WorldWideScience

Sample records for survey instrument calibrations

  1. Calibration of Geodetic Instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Bajtala

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The problem of metrology and security systems of unification, correctness and standard reproducibilities belong to the preferred requirements of theory and technical practice in geodesy. Requirements on the control and verification of measured instruments and equipments increase and the importance and up-to-date of calibration get into the foreground. Calibration possibilities of length-scales (of electronic rangefinders and angle-scales (of horizontal circles of geodetic instruments. Calibration of electronic rangefinders on the linear comparative baseline in terrain. Primary standard of planar angle – optical traverse and its exploitation for calibration of the horizontal circles of theodolites. The calibration equipment of the Institute of Slovak Metrology in Bratislava. The Calibration process and results from the calibration of horizontal circles of selected geodetic instruments.

  2. Calibration of "Babyline" RP instruments

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

      If you have old RP instrumentation of the “Babyline” type, as shown in the photo, please contact the Radiation Protection Group (Joffrey Germa, 73171) to have the instrument checked and calibrated. Thank you. Radiation Protection Group

  3. Calibration of shaft alignment instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemming, Bjorn

    1998-09-01

    Correct shaft alignment is vital for most rotating machines. Several shaft alignment instruments, ranging form dial indicator based to laser based, are commercially available. At VTT Manufacturing Technology a device for calibration of shaft alignment instruments was developed during 1997. A feature of the developed device is the similarity to the typical use of shaft alignment instruments i.e. the rotation of two shafts during the calibration. The benefit of the rotation is that all errors of the shaft alignment instrument, for example the deformations of the suspension bars, are included. However, the rotation increases significantly the uncertainty of calibration because of errors in the suspension of the shafts in the developed device for calibration of shaft alignment instruments. Without rotation the uncertainty of calibration is 0.001 mm for the parallel offset scale and 0,003 mm/m for the angular scale. With rotation the uncertainty of calibration is 0.002 mm for the scale and 0.004 mm/m for the angular scale.

  4. ALTEA: The instrument calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaconte, V. [INFN and University of Rome Tor Vergata, Department of Physics, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Rome (Italy)], E-mail: livio.narici@roma2.infn.it; Belli, F.; Bidoli, V.; Casolino, M.; Di Fino, L.; Narici, L.; Picozza, P.; Rinaldi, A. [INFN and University of Rome Tor Vergata, Department of Physics, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Rome (Italy); Sannita, W.G. [DISM, University of Genova, Genova (Italy); Department of Psychiatry, SUNY, Stoony Brook, NY (United States); Finetti, N.; Nurzia, G.; Rantucci, E.; Scrimaglio, R.; Segreto, E. [Department of Physics, University and INFN, L' Aquila (Italy); Schardt, D. [GSI/Biophysik, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2008-05-15

    The ALTEA program is an international and multi-disciplinary project aimed at studying particle radiation in space environment and its effects on astronauts' brain functions, as the anomalous perception of light flashes first reported during Apollo missions. The ALTEA space facility includes a 6-silicon telescopes particle detector, and is onboard the International Space Station (ISS) since July 2006. In this paper, the detector calibration at the heavy-ion synchrotron SIS18 at GSI Darmstadt will be presented and compared to the Geant 3 Monte Carlo simulation. Finally, the results of a neural network analysis that was used for ion discrimination on fragmentation data will also be presented.

  5. Instrument Calibration and Certification Procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, R. Wesley [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-05-31

    The Amptec 640SL-2 is a 4-wire Kelvin failsafe resistance meter, designed to reliably use very low-test currents for its resistance measurements. The 640SL-1 is a 2-wire version, designed to support customers using the Reynolds Industries type 311 connector. For both versions, a passive (analog) dual function DC Milliameter/Voltmeter allows the user to verify the actual 640SL output current level and the open circuit voltage on the test leads. This procedure includes tests of essential performance parameters. Any malfunction noticed during calibration, whether specifically tested for or not, shall be corrected before calibration continues or is completed.

  6. Calibration of the COBE FIRAS instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fixsen, D. J.; Cheng, E. S.; Cottingham, D. A.; Eplee, R. E., Jr.; Hewagama, T.; Isaacman, R. B.; Jensen, K. A.; Mather, J. C.; Massa, D. L.; Meyer, S. S.

    1994-01-01

    The Far-Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) instrument on the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite was designed to accurately measure the spectrum of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) in the frequency range 1-95/cm with an angular resolution of 7 deg. We describe the calibration of this instrument, including the method of obtaining calibration data, reduction of data, the instrument model, fitting the model to the calibration data, and application of the resulting model solution to sky observations. The instrument model fits well for calibration data that resemble sky condition. The method of propagating detector noise through the calibration process to yield a covariance matrix of the calibrated sky data is described. The final uncertainties are variable both in frequency and position, but for a typical calibrated sky 2.6 deg square pixel and 0.7/cm spectral element the random detector noise limit is of order of a few times 10(exp -7) ergs/sq cm/s/sr cm for 2-20/cm, and the difference between the sky and the best-fit cosmic blackbody can be measured with a gain uncertainty of less than 3%.

  7. HPS instrument calibration laboratory accreditation program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masse, F.X; Eisenhower, E.H.; Swinth, K.L.

    1993-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is to provide an accurate overview of the development and structure of the program established by the Health Physics Society (HPS) for accrediting instrument calibration laboratories relative to their ability to accurately calibrate portable health physics instrumentation. The purpose of the program is to provide radiation protection professionals more meaningful direct and indirect access to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) national standards, thus introducing a means for improving the uniformity, accuracy, and quality of ionizing radiation field measurements. The process is designed to recognize and document the continuing capability of each accredited laboratory to accurately perform instrument calibration. There is no intent to monitor the laboratory to the extent that each calibration can be guaranteed by the program; this responsibility rests solely with the accredited laboratory.

  8. NASA AURA HIRDLS instrument calibration facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepplewhite, Christopher L.; Barnett, John J.; Watkins, Robert E. J.; Row, Frederick; Wolfenden, Roger; Djotni, Karim; Oduleye, Olusoji O.; Whitney, John G.; Walton, Trevor W.; Arter, Philip I.

    2003-11-01

    A state-of-the-art calibration facility was designed and built for the calibration of the HIRDLS instrument at the University of Oxford, England. This paper describes the main features of the facility, the driving requirements and a summary of the performance that was achieved during the calibration. Specific technical requirements and a summary of the performance that was achieved during the calibration. Specific technical requirements and other constaints determined the design solutions that were adopted and the implementation methodology. The main features of the facility included a high performance clean room, vacuum chamber with thermal environmental control as well as the calibration sources. Particular attention was paid to maintenance of cleanliness (molecular and particulate), ESD control, mechanical isolation and high reliability. Schedule constraints required that all the calibration sources were integrated into the facility so that the number of re-press and warm up cycles was minimized and so that all the equipment could be operated at the same time.

  9. HIRDLS instrument radiometric calibration black body targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepplewhite, Christopher L.; Watkins, Robert E. J.; Row, Frederick; Barnett, John J.; Peters, Daniel M.; Palmer, Christopher W. P.; Wolfenden, Roger; Djotni, Karim; Arter, Philip I.

    2003-11-01

    The pre-launch calibration of the HIRDLS instrument took place in a dedicated facility at the University of Oxford. One aspect of this calibration was the determination of the response of the instrument to black body radiation. This was achieved with the use of purpose built full aperture black body targets which were mounted in the vacuum chamber together with all of the calibration equipment. Special attention was placed on the absolute knowledge of the emission from these targets. This was done through a combination of thermometric sensor calibration traceable to the International Temperature Standard (ITS-90), surface emission measurements, cavity design and modeling and controlling the stray light sources in the vacuum chamber. This paper describes the design requirements, implementation and performance achieved.

  10. Calibration facility for environment dosimetry instruments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bercea, Sorin; Celarel, Aurelia; Cenusa, Constantin [Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, 30 Reactorului St, Magurele, Jud Ilfov, P.O.B. MG-6, RO-077125 (Romania)

    2013-12-16

    In the last ten years, the nuclear activities, as well as the major nuclear events (see Fukushima accident) had an increasing impact on the environment, merely by contamination with radioactive materials. The most conferment way to quickly identify the presence of some radioactive elements in the environment, is to measure the dose-equivalent rate H. In this situation, information concerning the values of H due only to the natural radiation background must exist. Usually, the values of H due to the natural radiation background, are very low (∼10{sup −9} - 10{sup −8} Sv/h). A correct measurement of H in this range involve a performing calibration of the measuring instruments in the measuring range corresponding to the natural radiation background lead to important problems due to the presence of the natural background itself the best way to overlap this difficulty is to set up the calibration stand in an area with very low natural radiation background. In Romania, we identified an area with such special conditions at 200 m dept, in a salt mine. This paper deals with the necessary requirements for such a calibration facility, as well as with the calibration stand itself. The paper includes also, a description of the calibration stand (and images) as well as the radiological and metrological parameters. This calibration facilities for environment dosimetry is one of the few laboratories in this field in Europe.

  11. Calibration facility for environment dosimetry instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercea, Sorin; Celarel, Aurelia; Cenusa, Constantin

    2013-12-01

    In the last ten years, the nuclear activities, as well as the major nuclear events (see Fukushima accident) had an increasing impact on the environment, merely by contamination with radioactive materials. The most conferment way to quickly identify the presence of some radioactive elements in the environment, is to measure the dose-equivalent rate H. In this situation, information concerning the values of H due only to the natural radiation background must exist. Usually, the values of H due to the natural radiation background, are very low (˜10-9 - 10-8 Sv/h). A correct measurement of H in this range involve a performing calibration of the measuring instruments in the measuring range corresponding to the natural radiation background lead to important problems due to the presence of the natural background itself the best way to overlap this difficulty is to set up the calibration stand in an area with very low natural radiation background. In Romania, we identified an area with such special conditions at 200 m dept, in a salt mine. This paper deals with the necessary requirements for such a calibration facility, as well as with the calibration stand itself. The paper includes also, a description of the calibration stand (and images) as well as the radiological and metrological parameters. This calibration facilities for environment dosimetry is one of the few laboratories in this field in Europe.

  12. On-orbit instrument calibration of CALET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javaid, Amir; Calet Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The CALorimetric Electron Telescope (CALET) is a high-energy cosmic ray experiment which will be placed on the International Space Station in 2015. Primary goals of CALET are measurement of cosmic ray electron spectra from 1 GeV to 20 TeV, gamma rays from 10 GeV to 10 TeV, and protons and nuclei from 10 GeV up to 1000 TeV. The detector consists of three main components: a Charge Detector (CHD), Imaging Calorimeter (IMC), and Total Absorption Calorimeter (TASC). As CALET is going to work in the ISS orbit space environment, it needs to be calibrated while it is in orbit. Penetrating non-showering protons and helium nuclei are prime candidates for instrument calibration, as they provide a known energy signal for calibrating the detector response. In the present paper, we discuss estimation of CALET's detector efficiency to protons and helium nuclei. Included is a discussion of different galactic cosmic ray and trapped proton models used for flux calculation and simulations performed for detector geometric area and trigger rate calculation. This paper also discusses the importance of the albedo proton flux for the CALET detector calibration. This research was supported by NASA at Louisiana State University under Grant Number NNX11AE01G.

  13. Ozone measurement systems: associated instrumentation and calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bellido

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The harmful effects produced by ozone have lead to a vast regulation to define and establish the quality goals of ambient air, based on common methods and criteria. The surveillance nets of atmospheric pollution are worldwide extended systems and the applied technology for the ozone measurement is nowadays quite standardized. The aim of this paper is to give a general view of the most common systems used in the ozone measurement in ambient air from a practical point of view. The used instrumentation and the usual calibration methods will be described.

  14. Portable calibration instrument of hemodialysis unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Liang-bing; Li, Dong-sheng; Chen, Ai-jun

    2013-01-01

    For the purpose of meeting the rapid development of blood purification in China, improve the level of blood purification treatment, and get rid of the plight of the foreign technology monopolization to promise patients' medical safety, a parameter-calibrator for the hemodialysis unit, which can detect simultaneously multi-parameter, is designed. The instrument includes a loop, which connects to the hemodialysis unit. Sensors are in the loop in series, so that the dialysis can flow through this loop and the sensors can acquisitive data of various parameters. In order to facilitate detection and carrying, the integrated circuit part modularly based on the ultralow-power microcontrollers,TI MSP430 is designed. High-performance and small-packaged components are used to establish a modular, high-precision, multi-functional, portable system. The functions and the key technical indexes of the instrument have reached the level of products abroad.

  15. Prelaunch calibration of the HIRDLS instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, John J.; Darbyshire, A. G.; Hepplewhite, Christopher L.; Palmer, Christopher W.; Row, F.; Venters, P.; Watkins, R. E.; Whitney, John G.; Gille, John C.; Johnson, Brian R.

    1998-11-01

    The High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS) instrument is being built jointly by the UK and USA, and is scheduled for launch on the NASA EOS Chem satellite in 2002. HIRDLS will measure the concentration of trace species and aerosol, and temperature and pressure variations in the Earth's atmosphere between about 8 and 100 km altitude. It is an infrared limb emission sounder, and a primary aim is that it should measure to much finder spatial resolution than has previously been achieved, with simultaneous 1 km vertical and 500 km horizontal resolutions, globally, every 12 hours. Achieving these objectives will depend upon very precise pre-launch calibration. This will be undertaken at Oxford University in a test laboratory that is currently being constructed specifically for the task. The instrument will be surrounded by cryogenically cooled walls, and mounted together with the test equipment on an optical table contained in a vacuum chamber. The table will be mounted independently of the chamber, on an inertial mass supported on pneumatic isolators. Test equipment is being manufactured to measure (1) the radiometric response (with an absolute accuracy equivalent to 70 mK) using full aperture black body targets, (2) the spectral response of each of the filter channels using a grating monochromator, (3) the spatial response of the instrument field of view, including low level out-of-field contributions, to 10 (mu) rad accuracy using a monochromator. The methods and equipment used are described together with the principal requirements.

  16. Calibration Base Lines for Electronic Distance Measuring Instruments (EDMI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A calibration base line (CBL) is a precisely measured, straight-line course of approximately 1,400 m used to calibrate Electronic Distance Measuring Instruments...

  17. The Second VLBA Calibrator Survey: VCS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomalont, E. B.; Petrov, L.; MacMillan, D. S.; Gordon, D.; Ma, C.

    2003-11-01

    This paper presents an extension of the Very Long Baseline Array Calibrator Survey, called VCS2, containing 276 sources. This survey fills in regions of the sky that were not completely covered by the previous VCS1 calibrator survey. The VCS2 survey includes calibrator sources near the Galactic plane, -30deganalysis of the group delays measured at 2.3 and 8.4 GHz using the Goddard Space Flight Center CALC/SOLVE package. From the VLBA snapshot observations, images of the calibrators are available, and each source is given a quality code for anticipated use. The VCS2 catalog is available from the NRAO Web site.

  18. Precision Spectrophotometric Calibration System for Dark Energy Instruments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schubnell, Michael S.

    2015-06-30

    For this research we build a precision calibration system and carried out measurements to demonstrate the precision that can be achieved with a high precision spectrometric calibration system. It was shown that the system is capable of providing a complete spectrophotometric calibration at the sub-pixel level. The calibration system uses a fast, high precision monochromator that can quickly and efficiently scan over an instrument’s entire spectral range with a spectral line width of less than 0.01 nm corresponding to a fraction of a pixel on the CCD. The system was extensively evaluated in the laboratory. Our research showed that a complete spectrophotometric calibration standard for spectroscopic survey instruments such as DESI is possible. The monochromator precision and repeatability to a small fraction of the DESI spectrograph LSF was demonstrated with re-initialization on every scan and thermal drift compensation by locking to multiple external line sources. A projector system that mimics telescope aperture for point source at infinity was demonstrated.

  19. Calibrating coastal GNSS-R instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löfgren, Johan; Haas, Rüdiger; Hobiger, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Since 2011, a GNSS-R (Global Navigation Satellite System - Reflectometry) instrument for local sea level observations is operated at the Onsala Space Observatory (Löfgren et al., 2011). The Onsala Space Observatory is the Swedish geodetic fundamental station, located at the Swedish West Coast, and contributes to the Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS) by a variety of geodetic and geophysical observations. The Onsala GNSS-R instrumentation consists of two GNSS antennas that are mounted back-to-back on a bar at the coastline extending over the open sea in southward direction. One of the antennas is upward oriented and receives the direct satellite signals, while the other antenna is downward oriented and receives the satellite signals that reflect off the sea surface. The antennas are connected to a commercial GNSS receiver each and data are recorded with sampling rate of up to 20 Hz. Satellite signals of several GNSS are received and are analysed with various different analysis strategies to provide sea level results with different temporal resolution and precision (Larson et al., 2013; Löfgren and Haas, 2014). Since the instrumentation uses GNSS signals, it is possible to derive both local sea level, i.e. relative to the coast, and absolute sea level, i.e. relative to the geocentre as realised by the GNSS. The bar carrying the two antennas can be placed in 10 different vertical positions covering a height difference of 2.5 m between the highest and lowest position. We present results from a calibration campaign of the Onsala GNSS-R instrumentation performed in 2014. During this several weeks long campaign the antennas were placed at different vertical positions for several days at each position. The recorded data are analysed with the different analysis strategies, and the results are compared to the results derived from the co-located tide gauge equipment. References - Löfgren J, Haas R, Scherneck H-G (2011). Three months of local sea-level derived from

  20. Brookhaven National Laboratory meteorological services instrument calibration plan and procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiser .

    2013-02-16

    This document describes the Meteorological Services (Met Services) Calibration and Maintenance Schedule and Procedures, The purpose is to establish the frequency and mechanism for the calibration and maintenance of the network of meteorological instrumentation operated by Met Services. The goal is to maintain the network in a manner that will result in accurate, precise and reliable readings from the instrumentation.

  1. Calibration of space instruments at the Metrology Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, R., E-mail: roman.klein@ptb.de; Fliegauf, R.; Gottwald, A.; Kolbe, M.; Paustian, W.; Reichel, T.; Richter, M.; Thornagel, R.; Ulm, G. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Berlin (Germany)

    2016-07-27

    PTB has more than 20 years of experience in the calibration of space-based instruments using synchrotron radiation to cover the UV, VUV and X-ray spectral range. New instrumentation at the electron storage ring Metrology Light Source (MLS) opens up extended calibration possibilities within this framework. In particular, the set-up of a large vacuum vessel that can accommodate entire space instruments opens up new prospects. Moreover, a new facility for the calibration of radiation transfer source standards with a considerably extended spectral range has been put into operation. Besides, characterization and calibration of single components like e.g. mirrors, filters, gratings, and detectors is continued.

  2. Radioactive standards and calibration methods for contamination monitoring instruments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Makoto [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-06-01

    Contamination monitoring in the facilities for handling unsealed radioactive materials is one of the most important procedures for radiation protection as well as radiation dose monitoring. For implementation of the proper contamination monitoring, radiation measuring instruments should not only be suitable to the purpose of monitoring, but also be well calibrated for the objective qualities of measurement. In the calibration of contamination monitoring instruments, quality reference activities need to be used. They are supplied in different such as extended sources, radioactive solutions or radioactive gases. These reference activities must be traceable to the national standards or equivalent standards. On the other hand, the appropriate calibration methods must be applied for each type of contamination monitoring instruments. In this paper, the concepts of calibration for contamination monitoring instruments, reference sources, determination methods of reference quantities and practical calibration methods of contamination monitoring instruments, including the procedures carried out in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute and some relevant experimental data. (G.K.)

  3. Calibration of Nacelle-based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yordanova, Ginka; Courtney, Michael

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for a two-beam nacelle based lidar at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements....

  4. Calibration of Nacelle-based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georgieva Yankova, Ginka; Courtney, Michael

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for a four-beam nacelle based lidar at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark.Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements...... with measurement uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements....

  5. Calibration of Ground-based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villanueva, Héctor; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given Ground-based Lidar at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement unce...

  6. Calibration of Ground -based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villanueva, Héctor; Yordanova, Ginka

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given Ground-based Lidar at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement unce...

  7. Forward Global Photometric Calibration of the Dark Energy Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, D.L.; et al.

    2017-06-05

    Many scientific goals for the Dark Energy Survey (DES) require calibration of optical/NIR broadband $b = grizY$ photometry that is stable in time and uniform over the celestial sky to one percent or better. It is also necessary to limit to similar accuracy systematic uncertainty in the calibrated broadband magnitudes due to uncertainty in the spectrum of the source. Here we present a "Forward Global Calibration Method (FGCM)" for photometric calibration of the DES, and we present results of its application to the first three years of the survey (Y3A1). The FGCM combines data taken with auxiliary instrumentation at the observatory with data from the broad-band survey imaging itself and models of the instrument and atmosphere to estimate the spatial- and time-dependence of the passbands of individual DES survey exposures. "Standard" passbands are chosen that are typical of the passbands encountered during the survey. The passband of any individual observation is combined with an estimate of the source spectral shape to yield a magnitude $m_b^{\\mathrm{std}}$ in the standard system. This "chromatic correction" to the standard system is necessary to achieve sub-percent calibrations. The FGCM achieves reproducible and stable photometric calibration of standard magnitudes $m_b^{\\mathrm{std}}$ of stellar sources over the multi-year Y3A1 data sample with residual random calibration errors of $\\sigma=5-6\\,\\mathrm{mmag}$ per exposure. The accuracy of the calibration is uniform across the $5000\\,\\mathrm{deg}^2$ DES footprint to within $\\sigma=7\\,\\mathrm{mmag}$. The systematic uncertainties of magnitudes in the standard system due to the spectra of sources are less than $5\\,\\mathrm{mmag}$ for main sequence stars with $0.5

  8. Calibration of Ground-based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yordanova, Ginka; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given Ground-based Lidar at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  9. Calibration of Ground -based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villanueva, Héctor; Yordanova, Ginka

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given Ground-based Lidar at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  10. Calibration of Ground-based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yordanova, Ginka; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given Ground-based Lidar at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  11. Calibration of Ground -based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villanueva, Héctor; Georgieva Yankova, Ginka

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given Ground-based Lidar at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  12. Multi-Instrument Inter-Calibration (MIIC System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Currey

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to have confidence in the long-term records of atmospheric and surface properties derived from satellite measurements it is important to know the stability and accuracy of the actual radiance or reflectance measurements. Climate quality measurements require accurate calibration of space-borne instruments. Inter-calibration is the process that ties the calibration of a target instrument to a more accurate, preferably SI-traceable, reference instrument by matching measurements in time, space, wavelength, and view angles. A major challenge for any inter-calibration study is to find and acquire matched samples from within the large data volumes distributed across Earth science data centers. Typically less than 0.1% of the instrument data are required for inter-calibration analysis. Software tools and networking middleware are necessary for intelligent selection and retrieval of matched samples from multiple instruments on separate spacecraft.  This paper discusses the Multi-Instrument Inter-Calibration (MIIC system, a web-based software framework used by the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO Pathfinder mission to simplify the data management mechanics of inter-calibration. MIIC provides three main services: (1 inter-calibration event prediction; (2 data acquisition; and (3 data analysis. The combination of event prediction and powerful server-side functions reduces the data volume required for inter-calibration studies by several orders of magnitude, dramatically reducing network bandwidth and disk storage needs. MIIC provides generic retrospective analysis services capable of sifting through large data volumes of existing instrument data. The MIIC tiered design deployed at large institutional data centers can help international organizations, such as Global Space Based Inter-Calibration System (GSICS, more efficiently acquire matched data from multiple data centers. In this paper we describe the MIIC

  13. Sloan Digital Sky Survey Photometric Calibration Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriner, J.

    2016-05-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey calibration is revisited to obtain the most accurate photometric calibration. A small but significant error is found in the flat-fielding of the Photometric telescope used for calibration. Two SDSS star catalogs are compared and the average difference in magnitude as a function of right ascension and declination exhibits small systematic errors in relative calibration. The photometric transformation from the SDSS Photometric Telescope to the 2.5 m telescope is recomputed and compared to synthetic magnitudes computed from measured filter bandpasses.

  14. Sloan Digital Sky Survey Photometric Calibration Revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marriner, John; /Fermilab

    2012-06-29

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey calibration is revisited to obtain the most accurate photometric calibration. A small but significant error is found in the flat-fielding of the Photometric telescope used for calibration. Two SDSS star catalogs are compared and the average difference in magnitude as a function of right ascension and declination exhibits small systematic errors in relative calibration. The photometric transformation from the SDSS Photometric Telescope to the 2.5 m telescope is recomputed and compared to synthetic magnitudes computed from measured filter bandpasses.

  15. MAGNETIC GRADIOMETRY: Instrumentation, Calibration and Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merayo, Jose Maria Garcia

    is to be used in the forthcoming satellites CHAMP and SAC-C. Linearity, thermal, radiation, dynamic and calibration tests are carried out to qualify the magnetometer in order to ensure state-of-the-art performance with subnanotesla precision. The overall calibration of the gradiometer yields an omnidirectional...... absolute accuracy of 93pT/m.The scalar calibration of a vector magnetometer is explained thoroughly. The novel method is simple and it represents the most robust and unique way to estimate the characterizing 9 parameters of a vector magnetometer. Its power relies on the linearization of the parametrization...... and offers the possibility of separating the geomagnetic field sources.By using tensor algebra the spherical harmonic expansion of the magnetic field in a curl free region and its associated gradient tensor are derived. This differential tensor quantity is then expressed by spherical coordinates...

  16. Calibration of LSST Instrumental and Atmospheric Photometric Passbands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, David L.; /SLAC; Axelrod, T.; /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ.; Barrau, Aurelien; Baumont, Sylvain; /LPSC, Grenoble; Blondin, Stephane; /Marseille, CPPM; Claver, Chuck; /NOAO, Tucson; Gorecki, Alexia; /LPSC, Grenoble; Ivezic, Zeljko; Jones, Lynne; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Krabbendam, Victor; Liang, Ming; Saha, Abhijit; /NOAO, Tucson; Smith, Allyn; /Austin Peay State U.; Smith, R.Chris; /Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Obs.; Stubbs, Christopher W.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2011-07-06

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will continuously image the entire sky visible from Cerro Pachon in northern Chile every 3-4 nights throughout the year. The LSST will provide data for a broad range of science investigations that require better than 1% photometric precision across the sky (repeatability and uniformity) and a similar accuracy of measured broadband color. The fast and persistent cadence of the LSST survey will significantly improve the temporal sampling rate with which celestial events and motions are tracked. To achieve these goals, and to optimally utilize the observing calendar, it will be necessary to obtain excellent photometric calibration of data taken over a wide range of observing conditions - even those not normally considered 'photometric'. To achieve this it will be necessary to routinely and accurately measure the full optical passband that includes the atmosphere as well as the instrumental telescope and camera system. The LSST mountain facility will include a new monochromatic dome illumination projector system to measure the detailed wavelength dependence of the instrumental passband for each channel in the system. The facility will also include an auxiliary spectroscopic telescope dedicated to measurement of atmospheric transparency at all locations in the sky during LSST observing. In this paper, we describe these systems and present laboratory and observational data that illustrate their performance.

  17. MAGNETIC GRADIOMETRY: Instrumentation, Calibration and Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merayo, Jose Maria Garcia

    The description of the single axis magnetic gradiometer based on two Compensation Detector Coil (CDC) fluxgate ringcore sensors separated 20cm introduces the subject of magnetic gradiometry. Despite its good properties and high precision of less than 1nT, the calibration procedures...... are not straightforward. Firstly, the monoaxial character does not provide the vectorial information on the magnetic field. Secondly, one of the sensors measures the ambient magnetic field and this is used to compensate the field in both sensors. Several methods have been developed for its characterization...... and the calibration of the gradient measurement is achieved by the use of a magnetic dipole pattern of strength 2mAm2. In a coil facility, the gradient can be determined with an RMS value of 0.3nT/m.The ultra high sensitivity magnetic triaxial gradiometer has been constructed by employing another approach. Two...

  18. IOT Overview: Calibrations of the VLTI Instruments (MIDI and AMBER)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morel, S.; Rantakyrö, F.; Rivinius, T.; Stefl, S.; Hummel, C.; Brillant, S.; Schöller, M.; Percheron, I.; Wittkowski, M.; Richichi, A.; Ballester, P.

    We present here a short review of the calibration processes that are currently applied to the instruments AMBER and MIDI of the VLTI (Very Large Telescope Interferometer) at Paranal. We first introduce the general principles to calibrate the raw data (the "visibilities") that have been measured by long-baseline optical interferometry. Then, we focus on the specific case of the scientific operation of the VLTI instruments. We explain the criteria that have been used to select calibrator stars for the observations with the VLTI instruments, as well as the routine internal calibration techniques. Among these techniques, the "P2VM" (Pixel-to-Visibility Matrix) in the case of AMBER is explained. Also, the daily monitoring of AMBER and MIDI, that has recently been implemented, is shortly introduced.

  19. Radiometric calibration stability and inter-calibration of solar-band instruments in orbit using the moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, T.C.

    2008-01-01

    With the increased emphasis on monitoring the Earth's climate from space, more stringent calibration requirements are being placed on the data products from remote sensing satellite instruments. Among these are stability over decade-length time scales and consistency across sensors and platforms. For radiometer instruments in the solar reflectance wavelength range (visible to shortwave infrared), maintaining calibration on orbit is difficult due to the lack of absolute radiometric standards suitable for flight use. The Moon presents a luminous source that can be viewed by all instruments in Earth orbit. Considered as a solar diffuser, the lunar surface is exceedingly stable. The chief difficulty with using the Moon is the strong variations in the Moon's brightness with illumination and viewing geometry. This mandates the use of a photometric model to compare lunar observations, either over time by the same instrument or between instruments. The U.S. Geological Survey in Flagstaff, Arizona, under NASA sponsorship, has developed a model for the lunar spectral irradiance that explicitly accounts for the effects of phase, the lunar librations, and the lunar surface reflectance properties. The model predicts variations in the Moon's brightness with precision ???1% over a continuous phase range from eclipse to the quarter lunar phases. Given a time series of Moon observations taken by an instrument, the geometric prediction capability of the lunar irradiance model enables sensor calibration stability with sub-percent per year precision. Cross-calibration of instruments with similar passbands can be achieved with precision comparable to the model precision. Although the Moon observations used for intercomparison can be widely separated in phase angle and/or time, SeaWiFS and MODIS have acquired lunar views closely spaced in time. These data provide an example to assess inter-calibration biases between these two instruments.

  20. Evaluation of multivariate calibration models transferred between spectroscopic instruments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskildsen, Carl Emil Aae; Hansen, Per W.; Skov, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    In a setting where multiple spectroscopic instruments are used for the same measurements it may be convenient to develop the calibration model on a single instrument and then transfer this model to the other instruments. In the ideal scenario, all instruments provide the same predictions for the ......In a setting where multiple spectroscopic instruments are used for the same measurements it may be convenient to develop the calibration model on a single instrument and then transfer this model to the other instruments. In the ideal scenario, all instruments provide the same predictions...... for the same samples using the transferred model. However, sometimes the success of a model transfer is evaluated by comparing the transferred model predictions with the reference values. This is not optimal, as uncertainties in the reference method will impact the evaluation. This paper proposes a new method...... for calibration model transfer evaluation. The new method is based on comparing predictions from different instruments, rather than comparing predictions and reference values. A total of 75 flour samples were available for the study. All samples were measured on ten near infrared (NIR) instruments from two...

  1. Fluorescence calibration method for single-particle aerosol fluorescence instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipley Robinson, Ellis; Gao, Ru-Shan; Schwarz, Joshua P.; Fahey, David W.; Perring, Anne E.

    2017-05-01

    Real-time, single-particle fluorescence instruments used to detect atmospheric bioaerosol particles are increasingly common, yet no standard fluorescence calibration method exists for this technique. This gap limits the utility of these instruments as quantitative tools and complicates comparisons between different measurement campaigns. To address this need, we have developed a method to produce size-selected particles with a known mass of fluorophore, which we use to calibrate the fluorescence detection of a Wideband Integrated Bioaerosol Sensor (WIBS-4A). We use mixed tryptophan-ammonium sulfate particles to calibrate one detector (FL1; excitation = 280 nm, emission = 310-400 nm) and pure quinine particles to calibrate the other (FL2; excitation = 280 nm, emission = 420-650 nm). The relationship between fluorescence and mass for the mixed tryptophan-ammonium sulfate particles is linear, while that for the pure quinine particles is nonlinear, likely indicating that not all of the quinine mass contributes to the observed fluorescence. Nonetheless, both materials produce a repeatable response between observed fluorescence and particle mass. This procedure allows users to set the detector gains to achieve a known absolute response, calculate the limits of detection for a given instrument, improve the repeatability of the instrumental setup, and facilitate intercomparisons between different instruments. We recommend calibration of single-particle fluorescence instruments using these methods.

  2. Planck 2015 results: VIII. High Frequency Instrument data processing: Calibration and maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adam, R.; Ade, P. A R; Aghanim, N.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the processing applied to the cleaned, time-ordered information obtained from the Planck High Frequency Instrument (HFI) with the aim of producing photometrically calibrated maps in temperature and (for the first time) in polarization. The data from the entire 2.5-year HFI...... mission include almost five full-sky surveys. HFI observes the sky over a broad range of frequencies, from 100 to 857 GHz. To obtain the best accuracy on the calibration over such a large range, two different photometric calibration schemes have been used. The 545 and 857 GHz data are calibrated using...... models of planetary atmospheric emission. The lower frequencies (from 100 to 353 GHz) are calibrated using the time-variable cosmological microwave background dipole, which we call the orbital dipole. This source of calibration only depends on the satellite velocity with respect to the solar system...

  3. Calibration strategies for the LAD instrument on-board LOFT

    CERN Document Server

    Pacciani, Luigi; Argan, Andrea; Barret, Didier; Bozzo, Enrico; Feroci, Marco; Fraser, George W; Herder, Jan-Willem den; Pohl, Martin; Schmid, Christian; Tenzer, Chris; Vacchi, Andrea; Walton, Dave; Zampa, Gianluigi; Zane, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    The Scientific objectives of the LOFT mission, e.g., the study of the Neutron Star equation of state and of the Strong Gravity, require accurate energy, time and flux calibration for the 500k channels of the SDD detectors, as well as the knowledge of the detector dead-time and of the detector response with respect to the incident angle of the photons. We report here the evaluations made to asses the calibration issues for the LAD instrument. The strategies for both ground and on-board calibrations, including astrophysical observations, show that the goals are achievable within the current technologies.

  4. Characterisation of pulsed Carbon fiber illuminators for FIR instrument calibration

    CERN Document Server

    Henrot-Versillé, S; Couchot, F

    2007-01-01

    We manufactured pulsed illuminators emitting in the far infrared for the Planck-HFI bolometric instrument ground calibrations. Specific measurements have been conducted on these light sources, based on Carbon fibers, to understand and predict their properties. We present a modelisation of the temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity and the calorific capacitance of the fibers. A comparison between simulations and bolometer data is given, that shows the coherence of our model. Their small time constants, their stability and their emission spectrum pointing in the submm range make these illuminators a very usefull tool for calibrating FIR instruments.

  5. Calibrating the PAU Survey's 46 Filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, A.; Castander, F.; Gaztañaga, E.; Serrano, S.; Sevilla, N.; Tonello, N.; PAU Team

    2016-05-01

    The Physics of the Accelerating Universe (PAU) Survey, being carried out by several Spanish institutions, will image an area of 100-200 square degrees in 6 broad and 40 narrow band optical filters. The team is building a camera (PAUCam) with 18 CCDs, which will be installed in the 4 meter William Herschel Telescope at La Palma in 2013. The narrow band filters will each cover 100Å, with the set spanning 4500-8500Å. The broad band set will consist of standard ugriZy filters. The narrow band filters will provide low-resolution (R˜50) photometric "spectra" for all objects observed in the survey, which will reach a depth of ˜24 mag in the broad bands and ˜22.5 mag (AB) in the narrow bands. Such precision will allow for galaxy photometric redshift errors of 0.0035(1+z), which will facilitate the measurement of cosmological parameters with precision comparable to much larger spectroscopic and photometric surveys. Accurate photometric calibration of the PAU data is vital to the survey's science goals, and is not straightforward due to the large and unusual filter set. We outline the data management pipelines being developed for the survey, both for nightly data reduction and coaddition of multiple epochs, with emphasis on the photometric calibration strategies. We also describe the tools we are developing to test the quality of the reduction and calibration.

  6. The LOFAR long baseline snapshot calibrator survey

    CERN Document Server

    Moldón, J; Wucknitz, O; Jackson, N; Drabent, A; Carozzi, T; Conway, J; Kapińska, A D; McKean, P; Morabito, L; Varenius, E; Zarka, P; Anderson, J; Asgekar, A; Avruch, I M; Bell, M E; Bentum, M J; Bernardi, G; Best, P; Bîrzan, L; Bregman, J; Breitling, F; Broderick, J W; Brüggen, M; Butcher, H R; Carbone, D; Ciardi, B; de Gasperin, F; de Geus, E; Duscha, S; Eislöffel, J; Engels, D; Falcke, H; Fallows, R A; Fender, R; Ferrari, C; Frieswijk, W; Garrett, M A; Grießmeier, J; Gunst, A W; Hamaker, J P; Hassall, T E; Heald, G; Hoeft, M; Juette, E; Karastergiou, A; Kondratiev, V I; Kramer, M; Kuniyoshi, M; Kuper, G; Maat, P; Mann, G; Markoff, S; McFadden, R; McKay-Bukowski, D; Morganti, R; Munk, H; Norden, M J; Offringa, A R; Orru, E; Paas, H; Pandey-Pommier, M; Pizzo, R; Polatidis, A G; Reich, W; Röttgering, H; Rowlinson, A; Scaife, A M M; Schwarz, D; Sluman, J; Smirnov, O; Stappers, B W; Steinmetz, M; Tagger, M; Tang, Y; Tasse, C; Thoudam, S; Toribio, M C; Vermeulen, R; Vocks, C; van Weeren, R J; White, S; Wise, M W; Yatawatta, S; Zensus, A

    2014-01-01

    Aims. An efficient means of locating calibrator sources for International LOFAR is developed and used to determine the average density of usable calibrator sources on the sky for subarcsecond observations at 140 MHz. Methods. We used the multi-beaming capability of LOFAR to conduct a fast and computationally inexpensive survey with the full International LOFAR array. Sources were pre-selected on the basis of 325 MHz arcminute-scale flux density using existing catalogues. By observing 30 different sources in each of the 12 sets of pointings per hour, we were able to inspect 630 sources in two hours to determine if they possess a sufficiently bright compact component to be usable as LOFAR delay calibrators. Results. Over 40% of the observed sources are detected on multiple baselines between international stations and 86 are classified as satisfactory calibrators. We show that a flat low-frequency spectrum (from 74 to 325 MHz) is the best predictor of compactness at 140 MHz. We extrapolate from our sample to sho...

  7. New instrument calibration facility for the DOE Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkie, W.H.; Polz, E.J. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States)

    1993-12-31

    A new laboratory facility is being designed, constructed, and equipped at the Savannah River Site (SRS) as a fiscal year 1992 line item project. This facility will provide space and equipment for test, evaluation, repair, maintenance, and calibration of radiation monitoring instrumentation. The project will replace an obsolete facility and will allow implementation of program upgrades necessary to meet ANSI N323 requirements and National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP) criteria for accreditation of federally owned secondary calibration laboratories. An outline of the project is presented including description, scope, cost, management organization, chronology, and current status. Selected design criteria and their impacts on the project are discussed. The upgraded SRS calibration program is described, and important features of the new facility and equipment that will accommodate this program are listed. The floor plan for the facility is shown, and equipment summaries and functional descriptions for each area are provided.

  8. Vacuum facility for calibration of space instrumentation in cleanroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelizzo, M. G.; Zuppella, P.; Polito, V.; Corso, A. J.; Zuccon, S.; Nicolosi, P.

    2012-09-01

    Calibration of optical systems is a fundamental step in the development of a space instrumentation. We have built a new cleanroom environment, divided in different areas characterized by a different level of contamination control. A vacuum chamber (a tube of 80 cm diameter, and 2 m length), able to accommodate optical components as well as whole instruments, is interfaced with a ISO6 area, allowing the handling of the instrumentation in a clean environment. The vacuum system is dimensioned to reach 10-7 mbar pressure in the chamber. Inside, a two axis platform allows the rotation of the instrument with respect to the incident collimating beam, in order to test the response of the instrument to light coming from different points of the field of view. A monochromator coupled with different sources provides radiation in the 40-350 nm spectral range, while a parabolic mirror is used as a collimator. As source, different spectral lamps can be used to generate emission lines, while a Xe lamp can be used to have continuum spectrum. An high brilliant hollow cathode lamp has been fabricated by the group to generate extreme ultraviolet radiation. Different calibrated detectors and other completing optical components are available.

  9. The Gaia-ESO Survey: calibration strategy

    CERN Document Server

    Pancino, E

    2016-01-01

    The Gaia-ESO survey (GES) is now in its fifth and last year of observations, and has already produced tens of thousands of high-quality spectra of stars in all Milky Way components. This paper presents the strategy behind the selection of astrophysical calibration targets, ensuring that all GES results on radial velocities, atmospheric parameters, and chemical abundance ratios will be both internally consistent and easily comparable with other literature results, especially from other large spectroscopic surveys and from Gaia. The calibration of GES is particularly delicate because of: (i) the large space of parameters covered by its targets, ranging from dwarfs to giants, from O to M stars, and with a large range of metallicities, as well as including fast rotators, emission line objects, stars affected by veiling and so on; (ii) the variety of observing setups, with different wavelength ranges and resolution; and (iii) the choice of analyzing the data with many different state-of-the art methods, each stron...

  10. Calibration of the C1XS instrument on Chandrayaan-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narendranath, S., E-mail: kcshyama@isac.gov.i [Space Astronomy Group, ISRO Satellite Centre, Bangalore 560017 (India); University of Calicut (India); Sreekumar, P. [Space Astronomy Group, ISRO Satellite Centre, Bangalore 560017 (India); Maddison, B.J.; Howe, C.J.; Kellett, B.J.; Wallner, M. [STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton (United Kingdom); Erd, C. [Advanced Studies and Technology Preparation Division, ESA, ESTEC, Noordwijk (Netherlands); Weider, S.Z. [School of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Birbeck College (United Kingdom)

    2010-09-21

    The Chandrayaan-1 X-ray spectrometer (C1XS) experiment on the Chandrayaan-1 mission was designed to carry out spectroscopic observations in the 1-10 keV range for deriving lunar chemistry. We present results from the ground calibration of the Swept Charge Devices (SCDs) on C1XS at the RESIK X-ray beam facility at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, UK. The spectral redistribution function of the SCDs are determined in the energy range from 2.3-8 keV using discrete line energies from a monochromatic X-ray beam. The detection efficiency of the SCDs are determined relative to a reference Si-PIN detector. The Si-PIN detector itself has been calibrated at the beamlines of the synchrotron facility at PTB/BESSY II. A non-Gaussian response matrix which includes probability for partial absorption events in the SCD is constructed using instrument parameters obtained from ground calibration. The calibration spectra from the {sup 55}Fe radioactive isotopes obtained from C1XS while in the lunar orbit, are used to validate the response matrix derived on ground.

  11. SMOS Instrument Performance and Calibration after 3 Years in Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Neira, Manuel; Corbella, Ignasi; Torres, Francesc; Kainulainen, Juha; Oliva, Roger; Closa, Josep; Cabot, François; Castro, Rita; Barbosa, Jose; Gutierrez, Antonio; Anterrieu, Eric; Tenerelli, Joe; Martin-Porqueras, Fernando; Buenadicha, Guillermo; Delwart, Steven; Crapolicchio, Raffaele; Suess, Martin

    2013-04-01

    ESA's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission has been in orbit for already over 3 years which has allowed the calibration and data processing team consolidating both the calibration strategy and the Level-1 processor which transforms the raw visibility samples into polarimetric brightness temperature images. The payload on board SMOS, MIRAS, is quite unique in that it is the first microwave radiometer in space ever capable to generate wide field of view images at every snapshot measurement. This means that most of the calibration as well as image processing techniques are being developed for the first time with little heritage from any previous space mission. Issues intrinsically attached to its wide field of view such as spatial ripples across the snapshot images are particular to MIRAS and to no other earlier radiometer. Even the fundamental theory behind the instrument was put at test, first on ground inside an electromagnetic compatibility chamber, and now in orbit when imaging the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation of the cold sky. A groundbreaking effort is being carried out by the SMOS project team to understand and master all calibration and image reconstruction issues of this novel microwave interferometer payload. MIRAS in-orbit performance is driven by the amplitude of spatial ripples across the image and orbital and seasonal radiometer stability. Spatial ripples are unique to interferometric radiometers and are produced by (a) a limited knowledge of the antenna patterns and, in general, of the model of the instrument, (b) some fundamental limitations related to the inverse problem of image reconstruction in undetermined conditions and (c) subtle data processing inconsistencies which are discovered and corrected. To reduce the spatial ripples sea surface salinity retrievals are performed by first removing the brightness temperature spatial errors using a uniform region of the Pacific Ocean. However soil moisture retrievals cannot benefit of

  12. CMB polarimetry with BICEP: instrument characterization, calibration, and performance

    CERN Document Server

    Takahashi, Yuki D; Battle, John O; Bierman, Evan M; Bock, James J; Chiang, H Cynthia; Dowell, C Darren; Hivon, Eric F; Holzapfel, William L; Hristov, Viktor V; Jones, William C; Kaufman, J P; Keating, Brian G; Kovac, John M; Kuo, Chao-Lin; Lange, Andrew E; Leitch, Erik M; Mason, Peter V; Matsumura, Tomotake; Nguyen, Hien T; Ponthieu, Nicolas; Rocha, Graca M; Yoon, Ki Won; Ade, P; Duband, L

    2008-01-01

    BICEP is a ground-based millimeter-wave bolometric array designed to target the primordial gravity wave signature on the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at degree angular scales. Currently in its third year of operation at the South Pole, BICEP is measuring the CMB polarization with unprecedented sensitivity at 100 and 150 GHz in the cleanest available 2% of the sky, as well as deriving independent constraints on the diffuse polarized foregrounds with select observations on and off the Galactic plane. Instrument calibrations are discussed in the context of rigorous control of systematic errors, and the performance during the first two years of the experiment is reviewed.

  13. Double-theodolite measurement system used in the image calibration of space photographic instrument

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yan; QIAO Yan-feng; SU Wan-xin; LIU Ze-xun

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of characterizing the image of space photographic instrument is to gain the space included angles from three coordinate axes in the three-dimensional coordinate of the image and the directionality of the three axes of coordinate in the frame of axes of the instrument. The two reference frames will keep in the same direction finally by adjusting according to space angles. This problem was solved by a new high-precision measurement system composed of a double-theodolite and a set of communication system. In the survey system, two TDA5005 total stations from Leica Company will be selected as the double-theodolite and the interdependence of both coordinate systems can be achieved by moving the stations only at one time. Therefore, this measurement system provides a highly efficient and high-precision surveying method to the image calibration of the space photographic instrument. According to the experiment, its measuring accuracy can reach arc-second level.

  14. Spectrometric methods used in the calibration of radiodiagnostic measuring instruments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Vries, W. [Rijksuniversiteit Utrecht (Netherlands)

    1995-12-01

    Recently a set of parameters for checking the quality of radiation for use in diagnostic radiology was established at the calibration facility of Nederlands Meetinstituut (NMI). The establishment of the radiation quality required re-evaluation of the correction factors for the primary air-kerma standards. Free-air ionisation chambers require several correction factors to measure air-kerma according to its definition. These correction factors were calculated for the NMi free-air chamber by Monte Carlo simulations for monoenergetic photons in the energy range from 10 keV to 320 keV. The actual correction factors follow from weighting these mono-energetic correction factors with the air-kerma spectrum of the photon beam. This paper describes the determination of the photon spectra of the X-ray qualities used for the calibration of dosimetric instruments used in radiodiagnostics. The detector used for these measurements is a planar HPGe-detector, placed in the direct beam of the X-ray machine. To convert the measured pulse height spectrum to the actual photon spectrum corrections must be made for fluorescent photon escape, single and multiple compton scattering inside the detector, and detector efficiency. From the calculated photon spectra a number of parameters of the X-ray beam can be calculated. The calculated first and second half value layer in aluminum and copper are compared with the measured values of these parameters to validate the method of spectrum reconstruction. Moreover the spectrum measurements offer the possibility to calibrate the X-ray generator in terms of maximum high voltage. The maximum photon energy in the spectrum is used as a standard for calibration of kVp-meters.

  15. Planck 2015 results. VIII. High Frequency Instrument data processing: Calibration and maps

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A.J.; Barreiro, R.B.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bertincourt, B.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J.J.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J.R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F.R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H.C.; Christensen, P.R.; Clements, D.L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L.P.L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B.P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R.D.; Davis, R.J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Désert, F.-X.; Diego, J.M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T.A.; Eriksen, H.K.; Falgarone, E.; Fergusson, J.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A.A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K.M.; Gratton, S.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J.E.; Hansen, F.K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.L.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S.R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W.A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K.M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A.H.; Jaffe, T.R.; Jones, W.C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T.S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C.R.; Le Jeune, M.; Leahy, J.P.; Lellouch, E.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P.B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P.M.; Macías-Pérez, J.F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P.G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; McGehee, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Moreno, R.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Mottet, S.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J.A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C.B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H.U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oxborrow, C.A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T.J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Pratt, G.W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J.P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Sauvé, A.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M.D.; Shellard, E.P.S.; Spencer, L.D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J.A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vibert, L.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L.A.; Wandelt, B.D.; Watson, R.; Wehus, I.K.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the processing applied to the Planck High Frequency Instrument (HFI) cleaned, time-ordered information to produce photometrically calibrated maps in temperature and (for the first time) in polarization. The data from the 2.5 year full mission include almost five independent full-sky surveys. HFI observes the sky over a broad range of frequencies, from 100 to 857 GHz. To get the best accuracy on the calibration over such a large range, two different photometric calibration schemes have been used. The 545 and 857 GHz data are calibrated using models of planetary atmospheric emission. The lower frequencies (from 100 to 353 GHz) are calibrated using the time-variable cosmological microwave background dipole which we call the orbital dipole. This source of calibration only depends on the satellite velocity with respect to the solar system and permits an independent measurement of the amplitude of the CMB solar dipole (3364.5 +/- 0.8 \\mu K) which is 1\\sigma\\ higher than the WMAP measurement wit...

  16. In-flight calibration of the Herschel-SPIRE instrument

    CERN Document Server

    Swinyard, B M; Baluteau, J-P; Aussel, H; Barlow, M J; Bendo, G J; Benielli, D; Bock, J; Brisbin, D; Conley, A; Conversi, L; Dowell, A; Dowell, D; Ferlet, M; Fulton, T; Glenn, J; Glauser, A; Griffin, D; Griffin, M; Guest, S; Imhof, P; Isaak, K; Jones, S; King, K; Leeks, S; Levenson, L; Lim, T L; Lu, N; Makiwa, G; Naylor, D; Nguyen, H; Oliver, S; Panuzzo, P; Papageorgiou, A; Pearson, C; Pohlen, M; Polehampton, E; Pouliquen, D; Rigopoulou, D; Ronayette, S; Roussel, H; Rykala, A; Savini, G; Schulz, B; Schwartz, A; Shupe, D; Sibthorpe, B; Sidher, S; Smith, A J; Spencer, L; Trichas, M; Triou, H; Valtchanov, I; Wesson, R; Woodcraft, A; Xu, C K; Zemcov, M; Zhang, L

    2010-01-01

    SPIRE, the Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver, is the Herschel Space Observatory's submillimetre camera and spectrometer. It contains a three-band imaging photometer operating at 250, 350 and 500 {\\mu}m, and an imaging Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) covering 194-671 {\\mu}m (447-1550 GHz). In this paper we describe the initial approach taken to the absolute calibration of the SPIRE instrument using a combination of the emission from the Herschel telescope itself and the modelled continuum emission from solar system objects and other astronomical targets. We present the photometric, spectroscopic and spatial accuracy that is obtainable in data processed through the "standard" pipelines. The overall photometric accuracy at this stage of the mission is estimated as 15% for the photometer and between 15 and 50% for the spectrometer. However, there remain issues with the photometric accuracy of the spectra of low flux sources in the longest wavelength part of the SPIRE spectrometer band. The spectromet...

  17. Development of the physician satisfaction survey instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soo Hoo, W E; Ramer, L

    1998-01-01

    Continuous quality improvement (CQI) activities depend on valid and reliable instruments to generate data. An evaluation of internal and external customer satisfaction is one of the pillars of the CQI process. This article describes the development of a valid and reliable instrument for measuring physicians' satisfaction with the orthopedic nursing units at a major medical trauma center. The physician satisfaction survey instrument was found to be internally consistent (alpha = .95). Confirmatory factor analysis revealed that 68% of the variance in physician satisfaction scores (eigenvalue = 8.14) was explained by using a single-factor model.

  18. Planck pre-launch status: High Frequency Instrument polarization calibration

    CERN Document Server

    Rosset, C; Ponthieu, N; Ade, P; Catalano, A; Conversi, L; Couchot, F; Crill, B P; Désert, F -X; Ganga, K; Giard, M; Giraud-Héraud, Y; Haïssinski, J; Henrot-Versillé, S; Holmes, W; Jones, W C; Lamarre, J -M; Lange, A; Leroy, C; Macías-Pérez, J; Maffei, B; de Marcillac, P; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Montier, L; Noviello, F; Pajot, F; Perdereau, O; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Puget, J -L; Ristorcelli, I; Savini, G; Sudiwala, R; Veneziani, M; Yvon, D

    2010-01-01

    The High Frequency Instrument of Planck will map the entire sky in the millimeter and sub-millimeter domain from 100 to 857 GHz with unprecedented sensitivity to polarization ($\\Delta P/T_{\\tiny cmb} \\sim 4\\cdot 10^{-6}$) at 100, 143, 217 and 353 GHz. It will lead to major improvements in our understanding of the Cosmic Microwave Background anisotropies and polarized foreground signals. Planck will make high resolution measurements of the $E$-mode spectrum (up to $\\ell \\sim 1500$) and will also play a prominent role in the search for the faint imprint of primordial gravitational waves on the CMB polarization. This paper addresses the effects of calibration of both temperature (gain) and polarization (polarization efficiency and detector orientation) on polarization measurements. The specific requirements on the polarization parameters of the instrument are set and we report on their pre-flight measurement on HFI bolometers. We present a semi-analytical method that exactly accounts for the scanning strategy of...

  19. Instruments for calibration and monitoring of the LHCb Muon Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Deplano, C; Lai, A

    2006-01-01

    The subject of this Ph. D. thesis is the study and the development of the instruments needed to monitor and calibrate the Muon Detector of the LHCb (Large Hadron Collider beauty) experiment. LHCb is currently under installation at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and will start to take data during 2007. The experiment will study B mesons decays to achieve a profound understanding of favour physics in the Standard Model framework and to search signs of new physics beyond. Muons can be found in the final states of many B-decays which are sensitive to CP violation. The Muon Detector has the crucial role to identify the muon particles generated by the b-hadron decays through a measurement of their transverse momentum, already at the first trigger level (Level-0). A 95% effciency in events selection is required for the Muon Trigger, which operates at the Level-0. 1380 detectors are used to equip the whole Muon System and the corresponding 122,112 readout channels must be time aligned and monitored with a resol...

  20. Planck 2015 results. VIII. High Frequency Instrument data processing: Calibration and maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planck Collaboration; Adam, R.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bertincourt, B.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Désert, F.-X.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Fergusson, J.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Le Jeune, M.; Leahy, J. P.; Lellouch, E.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; McGehee, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Moreno, R.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Mottet, S.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Sauvé, A.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vibert, L.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Watson, R.; Wehus, I. K.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes the processing applied to the cleaned, time-ordered information obtained from the Planck High Frequency Instrument (HFI) with the aim of producing photometrically calibrated maps in temperature and (for the first time) in polarization. The data from the entire 2.5-year HFI mission include almost five full-sky surveys. HFI observes the sky over a broad range of frequencies, from 100 to 857 GHz. To obtain the best accuracy on the calibration over such a large range, two different photometric calibration schemes have been used. The 545 and 857 GHz data are calibrated using models of planetary atmospheric emission. The lower frequencies (from 100 to 353 GHz) are calibrated using the time-variable cosmological microwave background dipole, which we call the orbital dipole. This source of calibration only depends on the satellite velocity with respect to the solar system. Using a CMB temperature of TCMB = 2.7255 ± 0.0006 K, it permits an independent measurement of the amplitude of the CMB solar dipole (3364.3 ± 1.5 μK), which is approximatively 1σ higher than the WMAP measurement with a direction that is consistent between the two experiments. We describe the pipeline used to produce the maps ofintensity and linear polarization from the HFI timelines, and the scheme used to set the zero level of the maps a posteriori. We also summarize the noise characteristics of the HFI maps in the 2015 Planck data release and present some null tests to assess their quality. Finally, we discuss the major systematic effects and in particular the leakage induced by flux mismatch between the detectors that leads to spurious polarization signal.

  1. 40 CFR 92.117 - Gas meter or flow instrumentation calibration, particulate measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... calibration, particulate measurement. 92.117 Section 92.117 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... ENGINES Test Procedures § 92.117 Gas meter or flow instrumentation calibration, particulate measurement... orifice, a bellmouth nozzle, or a laminar flow element or an NIST traceable flow calibration device...

  2. Resent Progress in Research on Calibration Instrument for Radioactive Aerosol Monitor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN; Xi-lin; CHEN; Yong-yong; WU; Chang-ping; XING; Yu; MENG; Jun; YANG; Qiao-ling

    2013-01-01

    Radioactive aerosol monitors are widely used in monitoring the radioactivity concentration of the artificial nuclides in gaseous effluents from the nuclear facilities.An on-developing calibration instrument for radioactive aerosol monitors consists of an α and β aerosol generating unit,aerosol transferring unit,measurement unit of radioactivity concentration of aerosol for instruments calibrated and the waste gas

  3. Field calibration and validation of remote-sensing surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pe'eri, Shachak; McLeod, Andy; Lavoie, Paul; Ackerman, Seth D.; Gardner, James; Parrish, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    The Optical Collection Suite (OCS) is a ground-truth sampling system designed to perform in situ measurements that help calibrate and validate optical remote-sensing and swath-sonar surveys for mapping and monitoring coastal ecosystems and ocean planning. The OCS system enables researchers to collect underwater imagery with real-time feedback, measure the spectral response, and quantify the water clarity with simple and relatively inexpensive instruments that can be hand-deployed from a small vessel. This article reviews the design and performance of the system, based on operational and logistical considerations, as well as the data requirements to support a number of coastal science and management projects. The OCS system has been operational since 2009 and has been used in several ground-truth missions that overlapped with airborne lidar bathymetry (ALB), hyperspectral imagery (HSI), and swath-sonar bathymetric surveys in the Gulf of Maine, southwest Alaska, and the US Virgin Islands (USVI). Research projects that have used the system include a comparison of backscatter intensity derived from acoustic (multibeam/interferometric sonars) versus active optical (ALB) sensors, ALB bottom detection, and seafloor characterization using HSI and ALB.

  4. A Survey of Catadioptric Omnidirectional Camera Calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available For dozen years, computer vision becomes more popular, in which omnidirectional camera has a larger field of view and widely been used in many fields, such as: robot navigation, visual surveillance, virtual reality, three-dimensional reconstruction, and so on. Camera calibration is an essential step to obtain three-dimensional geometric information from a two-dimensional image. Meanwhile, the omnidirectional camera image has catadioptric distortion, which need to be corrected in many applications, thus the study of such camera calibration method has important theoretical significance and practical applications. This paper firstly introduces the research status of catadioptric omnidirectional imaging system; then the image formation process of catadioptric omnidirectional imaging system has been given; finally a simple classification of omnidirectional imaging method is given, and we discussed the advantages and disadvantages of these methods.

  5. Shear calibration biases in weak lensing surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Hirata, C M; Hirata, Christopher M.; Seljak, Uros

    2003-01-01

    We investigate biases induced by the conversion between the observed image shape to shear distortion in current weak lensing analysis methods. Such overall calibration biases cannot be detected by the standard tests such as E/B decomposition or calibration with stars. We find that the non-Gaussianity of point spread function has a significant effect and can lead to up to 15 per cent error on the linear amplitude of fluctuations sigma_8 depending on the method of analysis. This could explain some of the discrepancies seen in recent amplitude determinations from weak lensing. Using an elliptical Laguerre expansion method we develop a re-Gaussianization method which reduces the error to calibration error of order 1 per cent even for poorly resolved galaxies. We also discuss a new type of shear selection bias which results in up to roughly 8 percent underestimation of the signal. It is expected to scale with redshift, inducing errors in the growth factor extraction if not properly corrected for. Understanding and...

  6. Photometric Calibration of the Supernova Legacy Survey Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Regnault, N; Guy, J; Sullivan, M; Cuillandre, J -C; Astier, P; Balland, C; Basa, S; Carlberg, R G; Fouchez, D; Hardin, D; Hook, I M; Howell, D A; Pain, R; Perrett, K; Pritchet, C J

    2009-01-01

    We present the photometric calibration of the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS) fields. The SNLS aims at measuring the distances to SNe Ia at (0.3calibration of the survey dominates the systematic uncertainty of the key measurement of the survey, namely the dark energy equation of state. The photometric calibration of the SNLS requires obtaining a uniform response across the imager, calibrating the science field stars in each survey band (SDSS-like ugriz bands) with respect to standards with known flux in the same bands, and binding the calibration to the UBVRI Landolt standards used to calibrate the nearby SNe from the literature necessary to produce cosmological constraints. The spatial non-uniformities of the imager photometric response are mapped using dithered observations of dense stellar fields. Photometric zero-points against Landolt standards are obtained. The linearity o...

  7. Improved Photometric Calibration of the SNLS and the SDSS Supernova Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Betoule, M; Regnault, N; Cuillandre, J -C; Astier, P; Guy, J; Balland, C; Hage, P El; Hardin, D; Kessler, R; Guillou, L Le; Mosher, J; Pain, R; Rocci, P -F; Sako, M; Schahmaneche, K

    2012-01-01

    We present a combined photometric calibration of the SNLS and the SDSS supernova survey, which results from a joint effort of the SDSS and the SNLS collaborations. We deliver fluxes calibrated to the HST spectrophotometric star network for large sets of tertiary stars that cover the science fields of both surveys in all photometric bands. We also cross-calibrate directly the two surveys and demonstrate their consistency. For each survey the flat-fielding is revised based on the analysis of dithered star observations. The calibration transfer from the HST spectrophotometric standard stars to the multi-epoch tertiary standard star catalogs in the science fields follows three different paths: observations of primary standard stars with the SDSS PT telescope; observations of Landolt secondary standard stars with SNLS MegaCam instrument at CFHT; and direct observation of faint HST standard stars with MegaCam. In addition, the tertiary stars for the two surveys are cross-calibrated using dedicated MegaCam observati...

