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Sample records for survey ii cancer

  1. Surveys of complementary and alternative medicine: Part II. Use of alternative and complementary cancer therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparber, A; Wootton, J C

    2001-06-01

    The second part of this series on surveys of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in the United States provides a "point-of-information" summary of the studies on patients with cancer and their use of CAM therapies. Surveys of patients with cancer were the precursors of the recent wave of studies on CAM prevalence and use. Three tables summarize the findings from a total of 18 surveys categorized by Childhood Cancer, Adult Cancer, and Breast Cancer studies.

  2. Survey design and observations relating to cancer education funding. Cancer Education Survey II: cancer education in United States medical schools (conducted by The American Association for Cancer Education with the support of the American Cancer Society).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakemeier, R F; Kupchella, C E; Chamberlain, R M; Gallagher, R E; O'Donnell, J F; Parker, J A; Hill, G J; Brooks, C M

    1992-01-01

    A survey has been conducted of cancer education programs for medical students in United States medical schools by the American Association for Cancer Education with grant support from the Department of Detection and Treatment of the American Cancer Society (formerly the Professional Education Department). Two questionnaires were used, an Educational Resources Questionnaire (ERQ), which 126 of the 128 medical schools completed and returned, and a Faculty and Curriculum Questionnaire (FCQ), which was completed and returned by 1,035 faculty members who had been named as active in undergraduate medical student cancer education by respondents in each school who had been designated by the Dean's Office to complete the ERQ. Overall conclusions included: (1) increased coordination of cancer education activities is a major need in many schools; (2) there is widespread interest in the further development of cancer education objectives; (3) development of a national cancer education curriculum is needed; (4) there is interest in the development of improved instructional materials and methods; (5) development of evaluation methods is needed for cancer education programs; and (6) an ongoing funding process is needed to provide support for interdepartmental coordination of cancer education activities. Cancer prevention and detection topics were ranked above cancer treatment in plans for future curriculum emphasis. More detailed conclusions and recommendations are provided in this publication and three subsequent articles in this issue of the Journal of Cancer Education.

  3. Ovarian Cancer Stage II

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Ovarian Cancer Stage II Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1650x675 View Download Large: 3300x1350 View Download Title: Ovarian Cancer Stage II Description: Three-panel drawing of stage ...

  4. The Southern H ii Region Discovery Survey (SHRDS): Pilot Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, C.; Jordan, C.; Dickey, John M.; Anderson, L. D.; Armentrout, W. P.; Balser, Dana S.; Bania, T. M.; Dawson, J. R.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Wenger, Trey V.

    2017-07-01

    The Southern H ii Region Discovery Survey is a survey of the third and fourth quadrants of the Galactic plane that will detect radio recombination line (RRL) and continuum emission at cm-wavelengths from several hundred H ii region candidates using the Australia Telescope Compact Array. The targets for this survey come from the WISE Catalog of Galactic H ii Regions and were identified based on mid-infrared and radio continuum emission. In this pilot project, two different configurations of the Compact Array Broad Band receiver and spectrometer system were used for short test observations. The pilot surveys detected RRL emission from 36 of 53 H ii region candidates, as well as seven known H ii regions that were included for calibration. These 36 recombination line detections confirm that the candidates are true H ii regions and allow us to estimate their distances.

  5. The sloan digital sky survey-II supernova survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frieman, Joshua A.; Bassett, Bruce; Becker, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) has embarked on a multi-year project to identify and measure light curves for intermediate-redshift (0.05 Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) using repeated five-band (ugriz) imaging over an area of 300 sq. deg. The survey region is a stripe 2.5° wide...... spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia, 30 probable SNe Ia, 14 confirmed SNe Ib/c, 32 confirmed SNe II, plus a large number of photometrically identified SNe Ia, 94 of which have host-galaxy spectra taken so far. This paper provides an overview of the project and briefly describes the observations completed during...

  6. The sloan digital sky survey-II supernova survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frieman, Joshua A.; Bassett, Bruce; Becker, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) has embarked on a multi-year project to identify and measure light curves for intermediate-redshift (0.05 supernovae (SNe Ia) using repeated five-band (ugriz) imaging over an area of 300 sq. deg. The survey region is a stripe 2.5° wide...... centered on the celestial equator in the Southern Galactic Cap that has been imaged numerous times in earlier years, enabling construction of a deep reference image for the discovery of new objects. Supernova imaging observations are being acquired between September 1 and November 30 of 2005-7. During...... the first two seasons, each region was imaged on average every five nights. Spectroscopic follow-up observations to determine supernova type and redshift are carried out on a large number of telescopes. In its first two three-month seasons, the survey has discovered and measured light curves for 327...

  7. Ca II Absorbers in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: Statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Sardane, Gendith M; Rao, Sandhya M

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of a survey for CaII 3934,3969 absorption-line systems culled from ~ 95,000 Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 and Data Release 9 quasar spectra. With 435 doublets identified in the catalog, this list is the largest CaII catalog compiled to date, spanning redshifts z = 0.3 A, is n_0=0.017 +/- 0.001. In comparison to MgII surveys, we found that only 3% of MgII systems in the SDSS have CaII, confirming that it is rare to identify CaII in quasar absorption-line surveys. We also report on some preliminary investigations of the nature of the two populations of CaII absorbers, and show that they can likely be distinguished using their MgII properties.

  8. PIVKA-II-producing advanced gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Shigetsugu; Honda, Ichiro; Watanabe, Satoshi; Soda, Hiroaki; Nagata, Matsuo; Hoshino, Isamu; Takenouchi, Toshinao; Miyazaki, Masaru

    2004-08-01

    We describe the case of a 68-year-old man with primary advanced adenocarcinoma of the stomach, who displayed extremely high plasma levels of protein induced by vitamin K antagonist (PIVKA)-II (15 600 mAU/ml) and normal levels of alphafetoprotein (AFP) (4 ng/ml). Ultrasonography and dynamic computed tomography ruled out hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) or liver metastasis. After preoperative chemotherapy, pancreatico-spleno total gastrectomy with D2 lymphadenectomy was performed. Postoperatively, plasma levels of PIVKA-II returned to within the normal range (29 mAU/ml). Microscopic examination revealed stomach adenocarcinoma showing various histological types, such as moderately to poorly differentiated mucinous adenocarcinoma, but hepatoid differentiation of gastric adenocarcinoma was not detected. Localization of PIVKA-II and AFP within tumor cells was demonstrated by immunohistochemical staining using monoclonal antibodies. These results indicate that tumor cells from gastric cancer may produce PIVKA-II. Some cases of PIVKA-II- and AFP-producing advanced gastric cancer with liver metastasis have been reported, but this is the first report of gastric cancer without liver metastasis producing PIVKA-II alone.

  9. Status of the Transneptunian Automated Occultation Survey (TAOS II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehner, Matthew; Wang, Shiang-Yu; Alcock, Charles; Reyes-Ruiz, Mauricio; Castro, Joel; Chen, Wen Ping; Chu, You-Hua; Cook, Kem H.; Geary, John C.; Huang, Chung-Kai; Kim, Dae-Won; Norton, Timothy; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew; Yen, WeiLing; Zhang, Zhi-Wei; Figueroa, Liliana

    2016-10-01

    The Transneptunian Automated Occultation Survey (TAOS II) will aim to detect occultations of stars by small (~1 km diameter) objects in the Kuiper Belt and beyond. Such events are very rare ($Construction of the site began in the fall of 2013, and the survey will begin in the summer of 2017. This poster will provide an update on the status of the survey development and the schedule leading to the beginning of survey operations.

  10. The Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sako, Masao; Bassett, Bruce; C. Becker, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey conducted between 2005 and 2007. Light curves, spectra, classifications, and ancillary data are presented for 10,258 variable and transient sources discovered through repeat ugriz imaging of SDSS S...

  11. First Results of The Konkoly Blazhko Survey II

    CERN Document Server

    Sódor, Á; Molnár, L; Szeidl, B; Hurta, Zs; Bakos, G Á; Hartman, J; Béky, B; Noyes, R W; Sasselov, D; Mazeh, T; Bartus, J; Belucz, B; Hajdu, G; Kővári, Zs; Kun, E; Nagy, I; Posztobányi, K; Smitola, P; Vida, K

    2012-01-01

    The two parts of the Konkoly Blazhko Survey (KBS I and II) are introduced. The most important preliminary findings of the second part are presented in comparison to the results of the first part. Two interesting cases of very strong modulation from the KBS II are also shown.

  12. The CLASS blazar survey - II. Optical properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caccianiga, A; Marcha, MJ; Anton, S; Mack, KH; Neeser, MJ

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the optical properties of the objects selected in the CLASS blazar survey. Because an optical spectrum is now available for 70 per cent of the 325 sources present in the sample, a spectral classification, based on the appearance of the emission/absorption lines, is possible. A wi

  13. The CLASS blazar survey - II. Optical properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caccianiga, A; Marcha, MJ; Anton, S; Mack, KH; Neeser, MJ

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the optical properties of the objects selected in the CLASS blazar survey. Because an optical spectrum is now available for 70 per cent of the 325 sources present in the sample, a spectral classification, based on the appearance of the emission/absorption lines, is possible. A

  14. Surveys in differential-algebraic equations II

    CERN Document Server

    Reis, Timo

    2015-01-01

    The present volume comprises survey articles on various fields of Differential-Algebraic Equations (DAEs), which have widespread applications in controlled dynamical systems, especially in mechanical and electrical engineering and a strong relation to (ordinary) differential equations. The individual chapters provide reviews, presentations of the current state of research and new concepts in - Observers for DAEs - DAEs in chemical processes - Optimal control of DAEs - DAEs from a functional-analytic viewpoint - Algebraic methods for DAEs The results are presented in an accessible style, making this book suitable not only for active researchers but also for graduate students (with a good knowledge of the basic principles of DAEs) for self-study.

  15. Pajarito Plateau archaeological surveys and excavations. II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steen, C R

    1982-04-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory continues its archaeological program of data gathering and salvage excavations. Sites recently added to the archaeological survey are described, as well as the results of five excavations. Among the more interesting and important discoveries are (1) the apparently well-established local use of anhydrous lime, and (2) a late pre-Columbian use of earlier house sites and middens for garden plots. Evidence indicated that the local puebloan population was the result of an expansion of upper Rio Grande peoples, not an influx of migrants.

  16. NATIONAL SURVEY ON PREVALENCE OF CANCER PAIN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘志民; 连智; 周伟华; 穆悦; 吕宪祥; 赵苳; 蔡志基; 曹家琪; 任正洪

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To collect nationwide basic data about cancer related pain.``Methods. Sixty cancer patients in each province were randomly selected to participate in this survey. The subjects represented all stages of cancer, tumor sites, and different demographic characteristics. Two self-designed structured questionnaires including reasons, types of pain and pain management were used by patients and physicians respectively. Subjects were asked to report whether he/she had experienced any type of cancer related pain and filled out the equivalent questionnaire. The severity of pain was assessed by using "visual analogue scale".Original data input and analysis were using EPI-INFO software package.``Results. The result showed that 61.6% (958/1555) of patients had different types of cancer related pain.Majority of pain (85.1%) were caused by advanced cancer. The major reasons (64.4%) for poor management or impedimental factors of pain care are due to patient including over-concern on opioid analgesic addiction, reluctance to report pain or refused to use opioid analgesic until at times when pain is intolerable; 26. 8% belonged to physician' s reasons including fear to cause addiction on opioid and lack of knowledge about cancer pain management; 16. 2% are due to lack of different kinds of opioid analgesic for use and 16. 1% belonged to drug regulation.``Conclusions. The results showed that majority of patients (61.6%) had different types of cancer related pain. In most of patients, cancer pain was relieved when they were treated. The major reason for under-treatment or impeded factors for effective relief of cancer pain was fear of opioid addiction by both medical professionals and patients.

  17. NATIONAL SURVEY ON PREVALENCE OF CANCER PAIN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘志民; 连智; 周伟华; 穆悦; 吕宪祥; 赵苳; 蔡志基; 曹家琪; 任正洪

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To collect nationwide basic data about cancer related pain. Methods. Sixty cancer patients in each province were randomly selected to participate in this survey. The subjects represented all stages of cancer, tumor sites, and different demographic characteristics. Two selfdesignedstructured questionnaires including reasons, types of pain and pain management were used by patients and physicians respectively. Subjects were asked to report whether he/she had experienced any type of cancer related pain and fdled out the equivalent questionnaire. The severity of pain was assessed by using "visual analogue scale".Original data input and analysis were using EPI-INFO software package. Results. The result showed that 61.6% (958/1555) of patients had different types of cancer related pain.Majority of pain (85.1%) were caused by advanced cancer. The major reasons (64.4%) for poor management or impedimental factors of pain care are due to patient including over-concern on opioid analgesic addiction, reluc-tance to report pain or refused to use opioid analgesic until at times when pain is intolerable; 26. 8% belonged to physician' s reasons includiag fear to cause addiction on opioid and lack of knowledge about cancer pain management; 16. 2% are due to lack of different kinds of opioid analgesic for use and 16. 1% belonged to drug regulation. Conclusions. The results showed that majority of patients (61.6%) had different types of cancer related pain. In most of patients, cancer pain was relieved when they were treated. The major reason for under-treatmentor impeded factors for effective relief of cancer pain was fear of opioid addiction by both medical professionals andpatients.

  18. Advances in nanotheranostics II cancer theranostic nanomedicine

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book surveys recent advances in theranostics based on magnetic nanoparticles, ultrasound contrast agents, silica nanoparticles and polymeric micelles. It presents magnetic nanoparticles, which offer a robust tool for contrast enhanced MRI imaging, magnetic targeting, controlled drug delivery, molecular imaging guided gene therapy, magnetic hyperthermia, and controlling cell fate. Multifunctional ultrasound contrast agents have great potential in ultrasound molecular imaging, multimodal imaging, drug/gene delivery, and integrated diagnostics and therapeutics. Due to their diversity and multifunctionality, polymeric micelles and silica-based nanocomposites are highly capable of enhancing the efficacy of multimodal imaging and synergistic cancer therapy. This comprehensive book summarizes the main advances in multifunctional nanoprobes for targeted imaging and therapy of gastric cancer, and explores the clinical translational prospects and challenges. Although more research is needed to overcome the substan...

  19. Harold Fred Dorn and the First National Cancer Survey (1937-1939): the founding of modern cancer epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilienfeld, David E

    2008-12-01

    The development of modern epidemiology, particularly cancer epidemiology, is often seen as a post-World War II phenomenon. However, the First National Cancer Survey, conducted from 1937 to 1939 as part of the newly formed National Cancer Institute's initial activities, provided the first data on the occurrence of cancer in the United States. This project was directed by a young sociologist, Harold Fred Dorn. Through Dorn, many of the methodological innovations in sociology, such as the use of surveys and observational study designs, were incorporated into modern epidemiology. I examine Dorn's training and early career in the context of the First National Cancer Survey as a means of investigating the beginnings of modern epidemiology.

  20. European cardiac resynchronization therapy survey II: rationale and design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickstein, Kenneth; Normand, Camilla; Anker, Stefan D; Auricchio, Angelo; Blomström, Carina Lundqvist; Lundqvist, Carina Blomström; Bogale, Nigussie; Cleland, John; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Gasparini, Maurizio; Gitt, Anselm; Hindricks, Gerhard; Kuck, Karl-Heinz; Ponikowski, Piotr; Stellbrink, Christoph; Ruschitzka, Frank; Linde, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    The Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy (CRT) Survey II is a 6 months snapshot survey initiated by two ESC Associations, the European Heart Rhythm Association and the Heart Failure Association, which is designed to describe clinical practice regarding implantation of CRT devices in a broad sample of hospitals in 47 ESC member countries. The large volume of clinical and demographic data collected should reflect current patient selection, implantation, and follow-up practice and provide information relevant for assessing healthcare resource utilization in connection with CRT. The findings of this survey should permit representative benchmarking both nationally and internationally across Europe.

  1. Spectral Confusion for Cosmological Surveys of Redshifted C II Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogut, A.; Dwek, E.; Moseley, S. H.

    2015-01-01

    Far-infrared cooling lines are ubiquitous features in the spectra of star-forming galaxies. Surveys of redshifted fine-structure lines provide a promising new tool to study structure formation and galactic evolution at redshifts including the epoch of reionization as well as the peak of star formation. Unlike neutral hydrogen surveys, where the 21 cm line is the only bright line, surveys of redshifted fine-structure lines suffer from confusion generated by line broadening, spectral overlap of different lines, and the crowding of sources with redshift. We use simulations to investigate the resulting spectral confusion and derive observing parameters to minimize these effects in pencilbeam surveys of redshifted far-IR line emission. We generate simulated spectra of the 17 brightest far-IR lines in galaxies, covering the 150-1300 µm wavelength region corresponding to redshifts 0 C II] line and other lines. Although the [C II] line is a principal coolant for the interstellar medium, the assumption that the brightest observed lines in a given line of sight are always [C II] lines is a poor approximation to the simulated spectra once other lines are included. Blind line identification requires detection of fainter companion lines from the same host galaxies, driving survey sensitivity requirements. The observations require moderate spectral resolution 700 < R < 4000 with angular resolution between 20? and 10', sufficiently narrow to minimize confusion yet sufficiently large to include a statistically meaningful number of sources.

  2. Annexin II/annexin II receptor axis regulates adhesion, migration, homing, and growth of prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiozawa, Yusuke; Havens, Aaron M.; Jung, Younghun; Ziegler, Anne M.; Pedersen, Elisabeth A.; Wang, Jingcheng; Wang, Jianhua; Lu, Ganwei; Roodman, G. David; Loberg, Robert D.; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Taichman, Russell S.

    2013-01-01

    One of the most life-threatening complications of prostate cancer is skeletal metastasis. In order to develop treatment for metastasis, it is important to understand its molecular mechanisms. Our work in this field has drawn parallels between hematopoietic stem cell and prostate cancer homing to the marrow. Our recent work demonstrated that annexin II expressed by osteoblasts and endothelial cells plays a critical role in niche selection. In this study, we demonstrate that annexin II and its receptor play a crucial role in establishing metastasis of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer cell lines migrate toward annexin II and the adhesion of prostate cancer to osteoblasts and endothelial cells was inhibited by annexin II. By blocking annexin II or its receptor in animal models, short-term and long-term localization of prostate cancers are limited. Annexin II may also facilitate the growth of prostate cancer in vitro and in vivo by the MAPK pathway. These data strongly suggest annexin II and its receptor axis plays a central role in prostate cancer metastasis, and that prostate cancer utilize the hematopoietic stem cell homing mechanisms to gain access to the niche. PMID:18636554

  3. Laparoscopic versus open surgery for rectal cancer (COLOR II)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Pas, Martijn Hgm; Haglind, Eva; Cuesta, Miguel A

    2013-01-01

    Laparoscopic surgery as an alternative to open surgery in patients with rectal cancer has not yet been shown to be oncologically safe. The aim in the COlorectal cancer Laparoscopic or Open Resection (COLOR II) trial was to compare laparoscopic and open surgery in patients with rectal cancer....

  4. SPECTRAL CONFUSION FOR COSMOLOGICAL SURVEYS OF REDSHIFTED C II EMISSION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kogut, A.; Dwek, E.; Moseley, S. H., E-mail: Alan.J.Kogut@nasa.gov [Code 665, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2015-06-20

    Far-infrared cooling lines are ubiquitous features in the spectra of star-forming galaxies. Surveys of redshifted fine-structure lines provide a promising new tool to study structure formation and galactic evolution at redshifts including the epoch of reionization as well as the peak of star formation. Unlike neutral hydrogen surveys, where the 21 cm line is the only bright line, surveys of redshifted fine-structure lines suffer from confusion generated by line broadening, spectral overlap of different lines, and the crowding of sources with redshift. We use simulations to investigate the resulting spectral confusion and derive observing parameters to minimize these effects in pencil-beam surveys of redshifted far-IR line emission. We generate simulated spectra of the 17 brightest far-IR lines in galaxies, covering the 150–1300 μm wavelength region corresponding to redshifts 0 < z < 7, and develop a simple iterative algorithm that successfully identifies the 158 μm [C ii] line and other lines. Although the [C ii] line is a principal coolant for the interstellar medium, the assumption that the brightest observed lines in a given line of sight are always [C ii] lines is a poor approximation to the simulated spectra once other lines are included. Blind line identification requires detection of fainter companion lines from the same host galaxies, driving survey sensitivity requirements. The observations require moderate spectral resolution 700 < R < 4000 with angular resolution between 20″ and 10′, sufficiently narrow to minimize confusion yet sufficiently large to include a statistically meaningful number of sources.

  5. Spectral Confusion for Cosmological Surveys of Redshifted C II Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogut, A.; Dwek, E.; Moseley, S. H.

    2015-01-01

    Far-infrared cooling lines are ubiquitous features in the spectra of star-forming galaxies. Surveys of redshifted fine-structure lines provide a promising new tool to study structure formation and galactic evolution at redshifts including the epoch of reionization as well as the peak of star formation. Unlike neutral hydrogen surveys, where the 21 cm line is the only bright line, surveys of redshifted fine-structure lines suffer from confusion generated by line broadening, spectral overlap of different lines, and the crowding of sources with redshift. We use simulations to investigate the resulting spectral confusion and derive observing parameters to minimize these effects in pencilbeam surveys of redshifted far-IR line emission. We generate simulated spectra of the 17 brightest far-IR lines in galaxies, covering the 150-1300 µm wavelength region corresponding to redshifts 0 < z < 7, and develop a simple iterative algorithm that successfully identifies the 158 µm [C II] line and other lines. Although the [C II] line is a principal coolant for the interstellar medium, the assumption that the brightest observed lines in a given line of sight are always [C II] lines is a poor approximation to the simulated spectra once other lines are included. Blind line identification requires detection of fainter companion lines from the same host galaxies, driving survey sensitivity requirements. The observations require moderate spectral resolution 700 < R < 4000 with angular resolution between 20? and 10', sufficiently narrow to minimize confusion yet sufficiently large to include a statistically meaningful number of sources.

  6. HERSCHEL GALACTIC PLANE SURVEY OF [N ii] FINE STRUCTURE EMISSION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldsmith, Paul F.; Yıldız, Umut A.; Langer, William D.; Pineda, Jorge L., E-mail: Paul.F.Goldsmith@jpl.nasa.gov [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2015-12-01

    We present the first large-scale high angular resolution survey of ionized nitrogen in the Galactic Plane through emission of its two fine structure transitions ([N ii]) at 122 and 205 μm. The observations were largely obtained with the PACS instrument onboard the Herschel Space Observatory. The lines of sight were in the Galactic plane, following those of the Herschel OTKP project GOT C+. Both lines are reliably detected at the 10{sup −8}–10{sup −7} Wm{sup −2} sr{sup −1} level over the range –60° ≤ l ≤ 60°. The rms of the intensity among the 25 PACS spaxels of a given pointing is typically less than one third of the mean intensity, showing that the emission is extended. [N ii] is produced in gas in which hydrogen is ionized, and collisional excitation is by electrons. The ratio of the two fine structure transitions provides a direct measurement of the electron density, yielding n(e) largely in the range 10–50 cm{sup −3} with an average value of 29 cm{sup −3} and N{sup +} column densities 10{sup 16}–10{sup 17} cm{sup −2}. [N ii] emission is highly correlated with that of [C ii], and we calculate that between 1/3 and 1/2 of the [C ii] emission is associated with the ionized gas. The relatively high electron densities indicate that the source of the [N ii] emission is not the warm ionized medium (WIM), which has electron densities more than 100 times smaller. Possible origins of the observed [N ii] include the ionized surfaces of dense atomic and molecular clouds, the extended low-density envelopes of H ii regions, and low-filling factor high-density fluctuations of the WIM.

  7. Status of the Transneptunian Automated Occultation Survey (TAOS II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Ruiz, Mauricio

    2014-11-01

    TAOS II is a next generation occultation survey with the goal of measuring the size distribution of the small objects (diameters between 0.5 and 30 km) in the Kuiper Belt. The project is a collaboration between the Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, and the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, The survey will operate three 1.3 m telescopes at San Pedro Martir Observatory in Baja California, Mexico. Each telescope will be equipped with a custom camera comprising a focal plane array of CMOS imagers. Each camera will be capable of reading out image data from 10,000 stars at a cadence of 20 Hz. All telescopes will monitor the same set of stars simultaneously to search for coincident occultation events while minimizing the false positive rate. This poster describes the project and reports on the progress of the development of the survey infrastructure.

  8. The Green Bank Telescope Galactic H II Region Discovery Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Bania, T M; Balser, Dana S; Rood, R T

    2010-01-01

    We discovered a large population of previously unknown Galactic H II regions by using the Green Bank Telescope to detect their hydrogen radio recombination line emission. Since recombination lines are optically thin at 3 cm wavelength, we can detect H II regions across the entire Galactic disk. Our targets were selected based on spatially coincident 24 micron and 21 cm continuum emission. For the Galactic zone -16 deg < L_gal < 67 deg and abs(B_gal) < 1 deg, we detected 602 discrete recombination line components from 448 lines of sight, 95% of the sample targets, which more than doubles the number of known H II regions in this part of the Milky Way. We found 25 new first quadrant nebulae with negative LSR velocities, placing them beyond the Solar orbit. Because we can detect all nebulae inside the Solar orbit that are ionized by O-stars, the Discovery Survey targets, when combined with existing H II region catalogs, give a more accurate census of Galactic H II regions and their properties. The distri...

  9. Breast Cancer Diagnosis Using Machine Learning Algorithms - A Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.M.Gayathri

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer has become a common factor now-a-days. Despite the fact, not all general hospitalshave the facilities to diagnose breast cancer through mammograms. Waiting for diagnosing a breastcancer for a long time may increase the possibility of the cancer spreading. Therefore a computerizedbreast cancer diagnosis has been developed to reduce the time taken to diagnose the breast cancer andreduce the death rate. This paper summarizes the survey on breast cancer diagnosis using various machinelearning algorithms and methods, which are used to improve the accuracy of predicting cancer. This surveycan also help us to know about number of papers that are implemented to diagnose the breast cancer.

  10. Type IA supernova spectroscopy analysis of Sloan Digital Sky Survey II - Supernova Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chen

    2009-06-01

    Supernovae (SNe) have played an important role in the recent dramatic development of observational cosmology. They possess homogeneous observable properties, and thus approximate "standard candles", allowing them to be precise, luminosity distance indicators. Over the last decade, the observed sample of supernovae (SNe) has increased by more than an order of magnitude. Further advances will no longer be limited by statistical errors, but rather by the control of systematic uncertainties, associated with source diversity and evolution. Over 500 SNe Ia have been discovered by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) -- II SN Survey during the three fall seasons from 2005 to 2007. We combine spectroscopic and photometric data to explore reducing these systematic errors. One challenge is to remove accurately the host galaxy light from the observed spectra. We have developed an effective host-subtraction tool using a composite color-constrained PCA+template-fitting program. We have applied this technique to more than 700 spectra from SNe with redshifts up to 0.4 obtained from the SDSS-II SN Survey and more than 200 spectra from low-z SNe at redshifts less than 0.01 obtained from the Center for Astrophysics (CfA) SN archive. We have also developed an automatic method to quantify spectral features of SNe Ia and applied it to the CfA and SDSS-II samples. By comparing the time series of the spectral features between these two samples, we have found no sign of cosmological evolution. We have, however, found evidence for luminosity-dependent differences in the Mg II 4300, Si II 4000, Si II 5800, and Si II 6150 lines. This should be useful for cosmological studies.

  11. NEWLY IDENTIFIED EXTENDED GREEN OBJECTS (EGOs) FROM THE SPITZER GLIMPSE II SURVEY. II. MOLECULAR CLOUD ENVIRONMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Xi; Gan Conggui; Shen Zhiqiang [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200030 (China); Ellingsen, Simon P.; Titmarsh, Anita [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania (Australia); He Jinhua, E-mail: chenxi@shao.ac.cn [Key Laboratory for the Structure and Evolution of Celestial Objects, Yunnan Astronomical Observatory/National Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 110, Kunming 650011, Yunnan Province (China)

    2013-06-01

    We have undertaken a survey of molecular lines in the 3 mm band toward 57 young stellar objects using the Australia Telescope National Facility Mopra 22 m radio telescope. The target sources were young stellar objects with active outflows (extended green objects (EGOs)) newly identified from the GLIMPSE II survey. We observe a high detection rate (50%) of broad line wing emission in the HNC and CS thermal lines, which combined with the high detection rate of class I methanol masers toward these sources (reported in Paper I) further demonstrates that the GLIMPSE II EGOs are associated with outflows. The physical and kinematic characteristics derived from the 3 mm molecular lines for these newly identified EGOs are consistent with these sources being massive young stellar objects with ongoing outflow activity and rapid accretion. These findings support our previous investigations of the mid-infrared properties of these sources and their association with other star formation tracers (e.g., infrared dark clouds, methanol masers and millimeter dust sources) presented in Paper I. The high detection rate (64%) of the hot core tracer CH{sub 3}CN reveals that the majority of these new EGOs have evolved to the hot molecular core stage. Comparison of the observed molecular column densities with predictions from hot core chemistry models reveals that the newly identified EGOs from the GLIMPSE II survey are members of the youngest hot core population, with an evolutionary time scale of the order of 10{sup 3} yr.

  12. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey: Technical Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frieman, Joshua A.; /Fermilab /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.; Bassett, Bruce; /Cape Town U. /South African Astron. Observ.; Becker, Andrew; /Washington; Choi, Changsu; /Seoul Natl. U.; Cinabro, David; /Wayne State U.; DeJongh, Don Frederic; /Fermilab; Depoy, Darren L.; /Ohio State U.; Doi, Mamoru; /Tokyo U.; Garnavich, Peter M.; /Notre Dame U.; Hogan, Craig J.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Holtzman, Jon; /New Mexico State U.; Im, Myungshin; /Seoul Natl. U.; Jha, Saurabh; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Konishi, Kohki; /Tokyo U.; Lampeitl, Hubert; /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci.; Marriner, John; /Fermilab; Marshall, Jennifer L.; /Ohio State U.; McGinnis,; /Fermilab; Miknaitis, Gajus; /Fermilab; Nichol, Robert C.; /Portsmouth U.; Prieto, Jose Luis; /Ohio State U. /Rochester Inst. Tech. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Pennsylvania U.

    2007-09-14

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) has embarked on a multi-year project to identify and measure light curves for intermediate-redshift (0.05 < z < 0.35) Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) using repeated five-band (ugriz) imaging over an area of 300 sq. deg. The survey region is a stripe 2.5 degrees wide centered on the celestial equator in the Southern Galactic Cap that has been imaged numerous times in earlier years, enabling construction of a deep reference image for discovery of new objects. Supernova imaging observations are being acquired between 1 September and 30 November of 2005-7. During the first two seasons, each region was imaged on average every five nights. Spectroscopic follow-up observations to determine supernova type and redshift are carried out on a large number of telescopes. In its first two three-month seasons, the survey has discovered and measured light curves for 327 spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia, 30 probable SNe Ia, 14 confirmed SNe Ib/c, 32 confirmed SNe II, plus a large number of photometrically identified SNe Ia, 94 of which have host-galaxy spectra taken so far. This paper provides an overview of the project and briefly describes the observations completed during the first two seasons of operation.

  13. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey: Technical Summary

    CERN Document Server

    Frieman, Joshua A; Becker, A; Choi, C; Cinabro, D; De Jongh, F; Depoy, D L; Dilday, B; Doi, M; Garnavich, P M; Hogan, C J; Holtzman, J; Im, M; Jha, S; Kessler, R; Konishi, K; Lampeitl, H; Marriner, J; Marshall, J L; McGinnis, D; Miknaitis, G; Nichol, R C; Prieto, J L; Riess, A G; Richmond, M W; Romani, R; Sako, M; Schneider, D P; Smith, M; Takanashi, N; Tokita, K; van der Heyden, K; Yasuda, N; Zheng, C; Adelman-McCarthy, J; Annis, J; Assef, R J; Barentine, J; Bender, R; Blandford, R D; Boroski, W N; Bremer, M; Brewington, H; Collins, C A; Crotts, A; Dembicky, J; Eastman, J; Edge, A; Edmondson, E; Elson, E; Eyler, M E; Filippenko, A V; Foley, R J; Frank, S; Goobar, A; Gueth, T; Gunn, J E; Harvanek, M; Hopp, U; Ihara, Y; Ivezić, Ž; Kahn, S; Kaplan, J; Kent, S; Ketzeback, W; Kleinman, S J; Kollatschny, W; Kron, R G; Krzesiński, J; Lamenti, D; Leloudas, G; Lin, H; Long, D C; Lucey, J; Lupton, R H; Malanushenko, E; Malanushenko, V; McMillan, R J; Méndez, J; Morgan, C W; Morokuma, T; Nitta, A; Ostman, L; Pan, K; Rockosi, C M; Romer, A K; Ruiz-Lapuente, P; Saurage, G; Schlesinger, K; Snedden, S A; Sollerman, J; Stoughton, C; Stritzinger, M; Subba-Rao, M; Tucker, D; Väisänen, P; Watson, L C; Watters, S; Wheeler, J C; Yanny, B; York, D

    2007-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) has embarked on a multi-year project to identify and measure light curves for intermediate-redshift (0.05 < z < 0.35) Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) using repeated five-band (ugriz) imaging over an area of 300 sq. deg. The survey region is a stripe 2.5 degrees wide centered on the celestial equator in the Southern Galactic Cap that has been imaged numerous times in earlier years, enabling construction of a deep reference image for discovery of new objects. Supernova imaging observations are being acquired between 1 September and 30 November of 2005-7. During the first two seasons, each region was imaged on average every five nights. Spectroscopic follow-up observations to determine supernova type and redshift are carried out on a large number of telescopes. In its first two three-month seasons, the survey has discovered and measured light curves for 327 spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia, 30 probable SNe Ia, 14 confirmed SNe Ib/c, 32 confirmed SNe II, plus a large ...

  14. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey: Technical Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frieman, Joshua A.; /Fermilab /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.; Bassett, Bruce; /Cape Town U. /South African Astron. Observ.; Becker, Andrew; /Washington; Choi, Changsu; /Seoul Natl. U.; Cinabro, David; /Wayne State U.; DeJongh, Don Frederic; /Fermilab; Depoy, Darren L.; /Ohio State U.; Doi, Mamoru; /Tokyo U.; Garnavich, Peter M.; /Notre Dame U.; Hogan, Craig J.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Holtzman, Jon; /New Mexico State U.; Im, Myungshin; /Seoul Natl. U.; Jha, Saurabh; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Konishi, Kohki; /Tokyo U.; Lampeitl, Hubert; /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci.; Marriner, John; /Fermilab; Marshall, Jennifer L.; /Ohio State U.; McGinnis,; /Fermilab; Miknaitis, Gajus; /Fermilab; Nichol, Robert C.; /Portsmouth U.; Prieto, Jose Luis; /Ohio State U. /Rochester Inst. Tech. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Pennsylvania U.

    2007-09-14

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) has embarked on a multi-year project to identify and measure light curves for intermediate-redshift (0.05 < z < 0.35) Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) using repeated five-band (ugriz) imaging over an area of 300 sq. deg. The survey region is a stripe 2.5 degrees wide centered on the celestial equator in the Southern Galactic Cap that has been imaged numerous times in earlier years, enabling construction of a deep reference image for discovery of new objects. Supernova imaging observations are being acquired between 1 September and 30 November of 2005-7. During the first two seasons, each region was imaged on average every five nights. Spectroscopic follow-up observations to determine supernova type and redshift are carried out on a large number of telescopes. In its first two three-month seasons, the survey has discovered and measured light curves for 327 spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia, 30 probable SNe Ia, 14 confirmed SNe Ib/c, 32 confirmed SNe II, plus a large number of photometrically identified SNe Ia, 94 of which have host-galaxy spectra taken so far. This paper provides an overview of the project and briefly describes the observations completed during the first two seasons of operation.

  15. Preoperative thrombocytosis predicts prognosis in stage II colorectal cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong Sun; Suh, Kwang Wook

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Thrombocytosis is known to be a poor prognostic factor in several types of solid tumors. The prognostic role of preoperative thrombocytosis in colorectal cancer remains limited. The aim of this study is to investigate the prognostic role of preoperative thrombocytosis in stage II colorectal cancer. Methods Two hundred eighty-four patients with stage II colorectal cancer who underwent surgical resection between December 2003 and December 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. Thrombocytosis was defined as platelet > 450 × 109/L. We compared patients with thrombocytosis and those without thrombocytosis in terms of survival. Results The 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) rates were lower in patients with thrombocytosis compared to those without thrombocytosis in stage II colorectal cancer (73.3% vs. 89.6%, P = 0.021). Cox multivariate analysis demonstrated that thrombocytosis (hazard ratio, 2.945; 95% confidence interval, 1.127–7.697; P = 0.028) was independently associated with DFS in patients with stage II colorectal cancer. Conclusion This study showed that thrombocytosis is a prognostic factor predicting DFS in stage II colorectal cancer patients. PMID:27274508

  16. Angiotensin II facilitates breast cancer cell migration and metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Rodrigues-Ferreira

    Full Text Available Breast cancer metastasis is a leading cause of death by malignancy in women worldwide. Efforts are being made to further characterize the rate-limiting steps of cancer metastasis, i.e. extravasation of circulating tumor cells and colonization of secondary organs. In this study, we investigated whether angiotensin II, a major vasoactive peptide both produced locally and released in the bloodstream, may trigger activating signals that contribute to cancer cell extravasation and metastasis. We used an experimental in vivo model of cancer metastasis in which bioluminescent breast tumor cells (D3H2LN were injected intra-cardiacally into nude mice in order to recapitulate the late and essential steps of metastatic dissemination. Real-time intravital imaging studies revealed that angiotensin II accelerates the formation of metastatic foci at secondary sites. Pre-treatment of cancer cells with the peptide increases the number of mice with metastases, as well as the number and size of metastases per mouse. In vitro, angiotensin II contributes to each sequential step of cancer metastasis by promoting cancer cell adhesion to endothelial cells, trans-endothelial migration and tumor cell migration across extracellular matrix. At the molecular level, a total of 102 genes differentially expressed following angiotensin II pre-treatment were identified by comparative DNA microarray. Angiotensin II regulates two groups of connected genes related to its precursor angiotensinogen. Among those, up-regulated MMP2/MMP9 and ICAM1 stand at the crossroad of a network of genes involved in cell adhesion, migration and invasion. Our data suggest that targeting angiotensin II production or action may represent a valuable therapeutic option to prevent metastatic progression of invasive breast tumors.

  17. Survey of biomass gasification. Volume II. Principles of gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, T.B. (comp.)

    1979-07-01

    Biomass can be converted by gasification into a clean-burning gaseous fuel that can be used to retrofit existing gas/oil boilers, to power engines, to generate electricity, and as a base for synthesis of methanol, gasoline, ammonia, or methane. This survey describes biomass gasification, associated technologies, and issues in three volumes. Volume I contains the synopsis and executive summary, giving highlights of the findings of the other volumes. In Volume II the technical background necessary for understanding the science, engineering, and commercialization of biomass is presented. In Volume III the present status of gasification processes is described in detail, followed by chapters on economics, gas conditioning, fuel synthesis, the institutional role to be played by the federal government, and recommendations for future research and development.

  18. Alternative Dosing of Exemestane Before Surgery in Treating Postmenopausal Patients With Stage 0-II Estrogen Positive Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-17

    Estrogen Receptor Positive; Postmenopausal; Stage 0 Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer

  19. The sloan digital sky Survey-II supernova survey: search algorithm and follow-up observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sako, Masao [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Bassett, Bruce [Department of Mathematics and Applied Mathematics, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa); Becker, Andrew; Hogan, Craig J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Cinabro, David [Department of Physics, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); DeJongh, Fritz; Frieman, Joshua A.; Marriner, John; Miknaitis, Gajus [Center for Particle Astrophysics, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Depoy, D. L.; Prieto, Jose Luis [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210-1173 (United States); Dilday, Ben; Kessler, Richard [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, The University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Doi, Mamoru [Institute of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo 2-21-1, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Garnavich, Peter M. [University of Notre Dame, 225 Nieuwland Science, Notre Dame, IN 46556-5670 (United States); Holtzman, Jon [Department of Astronomy, MSC 4500, New Mexico State University, P.O. Box 30001, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); Jha, Saurabh [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford University, P.O. Box 20450, MS29, Stanford, CA 94309 (United States); Konishi, Kohki [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5, Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba, 277-8582 (Japan); Lampeitl, Hubert [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Nichol, Robert C. [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, Mercantile House, Hampshire Terrace, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth PO1 2EG (United Kingdom); and others

    2008-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey has identified a large number of new transient sources in a 300 deg{sup 2} region along the celestial equator during its first two seasons of a three-season campaign. Multi-band (ugriz) light curves were measured for most of the sources, which include solar system objects, galactic variable stars, active galactic nuclei, supernovae (SNe), and other astronomical transients. The imaging survey is augmented by an extensive spectroscopic follow-up program to identify SNe, measure their redshifts, and study the physical conditions of the explosions and their environment through spectroscopic diagnostics. During the survey, light curves are rapidly evaluated to provide an initial photometric type of the SNe, and a selected sample of sources are targeted for spectroscopic observations. In the first two seasons, 476 sources were selected for spectroscopic observations, of which 403 were identified as SNe. For the type Ia SNe, the main driver for the survey, our photometric typing and targeting efficiency is 90%. Only 6% of the photometric SN Ia candidates were spectroscopically classified as non-SN Ia instead, and the remaining 4% resulted in low signal-to-noise, unclassified spectra. This paper describes the search algorithm and the software, and the real-time processing of the SDSS imaging data. We also present the details of the supernova candidate selection procedures and strategies for follow-up spectroscopic and imaging observations of the discovered sources.

  20. 94 studies on dog population in makurdi, nigeria (ii): a survey of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STUDIES ON DOG POPULATION IN MAKURDI, NIGERIA (II): A SURVEY OF ... several studies on the ectoparasites of dogs have shown that ..... Epidemiological survey of. JOURNAL OF ... endoparasites of dogs and cats with selamectin.

  1. Molecular Medicine II: Hormone Dependent Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-04-01

    family, member 4 deiodinase, iodothyronine, -3.1 Dio2 thyroid hormone catabolism type II serne (cysteine) -4.3 Serpina3n proteinas inhibitor, clade A...ElO, and the anti- p44/42 teins and recruit various proteinases , including matrix metal- MAPK rabbit polyclonal antibody were from Cell Signaling Tech

  2. The Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Sako, Masao; Becker, Andrew C; Brown, Peter J; Campbell, Heather; Cane, Rachel; Cinabro, David; D'Andrea, Chris B; Dawson, Kyle S; DeJongh, Fritz; Depoy, Darren L; Dilday, Ben; Doi, Mamoru; Filippenko, Alexei V; Fischer, John A; Foley, Ryan J; Frieman, Joshua A; Galbany, Lluis; Garnavich, Peter M; Goobar, Ariel; Gupta, Ravi R; Hill, Gary J; Hayden, Brian T; Hlozek, Renee; Holtzman, Jon A; Hopp, Ulrich; Jha, Saurabh W; Kessler, Richard; Kollatschny, Wolfram; Leloudas, Giorgos; Marriner, John; Marshall, Jennifer L; Miquel, Ramon; Morokuma, Tomoki; Mosher, Jennifer; Nichol, Robert C; Nordin, Jakob; Olmstead, Matthew D; Ostman, Linda; Prieto, Jose L; Richmond, Michael; Romani, Roger W; Sollerman, Jesper; Stritzinger, Max; Schneider, Donald P; Smith, Mathew; Wheeler, J Craig; Yasuda, Naoki; Zheng, Chen

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey conducted between 2005 and 2007. Light curves, spectra, classifications, and ancillary data are presented for 10,258 variable and transient sources discovered through repeat ugriz imaging of SDSS Stripe 82, a 300 deg2 area along the celestial equator. This data release is comprised of all transient sources brighter than r~22.5 mag with no history of variability prior to 2004. Dedicated spectroscopic observations were performed on a subset of 889 transients, as well as spectra for thousands of transient host galaxies using the SDSS-III BOSS spectrographs. Photometric classifications are provided for the candidates with good multi-color light curves that were not observed spectroscopically. From these observations, 4607 transients are either spectroscopically confirmed, or likely to be, supernovae, making this the largest sample of supernova candidates ever compiled. We present a new method for SN host-galaxy ide...

  3. The Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sako, Masao; et al.

    2014-01-14

    This paper describes the data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey conducted between 2005 and 2007. Light curves, spectra, classifications, and ancillary data are presented for 10,258 variable and transient sources discovered through repeat ugriz imaging of SDSS Stripe 82, a 300 deg2 area along the celestial equator. This data release is comprised of all transient sources brighter than r~22.5 mag with no history of variability prior to 2004. Dedicated spectroscopic observations were performed on a subset of 889 transients, as well as spectra for thousands of transient host galaxies using the SDSS-III BOSS spectrographs. Photometric classifications are provided for the candidates with good multi-color light curves that were not observed spectroscopically. From these observations, 4607 transients are either spectroscopically confirmed, or likely to be, supernovae, making this the largest sample of supernova candidates ever compiled. We present a new method for SN host-galaxy identification and derive host-galaxy properties including stellar masses, star-formation rates, and the average stellar population ages from our SDSS multi-band photometry. We derive SALT2 distance moduli for a total of 1443 SN Ia with spectroscopic redshifts as well as photometric redshifts for a further 677 purely-photometric SN Ia candidates. Using the spectroscopically confirmed subset of the three-year SDSS-II SN Ia sample and assuming a flat Lambda-CDM cosmology, we determine Omega_M = 0.315 +/- 0.093 (statistical error only) and detect a non-zero cosmological constant at 5.7 sigmas.

  4. Gene expression profiles in stages II and III colon cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsson, Morten; Kirkeby, Lene T; Hansen, Raino;

    2012-01-01

    were retrieved from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) (n¿=¿111) in addition to a Danish data set (n¿=¿37). All patients had stages II and III colon cancers. A Prediction Analysis of Microarray classifier, based on the 128-gene signature and the original training set of stage I (n¿=¿65) and stage IV (n......¿=¿76) colon cancers, was reproduced. The stages II and III colon cancers were subsequently classified as either stage I-like (good prognosis) or stage IV-like (poor prognosis) and assessed by the 36 months cumulative incidence of relapse. RESULTS: In the GEO data set, results were reproducible in stage...... correctly predicted as stage IV-like, and the remaining patients were predicted as stage I-like and unclassifiable, respectively. Stage II patients could not be stratified. CONCLUSIONS: The 128-gene signature showed reproducibility in stage III colon cancer, but could not predict recurrence in stage II...

  5. Ambient Air Pollution and Cancer Mortality in the Cancer Prevention Study II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Michelle C; Krewski, Daniel; Diver, W Ryan; Pope, C Arden; Burnett, Richard T; Jerrett, Michael; Marshall, Julian D; Gapstur, Susan M

    2017-08-21

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer classified both outdoor air pollution and airborne particulate matter as carcinogenic to humans (Group 1) for lung cancer. There may be associations with cancer at other sites; however, the epidemiological evidence is limited. The aim of this study was to clarify whether ambient air pollution is associated with specific types of cancer other than lung cancer by examining associations of ambient air pollution with nonlung cancer death in the Cancer Prevention Study II (CPS-II). Analysis included 623,048 CPS-II participants who were followed for 22 y (1982-2004). Modeled estimates of particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter pollutant models including PM2.5 and NO2 and in three-pollutant models with O3. We observed no statistically significant positive associations with death from other types of cancer based on results from adjusted models. The results from this large prospective study suggest that ambient air pollution was not associated with death from most nonlung cancers, but associations with kidney, bladder, and colorectal cancer death warrant further investigation. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1249.

  6. A survey of etiologic hypotheses among testicular cancer researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stang, A; Trabert, B; Rusner, C; Poole, C; Almstrup, K; Rajpert-De Meyts, E; McGlynn, K A

    2015-01-01

    Basic research results can provide new ideas and hypotheses to be examined in epidemiological studies. We conducted a survey among testicular cancer researchers on hypotheses concerning the etiology of this malignancy. All researchers on the mailing list of Copenhagen Testis Cancer Workshops and corresponding authors of PubMed-indexed articles identified by the search term 'testicular cancer' and published within 10 years (in total 2750 recipients) were invited to respond to an e-mail-based survey. Participants of the 8th Copenhagen Testis Cancer Workshop in May 2014 were subsequently asked to rate the plausibility of the suggested etiologic hypotheses on a scale of 1 (very implausible) to 10 (very plausible). This report describes the methodology of the survey, the score distributions by individual hypotheses, hypothesis group, and the participants' major research fields, and discuss the hypotheses that scored as most plausible. We also present plans for improving the survey that may be repeated at a next international meeting of experts in testicular cancer. Overall 52 of 99 (53%) registered participants of the 8th Copenhagen Testis Cancer Workshop submitted the plausibility rating form. Fourteen of 27 hypotheses were related to exposures during pregnancy. Hypotheses with the highest mean plausibility ratings were either related to pre-natal exposures or exposures that might have an effect during pregnancy and in post-natal life. The results of the survey may be helpful for triggering more specific etiologic hypotheses that include factors related to endocrine disruption, DNA damage, inflammation, and nutrition during pregnancy. The survey results may stimulate a multidisciplinary discussion about new etiologic hypotheses of testicular cancer.

  7. Alcohol intake and mortality among survivors of colorectal cancer: The Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Baiyu; Gapstur, Susan M; Newton, Christina C; Jacobs, Eric J; Campbell, Peter T

    2017-06-01

    Alcohol consumption is associated with a higher risk of colorectal cancer, but to the authors' knowledge its influence on survival after a diagnosis of colorectal cancer is unclear. The authors investigated associations between prediagnosis and postdiagnosis alcohol intake with mortality among survivors of colorectal cancer. The authors identified 2458 men and women who were diagnosed with invasive, nonmetastatic colorectal cancer between 1992 (enrollment into the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort) and 2011. Alcohol consumption was self-reported at baseline and updated in 1997, 1999, 2003, and 2007. Postdiagnosis alcohol data were available for 1599 participants. Of the 2458 participants diagnosed with colorectal cancer, 1156 died during follow-up through 2012. Prediagnosis and postdiagnosis alcohol consumption were not found to be associated with all-cause mortality, except for an association between prediagnosis consumption of Alcohol use was generally not associated with colorectal cancer-specific mortality, although there was some suggestion of increased colorectal cancer-specific mortality with postdiagnosis drinking (RR, 1.27 [95% CI, 0.87-1.86] for current drinking of alcohol consumption and all-cause mortality among individuals with nonmetastatic colorectal cancer. The association between postdiagnosis drinking and colorectal cancer-specific mortality should be examined in larger studies of individuals diagnosed with nonmetastatic colorectal cancer. Cancer 2017;123:2006-2013. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  8. Extended Cancer Education for Longer-Term Survivors in Primary Care for Patients With Stage I-II Breast or Prostate Cancer or Stage I-III Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage I Colorectal Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage I Prostate Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage II Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage II Prostate Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIA Prostate Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIB Prostate Cancer; Stage IIC Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage III Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7

  9. Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy With or Without Triapine in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer or Stage II-IVA Vaginal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-25

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer; Stage II Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIA1 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA2 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Vaginal Cancer; Vaginal Adenocarcinoma; Vaginal Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Vaginal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  10. A survey of individual preference for colorectal cancer screening technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwartz Alan

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to the low participation in colorectal cancer screening, public preference for colorectal cancer screening modality was determined. Methods A cross-sectional survey was performed of healthy ambulatory adults in a pediatrics primary care office and neighboring church. Overall preference was ranked for each of four colorectal cancer screening modalities: Faecal Occult Blood, Fiberoptic Sigmoidoscopy, Barium Enema and Colonoscopy. Four additional domains of preference also were ranked: suspected discomfort, embarrassment, inconvenience and danger of each exam. Results 80 surveys were analyzed, 57 of which were received from participants who had experienced none of the screening tests. Fecal Occult Blood Testing is significantly preferred over each other screening modality in overall preference and every domain of preference, among all subjects and those who had experienced none of the tests. Conclusions Efforts to increase public participation in colorectal cancer screening may be more effective if undertaken in the context of public perceptions of screening choices.

  11. Casein kinase II inhibition induces apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamacher, Rainer; Saur, Dieter; Fritsch, Ralph; Reichert, Maximilian; Schmid, Roland M; Schneider, Günter

    2007-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer death in western civilization. The five-year survival rate is below 1% and of the 10% of patients with resectable disease only around one-fifth survives 5 years. Survival rates have not changed much during the last 20 years, demonstrating the inefficacy of current available therapies. To improve the prognosis of pancreatic cancer, there is the need to develop effective non-surgical treatment for this disease. The protein kinase casein kinase II (CK2) is a ubiquitously expressed serine-threonine kinase and its activity is enhanced in all human tumors examined so far. The contribution of CK2 to the tumor maintenance of pancreatic cancer has not been investigated. To investigate the function of CK2 in pancreatic cancer cells we used the CK2 specific inhibitors 5,6-Dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole and Apigenin. Furthermore, we interfered with CK2 expression using CK2 specific siRNAs. Interfering with CK2 function led to a reduction of pancreatic cancer cell viability, which was due to caspase-dependent apoptosis. The induction of apoptosis correlated with a reduced NF-kappaB-dependent transcriptional activity. This study validates CK2 as a molecular drug target in a preclinical in vitro model of pancreatic cancer.

  12. Ultrasonography survey and thyroid cancer in the Fukushima Prefecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob, Peter; Kaiser, Jan Christian; Ulanovsky, Alexander [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen-German Research Center for Environmental Health, Department of Radiation Sciences, Institute of Radiation Protection, Neuherberg (Germany)

    2014-05-15

    Thyroid cancer is one of the major health concerns after the accident in the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power station (NPS). Currently, ultrasonography surveys are being performed for persons residing in the Fukushima Prefecture at the time of the accident with an age of up to 18 years. Here, the expected thyroid cancer prevalence in the Fukushima Prefecture is assessed based on an ultrasonography survey of Ukrainians, who were exposed at an age of up to 18 years to {sup 131}I released during the Chernobyl NPS accident, and on differences in equipment and study protocol in the two surveys. Radiation risk of thyroid cancer incidence among survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and preliminary estimates of thyroid dose due to the Fukushima accident were used for the prediction of baseline and radiation-related thyroid cancer risks. We estimate a prevalence of thyroid cancer of 0.027 % (95 % CI 0.010 %; 0.050 %) for the first screening campaign in the Fukushima Prefecture. Compared with the incidence rate in Japan in 2007, the ultrasonography survey is predicted to increase baseline thyroid cancer incidence by a factor of 7.4 (95 % CI 0.95; 17.3). Under the condition of continued screening, thyroid cancer during the first fifty years after the accident is predicted to be detected for about 2 % of the screened population. The prediction of radiation-related thyroid cancer in the most exposed fraction (a few ten thousand persons) of the screened population of the Fukushima Prefecture has a large uncertainty with the best estimates of the average risk of 0.1-0.3 %, depending on average dose. (orig.)

  13. A survey of etiologic hypotheses among testicular cancer researchers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stang, A; Trabert, B; Rusner, C

    2015-01-01

    the plausibility of the suggested etiologic hypotheses on a scale of 1 (very implausible) to 10 (very plausible). This report describes the methodology of the survey, the score distributions by individual hypotheses, hypothesis group, and the participants' major research fields, and discuss the hypotheses......Basic research results can provide new ideas and hypotheses to be examined in epidemiological studies. We conducted a survey among testicular cancer researchers on hypotheses concerning the etiology of this malignancy. All researchers on the mailing list of Copenhagen Testis Cancer Workshops...

  14. Post treatment surveillance of type II endometrial cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakhour, Mae; Li, Andrew J; Walsh, Christine S; Cass, Ilana; Karlan, Beth Y; Rimel, B J

    2013-12-01

    There are few studies analyzing surveillance for Type II endometrial cancer recurrence. Our objective was to determine the types of post treatment surveillance tests performed in our institution and the efficacy of these tests in detecting recurrence in type II endometrial cancer patients. One hundred and thirty six cases of type II endometrial cancers at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center from January of 2000 to August of 2011 were identified and 106 patients met inclusion criteria. Medical charts were reviewed for surveillance methods and number of follow up visits. For patients who underwent a recurrence of disease, the surveillance method utilized for detection was documented. Forty-seven of the 106 (44%) patients developed recurrence with a mean progression free interval of 11 months. All patients had a history and physical at each surveillance visit, 78% had Pap testing, 57% had CA-125 levels drawn, 59% had CT (computed tomography) scans done, 6% had PET (positron emission tomography) scans done for surveillance. In our cohort, recurrence was detected by symptoms in 16, by CA-125 in 11, by physical exam in 7, by CT scan in 12, and by PET scan in one patient. No patients had recurrence detected by vaginal cytology. Although performed in the majority of patients, Pap testing did not detect any recurrences within this cohort. History and physical exam detected the most recurrences. These findings suggest that educating patients about relevant symptoms and performing thorough follow-up exams may be the most important aspects of detecting type II endometrial cancer recurrence. © 2013.

  15. The extended ROSAT-ESO Flux Limited X-ray Galaxy Cluster Survey (REFLEX II)\\\\ II. Construction and Properties of the Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Böhringer, Hans; Collins, Chris A; Guzzo, Luigi; Nowak, Nina; Bobrovskyi, Sergei

    2014-01-01

    Galaxy clusters provide unique laboratories to study astrophysical processes on large scales and are important probes for cosmology. X-ray observations are currently the best means of detecting and characterizing galaxy clusters. In this paper we describe the construction of the REFLEX II galaxy cluster survey based on the southern part of the ROSAT All-Sky Survey. REFLEX II extends the REFLEX I survey by a factor of about two down to a flux limit of $1.8 \\times 10^{-12}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$ (0.1 - 2.4 keV). We describe the determination of the X-ray parameters, the process of X-ray source identification, and the construction of the survey selection function. The REFLEX II cluster sample comprises currently 915 objects. A standard selection function is derived for a lower source count limit of 20 photons in addition to the flux limit. The median redshift of the sample is $z = 0.102$. Internal consistency checks and the comparison to several other galaxy cluster surveys imply that REFLEX II is better than 9...

  16. Radiation Therapy and Cisplatin With or Without Triapine in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage IB2, II, or IIIB-IVA Cervical Cancer or Stage II-IVA Vaginal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-23

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer; Stage II Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Vaginal Cancer; Stage IVB Vaginal Cancer

  17. Be Stars as Seen Through Telescopes in Survey Mode (II)

    CERN Document Server

    Rivinius, Th; Baade, D

    2016-01-01

    The first half of the review dedicated to survey works on Be stars (Baade, Martayan, and Rivinius, this vol.) put emphasis on what we can learn from surveys about Be stars as a part of an environment, such as Be stars in binaries, Be stars in different metalicities, or Be stars as part of a star forming and then co-evolving group. This second half will rather concentrate on the information that more focused surveys can give on a Be star, understood as an individual object, and in this way attempts to bridge the gap between highly detailed single star studies, and necessarily broad survey and catalog work.

  18. Lycopene, tomato products and prostate cancer-specific mortality among men diagnosed with nonmetastatic prostate cancer in the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Jacobs, Eric J; Newton, Christina C; McCullough, Marjorie L

    2016-06-15

    While dietary lycopene and tomato products have been inversely associated with prostate cancer incidence, there is limited evidence for an association between consumption of lycopene and tomato products and prostate-cancer specific mortality (PCSM). We examined the associations of prediagnosis and postdiagnosis dietary lycopene and tomato product intake with PCSM in a large prospective cohort. This analysis included men diagnosed with nonmetastatic prostate cancer between enrollment in the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort in 1992 or 1993 and June 2011. Prediagnosis dietary data, collected at baseline, were available for 8,898 men, of whom 526 died of prostate cancer through 2012. Postdiagnosis dietary data, collected on follow-up surveys in 1999 and/or 2003, were available for 5,643 men, of whom 363 died of prostate cancer through 2012. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for PCSM. Neither prediagnosis nor postdiagnosis dietary lycopene intake was associated with PCSM (fourth vs. first quartile HR = 1.00, 95% CI 0.78-1.28; HR = 1.22, 95% CI 0.91-1.64, respectively). Similarly, neither prediagnosis nor postdiagnosis consumption of tomato products was associated with PCSM. Among men with high-risk cancers (T3-T4 or Gleason score 8-10, or nodal involvement), consistently reporting lycopene intake ≥ median on both postdiagnosis surveys was associated with lower PCSM (HR = 0.41, 95% CI 0.17-0.99, based on ten PCSM cases consistently ≥ median intake) compared to consistently reporting intake lycopene intake with PCSM among men with high-risk prostate cancers.

  19. Bioimpedance Spectroscopy in Detecting Lower-Extremity Lymphedema in Patients With Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Vulvar Cancer Undergoing Surgery and Lymphadenectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-09

    Lymphedema; Perioperative/Postoperative Complications; Stage IA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IB Vulvar Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIB Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIC Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVB Vulvar Cancer

  20. Burrell-Optical-Kepler Survey (BOKS) II: Early Variability Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Steve B.; Feldmeier, J.; von Braun, K.; Everett, M.; Mihos, C.; Harding, P.; Knox, C.; Sherry, W.; Lee, T.; Ciardi, D.; Rudick, C.; Proctor, M.; van Belle, G.

    2006-12-01

    We present preliminary results for the photometric time-series data obtained with the BOKS survey (see BOKS I poster Feldmeier et al.). The BOKS survey covers about 1 square degree in the constellation of Cygnus. We obtained nearly 2000 SDSS r-band images spanning a total time period of 39 days. Each point source in our BOKS survey is also present in the single epoch, 7-color photometric survey catalogue being produced by the NASA Discovery program Kepler mission. Light curves of approximately 60,000 point sources, spanning r=14 to 20, are examined and discussed. We will present variability demographics for the BOKS survey including characterization of the light curves into variable classes based on type, color, amplitude, and any extra-solar planet transit candidates.

  1. First-year Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Results: Hubble Diagram and Cosmological Parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Kessler, Richard; Cinabro, David; Vanderplas, Jake; Frieman, Joshua A; Marriner, John; Davis, Tamara M; Dilday, Benjamin; Holtzman, Jon; Jha, Saurabh; Lampeitl, Hubert; Sako, Masao; Smith, Mathew; Zheng, Chen; Nichol, Robert C; Bassett, Bruce; Bender, Ralf; Depoy, Darren L; Doi, Mamoru; Elson, Ed; Filippenko, Alex V; Foley, Ryan J; Garnavich, Peter M; Hopp, Ulrich; Ihara, Yutaka; Ketzeback, William; Kollatschny, W; Konishi, Kohki; Marshall, Jennifer L; McMillan, Russet J; Miknaitis, Gajus; Morokuma, Tomoki; M"ortsell, Edvard; Pan, Kaike; Prieto, Jose Luis; Richmond, Michael W; Riess, Adam G; Romani, Roger; Schneider, Donald P; Sollerman, Jesper; Takanashi, Naohiro; Tokita, Kouichi; van der Heyden, Kurt; Wheeler, J C; Yasuda, Naoki; York, Donald

    2009-01-01

    We present measurements of the Hubble diagram for 103 Type Ia supernovae (SNe) with redshifts 0.04 < z < 0.42, discovered during the first season (Fall 2005) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey. These data fill in the redshift "desert" between low- and high-redshift SN Ia surveys. We combine the SDSS-II measurements with new distance estimates for published SN data from the ESSENCE survey, the Supernova Legacy Survey, the Hubble Space Telescope, and a compilation of nearby SN Ia measurements. Combining the SN Hubble diagram with measurements of Baryon Acoustic Oscillations from the SDSS Luminous Red Galaxy sample and with CMB temperature anisotropy measurements from WMAP, we estimate the cosmological parameters w and Omega_M, assuming a spatially flat cosmological model (FwCDM) with constant dark energy equation of state parameter, w. For the FwCDM model and the combined sample of 288 SNe Ia, we find w = -0.76 +- 0.07(stat) +- 0.11(syst), Omega_M = 0.306 +- 0.019(stat) +- 0.023...

  2. National Youth Survey US: Wave II (NYS-1977)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Youth data for the second wave of the National Youth Survey are contained in this data collection. The first wave was conducted in 1976. Youths were interviewed in...

  3. A Survey of Fertilizer Dealers: II. Sources of Agronomic Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, M. A.

    1988-01-01

    Reports on a survey of fertilizer dealers that was conducted to assess how the dealers were obtaining their agronomic information, aside from formal training sessions, and determine if these sources of information were satisfactory in fulfilling the dealers' needs. (TW)

  4. Type II-P Supernovae from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey and the Standardized Candle Method

    CERN Document Server

    D'Andrea, Chris B; Dilday, Benjamin; Frieman, Joshua A; Holtzman, Jon; Kessler, Richard; Konishi, Kohki; Schneider, Donald P; Sollerman, Jesper; Wheeler, J C; Yasuda, Naoki; Cinabro, David; Jha, Saurabh; Nichol, Robert C; Lampeitl, Hubert; Smith, Mathew; Atlee, David W; Basset, Bruce; Castander, Francisco J; Goobar, Ariel; Miquel, Ramon; Nordin, Jakob; Östman, Linda; Prieto, Jose Luis; Quimby, Robert; Riess, Adam G; Stritzinger, Maximilian

    2009-01-01

    We apply the Standardized Candle Method (SCM) for Type II Plateau supernovae (SNe II-P), which relates the velocity of the ejecta of a SN to its luminosity during the plateau, to 15 SNe II-P discovered over the three season run of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey - II Supernova Survey. The redshifts of these SNe - 0.027 0.01) as all of the current literature on the SCM combined. We find that the SDSS SNe have a very small intrinsic I-band dispersion (0.22 mag), which can be attributed to selection effects. When the SCM is applied to the combined SDSS-plus-literature set of SNe II-P, the dispersion increases to 0.29 mag, larger than the scatter for either set of SNe separately. We show that the standardization cannot be further improved by eliminating SNe with positive plateau decline rates, as proposed in Poznanski et al. (2009). We thoroughly examine all potential systematic effects and conclude that for the SCM to be useful for cosmology, the methods currently used to determine the Fe II velocity at day 50 mus...

  5. Obesity and prostate cancer detection: insights from three national surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, Niyati; Lin, Yong; Dipaola, Robert S; Marcella, Stephen; Lu-Yao, Grace

    2010-09-01

    Previous studies suggest that obesity is associated with higher prostate cancer progression and mortality despite an association with lower prostate cancer incidence. This study aims to better understand these apparently inconsistent relationships among obese men by combining evidence from 3 nationally representative cross-sectional surveys. We evaluated relationships between obesity and 1) testosterone concentrations in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III; n=845); 2) prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in NHANES 2001-2004 (n=2458); and 3) prostate biopsy rates in the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS 2000; n=4789) population. Mean testosterone, PSA concentrations, and biopsy rates were computed for Body Mass Index (BMI) categories. Testosterone concentrations were inversely associated with obesity (P-trend obese (BMI >35) versus lean (BMI 4 ng/mL (3% vs 8%; P 30 versus 16% with BMI 30 versus BMI Obesity was associated with lower PSA-driven biopsy rates. These data support further studies to test the hypothesis that obesity affects prostate cancer detection independent of prostate cancer risk by decreasing the PSA-driven biopsy rates.

  6. Obesity and prostate cancer detection: insights from three national surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, Niyati; Lin, Yong; DiPaola, Robert S.; Marcella, Stephen; Lu-Yao, Grace

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous studies suggest that obesity is associated with higher prostate cancer progression and mortality despite an association with lower prostate cancer incidence. This study aims to better understand these apparently inconsistent relationships among obese men, by combining evidence from three nationally representative cross-sectional surveys. Methods We evaluated relationships between obesity and (1) testosterone concentrations in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III; n=845), (2) prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in NHANES 2001–2004 (n=2,458) and (3) prostate biopsy rates in the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS 2000; n=4,789) population. Mean testosterone, PSA concentrations and biopsy rates were computed for body mass index (BMI) categories. Results Testosterone concentrations were inversely associated with obesity (p-trendobese (BMI >35) versus lean (BMI 4 ng/ml (3% versus 8%; p30 versus 16% with BMI 30 versus BMI Obesity was associated with lower PSA-driven biopsy rates. These data support further studies to test the hypothesis that obesity affects prostate cancer detection independent of prostate cancer risk by decreasing the PSA-driven biopsy rates. PMID:20800152

  7. 78 FR 36788 - Proposed Collection; 60-Day Comment Request; Awareness and Beliefs About Cancer Survey, National...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-19

    ... Beliefs About Cancer Survey, National Cancer Institute (NCI) Summary: In compliance with the requirement... this publication. Proposed Collection: Awareness and Beliefs about Cancer Survey, 0925-NEW, National... objective of the study is gather data about American adults' awareness and beliefs about cancer....

  8. Comparison of candidate serologic markers for type I and type II ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Dan; Kuhn, Elisabetta; Bristow, Robert E

    2011-01-01

    To examine the value of individual and combinations of ovarian cancer associated blood biomarkers for the discrimination between plasma of patients with type I or II ovarian cancer and disease-free volunteers....

  9. Magainin II modified polydiacetylene micelles for cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Danling; Zou, Rongfeng; Zhu, Yu; Liu, Ben; Yao, Defan; Jiang, Juanjuan; Wu, Junchen; Tian, He

    2014-11-01

    Polydiacetylene (PDA) micelles have been widely used to deliver anticancer drugs in the treatment of a variety of tumours and for imaging living cells. In this study, we developed an effective strategy to directly conjugate magainin II (MGN-II) to the surface of PDA micelles using a fluorescent dye. These stable and well-defined PDA micelles had high cytotoxicity in cancer cell lines, and were able to reduce the tumour size in mice. The modified PDA micelles improved the anticancer effects of MGN-II in the A549 cell line only at a concentration of 16.0 μg mL-1 (IC50). In addition, following irradiation with UV light at 254 nm, the PDA micelles gave rise to an energy transfer from the fluorescent dye to the backbone of PDA micelles to enhance the imaging of living cells. Our results demonstrate that modified PDA micelles can not only be used in the treatment of tumors in vitro and in vivo in a simple and directed way, but also offer a new platform for designing functional liposomes to act as anticancer agents.Polydiacetylene (PDA) micelles have been widely used to deliver anticancer drugs in the treatment of a variety of tumours and for imaging living cells. In this study, we developed an effective strategy to directly conjugate magainin II (MGN-II) to the surface of PDA micelles using a fluorescent dye. These stable and well-defined PDA micelles had high cytotoxicity in cancer cell lines, and were able to reduce the tumour size in mice. The modified PDA micelles improved the anticancer effects of MGN-II in the A549 cell line only at a concentration of 16.0 μg mL-1 (IC50). In addition, following irradiation with UV light at 254 nm, the PDA micelles gave rise to an energy transfer from the fluorescent dye to the backbone of PDA micelles to enhance the imaging of living cells. Our results demonstrate that modified PDA micelles can not only be used in the treatment of tumors in vitro and in vivo in a simple and directed way, but also offer a new platform for

  10. A Type II Supernova Hubble Diagram from the CSP-I, SDSS-II, and SNLS Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jaeger, T.; González-Gaitán, S.; Hamuy, M.; Galbany, L.; Anderson, J. P.; Phillips, M. M.; Stritzinger, M. D.; Carlberg, R. G.; Sullivan, M.; Gutiérrez, C. P.; Hook, I. M.; Howell, D. Andrew; Hsiao, E. Y.; Kuncarayakti, H.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Folatelli, G.; Pritchet, C.; Basa, S.

