnancy and Parenthood Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    one-third were using birth control when they became pregnant. Of those whose pregnancy was unplanned , 58 percent of enlisted were not using any form...military families. • A little bit more on STDs. More ways to prevent an unplanned pregnancy . And sources available to the public to find out more...07-5 June 2007 Results of the 2005 Pregnancy and Parenthood Survey Zannette A. Uriell Navy Personnel Research, Studies, and

  7. Impact of methodological "shortcuts" in conducting public health surveys: Results from a vaccination coverage survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luman Elizabeth T

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lack of methodological rigor can cause survey error, leading to biased results and suboptimal public health response. This study focused on the potential impact of 3 methodological "shortcuts" pertaining to field surveys: relying on a single source for critical data, failing to repeatedly visit households to improve response rates, and excluding remote areas. Methods In a vaccination coverage survey of young children conducted in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands in July 2005, 3 sources of vaccination information were used, multiple follow-up visits were made, and all inhabited areas were included in the sampling frame. Results are calculated with and without these strategies. Results Most children had at least 2 sources of data; vaccination coverage estimated from any single source was substantially lower than from all sources combined. Eligibility was ascertained for 79% of households after the initial visit and for 94% of households after follow-up visits; vaccination coverage rates were similar with and without follow-up. Coverage among children on remote islands differed substantially from that of their counterparts on the main island indicating a programmatic need for locality-specific information; excluding remote islands from the survey would have had little effect on overall estimates due to small populations and divergent results. Conclusion Strategies to reduce sources of survey error should be maximized in public health surveys. The impact of the 3 strategies illustrated here will vary depending on the primary outcomes of interest and local situations. Survey limitations such as potential for error should be well-documented, and the likely direction and magnitude of bias should be considered.

  8. On the Effectiveness of the Dynamic Force Adjustment for Reducing the Scatter of Instrumented Charpy Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucon, E.

    2008-09-15

    One of the key factors for obtaining reliable instrumented Charpy results is the calibration of the instrumented striker. An interesting alternative to the conventional static calibration recommended by the standards is the Dynamic Force Adjustment (DFA), in which forces and displacements are iteratively adjusted until equality is achieved between absorbed energies calculated under the test record (Wt) and measured by the machine encoder (KV). In this study, this procedure has been applied to the instrumented data obtained by 10 international laboratories using notched and precracked Charpy specimens, in the framework of a Coordinated Research Project (CRP8) of IAEA. DFA is extremely effective in reducing the between-laboratory scatter for both general yield and maximum forces. The effect is less significant for dynamic reference temperatures measured from precracked Charpy specimens using the Master Curve procedure, but a moderate reduction of the standard deviation is anyway observed. It is shown that striker calibration is a prominent contribution to the interlaboratory variability of instrumented impact forces, particularly in the case of maximum forces.

  9. Biomechanical analysis of pedicle screw density in spinal instrumentation for scoliosis treatment: first results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Aubin, Carl-Eric; Larson, A Noelle; Labelle, Hubert; Parent, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Clinical studies reveal remarkable variation in screw patterns, or screw density in spinal instrumentation. Screw density may have a great impact on blood loss, operative time, radiation, risk of screw malposition, and cost. Thus, there is a need to understanding of the biomechanical effects of screw density so as to minimize the number of pedicle screws while ensuring safe and effective instrumentation. The objective of this study was to compare the deformity correction effects and bone-screw loadings of different pedicle screw densities in spinal instrumentation for scoliosis treatment. Spinal instrumentation simulations were performed on three scoliosis patients using 3 screw density patterns (low, preferred, and high screw density) proposed by two experienced surgeons and basic correction techniques: concave rod attachment, rod derotation, apical vertebral derotation, and convex side rod attachment. Simulation results showed that all tested screw densities generated quite similar correction, with differences between the achieved corrections all below 3°. The average bone-screw forces were 244±67N, 214±66 N, and 210±71 N, respectively for low, preferred, and high densities. It remains a complex challenge balancing the benefit of load sharing between more implants with the overconstraints and limited degrees of freedom introduced by the increased number of implants. Studies on additional screw densities and patterns proposed by more surgeons for a variety of cases, and using more diverse correction techniques are necessary to draw stronger conclusions and to recommend the optimal screw density.

  10. Weighting of items in a tutorial performance evaluation instrument: Statistical analysis and results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piet J. Becker

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Weighting of items in an evaluation instrument contributes to more meaningful and valid interpretations of student performance in respect of each learning outcome or item being assessed. It follows that the validity of instruments is important for meaningful inferences about students’ learning performance, including their performance in tutorial groups. The Delphi technique was used to elicit experts’ subjective judgement of the content validity of items in the tutorial performance evaluation instrument in rounds one and two. A sample of eight experts (n = 8 was selected by purposive, maximum variation sampling.

    In round three Delphi a weighted score was determined for each of the instrument items, subitems and Likert scale points through pairwise comparison by the experts. Mathematical modelling of experts’ weighting comparisons, recorded on visual analogue scales, resulted in proportional weights for each item; these weights are expressed as a percentage.

    The final instrument comprised weighted items measured on a rating scale with points that are not equidistant. A computerised tutorial performance evaluator (TPE was developed for accurate, economical and efficient calculation of student scores. The purpose of this article is to report on the statistical analysis and results of the weighting of items in an instrument to assess and evaluate baccalaureate nursing students’ performance in problem-based learning tutorials.

    Opsomming

    Die waardebepaling van items in ‘n evalueringsinstrument dra by tot ‘n meer betekenisvolle en geldige interpretasie van studente se vermoë ten opsigte van elke leeruitkoms of item wat geassesseer word. Hieruit volg dit dat die geldigheid van instrumente belangrik is vir betekenisvolleafleidings betreffende studente se leervermoë, insluitend hulle prestasie in leergroepe. Die Delphi-tegniek is gebruik in rondtes een en twee om kundiges se subjektiewe oordeel oor die

  11. The Lupus Transit Survey For Hot Jupiters: Results and Lessons

    CERN Document Server

    Bayliss, D D R; Sackett, P D; Tingley, B W; Lewis, K M

    2009-01-01

    We present the results of a deep, wide-field transit survey targeting Hot Jupiter planets in the Lupus region of the Galactic plane conducted over 53 nights concentrated in two epochs separated by a year. Using the Australian National University 40-inch telescope at Siding Spring Observatory (SSO), the survey covered a 0.66 sq. deg. region close to the Galactic Plane (b=11 deg.) and monitored a total of 110,372 stars (15.0results of this successful survey...

  12. A frailty instrument for primary care: findings from the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE).

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Romero-Ortuno, Roman

    2010-01-01

    A frailty paradigm would be useful in primary care to identify older people at risk, but appropriate metrics at that level are lacking. We created and validated a simple instrument for frailty screening in Europeans aged ≥50. Our study is based on the first wave of the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE, http:\\/\\/www.share-project.org), a large population-based survey conducted in 2004-2005 in twelve European countries.

  13. Does improved instrumentation result in better component alignment in total knee arthroplasty?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mo Hassaballa

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Accurate component alignment and joint line reproduction in total knee replacement (TKR is crucial for successful clinical outcome. Advances in instrumentation and better understanding of the biomechanics can help to achieve better three dimensional alignments of TKR components and joint line restoration. We compared the accuracy of component alignment and joint line restoration with the use of 2 different TKR instrumentation kits (an older Gobot and a newer Xcelerate. Retrospective study of 150 consecutive patients undergoing primary TKR had their pre and post-operative x-rays reviewed. Seventy-five patients (group A had their TKR using the older instrumentation kit (Gobot and 75 (group B had the newer version (Xcelerate. The positioning of the prosthesis components were assessed using the American Knee society radiographic evaluation method and the joint line position using the Figgie’s method. The results from the two groups were statistically compared. There was a significantly greater elevation of the joint line position in TKRs done with the Gobot instrumentation (mean 4.49 mm vs. 2.71 mm in group B, P=0.03, and significant differences in the mean tibial component angle cTCA (group A 88.6º, group B 90.1º, P=0.04 and the mean Q angle (group A 6.28º valgus, group B 8.45º valgus, P=0.04. Use of the newer Xcelerate instrumentation was associated with better restoration of joint line position, however the femoral component flexion and posterior slope of the tibial component ere found to be above the desired level. Hence the overall differences between the two groups were found to be small.

  14. Bolivia 1998: results from the Demographic and Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-09-01

    This document presents the results of the Bolivia Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), or Encuesta Nacional de Demografia y Salud 1998, conducted by the Instituto Nacional de Estadistica, La Paz, Bolivia, within the framework of the DHS Program of Macro International. Data were collected from 12,109 households and complete interviews were conducted with 11,187 women aged 15-49. A male survey was also conducted, which collected data from 3780 men aged 15-64. The information collected include the following: 1) general characteristics of the population, 2) fertility, 3) fertility preferences, 4) current contraceptive use, 5) contraception, 6) marital and contraceptive status, 7) postpartum variables, 8) infant mortality, 9) health: disease prevention and treatment, and 10) nutritional status: anthropometric measures.

  15. The SOFIA Massive (SOMA) Star Formation Survey: I. Overview and First Results

    CERN Document Server

    De Buizer, James M; Tan, Jonathan C; Zhang, Yichen; Beltran, Maria T; Shuping, Ralph; Staff, Jan E; Tanaka, Kei E I; Whitney, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    We present an overview and first results of the SOFIA Massive (SOMA) Star Formation Survey, which is using the FORCAST instrument to image massive protostars from $\\sim10$-$40\\:\\rm{\\mu}\\rm{m}$. These wavelengths trace thermal emission from warm dust that in Core Accretion models mainly emerges from the inner regions of protostellar outflow cavities. Dust in dense core envelopes also imprints characteristic extinction patterns at these wavelengths causing intensity peaks to shift along the outflow axis and profiles to become more symmetric at longer wavelengths. We present observational results for the first eight protostars in the survey, i.e., multiwavelength images, including some ancillary ground-based MIR observations and archival Spitzer and Herschel data. These images generally show extended MIR/FIR emission along directions consistent with those of known outflows and with shorter wavelength peak flux positions displaced from the protostar along the blue-shifted, near-facing sides, thus confirming quali...

  16. Analysis of behaviour of transonic profiles with strong curvature: Test facilities, instrumentation, test results, theoretical interpretations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pittaluga, G.; Benvenuto, G. (Udine Univ. (Italy); L' Aquila Univ. (Italy))

    1988-06-01

    Relevant to experimental investigations on the performance of a transonic turbine blade cascade, this paper discusses recent developments regarding the following topics: the experimental equipment and relative instrumentation; the results of tests on turbine blade cascades; the conceptual methods specifically developed and aimed at the optimized design of steam turbines systems and turbine blades; the theoretical-numerical procedures developed and applied as supports for theoretical-experimental analyses and the redesign of blade profiles to increase efficiency.

  17. This Month in Astronomical History: Preliminary Survey Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Teresa

    2017-01-01

    This Month in Astronomical History is a short (~500 word) column on the AAS website that revisits significant astronomical events or the lives of people who have made a large impact on the field. The monthly column began in July 2016 at the request of the Historical Astronomical Division. Examples of topics that have been covered include Comet Shoemaker-Levy’s collision with Jupiter, the discovery of the moons of Mars, the life of Edwin Hubble, Maria Mitchell’s comet discovery, and the launch of Sputnik II. A survey concerning the column is in progress to ensure the column addresses the interests and needs of a broad readership, including historians, educators, research astronomers, and the general public. Eleven questions focus on the style and content of the column, while eight collect simple demographics. The survey has been available on the AAS website since and was mentioned in several AAS newsletters; however, non-members of AAS were also recruited to include respondents from a variety of backgrounds. Preliminary results of the survey are presented and will be used to hone the style and content of the column to serve the widest possible audience. Responses continue to be collected at: https://goo.gl/forms/Lhwl2aWJl2Vkoo7v1

  18. First Results from the Catalina Real-time Transient Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Drake, A J; Mahabal, A; Beshore, E; Larson, S; Graham, M J; Williams, R; Christensen, E; Catelan, M; Boattini, A; Gibbs, A; Hill, R; Kowalski, R

    2008-01-01

    We report on the results from the first six months of the Catalina Real-time Transient Survey (CRTS). In order to search for optical transients with timescales of minutes to years, the CRTS analyses data from the Catalina Sky Survey which repeatedly covers twenty six thousand of square degrees on the sky. The CRTS provides a public stream of transients that are bright enough to be followed up using small telescopes. Since the beginning of the survey, all CRTS transients have been made available to astronomers around the world in real-time using HTML tables, RSS feeds and VOEvents. As part of our public outreach program the detections are now also available in KML through Google Sky. The initial discoveries include over 350 unique optical transients rising more than two magnitudes from past measurements. Sixty two of these are classified as supernovae, based on light curves, prior deep imaging and spectroscopic data. Seventy seven are due to cataclysmic variables (only 13 previously known), while an additional...

  19. Evaluation the Results of Harington Rod Instrumentation in Correction of Schuermann Kyphosis Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.A.R. Basam Pur

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Before using multi hook segmental fixation in schuerman kyphosis (SK surgery, instrumentation by harington rod (H.R was common. Materials & Methods: In this study we evaluated the complication and pre and post surgical kyphosis in 26 SK patients who had anterior release and anterior fusion and then halofemoral traction and finally posterior fusion and instrumentation by Harington compression rod, in Shafa Yahyaian Hospital from 1976 till 2001. All of their documents were available in hospital archive and had minimum acceptable follow up.Results: No major complication was noted. One infection and one Harington rod fracture was noted, which they cured by appropriate treatment. Mean degree of thoracic kyphosis was 94 and after surgery it was 43.Conclusion: It seems that most prominent failure was overcorrection after surgery, so sometimes it reached to below 35 degree.

  20. Airborne In-Situ Measurements of Formaldehyde over California: First Results from the COFFEE Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero, Josette; St. Clair, Jason; Yates, Emma; Swanson, Andrew; Gore, Warren; Iraci, Laura; Hanisco, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) is one of the most abundant oxygenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere, playing a role multiple atmospheric processes. Measurements of HCHO can be used to help quantify convective transport, the abundance of VOCs, and ozone production in urban environments. The Compact Formaldehyde FluorescencE Experiment (COFFEE) instrument uses Non-Resonant Laser Induced Fluorescence (NR-LIF) to detect trace concentrations of HCHO as part of the Alpha Jet Atmospheric eXperiment (AJAX) payload. Developed at NASA GSFC, COFFEE is a small, low maintenance instrument with a sensitivity of 100 pptv and a quick response time (1 sec). The COFFEE instrument has been customized to fit in an external wing pod on the Alpha Jet aircraft based at NASA ARC. The instrument can operate over a broad range of altitudes, from boundary layer to lower stratosphere, making it well suited for the Alpha Jet, which can access altitudes from the surface up to 40,000 ft. We will present results from flights performed over the Central Valley of California, including boundary layer measurements and vertical profiles in the tropospheric column. This region is of particular interest, due to its elevated levels of HCHO, revealed in satellite images, as well as its high ozone concentrations. In addition to HCHO, the AJAX payload includes measurements of atmospheric ozone, methane, and carbon dioxide. These results will be presented in conjunction with formaldehyde. Targets in the Central Valley consist of an oil field, agricultural areas, and highways, each of which can emit HCHO primarily and generate HCHO through secondary production. Formaldehyde is one of the few urban pollutants that can be measured from space. Plans to compare in-situ COFFEE data with satellite-based HCHO observations such as those from OMI (Aura) and OMPS (SuomiNPP) will also be presented.

  1. Development and testing of a survey instrument to measure benefits of a nursing information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdrbo, Amany A; Zauszniewski, Jaclene A; Hudak, Christine A; Anthony, Mary K

    2011-01-01

    Information systems (IS) benefits for nurses are outcomes related to the tangible products or improvements that nurses realize from using IS. This study examined the development and psychometric testing of a measure of nurses' benefits from IS. A random sample of 570 nurses working in hospitals, providing direct patient care, and using IS completed the study questionnaire. The internal consistency reliability of the results was .97. Exploratory factor analysis, using principal components extraction and varimax rotation, revealed items loaded on four factors (saving time and efficiency, quality of care, charting, and professional practice) that were confirmed by confirmatory factor analysis. Continued refinement of the instrument is needed with more diverse samples of nurses.

  2. CUSTOMIZATION IN THE MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY: SURVEY RESULTS IN SOUTHEASTERN BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Reis Graeml

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the advantage of using kanban, postponement, modularization, just-in-time, production sequencing, milk-run and cross-docking by companies that intend to increase their flexibility, agility and reliability in order to support web-based businesses. It presents the results of a survey carried out with more than 600 manufacturing companies in the state of Sao Paulo, Brazil, and evaluates the changes that are taking place in operations, in order to make companies better suited to provide customized products, which are made to meet the individual requirements of each customer.

  3. CUSTOMIZATION IN THE MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY: SURVEY RESULTS IN SOUTHEASTERN BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Reis Graeml

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the advantage of using kanban, postponement, modularization, just-in-time, production sequencing, milk-run and cross-docking by companies that intend to increase their flexibility, agility and reliability in order to support web-based businesses. It presents the results of a survey carried out with more than 600 manufacturing companies in the state of Sao Paulo, Brazil, and evaluates the changes that are taking place in operations, in order to make companies better suited to provide customized products, which are made to meet the individual requirements of each customer.

  4. The VLA Sky Survey (VLASS): Technical Implementation and Pilot Survey Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Steven T.; Baum, Stefi; Chandler, Claire J.; Chatterjee, Shami; Kimball, Amy E.; Lacy, Mark; Law, Casey J.; Schinzel, Frank; Arancibia, Demian; Hiriart, R.; Medlin, Drew; VLA Sky Survey Team; Survey Science Group

    2017-01-01

    The VLA Sky Survey (VLASS) is a 5520 hour project to survey the 33885 square degrees of the sky above Declination -40 degrees from 2-4 GHz at 2.5" angular resolution using the upgraded Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA). Over the survey duration of 7 years, each area of the sky will be covered in 3 epochs spaced 32 months apart, to a depth of 0.12mJy/beam rms noise per epoch and 0.07mJy/beam for 3 epochs combined. Pilot observations were taken in mid-2016, with the full survey to start in September 2017. The raw data will be available in the NRAO archive immediately with no proprietary period and science data products will be provided to the community in a timely manner. Basic Data Products (BDP) that will be produced by the survey team include: raw and calibrated visibility data, quick-look continuum images, single-epoch images and spectral image cubes, single-epoch basic object catalogs, and cumulative "static sky" images and image cubes and basic object catalogs to the full survey depth. Single-epoch and cumulative images are in intensity and linear polarization (Stokes IQU). In addition to the BDP provided by NRAO and served through the NRAO archive, there are opportunities for Enhanced Data Products and Services that are provided by the community in partnership with the VLASS team.In this presentation we describe the survey design and the Technical Implementation Plan (TIP) for the VLASS, and report on results from the VLASS Pilot observations. The pilot survey covered 2480 unique square degrees, with 2160 square degrees within the SDSS/FIRST footprint. The pilot also covered key deep fields including COSMOS, GOODS-N, CDFS, Elais-N1, and the SDSS Stripe-82. Preliminary imaging and comparisons have been carried out for selected pilot fields as part of early science verification. We also discuss the technical issues and challenges remaining to be addressed before commencing the survey and our plans moving forward. There are also opportunities for community

  5. National Survey Results: Retention of Women in Collegiate Aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turney, Mary Ann; Bishop, James C.; Karp, Merrill R.; Niemczyk, Mary; Sitler, Ruth L.; Green, Mavis F.

    2002-01-01

    Since the numbers of women pursuing technical careers in aviation continues to remain very low, a study on retention of women was undertaken by a team of university faculty from Embry Riddle Aeronautical University, Arizona State University, and Kent State University. The study was initiated to discover the factors that influence women once they have already selected an aviation career and to ascertain what could be done to support those women who have demonstrated a serious interest in an aviation career by enrolling in a collegiate aviation program. This paper reports preliminary results of data collected in the first and second years of the study. The data was collected from surveys of 390 college students (195 women and 195 men) majoring in aviation programs in nine colleges and universities, representing widely varied geographic areas and including both two- and four-year institutions. Results revealed significant areas of concern among women in pilot training. When queried about these concerns, differences were evident in the responses of the male and female groups. These differences were expected. However, a surprising finding was that women in early stages of pilot training responded differently from women in more experienced stages, These response differences did not occur among the men surveyed. The results, therefore, suggest that women in experienced stages of training may have gone through an adaptation process and reflect more male-like attitudes about a number of objects, including social issues, confidence, family, and career.

  6. Do we understand what the mercury speciation instruments are actually measuring? Results of RAMIX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustin, Mae Sexauer; Huang, Jiaoyan; Miller, Matthieu B; Peterson, Christianna; Jaffe, Daniel A; Ambrose, Jesse; Finley, Brandon D; Lyman, Seth N; Call, Kevin; Talbot, Robert; Feddersen, Dara; Mao, Huiting; Lindberg, Steven E

    2013-07-02

    From August 22 to September 16, 2012, atmospheric mercury (Hg) was measured from a common manifold in the field during the Reno Atmospheric Mercury Intercomparison eXperiment. Data were collected using Tekran systems, laser induced fluorescence, and evolving new methods. The latter included the University of Washington-Detector for Oxidized Mercury, the University of Houston Mercury instrument, and a filter-based system under development by the University of Nevada-Reno. Good transmission of total Hg was found for the manifold. However, despite application of standard protocols and rigorous quality control, systematic differences in operationally defined forms of Hg were measured by the sampling systems. Concentrations of reactive Hg (RM) measured with new methods were at times 2-to-3-fold higher than that measured by Tekran system. The low RM recovery by the latter can be attributed to lack of collection as the system is currently configured. Concentrations measured by all instruments were influenced by their sampling location in-the-manifold and the instrument analytical configuration. On the basis of collective assessment of the data, we hypothesize that reactions forming RM were occurring in the manifold. Results provide a new framework for improved understanding of the atmospheric chemistry of Hg.

  7. Survey sustainability Biomass. Appendix. Results of the international respondents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergsma, G.C.; Groot, M.I.

    2006-06-15

    As part of an array of strategies to combat climate change, biomass is being used increasingly as a substitute for fossil fuels. It is important that the sustainability benefits thus accruing to the Netherlands are not at the expense of sustainable development in producer countries. Against this background the 'Sustainable biomass imports' project group is developing a set of criteria for evaluating the sustainability of biomass projects. To assess support for such criteria, CE conducted an internet survey among the various stakeholders (NGOs, industry, government), drawing a total of 104 responses. This report presents all the results and conclusions of the survey, for each category of stakeholders and overall. Among the most striking conclusions are the following: The majority of respondents see a sustainability audit on biomass as feasible, provided the sustainability criteria are adequate for the purpose (68%); Almost all the respondents are of the opinion that such sustainability criteria should apply to all applications of biomass (90%); On the issue of whether these criteria should vary according to the producer region concerned, respondents were divided (50% for, 50% against); Many NGOs state there should be different sustainability criteria in force for different biomass flows (50%), in contrast to industry, which argues for a uniform set of criteria for all flows; Most respondents hold that any biomass criteria should apply to both subsidised and unsubsidised projects; At the same time, a sizable majority of respondents state that subsidisation of biomass projects should depend on the degree of sustainability (72%) and in particular on the CO2 emission cuts achieved, this being regarded as the single most important factor; When it comes to the issue of GMO, opinions differ markedly between NGOs and industry, with some 75% of NGOs wanting this aspect included, but only 10% of industry; Respondents also commented on a number of additional issues

  8. Yoga in Australia: Results of a national survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Penman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The therapeutic benefits of yoga and meditation are well documented, yet little is known about the practice of yoga in Australia or elsewhere, whether as a physical activity, a form of therapy, a spiritual path or a lifestyle. Materials and Methods: To investigate the practice of yoga in Australia, a national survey of yoga practitioners was conducted utilizing a comprehensive web-based questionnaire. Respondents were self-selecting to participate. A total of 3,892 respondents completed the survey. Sixty overseas respondents and 1265 yoga teachers (to be reported separately were excluded, leaving 2,567 yoga practitioner respondents. Results: The typical yoga survey respondent was a 41-year-old, tertiary educated, employed, health-conscious female (85% women. Asana (postures and vinyasa (sequences of postures represented 61% of the time spent practicing, with the other 39% devoted to the gentler practices of relaxation, pranayama (breathing techniques, meditation and instruction. Respondents commonly started practicing yoga for health and fitness but often continued practicing for stress management. One in five respondents practiced yoga for a specific health or medical reason which was seen to be improved by yoga practice. Of these, more people used yoga for stress management and anxiety than back, neck or shoulder problems, suggesting that mental health may be the primary health-related motivation for practicing yoga. Healthy lifestyle choices were seen to be more prevalent in respondents with more years of practice. Yoga-related injuries occurring under supervision in the previous 12 months were low at 2.4% of respondents. Conclusions: Yoga practice was seen to assist in the management of specific health issues and medical conditions. Regular yoga practice may also exert a healthy lifestyle effect including vegetarianism, non-smoking, reduced alcohol consumption, increased exercise and reduced stress with resulting cost benefits

  9. Avionics Instrument Systems Specialist Career Ladder: AFSCs 32531, 32551, 31571, and 32591. Occupational Survey Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Air Force Occupational Measurement Center, Lackland AFB, TX.

    The Avionics Instrument Systems career ladder (AFSC 325X1) provides flight line and shop maintenance training on aircraft instrument systems, electromechancial instruments, components, and test equipment. Duties involve inspecting, removing, installing, repairing, operating, troubleshooting, overhauling, and modifying systems such as flight and…

  10. Modified ERT instrumentation for geo-scientific surveys in the historical centre of Mesagne (Brindisi, Southern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leucci, Giovanni; De Giorgi, Lara; Terenzio Gizzi, Fabrizio; Persico, Raffaele

    2016-04-01

    The town of Mesagne is one of the sites at greatest geological risk in the north Salento peninsula. In the last few decades, the historical centre of Mesagne has been affected by a series of subsidence events, which have, in some cases, resulted in the partial collapse of buildings and road surfaces. The last event was in the January 2014. It caused subsidence phenomenon in a wide area and many families have been forced from their homes. These events have had both social repercussions, causing alarm and emergency situations, and economic repercussions in terms of the expense of restoration. In order to determine the causes of the ground subsidence events, integrated geophysical surveys were undertaken in the historical centre of Mesagne. In addition, the analysis of several wells allowed the 3D model reconstruction related both to the geology and to the groundwater depth in the surveyed areas. With the purpose of estimating the dimensions of the phenomenon and its possible relationship with both specific environmental conditions (for instance groundwater depth variation) and anthropic conditions (for instance the losses in water supply and sanitation) some geophysical measurements were repeated in the time. For this purpose a modified ERT instrumentation together GPR were used. The study led to the production of a detailed description of the subsidence causes that allows a quick action to restore security conditions in the area.

  11. GASS: The Parkes Galactic All-Sky Survey. Update: improved correction for instrumental effects and new data release

    CERN Document Server

    Kalberla, Peter M W

    2015-01-01

    The Galactic All-Sky Survey is a survey of Galactic atomic hydrogen emission in the southern sky observed with the Parkes 64-m Radio Telescope. The first data release (GASS I) concerned survey goals and observing techniques, the second release (GASS II) focused on stray radiation and instrumental corrections. We seek to remove the remaining instrumental effects and present a third data release. We use the HEALPix tessellation concept to grid the data on the sphere. Individual telescope records are compared with averages on the nearest grid position for significant deviations. All averages are also decomposed into Gaussian components with the aim of segregating unacceptable solutions. Improved priors are used for an iterative baseline fitting and cleaning. In the last step we generate 3-D FITS data cubes and examine them for remaining problems. We have removed weak, but systematic baseline offsets with an improved baseline fitting algorithm. We have unraveled correlator failures that cause time dependent oscil...

  12. Results from BASS, the BANYAN All-Sky Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Gagné, Jonathan; Doyon, René; Faherty, Jacqueline K; Malo, Lison; Artigau, Étienne

    2014-01-01

    We present results from the BANYAN All-Sky Survey (BASS), a systematic all-sky survey for brown dwarf candidates in young moving groups. We describe a cross-match of the 2MASS and AllWISE catalogs that provides a list of 98 970 potential nearby dwarfs with spectral types later than M5 with measurements of proper motion at precisions typically better than 15 mas yr$^{-1}$, as well as the Bayesian Analysis for Nearby Young AssociatioNs II tool (BANYAN II) which we use to build the BASS catalog from this 2MASS-AllWISE cross-match, consisting of more than 300 candidate members of young moving groups. We present the first results of a spectroscopic follow-up of those candidates, which allowed us to identify several new low-mass stars and brown dwarfs displaying signs of low gravity. We use the BASS catalog to show tentative evidence for mass segregation in AB Doradus and Argus, and reveal a new $\\sim$ 13 M$_{Jup}$ co-moving companion to a young low-mass star in BASS. We obtain a moderate-resolution near-infrared s...

  13. Results from BASS, the BANYAN All-Sky Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagne, Jonathan; Lafreniere, David; Doyon, Rene; Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Malo, Lison; Artigau, Etienne

    2015-01-01

    We present results from the BANYAN All-Sky Survey (BASS), a systematic all-sky survey for brown dwarf candidates in young moving groups. We describe a cross-match of the 2MASS and ALLWISE catalogs that provides a list of 98 970 potential nearby dwarfs with spectral types later than M5 with measurements of proper motion at precisions typically better than 15 masyr, as well as the Bayesian Analysis for Nearby Young AssociatioNs II tool (BANYAN II) which we use to build the BASS catalog from this 2MASS-ALLWISE cross-match, consisting of more than 300 candidate members of young moving groups. We present the first results of a spectroscopic follow-up of those candidates, which allowed us to identify several new low-mass stars and brown dwarfs displaying signs of low gravity. We use the BASS catalog to show tentative evidence for mass segregation in AB Doradus and Argus, and reveal a new ˜ 13 Mjup\\ co-moving companion to a young low-mass star in BASS. We obtain a moderate-resolution near-infrared spectrum for the companion, which reveals typical signs of youth and a spectral type L4γ.

  14. [Results of a national survey on abdominal wall closure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, José Antonio; López-Cano, Manuel; Marsal, Francesc; Feliu, Xavier

    2013-12-01

    To assess knowledge on the abdominal wall closure through a surgeon cohort survey. A twenty question individual questionnaire on laparotomy in elective surgery. A total of 131 surgeons from seven hospitals responded (72% specialists and 28% in training). 71% of respondents estimated the frequency of incisional hernia to be higher than 15% and 54% considered the technique to be the most significant risk factor. 85% considered midline laparotomy closed with slow absorbable suture (57%) in a single layer (66%) to be the most appropriate technique. 67% believed retention sutures to be the appropriate prevention technique. 50% did not know or could not apply the 4:1 technique. 87% considered that an incisional hernia can be prevented and that the technique is the most important factor on which to act. 84% believed that a prosthesis can prevent the occurrence of incisional hernia, whereas 40% of respondents never use it and only 38% use it in patients at risk. On comparing surveys between specialists and residents, significant differences appeared in terms of a better understanding of the theoretical technical aspects in trainee surgeons. Although the results show an adequate understanding of the epidemiology and risk factors for development of incisional hernia, training and consensus measures are likely to be introduced in some basic technical aspects in order to improve results in laparotomy closure. Copyright © 2012 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey Results: 2010/2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) collaborated with the U.S. Geological Survey to conduct a national survey of visitors regarding their experiences on...

  16. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2012: Individual Refuge Results

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service collaborated with the U.S. Geological Survey to conduct a national survey of visitors regarding their experiences on National...

  17. Development and measurement properties of the Orthotics and Prosthetics Users' Survey (OPUS): a comprehensive set of clinical outcome instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, A W; Bode, R K; O'Reilly, C

    2003-12-01

    The need to measure and evaluate orthotics and prosthetics (O&P) practice has received growing recognition in the past several years. Reliable and valid self-report instruments are needed that can help facilities evaluate patient outcomes. The objective of this project was to develop a set of self-report instruments that assess functional status, quality of life, and satisfaction with devices and services that can be used in an orthotics and prosthetics clinic. Selecting items from a variety of existing instruments, the authors developed and revised four instruments that differentiate patients with varying levels of lower limb function, quality of life, and satisfaction with devices and services. Evidence of construct validity is provided by hierarchies of item difficulty that are consistent with clinical experience. For example, with the lower limb function instrument, running one block was much more difficult than walking indoors. The instruments demonstrate adequate internal consistency (0.88 for lower limb function, 0.88 for quality of life, 0.74 for service satisfaction, 0.78 for device satisfaction). The next steps in their research programme are to evaluate sensitivity and construct validity. The Orthotics and Prosthetics Users' Survey (OPUS) is a promising self-report instrument which may, with further development, allow orthotic and prosthetic practitioners to evaluate the quality and effectiveness of their services as required by accreditation standards such as those of the American Board for Certification in Orthotics and Prosthetics that mandate quality assessment.

  18. Pharmacy Survey on Patient Safety Culture: Benchmarking Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herner, Sheryl J; Rawlings, Julia E; Swartzendruber, Kelly; Delate, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    This study's objective was to assess the patient safety culture in a large, integrated health delivery system's pharmacy department to allow for benchmarking with other health systems. This was a cross-sectional survey conducted in a pharmacy department consisting of staff members who provide dispensing, clinical, and support services within an integrated health delivery system. The U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality's 11-composite, validated Pharmacy Survey on Patient Safety Culture questionnaire was transcribed into an online format. All departmental staff members were invited to participate in this anonymous survey. Cronbach α and overall results and contrasts between dispensing and clinical services staff and dispensing pharmacists and technicians/clerks as percentage positive scores (PPSs) are presented. Differences in contrasts were assessed with χ tests of association. Completed questionnaires were received from 598 (69.9%) of 855 employees. Cronbach α ranged from 0.55 to 0.90. Overall, the highest and lowest composite PPSs were for patient counseling (94.5%) and staffing and work pressure (44.7%), respectively. Compared with dispensing service, the clinical service participants had statistically higher PPSs for all composites except patient counseling, communication about mistakes, and staffing and work pressure (all P > 0.05). The technicians/clerks had a statistically higher PPS compared with the pharmacists for communication about mistakes (P = 0.007). All other composites were equivalent between groups. Patient counseling consistently had the highest PPS among composites measured, but opportunities existed for improvement in all aspects measured. Future research should identify and assess interventions targeted to improving the patient safety culture in pharmacy.

  19. Stigma in Canada: Results From a Rapid Response Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Heather; Patten, Scott B; Koller, Michelle; Modgill, Geeta; Liinamaa, Tiina

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Our paper presents findings from the first population survey of stigma in Canada using a new measure of stigma. Empirical objectives are to provide a descriptive profile of Canadian’s expectations that people will devalue and discriminate against someone with depression, and to explore the relation between experiences of being stigmatized in the year prior to the survey among people having been treated for a mental illness with a selected number of sociodemographic and mental health–related variables. Method: Data were collected by Statistics Canada using a rapid response format on a representative sample of Canadians (n = 10 389) during May and June of 2010. Public expectations of stigma and personal experiences of stigma in the subgroup receiving treatment for a mental illness were measured. Results: Over one-half of the sample endorsed 1 or more of the devaluation discrimination items, indicating that they believed Canadians would stigmatize someone with depression. The item most frequently endorsed concerned employers not considering an application from someone who has had depression. Over one-third of people who had received treatment in the year prior to the survey reported discrimination in 1 or more life domains. Experiences of discrimination were strongly associated with perceptions that Canadians would devalue someone with depression, younger age (12 to 15 years), and self-reported poor general mental health. Conclusions: The Mental Health Experiences Module reflects an important partnership between 2 national organizations that will help Canada fulfill its monitoring obligations under the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and provide a legacy to researchers and policy-makers who are interested in monitoring changes in stigma over time. PMID:25565699

  20. HD 12098 and Other Results from Nainital–Cape Survey

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V. Girish

    2005-06-01

    Nainital;Cape Survey was started with an aim to search for new rapidly oscillating Ap stars in the northern hemisphere.We discovered one new mono-periodic roAp star HD 12098. The frequency separation of HD 12098 suggests a rotation period of 5.5 days for the star. We summarize here the observations of HD 12098 and briefly discuss the results of the multi-site observation campaign organized to resolve the ambiguity in the determination of the rotation period of HD 12098. Other interesting results like non-oscillating Ap stars discovered and two candidate stars in which roAp periodicity is seen but not confirmed are also discussed.

  1. THE TAOS PROJECT: RESULTS FROM SEVEN YEARS OF SURVEY DATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Z.-W.; Lehner, M. J.; Wang, J.-H.; Wen, C.-Y.; Wang, S.-Y.; King, S.-K.; Cook, K. H.; Lee, T. [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica. 11F of Astronomy-Mathematics Building, National Taiwan University. No. 1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Granados, A. P. [Instituto de Astronomia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apdo. Postal 106, Ensenada, Baja California 22800 (Mexico); Alcock, C.; Protopapas, P. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Axelrod, T. [Steward Observatory, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Room No. 204, Tucson AZ 85721 (United States); Bianco, F. B. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Byun, Y.-I. [Department of Astronomy and University Observatory, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Chen, W. P. [Institute of Astronomy, National Central University, No. 300, Jhongda Road, Jhongli City, Taoyuan County 320, Taiwan (China); Coehlo, N. K. [Department of Statistics, University of California Berkeley, 367 Evans Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); De Pater, I. [Department of Astronomy, University of California Berkeley, 601 Campbell Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Kim, D.-W. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Lissauer, J. J. [Space Science and Astrobiology Division 245-3, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Marshall, S. L., E-mail: zwzhang@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, 2575 Sand Hill Road, MS 29, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); and others

    2013-07-01

    The Taiwanese-American Occultation Survey (TAOS) aims to detect serendipitous occultations of stars by small ({approx}1 km diameter) objects in the Kuiper Belt and beyond. Such events are very rare (<10{sup -3} events per star per year) and short in duration ({approx}200 ms), so many stars must be monitored at a high readout cadence. TAOS monitors typically {approx}500 stars simultaneously at a 5 Hz readout cadence with four telescopes located at Lulin Observatory in central Taiwan. In this paper, we report the results of the search for small Kuiper Belt objects (KBOs) in seven years of data. No occultation events were found, resulting in a 95% c.l. upper limit on the slope of the faint end of the KBO size distribution of q = 3.34-3.82, depending on the surface density at the break in the size distribution at a diameter of about 90 km.

  2. The results of decompressive surgery and instrumented posterolateral fusion in refractory degenerative spondylolisthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behtash H

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Degenerative spondylolisthesis is a common disease of the lumbar spine especially in older ones. The disease represents a challenge to the treating physician. At present, for those patients that deteriorate clinically, there are many proposed algorithms for the surgical treatment. This before and after study was undertaken to assess the surgical results of decompression and instrumented posterolateral fusion in these patients. "nMethods: The study population consisted of 23 patients who had undergone no prior surgery for degenerative spondylolisthesis on the lumbar spine. These patients were treated by decompression, bilateral posterolateral fusion, and segmental (pedicle screw instrumentation with mean follow-up of 29 months (range, 13-73 months. Finally, The clinical results were evaluated for all patients by means of an Oswestry Disability Index (ODI version 2.1, the Henderson's functional capacity, and persistence of leg symptoms, low back pain or claudication. Mann-Whitney and Chi-Square tests were used to assess the average values and comparison, respectively. "nResults: Henderson's functional capacity at the last visit session was excellent in 14 (60.9%, good in 7 (30.4%, fair in 2 (8.7% cases. ODI decreased from 72.2% (50-88% preoperatively to 14.4% (0-54% at the latest follow-up visit. A history of leg pain or claudication was correlated significantly with the amount of decline in ODI score and Henderson's functional capacity (p<0.05. "nConclusion: In spite of limited number of our patients, decompressive surgery plus instrumented posterolateral fusion is a safe, reliable, and satisfactory procedure for treating degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis. This procedure may be done when conservative treatment was failed and psychological problems can be ruled out.