  8. The Dark Energy Survey Data Processing and Calibration System

    CERN Document Server

    Mohr, Joseph J; Bertin, Emmanuel; Daues, Gregory E; Desai, Shantanu; Gower, Michelle; Gruendl, Robert; Hanlon, William; Kuropatkin, Nikolay; Lin, Huan; Marriner, John; Petravick, Don; Sevilla, Ignacio; Swanson, Molly; Tomashek, Todd; Tucker, Douglas; Yanny, Brian

    2012-01-01

    The Dark Energy Survey (DES) is a 5000 deg2 grizY survey reaching characteristic photometric depths of 24th magnitude (10 sigma) and enabling accurate photometry and morphology of objects ten times fainter than in SDSS. Preparations for DES have included building a dedicated 3 deg2 CCD camera (DECam), upgrading the existing CTIO Blanco 4m telescope and developing a new high performance computing (HPC) enabled data management system (DESDM). The DESDM system will be used for processing, calibrating and serving the DES data. The total data volumes are high (~2PB), and so considerable effort has gone into designing an automated processing and quality control system. Special purpose image detrending and photometric calibration codes have been developed to meet the data quality requirements, while survey astrometric calibration, coaddition and cataloging rely on new extensions of the AstrOmatic codes which now include tools for PSF modeling, PSF homogenization, PSF corrected model fitting cataloging and joint mode...

  9. Calibration of Instruments for Measuring Wind Velocity and Direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogler, Raymond D.; Pilny, Miroslav J.

    1950-01-01

    Signal Corps wind equipment AN/GMQ-1 consisting of a 3-cup anemometer and wind vane was calibrated for wind velocities from 1 to 200 miles per hour. Cup-shaft failure prevented calibration at higher wind velocities. The action of the wind vane was checked and found to have very poor directional accuracy below a velocity of 8 miles per hour. After shaft failure was reported to the Signal Corps, the cup rotors were redesigned by strengthening the shafts for better operation at high velocities. The anemometer with the redesigned cup rotors was recalibrated, but cup-shaft failure occurred again at a wind velocity of approximately 220 miles per hour. In the course of this calibration two standard generators were checked for signal output variation, and a wind-speed meter was calibrated for use with each of the redesigned cup rotors. The variation of pressure coefficient with air-flow direction at four orifices on a disk-shaped pitot head was obtained for wind velocities of 37.79 53.6, and 98.9 miles per hour. A pitot-static tube mounted in the nose of a vane was calibrated up to a dynamic pressure of 155 pounds per square foot, or approximately 256 miles per hour,

  10. Designing Large-Scale Imaging Surveys for a Retrospective Relative Photometric Calibration

    CERN Document Server

    Holmes, Rory; Rix, Hans-Walter

    2012-01-01

    We study the self-calibration - the determination of a complex system response from science data alone - for precise photometric catalogs from wide-field imaging surveys. We create an artificial sky of sources and synthetically observe it under four basic survey strategies, creating an end-to-end simulation of an imaging survey for each. These catalog-level simulations include realistic measurement uncertainties and a complex focal-plane dependence of the instrument response. In the self-calibration step, we simultaneously fit for all the star fluxes and the parameters of a position-dependent flat-field. For realism, we deliberately fit with a wrong noise model and a flat-field functional basis that does not include the model that generated the synthetic data. We demonstrate that with a favorable survey strategy, a complex (but smooth) instrument response can be precisely self-calibrated. We show that returning the same sources to very different focal plane positions is the key property of any survey strategy...

  11. LBCS: the LOFAR Long-Baseline Calibrator Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Jackson, N; Deller, A; Moldón, J; Varenius, E; Morabito, L; Wucknitz, O; Carozzi, T; Conway, J; Drabent, A; Kapinska, A; Orrù, E; Brentjens, M; Blaauw, R; Kuper, G; Sluman, J; Schaap, J; Vermaas, N; Iacobelli, M; Cerrigone, L; Shulevski, A; ter Veen, S; Fallows, R; Pizzo, R; Sipior, M; Anderson, J; Avruch, M; Bell, M; van Bemmel, I; Bentum, M; Best, P; Bonafede, A; Breitling, F; Broderick, J; Brouw, W; Brüggen, M; Ciardi, B; Corstanje, A; de Gasperin, F; de Geus, E; Eislöffel, J; Engels, D; Falcke, H; Garrett, M; Griessmeier, J; Gunst, A; van Haarlem, M; Heald, G; Hoeft, M; Hörandel, J; Horneffer, A; Intema, H; Juette, E; Kuniyoshi, M; van Leeuwen, J; Loose, G; Maat, P; McFadden, R; McKay-Bukowski, D; McKean, J; Mulcahy, D; Munk, H; Pandey-Pommier, M; Polatidis, A; Reich, W; Röttgering, H; Rowlinson, A; Scaife, A; Schwarz, D; Steinmetz, M; Swinbank, J; Thoudam, S; Toribio, M; Vermeulen, R; Vocks, C; van Weeren, R; Wise, M; Yatawatta, S; Zarka, P

    2016-01-01

    (abridged). We outline LBCS (the LOFAR Long-Baseline Calibrator Survey), whose aim is to identify sources suitable for calibrating the highest-resolution observations made with the International LOFAR Telescope, which include baselines >1000 km. Suitable sources must contain significant correlated flux density (50-100mJy) at frequencies around 110--190~MHz on scales of a few hundred mas. At least for the 200--300-km international baselines, we find around 1 suitable calibrator source per square degree over a large part of the northern sky, in agreement with previous work. This should allow a randomly selected target to be successfully phase calibrated on the international baselines in over 50% of cases. Products of the survey include calibrator source lists and fringe-rate and delay maps of wide areas -- typically a few degrees -- around each source. The density of sources with significant correlated flux declines noticeably with baseline length over the range 200--600~km, with good calibrators on the longest...

  12. Comparison of Two Methodologies for Calibrating Satellite Instruments in the Visible and Near-Infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Robert A.; Brown, Steven W.; Lykke, Keith R.; Guenther, Bruce; Butler, James J.; Schwarting, Thomas; Turpie, Kevin; Moyer, David; DeLuccia, Frank; Moeller, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, satellite instruments that measure Earth-reflected solar radiation in the visible and near infrared wavelength regions have been calibrated for radiance responsivity in a two-step method. In the first step, the relative spectral response (RSR) of the instrument is determined using a nearly monochromatic light source such as a lamp-illuminated monochromator. These sources do not typically fill the field-of-view of the instrument nor act as calibrated sources of light. Consequently, they only provide a relative (not absolute) spectral response for the instrument. In the second step, the instrument views a calibrated source of broadband light, such as a lamp-illuminated integrating sphere. The RSR and the sphere absolute spectral radiance are combined to determine the absolute spectral radiance responsivity (ASR) of the instrument. More recently, a full-aperture absolute calibration approach using widely tunable monochromatic lasers has been developed. Using these sources, the ASR of an instrument can be determined in a single step on a wavelength-by-wavelength basis. From these monochromatic ASRs, the responses of the instrument bands to broadband radiance sources can be calculated directly, eliminating the need for calibrated broadband light sources such as lamp-illuminated integrating spheres. In this work, the traditional broadband source-based calibration of the Suomi National Preparatory Project (SNPP) Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) sensor is compared with the laser-based calibration of the sensor. Finally, the impact of the new full-aperture laser-based calibration approach on the on-orbit performance of the sensor is considered.

  13. Specifying and calibrating instrumentations for wideband electronic power measurements. [in switching circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesco, D. J.; Weikle, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    The wideband electric power measurement related topics of electronic wattmeter calibration and specification are discussed. Tested calibration techniques are described in detail. Analytical methods used to determine the bandwidth requirements of instrumentation for switching circuit waveforms are presented and illustrated with examples from electric vehicle type applications. Analog multiplier wattmeters, digital wattmeters and calculating digital oscilloscopes are compared. The instrumentation characteristics which are critical to accurate wideband power measurement are described.

  14. On-line calibration of process instrumentation channels in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashemian, H.M.; Farmer, J.P. [Analysis and Measurement Services Corp., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1995-04-01

    An on-line instrumentation monitoring system was developed and validated for use in nuclear power plants. This system continuously monitors the calibration status of instrument channels and determines whether or not they require manual calibrations. This is accomplished by comparing the output of each instrument channel to an estimate of the process it is monitoring. If the deviation of the instrument channel from the process estimate is greater than an allowable limit, then the instrument is said to be {open_quotes}out of calibration{close_quotes} and manual adjustments are made to correct the calibration. The success of the on-line monitoring system depends on the accuracy of the process estimation. The system described in this paper incorporates both simple intercomparison techniques as well as analytical approaches in the form of data-driven empirical modeling to estimate the process. On-line testing of the calibration of process instrumentation channels will reduce the number of manual calibrations currently performed, thereby reducing both costs to utilities and radiation exposure to plant personnel.

  15. Star Formation & Stellar Evolution: Future Surveys & Instrumentation

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, C J

    2015-01-01

    The next generation of multi-object spectrographs (MOS) will deliver comprehensive surveys of the Galaxy, Magellanic Clouds and nearby dwarfs. These will provide us with the vast samples, spanning the full extent of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, that are needed to explore the chemistry, history and dynamics of their host systems. Further ahead, the Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs) will have sufficient sensitivity and angular resolution to extend stellar spectroscopy well beyond the Local Group, opening-up studies of the chemical evolution of galaxies across a broad range of galaxy types and environments. In this contribution I briefly reflect on current and future studies of stellar populations, and introduce plans for the MOSAIC instrument for the European ELT.

  16. Application of six sigma and AHP in analysis of variable lead time calibration process instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimantho, Dino; Rahman, Tomy Abdul; Cahyadi, Bambang; Tina Hernawati, S.

    2017-02-01

    Calibration of instrumentation equipment in the pharmaceutical industry is an important activity to determine the true value of a measurement. Preliminary studies indicated that occur lead-time calibration resulted in disruption of production and laboratory activities. This study aimed to analyze the causes of lead-time calibration. Several methods used in this study such as, Six Sigma in order to determine the capability process of the calibration instrumentation of equipment. Furthermore, the method of brainstorming, Pareto diagrams, and Fishbone diagrams were used to identify and analyze the problems. Then, the method of Hierarchy Analytical Process (AHP) was used to create a hierarchical structure and prioritize problems. The results showed that the value of DPMO around 40769.23 which was equivalent to the level of sigma in calibration equipment approximately 3,24σ. This indicated the need for improvements in the calibration process. Furthermore, the determination of problem-solving strategies Lead Time Calibration such as, shortens the schedule preventive maintenance, increase the number of instrument Calibrators, and train personnel. Test results on the consistency of the whole matrix of pairwise comparisons and consistency test showed the value of hierarchy the CR below 0.1.

  17. A virtual instrument to standardise the calibration of atomic force microscope cantilevers

    CERN Document Server

    Sader, John E; Gibson, Christopher T; Haviland, David B; Higgins, Michael J; Kilpatrick, Jason I; Lu, Jianing; Mulvaney, Paul; Shearer, Cameron J; Slattery, Ashley D; Thorén, Per-Anders; Tran, Jim; Zhang, Heyou; Zhang, Hongrui; Zheng, Tian

    2016-01-01

    Atomic force microscope (AFM) users often calibrate the spring constants of cantilevers using functionality built into individual instruments. This is performed without reference to a global standard, which hinders robust comparison of force measurements reported by different laboratories. In this article, we describe a virtual instrument (an internet-based initiative) whereby users from all laboratories can instantly and quantitatively compare their calibration measurements to those of others - standardising AFM force measurements - and simultaneously enabling non-invasive calibration of AFM cantilevers of any geometry. This global calibration initiative requires no additional instrumentation or data processing on the part of the user. It utilises a single website where users upload currently available data. A proof-of-principle demonstration of this initiative is presented using measured data from five independent laboratories across three countries, which also allows for an assessment of current calibratio...

  18. Building 772 - CERN’s new calibration facility for radiation protection instruments is ready to go

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    Building 772 is becoming the new home of CERN’s calibration facility for radiation protection instrumentation. The new laboratory in Prévessin will be a state-of-the-art calibration facility and the first of its kind in both France and Switzerland, offering a wide range of possibilities with respect to radiation fields and instrumentation.   New four-axis calibration bench for radiation protection instruments.   Civil engineering work started in November 2013 in Prévessin and Building 772 is now finished and ready for inauguration. CERN’s calibration facility was previously located in Building 172 in Meyrin. Although still very accurate, the technology used was becoming obsolete and needed replacement. “Having considered different options, the decision was taken to build a new facility fully designed and conceived to meet all international safety and technical requirements of such a laboratory,” says Pie...

  19. LBCS: The LOFAR Long-Baseline Calibrator Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, N.; Tagore, A.; Deller, A.; Moldón, J.; Varenius, E.; Morabito, L.; Wucknitz, O.; Carozzi, T.; Conway, J.; Drabent, A.; Kapinska, A.; Orrù, E.; Brentjens, M.; Blaauw, R.; Kuper, G.; Sluman, J.; Schaap, J.; Vermaas, N.; Iacobelli, M.; Cerrigone, L.; Shulevski, A.; ter Veen, S.; Fallows, R.; Pizzo, R.; Sipior, M.; Anderson, J.; Avruch, I. M.; Bell, M. E.; van Bemmel, I.; Bentum, M. J.; Best, P.; Bonafede, A.; Breitling, F.; Broderick, J. W.; Brouw, W. N.; Brüggen, M.; Ciardi, B.; Corstanje, A.; de Gasperin, F.; de Geus, E.; Eislöffel, J.; Engels, D.; Falcke, H.; Garrett, M. A.; Grießmeier, J. M.; Gunst, A. W.; van Haarlem, M. P.; Heald, G.; Hoeft, M.; Hörandel, J.; Horneffer, A.; Intema, H.; Juette, E.; Kuniyoshi, M.; van Leeuwen, J.; Loose, G. M.; Maat, P.; McFadden, R.; McKay-Bukowski, D.; McKean, J. P.; Mulcahy, D. D.; Munk, H.; Pandey-Pommier, M.; Polatidis, A. G.; Reich, W.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Rowlinson, A.; Scaife, A. M. M.; Schwarz, D. J.; Steinmetz, M.; Swinbank, J.; Thoudam, S.; Toribio, M. C.; Vermeulen, R.; Vocks, C.; van Weeren, R. J.; Wise, M. W.; Yatawatta, S.; Zarka, P.

    2016-11-01

    We outline the LOFAR Long-Baseline Calibrator Survey (LBCS), whose aim is to identify sources suitable for calibrating the highest-resolution observations made with the International LOFAR Telescope, which include baselines >1000 km. Suitable sources must contain significant correlated flux density (≳ 50 - 100 mJy) at frequencies around 110-190 MHz on scales of a few hundred milliarcseconds. At least for the 200-300-km international baselines, we find around 1 suitable calibrator source per square degree over a large part of the northern sky, in agreement with previous work. This should allow a randomly selected target to be successfully phase calibrated on the international baselines in over 50% of cases. Products of the survey include calibrator source lists and fringe-rate and delay maps of wide areas - typically a few degrees - around each source. The density of sources with significant correlated flux declines noticeably with baseline length over the range 200-600 km, with good calibrators on the longest baselines appearing only at the rate of 0.5 per sq. deg. Coherence times decrease from 1-3 min on 200-km baselines to about 1 min on 600-km baselines, suggesting that ionospheric phase variations contain components with scales of a few hundred kilometres. The longest median coherence time, at just over 3 min, is seen on the DE609 baseline, which at 227 km is close to being the shortest. We see median coherence times of between 80 and 110 s on the four longest baselines (580-600 km), and about 2 min for the other baselines. The success of phase transfer from calibrator to target is shown to be influenced by distance, in a manner that suggests a coherence patch at 150-MHz of the order of 1 deg. Although source structures cannot be measured in these observations, we deduce that phase transfer is affected if the calibrator source structure is not known. We give suggestions for calibration strategies and choice of calibrator sources, and describe the access to

  20. Preparation of a new autonomous instrumented radiometric calibration site: Gobabeb, Namib Desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwell, Claire; Bialek, Agnieszka; Marks, Amelia; Woolliams, Emma; Berthelot, Béatrice; Meygret, Aimé; Marcq, Sébastien; Bouvet, Marc; Fox, Nigel

    2015-10-01

    A new permanently instrumented radiometric calibration site for high/medium resolution imaging satellite sensors is currently under development, focussing on the visible and near infra-red parts of the spectrum. The site will become a European contribution to the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) initiative RadCalNet (Radiometric Calibration Network). The exact location of the permanent monitoring instrumentation will be defined following the initial site characterisation. The new ESA/CNES RadCalNet site will have a robust uncertainty budget and its data fully SI traceable through detailed characterisation and calibration by NPL of the instruments and artefacts to be used on the site. This includes a CIMEL sun photometer (the permanent instrumentation) an ASD FieldSpec spectroradiometer, Gonio Radiometric Spectrometer System (GRASS), and reference reflectance standards.

  1. S-NPP VIIRS instrument telemetry and calibration data trend study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, ZiPing; De Luccia, Frank J.; Cardema, Jason C.; Moy, Gabriel

    2015-09-01

    The Suomi National Polar Orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) employs a large number of temperature and voltage sensors (telemetry points) to monitor instrument health and performance. We have collected data and built tools to study telemetry and calibration parameters trends. The telemetry points are organized into groups based on locations and functionalities. Examples of the groups are: telescope motor, focal plane array (FPA), scan cavity bulkhead, radiators, solar diffuser and Solar Diffuser Stability Monitor (SDSM). We have performed daily monitoring and long-term trending studies. Daily monitoring processes are automated with alarms built into the software to indicate if pre-defined limits are exceeded. Long-term trending studies focus on instrument performance and sensitivities of Sensor Data Record (SDR) products and calibration look-up tables (LUTs) to instrument temperature and voltage variations. VIIRS uses a DC Restore (DCR) process to periodically correct the analog offsets of each detector of each spectral band to ensure that the FPA output signals are always within the dynamic range of the Analog to Digital Converter (ADC). The offset values are updated based on observations of the On-Board Calibrator Blackbody source. We have performed a long-term trend study of DCR offsets and calibration parameters to explore connections of the DCR offsets with onboard calibrators. The study also shows how the instrument and calibration parameters respond to the VIIRS Petulant Mode, spacecraft (SC) anomalies and flight software (FSW) updates. We have also shown that trending studies of telemetry and calibration parameters may help to improve the instrument calibration processes and SDR Quality Flags.

  2. Earth observation sensor calibration using a global instrumented and automated network of test sites (GIANTS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teillet, Phil M.; Thome, Kurtis J.; Fox, Nigel P.; Morisette, Jeffrey T.

    2001-12-01

    Calibration is critical for useful long-term data records, as well as independent data quality control. However, in the context of Earth observation sensors, post-launch calibration and the associated quality assurance perspective are far from operational. This paper explores the possibility of establishing a global instrumented and automated network of test sites (GIANTS) for post-launch radiometric calibration of Earth observation sensors. It is proposed that a small number of well-instrumented benchmark test sites and data sets for calibration be supported. A core set of sensors, measurements, and protocols would be standardized across all participating test sites and the measurement data sets would undergo identical processing at a central secretariat. The network would provide calibration information to supplement or substitute for on-board calibration, would reduce the effort required by individual agencies, and would provide consistency for cross-platform studies. Central to the GIANTS concept is the use of automation, communication, coordination, visibility, and education, all of which can be facilitated by greater use of advanced in-situ sensor and telecommunication technologies. The goal is to help ensure that the resources devoted to remote sensing calibration benefit the intended user community and facilitate the development of new calibration methodologies (research and development) and future specialists (education and training).

  3. Design Through Integration of On-Board Calibration Device with Imaging Spectroscopy Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stange, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The main purpose of the Airborne Visible and Infrared Imaging Spectroscopy (AVIRIS) project is to "identify, measure, and monitor constituents of the Earth's surface and atmosphere based on molecular absorption and particle scattering signatures." The project designs, builds, and tests various imaging spectroscopy instruments that use On-Board Calibration devices (OBC) to check the accuracy of the data collected by the spectrometers. The imaging instrument records the spectral signatures of light collected during flight. To verify the data is correct, the OBC shines light which is collected by the imaging spectrometer and compared against previous calibration data to track spectral response changes in the instrument. The spectral data has the calibration applied to it based on the readings from the OBC data in order to ensure accuracy.

  4. Suborbital Reusable Launch Vehicles as an Opportunity to Consolidate and Calibrate Ground Based and Satellite Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, K.

    2014-12-01

    XCOR Aerospace, a commercial space company, is planning to provide frequent, low cost access to near-Earth space on the Lynx suborbital Reusable Launch Vehicle (sRLV). Measurements in the external vacuum environment can be made and can launch from most runways on a limited lead time. Lynx can operate as a platform to perform suborbital in situ measurements and remote sensing to supplement models and simulations with new data points. These measurements can serve as a quantitative link to existing instruments and be used as a basis to calibrate detectors on spacecraft. Easier access to suborbital data can improve the longevity and cohesiveness of spacecraft and ground-based resources. A study of how these measurements can be made on Lynx sRLV will be presented. At the boundary between terrestrial and space weather, measurements from instruments on Lynx can help develop algorithms to optimize the consolidation of ground and satellite based data as well as assimilate global models with new data points. For example, current tides and the equatorial electrojet, essential to understanding the Thermosphere-Ionosphere system, can be measured in situ frequently and on short notice. Furthermore, a negative-ion spectrometer and a Faraday cup, can take measurements of the D-region ion composition. A differential GPS receiver can infer the spatial gradient of ionospheric electron density. Instruments and optics on spacecraft degrade over time, leading to calibration drift. Lynx can be a cost effective platform for deploying a reference instrument to calibrate satellites with a frequent and fast turnaround and a successful return of the instrument. A calibrated reference instrument on Lynx can make collocated observations as another instrument and corrections are made for the latter, thus ensuring data consistency and mission longevity. Aboard a sRLV, atmospheric conditions that distort remotely sensed data (ground and spacecraft based) can be measured in situ. Moreover, an

  5. Calibration and Verification of Remote Sensing Instruments and Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Müller

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Satellite instruments are nowadays a very important source of information. The physical quantities (essential variables derived from satellites are utilized in a wide field of applications, in particular in atmospheric physics and geoscience. In contrast to ground measurements the physical quantities are not directly measured, but have to be retrieved from satellite observations. Satellites observe hereby the reflection or emission of radiation by the Earth's surface or atmosphere, which enables the retrieval of respective physical quantities (essential variables. The physical basis for the retrieval is the interaction of the radiation with the Earth’s atmosphere and surface. This interaction is defined by radiative transfer, which favors the use of radiances and their respective units within retrieval methods. [...

  6. Inter-calibration and validation of observations from SAPHIR and ATMS instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, I.; Ferraro, R. R.

    2015-12-01

    We present the results of evaluating observations from microwave instruments aboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP, ATMS instrument) and Megha-Tropiques (SAPHIR instrument) satellites. The study includes inter-comparison and inter-calibration of observations of similar channels from the two instruments, evaluation of the satellite data using high-quality radiosonde data from Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program and GPS Radio Occultaion Observations from COSMIC mission, as well as geolocation error correction. The results of this study are valuable for generating climate data records from these instruments as well as for extending current climate data records from similar instruments such as AMSU-B and MHS to the ATMS and SAPHIR instruments. Reference: Moradi et al., Intercalibration and Validation of Observations From ATMS and SAPHIR Microwave Sounders. IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing. 01/2015; DOI: 10.1109/TGRS.2015.2427165

  7. Inter-laboratory project q calibration of SANS instruments using silver behenate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikram, Abarrul; Gunawan; Edy Giri, Putra [Indonesia National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN) (Indonesia); Suzuki, Jun-ichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokyo (Japan); Knott, Robert [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) (Australia)

    2000-10-01

    The inter-laboratory project for q-calibration of SANS (small angle neutron scattering) using silver behenate was carried out among Indonesia National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN), Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO). The standard sample of silver behenate, [CH{sub 3}(CH{sub 2}){sub 20}COOAg](AgBE), has been assessed as an international standard for the calibration of both x-ray and neutron scattering instruments. The results indicate excellent agreement for q calibration obtained among the three laboratories, BATAN, JAERI and ANSTO. (Y. Kazumata)

  8. Calibration standards and field instruments for the precision measurement of insolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, M. S.; Berdahl, C. M.

    1978-01-01

    The paper describes the development of an absolute calibration standard for irradiance measurements. This field instrument, designated the Kendall Radiometer System Mark 3, is identical to the PACRAD (Primary Absolute Cavity Radiometer) except for a modification to ensure all weather operation. Two Mark 3 radiometers have been in operation at the JPL's Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex for over two years and are continuing to provide data which are within plus or minus 1% of the absolute value. A calibration stability analysis is presented for the two instruments.

  9. Updated Global Data from the Guvi Instrument: New Products, Updated Calibration, and a New Web Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, R. K.; Paxton, L. J.; Romeo, G.; Wolven, B. C.; Zhang, Y.; Comberiate, J.

    2014-12-01

    With it's high inclination orbit, GUVI provides global coverage of the ionosphere/thermosphere system, revisiting each polar region 15 times a day. The GUVI instrument has long been a resource for the ITM community with a panoply of data products available from the GUVI website (http://guvi.jhuapl.edu). GUVI is in a high inclination orbit and so provides coverage of both hemispheres. With the release last year of the data products from the DMSO/SSUSI instrument, particularly more detailed auroral zone products (Q, E0, Hemispheric Power, discrete auroral arcs, proton precipitation regions), new equatorial ionospheric products (3D electron densities, bubbles), a whole new set of UV data products has become available. SSUSI are available from http://ssusi.jhuapl.edu. To leverage the experience and knowledge gained from running all of these instruments we have adapted the SSUSI products so they can be made from GUVI telemetry. There are now updated versions of GUVI legacy products as well as brand new products. In addition, better on-orbit calibration techniques developed for SSUSI have now been applied to the GUVI instrument calibration - there is now a common set of software for calibrating both instruments. With a common data format, calibration, and product definition, the data from all SSUSI and GUVI instruments can now be easily combined to get multiple instruments to cover the hemispheres to do a variety of global studies. In addition, the GUVI spectrographic mode data provides great detail about spectrographic features (e.g. O/N2 ratios, NO band emission) that are important for understanding dynamical processes in the thermosphere. A new version of the GUVI website (with the same interface as the SSUSI website) has been launched from guvi.jhuapl.edu to showcase the legacy products made with the new calibration and also highlight the newly developed products for the GUVI imaging and spectrographic modes.

  10. A new automatic system for angular measurement and calibration in radiometric instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquez, Jose Manuel Andujar; Bohórquez, Miguel Ángel Martínez; Garcia, Jonathan Medina; Nieto, Francisco Jose Aguilar

    2010-01-01

    This paper puts forward the design, construction and testing of a new automatic system for angular-response measurement and calibration in radiometric instruments. Its main characteristics include precision, speed, resolution, noise immunity, easy programming and operation. The developed system calculates the cosine error of the radiometer under test by means of a virtual instrument, from the measures it takes and through a mathematical procedure, thus allowing correcting the radiometer with the aim of preventing cosine error in its measurements.

  11. A New Automatic System for Angular Measurement and Calibration in Radiometric Instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Manuel Andujar Marquez

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper puts forward the design, construction and testing of a new automatic system for angular-response measurement and calibration in radiometric instruments. Its main characteristics include precision, speed, resolution, noise immunity, easy programming and operation. The developed system calculates the cosine error of the radiometer under test by means of a virtual instrument, from the measures it takes and through a mathematical procedure, thus allowing correcting the radiometer with the aim of preventing cosine error in its measurements.

  12. Calibrated Ultra Fast Image Simulations for the Dark Energy Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Bruderer, Claudio; Refregier, Alexandre; Amara, Adam; Berge, Joel; Gamper, Lukas

    2015-01-01

    Weak lensing by large-scale structure is a powerful technique to probe the dark components of the universe. To understand the measurement process of weak lensing and the associated systematic effects, image simulations are becoming increasingly important. For this purpose we present a first implementation of the $\\textit{Monte Carlo Control Loops}$ ($\\textit{MCCL}$; Refregier & Amara 2014), a coherent framework for studying systematic effects in weak lensing. It allows us to model and calibrate the shear measurement process using image simulations from the Ultra Fast Image Generator (UFig; Berge et al. 2013). We apply this framework to a subset of the data taken during the Science Verification period (SV) of the Dark Energy Survey (DES). We calibrate the UFig simulations to be statistically consistent with DES images. We then perform tolerance analyses by perturbing the simulation parameters and study their impact on the shear measurement at the one-point level. This allows us to determine the relative im...

  13. Higher Education and Students with Orthopedic Disabilities: A Survey Instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Delar K.

    A survey instrument is presented that was used in a national survey of 160 colleges and universities to explore facilities and services to students with orthopedic disabilities. The survey contains 33 items that focus on the following areas: structural accessibility, academic accessibility, dorm-living, and recreational opportunities. The total…

  14. Array calibration of angularly dependent gain and phase uncertainties with carry-on instrumental sensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Buhong; WANG Yongliang; CHEN Hui; GUO Ying

    2004-01-01

    Array calibration with angularly dependent gain and phase uncertainties has long been a difficult problem. Although many array calibration methods have been reported extensively in the literature, they almost all assumed an angularly independent model for array uncertainties. Few calibration methods have been developed for the angularly dependent array uncertainties. A novel and efficient auto-calibration method for angularly dependent gain and phase uncertainties is proposed in this paper, which is called ISM (Instrumental Sensors Method). With the help of a few well-calibrated instrumental sensors, the ISM is able to achieve favorable and unambiguous direction-of-arrivals (DOAs) estimate and the corresponding angularly dependent gain and phase estimate simultaneously, even in the case of multiple non-disjoint sources. Since the mutual coupling and sensor position errors can all be described as angularly dependent gain/phase uncertainties, the ISM proposed still works in the presence of a combination of all these array perturbations. The ISM can be applied to arbitrary array geometries including linear arrays. The ISM is computationally efficient and requires only one-dimensional search, with no high-dimensional nonlinear search and convergence burden involved. Besides, no small error assumption is made, which is always an essential prerequisite for many existing array calibration techniques. The estimation performance of the ISM is analyzed theoretically and simulation results are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness and behavior of the proposed ISM.

  15. 16 CFR 1209.8 - Procedure for calibration of radiation instrumentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Procedure for calibration of radiation instrumentation. 1209.8 Section 1209.8 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS INTERIM SAFETY STANDARD FOR CELLULOSE INSULATION The Standard § 1209.8 Procedure...

  16. Calibrating the human instrument: understanding the interviewing experience of novice qualitative researchers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peredaryenko, Margarita S; Krauss, Steven Eric

    2013-01-01

    ... researchers perceived themselves as the research instrument in the process of their first qualitative interviewing experiences. The findings from interviews with four such novices were that their initial calibration gravitated towards one of two states - being "researcher-centered" or "informant-centered." Their proximity to either of these ...

  17. 1 {\\Omega}-10 k{\\Omega} high precision transportable setup to calibrate multifunction electrical instruments

    CERN Document Server

    Capra, P P

    2015-01-01

    A temperature controlled 1 {\\Omega}-10 k{\\Omega} standard Resistors transportable setup was developed at National Institute of Metrological Research, (INRIM) for the calibration and adjustment of multifunction electrical instruments. The two Standards consist respectively of two 10 {\\Omega} and 100 k{\\Omega} parallel connected resistors nets inserted in a temperature controlled aluminium box. Novelty of the realization is the oil insertion of the 1 {\\Omega} net with its internal connectors lowering the thermo-electromotive forces (emfs) effects. Short and mid-term stabilities of the setup Standards resulted on the order and in some cases better than other top level 1 {\\Omega} and 10 k{\\Omega} commercial Standards. The transport effect turning off the setup temperature control did not cause appreciable measurement deviations on the two Standards. The Standards uncertainties meet those requested by DMMs and MFCs manufacturers to calibrate and adjust these instruments. A test to adjust a multifunction calibrator...

  18. Constraining Direction-Dependent Instrumental Polarisation: A New Technique for Polarisation Angle Calibration

    CERN Document Server

    Farnes, J S

    2014-01-01

    Direction-dependent instrumental polarisation introduces wide-field polarimetric aberrations and limits the dynamic range of low-frequency interferometric images. We therefore provide a detailed two-dimensional analysis of the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) primary beam in full-Stokes at 325 MHz and 610 MHz. We find that the directional dependence is essentially independent of the feed and is dominated by the curvature of the dishes reflecting mesh. The developed beam models are used to reduce wide-field instrumental polarisation in 610 MHz observations by subtracting the expected response from the $uv$-data itself. Furthermore, a new technique for polarisation angle calibration is presented that allows for calibration using an unpolarised source and therefore can be implemented at arbitrarily low observational frequencies. This technique has the advantage that it calibrates the polarisation angle independently of ionospheric Faraday rotation and source variability. It also removes the need for known ...

  19. Calibration and survey of AMANDA with the SPASE detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Ahrens, J; Barwick, S W; Bay, R C; Becka, T; Becker, K H; Bernardini, E; Bertrand, E; Binon, F; Biron, A; Boser, S; Botner, O; Bouchta, A; Bouhali, O; Burgess, T; Carius, S; Castermans, T; Chirkin, D; Conrad, J; Cooley, J; Cowen, D F; Davour, A; De Clercq, C; De Young, T R; Desiati, P; Dewulf, J P; Dickinson, E; Doksus, P; Ekstrom, P; Engel, R; Evenson, P; Feser, T; Gaisser, T K; Ganugapati, R; Gaug, M; Geenen, H; Gerhardt, L; Goldschmidt, A; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hanson, K; Hardtke, R; Hauschildt, T; Hellwig, M; Herquet, P; Hill, G C; Hinton, J A; Hughey, B; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hundertmark, S; Jacobsen, J; Karle, A; Kim, J; Köpke, L; Kowalski, M; Kühn, K; Lamoureux, J I; Leich, H; Leuthold, M; Lindahl, P; Liubarsky, I; Lloyd Evans, J; Madsen, J; Mandli, K; Marciniewski, P; Martello, D; Matis, H S; McParland, C P; Messarius, T; Miller, T C; Minaeva, Y; Miocinovic, P; Mock, P C; Morse, R; Neunhoffer, T; Niessen, P; Nygren, D R; Ogelman, H; Olbrechts, P; Perez de los Heros, C; Pohl, A C; Porrata, R; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Rawlins, K; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Richter, S; Rochester, K; Rodríguez-Martino, J; Romenesko, P; Ross, D; Sander, H G; Schinarakis, K; Schlenstedt, S; Schmidt, T; Schneider, D; Schwarz, R; Silvestri, A; Solarz, M; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Steele, D; Steffen, P; Stokstad, R G; Sulanke, K H; Taboada, I; Tilav, S; Wagner, W; Walck, C; Wang, Y R; Watson, A A; Weinheimer, C; Wiebusch, C; Wiedemann, C; Wischnewski, R; Wissing, H; Woschnagg, K; Wu, W; Yodh, G; Young, S; 10.1016/j.nima.2003.12.007

    2004-01-01

    We report on the analysis of air showers observed in coincidence by the Antarctic Muon and Neutrino detector array (AMANDA-B10) and the South Pole Air Shower Experiment (SPASE-1 and SPASE-2). We discuss the use of coincident events for calibration and survey of the deep AMANDA detector as well as the response of AMANDA to muon bundles. This analysis uses data taken during 1997 when both SPASE-1 and SPASE-2 were in operation to provide a stereo view of AMANDA.

  20. Calibration and survey of AMANDA with the SPASE detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahrens, J.; Bai, X.; Barwick, S.W.; Bay, R.C.; Becka, T.; Becker, K.-H.; Bernardini, E.; Bertrand, D.; Binon, F.; Biron, A.; Boeser, S.; Botner, O.; Bouchta, A.; Bouhali, O.; Burgess, T.; Carius, S.; Castermans, T.; Chirkin, D.; Conrad, J.; Cooley, J.; Cowen, D.F.; Davour, A.; Clercq, C. de; De Young, T.; Desiati, P.; Dewulf, J.-P.; Dickinson, E.; Doksus, P.; Ekstroem, P.; Engel, R.; Evenson, P.; Feser, T.; Gaisser, T.K. E-mail: gaisser@bartol.udel.edu; Ganugapati, R.; Gaug, M.; Geenen, H.; Gerhardt, L.; Goldschmidt, A.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Hardtke, R.; Hauschildt, T.; Hellwig, M.; Herquet, P.; Hill, G.C.; Hinton, J.A.; Hughey, B.; Hulth, P.O.; Hultqvist, K.; Hundertmark, S.; Jacobsen, J.; Karle, A.; Kim, J.; Koepke, L.; Kowalski, M.; Kuehn, K.; Lamoureux, J.I.; Leich, H.; Leuthold, M.; Lindahl, P.; Liubarsky, I.; Lloyd-Evans, J.; Madsen, J.; Mandli, K.; Marciniewski, P.; Martello, D.; Matis, H.S.; McParland, C.P.; Messarius, T.; Miller, T.C.; Minaeva, Y.; Miocinovic, P.; Mock, P.C.; Morse, R.; Neunhoeffer, T.; Niessen, P.; Nygren, D.R.; Oegelman, H.; Olbrechts, Ph.; Perez de los Heros, C.; Pohl, A.C.; Porrata, R.; Price, P.B.; Przybylski, G.T.; Rawlins, K.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Ribordy, M.; Richter, S.; Rochester, K.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Romenesko, P.; Ross, D.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmidt, T.; Schinarakis, K.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schneider, D.; Schwarz, R.; Silvestri, A.; Solarz, M.; Spiczak, G.M.; Spiering, C.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Steele, D.; Steffen, P.; Stokstad, R.G.; Sulanke, K.-H.; Taboada, I.; Tilav, S.; Walck, C.; Wagner, W.; Wang, Y.-R.; Watson, A.A.; Weinheimer, C.; Wiebusch, C.H.; Wiedemann, C.; Wischnewski, R.; Wissing, H.; Woschnagg, K.; Wu, W.; Yodh, G.; Young, S

    2004-04-21

    We report on the analysis of air showers observed in coincidence by the Antarctic Muon and Neutrino detector array (AMANDA-B10) and the South Pole Air Shower Experiment (SPASE-1 and SPASE-2). We discuss the use of coincident events for calibration and survey of the deep AMANDA detector as well as the response of AMANDA to muon bundles. This analysis uses data taken during 1997 when both SPASE-1 and SPASE-2 were in operation to provide a stereo view of AMANDA.

  1. PreCam: A Precursor Observational Campaign for Calibration of the Dark Energy Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuehn, K.; Kuhlmann, S.; Allam, S.; Annis, J. T.; Bailey, T.; Balbinot, E.; Bernstein, J. P.; Biesiadzinski, T.; Burke, D. L.; Butner, M.; Camargo, J. I. B.; da Costa, L. A. N.; DePoy, D.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Estrada, J.; Fausti, A.; Gerke, B.; Guarino, V.; Head, H. H.; Kessler, R.; Lin, H.; Lorenzon, W.; Maia, M. A. G.; Maki, L.; Marshall, J.; Nord, B.; Neilsen, E.; Ogando, R. L. C.; Park, D.; Peoples, J.; Rastawicki, D.; Rheault, J. -P.; Santiago, B.; Schubnell, M.; Seitzer, P.; Smith, J. A.; Spinka, H.; Sypniewski, A.; Tarle, G.; Tucker, D. L.; Walker, A. R.; Wester, W.

    2013-04-01

    PreCam, a precursor observational campaign supporting the Dark Energy Survey (DES), is designed to produce a photometric and astrometric catalog of nearly a hundred thousand standard stars within the DES footprint, while the PreCam instrument also serves as a prototype testbed for the Dark Energy Camera's hardware and software. This catalog represents a potential 100-fold increase in Southern Hemisphere photometric standard stars, and therefore will be an important component in the calibration of the Dark Energy Survey. We provide details on the PreCam instrument's design, construction, and testing, as well as results from a subset of the 51 nights of PreCam survey observations on the University of Michigan Department of Astronomy's Curtis-Schmidt telescope at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO). We briefly describe the preliminary data processing pipeline that has been developed for PreCam data and the preliminary results of the instrument performance, as well as astrometry and photometry of a sample of stars previously included in other southern sky surveys.

  2. Calibration of the Reflected Solar Instrument for the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thome, Kurtis; Barnes, Robert; Baize, Rosemary; O'Connell, Joseph; Hair, Jason

    2010-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) plans to observe climate change trends over decadal time scales to determine the accuracy of climate projections. The project relies on spaceborne earth observations of SI-traceable variables sensitive to key decadal change parameters. The mission includes a reflected solar instrument retrieving at-sensor reflectance over the 320 to 2300 nm spectral range with 500-m spatial resolution and 100-km swath. Reflectance is obtained from the ratio of measurements of the earth s surface to those while viewing the sun relying on a calibration approach that retrieves reflectance with uncertainties less than 0.3%. The calibration is predicated on heritage hardware, reduction of sensor complexity, adherence to detector-based calibration standards, and an ability to simulate in the laboratory on-orbit sources in both size and brightness to provide the basis of a transfer to orbit of the laboratory calibration including a link to absolute solar irradiance measurements.

  3. Urbis: Instrument ofr local environmental survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borst, H.C.

    2000-01-01

    TNO has developed a GIS based instrument, named Urbis, which makes it possible to assess the noise situation in a municipality or region as a whole, with a high level of detail. On the basis of activity or emission data (road-traffic intensities, acoustical reports, etc.), noise loads are calculated

  4. 40 CFR 86.1320-90 - Gas meter or flow instrumentation calibration; particulate, methanol, and formaldehyde measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... calibration; particulate, methanol, and formaldehyde measurement. 86.1320-90 Section 86.1320-90 Protection of... instrumentation calibration; particulate, methanol, and formaldehyde measurement. (a) Sampling for particulate, methanol and formaldehyde emissions requires the use of gas meters or flow instrumentation to...

  5. High accuracy calibration of a dynamic vapor sorption instrument and determination of the equilibrium humidities using single salts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rörig-Dalgaard, Inge; Svensson, Staffan

    2016-01-01

    We present a procedure for accurately calibrating a dynamic vapor sorption (DVS) instrument using single salts. The procedure accounts for and tailors distinct calibration tests according to the fundamental properties of each salt. Especially relevant properties influencing the calibration...... are the heat of solution, heat of condensation, and the kinetics connected to the salt phase transition, as these influence the microclimate surrounding the salts during calibration. All these issues were dealt with to obtain precise calibration results. The DVS instrument comprises two control modes...

  6. Calibration of high resolution remote sensing instruments in the visible and near infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüller, L.; Fischer, J.; Armbruster, W.; Bartsch, B.

    1997-05-01

    Measurements of the reflected solar radiation with high spectral resolution airborne instruments are usually used to develop new remote sensing techniques. The observed spectral features in the signals provide the possibility to define useful band settings for future satellite instruments. A precise wavelength and radiometric calibration is a prerequisite for such tasks. In this paper, a calibration procedure for the airborne spectrometer OVID is presented. The Optical Visible and near Infrared Detector consists of two similar detector systems, (600 - 1100 nm = VIS and 900 - 1700 nm = NIR). The spectral resolution is ~1.7 nm for the VIS-system and ~6 nm for the IR-system. This instrument is applied for the retrieval of water vapour content, aerosol and cloud properties. Besides the spectral and intensity calibration, also corrections for the dark current signals and for defective pixels have been performed. An indirect verification of the calibration procedure by the comparison of OVID measurements in cloudy and cloud free atmospheres with radiative transfer simulations is discussed in this paper. The used radiation transfer model MOMO is based on the matrix operator method.

  7. The GOME-2 instrument on the Metop series of satellites: instrument design, calibration, and level 1 data processing - an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, Rosemary; Lang, Rüdiger; Klaes, Dieter; Poli, Gabriele; Retscher, Christian; Lindstrot, Rasmus; Huckle, Roger; Lacan, Antoine; Grzegorski, Michael; Holdak, Andriy; Kokhanovsky, Alexander; Livschitz, Jakob; Eisinger, Michael

    2016-03-01

    The Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2) flies on the Metop series of satellites, the space component of the EUMETSAT Polar System. In this paper we will provide an overview of the instrument design, the on-ground calibration and characterization activities, in-flight calibration, and level 0 to 1 data processing. The current status of the level 1 data is presented and points of specific relevance to users are highlighted. Long-term level 1 data consistency is also discussed and plans for future work are outlined. The information contained in this paper summarizes a large number of technical reports and related documents containing information that is not currently available in the published literature. These reports and documents are however made available on the EUMETSAT web pages and readers requiring more details than can be provided in this overview paper will find appropriate references at relevant points in the text.

  8. Instrument evaluation, calibration, and installation for the heater experiments at Stripa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schrauf, T.; Pratt, H.; Simonson, E.; Hustrulid, W.; Nelson, P.; DuBois, A.; Binnall, E.; Haught, R.

    1979-12-01

    Borehole instrumentation for the measurement of temperature, displacement, and stress was evaluated, modified, calibrated, and installed in an underground site at Stripa, Sweden where experiments are currently underway to investigate the suitability of granite as a storage medium for nuclear waste. Three arrays of borehole instrumentation measure the thermomechanical effects caused by electrical heaters which simulate the thermal output of canisters of radioactive waste. Because most rock mechanics investigations are carried out at modest temperatures, a sustained operating temperature as high as 200/sup 0/C was an unusual and most important criterion governing the instrumentation program. Extensive laboratory experiments were conducted to determine the effect of high temperature on instrument behavior and also to develop calibration and data-reduction procedures. The rod extensometers were tested for anchor creep, the selection of a suitable high-temperature pressurizing fluid, and the thermal stability of the grout. Four temperature corrections are incorporated into the data reduction of the USBM borehole deformation measurement: the bridge voltage offset correction, the change in calibration factor induced by temperature, and the thermal expansion of the gage and of the rock. The vibrating wire gages were calibrated in the laboratory by loading gages installed in a granite block at pressures up to 13 MPa and at temperatures ranging from 20/sup 0/ to 200/sup 0/C. Both the slope and offset of the response equation are corrected for temperature effects. Most thermocouples were calibrated in an oven at the field site. Thermocouples were emplaced with individual gages and into holes backfilled with sand or grout.

  9. Calibration and validation of 6 DOFs instrumented spatial linkage for biomechanical applications. A practical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sholukha, Victor; Salvia, Patrick; Hilal, Isam; Feipel, Véronique; Rooze, Marcel; Jan, Serge Van Sint

    2004-04-01

    A method for both calibration and validation of a 6 DOF electrogoniometer is presented. A 6 Revolute Instrumented Spatial Linkage (6R-ISL) and a three-dimensional digitizer (3DD) were used simultaneously to collect both static and continuous poses of unconstrained or constrained motions. Validation occurred using a calibrated ball-and-socket joint. A parametrical model of the 6R-ISL (i.e. Virtual Goniometer or VG) was designed using a standard multibody system geometry. Two approaches were used to adjust the VG parameters: a parametrical adjustment of the VG linkage geometry, and a functional adjustment of the potentiometer calibration curves (angle-voltage) in a predefined range of motion. After calibration, 6R-ISL accuracy was better than 1 mm and 1 degrees for translation and orientation, respectively. The functional method presented in this paper can be suggested as a practical approach, which allows on-line checking and calibration of 6R-ISL within the specific range of interest of a particular anatomical joint. In addition, improving the potentiometer calibration curves was less time consuming than the parametrical adjustment.

  10. On-line testing of calibration of process instrumentation channels in nuclear power plants. Phase 2, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashemian, H.M. [Analysis and Measurement Services Corp., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1995-11-01

    The nuclear industry is interested in automating the calibration of process instrumentation channels; this report provides key results of one of the sponsored projects to determine the validity of automated calibrations. Conclusion is that the normal outputs of instrument channels in nuclear plants can be monitored over a fuel cycle while the plant is operating to determine calibration drift in the field sensors and associated signal conversion and signal conditioning equipment. The procedure for on-line calibration tests involving calculating the deviation of each instrument channel from the best estimate of the process parameter that the instrument is measuring. Methods were evaluated for determining the best estimate. Deviation of each signal from the best estimate is updated frequently while the plant is operating and plotted vs time for entire fuel cycle, thereby providing time history plots that can reveal channel drift and other anomalies. Any instrument channel that exceeds allowable drift or channel accuracy band is then scheduled for calibration during a refueling outage or sooner. This provides calibration test results at the process operating point, one of the most critical points of the channel operation. This should suffice for most narrow-range instruments, although the calibration of some instruments can be verified at other points throughout their range. It should be pointed out that the calibration of some process signals such as the high pressure coolant injection flow in BWRs, which are normally off- scale during plant operation, can not be tested on-line.

  11. Development of an RDECOM Workforce Motivational Survey Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    compensation and workplace environment structure to motivate the target generational workforce demographic to improve productivity. The deliverables from this...factors. We developed a closed-loop survey instrument and analysis methodology to identify distinct generational workforce motivational factors. Nine...United States Army Research Development and Engineering Command (RDECOM) supervisory engineers, General Schedule (GS) 14 and 15, reviewed the survey

  12. Inertial instrument system for aerial surveying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, R.H.; Chapman, W.H.; Hanna, W.F.; Mongan, C.E.; Hursh, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    An inertial guidance system for aerial surveying has been developed under contract to the U.S. Geological Survey. This prototype system, known as the aerial profiling of terrain (APT) system, is designed to determine continuously the positions of points along an aircraft flight path, or the underlying terrain profile, to an accuracy of + or - 0.5 ft (15 cm) vertically and + or - 2 ft (61 cm) horizontally. The system 's objective thus is to accomplish, from a fixed-wing aircraft, what would traditionally be accomplished from ground-based topographic surveys combined with aerial photography and photogrammetry. The two-part strategy for measuring the terrain profile entails: (1) use of an inertial navigator for continuous determination of the three-coordinate position of the aircraft, and (2) use of an eye-safe pulsed laser profiler for continuous measurement of the vertical distance from aircraft to land surface, so that the desired terrain profile can then be directly computed. The APT system, installed in a DeHavilland Twin Otter aircraft, is typically flown at a speed of 115 mph (105 knots) at an altitude of 2,000 ft (610 m) above the terrain. Performance-evaluation flights have shown that the vertical and horizontal accuracy specifications are met. (USGS)

  13. A method for automating calibration and records management for instrumentation and dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Brien, J.M. Jr.; Rushton, R.O.; Burns, R.E. Jr. [Atlan-Tech, Inc., Roswell, GA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Current industry requirements are becoming more stringent on quality assurance records and documentation for calibration of instruments and dosimetry. A novel method is presented here that will allow a progressive automation scheme to be used in pursuit of that goal. This concept is based on computer-controlled irradiators that can act as stand-alone devices or be interfaced to other components via a computer local area network. In this way, complete systems can be built with modules to create a records management system to meet the needs of small laboratories or large multi-building calibration groups. Different database engines or formats can be used simply by replacing a module. Modules for temperature and pressure monitoring or shipping and receiving can be added, as well as equipment modules for direct IEEE-488 interface to electrometers and other instrumentation.

  14. Influence of Loading Rate on the Calibration of Instrumented Charpy Strikers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucon, E.; Scibetta, M.; McColskey, D.; McCowan, C.

    2009-01-15

    One of the key factors for obtaining reliable instrumented Charpy results is the calibration of the instrumented striker. The conventional approach for establishing an analytical relationship between strain gage output and force applied to the transducer is the static calibration, which is preferably performed with the striker installed in the pendulum assembly. However, the response of an instrumented striker under static force application may sometimes differ significantly from its dynamic performance during an actual Charpy test. This is typically reflected in a large difference between absorbed energy returned by the pendulum encoder (KV) and calculated under the instrumented force/displacement test record (Wt). Such difference can be either minimized by optimizing the striker design or analytically removed by adjusting forces and displacements until KV = Wt (the so-called 'Dynamic Force Adjustment'). This study investigates the influence of increasing force application rates on the force/voltage characteristics of two instrumented strikers, one at NIST in Boulder, CO and one at SCK-CEN in Mol, Belgium.

  15. Time transfer by laser link (T2L2): characterization and calibration of the flight instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samain, E.; Vrancken, P.; Guillemot, P.; Fridelance, P.; Exertier, P.

    2014-10-01

    The T2L2 project (time transfer by laser link) allows for the synchronization of remote ultra-stable clocks over intercontinental distances (Fridelance et al 1997 Exp. Astron. 7, Samain and Fridelance 1998 Metrologia 35 151-9). The principle is derived from satellite laser ranging technology with dedicated space equipment designed to record arrival times of laser pulses at the satellite. The space segment has been launched in June 2008 as a passenger experiment on the ocean altimetry satellite Jason 2. T2L2 had been specified to yield a time stability of better than 1 ps over 1000 s integration time and an accuracy of better than 100 ps. This level of performance requires a rigorous data processing which can be performed only with a comprehensive calibration model of the whole instrumentation. For this purpose, several experimental measurements have been performed before and during the integration phase of the T2L2 space instrument. This instrument model is one of the cornerstones of the data reduction process which is carried out to translate the raw information to a usable picosecond time transfer. After providing a global synopsis of the T2L2 space instrument, the paper gives a description of the experimental setup for the instrument characterization. It then details the different contributions within the calibration model and concludes with an applied example of a space to ground time transfer.

  16. Extensions of Kalman recursive estimation theory to retrospective updating and interpolation with applications to instrument calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glassey, C.R.; Choy, Y.C.

    1977-09-01

    The problem of estimation of a physical quantity from a set of measurements is considered. We extend Kalman recursive estimation procedure in two ways. First, we explore how to use the latest observation to retrospectively update estimates of past system states. Second, we show how to apply the retrospective update idea to get interpolation estimates between the epochs of observations. We also show application of these ideas for instrument calibration in nuclear accountability systems.

  17. Optical Comb from a Whispering Gallery Mode Resonator for Spectroscopy and Astronomy Instruments Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strekalov, Dmitry V.; Yu, Nam; Thompson, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    The most accurate astronomical data is available from space-based observations that are not impeded by the Earth's atmosphere. Such measurements may require spectral samples taken as long as decades apart, with the 1 cm/s velocity precision integrated over a broad wavelength range. This raises the requirements specifically for instruments used in astrophysics research missions -- their stringent wavelength resolution and accuracy must be maintained over years and possibly decades. Therefore, a stable and broadband optical calibration technique compatible with spaceflights becomes essential. The space-based spectroscopic instruments need to be calibrated in situ, which puts forth specific requirements to the calibration sources, mainly concerned with their mass, power consumption, and reliability. A high-precision, high-resolution reference wavelength comb source for astronomical and astrophysics spectroscopic observations has been developed that is deployable in space. The optical comb will be used for wavelength calibrations of spectrographs and will enable Doppler measurements to better than 10 cm/s precision, one hundred times better than the current state-of-the- art.

  18. Assessing the Photometric Calibration of the ASAS Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdnikov, L. N.; Dambis, A. K.

    2016-05-01

    We compare bona fide calibrated mean VIC magnitudes of several hundred stars found in the CCD frames taken in 2012 during our photometric observations of 109 Cepheids and RR Lyrae type stars made at the South African Astronomical Observatory to the corresponding mean VIC magnitudes measured in the course of the ASAS survey to assess the quality of ASAS photometry and derive the appropriate transformation equations. We conclude that as far as the only serious caveat due to photometric errors, which range from ˜ 0.05m for relatively bright stars to about ˜ 0.15m for ˜ 14m stars and translates into extra fractional distance error of 0.025-0.07.

  19. Site survey instrumentation for the National New Technology Telescope (NNTT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, F. F.; Morse, D. A.; Poczulp, G. A.

    1988-10-01

    The characterization of atmospheric turbulence at and above the two candidate sites for the 15 m National New Technology Telescope (NNTT) has required the development of specialized measurement techniques. The equipment used to measure astronomical seeing, microthermals, water vapor, and temperature is discussed, along with sample data and calibration results. By use of instruments with overlapping altitude coverage, it has been possible to 'bookkeep' qualitatively all of the sources of innate degradation, especially near the ground.

  20. Survey Instrument Validity Part I: Principles of Survey Instrument Development and Validation in Athletic Training Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Laura J.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Instrument validation is an important facet of survey research methods and athletic trainers must be aware of the important underlying principles. Objective: To discuss the process of survey development and validation, specifically the process of construct validation. Background: Athletic training researchers frequently employ the use of…

  1. Instrumentation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Journal Scope:Instrumentation is a high quality open access peer reviewed research journal.Authors are solicited to contribute to these journals by submitting articles that illustrate most up-to-date research results,projects,surveying works and industrial experiences that describe significant advances in the instrumental science.The mission of the Instrumentation is

  2. Application of new techniques in the calibration of the TROPOMI-SWIR instrument (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tol, Paul; van Hees, Richard; van Kempen, Tim; Krijger, Matthijs; Cadot, Sidney; Aben, Ilse; Ludewig, Antje; Dingjan, Jos; Persijn, Stefan; Hoogeveen, Ruud

    2016-10-01

    The Tropospheric Monitoring Instrument (TROPOMI) on-board the Sentinel-5 Precursor satellite is an Earth-observing spectrometer with bands in the ultraviolet, visible, near infrared and short-wave infrared (SWIR). It provides daily global coverage of atmospheric trace gases relevant for tropospheric air quality and climate research. Three new techniques will be presented that are unique for the TROPOMI-SWIR spectrometer. The retrieval of methane and CO columns from the data of the SWIR band requires for each detector pixel an accurate instrument spectral response function (ISRF), i.e. the normalized signal as a function of wavelength. A new determination method for Earth-observing instruments has been used in the on-ground calibration, based on measurements with a SWIR optical parametric oscillator (OPO) that was scanned over the whole TROPOMI-SWIR spectral range. The calibration algorithm derives the ISRF without needing the absolute wavelength during the measurement. The same OPO has also been used to determine the two-dimensional stray-light distribution for each SWIR pixel with a dynamic range of 7 orders. This was achieved by combining measurements at several exposure times and taking saturation into account. The correction algorithm and data are designed to remove the mean stray-light distribution and a reflection that moves relative to the direct image, within the strict constraints of the available time for the L01b processing. A third new technique is an alternative calibration of the SWIR absolute radiance and irradiance using a black body at the temperature of melting silver. Unlike a standard FEL lamp, this source does not have to be calibrated itself, because the temperature is very stable and well known. Measurement methods, data analyses, correction algorithms and limitations of the new techniques will be presented.

  3. Environmental Assessment for the Health Protection Instrument Calibration Facility at the Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-01

    The purpose of this Environmental Assessment (EA) is to review the possible environmental consequences associated with the construction and operation of a Health Protection Instrument Calibration Facility on the Savannah River Site (SRS). The proposed replacement calibration facility would be located in B Area of SRS and would replace an inadequate existing facility currently located within A Area of SRS (Building 736-A). The new facility would provide laboratories, offices, test equipment and the support space necessary for the SRS Radiation Monitoring Instrument Calibration Program to comply with DOE Orders 5480.4 (Environmental Protection, Safety and Health Protection Standards) and 5480.11 (Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers). The proposed facility would serve as the central site source for the evaluation, selection, inspection, testing, calibration, and maintenance of all SRS radiation monitoring instrumentation. The proposed facility would be constructed on a currently undeveloped portion in B Area of SRS. The exact plot associated with the proposed action is a 1.2 hectare (3 acre) tract of land located on the west side of SRS Road No. 2. The proposed facility would lie approximately 4.4 km (2.75 mi) from the nearest SRS site boundary. The proposed facility would also lie within the confines of the existing B Area, and SRS safeguards and security systems. Archaeological, ecological, and land use reviews have been conducted in connection with the use of this proposed plot of land, and a detailed discussion of these reviews is contained herein. Socioeconomic, operational, and accident analyses were also examined in relation to the proposed project and the findings from these reviews are also contained in this EA.

  4. [French residents' training in instrumental deliveries: A national survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunier, C; Raimond, E; Dupont, A; Pelissier, A; Bonneau, S; Gabriel, R; Graesslin, O

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate French residents in Obstetrics and Gynaecology's training in instrumental deliveries in 2015. We conducted a national descriptive survey among 758 residents between December 2014 and January 2015. Respondents were invited by email to specify their University Hospital, their current university term, the number of instrumental deliveries performed by vacuum extractor, forceps or spatulas, and whether they made systematic ultrasound exams before performing the extraction. Response rate was 34.7 % (n=263). There were important differences between regions in terms of type of instruments used. Vacuum extractor was the most commonly used instrument for instrumental deliveries by French residents (56.9 %), more than forceps (25.2 %) and spatulas (17.9 %). At the end of the residency, all the residents had been trained in instrumental deliveries with at least two instruments. The training of difficult techniques as well as their perfect control is required for instrumental deliveries. Yet, we are forced to note that there are substantial differences in the French residents' training in instrumental deliveries depending on their region. So, teaching at least two techniques seems essential as well as improving the training capacities and standardizing practices. A greater systematization of the teaching of the mechanics and obstetric techniques might be a solution to be considered too. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. An Improved Photometric Calibration of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Imaging Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Schlegel, D.J.; Finkbeiner, D.P.; Barentine, J.C.; Blanton, M.R.; Brewington, H.J.; Gunn, J.E.; Harvanek, M.; Hogg, D.W.; Ivezic, Z.; Johnston, D.; /LBL, Berkeley /Princeton U. /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys. /Texas U., Astron. Dept. /Apache Point Observ. /New York U. /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /Caltech, JPL

    2007-03-01

    We present an algorithm to photometrically calibrate wide field optical imaging surveys, that simultaneously solves for the calibration parameters and relative stellar fluxes using overlapping observations. The algorithm decouples the problem of ''relative'' calibrations from that of ''absolute'' calibrations; the absolute calibration is reduced to determining a few numbers for the entire survey. We pay special attention to the spatial structure of the calibration errors, allowing one to isolate particular error modes in downstream analyses. Applying this to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey imaging data, we achieve {approx}1% relative calibration errors across 8500 deg{sup 2} in griz; the errors are {approx}2% for the u band. These errors are dominated by unmodeled atmospheric variations at Apache Point Observatory.

  6. Planck pre-launch status: calibration of the Low Frequency Instrument flight model radiometers

    CERN Document Server

    Villa, F; Sandri, M; Meinhold, P; Poutanen, T; Battaglia, P; Franceschet, C; Hughes, N; Laaninen, M; Lapolla, P; Bersanelli, M; Butler, R C; Cuttaia, F; D'Arcangelo, O; Frailis, M; Franceschi, E; Galeotta, S; Gregorio, A; Leonardi, R; Lowe, S R; Mandolesi, N; Maris, M; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Morgante, G; Stringhetti, L; Tomasi, M; Valenziano, L; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A; Aja, B; Artal, E; Balasini, M; Bernardino, T; Blackhurst, E; Boschini, L; Cappellini, B; Cavaliere, F; Colin, A; Colombo, F; Davis, R J; De La Fuente, L; Edgeley, J; Gaier, T; Galtress, A; Hoyland, R; Jukkala, P; Kettle, D; Kilpia, V-H; Lawrence, C R; Lawson, D; Leahy, J P; Leutenegger, P; Levin, S; Maino, D; Malaspina, M; Mediavilla, A; Miccolis, M; Pagan, L; Pascual, J P; Pasian, F; Pecora, M; Pospieszalski, M; Roddis, N; Salmon, M J; Seiffert, M; Silvestri, R; Simonetto, A; Sjoman, P; Sozzi, C; Tuovinen, J; Varis, J; Wilkinson, A; Winder, F

    2010-01-01

    The Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) on-board the ESA Planck satellite carries eleven radiometer subsystems, called Radiometer Chain Assemblies (RCAs), each composed of a pair of pseudo-correlation receivers. We describe the on-ground calibration campaign performed to qualify the flight model RCAs and to measure their pre-launch performances. Each RCA was calibrated in a dedicated flight-like cryogenic environment with the radiometer front-end cooled to 20K and the back-end at 300K, and with an external input load cooled to 4K. A matched load simulating a blackbody at different temperatures was placed in front of the sky horn to derive basic radiometer properties such as noise temperature, gain, and noise performance, e.g. 1/f noise. The spectral response of each detector was measured as was their susceptibility to thermal variation. All eleven LFI RCAs were calibrated. Instrumental parameters measured in these tests, such as noise temperature, bandwidth, radiometer isolation, and linearity, provide essential i...