    2017-02-01

    The coming era of large photometric wide-field surveys will increase the detection rate of supernovae by orders of magnitude. Such numbers will restrict spectroscopic follow-up in the vast majority of cases, and hence new methods based solely on photometric data must be developed. Here, we construct a complete Hubble diagram of Type II supernovae (SNe II) combining data from three different samples: the Carnegie Supernova Project-I, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II SN, and the Supernova Legacy Survey. Applying the Photometric Color Method (PCM) to 73 SNe II with a redshift range of 0.01–0.5 and with no spectral information, we derive an intrinsic dispersion of 0.35 mag. A comparison with the Standard Candle Method (SCM) using 61 SNe II is also performed and an intrinsic dispersion in the Hubble diagram of 0.27 mag, i.e., 13% in distance uncertainties, is derived. Due to the lack of good statistics at higher redshifts for both methods, only weak constraints on the cosmological parameters are obtained. However, assuming a flat universe and using the PCM, we derive the universe’s matter density: {{{Ω }}}m={0.32}-0.21+0.30 providing a new independent evidence for dark energy at the level of two sigma. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes, with the du Pont and Swope telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile; and the Gemini Observatory, Cerro Pachon, Chile (Gemini Program N-2005A-Q-11, GN-2005B-Q-7, GN-2006A-Q-7, GS-2005A-Q-11, GS-2005B-Q-6, and GS-2008B-Q-56). Based on observations collected at the European Organization for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile (ESO Programmes 076.A-0156,078.D-0048, 080.A-0516, and 082.A-0526).

  11. Oral cancer in Myanmar: a preliminary survey based on hospital-based cancer registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oo, Htun Naing; Myint, Yi Yi; Maung, Chan Nyein; Oo, Phyu Sin; Cheng, Jun; Maruyama, Satoshi; Yamazaki, Manabu; Yagi, Minoru; Sawair, Faleh A; Saku, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    The occurrence of oral cancer is not clearly known in Myanmar, where betel quid chewing habits are widely spread. Since betel quid chewing has been considered to be one of the important causative factors for oral cancer, the circumstantial situation for oral cancer should be investigated in this country. We surveyed oral cancer cases as well as whole body cancers from two cancer registries from Yangon and Mandalay cities, both of which have representative referral hospitals in Myanmar, and we showed that oral cancer stood at the 6th position in males and 10th in females, contributing to 3.5% of whole body cancers. There was a male predominance with a ratio of 2.1:1. Their most frequent site was the tongue, followed by the palate, which was different from that in other countries with betel quid chewing habits. About 90% of male and 44% of female patients had habitual backgrounds of chewing and smoking for more than 15 years. The results revealed for the first time reliable oral cancer frequencies in Myanmar, suggesting that longstanding chewing and smoking habits are etiological backgrounds for oral cancer patients. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. PHAT Stellar Cluster Survey. II. Andromeda Project Cluster Catalog

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, L Clifton; Dalcanton, Julianne J; Wallace, Matthew L; Simpson, Robert J; Lintott, Chris J; Kapadia, Amit; Skillman, Evan D; Caldwell, Nelson; Fouesneau, Morgan; Weisz, Daniel R; Williams, Benjamin F; Beerman, Lori C; Gouliermis, Dimitrios A; Sarajedini, Ata

    2015-01-01

    We construct a stellar cluster catalog for the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) survey using image classifications collected from the Andromeda Project citizen science website. We identify 2,753 clusters and 2,270 background galaxies within ~0.5 deg$^2$ of PHAT imaging searched, or ~400 kpc$^2$ in deprojected area at the distance of the Andromeda galaxy (M31). These identifications result from 1.82 million classifications of ~20,000 individual images (totaling ~7 gigapixels) by tens of thousands of volunteers. We show that our crowd-sourced approach, which collects >80 classifications per image, provides a robust, repeatable method of cluster identification. The high spatial resolution Hubble Space Telescope images resolve individual stars in each cluster and are instrumental in the factor of ~6 increase in the number of clusters known within the survey footprint. We measure integrated photometry in six filter passbands, ranging from the near-UV to the near-IR. PHAT clusters span a range of ~8 ma...

  13. A tutorial survey of topics in wireless networking: Part II

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anurag Kumar; D Manjunath

    2007-12-01

    This is the second part of the survey of recent and emerging topics in wireless networking. We provide an overview of the area of wireless networking as that of dealing with problems of resource allocation so that the various connections that utilise the network achieve their desired performance objectives. In Part I we provided a taxonomy of wireless networks as they have been deployed. We then provided a quick survey of the main issues in the wireless 'physical' layer. We then discussed some resource allocation formulations in CDMA (code division multiple access) cellular networks and OFDMA (orthogonal frequency division multiple access) networks. In this part we begin with a discussion of random access wireless networks. We first provide an overview of the evolution of random access networks from Aloha to the currently popular 802·11 (Wi-Fi) networks. We then analyse the performance of the 802·11 random access protocol. We briefly discuss the problem of optimal association of nodes to Wi-Fi access points. Next, we consider topics in ad hoc multihop wireless networks. We first discuss topology and cross layer control. For the latter, we describe the important maximum weight link scheduling algorithm. The connectivity and capacity of randomly deployed networks are then analysed. Finally, we provide an overview of the technical issues in the emerging area of wireless sensor networks.

  14. SKA Weak Lensing II: Simulated Performance and Survey Design Considerations

    CERN Document Server

    Bonaldi, Anna; Camera, Stefano; Brown, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    We construct a pipeline for simulating weak lensing cosmology surveys with the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), taking as inputs telescope sensitivity curves; correlated source flux, size and redshift distributions; a simple ionospheric model; source redshift and ellipticity measurement errors. We then use this simulation pipeline to optimise a 2-year weak lensing survey performed with the first deployment of the SKA (SKA1). Our assessments are based on the total signal-to-noise of the recovered shear power spectra, a metric that we find to correlate very well with a standard dark energy figure of merit. We first consider the choice of frequency band, trading off increases in number counts at lower frequencies against poorer resolution; our analysis strongly prefers the higher frequency Band 2 (950-1760 MHz) channel of the SKA-MID telescope to the lower frequency Band 1 (350-1050 MHz). Best results would be obtained by allowing the centre of Band 2 to shift towards lower frequency, around 1.1 GHz. We then move o...

  15. The WSRT Virgo Hi filament survey II; Cross Correlation Data

    CERN Document Server

    Popping, Attila

    2011-01-01

    The extended environment of galaxies contains a wealth of information about the formation and life cycle of galaxies which are regulated by accretion and feedback processes. Observations of neutral hydrogen are routinely used to image the high brightness disks of galaxies and to study their kinematics. Deeper observations will give more insight into the distribution of diffuse gas in the extended halo of the galaxies and the IGM, where numerical simulations predict a cosmic web of extended structures and gaseous filaments. To observe the extended environment of galaxies, column density sensitivities have to be achieved that probe the regime of Lyman limit systems. HI observations are typically limited to a brightness sensitivity of NHI~10^19 cm-2, but this must be improved upon by ~2 orders of magnitude. In this paper we present the interferometric data of the Westerbork Virgo HI Filament Survey (WVFS) - the total power product of this survey has been published in an earlier paper. By observing at extreme hou...

  16. The Arecibo Galaxy Environment Survey VI : The Virgo Cluster (II)

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, R; Auld, R; Minchin, R F; Smith, R

    2012-01-01

    We present 21 cm observations of a 5 x degree region in the Virgo cluster, obtained as part of the Arecibo Galaxy Environment Survey. 13 cluster members are detected, together with 36 objects in the background. We compare and contrast the results from this area with a larger 10 x degree region. We combine the two data sets to produce an HI mass function, which shows a higher detection rate at low masses (but finds fewer massive galaxies) than less sensitive wider-area surveys, such as ALFALFA. We find that the HI-detected galaxies are distributed differently to the non-detections, both spatially and in velocity, providing further evidence that the cluster is still assembling. We use the Tully-Fisher relation to examine the possibility of morphological evolution. We find that highly deficient galaxies, as well as some early-type galaxies, have much lower velocity widths than the Tully-Fisher relation predicts, indicating gas loss via ram pressure stripping. We also find that HI detections without optical count...

  17. Who treats lung cancer? Results from a global survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komiya, Takefumi; Mackay, Christine B; Chalise, Prabhakar

    2017-09-01

    In most Western nations, the medical oncologist plays a significant role in the administration of systemic therapy for lung cancer. In Japan however, treatment for lung cancer has historically been provided by pulmonologists and thoracic surgeons. A comparison of the management of advanced disease between Japan and other nations has not been described. An online, self-administered, international survey was sent to 3907 active members of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. Eligible participants were degreed physicians who prescribed systemic agents for adult cancer treatment within the past five years. In total, 281 respondents answered the questions regarding management of lung cancer. Thorough analysis demonstrated that pulmonologists play a significant role in Japan and the Netherlands, where the role of oncologic specialists is not well established. Of note, all the respondents from the Netherlands reported that pulmonary medicine primarily manages systemic chemotherapy in stage IV, adjuvant chemotherapy, and targeted therapy. We found there are several nations where non-oncologic specialists play a critical role in the systemic treatment of lung cancer. We expect this practice pattern to continue until the global adoption of the oncologic specialty role. Copyright © 2017 The Japanese Respiratory Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Gravitational lensing statistics with extragalactic surveys - II. Analysis of the Jodrell Bank-VLA Astrometric Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helbig, P; Marlow, D; Quast, R; Wilkinson, PN; Browne, IWA; Koopmans, LVE

    We present constraints on the cosmological constant lambda(0) from gravitational lensing statistics of the Jodrell Bank-VLA Astrometric Survey (JVAS). Although this is the largest gravitational lens survey which has been analysed, cosmological constraints are only comparable to those from optical

  19. Cancer mortality and wood dust exposure among participants in the American Cancer Society Cancer Prevention Study-II (CPS-II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stellman, S D; Demers, P A; Colin, D; Boffetta, P

    1998-09-01

    In 1994, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classified wood duct as a human carcinogen, based on very strong evidence of a carcinogenic risk of sino-nasal cancer. Excesses of other cancers, including lung and stomach, have been reported among persons employed in wood industries or occupationally exposed to wood dust, but not as consistently. We investigated such possible associations using the mortality experience of 362,823 men enrolled in the American Cancer Society's Cancer Prevention Study-II in 1982 and followed up for 6 years. Within this group, 45,399 men (12.5%) reported either employment in a wood-related occupation or exposure to wood dust or both. Among woodworkers, a small but significant excess risk was found for all cases of death (RR 1.17 (95% CI 1.11-1.24)) and for total malignancies (RR 1.17 (1.05-1.30)). Among men who reported exposure to wood dust, there was an elevated risk of total mortality (Rr 1.07 (1.03-1.11)), total malignancies (RR 1.08 (1.01-1.15)), and lung cancer (RR 1.17 (1.04-1.31)). Among woodworkers, a significant trend (P = 0.02) of increasing risk of lung cancer with increasing duration of exposure was observed. An unexpected, significantly increased mortality from prostate cancer was observed in both wood-employed and wood-exposed, and a twofold increased risk of fatal brain cancer was seen among the former. Lung cancer mortality was especially high among woodworkers who also reported exposure to asbestos or formaldehyde, and it appears that exposure to these known carcinogens may partly explain the observed increased risks. Excess sino-nasal cancer was not observed, but the number of cases was small.

  20. The Core Collapse Supernova Rate from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Matt; Cinabro, David; Dilday, Ben; Galbany, Lluis; Gupta, Ravi R.; Kessler, R.; Marriner, John; Nichol, Robert C.; Richmond, Michael; Schneider, Donald P.; Sollerman, Jesper

    2014-08-26

    We use the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II Supernova Survey (SDSS-II SNS) data to measure the volumetric core collapse supernova (CCSN) rate in the redshift range (0.03 < z < 0.09). Using a sample of 89 CCSN, we find a volume-averaged rate of 1.06 ± 0.19 × 10(–)(4)((h/0.7)(3)/(yr Mpc(3))) at a mean redshift of 0.072 ± 0.009. We measure the CCSN luminosity function from the data and consider the implications on the star formation history.

  1. Bright but slow - Type II supernovae from OGLE-IV - Implications for magnitude limited surveys

    OpenAIRE

    Poznanski, Dovi; Kostrzewa-Rutkowska, Zuzanna; Wyrzykowski, Lukasz; Blagorodnova, Nadejda

    2015-01-01

    We study a sample of 11 Type II supernovae (SNe) discovered by the OGLE-IV survey. All objects have well sampled I-band light curves, and at least one spectrum. We find that 2 or 3 of the 11 SNe have a declining light curve, and spectra consistent with other SNe II-L, while the rest have plateaus that can be as short as 70d, unlike the 100d typically found in nearby galaxies. The OGLE SNe are also brighter, and show that magnitude limited surveys find SNe that are different than usually found...

  2. The core collapse supernova rate from the SDSS-II supernova survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Matt; Cinabro, David [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); Dilday, Ben [Spokane, WA 99203 (United States); Galbany, Lluis [Millennium Institute of Astrophysics, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Gupta, Ravi R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Kessler, R. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Marriner, John [Center for Particle Astrophysics, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Nichol, Robert C. [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, Dennis Sciama Building, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth PO1 2FX (United Kingdom); Richmond, Michael [School of Physics and Astronomy, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Schneider, Donald P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Sollerman, Jesper, E-mail: cinabro@physics.wayne.edu [The Oskar Klein Centre, Department of Astronomy, AlbaNova, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-09-10

    We use the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II Supernova Survey (SDSS-II SNS) data to measure the volumetric core collapse supernova (CCSN) rate in the redshift range (0.03 < z < 0.09). Using a sample of 89 CCSN, we find a volume-averaged rate of 1.06 ± 0.19 × 10{sup –4}((h/0.7){sup 3}/(yr Mpc{sup 3})) at a mean redshift of 0.072 ± 0.009. We measure the CCSN luminosity function from the data and consider the implications on the star formation history.

  3. Cancer screening in Korea, 2012: results from the Korean National Cancer Screening Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Mina; Choi, Kui Son; Lee, Yoon Young; Park, Boyoung; Jun, Jae Kwan

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the cancer screening rates for five types of cancer (stomach, liver, colorectal, breast, and cervix uteri) using data from the Korean National Cancer Screening Survey (KNCSS), which is a nationwide, annual cross-sectional survey. The eligible study population included cancer-free men 40 years of age and older and women 30 years of age and older. The lifetime screening rate and screening rate with recommendation were calculated. The lifetime screening rates for gastric, liver, colorectal, breast, and cervical cancers were 77.9%, 69.9%, 65.8%, 82.9%, and 77.1%, respectively. The screening rates with recommendation were 70.9%, 21.5%, 44.7%, 70.9%, and 67.9%, respectively. The most common reason for all types of cancer was "no symptoms, " followed by "lack of time" and "fear of the examination procedure. " Efforts to facilitate participation in liver and colorectal cancer screening among Korean men and women are needed.

  4. Family Caregiver Palliative Care Intervention in Supporting Caregivers of Patients With Stage II-IV Gastrointestinal, Gynecologic, and Urologic Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-13

    Healthy, no Evidence of Disease; Localized Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Psychosocial Effects of Cancer and Its Treatment; Recurrent Bladder Cancer; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Recurrent Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Urethral Cancer; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Regional Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage II Bladder Cancer; Stage II Renal Cell Cancer; Stage II Urethral Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIA Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage III Urethral Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Rectal

  5. Chemotherapy Toxicity On Quality of Life in Older Patients With Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial, Primary Peritoneal Cavity, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-09

    Stage I Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage III Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  6. Statistical design in phase II clinical trials and its application in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, Francesco; Di Maio, Massimo; De Maio, Ermelinda; Maione, Paolo; Ottaiano, Alessandro; Pensabene, Matilde; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe; Lombardi, Alessandra Vernaglia; Signoriello, Giuseppe; Gallo, Ciro

    2003-05-01

    Several statistical designs for phase II studies have been proposed, but they are frequently misunderstood or not applied at all. In this review we describe the major characteristics of the available designs. To investigate the extent to which statistical designs were used in some recent phase II studies, and which designs were the most common, we did a survey of 145 trials involving treatment of breast cancer. Studies selected for the survey were published between 1995 and 1999 in one of seven specific oncology journals (all with impact factor consistently higher than 2). 94 of the studies (64.8%) did not have an identifiable statistical design. However, among the 51 studies with statistical design there was a notable heterogeneity in the type of design applied. We put together a list of factors associated with use of statistical design at univariate analysis. These factors included: referral to a previous phase I study, recent trial start date, private sponsorship, single-agent treatment, and multicentre organisation. Single-agent treatment (OR 2.35; 95% CI 1.01-5.51) and multicentre organisation (OR 3.24; 95% CI 1.47-7.15) were independently predictive of the presence of statistical design. Publication in journals with high impact factors and short intervals between the start of the study and publication were also correlated with statistical design.

  7. Seroepidemiologic studies in Oaxaca, Mexico. II. Survey for arbovirus antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, R S; Zarate, M L; Cedeño-Ferreira, J; Antonio Paz, E

    1979-01-01

    A serologic survey was conducted in south-western Mexico to obtain information on human experience with arbovirus infections. Sera were collected from two semitropical areas along the Pacific coast of Oaxaca State, two mountain areas above 1,700 meters and the interior valley at 1,500 meters. Of the 610 sera tested for group A antibody, 4.9 per cent were positive in the hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) test to Venezuelan (VE), 11 per cent to Eastern, and none to Western encephalitis viruses. In neutralization tests the antibody was shown to be probably due to VE virus infections. When sera were screened for group B antibodies in the HI test, 32 per cent were positive with St. Louis encephalitis (SLE), 19 per cent with Ilhéus, and 4 per cent with yellow fever viruses. The pattern of reactions suggested that SLE or an antigenically related virus was responsible for the antibody detected. An unusually high rate was found in a mountain area at 2,000 meters: 41 per cent of 113 persons tested were seropositive to SLE. Of 493 sera screened by complement-fixation test, 6 per cent were positive to Nepuyo, 4 per cent to Patois, and 3 per cent to Tlacotalpan viruses.

  8. THE CARNEGIE-IRVINE GALAXY SURVEY. II. ISOPHOTAL ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Zhaoyu [Department of Astronomy, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Ho, Luis C. [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Barth, Aaron J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, 4129 Frederick Reines Hall, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697-4575 (United States); Peng, Chien Y. [NRC Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada)

    2011-12-01

    The Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey (CGS) is a comprehensive investigation of the physical properties of a complete, representative sample of 605 bright (B{sub T} {<=} 12.9 mag) galaxies in the southern hemisphere. This contribution describes the isophotal analysis of the broadband (BVRI) optical imaging component of the project. We pay close attention to sky subtraction, which is particularly challenging for some of the large galaxies in our sample. Extensive crosschecks with internal and external data confirm that our calibration and sky subtraction techniques are robust with respect to the quoted measurement uncertainties. We present a uniform catalog of one-dimensional radial profiles of surface brightness and geometric parameters, as well as integrated colors and color gradients. Composite profiles highlight the tremendous diversity of brightness distributions found in disk galaxies and their dependence on Hubble type. A significant fraction of S0 and spiral galaxies exhibit non-exponential profiles in their outer regions. We perform Fourier decomposition of the isophotes to quantify non-axisymmetric deviations in the light distribution. We use the geometric parameters, in conjunction with the amplitude and phase of the m = 2 Fourier mode, to identify bars and quantify their size and strength. Spiral arm strengths are characterized using the m = 2 Fourier profiles and structure maps. Finally, we utilize the information encoded in the m = 1 Fourier profiles to measure disk lopsidedness. The databases assembled here and in Paper I lay the foundation for forthcoming scientific applications of CGS.

  9. The Pittsburgh Sloan Digital Sky Survey MgII Quasar Absorption-Line Survey Catalog

    CERN Document Server

    Quider, Anna M; Turnshek, David A; Rao, Sandhya M; Monier, Eric M; Weyant, Anja N; Busche, Joseph R

    2011-01-01

    We present a catalog of intervening MgII quasar absorption-line systems in the redshift interval 0.36 17,000 measured MgII doublets. We also present data on the ~44,600 quasar spectra which were searched to construct the catalog, including redshift and magnitude information, continuum-normalized spectra, and corresponding arrays of redshift-dependent minimum rest equivalent widths detectable at our confidence threshold. The catalog is available on the web. A careful second search of 500 random spectra indicated that, for every 100 spectra searched, approximately one significant MgII system was accidentally rejected. Current plans to expand the catalog beyond DR4 quasars are discussed. Many MgII absorbers are known to be associated with galaxies. Therefore, the combination of large size and well understood statistics makes this catalog ideal for precision studies of the low-ionization and neutral gas regions associated with galaxies at low to moderate redshift. An analysis of the statistics of MgII absorbers ...

  10. Cancer screening status in Korea, 2011: results from the Korean National Cancer Screening Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Boyoung; Choi, Kui Son; Lee, Yoon Young; Jun, Jae Kwan; Seo, Hong Gwan

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the use of screening for stomach, liver, colorectal, breast, and cervical cancers, which are included in the Korean National Cancer Screening Programme. In 2011 the National Cancer Centre in Korea conducted a nationwide, population-based, cross-sectional interview survey using multi-stage random sampling. Participants included 4,100 cancer-free men 40 years and over of age and women over 30 years of age. The lifetime screening rates for stomach, liver, colorectal, breast, and cervical cancers were 76.2%, 54.3%, 56.1%, 79.0%, and, 74.8%, respectively. The rates of recommended screening for stomach, liver, colorectal, breast, and cervical cancers were 64.6%, 22.9%, 35.3%, 60.4%, and 62.4%, respectively. More than 70% of all screening was attributed to organised cancer screening programmes. The main reason given for non attendance was 'no symptoms'. A greater effort is needed to increase screening rates, especially for liver and colorectal cancers.

  11. Cancer incidence by marital status: U. S. Third National Cancer Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernster, V.L. (Univ. of California, San Francisco); Sacks, S.T.; Selvin, S.; Petrakis, N.L.

    1979-09-01

    Site-specific cancer incidence rats were computed by sex, age, and marital status for whites and blacks separately for ages 35-64 years with the use of population-based incidence data from the Third National Cancer Survey (1969-71) and with demographic data from the 1970 U.S. Census. Although rates were presented for all cancer sites combined and for 44 specific sites or rubrics, discussion focused on the 17 most common cancers. Within age, race, and sex groups, patterns of cancer incidence by marital status were compared by means of standardized incidence ratios, and the consistency of marital status patterns across age groups was assessed statistically. Among the most notable findings were: excess cancer rates across most sites and age groups in single black males, consistently high rates for cancer of the lung and bronchus in divorced white males and in single black females, low rates for the hormone-dependent reproductive tumors (prostate gland, breast, uterine corpus, and ovary) in separated white males and females, and high rates for cervical cancer among separated white women. Marital status patterns, where found, frequently differed between whites and blacks and between males and females.

  12. Bright but slow - Type II supernovae from OGLE-IV & magnitude limited surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Poznanski, Dovi; Wyrzykowski, Lukasz; Blagorodnova, Nadejda

    2015-01-01

    We study a sample of 11 Type II supernovae (SNe) discovered by the OGLE-IV survey. All objects have well sampled I-band light curves, and at least one spectrum. We find that 3 or 4 of the 11 SNe have a declining light curve, making them SNe II-L, while the rest have plateaus that can be as short as 70d, unlike the 100d typically found in nearby galaxies. These SNe are also brighter than found in the local Universe, and show that magnitude limited surveys find SNe that are different than found in nearby galaxies. We discuss this sample in the context of understanding Type II SNe as a class and their suggested use as standard candles.

  13. Dietary Screener Questionnaire in the National Health Interview Survey Cancer Control Supplement 2010: Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) Cancer Control Supplement (CCS) is administered every five years and focuses on knowledge, attitudes, and practices in cancer-related health behaviors, screening, and risk assessment.

  14. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey:Search Algorithm and Follow-up Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sako, Masao; /Pennsylvania U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Bassett, Bruce; /Cape Town U. /South African Astron. Observ.; Becker, Andrew; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Cinabro, David; /Wayne State U.; DeJongh, Don Frederic; /Fermilab; Depoy, D.L.; /Ohio State U.; Doi, Mamoru; /Tokyo U.; Garnavich, Peter M.; /Notre Dame U.; Craig, Hogan, J.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Holtzman, Jon; /New Mexico State U.; Jha, Saurabh; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Konishi, Kohki; /Tokyo U.; Lampeitl, Hubert; /Baltimore, Space; Marriner, John; /Fermilab; Miknaitis, Gajus; /Fermilab; Nichol, Robert C.; /Portsmouth U.; Prieto, Jose Luis; /Ohio State U.; Richmond, Michael W.; /Rochester Inst.; Schneider, Donald P.; /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys.; Smith, Mathew; /Portsmouth U.; SubbaRao, Mark; /Chicago U. /Tokyo U. /Tokyo U. /South African Astron. Observ. /Tokyo

    2007-09-14

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey has identified a large number of new transient sources in a 300 deg2 region along the celestial equator during its first two seasons of a three-season campaign. Multi-band (ugriz) light curves were measured for most of the sources, which include solar system objects, Galactic variable stars, active galactic nuclei, supernovae (SNe), and other astronomical transients. The imaging survey is augmented by an extensive spectroscopic follow-up program to identify SNe, measure their redshifts, and study the physical conditions of the explosions and their environment through spectroscopic diagnostics. During the survey, light curves are rapidly evaluated to provide an initial photometric type of the SNe, and a selected sample of sources are targeted for spectroscopic observations. In the first two seasons, 476 sources were selected for spectroscopic observations, of which 403 were identified as SNe. For the Type Ia SNe, the main driver for the Survey, our photometric typing and targeting efficiency is 90%. Only 6% of the photometric SN Ia candidates were spectroscopically classified as non-SN Ia instead, and the remaining 4% resulted in low signal-to-noise, unclassified spectra. This paper describes the search algorithm and the software, and the real-time processing of the SDSS imaging data. We also present the details of the supernova candidate selection procedures and strategies for follow-up spectroscopic and imaging observations of the discovered sources.

  15. A Class I and Class II Methanol Maser Survey of Extended Green Objects (EGOs) from the GLIMPSE Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Cyganowski, C J; Hunter, T R; Churchwell, E

    2009-01-01

    We present the results of a high angular resolution Very Large Array (VLA) Class I 44 GHz and Class II 6.7 GHz methanol maser survey of a sample of ~20 massive young stellar object (MYSO) outflow candidates selected on the basis of extended 4.5 micron emission in Spitzer Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire (GLIMPSE) images. These 4.5 micron-selected candidates are referred to as extended green objects (EGOs), for the common coding of this band as green in three-color IRAC images. The detection rate of 6.7 GHz Class II methanol masers, which are associated exclusively with massive YSOs, towards EGOs is greater than ~64%--nearly double the detection rate of surveys using other MYSO selection criteria. The detection rate of Class I 44 GHz methanol masers, which trace molecular outflows, is ~89% towards EGOs associated with 6.7 GHz methanol masers. The two types of methanol masers exhibit different spatial distributions: 6.7 GHz masers are centrally concentrated and usually coincide with 24 m...

  16. Tubal sterilization and breast cancer incidence: results from the cancer prevention study II nutrition cohort and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudet, Mia M; Patel, Alpa V; Sun, Juzhong; Teras, Lauren R; Gapstur, Susan M

    2013-03-15

    Tubal sterilization is a common form of contraception in the United States and is hypothesized to be associated with a lower risk of breast cancer. However, prior observational studies have reported inconsistent results. We investigated the association between tubal sterilization and breast cancer risk among 77,249 postmenopausal, cancer-free women in the Cancer Prevention Study II (CPS-II) Nutrition Cohort, enrolled in 21 states in the United States during 1992-1993. During 15 years of follow-up through June 30, 2007, 4,084 invasive breast cancer cases were diagnosed. Multivariable Cox proportional hazard regression was used to estimate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals. A meta-analysis including the CPS-II Nutrition Cohort results with other published results from 4 case-control studies and 3 prospective studies was conducted to provide a summary estimate for the association between tubal sterilization and breast cancer risk. In the CPS-II Nutrition Cohort, tubal sterilization was not associated with breast cancer incidence (multivariable-adjusted hazard ratio = 1.08, 95% confidence interval: 0.97, 1.20). Associations stratified by year of tubal sterilization, age, and time since surgery were also null. The meta-analysis also found no association between tubal sterilization and breast cancer risk (odds ratio = 0.97, 95% confidence interval: 0.84, 1.09). Tubal sterilization does not appear to be associated with breast cancer risk.

  17. Zn(II)-curc targets p53 in thyroid cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garufi, Alessia; D'Orazi, Valerio; Crispini, Alessandra; D'Orazi, Gabriella

    2015-10-01

    TP53 mutation is a common event in many cancers, including thyroid carcinoma. Defective p53 activity promotes cancer resistance to therapies and a more malignant phenotype, acquiring oncogenic functions. Rescuing the function of mutant p53 (mutp53) protein is an attractive anticancer therapeutic strategy. Zn(II)-curc is a novel small molecule that has been shown to target mutp53 protein in several cancer cells, but its effect in thyroid cancer cells remains unclear. Here, we investigated whether Zn(II)-curc could affect p53 in thyroid cancer cells with both p53 mutation (R273H) and wild-type p53. Zn(II)-curc induced mutp53H273 downregulation and reactivation of wild-type functions, such as binding to canonical target promoters and target gene transactivation. This latter effect was similar to that induced by PRIMA-1. In addition, Zn(II)-curc triggered p53 target gene expression in wild-type p53-carrying cells. In combination treatments, Zn(II)-curc enhanced the antitumor activity of chemotherapeutic drugs, in both mutant and wild-type-carrying cancer cells. Taken together, our data indicate that Zn(II)-curc promotes the reactivation of p53 in thyroid cancer cells, providing in vitro evidence for a potential therapeutic approach in thyroid cancers.

  18. SURVEY OF KNOWLEDGE AND ATTITUDES ON PREVENTION OF CERVICAL CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galina Terzieva

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Cancer of the cervix is the second most common cause of death among women of malignancies after breast cancer. Human Papilloma Virus (HPV is transmitted through sexual contact (vaginal, anal and oral and in contact skin-skin in the genital area. It is highly resistant to environmental conditions and is therefore widespread. Every sexually active woman is at risk. HPV is transmitted from man to woman and in most cases the infection is asymptomatic from 6 to 15 years after the time of infection, which further contributes to the spread of the virus. The aim of the research is exploring the opinion of students and their parents about the use of a vaccine to prevent cervical cancer. The subject of the research is the process of building a culture of health of young people and their subject position for participation in health prevention. Objects of the survey are the attitudes, knowledges and assessment of different social groups for protection and preservation of their health and the health of others. Scope of the research are 141 respondents: students and their parents. Approaches and methods for the study of the problem: theoretical analysis of the problem in the medical literature; documentary research; anonymous questionnaire survey; comparative analysis. Results of the study outline the unwillingness of the majority of parents - 54% to vaccinate their daughters. 62.3% of students said they "would not be vaccinated because the vaccine is considered as dangerous to health, and because there are not enough studies about the benefits of it."

  19. Eclalbasaponin II induces autophagic and apoptotic cell death in human ovarian cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon Jin Cho

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Triterpenoids echinocystic acid and its glycosides, isolated from several Eclipta prostrata, have been reported to possess various biological activities such as anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, and anti-diabetic activity. However, the cytotoxicity of the triterpenoids in human cancer cells and their molecular mechanism of action are poorly understood. In the present study, we found that eclalbasaponin II with one glucose moiety has potent cytotoxicity in three ovarian cancer cells and two endometrial cancer cells compared to an aglycone echinocystic acid and eclalbasaponin I with two glucose moiety. Eclalbasaponin II treatment dose-dependently increased sub G1 population. Annexin V staining revealed that eclalbasaponin II induced apoptosis in SKOV3 and A2780 ovarian cancer cells. In addition, eclalbasaponin II-induced cell death was associated with characteristics of autophagy; an increase in acidic vesicular organelle content and elevation of the levels of LC3-II. Interestingly, autophagy inhibitor BaF1 suppressed the eclalbasaponin II-induced apoptosis. Moreover, eclalbasaponin II activated JNK and p38 signaling and inhibited the mTOR signaling. We further demonstrated that pre-treatment with a JNK and p38 inhibitor and mTOR activator attenuated the eclalbasaponin II-induced autophagy. This suggests that eclalbasaponin II induces apoptotic and autophagic cell death through the regulation of JNK, p38, and mTOR signaling in human ovarian cancer cells.

  20. The HIFI spectral survey of AFGL 2591 (CHESS). II. Summary of the survey

    CERN Document Server

    Kazmierczak-Barthel, M; Helmich, F P; Chavarria, L; Wang, K -S; Ceccarelli, C

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the richness of submillimeter spectral features in the high-mass star forming region AFGL 2591. As part of the CHESS (Chemical Herschel Survey of Star Forming Regions) Key Programme, AFGL 2591 was observed by the Herschel/HIFI instrument. The spectral survey covered a frequency range from 480 up to 1240 GHz as well as single lines from 1267 to 1901 GHz (i.e. CO, HCl, NH3, OH and [CII]). Rotational and population diagram methods were used to calculate column densities, excitation temperatures and the emission extents of the observed molecules associated with AFGL 2591. The analysis was supplemented with several lines from ground-based JCMT spectra. From the HIFI spectral survey analysis a total of 32 species were identified (including isotopologues). In spite of the fact that lines are mostly quite week, 268 emission and 16 absorption lines were found (excluding blends). Molecular column densities range from 6e11 to 1e19 cm-2 and excitation temperatures range from 19 to 175 K. One can disti...

  1. Physical and Morphological Properties of [O II] Emitting Galaxies in the HETDEX Pilot Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Bridge, Joanna S; Ciardullo, Robin; Hagen, Alex; Zeimann, Greg; Malz, A I; Acquaviva, Viviana; Schneider, Donald P; Drory, Niv; Gebhardt, Karl; Jogee, Shardha

    2014-01-01

    The Hobby-Eberly Dark Energy Experiment pilot survey identified 284 [O II] 3727 emitting galaxies in a 169 square-arcminute field of sky in the redshift range 0 < z < 0.57. This line flux limited sample provides a bridge between studies in the local universe and higher-redshift [O II] surveys. We present an analysis of the star formation rates (SFRs) of these galaxies as a function of stellar mass as determined via spectral energy distribution fitting. The [O II] emitters fall on the "main sequence" of star-forming galaxies with SFR decreasing at lower masses and redshifts. However, the slope of our relation is flatter than that found for most other samples, a result of the metallicity dependence of the [O II] star formation rate indicator. The mass specific SFR is higher for lower mass objects, supporting the idea that massive galaxies formed more quickly and efficiently than their lower mass counterparts. This is confirmed by the fact that the equivalent widths of the [O II] emission lines trend small...

  2. Peroxiredoxin II Is Essential for Maintaining Stemness by Redox Regulation in Liver Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Taeho; Bak, Yesol; Park, Young-Ho; Jang, Gyu-Beom; Nam, Jeong-Seok; Yoo, Jeong Eun; Park, Young Nyun; Bak, In Seon; Kim, Jin-Man; Yoon, Do-Young; Yu, Dae-Yeul

    2016-05-01

    Redox regulation in cancer stem cells (CSCs) is viewed as a good target for cancer therapy because redox status plays an important role in cancer stem-cell maintenance. Here, we investigated the role of Peroxiredoxin II (Prx II), an antioxidant enzyme, in association with maintenance of liver CSCs. Our study demonstrates that Prx II overexpressed in liver cancer cells has high potential for self-renewal activity. Prx II expression significantly corelated with expression of epithelial-cell adhesion molecules (EpCAM) and cytokerain 19 in liver cancer tissues of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. Downregulation of Prx II in Huh7 cells with treatment of siRNA reduced expression of EpCAM and CD133 as well as Sox2 in accordance with increased ROS and apoptosis, which were reversed in Huh7-hPrx II cells. Huh7-hPrx II cells exhibited strong sphere-formation activity compared with mock cells. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) exposure enhanced sphere formation, cell-surface expression of EpCAM and CD133, and pSTAT3 along with activation of VEGF receptor 2 in Huh7-hPrx II cells. The result also emerged in Huh7-H-ras(G12V) and SK-HEP-1-H-ras(G12V) cells with high-level expression of Prx II. Prx II was involved in regulation of VEGF driving cancer stem cells through VEGFR-2/STAT3 signaling to upregulate Bmi1 and Sox2. In addition, knockdown of Prx II in Huh7-H-ras(G12V) cells showed significant reduction in cell migration in vitro and in tumorigenic potential in vivo. Taken together, all the results demonstrated that Prx II plays a key role in the CSC self-renewal of HCC cells through redox regulation. Stem Cells 2016;34:1188-1197.

  3. Alcohol, folate, methionine, and risk of incident breast cancer in the American Cancer Society Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Jonas, Carolyn R; Robertson, Andreas S; McCullough, Marjorie L; Thun, Michael J; Calle, Eugenia E

    2003-02-01

    Recent studies suggest that the increased risk of breast cancer associated with alcohol consumption may be reduced by adequate folate intake. We examined this question among 66,561 postmenopausal women in the American Cancer Society Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort. A total of 1,303 incident cases had accrued during the first 5 years of follow-up. Cox proportional hazards models and stratified analysis were used to examine the relationship between alcohol, dietary and total folate intake, multivitamin use, dietary methionine, and breast cancer. We observed an increasing risk of breast cancer with increasing alcohol consumption (P for trend = 0.01). In the highest category of consumption (15 or more grams of ethanol/day), the risk of breast cancer was 1.26 (95% confidence interval, 1.04-1.53) compared with nonusers. We observed this association with higher alcohol consumption for in situ, localized, and regional disease. We found no association between risk of breast cancer and dietary folate, total folate, multivitamin use, or methionine intake. Furthermore, we found no evidence of an interaction between levels of dietary folate (P for interaction = 0.10) or total folate (P for interaction = 0.61) and alcohol. Nor did we find evidence of an interaction between alcohol consumption and recent or long-term multivitamin use (P for interaction = 0.27). Our results are consistent with a positive association with alcohol but do not support an association with folate or methionine intake or an interaction between folate and alcohol intake on risk of breast cancer.

  4. Changes of Multiple Metal Accumulation (MMA in New Orleans Soil: Preliminary Evaluation of Differences between Survey I (1992 and Survey II (2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul W. Mielke

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Soil metal surveys were conducted in Baltimore, MD (1976-1979, Minnesota (1981-1988 and most recently, New Orleans, LA (1989-present. The unique characteristic of New Orleans is that it has two surveys; Survey I was completed in 1992 and Survey II was completed in 2000. This paper seeks to determine if there is a perceptible change in the amount of metals during less than a decade that separated these surveys. The Survey I collection was 4,026 samples stratified by 283 census tracts. All samples were collected in residential neighborhoods at least one block from a busy street. The Survey II collection was 5,467 samples stratified by 286 census tracts (plus City Park. The Survey II collection included busy streets as a category of samples. For comparison, the busy street category of 1,078 samples was excluded from Survey II for a total of 4,388 samples. The extraction methods of the two surveys used the same protocol for strength of acid (1 M HNO3, shaker-time (2 hours, and room temperature (~22ºC. However, Survey II differed in amount of sample used in extraction. For Surveys I and II, 4.0g and 0.4g were used respectively. The same ICP-AES was used to measure 8 metals in both surveys. To evaluate the analytical results of the two methods, reference soil samples (n=36 from the Wageningen Evaluating Programs for Analytical Laboratories, International Soil-analytical Exchange (WEPAL; ISE were used. The relationship between the 4.0 and 0.4 g results were linear and the Survey I results were adjusted for sample:acid ratio. Further evaluation was done by creating interpolated Multiple Metal Accumulation (MMA maps based on the median MMA for each census tract. A new map was created by dividing Survey II MMA by Survey I MMA. The ratio indicates increases of soil metals in the inner city and decreases of soil metals in the outlying areas of Metropolitan New Orleans. Comparing fresh parent alluvium from the Mississippi River with urban soil metal

  5. Deletion of Chromosome 4q Predicts Outcome in Stage II Colon Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. P. M. Brosens

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Around 30% of all stage II colon cancer patients will relapse and die of their disease. At present no objective parameters to identify high-risk stage II colon cancer patients, who will benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy, have been established. With traditional histopathological features definition of high-risk stage II colon cancer patients is inaccurate. Therefore more objective and robust markers for prediction of relapse are needed. DNA copy number aberrations have proven to be robust prognostic markers, but have not yet been investigated for this specific group of patients. The aim of the present study was to identify chromosomal aberrations that can predict relapse of tumor in patients with stage II colon cancer.

  6. The Relationship between Urotensin II and its Receptor and the Clinicopathological Parameters of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakan, Ozan; Kalender, Mehmet Emin; Suner, Ali; Cengiz, Beyhan; Oztuzcu, Serdar; Bayraktar, Recep; Borazan, Ersin; Babacan, Taner; Camci, Celaletdin

    2014-01-01

    Background Urotensin II is a vasoactive polypeptide. It is known that some vasoactive polypeptides are produced and secreted by tumor cells, and act as a paracrine growth stimulant. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between urotensin II and its receptor’s messenger RNA expression in breast cancer. Material/Methods Fifty-nine women with breast cancer were included in this study. The median age was 48 years. The relationships between urotensin II and urotensin II receptor mRNA expressions, which were derived from fresh breast cancer tissues and adjacent normal breast tissues, and clinical and pathological parameters, were assessed. Results We found expressions of urotensin II mRNA and its receptor in 55 of 59 breast cancer tissues and in 55 of 59 normal breast tissues. We found a positive significant correlation between urotensin II and its receptor (p=0.001, r=0.632), and found a negative, but insignificant, correlation between urotensin II and age (p=0.038, r=−0.281). Urotensin II levels were higher in the premenopausal group compared to the postmenopausal group (p<0.05). The mean urotensin II receptor expression was higher in the premenopausal group (p<0.05) compared to the postmenopausal group, and its expression was also higher in the group without extra-nodal invasion compared to that of the group with extra-nodal invasion (p=0.001). Urotensin II levels were higher in the group without lymphatic invasion compared to the group with lymphatic invasion (p=0.048). Conclusions This study is the first in the English medical literature to determine the urotensin II and its receptor mRNA expressions in breast cancer tissues. Consequently, urotensin II seems be associated with menopausal status, and extra-nodal and lymphatic invasion. PMID:25112588

  7. Prognostic importance of VEGF-A haplotype combinations in a stage II colon cancer population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer-Frifeldt, Sanne; Fredslund, Rikke; Lindebjerg, Jan;

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the prognostic effect of three VEGF-A SNPs, -2578, -460 and 405, as well as the corresponding haplotype combinations, in a unique population of stage II colon cancer patients.......To investigate the prognostic effect of three VEGF-A SNPs, -2578, -460 and 405, as well as the corresponding haplotype combinations, in a unique population of stage II colon cancer patients....

  8. Comparing acquired angioedema with hereditary angioedema (types I/II): findings from the Icatibant Outcome Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhurst, H J; Zanichelli, A; Caballero, T; Bouillet, L; Aberer, W; Maurer, M; Fain, O; Fabien, V; Andresen, I

    2017-04-01

    Icatibant is used to treat acute hereditary angioedema with C1 inhibitor deficiency types I/II (C1-INH-HAE types I/II) and has shown promise in angioedema due to acquired C1 inhibitor deficiency (C1-INH-AAE). Data from the Icatibant Outcome Survey (IOS) were analysed to evaluate the effectiveness of icatibant in the treatment of patients with C1-INH-AAE and compare disease characteristics with those with C1-INH-HAE types I/II. Key medical history (including prior occurrence of attacks) was recorded upon IOS enrolment. Thereafter, data were recorded retrospectively at approximately 6-month intervals during patient follow-up visits. In the icatibant-treated population, 16 patients with C1-INH-AAE had 287 attacks and 415 patients with C1-INH-HAE types I/II had 2245 attacks. Patients with C1-INH-AAE versus C1-INH-HAE types I/II were more often male (69 versus 42%; P = 0·035) and had a significantly later mean (95% confidence interval) age of symptom onset [57·9 (51·33-64·53) versus 14·0 (12·70-15·26) years]. Time from symptom onset to diagnosis was significantly shorter in patients with C1-INH-AAE versus C1-INH-HAE types I/II (mean 12·3 months versus 118·1 months; P = 0·006). Patients with C1-INH-AAE showed a trend for higher occurrence of attacks involving the face (35 versus 21% of attacks; P = 0·064). Overall, angioedema attacks were more severe in patients with C1-INH-HAE types I/II versus C1-INH-AAE (61 versus 40% of attacks were classified as severe to very severe; P types I/II, respectively. © 2016 British Society for Immunology.

  9. The role of peroxiredoxin II in chemoresistance of breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang T

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Tieli Wang,1 Anthony Joseph Gomez Diaz,1 Yun Yen2 1Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University Dominguez Hills, Carson, CA, USA; 2Department of Clinical and Molecular Pharmacology, Beckman Research Institute of City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA, USA Abstract: Peroxiredoxin (PrxII belongs to a family of redox-active proteins that use redox-sensitive cysteine in the active site to reduce peroxides. PrxII is induced by various oxidative stimuli and plays an important protective role against oxidative radical damage by reactive oxygen species. PrxII expression levels are correlated with resistance to radiation therapy or certain anti-cancer drugs in radioresistant breast cancer cells, glioblastomas, and head and neck cancer cells as well as in tissue isolated from head and neck patients who do not respond to radiation therapy. Small interfering RNA (siRNA that inhibits the PrxII gene expression has been shown to partially reverse the radioresistant phenotype in radiation resistant breast cancer cells and sensitizes glioma cells to oxidative stress, highlighting the potential clinical importance of PrxII in radiation resistance in cancer. This article focuses on the role that PrxII may play in chemoresistant breast cancer cells. Keywords: siRNA, redox, cysteine disulfide bridges, targeted therapy, reactive oxygen species

  10. NEWLY IDENTIFIED EXTENDED GREEN OBJECTS (EGOs) FROM THE SPITZER GLIMPSE II SURVEY. I. CATALOG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xi; Gan, Cong-Gui; Shen, Zhi-Qiang [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200030 (China); Ellingsen, Simon P.; Titmarsh, Anita [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania (Australia); He, Jin-Hua, E-mail: chenxi@shao.ac.cn [Key Laboratory for the Structure and Evolution of Celestial Objects, Yunnan Astronomical Observatory/National Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 110, Kunming, 650011 Yunnan Province (China)

    2013-05-01

    We have produced a catalog containing 98 newly identified massive young stellar object (MYSO) candidates associated with ongoing outflows (known as extended green objects, or EGOs). These have been identified from the Spitzer Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire (GLIMPSE) II data set and our new identifications increase the number of known EGOs to {approx}400 in our Galaxy, adding to the {approx}300 previously identified EGOs reported by Cyganowski et al. from the GLIMPSE I survey. The high detection rate ({approx}70%) of 95 GHz class I methanol masers achieved in a survey toward 57 of these new EGOs with the Mopra 22 m radio telescope demonstrates that the new EGOs are associated with outflows. Investigations of the mid-infrared properties and physical associations with other star formation tracers (e.g., infrared dark clouds, class I and II methanol masers, and millimeter Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey sources) reveal that the newly identified EGOs are very similar in nature to those in the sample of Cyganowski et al. All of the observational evidence supports the hypothesis that EGOs correspond to MYSOs at the earliest evolutionary stage, with ongoing outflow activity, and active rapid accretion.

  11. Dose-Escalated Robotic SBRT for Stage I–II Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Meier, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is the precise external delivery of very high-dose radiotherapy to targets in the body, with treatment completed in one to five fractions. SBRT should be an ideal approach for organ-confined prostate cancer because (I) dose-escalation should yield improved rates of cancer control; (II) the unique radiobiology of prostate cancer favors hypofractionation; and (III) the conformal nature of SBRT minimizes high-dose radiation delivery to immediately adjacent o...

  12. Dose-Escalated Robotic SBRT for Stage I-II Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Robert eMeier

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is the precise external delivery of very high-dose radiotherapy to targets in the body, with treatment completed in one to five fractions. SBRT should be an ideal approach for organ-confined prostate cancer because (I) dose escalation should yield improved rates of cancer control; (II) the unique radiobiology of prostate cancer favors hypofractionation and (III) the conformal nature of SBRT minimizes high-dose radiation delivery to immediately a...

  13. SOX9 Expression Predicts Relapse of Stage II Colon Cancer Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Espersen, Maiken Lise Marcker; Linnemann, Dorte; Alamili, Mahdi;

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if the protein expression of Sex-determining region y-box 9 (SOX9) in primary tumors could predict relapse of stage II colon cancer patients.144 patients with stage II primary colon cancer were retrospectively enrolledin the study. SOX9 expression...... high levels of SOX9 of primary stage II colon tumors predict low riskof relapse whereas low levels of SOX9 predict high risk of relapse. SOX9 may have an important value as a biomarker when evaluating risk of relapse for personalized treatment....

  14. Targeting the MHC Class II antigen presentation pathway in cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibodeau, Jacques; Bourgeois-Daigneault, Marie-Claude; Lapointe, Réjean

    2012-09-01

    The success of immunotherapy relies on the participation of all arms of the immune system and the role of CD4+ T lymphocytes in preventing tumor growth is now well established. Understanding how tumors evade immune responses holds the key to the development of cancer immunotherapies. In this review, we discuss how MHC Class II expression varies in cancer cells and how this influences antitumor immune responses. We also discuss the means that are currently available for harnessing the MHC Class II antigen presentation pathway for the development of efficient vaccines to activate the immune system against cancer.

  15. A survey of weak MgII absorbers at redshift =1.78

    CERN Document Server

    Lynch, R S; Kim, T S; Lynch, Ryan S.; Charlton, Jane C.; Kim, Tae-Sun

    2006-01-01

    The exact nature of weak MgII absorbers (those with W_r(2796) < 0.3 A) is a matter of debate, but most are likely related to areas of local star formation or supernovae activity outside of giant galaxies. Using 18 QSO spectra obtained with the Ultra-Violet Echelle Spectrograph (UVES) on the Very Large Telescope (VLT), we have conducted a survey for weak MgII absorbers at 1.4 < z < 2.4. We searched a redshift path length of 8.51, eliminating regions badly contaminated by atmospheric absorption so that the survey is close to 100% complete to W_r(2796) = 0.02 A. We found a total of 9 weak absorbers, yielding a number density of absorbers of dN/dz = 1.06 +/- 0.12 for 0.02 <= W_r(2796) < 0.3 A. Narayanan et al. (2005) found dN/dz = 1.00 +/- 0.20 at 0 < z < 0.3 and Churchill et al. (1999) found dN/dz = 1.74 +/- 0.10 at 0.4 < z < 1.4. Therefore, the population of weak MgII absorbers appears to peak at z~1. We explore the expected evolution of the absorber population subject to a changing e...

  16. Stage II colorectal cancer: lack of prognostic model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelbaset Buhmeida

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available TO THE EDITOR: Colorectal cancer (CRC is one of the most common malignant tumors worldwide (Gatta et al. 1998 [1], Repetto et al. 2003 [2] with the disease incidence rising along with an advanced age (Wymenga et al. 2001 [3], Franceschi et al. 2001 [4]. The overall mortality from CRC is 60%, which represents the second leading cause of cancer death in western societies. In Finland, the incidence of CRC is 25/100.000, and 20/100.000 among males and females, respectively. Annually, 1.150 new cases are detected among males and 1.200 among women, representing 9.2% and 10% of all cancer cases, respectively (Finnish Cancer Registry, 2005. On the other hand, according to Benghazi Cancer Registry, 2003 [5] the colorectal cancer in eastern part of Libya is the most second frequent cancer after lung cancer in males and breast cancer in females. The average crude incidence rate is 6.4 (male and 5.2 (female cases per 100,000 inhabitants, representing 10.1% of male patients and 9.3% of female patients of all cancer cases.

  17. Cosmology with Photometrically-Classified Type Ia Supernovae from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Campbell, Heather; Nichol, Robert C; Sako, Masao; Smith, Mathew; Lampeitl, Hubert; Olmstead, Matthew D; Bassett, Bruce; Biswas, Rahul; Brown, Peter; Cinabro, David; Dawson, Kyle S; Dilday, Ben; Foley, Ryan J; Frieman, Joshua A; Garnavich, Peter; Hlozek, Renee; Jha, Saurabh W; Kuhlmann, Steve; Kunz, Martin; Marriner, John; Miquel, Ramon; Richmond, Michael; Riess, Adam; Schneider, Donald P; Sollerman, Jesper; Taylor, Matt; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2012-01-01

    We present the cosmological analysis of 752 photometrically-classified Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) obtained from the full Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) Supernova (SN) Survey, supplemented with host-galaxy spectroscopy from the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). Our photometric-classification method is based on the SN typing technique of Sako et al. (2011), aided by host galaxy redshifts (0.05

  18. First-Year Spectroscopy for the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Chen; Sako, Masao; Marriner, John; Bassett, Bruce; Becker, Andrew; Choi, Changsu; Cinabro, David; DeJongh, Fritz; Depoy, Darren L; Dilday, Ben; Doi, Mamoru; Frieman, Joshua A; Garnavich, Peter M; Hogan, Craig J; Holtzman, Jon; Im, Myungshin; Jha, Saurabh; Kessler, Richard; Konishi, Kohki; Lampeitl, Hubert; Marshall, Jennifer L; McGinnis, David; Miknaitis, Gajus; Nichol, Robert C; Prieto, Jose Luis; Riess, Adam G; Richmond, Michael W; Schneider, Donald P; Smith, Mathew; Takanashi, Naohiro; Tokita, Kouichi; van der Heyden, Kurt; Yasuda, Naoki; Assef, Roberto J; Barentine, John; Bender, Ralf; Blandford, Roger D; Bremer, Malcolm; Brewington, Howard; Collins, Chris A; Crotts, Arlin; Dembicky, Jack; Eastman, Jason; Edge, Alastair; Elson, Ed; Eyler, Michael E; Filippenko, Alexei V; Foley, Ryan J; Frank, Stephan; Goobar, Ariel; Harvanek, Michael; Hopp, Ulrich; Ihara, Yutaka; Kahn, Steven; Ketzeback, William; Kleinman, Scott J; Kollatschny, Wolfram; Krzesiński, Jurek; Leloudas, Giorgos; Long, Daniel C; Lucey, John; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; McMillan, Russet J; Morgan, Christopher W; Morokuma, Tomoki; Nitta, Atsuko; Ostman, Linda; Pan, Kaike; Romer, A Kathy; Saurage, Gabrelle; Schlesinger, Katie; Snedden, Stephanie A; Sollerman, Jesper; Stritzinger, Maximilian; Watson, Linda C; Watters, Shannon; Wheeler, J Craig; York, Donald

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents spectroscopy of supernovae discovered in the first season of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey. This program searches for and measures multi-band light curves of supernovae in the redshift range z = 0.05 - 0.4, complementing existing surveys at lower and higher redshifts. Our goal is to better characterize the supernova population, with a particular focus on SNe Ia, improving their utility as cosmological distance indicators and as probes of dark energy. Our supernova spectroscopy program features rapid-response observations using telescopes of a range of apertures, and provides confirmation of the supernova and host-galaxy types as well as precise redshifts. We describe here the target identification and prioritization, data reduction, redshift measurement, and classification of 129 SNe Ia, 16 spectroscopically probable SNe Ia, 7 SNe Ib/c, and 11 SNe II from the first season. We also describe our efforts to measure and remove the substantial host galaxy contamination existi...

  19. First-Year Spectroscopy for the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Chen; Romani, Roger W.; Sako, Masao; Marriner, John; Bassett, Bruce; Becker, Andrew; Choi, Changsu; Cinabro, David; DeJongh, Fritz; Depoy, Darren L.; Dilday, Ben; Doi, Mamoru; Frieman, Joshua A.; Garnavich, Peter M.; Hogan, Craig J.; Holtzman, Jon; Im, Myungshin; Jha, Saurabh; Kessler, Richard; Konishi, Kohki; Lampeitl, Hubert

    2008-03-25

    This paper presents spectroscopy of supernovae discovered in the first season of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey. This program searches for and measures multi-band light curves of supernovae in the redshift range z = 0.05-0.4, complementing existing surveys at lower and higher redshifts. Our goal is to better characterize the supernova population, with a particular focus on SNe Ia, improving their utility as cosmological distance indicators and as probes of dark energy. Our supernova spectroscopy program features rapid-response observations using telescopes of a range of apertures, and provides confirmation of the supernova and host-galaxy types as well as precise redshifts. We describe here the target identification and prioritization, data reduction, redshift measurement, and classification of 129 SNe Ia, 16 spectroscopically probable SNe Ia, 7 SNe Ib/c, and 11 SNe II from the first season. We also describe our efforts to measure and remove the substantial host galaxy contamination existing in the majority of our SN spectra.

  20. The national survey of breast cancer treatment pattern in Korea (1998): the use of breast-conserving treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hyun Soo; Chang, Sei Kyung [Bundang CHA General Hospital, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyung Sik [DongA University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2004-09-15

    In order to improve the proper use of radiotherapy and breast-conserving treatment (BCT) in the management of breast cancer, current status of breast cancer treatment in Korea was surveyed nationwide and the use of BCT were evaluated. Patients characteristics and treatment pattern of 1048 breast cancer patients from 27 institutions diagnosed between January, 1998 and June, 1998 were analyzed. The incidence of receiving BCT was analyzed according to the stage, age, geography, type of hospital, and the availability of radiotherapy facility. Radical mastectomy was performed in 64.8% of total patients and 26% of patients received breast-conserving surgery (BCS). The proportions of patients receiving BCT were 47.5% in stage 0, 54.4% in stage I and 20.3% in stage II. Some of the patients (6.6% of stage I, 10.1% of stage II and 66.7% of stage III) not received radiotherapy after BCS. Only 45% of stage III patients received post-operative radiotherapy after radical mastectomy. The proportion of patients receiving BCT was different according to the geography and availability of radiotherapy facilities. Radiotherapy was not fully used in the management of breast cancer, even in the patients received breast-conserving surgery. The proportion of the patients who received BCT was lower than the report of western countries. To improve the application of proper management of breast cancer, every efforts such as a training of physicians, public education, and improving accessibility of radiotherapy facilities should be done. The factors predicting receipt of BCT were accessibility of radiotherapy facility and geography. Also, periodic survey like current research is warranted.

  1. Cancer perceptions: implications from the 2007 Health Information National Trends Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalkowski, Marc A; Hart, Stacey L; Du, Xianglin L; Baraniuk, Sarah; Latini, David M

    2012-09-01

    Research has demonstrated associations between sociodemographic characteristics and illness perceptions; however, the impact of cancer exposure through personal or family diagnoses is not well-studied. The purposes of this study were to examine different cancer beliefs and disparities in cancer beliefs across groups of individuals with distinct cancer histories and to identify whether cancer history predicts a set of cancer beliefs. Using Leventhal's Common Sense Model and data from the 2007 Health Information National Trends Survey (N = 7,172), we constructed multivariable logistic regression models to evaluate the effect of different stimuli, including cancer experience on cancer perceptions (e.g., prevention, causation, outcome, worry). Findings indicated significant associations between cancer history and cancer perceptions. Individuals with family and personal cancer histories were more likely than individuals without any cancer history to worry about getting cancer (OR = 3.55, 95 %CI = 2.53-4.99), agree they will develop cancer in the future (OR = 8.81, 95 %CI = 6.12-12.67) and disagree that cancer is most often caused by a person's behavior or lifestyle (OR = 1.24, 95 %CI = 1.01-1.52). Cancer history affects perceptions throughout the cancer continuum. Additionally, cancer history may influence coping behaviors and outcomes. Cancer education and survivorship programs should assess important variables such as cancer history to more effectively tailor services and monitor evolving needs throughout cancer care. Integrating cancer history information into patient education programs tailored to an individual's needs may better empower survivors and their family members to effectively promote informed decision-making about screening and preventive health behaviors, manage cancer worry, and enhance quality of life.

  2. THE GREEN BANK TELESCOPE H II REGION DISCOVERY SURVEY. IV. HELIUM AND CARBON RECOMBINATION LINES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenger, Trey V.; Bania, T. M. [Astronomy Department, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Balser, Dana S. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA, 22903-2475 (United States); Anderson, L. D. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)

    2013-02-10

    The Green Bank Telescope H II Region Discovery Survey (GBT HRDS) found hundreds of previously unknown Galactic regions of massive star formation by detecting hydrogen radio recombination line (RRL) emission from candidate H II region targets. Since the HRDS nebulae lie at large distances from the Sun, they are located in previously unprobed zones of the Galactic disk. Here, we derive the properties of helium and carbon RRL emission from HRDS nebulae. Our target sample is the subset of the HRDS that has visible helium or carbon RRLs. This criterion gives a total of 84 velocity components (14% of the HRDS) with helium emission and 52 (9%) with carbon emission. For our highest quality sources, the average {sup 4}He{sup +}/H{sup +} abundance ratio by number, (y {sup +}), is 0.068 {+-} 0.023(1{sigma}). This is the same ratio as that measured for the sample of previously known Galactic H II regions. Nebulae without detected helium emission give robust y {sup +} upper limits. There are 5 RRL emission components with y {sup +} less than 0.04 and another 12 with upper limits below this value. These H II regions must have either a very low {sup 4}He abundance or contain a significant amount of neutral helium. The HRDS has 20 nebulae with carbon RRL emission but no helium emission at its sensitivity level. There is no correlation between the carbon RRL parameters and the 8 {mu}m mid-infrared morphology of these nebulae.

  3. The influence of hormone therapies on type I and II endometrial cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Lina S.; Kjær, Susanne K.; Keiding, Niels

    2016-01-01

    The influence of hormone therapy (HT) on risk for endometrial cancer is still casting which type of HT the clinicians recommend. It is unrevealed if HT has a differential influence on Type I versus Type II endometrial tumors, and little is known about the influence of, e.g., different routes...... of administration and about the influence of tibolone. We followed all Danish women aged 50–79 years without previous cancer or hysterectomy (n = 914,595) during 1995–2009. From the National Prescription Register, we computed HT exposures as time-dependent covariates. Incident endometrial cancers (n = 6,202) were...... identified from the National Cancer Registry: 4,972 Type I tumors and 500 Type II tumors. Incidence rate ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (Cls) were estimated by Poisson regression. Compared with women never on HT, the RR of endometrial cancer was increased with conjugated estrogen: 4.27 (1...

  4. Analyzing proteasomal subunit expression reveals Rpt4 as a prognostic marker in stage II colorectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-02-01

    Colorectal cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Early diagnosis and treatment of colorectal cancer is the key to improving survival rates and as such a need exists to identify patients who may benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy. The dysregulation of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) has been implicated in oncogenesis and cancer cell survival, and proteasome inhibitors are in clinical use for a number of malignancies including multiple myeloma. In our study, we examined the protein expression of several key components of the UPS in colorectal cancer using immunohistochemistry to determine expression levels of ubiquitinylated proteins and the proteasomal subunits, 20S core and Rpt4 in a cohort of 228 patients with colon cancer. Multivariate Cox analysis revealed that neither the intensity of either ubiquitinylated proteins or the 20S core was predictive in either Stage II or III colon cancer for disease free survival or overall survival. In contrast, in Stage II patients increased Rpt4 staining was significantly associated with disease free survival (Cox proportional hazard ratio 0.605; p = 0.0217). Our data suggest that Rpt4 is an independent prognostic variable for Stage II colorectal cancer and may aid in the decision of which patients undergo adjuvant chemotherapy.

  5. Trends in Cancer Screening Rates among Korean Men and Women: Results from the Korean National Cancer Screening Survey (KNCSS), 2004-2010

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Eun-Ha; Lee, Hoo-Yeon; Choi, Kui Son; Jun, Jae Kwan; Park, Eun-Cheol; Lee, Jin Soo

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The Korean National Cancer Screening Survey (KNCSS) is a continuous nationwide survey implemented by the National Cancer Center in Korea since 2004. The purpose of the present study was to report trends in cancer screening rates for the five major cancers (stomach, liver, colorectal, breast, and cervix uteri) in Korean men and women. Materials and Methods The study used KNCSS data collected between 2004 and 2010. The survey was conducted on Korean men aged 40-74 years and Korean women...

  6. Alchemical poetry in medieval and early modern Europe: a preliminary survey and synthesis. Part II - Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Didier

    2011-03-01

    This article provides a preliminary description of medieval and early modern alchemical poetry composed in Latin and in the principal vernacular languages of western Europe. It aims to distinguish the various genres in which this poetry flourished, and to identify the most representative aspects of each cultural epoch by considering the medieval and early modern periods in turn. Such a distinction (always somewhat artificial) between two broad historical periods may be justified by the appearance of new cultural phenomena that profoundly modified the character of early modern alchemical poetry: the ever-increasing importance of the prisca theologia, the alchemical interpretation of ancient mythology, and the rise of neo-Latin humanist poetry. Although early modern alchemy was marked by the appearance of new doctrines (notably the alchemical spiritus mundi and Paracelsianism), alchemical poetry was only superficially modified by criteria of a scientific nature, which therefore appear to be of lesser importance. This study falls into two parts. Part I provides a descriptive survey of extant poetry, and in Part II the results of the survey are analysed in order to highlight such distinctive features as the function of alchemical poetry, the influence of the book market on its evolution, its doctrinal content, and the question of whether any theory of alchemical poetry ever emerged. Part II is accompanied by an index of the authors and works cited in both parts.

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Second epoch VLBA Calibrator Survey (VCS-II) (Gordon+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, D.; Jacobs, C.; Beasley, A.; Peck, A.; Gaume, R.; Charlot, P.; Fey, A.; Ma, C.; Titov, O.; Boboltz, D.

    2016-07-01

    Six Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) calibrator survey campaigns were run between 1994 and 2007 (VCS1, Beasley et al. 2002, cat. J/ApJS/141/13; VCS2, Fomalont et al. 2003, cat. J/AJ/126/2562; VCS3, Petrov et al. 2005, cat. J/AJ/129/1163; VCS4, Petrov et al. 2006, cat. J/AJ/131/1872; VCS5, Kovalev et al. 2007, cat. J/AJ/133/1236; VCS6, Petrov et al. 2008, cat. J/AJ/136/580) We report on the results of a second epoch VLBA Calibrator Survey campaign (VCS-II) in which 2400 VCS sources were re-observed in the X and S bands. The VLBA S/X (S band~2.3GHz and X band~8.6GHz) dual frequency system was used. We used the VLBA RDBE/Mark5C system, which has 16 32MHz channels and records 2 Gbits/s using 2 bit sampling. Due to S-band filters below 2200MHz and above 2400MHz at most of the VLBA antennas, and a broad area of RFI from SiriusXM satellites (2320-2345MHz), only four channels could be deployed in the S band (2220.0, 2252.0, 2284.0, and 2348.0MHz). The other 12 channels were deployed in the X band (8460.0, 8492.0, 8524.0, 8556.0, 8620.0, 8652.0, 8716.0, 8748.0, 8812.0, 8844.0, 8876.0, and 8908.0MHz). We set a target of 300 sources per session, or 2400 total sources for the 8 VLBA sessions. We selected all sources from the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) S/X astrometric/geodetic catalog (available at http://gemini.gsfc.nasa.gov/solutions/ or by following the links at http://lupus.gsfc.nasa.gov/) between -50° and +90° decl. that had been observed in only 1 or 2 sessions as of mid 2013. This amounted to ~2060 sources. To fill out the list, we added ~340 additional sources that had been observed but not detected in the original VCS1-6 analysis. The eight schedules were run between 2014 January and 2015 March (VCS-II-A/BG219A on 2014 01/04 10:04-01/05 10:02; VCS-II-B/BG219B1 on 2014 05/31 17:12-06/01 17:05; VCS-II-D/BG219D on 2014 06/09 09:13-06/10 09:10; VCS-II-C/BG219C on 2014 08/05 13:03-08/06 13:00; VCS-II-E/BG219E on 2014 08/09 00:00-08/09 23:55; VCS-II-F/BG219F on 2014

  8. COSMOLOGY WITH PHOTOMETRICALLY CLASSIFIED TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE FROM THE SDSS-II SUPERNOVA SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Heather; D' Andrea, Chris B; Nichol, Robert C.; Smith, Mathew; Lampeitl, Hubert [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, PO1 3FX (United Kingdom); Sako, Masao [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Olmstead, Matthew D.; Brown, Peter; Dawson, Kyle S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, 115 South 1400 East 201, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Bassett, Bruce [Mathematics Department, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch, Cape Town (South Africa); Biswas, Rahul; Kuhlmann, Steve [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Cinabro, David [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48126 (United States); Dilday, Ben [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, 6740 Cortona Dr., Suite 102, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States); Foley, Ryan J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Frieman, Joshua A. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Garnavich, Peter [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Hlozek, Renee [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Jha, Saurabh W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, 136 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Kunz, Martin, E-mail: Heather.Campbell@port.ac.uk [African Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Muizenberg, 7945, Cape Town (South Africa); and others

    2013-02-15

    We present the cosmological analysis of 752 photometrically classified Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) obtained from the full Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) Supernova (SN) Survey, supplemented with host-galaxy spectroscopy from the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. Our photometric-classification method is based on the SN classification technique of Sako et al., aided by host-galaxy redshifts (0.05 < z < 0.55). SuperNova ANAlysis simulations of our methodology estimate that we have an SN Ia classification efficiency of 70.8%, with only 3.9% contamination from core-collapse (non-Ia) SNe. We demonstrate that this level of contamination has no effect on our cosmological constraints. We quantify and correct for our selection effects (e.g., Malmquist bias) using simulations. When fitting to a flat {Lambda}CDM cosmological model, we find that our photometric sample alone gives {Omega} {sub m} = 0.24{sup +0.07} {sub -0.05} (statistical errors only). If we relax the constraint on flatness, then our sample provides competitive joint statistical constraints on {Omega} {sub m} and {Omega}{sub {Lambda}}, comparable to those derived from the spectroscopically confirmed Three-year Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS3). Using only our data, the statistics-only result favors an accelerating universe at 99.96% confidence. Assuming a constant wCDM cosmological model, and combining with H {sub 0}, cosmic microwave background, and luminous red galaxy data, we obtain w = -0.96{sup +0.10} {sub -0.10}, {Omega} {sub m} = 0.29{sup +0.02} {sub -0.02}, and {Omega} {sub k} = 0.00{sup +0.03} {sub -0.02} (statistical errors only), which is competitive with similar spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia analyses. Overall this comparison is reassuring, considering the lower redshift leverage of the SDSS-II SN sample (z < 0.55) and the lack of spectroscopic confirmation used herein. These results demonstrate the potential of photometrically classified SN Ia samples in improving

  9. The Green Bank Telescope H II Region Discovery Survey: IV. Helium and Carbon Recombination Lines

    CERN Document Server

    Wenger, Trey V; Balser, Dana S; Anderson, L D

    2012-01-01

    The Green Bank Telescope H II Region Discovery Survey (GBT HRDS) found hundreds of previously unknown Galactic regions of massive star formation by detecting hydrogen radio recombination line (RRL) emission from candidate H II region targets. Since the HRDS nebulae lie at large distances from the Sun, they are located in previously unprobed zones of the Galactic disk. Here we derive the properties of helium and carbon RRL emission from HRDS nebulae. Our target sample is the subset of the HRDS that has visible helium or carbon RRLs. This criterion gives a total of 84 velocity components (14% of the HRDS) with helium emission and 52 (9%) with carbon emission. For our highest quality sources, the average ionic He-4+/H+ abundance ratio by number, , is 0.068 +/- 0.023 (1-sigma). This is the same ratio as that measured for the sample of previously known Galactic H II regions. Nebulae without detected helium emission give robust y+ upper limits. There are 5 RRL emission components with y+ less than 0.04 and another ...

