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Sample records for surveillance-selected steps communities

  1. Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance--Selected Steps Communities, United States, 2007 and Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance--Pacific Island United States Territories, 2007. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Surveillance Summaries. Volume 57, Number SS-12

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    Shaw, Frederic E., Ed.

    2008-01-01

    The "Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report" ("MMWR") Series is prepared by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Data in the weekly "MMWR" are provisional, based on weekly reports to CDC by state health departments. This issue of "MMWR" contains the following studies: (1) Youth Risk Behavior…

  2. The Recruiting Game: Community Colleges Step up to the Plate.

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    Bus, Ken

    This paper offers advice for ways in which community colleges can approach the challenge of recruiting international students. Community colleges are enjoying a new popularity with overseas students, even though other higher education programs are showing slow growth for this group. According to the paper, it is becoming more common to find…

  3. Community-based Participatory Research: Necessary Next Steps

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    Zubaida Faridi, MBBS, MPH

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Community-based participatory research (CBPR is gaining increasing credence among public health researchers and practitioners. However, there is no standardization in assessing the quality of research methods, the effectiveness of the interventions, and the reporting requirements in the literature. The absence of standardization precludes meaningful comparisons of CBPR studies. Several authors have proposed a broad set of competencies required for CBPR research for both individuals and organizations, but the discussion remains fragmented. The Prevention Research Centers (PRC Program recently began a qualitative assessment of its national efforts, including an evaluation of how PRCs implement CBPR studies. Topics of interest include types of community partnerships; community capacity for research, evaluation, and training; and factors that help and hinder partner relationships. The assessment will likely contribute to the development of a standard set of competencies and resources required for effective CBPR.

  4. Comparison between investigations of induced stepping postural responses and voluntary steps to better detect community-dwelling elderly fallers.

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    Tisserand, R; Robert, T; Chabaud, P; Livet, P; Bonnefoy, M; Chèze, L

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we review a physiological task that is predominant in preventing humans from falling, but that simultaneously also challenges balance: taking a step. In particular, two variants of this task are presented and compared: the voluntary step versus a step induced by an external and unpredictable perturbation. We show that, while these contribute different information, it is interesting to compare these. Indeed, they both are relevant in a global balance assessment and should be included within this, at the same level as tests usually dispensed in the clinical environment such as posturography. We choose to focus on the community-dwelling elderly population, to discuss means of early detection of risk of falls, in order to prescribe an appropriate prevention. An overview of posture-movement coordination and balance recovery strategies is also provided. Finally, a working hypothesis is suggested on how "compensatory protective" steps are controlled and how their evaluation could bring additional information to the global balance assessment of risk of fall.

  5. The step length-frequency relationship in physically active community-dwelling older women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, Agnes; de Bruin, Eling D.; Bruins, Nienke; Zijlstra, Wiebren

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the step length-frequency relationship in physically active community-dwelling older women in order to investigate whether the relationship between these two spatio-temporal gait parameters changes with increasing age. Forty older women in four age groups, i.e. 64-69, 70-74, 75-

  6. The step length-frequency relationship in physically active community-dwelling older women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, Agnes; de Bruin, Eling D.; Bruins, Nienke; Zijlstra, Wiebren

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the step length-frequency relationship in physically active community-dwelling older women in order to investigate whether the relationship between these two spatio-temporal gait parameters changes with increasing age. Forty older women in four age groups, i.e. 64-69, 70-74, 75-

  7. Taking Steps Together: A Family- and Community-Based Obesity Intervention for Urban, Multiethnic Children

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    Anderson, John D.; Newby, Rachel; Kehm, Rebecca; Barland, Patricia; Hearst, Mary O.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Successful childhood obesity intervention models that build sustainable behavioral change are needed, particularly in low-income, ethnic minority communities disparately affected by this problem. Method: Families were referred to Taking Steps Together (TST) by their primary care provider if at least one child had a body mass index…

  8. Taking Steps Together: A Family- and Community-Based Obesity Intervention for Urban, Multiethnic Children

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    Anderson, John D.; Newby, Rachel; Kehm, Rebecca; Barland, Patricia; Hearst, Mary O.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Successful childhood obesity intervention models that build sustainable behavioral change are needed, particularly in low-income, ethnic minority communities disparately affected by this problem. Method: Families were referred to Taking Steps Together (TST) by their primary care provider if at least one child had a body mass index…

  9. Strategies and steps fostering the success of medication management services in community pharmacies.

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    Pestka, Deborah L; Frail, Caitlin K; Palombi, Laura C; Von Hoff, Bethany A; Conway, Jeannine M; Sorensen, Todd D

    2016-01-01

    To identify and describe the steps and strategies that community pharmacies with established medication management services have used to integrate medication management services into their practice settings. Qualitative case study with semistructured interviews and focus groups. Community pharmacy organizations in Minnesota. Pharmacists and pharmacy leadership from 4 different pharmacy organizations including independent, chain, and health system pharmacies. Not applicable. Qualitative case study analysis of community pharmacy management and pharmacists' perceptions of the factors that led to the establishment and sustainability of their medication management programs. Focus groups and interviews were undertaken with 25 pharmacists and pharmacy leaders from 4 distinct community pharmacy organizations from April to June 2015. Five themes emerged, representing specific implementation and continuation stages of medication management services in community practice: Deciding to Act, Setting the Stage, Executing the Service, Sticking to It, and Continuing to Grow. This study sheds light on key stages that have commonly occurred across community pharmacies that are delivering medication management services. The results of this work may serve as a road map for other community pharmacies looking to integrate medication management services into their own practice settings. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Two-Step Oxidation of Refractory Gold Concentrates with Different Microbial Communities.

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    Wang, Guo-Hua; Xie, Jian-Ping; Li, Shou-Peng; Guo, Yu-Jie; Pan, Ying; Wu, Haiyan; Liu, Xin-Xing

    2016-11-28

    Bio-oxidation is an effective technology for treatment of refractory gold concentrates. However, the unsatisfactory oxidation rate and long residence time, which cause a lower cyanide leaching rate and gold recovery, are key factors that restrict the application of traditional bio-oxidation technology. In this study, the oxidation rate of refractory gold concentrates and the adaption of microorganisms were analyzed to evaluate a newly developed two-step pretreatment process, which includes a high temperature chemical oxidation step and a subsequent bio-oxidation step. The oxidation rate and recovery rate of gold were improved significantly after the two-step process. The results showed that the highest oxidation rate of sulfide sulfur could reach to 99.01 % with an extreme thermophile microbial community when the pulp density was 5%. Accordingly, the recovery rate of gold was elevated to 92.51%. Meanwhile, the results revealed that moderate thermophiles performed better than acidophilic mesophiles and extreme thermophiles, whose oxidation rates declined drastically when the pulp density was increased to 10% and 15%. The oxidation rates of sulfide sulfur with moderate thermophiles were 93.94% and 65.73% when the pulp density was increased to 10% and 15%, respectively. All these results indicated that the two-step pretreatment increased the oxidation rate of refractory gold concentrates and is a potential technology to pretreat the refractory sample. Meanwhile, owing to the sensitivity of the microbial community under different pulp density levels, the optimization of microbial community in bio-oxidation is necessary in industry.

  11. Improved chalcopyrite bioleaching by Acidithiobacillus sp. via direct step-wise regulation of microbial community structure.

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    Feng, Shoushuai; Yang, Hailin; Wang, Wu

    2015-09-01

    A direct step-wise regulation strategy of microbial community structure was developed for improving chalcopyrite bioleaching by Acidithiobacillus sp. Specially, the initial microbial proportion between Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans was controlled at 3:1 with additional 2 g/L Fe(2+) for faster initiating iron metabolism. A. thiooxidans biomass was fed via a step-wise strategy (8-12th d) with the microbial proportion 1:1 for balancing community structure and promoting sulfur metabolism in the stationary phase. A. thiooxidans proportion was further improved via another step-wise feeding strategy (14-18th d) with the microbial proportion 1:2 for enhancing sulfur metabolism and weakening jarosite passivation in the later phase. With the community structure-shift control strategy, biochemical reaction was directly regulated for creating a better balance in different phases. Moreover, the final copper ion was increased from 57.1 to 93.2 mg/L, with the productivity 2.33 mg/(Ld). The novel strategy may be valuable in optimization of similar bioleaching process.

  12. Sustainability of the whole-community project '10,000 Steps': a longitudinal study

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    Van Acker Ragnar

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the dissemination and implementation literature, there is a dearth of information on the sustainability of community-wide physical activity (PA programs in general and of the '10,000 Steps' project in particular. This paper reports a longitudinal evaluation of organizational and individual sustainability indicators of '10,000 Steps'. Methods Among project adopters, department heads of 24 public services were surveyed 1.5 years after initially reported project implementation to assess continuation, institutionalization, sustained implementation of intervention components, and adaptations. Barriers and facilitators of project sustainability were explored. Citizens (n = 483 living near the adopting organizations were interviewed to measure maintenance of PA differences between citizens aware and unaware of '10,000 Steps'. Independent-samples t, Mann-Whitney U, and chi-square tests were used to compare organizations for representativeness and individual PA differences. Results Of all organizations, 50% continued '10,000 Steps' (mostly in cycles and continuation was independent of organizational characteristics. Level of intervention institutionalization was low to moderate on evaluations of routinization and moderate for project saturation. The global implementation score (58% remained stable and three of nine project components were continued by less than half of organizations (posters, street signs and variants, personalized contact. Considerable independent adaptations of the project were reported (e.g. campaign image. Citizens aware of '10,000 Steps' remained more active during leisure time than those unaware (227 ± 235 and 176 ± 198 min/week, respectively; t = -2.6; p t = -2.2; p t = -2.0; p Conclusions '10,000 Steps' could remain sustainable but design, organizational, and contextual barriers need consideration. Sustainability of '10,000 Steps' in organizations can occur in cycles rather than in ongoing projects

  13. A cost-effectiveness study of the community-based intervention '10 000 Steps Ghent'.

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    De Smedt, Delphine; De Cocker, Katrien; Annemans, Lieven; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Cardon, Greet

    2012-03-01

    To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the European community-based project '10 000 Steps Ghent', an intervention that resulted in a significant decrease in sedentary time and a significant increase in step counts (896 steps/d) and self-reported walking (66 min/week). An age- and gender-dependent Markov model, with a time horizon of 20 years and a cycle length of 1 year, estimating the development of diabetes, cardiovascular events and colorectal cancer. All individuals started in a health state free of events. The effect of the intervention was based on published risk reductions related to increased walking time. Costs and utility decrements related to events were obtained from published literature. The impact of the uncertainty of the parameters on incremental costs and quality-adjusted life years (QALY) were assessed with one-way sensitivity analyses and a Monte Carlo analysis. Cohort representing the population reached by the intervention (266 adults aged 25-75 years with a mean age of 48·2 (sd 13·1) years, 45·6 % men, 64·6 % highly educated, 70·0 % employed). Implementing the community-based programme increased average QALY by 0·16 and 0·11 for men and women, respectively. The total costs decreased by approximately 576€ and 427€, respectively. Hence, for both genders the intervention programme was dominant. The sensitivity analyses did not change the conclusion of dominance. The community-based '10 000 Steps Ghent' campaign is a dominant intervention. Sensitivity analyses have proved the robustness of the results; hence implementing this intervention on a population-based level could lead to improved health outcomes and reduced costs.

  14. Activity-monitor accuracy in measuring step number and cadence in community-dwelling older adults.

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    Grant, P Margaret; Dall, Philippa M; Mitchell, Sarah L; Granat, Malcolm H

    2008-04-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to investigate the accuracy of the activPAL physical activity monitor in measuring step number and cadence in older adults. Two pedometers (New-Lifestyles Digi-Walker SW-200 and New-Lifestyles NL2000) used in clinical practice to count steps were simultaneously evaluated. Observation was the criterion measure. Twenty-one participants (65-87 yr old) recruited from community-based exercise classes walked on a treadmill at 5 speeds (0.67, 0.90, 1.12, 1.33, and 1.56 m/s) and outdoors at 3 self-selected speeds (slow, normal, and fast). The absolute percentage error of the activPAL was <1% for all treadmill and outdoor conditions for measuring steps and cadence. With the exception of the slowest treadmill speed, the NL-2000 error was <2%. The SW-200 was the least accurate device, particularly at slower walking speeds. The activPAL monitor accurately recorded step number and cadence. Combined with its ability to identify primary postures, the activPAL might be a useful and versatile device for measuring activity in older adults.

  15. Research on the Translation and Implementation of Stepping On in Three Wisconsin Communities

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    Amy E. Schlotthauer

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveFalls are a leading cause of injury death. Stepping On is a fall prevention program developed in Australia and shown to reduce falls by up to 31%. The original program was implemented in a community setting, by an occupational therapist, and included a home visit. The purpose of this study was to examine aspects of the translation and implementation of Stepping On in three community settings in Wisconsin.MethodsThe investigative team identified four research questions to understand the spread and use of the program, as well as to determine whether critical components of the program could be modified to maximize use in community practice. The team evaluated program uptake, participant reach, program feasibility, program acceptability, and program fidelity by varying the implementation setting and components of Stepping On. Implementation setting included type of host organization, rural versus urban location, health versus non-health background of leaders, and whether a phone call could replace the home visit. A mixed methodology of surveys and interviews completed by site managers, leaders, guest experts, participants, and content expert observations for program fidelity during classes was used.ResultsThe study identified implementation challenges that varied by setting, including securing a physical therapist for the class and needing more time to recruit participants. There were no implementation differences between rural and urban locations. Potential differences emerged in program fidelity between health and non-health professional leaders, although fidelity was high overall with both. Home visits identified more home hazards than did phone calls and were perceived as of greater benefit to participants, but at 1 year no differences were apparent in uptake of strategies discussed in home versus phone visits.ConclusionAdaptations to the program to increase implementation include using a leader who is a non-health professional, and

  16. Two steps forward, one step back: Achievements and limitations of university-community partnerships in addressing neighbourhood socioeconomic disadvantage

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    Deborah Warr

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses a partnership initiative that involved a major Australian research university (University of Melbourne, a local government and a network of local community service organisations. The partnership projects aimed to promote public access to university infrastructure for poor and marginalised residents, enhance the local value of research and teaching activities, and create employment opportunities. The article draws on an evaluation of the partnership, which focused on four keynote projects. It found that the partnership appeared to achieve positive outcomes for residents but was limited by tensions associated with the university’s ambivalent commitment to the value of such partnerships. These tensions remained difficult to resolve because they signalled present contestation over the foundational values of contemporary public universities. Keywords: university-community partnerships, neoliberalism, neighbourhoods, community development

  17. Improving pain care through implementation of the Stepped Care Model at a multisite community health center

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    Anderson DR

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Daren R Anderson,1 Ianita Zlateva,1 Emil N Coman,2 Khushbu Khatri,1 Terrence Tian,1 Robert D Kerns3 1Weitzman Institute, Community Health Center, Inc., Middletown, 2UCONN Health Disparities Institute, University of Connecticut, Farmington, 3VA Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, CT, USA Purpose: Treating pain in primary care is challenging. Primary care providers (PCPs receive limited training in pain care and express low confidence in their knowledge and ability to manage pain effectively. Models to improve pain outcomes have been developed, but not formally implemented in safety net practices where pain is particularly common. This study evaluated the impact of implementing the Stepped Care Model for Pain Management (SCM-PM at a large, multisite Federally Qualified Health Center. Methods: The Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services framework guided the implementation of the SCM-PM. The multicomponent intervention included: education on pain care, new protocols for pain assessment and management, implementation of an opioid management dashboard, telehealth consultations, and enhanced onsite specialty resources. Participants included 25 PCPs and their patients with chronic pain (3,357 preintervention and 4,385 postintervention cared for at Community Health Center, Inc. Data were collected from the electronic health record and supplemented by chart reviews. Surveys were administered to PCPs to assess knowledge, attitudes, and confidence. Results: Providers’ pain knowledge scores increased to an average of 11% from baseline; self-rated confidence in ability to manage pain also increased. Use of opioid treatment agreements and urine drug screens increased significantly by 27.3% and 22.6%, respectively. Significant improvements were also noted in documentation of pain, pain treatment, and pain follow-up. Referrals to behavioral health providers for patients with pain increased by 5.96% (P=0.009. There was no

  18. Improving pain care through implementation of the Stepped Care Model at a multisite community health center

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    Anderson, Daren R; Zlateva, Ianita; Coman, Emil N; Khatri, Khushbu; Tian, Terrence; Kerns, Robert D

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Treating pain in primary care is challenging. Primary care providers (PCPs) receive limited training in pain care and express low confidence in their knowledge and ability to manage pain effectively. Models to improve pain outcomes have been developed, but not formally implemented in safety net practices where pain is particularly common. This study evaluated the impact of implementing the Stepped Care Model for Pain Management (SCM-PM) at a large, multisite Federally Qualified Health Center. Methods The Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services framework guided the implementation of the SCM-PM. The multicomponent intervention included: education on pain care, new protocols for pain assessment and management, implementation of an opioid management dashboard, telehealth consultations, and enhanced onsite specialty resources. Participants included 25 PCPs and their patients with chronic pain (3,357 preintervention and 4,385 postintervention) cared for at Community Health Center, Inc. Data were collected from the electronic health record and supplemented by chart reviews. Surveys were administered to PCPs to assess knowledge, attitudes, and confidence. Results Providers’ pain knowledge scores increased to an average of 11% from baseline; self-rated confidence in ability to manage pain also increased. Use of opioid treatment agreements and urine drug screens increased significantly by 27.3% and 22.6%, respectively. Significant improvements were also noted in documentation of pain, pain treatment, and pain follow-up. Referrals to behavioral health providers for patients with pain increased by 5.96% (P=0.009). There was no significant change in opioid prescribing. Conclusion Implementation of the SCM-PM resulted in clinically significant improvements in several quality of pain care outcomes. These findings, if sustained, may translate into improved patient outcomes. PMID:27881926

  19. Abundance and composition of indigenous bacterial communities in a multi-step biofiltration-based drinking water treatment plant.

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    Lautenschlager, Karin; Hwang, Chiachi; Ling, Fangqiong; Liu, Wen-Tso; Boon, Nico; Köster, Oliver; Egli, Thomas; Hammes, Frederik

    2014-10-01

    Indigenous bacterial communities are essential for biofiltration processes in drinking water treatment systems. In this study, we examined the microbial community composition and abundance of three different biofilter types (rapid sand, granular activated carbon, and slow sand filters) and their respective effluents in a full-scale, multi-step treatment plant (Zürich, CH). Detailed analysis of organic carbon degradation underpinned biodegradation as the primary function of the biofilter biomass. The biomass was present in concentrations ranging between 2-5 × 10(15) cells/m(3) in all filters but was phylogenetically, enzymatically and metabolically diverse. Based on 16S rRNA gene-based 454 pyrosequencing analysis for microbial community composition, similar microbial taxa (predominantly Proteobacteria, Planctomycetes, Acidobacteria, Bacteriodetes, Nitrospira and Chloroflexi) were present in all biofilters and in their respective effluents, but the ratio of microbial taxa was different in each filter type. This change was also reflected in the cluster analysis, which revealed a change of 50-60% in microbial community composition between the different filter types. This study documents the direct influence of the filter biomass on the microbial community composition of the final drinking water, particularly when the water is distributed without post-disinfection. The results provide new insights on the complexity of indigenous bacteria colonizing drinking water systems, especially in different biofilters of a multi-step treatment plant.

  20. The Learning Community Narrative: An Essential First Step in Creating and Sustaining Program Identity

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    Borthwick-Wong, Emilly; Jones, Janna

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors argue that successful learning communities are built on the stakeholders' clear understanding of how a learning community model is fundamentally different from traditional curricular approaches and cannot simply be overlaid onto traditional pedagogy. Especially in difficult economic times, well-functioning learning…

  1. LifeSteps: An Evidence-based Health Promotion Program for Underserved Populations – A Community Service Learning Approach

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    Melanie Austin-McCain

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Chronic diseases are the most common, costly, and preventable of all health problems in the United States. Chronic diseases represent the leading causes of death and are experienced at higher rates by minority populations (CDC, 2012. Innovative community-based health promotion programs are recommended that meet the diverse needs of underserved populations (Yeary, et al., 2011. LifeSteps is being developed as an evidence-based health promotion program focusing on health and wellness, a domain area defined within the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework (OTPF, 2008. LifeSteps will utilize a client-centered approach to coach individuals in making health behavior changes. Fieldwork and service-learning components are incorporated integrating clinical practice, academic study, and collaboration with community providers. Program evaluation measures based on the Transtheoretical Model (TTM have been identified to address all phases of program planning. The LifeSteps health promotion program aligns with local, national, and international objectives and addresses the need for programs that meet the diverse needs of underserved populations. Occupational therapists are in a unique position for implementing community-based interventions that promote health and contribute to a healthier society.

  2. 40 Steps to Better Physician Recruitment and Retention: A Guidebook for Community and Migrant Health Centers.

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    California Health Federation, Sacramento.

    This guide presents methods for community and migrant health centers to attract and keep competent physicians. Strategies for recruiting physicians include planning the recruitment and choosing the right physician. Compensation arrangements should attract and retain competent health providers, provide incentives for productivity and professional…

  3. First steps of ecological restoration in Mediterranean lagoons: Shifts in phytoplankton communities

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    Leruste, A.; Malet, N.; Munaron, D.; Derolez, V.; Hatey, E.; Collos, Y.; De Wit, R.; Bec, B.

    2016-10-01

    Along the French Mediterranean coast, a complex of eight lagoons underwent intensive eutrophication over four decades, mainly related to nutrient over-enrichment from continuous sewage discharges. The lagoon complex displayed a wide trophic gradient from mesotrophy to hypertrophy and primary production was dominated by phytoplankton communities. In 2005, the implementation of an 11 km offshore outfall system diverted the treated sewage effluents leading to a drastic reduction of anthropogenic inputs of nitrogen and phosphorus into the lagoons. Time series data have been examined from 2000 to 2013 for physical, chemical and biological (phytoplankton) variables of the water column during the summer period. Since 2006, total nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations as well as chlorophyll biomass strongly decreased revealing an improvement in lagoon water quality. In summertime, the decline in phytoplankton biomass was accompanied by shifts in community structure and composition that could be explained by adopting a functional approach by considering the common functional traits of the main algal groups. These phytoplankton communities were dominated by functional groups of small-sized and fast-growing algae (diatoms, cryptophytes and green algae). The trajectories of summer phytoplankton communities displayed a complex response to changing nutrient loads over time. While diatoms were the major group in 2006 in all the lagoons, the summer phytoplankton composition in hypertrophic lagoons has shifted towards green algae, which are particularly well adapted to summertime conditions. All lagoons showed increasing proportion and occurrence of peridinin-rich dinophytes over time, probably related to their capacity for mixotrophy. The diversity patterns were marked by a strong variability in eutrophic and hypertrophic lagoons whereas phytoplankton community structure reached the highest diversity and stability in mesotrophic lagoons. We observe that during the re

  4. The impact of disseminating the whole-community project '10,000 Steps': a RE-AIM analysis

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    Klesges Lisa M

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are insufficient research reports on the wide-scale dissemination of effective whole-community physical activity (PA programs. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the impact of the wide-scale dissemination of '10,000 Steps', using the RE-AIM framework. Methods Dissemination efforts targeted a large region of Belgium and were concentrated on media strategies and peer networks of specific professional organizations, such as local health promotion services. Heads of department of 69 organizations received an on-line survey to assess project awareness, adoption, implementation and intended continuation of '10,000 Steps'. On the individual level, 755 citizens living in the work area of the organizations were interviewed for project awareness and PA levels. Measures were structured according to the RE-AIM dimensions (reach, effectiveness, adoption, implementation, maintenance. Independent sample t and chi-square tests were used to compare groups for representativeness at the organizational and individual level, and for individual PA differences. Results Of all organizations, 90% was aware of '10,000 Steps' (effectiveness - organizational level and 36% adopted the project (adoption. The global implementation score was 52%. One third intended to continue the project in the future (maintenance and 48% was still undecided. On the individual level, 35% of citizens were aware of '10,000 Steps' (reach. They reported significantly higher leisure-time PA levels than those not aware of '10,000 Steps' (256 ± 237 and 207 ± 216 min/week, respectively; t = -2.8; p t = 2.79; p Conclusions '10,000 Steps' shows potential for wide-scale dissemination but a supportive linkage system seems recommended to encourage adoption levels and high quality implementation.