  3. Radon in Estonian dwellings - Results from a National Radon Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pahapill, Lia; Rulkov, Anne; Rajamaee, Raivo [Estonian Radiation Protection Centre (Kiirguskeskus), Tallinn (Spain); Aakerblom, Gustav [Swedish Radiation Protection Authority, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2003-10-01

    A countrywide survey of radon concentrations in Estonian dwellings was carried out during the period 1998-2001. The survey formed a part of the cooperation program on radiation protection between the Estonian Radiation Protection (Kiirguskeskus) Centre and the Swedish Radiation Protection Authority (SSI). The survey included measurements in a number of dwellings representative for Estonia in detached houses and multifamily buildings (only dwellings on the bottom floor were included in the survey). Altogether, radon concentrations were measured in 515 dwellings, a number large enough to be statistically significant. All measurements were made with alphatrack film detectors of the same type that SSI uses in Sweden. The measurements were made during a 2-3 month period during the winter half-year. Two detectors were used in each dwelling. In Estonia there are 0.17 million dwellings in detached houses and 0.45 million in multi apartment buildings. Of the 1.26 million inhabitants in Estonia. 0.36 million live in detached houses and 0.90 million in multi apartment buildings. Most of the latter were built during the Soviet occupation. Of the dwellings in multifamily buildings 30 % are assumed to be situated on the first floor. The mean radon concentration in dwellings in detached hoses, according to the survey results, is 103 Bq/m{sup 3}, in dwellings on the bottom floor in multi apartment buildings it is 78 Bq/m{sup 3}. In 1% of the dwellings the radon concentration exceeded 400 Bq/m{sup 3}. The highest radon concentration found in the study was 1040 Bq/m{sup 3}. Based on the assumption that the average radon concentration in the dwellings in multi-apartment buildings that are not situated on the bottom floor is 30 Bq/m{sup 3}, and that these dwellings constitute 70% of all dwellings in multi apartment buildings, the mean radon concentration in dwellings in multi apartment buildings is calculated to be 44 Bq/m{sup 3}. The mean value for all Estonia dwellings is calculated

  4. PICASSO VISION instrument design, engineering model test results, and flight model development status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Näsilä, Antti; Holmlund, Christer; Mannila, Rami; Näkki, Ismo; Ojanen, Harri J.; Akujärvi, Altti; Saari, Heikki; Fussen, Didier; Pieroux, Didier; Demoulin, Philippe

    2016-10-01

    PICASSO - A PICo-satellite for Atmospheric and Space Science Observations is an ESA project led by the Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy, in collaboration with VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd, Clyde Space Ltd. (UK) and Centre Spatial de Liège (BE). The test campaign for the engineering model of the PICASSO VISION instrument, a miniaturized nanosatellite spectral imager, has been successfully completed. The test results look very promising. The proto-flight model of VISION has also been successfully integrated and it is waiting for the final integration to the satellite platform.

  5. STARtorialist: Astronomy Fashion & Culture Blog and Reader Survey Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, Summer; Rice, Emily L.; Jarreau, Paige B.

    2016-01-01

    STARtorialist (startorialist.com) is a Tumblr-based blog that curates the proliferation of "Astro Fashion" - clothing accessories, decor, and more - with the goal of celebrating the beauty of the universe and highlighting the science behind the astronomical imagery. Since launching in January 2013, we have written over 1000 unique posts about everything from handmade and boutique products to mass-produced commercial items to haute couture seen on fashion runways. Each blog post features images and descriptions of the products with links to the original astronomical images or other relevant science content. We also feature profiles of astronomers, scientists, students, and communicators wearing, making, or decorating with "startorial" items. Our most popular posts accumulate hundreds or thousands of notes (faves or reblogs, in Tumblr parlance), and one post has nearly 150,000 notes. In our second year, we have grown from 1,000 to just shy of 20,000 followers on Tumblr, with an increased audience on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook as well. We present preliminary results from a reader survey conducted September-October 2015 in collaboration with science communication researcher Dr. Paige Jarreau. The survey provides data on reader habits, motivations, attitudes, and demographics in order to assess how STARtorialist has influenced our readers' views on science, scientists, and the scientific community as a whole.

  6. Salvia divinorum use and phenomenology: results from an online survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumnall, H R; Measham, F; Brandt, S D; Cole, J C

    2011-11-01

    Salvia divinorum is a hallucinogenic plant with ethnopharmacological and recreational uses. It differs from classic serotonergic hallucinogens such as LSD and psilocin in both phenomenology and potent agonist activity of the active component salvinorin A at κ-opioid receptors. Awareness of S. divinorum has grown recently, with both an increase in its public representation and concern over its potential harmful effects. This discussion is particularly relevant as S. divinorum is legal to use in many countries and regions and easily available through online retailers. Drawing upon previous investigations of S. divinorum and other hallucinogens, this study surveyed 154 recent users and questioned them on their use behaviours, consequences of use and other attitudinal measures. Although reporting an extensive substance use history, and considering the limitations of online surveys, there was little evidence of dysfunctional S. divinorum use, and few reports of troubling adverse consequences of use. Furthermore, there was no evidence that users exhibited increased schizotypy. Respondents reported that S. divinorum produced mixed hallucinogenic and dissociative effects, which lends support to assertions that it phenomenologically differs from other hallucinogens with primary serotonergic activity. The functions of use changed with greater experiences with the drug, and although many respondents reported use of S. divinorum as an alternative to illegal drugs it, was apparent that legal proscription would be unlikely to dissuade them from use. These results are discussed with reference to psychopharmacologically informed public health responses to substance use.

  7. Off-label use of oncology drugs: national survey results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva González-Haba Peña

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: identify by means of a survey the off-label treatments more often used in the oncohaematology area, as well as to know the established procedures and criteria used to authorise those treatments. Methods: a four-section survey was designed: 1 demographic data and hospital activity, 2 Off-label treatments protocol, 3 Approval criteria and 4 Off-label oncology treatments conducted during the last year. Results: in 42.1% of the hospitals it’s needed an authorisation before dispensing in more tan 80% of the treatments. The most influential factor in the approval-dispensation system is the available evidence. The consent of the hospital management with previous Pharmacy department’s report was the most common authorisation procedure. 55.3% of the hospitals settled specific patient criteria to help the decision-making altogether with the available safety and efficacy data of the drug for the requested indication. In most centers a lower level of evidence is accepted if there are no therapeutic alternatives as well as in tumors of low prevalence. Most of the centers have not clearly established a criterion of effectiveness to consider a benefit as clinically relevant, nor the cost-effectiveness threshold for approving a FFT. Conclusions: there is a great variability in the off-label treatments use and also in the criteria used for its approval.

  8. The core principles ("big ideas") of physiology: results of faculty surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Joel; McFarland, Jenny

    2011-12-01

    Physiology faculty members at a wide range of institutions (2-yr colleges to medical schools) were surveyed to determine what core principles of physiology they want their students to understand. From the results of the first survey, 15 core principles were described. In a second survey, respondents were asked to rank order these 15 core principles and, independently, to identify the three most important for their students to understand. The five most important core principles were "cell membrane," "homeostasis," "cell-to-cell communications," "interdependence," and "flow down gradients." We then "unpacked" the flow down gradients core principle into the component ideas of which it is comprised. This unpacking was sent to respondents who were asked to identify the importance of each of the component ideas. Respondents strongly agreed with the importance of the component ideas we had identified. We will be using the responses to our surveys as we begin the development of a conceptual assessment of physiology instrument (i.e., a concept inventory).

  9. Planck 2015 results. VIII. High Frequency Instrument data processing: Calibration and maps

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A.J.; Barreiro, R.B.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bertincourt, B.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J.J.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J.R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F.R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H.C.; Christensen, P.R.; Clements, D.L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L.P.L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B.P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R.D.; Davis, R.J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Désert, F.-X.; Diego, J.M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T.A.; Eriksen, H.K.; Falgarone, E.; Fergusson, J.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A.A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K.M.; Gratton, S.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J.E.; Hansen, F.K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.L.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S.R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W.A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K.M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A.H.; Jaffe, T.R.; Jones, W.C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T.S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C.R.; Le Jeune, M.; Leahy, J.P.; Lellouch, E.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P.B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P.M.; Macías-Pérez, J.F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P.G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; McGehee, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Moreno, R.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Mottet, S.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J.A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C.B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H.U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oxborrow, C.A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T.J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Pratt, G.W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J.P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Sauvé, A.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M.D.; Shellard, E.P.S.; Spencer, L.D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J.A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vibert, L.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L.A.; Wandelt, B.D.; Watson, R.; Wehus, I.K.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the processing applied to the Planck High Frequency Instrument (HFI) cleaned, time-ordered information to produce photometrically calibrated maps in temperature and (for the first time) in polarization. The data from the 2.5 year full mission include almost five independent full-sky surveys. HFI observes the sky over a broad range of frequencies, from 100 to 857 GHz. To get the best accuracy on the calibration over such a large range, two different photometric calibration schemes have been used. The 545 and 857 GHz data are calibrated using models of planetary atmospheric emission. The lower frequencies (from 100 to 353 GHz) are calibrated using the time-variable cosmological microwave background dipole which we call the orbital dipole. This source of calibration only depends on the satellite velocity with respect to the solar system and permits an independent measurement of the amplitude of the CMB solar dipole (3364.5 +/- 0.8 \\mu K) which is 1\\sigma\\ higher than the WMAP measurement wit...

  10. Calibration results using highly aberrated images for aligning the JWST instruments to the telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Koby Z.; Acton, D. Scott; Gallagher, Ben B.; Knight, J. Scott; Dean, Bruce H.; Jurling, Alden S.; Zielinski, Thomas P.

    2016-07-01

    mostly of 3rd-order astigmatism and coma. This is because the elliptical tertiary mirror of the AOS is used off of its ideal foci locations without the compensating wavefront effects of the JWST primary and secondary mirrors. Therefore, the PSFs created are highly asymmetric with relatively complex structure and the centroid and encircled energy analyses traditionally used to locate images are not sufficient for ensuring the AOS to ISIM alignment. A novel approach combining phase retrieval and spatial metrology was developed to both locate the images with respect to the AOS and provide calibration information for eventual AOS to ISIM alignment verification. During final JWST OTE and ISIM (OTIS) testing, only a single thru-focus image will be collected by the instruments. Therefore, tools and processes were developed to perform single-image phase retrieval on these highly aberrated images such that any single image of the ASPA source can provide calibrated knowledge of the instruments' position relative to the AOS. This paper discusses the results of the methodology, hardware, and calibration performed to ensure that the AOS and ISIM are aligned within their respective tolerances at JWST OTIS testing.

  11. The Danish airborne gamma-ray surveying results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovgaard, J. [Danish Emergency Management Agency, Birkeroed (Denmark)

    1997-12-31

    The Danish Emergency Management Agency (DEMA) in co-operation with the Technical University of Denmark (TUD), Department of Automation, participated in the international exercise RESUME-95 arranged in Finland in August 1995. DEMA performed measurement with their airborne gamma-ray surveying system. Surveys were done in the three areas known as AREA I, II, III. Results from AREA II (3 km x 6 km) show that the apparent {sup 137}Cs deposition assuming a deposition profile equal to the profile in AREA I based on soil samples varies from a few 10th kBqm{sup -2} up to 110 kBqm{sup -2}. However, a detailed analysis using a new method, Noise Adjusted Singular Value Decomposition (NASVD), shows that the true variations probably are smaller and that the observed differences to some extend are due to major variations in the depth distribution of the cesium. For example agricultural areas appears to have cesium much deeper deposit than the undisturbed areas. Another interesting result is that the NASVD analysis shows that the ration of {sup 134}Cs to {sup 137}Cs is fixed and approximately 0.03 (August 1995) a number in good agreement with the expected ratio from the Chernobyl accident. No true real-time software for source detection is yet integrated in the Danish system. Results from AREA III, however, show that the implemented software for rapid post processing of data worked excellent for detection of radioactive sources. Post analysis using NASVD demonstrates that all sources except for a small {sup 137}Cs source can be localized. (au).

  12. Navy-Wide Personnel Survey (NPS) 2008: Summary of Survey Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-01

    officers, enlisted) and, where relevant, comparisons to previous NPS results. The authors acknowledge the assistance of Ms . Evangeline Clewis with the...integration, and organizational commitment. Past NPS and the related Navy Quality of Life ( QOL ) surveys have consistently found that the quality of...psychometric analysis of the 2005 NPS (Bann, Whittam, Barnett- Walker, 2006), in which scales were pared down to their essential questions. In this way, burden

  13. Measuring stigma among abortion providers: assessing the Abortion Provider Stigma Survey instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Lisa A; Debbink, Michelle; Hassinger, Jane; Youatt, Emily; Eagen-Torkko, Meghan; Harris, Lisa H

    2014-01-01

    We explored the psychometric properties of 15 survey questions that assessed abortion providers' perceptions of stigma and its impact on providers' professional and personal lives referred to as the Abortion Provider Stigma Survey (APSS). We administered the survey to a sample of abortion providers recruited for the Providers' Share Workshop (N = 55). We then completed analyses using Stata SE/12.0. Exploratory factor analysis, which resulted in 13 retained items and identified three subscales: disclosure management, resistance and resilience, and discrimination. Stigma was salient in abortion provider's lives: they identified difficulties surrounding disclosure (66%) and felt unappreciated by society (89%). Simultaneously, workers felt they made a positive contribution to society (92%) and took pride in their work (98%). Paired t-test analyses of the pre- and post-Workshop APSS scores showed no changes in the total score. However, the Disclosure Management subscale scores were significantly lower (indicating decreased stigma) for two subgroups of participants: those over the age of 30 and those with children. This analysis is a promising first step in the development of a quantitative tool for capturing abortion providers' experiences of and responses to pervasive abortion stigma.

  14. The results of the critical design of the mission instruments of GOSAT-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajima, Yukie; Suto, Hiroshi; Yotsumoto, Kazuhiko; Miyakawa, Takehiro; Hashimoto, Makiko; Shiomi, Kei; Nakajima, Masakatsu; Hirabayashi, Takeshi

    2016-04-01

    The GOSAT-2 is the successor satellite to the GOSAT which is the satellite dedicated to the measurements of the greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide and methane. GOSAT was launched in January of 2009 and has been operated for about seven years. The development of the GOSAT-2 has been continued for two years, and through the preliminary and critical design phase the detail of the design of the mission instruments were fixed as well as the bus system design. The mission instruments of the GOSAT-2 are TANSO-FTS-2 and TANSO-CAI-2. TANSO-FTS-2 is the Fourier Transform Spectrometer observing greenhouse gases such as Carbon Dioxide and Methane and TANSO-CAI-2 is the imager observing the aerosols and clouds to compensate the TANSO-FTS-2 data and to grasp the movements of the aerosols such as PM2.5. The mission instruments will adopt the same kinds of instruments as GOSAT. But some improvements will be carried. Based on the results of the preliminary design, the design had been refined in the critical design phase and the results of the design meets all of the requirements on the mission instruments derived from the mission requirements to understand CO2 and CH4 sources and sinks and carbon cycle precisely. To improve the measurement accuracy, the signal to noise ratio will be increased by the extension of the aperture size from 64mm to 73mm and cooling the after optics as well as the thermal detectors. And to increase the number of the useful data, GOSAT-2 will equip the function to avoid the clouds during the observation using the images obtained by the monitor camera in FTS. To observe the carbon monoxide, the 2.3μm observation channel will be added. This function will be realized by the extension of the 2.0μm observation band to 2.3μm. The pointing angle in the along track direction will be extend from 20 degrees of GOSAT to 40 degrees to expand the observation area over the ocean where the sun glint is observed. This will make it possible to increase the number

  15. FIRBACK; 1, A deep survey at 175 $\\mu$m with ISO, preliminary results

    CERN Document Server

    Puget, J L; Clements, D L; Reach, W T; Aussel, H; Bouchet, F R; Césarsky, C J; Désert, F X; Dole, H; Elbaz, D; Franceschini, A; Guiderdoni, B; Moorwood, A F M

    1999-01-01

    FIRBACK is a deep survey conducted with the ISOPHOT instrument aboard the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) at an effective wavelength of 175 $\\mu$m. We present here results we have obtained on the first field, the so-called Marano1 which covers around 0.25 square degree. We find that the source density for objects with a flux above 200 mJy exceeds the counts expected for sources found in the IRAS deep surveys with a similar flux by about an order of magnitude. Such an excess was expected on the basis of the high far infrared background detected with the FIRAS and DIRBE instruments aboard the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE). These sources are likely to be redshifted infrared galaxies. The steep number counts indicate strong cosmological evolution in this population. The detected sources account for only 10 % of the cosmic IR background. An extrapolation of the counts down to about 10 mJy would be needeed to account for the whole background at this wavelength.

  16. Risk perception and benefits perception. Survey results and discussion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Touzet, R.; Remedi, J. [Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear, Sede Central (Argentina); Baron, J. [Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear, Univ. Nac. de Cuyo, CEDIAC (Argentina); Caspani, C. [Ministerio de Salud Publica, Pcia. de Santa Fe (Argentina)

    2000-05-01

    The fact that the risks deriving from different activities involving the same radiation exposure are seen very differently by a single population is a highly significant one. Exactly identical risks are considered oppositely, depending on the origin of radiation (whether produced by medical applications or by nuclear power plants, resulting from natural radiation or from artificial radiation). It appears as if there was good radiation and bad radiation..{exclamation_point} One of the purposes of the paper is the discussion of causes. The acceptance of a given risk by a certain section of the population is closely related to the benefits that the group expects to receive-either consciously or unconsciously-from the activity producing the risk. Consequently, an analysis of the factors influencing the eventual rejection of a practice should explore not only fears, but also hopes...{exclamation_point} On the basis of a risk-perception survey carried out in a population sector attending hospitals-including both patients and physicians-, a prior objective analysis of the results obtained was performed and, later on, the various statements by those surveyed were studied. The design of the survey allowed for a comparative assessment of the perception of different risks depending on the people's educational and social level. An epistemological study was made on the validity involved in the use of the data resulting from the survey, so as to reach different conclusions. The population's opinion about the capacity for response, the qualification and the mitigation means available to the State authorities in order to face an eventual radiological emergency plays a leading role in risk perception. In an analysis of the relevant factors involved in risk and benefits perception by the population (in the real world), attention must be paid to the existence of organized opinion groups representing the interest of a given sector. Of course, the population's confidence

  17. Results of the 2010 Pregnancy and Parenthood Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    collected, as is the case for family planning attitudes and birth control practices and knowledge. This survey satisfies the requirements to collect...29 The next sections of the survey dealt with attitudes towards family planning and birth control practices and knowledge. 30 The survey...regarding prenatal medical issues. The majority complete the NAVMED forms and discuss both breastfeeding and post-pregnancy birth control. 82

  18. Effects of testing conditions on conceptual survey results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Ding

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Pre-testing and post-testing is a commonly used method in Physics Education Research to assess student learning gains. It is well recognized in the community that timings and incentives in delivering conceptual tests can impact test results. However, it is difficult to control these variables across different studies. As a common practice, a pre-test is often administered either at or near the beginning of a course, while a post-test can be given either at or near the end of a course. Also, in conducting such tests there often is no norm as to whether incentives should be offered to students. Because these variations can significantly affect test results, it is important to study and document their impact. We analyzed five years of data that were collected at The Ohio State University from over 2100 students, who took both the pre-test and post-test of the Conceptual Survey of Electricity and Magnetism under various timings and incentives. We observed that the actual time frame for giving a test has a marked effect on the test results and that incentive granting also has a significant influence on test outcomes. These results suggest that one should carefully monitor and document the conditions under which tests are administered.

  19. Latest Results of the SETHI Survey at Arecibo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korpela, E. J.; Demorest, P.; Heien, E.; Heiles, C.; Werthimer, D.

    2004-10-01

    SETH i is a survey of the distribution of galactic neutral hydrogen being performed comensally at the NAIC Arecibo Observatory. At the same time that observers use receivers in the Gregorian dome, SETHi is recording a 2.5MHz band centered at 1420 MHz from a flat feed on Carriage House 1. During normal astronomical observations, the SETH i feed scans across the sky at twice the sidereal rate. During 4 years of observations, we have accumulated over 15,000 hours of data covering most of the sky accessible to Arecibo. This survey has higher angular resolution than existing single dish surveys and higher sensitivity than existing or planned interferometric surveys.

  20. DUst around NEarby Stars. The Survey Observational Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiroa, C.; Marshall, J. P.; Mora, A.; Montesinos, B.; Absil, O.; Augereau, J. Ch.; Bayo, A.; Bryden, G.; Danchi, W.; delBurgo, C.; Ertel, S..; Fridlund, M.; Heras, A. M.; Krivov, A. V.; Launhardt, R.; Liseau, R.; Lohne, T.; Maldonado, J.; Pilbratt, G. L.; Roberge, A.; Rodman, J.; Sanz-Forcada, J.; Stapelfeldt, K.; Ardila, D.; Beichmann, C.

    2013-01-01

    Context. Debris discs are a consequence of the planet formation process and constitute the fingerprints of planetesimal systems. Their solar system counterparts are the asteroid and Edgeworth-Kuiper belts.Aims. The DUNES survey aims at detecting extra-solar analogues to the Edgeworth-Kuiper belt around solar-type stars, putting in this way the solar system into context. The survey allows us to address some questions related to the prevalence and properties of planetesimal systems.Methods. We used Herschel PACS to observe a sample of nearby FGK stars. Data at 100 and 160 micron were obtained, complemented in some cases with observations at 70 micron, and at 250, 350 and 500 micron using SPIRE. The observing strategy was to integrate as deep as possible at 100 micron to detect the stellar photosphere. Results. Debris discs have been detected at a fractional luminosity level down to several times that of the Edgeworth-Kuiper belt. The incidence rate of discs around the DUNES stars is increased from a rate of approx. 12.1% +/- 5% before Herschel to approx 20.2 % +/- % 2. A significant fraction (approx. 52%) of the discs are resolved, which represents an enormous step ahead from the previously known resolved discs. Some stars are associated with faint far-IR excesses attributed to a new class of cold discs. Although it cannot be excluded that these excesses are produced by coincidental alignment of background galaxies, statistical arguments suggest that at least some of them are true debris discs. Some discs display peculiar SEDs with spectral indexes in the 70-160 micron range steeper than the Rayleigh-Jeans one. An analysis of the debris disc parameters suggests that a decrease might exist of the mean black body radius from the F-type to the K-type stars. In addition, a weak trend is suggested for a correlation of disc sizes and an anticorrelation of disc temperatures with the stellar age.

  1. FIRST, a fibered aperture masking instrument. I. First on-sky test results

    CERN Document Server

    Huby, E; Marchis, F; Lacour, S; Kotani, T; Duchêne, G; Choquet, E; Gates, E L; Woillez, J M; Lai, O; Fédou, P; Collin, C; Chapron, F; Arslanyan, V; Burns, K J

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present the first on-sky results with the fibered aperture masking instrument FIRST. Its principle relies on the combination of spatial filtering and aperture masking using single-mode fibers, a novel technique that is aimed at high dynamic range imaging with high angular resolution. The prototype has been tested with the Shane 3-m telescope at Lick Observatory. The entrance pupil is divided into subpupils feeding single-mode fibers. The flux injection into the fibers is optimized by a segmented mirror. The beams are spectrally dispersed and recombined in a non-redundant exit configuration in order to retrieve all contrasts and phases independently. The instrument works at visible wavelengths between 600 nm and 760 nm and currently uses nine of the 30 43 cm subapertures constituting the full pupil. First fringes were obtained on Vega and Deneb. Stable closure phases were measured with standard deviations on the order of 1 degree. Closure phase precision can be further improved by addressing s...

  2. Stray light in PICARD SODISM instrument: design, check, flight results, and alignment issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etcheto, P.; Meftah, M.; Meissonnier, M.; Irbah, A.; Assus, P.; Thuillier, G.

    2011-10-01

    The PICARD satellite is dedicated to the monitoring of solar activity. It carries several imaging and radiometric instruments. One of them, SODISM, is a high-resolution radio-imaging telescope measuring the Sun diameter and total flux in near UV and visible wavelengths. Along with mirrors, SODISM includes highly reflective filters and attenuators, which generate ghost images. These disturb the Sun edge area, the total flux measurement and also the fine aiming channel. This is compounded with tilt tolerances, which shift and modify the ghosts images. Stray light was studied through ASAP simulation, with broad sources and high order splits. Each path was studied separately, checking its effect on instrument performance and the possible effect of tilts. Some design improvements allowed to reduce the most critical paths, while others, although relatively intense, stood clear from the critical areas. However ground tests and flight results show some residual ghosts, which could not be fully suppressed due to mechanical tolerances. They shall be taken into account by image processing.

  3. The LOFAR multi-frequency snapshot sky survey (MSSS) I. survey description and first results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heald, G.H.; Pizzo, R.F.; Orrú, E.; Breton, R.P.; Carbone, D.; Ferrari, C.; Hardcastle, M.J.; Bentum, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    We present the Multifrequency Snapshot Sky Survey (MSSS), the first northern-sky Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) imaging survey. In this introductory paper, we first describe in detail the motivation and design of the survey. Compared to previous radio surveys, MSSS is exceptional due to its intrinsic m

  4. The LOFAR Multifrequency Snapshot Sky Survey (MSSS). I. Survey description and first results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heald, G.; Pizzo, R.; et al, not CWI; Scheers, L.H.A.

    2015-01-01

    We present the Multifrequency Snapshot Sky Survey (MSSS), the first northern-sky Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) imaging survey. In this introductory paper, we first describe in detail the motivation and design of the survey. Compared to previous radio surveys, MSSS is exceptional due to its intrinsic m

  5. Results of the Fall 1984 Survey of Napa County Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedlander, Jack; Gocke, Sharon

    In November 1984, a random sample of Napa County residents was asked to complete a survey concerning the educational programs of Napa Valley College (NVC) to determine the extent to which NVC was meeting the county's educational needs. The survey was completed by 207 of the 400 community members in the sample. Study findings included the…

  6. Results From the 2014 National Wilderness Manager Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh Ghimire; Ken Cordell; Alan Watson; Chad Dawson; Gary T. Green

    2015-01-01

    A national survey of managers was developed to support interagency wilderness strategic planning. The focus was on major challenges, perceived needs for science and training, and accomplishments of 1995 Strategic Plan objectives. The survey was administered to managers at the four federal agencies with wilderness management responsibilities: the Bureau of Land...

  7. Results of a Survey of Pupils and Teachers Regarding Television.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Patricia; Rapoport, Max

    To test the validity of hypotheses regarding television violence and social behavior of viewers, a survey was conducted of a large stratified sample of sixth grade and kindergarten pupils and of teachers. The student survey identified: (1) frequency with which pupils watch television; (2) parental control of television viewing; (3) family…

  8. Developing a survey instrument to assess the readiness of primary care data, genetic and disease registries to conduct linked research: TRANSFoRm International Research Readiness (TIRRE survey instrument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Leppenwell

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Clinical data are collected for routine care in family practice; there are also a growing number of genetic and cancer registry data repositories. The Translational Research and Patient Safety in Europe (TRANSFoRm project seeks to facilitate research using linked data from more than one source. We performed a requirements analysis which identified a wide range of data and business process requirements that need to be met before linking primary care and either genetic or disease registry data.Objectives To develop a survey to assess the readiness of data repositories to participate in linked research – the Transform International Research Readiness (TIRRE survey.Method We develop the questionnaire based on our requirement analysis; with questions at micro-, meso- and macro levels of granularity, study-specific questions about diabetes and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD, and research track record. The scope of the data required was extensive. We piloted this instrument, conducting ten preliminary telephone interviews to evaluate the response to the questionnaire.Results Using feedback gained from these interviews we revised the questionnaire; clarifying questions that were difficult to answer and utilising skip logic to create different series of questions for the various types of data repository. We simplified the questionnaire replacing free-text responses with yes/no or picking list options, wherever possible. We placed the final questionnaire online and encouraged its use (www.clininf.eu/jointirre/info.html.Conclusion Limited field testing suggests that TIRRE is capable of collecting comprehensive and relevant data about the suitability and readiness of data repositories to participate in linked data research.

  9. Planck 2015 results. VIII. High Frequency Instrument data processing: Calibration and maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planck Collaboration; Adam, R.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bertincourt, B.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Désert, F.-X.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Fergusson, J.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Le Jeune, M.; Leahy, J. P.; Lellouch, E.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; McGehee, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Moreno, R.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Mottet, S.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Sauvé, A.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vibert, L.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Watson, R.; Wehus, I. K.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes the processing applied to the cleaned, time-ordered information obtained from the Planck High Frequency Instrument (HFI) with the aim of producing photometrically calibrated maps in temperature and (for the first time) in polarization. The data from the entire 2.5-year HFI mission include almost five full-sky surveys. HFI observes the sky over a broad range of frequencies, from 100 to 857 GHz. To obtain the best accuracy on the calibration over such a large range, two different photometric calibration schemes have been used. The 545 and 857 GHz data are calibrated using models of planetary atmospheric emission. The lower frequencies (from 100 to 353 GHz) are calibrated using the time-variable cosmological microwave background dipole, which we call the orbital dipole. This source of calibration only depends on the satellite velocity with respect to the solar system. Using a CMB temperature of TCMB = 2.7255 ± 0.0006 K, it permits an independent measurement of the amplitude of the CMB solar dipole (3364.3 ± 1.5 μK), which is approximatively 1σ higher than the WMAP measurement with a direction that is consistent between the two experiments. We describe the pipeline used to produce the maps ofintensity and linear polarization from the HFI timelines, and the scheme used to set the zero level of the maps a posteriori. We also summarize the noise characteristics of the HFI maps in the 2015 Planck data release and present some null tests to assess their quality. Finally, we discuss the major systematic effects and in particular the leakage induced by flux mismatch between the detectors that leads to spurious polarization signal.

  10. Development and Validation of an Instrument for Assessing Climate Change Knowledge and Perceptions: The Climate Stewardship Survey (CSS)

    OpenAIRE

    Scott L. WALKER; McNeal, Karen S

    2013-01-01

    The Climate Stewardship Survey (CSS) was developed to measure knowledge and perceptions of global climate change, while also considering information sources that respondents ‘trust.’ The CSS was drafted using a three-stage approach: development of salient scales, writing individual items, and field testing and analyses. Construct validity and alpha-level reliability was conducted on the 122-item test instrument to produce a refined 84-item CSS.  The field tested C...

  11. Search for giant planets in M 67. IV. Survey results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brucalassi, A.; Koppenhoefer, J.; Saglia, R.; Pasquini, L.; Ruiz, M. T.; Bonifacio, P.; Bedin, L. R.; Libralato, M.; Biazzo, K.; Melo, C.; Lovis, C.; Randich, S.

    2017-07-01

    Context. We present the results of a seven-year-long radial velocity survey of a sample of 88 main-sequence and evolved stars to reveal signatures of Jupiter-mass planets in the solar-age and solar-metallicity open cluster M 67. Aims: We aim at studying the frequency of giant planets in this cluster with respect to the field stars. In addition, our sample is also ideal to perform a long-term study to compare the chemical composition of stars with and without giant planets in detail. Methods: We analyzed precise radial velocity (RV) measurements obtained with the HARPS spectrograph at the European Southern Observatory (La Silla), the SOPHIE spectrograph at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence (France), the HRS spectrograph at the Hobby Eberly Telescope (Texas), and the HARPS-N spectrograph at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (La Palma). Additional RV data come from the CORALIE spectrograph at the Euler Swiss Telescope (La Silla). We conducted Monte Carlo simulations to estimate the occurrence rate of giant planets in our radial velocity survey. We considered orbital periods between 1.0 day and 1000 days and planet masses between 0.2 MJ and 10.0 MJ. We used a measure of the observational detection efficiency to determine the frequency of planets for each star. Results: All the planets previously announced in this RV campaign with their properties are summarized here: 3 hot Jupiters around the main-sequence stars YBP1194, YBP1514, and YBP401, and 1 giant planet around the evolved star S364. Two additional planet candidates around the stars YBP778 and S978 are also analyzed in the present work. We discuss stars that exhibit large RV variability or trends individually. For 2 additional stars, long-term trends are compatible with new binary candidates or substellar objects, which increases the total number of binary candidates detected in our campaign to 14. Based on the Doppler-detected planets discovered in this survey, we find an occurrence of giant planets of 18

  12. The STAFF-DWP wave instrument on the DSP equatorial spacecraft: description and first results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Cornilleau-Wehrlin

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The STAFF-DWP wave instrument on board the equatorial spacecraft (TC1 of the Double Star Project consists of a combination of 2 instruments which are a heritage of the Cluster mission: the Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Field Fluctuations (STAFF experiment and the Digital Wave-Processing experiment (DWP. On DSP-TC1 STAFF consists of a three-axis search coil magnetometer, used to measure magnetic fluctuations at frequencies up to 4 kHz and a waveform unit, up to 10 Hz, plus snapshots up to 180 Hz. DWP provides several onboard analysis tools: a complex FFT to fully characterise electromagnetic waves in the frequency range 10 Hz-4 kHz, a particle correlator linked to the PEACE electron experiment, and compression of the STAFF waveform data. The complementary Cluster and TC1 orbits, together with the similarity of the instruments, permits new multi-point studies. The first results show the capabilities of the experiment, with examples in the different regions of the magnetosphere-solar wind system that have been encountered by DSP-TC1 at the beginning of its operational phase. An overview of the different kinds of electromagnetic waves observed on the dayside from perigee to apogee is given, including the different whistler mode waves (hiss, chorus, lion roars and broad-band ULF emissions. The polarisation and propagation characteristics of intense waves in the vicinity of a bow shock crossing are analysed using the dedicated PRASSADCO tool, giving results compatible with previous studies: the broad-band ULF waves consist of a superimposition of different wave modes, whereas the magnetosheath lion roars are right-handed and propagate close to the magnetic field. An example of a combined Cluster DSP-TC1 magnetopause crossing is given. This first case study shows that the ULF wave power intensity is higher at low latitude (DSP than at high latitude (Cluster. On the nightside in the tail, a first wave event comparison - in a rather quiet time interval

  13. Experimental Estimation of CLASP Spatial Resolution: Results of the Instrument's Optical Alignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giono, Gabrial; Katsukawa, Yukio; Ishikawa, Ryoko; Narukage, Noriyuki; Bando, Takamasa; Kano, Ryohei; Suematsu, Yoshinori; Kobayashi, Ken; Winebarger, Amy; Auchere, Frederic

    2015-01-01

    The Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha SpectroPolarimeter (CLASP) is a sounding-rocket experiment currently being built at the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan. This instrument aims to probe for the first time the magnetic field strength and orientation in the solar upper-chromosphere and lower-transition region. CLASP will measure the polarization of the Lyman-Alpha line (121.6nm) with an unprecedented accuracy, and derive the magnetic field information through the Hanle effect. Although polarization accuracy and spectral resolution are crucial for the Hanle effect detection, spatial resolution is also important to get reliable context image via the slit-jaw camera. As spatial resolution is directly related with the alignment of optics, it is also a good way of ensuring the alignment of the instrument to meet the scientific requirement. This poster will detail the experiments carried out to align CLASP's optics (telescope and spectrograph), as both part of the instrument were aligned separately. The telescope was aligned in double-pass mode, and a laser interferometer (He-Ne) was used to measure the telescope's wavefront error (WFE). The secondary mirror tilt and position were adjusted to remove comas and defocus aberrations from the WFE. Effect of gravity on the WFE measurement was estimated and the final WFE derived in zero-g condition for CLASP telescope will be presented. In addition, an estimation of the spot shape and size derived from the final WFE will also be shown. The spectrograph was aligned with a custom procedure: because Ly-??light is absorbed by air, the spectrograph's off-axis parabolic mirrors were aligned in Visible Light (VL) using a custom-made VL grating instead of the flight Ly-? grating. Results of the alignment in Visible Light will be shown and the spot shape recorded with CCDs at various position along the slit will be displayed. Results from both alignment experiment will be compared to the design requirement, and will be combined in

  14. New Results from Air Pollution Studies in Bulgaria (Moss Survey 2000-2001)

    CERN Document Server

    Stamenov, J N; Vachev, B; Gueleva, E; Yurukova, L; Ganeva, A; Mitrikov, M; Antonov, A; Srentz, A; Varbanov, Z; Batov, I V; Damov, K; Marinova, E; Frontasyeva, M V; Pavlov, S S; Strelkova, L P

    2002-01-01

    New results of moss survey 2000 of systematic study of air pollution with heavy metals and other toxic elements in Bulgaria are reported. The moss samples collected at 103 sites in Bulgaria, along the borders with Yugoslavia, Macedonia, Greece and Turkey were analyzed by instrumental activation analysis using epithermal neutrons (ENAA) at the IBR-2 pulsed fast reactor for a wide set of elements including heavy metals and rare earth elements (Na, Mg, Al, Cl, K, Ca, Sc, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Zn, As, Se, Br, Rb, Sr, Mo, Sb, I, Cs, Ba, La, Sm, Tb, Yb, Hf, Ta, W, Au, Th, and U). The results obtained are consistent with the mean European values for most of elements. The principle component analysis is applied to distinguish heavy and light crust elements and vegetation ones from those of anthropogenic origin.

  15. The LOFAR Multifrequency Snapshot Sky Survey (MSSS) I. Survey description and first results

    CERN Document Server

    Heald, G H; Orrú, E; Breton, R P; Carbone, D; Ferrari, C; Hardcastle, M J; Jurusik, W; Macario, G; Mulcahy, D; Rafferty, D; Asgekar, A; Brentjens, M; Fallows, R A; Frieswijk, W; Toribio, M C; Adebahr, B; Arts, M; Bell, M R; Bonafede, A; Bray, J; Broderick, J; Cantwell, T; Carroll, P; Cendes, Y; Clarke, A O; Croston, J; Daiboo, S; de Gasperin, F; Gregson, J; Harwood, J; Hassall, T; Heesen, V; Horneffer, A; van der Horst, A J; Iacobelli, M; Jelić, V; Jones, D; Kant, D; Kokotanekov, G; Martin, P; McKean, J P; Morabito, L K; Nikiel-Wroczyński, B; Offringa, A; Pandey, V N; Pandey-Pommier, M; Pietka, M; Pratley, L; Riseley, C; Rowlinson, A; Sabater, J; Scaife, A M M; Scheers, L H A; Sendlinger, K; Shulevski, A; Sipior, M; Sobey, C; Stewart, A J; Stroe, A; Swinbank, J; Tasse, C; Trüstedt, J; Varenius, E; van Velzen, S; Vilchez, N; van Weeren, R J; Wijnholds, S; Williams, W L; de Bruyn, A G; Nijboer, R; Wise, M; Alexov, A; Anderson, J; Avruch, I M; Beck, R; Bell, M E; van Bemmel, I; Bentum, M J; Bernardi, G; Best, P; Breitling, F; Brouw, W N; Brüggen, M; Butcher, H R; Ciardi, B; Conway, J E; de Geus, E; de Jong, A; de Vos, M; Deller, A; Dettmar, R J; Duscha, S; Eislöffel, J; Engels, D; Falcke, H; Fender, R; Garrett, M A; Grießmeier, J; Gunst, A W; Hamaker, J P; Hessels, J W T; Hoeft, M; Hörandel, J; Holties, H A; Intema, H; Jackson, N J; Jütte, E; Karastergiou, A; Klijn, W F A; Kondratiev, V I; Koopmans, L V E; Kuniyoshi, M; Kuper, G; Law, C; van Leeuwen, J; Loose, M; Maat, P; Markoff, S; McFadden, R; McKay-Bukowski, D; Mevius, M; Miller-Jones, J C A; Morganti, R; Munk, H; Nelles, A; Noordam, J E; Norden, M J; Paas, H; Polatidis, A G; Reich, W; Renting, A; Röttgering, H; Schoenmakers, A; Schwarz, D; Sluman, J; Smirnov, O; Stappers, B W; Steinmetz, M; Tagger, M; Tang, Y; ter Veen, S; Thoudam, S; Vermeulen, R; Vocks, C; Vogt, C; Wijers, R A M J; Wucknitz, O; Yatawatta, S; Zarka, P

    2015-01-01

    We present the Multifrequency Snapshot Sky Survey (MSSS), the first northern-sky LOFAR imaging survey. In this introductory paper, we first describe in detail the motivation and design of the survey. Compared to previous radio surveys, MSSS is exceptional due to its intrinsic multifrequency nature providing information about the spectral properties of the detected sources over more than two octaves (from 30 to 160 MHz). The broadband frequency coverage, together with the fast survey speed generated by LOFAR's multibeaming capabilities, make MSSS the first survey of the sort anticipated to be carried out with the forthcoming Square Kilometre Array (SKA). Two of the sixteen frequency bands included in the survey were chosen to exactly overlap the frequency coverage of large-area Very Large Array (VLA) and Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) surveys at 74 MHz and 151 MHz respectively. The survey performance is illustrated within the "MSSS Verification Field" (MVF), a region of 100 square degrees centered at J...