  7. Beyond Californium-A Neutron Generator Alternative for Dosimetry and Instrument Calibration in the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, Roman K; Mozhayev, Andrey V; Murphy, Mark K; Thompson, Alan K

    2017-09-01

    Evaluations of neutron survey instruments, area monitors, and personal dosimeters rely on reference neutron radiations, which have evolved from the heavy reliance on (α,n) sources to a shared reliance on (α,n) and the spontaneous fission neutrons of californium-252 (Cf). Capable of producing high dose equivalent rates from an almost point source geometry, the characteristics of Cf are generally more favorable when compared to the use of (α,n) and (γ,n) sources or reactor-produced reference neutron radiations. Californium-252 is typically used in two standardized configurations: unmoderated, to yield a fission energy spectrum; or with the capsule placed within a heavy-water moderating sphere to produce a softened spectrum that is generally considered more appropriate for evaluating devices used in nuclear power plant work environments. The U.S. Department of Energy Cf Loan/Lease Program, a longtime origin of affordable Cf sources for research, testing and calibration, was terminated in 2009. Since then, high-activity sources have become increasingly cost-prohibitive for laboratories that formerly benefited from that program. Neutron generators, based on the D-T and D-D fusion reactions, have become economically competitive with Cf and are recognized internationally as important calibration and test standards. Researchers from the National Institute of Standards and Technology and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are jointly considering the practicality and technical challenges of implementing neutron generators as calibration standards in the U.S. This article reviews the characteristics of isotope-based neutron sources, possible isotope alternatives to Cf, and the rationale behind the increasing favor of electronically generated neutron options. The evaluation of a D-T system at PNNL has revealed characteristics that must be considered in adapting generators to the task of calibration and testing where accurate determination of a dosimetric quantity is

  8. Michelson Interferometer for Global High-Resolution Thermospheric Imaging (MIGHTI): Instrument Design and Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englert, Christoph R.; Harlander, John M.; Brown, Charles M.; Marr, Kenneth D.; Miller, Ian J.; Stump, J. Eloise; Hancock, Jed; Peterson, James Q.; Kumler, Jay; Morrow, William H.; Mooney, Thomas A.; Ellis, Scott; Mende, Stephen B.; Harris, Stewart E.; Stevens, Michael H.; Makela, Jonathan J.; Harding, Brian J.; Immel, Thomas J.

    2017-04-01

    The Michelson Interferometer for Global High-resolution Thermospheric Imaging (MIGHTI) instrument was built for launch and operation on the NASA Ionospheric Connection Explorer (ICON) mission. The instrument was designed to measure thermospheric horizontal wind velocity profiles and thermospheric temperature in altitude regions between 90 km and 300 km, during day and night. For the wind measurements it uses two perpendicular fields of view pointed at the Earth's limb, observing the Doppler shift of the atomic oxygen red and green lines at 630.0 nm and 557.7 nm wavelength. The wavelength shift is measured using field-widened, temperature compensated Doppler Asymmetric Spatial Heterodyne (DASH) spectrometers, employing low order échelle gratings operating at two different orders for the different atmospheric lines. The temperature measurement is accomplished by a multichannel photometric measurement of the spectral shape of the molecular oxygen A-band around 762 nm wavelength. For each field of view, the signals of the two oxygen lines and the A-band are detected on different regions of a single, cooled, frame transfer charge coupled device (CCD) detector. On-board calibration sources are used to periodically quantify thermal drifts, simultaneously with observing the atmosphere. The MIGHTI requirements, the resulting instrument design and the calibration are described.

  9. 40 CFR 86.120-94 - Gas meter or flow instrumentation calibration; particulate, methanol and formaldehyde measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... calibration; particulate, methanol and formaldehyde measurement. 86.120-94 Section 86.120-94 Protection of... Procedures § 86.120-94 Gas meter or flow instrumentation calibration; particulate, methanol and formaldehyde measurement. (a) Sampling for particulate, methanol and formaldehyde emissions requires the use of gas...

  10. Post-Launch Calibration and Testing of Space Weather Instruments on GOES-R Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadikonda, Sivakumara S. K.; Merrow, Cynthia S.; Kronenwetter, Jeffrey A.; Comeyne, Gustave J.; Flanagan, Daniel G.; Todirita, Monica

    2016-01-01

    The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite - R (GOES-R) is the first of a series of satellites to be launched, with the first launch scheduled for October 2016. The three instruments - Solar Ultra Violet Imager (SUVI), Extreme ultraviolet and X-ray Irradiance Sensor (EXIS), and Space Environment In-Situ Suite (SEISS) provide the data needed as inputs for the product updates National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) provides to the public. SUVI is a full-disk extreme ultraviolet imager enabling Active Region characterization, filament eruption, and flare detection. EXIS provides inputs to solar backgrounds/events impacting climate models. SEISS provides particle measurements over a wide energy-and-flux range that varies by several orders of magnitude and these data enable updates to spacecraft charge models for electrostatic discharge. EXIS and SEISS have been tested and calibrated end-to-end in ground test facilities around the United States. Due to the complexity of the SUVI design, data from component tests were used in a model to predict on-orbit performance. The ground tests and model updates provided inputs for designing the on-orbit calibration tests. A series of such tests have been planned for the Post-Launch Testing (PLT) of each of these instruments, and specific parameters have been identified that will be updated in the Ground Processing Algorithms, on-orbit parameter tables, or both. Some of SUVI and EXIS calibrations require slewing them off the Sun, while no such maneuvers are needed for SEISS. After a six-month PLT period the GOES-R is expected to be operational. The calibration details are presented in this paper.

  11. Post-Launch Calibration and Testing of Space Weather Instruments on GOES-R Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadikonda, S. K.; Merrow, Cynthia S.; Kronenwetter, Jeffrey A.; Comeyne, Gustave J.; Flanagan, Daniel G.; Todrita, Monica

    2016-01-01

    The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite - R (GOES-R) is the first of a series of satellites to be launched, with the first launch scheduled for October 2016. The three instruments Solar UltraViolet Imager (SUVI), Extreme ultraviolet and X-ray Irradiance Sensor (EXIS), and Space Environment In-Situ Suite (SEISS) provide the data needed as inputs for the product updates National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) provides to the public. SUVI is a full-disk extreme ultraviolet imager enabling Active Region characterization, filament eruption, and flare detection. EXIS provides inputs to solar back-ground-sevents impacting climate models. SEISS provides particle measurements over a wide energy-and-flux range that varies by several orders of magnitude and these data enable updates to spacecraft charge models for electrostatic discharge. EXIS and SEISS have been tested and calibrated end-to-end in ground test facilities around the United States. Due to the complexity of the SUVI design, data from component tests were used in a model to predict on-orbit performance. The ground tests and model updates provided inputs for designing the on-orbit calibration tests. A series of such tests have been planned for the Post-Launch Testing (PLT) of each of these instruments, and specific parameters have been identified that will be updated in the Ground Processing Algorithms, on-orbit parameter tables, or both. Some of SUVI and EXIS calibrations require slewing them off the Sun, while no such maneuvers are needed for SEISS. After a six-month PLT period the GOES-R is expected to be operational. The calibration details are presented in this paper.

  12. Post-launch calibration and testing of space weather instruments on GOES-R satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadikonda, Sivakumara S. K.; Merrow, Cynthia S.; Kronenwetter, Jeffrey A.; Comeyne, Gustave J.; Flanagan, Daniel G.; Todirita, Monica

    2016-05-01

    The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite - R (GOES-R) is the first of a series of satellites to be launched, with the first launch scheduled for October 2016. The three instruments -- Solar UltraViolet Imager (SUVI), Extreme ultraviolet and X-ray Irradiance Sensor (EXIS), and Space Environment In-Situ Suite (SEISS) provide the data needed as inputs for the product updates National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) provides to the public. SUVI is a full-disk extreme ultraviolet imager enabling Active Region characterization, filament eruption, and flare detection. EXIS provides inputs to solar backgrounds/events impacting climate models. SEISS provides particle measurements over a wide energy-and-flux range that varies by several orders of magnitude and these data enable updates to spacecraft charge models for electrostatic discharge. EXIS and SEISS have been tested and calibrated end-to-end in ground test facilities around the United States. Due to the complexity of the SUVI design, data from component tests were used in a model to predict on-orbit performance. The ground tests and model updates provided inputs for designing the on-orbit calibration tests. A series of such tests have been planned for the Post-Launch Testing (PLT) of each of these instruments, and specific parameters have been identified that will be updated in the Ground Processing Algorithms, on-orbit parameter tables, or both. Some of SUVI and EXIS calibrations require slewing them off the Sun, while no such maneuvers are needed for SEISS. After a six-month PLT period the GOES-R is expected to be operational. The calibration details are presented in this paper.

  13. Applications of Calendar Instruments in Social Surveys: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glasner, T.J.; Vaart, van der W.

    2009-01-01

    Retrospective reports in survey interviews and questionnaires are subject to many types of recall error, which affect completeness, consistency, and dating accuracy. Concerns about this problem have led to the development of so-called calendar instruments, or timeline techniques. These aided recall

  14. The Undergraduate Instrumental Analysis Course: A Survey of Available Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggett, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    Reports results of a survey in which 110 universities were selected to respond to questions regarding approximate age and cost of the instruments used in three major areas: separations, spectroscopy, and electroanalysis. Respondents (N=41) also indicated which pieces of equipment were used in undergraduate courses or were used for research. (CS)

  15. Inter-instrument calibration using magnetic field data from Flux Gate Magnetometer (FGM) and Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) onboard Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, R.; Plaschke, F.; Teubenbacher, R.; Giner, L.; Baumjohann, W.; Magnes, W.; Steller, M.; Torbert, R. B.; Vaith, H.; Chutter, M.; Fornaçon, K.-H.; Glassmeier, K.-H.; Carr, C.

    2013-07-01

    We compare the magnetic field data obtained from the Flux-Gate Magnetometer (FGM) and the magnetic field data deduced from the gyration time of electrons measured by the Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) onboard Cluster to determine the spin axis offset of the FGM measurements. Data are used from orbits with their apogees in the magnetotail, when the magnetic field magnitude was between about 20 nT and 500 nT. Offset determination with the EDI-FGM comparison method is of particular interest for these orbits, because no data from solar wind are available in such orbits to apply the usual calibration methods using the Alfvén waves. In this paper, we examine the effects of the different measurement conditions, such as direction of the magnetic field relative to the spin plane and field magnitude in determining the FGM spin-axis offset, and also take into account the time-of-flight offset of the EDI measurements. It is shown that the method works best when the magnetic field magnitude is less than about 128 nT and when the magnetic field is aligned near the spin-axis direction. A remaining spin-axis offset of about 0.4 ~ 0.6 nT was observed between July and October 2003. Using multi-point multi-instrument measurements by Cluster we further demonstrate the importance of the accurate determination of the spin-axis offset when estimating the magnetic field gradient.

  16. Absolute calibration and beam reconstruction of MITO (a ground-based instrument in the millimetric region)

    CERN Document Server

    Savini, G; Battistelli, E S; De Petris, M; Lamagna, L; Luzzi, G; Palladino, E

    2003-01-01

    An efficient sky data reconstruction derives from a precise characterization of the observing instrument. Here we describe the reconstruction of performances of a single-pixel 4-band photometer installed at MITO (Millimeter and Infrared Testagrigia Observatory) focal plane. The strategy of differential sky observations at millimeter wavelengths, by scanning the field of view at constant elevation wobbling the subreflector, induces a good knowledge of beam profile and beam-throw amplitude, allowing efficient data recovery. The problems that arise estimating the detectors throughput by drift scanning on planets are shown. Atmospheric transmission, monitored by skydip technique, is considered for deriving final responsivities for the 4 channels using planets as primary calibrators.

  17. Technical evaluation of available state of Nevada survey instruments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-02-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is reviewing the survey research studies completed by Mountain West Research (1987-1989) for the state of Nevada`s Nuclear Waste Project Office. In this research, 14 survey instruments were used to seek data on whether perceptions of risk could be associated with the possible siting of a high-level radioactive waste repository in Nevada and could be a dominant source of potential, significant, adverse economic impacts. This report presents results from phase 1 of the review, in which ANL contracted with the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) at the University of Chicago to evaluate the technical merits of the nine survey instruments that ANL had been able to acquire. The scope of NORC`s work was limited to rating the questions and stating their strengths and weaknesses. NORC concluded that the surveys could provide valuable data about risk perceptions and potential behavioral responses. NORC identified a few minor problems with a number of questions and the calculated response rates but claimed these problems would probably not have any major biasing effect. The NORC evaluation would have been more complete if the terms used in the questionnaires had been defined, all survey instruments had been acquired, and all data had been made available to the public.

  18. Antisocial sport behaviors survey: instrument development and initial validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, Miranda P; Hoar, Sharleen

    2015-04-01

    The development of a self-report instrument to measure antisocial sport behavior, labeled the Antisocial Sport Behavior Survey (ASBS), among large and diverse samples of athletes is reported. Grounded in the social cognitive theory of moral thought and action (Bandura, 1991) and interpersonal theory (Horowitz, 2004), this instrument was developed and tested in accordance with the traditions of construct validity and classical test theory (Gehlback & Brinkworth, 2011). In Phase 1, 272 college-aged competitive sport participants confirmed a theoretical structure of antisocial sport behavior including eight factors (hypercompetitive, intimidating, antagonistic, disrespectful, exploitable, overly accommodating, abetting, and melodramatic). Phase 2 reports on item development and the response structure of the instrument. In Phase 3, evidence of structural validity and external validity for the ASBS was established with 340 college-aged competitive sport participants. The ASBS presents as a promising new instrument to advance understanding of antisocial sport behavior acts committed by competitive athletes.

  19. Lessons Learned from GOSAT; Instrument Design, Calibration, Operation, Data Processing, and International Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuze, A.; Suto, H.; Shiomi, K.; Nakajima, M.

    2012-12-01

    Advantage of satellite observation is its ability to monitor long term and global distribution with a single instrument. Ozone observation from space has been successful for long term monitoring purposes. Monitoring gradual increase and distribution of greenhouse gases in the troposphere with sub-percent accuracy has become a challenging subject. Interference of cloud and aerosol in radiative transfer has to be corrected for troposphere measurement. Accurate O2-A band measurement can retrieve surface pressure and aerosol distribution property. We have selected a Fourier Transform spectrometer (FTS) to achieve high throughput and wide spectral coverage with uniform spectral resolution. On the other hand, it is difficult to modulate short wave such as 0.76μm and avoid micro vibration interference. Prelaunch, we took special care to select optical components of excellent surface quality and isolate vibration. Design parameters such as IFOV, spectral resolution, observation interval within limited satellite resources must be carefully optimized. Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) has been providing global high spectral resolution data for almost 4 years. Instrument performance, radiometric calibration, radiative transfer calculation and laboratory spectroscopy are all important. The first step was to reduce bias of column-averaged dry air mole fractions (the Level 2 product) of CO2 and CH4 (XCO2 and XCH4) and validate using well calibrated data such as TCCON. After 2 years of operation, latitudinal distribution of zonal mean and seasonal variation at these sites can be measured with better than 2ppm accuracy. However, validations are limited to ideal conditions. Next step is to evaluate consistency of measured values from long periods since launch, different surface types, and various input radiance with different instrument gain. For long term radiometric calibration, we have uses vicarious, onboard solar diffuser, and lunar calibration data. Over the ocean

  20. Standardisation of a Vapour Generator for Calibration of Environmental Monitoring Instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parul Rana

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Very low vapour pressure of 2,4,6 trinitrotoulene (TNT yields extremely low vapour concentrations at different flow rates in the air, yet considerable quantity of vapours and TNTdust during handling may be present at the workplace environment which is harmful to the health of the personnel working there. The explosive vapours, such as TNT,  2,6-dinitrotoluene (DNT, etc., though harmful to the health of the personnel, are not covered either in the emission standards or in the ambient air quality standards. Presently, no instrument is available for air monitoring of TNT vapours. These vapours need to be collected on-site to estimate TNT concentration. Realising the need for real-time air monitoring of TNT, efforts have been made to understand and device an instrument for on-site determination of TNT vapours parts per billiion (ppb range. Low-level TNT vapours and TNT buried in the soil in military operations are required to be detected. The instruments for this require careful calibration to yield accurate and reliable results. Hence, an effort has been made to develop a trace-level ppb vapour generator. The vapour generator of a spiral glass column of length 170 cm and inner diameter 4 mm 2 0.5 mm has been used. An activated charcoal glass tube has been used for sampling TNT vapours. The adsorbed TNT vapours were desorbed and analysed using high performance liquid chromatography. Thesolid support used has been studied. These vapours generated at different flow rates have been evaluated. The calibrated instrument can be used for in situ and on-site analysis of samples of TNT and also for samples collected.

  1. Astrobiology Sample Analysis Program (ASAP) for Advanced Life Detection Instrumentation Development and Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavin, Daniel; Brinkerhoff, Will; Dworkin, Jason; Eigenbrode, Jennifer; Franz, Heather; Mahaffy, Paul; Stern, Jen; Blake, Daid; Sandford, Scott; Fries, marc; hide

    2008-01-01

    Scientific ground-truth measurements for near-term Mars missions, such as the 2009 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission, are essential for validating current in situ flight instrumentation and for the development of advanced instrumentation technologies for life-detection missions over the next decade. The NASA Astrobiology Institute (NAI) has recently funded a consortium of researchers called the Astrobiology Sample Analysis Program (ASAP) to analyze an identical set of homogenized martian analog materials in a "round-robin" style using both state-of-the-art laboratory techniques as well as in-situ flight instrumentation including the SAM gas chromatograph mass spectrometer and CHEMIN X-ray diffraction/fluorescence instruments on MSL and the Urey and MOMA organic analyzer instruments under development for the 2013 ExoMars missions. The analog samples studied included an Atacama Desert soil from Chile, the Murchison meteorite, a gypsum sample from the 2007 AMASE Mars analog site, jarosite from Panoche Valley, CA, a hydrothermal sample from Rio Tinto, Spain, and a "blind" sample collected during the 2007 MSL slow-motion field test in New Mexico. Each sample was distributed to the team for analysis to: (1) determine the nature and inventory of organic compounds, (2) measure the bulk carbon and nitrogen isotopic composition, (3) investigate elemental abundances, mineralogy and matrix, and (4) search for biological activity. The experimental results obtained from the ASAP Mars analog research consortium will be used to build a framework for understanding the biogeochemistry of martian analogs, help calibrate current spaceflight instrumentation, and enhance the scientific return from upcoming missions.

  2. Astrobiology Sample Analysis Program (ASAP) for Advanced Life Detection Instrumentation Development and Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavin, Daniel; Brinkerhoff, Will; Dworkin, Jason; Eigenbrode, Jennifer; Franz, Heather; Mahaffy, Paul; Stern, Jen; Blake, Daid; Sandford, Scott; Fries, marc; Steele, Andrew; Amashukeli, Xenia; Fisher, Anita; Grunthaner, Frank; Aubrey, Andrew; Bada, Jeff; Chiesl, Tom; Stockton, Amanda; Mathies, Rich

    2008-01-01

    Scientific ground-truth measurements for near-term Mars missions, such as the 2009 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission, are essential for validating current in situ flight instrumentation and for the development of advanced instrumentation technologies for life-detection missions over the next decade. The NASA Astrobiology Institute (NAI) has recently funded a consortium of researchers called the Astrobiology Sample Analysis Program (ASAP) to analyze an identical set of homogenized martian analog materials in a "round-robin" style using both state-of-the-art laboratory techniques as well as in-situ flight instrumentation including the SAM gas chromatograph mass spectrometer and CHEMIN X-ray diffraction/fluorescence instruments on MSL and the Urey and MOMA organic analyzer instruments under development for the 2013 ExoMars missions. The analog samples studied included an Atacama Desert soil from Chile, the Murchison meteorite, a gypsum sample from the 2007 AMASE Mars analog site, jarosite from Panoche Valley, CA, a hydrothermal sample from Rio Tinto, Spain, and a "blind" sample collected during the 2007 MSL slow-motion field test in New Mexico. Each sample was distributed to the team for analysis to: (1) determine the nature and inventory of organic compounds, (2) measure the bulk carbon and nitrogen isotopic composition, (3) investigate elemental abundances, mineralogy and matrix, and (4) search for biological activity. The experimental results obtained from the ASAP Mars analog research consortium will be used to build a framework for understanding the biogeochemistry of martian analogs, help calibrate current spaceflight instrumentation, and enhance the scientific return from upcoming missions.

  3. Flux Calibration of Broadband Far Infrared and Submillimetre Photometric Instruments: Theory and Application to Herschel-SPIRE

    CERN Document Server

    Griffin, M J; Schulz, B; Amaral-Rogers, A; Bendo, G; Bock, J; Conley, A; Dowell, C D; Ferlet, M; Glenn, J; Lim, T; Pearson, C; Pohlen, M; Sibthorpe, B; Spencer, L; Swinyard, B; Valtchanov, I

    2013-01-01

    Photometric instruments operating at far infrared to millimetre wavelengths often have broad spectral passbands (central wavelength/bandwidth ~ 3 or less), especially those operating in space. A broad passband can result in significant variation of the beam profile and aperture efficiency across the passband, effects which thus far have not generally been taken into account in the flux calibration of such instruments. With absolute calibration uncertainties associated with the brightness of primary calibration standards now in the region of 5% or less, variation of the beam properties across the passband can be a significant contributor to the overall calibration accuracy for extended emission. We present a calibration framework which takes such variations into account for both antenna-coupled and absorber-coupled focal plane architectures. The scheme covers point source and extended source cases, and also the intermediate case of a semi-extended source profile. We apply the new method to the Herschel-SPIRE s...

  4. Evaluation applications of instrument calibration research findings in psychology for very small samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, W. P., Jr.; Petry, P.

    2016-11-01

    Many published research studies document item calibration invariance across samples using Rasch's probabilistic models for measurement. A new approach to outcomes evaluation for very small samples was employed for two workshop series focused on stress reduction and joyful living conducted for health system employees and caregivers since 2012. Rasch-calibrated self-report instruments measuring depression, anxiety and stress, and the joyful living effects of mindfulness behaviors were identified in peer-reviewed journal articles. Items from one instrument were modified for use with a US population, other items were simplified, and some new items were written. Participants provided ratings of their depression, anxiety and stress, and the effects of their mindfulness behaviors before and after each workshop series. The numbers of participants providing both pre- and post-workshop data were low (16 and 14). Analysis of these small data sets produce results showing that, with some exceptions, the item hierarchies defining the constructs retained the same invariant profiles they had exhibited in the published research (correlations (not disattenuated) range from 0.85 to 0.96). In addition, comparisons of the pre- and post-workshop measures for the three constructs showed substantively and statistically significant changes. Implications for program evaluation comparisons, quality improvement efforts, and the organization of communications concerning outcomes in clinical fields are explored.

  5. Soot Reference Materials for instrument calibration and intercomparisons: a workshop summary with recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Baumgardner

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Soot, which is produced from biomass burning and the incomplete combustion of fossil and biomass fuels, has been linked to regional and global climate change and to negative health problems. Scientists measure soot using a variety of methods in order to quantify source emissions and understand its atmospheric chemistry, reactivity under emission conditions, interaction with solar radiation, influence on clouds, and health impacts. A major obstacle currently limiting progress is the absence of established standards or reference materials for calibrating the many instruments used to measure the various properties of soot.

    The current state of availability and practicability of soot standard reference materials (SRMs was reviewed by a group of 50 international experts during a workshop in June of 2011. The workshop was convened to summarize the current knowledge on soot measurement techniques, identify the measurement uncertainties and limitations related to the lack of SRMs, and identify attributes of SRMs that, if developed, would reduce measurement uncertainties. The workshop established that suitable SRMs are available for calibrating some, but not all, measurement methods. The community of single-particle sootphotometer (SP2 users identified a suitable SRM, fullerene soot, but users of instruments that measure light absorption by soot collected on filters did not. Similarly, those who use thermal optical analysis (TOA to analyze the organic and elemental carbon components of soot were not satisfied with current SRMs. The workshop produced recommendations for the development of new SRMs that would be suitable for the different soot measurement methods.

  6. Instrumentation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    Journal Scope:Instrumentation is a high quality open access peer reviewed research journal.Authors are solicited to contribute to these journals by submitting articles that illustrate most up-to-date research results,projects,surveying works and industrial experiences that describe significant advances in the instrumental science.The mission of the Instrumentation is to provide a platform for the researchers,academicians,

  7. A Fully Bayesian Method for Jointly Fitting Instrumental Calibration and X-Ray Spectral Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jin; van Dyk, David A.; Kashyap, Vinay L.; Siemiginowska, Aneta; Connors, Alanna; Drake, Jeremy; Meng, Xiao-Li; Ratzlaff, Pete; Yu, Yaming

    2014-10-01

    Owing to a lack of robust principled methods, systematic instrumental uncertainties have generally been ignored in astrophysical data analysis despite wide recognition of the importance of including them. Ignoring calibration uncertainty can cause bias in the estimation of source model parameters and can lead to underestimation of the variance of these estimates. We previously introduced a pragmatic Bayesian method to address this problem. The method is "pragmatic" in that it introduced an ad hoc technique that simplified computation by neglecting the potential information in the data for narrowing the uncertainty for the calibration product. Following that work, we use a principal component analysis to efficiently represent the uncertainty of the effective area of an X-ray (or γ-ray) telescope. Here, however, we leverage this representation to enable a principled, fully Bayesian method that coherently accounts for the calibration uncertainty in high-energy spectral analysis. In this setting, the method is compared with standard analysis techniques and the pragmatic Bayesian method. The advantage of the fully Bayesian method is that it allows the data to provide information not only for estimation of the source parameters but also for the calibration product—here the effective area, conditional on the adopted spectral model. In this way, it can yield more accurate and efficient estimates of the source parameters along with valid estimates of their uncertainty. Provided that the source spectrum can be accurately described by a parameterized model, this method allows rigorous inference about the effective area by quantifying which possible curves are most consistent with the data.

  8. A fully Bayesian method for jointly fitting instrumental calibration and X-ray spectral models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Jin; Yu, Yaming [Department of Statistics, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-1250 (United States); Van Dyk, David A. [Statistics Section, Imperial College London, Huxley Building, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Kashyap, Vinay L.; Siemiginowska, Aneta; Drake, Jeremy; Ratzlaff, Pete [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Connors, Alanna; Meng, Xiao-Li, E-mail: jinx@uci.edu, E-mail: yamingy@ics.uci.edu, E-mail: dvandyk@imperial.ac.uk, E-mail: vkashyap@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: asiemiginowska@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: jdrake@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: pratzlaff@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: meng@stat.harvard.edu [Department of Statistics, Harvard University, 1 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2014-10-20

    Owing to a lack of robust principled methods, systematic instrumental uncertainties have generally been ignored in astrophysical data analysis despite wide recognition of the importance of including them. Ignoring calibration uncertainty can cause bias in the estimation of source model parameters and can lead to underestimation of the variance of these estimates. We previously introduced a pragmatic Bayesian method to address this problem. The method is 'pragmatic' in that it introduced an ad hoc technique that simplified computation by neglecting the potential information in the data for narrowing the uncertainty for the calibration product. Following that work, we use a principal component analysis to efficiently represent the uncertainty of the effective area of an X-ray (or γ-ray) telescope. Here, however, we leverage this representation to enable a principled, fully Bayesian method that coherently accounts for the calibration uncertainty in high-energy spectral analysis. In this setting, the method is compared with standard analysis techniques and the pragmatic Bayesian method. The advantage of the fully Bayesian method is that it allows the data to provide information not only for estimation of the source parameters but also for the calibration product—here the effective area, conditional on the adopted spectral model. In this way, it can yield more accurate and efficient estimates of the source parameters along with valid estimates of their uncertainty. Provided that the source spectrum can be accurately described by a parameterized model, this method allows rigorous inference about the effective area by quantifying which possible curves are most consistent with the data.

  9. Soot reference materials for instrument calibration and intercomparisons: a workshop summary with recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Baumgardner

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Soot, which is produced from biomass burning and the incomplete combustion of fossil and biomass fuels, has been linked to regional and global climate change and to negative health problems. Scientists measure the properties of soot using a variety of methods in order to quantify source emissions and understand its atmospheric chemistry, reactivity under emission conditions, interaction with solar radiation, influence on clouds, and health impacts. A major obstacle currently limiting progress is the absence of established standards or reference materials for calibrating the many instruments used to measure the various properties of soot.

    The current state of availability and practicability of soot standard reference materials (SRMs was reviewed by a group of 50 international experts during a workshop in June of 2011. The workshop was convened to summarize the current knowledge on soot measurement techniques, identify the measurement uncertainties and limitations related to the lack of soot SRMs, and identify attributes of SRMs that, if developed, would reduce measurement uncertainties. The workshop established that suitable SRMs are available for calibrating some, but not all, measurement methods. The community of users of the single-particle soot-photometer (SP2, an instrument using laser-induced incandescence, identified a suitable SRM, fullerene soot, but users of instruments that measure light absorption by soot collected on filters did not. Similarly, those who use thermal optical analysis (TOA to analyze the organic and elemental carbon components of soot were not satisfied with current SRMs. The workshop, and subsequent, interactive discussions, produced a number of recommendations for the development of new SRMs, and their implementation, that would be suitable for the different soot measurement methods.

  10. Fifteen Years of the Hubble Space Telescope's Advanced Camera for Surveys: Calibration Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grogin, Norman A.; Advanced CameraSurveys Instrument Team

    2017-06-01

    The Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) has been a workhorse HST imager for over fifteen years, subsequent to its Servicing Mission 3B installation in 2002. The once defunct ACS Wide Field Channel (WFC) has now been operating almost twice as long (>8yrs) since its Servicing Mission 4 (SM4) repair than it had originally operated prior to its 2007 failure. Despite the accumulating radiation damage to the WFC CCDs during their long stay in low Earth orbit, ACS continues to be heavily exploited by the HST community as both a prime and a parallel detector.The past year has seen several advancements in ACS data acquisition and calibration capabilities: the mostwidespread changes since shortly after SM4. We review these recent developments that enable the continued high performance of this instrument, including both the WFC and the Solar Blind Channel (SBC). Highlightsinclude: 1) implementaton of new WFC subarray modes to allow for more consistent high-fidelity calibration; 2) a thorough modernization of the original pixel-based correction of WFC charge-transfer efficiency decline; 3)"save the pixels" initiatives resulting in much less WFC bad-pixel flagging via hot-pixel stability analyses and readout-dark modeling; and 4) a new initiative to provide improved PSF estimates via empirical fitting to the full ACS archive of nearly 200,000 images.

  11. Application of Allan Deviation to Assessing Uncertainties of Continuous-measurement Instruments, and Optimizing Calibration Schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Gloria; Rella, Chris; Farinas, Alejandro

    2014-05-01

    Technological advancement of instrumentation in atmospheric and other geoscience disciplines over the past decade has lead to a shift from discrete sample analysis to continuous, in-situ monitoring. Standard error analysis used for discrete measurements is not sufficient to assess and compare the error contribution of noise and drift from continuous-measurement instruments, and a different statistical analysis approach should be applied. The Allan standard deviation analysis technique developed for atomic clock stability assessment by David W. Allan [1] can be effectively and gainfully applied to continuous measurement instruments. As an example, P. Werle et al has applied these techniques to look at signal averaging for atmospheric monitoring by Tunable Diode-Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS) [2]. This presentation will build on, and translate prior foundational publications to provide contextual definitions and guidelines for the practical application of this analysis technique to continuous scientific measurements. The specific example of a Picarro G2401 Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy (CRDS) analyzer used for continuous, atmospheric monitoring of CO2, CH4 and CO will be used to define the basics features the Allan deviation, assess factors affecting the analysis, and explore the time-series to Allan deviation plot translation for different types of instrument noise (white noise, linear drift, and interpolated data). In addition, the useful application of using an Allan deviation to optimize and predict the performance of different calibration schemes will be presented. Even though this presentation will use the specific example of the Picarro G2401 CRDS Analyzer for atmospheric monitoring, the objective is to present the information such that it can be successfully applied to other instrument sets and disciplines. [1] D.W. Allan, "Statistics of Atomic Frequency Standards," Proc, IEEE, vol. 54, pp 221-230, Feb 1966 [2] P. Werle, R. Miicke, F. Slemr, "The Limits

  12. Instrument and Survey Analysis Technical Report: Program Implementation Survey. Technical Report #1112

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald

    2011-01-01

    This technical document provides guidance to educators on the creation and interpretation of survey instruments, particularly as they relate to an analysis of program implementation. Illustrative examples are drawn from a survey of educators related to the use of the easyCBM learning system. This document includes specific sections on…

  13. Calibration results using highly aberrated images for aligning the JWST instruments to the telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Koby Z.; Acton, D. Scott; Gallagher, Ben B.; Knight, J. Scott; Dean, Bruce H.; Jurling, Alden S.; Zielinski, Thomas P.

    2016-07-01

    mostly of 3rd-order astigmatism and coma. This is because the elliptical tertiary mirror of the AOS is used off of its ideal foci locations without the compensating wavefront effects of the JWST primary and secondary mirrors. Therefore, the PSFs created are highly asymmetric with relatively complex structure and the centroid and encircled energy analyses traditionally used to locate images are not sufficient for ensuring the AOS to ISIM alignment. A novel approach combining phase retrieval and spatial metrology was developed to both locate the images with respect to the AOS and provide calibration information for eventual AOS to ISIM alignment verification. During final JWST OTE and ISIM (OTIS) testing, only a single thru-focus image will be collected by the instruments. Therefore, tools and processes were developed to perform single-image phase retrieval on these highly aberrated images such that any single image of the ASPA source can provide calibrated knowledge of the instruments' position relative to the AOS. This paper discusses the results of the methodology, hardware, and calibration performed to ensure that the AOS and ISIM are aligned within their respective tolerances at JWST OTIS testing.

  14. Instrumental and Calibration Advancements for the Dark Ages Radio Explorer (DARE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsalve, Raul A.; Burns, Jack O.; Bradley, Richard F.; Tauscher, Keith; Nhan, Bang; Bowman, Judd D.; Purcell, William R.; Newell, David; Draper, David

    2017-01-01

    The Dark Ages Radio Explorer (DARE) is a space mission concept proposed to NASA to measure with high precision the monopole component of the redshifted 21-cm signal from neutral hydrogen originated during cosmic dawn at redshifts 35 > z > 11. For the 21-cm line, these high redshifts correspond to the frequency range 40-120 MHz. Through its spectral features, this signal will provide a wealth of information about the large-scale physics of the first stars, galaxies and black holes. The signal is expected to have an absolute amplitude below 200 mK, which is five orders of magnitude smaller than the diffuse foregrounds dominated by Galactic synchrotron radiation. In order to avoid the impact of the Earth’s ionosphere, which corrupts low-frequency radio waves through refraction, absorption, and emission, this measurement is conducted from orbit above the far side of the Moon. This location is ideal because it enables the Moon to shield the spacecraft from Solar radiation and terrestrial radio-frequency interference. The DARE instrument is designed around a dual-polarization, widefield, wideband, biconical antenna, which provides full-Stokes capabilities in order to measure and remove the low-level polarized component of the foregrounds. The spacecraft is rotated about its boresight axis at 1 RPM to modulate the foregrounds and separate them from the spatially uniform cosmological signal. The instrument requires exquisite calibration to reach a sensitivity of a few mK in the presence of strong foregrounds. For this purpose, the frequency-dependent antenna beam is characterized to 20 ppm. This is accomplished through a combination of electromagnetic simulations, anechoic chamber measurements, and on-orbit mapping using a calibrated high-power ground-based source. The DARE front-end receiver is characterized on the ground in terms of its input impedance, gain, noise properties, and stability. Its performance is verified when operating on-orbit at a fixed temperature

  15. Application of the Langley plot method to the calibration of the solar backscattered ultraviolet instrument on the Nimbus 7 satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhartia, P. K.; Taylor, S.; Mcpeters, R. D.; Wellemeyer, C.

    1995-01-01

    The concept of the well-known Langley plot technique, used for the calibration of ground-based instruments, has been generalized for application to satellite instruments. In polar regions, near summer solstice, the solar backscattered ultraviolet (SBUV) instrument on the Nimbus 7 satellite samples the same ozone field at widely different solar zenith angles. These measurements are compared to assess the long-term drift in the instrument calibration. Although the technique provides only a relative wavelength-to-wavelength calibration, it can be combined with existing techniques to determine the drift of the instrument at any wavelength. Using this technique, we have generated a 12-year data set of ozone vertical profiles from SBUV with an estimated accuracy of +/- 5% at 1 mbar and +/- 2% at 10 mbar (95% confidence) over 12 years. Since the method is insensitive to true changes in the atmospheric ozone profile, it can also be used to compare the calibrations of similar SBUV instruments launched without temporal overlap.

  16. Human factors survey of advanced instrumentation and controls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    A survey oriented towards identifying the human factors issues in regard to the use of advanced instrumentation and controls (I C) in the nuclear industry was conducted. A number of United States (US) and Canadian nuclear vendors and utilities were participants in the survey. Human factors items, subsumed under the categories of computer-generated displays (CGD), controls, organizational support, training, and related topics, were discussed. The survey found the industry to be concerned about the human factors issues related to the implementation of advanced I C. Fifteen potential human factors problems were identified. They include: the need for an advanced I C guideline equivalent to NUREG-0700; a role change in the control room from operator to supervisor; information overload; adequacy of existing training technology for advanced I C; and operator acceptance and trust. 11 refs., 1 tab.

  17. Jefferson Lab Hall A Beamline Instrumentation and Calibration for GMP experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Thir Narayan

    2015-10-01

    The nucleon electromagnetic form factors characterize the distributions of electric charge and magnetization current inside the nucleon and thus reflect the internal structure determined by Quantum Chromodynamics. The GMp experiment is a first experiment run in Hall A at Jefferson Lab after the upgrade to double the beam energy with the goal to precisely measure electron-proton elastic cross section in the Q2 range of 7 to 17 GeV2 with an accuracy of better than 2%; several time better than existing data at the highest Q2. In order to achieve this accuracy, a determination of the accumulated beam charge of better than 0.5% is required. The new 12 GeV beamline was commissioned during the spring of 2015, with the main instrumentation consisting of beam charge and position monitors. In this talk, the procedures and the results of the calibrations of these beamline components will be presented.

  18. An automated calibration laboratory for flight research instrumentation: Requirements and a proposed design approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oneill-Rood, Nora; Glover, Richard D.

    1990-01-01

    NASA's Dryden Flight Research Facility (Ames-Dryden), operates a diverse fleet of research aircraft which are heavily instrumented to provide both real time data for in-flight monitoring and recorded data for postflight analysis. Ames-Dryden's existing automated calibration (AUTOCAL) laboratory is a computerized facility which tests aircraft sensors to certify accuracy for anticipated harsh flight environments. Recently, a major AUTOCAL lab upgrade was initiated; the goal of this modernization is to enhance productivity and improve configuration management for both software and test data. The new system will have multiple testing stations employing distributed processing linked by a local area network to a centralized database. The baseline requirements for the new AUTOCAL lab and the design approach being taken for its mechanization are described.

  19. Design, calibration and error analysis of instrumentation for heat transfer measurements in internal combustion engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, C. R.; Tree, D. R.; Dewitt, D. P.; Wahiduzzaman, S. A. H.

    1987-01-01

    The paper reports the methodology and uncertainty analyses of instrumentation for heat transfer measurements in internal combustion engines. Results are presented for determining the local wall heat flux in an internal combustion engine (using a surface thermocouple-type heat flux gage) and the apparent flame-temperature and soot volume fraction path length product in a diesel engine (using two-color pyrometry). It is shown that a surface thermocouple heat transfer gage suitably constructed and calibrated will have an accuracy of 5 to 10 percent. It is also shown that, when applying two-color pyrometry to measure the apparent flame temperature and soot volume fraction-path length, it is important to choose at least one of the two wavelengths to lie in the range of 1.3 to 2.3 micrometers. Carefully calibrated two-color pyrometer can ensure that random errors in the apparent flame temperature and in the soot volume fraction path length will remain small (within about 1 percent and 10-percent, respectively).

  20. Design, calibration and error analysis of instrumentation for heat transfer measurements in internal combustion engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, C. R.; Tree, D. R.; Dewitt, D. P.; Wahiduzzaman, S. A. H.

    1987-01-01

    The paper reports the methodology and uncertainty analyses of instrumentation for heat transfer measurements in internal combustion engines. Results are presented for determining the local wall heat flux in an internal combustion engine (using a surface thermocouple-type heat flux gage) and the apparent flame-temperature and soot volume fraction path length product in a diesel engine (using two-color pyrometry). It is shown that a surface thermocouple heat transfer gage suitably constructed and calibrated will have an accuracy of 5 to 10 percent. It is also shown that, when applying two-color pyrometry to measure the apparent flame temperature and soot volume fraction-path length, it is important to choose at least one of the two wavelengths to lie in the range of 1.3 to 2.3 micrometers. Carefully calibrated two-color pyrometer can ensure that random errors in the apparent flame temperature and in the soot volume fraction path length will remain small (within about 1 percent and 10-percent, respectively).

  1. NEFSC 2007 Bottom Trawl Survey Calibration (HB0710, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NEFSC bottom trawl survey is a fisheries independent, multi-species survey that provides the primary scientific data for fisheries assessments in the U.S....

  2. NEFSC 2007 Bottom Trawl Survey Calibration (HB0711, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NEFSC bottom trawl survey is a fisheries independent, multi-species survey that provides the primary scientific data for fisheries assessments in the U.S....

  3. Post calibration of the two-dimensional electron cyclotron emission imaging instrument with electron temperature characteristics of the magnetohydrodynamic instabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, M J; Park, H K; Yun, G S; Nam, Y B; Choe, G H; Lee, W; Jardin, S

    2016-01-01

    The electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) instrument is widely used to study the local electron temperature (Te) fluctuations by measuring the ECE intensity IECE ∝ Te in tokamak plasmas. The ECEI measurement is often processed in a normalized fluctuation quantity against the time averaged value due to complication in absolute calibration. In this paper, the ECEI channels are relatively calibrated using the flat Te assumption of the sawtooth crash or the tearing mode island and a proper extrapolation. The 2-D relatively calibrated electron temperature (Te,rel) images are reconstructed and the displacement amplitude of the magnetohydrodynamic modes can be measured for the accurate quantitative growth analysis.

  4. An Improved Photometric Calibration of the Sloan Digital SkySurvey Imaging Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Schlegel, David J.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Barentine, J.C.; Blanton, Michael R.; Brewington, Howard J.; Gunn, JamesE.; Harvanek, Michael; Hogg, David W.; Ivezic, Zeljko; Johnston, David; Kent, Stephen M.; Kleinman, S.J.; Knapp, Gillian R.; Krzesinski, Jurek; Long, Dan; Neilsen Jr., Eric H.; Nitta, Atsuko; Loomis, Craig; Lupton,Robert H.; Roweis, Sam; Snedden, Stephanie A.; Strauss, Michael A.; Tucker, Douglas L.

    2007-09-30

    We present an algorithm to photometrically calibrate widefield optical imaging surveys, that simultaneously solves for thecalibration parameters and relative stellar fluxes using overlappingobservations. The algorithm decouples the problem of "relative"calibrations from that of "absolute" calibrations; the absolutecalibration is reduced to determining a few numbers for the entiresurvey. We pay special attention to the spatial structure of thecalibration errors, allowing one to isolate particular error modes indownstream analyses. Applying this to the SloanDigital Sky Survey imagingdata, we achieve ~;1 percent relative calibration errors across 8500sq.deg/ in griz; the errors are ~;2 percent for the u band. These errorsare dominated by unmodelled atmospheric variations at Apache PointObservatory. These calibrations, dubbed ubercalibration, are now publicwith SDSS Data Release 6, and will be a part of subsequent SDSS datareleases.

  5. Use of Transportable Radiation Detection Instruments to Assess Internal Contamination from Intakes of Radionuclides Part II: Calibration Factors and ICAT Computer Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anigstein, Robert; Olsher, Richard H; Loomis, Donald A; Ansari, Armin

    2016-12-01

    The detonation of a radiological dispersion device or other radiological incidents could result in widespread releases of radioactive materials and intakes of radionuclides by affected individuals. Transportable radiation monitoring instruments could be used to measure radiation from gamma-emitting radionuclides in the body for triaging individuals and assigning priorities to their bioassay samples for in vitro assessments. The present study derived sets of calibration factors for four instruments: the Ludlum Model 44-2 gamma scintillator, a survey meter containing a 2.54 × 2.54-cm NaI(Tl) crystal; the Captus 3000 thyroid uptake probe, which contains a 5.08 × 5.08-cm NaI(Tl) crystal; the Transportable Portal Monitor Model TPM-903B, which contains two 3.81 × 7.62 × 182.9-cm polyvinyltoluene plastic scintillators; and a generic instrument, such as an ionization chamber, that measures exposure rates. The calibration factors enable these instruments to be used for assessing inhaled or ingested intakes of any of four radionuclides: Co, I, Cs, and Ir. The derivations used biokinetic models embodied in the DCAL computer software system developed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Monte Carlo simulations using the MCNPX radiation transport code. The three physical instruments were represented by MCNP models that were developed previously. The affected individuals comprised children of five ages who were represented by the revised Oak Ridge National Laboratory pediatric phantoms, and adult men and adult women represented by the Adult Reference Computational Phantoms described in Publication 110 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection. These calibration factors can be used to calculate intakes; the intakes can be converted to committed doses by the use of tabulated dose coefficients. These calibration factors also constitute input data to the ICAT computer program, an interactive Microsoft Windows-based software package that estimates intakes of

  6. The Gaia spectrophotometric standard stars survey -II. Instrumental effects of six ground-based observing campaigns

    CERN Document Server

    Altavilla, G; Pancino, E; Galleti, S; Ragaini, S; Bellazzini, M; Cocozza, G; Bragaglia, A; Carrasco, J M; Castro, A; Di Fabrizio, L; Federici, L; Figueras, F; Gebran, M; Jordi, C; Masana, E; Schuster, W; Valentini, G; Voss, H

    2015-01-01

    The Gaia SpectroPhotometric Standard Stars (SPSS) survey started in 2006, it was awarded almost 450 observing nights, and accumulated almost 100,000 raw data frames, with both photometric and spectroscopic observations. Such large observational effort requires careful, homogeneous, and automated data reduction and quality control procedures. In this paper, we quantitatively evaluate instrumental effects that might have a significant (i.e.,$\\geq$1%) impact on the Gaia SPSS flux calibration. The measurements involve six different instruments, monitored over the eight years of observations dedicated to the Gaia flux standards campaigns: DOLORES@TNG in La Palma, EFOSC2@NTT and ROSS@REM in La Silla, CAFOS@2.2m in Calar Alto, BFOSC@Cassini in Loiano, and LaRuca@1.5m in San Pedro Martir. We examine and quantitatively evaluate the following effects: CCD linearity and shutter times, calibration frames stability, lamp flexures, second order contamination, light polarization, and fringing. We present methods to correct ...

  7. Weak Lensing from Space I: Instrumentation and Survey Strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhodes, Jason; Refregier, Alexandre; Massey, Richard; Albert, Justin; Bacon, David; Bernstein, Gary; Ellis, Richard; Jain, Bhuvnesh; Kim, Alex; Lampton, Mike; McKay, Tim; Akerlof, C.; Aldering, G.; Amanullah, R.; Astier, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bebek, C.; Bergstrom, L.; Bercovitz, J.; Bester, M.; Bonissent, A.; Bower, C.; Carithers, W.; Commins, E.; Day, C.; Deustua, S.; DiGennaro, R.; Ealet, A.; Eriksson, M.; Fruchter, A.; Genat, J.-F.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D.; Harris, S.; Harvey, P.; Heetderks, H.; Holland, S.; Huterer, D.; Karcher, A.; Kolbe, W.; Kreiger, B.; Lafever, R.; Lamoureux, J.; Levi, M.; Devin, D.; Linder, E.; Loken, S.; Malina, R.; McKee, S.; Miquel, R.; Mortsell, E.; Mostek, N.; Mufson, S.; Musser, J.; Nugent, P.; Oluseyi, H.; Pain, R.; Palaio, N.; Pankow, D.; Perlmutter, S.; Pratt, R.; Prieto, E.; Robinson, K.; Roe, N.; Sholl, M.; Schubnell, M.; Smadja, G.; Smoot, G.; Spadafora, A.; Tarle, G.; Tomasch, A.; von der Lippe, H.; Vincent, D.; Walder, J.-P.; Wang, G.

    2003-04-23

    A wide field space-based imaging telescope is necessary to fully exploit the technique of observing dark matter via weak gravitational lensing. This first paper in a three part series outlines the survey strategies and relevant instrumental parameters for such a mission. As a concrete example of hardware design, we consider the proposed Supernova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP). Using SNAP engineering models, we quantify the major contributions to this telescope's Point Spread Function (PSF). These PSF contributions are relevant to any similar wide field space telescope. We further show that the PSF of SNAP or a similar telescope will be smaller than current ground-based PSFs, and more isotropic and stable over time than the PSF of the Hubble Space Telescope. We outline survey strategies for two different regimes - a ''wide'' 300 square degree survey and a ''deep'' 15 square degree survey that will accomplish various weak lensing goals including statistical studies and dark matter mapping.

  8. Roller compaction process development and scale up using Johanson model calibrated with instrumented roll data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesarikar, Vishwas V; Patel, Chandrakant; Early, William; Vatsaraj, Nipa; Sprockel, Omar; Jerzweski, Robert

    2012-10-15

    and calibrated using a subset of placebo run data obtained on WP120. The roll force values were calculated using vendor supplied equation. The nip angle was expressed as a function of gap and RFU. The nip angle, gap and RFU were used in a new roll force equation to estimate normal stress P2 at the center of the ribbon. Using ratios P1/P2 and P3/P2 from the calibration data set, P1 and P2 were estimated. The ribbon width over which P1, P2, and P3 are effective was determined by minimizing sum square error between the model predicted vs. experimental ribbon densities of the calibration set. The model predicted ribbon densities of the placebo runs compared well with the experimental data. The placebo model also predicted with reasonable accuracy the ribbon densities of active A, B, and C blends prepared at various combinations of process parameters. The placebo model was then used to calculate scale up parameters from WP120 to WP200 roller compactor. While WP120 has a single screw speed, WP200 is equipped with a twin feed screw system. A limited number of roller compaction runs on WP200 was used as a calibration set to determine normal stress profile across ribbon width. The nip angle equation derived from instrumented roll data collected on WP120 was applied to estimate nip angles on WP200 at various processing conditions. The roll force values calculated from vendor supplied equation and the nip angle values were used in roll force equation to estimate normal stress P2 at the tip of the feed screws. Based on feed screw design, it was assumed that the normal stress at the center of the ribbon was equal to those calculated at the tip of the feed screws. The ratio of normal stress at the edge of the ribbon Pe to the normal stress P2 at the feed screw tip was optimized to minimize sum square error between model predicted vs. experimental ribbon densities of the calibration set. The model predicted ribbon densities of the batches prepared on WP200 compared well with the

  9. Lateral Violence in Nursing Survey: Instrument Development and Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynne S. Nemeth

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available An examination of the psychometric properties of the Lateral Violence in Nursing Survey (LVNS, an instrument previously developed to measure the perceived incidence and severity of lateral violence (LV in the nursing workplace, was carried out. Conceptual clustering and principal components analysis were used with survey responses from 663 registered nurses and ancillary nursing staff in a southeastern tertiary care medical center. Where appropriate, Cronbach’s alpha (α evaluated internal consistency. The prevalence/severity of lateral violence items constitute two distinct subscales (LV by self and others with Cronbach’s alpha of 0.74 and 0.86, respectively. The items asking about potential causes of LV are unidimensional and internally consistent (alpha = 0.77 but there is no conceptually coherent theme underlying the various causes. Respondents rating a potential LV cause as “major” scored higher on both prevalence/severity subscales than those rating it a “minor” cause or not a cause. Subsets of items on the LVNS are internally reliable, supporting construct validity. Revisions of the original LVNS instrument will improve its use in future work.

  10. Design, Building and Testing of a Sun Calibration Mechanism for the MSI-VNS Instrument on EarthCARE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabak, Erik; de Goeij, Bryan; van Riel, Luud; Meijer, Ellart; van der Knaap, Frits; Doornink, Jan; de Graaf, Harm-Jan

    2013-09-01

    TNO has developed a mechanism to perform sun and dark calibration as a module of the Visible-NIR-SWIR Optical Unit (VNS) in the context of the ESA EarthCARE mission. This paper will address the conceptual and detailed design and modelling approach of the mechanism. Finally the production and testing of the Life Test Model (LTM) will be presented.The rotating part of the mechanism (calibration carousel) is the supporting structure of the instrument calibration diffusers. By rotating the carousel either the instrument nominal, sun calibration or dark calibration/safe modes can be selected. The calibration carousel is suspended in (a.o.) hard preloaded angular contact bearings and driven by a Phytron stepper motor. FE Modelling has been used to derive the bearing- and motor forces and accelerations. These analysis results were used as input to the CABARET analyses performed by ESTL (UK). Using the analysis results the bearing stress, stiffness, gapping and friction torque were predicted.A flight representative Life Test Model (LTM) has been manufactured assembled and was successfully subjected to ground cycles testing, vibration-, thermal vacuum- and life cycle testing.

  11. Advanced Camera for Surveys Instrument Handbook for Cycle 25 v. 16.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, R. J.

    2017-01-01

    The Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS), a third-generation instrument, was installed in the Hubble Space Telescope during Servicing Mission 3B, on March 7, 2002. Its primary purpose was to increase HST imaging discovery efficiency by about a factor of 10, with a combination of detector area and quantum efficiency that surpasses previous instruments. ACS has three independent cameras that have provided wide-field, high resolution, and ultraviolet imaging capabilities respectively, using a broad assortment of filters designed to address a large range of scientific goals. In addition, coronagraphic, polarimetric, and grism capabilities have made the ACS a versatile and powerful instrument. The ACS Instrument Handbook, which is maintained by the ACS Team at STScI, descr ibes the instrument properties, performance, operations, and calibration. It is the basic technical reference manual for the instrument, and should be used with other documents (listed in Table 1.1) for writing Phase I proposals, detailed Phase II programs, and for data analysis. (See Figure 1.1). In May 2009, Servicing Mission 4 (SM4) successfully restored the ACS Wide Field Camera (WFC) to regular service after its failure in January 2007. Unfortunately, the ACS High Resolution Camera (HRC) was not restored to operation during SM4, so it cannot be proposed for new observations. Nevertheless, this handbook retains description of the HRC to support analysis of archived observations. The ACS Solar Blind Channel (SBC) was unaffected by the January 2007 failure of WFC and HRC. The SBC has remained in steady operation, and was not serviced during SM4. It remains available for new observations.

  12. Addressing the Photometric Calibration Challenge: Explicit Determination of the Instrumental Response and Atmospheric Response Functions, and Tying it All Together.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, C. W.; Tonry, J. L.

    2016-05-01

    Photometric calibration is currently the dominant source of systematic uncertainty in exploiting type Ia supernovae to determine the nature of the dark energy. We review our ongoing program to address this calibration challenge by performing measurements of both the instrumental response function and the optical transmission function of the atmosphere. A key aspect of this approach is to complement standard star observations by using NIST-calibrated photodiodes as a metrology foundation for optical flux measurements. We present our first attempt to assess photometric consistency between synthetic photometry and observations, by comparing predictions based on a NIST-diode-based determination of the PanSTARRS-1 instrumental response and empirical atmospheric transmission measurements, with fluxes we obtained from observing spectrophotometric standards.

  13. Addressing the Photometric Calibration Challenge: Explicit Determination of the Instrumental Response and Atmospheric Response Functions, and Tying it All Together

    CERN Document Server

    Stubbs, Christopher W

    2012-01-01

    Photometric calibration is currently the dominant source of systematic uncertainty in exploiting type Ia supernovae to determine the nature of the dark energy. We review our ongoing program to address this calibration challenge by performing measurements of both the instrumental response function and the optical transmission function of the atmosphere. A key aspect of this approach is to complement standard star observations by using NIST-calibrated photodiodes as a metrology foundation for optical flux measurements. We present our first attempt to assess photometric consistency between synthetic photometry and observations, by comparing predictions based on a NIST-diode-based determination of the PanSTARRS-1 instrumental response and empirical atmospheric transmission measurements, with fluxes we obtained from observing spectrophotometric standards.

  14. Instrumentation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Journal Scope:Instrumentation is a high quality open access peer reviewed research journal,Authors are solicited to contribute to these journals by submitting articles that illustrate most up-to-date research results,projects,surveying works and industrial

  15. Spectroscopic Reductions of White Dwarf Stars to Support Dark Energy Survey Calibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulledge, Deborah Jean; Robertson, Jacob M.; Tucker, Douglas Lee; Smith, J. Allyn; Wester, William; Tremblay, Pier-Emmanuel; Fix, Mees B.

    2017-01-01

    The Dark Energy Survey is an imaging survey that covers 5000 square degrees in the Southern hemisphere to map galaxies and gather information on dark energy. Science requirements for the survey require a 0.5% uncertainty in color, driven by supernova science. The Dark Energy Survey relies a calibration technique that uses white dwarf stars to set zero points. These white dwarf spectra are fit to models which are used to generate synthetic photometry. These values are compared to the measured values from the survey to verify that the zero points are correct. We present results to date of the spectroscopic reductions of these white dwarf stars in support of the calibrations for the Dark Energy Survey.

  16. RADBALL TECHNOLOGY TESTING IN THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HEALTH PHYSICS INSTRUMENT CALIBRATION LABORATORY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farfan, E.

    2010-07-08

    The United Kingdom's National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) has developed a radiation-mapping device that can locate and quantify radioactive hazards within contaminated areas of the nuclear industry. The device, known as RadBall{trademark}, consists of a colander-like outer collimator that houses a radiation-sensitive polymer sphere. The collimator has over two hundred small holes; thus, specific areas of the polymer sphere are exposed to radiation becoming increasingly more opaque in proportion to the absorbed dose. The polymer sphere is imaged in an optical-CT scanner that produces a high resolution 3D map of optical attenuation coefficients. Subsequent analysis of the optical attenuation data provides information on the spatial distribution of sources in a given area forming a 3D characterization of the area of interest. The RadBallTM technology has been deployed in a number of technology trials in nuclear waste reprocessing plants at Sellafield in the United Kingdom and facilities of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This paper summarizes the tests completed at SRNL Health Physics Instrument Calibration Laboratory (HPICL).

  17. James Webb Space Telescope Integrated Science Instrument Module Calibration and Verification of High-Accuracy Instrumentation to Measure Heat Flow in Cryogenic Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comber, Brian; Glazer, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is an upcoming flagship observatory mission scheduled to be launched in 2018. Three of the four science instruments are passively cooled to their operational temperature range of 36K to 40K, and the fourth instrument is actively cooled to its operational temperature of approximately 6K. The requirement for multiple thermal zoned results in the instruments being thermally connected to five external radiators via individual high purity aluminum heat straps. Thermal-vacuum and thermal balance testing of the flight instruments at the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) element level will take place within a newly constructed shroud cooled by gaseous helium inside Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC) Space environment Simulator (SES). The flight external radiators are not available during ISIM-level thermal vacuum/thermal testing, so they will be replaced in test with stable and adjustable thermal boundaries with identical physical interfaces to the flight radiators. Those boundaries are provided by specially designed test hardware which also measures the heat flow within each of the five heat straps to an accuracy of less than 2 mW, which is less than 5% of the minimum predicted heat flow values. Measurement of the heat loads to this accuracy is essential to ISIM thermal model correlation, since thermal models are more accurately correlated when temperature data is supplemented by accurate knowledge of heat flows. It also provides direct verification by test of several high-level thermal requirements. Devices that measure heat flow in this manner have historically been referred to a "Q-meters". Perhaps the most important feature of the design of the JWST Q-meters is that it does not depend on the absolute accuracy of its temperature sensors, but rather on knowledge of precise heater power required to maintain a constant temperature difference between sensors on two stages, for which a table is empirically developed during a

  18. The calibration of the DSCOVR EPIC multiple visible channel instrument using MODIS and VIIRS as a reference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haney, Conor; Doelling, David; Minnis, Patrick; Bhatt, Rajendra; Scarino, Benjamin; Gopalan, Arun

    2016-09-01

    The Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR), launched on 11 February 2015, is a satellite positioned near the Lagrange-1 (L1) point, carrying several instruments that monitor space weather, and Earth-view sensors designed for climate studies. The Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC) onboard DSCOVR continuously views the sun illuminated portion of the Earth with spectral coverage in the UV, VIS, and NIR bands. Although the EPIC instrument does not have any onboard calibration abilities, its constant view of the sunlit Earth disk provides a unique opportunity for simultaneous viewing with several other satellite instruments. This arrangement allows the EPIC sensor to be intercalibrated using other well-characterized satellite instrument reference standards. Two such instruments with onboard calibration are MODIS, flown on Aqua and Terra, and VIIRS, onboard Suomi-NPP. The MODIS and VIIRS reference calibrations will be transferred to the EPIC instrument using both all-sky ocean and deep convective clouds (DCC) ray-matched EPIC and MODIS/VIIRS radiance pairs. An automated navigation correction routine was developed to more accurately align the EPIC and MODIS/VIIRS granules. The automated navigation correction routine dramatically reduced the uncertainty of the resulting calibration gain based on the EPIC and MODIS/VIIRS radiance pairs. The SCIAMACHY-based spectral band adjustment factors (SBAF) applied to the MODIS/ VIIRS radiances were found to successfully adjust the reference radiances to the spectral response of the specific EPIC channel for over-lapping spectral channels. The SBAF was also found to be effective for the non overlapping EPIC channel 10. Lastly, both ray-matching techniques found no discernable trends for EPIC channel 7 over the year of publically released EPIC data.

  19. MAPPING THE GALAXY COLOR–REDSHIFT RELATION: OPTIMAL PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFT CALIBRATION STRATEGIES FOR COSMOLOGY SURVEYS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masters, Daniel; Steinhardt, Charles; Faisst, Andreas [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Capak, Peter [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Stern, Daniel; Rhodes, Jason [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Ilbert, Olivier [Aix Marseille Universite, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire dAstrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388, Marseille (France); Salvato, Mara [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Schmidt, Samuel [Department of Physics, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Longo, Giuseppe [Department of Physics, University Federico II, via Cinthia 6, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Paltani, Stephane; Coupon, Jean [Department of Astronomy, University of Geneva ch. dcogia 16, CH-1290 Versoix (Switzerland); Mobasher, Bahram [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Hoekstra, Henk [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA, Leiden (Netherlands); Hildebrandt, Hendrik [Argelander-Institut für Astronomie, Universität Bonn, Auf dem H’´ugel 71, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Speagle, Josh [Department of Astronomy, Harvard University, 60 Garden Street, MS 46, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Kalinich, Adam [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Brodwin, Mark [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Brescia, Massimo; Cavuoti, Stefano [Astronomical Observatory of Capodimonte—INAF, via Moiariello 16, I-80131, Napoli (Italy)

    2015-11-01

    Calibrating the photometric redshifts of ≳10{sup 9} galaxies for upcoming weak lensing cosmology experiments is a major challenge for the astrophysics community. The path to obtaining the required spectroscopic redshifts for training and calibration is daunting, given the anticipated depths of the surveys and the difficulty in obtaining secure redshifts for some faint galaxy populations. Here we present an analysis of the problem based on the self-organizing map, a method of mapping the distribution of data in a high-dimensional space and projecting it onto a lower-dimensional representation. We apply this method to existing photometric data from the COSMOS survey selected to approximate the anticipated Euclid weak lensing sample, enabling us to robustly map the empirical distribution of galaxies in the multidimensional color space defined by the expected Euclid filters. Mapping this multicolor distribution lets us determine where—in galaxy color space—redshifts from current spectroscopic surveys exist and where they are systematically missing. Crucially, the method lets us determine whether a spectroscopic training sample is representative of the full photometric space occupied by the galaxies in a survey. We explore optimal sampling techniques and estimate the additional spectroscopy needed to map out the color–redshift relation, finding that sampling the galaxy distribution in color space in a systematic way can efficiently meet the calibration requirements. While the analysis presented here focuses on the Euclid survey, similar analysis can be applied to other surveys facing the same calibration challenge, such as DES, LSST, and WFIRST.