  5. Understanding barriers to involving community midwives in identifying research participants; experience of the first steps randomised controlled trial.

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    Stuart, Jane; Barnes, Jacqueline; Spiby, Helen; Elbourne, Diana

    2015-08-01

    to explore barriers to the involvement of community midwives in identifying women in early pregnancy as potential participants in the first steps study, a randomised controlled trial of a new intervention to provide health and parenting support to potentially vulnerable women. descriptive qualitative investigation using semi-structured audio-recorded interviews. community midwifery offices. volunteer sample of 13 community midwives. themes derived from content analysis. understanding of their role in the research process was unclear to many midwives. Confusion arose about the difference between potential participant identification and trial recruitment. There were concerns about the eligibility criteria and it was suggested that there was insufficient time during booking appointments, and sometimes insufficient information, to determine potential eligibility. Midwives had concerns about some aspects of the intervention, which incorporated routine midwifery care, and had expectations that women may not like a group programme. This may have led some not to mention the trial. They were, however positive about the programme׳s potential for beneficial impacts on mothers and infants. dedicated research midwives may be the best option if research studies need to identify potential participants early in pregnancy, so that they can communicate with all their colleagues. if community midwives are asked to be involved in time-critical research they are likely to need additional local resources and support. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Self-directed community services for older Australians: a stepped capacity-building approach.

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    Ottmann, Goetz; Mohebbi, Mohammedreza

    2014-11-01

    Consumer-directed care (CDC) is increasingly widespread among aged care service options in Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries. However, the evidence base regarding the programmatic and contextual factors that affect the outcome of CDC interventions is surprisingly small. This paper reports on a self-directed care approach for older Australians with complex care needs. A multi-methods longitudinal comparative cohort study was employed comprising 4 survey tools and 56 semi-structured interviews. Participation rates were around 20%. A total of 185 (98 in the intervention and 87 in the control group) older people and carers were recruited at baseline. Eleven months later, 109 participants (59 in the intervention and 50 in the control group) completed the repeat measure. Attrition rates were around 40%. Data collection occurred between July 2010 and April 2012. The data suggest that intervention group participants were likely to be more satisfied with the way they were treated (P = 0.013), their care options (P = 0.014), the 'say' they had in their care (P < 0.001), the information they received regarding their care (P = 0.012), what they were achieving in life (P = 0.031), that the services changed their view on what could be achieved in life (P = 0.020) and with their standard of living (P = 0.008). The evaluation suggests that while only a very small segment of older people is interested in a voucher or cash option, a substantially larger group would like to have greater say over and more direct access to their care, without, however, assuming administrative and financial responsibilities. The paper concludes that a stepped capacity-building approach to CDC may improve the acceptability of CDC to older people and generate synergies that improve older people's care outcomes. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Aerobic Bacterial Community of American Cockroach Periplaneta americana,a Step toward Finding Suitable Paratransgenesis Candidates

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    Sanaz Akbari

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cockroaches mechanically spread pathogenic agents, however, little is known about their gut microbiota. Identification of midgut microbial community helps targeting novel biological control strategies such as paratransgenesis. Here the bacterial microbiota of Periplaneta americana midgut, were identified and evaluated for finding proper paratransgenesis candidate.Methods: Midgut of specimens were dissected and cultivated in different media. The bacterial isolates were then identified using the phenotypic and 16S-rRNA sequencing methods.Results: The analytical profile index (API kit showed presence of 11 bacterial species including: Escherichia coli, Shigella flexineri, Citrobacter freundii, E. vulneris, Enterobacter cloacae, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, Y.intermedia, Leclericia adecarboxylata, Klebsiella oxytoca, K. planticola, and Rahnella aquatilis in the cockroach midguts. The first three species are potentially symbiotic whereas others are transient. The conventional platingmethod revealed presence of only four isolates of Salmonella, E. coli, and Proteus which in three cases mismatched with API and 16S-rRNA genotyping. The API correctly identified the four isolates as Shigella flexneri, Citrobacter freundii, and E. coli (n= 2. 16S-rRNA sequence analysis confirmed the API results; however the C. freundii sequencewas identical with C. murliniae indicating lack of genetic variation in the gene between these two closely related species.Conclusion: A low number of potentially symbiotic bacteria were found in the American cockroach midguts. Among them Enterobacter cloacae is a potential candidate for paratransgenesis approach whereas other bacteria are pathogens and are not useful for the approach. Data analysis showed that identification levels increase from the conventional to API and to genotyping respectively.

  8. Correlates of pedometer use: Results from a community-based physical activity intervention trial (10,000 Steps Rockhampton

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    Schofield Grant

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pedometers have become common place in physical activity promotion, yet little information exists on who is using them. The multi-strategy, community-based 10,000 Steps Rockhampton physical activity intervention trial provided an opportunity to examine correlates of pedometer use at the population level. Methods Pedometer use was promoted across all intervention strategies including: local media, pedometer loan schemes through general practice, other health professionals and libraries, direct mail posted to dog owners, walking trail signage, and workplace competitions. Data on pedometer use were collected during the 2-year follow-up telephone interviews from random population samples in Rockhampton, Australia, and a matched comparison community (Mackay. Logistic regression analyses were used to determine the independent influence of interpersonal characteristics and program exposure variables on pedometer use. Results Data from 2478 participants indicated that 18.1% of Rockhampton and 5.6% of Mackay participants used a pedometer in the previous 18-months. Rockhampton pedometer users (n = 222 were more likely to be female (OR = 1.59, 95% CI: 1.11, 2.23, aged 45 or older (OR = 1.69, 95% CI: 1.16, 2.46 and to have higher levels of education (university degree OR = 4.23, 95% CI: 1.86, 9.6. Respondents with a BMI > 30 were more likely to report using a pedometer (OR = 1.68, 95% CI: 1.11, 2.54 than those in the healthy weight range. Compared with those in full-time paid work, respondents in 'home duties' were significantly less likely to report pedometer use (OR = 0.18, 95% CI: 0.06, 0.53. Exposure to individual program components, in particular seeing 10,000 Steps street signage and walking trails or visiting the website, was also significantly associated with greater pedometer use. Conclusion Pedometer use varies between population subgroups, and alternate strategies need to be investigated to engage men, people with lower levels

  9. Time will tell: community acceptability of HIV vaccine research before and after the “Step Study” vaccine discontinuation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula M Frew

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Paula M Frew1,2,3,4, Mark J Mulligan1,2,3, Su-I Hou5, Kayshin Chan3, Carlos del Rio1,2,3,61Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia, USA; 2Emory Center for AIDS Research, Atlanta, Georgia, USA; 3The Hope Clinic of the Emory Vaccine Center, Decatur, Georgia, USA; 4Department of Behavioral Sciences and Health Education, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA; 5Department of Health Promotion and Behavior, College of Public Health, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, USA; 6Department of Global Health, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USAObjective: This study examines whether men-who-have-sex-with-men (MSM and transgender (TG persons’ attitudes, beliefs, and risk perceptions toward human immunodeficiency virus (HIV vaccine research have been altered as a result of the negative findings from a phase 2B HIV vaccine study.Design: We conducted a cross-sectional survey among MSM and TG persons (N = 176 recruited from community settings in Atlanta from 2007 to 2008. The first group was recruited during an active phase 2B HIV vaccine trial in which a candidate vaccine was being evaluated (the “Step Study”, and the second group was recruited after product futility was widely reported in the media.Methods: Descriptive statistics, t tests, and chi-square tests were conducted to ascertain differences between the groups, and ordinal logistic regressions examined the influences of the above-mentioned factors on a critical outcome, future HIV vaccine study participation. The ordinal regression outcomes evaluated the influences on disinclination, neutrality, and inclination to study participation.Results: Behavioral outcomes such as future recruitment, event attendance, study promotion, and community mobilization did not reveal any differences in participants’ intentions between the groups. However, we observed

  10. Walk together children with no wasted steps: community-academic partnering for equal power in NIH proposal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Karen Jaynes; Cooks, John Mark; May, Marlynn; Peranteau, Jane; Reifsnider, Elizabeth; Hargraves, Martha A

    2010-01-01

    Community-based participatory research (CBPR) approaches equitably involve community members and researchers throughout the research process. A developing literature examines problems in CBPR partnerships, but less is written about community groups using CBPR to access university resources to address community-prioritized health concerns. We sought to examine issues in two stages of a National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded CBPR partnership: (1) joint proposal preparation, and (2) grant administration. We used a case study approach to analyze data (partner dialogs, meeting notes, interviews, and press coverage) from a longstanding community-academic partnership. The partnership received NIH Partners in Research Program funding. During joint proposal preparation, issues included (1) learning to practice operating principles, such as "talking in ways that all people can understand," (2) streamlining proposal design to facilitate communication with community members, and (3) addressing inequities inherent in community-academic budget sharing. During the administration phase, issues included (1) community partner struggles with administrative requirements, (2) inequities in indirect cost (IDC) allocations, and (3) the impact of a natural disaster. Separately funded CBPR grants can contribute to community partner development, but make substantive demands on small, grassroots community organizations. Funders should consider taking more responsibility in developing community resources and infrastructure to ensure that grassroots community groups have the power to be equal partners. More accurate accounting of costs and benefits of CBPR to vulnerable communities should be in place to ensure communities receive adequate return on the time they invest in partnering with universities.

  11. Assessing communities of practice in health policy: a conceptual framework as a first step towards empirical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertone, Maria Paola; Meessen, Bruno; Clarysse, Guy; Hercot, David; Kelley, Allison; Kafando, Yamba; Lange, Isabelle; Pfaffmann, Jérôme; Ridde, Valéry; Sieleunou, Isidore; Witter, Sophie

    2013-10-20

    Communities of Practice (CoPs) are groups of people that interact regularly to deepen their knowledge on a specific topic. Thanks to information and communication technologies, CoPs can involve experts distributed across countries and adopt a 'transnational' membership. This has allowed the strategy to be applied to domains of knowledge such as health policy with a global perspective. CoPs represent a potentially valuable tool for producing and sharing explicit knowledge, as well as tacit knowledge and implementation practices. They may also be effective in creating links among the different 'knowledge holders' contributing to health policy (e.g., researchers, policymakers, technical assistants, practitioners, etc.). CoPs in global health are growing in number and activities. As a result, there is an increasing need to document their progress and evaluate their effectiveness. This paper represents a first step towards such empirical research as it aims to provide a conceptual framework for the analysis and assessment of transnational CoPs in health policy.The framework is developed based on the findings of a literature review as well as on our experience, and reflects the specific features and challenges of transnational CoPs in health policy. It organizes the key elements of CoPs into a logical flow that links available resources and the capacity to mobilize them, with knowledge management activities and the expansion of knowledge, with changes in policy and practice and, ultimately, with an improvement in health outcomes. Additionally, the paper addresses the challenges in the operationalization and empirical application of the framework.

  12. Revamping of existent chlor-alkali plants for conversion of hydrogen to electricity, hydrogen community germination step

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iordache, Ioan; Laurentiu, Patularu [National R and D Institute for Cryogenics and Isotopic Technologies - ICSI, Rm. Valcea (Romania); Delfrate, Alessandro [UHDENORA SpA (Italy); Iordache, Mihaela [National R and D Institute for Industrial Ecology - ECOIND, Rm. Valcea (Romania)

    2010-07-01

    The transition towards hydrogen becoming widespread in future energy systems and may be one of the greatest social and technical challenges facing society. A wide range of stakeholders will need to work together over extended periods of time to make the sustainable hydrogen ''vision'' a reality. Community-based projects are seen as a route to stimulate the start of the transformation, leading to more widespread early adoption of these new technologies. Valcea have premises to develop some local projects in order to become a Hydrogen Community. This ''Community'' fulfills both an economic-technical background and a scientifically potential. (orig.)

  13. 'Take the stairs instead of the escalator': effect of environmental prompts on community stair use and implications for a national 'Small Steps' campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, M S; Weiss, L A; Lewis, R A; Pietrobelli, A; Heo, M; Faith, M S

    2006-02-01

    The US government initiated a national health campaign targeting 100 'small step' lifestyle changes to combat obesity. Small Step #67 advocates stair instead of escalator usage in public settings. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of motivational signs prompting stair use over escalator use on pedestrians' stair usage in commuter settings. Eight studies, testing the effects of motivational prompts on stair vs. escalator usage in public settings, were reviewed. Participant and study attributes were descriptively coded. Effect size was calculated as the change in percent units of stair users during the intervention phases vs. the baseline phase. The average study included approximately 45,000 observations that were recorded across an average of 15 weeks of intervention. The mean +/- SD change in percent units of stair users was 2.8% +/- 2.4% (P stairs/building, baseline stair use, and total intervention weeks predicted change in stair use, although the effects were clinically miniscule. In a hypothetical city intervention, we projected that a 2.8% increase in stair usage would result in a weight loss and/or weight gain prevention of 300 g/person/year among new stair users. In sum, point-of-decision motivational signs may help communities attain Small Step #67. However, the singular impact of this community intervention on correcting energy imbalance may be minimal, having slight impact itself on reducing the national obesity prevalence.

  14. Null Models for Everyone: A Two-Step Approach to Teaching Null Model Analysis of Biological Community Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Declan J.; Knight, Evelyn J.

    2016-01-01

    Since being introduced by Connor and Simberloff in response to Diamond's assembly rules, null model analysis has been a controversial tool in community ecology. Despite being commonly used in the primary literature, null model analysis has not featured prominently in general textbooks. Complexity of approaches along with difficulty in interpreting…

  15. Can a Single Session of a Community-Based Group Exercise Program Combining Step Aerobics and Bodyweight Resistance Exercise Acutely Reduce Blood Pressure?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mendes Romeu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to analyze the acute effects of a single session of a community-based group exercise program combining step aerobics and bodyweight resistance exercise on blood pressure in healthy young adult women. Twentythree healthy young adult women (aged 31.57 ± 7.87 years participated in two experimental sessions (exercise and control in a crossover study design. Blood pressure was monitored before, immediately after and at 10, 20 and 30 min of recovery. The exercise session consisted of four phases: 1 a warm-up (5 min of dance aerobics; 2 aerobic exercise training (30 min of step aerobics; 3 resistance exercise training (six sets of 12 repetitions of three bodyweight exercises in a circuit mode, 10 min; and 4 a cool-down (5 min of breathing and flexibility exercises; totaling 50 min of duration. Systolic blood pressure after exercise was significantly lower compared to control at the 10th min (-10.83 ± 2.13 vs. -2.6 ± 2.13 mmHg; p = 0.009, 20th min (-11.26 ± 2.13 vs. -3.04 ± 2.13 mmHg; p = 0.009 and 30th min of recovery (-10.87 ± 2.39 vs. -0.48 ± 2.39 mmHg; p = 0.004. A single session of a community-based group exercise program combining step aerobics and bodyweight resistance exercise was effective in inducing significant post-exercise hypotension in healthy young adult women. This type of low-cost exercise interventions may have an important role in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases and in community health promotion.

  16. The Devon Active Villages Evaluation (DAVE trial: Study protocol of a stepped wedge cluster randomised trial of a community-level physical activity intervention in rural southwest England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solomon Emma

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although physical inactivity has been linked with numerous chronic health conditions and overall mortality, the majority of English adults report doing insufficient physical activity. To increase population physical activity levels, researchers have called for more community-level interventions. To evaluate these complex public health interventions, innovative study designs are required. This study protocol describes Devon Active Villages, a community-level intervention providing physical activity opportunities to 128 rural villages in southwest England, and the methods used to evaluate its effectiveness in increasing physical activity levels. Methods/Design A stepped wedge cluster randomised trial will be used to evaluate whether Devon Active Villages leads to increased physical activity levels in rural communities. Community engagement will help tailor activity programmes for each village; communities will then be supported for a further twelve months. The intervention will be delivered over four periods, each lasting twelve weeks. Data collection consists of a postal survey of a random sample of adults aged 18 years and over, at baseline and after each of the four intervention periods. The questionnaire includes questions on participant demographics, physical activity behaviour, local environment characteristics, awareness of local activity programmes, and psychosocial factors. Based on detecting an increase in the proportion of people who meet physical activity guidelines (from 25% to 30%, at least ten respondents are needed from each of the 128 villages at each stage (80% power at the 5% level of significance. Anticipating a 20% response rate, 6,400 questionnaires will be sent out at each stage (i.e., 50 surveys to each village. Using data from all five periods, a comparison of study outcomes between intervention and control arms will be performed, allowing for time period (as a fixed effect and the random effect

  17. Integrated proteomic and metabolomic analysis of an artificial microbial community for two-step production of vitamin C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Ma

    Full Text Available An artificial microbial community consisted of Ketogulonicigenium vulgare and Bacillus megaterium has been used in industry to produce 2-keto-gulonic acid (2-KGA, the precursor of vitamin C. During the mix culture fermentation process, sporulation and cell lysis of B. megaterium can be observed. In order to investigate how these phenomena correlate with 2-KGA production, and to explore how two species interact with each other during the fermentation process, an integrated time-series proteomic and metabolomic analysis was applied to the system. The study quantitatively identified approximate 100 metabolites and 258 proteins. Principal Component Analysis of all the metabolites identified showed that glutamic acid, 5-oxo-proline, L-sorbose, 2-KGA, 2, 6-dipicolinic acid and tyrosine were potential biomarkers to distinguish the different time-series samples. Interestingly, most of these metabolites were closely correlated with the sporulation process of B. megaterium. Together with several sporulation-relevant proteins identified, the results pointed to the possibility that Bacillus sporulation process might be important part of the microbial interaction. After sporulation, cell lysis of B. megaterium was observed in the co-culture system. The proteomic results showed that proteins combating against intracellular reactive oxygen stress (ROS, and proteins involved in pentose phosphate pathway, L-sorbose pathway, tricarboxylic acid cycle and amino acids metabolism were up-regulated when the cell lysis of B. megaterium occurred. The cell lysis might supply purine substrates needed for K. vulgare growth. These discoveries showed B. megaterium provided key elements necessary for K. vulgare to grow better and produce more 2-KGA. The study represents the first attempt to decipher 2-KGA-producing microbial communities using quantitative systems biology analysis.

  18. Integrated proteomic and metabolomic analysis of an artificial microbial community for two-step production of vitamin C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qian; Zhou, Jian; Zhang, Weiwen; Meng, Xinxin; Sun, Junwei; Yuan, Ying-Jin

    2011-01-01

    An artificial microbial community consisted of Ketogulonicigenium vulgare and Bacillus megaterium has been used in industry to produce 2-keto-gulonic acid (2-KGA), the precursor of vitamin C. During the mix culture fermentation process, sporulation and cell lysis of B. megaterium can be observed. In order to investigate how these phenomena correlate with 2-KGA production, and to explore how two species interact with each other during the fermentation process, an integrated time-series proteomic and metabolomic analysis was applied to the system. The study quantitatively identified approximate 100 metabolites and 258 proteins. Principal Component Analysis of all the metabolites identified showed that glutamic acid, 5-oxo-proline, L-sorbose, 2-KGA, 2, 6-dipicolinic acid and tyrosine were potential biomarkers to distinguish the different time-series samples. Interestingly, most of these metabolites were closely correlated with the sporulation process of B. megaterium. Together with several sporulation-relevant proteins identified, the results pointed to the possibility that Bacillus sporulation process might be important part of the microbial interaction. After sporulation, cell lysis of B. megaterium was observed in the co-culture system. The proteomic results showed that proteins combating against intracellular reactive oxygen stress (ROS), and proteins involved in pentose phosphate pathway, L-sorbose pathway, tricarboxylic acid cycle and amino acids metabolism were up-regulated when the cell lysis of B. megaterium occurred. The cell lysis might supply purine substrates needed for K. vulgare growth. These discoveries showed B. megaterium provided key elements necessary for K. vulgare to grow better and produce more 2-KGA. The study represents the first attempt to decipher 2-KGA-producing microbial communities using quantitative systems biology analysis.

  19. Building Support for Better Schools: Seven Steps to Engaging Hard-to-Reach Communities = La creacion de apoyo para mejores escuelas: Siete pasos para lograr la participacion de todas las comunidades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southwest Educational Development Lab., Austin, TX.

    In 1999, the Southern Educational Development Laboratory (SEDL) interviewed leaders from Hispanic, African American, Native American, and Asian communities in Arkansas and Oklahoma to understand what keeps parents and others from participating in community forums. After conducting more than fifty interviews, SEDL developed seven steps to help…

  20. Promoting ADL independence in vulnerable, community-dwelling older adults: a pilot RCT comparing 3-Step Workout for Life versus resistance exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu C

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Chiung-ju Liu,1,2 Huiping Xu,3,4 NiCole R Keith,2,4,5 Daniel O Clark2,4,6 1Department of Occupational Therapy, Indiana University School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, 2Indiana University Center for Aging Research, 3Department of Biostatistics, Indiana University Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health, 4Regenstrief Institute, Inc., 5Department of Kinesiology, Indiana University School of Physical Education and Tourism Management, 6Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, USA Background: Resistance exercise is effective to increase muscle strength for older adults; however, its effect on the outcome of activities of daily living is often limited. The purpose of this study was to examine whether 3-Step Workout for Life (which combines resistance exercise, functional exercise, and activities of daily living exercise would be more beneficial than resistance exercise alone. Methods: A single-blind randomized controlled trial was conducted. Fifty-two inactive, community-dwelling older adults (mean age =73 years with muscle weakness and difficulty in activities of daily living were randomized to receive 3-Step Workout for Life or resistance exercise only. Participants in the 3-Step Workout for Life Group performed functional movements and selected activities of daily living at home in addition to resistance exercise. Participants in the Resistance Exercise Only Group performed resistance exercise only. Both groups were comparable in exercise intensity (moderate, duration (50–60 minutes each time for 10 weeks, and frequency (three times a week. Assessment of Motor and Process Skills, a standard performance test on activities of daily living, was administered at baseline, postintervention, and 6 months after intervention completion.Results: At postintervention, the 3-Step Workout for Life Group showed improvement on the outcome measure (mean change from baseline =0.29, P=0.02, but the improvement was not greater than

  1. Characterization of a Marine Microbial Community Used for Enhanced Sulfate Reduction and Copper Precipitation in a Two-Step Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Depraect, Octavio; Guerrero-Barajas, Claudia; Jan-Roblero, Janet; Ordaz, Alberto

    2017-06-01

    Marine microorganisms that are obtained from hydrothermal vent sediments present a great metabolic potential for applications in environmental biotechnology. However, the work done regarding their applications in engineered systems is still scarce. Hence, in this work, the sulfate reduction process carried out by a marine microbial community in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor was investigated for 190 days under sequential batch mode. The effects of 1000 to 5500 mg L(-1) of SO4(-2) and the chemical oxygen demand (COD)/SO4(-2) ratio were studied along with a kinetic characterization with lactate as the electron donor. Also, the feasibility of using the sulfide produced in the UASB for copper precipitation in a second column was studied under continuous mode. The system presented here is an alternative to sulfidogenesis, particularly when it is necessary to avoid toxicity to sulfide and competition with methanogens. The bioreactor performed better with relatively low concentrations of sulfate (up to 1100 mg L(-1)) and COD/SO4(-2) ratios between 1.4 and 3.6. Under the continuous regime, the biogenic sulfide was sufficient to precipitate copper at a removal rate of 234 mg L(-1) day(-1). Finally, the identification of the microorganisms in the sludge was carried out; some genera of microorganisms identified were Desulfitobacterium and Clostridium.