  16. A Frailty Instrument for primary care: findings from the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romero-Ortuno Roman

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A frailty paradigm would be useful in primary care to identify older people at risk, but appropriate metrics at that level are lacking. We created and validated a simple instrument for frailty screening in Europeans aged ≥50. Our study is based on the first wave of the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE, http://www.share-project.org, a large population-based survey conducted in 2004-2005 in twelve European countries. Methods Subjects: SHARE Wave 1 respondents (17,304 females and 13,811 males. Measures: five SHARE variables approximating Fried's frailty definition. Analyses (for each gender: 1 estimation of a discreet factor (DFactor model based on the frailty variables using LatentGOLD®. A single DFactor with three ordered levels or latent classes (i.e. non-frail, pre-frail and frail was modelled; 2 the latent classes were characterised against a biopsychosocial range of Wave 1 variables; 3 the prospective mortality risk (unadjusted and age-adjusted for each frailty class was established on those subjects with known mortality status at Wave 2 (2007-2008 (11,384 females and 9,163 males; 4 two web-based calculators were created for easy retrieval of a subject's frailty class given any five measurements. Results Females: the DFactor model included 15,578 cases (standard R2 = 0.61. All five frailty indicators discriminated well (p N = 10,420; 66.9%, pre-frail (N = 4,025; 25.8%, and frail (N = 1,133; 7.3%. Relative to the non-frail class, the age-adjusted Odds Ratio (with 95% Confidence Interval for mortality at Wave 2 was 2.1 (1.4 - 3.0 in the pre-frail and 4.8 (3.1 - 7.4 in the frail. Males: 12,783 cases (standard R2 = 0.61, all frailty indicators had p N = 10,517; 82.3%, pre-frail (N = 1,871; 14.6%, and frail (N = 395; 3.1%; age-adjusted OR (95% CI for mortality: 3.0 (2.3 - 4.0 in the pre-frail, 6.9 (4.7 - 10.2 in the frail. Conclusions The SHARE Frailty Instrument has sufficient construct and

  17. Planck early results. IV. First assessment of the High Frequency Instrument in-flight performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bréelle, E.; Bucher, M.; Cressiot, C.

    2011-01-01

    The Planck High Frequency Instrument (HFI) is designed to measure the temperature and polarization anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background and Galactic foregrounds in six ~30% bands centered at 100, 143, 217, 353, 545, and 857 GHz at an angular resolution of 10′ (100 GHz), 7′ (143 GHz...... as the ones chosen during ground testing. Observations of Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn have confirmed that the optical beams and the time responses of the detection chains are in good agreement with the predictions of physical optics modeling and pre-launch measurements. The Detectors suffer from a high flux...... heat load on the sub-Kelvin stage. Temporal variation and the inhomogeneous distribution of the flux results in thermal fluctuations that are a probable source of low frequency noise. The removal of systematic effects in the time ordered data provides a signal with an average noise equivalent power...

  18. First results of the Instrumentation Line for the deep-sea ANTARES neutrino telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Aguilar, J A; Ameli, F; Anghinolfi, M; Anton, G; Anvar, S; Aslanides, E; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Barbarito, E; Basa, S; Battaglieri, M; Becherini, Y; Bellotti, R; Beltramelli, J; Bertin, V; Bigi, A; Billault, M; Blaes, R; de Botton, N; Bouwhuis, M C; Bradbury, S M; Bruijn, R; Brunner, J; Burgio, G F; Busto, J; Cafagna, F; Caillat, L; Calzas, A; Capone, A; Caponetto, L; Carmona, E; Carr, J; Cartwright, S L; Castel, D; Castorina, E; Cavasinni, V; Cecchini, S; Ceres, A; Charvis, P; Chauchot, P; Chiarusi, T; Circella, M; Colnard, C; Compere, C; Coniglione, R; Cottini, N; Coyle, P; Cuneo, S; Cussatlegras, A S; Damy, G; Van Dantzig, R; De Marzo, C; Dekeyser, I; Delagnes, E; Denans, D; Deschamps, A; Dessages-Ardellier, F; Destelle, J J; Dinkespieler, B; Distefano, C; Donzaud, C; Drogou, J F; Druillole, F; Durand, D; Ernenwein, J P; Escoffier, S; Falchini, E; Favard, S; Feinstein, F; Ferry, S; Festy, D; Fiorello, C; Flaminio, V; Galeotti, S; Gallone, J M; Giacomelli, G; Girard, N; Gojak, C; Goret, P; Graf, K; Hallewell, G D; Harakeh, M N; Hartmann, B; Heijboer, A; Heine, E; Hello, Y; Hernández-Rey, J J; Hossl, J; Hoffman, C; Hogenbirk, J; Hubbard, John R; Jaquet, M; Jaspers, M; De Jong, M; Jouvenot, F; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karkar, S; Katz, U; Keller, P; Kok, H; Kooijman, P; Kopper, C; Korolkova, E V; Kouchner, A; Kretschmer, W; Kruijer, A; Kuch, S; Kudryavtsev, V A; Lachartre, D; Lafoux, H; Lagier, P; Lahmann, R; Lamanna, G; Lamare, P; Languillat, J C; Laschinsky, H; Le Guen, Y; Le Provost, H; Le Van-Suu, A; Legou, T; Lim, G; Lo Nigro, L; Lo Presti, D; Löhner, H; Loucatos, Sotirios S; Louis, F; Lucarelli, F; Lyashuk, V; Marcelin, M; Margiotta, A; Masullo, R; Mazéas, F; Mazure, A; McMillan, J E; Megna, R; Melissas, M; Migneco, E; Milovanovic, A; Mongelli, M; Montaruli, T; Morganti, M; Moscoso, L; Musumeci, M; Naumann, C; Naumann-Godo, M; Niess, V; Olivetto, C; Ostasch, R; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Payre, P; Peek, H; Petta, C; Piattelli, P; Pineau, J P; Poinsignon, J; Popa, V; Pradier, T; Racca, C; Randazzo, N; Van Randwijk, J; Real, D; Van Rens, B; Rethore, F; Rewiersma, P A M; Riccobene, G; Rigaud, V; Ripani, M; Roca, V; Roda, C; Rolin, J F; Romita, M; Rose, H J; Rostovtsev, A; Roux, J; Ruppi, M; Russo, G V; Salesa, F; Salomon, K; Sapienza, P; Schmitt, F; Schuller, J P; Shadnize, R; Sokalski, I A; Spona, T; Spurio, M; van der Steenhoven, G; Stolarczyk, T; Streeb, K; Stubert, D; Sulak, L; Taiuti, M; Tamburini, C; Tao, C; Terreni, G; Thompson, L F; Valdy, P; Valente, V; Vallage, B; Venekamp, G; Verlaat, B; Vernin, P; De Vita, R; De Vries, G; Van Wijk, R F; De Witt-Huberts, P K A; Wobbe, G; De Wolf, E; Yao, A F; Zaborov, D; Zaccone, Henri; De Dios-Zornoza-Gomez, Juan; Zúñiga, J; Deceased

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, the ANTARES Collaboration deployed and operated at a depth of 2500 m a so-called Mini Instrumentation Line equipped with Optical Modules (MILOM) at the ANTARES site. The various data acquired during the continuous operation from April to December 2005 of the MILOM confirm the satisfactory performance of the Optical Modules, their front-end electronics and readout system, as well as the calibration devices of the detector. The in-situ measurement of the Optical Module time response yields a resolution better than 0.5 ns. The performance of the acoustic positioning system, which enables the spatial reconstruction of the ANTARES detector with a precision of about 10 cm, is verified. These results demonstrate that with the full ANTARES neutrino telescope the design angular resolution of better than $0.3^\\circ$ can be realistically achieved.

  19. Results and Insights on the Impact of Smoke on Digital Instrumentation and Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, T. J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Nowlen, S. P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2001-01-31

    Smoke can cause interruptions and upsets in active electronics. Because nuclear power plants are replacing analog with digital instrumentation and control systems, qualification guidelines for new systems are being reviewed for severe environments such as smoke and electromagnetic interference. Active digital systems, individual components, and active circuits have been exposed to smoke in a program sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The circuits and systems were all monitored during the smoke exposure, indicating any immediate effects of the smoke. The major effect of smoke has been to increase leakage currents (through circuit bridging across contacts and leads) and to cause momentary upsets and failures in digital systems. This report summarizes two previous reports and presents new results from conformal coating, memory chip, and hard drive tests. The report describes practices for mitigation of smoke damage through digital system design, fire barriers, ventilation, fire suppressants, and post fire procedures.

  20. Results of instrumental observations of tidal wave propagation in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adushkin, V. V.; Spivak, A. A.; Kharlamov, V. A.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents the results of processing and analysis of acoustic waves in the surface layer of the atmosphere, registered at the Mikhnevo Geophysical Observatory, Institute of Geosphere Dynamics, Russian Academy of Sciences (IGD RAS). Using the autoregression model of digital series, the spectrum of acoustic oscillations was evaluated and the tidal waves in the envelopes of acoustic oscillations were distinguished. The tidal components with similar periods were separated using the method of extraction of harmonic components by using adaptive notch filters. The observed features of the spectrum of acoustic oscillations open up new opportunities for instrumental control over meteorological conditions and the establishment of general regularities controlling the regimes of energy-exchange processes in the Earth's atmosphere.

  1. Survey-related experiential and attitudinal correlates of future health survey participation: results of a statewide survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beebe, Timothy J; Jenkins, Sarah M; Anderson, Kari J; Davern, Michael E

    2008-12-01

    To determine the survey-related experiential and attitudinal correlates of future health-related survey participation. From July 21, 2005, through October 25, 2005, we conducted a mixed-mode mail and telephone survey of 1636 noninstitutionalized Minnesota residents aged 18 years or older. The overall response rate was 49%. We examined the unadjusted effect of each independent variable on the likelihood of future participation in health-related surveys using univariate logistic regression and discerned the relative contribution of the different variables with multivariate logistic regression analysis. Respondents were asked to complete an average of 4.5 different surveys in the year before the current survey; approximately a quarter of the respondents perceived these surveys to be burdensome. The likelihood of future participation in health-related surveys was negatively related to good health status, a busy schedule, and perceptions that the surveys were too long. Respondents were more than twice as likely to indicate that they would participate in a future health-related survey if they knew the organization doing the survey. For health-related surveys, investigators should remain mindful of people's busy schedules and keep their surveys as short as possible. Further research is needed to clarify whether the decision to participate in a survey hinges more on knowing the organization paying to have a survey performed (the sponsor) or the survey vendor collecting the data.

  2. PROBA-V Energetic Particle Telescope instrument and its early science results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyamukungu, Mathias; O'Brien, Paul; Benck, Sylvie; Evans, Hugh; Nieminen, Petteri; Mazur, Joseph; Daly, Eamonn; Borisov, Stanislav

    The Energetic Particle Telescope (EPT) is a science-class instrument designed to measure contamination-free spectra of electrons (0.5 - 10 MeV), protons (9 - 300 MeV) and He-ions (38 - 1200 MeV) within a 52 deg. Field Of View (FOV) angle and a 149 cm(2) sr aperture geometrical factor. The instrument is modular and it can be in-flight configured so as to provide up to 19 energy channels per particle type. The EPT dimensions are 210 mm x 162 mm x 128 mm, the total mass is 4.6 kgs and its power consumption amounts to 5.6 Watts. The satellite PROBA-V was launched on the 7th May 2013 onto a sun-synchronous circular Low Earth Orbit at 820 km altitude and 98.7 deg. inclination. Its local time at descending node is 10:30. The EPT has been accommodated onto the S/C so as to get its boresight oriented Eastwards during local night time and Westwards during local day time. However, the East/West orientation has been modified during the commissioning phase to allow measurements of Pitch Angle Distribution (PAD). The latters were part of a plan aimed at validating the EPT hardware and the data analysis software. The EPT is currently acquiring data that are used for (i) cross-validation of radiation monitors or spectrometers, (ii) cross-validation of space radiation models, (iii) development of steady-state electron and proton flux models and (iv) space weather studies. The EPT validation results along with early results of the ongoing science studies are presented in this paper.

  3. The VMC Survey. VI. First results for Classical Cepheids

    CERN Document Server

    Ripepi, V; Marconi, M; Clementini, G; Cioni, M R; Marquette, J B; Girardi, L; Rubele, S; Groenewegen, M A T; de Grijs, R; Gibson, B K; Oliveira, J M; van Loon, J Th

    2012-01-01

    The VISTA Magellanic Cloud (VMC, PI M.R. Cioni) survey is collecting deep Ks-band time-series photometry of the pulsating variable stars hosted by the system formed by the two Magellanic Clouds (MCs) and the "bridge" connecting them. In this paper we present the first results for Classical Cepheids, from the VMC observations of two fields in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). The VMC Ks-band light curves of the Cepheids are well sampled (12-epochs) and of excellent precision. We were able to measure for the first time the Ks magnitude of the faintest Classical Cepheids in the LMC (Ks\\sim17.5 mag), which are mostly pulsating in the First Overtone (FO) mode, and to obtain FO Period-Luminosity (PL), Period-Wesenheit (PW), and Period-Luminosity-Color (PLC) relations, spanning a whole period range from 0.25 to 6 days. Saturation limits our Ks measurements of the Fundamental mode (F) Cepheids to periods shorter than 15-20 days. Therefore, we have complemented our sample with literature data for brighter F Cepheids. ...

  4. Internet use in radiology: results of a nationwide survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorbeck, F. E-mail: friedrich.vorbeck@univie.ac.at; Zimmermann, C.; Vorbeck-Meister, I.; Kainberger, F.; Imhof, H

    1999-08-01

    Purpose: To determine the number of radiologists who currently have Internet access, their use patterns on the Internet for Radiology purposes, the web sites they would recommend, and the potential site access to the Internet that they would like to see in the future. In addition, this study analyzed the best way to find nationwide radiological sites and their content. Materials and Methods: In a nationwide survey, 854 Austrian radiologist were asked to fill out and return a questionnaire about Internet access, current problems, current and future use, which web site they recommend, and about the use of e-mail. Next, the available nationwide radiological sites were searched with seven major search engines using 37 different keywords, as well as by category search, and by searching for links on the homepages of the radiological departments of all Universities of Austria. Then, the offered information of the founded pages was classified in categories. Results: Of the 210 (24.6%) radiologists who returned the questionnaire, 154 (73%) had Internet access. Time expenditure was considered the main problem using the Internet. The Internet was used for literature research by 69% of the radiologists with Internet access, for e-mail by 60%, and for congress information by 57%. In future, 43% would like to read electronic journals more often and 39% would like to use the web more intensively for scientific congresses. At the present time, we found 17 radiological web sites in Austria. The most promising way to find these sites was to use the search engines Alta Vista and Hotbot. Fifteen (88%) sites offered information for patients, seven (41%) for radiologists, five (29%) for students, and four (24%) for researchers. Summary: Many radiologists in Austria already have Internet access, although time expenditure was considered the main problem with Internet use. Survey responses showed a need for electronic journals. To our point of view, Universities and radiological societies

  5. Variational Approach to Impulsive Problems: A Survey of Recent Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang-fang Liao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a survey on the existence of nontrivial solutions to impulsive differential equations by using variational methods, including solutions to boundary value problems, periodic solutions, and homoclinic solutions.

  6. National Geochemical Survey Locations and Results for Iowa

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — The United States Geological Survey (USGS), in collaboration with other state and federal agencies, industry, and academia, is conducting a National Geochemical...

  7. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey Results: 2010/2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Surveys that were conducted on 53 refuges across the Refuge System. The report is part of USGS Data...

  8. Civilian First Responder Decontamination Equipment Characteristics Survey Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    of Standards and Technology (DHS/NIST) Standards Development Team to develop a survey to determine important characteristics of first responder decontamination...a draft American Society for Testing Materials standard for civilian first responder decontamination systems.

  9. Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge contaminant survey results

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — As part of a baseline contaminant survey of all National Wildlife Refuges (NWR) in Missouri, fish were collected at the Squaw Creek NWR from Davis and Squaw creeks...

  10. Library services for people with disabilities: results of a survey.

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, P P

    1996-01-01

    The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), enacted in 1990, has had a significant impact on the way many institutions, including libraries, do business. The Association of Research Libraries surveyed its members in 1991 to determine the effect of this legislation, and the author conducted a similar survey in 1995 to learn what progress academic health sciences libraries have made in serving the needs of people with disablities. A questionnaire was mailed to 131 members of the Association of A...

  11. The 2003 Australian Breast Health Survey: survey design and preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Favelle Simone

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Breast Health Surveys, conducted by the National Breast Cancer Centre (NBCC in 1996 and 2003, are designed to gain insight into the knowledge, attitudes and behaviours of a nationally representative sample of Australian women on issues relevant to breast cancer. In this article, we focus on major aspects of the design and present results on respondents' knowledge about mammographic screening. Methods The 2003 BHS surveyed English-speaking Australian women aged 30–69 without a history of breast cancer using computer-assisted telephone interviewing. Questions covered the following themes: knowledge and perceptions about incidence, mortality and risk; knowledge and behaviour regarding early detection, symptoms and diagnosis; mammographic screening; treatment; and accessibility and availability of information and services. Respondents were selected using a complex sample design involving stratification. Sample weights against Australian population benchmarks were used in all statistical analyses. Means and proportions for the entire population and by age group and area of residence were calculated. Statistical tests were conducted using a level of significance of 0.01. Results Of the 3,144 respondents who consented to being interviewed, 138 (4.4% had a previous diagnosis of breast cancer and were excluded leaving 3,006 completed interviews eligible for analysis. A majority of respondents (61.1% reported ever having had a mammogram and 29.1% identified mammography as being the best way of finding breast cancer. A majority of women (85.9% had heard of the BreastScreen Australia (BSA program, the national mammographic screening program providing free biennial screening mammograms, with 94.5% believing that BSA attendance was available regardless of the presence or absence of symptoms. There have been substantial gains in women's knowledge about mammographic screening over the seven years between the two surveys. Conclusion The

  12. Program Evaluation Using the Project Dakota Parent Satisfaction Survey. A Manual for Administration and Interpretation of Findings Using a Validated Instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovach, JoAnne; Jacks, Robert

    This manual presents an instrument (the Dakota Parent Satisfaction Survey) and procedures for evaluating parent satisfaction with early intervention programs. The survey procedures have been used to evaluate seven early intervention programs each year since 1985. Development of the Survey is discussed, including the identification of program…

  13. Herschel : Testing of Cryogenics Instruments at Spacecraft Level and Early Flight Results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collaudin, B.; Montet, D.; Roche, Y.; Ilsen, S.; Schamberg, C.; Cesa, M.; Goodey, K.; Rautakoski, J.; Jewell, C.; Idler, S.; Koppe, A.; Sonn, N.; Hendry, D.; Hamer, S.; Bauer, O.; Feuchtgruber, H.; Sawyer, E.; Swinyard, B.; Sidher, S.; Roelfsema, P.; Dieleman, P.; Teyssier, D.

    2010-01-01

    Herschel cryogenics instrument (HIFI, PACS, SPIRE) flight models have been delivered to ESA & Prime contractor Thales Alenia Space mid 2007, to be integrated and tested on the Herschel spacecraft, for a launch mid May 2009. The instrument integration and test campaign at spacecraft level was perform

  14. Herschel: Testing of Cryogenics Instruments at Spacecraft Level and Early Flight Results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collaudin, B.; Montet, D.; Roche, Y.; Ilsen, S.; Schamberg, C.; Cesa, M.; Goodey, K.; Rautakoski, J.; Jewell, C.; Idler, S.; Koppe, A.; Sonn, N.; Hendry, D.; Hamer, S.; Bauer, O.; Feuchtgruber, H.; Sawyer, E.; Swinyard, B.; Sidher, S.; Roelfsema, P.; Dieleman, P.; Teyssier, D.

    2010-01-01

    Herschel cryogenics instrument (HIFI, PACS, SPIRE) flight models have been delivered to ESA & Prime contractor Thales Alenia Space mid 2007, to be integrated and tested on the Herschel spacecraft, for a launch mid May 2009. The instrument integration and test campaign at spacecraft level was perform

  15. The Cabauw Intercomparison campaign for Nitrogen Dioxide measuring Instruments (CINDI): Design, execution, and early results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piters, A.J.M.; Boersma, K.F.; Kroon, M.; Hains, J.C.; Roozendael, M. van; Wittrock, F.; Abuhassan, N.; Adams, C.; Akrami, M.; Allaart, M.A.F.; Apituley, A.; Beirle, S.; Bergwerff, J.B.; Berkhout, A.J.C.; Brunner, D.; Cede, A.; Chong, J.; Clémer, K.; Fayt, C.; Frieß, U.; Gast, L.F.L.; Gil-Ojeda, M.; Goutail, F.; Graves, R.; Griesfeller, A.; Großmann, K.; Hemerijckx, G.; Hendrick, F.; Henzing, B.; Herman, J.; Hermans, C.; Hoexum, M.; Hoff, G.R. van der; Irie, H.; Johnston, P.V.; Kanaya, Y.; Kim, Y.J.; Klein Baltink, H.; Kreher, K.; Leeuw, G. de; Leigh, R.; Merlaud, A.; Moerman, M.M.; Monks, P.S.; Mount, G.H.; Navarro-Comas, M.; Oetjen, H.; Pazmino, A.; Perez-Camacho, M.; Peters, E.; Du Piesanie, A.; Pinardi, G.; Puentedura, O.; Richter, A.; Roscoe, H.K.; Schönhardt, A.; Schwarzenbach, B.; Shaiganfar, R.; Sluis, W.; Spinei, E.; Stolk, A.P.; Strong, K.; Swart, D.P.J.; Takashima, H.; Vlemmix, T.; Vrekoussis, M.; Wagner, T.; Whyte, C.; Wilson, K.M.; Yela, M.; Yilmaz, S.; Zieger, P.; Zhou, Y.

    2012-01-01

    From June to July 2009 more than thirty different in-situ and remote sensing instruments from all over the world participated in the Cabauw Intercomparison campaign for Nitrogen Dioxide measuring Instruments (CINDI). The campaign took place at KNMI's Cabauw Experimental Site for Atmospheric Research

  16. The Cabauw Intercomparison campaign for Nitrogen Dioxide measuring Instruments (CINDI): design, execution, and early results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henzing, J.S.; Leeuw, G. de; Piters, A.J.M.; Boersma, K.F.; Kroon, M.; Hains, J.C.; Roozendael, M. van; Wittrock, F.; Abuhassan, N.; Adams, C.; Akrami, M.; Allaart, M.A.F.; Apituley, A.; Bergwerff, J.B.; Berkhout, A.J.C.; Brunner, D.; Cede, A.; Chong, J.; Clémer, K.; Fayt, C.; Friess, U.; Gast, L.F.L.; Gil-Ojeda, M.; Goutail, F.; Graves, R.; Griesfeller, A.; Grossmann, K.; Hemerijckx, G.; Hendrick, F.; Herman, J.; Hermans, C.; Hoexum, M.; Hoff, G.R. van der; Irie, H.; Johnston, P.V.; Kanaya, Y.; Kim, Y.J.; Klein Baltink, H.; Kreher, K.; Leigh, R.; Merlaud, A.; Moerman, M.M.; Monks, P.S.; Mount, G.H.; Navarro-Comas, M.; Oetjen, H.; Pazmino, A.; Perez-Camacho, M.; Peters, E.; Piesanie, A. du; Pinardi, G.; Puentadura, O.; Richter, A.; Roscoe, H.K.; Schönhardt, A.; Schwarzenbach, B.; Shaiganfar, R.; Sluis, W.; Spinei, E.; Stolk, A.P.; Strong, K.; Swart, D.P.J.; Takashima, H.; Vlemmix, T.; Vrekoussis, M.; Wagner, T.; Whyte, C.; Wilson, K.M.; Yela, M.; Yilmaz, S.; Zieger, P.; Zhou, Y.

    2011-01-01

    From June to July 2009 more than thirty different in-situ and remote sensing instruments from all over the world participated in the Cabauw Intercomparison campaign for Nitrogen Dioxide measuring Instruments (CINDI). The campaign took place at KNMI’s 5 Cabauw Experimental Site for Atmospheric Resear

  17. Cultural adaptation and validation of an instrument on barriers for the use of research results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Maria Beatriz Guimarães; Haas, Vanderlei José; Dantas, Rosana Aparecida Spadoti; Felix, Márcia Marques Dos Santos; Galvão, Cristina Maria

    2017-03-02

    to culturally adapt The Barriers to Research Utilization Scale and to analyze the metric validity and reliability properties of its Brazilian Portuguese version. methodological research conducted by means of the cultural adaptation process (translation and back-translation), face and content validity, construct validity (dimensionality and known groups) and reliability analysis (internal consistency and test-retest). The sample consisted of 335 nurses, of whom 43 participated in the retest phase. the validity of the adapted version of the instrument was confirmed. The scale investigates the barriers for the use of the research results in clinical practice. Confirmatory factorial analysis demonstrated that the Brazilian Portuguese version of the instrument is adequately adjusted to the dimensional structure the scale authors originally proposed. Statistically significant differences were observed among the nurses holding a Master's or Doctoral degree, with characteristics favorable to Evidence-Based Practice, and working at an institution with an organizational cultural that targets this approach. The reliability showed a strong correlation (r ranging between 0.77 and 0.84, pcultura organizacional dirigida hacia tal aproximación. La fiabilidad presentó correlación fuerte (r variando entre 0,77 y 0,84, pcultura organizacional direcionada para tal abordagem. A confiabilidade apresentou correlação forte (r variando entre 0,77e 0,84, p<0,001) e a consistência interna foi adequada (alfa de Cronbach variando entre 0,77 e 0,82) . a versão para o português brasileiro do instrumento The Barriers Scale demonstrou-se válida e confiável no grupo estudado.

  18. [Severe idiopathic scoliosis. Does the approach and the instruments used modify the results?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Márquez, J M; Sánchez Pérez-Grueso, F J; Pérez Martín-Buitrago, M; Fernández-Baíllo, N; García-Fernández, A; Quintáns-Rodríguez, J

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work is to evaluate and compare the radiographic results and complications of the surgical treatment of adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis greater than 75 degrees, using a double approach (DA) or an isolated posterior approach with hybrid instruments (posterior hybrid [PH]), or with «all-pedicle screws» (posterior screws [PS]). A retrospective review was performed on 69 patients with idiopathic scoliosis greater than 75°, with a follow-up of more than 2 years, to analyze the flexibility of the curves, the correction obtained, and the complications depending on the type of surgery. The Kruskal-Wallis test for non-parametric variables was used for the statistical analysis. There were no statistically significant differences between the 3 patient groups in the pre-surgical Cobb angle values (DA=89°, PH=83°, PS=83°), in the immediate post-surgical (DA=34°, PH=33°, PS=30°), nor at the end of follow-up (DA=36°, PH=36°, PS=33°) (P>.05). The percentage correction (DA=60%, PH=57%, PS=60%) was similar between groups (P>.05). The percentage of complications associated with the procedure was 20.8% in DA, 10% in PH and 20% in PS. Two patients in the PS group showed changes, with no neurological lesions, in the spinal cord monitoring, and one patient in the same group suffered a delayed and transient incomplete lesion. No significant differences were observed in the correction of severe idiopathic scoliosis between patients operated using the double or isolated posterior approach, regardless of the type of instrumentation used. Copyright © 2013 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Seismic refraction profile, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia: field operations, instrumentation, and initial results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, H. Richard; Healy, J.H.; Roller, John; Lamson, Ralph; Fisher, Fred; McClearn, Robert; Allen, Steve

    1979-01-01

    In February 1978 a seismic deep-refraction profile was recorded by the USGS along a 1000-km line across the Arabian Shield in western Saudi Arabia. The line begins in Paleozoic and Mesozoic cover rocks near Riyadh on the Arabian Platform, leads southwesterly across three major Precambrian tectonic provinces, traverses Cenozoic rocks of the coastal plain near Jizan (Tihamat Asir), and terminates at the outer edge of the Farasan Bank in the southern Red Sea. More than 500 surveyed recording sites were occupied, including 19 in the Farasan Islands. Six shot points were used--five on land, with charges placed mostly below water table in drill holes, and one at sea, with charges placed on the sea floor and fired from a ship. The total charge consumed was slightly in excess of 61 metric tons in 21 discrete firings. Seismic energy was recorded by means of a set of 100 newly developed portable seismic stations. Each station consists of a standard 2-Hz vertical geophone coupled to a self-contained analog recording instrument equipped with a magnetic-tape cassette. The stations were deployed in groups of 20 by five observer teams, each generally consisting of two scientist-technicians and a surveyor-guide. On the day prior to deployment, the instruments were calibrated and programmed for automatic operation by means of a specially designed device called a hand-held tester. At each of ten pre-selected recording time windows on a designated firing day, the instruments were programmed to turn on, stabilize, record internal calibration signals, record the seismic signals at three levels of amplification, and then deactivate. After the final window in the firing sequence, all instruments were retrieved and their data tapes removed for processing. A specially designed, field tape- dubbing system was utilized at shot point camps to organize and edit data recorded on the cassette tapes. The main functions of this system are to concatenate all data from each shot on any given day

  20. Nutrition knowledge and Mediterranean diet adherence in the southeast United States: Validation of a field-based survey instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottcher, Mary Rose; Marincic, Patricia Z; Nahay, Katie L; Baerlocher, Brittany E; Willis, Amy W; Park, Jieun; Gaillard, Philippe; Greene, Michael W

    2017-04-01

    The Mediterranean diet (MD) can reduce chronic disease risk and is a recommended diet for prevention and management of diabetes. Adherence to the MD in the southeast United States where obesity and diabetes are highly prevalent is unknown. The purpose of the present study was to: 1) construct a survey instrument relevant to the general population integrating both MD related nutrition knowledge and adherence questions from previously validated instruments, and 2) assess MD related nutrition knowledge and adherence in a sample population in the southest United States. Adherance was assessed using the validated short MD Adherence Screener (MEDAS). A MD nutrition knowledge (MDNK) questionnaire was developed from previously validated general nutrition knowledge questionnaires and was validated using 127 university students enrolled in three courses with varying levels of nutrition education. Cronbach's α for internal validity of MDNK was acceptable for a short questionnaire (0.653). Test-retest reliability was established (r = 0.853). Field validation of the three-part survey instrument (MEDAS, MDNK and demographic questions) was subsequently performed in 230 adults shopping at supermarkets and farmers markets in eastern Alabama. Total MDNK and MEDAS scores were significantly higher in students with formal nutrition education and in patrons of farmers markets. Greater MD adherence, assessed by dividing MEDAS scores into thirds, was found with increasing formal nutrition education in university students (p = 0.002) and in farmers market participants (p < 0.001). There was a weak but significant association between MDNK and MEDAS scores within university students and participants in the field. Together, the MDNK-MEDAS survey instrument is an effective tool for assessing baseline knowledge and adherence and can be used to target nutritional interventions to improve MD adherence for prevention and management of diabetes and other chronic disease.

  1. The ESO Imaging Survey Status Report and Preliminary Results

    CERN Document Server

    Da Costa, L N; Deul, E; Erben, T; Freudling, W; Guarnieri, M D; Hook, I; Hook, R N; Méndez, R; Nonino, M; Olsen, L; Prandoni, I; Renzini, A; Savaglio, S; Scodeggio, M; Silva, D; Slijkhuis, R; Wicenec, A; Wichmann, R; Benoist, C

    1998-01-01

    The ESO Imaging Survey (EIS) presented in early issues of the Messenger, and with up-to-date information on the ongoing observations available on the Web (http://www.eso.org/eis), is a concerted effort by ESO and the Member State community to provide targets for the first year of operation of the VLT. It consists of two parts: a relatively wide-angle survey (EIS-WIDE) to cover four pre-selected patches of sky, 6 square degrees each, spread in right ascension to search for distant clusters and quasars and a deep, multicolor survey of four optical (SUSI-2) and two infrared (SOFI) covering the HST/Hubble Deep Field South (HDFS) and its flanking fields (EIS-DEEP). From the start, the main challenge has been to carry out a public survey in a limited amount of time requiring observations, software development and data reduction with the goal of distributing the survey data products before the call for proposal for the VLT. To cope with this one-year timetable, a novel type of collaboration between ESO and the commu...

  2. Measuring children's self-reported sport participation, risk perception and injury history: development and validation of a survey instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siesmaa, Emma J; Blitvich, Jennifer D; White, Peta E; Finch, Caroline F

    2011-01-01

    Despite the health benefits associated with children's sport participation, the occurrence of injury in this context is common. The extent to which sport injuries impact children's ongoing involvement in sport is largely unknown. Surveys have been shown to be useful for collecting children's injury and sport participation data; however, there are currently no published instruments which investigate the impact of injury on children's sport participation. This study describes the processes undertaken to assess the validity of two survey instruments for collecting self-reported information about child cricket and netball related participation, injury history and injury risk perceptions, as well as the reliability of the cricket-specific version. Face and content validity were assessed through expert feedback from primary and secondary level teachers and from representatives of peak sporting bodies for cricket and netball. Test-retest reliability was measured using a sample of 59 child cricketers who completed the survey on two occasions, 3-4 weeks apart. Based on expert feedback relating to face and content validity, modification and/or deletion of some survey items was undertaken. Survey items with low test-retest reliability (κ≤0.40) were modified or deleted, items with moderate reliability (κ=0.41-0.60) were modified slightly and items with higher reliability (κ≥0.61) were retained, with some undergoing minor modifications. This is the first survey of its kind which has been successfully administered to cricketers aged 10-16 years to collect information about injury risk perceptions and intentions for continued sport participation. Implications for its generalisation to other child sport participants are discussed.

  3. The GaLAxy Cluster Evolution Survey (GLACE): introduction and first results

    CERN Document Server

    Sánchez-Portal, M; Pintos-Castro, I; Pérez-Martínez, R; Smail, I; Alfaro, E; Altieri, B; Aragón-Salamanca, A; Balkowski, C; Balogh, M; Biviano, A; Bongiovanni, A; Bremer, M; Castander, F; Castañeda, H; Castro-Rodríguez, N; Coia, D; Duc, P A; Geach, J; González-Serrano, I; Haines, C; McBreen, B; Metcalfe, L; Pérez-Fournón, I; García, A M Pérez; Poggianti, B; Rodríguez-Espinosa, J M; Smith, G P; Temporin, S; Valtchanov, I

    2010-01-01

    Aimed at understanding the evolution of galaxies in clusters, the GLACE survey is mapping a set of optical lines ([OII]3727, [OIII]5007, Hbeta and Halpha/[NII] when possible) in several galaxy clusters at redshift around 0.40, 0.63 and 0.86, using the Tuneable Filters (TF) of the OSIRIS instrument (Cepa et al. 2005) at the 10.4m GTC telescope. This study will address key questions about the physical processes acting upon the infalling galaxies during the course of hierarchical growth of clusters. GLACE is already ongoing: we present some preliminary results on our observations of the galaxy cluster Cl0024+1654 at z = 0.395; on the other hand, GLACE@0.86 has been approved as ESO/GTC large project to be started in 2011.

  4. AKARI IRC survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud: Outline of the survey and initial results

    CERN Document Server

    Ita, Yoshifusa; Kato, Daisuke; Tanabe, Toshihiko; Sakon, Itsuki; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Kawamura, Akiko; Shimonishi, Takashi; Wada, Takehiko; Usui, Fumihiko; Koo, Bon-Chul; Matsuura, Mikako; Takahashi, Hidenori; Nakada, Yoshikazu; Hasegawa, Tetsuo; Tamura, Motohide

    2008-01-01

    We observed an area of 10 deg^2 of the Large Magellanic Cloud using the Infrared Camera on board AKARI. The observations were carried out using five imaging filters (3, 7, 11, 15, and 24 micron) and a dispersion prism (2 -- 5 micron, $\\lambda / \\Delta\\lambda$ $\\sim$ 20) equipped in the IRC. This paper describes the outline of our survey project and presents some initial results using the imaging data that detected over 5.9x10^5 near-infrared and 6.4x10^4 mid-infrared point sources. The 10 $\\sigma$ detection limits of our survey are about 16.5, 14.0, 12.3, 10.8, and 9.2 in Vega-magnitude at 3, 7, 11, 15, and 24 micron, respectively. The 11 and 15 micron data, which are unique to AKARI IRC, allow us to construct color-magnitude diagrams that are useful to identify stars with circumstellar dust. We found a new sequence in the color-magnitude diagram, which is attributed to red giants with luminosity fainter than that of the tip of the first red giant branch. We suggest that this sequence is likely to be related ...

  5. SY 2010-11 Customer Satisfaction Survey Results (Full Report). DoDEA Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Defense Education Activity, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The Department of Defense Education Activity (DoDEA) Customer Satisfaction Survey is a biennial survey administered by DoDEA to parents and students to monitor DoDEA's success in meeting students' needs. The survey is administered every other year to sponsors with children in pre-kindergarten-12th grade and to students in grades 4-12. For the…

  6. SY 2008-09 Customer Satisfaction Survey Results (Full Report). DoDEA Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Defense Education Activity, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Department of Defense Education Activity (DoDEA) Customer Satisfaction Survey is a biennial survey administered by DoDEA to parents and students to monitor DoDEA's success in meeting students' needs. The survey is administered every other year to sponsors with children in pre-kindergarten--12th grade and to students in grades 4-12. For the…

  7. First results from Faint Infrared Grism Survey (FIGS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tilvi, V.; Pirzkal, N.; Malhotra, S.

    2016-01-01

    in the Faint Infrared Grism Survey (FIGS). These spectra, taken with G102 grism on Hubble Space Telescope (HST), show a significant emission line detection (6{\\sigma}) in multiple observational position angles (PA), with total integrated Ly{\\alpha} line flux of 1.06+/- 0.12 e10-17erg s-1cm-2. The line flux......-redshift AGN yet found. Thus, this observation from the Hubble Space Telescope clearly demonstrates the sensitivity of the FIGS survey, and the capability of grism spectroscopy to study the epoch of reionization....

  8. Results of a national survey of high-frequency fish consumers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Stackelberg, Katherine; Li, Miling; Sunderland, Elsie

    2017-10-01

    Exposure to contaminants in fish may be associated with adverse health outcomes even as fish consumption is generally considered beneficial. Risk assessments conducted to support regulatory analyses rely on quantitative fish consumption estimates. Here we report the results of a national survey of high-frequency fish consumers (n = 2099) based on a survey population statistically representative of ~17.6 million U.S. individuals consuming three or more fish meals per week. The survey was conducted during 2013 using an on-line survey instrument. Total fish consumption averaged 111g/day from market, restaurant and self-caught sources. Depending on the season, the incidence of individuals reporting consumption of self-caught species ranged between 10-12% of our high-frequency fish consuming demographic, averaging approximately 30g/day and comprising 23% of total fish consumption from all sources of fish. Recreational or self-caught consumption rates vary regionally and are poorly understood, particularly for high-frequency consumers, making it difficult to support national-scale assessments. A divergence between sport-fishing and harvesting of fish as a food-staple is apparent in survey results given differences in consumption patterns with income and education. Highest consumption rates were reported for low income respondents more likely to harvest fish as a food staple. By contrast, the incidence of self-caught fish consumption was higher with income and education although overall consumption rates were lower. Regional differences were evident, with respondents from the East-South Central and New England regions reporting lowest consumption rates from self-caught fish on the order of 12-16g/day and those from Mountain, Pacific and Mid-Atlantic regions reporting highest rates ranging from 44 to 59g/day. Respondent-specific consumption rates together with national-level data on fish tissue concentrations of PCBs, MeHg, and PFOS suggest that 10-58% of respondents

  9. RESULTS OF SURGICAL TREATMENT OF INFANTILE AND JUVENILE SCOLIOSIS USING VARIOUS INSTRUMENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Mikhailovsky

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The analysis Results of surgical treatment of growing children with infantile and juvenile scoliosis (IS can the optimal method of treatment select. In young children with significant growth potential spinal fusion may not be the best option as it limits further longitudinal growth of the spine and may to the thoracic insufficiency syndrome result. To address this problem recently several techniques focused, their have advantages and drawbacks.Material and methods. Since 2008 year 127 patients (64 girls, 63 boys aged (4.5 ± 2.1 years were operated on. In group I 65 patients were operated on using VEPTR (Vertical Expandable Prosthetic Titanium Rib instrumentation, in group II 42 patients using various spinal instrumentation. 20 patients with congenital kyphosis were excluded. The average follow-up time was (5.6 ± 1.1 years.Results. In group I average value of the primary scoliotic curve before surgery was (74.7 ± 22.9, secondary curve (42.8 ± 16.0, thoracic kyphosis (46.3 ± 27.4, lumbar lordosis (54.6 ± 14. Average value of the primary scoliotic curve after surgery was reduced to (51 ± 20 (correction 31.7%, at followup to (56.5 ± 18.5, secondary curve (31.8 ± 12.8 (25.7%, at follow-up to (32.4 ± 18.4, thoracic kyphosis (36.8 ± 20.8 (20,5%, at follow-up to (41.8 ± 21.0, lumbar lordosis (45.4 ± 12.7 (16,9%, at follow-up to (48.2 ± 11.7 (p < 0.05. Space available for lung before surgery was (84.5 ± 8.7 %, after surgery was (94.8 ± 6.7%, at follow-up increased to (98.6 ± 5.4 % (p < 0.05. Complications included 11 implant dislocations and 1 infection. In group II average value of the primary scoliotic curve before surgery was (87.6 ± 6.6, secondary curve (47.8 ± 4.6, thoracic kyphosis (61.4 ± 10.4, lumbar lordosis (61.8 ± 4.9. Average value of the primary scoliotic curve after surgery was reduced to 50.6 ± 5.3 (correction 42.3%, at follow-up to (66.1 ± 6.3

  10. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey Results: 2010/2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — ViSIT is an interactive web tool created by USGS to visualize the data collected as part of the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife...