  10. Addressing future challenges for cancer services: part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Jane; Radford, Gina

    2016-02-01

    Jane Maher & Gina Radford speak to Gemma Westcott, Commissioning Editor Jane Maher has been Macmillan's Chief Medical Officer since 1999 and now shares the role as Joint Chief Medical Officer with general practitioner Rosie Loftus, reflecting the growing need for specialists and generalists to work more effectively together. She has been an National Health Service (NHS) improvement clinical leader for over 10 years and is a Consultant Clinical Oncologist at Mount Vernon Cancer Centre and Hillingdon Hospital where she has worked for more than 20 years, during which she helped develop nonsurgical oncology services in five district general hospitals. She is a senior Clinical Lecturer at University College London and Visiting Professor in Cancer and Supportive Care at the Centre for Complexity Management at the University of Hertfordshire. Jane chaired the Maher Committee for the Department of Health in 1995, led the UK National Audit of Late Effects Pelvic Radiotherapy for the Royal College of Radiologists (RCR) in 2000 and, most recently, chaired the National Cancer Survivorship Initiative Consequences of Treatment work stream. She co-founded one of the first Cancer Support and Information services in the UK, winning the Nye Bevan award in 1992 and there are now more than 60 units based on this model. She is a member of the Older People and Cancer Clinical Advisory Group. She has written more than 100 published articles and is a UK representative for cancer survivorship in Europe and advises on cancer survivorship programs in Denmark and Canada. Gina Radford is Deputy Chief Medical Officer for England, a post she took up in January 2015. Prior to that, she has held a number of roles in public health, at local and regional level. Most recently she was Centre Director for Anglia and Essex for Public Health England, and as a part of that role helped lead nationally on the public health response to Ebola. She was until very recently Chair of one of the NICE public health

  11. Stem cell-like gene expression in ovarian cancer predicts type II subtype and prognosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Schwede

    Full Text Available Although ovarian cancer is often initially chemotherapy-sensitive, the vast majority of tumors eventually relapse and patients die of increasingly aggressive disease. Cancer stem cells are believed to have properties that allow them to survive therapy and may drive recurrent tumor growth. Cancer stem cells or cancer-initiating cells are a rare cell population and difficult to isolate experimentally. Genes that are expressed by stem cells may characterize a subset of less differentiated tumors and aid in prognostic classification of ovarian cancer. The purpose of this study was the genomic identification and characterization of a subtype of ovarian cancer that has stem cell-like gene expression. Using human and mouse gene signatures of embryonic, adult, or cancer stem cells, we performed an unsupervised bipartition class discovery on expression profiles from 145 serous ovarian tumors to identify a stem-like and more differentiated subgroup. Subtypes were reproducible and were further characterized in four independent, heterogeneous ovarian cancer datasets. We identified a stem-like subtype characterized by a 51-gene signature, which is significantly enriched in tumors with properties of Type II ovarian cancer; high grade, serous tumors, and poor survival. Conversely, the differentiated tumors share properties with Type I, including lower grade and mixed histological subtypes. The stem cell-like signature was prognostic within high-stage serous ovarian cancer, classifying a small subset of high-stage tumors with better prognosis, in the differentiated subtype. In multivariate models that adjusted for common clinical factors (including grade, stage, age, the subtype classification was still a significant predictor of relapse. The prognostic stem-like gene signature yields new insights into prognostic differences in ovarian cancer, provides a genomic context for defining Type I/II subtypes, and potential gene targets which following further

  12. Molecular targeting therapy with angiotensin II receptor blocker for prostatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroji Uemura

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Angiotensin II (Ang-II plays a key role as a vasoconstrictor in controlling blood pressure and electrolyte/fluid homeostasis. Recently it has also been shown that this peptide is a cytokine, acting as a growth factor in cardiovascular and stromal cells. In addition, the physiological function of Ang-II seems to be similar in prostate cancer and stromal cells. It is widely assumed that Ang-II facilitates the growth of both cells, and its receptor blockers (ARBs have the potential to inhibit the growth of various cancer cells and tumors through the Ang-II receptor type 1 (AT1 receptor. The mechanism of cell growth inhibition by ARBs has been considered to be that of suppression of the signal transduction systems activated by growth factors or cytokines in prostate cancer cells, and suppression of angiogenesis. This review highlights the possible use of ARBs as novel agents for prostatic diseases including prostate cancer and benign hypertrophy, and covers related literature.

  13. Molecular targeting therapy with angiotensin II receptor blocker for prostatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroji Uemura

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Angiotensin II (Ang-II plays a key role as a vasoconstrictor in controlling blood pressure and electrolyte/fluid homeostasis. Recently it has also been shown that this peptide is a cytokine, acting as a growth factor in cardiovascular and stromal cells. In addition, the physiological function of Ang-II seems to be similar in prostate cancer and stromal cells. It is widely assumed that Ang-II facilitates the growth of both cells, and its receptor blockers (ARBs have the potential to inhibit the growth of various cancer cells and tumors through the Ang-II receptor type 1 (AT1 receptor. The mechanism of cell growth inhibition by ARBs has been considered to be that of suppression of the signal transduction systems activated by growth factors or cytokines in prostate cancer cells, and suppression of angiogenesis. This review highlights the possible use of ARBs as novel agents for prostatic diseases including prostate cancer and benign hypertrophy, and covers related literature.

  14. Unique roles of nanotechnology in medicine and cancer-II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Alam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Applications of nanotechnology in medicine and cancer are becoming increasingly popular. Common nanomaterials and devices applicable in cancer medicine are classifiable as liposomes, polymeric-micelles, dendrimers, nano-cantilevers, carbon nanotubes, quantum dots, magnetic-nanoparticles, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs and certain miscellaneous nanoparticles. Here, we present review of the structure, function and utilities of the various approved, under trial and pretrial nanodevices applicable in the cancer care and medicine. The liposomes are phospholipid-vesicles made use in carrying drugs to the target site minimizing the bio-distribution toxicity and a number of such theranostics have been approved for clinical practice. Newly worked out liposomes and polymeric micelles are under the trail phases for nano-therapeutic utility. A multifunctional dendrimer conjugate with imaging, targeting and drug molecules of paclitaxel has been recently synthesized for cancer theranostic applications. Nano-cantilever based assays are likely going to replace the conventions methods of chemical pathological investigations. Carbon nanotubes are emerging for utility in regenerative and cancer medicine. Quantum dots hold great promise for the micro-metastasis and intra-operative tumor imaging. Important applications of magnetic nanoparticles are in the cardiac stents, photodynamic therapy and liver metastasis imaging. The AuNPs have been employed for cell imaging, computed tomography and cancer therapy. Besides these categories, miscellaneous other nanoparticles are being discovered for utility in the cancer diagnosis and disease management. However, the use of nanoparticles should be cautious since the toxic effects of nanoparticles are not well-known. The use of nanoparticles in the clinical practice and their toxicity profile require further extensive research.

  15. [A surgically resected case of AFP and PIVKA-II producing gastric cancer with hepatic metastasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomono, Ayako; Wakahara, Tomoyuki; Kanemitsu, Kiyonori; Toyokawa, Akihiro; Teramura, Kazuhiro; Iwasaki, Takeshi

    2013-05-01

    A 78-year-old man was admitted for workup for a liver tumor. Both serum AFP and PIVKA-II levels were high (2260ng/ml and 806mAU/ml, respectively). Contrast-enhanced CT scan and MRI using Gd-EOB-DTPA demonstrated a liver tumor in segment 6 resembling the imaging patterns of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), while the upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed a type 2 gastric cancer in the gastric antrum. Although the liver metastasis of the gastric cancer was undeniable, we performed partial resection of segment 6 of the liver and distal gastrectomy under a preoperative diagnosis of double cancer. Histopathologically, gastric tumor consisted of two components, such as well differentiated adenocarcinoma and hepatoid adenocarcinoma. The histology of the liver tumor was similar to that of the hepatoid component in the stomach lesion. Immunohistochemical staining revealed both the gastric and the liver tumors to be positive for AFP and PIVKA-II, yielding a definite diagnosis of AFP and PIVKA-II producing gastric cancer with liver metastasis. Because many cases of this disease have liver metastases at presentation with confusing images with HCC, the diagnosis of liver tumors should be carefully differentiated in the gastric cancer patients with liver tumors, high serum AFP and PIVKA-II levels.

  16. Impact of diabetes type II and chronic inflammation on pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Zechner, Dietmar; Radecke, Tobias; Amme, Jonas; Bürtin, Florian; Albert, Ann-Christin; Partecke, Lars Ivo; Vollmar, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    Background We explored if known risk factors for pancreatic cancer such as type II diabetes and chronic inflammation, influence the pathophysiology of an established primary tumor in the pancreas and if administration of metformin has an impact on tumor growth. Methods Pancreatic carcinomas were assessed in a syngeneic orthotopic pancreas adenocarcinoma model after injection of 6606PDA cells in the pancreas head of either B6.V-Lepob/ob mice exhibiting a type II diabetes-like syndrome or normo...

  17. The VMC Survey. XIII. Type II Cepheids in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Ripepi, V; Marconi, M; Clementini, G; Cioni, M-R L; de Grijs, R; Emerson, J P; Groenewegen, M A T; Ivanov, V D; Muraveva, T; Piatti, A E; Subramanian, S

    2014-01-01

    The VISTA survey of the Magellanic Clouds System (VMC) is collecting deep $K_\\mathrm{s}$--band time--series photometry of the pulsating variable stars hosted in the system formed by the two Magellanic Clouds and the Bridge connecting them. In this paper we have analysed a sample of 130 Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) Type II Cepheids (T2CEPs) found in tiles with complete or near complete VMC observations for which identification and optical magnitudes were obtained from the OGLE III survey. We present $J$ and $K_\\mathrm{s}$ light curves for all 130 pulsators, including 41 BL Her, 62 W Vir (12 pW Vir) and 27 RV Tau variables. We complement our near-infrared photometry with the $V$ magnitudes from the OGLE III survey, allowing us to build a variety of Period-Luminosity ($PL$), Period-Luminosity-Colour ($PLC$) and Period-Wesenheit ($PW$) relationships, including any combination of the $V, J, K_\\mathrm{s}$ filters and valid for BL Her and W Vir classes. These relationships were calibrated in terms of the LMC distanc...

  18. MASH-II: More Planetary Nebulae from the AAO/UKST H\\alpha Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Miszalski, B; Acker, A; Birkby, J L; Frew, D J; Kovacevic, A

    2007-01-01

    We present a supplement to the Macquarie/AAO/Strasbourg H$\\alpha$ planetary nebulae (PNe) catalogue (MASH), which we denote MASH-II. The supplement consists of over 300 true, likely and possible new Galactic PNe found after re-examination of the entire AAO/UKST H$\\alpha$ survey of the southern Galactic Plane in digital form. We have spectroscopically confirmed over 240 of these new candidates as bona-fide PNe and we include other high quality candidates awaiting spectroscopic confirmation as possible PNe. These latest discoveries largely comprise two distinct groups: small, star-like or moderately resolved PNe at one end and mostly large, extremely low surface brightness PNe at the other. Neither group were easy to discover from simple visual scrutiny of the original survey exposures as for MASH but were relatively straightforward to uncover from the digital images via application of semi-automated discovery techniques. We suspect the few PNe still hidden in the H$\\alpha$ survey will lie outside our search cr...

  19. Identification of 42 Genes Linked to Stage II Colorectal Cancer Metastatic Relapse

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of cancer mortality. Metastasis remains the primary cause of CRC death. Predicting the possibility of metastatic relapse in early-stage CRC is of paramount importance to target therapy for patients who really need it and spare those with low-potential of metastasis. Ninety-six stage II CRC cases were stratified using high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) data based on a predictive survival algorithm and supervised c...

  20. The role of adhesive molecules in endometrial cancer: part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Malinowski

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The carcinogenesis is a result of both functional and structural disorders in the tissue. It initiates as a mutationin a gene encoding protein that is essential for cellular function. The subsequent cascade of eventsleads to accumulation of mutations and loss of cellular function. The cell loses its tissue-specific morphology,disconnects from other cells and extracellular matrix and migrates – the invasion begins. It is now clear thatadhesive molecules are a key player in this cascade. These proteins of the cell membrane surface are responsiblefor attachment of the cells to each other and to the extracellular matrix. These interactions are crucial forboth structural and functional tissue organization. Lack of this homeostasis destroys the tissue architectureand impairs its function and results in invasion. Abnormal expression of adhesive molecules was reported in allexamined cancers, including endometrial cancer.Endometrial cancer is the most common gynaecological cancer in developed countries. Although in many casesdiagnosed and treated in early stages, and thus with good results, some patients cannot be cured. Completeknowledge of the pathogenesis of the disease will be helpful in identifying the patients with negative prognosticfactors, increased risk of recurrence and, perhaps, to find other therapeutic options. In the paper we are trying tosum up the up-to-date knowledge of the role of adhesive molecules in pathogenesis of endometrial cancer.

  1. Health survey on cancers about the Tricastin nuclear site; Etude sanitaire sur les cancers autour du site nucleaire du Tricastin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    This survey aims at describing the health status of the population around the Tricastin site, and more particularly at determining whether there is a difference between death or cancer occurrence frequencies observed around this site with respect to reference frequencies. It does not aim at assessing the health impact of the site industrial installations. Cancer mortality data, cancer diagnosis data, demographic data, child cancer data, data related to hospital stays in relationship with cancer, long duration hospital stay data, and mortality data are used. Several indicators are defined and used: standardised mortality ratio, standardised hospitalisation ratio. Data are also analysed in terms of location, and socio-demographic categories. It appears that there is no specific health situation for the considered area, except for pancreas cancer for women

  2. Carboplatin and Paclitaxel With or Without Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IVA Endometrial Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-23

    Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage II Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer

  3. THE COORDINATED RADIO AND INFRARED SURVEY FOR HIGH-MASS STAR FORMATION. II. SOURCE CATALOG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purcell, C. R.; Hoare, M. G.; Lumsden, S. L.; Urquhart, J. S. [School of Physics and Astronomy, E.C. Stoner Building, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Cotton, W. D. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903-2475 (United States); Chandler, C. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Array Operations Center, P.O. Box O, 1003 Lopezville Road, Socorro, NM 87801-0387 (United States); Churchwell, E. B. [The University of Wisconsin, Department of Astronomy, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Diamond, P.; Fuller, G.; Garrington, S. T. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, The Alan Turing Building, School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Manchester, Oxford Rd, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Dougherty, S. M. [National Research Council of Canada, Herzberg Institute for Astrophysics, Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory, P.O. Box 248, Penticton, British Columbia V2A 6J9 (Canada); Fender, R. P. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Gledhill, T. M. [Science and Technology Research Institute, University of Hertfordshire, College Lane, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Goldsmith, P. F. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Hindson, L. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Jackson, J. M. [Astronomy Department, Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Kurtz, S. E. [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico - Morelia, Apartado Postal 3-72, C.P. 58090 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico); Marti, J., E-mail: C.R.Purcell@leeds.ac.uk [Departamento de Fisica, EPSJ, Universidad de Jaen, Campus Las Lagunillas s/n, Edif. A3, E-23071 Jaen (Spain); and others

    2013-03-01

    The CORNISH project is the highest resolution radio continuum survey of the Galactic plane to date. It is the 5 GHz radio continuum part of a series of multi-wavelength surveys that focus on the northern GLIMPSE region (10 Degree-Sign < l < 65 Degree-Sign ), observed by the Spitzer satellite in the mid-infrared. Observations with the Very Large Array in B and BnA configurations have yielded a 1.''5 resolution Stokes I map with a root mean square noise level better than 0.4 mJy beam{sup -1}. Here we describe the data-processing methods and data characteristics, and present a new, uniform catalog of compact radio emission. This includes an implementation of automatic deconvolution that provides much more reliable imaging than standard CLEANing. A rigorous investigation of the noise characteristics and reliability of source detection has been carried out. We show that the survey is optimized to detect emission on size scales up to 14'' and for unresolved sources the catalog is more than 90% complete at a flux density of 3.9 mJy. We have detected 3062 sources above a 7{sigma} detection limit and present their ensemble properties. The catalog is highly reliable away from regions containing poorly sampled extended emission, which comprise less than 2% of the survey area. Imaging problems have been mitigated by down-weighting the shortest spacings and potential artifacts flagged via a rigorous manual inspection with reference to the Spitzer infrared data. We present images of the most common source types found: H II regions, planetary nebulae, and radio galaxies. The CORNISH data and catalog are available online at http://cornish.leeds.ac.uk.

  4. SKI-II reverses the chemoresistance of SGC7901/DDP gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Zhu, Zuan; Cai, Hongxing; Liu, Qinghua; Zhou, Honglian; Zhu, Zhengqiu

    2014-07-01

    Cisplatin is frequently used in treating gastric cancers; however, acquired resistance to the drug often reduces the efficacy of therapy. The present study analyzed the efficacy of the combination of 4-[4-(4-chloro-phenyl)-thiazol-2-ylamino]-phenol (SKI-II) and cisplatin [cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II); DDP] on the gastric cancer SGC7901/DDP cell line. The results revealed that SKI-II and DDP had a clear synergistic effect. Glutathione (GSH) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) levels decreased significantly subsequent to the cells being treated with the combination of DDP and SKI-II compared with the cells that were treated with DDP or SKI-II alone. Phosphorylated extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK) and phosphorylated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (p-JNK) expression levels also decreased following treatment with SKI-II. The results suggested that SKI-II is able to reverse the drug resistance in human gastric carcinoma cells and enhance the antitumor effect of DDP through the ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) proliferation pathway.

  5. Survey of Enteric Pathogens Causing Bacteremia in Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enayatollah Kalantar

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Symptomatic bacteraemia, is a frequent condition among cancer patients with a significant morbidity and mortality all over the world. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the burden of enteric pathogens causing bacteremia among cancer patients. Patients and Methods: Ten ml blood samples were withdrawn from the cancer patients under aseptic conditions. The blood specimens were added to the blood culture bottles and incubated at 37°C. The bacterial isolates from these samples were identified by routine biochemical reactions. Results: During the study period, 68 blood samples from cancer patients were analyzed for bacteremia. Of these patients, six were female (08/82% and 62 were male (91.18%; with age ranging from under 40 years to 85 years old (mean, 63 years. Gastro-intestinal cancer and cancers of head and neck were the most frequent cancer types in the studied group, accounting for 51 (75% and 15 (22.1% cases, respectively. The mean weight of patients was 69.18 Kg (range: 49-100 Kg. Similarly, the mean length of hospital stay was 8 days (range: 4-12 days. Positive blood cultures were detected in only 12 (17.65% and 11 (91.7% blood specimens from the Cancer Institute, Tehran, compared with one (08.33% from Shahid Kamali hospital, Karaj. From these patients, 15 bacteria were isolated; E. coli alone outnumbered other species and accounted for 33.33% of the episodes of bacteremia. Conclusions: In conclusion, our investigation revealed that cancers of GI tract are the most common cancer types causing bacteremia and also we identified that most common bacteria causing bacteremia in Cancer Institute, Tehran and Shahid Kamali Hospital, Karaj, are E. coli and S. aureus

  6. Sociodemographic gradients in breast and cervical cancer screening in Korea: the Korean National Cancer Screening Survey (KNCSS 2005-2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Jae

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer screening rates in Korea for five cancer types have increased steadily since 2002. With regard to the life-time cancer screening rates in 2009 according to cancer sites, the second highest was breast cancer (78.1% and the third highest was cervical cancer (76.1%. Despite overall increases in the screening rate, disparities in breast and cervical cancer screening, based on sociodemographic characteristics, still exist. Methods Data from 4,139 women aged 40 to74 years from the 2005 to 2009 Korea National Cancer Screening Survey were used to analyze the relationship between sociodemographic characteristics and receiving mammograms and Pap smears. The main outcome measures were ever having had a mammogram and ever having had a Pap smear. Using these items of information, we classified women into those who had had both types of screening, only one screening type, and neither screening type. We used logistic regression to investigate relationships between screening history and sociodemographic characteristics of the women. Results Being married, having a higher education, a rural residence, and private health insurance were significantly associated with higher rates of breast and cervical cancer screening after adjusting for age and sociodemographic factors. Household income was not significantly associated with mammograms or Pap smears after adjusting for age and sociodemographic factors. Conclusions Disparities in breast and cervical cancer screening associated with low sociodemographic status persist in Korea.

  7. The Basic Facts of Korean Breast Cancer in 2013: Results of a Nationwide Survey and Breast Cancer Registry Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Sun Young; Kim, Zisun; Hur, Min Hee; Yoon, Chan Seok; Park, Eun-Hwa; Jung, Kyu-Won

    2016-03-01

    The Korean Breast Cancer Society (KBCS) has reported a nationwide breast cancer data since 1996. We present a comprehensive report on the facts and trends of breast cancer in Korea in 2013. Data on the newly diagnosed patients in the year 2013 were collected from 99 hospitals by using nationwide questionnaire survey. Clinical characteristics such as stage of cancer, histologic types, biological markers, and surgical management were obtained from the online registry database. A total of 19,316 patients were newly diagnosed with breast cancer in 2013. The crude incidence rate of female breast cancer including carcinoma in situ was 76.2 cases per 100,000 women. The median age at diagnosis was 50 years, and the proportions of postmenopausal women with breast cancer accounted for more than half of total patients. The proportion of early breast cancer increased consistently, and the pathologic features have changed accordingly. Breast-conserving surgery was performed in more cases than total mastectomy in the year. The total number of breast reconstruction surgeries markedly increased approaching 3-fold in last 11 years. According to annual percentile change of invasive cancer incidence, the incidence increased rapidly until 2010. And thereafter the increase of it became steadier. For ductal carcinoma in situ, the incidence consistently increased during the same period without any joinpoint. Analysis of nationwide registry data will contribute to defining of the trends and characteristics of breast cancer in Korea.

  8. Cancer Cell Mitochondria Targeting by Pancratistatin Analogs is Dependent on Functional Complex II and III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Dennis; Pignanelli, Christopher; Tarade, Daniel; Gilbert, Tyler; Noel, Megan; Mansour, Fadi; Adams, Scott; Dowhayko, Alexander; Stokes, Kyle; Vshyvenko, Sergey; Hudlicky, Tomas; McNulty, James; Pandey, Siyaram

    2017-01-01

    Enhanced mitochondrial stability and decreased dependence on oxidative phosphorylation confer an acquired resistance to apoptosis in cancer cells, but may present opportunities for therapeutic intervention. The compound pancratistatin (PST) has been shown to selectively induce apoptosis in cancer cells. However, its low availability in nature has hindered its clinical advancement. We synthesized PST analogs and a medium-throughput screen was completed. Analogs SVTH-7, -6, and -5 demonstrated potent anti-cancer activity greater than PST and several standard chemotherapeutics. They disrupted mitochondrial function, activated the intrinsic apoptotic pathway, and reduced growth of tumor xenografts in vivo. Interestingly, the pro-apoptotic effects of SVTH-7 on cancer cells and mitochondria were abrogated with the inhibition of mitochondrial complex II and III, suggesting mitochondrial or metabolic vulnerabilities may be exploited by this analog. This work provides a scaffold for characterizing distinct mitochondrial and metabolic features of cancer cells and reveals several lead compounds with high therapeutic potential. PMID:28220885

  9. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations and postmenopausal breast cancer risk: a nested case control study in the Cancer Prevention Study-II Nutrition Cohort

    OpenAIRE

    McCullough, Marjorie L.; Stevens, Victoria L.; Patel, Roshni; Jacobs, Eric J.; Bain, Elizabeth B; Horst, Ronald L.; Gapstur, Susan M; Thun, Michael J.; Calle, Eugenia E.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Vitamin D status measured during adulthood has been inversely associated with breast cancer risk in some, but not all, studies. Vitamin D has been hypothesized to prevent breast cancer through genomic and non-genomic actions in cell-cycle regulation. Methods A subset (n = 21,965) of female participants from the prospective Cancer Prevention Study-II (CPS-II) Nutrition Cohort provided a blood sample from 1998-2001 and were followed through 2005. We measured serum 25-hydroxyvitamin...

  10. Environmental monitoring survey of oil and gas fields in Region II in 2009. Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-03-15

    The oil companies Statoil ASA, ExxonMobil Exploration and Production Norway AS, Total E&P Norge AS, Talisman Energy Norge AS and Marathon Petroleum Norge AS commissioned Section of Applied Environmental Research at UNI RESEARCH AS to undertake the monitoring survey of Region II in 2009. Similar monitoring surveys in Region II have been carried out in 1996, 2000, 2003 and 2006. The survey in 2009 included in total 18 fields: Rev, Varg, Sigyn, Sleipner Vest, Sleipner OEst, Sleipner Alfa Nord, Glitne, Grane, Balder, Ringhorne, Jotun, Vale, Skirne, Byggve, Heimdal, Volve, Vilje og Alvheim. Sampling was conducted from the vessel MV Libas between May 18 and May 27. Samples were collected from in totally 137 sampling sites, of which 15 were regional sampling sites. Samples for chemical analysis were collected at all sites, whereas samples for benthos analysis were collected at 12 fields. As in previous surveys, Region II is divided into natural sub-regions. One sub-region is shallow (77-96 m) sub-region, a central sub-region (107-130 m) and a northern subregion (115-119 m). The sediments of the shallow sub-region had relatively lower content of TOM and pelite and higher content of fine sand than the central and northern sub-regions. Calculated areas of contamination are shown for the sub-regions in Table 1.1. The fields Sigyn, Sleipner Alfa Nord, Glitne, Grane, Balder, Ringhorne, Jotun, Skirne, Byggve, Vilje og Alvheim showed no contamination of THC. At the other fields there were minor changes from 2006. The concentrations of barium increased in the central sub-region from 2006 to 2009, also at fields where no drilling had been undertaken during the last years. The same laboratory and methods are used during the three last regional investigations. The changes in barium concentrations may be due to high variability of barium concentrations in the sediments. This is supported by relatively large variations in average barium concentrations at the regional sampling sites in

  11. Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening Behavior in Female Cancer Survivors: The Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2007-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun-Ae; Shin, Jinyoung; Hwang, Eun-Joo; Lee, Jung-Woong

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare breast and cervical cancer screening rates between female cancer survivors and a population without cancer to identify factors related to cervical and breast cancer screening in cancer survivors. We included 17,765 adults (738 cancer survivors and 17,027 individuals without cancer) in this study, all of whom who were 30 years of age or older and participated in the Fourth and Fifth Korean National Health and Nutritional Examination Surveys from 2007-2012. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to identify factors related to cervical and breast cancer screening uptake in female cancer survivors. The screening rate for breast cancer was 56.6%, which was higher than that in the non-cancer control group (P=0.001). The screening rate for cervical cancer was 51.4%, which was not different from that of the non-cancer control group. In terms of breast cancer screening, cancer survivors showed no significant difference in the rate of screening 5 years after their cancer diagnosis. However, cervical cancer survivors were less likely to have cervical cancer screening 10 years after their cancer diagnosis. There was no significant association between cancer screening and sociodemographic factors. Breast and cervical cancer screening rates in Korean female cancer survivors are low. Secondary primary cancer screening of female cancer survivors needs to be planned in a comprehensive manner, with the consideration of influences beyond sociodemographic factors.

  12. Phase II study of ACNU in non-small-cell lung cancer: EORTC study 08872

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.S.Th. Planting (André); A. Ardizzoni (A.); J. Estapé (J.); G. Giaccone (Giuseppe); G.V. Scagliotti (Giorgio); T.A.W. Splinter (Ted); A. Kirkpatrick (A.); O. Dalesio (O.); J.G. Mcvie (John Gordon)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractA total of 62 patients with metastatic or locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer were entered in a phase II study of ACNU. Initially, the drug was given i. v. at a dose of 100 mg/m2 every 6 weeks, but due to observed haematological side effects in chemotherapy-pretreated patients,

  13. Recombinant human interleukin 6 in metastatic renal cell cancer : A phase II trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stouthard, JML; Goey, H; deVries, EGE; deMulder, PH; Groenewegen, A; Stoter, G; Sauerwein, HP; Bakker, PJM; Veenhof, CHN

    A phase II trial investigating the anti-tumour effects of recombinant human interleukin 6 (rhlL-6) in patients with metastatic renal cell cancer was carried out. RhIL-6 (150 mu g) was administered as a daily subcutaneous injection for 42 consecutive days on an outpatient basis. Forty-nine patients

  14. Reference frameworks for the health management of measles, breast cancer and diabetes (type II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Helmut; Schröder, Peter; Davies, John K; Escamilla, Ixhel; Hall, Caroline; Hickey, Kieran; Jelastopulu, Eleni; Mechtler, Reli; Yared, Wendy Tse; Volf, Jaroslav; Weihrauch, Birgit

    2006-03-01

    This paper presents reference frameworks which order effective and feasible policies and interventions for the health management of measles, breast cancer and diabetes (type II). These reference frameworks can be used to rapidly appraise regional health policy documents and existing health management systems. Furthermore, the reference frameworks can serve health policy makers for the planning of health management measures.

  15. Recombinant human interleukin 6 in metastatic renal cell cancer : A phase II trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stouthard, JML; Goey, H; deVries, EGE; deMulder, PH; Groenewegen, A; Stoter, G; Sauerwein, HP; Bakker, PJM; Veenhof, CHN

    1996-01-01

    A phase II trial investigating the anti-tumour effects of recombinant human interleukin 6 (rhlL-6) in patients with metastatic renal cell cancer was carried out. RhIL-6 (150 mu g) was administered as a daily subcutaneous injection for 42 consecutive days on an outpatient basis. Forty-nine patients w

  16. Risk of recurrence in patients with colon cancer stage II and III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bockelman, C.; Engelmann, Bodil E.; Kaprio, T.;

    2015-01-01

    Background. Adjuvant chemotherapy is established routine therapy for colon cancer (CC) patients with radically resected stage III and 'high-risk' stage II disease. The decision on recommending adjuvant chemotherapy, however, is based on data from older patient cohorts not reflecting improvements...

  17. Kisspeptin Effect on Endothelial Monocyte Activating Polypeptide II (EMAP-II)-Associated Lymphocyte Cell Death and Metastases in Colorectal Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stathaki, Martha; Armakolas, Athanasios; Dimakakos, Andreas; Kaklamanis, Loukas; Vlachos, Ioannis; Konstantoulakis, Manoussos M; Zografos, George; Koutsilieris, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Kisspeptin is an antimetastatic agent in some cancers that has also been associated with lymphoid cell apoptosis, a phenomenon favoring metastases. Our aim was to determine the association of kisspeptin with lymphocyte apoptosis and the presence of metastases in colorectal cancer patients. Blood was drawn from 69 colon cancer patients and 20 healthy volunteers. Tissue specimens from healthy and pathological tissue were immunohistochemically analyzed for kisspeptin and endothelial monocyte activating polypeptide II (EMAP-II) expression. Blood EMAP-II and soluble Fas ligand (sFasL) levels were examined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. The kisspeptin and EMAP-II expression and secretion levels in the DLD-1 and HT-29 colon cancer cell lines were examined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, Western analysis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, whereas lymphocyte viability was assessed by flow cytometry. The effect of kisspeptin on the viability of colon cancer cells was examined by MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide]. Exogenous, synthetic and naturally produced, kisspeptin induces through the G-protein-coupled receptor 54 (GPR54; also known as the kisspeptin receptor) the EMAP-II expression and secretion in colon cancer cell lines, inducing in vitro lymphocyte apoptosis, as verified by the use of an anti-EMAP-II antibody. These results were reversed with the use of kisspeptin inhibitors and by kisspeptin-silencing experiments. Tumor kisspeptin expression was associated with the tumor EMAP-II expression (p < 0.001). Elevated kisspeptin and EMAP-II expression in colon cancer tissues was associated with lack of metastases (p < 0.001) in colon cancer patients. These data indicate the antimetastatic effect of tumor-elevated kisspeptin in colon cancer patients that may be mediated by the effect of kisspeptin on EMAP-II expression in colon cancer tumors in patients with normal serum EMAP-II levels. These findings

  18. SNe Ia host galaxy properties from Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Johansson, Jonas; Pforr, Janine; Maraston, Claudia; Nichol, Robert C; Smith, Mathew; Lampeitl, Hubert; Beifiori, Alessandra; Gupta, Ravi R; Schneider, Donald P

    2012-01-01

    We study the stellar populations of SNe Ia host galaxies using SDSS-II spectroscopy. We focus on the relationships of SNe Ia properties with stellar velocity dispersion and the stellar population parameters age, metallicity and element abundance ratios derived by fitting absorption line indices to stellar population models. We concentrate on a sub-sample of 84 SNe Ia from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey. In agreement with previous findings, we find that SALT2 stretch factor values show the strongest dependence on stellar population age. Hence, SNe Ia peak-luminosity is closely related to the age of the stellar progenitor systems, where more luminous SNe Ia appear in younger stellar populations. We find no statistically significant trends in the Hubble residual with any of the stellar population parameters studied, including age and metallicity contrary to the literature, as well as with stellar velocity dispersion. Moreover, we find that the method of stellar mass derivation is affecting the Hubble residual-mass...

  19. [Update of breast cancer in Primary Care (II/V)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusint, B; Vich, P; Ávarez-Hernández, C; Cuadrado-Rouco, C; Díaz-García, N; Redondo-Margüello, E

    2014-10-01

    Breast cancer is a prevalent disease affecting all areas of patients' lives. Therefore, family doctors need to thoroughly understand this disease in order to optimize the health care services for these patients, making the best use of available resources. A series of 5 articles on breast cancer is presented below. It is based on a review of the scientific literature over the last 10 years. The second one deals with population screening and its controversies, screening in high-risk women, and the current recommendations. This summary report aims to provide a current and practical review about this problem, providing answers to family doctors, and helping them to be able to care for their patients for their benefit throughout their illness. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  20. Protein kinase C-beta II (PKC-betaII) expression in patients with colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spindler, Karen-Lise; Lindebjerg, Jan; Lahn, Michael;

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: Current development of targeted agents for the treatment of colorectal cancer include the clinical evaluation of kinase inhibitors, such as enzastaurin, a serine/threonine kinase inhibitor designed to suppress signaling through Protein Kinase C (PKC) and AKT pathways. Little is known abo...

  1. The International Deep Planet Survey II: The frequency of directly imaged giant exoplanets with stellar mass

    CERN Document Server

    Galicher, Raphael; Macintosh, Bruce; Zuckerman, Ben; Barman, Travis; Konopacky, Quinn; Song, Inseok; Patience, Jenny; Lafreniere, David; Doyon, Rene; Nielsen, Eric L

    2016-01-01

    Radial velocity and transit methods are effective for the study of short orbital period exoplanets but they hardly probe objects at large separations for which direct imaging can be used. We carried out the international deep planet survey of 292 young nearby stars to search for giant exoplanets and determine their frequency. We developed a pipeline for a uniform processing of all the data that we have recorded with NIRC2/Keck II, NIRI/Gemini North, NICI/Gemini South, and NACO/VLT for 14 years. The pipeline first applies cosmetic corrections and then reduces the speckle intensity to enhance the contrast in the images. The main result of the international deep planet survey is the discovery of the HR 8799 exoplanets. We also detected 59 visual multiple systems including 16 new binary stars and 2 new triple stellar systems, as well as 2,279 point-like sources. We used Monte Carlo simulations and the Bayesian theorem to determine that 1.05[+2.80-0.70]% of stars harbor at least one giant planet between 0.5 and 14...

  2. Polymorphisms of phase I and phase II enzymes and breast cancer risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina eJustenhoven

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is a complex disease which is provoked by a multitude of exogenous and endogenous factors including genetic variations. Recent genome-wide association studies identified a set of more than 18 novel low penetrant susceptibility loci, however, a limitation of this powerful approach is the hampered analysis of polymorphisms in DNA sequences with a high degree of similarity to other genes or pseudo genes. Since this common feature affects the majority of the highly polymorphic genes encoding phase I and II enzyme the retrieval of specific genotype data requires adapted amplification methods. With regard to breast cancer these genes are of certain interest due to their involvement in the metabolism of carcinogens like exogenous genotoxic compounds or steroid hormones. The present review summarizes the observed effects of functional genetic variants of phase I and II enzymes in well designed case control studies to shed light on their contribution to breast cancer risk.

  3. Evaluating arts-based cancer education using an internet survey among Alaska community health workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cueva, Melany; Cueva, Katie; Dignan, Mark; Lanier, Anne; Kuhnley, Regina

    2014-09-01

    Cancer, considered a rare disease among Alaska Native people as recently as the 1950s, surpassed heart disease in the 1990s to become the leading cause of mortality. In response to Alaska's village-based Community Health Workers' (CHWs) desire to learn more about cancer for themselves and the people in their communities, cancer education that incorporated the expressive arts of moving, drawing, and sculpting was developed, implemented, and evaluated. Arts-based education integrates the dynamic wisdom and experiences of Alaska Native people and western medical knowledge to share cancer information in a culturally respectful way. Between May 2009 and March 2013, 12 5-day courses that included arts activities to support cancer information were provided for 118 CHWs in Anchorage, AK, USA. A post-course internet survey was conducted in April 2013, to learn how arts-based cancer education affected participants' knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors. Surveys were completed by 54 of the 96 course participants; 22 course participants were lost to follow-up. As a result of integrating the arts with cancer education, respondents reported an increase in their cancer knowledge and comfort with talking about cancer. Additionally, 82 % (44) of respondents described feeling differently about cancer. By integrating the arts with cancer information, participants reported healthy behavior changes for themselves (76 %), with their families (70 %), and in their work (72 %). The expressive arts of moving, drawing, and sculpting provided a creative pathway for diverse adult learners in Alaska to increase their cancer knowledge, comfort with talking about cancer, and wellness behaviors.

  4. A Herschel [C ii] Galactic plane survey. I. The global distribution of ISM gas components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda, J. L.; Langer, W. D.; Velusamy, T.; Goldsmith, P. F.

    2013-06-01

    Context. The [C ii] 158 μm line is an important tool for understanding the life cycle of interstellar matter. Ionized carbon is present in a variety of phases of the interstellar medium (ISM), including the diffuse ionized medium, warm and cold atomic clouds, clouds in transition from atomic to molecular, and dense and warm photon dominated regions. Aims: Velocity-resolved observations of [C ii] are the most powerful technique available to disentangle the emission produced by these components. These observations can also be used to trace CO-dark H2 gas and determine the total mass of the ISM. Methods: The Galactic Observations of Terahertz C+ (GOT C+) project surveys the [C ii] 158 μm line over the entire Galactic disk with velocity-resolved observations using the Herschel/HIFI instrument. We present the first longitude-velocity maps of the [C ii] emission for Galactic latitudes b = 0°, ±0.5°, and ±1.0°. We combine these maps with those of H i, 12CO, and 13CO to separate the different phases of the ISM and study their properties and distribution in the Galactic plane. Results: [C ii] emission is mostly associated with spiral arms, mainly emerging from Galactocentric distances between 4 and 10 kpc. It traces the envelopes of evolved clouds as well as clouds that are in the transition between atomic and molecular. We estimate that most of the observed [C ii] emission is produced by dense photon dominated regions (~47%), with smaller contributions from CO-dark H2 gas (~28%), cold atomic gas (~21%), and ionized gas (~4%). Atomic gas inside the Solar radius is mostly in the form of cold neutral medium (CNM), while the warm neutral medium gas dominates the outer galaxy. The average fraction of CNM relative to total atomic gas is ~43%. We find that the warm and diffuse CO-dark H2 is distributed over a larger range of Galactocentric distances (4-11 kpc) than the cold and dense H2 gas traced by 12CO and 13CO (4-8 kpc). The fraction of CO-dark H2 to total H2 increases

  5. Perceived Neighborhood Quality and Cancer Screening Behavior: Evidence from the Survey of the Health of Wisconsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Kirsten M M; Malecki, Kristen M; Hoormann, Kelly A; Szabo, Aniko; Nattinger, Ann B

    2016-02-01

    Socioeconomic disparities in colorectal and breast cancer screening persist, partially accounting for disparities in cancer outcomes. Some neighborhood characteristics--particularly area level socioeconomic factors--have been linked to cancer screening behavior, but few studies have examined the relationship between perceived neighborhood quality and screening behavior, which may provide more insight into the ways in which neighborhood environments shape cancer related behaviors. This study examines the relationship between several aspects of the perceived neighborhood environment and breast and colorectal cancer screening behavior among a population-based sample of Wisconsin residents. A sub-goal was to compare the relevance of different perceived neighborhood factors for different screening tests. This is a cross-sectional study of 2008-2012 data from the Survey of the Health of Wisconsin, a population-based annual survey of Wisconsin residents. An average risk sample of Black, Hispanic and White women age 50 and older (n = 1265) were selected. Survey regression analyses examined predictors of screening, as well as adherence to screening guidelines. Models controlled for individual socio-demographic information and insurance status. Perceptions of social and physical disorder, including fear of crime and visible garbage, were associated with screening rates. Findings emphasize the particular importance of these factors for colorectal cancer screening, indicating the necessity of improving screening rates in areas characterized by social disorganization, crime, and physical disorder. Additional work should be done to further investigate the pathways that explain the linkage between neighborhood conditions, perceived neighborhood risks and cancer screening behavior.

  6. Norspermidine and novel Pd(II) and Pt(II) polynuclear complexes of norspermidine as potential antineoplastic agents against breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Tânia Magalhães; Andersson, Sara; Sukumaran, Sunil Kumar; Marques, Maria Paula; Persson, Lo; Oredsson, Stina

    2013-01-01

    New strategies are needed for breast cancer treatment and one initial step is to test new chemotherapeutic drugs in breast cancer cell lines, to choose candidates for further studies towards clinical use. The cytotoxic effects of a biogenic polyamine analogue - norspermidine - and its trinuclear Pd(II) and Pt(II) complexes - Pd(3)NSpd(2) and Pt(3)NSpd(2), respectively - were investigated in one immortalized normal-like and three breast cancer cell lines. The normal-like MCF-10A cells were least sensitive to the compounds, while growth inhibition and cell death was observed in the cancer cell lines. Norspermidine and its Pd(II) complex were generally shown to have stronger antiproliferative effects than the corresponding Pt(II) complex. Moreover, both norspermidine and the Pd(II) complex reduced the cellular activity of the growth-related enzyme, ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) to a lower level than the Pt(II) complex in most of the cell lines examined. Treatment with norspermidine or the Pd(II) complex reduced the number of colonies formed in a soft agar assay performed with the breast cancer cell lines, indicating that these compounds reduced the malignancy of the breast cancer cells. The effect of norspermidine or the Pd(II) complex on colony formation was much stronger than that observed for the Pt(II) complex. The results from a new mammalian genotoxicity screen together with those of a single cell gel electrophoresis assay indicated that none of the drugs were genotoxic at a 25 µM concentration. Overall, norspermidine and its Pd(II) complex were shown to have strong antiproliferative effects. In comparison, the effects obtained with the Pd(II) complex were much stronger than that of the Pt(II) complex. The results obtained in the present study demonstrate that the trinuclear Pd(II) complex of norspermidine (Pd(3)NSpd(2)) may be regarded as a potential new metal-based drug against breast cancer, coupling a significant efficiency to a low toxicity.

  7. Cancer pain management in China: current status and practice implications based on the ACHEON survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Zhongjun

    2017-01-01

    Cancer pain can seriously impact the quality of life (QoL) of patients, and optimal management practices are therefore of paramount importance. The ACHEON survey queried physicians and patients from 10 Asian countries/regions to assess current clinical practices in cancer pain management in Asia. This study presents the data obtained for cancer pain management in mainland China, with an emphasis on practices related to opioid drugs. In several tertiary hospitals across China, 250 patients experiencing cancer pain and 100 physicians were surveyed on questions designed to assess current cancer pain management practices and cancer pain impact on QoL. The patient survey showed that 88% of patients reported moderate-to-severe cancer pain, with a median duration of 6 months. The physician survey showed that medical school/residency training with regard to cancer pain management was inadequate in ~80% of physicians. A total of 80% of physicians and 67.2% of patients reported that pain scale was used during pain assessment; 84% of physicians expressed that physician-perceived pain severity was not completely consistent with actual pain the patient experienced. Of the 147 patients who recalled the medication received, 83.7% were administered opioid prescriptions. Of the 240 patients who received treatment, 43.8% perceived the inadequacy of controlling pain. The primary barriers from physicians perceived to optimal pain management included patients' fear of side effects (58%), patients' fear of addiction (53%), patients' reluctance to report pain (43%), physicians' reluctance to prescribe (29%), physicians' inadequacy of pain assessment (27%) and excessive regulation of opioid analgesics (47%). Knowledge of cancer pain management should be strengthened among physicians. Quantitative pain assessment and principle-based pain management should be combined to achieve pain relief. Misconceptions about opioids in patients and physicians and poor report about pain should be

  8. Survey of Differentially Methylated Promoters in Prostate Cancer Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yipeng Wang

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available DNA methylation, copy number in the genomes of three immortalized prostate epithelial, five cancer cell lines (LNCaP, PC3, PC3M, PC3M-Pro4, PC3MLN4 were compared using a microarray-based technique. Genomic DNA is cut with a methylation-sensitive enzyme Hpall, followed by linker ligation, polymerase chain reaction (PCR amplification, labeling, hybridization to an array of promoter sequences. Only those parts of the genomic DNA that have unmethylated restriction sites within a few hundred base pairs generate PCR products detectable on an array. Of 2732 promoter sequences on a test array, 504 (18.5% showed differential hybridization between immortalized prostate epithelial, cancer cell lines. Among candidate hypermethylated genes in cancer-derived lines, there were eight (CD44, CDKN1A, ESR1, PLAU, RARB, SFN, TNFRSF6, TSPY previously observed in prostate cancer, 13 previously known methylation targets in other cancers (ARHI, bcl-2, BRCA1, CDKN2C, GADD45A, MTAP, PGR, SLC26A4, SPARC, SYK, TJP2, UCHL1, WIT-1. The majority of genes that appear to be both differentially methylated, differentially regulated between prostate epithelial, cancer cell lines are novel methylation targets, including PAK6, RAD50, TLX3, PIR51, MAP2K5, INSR, FBN1, GG2-1, representing a rich new source of candidate genes used to study the role of DNA methylation in prostate tumors.

  9. Clinical management of gastric cancer: results of a multicentre survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Feng

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The National Comprehensive Cancer Network clinical practice guidelines in oncology-gastric cancer guidelines have been widely used to provide appropriate recommendations for the treatment of patients with gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to examine the adherence of surgical oncologists, medical oncologists, and radiation oncologists' to the recommended guidelines. Methods A questionnaire asking the treatment options for gastric cancer cases was sent to 394 Chinese oncology specialists, including surgical oncologists, medical oncologists, and radiation oncologists working in hospitals joined in The Western Cooperative Gastrointestinal Oncology Group of China. The questionnaire involved a series of clinical scenarios regarding the interpretation of surgery, neoadjuvant, adjuvant, and advanced treatment planning of gastric cancer. Results Analysis of 358 respondents (91% showed variations between each specialization and from the recommended guidelines in the management approaches to specific clinical scenarios. The majority of specialists admitted that less than 50% of patients received multidisciplinary evaluation before treatment. The participants gave different responses to questions involving adjuvant, neoadjuvant, and advanced settings, compared to the recommended guidelines. Conclusions These results highlight the heterogeneity of the treatment of gastric cancer. Surgical oncologists, medical oncologists, and radiation oncologists are not adhering to the recommended guidelines.

  10. Quality-of-life survey for patients diagnosed with nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abáigar-Pedraza, I; Megías-Garrigós, J; Sánchez-Payá, J

    2016-05-01

    To determine the reliability and validity of a quality-of-life survey for patients with nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer. A total of 180 patients were included in the study. We developed a survey with 21 questions grouped into 5 areas. The patients filled in this survey and the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy - Bladder Cancer (FACT-BL) survey. To assess reliability, we calculated Cronbach's alpha coefficient and the kappa index. To determine criterion validity, we studied the association between the scores obtained from our survey and those from the FACT-BL survey using the Pearson correlation coefficient. To determine the construct validity (factorial and discriminatory), we performed a factor analysis, comparing it with Student's t-test for the scores obtained according to the tumour characteristics of reduced quality of life (e.g., malignancies located at the trigone of the bladder). Cronbach's alpha reliability coefficient was .83, and the kappa index varied between .7 and 1. For the association study between the new survey and the FACT-BL survey, we measured an r=.82 for the overall score and between r=.68 (disease) and r=.97 (sex life) in the various measures. In the factor analysis, we measured a Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin index of .77 and performed the Barlett test (P<.001). The comparison between the scores, in the presence or absence of certain tumour characteristics, has shown a reduced quality of life when those characteristics are present, which was statistically significant (P<.05) in the majority of cases. Our survey to measure the quality of life of patients with nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer is reliable and valid. Copyright © 2015 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Patient Survey (HCAHPS) - PPS-Exempt Cancer Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of hospital ratings for the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS). HCAHPS is a national, standardized survey of hospital...

  12. The International Deep Planet Survey. II. The frequency of directly imaged giant exoplanets with stellar mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galicher, R.; Marois, C.; Macintosh, B.; Zuckerman, B.; Barman, T.; Konopacky, Q.; Song, I.; Patience, J.; Lafrenière, D.; Doyon, R.; Nielsen, E. L.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Radial velocity and transit methods are effective for the study of short orbital period exoplanets but they hardly probe objects at large separations for which direct imaging can be used. Aims: We carried out the international deep planet survey of 292 young nearby stars to search for giant exoplanets and determine their frequency. Methods: We developed a pipeline for a uniform processing of all the data that we have recorded with NIRC2/Keck II, NIRI/Gemini North, NICI/Gemini South, and NACO/VLT for 14 yr. The pipeline first applies cosmetic corrections and then reduces the speckle intensity to enhance the contrast in the images. Results: The main result of the international deep planet survey is the discovery of the HR 8799 exoplanets. We also detected 59 visual multiple systems including 16 new binary stars and 2 new triple stellar systems, as well as 2279 point-like sources. We used Monte Carlo simulations and the Bayesian theorem to determine that 1.05+2.80-0.70% of stars harbor at least one giant planet between 0.5 and 14 MJ and between 20 and 300 AU. This result is obtained assuming uniform distributions of planet masses and semi-major axes. If we consider power law distributions as measured for close-in planets instead, the derived frequency is 2.30+5.95-1.55%, recalling the strong impact of assumptions on Monte Carlo output distributions. We also find no evidence that the derived frequency depends on the mass of the hosting star, whereas it does for close-in planets. Conclusions: The international deep planet survey provides a database of confirmed background sources that may be useful for other exoplanet direct imaging surveys. It also puts new constraints on the number of stars with at least one giant planet reducing by a factor of two the frequencies derived by almost all previous works. Tables 11-15 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  13. The Danish Barriers Questionnaire-II: preliminary validation in cancer pain patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Ramune; Møldrup, Claus; Christrup, Lona Louring;

    2009-01-01

    of three items addressing the fear of getting tolerant to analgesic effect of pain medicine. Items related to medication side effects were analyzed as separate units. The DBQ-II total had an internal consistency of 0.87. The DBQ-II total score was related to measures of pain relief and anxiety. CONCLUSIONS...... management facilities. Thirty-three patients responded to the DBQ-II, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and Brief Pain Inventory pain severity scale. RESULTS: A factor analysis of the DBQ-II resulted in six scales. Scale one, Fatalism, consisted of three items addressing fatalistic beliefs regarding...... cancer pain management. Scale two, Immune System, consisted of three items addressing the belief that pain medications harm the immune system. Scale three, Monitor, consisted of three items addressing the fear that pain medicine masks changes in one's body. Scale four, Communication, consisted of five...

  14. Long-term use of metformin and colorectal cancer risk in type II diabetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardel, Majken; Jensen, S. M.; Pottegård, Anton;

    2014-01-01

    In vitro and animal studies indicate that metformin prevents colorectal cancer (CRC). Epidemiological studies, however, have been equivocal. We undertook this study to assess whether metformin prevents CRC in individuals with type II diabetes. We performed a nested case-control study restricted...... to Danish citizens with type II diabetes. Data were collected from four Danish nationwide registries. Cases were type II diabetics with a primary CRC between 2000 and 2009, and controls were sampled among subjects with type II diabetes. Longterm exposure to metformin was defined by the redeeming...... of prescriptions for a cumulative dose of 2000 g within 5 years prior to the index date. To control for potential confounders, we used unconditional logistic regression. We generated adjusted odds ratios (OR) for the association between metformin and CRC and performed subanalyses for selected subgroups...

  15. [Demonstration of PIVKA-II and AFP production by gastric cancer by indirect immunoenzymatic staining of paraffin sections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, K; Sakizono, K; Oita, T; Kudo, M; Shirane, H; Uchida, H; Kasakura, S

    1991-06-01

    The patient had elevated plasma PIVKA-II and serum AFP levels. However, no tumor was detected with an ultrasonography, angiography, abdominal computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MR). Gastric endoscopic examination disclosed gastric cancer and then subtotal gastrectomy was done. Shortly after the surgery, both plasma PIVKA-II and serum AFP levels returned to each normal level. The extirpated tumor revealed histologically immature and mature cancer cells. It was pathologically diagnosed as IIc early cancer. The localization of PIVKA-II and AFP in gastric cancer cells was demonstrated by the immunostaining method using monoclonal antibody. Taken together, these results indicate that cancer cells may produce PIVKA-II or AFP in this patient.

  16. Hydra II: A Faint and Compact Milky Way Dwarf Galaxy Found in the Survey of the Magellanic Stellar History

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin, Nicolas F.; Nidever, David L.; Besla, Gurtina; Olsen, Knut; Walker, Alistair R.; Vivas, A. Katherina; Gruendl, Robert A.; Kaleida, Catherine C.; Muñoz, Ricardo R.; Blum, Robert D.; Saha, Abhijit; Conn, Blair C.; Bell, Eric F.; Chu, You-Hua; Cioni, Maria-Rosa L.; de Boer, Thomas J. L.; Gallart, Carme; Jin, Shoko; Kunder, Andrea; Majewski, Steven R.; Martinez-Delgado, David; Monachesi, Antonela; Monelli, Matteo; Monteagudo, Lara; Noël, Noelia E. D.; Olszewski, Edward W.; Stringfellow, Guy S.; van der Marel, Roeland P.; Zaritsky, Dennis

    We present the discovery of a new dwarf galaxy, Hydra II, found serendipitously within the data from the ongoing Survey of the Magellanic Stellar History conducted with the Dark Energy Camera on the Blanco 4 m Telescope. The new satellite is compact ({{r}h}=68 ± 11 pc) and faint ({{M}V}=-4.8 ± 0.3),

  17. SN 2006oz: rise of a super-luminous supernova observed by the SDSS-II SN Survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leloudas, Georgios; Chatzopoulos, E.; Dilday, B.;

    2012-01-01

    to contribute to a better understanding of these objects by studying SN 2006oz, a newly-recognized member of this class. Methods. We present multi-color light curves of SN 2006oz from the SDSS-II SN Survey that cover its rise time, as well as an optical spectrum that shows that the explosion occurred at z ~ 0...

  18. Inhaled cisplatin deposition and distribution in lymph nodes in stage II lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarogoulidis, Paul; Darwiche, Kaid; Krauss, Leslie; Huang, Haidong; Zachariadis, George A; Katsavou, Anna; Hohenforst-Schmidt, Wolfgang; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Vogl, Thomas J; Freitag, Lutz; Stamatis, George; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2013-09-01

    Lung cancer therapies during the last decade have focused on targeting the genome of cancer cells, and novel routes for administering lung cancer therapies have been investigated for decades. Aerosol therapies for several systematic diseases and systemic infections were introduced into the market a decade ago. One of the main issues of aerosol therapies has been the ability to investigate the deposition of a drug compound throughout the systematic circulation and lymph node circulation. Until now, none of the published studies have efficiently shown the deposition of a chemotherapy pharmaceutical within the lymph node tissue. In our current work we present, for the first time, with the novel CytoViva(®) (AL, USA) technique, the deposition of cisplatin aerosol therapy in surgically resected stage II lymph nodes from lung cancer patients. Finally, we present the distribution of cisplatin in correlation with the cisplatin concentration in different lymph stations and comment on the possible mechanisms of distribution.

  19. Exploring Cancer Therapeutics with Natural Products from African Medicinal Plants, Part II: Alkaloids, Terpenoids and Flavonoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwodo, Justina N; Ibezim, Akachukwu; Simoben, Conrad V; Ntie-Kang, Fidele

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stands as second most common cause of disease-related deaths in humans. Resistance of cancer to chemotherapy remains challenging to both scientists and physicians. Medicinal plants are known to contribute significantly to a large population of Africa, which is to a very large extent linked to folkloric claims which is part of their livelihood. In this review paper, the potential of naturally occurring anti-cancer agents from African flora has been explored, with suggested modes of action, where such data is available. Literature search revealed plant-derived compounds from African flora showing anti-cancer and/or cytotoxic activities, which have been tested in vitro and in vivo. This corresponds to 400 compounds (from mildly active to very active) covering various compound classes. However, in this part II, we only discussed the three major compound classes which are: flavonoids, alkaloids and terpenoids.

  20. A novel agent exerts antitumor activity in breast cancer cells by targeting mitochondrial complex II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Guozhen; Chan, Judy Yuet-Wa; Wang, Li; Li, Chuwen; Shan, Luchen; Xu, Changjiang; Zhang, Qingwen; Wang, Yuqiang; Di, Lijun; Lee, Simon Ming-Yuen

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrial respiratory chain, including mitochondrial complex II, has emerged as a potential target for cancer therapy. In the present study, a novel conjugate of danshensu (DSS) and tetramethylpyrazine (TMP), DT-010, was synthesized. Our results showed that DT-010 is more potent than its parental compounds separately or in combination, in inhibiting the proliferation of MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells by inducing cytotoxicity and promoting cell cycle arrest. It also inhibited the growth of 4T1 breast cancer cells in vivo. DT-010 suppressed the fundamental parameters of mitochondrial function in MCF-7 cells, including basal respiration, ATP turnover, maximal respiration. Treatment with DT-010 in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells resulted in the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and decreased ATP production. DT-010 also promoted ROS generation, while treatment with ROS scavenger, NAC (N-acetyl-L-cysteine), reversed DT-010-induced cytotoxicity. Further study showed that DT-010 suppressed succinate-induced mitochondrial respiration and impaired mitochondrial complex II enzyme activity indicating that DT-010 may inhibit mitochondrial complex II. Overall, our results suggested that the antitumor activity of DT-010 is associated with inhibition of mitochondrial complex II, which triggers ROS generation and mitochondrial dysfunction in breast cancer cells. PMID:27081033

  1. Prognostic value of stem cell quantification in stage II colon cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Angeles Vaz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cancer stem cells (CSCs are a subset of tumor cells with capacity to self-renew and generate the diverse cells that make up the tumor. The aim of this study is to evaluate the prognostic value of CSCs in a highly homogeneous population of stage II colon cancer. METHODS: One hundred stage II colon cancer patients treated by the same surgical team between 1977 and 2005 were retrospectively analyzed. None of the patients received adjuvant chemotherapy. Inmunohistochemistry expression of CD133, NANOG and CK20 was scored, using four levels: 50% positivity. Kaplan-Meier analysis and log rank test were used to compare survival. RESULTS: The average patient age was 68 years (patients were between 45-92 years of age and median follow up was 5.8 years. There was recurrent disease in 17 (17%; CD133 expression (defined by >10% positivity was shown in 60% of the tumors, in 95% for NANOG and 78% for CK20. No correlation was found among expression levels of CD133, NANOG or CK20 and relapse-free survival (RFS or overall survival (OS. However, a statistical significant correlation was found between established pathological prognostic factors and RFS and OS. CONCLUSIONS: Stem Cell quantification defined by CD133 and NANOG expression has no correlation with RFS or OS in this cohort of Stage II colon cancer.

  2. High clusterin expression correlates with a poor outcome in stage II colorectal cancers.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kevans, David

    2012-02-01

    The role of clusterin in tumor growth and progression remains unclear. Overexpression of cytoplasmic clusterin has been studied in aggressive colon tumors; however, no correlation between clusterin expression and survival in colorectal cancer has been identified to date. We assessed levels of clusterin expression in a group of stage II colorectal cancer patients to assess its utility as a prognostic marker. The study included 251 patients with stage II colorectal cancer. Tissue microarrays were constructed and immunohistochemistry done and correlated with clinical features and long term outcome. Dual immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy were used with terminal deoxynucleotidyl-transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling probes and clusterin antibody to assess the degree of co localization. Percentage epithelial cytoplasmic staining was higher in tumor compared with nonadjacent normal mucosa (P < 0.001). Within the stromal compartment, percentage cytoplamic staining and intensity was lower in tumor tissue compared with normal nonadjacent mucosa (P < or = 0.001). Survival was significantly associated with percentage epithelial cytoplasmic staining (P < 0.001), epithelial cytoplasmic staining intensity (P < 0.001), percentage stromal cytoplasmic staining (P = 0.002), and stromal cytoplasmic staining intensity (P < 0.001). Clusterin levels are associated with poor survival in stage II colorectal cancer.

  3. Hepatitis B vaccinations among Koreans: Results from 2005 Korea National Cancer Screening Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwak Min-Son

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Liver cancer is one of most commonly diagnosed cancers among Koreans. Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV infection is a major risk factor for liver cancer. HBV infection can be prevented by effective screening and vaccination programs. The purpose of this study is to examine the status of HBV infection and the predictors associated with HBV vaccination. Methods The study population was derived from the 2005 Korea National Cancer Screening Survey (KNCSS. The KNCSS is an annual cross-sectional survey that uses a nationally-representative random sampling to investigate cancer screening rates. A total of 1,786 Koreans over 40 years of age participated in this study. Results Of all the participants, 5.9% reported HBV positive (HBsAg+, HBsAb-, 41.8% were HBV negative but protected (HBsAg-, HBsAb+, and 52.3% were unprotected (HBsAg-, HBsAb-. Among unprotected individuals (n = 934, 23.1% reported to have received the vaccination. About half of those who had vaccinations completed the 3-shot vaccine series. In multiple analyses, education, having private cancer insurance, alcohol use, having regular check-up, and doing regular exercise were associated with completed HBV vaccination. Conclusion This study result suggests that we need a liver cancer education program to increase HBV awareness and to increase the liver cancer prevention message among low educated populations.

  4. Evaluation of lymph node numbers for adequate staging of Stage II and III colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bumpers Harvey L

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although evaluation of at least 12 lymph nodes (LNs is recommended as the minimum number of nodes required for accurate staging of colon cancer patients, there is disagreement on what constitutes an adequate identification of such LNs. Methods To evaluate the minimum number of LNs for adequate staging of Stage II and III colon cancer, 490 patients were categorized into groups based on 1-6, 7-11, 12-19, and ≥ 20 LNs collected. Results For patients with Stage II or III disease, examination of 12 LNs was not significantly associated with recurrence or mortality. For Stage II (HR = 0.33; 95% CI, 0.12-0.91, but not for Stage III patients (HR = 1.59; 95% CI, 0.54-4.64, examination of ≥20 LNs was associated with a reduced risk of recurrence within 2 years. However, examination of ≥20 LNs had a 55% (Stage II, HR = 0.45; 95% CI, 0.23-0.87 and a 31% (Stage III, HR = 0.69; 95% CI, 0.38-1.26 decreased risk of mortality, respectively. For each six additional LNs examined from Stage III patients, there was a 19% increased probability of finding a positive LN (parameter estimate = 0.18510, p Conclusions Thus, the 12 LN cut-off point cannot be supported as requisite in determining adequate staging of colon cancer based on current data. However, a minimum of 6 LNs should be examined for adequate staging of Stage II and III colon cancer patients.

  5. Apoptotic death of prostate cancer cells by a gonadotropin-releasing hormone-II antagonist.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumi Park

    Full Text Available Gonadotropin-releasing hormone-I (GnRH-I has attracted strong attention as a hormonal therapeutic tool, particularly for androgen-dependent prostate cancer patients. However, the androgen-independency of the cancer in advanced stages has spurred researchers to look for new medical treatments. In previous reports, we developed the GnRH-II antagonist Trp-1 to inhibit proliferation and stimulate the autophagic death of various prostate cancer cells, including androgen-independent cells. We further screened many GnRH-II antagonists to identify molecules with higher efficiency. Here, we investigated the effect of SN09-2 on the growth of PC3 prostate cancer cells. SN09-2 reduced the growth of prostate cancer cells but had no effect on cells derived from other tissues. Compared with Trp-1, SN09-2 conspicuously inhibited prostate cancer cell growth, even at low concentrations. SN09-2-induced PC3 cell growth inhibition was associated with decreased membrane potential in mitochondria where the antagonist was accumulated, and increased mitochondrial and cytosolic reactive oxygen species. SN09-2 induced lactate dehydrogenase release into the media and annexin V-staining on the PC3 cell surface, suggesting that the antagonist stimulated prostate cancer cell death by activating apoptotic signaling pathways. Furthermore, cytochrome c release from mitochondria to the cytosol and caspase-3 activation occurred in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. SN09-2 also inhibited the growth of PC3 cells xenotransplanted into nude mice. These results demonstrate that SN09-2 directly induces mitochondrial dysfunction and the consequent ROS generation, leading to not only growth inhibition but also apoptosis of prostate cancer cells.

  6. Australian survey of current practice and guideline use in adult cancer pain assessment and management: perspectives of oncologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckett, Tim; Davidson, Patricia Mary; Boyle, Frances; Liauw, Winston; Agar, Meera; Green, Anna; Lovell, Melanie

    2014-06-01

    Cancer pain continues to be undertreated in up to half of cases, despite the availability of evidence-based guidelines. This study aimed to: (i) identify barriers and facilitators to adult cancer pain assessment and management, as perceived by Australian health professionals; (ii) establish the perceived need for new Australian guidelines and implementation strategy; (iii) identify which guidelines are used; (iv) identify barriers and facilitators to guideline use. This article focuses on the perceptions of responding oncologists. A cross-sectional survey was administered online. Invitations were circulated via peak bodies and clinical leaders. Comments were coded independently by two researchers. In all 76 oncologists self-reported high concordance with evidence-based recommendations, except validated pain scales. Perceived barriers to pain management included insufficient non-pharmacological interventions, access to /coordination between services, and time. Only 22 percent of respondents reported using pain guidelines. Perceived barriers to guideline use included lack of access, awareness and any single standard. Respondents were generally supportive of new Australian guidelines and especially an implementation strategy. Barriers to evidence-based practice and guideline use identified by our survey might be addressed via a clinical pathway that gives step-by-step guidance on evidence-based practice along with a framework for evaluation. Particular attention should be paid to promoting use of validated scales, patient education and non-pharmacological interventions, training of an appropriately skilled workforce and improving care coordination. Challenges are discussed. © 2012 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  7. A survey on cancer-related nutritional information in Iranian popular magazines

    OpenAIRE

    Hovsepyan, Ourfa; Zare-Farashbandi, Firoozeh; Askari, Gholamreza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Due to the wide influence of public media, they become important communication channels for changing health beliefs and behaviors. One of the areas that have gained increased attention in public media is nutritional information. Cancer is one among the diseases related to nutrition. The goal of this study is to do a content analysis of the popular magazines in Iran for nutritional information related to cancer in year 2012–2013. Materials and Methods: This is an applied survey per...

  8. A survey on cancer-related nutritional information in Iranian popular magazines

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background: Due to the wide influence of public media, they become important communication channels for changing health beliefs and behaviors. One of the areas that have gained increased attention in public media is nutritional information. Cancer is one among the diseases related to nutrition. The goal of this study is to do a content analysis of the popular magazines in Iran for nutritional information related to cancer in year 2012–2013. Materials and Methods: This is an applied survey per...

  9. Sagittarius II, Draco II and Laevens 3: three new Milky Way satellites discovered in the Pan-STARRS 1 3pi Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Laevens, Benjamin P M; Bernard, Edouard J; Schlafly, Edward F; Sesar, Branimir; Rix, Hans-Walter; Bell, Eric F; Ferguson, Annette M N; Slater, Colin T; Sweeney, William E; Wyse, Rosemary F G; Huxor, Avon P; Burgett, William S; Chambers, Kenneth C; Draper, Peter W; Magnier, Eugene A; Metcalfe, Nigel; Tonry, John L; Wainscoat, Richard J; Waters, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    We present the discovery of three new Milky Way satellites from our search for compact stellar overdensities in the photometric catalog of the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System 1 (Pan-STARRS 1, or PS1) 3pi survey. The first satellite, Laevens 3, is located at a heliocentric distance of d=67+/-3 kpc. With a total magnitude of Mv=-4.4+/-0.3 and a half-light radius rh=7+/-2 pc, its properties resemble those of outer halo globular clusters. The second system, Draco II/Laevens 4 (Dra II), is a closer and fainter satellite (d~20 kpc, Mv =-2.9+/-0.8), whose uncertain size (rh = 19 +8/-6 pc) renders its classification difficult without kinematic information; it could either be a faint and extended globular cluster or a faint and compact dwarf galaxy. The third satellite, Sagittarius II/Laevens 5 (Sgr II), has an ambiguous nature as it is either the most compact dwarf galaxy or the most extended globular cluster in its luminosity range (rh = 37 +9/-8 pc and Mv=-5.2+/-0.4). At a heliocentric distance...

  10. Self-testing for cancer: a community survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fitzmaurice David A

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer-related self-tests are currently available to buy in pharmacies or over the internet, including tests for faecal occult blood, PSA and haematuria. Self-tests have potential benefits (e.g. convenience but there are also potential harms (e.g. delays in seeking treatment. The extent of cancer-related self-test use in the UK is not known. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of cancer-related self-test use. Methods Adults (n = 5,545 in the West Midlands were sent a questionnaire that collected socio-demographic information and data regarding previous and potential future use of 18 different self-tests. Prevalence rates were directly standardised to the England population. The postcode based Index of Multiple Deprivation 2004 was used as a proxy measure of deprivation. Results 2,925 (54% usable questionnaires were returned. 1.2% (95% CI 0.83% to 1.66% of responders reported having used a cancer related self test kit and a further 36% reported that they would consider using one in the future. Logistic regression analyses suggest that increasing age, deprivation category and employment status were associated with cancer-related self-test kit use. Conclusion We conclude that one in 100 of the adult population have used a cancer-related self-test kit and over a third would consider using one in the future. Self-test kit use could alter perceptions of risk, cause psychological morbidity and impact on the demand for healthcare.

  11. Meat consumption among Black and White men and risk of prostate cancer in the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Carmen; McCullough, Marjorie L; Mondul, Alison M; Jacobs, Eric J; Chao, Ann; Patel, Alpa V; Thun, Michael J; Calle, Eugenia E

    2006-02-01

    Previous epidemiologic studies have suggested that intake of red meat may be associated with increased risk of prostate cancer. Few studies, however, have examined these associations by race. We examined intake of red meat, processed meat, and poultry in relation to incident prostate cancer among Black and White men in the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort. Participants in the study completed a detailed questionnaire on diet, medical history, and lifestyle in 1992 to 1993. After excluding men with a history of cancer and incomplete dietary information, 692 Black and 64,856 White men were included in the cohort. During follow-up through August 31, 2001, we documented 85 and 5,028 cases of incident prostate cancer among Black and White men, respectively. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate rate ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). No measure of meat consumption was associated with risk of prostate cancer among White men. Among Black men, total red meat intake (processed plus unprocessed red meat) was associated with higher risk of prostate cancer (RR, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.0-4.2 for highest versus lowest quartile; P(trend) = 0.05); this increase in risk was mainly due to risk associated with consumption of cooked processed meats (sausages, bacon, and hot dogs; RR, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.3-5.3 for highest versus lowest quartile; P(trend) = 0.008). This study suggests that high consumption of cooked processed meats may contribute to prostate cancer risk among Black men in the United States.

  12. Factors affecting access to head and neck cancer care after a natural disaster: a post-Hurricane Katrina survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loehn, Bridget; Pou, Anna M; Nuss, Daniel W; Tenney, Justin; McWhorter, Andrew; DiLeo, Michael; Kakade, Anagha C; Walvekar, Rohan R

    2011-01-01

    Our aim was to survey the factors affecting access to cancer care in patients with head and neck cancer after Hurricane Katrina. In this cross-sectional survey, 207 patients with head and neck cancer were identified post-Hurricane Katrina, but only 83 patients completed the questionnaires and were analyzed. Clinical, demographic, and socioeconomic data were recorded. Chi-square test and t test were used for comparisons. Patients who felt that there was a lack of access to cancer care would have sought treatment earlier had they had better access to cancer care (chi-square[1] = 32; p Hurricane Katrina would have sought treatment earlier with better access to cancer care. These patients also reported difficulty obtaining cancer treatment. Availability of transportation affected access to cancer care in patients with early-stage cancers. Clinical, demographic, and socioeconomic factors did not influence access to cancer care. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck, 2011.