  2. Next Step for STEP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Claire [CTSI; Bremner, Brenda [CTSI

    2013-08-09

    The Siletz Tribal Energy Program (STEP), housed in the Tribe’s Planning Department, will hire a data entry coordinator to collect, enter, analyze and store all the current and future energy efficiency and renewable energy data pertaining to administrative structures the tribe owns and operates and for homes in which tribal members live. The proposed data entry coordinator will conduct an energy options analysis in collaboration with the rest of the Siletz Tribal Energy Program and Planning Department staff. An energy options analysis will result in a thorough understanding of tribal energy resources and consumption, if energy efficiency and conservation measures being implemented are having the desired effect, analysis of tribal energy loads (current and future energy consumption), and evaluation of local and commercial energy supply options. A literature search will also be conducted. In order to educate additional tribal members about renewable energy, we will send four tribal members to be trained to install and maintain solar panels, solar hot water heaters, wind turbines and/or micro-hydro.

  3. Next Step for STEP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Claire [CTSI; Bremner, Brenda [CTSI

    2013-08-09

    The Siletz Tribal Energy Program (STEP), housed in the Tribe’s Planning Department, will hire a data entry coordinator to collect, enter, analyze and store all the current and future energy efficiency and renewable energy data pertaining to administrative structures the tribe owns and operates and for homes in which tribal members live. The proposed data entry coordinator will conduct an energy options analysis in collaboration with the rest of the Siletz Tribal Energy Program and Planning Department staff. An energy options analysis will result in a thorough understanding of tribal energy resources and consumption, if energy efficiency and conservation measures being implemented are having the desired effect, analysis of tribal energy loads (current and future energy consumption), and evaluation of local and commercial energy supply options. A literature search will also be conducted. In order to educate additional tribal members about renewable energy, we will send four tribal members to be trained to install and maintain solar panels, solar hot water heaters, wind turbines and/or micro-hydro.

  4. The effect of the electronic transmission of prescriptions on dispensing errors and prescription enhancements made in English community pharmacies: a naturalistic stepped wedge study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Bryony Dean; Reynolds, Matthew; Sadler, Stacey; Hibberd, Ralph; Avery, Anthony J; Armstrong, Sarah J; Mehta, Rajnikant; Boyd, Matthew J; Barber, Nick

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To compare prevalence and types of dispensing errors and pharmacists’ labelling enhancements, for prescriptions transmitted electronically versus paper prescriptions. Design Naturalistic stepped wedge study. Setting 15 English community pharmacies. Intervention Electronic transmission of prescriptions between prescriber and pharmacy. Main outcome measures Prevalence of labelling errors, content errors and labelling enhancements (beneficial additions to the instructions), as identified by researchers visiting each pharmacy. Results Overall, we identified labelling errors in 5.4% of 16 357 dispensed items, and content errors in 1.4%; enhancements were made for 13.6%. Pharmacists also edited the label for a further 21.9% of electronically transmitted items. Electronically transmitted prescriptions had a higher prevalence of labelling errors (7.4% of 3733 items) than other prescriptions (4.8% of 12 624); OR 1.46 (95% CI 1.21 to 1.76). There was no difference for content errors or enhancements. The increase in labelling errors was mainly accounted for by errors (mainly at one pharmacy) involving omission of the indication, where specified by the prescriber, from the label. A sensitivity analysis in which these cases (n=158) were not considered errors revealed no remaining difference between prescription types. Conclusions We identified a higher prevalence of labelling errors for items transmitted electronically, but this was predominantly accounted for by local practice in a single pharmacy, independent of prescription type. Community pharmacists made labelling enhancements to about one in seven dispensed items, whether electronically transmitted or not. Community pharmacists, prescribers, professional bodies and software providers should work together to agree how items should be dispensed and labelled to best reap the benefits of electronically transmitted prescriptions. Community pharmacists need to ensure their computer systems are promptly updated

  5. The use of step aerobics and the stability ball to improve balance and quality of life in community-dwelling older adults - a randomized exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunsky, Ayelet; Yahalom, Tal; Arnon, Michal; Lidor, Ronnie

    2017-07-01

    To explore the use of step aerobics (SA) and the stability ball (SB) as tools for balance improvement in community-dwelling older adults. Forty-two women (age: 72.2±5.8 years) who attended a community day center volunteered to participate in the study. Following the first assessment session, 28 women were assigned randomly to one of two experimental groups (the use of either SA or SB). The other 14 participants, who were engaged in a ceramic class, served as the control group. The study design was based on four assessment sessions and eight weeks of intervention. Assessment included four balance tests: Timed Up and Go (TUG), One-Leg Stand, Functional Reach, and the Performance-Oriented Assessment of Mobility (POMA). Quality of life was assessed by the use of the Short Form-36 Health Survey questionnaire. The TUG and POMA intervention improved significantly (d=.83 and d=.95, respectively) following the SA. In addition, general health perception following both the SA and SB interventions improved significantly relative to the control condition (d=.62 and d=.22, respectively). The findings of this study may imply that trainers should consider the inclusion of SA and SB as components of physical activity programs for seniors, aimed at improving balance ability and quality of life. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. First Steps in Initiating an Effective Maternal, Neonatal, and Child Health Program in Urban Slums: the BRAC Manoshi Project's Experience with Community Engagement, Social Mapping, and Census Taking in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcil, Lucy; Afsana, Kaosar; Perry, Henry B

    2016-02-01

    The processes for implementing effective programs at scale in low-income countries have not been well-documented in the peer-reviewed literature. This article describes the initial steps taken by one such program--the BRAC Manoshi Project, which now reaches a population of 6.9 million. The project has achieved notable increases in facility births and reductions in maternal and neonatal mortality. The focus of the paper is on the initial steps--community engagement, social mapping, and census taking. Community engagement began with (1) engaging local leaders, (2) creating Maternal, Neonatal, and Child Health Committees for populations of approximately 10,000 people, (3) responding to advice from the community, (4) social mapping of the community, and (5) census taking. Social mapping involved community members working with BRAC staff to map all important physical features that affect how the community carries out its daily functions--such as alleys, lanes and roads, schools, mosques, markets, pharmacies, health facilities, latrine sites, and ponds. As the social mapping progressed, it became possible to conduct household censuses with maps identifying every household and listing family members by household. Again, this was a process of collaboration between BRAC staff and community members. Thus, social mapping and census taking were also instrumental for advancing community engagement. These three processes-community engagement, social mapping, and census taking--can be valuable strategies for strengthening health programs in urban slum settings of low-income countries.

  7. A Step towards a Sharable Community Knowledge Base for WRF Settings -Developing a WRF Setting Methodology based on a case study in a Torrential Rainfall Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHU, Q.; Xu, Z.; Zhuo, L.; Han, D.

    2016-12-01

    Increased requirements for interactions between different disciplines and readily access to the numerical weather forecasting system featured with portability and extensibility have made useful contribution to the increases of downstream model users in WRF over recent years. For these users, a knowledge base classified by the representative events would be much helpful. This is because the determination of model settings is regarded as the most important steps in WRF. However, such a process is generally time-consuming, even if with a high computational platform. As such, we propose a sharable proper lookup table on WRF domain settings and corresponding procedures based on a representative torrential rainfall event in Beijing, China. It has been found that WRF's simulations' drift away from the input lateral boundary conditions can be significantly reduced with the adjustment of the domain settings. Among all the impact factors, the placement of nested domain can not only affect the moving speed and angle of the storm-center, but also the location and amount of heavy-rain-belt which can only be detected with adjusted spatial resolutions. Spin-up time is also considered in the model settings, which is demonstrated to have the most obvious influence on the accuracy of the simulations. This conclusion is made based on the large diversity of spatial distributions of precipitation, in terms of the amount of heavy rain varied from -30% to 58% among each experiment. After following all the procedures, the variations of domain settings have minimal effect on the modeling and show the best correlation (larger than 0.65) with fusion observations. So the model settings, including domain size covering the greater Beijing area, 1:5:5 downscaling ratio, 57 vertical levels with top of 50hpa and 60h spin-up time, are found suitable for predicting the similar convective torrential rainfall event in Beijing area. We hope that the procedure for building the community WRF knowledge

  8. Linear algebra step by step

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Kuldeep

    2013-01-01

    Linear algebra is a fundamental area of mathematics, and is arguably the most powerful mathematical tool ever developed. It is a core topic of study within fields as diverse as: business, economics, engineering, physics, computer science, ecology, sociology, demography and genetics. For an example of linear algebra at work, one needs to look no further than the Google search engine, which relies upon linear algebra to rank the results of a search with respect to relevance. The strength of the text is in the large number of examples and the step-by-step explanation of each topic as it is introduced. It is compiled in a way that allows distance learning, with explicit solutions to set problems freely available online. The miscellaneous exercises at the end of each chapter comprise questions from past exam papers from various universities, helping to reinforce the reader's confidence. Also included, generally at the beginning of sections, are short historicalbiographies of the leading players in the field of lin...

  9. A randomized trail using motivational interviewing for maintenance of blood pressure improvements in a community-engaged lifestyle intervention: HUB City Steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Little is known about the effective dose of motivational interviewing for maintaining intervention-induced health outcome improvements. Purpose: To compare effects of two doses of motivational interviewing for maintaining blood pressure improvements in a community-engaged lifestyle int...

  10. A Randomized Trial Using Motivational Interviewing for Maintenance of Blood Pressure Improvements in a Community-Engaged Lifestyle Intervention: HUB City Steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Alicia; Madson, Michael; Thomson, Jessica; Zoellner, Jamie; Connell, Carol; Yadrick, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the effective dose of motivational interviewing for maintaining intervention-induced health outcome improvements. The purpose of this study was to compare effects of two doses of motivational interviewing for maintaining blood pressure improvements in a community-engaged lifestyle intervention conducted with…

  11. Transition at Age 3: Steps for Success Transition Guide for Oklahoma Children with Disabilities, Their Families, SoonerStart Early Intervention Services, Schools, and Community Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Mark, Ed.; Villines-Hackney, Amber, Ed.; Rush, Dathan, Ed.; Shelden, M'Lisa, Ed.; Hansen, Laura, Ed.

    This guide was developed to support families, the SoonerStart Early Intervention Program, schools, and community programs in meeting the federal and state requirements under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) Amendments of 1997 for transition of children at age three. It provides guiding principles, recommended practices, and…

  12. A Significant Step Forward

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Australia officially ratified the Kyoto Protocol on December 3,the first act of its new government under Prime Minister Kevin Rudd.Rudd signed the instrument of ratification the very day he was sworn in by Australia’s Governor General Michael Jeffery. This is a significant step in Australia’s efforts to fight climate change domestically and with the international community,Rudd said in a statement.The Australian Government will do everything in its power to help Australia meet its Kyoto obligations,he added.

  13. Building on the CMIP5 effort to prepare next steps : integrate community related effort in the every day workflow to lower the data distribution and data management burden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denvil, Sébastien; Bhardwaj, Ashish; Morgan, Mark; Mancip, Martial; Brockmann, Patrick

    2010-05-01

    The Pierre Simon Laplace Institute (IPSL), like many other climate modeling groups, is involved in the development of a comprehensive Earth System Model (ESM) to study the interactions between chemical, physical, and biological processes. This work entails the coupling of different components (land, ocean, atmosphere, chemistry...etc) and requires an execution environment platform that can tackle the entire range of interdependent model configurations. Furthermore, the ever-increasing number of simulations, executed against model configurations within scientific computing centres, is generating a huge volume of data and meta-data that must be made available to researchers, modelers, students and general users. Each user group has a different set of information demands related to climate simulation data and meta-data, and thus fulfilling the requirements of the entire community is highly challenging. This talk will focus upon the strategy adopted by IPSL to simultaneously fulfill the needs of the community and to lower the data distribution and data management burdens upon the climate modeling group due to the growing interest related to climate simulations data and information. To achieve these objectives we decided to integrate the efforts of international and European projects such as Earth System Grid, METAFOR and IS-ENES, within our execution environment platform. We will present the emerging workflow that will be in place to run CMIP5 simulations and that we will extend to manage the "every day" simulations that are intended not only for participation within a large model intercomparaison project such as CMIP5.

  14. H.U.B city steps: methods and early findings from a community-based participatory research trial to reduce blood pressure among african americans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molaison Elaine

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Community-based participatory research (CBPR has been recognized as an important approach to develop and execute health interventions among marginalized populations, and a key strategy to translate research into practice to help reduce health disparities. Despite growing interest in the CBPR approach, CBPR initiatives rarely use experimental or other rigorous research designs to evaluate health outcomes. This behavioral study describes the conceptual frameworks, methods, and early findings related to the reach, adoption, implementation, and effectiveness on primary blood pressure outcomes. Methods The CBPR, social support, and motivational interviewing frameworks are applied to test treatment effects of a two-phased CBPR walking intervention, including a 6-month active intervention quasi experimental phase and 12-month maintenance randomized controlled trial phase to test dose effects of motivational interviewing. A community advisory board helped develop and execute the culturally-appropriate intervention components which included social support walking groups led by peer coaches, pedometer diary self-monitoring, monthly diet and physical activity education sessions, and individualized motivational interviewing sessions. Although the study is on-going, three month data is available and reported. Analyses include descriptive statistics and paired t tests. Results Of 269 enrolled participants, most were African American (94% females (85% with a mean age of 43.8 (SD = 12.1 years. Across the 3 months, 90% of all possible pedometer diaries were submitted. Attendance at the monthly education sessions was approximately 33%. At the 3-month follow-up 227 (84% participants were retained. From baseline to 3-months, systolic BP [126.0 (SD = 19.1 to 120.3 (SD = 17.9 mmHg; p Conclusions This CBPR study highlights implementation factors and signifies the community's active participation in the development and execution of this study. Reach

  15. Steps Toward Creating A Therapeutic Community for Inpatients Suffering from Chronic Ulcers: Lessons from Allada Buruli Ulcer Treatment Hospital in Benin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoussouhoui, Arnaud Setondji; Johnson, Roch Christian; Sopoh, Ghislain Emmanuel; Agbo, Ines Elvire; Aoulou, Paulin; Houezo, Jean-Gabin; Tingbe-Azalou, Albert; Boyer, Micah; Nichter, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Background Reducing social distance between hospital staff and patients and establishing clear lines of communication is a major challenge when providing in-patient care for people afflicted by Buruli ulcer (BU) and chronic ulcers. Research on hospitals as therapeutic communities is virtually non-existent in Africa and is currently being called for by medical anthropologists working in the field of health service and policy planning. This paper describes a pioneering attempt to establish a therapeutic community for patients suffering from BU and other chronic ulcers requiring long term hospital care in Benin. Methods A six-month pilot project was undertaken with the objectives of establishing a therapeutic community and evaluating its impact on practitioner and patient relations. The project was designed and implemented by a team of social scientists working in concert with the current and previous director of a hospital serving patients suffering from advanced stage BU and other chronic ulcers. Qualitative research initially investigated patients’ understanding of their illness and its treatment, identified questions patients had about their hospitalization, and ascertained their level of social support. Newly designed question–answer health education sessions were developed. Following these hospital wide education sessions, open forums were held each week to provide an opportunity for patients and hospital staff to express concerns and render sources of discontent transparent. Patient group representatives then met with hospital staff to problem solve issues in a non-confrontational manner. Psychosocial support for individual patients was provided in a second intervention which took the form of drop-in counseling sessions with social scientists trained to serve as therapy facilitators and culture brokers. Results Interviews with patients revealed that most patients had very little information about the identity of their illness and the duration of their

  16. Taking a Step to Identify How to Create Professional Learning Communities--Report of a Case Study of a Korean Public High School on How to Create and Sustain a School-Based Teacher Professional Learning Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Joonkil

    2017-01-01

    This study intends to identify some key factors in creating and sustaining school-based teacher professional learning communities (PLCs) through a case study of a South Korean public high school. To achieve this, the study identified some essential infrastructure, preparation, and necessary social organization for creating PLCs. The ideal unit and…

  17. The way to collisions, step by step

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    While the LHC sectors cool down and reach the cryogenic operating temperature, spirits are warming up as we all eagerly await the first collisions. No reason to hurry, though. Making particles collide involves the complex manoeuvring of thousands of delicate components. The experts will make it happen using a step-by-step approach.

  18. Internship guide : Work placements step by step

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haag, Esther

    2013-01-01

    Internship Guide: Work Placements Step by Step has been written from the practical perspective of a placement coordinator. This book addresses the following questions : what problems do students encounter when they start thinking about the jobs their degree programme prepares them for? How do you

  19. Internship guide : Work placements step by step

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haag, Esther

    2013-01-01

    Internship Guide: Work Placements Step by Step has been written from the practical perspective of a placement coordinator. This book addresses the following questions : what problems do students encounter when they start thinking about the jobs their degree programme prepares them for? How do you fi

  20. On Computational Small Steps and Big Steps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannsen, Jacob

    rules in the small-step semantics cause the refocusing step of the syntactic correspondence to be inapplicable. Second, we propose two solutions to overcome this in-applicability: backtracking and rule generalization. Third, we show how these solutions affect the other transformations of the two...

  1. Microsoft Office professional 2010 step by step

    CERN Document Server

    Cox, Joyce; Frye, Curtis

    2011-01-01

    Teach yourself exactly what you need to know about using Office Professional 2010-one step at a time! With STEP BY STEP, you build and practice new skills hands-on, at your own pace. Covering Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, Outlook, Excel, Access, Publisher, and OneNote, this book will help you learn the core features and capabilities needed to: Create attractive documents, publications, and spreadsheetsManage your e-mail, calendar, meetings, and communicationsPut your business data to workDevelop and deliver great presentationsOrganize your ideas and notes in one placeConnect, share, and accom

  2. Developing Instructional Videotapes Step by Step.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Thomas E.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the eight steps in developing an instructional videotape: planning, brainstorming content, sequencing the storyline, defining the treatment, developing the introduction and conclusion, scripting the video and audio, controlling the production, and specifying the postproduction. (DMM)

  3. Step by step: Revisiting step tolling in the bottleneck model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindsey, C.R.; Berg, van den V.A.C.; Verhoef, E.T.

    2010-01-01

    In most dynamic traffic congestion models, congestion tolls must vary continuously over time to achieve the full optimum. This is also the case in Vickrey's (1969) 'bottleneck model'. To date, the closest approximations of this ideal in practice have so-called 'step tolls', in which the toll takes o

  4. Protocol for a cluster randomised stepped wedge trial assessing the impact of a community-level hygiene intervention and a water intervention using riverbank filtration technology on diarrhoeal prevalence in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuinness, Sarah L; O'Toole, Joanne E; Boving, Thomas B; Forbes, Andrew B; Sinclair, Martha; Gautam, Sumit K; Leder, Karin

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Diarrhoea is a leading cause of death globally, mostly occurring as a result of insufficient or unsafe water supplies, inadequate sanitation and poor hygiene. Our study aims to investigate the impact of a community-level hygiene education program and a water quality intervention using riverbank filtration (RBF) technology on diarrhoeal prevalence. Methods and analysis We have designed a stepped wedge cluster randomised trial to estimate the health impacts of our intervention in 4 rural villages in Karnataka, India. At baseline, surveys will be conducted in all villages, and householders will receive hygiene education. New pipelines, water storage tanks and taps will then be installed at accessible locations in each village and untreated piped river water will be supplied. A subsequent survey will evaluate the impact of hygiene education combined with improved access to greater water volumes for hygiene and drinking purposes (improved water quantity). Villages will then be randomly ordered and RBF-treated water (improved water quality) will be sequentially introduced into the 4 villages in a stepwise manner, with administration of surveys at each time point. The primary outcome is a 7-day period prevalence of self-reported diarrhoea. Secondary outcomes include self-reported respiratory and skin infections, and reported changes in hygiene practices, household water usage and water supply preference. River, tank and tap water from each village, and stored water from a subset of households, will be sampled to assess microbial and chemical quality. Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval was obtained from the Monash University Human Research Ethics Committee in Australia and The Energy and Resources Institute Institutional Ethics Committee in India. The results of the trial will be presented at conferences, published in peer-reviewed journals and disseminated to relevant stakeholders. This study is funded by an Australian National Health and Medical

  5. Step by Step Microsoft Office Visio 2003

    CERN Document Server

    Lemke, Judy

    2004-01-01

    Experience learning made easy-and quickly teach yourself how to use Visio 2003, the Microsoft Office business and technical diagramming program. With STEP BY STEP, you can take just the lessons you need, or work from cover to cover. Either way, you drive the instruction-building and practicing the skills you need, just when you need them! Produce computer network diagrams, organization charts, floor plans, and moreUse templates to create new diagrams and drawings quicklyAdd text, color, and 1-D and 2-D shapesInsert graphics and pictures, such as company logosConnect shapes to create a basic f

  6. Free Modal Algebras Revisited: The Step-by-Step Method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bezhanishvili, N.; Ghilardi, Silvio; Jibladze, Mamuka

    2012-01-01

    We review the step-by-step method of constructing finitely generated free modal algebras. First we discuss the global step-by-step method, which works well for rank one modal logics. Next we refine the global step-by-step method to obtain the local step-by-step method, which is applicable beyond ran

  7. Diabetes PSA (:60) Step By Step

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-10-24

    First steps to preventing diabetes. For Hispanic and Latino American audiences.  Created: 10/24/2009 by National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP), a joint program of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institutes of Health.   Date Released: 10/24/2009.

  8. Diabetes PSA (:30) Step By Step

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-10-24

    First steps to preventing diabetes. For Hispanic and Latino American audiences.  Created: 10/24/2009 by National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP), a joint program of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institutes of Health.   Date Released: 10/24/2009.

  9. Microsoft Office Word 2007 step by step

    CERN Document Server

    Cox, Joyce

    2007-01-01

    Experience learning made easy-and quickly teach yourself how to create impressive documents with Word 2007. With Step By Step, you set the pace-building and practicing the skills you need, just when you need them!Apply styles and themes to your document for a polished lookAdd graphics and text effects-and see a live previewOrganize information with new SmartArt diagrams and chartsInsert references, footnotes, indexes, a table of contentsSend documents for review and manage revisionsTurn your ideas into blogs, Web pages, and moreYour all-in-one learning experience includes:Files for building sk

  10. Participant-Observation and Pile Sorting: Methods for Eliciting Local Understandings and Valuations of Plants as a First Step towards Informed Community Participation in Environment and Health Initiatives in Hawai'i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollin, Lisa X.; McMillen, Heather; Wilcox, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    Semistructured interviews were conducted to explore local, lay perceptions and valuations of native and nonnative flora in order to better understand and anticipate community perceptions of, and potential participation in revegetation or eradication conservation efforts in multiethnic communities of Oahu, Hawai'i. The authors detail the…

  11. Computational Abstraction Steps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Lone Leth; Thomsen, Bent; Nørmark, Kurt

    2010-01-01

    and class instantiations. Our teaching experience shows that many novice programmers find it difficult to write programs with abstractions that materialise to concrete objects later in the development process. The contribution of this paper is the idea of initiating a programming process by creating......In this paper we discuss computational abstraction steps as a way to create class abstractions from concrete objects, and from examples. Computational abstraction steps are regarded as symmetric counterparts to computational concretisation steps, which are well-known in terms of function calls...... or capturing concrete values, objects, or actions. As the next step, some of these are lifted to a higher level by computational means. In the object-oriented paradigm the target of such steps is classes. We hypothesise that the proposed approach primarily will be beneficial to novice programmers or during...

  12. Computational Abstraction Steps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Lone Leth; Thomsen, Bent; Nørmark, Kurt

    2010-01-01

    and class instantiations. Our teaching experience shows that many novice programmers find it difficult to write programs with abstractions that materialise to concrete objects later in the development process. The contribution of this paper is the idea of initiating a programming process by creating......In this paper we discuss computational abstraction steps as a way to create class abstractions from concrete objects, and from examples. Computational abstraction steps are regarded as symmetric counterparts to computational concretisation steps, which are well-known in terms of function calls...

  13. Community Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Bródka, Piotr; Kazienko, Przemysław

    2016-01-01

    The continuous interest in the social network area contributes to the fast development of this field. The new possibilities of obtaining and storing data facilitate deeper analysis of the entire social network, extracted social groups and single individuals as well. One of the most interesting research topic is the network dynamics and dynamics of social groups in particular, it means analysis of group evolution over time. It is the natural step forward after social community extraction. Having communities extracted, appropriate knowledge and methods for dynamic analysis may be applied in order to identify changes as well as to predict the future of all or some selected groups. Furthermore, knowing the most probably change of a given group some additional steps may be performed in order to change this predicted future according to specific needs. Such ability would be a powerful tool in the hands of human resource managers, personnel recruitment, marketing, telecommunication companies, etc.