  11. Planck intermediate results XXXI. Microwave survey of Galactic supernova remnants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.;

    2016-01-01

    The all-sky Planck survey in 9 frequency bands was used to search for emission from all 274 known Galactic supernova remnants. Of these, 16 were detected in at least two Planck frequencies. The radio-through-microwave spectral energy distributions were compiled to determine the mechanism for micr...

  12. Results of the Navy Quality of Life Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-05-01

    university student contractors were directed to complete the Web version and report any difficulties that they encountered. They completed the survey on fast...Aviation Squadron/Detachment Aircraft Carrier Cruiser Destroyer types (includes frigates) Minecraft Submarine Tender/Repair ship Reserve Unit Service...COMMENTS Fom: SOC0104 OCTOBER 2001 Distribution AIR UNIVERSITY LIBRARY AIRFORCE RESEARCH LABORATORY (CODE 13) ARMY MANAGEMENT STAFF COLLEGE

  13. Radiologists' Usage of Social Media : Results of the RANSOM Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ranschaert, Erik R.; Van Ooijen, Peter M. A.; McGinty, Geraldine B.; Parizel, Paul M.

    The growing use of social media is transforming the way health care professionals (HCPs) are communicating. In this changing environment, it could be useful to outline the usage of social media by radiologists in all its facets and on an international level. The main objective of the RANSOM survey

  14. Results of the 2010 Survey on Teaching Chemical Reaction Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, David L.; Vigeant, Margot A. S.

    2012-01-01

    A survey of faculty teaching the chemical reaction engineering course or sequence during the 2009-2010 academic year at chemical engineering programs in the United States and Canada reveals change in terms of content, timing, and approaches to teaching. The report consists of two parts: first, a statistical and demographic characterization of the…

  15. Radiologists' Usage of Social Media : Results of the RANSOM Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ranschaert, Erik R.; Van Ooijen, Peter M. A.; McGinty, Geraldine B.; Parizel, Paul M.

    2016-01-01

    The growing use of social media is transforming the way health care professionals (HCPs) are communicating. In this changing environment, it could be useful to outline the usage of social media by radiologists in all its facets and on an international level. The main objective of the RANSOM survey w

  16. Survey Results on Fashion Consumption and Sustainability among Young Swedes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gwozdz, Wencke; Netter, Sarah; Bjartmarz, Thordis

    of young consumers and sustainability related attitudes and knowledge and b) to compare attitudes, knowledge and behaviour between consumers with different levels of awareness and commitment towards sustainability. The survey was conducted among 1,175 young Swedish consumers (aged 16-30) in 2012...

  17. Main Results of the Azerbaijan STEP Employer Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Rutkowski, Jan J.

    2015-01-01

    This note summarizes the main findings of the STEP Employer Skills Survey carried out in Azerbaijan in 2013. The note argues that there is a skills shortage in Azerbaijan. Azeri employers claim that it is difficult to find workers with required skills. The shortage is particularly pronounced in the case of modern, innovative firms, which tend to required more advanced skills. The education...

  18. Results of the 2010 Survey on Teaching Chemical Reaction Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, David L.; Vigeant, Margot A. S.

    2012-01-01

    A survey of faculty teaching the chemical reaction engineering course or sequence during the 2009-2010 academic year at chemical engineering programs in the United States and Canada reveals change in terms of content, timing, and approaches to teaching. The report consists of two parts: first, a statistical and demographic characterization of the…

  19. 2006 B100 Quality Survey Results: Milestone Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alleman, T. L.; McCormick, R. L.; Deutch, S.

    2007-05-01

    In 2006, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory conducted a nationwide quality survey of pure biodiesel (B100) intended to be used as a blendstock. The study collected random samples throughout the United States and analyzed them for quality against the current and proposed ASTM D6751 fuel quality specifications.

  20. DUst around NEarby Stars. The survey observational results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eiroa, C.; Marshall, J. P.; Mora, A.; Montesinos, B.; Absil, O.; Augereau, J. Ch.; Bayo, A.; Bryden, G.; Danchi, W.; del Burgo, C.; Ertel, S.; Fridlund, M.; Heras, A. M.; Krivov, A. V.; Launhardt, R.; Liseau, R.; Loehne, T.; Maldonado, J.; Pilbratt, G. L.; Roberge, A.; Rodmann, J.; Sanz-Forcada, J.; Solano, E.; Stapelfeldt, K.; Thebault, P.; Wolf, S.; Ardila, D.; Arevalo, M.; Beichmann, C.; Faramaz, V.; Gonzalez-Garcia, B. M.; Gutierrez, R.; Lebreton, J.; Martinez-Arnaiz, R.; Meeus, G.; Montes, D.; Olofsson, G.; Su, K. Y. L.; White, G. J.; Barrado, D.; Fukagawa, M.; Gruen, E.; Kamp, I.; Lorente, R.; Morbidelli, A.; Mueller, S.; Mutschke, H.; Nakagawa, T.; Ribas, I.; Walker, H.

    2013-01-01

    Context. Debris discs are a consequence of the planet formation process and constitute the fingerprints of planetesimal systems. Their solar system counterparts are the asteroid and Edgeworth-Kuiper belts. Aims: The DUNES survey aims at detecting extra-solar analogues to the Edgeworth-Kuiper belt ar

  1. Consumer attitudes on cough and cold: US (ACHOO) survey results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaiss, M S; Dicpinigaitis, P V; Eccles, R; Wingertzahn, M A

    2015-08-01

    The Attitudes of Consumers Toward Health, Cough, and Cold (ACHOO) survey was developed to better inform health care providers on the natural history and impact of common cold and cough, and related consumer experience and behaviors. Randomly selected US Internet/mobile device users were invited to participate in an online survey (N = 3333) in October 2012. Response quotas modeled upon 2010 US Census data ensured a demographically representative sample. To reduce potential bias from the quota design, 75% of the completed surveys were randomly selected as the primary analysis pool. Survey questions assessed participant demographics, frequency and duration of cough/cold symptoms, impact of symptoms on daily life, treatment preferences, and knowledge about cough/cold pathophysiology. In the past year, 84.6% of respondents had experienced at least one cold. Colds typically started with sore/scratchy throat (39.2%), nasal congestion (9.8%), and runny nose (9.3%) and lasted 3-7 days. Cough, the most common cold symptom (73.1%), had a delayed onset (typically 1-5 days after cold onset) and a long duration (>6 days in 35.2%). Nasal congestion and cough were the most bothersome symptoms. Many respondents waited until symptoms were 'bad enough' (42.6%) or multiple symptoms were present (20.2%) before using nonprescription medications. Drivers of choice included effectiveness in relieving symptoms, safety, and past experience. Respondents rarely consulted clinicians regarding treatment, and more than three-quarters had never received instructions from a clinician on how to choose a nonprescription cough/cold medication. Misperceptions regarding etiology and treatment of the common cold were prevalent. The main limitation is potential recall bias, since respondents had to recall cough/cold episodes over the prior year. The ACHOO survey confirms that cold is a common, bothersome experience and that there are gaps in consumers' knowledge of pathophysiology and appropriate

  2. Nearest Neighbor Averaging and its Effect on the Critical Level and Minimum Detectable Concentration for Scanning Radiological Survey Instruments that Perform Facility Release Surveys.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fournier, Sean Donovan; Beall, Patrick S; Miller, Mark L

    2014-08-01

    Through the SNL New Mexico Small Business Assistance (NMSBA) program, several Sandia engineers worked with the Environmental Restoration Group (ERG) Inc. to verify and validate a novel algorithm used to determine the scanning Critical Level (L c ) and Minimum Detectable Concentration (MDC) (or Minimum Detectable Areal Activity) for the 102F scanning system. Through the use of Monte Carlo statistical simulations the algorithm mathematically demonstrates accuracy in determining the L c and MDC when a nearest-neighbor averaging (NNA) technique was used. To empirically validate this approach, SNL prepared several spiked sources and ran a test with the ERG 102F instrument on a bare concrete floor known to have no radiological contamination other than background naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). The tests conclude that the NNA technique increases the sensitivity (decreases the L c and MDC) for high-density data maps that are obtained by scanning radiological survey instruments.

  3. A new aberration-corrected, energy-filtered LEEM/PEEM instrument II. Operation and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tromp, R.M., E-mail: rtromp@us.ibm.com [IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, 1101 Kitchawan Road, P.O. Box 218, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States); Hannon, J.B. [IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, 1101 Kitchawan Road, P.O. Box 218, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States); Wan, W. [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Mailstop 80R0114, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Berghaus, A.; Schaff, O. [SPECS GmbH, Voltastrasse 5, D-13355 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-04-15

    In Part I we described a new design for an aberration-corrected Low Energy Electron Microscope (LEEM) and Photo Electron Emission Microscope (PEEM) equipped with an in-line electron energy filter. The chromatic and spherical aberrations of the objective lens are corrected with an electrostatic electron mirror that provides independent control of the chromatic and spherical aberration coefficients C{sub c} and C{sub 3}, as well as the mirror focal length. In this Part II we discuss details of microscope operation, how the microscope is set up in a systematic fashion, and we present typical results. - Highlights: ► The C{sub c} and C{sub 3} aberrations of a LEEM/PEEM instrument are corrected with an electrostatic electron mirror. ► The mirror provides independent control over C{sub c}, C{sub 3} and focal length in close agreement with theory. ► A detailed alignment procedure for the corrected microscope is given. ► Novel methods to measure C{sub c} and C{sub 3} of the objective lens and the mirror are presented. ► We demonstrate a record spatial resolution of 2 nm.

  4. Energetic Neutral Atom Imaging with the POLAR CEPPAD/ IPS Instrument : Initial Forward Modeling Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, M. G.; Reeves, G. D.; Moore, K. R.; Spence, H. E.; Jorgensen, A. M.; Fennell, J. F.; Blake, J. B.; Roelof, E. C.

    1999-01-01

    Although the primary function of the CEPPAD/IPS instrument on Polar is the measurement of energetic ions in-situ, it has also proven to be a very capable Energetic Neutral Atom (ENA) imager. Raw ENA images are currently being constructed on a routine basis with a temporal resolution of minutes during both active and quiet times. However, while analyses of these images by themselves provide much information on the spatial distribution and dynamics of the energetic ion population in the ring current. detailed modeling is required to extract the actual ion distributions. In this paper. we present the initial results of forward modeling an IPS ENA image obtained during a small geo-magnetic storm on June 9, 1997. The equatorial ion distribution inferred with this technique reproduces the expected large noon/midnight and dawn/dusk asymmetries. The limitations of the model are discussed and a number of modifications to the basic forward modeling technique are proposed which should significantly improve its performance in future studies.

  5. First Results from the COFFEE Instrument: Airborne In-Situ Measurements of Formaldehyde over California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iraci, L. T.; St Clair, J.; Marrero, J. E.; Gore, W.; Swanson, A. K.; Hanisco, T. F.

    2015-12-01

    The Compact Formaldehyde Fluorescence Experiment (COFFEE) instrument uses Non-Resonant Laser Induced Fluorescence (NR-LIF) to detect trace concentrations of formaldehyde as part of the Alpha Jet Atmospheric eXperiment (AJAX) payload. COFFEE, developed at NASA-GSFC, has a sensitivity of 100 pptv (1 sec) and can operate over a wide range of altitudes from the boundary layer to the lower stratosphere. It is mounted in an external wing pod on the Alpha Jet aircraft based at NASA-ARC, which can access altitudes from the surface up to 40,000 ft. We will present results from test flights performed in Fall 2015 over the Central Valley of California. Targets include an oil field, agricultural areas, and highways. Formaldehyde is one of the few urban pollutants that can be measured from space, and we will present plans to compare COFFEE in-situ data with space-based formaldehyde observations such as those from OMI (Aura) and OMPS (SuomiNPP).

  6. Prevalence and Correlates of Mental Disorders in Israeli Adolescents: Results from a National Mental Health Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farbstein, Ilana; Mansbach-Kleinfeld, Ivonne; Levinson, Daphna; Goodman, Robert; Levav, Itzhak; Vograft, Itzik; Kanaaneh, Rasim; Ponizovsky, Alexander M.; Brent, David A.; Apter, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Background: The development of epidemiological instruments has enabled the assessment of mental disorders in youth in countries that plan policy according to evidence-based principles. The Israel Survey of Mental Health among Adolescents (ISMEHA) was conducted in 2004-2005 in a representative sample of 957 adolescents aged 14-17 and their mothers.…

  7. Reading Attitudes of Middle School Students: Results of a U.S. Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Michael C.; Conradi, Kristin; Lawrence, Camille; Jang, Bong Gee; Meyer, J. Patrick

    2012-01-01

    To examine the current state of reading attitudes among middle school students in the United States, a survey was developed and administered to 4,491 students in 23 states plus the District of Columbia. The instrument comprised four subscales measuring attitudes toward: recreational reading in print settings, recreational reading in digital…

  8. Reading Attitudes of Middle School Students: Results of a U.S. Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Michael C.; Conradi, Kristin; Lawrence, Camille; Jang, Bong Gee; Meyer, J. Patrick

    2012-01-01

    To examine the current state of reading attitudes among middle school students in the United States, a survey was developed and administered to 4,491 students in 23 states plus the District of Columbia. The instrument comprised four subscales measuring attitudes toward: recreational reading in print settings, recreational reading in digital…

  9. Use of electronic microprocessor-based instrumentation by the U.S. geological survey for hydrologic data collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shope, William G.; ,

    1991-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey is acquiring a new generation of field computers and communications software to support hydrologic data-collection at field locations. The new computer hardware and software mark the beginning of the Survey's transition from the use of electromechanical devices and paper tapes to electronic microprocessor-based instrumentation. Software is being developed for these microprocessors to facilitate the collection, conversion, and entry of data into the Survey's National Water Information System. The new automated data-collection process features several microprocessor-controlled sensors connected to a serial digital multidrop line operated by an electronic data recorder. Data are acquired from the sensors in response to instructions programmed into the data recorder by the user through small portable lap-top or hand-held computers. The portable computers, called personal field computers, also are used to extract data from the electronic recorders for transport by courier to the office computers. The Survey's alternative to manual or courier retrieval is the use of microprocessor-based remote telemetry stations. Plans have been developed to enhance the Survey's use of the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite telemetry by replacing the present network of direct-readout ground stations with less expensive units. Plans also provide for computer software that will support other forms of telemetry such as telephone or land-based radio.

  10. A systematic survey instrument translation process for multi-country, comparative health workforce studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Squires, A.; Aiken, L.H.; Heede, K. Van den; Sermeus, W.; Bruyneel, L.; Lindqvist, R.; Schoonhoven, L.; Stromseng, I.; Busse, R.; Brzostek, T.; Ensio, A.; Moreno-Casbas, M.; Rafferty, A.M.; Schubert, M.; Zikos, D.; Matthews, A.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As health services research (HSR) expands across the globe, researchers will adopt health services and health worker evaluation instruments developed in one country for use in another. This paper explores the cross-cultural methodological challenges involved in translating HSR in the

  11. Planck intermediate results XXXI. Microwave survey of Galactic supernova remnants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.

    2016-01-01

    The all-sky Planck survey in 9 frequency bands was used to search for emission from all 274 known Galactic supernova remnants. Of these, 16 were detected in at least two Planck frequencies. The radio-through-microwave spectral energy distributions were compiled to determine the mechanism for micr......The all-sky Planck survey in 9 frequency bands was used to search for emission from all 274 known Galactic supernova remnants. Of these, 16 were detected in at least two Planck frequencies. The radio-through-microwave spectral energy distributions were compiled to determine the mechanism...... for microwave emission. In only one case, IC 443, is there high-frequency emission clearly from dust associated with the supernova remnant. In all cases, the low-frequency emission is from synchrotron radiation. As predicted for a population of relativistic particles with energy distribution that extends...

  12. The US Geological Survey's national coal resource assessment: The results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppert, L.F.; Kirschbaum, M.A.; Warwick, P.D.; Flores, R.M.; Affolter, R.H.; Hatch, J.R.

    2002-01-01

    The US Geological Survey and the State geological surveys of many coal-bearing States recently completed a new assessment of the top producing coal beds and coal zones in five major producing coal regions the Appalachian Basin, Gulf Coast, Illinois Basin, Colorado Plateau, and Northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains. The assessments, which focused on both coal quality and quantity, utilized geographic information system technology and large databases. Over 1,600,000 million short tons of coal remain in over 60 coal beds and coal zones that were assessed. Given current economic, environmental, and technological restrictions, the majority of US coal production will occur in that portion of the assessed coal resource that is lowest in sulfur content. These resources are concentrated in parts of the central Appalachian Basin, Colorado Plateau, and the Northern Rocky Mountains. ?? Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Immersion freezing by SnomaxTM particles: Comparison of results from different instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wex, Heike; Stratmann, Frank; Rösch, Michael; Niedermeier, Dennis; Nilius, Björn; Möhler, Ottmar; Mitra, Subir K.; Koop, Thomas; Jantsch, Evelyn; Hiranuma, Naruki; Diehl, Karoline; Curtius, Joachim; Budke, Carsten; Boose, Yvonne; Augustin, Stefanie

    2014-05-01

    Within the DFG funded research unit INUIT (Ice Nucleation research UnIT, FOR 1525), an effort was made to compare results on immersion freezing from a suite of different instruments. Besides mineral dusts, SnomaxTM was picked as one of the substances that were examined by all participating groups. Here, the comparison of the results for SnomaxTM is presented. Every participating group used SnomaxTM from the same batch and, as far as possible, the same particle generation set-up. Instruments participating in the comparison were, in alphabetical order, an acoustic levitator (Diehl et al., 2009), AIDA (Connolly et al., 2009), BINARY (Budke et al., 2013), FINCH (Bundke et al., 2008), LACIS (Hartmann et al., 2011), PINC (Chou et al., 2011) and the Mainz vertical windtunnel (Diehl et al., 2011). Some of the instruments examined droplets directly produced from SnomaxTM suspensions, where the suspensions could have a wide range of concentrations. Other instruments used size segregated particles which were generated via atomization from a SnomaxTM suspension and subsequent drying, followed by size selection with a DMA (Differential Mobility Analyzer). These particles were then activated to droplets and cooled subsequently. For these, the number of ice nucleation active protein complexes present in the droplets depended on the original particle size (for details see e.g. Hartmann et al., 2013). Also, the different measurements spanned a range of different time scales. The shortest residence time of roughly 1 second was used for LACIS measurements, and the longest one was about 6 seconds used in the BINARY setup with a cooling rate of 1 K/min. All data were evaluated using two different approaches: 1) a time dependent approach following Classical Nucleation Theory which included the use of a contact angle distribution (see Niedermeier et al., 2014); 2) a singular approach using an active site density per mass (see Vali, 1971, Murray et al., 2012). Both approaches were found

  14. Overview of cycling injuries: results of a cycling club survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decalzi, Javier F; Narvy, Steven J; Vangsness, C Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Participation in competitive bicycling has increased substantially over the past decade, and bicycle injuries have increased accordingly. Cycling has been reported in several studies to have higher rates of injury than other sports and recreational activities; accordingly, riders must be cognizant of the potential for injury and protect themselves appropriately. The purpose of the current study was to survey an established competitive Los Angeles-based road cycling team to determine the epidemiology of and circumstances for traumatic cycling injuries.

  15. Results of the 2000 Creek Plantation Swamp Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fledderman, P.D.

    2000-10-30

    This report is a survey of the Creek Plantation located along the Savannah River and borders the southeast portion of the Savannah River Site. The land is primarily undeveloped and agricultural; its purpose is to engage in equestrian-related operations. A portion of Creek Plantation along the Savannah River is a low-lying swamp, known as the Savannah River Swamp, which is uninhabited and not easily accessible.

  16. A survey of results on mobile phone datasets analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Blondel, Vincent D; Krings, Gautier

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we review some advances made recently in the study of mobile phone datasets. This area of research has emerged a decade ago, with the increasing availability of large-scale anonymized datasets, and has grown into a stand-alone topic. We will survey the contributions made so far on the social networks that can be constructed with such data, the study of personal mobility, geographical partitioning, urban planning, and help towards development as well as security and privacy issues.

  17. Specialized Prisons and Services: Results From a National Survey

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Findings from the National Criminal Justice Drug Abuse Treatment Studies (CJ-DATS) National Criminal Justice Treatment Practices survey are examined to describe types of services provided by three types of prisons: those that serve a cross-section of offenders, those that specialize in serving offenders with special psychosocial and medical needs, and those that specialize in serving legal status or gender specific populations. Information is presented on the prevalence and type of specialize...

  18. MICROBIOLOGICAL SURVEY ON JELLYFISH FOOD PRODUCTS: PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Guidi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available A microbiological survey was performed on ten brined jellyfish products, sampled in Italy from Chinese food markets. In general, the microbiological conditions were good and respected the standards contemplated in the regulations CE 2073/2005 e 1441/2007. The presence of inhibiting substances and the absence of aerobic mesophilic bacteria in two samples suggest a treatment to preserve the product.

  19. Measuring patient experiences with diabetes care in The Netherlands: the validity of a new survey instrument.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asbroek, G. ten; Delnoij, D.M.J.; Arah, O.A.; Sixma, H.; Koning, J.S. de; Rupp, I.; Poll, A.; Stam, P.J.A.; Schmidt, P.; Vriens, B.; Klazinga, N.S.

    2005-01-01

    Background: The introduction of market mechanisms in Dutch healthcare engages insurance companies in competition. Patient experience surveys are increasingly applied to generate performance information guiding consumers and insurers to choose and contract high performers, as well as holding them acc

  20. Library services for people with disabilities: results of a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, P P

    1996-07-01

    The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), enacted in 1990, has had a significant impact on the way many institutions, including libraries, do business. The Association of Research Libraries surveyed its members in 1991 to determine the effect of this legislation, and the author conducted a similar survey in 1995 to learn what progress academic health sciences libraries have made in serving the needs of people with disablities. A questionnaire was mailed to 131 members of the Association of Academic Health Sciences Library Directors. Nearly three-quarters of respondents reported elimination of physical barriers. The most common services provided are retrieval of materials from the stacks and photocopy assistance. Much less attention has been paid to the use of adaptive technology that allows disabled users to search a library's online catalog and databases; special technology is often provided by another unit on campus but there seems to be little coordination with library services Few libraries have assigned responsibility for disability services to a specific staff member and even fewer have done a formal assessment of the need for special services. The issues identified by the survey should challenge academic health sciences libraries to examine their status regarding compliance with ADA legislation.

  1. The WHAM Hα Magellanic Stream Survey: Progress and Early Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Brianna; Haffner, L. Matthew; Barger, Kat; Krishnarao, Dhanesh

    2017-01-01

    We present early analysis of the Hα survey of the Magellanic Stream using the Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM). The neutral component of the Stream extends some 200° across the sky (Nidever et al. 2010). However, the full extent of the ionized gas has not been mapped in detail. Previous studies (e.g., Putman et al. 2003; Weiner & Williams 1996) suggest that ionized gas is likely to be found all along the length of the Stream, and may extend beyond the current neutral boundaries as traced by 21 cm. Barger et al. (2013) used WHAM to map ionized gas throughout the Magellanic Bridge between the Magellanic Clouds. Although ionized emission tracks the neutral emission for the most part, it often spans a few degrees away from the H I at slightly offset velocities. Additionally, Fox et al. (2014) find evidence in an absorption line study that the tidal debris in the Magellanic System contains twice as much ionized gas as neutral material and may extend 30° away from 21-cm sensitivity boundaries. We are now compiling the first comprehensive picture of the ionized component of the Magellanic Stream using WHAM's unprecedented sensitivity to trace diffuse emission (~tens of mR), its velocity resolution (12 km/s) to separate the Stream from the Milky Way, and its multiwavelength capabilities (e.g., [S II] and [N II]) to examine the physical conditions of the gas. Much of the data along the primary axis of the Stream has been collected for the first phase of this extensive study, a complete kinematic Hα survey of the Stream. We present survey progress, challenges in extracting Stream emission, and first-look kinematic maps at select positions along the Stream.

  2. Report - Results of survey on child care needs - 2017

    CERN Document Server

    Guinot, Genevieve; Weymaere, Emeline; Trilhe, Philippe; Palluel, Stephanie; Mangiorou, Maria-Anna; Mondlane, Bruna; CERN. Geneva. HR Department

    2017-01-01

    In June 2016, a working group reporting to the Director for Finance and Human Resources was established to study the sustainability of CERN nursery and school services. Among actions taken by the working group, a survey was carried out to achieve a better understanding of the needs of CERN families for child care and educational structures, to identify which services are in highest demand (e.g. crèche or early years, primary schooling) and to understand the expectations and preferences of CERN families regarding these services.

  3. Homeopathy Use by US Adults: Results of a National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dossett, Michelle L; Davis, Roger B; Kaptchuk, Ted J; Yeh, Gloria Y

    2016-04-01

    We used the 2012 National Health Interview Survey to compare homeopathy users with supplement users and those using other forms of complementary and integrative medicine. Among US adults, 2.1% used homeopathy within the past 12 months. Respiratory and otorhinolaryngology complaints were most commonly treated (18.5%). Homeopathy users were more likely to use multiple complementary and integrative medicine therapies and to perceive the therapy as helpful than were supplement users. US homeopathy use remains uncommon; however, users perceive it as helpful.

  4. Results of the 2016 AORN Salary and Compensation Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, Donald R; Stewart, Kim A

    2016-12-01

    AORN conducted its 14th annual compensation survey for perioperative nurses in June 2016. A multiple regression model was used to examine how several variables, including job title, education level, certification, experience, and geographic region, affect nurse compensation. Comparisons between the 2016 data and data from previous years are presented. The effects of other forms of compensation (eg, on-call compensation, overtime, bonuses, shift differentials, benefits) on base compensation rates also are examined. Additional analyses explore the effect of the economic downturn on the perioperative work environment. Copyright © 2016 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Health survey of radiation workers. Results of questionnaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morikawa, Kaoru [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Medical School; Aoyama, Takashi; Kawagoe, Yasumitsu; Sunayashiki, Tadashi; Tanaka, Kiyoshi; Nishitani, Motohiro; Yoshinaga, Nobuharu

    1998-11-01

    The Japanese Society of Radiological Technology asked radiation workers about the radiation doses and the state of their health as well as family. The reports by the Health and Welfare Ministry were referenced to compare radiation workers with others. The questionnaire was sent to about 4,000 members, and returned from 2,479. The survey showed that 684 persons (27.6%) felt health anxiety, 455 persons (18.4%) had medical check for recent one year, and 1,645 persons (66.4%) had anamnesis. Radiation doses for one year and cumulated doses varied according to engaging duration. (K.H.)

  6. Acquisition Information Management system telecommunication site survey results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hake, K.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Key, B.G. [COR, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1993-09-01

    The Army acquisition community currently uses a dedicated, point-to-point secure computer network for the Army Material Plan Modernization (AMPMOD). It must transition to the DOD supplied Defense Secure Network 1 (DSNET1). This is one of the first networks of this size to begin the transition. The type and amount of computing resources available at individual sites may or may not meet the new network requirements. This task surveys these existing telecommunications resources available in the Army acquisition community. It documents existing communication equipment, computer hardware, associated software, and recommends appropriate changes.

  7. Impact of the Medical Faculty on Study Success in Freiburg: Results from Graduate Surveys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biller, Silke

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Using the data from graduate surveys, this study aims to analyze which factors related to teaching and learning at the Freiburg Faculty of Medicine can influence study success.Background: Study success and the factors influencing it have long been the subject of investigation, with study success being measured in terms of easily quantifiable indicators (final grades, student satisfaction, etc.. In recent years, it has also frequently been assessed in terms of graduate competency levels. Graduate surveys are considered suitable instruments for measuring these dimensions of study success.Method: Data from three Freiburg graduate surveys conducted one and a half years after graduation were drawn upon for the analysis.Study success was operationalized using four indicators: results on the written section of the M2 exam, self-assessment of medical expertise and scientific expertise, and student satisfaction. Using multiple regression analyses, the predictive power was calculated for selected variables, also measured by the graduate surveys, for the different study success indicators.Results: It was possible to identify models that contribute slightly or moderately to the prediction of study success. The score earned on the university entrance qualification demonstrated itself to be the strongest predictor for forecasting the M2 written exam: R is between 0.08 and 0.22 for the three surveys. Different variables specific to degree program structure and teaching are helpful for predicting medical expertise (R=0.04-0.32 and student satisfaction (R=0.12-0.35. The two variables, and , show themselves to be significant, sample-invariant predictors (β-weight=0.21-0.58, β-weight=0.27-0.56. For scientific expertise, no sample-independent predictors could be determined.Conclusion: Factors describing teaching hardly provide any assistance when predicting the written M2 exam score, which makes sense to the extent that teaching goes far beyond the heavily

  8. Modern nature and climate changes in Siberia: new methods and results of analysis of instrumented observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabanov, Mikhail V.

    2002-02-01

    Peculiarity of nature and climate changes in middle latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere and in Siberia is that the temporal variability of meteorological quantities here has a wide range and their spatial variability has a complicated zone structure. Therefore, regional monitoring of modern nature and climate changes in Siberia is of scientific interest from the viewpoint of the global changes observed. Another Siberian peculiarity is associated with the fact that there are many unique objects that have global importance both as natural complexes (boreal forests, water- bog systems, Baikal lake, etc.) And as technogenic objects (oil and gas production, coal mining, metallurgy, transport, etc.). Therefore monitoring and modeling of regional nature and climate changes in Siberia have great practical importance, which is underestimated now, for industrial development of Siberia. Taking into account the above peculiarities and tendencies on investigation of global and regional environmental and climate changes, the multidisciplinary project on Climate and Ecological Monitoring of Siberia (CEMS) was accepted to the research and development program Sibir' since 1993. To realize this project, the Climate and Ecological Observatory was established in Tomsk at the Institute for Optical Monitoring (IOM) SB RAS. At the present time the stations (the basic and background ones) of this observatory are in a progress and theory and instruments for monitoring are being developed as well. In this paper we discuss some results obtained in the framework of CEMS project that were partially published in the monographs, in scientific journals, and will be published in the Proceedings of the 8th Joint International Symposium on Atmospheric and Ocean Optics and Atmosphere Physics. This review has a purpose not only to discuss the obtained regularities but also to formulate scientific and technical tasks for further investigations into the regional changes of technogenic, natural, and

  9. Survey Instrument Development for Consumer Perception Testing to RTE Product in Convenience Store

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyah Lestari Widaningrum

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Global trade and the abolition of trade barriers lead to the proliferation of imported food products such as various types of fast food products (RTE: ready-to-eat food sold by convenience stores mainly scattered in Jakarta. The question is what causes consumers choose certain convenience store to buy RTE Product and not choose another outlet category. To understand consumer perceptions, it is necessary to develop an instrument for measuring consumer perceptions of the option to purchase RTE Product at convenience stores. Variables used in this research are the perception and knowledge of the public/consumers against food safety, store attributes, service, and product attributes. The instrument used in this study is a questionnaire with a scalemeasuring1-5 to see the relationship between variables, we used the method of Structural Equation Modeling (SEM. The sample used in this study was 223 respondents that were divided into five areas in Jakarta, namely Central Jakarta, West Jakarta, South Jakarta, East Jakarta, and North Jakarta. The final outcome of the instrument development process was 25 observed variables, consisting of 4 indicators, which valid and reliable, with T-values for each observed variable is above 2,58, and Construct Reliability values range between 0,76 to 0,853.

  10. Characteristics of effective health and safety committees: survey results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Tim; Bracker, Anne; Warren, Nicholas; Goyzueta, Jeanette; Cook, Matthew

    2013-02-01

    Although perhaps the most common worker-management structure, there has been surprisingly little research on describing and evaluating the characteristics of health and safety committees. A survey of 380 health and safety committee members from 176 manufacturing workplaces was supplemented with administrative data and compared with reported workers' compensation rates. Survey respondents also reported perceptions of overall safety, committee, effectiveness, committee activities, and "best practices." Extensive descriptive data is presented, including a mean of 8.7 members per committee spending 1,167 hr per year on committee business for an estimate of $40,500 worth of time per committee. Higher speed to correct action items, a focus on ergonomics, and planning for safety training was associated with lower injury rates. The discrepancy between managers and hourly committee members in estimating overall safety was strongly positively associated with injury rates. Communications and worker involvement may be important to address discrepancy issues. Prospective studies are needed to distinguish directionality of associations. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Dark Energy Survey Year 1 Results: Weak Lensing Shape Catalogues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuntz, J.; et al.

    2017-08-04

    We present two galaxy shape catalogues from the Dark Energy Survey Year 1 data set, covering 1500 square degrees with a median redshift of $0.59$. The catalogues cover two main fields: Stripe 82, and an area overlapping the South Pole Telescope survey region. We describe our data analysis process and in particular our shape measurement using two independent shear measurement pipelines, METACALIBRATION and IM3SHAPE. The METACALIBRATION catalogue uses a Gaussian model with an innovative internal calibration scheme, and was applied to $riz$-bands, yielding 34.8M objects. The IM3SHAPE catalogue uses a maximum-likelihood bulge/disc model calibrated using simulations, and was applied to $r$-band data, yielding 21.9M objects. Both catalogues pass a suite of null tests that demonstrate their fitness for use in weak lensing science. We estimate the 1$\\sigma$ uncertainties in multiplicative shear calibration to be $0.013$ and $0.025$ for the METACALIBRATION and IM3SHAPE catalogues, respectively.

  12. RESULTS OF THE MEGAVERTEBRATE ANALGESIA SURVEY: ELEPHANTS AND RHINO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottwitz, Jack; Boothe, Matthew; Harmon, Roy; Citino, Scott B; Zuba, Jeffery R; Boothe, Dawn M

    2016-03-01

    An online survey utilizing Survey Monkey linked through the American Association of Zoo Veterinarians listserve examined current practices in megavertebrate analgesia. Data collected included drugs administered, dosing regimens, ease of administration, efficacy, and adverse events. Fifty-nine facilities (38 housing elephants, 33 housing rhinoceroses) responded. All facilities administered nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), with phenylbutazone (0.25-10 mg/kg) and flunixin meglumine (0.2-4 mg/kg) being most common. Efficacy was reported as "good" to "excellent" for these medications. Opioids were administered to elephants (11 of 38) and rhinoceroses (7 of 33), with tramadol (0.5-3.0 mg/kg) and butorphanol (0.05-1.0 mg/kg) being most common. Tramadol efficacy scores were highly variable in both elephants and rhinoceroses. While drug choices were similar among institutions, substantial variability in dosing regimens and reported efficacy between and within facilities indicates the need for pharmacokinetic studies and standardized methods of analyzing response to treatment to establish dosing regimens and clinical trials to establish efficacy and safety.

  13. DUst Around NEarby Stars. The survey observational results

    CERN Document Server

    Eiroa, C; Mora, A; Montesinos, B; Absil, O; Augereau, J Ch; Bayo, A; Bryden, G; Danchi, W; del Burgo, C; Ertel, S; Fridlund, M; Heras, A M; Krivov, A V; Launhardt, R; Liseau, R; Löhne, T; Maldonado, J; Pilbratt, G L; Roberge, A; Rodmann, J; Sanz-Forcada, J; Solano, E; Stapelfeldt, K; Thébault, P; Wolf, S; Ardila, D; Arévalo, M; Beichmann, C; Faramaz, V; González-García, B M; Gutiérrez, R; Lebreton, J; Martínez-Arnáiz, R; Meeus, G; Montes, D; Olofsson, G; Su, K Y L; White, G J; Barrado, D; Fukagawa, M; Grün, E; Kamp, I; Lorente, R; Morbidelli, A; Müller, S; Mutschke, H; Nakagawa, T; Ribas, I; Walker, H

    2013-01-01

    Debris discs are a consequence of the planet formation process and constitute the fingerprints of planetesimal systems. Their solar system's counterparts are the asteroid and Edgeworth-Kuiper belts. The DUNES survey aims at detecting extra-solar analogues to the Edgeworth-Kuiper belt around solar-type stars, putting in this way the solar system into context. The survey allows us to address some questions related to the prevalence and properties of planetesimal systems. We used {\\it Herschel}/PACS to observe a sample of nearby FGK stars. Data at 100 and 160 $\\mu$m were obtained, complemented in some cases with observations at 70 $\\mu$m, and at 250, 350 and 500 $\\mu$m using SPIRE. The observing strategy was to integrate as deep as possible at 100 $\\mu$m to detect the stellar photosphere. Debris discs have been detected at a fractional luminosity level down to several times that of the Edgeworth-Kuiper belt. The incidence rate of discs around the DUNES stars is increased from a rate of $\\sim$ 12.1% $\\pm$ 5% befo...

  14. The Burrell-Optical-Kepler-Survey (BOKS) I: Survey Description and Initial Results

    CERN Document Server

    Feldmeier, John J; Sherry, William; von Braun, Kaspar; Everett, Mark E; Ciardi, David R; Harding, Paul; Mihos, J Christopher; Rudick, Craig S; Lee, Ting-Hui; Kutsko, Rebecca M; van Belle, Gerard T

    2011-01-01

    We present the initial results of a 40 night contiguous ground-based campaign of time series photometric observations of a 1.39 sq. deg field located within the NASA Kepler mission field of view. The goal of this pre-launch survey was to search for transiting extrasolar planets and to provide independent variability information of stellar sources. We have gathered a data set containing light curves of 54,687 stars from which we have created a statistical sub-sample of 13,786 stars between 14< r <18.5 and have statistically examined each light curve to test for variability. We present a summary of our preliminary photometric findings including the overall level and content of stellar variability in this portion of the Kepler field and give some examples of unusual variable stars found within. We present a preliminary catalog of 2,457 candidate variable stars, of which 776 show signs of periodicity. We also present three potential exoplanet candidates, all of which should be observable in detail by the Ke...

  15. Planck early results. III. First assessment of the Low Frequency Instrument in-flight performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    León-Tavares, J.; Falvella, M.C.; Hughes, N.;

    2011-01-01

    The scientific performance of the Planck Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) after one year of in-orbit operation is presented. We describe the main optical parameters and discuss photometric calibration, white noise sensitivity, and noise properties. A preliminary evaluation of the impact of the main...

  16. Planck 2015 results: VII. High Frequency Instrument data processing: Time-ordered information and beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adam, R.; Ade, P. A R; Aghanim, N.

    2016-01-01

    The Planck High Frequency Instrument (HFI) has observed the full sky at six frequencies (100, 143, 217, 353, 545, and 857 GHz) in intensity and at four frequencies in linear polarization (100, 143, 217, and 353 GHz). In order to obtain sky maps, the time-ordered information (TOI) containing...

  17. Planck early results. IV. First assessment of the High Frequency Instrument in-flight performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bréelle, E.; Bucher, M.; Cressiot, C.;

    2011-01-01

    The Planck High Frequency Instrument (HFI) is designed to measure the temperature and polarization anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background and Galactic foregrounds in six ~30% bands centered at 100, 143, 217, 353, 545, and 857 GHz at an angular resolution of 10′ (100 GHz), 7′ (143 GHz), a...