  13. Type II NKT cells in inflammation, autoimmunity, microbial immunity and cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idania eMarrero

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer T cells (NKT recognize self and microbial lipid antigens presented by non-polymorphic CD1d molecules. Two major NKT cell subsets, type I and II, express different types of antigen receptors (TCR with distinct mode of CD1d/lipid recognition. Though, type II NKT cells are less frequent in mice and difficult to study, they are predominant in human. One of the major subsets of type II NKT cells reactive to the self-glycolipid sulfatide is the best characterized and has been shown to induce a dominant immune regulatory mechanism that controls inflammation in autoimmunity and in anti-cancer immunity. Recently, type II NKT cells reactive to other self-glycolipids and phospholipids have been identified suggesting both promiscuous and specific TCR recognition in microbial immunity as well. Since the CD1d pathway is highly conserved, a detailed understanding of the biology and function of type II NKT cells as well as their interplay with type I NKT cells or other innate and adaptive T cells will have major implications for potential novel interventions in inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, microbial immunity and cancer.

  14. Type II NKT Cells in Inflammation, Autoimmunity, Microbial Immunity, and Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero, Idania; Ware, Randle; Kumar, Vipin

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer T cells (NKT) recognize self and microbial lipid antigens presented by non-polymorphic CD1d molecules. Two major NKT cell subsets, type I and II, express different types of antigen receptors (TCR) with distinct mode of CD1d/lipid recognition. Though type II NKT cells are less frequent in mice and difficult to study, they are predominant in human. One of the major subsets of type II NKT cells reactive to the self-glycolipid sulfatide is the best characterized and has been shown to induce a dominant immune regulatory mechanism that controls inflammation in autoimmunity and in anti-cancer immunity. Recently, type II NKT cells reactive to other self-glycolipids and phospholipids have been identified suggesting both promiscuous and specific TCR recognition in microbial immunity as well. Since the CD1d pathway is highly conserved, a detailed understanding of the biology and function of type II NKT cells as well as their interplay with type I NKT cells or other innate and adaptive T cells will have major implications for potential novel interventions in inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, microbial immunity, and cancer.

  15. Enhancing the copper(II) complexes cytotoxicity to cancer cells through bound to human serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Yi; Zhang, Yao; Qi, Jinxu; Zhou, Zuping; Yang, Feng; Liang, Hong

    2015-03-01

    We use Schiff-base salicylaldehyde benzoylhydrazone (HL) as the ligand for copper(II), resulting in the complexes [CuCl(L)]·H2O (C1), [CuNO3(L)]·H2O (C2) and [CuBr(L)]2 (C3). We characterize the Cu(II) compounds' interactions with human serum albumin (HSA) using fluorescence spectroscopy and molecular docking. These studies revealed that Cu(II) compounds propensity bound to IIA subdomain of HSA possible by hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bond. Cu(II) compounds produce intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cancer cells. Complexes of HSA and copper(II) compounds enhance about 2-fold cytotoxicity in cancer cells but do not raise cytotoxicity levels in normal cells in vitro. Compared with C3 alone, HSA-C3 complex promotes HepG2 cell apoptosis and has a stronger capacity to promote cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase of HepG2.

  16. Catalytic inhibitors of DNA topoisomerase II suppress the androgen receptor signaling and prostate cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haolong; Xie, Ning; Gleave, Martin E; Dong, Xuesen

    2015-08-21

    Although the new generation of androgen receptor (AR) antagonists like enzalutamide (ENZ) prolong survival of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), AR-driven tumors eventually recur indicating that additional therapies are required to fully block AR function. Since DNA topoisomerase II (Topo II) was demonstrated to be essential for AR to initiate gene transcription, this study tested whether catalytic inhibitors of Topo II can block AR signaling and suppress ENZ-resistant CRPC growth. Using multiple prostate cancer cell lines, we showed that catalytic Topo II inhibitors, ICRF187 and ICRF193 inhibited transcription activities of the wild-type AR, mutant ARs (F876L and W741C) and the AR-V7 splice variant. ICRF187 and ICRF193 decreased AR recruitment to target promoters and reduced AR nuclear localization. Both ICRF187 and ICRF193 also inhibited cell proliferation and delayed cell cycling at the G2/M phase. ICRF187 inhibited tumor growth of castration-resistant LNCaP and 22RV1 xenografts as well as ENZ-resistant MR49F xenografts. We conclude that catalytic Topo II inhibitors can block AR signaling and inhibit tumor growth of CRPC xenografts, identifying a potential co-targeting approach using these inhibitors in combination with AR pathway inhibitors in CRPC.

  17. Nature as the Most Important Coping Strategy Among Cancer Patients: A Swedish Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Fereshteh; Ahmadi, Nader

    2015-08-01

    The authors have conducted a quantitative survey to examine the extent to which the results obtained in a qualitative study among cancer patients in Sweden (Ahmadi, Culture, religion and spirituality in coping: The example of cancer patients in Sweden, Uppsala, Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2006) are applicable to a wider population of cancer patients in this country. In addition to questions relating to the former qualitative study, this survey also references the RCOPE questionnaire (designed by Kenneth I Pargament) in the design of the new quantitative study. In this study, questionnaires were distributed among persons diagnosed with cancer; 2,355 people responded. The results show that nature has been the most important coping method among cancer patients in Sweden. The highest mean value (2.9) is the factor 'nature has been an important resource to you so that you could deal with your illnesses'. Two out of three respondents (68 %) affirm that this method helped them feel significantly better during or after illness. The second highest average (2.8) is the factor 'listening to 'natural music' (birdsong and the wind)'. Two out of three respondents (66 %) answered that this coping method significantly helped them feel better during illness. The third highest average (2.7) is the factor 'to walk or engage in any activity outdoors gives you a spiritual sense'. This survey concerning the role of nature as the most important coping method for cancer patients confirms the result obtained from the previous qualitative studies.

  18. Dose-Escalated Robotic SBRT for Stage I-II Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert eMeier

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT is the precise external delivery of very high-dose radiotherapy to targets in the body, with treatment completed in one to five fractions. SBRT should be an ideal approach for organ-confined prostate cancer because (I dose escalation should yield improved rates of cancer control; (II the unique radiobiology of prostate cancer favors hypofractionation and (III the conformal nature of SBRT minimizes high-dose radiation delivery to immediately adjacent organs, potentially reducing complications. This approach is also more convenient for patients, and is cheaper than intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT. Several external beam platforms are capable of delivering SBRT for early-stage prostate cancer, although most of the mature reported series have employed a robotic non-coplanar platform (i.e., CyberKnife. Several large studies report 5-year biochemical relapse rates which compare favorably to IMRT. Rates of late GU toxicity are similar to those seen with IMRT, and rates of late rectal toxicity may be less than with IMRT and low dose rate (LDR brachytherapy. Patient-reported quality of life (QOL outcomes appear similar to IMRT in the urinary domain. Bowel QOL may be less adversely affected by SBRT than with other radiation modalities. After five years of follow-up, SBRT delivered on a robotic platform is yielding outcomes at least as favorable as IMRT, and may be considered appropriate therapy for stage I-II prostate cancer.

  19. Dose-Escalated Robotic SBRT for Stage I-II Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is the precise external delivery of very high-dose radiotherapy to targets in the body, with treatment completed in one to five fractions. SBRT should be an ideal approach for organ-confined prostate cancer because (I) dose-escalation should yield improved rates of cancer control; (II) the unique radiobiology of prostate cancer favors hypofractionation; and (III) the conformal nature of SBRT minimizes high-dose radiation delivery to immediately adjacent organs, potentially reducing complications. This approach is also more convenient for patients, and is cheaper than intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Several external beam platforms are capable of delivering SBRT for early-stage prostate cancer, although most of the mature reported series have employed a robotic non-coplanar platform (i.e., CyberKnife). Several large studies report 5-year biochemical relapse rates which compare favorably to IMRT. Rates of late GU toxicity are similar to those seen with IMRT, and rates of late rectal toxicity may be less than with IMRT and low-dose rate brachytherapy. Patient-reported quality of life (QOL) outcomes appear similar to IMRT in the urinary domain. Bowel QOL may be less adversely affected by SBRT than with other radiation modalities. After 5 years of follow-up, SBRT delivered on a robotic platform is yielding outcomes at least as favorable as IMRT, and may be considered appropriate therapy for stage I-II prostate cancer.

  20. A European survey of oncology nurse breakthrough cancer pain practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rustoen, Tone; Geerling, Jenske I.; Pappa, Theodora; Rundstrom, Carina; Weisse, Isolde; Williams, Sian C.; Zavratnik, Bostjan; Kongsgaard, Ulf E.; Wengstrom, Yvonne

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of the research: Breakthrough cancer pain (BTCP) is a prevalent type of pain in which the nurse can play an important role in improving patients' pain symptoms and overall well-being. Nurses' experience with BTCP (number of patients, and estimates of severity and frequency), the treatment of

  1. Granisetron, Aprepitant, and Dexamethasone in Preventing Nausea and Vomiting in Patients Receiving Chemotherapy for Stage II, III, or IV Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-16

    Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Nausea and Vomiting; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  2. The Effect of Host Galaxies on Type Ia Supernovae in the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Lampeitl, Hubert; Nichol, Robert C; Bassett, Bruce; Cinabro, David; Dilday, Benjamin; Foley, Ryan J; Frieman, Joshua A; Garnavich, Peter M; Goobar, Ariel; Im, Myungshin; Jha, Saurabh W; Marriner, John; Miquel, Ramon; Nordin, Jakob; Östman, Linda; Riess, Adam G; Sako, Masao; Schneider, Donald P; Sollerman, Jesper; Stritzinger, Maximilian

    2010-01-01

    We present an analysis of the host galaxy dependencies of Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) from the full three year sample of the SDSS-II Supernova Survey. We rediscover, to high significance, the strong correlation between host galaxy typeand the width of the observed SN light curve, i.e., fainter, quickly declining SNe Ia favor passive host galaxies, while brighter, slowly declining Ia's favor star-forming galaxies. We also find evidence (at between 2 to 3 sigma) that SNe Ia are ~0.1 magnitudes brighter in passive host galaxies, than in star-forming hosts, after the SN Ia light curves have been standardized using the light curve shape and color variations: This difference in brightness is present in both the SALT2 and MCLS2k2 light curve fitting methodologies. We see evidence for differences in the SN Ia color relationship between passive and star-forming host galaxies, e.g., for the MLCS2k2 technique, we see that SNe Ia in passive hosts favor a dust law of R_V ~1, while SNe Ia in star-forming hosts require R_V ...

  3. Survey of non-linear hydrodynamic models of type-II Cepheids

    CERN Document Server

    Smolec, R

    2015-01-01

    We present a grid on non-linear convective type-II Cepheid models. The dense model grids are computed for 0.6M_Sun and a range of metallicities ([Fe/H]=-2.0,-1.5,-1.0), and for 0.8M_Sun ([Fe/H]=-1.5). Two sets of convective parameters are considered. The models cover the full temperature extent of the classical instability strip, but are limited in luminosity; for the most luminous models violent pulsation leads to the decoupling of the outermost model shell. Hence, our survey reaches only the shortest period RV Tau domain. In the Hertzsprung-Russel diagram we detect two domains in which period doubled pulsation is possible. The first extends through the BL Her domain and low luminosity W Vir domain (pulsation periods ~2-6.5 d). The second domain extends at higher luminosities (W Vir domain; periods >9.5d). Some models within these domains display period-4 pulsation. We also detect very narrow domains (~10 K wide) in which modulation of pulsation is possible. Another interesting phenomenon we detect is double...

  4. CALIFA, the Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field Area survey: II. First public data release

    CERN Document Server

    Husemann, B; Sánchez, S F; Barrado-Navascues, D; Bekeraitė, S; Bomans, D J; Castillo-Morales, A; Catalán-Torrecilla, C; Fernandes, R Cid; Falcón-Barroso, J; García-Benito, R; Delgado, R M González; Iglesias-Páramo, J; Johnson, B D; Kupko, D; López-Fernandez, R; Lyubenova, M; Marino, R A; Mast, D; Miskolczi, A; Monreal-Ibero, A; de Paz, A Gil; Pérez, E; Pérez, I; Rosales-Ortega, F F; Ruiz-Lara, T; Schilling, U; van de Ven, G; Walcher, J; Alves, J; de Amorim, A L; Backsmann, N; Barrera-Ballesteros, J K; Bland-Hawthorn, J; Dettmar, R -J; Demleitner, M; Díaz, A I; Enke, H; Florido, E; Flores, H; Galbany, L; Gallazzi, A; García-Lorenzo, B; Gomes, J M; Gruel, N; Haines, T; Holmes, L; Jungwiert, B; Kalinova, V; Kehrig, C; Kennicutt, R C; Klar, J; Lehnert, M D; Lóez-Sáchez, Á R; de Lorenzo-Cáceres, A; Mármol-Queraltó, E; Márquez, I; Mendez-Abreu, J; Mollá, M; del Olmo, A; Meidt, S E; Papaderos, P; Puschnig, J; Quirrenbach, A; Roth, M M; Sánchez-Blázquez, P; Spekkens, K; Singh, R; Stanishev, V; Trager, S C; Vilchez, J M; Wild, V; Wisotzki, L; Zibetti, S; Ziegler, B

    2012-01-01

    We present the first public data release of the CALIFA survey. It consists of science-grade optical datacubes for the first 100 of eventually 600 nearby (0.005ii) a medium-resolution V1200 setup covering the nominal wavelength range 3650-4840A with a spectral resolution of 2.3A (FWHM). We present the characteristics and data structure of the CALIFA datasets that should be taken into account for scientific exploita...

  5. Associations of cancer site and type with occupation and industry from the Third National Cancer Survey Interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R R; Stegens, N L; Goldsmith, J R

    1977-10-01

    From the Third National Cancer Survey (TNCS) Interview Study of 7,518 incident cases, lifetime histories of occupations and industries were studied for associations with specific cancer sites and types while controlling for age, sex, race, education, use of cigarettes or alcohol, and geographic location. Lung cancer patients were found more often than expected among several categories including trucking, air transportation, wholesaling, painting, building construction, building maintenance, and manufacturing (furniture, transportation equipment, and food products). Controlling for cigarette smoking did not change these associations. Leukemia and multiple myeloma were associated with sales personnel of both sexes, whereas lymphomas and Hodgkin's disease were excessive among women working in the medical industry. Other associations included rectal cancer with several retail industries; prostate cancer with ministers, farmers, plumbers, and coal miners; malignant melanoma with school teachers; and invasive cervical cancer with women working in hotels and restaurants. Breast cancer patients were more common among women who were teachers or other professionals and who worked in business and finance (even after controlling for education). Many other findings are presented in detailed tables. Results are reported mainly as a research resource for use by other investigators doing work in this field. Suggestions are given for future studies.

  6. Antiangiogenic activity of mononuclear copper(II) polypyridyl complexes for the treatment of cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagababu, Penumaka; Barui, Ayan Kumar; Thulasiram, Bathini; Devi, C Shobha; Satyanarayana, S; Patra, Chitta Ranjan; Sreedhar, Bojja

    2015-07-09

    A series of four new mononuclear copper(II) polypyridyl complexes (1-4) have been designed, developed, and thoroughly characterized by several physicochemical techniques. The CT-DNA binding properties of 1-4 have been investigated by absorption, emission spectroscopy, and viscosity measurements. All the complexes especially 1 and 4 exhibit cytotoxicity toward several cancer cell lines, suggesting their anticancer properties as observed by several in vitro assays. Additionally, the complexes show inhibition of endothelial cell (HUVECs) proliferation, indicating their antiangiogenic nature. In vivo chick embryo angiogenesis assay again confirms the antiangiogenic properties of 1 and 4. The formation of excessive intracellular ROS (H2O2 and O2(•-)) and upregulation of BAX induced by copper(II) complexes may be the plausible mechanisms behind their anticancer activities. The present study may offer a basis for the development of new transition metal complexes through suitable choice of ligands for cancer therapeutics by controlling tumor angiogenesis.

  7. Trends in Cancer Screening Rates among Korean Men and Women: Results of the Korean National Cancer Screening Survey, 2004-2013

    OpenAIRE

    Suh, Mina; Choi, Kui Son; Park, Boyoung; Lee, Yoon Young; Jun, Jae Kwan; Lee, Duk-Hyoung; Kim, Yeol

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The Korean National Cancer Screening Survey (KNCSS), a nationwide cross-sectional survey, has been conducted annually since 2004. The current study was conducted to report on the trends in screening rates among Korean men and women, and to evaluate policies regarding cancer screening programs implemented to reduce the burden of cancer. Materials and Methods The current study used KNCSS data. The eligible study population included men aged 40-74 years and women aged 30-74 years with no...

  8. Colorectal cancer incidence and postmenopausal hormone use by type, recency, and duration in cancer prevention study II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, Janet S; Jacobs, Eric J; Campbell, Peter T; McCullough, Marjorie L; Teras, Lauren R; Thun, Michael J; Gapstur, Susan M

    2009-11-01

    The Women's Health Initiative randomized trials showed a reduction in colorectal cancer risk with the use of estrogen plus progesterone (E + P), but not with estrogen alone (E-only), after intervention periods Study II Nutrition Cohort, we examined associations of colorectal cancer risk with E-only and E + P, including analyses by recency and duration of hormone use. During 13.2 years of follow-up, 776 cases of invasive colorectal cancer occurred among 67,412 postmenopausal women participants. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate multivariate-adjusted relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) of colorectal cancer for current and former hormone users according to hormone type and duration of use. Relative to women who never used postmenopausal hormones, current, but not former, use of E-only was associated with a reduced risk of colorectal cancer (RR 0.76; 95% CI, 0.59-0.97). Among current E-only users, duration of use was inversely and linearly associated with risk (P(trend) = 0.01). Use of E-only for or=20 years was associated with a 45% reduction in risk (RR, 0.55; 95% CI, 0.36-0.86). There were no statistically significant associations between E + P and colorectal cancer risk. Our results suggest a strong inverse association of long-term use of E-only with colorectal cancer risk, underscoring the importance of collecting data on duration of hormone use in epidemiologic studies of postmenopausal hormones and risk of disease.

  9. Gynaecological cancer follow-up: national survey of current practice in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeson, Simon; Stuart, Nick; Sylvestre, Yvonne; Hall, Liz; Whitaker, Rhiannon

    2013-01-01

    To establish a baseline of national practice for follow-up after treatment for gynaecological cancer. Questionnaire survey. Gynaecological cancer centres and units. Members of the British Gynaecological Cancer Society and the National Forum of Gynaecological Oncology Nurses. A questionnaire survey. To determine schedules of follow-up, who provides it and what routine testing is used for patients who have had previous gynaecological cancer. A total of 117 responses were obtained; 115 (98%) reported hospital scheduled regular follow-up appointments. Two involved general practitioners. Follow-up was augmented or replaced by telephone follow-up in 29 responses (25%) and patient-initiated appointments in 38 responses (32%). A total of 80 (68%) cancer specialists also offered combined follow-up clinics with other specialties. Clinical examinations for hospital-based follow-up were mainly performed by doctors (67% for scheduled regular appointments and 63% for patient-initiated appointments) while telephone follow-up was provided in the majority by nurses (76%). Most respondents (76/117 (65%)) provided routine tests, of which 66/76 (87%) reported carrying out surveillance tests for ovarian cancer, 35/76 (46%) for cervical cancer, 8/76 (11%) for vulval cancer and 7/76 (9%) for endometrial cancer. Patients were usually discharged after 5 years (82/117 (70%)), whereas three (3%) were discharged after 4 years, nine (8%) after three years and one (1%) after 2 years. Practice varied but most used a standard hospital-based protocol of appointments for 5 years and routine tests were performed usually for women with ovarian cancer. A minority utilised nurse-led or telephone follow-up. General practitioners were rarely involved in routine care. A randomised study comparing various models of follow-up could be considered.

  10. Phase I-II study of isotopic immunoglobulin therapy for primary liver cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ettinger, D.S.; Order, S.E.; Wharam, M.D.; Parker, M.K.; Klein, J.L.; Leichner, P.K.

    1982-02-01

    A phase I-II study of isotopic immunoglobulin therapy was performed in 18 patients with primary liver cancer; 14 were evaluable for toxicity. The patients received a dose of 37-157 millicuries of 131I-labeled antibody. The dose-limiting factor appears to be hematologic toxicity, especially thrombocytopenia. An objective antitumor effect was seen in six of nine patients who were evaluable for response. Present results suggest that further clinical studies with isotopic immunoglobulin are indicated.

  11. Investigation of the Effect of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy on Stage II Breast Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanli Song; Dong Wang

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in treatment of Stage II breast cancer.METHODS The data from 113 patients with breast cancer of the same pathologic type in Stage II, during the period of 1995 to 2001, were analyzed retrospectively. Among the patients, 47 were treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and 66 received no adjuvant therapy before surgery (control group). After the patients of the neoadjuvant chemotherapy group had received 2 courses of chemotherapy with the CMF regimen, the surgical procedure was conducted.RESULTS Complete remission (CR) was attained in 9 of the 47 cases receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy and partial remission (PR) was reached for 22 cases. The rate of breast-conserving surgery was enhanced from 22.73% to 46.81% (P<0.05) in the neoadjuvant treatment group. There was no difference in the 5-year overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) rate between the two groups (P>0.05), but the 5-year OS and DFS of the cases with clinical tumor remission was higher compared to the control group (P<0.05).CONCLUSION Neoadjuvant chemotherapy can enhance the rate of breast conservation for Stage II breast cancer and may improve the prognosis of the cases with clinical remission.

  12. The Prognostic Value of Polycomb Group Protein BMI1 in Stage II Colon Cancer Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Espersen, Maiken Lise Marcker; Linnemann, Dorte; Christensen, Ib J.;

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic value of B-cell-specific moloney murine leukemia virus insertion site 1 (BMI1) protein expression in primary tumors of stage II colon cancer patients. BMI1 protein expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry in a retrospective patient...... cohort consisting of 144 stage II colon cancer patients. BMI1 expression at the invasive front of the primary tumors correlated with mismatch repair status of the tumors. Furthermore, BMI1 expression at the luminal surface correlated with T-stage, tumor location, and the histological subtypes....... Likewise, there was no association between 5-year overall survival and BMI1 expression at the invasive front (HR: 1.12; 95% CI 0.80-1.56; p = 0.46) or at the luminal surface of the tumor (HR: 1.16; 95% CI 0.86-1.60; p = 0.33). In conclusion, BMI1 expression in primary tumors of stage II colon cancer...

  13. Integration of early specialist palliative care in cancer care: Survey of oncologists, oncology nurses, and patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Salins

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Oncologists, oncology nurses, and patients felt that integration of early specialist palliative care in cancer improves symptom control, end-of-life care, health-related communication, and continuity of care. The perceptions of benefit of the palliative care intervention in the components surveyed, differed among the three groups.

  14. Breakthrough pain characteristics and syndromes in patients with cancer pain. An international survey.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caraceni, A.; Martini, C.; Zecca, E.; Portenoy, R.K.; Ashby, M.A.; Hawson, G.; Jackson, K.A.; Lickiss, N.; Muirden, N.; Pisasale, M.; Moulin, D.; Schulz, V.N.; Rico Pazo, M.A.; Serrano, J.A.; Andersen, H.S.; Henriksen, H.T.; Mejholm, I.; Sjogren, P.M.; Heiskanen, T.; Kalso, E.; Pere, P.; Poyhia, R.; Vuorinen, E.; Tigerstedt, I.; Ruismaki, P.; Bertolino, M.; Larue, F.; Ranchere, J.Y.; Hege-Scheuing, G.; Bowdler, I.; Helbing, F.; Kostner, E.; Radbruch, L.; Kastrinaki, K.; Shah, S.; Vijayaram, S.; Sharma, K.S.; Devi, P.S.; Jain, P.N.; Ramamani, P.V.; Beny, A.; Brunelli, C.; Maltoni, M.; Mercadante, S.; Plancarte, R.; Schug, S.; Engstrand, P.; Ovalle, A.F.; Wang, X.; Alves, M.F.; Abrunhosa, M.R.; Sun, W.Z.; Zhang, L.; Gazizov, A.; Vaisman, M.; Rudoy, S.; Sancho, M.G.; Vila, P.; Trelis, J.; Chaudakshetrin, P.; Koh, M.L.; Dongen, R.T.M. van; Vielvoye-Kerkmeer, A.; Boswell, M.V.; Elliott, T.; Hargus, E.; Lutz, L.

    2004-01-01

    Breakthrough pain (BKP) is a transitory flare of pain that occurs on a background of relatively well controlled baseline pain. Previous surveys have found that BKP is highly prevalent among patients with cancer pain and predicts more severe pain, pain-related distress and functional impairment, and

  15. Hexokinase II-derived cell-penetrating peptide targets mitochondria and triggers apoptosis in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woldetsadik, Abiy D; Vogel, Maria C; Rabeh, Wael M; Magzoub, Mazin

    2017-05-01

    Overexpression of mitochondria-bound hexokinase II (HKII) in cancer cells plays an important role in their metabolic reprogramming and protects them against apoptosis, thereby facilitating their growth and proliferation. Here, we show that covalently coupling a peptide corresponding to the mitochondrial membrane-binding N-terminal 15 aa of HKII (pHK) to a short, penetration-accelerating sequence (PAS) enhances the cellular uptake, mitochondrial localization, and cytotoxicity of the peptide in HeLa cells. Further analysis revealed that pHK-PAS depolarized mitochondrial membrane potential, inhibited mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis, and depleted intracellular ATP levels. The effects of pHK-PAS were correlated with dissociation of endogenous full-length HKII from mitochondria and release of cytochrome c Of significance, pHK-PAS treatment of noncancerous HEK293 cells resulted in substantially lower cytotoxicity. Thus, pHK-PAS effectively disrupted the mitochondria-HKII association in cancer cells, which led to mitochondrial dysfunction and, finally, apoptosis. Our results demonstrate the potential of the pHK-PAS cell-penetrating peptide as a novel therapeutic strategy in cancer.-Woldetsadik, A. D., Vogel, M. C., Rabeh, W. M., Magzoub, M. Hexokinase II-derived cell-penetrating peptide targets mitochondria and triggers apoptosis in cancer cells. © The Author(s).

  16. A phase II study of combination chemotherapy in early relapsed epithelial ovarian cancer using gemcitabine and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirza, Mansoor Raza; Lund, Bente; Lindegaard, Jacob Christian

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of epithelial ovarian cancer patients relapsing with a short treatment-free interval (TFI) after prior chemotherapy is unsatisfactory. This phase II trial evaluated the activity and feasibility of pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) plus gemcitabine in this setting.......Treatment of epithelial ovarian cancer patients relapsing with a short treatment-free interval (TFI) after prior chemotherapy is unsatisfactory. This phase II trial evaluated the activity and feasibility of pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) plus gemcitabine in this setting....

  17. Dietary factors, metabolic syndrome and risks of breast cancer and type II diabetes in the E3N cohort

    OpenAIRE

    Fagherazzi, Guy

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer and type II diabetes are two of the main chronic diseases in women and are suspected to share common risk factors. But their etiologies are still partially unknown, in particular concerning some dietary factors and some parameters of the metabolic syndrome. If evidence is convincing that themetabolic syndrome is associated with an increased type II diabetes risk, questions remain unanswered regarding cholesterol level, anthropometric factors and breast cancer risk. The French E3...

  18. 78 FR 55264 - Submission for OMB Review; 30-Day Comment Request: Awareness and Beliefs About Cancer Survey...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-10

    ...: Awareness and Beliefs About Cancer Survey, National Cancer Institute (NCI) SUMMARY: Under the provisions of... plans and instruments must be requested in writing. Proposed Collection: Awareness and Beliefs about...' awareness and beliefs about cancer. The ultimate goal is to determine how individuals' perceptions of...

  19. Use of Chinese Herb Medicine in Cancer Patients: A Survey in Southwestern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai-Guo Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chinese herb medicine (CHM is the most commonly reported traditional Chinese medicine (TCM modality. This study aimed to assess the prevalence and associated factors of CHM use in cancer patients in southwestern China. Cancer patients from eleven comprehensive cancer centers were asked to complete a structured questionnaire. Of 587 available replies, 53.0% used CHM. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that educational level, stage of disease, duration of cancer since diagnosis, marital status, and previous use of CHM were strongly associated with CHM use after cancer diagnosis. The source of information about CHM was mainly from media and friends/family. CHM products were used without any consultation with a TCM practitioner by 67.5% of users. The majority used CHM to improve their physical and emotional well-beings and to reduce cancer therapy-induced toxicities. About 4.5% patients reported side effects of CHM. This survey revealed a high prevalence of CHM use among cancer patients. However, these patients did not get sufficient consultation about the indications and contradictions of these drugs. It is imperative for oncologists to communicate with their cancer patients about the usage of CHM so as to avoid the potential side effects.

  20. Oncotype DX(®) colon cancer assay for prediction of recurrence risk in patients with stage II and III colon cancer: A review of the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Y Nancy; Rustin, Rudolph B; Sullivan, James D

    2015-06-01

    Advances in molecular biology have enabled identification of tumor biomarkers that allow for individualized risk assessment for patients with cancer. Molecular predictors of clinical outcome can help inform discussion regarding the role of adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with resected colon cancer, such as those with stage II colon cancer in which the benefit of adjuvant therapy is controversial or those with stage III colon cancer who may have a lower risk of recurrence and less absolute benefit from oxaliplatin therapy. This article summarizes the data surrounding the development, validation, and clinical and economic utility of the Oncotype DX(®) colon cancer assay, a multigene expression assay validated to independently predict recurrence risk in patients with stage II and III colon cancer beyond traditional factors.

  1. Lysophosphatidic Acid Up-Regulates Hexokinase II and Glycolysis to Promote Proliferation of Ovarian Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abir Mukherjee

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA, a blood-borne lipid mediator, is present in elevated concentrations in ascites of ovarian cancer patients and other malignant effusions. LPA is a potent mitogen in cancer cells. The mechanism linking LPA signal to cancer cell proliferation is not well understood. Little is known about whether LPA affects glucose metabolism to accommodate rapid proliferation of cancer cells. Here we describe that in ovarian cancer cells, LPA enhances glycolytic rate and lactate efflux. A real time PCR-based miniarray showed that hexokinase II (HK2 was the most dramatically induced glycolytic gene to promote glycolysis in LPA-treated cells. Analysis of the human HK2 gene promoter identified the sterol regulatory element-binding protein as the primary mediator of LPA-induced HK2 transcription. The effects of LPA on HK2 and glycolysis rely on LPA2, an LPA receptor subtype overexpressed in ovarian cancer and many other malignancies. We further examined the general role of growth factor-induced glycolysis in cell proliferation. Like LPA, epidermal growth factor (EGF elicited robust glycolytic and proliferative responses in ovarian cancer cells. Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1 and insulin, however, potently stimulated cell proliferation but only modestly induced glycolysis. Consistent with their differential effects on glycolysis, LPA and EGF-dependent cell proliferation was highly sensitive to glycolytic inhibition while the growth-promoting effect of IGF-1 or insulin was more resistant. These results indicate that LPA- and EGF-induced cell proliferation selectively involves up-regulation of HK2 and glycolytic metabolism. The work is the first to implicate LPA signaling in promotion of glucose metabolism in cancer cells.

  2. Presidential address: Gastrointestinal cancer. Surgical survey of abdominal tragedy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, I

    1978-01-01

    The experience with gastrointestinal cancer at a single large hospital has been utilized as a "micro-model" of the experience for the country at large, and the reasons why such a comparison might be possible have been presented. The incidence of various lesions has been discussed in terms of sex, age, and race. The changing incidence of various lesions has been pointed out. Survival results have been determined for total series, for various types of operative procedures, and for various extents of disease. The comparability of survival results from this one institution and those collected from the literature have been discussed. The emergence of newer diagnostic and therapeutic measures has been highlighted. The importance of education of both patients and physicians is emphasized repeatedly by the late stage at which so many of the patients with any gastrointestinal cancer present to and are diagnosed by the physician. The educational task for all of medicine is apparent and must be faced in some effective fashion.

  3. Survey of non-linear hydrodynamic models of type-II Cepheids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolec, R.

    2016-03-01

    We present a grid of non-linear convective type-II Cepheid models. The dense model grids are computed for 0.6 M⊙ and a range of metallicities ([Fe/H] = -2.0, -1.5, -1.0), and for 0.8 M⊙ ([Fe/H] = -1.5). Two sets of convective parameters are considered. The models cover the full temperature extent of the classical instability strip, but are limited in luminosity; for the most luminous models, violent pulsation leads to the decoupling of the outermost model shell. Hence, our survey reaches only the shortest period RV Tau domain. In the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, we detect two domains in which period-doubled pulsation is possible. The first extends through the BL Her domain and low-luminosity W Vir domain (pulsation periods ˜2-6.5 d). The second domain extends at higher luminosities (W Vir domain; periods >9.5 d). Some models within these domains display period-4 pulsation. We also detect very narrow domains (˜10 K wide) in which modulation of pulsation is possible. Another interesting phenomenon we detect is double-mode pulsation in the fundamental mode and in the fourth radial overtone. Fourth overtone is a surface mode, trapped in the outer model layers. Single-mode pulsation in the fourth overtone is also possible on the hot side of the classical instability strip. The origin of the above phenomena is discussed. In particular, the role of resonances in driving different pulsation dynamics as well as in shaping the morphology of the radius variation curves is analysed.

  4. A Survey of MgII Absorption at 2 < z < 6 with Magellan / FIRE: I: Sample and Evolution of the MgII Frequency

    CERN Document Server

    Matejek, Michael S

    2012-01-01

    We present initial results from the first systematic survey for MgII quasar absorption lines at z > 2.5. Using infrared spectra of 46 high-redshift quasars, we discovered 111 MgII systems over a path covering 1.9 5, with a maximum of z = 5.33 - the most distant MgII system now known. The comoving MgII line density for weaker systems (Wr < 1.0A) is statistically consistent with no evolution from z = 0.4 to z = 5.5, while that for stronger systems increases three-fold until z \\sim 3 before declining again towards higher redshifts. The equivalent width distribution, which fits an exponential, reflects this evolution by flattening as z approaches 3 before steepening again. The rise and fall of the strong absorbers suggests a connection to the star formation rate density, as though they trace galactic outflows or other byproducts of star formation. The weaker systems' lack of evolution does not fit within this interpretation, but may be reproduced by extrapolating low redshift scaling relations between host ga...

  5. Phase I/II Study of IMMU-132 in Patients With Epithelial Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-20

    Colorectal Cancer; Gastric Adenocarcinoma; Esophageal Cancer; Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Small Cell Lung Cancer; Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Carcinoma Breast Stage IV; Hormone-refractory Prostate Cancer; Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma; Head and Neck Cancers- Squamous Cell; Renal Cell Cancer; Urinary Bladder Neoplasms; Cervical Cancer; Endometrial Cancer; Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Glioblastoma Multiforme

  6. Phase II study of intensive chemotherapy with autologous bone marrow transplantation in patients in complete remission of disseminated breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    deVries, EGE; Rodenhuis, S; Hupperets, PSGJ; Dolsma, WV; Lebesque, JV; Blijham, GH; Bontenbal, M; Mulder, NH

    1996-01-01

    Background: This trial studied the disease-free survival after high-dose chemotherapy in patients in complete remission of metastatic breast cancer. Patients and methods: Thirty women, mean age 42.2 years (range 33-55) with metastatic breast cancer, received high-dose chemotherapy in a phase II stud

  7. Potentiation of a p53-SLP vaccine by cyclophosphamide in ovarian cancer : A single-arm phase II study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeij, Renee; Leffers, Ninke; Hoogeboom, Baukje-Nynke; Hamming, Ineke L. E.; Wolf, Rinze; Reyners, Anna K. L.; Molmans, Barbara H. W.; Hollema, Harry; Bart, Joost; Drijfhout, Jan W.; Oostendorp, Jaap; van der Zee, Ate G. J.; Melief, Cornelis J.; van der Burg, Sjoerd H.; Daemen, Toos; Nijman, Hans W.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the current phase II single-arm clinical trial was to evaluate whether pretreatment with low-dose cyclophosphamide improves immunogenicity of a p53-synthetic long peptide (SLP) vaccine in patients with recurrent ovarian cancer. Patients with ovarian cancer with elevated serum levels

  8. Combined effect of genetic polymorphisms in phase I and II biotransformation enzymes on head and neck cancer risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lacko, M.; Voogd, A.C.; Roelofs, H.M.J.; Morsche, R.H.M. te; Ophuis, M.B.; Peters, W.H.M.; Manni, J.J.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Combinations of genetic polymorphisms in biotransformation enzymes might modify the individual risk for head and neck cancer. METHODS: Blood from 432 patients with head and neck cancer and 437 controls was investigated for genetic polymorphisms in 9 different phase I and II biotransforma

  9. Preoperative radiotherapy for inoperable stage II endometrial cancer: insights into improving treatment and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Marette H; Aquino-Parsons, Christina; Hoskins, Paul J; Lim, Peter; Kwon, Janice S

    2013-07-01

    To review recurrence patterns and survival outcomes of women receiving preoperative radiotherapy for clinical stage II endometrial cancer in British Columbia. We performed a retrospective population-based cohort study of all patients with clinical stage II endometrial cancer who were referred to the British Columbia Cancer Agency from 2000 to 2008, deemed ineligible for primary surgery, and therefore offered preoperative radiotherapy followed by surgery. Patient demographics, uterine risk factors, timing and details of treatments, and timing and sites of recurrence were obtained from patient records. Primary outcome measures were the sites and rates of recurrence and recurrence-free survival. We identified 29 patients with a mean age of 61 years (range 41 to 83) and median follow-up of 3.1 years (range 0.3 to 5.3). Three-year overall survival was 79%, and median recurrence-free survival was 2.5 years. Eight patients had recurrence of disease (27.6%), with a median time to recurrence of 1.3 years, (range 0.4 to 2.7). Six of these eight women had two or more high-risk uterine factors (deep myometrial invasion, grade 3 tumour), ovarian involvement, or adverse histological type (carcinosarcoma), compared with only one of 21 patients without recurrence. Seven of eight women had recurrence outside the radiated volume of tissue. Median survival after recurrence was 1.0 years (range 0.4 to 2.2). Women with clinical stage II endometrial cancer had a significant risk of recurrence when treated with preoperative radiotherapy followed by surgery. They were more likely to have distant recurrences, implying the need for an alternate treatment paradigm.

  10. A COMPLETE ATLAS OF H I ABSORPTION TOWARD H II REGIONS IN THE SOUTHERN GALACTIC PLANE SURVEY (SGPS I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, C.; Dickey, J. M.; Dawson, J. R. [School of Physical Sciences, Private Bag 37, University of Tasmania, Hobart 7001 (Australia); McClure-Griffiths, N. M. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, ATNF, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia)

    2014-04-01

    We present a complete catalog of H I emission and absorption spectrum pairs, toward H II regions, detectable within the boundaries of the Southern Galactic Plane Survey (SGPS I), a total of 252 regions. The catalog is presented in graphical, numerical, and summary formats. We demonstrate an application of this new data set through an investigation of the locus of the Near 3 kpc Arm.

  11. Field Surveys, IOC Valleys. Volume III, Part II. Cultural Resources Survey, Pine and Wah Wah Valleys, Utah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-01

    including horse, camel, mammoth, Ertm E-TR-48-III-II 20 musk ox, and certain species of bison, goat, and bear, which had previously inhabited the marsh and...34 - - -9,$.. 𔄃 Im I I I Si to * Location lype/Contents Affiliation 42B@644 rid e over cr ek - P/J depression, cleared areas, Fr elon (f4-5-18-92) ground

  12. National databases and rheumatology research II: the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokka, Tuulikki; Krishnan, Eswar

    2004-11-01

    Three National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys were conducted in the United States between 1971 and 1994 to provide data on the nutritional and health status of the population and on specific target conditions. This article describes features of the surveys and provides examples of research on musculoskeletal disorders that used the survey data.

  13. Awareness of cervical cancer risk factors and symptoms: cross-sectional community survey in post-conflict northern Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Mwaka, A. D.; Orach, C.G.; Were, E.M.; Lyratzopoulos, G; Wabinga, H.; Roland, M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Lack of awareness of risk factors and symptoms for cancer may lead to late diagnosis and poor prognosis. Objective We assessed community awareness about cervical cancer risk factors and symptoms and perceptions about prevention and cure of cervical cancer in order to contribute data to inform interventions to improve cervical cancer survival. Design Cross‐sectional population‐based survey. Setting and participants We conducted this study in Gulu, a post‐conflict district i...

  14. Who tended to continue smoking after cancer diagnosis: the national health and nutrition examination survey 1999–2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tseng Tung-Sung

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been estimated that there are approximately 12 million cancer survivors in the United States. Continued smoking after a cancer diagnosis is linked to adverse effects among cancer survivors on overall survival, treatment effectiveness, and quality of life. Little is known about who is more likely to quit smoking after his/her cancer diagnosis. The objective of this study is to evaluate factors associated with smoking cessation in cancer survivors, which to date has not been well studied. Method The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES 1999–2008 surveys were used in this study. A total of 2,374 cancer survivors aged 20 and over with valid smoking status in the NHANES 99–08 survey were included in this study. Among them, 566 cancer survivors who regularly smoked at the time of their cancer diagnosis were included in the analyses. Results Around 50.6% of cancer survivors smoked regularly prior to their cancer diagnosis and only 36.1% of them quit smoking after their cancer diagnosis. Racial disparity was observed in smoking cessation among cancer survivors. Hispanics (OR = 0.23, 95% CI = 0.10-0.57 were less likely to quit smoking than Whites after their cancer diagnosis. Conclusion Two-thirds of cancer survivors continued smoking after cancer diagnosis. Our study observed that the high risk group of continued smokers among cancer survivors is made up of those who are female, younger, Hispanic, with longer smoking history, underweight or with normal weight and without smoking-related cancer. These findings suggest that smoking cessation for cancer survivors should target on the high risk subgroups.

  15. Orthopedic manifestations in patients with muco­polysaccharidosis type II (Hunter syndrome enrolled in the Hunter Outcome Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Link

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS II or Hunter syndrome is a rare, inherited disorder caused by deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme iduronate-2-sulfatase. As a result of this deficiency, glycosaminoglycans accumulate in lysosomes in many tissues, leading to progressive multisystemic disease. The cardiopulmonary and neurological problems associated with MPS II have received considerable attention. Orthopedic manifestations are common but not as well characterized. This study aimed to characterize the prevalence and severity of orthopedic manifestations of MPS II and to determine the relationship of these signs and symptoms with cardiovascular, pulmonary and central nervous system involvement. Orthopedic manifestations of MPS II were studied using cross-sectional data from the Hunter Outcome Survey (HOS. The HOS is a global, physician-led, multicenter observational database that collects information on the natural history of MPS II and the long-term safety and effectiveness of enzyme replacement therapy. As of January 2009, the HOS contained baseline data on joint range of motion in 124 males with MPS II. In total, 79% of patients had skeletal manifestations (median onset, 3.5 years and 25% had abnormal gait (median onset, 5.4 years. Joint range of motion was restricted for all joints assessed (elbow, shoulder, hip, knee and ankle. Extension was the most severely affected movement: the exception to this was the shoulder. Surgery for orthopedic problems was rare. The presence of orthopedic manifestations was associated with the presence of central nervous system and pulmonary involvement, but not so clearly with cardiovascular involvement. Orthopedic interventions should be considered on an individual-patient basis. Although some orthopedic manifestations associated with MPS II may be managed routinely, a good knowledge of other concurrent organ system involvement is essential. A multidisciplinary approach is required.

  16. Surgical management of stage I and II vulvar cancer:The role of the separated incision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrijono Andrijono

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Vulvar cancer is a gynecological cancer whose incidence rate is relatively low. Patients generally were admitted at advanced stage, and radiation therapy at advanced stage does not provide favorable prognosis. Two main modalities in the treatment of vulvar cancer are surgery and radiation therapy. However, radiation can be performed in early stage vulvar cancer but surgery is thought to have more benefits, such as in side effect on the ovary/ reproductive function disorder, patient's hygiene factor, and the ease in performing therapy if recurrence occurs. There are various techniques of vulvar cancer surgery, such as radical vulvectomy with butterfly incision (RVBI and radical vulvectomy with separated incision (RVSI. The objective of this study was to identify the benefits of radical vulvectomy with separated incision in comparison with radical vulvectomy with butterfly incision in terms of the length of surgery, wound recovery, infection incidence, length of hospital stay. This study was a clinical trial performed during the period of 1990-2000. Fifteen cases of vulvar cancer were found and underwent surgery. Fourteen cases were at stage II and 14 cases were histologically defined as squamous-cell carcinoma and 1 case was adenocarcinoma. The average length of surgery in RVSI was 168 minutes, this was shorter than that in VRBI which reached an average of 275 minutes. The incidence of infection in RVSI group was 3 of 11 cases (27.27%, while in RVBI group all cases had infection in surgical wound. Failure of surgical wound approximation was 1 of 12 cases (9.99%, while in RVBI all cases experienced the failure such that cosmetic surgery was required. Length of postoperative care in RVSI group was 12.3 days, while in RVBI 21.5 days. Thus, complications in VRBI were lower, and length of surgery and length of postoperative care were shorter. (Med J Indones 2003; 12: 103-8 Keywords: vulvar cancer, separated incision

  17. The role of the general practitioner in cancer care: a survey of the patients' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, V; Walter, S; Fessler, J; Koester, M J; Ruetters, D; Huebner, J

    2017-05-01

    Modern cancer care is provided in highly specialized structures as certificated centres and comprehensive cancer center, as well as specialized practices. In contrast, the position of the general practitioner (GP) is less well characterised and there is a lack of information about his importance in the care for cancer patients. The aim of our survey was to assess the role of GPs in German cancer care from patients' perspective. In several steps we developed a standardized anonymous questionnaire in cooperation with the German Association of General Practitioners and the Federal Association of German Self-Help Groups. This questionnaire was used in a print and an online version and distributed by the self-help organizations to their members. Seven hundred and forty participants took part in the survey, 66.5% women and 30.1% men. 71% had visited the GP during cancer therapy and 34.5% discussed decisions concerning diagnostics and therapy with him. The most relevant reasons to visit the GP during cancer therapy were to get a blood test (63.3%), comorbidities (42.7%) and complaints and side effects (38.3%). For the latter, most often a detailed discussion ensued (57%), fooled by a prescription (37.7%). In 63.4% the GP offered support when patients had some questions or worries concerning their cancer. Yet, 17% of the patients reported that the GP did not try to help. 85.5% of the participants thought that it is important that their GP is informed about the therapy on a regular basis. For 77.0%, a simultaneous care provided by the GP is important or very important. Our survey points to the importance of the GP during cancer therapy from the patient's point of view. Patients want their GP to take an active part in the cancer therapy. Furthermore, early integration of the GP may also enhance early integration of palliative care and also help family members and caregivers. A strategy to integrate GPs is the establishment of shared care models, in which GPs are supported by

  18. A survey on cancer-related nutritional information in Iranian popular magazines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovsepyan, Ourfa; Zare-Farashbandi, Firoozeh; Askari, Gholamreza

    2015-01-01

    Due to the wide influence of public media, they become important communication channels for changing health beliefs and behaviors. One of the areas that have gained increased attention in public media is nutritional information. Cancer is one among the diseases related to nutrition. The goal of this study is to do a content analysis of the popular magazines in Iran for nutritional information related to cancer in year 2012-2013. This is an applied survey performed using content analysis method. The data gathering tool is a checklist designed by the researcher. The statistical population consisted of all of the messages printed in 173 volumes of eight most popular magazines which were selected based on their characteristics by searching the Iranian publication database using certain inclusion and exclusion criteria. The sample size calculated using non-probability - purposive sampling was 295 messages from 96 magazine volumes. Findings showed that prevention trends had the highest (86.8%) and treatment had the lowest (4.7%) frequency in the messages. Pomegranate was the most commonly mentioned preventive food, while mayonnaises were the most commonly mentioned carcinogen and tangerine was the most commonly mentioned food used for cancer treatment. Among the different types of cancer, more than half of the messages (51.2%) mentioned "cancer" as a general term. After that, breast cancer (13.2%) and prostate cancer (10.51%) were the most commonly motioned cancers and messages regarding pancreatic cancer and hormone-related cancers were the least frequent (0.3%). The findings of this study show that the main goal of these messages was to increase the information provided to the readers, although some doubts regarding the scientific credibility of the claims made in these messages still remain.

  19. A Survey of Knowledge About and Perceived Barriers to Prostate Cancer Screening Among Medical Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akbarizadeh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among men and the second leading cause of deaths from cancer. Results of previous studies indicate the effectiveness of screening and early detection in reducing mortality from this disease. Objectives The purpose of this study was to survey the knowledge about prostate cancer and perceived barriers to prostate cancer screening among medical staff of two universities in Ahvaz, Iran. Materials and Methods This cross-sectional descriptive study was performed on 120 employees over 40 years old at Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences and Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz, who were selected by using simple random sampling. The data collection tool was a researcher-created questionnaire based on the study of texts and other studies. Data analysis was performed using SPSS software and through analytical methods including descriptive and inferential statistics. Results The most common barriers to screening for prostate cancer were a lack of knowledge about where to go for tests and how screening tests are done (70.8%, a lack of emphasis on screening tests (59.1%, and a fear of thinking about the disease (50%. Results showed that there was no significant relationship between doing the serum antigen test and having knowledge regarding prostate cancer. But there was a significant association between prostate cancer screening and perceived barriers (P = 0.001. Conclusions Results showed that whereas knowledge by itself cannot guarantee men’s participation in prostate cancer screenings, perceived barriers can play an important role in discouraging men from cancer screening participation. Therefore, designing programs to address these barriers is very important.

  20. Trends in Cancer Screening Rates among Korean Men and Women: Results from the Korean National Cancer Screening Survey (KNCSS), 2004-2011

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Boyoung; Choi, Kui Son; Lee, Yoon Young; Jun, Jae Kwan; Seo, Hong Gwan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The Korean National Cancer Screening Survey (KNCSS) is a nationwide survey conducted annually, since 2004. This study was conducted in order to report on trends in rates of cancer screening for five major cancers-stomach, liver, colorectal, breast, and cervix uteri in Korea. Materials and Methods Data collected by the KNCSS between 2004 and 2011 were used in this study. The eligible study population included cancer-free men who were 40 years old and over, and women who were 30 years o...

  1. Low Level of Microsatellite Instability Correlates with Poor Clinical Prognosis in Stage II Colorectal Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Nazemalhosseini Mojarad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of microsatellite instability (MSI on the prognosis of colorectal cancer (CRC requires more investigation. We assessed the role of MSI status in survival of individuals diagnosed with primary colorectal cancer. In this retrospective cross-sectional study the MSI status was determined in 158 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumors and their matched normal tissues from patients who underwent curative surgery. Cox proportional hazard modeling was performed to assess the clinical prognostic significance. In this study we found that MSI-H tumors were predominantly located in the colon versus rectum (p=0.03, associated with poorer differentiation (p=0.003 and TNM stage II/III of tumors (p=0.02. In CRC patients with stage II, MSI-L cases showed significantly poorer survival compared with patients who had MSI-H or MSS tumors (p=0.04. This study indicates that MSI-L tumors correlate with poorer clinical outcome in patients with stage II tumors (p=0.04 or in tumors located in the colon (p=0.02. MSI-L characterizes a distinct subgroup of CRC patients who have a poorer outcome. This study suggests that MSI status in CRC, as a clinical prognostic marker, is dependent on other factors, such as tumor stage and location.

  2. Half-sandwich ruthenium(II) biotin conjugates as biological vectors to cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babak, Maria V; Plażuk, Damian; Meier, Samuel M; Arabshahi, Homayon John; Reynisson, Jóhannes; Rychlik, Błażej; Błauż, Andrzej; Szulc, Katarzyna; Hanif, Muhammad; Strobl, Sebastian; Roller, Alexander; Keppler, Bernhard K; Hartinger, Christian G

    2015-03-23

    Ruthenium(II)-arene complexes with biotin-containing ligands were prepared so that a novel drug delivery system based on tumor-specific vitamin-receptor mediated endocytosis could be developed. The complexes were characterized by spectroscopic methods and their in vitro anticancer activity in cancer cell lines with various levels of major biotin receptor (COLO205, HCT116 and SW620 cells) was tested in comparison with the ligands. In all cases, coordination of ruthenium resulted in significantly enhanced cytotoxicity. The affinity of Ru(II) -biotin complexes to avidin was investigated and was lower than that of unmodified biotin. Hill coefficients in the range 2.012-2.851 suggest strong positive cooperation between the complexes and avidin. To estimate the likelihood of binding to the biotin receptor/transporter, docking studies with avidin and streptavidin were conducted. These explain, to some extent, the in vitro anticancer activity results and support the conclusion that these novel half-sandwich ruthenium(II)-biotin conjugates may act as biological vectors to cancer cells, although no clear relationship between the cellular Ru content, the cytotoxicity, and the presence of the biotin moiety was observed.

  3. Questions About Cervical and Breast Cancer Screening Knowledge, Practice, and Outcomes: A Review of Demographic and Health Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viens, Laura; Perin, Doug; Senkomago, Virginia; Neri, Antonio; Saraiya, Mona

    2017-05-01

    United Nation's Sustainable Development Goals and the World Health Organization's Global Monitoring Framework support a strong global commitment to reducing the high burden of cervical and breast cancers among low- and middle-income countries. Strategies include vaccination, screening, and early diagnosis. Population-based surveys, such as those conducted by the Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) Program, can collect the information needed to guide cancer control efforts in a standardized comparable manner. We identified and evaluated the breadth of breast and cervical cancer screening information that was collected by the DHS from 1984 through 2015. Then, we determined if these surveys currently provide the specific and measurable data about both the quantity and quality of cancer screening needed to guide national efforts to reduce the overall effects of cervical and breast cancers. We searched the DHS website to identify surveys conducted between the start of the DHS Program in 1984 and November 2015 that included questions about breast and cervical cancer screening. The relevant questions were extracted from the questionnaire, translated into English, and grouped by themes. Of the 90 countries where DHS surveys have been implemented, cervical cancer screening questions were included in 22 countries (24.4%) and breast cancer screening questions in 18 countries (20.0%). The common themes identified were disease knowledge, screening knowledge, screening practice, and screening outcomes. Most countries with survey questionnaires available for review addressed at least one aspect of screening practice (88.9% of cervical and 87.5% of breast), although few countries queried knowledge and outcomes. Questions that assess varied aspects of breast and cervical cancer screening have been incorporated into relatively few DHS surveys. The themes identified could guide the design of a standard set of questions for use in future population-based surveys and enable evaluation

  4. Nimotuzumab combined with radiotherapy for esophageal cancer: preliminary study of a Phase II clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang J

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Jun Liang,1 Mingyan E,2 Gang Wu,3 Lujun Zhao,4 Xia Li,5 Xia Xiu,6 Ning Li,1 Bo Chen,1 Zhouguang Hui,1 Jima Lv,1 Hui Fang,1 Yu Tang,1 Nan Bi,1 Wenqing Wang,1 Yirui Zhai,1 Tao Li,1 Dongfu Chen,1 Shuangmei Zou,7 Ning Lu,7 Rolando Perez-Rodríguez,8 Junqi Zheng,9 Luhua Wang11Department of Radiotherapy, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, People's Republic of China; 2Department of Radiotherapy, Cancer Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin, People's Republic of China; 3Department of Radiotherapy, Tongji Cancer Center Hospital, Wuhan, People's Republic of China; 4Department of Radiotherapy, Cancer Hospital of Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, People's Republic of China; 5Department of Radiotherapy, LiaoNing Province Cancer Hospital, Shenyang, People's Republic of China; 6Department of Radiotherapy, Beijing Hospital, Beijing, People's Republic of China; 7Department of Pathology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, People's Republic of China; 8Center of Molecular Immunology, Havana, Cuba; 9School of Medicine, Tongji University, Shanghai, People's Republic of ChinaObjective: To determine the safety and therapeutic effects of nimotuzumab (h-R3 combined with radiotherapy in esophageal cancer.Methods: This Phase II clinical trial involved 42 patients with stage II (inoperable or refused surgery to stage IV (supraclavicular lymph node metastasis only esophageal cancers treated between November 2008 and July 2010. All patients had squamous cell carcinomas, and all received three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and 200 mg nimotuzumab per week during radiotherapy.Results: There were 9, 25, and 8 patients with stage II, III and IV disease, respectively. All except two patients received 50–70 Gy radiation; 37 patients (88.1% received more than five nimotuzumab doses. Grade III toxicities (21.4% of all adverse events included esophagitis and gastrointestinal, dermatological and hematological

  5. Identification of 42 Genes Linked to Stage II Colorectal Cancer Metastatic Relapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabeah A. Al-Temaimi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is one of the leading causes of cancer mortality. Metastasis remains the primary cause of CRC death. Predicting the possibility of metastatic relapse in early-stage CRC is of paramount importance to target therapy for patients who really need it and spare those with low-potential of metastasis. Ninety-six stage II CRC cases were stratified using high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH data based on a predictive survival algorithm and supervised clustering. All genes included within the resultant copy number aberrations were each interrogated independently at mRNA level using CRC expression datasets available from public repositories, which included 1820 colon cancers, and 167 normal colon tissues. Reduced mRNA expression driven by copy number losses and increased expression driven by copy number gains revealed 42 altered transcripts (29 reduced and 13 increased transcripts associated with metastatic relapse, short disease-free or overall survival, and/or epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT. Resultant genes were classified based on gene ontology (GO, which identified four functional enrichment groups involved in growth regulation, genomic integrity, metabolism, and signal transduction pathways. The identified 42 genes may be useful for predicting metastatic relapse in stage II CRC. Further studies are necessary to validate these findings.

  6. Identification of 42 Genes Linked to Stage II Colorectal Cancer Metastatic Relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Temaimi, Rabeah A; Tan, Tuan Zea; Marafie, Makia J; Thiery, Jean Paul; Quirke, Philip; Al-Mulla, Fahd

    2016-04-28

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of cancer mortality. Metastasis remains the primary cause of CRC death. Predicting the possibility of metastatic relapse in early-stage CRC is of paramount importance to target therapy for patients who really need it and spare those with low-potential of metastasis. Ninety-six stage II CRC cases were stratified using high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) data based on a predictive survival algorithm and supervised clustering. All genes included within the resultant copy number aberrations were each interrogated independently at mRNA level using CRC expression datasets available from public repositories, which included 1820 colon cancers, and 167 normal colon tissues. Reduced mRNA expression driven by copy number losses and increased expression driven by copy number gains revealed 42 altered transcripts (29 reduced and 13 increased transcripts) associated with metastatic relapse, short disease-free or overall survival, and/or epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Resultant genes were classified based on gene ontology (GO), which identified four functional enrichment groups involved in growth regulation, genomic integrity, metabolism, and signal transduction pathways. The identified 42 genes may be useful for predicting metastatic relapse in stage II CRC. Further studies are necessary to validate these findings.

  7. Pilot Survey of Breast Cancer Management in Sub-Saharan Africa

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    Verna D.N.K. Vanderpuye

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To understand the current state of breast cancer management in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods: We conducted an anonymous online survey of breast cancer management among African Organization for Research and Treatment in Cancer (AORTIC members by using a 42-question structured questionnaire in both English and French in 2013. Results: Twenty members from 19 facilities in 14 countries responded to the survey. Twelve members (60% belonged to a multidisciplinary breast cancer team. Radiotherapy equipment was available in seven facilities (36%, but equipment had down time at least once a week in four facilities. Available chemotherapy drugs included methotrexate, cyclophosphamide, fluorouracil, anthracyclines, and vincristine, whereas trastuzumab, taxanes, vinorelbine, and gemcitabine were available in few facilities. Core-needle biopsy was available in 16 facilities (84%; mammogram, in 17 facilities (89%; computed tomography scan, in 15 facilities (79%; magnetic resonance imaging, in 11 facilities (58%; and bone scans, in nine facilities (47%. It took an average of 1 to 3 weeks to report histopathology. Immunohistochemistry was available locally in eight facilities (42%, outside hospitals but within the country in seven facilities (37%, and outside the country in four facilities (21%. Thirteen facilities (68% performed axillary node dissections as part of a breast protocol. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy was the most common therapy for locally advanced breast cancer in 13 facilities (68%. In three facilities (16%, receptor status did not influence the prescription of hormone treatment. Conclusion: This pilot survey suggests that AORTIC members in sub-Saharan Africa continue to make gains in the provision of access to multidisciplinary breast cancer care, but the lack of adequate pathology and radiotherapy services is a barrier. Focused attention on in-country and regional training needs and improvement of health systems deliverables is urgently

  8. Exercise in cancer care in Ireland: a survey of oncology nurses and physiotherapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hanlon, E; Kennedy, N

    2014-09-01

    Little is known about the extent of exercise prescription within cancer care. This cross-sectional survey aims to identify Irish oncology nurses and physiotherapists' current knowledge and practice in prescribing exercise for cancer care and barriers to such prescription. An online survey was distributed to the Chartered Physiotherapists in Oncology and Palliative Care (n = 35) and the Irish Association for Nurses in Oncology (n = 170). The response rate was 74% (26/35) for physiotherapists and 34% (58/170) for oncology nurses. Three quarters of physiotherapists recommended/prescribed exercise with 81% or more of cancer patients in the past 6 months, with the exercises prescribed largely in line with current guidelines. Patients' family/friends advising rest was the most commonly reported exercise barrier by physiotherapists [89% (17/19)], with a lack of exercise guidelines for cancer patients being most problematic for oncology nurses [93% (50/54)]. Only 33% (18/54) of oncology nurses felt they had sufficient knowledge regarding exercise in cancer care. In conclusion, exercise prescription by physiotherapists largely corresponds with current guidelines. A minority of nurses felt they had sufficient knowledge of exercise for this population. Further formal postgraduate educational opportunities are needed for oncology nurses and physiotherapists in this area.

  9. Understanding Transgender Men's Experiences with and Preferences for Cervical Cancer Screening: A Rapid Assessment Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seay, Julia; Ranck, Atticus; Weiss, Roy; Salgado, Christopher; Fein, Lydia; Kobetz, Erin

    2017-08-01

    Transgender men are less likely than cisgender women to receive cervical cancer screening. The purpose of the current study was to understand experiences with and preferences for cervical cancer screening among transgender men. Ninety-one transgender men ages 21-63 completed the survey. The survey evaluated experiences with and preferences for screening, including opinions regarding human papillomavirus (HPV) self-sampling as a primary cervical cancer screening. Half (50.5%) of participants did not have Pap smear screening within the past 3 years. The majority (57.1%) of participants preferred HPV self-sampling over provider-collected Pap smear screening. Participants who reported discrimination were more likely to prefer HPV self-sampling (odds ratio = 3.29, 95% confidence interval 1.38-7.84, P = 0.007). Primary HPV testing via HPV self-sampling may improve cervical cancer screening uptake among transgender men. Future work should pilot this innovative cervical cancer screening method within this population.

  10. The Building the Bridge survey for z=3 Ly-alpha emitting galaxies II: Completion of the survey

    CERN Document Server

    Grove, L F; Ledoux, C; Limousin, M; Møller, P; Nilsson, K; Thomsen, B

    2009-01-01

    (Abridged). We aim at bridging the gap between absorption selected and emission selected galaxies at z~3 by probing the faint end of the luminosity function of star-forming galaxies at z~3. We have performed narrow-band imaging in three fields with intervening QSO absorbers (a damped Ly$\\alpha$ absorber and two Lyman-limit systems) using the VLT. We target Ly-alpha at redshifts 2.85, 3.15 and 3.20. We find a consistent surface density of about 10 Ly-alpha-emitters per square arcmin per unit redshift in all three fields down to our detection limit of about 3x10^41 ergs s^-1. The luminosity function is consistent with what has been found by other surveys at similar redshifts. About 85% of the sources are fainter than the canonical limit of R=25.5 for most Lyman-break galaxy surveys. In none of the three fields do we detect the emission counterparts of the QSO absorbers. In particular we do not detect the counterpart of the z=2.85 damped Ly-alpha absorber towards Q2138-4427. Narrow-band surveys for Ly-alpha emit...

  11. Lung Cancer Early Diagnosis Using Some Data Mining Classification Techniques: A Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thangaraju P

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Data mining is the process of analyzing data from different perspectives and summarizing it into useful information. Data mining is primarily used to this requirement thus finding its applications in diverse fields such as retail, financial, communication, marketing organizations and medicine. Data Mining plays an important role in healthcare organization because with the growth of population and dangerous deadly diseases like Cancer, SARS, Leprosy, HIV etc, Lung cancer is one of the most dangerous disease. This survey for appropriate medical image mining, Data Preprocessing, Feature Extraction, rule generation and classification, it provides basic framework for further improvement in medical diagnosis.

  12. Lung Cancer Early Diagnosis Using Some Data Mining Classification Techniques: A Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thangaraju P

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available  Data mining is the process of analyzing data from different perspectives and summarizing it into useful information. Data mining is primarily used to this requirement thus finding its applications in diverse fields such as retail, financial, communication, marketing organizations and medicine. Data Mining plays an important role in healthcare organization because with the growth of population and dangerous deadly diseases like Cancer, SARS, Leprosy, HIV etc, Lung cancer is one of the most dangerous disease. This survey for appropriate medical image mining, Data Preprocessing, Feature Extraction, rule generation and classification, it provides basic framework for further improvement in medical diagnosis.

  13. Pioglitazone does not increase the risk of type II diabetes in patients with bladder cancer: A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Youhong; Wang, Anping

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the retrospective study was to analyze the effect of pioglitazone on the expression of tumor tissue inflammation factor interleukin (IL)-8, macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) of type II diabetes in bladder cancer patients. In addition, whether there was a correlation between pioglitazone and the occurrence of male bladder cancer was also investigated. In total, 42 male cases diagnosed with type II diabetes secondary to bladder cancer were selected. Forty male cases, with simplex type II diabetes but not with bladder cancer, served as the control. Tumor biopsy specimens were collected to detect the expression levels of IL-8, M-CSF and VEGF. The results showed that the expression of IL-8, M-CSF and VEGF of the simplex diabetes group was significantly lower than that of the secondary to tumor group (Ppioglitazone, duration of diabetes, average fasting blood sugar and glycated hemoglobin levels, was not statistically significant. Multivariable logistic regression analysis revealed that the expression levels of IL-8, M-CSF and VEGF were independent risk factors for the occurrence of bladder cancer (Ppioglitazone (P>0.05). In conclusion, oral pioglitazone may not increase the risk of type II diabetes patients with bladder cancer. However, the occurrence of bladder cancer be associated with the increasing expression levels of IL-8, M-CSF and VEGF.

  14. A survey on cancer-related nutritional information in Iranian popular magazines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovsepyan, Ourfa; Zare-Farashbandi, Firoozeh; Askari, Gholamreza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Due to the wide influence of public media, they become important communication channels for changing health beliefs and behaviors. One of the areas that have gained increased attention in public media is nutritional information. Cancer is one among the diseases related to nutrition. The goal of this study is to do a content analysis of the popular magazines in Iran for nutritional information related to cancer in year 2012–2013. Materials and Methods: This is an applied survey performed using content analysis method. The data gathering tool is a checklist designed by the researcher. The statistical population consisted of all of the messages printed in 173 volumes of eight most popular magazines which were selected based on their characteristics by searching the Iranian publication database using certain inclusion and exclusion criteria. The sample size calculated using non-probability – purposive sampling was 295 messages from 96 magazine volumes. Results: Findings showed that prevention trends had the highest (86.8%) and treatment had the lowest (4.7%) frequency in the messages. Pomegranate was the most commonly mentioned preventive food, while mayonnaises were the most commonly mentioned carcinogen and tangerine was the most commonly mentioned food used for cancer treatment. Among the different types of cancer, more than half of the messages (51.2%) mentioned “cancer” as a general term. After that, breast cancer (13.2%) and prostate cancer (10.51%) were the most commonly motioned cancers and messages regarding pancreatic cancer and hormone-related cancers were the least frequent (0.3%). Conclusions: The findings of this study show that the main goal of these messages was to increase the information provided to the readers, although some doubts regarding the scientific credibility of the claims made in these messages still remain. PMID:27462644

  15. Metabolic syndrome and total cancer mortality in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gathirua-Mwangi, Wambui G; Monahan, Patrick O; Murage, Mwangi J; Zhang, Jianjun

    2017-02-01

    Although metabolic syndrome incidence has substantially increased during the last few decades, it largely remains unclear whether this metabolic disorder is associated with total cancer mortality. The present study was carried out to investigate this important question. A total of 687 cancer deaths were identified from 14,916 participants in the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey by linking them to the National Death Index database through December 31, 2006. Cox proportional hazards regression was performed to calculate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for total cancer mortality in relation to metabolic syndrome and its individual components. After adjustment for confounders, a diagnosis of metabolic syndrome was associated with 33% elevated total cancer mortality. Compared with individuals without metabolic syndrome, those with 3, 4 and 5 abnormal components had HRs (95% CIs) of 1.28 (1.03-1.59), 1.24 (0.96-1.60), and 1.87 (1.34-2.63), respectively (p-trend = 0.0003). Systolic blood pressure and serum glucose were associated with an increased risk of death from total cancer [HR (95% CI) for highest vs. lowest quartiles: 1.67 (1.19-2.33), p-trend = 0.002 and 1.34 (1.04-1.74), p-trend = 0.003, respectively]. Overall null results were obtained for lung cancer mortality. The effects of metabolic syndrome and its components on non-lung cancer mortality were generally similar to, but somewhat larger than, those for total cancer mortality. Our study is among the first to reveal that metabolic syndrome is associated with increased total cancer mortality.

  16. Breast Cancer Stem Cell Potent Copper(II)-Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boodram, Janine N; Mcgregor, Iain J; Bruno, Peter M; Cressey, Paul B; Hemann, Michael T; Suntharalingam, Kogularamanan

    2016-02-18

    The breast cancer stem cell (CSC) potency of a series of copper(II)-phenanthroline complexes containing the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), indomethacin, is reported. The most effective copper(II) complex in this series, 4, selectivity kills breast CSC-enriched HMLER-shEcad cells over breast CSC-depleted HMLER cells. Furthermore, 4 reduces the formation, size, and viability of mammospheres, to a greater extent than salinomycin, a potassium ionophore known to selectively inhibit CSCs. Mechanistic studies revealed that the CSC-specificity observed for 4 arises from its ability to generate intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inhibit cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), an enzyme that is overexpressed in breast CSCs. The former induces DNA damage, activates JNK and p38 pathways, and leads to apoptosis.

  17. Solitary AFP- and PIVKA-II-producing hepatoid gastric cancer with giant lymph node metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iso, Yukihiro; Sawada, Tokihiko; Shimoda, Mitsugi; Rokkaku, Kyu; Ohkura, Yasuo; Kubota, Keiichi

    2005-01-01

    A 61-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of abdominal pain and an abdominal mass. The patient had anemia and elevated serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) (9630ng/mL) and PIVKA-II (91mAU/mL) levels. Roentgenographic examination revealed an extra-gastric tumor in the upper abdomen, and gastroscopy revealed Bormann type 2 gastric cancer in the lower portion of the stomach. The preoperative diagnosis was synchronous gastric cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and surgery was performed. The extra-gastric tumor appeared to be an extra-hepatically growing HCC because the tumor was fed by vessels ramifying from the umbilical portion of the liver. Distal gastrectomy with resection of the extra-gastric tumor was performed, and histological examination of the resected specimen revealed that the gastric cancer was an AFP-producing hepatoid gastric adenocarcinoma and that the extra-gastric tumor was a lymph node metastasis. AFP-producing hepatoid gastric adenocarcinoma tends to metastasize to the regional lymph nodes and form a giant tumor. A giant tumor in the upper abdomen associated with gastric cancer may therefore be a clinical manifestation of AFP-producing hepatoid gastric adenocarcinoma.