  14. STEP electronic system design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couch, R. H.; Johnson, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    The STEP electronic system design is discussed. The purpose of the design is outlined. The electronic system design is summarized and it is found that: an effective conceptual system design is developed; the design represents a unique set of capabilities; makes efficient use of available orbiter resources; the system capabilities exceed identified potential experiment needs.

  15. Stepping in the river

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Kearney

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available 'Stepping in the River' is about the cultural misunderstandings and small betrayals that arise when First World tourists visit Third World countries. It is also about the enduring love that people in these countries can inspire, imperfect though that love may be.

  16. A Major Step Forward

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Optimism arises from the new timetable of denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula Chinese officials like to use mountain climbing to describe the six-party talks aimed at resolving the North Korean nuclear puzzle.In this sense,any step toward the peak-"the verifiable denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula in a peaceful manner"-

  17. Learning SQL in Steps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Garner

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Learning SQL is a common problem for many Computer Science (CS students, the steps involved are quite different to those mastered when learning procedural or object-oriented programming languages. The introduction of commercial products that include shortcuts into the learning environment can initially appear to benefit the student, however, transferring these skills to a textual environment can be difficult for many students. Computer Science students are required to build textual SQL queries because the demands of complex queries can quickly out grow the capabilities of graphical query builders available in many software packages. SQL in Steps (SiS is a graphical user interface centred around the textual translation of a query; this combination of a GUI and a clear representation of its textual meaning has the potential to improve the way in which users gain an understanding of SQL. SiS allows for an incremental and evolutionary development of queries by enabling students to build queries step by step until their goal is reached. A planned evaluation of SiS hopes to quantify the extent to which the introduction of such a user interface into the learning environment can improve the students' understanding of the language.

  18. Steps toward Successful Dictation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebhaber, Barbara

    2001-01-01

    Relates a technique that helps students learn dictation while enjoying the topic. Provides six steps: (1) send students to the blackboard to take dictation; (2) have students listen first; (3) ask students to isolate melody from rhythm; (4) have all students sing using solfege syllables; (5) provide feedback; and (6) accommodate varying abilities.…

  19. Step-Change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Babah Daouda, Falylath; Ingenbleek, P.T.M.; Trijp, van H.C.M.

    2016-01-01

    With upcoming middle classes in Africa, micro-entrepreneurs witness new opportunities that can potentially lift them out of poverty. Exploiting these opportunities requires entrepreneurs to make a ‘step-change’ away from the bottom of the pyramid to middle-class markets. This process hosts potent

  20. Steps in the Right Direction, Against the Odds: An Evaluation of a Community-Based Programme Aiming to Reduce Inactivity and Improve Health and Morale in Overweight and Obese School-Age Children

    OpenAIRE

    Fraser, Claire; Lewis, Kiara; Manby, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The study describes an evaluation of a 48-week physical activity and nutritional education programme for overweight/obese school-age children using quantitative and qualitative methods. The majority of participants were obese or severely obese when enrolled, and while some improvements in body mass index, self-esteem and engagement in a range of physical activities were noted, difficulties in evaluating a complex community-based intervention were highlighted. Children, parents and health prof...

  1. Implementing Service Learning into a Graduate Social Work Course: A Step-by-Step Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Evelyn Marie

    2012-01-01

    Service learning is a powerful pedagogical tool linking community service to academic learning. Several steps are necessary to implement service learning effectively into the curriculum. This study uses a case example as an exploratory study to pilot-test data on how service learning impacts student outcomes. The paper will (1) provide an overview…

  2. Tick Removal: A Step-by-Step Guide (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Tick Removal: A Step-by-Step Guide KidsHealth > For Parents > Tick Removal: A Step-by-Step Guide A A ... isn't a freckle at all. It's a tick. What should you do? First, don't panic. ...

  3. Extension for Community Health Outcomes-hepatitis C:Small steps carve big footprints in the allocation of scarce resources for hepatitis C virus treatment to remote developing areas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Veysel; Tahan; Ashraf; Almashhrawi; Ali; M; Kahveci; Rachel; Mutrux; Jamal; A; Ibdah

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus(HCV)infection is still a major health problem throughout the world.HCV patients living in rural areas are less fortunate than their counterparts residing in populous urbanized regions.The lack of medical resources and properly trained medical personnel in rural regions make it especially burdensome for HCV patients seeking treatment.Dr.Sanjeev Arora at the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center took initiative to resolve the issue at hand by developing a model named Project Extension for Community Health Outcomes(ECHO).ECHO connects primary care providers(PCPs),usually family medicine physicians,in local communities with specialists.ECHO providers test the efficacy of treatment given using the ECHO model vs that at academic medical centers.The ECHO model has produced promising results such that the sustained virologic response rates for both types of sites were near-equivalent.Show Me ECHO was adapted from Project ECHO to train PCPs in Missouri and equip them with the tools and skills to properly treat and diagnose HCV in a timely manner.This healthcare model can be implemented for treating other common infections and chronic diseases.Telemedicine is the direction healthcare is headed for the next several decades.It has potential to be applied in developing countries to alleviate agony and despair resulting from limited resources and lack of access to expert medical care.

  4. A Reconfigurable Stepping Motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Charles; Selvaggi, Richard

    2009-04-01

    Multiphase brushless actuators, commonly known as the stepper motors, are ubiquitous for many precision control applications. Developments in the microelectronics have lead to their use as efficient drive motors for modern electric vehicles. Understanding the physics and the control logic for interfacing these transducers continues to be important for scientists and engineers. An overview of the stepping motor principles and interfacing requirements is presented and a simple working model used to teach the concepts of stepper motors is described and demonstrated. This model was used to design a much larger stepper motor required to precisely rotate a massive optical system in the undergraduate advanced physics laboratory.

  5. Step Motor Control System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhangShuochengt; WangDan; QiaoWeimin; JingLan

    2003-01-01

    All kinds of step motors and servomotors are widely used in CSR control system, such as many vacuum valves control that set on the HIRFL-CSR; all kinds of electric switches and knobs of ECR Ion Source; equipment of CSR Beam Diagnostics and a lot of large equipment like Inside Gun Toroid and Collector Toroid of HIRFL. A typical control system include up to 32 16-I/O Control boards, and each 16-I/O Control board can control 4 motors at the same time (including 8 Limit Switches).

  6. Small Town Energy Program (STEP) Final Report revised

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Charles (Chuck) T.

    2014-01-02

    University Park, Maryland (“UP”) is a small town of 2,540 residents, 919 homes, 2 churches, 1 school, 1 town hall, and 1 breakthrough community energy efficiency initiative: the Small Town Energy Program (“STEP”). STEP was developed with a mission to “create a model community energy transformation program that serves as a roadmap for other small towns across the U.S.” STEP first launched in January 2011 in UP and expanded in July 2012 to the neighboring communities of Hyattsville, Riverdale Park, and College Heights Estates, MD. STEP, which concluded in July 2013, was generously supported by a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The STEP model was designed for replication in other resource-constrained small towns similar to University Park - a sector largely neglected to date in federal and state energy efficiency programs. STEP provided a full suite of activities for replication, including: energy audits and retrofits for residential buildings, financial incentives, a community-based social marketing backbone and local community delivery partners. STEP also included the highly innovative use of an “Energy Coach” who worked one-on-one with clients throughout the program. Please see www.smalltownenergy.org for more information. In less than three years, STEP achieved the following results in University Park: • 30% of community households participated voluntarily in STEP; • 25% of homes received a Home Performance with ENERGY STAR assessment; • 16% of households made energy efficiency improvements to their home; • 64% of households proceeded with an upgrade after their assessment; • 9 Full Time Equivalent jobs were created or retained, and 39 contractors worked on STEP over the course of the project. Estimated Energy Savings - Program Totals kWh Electricity 204,407 Therms Natural Gas 24,800 Gallons of Oil 2,581 Total Estimated MMBTU Saved (Source Energy) 5,474 Total Estimated Annual Energy Cost Savings $61,343 STEP clients who

  7. SPAR-H Step-by-Step Guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. J. Galyean; A. M. Whaley; D. L. Kelly; R. L. Boring

    2011-05-01

    This guide provides step-by-step guidance on the use of the SPAR-H method for quantifying Human Failure Events (HFEs). This guide is intended to be used with the worksheets provided in: 'The SPAR-H Human Reliability Analysis Method,' NUREG/CR-6883, dated August 2005. Each step in the process of producing a Human Error Probability (HEP) is discussed. These steps are: Step-1, Categorizing the HFE as Diagnosis and/or Action; Step-2, Rate the Performance Shaping Factors; Step-3, Calculate PSF-Modified HEP; Step-4, Accounting for Dependence, and; Step-5, Minimum Value Cutoff. The discussions on dependence are extensive and include an appendix that describes insights obtained from the psychology literature.

  8. Step & flash imprint lithography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas J. Resnick

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The escalating cost of next generation lithography (NGL is driven in part by the need for complex sources and optics. The cost for a single NGL tool could soon exceed $50 million, a prohibitive amount for many companies. As a result, several research groups are looking at alternative, low-cost methods for printing sub-100 nm features. Many of these methods are limited in their ability to do precise overlay. In 1999, Willson and Sreenivasan developed step and flash imprint lithography (S-FIL™. The use of a quartz template opens up the potential for optical alignment of the wafer and template. This paper reviews several key aspects of the S-FIL process, including template, tool, ultraviolet (UV-curable monomer, and pattern transfer. Two applications are also presented: contact holes and surface acoustic wave (SAW filters.

  9. Astronomical sketching a step-by-step introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Handy, Richard; Perez, Jeremy; Rix, Erika; Robbins, Sol

    2007-01-01

    This book presents the amateur with fine examples of astronomical sketches and step-by-step tutorials in each medium, from pencil to computer graphics programs. This unique book can teach almost anyone to create beautiful sketches of celestial objects.

  10. The CORE study protocol: a stepped wedge cluster randomised controlled trial to test a co-design technique to optimise psychosocial recovery outcomes for people affected by mental illness in the community mental health setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Victoria J; Chondros, Patty; Piper, Donella; Callander, Rosemary; Weavell, Wayne; Godbee, Kali; Potiriadis, Maria; Richard, Lauralie; Densely, Konstancja; Herrman, Helen; Furler, John; Pierce, David; Schuster, Tibor; Iedema, Rick; Gunn, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Introduction User engagement in mental health service design is heralded as integral to health systems quality and performance, but does engagement improve health outcomes? This article describes the CORE study protocol, a novel stepped wedge cluster randomised controlled trial (SWCRCT) to improve psychosocial recovery outcomes for people with severe mental illness. Methods An SWCRCT with a nested process evaluation will be conducted over nearly 4 years in Victoria, Australia. 11 teams from four mental health service providers will be randomly allocated to one of three dates 9 months apart to start the intervention. The intervention, a modified version of Mental Health Experience Co-Design (MH ECO), will be delivered to 30 service users, 30 carers and 10 staff in each cluster. Outcome data will be collected at baseline (6 months) and at completion of each intervention wave. The primary outcome is improvement in recovery score using the 24-item Revised Recovery Assessment Scale for service users. Secondary outcomes are improvements to user and carer mental health and well-being using the shortened 8-item version of the WHOQOL Quality of Life scale (EUROHIS), changes to staff attitudes using the 19-item Staff Attitudes to Recovery Scale and recovery orientation of services using the 36-item Recovery Self Assessment Scale (provider version). Intervention and usual care periods will be compared using a linear mixed effects model for continuous outcomes and a generalised linear mixed effects model for binary outcomes. Participants will be analysed in the group that the cluster was assigned to at each time point. Ethics and dissemination The University of Melbourne, Human Research Ethics Committee (1340299.3) and the Federal and State Departments of Health Committees (Project 20/2014) granted ethics approval. Baseline data results will be reported in 2015 and outcomes data in 2017. Trial registration number Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN

  11. The CORE study protocol: a stepped wedge cluster randomised controlled trial to test a co-design technique to optimise psychosocial recovery outcomes for people affected by mental illness in the community mental health setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Victoria J; Chondros, Patty; Piper, Donella; Callander, Rosemary; Weavell, Wayne; Godbee, Kali; Potiriadis, Maria; Richard, Lauralie; Densely, Konstancja; Herrman, Helen; Furler, John; Pierce, David; Schuster, Tibor; Iedema, Rick; Gunn, Jane

    2015-03-24

    User engagement in mental health service design is heralded as integral to health systems quality and performance, but does engagement improve health outcomes? This article describes the CORE study protocol, a novel stepped wedge cluster randomised controlled trial (SWCRCT) to improve psychosocial recovery outcomes for people with severe mental illness. An SWCRCT with a nested process evaluation will be conducted over nearly 4 years in Victoria, Australia. 11 teams from four mental health service providers will be randomly allocated to one of three dates 9 months apart to start the intervention. The intervention, a modified version of Mental Health Experience Co-Design (MH ECO), will be delivered to 30 service users, 30 carers and 10 staff in each cluster. Outcome data will be collected at baseline (6 months) and at completion of each intervention wave. The primary outcome is improvement in recovery score using the 24-item Revised Recovery Assessment Scale for service users. Secondary outcomes are improvements to user and carer mental health and well-being using the shortened 8-item version of the WHOQOL Quality of Life scale (EUROHIS), changes to staff attitudes using the 19-item Staff Attitudes to Recovery Scale and recovery orientation of services using the 36-item Recovery Self Assessment Scale (provider version). Intervention and usual care periods will be compared using a linear mixed effects model for continuous outcomes and a generalised linear mixed effects model for binary outcomes. Participants will be analysed in the group that the cluster was assigned to at each time point. The University of Melbourne, Human Research Ethics Committee (1340299.3) and the Federal and State Departments of Health Committees (Project 20/2014) granted ethics approval. Baseline data results will be reported in 2015 and outcomes data in 2017. Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12614000457640. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For

  12. First steps for safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haysley, D. [Albert-Garaudy and Associates, Inc. (United States)

    2001-06-01

    Albert-Garaudy and Associates discusses how the new steps introduced in ANS/ISA apply to safety instrumental systems in the process sector. Safety is discussed in 'jargonistic' terms. The problems faced by the process industry in developing procedures to meet the 1996 ANSI/ISA S84.01 are recognised and two recommendations are made; these describe (a) how the PHA (process hazards analysis) can be carried out and (b) how acceptable methods can be used for the risk assessment and determine the SIS (safety instrumental system) requirements. Diagrams illustrate (i) the modified SIS life cycle; (ii) selection of safety integrity levels using matrix method; (iii) construction of a risk graph and (iv) the ALARP (As Low as Reasonably Possible) method. An answer to the problem of defining an 'acceptable risk level' through adopting risk values published by the US government is outlined, and references to useful sources are listed. The paper should be helpful in development and documentation of risk assessment in the process industry.

  13. One-step microlithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlen, Franz-Josef; Sankaranarayanan, Srikanth; Kar, Aravinda

    1997-09-01

    Subject of this investigation is a one-step rapid machining process to create miniaturized 3D parts, using the original sample material. An experimental setup where metal powder is fed to the laser beam-material interaction region has been built. The powder is melted and forms planar, 2D geometries as the substrate is moved under the laser beam in XY- direction. After completing the geometry in the plane, the substrate is displaced in Z-direction, and a new layer of material is placed on top of the just completed deposit. By continuous repetition of this process, 3D parts wee created. In particular, the impact of the focal spot size of the high power laser beam on the smallest achievable structures was investigated. At a translation speed of 51 mm/s a minimum material thickness of 590 micrometers was achieved. Also, it was shown that a small Z-displacement has a negligible influence on the continuity of the material deposition over this power range. A high power CO2 laser was used as energy source, the material powder under investigation was stainless steel SS304L. Helium was used as shield gas at a flow rate of 15 1/min. The incident CO2 laser beam power was varied between 300 W and 400 W, with the laser beam intensity distribute in a donut mode. The laser beam was focused to a focal diameter of 600 (Mu) m.

  14. STEPS: JPL's Astrometric Exoplanet Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaklan, Stuart; Pravdo, Steve

    2008-01-01

    Presentation topics include: STEPS ground-based astrometry at Hale Telescope; the instrument; why astronomy and why M-dwarfs; motion of center of light about center of mass in photocentric orbit; photocentric motion vs. fractional mass; high-resolution imaging of STEPS targets; GU 802 p one possible orbit plotted with data, Keplerian frame; GJ 802 results; STEPS future; and a bibliography of STEPS papers.

  15. SPAR-H Step-by-Step Guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    April M. Whaley; Dana L. Kelly; Ronald L. Boring; William J. Galyean

    2012-06-01

    Step-by-step guidance was developed recently at Idaho National Laboratory for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission on the use of the Standardized Plant Analysis Risk-Human Reliability Analysis (SPAR-H) method for quantifying Human Failure Events (HFEs). This work was done to address SPAR-H user needs, specifically requests for additional guidance on the proper application of various aspects of the methodology. This paper overviews the steps of the SPAR-H analysis process and highlights some of the most important insights gained during the development of the step-by-step directions. This supplemental guidance for analysts is applicable when plant-specific information is available, and goes beyond the general guidance provided in existing SPAR-H documentation. The steps highlighted in this paper are: Step-1, Categorizing the HFE as Diagnosis and/or Action; Step-2, Rate the Performance Shaping Factors; Step-3, Calculate PSF-Modified HEP; Step-4, Accounting for Dependence, and; Step-5, Minimum Value Cutoff.

  16. Friction of atomically stepped surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikken, R. J.; Thijsse, B. J.; Nicola, L.

    2017-03-01

    The friction behavior of atomically stepped metal surfaces under contact loading is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. While real rough metal surfaces involve roughness at multiple length scales, the focus of this paper is on understanding friction of the smallest scale of roughness: atomic steps. To this end, periodic stepped Al surfaces with different step geometry are brought into contact and sheared at room temperature. Contact stress that continuously tries to build up during loading, is released with fluctuating stress drops during sliding, according to the typical stick-slip behavior. Stress release occurs not only through local slip, but also by means of step motion. The steps move along the contact, concurrently resulting in normal migration of the contact. The direction of migration depends on the sign of the step, i.e., its orientation with respect to the shearing direction. If the steps are of equal sign, there is a net migration of the entire contact accompanied by significant vacancy generation at room temperature. The stick-slip behavior of the stepped contacts is found to have all the characteristic of a self-organized critical state, with statistics dictated by step density. For the studied step geometries, frictional sliding is found to involve significant atomic rearrangement through which the contact roughness is drastically changed. This leads for certain step configurations to a marked transition from jerky sliding motion to smooth sliding, making the final friction stress approximately similar to that of a flat contact.

  17. Step-step interactions on GaAs (110) nanopatterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galiana, B.; Benedicto, M.; Tejedor, P. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, C.S.I.C., Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-01-14

    The step-step interactions on vicinal GaAs (110) surface patterns have been extracted from the quantitative analysis of the terrace width distribution (TWD). We have specifically studied the interactions in near-equilibrium faceting and kinetics-driven step bunching and meandering formed by spontaneous self-organization or through the modification of GaAs growth kinetics by atomic hydrogen. We show that the experimental TWDs determined from atomic force microscopy measurements can be accurately described by a weighed sum of a generalized Wigner distribution and several Gaussians. The results of our calculations indicate that straight facets are formed during high temperature homoepitaxy due to attractive interactions between [110] steps. At low temperatures, steady state attractive interactions in [110] step bunches are preceded by a transition regime dominated by entropic and energetic repulsions between meandering [11n]-type steps (n {>=} 2), whose population density exceeds that of the [110] bunched steps. In addition, it has been found that atomic H reduces the attractive interactions between [110] bunched steps and enhances entropic and dipole-induced energetic repulsions between H-terminated [11n] steps through the inhibition of As-As bond formation at step edges. Our analysis has evidenced a correlation between the value of the adjustable parameter that accounts in our model for the specific weight of the secondary peaks in the TWD ({beta}) and the extent of transverse meandering on the vicinal surface.

  18. Faceting diagram for sticky steps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriko Akutsu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Faceting diagrams for the step-faceting zone, the step droplet zone, and the Gruber-Mullins-Pokrovsky-Talapov (GMPT zone for a crystal surface are obtained by using the density matrix renormalization group method to calculate the surface tension. The model based on these calculations is the restricted solid-on-solid (RSOS model with a point-contact-type step-step attraction (p-RSOS model on a square lattice. The point-contact-type step-step attraction represents the energy gain obtained by forming a bonding state with orbital overlap at the meeting point of the neighboring steps. In the step-faceting zone, disconnectedness in the surface tension leads to the formation of a faceted macrostep on a vicinal surface at equilibrium. The disconnectedness in the surface tension also causes the first-order shape transition for the equilibrium shape of a crystal droplet. The lower zone boundary line (ZBL, which separates the step-faceting zone and the step droplet zone, is obtained by the condition γ 1 = lim n → ∞ γ n / n , where γn is the step tension of the n-th merged step. The upper ZBL, which separates the GMPT zone and the step droplet zone, is obtained by the condition Aq,eff = 0 and Bq,eff = 0, where Aq,eff and Bq,eff represent the coefficients for the | q → | 2 term and the | q → | 3 term, respectively, in the | q → | -expanded form of the surface free energy f eff ( q → . Here, q → is the surface gradient relative to the (111 surface. The reason why the vicinal surface inclined in the 〈101〉 direction does not exhibit step-faceting is explained in terms of the one-dimensional spinless quasi-impenetrable attractive bosons at absolute zero.

  19. Prevention of anxiety and depression in the age group of 75 years and over: a randomised controlled trial testing the feasibility and effectiveness of a generic stepped care programme among elderly community residents at high risk of developing anxiety and depression versus usual care [ISRCTN26474556

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Oppen Patricia

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In frail elderly, the effects of depression and anxiety are deep encroaching. Indicated prevention studies, aimed at subjects with subthreshold disorder, have shown that well designed interventions are capable of reducing the incidence of depression and anxiety. In this randomised prevention trial for elderly, living in the community and suffering from subthreshold depression and anxiety, a stepped care programme was put together to be tested versus usual (GP care. Methods/design Design: randomised controlled trial. (See figure 1: organisation chart together with two other projects, this project is part of a national consortium that investigates the prevention of anxiety and depressive disorders in later life using a stepped care programme. The three projects have their own particular focus. This project is aimed at elderly living in the community. Inclusion: subjects with a high risk for depression and anxiety without clinical evidence of these syndromes. The participants are 75 years of age and over and have subthreshold symptoms of depression and or anxiety: they score above the cut-off point on the self-report Centre for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D scale, but the criteria for a major depressive disorder or anxiety disorder (panic disorder, agoraphobia, social phobia, generalized anxiety disorder according to a validated interview, the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI are not fulfilled. Outcomes: primary outcome: incidence of a depressive or anxiety disorder over a period of two years (MINI; secondary outcome: a positive influence of the intervention, a stepped care programme, on symptoms of depression and anxiety and on quality of life as assessed with the CES D, the HADS A and the SF36 respectively (i.e. stabilisation or improvement of symptoms [see table 1]. Measurements: Take place at baseline and at 3, 6, 9, 12, 18 and 24 months. Trained independent evaluators assess depression and

  20. Building Disaster Resilience: Steps toward Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan L. Cutter

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Disaster losses continue to escalate globally and in many regions human losses (death, injury, permanent displacement often exceed the economic toll. Current disaster policies are reactive with a short-term focus―respond and rebuild as quickly as possible and in the same way after the event. Such policies ignore the longer-term approach of building disaster-resilient communities, in which investments made now show financial and social returns later by reducing the impact of disasters. This article provides a vision for resilient nations in 2030 based on three recent policy reports. It highlights the necessary steps to wards achieving sustainability using the lens of disaster resilience as the pathway towards strengthening communities' ability to prepare and plan for, absorb, respond to, and recover from present and future disasters.