  20. Calibration method for the pulmonary function measuring instrument%肺功能仪校准方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马建民; 罗峥

    2013-01-01

    The social significance and the clinical diagnosis parameters from calibration or measurement for the pulmonary function measuring instrument are introduced. Main contents of calibration speciifcation for the pulmonary function measuring instrument are analyzed. Combined with specification, calibration method of the vital capacity, forced vital capacity, peak expiratory flow, maximum minute ventilation and gas analyzer are detailed, then point out what should be paid attention to in calibration for the pulmonary function measuring instrument.%简要阐述了肺功能仪校准的社会意义,介绍了肺功能测量的临床诊断参数,分析了肺功能仪校准规范的主要内容,并结合规范详细说明了肺活量、用力肺活量、呼气峰值流量、最大分钟通气量、气体分析器的校准方法,提出了肺功能仪校准应注意的问题。

  1. Development of monoenergetic electron beam sources for radiation-instrument calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, C.G.; Dick, C.E.; Pruitt, J.S.; Sparrow, J.H.

    1985-05-15

    Accelerator-produced electron beams are being studied for use in obtaining the response of beta-particle dosimetry instrumentation as a function of electron energy. The NBS 4 MV Van de Graaff and 500 kV cascaded rectifier accelerators are being used to generate electron beams from 200 keV to 2.5 MeV. A device capable of scanning the electron beam in two dimensions over an area large enough to cover radiation-survey instruments uniformly is attached to the beam-handling system of each accelerator. The scanned beam exits from vacuum through a 16 cm/sup 2/ window consisting of either 25 ..mu..m Kapton (for energies below 500 keV) or 100 ..mu..m aluminum. The electron beams produced have been characterized in terms of (1) spatial distribution, (2) energy spectrum, and (3) absorbed dose to plastic. Spatial distributions were determined using film, while spectra were measured using a 5 mm-deep Si surface barrier detector. An extrapolation chamber is being used for beam standardization in terms of absorbed dose to plastic. (orig.).

  2. Star Formation and Stellar Evolution: Future Surveys and Instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, C. J.

    2016-10-01

    The next generation of multi-object spectrographs (MOS) will deliver comprehensive surveys of the Galaxy, Magellanic Clouds and nearby dwarfs. These will provide us with the vast samples, spanning the full extent of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, that are needed to explore the chemistry, history and dynamics of their host systems. Further ahead, the Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs) will have sufficient sensitivity and angular resolution to extend stellar spectroscopy well beyond the Local Group, opening-up studies of the chemical evolution of galaxies across a broad range of galaxy types and environments. In this contribution I briefly reflect on current and future studies of stellar populations, and introduce plans for the MOSAIC instrument for the European ELT.

  3. New hydrologic instrumentation in the U.S. Geological Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latkovich, V.J.; Shope, W.G.; ,

    1991-01-01

    New water-level sensing and recording instrumentation is being used by the U.S. Geological Survey for monitoring water levels, stream velocities, and water-quality characteristics. Several of these instruments are briefly described. The Basic Data Recorder (BDR) is an electronic data logger, that interfaces to sensor systems through a serial-digital interface standard (SDI-12), which was proposed by the data-logger industry; the Incremental Shaft Encoder is an intelligent water-level sensor, which interfaces to the BDR through the SDI-12; the Pressure Sensor is an intelligent, nonsubmersible pressure sensor, which interfaces to the BDR through the SDI-12 and monitors water levels from 0 to 50 feet; the Ultrasonic Velocity Meter is an intelligent, water-velocity sensor, which interfaces to the BDR through the SDI-12 and measures the velocity across a stream up to 500 feet in width; the Collapsible Hand Sampler can be collapsed for insertion through holes in the ice and opened under the ice to collect a water sample; the Lighweight Ice Auger, weighing only 32 pounds, can auger 6- and 8-inch holes through approximately 3.5 feet of ice; and the Ice Chisel has a specially hardened steel blade and 6-foot long, hickory D-handle.

  4. The on-orbit performance of the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) instrument and its radiometrically calibrated products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisp, David; Pollock, Harold R.; Rosenberg, Robert; Chapsky, Lars; Lee, Richard A. M.; Oyafuso, Fabiano A.; Frankenberg, Christian; O'Dell, Christopher W.; Bruegge, Carol J.; Doran, Gary B.; Eldering, Annmarie; Fisher, Brendan M.; Fu, Dejian; Gunson, Michael R.; Mandrake, Lukas; Osterman, Gregory B.; Schwandner, Florian M.; Sun, Kang; Taylor, Tommy E.; Wennberg, Paul O.; Wunch, Debra

    2017-01-01

    The Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) carries and points a three-channel imaging grating spectrometer designed to collect high-resolution, co-boresighted spectra of reflected sunlight within the molecular oxygen (O2) A-band at 0.765 microns and the carbon dioxide (CO2) bands at 1.61 and 2.06 microns. These measurements are calibrated and then combined into soundings that are analyzed to retrieve spatially resolved estimates of the column-averaged CO2 dry-air mole fraction, XCO2. Variations of XCO2 in space and time are then analyzed in the context of the atmospheric transport to quantify surface sources and sinks of CO2. This is a particularly challenging remote-sensing observation because all but the largest emission sources and natural absorbers produce only small ( 17 000), dynamic range (˜ 104), and sensitivity (continuum signal-to-noise ratio > 400). The OCO-2 instrument performance was extensively characterized and calibrated prior to launch. In general, the instrument has performed as expected during its first 18 months in orbit. However, ongoing calibration and science analysis activities have revealed a number of subtle radiometric and spectroscopic challenges that affect the yield and quality of the OCO-2 data products. These issues include increased numbers of bad pixels, transient artifacts introduced by cosmic rays, radiance discontinuities for spatially non-uniform scenes, a misunderstanding of the instrument polarization orientation, and time-dependent changes in the throughput of the oxygen A-band channel. Here, we describe the OCO-2 instrument, its data products, and its on-orbit performance. We then summarize calibration challenges encountered during its first 18 months in orbit and the methods used to mitigate their impact on the calibrated radiance spectra distributed to the science community.

  5. Predictions for surveys with the SPICA Mid-infrared Instrument

    CERN Document Server

    Bonato, M; Cai, Z -Y; De Zotti, G; Bressan, A; Wada, T; Kohno, K; Maiolino, R; Gruppioni, C; Pozzi, F; Lapi, A

    2015-01-01

    We present predictions for number counts and redshift distributions of galaxies detectable in continuum and in emission lines with the Mid-infrared (MIR) Instrument (SMI) proposed for the Space Infrared Telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics (SPICA). We have considered 24 MIR fine-structure lines, four Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) bands (at 6.2, 7.7, 8.6 and 11.3$\\mu$m) and two silicate bands (in emission and in absorption) at 9.7$\\mu$m and 18.0$\\mu$m. Six of these lines are primarily associated with Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs), the others with star formation. A survey with the SMI spectrometers of 1 hour integration per field-of-view (FoV) over an area of $1\\,\\hbox{deg}^2$ will yield $5\\,\\sigma$ detections of $\\simeq 140$ AGN lines and of $\\simeq 5.2\\times10^{4}$ star-forming galaxies, $\\simeq 1.6\\times10^{4}$ of which will be detected in at least two lines. The combination of a shallow ($20.0\\,\\hbox{deg}^{2}$, $1.4\\times10^{-1}$ h integration per FoV) and a deep survey ($6.9\\times10^{-3}\\,\\hbox...

  6. Survey gear calibration independent of spatial fish distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lewy, Peter; Nielsen, J. Rasmus; Hovgård, Holger

    2004-01-01

    factors is developed based on a survey design where paired hauls are taken in the same trawl track line. The method explicitly accounts for changes in fish density caused by trawling disturbance. A generalized linear model for paired hauls catches is analytically derived and the gear conversion...... and disturbance parameters with their precision are obtained using standard software. Simulation studies carried out additionally showed that the estimated conversion factors were practically unbiased. Because of the independence of the spatial fish distribution, the new method is preferable to the traditional...

  7. Mathematical calibration of Ge detectors, and the instruments that use them

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bronson, F.L.; Young, B. [Canberra Industries, Meriden, CT (United States)

    1997-11-01

    Efficiency calibrations for Ge detectors are typically done with the use of multiple energy calibrations sources which are added to a bulk matrix intended to simulate the measurement sample, and then deposited in the sample container. This is rather easy for common laboratory samples. Bu, even there, for many environmental samples, waste assay samples, and operational health physics samples, accurate calibrations are difficult. For these situations, various mathematical corrections or direct calibration techniques are used at Canberra. EML has pioneered the use of mathematical calibrations following source-based detector characterization measurements for in situ measurements of environmental fallout. Canberra has expanded this by the use of MCNP for the source measurements required in EML. For other calibration situations, MCNP was used directly, as the primary calibration method. This is demonstrated to be at least as accurate as source based measurements, and probably better. Recently, a new method [ISOCS] has been developed and is nearing completion. This promises to be an easy to use calibration software that can be used by the customer for in situ gamma spectroscopy to accurately measure many large sized samples, such as boxes, drums, pipes, or to calibrate small laboratory-type samples. 8 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Structural safety evaluation of Karun III Dam and calibration of its finite element model using instrumentation and site observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Mirzabozorg

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, a comprehensive finite element model of Karun III double curvature arch dam is calibrated based on the micro geodesies measurements and instrumentation. Thermal properties of concrete are obtained by transient thermal analysis and the results are compared with those obtained from thermometers. Thermal analysis features include air temperature, water layers temperatures, and the solar radiation on the exposed faces. Structural calibration features include thermal distribution within the dam body, dam self-weight, hydrostatic pressure, and silt load applied on the model of dam–reservoir–foundation system. Finite element model calibration provides updated information related to the current dam status and can be used for further safety evaluations.

  9. Post calibration of the two-dimensional electron cyclotron emission imaging instrument with electron temperature characteristics of the magnetohydrodynamic instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, M. J., E-mail: mjchoi@nfri.re.kr [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 34133 (Korea, Republic of); Park, H. K. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 34133 (Korea, Republic of); Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); Yun, G. S.; Nam, Y. B.; Choe, G. H. [Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang, Gyeongbuk 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, W. [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); Jardin, S. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    The electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) instrument is widely used to study the local electron temperature (T{sub e}) fluctuations by measuring the ECE intensity I{sub ECE} ∝ T{sub e} in tokamak plasmas. The ECEI measurement is often processed in a normalized fluctuation quantity against the time averaged value due to complication in absolute calibration. In this paper, the ECEI channels are relatively calibrated using the flat T{sub e} assumption of the sawtooth crash or the tearing mode island and a proper extrapolation. The 2-D relatively calibrated electron temperature (T{sub e,rel}) images are reconstructed and the displacement amplitude of the magnetohydrodynamic modes can be measured for the accurate quantitative growth analysis.

  10. Micro-Arcsec mission: implications of the monitoring, diagnostic and calibration of the instrument response in the data reduction chain. .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busonero, D.; Gai, M.

    The goals of 21st century high angular precision experiments rely on the limiting performance associated to the selected instrumental configuration and observational strategy. Both global and narrow angle micro-arcsec space astrometry require that the instrument contributions to the overall error budget has to be less than the desired micro-arcsec level precision. Appropriate modelling of the astrometric response is required for optimal definition of the data reduction and calibration algorithms, in order to ensure high sensitivity to the astrophysical source parameters and in general high accuracy. We will refer to the framework of the SIM-Lite and the Gaia mission, the most challenging space missions of the next decade in the narrow angle and global astrometry field, respectively. We will focus our dissertation on the Gaia data reduction issues and instrument calibration implications. We describe selected topics in the framework of the Astrometric Instrument Modelling for the Gaia mission, evidencing their role in the data reduction chain and we give a brief overview of the Astrometric Instrument Model Data Analysis Software System, a Java-based pipeline under development by our team.

  11. Prime candidate earth targets for the post-launch radiometric calibration of space-based optical imaging instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teillet, P.M.; Barsi, J.A.; Chander, G.; Thome, K.J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides a comprehensive list of prime candidate terrestrial targets for consideration as benchmark sites for the post-launch radiometric calibration of space-based instruments. The key characteristics of suitable sites are outlined primarily with respect to selection criteria, spatial uniformity, and temporal stability. The establishment and utilization of such benchmark sites is considered an important element of the radiometric traceability of satellite image data products for use in the accurate monitoring of environmental change.

  12. Evaluation of Instrument Landing System DDM (Difference in Depth of Modulation) Calibration Accuracies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-01

    provided invaluable help in the development and completion of this thesis project. Sincere appreciation is expressed to Mr. William E. Herod , Chief of...0.01728 :I ; Fig. IV-13. Calibration Hierarchy & Accuracies. IV-18 L Ley ’ ! It is clear that if the calibration accuracies of figure IV-13 can be

  13. Calibration of ground-based Lidar instrument WLS7-318

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yordanova, Ginka; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement uncertain......This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  14. Calibration of ground-based Lidar instrument WLS866-12

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yordanova, Ginka; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement uncertain......This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  15. Calibration of ground-based lidar instrument WLS7-218

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gómez Arranz, Paula; Wagner, Rozenn

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbine at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement uncertaint......This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbine at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  16. Calibration of ground-based lidar instrument WLS7-99

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gómez Arranz, Paula; Wagner, Rozenn

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbine at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement uncertaint......This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbine at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  17. Calibration of ground-based Lidar instrument WLS7-283

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gómez Arranz, Paula; Courtney, Michael

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement uncertain......This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  18. Calibration of ground-based Lidar instrument WLS7-37

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gómez Arranz, Paula; Courtney, Michael

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement uncertain......This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  19. Calibration of ground-based Lidar instrument WLS7-341

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yordanova, Ginka; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement uncertain......This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  20. Calibration of ground-based lidar instrument WLS7-219

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gómez Arranz, Paula; Wagner, Rozenn

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbine at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement uncertaint......This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbine at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  1. Calibration of ground-based Lidar instrument WLS866-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gómez Arranz, Paula; Courtney, Michael

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement uncertain......This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  2. Calibration of ground-based Lidar instrument WLS7-327

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yordanova, Ginka; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement uncertain......This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  3. Calibration of ground-based Lidar instrument WLS866-13

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yordanova, Ginka; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement uncertain......This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  4. Calibration of ground-based Lidar instrument WLS7-218

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yordanova, Ginka; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement uncertain......This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  5. Calibration of ground-based lidar instrument WLS7-213

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gómez Arranz, Paula; Courtney, Michael

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbine at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement uncertaint......This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbine at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  6. Calibration of ground-based Lidar instrument WLS7-73

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yordanova, Ginka; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement uncertain......This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  7. Calibration of ground-based Lidar instrument WLS7-222

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yordanova, Ginka; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement uncertain......This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  8. Calibration of ground-based Lidar instrument WLS866-8

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yordanova, Ginka; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement uncertain......This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  9. Calibration of ground-based Lidar instrument WLS7-226

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gómez Arranz, Paula; Wagner, Rozenn

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement uncertain......This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  10. Calibration of ground-based Lidar instrument WLS7-34

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yordanova, Ginka; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement uncertain......This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  11. Calibration of ground-based Lidar instrument WLS7-369

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yordanova, Ginka; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement uncertain......This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  12. Calibration of ground-based Lidar instrument WLS7-150

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yordanova, Ginka; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement uncertain......This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  13. Calibration of ground-based Lidar instrument WLS866-5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yordanova, Ginka; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement uncertain......This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  14. Calibration of ground-based lidar instrument WLS7-151

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gómez Arranz, Paula; Wagner, Rozenn

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbine at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement uncertaint......This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbine at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  15. Calibration of ground-based Lidar instrument WLS7-264

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yordanova, Ginka; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement uncertain......This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  16. Calibration of ground-based lidar instrument WLS7-221

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gómez Arranz, Paula; Wagner, Rozenn

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbine at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement uncertaint......This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbine at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  17. Calibration of ground-based Lidar instrument WLS7-91

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yordanova, Ginka; Wagner, Rozenn

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement uncertain......This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  18. Calibration of ground-based Lidar instrument WLS7-66

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yordanova, Ginka; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement uncertain......This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  19. Calibration of ground-based Lidar instrument WLS7-284

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yordanova, Ginka; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement uncertain......This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  20. Calibration of ground-based lidar instrument WLS7-202

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gómez Arranz, Paula; Courtney, Michael

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbine at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement uncertaint......This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbine at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  1. Calibration of ground-based Lidar instrument WLS7-150

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yordanova, Ginka; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement uncertain......This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  2. Calibration of ground-based lidar instrument WLS7-204

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gómez Arranz, Paula; Courtney, Michael

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbine at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement uncertaint......This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbine at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  3. Calibration between color camera and 3D LIDAR instruments with a polygonal planar board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yoonsu; Yun, Seokmin; Won, Chee Sun; Cho, Kyungeun; Um, Kyhyun; Sim, Sungdae

    2014-03-17

    Calibration between color camera and 3D Light Detection And Ranging (LIDAR) equipment is an essential process for data fusion. The goal of this paper is to improve the calibration accuracy between a camera and a 3D LIDAR. In particular, we are interested in calibrating a low resolution 3D LIDAR with a relatively small number of vertical sensors. Our goal is achieved by employing a new methodology for the calibration board, which exploits 2D-3D correspondences. The 3D corresponding points are estimated from the scanned laser points on the polygonal planar board with adjacent sides. Since the lengths of adjacent sides are known, we can estimate the vertices of the board as a meeting point of two projected sides of the polygonal board. The estimated vertices from the range data and those detected from the color image serve as the corresponding points for the calibration. Experiments using a low-resolution LIDAR with 32 sensors show robust results.

  4. Calibration of ground-based Lidar instrument WLS866-4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yordanova, Ginka; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement uncertain......This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  5. Calibration of ground-based Lidar instrument WLS7-343

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yordanova, Ginka; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement uncertain......This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  6. Calibration of ground-based Lidar instrument WLS7-377

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yordanova, Ginka; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement uncertain......This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  7. Calibration of ground-based Lidar instrument WLS7-219

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yordanova, Ginka; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement uncertain......This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  8. Calibration of ground-based lidar instrument WLS7-202

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gómez Arranz, Paula; Courtney, Michael

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbine at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement uncertaint......This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbine at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  9. Calibration of ground-based Lidar instrument WLS866-3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yordanova, Ginka; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement uncertain......This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  10. Calibration of ground-based Lidar instrument WLS866-9

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yordanova, Ginka; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement uncertain......This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  11. Calibration of ground-based lidar instrument WLS7-203

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gómez Arranz, Paula; Courtney, Michael

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbine at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement uncertaint......This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbine at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  12. Calibration of ground-based lidar instrument WLS7-222

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gómez Arranz, Paula; Wagner, Rozenn

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbine at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement uncertaint......This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbine at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  13. Calibration of ground-based Lidar instrument WLS7-9

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yordanova, Ginka; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement uncertain......This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  14. Calibration of ground-based lidar instrument WLS7-204

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gómez Arranz, Paula; Courtney, Michael

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbine at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement uncertaint......This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbine at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  15. Calibration of ground-based Lidar instrument WLS7-269

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gómez Arranz, Paula; Wagner, Rozenn

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement uncertain......This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given WLS7 Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  16. Theoretical model atmosphere spectra used for the calibration of infrared instruments

    CERN Document Server

    Decin, L

    2007-01-01

    One of the key ingredients in establishing the relation between input signal and output flux from a spectrometer is accurate determination of the spectrophotometric calibration. In the case of spectrometers onboard satellites, the accuracy of this part of the calibration pedigree is ultimately linked to the accuracy of the set of reference SEDs that the spectrophotometric calibration is built on. In this paper, we deal with the spectrophotometric calibration of infrared (IR) spectrometers onboard satellites in the 2 to 200 micron range. We aim at comparing the different reference SEDs used for the IR spectrophotometric calibration. The emphasis is on the reference SEDs of stellar standards with spectral type later than A0, with special focus on the theoretical model atmosphere spectra. Using the MARCS model atmosphere code, spectral reference SEDs were constructed for a set of IR stellar standards (A dwarfs, solar analogs, G9-M0 giants). A detailed error analysis was performed to estimate proper uncertainties...

  17. High accuracy calibration of a dynamic vapor sorption instrument and determination of the equilibrium humidities using single salts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rörig-Dalgaard, Inge; Svensson, Staffan

    2016-01-01

    We present a procedure for accurately calibrating a dynamic vapor sorption (DVS) instrument using single salts. The procedure accounts for and tailors distinct calibration tests according to the fundamental properties of each salt. Especially relevant properties influencing the calibration......) enables five discrete sorption isotherm measurements within the range of 11%–93%RH. The equilibrium RH of the solution for LiCl, MgCl2, Mg(NO3)2, NaCl, and KNO3 was determined with a standard deviation of 0.06%-0.15% (0.45% for KNO3) RH. By comparing the measured calibration values with the well...... to generate and measure the relative humidity (RH). Both control modes were separately examined and combined to overcome the shortcomings of each of the two control modes and thereby obtain the most accurate results. Repeated calibration testing with the single salts (LiCl, MgCl2, Mg(NO3)2, NaCl, and KNO3...

  18. Development of monoenergetic electron beam sources for radiation-instrument calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, C. G.; Dick, C. E.; Pruitt, J. S.; Sparrow, J. H.

    1985-05-01

    Accelerator-produced electron beams are being studied for use in obtaining the response of beta-particle dosimetry instrumenta- tion as a function of electron energy. The NBS 4 MV Van de Graaff and 500 kV cascaded rectifier accelerators are being used to generate electron beams from 200 keV to 2.5 MeV. A device capable of scanning the electron beam in two dimensions over an area large enough to cover radiation-survey instruments uniformly is attached to the beam-handling system of each accelerator. The scanned beam exits from vacuum through a 16 cm 2 window consisting of either 25 μm Kapton (for energies below 500 keV) or 100 μm aluminum. The electron beams produced have been characterized in terms of (1) spatial distribution, (2) energy spectrum, and (3) absorbed dose to plastic. Spatial distributions were determined using film, while spectra were measured using a 5 mm-deep Si surface barrier detector. An extrapolation chamber is being used for beam standardization in terms of absorbed dose to plastic.

  19. Calibration of speleothem δ18O records against hydroclimate instrumental records in Central Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moquet, J. S.; Cruz, F. W.; Novello, V. F.; Stríkis, N. M.; Deininger, M.; Karmann, I.; Santos, R. Ventura; Millo, C.; Apaestegui, J.; Guyot, J.-L.; Siffedine, A.; Vuille, M.; Cheng, H.; Edwards, R. L.; Santini, W.

    2016-04-01

    δ18O in speleothems is a powerful proxy for reconstruction of precipitation patterns in tropical and sub-tropical regions. The aim of this study is to calibrate the δ18O record of speleothems against historical precipitation and river discharge data in central Brazil, a region directly influenced by the Southern Atlantic Convergence Zone (SACZ), a major feature of the South American Monsoon System (SAMS). The present work is based on a sub-annual resolution speleothem record covering the last 141 years (the period between the years 1870 and 2011) from a cave in central Brazil. The comparison of this record with instrumental hydroclimate records since 1921 allows defining a strong relationship between precipitation variability and stable oxygen isotope ratios from speleothems. The results from a monitoring program of climatic parameters and isotopic composition of rainfall and cave seepage waters performed in the same cave, show that the rain δ18O variability is dominated by the amount effect in this region, while δ18O drip water remains almost constant over the monitored period (1.5 years). The δ18O of modern calcite, on the other hand, shows clear seasonal variations, with more negative values observed during the rainy season, which implies that other factors also influence the isotopic composition of carbonate. However, the relationship between δ18O of carbonate deposits and rainwater is supported by the results from the comparison between speleothem δ18O records and historical hydroclimate records. A significant correlation between speleothem δ18O and monsoon rainfall variability is observed on sub-decadal time scales, especially for the monsoon period (DJFM and NDJFM), once the rainfall record have been smoothed with a 7-9 years running mean. This study confirms that speleothem δ18O is directly associated with monsoon rainfall variability in central Brazil. The relationship between speleothem δ18O records and hydroclimatic historical records allows

  20. Calibration and Industrial Application of Instrument for Surface Mapping based on AFM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Kofod, Niels; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2002-01-01

    The paper describes the calibration and application of an integrated system for topographic characterisation of fine surfaces on large workpieces. The system, consisting of an atomic force microscope mounted on a coordinate measuring machine, was especially designed for surface mapping, i.......e., measurement and tiling of adjacent areas. A calibration procedure was proposed involving a glass artefact featuring chromium lines with different pitch distances, giving the possibility to identify the exact position of single surface areas. The calibrated system was used to surface map a hip joint prosthesis...

  1. A new calibration system for lightweight, compact and mobile Cavity-Enhanced Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielcke, Johannes; Horbanski, Martin; Pöhler, Denis; Frieß, Udo; Platt, Ulrich

    2013-04-01

    Absorption Spectroscopy has been employed for several decades now to study the earth's atmosphere. While the focus has been on remote sensing for a long time, lately there has been a renewed interest in in-situ methods, as point measurements allow an easier interpretation for highly inhomogeneous distributions of gases of interest compared to the integration approach of most remote sensing methods. One comparatively new method offering both advantages of in-situ measurements as well as being contactless is open-path Cavity-Enhanced Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CE-DOAS). Broadband open-path CE-DOAS instruments have been used for ten years now, and in the meantime allow the measurement of numerous atmospheric trace gases (e.g. NO2, NO3, IO, CHOCHO, HCHO). While those instruments were bulky and not very mobile at first, recent developments resulted in relatively lightweight (< 30 kg) instruments with a relatively low power consumption allowing mobile open-path measurements at remote field locations. An important operational issue has been the path length calibration in the field, necessary for the determination of the concentration of measured gases. Until now, often calibration gases were used with different scattering properties than air or known concentrations. However this methods has several major shortcomings, being rather inconvenient and cumbersome in the field with the need for compressed gas cylinders, as well as time consuming, preventing a quick check of the state of the instrument in the field after changing measurement locations. Here we present a new wavelength-resolved method for broadband CE-DOAS path length calibration. A small, custom made ring-down system is employed with a pulsed LED as light source. The wavelength is then resolved by tilting a narrow band interference filter. The system not only allows quick, automated path length calibrations without physical interaction on the instrument, but also saves weight, space and the

  2. Survey Instrument Validity Part II: Validation of a Survey Instrument Examining Athletic Trainers' Knowledge and Practice Beliefs Regarding Exertional Heat Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Laura J.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this article is to discuss the process of developing and validating an instrument to investigate an athletic trainer's attitudes and behaviors regarding the recognition and treatment of exertional heat stroke. Background: Following up from our initial paper, which discussed the process of survey instrument design and…

  3. Design and Ground Calibration of the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) Instrument on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schou, J.; Scherrer, P. H.; Bush, R. I.; Wachter, R.; Couvidat, S.; Rabello-Soares, M. C.; Bogart, R. S.; Hoeksema, J. T.; Liu, Y.; Duvall, T. L., Jr.; Akin, D. J.; Allard, B. A.; Miles, J. W.; Rairden, R.; Shine, R. A.; Tarbell, T. D.; Title, A. M.; Wolfson, C. J.; Elmore, D. F.; Norton, A. A..; Tomczyk, S.

    2012-01-01

    The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) investigation will study the solar interior using helioseismic techniques as well as the magnetic field near the solar surface. The HMI instrument is part of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) that was launched on 11 February 2010. The instrument is designed to measure the Doppler shift, intensity, and vector magnetic field at the solar photosphere using the 6173 Fe I absorption line. The instrument consists of a front-window filter, a telescope, a set of wave plates for polarimetry, an image-stabilization system, a blocking filter, a five-stage Lyot filter with one tunable element, two wide-field tunable Michelson interferometers, a pair of 4096(exo 2) pixel cameras with independent shutters, and associated electronics. Each camera takes a full-disk image roughly every 3.75 seconds giving an overall cadence of 45 seconds for the Doppler, intensity, and line-of-sight magnetic-field measurements and a slower cadence for the full vector magnetic field. This article describes the design of the HMI instrument and provides an overview of the pre-launch calibration efforts. Overviews of the investigation, details of the calibrations, data handling, and the science analysis are provided in accompanying articles.

  4. The Effect of Halo Assembly Bias on Self Calibration in Galaxy Cluster Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Hao-Yi; Wechsler, Risa H

    2008-01-01

    Self-calibration techniques for analyzing cluster counts rely on using the abundance and the clustering amplitude of clusters to simultaneously constrain cosmological parameters and the relation between halo mass and its observable mass tracer. It was recently discovered that the clustering amplitude of halos depends not only on halo mass, but also on various secondary variables such as halo formation time and concentration; these dependences are collectively termed ``assembly bias.'' Using a modified Fisher matrix formalism, we explore whether these secondary variables have a significant impact on studying the properties of dark energy with self calibration in current (SDSS) and near future (DES, SPT, and LSST) cluster surveys. We find that for an SDSS-like survey, secondary dependences of halo bias are insignificant given the expected large statistical uncertainties in dark energy parameters. For SPT- or DES-like survey volumes, we find that the dependence of halo bias on secondary variables is not a signif...

  5. Mapping the Galaxy Color-Redshift Relation: Optimal Photometric Redshift Calibration Strategies for Cosmology Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Masters, Daniel; Stern, Daniel; Ilbert, Olivier; Salvato, Mara; Schmidt, Samuel; Longo, Giuseppe; Rhodes, Jason; Paltani, Stephane; Mobasher, Bahram; Hoekstra, Henk; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Coupon, Jean; Steinhardt, Charles; Speagle, Josh; Faisst, Andreas; Kalinich, Adam; Brodwin, Mark; Brescia, Massimo; Cavuoti, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Calibrating the photometric redshifts of >10^9 galaxies for upcoming weak lensing cosmology experiments is a major challenge for the astrophysics community. The path to obtaining the required spectroscopic redshifts for training and calibration is daunting, given the anticipated depths of the surveys and the difficulty in obtaining secure redshifts for some faint galaxy populations. Here we present an analysis of the problem based on the self-organizing map, a method of mapping the distribution of data in a high-dimensional space and projecting it onto a lower-dimensional representation. We apply this method to existing photometric data from the COSMOS survey selected to approximate the anticipated Euclid weak lensing sample, enabling us to robustly map the empirical distribution of galaxies in the multidimensional color space defined by the expected Euclid filters. Mapping this multicolor distribution lets us determine where - in galaxy color space - redshifts from current spectroscopic surveys exist and whe...

  6. Onboard Blackbody Calibrator Component Development for IR Remote Sensing Instrumentation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We plan to develop a blackbody coated with Carbon nanotube materials that will able to operate in the temperature ranges need to calibrate a thermal infrared sensor...

  7. Outcome-Based Comparison of Percutaneous Procedures for Urinary Lithiasis with Calibre of Instrumentation less than 12Fr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, H; Rukin, N; Wright, A; Somani, B K

    2015-08-01

    Renal stone disease is becoming increasingly prevalent globally. With a rise in stone disease worldwide, there is also a relative increase in the rates of surgical intervention. Technological advances have allowed a move towards minimising the complications rates and length of stay with a reduction in invasiveness and size of instruments. A trend for minimising the percutaneous tract size has been noted in percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) for renal stones. The management has shifted from open surgery to standard PCNL, mini-PCNL and the latest ultra-mini and micro-PCNL techniques. There is a need to compare outcomes for the ever-advancing technologies, such as the smaller calibre of instruments, to assess risk-benefit in practice. This review looks at outcome-based comparison of percutaneous procedures for urinary lithiasis with instruments <12Fr in size.

  8. The Photometric Calibration of the Dark Energy Survey (DES): Results from the Summer 2013 Re-processing of the DES Science Verification Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Douglas L.; Allam, S. S.; Annis, J. T.; Armstrong, R.; Bauer, A.; Bernstein, G.; Burke, D.; Fix, M.; Foust, W.; Gruendl, R. A.; Head, H.; Kuehn, K.; Kuhlmann, S.; Li, T.; Lin, H.; Rykoff, E. S.; Smith, J.; Wester, W.; Wyatt, S.; Yanny, B.; Energy Survey, Dark

    2014-01-01

    The Dark Energy Survey (DES) -- a five-year 5000 sq deg grizY survey of the Southern sky to probe the parameters of dark energy -- recently began operations using the new 3 sq deg DECam imager on the Blanco 4m telescope at the Cerro Tololo Interamerican Observatory. In order to achieve its science goals, the DES has tight requirements on both its relative and absolute photometric calibrations. The 5-year requirements are (1) an internal (relative) photometric calibration of 2% rms (2) an absolute color calibration of 0.5%, and (3) an absolute flux calibration of 0.5% (in i-band relative to BD+17 4708). In preparation for DES operations, the instrument+telescope underwent a period of Science Verification between November 2012 and February 2013. These Science Verification (SV) data were quickly processed to determine whether the image data were being produced with sufficient quality and efficiency to meet DES science goals. These data were also useful for initial science, and they were re-processed and re-calibrated during Summer 2013. The photometric goals for Summer 2013 re-processing of the DES SV were intentionally more relaxed than the requirements for the final 5-year survey: (1) an all-sky internal (relative) calibration goal of 3%, (2) an absolute color goal of 3%, and (3) an absolute flux goal of 3%. Here, we describe the results from the photometric calibration of the Summer 2013 re-processing of the DES SV data, the lessons learned, and plans for the future.

  9. MERITXELL: The Multifrequency Experimental Radiometer with Interference Tracking for Experiments over Land and Littoral-Instrument Description, Calibration and Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Querol, Jorge; Tarongí, José Miguel; Forte, Giuseppe; Gómez, José Javier; Camps, Adriano

    2017-05-10

    MERITXELL is a ground-based multisensor instrument that includes a multiband dual-polarization radiometer, a GNSS reflectometer, and several optical sensors. Its main goals are twofold: to test data fusion techniques, and to develop Radio-Frequency Interference (RFI) detection, localization and mitigation techniques. The former is necessary to retrieve complementary data useful to develop geophysical models with improved accuracy, whereas the latter aims at solving one of the most important problems of microwave radiometry. This paper describes the hardware design, the instrument control architecture, the calibration of the radiometer, and several captures of RFI signals taken with MERITXELL in urban environment. The multiband radiometer has a dual linear polarization total-power radiometer topology, and it covers the L-, S-, C-, X-, K-, Ka-, and W-band. Its back-end stage is based on a spectrum analyzer structure which allows to perform real-time signal processing, while the rest of the sensors are controlled by a host computer where the off-line processing takes place. The calibration of the radiometer is performed using the hot-cold load procedure, together with the tipping curves technique in the case of the five upper frequency bands. Finally, some captures of RFI signals are shown for most of the radiometric bands under analysis, which evidence the problem of RFI in microwave radiometry, and the limitations they impose in external calibration.

  10. MERITXELL: The Multifrequency Experimental Radiometer with Interference Tracking for Experiments over Land and Littoral—Instrument Description, Calibration and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Querol, Jorge; Tarongí, José Miguel; Forte, Giuseppe; Gómez, José Javier; Camps, Adriano

    2017-01-01

    MERITXELL is a ground-based multisensor instrument that includes a multiband dual-polarization radiometer, a GNSS reflectometer, and several optical sensors. Its main goals are twofold: to test data fusion techniques, and to develop Radio-Frequency Interference (RFI) detection, localization and mitigation techniques. The former is necessary to retrieve complementary data useful to develop geophysical models with improved accuracy, whereas the latter aims at solving one of the most important problems of microwave radiometry. This paper describes the hardware design, the instrument control architecture, the calibration of the radiometer, and several captures of RFI signals taken with MERITXELL in urban environment. The multiband radiometer has a dual linear polarization total-power radiometer topology, and it covers the L-, S-, C-, X-, K-, Ka-, and W-band. Its back-end stage is based on a spectrum analyzer structure which allows to perform real-time signal processing, while the rest of the sensors are controlled by a host computer where the off-line processing takes place. The calibration of the radiometer is performed using the hot-cold load procedure, together with the tipping curves technique in the case of the five upper frequency bands. Finally, some captures of RFI signals are shown for most of the radiometric bands under analysis, which evidence the problem of RFI in microwave radiometry, and the limitations they impose in external calibration. PMID:28489056

  11. Parents' childhood fever management: community survey and instrument development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Anne; Edwards, Helen; Fraser, Jenny

    2008-08-01

    This paper is a report of a study to explore Australian parents' knowledge, beliefs, practices and information sources about fever management and develop a scale to measure parents' fever management practices. Parental fever phobia and overuse of antipyretics to reduce fever continue. No scales to measure parents' fever management practices are available. A community-based, postal survey was carried out in 2005 with 401 Australian parents of well children aged 6 months-5 years. Respondents were recruited through advertising (48.4%), face-to-face (26.4%) and snowball (24.4%) methods. A 33-item instrument was developed; construct and content validity were determined by an expert panel and item reliability by test-retest. Moderate fever (40.0 +/- 1.0 degrees C) was reported to be harmful (88%), causing febrile convulsions (77.7%). Usual practices targeted temperature reduction, antipyretic administration (87.8%), temperature monitoring (52.5%). Fewer evidence-based practices, such as encouraging fluids (49.0%) and light clothing (43.8%), were reported. Positive changes over time (36.4%) included less concern and delayed or reduced antipyretic use. Negative practice changes (22.7%) included greater concern and increased antipyretic use. Medical advice was sought for illness symptoms (48.7%) and high (37.4%) or persistent (41.5%) fevers. Fever management was learnt from doctors, family and friends and working experience, while receiving conflicting information (41.9%) increased concerns and created uncertainty about best practice. Parents need consistent evidence-based information about childhood fever management. The Parental Fever Management Scale requires further testing with different populations and in different cultures and healthcare systems to evaluate its usefulness in nursing practice and research.

  12. Calibration of Nu-Instruments Noblesse multicollector mass spectrometers for argon isotopic measurements using a newly developed reference gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coble, M.A.; Grove, M.; Calvert, A.T.

    2011-01-01

    The greatest challenge limiting 40Ar/39Ar multicollection measurements is the availability of appropriate standard gasses to intercalibrate detectors. In particular, use of zoom lens ion-optics to steer and focus ion beams into a fixed detector array (i.e., Nu Instruments Noblesse) makes intercalibration of multiple detectors challenging because different ion-optic tuning conditions are required for optimal peak shape and sensitivity at different mass stations. We have found that detector efficiency and mass discrimination are affected by changes in ion-optic tuning parameters. Reliance upon an atmospheric Ar standard to calibrate the Noblesse is problematic because there is no straightforward way to relate atmospheric 40Ar and 36Ar to measurements of 40Ar and 39Ar if they are measured on separate detectors. After exploring alternative calibration approaches, we have concluded that calibration of the Noblesse is best performed using exactly the same source, detector, and ion-optic tuning settings as those used in routine 40Ar/39Ar analysis. To accomplish this, we have developed synthetic reference gasses containing 40Ar, 39Ar and 38Ar produced by mixing gasses derived from neutron-irradiated sanidine with an enriched 38Ar spike. We present a new method for calibrating the Noblesse based on use of both atmospheric Ar and the synthetic reference gasses. By combining atmospheric Ar and synthetic reference gas in different ways, we can directly measure 40Ar/39Ar, 38Ar/39Ar, and 36Ar/39Ar correction factors over ratios that vary from 0.5 to 460. These correction factors are reproducible to better than ??0.5??? (2?? standard error) over intervals spanning ~24h but can vary systematically by ~4% over 2weeks of continuous use when electron multiplier settings are held constant. Monitoring this variation requires daily calibration of the instrument. Application of the calibration method to 40Ar/39Ar multicollection measurements of widely used sanidine reference materials

  13. Surveying Instruments: Their History and Classroom Use. National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, Yearbook 19 [1947].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiely, Edmond R.

    The first four chapters trace the history of surveying instruments from beginnings in Egypt, China, and Babylonia to Greece and Rome, then Europe, Islam, and India and finally in the Renaissance in Europe. The organization of these chapters is generally by the major areas of leveling instruments, right-angle instruments, staff combinations, and…

  14. Survey of the nonlinearities structures in gamma ray energy calibration using HPGe detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serra, Andre da Silva; Pascholati, Paulo Reginaldo; Guillaumon, Pedro Vinicius, E-mail: andreserra@ymail.co, E-mail: pascholati@if.com.b, E-mail: pedrovg@if.usp.b [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica. Lab. do Acelerador Linear; Castro, Ruy Morgado de, E-mail: rmcastro@ieav.cta.b [Centro Tecnologico da Aeronautica, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The present work aims to survey the typical fine energy calibration structure in gamma-ray spectroscopy systems which use successive approximation ADC and shows that the knowledge of this fine structure, about 5 eV per 10{sup 2} channels, allows achieving correct statistic energy calibrations without the usually ad hoc introduction of uncertainties associated with the differential non-linearity inherent to those systems. Differently of previous works, the One Step Self-Calibration Procedure implementation allows the proper use of all covariances between the experimental data. At the end of the interactive scheme proposed in this work, it was achieved a reduced chi-square of 1,107 without the ad hoc introduction of uncertainties related to the differential nonlinearities. (author)

  15. 某钨矿斜坡道中高程法标定腰线的全站仪应用%Applying Total Station Instrument to Waistline Calibration in a Tungsten Mine's Ramp

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟晓阳

    2013-01-01

      The conventional method used for waist calibration during a tungsten mine's ramp construction can't meet the production requirements. This paper applies the total station instrument to control surveying, topographic surveying and engineering surveying adopting midline point calibration waistline and pseudo-angle calibration waistline principles. Two calibration points of the ramp are measured by plan and profile derivations. The height variations between each Calibration point and waistline by elevation method are calculated.%  某钨矿斜坡道工程施工中,采用日常方法标定腰线因测量精度较低,满足不了矿山生产需求。试将全站仪用于矿山控制测量、地形测量及工程测量中,结合利用中线点标定腰线和伪倾角标定腰线原理,通过对斜坡道两帮标定点进行测量,然后根据斜坡道平面及剖面进行公式推导,用高程法计算出各标定点与腰线的高差,最后标定腰线点,测高测距结果精确。

  16. Nickel replicas as calibration reference standards for industrial surface texture instruments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sammatini-Malberg, Maria-Pia

    The present report is a documentation of measurements carried out at DTU on Nickel replicas. The research is performed in the frame of the project with contract SMT4-CT97-2176 with title: Calibration Standards for Surface Topography Measuring Systems down to Nanometric Scale.......The present report is a documentation of measurements carried out at DTU on Nickel replicas. The research is performed in the frame of the project with contract SMT4-CT97-2176 with title: Calibration Standards for Surface Topography Measuring Systems down to Nanometric Scale....

  17. Calibration of weak-lensing shear in the Kilo-Degree Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Conti, Ian Fenech; Hoekstra, Henk; Merten, Julian; Miller, Lance; Viola, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    We describe and test the pipeline used to measure the weak lensing shear signal from the Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS). It includes a novel method of `self-calibration' that partially corrects for the effect of noise bias. We also discuss the `weight bias' that may arise in optimally-weighted measurements, and present a scheme to mitigate that bias. To study the residual biases arising from both galaxy selection and shear measurement, and to derive an empirical correction to reduce the shear biases to $\\lesssim 1\\%$, we create a suite of simulated images whose properties are close to those of the KiDS survey observations. We find that the use of `self-calibration' reduces the additive and multiplicative shear biases significantly, although further correction via a calibration scheme is required, which also corrects for a dependence of the bias on galaxy properties. We find that the calibration relation itself is biased by the use of noisy, measured galaxy properties, which may limit the final accuracy that can be...

  18. Survey of instrumentation for environmental monitoring: major update. Volume 3. Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-09-01

    This is the third volume of a four-volume (seven-part) series, the culmination of a comprehensive survey of instrumentation for environmental monitoring. Consideration is given to instruments and techniques presently in use and to those developed for other purposes but having possible applications to radiation monitoring. The results of the survey are given as descriptions of the physical and operating characteristics of available instruments, critical comparisons among instrumentation methods, and recommendations of promising methodology and development of new instrumentation. Information is also given regarding the pollutants to be monitored, their characteristics and forms, their sources and pathways, their effects on the ecosystem, and the means of controlling them through process and regulatory controls. The discussion is presented under sections entitled radiation sources; instrumentation: by type of radiation or instrument type; and, instrumentation for specific radionuclides. (JGB)

  19. Borehole strainmeter measurements spanning the 2014, Mw6.0 South Napa Earthquake, California: The effect from instrument calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langbein, John O.

    2015-01-01

    The 24 August 2014 Mw6.0 South Napa, California earthquake produced significant offsets on 12 borehole strainmeters in the San Francisco Bay area. These strainmeters are located between 24 and 80 km from the source and the observed offsets ranged up to 400 parts-per-billion (ppb), which exceeds their nominal precision by a factor of 100. However, the observed offsets of tidally calibrated strains differ by up to 130 ppb from predictions based on a moment tensor derived from seismic data. The large misfit can be attributed to a combination of poor instrument calibration and better modeling of the strain fit from the earthquake. Borehole strainmeters require in-situ calibration, which historically has been accomplished by comparing their measurements of Earth tides with the strain-tides predicted by a model. Although the borehole strainmeter accurately measure the deformation within the borehole, the long-wavelength strain signals from tides or other tectonic processes recorded in the borehole are modified by the presence of the borehole and the elastic properties of the grout and the instrument. Previous analyses of surface-mounted, strainmeter data and their relationship with the predicted tides suggest that tidal models could be in error by 30%. The poor fit of the borehole strainmeter data from this earthquake can be improved by simultaneously varying the components of the model tides up to 30% and making small adjustments to the point-source model of the earthquake, which reduces the RMS misfit from 130 ppb to 18 ppb. This suggests that relying on tidal models to calibrate borehole strainmeters significantly reduces their accuracy.

  20. Borehole strainmeter measurements spanning the 2014 Mw6.0 South Napa Earthquake, California: The effect from instrument calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langbein, John

    2015-10-01

    The 24 August 2014 Mw6.0 South Napa, California earthquake produced significant offsets on 12 borehole strainmeters in the San Francisco Bay area. These strainmeters are located between 24 and 80 km from the source, and the observed offsets ranged up to 400 parts per billion (ppb), which exceeds their nominal precision by a factor of 100. However, the observed offsets of tidally calibrated strains differ by up to 130 ppb from predictions based on a moment tensor derived from seismic data. The large misfit can be attributed to a combination of poor instrument calibration and better modeling of the strain field from the earthquake. Borehole strainmeters require in situ calibration, which historically has been accomplished by comparing their measurements of Earth tides with the strain tides predicted by a model. Although the borehole strainmeter accurately measures the deformation within the borehole, the long-wavelength strain signals from tides or other tectonic processes recorded in the borehole are modified by the presence of the borehole and the elastic properties of the grout and the instrument. Previous analyses of surface-mounted, strainmeter data and their relationship with the predicted tides suggest that tidal models could be in error by 30%. The poor fit of the borehole strainmeter data from this earthquake can be improved by simultaneously varying the components of the model tides up to 30% and making small adjustments to the point source model of the earthquake, which reduces the RMS misfit from 130 ppb to 18 ppb. This suggests that relying on tidal models to calibrate borehole strainmeters significantly reduces their accuracy.

  1. Onboard calibration igneous targets for the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover and the Chemistry Camera laser induced breakdown spectroscopy instrument

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabre, C., E-mail: cecile.fabre@g2r.uhp-nancy.fr [G2R, Nancy Universite (France); Maurice, S.; Cousin, A. [IRAP, Toulouse (France); Wiens, R.C. [LANL, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Forni, O. [IRAP, Toulouse (France); Sautter, V. [MNHN, Paris (France); Guillaume, D. [GET, Toulouse (France)

    2011-03-15

    Accurate characterization of the Chemistry Camera (ChemCam) laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) on-board composition targets is of prime importance for the ChemCam instrument. The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) science and operations teams expect ChemCam to provide the first compositional results at remote distances (1.5-7 m) during the in situ analyses of the Martian surface starting in 2012. Thus, establishing LIBS reference spectra from appropriate calibration standards must be undertaken diligently. Considering the global mineralogy of the Martian surface, and the possible landing sites, three specific compositions of igneous targets have been determined. Picritic, noritic, and shergottic glasses have been produced, along with a Macusanite natural glass. A sample of each target will fly on the MSL Curiosity rover deck, 1.56 m from the ChemCam instrument, and duplicates are available on the ground. Duplicates are considered to be identical, as the relative standard deviation (RSD) of the composition dispersion is around 8%. Electronic microprobe and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA ICP-MS) analyses give evidence that the chemical composition of the four silicate targets is very homogeneous at microscopic scales larger than the instrument spot size, with RSD < 5% for concentration variations > 0.1 wt.% using electronic microprobe, and < 10% for concentration variations > 0.01 wt.% using LA ICP-MS. The LIBS campaign on the igneous targets performed under flight-like Mars conditions establishes reference spectra for the entire mission. The LIBS spectra between 240 and 900 nm are extremely rich, hundreds of lines with high signal-to-noise, and a dynamical range sufficient to identify unambiguously major, minor and trace elements. For instance, a first LIBS calibration curve has been established for strontium from [Sr] = 284 ppm to [Sr] = 1480 ppm, showing the potential for the future calibrations for other major or minor

  2. Research on Calibration Transfer across Infrared Spectrometric Instruments for Fast Evaluation of Crude Oils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Jingyan; Chu Xiaoli; Tian Songbai

    2015-01-01

    The spectral analysis method is suitable for the process control and the process analysis such as the fast evalua-tion of crude oils. In this study, model transfer between the same type of spectrometer and different type of spectrometers was discussed respectively, and the results have shown that the transfer of calibration model can satisfy the demand of rapid analysis.

  3. Calibration and Industrial Application of Instrument for Surface Mapping based on AFM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Kofod, Niels; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2002-01-01

    The paper describes the calibration and application of an integrated system for topographic characterisation of fine surfaces on large workpieces. The system, consisting of an atomic force microscope mounted on a coordinate measuring machine, was especially designed for surface mapping, i.e., mea...

  4. Nickel replicas as calibration reference standards for industrial surface texture instruments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sammatini-Malberg, Maria-Pia

    The present report is a documentation of measurements carried out at DTU on Nickel replicas. The research is performed in the frame of the project with contract SMT4-CT97-2176 with title: Calibration Standards for Surface Topography Measuring Systems down to Nanometric Scale....

  5. Instrument development and field application of the in situ pH Calibrator at the Ocean Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, C.; Ding, K.; Seyfried, W. E.

    2012-12-01

    A novel, self-calibrating instrument for in-situ measurement of pH in deep sea environments up to 4000 m has recently been developed. The device utilizes a compact fluid delivery system to perform measurement and two-point calibration of the solid state pH sensor array (Ir|IrOx| Ag|AgCl), which is sealed in a flow cell to enhance response time. The fluid delivery system is composed of a metering pump and valves, which periodically deliver seawater samples into the flow cell to perform measurements. Similarly, pH buffer solutions can be delivered into the flow cell to calibrate the electrodes under operational conditions. Sensor signals are acquired and processed by a high resolution (0.25 mV) datalogger circuit with a size of 114 mm×31 mm×25 mm. Eight input channels are available: two high impedance sensor input channels, two low impedance sensor input channel, two thermocouple input channels and two thermistor input channels. These eight channels provide adequate measurement flexibility to enhance applications in deep sea environments. The two high impedance channels of the datalogger are especially designed with the input impedance of 1016 Ω for YSZ (yittria-stabilized zirconia) ceramic electrodes characterized by the extremely low input bias current and high resistance. Field tests have been performed in 2008 by ROV at the depth up to 3200 m. Using the continuous power supply and TCP/IP network capability of the Monterey Accelerated Research System (MARS) ocean observatory, the so-called "pH Calibrator" has the capability of long term operation up to six months. In the observatory mode, the electronics are configured with DC-DC power converter modules and Ethernet to serial module to gain access to the science port of seafloor junction box. The pH Calibrator will be deployed at the ocean observatory in October and the in situ data will be on line on the internet. The pH Calibrator presents real time pH data at high pressures and variable temperatures, while

  6. Measuring teamwork in health care settings: a review of survey instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Melissa A; Nembhard, Ingrid M; Edmondson, Amy C

    2015-04-01

    Teamwork in health care settings is widely recognized as an important factor in providing high-quality patient care. However, the behaviors that comprise effective teamwork, the organizational factors that support teamwork, and the relationship between teamwork and patient outcomes remain empirical questions in need of rigorous study. To identify and review survey instruments used to assess dimensions of teamwork so as to facilitate high-quality research on this topic. We conducted a systematic review of articles published before September 2012 to identify survey instruments used to measure teamwork and to assess their conceptual content, psychometric validity, and relationships to outcomes of interest. We searched the ISI Web of Knowledge database, and identified relevant articles using the search terms team, teamwork, or collaboration in combination with survey, scale, measure, or questionnaire. We found 39 surveys that measured teamwork. Surveys assessed different dimensions of teamwork. The most commonly assessed dimensions were communication, coordination, and respect. Of the 39 surveys, 10 met all of the criteria for psychometric validity, and 14 showed significant relationships to nonself-report outcomes. Evidence of psychometric validity is lacking for many teamwork survey instruments. However, several psychometrically valid instruments are available. Researchers aiming to advance research on teamwork in health care should consider using or adapting one of these instruments before creating a new one. Because instruments vary considerably in the behavioral processes and emergent states of teamwork that they capture, researchers must carefully evaluate the conceptual consistency between instrument, research question, and context.

  7. A novel single-step, multipoint calibration method for instrumented Lab-on-Chip systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfreundt, Andrea; Patou, François; Zulfiqar, Azeem

    2014-01-01

    Despite recent and substantial advances in biosensing, information and communication, and Lab-on-Chip (LoC) technologies, the success of Point-of-Care (PoC) diagnostics and monitoring systems is still challenged by stringent requirements for robustness, cost-effectiveness, and system integration...... specifically addresses the important interfaces between a novel microfluidic unit to integrate the sensor array and a mobile-device hardware accessory. A multi-point calibration curve is obtained by generating a defined set of reference concentrations from a single input. By consecutively splitting the flow...... perpendicular to the diffusion interface only one mixing step is required for each of the generated calibration solutions. This results in a compact design with a very small footprint of the microfluidic layout....

  8. Validation of the calibration of a laser-induced fluorescence instrument for the measurement of OH radicals in the atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. J. Bloss

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available An assessment of the accuracy of OH concentrations measured in a smog chamber by a calibrated laser-induced fluorescence (LIF instrument has been made, in the course of 9 experiments performed to study the photo-oxidation of benzene, toluene, 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene, para-xylene, ortho-cresol and ethene at the European Photoreactor facility (EUPHORE. The LIF system was calibrated via the water photolysis / ozone actinometry approach. OH concentrations were inferred from the instantaneous rate of removal of each hydrocarbon species (measured by FTIR or HPLC via the appropriate rate coefficient for their reaction with OH, and compared with those obtained from the LIF system. Good agreement between the two approaches was found for all species with the exception of 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene, for which OH concentrations inferred from hydrocarbon removal were a factor of 3 lower than those measured by the LIF system. From the remaining 8 experiments, an overall value of 1.15±0.13 (±1σ was obtained for [OH]LIF / [OH]Hydrocarbon Decay, compared with the estimated uncertainty in the accuracy of the water photolysis / ozone actinometry OH calibration technique of 26% (1σ.

  9. Survey Cross-Calibration with The Cannon: APOGEE-scale Stellar Labels from LAMOST Spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Ho, Anna Y Q; Hogg, David W; Rix, Hans-Walter; Liu, Chao; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Yong; Hou, Yonghui; Wang, Yuefei

    2016-01-01

    To capitalize on a diverse set of large spectroscopic stellar surveys, it is essential to develop techniques for precise and accurate survey cross-calibration. Here, we demonstrate that this can be achieved by a data-driven approach to spectral modeling: we use The Cannon (Ness et al. 2015) to cross-calibrate APOGEE and LAMOST, two large-scale surveys that currently yield inconsistent results due to differing experimental setups and data analysis methodologies. The Cannon constructs a predictive model for LAMOST spectra using a reference set of 9952 stars observed in common between the two surveys, taking five labels as ground truth from APOGEE DR12: Teff, log g, [Fe/H], [\\alpha/M], and K-band extinction A_k. The model is then used to infer Teff, log g, [Fe/H], and [\\alpha/M] for 454,180 giant stars in LAMOST DR2, thus tying low-resolution (R=1800) LAMOST spectra to the APOGEE (R=22,500) label scale. Despite being derived directly from LAMOST spectra, which have lower spectral resolution and very different wa...

  10. Designing, Testing, and Validating an Attitudinal Survey on an Environmental Topic: A Groundwater Pollution Survey Instrument for Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacosta-Gabari, Idoya; Fernandez-Manzanal, Rosario; Sanchez-Gonzalez, Dolores

    2009-01-01

    Research in environmental attitudes' assessment has significantly increased in recent years. The development of specific attitude scales for specific environmental problems has often been proposed. This paper describes the Groundwater Pollution Test (GPT), a 19-item survey instrument using a Likert-type scale. The survey has been used with…

  11. Designing, Testing, and Validating an Attitudinal Survey on an Environmental Topic: A Groundwater Pollution Survey Instrument for Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacosta-Gabari, Idoya; Fernandez-Manzanal, Rosario; Sanchez-Gonzalez, Dolores

    2009-01-01

    Research in environmental attitudes' assessment has significantly increased in recent years. The development of specific attitude scales for specific environmental problems has often been proposed. This paper describes the Groundwater Pollution Test (GPT), a 19-item survey instrument using a Likert-type scale. The survey has been used with…

  12. New Quasar Surveys with WIRO: Data and Calibration for Studies of Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyke, Bradley; Bassett, Neil; Deam, Sophie; Dixon, Don; Griffith, Emily; Harvey, William; Lee, Daniel; Haze Nunez, Evan; Parziale, Ryan; Witherspoon, Catherine; Myers, Adam D.; Findlay, Joseph; Kobulnicky, Henry A.; Dale, Daniel A.

    2017-01-01

    Measurements of quasar variability offer the potential for understanding the physics of accretion processes around supermassive black holes. However, generating structure functions in order to characterize quasar variability can be observationally taxing as it requires imaging of quasars over a large variety of date ranges. To begin to address this problem, we have conducted an imaging survey of sections of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82 at the Wyoming Infrared Observatory (WIRO). We used standard stars to calculate zero-point offsets between WIRO and SDSS observations in the urgiz magnitude system. After finding the zero-point offset, we accounted for further offsets by comparing standard star magnitudes in each WIRO frame to coadded magnitudes from Stripe 82 and applying a linear correction. Known (i.e. spectroscopically confirmed) quasars at the epoch we conducted WIRO observations (Summer, 2016) and at every epoch in SDSS Stripe 82 (~80 total dates) were hence calibrated to a similar magnitude system. The algorithm for this calibration compared 1500 randomly selected standard stars with an MJD within 0.07 of the MJD of each quasar of interest, for each of the five ugriz filters. Ultimately ~1000 known quasars in Stripe 82 were identified by WIRO and their SDSS-WIRO magnitudes were calibrated to a similar scale in order to generate ensemble structure functions.This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under REU grant AST 1560461.

  13. THE FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE ON ORBIT: EVENT CLASSIFICATION, INSTRUMENT RESPONSE FUNCTIONS, AND CALIBRATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackermann, M. [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Bechtol, K.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bogart, J. R.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Albert, A. [Department of Physics, Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Atwood, W. B.; Bouvier, A. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, Department of Physics and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Axelsson, M. [Department of Astronomy, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Baldini, L. [Universita di Pisa and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Ballet, J. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA-IRFU/CNRS/Universite Paris Diderot, Service d' Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Barbiellini, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Bastieri, D. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Bellazzini, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bissaldi, E. [Institut fuer Astro- und Teilchenphysik and Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Leopold-Franzens-Universitaet Innsbruck, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Bonamente, E., E-mail: echarles@slac.stanford.edu, E-mail: luca.baldini@pi.infn.it, E-mail: rando@pd.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); and others

    2012-11-15

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT, hereafter LAT), the primary instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) mission, is an imaging, wide field-of-view, high-energy {gamma}-ray telescope, covering the energy range from 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV. During the first years of the mission, the LAT team has gained considerable insight into the in-flight performance of the instrument. Accordingly, we have updated the analysis used to reduce LAT data for public release as well as the instrument response functions (IRFs), the description of the instrument performance provided for data analysis. In this paper, we describe the effects that motivated these updates. Furthermore, we discuss how we originally derived IRFs from Monte Carlo simulations and later corrected those IRFs for discrepancies observed between flight and simulated data. We also give details of the validations performed using flight data and quantify the residual uncertainties in the IRFs. Finally, we describe techniques the LAT team has developed to propagate those uncertainties into estimates of the systematic errors on common measurements such as fluxes and spectra of astrophysical sources.

  14. Survey instruments used in clinical and epidemiological research on waterpipe tobacco smoking: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunukula Sameer K

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The primary objective was to systematically review the medical literature for instruments validated for use in epidemiological and clinical research on waterpipe smoking. Methods We searched the following databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, and ISI the Web of Science. We selected studies using a two-stage duplicate and independent screening process. We included papers reporting on the development and/or validation of survey instruments to measure waterpipe tobacco consumption or related concepts. Two reviewers used a standardized and pilot tested data abstraction form to collect data from each eligible study using a duplicate and independent screening process. We also determined the percentage of observational studies assessing the health effects of waterpipe tobacco smoking and the percentage of studies of prevalence of waterpipe tobacco smoking that have used validated survey instruments. Results We identified a total of five survey instruments. One instrument was designed to measure knowledge, attitudes, and waterpipe use among pregnant women and was shown to have internal consistency and content validity. Three instruments were designed to measure waterpipe tobacco consumption, two of which were reported to have face validity. The fifth instrument was designed to measure waterpipe dependence and was rigorously developed and validated. One of the studies of prevalence and none of the studies of health effects of waterpipe smoking used validated instruments. Conclusions A number of instruments for measuring the use of and dependence on waterpipe smoking exist. Future research should study content validity and cross cultural adaptation of these instruments.

  15. BUSINESS SURVEYS-EVALUATION INSTRUMENT OF THE EUROPEAN ECONOMIC CLIMATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SECAREANU CONSTANTIN

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Business surveys or conjuncture surveys are specific statiostical researches, but complementary to traditional, official statistics.While official statistics provide quantitive information regardin the level,structure and evolution of varied economic process and phenomena, business surveys offer quality information, essential to the short term evolutional analysis of economic indicators: the diagnosis of the current situation, the timely detection of inflexion points within the economic cycle and the rapid estimation of short term tendencies of the main macroeconomic indicators (the dynamics of the gross domestic product, the index of industrial production, etc.