  18. Expression of Glut-1 and HK-II in Pancreatic Cancer and Their Impact on Prognosis and FDG Accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Jing Yang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this article is to analyze the expression of Glut-1 and HK-II, the association between their expression and 18F-FDG accumulation in pancreatic cancer. METHODS: Fifty patients with histologically proven pancreatic cancer were included in this preliminary study, all of whom received 18F-FDG PET/CT performance before surgery. Immunohistochemical staining of tumor tissue and adjacent normal tissue was performed for Glut-1 and HK-II. By combining proportions and intensity of immunochemical staining, we obtained the modified immunohistological scores for Glut-1 and HK-II respectively. The relationship between expression of Glut-1, HK-II and series of parameters was analyzed, i.e. clinicopathological characteristics, prognosis of patients and SUVmax of PET-CT. RESULTS: Compared with normal tissue, the Glut-1 and HK-II expression in pancreatic cancer tissue was significantly increased (P  .05. During the follow-up period, the survival curves of low Glut-1 group and high Glut-1 group were statistically different (P = .049. Multivariate analysis (Cox regression revealed that Glut-1 expression was not associated with mortality (P > .05. No statistical difference was found in the survival curves of negative HK-II group and positive HK-II group (P = .545. There was no correlation between 18F-FDG uptake and expression of Glut-1 and HK-II(P > .05. CONCLUSION: The Glut-1 and HK-II expression in pancreatic cancer tissue was significantly increased. There was no correlation between expression of Glut-1, HK-II and clinicopathological characteristics, prognosis and 18F-FDG uptake.

  19. The Reality in the Surveillance of Breast Cancer Survivors—Results of a Patient Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stemmler Hans-Joachim

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: International guidelines for the surveillance of breast cancer patients recommend a minimized clinical follow-up including routine history and physical examination and regularly scheduled mammograms. However, the abandonment of scheduled follow-up examinations in breast cancer survivors remains a contradiction to established follow-up guidelines for other solid tumours.Patients and Methods: We report the patients’ view on the basis of a survey performed in two separate geographical areas in Germany. The questionnaires were sent out to 2.658 patients with a history of breast cancer.Results: A total of 801 patients (30.1% responded to the questionnaire. The results of the survey can be summarized in two major categories: First, necessity for surveillance was affi rmed by a majority (>95%, and 47.8% of the organized patients answered that there was a need for more intensive diagnostic effort during follow-up. The main expectation from an intensified follow-up was the increased feeling of security as expressed by >80% of the women. Second, the present survey indicates that most of the regularly scheduled follow-up visits were expanded using extensive laboratory and imaging procedures exceeding the quantity of examinations recommended in the present follow-up guidelines.Conclusion: Despite the fact that only one third of the patients responded to the questionnaire, the survey indicates that a majority of physicians who treated these patients still do not accept the present follow-up guidelines. To some extent this may be explained by the observation that patients and possibly also their doctors trust that intensified follow-up increases diagnostic security and survival. Since considerable changes in the treatment options of breast cancer have been made during the last decades a new trial of investigations in follow-up is warranted.

  20. Perspectives of health care professionals on cancer cachexia: results from three global surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscaritoli, M.; Rossi Fanelli, F.; Molfino, A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cachexia has a high prevalence in cancer patients and negatively impacts prognosis, quality of life (QOL), and tolerance/response to treatments. This study reports the results of three surveys designed to gain insights into cancer cachexia (CC) awareness, understanding, and treatment practices among health care professionals (HCPs). Methods Surveys were conducted globally among HCPs involved in CC management. Topics evaluated included definitions and synonyms of CC, diagnosis and treatment practices, and goals and desired improvements of CC treatment. Results In total, 742 HCPs from 14 different countries participated in the surveys. The majority (97%) of participants were medical oncologists or hematologists. CC was most frequently defined as weight loss (86%) and loss of appetite (46%). The terms loss of weight and decreased appetite (51% and 34%, respectively) were often provided as synonyms of CC. Almost half (46%) of the participants reported diagnosing CC and beginning treatment if a patient experienced a weight loss of 10%. However, 48% of the participants would wait until weight loss was ≥15% to diagnose CC and start treatment. HCPs also reported that 61%–77% of cancer patients do not receive any prescription medication for CC before Stage IV of disease is reached. Ability to promote weight gain was rated as the most important factor for selecting CC treatment. Key goals of treatment included ensuring that patients can cope with the cancer and treatment and have a QOL benefit. HCPs expressed desire for treatments with a more CC-specific mode of action and therapies that enhance QOL. Conclusions These surveys underscore the need for increased awareness among HCPs of CC and its management. PMID:28007753

  1. A Survey of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use in Cancer Patients Treated with Radiotherapy in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Putipun Puataweepong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM in cancer patients is increasingly acceptable worldwide, but most of the studies were surveyed from developed countries. In this study, we evaluated the first and large cohort of cancer patients with CAM use in Thailand. Materials and Methods. A self-administered questionnaire was completed by 248 cancer patients attending outpatient radiotherapy unit at Ramathibodi Hospital. Results. The prevalence of CAM use was 60.9%. The most frequently used CAM were dietary/vitamin supplements (56.9%. Independent predictors of CAM use were high income (<0.001 and cancer type (=0.019. About half of the patients (51% reported positive effects from CAM use. Nevertheless, 9.4% of the patient also reported side effects. The majority of patients (58.3% did not disclose their use of CAM to their doctors because they felt that it was not necessary for doctors to know (65.9%. The average spending for CAM use was 200 USD/month (range, 10–1,000. Conclusion. Although the cost for CAM is relatively expensive, the prevalence of CAM use in cancer patients in Thailand is high particularly, in patients with higher income. Therefore, all clinical oncologists should be concerned about the use of CAM during evaluation of the cancer patients.

  2. National survey of comprehensive pharmacy services provided in cancer clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandoobhai, Anand; Poi, Ming; Kelley, Katherine; Mirtallo, Jay; Lopez, Ben; Griffith, Niesha

    2017-06-01

    Pharmacy services provided in clinical trials at National Cancer Institute (NCI)-designated centers were assessed. This was a cross-sectional survey of 61 NCI-designated cancer centers. Directors of pharmacy were contacted and data were collected electronically via Qualtrics over 2 months. Trial participants were asked to estimate the frequency that their sites performed 26 services and the perceived importance of these services. Services were examined with respect to the difference between their reported performance and their reported importance. Eight of the 26 services showed a difference of at least 40% between the proportion of respondents performing the activities "often" or "almost always" and the proportion considering them "important" or "very important." Demographic information was collected, as well as perceived barriers. Survey response rate was 59% (36 out of 61). The majority of services for clinical trials (19 out of 26) were viewed as important for pharmacists to perform; however, less than half (10 out of 26) were performed more than 50% of the time. Eight services had a gap of more than 40% when comparing the importance versus extent of implementation. Some of the largest gaps were reported in investigator-initiated trials development, medication reconciliation, therapeutic drug monitoring, and oral chemotherapy adherence assessment. Future studies can assist with cost justification by demonstrating the regulatory, safety, and financial benefits of pharmacist involvement in cancer trials. A survey of pharmacy directors at cancer centers revealed gaps between what respondents considered important pharmacist services in the provision of cancer clinical trials and the actual performance of those services in their institution. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Photometric H alpha and [O II] Luminosity Function of SDF and SXDF Galaxies: Implications for Future Baryon Oscillation Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Sumiyoshi, Masanao; Oshige, Shunsuke; Glazebrook, Karl; Akiyama, Masayuki; Morokuma, Tomoki; Motohara, Kentaro; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Hayashi, Masao; Yoshida, Makiko; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Kodama, Tadayuki

    2009-01-01

    Efficient selection of emission line galaxies at z > 1 by photometric information in wide field surveys is one of the keys for future spectroscopic surveys to constrain dark energy using the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) signature. Here we estimate the H alpha and [O II] line luminosity functions of galaxies at z = 0.5-1.7 using a novel approach where multi-wavelength imaging data is used to jointly estimate both photometric redshifts and star-formation rates. These photometric estimates of line luminosities at high-redshift use the large data sets of the Subaru Deep Field and Subaru XMM-Newton Deep Field (covering \\sim 1 deg^2) and are calibrated with the spectroscopic data of the local Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies. The derived luminosity functions (especially H alpha) are in reasonable agreement with the past estimates based on spectroscopic or narrow-band-filter surveys. This dataset is useful for examining the photometric selection of target galaxies for BAO surveys because of the large cosmologi...

  4. Sejong Open Cluster Survey (SOS). II. IC 1848 Cluster in the H II Region W5 West

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Beomdu; Kim, Jinyoung S; Bessell, Michael S; Karimov, Rivkat

    2013-01-01

    IC 1848 is one of the young open clusters in the giant star forming Cas OB6 association. Several interesting aspects relating to star formation processes in giant star forming regions attracted us to study the initial mass function (IMF), star formation mode, and properties of pre-main sequence stars (PMS). A UBVI and H alpha photometric study of the young open cluster IC 1848 was conducted as part of the "Sejong Open cluster Survey" (SOS). We have selected 105 early-type members from photometric diagrams. Their mean reddening is = 0.660 +/- 0.054 mag. Using the published photometric data with near- and mid-infrared archival data we confirmed the normal reddening law (R_V = 3.1) toward the cluster (IC 1848). A careful zero-age main sequence fitting gives a distance modulus of V_0 - M_V = 11.7 +/- 0.2 mag, equivalent to 2.2 +/- 0.2 kpc. H alpha photometry and the list of young stellar objects identified by Koenig et al. permitted us to select a large number of PMS stars comprising 196 H alpha emission stars, ...

  5. A Survey of Attitudes towards the Clinical Application of Systemic Inflammation Based Prognostic Scores in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G. Watt

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The systemic inflammatory response (SIR plays a key role in determining nutritional status and survival of patients with cancer. A number of objective scoring systems have been shown to have prognostic value; however, their application in routine clinical practice is not clear. The aim of the present survey was to examine the range of opinions internationally on the routine use of these scoring systems. Methods. An online survey was distributed to a target group consisting of individuals worldwide who have reported an interest in systemic inflammation in patients with cancer. Results. Of those invited by the survey (n=238, 65% routinely measured the SIR, mainly for research and prognostication purposes and clinically for allocation of adjuvant therapy or palliative chemotherapy. 40% reported that they currently used the Glasgow Prognostic Score/modified Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS/mGPS and 81% reported that a measure of systemic inflammation should be incorporated into clinical guidelines, such as the definition of cachexia. Conclusions. The majority of respondents routinely measured the SIR in patients with cancer, mainly using the GPS/mGPS for research and prognostication purposes. The majority reported that a measure of the SIR should be adopted into clinical guidelines.

  6. The HST/ACS Coma Cluster Survey : II. Data Description and Source Catalogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hammer, Derek; Kleijn, Gijs Verdoes; Hoyos, Carlos; den Brok, Mark; Balcells, Marc; Ferguson, Henry C.; Goudfrooij, Paul; Carter, David; Guzman, Rafael; Peletier, Reynier F.; Smith, Russell J.; Graham, Alister W.; Trentham, Neil; Peng, Eric; Puzia, Thomas H.; Lucey, John R.; Jogee, Shardha; Aguerri, Alfonso L.; Batcheldor, Dan; Bridges, Terry J.; Chiboucas, Kristin; Davies, Jonathan I.; del Burgo, Carlos; Erwin, Peter; Hornschemeier, Ann; Hudson, Michael J.; Huxor, Avon; Jenkins, Leigh; Karick, Arna; Khosroshahi, Habib; Kourkchi, Ehsan; Komiyama, Yutaka; Lotz, Jennifer; Marzke, Ronald O.; Marinova, Irina; Matkovic, Ana; Merritt, David; Miller, Bryan W.; Miller, Neal A.; Mobasher, Bahram; Mouhcine, Mustapha; Okamura, Sadanori; Percival, Sue; Phillipps, Steven; Poggianti, Bianca M.; Price, James; Sharples, Ray M.; Tully, R. Brent; Valentijn, Edwin

    2010-01-01

    The Coma cluster, Abell 1656, was the target of an HST-ACS Treasury program designed for deep imaging in the F475W and F814W passbands. Although our survey was interrupted by the ACS instrument failure in early 2007, the partially completed survey still covers ~50% of the core high-density region in

  7. The HST/ACS Coma Cluster Survey. II. Data Description and Source Catalogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hammer, Derek; Verdoes Kleijn, Gijs; Hoyos, Carlos; den Brok, Mark; Balcells, Marc; Ferguson, Henry C.; Goudfrooij, Paul; Carter, David; Guzmán, Rafael; Peletier, Reynier F.; Smith, Russell J.; Graham, Alister W.; Trentham, Neil; Peng, Eric; Puzia, Thomas H.; Lucey, John R.; Jogee, Shardha; Aguerri, Alfonso L.; Batcheldor, Dan; Bridges, Terry J.; Chiboucas, Kristin; Davies, Jonathan I.; del Burgo, Carlos; Erwin, Peter; Hornschemeier, Ann; Hudson, Michael J.; Huxor, Avon; Jenkins, Leigh; Karick, Arna; Khosroshahi, Habib; Kourkchi, Ehsan; Komiyama, Yutaka; Lotz, Jennifer; Marzke, Ronald O.; Marinova, Irina; Matkovic, Ana; Merritt, David; Miller, Bryan W.; Miller, Neal A.; Mobasher, Bahram; Mouhcine, Mustapha; Okamura, Sadanori; Percival, Sue; Phillipps, Steven; Poggianti, Bianca M.; Price, James; Sharples, Ray M.; Tully, R. Brent; Valentijn, Edwin

    2010-01-01

    The Coma cluster, Abell 1656, was the target of an HST-ACS Treasury program designed for deep imaging in the F475W and F814W passbands. Although our survey was interrupted by the ACS instrument failure in early 2007, the partially completed survey still covers ~50% of the core high-density region in

  8. A survey of nutritional practices for children with cancer in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Assessing nutritional status and delivering optimal nutritional care is a part of modern day treatment of children with cancer. The nutritional practices in India for these children have not been previously described. Aims: To describe the existing nutrition assessment and management practices for children with cancer in India. Methods: Attendees of the First International Society of Pediatric Oncology-Pediatric Oncology in Developing Countries workshop on nutrition in children with cancer organized in September 2014 at Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai, India were invited to complete a self-administered questionnaire related to three domains: nutritional assessment, intervention, and education. Results: Hundred and eight respondents from 42 health institutions and background in the health sector participated in the survey. There was variability in nutritional assessment, practice and education. Lack of resources and time are contributory. Conclusions: This assessment of nutritional services in India provided useful information to plan development of national guidelines, policy, and delivery of services.

  9. Cause-specific effects of radiotherapy and lymphadenectomy in stage I-II endometrial cancer: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mell, Loren K; Carmona, Ruben; Gulaya, Sachin; Lu, Tina; Wu, John; Saenz, Cheryl C; Vaida, Florin

    2013-11-06

    Radiotherapy and lymphadenectomy have been associated with improved survival in population-based studies of endometrial cancer, which is in contrast with findings from randomized trials and meta-analyses. The primary study aim was to estimate the cause-specific effects of adjuvant radiotherapy and lymphadenectomy on competing causes of mortality. We analyzed Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) data from 1988 to 2006. The sample comprised 58172 patients with stage I and II endometrial adenocarcinoma. Patients were risk stratified by stage, grade, and age. Cumulative incidences and cause-specific hazards of competing causes of mortality were estimated according to treatment. All statistical tests were two-sided. Pelvic radiotherapy was associated with statistically significantly increased endometrial cancer mortality (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.66; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.52 to 1.82) in all stage I and II patients and decreased noncancer mortality in intermediate and high-risk stage I and II patients (HR = 0.82; 95% CI = 0.77 to 0.89). Lymphadenectomy was associated with increased endometrial cancer mortality in stage I patients (HR = 1.27; 95% CI = 1.16 to 1.39), decreased endometrial cancer mortality in stage II patients (HR = 0.61; 95% CI = 0.52 to 0.72), and decreased noncancer mortality in both stage I and II patients (HR = 0.84; 95% CI = 0.80 to 0.88). Effects of radiotherapy and lymphadenectomy on second cancer mortality varied according to risk strata. Radiotherapy and lymphadenectomy are associated with statistically significantly reduced noncancer mortality in stage I and II endometrial cancer. The improved overall survival associated with these treatments reported from SEER studies is largely attributable to their selective application in healthier patients rather than their effects on endometrial cancer.

  10. Diffusion of Molecular Diagnostic Lung Cancer Tests: A Survey of German Oncologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julius Alexander Steffen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed at examining the diffusion of diagnostic lung cancer tests in Germany. It was motivated by the high potential of detecting and targeting oncogenic drivers. Recognizing that the diffusion of diagnostic tests is a conditio sine qua non for the success of personalized lung cancer therapies, this study analyzed the diffusion of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK tests in Germany. Qualitative and quantitative research strategies were combined in a mixed-method design. A literature review and subsequent Key Opinion Leader interviews identified a set of qualitative factors driving the diffusion process, which were then translated into an online survey. The survey was conducted among a sample of 961 oncologists (11.34% response rate. The responses were analyzed in a multiple linear regression which identified six statistically significant factors driving the diffusion of molecular diagnostic lung cancer tests: reimbursement, attitude towards R&D, information self-assessment, perceived attitudes of colleagues, age and test-pathway strategies. Besides the important role of adequate reimbursement and relevant guidelines, the results of this study suggest that an increasing usage of test-pathway strategies, especially in an office-based setting, can increase the diffusion of molecular diagnostic lung cancer tests in the future.

  11. Diffusion of molecular diagnostic lung cancer tests: a survey of german oncologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Julius Alexander

    2014-03-21

    This study was aimed at examining the diffusion of diagnostic lung cancer tests in Germany. It was motivated by the high potential of detecting and targeting oncogenic drivers. Recognizing that the diffusion of diagnostic tests is a conditio sine qua non for the success of personalized lung cancer therapies, this study analyzed the diffusion of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) tests in Germany. Qualitative and quantitative research strategies were combined in a mixed-method design. A literature review and subsequent Key Opinion Leader interviews identified a set of qualitative factors driving the diffusion process, which were then translated into an online survey. The survey was conducted among a sample of 961 oncologists (11.34% response rate). The responses were analyzed in a multiple linear regression which identified six statistically significant factors driving the diffusion of molecular diagnostic lung cancer tests: reimbursement, attitude towards R&D, information self-assessment, perceived attitudes of colleagues, age and test-pathway strategies. Besides the important role of adequate reimbursement and relevant guidelines, the results of this study suggest that an increasing usage of test-pathway strategies, especially in an office-based setting, can increase the diffusion of molecular diagnostic lung cancer tests in the future.

  12. Significance of serum markers pepsinogen I and II for chronic atrophic gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsukura, N; Onda, M; Tokunaga, A; Fujita, I; Okuda, T; Mizutani, T; Kyono, S; Yamashita, K

    1993-01-01

    Chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG) is closely correlated with gastric cancer and is predominant in Japan. Epidemiologically, food habits are the primary factor in both CAG and gastric cancer. Two potential serum markers for CAG have recently been investigated, i.e., the concentration of serum pepsinogen (PG) and the presence of serum antibodies against Helicobacter pylori. Serum PG I and II and the PG I:PG II ratio have been reported to be useful as indicators of recurrent peptic ulcer and for screening of patients at risk from gastric cancer. In this study, we examined PG I and II in serum from 483 patients by RIA (DAINABOT), and endoscopic examination performed in the same patients before serological assay revealed CAG in 68, peptic ulcer in 91, and gastric cancer in 48. Analysis of the mean values according to patients age showed that CAG patients in their forties to eighties had low ( or = 70 ng/ml) levels, except for those in their seventies, and gastric cancer patients in their twenties to sixties had low (< 3.0) PG I:PG II ratios, except for those in their sixties. Thus serum PG assay has potential utility for detection of CAG, peptic ulcer, and gastric cancer.

  13. Non-Surgical Breast-Conserving Treatment (KORTUC-BCT Using a New Radiosensitization Method (KORTUC II for Patients with Stage I or II Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Ogawa

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to establish a non-surgical breast-conserving treatment (BCT using KORTUC II radiosensitization treatment. A new radiosensitizing agent containing 0.5% hydrogen peroxide and 0.83% sodium hyaluronate (a CD44 ligand has been developed for intra-tumoral injection into various tumors. This new method, named KORTUC II, was approved by our local ethics committee for the treatment of breast cancer and metastatic lymph nodes. A total of 72 early-stage breast cancer patients (stage 0, 1 patient; stage I, 23; stage II, 48 were enrolled in the KORTUC II trial after providing fully informed consent. The mean age of the patients was 59.7 years. A maximum of 6 mL (usually 3 mL for tumors of less than approximately 3 cm in diameter of the agent was injected into breast tumor tissue twice a week under ultrasonographic guidance. For radiotherapy, hypofraction radiotherapy was administered using a tangential fields approach including an ipsilateral axillary region and field-in-field method; the energy level was 4 MV, and the total radiation dose was 44 Gy administered as 2.75 Gy/fraction. An electron boost of 3 Gy was added three times. Treatment was well tolerated with minimal adverse effects in all 72 patients. No patients showed any significant complications other than mild dermatitis. A total of 24 patients under 75 years old with stage II breast cancer underwent induction chemotherapy (EC and/or taxane prior to KORTUC II treatment, and 58 patients with estrogen receptor-positive tumors also received hormonal therapy following KORTUC II. The mean duration of follow-up as of the end of September 2014 was 51.1 months, at which time 68 patients were alive without any distant metastases. Only one patient had local recurrence and died of cardiac failure at 6.5 years. Another one patient had bone metastases. For two of the 72 patients, follow-up ended after several months following KORTUC II treatment. In conclusion, non

  14. Are Cancer Survivors/Patients Knowledgeable about Osteoporosis? Results from a Survey of 285 Chemotherapy-Treated Cancer Patients and Their Companions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKean, Heidi; Looker, Sherry; Hartmann, Lynn C.; Hayman, Suzanne R.; Kaur, Judith S.; McWilliams, Robert R.; Peethambaram, Prema P.; Stahl, Jean F.; Jatoi, Aminah

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This study assessed osteoporosis knowledge deficits among cancer patients and their spouses/partners. Design: Single-institution survey (modified version of the Osteoporosis Knowledge Assessment Tool). Setting: The Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. Participants: Consecutive chemotherapy-treated cancer patients (n = 285) with their…

  15. Brief Report: Higher Stage of Disease is associated with Bilateral Mastectomy among Patients with Breast Cancer: A Population-Based Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Rachel A.; Kouri, Elena M.; West, Dee W.; Rosenberg, Shoshana; Partridge, Ann H.; Lii, Joyce; Keating, Nancy L.

    2017-01-01

    Background The reasons for increasing rates of bilateral mastectomy for unilateral breast cancer are incompletely understood and associations of disease stage with bilateral surgery have been inconsistent. We examined associations of clinical and sociodemographic factors, including stage, with surgery type and reconstruction receipt among women with breast cancer. Patients/Methods We surveyed a diverse population-based sample of women from northern California cancer registries with stage 0–III breast cancer diagnosed during 2010–2011 (participation rate=68.5%). Using multinomial logistic regression, we examined factors associated with bilateral and unilateral mastectomy (vs. breast conservation [BCS]), adjusting for tumor and sociodemographic characteristics. In a second model, we examined factors associated with reconstruction for mastectomy-treated patients. Results Among 487 participants, 58% had BCS, 32% had unilateral mastectomy, and 10% underwent bilateral mastectomy. In adjusted analyses, women with stage III (vs. stage 0) cancers had higher odds of bilateral mastectomy (odds ratio [O.R]=8.28; 95% Confidence Interval=2.32–29.50); women with stage II and III (vs. stage 0) disease had higher odds of unilateral mastectomy. Higher (vs. lower) income was also associated with bilateral mastectomy, while age ≥60 (vs. mastectomy-treated patients (n=206), bilateral mastectomy, unmarried status, higher education and income were all associated with reconstruction (Psmastectomy despite a lack of clear medical benefit, raising concern for over-treatment. Our findings highlight the need for interventions to assure women are making informed surgical decisions. PMID:26410475

  16. Role of mitochondria-associated hexokinase II in cancer cell death induced by 3-bromopyruvate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhao; Zhang, Hui; Lu, Weiqin; Huang, Peng

    2009-05-01

    It has long been observed that cancer cells rely more on glycolysis to generate ATP and actively use certain glycolytic metabolic intermediates for biosynthesis. Hexokinase II (HKII) is a key glycolytic enzyme that plays a role in the regulation of the mitochondria-initiated apoptotic cell death. As a potent inhibitor of hexokinase, 3-bromopyruvate (3-BrPA) is known to inhibit cancer cell energy metabolism and trigger cell death, supposedly through depletion of cellular ATP. The current study showed that 3-BrPA caused a covalent modification of HKII protein and directly triggered its dissociation from mitochondria, leading to a specific release of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) from the mitochondria to cytosol and eventual cell death. Co-immunoprecipitation revealed a physical interaction between HKII and AIF. Using a competitive peptide of HKII, we showed that the dissociation of hexokinase II from mitochondria alone could cause apoptotic cell death, especially in the mitochondria-deficient rho(0) cells that highly express HKII. Interestingly, the dissociation of HKII itself did not directly affect the mitochondrial membrane potential, ROS generation, and oxidative phosphorylation. Our study suggests that the physical association between HKII and AIF is important for the normal localization of AIF in the mitochondria, and disruption of this protein complex by 3-BrPA leads to their release from the mitochondria and eventual cell death.

  17. CXC chemokine receptor 1 predicts postoperative prognosis and chemotherapeutic benefits for TNM II and III resectable gastric cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yifan; Liu, Hao; Zhang, Heng; Lin, Chao; Li, Ruochen; Wu, Songyang; Li, He; He, Hongyong; Zhang, Weijuan; Xu, Jiejie

    2017-03-21

    Backround: Abnormal expression of CXC chemokine receptor 1 (CXCR1) has shown the ability to promote tumor angiogensis, invasion and metastasis in several cancers. The purpose of our curret study is to discover the clinical prognostic significance of CXCR1 in resectable gastric cancer. 330 gastric cancer patients who underwent R0 gastrectomy with standard D2 lymphadenectomy at Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University between 2007 and 2008 were enrolled. CXCR1 expression was evaluated with use of immunohistochemical staining. The relation between CXCR1 expression and clinicopathological features and postoperative prognosis was respectively inspected. In both discovery and validation data sets, CXCR1 high expression indicated poorer overall survival (OS) in TNM II and III patients. Furthermore, multivariate analysis identified CXCR1 expression and TNM stage as two independent prognostic factors for OS. Incorporating CXCR1 expression into current TNM staging system could generate a novel clinical predictive model for gastric cancer, showing better prognostic accuracy with respect to patients' OS. More importantly, TNM II patients with higher CXCR1 expression were shown to significantly benefit from postoperative 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) based adjuvant chemotherapy (ACT). CXCR1 in gastric cancer was identified as an independent adverse prognostic factor. Combining CXCR1 expression with current TNM staging system could lead to better risk stratification and more accurate prognosis for gastric cancer patients. High expression of CXCR1 identified a subgroup of TNM stage II gastric cancer patients who appeared to benefit from 5-FU based ACT.

  18. Predictors of BMI Vary along the BMI Range of German Adults - Results of the German National Nutrition Survey II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Kilson; Krems, Carolin; Heuer, Thorsten; Roth, Alexander; Hoffmann, Ingrid

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the study was to identify predictors of BMI in German adults by considering the BMI distribution and to determine whether the association between BMI and its predictors varies along the BMI distribution. The sample included 9,214 adults aged 18-80 years from the German National Nutrition Survey II (NVS II). Quantile regression analyses were conducted to examine the association between BMI and the following predictors: age, sports activities, socio-economic status (SES), healthy eating index-NVS II (HEI-NVS II), dietary knowledge, sleeping duration and energy intake as well as status of smoking, partner relationship and self-reported health. Age, SES, self-reported health status, sports activities and energy intake were the strongest predictors of BMI. The important outcome of this study is that the association between BMI and its predictors varies along the BMI distribution. Especially, energy intake, health status and SES were marginally associated with BMI in normal-weight subjects; this relationships became stronger in the range of overweight, and were strongest in the range of obesity. Predictors of BMI and the strength of these associations vary across the BMI distribution in German adults. Consequently, to identify predictors of BMI, the entire BMI distribution should be considered. © 2017 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  19. Predictors of BMI Vary along the BMI Range of German Adults - Results of the German National Nutrition Survey II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kilson Moon

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of the study was to identify predictors of BMI in German adults by considering the BMI distribution and to determine whether the association between BMI and its predictors varies along the BMI distribution. Methods: The sample included 9,214 adults aged 18-80 years from the German National Nutrition Survey II (NVS II. Quantile regression analyses were conducted to examine the association between BMI and the following predictors: age, sports activities, socio-economic status (SES, healthy eating index-NVS II (HEI-NVS II, dietary knowledge, sleeping duration and energy intake as well as status of smoking, partner relationship and self-reported health. Results: Age, SES, self-reported health status, sports activities and energy intake were the strongest predictors of BMI. The important outcome of this study is that the association between BMI and its predictors varies along the BMI distribution. Especially, energy intake, health status and SES were marginally associated with BMI in normal-weight subjects; this relationships became stronger in the range of overweight, and were strongest in the range of obesity. Conclusions: Predictors of BMI and the strength of these associations vary across the BMI distribution in German adults. Consequently, to identify predictors of BMI, the entire BMI distribution should be considered.

  20. The HETDEX Pilot Survey. IV. The Evolution of [O II] Emitting Galaxies from z ~ 0.5 to z ~ 0

    CERN Document Server

    Ciardullo, Robin; Adams, Joshua J; Blanc, Guillermo A; Gebhardt, Karl; Finkelstein, Steven L; Jogee, Shardha; Hill, Gary J; Drory, Niv; Hopp, Ulrich; Schneider, Donald P; Zeimann, Gregory R; Dalton, Gavin B

    2013-01-01

    We present an analysis of the luminosities and equivalent widths of the 284 z < 0.56 [O II]-emitting galaxies found in the 169 square arcmin pilot survey for the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX). By combining emission-line fluxes obtained from the Mitchell spectrograph on the McDonald 2.7-m telescope with deep broadband photometry from archival data, we derive each galaxy's de-reddened [O II] 3727 luminosity and calculate its total star formation rate. We show that over the last ~5 Gyr of cosmic time there has been substantial evolution in the [O II] emission-line luminosity function, with L* decreasing by ~0.6 +/-0.2 dex in the observed function, and by ~0.9 +/-0.2 dex in the de-reddened relation. Accompanying this decline is a significant shift in the distribution of [O II] equivalent widths, with the fraction of high equivalent-width emitters declining dramatically with time. Overall, the data imply that the relative intensity of star formation within galaxies has decreased over th...

  1. Imprints of galaxy evolution on H ii regions Memory of the past uncovered by the CALIFA survey

    CERN Document Server

    Sanchez, S F; Rosales-Ortega, F F; Miralles-Caballero, D; Lopez-Sanchez, A R; Iglesias-Páramo, J; Marino, R A; Sánchez-Menguiano, L; García-Benito, R; Mast, D; Mendoza, M A; Papaderos, P; Ellis, S; Galbany, L; Kehrig, C; Monreal-Ibero, A; Delgado, R González; Mollá, M; Ziegler, B; de Lorenzo-Cáceres, A; Mendez-Abreu, J; Bland-Hawthorn, J; Bekeraite, S; Roth, M M; Pasquali, A; Díaz, A; Bomans, D; van de Ven, G; Wisotzki, L

    2014-01-01

    H ii regions in galaxies are the sites of star formation and thus particular places to understand the build-up of stellar mass in the universe. The line ratios of this ionized gas are frequently used to characterize the ionization conditions. We use the Hii regions catalogue from the CALIFA survey (~5000 H ii regions), to explore their distribution across the classical [OIII]/Hbeta vs. [NII]/Halpha diagnostic diagram, and how it depends on the oxygen abundance, ionization parameter, electron density, and dust attenuation. We compared the line ratios with predictions from photoionization models. Finally, we explore the dependences on the properties of the host galaxies, the location within those galaxies and the properties of the underlying stellar population. We found that the location within the BPT diagrams is not totally predicted by photoionization models. Indeed, it depends on the properties of the host galaxies, their galactocentric distances and the properties of the underlying stellar population. Thes...

  2. Southern Cosmology Survey II: Massive Optically-Selected Clusters from 70 square degrees of the SZE Common Survey Area

    CERN Document Server

    Menanteau, Felipe; Barrientos, L Felipe; Deshpande, Amruta J; Hilton, Matt; Infante, Leopoldo; Jimenez, Raul; Kosowsky, Arthur; Moodley, Kavilan; Spergel, David; Verde, Licia

    2010-01-01

    We present a catalog of 105 rich and massive ($M>3\\times10^{14}M_{\\sun}$) optically-selected clusters of galaxies extracted from 70 square-degrees of public archival griz imaging from the Blanco 4-m telescope acquired over 45 nights between 2005 and 2007. We use the clusters' optically-derived properties to estimate photometric redshifts, optical luminosities, richness, and masses. We complement the optical measurements with archival XMM-Newton and ROSAT X-ray data which provide additional luminosity and mass constraints on a modest fraction of the cluster sample. Two of our clusters show clear evidence for central lensing arcs; one of these has a spectacular large-diameter, nearly-complete Einstein Ring surrounding the brightest cluster galaxy. A strong motivation for this study is to identify the massive clusters that are expected to display prominent signals from the Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect (SZE) and therefore be detected in the wide-area mm-band surveys being conducted by both the Atacama Cosmology Teles...

  3. Angiotensin II receptor type 1 blockers suppress the cell proliferation effects of angiotensin II in breast cancer cells by inhibiting AT1R signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Ning; Feng, Jiang; Hu, Li-Juan; Sun, Xin; Sun, Hai-Bing; Zhao, Yang; Yang, Yi-Ping; Ren, Hong

    2012-06-01

    Chronic stress and a high-fat diet are well-documented risk factors associated with the renin-angiotensin system in the development of breast cancer. The angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) is a novel component of the renin-angiotensin system. Several recent studies have focused on the function of AT1R in cell proliferation during cancer development. Thus, we hypothesized that angiotensin II (Ang Ⅱ) can promote proliferation of breast cancer via activated AT1R; the activation of AT1R may play an important role in promoting breast cancer growth, and AT1R blocker (ARB) may suppress the promotional effect on proliferation by antagonizing AT1R. The expression level of AT1R was found to be significantly upregulated in breast cancer cells by immunohistochemistry, but no correlation between AT1R expression and ER/PR/Her-2 expression was observed. The AT1R(+)-MCF-7 cell line exhibited high expression of AT1R protein, and we generated the AT1R(-)-MCF-7 cell line using RNA interference. ARBs, and in particular irbesartan, effectively inhibited the effects of Ang II on cell proliferation, cell cycle development and downstream AT1R signaling events, including the activation of the Ras-Raf-MAPK pathway and the transcription factors NF-κB and CREB. Irbesartan also significantly altered p53, PCNA and cyclin D1 expression, which was also influenced by activated AT1R in AT1R(+)-MCF-7 cells. These results suggest that ARBs may be useful as a novel preventive and therapeutic strategy for treating breast cancer.

  4. Level II contamiant survey of the Tallahatchie National Wildlife Refuge, Quitman, Tallahatchie, and Grenada Counties, Mississippi

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Report contains findings of tissue and sediment samples for organic and inorganic contaminants as part of a preaquistion survey for Tallahatchie NWR. Elevated levels...

  5. Predictors of breast cancer screening uptake: a pre intervention community survey in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlui, Maznah; Gan, Daniel Eng Hwee; Taib, Nur Aishah; Pritam, Ranjit; Lim, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Despite health education efforts to educate women on breast cancer and breast cancer screening modalities, the incidence of breast cancer and presentation at an advanced stage are still a problem in Malaysia. To determine factors associated with the uptake of breast cancer screening among women in the general population. This pre-intervention survey was conducted in a suburban district. All households were approached and women aged 20 to 60 years old were interviewed with pre-tested guided questionnaires. Variables collected included socio-demographic characteristics, knowledge on breast cancer and screening practice of breast cancer. Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed. 41.5% of a total of 381 respondents scored above average; the mean knowledge score on causes and risks factors of breast cancer was 3.41 out of 5 (SD1.609). 58.5% had ever practiced BSE with 32.5% performing it at regular monthly intervals. Uptake of CBE by nurses and by doctors was 40.7% and 37.3%, respectively. Mammogram uptake was 14.6%. Significant predictors of BSE were good knowledge of breast cancer (OR=2.654, 95% CI: 1.033-6.816), being married (OR=2.213, 95% CI: 1.201-4.076) and attending CBE (OR=1.729, 95% CI: 1.122-2.665). Significant predictors for CBE included being married (OR=2.161, 95% CI: 1.174-3.979), good knowledge of breast cancer (OR=2.286, 95% CI: 1.012-5.161), and social support for breast cancer screening (OR=2.312, 95% CI: 1.245-4.293). Women who had CBE were more likely to undergo mammographic screening of the breast (OR=5.744, 95% CI: 2.112-15.623), p<0.005. CBE attendance is a strong factor in promoting BSE and mammography, educating women on the importance of breast cancer screening and on how to conduct BSE. The currently opportunistic conduct of CBE should be extended to active calling of women for CBE.

  6. High-velocity streams in the Milky Way halo with the SDSS and GSC-II kinematic survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spagna A.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We explore the stellar halo of the Milky Way to search for fossil signatures of past mergers, consisting of streams of particles torn from their progenitors during the process of hierarchical merging. We examine a representative sample of about 2 700 halo subdwarfs in the solar neighborhood, selected from a new kinematic survey produced by means of spectrophotometric data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and high-quality proper motions derived from multi-epoch positions using the Guide Star Catalog II. We find statistical evidence for discrete overdensities, likely possible accretion remnants. This methodology and the quality of the selected sample are an efficient means to discover new members of known streams and to identify new streams themselves, and set the basis for future studies.

  7. Galactic bulge population II Cepheids in the VVV survey: period-luminosity relations and a distance to the Galactic centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, A.; Rejkuba, M.; Minniti, D.; Surot, F.; Valenti, E.; Zoccali, M.; Gonzalez, O. A.; Romaniello, M.; Kanbur, S. M.; Singh, H. P.

    2017-09-01

    Context. Multiple stellar populations of different ages and metallicities reside in the Galactic bulge that trace its structure and provide clues to its formation and evolution. Aims: We present the near-infrared observations of population II Cepheids in the Galactic bulge from VISTA Variables in the Vía Láctea (VVV) survey. The JHKs photometry together with optical data from Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE) survey provide an independent estimate of the distance to the Galactic centre. The old, metal-poor and low-mass population II Cepheids are also investigated as useful tracers for the structure of the Galactic bulge. Methods: We identify 340 population II Cepheids in the VVV survey Galactic bulge catalogue based on their match with the OGLE-III Catalogue. The single-epoch JH and multi-epoch Ks observations complement the accurate periods and optical (VI) mean-magnitudes from OGLE. The sample consisting of BL Herculis and W Virginis subtypes is used to derive period-luminosity relations after correcting mean-magnitudes for the extinction. Our Ks-band period-luminosity relation, Ks = -2.189(0.056) [log (P)-1] + 11.187(0.032), is consistent with published work for BL Herculis and W Virginis variables in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Results: We present a combined OGLE-III and VVV catalogue with periods, classification, mean magnitudes, and extinction for 264 Galactic bulge population II Cepheids that have good-quality Ks-band light curves. The absolute magnitudes for population II Cepheids and RR Lyraes calibrated using Gaia and Hubble Space Telescope parallaxes, together with calibrated magnitudes for Large Magellanic Cloud population II Cepheids, are used to obtain a distance to the Galactic centre, R0 = 8.34 ± 0.03(stat.) ± 0.41(syst.), which changes by with different extinction laws. While noting the limitation of small number statistics, we find that the present sample of population II Cepheids in the Galactic bulge shows a nearly spheroidal

  8. A survey on control schemes for distributed solar collector fields. Part II: Advanced control approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camacho, E.F.; Rubio, F.R. [Universidad de Sevilla, Escuela Superior de Ingenieros, Departamento de Ingenieria de Sistemas y Automatica, Camino de Los Descubrimientos s/n, E-41092 Sevilla (Spain); Berenguel, M. [Universidad de Almeria, Departamento de Lenguajes y Computacion, Area de Ingenieria de Sistemas y Automatica, Carretera Sacramento s/n, E-04120 La Canada, Almeria (Spain); Valenzuela, L. [Plataforma Solar de Almeria - CIEMAT, Carretera Senes s/n, P.O. Box 22, E-04200 Tabernas (Almeria) (Spain)

    2007-10-15

    This article presents a survey of the different advanced automatic control techniques that have been applied to control the outlet temperature of solar plants with distributed collectors during the last 25 years. A classification of the modeling and control approaches described in the first part of this survey is used to explain the main features of each strategy. The treated strategies range from classical advanced control strategies to those with few industrial applications. (author)

  9. Report on the Council of Graduate Schools-Graduate Record Examinations Board 1981-82 Survey of Graduate Enrollment, Part II, June 1982.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Virginia B.; Khoury, Bernard V.

    Results of the Council of Graduate Schools-Graduate Record Examinations Board 1981-1982 Survey of Graduate Enrollment, Part II are presented, based on usable responses from 299 institutions. The survey findings provide information about changes in the pattern of graduate school enrollment and allow comparisons between public and private…

  10. Unmet needs in cancer rehabilitation during the early cancer trajectory - a nationwide patient survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veloso, Astrid Gisèle; Sperling, Cecilie; Holm, Lise Vilstrup

    2013-01-01

    A cancer diagnosis may lead to psychosocial problems and physical symptoms that can be relieved during rehabilitation. The aim of this study was to analyse patient-perceived unmet needs of rehabilitation close to time of diagnosis, i.e. frequencies of unmet needs and the association...

  11. Men's values-based factors on prostate cancer risk genetic testing: A telephone survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yuelin

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While a definitive genetic test for Hereditary Prostate Cancer (HPC is not yet available, future HPC risk testing may become available. Past survey data have shown high interest in HPC testing, but without an in-depth analysis of its underlying rationale to those considering it. Methods Telephone computer-assisted interviews of 400 men were conducted in a large metropolitan East-coast city, with subsequent development of psychometric scales and their correlation with intention to receive testing. Results Approximately 82% of men interviewed expressed that they "probably" or "definitely" would get genetic testing for prostate cancer risk if offered now. Factor analysis revealed four distinct, meaningful factors for intention to receive genetic testing for prostate cancer risk. These factors reflected attitudes toward testing and were labeled "motivation to get testing," "consequences and actions after knowing the test result," "psychological distress," and "beliefs of favorable outcomes if tested" (α = 0.89, 0.73, 0.73, and 0.60, respectively. These factors accounted for 70% of the total variability. The domains of motivation (directly, consequences (inversely, distress (inversely, and positive expectations (directly all correlated with intention to receive genetic testing (p Conclusions Men have strong attitudes favoring genetic testing for prostate cancer risk. The factors most associated with testing intention include those noted in past cancer genetics studies, and also highlights the relevance in considering one's motivation and perception of positive outcomes in genetic decision-making.

  12. Breast cancer awareness and breast self-examination in Northern Saudi Arabia. A preliminary survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Deema M; Alorf, Sana H; Al-Sogaih, Yasmeen S; Alorf, Sheikha H; Alaskar, Reem S; Al-Mahana, Ashgan M; Alsalhowb, Waad F; Alibrahim, Anfal K; Saka, Mohamad Y; Alhazimi, Awdah M; Baghirova, Arzu; Hindawi, Salwa I

    2013-07-01

    To elicit knowledge of breast cancer, perception of occurrence, and behavior in relation to breast self-examination (BSE). A cross-sectional survey was carried out at the Department of Pathology, Medical College, University of Hail, Hail, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia for local occupants from Hail city and its rural neighborhood between September 2010 and February 2012. A personal interview-administered descriptive questionnaire and both descriptive and inferential statistics were used. A total of 1000 participants agreed to be involved, out of which 87.7% were females, 7.2% were males and 5.1% had undisclosed gender. The age range for participants was 12-66 years. Out of all participants, 44% did not know that breast cancer is an abnormal growth and 78% failed to recognise its multi-factorial nature, with Increased age being the least recognised single risk factor 4.8%. Scores showed that 61.5% had a low level of breast cancer related knowledge. Out of the participants who knew of someone who had breast cancer 73%, 50.1% said the disease was discovered at a Late stage mainly by Chance. Data for BSE indicated that 50.1% of female participants >16 years old did not practice BSE, and Fear was the main declared perceived reason. This study demonstrates a low level of fundamental knowledge of breast cancer and fear to practice BSE.

  13. Patterns of Cancer Genetic Testing: A Randomized Survey of Oregon Clinicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Summer L. Cox

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Appropriate use of genetic tests for population-based cancer screening, diagnosis of inherited cancers, and guidance of cancer treatment can improve health outcomes. We investigated clinicians’ use and knowledge of eight breast, ovarian, and colorectal cancer genetic tests. Methods. We conducted a randomized survey of 2,191 Oregon providers, asking about their experience with fecal DNA, OncoVue, BRCA, MMR, CYP2D6, tumor gene expression profiling, UGT1A1, and KRAS. Results. Clinicians reported low confidence in their knowledge of medical genetics; most confident were OB-GYNs and specialists. Clinicians were more likely to have ordered/recommended BRCA and MMR than the other tests, and OB-GYNs were twice as likely to have ordered/recommended BRCA testing than primary care providers. Less than 10% of providers ordered/recommended OncoVue, fecal DNA, CYP2D6, or UGT1A1; less than 30% ordered/recommended tumor gene expression profiles or KRAS. The most common reason for not ordering/recommending these tests was lack of familiarity. Conclusions. Use of appropriate, evidence-based testing can help reduce incidence and mortality of certain cancers, but these tests need to be better integrated into clinical practice. Continued evaluation of emerging technologies, dissemination of findings, and an increase in provider confidence and knowledge are necessary to achieve this end.

  14. The WIRED Survey II: Infrared Excesses in the SDSS DR7 White Dwarf Catalog

    CERN Document Server

    Debes, J H; Wachter, S; Leisawitz, D T; Cohen, M

    2011-01-01

    With the launch of the {\\em Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer} ({\\em WISE}), a new era of detecting planetary debris and brown dwarfs around white dwarfs (WDs) has begun with the {\\em WISE} InfraRed Excesses around Degenerates (WIRED) Survey. The WIRED Survey is sensitive to substellar objects and dusty debris around WDs out to distances exceeding 100 pc, well beyond the completeness level of local WDs. In this paper, we present a cross-correlation of the preliminary Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 (DR7) WD Catalog between the {\\em WISE}, Two-Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS), UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS), and SDSS DR7 photometric catalogs. From $\\sim18,000$ input targets, there are {\\em WISE} detections comprising 344 "naked" WDs (detection of the WD photosphere only), 1020 candidate WD+M dwarf binaries, 42 candidate WD+brown dwarf (BD) systems, 52 candidate WD+dust disk systems, and 69 targets with indeterminate infrared excess. We classified all of the detected targets through spect...

  15. Preoperative Serum Interleukin-6 Is a Potential Prognostic Factor for Colorectal Cancer, including Stage II Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuyoshi Shiga

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To evaluate the prognostic significance of serum interleukin-6 (IL-6 in colorectal cancer (CRC. Patients and Methods. Preoperative serum IL-6 was measured in 233 CRC patients and 13 healthy controls. Relationships between IL-6 and various clinicopathological factors were evaluated, and the overall survival (OS and disease-free survival (DFS rates according to IL-6 status were calculated for all patients and according to disease stage. Results. The mean IL-6 level was 6.6 pg/mL in CRC patients and 2.6 pg/mL in healthy controls. Using a cutoff of 6.3 pg/mL, obtained using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, 57 patients had a high IL-6 level. The mean value was higher for stage II disease than for stage III disease. IL-6 status correlated with C-reactive protein (CRP and carcinoembryonic antigen levels, obstruction, and pT4 disease. The OS differed according to the IL-6 status for all patients, whereas the DFS differed for all patients and for those with stage II disease. The Cox proportional hazards model showed that pT4 disease was an independent risk factor for recurrence in all CRC patients; IL-6, CRP, and pT4 were significant risk factors in stage II patients. Conclusions. The preoperative IL-6 level influences the risk of CRC recurrence.

  16. Environmental monitoring survey of oil and gas fields in Region II in 2009. Summary report; Miljoeovervaaking av olje- og gassfelt i Region II i 2009. Sammendragsrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-03-15

    The oil companies Statoil ASA, ExxonMobil Exploration and Production Norway AS, Total E&P Norge AS, Talisman Energy Norge AS and Marathon Petroleum Norge AS commissioned Section of Applied Environmental Research at UNI RESEARCH AS to undertake the monitoring survey of Region II in 2009. Similar monitoring surveys in Region II have been carried out in 1996, 2000, 2003 and 2006. The survey in 2009 included in total 18 fields: Rev, Varg, Sigyn, Sleipner Vest, Sleipner Oest, Sleipner Alfa Nord, Glitne, Grane, Balder, Ringhorne, Jotun, Vale, Skirne, Byggve, Heimdal, Volve, Vilje og Alvheim. Sampling was conducted from the vessel MV Libas between May 18 and May 27. Samples were collected from in totally 137 sampling sites, of which 15 were regional sampling sites. Samples for chemical analysis were collected at all sites, whereas samples for benthos analysis were collected at 12 fields. As in previous surveys, Region II is divided into natural sub-regions. One sub-region is shallow (77-96 m) sub-region, a central sub-region (107-130 m) and a northern subregion (115-119 m). The sediments of the shallow sub-region had relatively lower content of TOM and pelite and higher content of fine sand than the central and northern sub-regions. Calculated areas of contamination are shown for the sub-regions in Table 1.1. The fields Sigyn, Sleipner Alfa Nord, Glitne, Grane, Balder, Ringhorne, Jotun, Skirne, Byggve, Vilje og Alvheim showed no contamination of THC. At the other fields there were minor changes from 2006. The concentrations of barium increased in the central sub-region from 2006 to 2009, also at fields where no drilling had been undertaken during the last years. The same laboratory and methods are used during the three last regional investigations. The changes in barium concentrations may be due to high variability of barium concentrations in the sediments. This is supported by relatively large variations in average barium concentrations at the regional sampling sites in

  17. Environmental monitoring survey of oil and gas fields in Region II in 2009. Summary report; Miljoeovervaaking av olje- og gassfelt i Region II i 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-03-15

    The oil companies Statoil ASA, ExxonMobil Exploration and Production Norway AS, Total E&P Norge AS, Talisman Energy Norge AS and Marathon Petroleum Norge AS commissioned Section of Applied Environmental Research at UNI RESEARCH AS to undertake the monitoring survey of Region II in 2009. Similar monitoring surveys in Region II have been carried out in 1996, 2000, 2003 and 2006. The survey in 2009 included in total 18 fields: Rev, Varg, Sigyn, Sleipner Vest, Sleipner OEst, Sleipner Alfa Nord, Glitne, Grane, Balder, Ringhorne, Jotun, Vale, Skirne, Byggve, Heimdal, Volve, Vilje og Alvheim. Sampling was conducted from the vessel MV Libas between May 18 and May 27. Samples were collected from in totally 137 sampling sites, of which 15 were regional sampling sites. Samples for chemical analysis were collected at all sites, whereas samples for benthos analysis were collected at 12 fields. As in previous surveys, Region II is divided into natural sub-regions. One sub-region is shallow (77-96 m) sub-region, a central sub-region (107-130 m) and a northern subregion (115-119 m). The sediments of the shallow sub-region had relatively lower content of TOM and pelite and higher content of fine sand than the central and northern sub-regions. Calculated areas of contamination are shown for the sub-regions in Table 1.1. The fields Sigyn, Sleipner Alfa Nord, Glitne, Grane, Balder, Ringhorne, Jotun, Skirne, Byggve, Vilje og Alvheim showed no contamination of THC. At the other fields there were minor changes from 2006. The concentrations of barium increased in the central sub-region from 2006 to 2009, also at fields where no drilling had been undertaken during the last years. The same laboratory and methods are used during the three last regional investigations. The changes in barium concentrations may be due to high variability of barium concentrations in the sediments. This is supported by relatively large variations in average barium concentrations at the regional sampling sites in

  18. A phase II trial of a biweekly combination of paclitaxel and gemcitabine in metastatic breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spinelli Gian

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many emerging new drugs have recently been trialled for treatment of early and advanced breast cancer. Among these new agents paclitaxel and gemcitabine play a crucial role, mostly in patients with relapsed and metastatic disease after failure of chemotherapy with antracyclines. Methods A phase II study was started in order to evaluate the activity and toxicity of a combination of paclitaxel and gemcitabine in a biweekly schedule on metastatic breast cancer patients previously treated with antracyclines. Results Twenty-five patients received paclitaxel (150 mg/mq by 3-hours infusion, followed by gemcitabine (2000 mg/mq given as a 60 min i.v. infusion (day 1–14 for a maximum of eight cycles. In all patients treatment was evaluated for toxicity and efficacy; four patients (16% achieved a complete response, 12 (48% a partial response giving an overall objective response rate of 64%. Stable disease was documented in 5 patients (20% and progressive disease occurred in 4 patients (16%. Conclusion The schedule of treatment was safe and tolerable from a haematological and non-haematological point of view. These data confirm that the combination of gemcitabine and paclitaxel on a biweekly basis is an effective and well-tolerated regimen in breast cancer patients with prior therapeutic exposure to antracyclines.

  19. A phase II trial of a biweekly combination of paclitaxel and gemcitabine in metastatic breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomao, Silverio; Romiti, Adriana; Tomao, Federica; Di Seri, Marisa; Caprio, Giuliana; Spinelli, Gian Paolo; Terzoli, Edmondo; Frati, Luigi

    2006-01-01

    Background Many emerging new drugs have recently been trialled for treatment of early and advanced breast cancer. Among these new agents paclitaxel and gemcitabine play a crucial role, mostly in patients with relapsed and metastatic disease after failure of chemotherapy with antracyclines. Methods A phase II study was started in order to evaluate the activity and toxicity of a combination of paclitaxel and gemcitabine in a biweekly schedule on metastatic breast cancer patients previously treated with antracyclines. Results Twenty-five patients received paclitaxel (150 mg/mq) by 3-hours infusion, followed by gemcitabine (2000 mg/mq) given as a 60 min i.v. infusion (day 1–14) for a maximum of eight cycles. In all patients treatment was evaluated for toxicity and efficacy; four patients (16%) achieved a complete response, 12 (48%) a partial response giving an overall objective response rate of 64%. Stable disease was documented in 5 patients (20%) and progressive disease occurred in 4 patients (16%). Conclusion The schedule of treatment was safe and tolerable from a haematological and non-haematological point of view. These data confirm that the combination of gemcitabine and paclitaxel on a biweekly basis is an effective and well-tolerated regimen in breast cancer patients with prior therapeutic exposure to antracyclines. PMID:16723016

  20. Phase II study of mifepristone (RU486) in refractory ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocereto, T F; Saul, H M; Aikins, J A; Paulson, J

    2000-06-01

    A phase II study of Mifepristone (RU486) was conducted in patients with ovarian cancer whose tumors were resistant to cisplatin and paclitaxel, alone or in combination. Forty-four patients were accrued into this study. All had ovarian cancer that had become resistant to cisplatin and paclitaxel. Patients received Mifepristone 200 mg orally on a daily basis. Patients were followed by tumor size or CA-125 levels when there was no measurable disease. A dose reduction of Mifepristone was to occur in the event of grade 3/4 hematologic, GI, or liver toxicity, creatinine >2.5%, and grade 4 peripheral neuropathy. Thirty-four patients were evaluable for response. Nine (26.5%) of these patients had a response to Mifepristone. Three(9%) patients had a complete response, and six (17.5%), a partial response. The response of one patient in each group was measured by CA-125 levels while the remainder had measurable disease. The response lasted 1 to 4 months in all but one patient. One patient continues to respond after more than 3 years. The major toxic effect was a rash and this was the major reason patients were removed from the study. Mifepristone has activity against ovarian cancer resistant to cisplatin and paclitaxel. The drug is well tolerated. Further studies need to be performed when this drug becomes more widely available in the United States. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  1. Phase II Evaluation of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Guided Focal Laser Ablation of Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggener, Scott E; Yousuf, Ambereen; Watson, Sydeaka; Wang, Shiyang; Oto, Aytekin

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging guided focal laser ablation is an investigational strategy for the treatment of prostate cancer. This phase II evaluation of focal laser ablation included men with stage T1c-T2a, prostate specific antigen less than 15 ng/ml or prostate specific antigen density less than 0.15 ng/ml(3), Gleason 7 or less in 25% or less of biopsies and magnetic resonance imaging with 1 or 2 lesions concordant with biopsy detected cancer. At 3 months all patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging with biopsy of ablation zone(s). At 12 months all underwent magnetic resonance imaging and systematic biopsy. I-PSS (International Prostate Symptom Score) and SHIM (Sexual Health Inventory for Men) scores were collected before focal laser ablation, and at 1, 3 and 12 months. The primary end point was no cancer on the 3-month ablation zone biopsy. Secondary end points were safety, 12-month biopsy, and urinary and sexual function. In the 27 men median age was 62 years and mean prostate specific antigen was 4.4 ng/ml. Biopsy Gleason score was 6 in 23 patients (85%) and Gleason 7 in 4 (15%). Seven men (26%) had low volume Gleason 6 disease outside the intended ablation zone(s). At 3 months 26 patients (96%) had no evidence of cancer on magnetic resonance imaging guided biopsy of the ablation zone. No significant I-PSS changes were observed (each p >0.05). SHIM was lower at 1 month (p = 0.03), marginally lower at 3 months (p = 0.05) and without a significant difference at 12 months (p = 0.38). At 12-month biopsy cancer was identified in 10 patients (37%), including in the ablation zone(s) in 3 (11%) and outside the ablation zone(s) in 8 (30%) with cancer in and outside the ablation zone in 1. In select men with localized prostate cancer and visible magnetic resonance imaging lesions focal laser ablation has an acceptable morbidity profile and is associated with encouraging short-term oncologic outcomes. Significantly longer followup is mandatory to fully assess this

  2. Epidemiologic survey on lung cancer with respect to cigarette smoking and plant diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, R

    1989-06-01

    This case-control study of lung cancer was based on a cross-sectional questionnaire survey of inpatients at 5 general hospitals in Okinawa, Japan, from 1982 to 1987. The purpose of the study was to clarify the relations of lung cancer to cigarette smoking and plant diet. Ingestion frequencies of 17 major dietary plants and/or herbs were obtained by means of a questionnaire interview. As eligible subjects for a case-control analysis, there were 673 respondents aged over 30 years with clear smoking history, age, sex and diagnosis. Psychiatric patients were excluded. Odds ratios of newly diagnosed lung cancer were calculated by the Mantel-Haenszel procedure. A pair consisted of a case and two controls which were selected randomly by using multivariate caliper matching. Sixty-four pairs matched for age (+/- 5) and sex showed a significantly high odds ratio of 2.9 (P less than 0.0005). However, three male groups who were categorized by the number of cigarettes smoked did not exhibit dose-dependency of lung cancer on smoking. Lung cancer was more prevalent in ex-smokers than in current smokers. Case-control analyses by male generations revealed that lung cancer incidence was age-dependent, and there was a clear dose-response relationship between smoking and lung cancer in males in their sixties. A case-control analysis of each of 17 edible plants based on 44 pairs who were matched for age (+/- 5), sex and smoking history demonstrated that the odds ratio of aloe (Aloe arborescens Mill var. natalensis Berger) was 0.5 (P less than 0.1), suggesting that the aloe may prevent human carcinogenesis at various sites.

  3. A Copernicus survey of Mg II emission in late-type stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiler, E. J.; Oegerle, W. R.

    1979-01-01

    The behavior of Mg II emission in late-type stars is examined using scan data obtained with the Copernicus satellite. The luminosity in the Mg II k emission line was found to be closely related to stellar absolute magnitude, leading to the suggestion that such correlation may be very useful for future UV observations. The stellar surface flux in the k line was observed to be roughly constant or to decrease slowly with later spectral type, a finding which is then used to show that the pressure at the top of the chromosphere decreases with later spectral type, in agreement with the conclusions by McClintock et al. (1975). An asymmetry in the Mg II k line was noticed to be present in the available data for the stars later than K2-K5.

  4. 76 FR 58520 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Cancer Risk in U.S. Radiologic Technologists: Fourth Survey...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-21

    .... Radiologic Technologists: Fourth Survey (NCI) SUMMARY: In compliance with the requirement of Section 3506(c... review and approval. Proposed Collection: Title: Cancer Risk in U.S. Radiologic Technologists: Fourth... a fourth cohort follow-up survey in an ongoing cohort study of U.S. Radiologic Technologists...

  5. The assessment and management of older cancer patients : A SIOG surgical task force survey on surgeons' attitudes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghignone, F; van Leeuwen, B. L.; Montroni, I; Huisman, M G; Somasundar, P; Cheung, K L; Audisio, R A; Ugolini, G

    Aim: The Surgical Task Force at SIOG (International Society of Geriatric Oncology) designed this survey to explore the surgical oncologists' approach toward elderly cancer patients. Methods: A web-based survey was sent to all members of ESSO (European Society of Surgical Oncology) and SSO (Society

  6. First-Year Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Results: Constraints on Non-Standard Cosmological Models

    CERN Document Server

    Sollerman, J; Davis, T M; Blomqvis, M; Bassett, B; Becker, A C; Cinabro, D; Filippenko, A V; Foley, R J; Frieman, J; Garnavich, P; Lampeitl, H; Marriner, J; Miquel, R; Nichol, R C; Richmond, M W; Sako, M; Schneider, D P; Smith, M; Vanderplas, J T; Wheeler, J C

    2009-01-01

    We use the new SNe Ia discovered by the SDSS-II Supernova Survey together with additional supernova datasets as well as observations of the cosmic microwave background and baryon acoustic oscillations to constrain cosmological models. This complements the analysis presented by Kessler et al. in that we discuss and rank a number of the most popular non-standard cosmology scenarios. When this combined data-set is analyzed using the MLCS2k2 light-curve fitter, we find that more exotic models for cosmic acceleration provide a better fit to the data than the Lambda-CDM model. For example, the flat DGP model is ranked higher by our information criteria tests than the standard model. When the dataset is instead analyzed using the SALT-II light-curve fitter, the standard cosmological constant model fares best. Our investigation also includes inhomogeneous Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi (LTB) models. While our LTB models can be made to fit the supernova data as well as any other model, the extra parameters they require are not...

  7. Macrophage markers in serum and tumor have prognostic impact in American Joint Committee on Cancer stage I/II melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, T.O.; Schmidt, H.; Moller, H.J.;

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the prognostic role of soluble CD163 (sCD163) in serum and macrophage infiltration in primary melanomas from patients with American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage I/II melanoma. The scavenger receptor CD163 is associated with anti-inflammatory macrophages, and it is s......PURPOSE: To evaluate the prognostic role of soluble CD163 (sCD163) in serum and macrophage infiltration in primary melanomas from patients with American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage I/II melanoma. The scavenger receptor CD163 is associated with anti-inflammatory macrophages...

  8. Biological evaluation of a novel Herceptin-platinum (II) conjugate for efficient and cancer cell specific delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rong; Sun, Yu; Zhang, Xiang-yang; Sun, Bai-wang; Wang, Qiu-cui; Zhu, Jin

    2015-07-01

    Platinum-based drugs have been widely used for the treatment of malignant tumors. However, their applications are limited by severe side effects for their lack of selectivity for cancer cells. The development of antibody drug conjugates (ADCs) have provided a platform to reduce drug toxicity and improve drug efficacy. Here we describe a nover conjugate comprising of Herceptin (an anti-HER2 antibody) and platinum drug via a cathepsin B cleavable dipetide for enhancing drug accumulation and HER2-positive cancer cell specific delivery. This conjugate is believed to be cleaved by cathepsin B, leading to a 1,6-elimination reaction and activation of drug release. Herceptin-Pt(II) is evaluated to have approximately loaded with 6.4 moles platinum drugs per mole of antibody. We demonstrate that Herceptin-Pt(II) retain high and selective binding affinity for HER2 protein and HER2-positive SK-BR-3 cancer cells. The in vitro cytotoxicity tests indicate that Herceptin-Pt(II) exhibits much higher cytotoxicity than oxaliplatin against SK-BR-3 cells. More importantly, Herceptin-Pt(II) shows no obvious inhibition against the growth of both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells, which express lower levels of HER2. Furthermore, compared with free oxaliplatin, Herceptin significantly improved the cellular uptake of platinum drugs in SK-BR-3 cells. In summary, Herceptin-platinum (II) conjugate is a remarkable and potent platform for efficient and cancer cell specific delivery.

  9. Serologic survey for Coxiella burnetii phase II antibodies among slaughterhouse workers in Kerman, southeast of Iran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammad Khalili; Morteza Mosavi; Hamzeh Ghobadian Diali; Hossein Norouzian Mirza

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the presence of antibodies against phase II among slaughterhouse workers in Kerman, southeast of Iran.Methods:sorbent assay using phase II Coxiella burnetii as the antigen [kit (Virion\\Serion, Wurzburg, Germany) according to the manufacturer’s protocol].Results:The antibody titers of the serum samples were measured by enzyme-linked immuno Conclusions: Our findings suggest that slaughterhouse workers in Kerman area have a higher risk of infection and should consider potential infection with Coxiella burnetii. The positive rate of IgG antibody was 68% in the slaughterhouse workers.

  10. Adjuvant 5FU plus levamisole in colonic or rectal cancer: improved survival in stage II and III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taal, B G; Van Tinteren, H; Zoetmulder, F A

    2001-11-16

    Based on the first favourable results of adjuvant therapy of 5FU plus levamisole in Dukes C colonic cancer in 1990, we conducted a prospective trial. 1029 patients were randomised to receive one year 5FU plus levamisole or no further treatment following curative surgery for stage II or III colon (n = 730) or rectal cancer (n = 299). 45% were in stage II and 55% in stage III. With a median follow-up of 4 years and 9 months a significant reduction in odds of death (25%, SD 9%, P = 0.007) was observed for those with adjuvant treatment (65% at 5 year) compared to the observation group (55%). Improved relative survival was present in stage III (56% vs 44%), and in stage II patients (78% vs 70%). In rectal cancer a non-significant difference in disease-free or overall survival was observed. Distant metastases developed in 76%, while local recurrence alone occurred in 14%. An early start of adjuvant treatment (5FU plus levamisole was 69%. Severe toxicity did not occur. In conclusion, one year 5FU plus levamisole was of benefit in stage II and III colonic cancer; in rectal cancer a significant positive effect could not be demonstrated.

  11. [Male breast cancer: prognostic factors, diagnosis and treatment: a multi-institutional survey of 95 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oger, A-S; Boukerrou, M; Cutuli, B; Campion, L; Rousseau, E; Bussières, E; Raro, P; Classe, J-M

    2015-04-01

    The optimal treatment for male breast cancer is not known because male breast cancer is a rare disease. It represents as little as 0.6% of all breast cancers and less than 1% of human cancers. The aim was to analyze the clinical, histological and therapeutic characteristics of 95 men cared for breast cancer between 2000 and 2010 in four hospitals, and determine predictors of poor prognosis to improve care of male breast cancer. This study is a multi-institutional survey, retrospective, involving four French institutions: Cancer Institute of the West (ICO), Reunion Island South hospital group, the hospital group of Dax, and the Bergonié Institute. All carcinomas in situ or invasive breast occurred in male patients were included. An analysis of clinical, histological and therapeutic features was performed. Statistical analysis of our study focused on the overall survival of patients and specific method of Kaplan-Meier, enabling search for predictors of poor prognosis. The mean age was 65 years. Thirty-seven percent of patients were overweight or obese. It was in 88% of cases of palpable tumor whose average size was 26.29mm. Ninety patients, none had a lesion palpable T0, 44% T1 tumors, 38% T2 tumors, 3% had a T3 tumors, and finally 10% T4 tumors. The histological type was the most common invasive ductal carcinoma (87%). He found a similar proportion of patients with or without lymph node involvement. N+ patients, capsular rupture was observed in 29% of cases. Receptor positivity was found, estrogen in 95% of cases and progesterone in 83% of cases. Additional irradiation was performed in 75% of patients and chemotherapy in 37% of patients. Overall survival was 79.2% at five years and 70.8% at ten years. Age, tumor size and histological capsular rupture are factors that significantly influence the overall survival and specific. Male breast cancer is a different pathology of breast cancer in women. The majority of recommendations suggest treating men who are diagnosed

  12. No association of plasma levels of adiponectin and c-peptide with risk of aggressive prostate cancer in the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Victoria L; Jacobs, Eric J; Sun, Juzhong; Gapstur, Susan M

    2014-05-01

    Obesity is associated with a higher risk of aggressive prostate cancer and alters circulating levels of insulin and adiponectin, two hormones that influence biologic processes implicated in carcinogenesis. Results of some studies showed associations of circulating levels of adiponectin, insulin, and c-peptide (a marker of insulin secretion) with aggressive prostate cancer, but the size of these studies was limited. A nested case-control study of 272 aggressive prostate cancer cases [Gleason score ≥ 7 (4+3) or T3-T4] and 272 age- and race-matched controls from the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort was conducted to determine the associations of prediagnostic plasma levels of c-peptide and adiponectin with risk of aggressive prostate cancer. Neither circulating adiponectin nor c-peptide was associated with risk of aggressive prostate cancer. In analyses of the highest-risk aggressive prostate cancer (Gleason score ≥ 8 or T3-T4), the highest quartile of c-peptide, compared with the lowest, was associated with an OR of 1.41 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.72-2.78]. Our findings provide no support for the hypothesis that adiponectin is associated with risk of aggressive prostate cancer but a possible association of high levels of c-peptide with particularly high-risk prostate cancer cannot be ruled out. These results indicate that changes in circulating levels of adiponectin and c-peptide do not play an important role in risk of aggressive prostate cancer. ©2014 AACR.

  13. The PRIsm MUlti-object Survey (PRIMUS). II. Data Reduction and Redshift Fitting

    CERN Document Server

    Cool, Richard J; Blanton, Michael R; Burles, Scott M; Coil, Alison L; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Wong, Kenneth C; Zhu, Guangtun; Aird, James; Bernstein, Rebecca A; Bolton, Adam S; Hogg, David W; Mendez, Alexander J

    2013-01-01

    The PRIsm MUti-object Survey (PRIMUS) is a spectroscopic galaxy redshift survey to z~1 completed with a low-dispersion prism and slitmasks allowing for simultaneous observations of ~2,500 objects over 0.18 square degrees. The final PRIMUS catalog includes ~130,000 robust redshifts over 9.1 sq. deg. In this paper, we summarize the PRIMUS observational strategy and present the data reduction details used to measure redshifts, redshift precision, and survey completeness. The survey motivation, observational techniques, fields, target selection, slitmask design, and observations are presented in Coil et al 2010. Comparisons to existing higher-resolution spectroscopic measurements show a typical precision of sigma_z/(1+z)=0.005. PRIMUS, both in area and number of redshifts, is the largest faint galaxy redshift survey completed to date and is allowing for precise measurements of the relationship between AGNs and their hosts, the effects of environment on galaxy evolution, and the build up of galactic systems over t...