  1. Facilitators of recovery for step-up and step-down clients of a sub-acute residential mental health service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kerry A; Rickwood, Debra J

    2016-08-01

    Sub-acute residential mental health services provide care for people who are not acutely unwell but require more support than generally available when living in the community. Little is known about how these services facilitate recovery and whether these facilitators differ for clients entering from the community (step-up) or from inpatient settings (step-down). To identify features of a sub-acute residential service that have assisted step-up and step-down clients in their recovery. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 16 step-up and 21 step-down clients. Interview transcripts were examined using an inductive, semantic content analysis approach. Themes identified included the community context, personal support, the formal program offered and assistance in personal recovery processes, with the level of support for these themes differing for step-up and step-down clients. Step-up and step-down clients have differing needs to be addressed in a sub-acute service. These services can better meet the needs of clients if they are aware of the setting the client has come from and tailor their services accordingly. Step-up clients prefer support in developing social skills and illness management techniques; step-down clients prefer a less structured environment with assistance in living skills and personal processes of recovery.

  2. A community assessment model appropriate for the Iranian community.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kourosh Holakouie Naieni

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Community assessment is one of the core competencies for public health professionals; mainly because it gives them a better understanding of the strengths and drawbacks of their jurisdictions. We planned to recognize an appropriate model that provides a conceptual framework for the Iranian community.This study was conducted in Tehran, during 2009-2010 and consisted of two parts: a review of the literature and qualitative interview with selected experts as well as focus group discussion with health field staff. These steps were done to develop a conceptual framework: planning for a steering committee, forming a working committee, re-viewing community assessment models and projects, preparing the proposed model draft, in-depth interview and focused group discussions with national experts, finalizing the draft, and preparing the final model.Three different models published and applied routinely in different contexts. The 2008 North Carolina Community Assessment model was used as a reference. Ten national and 18 international projects were compared to the reference and one and six projects were completely compatible with this model, respectively.Our final proposed model takes communities through eight steps to complete a collaborative community assessment: form a community assessment team, solicit community participation and gain inter-sectoral collaboration, establish a working committee, empower the community, collect and analyze community's primary and secondary statistics, solicit community input to select health priorities, evaluate the community assessment and develop the community assessment document, an develop the community action plans.

  3. Step-By-Step Professional Development in Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltzer, Sarah T.

    2012-01-01

    Don't train your teachers in instructional technology without reading this resource-packed book from Sarah T. Meltzer. Meltzer presents easy-to-follow guidelines for bringing about effective professional development in technology from start to finish. She takes you step-by-step through the process of planning, implementing, and managing…

  4. Leading Change Step-by-Step: Tactics, Tools, and Tales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiro, Jody

    2010-01-01

    "Leading Change Step-by-Step" offers a comprehensive and tactical guide for change leaders. Spiro's approach has been field-tested for more than a decade and proven effective in a wide variety of public sector organizations including K-12 schools, universities, international agencies and non-profits. The book is filled with proven tactics for…

  5. Preface, Soil Science: A step-by-step analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    This book provides step-by-step procedures for soil professionals, without a lot of background theory. Chapters are targeted toward agricultural and environmental consultants, producers, students, teachers, government, and industry. Applied soil scientists gave input through a survey, which guided t...

  6. Physical modeling of stepped spillways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepped spillways applied to embankment dams are becoming popular for addressing the rehabilitation of aging watershed dams, especially those situated in the urban landscape. Stepped spillways are typically placed over the existing embankment, which provides for minimal disturbance to the original ...

  7. Popularization and application of Three-steps Massage Therapy for treating lumbar disc herniation in communities%三步推拿法治疗腰椎间盘突出症在社区农村的推广应用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾非; 吕强; 刘鲲鹏; 卫明; 郑磊; 胡炳麟; 张超; 黄湧

    2013-01-01

    目的 论证三步推拿法治疗腰椎间盘突出症的临床疗效,同时研究其在社区医疗机构推广应用的价值.方法 采用三级推广模式,选取腰椎间盘突出症患者180例(三甲医院90例、二级医院45例和基层社区卫生服务中心45例),均随机分为三步推拿组、牵引治疗组和传统手法组,分别采用相应的治疗方法,观察比较三家医院各组间的临床疗效及ODI、VAS差异.结果 三组临床总有效率分别为三步推拿组85.00%、牵引治疗组60.00%和传统手法组83.33%,组间临床疗效差异具有统计学意义(P<0.05).三家医疗机构三步推拿组临床疗效比较,差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).结论 三步推拿法治疗腰椎间盘突出症的临床疗效等同于传统推拿手法,且明显优于单一的牵引治疗;其具有简便易掌握的特点,适合在基层医院推广应用.%Objective To further expound and prove the clinical effect of lumbar disc herniation with Three-steps Massage Therapy, and research the value of popularization and application in the community and rural basic medical institutions. Methods The study adopted three popularizing models. 180 cases with herniated lumbar disc were selected, 90 cases from municipal hospital ,45 cases from district hospital and 45 from community health center. The trials were randomly divided into Three-steps Massage Therapy group,traction treatment group and traditional massage therapy group. Compare the clinical efficacy among the three hospitals. ODI( Oswestry disability index) and VAS( visual analogus scale) were used as the observation index sign for quantitative curative effects. Results The total effective rates of Three-steps Massage Therapy group,traction treatment group and traditional massage therapy group were respectively 85. 00% ,60. 00% and 83. 33% , with obvious statistical differences between the three groups {P 0.05). Conclusion Three-steps Massage Therapy is quite effective for lumbar

  8. Leidenfrost Drop on a Step

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagubeau, Guillaume; Le Merrer, Marie; Clanet, Christophe; Quere, David

    2008-11-01

    When deposited on a hot plate, a water droplet evaporates quickly. However, a vapor film appears under the drop above a critical temperature, called Leidenfrost temperature, which insulates the drop from its substrate. Linke & al (2006) reported a spontaneous movement of such a drop, when deposited on a ratchet. We study here the case of a flat substrate decorated with a single micrometric step. The drop is deposited on the lower part of the plate and pushed towards the step at small constant velocity. If the kinetic energy of the drop is sufficient, it can climb up the step. In that case, depending on the substrate temperature, the drop can either be decelerated or accelerated by the step. We try to understand the dynamics of these drops, especially the regime where they accelerate. Taking advantage of this phenomenon, we could then build a multiple-step setup, making it possible for a Leidenfrost drop to climb stairs.

  9. Stepping stones toward global space exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansdell, M.; Ehrenfreund, P.; McKay, C.

    2011-06-01

    Several nations are currently engaging in or planning for robotic and human space exploration programs that target the Moon, Mars and near-Earth asteroids. These ambitious plans to build new space infrastructures, transport systems and space probes will require international cooperation if they are to be sustainable and affordable. Partnerships must involve not only established space powers, but also emerging space nations and developing countries; the participation of these new space actors will provide a bottom-up support structure that will aid program continuity, generate more active members in the space community, and increase public awareness of space activities in both developed and developing countries. The integration of many stakeholders into a global space exploration program represents a crucial element securing political and programmatic stability. How can the evolving space community learn to cooperate on a truly international level while engaging emerging space nations and developing countries in a meaningful way? We propose a stepping stone approach toward a global space exploration program, featuring three major elements: (1) an international Earth-based field research program preparing for planetary exploration, (2) enhanced exploitation of the International Space Station (ISS) enabling exploration and (3) a worldwide CubeSat program supporting exploration. An international Earth-based field research program can serve as a truly global exploration testbed that allows both established and new space actors to gain valuable experience by working together to prepare for future planetary exploration missions. Securing greater exploitation of the ISS is a logical step during its prolonged lifetime; ISS experiments, partnerships and legal frameworks are valuable foundations for exploration beyond low Earth orbit. Cooperation involving small, low-cost missions could be a major stride toward exciting and meaningful participation from emerging space nations

  10. Luminosity progression in dart-stepped leader step formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, D.; Takagi, N.; Uman, M. A.; Jordan, D. M.

    2016-12-01

    Using a high-speed optical imaging system, we have observed the step formation bright pulse discharges occurring at the tip of dart-stepped leaders of rocket triggered lightning with a time resolution of 0.1 µs and a spatial resolution of about 1.4 m. Each of the step formation pulse discharges appeared to initiate at a location immediately below the bottom of its previous pulse discharge and to propagate in bidirectional (upward and downward) waves with a speed on the order of 107 m/s. The downward waves of the pulse discharges tended to slow down significantly after they propagated a distance of about 2 m. Based on the results observed in this study and those published in literatures, we propose a conceptual view of leader step formation.

  11. Adsorption-induced step formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thostrup, P.; Christoffersen, Ebbe; Lorensen, Henrik Qvist

    2001-01-01

    Through an interplay between density functional calculations, Monte Carlo simulations and scanning tunneling microscopy experiments, we show that an intermediate coverage of CO on the Pt(110) surface gives rise to a new rough equilibrium structure with more than 50% step atoms. CO is shown to bin...... so strongly to low-coordinated Pt atoms that it can break Pt-Pt bonds and spontaneously form steps on the surface. It is argued that adsorption-induced step formation may be a general effect, in particular at high gas pressures and temperatures....

  12. Two-Step Electroweak Baryogenesis

    CERN Document Server

    Inoue, Satoru; Ramsey-Musolf, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    We analyze electroweak baryogenesis during a two-step electroweak symmetry breaking transition, wherein the baryon asymmetry is generated during the first step and preserved during the second. Focusing on the dynamics of CP-violation required for asymmetry generation, we discuss general considerations for successful two-step baryogenesis. Using a concrete model realization, we illustrate in detail the viability of this scenario and the implications for present and future electric dipole moment (EDM) searches. We find that CP-violation associated with a partially excluded sector may yield the observed baryon asymmetry while evading present and future EDM constraints.

  13. Learning process for creating community identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratanakosol Kulthida

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Creating community identity needs a learning process to assist community to identify, recognize, build acceptance and cultivate awareness in identity. The purpose of this study was to develop the draft of a learning process to create community identity. The study employed a qualitative research method through literature review. The result shows that the community learning process must empower all parties concerned and empowerment should be based on the social capital of the community. A draft of the learning process involved in the creation of community identity includes four main steps: i plan consists of target community selection, community identity vision creation and operational planning for creation of community identity, ii action consists of community survey, social capital analysis, community identity identification, creating and operating activities to supplement community identity, and setting development goals and actions based on community identity, iii practical observation, iv reflection consists of evaluation and reflection, and public presentation.

  14. 7 Steps to Aging Well

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issue Past Issues Special Section 7 Steps to Aging Well Past Issues / Winter 2007 Table of Contents ... Exercise: A Guide from the National Institute on Aging is a publication from NIA that has strength, ...

  15. Vortex scattering by step topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinds, A. K.; Johnson, E. R.; McDonald, N. R.

    The scattering at a rectilinear step change in depth of a shallow-water vortex pair consisting of two patches of equal but opposite-signed vorticity is studied. Using the constants of motion, an explicit relationship is derived relating the angle of incidence to the refracted angle after crossing. A pair colliding with a step from deep water crosses the escarpment and subsequently propagates in shallow water refracted towards the normal to the escarpment. A pair colliding with a step from shallow water either crosses and propagates in deep water refracted away from the normal or, does not cross the step and is instead totally internally reflected by the escarpment. For large depth changes, numerical computations show that the coherence of the vortex pair is lost on encountering the escarpment.

  16. Community Psychiatric Rehabilitation in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Amihay; Neumann, Micha

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the development of community-based rehabilitation services for persons with mental illness in Israel. It focuses on occupational, social, and residential community psychiatric rehabilitation services. The paper argues that service development has been slow and out of step with the philosophy and objectives of community…

  17. Consumerism and the Community College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, George B.

    1977-01-01

    Emphasis on consumerism in higher education as manifest through new federal rules and regulations and the tightening of existing ones is a source of new pressure for the community college. Consumerism provides a focal point around which reforms can take place; appropriate steps can be taken by community colleges to interact positively with this…

  18. Building communities in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriessen, B

    1996-03-01

    In Ghana, 11 communities are participating in a Community Management Program (CMP) sponsored by the UN Centre for Human Settlements/Danida and jointly implemented with the Ministry of Local Government and Rural Development. The main goal of the program is to reduce poverty by strengthening district- and community-level capacity to improve living and working conditions in low-income settlements. Currently, the CMP is operating training programs in 1) community participation and management, 2) technical skills, 3) income generation and business management, and 4) family life and health education. The community participation and management training includes strategies for problem-solving, identifying the steps of participatory planning, and negotiating project funding. Technical assistance is also given during project implementation. Technical skills training in carpentry, masonry, and painting allows selected community members to assist in the construction and maintenance of a community facility as part of their training. Income generation and business management training is offered to women organized in solidarity groups. Family life and health education involves training community mobilizers in family planning, oral rehydration, child health, and environmental health. The training materials developed for each program will soon be incorporated in the curriculum of a new Local Government Training Institute. The CMP has already sparked a range of related initiatives and has built the capacity for local communities to demand involvement in planning of initiatives that will affect their lives.

  19. Preimages for Step-Reduced SHA-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aoki, Kazumaro; Guo, Jian; Matusiewicz, Krystian;

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present preimage attacks on up to 43-step SHA-256 (around 67% of the total 64 steps) and 46-step SHA-512 (around 57.5% of the total 80 steps), which significantly increases the number of attacked steps compared to the best previously published preimage attack working for 24 step...

  20. Transoral Robotic Surgery: Step-by-Step Radical Tonsillectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Granell

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Transoral robotic surgery (TORS radical tonsillectomy is an emerging minimally invasive surgical procedure for the treatment of cancer of the tonsil. The detailed surgical technique and claims for its reproducibility have been previously published. Case Presentation. We present a patient with a T2N2bM0 epidermoid carcinoma of the tonsil to illustrate step by step the surgical procedure for TORS radical tonsillectomy. Neck dissection and TORS were staged. No surgical reconstruction of the defect was required. No tracheostomy was necessary. The patient could eat without any feeding tube and was on full oral diet on the fifth postoperative day. Discussion. The transoral approach offers the benefits of minimally invasive surgery to patients with cancer of the tonsil. The excellent exposure and high precision provided by robotic instrumentation allow the surgeon to closely follow and accomplish the surgical steps, which is the best warranty for safety and effectiveness.

  1. Microsoft Office SharePoint Designer 2007 Step by Step

    CERN Document Server

    Coventry, Penelope

    2008-01-01

    The smart way to learn Office SharePoint Designer 2007-one step at a time! Work at your own pace through the easy numbered steps, practice files on CD, helpful hints, and troubleshooting tips to master the fundamentals of building customized SharePoint sites and applications. You'll learn how to work with Windows® SharePoint Services 3.0 and Office SharePoint Server 2007 to create Web pages complete with Cascading Style Sheets, Lists, Libraries, and customized Web parts. Then, make your site really work for you by adding data sources, including databases, XML data and Web services, and RSS fe

  2. A step-by-step methodology for enterprise interoperability projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmeta, Ricardo; Pazos, Verónica

    2015-05-01

    Enterprise interoperability is one of the key factors for enhancing enterprise competitiveness. Achieving enterprise interoperability is an extremely complex process which involves different technological, human and organisational elements. In this paper we present a framework to help enterprise interoperability. The framework has been developed taking into account the three domains of interoperability: Enterprise Modelling, Architecture and Platform and Ontologies. The main novelty of the framework in comparison to existing ones is that it includes a step-by-step methodology that explains how to carry out an enterprise interoperability project taking into account different interoperability views, like business, process, human resources, technology, knowledge and semantics.

  3. Information marketing business entrepreneur's step-by-step startup guide

    CERN Document Server

    magazine, Entrepreneur

    2012-01-01

    A six-figure income from information? Yes! It sounds easy because it is. You've got information that millions of others are looking for and now you can learn how to package, price and sell it.The experts at Entrepreneur take you step by step, jumpstarting your thinking about your area of expertise and showing you how to convert it into a high-demand information product. Following the example set by today's most successful information marketers, you learn the ins and outs of running your own information marketing business using proven strategies and effective marketing techniques.

  4. Writing a Simulation Scenario: A Step-By-Step Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bambini, Deborah

    2016-02-01

    Simulation is becoming a widely used method of helping nurses learn and maintain competency in the clinical area for both staff educators in clinical settings and nursing faculty in academic settings. Designing an effective simulation experience requires thoughtful planning, knowledge of educational principles, and knowledge of best practices in both simulation and clinical practice. An evidence-based strategy for writing a simulation scenario for nurses and other health care providers in any setting is described. A step-by-step process is outlined that incorporates best practices. Examples and suggestions are provided to help readers create quality simulation experiences.

  5. Microsoft Windows Sharepoint Services 3.0 Step by Step

    CERN Document Server

    Londer, Olga; Bleeker, Todd; Coventry, Penelope

    2007-01-01

    Experience learning made easy-and quickly teach yourself how to use Windows SharePoint Services to enable effective team collaboration. With Step By Step, you set the pace-building and practicing the skills you need, just when you need them! Build your own SharePoint site with easy-to-use templatesCreate lists and libraries to store informationAdd discussion boards, wikis, and blogsSet up Document and Meeting Workspaces for easy collaborationShare calendars, contacts, and data from Microsoft Office programsCustomize your pages with Web Parts Your all-in-one learning experience includes: Fi

  6. Microsoft® Office Access™ 2007 Step by Step

    CERN Document Server

    Lambert, Steve; Lambert, Joan

    2009-01-01

    Experience learning made easy-and quickly teach yourself how to build database solutions with Access 2007. With Step By Step, you set the pace-building and practicing the skills you need, just when you need them! Build databases from scratch or from templatesExchange data with other databases and Office documentsCreate forms to simplify data entryUse filters and queries to find and analyze informationDesign rich reports that help make your data meaningfulHelp prevent data corruption and unauthorized access Your all-in-one learning experience includes: Files for building skills and practic

  7. Partial Return Yoke for MICE Step IV and Final Step

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witte, Holger [Brookhaven; Plate, Stephen [Brookhaven; Berg, J.Scott [Brookhaven; Tarrant, Jason [Rutherford; Bross, Alan [Fermilab

    2015-06-01

    This paper reports on the progress of the design and construction of a retro-fitted return yoke for the international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE). MICE is a proof-of-principle experiment aiming to demonstrate ionization cooling experimentally. In earlier studies we outlined how a partial return yoke can be used to mitigate stray magnetic field in the experimental hall; we report on the progress of the construction of the partial return yoke for MICE Step IV. We also discuss an extension of the Partial Return Yoke for the final step of MICE; we show simulation results of the expected performance.

  8. Partial return yoke for MICE step IV and final step

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witte, H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Plate, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Berg, J. S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Tarrant, J. [Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC), Oxford (United Kingdom). Rutherford Appleton Lab. (RAL); Bross, A. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-05-03

    This paper reports on the progress of the design and construction of a retro-fitted return yoke for the international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE). MICE is a proof-of-principle experiment aiming to demonstrate ionization cooling experimentally. In earlier studies we outlined how a partial return yoke can be used to mitigate stray magnetic field in the experimental hall; we report on the progress of the construction of the partial return yoke for MICE Step IV. We also discuss an extension of the Partial Return Yoke for the final step of MICE; we show simulation results of the expected performance.

  9. 行为认知六步法应用于社区人群牙周病防治相关研究%The related research about cognitive behavioral six-step method applied in periodontal disease prevention of community people

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈翠婷; 邹菡; 肖峰; 孙文娟; 吴坚

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the effect of cognitive behavioral six-step method on the improvement of the oral health behavior and the periodontal disease control of community people . Methods Fifty people selected form community population with CPI code 3 were randomly assigned into the intervention and control groups . People in the intervention group were received six-step behavioral cognitive intervention , while people in the control group were given traditional oral hygiene instruction. Periodontal changes including plaque index (PI), sulcus bleeding index (SBI) and probing depth (PD) as well as the scores of task-specific self-efficacy scale for self-care (SESS) were evaluated respectively at three observation points (before intervention as the baseline, 1 month and 3 months after intervention). Results The scores of PI, SBI and brushing self-efficacy at 1 month and 3 months were improved significantly after intervention for both groups , and the intervention group demonstrated significantly greater outcomes compared with the control group (PI: 1 month, t=-8.73, P=0.001;3 months, t=-7.88, P=0.001;SBI: 1 month, t=-7.71, P=0.001; 3 months, t=-5.00, P=0.001;brushing self-efficacy: 1 month, t=10.36, P=0.001; 3 months, t=10.27, P=0.001). However, no significant difference in PD was shown between intervention and control groups at all three observation points (1 month, t=-1.87, P=0.068; 3 months, t=-1.26, P=0.094). Conclusion Comparing with the traditional oral hygiene education , cognitive behavioral six-step method demonstrates a superior promoting in the oral health behavior and periodontal disease prevention of community population .%目的:研究行为认知六步法(cognitive behavioral six-step method)是否更有利于促进社区人群口腔保健行为的改善,从而更有利于社区人群牙周病的防治。方法于2014年3月随机抽样获取广州天河石牌社区人群中社区牙周指数(CPI)符合3区段的50人,随机分配进入

  10. Writing the Winning Dissertation: A Step-By-Step Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glatthorn, Allan A.

    This book is a practical guide to researching and writing the doctoral dissertation or master's thesis. Part 1 offers seven chapters on preparatory steps: laying the groundwork for the thesis and dissertation; finding a research problem; conducting a focused review of the literature; making a preliminary choice of methodology; organizing and…

  11. Publishing Ethical Research: A Step-by-Step Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wester, Kelly L.

    2011-01-01

    To publish ethical research, one must conduct research responsibly, making ethical choices from the inception of the research idea and throughout the research process. Conducting and publishing ethical research is important because of the impact the results will have on the counseling profession. Steps to consider are discussed.

  12. A Step-by-Step Guide to Personalize Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Barbara; McClaskey, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    It is known that every learner is unique and that one-size-fits-all instruction does not work for most. How can a classroom environment be created that gives each learner voice and choice? The co-founders of Personalize Learning, LLC, offer a detailed six-step approach. This article provides the background on what is and what is not Personalized…

  13. Shapiro step at nonequilibrium conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukrinov, Yu. M.; Nashaat, M.; Kulikov, K. V.; Dawood, R.; El Samman, H.; El Sherbini, Th. M.

    2016-07-01

    Detailed numerical simulations of intrinsic Josephson junctions of high-temperature superconductors under external electromagnetic radiation are performed taking into account a charge imbalance effect. We demonstrate that the charge imbalance is responsible for a slope in the Shapiro step in the IV-characteristic. The value of slope increases with a nonequilibrium parameter. Coupling between junctions leads to the distribution of the slope's values along the stack. The nonperiodic boundary conditions shift the Shapiro step from the canonical position determined by Vss=\\hbar f /(2e) , where f is a frequency of external radiation. This fact makes the interpretation of the experimentally found Shapiro step shift by the charge imbalance effect ambiguous.

  14. Convex Optimization without Projection Steps

    CERN Document Server

    Jaggi, Martin

    2011-01-01

    We study the general problem of minimizing a convex function over a compact convex domain. We will investigate a simple iterative approximation algorithm that does not need projection steps in order to stay inside the optimization domain. Instead of a projection step, the linearized problem defined by a current subgradient is solved, which gives a step direction that will naturally stay in the domain. The approach generalizes the sparse greedy algorithm of Clarkson (and the low-rank SDP solver by Hazan) to arbitrary convex domains, and to using subgradients for the case of non-differentiable convex functions. Analogously, we give a convergence proof guaranteeing {\\epsilon}-small duality gap after O(1/{\\epsilon}) iterations. The framework allows us understand the sparsity of approximate solutions for any l1-regularized convex optimization problem, expressed as a function of the approximation quality. We obtain matching upper and lower bounds of {\\Theta}(1/{\\epsilon}) for the sparsity for l1-problems. The same ...