  18. First results of the instrumentation line for the deep-sea ANTARES neutrino telescope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aguilar, J. A.; Albert, A.; Ameli, F.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Anvar, S.; Aslanides, E.; Aubert, J. -J.; Barbarito, E.; Basa, S.; Battaglieri, M.; Becherini, Y.; Bellotti, R.; Beltramelli, J.; Bertin, V.; Bigi, A.; Billault, M.; Blaes, R.; de Botton, N.; Bradbury, S. M.; Bruijn, R.; Brunner, J.; Burgio, G. F.; Busto, J.; Cafagna, F.; Caillat, L.; Calzas, A.; Capone, A.; Caponetto, L.; Carmona, E.; Carr, J.; Cartwright, S. L.; Castel, D.; Castorina, E.; Cavasinni, V.; Cecchini, S.; Ceres, A.; Charvis, P.; Chauchot, P.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Colnard, C.; Compere, C.; Coniglione, R.; Cottini, N.; Coyle, P.; Cuneo, S.; Cussatlegras, A. -S.; Damy, G.; van Dantzig, R.; De Marzo, C.; Dekeyser, I.; Delagnes, E.; Denans, D.; Deschamps, A.; Dessages-Ardellier, F.; Destelle, J. -J.; Dinkespieler, B.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Drogou, J. -F.; Druillole, F.; Durand, D.; Ernenwein, J. -P.; Escoffier, S.; Falchini, E.; Favard, S.; Feinstein, F.; Ferry, S.; Festy, D.; Fiorello, C.; Flaminio, V.; Galeotti, S.; Gallone, J. -M.; Giacomelli, G.; Girard, N.; Gojak, C.; Goret, Ph.; Graf, K.; Hallewell, G.; Harakeh, M. N.; Hartmann, B.; Heijboer, A.; Heine, E.; Hello, Y.; Hernandez-Rey, J. J.; Hoessl, J.; Hoffman, C.; Hogenbirk, J.; Hubbard, J. R.; Jaquet, M.; de Jong, M.; Jouvenot, F.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karkar, S.; Katz, U.; Keller, P.; Kok, H.; Kooijman, P.; Kopper, C.; Korolkova, E. V.; Kouchner, A.; Kretschmer, W.; Kruijer, A.; Kuch, S.; Kudryavstev, V. A.; Lachartre, D.; Lafoux, H.; Lagier, P.; Lahmann, R.; Lamanna, G.; Lamare, P.; Languillat, J. C.; Laschinsky, H.; Le Guen, Y.; Le Provost, H.; Van Suu, A. Le; Legou, T.; Lim, G.; Lo Nigro, L.; Lo Presti, D.; Loehner, H.; Loucatos, S.; Louis, F.; Lucarelli, F.; Lyashuk, V.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Masullo, R.; Mazeas, F.; Mazure, A.; McMillan, J. E.; Megna, R.; Melissas, M.; Migneco, E.; Milovanovic, A.; Mongelli, M.; Montaruli, T.; Morganti, M.; Moscoso, L.; Musumeci, M.; Naumann, C.; Naumann-Godo, M.; Niess, V.; Olivetto, C.; Ostasch, R.; Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Payre, P.; Peek, H.; Petta, C.; Piattelli, P.; Pineau, J. -P.; Poinsignon, J.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Racca, C.; Randazzo, N.; van Randwijk, J.; Real, D.; van Rens, B.; Rethore, F.; Rewiersma, P.; Riccobene, G.; Rigaud, V.; Ripani, M.; Roca, V.; Roda, C.; Rolin, J. F.; Romita, M.; Rose, H. J.; Rostovtsev, A.; Roux, J.; Ruppi, M.; Russo, G. V.; Salesa, F.; Salomon, K.; Sapienza, P.; Schmitt, F.; Schuller, J. -P.; Shanidze, R.; Sokalski, I.; Spona, T.; Spurio, M.; van der Steenhoven, Gerardus; Stolarczyk, T.; Streeb, K.; Stubert, D.; Sulak, L.; Taiuti, M.; Tamburini, C.; Tao, C.; Terreni, G.; Thompson, L. F.; Valdy, P.; Valente, V.; Vallage, B.; Venekamp, G.; Verlaat, B.; Vernin, P.; de Vita, R.; de Vries, G.; Huberts, P. de Witt; Wobbe, G.; de Wolf, E.; Yao, A. -F.; Zaborov, D.; Zaccone, H.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zuniga, J.; van Wijk, R.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, the ANTARES Collaboration deployed and operated at a depth of 2500 m a so-called Mini Instrumentation Line equipped with Optical Modules (MILOM) at the ANTARES site. The various data acquired during the continuous operation from April to December 2005 of the MILOM confirm the satisfactory p

  19. Ear Playing and Aural Development in the Instrumental Lesson: Results from a "Case-Control" Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, David; Green, Lucy

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on a case-control experiment that was conducted in 2012 as part of the Ear Playing Project (EPP) at the Institute of Education, University of London. The EPP developed from the "informal learning" strand of Musical Futures and engaged instrumental students in the UK in learning from specially-created audio recordings…

  20. Preliminary results of the Geoid Slope Validation Survey 2014 in Iowa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y. M.; Becker, C.; Breidenbach, S.; Geoghegan, C.; Martin, D.; Winester, D.; Hanson, T.; Mader, G. L.; Eckl, M. C.

    2014-12-01

    The National Geodetic Survey conducted a second Geoid Slope Validation Survey in the summer of 2014 (GSVS14). The survey took place in Iowa along U.S Route 30. The survey line is approximately 200 miles long (325 km), extending from Denison, IA to Cedar Rapids, IA. There are over 200 official survey bench marks. A leveling survey was performed, conforming to 1st order, class II specifications. A GPS survey was performed using 24 to 48 hour occupations. Absolute gravity, relative gravity, and gravity gradient measurements were also collected during the survey. In addition, deflections of the vertical were acquired at 200 eccentric survey benchmarks using the Compact Digital Astrometric Camera (CODIAC) camera. This paper presents the preliminary results of the survey, including the accuracy analysis of the leveling data, GPS ellipsoidal heights, and the deflections of the vertical which serves as an independent data set in addition to the GPS/leveling implied geoid heights.

  1. The Cabauw Intercomparison campaign for Nitrogen Dioxide measuring Instruments (CINDI: design, execution, and early results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. M. Piters

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available From June to July 2009 more than thirty different in-situ and remote sensing instruments from all over the world participated in the Cabauw Intercomparison campaign for Nitrogen Dioxide measuring Instruments (CINDI. The campaign took place at KNMI's Cabauw Experimental Site for Atmospheric Research (CESAR in the Netherlands. Its main objectives were to determine the accuracy of state-of-the-art ground-based measurement techniques for the detection of atmospheric nitrogen dioxide (both in-situ and remote sensing, and to investigate their usability in satellite data validation. The expected outcomes are recommendations regarding the operation and calibration of such instruments, retrieval settings, and observation strategies for the use in ground-based networks for air quality monitoring and satellite data validation. Twenty-four optical spectrometers participated in the campaign, of which twenty-one had the capability to scan different elevation angles consecutively, the so-called Multi-axis DOAS systems, thereby collecting vertical profile information, in particular for nitrogen dioxide and aerosol. Various in-situ samplers and lidar instruments simultaneously characterized the variability of atmospheric trace gases and the physical properties of aerosol particles. A large data set of continuous measurements of these atmospheric constituents has been collected under various meteorological conditions and air pollution levels. Together with the permanent measurement capability at the CESAR site characterizing the meteorological state of the atmosphere, the CINDI campaign provided a comprehensive observational data set of atmospheric constituents in a highly polluted region of the world during summertime. First detailed comparisons performed with the CINDI data show that slant column measurements of NO2, O4 and HCHO with MAX-DOAS agree within 5 to 15%, vertical profiles of NO2 derived from several independent

  2. The Gaia spectrophotometric standard stars survey. I. Preliminary results

    CERN Document Server

    Pancino, E; Marinoni, S; Cocozza, G; Carrasco, J M; Bellazzini, M; Bragaglia, A; Federici, L; Rossetti, E; Cacciari, C; Nunez, L Balaguer; Castro, A; Figueras, F; Pecci, F Fusi; Galleti, S; Gebran, M; Jordi, C; Lardo, C; Masana, E; Monguio, M; Montegriffo, P; Ragaini, S; Schuster, W; Trager, S; Vilardell, F; Voss, H

    2012-01-01

    We describe two ground based observing campaigns aimed at building a grid of approximately 200 spectrophotometric standard stars (SPSS), with an internal ~1% precision and tied to Vega within ~3%, for the absolute flux calibration of data gathered by Gaia, the ESA astrometric mission. The criteria for the selection and a list of candidates are presented, together with a description of the survey strategy and the adopted data analysis methods. We also discuss a short list of notable rejected SPSS candidates and difficult cases, based on identification problems, literature discordant data, visual companions, and variability. In fact, all candidates are also monitored for constancy (within \\pm5 mmag, approximately). In particular, we report on a CALSPEC standard, 1740346, that we found to be a delta Scuti variable during our short-term monitoring (1-2 h) campaign.

  3. Fifty Years of the Spectrum Problem: Survey and New Results

    CERN Document Server

    Durand, Arnaud; Makowsky, Johann; More, Malika

    2009-01-01

    In 1952, Heinrich Scholz published a question in the Journal of Symbolic Logic asking for a characterization of spectra, i.e., sets of natural numbers that are the cardinalities of finite models of first order sentences. G\\"unter Asser asked whether the complement of a spectrum is always a spectrum. These innocent questions turned out to be seminal for the development of finite model theory and descriptive complexity. In this paper we survey developments over the last 50-odd years pertaining to the spectrum problem. Our presentation follows conceptual developments rather than the chronological order. Originally a number theoretic problem, it has been approached in terms of recursion theory, resource bounded complexity theory, classification by complexity of the defining sentences, and finally in terms of structural graph theory. Although Scholz' question was answered in various ways, Asser's question remains open. One appendix paraphrases the contents of several early and not easily accesible papers by G. Ass...

  4. Nicaragua 1998: results from the Demographic and Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-06-01

    This article presents summary statistics gathered from the 1998 Nicaragua Demographic and Health Survey (Encuesta Nicaraguense de Demografia y Salud 1998, ENDESA-98). Data from the nationally representative ENDESA-98 were collected from 11,528 households. Interviews were conducted with 13,634 women aged 15-49 years and 2912 men aged 15-59 years between December 1, 1997, and May 31, 1998. The statistics presented were on fertility trends, fertility differentials, age-specific fertility, fertility preferences, current contraceptive use, contraception, marital and contraceptive status, differentials in median age at first birth, postpartum variables, and infant mortality. In addition, statistical data on the health and nutritional status of children were also presented.

  5. Current Trends in Nursing Informatics: Results of an International Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltonen, Laura-Maria; Alhuwail, Dari; Ali, Samira; Badger, Martha K; Eler, Gabrielle Jacklin; Georgsson, Mattias; Islam, Tasneem; Jeon, Eunjoo; Jung, Hyunggu; Kuo, Chiu-Hsiang; Lewis, Adrienne; Pruinelli, Lisiane; Ronquillo, Charlene; Sarmiento, Raymond Francis; Sommer, Janine; Tayaben, Jude L; Topaz, Maxim

    2016-01-01

    Nursing informatics (NI) can help provide effective and safe healthcare. This study aimed to describe current research trends in NI. In the summer 2015, the IMIA-NI Students Working Group created and distributed an online international survey of the current NI trends. A total of 402 responses were submitted from 44 countries. We identified a top five NI research areas: standardized terminologies, mobile health, clinical decision support, patient safety and big data research. NI research funding was considered to be difficult to acquire by the respondents. Overall, current NI research on education, clinical practice, administration and theory is still scarce, with theory being the least common. Further research is needed to explain the impact of these trends and the needs from clinical practice.

  6. Proposing a survey instrument for measuring operational, formal, information and strategic Internet skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deursen, van A.J.A.M.; Dijk, van J.A.G.M.; Peters, O.

    2012-01-01

    Observational studies prove to be very suitable to provide a realistic view of people's Internet skills. However, their cost and time are a strong limitation for large-scale data gathering. A useful addition to the measurement of Internet skills would be the development of survey questions for measu

  7. Results of the American Academy of Neurology resident survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, W D; Nolte, C M; Matthews, B R; Coleman, M; Corboy, J R

    2011-03-29

    To assess the effect of neurology residency education as trainees advance into independent practice, the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) elected to survey all graduating neurology residents at time of graduation and in 3-year cycles thereafter. A 22-question survey was sent to all neurology residents completing residency training in the United States in 2007. Of 523 eligible residents, 285 (54.5%) responded. Of these, 92% reported good to excellent quality teaching of basic neurology from their faculty; however, 47% noted less than ideal training in basic neuroscience. Two-thirds indicated that the Residency In-service Training Examination was used only as a self-assessment tool, but reports of misuse were made by some residents. After residency, 78% entered fellowships (with 61% choosing a fellowship based on interactions with a mentor at their institution), whereas 20% entered practice directly. After adjustment for the proportion of residents who worked before the duty hour rules were implemented and after their implementation, more than half reported improvement in quality of life (87%), education (60%), and patient care (62%). The majority of international medical graduates reported wanting to stay in the United States to practice rather than return to their country of residence. Neurology residents are generally satisfied with training, and most entered a fellowship. Duty hour implementation may have improved resident quality of life, but reciprocal concerns were raised about impact on patient care and education. Despite the majority of international trainees wishing to stay in the United States, stricter immigration laws may limit their entry into the future neurology workforce.

  8. Survey of Hospitals and Manufacturers of Biomedical Instrumentation Concerning Variables Related to the Development and Implementation of a Bio-Med Instrumentation Technologist Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaumberg, Gary F.

    The Bio-Med Instrumentation Technologist Questionnaire was sent to 105 hospitals in the Southern California area that had electronic instrumentation for patient monitoring purposes. Sixty completed questionnaires were returned. Twenty manufacturers of bio-medical instrumentation were sent the questionnaires and seven responded. Some of the…

  9. Organizational member involvement in physical activity coalitions across the United States: development and testing of a novel survey instrument for assessing coalition functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornstein, Daniel B; Pate, Russell R; Beets, Michael W; Saunders, Ruth P; Blair, Steven N

    2015-06-01

    Coalitions are often composed of member organizations. Member involvement is thought to be associated with coalition success. No instrument currently exists for evaluating organizational member involvement in physical activity coalitions. This study aimed to develop a survey instrument for evaluating organizational member involvement in physical activity coalitions. The study was carried out in three phases: (a) developing a draft survey, (b) assessing the content validity of the draft survey, and (c) assessing the underlying factor structure, reliability, and validity of the survey. A cross-sectional design was employed. In Phase 1, a team of experts in survey development produced a draft survey. In Phase 2, the content validity of the draft survey was evaluated by a panel of individuals with expertise in physical activity coalitions. In Phase 3, the survey was administered to 120 individuals on local-, state-, and national-level physical activity coalitions. Responses were subjected to an exploratory factor analysis in order to determine the survey's underlying factor structure, reliability, and validity. Phases 1 and 2yielded a survey instrument with demonstrated content validity. Phase 3 yielded a three-factor model with three subscales: Strategic Alignment, Organizational Alignment, and Providing Input. Each subscale demonstrated high internal consistency reliability and construct validity. The survey instrument developed here demonstrated sound psychometric properties and provides new insight into organizational member involvement in physical activity coalitions. This instrument may be an important tool in developing a more complete picture of coalition functioning in physical activity coalitions specifically and health-based coalitions overall. © 2014 Society for Public Health Education.

  10. Final Report - Independent Confirmatory Survey Summary and Results for the Hematite Decommissioning Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E.N. Bailey

    2009-03-18

    The objectives of the confirmatory surveys were to provide independent contractor field data reviews and to generate independent radiological data for use by the NRC in evaluating the adequacy and accuracy of the licensee’s procedures and survey results.

  11. The CFEPS Kuiper Belt Survey: Strategy and Pre-survey Results

    CERN Document Server

    Allen, R L; Petit, J M; Rousselot, P; Moussis, O; Kavelaars, J J; Bagatin, A C; Bernabeu, G; Benavenidez, P; Parker, J; Nicholson, P; Holman, M; Doressoundiram, A; Veillet, C; Scholl, H; Mars, G

    2005-01-01

    We present the data acquisition strategy and characterization procedures for the Canada-France Ecliptic Plane Survey (CFEPS), a sub-component of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey. The survey began in early 2003 and as of summer 2005 has covered 430 square degrees of sky within a few degrees of the ecliptic. Moving objects beyond the orbit of Uranus are detected to a magnitude limit of $m_R$=23 -- 24 (depending on the image quality). To track as large a sample as possible and avoid introducing followup bias, we have developed a multi-epoch observing strategy that is spread over several years. We present the evolution of the uncertainties in ephemeris position and orbital elements as the objects progress through the epochs. We then present a small 10-object sample that was tracked in this manner as part of a preliminary survey starting a year before the main CFEPS project. We describe the CFEPS survey simulator, to be released in 2006, which allows theoretical models of the Kuiper Belt to be comp...

  12. Astro 101 Students' Perceptions of Science: Results from the "Thinking about Science Survey Instrument"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Colin S.; Prather, Edward E.; Mendelsohn, Benjamin M.

    2013-01-01

    What are the underlying worldviews and beliefs about the role of science in society held by students enrolled in a college-level, general education, introductory astronomy course (Astro 101)--and are those beliefs affected by active engagement instruction shown to significantly increase students' conceptual knowledge and reasoning abilities…

  13. Novel Scanning Lens Instrument for Evaluating Fresnel Lens Performance: Equipment Development and Initial Results (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrero, R.; Miller, D. C.; Kurtz, S. R.; Anton, I.; Sala, G.

    2013-07-01

    A system dedicated to the optical transmittance characterization of Fresnel lenses has been developed at NREL, in collaboration with the UPM. The system quantifies the optical efficiency of the lens by generating a performance map. The shape of the focused spot may also be analyzed to understand change in the lens performance. The primary instrument components (lasers and CCD detector) have been characterized to confirm their capability for performing optical transmittance measurements. Measurements performed on SoG and PMMA lenses subject to a variety of indoor conditions (e.g., UV and damp heat) identified differences in the optical efficiency of the evaluated lenses, demonstrating the ability of the Scanning Lens Instrument (SLI) to distinguish between the aged lenses.

  14. Development of a respiratory protection survey instrument for occupational health nurses: an educational project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taormina, Deborah; Burgel, Barbara J

    2013-02-01

    The Institute of Medicine (2011) report Occupational Health Nurses and Respiratory Protection: Improving Education and Training outlined seven recommendations to improve the competency of occupational health nurses in respiratory protection. An advisory group was convened in December 2011, with stakeholder representation from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health/National Personal Protective Technology Laboratory, American Association of Occupational Health Nurses, Inc., American Board for Occupational Health Nurses, Inc., Association of Occupational Health Professionals in Healthcare, American Nurses Association, and Institute of Medicine Standing Committee on Personal Protective Equipment for Workplace Safety and Health. The initial work of the advisory group included developing and administering a survey to assess current occupational health nurse roles and responsibilities relevant to respiratory protection. Development of the survey was led by a master's student and advisor who worked with the advisory group. The process of tool development and preliminary findings are presented in this article.

  15. A Survey of Commercially Available Chemical Agent Instrumentation for Use in the Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haas, J S; Alcaraz, A; Andresen, B D; Pruneda, C O

    2002-03-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) Forensic Science Center (FSC) has extensive experience and capabilities in the analysis of chemical agents (CA) and related compounds as well as experience in identifying these materials in the field (i.e. samples such as those found in soils, liquids, gases). An open source survey was performed to determine viable, commercially available technology that can detect, in situ, CA and also meet field-use performance criteria as specified by the Program Management Consultant (PMC). The performance requirements of the technology include accuracy, reliability, integration onto robotics, and chemical detection sensitivities that meet required specifications. Not included in this survey are technologies and methodologies to detect CA decomposition products and related waste streams.

  16. First Results from COPSS: The CO Power Spectrum Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Keating, Garrett K; Marrone, Daniel P; DeBoer, David R; Heiles, Carl; Chang, Tzu-Ching; Carlstrom, John E; Greer, Christopher H; Hawkins, David; Lamb, James W; Leitch, Erik; Miller, Amber D; Muchovej, Stephen; Woody, David P

    2015-01-01

    We present constraints on the abundance of carbon-monoxide in the early Universe from the CO Power Spectrum Survey (COPSS). We utilize a data set collected between 2005 and 2008 using the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Array (SZA), which were previously used to measure arcminute-scale fluctuations of the CMB. This data set features observations of 44 fields, covering an effective area of 1.7 square degrees, over a frequency range of 27 to 35 GHz. Using the technique of intensity mapping, we are able to probe the CO(1-0) transition, with sensitivity to spatial modes between $k=0.5{-}2\\ h\\,\\textrm{Mpc}^{-1}$ over a range in redshift of $z=2.3{-}3.3$, spanning a comoving volume of $3.6\\times10^{6}\\ h^{-3}\\,\\textrm{Mpc}^{3}$. We demonstrate our ability to mitigate foregrounds, and present estimates of the impact of continuum sources on our measurement. We constrain the CO power spectrum to $P_{\\textrm{CO}}<2.6\\times10^{4}\\ \\mu\\textrm{K}^{2} (h^{-1}\\,\\textrm{Mpc})^{3}$, or $\\Delta^{2}_{\\textrm{CO}}(k\\! = \\! 1 \\ h\\,\\textrm{...

  17. Who treats lung cancer? Results from a global survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komiya, Takefumi; Mackay, Christine B; Chalise, Prabhakar

    2017-09-01

    In most Western nations, the medical oncologist plays a significant role in the administration of systemic therapy for lung cancer. In Japan however, treatment for lung cancer has historically been provided by pulmonologists and thoracic surgeons. A comparison of the management of advanced disease between Japan and other nations has not been described. An online, self-administered, international survey was sent to 3907 active members of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. Eligible participants were degreed physicians who prescribed systemic agents for adult cancer treatment within the past five years. In total, 281 respondents answered the questions regarding management of lung cancer. Thorough analysis demonstrated that pulmonologists play a significant role in Japan and the Netherlands, where the role of oncologic specialists is not well established. Of note, all the respondents from the Netherlands reported that pulmonary medicine primarily manages systemic chemotherapy in stage IV, adjuvant chemotherapy, and targeted therapy. We found there are several nations where non-oncologic specialists play a critical role in the systemic treatment of lung cancer. We expect this practice pattern to continue until the global adoption of the oncologic specialty role. Copyright © 2017 The Japanese Respiratory Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Results of a Dietitian Survey About Nutrition Games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederico, Catherine

    2012-02-01

    Registered dietitians are the nutrition experts in America. As such, their opinions about using technology-based nutrition games as teaching tools are important. The purpose of this study was to query registered dietitians about their experience and recommendations for topics, age, and platforms for future nutrition game development. The author gave a 1-hour talk to two state dietetic conference groups about nutrition games and their efficacy, concerns, and hopes and opportunities for their future as viable nutrition teaching tools. After the talks attendees completed a five-question survey about nutrition games, including if they played nutrition games, if they thought games could possibly help in their work, and preferences for topics, ages, and platforms for which they wanted to see priority development. Although only 4% of respondents played nutrition games, 79% thought they could be of benefit, and 21% felt that "maybe" they could be beneficial educational tools. Games on all nutrition topics were welcome, with preference for computers and smartphone apps. After a lengthy presentation on the new genre of technology-based nutrition games, registered dietitians reported that they are open to using technology-based nutrition education apps and feel they could have some benefit in educating the public about nutrition, even though dietitians presently have little experience with them. The talk was successful in informing dietitians about this new game genre, and their suggestions for topics, target ages, and tech platforms will be helpful to nutrition game developers and designers.

  19. Planck early results: First assessment of the Low Frequency Instrument in-flight performance

    CERN Document Server

    Mennella, A; Butler, R C; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Davis, R J; Dick, J; Frailis, M; Galeotta, S; Gregorio, A; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lawrence, C R; Leach, S; Leahy, J P; Lowe, S; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Maris, M; Mart\\'\\inez-González, E; Meinhold, P R; Morgante, G; Pearson, D; Perrotta, F; Polenta, G; Poutanen, T; Sandri, M; Seiffert, M D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Tavagnacco, D; Terenzi, L; Tomasi, M; Valiviita, J; Villa, F; Watson, R; Wilkinson, A; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A; Aja, B; Artal, E; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartlett, J G; Bartolo, N; Battaglia, P; Bennett, K; Bonaldi, A; Bonavera, L; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Burigana, C; Cabella, P; Cappellini, B; Chen, X; Colombo, L; Cruz, M; Danese, L; D'Arcangelo, O; Davies, R D; de Gasperis, G; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Donzelli, S; Efstathiou, G; En\\sslin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Falvella, M C; Finelli, F; Foley, S; Franceschet, C; Franceschi, E; Gaier, T C; Génova-Santos, R T; George, D; Gómez, F; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gruppuso, A; Hansen, F K; Herranz, D; Herreros, J M; Hoyland, R J; Hughes, N; Jewell, J; Jukkala, P; Juvela, M; Kangaslahti, P; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kilpia, V -H; Kisner, T S; Knoche, J; Knox, L; Laaninen, M; Lähteenmäki, A; Lamarre, J -M; Leonardi, R; León-Tavares, J; Leutenegger, P; Lilje, P B; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Malaspina, M; Marinucci, D; Massardi, M; Matarrese, S; Matthai, F; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Miccolis, M; Migliaccio, M; Mitra, S; Moss, A; Natoli, P; Nesti, R; N\\orgaard-Nielsen, H U; Pagano, L; Paladini, R; Paoletti, D; Partridge, B; Pasian, F; Pettorino, V; Pietrobon, D; Pospieszalski, M; Prézeau, G; Prina, M; Procopio, P; Puget, J -L; Quercellini, C; Rachen, J P; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Ricciardi, S; Robbers, G; Rocha, G; Roddis, N; Rubi\; Savelainen, M; Scott, D; Silvestri, R; Simonetto, A; Sjoman, P; Smoot, G F; Sozzi, C; Stringhetti, L; Tauber, J A; Tofani, G; Tuovinen, J; Türler, M; Umana, G; Valenziano, L; Varis, J; Vielva, P; Vittorio, N; Wade, L A; Watson, C; White, S; Winder, F

    2011-01-01

    The scientific performance of the Planck Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) after one year of in-orbit operation is presented. We describe the main optical parameters and discuss photometric calibration, white noise sensitivity, and noise properties. A preliminary evaluation of the impact of the main systematic effects is presented. For each of the performance parameters, we outline the methods used to obtain them from the flight data and provide a comparison with pre-launch ground assessments, which are essentially confirmed in flight.

  20. NEW INSTRUMENTS FOR SURVEY: ON LINE SOFTWARES FOR 3D RECONTRUCTION FROM IMAGES

    OpenAIRE

    E. Fratus de Balestrini; Guerra, F.

    2012-01-01

    3d scanning technologies had a significant development and have been widely used in documentation of cultural, architectural and archeological heritages. Modern methods of three-dimensional acquiring and modeling allow to represent an object through a digital model that combines visual potentialities of images (normally used for documentation) to the accuracy of the survey, becoming at the same time support for the visualization that for metric evaluation of any artefact that have an historic...

  1. Musculoskeletal impairment survey in Rwanda: Design of survey tool, survey methodology, and results of the pilot study (a cross sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simms Victoria

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Musculoskeletal impairment (MSI is an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, especially in developing countries. Prevalence studies for MSI in the developing world have used varying methodologies and are seldom directly comparable. This study aimed to develop a new tool to screen for and diagnose MSI and to pilot test the methodology for a national survey in Rwanda. Methods A 7 question screening tool to identify cases of MSI was developed through literature review and discussions with healthcare professionals. To validate the tool, trained rehabilitation technicians screened 93 previously identified gold standard 'cases' and 86 'non cases'. Sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value were calculated. A standardised examination protocol was developed to determine the aetiology and diagnosis of MSI for those who fail the screening test. For the national survey in Rwanda, multistage cluster random sampling, with probability proportional to size procedures will be used for selection of a cross-sectional, nationally representative sample of the population. Households to be surveyed will be chosen through compact segment sampling and all individuals within chosen households will be screened. A pilot survey of 680 individuals was conducted using the protocol. Results: The screening tool demonstrated 99% sensitivity and 97% specificity for MSI, and a positive predictive value of 98%. During the pilot study 468 out of 680 eligible subjects (69% were screened. 45 diagnoses were identified in 38 persons who were cases of MSI. The subjects were grouped into categories based on diagnostic subgroups of congenital (1, traumatic (17, infective (2 neurological (6 and other acquired(19. They were also separated into mild (42.1%, moderate (42.1% and severe (15.8% cases, using an operational definition derived from the World Health Organisation's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health

  2. Spitzer Survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud, Surveying the Agents of a Galaxy's Evolution (SAGE) I : Overview and Initial Results

    CERN Document Server

    Meixner, M; Indebetouw, R; Hora, J L; Whitney, B; Blum, R; Reach, W; Bernard, J P; Meade, M; Babler, B; Engelbracht, C W; Misselt, K; Vijh, U; Leitherer, C; Cohen, M; Churchwell, E B; Boulanger, F; Frogel, J A; Fukui, Y; Gallagher, J; Gorjian, V; Harris, J; Kelly, D; Kawamura, A; Kim, S Y; Latter, W B; Madden, S; Markwick-Kemper, C; Mizuno, A; Mizuno, N; Mould, J; Nota, A; Oey, M S; Olsen, K; Onishi, T; Paladini, R; Panagia, N; Perez-Gonzalez, P; Shibai, H; Shuji, S; Smith, L; Staveley-Smith, L; Tielens, A G G M; Ueta, T; Van Dyk, S D; Volk, K; Werner, M; Zaritsky, D; Meixner, Margaret; Gordon, Karl D.; Indebetouw, Remy; Hora, Joseph L.; Whitney, Barbara; Blum, Robert; Reach, William; Bernard, Jean-Philippe; Meade, Marilyn; Babler, Brian; Engelbracht, Charles W.; For, Bi-Qing; Misselt, Karl; Vijh, Uma; Leitherer, Claus; Cohen, Martin; Churchwell, Ed B.; Boulanger, Francois; Frogel, Jay A.; Fukui, Yasuo; Gallagher, Jay; Gorjian, Varoujan; Harris, Jason; Kelly, Douglas; Kawamura, Akiko; Kim, SoYoung; Latter, William B.; Madden, Suzanne; Markwick-Kemper, Ciska; Mizuno, Akira; Mizuno, Norikazu; Mould, Jeremy; Nota, Antonella; Olsen, Knut; Onishi, Toshikazu; Paladini, Roberta; Panagia, Nino; Perez-Gonzalez, Pablo; Shibai, Hiroshi; Shuji, Sato; Smith, Linda; Staveley-Smith, Lister; Ueta, Toshiya; Dyk, Schuyler Van; Volk, Kevin; Werner, Michael; Zaritsky, Dennis

    2006-01-01

    We are performing a uniform and unbiased, ~7x7 degrees imaging survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), using the IRAC and MIPS instruments on board the Spitzer Space Telescope in order to survey the agents of a galaxy's evolution (SAGE), the interstellar medium (ISM) and stars in the LMC. The detection of diffuse ISM with column densities >1.2x10^21 H cm^-2 permits detailed studies of dust processes in the ISM. SAGE's point source sensitivity enables a complete census of newly formed stars with masses >3 solar masses that will determine the current star formation rate in the LMC. SAGE's detection of evolved stars with mass loss rates >1x10^-8 solar masses per year will quantify the rate at which evolved stars inject mass into the ISM of the LMC. The observing strategy includes two epochs in 2005, separated by three months, that both mitigate instrumental artifacts and constrain source variability. The SAGE data are non-proprietary. The data processing includes IRAC and MIPS pipelines and a database for mi...

  3. The Forest Service Safety Survey: results from an employee-wide safety attitude survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanessa R. Lane; Ken Cordell; Stanley J. Zarnoch; Gary T. Green; Neelam Poudyal; Susan Fox

    2014-01-01

    The Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture launched a Safety Journey in 2011 aimed at elevating safety consciousness and practice in the Agency. All employees were required to attend an engagement session during the year to introduce them to the Safety Journey. In September, a survey was launched to help Forest Service leadership better understand employee...

  4. The association between survey timing and patient-reported experiences with hospitals: results of a national postal survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjertnaes Oyvind A

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research on the effect of survey timing on patient-reported experiences and patient satisfaction with health services has produced contradictory results. The objective of this study was thus to assess the association between survey timing and patient-reported experiences with hospitals. Methods Secondary analyses of a national inpatient experience survey including 63 hospitals in the 5 health regions in Norway during the autumn of 2006. 10,912 (45% patients answered a postal questionnaire after their discharge from hospital. Non-respondents were sent a reminder after 4 weeks. Multilevel linear regression analysis was used to assess the association between survey timing and patient-reported experiences, both bivariate analysis and multivariate analysis controlling for other predictors of patient experiences. Results Multivariate multilevel regression analysis revealed that survey time was significantly and negatively related to three of six patient-reported experience scales: doctor services (Beta = -0.424, pp p Conclusions Survey time was significantly and negatively related to three of the six scales for patient-reported experiences with hospitals. Large differences in survey time across hospitals could be problematic for between-hospital comparisons, implying that survey time should be considered as a potential adjustment factor. More research is needed on this topic, including studies with other population groups, other data collection modes and a longer time span.

  5. Relationships Among the Knowledge, Efficacy, and Practices Instrument, Color-Blind Racial Attitudes Scale, Deamonte Driver Survey, and Defining Issues Test 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar-Horenstein, Linda S; Garvan, Cynthia W

    2016-03-01

    Concordance studies indicate the degree to which instruments measure the same or similar constructs or something different. The aims of this study were to identify the factor structure of the Deamonte Driver Survey and determine the relationship between the Deamonte Driver (a measure of social class stereotyping), the Defining Issues Test 2 (DIT2; a measure of ethical sensitivity), the Color-Blind Racial Attitudes Scale (CoBRAS; a measure of racial stereotyping), and the Knowledge, Efficacy, and Practices Instrument (KEPI; a measure of cultural competence). The results showed a three-factor solution for the Deamonte Driver Survey and significant relationships between CoBRAS and DIT2 subscales and between CoBRAS and Deamonte Driver subscales. Significant relationships between the measures and exploratory variables, underrepresented minority status, age, citizenship, marital status, political stance, English as a first language, and gender were found. The lack of a significant relationship between the KEPI and Deamonte Driver, DIT2, or CoBRAS subscales suggests that the KEPI is measuring a unique construct. These findings showed how these scales contributed to the assessment of cultural competence among dental students and faculty.

  6. The JCMT Plane Survey: early results from the ℓ = 30° field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moore, T. J. T.; Plume, R.; Thompson, M. A.; Parsons, H.; Urquhart, J. S.; Eden, D. J.; Dempsey, J. T.; Morgan, L. K.; Thomas, H. S.; Buckle, J.; Brunt, C. M.; Butner, H.; Carretero, D.; Chrysostomou, A.; deVilliers, H. M.; Fich, M.; Hoare, M. G.; Manser, G.; Mottram, J. C.; Natario, C.; Olguin, F.; Peretto, N.; Polychroni, D.; Redman, R. O.; Rigby, A. J.; Salji, C.; Summers, L. J.; Berry, D.; Currie, M. J.; Jenness, T.; Pestalozzi, M.; Traficante, A.; Bastien, P.; diFrancesco, J.; Davis, C. J.; Evans, A.; Friberg, P.; Fuller, G. A.; Gibb, A. G.; Gibson, S.; Hill, T.; Johnstone, D.; Joncas, G.; Longmore, S. N.; Lumsden, S. L.; Martin, P. G.; Lu'o'ng, Q. Nguyê˜n.; Pineda, J. E.; Purcell, C.; Richer, J. S.; Schieven, G. H.; Shipman, R.; Spaans, M.; Taylor, A. R.; Viti, S.; Weferling, B.; White, G. J.; Zhu, M.

    2015-01-01

    We present early results from the JCMT (James Clerk Maxwell Telescope) Plane Survey (JPS), which has surveyed the northern inner Galactic plane between longitudes ℓ = 7° and ℓ = 63° in the 850-μm continuum with SCUBA-2 (Submm Common-User Bolometer Array 2), as part of the JCMT Legacy Survey programm

  7. A survey of some recent results on Risk Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avram Florin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this paper is to give recent results in risk theory presented at the Conference ”Journée MAS 2012” which took place in Clermont Ferrand. After a brief state of the art on ruin theory, we explore some particular aspects and recent results. One presents matrix exponential approximations of the ruin probability. Then we present asymptotics of the ruin probability based on mixing properties of the claims distribution. Finally, the multivariate case, motivated by reinsurance, is presented and some contemporary results (closed forms and asymptotics are given.

  8. Cyclists and traffic sounds : the results of an internet survey.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stelling-Konczak, A. Hagenzieker, M.P. & Wee, G.P. van

    2014-01-01

    Many cyclists, especially youngsters, listen to music and talk on their mobile phones while cycling. As a result, auditory traffic information that can be used by cyclists to make safe decisions is less available. Also the growing number of quiet (electric) vehicles on the road makes use of auditory

  9. Cyclists and traffic sounds : the results of an internet survey.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stelling-Konczak, A. Hagenzieker, M.P. & Wee, G.P. van

    2014-01-01

    Many cyclists, especially youngsters, listen to music and talk on their mobile phones while cycling. As a result, auditory traffic information that can be used by cyclists to make safe decisions is less available. Also the growing number of quiet (electric) vehicles on the road makes use of auditory

  10. Pooled results from five validation studies of dietary self-report instruments using recovery biomarkers for potassium and sodium intake

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have pooled data from five large validation studies of dietary self-report instruments that used recovery biomarkers as referents to assess food frequency questionnaires (FFQs) and 24-hour recalls. We reported on total potassium and sodium intakes, their densities, and their ratio. Results were...

  11. [First stage of the cross-cultural adaptation of the instrument The Vulnerable Elders Survey (VES-13) to Portuguese].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Laércio Lima; Santiago, Lívia Maria; Silva, João Francisco Santos da; Mattos, Inês Echenique

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the initial stages of the cross-cultural adaptation of the instrument The Vulnerable Elders Survey (VES-13) for use in the context of cancer care in Brazil. Two translations into Portuguese and two back-translations into English were carried out independently, and a formal assessment of the general and referential meanings was performed in order to obtain a synthesis version. Understanding of the synthesis version was evaluated in a pretest applied to 33 patients in an oncologic hospital of the Brazilian Unified National Health System (SUS). The version was easily applied in the intended context and was well-accepted by elders. The Portuguese version of the VES-13 proved to be well understood and adequate for testing its psychometric qualities. The latter step is currently in the final phase.

  12. A survey on the high reliability software verification and validation technology for instrumentation and control in NPP.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Kee Choon; Lee, Chang Soo; Dong, In Sook [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-01-01

    This document presents the technical status of the software verification and validation (V and V) efforts to support developing and licensing digital instrumentation and control (I and C) systems in nuclear power plants. We have reviewed codes and standards to be concensus criteria among vendor, licensee and licenser. Then we have described the software licensing procedures under 10 CFR 50 and 10 CFR 52 of the United States cope with the licensing barrier. At last, we have surveyed the technical issues related to developing and licensing the high integrity software for digital I and C systems. These technical issues let us know the development direction of our own software V and V methodology. (Author) 13 refs., 2 figs.,.

  13. Cavity Attenuated Phase Shift (CAPS) Method for Airborne Aerosol Light Extinction Measurement: Instrument Validation and First Results from Field Deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, A.; Perim de Faria, J.; Berg, M.; Bundke, U.; Freedman, A.

    2015-12-01

    Monitoring the direct impact of aerosol particles on climate requires the continuous measurement of aerosol optical parameters like the aerosol extinction coefficient on a regular basis. Remote sensing and ground-based networks are well in place (e.g., AERONET, ACTRIS), whereas the regular in situ measurement of vertical profiles of atmospheric aerosol optical properties remains still an important challenge in quantifying climate change. The European Research Infrastructure IAGOS (In-service Aircraft for a Global Observing System; www.iagos.org) responds to the increasing requests for long-term, routine in situ observational data by using commercial passenger aircraft as measurement platform. However, scientific instrumentation for the measurement of atmospheric constituents requires major modifications before being deployable aboard in-service passenger aircraft. Recently, a compact and robust family of optical instruments based on the cavity attenuated phase shift (CAPS) technique has become available for measuring aerosol light extinction. While this technique was successfully deployed for ground-based atmospheric measurements under various conditions, its suitability for operation aboard aircraft in the free and upper free troposphere still has to be demonstrated. In this work, the modifications of a CAPS PMex instrument for measuring aerosol light extinction on aircraft, the results from subsequent laboratory tests for evaluating the modified instrument prototype, and first results from a field deployment aboard a research aircraft will be covered. In laboratory studies, the instrument showed excellent agreement (deviation < 5%) with theoretical values calculated from Rayleigh scattering cross-sections, when operated on pressurized air and CO2 at ambient and low pressure (~200 hPa). For monodisperse and polydisperse aerosols, reference aerosol extinction coefficients were calculated from measured size distributions and agreed with the CAPS PMex instrument

  14. Trends in caesarean section and instrumental deliveries in relation to Body Mass Index: a clinical survey during 1978 - 2001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefsson Ann

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the last 20 years the rate of CS has increased in Sweden as it has in many other countries. The proportion of pregnant women suffering from a high BMI has also increased rapidly during the same time period. It would therefore be of interest to study both how and if these two observations are related to each other. The aim was therefore to study trends in mode of caesarean section (CS and instrumental deliveries among women in three BMI groups over a time span of almost 25 years with special focus on the observed body weight of pregnant women. Method The design is a retrospective cohort study using medical records of consecutively delivered women at two delivery wards in South East Sweden during the years 1978, 1986, 1992, 1997 and 2001. Results No significant time-trends were found for CS and instrumental delivery within each BMI-group for the time period studied. The proportion of women with BMI ≥ 25 delivered by means of CS or instrumental delivery increased quite dramatically from 1978 to 2001 (χ2 test for trend; p Conclusion Overweight and obese pregnant women constitute a rapidly growing proportion of the total number of CS and instrumental deliveries. Planning and allocation of health resources must be adjusted to this fact and its implications.