  14. Study of the Sextans dwarf spheroidal galaxy from the DART Ca II triplet survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Battaglia, G.; Tolstoy, E.; Helmi, A.; Irwin, M.; Parisi, P.; Hill, V.; Jablonka, P.

    2011-01-01

    We use Very Large Telescope (VLT)/Fibre Large Array Multi Element Spectrograph (FLAMES) intermediate-resolution (R˜ 6500) spectra of individual red giant branch stars in the near-infrared Ca II triplet (CaT) region to investigate the wide-area metallicity properties and internal kinematics of the Se

  15. CaII Absorbers in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: Element Abundances and Dust

    CERN Document Server

    Sardane, Gendith M; Rao, Sandhya M

    2015-01-01

    We present measurements of element abundance ratios and dust in CaII~absorbers identified in SDSS DR7+DR9. In an earlier paper we formed a statistical sample of 435 CaII absorbers and postulated that their statistical properties might be representative of at least two populations of absorbers. Here we show that if the absorbers are roughly divided into two subsamples with CaII rest equivalent widths larger and smaller than $W_0^{\\lambda 3934} = 0.7$ \\AA, they are then representative of two physically different populations. Comparisons of abundance ratios between the two CaII absorber populations indicate that the weaker $W_0^{\\lambda 3934}$ absorbers have properties consistent with halo-type gas, while the stronger absorbers have properties intermediate between halo- and disk-type gas. We also show that, on average, the dust extinction properties of the overall sample is consistent with a LMC or SMC dust law, and the stronger absorbers are nearly 6 times more reddened than their weaker counterparts. The absor...

  16. Study of the Sextans dwarf spheroidal galaxy from the DART CaII triplet survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Battaglia, G.; Tolstoy, E.; Helmi, A.; Irwin, M.; Parisi, P.; Hill, V.; Jablonka, P.

    2011-01-01

    We use Very Large Telescope (VLT)/Fibre Large Array Multi Element Spectrograph (FLAMES) intermediate-resolution (R similar to 6500) spectra of individual red giant branch stars in the near-infrared Ca ii triplet (CaT) region to investigate the wide-area metallicity properties and internal kinematics

  17. Survey of Differentially Methylated Promoters in Prostate Cancer Cell Lines1*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yipeng; Yu, Qiuju; Cho, Ann H; Rondeau, Gaelle; Welsh, John; Adamson, Eileen; Mercola, Dan; McClelland, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Abstract DNA methylation and copy number in the genomes of three immortalized prostate epithelial and five cancer cell lines (LNCaP, PC3, PC3M, PC3M-Pro4, and PC3M-LN4) were compared using a microarray-based technique. Genomic DNA is cut with a methylation-sensitive enzyme HpaII, followed by linker ligation, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification, labeling, and hybridization to an array of promoter sequences. Only those parts of the genomic DNA that have unmethylated restriction sites within a few hundred base pairs generate PCR products detectable on an array. Of 2732 promoter sequences on a test array, 504 (18.5%) showed differential hybridization between immortalized prostate epithelial and cancer cell lines. Among candidate hypermethylated genes in cancer-derived lines, there were eight (CD44, CDKN1A, ESR1, PLAU, RARB, SFN, TNFRSF6, and TSPY) previously observed in prostate cancer and 13 previously known methylation targets in other cancers (ARHI, bcl-2, BRCA1, CDKN2C, GADD45A, MTAP, PGR, SLC26A4, SPARC, SYK, TJP2, UCHL1, and WIT-1). The majority of genes that appear to be both differentially methylated and differentially regulated between prostate epithelial and cancer cell lines are novel methylation targets, including PAK6, RAD50, TLX3, PIR51, MAP2K5, INSR, FBN1, and GG2-1, representing a rich new source of candidate genes used to study the role of DNA methylation in prostate tumors. PMID:16207477

  18. Validated Competing Event Model for the Stage I-II Endometrial Cancer Population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmona, Ruben; Gulaya, Sachin; Murphy, James D. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Rose, Brent S. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Wu, John; Noticewala, Sonal [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); McHale, Michael T. [Department of Reproductive Medicine, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Yashar, Catheryn M. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Vaida, Florin [Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, University of California San Diego Medical Center, San Diego, California (United States); Mell, Loren K., E-mail: lmell@ucsd.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose/Objectives(s): Early-stage endometrial cancer patients are at higher risk of noncancer mortality than of cancer mortality. Competing event models incorporating comorbidity could help identify women most likely to benefit from treatment intensification. Methods and Materials: 67,397 women with stage I-II endometrioid adenocarcinoma after total hysterectomy diagnosed from 1988 to 2009 were identified in Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) and linked SEER-Medicare databases. Using demographic and clinical information, including comorbidity, we sought to develop and validate a risk score to predict the incidence of competing mortality. Results: In the validation cohort, increasing competing mortality risk score was associated with increased risk of noncancer mortality (subdistribution hazard ratio [SDHR], 1.92; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.60-2.30) and decreased risk of endometrial cancer mortality (SDHR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.55-0.78). Controlling for other variables, Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) = 1 (SDHR, 1.62; 95% CI, 1.45-1.82) and CCI >1 (SDHR, 3.31; 95% CI, 2.74-4.01) were associated with increased risk of noncancer mortality. The 10-year cumulative incidences of competing mortality within low-, medium-, and high-risk strata were 27.3% (95% CI, 25.2%-29.4%), 34.6% (95% CI, 32.5%-36.7%), and 50.3% (95% CI, 48.2%-52.6%), respectively. With increasing competing mortality risk score, we observed a significant decline in omega (ω), indicating a diminishing likelihood of benefit from treatment intensification. Conclusion: Comorbidity and other factors influence the risk of competing mortality among patients with early-stage endometrial cancer. Competing event models could improve our ability to identify patients likely to benefit from treatment intensification.

  19. THE WIRED SURVEY. II. INFRARED EXCESSES IN THE SDSS DR7 WHITE DWARF CATALOG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debes, John H.; Leisawitz, David T. [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Hoard, D. W. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Wachter, Stefanie [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Cohen, Martin [Monterey Institute for Research in Astronomy, Marina, CA 93933 (United States)

    2011-12-01

    With the launch of the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), a new era of detecting planetary debris and brown dwarfs (BDs) around white dwarfs (WDs) has begun with the WISE InfraRed Excesses around Degenerates (WIRED) Survey. The WIRED Survey is sensitive to substellar objects and dusty debris around WDs out to distances exceeding 100 pc, well beyond the completeness level of local WDs. In this paper, we present a cross-correlation of the preliminary Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 (DR7) WD catalog between the WISE, Two-Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS), UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS), and SDSS DR7 photometric catalogs. From {approx}18,000 input targets, there are WISE detections comprising 344 'naked' WDs (detection of the WD photosphere only), 1020 candidate WD+M dwarf binaries, 42 candidate WD+BD systems, 52 candidate WD+dust disk systems, and 69 targets with indeterminate infrared excess. We classified all of the detected targets through spectral energy distribution model fitting of the merged optical, near-IR, and WISE photometry. Some of these detections could be the result of contaminating sources within the large ( Almost-Equal-To 6'') WISE point-spread function; we make a preliminary estimate for the rates of contamination for our WD+BD and WD+disk candidates and provide notes for each target of interest. Each candidate presented here should be confirmed with higher angular resolution infrared imaging or infrared spectroscopy. We also present an overview of the observational characteristics of the detected WDs in the WISE photometric bands, including the relative frequencies of candidate WD+M, WD+BD, and WD+disk systems.

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Spitzer/IRS survey of Class II objects in Orion A. I. (Kim+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K. H.; Watson, D. M.; Manoj, P.; Forrest, W. J.; Furlan, E.; Najita, J.; Sargent, B.; Hernandez, J.; Calvet, N.; Adame, L.; Espaillat, C.; Megeath, S. T.; Muzerolle, J.; McClure, M. K.

    2016-10-01

    We present 319 Class II disks observed with Spitzer/IRS in the Orion A star-forming region. We described the Spitzer/IRS and IRTF/SpeX observations and data reduction process in Kim+ (2013, J/ApJ/769/149). The Orion A objects in this paper were selected based on the identification of young stars with disks by IRAC/Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) color-color diagrams (Megeath+ 2012, J/AJ/144/192). We observed them using Spitzer/IRS during campaigns 36, 39, 40, and 44 between 2006 November and 2007 October. To this group we added 16 additional objects (5 in the ONC; 11 in L1641) that were reclassified as Class II from Class 0/I sources observed in the Orion A protostar survey by C. Poteet et al. (2016, in preparation); 14 of these 16 were observed during campaigns 39 and 40, but 2 sources were observed in campaign 56 (see table 1). Of our IRS targets observed in both SL and LL modules in Orion A with Spitzer/IRS, we observed 120 at near-IR (0.8-2.4um) wavelengths with the medium-resolution spectrograph SpeX, on the NASA IRTF on Mauna Kea during the 2010A, 2011A, and 2011B semesters (see table 3). (9 data files).

  1. A Measurement of the Rate of Type Ia Supernovae in Galaxy Clusters from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Dilday, Benjamin; Becker, Andrew; Bender, Ralf; Castander, Francisco; Cinabro, David; Frieman, Joshua A; Galbany, Lluís; Garnavich, Peter; Goobar, Ariel; Hopp, Ulrich; Ihara, Yutaka; Jha, Saurabh W; Kessler, Richard; Lampeitl, Hubert; Marriner, John; Miquel, Ramon; Mollá, Mercedes; Nichol, Robert C; Nordin, Jakob; Riess, Adam G; Sako, Masao; Schneider, Donald P; Smith, Mathew; Sollerman, Jesper; Wheeler, J Craig; Östman, Linda; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Oravetz, Dan; Pan, Kaike; Simmons, Audrey; Snedden, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    ABRIDGED We present measurements of the Type Ia supernova (SN) rate in galaxy clusters based on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey. The cluster SN Ia rate is determined from 9 SN events in a set of 71 C4 clusters at z <0.17 and 27 SN events in 492 maxBCG clusters at 0.1 < z < 0.3$. We find values for the cluster SN Ia rate of $({0.37}^{+0.17+0.01}_{-0.12-0.01}) \\mathrm{SNu}r h^{2}$ and $({0.55}^{+0.13+0.02}_{-0.11-0.01}) \\mathrm{SNu}r h^{2}$ ($\\mathrm{SNu}x = 10^{-12} L_{x\\sun}^{-1} \\mathrm{yr}^{-1}$) in C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively, where the quoted errors are statistical and systematic, respectively. The SN rate for early-type galaxies is found to be $({0.31}^{+0.18+0.01}_{-0.12-0.01}) \\mathrm{SNu}r h^{2}$ and $({0.49}^{+0.15+0.02}_{-0.11-0.01})$ $\\mathrm{SNu}r h^{2}$ in C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively. The SN rate for the brightest cluster galaxies (BCG) is found to be $({2.04}^{+1.99+0.07}_{-1.11-0.04}) \\mathrm{SNu}r h^{2}$ and $({0.36}^{+0.84+0.01}_...

  2. Barriers to accessing quality health care for cancer patients: a survey of members of the association of oncology social work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burg, Mary Ann; Zebrack, Brad; Walsh, Katherine; Maramaldi, Peter; Lim, Jung-Won; Smolinski, Kathryn M; Lawson, Kim

    2010-01-01

    The present article reports data from a cross-sectional survey of members of the Association of Oncology Social Work (AOSW) completed in May 2006. The purpose of the survey was to gather information on AOSW members' practice roles, the clients they serve, and their views on barriers cancer patients face in obtaining quality cancer care. The survey instrument was a self-administered 18-page survey disseminated online and by U.S. mail to members who did not provide e-mail addresses. The response rate to the survey was 62.3% (622/999). Reported barriers to quality cancer care are presented here in three categories: health system, social/environmental, and individual-level barriers. The majority of respondents reported health system barriers, specifically inadequate health insurance, as the major barrier to accessing quality health care for cancer patients. Among social/environmental barriers, inability to pay for treatment-related expenses was the major barrier. Among individual-level barriers, patients' fears and distress were the major barriers. The conclusions from this survey point to the critical role of oncology social workers in assisting cancer patients in overcoming the barriers to quality care and achieving optimum quality of life.

  3. [Importance of the primary physician for pain management in patients with recurrent advanced cancer--a questionnaire survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konishi, Toshiro; Sasaki, Tsuneo; Aiba, Keisuke; Fukutomi, Takashi; Kakegawa, Kimiko; Okubo, Takashi

    2009-03-01

    With the objective of clarifying points that needed improvement to provide earlier and better treatment of pain by assessing the current state of cancer pain management in Japan, we conducted a questionnaire survey about pain management in patients with advanced/recurrent cancer who were suffering from pain. The results of the survey revealed that it is important for primary physician to place greater emphasis on pain management when treating cancer patients, to inform patients that the doctor should always be told if the patient has pain, and provide appropriate information about medical narcotics to their patients. The team approach to management of cancer has been increasing in importance recently. This survey suggested it is important for primary physicians, who play a central role in such teams, to listen to their patients' complaints about symptoms including pain. Furthermore, it should be remembered that patients are eager to establish a good, trusting relationship with their primary physician.

  4. Facebook advertisements recruit parents of children with cancer for an online survey of web-based research preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akard, Terrah Foster; Wray, Sarah; Gilmer, Mary Jo

    2015-01-01

    Studies involving samples of children with life-threatening illnesses and their families face significant challenges, including inadequate sample sizes and limited diversity. Social media recruitment and Web-based research methods may help address such challenges yet have not been explored in pediatric cancer populations. This study examined the feasibility of using Facebook advertisements to recruit parent caregivers of children and teenagers with cancer. We also explored the feasibility of Web-based video recording in pediatric palliative care populations by surveying parents of children with cancer regarding (a) their preferences for research methods and (b) technological capabilities of their computers and phones. Facebook's paid advertising program was used to recruit parent caregivers of children currently living with cancer to complete an electronic survey about research preferences and technological capabilities. The advertising campaign generated 3 897 981 impressions, which resulted in 1050 clicks at a total cost of $1129.88. Of 284 screened individuals, 106 were eligible. Forty-five caregivers of children with cancer completed the entire electronic survey. Parents preferred and had technological capabilities for Web-based and electronic research methods. Participant survey responses are reported. Facebook was a useful, cost-effective method to recruit a diverse sample of parent caregivers of children with cancer. Web-based video recording and data collection may be feasible and desirable in samples of children with cancer and their families. Web-based methods (eg, Facebook, Skype) may enhance communication and access between nurses and pediatric oncology patients and their families.

  5. Differences in Cancer Information Seeking Behavior, Preferences, and Awareness Between Cancer Survivors and Healthy Controls: A National, Population-Based Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Abbey R.; Lykins, Emily L.B.; Gochett, Celestine G.; Brechting, Emily H.; Graue, Lili O.; Andrykowski, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Background No research has examined how cancer diagnosis and treatment might alter information source preferences or opinions. Methods Data from 719 cancer survivors (CS group) and 2012 matched healthy controls (NCC group) regarding cancer-related information seeking behavior, preferences, and awareness from the population-based 2003 Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) was examined. Results The CS group reported greater consumption of cancer-related information but the CS and NCC groups did not differ in information source use or preferences. The CS group was more confident of their ability to get cancer information, reported more trust in health care professionals and television as cancer information sources, but evaluated their recent cancer information seeking experiences more negatively than the NCC group. Awareness of cancer information resources was surprisingly low in both the CS and NCC groups. Conclusions Cancer diagnosis and treatment subtly alters cancer information seeking preferences and experience. However awareness and use of cancer information resources was relatively low regardless of personal history of cancer. PMID:19259869

  6. Adjuvant systemic chemotherapy for stages II and III colon cancer after complete resection: a clinical practice guideline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, B.M.; Cosby, R.; Quereshy, F.; Jonker, D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Updated practice guidelines on adjuvant chemotherapy for completely resected colon cancer are lacking. In 2008, Cancer Care Ontario’s Program in Evidence-Based Care developed a guideline on adjuvant therapy for stages ii and iii colon cancer. With newer regimens being assessed in this patient population and older agents being either abandoned because of non-effectiveness or replaced by agents that are more efficacious, a full update of the original guideline was undertaken. Methods Literature searches (January 1987 to August 2015) of medline, embase, and the Cochrane Library were conducted; in addition, abstracts from the American Society of Clinical Oncology, the European Society for Medical Oncology, and the European Cancer Congress were reviewed (the latter for January 2007 to August 2015). A practice guideline was drafted that was then scrutinized by internal and external reviewers whose comments were incorporated into the final guideline. Results Twenty-six unique reports of eighteen randomized controlled trials and thirteen unique reports of twelve meta-analyses or pooled analyses were included in the evidence base. The 5 recommendations developed included 3 for stage ii colon cancer and 2 for stage iii colon cancer. Conclusions Patients with completely resected stage iii colon cancer should be offered adjuvant 5-fluorouracil (5fu)–based chemotherapy with or without oxaliplatin (based on definitive data for improvements in survival and disease-free survival). Patients with resected stage ii colon cancer without “high-risk” features should not receive adjuvant chemotherapy. For patients with “high-risk” features, 5fu-based chemotherapy with or without oxaliplatin should be offered, although no clinical trials have been conducted to conclusively demonstrate the same benefits seen in stage iii colon cancer. PMID:28050138

  7. Phase II trial of second-line erlotinib and digoxin for nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadi Kayali

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Fadi Kayali, Muhamad A Janjua, Damian A Laber, Donald Miller, Goetz H KloeckerUniversity of Louisville, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, Louisville, KY, USABackground: In vitro digoxin sensitizes cancer cells to the induction of apoptosis by chemotherapy. Inhibition of the Na/K-ATPase enzyme by ouabain disturbs the intracellular ion composition of cancer cells, altering cellular homeostasis. This suggests that inhibition of the Na/K pump results in cellular sensitization of malignant but not benign cells to the induction of apoptosis. Epidemiologic studies have also shown beneficial effects of digitalis in breast cancer incidence. At ASCO (American Society of Clinical Oncology 2007 our group presented a Phase II study showing encouraging results by adding digoxin to biochemotherapy for melanoma. Erlotinib is one of the standard second-line treatments for nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC, with a response rate (RR of 10%. This study's hypothesis was that adding digoxin to erlotinib will improve the RR and time to progression (TTP in NSCLC.Methods: Patients with progressive disease (PD after chemotherapy were enrolled if they had an ECOG (Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group score from 0 to 2 and good organ function. Daily erlotinib 150 mg and digoxin 0.25 mg were taken by mouth. The digoxin dose was adjusted to keep levels between 1 and 2 ng/mL. Computed tomography scans were done every 6 weeks. Treatment continued until PD or significant toxicity occurred.Results: Patient accrual lasted from March 2006 until August 2008 and was stopped early at the time of interim analysis. Twenty-eight patients were enrolled, and 24 who completed at least 6 weeks of therapy are presented here. All patients had unresectable NSCLC stage III/IV at diagnosis. Median age was 61 (34–78, 14 were female, 17 had prior radiation (not involving the target lesions, 23 had one prior chemotherapy, and one subject had two. Only one patient was a never-smoker. Histologies were

  8. GnRH-II receptor-like antigenicity in human placenta and in cancers of the human reproductive organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eicke, Nicola; Günthert, Andreas R; Viereck, Volker; Siebold, Doreen; Béhé, Martin; Becker, Tamara; Emons, Günter; Gründker, Carsten

    2005-10-01

    We have recently demonstrated that the antiproliferative activity of GnRH-II on human endometrial and ovarian cancer cell lines is not mediated through the GnRH-I receptor. A functional receptor for human GnRH-II has not yet been identified. In this study, we have generated a polyclonal antiserum to the putative human GnRH-II receptor using a peptide (YSPTMLTEVPPC) corresponding to the third extracellular domain coupled to keyhole limpet haemocyanin via the Cys residue. A database search showed no identical peptide sequences in any other human gene. To avoid cross-reactions against two similar amino acid sequences the antiserum was pre-absorbed using these peptides. Immune histological sections of human placenta and human endometrial, ovarian and prostate cancers using rabbit anti-human GnRH-II receptor antiserum showed GnRH-II receptor-like staining. Western blot analysis of cell membrane preparations of human endometrial and ovarian cancer cell lines yielded a band at approximately 43 kDa whereas Western blot analysis of cell membrane preparations of ovaries obtained from the marmoset monkey (Callithrix jacchus) yielded a band at approximately 54 kDa. To identify the GnRH-II receptor-like antigen we used the photo-affinity labelling technique. Photochemical reaction of (125)I-labelled (4-azidobenzoyl)-N-hydroxysuccinimide-[d-Lys(6)]-GnRH-II (10(-9) M) with cell membrane preparations of human endometrial and ovarian cancer cells yielded a band at approximately 43 kDa. In competition experiments, the GnRH-I agonist Triptorelin (10(-7) M) showed a weak decrease of (125)I-labelled (4-azidobenzoyl)-N-hydroxysuccinimide-[d-Lys(6)]-GnRH-II binding to its binding site. The GnRH-I antagonist Cetrorelix (10(-7) M) showed a clearly stronger decrease, whereas GnRH-II agonist [d-Lys(6)]-GnRH-II (10(-7) M) was the most potent competitor. Western blot analysis of the same gel using rabbit anti-human GnRH-II receptor antiserum identified this band as GnRH-II receptor

  9. Hydra II: a faint and compact Milky Way dwarf galaxy found in the Survey of the Magellanic Stellar History

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Nicolas F; Besla, Gurtina; Olsen, Knut; Walker, Alistair R; Vivas, A Katherina; Gruendl, Robert A; Muñoz, Ricardo R; Blum, Robert D; Saha, Abhijit; Conn, Blair C; Bell, Eric F; Chu, You-Hua; Cioni, Maria-Rosa L; de Boer, Thomas J L; Gallart, Carme; Jin, Shoko; Kunder, Andrea; Majewski, Steven R; Martinez-Delgado, David; Monachesi, Antonela; Monelli, Matteo; Monteagudo, Lara; Noël, Noelia E D; Olszewski, Edward W; Stringfellow, Guy S; van der Marel, Roeland P; Zaritsky, Denis

    2015-01-01

    We present the discovery of a new dwarf galaxy, Hydra II, found serendipitously within the data from the ongoing Survey of the MAgellanic Stellar History (SMASH) conducted with the Dark Energy Camera on the Blanco 4m Telescope. The new satellite is compact (r_h = 68 +/- 11 pc) and faint (M_V = -4.8 +/- 0.3), but well within the realm of dwarf galaxies. The stellar distribution of HydraII in the color-magnitude diagram is well-described by a metal-poor ([Fe/H] = -2.2) and old (13 Gyr) isochrone and shows a distinct blue horizontal branch, some possible red clump stars, and faint stars that are suggestive of blue stragglers. At a heliocentric distance of 134 +/- 10 kpc, Hydra II is located in a region of the Galactic halo that models have suggested may host material from the leading arm of the Magellanic Stream. A comparison with N-body simulations hints that the new dwarf galaxy could be or could have been a satellite of the Magellanic Clouds.

  10. The Herschel Gould Belt Survey in Chamaeleon II - Properties of cold dust in disks around young stellar objects

    CERN Document Server

    Spezzi, L; Prusti, T; Merin, B; Ribas, A; de Oliveira, C Alves; Winston, E; Kospal, A; Royer, P; Vavrek, R; Andre, Ph; Pilbratt, G L; Testi, L; Bressert, E; Ricci, L; Menshchikov, A; Konyves, V

    2013-01-01

    We report on the Herschel Gould Belt survey (HGBS) of ChaII, focusing on the detection of Class I to III young stellar objects (YSOs). We aim at characterizing the circumstellar material around these YSOs and understanding which disk parameters are most likely constrained by the new HGBS data. We recovered 29 out of the 63 known YSOs in ChaII with a detection in at least one of the PACS/SPIRE pass-bands: 3 Class I YSOs (i.e.,100%), 1 Flat source (i.e., 50%), 21 Class II objects (i.e., 55%), 3 Class III objects (i.e, 16%) and the unclassified source IRAS 12522-7640. We explore PACS/SPIRE colors of this sample and present modeling of their SEDs using the RADMC-2D radiative transfer code. We find that YSO colors are confined in specific regions of PACS/SPIRE color-color diagrams. These color ranges are expected to be only marginally contaminated by extragalactic sources and field stars and, hence, provide a useful YSO selection tool when applied altogether. We were able to model the SED of 26 out of the 29 detec...

  11. CALIFA, the Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field Area survey. II. First public data release

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Husemann, B.; Jahnke, K.; Sánchez, S. F.; Barrado, D.; Bekerait*error*ė, S.; Bomans, D. J.; Castillo-Morales, A.; Catalán-Torrecilla, C.; Cid Fernandes, R.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; García-Benito, R.; González Delgado, R. M.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; Johnson, B. D.; Kupko, D.; López-Fernandez, R.; Lyubenova, M.; Marino, R. A.; Mast, D.; Miskolczi, A.; Monreal-Ibero, A.; Gil de Paz, A.; Pérez, E.; Pérez, I.; Rosales-Ortega, F. F.; Ruiz-Lara, T.; Schilling, U.; van de Ven, G.; Walcher, J.; Alves, J.; de Amorim, A. L.; Backsmann, N.; Barrera-Ballesteros, J. K.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Cortijo, C.; Dettmar, R.-J.; Demleitner, M.; Díaz, A. I.; Enke, H.; Florido, E.; Flores, H.; Galbany, L.; Gallazzi, A.; García-Lorenzo, B.; Gomes, J. M.; Gruel, N.; Haines, T.; Holmes, L.; Jungwiert, B.; Kalinova, V.; Kehrig, C.; Kennicutt, R. C.; Klar, J.; Lehnert, M. D.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; de Lorenzo-Cáceres, A.; Mármol-Queraltó, E.; Márquez, I.; Mendez-Abreu, J.; Mollá, M.; del Olmo, A.; Meidt, S. E.; Papaderos, P.; Puschnig, J.; Quirrenbach, A.; Roth, M. M.; Sánchez-Blázquez, P.; Spekkens, K.; Singh, R.; Stanishev, V.; Trager, S. C.; Vilchez, J. M.; Wild, V.; Wisotzki, L.; Zibetti, S.; Ziegler, B.

    2013-01-01

    We present the first public data release (DR1) of the Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field Area (CALIFA) survey. It consists of science-grade optical datacubes for the first 100 of eventually 600 nearby (0.005

  12. The Green Bank Telescope HII Region Discovery Survey II. The Source Catalog

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, L D; Balser, Dana S; Rood, Robert T

    2011-01-01

    The Green Bank Telescope HII Region Discovery Survey has doubled the number of known HII regions in the Galactic zone 343deg.\\leql\\leq67deg. with |b|\\leq1deg. We detected 603 discrete hydrogen radio recombination line (RRL) components at 9GHz (3cm) from 448 targets. Our targets were selected based on spatially coincident mid-infrared and 20cm radio continuum emission. Such sources are almost invariably HII regions; we detected hydrogen RRL emission from 95% of our target sample. The sensitivity of the Green Bank Telescope and the power of its spectrometer together made this survey possible. Here we provide a catalog of the measured properties of the RRL and continuum emission from the survey nebulae. The derived survey completeness limit, 180mJy at 9GHz, is sufficient to detect all HII regions ionized by single O-stars to a distance of 12kpc. These recently discovered nebulae share the same distribution on the sky as does the previously known census of Galactic HII regions. On average, however, the new nebula...

  13. The Herschel Fornax Cluster Survey II: FIR properties of optically-selected Fornax cluster galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Fuller, C; Auld, R; Smith, M W L; Baes, M; Bianchi, S; Bocchio, M; Boselli, A; Clemens, M; Davis, T A; De Looze, I; Alighieri, S di Serego; Grossi, M; Hughes, T M; Viaene, S; Serra, P

    2014-01-01

    The $Herschel$ Fornax Cluster Survey (HeFoCS) is a deep, far-infrared (FIR) survey of the Fornax cluster. The survey is in 5 $Herschel$ bands (100 - 500 $\\mu$m) and covers an area of 16 deg$^2$ centred on NGC1399. This paper presents photometry, detection rates, dust masses and temperatures using an optically selected sample from the Fornax Cluster Catalogue (FCC). Our results are compared with those previously obtained using data from the $Herschel$ Virgo Cluster Survey (HeViCS). In Fornax, we detect 30 of the 237 (13%) optically selected galaxies in at least one $Herschel$ band. The global detection rates are significantly lower than Virgo, reflecting the morphological make up of each cluster - Fornax has a lower fraction of late-type galaxies. For galaxies detected in at least 3 bands we fit a modified blackbody with a $\\beta = 2$ emissivity. Detected early-type galaxies (E/S0) have a mean dust mass, temperature, and dust-to-stars ratio of $\\log_{10}(/\\mathrm{M_{\\odot}}) = 5.82 \\pm 0.20$, $ = 20.82 \\pm 1.7...

  14. Linking a Medical User Survey to Management for Library Effectiveness: II, A Checkland Soft Systems Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brember, V. L.

    1985-01-01

    Presents Checkland's soft systems methodology, discusses it in terms of the systems approach, and illustrates how it was used to relate evidence of user survey to practical problems of library management. Difficulties in using methodology are described and implications for library management and information science research are presented. (8…

  15. Physicians' attitudes toward homosexuality and HIV: survey of a California Medical Society- revisited (PATHH-II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Davey M; Mathews, Wm Christopher

    2007-01-01

    In 1982, Mathews et al. surveyed San Diego County Medical Society's (SDCMS) physicians about their attitudes toward homosexuality. They found significant differences in prevalence of homophobic attitudes by gender, year of medical school graduation, specialty, and practice setting. To assess current physicians' attitudes toward homosexuality and persons with HIV infection, an anonymous, self-administered, 17-item survey was mailed to all 4,385 members of the SDCMS and 1,271 UCSD physicians. The survey included items measuring attitudes toward homosexuality and toward entry to medical school and referral patterns, conditional on sexual orientation and HIV status of hypothetical referents. Only 3% of respondents would not admit a highly qualified homosexual applicant to medical school compared with 30% in 1982. Similarly, 9% would discontinue referrals to a gay pediatrician compared with 46% of respondents in 1982. Forty-two percent would not admit a "highly qualified but asymptomatic HIV-infected applicant with excellent response to antiretroviral therapy to medical school" and 66% would discontinue referral to a general surgeon known to be HIV infected. In multiple logistic regression analyses controlling for sex and medical school affiliation, significant (p school and degree of homophobia (model ROC = 0.77). This survey suggests a substantial reduction in homophobia since 1982. However, attitudes toward homosexuals and year of graduation from medical school appear to be significant predictors of attitudes toward persons with HIV infection.

  16. CALIFA, the Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field Area survey : II. First public data release

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Husemann, B.; Jahnke, K.; Sanchez, S. F.; Barrado, D.; Bekeraite, S.; Bomans, D. J.; Castillo-Morales, A.; Catalan-Torrecilla, C.; Cid Fernandes, R.; Falcon-Barroso, J.; Garcia-Benito, R.; Gonzalez Delgado, R. M.; Iglesias-Paramo, J.; Johnson, B. D.; Kupko, D.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lyubenova, M.; Marino, R. A.; Mast, D.; Miskolczi, A.; Monreal-Ibero, A.; Gil de Paz, A.; Perez, E.; Perez, I.; Rosales-Ortega, F. F.; Ruiz-Lara, T.; Schilling, U.; van de Ven, G.; Walcher, J.; Alves, J.; de Amorim, A. L.; Backsmann, N.; Barrera-Ballesteros, J. K.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Cortijo, C.; Dettmar, R. -J.; Demleitner, M.; Diaz, A. I.; Enke, H.; Florido, E.; Flores, H.; Galbany, L.; Gallazzi, A.; Garcia-Lorenzo, B.; Gomes, J. M.; Gruel, N.; Haines, T.; Holmes, L.; Jungwiert, B.; Kalinova, V.; Kehrig, C.; Kennicutt, R. C.; Klar, J.; Lehnert, M. D.; Lopez-Sanchez, A. R.; de Lorenzo-Caceres, A.; Marmol-Queralto, E.; Marquez, I.; Mendez-Abreu, J.; Molla, M.; del Olmo, A.; Meidt, S. E.; Papaderos, P.; Puschnig, J.; Quirrenbach, A.; Roth, M. M.; Sanchez-Blazquez, P.; Spekkens, K.; Singh, R.; Stanishev, V.; Trager, S. C.; Vilchez, J. M.; Wild, V.; Wisotzki, L.; Zibetti, S.; Ziegler, B.

    2013-01-01

    We present the first public data release (DR1) of the Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field Area (CALIFA) survey. It consists of science-grade optical datacubes for the first 100 of eventually 600 nearby (0.005

  17. Postmastectomy radiation in supraclavicular and internal mammary regions of patients with breast cancer of stage II/III

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MEI Xin; GUO Xiao-mao; ZHANG Zhen; CHEN Jia-yi

    2009-01-01

    @@ Adjuvant radiotherapy plays a vital role in the treatment of breast cancer, but irradiated area was not standardized. The ipsilateral chest wall and supraclavicular regions with or without internal mammary lymph nodes were reported in patients receiving postmastectomy radiotherapy.1,2 In our study, 133 consecutive patients with breast cancer of stage II/III who had received postmastectomy radiotherapy of supraclavicular and internal mammary regions at Cancer Hospital of Fudan University were analyzed for their survival and locoregional control as well as their relative prognostic predicator.

  18. Needs of family caregivers of advanced cancer patients: a survey in Shanghai of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, J; Song, L J; Zhou, L J; Meng, H; Zhao, J J

    2014-07-01

    It is important to understand the unmet needs of family caregivers of advanced cancer patients for developing and refining services to address the identified gaps in cancer care. To explore their needs in Chinese mainland and the possible factors associated with their needs, a self-developed questionnaire was used to survey a sample of 649 participants in 15 hospitals of Shanghai. The data were analysed using descriptive statistics, factor analysis, t-test, one-way ANOVA, and Fishers least significant difference t-test. All statistical analyses were performed using SPSS 13.0. Seven dimensions of needs (maintaining health, support from healthcare professionals, knowledge about the disease and treatment, support on funeral, information on hospice care, psychological support for patients and symptoms control for patients) were extracted from the results by factor analysis. The dimension with the highest score was 'knowledge about the disease and treatment' (4.37), and that with the lowest score named 'support on funeral' (2.85). The results showed that the factors including burden of payment for treatment, former caregiving experience of family caregivers and length of caregiving time were associated with their needs. Cancer services need to consider how to tailor resources and interventions to meet these needs of family caregivers of advanced cancer patients.

  19. A Survey of Esophageal Cancer in Cixian County of Hebei Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JunHou; ZhifengChen; CuilanGuo; ShaosenLi; WenlongBai; GuolimngJin; YuxiaWang; FanshuMeng; FengGao; XujingLu; ZhifangWang; GangKuang

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To characterize the histologic types of esophageal cardiac mucosa by endoscopic survey in a high-risk cancer area of China. METHODS An endoscopic survey with Lugol,s staining was carried out in Cixian County, Hebei Province from December 2001 to May 2002. The data were processed using computer SPSS 10.0 software. RESULTS The incidences of mild esophagitis, moderate esophagitis, and severe esophagitis were for 2013 cases, 34.9%(703), 1.6%(33) and 0.1% (2)respectively; those with mild dysplasia, moderate dysplasia, severe dysplasia of the esophagus were 8.6% (172), 7.8% (157) and 2.6% (53) respectively; those with carcinoma in situ, intramucosal carcinoma, invasive squamous carcinoma of the esophagus were 2.5%(50), 0.2% (4) and 0.7%(14) respectively. The histologic-detecting rates of non-atrophic gastritis, and atrophic gastritis of the cardia were 36.3%(730), 11.5% (232) respectively; those with mild dysplasia, severe dysplasia of the cardia were 2.5%(51), 0.8%(17) respectively; those with intramucosal adenocarcinoma, invasive adenocarcinoma of the cardia were 0.1% (3), 0.8%(17) respectively. The early-detection rate of esophageal cancer was 79.4%(54/68). The survey rate(examined population to covered population) was 73.8% (2013/2725). CONCLUSIONS Esophageal endoscopic screening with Lugol's solution staining has an advantage over esophageal balloon cytology, in that the histological diagnoses of esophageal cardiac diseases can be obtained, thus contributing to the prevention of subsequent disease. In using the staining method the detection rate of early esophageal cancer is higher than that revealed by balloon cytology.

  20. Survey and Analysis of Awareness of Lung Cancer Prevention and Control in a LDCT Lung Cancer Screening Project in Tianjin Dagang Oilfield of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanhua REN

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective It has been proven that increase of the awareness level of lung cancer prevention and control could enhance participation of lung cancer screening of lung cancer high risk group. The aim of this study is to investigate the awareness level of lung cancer prevention and control and the effect of individual characteristics on lung cancer awareness, and to provide evidence for comprehensive lung cancer prevention in high risk areas of lung cancer. Methods Staffs of Tianjin Dagang Oil Field who participate low dose CT (LDCT lung cancer screening by cluster sampling or according to voluntary principle were surveyed, data of lung cancer awareness were collected by questionnaire. Results A total of 1,633 valid questionnaires were collected. The average age of respondents was 60.08±6.58. Most participants were males (82.2% while female only accounted for 17.8%. The proportions of awareness about lung cancer in China, risk factors, screening methods and the knowledge of health examination were 64.5%, 77.1%, 43.7%, 49.6% respectively. Result of multiple logistic regression analysis showed that education level, smoking (pack-year, age, prior tuberculosis were the influencing factors of lung cancer awareness with adjusted Ors for education and age level as of 0.567 (95%CI: 0.439-0.733 and 1.373 (95%CI: 1.084-1.739 respectively. 80.3% of the participants can accept health examination once a year, while the ability to pay the medical expenses was not high. The influencing factors of health examination willingness were gender, age, income, the knowledge of lung cancer. Conclusion Education level and smoking affect the awareness of lung cancer prevention and control, health education for lung cancer should be conducted especially in population with low education level. Comprehensive lung cancer control in high risk areas should combined lung cancer screening, tobacco control and health education.

  1. Dose-Response Relationship between Radiation Dose and Loco-regional Control in Patients with Stage II-III Esophageal Cancer Treated with Definitive Chemoradiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Ju; Suh, Yang-Gun; Lee, Yong Chan; Lee, Sang Kil; Shin, Sung Kwan; Cho, Byung Chul; Lee, Chang Geol

    2017-07-01

    The correlation between radiation dose and loco-regional control (LRC) was evaluated in patients with stage II-III esophageal cancer treated with definitive concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Medical records of 236 stage II-III esophageal cancer patients treated with definitive CRT at Yonsei Cancer Center between 1994 and 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Among these, 120 received a radiation dose of 60 Gy) is associated with increased LRC, PFS, and OS in patients with stage II-III esophageal cancer treated with definitive CRT.

  2. COLOR II. A randomized clinical trial comparing laparoscopic and open surgery for rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Laparoscopic resection of rectal cancer has been proven efficacious but morbidity and oncological outcome need to be investigated in a randomized clinical trial. Trial design: Non-inferiority randomized clinical trial. METHODS: The COLOR II trial is an ongoing international randomized...... clinical trial. Currently 27 hospitals from Europe, South Korea and Canada are including patients. The primary endpoint is loco-regional recurrence rate three years post-operatively. Secondary endpoints cover quality of life, overall and disease free survival, post-operative morbidity and health economy...... analysis. RESULTS: By July 2008, 27 hospitals from the Netherlands, Belgium, Germany, Sweden, Spain, Denmark, South Korea and Canada had included 739 patients. The intra-operative conversion rate in the laparoscopic group was 17%. Distribution of age, location of the tumor and radiotherapy were equal...

  3. Determining the use of prophylactic antibiotics in breast cancer surgeries: a survey of practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acuna Sergio A

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prophylactic antibiotics (PAs are beneficial to breast cancer patients undergoing surgery because they prevent surgical site infection (SSI, but limited information regarding their use has been published. This study aims to determine the use of PAs prior to breast cancer surgery amongst breast surgeons in Colombia. Methods An online survey was distributed amongst the breast surgeon members of the Colombian Association of Mastology, the only breast surgery society of Colombia. The scope of the questions included demographics, clinical practice characteristics, PA prescription characteristics, and the use of PAs in common breast surgical procedures. Results The survey was distributed amongst eighty-eight breast surgeons of whom forty-seven responded (response rate: 53.4%. Forty surgeons (85.1% reported using PAs prior to surgery of which >60% used PAs during mastectomy, axillary lymph node dissection, and/or breast reconstruction. Surgeons reported they targeted the use of PAs in cases in which patients had any of the following SSI risk factors: diabetes mellitus, drains in situ, obesity, and neoadjuvant therapy. The distribution of the self-reported PA dosing regimens was as follows: single pre-operative fixed-dose (27.7%, single preoperative dose followed by a second dose if the surgery was prolonged (44.7%, single preoperative dose followed by one or more postoperative doses for >24 hours (10.6%, and single preoperative weight-adjusted dose (2.1%. Conclusion Although this group of breast surgeons is aware of the importance of PAs in breast cancer surgery there is a discrepancy in how they use it, specifically with regards to prescription and timeliness of drug administration. Our findings call for targeted quality-improvement initiatives, such as standardized national guidelines, which can provide sufficient evidence for all stakeholders and therefore facilitate best practice medicine for breast cancer surgery.

  4. Endoscopic survey of esophageal cancer in a high-risk area of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu-Jing Lu; Jun Hou; Zhi-Feng Chen; Cui-Lan Guo; Shao-Sen Li; Wen-Long Bai; Guo-Liang Jin; Yu-Xia Wang; Fan-Shu Meng; Feng Gao

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To characterize the histological types of esophageal and cardiac mucosa by endoscopic survey of a population in a high-risk area of esophageal cancer of China.METHODS: A selected cohort of residents in Cixian County during December 2001 and May 2002 was surveyed by using Lugol′s staining, followed by computer-based statistical analysis of the data with SPSS 10.0 software.RESULTS: Histologically, the detection rates of squamous epithelial acanthosis, squamous epithelial atrophy, and basal cell hyperplasia in the esophagus were 1.9% (38/2 013),0.1% (3/2 013) and 0.9% (18/2 013) respectively, and those of mild, moderate, and severe esophagitis were 34.9% (703/2 013), 1.6% (33/2 013) and 0.2% (2/2 013)respectively. Mild, moderate, and severe esophageal dysplasia were detected in 8.6% (172/2 013), 7.8% (157/2 013) and 2.6% (53/2 013) respectively in the selected population,whereas in situ carcinoma, intramucosal carcinoma, invasive squamous carcinoma of the esophagus in 2.5% (50/2 013),0.2% (4/2 013) and 0.7% (14/2 013) respectively. The detection rates of non-atrophic gastritis and atrophic gastritis of the cardia were 36.3% (730/2 013) and 11.5% (232/2 013) respectively,with mild and severe dysplasia of the cardia detected in 2.5% (51/2 013) and 0.8% (17/2 013), respectively, in this population; the rates of intramucosal adenocarcinoma and invasive adenocarcinoma of the cardia were 0.1% (3/2 013)and 0.8% (17/2 013) respectively. The detection rate of esophageal cancer at early stage was 79.4% (54/68). The survey rate (ratio of examined population to expected population) was 73.8% (2 013/2 725).CONCLUSION: Histologic types of the esophageal and cardiac mucosa were characterized by endoscopic survey in a high-risk population of esophageal cancer, which may help the early detection and treatment of esophageal and cardiac cancers and dysplasia, and reduce the mortality of such malignancies.

  5. Availability of stage at diagnosis, cancer treatment delay and compliance with cancer guidelines as cancer registry indicators for cancer care in Europe: Results of EUROCHIP-3 survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siesling, Sabine; Kwast, A.; Gavin, A.; Baili, P.; Otter, R.

    2013-01-01

    EUROCHIP (European Cancer Health Indicators Project) focuses on understanding inequalities in the cancer burden, care and survival by the indicators “stage at diagnosis,” “cancer treatment delay” and “compliance with cancer guidelines” as the most important indicators. Our study aims at providing

  6. Continuum Halos in Nearby Galaxies -- an EVLA Survey (CHANG-ES) -- II: First Results on NGC 4631

    CERN Document Server

    Irwin, Judith; Benjamin, R A; Dettmar, Ralf-Juergen; English, Jayanne; Heald, George; Henriksen, Richard N; Johnson, Megan; Krause, Marita; Li, Jiang-Tao; Miskolczi, Arpad; Mora, Silvia Carolina; Murphy, E J; Oosterloo, Tom; Porter, Troy A; Rand, Richard J; Saikia, D J; Schmidt, Philip; Strong, A W; Walterbos, Rene; Wang, Q Daniel; Wiegert, Theresa

    2012-01-01

    We present the first results from the CHANG-ES survey, a new survey of 35 edge-on galaxies to search for both in-disk as well as extra-planar radio continuum emission. The motivation and science case for the survey are presented in a companion paper (Paper I). In this paper (Paper II), we outline the observations and data reduction steps required for wide-band calibration and mapping of EVLA data, including polarization, based on C-array test observations of NGC 4631. With modest on-source observing times (30 minutes at 1.5 GHz and 75 minutes at 6 GHz for the test data) we have achieved best rms noise levels of 22 and 3.5 $\\mu$Jy beam$^{-1}$ at 1.5 GHz and 6 GHz, respectively. New disk-halo features have been detected, among them two at 1.5 GHz that appear as loops in projection. We present the first 1.5 GHz spectral index map of NGC 4631 to be formed from a single wide-band observation in a single array configuration. This map represents tangent slopes to the intensities within the band centered at 1.5 GHz, ...

  7. Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancer Non-Hodgkin lymphoma Ovarian cancer Pancreatic cancer Testicular cancer Thyroid cancer Uterine cancer Symptoms Symptoms of cancer ... tumor Obesity Pancreatic cancer Prostate cancer Stomach cancer Testicular cancer Throat or larynx cancer Thyroid cancer Patient Instructions ...

  8. First-line treatment with oxaliplatin and capecitabine in patients with advanced or metastatic oesophageal cancer: A phase II study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. van Meerten (Esther); F.A.L.M. Eskens (Ferry); E.C. van Gameren; L. Doorn; A. van der Gaast (Ate)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThis phase II study assessed the safety and efficacy of oxaliplatin and capecitabine in patients with advanced oesophageal cancer. Fifty-one eligible patients received oxaliplatin 130 mg m-2intravenously on day 1 and capecitabine 1000 mg m-2orally twice daily on days 1 to 14 in a 21-day

  9. Salivary secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) and head and neck cancer: The Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Christine M. Pierce; Giuliano, Anna R.; Torres, B. Nelson; O'Keefe, Michael T.; Ingles, Donna J.; Anderson, Rebecca L.; Teras, Lauren R.; Gapstur, Susan M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) is an innate-immunity protein displaying antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties that is found in high concentrations in saliva. The role of extracellular salivary SLPI in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) remains unclear. Thus, we aimed to evaluate the association between SLPI and HNSCC risk in the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort. Materials and Methods Among 53,180 men and women with no history of cancer who provided an oral rinse between 2001 and 2002, 60 were subsequently diagnosed with incident HNSCC between specimen collection and June 2009. In this nested case-control study, archived oral supernatants were evaluated using the Human SLPI Quantikine ELISA Kit for all 60 cases and 180 controls individually matched on gender, race, date of birth, and date of oral rinse collection. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate HNSCC risk. Results Overall, pre-diagnostic salivary SLPI was associated with a non-statistically significant higher risk of HNSCC (OR=1.6, 95% CI=0.9–3.0). Among never smokers, high SLPI was associated with a non-statistically significant lower risk (OR=0.5, 95% CI=0.1–1.9), whereas among ever smokers, high SLPI was associated with a statistically significant higher risk (OR=2.1, 95% CI=1.0–4.3) of HNSCC, compared to low SLPI. Conclusion While results from this study suggest that higher concentrations of salivary SLPI might increase the risk of HNSCC among ever smokers, more research is needed to verify these findings and define the mechanisms by which SLPI and smoking influence the etiology of HNSCC. PMID:27016010

  10. Visual servoing in medical robotics: a survey. Part II: tomographic imaging modalities--techniques and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizian, Mahdi; Najmaei, Nima; Khoshnam, Mahta; Patel, Rajni

    2015-03-01

    Intraoperative application of tomographic imaging techniques provides a means of visual servoing for objects beneath the surface of organs. The focus of this survey is on therapeutic and diagnostic medical applications where tomographic imaging is used in visual servoing. To this end, a comprehensive search of the electronic databases was completed for the period 2000-2013. Existing techniques and products are categorized and studied, based on the imaging modality and their medical applications. This part complements Part I of the survey, which covers visual servoing techniques using endoscopic imaging and direct vision. The main challenges in using visual servoing based on tomographic images have been identified. 'Supervised automation of medical robotics' is found to be a major trend in this field and ultrasound is the most commonly used tomographic modality for visual servoing. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Optimal Moments for the Analysis of Peculiar Velocity Surveys II: Testing

    CERN Document Server

    Feldman, H A; Melott, A L; Chambers, S W; Feldman, Hume A.; Watkins, Richard; Melott, Adrian L.; Chambers, Scott W.

    2003-01-01

    Analyses of peculiar velocity surveys face several challenges, including low signal--to--noise in individual velocity measurements and the presence of small--scale, nonlinear flows. This is the second in a series of papers in which we describe a new method of overcoming these problems by using data compression as a filter with which to separate large--scale, linear flows from small--scale noise that can bias results. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our method using realistic catalogs of galaxy velocities drawn from N--body simulations. Our tests show that a likelihood analysis of simulated catalogs that uses all of the information contained in the peculiar velocities results in a bias in the estimation of the power spectrum shape parameter $\\Gamma$ and amplitude $\\beta$, and that our method of analysis effectively removes this bias. We expect that this new method will cause peculiar velocity surveys to re--emerge as a useful tool to determine cosmological parameters.

  12. Cosmic Shear Results from the Deep Lens Survey. II. Full Cosmological Parameter Constraints from Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jee, M. James; Tyson, J. Anthony; Hilbert, Stefan; Schneider, Michael D.; Schmidt, Samuel; Wittman, David

    2016-06-01

    We present a tomographic cosmic shear study from the Deep Lens Survey (DLS), which, providing a limiting magnitude {r}{lim}˜ 27 (5σ ), is designed as a precursor Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) survey with an emphasis on depth. Using five tomographic redshift bins, we study their auto- and cross-correlations to constrain cosmological parameters. We use a luminosity-dependent nonlinear model to account for the astrophysical systematics originating from intrinsic alignments of galaxy shapes. We find that the cosmological leverage of the DLS is among the highest among existing \\gt 10 deg2 cosmic shear surveys. Combining the DLS tomography with the 9 yr results of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP9) gives {{{Ω }}}m={0.293}-0.014+0.012, {σ }8={0.833}-0.018+0.011, {H}0={68.6}-1.2+1.4 {\\text{km s}}-1 {{{Mpc}}}-1, and {{{Ω }}}b=0.0475+/- 0.0012 for ΛCDM, reducing the uncertainties of the WMAP9-only constraints by ˜50%. When we do not assume flatness for ΛCDM, we obtain the curvature constraint {{{Ω }}}k=-{0.010}-0.015+0.013 from the DLS+WMAP9 combination, which, however, is not well constrained when WMAP9 is used alone. The dark energy equation-of-state parameter w is tightly constrained when baryonic acoustic oscillation (BAO) data are added, yielding w=-{1.02}-0.09+0.10 with the DLS+WMAP9+BAO joint probe. The addition of supernova constraints further tightens the parameter to w=-1.03+/- 0.03. Our joint constraints are fully consistent with the final Planck results and also with the predictions of a ΛCDM universe.

  13. Apples to apples A2 - II. Cluster selection functions for next-generation surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascaso, B.; Mei, S.; Bartlett, J. G.; Benítez, N.

    2017-01-01

    We present the cluster selection function for three of the largest next-generation stage-IV surveys in the optical and infrared: Euclid-Optimistic, Euclid-Pessimistic and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). To simulate these surveys, we use the realistic mock catalogues introduced in the first paper of this series. We detected galaxy clusters using the Bayesian Cluster Finder in the mock catalogues. We then modelled and calibrated the total cluster stellar mass observable-theoretical mass (M^{*}_CL-M_h) relation using a power-law model, including a possible redshift evolution term. We find a moderate scatter of σ _{M^{*}_CL | M_h} of 0.124, 0.135 and 0.136 dex for Euclid-Optimistic, Euclid-Pessimistic and LSST, respectively, comparable to other work over more limited ranges of redshift. Moreover, the three data sets are consistent with negligible evolution with redshift, in agreement with observational and simulation results in the literature. We find that Euclid-Optimistic will be able to detect clusters with >80 per cent completeness and purity down to 8 × 1013 h-1 M⊙ up to z < 1. At higher redshifts, the same completeness and purity are obtained with the larger mass threshold of 2 × 1014 h-1 M⊙ up to z = 2. The Euclid-Pessimistic selection function has a similar shape with ˜10 per cent higher mass limit. LSST shows ˜5 per cent higher mass limit than Euclid-Optimistic up to z < 0.7 and increases afterwards, reaching a value of 2 × 1014 h-1 M⊙ at z = 1.4. Similar selection functions with only 80 per cent completeness threshold have also been computed. The complementarity of these results with selection functions for surveys in other bands is discussed.

  14. Test program element II blanket and shield thermal-hydraulic and thermomechanical testing, experimental facility survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ware, A.G.; Longhurst, G.R.

    1981-12-01

    This report presents results of a survey conducted by EG and G Idaho to determine facilities available to conduct thermal-hydraulic and thermomechanical testing for the Department of Energy Office of Fusion Energy First Wall/Blanket/Shield Engineering Test Program. In response to EG and G queries, twelve organizations (in addition to EG and G and General Atomic) expressed interest in providing experimental facilities. A variety of methods of supplying heat is available.

  15. A Successful Broad-band Survey for Giant Lya Nebulae II: Spectroscopic Confirmation

    CERN Document Server

    Prescott, Moire K M; Jannuzi, Buell T

    2012-01-01

    Using a systematic broad-band search technique, we have carried out a survey for large Lya nebulae (or Lya "blobs") at 2Survey (NDWFS) Bootes field, corresponding to a total survey comoving volume of ~10^8 h_70^-3 Mpc^3. Here, we present our spectroscopic observations of candidate giant Lya nebulae. Of 26 candidates targeted, 5 were confirmed to have Lya emission at 1.7

  16. AN H I SURVEY OF SIX LOCAL GROUP ANALOGS. II. H I PROPERTIES OF GROUP GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pisano, D. J. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, P.O. Box 6315, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Barnes, David G.; Kilborn, Virginia A. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia); Staveley-Smith, Lister [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, M468, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Gibson, Brad K. [Jeremiah Horrocks Institute, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); Freeman, Ken C., E-mail: djpisano@mail.wvu.edu, E-mail: David.G.Barnes@gmail.com, E-mail: vkilborn@astro.swin.edu.au, E-mail: Lister.Staveley-Smith@icrar.org, E-mail: brad.k.gibson@gmail.com, E-mail: kcf@mso.anu.edu.au [RSAA, Mount Stromlo Observatory, Cotter Road, Weston, ACT 2611 (Australia)

    2011-12-01

    We have conducted an H I 21 cm emission-line survey of six loose groups of galaxies chosen to be analogs to the Local Group. The survey was conducted using the Parkes multibeam instrument and the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) over a {approx}1 Mpc{sup 2} area and covering the full depth of each group, with an M{sub HI} sensitivity of {approx}7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} M{sub Sun }. Our survey detected 110 sources, 61 of which are associated with the six groups. All of these sources were confirmed with ATCA observations or were previously cataloged by HIPASS. The sources all have optical counterparts and properties consistent with dwarf irregular or late-type spiral galaxies. We present here the H I properties of the groups and their galaxies. We derive an H I mass function (HIMF) for the groups that is consistent with being flatter than the equivalent field HIMF. We also derive a circular velocity distribution function, tracing the luminous dark matter halos in the groups, that is consistent with those of the Local Group and HIPASS galaxies, both of which are shallower than that of clusters or predictions from cold dark matter models of galaxy formation.

  17. An HI Survey of Six Local Group Analogs. II. HI properties of group galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Pisano, D J; Staveley-Smith, L; Gibson, B K; Kilborn, V A; Freeman, K C

    2011-01-01

    We have conducted an HI 21 cm emission-line survey of six loose groups of galaxies chosen to be analogs to the Local Group. The survey was conducted using the Parkes Multibeam instrument and the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) over a ~1 Mpc^2 area and covering the full depth of each group, with a M(HI) sensitivity of ~7x10^5 M(sun). Our survey detected 110 sources, 61 of which are associated with the six groups. All of these sources were confirmed with ATCA observations or were previously cataloged by HIPASS. The sources all have optical counterparts and properties consistent with dwarf irregular or late-type spiral galaxies. We present here the HI properties of the groups and their galaxies. We derive an HI mass function for the groups that is consistent with being flatter than the equivalent field HIMF. We also derive a circular velocity distribution function, tracing the luminous dark matter halos in the groups, that is consistent with those of the Local Group and HIPASS galaxies, both of which ar...

  18. Spitzer SAGE survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud II : Evolved Stars and Infrared Color Magnitude Diagrams

    CERN Document Server

    Blum, R D; Olsen, K A; Frogel, J A; Werner, M; Meixner, M; Markwick-Kemper, F; Indebetouw, R; Whitney, B; Meade, M; Babler, B; Churchwell, E B; Gordon, K; Engelbracht, C W; Misselt, K; Vijh, U; Leitherer, C; Volk, K; Points, S; Reach, W; Hora, J L; Bernard, J P; Boulanger, F; Bracker, S; Cohen, M; Fukui, Y; Gallagher, J; Gorjian, V; Harris, J; Kelly, D; Kawamura, A; Latter, W B; Madden, S; Mizuno, A; Mizuno, N; Nota, A; Oey, M S; Onishi, T; Paladini, R; Panagia, N; Perez-Gonzalez, P; Shibai, H; Sato, S; Smith, L; Staveley-Smith, L; Tielens, A G G M; Ueta, T; Van Dyk, S D; Zaritsky, D

    2006-01-01

    Color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) are presented for the Spitzer SAGE (Surveying the Agents of a Galaxy's Evolution) survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). IRAC and MIPS 24 um epoch one data are presented. These data represent the deepest, widest mid-infrared CMDs of their kind ever produced in the LMC. Combined with the 2MASS survey, the diagrams are used to delineate the evolved stellar populations in the Large Magellanic Cloud as well as Galactic foreground and extragalactic background populations. Some 32000 evolved stars brighter than the tip of the red giant branch are identified. Of these, approximately 17500 are classified as oxygen-rich, 7000 carbon-rich, and another 1200 as ``extreme'' asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. Brighter members of the latter group have been called ``obscured'' AGB stars in the literature owing to their dusty circumstellar envelopes. A large number (1200) of luminous oxygen--rich AGB stars/M supergiants are also identified. Finally, there is strong evidence from the 24 u...

  19. The Extended GMRT Radio Halo Survey II: Further results and analysis of the full sample

    CERN Document Server

    Kale, R; Giacintucci, S; Dallacasa, D; Cassano, R; Brunetti, G; Cuciti, V; Macario, G; Athreya, R

    2015-01-01

    The intra-cluster medium contains cosmic rays and magnetic fields that are manifested through the large scale synchrotron sources, termed as radio halos, relics and mini-halos. The Extended Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) Radio Halo Survey (EGRHS) is an extension of the GMRT Radio Halo Survey (GRHS) designed to search for radio halos using GMRT 610/235 MHz observations. The GRHS+EGRHS consists of 64 clusters in the redshift range 0.2 -- 0.4 that have an X-ray luminosity larger than 5x10^44 erg/s in the 0.1 -- 2.4 keV band and with declinations > -31 deg in the REFLEX and eBCS X-ray cluster catalogues. In this second paper in the series, GMRT 610/235 MHz data on the last batch of 11 galaxy clusters and the statistical analysis of the full sample are presented. A new mini-halo in RXJ2129.6+0005 and candidate diffuse sources in Z5247, A2552 and Z1953 are discovered. A unique feature of this survey are the upper limits on the detections of 1 Mpc sized radio halos; 4 new are presented here making a total of...

  20. [Analysis of prognostic factors after radical resection in 628 patients with stage II or III colon cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Qiong; Yang, Lin; Zhou, Ai-ping; Sun, Yong-kun; Song, Yan; DU, Feng; Wang, Jin-wan

    2013-03-01

    To analyze the clinicopathologic factors related to recurrence and metastasis of stage II or III colon cancer after radical resection. The clinical and pathological data of 628 patients with stage II or III colon cancer after radical resection from Jan. 2005 to Dec. 2008 in our hospital were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed. The overall recurrence and metastasis rate was 28.5% (179/628). The 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) rate was 70.3% and 5-year overall survival (OS) rate was 78.5%. Univariate analysis showed that age, smoking intensity, depth of tumor invasion, lymph node metastasis, TNM stage, gross classification, histological differentiation, blood vessel tumor embolus, tumor gross pathology, multiple primary tumors, preoperative and postoperative serum concentration of CEA and CA19-9, and the regimen of adjuvant chemotherapy were correlated to recurrence and metastasis of colon cancer after radical resection. Multivariate analysis showed that regional lymph node metastasis, TNM stage, the regimen of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy, and preoperative serum concentration of CEA and CA19-9 were independent factors affecting the prognosis of colon cancer patients. Regional lymph node metastasis, TNM stage, elevated preoperative serum concentration of CEA and CA19-9, the regimen of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy with single fluorouracil type drug are independent risk factors of recurrence and metastasis in patients with stage II-III colon cancer after radical resection.

  1. Preoperative neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio plusplatelet-to-lymphocyte ratio inpredicting survival forpatients withstage I-II gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XiaoweiSun; ZhiweiZhou; XuechaoLiu; JianjunLiu; ShangxiangChen; DazhiXu; WeiLi; YouqingZhan; YuanfangLi; YingboChen

    2016-01-01

    Background:The preoperative neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and the platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR) are associated with poor prognosis of gastric cancer. We aimed to determine whether the combination of NLR and PLR (NLR–PLR) could better predict survival of patients after curative resection for stage I–II gastric cancer. Methods:We collected data from the medical records of patients with stage I–II gastric cancer undergoing curative resection between December 2000 and November 2012 at the Sun Yat-sen Cancer Center. The preoperative NLR–PLR was calculated as follows: patients with both elevated NLR (≥2.1) and PLR (≥120) were given a score of 2, and patients with only one or neither were given a score of 1 or 0, respectively. Results:Kaplan–Meier analysis and log-rank tests revealed signiifcant differences in overall survival (OS) among patients with NLR–PLR scores of 0, 1 and 2 (P Conclusion:The preoperative NLR-PLR score is a useful predictor of postoperative survival in the patients with stage I–II gastric cancer and may help identify high-risk patients for rational therapy and timely follow-up.

  2. Photodynamic killing of cancer cells by a Platinum(II) complex with cyclometallating ligand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Rachel E.; Sazanovich, Igor V.; McKenzie, Luke K.; Stasheuski, Alexander S.; Coyle, Rachel; Baggaley, Elizabeth; Bottomley, Sarah; Weinstein, Julia A.; Bryant, Helen E.

    2016-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy that uses photosensitizers which only become toxic upon light-irradiation provides a strong alternative to conventional cancer treatment due to its ability to selectively target tumour material without affecting healthy tissue. Transition metal complexes are highly promising PDT agents due to intense visible light absorption, yet the majority are toxic even without light. This study introduces a small, photostable, charge-neutral platinum-based compound, Pt(II) 2,6-dipyrido-4-methyl-benzenechloride, complex 1, as a photosensitizer, which works under visible light. Activation of the new photosensitizer at low concentrations (0.1-1 μM) by comparatively low dose of 405 nm light (3.6 J cm-2) causes significant cell death of cervical, colorectal and bladder cancer cell lines, and, importantly, a cisplatin resistant cell line EJ-R. The photo-index of the complex is 8. We demonstrate that complex 1 induces irreversible DNA single strand breaks following irradiation, and that oxygen is essential for the photoinduced action. Neither light, nor compound alone led to cell death. The key advantages of the new drug include a remarkably fast accumulation time (diffusion-controlled, minutes), and photostability. This study demonstrates a highly promising new agent for photodynamic therapy, and attracts attention to photostable metal complexes as viable alternatives to conventional chemotherapeutics, such as cisplatin.

  3. Photodynamic killing of cancer cells by a Platinum(II) complex with cyclometallating ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Rachel E; Sazanovich, Igor V; McKenzie, Luke K; Stasheuski, Alexander S; Coyle, Rachel; Baggaley, Elizabeth; Bottomley, Sarah; Weinstein, Julia A; Bryant, Helen E

    2016-03-04

    Photodynamic therapy that uses photosensitizers which only become toxic upon light-irradiation provides a strong alternative to conventional cancer treatment due to its ability to selectively target tumour material without affecting healthy tissue. Transition metal complexes are highly promising PDT agents due to intense visible light absorption, yet the majority are toxic even without light. This study introduces a small, photostable, charge-neutral platinum-based compound, Pt(II) 2,6-dipyrido-4-methyl-benzenechloride, complex 1, as a photosensitizer, which works under visible light. Activation of the new photosensitizer at low concentrations (0.1-1 μM) by comparatively low dose of 405 nm light (3.6 J cm(-2)) causes significant cell death of cervical, colorectal and bladder cancer cell lines, and, importantly, a cisplatin resistant cell line EJ-R. The photo-index of the complex is 8. We demonstrate that complex 1 induces irreversible DNA single strand breaks following irradiation, and that oxygen is essential for the photoinduced action. Neither light, nor compound alone led to cell death. The key advantages of the new drug include a remarkably fast accumulation time (diffusion-controlled, minutes), and photostability. This study demonstrates a highly promising new agent for photodynamic therapy, and attracts attention to photostable metal complexes as viable alternatives to conventional chemotherapeutics, such as cisplatin.

  4. Amount, type, and timing of recreational physical activity in relation to colon and rectal cancer in older adults: the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Ann; Connell, Cari J; Jacobs, Eric J; McCullough, Marjorie L; Patel, Alpa V; Calle, Eugenia E; Cokkinides, Vilma E; Thun, Michael J

    2004-12-01

    Physical activity has consistently been associated with lower risk of colon cancer, but information is limited on the amount, type, and timing of activities. The relationship between physical activity and rectal cancer is unclear. We examined characteristics of recreational physical activity in relation to colon and rectal cancer in the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort of 70,403 men and 80,771 women (median age, 63 years); 940 colon and 390 rectal cancers were identified from enrollment in 1992 to 1993 through August 1999. The multivariate-adjusted rate ratios (95% confidence intervals) associated with any recreational physical activity compared with none were 0.87 (0.71-1.06) for colon cancer and 0.70 (0.53-0.93) for rectal cancer. Colon cancer risk decreased significantly with increasing total hours (P for trend without reference group = 0.007) and metabolic equivalent hours (P for trend = 0.006) per week of activities. No clear decrease in rectal cancer risk was seen with increasing hours per week of physical activity. Rate ratios (95% confidence intervals) were 0.72 (0.52-0.98) for /=7 hours per week of physical activity compared with none. Past exercise, as reported in 1982, was not associated with risk of either colon or rectal cancer. We conclude that increasing amounts of time spent at recreational physical activity are associated with substantially lower risk of colon cancer and that recreational physical activity is associated with lower risk of rectal cancer in older men and women.

  5. Cellular and biomolecular responses of human ovarian cancer cells to cytostatic dinuclear platinum(II) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Miaoxin; Wang, Xiaoyong; Zhu, Jianhui; Fan, Damin; Zhang, Yangmiao; Zhang, Junfeng; Guo, Zijian

    2011-03-01

    Polynuclear platinum(II) complexes represent a class of potential anticancer agents that have shown promising pharmacological properties in preclinical studies. The nature of cellular responses induced by these complexes, however, is poorly understood. In this research, the cellular responses of human ovarian cancer COC1 cells to dinuclear platinum(II) complexes {[cis-Pt(NH₃)₂Cl]₂L¹}(NO₃)₂ (1) and {[cis-Pt(NH₃)₂Cl]₂L²}(NO₃)₂ (2) (L¹ = α,α'-diamino-p-xylene, L² = 4,4'-methylenedianiline) has been studied using cisplatin as a reference. The effect of platinum complexes on the proliferation, death mode, mitochondrial membrane potential, and cell cycle progression has been examined by MTT assay and flow cytometry. The activation of cell cycle checkpoint kinases (CHK1/2), extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2), and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) of the cells by the complexes has also been analyzed using phospho-specific flow cytometry. Complex 1 is more cytotoxic than complex 2 and cisplatin at most concentrations; complex 2 and cisplatin are comparably cytotoxic. These complexes kill the cells through an apoptotic or apoptosis-like pathway characterized by exposure of phosphatidylserine and dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential. Complex 1 shows the strongest inductive effect on the morphological changes of the cells, followed by cisplatin and complex 2. Complexes 1 and 2 arrest the cell cycle in G2 or M phase, while cisplatin arrests the cell cycle in S phase. The influence of these complexes on CHK1/2, ERK1/2, and p38 MAPK varies with the dose of the drugs or reaction time. Activation of phospho-ERK1/2 and phospho-p38 MAPK by these complexes is closely related to the cytostatic activity. The results demonstrate that dinuclear platinum(II) complexes can induce some cellular responses different from those caused by cisplatin.

  6. Triple-negative breast cancer: multipronged approach, single-arm pilot phase II study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recchia, Francesco; Candeloro, Giampiero; Desideri, Giovambattista; Necozione, Stefano; Recchia, Cornelia O C; Cirulli, Vincenzo; Rea, Silvio

    2012-08-01

    Anthracyclines (A) and taxanes (T) are standard first-line chemotherapy agents for patients with advanced breast cancer. Platinum analogues have also shown activity in the triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) histology, but clinical data are limited. Here we report the long-term follow-up of a phase II study on TNBC treated with a combined modality therapy, including induction with AT, cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and 5-fluorouracil (CMF) with concurrent radiation therapy, and a dose-dense consolidation chemotherapy (HDCT) with carboplatin (CBDCA), ifosfamide (IFX), etoposide (VP-16). Patients' median age was 44 years, with 73% premenopausal. Epirubicin 75 mg/m(2) and docetaxel 75 mg/m(2) were administered to 70 patients with TNBC: as neoadjuvant and adjuvant therapy to 12 and 58 patients, respectively. Postoperative radiation therapy, 5000 cGy, was delivered, synchronous with triweekly CMF. After radiation therapy, two courses of HDCT with CBDCA, IFX, VP-16, were given, with hematological growth factors. After a median follow-up of 81 months, all patients were evaluable for toxicity and response. Most important toxicity were grade 3 skin reaction and grade 4 hematological in 3% and 31% of patients, respectively. Pathological complete response was observed in 25% of patients receiving preoperative chemotherapy. Treatment failures were as follows: eight visceral, four contralateral breast cancer, four locoregional, and one leukemia. Five-year progression-free survival and overall survival rate were 78% and 91%, respectively. Induction chemotherapy, followed by chemoradiation therapy and HDCT, provides a prolonged disease-free period and a significant increase in overall survival in TNBC, with an acceptable toxicity profile.