  16. Measuring Quality of Life: A New and Practical Survey Instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenley, James R.; Greenberg, Jan Steven; Brown, Roger

    1997-01-01

    Presents a new, short, self-administered questionnaire that assesses the quality of life in seven areas. Evidence for the reliability and validity of the questionnaire was based on data gathered from 971 clients; results indicate instrument reliability. The questionnaire features low-cost administration and valid psychometric properties. (RJM)

  17. Language Awareness Surveys: A Rationale and Three Instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belanger, Joe

    Noting that language study (one leg of the traditional English tripod of language, literature, and composition) has received mixed attention internationally and is almost forgotten in North America, this paper presents a rationale for researching language awareness and three instruments that can be used in such research. The paper begins with…

  18. A review of neutron scattering correction for the calibration of neutron survey meters using the shadow cone method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang In; Kim, Bong Hwan; Kim, Jang Lyul; Lee, Jung Il [Health Physics Team, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    The calibration methods of neutron-measuring devices such as the neutron survey meter have advantages and disadvantages. To compare the calibration factors obtained by the shadow cone method and semi-empirical method, 10 neutron survey meters of five different types were used in this study. This experiment was performed at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI; Daejeon, South Korea), and the calibration neutron fields were constructed using a {sup 252}Californium ({sup 252}Cf) neutron source, which was positioned in the center of the neutron irradiation room. The neutron spectra of the calibration neutron fields were measured by a europium-activated lithium iodide scintillator in combination with KAERI's Bonner sphere system. When the shadow cone method was used, 10 single moderator-based survey meters exhibited a smaller calibration factor by as much as 3.1 - 9.3% than that of the semi-empirical method. This finding indicates that neutron survey meters underestimated the scattered neutrons and attenuated neutrons (i.e., the total scatter corrections). This underestimation of the calibration factor was attributed to the fact that single moderator-based survey meters have an under-ambient dose equivalent response in the thermal or thermal-dominant neutron field. As a result, when the shadow cone method is used for a single moderator-based survey meter, an additional correction and the International Organization for Standardization standard 8529-2 for room-scattered neutrons should be considered.

  19. The SAMI Galaxy Survey: instrument specification and target selection

    CERN Document Server

    Bryant, J J; Robotham, A S G; Croom, S M; Driver, S P; Drinkwater, M J; Lorente, N P F; Cortese, L; Scott, N; Colless, M; Schaefer, A; Taylor, E N; Konstantopoulos, I S; Allen, J T; Baldry, I; Barnes, L; Bauer, A E; Bland-Hawthorn, J; Bloom, J V; Brooks, A M; Brough, S; Cecil, G; Couch, W; Croton, D; Davies, R; Ellis, S; Fogarty, L M R; Foster, C; Glazebrook, K; Goodwin, M; Green, A; Gunawardhana, M L; Hampton, E; Ho, I -T; Hopkins, A M; Kewley, L; Lawrence, J S; Leon-Saval, S G; Leslie, S; Lewis, G; Liske, J; Lopez-Sanchez, A R; Mahajan, S; Medling, A M; Metcalfe, N; Meyer, M; Mould, J; Obreschkow, D; O'Toole, S; Pracy, M; Richards, S N; Shanks, T; Sharp, R; Sweet, S M; Thomas, A D; Tonini, C; Walcher, C J

    2014-01-01

    The SAMI Galaxy Survey will observe 3400 galaxies with the Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral-field spectrograph (SAMI) on the Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT) in a 3-year survey which began in 2013. We present the throughput of the SAMI system, the science basis and specifications for the target selection, the survey observation plan and the combined properties of the selected galaxies. The survey includes four volume limited galaxy samples based on cuts in a proxy for stellar mass, along with low-stellar mass dwarf galaxies all selected from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey. The GAMA regions were selected because of the vast array of ancillary data available, including ultraviolet through to radio bands. These fields are on the celestial equator at 9, 12, and 14.5 hours, and cover a total of 144 square degrees (in GAMA-I). Higher density environments are also included with the addition of eight clusters. The clusters have spectroscopy from 2dFGRS and SDSS and photometry in regions covered by the Slo...

  20. Use of multiple in situ instruments and remote sensed satellite data for calibration tests at Solfatara (Campi Flegrei volcanic area)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestri, Malvina; Musacchio, Massimo; Fabrizia Buongiorno, Maria; Doumaz, Fawzi; Andres Diaz, Jorge

    2017-04-01

    Monitoring natural hazards such as active volcanoes requires specific instruments to measure many parameters (gas emissions, surface temperatures, surface deformation etc.) to determine the activity level of a volcano. Volcanoes in most cases present difficult and dangerous environment for scientists who need to take in situ measurements. Remote Sensing systems on board of satellite permit to measure a large number of parameters especially during the eruptive events but still show large limits to monitor volcanic precursors and phenomena at local scale (gas species emitted by fumarole or summit craters degassing plumes and surface thermal changes of few degrees) for their specific risk. For such reason unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) mounting a variety of multigas sensors instruments (such as miniature mass spectrometer) or single specie sensors (such as electrochemical and IR sensors) allow a safe monitoring of volcanic activities. With this technology, it is possible to perform monitoring measurements of volcanic activity without risking the lives of scientists and personnel performing analysis during the field campaigns in areas of high volcanic activity and supporting the calibration and validation of satellite data measurements. These systems allowed the acquisition of real-time information such as temperature, pressure, relative humidity, SO2, H2S, CO2 contained in degassing plume and fumaroles, with GPS geolocation. The acquired data are both stored in the sensor and transmitted to a computer for real time viewing information. Information in the form of 3D concentration maps can be returned. The equipment used during the campaigns at Solfatara Volcano (in 2014, 2015 and 2016) was miniaturized instruments allowed measurements conducted either by flying drones over the fumarolic sites and by hand carrying into the fumaroles. We present the results of the field campaign held in different years at the Solfatara of Pozzuoli, near Naples, concerning measurements

  1. School Leadership Preparation and Practice Survey Instruments and Their Uses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pounder, Diana

    2012-01-01

    This article addresses the leadership preparation line of inquiry developed in the past decade by the University Council for Educational Administration/Learning and Teaching in Educational Leadership Special Interest Group Taskforce on Evaluating Leadership Preparation Programs, and it particularly addresses the series of survey instruments…

  2. Calibration of BVRI Photometry for the Wide Field Channel of the HST Advanced Camera for Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Abhijit; Shaw, Richard A.; Claver, Jennifer A.; Dolphin, Andrew E.

    2011-04-01

    We present new observations of two Galactic globular clusters, PAL4 and PAL14, using the Wide Field Channel of the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and reanalyze archival data from a third, NGC2419. We matched our photometry of hundreds of stars in these fields from the ACS images to existing ground-based photometry of faint sequences that were calibrated on the standard BVRI system of Landolt. These stars are significantly fainter than those generally used for HST calibration purposes and therefore are much better matched to supporting precision photometry of ACS science targets. We were able to derive more accurate photometric transformation coefficients for the commonly used ACS broadband filters, compared with those published by Sirianni et al., due to the use of a factor of several more calibration stars that span a greater range of color. We find that the inferred transformations from each cluster individually do not vary significantly from the average, except for a small offset of the photometric zero point in the F850LP filter. Our results suggest that the published prescriptions for the time-dependent correction of CCD charge transfer efficiency appear to work very well over the ˜3.5 yr interval that spans our observations of PAL4 and PAL14 and the archived images of NGC2419.

  3. Relative Flux Calibration of the LAMOST Spectroscopic Survey of the Galactic Anti-center

    CERN Document Server

    Xiang, Maosheng; Yuan, Haibo; Huo, Zhiying; Huang, Yang; Zheng, Yong; Zhang, Huawei; Chen, Bingqiu; Zhang, Huihua; Sun, Ningchen; Wang, Chun; Zhao, Yongheng; Shi, Jianrong; Luo, Ali; Li, Guoping; Bai, Zongrui; Zhang, Yong; Hou, Yonghui; Yuan, Hailong; Li, Guangwei

    2014-01-01

    We have developed and implemented an iterative algorithm of flux calibration for the LAMOST Spectroscopic Survey of the Galactic anti-center (LSS-GAC). For a given LSS-GAC plate, the spectra are first processed with a set of nominal spectral response curves (SRCs) and used to derive initial stellar atmospheric parameters (effective temperature $T_{\\rm eff}$, surface gravity log\\,$g$ and metallicity [Fe/H]) as well as dust reddening $E(B-V)$ of all targeted stars. For each of the sixteen spectrographs, several F-type stars of good signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) are then selected as flux standard stars for further, iterative spectral flux calibration. Comparison of spectrophotometric colours, deduced from the flux-calibrated spectra, with the photometric measurements yields average differences of 0.02$\\pm$0.07 and $-$0.04$\\pm$0.09\\,mag for the $(g-r)$ and $(g-i)$, respectively. The relatively large negative offset in $(g-i)$ is due to the fact that we have opted not to correct for the telluric bands, most notabl...

  4. Survey of instrumentation used for monitoring metals in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinby-Hunt, M.S.

    1978-06-01

    A study was conducted of instrumentation used to determine metals in water. Several of the techniques most commonly used for analysis and routine determinations of metals in water are shown in Table 1. They are atomic absorption spectroscopy, both flame and flameless, atomic emission spectroscopy using conventional flame sources and inductively-coupled plasma sources, and ultraviolet-visible absorption techniques. Other less frequently employed methods are x-ray fluorescence analysis using both photon and charged particle excitation with energy-dispersive and wavelength-dispersive spectral analysis. Also electrochemical techniques and activation analysis are studied.

  5. The System of the Calibration for Visibility Measurement Instrument Under the Atmospheric Aerosol Simulation Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Zhifeng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Visibility is one of the most important parameters for meteorological observation and numerical weather prediction (NWP.It is also an important factor in everyday life, mainly for surface and air traffic especially in the Aeronautical Meteorology. The visibility decides the taking off and landing of aircraft. If the airport visibility is lower than requirement for aircraft taking off stipulated by International Civil Aviation Administration, then the aircraft must be parked at the airport. So the accurate measurement of visibility is very important. Nowadays, many devices can be measured the visibility or meteorological optical range (MOR such as Scatterometers, Transmissometers and visibility lidar. But there is not effective way to verify the accuracy of these devices expect the artificial visual method. We have developed a visibility testing system that can be calibration and verification these devices. The system consists of laser transmitter, optical chopper, phase-locking amplifier, the moving optic receiving system, signal detection and data acquisition system, atmospheric aerosol simulation chamber. All of them were placed in the atmosphere aerosol simulation chamber with uniform aerosol concentration. The Continuous wave laser, wavelength 550nm, has been transmitted into the collimation system then the laser beam expanded into 40mm diameter for compressing the laser divergence angle before modulated by optical chopper. The expanding beam transmitting in the atmosphere aerosol cabin received by the optic receiving system moving in the 50m length precision guide with 100mm optical aperture. The data of laser signal has been acquired by phase-locking amplifier every 5 meter range. So the 10 data points can be detected in the 50 meters guide once. The slope of the fitting curve can be obtained by linear fitting these data using the least square method. The laser extinction coefficient was calculated from the slope using the Koschmieder

  6. The VLBA Calibrator Search for the BeSSeL Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Immer, K; Reid, M J; Bartkiewicz, A; Choi, Y K; Menten, K M; Moscadelli, L; Sanna, A; Wu, Y W; Xu, Y; Zhang, B; Zheng, X W

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of a survey of radio continuum sources near the Galactic plane using the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA). Our observations are designed to identify compact extragalactic sources of milliarcsecond size that can be used for parallax measurements in the Bar and Spiral Structure Legacy Survey. We selected point sources from the NVSS and CORNISH catalogs with flux densities above 30 mJy and within $1.5\\degr$ of known maser targets. Of the 1529 sources observed, 199 were detected. For sources detected on 3 or more baselines, we determined accurate positions and evaluated their quality as potential calibrators. Most of the 1330 sources that were not detected with the VLBA are probably of extragalactic origin.

  7. The Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) imaging spectrometer for lunar science: Instrument description, calibration, on-orbit measurements, science data calibration and on-orbit validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, R.O.; Pieters, C.; Mouroulis, P.; Eastwood, M.; Boardman, J.; Glavich, T.; Isaacson, P.; Annadurai, M.; Besse, S.; Barr, D.; Buratti, B.; Cate, D.; Chatterjee, A.; Clark, R.; Cheek, L.; Combe, J.; Dhingra, D.; Essandoh, V.; Geier, S.; Goswami, J.N.; Green, R.; Haemmerle, V.; Head, J.; Hovland, L.; Hyman, S.; Klima, R.; Koch, T.; Kramer, G.; Kumar, A.S.K.; Lee, Kenneth; Lundeen, S.; Malaret, E.; McCord, T.; McLaughlin, S.; Mustard, J.; Nettles, J.; Petro, N.; Plourde, K.; Racho, C.; Rodriquez, J.; Runyon, C.; Sellar, G.; Smith, C.; Sobel, H.; Staid, M.; Sunshine, J.; Taylor, L.; Thaisen, K.; Tompkins, S.; Tseng, H.; Vane, G.; Varanasi, P.; White, M.; Wilson, D.

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Discovery Moon Mineralogy Mapper imaging spectrometer was selected to pursue a wide range of science objectives requiring measurement of composition at fine spatial scales over the full lunar surface. To pursue these objectives, a broad spectral range imaging spectrometer with high uniformity and high signal-to-noise ratio capable of measuring compositionally diagnostic spectral absorption features from a wide variety of known and possible lunar materials was required. For this purpose the Moon Mineralogy Mapper imaging spectrometer was designed and developed that measures the spectral range from 430 to 3000 nm with 10 nm spectral sampling through a 24 degree field of view with 0.7 milliradian spatial sampling. The instrument has a signal-to-noise ratio of greater than 400 for the specified equatorial reference radiance and greater than 100 for the polar reference radiance. The spectral cross-track uniformity is >90% and spectral instantaneous field-of-view uniformity is >90%. The Moon Mineralogy Mapper was launched on Chandrayaan-1 on the 22nd of October. On the 18th of November 2008 the Moon Mineralogy Mapper was turned on and collected a first light data set within 24 h. During this early checkout period and throughout the mission the spacecraft thermal environment and orbital parameters varied more than expected and placed operational and data quality constraints on the measurements. On the 29th of August 2009, spacecraft communication was lost. Over the course of the flight mission 1542 downlinked data sets were acquired that provide coverage of more than 95% of the lunar surface. An end-to-end science data calibration system was developed and all measurements have been passed through this system and delivered to the Planetary Data System (PDS.NASA.GOV). An extensive effort has been undertaken by the science team to validate the Moon Mineralogy Mapper science measurements in the context of the mission objectives. A focused spectral, radiometric

  8. The New Mexico Tech Extrasolar Spectroscopic Survey Instrument (NESSI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creech-Eakman, Michelle J.; Jurgenson, C.; Vasisht, G.; Swain, M.; Boston, P.; Santoro, F.

    2010-01-01

    We present the design and scientific objectives behind NESSI, a near-infrared spectroscopic purpose-built for studying exoplanet atmospheres. This instrument is being designed and assembled by a team of scientists and engineers at New Mexico Tech (NMT), the Magdalena Ridge Observatory (MRO) and NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab (JPL), and is scheduled for deployment in late 2010 at the MRO 2.4m telescope. NESSI's unique design is driven by recent space and ground-based NIR spectroscopy of exoplanet atmospheres by members of our team. Optimization of the instrument to achieve 0.01% relative accuracies in spectra of exoplanetary molecular constituents requires careful attention to certain design features and a new technical approach. We present an overview of NESSI's design, including the four major subassemblies: 1) a field derotator, 2) a reimaging module, 3) an optical guiding module, and 4) a multi-object spectrograph subassembly. We also present an overview of our science program specifically designed to build the community of exoplanet researchers and students in NM. The financial support of our team and NESSI itself have been made possible by a NM NASA EPSCoR grant, matching funds from the NMT administration, and internal support for the NESSI hardware from Dr. Van Romero, NMT's Research Vice-President.

  9. Design and Instrumentation of a Measurement and Calibration System for an Acoustic Telemetry System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqun Deng

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS is an active sensing technology developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, for detecting and tracking small fish. It is used primarily for evaluating behavior and survival of juvenile salmonids migrating through the Federal Columbia River Power System to the Pacific Ocean. It provides critical data for salmon protection and development of more “fish-friendly” hydroelectric facilities. The objective of this study was to design and build a Measurement and Calibration System (MCS for evaluating the JSATS components, because the JSATS requires comprehensive acceptance and performance testing in a controlled environment before it is deployed in the field. The MCS consists of a reference transducer, a water test tank lined with anechoic material, a motion control unit, a reference receiver, a signal conditioner and amplifier unit, a data acquisition board, MATLAB control and analysis interface, and a computer. The fully integrated MCS has been evaluated successfully at various simulated distances and using different encoded signals at frequencies within the bandwidth of the JSATS transmitter. The MCS provides accurate acoustic mapping capability in a controlled environment and automates the process that allows real-time measurements and evaluation of the piezoelectric transducers, sensors, or the acoustic fields. The MCS has been in use since 2009 for acceptance and performance testing of, and further improvements to, the JSATS.

  10. Status of aerial survey emergency preparedness and ground support equipment, calibration, and sensitivities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlstrom, T.S.

    1986-01-01

    During the course of EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc. history in aerial surveillance, the scope of response has broadened from routine surveys and accident response with aerial systems, to being prepared to respond to any radiological incident with aerial, ground mobile, and hand-held instrumentation. The aerial survey system presently consists of four MBB BO-105 helicopters outfitted with gamma pods and specialized navigation systems (MRS or URS) that allow the operator and pilot to fly well-defined survey lines. Minimum detectable activities (MDA) for various isotopes range from a few tenths of a mCi to 100 mCI for point sources and from 1 to 200 pCi/g for volume sources.

  11. The Multi-sensor Airborne Radiation Survey (MARS) Instrument

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fast, James E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Aalseth, Craig E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Asner, David M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bonebrake, Christopher A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Day, Anthony R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dorow, Kevin E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Fuller, Erin S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Glasgow, Brian D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hossbach, Todd W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hyronimus, Brian J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jensen, Jeffrey L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Johnson, Kenneth I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jordan, David V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Morgen, Gerald P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Morris, Scott J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mullen, O Dennis [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Myers, Allan W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pitts, W. Karl [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rohrer, John S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Runkle, Robert C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Seifert, Allen [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Shergur, Jason M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stave, Sean C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Tatishvili, Gocha [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Thompson, Robert C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Todd, Lindsay C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Warren, Glen A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Willett, Jesse A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wood, Lynn S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-01-11

    The Multi-sensor Airborne Radiation Survey (MARS) project has developed a new single cryostat detector array design for high purity germanium (HPGe) gama ray spectrometers that achieves the high detection efficiency required for stand-off detection and actionable characterization of radiological threats. This approach, we found, is necessary since a high efficiency HPGe detector can only be built as an array due to limitations in growing large germanium crystals. Moreover, the system is ruggedized and shock mounted for use in a variety of field applications, including airborne and maritime operations.

  12. ON-LINE SELF-CALIBRATING SINGLE CRYSTAL SAPPHIRE OPTICAL SENSOR INSTRUMENTATION FOR ACCURATE AND RELIABLE COAL GASIFIER TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristie Cooper; Gary Pickrell; Anbo Wang; Zhengyu Huang; Yizheng Zhu

    2005-04-01

    This report summarizes technical progress October 2004-March 2005 on the Phase II program ''On-Line Self-Calibrating Single Crystal Sapphire Optical Sensor Instrumentation for Accurate and Reliable Coal Gasifier Temperature Measurement'', funded by the Federal Energy Technology Center of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. The outcome of the first phase of this program was the selection of broadband polarimetric differential interferometry (BPDI) for further prototype instrumentation development. This approach is based on the measurement of the optical path difference (OPD) between two orthogonally polarized light beams in a single-crystal sapphire disk. The objective of this program is to bring the BPDI sensor technology, which has already been demonstrated in the laboratory, to a level where the sensor can be deployed in the harsh industrial environments and will become commercially viable. Due to the difficulties described on the last report, field testing of the BPDI system has not continued to date. However, we have developed an alternative high temperature sensing solution, which is described in this report.

  13. On-Line Self-Calibrating Single Crystal Sapphire Optical Sensor Instrumentation for Accurate and Reliable Coal Gasifier Temperature Measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristie Cooper; Anbo Wang

    2007-03-31

    This report summarizes technical progress October 2006 - March 2007 on the Phase II program ''On-Line Self-Calibrating Single Crystal Sapphire Optical Sensor Instrumentation for Accurate and Reliable Coal Gasifier Temperature Measurement'', funded by the Federal Energy Technology Center of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. The outcome of the first phase of this program was the selection of broadband polarimetric differential interferometry (BPDI) for further prototype instrumentation development. This approach is based on the measurement of the optical path difference (OPD) between two orthogonally polarized light beams in a single-crystal sapphire disk. During the second phase, an alternative high temperature sensing system based on Fabry-Perot interferometry was developed that offers a number of advantages over the BPDI solution. The objective of this program is to bring the sensor technology, which has already been demonstrated in the laboratory, to a level where the sensor can be deployed in the harsh industrial environments and will become commercially viable. The sapphire wafer-based interferometric sensing system that was installed at TECO's Polk Power Station remained in operation for seven months. Our efforts have been focused on monitoring and analyzing the real-time data collected, and preparing for a second field test.

  14. ON-LINE SELF-CALIBRATING SINGLE CRYSTAL SAPPHIRE OPTICAL SENSOR INSTRUMENTATION FOR ACCURATE AND RELIABLE COAL GASIFIER TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristie Cooper; Gary Pickrell; Anbo Wang

    2003-04-01

    This report summarizes technical progress over the first six months of the Phase II program ''On-Line Self-Calibrating Single Crystal Sapphire Optical Sensor Instrumentation for Accurate and Reliable Coal Gasifier Temperature Measurement'', funded by the Federal Energy Technology Center of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. The outcome of the first phase of this program was the selection of broadband polarimetric differential interferometry (BPDI) for further prototype instrumentation development. This approach is based on the measurement of the optical path difference (OPD) between two orthogonally polarized light beams in a single-crystal sapphire disk. The objective of this program is to bring the BPDI sensor technology, which has already been demonstrated in the laboratory, to a level where the sensor can be deployed in the harsh industrial environments and will become commercially viable. Research efforts were focused on analyzing and testing factors that impact performance degradation of the initially designed sensor prototype, including sensing element movement within the sensing probe and optical signal quality degradation. Based these results, a new version of the sensing system was designed by combining the sapphire disk sensing element and the single crystal zirconia right angle light reflector into one novel single crystal sapphire right angle prism. The new sensor prototype was tested up to 1650 C.

  15. ON-LINE SELF-CALIBRATING SINGLE CRYSTAL SAPPHIRE OPTICAL SENSOR INSTRUMENTATION FOR ACCURATE AND RELIABLE COAL GASIFIER TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristie Cooper; Gary Pickrell; Anbo Wang

    2003-11-01

    This report summarizes technical progress over the second six month period of the Phase II program ''On-Line Self-Calibrating Single Crystal Sapphire Optical Sensor Instrumentation for Accurate and Reliable Coal Gasifier Temperature Measurement'', funded by the Federal Energy Technology Center of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. The outcome of the first phase of this program was the selection of broadband polarimetric differential interferometry (BPDI) for further prototype instrumentation development. This approach is based on the measurement of the optical path difference (OPD) between two orthogonally polarized light beams in a single-crystal sapphire disk. The objective of this program is to bring the BPDI sensor technology, which has already been demonstrated in the laboratory, to a level where the sensor can be deployed in the harsh industrial environments and will become commercially viable. Research efforts were focused on evaluating corrosion effects in single crystal sapphire at temperatures up to 1400 C, and designing the sensor mechanical packaging with input from Wabash River Power Plant. Upcoming meetings will establish details for the gasifier field test.

  16. ON-LINE SELF-CALIBRATING SINGLE CRYSTAL SAPPHIRE OPTICAL SENSOR INSTRUMENTATION FOR ACCURATE AND RELIABLE COAL GASIFIER TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristie Cooper; Gary Pickrell; Anbo Wang; Zhengyu Huang

    2004-04-01

    This report summarizes technical progress over the third six month period of the Phase II program ''On-Line Self-Calibrating Single Crystal Sapphire Optical Sensor Instrumentation for Accurate and Reliable Coal Gasifier Temperature Measurement'', funded by the Federal Energy Technology Center of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. The outcome of the first phase of this program was the selection of broadband polarimetric differential interferometry (BPDI) for further prototype instrumentation development. This approach is based on the measurement of the optical path difference (OPD) between two orthogonally polarized light beams in a single-crystal sapphire disk. The objective of this program is to bring the BPDI sensor technology, which has already been demonstrated in the laboratory, to a level where the sensor can be deployed in the harsh industrial environments and will become commercially viable. Research efforts were focused on sensor probe design and machining, sensor electronics design, software algorithm design, sensor field installation procedures, and sensor remote data access and control. Field testing will begin in the next several weeks.

  17. Interinstrument calibration using magnetic field data from the flux-gate magnetometer (FGM) and electron drift instrument (EDI) onboard Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, R.; Plaschke, F.; Teubenbacher, R.; Giner, L.; Baumjohann, W.; Magnes, W.; Steller, M.; Torbert, R. B.; Vaith, H.; Chutter, M.; Fornaçon, K.-H.; Glassmeier, K.-H.; Carr, C.

    2014-01-01

    We compare the magnetic field data obtained from the flux-gate magnetometer (FGM) and the magnetic field data deduced from the gyration time of electrons measured by the electron drift instrument (EDI) onboard Cluster to determine the spin-axis offset of the FGM measurements. Data are used from orbits with their apogees in the magnetotail, when the magnetic field magnitude was between about 20 and 500 nT. Offset determination with the EDI-FGM comparison method is of particular interest for these orbits, because no data from solar wind are available in such orbits to apply the usual calibration methods using the Alfvén waves. In this paper, we examine the effects of the different measurement conditions, such as direction of the magnetic field relative to the spin plane and field magnitude in determining the FGM spin-axis offset, and also take into account the time-of-flight offset of the EDI measurements. It is shown that the method works best when the magnetic field magnitude is less than about 128 nT and when the magnetic field is aligned near the spin-axis direction. A remaining spin-axis offset of about 0.4 ∼ 0.6 nT was observed for Cluster 1 between July and October 2003. Using multipoint multi-instrument measurements by Cluster we further demonstrate the importance of the accurate determination of the spin-axis offset when estimating the magnetic field gradient.

  18. On-Line Self-Calibrating Single Crystal Sapphire Optical Sensor Instrumentation for Accurate and Reliable Coal Gasifier Temperature Measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristie Cooper; Anbo Wang

    2007-03-31

    This report summarizes technical progress October 2006 - March 2007 on the Phase II program ''On-Line Self-Calibrating Single Crystal Sapphire Optical Sensor Instrumentation for Accurate and Reliable Coal Gasifier Temperature Measurement'', funded by the Federal Energy Technology Center of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. The outcome of the first phase of this program was the selection of broadband polarimetric differential interferometry (BPDI) for further prototype instrumentation development. This approach is based on the measurement of the optical path difference (OPD) between two orthogonally polarized light beams in a single-crystal sapphire disk. During the second phase, an alternative high temperature sensing system based on Fabry-Perot interferometry was developed that offers a number of advantages over the BPDI solution. The objective of this program is to bring the sensor technology, which has already been demonstrated in the laboratory, to a level where the sensor can be deployed in the harsh industrial environments and will become commercially viable. The sapphire wafer-based interferometric sensing system that was installed at TECO's Polk Power Station remained in operation for seven months. Our efforts have been focused on monitoring and analyzing the real-time data collected, and preparing for a second field test.

  19. ON-LINE SELF-CALIBRATING SINGLE CRYSTAL SAPPHIRE OPTICAL SENSOR INSTRUMENTATION FOR ACCURATE AND RELIABLE COAL GASIFIER TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristie Cooper; Gary Pickrell; Anbo Wang; Zhengyu Huang; Yizheng Zhu

    2005-04-01

    This report summarizes technical progress October 2004-March 2005 on the Phase II program ''On-Line Self-Calibrating Single Crystal Sapphire Optical Sensor Instrumentation for Accurate and Reliable Coal Gasifier Temperature Measurement'', funded by the Federal Energy Technology Center of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. The outcome of the first phase of this program was the selection of broadband polarimetric differential interferometry (BPDI) for further prototype instrumentation development. This approach is based on the measurement of the optical path difference (OPD) between two orthogonally polarized light beams in a single-crystal sapphire disk. The objective of this program is to bring the BPDI sensor technology, which has already been demonstrated in the laboratory, to a level where the sensor can be deployed in the harsh industrial environments and will become commercially viable. Due to the difficulties described on the last report, field testing of the BPDI system has not continued to date. However, we have developed an alternative high temperature sensing solution, which is described in this report.

  20. The Calibration and Characterization of Earth Remote Sensing and Environmental Monitoring Instruments. Chapter 10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, James J.; Johnson, B. Carol; Barnes, Robert A.

    2005-01-01

    The use of remote sensing instruments on orbiting satellite platforms in the study of Earth Science and environmental monitoring was officially inaugurated with the April 1, 1960 launch of the Television Infrared Observation Satellite (TIROS) [1]. The first TIROS accommodated two television cameras and operated for only 78 days. However, the TIROS program, in providing in excess of 22,000 pictures of the Earth, achieved its primary goal of providing Earth images from a satellite platform to aid in identifying and monitoring meteorological processes. This marked the beginning of what is now over four decades of Earth observations from satellite platforms. reflected and emitted radiation from the Earth using instruments on satellite platforms. These measurements are input to climate models, and the model results are analyzed in an effort to detect short and long-term changes and trends in the Earth's climate and environment, to identify the cause of those changes, and to predict or influence future changes. Examples of short-term climate change events include the periodic appearance of the El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) in the tropical Pacific Ocean [2] and the spectacular eruption of Mount Pinatubo on the Philippine island of Luzon in 1991. Examples of long term climate change events, which are more subtle to detect, include the destruction of coral reefs, the disappearance of glaciers, and global warming. Climatic variability can be both large and small scale and can be caused by natural or anthropogenic processes. The periodic El Nino event is an example of a natural process which induces significant climatic variability over a wide range of the Earth. A classic example of a large scale anthropogenic influence on climate is the well-documented rapid increase of atmospheric carbon dioxide occurring since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution [3]. An example of the study of a small-scale anthropogenic influence in climate variability is the Atlanta Land

  1. Two valuation questions in one survey: Is it a recipe for sequencing and instrument context effects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraud, K.L.; Loomis, J.B.; Johnson, R.L.

    1999-01-01

    Economic theory suggests that willingness to pay for two goods independently offered should remain unchanged when the survey instrument changes slightly. Four survey treatments consisting of comprehensive good and a subset of that good were used. The surveys alternated in the question ordering and in the embedded good which accompanied the comprehensive good. We tested for sequencing and instrument context effects using both a combined and split sample designs. In the combined sample case we found some evidence to sequencing effects in the data containing the first subset good. Likelihood ratio tests indicated that sequencing did not effect scale or location of parameters. In the test for instrument context effects, evidence was found indicating context does effect willingness to pay estimates.

  2. Construction of a Calibrated Probabilistic Classification Catalog: Application to 50k Variable Sources in the All-Sky Automated Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Richards, Joseph W; Miller, Adam A; Bloom, Joshua S; Butler, Nathaniel R; Brink, Henrik; Crellin-Quick, Arien

    2012-01-01

    With growing data volumes from synoptic surveys, astronomers must become more abstracted from the discovery and introspection processes. Given the scarcity of follow-up resources, there is a particularly sharp onus on the frameworks that replace these human roles to provide accurate and well-calibrated probabilistic classification catalogs. Such catalogs inform the subsequent follow-up, allowing consumers to optimize the selection of specific sources for further study and permitting rigorous treatment of purities and efficiencies for population studies. Here, we describe a process to produce a probabilistic classification catalog of variability with machine learning from a multi-epoch photometric survey. In addition to producing accurate classifications, we show how to estimate calibrated class probabilities, and motivate the importance of probability calibration. We also introduce a methodology for feature-based anomaly detection, which allows discovery of objects in the survey that do not fit within the pre...

  3. Spectroscopic failures in photometric redshift calibration: cosmological biases and survey requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, Carlos E. [KIPAC, Menlo Park; Huterer, Dragan [Michigan U.; Lin, Huan [Fermilab; Busha, Michael T. [Zurich U.; Wechsler, Risa H. [SLAC

    2014-10-11

    We use N-body-spectro-photometric simulations to investigate the impact of incompleteness and incorrect redshifts in spectroscopic surveys to photometric redshift training and calibration and the resulting effects on cosmological parameter estimation from weak lensing shear-shear correlations. The photometry of the simulations is modeled after the upcoming Dark Energy Survey and the spectroscopy is based on a low/intermediate resolution spectrograph with wavelength coverage of 5500{\\AA} < {\\lambda} < 9500{\\AA}. The principal systematic errors that such a spectroscopic follow-up encounters are incompleteness (inability to obtain spectroscopic redshifts for certain galaxies) and wrong redshifts. Encouragingly, we find that a neural network-based approach can effectively describe the spectroscopic incompleteness in terms of the galaxies' colors, so that the spectroscopic selection can be applied to the photometric sample. Hence, we find that spectroscopic incompleteness yields no appreciable biases to cosmology, although the statistical constraints degrade somewhat because the photometric survey has to be culled to match the spectroscopic selection. Unfortunately, wrong redshifts have a more severe impact: the cosmological biases are intolerable if more than a percent of the spectroscopic redshifts are incorrect. Moreover, we find that incorrect redshifts can also substantially degrade the accuracy of training set based photo-z estimators. The main problem is the difficulty of obtaining redshifts, either spectroscopically or photometrically, for objects at z > 1.3. We discuss several approaches for reducing the cosmological biases, in particular finding that photo-z error estimators can reduce biases appreciably.

  4. CERES Top-of-Atmosphere Earth Radiation Budget Climate Data Record: Accounting for in-Orbit Changes in Instrument Calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman G. Loeb

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The Clouds and the Earth’s Radiant Energy System (CERES project provides observations of Earth’s radiation budget using measurements from CERES instruments onboard the Terra, Aqua and Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP satellites. As the objective is to create a long-term climate data record, it is necessary to periodically reprocess the data in order to incorporate the latest calibration changes and algorithm improvements. Here, we focus on the improvements and validation of CERES Terra and Aqua radiances in Edition 4, which are used to generate higher-level climate data products. Onboard sources indicate that the total (TOT channel response to longwave (LW radiation has increased relative to the start of the missions by 0.4% to 1%. In the shortwave (SW, the sensor response change ranges from −0.4% to 0.6%. To account for in-orbit changes in SW spectral response function (SRF, direct nadir radiance comparisons between instrument pairs on the same satellite are made and an improved wavelength dependent degradation model is used to adjust the SRF of the instrument operating in a rotating azimuth plane scan mode. After applying SRF corrections independently to CERES Terra and Aqua, monthly variations amongst these instruments are highly correlated and the standard deviation in the difference of monthly anomalies is 0.2 Wm−2 for ocean and 0.3 Wm−2 for land/desert. Additionally, trends in CERES Terra and Aqua monthly anomalies are consistent to 0.21 Wm−2 per decade for ocean and 0.31 Wm−2 per decade for land/desert. In the LW, adjustments to the TOT channel SRF are made to ensure that removal of the contribution from the SW portion of the TOT channel with SW channel radiance measurements during daytime is consistent throughout the mission. Accordingly, anomalies in day–night LW difference in Edition 4 are more consistent compared to Edition 3, particularly for the Aqua land/desert case.

  5. Instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decreton, M

    2001-04-01

    SCK-CEN's research and development programme on instrumentation involves the assessment and the development of sensitive measurement systems used within a radiation environment. Particular emphasis is on the assessment of optical fibre components and their adaptability to radiation environments. The evaluation of ageing processes of instrumentation in fission plants, the development of specific data evaluation strategies to compensate for ageing induced degradation of sensors and cable performance form part of these activities. In 2000, particular emphasis was on in-core reactor instrumentation applied to fusion, accelerator driven and water-cooled fission reactors. This involved the development of high performance instrumentation for irradiation experiments in the BR2 reactor in support of new instrumentation needs for MYRRHA, and for diagnostic systems for the ITER reactor.

  6. On-Line Self-Calibrating Single Crystal Sapphire Optical Sensor Instrumentation for Accurate and Reliable Coal Gasifier Temperature Measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristie Cooper; Gary Pickrell; Anbo Wang

    2005-11-01

    This report summarizes technical progress April-September 2005 on the Phase II program ''On-Line Self-Calibrating Single Crystal Sapphire Optical Sensor Instrumentation for Accurate and Reliable Coal Gasifier Temperature Measurement'', funded by the Federal Energy Technology Center of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. The outcome of the first phase of this program was the selection of broadband polarimetric differential interferometry (BPDI) for further prototype instrumentation development. This approach is based on the measurement of the optical path difference (OPD) between two orthogonally polarized light beams in a single-crystal sapphire disk. The objective of this program is to bring the sensor technology, which has already been demonstrated in the laboratory, to a level where the sensor can be deployed in the harsh industrial environments and will become commercially viable. Due to the difficulties described on the last report, field testing of the BPDI system has not continued to date. However, we have developed an alternative high temperature sensing solution, which is described in this report. The sensing system will be installed and tested at TECO's Polk Power Station. Following a site visit in June 2005, our efforts have been focused on preparing for that field test, including he design of the sensor mechanical packaging, sensor electronics, the data transfer module, and the necessary software codes to accommodate this application.. We are currently ready to start sensor fabrication.

  7. On-Line Self-Calibrating Single Crystal Sapphire Optical Sensor Instrumentation for Accurate and Reliable Coal Gasifier Temperature Measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristie Cooper; Gary Pickrell; Anbo Wang

    2005-11-01

    This report summarizes technical progress April-September 2005 on the Phase II program ''On-Line Self-Calibrating Single Crystal Sapphire Optical Sensor Instrumentation for Accurate and Reliable Coal Gasifier Temperature Measurement'', funded by the Federal Energy Technology Center of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. The outcome of the first phase of this program was the selection of broadband polarimetric differential interferometry (BPDI) for further prototype instrumentation development. This approach is based on the measurement of the optical path difference (OPD) between two orthogonally polarized light beams in a single-crystal sapphire disk. The objective of this program is to bring the sensor technology, which has already been demonstrated in the laboratory, to a level where the sensor can be deployed in the harsh industrial environments and will become commercially viable. Due to the difficulties described on the last report, field testing of the BPDI system has not continued to date. However, we have developed an alternative high temperature sensing solution, which is described in this report. The sensing system will be installed and tested at TECO's Polk Power Station. Following a site visit in June 2005, our efforts have been focused on preparing for that field test, including he design of the sensor mechanical packaging, sensor electronics, the data transfer module, and the necessary software codes to accommodate this application.. We are currently ready to start sensor fabrication.

  8. Design, Calibration, and Expected On-Orbit Performance of the GOES-R MPS-LO Suprathermal Plasma Analyzer Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golightly, M. J.; McGarity, J. O.; Dichter, B. K.; Galica, G. E.

    2015-12-01

    The next generation U.S. geosynchronous weather satellite—GOES series R-U—will include for the first time a suprathermal plasma analyzer. The Magnetospheric Particle Sensor-Low (MPS-LO), an electrostatic analyzer utilizing triquadrispheric geometry (270° turn)deflection electrodes, will measure the flux of electrons and ions with energies between 30 eV - 30 keV in fifteen logarithmically-spaced differential energy channels and arrival direction in twelve angular bins. MPS-LO consists of two sensor heads mounted in a common electronics box. Each sensor head contains a set of deflection electrodes, microchannel plates, and segmented detector anodes. The common electronics box provides the power and I/O interface with a data processing unit, voltage supplies for all of the instrument's electronics, high voltage for the deflection electrodes, in-flight calibration pulsers, and the digital electronics to process signals from sensor heads' detector anodes. Great care was taken in the manufacture and mounting of the triquadrisphere deflection electrodes; each electrode was machined from a single piece of aluminum and specific electrode combinations were mounted with precision machined spacers and matched drilling. The precise fabrication and assembly resulted in near perfect spherical electric fields between the electrodes. The triquadrispheric electrode shape also prevents photons from reaching the detection elements-as a result, MPS-LO is solar blind. The combined field-of-view for the two sensor heads is 180° x 5°, with the larger angle in a plane perpendicular to the spacecraft's orbit and its central axis oriented anti-Earthward. An incident particle's arrival direction is determined in one of twelve 15° x 5° angular zones. A set of shielded anodes is used to measure the background caused by penetrating charged particles that reach the MCPs; this background data is used to correct the MPS-LO data. The instrument's energy resolution ΔE/E is 5.8%.

  9. Calibration of quasi-static aberrations in exoplanet direct imaging instruments with a Zernike phase mask sensor

    CERN Document Server

    N'Diaye, M; Fusco, T; Paul, B

    2013-01-01

    Context. Several exoplanet direct imaging instruments will soon be in operation. They use an extreme adaptive optics (XAO) system to correct the atmospheric turbulence and provide a highly-corrected beam to a near-infrared (IR) coronagraph for starlight suppression. The performance of the coronagraph is however limited by the non-common path aberrations (NCPA) due to the differential wavefront errors existing between the visible XAO sensing path and the near-IR science path, leading to residual speckles in the coronagraphic image. Aims. Several approaches have been developed in the past few years to accurately calibrate the NCPA, correct the quasi-static speckles and allow the observation of exoplanets at least 1e6 fainter than their host star. We here propose an approach based on the Zernike phase-contrast method for the measurements of the NCPA between the optical path seen by the visible XAO wavefront sensor and that seen by the near-IR coronagraph. Methods. This approach uses a focal plane phase mask of s...

  10. RadBall{sup TM} Technology Testing in the Savannah River Site's Health Physics Instrument Calibration Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farfan, Eduardo B; Foley, Trevor Q; Jannik, G Timothy; Harpring, Larry J; Gordon, John R; Blessing, Ronald; Coleman, J Rusty; Holmes, Christopher J; Oldham, Mark; Adamovics, John; Stanley, Steven J, E-mail: Eduardo.Farfan@srnl.doe.go

    2010-11-01

    The UK's National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) has developed a radiation-mapping device that can locate and quantify radioactive hazards within contaminated areas of the nuclear industry. The device, known as RadBall{sup TM}, consists of a colander-like outer collimator that houses a radiation-sensitive polymer sphere. The collimator has over two hundred small holes; thus, specific areas of the polymer sphere are exposed to radiation becoming increasingly more opaque in proportion to the absorbed dose. The polymer sphere is imaged in an optical-CT scanner that produces a high resolution 3D map of optical attenuation coefficients. Subsequent analysis of the optical attenuation data provides information on the spatial distribution of sources in a given area forming a 3D characterization of the area of interest. The RadBall{sup TM} technology has been deployed in a number of technology trials in nuclear waste reprocessing plants at Sellafield in the UK and facilities of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This paper summarizes the tests completed at SRNL Health Physics Instrument Calibration Laboratory (HPICL).

  11. Using Moodle as On-line Survey Instrument in Medical Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan ISTRATE

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the principal issues in any university community is the lack of communication between community categories – leadership, administration, teaching staff and students. Sometimes is important to know in a short time the opinion of one particular group, without investing a lot of resources and without being extremely formal. The aim of this study was to test if an open-source platform – Moodle – can be used for quick surveys inside the Faculty of Medicine, UMF “Iuliu Hatieganu” Cluj-Napoca community. For this, on existing Moodle platform was installed one specific survey instrument – a questionnaire module and a survey containing a real life issue to the students of Faculty of Medicine was launched. The researchers have focused on how the specific problems of a survey - preparing of the survey, the survey process and the analysis of the results can be handle in Moodle. The pilot survey was a success; the conclusion of the study was that Moodle can be used as on-line survey instrument for that community.

  12. Instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decreton, M

    2002-04-01

    SCK-CEN's R and D programme on instrumentation involves the development of advanced instrumentation systems for nuclear applications as well as the assessment of the performance of these instruments in a radiation environment. Particular emphasis is on the use of optical fibres as umbilincal links of a remote handling unit for use during maintanance of a fusion reacor, studies on the radiation hardening of plasma diagnostic systems; investigations on new instrumentation for the future MYRRHA accelerator driven system; space applications related to radiation-hardened lenses; the development of new approaches for dose, temperature and strain measurements; the assessment of radiation-hardened sensors and motors for remote handling tasks and studies of dose measurement systems including the use of optical fibres. Progress and achievements in these areas for 2001 are described.

  13. Instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decreton, M

    2000-07-01

    SCK-CEN's research and development programme on instrumentation aims at evaluating the potentials of new instrumentation technologies under the severe constraints of a nuclear application. It focuses on the tolerance of sensors to high radiation doses, including optical fibre sensors, and on the related intelligent data processing needed to cope with the nuclear constraints. Main achievements in these domains in 1999 are summarised.

  14. Development and validation of a survey instrument to measure children's advertising literacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozendaal, E.; Opree, S.J.; Buijzen, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and validate a survey measurement instrument for children's advertising literacy. Based on the multidimensional conceptualization of advertising literacy by 0056"> Rozendaal, Lapierre, Van Reijmersdal, and Buijzen (2011), 39 items were created to measure two d

  15. Establishing Educational Priorities through the Illinois Problems Index. Survey Instruments [and] User's Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois State Board of Education, Springfield.

    The Illinois Problems Index (IPI), a process with supporting survey instruments, enables local school districts to assess and evaluate the adequacy of current programs and services and plan improvements where problems exist. A User's Manual provides a step-by-step "walk through" of the process, while permitting alternative techniques for…

  16. Development and validation of a survey instrument to measure children's advertising literacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozendaal, E.; Opree, S.J.; Buijzen, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and validate a survey measurement instrument for children's advertising literacy. Based on the multidimensional conceptualization of advertising literacy by 0056"> Rozendaal, Lapierre, Van Reijmersdal, and Buijzen (2011), 39 items were created to measure two

  17. Conception of the Instrument Calibration Laboratory of Ionizing Radiation Measurement (LACIMRI) of CTMSP - Sao Paulo, SP; Concepcao do Laboratorio de Calibracao de Instrumentos de Medicao de Radiacao Ionizante (LACIMRI) do CTMSP, Sao Paulo, SP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Raimundo Dias da; Kibrit, Eduardo, E-mail: raimundo@ctmsp.mar.mil.b, E-mail: kibrit@ctmsp.mar.mil.b [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo (CTMSP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The present work describes the phases of implantation of calibration laboratory of ionizing radiation measurement instruments at the CTMSP, Sao Paulo, in a priory approved by CNEN, Brazil. That laboratory will allow and enhance the present metrological capacity for the attendance to the growing demand for calibration services of the instruments

  18. Project of an integrated calibration laboratory of instruments at IPEN; Projeto de um laboratorio integrado de calibracao de instrumentos no IPEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barros, Gustavo Adolfo San Jose

    2009-07-01

    The Calibration Laboratory of Instruments of Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares offers calibration services of radiation detectors used in radioprotection, diagnostic radiology and radiotherapy, for IPEN and for external facilities (public and private). One part of its facilities is located in the main building, along with other laboratories and study rooms, and another part in an isolated building called Bunker. For the optimization, modernization and specially the safety, the laboratories in the main building shall be transferred to an isolated place. In this work, a project of an integrated laboratory for calibration of instruments was developed, and it will be an expansion of the current Calibration Laboratory of Instruments of IPEN. Therefore, a series of radiometric monitoring of the chosen localization of the future laboratory was realized, and all staff needs (dimensions and disposition of the study rooms and laboratories) were defined. In this project, the laboratories with X ray equipment, alpha and beta radiation sources were located at an isolated part of the building, and the wall shielding was determined, depending on the use of each laboratory. (author)

  19. High precision tilt stage as a key element to a universal test mirror for characterization and calibration of slope measuring instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V; Artemiev, Nikolay A; Centers, Gary; Chaubard, Arthur; Geckeler, Ralf D; Lacey, Ian; Marth, Harry; McKinney, Wayne R; Noll, Tino; Siewert, Frank; Winter, Mathias; Zeschke, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    The ultimate performance of surface slope metrology instrumentation, such as long trace profilers and auto-collimator based deflectometers, is limited by systematic errors that are increased when the entire angular range is used for metrology of significantly curved optics. At the ALS X-Ray Optics Laboratory, in collaboration with the HZB/BESSY-II and PTB (Germany) metrology teams, we are working on a calibration method for deflectometers, based on a concept of a universal test mirror (UTM) [V. V. Yashchuk et al., Proc. SPIE 6704, 67040A (2007)]. Potentially, the UTM method provides high performance calibration and accounts for peculiarities of the optics under test (e.g., slope distribution) and the experimental arrangement (e.g., the distance between the sensor and the optic under test). At the same time, the UTM calibration method is inherently universal, applicable to a variety of optics and experimental arrangements. In this work, we present the results of tests with a key component of the UTM system, a custom high precision tilt stage, which has been recently developed in collaboration with Physik Instrumente, GmbH. The tests have demonstrated high performance of the stage and its capability (after additional calibration) to provide angular calibration of surface slope measuring profilers over the entire instrumental dynamic range with absolute accuracy better than 30 nrad. The details of the stage design and tests are presented. We also discuss the foundation of the UTM method and calibration algorithm, as well as the possible design of a full scale UTM system.

  20. Comparing NICU teamwork and safety climate across two commonly used survey instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Profit, Jochen; Lee, Henry C; Sharek, Paul J; Kan, Peggy; Nisbet, Courtney C; Thomas, Eric J; Etchegaray, Jason M; Sexton, Bryan

    2016-12-01

    Measurement and our understanding of safety culture are still evolving. The objectives of this study were to assess variation in safety and teamwork climate and in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) setting, and compare measurement of safety culture scales using two different instruments (Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ) and Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPSC)). Cross-sectional survey study of a voluntary sample of 2073 (response rate 62.9%) health professionals in 44 NICUs. To compare survey instruments, we used Spearman's rank correlation coefficients. We also compared similar scales and items across the instruments using t tests and changes in quartile-level performance. We found significant variation across NICUs in safety and teamwork climate scales of SAQ and HSOPSC (pteamwork scales (teamwork climate and teamwork within units) of the two instruments correlated strongly (safety r=0.72, pteamwork r=0.67, p<0.001). However, the means and per cent agreements for all scale scores and even seemingly similar item scores were significantly different. In addition, comparisons of scale score quartiles between the two instruments revealed that half of the NICUs fell into different quartiles when translating between the instruments. Large variation and opportunities for improvement in patient safety culture exist across NICUs. Important systematic differences exist between SAQ and HSOPSC such that these instruments should not be used interchangeably. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  1. Unit-specific calibration of Actigraph accelerometers in a mechanical setup - is it worth the effort? The effect on random output variation caused by technical inter-instrument variability in the laboratory and in the field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moeller, Niels C; Korsholm, Lars; Kristensen, Peter L

    2008-01-01

    during free living conditions. RESULTS: Calibration reduced inter-instrument variability considerably in the mechanical setup, both in the MTI instruments (raw SDbetween units = 195 counts*min-1 vs. calibrated SDbetween units = 65 counts*min-1) and in the CSA instruments (raw SDbetween units = 343 counts...... conditions had no apparent effect on inter-instrument variability. In all probability, the effect of technical calibration was primarily attenuated in the field by other more dominant sources of variation. However, routine technical assessments are still very important for determining the acceleration...

  2. Calibration of the Fluorine, Chlorine and Hydrogen Content of Apatites With the ChemCam LIBS Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meslin, P.-Y.; Cicutto, L.; Forni, O.; Drouet, C.; Rapin, W.; Nachon, M.; Cousin, A.; Blank, J. G.; McCubbin, F. M.; Gasnault, O.; Newsom, H.; Mangold, N.; Schroeder, S.; Sautter, V.; Maurice, S.; Wiens, R. C.

    2016-01-01

    Determining the composition of apatites is important to understand the behavior of volatiles during planetary differentiation. Apatite is an ubiquitous magmatic mineral in the SNC meteorites. It is a significant reservoir of halogens in these meteorites and has been used to estimate the halogen budget of Mars. Apatites have been identified in sandstones and pebbles at Gale crater by ChemCam, a Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscometer (LIBS) instrument onboard the Curiosity rover. Their presence was inferred from correlations between calcium, fluorine (using the CaF molecular band centered near 603 nm, whose detection limit is much lower that atomic or ionic lines and, in some cases, phosphorus (whose detection limit is much larger). An initial quantification of fluorine, based on fluorite (CaF2)/basalt mixtures and obtained at the LANL laboratory, indicated that the excess of F/Ca (compared to the stoichiometry of pure fluorapatites) found on Mars in some cases could be explained by the presence of fluorite. Chlorine was not detected in these targets, at least above a detection limit of 0.6 wt% estimated from. Fluorapatite was later also detected by X-ray diffraction (with CheMin) at a level of approx.1wt% in the Windjana drill sample (Kimberley area), and several points analyzed by ChemCam in this area also revealed a correlation between Ca and F. The in situ detection of F-rich, Cl-poor apatites contrasts with the Cl-rich, F-poor compositions of apatites found in basaltic shergottites and in gabbroic clasts from the martian meteorite NWA 7034, which were also found to be more Cl-rich than apatites from basalts on Earth, the Moon, or Vesta. The in situ observations could call into question one of the few possible explanations brought forward to explain the SNC results, namely that Mars may be highly depleted in fluorine. The purpose of the present study is to refine the calibration of the F, Cl, OH and P signals measured by the ChemCam LIBS instrument, initiated

  3. Instruments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buehrer, W. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1996-12-31

    The present paper mediates a basic knowledge of the most commonly used experimental techniques. We discuss the principles and concepts necessary to understand what one is doing if one performs an experiment on a certain instrument. (author) 29 figs., 1 tab., refs.

  4. GPS Survey of the salar de Uyuni, Bolivia, for Satellite Altimeter Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsa, A. A.; Fricker, H. A.; Bills, B. G.; Carabajal, C. C.; Quinn, K.; Minster, J. B.; Schutz, B.

    2002-12-01

    The salar de Uyuni, a 100km x 100km salt flat in the Andean Altiplano of southern Bolivia, is the largest dry lake on Earth. The size, high albedo and remarkable flatness of the salar make it an ideal reference surface for satellite-based altimeters - in particular, the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) to be flown on the Ice, Cloud and Land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) - especially with regard to range measurements and waveform analysis of return signals. A simple reference surface such as the salar can be mapped by ground-based surveying, although the sheer size of the area requires adaptations to standard survey techniques. We describe a survey of the salar de Uyuni carried out with car-mounted kinematic GPS over a seven-day period in September 2002. We divided the salar surface into a number of survey grids that were driven in multiple directions to yield redundant measurements and corresponding error statistics at grid crossover points. Adjacent grids were overlapped so we could also determine errors between grids and over multi-day time periods. In addition, we set up five fixed GPS sites on the salar to serve as local survey control in post-processing. These fixed sites will be used to map ionospheric effects and interpolate them to the roving GPS receivers. If successful, this will allow reprocessing of GPS solutions using L1 data only, with a corresponding reduction in noise compared to solutions using the standard ionosphere-free LC combination. We present our surveyed topography of the eastern half of the salar de Uyuni, comparing it to previously-published elevation measurements and to the best geoid model available for the region. We show the close relationship between the topography of the salar and the shape of the geoid, a result we had expected since the salar is flooded each austral summer to an almost uniform depth. We also demonstrate knowledge of the surface height of the salar to within the measurement error specified for the GLAS

  5. CERN Radiation Protection (RP) calibration facilities

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2082069; Macián-Juan, Rafael

    Radiation protection calibration facilities are essential to ensure the correct operation of radiation protection instrumentation. Calibrations are performed in specific radiation fields according to the type of instrument to be calibrated: neutrons, photons, X-rays, beta and alpha particles. Some of the instruments are also tested in mixed radiation fields as often encountered close to high-energy particle accelerators. Moreover, calibration facilities are of great importance to evaluate the performance of prototype detectors; testing and measuring the response of a prototype detector to well-known and -characterized radiation fields contributes to improving and optimizing its design and capabilities. The CERN Radiation Protection group is in charge of performing the regular calibrations of all CERN radiation protection devices; these include operational and passive dosimeters, neutron and photon survey-meters, and fixed radiation detectors to monitor the ambient dose equivalent, H*(10), inside CERN accelera...

  6. Developing Calibration Weights and Standard-Error Estimates for a Survey of Drug-Related Emergency-Department Visits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kott Phillip S.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This article describes a two-step calibration-weighting scheme for a stratified simple random sample of hospital emergency departments. The first step adjusts for unit nonresponse. The second increases the statistical efficiency of most estimators of interest. Both use a measure of emergency-department size and other useful auxiliary variables contained in the sampling frame. Although many survey variables are roughly a linear function of the measure of size, response is better modeled as a function of the log of that measure. Consequently the log of size is a calibration variable in the nonresponse-adjustment step, while the measure of size itself is a calibration variable in the second calibration step. Nonlinear calibration procedures are employed in both steps. We show with 2010 DAWN data that estimating variances as if a one-step calibration weighting routine had been used when there were in fact two steps can, after appropriately adjusting the finite-population correct in some sense, produce standard-error estimates that tend to be slightly conservative.

  7. GOES-R Space Environment In-Situ Suite: instruments overview, calibration results, and data processing algorithms, and expected on-orbit performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galica, G. E.; Dichter, B. K.; Tsui, S.; Golightly, M. J.; Lopate, C.; Connell, J. J.

    2016-05-01

    The space weather instruments (Space Environment In-Situ Suite - SEISS) on the soon to be launched, NOAA GOES-R series spacecraft offer significant space weather measurement performance advances over the previous GOES N-P series instruments. The specifications require that the instruments ensure proper operation under the most stressful high flux conditions corresponding to the largest solar particle event expected during the program, while maintaining high sensitivity at low flux levels. Since the performance of remote sensing instruments is sensitive to local space weather conditions, the SEISS data will be of be of use to a broad community of users. The SEISS suite comprises five individual sensors and a data processing unit: Magnetospheric Particle Sensor-Low (0.03-30 keV electrons and ions), Magnetospheric Particle Sensor-High (0.05-4 MeV electrons, 0.08-12 MeV protons), two Solar And Galactic Proton Sensors (1 to >500 MeV protons), and the Energetic Heavy ion Sensor (10-200 MeV for H, H to Fe with single element resolution). We present comparisons between the enhanced GOES-R instruments and the current GOES space weather measurement capabilities. We provide an overview of the sensor configurations and performance. Results of extensive sensor modeling with GEANT, FLUKA and SIMION are compared with calibration data measured over nearly the entire energy range of the instruments. Combination of the calibration results and model are used to calculate the geometric factors of the various energy channels. The calibrated geometric factors and typical and extreme space weather environments are used to calculate the expected on-orbit performance.

  8. Understanding Teachers' Conceptions of Classroom Inquiry With a Teaching Scenario Survey Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Nam-Hwa; Orgill, Marykay; Crippen, Kent J.

    2008-08-01

    A survey instrument using everyday teaching scenarios was developed to measure teacher conceptions of inquiry. Validity of the instrument was established by comparing responses for a group of secondary teachers to narrative writing and group discussion. Participating teachers used only three of the five essential features of inquiry detailed in the standards documents (NRC 2000) when expressing their ideas of classroom inquiry. The features of ‘evaluating explanations in connection with scientific knowledge’ and ‘communicating explanations’ were rarely mentioned. These missing components indicate a gap between the teachers’ conceptions of inquiry and the ideals of the reform movement.

  9. Calibrating the lithium-age relation with open clusters observed with GES (Gaia-ESO Survey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez Albarrán, M. L.; Montes, D.; Gómez Garrido, M.; Tabernero, H. M..; González Hernández, J. I.; GES Survey Builders

    2017-03-01

    Li depletion is strongly age-dependent but currently available data have shown a complex pattern of Li depletion on the pre- and main-sequence stars that is not yet understood. The lithium abundance observed in late-type stars depend not only of the age and the temperature but also on metallicity, mixing mechanisms, convection structure, rotation and magnetic activity. The large number of stars observed within the Gaia-ESO survey (GES - https://www.gaia-eso.eu/) for many open clusters and associations can be used to calibrate the lithium-age relation and its dependence with other parameters that can be derived from the UVES and GIRAFFE spectroscopic observations. We present here the preliminary results of the analysis of membership and Li abundance of the young clusters and associations, as well as of the intermediate-age and old open clusters, observed until now in GES (iDR4) in order to conduct a comparative study. All this information allowed us to characterize the properties of the members of these clusters and identify a series of field contaminant stars, both lithium-rich giants and non-giant outliers.

  10. RESOLVE Survey Photometry and Volume-limited Calibration of the Photometric Gas Fractions Technique

    CERN Document Server

    Eckert, Kathleen D; Stark, David V; Moffett, Amanda J; Norris, Mark A; Snyder, Elaine M; Hoversten, Erik A

    2015-01-01

    We present custom-processed UV, optical, and near-IR photometry for the RESOLVE survey, a volume-limited census of stellar, gas, and dynamical mass within two subvolumes of the nearby universe (RESOLVE-A and -B), complete down to baryonic mass ~10^9.1-9.3 Msun. In contrast to standard pipeline photometry (e.g., SDSS), our photometry uses optimal background subtraction, avoids suppressing color gradients, and includes systematic errors. With these improvements, we measure brighter magnitudes, larger radii, bluer colors, and a real increase in scatter around the red sequence. Combining stellar masses from our photometry with the RESOLVE-A HI mass census, we create volume-limited calibrations of the photometric gas fractions (PGF) technique, which predicts gas-to-stellar mass ratios (G/S) from galaxy colors and optional additional parameters. We analyze G/S-color residuals vs. potential third parameters, finding that axial ratio is the best independent and physically meaningful third parameter. We define a "modi...

  11. Cross-calibration of the X-ray instruments onboard the Chandra, INTEGRAL, RXTE, Suzaku, Swift, and XMM-Newton observatories using G21.5-0.9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimoto, M.; Guainazzi, M.; Plucinsky, P. P.; Beardmore, A. P.; Ishida, M.; Natalucci, L.; Posson-Brown, J. L. L.; Read, A. M.; Saxton, R. D.; Shaposhnikov, N. V.

    2011-01-01

    Context. For many years, X-ray astronomy missions have used the Crab nebula as a celestial calibration source for the X-ray flux and spectral shape. However, the object is often too bright for current and future missions equipped with instruments with improved sensitivity. Aims: We use G21.5-0.9, a pulsar-wind nebula with a time-constant power-law spectrum and a flux of a few milli-Crab in the X-ray band, as a viable, fainter substitute to the Crab. Using this source, we conduct a cross-calibration study of the instruments onboard currently active observatories: Chandra ACIS, Suzaku XIS, Swift XRT, and XMM-Newton EPIC (MOS and pn) for the soft-band, and INTEGRAL IBIS-ISGRI, RXTE PCA, and Suzaku HXD-PIN for the hard band. Methods: We extract spectra from all instruments and fit under the same astrophysical assumptions. We compare the spectral parameters of the G21.5-0.9 model: power-law photon index, H-equivalent column density of the interstellar photoelectric absorption, and flux in the soft (2-8 keV) or hard (15-50 keV) energy band. Results: We identify systematic differences in the best-fit parameter values unattributable to statistical scatter of the data alone. We interpret these differences as due to residual cross-calibration problems. The differences can be as large as 20% and 9% for the soft-band flux and power-law index, respectively, and 46% for the hard-band flux. The results are plotted and tabulated as a useful reference for future calibration and scientific studies using multiple missions. This work is based on the activity of the International Astronomical Consortium for High Energy Calibration (IACHEC).