  15. Clinical management of gastric cancer: results of a multicentre survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Feng

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The National Comprehensive Cancer Network clinical practice guidelines in oncology-gastric cancer guidelines have been widely used to provide appropriate recommendations for the treatment of patients with gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to examine the adherence of surgical oncologists, medical oncologists, and radiation oncologists' to the recommended guidelines. Methods A questionnaire asking the treatment options for gastric cancer cases was sent to 394 Chinese oncology specialists, including surgical oncologists, medical oncologists, and radiation oncologists working in hospitals joined in The Western Cooperative Gastrointestinal Oncology Group of China. The questionnaire involved a series of clinical scenarios regarding the interpretation of surgery, neoadjuvant, adjuvant, and advanced treatment planning of gastric cancer. Results Analysis of 358 respondents (91% showed variations between each specialization and from the recommended guidelines in the management approaches to specific clinical scenarios. The majority of specialists admitted that less than 50% of patients received multidisciplinary evaluation before treatment. The participants gave different responses to questions involving adjuvant, neoadjuvant, and advanced settings, compared to the recommended guidelines. Conclusions These results highlight the heterogeneity of the treatment of gastric cancer. Surgical oncologists, medical oncologists, and radiation oncologists are not adhering to the recommended guidelines.

  16. Experimental Estimation of CLASP Spatial and Spectral Resolutions: Results of the Instrument's Optical Alignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giono, G.; Katsukawa, Y.; Ishikawa, R.; Narukage, N.; Bando, T.; Kano, R.; Suematsu, Y.; Winebarger, A.; Kobayashi, K.; Auchere, F.

    2015-01-01

    The Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha SpectroPolarimeter is a sounding rocket experiment design to measure for the first time the polarization signal of the Lyman-Alpha line (121.6nm), emitted in the solar upper-chromosphere and transition region. This instrument aims to detect the Hanle effect's signature hidden in the Ly-alpha polarization, as a tool to probe the chromospheric magnetic field. Hence, an unprecedented polarization accuracy is needed ((is) less than 10 (exp -3). Nevertheless, spatial and spectral resolutions are also crucial to observe chhromospheric feature such as spicules, and to have precise measurement of the Ly-alpha line core and wings. Hence, this poster will present how the telescope and the spectrograph were separately aligned, and their combined spatial and spectral resolutions.

  17. The multipurpose thermalhydraulic test facility TOPFLOW: an overview on experimental capabilities, instrumentation and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasser, H.M.; Beyer, M.; Carl, H.; Manera, A.; Pietruske, H.; Schuetz, P.; Weiss, F.P. [Forschungszentrum Rossedorf e.V. (FZR), Dresden (Germany). Inst. fuer Sicherheitsforschung

    2006-08-15

    A new multipurpose thermalhydraulic test facility TOPFLOW (TwO Phase FLOW) was built and put into operation at Forschungszentrum Rossendorf in 2002 and 2003. Since then, it has been mainly used for the investigation of generic and applied steady state and transient two phase flow phenomena and the development and validation of models of computational fluid dynamic (CFD) codes in the frame of the German CFD initiative. The advantage of TOPFLOW consists in the combination of a large scale of the test channels with a wide operational range both of the flow velocities as well as of the system pressures and temperatures plus finally the availability of a special instrumentation that is capable in high spatial and temporal resolving two phase flow phenomena, for example the wire-mesh sensors. (orig.)

  18. On results using automated wideband instrumentation for radar measurements and characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govoni, Mark A.; Dogaru, Traian; Le, Calvin; Sobczak, Kevin

    2017-05-01

    Experiences are shared from a recent radar measurement and characterization effort. A regimented data collection procedure ensures repeatability and provides an expedited alternative to typical narrowband capabilities. Commercially-available instrumentation is repurposed to support wideband data collections spanning a contiguous range of frequencies from 700 MHz to 40 GHz. Utilizing a 4-port network analyzer, both monostatic and quasi-monostatic measurements are achievable. Polarization is varied by way of a custom-designed antenna mount that allows for the mechanical reorientation of the antennas. Computational electromagnetic modeling is briefly introduced and serves in validating the legitimacy of the collection capability. Data products presented will include high-range resolution profiles and inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) imagery.

  19. Texas Instruments TPS7H1101-SP Fast Neutron Irradiation Results

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Texas Instruments’s TPS7H1101-SP is an ultra low drop-out voltage regulator that operates under a wide range of input voltages - 1.5 to 7V. It can operate under a load of at most 3A and is radiation qualified by Texas Instruments for Total Ionizing Dose (TID) effects and Single Event Effects (SEE). For the application of the TPS7H1101-SP on the Front End Boards (FEBs) of the New Small Wheel (NSW) of the ATLAS detector, we study its susceptibility to a third kind of radiation effect -displacement damage- and present its performance in fast neutrons up to a dose of 6 x 10$^{14}$ 1MeVNE/cm$^{2}$.

  20. Instrumentation and First Results of the Reflected Solar Demonstration System for the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCorkel, Joel; Thome, Kurtis; Hair, Jason; McAndrew, Brendan; Jennings, Don; Rabin, Douglas; Daw, Adrian; Lundsford, Allen

    2012-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission key goals include enabling observation of high accuracy long-term climate change trends, use of these observations to test and improve climate forecasts, and calibration of operational and research sensors. The spaceborne instrument suites include a reflected solar spectroradiometer, emitted infrared spectroradiometer, and radio occultation receivers. The requirement for the RS instrument is that derived reflectance must be traceable to Sl standards with an absolute uncertainty of instrument, and presents initial calibration and characterization methods and results. SOLARIS is an Offner spectrometer with two separate focal planes each with its own entrance aperture and grating covering spectral ranges of 320-640, 600-2300 nm over a full field-of-view of 10 degrees with 0.27 milliradian sampling. Results from laboratory measurements including use of integrating spheres, transfer radiometers and spectral standards combined with field-based solar and lunar acquisitions are presented. These results will be used to assess the accuracy and repeatability of the radiometric and spectral characteristics of SOLARIS, which will be presented against the sensor-level requirements addressed in the CLARREO RS instrument error budget.

  1. Cost and results accounting as an instrument for controlling divisions of energy supply companies; Kosten- und Leistungsrechnung als Instrument des Controlling in Unternehmen der Energiewirtschaft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-08-23

    Under the competitive market regime, corporate success of the electric utilities is increasingly determined by the efficiency of cost management and controlling functions. The various cost accounting systems available produce a variety of information of different relevance for the decision-making process in controlling departments. The authors of the article present a comparative analysis of the cost and results accounting systems in terms of their suitability and efficiency for controlling purposes. (orig./CB) [German] Im wettbewerblichen Ordnungsrahmen spielen fuer den unternehmerischen Erfolg der EVU die Leistungsfaehigkeit von Kostenmanagement sowie Controlling eine wesentliche, an Bedeutung gewinnende Rolle. Dabei stellen die verschiedenen, in der betrieblichen Praxis verwendeten Kostenrechnungssysteme in unterschiedlichem Ausmass entscheidungsorientierte Informationen zur aktiven Unterstuetzung von Controlling-Aufgaben bereit. Ausgehend von den sich aus Sicht des Controlling ergebenden Anforderungen an die Kosten- und Leistungsrechnung stellen die Verfasser die einzelnen Kostenrechnungssysteme dar und untersuchen diese hinsichtlich ihrer jeweiligen Verwendbarkeit als Controlling-Instrument. (orig.)

  2. The THU-NAOC Transient Survey: the Performance and the First-year Result

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Tianmeng; Chen, Junchen; Zhang, Jujia; Zhou, Li; Li, Wenxiong; Liu, Qing; Mo, Jun; Zhang, Kaicheng; Yao, Xinyu; Zhao, Xulin; Zhou, Xu; Nie, Jundan; Huang, Fang; Jiang, Zhaoji; Ma, Jun; Wang, Lingzhi; Wu, Chao; Zhou, Zhimin; Zou, Hu; Wang, Lifan

    2014-01-01

    The Tsinghua University-National Astronomical Observatories of China (NAOC) Transient Survey (TNTS) is an automatic survey for a systematic exploration of optical transients (OTs), conducted with a 60/90 cm Schmidt telescope at Xinglong station of NAOC. This survey repeatedly covers ~ 1000 square degrees of the north sky with a cadence of 3-4 days. With an exposure of 60 s, the survey reaches a limited unfiltered magnitude of about 19.5 mag. This enables us to discover supernovae at their relatively young stages. In this paper, we describe the overall performance of our survey during the first year and present some preliminary results.

  3. The Frontier Fields: Survey Design and Initial Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotz, J. M.; Koekemoer, A.; Coe, D.; Grogin, N.; Capak, P.; Mack, J.; Anderson, J.; Avila, R.; Barker, E. A.; Borncamp, D.; Brammer, G.; Durbin, M.; Gunning, H.; Hilbert, B.; Jenkner, H.; Khandrika, H.; Levay, Z.; Lucas, R. A.; MacKenty, J.; Ogaz, S.; Porterfield, B.; Reid, N.; Robberto, M.; Royle, P.; Smith, L. J.; Storrie-Lombardi, L. J.; Sunnquist, B.; Surace, J.; Taylor, D. C.; Williams, R.; Bullock, J.; Dickinson, M.; Finkelstein, S.; Natarajan, P.; Richard, J.; Robertson, B.; Tumlinson, J.; Zitrin, A.; Flanagan, K.; Sembach, K.; Soifer, B. T.; Mountain, M.

    2017-03-01

    What are the faintest distant galaxies we can see with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) now, before the launch of the James Webb Space Telescope? This is the challenge taken up by the Frontier Fields, a Director’s discretionary time campaign with HST and the Spitzer Space Telescope to see deeper into the universe than ever before. The Frontier Fields combines the power of HST and Spitzer with the natural gravitational telescopes of massive high-magnification clusters of galaxies to produce the deepest observations of clusters and their lensed galaxies ever obtained. Six clusters—Abell 2744, MACSJ0416.1-2403, MACSJ0717.5+3745, MACSJ1149.5+2223, Abell S1063, and Abell 370—have been targeted by the HST ACS/WFC and WFC3/IR cameras with coordinated parallel fields for over 840 HST orbits. The parallel fields are the second-deepest observations thus far by HST with 5σ point-source depths of ∼29th ABmag. Galaxies behind the clusters experience typical magnification factors of a few, with small regions magnified by factors of 10–100. Therefore, the Frontier Field cluster HST images achieve intrinsic depths of ∼30–33 mag over very small volumes. Spitzer has obtained over 1000 hr of Director’s discretionary imaging of the Frontier Field cluster and parallels in IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 μm bands to 5σ point-source depths of ∼26.5, 26.0 ABmag. We demonstrate the exceptional sensitivity of the HST Frontier Field images to faint high-redshift galaxies, and review the initial results related to the primary science goals.

  4. Tunka Advanced Instrument for cosmic rays and Gamma Astronomy (TAIGA: Status, results and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuzmichev L.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the current status of high-energy cosmic-ray physics and gamma-ray astronomy at the Tunka Astrophysical Center (AC. This complex is located in the Tunka Valley, about 50 km from Lake Baikal. Present efforts are focused on the construction of the first stage of the gamma-ray observatory TAIGA - the TAIGA prototype. TAIGA (Tunka Advanced Instrument for cosmic ray physics and Gamma Astronomy is designed for the study of gamma rays and charged cosmic rays in the energy range 1013 eV–1018 eV. The array includes a network of wide angle timing Cherenkov stations (TAIGA-HiSCORE, each with a FOV = 0.6 sr, plus up to 16 IACTs (FOV - 10∘× 10∘. This part covers an area of 5 km2. Additional muon detectors (TAIGA-Muon, with a total coverage of 2000 m2, are distributed over an area of 1 km2.

  5. Planck 2015 results. IV. Low Frequency Instrument beams and window functions

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P A R; Ashdown, M; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartolo, N; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bonaldi, A; Bonavera, L; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Bucher, M; Burigana, C; Butler, R C; Calabrese, E; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Chamballu, A; Christensen, P R; Colombi, S; Colombo, L P L; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Ducout, A; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Elsner, F; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Fergusson, J; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Franceschi, E; Frejsel, A; Galeotta, S; Galli, S; Ganga, K; Giard, M; Giraud-Héraud, Y; Gjerløw, E; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Hansen, F K; Hanson, D; Harrison, D L; Henrot-Versillé, S; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hornstrup, A; Hovest, W; Huffenberger, K M; Hurier, G; Jaffe, A H; Jaffe, T R; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kiiveri, K; Kisner, T S; Knoche, J; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lähteenmäki, A; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Lattanzi, M; Lawrence, C R; Leahy, J P; Leonardi, R; Lesgourgues, J; Levrier, F; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; Lindholm, V; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maggio, G; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Mangilli, A; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Mazzotta, P; McGehee, P; Meinhold, P R; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Mitra, S; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Moss, A; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Netterfield, C B; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Paci, F; Pagano, L; Paoletti, D; Partridge, B; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Pearson, T J; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Pettorino, V; Piacentini, F; Pierpaoli, E; Pietrobon, D; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Pratt, G W; Prézeau, G; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renzi, A; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Rossetti, M; Roudier, G; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Santos, D; Savelainen, M; Scott, D; Seiffert, M D; Shellard, E P S; Spencer, L D; Stolyarov, V; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Tuovinen, J; Umana, G; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vassallo, T; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Watson, R; Wehus, I K; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the characterization of the in-flight beams, the beam window functions, and the associated uncertainties for the Planck Low Frequency Instrument (LFI). The structure of the paper is similar to that presented in the 2013 Planck release; the main differences concern the beam normalization and the delivery of the window functions to be used for polarization analysis. The in-flight assessment of the LFI main beams relies on measurements performed during observations of Jupiter. By stacking data from seven Jupiter transits, the main beam profiles are measured down to -25 dB at 30 and 44 GHz, and down to -30 dB at 70 GHz. The agreement between the simulated beams and the measured beams is confirmed to be better than 1% at each LFI frequency band (within the 20 dB contour from the peak, the rms values are: 0.1% at 30 and 70 GHz; 0.2% at 44 GHz). Simulated polarized beams are used for the computation of the effective beam window functions. The error budget for the window functions is estimated fro...

  6. New Observations of Balmer Continuum Flux in Solar Flares, Instrument Description and First Results

    CERN Document Server

    Kotrč, P; Heinzel, P

    2016-01-01

    Increase in the Balmer continuum radiation during solar flares was predicted by various authors but never firmly confirmed observationally using ground-based slit spectrographs. Here we describe a new post-focal instrument - Image Selector - enabling to measure the Balmer continuum flux from the whole flare area, in analogy of successful detections of flaring dMe stars. The system was developed and put into operation at the horizontal solar telescope HSFA-2 of the Ond\\v{r}ejov Observatory. We measure the total flux by a fast spectrometer from a limited but well defined region on the solar disk. Using a system of diaphragms, the disturbing contribution of a bright solar disk can be eliminated as much as possible. Light curves of the measured flux in the spectral range 350 - 440 nm are processed, together with the H{\\alpha} images of the flaring area delimited by the appropriate diaphragm. The spectral flux data are flat-fielded, calibrated and processed to be compared with model predictions. Our analysis of th...

  7. Planck 2013 results. IV. Low Frequency Instrument beams and window functions

    CERN Document Server

    Aghanim, N; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Atrio-Barandela, F; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bobin, J; Bock, J J; Bonaldi, A; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Bridges, M; Bucher, M; Burigana, C; Butler, R C; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Chamballu, A; Chiang, L -Y; Christensen, P R; Church, S; Colombi, S; Colombo, L P L; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Franceschi, E; Gaier, T C; Galeotta, S; Ganga, K; Giard, M; Giraud-Héraud, Y; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Hansen, F K; Hanson, D; Harrison, D; Henrot-Versillé, S; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hornstrup, A; Hovest, W; Huffenberger, K M; Jaffe, T R; Jaffe, A H; Jewell, J; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Kangaslahti, P; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kiiveri, K; Kisner, T S; Knoche, J; Knox, L; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lähteenmäki, A; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Laureijs, R J; Lawrence, C R; Leahy, J P; Leonardi, R; Lesgourgues, J; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Lindholm, V; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Maris, M; Marshall, D J; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Matthai, F; Mazzotta, P; Meinhold, P R; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Mitra, S; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Moss, A; Munshi, D; Naselsky, P; Natoli, P; Netterfield, C B; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; O'Dwyer, I J; Osborne, S; Paci, F; Pagano, L; Paoletti, D; Partridge, B; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Pierpaoli, E; Pietrobon, D; Plaszczynski, S; Platania, P; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Popa, L; Poutanen, T; Pratt, G W; Prézeau, G; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Ricciardi, S; Riller, T; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Roudier, G; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Santos, D; Scott, D; Seiffert, M D; Shellard, E P S; Spencer, L D; Starck, J -L; Stolyarov, V; Stompor, R; Sureau, F; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Tavagnacco, D; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Tuovinen, J; Türler, M; Umana, G; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Varis, J; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Vittorio, N; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the characterization of the in-flight beams, the beam window functions and the associated uncertainties for the Planck Low Frequency Instrument (LFI). Knowledge of the beam profiles is necessary for determining the transfer function to go from the observed to the actual sky anisotropy power spectrum. The main beam distortions affect the beam window function, complicating the reconstruction of the anisotropy power spectrum at high multipoles, whereas the sidelobes affect the low and intermediate multipoles. The in-flight assessment of the LFI main beams relies on the measurements performed during Jupiter observations. By stacking the data from multiple Jupiter transits, the main beam profiles are measured down to -20 dB at 30 and 44 GHz, and down to -25 dB at 70 GHz. The main beam solid angles are determined to better than 0.2% at each LFI frequency band. The Planck pre-launch optical model is conveniently tuned to characterize the main beams independently of any noise effects. This approac...

  8. Italian panoramic monochromator for the THEMIS telescope: the first results and instrument evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallini, Fabio; Berrilli, Francesco; Caccin, Bruno; Cantarano, Sergio; Ceppatelli, Guido; Egidi, Alberto; Righini, Alberto

    1998-07-01

    We briefly describe the design and the characteristics of the Italian Panoramic Monochromator installed at the focal plane of the THEMIS telescope built in Izana by a joint venture of the French and Italian National Research Councils. The Panoramic Monochromator substantially is a narrow band filter (approximately equals 22 mAngstrom bandwidth) tunable on the visible spectrum for quasi simultaneous bidimensional spectrometry of the solar atmosphere. The narrow bandwidth is obtained by using a non standard birefringent filter and a Fabry Perot interferometer mounted in series. This assembly has the advantage of the spectral purity of one channel of the Fabry Perot interferometer and a very large free spectral range. Moreover the spectral stability depends on the interferometer, the environment of which may be carefully controlled. The design of this instrument is not really new, but, only now it has been possible to build it thanks to the development of servo controlled Fabry Perot interferometers, which are stable in time and may easily be tuned. The system seems to perform well. It is stable in wavelength and the spectral pass band and stray light are within the expected values, as it may be deduced by very preliminary tests performed at the THEMIS Telescope and in Arcetri (Firenze) at the 'G. B. Donati' solar tower.

  9. Planck early results: first assessment of the High Frequency Instrument in-flight performance

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P A R; Ansari, R; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Aumont, J; Banday, A J; Bartelmann, M; Bartlett, J G; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benot, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bhatia, R; Bock, J J; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Boulanger, F; Bradshaw, T; Brelle, E; Bucher, M; Camus, P; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Challinor, A; Chamballu, A; Charra, J; Charra, M; Chary, R -R; Chiang, C; Church, S; Clements, D L; Colombi, S; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Cressiot, C; Crill, B P; Crook, M; de Bernardis, P; Delabrouille, J; Delouis, J -M; Désert, F -X; Dolag, K; Dole, H; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Efstathiou, G; Eng, P; Filliard, C; Forni, O; Fosalba, P; Fourmond, J -J; Ganga, K; Giard, M; Girard, D; Giraud-Héraud, Y; Gispert, R; Gorski, K M; Gratton, S; Griffin, M; Guyot, G; Haissinski, J; Harrison, D; Helou, G; Henrot-Versillé, S; Hernandez-Monteagudo, C; Hildebrandt, S R; Hills, R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Huenberger, K M; Jae, A H; Jones, W C; Kaplan, J; Kneissl, R; Knox, L; Lagache, G; Lamarre, J -M; Lami, P; Lange, A E; Lasenby, A; Lavabre, A; Lawrence, C R; Leriche, B; Leroy, C; Macas-Perez, Y Longval25) J F; Maciaszek, T; MacTavish, C J; Maei, B; Mandolesi, N; Mann, R; Mansoux, B; Masi, S; Matsumura, T; McGehee, P; Melin, J -B; Mercier, C; Miville-Deschnes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Mortlock, D; Murphy, A; Nati, F; Nettereld, C B; Norgaard-Nielsen, H U; North, C; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Osborne, S; Paine, C; Pajot, F; Patanchon, G; Peacocke, T; Pearson, T J; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Pons, R; Ponthieu, N; Prezeau, G; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Reach, W T; Renault, C; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Roudier, G; Rowan-Robinson, M; Rusholme, B; Santos, D; Savini, G; Schaefer, B M; Shellard, P; Spencer, L; Starck, J -L; Stassi, P; Stolyarov, V; Stompor, R; Sudiwala, R; Sunyaev, R; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Thum, C; Torre, J -P; Touze, F; Tristram, M; Van Leeuwen, F; Vibert, L; Vibert, D; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; White, S D M; Wiesemeyer, H; Woodcraft, A; Yurchenko, V; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A

    2011-01-01

    The Planck High Frequency Instrument (HFI) is designed to measure the temperature and polarization anisotropies of the Cosmic Microwave Background and galactic foregrounds in six wide bands centered at 100, 143, 217, 353, 545 and 857 GHz at an angular resolution of 10' (100 GHz), 7' (143 GHz), and 5' (217 GHz and higher). HFI has been operating flawlessly since launch on 14 May 2009. The bolometers cooled to 100 mK as planned. The settings of the readout electronics, such as the bolometer bias current, that optimize HFI's noise performance on orbit are nearly the same as the ones chosen during ground testing. Observations of Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn verified both the optical system and the time response of the detection chains. The optical beams are close to predictions from physical optics modeling. The time response of the detection chains is close to pre-launch measurements. The detectors suffer from an unexpected high flux of cosmic rays related to low solar activity. Due to the redundancy of Planck's ob...

  10. Planck 2015 results. IV. Low Frequency Instrument beams and window functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Christensen, P. R.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fergusson, J.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kisner, T. S.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vassallo, T.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Watson, R.; Wehus, I. K.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents the characterization of the in-flight beams, the beam window functions, and the associated uncertainties for the Planck Low Frequency Instrument (LFI). The structure of the paper is similar to that presented in the 2013 Planck release; the main differences concern the beam normalization and the delivery of the window functions to be used for polarization analysis. The in-flight assessment of the LFI main beams relies on measurements performed during observations of Jupiter. By stacking data from seven Jupiter transits, the main beam profiles are measured down to -25 dB at 30 and 44 GHz, and down to -30 dB at 70 GHz. It has been confirmed that the agreement between the simulated beams and the measured beams is better than 1% at each LFI frequency band (within the 20 dB contour from the peak, the rms values are 0.1% at 30 and 70 GHz; 0.2% at 44 GHz). Simulated polarized beams are used for the computation of the effective beam window functions. The error budget for the window functions is estimated from both main beam and sidelobe contributions, and accounts for the radiometer band shapes. The total uncertainties in the effective beam window functions are 0.7% and 1% at 30 and 44 GHz, respectively (at ℓ ≈ 600); and 0.5% at 70 GHz (at ℓ ≈ 1000).

  11. Lessons learnt and results from the first survey of transiting exoplanet atmospheres using a multi-object spectrograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desert, Jean-Michel

    2015-12-01

    We present results from the first comprehensive survey program dedicated to probing transiting exoplanet atmospheres using transmission spectroscopy with a multi-object spectrograph (MOS). Our three-year survey focused on nine close-in giant planets for which the wavelength dependent transit depths in the visible were measured with Gemini/GMOS. In total, about 40 transits (200 hours) have been secured, with each exoplanet observed on average during four transits. This approach allows for a high spectrophotometric precision (200-500 ppm / 10 nm) and for a unique and reliable estimate of systematic uncertainties. We present the main results from this survey, the challenges faced by such an experiment, and the lessons learnt for future MOS observations and instrument designs. We show that the precision achieved by this survey permits us to distinguish hazy atmospheres from cloud-free scenarios. We lay out the challenges that are in front of us whilst preparing future atmospheric reconnaissance of habitable worlds with multi-object spectrographs.

  12. Market assessment for active solar heating and cooling products. Category B: A survey of decision makers in the HVAC market place. Survey instruments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lilien, G. L.; Johnston, P. E.

    1980-09-01

    Telephone screener questionnaires and mail-out questionnaires for marketing surveys for solar heating and cooling equipment are presented. Questionnaires are included for the residential segment, industrial segment, HVAC professionals segment, builder/developer segment, and the commercial segment. No results are reported. (WHK)

  13. Student Engagement in Law School: Enhancing Student Learning. Annual Survey Results, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law School Survey of Student Engagement, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Law School Survey of Student Engagement (LSSSE) focuses on activities that affect learning in law school. The results in this year's survey show how law students use their time, what they think about their legal training, and what law schools can do to improve engagement and learning. The selected results reported in this study are based on…

  14. Results of instrumented posterolateral fusion in treatment of lumbar spondylolisthesis with and without segmental kyphosis: A retrospective investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szu-Yuan Chen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Treatment by posterolateral fusion (PLF with pedicle-screw instrumentation can be unsuccessful in one-segment and low-grade lumbar spondylolisthesis. Segmental kyphosis, either rigid or dynamic, was hypothesized to be one of the factors interfering with the fusion results. Methods: From 2004 to 2005, 239 patients with single-segment and low-grade spondylolisthesis were recruited and divided into two groups: Group 1 consisting of 129 patients without segmental kyphosis and group 2 consisting of 110 patients with segmental kyphosis. All patients underwent instrumented PLF at the same medical institute, and the average follow-up period was 31 ± 19 months. We obtained plain radiographs of the lumbosacral spine with the anteroposterior view, the lateral view, and the dynamic flexion-extension views before the operation and during the follow-ups. The results of PLF in the two groups were then compared. Results: There was no significant difference in the demographic data of the two groups, except for gender distribution. The osseous fusion rates were 90.7% in group 1 and 68.2% in group 2 (p < 0.001. Conclusion: Instrumented PLF resulted in significantly higher osseous fusion rate in patients without segmental kyphosis than in the patients with segmental kyphosis. For the patients with sagittal imbalance, such as rigid or dynamic kyphosis, pedicle-screw fixation cannot ensure successful PLF. Interbody fusion by the posterior lumbar interbody fusion or transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion technique might help overcome this problem.

  15. Survey Questionnaire on Environmental Management Practices: Summary of Results by Industry and practices

    OpenAIRE

    Delmas, Magali A; Michael W. Toffel

    2008-01-01

    This document provides a summary of the results of a survey on Environmental Management Practices (EMP) conducted by the University of California at Santa Barbara during October and November 2003. The survey was sent to 3255 facilities in 8 industrial sectors: pulp, paper and paperboard mills, chemical and allied products, refining, primary metals, machinery, electronics /electrical, automotive, and utilities. The survey yielded 562 responses, which constitutes a 17.2% response rate. This sum...

  16. Patient experience and satisfaction with inpatient service: development of short form survey instrument measuring the core aspect of inpatient experience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliza L Y Wong

    Full Text Available Patient experience reflects quality of care from the patients' perspective; therefore, patients' experiences are important data in the evaluation of the quality of health services. The development of an abbreviated, reliable and valid instrument for measuring inpatients' experience would reflect the key aspect of inpatient care from patients' perspective as well as facilitate quality improvement by cultivating patient engagement and allow the trends in patient satisfaction and experience to be measured regularly. The study developed a short-form inpatient instrument and tested its ability to capture a core set of inpatients' experiences. The Hong Kong Inpatient Experience Questionnaire (HKIEQ was established in 2010; it is an adaptation of the General Inpatient Questionnaire of the Care Quality Commission created by the Picker Institute in United Kingdom. This study used a consensus conference and a cross-sectional validation survey to create and validate a short-form of the Hong Kong Inpatient Experience Questionnaire (SF-HKIEQ. The short-form, the SF-HKIEQ, consisted of 18 items derived from the HKIEQ. The 18 items mainly covered relational aspects of care under four dimensions of the patient's journey: hospital staff, patient care and treatment, information on leaving the hospital, and overall impression. The SF-HKIEQ had a high degree of face validity, construct validity and internal reliability. The validated SF-HKIEQ reflects the relevant core aspects of inpatients' experience in a hospital setting. It provides a quick reference tool for quality improvement purposes and a platform that allows both healthcare staff and patients to monitor the quality of hospital care over time.

  17. Effect of survey instrument on participation in a follow-up study: a randomization study of a mailed questionnaire versus a computer-assisted telephone interview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocheleau Carissa M

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many epidemiological and public health surveys report increasing difficulty obtaining high participation rates. We conducted a pilot follow-up study to determine whether a mailed or telephone survey would better facilitate data collection in a subset of respondents to an earlier telephone survey conducted as part of the National Birth Defects Prevention Study. Methods We randomly assigned 392 eligible mothers to receive a self-administered, mailed questionnaire (MQ or a computer-assisted telephone interview (CATI using similar recruitment protocols. If mothers gave permission to contact the fathers, fathers were recruited to complete the same instrument (MQ or CATI as mothers. Results Mothers contacted for the MQ, within all demographic strata examined, were more likely to participate than those contacted for the CATI (86.6% vs. 70.6%. The median response time for mothers completing the MQ was 17 days, compared to 29 days for mothers completing the CATI. Mothers completing the MQ also required fewer reminder calls or letters to finish participation versus those assigned to the CATI (median 3 versus 6, though they were less likely to give permission to contact the father (75.0% vs. 85.8%. Fathers contacted for the MQ, however, had higher participation compared to fathers contacted for the CATI (85.2% vs. 54.5%. Fathers recruited to the MQ also had a shorter response time (median 17 days and required fewer reminder calls and letters (median 3 reminders than those completing the CATI (medians 28 days and 6 reminders. Conclusions We concluded that offering a MQ substantially improved participation rates and reduced recruitment effort compared to a CATI in this study. While a CATI has the advantage of being able to clarify answers to complex questions or eligibility requirements, our experience suggests that a MQ might be a good survey option for some studies.

  18. MicroCameras and Photometers (MCP) instrument on board TARANIS satellite: scientific objectives, design, characterization results and products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farges, T.; Hébert, P.; Le Mer-Dachard, F.; Cansot, E.; Offroy, M.; Ravel, K.; Gaillac, S.; Sato, M.; Blanc, E.

    2015-12-01

    TARANIS (Tool for the Analysis of Radiations from lightNings and Sprites) is a CNES micro satellite. Its main objective is to study impulsive transfers of energy between the Earth atmosphere and the space environment. It will be sun-synchronous at an altitude of 700 km. It will be launched from late 2017 for at least 2 years. Its payload is composed of several electromagnetic instruments in different wavelengths (from gamma-rays to radio waves including optical). TARANIS instruments are currently in calibration and qualification phase. The purpose of this poster is to present the MicroCameras and Photometers (MCP) scientific objectives and the sensor design, to show the performances of this instrument using the recent characterization, and at last to promote its products. The MicroCameras, developed by Sodern, are dedicated to the spatial description of TLEs and their parent lightning. They are able to differentiate sprite and lightning thanks to two narrow bands ([757-767 nm] and [772-782 nm]) that provide simultaneous pairs of images of an Event. The calibration results will be detailed. Simulation results of the differentiation method will be shown. Photometers, developed by Bertin Technologies, will provide temporal measurements and spectral characteristics of TLEs and lightning. It is a key instrument because of its on-board detection of the TLEs which can trigger the whole payload. Photometers use four spectral bands in the [170-260 nm], [332-342 nm], [757-767 nm] and [600-900 nm] and have the same field of view as cameras. The calibration results will also be detailed. The on-board TLE detection algorithm remote-controlled parameters will be tuned before launch using the electronic board and simulated or real events waveforms. Automatic classification tools are now tested to produce for the Scientific Mission Center some lists of elves, sprites or lightning without TLE following the recent work of Offroy et al. [2015] using ISUAL spectrophotometer data.

  19. Measuring professionalism in medicine and nursing: results of a European survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiki M J M H Lombarts

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leveraging professionalism has been put forward as a strategy to drive improvement of patient care. We investigate professionalism as a factor influencing the uptake of quality improvement activities by physicians and nurses working in European hospitals. OBJECTIVE: To (i investigate the reliability and validity of data yielded by using the self-developed professionalism measurement tool for physicians and nurses, (ii describe their levels of professionalism displayed, and (iii quantify the extent to which professional attitudes would predict professional behaviors. METHODS AND MATERIALS: We designed and deployed survey instruments amongst 5920 physicians and nurses working in European hospitals. This was conducted under the cross-sectional multilevel study "Deepening Our Understanding of Quality Improvement in Europe" (DUQuE. We used psychometric and generalized linear mixed modelling techniques to address the aforementioned objectives. RESULTS: In all, 2067 (response rate 69.8% physicians and 2805 nurses (94.8% representing 74 hospitals in 7 European countries participated. The professionalism instrument revealed five subscales of professional attitude and one scale for professional behaviour with moderate to high internal consistency and reliability. Physicians and nurses display equally high professional attitude sum scores (11.8 and 11.9 respectively out of 16 but seem to have different perceptions towards separate professionalism aspects. Lastly, professionals displaying higher levels of professional attitudes were more involved in quality improvement actions (physicians: b = 0.019, P<0.0001; nurses: b = 0.016, P<0.0001 and more inclined to report colleagues' underperformance (physicians--odds ratio (OR 1.12, 95% CI 1.01-1.24; nurses - OR 1.11, 95% CI 1.01-1.23 or medical errors (physicians--OR 1.14, 95% CI 1.01-1.23; nurses - OR 1.43, 95% CI 1.22-1.67. Involvement in QI actions was found to increase the odds of

  20. Deployment of ITS: A Summary of the 2010 National Survey Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, Stephen Reed [ORNL; Trombly, Jeff [Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), Oak Ridge, TN

    2011-08-01

    This report presents summary results of the 2010 ITS Deployment Tracking survey, the most recent survey conducted by the ITS Deployment Tracking Project. The U.S. Department of Transportation and its member agencies, including the Research and Innovative Technology Administration, have pursued a research and development agenda, the Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) Program, designed to integrate the latest in information technologies to improve the safety, mobility, and reliability of surface transportation modes. Within metropolitan areas, implementation of these advanced technologies has been accomplished by a variety of state and local transportation and emergency management agencies as well as the private sector. In order to measure the rate of ITS deployment within the nation s largest metropolitan areas, the ITS Deployment Tracking Project has conducted a nationwide survey of state and local transportation and emergency management agencies nearly every year since 1997. The results presented in this report are intended to be a summary of the entire database from the 2010 survey. Access to the complete survey results and previous national surveys are available on-line at http://www.itsdeployment.its.dot.gov. The website also provides access to survey results in the form of downloadable reports, including a survey summary for each survey type and fact sheets. Nearly 1,600 surveys were distributed to state and local transportation agencies in 2010. A total of seven (7) survey types were distributed including: Freeway Management, Arterial Management, Transit Management, Transportation Management Center (TMC), Electronic Toll Collection (ETC), Public Safety Law Enforcement, and Public Safety Fire/Rescue. Among other things, the data collection results indicate that ITS has moved from being experimental to mainstream and interest in continuing investments in ITS continues to be very strong. When asked about future deployment plans, one-third to three

  1. Development and testing of the Survey of Family Environment (SFE): a novel instrument to measure family functioning and needs for family support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohashi, Naohiro; Honda, Junko

    2012-01-01

    Hohashi's Concentric Sphere Family Environment Model (CSFEM; Hohashi & Honda, 2011) is a newly proposed family nursing theory for holistically understanding the family environment that acts on family well-being. The purpose of this article is to develop and psychometrically test the Japanese version of the Survey of Family Environment (SFE-J), grounded in the CSFEM, for measuring family's perceived family functioning and family's perceived needs for family support. The SFE-J is a 30-item self-administered instrument that assesses five domains (suprasystem, macrosystem, microsystem, family internal environment system, and chronosystem) and has been subjected to rigorous reliability and validity investigations among paired partners in child-rearing families (N of family = 1,990). Internal consistency reliability was high as measured by Cronbach's alpha coefficients. Temporal stability over a 2-week interval was supported by high (substantial or perfect) and significant intraclass correlation coefficients. The total score for the SFE-J was significantly correlated with the Japanese version of the Feetham Family Functioning Survey (FFFS-J), indicating an acceptable concurrent validity. Construct validity was supported by a confirmatory factor analysis that evaluated the five-factor structure to measure the concept of CSFEM. Results also demonstrate that the SFE-J family functioning scores show no significant differences between paired partners. The SFE-J is a reliable and valid instrument to assess not only intrafamily functioning but also interfamily functioning and, by identifying items/domains with high requirements for family support, serves to facilitate the providing of appropriate support to families.

  2. Social Media Use of Cooperative Extension Family Economics Educators: Online Survey Results and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Barbara; Zumwalt, Andrew; Bechman, Janet

    2011-01-01

    This article describes results of an online survey conducted by the eXtension Financial Security for All (FSA) Community of Practice (CoP) to determine the social media capacity and activity of its members. The survey was conducted to inform two subsequent FSA CoP programs: an archived webinar on social media programs and impact evaluation methods…

  3. OECD Skills Outlook 2013: First Results from the Survey of Adult Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    OECD Publishing, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This first "OECD Skills Outlook" presents the initial results of the Survey of Adult Skills (PIAAC), which evaluates the skills of adults in 22 OECD member countries and two partner countries. The PIAAC survey was designed to provide insights into the availability of some key skills and how they are used at work and at home through the…

  4. Educational Psychology in New Zealand: Results of the 2006 International School Psychology Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimerson, Shane R.; Annan, Jean; Skokut, Mary; Renshaw, Tyler L.

    2009-01-01

    The International School Psychology Survey (ISPS) was used to gather information about New Zealand educational psychologists' characteristics, training, roles, activities, preferences, research interests and the challenges they experienced in their work. The results of this survey were considered in relation to the social and cultural context of…

  5. User Needs in Green ITS: Results of a Questionnaire Survey and Proposal for Green ITS Design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Man, W.Y.; Bie, J.; Van Arem, B.

    2012-01-01

    An internet survey has been conducted among drivers in the Netherlands and Japan to study their attitude towards Green ITS. The survey focuses on driving behavior and ITS experience, attitude towards environment, and Green ITS preferences. The results show that money-related information gives the mo

  6. Social Media Use of Cooperative Extension Family Economics Educators: Online Survey Results and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Barbara; Zumwalt, Andrew; Bechman, Janet

    2011-01-01

    This article describes results of an online survey conducted by the eXtension Financial Security for All (FSA) Community of Practice (CoP) to determine the social media capacity and activity of its members. The survey was conducted to inform two subsequent FSA CoP programs: an archived webinar on social media programs and impact evaluation methods…

  7. Teaching Non-Beginner Programmers with App Inventor: Survey Results and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Andrey; Martin, Nancy L.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a survey with 40 students enrolled in an Android Application Development course offered during the spring semester of 2013 and 2014. The course used App Inventor to build the apps and required students to have an introduction to programming course as a prerequisite. The survey asked for demographic information and…

  8. Results of the 1985 membership survey of the 'Vereniging Ziekte Van von Recklinghausen Nederland'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinebach, M

    1988-01-01

    The Vereniging Ziekte Van von Recklinghausen Nederland (VZRN) is a lay organization in The Netherlands dedicated to the dissemination of neurofibromatosis-related information to patients and their families, medical professionals, and the community at large. In 1985, a survey of the membership of the VZRN was conducted. This report presents the results of that survey.