  7. Phase II Study of Preoperative Helical Tomotherapy With a Simultaneous Integrated Boost for Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engels, Benedikt; Tournel, Koen [Department of Radiotherapy, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Everaert, Hendrik [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Hoorens, Anne [Department of Pathology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Sermeus, Alexandra [Department of Gastroenterology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Christian, Nicolas; Storme, Guy; Verellen, Dirk [Department of Radiotherapy, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); De Ridder, Mark, E-mail: mark.deridder@uzbrussel.be [Department of Radiotherapy, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: The addition of concomitant chemotherapy to preoperative radiotherapy is considered the standard of care for patients with cT3-4 rectal cancer. The combined treatment modality increases the complete response rate and local control (LC), but has no impact on survival or the incidence of distant metastases. In addition, it is associated with considerable toxicity. As an alternative strategy, we explored prospectively, preoperative helical tomotherapy with a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB). Methods and Materials: A total of 108 patients were treated with intensity-modulated and image-guided radiotherapy using the Tomotherapy Hi-Art II system. A dose of 46 Gy, in daily fractions of 2 Gy, was delivered to the mesorectum and draining lymph nodes, without concomitant chemotherapy. Patients with an anticipated circumferential resection margin (CRM) of less than 2 mm, based on magnetic resonance imaging, received a SIB to the tumor up to a total dose of 55.2 Gy. Acute and late side effects were scored using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Results: A total of 102 patients presented with cT3-4 tumors; 57 patients entered the boost group and 51 the no-boost group. One patient in the no-boost group developed a radio-hypersensitivity reaction, resulting in a complete tumor remission, a Grade 3 acute and Grade 5 late enteritis. No other Grade {>=}3 acute toxicities occurred. With a median follow-up of 32 months, Grade {>=}3 late gastrointestinal and urinary toxicity were observed in 6% and 4% of the patients, respectively. The actuarial 2-year LC, progression-free survival and overall survival were 98%, 79%, and 93%. Conclusions: Preoperative helical tomotherapy displays a favorable acute toxicity profile in patients with cT3-4 rectal cancer. A SIB can be safely administered in patients with a narrow CRM and resulted in a promising LC.

  8. Phase II trial of neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by chemoradiation in locally advanced cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Azevedo, Carla Rameri Alexandre Silva; Thuler, Luiz Cláudio Santos; de Mello, Maria Júlia Gonçalves; de Oliveira Lima, Jurema Telles; da Fonte, Ana Luiza Fassizoli; Fontão, Diógenes Fernando Santos; Carneiro, Vandré Cabral Gomes; Chang, Tien Man Cabral; Ferreira, Carlos Gil

    2017-09-01

    Cervical cancer is a global public health challenge. Since 1999, platin based chemoradiation (CRT) is the standard treatment for those patients with locally advanced disease. However, this population still has a dismal prognosis and, alternatives approaches such as adjuvant chemotherapy are controversial, especially because of increased toxicity. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) could be an option for more intensive treatment with manageable toxicity. A phase II, prospective, non-randomized trial was conducted at a reference center in Recife, Brazil. Locally advanced cervical cancer patients (Ib2-IVa) were treated with neoadjuvant cisplatin 35mg/m(2) and gemcitabine 1000mg/m(2) D1 and D8, for 2cycles. Then, they received CRT (50.4Gy) with weekly cisplatin 40mg/m(2) followed by brachytherapy. Response rate (RR) and toxicity were the primary endpoints. Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were secondary endpoints. Between Sep/2013 and Oct/2015, 50 patients were initiated on NACT and CRT. RR was 81% at the end of treatment. Hematological and gastrointestinal toxicity were most common. Grade 3/4 toxicity was 20% during NACT and 44% during CRT. Late adverse events were present in 20% of patients. PFS at 1 and 3-years were 73.4% (IC 58.7-83.6) and 53.9% (IC 36.9-68.3), respectively; and, OS at 1 and 3-years were 93.9% (IC 82.4-98.0) and 71.3% (IC 53.3-83.3), respectively. In our hands NACT in locally advanced cervical cancer patients did not show a meaningful improvement in ORR. Nevertheless, we believe it should be further explored in prospective trials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Antiproliferative effects of copper(II)-polypyridyl complexes in breast cancer cells through inducing apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salimi, Mona; Abdi, Khatereh; Kandelous, Hirsa Mostafapour; Hadadzadeh, Hassan; Azadmanesh, Kayhan; Amanzadeh, Amir; Sanati, Hassan

    2015-04-01

    Although cisplatin has been used for decades to treat human cancer, some toxic side effects and resistance are observed. Previous investigations have suggested copper complexes as a novel class of tumor-cell apoptosis inducers. The present study aimed to evaluate the anti-breast cancer activities of two polypyridyl-based copper(II) complexes, [Cu(tpy)(dppz)](NO3)2 (1) and [Cu(tptz)2](NO3)2 (2) (tpy = 2,2':6',2″-terpyridine, dppz = dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine, tptz = 2,4,6-tris(2-pyridyl)-1,3,5-triazine), using human breast adenocarcinoma cell line (MCF-7). The ability of the complexes to cleave supercoiled DNA in the presence and absence of external agents was also examined. The apoptotic activities of the complexes were assessed using flow cytometry, fluorescence microscope and western blotting analysis. Our results indicated the high DNA affinity and nuclease activity of complexes 1 and 2. The cleavage mechanisms between the complexes and plasmid DNA are likely to involve a singlet oxygen or singlet oxygen-like entity as the reactive oxygen species. Complexes 1 and 2 also significantly inhibited the proliferation of MCF-7 cells in a dose-dependent manner (IC50 values = 4.57 and 1.98 μM at 24 h, respectively). Complex 2 remarkably induced MCF-7 cells to undergo apoptosis, which was demonstrated by cell morphology, annexin-V and propidium iodide staining. The caspase cascade was activated as shown by the proteolytic cleavage of caspase-3 after treatment of MCF-7 cells with complex 2. Additionally, complex 2 significantly increased the expression of the Bax-to-Bcl-2 ratio to induce apoptosis. In conclusion, these results revealed that complex 2 may be a potential and promising chemotherapeutic agent to treat breast cancer.

  10. Axillary radiotherapy in conservative surgery for early-stage breast cancer (stage I and II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Novoa, Alejandra; Acea Nebril, Benigno; Díaz, Inma; Builes Ramírez, Sergio; Varela, Cristina; Cereijo, Carmen; Mosquera Oses, Joaquín; López Calviño, Beatriz; Seoane Pillado, María Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Several clinical studies analyze axillary treatment in women with early-stage breast cancer because of changes in the indication for axillary lymph node dissection. The aim of the study is to analyze the impact of axillary radiotherapy in disease-free and overall survival in women with early breast cancer treated with lumpectomy. Retrospective study in women with initial stages of breast carcinoma treated by lumpectomy. A comparative analysis of high-risk women with axillary lymph node involvement who received axillary radiotherapy with the group of women with low risk without radiotherapy was performed. Logistic regression was used to determine factors influencing survival and lymphedema onset. A total of 541 women were included in the study: 384 patients (71%) without axillary lymph node involvement and 157 women (29%) with 1-3 axillary lymph node involvement. Patients with axillary radiotherapy had a higher number of metastatic lymph node compared to non-irradiated (1.6±0.7 vs. 1.4±0.6, P=.02). The group of women with axillary lymph node involvement and radiotherapy showed an overall and disease-free survival at 10 years similar to that obtained in patients without irradiation (89.7% and 77.2%, respectively). 3 lymph nodes involved multiplied by more than 7 times the risk of death (HR=7.20; 95% CI: 1.36 to 38.12). The multivariate analysis showed axillary lymph node dissection as the only variable associated with the development of lymphedema. The incidence of axillary relapse on stage I and II breast cancer is rare. In these patients axillary radiotherapy does not improve overall survival, but contributes to regional control in those patients with risk factors. Copyright © 2016 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Influence of Arsenic (III, Cadmium (II, Chromium (VI, Mercury (II, and Lead (II Ions on Human Triple Negative Breast Cancer (HCC1806 Cell Cytotoxicity and Cell Viability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsdale F. Mehari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The hazardous consequences of heavy metal ions (HMIs on human health necessitate the immediate need to probe fundamentally the interactions and cytotoxic effects of HMIs on humans. This study investigated the influence of five toxic HMIs (arsenic (As (III, cadmium (Cd (II, chromium (Cr (VI, mercury (Hg (II, and lead (Pb (II on human TNBC (HCC 1806 cell viability using optical microscopy, trypan blue dye-exclusion assays, and flow cytometry. The TNBC cells were exposed to varying concentrations of HMIs for 24 and 48 hours. We evaluated the influence of the concentrations and duration of HMIs exposure on TNBC cell viability. Light microscopy, cell viability assays, revealed that after 48-hour treatment of TNBC cells with 1 x 10-5 M of As (III, Cd (II, Hg (II, Cr (IV, and Pb (II resulted in cell viabilities of 23%, 34%, 35%, 56%, 91% respectively, suggesting that As (III has the greatest cytotoxicity (77% cell death while Pb (II showed the least (9% cell death. Furthermore, flow cytometry revealed that while Pb (II, As (III and Cr (IV had significant increases in cell death, Hg (II caused a G1 arrest. Together, this study revealed that HMIs cause a differential cytotoxic effect on TNBC cells and suggest that they may have very different genotoxic targets and implications in their mutagenic potential.

  12. The Rise and Fall of Type Ia Supernova Light Curves in the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayden, Brian T.; /Notre Dame U.; Garnavich, Peter M.; /Notre Dame U.; Kessler, Richard; /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U., EFI; Frieman, Joshua A.; /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U. /Fermilab; Jha, Saurabh W.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Rutgers U., Piscataway; Bassett, Bruce; /Cape Town U., Dept. Math. /South African Astron. Observ.; Cinabro, David; /Wayne State U.; Dilday, Benjamin; /Rutgers U., Piscataway; Kasen, Daniel; /UC, Santa Cruz; Marriner, John; /Fermilab; Nichol, Robert C.; /Portsmouth U., ICG /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /Johns Hopkins U.

    2010-01-01

    We analyze the rise and fall times of Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) light curves discovered by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey. From a set of 391 light curves k-corrected to the rest-frame B and V bands, we find a smaller dispersion in the rising portion of the light curve compared to the decline. This is in qualitative agreement with computer models which predict that variations in radioactive nickel yield have less impact on the rise than on the spread of the decline rates. The differences we find in the rise and fall properties suggest that a single 'stretch' correction to the light curve phase does not properly model the range of SN Ia light curve shapes. We select a subset of 105 light curves well observed in both rise and fall portions of the light curves and develop a '2-stretch' fit algorithm which estimates the rise and fall times independently. We find the average time from explosion to B-band peak brightness is 17.38 {+-} 0.17 days, but with a spread of rise times which range from 13 days to 23 days. Our average rise time is shorter than the 19.5 days found in previous studies; this reflects both the different light curve template used and the application of the 2-stretch algorithm. The SDSS-II supernova set and the local SNe Ia with well-observed early light curves show no significant differences in their average rise-time properties. We find that slow-declining events tend to have fast rise times, but that the distribution of rise minus fall time is broad and single peaked. This distribution is in contrast to the bimodality in this parameter that was first suggested by Strovink (2007) from an analysis of a small set of local SNe Ia. We divide the SDSS-II sample in half based on the rise minus fall value, t{sub r} - t{sub f} {approx}< 2 days and t{sub r} - t{sub f} > 2 days, to search for differences in their host galaxy properties and Hubble residuals; we find no difference in host galaxy properties or Hubble

  13. Colorectal cancer screening of high-risk populations: A national survey of physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    White Pascale M

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The incidence of colorectal cancer can be decreased by appropriate use of screening modalities. Patients with a family history of colon cancer and of African-American ethnicity are known to be at higher risk of developing colorectal cancer. We aimed to determine if there is a lack of physician knowledge for colorectal cancer screening guidelines based on family history and ethnicity. Between February and April 2009 an anonymous web-based survey was administered to a random sample selected from a national list of 25,000 internists, family physicians and gastroenterologists. A stratified sampling strategy was used to include practitioners from states with high as well as low CRC incidence. All data analyses were performed following data collection in 2009. Results The average knowledge score was 37 ± 18% among the 512 respondents. Gastroenterologists averaged higher scores compared to internists, and family physicians, p = 0.001. Only 28% of physicians correctly identified the screening initiation point for African-Americans while only 12% of physicians correctly identified the screening initiation point and interval for a patient with a family history of CRC. The most commonly cited barriers to referring high-risk patients for CRC screening were "patient refusal" and "lack of insurance reimbursement." Conclusions There is a lack of knowledge amongst physicians of the screening guidelines for high-risk populations, based on family history and ethnicity. Educational programs to improve physician knowledge and to reduce perceived barriers to CRC screening are warranted to address health disparities in colorectal cancer.

  14. A survey of the barriers associated with academic-based cancer research commercialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderford, Nathan L; Weiss, L Todd; Weiss, Heidi L

    2013-01-01

    Commercialization within the academic setting is associated with many challenges and barriers. Previous studies investigating these challenges/barriers have, in general, broadly focused on multiple disciplines and, oftentimes, several institutions simultaneously. The goal of the study presented here was to analyze a range of barriers that may be broadly associated with commercializing academic-based cancer research. This goal was addressed via a study of the barriers associated with cancer research commercialization at the University of Kentucky (UK). To this end, a research instrument in the form of an electronic survey was developed. General demographic information was collected on study participants and two research questions were addressed: 1) What are the general barriers inhibiting cancer research commercialization at UK? and 2) Would mitigation of the barriers potentially enhance faculty engagement in commercialization activities? Descriptive and statistical analysis of the data reveal that multiple barriers likely inhibit cancer research commercialization at UK with expense, time, infrastructure, and lack of industry partnerships being among the most commonly cited factors. The potential alleviation of these factors in addition to revised University policies/procedures, risk mitigation, more emphasis on commercialization by academia research field, and increased information on how to commercialize significantly correlated with the potential for increased commercialization activity. Furthermore, multivariate logistic regression modeling demonstrated that research commercialization would incrementally increase as barriers to the process are removed and that PhD-holding respondents and respondents in commercialization-supportive research fields would be more likely to commercialize their research upon barrier removal. Overall, as with other disciplines, these data suggest that for innovations derived from academic cancer-research to move more effectively and

  15. MicroRNA-139 suppresses proliferation in luminal type breast cancer cells by targeting Topoisomerase II alpha

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua, Wei [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi' an (China); Sa, Ke-Di; Zhang, Xiang; Jia, Lin-Tao; Zhao, Jing [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi' an (China); Yang, An-Gang [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Immunology, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi' an (China); Zhang, Rui, E-mail: ruizhang@fmmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi' an (China); Fan, Jing, E-mail: jingfan@fmmu.edu.cn [Department of Vascular and Endocrine Surgery, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Bian, Ka, E-mail: kakamax85@hotmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Immunology, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi' an (China); Department of Otolaryngology, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710038 (China)

    2015-08-07

    The classification of molecular subtypes of breast cancer improves the prognostic accuracy and therapeutic benefits in clinic. However, because of the complexity of breast cancer, more biomarkers and functional molecules need to be explored. Here, analyzing the data in a huge cohort of breast cancer patients, we found that Topoisomerase II alpha (TOP2a), an important target of chemotherapy is a biomarker for prognosis in luminal type breast cancer patients, but not in basal like or HER2 positive breast cancer patients. We identified that miR-139, a previous reported anti-metastatic microRNA targets 3’-untranslated region (3′UTR) of TOP2a mRNA. Further more, we revealed that the forced expression of miR-139 reduces the TOP2a expression at both mRNA and protein levels. And our functional experiments showed that the ectopic expression of miR-139 remarkably inhibits proliferation in luminal type breast cancer cells, while exogenous TOP2a expression could rescue inhibition of cell proliferation mediated by miR-139. Collectively, our present study demonstrates the miR-139-TOP2a regulatory axis is important for proliferation in luminal type breast cancer cells. This functional link may help us to further understand the specificity of subtypes of breast cancer and optimize the strategy of cancer treatment. - Highlights: • High levels of TOP2a expression are closely associated with poor prognosis in luminal type breast cancer patients. • TOP2a is a novel target of miR-139. • Overexpression of miR-139 inhibits proliferation in luminal type breast cancer cells. • TOP2a is essential for miR-139-induced growth arrest in luminal type breast cancer cells.

  16. Characterising the local void with the X-ray cluster survey REFLEX II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Chris A.; Böhringer, Hans; Bristow, Martyn; Chon, Gayoung

    2016-10-01

    Claims of a significant underdensity or void in the density distribution on scales out to ~= 300 Mpc have recently been made using samples of galaxies. We present the results of an alternative test of the matter distribution on these scales using clusters of galaxies, which provide an independent and powerful probe of large-scale structure. We study the density distribution of X-ray clusters from the ROSAT-based REFLEX II catalogue, which covers a contiguous area of 4.24 steradians in the southern hempsphere (34% of the entire sky). Using the normalised comoving number density of clusters we find evidence for an underdensity (30-40%), out to z~ 0.04, equivalent to ~=170 Mpc and with a significance of 3.4σ. On scales between 300 Mpc and 1 Gpc the distribution of REFLEX II clusters is consistent with being uniform. We also confirm recent results that the underdensity has a large contribution from the direction of the South Galactic Cap region, but is not significant in the direction of the Northern Galactic Cap as viewed from the southern sky. Both the limited size of the detected underdensity and its lack of isotropy, argue against the idea that the Type Ia supernovae data can be explained without the need for dark energy.

  17. Des-gamma carboxy prothrombin (PIVKA-II) and alpha-fetoprotein producing gastric cancer with multiple liver metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yoshihisa; Inoue, Tohru

    2003-04-01

    We describe the case of an 87-year-old woman who presented to Tokyo Kousei Nenkin Hospital because of appetite loss and general fatigue. Multiple liver masses and Borrmann type 2 gastric tumor were detected. A clinical diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma and gastric cancer was made based on the patient's high levels of serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP; 490 200 ng/mL) and protein induced by vitamin K absence or antagonist-II (PIVKA-II, 2284 mAU/mL). The patient's general condition worsened gradually and she died 42 days after admission. Autopsy revealed that the predominant histological structure of the gastric tumor was trabecular or sheet-like, although a tubular structure was also found. Venous invasion was prominent. Immunohistochemically, the tumor tissue was positive for AFP and a few tumor cells were positive for PIVKA-II. The histological appearance and immunohistochemical features of the hepatic tumors resembled that of the gastric tumor. This case was pathologically diagnosed as AFP- and PIVKA-II-producing gastric carcinoma with multiple liver metastases. When tumors are found in the stomach and liver and serum PIVKA-II level is abnormally high, the possibility of PIVKA-II-producing gastric cancer with liver metastasis should be considered, especially when hepatitis virus markers are negative and liver cirrhosis is not present.

  18. Public awareness of the link between alcohol and cancer in England in 2015: a population-based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buykx, Penny; Li, Jessica; Gavens, Lucy; Hooper, Lucie; Lovatt, Melanie; Gomes de Matos, Elena; Meier, Petra; Holmes, John

    2016-11-30

    Public knowledge of the association between alcohol and cancer is reported to be low. We aimed to provide up-to-date evidence for England regarding awareness of the link between alcohol and different cancers and to determine whether awareness differs by demographic characteristics, alcohol use, and geographic region. A representative sample of 2100 adults completed an online survey in July 2015. Respondents were asked to identify which health outcomes, including specific cancers, may be caused by alcohol consumption. Logistic regressions explored whether demographic, alcohol use, and geographic characteristics predicted correctly identifying alcohol-related cancer risk. Unprompted, 12.9% of respondents identified cancer as a potential health outcome of alcohol consumption. This rose to 47% when prompted (compared to 95% for liver disease and 73% for heart disease). Knowledge of the link between alcohol and specific cancers varied between 18% (breast) and 80% (liver). Respondents identified the following cancers as alcohol-related where no such evidence exists: bladder (54%), brain (32%), ovarian (17%). Significant predictors of awareness of the link between alcohol and cancer were being female, more highly educated, and living in North-East England. There is generally low awareness of the relationship between alcohol consumption and cancer, particularly breast cancer. Greater awareness of the relationship between alcohol and breast cancer in North-East England, where a mass media campaign highlighted this relationship, suggests that population awareness can be influenced by social marketing.

  19. The Prevalence of Vitamin D Deficiency among Cancer Survivors in a Nationwide Survey of the Korean Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myueng Guen Oh

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that inadequate vitamin D levels are associated with a poor cancer prognosis, but data regarding actual vitamin D levels in cancer survivors are limited. This study investigated the vitamin D levels and prevalence of vitamin D deficiency among Korean cancer survivors compared with non-cancer controls, and identified the factors associated with vitamin D deficiency.Using the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES, 915 cancer survivors and 29,694 controls without a history of cancer were selected. Serum 25(OHD levels were measured; vitamin D deficiency was defined as 25(OHD levels less than 20 ng/mL. Chi-square tests and multiple logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and associated factors.Vitamin D deficiency was observed in 62.7% of cancer survivors and 67.1% of controls. Among cancer survivors, vitamin D deficiency was most prevalent among 19-44 year olds (76.2% and among managers, professionals, and related workers (79.3%. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that younger cancer survivors and those who work indoors were predisposed to vitamin D deficiency.Vitamin D deficiency was prevalent among both cancer survivors and controls in Korea. The regular evaluation and management of vitamin D levels is needed for both bone health and general health in cancer survivors.

  20. THE GALACTIC O-STAR SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY (GOSSS). II. BRIGHT SOUTHERN STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sota, A.; Apellániz, J. Maíz; Alfaro, E. J. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía-CSIC, Glorieta de la Astronomía s/n, E-18008 Granada (Spain); Morrell, N. I. [Las Campanas Observatory, Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, La Serena (Chile); Barbá, R. H.; Arias, J. I. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de La Serena, Av. Cisternas 1200 Norte, La Serena (Chile); Walborn, N. R. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Gamen, R. C., E-mail: jmaiz@iaa.es [Instituto de Astrofísica de La Plata (CCT La Plata-CONICET, Universidad Nacional de La Plata), Paseo del Bosque s/n, 1900 La Plata (Argentina)

    2014-03-01

    We present the second installment of GOSSS, a massive spectroscopic survey of Galactic O stars, based on new homogeneous, high signal-to-noise ratio, R ∼ 2500 digital observations from both hemispheres selected from the Galactic O-Star Catalog (GOSC). In this paper we include bright stars and other objects drawn mostly from the first version of GOSC, all of them south of δ = –20°, for a total number of 258 O stars. We also revise the northern sample of Paper I to provide the full list of spectroscopically classified Galactic O stars complete to B = 8, bringing the total number of published GOSSS stars to 448. Extensive sequences of exceptional objects are given, including the early Of/WN, O Iafpe, Ofc, ON/OC, Onfp, Of?p, and Oe types, as well as double/triple-lined spectroscopic binaries. The new spectral subtype O9.2 is also discussed. The magnitude and spatial distributions of the observed sample are analyzed. We also present new results from OWN, a multi-epoch high-resolution spectroscopic survey coordinated with GOSSS that is assembling the largest sample of Galactic spectroscopic massive binaries ever attained. The OWN data combined with additional information on spectroscopic and visual binaries from the literature indicate that only a very small fraction (if any) of the stars with masses above 15-20 M {sub ☉} are born as single systems. In the future we will publish the rest of the GOSSS survey, which is expected to include over 1000 Galactic O stars.

  1. Deep Chandra Survey of the Small Magellanic Cloud. II. Timing Analysis of X-Ray Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, JaeSub; Antoniou, Vallia; Zezas, Andreas; Haberl, Frank; Sasaki, Manami; Drake, Jeremy J.; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Laycock, Silas

    2017-09-01

    We report the timing analysis results of X-ray pulsars from a recent deep Chandra survey of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). We analyzed a total exposure of 1.4 Ms from 31 observations over a 1.2 deg2 region in the SMC under a Chandra X-ray Visionary Program. Using the Lomb–Scargle and epoch-folding techniques, we detected periodic modulations from 20 pulsars and a new candidate pulsar. The survey also covered 11 other pulsars with no clear sign of periodic modulation. The 0.5–8 keV X-ray luminosity (L X ) of the pulsars ranges from 1034 to 1037 erg s‑1 at 60 kpc. All of the Chandra sources with L X ≳ 4 × 1035 erg s‑1 exhibit X-ray pulsations. The X-ray spectra of the SMC pulsars (and high-mass X-ray binaries) are in general harder than those of the SMC field population. All but SXP 8.02 can be fitted by an absorbed power-law model with a photon index of Γ ≲ 1.5. The X-ray spectrum of the known magnetar SXP 8.02 is better fitted with a two-temperature blackbody model. Newly measured pulsation periods of SXP 51.0, SXP 214, and SXP 701, are significantly different from the previous XMM-Newton and RXTE measurements. This survey provides a rich data set for energy-dependent pulse profile modeling. Six pulsars show an almost eclipse-like dip in the pulse profile. Phase-resolved spectral analysis reveals diverse spectral variations during pulsation cycles: e.g., for an absorbed power-law model, some exhibit an (anti)-correlation between absorption and X-ray flux, while others show more intrinsic spectral variation (i.e., changes in photon indices).

  2. Characterising large-scale structure with the REFLEX II cluster survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chon, Gayoung

    2016-10-01

    We study the large-scale structure with superclusters from the REFLEX X-ray cluster survey together with cosmological N-body simulations. It is important to construct superclusters with criteria such that they are homogeneous in their properties. We lay out our theoretical concept considering future evolution of superclusters in their definition, and show that the X-ray luminosity and halo mass functions of clusters in superclusters are found to be top-heavy, different from those of clusters in the field. We also show a promising aspect of using superclusters to study the local cluster bias and mass scaling relation with simulations.

  3. The Chandra planetary nebula survey (CHANPLANS). II. X-ray emission from compact planetary nebulae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, M.; Kastner, J. H. [Center for Imaging Science and Laboratory for Multiwavelength Astrophysics, Rochester Institute of Technology, 54 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Montez, R. Jr. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Balick, B. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Frew, D. J.; De Marco, O.; Parker, Q. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Macquarie Research Centre for Astronomy, Astrophysics and Astrophotonics, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia); Jones, D. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Atacama, Copayapu 485, Copiapó (Chile); Miszalski, B. [South African Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 9, Observatory, 7935 (South Africa); Sahai, R. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, MS 183-900, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Blackman, E.; Frank, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Chu, Y.-H. [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL (United States); Guerrero, M. A. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía, IAA-CSIC, Glorieta de la Astronomía s/n, Granada, E-18008 (Spain); Lopez, J. A. [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Campus Ensenada, Apdo. Postal 22860, Ensenada, B. C. (Mexico); Zijlstra, A. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Bujarrabal, V. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Corradi, R. L. M. [Departamento de Astrofísica, Universidad de La Laguna, E-38206 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Nordhaus, J. [NSF Astronomy and Astrophysics Fellow, Center for Computational Relativity and Gravitation, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); and others

    2014-10-20

    We present results from the most recent set of observations obtained as part of the Chandra X-ray observatory Planetary Nebula Survey (CHANPLANS), the first comprehensive X-ray survey of planetary nebulae (PNe) in the solar neighborhood (i.e., within ∼1.5 kpc of the Sun). The survey is designed to place constraints on the frequency of appearance and range of X-ray spectral characteristics of X-ray-emitting PN central stars and the evolutionary timescales of wind-shock-heated bubbles within PNe. CHANPLANS began with a combined Cycle 12 and archive Chandra survey of 35 PNe. CHANPLANS continued via a Chandra Cycle 14 Large Program which targeted all (24) remaining known compact (R {sub neb} ≲ 0.4 pc), young PNe that lie within ∼1.5 kpc. Results from these Cycle 14 observations include first-time X-ray detections of hot bubbles within NGC 1501, 3918, 6153, and 6369, and point sources in HbDs 1, NGC 6337, and Sp 1. The addition of the Cycle 14 results brings the overall CHANPLANS diffuse X-ray detection rate to ∼27% and the point source detection rate to ∼36%. It has become clearer that diffuse X-ray emission is associated with young (≲ 5 × 10{sup 3} yr), and likewise compact (R {sub neb} ≲ 0.15 pc), PNe with closed structures and high central electron densities (n{sub e} ≳ 1000 cm{sup –3}), and is rarely associated with PNe that show H{sub 2} emission and/or pronounced butterfly structures. Hb 5 is one such exception of a PN with a butterfly structure that hosts diffuse X-ray emission. Additionally, two of the five new diffuse X-ray detections (NGC 1501 and NGC 6369) host [WR]-type central stars, supporting the hypothesis that PNe with central stars of [WR]-type are likely to display diffuse X-ray emission.

  4. Characterising large-scale structure with the REFLEX II cluster survey

    CERN Document Server

    Chon, Gayoung

    2015-01-01

    We study the large-scale structure with superclusters from the REFLEX X-ray cluster survey together with cosmological N-body simulations. It is important to construct superclusters with criteria such that they are homogeneous in their properties. We lay out our theoretical concept considering future evolution of superclusters in their definition, and show that the X-ray luminosity and halo mass functions of clusters in superclusters are found to be top-heavy, different from those of clusters in the field. We also show a promising aspect of using superclusters to study the local cluster bias and mass scaling relation with simulations.

  5. The Dubai Community Psychiatric Survey: II. Development of the Socio-cultural Change Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebbington, P; Ghubash, R; Hamdi, E

    1993-04-01

    The Dubai Community Psychiatric Survey was carried out to assess the effect of very rapid social change on the mental health of women in Dubai, one of the United Arab Emirates. In order to measure social change at an individual level, we developed a questionnaire covering behaviour and attitudes in a wide range of situations, the Socio-cultural Change Questionnaire (ScCQ). In this paper we give an account of the considerations that determined the form of the ScCQ, its structural characteristics, and its validity.

  6. Novel MHC Class II Breast Cancer Vaccine Using RNA Interference (RNAi) to Down Regulate Invariant Chain (Ii)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    an irrelevant Ab (HLA-DR2-biotin) plus an avidin -PE conjugate. Jurkat is a DR1 cell line. Gray peaks denote staining with fluorescent conjugate...hen egg lysozyme (HEL) cytosolic model antigen via MHC II in the absence of Ii (122, 123). Yet others have shown that this process is involved in...an irrelevant Ab (HLA-DR2-biotin) plus an avidin -FITC conjugate. Jurkat is a DR1- cell line. Gray peaks denote staining with fluorescent conjugate

  7. Genetic Polymorphisms of Phase II Metabolic Enzymes and Lung Cancer Susceptibility in a Population of Central South China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-chun Chen

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A case-control study was conducted for analyzing the genetic polymorphisms of phase II metabolic enzymes in 97 patients with lung cancer and 197 healthy subjects from Han ethnic group of Hunan Province located in Central South China. The results showed that the frequencies of glutathione S-transferase (GST M1-null (GSTM1- or GSTT1-null (GSTT1- genotype alone, or combined form of both in lung cancer patients were significantly higher than those of the controls. Genotypes of combining GSTP1 mutant/GSTM1(- or GSTP1 mutant/GSTT1(- led to high risk of lung cancer. Individuals carrying any two or all three of GSTM1(-, GSTT1(- and GSTP1 mutant genotypes have a distinctly increased risk of lung cancer when compared to those with GSTM1 present (GSTM1+: GSTM1+/+ or GSTM1+/−, GSTT1 present (GSTT1+: GSTT1+/+ or GSTT1+/− and GSTP1 wild genotypes. Furthermore, individuals possessing combined genotypes of N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2 rapid acetylator, GSTP1 mutant and both GSTT1(- and GSTM1(- have a remarkably higher lung cancer risk than those carrying combined NAT2 slow acetylator genotype, GSTP1 wild genotype and both GSTT1(+ and GSTM1(+ genotypes. All these findings suggest that the genetic polymorphisms of phase II metabolic enzymes affect the susceptibility of lung cancer in the Han ethnic group of Central South China.

  8. Breast cancer incidence in food- vs non-food-producing areas in Norway: possible beneficial effects of World War II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robsahm, Trude Eid; Tretli, S

    2002-02-01

    It has been suggested that World War II influenced breast cancer risk among Norwegian women by affecting adolescent growth. Diet changed substantially during the war, and the reduction in energy intake was assumed to be larger in non-food-producing than in food-producing municipalities. In the present study, we have looked at the influence of residential history in areas with and without food production on the incidence of breast cancer in a population-based cohort study consisting of 597,906 women aged between 30 and 64 years. The study included 7311 cases of breast cancer, diagnosed between 1964 and 1992. The risk estimates were calculated using a Poisson regression model. The results suggest that residential history may influence the risk of breast cancer, where the suggested advantageous effect of World War II seems to be larger in non-food-producing than in food-producing areas. Breast cancer incidence was observed to decline for the post-war cohorts, which is discussed in relation to diet. Copyright 2002 The Cancer Research Campaign

  9. Skin cancer education among massage therapists: a survey at the 2010 meeting of the American Massage Therapy Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Shannon M; Louie-Gao, Qiong; Hession, Meghan L; Bailey, Elizabeth; Geller, Alan C; Cummins, Deborah

    2013-03-01

    Massage therapists encounter skin on a daily basis and have a unique opportunity to recognize potential skin cancers. The purpose of this study was to describe the skin cancer education provided to massage therapists and to assess their comfort regarding identification and communication of suspicious lesions. An observational retrospective survey study was conducted at the 2010 American Massage Therapy Association Meeting. Sixty percent reported receiving skin cancer education during and 25% reported receiving skin cancer education after training. Massage therapists who examine their own skin are more likely to be comfortable with recognizing a suspicious lesion and are more likely to examine their client's skin. Greater number of clients treated per year and greater frequency of client skin examinations were predictors of increased comfort level with recognizing a suspicious lesion. Massage therapists are more comfortable discussing than identifying a potential skin cancer. Massage therapists may be able to serve an important role in the early detection of skin cancer.

  10. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II: Photometry and Supernova Ia Light Curves from the 2005 Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holtzman, Jon A.; /New Mexico State U.; Marriner, John; /Fermilab; Kessler, Richard; /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U., EFI; Sako, Masao; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Pennsylvania U.; Dilday, Ben; /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U.; Frieman, Joshua A.; /Fermilab /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.; Schneider, Donald P.; /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys.; Bassett, Bruce; /Cape Town U., Dept. Math. /South African Astron. Observ.; Becker, Andrew; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Cinabro, David; /Wayne State U.; DeJongh, Fritz; /KICP, Chicago; Depoy, Darren L.; /Ohio State U., Dept. Astron.; Doi, Mamoru; /Tokyo U., Inst. Astron.; Garnavich, Peter M.; /Notre Dame U.; Hogan, Craig J.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Jha, Saurabh; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Rutgers U., Piscataway; Konishi, Kohki; /Tokyo U., ICRR; Lampeitl, Hubert; /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /Portsmouth U., ICG; Marshall, Jennifer L.; /Ohio State U., Dept. Astron.; McGinnis, David; Miknaitis, Gajus; /KICP, Chicago /Portsmouth U., ICG /Ohio State U., Dept. Astron. /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /Johns Hopkins U. /Rochester Inst. Tech. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Portsmouth U., ICG /Tokyo U., Inst. Astron. /South African Astron. Observ. /Cape Town U. /Tokyo U., ICRR /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2010-08-26

    We present ugriz light curves for 146 spectroscopically confirmed or spectroscopically probable Type Ia supernovae from the 2005 season of the SDSS-II Supernova survey. The light curves have been constructed using a photometric technique that we call scene modeling, which is described in detail here; the major feature is that supernova brightnesses are extracted from a stack of images without spatial resampling or convolution of the image data. This procedure produces accurate photometry along with accurate estimates of the statistical uncertainty, and can be used to derive photometry taken with multiple telescopes. We discuss various tests of this technique that demonstrate its capabilities. We also describe the methodology used for the calibration of the photometry, and present calibrated magnitudes and fluxes for all of the spectroscopic SNe Ia from the 2005 season.

  11. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II: Photometry and Supernova Ia Light Curves from the 2005 data

    CERN Document Server

    Holtzman, Jon A; Kessler, Richard; Sako, Masao; Dilday, Ben; Frieman, Joshua A; Schneider, Donald P; Bassett, Bruce; Becker, Andrew; Cinabro, David; DeJongh, Fritz; Depoy, Darren L; Doi, Mamoru; Garnavich, Peter M; Hogan, Craig J; Jha, Saurabh; Konishi, Kohki; Lampeitl, Hubert; Marshall, Jennifer L; McGinnis, David; Miknaitis, Gajus; Nichol, Robert C; Prieto, Jose Luis; Reiss, Adam G; Richmond, Michael W; Romani, Roger; Smith, Mathew; Takanashi, Naohiro; Tokita, Kouichi; van der Heyden, Kurt; Yasuda, Naoki; Zheng, Chen

    2009-01-01

    We present ugriz light curves for 146 spectroscopically confirmed or spectroscopically probable Type Ia supernovae from the 2005 season of the SDSS-II Supernova survey. The light curves have been constructed using a photometric technique that we call scene modelling, which is described in detail here; the major feature is that supernova brightnesses are extracted from a stack of images without spatial resampling or convolution of the image data. This procedure produces accurate photometry along with accurate estimates of the statistical uncertainty, and can be used to derive photometry taken with multiple telescopes. We discuss various tests of this technique that demonstrate its capabilities. We also describe the methodology used for the calibration of the photometry, and present calibrated magnitudes and fluxes for all of the spectroscopic SNe Ia from the 2005 season.

  12. Physical activity among cancer survivors and those with no history of cancer- a report from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Webb A; Nolan, Vikki G; Robison, Leslie L; Hudson, Melissa M; Ness, Kirsten K

    2011-08-15

    Cancer survivors are at greater risk for chronic diseases that make regular physical activity a challenge. The purpose of this manuscript was to compare physical activity levels among five-year cancer survivors and those with no history of cancer, and to determine risk factors for physical inactivity. Participants who completed the physical activity monitoring portion of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) in 2003-04 and 2005-06 were included in these analyses. Physical activity collected via accelerometer was used to determine who completed recommended amounts of physical activity according to Centers for Disease Control (CDC) guidelines. Associations between physical activity and cancer status were evaluated with multiple logistic regressions. 95.5% of five-year cancer survivors and 87.3% of those with no cancer history did not meet the CDC guidelines. After adjusting for sex, age, race, education and chronic conditions, cancer survivors were 1.7 (95% CI: 1.0, 2.9) times more likely than those with no cancer history to fail to meet CDC guidelines for physical activity. Neither the general population nor cancer survivors met the CDC guidelines for physical activity. Cancer survivors were less likely to meet recommendations and may need tailored interventions designed to take into account comorbid conditions to increase their physical activity levels.

  13. A resected case of metachronous liver metastasis from lung cancer producing alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and protein induced by vitamin K absence or antagonist II (PIVKA-II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshiro, Yukio; Takada, Yasutsugu; Enomoto, Tsuyoshi; Fukao, Katashi; Ishikawa, Shigemi; Iijima, Tatsuo

    2004-01-01

    A resected case of huge liver metastasis of hepatoid adenocarcinoma of the lung is described. A 77-year-old man who presented a solitary huge liver tumor was admitted to our hospital. He had undergone right lower lobectomy of the lung for lung cancer one year before. The view of imaging studies was not a typical one of hepatocellular carcinoma. Serum levels of AFP and PIVKA-II were 334,500ng/mL and 3,890mAU/mL, respectively, and the proportion of AFP L3 was 97.9%. It was thought that they were strongly diagnostic for hepatocellular carcinoma. Extended right lobectomy of the liver was performed. Microscopically, it was poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma and diagnosed as liver metastasis from the formerly resected lung cancer. The tumor was composed of cells with both sheet-like growth and tubule formation. The neoplastic cells, in the sheet-like growth resembled hepatocellular carcinoma cells. By immunohistochemical staining with anti-AFP and anti-PIVKA-II antibodies, cancer cells of both the primary and metastatic lesions were positive. The patient eventually died of multiple liver and bone metastasis 6 months after the operation.

  14. MicroRNA-410 functions as a tumor suppressor by targeting angiotensin II type 1 receptor in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Rende; Gu, Jianhua; Zhang, Zhibin; Wang, Yi; Gu, Chuan

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) act as key regulators of gene expression in diverse biological processes and are intimately involved in tumorigenesis. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of miR-410 in pancreatic cancer remain poorly understood. In this study, we found that miR-410 overexpression suppressed pancreatic cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo as well as cell invasion and migration. miR-410 also resulted in G1/S cell-cycle arrest. We then showed that angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AGTR1) was a direct target of miR-410, with miR-410 suppressing AGTR1 expression levels. In contrast, inhibition of miR-410 increased the expression of AGTR1. Silencing of AGTR1 inhibited cell growth and invasion, similar to miR-410 overexpression. In addition, we found that the induction of vascular endothelial growth factor and the activation of the ERK signaling pathway by angiotensin II were blocked by miR-410, similar to the angiotensin II inhibitor losartan. miR-410 overexpression inhibited angiogenesis in mice through the repression of CD31 expression. ERK pathway knockdown suppressed pancreatic cancer cell proliferation, invasion, and angiogenesis. Finally, we found that miR-410 was downregulated in pancreatic cancer tissues compared to adjacent nontumor tissues, whereas AGTR1 was upregulated in pancreatic cancer tissues. Pearson correlation analysis showed that miR-410 and AGTR1 were inversely expressed. In conclusion, our data indicate that miR-410 suppresses pancreatic cancer growth, cell invasion, migration, and angiogenesis via the downregulation of AGTR1, acting as a tumor-suppressive miRNA. In addition, our results suggest that miR-410 is a potential diagnostic biomarker and therapeutic target for patients with pancreatic cancer. © 2015 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  15. The Swift/UVOT Stars Survey. II. RR Lyrae Stars in M 3 and M 15

    CERN Document Server

    Siegel, Michael H; Balzer, Benjamin G; Hagen, Lea M Z

    2015-01-01

    We present the first results of an near-ultraviolet (NUV) survey of RR Lyrae stars from the Ultraviolet Optical Telescope (UVOT) aboard the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Mission. It is well-established that RR Lyrae have large amplitudes in the far- and near-ultraviolet. We have used UVOT's unique wide-field NUV imaging capability to perform the first systematic NUV survey of variable stars in the Galactic globular clusters M 3 and M 15. We identify 280 variable stars, comprising 275 RR Lyrae, two anomalous Cepheids, one classical Cepheid, one SX Phoenicis star and one possible long-period or irregular variable. Only two of these are new discoveries. We compare our results to previous investigations and find excellent agreement in the periods with significantly larger amplitudes in the NUV. We map out, for the first time, an NUV Bailey diagram from globular clusters, showing the usual loci for fundamental mode RRab and first overtone RRc pulsators. We show the unique sensitivity of NUV photometry to both the temperat...

  16. THE SWIFT UVOT STARS SURVEY. II. RR LYRAE STARS IN M3 AND M15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegel, Michael H.; Porterfield, Blair L.; Balzer, Benjamin G.; Hagen, Lea M. Z., E-mail: siegel@astro.psu.edu, E-mail: blp14@psu.edu, E-mail: bgb5080@psu.edu, E-mail: lea.zernow.hagen@gmail.com [Pennsylvania State University, Department of Astronomy, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    We present the first results of a near-ultraviolet (NUV) survey of RR Lyrae stars from the Ultraviolet Optical Telescope (UVOT) on board the Swift Gamma-ray Burst Mission. It is well-established that RR Lyrae stars have large amplitudes in the far- and near-ultraviolet. We have used UVOT’s unique wide-field NUV imaging capability to perform the first systematic NUV survey of variable stars in the Galactic globular clusters M3 and M15. We identify 280 variable stars, comprised of 275 RR Lyrae, 2 anomalous Cepheids, 1 classical Cepheid, 1 SX Phoenicis star, and 1 possible long-period or irregular variable. Only two of these are new discoveries. We compare our results to previous investigations and find excellent agreement in the periods with significantly larger amplitudes in the NUV. We map out, for the first time, an NUV Bailey diagram from globular clusters, showing the usual loci for fundamental mode RRab and first overtone RRc pulsators. We show the unique sensitivity of NUV photometry to both the temperatures and the surface gravities of RR Lyrae stars. Finally, we show evidence of an NUV period–metallicity–luminosity relationship. Future investigations will further examine the dependence of NUV pulsation parameters on metallicity and Oosterhoff classification.

  17. The Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey (SXDS) - II. Optical Imaging and Photometric Catalogs

    CERN Document Server

    Furusawa, H; Akiyama, M; Takata, T; Sekiguchi, K; Tanaka, I; Iwata, I; Kajisawa, M; Yasuda, N; Doi, M; Ouchi, M; Simpson, C; Shimasaku, K; Yamada, T; Furusawa, J; Morokuma, T; Ishida, C M; Aoki, K; Fuse, T; Imanishi, M; Iye, M; Karoji, H; Kobayashi, N; Kodama, T; Komiyama, Yu; Maeda, Y; Miyazaki, S; Mizumoto, Y; Nakata, F; Noumaru, J; Ogasawara, R; Okamura, S; Saitô, T; Sasaki, T; Ueda, Y; Yoshida, M

    2008-01-01

    We present multi-waveband optical imaging data obtained from observations of the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey (SXDS). The survey field, centered at R.A.=02:18:00, decl.=-05:00:00, has been the focus of a wide range of multi-wavelength observing programs spanning from X-ray to radio wavelengths. A large part of the optical imaging observations are carried out with Suprime-Cam on Subaru Telescope at Mauna Kea in the course of Subaru Telescope Observatory Projects. This paper describes our optical observations, data reduction and analysis procedures employed, and the characteristics of the data products. A total area of 1.22 sqdeg is covered in five contiguous sub-fields, each of which corresponds to a single Suprime-Cam field of view (34'x27'), in five broad-band filters B, V, Rc, i', z' to the depths of B=28.4, V=27.8, Rc=27.7, i'=27.7 and z'=26.6 (AB, 3-sigma, 2-arcsec aperture). The data are reduced and compiled into five multi-waveband photometric catalogs, separately for each Suprime-Cam pointing. The i'-...

  18. The XXL Survey. II. The bright cluster sample: catalogue and luminosity function

    CERN Document Server

    Pacaud, F; Giles, P A; Adami, C; Sadibekova, T; Pierre, M; Maughan, B J; Lieu, M; Fèvre, J -P Le; Alis, S; Altieri, B; Ardila, F; Baldry, I; Benoist, C; Birkinshaw, M; Chiappetti, L; Démoclès, J; Eckert, D; Evrard, A E; Faccioli, L; Gastaldello, F; Guennou, L; Horellou, C; Iovino, A; Koulouridis, E; Brun, V Le; Lidman, C; Liske, J; Maurogordato, S; Menanteau, F; Owers, M; Poggianti, B; Pomarède, D; Pompei, E; Ponman, T J; Rapetti, D; Reiprich, T H; Smith, G P; Tuffs, R; Valageas, P; Valtchanov, I; Willis, J P; Ziparo, F

    2015-01-01

    Context. The XXL Survey is the largest survey carried out by the XMM-Newton satellite and covers a total area of 50 square degrees distributed over two fields. It primarily aims at investigating the large-scale structures of the Universe using the distribution of galaxy clusters and active galactic nuclei as tracers of the matter distribution. Aims. This article presents the XXL bright cluster sample, a subsample of 100 galaxy clusters selected from the full XXL catalogue by setting a lower limit of $3\\times 10^{-14}\\,\\mathrm{erg \\,s^{-1}cm^{-2}}$ on the source flux within a 1$^{\\prime}$ aperture. Methods. The selection function was estimated using a mixture of Monte Carlo simulations and analytical recipes that closely reproduce the source selection process. An extensive spectroscopic follow-up provided redshifts for 97 of the 100 clusters. We derived accurate X-ray parameters for all the sources. Scaling relations were self-consistently derived from the same sample in other publications of the series. On th...

  19. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Catalog II. First Data Release

    CERN Document Server

    Schneider, D P; Hall, P B; Jester, S; Richards, G T; Stoughton, C; Strauss, M A; Subba-Rao, M; Vanden Berk, Daniel E; Anderson, S F; Brandt, W N; Gunn, J E; Gray, J; Trump, J R; Voges, W; Yanny, B; Schneider, Donald P.; Fan, Xiaohui; Hall, Patrick B.; Jester, Sebastian; Richards, Gordon T.; Stoughton, Chris; Strauss, Michael A.; Rao, Mark Subba; Berk, Daniel E. Vanden; Anderson, Scott F.; Gunn, James E.; Gray, Jim; Trump, Jonathan R.; Voges, Wolfgang; Yanny, Brian

    2003-01-01

    We present the second edition of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Quasar Catalog. The catalog consists of 16713 objects in the SDSS First Data Release (DR1) that have luminosities larger than M_i=-22 (H_0=70 km/s, Omega_M=0.3, Omega_Lambda=0.7), have at least one emission line with FWHM larger than 1000 km/s, and have highly reliable redshifts. The area covered is ~1360 deg^2 and the redshifts range from 0.08 to 5.41, with a median value of 1.43. Each object has positions accurate to better than 0.2" rms per coordinate, five-band (ugriz) CCD-based photometry with typical accuracy of 0.03 mag, and information on the morphology and selection method, in addition to radio, near-infrared, and X-ray emission properties of the quasars, when available, from other large area surveys. Calibrated digital spectra covering 3800-9200 Angstroms at a spectral resolution 1800-2100, are available. This publication supersedes the first SDSS Quasar Catalog, which was based on material from the SDSS Early Data Release. A summa...

  20. A selection of hot subluminous stars in the GALEX survey II. Subdwarf atmospheric parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Németh, Péter; Vennes, Stéphane

    2012-01-01

    We present an update of our low-resolution spectroscopic follow-up and model atmosphere analysis of hot subdwarf stars from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) survey. Targets were selected on the basis of colour indices calculated from the GALEX GR6 N_UV, Guide Star Catalogue (GSC2.3.2) V and the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) J and H photometry. High signal-to-noise ratio spectra were obtained at the European Southern Observatory (ESO) and the Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO) over the course of three years. Detailed H, He and CNO abundance analysis helped us improve our T_eff, log g and He abundance determination and to constrain CNO abundances. We processed 191 observations of 180 targets and found 124 sdB and 42 sdO stars in this sample while some blue horizontal branch stars were also found in this programme. With quantitative binary decomposition of 29 composite spectra we investigated the incidence of A, F and G type companions. The incidence of late G and K type companions and their effects ...

  1. The Sedentary Survey of Extreme High Energy Peaked BL Lacs. II. The Catalog and Spectral Properties

    CERN Document Server

    Giommi, P; Perri, M; Padovani, P

    2004-01-01

    The multi-frequency `Sedentary Survey' is a deep, statistically complete, radio flux limited sample comprising 150 BL Lacertae objects distinguished by their extremely high X-ray to radio flux ratio, ranging from five hundred to over five thousand times that of typical BL Lacs discovered in radio surveys. This paper presents the final, 100% identified, catalog together with the optical, X-ray and broad-band SEDs constructed combining literature multi-frequency data with non-simultaneous optical observations and BeppoSAX X-ray data, when available. The SEDs confirm that the peak of the synchrotron power in these objects is located at very high energies. BeppoSAX wide band X-ray observations show that, in most cases, the X-ray spectra are convex and well described by a logarithmic parabola model peaking (in a E f(E) vs E representation) between 0.02 to several keV. Owing to the high synchrotron energies involved most of the sources in the catalog are likely to be TeV emitters, with the closest and brightest one...

  2. The HST/ACS+WFC3 Survey for Lyman Limit Systems. II. Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Meara, John M.; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Worseck, Gabor; Chen, Hsiao-Wen; Madau, Piero

    2013-03-01

    We present the first science results from our Hubble Space Telescope survey for Lyman limit absorption systems (LLS) using the low dispersion spectroscopic modes of the Advanced Camera for Surveys and the Wide Field Camera 3. Through an analysis of 71 quasars, we determine the incidence frequency of LLS per unit redshift and per unit path length, l(z) and l(X), respectively, over the redshift range 1 Prochaska et al. and place constraints on the evolution of λ912 mfp with redshift, including an estimate of the "breakthrough" redshift of z = 1.6. Consistent with results at higher z, we find that a significant fraction of the opacity for absorption of ionizing photons comes from systems with N H I <=1017.5 cm-2 with a value for the total Lyman opacity of τLyman eff = 0.40 ± 0.15. Finally, we determine that at minimum, a 5-parameter (4 power law) model is needed to describe the column density distribution function f(N H I , X) at z ~ 2.4, find that f(N H I , X) undergoes no significant change in shape between z ~ 2.4 and z ~ 3.7, and provide our best fit model for f(N H I , X).

  3. The Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA Survey: II. Results of Precursor Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Giovanelli, R; Kent, B R; Perillat, P; Catinella, B; Hoffman, G L; Momjian, E; Rosenberg, J L; Saintonge, A; Spekkens, K; Stierwalt, S; Brosch, N; Masters, K L; Springob, C M; Karachentsev, I D; Karachentseva, V E; Koopmann, R A; Müller, E; Van Driel, W; Van Zee, L; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P.; Kent, Brian R.; Perillat, Philip; Catinella, Barbara; Momjian, Emmanuel; Rosenberg, Jessica L.; Saintonge, Amelie; Spekkens, Kristine; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Brosch, Noah; Masters, Karen L.; Springob, Christopher M.; Karachentsev, Igor D.; Karachentseva, Valentina E.; Koopmann, Rebecca A.; Muller, Erik; Driel, Wim van; Zee, Liese van

    2005-01-01

    In preparation for the full Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA extragalactic HI survey, precursor observations were carried out in Aug--Sep 2004 with the 7-beam Arecibo L-band feed array (ALFA) receiver system and the WAPP spectral processors. While these observations were geared mainly at testing and debugging survey strategy, hardware and software, approximately 36 hours of telescope time yielded science--quality data. From those observations, an initial list of 730 tentative detections of varying degree of reliability was extracted. Ninety--eight high signal-to-noise candidates were deemed to be bona fide HI line detections. To test our ability to discriminate cosmic signals from RFI and noise, 165 candidates ranging in reliability likelihood were re--observed with the single beam L--band wide system at Arecibo in Jan--Feb 2005. Of those, 41% were confirmed as real. We present the results of both the ALFA and single beam observations for the sample of 166 confirmed HI sources, as well as our assessment of their opti...

  4. Seeing in the dark -- II. Cosmic shear in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Huff, Eric M; Hirata, Christopher M; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Schlegel, David; Seljak, Uros

    2011-01-01

    Statistical weak lensing by large-scale structure -- cosmic shear -- is a promising cosmological tool, which has motivated the design of several large upcoming surveys. Here, we present a measurement of cosmic shear using coadded Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) imaging in 168 square degrees of the equatorial region, with r<23.5 and i<22.5, a source number density of 2.2 galaxies per square arcminute and median redshift of 0.52. These coadds were generated using a new method described in the companion Paper I that was intended to minimise systematic errors in the lensing measurement due to coherent PSF anisotropies that are otherwise prevalent in the SDSS imaging data. We present measurements of cosmic shear out to angular separations of 2 degrees, along with systematics tests that (combined with those from Paper I on the catalogue generation) demonstrate that our results are dominated by statistical rather than systematic errors. Assuming a cosmological model corresponding to WMAP7 and allowing only the...

  5. Shocked POststarburst Galaxy Survey II: The Molecular Gas Content and Properties of a Subset of SPOGs

    CERN Document Server

    Alatalo, Katherine; Lanz, Lauranne; Appleton, Philip N; Cales, Sabrina L; Kewley, Lisa J; Lacy, Mark; Medling, Anne M; Nyland, Kristina; Rich, Jeffrey A; Urry, C Meg

    2016-01-01

    We present CO(1-0) observations of objects within the Shocked POststarburst Galaxy Survey taken with the Institut de Radioastronomie Millimetrique (IRAM) 30m single dish and the Combined Array for Research for Millimeter Astronomy (CARMA) interferometer. Shocked Poststarburst Galaxies (SPOGs) represent a transitioning population of galaxies, with deep Balmer absorption (Hdelta>5A), consistent with an intermediate-age (A-star) stellar population, and ionized gas line ratios inconsistent with pure star formation. The CO(1-0) subsample was selected from SPOGs detected by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer with 22um flux detected at a signal-to-noise (S/N)>3. Of the 52 objects observed in CO(1-0), 47 are detected with S/N>3. A large fraction (37-46%) of our CO-SPOG sample were visually classified as morphologically disrupted. The H2 masses detected were between 10^(8.7-10.8) Msuns, consistent with the gas masses found in normal galaxies, though approximately an order of magnitude larger than the range seen i...

  6. Emission Line Galaxies in the STIS Parallel Survey II: Star Formation Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teplitz, Harry I.; Collins, Nicholas R.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Hill, Robert S.; Rhodes, Jason

    2002-01-01

    We present the luminosity function of [OII]-emitting galaxies at a median redshift of z = 0.9, as measured in the deep spectroscopic data in the STIS Parallel Survey (SPS). The luminosity function shows strong evolution from the local value, as expected. By using random lines of sight, the SPS measurement complements previous deep single field studies. We calculate the density of inferred star formation at this redshift by converting from [OII] to H(alpha) line flux as a function of absolute magnitude and find rho = 0.052 +/- 0.017 Solar mass/yr Mpc(sup -3) at a median redshift z approx. 0.9 within the range 0.46 less than z less than 1.415 (H(sub 0) = 50 km/s Mpc(sup -l), Omega(sub M) = 1.0, Omega(sub lambda) = 0.0). This density is consistent with a (1 + z)(sup )4 evolution in global star formation since z approx. 1. To reconcile the density with similar measurements made by surveys targeting H(alpha) may require substantial extinction correction.

  7. A survey of immunohistochemical biomarkers for basal-like breast cancer against a gene expression profile gold standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Jennifer R; Gao, Dongxia; Chow, Christine; Cheng, Jinjin; Lau, Sherman Y H; Ellis, Matthew J; Perou, Charles M; Bernard, Philip S; Nielsen, Torsten O

    2013-11-01

    Gene expression profiling of breast cancer delineates a particularly aggressive subtype referred to as 'basal-like', which comprises ∼15% of all breast cancers, afflicts younger women and is refractory to endocrine and anti-HER2 therapies. Immunohistochemical surrogate definitions for basal-like breast cancer, such as the clinical ER/PR/HER2 triple-negative phenotype and models incorporating positive expression for CK5 (CK5/6) and/or EGFR are heavily cited. However, many additional biomarkers for basal-like breast cancer have been described in the literature. A parallel comparison of 46 proposed immunohistochemical biomarkers of basal-like breast cancer was performed against a gene expression profile gold standard on a tissue microarray containing 42 basal-like and 80 non-basal-like breast cancer cases. Ki67 and PPH3 were the most sensitive biomarkers (both 92%) positively expressed in the basal-like subtype, whereas CK14, IMP3 and NGFR were the most specific (100%). Among biomarkers surveyed, loss of INPP4B (a negative regulator of phosphatidylinositol signaling) was 61% sensitive and 99% specific with the highest odds ratio (OR) at 108, indicating the strongest association with basal-like breast cancer. Expression of nestin, a common marker of neural progenitor cells that is also associated with the triple-negative/basal-like phenotype and poor breast cancer prognosis, possessed the second highest OR at 29 among the 46 biomarkers surveyed, as well as 54% sensitivity and 96% specificity. As a positively expressed biomarker, nestin possesses technical advantages over INPP4B that make it a more ideal biomarker for identification of basal-like breast cancer. The comprehensive immunohistochemical biomarker survey presented in this study is a necessary step for determining an optimized surrogate immunopanel that best defines basal-like breast cancer in a practical and clinically accessible way.

  8. ONLINE PORNOGRAPHY AND SEXUALITY: SOME RESULTS OF EU KIDS ONLINE SURVEY II IN THE ROMANIAN CASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VALENTINA MARINESCU

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The present article intends to analyze the exposure of Romanian children and teens to sexually explicit message and the so-called „sexting” activities they perform in the online environment. The main research topic to which we try to find some answers is: are young people more exposed to risks because they view sexually explicit content online and send sexual messages to others? Our results validate the risk migration hypothesis, the blurring boundaries between the online and offline worlds enabling the migration of risk from the real world to the internet and the reverse. At the same time, the date of EU Kinds Online II validate the vulnerability hypothesis, according to which the harm declared by the children following the exposure to sexually explicit images and the receiving the sexual messages is the result of their socio-demographic vulnerabilities

  9. Comorbidity of common mental disorders with cancer and their treatment gap: Findings from the World Mental Health Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakash, Ora; Levav, Itzhak; Aguilar-Gaxiola, Sergio; Alonso, Jordi; Andrade, Laura Helena; Angermeyer, Matthias C.; Bruffaerts, Ronny; Caldas-de-Almeida, Jose Miguel; Florescu, Slivia; de Girolamo, Giovanni; Gureje, Oye; He, Yanling; Hu, Chiyi; de Jonge, Peter; Karam, Elie G.; Kovess-Masfety, Viviane; Medina-Mora, Maria Elena; Moskalewicz, Jacek; Murphy, Sam; Nakamura, Yosikazu; Piazza, Marina; Posada-Villa, Jose; Stein, Dan J.; Taib, Nezar Ismet; Zarkov, Zahari; Kessler, Ronald C.; Scott, Kate M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the comorbidity of common mental disorders (CMDs) and cancer, and the mental health treatment gap among community residents with active cancer, cancer survivors and cancer-free respondents in 13 high- and 11 low-middle income countries. Methods Data were derived from the World Mental Health Surveys (N=66,387; n=357 active cancer, n=1,373 cancer survivors, n=64,657 cancer free respondents). The WHO/Composite International Diagnostic Interview was used in all surveys to estimate CMDs prevalence rates. Respondents were also asked about mental health service utilization in the preceding 12 months. Cancer status was ascertained by self-report of physician’s diagnosis. Results Twelve month prevalence rates of CMDs were higher among active cancer (18.4% SE=2.1) than cancer free respondents (13.3%, SE=0.2) adjusted for socio-demographic confounders and other lifetime chronic conditions (Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR)=1.44 95% CI 1.05–1.97). CMD rates among cancer survivors (14.6% SE=0.9) compared with cancer-free respondents did not differ significantly (AOR=0.95 95% CI 0.82–1.11). Similar patterns characterized high and low-middle income countries. Of respondents with active cancer who had CMD in the preceding 12 months 59% sought services for mental health problems (SE=5.3). The pattern of service utilization among people with CMDs by cancer status (highest among persons with active cancer, lower among survivors and lowest among cancer-free respondents) was similar in high- (64.0% SE=6.0, 41.2% SE=3.0, 35.6% SE=0.6) and low-middle income countries (46.4% SE=11.0, 22.5% SE=9.1, 17.4% SE=0.7). Conclusions Community respondents with active cancer have relatively higher CMD rates and relatively high treatment gap. Comprehensive cancer care should consider both factors. PMID:23983079

  10. Vaginal brachytherapy for postoperative endometrial cancer: 2014 Survey of the American Brachytherapy Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkenrider, Matthew M; Grover, Surbhi; Erickson, Beth A; Viswanathan, Akila N; Small, Christina; Kliethermes, Stephanie; Small, William

    2016-01-01

    Report current practice patterns for postoperative endometrial cancer emphasizing vaginal brachytherapy (VBT). A 38-item survey was e-mailed to 1,598 American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) members and 4,329 US radiation oncologists in 2014 totaling 5,710 recipients. Responses of practitioners who had delivered VBT in the previous 12 months were included in the analysis. Responses were tabulated to determine relative frequency distributions. χ(2) analysis was used to compare current results with those from the 2003 ABS survey. A total of 331 respondents initiated the VBT survey, of whom 289 (87.3%) administered VBT in the prior 12 months. Lymph node dissection and number of nodes removed influenced treatment decisions for 90.5% and 69.8%, respectively. High-dose-rate was used by 96.2%. The most common vaginal length treated was 4 cm (31.0%). Three-dimensional planning was used by 83.2% with 73.4% of those for the first fraction only. Doses to normal tissues were reported by 79.8%. About half optimized to the location of dose specification and/or normal tissues. As monotherapy, the most common prescriptions were 7 Gy for three fractions to 0.5-cm depth and 6 Gy for five fractions to the surface. As a boost, the most common prescriptions were 5 Gy for three fractions to 0.5-cm depth and 6 Gy for three fractions to the vaginal surface. Optimization points were placed at the apex and lateral vagina by 73.1%. Secondary quality assurance checks were performed by 98.9%. VBT is a common adjuvant therapy for endometrial cancer patients, most commonly with HDR. Fractionation and planning processes are variable but generally align with ABS recommendations. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Complementary therapy support in cancer survivorship: a survey of complementary and alternative medicine practitioners' provision and perception of skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, C A; Faithfull, S

    2014-03-01

    This study reviewed the confidence and perceived skills of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) practitioners in providing care and symptom management for clients post cancer. An e-survey was mailed to approximately 21, 000 CAM practitioners, targeted at those working with clients who were experiencing consequences of cancer and its treatments. Questions were asked about the main symptoms and concerns of clients, the confidence and current skill levels of practitioners and additional training requirements. Six hundred and twelve practitioners responded to the survey, 507 of whom were working with individuals experiencing the consequences of cancer and its treatments. Forty-five per cent (n = 134) had undertaken training in cancer prior to working with cancer patients, 61% (n = 182) had undertaken courses or study days relative to cancer care in the past two years. The most often treated symptoms or concerns of patients were those of a psychosocial nature, pain management and lymphoedema. CAM practitioners with limited knowledge and training are providing support to cancer survivors, particularly in services where the National Health Service has limited provision. CAM practitioners may fulfil a future role in providing long-term support for cancer survivors; however, in order to properly safeguard patients they are in need of further training and development.

  12. SURVEY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    SURVEY er en udbredt metode og benyttes inden for bl.a. samfundsvidenskab, humaniora, psykologi og sundhedsforskning. Også uden for forskningsverdenen er der mange organisationer som f.eks. konsulentfirmaer og offentlige institutioner samt marketingsafdelinger i private virksomheder, der arbejder...... med surveys. Denne bog gennemgår alle surveyarbejdets faser og giver en praktisk indføring i: • design af undersøgelsen og udvælgelse af stikprøver, • formulering af spørgeskemaer samt indsamling og kodning af data, • metoder til at analysere resultaterne...

  13. The XXL Survey. II. The bright cluster sample: catalogue and luminosity function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacaud, F.; Clerc, N.; Giles, P. A.; Adami, C.; Sadibekova, T.; Pierre, M.; Maughan, B. J.; Lieu, M.; Le Fèvre, J. P.; Alis, S.; Altieri, B.; Ardila, F.; Baldry, I.; Benoist, C.; Birkinshaw, M.; Chiappetti, L.; Démoclès, J.; Eckert, D.; Evrard, A. E.; Faccioli, L.; Gastaldello, F.; Guennou, L.; Horellou, C.; Iovino, A.; Koulouridis, E.; Le Brun, V.; Lidman, C.; Liske, J.; Maurogordato, S.; Menanteau, F.; Owers, M.; Poggianti, B.; Pomarède, D.; Pompei, E.; Ponman, T. J.; Rapetti, D.; Reiprich, T. H.; Smith, G. P.; Tuffs, R.; Valageas, P.; Valtchanov, I.; Willis, J. P.; Ziparo, F.

    2016-06-01

    Context. The XXL Survey is the largest survey carried out by the XMM-Newton satellite and covers a total area of 50 square degrees distributed over two fields. It primarily aims at investigating the large-scale structures of the Universe using the distribution of galaxy clusters and active galactic nuclei as tracers of the matter distribution. The survey will ultimately uncover several hundreds of galaxy clusters out to a redshift of ~2 at a sensitivity of ~10-14 erg s-1 cm-2 in the [0.5-2] keV band. Aims: This article presents the XXL bright cluster sample, a subsample of 100 galaxy clusters selected from the full XXL catalogue by setting a lower limit of 3 × 10-14 erg s-1 cm-2 on the source flux within a 1' aperture. Methods: The selection function was estimated using a mixture of Monte Carlo simulations and analytical recipes that closely reproduce the source selection process. An extensive spectroscopic follow-up provided redshifts for 97 of the 100 clusters. We derived accurate X-ray parameters for all the sources. Scaling relations were self-consistently derived from the same sample in other publications of the series. On this basis, we study the number density, luminosity function, and spatial distribution of the sample. Results: The bright cluster sample consists of systems with masses between M500 = 7 × 1013 and 3 × 1014 M⊙, mostly located between z = 0.1 and 0.5. The observed sky density of clusters is slightly below the predictions from the WMAP9 model, and significantly below the prediction from the Planck 2015 cosmology. In general, within the current uncertainties of the cluster mass calibration, models with higher values of σ8 and/or ΩM appear more difficult to accommodate. We provide tight constraints on the cluster differential luminosity function and find no hint of evolution out to z ~ 1. We also find strong evidence for the presence of large-scale structures in the XXL bright cluster sample and identify five new superclusters. Based on

  14. An updated survey of globular clusters in M31. II Newly discovered bright and remote clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Galleti, S; Federici, L; Buzzoni, A; Pecci, F Fusi

    2007-01-01

    We present the first results of a large spectroscopic survey of candidate globular clusters located in the extreme outskirts of the nearby M31 galaxy. We obtained low resolution spectra of 48 targets selected from the XSC of 2MASS, as in Galleti et al. (2005). The observed candidates have been robustly classified according to their radial velocity and by verifying their extended/point-source nature from ground-based optical images. Among the 48 observed candidates clusters we found 5 genuine remote globular clusters. One of them has been already identified independently by Mackey et al. (2007), their GC1; the other four are completely new discoveries: B516, B517, B518, B519. The newly discovered clusters lie at projected distance 40 kpc 40 kpc. At odds with the Milky Way, M31 appears to have a significant population of very bright globular clusters in its extreme outskirts.

  15. White Dwarf - Red Dwarf Systems Resolved with the Hubble Space Telescope. II. Full Snapshot Survey Results

    CERN Document Server

    Farihi, J; Wachter, S

    2010-01-01

    {Abrigded} Results are presented for a Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys high-resolution imaging campaign of 90 white dwarfs with known or suspected low mass stellar and substellar companions. Of the 72 targets which remain candidate and confirmed white dwarfs with near-infrared excess, 43 are spatially resolved into two or more components, and a total of 12 systems are potentially triples. There is a possible, slight deficit of earlier spectral types (bluer colors) among the spatially unresolved companions, exactly the opposite of expectations if significant mass is transferred to the companion during the common envelope phase. Using the best available distance estimates, the low mass companions to white dwarfs exhibit a bimodal distribution in projected separation. This result supports the hypothesis that during the giant phases of the white dwarf progenitor, any unevolved companions either migrate inward to short periods of hours to days, or outward to periods of hundreds to thousands of y...

  16. Survey of fish impingement at power plants in the United States. Volume II. Inland waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, III, Richard F.; Sharma, Rajendra K.

    1977-03-01

    Impingement of fish at cooling-water intakes of 33 power plants located on inland waters other than the Great Lakes has been surveyed and data are presented. Descriptions of site, plant, and intake design and operation are provided. Reports in this volume summarize impingement data for individual plants in tabular and histogram formats. Information was available from differing sources such as the utilities themselves, public documents, regulatory agencies, and others. Thus, the extent of detail in the reports varies greatly from plant to plant. Histogram preparation involved an extrapolation procedure that has inadequacies. The reader is cautioned in the use of information presented in this volume to determine intake-design acceptability or intensity of impacts on ecosystems. No conclusions are presented herein; data comparisons are made in Volume IV.

  17. Shocked POststarburst Galaxy Survey. II. The Molecular Gas Content and Properties of a Subset of SPOGs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alatalo, Katherine; Lisenfeld, Ute; Lanz, Lauranne; Appleton, Philip N.; Ardila, Felipe; Cales, Sabrina L.; Kewley, Lisa J.; Lacy, Mark; Medling, Anne M.; Nyland, Kristina; Rich, Jeffrey A.; Urry, C. Meg

    2016-08-01

    We present CO(1-0) observations of objects within the Shocked POststarburst Galaxy Survey taken with the Institut de Radioastronomie Millimétrique 30 m single dish and the Combined Array for Research for Millimeter Astronomy interferometer. Shocked poststarburst galaxies (SPOGs) represent a transitioning population of galaxies, with deep Balmer absorption ({{EW}}{{H}δ }\\gt 5 {\\mathring{{A}}} ), consistent with an intermediate-age (A-star) stellar population, and ionized gas line ratios inconsistent with pure star formation. The CO(1-0) subsample was selected from SPOGs detected by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer with 22 μm flux detected at a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) > 3. Of the 52 objects observed in CO(1-0), 47 are detected with S/N > 3. A large fraction (37%-46% ± 7%) of our CO-SPOG sample were visually classified as morphologically disrupted. The H2 masses detected were between {10}8.7-10.8 {M}⊙ , consistent with the gas masses found in normal galaxies, though approximately an order of magnitude larger than the range seen in poststarburst galaxies. When comparing the 22 μm and CO(1-0) fluxes, SPOGs diverge from the normal star-forming relation, having 22 μm fluxes in excess of the relation by a factor of ={4.91}-0.39+0.42, suggestive of the presence of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The Na i D characteristics of CO-SPOGs show that it is likely that many of these objects host interstellar winds. Objects with large Na i D enhancements also tend to emit in the radio, suggesting possible AGN driving of neutral winds.