  15. Piezoelectric step-motion actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentesana; Charles P.

    2006-10-10

    A step-motion actuator using piezoelectric material to launch a flight mass which, in turn, actuates a drive pawl to progressively engage and drive a toothed wheel or rod to accomplish stepped motion. Thus, the piezoelectric material converts electrical energy into kinetic energy of the mass, and the drive pawl and toothed wheel or rod convert the kinetic energy of the mass into the desired rotary or linear stepped motion. A compression frame may be secured about the piezoelectric element and adapted to pre-compress the piezoelectric material so as to reduce tensile loads thereon. A return spring may be used to return the mass to its resting position against the compression frame or piezoelectric material following launch. Alternative embodiment are possible, including an alternative first embodiment wherein two masses are launched in substantially different directions, and an alternative second embodiment wherein the mass is eliminated in favor of the piezoelectric material launching itself.

  16. Step-by-step phacoemulsification training program for ophthalmology residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yulan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The aim was to analyze the learning curve of phacoemulsification (phaco performed by residents without experience in performing extra-capsular cataract extraction (ECCE in a step-by-step training program (SBSTP. Materials and Methods: Consecutive surgical records of phaco performed from March 2009 to Sept 2011 by four residents without previous ECCE experience were retrospectively reviewed. The completion rate of the first 30 procedures by each resident was calculated. The main intraoperative phaco parameter records for the first 30 surgeries by each resident were compared with those for their last 30 surgeries. Intraoperative complications in the residents′ procedures were also recorded and analyzed. Results: A total of 1013 surgeries were performed by residents. The completion rate for the first 30 phaco procedures was 79.2 μ 5.8%. The main reasons for halting the procedure were as follows: Anterior capsule tear, inability to crack the nucleus, and posterior capsular rupture during phaco or cortex removal. Cumulative dissipated energy of phaco power used during the surgeries was significantly less in the last 30 cases compared with the first 30 cases (30.10 μ 17.58 vs. 55.41 μ 37.59, P = 0.021. Posterior capsular rupture rate was 2.5 μ 1.2% in total (10.8 μ 4.2% in the first 30 cases and 1.7 μ 1.9% in the last 30 cases, P = 0.008; a statistically significant difference. Conclusion:The step-by-step training program might be a necessary process for a resident to transit from dependence to a self-supported operator. It is also an essential middle step between wet lab training to performing the entire phaco procedure on the patient both effectively and safely.

  17. Distributed Stepping Motor Control System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The beam diagnostic devices used at RIBLL are driven by stepper motors, which are controlled by I/O modules based on ISA-bus in an industrial computer. The disadvantages of such mode are that a large number of long cables are used and one computer to control is unsafe. We have developed a distributed stepping motor control system for the remote, local and centralized control of the stepping motors. RS-485 bus is used for the connection between the remote control unit and the local control units. The con...

  18. A Step-by-Step Study of Formative Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietsch, Laura

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a guide to the development of formative assessments for school librarians participating in professional learning communities (PLC). It describes librarians' reading of assigned books, meeting with their PLCs, and incorporation of learned strategies in their daily instruction. Central library service readers' regular visits to…

  19. Developing a sense of virtual community measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Anita L

    2007-12-01

    Sense of virtual community is an important feature of virtual communities. This study develops a sense of virtual community (SOVC) measure, building off the strengths of a widely used measure of sense of community (SOC) for face-to-face communities. Although there is overlap between the senses of community for face-to-face and virtual communities, there are significant differences. The new SOVC measure is compared to the SOC measure on 265 members of seven online groups, explaining at least 7% more of the variance from exchanging support and member identification. This study represents an important step in developing a valid measure of SOCV.

  20. Bridging the Cultural Gap: Ten Steps toward a More Multicultural Youth Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosto, Denise E.

    2001-01-01

    Presents ten steps toward a more multicultural youth library to help bridge cultural and linguistic gaps in public and school libraries. Topics include mission statements; physical environment; collection diversity; collaboration; bilingual materials; multicultural materials; community involvement; and appreciating diversity. (LRW)

  1. Practical design of stepped columns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Girao Coelho, A.M.; Simao, P.D.; Bijlaard, F.S.K.

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with buckling aspects of the design of stepped columns in heavy mill buildings. In these structures, columns have to carry significant axial loads that usually act eccentrically and strength reducing bending moments due to lateral loads. A simple physical model for buckling behaviou

  2. Step sites in syngas catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostrup-Nielsen, J.; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2006-01-01

    Step sites play an important role in many catalytic reactions. This paper reviews recent results on metal catalysts for syngas reactions with emphasis on steam reforming. Modern characterization techniques (STEM, HREM...) and theoretical calculations (DFT) has allowed a more quantitative explanat...

  3. Pride Is the First Step

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rourke, James; Boone, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    When visitors step inside Pocomoke (MD) Middle School, they are immediately surrounded by a profound sense of pride and high expectations. Students are actively engaged in instruction, the classroom walls are covered with student work, and the halls are lined with pictures of students demonstrating success. Beanbag chairs await eager readers,…

  4. Dissecting a complex neurosurgical illustration: step-by-step development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suk, Ian

    2011-12-01

    Modern computer graphics software has enabled the medical illustrator to render very complex anatomy by composing many different layers of drawings simultaneously. This and the author's capacity to take an "editorial" approach to compress several chronological events into a single, comprehensive two-dimensional illustration are analyzed in a step-by-step process. Through a series of images, the article provides a visual synopsis of the development of an illustration for an extensive clinical case: total sacrectomy performed through an all-posterior approach. Originally given as a slide presentation at the American Association of Neurological Surgeons Theodore Kurze Lecture in April 2011, the article provides some detailed notes on the techniques the author used to develop a comprehensive neurosurgical illustration.

  5. Step-by-step Organization of a University CLIL Course

    OpenAIRE

    Cignoni, Laura (ILC-CNR); Fornaciari, Antonio; Coschino, Francesco; Fornaciari, Gino

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on the organization of CLIL (Content and Language Integrated Learning) University courses in funerary archaeology held at the Division of Palaeopathology of Pisa University. We outline the different steps involved in the practical implementation of the proposed approach, which include choice of topic, linguistic content, tasks and strategies, and we describe the ways in which CLIL can be used both in the classroom and in archaeological fieldwork excavations for teaching of ...

  6. Undertaking a literature review: a step-by-step approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, Patricia; Ryan, Frances; Coughlan, Michael

    Nowadays, most nurses, pre- and post-qualification, will be required to undertake a literature review at some point, either as part of a course of study, as a key step in the research process, or as part of clinical practice development or policy. For student nurses and novice researchers it is often seen as a difficult undertaking. It demands a complex range of skills, such as learning how to define topics for exploration, acquiring skills of literature searching and retrieval, developing the ability to analyse and synthesize data as well as becoming adept at writing and reporting, often within a limited time scale. The purpose of this article is to present a step-by-step guide to facilitate understanding by presenting the critical elements of the literature review process. While reference is made to different types of literature reviews, the focus is on the traditional or narrative review that is undertaken, usually either as an academic assignment or part of the research process.

  7. Salsa Steps toward Intercultural Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMains, Juliet

    2016-01-01

    Arguably the world's most popular partnered social dance form, salsa attracts devotees far beyond the Latino communities in which this pungent "sauce" was brewed. The cross-cultural appeal of salsa, which celebrates its mixed origins in the Caribbean and Spanish Harlem, makes it a prime candidate for inclusion in university dance…

  8. Two-Dimensional Speckle Tracking of the Fetal Heart: A Practical Step-by-Step Approach for the Fetal Sonologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVore, Greggory R; Polanco, Bardo; Satou, Gary; Sklansky, Mark

    2016-08-01

    Various approaches to 2-dimensional speckle tracking have been used to evaluate left ventricular function and deformation in the fetus, child, and adult. In 2015, because of differences in imaging devices and analytical programs, the cardiology community published a consensus document proposing standards for pediatric/adult deformation imaging using 2-dimensional speckle tracking. The understanding and application of deformation imaging in the fetus have been limited by a lack of uniform software, terminology, techniques, and display. This article provides a practical, step-by-step approach for deformation analysis of the fetal heart using offline software that is independent of specific ultrasound vendors.

  9. The TAOS/STEP Satellite

    OpenAIRE

    Edwards, David; Hosken, Robert

    1995-01-01

    The Technology for Autonomous Operational Survivability / Space Test Experiments Platform (TAOS/STEP) satellite was launched on a Taurus booster from Vandenberg Air Force Base into a nearly circular, 105 degree inclined orbit on March 13, 1994. The purpose of this satellite is twofold: 1) to test a new concept in multiple procurements of fast-track modular satellites and 2) to test a suite of Air Force Phillips Laboratory payloads in space. The TAOS payloads include the Microcosm Autonomous N...

  10. First Steps for New Government

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The formation of a unity government brings hopes of peace and stability to war-torn Iraq, though violence continues Thirty-eight months after the war on Iraq began, and after five months of wrangling over cabinet posts, a new national government led by Nuri al-Maliki was sworn in, marking a great step in the country's post-war reconstruction but one on a road that appears to be growing ever longer and rockier.

  11. Blogging business step-by-step startup guide

    CERN Document Server

    magazine, Entrepreneur

    2014-01-01

    This kit includes: Essential industry and business-specific startup steps with worksheets, calculators, checklists and more. Entrepreneur Editors' Start Your Own Business, a guide to starting any business and surviving the first three years. Downloadable, customizable business letters, sales letters, and other sample documents. Entrepreneur's Small Business Legal Toolkit. Blogs are still one of the internet's fastest-growing phenomena–and one of the best and easiest ways to make money online. Packed with the latest blog tools, tricks, and up-and-coming trends, this fully revised edition teache

  12. Short-term time step convergence in a climate model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Hui; Rasch, Philip J; Taylor, Mark A; Jablonowski, Christiane

    2015-03-01

    This paper evaluates the numerical convergence of very short (1 h) simulations carried out with a spectral-element (SE) configuration of the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5). While the horizontal grid spacing is fixed at approximately 110 km, the process-coupling time step is varied between 1800 and 1 s to reveal the convergence rate with respect to the temporal resolution. Special attention is paid to the behavior of the parameterized subgrid-scale physics. First, a dynamical core test with reduced dynamics time steps is presented. The results demonstrate that the experimental setup is able to correctly assess the convergence rate of the discrete solutions to the adiabatic equations of atmospheric motion. Second, results from full-physics CAM5 simulations with reduced physics and dynamics time steps are discussed. It is shown that the convergence rate is 0.4-considerably slower than the expected rate of 1.0. Sensitivity experiments indicate that, among the various subgrid-scale physical parameterizations, the stratiform cloud schemes are associated with the largest time-stepping errors, and are the primary cause of slow time step convergence. While the details of our findings are model specific, the general test procedure is applicable to any atmospheric general circulation model. The need for more accurate numerical treatments of physical parameterizations, especially the representation of stratiform clouds, is likely common in many models. The suggested test technique can help quantify the time-stepping errors and identify the related model sensitivities.

  13. Carbohydrates Through Animation: Preliminary Step

    OpenAIRE

    J.K. Sugai; M.S.R. Figueiredo; ANTÔNIO, R. V.; P. M. Oliveira; V.A Cardoso; Ricardo, J.; Merino, E.; L.F Figueiredo; D.N. Heidrich

    2004-01-01

    Methods of education are changing, so the educational tools must change too. The developmentof the systems of information and communication gave the opportunity to bring new technology tothe learning process. Modern education needs interactive programs that may be available to theacademic community, in order to ease the learning process and sharing of the knowledge. Then,an educational software on Carbohydrates is being developed using concept maps and FLASH-MXanimations program, and approach...

  14. Acta Clinica Croatica: progress of a journal step by step.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramljak, Gordana

    2014-03-01

    The journal Acta Clinica Croatica (ACC) was founded in 1962 under the title Anali Bolnice Dr. M. Stojanović. In 1995, the title of the journal was changed into its present form and ever since all papers have been published in English. In 2000, the electronic (online) edition of the ACC was released in addition to the print version. The paper presents development of the journal from 1962 to 2012 based on the analysis of the following SCOPUS citation index parameters: type and number of documents published in the journal; number of citations; and number of domestic and foreign authors. The studied period was analyzed in three time segments: the period from 1995 to 1999, the period from 2000 to 2006 and the period from 2007 to 2012. The same parameters were analyzed in the Web of Science/SCI-Expanded bibliographic and citation index for the 2007-2012 period. The increasing number of documents, authors (both domestic and foreign) and citations demonstrates gradual rise in the quality, visibility and impact of the journal. The fifty years of experience show that a goal, at first very distant and almost unachievable, may be reached by progressing step by step.

  15. Steps Towards an Evolutionary Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Tiezzi, E

    2006-01-01

    If thermodynamics is to physics as logic is to philosophy, recent theoretical advancements lend new coherence to the marvel and dynamism of life on Earth. Enzo Tiezzi's "Steps Towards an Evolutionary Physics" is a primer and guide, to those who would to stand on the shoulders of giants to attain this view: Heisenberg, Planck, Bateson, Varela, and Prigogine as well as notable contemporary scientists. The adventure of such a free and enquiring spirit thrives not so much on answers as on new questions. The book offers a new gestalt on the uncertainty principle and concept of probability. A wide r

  16. 48 CFR 52.214-25 - Step Two of Two-Step Sealed Bidding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Step Two of Two-Step... Clauses 52.214-25 Step Two of Two-Step Sealed Bidding. As prescribed in 14.201-6(t), insert the following provision: Step Two of Two-Step Sealed Bidding (APR 1985) (a) This invitation for bids is issued to...

  17. Hydraulic Design of Stepped Spillways Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepped chutes and spillways are commonly used for routing discharges during flood events. In addition, stepped chutes are used for overtopping protection of earthen embankments. Stepped spillways provide significant energy dissipation due to its stepped feature; as a result, the stilling basin as...

  18. Steps in Researching the Music in Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Lars Ole

    2007-01-01

    The chapter introduces a generic flowchart + step-by-step guide for microanalysis of music (compositions and improvisations) in music therapy.......The chapter introduces a generic flowchart + step-by-step guide for microanalysis of music (compositions and improvisations) in music therapy....

  19. Designing for Communities

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2011-01-01

    In 2008, Mark Boulton's small design firm won the project to redesign drupal.org home to the Drupal open source content management project and its community of over 400,000 users and developers. Designing for open source communities has its challenges: it is a developer-centric environment where discussion, debate and consensus rules and where design processes are often viewed sceptically. To help dispel some misconceptions behind the design process, Mark's team worked completely openly with the Drupal community - and broader the web design community - throughout the project. This talk will walk through some of the challenges and solutions for designing for large communities. Mark will share the successes - and the horror stories - of how a traditional design process was challenged every step of the way and how the Drupal community became an integral part of that new process. Mark and his team will be working with the Communication Group on an open project to r...

  20. Community psykologi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berliner, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Kapitlet giver en intriduktion til community psykologien ud fra teori og ud fra forfatterens egen forskning......Kapitlet giver en intriduktion til community psykologien ud fra teori og ud fra forfatterens egen forskning...

  1. Staircase Structure of Shapiro Steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukrinov, Yu. M.; Rahmonov, I. R.; Nashaat, M.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate IV-characteristics of coupled Josephson junctions which model the intrinsic Josephson junctions in high temperature superconductors under external electromagnetic radiation. A staircase structure of Shapiro steps is found in the branching region. Its origin is related to the coupling between junctions and their switching from rotating to oscillating states. This conclusion is tested by detailed analysis of the IV-characteristics as for total stack and for each junction in the stack. IV-curves of junctions in the stack are compared with the average of time derivative of phase difference. Experimental observation of this staircase structure would give us a proof of coupling between junctions and a way for precise measurement of its value. Such investigations would be also useful for a diagnostic of Josephson junctions in the stack.

  2. Moral transhumanism: the next step.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennison, Michael N

    2012-08-01

    Although transhumanism offers hope for the transcendence of human biological limitations, it generates many intrinsic and consequential ethical concerns. The latter include issues such as the exacerbation of social inequalities and the exponentially increasing technological capacity to cause harm. To mitigate these risks, many thinkers have initiated investigations into the possibility of moral enhancement that could limit the power disparities facilitated by biotechnological enhancement. The arguments often focus on whether moral enhancement is morally permissible, or even obligatory, and remain largely in the realm of the hypothetical. This paper proposes that psilocybin may represent a viable, practical option for moral enhancement and that its further research in the context of moral psychology could comprise the next step in the development of moral transhumanism.

  3. Brand Community.

    OpenAIRE

    Muniz, Albert M, Jr; O'Guinn, Thomas C

    2001-01-01

    This article introduces the idea of brand community. A brand community is a specialized, non-geographically bound community, based on a structured set of social relations among admirers of a brand. Grounded in both classic and contemporary sociology and consumer behavior, this article uses ethnographic and computer mediated environment data to explore the characteristics, processes, and particularities of three brand communities (those centered on Ford Bronco, Macintosh, and Saab). These bran...

  4. Topographic ERP analyses: a step-by-step tutorial review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Micah M; Brunet, Denis; Michel, Christoph M

    2008-06-01

    In this tutorial review, we detail both the rationale for as well as the implementation of a set of analyses of surface-recorded event-related potentials (ERPs) that uses the reference-free spatial (i.e. topographic) information available from high-density electrode montages to render statistical information concerning modulations in response strength, latency, and topography both between and within experimental conditions. In these and other ways these topographic analysis methods allow the experimenter to glean additional information and neurophysiologic interpretability beyond what is available from canonical waveform analyses. In this tutorial we present the example of somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) in response to stimulation of each hand to illustrate these points. For each step of these analyses, we provide the reader with both a conceptual and mathematical description of how the analysis is carried out, what it yields, and how to interpret its statistical outcome. We show that these topographic analysis methods are intuitive and easy-to-use approaches that can remove much of the guesswork often confronting ERP researchers and also assist in identifying the information contained within high-density ERP datasets.

  5. Critical flux determination by flux-stepping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beier, Søren; Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil

    2010-01-01

    In membrane filtration related scientific literature, often step-by-step determined critical fluxes are reported. Using a dynamic microfiltration device, it is shown that critical fluxes determined from two different flux-stepping methods are dependent upon operational parameters such as step......, such values are more or less useless in itself as critical flux predictors, and constant flux verification experiments have to be conducted to check if the determined critical fluxes call predict sustainable flux regimes. However, it is shown that using the step-by-step predicted critical fluxes as start...

  6. The one step fermionic ladder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Joy Prakash; Setlur, Girish S.

    2017-10-01

    The one step fermionic ladder refers to two parallel Luttinger Liquids (poles of the ladder) placed such that there is a finite probability of electrons hopping between the two poles at a pair of opposing points along each of the poles. The many-body Green function for such a system is calculated in presence of forward scattering interactions using the powerful non-chiral bosonization technique (NCBT). This technique is based on a non-standard harmonic analysis of the rapidly varying parts of the density fields appropriate for the study of strongly inhomogeneous ladder systems. The closed analytical expression for the correlation function obtained from NCBT is nothing but the series involving the RPA (Random Phase Approximation) diagrams in powers of the forward scattering coupling strength resummed to include only the most singular terms with the source of inhomogeneities treated exactly. Finally the correlation functions are used to study physical phenomena such as Friedel oscillations and the conductance of such systems with the potential difference applied across various ends.

  7. Terrace-width distributions of touching steps: Modification of the fermion analogy with implications for measuring step-step interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathiyanarayanan, Rajesh; Hamouda, Ajmi Bh.; Einstein, T. L.

    2009-10-01

    Using Monte Carlo simulations, we compute the terrace-width distributions (TWDs) of surfaces in which steps can touch each other, forming multiple-atomic height steps, but cannot cross (no overhangs), and so inconsistent with the standard mapping to spinless fermions. Our results show that the generalized Wigner distribution with minor modifications at small step separations, gives a very good fit for TWDs of touching steps. The interaction strength derived from the fit parameter (ϱ) indicates an effective attraction between steps. The strength of this effective attraction decreases for larger mean-step separations and decreasing step-touching energies; describable via finite-size scaling. Hence, accurate extraction of the true repulsion strength requires multiple vicinalities.

  8. 7 CFR 65.230 - Production step.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Production step. 65.230 Section 65.230 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards..., PEANUTS, AND GINSENG General Provisions Definitions § 65.230 Production step. Production step means, in...

  9. Step-Wise Migration : Evidence from Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pardede, Elda; McCann, Philip; Venhorst, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to study multiple internal migration trajectories in Indonesia, with special attention to step-wise migration. Step-wise migration involves moves with smaller steps from village to nearby small town, to larger town, and then to big cities rather than a direct move from

  10. Ten Steps to Making Evaluation Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, Sanjeev; Nakaima, April

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes ten steps to make evaluations matter. The ten steps are a combination of the usual recommended practice such as developing program theory and implementing rigorous evaluation designs with a stronger focus on more unconventional steps including developing learning frameworks, exploring pathways of evaluation influence, and…

  11. Step-Wise Migration : Evidence from Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pardede, Elda; McCann, Philip; Venhorst, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to study multiple internal migration trajectories in Indonesia, with special attention to step-wise migration. Step-wise migration involves moves with smaller steps from village to nearby small town, to larger town, and then to big cities rather than a direct move from

  12. Carbohydrates Through Animation: Preliminary Step

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.K. Sugai

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Methods of education are changing, so the educational tools must change too. The developmentof the systems of information and communication gave the opportunity to bring new technology tothe learning process. Modern education needs interactive programs that may be available to theacademic community, in order to ease the learning process and sharing of the knowledge. Then,an educational software on Carbohydrates is being developed using concept maps and FLASH-MXanimations program, and approached through six modules. The introduction of Carbohydrates wasmade by the module Carbohydrates on Nature, which shows the animations gures of a teacher andstudents, visiting a farm, identifying the carbohydrates found in vegetables, animals, and microor-ganisms, integrated by links containing short texts to help understanding the structure and functionof carbohydrates. This module was presented, as pilot experiment, to teachers and students, whichdemonstrated satisfaction, and high receptivity, by using animation and interactivitys program asstrategy to biochemistrys education. The present work is part of the project Biochemistry throughanimation, which is having continuity.

  13. Further steps towards healthy women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-10-01

    In many areas of the world, lack of money, time, and education compels women to perform their household duties and neglect their health care regardless of how sick they are. In response to this situation, the World Health Organization created a "Healthy Women Counselling Guide" (HWCG) package consisting of 1) a document that describes background research conducted in Nigeria, Kenya, and Sierra Leone; 2) a document that chronicles the development of radio and illustration materials; 3) sample audiocassette tapes from the three country teams; 4) two illustrated booklets and a calendar supporting the radio tapes; and 5) a user's guide. The pretested materials in the HWCG were designed with community input for rural women. The sample tape from Kenya focuses on malaria and that from Nigeria on vesicovaginal fistula. The Nigerian team also produced a booklet on adolescent childbirth. The Sierra Leone team prepared a calendar illustrated with information about a variety of ways to obtain good health. A further HWCG series is being developed in India on alcohol abuse. The HWCG package was developed for policy-makers, nongovernmental organizations, and other individuals and agencies concerned with improving women's health. Additional HWCC activities will involve wider dissemination of the material that has been developed, exchanges among teams to determine cross-cultural applicability and adaptability of the material, and studies of the impact of the HWCG process.

  14. Traffic safety and step-by-step driving licence for young people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønning, Charlotte; Agerholm, Niels

    2017-01-01

    Young novice car drivers are much more accident-prone than other drivers – up to 10 times that of their parents’ generation. A central solution to improve the traffic safety for this group is implementation of a step-by-step driving licence. A number of countries have introduced a step...... presents a review of safety effects from step-by-step driving licence schemes. Most of the investigated schemes consist of a step-by-step driving licence with Step 1) various tests and education, Step 2) a period where driving is only allowed together with an experienced driver and Step 3) driving without...... companion is allowed but with various restrictions and, in some cases, additional driving education and tests. In general, a step-by-step driving licence improves traffic safety even though the young people are permitted to drive a car earlier on. The effects from driving with an experienced driver vary...