  9. Student Engagement in Law School: In Class and Beyond. Annual Survey Results, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law School Survey of Student Engagement, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The Law School Survey of Student Engagement (LSSSE) focuses on activities related to effective learning in law school. The results of this year's survey show how law students use their time and what they think about their legal education experience, while simultaneously providing guidance to law schools seeking to improve engagement and learning.…

  10. Quality of Academic Advising at UNO: Results of Student and Faculty Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ESS Reports, 1988

    1988-01-01

    This report presents the results of a student/faculty survey on the academic advising process at the University of Nebraska at Omaha, and highlights issues in improving the advising process. The survey included 195 recent graduates, 269 existing students, and 207 faculty and professional advisors. The study found that 70.8% of students were…

  11. The integration of similar clinical research data collection instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Dorothy B; Frawley, Sandra J; Shifman, Mark A; Miller, Perry L; Brandt, Cynthia

    2003-01-01

    We devised an algorithm for integrating similar clinical research data collection instruments to create a common measurement instrument. We tested this algorithm using questions from several similar surveys. We encountered differing levels of granularity among questions and responses across surveys resulting in either the loss of granularity or data. This algorithm may make survey integration more systematic and efficient.

  12. Uncertainty of Blood Alcohol Concentration (BAC Results as Related to Instrumental Conditions: Optimization and Robustness of BAC Analysis Headspace Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haleigh A. Boswell

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of blood alcohol concentration is a routine analysis performed in many forensic laboratories. This analysis commonly utilizes static headspace sampling, followed by gas chromatography combined with flame ionization detection (GC-FID. Studies have shown several “optimal” methods for instrumental operating conditions, which are intended to yield accurate and precise data. Given that different instruments, sampling methods, application specific columns and parameters are often utilized, it is much less common to find information on the robustness of these reported conditions. A major problem can arise when these “optimal” conditions may not also be robust, thus producing data with higher than desired uncertainty or potentially inaccurate results. The goal of this research was to incorporate the principles of quality by design (QBD in the adjustment and determination of BAC (blood alcohol concentration instrumental headspace parameters, thereby ensuring that minor instrumental variations, which occur as a matter of normal work, do not appreciably affect the final results of this analysis. This study discusses both the QBD principles as well as the results of the experiments, which allow for determination of more favorable instrumental headspace conditions. Additionally, method detection limits will also be reported in order to determine a reporting threshold and the degree of uncertainty at the common threshold value of 0.08 g/dL. Furthermore, the comparison of two internal standards, n-propanol and t-butanol, will be investigated. The study showed that an altered parameter of 85 °C headspace oven temperature and 15 psi headspace vial pressurization produces the lowest percent relative standard deviation of 1.3% when t-butanol is implemented as an internal standard, at least for one very common platform. The study also showed that an altered parameter of 100 °C headspace oven temperature and 15-psi headspace vial pressurization

  13. How neuroscience is taught to North American dental students: results of the Basic Science Survey Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Douglas J; Clarkson, Mackenzie J; Hutchins, Bob; Lambert, H Wayne

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine how North American dental students are taught neuroscience during their preclinical dental education. This survey represents one part of a larger research project, the Basic Science Survey Series for Dentistry, which covers all of the biomedical science coursework required of preclinical students in North American dental schools. Members of the Section on Anatomical Sciences of the American Dental Education Association assembled, distributed, and analyzed the neuroscience survey, which had a 98.5 percent response from course directors of the sixty-seven North American dental schools. The eighteen-item instrument collected demographic data on the course directors, information on the content in each course, and information on how neuroscience content is presented. Findings indicate that 1) most neuroscience instruction is conducted by non-dental school faculty members; 2) large content variability exists between programs; and 3) an increase in didactic instruction, integrated curricula, and use of computer-aided instruction is occurring. It is anticipated that the information derived from the survey will help guide neuroscience curricula in dental schools and aid in identifying appropriate content.

  14. The HIA instrument on board the Tan Ce 1 Double Star near-equatorial spacecraft and its first results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Rème

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available On 29 December 2003, the Chinese spacecraft Tan Ce 1 (TC-1, the first component of the Double Star mission, was successfully launched within a low-latitude eccentric orbit. In the framework of the scientific cooperation between the Academy of Sciences of China and ESA, several European instruments, identical to those developed for the Cluster spacecraft, were installed on board this spacecraft.

    The HIA (Hot Ion Analyzer instrument on board the TC-1 spacecraft is an ion spectrometer nearly identical to the HIA sensor of the CIS instrument on board the 4 Cluster spacecraft. This instrument has been specially adapted for TC-1. It measures the 3-D distribution functions of the ions between 5 eV/q and 32 keV/q without mass discrimination.

    TC-1 is like a fifth Cluster spacecraft to study the interaction of the solar wind with the magnetosphere and to study geomagnetic storms and magnetospheric substorms in the near equatorial plane.

    HIA was commissioned in February 2004. Due to the 2 RE higher apogee than expected, some in-flight improvements were needed in order to use HIA in the solar wind in the initial phase of the mission. Since this period HIA has obtained very good measurements in the solar wind, the magnetosheath, the dayside and nightside plasma sheet, the ring current and the radiation belts. We present here the first results in the different regions of the magnetosphere and in the solar wind. Some of them are very new and include, for example, ion dispersion structures in the bow shock and ion beams close to the magnetopause. The huge interest in the orbit of TC-1 is strongly demonstrated.

  15. Airborne In-Situ Measurements of Formaldehyde Over California: First Results from the Compact Formaldehyde Fluorescence Experiment (COFFEE) Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero, Josette Elizabeth; Saint Clair, Jason; Yates, Emma L.; Gore, Warren; Swanson, Andrew K.; Iraci, Laura T.; Hanisco, Thomas F.

    2016-01-01

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) is one of the most abundant oxygenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere, playing a role multiple atmospheric processes. Measurements of HCHO can be used to help quantify convective transport, the abundance of VOCs, and ozone production in urban environments. The Compact Formaldehyde FluorescencE Experiment (COFFEE) instrument uses Non-Resonant Laser Induced Fluorescence (NR-LIF) to detect trace concentrations of HCHO as part of the Alpha Jet Atmospheric eXperiment (AJAX) payload. Developed at NASA GSFC, COFFEE is a small, low maintenance instrument with a sensitivity of 100 pptv and a quick response time (1 sec). The COFFEE instrument has been customized to fit in an external wing pod on the Alpha Jet aircraft based at NASA ARC. The instrument can operate over a broad range of altitudes, from boundary layer to lower stratosphere, making it well suited for the Alpha Jet, which can access altitudes from the surface up to 40,000 ft. Results of the first COFFEE science flights preformed over the California's Central Valley will be presented. Boundary layer measurements and vertical profiles in the tropospheric column will both be included. This region is of particular interest, due to its elevated levels of HCHO, revealed in satellite images, as well as its high ozone concentrations. In addition to HCHO, the AJAX payload includes measurements of atmospheric ozone, methane, and carbon dioxide. Formaldehyde is one of the few urban pollutants that can be measured from space. Plans to compare in-situ COFFEE data with satellite-based HCHO observations such as those from OMI (Aura) and OMPS (SuomiNPP) will also be presented.

  16. The Huygens Atmospheric Structure Instrument (HASI): Expected Results at Titan and Performance Verification in Terrestrial Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, F.; Fulchignoni, M.; Colombatti, G.; Stoppato, P. F. Lion; Zarnecki, J. C.; Harri, A. M.; Schwingenschuh, K.; Hamelin, M.; Flamini, E.; Bianchini, G.; Angrilli, F.

    2005-01-01

    The Huygens ASI is a multi-sensor package resulting from an international cooperation, it has been designed to measure the physical quantities characterizing Titan's atmosphere during the Huygens probe mission. On 14th January, 2005, HASI will measure acceleration, pressure, temperature and electrical properties all along the Huygens probe descent on Titan in order to study Titan s atmospheric structure, dynamics and electric properties. Monitoring axial and normal accelerations and providing direct pressure and temperature measurements during the descent, HASI will mainly contribute to the Huygens probe entry and trajectory reconstruction. In order to simulate the Huygens probe descent and verify HASI sensors performance in terrestrial environment, stratospheric balloon flight experiment campaigns have been performed, in collaboration with the Italian Space Agency (ASI). The results of flight experiments have allowed to determine the atmospheric vertical profiles and to obtain a set of data for the analysis of probe trajectory and attitude reconstruction.

  17. Infrared Thermography for Monitoring of Freeze-Drying Processes: Instrumental Developments and Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emteborg, Håkan; Zeleny, Reinhard; Charoud-Got, Jean; Martos, Gustavo; Lüddeke, Jörg; Schellin, Holger; Teipel, Katharina

    2014-01-01

    Coupling an infrared (IR) camera to a freeze dryer for on-line monitoring of freeze-drying cycles is described for the first time. Normally, product temperature is measured using a few invasive Pt-100 probes, resulting in poor spatial resolution. To overcome this, an IR camera was placed on a process-scale freeze dryer. Imaging took place every 120 s through a Germanium window comprising 30,000 measurement points obtained contact-free from −40°C to 25°C. Results are presented for an empty system, bulk drying of cheese slurry, and drying of 1 mL human serum in 150 vials. During freezing of the empty system, differences of more than 5°C were measured on the shelf. Adding a tray to the empty system, a difference of more than 8°C was observed. These temperature differences probably cause different ice structures affecting the drying speed during sublimation. A temperature difference of maximum 13°C was observed in bulk mode during sublimation. When drying in vials, differences of more than 10°C were observed. Gradually, the large temperature differences disappeared during secondary drying and products were transformed into uniformly dry cakes. The experimental data show that the IR camera is a highly versatile on-line monitoring tool for different kinds of freeze-drying processes. © 2014 European Union 103:2088–2097, 2014 PMID:24902839

  18. The PRL Stabilized High Resolution Echelle Fiber-fed Spectrograph: Instrument Description & First Radial Velocity Results

    CERN Document Server

    Chakraborty, Abhijit; Roy, Arpita; Dixit, Vaibhav; Richardson, Eric Harvey; Dongre, Varun; Pathan, F M; Chaturvedi, Priyanka; Shah, Vishal; Ubale, Girish P; Anandarao, B G

    2013-01-01

    We present spectrograph design details and initial radial velocity results from the PRL optical fiber-fed high-resolution cross-dispersed echelle spectrograph (PARAS), which has recently been commissioned at the Mt Abu 1.2 m telescope, in India. Data obtained as part of the post-commissioning tests with PARAS show velocity precision better than 2m/s over a period of several months on bright RV standard stars. For observations of sigma-Dra we report 1.7m/s precision for a period of seven months and 2.1m/s for HD 9407 over a period of 2 months. PARAS is capable of a single-shot spectral coverage of 3800A - 9500A at a resolution of about 67,000. The RV results were obtained between 3800A and 6900A using simultaneous wavelength calibration with a Thorium-Argon (ThAr) hollow cathode lamp. The spectrograph is maintained under stable conditions of temperature with a precision of 0.01 - 0.02C (rms) at 25.55C, and enclosed in a vacuum vessel at pressure of 0.1 +/-0.03 mbar. The blaze peak efficiency of the spectrograp...

  19. Musculoskeletal Pain in Trombonists: Results from the UNT Trombone Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Eric; Klinge, Derek; Chesky, Kris

    2016-06-01

    The trombone is a popular, versatile, and unique member of the brass family of musical instruments. Yet the musculoskeletal health concerns of trombonists are grossly understudied. The purpose of this study was to develop and apply a novel online research strategy for assessing musical and non-musical demographics along with prevalence, frequency, intensity, quality, timing, and location of site-specific trombone-related pain. Of the 316 trombonist respondents to this open survey, 76.6% (n=242) experienced trombone-related pain in one or more sites over the past year. Lip was the site with the highest prevalence rate for pain (23%). Selected pain sites were outlined in three primary clusters of musculoskeletal sites: 1) the lips and jaw region, 2) left upper extremity, and 3) back region. Over 35% (n=114) reported that trombone-related pain prevented playing their instrument. Site-specific characteristics of pain suggest that future epidemiologic studies seek to better understand location-specific intensity, frequency, quality, and timing of pain. Such details will assist educators, performers, and clinicians understand, prevent, and treat musculoskeletal problems associated with learning and performing musical instruments.

  20. UNCERTAINTY OF MEASUREMENT- AN IMPORTANT INSTRUMENT TO EVALUATE THE QUALITY OF RESULTS IN FORMALDEHYDE TESTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuela BELDEAN

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The measurement uncertainty is a quantitativeindicator of the results quality, meaning how well theresult represents the value of the quantity beingmeasured. It is a relatively new concept and severalguides and regulations were elaborated in order tofacilitate laboratories to evaluate it. The uncertaintycomponents are quantified based on data fromrepeated measurements, previous measurements,knowledge of the equipment and experience of themeasurement. Uncertainity estimation involves arigorous evaluation of possible sources of uncertaintyand good knowledge of the measurement procedure.The case study presented in this paper revealed thebasic steps in uncertainty calculation for formaldehydeemission from wood-based panels determined by the1m3 Chamber method. Based on a very well definedIshikawa Diagram, the expanded uncertainty of0.044mg/m3 for k=2, at 95% confidence level wasestablished.

  1. Results of aerial surveys of migratory birds on NPR-A in 1977 and 1978

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the results of aerial surveys flown in 1977 and1978 on the National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska (NPR-A) to determine densities and...

  2. Community survey results for Rappahannock River Valley National Wildlife Refuge : Completion report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report provides a summary of results for the survey of residents of communities adjacent to Rappahannock River Valley NWR conducted from the spring through the...

  3. A statistical evaluation of factors influencing aerial survey results on brown bears

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report is a statistical evaluation of factors influencing aerial survey results on Brown Bears. The purpose of this study was to provide a statistical...

  4. Visitor and community survey results for Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge : Completion report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report provides a summary of results for the community and visitor surveys conducted at Prime Hook NWR from the fall of 2004 through fall of 2005. The purpose...

  5. Preliminary results of a beached bird survey at Cinder Lagoon, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the results of a beached bird survey that was conducted at Cinder Lagoon, Alaska in September of 1989 to determine if there was increased...

  6. SURVEY OF ABANDONED INDUSTRIAL SITES IN THE PROVINCE OF CARINTHIA/AUSTRIA - METHODOLOGY AND RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WOLFGANG FISCHER

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper in hand mainly addresses the issue of abandoned industrial and commercial sites. The results of a survey form the central content and regards the method of investigation of this survey of abandoned sites in the province of Carinthia, including experiences and recommendations. The survey started with a number of more than 10,000 businesses. After the different steps of the survey (research phase, exploration phase, clarification phase and evaluation phase 444 sites had to be attributed an increased potential for danger. After these steps followed an evaluation which concerned the priority in regard to the securing and/ or remediation of the abandoned sites. On the basis of certain gathered values, future surveys of abandoned industrial and commercial sites can be calculated fairly exactly.

  7. [Epidemiological basis and results of the National Survey 2001 conducted in the Swiss pig population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadorn, D; Hauser, R; Stärk, K D C

    2002-10-01

    Free trade with animals and animal products requires transparency concerning health information of animal populations. On the basis of the bilateral agreement with the European Union (EU), Switzerland is obliged to document freedom from Aujeszky's disease (AD) in its pig population by conducting surveys on a regular basis. Such a survey was planned for the first time for the year 2001. In this context, it was evaluated whether additional pig diseases should be included in the survey. This article describes the evaluation procedure for the selection of pig diseases integrated in the survey 2001. Additionally, it reports and interprets the results of this survey. All of the 2537 farms and 41,719 blood samples were tested negative. Therefore, it could be documented with a confidence of 99.98% that the AD-prevalence in Switzerland is below 1%.

  8. FIRBACK Far Infrared Survey with ISO Data Reduction, Analysis and First Results

    CERN Document Server

    Dole, H; Puget, J L; Aussel, H; Bouchet, F R; Ciliegi, C; Clements, D L; Césarsky, C J; Désert, F X; Elbaz, D; Franceschini, A; Gispert, R; Guiderdoni, B; Harwit, M; Laureijs, R J; Lemke, D; McMahon, R; Moorwood, A F M; Oliver, S; Reach, W T; Rowan-Robinson, M; Stickel, M; Dole, Herve; Lagache, Guilaine; Puget, Jean-Loup

    1999-01-01

    FIRBACK is one of the deepest cosmological surveys performed in the far infrared, using ISOPHOT. We describe this survey, its data reduction and analysis. We present the maps of fields at 175 microns. We point out some first results: source identifications with radio and mid infrared, and source counts at 175 microns. These two results suggest that half of the FIRBACK sources are probably at redshifts greater than 1. We also present briefly the large follow-up program.

  9. The thirty gigahertz instrument receiver for the Q-U-I Joint Tenerife experiment: Concept and experimental results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villa, Enrique, E-mail: villae@unican.es; Cano, Juan L.; Cagigas, Jaime; Pérez, Ana R.; Aja, Beatriz; Terán, J. Vicente; Fuente, Luisa de la; Artal, Eduardo; Mediavilla, Ángel [Departamento Ingeniería de Comunicaciones, Universidad de Cantabria, Plaza de la Ciencia s/n, Santander 39005 (Spain); Ortiz, David; Casas, Francisco J. [Instituto de Física de Cantabria, Avda. Los Castros s/n, Santander 39005 (Spain); Hoyland, Roger [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, Vía Láctea s/n, La Laguna 38205 (Spain)

    2015-02-15

    This paper presents the analysis, design, and characterization of the thirty gigahertz instrument receiver developed for the Q-U-I Joint Tenerife experiment. The receiver is aimed to obtain polarization data of the cosmic microwave background radiation from the sky, obtaining the Q, U, and I Stokes parameters of the incoming signal simultaneously. A comprehensive analysis of the theory behind the proposed receiver is presented for a linearly polarized input signal, and the functionality tests have demonstrated adequate results in terms of Stokes parameters, which validate the concept of the receiver based on electronic phase switching.

  10. The thirty gigahertz instrument receiver for the Q-U-I Joint Tenerife experiment: concept and experimental results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Enrique; Cano, Juan L; Cagigas, Jaime; Ortiz, David; Casas, Francisco J; Pérez, Ana R; Aja, Beatriz; Terán, J Vicente; de la Fuente, Luisa; Artal, Eduardo; Hoyland, Roger; Mediavilla, Ángel

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents the analysis, design, and characterization of the thirty gigahertz instrument receiver developed for the Q-U-I Joint Tenerife experiment. The receiver is aimed to obtain polarization data of the cosmic microwave background radiation from the sky, obtaining the Q, U, and I Stokes parameters of the incoming signal simultaneously. A comprehensive analysis of the theory behind the proposed receiver is presented for a linearly polarized input signal, and the functionality tests have demonstrated adequate results in terms of Stokes parameters, which validate the concept of the receiver based on electronic phase switching.

  11. Early-onset type 2 diabetes in a Mexican survey. Results from the National Health and Nutrition Survey 2006

    OpenAIRE

    Aída Jiménez-Corona; Rosalba Rojas; Francisco J Gómez-Pérez; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the characteristics of patients with type 2 diabetes diagnosed before age 40 (early-onset type 2 diabetes) identified in a nation-wide, population-based study. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The survey was done in Mexico during 2006. Medical history, anthropometric and biochemical measurements were obtained in every subject. RESULTS: Cases diagnosed before (n=181) and after age 40 (n=659) were included. Early-onset type 2 diabetes was present in 13.1% of the previously diagnose...

  12. The effect of mode and context on survey results: Analysis of data from the Health Survey for England 2006 and the Boost Survey for London

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roth Marilyn A

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health-related data at local level could be provided by supplementing national health surveys with local boosts. Self-completion surveys are less costly than interviews, enabling larger samples to be achieved for a given cost. However, even when the same questions are asked with the same wording, responses to survey questions may vary by mode of data collection. These measurement differences need to be investigated further. Methods The Health Survey for England in London ('Core' and a London Boost survey ('Boost' used identical sampling strategies but different modes of data collection. Some data were collected by face-to-face interview in the Core and by self-completion in the Boost; other data were collected by self-completion questionnaire in both, but the context differed. Results were compared by mode of data collection using two approaches. The first examined differences in results that remained after adjusting the samples for differences in response. The second compared results after using propensity score matching to reduce any differences in sample composition. Results There were no significant differences between the two samples for prevalence of some variables including long-term illness, limiting long-term illness, current rates of smoking, whether participants drank alcohol, and how often they usually drank. However, there were a number of differences, some quite large, between some key measures including: general health, GHQ12 score, portions of fruit and vegetables consumed, levels of physical activity, and, to a lesser extent, smoking consumption, the number of alcohol units reported consumed on the heaviest day of drinking in the last week and perceived social support (among women only. Conclusion Survey mode and context can both affect the responses given. The effect is largest for complex question modules but was also seen for identical self-completion questions. Some data collected by interview and self

  13. The Herschel Open Time Key Project; DUst Around NEarby Stars: Results from the Complete Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danchi, William C.; Eiroa, C.; Consortium, DUNES

    2013-01-01

    The Herschel DUst Around Nearby Stars (DUNES) survey (Eiroa et al. 2010) was designed to address several fundamental questions regarding debris disks around nearby solar type stars, in order to put the Solar System into context. Our goals were to: (1) determine the fraction of stars with faint, Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt (EKB)-like disks, (2) explore collisional and dynamical evolution of EKB analogues, (3) observe dust properties and size distribution, and (4) determine the incidence of EKB-like disks vs. presence of planets. The final sample of stars directly observed by DUNES included 133 stars, including 27 F-type, 52 G-type and 54 K-type stars within 20 pc of the Sun. The integration time was set in order to make a 5-sigma detection of the expected photospheric emission at 100 and 160 microns, using the PACS instrument. In addition, 106 stars observed by DEBRIS survey (Mathews et al. 2010) satisfying the photospheric detection condition are shared targets, specifically 83 FGK stars - 51 F, 24 G and 8 K (the rest are A and M stars). We report the main conclusions from the survey including the frequency of detection of debris disks as a function of fractional luminosity of the dust, Ld/L*, and correlations of Ld/L* with metallicity, bolometric luminosity, effective temperature, and stellar age.

  14. Latest Results from the DODO Survey: Imaging Planets around White Dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Emma; Burleigh, Matt R.; Clarke, Fraser J.

    2011-03-01

    The aim of the Degenerate Objects around Degenerate Objects (DODO) survey is to search for very low mass brown dwarfs and extrasolar planets in wide orbits around white dwarfs via direct imaging. The direct detection of such companions would allow the spectroscopic investigation of objects with temperatures lower (DODO survey has the ability to directly image planets in post-main sequence analogues of these systems. These proceedings present the latest results of our multi-epoch J band common proper motion survey of nearby white dwarfs.

  15. Disability Weights for Chronic Mercury Intoxication Resulting from Gold Mining Activities: Results from an Online Pairwise Comparisons Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Steckling

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In artisanal small-scale gold mining, mercury is used for gold-extraction, putting miners and nearby residents at risk of chronic metallic mercury vapor intoxication (CMMVI. Burden of disease (BoD analyses allow the estimation of the public health relevance of CMMVI, but until now there have been no specific CMMVI disability weights (DWs. The objective is to derive DWs for moderate and severe CMMVI. Disease-specific and generic health state descriptions of 18 diseases were used in a pairwise comparison survey. Mercury and BoD experts were invited to participate in an online survey. Data were analyzed using probit regression. Local regression was used to make the DWs comparable to the Global Burden of Disease (GBD study. Alternative survey (visual analogue scale and data analyses approaches (linear interpolation were evaluated in scenario analyses. A total of 105 participants completed the questionnaire. DWs for moderate and severe CMMVI were 0.368 (0.261–0.484 and 0.588 (0.193–0.907, respectively. Scenario analyses resulted in higher mean values. The results are limited by the sample size, group of interviewees, questionnaire extent, and lack of generally accepted health state descriptions. DWs were derived to improve the data basis of mercury-related BoD estimates, providing useful information for policy-making. Integration of the results into the GBD DWs enhances comparability.

  16. Disability Weights for Chronic Mercury Intoxication Resulting from Gold Mining Activities: Results from an Online Pairwise Comparisons Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steckling, Nadine; Devleesschauwer, Brecht; Winkelnkemper, Julia; Fischer, Florian; Ericson, Bret; Krämer, Alexander; Hornberg, Claudia; Fuller, Richard; Plass, Dietrich; Bose-O'Reilly, Stephan

    2017-01-10

    In artisanal small-scale gold mining, mercury is used for gold-extraction, putting miners and nearby residents at risk of chronic metallic mercury vapor intoxication (CMMVI). Burden of disease (BoD) analyses allow the estimation of the public health relevance of CMMVI, but until now there have been no specific CMMVI disability weights (DWs). The objective is to derive DWs for moderate and severe CMMVI. Disease-specific and generic health state descriptions of 18 diseases were used in a pairwise comparison survey. Mercury and BoD experts were invited to participate in an online survey. Data were analyzed using probit regression. Local regression was used to make the DWs comparable to the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) study. Alternative survey (visual analogue scale) and data analyses approaches (linear interpolation) were evaluated in scenario analyses. A total of 105 participants completed the questionnaire. DWs for moderate and severe CMMVI were 0.368 (0.261-0.484) and 0.588 (0.193-0.907), respectively. Scenario analyses resulted in higher mean values. The results are limited by the sample size, group of interviewees, questionnaire extent, and lack of generally accepted health state descriptions. DWs were derived to improve the data basis of mercury-related BoD estimates, providing useful information for policy-making. Integration of the results into the GBD DWs enhances comparability.

  17. Disability Weights for Chronic Mercury Intoxication Resulting from Gold Mining Activities: Results from an Online Pairwise Comparisons Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steckling, Nadine; Devleesschauwer, Brecht; Winkelnkemper, Julia; Fischer, Florian; Ericson, Bret; Krämer, Alexander; Hornberg, Claudia; Fuller, Richard; Plass, Dietrich; Bose-O’Reilly, Stephan

    2017-01-01

    In artisanal small-scale gold mining, mercury is used for gold-extraction, putting miners and nearby residents at risk of chronic metallic mercury vapor intoxication (CMMVI). Burden of disease (BoD) analyses allow the estimation of the public health relevance of CMMVI, but until now there have been no specific CMMVI disability weights (DWs). The objective is to derive DWs for moderate and severe CMMVI. Disease-specific and generic health state descriptions of 18 diseases were used in a pairwise comparison survey. Mercury and BoD experts were invited to participate in an online survey. Data were analyzed using probit regression. Local regression was used to make the DWs comparable to the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) study. Alternative survey (visual analogue scale) and data analyses approaches (linear interpolation) were evaluated in scenario analyses. A total of 105 participants completed the questionnaire. DWs for moderate and severe CMMVI were 0.368 (0.261–0.484) and 0.588 (0.193–0.907), respectively. Scenario analyses resulted in higher mean values. The results are limited by the sample size, group of interviewees, questionnaire extent, and lack of generally accepted health state descriptions. DWs were derived to improve the data basis of mercury-related BoD estimates, providing useful information for policy-making. Integration of the results into the GBD DWs enhances comparability. PMID:28075395

  18. Plastic Surgeons’ Perceptions of the Affordable Care Act: Results of a National Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline S. Israel, MD

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: The ACA will affect all specialties, including plastic surgery. The results of this survey suggest that many plastic surgeons believe that they have a baseline understanding of current health-care reform. The majority of surveyed surgeons do not support the Act. It is imperative that plastic surgeons possess the knowledge of the ACA; its changes, both current and impending, will likely affect patient mix, coverage of procedures, and reimbursement.

  19. The Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Public Outdoor Lighting Inventory: Phase I: Survey Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinzey, Bruce R.; Smalley, Edward; Haefer, R.

    2014-09-30

    This document presents the results of a voluntary web-based inventory survey of public street and area lighting across the U.S. undertaken during the latter half of 2013.This survey attempts to access information about the national inventory in a “bottoms-up” manner, going directly to owners and operators. Adding to previous “top down” estimates, it is intended to improve understanding of the role of public outdoor lighting in national energy use.

  20. Teaching with Information and Communication Technologies : Results of a Large Scale Survey

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    On behalf of the Ministry of Education in Luxembourg (Europe), 821 teachers - from primary school to higher education - were questioned in an online survey at the beginning of 2009 about their use of information and communication technologies (ICT) in education. In this paper, we briefly present the context of the questionnaire and will then focus on its outcomes. The preliminary analysis of the results will mainly focus on the closed questions of the survey and try to answer several fundamen...

  1. Algorithms for personalized therapy of type 2 diabetes: results of a web-based international survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Marco; Mannucci, Edoardo; De Cosmo, Salvatore; Gentile, Sandro; Candido, Riccardo; De Micheli, Alberto; Di Benedetto, Antonino; Esposito, Katherine; Genovese, Stefano; Medea, Gerardo; Ceriello, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    In recent years increasing interest in the issue of treatment personalization for type 2 diabetes (T2DM) has emerged. This international web-based survey aimed to evaluate opinions of physicians about tailored therapeutic algorithms developed by the Italian Association of Diabetologists (AMD) and available online, and to get suggestions for future developments. Another aim of this initiative was to assess whether the online advertising and the survey would have increased the global visibility of the AMD algorithms. The web-based survey, which comprised five questions, has been available from the homepage of the web-version of the journal Diabetes Care throughout the month of December 2013, and on the AMD website between December 2013 and September 2014. Participation was totally free and responders were anonymous. Overall, 452 physicians (M=58.4%) participated in the survey. Diabetologists accounted for 76.8% of responders. The results of the survey show wide agreement (>90%) by participants on the utility of the algorithms proposed, even if they do not cover all possible needs of patients with T2DM for a personalized therapeutic approach. In the online survey period and in the months after its conclusion, a relevant and durable increase in the number of unique users who visited the websites was registered, compared to the period preceding the survey. Patients with T2DM are heterogeneous, and there is interest toward accessible and easy to use personalized therapeutic algorithms. Responders opinions probably reflect the peculiar organization of diabetes care in each country.

  2. OBSERVATIONS OF BINARY STARS WITH THE DIFFERENTIAL SPECKLE SURVEY INSTRUMENT. V. TOWARD AN EMPIRICAL METAL-POOR MASS–LUMINOSITY RELATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horch, Elliott P. [Department of Physics, Southern Connecticut State University, 501 Crescent Street, New Haven, CT 06515 (United States); Van Altena, William F.; Demarque, Pierre [Department of Astronomy, Yale University P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Howell, Steve B. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Everett, Mark E. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Ciardi, David R. [NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, California Institute of Technology, 770 South Wilson Avenue, Mail Code 100-22, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Teske, Johanna K. [Department of Terrestrial Magnetism and Carnegie Observatories, Carnegie Institute of Washington, 5241 Broad Branch Road, NW, Washington, DC 20015 (United States); Henry, Todd J.; Winters, Jennifer G., E-mail: horche2@southernct.edu, E-mail: william.vanaltena@yale.edu, E-mail: pierre.demarque@yale.edu, E-mail: steve.b.howell@nasa.gov, E-mail: everett@noao.edu, E-mail: ciardi@ipac.caltech.edu, E-mail: jteske@carnegiescience.edu, E-mail: thenry@astro.gsu.edu, E-mail: winters@astro.gsu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30302 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    In an effort to better understand the details of the stellar structure and evolution of metal-poor stars, the Gemini North telescope was used on two occasions to take speckle imaging data of a sample of known spectroscopic binary stars and other nearby stars in order to search for and resolve close companions. The observations were obtained using the Differential Speckle Survey Instrument, which takes data in two filters simultaneously. The results presented here are of 90 observations of 23 systems in which one or more companions was detected, and six stars where no companion was detected to the limit of the camera capabilities at Gemini. In the case of the binary and multiple stars, these results are then further analyzed to make first orbit determinations in five cases, and orbit refinements in four other cases. The mass information is derived, and since the systems span a range in metallicity, a study is presented that compares our results with the expected trend in total mass as derived from the most recent Yale isochrones as a function of metal abundance. These data suggest that metal-poor main-sequence stars are less massive at a given color than their solar-metallicity analogues in a manner consistent with that predicted from the theory.

  3. Observations of Binary Stars with the Differential Speckle Survey Instrument. V. Toward an Empirical Metal-Poor Mass-Luminosity Relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horch, Elliott P.; van Altena, William F.; Demarque, Pierre; Howell, Steve B.; Everett, Mark E.; Ciardi, David R.; Teske, Johanna K.; Henry, Todd J.; Winters, Jennifer G.

    2015-05-01

    In an effort to better understand the details of the stellar structure and evolution of metal-poor stars, the Gemini North telescope was used on two occasions to take speckle imaging data of a sample of known spectroscopic binary stars and other nearby stars in order to search for and resolve close companions. The observations were obtained using the Differential Speckle Survey Instrument, which takes data in two filters simultaneously. The results presented here are of 90 observations of 23 systems in which one or more companions was detected, and six stars where no companion was detected to the limit of the camera capabilities at Gemini. In the case of the binary and multiple stars, these results are then further analyzed to make first orbit determinations in five cases, and orbit refinements in four other cases. The mass information is derived, and since the systems span a range in metallicity, a study is presented that compares our results with the expected trend in total mass as derived from the most recent Yale isochrones as a function of metal abundance. These data suggest that metal-poor main-sequence stars are less massive at a given color than their solar-metallicity analogues in a manner consistent with that predicted from the theory.

  4. Observations of Binary Stars with the Differential Speckle Survey Instrument. V. Toward an Empirical Metal-Poor Mass-Luminosity Relation

    CERN Document Server

    Horch, Elliott P; Demarque, Pierre; Howell, Steve B; Everett, Mark E; Ciardi, David R; Teske, Johanna K; Henry, Todd J; Winters, Jennifer G

    2015-01-01

    In an effort to better understand the details of the stellar structure and evolution of metal poor stars, the Gemini North telescope was used on two occasions to take speckle imaging data of a sample of known spectroscopic binary stars and other nearby stars in order to search for and resolve close companions. The observations were obtained using the Differential Speckle Survey Instrument, which takes data in two filters simultaneously. The results presented here are of 90 observations of 23 systems in which one or more companions was detected, and 6 stars where no companion was detected to the limit of the camera capabilities at Gemini. In the case of the binary and multiple stars, these results are then further analyzed to make first orbit determinations in five cases, and orbit refinements in four other cases. Mass information is derived, and since the systems span a range in metallicity, a study is presented that compares our results with the expected trend in total mass as derived from the most recent Ya...

  5. Effects of Olympic-style taekwondo kicks on an instrumented head-form and resultant injury measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fife, Gabriel P; O'Sullivan, David M; Pieter, Willy; Cook, David P; Kaminski, Thomas W

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effect of taekwondo kicks and peak foot velocity (FVEL) on resultant head linear acceleration (RLA), head injury criterion (HIC15) and head velocity (HVEL). Each subject (n=12) randomly performed five repetitions of the turning kick (TK), clench axe kick (CA), front leg axe kick, jump back kick (JB) and jump spinning hook kick (JH) at the average standing head height for competitors in their weight division. A Hybrid II Crash Test Dummy head was fitted with a protective taekwondo helmet and instrumented with a triaxial accelerometer and fixed to a height-adjustable frame. Resultant head linear acceleration, HVEL, FVEL data were captured and processed using Qualysis Track Manager. The TK (130.11 ± 51.67 g) produced a higher RLA than the CA (54.95 ± 20.08 g, ptaekwondo. Future studies should aim to understand rotational accelerations of the head.

  6. Development and pilot testing of an Internet-based survey instrument to measure the alcohol brand preferences of U.S. youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Michael; DiLoreto, Joanna; Johnson, Andrea; Fortunato, Erin K; DeJong, William

    2011-04-01

    Although we know a great deal about the percentage of youth who drink alcohol, we know very little about the specific brands they choose to drink. This information gap needs to be addressed if public health officials are to develop more effective interventions. Unfortunately, there are no national youth surveys that collect data on alcohol brand consumption. In this paper, we describe the development and pilot testing of what we believe to be the first comprehensive, Internet-based youth survey of brand-specific alcohol use. We used online advertising in 3 U.S. cities to recruit a convenience sample of 241 respondents, ages 16 to 18 years. We used Craigslist, a network of online communities that features local classified advertisements, to recruit the sample. We used SurveyGizmo, an online software program for designing Internet surveys, collecting data, and performing basic analysis, to survey these respondents about their brand-specific alcohol consumption patterns. The survey instrument assessed each respondent's 30-day drinking history, including the frequency of consumption for each alcohol brand. Using Internet survey technology, we were able to collect information on 366 brands and still have respondents complete the instrument quickly and easily. The total number of brands consumed in the past 30 days ranged from 1 to 18, with a median of 4 brands. The top 5 brands consumed were beer brands, as were eleven of the top 15 brands. The remaining 4 brands in the top 15 included 3 brands of flavored alcoholic beverages and 1 brand of mixed drink. Among the top 15 alcohol brands consumed during heavy drinking episodes were 8 brands of beer, 4 brands of flavored alcoholic beverages, 2 brands of wine, and 1 brand of mixed drink. This pilot study helps establish the feasibility of including brand-specific questions on federal or other national youth alcohol surveys. Copyright © 2011 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  7. First Results from the HI Jodrell All Sky Survey Inclination-Dependent Selection Effects in a 21-cm Blind Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Lang, R H; Kilborn, V A; Minchin, R F; Disney, M J; Jordan, C A; Grossi, M; García, D A; Freeman, K C; Phillipps, S; Wright, A E

    2003-01-01

    Details are presented of the HI Jodrell All Sky Survey (HIJASS). HIJASS is a blind neutral hydrogen (HI) survey of the northern sky, being conducted using the multibeam receiver on the Lovell Telescope at Jodrell Bank. HIJASS covers the velocity range -3500 km/s to 10000 km/s with a velocity resolution of 18.1 km/s and a spatial positional accuracy of ~2.5 arcmin. Thus far about 1115 sq deg have been surveyed. We describe the methods of detecting galaxies within the HIJASS data and of measuring their HI parameters. The properties of the resulting HI-selected sample of galaxies are described. Of the 222 sources so far confirmed, 170 (77 per cent) are clearly associated with a previously catalogued galaxy. A further 23 sources (10 percent) lie close (within 6 arcmin) to a previously catalogued galaxy for which no previous redshift exists. A further 29 sources (13 per cent) do not appear to be associated with any previously catalogued galaxy. The distributions of peak flux, integrated flux, HI mass and cz are di...

  8. The Three-mm Ultimate Mopra Milky Way Survey. I. Survey Overview, Initial Data Releases, and First Results

    CERN Document Server

    Barnes, Peter J; Indermuehle, Balthasar; O'Dougherty, Stefan N; Lowe, Vicki; Cunningham, Maria R; Hernandez, Audra K; Fuller, Gary A

    2015-01-01

    We describe a new mm-wave molecular-line mapping survey of the southern Galactic Plane and its first data releases. The Three-mm Ultimate Mopra Milky Way Survey (ThrUMMS) maps a 60{\\deg}x2{\\deg} sector of our Galaxy's fourth quadrant, using a combination of fast mapping techniques with the Mopra radio telescope, simultaneously in the J=1-0 lines of $^{12}$CO, $^{13}$CO, C$^{18}$O, and CN near 112 GHz at ~arcminute and ~0.3 km s$^{-1}$ resolution, with ~2 K channel$^{-1}$ sensitivity for $^{12}$CO and ~1 K channel$^{-1}$ for the other transitions. The calibrated data cubes from these observations are made available to the community after processing through our pipeline. Here, we describe the motivation for ThrUMMS, the development of new observing techniques for Mopra, and how these techniques were optimised to the objectives of the survey. We showcase some sample data products and describe the first science results on CO-isotopologue line ratios. These vary dramatically across the Galactic Plane, indicating a...

  9. Prevalence and Factors Associated with Teen Pregnancy in Vietnam: Results from Two National Surveys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huong Nguyen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This study asked two broad questions: (1 what is the prevalence of teen pregnancy in contemporary Vietnam; and (2 what selected social, family, and individual factors are associated with teen pregnancy in Vietnam? The study utilized Vietnam Survey Assessment of Vietnamese Youth surveys conducted in 2003 and 2008 to answer the two research questions within the context of fast political, economic, and social change in Vietnam in the last two decades. Results of this study show that the prevalence of pregnancy among Vietnamese teenagers in the surveys was stable at 4%, or 40 pregnancies per 1000 adolescent girls aged 14 to 19. Age, experience of domestic violence, and early sexual debut were positively correlated with higher odds of teenage pregnancy for both survey cohorts; however, being an ethnic minority, educational attainment, sexual education at school, Internet use, and depressive symptoms were significantly related to teenage pregnancy only in the 2008 cohort.