  18. THE SWIFT AGN AND CLUSTER SURVEY. II. CLUSTER CONFIRMATION WITH SDSS DATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, Rhiannon D.; Dai, Xinyu [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Kochanek, Christopher S. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Bregman, Joel N., E-mail: Rhiannon.D.Griffin-1@ou.edu, E-mail: xdai@ou.edu, E-mail: ckochanek@astronomy.ohio-state.edu, E-mail: jbregman@umich.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    We study 203 (of 442) Swift AGN and Cluster Survey extended X-ray sources located in the SDSS DR8 footprint to search for galaxy over-densities in three-dimensional space using SDSS galaxy photometric redshifts and positions near the Swift cluster candidates. We find 104 Swift clusters with a >3σ galaxy over-density. The remaining targets are potentially located at higher redshifts and require deeper optical follow-up observations for confirmation as galaxy clusters. We present a series of cluster properties including the redshift, brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) magnitude, BCG-to-X-ray center offset, optical richness, and X-ray luminosity. We also detect red sequences in ∼85% of the 104 confirmed clusters. The X-ray luminosity and optical richness for the SDSS confirmed Swift clusters are correlated and follow previously established relations. The distribution of the separations between the X-ray centroids and the most likely BCG is also consistent with expectation. We compare the observed redshift distribution of the sample with a theoretical model, and find that our sample is complete for z ≲ 0.3 and is still 80% complete up to z ≃ 0.4, consistent with the SDSS survey depth. These analysis results suggest that our Swift cluster selection algorithm has yielded a statistically well-defined cluster sample for further study of cluster evolution and cosmology. We also match our SDSS confirmed Swift clusters to existing cluster catalogs, and find 42, 23, and 1 matches in optical, X-ray, and Sunyaev–Zel’dovich catalogs, respectively, and so the majority of these clusters are new detections.

  19. Current medication choices in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis II--update of a survey performed in 1993.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, H I; Kim, K N; Ballinger, S H; Bowyer, S L; Griffin, T A; Higgins, G C; Mier, R; Passo, M H; Rennebohm, R; Schikler, K; Lovell, D J

    2001-10-01

    The documentation of treatments used for Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis (JRA) is important to allow for the evaluation of practice patterns for future outcome studies. A survey of nine pediatric rheumatologists was performed between September 1999 and February 2000. Each of the physicians prospectively recorded demographic and treatment information on consecutively sampled JRA patients (n=395). Pauciarticular onset JRA was present in 46%, polyarticular onset JRA in 35%, and systemic onset JRA in 19% of the children. Naproxen was the most frequently prescribed medication (55% of the patients), followed by methotrexate (MTX), which was used in 39% of the patients. Folic acid supplementation (1 mg/day) was provided to 69% of the patients treated with MTX. Etanercept was used in 11% of the children. Eleven percent of the patients received corticosteroids, and 13% of children on corticosteroids took calcium supplements. Uveitis was present in 8% and had a chronic course in 79% of those cases. Although systemic medications were used in 50% of the children with uveitis to control eye inflammation, severe damage to the eyes developed in 30% of them. Fourteen percent of the patients required gastroprotective medications. Compared with findings of a similar survey performed in 1993, there was no significant change in the frequency of use of naproxen, but nabumetone is now more often prescribed, and COX-2 inhibitors have been introduced in the therapy of JRA. Changes among second-line agents used for JRA have also occurred, although there was no change in the frequency of use of MTX or corticosteroids. JRA continues to be a treatment challenge for the practicing pediatric rheumatologist. Patients often show incomplete response to the currently available medications. Therefore, new therapeutic agents need to be evaluated for their use in JRA, and the treatment of JRA associated uveitis especially needs to be improved.

  20. Patient-reported genitourinary dysfunction after laparoscopic and open rectal cancer surgery in a randomized trial (COLOR II)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, J; Abis, G; Gellerstedt, M

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This article reports on patient-reported sexual dysfunction and micturition symptoms following a randomized trial of laparoscopic and open surgery for rectal cancer. METHODS: Patients in the COLOR II randomized trial, comparing laparoscopic and open surgery for rectal cancer, completed...... the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-CR38 questionnaire before surgery, and after 4 weeks, 6, 12 and 24 months. Adjusted mean differences on a 100-point scale were calculated using changes from baseline value at the various time points in the domains of sexual functioning...... radiotherapy, did not change these results. CONCLUSION: Sexual dysfunction is common in patients with rectal cancer, and treatment (including surgery) increases the proportion of patients affected. A laparoscopic approach does not change this. REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT0029779 (http://www.clinicaltrials.gov)....

  1. Early-time light curves of Type Ib/c supernovae from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Taddia, F; Leloudas, G; Stritzinger, M D; Valenti, S; Galbany, L; Kessler, R; Schneider, D P; Wheeler, J C

    2014-01-01

    We analyse the early-time optical light curves (LCs) of 20 Type Ib/c supernovae (SNe Ib/c) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) SN survey II, aiming to study their properties as well as to derive their progenitor parameters. High-cadence, multi-band LCs are fitted with a functional model and the best-fit parameters are compared among the SN types. Bolometric LCs (BLCs) are constructed for the entire sample. We computed the black-body (BB) temperature (T_BB) and photospheric radius (R_ph) evolution for each SN via BB fits on the spectral energy distributions. In addition, the BLC properties are compared to model expectations. Complementing our sample with literature data, we find that SNe Ic and Ic-BL (broad-line) have shorter rise times than those of SNe Ib and IIb. \\Delta m_15 is similar among the different sub-types. SNe Ic appear brighter and bluer than SNe Ib, but this difference vanishes if we consider host galaxy extinction corrections based on colors. Our SNe have typical T_BB ~ 10000 K at peak, an...

  2. Effects of laser immunotherapy on late-stage, metastatic breast cancer patients in a Phase II clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrel, Gabriela L.; Zhou, Feifan; Li, Xiaosong; Hode, Tomas; Nordquist, Robert E.; Alleruzzo, Luciano; Chen, Wei R.

    2014-03-01

    Laser immunotherapy (LIT), a novel technique with a local intervention to induce systemic antitumor effects, was developed to treat metastatic cancers. The pre-clinical studies of LIT have shown its unique characteristics in generating a specific antitumor immunity in treating metastatic tumors in rats and mice. For late-stage, metastatic breast cancer patients, who were considered to be out of other available treatment options, we conducted a small Phase II clinical trial using LIT starting in 2009 in Lima, Peru. This Phase II study was closed in December of 2012, as acknowldged by the Ministry of Health (MOH) of Peur letter 438-2014-OGITT/INS dated March 5th, 2014. Ten patients were enrolled and received LIT in one or multiple 4-week treatment cycles. At the study closing date, four patients were alive and two of them remained cancer free. Here, following the successful conclusion of our Phase II study, we report the clinical effects of LIT on metastatic breast cancer patients. Specifically, we present the overall status of all the patients three years after the treatment and also the outcomes of two long-term surviving patients.

  3. In silico designing breast cancer peptide vaccine for binding to MHC class I and II: A molecular docking study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdavi, Manijeh; Moreau, Violaine

    2016-12-01

    Antigenic peptides or cancer peptide vaccines can be directly delivered to cancer patients to produce immunologic responses against cancer cells. Specifically, designed peptides can associate with Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class I or II molecules on the cell surface of antigen presenting cells activating anti-tumor effector mechanisms by triggering helper T cell (Th) or cytotoxic T cells (CTL). In general, high binding to MHCs approximately correlates with in vivo immunogenicity. Consequently, a molecular docking technique was run on a library of novel discontinuous peptides predicted by PEPOP from Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 ECD) subdomain III. This technique is expected to improve the prediction accuracy in order to identify the best MHC class I and II binder peptides. Molecular docking analysis through GOLD identified the peptide 1412 as the best MHC binder peptide to both MHC class I and II molecules used in the study. The GOLD results predicted HLA-DR4, HLA-DP2 and TCR as the most often targeted receptors by the peptide 1412. These findings, based on bioinformatics analyses, can be exploited in further experimental analyses in vaccine design and cancer therapy to find possible proper approaches providing beneficial effects.

  4. Characteristics of elderly cancer patients' concerns and their quality of life in Japan: a Web-based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanotani, Takako; Akechi, Tatsuo; Takayama, Tomoko; Karato, Atsuya; Kikuuchi, Yuki; Okamoto, Naoyuki; Katayama, Kayoko; Yokoo, Minori; Ogawa, Asao

    2014-05-01

    Cancer incidence and the number of cancer patients are increasing in today's aging society. The purpose of this study was to investigate the characteristics of elderly cancer patients' concerns and examine the association between their concerns and quality of life. This was a cross-sectional web-based survey completed by ambulatory cancer patients aged 20 years or older. The questionnaire on cancer patients' concerns, comprehensive concerns assessment tool and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C30 were distributed to the subjects. Multiple regression analysis was conducted to determine which patients' concerns significantly contributed to their quality of life. The final study population consisted of 807 cancer patients, among whom 243 (30%) were elderly (65 years or older). Elderly cancer patients had particular difficulty with self-management, psychological symptoms and medical information, and the prevalence of their concerns was generally lower than that of younger patients, with the exception of physical symptoms. Multiple types of elderly patients' concerns were independently associated with quality of life. We found that elderly cancer patients suffered from various concerns, thus multidisciplinary intervention is important for providing them with optimal care. The results of this study suggest that elderly cancer patients' quality of life will improve if their concerns are properly handled.

  5. Antitumor effect of free rhodium (II) citrate and rhodium (II) citrate-loaded maghemite nanoparticles on mice bearing breast cancer: a systemic toxicity assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixoto, Raphael Cândido Apolinário; Miranda-Vilela, Ana Luisa; de Souza Filho, José; Carneiro, Marcella Lemos' Brettas; Oliveira, Ricardo G S; da Silva, Matheus Oliveira; de Souza, Aparecido R; Báo, Sônia Nair

    2015-05-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most prevalent cancer types among women. The use of magnetic fluids for specific delivery of drugs represents an attractive platform for chemotherapy. In our previous studies, it was demonstrated that maghemite nanoparticles coated with rhodium (II) citrate (Magh-Rh2Cit) induced in vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo antitumor activity, followed by intratumoral administration in breast carcinoma cells. In this study, our aim was to follow intravenous treatment to evaluate the systemic antitumor activity and toxicity induced by these formulations in Balb/c mice bearing orthotopic 4T1 breast carcinoma. Female Balb/c mice were evaluated with regard to toxicity of intravenous treatments through analyses of hemogram, serum levels of alanine aminotransferase, iron, and creatinine and liver, kidney, and lung histology. The antitumor activity of rhodium (II) citrate (Rh2Cit), Magh-Rh2Cit, and maghemite nanoparticles coated with citrate (Magh-Cit), used as control, was evaluated by tumor volume reduction, histology, and morphometric analysis. Magh-Rh2Cit and Magh-Cit promoted a significant decrease in tumor area, and no experimental groups presented hematotoxic effects or increased levels of serum ALT and creatinine. This observation was corroborated by the histopathological examination of the liver and kidney of mice. Furthermore, the presence of nanoparticles was verified in lung tissue with no morphological changes, supporting the idea that our nanoformulations did not induce toxicity effects. No studies about the systemic action of rhodium (II) citrate-loaded maghemite nanoparticles have been carried out, making this report a suitable starting point for exploring the therapeutic potential of these compounds in treating breast cancer.

  6. Nutritional care of cancer patients: a survey on patients' needs and medical care in reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maschke, J; Kruk, U; Kastrati, K; Kleeberg, J; Buchholz, D; Erickson, N; Huebner, J

    2017-02-01

    Cancer patients represent a patient group with a wide-range of nutrition related problems which are often under-recognized and undertreated. In order to assess the status quo of nutritional care in Germany, we conducted a survey among patients with different types of cancer. A standardized questionnaire was distributed online by two national umbrella organizations for self-help groups. 1335 participants completed the questionnaire. 69 % of the participants reported having received information on nutrition and/or specific nutrition-related symptoms. Most often this information was derived from print media (68.5 %) or from within self-help groups (58.7 %). 57.0 % of participants reported having had questions concerning nutrition and/or problems with food intake. most frequently named topics of interest were "healthy diet" (35.0 %) weakness/fatigue (24.3 %), dietary supplements (21.3 %) and taste changes (19.8 %). Nutrition information was most often provided by dietitians (38.7 %) followed by physicians (9.8 %). Women reported receiving nutrition counseling in the hospital nearly twice as often as men (12.5 % versus 5.7 %; p nutrition information more often reported using supplements (p Nutrition is an essential element in cancer care and patients report a high interest and need: Yet, many patients do not have access to high quality nutrition therapy during and after cancer therapy. With respect to survival and quality of life, increasing the availability and resources for provision of evidence based nutrition information seems mandatory.

  7. Education and support needs in patients with head and neck cancer: A multi-institutional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbour, Joe; Milross, Chris; Sundaresan, Puma; Ebrahimi, Ardalan; Shepherd, Heather L; Dhillon, Haryana M; Morgan, Gary; Ashford, Bruce; Abdul-Razak, Muzib; Wong, Eva; Veness, Michael; Palme, Carsten E; Froggatt, Cate; Cohen, Ruben; Ekmejian, Rafael; Tay, Jessica; Roshan, David; Clark, Jonathan R

    2017-06-01

    Head and neck cancer (HNC) encompasses a diverse group of tumors, and thus providing appropriate and tailored information to patients before, during, and after treatment is a challenge. The objective of the current study was to characterize the experience and unmet needs of patients with HNC with regard to information and support provision. A 28-question, cross-sectional survey was completed by patients treated for HNC at 1 of 4 institutions in New South Wales, Australia (Chris O'Brien Lifehouse and Liverpool, Westmead, and Wollongong hospitals). It consisted of the adapted Kessler Psychological Distress Scale and questions assessing information quality, quantity, and format. A total of 597 patients responded. The mean age of the patients was 58 years (range, 21-94 years) with 284 men and 313 women (1:1.1). The majority of patients reported information concerning the disease process (76%), prognosis (67%), and treatment (77%) was sufficient, and approximately 50% reporting having received little or no information regarding coping with stress and anxiety. A substantial percentage of patients reported receiving minimal information concerning psychosexual health (56%) or the availability of patient support groups (56%). The majority of patients preferred access to multiple modes of information delivery (72%), with the preferred modality being one-on-one meetings with a health educator (37%) followed by internet-based written information (19%). Patients with HNC are a diverse group, with complex educational and support needs. Patients appear to be given information regarding survivorship topics such as psychological well-being, patient support groups, and psychosexual health less frequently than information concerning disease and treatment. Verbal communication needs to be reinforced by accessible, well-constructed, written and multimedia resources appropriate to the patient's educational level. Cancer 2017;123:1949-1957. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017

  8. Spectroscopy of supernova host galaxies from the SDSS-II SN survey with the SDSS and BOSS spectrographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmstead, Matthew Dwaune

    Type Ia supernovae (SNeIa) have been used as standard candles to measure cosmological distances. The initial discovery of the accelerated expansion of the universe was performed using ~50 SNe Ia. Large SNe surveys have increased the number of spectroscopically-confirmed SNe Ia to over a thousand with redshift coverage beyond z = 1. We are now in the age of abundant photometry without the ability for full follow-up spectroscopy of all SN candidates. SN cosmology using these large samples will increasingly rely on robust photometric classification of SN candidates. Photometric classification will increase the sample by including faint SNe as these are preferentially not observed with follow-up spectroscopy. The primary concern with using photometrically classified SNe Ia in cosmology is when a core-collapse SNe is incorrectly classified as an SN Ia. This can be mitigated by obtaining the host galaxy redshift of each SN candidate and using this information as a prior in the photometric classification, removing one degree of freedom. To test the impact of redshift on photometric classification, I have performed an assessment on photometric classification of candidates from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) SN Survey. I have tested the classification with and without redshift priors by looking at the change of photometric classification, the effect of data quality on photometric classification, and the effect of SN light curve properties on photometric classification. Following our suggested classification scheme, there are a total of 1038 photometrically classified SNe Ia when using a flat redshift prior and 1002 SNe~Ia with the spectroscopic redshift. For 912 (91.0%) candidates classified as likely SNe Ia without redshift information, the classification is unchanged when adding the host galaxy redshift. Finally, I investigate the differences in the interpretation of the light curve properties with and without knowledge of the redshift. When using the SALT2

  9. A seroepidemiological survey of HTLV-I/II carriers in the Puna Jujeña.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dipierri, J E; Tajima, K; Cartier Robirosa, L; Sonoda, S

    1999-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) carriers are clustered in limited groups in the world. One of these groups is the Andean native population of South America. As part of an international collaborative study devoted to explore the clustering of HTVL-I carriers in different countries, the aim of this paper was to evaluate the seroprevalence of HTLV-I/II virus in the native population of Puna Argentina in Jujuy. Blood samples of individuals of three populations of Puna Jujeña (Susques, Rinconada, Cochinoca) were screened with particle agglutination (PA), immunofluorescence (IF) and western immunoblotting analysis (WB) tests. Two out 86 (2.32%) individuals examined in the Puna Jujeña showed positive results for HTLV-I antibodies. It is concluded that the Province of Jujuy, in particular its less miscegenated highest altitude areas, constitute the northern and southern Andean natural geographical clustering of HTLV-I. This distribution is probably linked both to a history of prehistoric human dispersal in the Andes and to high mother- to-child transmission of the virus under close conditions of each group.

  10. BAT AGN Spectroscopic Survey II: X-ray Emission and High Ionization Optical Emission Lines

    CERN Document Server

    Berney, Simon; Trakhtenbrot, Benny; Ricci, Claudio; Lamperti, Isabella; Schawinski, Kevin; Balokovic, Mislav; Crenshaw, D Michael; Fischer, Travis; Gehrels, Neil; Harrison, Fiona; Hashimoto, Yasuhiro; Ichikawa, Kohei; Mushotzky, Richard; Oh, Kyuseok; Stern, Daniel; Treister, Ezequiel; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Veilleux, Sylvain; Winter, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the relationship between X-ray and optical line emission in 340 nearby AGN selected above 10 keV using Swift BAT. We find a weak correlation between the extinction corrected [O III] and hard X-ray luminosity (14-195 keV) with a [OIII] large scatter (R_Pear = 0.64, sigma = 0.62 dex) and a similarly large scatter with the intrinsic 2-10 keV to [O III] luminosities (RPear=0.63, sigma = 0.63 dex). Correlations of the hard X-ray fluxes with the fluxes of high-ionization narrow lines ([O III], He II, [Ne III] and [Ne V]) are not significantly better than with the low ionization lines (Halpha, [SII]). Factors like obscuration or physical slit size are not found to be a significant part of the large scatter. In contrast, the optical emission lines show much better correlations with each other (sigma = 0.3 dex) than with the X-ray flux. The inherent large scatter questions the common usage of narrow emission lines as AGN bolometric luminosity indicators and suggests that other issues such as geometrical...

  11. Nearby supernova host galaxies from the CALIFA Survey: II. SN environmental metallicity

    CERN Document Server

    Galbany, L; Mourão, A M; Rodrigues, M; Flores, H; Walcher, C J; Sánchez, S F; García-Benito, R; Mast, D; Badenes, C; Delgado, R M González; Kehrig, C; Lyubenova, M; Marino, R A; Mollá, M; Meidt, S; Pérez, E; van de Ven, G; Vílchez, J M

    2016-01-01

    The metallicity of a supernova (SN) progenitor, together with its mass, is one of the main parameters that rules their outcome. We present a metallicity study of 115 nearby SN host galaxies (0.00510 dex) by targeted searches. We also found no evidence that the metallicity at the SN location differs from the average metallicity at the GCD of the SNe. By extending our SN sample with published metallicities at the SN location, we studied the metallicity distributions for all SN subtypes split into SN discovered in targeted and untargeted searches. We confirm a bias toward higher host masses and metallicities in the targeted searches. Combining data from targeted and untargeted searches we found a sequence from higher to lower local metallicity: SN Ia, Ic, and II show the highest metallicity, which is significantly higher than SN Ib, IIb, and Ic-BL. Our results support the picture of SN Ib resulting from binary progenitors and, at least part of, SN Ic being the result of single massive stars stripped of their out...

  12. The POINT-AGAPE survey II: An Unrestricted Search for Microlensing Events towards M31

    CERN Document Server

    Belokurov, V; Evans, N W; Hewett, P C; Baillon, Paul; Novati, S C; Carr, B J; Creze, M; Giraud-Héraud, Yannick; Gould, A; Jetzer, P; Kaplan, J; Kerins, E; Paulin-Henriksson, S; Smartt, S J; Stalin, C S; Tsapras, Y; Weston, M J; Jetzer, Ph.

    2005-01-01

    An automated search is carried out for microlensing events using a catalogue of 44554 variable superpixel lightcurves derived from our three-year monitoring program of M31. Each step of our candidate selection is objective and reproducible by a computer. Our search is unrestricted, in the sense that it has no explicit timescale cut. So, it must overcome the awkward problem of distinguishing long-timescale microlensing events from long-period stellar variables. The basis of the selection algorithm is the fitting of the superpixel lightcurves to two different theoretical models, using variable star and blended microlensing templates. Only if microlensing is preferred is an event retained as a possible candidate. Further cuts are made with regard to (i) sampling, (ii) goodness of fit of the peak to a Paczynski curve, (iii) consistency of the microlensing hypothesis with the absence of a resolved source, (iv) achromaticity, (v) position in the colour-magnitude diagram and (vi) signal-to-noise ratio. Our results a...

  13. Study of the Sextans dwarf spheroidal galaxy from the DART CaII triplet survey

    CERN Document Server

    Battaglia, G; Helmi, A; Irwin, M; Parisi, P; Hill, V; Jablonka, P

    2010-01-01

    We use VLT/FLAMES intermediate resolution (R~6500) spectra of individual red giant branch stars in the near-infrared CaII triplet (CaT) region to investigate the wide-area metallicity properties and internal kinematics of the Sextans dwarf spheroidal galaxy (dSph). Our final sample consists of 174 probable members of Sextans with accurate line-of-sight velocities (+- 2 km/s) and CaT [Fe/H] measurements (+- 0.2 dex). We use the MgI line at 8806.8 \\AA\\, as an empirical discriminator for distinguishing between probable members of the dSph (giant stars) and probable Galactic contaminants (dwarf stars). Sextans shows a similar chemo-dynamical behaviour to other Milky Way dSphs, with its central regions being more metal rich than the outer parts and with the more metal-rich stars displaying colder kinematics than the more metal-poor stars. Hints of a velocity gradient are found along the projected major axis and along an axis at P.A.=191 deg, however a larger and more spatially extended sample may be necessary to p...

  14. The effect of laparoscopic surgery in stage II and III right-sided colon cancer: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kye Bong-Hyeon

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This retrospective study compared the clinicopathological results among three groups divided by time sequence to evaluate the impact of introducing laparoscopic surgery on long-term oncological outcomes for right-sided colon cancer. Methods From April 1986 to December 2006, 200 patients who underwent elective surgery with stage II and III right-sided colon cancer were analyzed. The period for group I referred back to the time when laparoscopic approach had not yet been introduced. The period for group II was designated as the time when first laparoscopic approach for right colectomy was carried out until we overcame its learning curve. The period for group III was the period after overcoming this learning curve. Results When groups I and II, and groups II and III were compared, overall survival (OS did not differ significantly whereas disease-free survival (DFS in groups I and III were statistically higher than in group II (P = 0.042 and P = 0.050. In group III, laparoscopic surgery had a tendency to provide better long-term OS ( P = 0.2036 and DFS ( P = 0.2356 than open surgery. Also, the incidence of local recurrence in group III (2.6% was significantly lower than that in groups II (7.4% and I (12.1% ( P = 0.013. Conclusions Institutions should standardize their techniques and then provide fellowship training for newcomers of laparoscopic colon cancer surgery. This technique once mastered will become the gold standard approach to colon surgery as it is both safe and feasible considering the oncological and technical aspects.

  15. The association between regular use of aspirin and the prevalence of prostate cancer: Results from the National Health Interview Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wan-Ting; Erickson, Steven R; Hansen, Richard A; Wu, Chung-Hsuen

    2016-06-01

    Prostate cancer is prevalent with significant morbidity in the United States. Aspirin previously has been found to be associated with reduced carcinogenesis of prostate cells. However, it remains unclear whether regularly taking aspirin could lower the risk of prostate cancer. Therefore, our aim was to examine the association between self-reported regular use of aspirin and the prevalence of prostate cancer in a national sample of the US adult population.The National Health Interview Survey is an annual survey conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics to investigate health and healthcare use of the US population. The current study is a population-based cross-sectional study using the 2010 National Health Interview Survey data. Adult male respondents who self-reported regularly taking aspirin at least 3 times per week were grouped as regular users. The prostate cancer prevalence was measured by respondents' self-report of prostate cancer. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to evaluate the association between these 2 factors by adjusting for covariates selected based on Andersen Behavioral Model of Health Services Use.An estimated 23 million (23.7%) males in the United States reported that they took aspirin regularly. Of them, 5.0% had prostate cancer. Regular aspirin use was significantly associated with a lower self-reported prevalence of prostate cancer after adjusting for predisposing, enabling, and need factors (odds ratio 0.60, 95% confidence interval 0.38-0.94).Regular aspirin use was found to be significantly associated with a lower self-reported prevalence of prostate cancer in the United States in 2010. Further clinical trials and longitudinal studies are needed to confirm the causality between regular aspirin use and prostate cancer.

  16. A phase II randomized trial comparing radiotherapy with concurrent weekly cisplatin or weekly paclitaxel in patients with advanced cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charafeddine Maya

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose/Objective This is a prospective comparison of weekly cisplatin to weekly paclitaxel as concurrent chemotherapy with standard radiotherapy for locally advanced cervical carcinoma. Materials/Methods Between May 2000 and May 2004, 31 women with FIGO stage IB2-IVA cervical cancer or with postsurgical pelvic recurrence were enrolled into this phase II study and randomized to receive on a weekly basis either 40 mg/m2 Cisplatin (group I; 16 patients or 50 mg/m2 paclitaxel (group II; 15 patients concurrently with radiotherapy. Median total dose to point A was 74 Gy (range: 66-92 Gy for group I and 66 Gy (range: 40-98 Gy for group II. Median follow-up time was 46 months. Results Patient and tumor characteristics were similar in both groups. The mean number of chemotherapy cycles was also comparable with 87% and 80% of patients receiving at least 4 doses in groups I and II, respectively. Seven patients (44% of group I and 8 patients (53% of group II developed tumor recurrence. The Median Survival time was not reached for Group I and 53 months for group II. The proportion of patients surviving at 2 and 5 years was 78% and 54% for group I and 73% and 43% for group II respectively. Conclusions This small prospective study shows that weekly paclitaxel does not provide any clinical advantage over weekly cisplatin for concurrent chemoradiation for advanced carcinoma of the cervix.

  17. Development and molecular modeling of Co(II, Ni(II and Cu(II complexes as high acting anti breast cancer agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.A. Deodware

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A series of cobalt, nickel and copper complexes of bidentate Schiff base derived from the condensation reaction of 4-amino-5-mercapto-3-methyl-1,2,4-triazole with 2-nitrobenzaldehyde had been synthesized. The synthesized Schiff base and their metal complexes have been characterized with the support of more than a few physicochemical techniques, elemental evaluation, magnetic moment measurements, spectroscopic, thermo gravimetric techniques and X-ray powder diffraction. Spectral analysis exhibits square planer geometry for Cu(II complex while octahedral geometry for Co(II and Ni(II complexes. The Schiff base and their complexes have been screened for their anticancer activity using MCF7 cell line. In molecular docking learn exhibits that Ni(II complex is more active confirmed quantity of interaction in particular hydrogen bond interaction with ASN142 and charge interactions with ASP97 and GLU99.

  18. Lymphedema After Surgery in Patients With Endometrial Cancer, Cervical Cancer, or Vulvar Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-23

    Lymphedema; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IB Vulvar Cancer; Stage II Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIB Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIC Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVB Vulvar Cancer

  19. The HST/ACS Coma Cluster Survey. II. Data Description and Source Catalogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Derek; Kleijn, Gijs Verdoes; Hoyos, Carlos; Den Brok, Mark; Balcells, Marc; Ferguson, Henry C.; Goudfrooij, Paul; Carter, David; Guzman, Rafael; Peletier, Reynier F.; hide

    2010-01-01

    The Coma cluster, Abell 1656, was the target of a HST-ACS Treasury program designed for deep imaging in the F475W and F814W passbands. Although our survey was interrupted by the ACS instrument failure in early 2007, the partially-completed survey still covers approximately 50% of the core high density region in Coma. Observations were performed for twenty-five fields with a total coverage area of 274 aremin(sup 2), and extend over a wide range of cluster-centric radii (approximately 1.75 Mpe or 1 deg). The majority of the fields are located near the core region of Coma (19/25 pointings) with six additional fields in the south-west region of the cluster. In this paper we present SEXTRACTOR source catalogs generated from the processed images, including a detailed description of the methodology used for object detection and photometry, the subtraction of bright galaxies to measure faint underlying objects, and the use of simulations to assess the photometric accuracy and completeness of our catalogs. We also use simulations to perform aperture corrections for the SEXTRACTOR Kron magnitudes based only on the measured source flux and its half-light radius. We have performed photometry for 76,000 objects that consist of roughly equal numbers of extended galaxies and unresolved objects. Approximately two-thirds of all detections are brighter than F814W=26.5 mag (AB), which corresponds to the 10sigma, point-source detection limit. We estimate that Coma members are 5-10% of the source detections, including a large population of compact objects (primarily GCs, but also cEs and UCDs), and a wide variety of extended galaxies from cD galaxies to dwarf low surface brightness galaxies. The initial data release for the HST-ACS Coma Treasury program was made available to the public in August 2008. The images and catalogs described in this study relate to our second data release.

  20. THE HST/ACS+WFC3 SURVEY FOR LYMAN LIMIT SYSTEMS. II. SCIENCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Meara, John M. [Department of Chemistry and Physics, Saint Michael' s College. One Winooski Park, Colchester, VT 05439 (United States); Prochaska, J. Xavier; Worseck, Gabor; Madau, Piero [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Chen, Hsiao-Wen [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, 640 S. Ellis Ave, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2013-03-10

    We present the first science results from our Hubble Space Telescope survey for Lyman limit absorption systems (LLS) using the low dispersion spectroscopic modes of the Advanced Camera for Surveys and the Wide Field Camera 3. Through an analysis of 71 quasars, we determine the incidence frequency of LLS per unit redshift and per unit path length, l(z) and l(X), respectively, over the redshift range 1 < z < 2.6, and find a weighted mean of l(X) =0.29 {+-} 0.05 for 2.0 < z < 2.5 through a joint analysis of our sample and that of Ribaudo et al. Through stacked spectrum analysis, we determine a median (mean) value of the mean free path to ionizing radiation at z = 2.4 of {lambda}{sup 912}{sub mfp} = 243(252) h {sup -1}{sub 72} Mpc, with an error on the mean value of {+-}43 h {sup -1}{sub 72} Mpc. We also re-evaluate the estimates of {lambda}{sup 912}{sub mfp} from Prochaska et al. and place constraints on the evolution of {lambda}{sup 912}{sub mfp} with redshift, including an estimate of the ''breakthrough'' redshift of z = 1.6. Consistent with results at higher z, we find that a significant fraction of the opacity for absorption of ionizing photons comes from systems with N{sub H{sub I}} {<=}10{sup 17.5} cm{sup -2} with a value for the total Lyman opacity of {tau}{sup Lyman}{sub eff} = 0.40 {+-} 0.15. Finally, we determine that at minimum, a 5-parameter (4 power law) model is needed to describe the column density distribution function f(N{sub H{sub I}}, X) at z {approx} 2.4, find that f(N{sub H{sub I}}, X) undergoes no significant change in shape between z {approx} 2.4 and z {approx} 3.7, and provide our best fit model for f(N{sub H{sub I}}, X).

  1. Role of Postmastectomy Radiation After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Stage II-III Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowble, Barbara L., E-mail: bfowble@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Einck, John P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Kim, Danny N. [Athena Breast Health Network, Program Management Office, San Francisco, CA (United States); McCloskey, Susan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Mayadev, Jyoti [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Yashar, Catheryn [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Chen, Steven L. [Department of Surgery, University of California, Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Hwang, E. Shelley [Department of Surgery, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To identify a cohort of women treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy for whom postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) may be omitted according to the projected risk of local-regional failure (LRF). Methods and Materials: Seven breast cancer physicians from University of California cancer centers created 14 hypothetical clinical case scenarios, identified, reviewed, and abstracted the available literature (MEDLINE and Cochrane databases), and formulated evidence tables with endpoints of LRF, disease-free survival, and overall survival. Using the American College of Radiology appropriateness criteria methodology, appropriateness ratings for postmastectomy radiation were assigned for each scenario. Finally, an overall summary risk assessment table was developed. Results: Of 24 sources identified, 23 were retrospective studies from single institutions. Consensus on the appropriateness rating, defined as 80% agreement in a category, was achieved for 86% of the cases. Distinct LRF risk categories emerged. Clinical stage II (T1-2N0-1) patients, aged >40 years, estrogen receptor-positive subtype, with pathologic complete response or 0-3 positive nodes without lymphovascular invasion or extracapsular extension, were identified as having {<=}10% risk of LRF without radiation. Limited data support stage IIIA patients with pathologic complete response as being low risk. Conclusions: In the absence of randomized trial results, existing data can be used to guide the use of PMRT in the neoadjuvant chemotherapy setting. Using available studies to inform appropriateness ratings for clinical scenarios, we found a high concordance of treatment recommendations for PMRT and were able to identify a cohort of women with a low risk of LRF without radiation. These low-risk patients will form the basis for future planned studies within University of California Athena Breast Health Network.

  2. A European survey relating to cancer therapy and neutropenic infections: Nurse and patient viewpoints.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Leonard, Kay

    2011-09-25

    PURPOSE: Severe neutropenia and febrile neutropenia (FN) are the major causes of morbidity, treatment interruptions and dose reductions in patients undergoing chemotherapy. The European Oncology Nursing Society (EONS) conducted an European survey to evaluate nurse perspectives on prevention of infection and FN in this setting, and how much they educate their patients about this. A separate survey explored these issues in patients receiving chemotherapy. METHODS: 217 nurse participants were identified by EONS from the membership database and 473 cancer patients who were receiving\\/had received chemotherapy were identified through patient advocacy groups. Questionnaires were completed anonymously online for both surveys. RESULTS: More than 90% of the nurses agreed that preventing infections including FN is extremely\\/very important for a successful chemotherapy outcome and said that they, or other health professionals in their practice, advised patients about these issues. Most (90%) indicated that they favoured giving treatment to protect against FN and infections in chemotherapy patients at risk, rather than treating infection after it develops, but 82% expressed concern over patient concordance with measures employed. A substantial proportion of patients reported emergency room visits, hospitalization and\\/or chemotherapy delays or changes as a result of neutropenia, infection or FN. However, only 44% said that their infection risk was discussed with them before starting chemotherapy. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that nurses recognise the importance of reducing the risk of infection and FN in patients undergoing chemotherapy, as well as the need to educate patients. However, results of the patient survey suggest a need for better patient education.

  3. The Swift AGN and Cluster Survey. II. Cluster Confirmation with SDSS Data

    CERN Document Server

    Griffin, Rhiannon D; Kochanek, Christopher S; Bregman, Joel N

    2015-01-01

    We study 203 extended X-ray sources in the Swift GRB fields that are located within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR8 footprint. We search for galaxy over-densities in three-dimensional space using SDSS galaxies and their photometric redshifts near the Swift cluster candidates. We find 103 Swift clusters with a >3 sigma over-density. The remaining targets are potentially located at higher redshifts and require deeper optical follow-up observations for confirmations as galaxy clusters. We present a series of cluster properties including the redshift, BCG magnitude, BCG-to-X-ray center offset, optical richness, and X-ray luminosity. We also detect red sequences in almost half of the 103 confirmed clusters. The X-ray luminosity and optical richness for the SDSS confirmed Swift clusters are correlated and follow previously established relations. The distribution of the separations between the X-ray centroids and the most likely BCG is also consistent with expectation. We compare the observed redshift distri...

  4. The Gaia spectrophotometric standard stars survey -II. Instrumental effects of six ground-based observing campaigns

    CERN Document Server

    Altavilla, G; Pancino, E; Galleti, S; Ragaini, S; Bellazzini, M; Cocozza, G; Bragaglia, A; Carrasco, J M; Castro, A; Di Fabrizio, L; Federici, L; Figueras, F; Gebran, M; Jordi, C; Masana, E; Schuster, W; Valentini, G; Voss, H

    2015-01-01

    The Gaia SpectroPhotometric Standard Stars (SPSS) survey started in 2006, it was awarded almost 450 observing nights, and accumulated almost 100,000 raw data frames, with both photometric and spectroscopic observations. Such large observational effort requires careful, homogeneous, and automated data reduction and quality control procedures. In this paper, we quantitatively evaluate instrumental effects that might have a significant (i.e.,$\\geq$1%) impact on the Gaia SPSS flux calibration. The measurements involve six different instruments, monitored over the eight years of observations dedicated to the Gaia flux standards campaigns: DOLORES@TNG in La Palma, EFOSC2@NTT and ROSS@REM in La Silla, CAFOS@2.2m in Calar Alto, BFOSC@Cassini in Loiano, and LaRuca@1.5m in San Pedro Martir. We examine and quantitatively evaluate the following effects: CCD linearity and shutter times, calibration frames stability, lamp flexures, second order contamination, light polarization, and fringing. We present methods to correct ...

  5. The Micro-Arcsecond Scintillation-Induced Variability (MASIV) Survey II: The First Four Epochs

    CERN Document Server

    Lovell, J E J; Macquart, J-P; Jauncey, D L; Bignall, H E; Kedziora-Chudczer, L; Ojha, R; Pursimo, T; Dutka, M; Senkbeil, C; Shabala, S

    2008-01-01

    We report on the variability of 443 flat spectrum, compact radio sources monitored using the VLA for 3 days in 4 epochs at ~ 4 month intervals at 5 GHz as part of the Micro-Arcsecond Scintillation-Induced Variability (MASIV) survey. Over half of these sources exhibited 2-10% rms variations on timescales over 2 days. We analyzed the variations by two independent methods, and find that the rms variability amplitudes of the sources correlate with the emission measure in the ionized Interstellar Medium along their respective lines of sight. We thus link the variations with interstellar scintillation of components of these sources, with some (unknown) fraction of the total flux density contained within a compact region of angular diameter in the range 10-50 micro-arcseconds. We also find that the variations decrease for high mean flux density sources and, most importantly, for high redshift sources. The decrease in variability is probably due either to an increase in the apparent diameter of the source, or a decre...

  6. The GLARE Survey II. Faint z=6 Ly-alpha Line Emitters in the HUDF

    CERN Document Server

    Stanway, Elizabeth R; Glazebrook, Karl; Abraham, Roberto G; Rhoads, James; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Crampton, David; Colless, Matthew; Chiu, Kuenley; 10.1111/j.1365-2966.2007.11469.x

    2008-01-01

    The galaxy population at z~6 has been the subject of intense study in recent years, culminating in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF) -- the deepest imaging survey yet. A large number of high redshift galaxy candidates have been identified within the HUDF, but until now analysis of their properties has been hampered by the difficulty of obtaining spectroscopic redshifts for these faint galaxies. Our ''Gemini Lyman-Alpha at Reionisation Era'' (GLARE) project has been designed to undertake spectroscopic follow up of faint (z'5.5, and a further nine possible line emitters with detections at lower significance. We also place tight constraints on the equivalent width of Lyman-alpha emission for a further ten i'-drop galaxies and examine the equivalent width distribution of this faint spectroscopic sample of z~6 galaxies. We find that the fraction of galaxies with little or no emission is similar to that at z~3, but that the z~6 population has a tail of sources with high rest frame equivalent widths. Possible expla...

  7. A line confusion limited millimeter survey of Orion KL. II: Silicon-bearing species

    CERN Document Server

    Tercero, B; Cernicharo, J; Viti, S; Marcelino, N

    2010-01-01

    We present a study of the Silicon-bearing species detected in a line confusion limited survey towards Orion KL performed with the IRAM 30-m telescope, which ranges from 80 to 280 GHz. Our aim is to derive physical and chemical conditions for each family taking into account all observed lines from all isotopologues of each species. We have modeled the lines of the detected molecules using a radiative transfer code, which permit us to choose between LVG and LTE approximations depending on the physical conditions of the gas. We have used appropriate collisional rates for the LVG calculations. For the v=1 state of SiO we have detected the J=2-1 line and, for the first time in this source, emission in the J=4-3 transition, both of them showing strong masering effect. For SiO v=0, we have detected 28SiO, 29SiO, and 30SiO; in addition, we have mapped the J = 5-4 SiO line. For SiS, we have detected the main species, 29SiS, and SiS v=1. Unlikely other species detected in Orion KL (IRc2), the emission peak of SiS appea...

  8. The GALEX Arecibo SDSS Survey II: The Star Formation Efficiency of Massive Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Schiminovich, David; Kauffmann, Guinevere; Fabello, Silvia; Wang, Jing; Hummels, Cameron; Lemonias, Jenna; Moran, Sean M; Wu, Ronin; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P; Heckman, Timothy M; Basu-Zych, Antara R; Blanton, Michael R; Brinchmann, Jarle; Budavari, Tamas; Goncalves, Thiago; Johnson, Benjamin D; Kennicutt, Robert C; Madore, Barry F; Martin, Christopher D; Rich, Michael R; Tacconi, Linda J; Thilker, David A; Wild, Vivienne; Wyder, Ted K

    2010-01-01

    We use measurements of the HI content, stellar mass and star formation rates in ~190 massive galaxies with stellar masses greater than 10^10 Msun, obtained from the Galex Arecibo SDSS Survey (GASS) described in Paper I (Catinella et al. 2010) to explore the global scaling relations associated with the bin-averaged ratio of the star formation rate over the HI mass, which we call the HI-based star formation efficiency (SFE). Unlike the mean specific star formation rate, which decreases with stellar mass and stellar mass surface density, the star formation efficiency remains relatively constant across the sample with a value close to SFE = 10^-9.5 yr^-1 (or an equivalent gas consumption timescale of ~3 Gyr). Specifically, we find little variation in SFE with stellar mass, stellar mass surface density, NUV-r color and concentration. We interpret these results as an indication that external processes or feedback mechanisms that control the gas supply are important for regulating star formation in massive galaxies....

  9. A Survey of Insulin-Dependent Diabetes—Part II: Control Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Takahashi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We survey blood glucose control schemes for insulin-dependent diabetes therapies and systems. These schemes largely rely on mathematical models of the insulin-glucose relations, and these models are typically derived in an empirical or fundamental way. In an empirical way, the experimental insulin inputs and resulting blood-glucose outputs are used to generate a mathematical model, which includes a couple of equations approximating a very complex system. On the other hand, the insulin-glucose relation is also explained from the well-known facts of other biological mechanisms. Since these mechanisms are more or less related with each other, a mathematical model of the insulin-glucose system can be derived from these surrounding relations. This kind of method of the mathematical model derivation is called a fundamental method. Along with several mathematical models, researchers develop autonomous systems whether they involve medical devices or not to compensate metabolic disorders and these autonomous systems employ their own control methods. Basically, in insulin-dependent diabetes therapies, control methods are classified into three categories: open-loop, closed-loop, and partially closed-loop controls. The main difference among these methods is how much the systems are open to the outside people.

  10. Far-infrared data for symbiotic stars. II - The IRAS survey observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, S. J.; Fernandez-Castro, T.; Stencel, R. E.

    1988-06-01

    IRAS survey data for all known symbiotic binaries are reported. S type systems have 25 micron excesses much larger than those of single red giant stars, suggesting that these objects lose mass more rapidly than do normal giants. D type objects have far-IR colors similar to those of Mira variables, implying mass-loss rate of about 10 to the -6th solar masses/yr. The near-IR extinctions of the D types indicate that their Mira components are enshrouded in optically thick dust shells, while their hot companions lie outside the shells. If this interpretation of the data is correct, then the very red near-IR colors of D type symbiotic stars are caused by extreme amounts of dust absorption rather than dust emission. The small group of D prime objects possesses far-IR colors resembling those of compact planetary nebulae or extreme OH/IR stars. It is speculated that these binaries are not symbiotic stars at all, but contain a hot compact star and an exasymptotic branch giant which is in the process of ejecting a planetary nebula shell.

  11. Bright Metal-Poor Stars from the Hamburg/ESO Survey. II. A Chemodynamical Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Beers, Timothy C; Carollo, Daniela; Rossi, Silvia; Frebel, Anna; Norris, John E; Dietz, Sarah; Masseron, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We obtain estimates of stellar atmospheric parameters for a previously published sample of 1777 relatively bright (9 < B < 14) metal-poor candidates from the Hamburg/ESO Survey. The original Frebel et al. analysis of these stars was only able to derive estimates of [Fe/H] and [C/Fe] for a subset of the sample, due to limitations in the methodology then available. A new spectroscopic analysis pipeline has been used to obtain estimates of Teff, log g, [Fe/H], and [C/Fe] for almost the entire dataset. This sample is very local - about 90% of the stars are located within 0.5 kpc of the Sun. We consider the chemodynamical properties of these stars in concert with a similarly local sample of stars from a recent analysis of the Bidelman & MacConnell 'weak-metal' candidates by Beers et al. We use this combined sample to identify possible members of the suggested halo stream of stars by Helmi et al. and Chiba & Beers, as well as stars that may be associated with stripped debris from the putative parent d...

  12. A submillimetre survey of the kinematics of the Perseus molecular cloud - II. Molecular outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Curtis, Emily I; Swift, Jonathan J; Williams, Jonathan P

    2010-01-01

    We present a census of molecular outflows across four active regions of star formation in the Perseus molecular cloud (NGC 1333, IC348/HH211, L1448 and L1455), totalling an area of over 1000 sq arcmin. This is one of the largest surveys of outflow evolution in a single molecular cloud published to date. We analyse large-scale, sensitive CO J=3-2 datasets from the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, including new data towards NGC 1333. Where possible we make use of our complementary 13CO and C18O data to correct for the 12CO optical depth and measure ambient cloud properties. Of the 65 submillimetre cores in our fields, we detect outflows towards 45. We compare various parameters between the outflows from Class 0 and I protostars, including their mass, momentum, energy and momentum flux. Class 0 outflows are longer, faster, more massive and have more energy than Class I outflows. The dynamical time-scales we derive from these outflows are uncorrelated to the age of the outflow driving source, computed from the prot...

  13. Increasing utilization of bone marrow transplantation. II. Results of the 1985-1987 survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortin, M M; Rimm, A A

    1989-09-01

    The International Bone Marrow Transplant REgistry conducts periodic surveys to determine activity in the field of allogeneic and syngeneic bone marrow transplantation. Data were reported to the IBMTR by 258 institutions in 41 countries regarding their patients who received bone marrow transplants during the period 1985-1987. To the best of our knowledge, the data represent essentially all bone marrow transplants (exclusive of autologous transplants) performed in the past 3 years. A total of 10,887 patients received bone marrow transplants; 73% were for leukemia, 11% for other malignant diseases, 9% for severe aplastic anemia and related disorders, 3% for immune deficiency diseases, 2% for thalassemia major, and 2% for genetic, metabolic, and several other rare diseases. 161 (62%) of the 258 institutions performed fewer than one transplant per month. More than 50% of the patients were transplanted in 37 institutions. 46% of the world's bone marrow transplants were performed in North America, 42% in Western Europe, 5% in Asia, 3% in Australia and New Zealand, 2% in the Mideast and Africa, 1% in South and Central America, and 1% in Eastern Europe and the USSR. The data reflect continued growth in utilization of allogeneic and syngeneic bone marrow transplantation and quantify the annual increases in the number of patients receiving transplants.

  14. Spectral Energy Distributions of Type 1 AGN in XMM-COSMOS Survey II - Shape Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Hao, Heng; Civano, Francesca; Zamorani, Gianni; Ho, Luis C; Comastri, Andrea; Bongiorno, Angela; Merloni, Andrea; Brusa, Marcella; Trump, Jonathan R; Salvato, Mara; Impey, Chris D; Koekemoer, Anton M; Lanzuisi, Giorgio; Celotti, Annalisa; Jahnke, Knud; Vignali, Cristian; Silverman, John D; Urry, C Megan; Schawinski, Kevin; Capak, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The near-infrared to optical-ultraviolet (0.1 -- 10 $\\mu m$) spectral energy distribution (SED) shapes of 407 X-ray-selected radio-quiet type 1 AGN in the wide-field "Cosmic Evolution Survey" (COSMOS) have been studied for signs of evolution. For a sub-sample of 200 radio-quiet quasars with black hole mass estimation and host galaxy correction, we study the mean SEDs as a function of a broad range of redshift, bolometric luminosity, black hole mass and Eddington ratio, and compare them with the Elvis et al. (1994, E94) type 1 AGN mean SED. The mean SEDs in each bin are very similar to each other, showing no evidence of dependence on any of the analyzed parameters. We also checked the SED dispersion as a function of these four parameters, and found no significant dependance. The dispersion of the XMM-COSMOS SEDs is generally larger than E94 SED dispersion in the ultraviolet, which might be largely due to the broader "window function" for COSMOS quasars, and the X-ray based selection technique.

  15. The High Time Resolution Universe Survey II: Discovery of 5 Millisecond Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Bates, S D; Bhat, N D R; Burgay, M; Burke-Spolaor, S; D'Amico, N; Jameson, A; Johnston, S; Keith, M J; Kramer, M; Levin, L; Lyne, A; Milia, S; Possenti, A; Stappers, B; van Straten, W

    2011-01-01

    We present the discovery of 5 millisecond pulsars found in the mid-Galactic latitude portion of the High Time Resolution Universe (HTRU) Survey. The pulsars have rotational periods from ~2.3 to ~7.5 ms, and all are in binary systems with orbital periods ranging from ~0.3 to ~150 d. In four of these systems, the most likely companion is a white dwarf, with minimum masses of ~0.2 Solar Masses. The other pulsar, J1731-1847, has a very low mass companion and exhibits eclipses, and is thus a member of the "black widow" class of pulsar binaries. These eclipses have been observed in bands centred near frequencies of 700, 1400 and 3000 MHz, from which measurements have been made of the electron density in the eclipse region. These measurements have been used to examine some possible eclipse mechanisms. The eclipse and other properties of this source are used to perform a comparison with the other known eclipsing and "black widow" pulsars. These new discoveries occupy a short-period and high-dispersion measure (DM) re...

  16. The Galactic O-Star Spectroscopic Survey (GOSSS). II. Bright Southern Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Sota, A; Morrell, N I; Barbá, R H; Walborn, N R; Gamen, R C; Arias, J I; Alfaro, E J

    2013-01-01

    We present the second installment of GOSSS, a massive spectroscopic survey of Galactic O stars, based on new homogeneous, high signal-to-noise ratio, R ~ 2500 digital observations from both hemispheres selected from the Galactic O-Star Catalog (GOSC). In this paper we include bright stars and other objects drawn mostly from the first version of GOSC, all of them south of delta = -20 degrees, for a total number of 258 O stars. We also revise the northern sample of paper I to provide the full list of spectroscopically classified Galactic O stars complete to B = 8, bringing the total number of published GOSSS stars to 448. Extensive sequences of exceptional objects are given, including the early Of/WN, O Iafpe, Ofc, ON/OC, Onfp, Of?p, and Oe types, as well as double/triple-lined spectroscopic binaries. The new spectral subtype O9.2 is also discussed. The magnitude and spatial distributions of the observed sample are analyzed. We also present new results from OWN, a multi-epoch high-resolution spectroscopic surve...

  17. The VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey II: R139 revealed as a massive binary system

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, W D; Sana, H; Walborn, N R; de Mink, S E; Stroud, V E; Alvarez-Candal, A; Barbá, R H; Bestenlehner, J M; Bonanos, A Z; Brott, I; Crowther, P A; de Koter, A; Friedrich, K; Gräfener, G; Hénault-Brunet, V; Herrero, A; Kaper, L; Langer, N; Lennon, D J; Apellániz, J Maíz; Markova, N; Morrell, N; Monaco, L; Vink, J S

    2011-01-01

    We report the discovery that R139 in 30 Doradus is a massive spectroscopic binary system. Multi-epoch optical spectroscopy of R139 was obtained as part of the VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey, revealing a double-lined system. The two components are of similar spectral types; the primary exhibits strong C III 4650 emission and is classified as an O6.5 Iafc supergiant, while the secondary is an O6 Iaf supergiant. The radial-velocity variations indicate a highly eccentric orbit with a period of 153.9 days. Photometry obtained with the Faulkes Telescope South shows no evidence for significant variability within an 18 month period. The orbital solution yields lower mass limits for the components of M1sin^3 i = 78 \\pm 8 Msun and M2sin^3 i = 66 \\pm 7 Msun. As R139 appears to be the most massive binary system known to contain two evolved Of supergiants, it will provide an excellent test for atmospheric and evolutionary models.

  18. VLBA Survey of OH Masers in Star-Forming Regions II: Satellite Lines

    CERN Document Server

    Ruiz-Velasco, A E; Migenes, V; Wiggins, B K

    2016-01-01

    Using the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) we performed a high resolution OH maser survey in Galactic star-forming regions (SFRs). We observed all the ground state spectral lines: the main lines at 1665 and 1667 MHz and the satellite lines at 1612 and 1720 MHz. Due to the exceptionality of finding satellite lines in SFRs, we will focus our discussion on those lines. In our sample of 41 OH maser sources, five (12%) showed the 1612 MHz line and ten (24%) showed the 1720 MHz line, with only one source showing both lines. We find that 1720 MHz emission is correlated with the presence of HII regions, suggesting that this emission could be used to diagnose or trace high-mass star formation. We include an analysis of the possible mechanisms that could be causing this correlation as well as assessing the possible relationships between lines in our sample. In particular, the presence of magnetic fields seems to play an important role, as we found Zeeman splitting in four of our sources (W75 N, W3(OH), W51 and NGC 7538)...

  19. The Westerbork SINGS Survey II. Polarization, Faraday Rotation, and Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Heald, G; Edmonds, R

    2009-01-01

    A sample of large northern Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey (SINGS) galaxies has recently been observed with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT). We present observations of the linearly polarized radio continuum emission in this WSRT-SINGS galaxy sample. Of the 28 galaxies treated in this paper, 21 are detected in polarized radio continuum at 18- and 22-cm wavelengths. We utilize the rotation measure synthesis (RM-Synthesis) method, as implemented by Brentjens & de Bruyn, to coherently detect polarized emission from a large fractional bandwidth, while simultaneously assessing the degree of Faraday rotation experienced by the radiation along each line-of-sight. This represents the first time that the polarized emission and its Faraday rotation have been systematically probed down to ~10 microJy/beam RMS for a large sample of galaxies. Non-zero Faraday rotation is found to be ubiquitous in all of the target fields, from both the Galactic foreground and the target galaxies themselves. In t...

  20. Regulation of angiotensin II type 1 receptor expression in ovarian cancer: a potential role for BRCA1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Fang-Fang; Li, Da; Cao, Chen; Li, Chun-Yan; Yang, Qing

    2013-12-09

    Both BRCA1 and angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AGTR1) play a critical role in ovarian cancer progression. However, the crosstalk between BRCA1 and AGTR1 signaling pathways remains largely unknown. BRCA1 promoter methylation was analyzed by bisulfite sequence using primers focused on the core promoter region. Expression levels of BRCA1 and AGTR1 were assessed by immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR. Regression analysis was used to examine the possible relationship between BRCA1 and AGTR1 protein levels. Knockdown or overexpression of BRCA1 was achieved by using a lentiviral vector in 293 T cells and SKOV3 ovarian carcinoma cells, and primary non-mutated and BRCA1-mutated ovarian cancer cells. BRCA1 dysfunction (BRCA1 mutation or hypermethylated BRCA1 promoter) ovarian cancer showed decreased AGTR1 levels compared to normal tissue. In contrast, AGTR1 expression was increased in non-BRCA1-mutated ovarian cancer. Notably, BRCA1 activation was an effective way to induce AGTR1 expression in primary ovarian cancer cells and a positive correlation exists between BRCA1 and AGTR1 expression in human ovarian cancer specimens. These results indicate that BRCA1 may be a potential trigger involved in the transcriptional regulation of AGTR1 in the development of ovarian cancer.

  1. Disparities in Cervical Cancer Mortality Rates as Determined by the Longitudinal Hyperbolastic Mixed-Effects Type II Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabai, Mohammad A.; Kengwoung-Keumo, Jean-Jacques; Eby, Wayne M.; Bae, Sejong; Guemmegne, Juliette T.; Manne, Upender; Fouad, Mona; Partridge, Edward E.; Singh, Karan P.

    2014-01-01

    Background The main purpose of this study was to model and analyze the dynamics of cervical cancer mortality rates for African American (Black) and White women residing in 13 states located in the eastern half of the United States of America from 1975 through 2010. Methods The cervical cancer mortality rates of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) were used to model and analyze the dynamics of cervical cancer mortality. A longitudinal hyperbolastic mixed-effects type II model was used to model the cervical cancer mortality data and SAS PROC NLMIXED and Mathematica were utilized to perform the computations. Results Despite decreasing trends in cervical cancer mortality rates for both races, racial disparities in mortality rates still exist. In all 13 states, Black women had higher mortality rates at all times. The degree of disparities and pace of decline in mortality rates over time differed among these states. Determining the paces of decline over 36 years showed that Tennessee had the most rapid decline in cervical cancer mortality for Black women, and Mississippi had the most rapid decline for White Women. In contrast, slow declines in cervical cancer mortality were noted for Black women in Florida and for White women in Maryland. Conclusions In all 13 states, cervical cancer mortality rates for both racial groups have fallen. Disparities in the pace of decline in mortality rates in these states may be due to differences in the rates of screening for cervical cancers. Of note, the gap in cervical cancer mortality rates between Black women and White women is narrowing. PMID:25226583

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Robo-AO Kepler planetary candidate survey. II. (Baranec+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranec, C.; Ziegler, C.; Law, N. M.; Morton, T.; Riddle, R.; Atkinson, D.; Schonhut, J.; Crepp, J.

    2016-10-01

    We selected targets that we had not previously observed from the KOI Catalog based on the Q1-Q12 Kepler data (Rowe et al. 2015, Cat. J/ApJS/217/16). These targets were added to the Robo-AO intelligent observing queue and observed during the summer of 2013. We obtained high angular resolution images of 956 Kepler planet candidate host stars with the Robo-AO robotic laser AOs system over the course of 19 nights between 2013 July 21 and 2013 October 25, detailed in Table5. We also include 13 images from 2012 (2012 July 16-September 13) that required additional confirmation of the KOI position in the Robo-AO field of view. All the observations were performed in a queue-scheduled mode in combination with other science programs using the Robo-AO autonomous laser AO system mounted on the robotic 1.5m telescope at Palomar Observatory (exposure time: 90s; observation wavelengths: 600-950nm; FWHM resolution: 0.12''-0.15''; field of view: 44''*44''; pixel scale: 43.1mas/pix; detector format: 10242 pixels; targets observed/hour: 20). We obtained images of 50 KOIs with the NIRC2 instrument behind the Keck II AO system that were previously observed with Robo-AO and had evidence of a companion. Observations were conducted on 2013 June 25, 2013 August 24 and 25, 2014 August 17, and 2015 July 25 in the K, Ks, or Kp filters, and in the narrow mode of NIRC2 (9.952mas/pixel). (4 data files).

  3. Fuel Quality/Processing Study. Volume II. Appendix, Task I, literature survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Hara, J B; Bela, A; Jentz, N E; Klumpe, H W; Kessler, R E; Kotzot, H T; Loran, B I

    1981-04-01

    This activity was begun with the assembly of information from Parsons' files and from contacts in the development and commercial fields. A further more extensive literature search was carried out using the Energy Data Base and the American Petroleum Institute Data Base. These are part of the DOE/RECON system. Approximately 6000 references and abstracts were obtained from the EDB search. These were reviewed and the especially pertinent documents, approximately 300, were acquired in the form of paper copy or microfiche. A Fuel Properties form was developed for listing information pertinent to gas turbine liquid fuel properties specifications. Fuel properties data for liquid fuels from selected synfuel processes, deemed to be successful candidates for near future commercial plants were tabulated on the forms. The processes selected consisted of H-Coal, SRC-II and Exxon Donor Solvent (EDS) coal liquefaction processes plus Paraho and Tosco shale oil processes. Fuel properties analyses for crude and distillate syncrude process products are contained in Section 2. Analyses representing synthetic fuels given refinery treatments, mostly bench scale hydrotreating, are contained in Section 3. Section 4 discusses gas turbine fuel specifications based on petroleum source fuels as developed by the major gas turbine manufacturers. Section 5 presents the on-site gas turbine fuel treatments applicable to petroleum base fuels impurities content in order to prevent adverse contaminant effects. Section 7 relates the environmental aspects of gas turbine fuel usage and combustion performance. It appears that the near future stationary industrial gas turbine fuel market will require that some of the synthetic fuels be refined to the point that they resemble petroleum based fuels.

  4. Fuel Quality/Processing Study. Volume II. Appendix, Task I, literature survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Hara, J B; Bela, A; Jentz, N E; Klumpe, H W; Kessler, R E; Kotzot, H T; Loran, B I

    1981-04-01

    This activity was begun with the assembly of information from Parsons' files and from contacts in the development and commercial fields. A further more extensive literature search was carried out using the Energy Data Base and the American Petroleum Institute Data Base. These are part of the DOE/RECON system. Approximately 6000 references and abstracts were obtained from the EDB search. These were reviewed and the especially pertinent documents, approximately 300, were acquired in the form of paper copy or microfiche. A Fuel Properties form was developed for listing information pertinent to gas turbine liquid fuel properties specifications. Fuel properties data for liquid fuels from selected synfuel processes, deemed to be successful candidates for near future commercial plants were tabulated on the forms. The processes selected consisted of H-Coal, SRC-II and Exxon Donor Solvent (EDS) coal liquefaction processes plus Paraho and Tosco shale oil processes. Fuel properties analyses for crude and distillate syncrude process products are contained in Section 2. Analyses representing synthetic fuels given refinery treatments, mostly bench scale hydrotreating, are contained in Section 3. Section 4 discusses gas turbine fuel specifications based on petroleum source fuels as developed by the major gas turbine manufacturers. Section 5 presents the on-site gas turbine fuel treatments applicable to petroleum base fuels impurities content in order to prevent adverse contaminant effects. Section 7 relates the environmental aspects of gas turbine fuel usage and combustion performance. It appears that the near future stationary industrial gas turbine fuel market will require that some of the synthetic fuels be refined to the point that they resemble petroleum based fuels.

  5. Invariance Testing of the SF-36 Health Survey in Women Breast Cancer Survivors: Do Personal and Cancer-Related Variables Influence the Meaning of Quality of Life Items?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosewich, Amber D.; Hadd, Valerie; Crocker, Peter R. E.; Zumbo, Bruno D.

    2013-01-01

    Quality of life (QoL) is affected by issues specific to illness trajectory and thus, may differ, and potentially take on different meanings, at different stages in the cancer process. A widely used measure of QoL is the SF-36 Health Survey (SF-36; Ware 1993); therefore, support for its appropriateness in a given population is imperative. The…

  6. Invariance Testing of the SF-36 Health Survey in Women Breast Cancer Survivors: Do Personal and Cancer-Related Variables Influence the Meaning of Quality of Life Items?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosewich, Amber D.; Hadd, Valerie; Crocker, Peter R. E.; Zumbo, Bruno D.

    2013-01-01

    Quality of life (QoL) is affected by issues specific to illness trajectory and thus, may differ, and potentially take on different meanings, at different stages in the cancer process. A widely used measure of QoL is the SF-36 Health Survey (SF-36; Ware 1993); therefore, support for its appropriateness in a given population is imperative. The…

  7. ACR Appropriateness Criteria for external beam radiation therapy treatment planning for clinically localized prostate cancer, part II of II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas G. Zaorsky, MD

    2017-07-01

    Conclusions: External beam radiation is a key component of the curative management of T1 and T2 prostate cancer. By combining the most recent medical literature, these Appropriateness Criteria can aid clinicians in determining the appropriate treatment delivery and personalized approaches for individual patients.

  8. Facebook Ads Recruit Parents of Children with Cancer for an Online Survey of Web-Based Research Preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akard, Terrah Foster; Wray, Sarah; Gilmer, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Background Studies involving samples of children with life-threatening illnesses and their families face significant challenges, including inadequate sample sizes and limited diversity. Social media recruitment and web-based research methods may help address such challenges yet have not been explored in pediatric cancer populations. Objective This study examined the feasibility of using Facebook ads to recruit parent caregivers of children and teens with cancer. We also explored the feasibility of web-based video recording in pediatric palliative care populations by surveying parents of children with cancer regarding (a) their preferences for research methods and (b) technological capabilities of their computers and phones. Methods Facebook's paid advertising program was used to recruit parent caregivers of children currently living with cancer to complete an electronic survey about research preferences and technological capabilities. Results The advertising campaign generated 3,897,981 impressions which resulted in 1050 clicks at a total cost of $1129.88. Of 284 screened individuals, 106 were eligible. Forty-five caregivers of children with cancer completed the entire electronic survey. Parents preferred and had technological capabilities for web-based and electronic research methods. Participant survey responses are reported. Conclusion Facebook was a useful, cost-effective method to recruit a diverse sample of parent caregivers of children with cancer. Web-based video recording and data collection may be feasible and desirable in samples of children with cancer and their families. Implications for Practice Web-based methods (e.g., Facebook, Skype) may enhance communication and access between nurses and pediatric oncology patients and their families. PMID:24945264

  9. An updated survey of globular clusters in M 31. II. Newly discovered bright and remote clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galleti, S.; Bellazzini, M.; Federici, L.; Buzzoni, A.; Fusi Pecci, F.

    2007-08-01

    Aims:We present the first results of a large spectroscopic survey of candidate globular clusters located in the extreme outskirts of the nearby M 31 galaxy. The survey is aimed at ascertaining the nature of the selected candidates to increase the sample of confirmed M 31 clusters lying more that 2° away from the center of the galaxy. Methods: We obtained low resolution spectra (λ/Δλ ≃ 800-1300) of 48 targets selected from the Extended Source Catalogue of 2MASS, as in Galleti et al. (2005, A&A, 436, 535). The observed candidates have been robustly classified according to their radial velocity and by verifying their extended/point-source nature from ground-based optical images. We have also obtained a spectrum and a radial velocity estimate for the remote M 31 globular discovered by Martin et al. (2006b, MNRAS, 371, 1983). Results: Among the 48 observed candidates clusters we found: 35 background galaxies, 8 foreground Galactic stars, and 5 genuine remote globular clusters. One of them has been already identified independently by Mackey et al. (2007, ApJ, 655, L85), their GC1; the other four are completely new discoveries: B516, B517, B518, B519. The newly discovered clusters lie at projected distance 40 kpc ≲ R_p≲ 100 kpc from the center of M 31, and have absolute integrated magnitude -9.5 ≲ MV ≲ -7.5. For all the observed clusters we have measured the strongest Lick indices and we have obtained spectroscopic metallicity estimates. Mackey-GC1, Martin-GC1, B517 and B518 have spectra typical of old and metal poor globular clusters ([Fe/H] ≲ -1.3); B519 appears old but quite metal-rich ([Fe/H]~≃ -0.5); B516 presents very strong Balmer absorption lines: if this is indeed a cluster it should have a relatively young age (likely < 2 Gyr). Conclusions: The present analysis nearly doubles the number of M 31 globulars at R_p≥ 40 kpc. At odds with the Milky Way, M 31 appears to have a significant population of very bright globular clusters in its extreme

  10. Chromospherically Active Stars in the RAVE Survey. II. Young Dwarfs in the Solar Neighborhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žerjal, M.; Zwitter, T.; Matijevič, G.; Grebel, E. K.; Kordopatis, G.; Munari, U.; Seabroke, G.; Steinmetz, M.; Wojno, J.; Bienaymé, O.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Conrad, C.; Freeman, K. C.; Gibson, B. K.; Gilmore, G.; Kunder, A.; Navarro, J.; Parker, Q. A.; Reid, W.; Siviero, A.; Watson, F. G.; Wyse, R. F. G.

    2017-01-01

    A large sample of over 38,000 chromospherically active candidate solar-like stars and cooler dwarfs from the RAVE survey is addressed in this paper. An improved activity identification with respect to the previous study was introduced to build a catalog of field stars in the solar neighborhood with an excess emission flux in the calcium infrared triplet wavelength region. The central result of this work is the calibration of the age–activity relation for main-sequence dwarfs in a range from a few 10 {Myr} up to a few Gyr. It enabled an order of magnitude age estimation of the entire active sample. Almost 15,000 stars are shown to be younger than 1 {Gyr} and ∼2000 younger than 100 {Myr}. The young age of the most active stars is confirmed by their position off the main sequence in the J ‑ K versus {N}{UV}-V diagram showing strong ultraviolet excess, mid-infrared excess in the J ‑ K versus {W}1-{W}2 diagram, and very cool temperatures (J-K> 0.7). They overlap with the reference pre-main-sequence RAVE stars often displaying X-ray emission. The activity level increasing with the color reveals their different nature from the solar-like stars and probably represents an underlying dynamo-generating magnetic fields in cool stars. Of the RAVE objects from DR5, 50% are found in the TGAS catalog and supplemented with accurate parallaxes and proper motions by Gaia. This makes the database of a large number of young stars in a combination with RAVE’s radial velocities directly useful as a tracer of the very recent large-scale star formation history in the solar neighborhood. The data are available online in the Vizier database.

  11. WEATHER ON OTHER WORLDS. II. SURVEY RESULTS: SPOTS ARE UBIQUITOUS ON L AND T DWARFS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metchev, Stanimir A. [The University of Western Ontario, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 1151 Richmond Avenue, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada); Heinze, Aren [Stony Brook University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook, 100 Nicolls Road, NY 11794-3800 (United States); Apai, Dániel [The University of Arizona, Department of Astronomy, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Flateau, Davin [The University of Arizona, Department of Planetary Sciences and Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, 1629 East University Boulevard, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Radigan, Jacqueline [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Burgasser, Adam [University of California San Diego, Center for Astrophysics and Space Science, 9500 Gilman Drive, Mail Code 0424, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Marley, Mark S. [NASA Ames Research Center, MS-245-3, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Artigau, Étienne [Université de Montréal, Département de Physique and Observatoire du Mont Mégantic, C.P. 6128, Succ. Centre-Ville, Montréal, QC, H3C 3J7 (Canada); Plavchan, Peter [Missouri State University, Department of Physics, Astronomy and Materials Science, 901 South National Avenue, Springfield, MO 65897 (United States); Goldman, Bertrand, E-mail: smetchev@uwo.ca [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, 69117, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-02-01

    We present results from the Weather on Other Worlds Spitzer Exploration Science program to investigate photometric variability in L and T dwarfs, usually attributed to patchy clouds. We surveyed 44 L3-T8 dwarfs, spanning a range of J – K{sub s} colors and surface gravities. We find that 14/23 (61%{sub