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF STEP-POOL SEQUENCE AND ITS EFFECTS IN RESISTANCE AND STREAM BED STABILITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao-Yin WANG; Jiang XU; Changzhi LI

    2004-01-01

    Experiments were conducted and field investigations were performed to study the development of step-pool sequence and its effects on resistance to the flow and stream bed stability. Step-pool sequence develops in incised channels as a result of streambed erosion, which is compared with sand dunes and armor layer of the role in resistance and streambed protection. The tight interlocking of particles in steps gives them an inherent stability which only extreme floods are likely to disturb. That stability suggests that step-pools are a valid equilibrium form, especially when coupled with their apparent regularity form and their role in satisfying the extreme condition of resistance maximization. The development degree of step-pools, SP, is proportional to the streambed slope. If the incoming sediment load is equal to or more than the sediment-carrying capacity of the flow, there is no bed erosion and thence there are no step-pools. Ifthe flow depth increases and is over the step-height the resistance caused by the step-pool sequence will be greatly reduced. The rate of energy dissipation by step-pools is a function of SP. The higher is SP, the larger is the rate of energy dissipation. The step-pool sequence increases the resistance and flow depth, reduces the shear stress of the flow and protects the streambed from erosion. Moreover,step-pool sequence provides ecologically sound habitats for aquatic bio-community as well.

  16. Claiming Community

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Steffen Bo

    As its point of departure this working paper takes the multitude of different uses and meanings of the concept of community in local politics in Cape Town. Instead of attempting to define it in substantive terms, the paper takes a social constructivist approach to the study of community...... is termed community work. First, the paper explores how community has become a governmental strategy, employed by the apartheid regime as well, although in different ways, as post-apartheid local government. Secondly, the paper explores the ways in which community becomes the means in which local residents...... lay claim on the state, as well as how it enters into local power struggles between different political groups within the township. In the third part, the paper explores how the meanings of community and the struggles to realise it have changed as South Africa, nationally and locally, has become...

  17. Improving anaerobic sewage sludge digestion by implementation of a hyper-thermophilic prehydrolysis step

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Jingquan; Gavala, Hariklia N.; Skiadas, Ioannis V.

    2008-01-01

    The present study focuses on a two-step process for treatment and stabilisation of primary sludge. The process consists of a hyperthermophilic hydrolysis step operated at 70 degrees C and a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 2 clays followed by a thermophilic (55 degrees C) anaerobic digestion step...... at a HRT of 13 days. A one-step anaerobic digester operated at 55 degrees C and 15 days HRT Was used as a reference process. The two-step process was characterized by a 12% higher organic suspended solids removal efficiency and better pathogen reduction effect than the conventional one-step digestion....... The microbial community of the digester fed with pre-treated sludge was characterised by it higher activity compared to that of the digester treating raw sludge. Moreover, the pre-treatment of the primary sludge resulted up to 48% increase of the methane potential (20.09 and 13.56 mmol CH4 g(-)VS(-1...

  18. Community Forestry and Forest Conservation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milhøj, Anders; Casse, Thorkil

    2011-01-01

    This paper is a meta-study of local forest management experiences in developing countries drawn from a review of 56 case-studies presented in 52 papers. Many case-studies report positive links between community forestry and forest conservation. In international organizations and NGOs...... there is a generally accepted agreement that collective management (community forestry) will yield success in forest conservation. However, the claim is seldom rigorously examined. We suggest to have a review of the literature and to propose a first step to a test of the claim in order to reach a first generalization...... as to the success of community forestry in forest conservation. The review of the literature is the first step towards such an examination, enabling us to make some initial generalizations for further research. In the present paper, a statistical test is performed and the claim is found wanting. The reviewed papers...

  19. THE EUROPEAN COMMUNITY PRIORITY - THE SOCIAL POLICY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gina Ignat

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available At the level of European Union, starting from the necessity of insurance economic growth, social community law gradually developed, benefitting by sinuous construction, extremely complex, beingcontinuously transformed. Familiarization with the model of social community law prescribed by European Union represents not only a forward step in the process of harmonization with community law, but also an alignment in settlement of European Union, which finally establishes the modernization of the whole domestic law system.

  20. Biclique communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Sune Lehmann; Hansen-Schwartz, Martin; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2008-01-01

    We present a method for detecting communities in bipartite networks. Based on an extension of the k-clique community detection algorithm, we demonstrate how modular structure in bipartite networks presents itself as overlapping bicliques. If bipartite information is available, the biclique...... community detection algorithm retains all of the advantages of the k-clique algorithm, but avoids discarding important structural information when performing a one-mode projection of the network. Further, the biclique community detection algorithm provides a level of flexibility by incorporating independent...

  1. 2-Year Colleges Step Up Lobbying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evelyn, Jamilah

    2001-01-01

    Describes how increased lobbying by community colleges is yielding payoffs in state legislatures and Congress and significantly more federal earmarks. Discusses how increased financial support may also be due to community colleges' responsiveness to states' economic needs. (EV)

  2. [Community Nutrition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranceta, Javier

    2004-06-01

    In the last 20 years, Public Health Nutrition focused mainly on the qualitative aspects which may influence the onset of chronic diseases, quality of life, physical and mental performance and life expectancy. This applied knowledge organised as part of preventive and health promotion programs led to the development of Community Nutrition. The aim of Community Nutrition actions is to adequate lifestyles related to food consumption patterns in order to improve the quality of life and contribute to health promotion of the population in the community where programs and services are delivered. Key functions to develop in a Community Nutrition Unit consist in the identification and assessment of nutrition problems in the community as well as the design, implementation and evaluation of intervention programs by means of appropriate strategies. These should aim at different populations groups and settings, such as work places, schools, high risk groups or the general public. Nowadays, Community Nutrition work efforts should focus on three main aspects: nutrition education in schools and in the community; food safety and food security and the development and reinforcement of food preparation skills across all age groups. Social catering services, either in schools, the work place or at the community level, need to ensure adequate nutritional supply, provide foods contributing to healthy eating practices as well as to enhance culinary traditions and social learning. Food safety and food security have become a top priority in Public Health. The concepts referes to the availability of food safe and adequate as well as in sufficient amount in order to satisfy nutrition requirements of all individuals in the community. Social changes along new scientific developments will introduce new demands in Community Nutrition work and individual dietary counselling will become a key strategy. In order to face new challenges, community nutrition pactitioners require a high quality

  3. Starting a new residency program: a step-by-step guide for institutions, hospitals, and program directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barajaz, Michelle; Turner, Teri

    2016-01-01

    Although our country faces a looming shortage of doctors, constraints of space, funding, and patient volume in many existing residency programs limit training opportunities for medical graduates. New residency programs need to be created for the expansion of graduate medical education training positions. Partnerships between existing academic institutions and community hospitals with a need for physicians can be a very successful means toward this end. Baylor College of Medicine and The Children's Hospital of San Antonio were affiliated in 2012, and subsequently, we developed and received accreditation for a new categorical pediatric residency program at that site in 2014. We share below a step-by-step guide through the process that includes building of the infrastructure, educational development, accreditation, marketing, and recruitment. It is our hope that the description of this process will help others to spur growth in graduate medical training positions. PMID:27507541

  4. Involving communities in community assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Mary Jo; Cary, Susan; Diemert, Grover; Ceballos, Rose; Sifuentes, Maria; Atteberry, Irene; Vue, Fu; Trieu, Sandy

    2003-01-01

    Focus groups provide an effective means of incorporating the perspectives of "hidden" populations in assessments of community health needs and assets. A series of focus groups was conducted with specifically targeted segments of a community to develop a comprehensive picture of community health. The authors describe the focus group process, major findings, and the use of focus group results in a highly multicultural community. Despite differences in age, length of residence, and ethnicity, the focus groups were remarkably similar in the issues raised. The majority of participants viewed the multicultural nature of the community as an asset but voiced some of the difficulties of living in a multiethnic and multilanguage environment. Similar areas of concern in the community arose from all of the focus groups, including housing and other environmental issues and problems of access to health care. Focus group findings have been used to initiate activity addressing identified community problems. Focus group participation had the added benefit of increasing community members' participation in other community endeavors.

  5. Community History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Helen M.

    1997-01-01

    Recounts the experience of researching community history in Ivanhoe, Virginia, between 1987 and 1990. The Ivanhoe History Project involved community members in collecting photographs, memorabilia, and oral histories of their town. Subsequent published volumes won the W. D. Weatherford Award and inspired a quilt exhibit and a theatrical production.…

  6. Community Connections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemball, Mark

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses the results of a CASE survey, compiled in April 2009, which was sent to almost 2,800 members who had previously indicated that community relations were part of their professional responsibilities or interests. The survey suggests that the role and practice of community relations in a public institution is somewhat different…

  7. A Step-by-Step Teaching Technique for Teachers with Adult Students of Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Betty

    2013-01-01

    Step-by-step teaching is a researcher-designed innovative process that takes the adult learner, step-by-step, from his present level of understanding to the required level. The technique is based on well-researched and accepted pedagogical practices set in their psychological, sociological, and andragogical perspectives. Using a convenience sample…

  8. Primes in Fibonacci n-step and Lucas n-step Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noe, Tony D.; Vos Post, Jonathan

    2005-09-01

    We search for primes in the Fibonacci n-step and Lucas n-step sequences, which are the natural generalizations of the Fibonacci and Lucas numbers. While the Fibonacci n-step sequences are nearly devoid of primes, the Lucas n-step sequences are prime-rich. We tabulate the occurrence of primes in the first 10000 terms for n sequences.

  9. Community Ecology

    CERN Document Server

    1988-01-01

    This book presents the proceedings of a workshop on community ecology organized at Davis, in April, 1986, sponsored by the Sloan Foundation. There have been several recent symposia on community ecology (Strong et. al., 1984, Diamond and Case, 1987) which have covered a wide range of topics. The goal of the workshop at Davis was more narrow: to explore the role of scale in developing a theoretical approach to understanding communities. There are a number of aspects of scale that enter into attempts to understand ecological communities. One of the most basic is organizational scale. Should community ecology proceed by building up from population biology? This question and its ramifications are stressed throughout the book and explored in the first chapter by Simon Levin. Notions of scale have long been important in understanding physical systems. Thus, in understanding the interactions of organisms with their physical environment, questions of scale become paramount. These more physical questions illustrate the...

  10. Frequency dependence of the subharmonic Shapiro steps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekić, Jasmina; Ivić, Zoran

    2011-05-01

    Frequency dependence of the subharmonic Shapiro steps has been studied in the ac driven overdamped Frenkel-Kontorova model with deformable substrate potential. As potential gets deformed, in addition to the harmonic steps, subharmonic steps appear in the number and size that increase as the frequency of the external force increases. It was found that size of both harmonic and subharmonic steps strongly depend on the frequency where in the high-amplitude limit oscillatory dependence appears. When expressed as a function of period these oscillations of the step size with frequency have the same form as the oscillations of the step size with amplitude. Deformation of the potential has strong influence on these oscillations, and as in the case of amplitude dependence, with the increase of deformation, the same three distinctive types of behavior have been classified.

  11. Explicit Time-Stepping for Stiff ODEs

    CERN Document Server

    Eriksson, Kenneth; Logg, Anders; 10.1137/S1064827502409626

    2012-01-01

    We present a new strategy for solving stiff ODEs with explicit methods. By adaptively taking a small number of stabilizing small explicit time steps when necessary, a stiff ODE system can be stabilized enough to allow for time steps much larger than what is indicated by classical stability analysis. For many stiff problems the cost of the stabilizing small time steps is small, so the improvement is large. We illustrate the technique on a number of well-known stiff test problems.

  12. Accuracy of 2 activity monitors in detecting steps in people with stroke and traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulk, George D; Combs, Stephanie A; Danks, Kelly A; Nirider, Coby D; Raja, Bhavana; Reisman, Darcy S

    2014-02-01

    Advances in sensor technologies and signal processing techniques provide a method to accurately measure walking activity in the home and community. Activity monitors geared toward consumer or patient use may be an alternative to more expensive monitors designed for research to measure stepping activity. The objective of this study was to examine the accuracy of 2 consumer/patient activity monitors, the Fitbit Ultra and the Nike+ Fuelband, in identifying stepping activity in people with stroke and traumatic brain injury (TBI). Secondarily, the study sought to compare the accuracy of these 2 activity monitors with that of the StepWatch Activity Monitor (SAM) and a pedometer, the Yamax Digi-Walker SW-701 pedometer (YDWP). A cross-sectional design was used for this study. People with chronic stroke and TBI wore the 4 activity monitors while they performed the Two-Minute Walk Test (2MWT), during which they were videotaped. Activity monitor estimated steps taken were compared with actual steps taken counted from videotape. Accuracy and agreement between activity monitor estimated steps and actual steps were examined using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC [2,1]) and the Bland-Altman method. The SAM demonstrated the greatest accuracy (ICC [2,1]=.97, mean difference between actual steps and SAM estimated steps=4.7 steps) followed by the Fitbit Ultra (ICC [2,1]=.73, mean difference between actual steps and Fitbit Ultra estimated steps=-9.7 steps), the YDWP (ICC [2,1]=.42, mean difference between actual steps and YDWP estimated steps=-28.8 steps), and the Nike+ Fuelband (ICC [2,1]=.20, mean difference between actual steps and Nike+ Fuelband estimated steps=-66.2 steps). Walking activity was measured over a short distance in a closed environment, and participants were high functioning ambulators, with a mean gait speed of 0.93 m/s. The Fitbit Ultra may be a low-cost alternative to measure the stepping activity in level, predictable environments of people with stroke

  13. Smart Steps to Sustainability 2.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart Steps to Sustainability provides small business owners and managers with practical advice and tools to implementsustainable and environmentally-preferable business practices that go beyond compliance.

  14. A step-by-step framework to assess benefits of established temperate marine protected areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albrecht Götz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Marine protected areas (MPAs have been advocated as a solution to the challenges of both conservation and modern fishery management, but their application remains controversial, partly because there are only general guidelines for evaluating their effectiveness. We propose a framework to specifically evaluate established MPAs in six steps. We tested the approach by reviewing published research and unpublished information on the Goukamma MPA in the centre of the South African temperate south coast. Information reviewed included effects on the structure of fish populations, catch and abundance indices of fish species, and ecosystem effects. We investigated factors that determine the usefulness of a MPA in fisheries management, including the movement behaviour of adult fishes, larval dispersal and fisher-displacement patterns. We found that differences in the rates of exploitation across the MPA border resulted in differences in abundance, size and condition of the main target species, roman (Chrysoblephus laticeps. The diversity and abundance of non-target fish species, and the composition of the benthic invertebrate community, were affected by the cessation of fishing. The potential for "spillover" of adult roman might be limited to the vicinity of the MPA by their small home range, but there is potential for self-seeding and dispersal of roman eggs and larvae over wider areas. These theoretical considerations were confirmed by an analysis of catch data from before and after MPA implementation. The framework presented here may help to identify and fill gaps in the knowledge of established MPAs along South Africa's temperate south coast.

  15. The Learning Community. A Pro-Family System of Education and Community Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carman-Ainsworth Community Schools, Flint, MI.

    This publication is an introduction and guide to developing The Learning Community, a system of integrated family services designed to support personal, educational, and employment goals as defined by each family member. It begins by describing The Learning Community and presenting its philosophy and goals. These five developmental steps are then…

  16. Interstellar Probe: The Next Step To Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNutt, Ralph; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2016-07-01

    Committee on Space Research (COSPAR) has recently established a new Panel on Interstellar Research (PIR) to consider the next steps toward finally making a dedicated Interstellar Probe mission a reality. Crucial tasks are to build consensus amongst the international scientific community for the appropriate scientific campaigns and measurements to be carried out for such a mission, taking into account the new and continuing results from the outer solar system and beyond by VIM, IBEX, New Horizons, and exoplanet observations and studies.

  17. Community and Interns' Perspectives on Community-Participatory Medical Education: From Passive to Active Participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamura, Akiteru; Misaki, Hidekazu; Takemura, Yousuke

    2017-07-01

    The use of community-based medical education as a method of learning primary care is now common worldwide. However, in many cases community participation remains passive. This study sought to explore the effects of introducing community members into medical education as active teachers. Medical education taught directly by community members might be a key to comprehensive community-based learning. This study was conducted in Japan at two postgraduate programs in community hospitals. We asked 10 community groups and 10 interns to join our 2-year "participatory" community curriculum continuously. Questionnaires completed by 10 interns and 77 community members were analyzed quantitatively. Audio-recorded and transcribed interview data from 10 interns and 39 community members were read iteratively and analyzed qualitatively. Community members who participated in groups with the interns gave higher scores on approval of and willingness to participate in such experiences. Interns scored higher on their view of the importance and preferences to work with the community. In the qualitative analysis, health-oriented behavior, social connectedness, and shaping community orientation among doctors emerged as important for community members. Important themes that emerged from the interns' interviews were: taking responsibility for shared understanding, community-oriented focus, valuing community nurses, and tension from competing demands. Interaction between interns and community members had positive effects for both. Community-participatory medical education could present a further step in the evolution of community-based medical education, one that is closest to community. Finding a balance between the time dedicated to working at the hospital and in the community proved to be essential to the success of this curriculum.

  18. Natural Communities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This dataset shows the locations of known tracts of high quality natural communities in Kansas, generalized to the PLSS section. It is not a compehensive dataset of...

  19. USMLE Step 1 Examination: Legal Vulnerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templeton, Bryce

    1996-01-01

    In 1994 the Federation of State Medical Boards and the National Board of Medical Examiners instituted a three-step U.S. Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE). Step one of the USMLE may be vulnerable to legal challenge on the basis of minority group bias and lack of construct validity. (SLD)

  20. Student USMLE Step One Preparation and Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chi

    This study investigated factors associated with medical students performance on the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Step One examination. The USMLE Step One emphasizes basic mechanisms and principles that are typically covered in the first 2 years of medical school. The study examined the relationship among student performance…

  1. Phonon scattering in graphene over substrate steps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sevincli, Haldun; Brandbyge, Mads

    2014-01-01

    We calculate the effect on phonon transport of substrate-induced bends in graphene. We consider bending induced by an abrupt kink in the substrate, and provide results for different step-heights and substrate interaction strengths. We find that individual substrate steps reduce thermal conductance...

  2. Haier's Four Steps to Brand Success

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAN YAN

    2006-01-01

    @@ On December 25 last year, Haier formally launched its fourth brand-building step, namely to make the company a global brand. The latest strategy follows the previous three steps - branding, diversification and internationalization. In the latest stage, Haier will further build its brand overseas, said Zhang Ruimin,CEO of the Chinese electronics appliances giant.

  3. Step tolling with bottleneck queuing congestion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, van den V.A.C.; Verhoef, E.T.; Lindsey, C.R.

    2012-01-01

    . It also proposes a third scheme in which late in the rush hour drivers slow down or stop just before reaching a tolling point, and wait until the toll is lowered from one step to the next step. Such ‘braking’ behaviour has been observed in practice. Analytical derivations and numerical modelling s

  4. Community concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Thomas; Bates, Tony

    2004-03-01

    Since the publication of "Sustainable Communities--building for the future", Government attention has focused largely on high-density affordable housing in the four "growth areas": Thames Gateway; Ashford; Milton Keynes--South Midlands, and London--Stansted--Cambridge. In this article, Thomas Yeung and Tony Bates suggest that a greater and more sustainable impact would be achieved if architects, planners, and developers considered the potential for community-based water and waste management and on-site energy generation and distribution right from the start of the project. In particular, they consider that the communal nature of hospitals, universities, and public/community housing provides a great opportunity for on-site renewable CHP and/or distributed heating, which could combine global environmental benefits with improved local amenities. They describe a simple model for prioritising energy management in the built environment, and draw on lessons learnt at ETRCL in Dagenham and BedZED in Surrey to offer a few recommendations for Government and developers. Tony Bates is the business development manager for Scott Wilson in the South East and is responsible for the promotion of sustainable communities through relationships with architects, developers, land owners and local authorities. Thomas Yeung leads the Energy Infrastructure Technologies group in Scott Wilson. This team offers an integrated approach to clean community-based energy generation, energy management, waste and water management, sustainable transport, and sustainable buildings/communities.

  5. Bi-modes alternation stepping ultrasonic motors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiamei JIN; Chunsheng ZHAO

    2008-01-01

    Based on the principle of alternative operation of two bending vibration modes in an annular stator, this paper presents a standing-wave stepping ultrasonic motor characterized by no accumulative errors driven by an open-loop control circuitry. The driving forces are generated from the motions of projections on the stator in two modes. The positioning of the motor is achieved by the cooperation between the stator projections and rotor teeth, and the number of the rotors determines the stepping angle of the motor. Two-phase sinusoidal signals corresponding to the two modal frequencies drive the motor bi-direction stepping rotation via a switch unit. The prototype runs steadily without miss-step on trial. The single-step angle displacement of the motor is 2.5°.

  6. Validity of 2 devices for measuring steps taken by older adults in assisted-living facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Randall J; Bassett, David R; Muthukrishnan, Suresh; Klein, Diane A

    2008-01-01

    This 2-part study examined validity of selected motion sensors for assessing physical activity in older adults residing in assisted-living communities. Twenty-one older adults (mean age = 78.6 +/- 13.1 years) wore the StepWatch 3 Step Activity Monitor (SW3) and the Yamax Digi-Walker SW-200 pedometer (DW). Part I compared accuracy of these devices for measuring steps taken over 161 m. Part II compared devices over a 1-day (24-hour) period. In part I, the DW recorded 51.9% (r2 = -.08, P = .75) and the SW3 recorded 102.6% (r2 = .99, P < .001) of steps. In part II, the DW measured significantly fewer steps (1587 +/- 1057 steps) than did the SW3 (6420 +/- 3180 steps). The SW3 pedometer was more accurate in counting steps and recorded higher 24-hour step counts than the DW pedometer. Thus, the SW3 is a valid research instrument for monitoring activity in the assisted-living population.

  7. A Coordinated Approach to Communicating Pediatric-Related Information on Pandemic Influenza at the Community Level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HCTT CHE

    2009-12-16

    The purpose of this document is to provide a suggested approach, based on input from pediatric stakeholders, to communicating pediatric-related information on pandemic influenza at the community level in a step-by-step manner.

  8. Community Greening: How To Develop A Strategic Energy Plan, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-02-01

    This guide provides an overview of strategic electricity planning for communities, using a step-by-step approach to develop the plan. This method has a high chance of success, because it is based on stakeholder buy-in and political commitment. Not all communities will need to follow all steps, but the process is designed to incorporate all parties, maximize solution-based thinking, and develop a plan that can be carried out by community leaders.

  9. Step length estimation using handheld inertial sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaudin, Valérie; Susi, Melania; Lachapelle, Gérard

    2012-01-01

    In this paper a novel step length model using a handheld Micro Electrical Mechanical System (MEMS) is presented. It combines the user's step frequency and height with a set of three parameters for estimating step length. The model has been developed and trained using 12 different subjects: six men and six women. For reliable estimation of the step frequency with a handheld device, the frequency content of the handheld sensor's signal is extracted by applying the Short Time Fourier Transform (STFT) independently from the step detection process. The relationship between step and hand frequencies is analyzed for different hand's motions and sensor carrying modes. For this purpose, the frequency content of synchronized signals collected with two sensors placed in the hand and on the foot of a pedestrian has been extracted. Performance of the proposed step length model is assessed with several field tests involving 10 test subjects different from the above 12. The percentages of error over the travelled distance using universal parameters and a set of parameters calibrated for each subject are compared. The fitted solutions show an error between 2.5 and 5% of the travelled distance, which is comparable with that achieved by models proposed in the literature for body fixed sensors only.

  10. Step Length Estimation Using Handheld Inertial Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gérard Lachapelle

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a novel step length model using a handheld Micro Electrical Mechanical System (MEMS is presented. It combines the user’s step frequency and height with a set of three parameters for estimating step length. The model has been developed and trained using 12 different subjects: six men and six women. For reliable estimation of the step frequency with a handheld device, the frequency content of the handheld sensor’s signal is extracted by applying the Short Time Fourier Transform (STFT independently from the step detection process. The relationship between step and hand frequencies is analyzed for different hand’s motions and sensor carrying modes. For this purpose, the frequency content of synchronized signals collected with two sensors placed in the hand and on the foot of a pedestrian has been extracted. Performance of the proposed step length model is assessed with several field tests involving 10 test subjects different from the above 12. The percentages of error over the travelled distance using universal parameters and a set of parameters calibrated for each subject are compared. The fitted solutions show an error between 2.5 and 5% of the travelled distance, which is comparable with that achieved by models proposed in the literature for body fixed sensors only.