  10. Non-governmental organizations assisting victims of crime in Belgrade: Survey results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milivojević Sanja K.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of survey regarding non-governmental organizations assisting victims of crime in Belgrade. The survey was completed at the end of 2002 for purposes of establishing a Victim Support Service in Serbia. In introduction authors give a short review of victim support services development in the World and the region, explaining the need for such service in Serbia, the subject and the aim of the article as well as the purpose of the survey. Second part of the paper contains the sample, methodology and the aim of the interview with NGO representatives. In the third section authors present the analysis of the survey data. Finally, in conclusion authors summarize the data and observed problems, suggestions for possible solution and directions of future development of services and organizations assisting victims of crime in Serbia.

  11. Evaluation of the two non-consecutive 24-h recall instrument for pan-European food consumption surveys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crispim, S.P.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The comparability of food consumption data originating from national nutritional surveys in Europe is currently hampered because of different methodologies used. Therefore, experts in the European Food Consumption Survey Method (EFCOSUM) consortium proposed to use two non-consecutive

  12. Results of the geomagnetic surveys developed at the oppidum of Monte Bernorio (Pomar de Valdivia, Palencia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús F. Torres-Martínez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The geomagnetic surveys carried out at the oppidum of Monte Bernorio in the years 2007-2008 have offered important insights into the structure of the settlement, its fortification system and the associated cemeteries. Moreover, the results have improved fieldwork planning, allowing the excavations to be undertaken in a more efficient way and resources to be optimized. This article offers, for the first time, a summary of the results of these surveys, carried out as the result of an international collaboration between scientific teams from Spain and Germany.

  13. Navigating Law School: Paths in Legal Education. Annual Survey Results, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law School Survey of Student Engagement, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The Law School Survey of Student Engagement (LSSSE) focuses on activities that affect learning in law school. This year's results show how law students spend their time, what they think about their experience in law school, and guide schools in their efforts to improve engagement and learning. The selected results are based on responses from more…

  14. Indoor radon and radon daughters survey at Campinas-Brazil using CR-39: First results

    CERN Document Server

    Guedes, S; Iunes, P J; Navia, L M S; Neman, R S; Paulo, S R; Rodrigues, V C; Souza, W F; Tello, C A S; Zúñiga, A G

    1999-01-01

    The first results of a radon and radon daughters (RD) survey performed at Campinas-SP, Brazil, are presented. We employed a technique that, potentially, makes possible to measure the radon and RD activity in the air and to separate from this result the activity of radon, alone. In this preliminary paper only the former activity is studied.

  15. The OmegaWhite Survey for Short-Period Variable Stars I: Overview and First Results

    CERN Document Server

    Macfarlane, S A; Ramsay, G; Groot, P J; Woudt, P A; Drew, J E; Barentsen, G; Eisloffel, J

    2015-01-01

    We present the goals, strategy and first results of the OmegaWhite survey: a wide-field high-cadence $g$-band synoptic survey which aims to unveil the Galactic population of short-period variable stars (with periods $<$ 80 min), including ultracompact binary star systems and stellar pulsators. The ultimate goal of OmegaWhite is to cover 400 square degrees along the Galactic Plane reaching a depth of $g = $ 21.5 mag (10$\\sigma$), using OmegaCam on the VLT Survey Telescope (VST). The fields are selected to overlap with surveys such as the Galactic Bulge Survey (GBS) and the VST Photometric H$\\alpha$ Survey of the Southern Galactic Plane (VPHAS+) for multi-band colour information. Each field is observed using 38 exposures of 39 s each, with a median cadence of $\\sim$2.7 min for a total duration of two hours. Within an initial 26 square degrees, we have extracted the light curves of 1.6 million stars, and have identified 613 variable candidates which satisfy our selection criteria. Furthermore, we present the ...

  16. Initial HI results from the Arecibo Pisces-Perseus Supercluster Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, David W.; Davis, Cory; Johnson, Cory; Koopmann, Rebecca A.; Jones, Michael G.; Hallenbeck, Gregory L.; O'Donoghue, Aileen A.; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Rosenberg, Jessica L.; Venkatesan, Aparna; Undergraduate ALFALFA Team

    2017-01-01

    The Arecibo Pisces-Perseus Supercluster Survey is a targeted HI survey of galaxies that began its second observing season in October 2016. The survey is conducted by members of the Undergraduate ALFALFA Team (UAT) and extensively involves undergraduates in observations, data reduction, and analysis. It aims to complement the HI sources identified by the ALFALFA extragalactic HI line survey by probing deeper in HI mass (to lower masses) than the legacy survey itself. Measurements of the HI line velocity widths will be combined with uniform processing of images obtained in the SDSS and GALEX public databases to localize the sample within the baryonic Tully Fisher relation, allowing estimates of their redshift-independent distances and thus their peculiar velocities.The survey is designed to constrain Pisces-Perseus Supercluster infall models by producing 5-σ detections of infall velocities to a precision of about 500 km/s. By targeting galaxies based on SDSS and GALEX photometry, we have achieved detection rates of 68% of the galaxies in our sample. We will discuss the target selection process, HI velocities and mass estimates from the 2015 fall observing season, preliminary results from 2016 observations, and preliminary comparisons with inflow models predicted by numerical simulations.This work has been supported by NSF grants AST-1211005, AST-1637339, AST-1637262.

  17. Polarimetric survey of main-belt asteroids. II. Results for 58 B- and C-type objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Hutton, R.; Cañada-Assandri, M.

    2012-03-01

    Aims: We present results of a polarimetric survey of main-belt asteroids at Complejo Astronómico el Leoncito (CASLEO), San Juan, Argentina. The aims of this survey are to increase the database of asteroid polarimetry, to estimate diversity in polarimetric properties of asteroids that belong to different taxonomic classes, and to search for objects that exhibit anomalous polarimetric properties. Methods: The data were obtained with the Torino and CASPROF polarimeters at the 2.15m telescope. The Torino polarimeter is an instrument that allows simultaneous measurement of polarization in five different bands, and the CASPROF polarimeter is a two-hole aperture polarimeter with rapid modulation. Results: The survey began in 2003, and up to 2009 data on a sample of more than 170 asteroids were obtained. In this paper the results for 58 B- and C-type objects are presented, most of them polarimetrically observed for the first time. Using these data we find phase-polarization curves and polarimetric parameters for these taxonomic classes. Based on observations carried out at the Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito, operated under agreement between the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas de la República Argentina and the National Universities of La Plata, Córdoba, and San Juan.Tables 1 and 2 are available in electronic form at CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/539/A115

  18. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: First results from SCUBA-2 observations of the Cepheus Flare Region

    CERN Document Server

    Pattle, Kate; Kirk, Jason M; Di Francesco, James; Kirk, Helen; Mottram, Joseph C; Keown, Jared; Buckle, Jane; Beaulieu, Sylvie F; Berry, David S; Broekhoven-Fiene, Hannah; Currie, Malcolm J; Fich, Michel; Hatchell, Jenny; Jenness, Tim; Johnstone, Doug; Nutter, David; Pineda, Jaime E; Quinn, Ciera; Salji, Carl; Tisi, Sam; Walker-Smith, Samantha; Hogerheijde, Michiel R; Bastien, Pierre; Bresnahan, David; Butner, Harold; Chen, Mike; Chrysostomou, Antonio; Coudé, Simon; Davis, Chris J; Drabek-Maunder, Emily; Duarte-Cabral, Ana; Fiege, Jason; Friberg, Per; Friesen, Rachel; Fuller, Gary A; Graves, Sarah; Greaves, Jane; Gregson, Jonathan; Holland, Wayne; Joncas, Gilles; Knee, Lewis B G; Mairs, Steve; Marsh, Ken; Matthews, Brenda C; Moriarty-Schieven, Gerald; Mowat, Chris; Rawlings, Jonathan; Richer, John; Robertson, Damien; Rosolowsky, Erik; Rumble, Damian; Sadavoy, Sarah; Thomas, Holly; Tothill, Nick; Viti, Serena; White, Glenn J; Wouterloot, Jan; Yates, Jeremy; Zhu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    We present observations of the Cepheus Flare obtained as part of the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) Gould Belt Legacy Survey (GBLS) with the SCUBA-2 instrument. We produce a catalogue of sources found by SCUBA-2, and separate these into starless cores and protostars. We determine masses and densities for each of our sources, using source temperatures determined by the Herschel Gould Belt Survey. We compare the properties of starless cores in four different molecular clouds: L1147/58, L1172/74, L1251 and L1228. We find that the core mass functions for each region typically show shallower-than-Salpeter behaviour. We find that L1147/58 and L1228 have a high ratio of starless cores to Class II protostars, while L1251 and L1174 have a low ratio, consistent with the latter regions being more active sites of current star formation, while the former are forming stars less actively. We determine that, if modelled as thermally-supported Bonnor-Ebert spheres, most of our cores have stable configurations accessible...

  19. Determinants of persistence in hypertensive patients treated with irbesartan: results of a postmarketing survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greminger Peter

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Persistence is a key factor for long-term blood pressure control, which is of high prognostic importance for patients at increased cardiovascular risk. Here we present the results of a post-marketing survey including 4769 hypertensive patients treated with irbesartan in 886 general practices in Switzerland. The goal of this survey was to evaluate the tolerance and the blood pressure lowering effect of irbesartan as well as the factors affecting persistence in a large unselected population. Methods Prospective observational survey conducted in general practices in all regions of Switzerland. Previously untreated and uncontrolled pre-treated patients were started with a daily dose of 150 mg irbesartan and followed up to 6 months. Results After an observation time slightly exceeding 4 months, the average reduction in systolic and diastolic blood pressure was 20 (95% confidence interval (CI -19.6 to -20.7 mmHg and 12 mmHg (95% CI -11.4 to -12.1 mmHg, respectively. At this time, 26% of patients had a blood pressure Conclusion The results of this survey confirm that irbesartan is effective, well tolerated and well accepted by patients, as indicated by the good persistence. This post-marketing survey also emphasizes the importance of the tolerability profile and of achieving an early control of blood pressure as positive predictors of persistence.

  20. Towards harmonisation of critical laboratory result management - review of the literature and survey of australasian practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Ca; Horvath, Ar

    2012-11-01

    Timely release and communication of critical test results may have significant impact on medical decisions and subsequent patient outcomes. Laboratories therefore have an important responsibility and contribution to patient safety. Certification, accreditation and regulatory bodies also require that laboratories follow procedures to ensure patient safety, but there is limited guidance on best practices. In Australasia, no specific requirements exist in this area and critical result reporting practices have been demonstrated to be heterogeneous worldwide.Recognising the need for agreed standards and critical limits, the AACB started a quality initiative to harmonise critical result management throughout Australasia. The first step toward harmonisation is to understand current laboratory practices. Fifty eight Australasian laboratories responded to a survey and 36 laboratories shared their critical limits. Findings from this survey are compared to international practices reviewed in various surveys conducted elsewhere. For the successful operation of a critical result management system, critical tests and critical limits must be defined in collaboration with clinicians. Reporting procedures must include how critical results are identified; who can report and who can receive critical results; what is an acceptable timeframe within which results must be delivered or, if reporting fails, what escalation procedures should follow; what communication channels or systems should be used; what should be recorded and how; and how critical result procedures should be maintained and evaluated to assess impact on outcomes.In this paper we review the literature of current standards and recommendations for critical result management. Key elements of critical result reporting are discussed in view of the findings of various national surveys on existing laboratory practices, including data from our own survey in Australasia. Best practice recommendations are made that laboratories

  1. Indoor Environment and Energy Use in Historic Buildings - Comparing Survey Results with Measurements and Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohdin, P.; Dalewski, M.; Moshfegh, B.

    2012-01-01

    Increasing demand for energy efficiency places new requirements on energy use in historic buildings. Efficient energy use is essential if a historic building is to be used and preserved, especially buildings with conventional uses such as residential buildings and offices. This paper presents...... results which combine energy auditing with building energy simulation and an indoor environment survey among the occupants of the building. Both when comparing simulations with measurements as well as with survey results good agreement was found. The two efficiency measures that are predicted to increase...... energy and thermal performance the most for this group of buildings were reduced infiltration and increasing heat-exchanger efficiency....

  2. Recent results and perspectives on cosmology and fundamental physics from microwave surveys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burigana, Carlo; Battistelli, Elia Stefano; Benetti, Micol

    2016-01-01

    surveys, and their cross-correlations are presented. Looking at fine signatures in the CMB, such as the lack of power at low multipoles, the primordial power spectrum (PPS) and the bounds on non-Gaussianities, complemented by galaxy surveys, we discuss inflationary physics and the generation of primordial...... perturbations in the early universe. Three important topics in particle physics, the bounds on neutrinos masses and parameters, on thermal axion mass and on the neutron lifetime derived from cosmological data are reviewed, with attention to the comparison with laboratory experiment results. Recent results from...

  3. Instrumentation and monitoring of the nextgen road infrastructure: Some results and perspectives from the R5G project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hautière, Nicolas; Bourquin, Frédéric

    2017-04-01

    Through the centuries, the roads - which today constitute in France a huge transport network of 1 millions kilometers length - have always been able to cope with society needs and challenges. As a consequence, the next generation road infrastructure will have to take into account at least three societal transitions: ecological, energetic and digital. The goal of the 5th generation road project (R5G©) [1], led by Ifsttar in France, aligned with the Forever Open program [2], is to design and build demonstrators of such future road infrastructures. The goal of this presentation is to present different results related to the greening of road materials [3], the design of energy-positive roads [4, 5], the test of roads that self-diagnose [6], the design of roads adapted for connected [7], autonomous [8] and electrified vehicles [9], etc. In terms of perspectives, we will demonstrate that the road infrastructures will soon become a complex system: On one side road users will benefit from new services, on the other side such massively connected and instrumented infrastructures will potentially become an opportune sensor for knowledge development in geoscience, such as air quality, visibility and fog monitoring. References: [1] R5G project. r5g.ifsttar.fr [2] Forever Open Road project. www.foreveropenroad.eu [3] Biorepavation project. www.infravation.net/projects/BIOREPAVATION [4] N. Le Touz, J. Dumoulin. Numerical study of the thermal behavior of a new deicing road structure design with energy harvesting capabilities. EGU General Assembly 2015, Apr 2015, Vienne, Austria. [5] S. Asfour, F. Bernardin, E. Toussaint, J.-M. Piau. Hydrothermal modeling of porous pavement for its surface de-freezing. Applied Thermal Engineering. Volume 107, 25 August 2016, Pages 493-500 [6] LGV BPL Instrumentation. http://railenium.eu/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/INSTRUMENTATION-BPL-FR.pdf [7] SCOOP@F project. https://ec.europa.eu/inea/en/connecting

  4. Description and primary results of Total Solar Irradiance Monitor, a solar-pointing instrument on an Earth observing satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongrui; Fang, Wei; Li, Huiduan

    2015-04-01

    Solar driving mechanism for Earth climate has been a controversial problem for centuries. Long-time data of solar activity is required by the investigations of the solar driving mechanism, such as Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) record. Three Total Solar Irradiance Monitors (TSIM) have been developed by Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics for China Meteorological Administration to maintain continuities of TSI data series which lasted for nearly 4 decades.The newest TSIM has recorded TSI daily with accurate solar pointing on the FY-3C meteorological satellite since Oct 2013. TSIM/FY-3C has a pointing system for automatic solar tracking, onboard the satellite designed mainly for Earth observing. Most payloads of FY-3C are developed for observation of land, ocean and atmosphere. Consequently, the FY-3C satellite is a nadir-pointing spacecraft with its z axis to be pointed at the center of the Earth. Previous TSIMs onboard the FY-3A and FY-3B satellites had no pointing system, solar observations were only performed when the sun swept through field-of-view of the instruments. And TSI measurements are influenced inevitably by the solar pointing errors. Corrections of the solar pointing errors were complex. The problem is now removed by TSIM/FY-3C.TSIM/FY-3C follows the sun accurately by itself using its pointing system based on scheme of visual servo control. The pointing system is consisted of a radiometer package, two motors for solar tracking, a sun sensor and etc. TSIM/FY-3C has made daily observations of TSI for more than one year, with nearly zero solar pointing errors. Short time-scale variations in TSI detected by TSIM/FY-3C are nearly the same with VIRGO/SOHO and TIM/SORCE.Instrument details, primary results of solar pointing control, solar observations and etc will be given in the presentation.

  5. Management of unstable spinal fractures with segmental spinal instrumentation (VSP System : Results at 5 year follow up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Dipankar

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pedicle screw instrumentation has been widely used for spinal stabilisation following spinal injury with variable results. The controversial points associated with spinal injury are effects of canal compromise and decompression on neurological status. Methods: Thirty four patients of unstable thoraco-lumbar fracture with or without neuro-deficit were treated by decompression and stabilisation with VSP system and followed up for 22 - 39 months (mean 29 months. The results were evaluated by neurological recovery (ASIA score, pain relief, loss of surgical correction and functional rehabilitation (FIM score. Results: We achieved a mean post-operative correction of the kyphotic deformity by 14 degrees and an average gain of 30.2% in the canal diameter by decompression. However no correlation was established between degree of canal compromise before or after the surgery with the final neurological outcome. Conclusion: Although the infrastructure for spinal injury management in developing countries is inadequate in many aspects, we find that it is still possible to achieve results, which are comparable with standard literature by adequate decompression and stabilisation followed by appropriate rehabilitation according to the social and cultural demands of the patients.

  6. The JCMT Plane Survey: early results from the l = 30 degree field

    CERN Document Server

    Moore, T J T; Thompson, M A; Parsons, H; Urquhart, J S; Eden, D J; Dempsey, J T; Morgan, L K; Thomas, H S; Buckle, J; Brunt, C M; Butner, H; Carretero, D; Chrysostomou, A; deVilliers, H M; Fich, M; Hoare, M G; Manser, G; Mottram, J C; Natario, C; Olguin, F; Peretto, N; Polychroni, D; Redman, R O; Rigby, A J; Salji, C; Summers, L J; Berry, D; Currie, M J; Jenness, T; Pestalozzi, M; Traficante, A; Bastien, P; diFrancesco, J; Davis, C J; Evans, A; Friberg, P; Fuller, G A; Gibb, A G; Gibson, S J; Hill, T; Johnstone, D; Joncas, G; Longmore, S N; Lumsden, S L; Martin, P G; Luong, Q Nguyen; Pineda, J E; Purcell, C; Richer, J S; Schieven, G H; Shipman, R; Spaans, M; Taylor, A R; Viti, S; Weferling, B; White, G J; Zhu, M

    2015-01-01

    We present early results from the JCMT Plane Survey (JPS), which has surveyed the northern inner Galactic plane between longitudes l=7 and l=63 degrees in the 850-{\\mu}m continuum with SCUBA-2, as part of the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope Legacy Survey programme. Data from the l=30 degree survey region, which contains the massive star-forming regions W43 and G29.96, are analysed after approximately 40% of the observations had been completed. The pixel-to-pixel noise is found to be 19 mJy/beam, after a smooth over the beam area, and the projected equivalent noise levels in the final survey are expected to be around 10 mJy/beam. An initial extraction of compact sources was performed using the FellWalker method resulting in the detection of 1029 sources above a 5-{\\sigma} surface-brightness threshold. The completeness limits in these data are estimated to be around 0.2 Jy/beam (peak flux density) and 0.8 Jy (integrated flux density) and are therefore probably already dominated by source confusion in this relativ...

  7. Conference Discussion: The Challenges in Multi-Object Spectroscopy Instrument and Survey Design, and in Data Processing and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcells, M.; Skillen, I.

    2016-10-01

    The final session of the conference Multi-Object Spectroscopy in the Next Decade: Big Questions, Large Surveys, and Wide Fields, held in La Palma 2-6 March 2015, was devoted to a discussion of the challenges in designing and operating the next-generation survey spectrographs, and planning and carrying out their massive surveys. The wide-ranging 1.5-hour debate was recorded on video tape, and in this paper we report the edited transcription of the dialog.

  8. Validation of a survey instrument to assess home environments for physical activity and healthy eating in overweight children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crane Lori A

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few measures exist to measure the overall home environment for its ability to support physical activity (PA and healthy eating in overweight children. The purpose of this study was to develop and test the reliability and validity of such a measure. Methods The Home Environment Survey (HES was developed to reflect availability, accessibility, parental role modelling, and parental policies related to PA resources, fruits and vegetables (F&V, and sugar sweetened drinks and snacks (SS. Parents of overweight children (n = 219 completed the HES and concurrent behavioural assessments. Children completed the Block Kids survey and wore an accelerometer for one week. A subset of parents (n = 156 completed the HES a second time to determine test-retest reliability. Finally, 41 parent dyads living in the same home (n = 41 completed the survey to determine inter-rater reliability. Initial psychometric analyses were completed to trim items from the measure based on lack of variability in responses, moderate or higher item to scale correlation, or contribution to strong internal consistency. Inter-rater and test-retest reliability were completed using intraclass correlation coefficients. Validity was assessed using Pearson correlations between the HES scores and child and parent nutrition and PA. Results Eight items were removed and acceptable internal consistency was documented for all scales (α = .66–84 with the exception of the F&V accessibility. The F&V accessibility was reduced to a single item because the other two items did not meet reliability standards. Test-retest reliability was high (r > .75 for all scales. Inter-rater reliability varied across scales (r = .22–.89. PA accessibility, parent role modelling, and parental policies were all related significantly to child (r = .14–.21 and parent (r = .15–.31 PA. Similarly, availability of F&V and SS, parental role modelling, and parental policies were related to child (r

  9. The European CRT Survey : 1 year (9-15 months) follow-up results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogale, Nigussie; Priori, Silvia; Cleland, John G. F.; Brugada, Josep; Linde, Cecilia; Auricchio, Angelo; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Limbourg, Tobias; Gitt, Anselm; Gras, Daniel; Stellbrink, Christoph; Gasparini, Maurizio; Metra, Marco; Derumeaux, Genevieve; Gadler, Fredrik; Buga, Laszlo; Dickstein, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Aims The European CRT Survey is a joint initiative of the Heart Failure Association (HFA) and the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) of the European Society of Cardiology evaluating the contemporary implantation practice of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) in Europe. Methods and results

  10. Inadequate control of heart rate in patients with stable angina: results from the European heart survey.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daly, C.A.; Clemens, F.; Sendon, J.L.; Tavazzi, L.; Boersma, E.; Danchin, N.; Delahaye, F.; Gitt, A.; Julian, D.; Mulcahy, D.; Ruzyllo, W.; Thygesen, K.; Verheugt, F.W.A.; Fox, K.M.

    2010-01-01

    AIMS: To examine resting heart rate (HR) in a population presenting with stable angina in relation to prior and subsequent pharmacological treatment, comorbid conditions and clinical outcome. METHODS AND RESULTS: The European Heart Survey was a prospective, observational, cohort study of 3779 patien

  11. The Changing Landscape of Principal Preparation: An Analysis of Statewide Longitudinal Program Component Survey Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friend, Jennifer; Watson, Robert

    2014-01-01

    This article examines comparative survey results for 16 principal preparation programs located in the Midwestern state of Missouri across a four-year time period from 2008 to 2012. The authors are founding members of a statewide Higher Education Evaluation Committee (HEEC), which has been meeting on a monthly basis since 2005, comprised of faculty…

  12. Quality metrics currently used in academic radiology departments: results of the QUALMET survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Eric A; Petscavage-Thomas, Jonelle M; Fotos, Joseph S; Bruno, Michael A

    2017-03-01

    We present the results of the 2015 quality metrics (QUALMET) survey, which was designed to assess the commonalities and variability of selected quality and productivity metrics currently employed by a large sample of academic radiology departments representing all regions in the USA. The survey of key radiology metrics was distributed in March-April of 2015 via personal e-mail to 112 academic radiology departments. There was a 34.8% institutional response rate. We found that most academic departments of radiology commonly utilize metrics of hand hygiene, report turn around time (RTAT), relative value unit (RVU) productivity, patient satisfaction and participation in peer review. RTAT targets were found to vary widely. The implementation of radiology peer review and the variety of ways in which peer review results are used within academic radiology departments, the use of clinical decision support tools and requirements for radiologist participation in Maintenance of Certification also varied. Policies for hand hygiene and critical results communication were very similar across all institutions reporting, and most departments utilized some form of missed case/difficult case conference as part of their quality and safety programme, as well as some form of periodic radiologist performance reviews. Results of the QUALMET survey suggest many similarities in tracking and utilization of the selected quality and productivity metrics included in our survey. Use of quality indicators is not a fully standardized process among academic radiology departments. Advances in knowledge: This article examines the current quality and productivity metrics in academic radiology.

  13. The Philippines Is Marlboro Country for Youth Smoking: Results from the Global Youth Tobacco Survey (GYTS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Randy M.; West, Joshua H.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine cigarette brand preference trends and differences in Marlboro smokers in smoking-related attitudes and behaviors from smokers of other brands. This study analyzed data from 25,027 adolescents represented in the 2000, 2003, and 2007 Philippine Global Youth Tobacco Surveys. Results indicated that from 2000…

  14. What Do AEFA Members Say? Summary of Results of an Education Finance and Policy Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiefel, Leanna; Schwartz, Amy Ellen; Rotenberg, Anne

    2011-01-01

    In the spring of 2008 the authors surveyed members of the American Education Finance Association (AEFA) to gain insight into their views on education policy issues. The results summarize opinions of this broad group of education researchers and practitioners, providing AEFA members and education leaders with access to views that may be helpful as…

  15. Factors Influencing Service-Learning Utilization in Social Work: Results from an Online Survey of Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronley, Courtney; Madden, Elissa; Davis, Jaya; Preble, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    The current study (N = 209) explored service-learning utilization in social work education by examining the influence of personal and institutional characteristics, perceived barriers, and beliefs about service-learning outcomes. Results of an online survey of social work educators showed that neither personal nor institutional characteristics…

  16. The Philippines Is Marlboro Country for Youth Smoking: Results from the Global Youth Tobacco Survey (GYTS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Randy M.; West, Joshua H.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine cigarette brand preference trends and differences in Marlboro smokers in smoking-related attitudes and behaviors from smokers of other brands. This study analyzed data from 25,027 adolescents represented in the 2000, 2003, and 2007 Philippine Global Youth Tobacco Surveys. Results indicated that from 2000…

  17. Working Conditions of Foreign Language Teachers: Results from a Pilot Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Gomez, Coral; Albright, Jeremy J.

    2009-01-01

    Recent research has consistently shown that teacher working conditions are highly predictive of faculty turnover and student performance. However, very little work investigates specifically the experiences of foreign-language instructors. This paper reports results from a pilot survey of language teachers in public and private schools from across…

  18. Gerontological Training in the Mental Health Professions: The Results of a National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Nancy E.; Agresti, Albert A.

    1999-01-01

    Presents the results of a survey of 458 mental health training programs regarding the availability of coursework, research opportunities, and clinical training experiences to prepare their students for work with older adults. There were significant differences among counseling psychology, clinical psychology, MSW, and MA programs concerning the…

  19. Physics Bachelor's Degrees: Results from the 2010 Survey of Enrollments and Degrees. Focus On

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvey, Patrick J.; Nicholson, Starr

    2012-01-01

    The Statistical Research Center of the American Institute of Physics conducts an annual census of all degree-granting physics departments in the United States and Puerto Rico. The survey had a 95% response rate from the 751 departments that granted physics bachelor's degrees in the class of 2010. Results show that the number of physics bachelor's…

  20. Bullying in Middle Schools: Results from a Four-School Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pergolizzi, Fabianna; Richmond, Darren; Macario, Samantha; Gan, Zoe; Richmond, Charlotte; Macario, Everly

    2009-01-01

    The suicide of a cyberbullied student prompted the school-aged authors of this article to administer a Child Abuse Prevention Services survey to 587 students in seventh and eighth grades at four schools. Results showed that 4 of 5 students felt bullying is a problem, with 1 in 3 admitting to having bullied someone. Of those who did nothing when…

  1. What Do AEFA Members Say? Summary of Results of an Education Finance and Policy Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiefel, Leanna; Schwartz, Amy Ellen; Rotenberg, Anne

    2011-01-01

    In the spring of 2008 the authors surveyed members of the American Education Finance Association (AEFA) to gain insight into their views on education policy issues. The results summarize opinions of this broad group of education researchers and practitioners, providing AEFA members and education leaders with access to views that may be helpful as…

  2. Promoting oral health of children through schools--results from a WHO global survey 2012

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jürgensen, N; Petersen, P E

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews the range of school-based approaches to oral health and describes what is meant by a Health Promoting School. The paper then reports the results of a World Health Organization global survey of school-based health promotion. Purposive sampling across 100 countries produced 108...

  3. Wildland fire, risk, and recovery: results of a national survey with regional and racial perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. Michael Bowker; Siew Hoon Lim; H. Ken Cordell; Gary T. Green; Sandra Rideout-Hanzak; Cassandra Y. Johnson

    2008-01-01

    We used a national household survey to examine knowledge, attitudes, and preferences pertaining to wildland fire. First, we present nationwide results and trends. Then, we examine opinions across region and race. Despite some regional variation, respondents are fairly consistent in their beliefs about assuming personal responsibility for living in fire-prone areas and...

  4. On the Integration of Computer Algebra Systems (CAS) by Canadian Mathematicians: Results of a National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buteau, Chantal; Jarvis, Daniel H.; Lavicza, Zsolt

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we outline the findings of a Canadian survey study (N = 302) that focused on the extent of computer algebra systems (CAS)-based technology use in postsecondary mathematics instruction. Results suggest that a considerable number of Canadian mathematicians use CAS in research and teaching. CAS use in research was found to be the…

  5. Tenure Standards in Political Science Departments: Results from a Survey of Department Chairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothgeb, John M., Jr.; Burger, Betsy

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the results from a survey of political science department chairs regarding the tenure procedures and standards at their colleges or universities. The findings reveal that only a small fraction of the colleges and universities in the United States refuse to offer tenure or are attempting to limit tenure. We also find general…

  6. The European CRT Survey : 1 year (9-15 months) follow-up results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogale, Nigussie; Priori, Silvia; Cleland, John G. F.; Brugada, Josep; Linde, Cecilia; Auricchio, Angelo; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Limbourg, Tobias; Gitt, Anselm; Gras, Daniel; Stellbrink, Christoph; Gasparini, Maurizio; Metra, Marco; Derumeaux, Genevieve; Gadler, Fredrik; Buga, Laszlo; Dickstein, Kenneth

    Aims The European CRT Survey is a joint initiative of the Heart Failure Association (HFA) and the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) of the European Society of Cardiology evaluating the contemporary implantation practice of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) in Europe. Methods and results

  7. Factors Influencing Service-Learning Utilization in Social Work: Results from an Online Survey of Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronley, Courtney; Madden, Elissa; Davis, Jaya; Preble, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    The current study (N = 209) explored service-learning utilization in social work education by examining the influence of personal and institutional characteristics, perceived barriers, and beliefs about service-learning outcomes. Results of an online survey of social work educators showed that neither personal nor institutional characteristics…

  8. SSL Demonstration: SSL Adoption by Museums: Survey Results, Analysis, and Recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2014-12-01

    DOE Solid-State Lighting GATEWAY summary brief for special report on the results of a survey of the museum community regarding conversions to SSL in museums. Responses provided real-world insight into how LEDs are being incorporated into museums, and what successes and hurdles have been encountered in the process.

  9. Results of User Satisfaction Surveys for 18 buildings, 3rd Draft

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Olena Kalyanova; Heiselberg, Per

    This report is prepared to assemble and to summarise all user satisfaction surveys available for buildings from Building AdVent project. The report is organised so, that results for each building presented in a separate chapter. Moreover, the report is divided into six parts, these are, as follow...

  10. Results of an Institutional LGBT Climate Survey at an Academic Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chester, Sean D; Ehrenfeld, Jesse M; Eckstrand, Kristen L

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the climate and culture experienced by lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) employees and students at one large academic medical center. An anonymous, online institutional climate survey was used to assess the attitudes and experiences of LGBT employees and students. There were 42 LGBT and 14 non-LGBT survey participants. Results revealed that a surprisingly large percentage of LGBT individuals experienced pressure to remain "closeted" and were harassed despite medical center policies of non-discrimination. Continuing training, inclusive policies and practices, and the development of mechanisms to address LGBT-specific harassment are necessary for improving institutional climate.

  11. Offroad vehicle riders in Big Cypress National Preserve: Results from a survey of permit holders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, T.; Kendra, A.; Roggenbuck, J.; Hall, T.; Marion, J.L.

    1999-01-01

    A survey of 800 offroad vehicle (ORV) owners at Big Cypress National Preserve, Florida, was conducted to obtain information on visitor characteristics and management preferences. This report characterizes survey results for riders of all-terrain vehicles, swamp buggies, standard 4-wheeled street vehicles, and airboats. Riders tended to feel satisfied with their ORV experiences and Preserve conditions. Riders were strongly opposed to management approaches that would restrict use or require certain behaviors. More favored were management actions to encourage low impact use practices

  12. Violence Against Women in Hong Kong: Results of the International Violence Against Women Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhours, Brigitte; Broadhurst, Roderic

    2015-11-01

    In Hong Kong, nearly 1,300 women participated by telephone in the International Violence Against Women Survey in 2006. One in five respondents had experienced violence since age 16. Sexual violence (13.4%) was more frequent than physical violence (11.7%). Women were more likely to be abused by men they knew (13.5%) than by strangers (8%). Compared with other surveyed countries, Hong Kong recorded among the lowest rates of violence by both intimate partners and non-partners. These results suggest that cultural influences linked to the interaction of modernization and some protective factors found in the adherence to traditional Chinese values are relevant.

  13. First Kepler results on compact pulsators VI. Targets in the final half of the survey phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    H. Østensen, R.; Silvotti, R.; Charpinet, S.;

    2011-01-01

    We present results from the final six months of a survey to search for pulsations in white dwarfs and hot subdwarf stars with the Kepler spacecraft. Spectroscopic observations are used to separate the objects into accurate classes, and we explore the physical parameters of the subdwarf B (sd....... No V361 Hya type of short-period pulsating sdB stars were found in this half, leaving us with a total of one single multiperiodic V361 Hya and 13 V1093 Her pulsators for the full survey. Except for the sdB pulsators, no other clearly pulsating hot subdwarfs or white dwarfs were found, although a few...

  14. Head teacher professional networks in Italy: preliminary results of a national survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurissens Isabel de

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we present the preliminary results of a national survey conducted by INDIRE on head teachers communities and professional networks. About one-fourth of the total population of Italian public school leaders participated in the survey. One of the main intents of this research is to contribute to understanding of the phenomenon of professional networks frequented by school leaders and to pave the way for a further reflection on how to use such networks for head teachers’ training so as to support their daily professional practice conducted too often in isolation.

  15. The Galactic O-Star Spectral Survey (GOSSS) Project status and first results

    CERN Document Server

    Sota, Alfredo; Barbá, Rodolfo H; Walborn, Nolan R; Alfaro, Emilio J; Gamen, Roberto C; Morrell, Nidia I; Arias, Julia I; Ordaz, Miguel Penadés

    2011-01-01

    The Galactic O-Star Spectroscopic Survey (GOSSS) is a project that is observing all known Galactic O stars with B < 13 (~2000 objects) in the blue-violet part of the spectrum with R~2500. It also includes two companion surveys (a spectroscopic one at R~1500 and a high resolution imaging one). It is based on v2.0 of the Galactic O star catalog (v1, Ma\\'iz-Apell\\'aniz et al. 2004; v2, Sota et al. 2008). We have completed the first part of the main project. Here we present results on the first 400 objects of the sample.

  16. Plane and geodetic surveying

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Aylmer

    2004-01-01

    Plane and Geodetic Surveying blends theory and practice, conventional techniques and GPS, to provide the ideal book for students of surveying.Detailed guidance is given on how and when the principle surveying instruments (theodolites, Total Stations, levels and GPS) should be used. Concepts and formulae needed to convert instrument readings into useful results are explained. Rigorous explanations of the theoretical aspects of surveying are given, while at the same time a wealth of useful advice about conducting a survey in practice is provided. An accompanying least squares adjustment program

  17. The HI Mass Function Derived from the 30% ALFALFA Survey: First Results and Environmental Dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Ann

    2010-01-01

    When complete, the ALFALFA survey catalog will cover 7000 square degrees and provide a catalog with 30,000 detections, improving our understanding of the density of HI in the local Universe and its environmental dependence. Following 585 observing runs with a total of 3400 hours of telescope time, observations for the ALFALFA survey are now 77% complete. Data reduction and catalog production has been completed for two large contiguous sections in the Virgo and anti-Virgo directions ( 1600 and 530 square degrees, respectively), and the ALFALFA survey now has the largest sample of blindly HI-selected galaxies. The regions analyzed here are 07h30ALFALFA Survey and contain on the order of 10,000 HI selected galaxies in a range of local environments, out to distances of 250 Mpc. In particular, this catalog contains 300 galaxies with log HI mass less than 8.0 solar masses, providing a robust determination of the low-mass end of the HI mass function presented here. Along with these preliminary results, we compare the HI mass function in the region containing the overdense Virgo cluster to that in the anti-Virgo direction, which includes the void in the foreground of the Pisces-Perseus supercluster. Finally, we discuss future improvements to this first HI mass function estimate from the ALFALFA survey. This work is partly supported by NSF grant AST-0607007 and the Brinson Foundation.

  18. Competency Recommendations for Advancing Nursing Informatics in the Next Decade: International Survey Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronquillo, Charlene; Topaz, Maxim; Pruinelli, Lisiane; Peltonen, Laura-Maria; Nibber, Raji

    2017-01-01

    The IMIA-NIstudents' and emerging professionals' working group conducted a large international survey in 2015 regarding research trends in nursing informatics. The survey was translated into half-a-dozen languages and distributed through 18 international research collaborators' professional connections. The survey focused on the perspectives of nurse informaticians. A total of 272 participants responded to an open ended question concerning recommendations to advance nursing informatics. Five key areas for action were identified through our thematic content analysis: education, research, practice, visibility and collaboration. This chapter discusses these results with implications for nursing competency development. We propose how components of various competency lists might support the key areas for action. We also identify room to further develop existing competency guidelines to support in-service education for practicing nurses, promote nursing informatics visibility, or improve and facilitate collaboration and integration with other professions.

  19. 2016 Annual Inspection and Radiological Survey Results for the Piqua, Ohio, Decommissioned Reactor Site, July 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmerman, Brian [USDOE Office of Legacy Management, Washington, DC (United States); Miller, Michele [Navarro Research and Engineering, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-07-01

    This report presents the findings of the annual inspection and radiological survey of the Piqua, Ohio, Decommissioned Reactor Site (site). The decommissioned nuclear power demonstration facility was inspected and surveyed on April 15, 2016. The site, located on the east bank of the Great Miami River in Piqua, Ohio, was in fair physical condition. There is no requirement for a follow-up inspection, partly because City of Piqua (City) personnel participated in a March 2016 meeting to address reoccurring safety concerns. Radiological survey results from 104 locations revealed no removable contamination. One direct beta activity reading in a floor drain on the 56-foot level (1674 disintegrations per minute [dpm]/100 square centimeters [cm2]) exceeded the minimum detectable activity (MDA). Beta activity has been detected in the past at this floor drain. The reading was well below the action level of 5000 dpm/100 cm2.

  20. An epistemology and expectations survey about experimental physics: Development and initial results

    CERN Document Server

    Zwickl, Benjamin M; Finkelstein, Noah; Lewandowski, H J

    2013-01-01

    In response to national calls to better align physics laboratory courses with the way physicists engage in research, we have developed an epistemology and expectations survey to assess how students perceive the nature of physics experiments in the contexts of laboratory courses and the professional research laboratory. The Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey for Experimental Physics (E-CLASS) evaluates students' shifts in epistemology and affect at the beginning and end of a semester. Also, at the end of the semester, the E-CLASS assesses students' reflections on their course's expectations for earning a good grade. By basing survey statements on widely embraced learning goals and common critiques of teaching labs, the E-CLASS serves as an assessment tool for lab courses across the undergraduate curriculum and as a tool for PER research. We present the development, evidence of validation, and initial formative assessment results from a sample that includes 45 classes at 20 institutions. We also d...