  12. Evaluation of a Brief Survey Instrument for Assessing Subtle Differences in Cognitive Function Among Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotwal, Ashwin A; Schumm, Philip; Kern, David W; McClintock, Martha K; Waite, Linda J; Shega, Joseph W; Huisingh-Scheetz, Megan J; Dale, William

    2015-01-01

    Most measures of cognitive function used in large-scale surveys of older adults have limited ability to detect subtle differences across cognitive domains, and standard clinical instruments are impractical to administer in general surveys. The Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) can address this need, but has limitations in a survey context. Therefore, we developed a survey adaptation of the MoCA, called the MoCA-SA, and describe its psychometric properties in a large national survey. Using a pretest sample of older adults (n=120), we reduced MoCA administration time by 26%, developed a model to accurately estimate full MoCA scores from the MoCA-SA, and tested the model in an independent clinical sample (n=93). The validated 18-item MoCA-SA was then administered to community-dwelling adults aged 62 to 91 as part of the National Social life Health and Aging Project Wave 2 sample (n=3196). In National Social life Health and Aging Project Wave 2, the MoCA-SA had good internal reliability (Cronbach α=0.76). Using item-response models, survey-adapted items captured a broad range of cognitive abilities and functioned similarly across sex, education, and ethnic groups. Results demonstrate that the MoCA-SA can be administered reliably in a survey setting while preserving sensitivity to a broad range of cognitive abilities and similar performance across demographic subgroups.

  13. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Second epoch VLBA Calibrator Survey (VCS-II) (Gordon+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, D.; Jacobs, C.; Beasley, A.; Peck, A.; Gaume, R.; Charlot, P.; Fey, A.; Ma, C.; Titov, O.; Boboltz, D.

    2016-07-01

    Six Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) calibrator survey campaigns were run between 1994 and 2007 (VCS1, Beasley et al. 2002, cat. J/ApJS/141/13; VCS2, Fomalont et al. 2003, cat. J/AJ/126/2562; VCS3, Petrov et al. 2005, cat. J/AJ/129/1163; VCS4, Petrov et al. 2006, cat. J/AJ/131/1872; VCS5, Kovalev et al. 2007, cat. J/AJ/133/1236; VCS6, Petrov et al. 2008, cat. J/AJ/136/580) We report on the results of a second epoch VLBA Calibrator Survey campaign (VCS-II) in which 2400 VCS sources were re-observed in the X and S bands. The VLBA S/X (S band~2.3GHz and X band~8.6GHz) dual frequency system was used. We used the VLBA RDBE/Mark5C system, which has 16 32MHz channels and records 2 Gbits/s using 2 bit sampling. Due to S-band filters below 2200MHz and above 2400MHz at most of the VLBA antennas, and a broad area of RFI from SiriusXM satellites (2320-2345MHz), only four channels could be deployed in the S band (2220.0, 2252.0, 2284.0, and 2348.0MHz). The other 12 channels were deployed in the X band (8460.0, 8492.0, 8524.0, 8556.0, 8620.0, 8652.0, 8716.0, 8748.0, 8812.0, 8844.0, 8876.0, and 8908.0MHz). We set a target of 300 sources per session, or 2400 total sources for the 8 VLBA sessions. We selected all sources from the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) S/X astrometric/geodetic catalog (available at http://gemini.gsfc.nasa.gov/solutions/ or by following the links at http://lupus.gsfc.nasa.gov/) between -50° and +90° decl. that had been observed in only 1 or 2 sessions as of mid 2013. This amounted to ~2060 sources. To fill out the list, we added ~340 additional sources that had been observed but not detected in the original VCS1-6 analysis. The eight schedules were run between 2014 January and 2015 March (VCS-II-A/BG219A on 2014 01/04 10:04-01/05 10:02; VCS-II-B/BG219B1 on 2014 05/31 17:12-06/01 17:05; VCS-II-D/BG219D on 2014 06/09 09:13-06/10 09:10; VCS-II-C/BG219C on 2014 08/05 13:03-08/06 13:00; VCS-II-E/BG219E on 2014 08/09 00:00-08/09 23:55; VCS-II-F/BG219F on 2014

  14. High Efficiency, Digitally Calibrated TR Modules Enabling Lightweight SweepSAR Architectures for DESDynI-Class Radar Instruments Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Develop and demonstrate a next-generation digitally calibrated, highly scalable, L-band Transmit/Receive (TR) module to enable a precision beamforming SweepSAR...

  15. The tabletting machine as an analytical instrument: qualification of the measurement devices for punch forces and validation of the calibration procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belda, P M; Mielck, J B

    1998-11-01

    The quality of force measurement in an eccentric tabletting machine equipped with piezo-electric load washers mounted under pre-stress at the upper and lower punches, and the reliability of their calibration in situ and under working conditions were carefully investigated, since this tabletting machine is used as an 'analytical instrument' for the evaluation of the compression behaviour of pharmaceutical materials. For a quasistatic calibration procedure the repeatability under standard conditions and the robustness against variations in machine settings, installation conditions, equipment and handling were evaluated. Two differently constructed reference load cells equipped with strain gauges were used for the calibration of the upper punch sensor. The lower punch sensor was calibrated against the upper one. Except for a mechanical hysteresis, owing to uneven stress distribution over the piezo-electric sensors, the results of the quasistatic measurements are assessed to be satisfactory. In addition, dynamic calibrations were performed. One of the strain-gauged load cells was used in addition to two piezo-electric load washers installed without pre-stress. The dynamic behaviour of all the transducers used is deficient. While for the piezo-electric sensors a significant change in the slope of the calibration function with respect to the quasistatic behaviour was observed, for the strain-gauged load cell a pronounced hysteresis must be noted. Comparing the dynamic behaviour at different profiles of rates of force development generated by variations in machine speed and by maximum force setting, the variability in the sensitivity of the upper and lower punch piezo-electric load washers is comparatively small.

  16. Absolute Flux Calibration of the IRAC Instrument on the Spitzer Space Telescope using Hubble Space Telescope Flux Standards

    CERN Document Server

    Bohlin, R C; Rieke, G H; Ardila, D; Carey, S; Deustua, S; Engelbracht, C; Ferguson, H C; Flanagan, K; Kalirai, J; Meixner, M; Noriega-Crespo, A; Su, K Y L; Tremblay, P -E

    2011-01-01

    The absolute flux calibration of the James Webb Space Telescope will be based on a set of stars observed by the Hubble and Spitzer Space Telescopes. In order to cross-calibrate the two facilities, several A, G, and white dwarf (WD) stars are observed with both Spitzer and Hubble and are the prototypes for a set of JWST calibration standards. The flux calibration constants for the four Spitzer IRAC bands 1-4 are derived from these stars and are 2.3, 1.9, 2.0, and 0.5% lower than the official cold-mission IRAC calibration of Reach et al. (2005), i.e. in agreement within their estimated errors of ~2%. The causes of these differences lie primarily in the IRAC data reduction and secondarily in the SEDs of our standard stars. The independent IRAC 8 micron band-4 fluxes of Rieke et al. (2008) are about 1.5 +/- 2% higher than those of Reach et al. and are also in agreement with our 8 micron result.

  17. Design and Calibration of a Flowfield Survey Rake for Inlet Flight Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Darin C.; Ratnayake, Nalin A.; Frederick, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Flowfield rake was designed to quantify the flowfield for inlet research underneath NASA DFRC s F-15B airplane. Detailed loads and stress analysis performed using CFD and empirical methods to assure structural integrity. Calibration data were generated through wind tunnel testing of the rake. Calibration algorithm was developed to determine the local Mach and flow angularity at each probe. RAGE was flown November, 2008. Data is currently being analyzed.

  18. The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI): Science from the DESI Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenstein, Daniel; DESI Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) will enable an ambitious redshift survey to probe dark energy by the baryon acoustic oscillation and redshift-space distortion methods. The same data set will serve numerous other goals in cosmology and astrophysics. Using a new 5000-fiber instrument and 8 square degree field of view at the Mayall telescope, the DESI survey plans to cover 14,000 square degrees and about 25 million high-redshift objects. The targets include 4M luminous red galaxies (redshift 0.4-1.0), 18M emission line galaxies (redshift 0.6-1.6), and 2.4M quasars, including 0.7M Lyman-alpha forest sight lines. With this, DESI can map the expansion history of the Universe to redshift 3, achieving unprecedented performance from the baryon acoustic oscillation method. We will describe the present state of the survey design and the cosmological forecasts for dark energy, inflation, and neutrino physics. We also give an update on the DESI Science Collaboration.

  19. DECal: A Spectrophotometric Calibration System For DECam

    CERN Document Server

    Marshall, J L; DePoy, D L; Prochaska, Travis; Allen, Richard; Behm, Tyler W; Martin, Emily C; Veal, Brannon; Villanueva,, Steven; Williams, Patrick; Wise, Jason

    2013-01-01

    DECal is a new calibration system for the CTIO 4 m Blanco telescope. It is currently being installed as part of the Dark Energy Survey and will provide both broadband flat fields and narrowband (about 1 nm bandwidth) spectrophotometric calibration for the new Dark Energy Camera (DECam). Both of these systems share a new Lambertian flat field screen. The broadband flat field system uses LEDs to illuminate each photometric filter. The spectrophotometric calibration system consists of a monochromator-based tunable light source that is projected onto the flat field screen using a custom line-to-spot fiber bundle and an engineered diffuser. Several calibrated photodiodes positioned along the beam monitor the telescope throughput as a function of wavelength. This system will measure the wavelength-dependent instrumental response function of the total telescope+instrument system in the range 300 < lambda < 1100nm. The spectrophotometric calibration will be performed regularly (roughly once per month) to determ...

  20. The Application of Surveying Biochemistry Light Instrument in the Reaction System of Starch with Mn3+

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gu Zhengbiao; Wu Jiagen

    2000-01-01

    The possibility of the application of Surveying Biochemistry Light Instrument (SBLI) in the reaction system of starch with Mn3+was studied. The results showed: neither starch nor initiator(Mn3+) could produce light because no factor that could produce light existed in them. But starch could produce light when it was acted by Mn3 + and the intensity of light depended on the kind and concentration of starch, the amount of Mn3 +, the temperature and pH of the reaction system. In addition, the intensity of light decreased with the reaction time because of the gradual disappearance of starch free radicals.

  1. Creation and Use of a Survey Instrument for Comparing Mobile Computing Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macri, Jennifer M.; Lee, Paul P.; Silvey, Garry M.; Lobach, David F.

    2005-01-01

    Both personal digital assistants (PDAs) and tablet computers have emerged to facilitate data collection at the point of care. However, little research has been reported comparing these mobile computing devices in specific care settings. In this study we present an approach for comparing functionally identical applications on a Palm operating system-based PDA and a Windows-based tablet computer for point-of-care documentation of clinical observations by eye care professionals when caring for patients with diabetes. Eye-care professionals compared the devices through focus group sessions and through validated usability surveys. This poster describes the development and use of the survey instrument used for comparing mobile computing devices. PMID:16779327

  2. Flux Calibration of the BATC Survey and Its Application for Checking the Consistency of the Oke-Gunn Standards

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Four Oke-Gunn (OG) standards, HD 19445, HD 84937, BD+26 2606 and BD+17 4708 are used as standard stars for flux calibration in the BATC project. They are also widely used in the visual wavelength region in many other photometric projects. Over the years we have observed on 58 good photometric nights, and the data obtained are used for flux calibration. Normally two or three OG standards are observed in every photometric night. The data are used for getting the atmo-spheric extinction coefficients and instrumental magnitude zero point. We also use these data to make inter-comparisons among the magnitudes of these standard stars.As a result, we found the magnitudes of HD 19445, HD 84937 and BD+17 4708 to agree well with those estimated in previous work to within 0.03 magnitude. How-ever, BD+26 2606 shows a larger deviation especially at short wavebands. Possible reasons are analyzed and the revised magnitudes are obtained for these standards.It is shown that the quality of flux calibration of the BATC fields is significantly improved by applying the new magnitudes.

  3. NEFSC 2008 Spring Bottom Trawl Survey - Site Specific Calibration (HB0803, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NEFSC bottom trawl survey is a fisheries independent, multi-species survey that provides the primary scientific data for fisheries assessments in the U.S....

  4. Assembly of a laboratory for calibration in brachytherapy. Comparison of responses with different instrumentation; Montaje de un laboratorio para calibraciones en braquiterapia. Comparacion de respuestas con diferente instrumentacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirchio, R.; Saravi, M. [CNEA, Pbro. J. Gonzalez y Aragon No. 16 (B1802AYA) Ezeiza, Buenos Aires (Argentina)]. e-mail: pirchio@cae.cnea.gov.ar

    2006-07-01

    A common practice in quality control programs for dosimetry in brachytherapy is the source calibration. The AAPM (American Association of Physicists in Medicine) in the Task Group No. 40 (TG-40) it recommends that each institution that offers a brachytherapy service verifies the intensity of each source provided by the maker with secondary traceability. For such a reason it is necessary to have laboratories able to make calibrations of sources, traceable electrometer-chambers to primary or credited laboratories. The Regional Center of Reference of Dosimetry of the CNEA (National Commission of Atomic Energy) it is in the stage of finalization of the assembly of a Laboratory for source calibration and use equipment in brachytherapy. For it has two ionization chambers well type and two electrometers gauged by the Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratory of the University of Wisconsin. Also account with a wide variety of supports and with a tube of {sup 137}Cs pattern 3M model 6500/6D6C. The procedures for the calibration of sources and equipment were elaborated starting from the TECDOC-1274. On the other hand, its were carried out measurements with different instrumentation for the comparison of responses and at the same time to implement the calibration procedures. For it, its were used chambers and electrometers of the institution, of hospitals and of the national company 'Solydes'. In the measurements its were used seeds of {sup 125}I taken place in Argentina and the tube of {sup 137}Cs pattern mentioned previously. In first place it was proceeded to the determination of the center of the region of the plateau in the axial response for the seeds of Iodine-125 and the tube of Cesium-137 pattern using different chambers. Later on its were carried out measurements of accumulated loads during a certain interval of time in this position. The calibration factors of each chamber were determined, N{sub Sk} ({mu}Gy m{sup 2} h{sup -1} A{sup -1}), as the quotient

  5. Longitudinal Weight Calibration with Estimated Control Totals for Cross Sectional Survey Data: Theory and Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, Siyu

    2014-01-01

    The National Science Foundation (NSF) Survey of Doctorate Recipients (SDR) collects information on a sample of individuals in the United States with PhD degrees. A significant portion of the sampled individuals appear in multiple survey years and can be linked across time. Survey weights in each year are created and adjusted for oversampling and…

  6. In situ calibration of the Gamma Reaction History instrument using reference samples ("pucks") for areal density measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, N. M.; Herrmann, H. W.; Kim, Y. H.; Hsu, H. H.; Horsfield, C. J.; Rubery, M. S.; Wilson, D. C.; Stoeffl, W. W.; Young, C. S.; Mack, J. M.; Miller, E. K.; Grafil, E.; Evans, S. C.; Sedillo, T. J.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Duffy, T.

    2013-11-01

    The introduction of a sample of carbon, for example a disk or "puck", near an imploding DT-filled capsule creates a source of 12C gamma rays that can serve as a reference for calibrating the response of the Gamma Reaction History (GRH) detector [1]. Such calibration is important in the measurement of ablator areal density ⟨ρR⟩abl in plastic-ablator DT-filled capsules at OMEGA [2], by allowing ⟨ρR⟩abl to be inferred as a function of ratios of signals rather than from absolute measurements of signal magnitudes. Systematic uncertainties in signal measurements and detector responses therefore cancel, permitting more accurate measurements of ⟨ρR⟩abl.

  7. In situ calibration of the Gamma Reaction History instrument using reference samples (“pucks” for areal density measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoffman N.M.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of a sample of carbon, for example a disk or “puck”, near an imploding DT-filled capsule creates a source of 12C gamma rays that can serve as a reference for calibrating the response of the Gamma Reaction History (GRH detector [1]. Such calibration is important in the measurement of ablator areal density ⟨ρR⟩abl in plastic-ablator DT-filled capsules at OMEGA [2], by allowing ⟨ρR⟩abl to be inferred as a function of ratios of signals rather than from absolute measurements of signal magnitudes. Systematic uncertainties in signal measurements and detector responses therefore cancel, permitting more accurate measurements of ⟨ρR⟩abl.

  8. The Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover Mastcam instruments: Preflight and in-flight calibration, validation, and data archiving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, James F.; Godber, A.; McNair, S.; Caplinger, M.A.; Maki, J.N.; Lemmon, M.T.; Van Beek, J.; Malin, M.C.; Wellington, D.; Kinch, K.M.; Madsen, M.B.; Hardgrove, C.; Ravine, M.A.; Jensen, E.; Harker, D.; Anderson, Ryan; Herkenhoff, Kenneth E.; Morris, R.V.; Cisneros, E.; Deen, R.G.

    2017-01-01

    The NASA Curiosity rover Mast Camera (Mastcam) system is a pair of fixed-focal length, multispectral, color CCD imagers mounted ~2 m above the surface on the rover's remote sensing mast, along with associated electronics and an onboard calibration target. The left Mastcam (M-34) has a 34 mm focal length, an instantaneous field of view (IFOV) of 0.22 mrad, and a FOV of 20° × 15° over the full 1648 × 1200 pixel span of its Kodak KAI-2020 CCD. The right Mastcam (M-100) has a 100 mm focal length, an IFOV of 0.074 mrad, and a FOV of 6.8° × 5.1° using the same detector. The cameras are separated by 24.2 cm on the mast, allowing stereo images to be obtained at the resolution of the M-34 camera. Each camera has an eight-position filter wheel, enabling it to take Bayer pattern red, green, and blue (RGB) “true color” images, multispectral images in nine additional bands spanning ~400–1100 nm, and images of the Sun in two colors through neutral density-coated filters. An associated Digital Electronics Assembly provides command and data interfaces to the rover, 8 Gb of image storage per camera, 11 bit to 8 bit companding, JPEG compression, and acquisition of high-definition video. Here we describe the preflight and in-flight calibration of Mastcam images, the ways that they are being archived in the NASA Planetary Data System, and the ways that calibration refinements are being developed as the investigation progresses on Mars. We also provide some examples of data sets and analyses that help to validate the accuracy and precision of the calibration

  9. Point source calibration of the AKARI/FIS all-sky survey maps for staking analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Arimatsu, Ko; Wada, Takehiko; Takita, Satoshi; Kawada, Mitsunobu; Matsuura, Shuji; Ootsubo, Takafumi; Kataza, Hirokazu

    2014-01-01

    Investigations of the point spread functions (PSFs) and flux calibrations for stacking analysis have been performed with the far-infrared (wavelengths range of 60 to 140 um all-sky maps taken by the Far-Infrared Surveyor (FIS) onboard the AKARI satellite. The PSFs are investigated by stacking the maps at the positions of standard stars with their fluxes of 0.02 -10 Jy. The derived full widths at the half maximum (FWHMs) of the PSFs are ~ 60 arcsec at 65 and 90 um and ~ 90 arcsec at 140 um, which are much smaller than that of the previous all-sky maps obtained with IRAS (~ 6 arcmin). Any flux dependence in the PSFs is not seen on the investigated flux range. By performing the flux calibrations, we found that absolute photometry for faint sources can be carried out with constant calibration factors, which range from 0.6 to 0.8. After applying the calibration factors, the photometric accuracies for the stacked sources in the 65, 90, and 140 um bands are 9, 3, and 21 %, respectively, even below the detection limi...

  10. Assessing or Reaffirming Accreditation Criteria for the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS): Development of an Alumni Survey Instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, William L.; Johnson, Annabel M.

    The "Criteria for Accreditation" (1991) and reaffirmation published by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools were validated through a survey of alumni. The criteria were developed to assist institutions in evaluating their effectiveness. In all, 2,300 survey instruments were mailed to college alumni in the United States. Of…

  11. Predicting Student Performance in Web-Based Distance Education Courses Based on Survey Instruments Measuring Personality Traits and Technical Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Two common web-based surveys, "Is Online Learning Right for Me?' and "What Technical Skills Do I Need?", were combined into a single survey instrument and given to 228 on-campus and 83 distance education students. The students were enrolled in four different classes (business, computer information services, criminal justice, and…

  12. Psychometric properties of the Dutch version of the hospital-level consumer assessment of health plans survey (R) instrument

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O.A. Arah; A.H.A. ten Asbroek; D.M.J. Delnoij; J.S. de Koning; P.J.A. Stam; A.H. Poll; B. Vriens; P.F. Schmidt; N.S. Klazinga

    2006-01-01

    Objectives. To assess the reliability and validity of a translated version of the American Hospital-level Consumer Assessment of Health Plans Survey (R) (H-CAHPS) instrument for use in Dutch health care. Data Sources/Study Setting. Primary survey data from adults aged 18 years or more who were recen

  13. Measuring determinants of career satisfaction of anesthesiologists: validation of a survey instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonso, Anoushka M; Diaz, James H; Scher, Corey S; Beyl, Robbie A; Nair, Singh R; Kaye, Alan David

    2013-06-01

    To measure the parameter of job satisfaction among anesthesiologists. Survey instrument. Academic anesthesiology departments in the United States. 320 anesthesiologists who attended the annual meeting of the ASA in 2009 (95% response rate). The anonymous 50-item survey collected information on 26 independent demographic variables and 24 dependent ranked variables of career satisfaction among practicing anesthesiologists. Mean survey scores were calculated for each demographic variable and tested for statistically significant differences by analysis of variance. Questions within each domain that were internally consistent with each other within domains were identified by Cronbach's alpha ≥ 0.7. P-values ≤ 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Cronbach's alpha analysis showed strong internal consistency for 10 dependent outcome questions in the practice factor-related domain (α = 0.72), 6 dependent outcome questions in the peer factor-related domain (α = 0.71), and 8 dependent outcome questions in the personal factor-related domain (α = 0.81). Although age was not a variable, full-time status, early satisfaction within the first 5 years of practice, working with respected peers, and personal choice factors were all significantly associated with anesthesiologist job satisfaction. Improvements in factors related to job satisfaction among anesthesiologists may lead to higher early and current career satisfaction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Survey Instruments for Knowledge, Skills, Attitudes and Behaviour Related to Evidence-based Practice in Occupational Therapy: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Helen; Siegfried, Nandi; Jelsma, Jennifer

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate, through a systematic review, assessment instruments for evidence-based practice (EBP). The specific objectives were to (1) identify survey instruments testing EBP knowledge, skills, attitudes and behaviour; (2) determine the attributes measured by each instrument; (3) evaluate the psychometric properties of the instruments; and (4) evaluate the methodological quality of the instruments. Using the Cochrane approach, searches were conducted in Pubmed, EBSCOHost and Scopus from inception to February 2014. Papers were screened by two independent assessors, and data were extracted by one researcher. Forty papers reporting 34 instruments met the inclusion criteria and were included in the qualitative synthesis. Most instruments measured EBP behaviour (n = 33) and attitudes (n = 21). This review provides a single source of information to enable researchers to select the most robust descriptive instruments to measure EBP learner attributes. Instruments used only with occupational therapists may have resulted in some instruments being missed. For further research, it is recommended that attention is given to developing objective instruments with a focus on knowledge and skills. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Deep Generative Models of Galaxy Images for the Calibration of the Next Generation of Weak Lensing Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanusse, Francois; Ravanbakhsh, Siamak; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Schneider, Jeff; Poczos, Barnabas

    2017-01-01

    Weak gravitational lensing has long been identified as one of the most powerful probes to investigate the nature of dark energy. As such, weak lensing is at the heart of the next generation of cosmological surveys such as LSST, Euclid or WFIRST.One particularly crititcal source of systematic errors in these surveys comes from the shape measurement algorithms tasked with estimating galaxy shapes. GREAT3, the last community challenge to assess the quality of state-of-the-art shape measurement algorithms has in particular demonstrated that all current methods are biased to various degrees and, more importantly, that these biases depend on the details of the galaxy morphologies. These biases can be measured and calibrated by generating mock observations where a known lensing signal has been introduced and comparing the resulting measurements to the ground-truth. Producing these mock observations however requires input galaxy images of higher resolution and S/N than the simulated survey, which typically implies acquiring extremely expensive space-based observations.The goal of this work is to train a deep generative model on already available Hubble Space Telescope data which can then be used to sample new galaxy images conditioned on parameters such as magnitude, size or redshift and exhibiting complex morphologies. Such model can allow us to inexpensively produce large set of realistic realistic images for calibration purposes.We implement a conditional generative model based on state-of-the-art deep learning methods and fit it to deep galaxy images from the COSMOS survey. The quality of the model is assessed by computing an extensive set of galaxy morphology statistics on the generated images. Beyond simple second moment statistics such as size and ellipticity, we apply more complex statistics specifically designed to be sensitive to disturbed galaxy morphologies. We find excellent agreement between the morphologies of real and model generated galaxies.Our results

  16. Development and validation of a survey instrument for assessing prescribers' perception of computerized drug-drug interaction alerts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Kai; Fear, Kathleen; Chaffee, Bruce W; Zimmerman, Christopher R; Karls, Edward M; Gatwood, Justin D; Stevenson, James G; Pearlman, Mark D

    2011-12-01

    To develop a theoretically informed and empirically validated survey instrument for assessing prescribers' perception of computerized drug-drug interaction (DDI) alerts. The survey is grounded in the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology and an adapted accident causation model. Development of the instrument was also informed by a review of the extant literature on prescribers' attitude toward computerized medication safety alerts and common prescriber-provided reasons for overriding. To refine and validate the survey, we conducted a two-stage empirical validation study consisting of a pretest with a panel of domain experts followed by a field test among all eligible prescribers at our institution. The resulting survey instrument contains 28 questionnaire items assessing six theoretical dimensions: performance expectancy, effort expectancy, social influence, facilitating conditions, perceived fatigue, and perceived use behavior. Satisfactory results were obtained from the field validation; however, a few potential issues were also identified. We analyzed these issues accordingly and the results led to the final survey instrument as well as usage recommendations. High override rates of computerized medication safety alerts have been a prevalent problem. They are usually caused by, or manifested in, issues of poor end user acceptance. However, standardized research tools for assessing and understanding end users' perception are currently lacking, which inhibits knowledge accumulation and consequently forgoes improvement opportunities. The survey instrument presented in this paper may help fill this methodological gap. We developed and empirically validated a survey instrument that may be useful for future research on DDI alerts and other types of computerized medication safety alerts more generally.

  17. Measuring social exclusion in routine public health surveys: construction of a multidimensional instrument.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Addi P L van Bergen

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Social exclusion is considered a major factor in the causation and maintenance of health inequalities, but its measurement in health research is still in its infancy. In the Netherlands the Institute for Social Research (SCP developed an instrument to measure the multidimensional concept of social exclusion in social and economic policy research. Here, we present a method to construct a similar measure of social exclusion using available data from public health surveys. METHODS: Analyses were performed on data from the health questionnaires that were completed by 20,877 adults in the four largest cities in the Netherlands. From each of the four questionnaires we selected the items that corresponded to those of the SCP-instrument. These were entered into a nonlinear canonical correlation analysis. The measurement properties of the resulting indices and dimension scales were assessed and compared to the SCP-instrument. RESULTS: The internal consistency of the indices and most of the dimension scales were adequate and the internal structure of the indices was as expected. Both generalisabiliy and construct validity were good: in all datasets strong associations were found between the index and a number of known risk factors of social exclusion. A limitation of content validity was that the dimension "lack of normative integration" could not be measured, because no relevant items were available. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that a measure for social exclusion can be constructed with available health questionnaires. This provides opportunities for application in public health surveillance systems in the Netherlands and elsewhere in the world.

  18. Dental Management Survey Brazil (DMS-BR): creation and validation of a management instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Paola Sampaio; Martins, Ismar Eduardo; Biazevic, Maria Gabriela Haye; Silva, Paulo Roberto da; Michel-Crosato, Edgard

    2017-04-10

    Questionnaires for the assessment of knowledge and self-perception can be useful to diagnose what a dentist knows about management and administration. The aim of the present study was to create and validate the Dental Management Survey Brazil (DMS-BR) scale, based on meetings with experts in the field. After having elaborated the first version, 10 audits were performed in dental offices in order to produce the final version, which included nine dimensions: location, patient, finance, marketing, competition, quality, staff, career, and productivity. The accuracy of the instrument was measured by intrarater and interrater reliability. In the validation phase, 247 Brazilian dentists answered a web-based questionnaire. The data were processed using Stata 13.0 and the significance level was set at 95%. The instrument had intrarater and interrater reliability (ICC-0.93 and 0.94). The overall average of respondents for the DMS-BR scale was 3.77 (SD = 0.45). Skewness and kurtosis were below absolute values 3 and 7, respectively. Internal validity measured by Cronbach's alpha was 0.925 and the correlation of each dimension with the final result of the DMS-BR ranged between 0.606 and 0.810. Correlation with the job satisfaction scale was 0.661. The SEM data ranged between 0.80 and 0.56. The questionnaire presented satisfactory indicators of dentists' self-perception about management and administration activities.

  19. Mechanical Design of NESSI: New Mexico Tech Extrasolar Spectroscopic Survey Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Fernando G.; Olivares, Andres M.; Salcido, Christopher D.; Jimenez, Stephen R.; Jurgenson, Colby A.; Hrynevych, Michael A.; Creech-Eakman, Michelle J.; Boston, Penny J.; Schmidt, Luke M.; Bloemhard, Heather; Rodeheffer, Dan; Vaive, Genevieve; Vasisht, Gautam; Swain, Mark R.; Deroo, Pieter

    2011-01-01

    NESSI: the New Mexico Tech Extrasolar Spectroscopic Survey Instrument is a ground-based multi-object spectrograph that operates in the near-infrared. It will be installed on one of the Nasmyth ports of the Magdalena Ridge Observatory (MRO) 2.4-meter Telescope sited in the Magdalena Mountains, about 48 km west of Socorro-NM. NESSI operates stationary to the telescope fork so as not to produce differential flexure between internal opto-mechanical components during or between observations. An appropriate mechanical design allows the instrument alignment to be highly repeatable and stable for both short and long observation timescales, within a wide-range of temperature variation. NESSI is optically composed of a field lens, a field de-rotator, re-imaging optics, an auto-guider and a Dewar spectrograph that operates at LN2 temperature. In this paper we report on NESSI's detailed mechanical and opto-mechanical design, and the planning for mechanical construction, assembly, integration and verification.

  20. Research on the thermocouple instrument calibration method%一种热电偶测量仪表的校准方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孔繁军; 戴晶; 潘婧

    2012-01-01

    Introduced a method of the thermocouple instrument calibration. Using of Labview and high precision analog output card, the computer can translate the temperature difference into the 0 ~5V DC voltage output, and form the function relation from a variety of types of thermocouple degree, which is used to modify non-strict linear function of thermocouple EMF and temperature difference. Then the outside analog circuit translate the 0 ~ 5V voltage into the EMF. This method can achieve the thermocouple instrument calibration for a variety of types of thermocouple and range of temperature. According to data test and analysis, all errors of output EMF are acceptable, the method is easy operated and can be used for thermocouple instrument calibration.%提出了一种热电偶测量仪表的校准方法.采用Labview软件和高精度模拟输出板卡相结合的方法,将温差转化为0~5V的直流电压输出,将不同类型的热电偶分度表拟合出函数关系,用于纠正热电偶产生的热电动势和温差之间非严格线性关系,然后通过外部模拟运算电路将板卡输出电压转化为标准热电偶的温差电动势输出,可以实现多种类型热电偶测量仪表在不同使用温度范围的校准.经过数据测试及分析,输出的温差电动势均在允许的误差范围内,且操作简便,能很方便地用于热电偶测量仪表的校准.

  1. Calibration Method of Nickel Water Quality On-line Automatic Monitoring Instrument%镍水质在线自动监测仪校准方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖克

    2016-01-01

    通过分析镍水质在线自动监测仪工作原理及结构,探讨其计量特性和校准方法。提出了校准项目和技术指标,示值误差:当镍的质量浓度c≤0.05 mg/L时为±0.01 mg/L,当0.05 mg/L<c≤0.2 mg/L时为±10%,当c>0.2 mg/L时为±5%;重复性不大于5%;稳定性不大于5%。对示值误差测量结果不确定度进行了评定,相对扩展不确定度为1.6%(k=2)。用所建校准方法对不同厂家的监测仪进行校准试验,示值误差、重复性、稳定性满足校准项目技术指标要求。该校准方法可以用于评价镍水质在线自动监测仪的性能。%The metrological characteristics and calibration method of the nickel water quality on-line automatic monitoring instrument were discussed on the basis of analysis of its working principle and structure. The calibration items and technical specifications were put forward. The indicating value error were±0.01 mg/L,±10% and±5% at the corresponding concentration of standard solutionc≤0.05 mg/L,0.05 mg/L0.2 mg/L, respectively. The repeatability was not more than 5% while the stability was not more than 5%. The measurement uncertainty of indicating value error was evaluated,and the relative expanded uncertainty was 1.6% (k=2). The established calibration method was applied to test monitoring instruments from different manufacturers. The results indicated that value error, repeatability and stability meet the requirement of technical specifications. This method can be used for the evaluation of the performance of nickel water quality on-line automatic monitoring instrument.

  2. Calibrating MMS Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Ambient Electron Flux Measurements and Characterizing 3D Electric Field Signatures of Magnetic Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuster, J. R.; Torbert, R. B.; Vaith, H.; Argall, M. R.; Li, G.; Chen, L. J.; Ergun, R. E.; Lindqvist, P. A.; Marklund, G. T.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Russell, C. T.; Magnes, W.; Le Contel, O.; Pollock, C. J.; Giles, B. L.

    2015-12-01

    The electron drift instruments (EDIs) onboard each MMS spacecraft are designed with large geometric factors (~0.01cm2 str) to facilitate detection of weak (~100 nA) electron beams fired and received by the two gun-detector units (GDUs) when EDI is in its "electric field mode" to determine the local electric and magnetic fields. A consequence of the large geometric factor is that "ambient mode" electron flux measurements (500 eV electrons having 0°, 90°, or 180° pitch angle) can vary depending on the orientation of the EDI instrument with respect to the magnetic field, a nonphysical effect that requires a correction. Here, we present determinations of the θ- and ø-dependent correction factors for the eight EDI GDUs, where θ (ø) is the polar (azimuthal) angle between the GDU symmetry axis and the local magnetic field direction, and compare the corrected fluxes with those measured by the fast plasma instrument (FPI). Using these corrected, high time resolution (~1,000 samples per second) ambient electron fluxes, combined with the unprecedentedly high resolution 3D electric field measurements taken by the spin-plane and axial double probes (SDP and ADP), we are equipped to accurately detect electron-scale current layers and electric field waves associated with the non-Maxwellian (anisotropic and agyrotropic) particle distribution functions predicted to exist in the reconnection diffusion region. We compare initial observations of the diffusion region with distributions and wave analysis from PIC simulations of asymmetric reconnection applicable for modeling reconnection at the Earth's magnetopause, where MMS will begin Science Phase 1 as of September 1, 2015.

  3. Pre-flight calibration and initial data processing for the ChemCam laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory rover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiens, R.C.; Maurice, S.; Lasue, J.; Forni, O.; Anderson, R.B.; Clegg, S.; Bender, S.; Blaney, D.; Barraclough, B.L.; Cousin, A.; DeFlores, L.; Delapp, D.; Dyar, M.D.; Fabre, C.; Gasnault, O.; Lanza, N.; Mazoyer, J.; Melikechi, N.; Meslin, P.-Y.; Newsom, H.; Ollila, A.; Perez, R.; Tokar, R.; Vaniman, D.

    2013-01-01

    The ChemCam instrument package on the Mars Science Laboratory rover, Curiosity, is the first planetary science instrument to employ laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to determine the compositions of geological samples on another planet. Pre-processing of the spectra involves subtracting the ambient light background, removing noise, removing the electron continuum, calibrating for the wavelength, correcting for the variable distance to the target, and applying a wavelength-dependent correction for the instrument response. Further processing of the data uses multivariate and univariate comparisons with a LIBS spectral library developed prior to launch as well as comparisons with several on-board standards post-landing. The level-2 data products include semi-quantitative abundances derived from partial least squares regression. A LIBS spectral library was developed using 69 rock standards in the form of pressed powder disks, glasses, and ceramics to minimize heterogeneity on the scale of the observation (350–550 μm dia.). The standards covered typical compositional ranges of igneous materials and also included sulfates, carbonates, and phyllosilicates. The provenance and elemental and mineralogical compositions of these standards are described. Spectral characteristics of this data set are presented, including the size distribution and integrated irradiances of the plasmas, and a proxy for plasma temperature as a function of distance from the instrument. Two laboratory-based clones of ChemCam reside in Los Alamos and Toulouse for the purpose of adding new spectra to the database as the need arises. Sensitivity to differences in wavelength correlation to spectral channels and spectral resolution has been investigated, indicating that spectral registration needs to be within half a pixel and resolution needs to match within 1.5 to 2.6 pixels. Absolute errors are tabulated for derived compositions of each major element in each standard using PLS regression

  4. Inherent calibration of a blue LED-CE-DOAS instrument to measure iodine oxide, glyoxal, methyl glyoxal, nitrogen dioxide, water vapour and aerosol extinction in open cavity mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Thalman

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The combination of Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy (CEAS with broad-band light sources (e.g. Light-Emitting Diodes, LEDs lends itself to the application of cavity enhanced Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CE-DOAS to perform sensitive and selective point measurements of multiple trace gases and aerosol extinction with a single instrument. In contrast to other broad-band CEAS techniques, CE-DOAS relies only on the measurement of relative intensity changes, i.e. does not require knowledge of the light intensity in the absence of trace gases and aerosols (I0. We have built a prototype LED-CE-DOAS instrument in the blue spectral range (420–490 nm to measure nitrogen dioxide (NO2, glyoxal (CHOCHO, methyl glyoxal (CH3COCHO, iodine oxide (IO, water vapour (H2O and oxygen dimers (O4. We demonstrate the first direct detection of methyl glyoxal, and the first CE-DOAS detection of CHOCHO and IO. The instrument is further inherently calibrated for light extinction from the cavity by observing O4 or H2O (at 477 nm and 443 nm and measuring the pressure, relative humidity and temperature independently. This approach is demonstrated by experiments where laboratory aerosols of known size and refractive index were generated and their extinction measured. The measured extinctions were then compared to the theoretical extinctions calculated using Mie theory (3–7 × 10−7cm−1. Excellent agreement is found from both the O4 and H2O retrievals. This enables the first inherently calibrated CEAS measurement at blue wavelengths in open cavity mode, and eliminates the need for sampling lines to supply air to the cavity, i.e., keep the cavity enclosed and/or aerosol free. Measurements in open cavity mode are demonstrated for CHOCHO, CH3COCHO, NO2, H2O and aerosol extinction. Our prototype

  5. Inherent calibration of a blue LED-CE-DOAS instrument to measure iodine oxide, glyoxal, methyl glyoxal, nitrogen dioxide, water vapour and aerosol extinction in open cavity mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalman, R.; Volkamer, R.

    2010-12-01

    The combination of Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy (CEAS) with broad-band light sources (e.g. Light-Emitting Diodes, LEDs) lends itself to the application of cavity enhanced Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CE-DOAS) to perform sensitive and selective point measurements of multiple trace gases and aerosol extinction with a single instrument. In contrast to other broad-band CEAS techniques, CE-DOAS relies only on the measurement of relative intensity changes, i.e. does not require knowledge of the light intensity in the absence of trace gases and aerosols (I0). We have built a prototype LED-CE-DOAS instrument in the blue spectral range (420-490 nm) to measure nitrogen dioxide (NO2), glyoxal (CHOCHO), methyl glyoxal (CH3COCHO), iodine oxide (IO), water vapour (H2O) and oxygen dimers (O4). We demonstrate the first direct detection of methyl glyoxal, and the first CE-DOAS detection of CHOCHO and IO. The instrument is further inherently calibrated for light extinction from the cavity by observing O4 or H2O (at 477 nm and 443 nm) and measuring the pressure, relative humidity and temperature independently. This approach is demonstrated by experiments where laboratory aerosols of known size and refractive index were generated and their extinction measured. The measured extinctions were then compared to the theoretical extinctions calculated using Mie theory (3-7 × 10-7cm-1). Excellent agreement is found from both the O4 and H2O retrievals. This enables the first inherently calibrated CEAS measurement at blue wavelengths in open cavity mode, and eliminates the need for sampling lines to supply air to the cavity, i.e., keep the cavity enclosed and/or aerosol free. Measurements in open cavity mode are demonstrated for CHOCHO, CH3COCHO, NO2, H2O and aerosol extinction. Our prototype LED-CE-DOAS provides a low cost, yet research grade innovative instrument for applications in simulation chambers and in the open atmosphere.

  6. Characterization of different qualities in X-rays, for instruments calibration in radiological protection; Caracterizacion de diferentes calidades en rayos X, para calibracion de instrumentos en proteccion radiologica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cejudo A, J.; Tovar M, V. M.; Vergara M, F., E-mail: jesus.cejudo@inin.gob.m [ININ, Departamento de Metrologia de Radiaciones Ionizantes, Laboratorio Secundario de Calibracion Dosimetrica, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2010-09-15

    In the Secondary Laboratory of Dosimetric Calibration in Mexico was realized the qualities characterization of the series X-rays RQR reported in the International Code of Practices in Dosimetry and Diagnostic Radiology No. 457, using attenuator filters of high purity aluminum and ionizing radiation equipment of inherent filtration of 4 mm Be with and emergent X-radiation beam of 40 grades. For the attenuation was used a geometric arrangement with three beam limiters and a monitor camera prepared on the established form in the mentioned technical report, and a spherical ionization chamber with collection volume of 3.6 cm{sup 3}, aligning its geometric center with the focus of X-rays tube to get that the incident radiation direction will be perpendicular to the ionization chamber. From the perspective of the radiological protection is important to know the X-radiation quality for the application dedicated to the instruments calibration and can to give to these the traceability to a reference laboratory, this way the quality combination and reference chamber can give as a result a procedure for the evaluation of the entrance in surface dose to estimate the dose orientate levels, specified in the basic standards of safety. (Author)

  7. Astrometric calibration of the Xuyi Schmidt Telescope Photometric Survey of the Galactic Anti-center (XSTPS-GAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui-Hua; Liu, Xiao-Wei; Yuan, Hai-Bo; Zhao, Hai-Bin; Yao, Jin-Sheng; Zhang, Hua-Wei; Xiang, Mao-Sheng; Huang, Yang

    2014-04-01

    We present astrometric calibration of the Xuyi Schmidt Telescope Photometric Survey of the Galactic Anti-center (XSTPS-GAC). XSTPS-GAC is the photometric part of the Digital Sky Survey of the Galactic Anti-center (DSS-GAC), which is a photometric and spectroscopic sky survey, in combination with LAMOST. In order to select an astrometric reference catalog, we made comparisons between the four widely used astrometric catalogs, GSC2.3, USNO-B1.0, UCAC3 and PPMXL. PPMXL shows relatively small systematic errors in positions and more homogeneous proper motion distributions toward the Galactic Anti-center (GAC), and was selected as the reference catalog. Based on the high quality and bright reference stars that were picked out from PPMXL, we performed a 4th-order polynomial fitting in image units, to construct the transformation relation between coordinates used by XSTPS-GAC and standard coordinates, and to simultaneously correct the image distortions in the CCD. Then we applied the derived relation to all sources to obtain their mean celestial coordinates based on the International Celestial Reference System. For bright point sources with r errors being less than 10 mas. But for the faint sources at the brightness limit of the survey, which was r ~ 19.0 mag, the accuracy can still reach 200 mas. After combining all observations, the final weighted average coordinates could reach an accuracy of less than 70 mas for bright stars. For faint stars, the rms residuals of weighted coordinates decrease to ~ 110 mas. The final combined XSTPS-GAC coordinates show a good consistency with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey.

  8. TIMASSS: The IRAS16293-2422 Millimeter And Submillimeter Spectral Survey. I. Observations, calibration and analysis of the line kinematics

    CERN Document Server

    Caux, E; Castets, A; Coutens, A; Ceccarelli, C; Bacmann, A; Bisshop, S; Bottinelli, S; Comito, C; Helmich, F P; Lefloch, B; Parise, B; Schilke, P; Tielens, A G G M; van Dishoeck, E; Vastel, C; Wakelam, V; Walters, A

    2011-01-01

    While unbiased surveys observable from ground-based telescopes have previously been obtained towards several high mass protostars, very little exists on low mass protostars. To fill up this gap, we carried out a complete spectral survey of the bands at 3, 2, 1 and 0.8 mm towards the solar type protostar IRAS16293-2422. The observations covered about 200\\,GHz and were obtained with the IRAM-30m and JCMT-15m telescopes. Particular attention was devoted to the inter-calibration of the obtained spectra with previous observations. All the lines detected with more than 3 sigma and free from obvious blending effects were fitted with Gaussians to estimate their basic kinematic properties. More than 4000 lines were detected (with sigma \\geq 3) and identified, yielding a line density of approximatively 20 lines per GHz, comparable to previous surveys in massive hot cores. The vast majority (~2/3) of the lines are weak and due to complex organic molecules. The analysis of the profiles of more than 1000 lines belonging 7...

  9. IOT Overview: IR Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, E.

    In this instrument review chapter the calibration plans of ESO IR instruments are presented and briefly reviewed focusing, in particular, on the case of ISAAC, which has been the first IR instrument at VLT and whose calibration plan served as prototype for the coming instruments.

  10. A frailty instrument for primary care: findings from the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE).

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Romero-Ortuno, Roman

    2010-01-01

    A frailty paradigm would be useful in primary care to identify older people at risk, but appropriate metrics at that level are lacking. We created and validated a simple instrument for frailty screening in Europeans aged ≥50. Our study is based on the first wave of the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE, http:\\/\\/www.share-project.org), a large population-based survey conducted in 2004-2005 in twelve European countries.

  11. Fourteen Years of the Hubble Space Telescope's Advanced Camera for Surveys : Calibration Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grogin, Norman A.; HST Advanced CameraSurveys Instrument Team

    2016-06-01

    The Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) has been a workhorse HST imager for over fourteen years, subsequent to its Servicing Mission 3B installation in 2002. The once defunct ACS Wide Field Channel (WFC) has now been operating considerably longer (>7yrs) since its Servicing Mission 4 repair than it had originally operated (SBC point spread function and long-term SBC flatfield stability.

  12. Satellite Instrument Calibration for Measuring Global Climate Change. Report of a Workshop at the University of Maryland Inn and Conference Center, College Park, MD. , November 12-14, 2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohring, G.; Wielicki, B.; Spencer, R.; Emery, B.; Datla, R.

    2004-01-01

    Measuring the small changes associated with long-term global climate change from space is a daunting task. To address these problems and recommend directions for improvements in satellite instrument calibration some 75 scientists, including researchers who develop and analyze long-term data sets from satellites, experts in the field of satellite instrument calibration, and physicists working on state of the art calibration sources and standards met November 12 - 14, 2002 and discussed the issues. The workshop defined the absolute accuracies and long-term stabilities of global climate data sets that are needed to detect expected trends, translated these data set accuracies and stabilities to required satellite instrument accuracies and stabilities, and evaluated the ability of current observing systems to meet these requirements. The workshop's recommendations include a set of basic axioms or overarching principles that must guide high quality climate observations in general, and a roadmap for improving satellite instrument characterization, calibration, inter-calibration, and associated activities to meet the challenge of measuring global climate change. It is also recommended that a follow-up workshop be conducted to discuss implementation of the roadmap developed at this workshop.

  13. Satellite Instrument Calibration for Measuring Global Climate Change. Report of a Workshop at the University of Maryland Inn and Conference Center, College Park, MD. , November 12-14, 2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohring, G.; Wielicki, B.; Spencer, R.; Emery, B.; Datla, R.

    2004-01-01

    Measuring the small changes associated with long-term global climate change from space is a daunting task. To address these problems and recommend directions for improvements in satellite instrument calibration some 75 scientists, including researchers who develop and analyze long-term data sets from satellites, experts in the field of satellite instrument calibration, and physicists working on state of the art calibration sources and standards met November 12 - 14, 2002 and discussed the issues. The workshop defined the absolute accuracies and long-term stabilities of global climate data sets that are needed to detect expected trends, translated these data set accuracies and stabilities to required satellite instrument accuracies and stabilities, and evaluated the ability of current observing systems to meet these requirements. The workshop's recommendations include a set of basic axioms or overarching principles that must guide high quality climate observations in general, and a roadmap for improving satellite instrument characterization, calibration, inter-calibration, and associated activities to meet the challenge of measuring global climate change. It is also recommended that a follow-up workshop be conducted to discuss implementation of the roadmap developed at this workshop.

  14. The calibration of PIXIE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fixsen, D. J.; Chuss, D. T.; Kogut, Alan; Mirel, Paul; Wollack, E. J.

    2016-07-01

    The FIRAS instrument demonstrated the use of an external calibrator to compare the sky to an instrumented blackbody. The PIXIE calibrator is improved from -35 dB to -65 dB. Another significant improvement is the ability to insert the calibrator into either input of the FTS. This allows detection and correction of additional errors, reduces the effective calibration noise by a factor of 2, eliminates an entire class of systematics and allows continuous observations. This paper presents the design and use of the PIXIE calibrator.

  15. Economic instruments for obesity prevention: results of a scoping review and modified delphi survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LaFrance Jeffrey

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comprehensive, multi-level approaches are required to address obesity. One important target for intervention is the economic domain. The purpose of this study was to synthesize existing evidence regarding the impact of economic policies targeting obesity and its causal behaviours (diet, physical activity, and to make specific recommendations for the Canadian context. Methods Arksey and O'Malley's (2005 methodological framework for conducting scoping reviews was adopted for this study and this consisted of two phases: 1 a structured literature search and review, and 2 consultation with experts in the research field through a Delphi survey and an in-person expert panel meeting in April 2010. Results Two key findings from the scoping review included 1 consistent evidence that weight outcomes are responsive to food and beverage prices. The debate on the use of food taxes and subsidies to address obesity should now shift to how best to address practical issues in designing such policies; and 2 very few studies have examined the impact of economic instruments to promote physical activity and clear policy recommendations cannot be made at this time. Delphi survey findings emphasised the relatively modest impact any specific economic instrument would have on obesity independently. Based on empirical evidence and expert opinion, three recommendations were supported. First, to create and implement an effective health filter to review new and current agricultural polices to reduce the possibility that such policies have a deleterious impact on population rates of obesity. Second, to implement a caloric sweetened beverage tax. Third, to examine how to implement fruit and vegetable subsidies targeted at children and low income households. Conclusions In terms of economic interventions, shifting from empirical evidence to policy recommendation remains challenging. Overall, the evidence is not sufficiently strong to provide clear policy

  16. Weak-lensing Mass Calibration of RedMaPPer Galaxy Clusters in Dark Energy Survey Science Verification Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melchior, P.; et al.

    2016-10-21

    We use weak-lensing shear measurements to determine the mean mass of optically selected galaxy clusters in Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data. In a blinded analysis, we split the sample of more than 8,000 redMaPPer clusters into 15 subsets, spanning ranges in the richness parameter $5 \\leq \\lambda \\leq 180$ and redshift $0.2 \\leq z \\leq 0.8$, and fit the averaged mass density contrast profiles with a model that accounts for seven distinct sources of systematic uncertainty: shear measurement and photometric redshift errors; cluster-member contamination; miscentering; deviations from the NFW halo profile; halo triaxiality; and line-of-sight projections. We combine the inferred cluster masses to estimate the joint scaling relation between mass, richness and redshift, $\\mathcal{M}(\\lambda,z) \\varpropto M_0 \\lambda^{F} (1+z)^{G}$. We find $M_0 \\equiv \\langle M_{200\\mathrm{m}}\\,|\\,\\lambda=30,z=0.5\\rangle=\\left[ 2.35 \\pm 0.22\\ \\rm{(stat)} \\pm 0.12\\ \\rm{(sys)} \\right] \\cdot 10^{14}\\ M_\\odot$, with $F = 1.12\\,\\pm\\,0.20\\ \\rm{(stat)}\\, \\pm\\, 0.06\\ \\rm{(sys)}$ and $G = 0.18\\,\\pm\\, 0.75\\ \\rm{(stat)}\\, \\pm\\, 0.24\\ \\rm{(sys)}$. The amplitude of the mass-richness relation is in excellent agreement with the weak-lensing calibration of redMaPPer clusters in SDSS by Simet et al. (2016) and with the Saro et al. (2015) calibration based on abundance matching of SPT-detected clusters. Our results extend the redshift range over which the mass-richness relation of redMaPPer clusters has been calibrated with weak lensing from $z\\leq 0.3$ to $z\\leq0.8$. Calibration uncertainties of shear measurements and photometric redshift estimates dominate our systematic error budget and require substantial improvements for forthcoming studies.

  17. Ergonomics and design of laparoscopic instruments: results of a survey among laparoscopic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Veelen, M A; Meijer, D W

    1999-12-01

    This study determined which types of laparoscopic instruments are most often used in Europe, why they are being used, and what problems exist while using the instruments. The handles were also evaluated according to ergonomic design criteria. A questionnaire was send to 62 experienced surgeons in 19 countries. The laparoscopic instruments were divided into four groups: instruments with similar functionality and handgrip model were grouped together. Eight questions were asked for every group about the type of instrument (disposable, reusable, or semireusable), the type of handle, the reason for using a specific instrument, and the experience of discomfort while using the instrument. The handles of the instruments of the group that were associated with the greatest discomfort were ergonomically evaluated on eight aspects (dimensions, angles, and control). Half of the questionnaires were returned. In every group, about 80% of the instruments the surgeons employed were reusable. The chief reason for using a specific type was the good cost-quality of the product and satisfying experiences with other products of the brand. The discomfort was pressure on thumb and fingers (scissors handle) and fixating the tip (ratchet). The handle of the instruments that causes the most discomfort met only three of the eight ergonomic requirements. Most of the laparoscopic instruments employed by surgeons in Europe are reusable. A significant number of the instruments cause discomfort. These instruments do not meet standard ergonomic requirements.

  18. Avionics Instrument Systems Specialist Career Ladder: AFSCs 32531, 32551, 31571, and 32591. Occupational Survey Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Air Force Occupational Measurement Center, Lackland AFB, TX.

    The Avionics Instrument Systems career ladder (AFSC 325X1) provides flight line and shop maintenance training on aircraft instrument systems, electromechancial instruments, components, and test equipment. Duties involve inspecting, removing, installing, repairing, operating, troubleshooting, overhauling, and modifying systems such as flight and…

  19. GASS: The Parkes Galactic All-Sky Survey. Update: improved correction for instrumental effects and new data release

    CERN Document Server

    Kalberla, Peter M W

    2015-01-01

    The Galactic All-Sky Survey is a survey of Galactic atomic hydrogen emission in the southern sky observed with the Parkes 64-m Radio Telescope. The first data release (GASS I) concerned survey goals and observing techniques, the second release (GASS II) focused on stray radiation and instrumental corrections. We seek to remove the remaining instrumental effects and present a third data release. We use the HEALPix tessellation concept to grid the data on the sphere. Individual telescope records are compared with averages on the nearest grid position for significant deviations. All averages are also decomposed into Gaussian components with the aim of segregating unacceptable solutions. Improved priors are used for an iterative baseline fitting and cleaning. In the last step we generate 3-D FITS data cubes and examine them for remaining problems. We have removed weak, but systematic baseline offsets with an improved baseline fitting algorithm. We have unraveled correlator failures that cause time dependent oscil...

  20. Development and measurement properties of the Orthotics and Prosthetics Users' Survey (OPUS): a comprehensive set of clinical outcome instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, A W; Bode, R K; O'Reilly, C

    2003-12-01

    The need to measure and evaluate orthotics and prosthetics (O&P) practice has received growing recognition in the past several years. Reliable and valid self-report instruments are needed that can help facilities evaluate patient outcomes. The objective of this project was to develop a set of self-report instruments that assess functional status, quality of life, and satisfaction with devices and services that can be used in an orthotics and prosthetics clinic. Selecting items from a variety of existing instruments, the authors developed and revised four instruments that differentiate patients with varying levels of lower limb function, quality of life, and satisfaction with devices and services. Evidence of construct validity is provided by hierarchies of item difficulty that are consistent with clinical experience. For example, with the lower limb function instrument, running one block was much more difficult than walking indoors. The instruments demonstrate adequate internal consistency (0.88 for lower limb function, 0.88 for quality of life, 0.74 for service satisfaction, 0.78 for device satisfaction). The next steps in their research programme are to evaluate sensitivity and construct validity. The Orthotics and Prosthetics Users' Survey (OPUS) is a promising self-report instrument which may, with further development, allow orthotic and prosthetic practitioners to evaluate the quality and effectiveness of their services as required by accreditation standards such as those of the American Board for Certification in Orthotics and Prosthetics that mandate quality assessment.

  1. Calibración de acelerómetros piezoeléctricos empleando un instrumento virtual. // Calibration Of piezoelectric accelerometers by using a virtual instrument.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Cabrera Gómez

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available La medición de los niveles de vibraciones en maquinarias y estructuras requiere el empleo de una instrumentaciónadecuada, dentro de la cual tiene un inobjetable protagonismo el captador utilizado como elemento sensor primario. Estohace que la calidad de la medición esté significativamente vinculada a la dependencia de la relación de la magnitud a mediry la señal eléctrica producida por el propio captador, así como el comportamiento de éste ante el contenido de frecuenciasde la vibración. El presente trabajo muestra la implementación automatizada, a través del análisis FFT, de un procedimientopara la calibración de acelerómetros piezoeléctricos a partir de suministrarle a éstos una excitación de tipo aleatoria.Palabras claves: Calibración de acelerómetros, medición de vibraciones, respuesta de frecuencias,sensibilidad.____________________________________________________________________SummaryVibration level measurements in machineries and structures require an appropriate instrumentation, being veryimportant the transducer used as primary sensor element. The quality of the measurement is significantly linked to thedependence of the relationship between the magnitude to measure and the electric output produced by the transducer, aswell as the behaviour of this device to the content of frequencies of the vibration. The pres ent work shows the automatedimplementation, through the FFT analysis, of a procedure in order to calibrate piezoelectric accelerometers submittingthem to random excitation forces.Key words: calibration of accelerometers, vibration measurements, frequency response, sensitivity

  2. Pre-flight calibration and initial data processing for the ChemCam laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory rover

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiens, R.C., E-mail: rwiens@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States); Maurice, S.; Lasue, J.; Forni, O. [Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planetologie, Toulouse (France); Anderson, R.B. [United States Geological Survey, Flagstaff, AZ (United States); Clegg, S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States); Bender, S. [Planetary Science Institute, Tucson, AZ (United States); Blaney, D. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA (United States); Barraclough, B.L. [Planetary Science Institute, Tucson, AZ (United States); Cousin, A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States); Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planetologie, Toulouse (France); Deflores, L. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA (United States); Delapp, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States); Dyar, M.D. [Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley, MA (United States); Fabre, C. [Georessources, Nancy (France); Gasnault, O. [Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planetologie, Toulouse (France); Lanza, N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States); Mazoyer, J. [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, Meudon (France); Melikechi, N. [Delaware State University, Dover, DE (United States); Meslin, P.-Y. [Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planetologie, Toulouse (France); Newsom, H. [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); and others

    2013-04-01

    The ChemCam instrument package on the Mars Science Laboratory rover, Curiosity, is the first planetary science instrument to employ laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to determine the compositions of geological samples on another planet. Pre-processing of the spectra involves subtracting the ambient light background, removing noise, removing the electron continuum, calibrating for the wavelength, correcting for the variable distance to the target, and applying a wavelength-dependent correction for the instrument response. Further processing of the data uses multivariate and univariate comparisons with a LIBS spectral library developed prior to launch as well as comparisons with several on-board standards post-landing. The level-2 data products include semi-quantitative abundances derived from partial least squares regression. A LIBS spectral library was developed using 69 rock standards in the form of pressed powder disks, glasses, and ceramics to minimize heterogeneity on the scale of the observation (350–550 μm dia.). The standards covered typical compositional ranges of igneous materials and also included sulfates, carbonates, and phyllosilicates. The provenance and elemental and mineralogical compositions of these standards are described. Spectral characteristics of this data set are presented, including the size distribution and integrated irradiances of the plasmas, and a proxy for plasma temperature as a function of distance from the instrument. Two laboratory-based clones of ChemCam reside in Los Alamos and Toulouse for the purpose of adding new spectra to the database as the need arises. Sensitivity to differences in wavelength correlation to spectral channels and spectral resolution has been investigated, indicating that spectral registration needs to be within half a pixel and resolution needs to match within 1.5 to 2.6 pixels. Absolute errors are tabulated for derived compositions of each major element in each standard using PLS regression

  3. Design and Calibration of a Raman Spectrometer for use in a Laser Spectroscopy Instrument Intended to Analyze Martian Surface and Atmospheric Characteristics for NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, John F.; Hornef, James

    2016-01-01

    This project's goal is the design of a Raman spectroscopy instrument to be utilized by NASA in an integrated spectroscopy strategy that will include Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and Laser-Induced Florescence Spectroscopy (LIFS) for molecule and element identification on Mars Europa, and various asteroids. The instrument is to be down scaled from a dedicated rover mounted instrument into a compact unit with the same capabilities and accuracy as the larger instrument. The focus for this design is a spectrometer that utilizes Raman spectroscopy. The spectrometer has a calculated range of 218 nm wavelength spectrum with a resolution of 1.23 nm. To filter out the laser source wavelength of 532 nm the spectrometer design utilizes a 532 nm wavelength dichroic mirror and a 532 nm wavelength notch filter. The remaining scatter signal is concentrated by a 20 x microscopic objective through a 25-micron vertical slit into a 5mm diameter, 1cm focal length double concave focusing lens. The light is then diffracted by a 1600 Lines per Millimeter (L/mm) dual holographic transmission grating. This spectrum signal is captured by a 1-inch diameter double convex 3 cm focal length capture lens. An Intensified Charge Couple Device (ICCD) is placed within the initial focal cone of the capture lens and the Raman signal captured is to be analyzed through spectroscopy imaging software. This combination allows for accurate Raman spectroscopy to be achieved. The components for the spectrometer have been bench tested in a series of prototype developments based on theoretical calculations, alignment, and scaling strategies. The mounting platform is 2.5 cm wide by 8.8 cm long by 7 cm height. This platform has been tested and calibrated with various sources such as a neon light source and ruby crystal. This platform is intended to be enclosed in a ruggedized enclosure for mounting on a rover platform. The size and functionality of the Raman spectrometer allows for the rover to

  4. New Instruments for Survey: on Line Softwares for 3d Recontruction from Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fratus de Balestrini, E.; Guerra, F.

    2011-09-01

    3d scanning technologies had a significant development and have been widely used in documentation of cultural, architectural and archeological heritages. Modern methods of three-dimensional acquiring and modeling allow to represent an object through a digital model that combines visual potentialities of images (normally used for documentation) to the accuracy of the survey, becoming at the same time support for the visualization that for metric evaluation of any artefact that have an historical or artistic interest, opening up new possibilities for cultural heritage's fruition, cataloging and study. Despite this development, because of the small catchment area and the 3D laser scanner's sophisticated technologies, the cost of these instruments is very high and beyond the reach of most operators in the field of cultural heritages. This is the reason why they have appeared low-cost technologies or even free, allowing anyone to approach the issues of acquisition and 3D modeling, providing tools that allow to create three-dimensional models in a simple and economical way. The research, conducted by the Laboratory of Photogrammetry of the University IUAV of Venice, of which we present here some results, is intended to figure out whether, with Arc3D, it is possible to obtain results that can be somehow comparable, in therms of overall quality, to those of the laser scanner, and/or whether it is possible to integrate them. They were carried out a series of tests on certain types of objects, models made with Arc3D, from raster images, were compared with those obtained using the point clouds from laser scanner. We have also analyzed the conditions for an optimal use of Arc3D: environmental conditions (lighting), acquisition tools (digital cameras) and type and size of objects. After performing the tests described above, we analyzed the patterns generated by Arc3D to check what other graphic representations can be obtained from them: orthophotos and drawings. The research

  5. NEW INSTRUMENTS FOR SURVEY: ON LINE SOFTWARES FOR 3D RECONTRUCTION FROM IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Fratus de Balestrini

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available 3d scanning technologies had a significant development and have been widely used in documentation of cultural, architectural and archeological heritages. Modern methods of three-dimensional acquiring and modeling allow to represent an object through a digital model that combines visual potentialities of images (normally used for documentation to the accuracy of the survey, becoming at the same time support for the visualization that for metric evaluation of any artefact that have an historical or artistic interest, opening up new possibilities for cultural heritage's fruition, cataloging and study. Despite this development, because of the small catchment area and the 3D laser scanner's sophisticated technologies, the cost of these instruments is very high and beyond the reach of most operators in the field of cultural heritages. This is the reason why they have appeared low-cost technologies or even free, allowing anyone to approach the issues of acquisition and 3D modeling, providing tools that allow to create three-dimensional models in a simple and economical way. The research, conducted by the Laboratory of Photogrammetry of the University IUAV of Venice, of which we present here some results, is intended to figure out whether, with Arc3D, it is possible to obtain results that can be somehow comparable, in therms of overall quality, to those of the laser scanner, and/or whether it is possible to integrate them. They were carried out a series of tests on certain types of objects, models made with Arc3D, from raster images, were compared with those obtained using the point clouds from laser scanner. We have also analyzed the conditions for an optimal use of Arc3D: environmental conditions (lighting, acquisition tools (digital cameras and type and size of objects. After performing the tests described above, we analyzed the patterns generated by Arc3D to check what other graphic representations can be obtained from them: orthophotos and drawings

  6. Understanding nature's particle accelerators using high energy gamma-ray survey instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeysekara, Anushka Udara

    Nature's particle accelerators, such as Pulsars, Pulsar Wind Nebulae, Active Galactic Nuclei and Supernova Remnants accelerate charged particles to very high energies that then produce high energy photons. The particle acceleration mechanisms and the high energy photon emission mechanisms are poorly understood phenomena. These mechanisms can be understood either by studying individual sources in detail or, alternatively, using the collective properties of a sample of sources. Recent development of GeV survey instruments, such as Fermi-LAT, and TeV survey instruments, such as Milagro, provides a large sample of high energy gamma-ray flux measurements from galactic and extra-galactic sources. In this thesis I provide constraints on GeV and TeV radiation mechanisms using the X-ray-TeV correlations and GeV-TeV correlations. My data sample was obtained from three targeted searches for extragalactic sources and two targeted search for galactic sources, using the existing Milagro sky maps. The first extragalactic candidate list consists of Fermi-LAT GeV extragalactic sources, and the second extragalactic candidate list consists of TeVCat extragalactic sources that have been detected by Imaging Atmospheric Cerenkov Telescopes (IACTs). In both extragalactic candidate lists Markarian 421 was the only source detected by Milagro. A comparison between the Markarian 421 time-averaged flux, measured by Milagro, and the flux measurements of transient states, measured by IACTs, is discussed. The third extragalactic candidate list is a list of potential TeV emitting BL Lac candidates that was synthesized using X-ray observations of BL Lac objects and a Synchrotron Self-Compton model. Milagro's sensitivity was not sufficient to detect any of those candidates. However, the 95% confidence flux upper limits of those sources were above the predicted flux. Therefore, these results provide evidence to conclude that the Synchrotron Self-Compton model for BL Lac objects is still a viable

  7. Inherent calibration of a novel LED-CE-DOAS instrument to measure iodine oxide, glyoxal, methyl glyoxal, nitrogen dioxide, water vapour and aerosol extinction in open cavity mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalman, R.; Volkamer, R.

    2010-06-01

    The combination of Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy (CEAS) with broad-band light sources (e.g. Light-Emitting Diodes, LEDs) lends itself to the application of cavity enhanced Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CE-DOAS) to perform sensitive and selective point measurements of multiple trace gases and aerosol extinction with a single instrument. In contrast to other broad-band CEAS techniques, CE-DOAS relies only on the measurement of relative intensity changes, i.e. does not require knowledge of the light intensity in the absence of trace gases and aerosols (I0). We have built a prototype LED-CE-DOAS instrument in the blue spectral range (420-490 nm) to measure nitrogen dioxide (NO2), glyoxal (CHOCHO), methyl glyoxal (CH3COCHO), iodine oxide (IO), water vapour (H2O) and oxygen dimers (O4). We demonstrate the first CEAS detection of methyl glyoxal, and the first CE-DOAS detection of CHOCHO and IO. A further innovation consists in the measurement of extinction losses from the cavity, e.g. due to aerosols, at two wavelengths by observing O4 (477 nm) and H2O (443 nm) and measuring the pressure, relative humidity and temperature independently. This approach is demonstrated by experiments where laboratory aerosols of known size and refractive index were generated and their extinction measured. The measured extinctions were then compared to the theoretical extinctions calculated using Mie theory (3-7×10-7 cm-1). Excellent agreement is found from both the O4 and H2O retrievals. This enables the first inherently calibrated CEAS measurement in open cavity mode (mirrors facing the open atmosphere), and eliminates the need for sampling lines to supply air to the cavity, and/or keep the cavity enclosed and aerosol free. Measurements in open cavity mode are demonstrated for CHOCHO, CH3COCHO, NO2, H2O and aerosol extinction at 477 nm and 443 nm. Our prototype LED-CE-DOAS provides a low cost, yet research grade innovative instrument for applications in simulation

  8. Inherent calibration of a novel LED-CE-DOAS instrument to measure iodine oxide, glyoxal, methyl glyoxal, nitrogen dioxide, water vapour and aerosol extinction in open cavity mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Thalman

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The combination of Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy (CEAS with broad-band light sources (e.g. Light-Emitting Diodes, LEDs lends itself to the application of cavity enhanced Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CE-DOAS to perform sensitive and selective point measurements of multiple trace gases and aerosol extinction with a single instrument. In contrast to other broad-band CEAS techniques, CE-DOAS relies only on the measurement of relative intensity changes, i.e. does not require knowledge of the light intensity in the absence of trace gases and aerosols (I0. We have built a prototype LED-CE-DOAS instrument in the blue spectral range (420–490 nm to measure nitrogen dioxide (NO2, glyoxal (CHOCHO, methyl glyoxal (CH3COCHO, iodine oxide (IO, water vapour (H2O and oxygen dimers (O4. We demonstrate the first CEAS detection of methyl glyoxal, and the first CE-DOAS detection of CHOCHO and IO. A further innovation consists in the measurement of extinction losses from the cavity, e.g. due to aerosols, at two wavelengths by observing O4 (477 nm and H2O (443 nm and measuring the pressure, relative humidity and temperature independently. This approach is demonstrated by experiments where laboratory aerosols of known size and refractive index were generated and their extinction measured. The measured extinctions were then compared to the theoretical extinctions calculated using Mie theory (3–7×10-7 cm-1. Excellent agreement is found from both the O4 and H2O retrievals. This enables the first inherently calibrated CEAS measurement in open cavity mode (mirrors facing the open atmosphere, and eliminates the need for sampling lines to supply air to the cavity, and/or keep the cavity enclosed and aerosol free. Measurements in open cavity mode are demonstrated for CHOCHO, CH3COCHO, NO2, H2

  9. Development and Validation of an Instrument for Assessing Climate Change Knowledge and Perceptions: The Climate Stewardship Survey (CSS)

    OpenAIRE

    Scott L. WALKER; McNeal, Karen S

    2013-01-01

    The Climate Stewardship Survey (CSS) was developed to measure knowledge and perceptions of global climate change, while also considering information sources that respondents ‘trust.’ The CSS was drafted using a three-stage approach: development of salient scales, writing individual items, and field testing and analyses. Construct validity and alpha-level reliability was conducted on the 122-item test instrument to produce a refined 84-item CSS.  The field tested C...

  10. Temperature performance of portable radiation survey instruments used for environmental monitoring and clean-up activities in Fukushima

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saegusa, Jun; Yanagisawa, Kayo; Hasumi, Atsushi; Shimizu, Takenori; Uchita, Yoshiaki

    2017-08-01

    Following the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident in March 2011, extensive radiation monitoring and environmental clean-up activities have been conducted throughout the Fukushima region. Outside air temperatures there reach 40 °C in summer and -20 °C in winter, which are beyond the quoted operational range of many radiation survey instruments. Herein, temperature performance of four types of portable Japanese radiation survey instruments widely used in Fukushima was experimentally investigated using a temperature-controlled chamber. They included two ionization chamber type instruments, Fuji NHA1 and Aloka ICS-323C, and two NaI(Tl) scintillation type ones, Fuji NHC7 and Aloka TCS-172B. Experimental results showed significantly diverse characteristics on the temperature dependences from one type of instrument to another. For example, NHA1 overestimated the ambient dose-equivalent rate by as much as 17% at -30 °C and 10% at 40 °C, whereas the TCS-172B readings underestimated the rate by 30% at -30 °C and 7% at 40 °C.

  11. Laboratory for Calibration of Gamma Radiation Measurement Instruments (LabCal) of Institute of Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defense (IDQBRN) from Brazilian Army Technology Center (CTEx); Laboratorio de Calibracao de Instrumentode Medicao de Radiacao Gama (LabCal) do IDQBRN do CTEx

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amorim, Aneuri de; Balthar, Mario Cesar V.; Santos, Avelino; Vilela, Paulo Ricardo T. de; Oliveira, Luciano Santa Rita; Penha, Paulo Eduardo C. de Oliveira; Gonzaga, Roberto Neves; Andrade, Edson Ramos de; Oliveira, Celio Jorge Vasques de; Fagundes, Luiz Cesar S., E-mail: aneurideamorim@gmail.com [Centro Tecnologico do Exercito (DQBRN/CTEx), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Defesa Quimica, Biologica, Radiologica e Nuclear

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes the calibration laboratory deployment steps (LABCAL) gamma ionizing radiation measuring instruments in the Army Technology Center, CTEx. Initially the calibration of radiation monitors will be held in the dosimetric quantity air kerma and operational quantity ambient dose equivalent H*(d). The LABCAL / CTEx has not yet authorized by CASEC / CNEN. This laboratory aims to calibrate the ionizing radiation instruments used by the Brazilian Army. (author)

  12. Program Evaluation Using the Project Dakota Parent Satisfaction Survey. A Manual for Administration and Interpretation of Findings Using a Validated Instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovach, JoAnne; Jacks, Robert

    This manual presents an instrument (the Dakota Parent Satisfaction Survey) and procedures for evaluating parent satisfaction with early intervention programs. The survey procedures have been used to evaluate seven early intervention programs each year since 1985. Development of the Survey is discussed, including the identification of program…

  13. Revised landsat-5 thematic mapper radiometric calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chander, G.; Markham, B.L.; Barsi, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    Effective April 2, 2007, the radiometric calibration of Landsat-5 (L5) Thematic Mapper (TM) data that are processed and distributed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Center for Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) will be updated. The lifetime gain model that was implemented on May 5, 2003, for the reflective bands (1-5, 7) will be replaced by a new lifetime radiometric-calibration curve that is derived from the instrument's response to pseudoinvariant desert sites and from cross calibration with the Landsat-7 (L7) Enhanced TM Plus (ETM+). Although this calibration update applies to all archived and future L5 TM data, the principal improvements in the calibration are for the data acquired during the first eight years of the mission (1984-1991), where the changes in the instrument-gain values are as much as 15%. The radiometric scaling coefficients for bands 1 and 2 for approximately the first eight years of the mission have also been changed. Users will need to apply these new coefficients to convert the calibrated data product digital numbers to radiance. The scaling coefficients for the other bands have not changed. ?? 2007 IEEE.

  14. Nutrition knowledge and Mediterranean diet adherence in the southeast United States: Validation of a field-based survey instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottcher, Mary Rose; Marincic, Patricia Z; Nahay, Katie L; Baerlocher, Brittany E; Willis, Amy W; Park, Jieun; Gaillard, Philippe; Greene, Michael W

    2017-04-01

    The Mediterranean diet (MD) can reduce chronic disease risk and is a recommended diet for prevention and management of diabetes. Adherence to the MD in the southeast United States where obesity and diabetes are highly prevalent is unknown. The purpose of the present study was to: 1) construct a survey instrument relevant to the general population integrating both MD related nutrition knowledge and adherence questions from previously validated instruments, and 2) assess MD related nutrition knowledge and adherence in a sample population in the southest United States. Adherance was assessed using the validated short MD Adherence Screener (MEDAS). A MD nutrition knowledge (MDNK) questionnaire was developed from previously validated general nutrition knowledge questionnaires and was validated using 127 university students enrolled in three courses with varying levels of nutrition education. Cronbach's α for internal validity of MDNK was acceptable for a short questionnaire (0.653). Test-retest reliability was established (r = 0.853). Field validation of the three-part survey instrument (MEDAS, MDNK and demographic questions) was subsequently performed in 230 adults shopping at supermarkets and farmers markets in eastern Alabama. Total MDNK and MEDAS scores were significantly higher in students with formal nutrition education and in patrons of farmers markets. Greater MD adherence, assessed by dividing MEDAS scores into thirds, was found with increasing formal nutrition education in university students (p = 0.002) and in farmers market participants (p < 0.001). There was a weak but significant association between MDNK and MEDAS scores within university students and participants in the field. Together, the MDNK-MEDAS survey instrument is an effective tool for assessing baseline knowledge and adherence and can be used to target nutritional interventions to improve MD adherence for prevention and management of diabetes and other chronic disease.

  15. Measuring children's self-reported sport participation, risk perception and injury history: development and validation of a survey instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siesmaa, Emma J; Blitvich, Jennifer D; White, Peta E; Finch, Caroline F

    2011-01-01

    Despite the health benefits associated with children's sport participation, the occurrence of injury in this context is common. The extent to which sport injuries impact children's ongoing involvement in sport is largely unknown. Surveys have been shown to be useful for collecting children's injury and sport participation data; however, there are currently no published instruments which investigate the impact of injury on children's sport participation. This study describes the processes undertaken to assess the validity of two survey instruments for collecting self-reported information about child cricket and netball related participation, injury history and injury risk perceptions, as well as the reliability of the cricket-specific version. Face and content validity were assessed through expert feedback from primary and secondary level teachers and from representatives of peak sporting bodies for cricket and netball. Test-retest reliability was measured using a sample of 59 child cricketers who completed the survey on two occasions, 3-4 weeks apart. Based on expert feedback relating to face and content validity, modification and/or deletion of some survey items was undertaken. Survey items with low test-retest reliability (κ≤0.40) were modified or deleted, items with moderate reliability (κ=0.41-0.60) were modified slightly and items with higher reliability (κ≥0.61) were retained, with some undergoing minor modifications. This is the first survey of its kind which has been successfully administered to cricketers aged 10-16 years to collect information about injury risk perceptions and intentions for continued sport participation. Implications for its generalisation to other child sport participants are discussed.

  16. Assessing the Learning Environment for Medical Students: An Evaluation of a Novel Survey Instrument in Four Medical Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pololi, Linda H; Evans, Arthur T; Nickell, Leslie; Reboli, Annette C; Coplit, Lisa D; Stuber, Margaret L; Vasiliou, Vasilia; Civian, Janet T; Brennan, Robert T

    2017-06-01

    A practical, reliable, and valid instrument is needed to measure the impact of the learning environment on medical students' well-being and educational experience and to meet medical school accreditation requirements. From 2012 to 2015, medical students were surveyed at the end of their first, second, and third year of studies at four medical schools. The survey assessed students' perceptions of the following nine dimensions of the school culture: vitality, self-efficacy, institutional support, relationships/inclusion, values alignment, ethical/moral distress, work-life integration, gender equity, and ethnic minority equity. The internal reliability of each of the nine dimensions was measured. Construct validity was evaluated by assessing relationships predicted by our conceptual model and prior research. Assessment was made of whether the measurements were sensitive to differences over time and across institutions. Six hundred and eighty-six students completed the survey (49 % women; 9 % underrepresented minorities), with a response rate of 89 % (range over the student cohorts 72-100 %). Internal consistency of each dimension was high (Cronbach's α 0.71-0.86). The instrument was able to detect significant differences in the learning environment across institutions and over time. Construct validity was supported by demonstrating several relationships predicted by our conceptual model. The C-Change Medical Student Survey is a practical, reliable, and valid instrument for assessing the learning environment of medical students. Because it is sensitive to changes over time and differences across institution, results could potentially be used to facilitate and monitor improvements in the learning environment of medical students.

  17. Handheld temperature calibrator

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Martella, Melanie

    2003-01-01

    ... you sign on. What are you waiting for? JOFRA ETC Series dry-block calibrators from AMETEK Test & Calibration Instruments, Largo, FL, are small enough to be handheld and feature easy-to-read displays, multiple bore blocks, programmable test setup, RS-232 communications, and software. Two versions are available: the ETC 125A that ranges from -10[degrees]C to 125[d...

  18. The Mathematics Attitudes and Perceptions Survey: an instrument to assess expert-like views and dispositions among undergraduate mathematics students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Code, Warren; Merchant, Sandra; Maciejewski, Wes; Thomas, Matthew; Lo, Joseph

    2016-08-01

    One goal of an undergraduate education in mathematics is to help students develop a productive disposition towards mathematics. A way of conceiving of this is as helping mathematical novices transition to more expert-like perceptions of mathematics. This conceptualization creates a need for a way to characterize students' perceptions of mathematics in authentic educational settings. This article presents a survey, the Mathematics Attitudes and Perceptions Survey (MAPS), designed to address this need. We present the development of the MAPS instrument and its validation on a large (N = 3411) set of student data. Results from various MAPS implementations corroborate results from analogous instruments in other STEM disciplines. We present these results and highlight some in particular: MAPS scores correlate with course grades; students tend to move away from expert-like orientations over a semester or year of taking a mathematics course; and interactive-engagement type lectures have less of a negative impact, but no positive impact, on students' overall orientations than traditional lecturing. We include the MAPS instrument in this article and suggest ways in which it may deepen our understanding of undergraduate mathematics education.

  19. System for calibration of instruments of x-ray measurement (CIR-X) applying the PGCS; Sistema para calibracion de instrumentos de medicion de rayos X (CIR-X) aplicando el PGCS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaytan G, E.; Rivero G, T.; Cruz E, P.; Tovar M, V.M.; Vergara M, F.J. [ININ, 52750 La Marquesa, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: egg@nuclear.inin.mx

    2007-07-01

    The Department of Metrology of Ionizing Radiations of the ININ carries out calibration of instruments for X-ray measurement that determine the operation parameters in X-ray diagnostic machines of the health and private sectors. To facilitate this task, the Department of Automation and Instrumentation developed a system for acquisition and signals processing coming from a reference voltage divider with traceability at NIST that is connected directly to the X-rays tube. The system is integrated by the X-ray unit, the X-ray measurement equipment Dynalizer IIIU of RADCAL, a data acquisition card, a personal computer and the acquisition software and signals processing. (Author)

  20. SNR 1E 0102.2-7219 as an X-ray calibration standard in the 0.5-1.0 keV bandpass and its application to the CCD instruments aboard Chandra, Suzaku, Swift and XMM-Newton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plucinsky, Paul P.; Beardmore, Andrew P.; Foster, Adam; Haberl, Frank; Miller, Eric D.; Pollock, Andrew M. T.; Sembay, Steve

    2017-01-01

    Context. The flight calibration of the spectral response of charge-coupled device (CCD) instruments below 1.5 keV is difficult in general because of the lack of strong lines in the on-board calibration sources typically available. This calibration is also a function of time due to the effects of radiation damage on the CCDs and/or the accumulation of a contamination layer on the filters or CCDs. Aims: We desire a simple comparison of the absolute effective areas of the current generation of CCD instruments onboard the following observatories: Chandra ACIS-S3, XMM-Newton (EPIC-MOS and EPIC-pn), Suzaku XIS, and Swift XRT and a straightforward comparison of the time-dependent response of these instruments across their respective mission lifetimes. Methods: We have been using 1E 0102.2-7219, the brightest supernova remnant in the Small Magellanic Cloud, to evaluate and modify the response models of these instruments. 1E 0102.2-7219 has strong lines of O, Ne, and Mg below 1.5 keV and little or no Fe emission to complicate the spectrum. The spectrum of 1E 0102.2-7219 has been well-characterized using the RGS gratings instrument on XMM-Newton and the HETG gratings instrument on Chandra. As part of the activities of the International Astronomical Consortium for High Energy Calibration (IACHEC), we have developed a standard spectral model for 1E 0102.2-7219 and fit this model to the spectra extracted from the CCD instruments. The model is empirical in that it includes Gaussians for the identified lines, an absorption component in the Galaxy, another absorption component in the SMC, and two thermal continuum components with different temperatures. In our fits, the model is highly constrained in that only the normalizations of the four brightest lines/line complexes (the O vii Heα triplet, O viii Lyα line, the Ne ix Heα triplet, and the Ne x Lyα line) and an overall normalization are allowed to vary, while all other components are fixed. We adopted this approach to

  1. Nearest Neighbor Averaging and its Effect on the Critical Level and Minimum Detectable Concentration for Scanning Radiological Survey Instruments that Perform Facility Release Surveys.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fournier, Sean Donovan; Beall, Patrick S; Miller, Mark L

    2014-08-01

    Through the SNL New Mexico Small Business Assistance (NMSBA) program, several Sandia engineers worked with the Environmental Restoration Group (ERG) Inc. to verify and validate a novel algorithm used to determine the scanning Critical Level (L c ) and Minimum Detectable Concentration (MDC) (or Minimum Detectable Areal Activity) for the 102F scanning system. Through the use of Monte Carlo statistical simulations the algorithm mathematically demonstrates accuracy in determining the L c and MDC when a nearest-neighbor averaging (NNA) technique was used. To empirically validate this approach, SNL prepared several spiked sources and ran a test with the ERG 102F instrument on a bare concrete floor known to have no radiological contamination other than background naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). The tests conclude that the NNA technique increases the sensitivity (decreases the L c and MDC) for high-density data maps that are obtained by scanning radiological survey instruments.

  2. Korean VLBI Network Calibrator Survey (KVNCS). 1. Source Catalog of KVN Single-dish Flux Density Measurement in the K and Q Bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong Ae; Sohn, Bong Won; Jung, Taehyun; Byun, Do-Young; Lee, Jee Won

    2017-02-01

    We present the catalog of the KVN Calibrator Survey (KVNCS). This first part of the KVNCS is a single-dish radio survey simultaneously conducted at 22 (K band) and 43 GHz (Q band) using the Korean VLBI Network (KVN) from 2009 to 2011. A total of 2045 sources are selected from the VLBA Calibrator Survey with an extrapolated flux density limit of 100 mJy at the K band. The KVNCS contains 1533 sources in the K band with a flux density limit of 70 mJy and 553 sources in the Q band with a flux density limit of 120 mJy; it covers the whole sky down to ‑32.°5 in decl. We detected 513 sources simultaneously in the K and Q bands; ∼76% of them are flat-spectrum sources (‑0.5 ≤ α ≤ 0.5). From the flux–flux relationship, we anticipated that most of the radiation of many of the sources comes from the compact components. The sources listed in the KVNCS therefore are strong candidates for high-frequency VLBI calibrators.

  3. Development and implantation of a control and data acquisition program for the calibration of instruments for diagnostic radiology; Desenvolvimento e implantacao de um programa de controle e aquisicao de dados na calibracao de instrumentos em radiodiagnostico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betti, Flavio

    2007-07-01

    Design techniques of an automatic control system implementing corrected kerma determination and shutter command in the calibration laboratory at IPEN are shown, as well as the periodic calibration program developed for a monitor chamber for several X-ray beam qualities used for diagnostic radiology and radiation protection instruments. Two reference electrometers, a multichannel secondary standard thermometer, and an absolute pressure barometer were connected to the Rs-232 interface from a PC computer equipped with a National Instruments multi function analog and digital I/O card. LabVIEW{sup MR} was chosen as programming tool, which allowed for the development of a suite of programs for both controlling the shutter timing cycles and the calibration of the monitor chamber against a reference standard. A detailed description of the methods used for troubleshooting, fine tuning of parameters and evaluation of program results is followed by an analysis showing that considerable advantages regarding reduction of time and precision improvements during the calibrations could be achieved by the use of the developed programs, particularly under adverse conditions like those found during short expositions, or instead during long irradiation intervals where fluctuation of parameters like kerma rate or room conditions (temperature or pressure) can be found. (author)

  4. Use of electronic microprocessor-based instrumentation by the U.S. geological survey for hydrologic data collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shope, William G.; ,

    1991-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey is acquiring a new generation of field computers and communications software to support hydrologic data-collection at field locations. The new computer hardware and software mark the beginning of the Survey's transition from the use of electromechanical devices and paper tapes to electronic microprocessor-based instrumentation. Software is being developed for these microprocessors to facilitate the collection, conversion, and entry of data into the Survey's National Water Information System. The new automated data-collection process features several microprocessor-controlled sensors connected to a serial digital multidrop line operated by an electronic data recorder. Data are acquired from the sensors in response to instructions programmed into the data recorder by the user through small portable lap-top or hand-held computers. The portable computers, called personal field computers, also are used to extract data from the electronic recorders for transport by courier to the office computers. The Survey's alternative to manual or courier retrieval is the use of microprocessor-based remote telemetry stations. Plans have been developed to enhance the Survey's use of the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite telemetry by replacing the present network of direct-readout ground stations with less expensive units. Plans also provide for computer software that will support other forms of telemetry such as telephone or land-based radio.

  5. Services of the CDRH X-ray calibration laboratory and their traceability to National Standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerra, F.; Heaton, H.T. [Center for Devices and Radiological Health, Rockville, MD (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The X-ray Calibration Laboratory (XCL) of the Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) provides calibration services for the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The instruments calibrated are used by FDA and contract state inspectors to verify compliance with federal x-ray performance standards and for national surveys of x-ray trends. In order to provide traceability of measurements, the CDRH XCL is accredited by the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP) for reference, diagnostic, and x-ray survey instrument calibrations. In addition to these accredited services, the CDRH XCL also calibrates non-invasive kVp meters in single- and three-phase x-ray beams, and thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) chips used to measure CT beam profiles. The poster illustrates these services and shows the traceability links back to the National Standards.

  6. A systematic survey instrument translation process for multi-country, comparative health workforce studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Squires, A.; Aiken, L.H.; Heede, K. Van den; Sermeus, W.; Bruyneel, L.; Lindqvist, R.; Schoonhoven, L.; Stromseng, I.; Busse, R.; Brzostek, T.; Ensio, A.; Moreno-Casbas, M.; Rafferty, A.M.; Schubert, M.; Zikos, D.; Matthews, A.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As health services research (HSR) expands across the globe, researchers will adopt health services and health worker evaluation instruments developed in one country for use in another. This paper explores the cross-cultural methodological challenges involved in translating HSR in the

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Gaia-ESO Survey iDR4 calibrators (Pancino+, 2017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancino, E.; Lardo, C.; Altavilla, G.; Marinoni, S.; Ragaini, S.; Cocozza, G.; Bellazzini, M.; Sabbi, E.; Zoccali, M.; Donati, P.; Heiter, U.; Koposov, S. E.; Blomme, R.; Morel, T.; Simon-Diaz, S.; Lobel, A.; Soubiran, C.; Montalban, J.; Valentini, M.; Casey, A. R.; Blanco-Cuaresma, S.; Jofre, P.; Worley, C. C.; Magrini, L.; Hourihane, A.; Francois, P.; Feltzing, S.; Gilmore, G.; Randich, S.; Asplund, M.; Bonifacio, P.; Drew, J. E.; Jeffries, R. D.; Micela, G.; Vallenari, A.; Alfaro, E. J.; Allende Prieto, C.; Babusiaux, C.; Bensby, T.; Bragaglia, A.; Flaccomio, E.; Hambly, N.; Korn, A. J.; Lanzafame, A. C.; Smiljanic, R.; van Eck, S.; Walton, N. A.; Bayo, A.; Carraro, G.; Costado, M. T.; Damiani, F.; Edvardsson, B.; Franciosini, E.; Frasca, A.; Lewis, J.; Monaco, L.; Morbidelli, L.; Prisinzano, L.; Sacco, G. G.; Sbordone, L.; Sousa, S. G.; Zaggia, S.; Koch, A.; Gaia-ESO Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    List of GES iDR4 calibrators. It can be used to select the iDR4 calibrators from the upcoming ESO Phase 3 public release. The columns contain: the GES unique identifier of each star (the CName), based on the object sexagesimal coordinates; the calibration type, which can be GC or OC for clusters, RV for radial velocity standards, BM for benchmark stars, or CR for CoRoT targets; the field name; and the 2MASS J and K magnitudes, when available. (1 data file).

  8. Measuring patient experiences with diabetes care in The Netherlands: the validity of a new survey instrument.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asbroek, G. ten; Delnoij, D.M.J.; Arah, O.A.; Sixma, H.; Koning, J.S. de; Rupp, I.; Poll, A.; Stam, P.J.A.; Schmidt, P.; Vriens, B.; Klazinga, N.S.

    2005-01-01

    Background: The introduction of market mechanisms in Dutch healthcare engages insurance companies in competition. Patient experience surveys are increasingly applied to generate performance information guiding consumers and insurers to choose and contract high performers, as well as holding them acc

  9. GASS: The Parkes Galactic All-Sky Survey. Update: improved correction for instrumental effects and new data release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalberla, P. M. W.; Haud, U.

    2015-06-01

    Context. The Galactic All-Sky Survey (GASS) is a survey of Galactic atomic hydrogen (H i) emission in the southern sky observed with the Parkes 64-m Radio Telescope. The first data release (GASS I) concerned survey goals and observing techniques, the second release (GASS II) focused on stray radiation and instrumental corrections. Aims: We seek to remove the remaining instrumental effects and present a third data release. Methods: We use the HEALPix tessellation concept to grid the data on the sphere. Individual telescope records are compared with averages on the nearest grid position for significant deviations. All averages are also decomposed into Gaussian components with the aim of segregating unacceptable solutions. Improved priors are used for an iterative baseline fitting and cleaning. In the last step we generate 3D FITS data cubes and examine them for remaining problems. Results: We have removed weak, but systematic baseline offsets with an improved baseline fitting algorithm. We have unraveled correlator failures that cause time dependent oscillations; errors cause stripes in the scanning direction. The remaining problems from radio frequency interference (RFI) are spotted. Classifying the severeness of instrumental errors for each individual telescope record (dump) allows us to exclude bad data from averages. We derive parameters that allow us to discard dumps without compromising the noise of the resulting data products too much. All steps are reiterated several times: in each case, we check the Gaussian parameters for remaining problems and inspect 3D FITS data cubes visually. We find that in total ~1.5% of the telescope dumps need to be discarded in addition to ~0.5% of the spectral channels that were excluded in GASS II. Conclusions: The new data release (GASS III) facilitates data products with improved quality. A new web interface, compatible with the previous version, is available for download of GASS III FITS cubes and spectra.

  10. Calibration of the SR4500 Time-Of Camera for Outdoor Mobile Surveying Applications: a Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinkelé, C.; Labbé, M.; Muzet, V.; Charbonnier, P.

    2016-06-01

    3D-cameras based on Time-of-Flight (ToF) technology have recently raised up to a commercial level of development. In this contribution, we investigate the outdoor calibration and measurement capabilities of the SR4500 ToF camera. The proposed calibration method combines up-to-date techniques with robust estimation. First, intrinsic camera parameters are estimated, which allows converting radial distances into orthogonal ones. The latter are then calibrated using successive acquisitions of a plane at different camera positions, measured by tacheometric techniques. This distance calibration step estimates two coefficient matrices for each pixel, using linear regression. Experimental assessments carried out with a 3D laser-cloud after converting all the data in a common basis show that the obtained precision is twice better than with the constructor default calibration, with a full-frame accuracy of about 4 cm. Moreover, estimating the internal calibration in sunny and warm outdoor conditions yields almost the same coefficients as indoors. Finally, a test shows the feasibility of dynamic outdoor acquisitions and measurements.

  11. Survey Instrument Development for Consumer Perception Testing to RTE Product in Convenience Store

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyah Lestari Widaningrum

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Global trade and the abolition of trade barriers lead to the proliferation of imported food products such as various types of fast food products (RTE: ready-to-eat food sold by convenience stores mainly scattered in Jakarta. The question is what causes consumers choose certain convenience store to buy RTE Product and not choose another outlet category. To understand consumer perceptions, it is necessary to develop an instrument for measuring consumer perceptions of the option to purchase RTE Product at convenience stores. Variables used in this research are the perception and knowledge of the public/consumers against food safety, store attributes, service, and product attributes. The instrument used in this study is a questionnaire with a scalemeasuring1-5 to see the relationship between variables, we used the method of Structural Equation Modeling (SEM. The sample used in this study was 223 respondents that were divided into five areas in Jakarta, namely Central Jakarta, West Jakarta, South Jakarta, East Jakarta, and North Jakarta. The final outcome of the instrument development process was 25 observed variables, consisting of 4 indicators, which valid and reliable, with T-values for each observed variable is above 2,58, and Construct Reliability values range between 0,76 to 0,853.

  12. Sandia WIPP calibration traceability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuhen, M.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dean, T.A. [RE/SPEC, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-05-01

    This report summarizes the work performed to establish calibration traceability for the instrumentation used by Sandia National Laboratories at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) during testing from 1980-1985. Identifying the calibration traceability is an important part of establishing a pedigree for the data and is part of the qualification of existing data. In general, the requirement states that the calibration of Measuring and Test equipment must have a valid relationship to nationally recognized standards or the basis for the calibration must be documented. Sandia recognized that just establishing calibration traceability would not necessarily mean that all QA requirements were met during the certification of test instrumentation. To address this concern, the assessment was expanded to include various activities.

  13. Proposing a survey instrument for measuring operational, formal, information and strategic Internet skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deursen, van A.J.A.M.; Dijk, van J.A.G.M.; Peters, O.

    2012-01-01

    Observational studies prove to be very suitable to provide a realistic view of people's Internet skills. However, their cost and time are a strong limitation for large-scale data gathering. A useful addition to the measurement of Internet skills would be the development of survey questions for measu

  14. The Calern Asteroid Polarimetric Survey using the Torino polarimeter: assessment of instrument performances and first scientific results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devogèle, M.; Cellino, A.; Bagnulo, S.; Rivet, J. P.; Bendjoya, P.; Abe, L.; Pernechele, C.; Massone, G.; Vernet, D.; Tanga, P.; Dimur, C.

    2017-03-01

    A new polarimeter based on the wedged double Wollaston concept has been built at the Torino Observatory and installed on a 1-m telescope at the Calern observing station of the Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur, France. Its main purpose is to carry out a polarimetric survey of minor Solar system objects, which is called the Calern Asteroid Polarimetric Survey. In this paper, we describe the new Torino polarimeter and the results of preliminary scientific validation tests. A number of standard stars with known polarization states, as well as a number of asteroids for which the polarimetric properties are known, have been observed in order to assess the instrument's accuracy. The instrumental polarization has been found to be stable within a few 10-4 units. A total of 124 new polarimetric observation of 78 asteroids are presented. In the case of asteroids already observed in the past, the new data are in agreement with available phase-polarization curves with error bars smaller than most previously published data. We also present data for 21 asteroids that have never been observed before in polarimetry.

  15. Survey of Hospitals and Manufacturers of Biomedical Instrumentation Concerning Variables Related to the Development and Implementation of a Bio-Med Instrumentation Technologist Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaumberg, Gary F.

    The Bio-Med Instrumentation Technologist Questionnaire was sent to 105 hospitals in the Southern California area that had electronic instrumentation for patient monitoring purposes. Sixty completed questionnaires were returned. Twenty manufacturers of bio-medical instrumentation were sent the questionnaires and seven responded. Some of the…

  16. Development and testing of a survey instrument to measure benefits of a nursing information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdrbo, Amany A; Zauszniewski, Jaclene A; Hudak, Christine A; Anthony, Mary K

    2011-01-01

    Information systems (IS) benefits for nurses are outcomes related to the tangible products or improvements that nurses realize from using IS. This study examined the development and psychometric testing of a measure of nurses' benefits from IS. A random sample of 570 nurses working in hospitals, providing direct patient care, and using IS completed the study questionnaire. The internal consistency reliability of the results was .97. Exploratory factor analysis, using principal components extraction and varimax rotation, revealed items loaded on four factors (saving time and efficiency, quality of care, charting, and professional practice) that were confirmed by confirmatory factor analysis. Continued refinement of the instrument is needed with more diverse samples of nurses.

  17. Organizational member involvement in physical activity coalitions across the United States: development and testing of a novel survey instrument for assessing coalition functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornstein, Daniel B; Pate, Russell R; Beets, Michael W; Saunders, Ruth P; Blair, Steven N

    2015-06-01

    Coalitions are often composed of member organizations. Member involvement is thought to be associated with coalition success. No instrument currently exists for evaluating organizational member involvement in physical activity coalitions. This study aimed to develop a survey instrument for evaluating organizational member involvement in physical activity coalitions. The study was carried out in three phases: (a) developing a draft survey, (b) assessing the content validity of the draft survey, and (c) assessing the underlying factor structure, reliability, and validity of the survey. A cross-sectional design was employed. In Phase 1, a team of experts in survey development produced a draft survey. In Phase 2, the content validity of the draft survey was evaluated by a panel of individuals with expertise in physical activity coalitions. In Phase 3, the survey was administered to 120 individuals on local-, state-, and national-level physical activity coalitions. Responses were subjected to an exploratory factor analysis in order to determine the survey's underlying factor structure, reliability, and validity. Phases 1 and 2yielded a survey instrument with demonstrated content validity. Phase 3 yielded a three-factor model with three subscales: Strategic Alignment, Organizational Alignment, and Providing Input. Each subscale demonstrated high internal consistency reliability and construct validity. The survey instrument developed here demonstrated sound psychometric properties and provides new insight into organizational member involvement in physical activity coalitions. This instrument may be an important tool in developing a more complete picture of coalition functioning in physical activity coalitions specifically and health-based coalitions overall. © 2014 Society for Public Health Education.

  18. Development of a respiratory protection survey instrument for occupational health nurses: an educational project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taormina, Deborah; Burgel, Barbara J

    2013-02-01

    The Institute of Medicine (2011) report Occupational Health Nurses and Respiratory Protection: Improving Education and Training outlined seven recommendations to improve the competency of occupational health nurses in respiratory protection. An advisory group was convened in December 2011, with stakeholder representation from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health/National Personal Protective Technology Laboratory, American Association of Occupational Health Nurses, Inc., American Board for Occupational Health Nurses, Inc., Association of Occupational Health Professionals in Healthcare, American Nurses Association, and Institute of Medicine Standing Committee on Personal Protective Equipment for Workplace Safety and Health. The initial work of the advisory group included developing and administering a survey to assess current occupational health nurse roles and responsibilities relevant to respiratory protection. Development of the survey was led by a master's student and advisor who worked with the advisory group. The process of tool development and preliminary findings are presented in this article.

  19. A Survey of Commercially Available Chemical Agent Instrumentation for Use in the Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haas, J S; Alcaraz, A; Andresen, B D; Pruneda, C O

    2002-03-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) Forensic Science Center (FSC) has extensive experience and capabilities in the analysis of chemical agents (CA) and related compounds as well as experience in identifying these materials in the field (i.e. samples such as those found in soils, liquids, gases). An open source survey was performed to determine viable, commercially available technology that can detect, in situ, CA and also meet field-use performance criteria as specified by the Program Management Consultant (PMC). The performance requirements of the technology include accuracy, reliability, integration onto robotics, and chemical detection sensitivities that meet required specifications. Not included in this survey are technologies and methodologies to detect CA decomposition products and related waste streams.

  20. NEW INSTRUMENTS FOR SURVEY: ON LINE SOFTWARES FOR 3D RECONTRUCTION FROM IMAGES

    OpenAIRE

    E. Fratus de Balestrini; Guerra, F.

    2012-01-01

    3d scanning technologies had a significant development and have been widely used in documentation of cultural, architectural and archeological heritages. Modern methods of three-dimensional acquiring and modeling allow to represent an object through a digital model that combines visual potentialities of images (normally used for documentation) to the accuracy of the survey, becoming at the same time support for the visualization that for metric evaluation of any artefact that have an historic...

  1. Measuring stigma among abortion providers: assessing the Abortion Provider Stigma Survey instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Lisa A; Debbink, Michelle; Hassinger, Jane; Youatt, Emily; Eagen-Torkko, Meghan; Harris, Lisa H

    2014-01-01

    We explored the psychometric properties of 15 survey questions that assessed abortion providers' perceptions of stigma and its impact on providers' professional and personal lives referred to as the Abortion Provider Stigma Survey (APSS). We administered the survey to a sample of abortion providers recruited for the Providers' Share Workshop (N = 55). We then completed analyses using Stata SE/12.0. Exploratory factor analysis, which resulted in 13 retained items and identified three subscales: disclosure management, resistance and resilience, and discrimination. Stigma was salient in abortion provider's lives: they identified difficulties surrounding disclosure (66%) and felt unappreciated by society (89%). Simultaneously, workers felt they made a positive contribution to society (92%) and took pride in their work (98%). Paired t-test analyses of the pre- and post-Workshop APSS scores showed no changes in the total score. However, the Disclosure Management subscale scores were significantly lower (indicating decreased stigma) for two subgroups of participants: those over the age of 30 and those with children. This analysis is a promising first step in the development of a quantitative tool for capturing abortion providers' experiences of and responses to pervasive abortion stigma.

  2. HIFLUGCS: X-ray luminosity-dynamical mass relation and its implications for mass calibrations with the SPIDERS and 4MOST surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-Ying; Reiprich, Thomas H.; Schneider, Peter; Clerc, Nicolas; Merloni, Andrea; Schwope, Axel; Borm, Katharina; Andernach, Heinz; Caretta, César A.; Wu, Xiang-Ping

    2017-03-01

    We present the relation of X-ray luminosity versus dynamical mass for 63 nearby clusters of galaxies in a flux-limited sample, the HIghest X-ray FLUx Galaxy Cluster Sample (HIFLUGCS, consisting of 64 clusters). The luminosity measurements are obtained based on 1.3 Ms of clean XMM-Newton data and ROSAT pointed observations. The masses are estimated using optical spectroscopic redshifts of 13647 cluster galaxies in total. We classify clusters into disturbed and undisturbed based on a combination of the X-ray luminosity concentration and the offset between the brightest cluster galaxy and X-ray flux-weighted center. Given sufficient numbers (i.e., ≥45) of member galaxies when the dynamical masses are computed, the luminosity versus mass relations agree between the disturbed and undisturbed clusters. The cool-core clusters still dominate the scatter in the luminosity versus mass relation even when a core-corrected X-ray luminosity is used, which indicates that the scatter of this scaling relation mainly reflects the structure formation history of the clusters. As shown by the clusters with only few spectroscopically confirmed members, the dynamical masses can be underestimated and thus lead to a biased scaling relation. To investigate the potential of spectroscopic surveys to follow up high-redshift galaxy clusters or groups observed in X-ray surveys for the identifications and mass calibrations, we carried out Monte Carlo resampling of the cluster galaxy redshifts and calibrated the uncertainties of the redshift and dynamical mass estimates when only reduced numbers of galaxy redshifts per cluster are available. The resampling considers the SPIDERS and 4MOST configurations, designed for the follow-up of the eROSITA clusters, and was carried out for each cluster in the sample at the actual cluster redshift as well as at the assigned input cluster redshifts of 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, and 0.8. To follow up very distant clusters or groups, we also carried out the mass

  3. The Science of Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, S. M.

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a broad overview of the many issues involved in calibrating astronomical data, covering the full electromagnetic spectrum from radio waves to gamma rays, and considering both ground-based and space-based missions. These issues include the science drivers for absolute and relative calibration, the physics behind calibration and the mechanisms used to transfer it from the laboratory to an astronomical source, the need for networks of calibrated astronomical standards, and some of the challenges faced by large surveys and missions.

  4. 局部放电测量仪校准装置的研制与应用%Development and Application About Calibrating Device of Shelf Depreciation Measuring Instrument

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭黎迎; 徐艳秋; 丁太春; 贺明志; 许睿

    2011-01-01

    局部放电测量仪校准装置是根据国家计量标准和高新科学技术设计和研制而成的,采用虚拟数据采集技术,进行数字积分.按照q=It的方法来实现对局部放电(电量单位:皮库(pC))的测量.该棱准装置能够按照标准的规定对局部放电测量仪进行全面的校准,具有半智能化、精度高,感应灵敏、操作方便等优点,对于提高电器产品的安全性能和产品质量很有帮助,是一种应用广泛的重要安全试验仪器.%The calibrating device of shelf depreciation measuring instrument was developed and designed according to the national measurement standard and the high technology, which used the virtual data gathering technology, carried on the digital intcgration, realized measuremcnt to the shelf depreciation (pC) through the q=It method. This calibrating device can calibrate the shelf depreciation measuring instrument according to the standard stipulation, which has half intellectualization,high precision, sensitive induction, easy operation and so on, and has great help for improving the safety performance ard the quality of products. It is a widely used important safety test instrument, and receives high praise from the colleague experts.

  5. [First stage of the cross-cultural adaptation of the instrument The Vulnerable Elders Survey (VES-13) to Portuguese].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Laércio Lima; Santiago, Lívia Maria; Silva, João Francisco Santos da; Mattos, Inês Echenique

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the initial stages of the cross-cultural adaptation of the instrument The Vulnerable Elders Survey (VES-13) for use in the context of cancer care in Brazil. Two translations into Portuguese and two back-translations into English were carried out independently, and a formal assessment of the general and referential meanings was performed in order to obtain a synthesis version. Understanding of the synthesis version was evaluated in a pretest applied to 33 patients in an oncologic hospital of the Brazilian Unified National Health System (SUS). The version was easily applied in the intended context and was well-accepted by elders. The Portuguese version of the VES-13 proved to be well understood and adequate for testing its psychometric qualities. The latter step is currently in the final phase.

  6. A survey on the high reliability software verification and validation technology for instrumentation and control in NPP.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Kee Choon; Lee, Chang Soo; Dong, In Sook [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-01-01

    This document presents the technical status of the software verification and validation (V and V) efforts to support developing and licensing digital instrumentation and control (I and C) systems in nuclear power plants. We have reviewed codes and standards to be concensus criteria among vendor, licensee and licenser. Then we have described the software licensing procedures under 10 CFR 50 and 10 CFR 52 of the United States cope with the licensing barrier. At last, we have surveyed the technical issues related to developing and licensing the high integrity software for digital I and C systems. These technical issues let us know the development direction of our own software V and V methodology. (Author) 13 refs., 2 figs.,.

  7. Shield calculation of project for instrument calibration integrated laboratory of IPEN-Sao Paulo, Brazil; Calculo das blindagens do projeto de um laboratorio integrado de calibracao de instrumentos no IPEN - Sao Paulo, Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barros, Gustavo A.S.J.; Caldas, Linda V.E., E-mail: gustavaobarros@gmail.co, E-mail: lcaldas@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    This work performed the shield calculation of the future rooms walls of the five X-ray equipment of the Instrument Calibration Laboratory of the IPEN, Sao Paulo, Brazil, which will be constructed in project of laboratory enlargement. The obtained results by application of a calculation methodology from an international regulation have shown that the largest thickness of shielding (25.7 cm of concrete or 7.1 mm of lead) will be of the wall which will receive the primary beam of the equipment with a 320 kV voltage. The cost/benefit analysis indicated the concrete as the best material option for the shielding

  8. TIMASSS: the IRAS 16293-2422 millimeter and submillimeter spectral survey. I. Observations, calibration, and analysis of the line kinematics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caux, E.; Kahane, C.; Castets, A.; Coutens, A.; Ceccarelli, C.; Bacmann, A.; Bisschop, S.; Bottinelli, S.; Comito, C.; Helmich, F. P.; Lefloch, B.; Parise, B.; Schilke, P.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; van Dishoeck, E.; Vastel, C.; Wakelam, V.; Walters, A.

    2011-01-01

    Context. Unbiased spectral surveys are powerful tools to study the chemistry and the physics of star forming regions, because they can provide a complete census of the molecular content and the observed lines probe the physical structure of the source. Aims: While unbiased surveys at the millimeter

  9. TIMASSS: the IRAS 16293-2422 millimeter and submillimeter spectral survey. I. Observations, calibration, and analysis of the line kinematics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caux, E.; Kahane, C.; Castets, A.; Coutens, A.; Ceccarelli, C.; Bacmann, A.; Bisschop, S.; Bottinelli, S.; Comito, C.; Helmich, F. P.; Lefloch, B.; Parise, B.; Schilke, P.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; van Dishoeck, E.; Vastel, C.; Wakelam, V.; Walters, A.

    2011-01-01

    Context. Unbiased spectral surveys are powerful tools to study the chemistry and the physics of star forming regions, because they can provide a complete census of the molecular content and the observed lines probe the physical structure of the source. Aims. While unbiased surveys at the millimeter

  10. Modified ERT instrumentation for geo-scientific surveys in the historical centre of Mesagne (Brindisi, Southern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leucci, Giovanni; De Giorgi, Lara; Terenzio Gizzi, Fabrizio; Persico, Raffaele

    2016-04-01

    The town of Mesagne is one of the sites at greatest geological risk in the north Salento peninsula. In the last few decades, the historical centre of Mesagne has been affected by a series of subsidence events, which have, in some cases, resulted in the partial collapse of buildings and road surfaces. The last event was in the January 2014. It caused subsidence phenomenon in a wide area and many families have been forced from their homes. These events have had both social repercussions, causing alarm and emergency situations, and economic repercussions in terms of the expense of restoration. In order to determine the causes of the ground subsidence events, integrated geophysical surveys were undertaken in the historical centre of Mesagne. In addition, the analysis of several wells allowed the 3D model reconstruction related both to the geology and to the groundwater depth in the surveyed areas. With the purpose of estimating the dimensions of the phenomenon and its possible relationship with both specific environmental conditions (for instance groundwater depth variation) and anthropic conditions (for instance the losses in water supply and sanitation) some geophysical measurements were repeated in the time. For this purpose a modified ERT instrumentation together GPR were used. The study led to the production of a detailed description of the subsidence causes that allows a quick action to restore security conditions in the area.

  11. WFPC2 Polarization Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biretta, J.; McMaster, M.

    1997-12-01

    We derive a detailed calibration for WFPC2 polarization data which is accurate to about 1.5%. We begin by computing polarizer flats, and show how they are applied to data. A physical model for the polarization effects of the WFPC2 optics is then created using Mueller matricies. This model includes corrections for the instrumental polarization (diattenuation and phase retardance) of the pick-off mirror, as well as the high cross-polarization transmission of the polarizer filter. We compare this model against the on-orbit observations of polarization calibrators, and show it predicts relative counts in the different polarizer/aperture settings to 1.5% RMS accuracy. We then show how this model can be used to calibrate GO data, and present two WWW tools which allow observers to easily calibrate their data. Detailed examples are given illustrationg the calibration and display of WFPC2 polarization data. In closing we describe future plans and possible improvements.

  12. Design and Lessons Learned on the Development of a Cryogenic Pupil Select Mechanism Used in the Testing and Calibration of the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Alissa; Capon, Thomas; Guzek, Jeffrey; Hakun, Claef; Haney, Paul; Koca, Corina

    2014-01-01

    Calibration and testing of the instruments on the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is being performed by the use of a cryogenic, full-field, optical simulator that was constructed for this purpose. The Pupil Select Mechanism (PSM) assembly is one of several mechanisms and optical elements that compose the Optical Telescope Element SIMulator, or OSIM. The PSM allows for several optical elements to be inserted into the optical plane of OSIM, introducing a variety of aberrations, distortions, obscurations, and other calibration states into the pupil plane. The following discussion focuses on the details of the design evolution, analysis, build, and test of this mechanism along with the challenges associated with creating a sub arc-minute positioning mechanism operating in an extreme cryogenic environment. In addition, difficult challenges in the control system design will be discussed including the incorporation of closed-loop feedback control into a system that was designed to operate in an open-loop fashion.

  13. SMAP RADAR Calibration and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, R. D.; Jaruwatanadilok, S.; Chaubel, M. J.; Spencer, M.; Chan, S. F.; Chen, C. W.; Fore, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission launched on Jan 31, 2015. The mission employs L-band radar and radiometer measurements to estimate soil moisture with 4% volumetric accuracy at a resolution of 10 km, and freeze-thaw state at a resolution of 1-3 km. Immediately following launch, there was a three month instrument checkout period, followed by six months of level 1 (L1) calibration and validation. In this presentation, we will discuss the calibration and validation activities and results for the L1 radar data. Early SMAP radar data were used to check commanded timing parameters, and to work out issues in the low- and high-resolution radar processors. From April 3-13 the radar collected receive only mode data to conduct a survey of RFI sources. Analysis of the RFI environment led to a preferred operating frequency. The RFI survey data were also used to validate noise subtraction and scaling operations in the radar processors. Normal radar operations resumed on April 13. All radar data were examined closely for image quality and calibration issues which led to improvements in the radar data products for the beta release at the end of July. Radar data were used to determine and correct for small biases in the reported spacecraft attitude. Geo-location was validated against coastline positions and the known positions of corner reflectors. Residual errors at the time of the beta release are about 350 m. Intra-swath biases in the high-resolution backscatter images are reduced to less than 0.3 dB for all polarizations. Radiometric cross-calibration with Aquarius was performed using areas of the Amazon rain forest. Cross-calibration was also examined using ocean data from the low-resolution processor and comparing with the Aquarius wind model function. Using all a-priori calibration constants provided good results with co-polarized measurements matching to better than 1 dB, and cross-polarized measurements matching to about 1 dB in the beta release. During the

  14. Developing a survey instrument to assess the readiness of primary care data, genetic and disease registries to conduct linked research: TRANSFoRm International Research Readiness (TIRRE survey instrument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Leppenwell

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Clinical data are collected for routine care in family practice; there are also a growing number of genetic and cancer registry data repositories. The Translational Research and Patient Safety in Europe (TRANSFoRm project seeks to facilitate research using linked data from more than one source. We performed a requirements analysis which identified a wide range of data and business process requirements that need to be met before linking primary care and either genetic or disease registry data.Objectives To develop a survey to assess the readiness of data repositories to participate in linked research – the Transform International Research Readiness (TIRRE survey.Method We develop the questionnaire based on our requirement analysis; with questions at micro-, meso- and macro levels of granularity, study-specific questions about diabetes and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD, and research track record. The scope of the data required was extensive. We piloted this instrument, conducting ten preliminary telephone interviews to evaluate the response to the questionnaire.Results Using feedback gained from these interviews we revised the questionnaire; clarifying questions that were difficult to answer and utilising skip logic to create different series of questions for the various types of data repository. We simplified the questionnaire replacing free-text responses with yes/no or picking list options, wherever possible. We placed the final questionnaire online and encouraged its use (www.clininf.eu/jointirre/info.html.Conclusion Limited field testing suggests that TIRRE is capable of collecting comprehensive and relevant data about the suitability and readiness of data repositories to participate in linked data research.

  15. HIRDLS monochromator calibration equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepplewhite, Christopher L.; Barnett, John J.; Djotni, Karim; Whitney, John G.; Bracken, Justain N.; Wolfenden, Roger; Row, Frederick; Palmer, Christopher W. P.; Watkins, Robert E. J.; Knight, Rodney J.; Gray, Peter F.; Hammond, Geoffory

    2003-11-01

    A specially designed and built monochromator was developed for the spectral calibration of the HIRDLS instrument. The High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS) is a precision infra-red remote sensing instrument with very tight requirements on the knowledge of the response to received radiation. A high performance, vacuum compatible monochromator, was developed with a wavelength range from 4 to 20 microns to encompass that of the HIRDLS instrument. The monochromator is integrated into a collimating system which is shared with a set of tiny broad band sources used for independent spatial response measurements (reported elsewhere). This paper describes the design and implementation of the monochromator and the performance obtained during the period of calibration of the HIRDLS instrument at Oxford University in 2002.

  16. Patient experience and satisfaction with inpatient service: development of short form survey instrument measuring the core aspect of inpatient experience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliza L Y Wong

    Full Text Available Patient experience reflects quality of care from the patients' perspective; therefore, patients' experiences are important data in the evaluation of the quality of health services. The development of an abbreviated, reliable and valid instrument for measuring inpatients' experience would reflect the key aspect of inpatient care from patients' perspective as well as facilitate quality improvement by cultivating patient engagement and allow the trends in patient satisfaction and experience to be measured regularly. The study developed a short-form inpatient instrument and tested its ability to capture a core set of inpatients' experiences. The Hong Kong Inpatient Experience Questionnaire (HKIEQ was established in 2010; it is an adaptation of the General Inpatient Questionnaire of the Care Quality Commission created by the Picker Institute in United Kingdom. This study used a consensus conference and a cross-sectional validation survey to create and validate a short-form of the Hong Kong Inpatient Experience Questionnaire (SF-HKIEQ. The short-form, the SF-HKIEQ, consisted of 18 items derived from the HKIEQ. The 18 items mainly covered relational aspects of care under four dimensions of the patient's journey: hospital staff, patient care and treatment, information on leaving the hospital, and overall impression. The SF-HKIEQ had a high degree of face validity, construct validity and internal reliability. The validated SF-HKIEQ reflects the relevant core aspects of inpatients' experience in a hospital setting. It provides a quick reference tool for quality improvement purposes and a platform that allows both healthcare staff and patients to monitor the quality of hospital care over time.

  17. Calibration Monitor for Dark Energy Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, M. E.

    2009-11-23

    The goal of this program was to design, build, test, and characterize a flight qualified calibration source and monitor for a Dark Energy related experiment: ACCESS - 'Absolute Color Calibration Experiment for Standard Stars'. This calibration source, the On-board Calibration Monitor (OCM), is a key component of our ACCESS spectrophotometric calibration program. The OCM will be flown as part of the ACCESS sub-orbital rocket payload in addition to monitoring instrument sensitivity on the ground. The objective of the OCM is to minimize systematic errors associated with any potential changes in the ACCESS instrument sensitivity. Importantly, the OCM will be used to monitor instrument sensitivity immediately after astronomical observations while the instrument payload is parachuting to the ground. Through monitoring, we can detect, track, characterize, and thus correct for any changes in instrument senstivity over the proposed 5-year duration of the assembled and calibrated instrument.

  18. A Frailty Instrument for primary care: findings from the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romero-Ortuno Roman

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A frailty paradigm would be useful in primary care to identify older people at risk, but appropriate metrics at that level are lacking. We created and validated a simple instrument for frailty screening in Europeans aged ≥50. Our study is based on the first wave of the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE, http://www.share-project.org, a large population-based survey conducted in 2004-2005 in twelve European countries. Methods Subjects: SHARE Wave 1 respondents (17,304 females and 13,811 males. Measures: five SHARE variables approximating Fried's frailty definition. Analyses (for each gender: 1 estimation of a discreet factor (DFactor model based on the frailty variables using LatentGOLD®. A single DFactor with three ordered levels or latent classes (i.e. non-frail, pre-frail and frail was modelled; 2 the latent classes were characterised against a biopsychosocial range of Wave 1 variables; 3 the prospective mortality risk (unadjusted and age-adjusted for each frailty class was established on those subjects with known mortality status at Wave 2 (2007-2008 (11,384 females and 9,163 males; 4 two web-based calculators were created for easy retrieval of a subject's frailty class given any five measurements. Results Females: the DFactor model included 15,578 cases (standard R2 = 0.61. All five frailty indicators discriminated well (p N = 10,420; 66.9%, pre-frail (N = 4,025; 25.8%, and frail (N = 1,133; 7.3%. Relative to the non-frail class, the age-adjusted Odds Ratio (with 95% Confidence Interval for mortality at Wave 2 was 2.1 (1.4 - 3.0 in the pre-frail and 4.8 (3.1 - 7.4 in the frail. Males: 12,783 cases (standard R2 = 0.61, all frailty indicators had p N = 10,517; 82.3%, pre-frail (N = 1,871; 14.6%, and frail (N = 395; 3.1%; age-adjusted OR (95% CI for mortality: 3.0 (2.3 - 4.0 in the pre-frail, 6.9 (4.7 - 10.2 in the frail. Conclusions The SHARE Frailty Instrument has sufficient construct and

  19. 太阳模拟器在辐射仪器检测中的应用%APPLICATIONS OF SOLAR SIMULATOR IN THE CALIBRATION AND TEST OF RADIATION INSTRUMENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕文华; 莫月琴; 杨云

    2001-01-01

    该文主要介绍了由TM-500F太阳模拟器和旋转工作台组成的具有多功能辐射仪器室内检测设备的结构、原理及应用。利用该设备可对太阳辐射测量仪器进行灵敏度的校准,由实验可知,总辐射表室内外灵敏度检定结果非常一致,其误差在±0.6%之内。也可进行余弦、方位响应误差,倾斜误差,非线性误差及响应时间等性能的测定。%To evaluate the solar radiation measurement data and instrument specifications, the new versatile laboratory test facility for solar radiation instruments has been developed. It consists of an available solar simulator and a rotating mechanism with an instrument mount. The spectral distribution is in accordance with Air Mass 1.5 global spectral conditions. Directionally, tilt and non-linearity errors of pyranometers can be tested by using this facility. Satisfactory results have been obtained according to calibration measurements of pyranometers. It is shown that the difference values of the sensitivity are within the range of ±0.6% measured in the outdoor exposure.

  20. SNR 1E 0102.2-7219 as an X-ray Calibration Standard in the 0.5-1.0 keV Bandpass and Its Application to the CCD Instruments aboard Chandra, Suzaku, Swift and XMM-Newton

    CERN Document Server

    Plucinsky, Paul P; Foster, Adam; Haberl, Frank; Miller, Eric D; Pollock, A M T; Sembay, Steve

    2016-01-01

    We desire a simple comparison of the absolute effective areas of the current generation of CCD instruments onboard the following observatories: Chandra ACIS-S3, XMM-Newton (EPIC-MOS and EPIC-pn), Suzaku XIS, and Swift XRT and a straightforward comparison of the time-dependent response of these instruments across their respective mission lifetimes. We have been using 1E 0102.2-7219, the brightest supernova remnant in the Small Magellanic Cloud, to evaluate and modify the response models of these instruments. 1E 0102.2-7219 has strong lines of O, Ne, and Mg below 1.5 keV and little or no Fe emission to complicate the spectrum. As part of the activities of the International Astronomical Consortium for High Energy Calibration (IACHEC), we have developed a standard spectral model for 1E 0102.2-7219. The model is empirical in that it includes Gaussians for the identified lines, an absorption component in the Galaxy, another absorption component in the SMC, and two thermal continuum components. In our fits, the mode...

  1. Calibrating Communication Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surges Tatum, Donna

    2016-11-01

    The Many-faceted Rasch measurement model is used in the creation of a diagnostic instrument by which communication competencies can be calibrated, the severity of observers/raters can be determined, the ability of speakers measured, and comparisons made between various groups.

  2. Calibration Systems Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, Tanya L.; Broocks, Bryan T.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2006-02-01

    The Calibration Systems project at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is aimed towards developing and demonstrating compact Quantum Cascade (QC) laser-based calibration systems for infrared imaging systems. These on-board systems will improve the calibration technology for passive sensors, which enable stand-off detection for the proliferation or use of weapons of mass destruction, by replacing on-board blackbodies with QC laser-based systems. This alternative technology can minimize the impact on instrument size and weight while improving the quality of instruments for a variety of missions. The potential of replacing flight blackbodies is made feasible by the high output, stability, and repeatability of the QC laser spectral radiance.

  3. Calibration uncertainty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heydorn, Kaj; Anglov, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Methods recommended by the International Standardization Organisation and Eurachem are not satisfactory for the correct estimation of calibration uncertainty. A novel approach is introduced and tested on actual calibration data for the determination of Pb by ICP-AES. The improved calibration unce...

  4. Calibration report for ZephIR Dual Mode lidar (unit 351)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borraccino, Antoine; Courtney, Michael

    . Their estimation is the ultimate goal of a calibration: a relation is established between reference measurements from calibrated instruments and corresponding LiDAR indications. Traceability in the calibration is obtained by transferring measurement uncertainties from the reference instrument through...

  5. 营销移动作业新型校验仪的研制%Research on New Type Calibration Instrument for Marketing Mobile Operation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱星; 霍政界; 王立白

    2016-01-01

    The fieldtestof traditional electricity metersrelied on artificial analysis and record of fielddata,which iseasy tocause data error due to human factors and unable to realize standardization of calibration. A new type calibrationinstrument for marketing mobile operation could realizeautomatic recognition of wiring mode and calibration methods of electricitymeter standardized operation. It establishes multiple data intelligent diagnostic model based on information such as current cutoff, loss of phase,voltage-loss and severe three-phase unbalance. The model can automatically identify and diagnose abnormal power consumption behavior like electricitytheft by analyzing and comparing with the user data of power user electric energy data acquisition system.It also establishes a model for distinguishing the abnormal operationstate of electricitymeter,which can realize automatic distinction of abnormal operationstate of electricity meter.%对传统电能表的现场检测主要依赖人工进行现场数据分析和录入,易造成人为因素错误,无法实现检测工作标准化。营销移动作业新型校验仪可实现电能表接线方式和检测方式的自动识别,建立以断流、断相、失压、三相严重不平衡等信息为基础的多数据智能诊断模型,并通过与用户采集系统的用电信息进行分析和比对,自动识别诊断疑似窃电等用电异常行为;同时建立基于多数据关联技术的电能表运行异常判别模型,实现电能表运行异常自动甄别。

  6. Calibrating nacelle lidars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Courtney, Michael

    Nacelle mounted, forward looking wind lidars are beginning to be used to provide reference wind speed measurements for the power performance testing of wind turbines. In such applications, a formal calibration procedure with a corresponding uncertainty assessment will be necessary. This report...... presents four concepts for performing such a nacelle lidar calibration. Of the four methods, two are found to be immediately relevant and are pursued in some detail. The first of these is a line of sight calibration method in which both lines of sight (for a two beam lidar) are individually calibrated...... a representative distribution of radial wind speeds. An alternative method is to place the nacelle lidar on the ground and incline the beams upwards to bisect a mast equipped with reference instrumentation at a known height and range. This method will be easier and faster to implement and execute but the beam...

  7. Calibration of quasi-static aberrations in exoplanet direct-imaging instruments with a Zernike phase-mask sensor. II. Concept validation with ZELDA on VLT/SPHERE

    Science.gov (United States)

    N'Diaye, M.; Vigan, A.; Dohlen, K.; Sauvage, J.-F.; Caillat, A.; Costille, A.; Girard, J. H. V.; Beuzit, J.-L.; Fusco, T.; Blanchard, P.; Le Merrer, J.; Le Mignant, D.; Madec, F.; Moreaux, G.; Mouillet, D.; Puget, P.; Zins, G.

    2016-08-01

    Warm or massive gas giant planets, brown dwarfs, and debris disks around nearby stars are now routinely observed by dedicated high-contrast imaging instruments that are mounted on large, ground-based observatories. These facilities include extreme adaptive optics (ExAO) and state-of-the-art coronagraphy to achieve unprecedented sensitivities for exoplanet detection and their spectral characterization. However, low spatial frequency differential aberrations between the ExAO sensing path and the science path represent critical limitations for the detection of giant planets with a contrast lower than a few 10-6 at very small separations (measure these quasi-static aberrations at a nanometric level. We present the design, manufacturing, and testing of ZELDA, a prototype that was installed on VLT/SPHERE during its reintegration in Chile. Using the internal light source of the instrument, we first performed measurements in the presence of Zernike or Fourier modes introduced with the deformable mirror. Our experimental results are consistent with the results in simulations, confirming the ability of our sensor to measure small aberrations (measurements and estimated a contrast gain of 10 in the coronagraphic image at 0.2'', reaching the raw contrast limit set by the coronagraph in the instrument. In addition to this encouraging result, the simplicity of the design and its phase reconstruction algorithm makes ZELDA an excellent candidate for the online measurements of quasi-static aberrations during the observations. The implementation of a ZELDA-based sensing path on the current and future facilities (ELTs, future space missions) could facilitate the observation of cold gaseous or massive rocky planets around nearby stars.

  8. Radiation survey meters used for environmental monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjerke, H. (ed.) (Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, NRPA (Norway)); Sigurdsson, T. (Icelandic Radiation Safety Authority, Geislavarnir Rikisins, GR (IS)); Meier Pedersen, K. (National Board of Health, Statens Institut for Straalebeskyttelse (SIS) (Denmark)); Grindborg, J.-E.; Persson, L. (Swedish Radiation Safety Authority, Straalsaekerhetsmyndigheten (SSM) (Sweden)); Siiskonen, T.; Hakanen, A.; Kosunen, A. (Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Saeteilyturvakeskus (STUK) (Finland))

    2012-01-15

    The Nordic dosimetry group set up the GammaRate project to investigate how its expertise could be used to assure appropriate usage of survey meters in environmental monitoring. Considerable expertise in calibrating radiation instruments exists in the Nordic radiation protection authorities. The Swedish, Finnish, Danish and Norwegian authorities operate Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratories (SSDLs) that provide users with calibration traceable to internationally recognised primary standards. These authorities together with the Icelandic authorities have formally cooperated since 2002 in the field of radiation dosimetry. Dosimetry is the base for assesment of risk from ionising radiation and calibration of instruments is an imported part in dosimetry. The Nordic dosimetry group has been focused on cancer therapy. This work extends the cooperation to the dosimetry of radiation protection and environmental monitoring. This report contains the formal, theoretical and practical background for survey meter measurements. Nordic standards dosimetry laboratories have the capability to provide traceable calibration of instruments in various types of radiation. To verify and explore this further in radiation protection applications a set of survey instruments were sent between the five Nordic countries and each of the authority asked to provide a calibration coefficient for all instruments. The measurement results were within the stated uncertainties, except for some results from NRPA for the ionchamber based instrument. The comparison was shown to be a valuable tool to harmonize the calibration of radiation protection instruments in the Nordic countries. Dosimetry plays an important role in the emergency situations, and it is clear that better traceability and harmonised common guidelines will improve the emergency preparedness and health. (Author)

  9. Calibration of quasi-static aberrations in exoplanet direct-imaging instruments with a Zernike phase-mask sensor. II. Concept validation with ZELDA on VLT/SPHERE

    CERN Document Server

    N'Diaye, M; Dohlen, K; Sauvage, J -F; Caillat, A; Costille, A; Girard, J H V; Beuzit, J -L; Fusco, T; Blanchard, P; Merrer, J Le; Mignant, D Le; Madec, F; Moreaux, G; Mouillet, D; Puget, P; Zins, G

    2016-01-01

    Warm or massive gas giant planets, brown dwarfs, and debris disks around nearby stars are now routinely observed by dedicated high-contrast imaging instruments on large, ground-based observatories. These facilities include extreme adaptive optics (ExAO) and state-of-the-art coronagraphy to achieve unprecedented sensitivities for exoplanet detection and spectral characterization. However, differential aberrations between the ExAO sensing path and the science path represent a critical limitation for the detection of giant planets with a contrast lower than a few $10^{-6}$ at very small separations (<0.3\\as) from their host star. In our previous work, we proposed a wavefront sensor based on Zernike phase contrast methods to circumvent this issue and measure these quasi-static aberrations at a nanometric level. We present the design, manufacturing and testing of ZELDA, a prototype that was installed on VLT/SPHERE during its reintegration in Chile. Using the internal light source of the instrument, we performed...

  10. HIFLUGCS: X-ray luminosity -- dynamical mass relation and its implications for mass calibrations with the SPIDERS and 4MOST surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yu-Ying; Schneider, Peter; Clerc, Nicolas; Merloni, Andrea; Schwope, Axel; Borm, Katharina; Andernach, Heinz; Caretta, César A; Wu, Xiang-Ping

    2016-01-01

    We present the X-ray luminosity (L) versus dynamical mass (M) relation for 63 nearby clusters in the HIFLUGCS. The luminosity measurements are obtained based on ~1.3 Ms of clean XMM data and ROSAT pointed observations. The masses are estimated using optical spectroscopic redshifts of 13647 cluster galaxies in total. Given sufficient numbers of member galaxies in computing the dynamical masses, the L-M relations agree between the disturbed and undisturbed clusters. The cool-core clusters still dominate the scatter in the L-M relation even when a core corrected X-ray luminosity is used, which indicates that the scatter mainly reflects the structure formation history of the clusters. As shown by the clusters with a small number of redshifts, the dynamical masses can be underestimated leading to a biased scaling relation. To investigate the potential of spectroscopic surveys to follow up high-redshift galaxy clusters/groups observed in X-ray surveys for the identifications and mass calibrations, we carried out Mo...

  11. Networks of Absolute Calibration Stars for SST, AKARI, and WISE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, M.

    2007-04-01

    I describe the Cohen-Walker-Witteborn (CWW) network of absolute calibration stars built to support ground-based, airborne, and space-based sensors, and how they are used to calibrate instruments on the SPITZER Space Telescope (SST and Japan's AKARI (formerly ASTRO-F), and to support NASA's planned MidEx WISE (the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer). All missions using this common calibration share a self-consistent framework embracing photometry and low-resolution spectroscopy. CWW also underpins COBE/DIRBE several instruments used on the Kuiper Airborne Observatory ({KAO}), the joint Japan-USA ``IR Telescope in Space" (IRTS) Near-IR and Mid-IR spectrometers, the European Space Agency's IR Space Observatory (ISO), and the US Department of Defense's Midcourse Space eXperiment (MSX). This calibration now spans the far-UV to mid-infrared range with Sirius (one specific Kurucz synthetic spectrum) as basis, and zero magnitude defined from another Kurucz spectrum intended to represent an ideal Vega (not the actual star with its pole-on orientation and mid-infrared dust excess emission). Precision 4-29 μm radiometric measurements on MSX validate CWW's absolute Kurucz spectrum of Sirius, the primary, and a set of bright K/MIII secondary standards. Sirius is measured to be 1.0% higher than predicted. CWW's definitions of IR zero magnitudes lie within 1.1% absolute of MSX measurements. The US Air Force Research Laboratory's independent analysis of on-orbit {MSX} stellar observations compared with emissive reference spheres show CWW primary and empirical secondary spectra lie well within the ±1.45% absolute uncertainty associated with this 15-year effort. Our associated absolute calibration for the InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC) on the SST lies within ˜2% of the recent extension of the calibration of the Hubble Space Telescope's STIS instrument to NICMOS (Bohlin, these Proceedings), showing the closeness of these two independent approaches to calibration.

  12. THE DETECTION RATE OF EARLY UV EMISSION FROM SUPERNOVAE: A DEDICATED GALEX/PTF SURVEY AND CALIBRATED THEORETICAL ESTIMATES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganot, Noam; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Ofek, Eran O.; Sagiv, Ilan; Waxman, Eli; Lapid, Ofer [Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, Faculty of Physics, The Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Kasliwal, Mansi M. [Cahill Center for Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Ben-Ami, Sagi [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Chelouche, Doron; Rafter, Stephen [Physics Department, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of Haifa, 31905 Haifa (Israel); Behar, Ehud; Laor, Ari [Physics Department, Technion Israel Institute of Technology, 32000 Haifa (Israel); Poznanski, Dovi; Nakar, Ehud; Maoz, Dan [School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, 69978 Tel Aviv (Israel); Trakhtenbrot, Benny [Institute for Astronomy, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27 Zurich 8093 (Switzerland); Neill, James D.; Barlow, Thomas A.; Martin, Christofer D., E-mail: noam.ganot@gmail.com [California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, MC 278-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Collaboration: ULTRASAT Science Team; WTTH consortium; GALEX Science Team; Palomar Transient Factory; and others

    2016-03-20

    The radius and surface composition of an exploding massive star, as well as the explosion energy per unit mass, can be measured using early UV observations of core-collapse supernovae (SNe). We present the first results from a simultaneous GALEX/PTF search for early ultraviolet (UV) emission from SNe. Six SNe II and one Type II superluminous SN (SLSN-II) are clearly detected in the GALEX near-UV (NUV) data. We compare our detection rate with theoretical estimates based on early, shock-cooling UV light curves calculated from models that fit existing Swift and GALEX observations well, combined with volumetric SN rates. We find that our observations are in good agreement with calculated rates assuming that red supergiants (RSGs) explode with fiducial radii of 500 R{sub ⊙}, explosion energies of 10{sup 51} erg, and ejecta masses of 10 M{sub ⊙}. Exploding blue supergiants and Wolf–Rayet stars are poorly constrained. We describe how such observations can be used to derive the progenitor radius, surface composition, and explosion energy per unit mass of such SN events, and we demonstrate why UV observations are critical for such measurements. We use the fiducial RSG parameters to estimate the detection rate of SNe during the shock-cooling phase (<1 day after explosion) for several ground-based surveys (PTF, ZTF, and LSST). We show that the proposed wide-field UV explorer ULTRASAT mission is expected to find >85 SNe per year (∼0.5 SN per deg{sup 2}), independent of host galaxy extinction, down to an NUV detection limit of 21.5 mag AB. Our pilot GALEX/PTF project thus convincingly demonstrates that a dedicated, systematic SN survey at the NUV band is a compelling method to study how massive stars end their life.

  13. CARMENES instrument overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirrenbach, A.; Amado, P. J.; Caballero, J. A.; Mundt, R.; Reiners, A.; Ribas, I.; Seifert, W.; Abril, M.; Aceituno, J.; Alonso-Floriano, F. J.; Ammler-von Eiff, M.; Antona Jiménez, R.; Anwand-Heerwart, H.; Azzaro, M.; Bauer, F.; Barrado, D.; Becerril, S.; Béjar, V. J. S.; Benítez, D.; Berdiñas, Z. M.; Cárdenas, M. C.; Casal, E.; Claret, A.; Colomé, J.; Cortés-Contreras, M.; Czesla, S.; Doellinger, M.; Dreizler, S.; Feiz, C.; Fernández, M.; Galadí, D.; Gálvez-Ortiz, M. C.; García-Piquer, A.; García-Vargas, M. L.; Garrido, R.; Gesa, L.; Gómez Galera, V.; González Álvarez, E.; González Hernández, J. I.; Grözinger, U.; Guàrdia, J.; Guenther, E. W.; de Guindos, E.; Gutiérrez-Soto, J.; Hagen, H.-J.; Hatzes, A. P.; Hauschildt, P. H.; Helmling, J.; Henning, T.; Hermann, D.; Hernández Castaño, L.; Herrero, E.; Hidalgo, D.; Holgado, G.; Huber, A.; Huber, K. F.; Jeffers, S.; Joergens, V.; de Juan, E.; Kehr, M.; Klein, R.; Kürster, M.; Lamert, A.; Lalitha, S.; Laun, W.; Lemke, U.; Lenzen, R.; López del Fresno, Mauro; López Martí, B.; López-Santiago, J.; Mall, U.; Mandel, H.; Martín, E. L.; Martín-Ruiz, S.; Martínez-Rodríguez, H.; Marvin, C. J.; Mathar, R. J.; Mirabet, E.; Montes, D.; Morales Muñoz, R.; Moya, A.; Naranjo, V.; Ofir, A.; Oreiro, R.; Pallé, E.; Panduro, J.; Passegger, V.-M.; Pérez-Calpena, A.; Pérez Medialdea, D.; Perger, M.; Pluto, M.; Ramón, A.; Rebolo, R.; Redondo, P.; Reffert, S.; Reinhardt, S.; Rhode, P.; Rix, H.-W.; Rodler, F.; Rodríguez, E.; Rodríguez-López, C.; Rodríguez-Pérez, E.; Rohloff, R.-R.; Rosich, A.; Sánchez-Blanco, E.; Sánchez Carrasco, M. A.; Sanz-Forcada, J.; Sarmiento, L. F.; Schäfer, S.; Schiller, J.; Schmidt, C.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Solano, E.; Stahl, O.; Storz, C.; Stürmer, J.; Suárez, J. C.; Ulbrich, R. G.; Veredas, G.; Wagner, K.; Winkler, J.; Zapatero Osorio, M. R.; Zechmeister, M.; Abellán de Paco, F. J.; Anglada-Escudé, G.; del Burgo, C.; Klutsch, A.; Lizon, J. L.; López-Morales, M.; Morales, J. C.; Perryman, M. A. C.; Tulloch, S. M.; Xu, W.

    2014-07-01

    This paper gives an overview of the CARMENES instrument and of the survey that will be carried out with it during the first years of operation. CARMENES (Calar Alto high-Resolution search for M dwarfs with Exoearths with Near-infrared and optical Echelle Spectrographs) is a next-generation radial-velocity instrument under construction for the 3.5m telescope at the Calar Alto Observatory by a consortium of eleven Spanish and German institutions. The scientific goal of the project is conducting a 600-night exoplanet survey targeting ~ 300 M dwarfs with the completed instrument. The CARMENES instrument consists of two separate echelle spectrographs covering the wavelength range from 0.55 to 1.7 μm at a spectral resolution of R = 82,000, fed by fibers from the Cassegrain focus of the telescope. The spectrographs are housed in vacuum tanks providing the temperature-stabilized environments necessary to enable a 1 m/s radial velocity precision employing a simultaneous calibration with an emission-line lamp or with a Fabry-Perot etalon. For mid-M to late-M spectral types, the wavelength range around 1.0 μm (Y band) is the most important wavelength region for radial velocity work. Therefore, the efficiency of CARMENES has been optimized in this range. The CARMENES instrument consists of two spectrographs, one equipped with a 4k x 4k pixel CCD for the range 0.55 - 1.05 μm, and one with two 2k x 2k pixel HgCdTe detectors for the range from 0.95 - 1.7μm. Each spectrograph will be coupled to the 3.5m telescope with two optical fibers, one for the target, and one for calibration light. The front end contains a dichroic beam splitter and an atmospheric dispersion corrector, to feed the light into the fibers leading to the spectrographs. Guiding is performed with a separate camera; on-axis as well as off-axis guiding modes are implemented. Fibers with octagonal cross-section are employed to ensure good stability of the output in the presence of residual guiding errors. The

  14. CERN radiation protection (RP) calibration facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pozzi, Fabio

    2016-04-14

    Radiation protection calibration facilities are essential to ensure the correct operation of radiation protection instrumentation. Calibrations are performed in specific radiation fields according to the type of instrument to be calibrated: neutrons, photons, X-rays, beta and alpha particles. Some of the instruments are also tested in mixed radiation fields as often encountered close to high-energy particle accelerators. Moreover, calibration facilities are of great importance to evaluate the performance of prototype detectors; testing and measuring the response of a prototype detector to well-known and -characterized radiation fields contributes to improving and optimizing its design and capabilities. The CERN Radiation Protection group is in charge of performing the regular calibrations of all CERN radiation protection devices; these include operational and passive dosimeters, neutron and photon survey-meters, and fixed radiation detectors to monitor the ambient dose equivalent, H*(10), inside CERN accelerators and at the CERN borders. A new state-of-the-art radiation protection calibration facility was designed, constructed and commissioned following the related ISO recommendations to replace the previous ageing (more than 30 years old) laboratory. In fact, the new laboratory aims also at the official accreditation according to the ISO standards in order to be able to release certified calibrations. Four radiation fields are provided: neutrons, photons and beta sources and an X-ray generator. Its construction did not only involve a pure civil engineering work; many radiation protection studies were performed to provide a facility that could answer the CERN calibration needs and fulfill all related safety requirements. Monte Carlo simulations have been confirmed to be a valuable tool for the optimization of the building design, the radiation protection aspects, e.g. shielding, and, as consequence, the overall cost. After the source and irradiator installation

  15. Development and pilot testing of an Internet-based survey instrument to measure the alcohol brand preferences of U.S. youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Michael; DiLoreto, Joanna; Johnson, Andrea; Fortunato, Erin K; DeJong, William

    2011-04-01

    Although we know a great deal about the percentage of youth who drink alcohol, we know very little about the specific brands they choose to drink. This information gap needs to be addressed if public health officials are to develop more effective interventions. Unfortunately, there are no national youth surveys that collect data on alcohol brand consumption. In this paper, we describe the development and pilot testing of what we believe to be the first comprehensive, Internet-based youth survey of brand-specific alcohol use. We used online advertising in 3 U.S. cities to recruit a convenience sample of 241 respondents, ages 16 to 18 years. We used Craigslist, a network of online communities that features local classified advertisements, to recruit the sample. We used SurveyGizmo, an online software program for designing Internet surveys, collecting data, and performing basic analysis, to survey these respondents about their brand-specific alcohol consumption patterns. The survey instrument assessed each respondent's 30-day drinking history, including the frequency of consumption for each alcohol brand. Using Internet survey technology, we were able to collect information on 366 brands and still have respondents complete the instrument quickly and easily. The total number of brands consumed in the past 30 days ranged from 1 to 18, with a median of 4 brands. The top 5 brands consumed were beer brands, as were eleven of the top 15 brands. The remaining 4 brands in the top 15 included 3 brands of flavored alcoholic beverages and 1 brand of mixed drink. Among the top 15 alcohol brands consumed during heavy drinking episodes were 8 brands of beer, 4 brands of flavored alcoholic beverages, 2 brands of wine, and 1 brand of mixed drink. This pilot study helps establish the feasibility of including brand-specific questions on federal or other national youth alcohol surveys. Copyright © 2011 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  16. Antenna Calibration and Measurement Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochblatt, David J.; Cortes, Manuel Vazquez

    2012-01-01

    A document describes the Antenna Calibration & Measurement Equipment (ACME) system that will provide the Deep Space Network (DSN) with instrumentation enabling a trained RF engineer at each complex to perform antenna calibration measurements and to generate antenna calibration data. This data includes continuous-scan auto-bore-based data acquisition with all-sky data gathering in support of 4th order pointing model generation requirements. Other data includes antenna subreflector focus, system noise temperature and tipping curves, antenna efficiency, reports system linearity, and instrument calibration. The ACME system design is based on the on-the-fly (OTF) mapping technique and architecture. ACME has contributed to the improved RF performance of the DSN by approximately a factor of two. It improved the pointing performances of the DSN antennas and productivity of its personnel and calibration engineers.

  17. Results of a healthcare worker (HCW) survey on environmental awareness as an instrument for the preparation of an environmental report for the University Medicine Greifswald.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiden, Jens-Uwe; Kramer, Axel; Bornewasser, Manfred; Lemanski, Sandra; Below, Harald

    2011-01-01

    Environmental reporting is increasingly important for medical facilities. Currently, hospitals can determine the content of an environmental report as they see fit. To examine the utility and scope of an employee survey as an instrument for the preparation of an environmental report at the University Hospital Greifswald. For this purpose a questionnaire was developed with a focus on environmental behaviour and the significance attached to the protection of the environment. The employees of the University Medicine Greifswald attach an unexpectedly high significance to the protection of the environment. Based on this finding, this potential should be used to promote the optimal implementation of ecological-economic behaviour within the University Medicine. An employee survey is a useful instrument in the preparation of an environmental report.

  18. Weak-lensing mass calibration of redMaPPer galaxy clusters in Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data

    CERN Document Server

    Melchior, P; McClintock, T; Varga, T N; Sheldon, E; Rozo, E; Amara, A; Becker, M R; Benson, B A; Bermeo, A; Bridle, S L; Clampitt, J; Dietrich, J P; Hartley, W G; Hollowood, D; Jain, B; Jarvis, M; Jeltema, T; Kacprzak, T; MacCrann, N; Rykoff, E S; Saro, A; Suchyta, E; Troxel, M A; Zuntz, J; Bonnett, C; Plazas, A A; Abbott, T M C; Abdalla, F B; Annis, J; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernstein, G M; Bertin, E; Brooks, D; Buckley-Geer, E; Rosell, A Carnero; Kind, M Carrasco; Carretero, J; Cunha, C E; D'Andrea, C B; da Costa, L N; Desai, S; Eifler, T F; Flaugher, B; Fosalba, P; García-Bellido, J; Gaztanaga, E; Gerdes, D W; Gruendl, R A; Gschwend, J; Gutierrez, G; Honscheid, K; James, D J; Kirk, D; Krause, E; Kuehn, K; Kuropatkin, N; Lahav, O; Lima, M; Maia, M A G; March, M; Martini, P; Menanteau, F; Miller, C J; Miquel, R; Mohr, J J; Nichol, R C; Ogando, R; Romer, A K; Sanchez, E; Scarpine, V; Sevilla-Noarbe, I; Smith, R C; Soares-Santos, M; Sobreira, F; Swanson, M E C; Tarle, G; Thomas, D; Walker, A R; Weller, J; Zhang, Y

    2016-01-01

    We use weak-lensing shear measurements to determine the mean mass of optically selected galaxy clusters in Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data. In a blinded analysis, we split the sample of more than 8,000 redMaPPer clusters into 15 subsets, spanning ranges in the richness parameter $5 \\leq \\lambda \\leq 180$ and redshift $0.2 \\leq z \\leq 0.8$, and fit the averaged mass density contrast profiles with a model that accounts for seven distinct sources of systematic uncertainty: shear measurement and photometric redshift errors; cluster-member contamination; miscentering; deviations from the NFW halo profile; halo triaxiality; and line-of-sight projections. We combine the inferred cluster masses to estimate the joint scaling relation between mass, richness and redshift, $\\mathcal{M}(\\lambda,z) \\varpropto M_0 \\lambda^{F} (1+z)^{G}$. We find $M_0 \\equiv \\langle M_{200\\mathrm{m}}\\,|\\,\\lambda=30,z=0.5\\rangle=\\left[ 2.35 \\pm 0.22\\ \\rm{(stat)} \\pm 0.12\\ \\rm{(sys)} \\right] \\cdot 10^{14}\\ M_\\odot$, with $F = 1.12...

  19. Evaluation of the energy dependence of ionization chambers pencil type calibrated beam tomography standards; Avaliacao da dependencia energetica de camaras de ionizacao do tipo lapis calibradas em feixes padroes de tomografia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontes, Ladyjane Pereira; Potiens, Maria da Penha A., E-mail: lpfontes@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleres (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The Instrument Calibration Laboratory of IPEN (LCI - IPEN) performs calibrations of pencil-type ionization chambers (IC) used in measures of dosimetric survey on clinical systems of Computed Tomography (CT). Many users make mistakes when using a calibrated ionization chamber in their CT dosimetry systems. In this work a methodology for determination of factors of correction for quality (Kq) through the calibration curve that is specific for each ionization chamber was established. Furthermore, it was possible to demonstrate the energy dependence on an pencil-type Ionization Chamber(IC) calibrated at the LCI - IPEN. (author)

  20. Evaluation of the two non-consecutive 24-h recall instrument for pan-European food consumption surveys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crispim, S.P.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The comparability of food consumption data originating from national nutritional surveys in Europe is currently hampered because of different methodologies used. Therefore, experts in the European Food Consumption Survey Method (EFCOSUM) consortium proposed to use two non-consecutive

  1. Backscatter nephelometer to calibrate scanning lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyle E. Wold; Vladmir A. Kovalev; Wei Min Hao

    2008-01-01

    The general concept of an open-path backscatter nephelometer, its design, principles of calibration and the operational use are discussed. The research-grade instrument, which operates at the wavelength 355 nm, will be co-located with a scanning-lidar at measurement sites near wildfires, and used for the lidar calibration. Such a near-end calibration has significant...

  2. Calibrating nacelle lidars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courtney, M.

    2013-01-15

    Nacelle mounted, forward looking wind lidars are beginning to be used to provide reference wind speed measurements for the power performance testing of wind turbines. In such applications, a formal calibration procedure with a corresponding uncertainty assessment will be necessary. This report presents four concepts for performing such a nacelle lidar calibration. Of the four methods, two are found to be immediately relevant and are pursued in some detail. The first of these is a line of sight calibration method in which both lines of sight (for a two beam lidar) are individually calibrated by accurately aligning the beam to pass close to a reference wind speed sensor. A testing procedure is presented, reporting requirements outlined and the uncertainty of the method analysed. It is seen that the main limitation of the line of sight calibration method is the time required to obtain a representative distribution of radial wind speeds. An alternative method is to place the nacelle lidar on the ground and incline the beams upwards to bisect a mast equipped with reference instrumentation at a known height and range. This method will be easier and faster to implement and execute but the beam inclination introduces extra uncertainties. A procedure for conducting such a calibration is presented and initial indications of the uncertainties given. A discussion of the merits and weaknesses of the two methods is given together with some proposals for the next important steps to be taken in this work. (Author)

  3. ALHAMBRA-survey: a new tool for photo-z calibrations in absence of spec-z information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molino Benito, A.; Benitez Lozano, N.; The Alhambra-Team

    2013-05-01

    La estimación de los desplazamientos al rojo (redshift) de las galaxias, derivados mediante fotometría multi-banda, se conoce con el nombre de photometric redshifts (photo-z). Es bien sabido que la precisión alcanzable por estas técnicas puede verse incrementada si se dispone de una muestra espectroscópica de galaxias (cuyos redshifts (spec-z) sean conocidos) con la que re-calibrar los puntos cero fotométricos. (Coe et al. 2006, Ilbert et al. 2008, Molino et al. 2012 in prep). ALHAMBRA-survey, que es un cartografiado extragaláctico (de ˜4 grados cuadrados) dedicado a la realización de un estudio de la evolución de las propiedades y contenido del Universo (Moles et al. 2005, 2008), presenta solapamientos parciales con otros cartografiados espectroscópicos ya existentes con el objetivo de validar y mejorar la precisión de sus photo-z. Sin embargo, dada la variabilidad fotométrica entre sus campos, resulta ineficiente extrapolar las correcciones de punto cero, introduciendo sesgos de inhomogeneidad en la precisión de los resultados. En este trabajo se presenta una nueva metodología que permite mejorar la calibración de los puntos cero fotométricos mediante la utilización de la información estadística proporcionada por los propios photo-z. Mediante esta técnica resulta posible no sólo mejorar la precisión de las estimaciones sino, además, soslayar la necesidad de obtener grandes muestras espectroscópicas.

  4. Landsat TM and ETM+ Thermal Band Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsi, Julia A.; Hook, Simon J.; Palluconi, Frank D.; Schott, John R.; Raqueno, Nina G.

    2006-01-01

    Landsat-5 Thematic Mapper (TM) has been imaging the Earth since March 1984 and Landsat-7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) was added to the series of Landsat instruments in April 1999. The stability and calibration of the ETM+ has been monitored extensively since launch. Though not monitored for many years, TM now has a similar system in place to monitor stability and calibration. University teams have been evaluating the on-board calibration of the instruments through ground-based measurements since 1999. This paper considers the calibration efforts for the thermal band, Band 6, of both the Landsat-5 and Landsat-7 instruments.

  5. Performance standard for dose Calibrator

    CERN Document Server

    Darmawati, S

    2002-01-01

    Dose calibrator is an instrument used in hospitals to determine the activity of radionuclide for nuclear medicine purposes. International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) has published IEC 1303:1994 standard that can be used as guidance to test the performance of the instrument. This paper briefly describes content of the document,as well as explains the assessment that had been carried out to test the instrument accuracy in Indonesia through intercomparison measurement.Its is suggested that hospitals acquire a medical physicist to perform the test for its dose calibrator. The need for performance standard in the form of Indonesia Standard is also touched.

  6. Cluster Mass Calibration at High Redshift: HST Weak Lensing Analysis of 13 Distant Galaxy Clusters from the South Pole Telescope Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schrabback, T.; et al.

    2016-11-11

    We present an HST/ACS weak gravitational lensing analysis of 13 massive high-redshift (z_median=0.88) galaxy clusters discovered in the South Pole Telescope (SPT) Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Survey. This study is part of a larger campaign that aims to robustly calibrate mass-observable scaling relations over a wide range in redshift to enable improved cosmological constraints from the SPT cluster sample. We introduce new strategies to ensure that systematics in the lensing analysis do not degrade constraints on cluster scaling relations significantly. First, we efficiently remove cluster members from the source sample by selecting very blue galaxies in V-I colour. Our estimate of the source redshift distribution is based on CANDELS data, where we carefully mimic the source selection criteria of the cluster fields. We apply a statistical correction for systematic photometric redshift errors as derived from Hubble Ultra Deep Field data and verified through spatial cross-correlations. We account for the impact of lensing magnification on the source redshift distribution, finding that this is particularly relevant for shallower surveys. Finally, we account for biases in the mass modelling caused by miscentring and uncertainties in the mass-concentration relation using simulations. In combination with temperature estimates from Chandra we constrain the normalisation of the mass-temperature scaling relation ln(E(z) M_500c/10^14 M_sun)=A+1.5 ln(kT/7.2keV) to A=1.81^{+0.24}_{-0.14}(stat.) +/- 0.09(sys.), consistent with self-similar redshift evolution when compared to lower redshift samples. Additionally, the lensing data constrain the average concentration of the clusters to c_200c=5.6^{+3.7}_{-1.8}.

  7. Weak-Lensing Mass Calibration of the Atacama Cosmology Telescope Equatorial Sunyaev-Zeldovich Cluster Sample with the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Stripe 82 Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Battaglia, N; Miyatake, H; Hasselfield, M; Gralla, M B; Allison, R; Bond, J R; Calabrese, E; Crichton, D; Devlin, M J; Dunkley, J; Dünner, R; Erben, T; Ferrara, S; Halpern, M; Hilton, M; Hill, J C; Hincks, A D; Hložek, R; Huffenberger, K M; Hughes, J P; Kneib, J P; Kosowsky, A; Makler, M; Marriage, T A; Menanteau, F; Miller, L; Moodley, K; Moraes, B; Niemack, M D; Page, L; Shan, H; Sehgal, N; Sherwin, B D; Sievers, J L; Sifón, C; Spergel, D N; Staggs, S T; Taylor, J; Thornton, R; van Waerbeke, L; Wollack, E J

    2015-01-01

    Mass calibration uncertainty is the largest systematic effect for using clusters of galaxies to constrain cosmological parameters. We present weak lensing mass measurements from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Stripe 82 Survey for galaxy clusters selected through their high signal-to-noise thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ) signal measured with the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT). The average weak lensing mass is $\\left(4.8\\pm0.8\\right)\\,\\times10^{14}\\,\\mathrm{M}_\\odot$, consistent with the tSZ mass estimate of $\\left(4.70\\pm1.0\\right)\\,\\times10^{14}\\,\\mathrm{M}_\\odot$ which assumes a universal pressure profile for the cluster gas. Our results are consistent with previous weak-lensing measurements of tSZ-detected clusters from the Planck satellite. When comparing our results, we estimate the Eddington bias correction for the sample intersection of Planck and weak-lensing clusters which was previously neglected.

  8. Cluster Mass Calibration at High Redshift: HST Weak Lensing Analysis of 13 Distant Galaxy Clusters from the South Pole Telescope Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Schrabback, T; Dietrich, J P; Hoekstra, H; Bocquet, S; Gonzalez, A H; von der Linden, A; McDonald, M; Morrison, C B; Raihan, S F; Allen, S W; Bayliss, M; Benson, B A; Bleem, L E; Chiu, I; Desai, S; Foley, R J; de Haan, T; High, F W; Hilbert, S; Mantz, A B; Massey, R; Mohr, J; Reichardt, C L; Saro, A; Simon, P; Stern, C; Stubbs, C W; Zenteno, A

    2016-01-01

    We present an HST/ACS weak gravitational lensing analysis of 13 massive high-redshift (z_median=0.88) galaxy clusters discovered in the South Pole Telescope (SPT) Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Survey. This study is part of a larger campaign that aims to robustly calibrate mass-observable scaling relations over a wide range in redshift to enable improved cosmological constraints from the SPT cluster sample. We introduce new strategies to ensure that systematics in the lensing analysis do not degrade constraints on cluster scaling relations significantly. First, we efficiently remove cluster members from the source sample by selecting very blue galaxies in V-I colour. Our estimate of the source redshift distribution is based on CANDELS data, where we carefully mimic the source selection criteria of the cluster fields. We apply a statistical correction for systematic photometric redshift errors as derived from Hubble Ultra Deep Field data and verified through spatial cross-correlations. We account for the impact of lensing...

  9. Weak-lensing mass calibration of the Atacama Cosmology Telescope equatorial Sunyaev-Zeldovich cluster sample with the Canada-France-Hawaii telescope stripe 82 survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, N.; Leauthaud, A.; Miyatake, H.; Hasselfield, M.; Gralla, M. B.; Allison, R.; Bond, J. R.; Calabrese, E.; Crichton, D.; Devlin, M. J.; Dunkley, J.; Dünner, R.; Erben, T.; Ferrara, S.; Halpern, M.; Hilton, M.; Hill, J. C.; Hincks, A. D.; Hložek, R.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hughes, J. P.; Kneib, J. P.; Kosowsky, A.; Makler, M.; Marriage, T. A.; Menanteau, F.; Miller, L.; Moodley, K.; Moraes, B.; Niemack, M. D.; Page, L.; Shan, H.; Sehgal, N.; Sherwin, B. D.; Sievers, J. L.; Sifón, C.; Spergel, D. N.; Staggs, S. T.; Taylor, J. E.; Thornton, R.; van Waerbeke, L.; Wollack, E. J.

    2016-08-01

    Mass calibration uncertainty is the largest systematic effect for using clusters of galaxies to constrain cosmological parameters. We present weak lensing mass measurements from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Stripe 82 Survey for galaxy clusters selected through their high signal-to-noise thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ) signal measured with the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT). For a sample of 9 ACT clusters with a tSZ signal-to-noise greater than five the average weak lensing mass is (4.8±0.8) ×1014 Msolar, consistent with the tSZ mass estimate of (4.70±1.0) ×1014 Msolar which assumes a universal pressure profile for the cluster gas. Our results are consistent with previous weak-lensing measurements of tSZ-detected clusters from the Planck satellite. When comparing our results, we estimate the Eddington bias correction for the sample intersection of Planck and weak-lensing clusters which was previously excluded.

  10. Ibis ground calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bird, A.J.; Barlow, E.J.; Tikkanen, T. [Southampton Univ., School of Physics and Astronomy (United Kingdom); Bazzano, A.; Del Santo, M.; Ubertini, P. [Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica - IASF/CNR, Roma (Italy); Blondel, C.; Laurent, P.; Lebrun, F. [CEA Saclay - Sap, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Di Cocco, G.; Malaguti, E. [Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica-Bologna - IASF/CNR (Italy); Gabriele, M.; La Rosa, G.; Segreto, A. [Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica- IASF/CNR, Palermo (Italy); Quadrini, E. [Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica-Cosmica, EASF/CNR, Milano (Italy); Volkmer, R. [Institut fur Astronomie und Astrophysik, Tubingen (Germany)

    2003-11-01

    We present an overview of results obtained from IBIS ground calibrations. The spectral and spatial characteristics of the detector planes and surrounding passive materials have been determined through a series of calibration campaigns. Measurements of pixel gain, energy resolution, detection uniformity, efficiency and imaging capability are presented. The key results obtained from the ground calibration have been: - optimization of the instrument tunable parameters, - determination of energy linearity for all detection modes, - determination of energy resolution as a function of energy through the range 20 keV - 3 MeV, - demonstration of imaging capability in each mode, - measurement of intrinsic detector non-uniformity and understanding of the effects of passive materials surrounding the detector plane, and - discovery (and closure) of various leakage paths through the passive shielding system.

  11. Conference Discussion: The Challenges in Multi-Object Spectroscopy Instrument and Survey Design, and in Data Processing and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcells, M.; Skillen, I.

    2016-10-01

    The final session of the conference Multi-Object Spectroscopy in the Next Decade: Big Questions, Large Surveys, and Wide Fields, held in La Palma 2-6 March 2015, was devoted to a discussion of the challenges in designing and operating the next-generation survey spectrographs, and planning and carrying out their massive surveys. The wide-ranging 1.5-hour debate was recorded on video tape, and in this paper we report the edited transcription of the dialog.

  12. Evaluation of the two non-consecutive 24-h recall instrument for pan-European food consumption surveys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crispim, S.P.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The comparability of food consumption data originating from national nutritional surveys in Europe is currently hampered because of different methodologies used. Therefore, experts in the European Food Consumption Survey Method (EFCOSUM) consortium proposed to use two non-consecutive 24-

  13. 飞机系统模拟试验中热电阻及其数字显示仪表的现场校准技术研究%The Field Calibration Technology Research of Thermal Resistance and Digital Display Instrument in Aircraft System Simulation Test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    倪君菲; 盛承勋

    2013-01-01

    在飞机系统地面模拟试验中,热电阻及其数字显示仪表在液压、飞控等试验系统中广泛使用。针对各试验系统中某些位置的热电阻及其数字显示仪表接线复杂,不便拆卸和传统计量方式的种种弊端等问题,提出了一种由现场计量炉、便携式测温仪和温度校准器等设备组成的现场校准系统。实现对热电阻及其数字显示仪表的现场整体校准,同时亦可实现对热电阻及其数字显示仪表的分部校准,避免了拆卸和安装,提高了工作效率,具有实用价值。%In aircraft system ground simulation test, thermal resistance and digital display instrument are widely used in the hydraulic, flight control and other experimental systems. Aiming at the problems of some thermal resist-ance and digital display instrument wiring complexity, inconvenient disassembly in each test system and the short-comings of traditional measurement way, a field calibration system which is consist of field metrology well, portable thermometric instrument and temperature calibrator is presented. The field calibration system realizes thermal resist-ance and digital display instrument field whole calibration, also can calibrate thermal resistance and digital display instrument by segments. It avoids dismantling and reassembling, improves the work efficiency and has strong practi-cability.

  14. Simulation and evaluation of mammography quality from an X-ray equipment of a instrument calibration laboratory; Simulacao e avaliacao das qualidades da mamografia do equipamento de raios-x de um laboratorio de calibracao de instrumentos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Natalia F. da; Castro, Maysa C. de; Caldas, Linda V.E., E-mail: na.fiorini@gmail.com, E-mail: maysadecastro@gmail.com, E-mail: lcaldas@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    The Instrument Calibration Laboratory (ICL) of the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil has developed some work in order to establish a primary standard system for low energy X-ray employing a ionization chamber of free air. For this, one of the most important steps is the determination of factors of correction of its answer. Simulation is a frequently used tool for this because some correction factors can not be determined experimentally. For the correct simulation of these correction factors is necessary some input parameters such as geometry, the material composition of the dosimeter, the experimental arrangement and the radiation source are specified correctly. For the ionization chamber available on the LCI, the geometry, the material components and the experimental arrangement can be obtained easily. On the other hand, spectrum of radiation energy source, which must be inserted into the computer code has not been obtained. Thus, this study aims to determine this radiation spectrum, thus enabling the characterization of the new primary standard for low power X-radiation of ICL.

  15. Trends in caesarean section and instrumental deliveries in relation to Body Mass Index: a clinical survey during 1978 - 2001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefsson Ann

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the last 20 years the rate of CS has increased in Sweden as it has in many other countries. The proportion of pregnant women suffering from a high BMI has also increased rapidly during the same time period. It would therefore be of interest to study both how and if these two observations are related to each other. The aim was therefore to study trends in mode of caesarean section (CS and instrumental deliveries among women in three BMI groups over a time span of almost 25 years with special focus on the observed body weight of pregnant women. Method The design is a retrospective cohort study using medical records of consecutively delivered women at two delivery wards in South East Sweden during the years 1978, 1986, 1992, 1997 and 2001. Results No significant time-trends were found for CS and instrumental delivery within each BMI-group for the time period studied. The proportion of women with BMI ≥ 25 delivered by means of CS or instrumental delivery increased quite dramatically from 1978 to 2001 (χ2 test for trend; p Conclusion Overweight and obese pregnant women constitute a rapidly growing proportion of the total number of CS and instrumental deliveries. Planning and allocation of health resources must be adjusted to this fact and its implications.

  16. The Development of a Survey Instrument on South Dakota's School District Leadership Climate as Related to Deming's Fourteen Points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Lawrence W. O.; And Others

    Development of an instrument to measure baseline levels of applied Total Quality Management (TQM) practices in South Dakota before the introduction and dissemination of TQM theory to the state's educational leaders is described. Using the interpretation of Deming's 14 points that was developed by J. J. Bonstigl, a 115-item initial item pool was…

  17. A Model-calibration Approach to Using Complete Auxiliary Information from Stratified Sampling Survey Data%利用分层抽样数据中完全辅助信息的模型校正方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    伍长春; 张润楚

    2006-01-01

    In stratified survey sampling, sometimes we have complete auxiliary information. One of the fundamental questions is how to effectively use the complete auxiliary information at the estimation stage. In this paper, we extend the model-calibration method to obtain estimators of the finite population mean by using complete auxiliary information from stratified sampling survey data. We show that the resulting estimators effectively use auxiliary information at the estimation stage and possess a number of attractive features such as asymptotically design-unbiased irrespective of the working model and approximately model-unbiased under the model. When a linear working-model is used, the resulting estimators reduce to the usual calibration estimator(or GREG).

  18. Calibration of the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    CERN Document Server

    Gaug, Markus; Berge, David; Reyes, Raquel de los; Doro, Michele; Foerster, Andreas; Maccarone, Maria Concetta; Parsons, Dan; van Eldik, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The construction of the Cherenkov Telescope Array is expected to start soon. We will present the baseline methods and their extensions currently foreseen to calibrate the observatory. These are bound to achieve the strong requirements on allowed systematic uncertainties for the reconstructed gamma-ray energy and flux scales, as well as on the pointing resolution, and on the overall duty cycle of the observatory. Onsite calibration activities are designed to include a robust and efficient calibration of the telescope cameras, and various methods and instruments to achieve calibration of the overall optical throughput of each telescope, leading to both inter-telescope calibration and an absolute calibration of the entire observatory. One important aspect of the onsite calibration is a correct understanding of the atmosphere above the telescopes, which constitutes the calorimeter of this detection technique. It is planned to be constantly monitored with state-of-the-art instruments to obtain a full molecular and...

  19. Calibration of Ground-based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yordanova, Ginka; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report presents the result of a test of a ground-based lidar of other type. The test was performed at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. The result as an establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement uncertainties provided...... by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from the wind vanes is also given....

  20. Landsat-8 Sensor Characterization and Calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Markham

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Landsat-8 was launched on 11 February 2013 with two new Earth Imaging sensors to provide a continued data record with the previous Landsats. For Landsat-8, pushbroom technology was adopted, and the reflective bands and thermal bands were split into two instruments. The Operational Land Imager (OLI is the reflective band sensor and the Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS, the thermal. In addition to these fundamental changes, bands were added, spectral bandpasses were refined, dynamic range and data quantization were improved, and numerous other enhancements were implemented. As in previous Landsat missions, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA and United States Geological Survey (USGS cooperated in the development, launch and operation of the Landsat-8 mission. One key aspect of this cooperation was in the characterization and calibration of the instruments and their data. This Special Issue documents the efforts of the joint USGS and NASA calibration team and affiliates to characterize the new sensors and their data for the benefit of the scientific and application users of the Landsat archive. A key scientific use of Landsat data is to assess changes in the land-use and land cover of the Earth’s surface over the now 43-year record. [...

  1. The balanced scorecard as a potential instrument for supporting planning and improvement in accounting education: Comparative survey findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CJ Cronje

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper is firstly a comparison of the components of a potential balanced scorecard for accounting departments of universities in South Africa and Australia. Secondly, the various suggested measurement criteria of the balanced scorecard components are also compared. The findings of the research paper indicate no significant differences. The conclusion is that the balanced scorecard constitutes a potential instrument for supporting the planning and improvement of the accounting education environment.

  2. Market assessment for active solar heating and cooling products. Category B: A survey of decision makers in the HVAC market place. Survey instruments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lilien, G. L.; Johnston, P. E.

    1980-09-01

    Telephone screener questionnaires and mail-out questionnaires for marketing surveys for solar heating and cooling equipment are presented. Questionnaires are included for the residential segment, industrial segment, HVAC professionals segment, builder/developer segment, and the commercial segment. No results are reported. (WHK)

  3. Self-Calibrating Vector Helium Magnetometer (SVHM) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase 2 SBIR proposal describes the design, fabrication and calibration of a brass-board Self-Calibrating Vector Helium Magnetometer (SVHM). The SVHM instrument...

  4. Development of a Survey Instrument to Measure TEFL Academics' Perceptions about, Individual and Workplace Characteristics for Conducting Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Li; Hudson, Peter; Millwater, Jan; Tones, Megan

    2013-01-01

    A 30-item survey was devised to determine Chinese TEFL (Teaching English as a Foreign Language) academics' potential for conducting research. A five-part Likert scale was used to gather data from 182 academics on four factors: (1) perceptions on teaching-research nexus, (2) personal perspectives for conducting research, (3) predispositions for…

  5. Relationships Among the Knowledge, Efficacy, and Practices Instrument, Color-Blind Racial Attitudes Scale, Deamonte Driver Survey, and Defining Issues Test 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar-Horenstein, Linda S; Garvan, Cynthia W

    2016-03-01

    Concordance studies indicate the degree to which instruments measure the same or similar constructs or something different. The aims of this study were to identify the factor structure of the Deamonte Driver Survey and determine the relationship between the Deamonte Driver (a measure of social class stereotyping), the Defining Issues Test 2 (DIT2; a measure of ethical sensitivity), the Color-Blind Racial Attitudes Scale (CoBRAS; a measure of racial stereotyping), and the Knowledge, Efficacy, and Practices Instrument (KEPI; a measure of cultural competence). The results showed a three-factor solution for the Deamonte Driver Survey and significant relationships between CoBRAS and DIT2 subscales and between CoBRAS and Deamonte Driver subscales. Significant relationships between the measures and exploratory variables, underrepresented minority status, age, citizenship, marital status, political stance, English as a first language, and gender were found. The lack of a significant relationship between the KEPI and Deamonte Driver, DIT2, or CoBRAS subscales suggests that the KEPI is measuring a unique construct. These findings showed how these scales contributed to the assessment of cultural competence among dental students and faculty.

  6. Precise Astronomical Flux Calibration and its Impact on Studying the Nature of Dark Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Stubbs, Christopher W

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of the luminosity of type Ia supernovae vs. redshift provided the original evidence for the accelerating expansion of the Universe and the existence of dark energy. Despite substantial improvements in survey methodology, systematic uncertainty in flux calibration dominates the error budget for this technique, exceeding both statistics and other systematic uncertainties. Consequently, any further collection of type Ia supernova data will fail to refine the constraints on the nature of dark energy unless we also improve the state of the art in astronomical flux calibration to the order of 1%. We describe how these systematic errors arise from calibration of instrumental sensitivity, atmospheric transmission, and Galactic extinction, and discuss ongoing efforts to meet the 1% precision challenge using white dwarf stars as celestial standards, exquisitely calibrated detectors as fundamental metrologic standards, and real-time atmospheric monitoring.

  7. Photometric Calibrations for the SIRTF Infrared Spectrograph

    CERN Document Server

    Morris, P W; Herter, T L; Armus, L; Houck, J; Sloan, G

    2002-01-01

    The SIRTF InfraRed Spectrograph (IRS) is faced with many of the same calibration challenges that were experienced in the ISO SWS calibration program, owing to similar wavelength coverage and overlapping spectral resolutions of the two instruments. Although the IRS is up to ~300 times more sensitive and without moving parts, imposing unique calibration challenges on their own, an overlap in photometric sensitivities of the high-resolution modules with the SWS grating sections allows lessons, resources, and certain techniques from the SWS calibration programs to be exploited. We explain where these apply in an overview of the IRS photometric calibration planning.

  8. An analysis of determinants influencing use of ayurvedic medication in Pune region utilizing a questionnaire survey instrument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vyawahare Neeraj

    2009-01-01

    The survey revealed that consumption of Ayurvedic medication in Pune region is increasing, wherein safety and faith are important parameters, however, like allopathic medication; people usually stick to the prescription issued by the physician. The increasing trend of self medication and lack of knowledge of herb drug interaction especially in non graduates are the major concerns need to be addressed for better outcome of the therapy.

  9. The calibration of the vector polarimeter POLIS

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, C

    2013-01-01

    In this diploma thesis, the calibration of the vector polarimeter POLIS will be described. The instrument is built by the Kiepenheuer-Institut fuer Sonnenphysik (Freiburg/Germany) in cooperation with the High Altitude Observatory (Boulder/USA) and will be operated at the German Vacuum Tower Telescope in Tenerife. The instrument yields simultaneously the polarization state of light in two spectral ranges at 396 nm and 630 nm. The measurement is performed with a rotating retarder, which modulates the incident polarization. The modulation is transformed into a varying intensity through polarizing beamsplitters. The demodulation uses a weighted integration scheme to obtain the full Stokes vector of the radiation. The calibration of the polarimeter is performed through the evaluation of a calibration data set produced with a calibration unit consisting of a linear polarizer and a retarder. The instrumental calibration and the polarimetric model of the telescope are described in detail. This document is an unaltere...

  10. 对JB 4730标准中无损检测仪器设备校准或核查要求的修改建议%The Modification Suggestions for the Requirements of Calibration or Check of Non-Destructive Testing Instruments in JB 4730 Standard

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢常欢

    2012-01-01

    This article compares the requirements of calibration or check for nondestructive testing instruments with EN-04/15,HOKLAS Supplementary etc.,and gives the modification suggestions for the requirements of calibration or check of non-destructive testing instruments for new JB 4730 standard.%借鉴欧盟EN-04/15、香港HOKLAS增补准则第15等标准中对无损检测仪器设备校准或核查的要求,对今后新版JB 4730标准中有关无损检测仪器设备校准或核查的要求提出了修改建议。

  11. Herschel SPIRE FTS Relative Spectral Response Calibration

    CERN Document Server

    Fulton, Trevor; Baluteau, Jean-Paul; Benielli, Dominique; Imhof, Peter; Lim, Tanya; Lu, Nanyao; Marchili, Nicola; Naylor, David; Polehampton, Edward; Swinyard, Bruce; Valtchanov, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Herschel/SPIRE Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) observations contain emission from both the Herschel Telescope and the SPIRE Instrument itself, both of which are typically orders of magnitude greater than the emission from the astronomical source, and must be removed in order to recover the source spectrum. The effects of the Herschel Telescope and the SPIRE Instrument are removed during data reduction using relative spectral response calibration curves and emission models. We present the evolution of the methods used to derive the relative spectral response calibration curves for the SPIRE FTS. The relationship between the calibration curves and the ultimate sensitivity of calibrated SPIRE FTS data is discussed and the results from the derivation methods are compared. These comparisons show that the latest derivation methods result in calibration curves that impart a factor of between 2 and 100 less noise to the overall error budget, which results in calibrated spectra for individual observations whose n...

  12. Calibration beads containing luminescent lanthanide ion complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The reliability of lanthanide luminescence measurements, by both flow cytometry and digital microscopy, will be enhanced by the availability of narrow-band emitting lanthanide calibration beads. These beads can also be used to characterize spectrographic instruments, including mi...

  13. Radiometric survey in mammography: problems and challenges; Levantamento radiometrico em mamografia: problemas e desafios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro, M.V.T.; Navarro, V.C.C.; Garcia, I.F.M.; Ferreira, M.J.; Macedo, E.M., E-mail: navarro@ifba.edu.br [Instituto Federal da Bahia (LABPROSAUD/IFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Laboratorio de Produtos para a Saude

    2015-07-01

    In addition to being mandatory, the radiometric survey is a necessity, especially in the Brazilian reality with the construction of smaller and smaller rooms. However, calibration conditions, the instrumentation and its use, can produce underestimated factors. Measures made at Labprosaud/IFBA, with five different instruments and the ISO N 25 radiation quality, show the possibility of the values presented in the radiometric surveys are underestimated by up to 10 times. The results indicate the need for meters to be calibrated in ISO N qualities, in mammography energy range, in integrated dose mode and exposure times shorter or equal to 1 s. (author)

  14. Reduced Ambiguity Calibration for LOFAR

    CERN Document Server

    Yatawatta, Sarod

    2012-01-01

    Interferometric calibration always yields non unique solutions. It is therefore essential to remove these ambiguities before the solutions could be used in any further modeling of the sky, the instrument or propagation effects such as the ionosphere. We present a method for LOFAR calibration which does not yield a unitary ambiguity, especially under ionospheric distortions. We also present exact ambiguities we get in our solutions, in closed form. Casting this as an optimization problem, we also present conditions for this approach to work. The proposed method enables us to use the solutions obtained via calibration for further modeling of instrumental and propagation effects. We provide extensive simulation results on the performance of our method. Moreover, we also give cases where due to degeneracy, this method fails to perform as expected and in such cases, we suggest exploiting diversity in time, space and frequency.

  15. Intercomparison and calibration of dose calibrators used in nuclear medicine facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, A M D

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this work was to establish a working standard for intercomparison and calibration of dose calibrators used in most of nuclear medicine facilities for the determination of the activity of radionuclides administered to patients in specific examinations or therapeutic procedures. A commercial dose calibrator, a set of standard radioactive sources, and syringes, vials and ampoules with radionuclide solutions used in nuclear medicine were utilized in this work. The commercial dose calibrator was calibrated for radionuclide solutions used in nuclear medicine. Simple instrument tests, such as linearity response and variation response with the source volume at a constant source activity concentration were performed. This instrument may be used as a reference system for intercomparison and calibration of other activity meters, as a method of quality control of dose calibrators utilized in nuclear medicine facilities.

  16. Planck 2013 results. V. LFI calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Planck Collaboration,; Aghanim, N.; Armitage-Caplan, C.;

    2014-01-01

    We discuss the methods employed to photometrically calibrate the data acquired by the Low Frequency Instrument on Planck. Our calibration is based on the Solar Dipole, caused by motion of the Solar System with respect to the CMB rest frame, which provides a signal of a few mK with the same spectr...

  17. Validation of a survey instrument to assess home environments for physical activity and healthy eating in overweight children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crane Lori A

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few measures exist to measure the overall home environment for its ability to support physical activity (PA and healthy eating in overweight children. The purpose of this study was to develop and test the reliability and validity of such a measure. Methods The Home Environment Survey (HES was developed to reflect availability, accessibility, parental role modelling, and parental policies related to PA resources, fruits and vegetables (F&V, and sugar sweetened drinks and snacks (SS. Parents of overweight children (n = 219 completed the HES and concurrent behavioural assessments. Children completed the Block Kids survey and wore an accelerometer for one week. A subset of parents (n = 156 completed the HES a second time to determine test-retest reliability. Finally, 41 parent dyads living in the same home (n = 41 completed the survey to determine inter-rater reliability. Initial psychometric analyses were completed to trim items from the measure based on lack of variability in responses, moderate or higher item to scale correlation, or contribution to strong internal consistency. Inter-rater and test-retest reliability were completed using intraclass correlation coefficients. Validity was assessed using Pearson correlations between the HES scores and child and parent nutrition and PA. Results Eight items were removed and acceptable internal consistency was documented for all scales (α = .66–84 with the exception of the F&V accessibility. The F&V accessibility was reduced to a single item because the other two items did not meet reliability standards. Test-retest reliability was high (r > .75 for all scales. Inter-rater reliability varied across scales (r = .22–.89. PA accessibility, parent role modelling, and parental policies were all related significantly to child (r = .14–.21 and parent (r = .15–.31 PA. Similarly, availability of F&V and SS, parental role modelling, and parental policies were related to child (r

  18. Field calibration of cup anemometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristensen, L.; Jensen, G.; Hansen, A.; Kirkegaard, P.

    2001-01-01

    An outdoor calibration facility for cup anemometers, where the signals from 10 anemometers of which at least one is a reference can be recorded simultaneously, has been established. The results are discussed with special emphasis on the statistical significance of the calibration expressions. It is concluded that the method has the advantage that many anemometers can be calibrated accurately with a minimum of work and cost. The obvious disadvantage is that the calibration of a set of anemometers may take more than one month in order to have wind speeds covering a sufficiently large magnitude range in a wind direction sector where we can be sure that the instruments are exposed to identical, simultaneous wind flows. Another main conclusion is that statistical uncertainty must be carefully evaluated since the individual 10 minute wind-speed averages are not statistically independent. (au)

  19. Effect of survey instrument on participation in a follow-up study: a randomization study of a mailed questionnaire versus a computer-assisted telephone interview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocheleau Carissa M

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many epidemiological and public health surveys report increasing difficulty obtaining high participation rates. We conducted a pilot follow-up study to determine whether a mailed or telephone survey would better facilitate data collection in a subset of respondents to an earlier telephone survey conducted as part of the National Birth Defects Prevention Study. Methods We randomly assigned 392 eligible mothers to receive a self-administered, mailed questionnaire (MQ or a computer-assisted telephone interview (CATI using similar recruitment protocols. If mothers gave permission to contact the fathers, fathers were recruited to complete the same instrument (MQ or CATI as mothers. Results Mothers contacted for the MQ, within all demographic strata examined, were more likely to participate than those contacted for the CATI (86.6% vs. 70.6%. The median response time for mothers completing the MQ was 17 days, compared to 29 days for mothers completing the CATI. Mothers completing the MQ also required fewer reminder calls or letters to finish participation versus those assigned to the CATI (median 3 versus 6, though they were less likely to give permission to contact the father (75.0% vs. 85.8%. Fathers contacted for the MQ, however, had higher participation compared to fathers contacted for the CATI (85.2% vs. 54.5%. Fathers recruited to the MQ also had a shorter response time (median 17 days and required fewer reminder calls and letters (median 3 reminders than those completing the CATI (medians 28 days and 6 reminders. Conclusions We concluded that offering a MQ substantially improved participation rates and reduced recruitment effort compared to a CATI in this study. While a CATI has the advantage of being able to clarify answers to complex questions or eligibility requirements, our experience suggests that a MQ might be a good survey option for some studies.

  20. The Swiss Health Literacy Survey: development and psychometric properties of a multidimensional instrument to assess competencies for health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jen; Thombs, Brett D.; Schmid, Margareta R.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background  Growing recognition of the role of citizens and patients in health and health care has placed a spotlight on health literacy and patient education. Objective  To identify specific competencies for health in definitions of health literacy and patient‐centred concepts and empirically test their dimensionality in the general population. Methods  A thorough review of the literature on health literacy, self‐management, patient empowerment, patient education and shared decision making revealed considerable conceptual overlap as competencies for health and identified a corpus of 30 generic competencies for health. A questionnaire containing 127 items covering the 30 competencies was fielded as a telephone interview in German, French and Italian among 1255 respondents randomly selected from the resident population in Switzerland. Findings  Analyses with the software MPlus to model items with mixed response categories showed that the items do not load onto a single factor. Multifactorial models with good fit could be erected for each of five dimensions defined a priori and their corresponding competencies: information and knowledge (four competencies, 17 items), general cognitive skills (four competencies, 17 items), social roles (two competencies, seven items), medical management (four competencies, 27 items) and healthy lifestyle (two competencies, six items). Multiple indicators and multiple causes models identified problematic differential item functioning for only six items belonging to two competencies. Conclusions  The psychometric analyses of this instrument support broader conceptualization of health literacy not as a single competence but rather as a package of competencies for health. PMID:22390287