  11. Stepping over the Line: Applying the Theories of Adult Learning in a GED Math Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    This article describes the author's determination to incorporate learner-focused teaching techniques and explore ways to adapt them with GED math learners. The primary goal was to find ways of getting students to participate more in the classroom. This was a first step towards building community and learning as they worked together. After a few…

  12. Stepping up, stepping back, stepping forward: Student nurses' experiences as peer mentors in a pre-nursing scholarship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Annetta; Beattie, Michelle; Kyle, Richard G

    2015-11-01

    Mentorship is an essential part of the registered nurse's role, yet few opportunities exist for student nurses to mentor others during pre-registration programmes. This paper reports student nurses' experiences of mentoring school pupils during a pre-nursing scholarship. Focus groups were conducted with fifteen final year student nurses (14 female, 1 male) in two university campuses in Scotland. Discussions were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim, and data analysed thematically. Three interconnected themes emerged: 1) stepping up; 2) stepping back; 3) stepping forward. 'Stepping up' was a process through which student nurses rapidly assumed responsibility for mentoring pupils, facilitated through the attitudes and actions of students' mentors and students' control over pupils' practice experiences. 'Stepping back' encapsulated attitudes and behaviours that enabled student nurses to mentor pupils that involved considerable judgement around how unfolding events in practice could provide learning and development opportunities, and emotional acuity to support pupils through, sometimes challenging, practice situations. 'Stepping forward' described how students' mentoring experience allowed them to appraise and affirm nursing knowledge and skills, and gain greater appreciation of the reality and complexity of mentorship in clinical practice. Peer mentoring may prepare student nurses for future mentoring roles and aid their transition into clinical practice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Deviation of viscous drops at chemical steps

    CERN Document Server

    Semprebon, Ciro; Filippi, Daniele; Perlini, Luca; Pierno, Matteo; Brinkmann, Martin; Mistura, Giampaolo

    2016-01-01

    We present systematic wetting experiments and numerical simulations of gravity driven liquid drops sliding on a plane substrate decorated with a linear chemical step. Surprisingly, the optimal direction to observe crossing is not the one perpendicular to the step, but a finite angle that depends on the material parameters. We computed the landscapes of the force acting on the drop by means of a contact line mobility model showing that contact angle hysteresis dominates the dynamics at the step and determines whether the drop passes onto the lower substrate. This analysis is very well supported by the experimental dynamic phase diagram in terms of pinning, crossing, sliding and sliding followed by pinning.

  14. Phonon scattering in graphene over substrate steps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevinçli, H., E-mail: haldunsevincli@iyte.edu.tr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Izmir Institute of Technology, Gülbahçe Kampüsü, 35430 Urla, Izmir (Turkey); Department of Micro- and Nano-technology (DTU Nanotech), Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Brandbyge, M., E-mail: mads.brandbyge@nanotech.dtu.dk [Department of Micro- and Nano-technology (DTU Nanotech), Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Center for Nanostructured Graphene(CNG), Department of Micro- and Nano-technology, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

    2014-10-13

    We calculate the effect on phonon transport of substrate-induced bends in graphene. We consider bending induced by an abrupt kink in the substrate, and provide results for different step-heights and substrate interaction strengths. We find that individual substrate steps reduce thermal conductance in the range between 5% and 47%. We also consider the transmission across linear kinks formed by adsorption of atomic hydrogen at the bends and find that individual kinks suppress thermal conduction substantially, especially at high temperatures. Our analysis show that substrate irregularities can be detrimental for thermal conduction even for small step heights.

  15. Effects of age and step length on joint kinetics during stepping task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieryla, Kathleen A; Buffinton, Christine

    2015-07-16

    Following a balance perturbation, a stepping response is commonly used to regain support, and the distance of the recovery step can vary. To date, no other studies have examined joint kinetics in young and old adults during increasing step distances, when participants are required to bring their rear foot forward. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine age-related differences in joint kinetics with increasing step distance. Twenty young and 20 old adults completed the study. Participants completed a step starting from double support, at an initial distance equal to the individual's average step length. The distance was increased by 10% body height until an unsuccessful attempt. A one-way, repeated measures ANOVA was used to determine the effects of age on joint kinetics during the maximum step distance. A two-way, repeated measures, mixed model ANOVA was used to determine the effects of age, step distance, and their interaction on joint kinetics during the first three step distances for all participants. Young adults completed a significantly longer step than old adults. During the maximum step, in general, kinetic measures were greater in the young than in the old. As step distance increased, all but one kinetic measure increased for both young and old adults. This study has shown the ability to discriminate between young and old adults, and could potentially be used in the future to distinguish between fallers and non-fallers.

  16. Portfolio Planner: A Step-by-Step Guide to Portfolio Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasmine, Julia

    This guide presents a step-by-step portfolio assessment method for teachers who want to implement portfolio assessment in their classrooms. Portfolio assessment is not neat or tidy in its early stages, but tidy and organized portfolios can be constructed if the outlined steps are followed. These are: (1) storage and establishing a file for each…

  17. EXPANSION OF STEP-TRANSITION OPERATOR OF MULTI-STEP METHOD AND ITS APPLICATIONS (I)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-fa Tang

    2002-01-01

    We expand the step-transition operator of any linear multi-step method with order s ≥ 2 up to O(τs+5). And through examples we show how much the perturbation of the step-transition operator caused by the error of initial value is.

  18. Another Step Closer to Artificial Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... news/fullstory_162357.html Another Step Closer to Artificial Blood Synthetic product could save lives on battlefield and ... 5, 2016 SATURDAY, Dec. 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Artificial blood stored as a powder could one day revolutionize ...

  19. Quit Smoking: 5 Steps to START

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Quit Smoking 5 Steps to START Past Issues / Winter 2011 ... a part of every successful plan to quit smoking: S et a quit date. T ell family, friends, ...

  20. Take Steps to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... En español Take Steps to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes Browse Sections The Basics Overview Types of Diabetes ... 1 of 9 sections The Basics: Types of Diabetes What is diabetes? Diabetes is a disease. People ...

  1. Fabrication of Simple Step-Target

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>Step-target was used to measure the shock velocity. If we can measure the shock velocity and particle velocity together, we get one point in the shock compress line. If we measure a series of shock velocity

  2. Step-emulsification in nanofluidic device

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Z; Pismen, L M; Tabeling, P

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present a comprehensive study of the step-emulsification process for high-throughput production of (sub-)$\\mu$m-size monodisperse droplets. The microfluidic device combines a Hele-Shaw nanofluidic cell with a step-like outlet to a deep and wide reservoir. The proposed theory based on Hele-Shaw hydrodynamics provides the quasi-static shape of the free boundary between the disperse liquid phase engulfed by the co-flowing continuous phase prior to transition to oscillatory step-emulsification at low enough capillary number. At the transition the proposed theory anticipates a simple condition for critical capillary number as a function of the Hele-Shaw cell geometry. The transition threshold is in excellent agreement with experimental data. A simple closed-form expression for the size of the droplets generated in step-emulsification regime derived using simple geometric arguments also shows a very good agreement with the experimental results.

  3. Novel precision piezoelectric step rotary actuator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jianfang; YANG Zhigang; ZHAO Hongwei; CHENG Guangming

    2007-01-01

    A novel piezoelectric (PZT) precision step rotary actuator was developed on the basis of PZT technology.It adopts the principle of bionics and works with an inside anchoring/loosening of the stator and a distortion structure of the uniformly distributed thin flexible hinge to solve problems such as ineffective anchoring/loosening,low step rotary frequency,small travel,poor resolution,low speed and unsteady output.The developed actuator is characterized by high frequency (30 Hz),high speed (380 μrad/s),large travel (>270°),high resolution (1 μrad/step),and work stability.It greatly improves the ability to drive the existing PZT step rotary actuator.The new actuator can be applied in the field of micromanipulation and precision engineering,including precision driving and positioning and optics engineering.

  4. Community involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial Office

    1979-09-01

    Full Text Available Community involvement is the main theme of Health Year. Governments have a responsibility for the health of their people, and in this country under the present 3-tier system of government, the responsibility for the rendering of health services is divided between central, provincial and local government. However, under our democratic system, all people have the right to, and it is indeed their duty, to participate individually and collectively in the planning and implementation of services to meet their health needs. Ultimately, through involvement of individuals, families and communities, greater self-reliance is achieved leading to greater responsibility being assumed by people for their own health.

  5. Interfirm communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergenholtz, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    . These results yield a paradox which the present paper aims to address. Based on an in-depth case study of how a high-tech small firm organizes its interfirm activity, I show how a hybrid social relation, that is neither weak nor strong, is a useful conception for interfirm communities. Hereby, the study also......Strong and trust-based ties are usually related to homogeneous and complex knowledge, while weak ties are associated with heterogeneous and simple knowledge. Interfirm communities have been shown to depend on trust-based ties, while also relying on getting access to heterogeneous knowledge...

  6. IT project management 30 steps to success

    CERN Document Server

    Doraiswamy, Premanand

    2011-01-01

    This pocket guide is designed to help IT project managers to succeed, and is based on the author's years of experience in IT project management. The guide's step-by-step approach will enable those new to IT project management, or intending to make a career in this field, to master the essential skills. For seasoned professionals, the pocket guide offers an invaluable concise reference guide.

  7. Lower limb loading in step aerobic dance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, H-W; Hsieh, H-M; Chang, Y-W; Wang, L-H

    2012-11-01

    Participation in aerobic dance is associated with a number of lower extremity injuries, and abnormal joint loading seems to be a factor in these. However, information on joint loading is limited. The purpose of this study was to investigate the kinetics of the lower extremity in step aerobic dance and to compare the differences of high-impact and low-impact step aerobic dance in 4 aerobic movements (mambo, kick, L step and leg curl). 18 subjects were recruited for this study. High-impact aerobic dance requires a significantly greater range of motion, joint force and joint moment than low-impact step aerobic dance. The peak joint forces and moments in high-impact step aerobic dance were found to be 1.4 times higher than in low-impact step aerobic dance. Understanding the nature of joint loading may help choreographers develop dance combinations that are less injury-prone. Furthermore, increased knowledge about joint loading may be helpful in lowering the risk of injuries in aerobic dance instructors and students.

  8. Steps in the bacterial flagellar motor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry Mora

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial flagellar motor is a highly efficient rotary machine used by many bacteria to propel themselves. It has recently been shown that at low speeds its rotation proceeds in steps. Here we propose a simple physical model, based on the storage of energy in protein springs, that accounts for this stepping behavior as a random walk in a tilted corrugated potential that combines torque and contact forces. We argue that the absolute angular position of the rotor is crucial for understanding step properties and show this hypothesis to be consistent with the available data, in particular the observation that backward steps are smaller on average than forward steps. We also predict a sublinear speed versus torque relationship for fixed load at low torque, and a peak in rotor diffusion as a function of torque. Our model provides a comprehensive framework for understanding and analyzing stepping behavior in the bacterial flagellar motor and proposes novel, testable predictions. More broadly, the storage of energy in protein springs by the flagellar motor may provide useful general insights into the design of highly efficient molecular machines.

  9. Does my step look big in this? A visual illusion leads to safer stepping behaviour.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B Elliott

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tripping is a common factor in falls and a typical safety strategy to avoid tripping on steps or stairs is to increase foot clearance over the step edge. In the present study we asked whether the perceived height of a step could be increased using a visual illusion and whether this would lead to the adoption of a safer stepping strategy, in terms of greater foot clearance over the step edge. The study also addressed the controversial question of whether motor actions are dissociated from visual perception. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 21 young, healthy subjects perceived the step to be higher in a configuration of the horizontal-vertical illusion compared to a reverse configuration (p = 0.01. During a simple stepping task, maximum toe elevation changed by an amount corresponding to the size of the visual illusion (p<0.001. Linear regression analyses showed highly significant associations between perceived step height and maximum toe elevation for all conditions. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The perceived height of a step can be manipulated using a simple visual illusion, leading to the adoption of a safer stepping strategy in terms of greater foot clearance over a step edge. In addition, the strong link found between perception of a visual illusion and visuomotor action provides additional support to the view that the original, controversial proposal by Goodale and Milner (1992 of two separate and distinct visual streams for perception and visuomotor action should be re-evaluated.

  10. Traffic safety and step-by-step driving licence for young people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønning, Charlotte; Agerholm, Niels

    2017-01-01

    Young novice car drivers are much more accident-prone than other drivers - up to 10 times that of their parents' generation. A central solution to improve the traffic safety for this group is implementation of a step-by-step driving licence. A number of countries have introduced a step...... companion is allowed but with various restrictions and, in some cases, additional driving education and tests. In general, a step-by-step driving licence improves traffic safety even though the young people are permitted to drive a car earlier on. The effects from driving with an experienced driver vary...... with effects of up to 40% reduced accident risk, but there is a markedly reduced effect, the older the novice drivers are when they initiate the driving education. In some cases, step 3 is found to reduce accident risk with up to 61%. As the Danish trial includes an additional step 2, and only drivers from 17...

  11. Traffic safety and step-by-step driving licence for young people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønning, Charlotte; Agerholm, Niels

    2016-01-01

    In order to improve the traffic safety, the Danish Government considered introducing and afterwards implemented a step-by-step driving licence for young drivers. Due to this topicality a literature review on the experiences from step-by-step driving licence for young drivers was conducted. All...... investigated studies show that young people are heavily overrepresented in traffic accident statistics. This is partly due to lack of experience, but also due to poor understanding of the risks involving actions taken in traffic. In order to prevent this, a number of countries have started introducing a step......-by-step driving licence for young drivers. The initiatives in the various countries are the young people driving with an adult, limitations to when and where they may drive, limitations to the number of passengers and their age along with a number of tests and interviews in connection with acquiring the step...

  12. The two steps thermal decomposition of titanium hydride and two steps foaming of Al alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHANG Jintang; HE Deping

    2005-01-01

    Two steps foaming (TSF) technique was proposed to prepare shaped Al alloy foam. Based on the thermal decomposition kinetics equation of titanium hydride, the relationship between two steps thermal decomposition kinetics of titanium hydride and two steps foaming Al alloy melt was studied. Two steps thermal decomposition curve of titanium hydride under increasing and constant temperature was calculated respectively. The hydrogen mass needed in the second foaming step was also calculated. Results showed that the hydrogen mass of the second thermal decomposition of titanium hydride is enough for the second foaming step in the condition of as-received Al melt foaming. Experimental and theoretical results indicate that two steps foaming technique can be used to prepare Al alloy foam with high porosity, shaped components and sandwich with Al alloy foam core.

  13. RELATIONSHIP OF FIRST STEP HEIGHT, STEP SLOPE AND CAVITY IN X-SHAPED FLARING GATE PIERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Bo; WU Chao; HU Yao-hua; MO Zheng-yu

    2007-01-01

    The energy dissipation of X-shaped flaring gate piers ahead of a stepped spillway was adopted in the Suofengying Hydroplant. Under the circumstance that the first step is higher than others, at the step surface an aerated cavity occured behind piers. The interaction of the weir head, the elevation difference between crest and chamber outlet, the first step height, the slopes of weir end and step, and the size of cavity, was investigated, the expression was derived to characterize their relationship, and the corresponding curves were plotted. The comparison of the calculated and simulated results with the measured data was performed. When the slopes of step and weir end are equivalent, the relative height difference between the first and second steps becomes the main factor influencing the aerated cavity. These findings may be useful in practical applications.

  14. Do changes in selfishness explain 12-step benefit? : A prospective lagged analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonigan, J. Scott; Rynes, Kristina; Toscova, Radka; Hagler, Kylee

    2017-01-01

    Objective 12-step attendance is associated with increased abstinence. A strong claim made in 12-step literature is that alcoholics are pathologically selfish and that working the 12 steps reduces this selfishness which, in turn, leads to sustained alcohol abstinence. This study tested this assumption by investigating the linkages between 12-step attendance, pathological narcissism, and drinking. Method 130 early AA affiliates with limited AA and treatment histories were recruited from treatment and community-based AA. A majority of the sample was alcohol dependent and reported illicit drug use before recruitment. Participants were interviewed at intake and at 3, 6, and 9 months. Results A majority of participants attended AA meetings throughout follow-up and such attendance predicted increased abstinence and reduced drinking intensity. 12-step affiliates were significantly higher on pathological narcissism (PN) relative to general population samples and their PN remained elevated. Contrary to predictions, PN was unrelated to 12-step meeting attendance and did not predict later abstinence or drinking intensity. Conclusion Findings did not support the hypothesis that reductions in PN explain 12-step benefit. An alternative function for the emphasis placed on pathological selfishness in 12-step programs is discussed and a recommendation is made to use unobtrusive measures of selfishness in future research. PMID:23327500

  15. Walkable Communities

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-04-18

    This podcast is for a general audience and discusses the benefits of walkable communities, as they relate to health, the environment, and social interaction.  Created: 4/18/2008 by National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH), ATSDR.   Date Released: 5/8/2008.

  16. Effect of One-Step and Multi-Steps Polishing System on Enamel Roughness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Sumali

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 The final procedures of orthodontic treatment are bracket debonding and cleaning the remaining adhesive. Multi-step polishing system is the most common method used. The disadvantage of that system is long working time, because of the stages that should be done. Therefore, dental material manufacturer make an improvement to the system, to reduce several stages into one stage only. This new system is known as one-step polishing system. Objective: To compare the effect of one-step and multi-step polishing system on enamel roughness after orthodontic bracket debonding. Methods: Randomized control trial was conducted included twenty-eight maxillary premolar randomized into two polishing system; one-step OptraPol (Ivoclar, Vivadent and multi-step AstroPol (Ivoclar, Vivadent. After bracket debonding, the remaining adhesive on each group was cleaned by subjective polishing system for ninety seconds using low speed handpiece. The enamel roughness was subjected to profilometer, registering two roughness parameters (Ra, Rz. Independent t-test was used to analyze the mean score of enamel roughness in each group. Results: There was no significant difference of enamel roughness between one-step and multi-step polishing system (p>0.005. Conclusion: One-step polishing system can produce a similar enamel roughness to multi-step polishing system after bracket debonding and adhesive cleaning.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v19i3.136

  17. Influence of step complexity and presentation style on step performance of computerized emergency operating procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Song [Department of Industrial Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Li Zhizhong [Department of Industrial Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)], E-mail: zzli@tsinghua.edu.cn; Song Fei; Luo Wei; Zhao Qianyi; Salvendy, Gavriel [Department of Industrial Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2009-02-15

    With the development of information technology, computerized emergency operating procedures (EOPs) are taking the place of paper-based ones. However, ergonomics issues of computerized EOPs have not been studied adequately since the industrial practice is quite limited yet. This study examined the influence of step complexity and presentation style of EOPs on step performance. A simulated computerized EOP system was developed in two presentation styles: Style A: one- and two-dimensional flowcharts combination; Style B: two-dimensional flowchart and success logic tree combination. Step complexity was quantified by a complexity measure model based on an entropy concept. Forty subjects participated in the experiment of EOP execution using the simulated system. The results of data analysis on the experiment data indicate that step complexity and presentation style could significantly influence step performance (both step error rate and operation time). Regression models were also developed. The regression analysis results imply that operation time of a step could be well predicted by step complexity while step error rate could only partly predicted by it. The result of a questionnaire investigation implies that step error rate was influenced not only by the operation task itself but also by other human factors. These findings may be useful for the design and assessment of computerized EOPs.

  18. Seven steps to curb global warming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathews, John [Macquarie Graduate School of Management, Macquarie University, Sydney NSW 2109 (Australia)]. E-mail: john.Mathews@mq.edu.au

    2007-08-15

    Based on best current estimates that the world needs to reduce global carbon dioxide emissions by 70% by 2050, and that there is at best a 10-year window of opportunity available to initiate the enormous changes needed, this paper proposes a set of seven self-contained steps that can be taken at a global level to tackle the problem with some prospect of success. The steps are self-financing and practicable, in that they are based on existing technologies. They involve agreement to create a new international agency charged with formulating and policing a global carbon pricing regime; a complementary step involving global monitoring of greenhouse gas emissions utilizing satellite resources; taking steps to compensate developing countries for preserving rainforest as carbon sinks; the dismantling of newly created trade barriers holding back global trade in biofuels; global promotion of a transition to renewable sources of electricity through facilitation of grid interconnections with independent power producers; a global moratorium on the building of new coal-fired power stations; and recycling of carbon revenues to promote uptake of renewable energy sources in developing countries, particularly Brazil, India and China. Taken as a group, it is argued that these steps are both necessary and sufficient. They call for institutional innovations at a global level that are politically difficult but feasible, given the magnitude of the problems addressed.

  19. Strength evaluation code STEP for brittle materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishihara, Masahiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment; Futakawa, Masatoshi

    1997-12-01

    In a structural design using brittle materials such as graphite and/or ceramics it is necessary to evaluate the strength of component under complex stress condition. The strength of ceramic materials is said to be influenced by the stress distribution. However, in the structural design criteria simplified stress limits had been adopted without taking account of the strength change with the stress distribution. It is, therefore, important to evaluate the strength of component on the basis of the fracture model for brittle material. Consequently, the strength evaluation program, STEP, on a brittle fracture of ceramic materials based on the competing risk theory had been developed. Two different brittle fracture modes, a surface layer fracture mode dominated by surface flaws and an internal fracture mode by internal flaws, are treated in the STEP code in order to evaluate the strength of brittle fracture. The STEP code uses stress calculation results including complex shape of structures analyzed by the generalized FEM stress analysis code, ABAQUS, so as to be possible to evaluate the strength of brittle fracture for the structures having complicate shapes. This code is, therefore, useful to evaluate the structural integrity of arbitrary shapes of components such as core graphite components in the HTTR, heat exchanger components made of ceramics materials etc. This paper describes the basic equations applying to the STEP code, code system with a combination of the STEP and the ABAQUS codes and the result of the verification analysis. (author)

  20. A model for two-step ageing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K T Kashyap; C Ramachandra; B Chatterji; S Lele

    2000-10-01

    In commercial practice, two-step ageing is commonly used in Al–Zn–Mg alloys to produce a fine dispersion of ′ precipitates to accentuate the mechanical properties and resistance to stress corrosion cracking. While this is true in Al–Zn–Mg alloys, two-step ageing leads to inferior properties in Al–Mg–Si alloys. This controversial behaviour in different alloys can be explained by Pashley’s Kinetic model. Pashley’s model addresses the stability of clusters after two-step ageing. In the development of the model, the surface energy term between cluster and matrix is taken into account while the coherency strains between the cluster and matrix are not considered. In the present work, a model is developed which takes into account the coherency strains between cluster and matrix and defines a new stability criterion, inclusive of strain energy term. Experiments were done on AA 7010 aluminium alloy by carrying out a two-step ageing treatment and the results fit the new stability criterion. Thus it is found that the new model for two-step ageing is verified in the case of Al–Zn–Mg alloy.

  1. A Two-Step Regularization Framework for Non-Local Means

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙忠贵; 陈松灿; 乔立山

    2014-01-01

    As an effective patch-based denoising method, non-local means (NLM) method achieves favorable denoising performance over its local counterparts and has drawn wide attention in image processing community. The implementation of NLM can formally be decomposed into two sequential steps, i.e., computing the weights and using the weights to compute the weighted means. In the first step, the weights can be obtained by solving a regularized optimization. And in the second step, the means can be obtained by solving a weighted least squares problem. Motivated by such observations, we establish a two-step regularization framework for NLM in this paper. Meanwhile, using the framework, we reinterpret several non-local filters in the unified view. Further, taking the framework as a design platform, we develop a novel non-local median filter for removing salt-pepper noise with encouraging experimental results.

  2. COORDINATION OF THE MOTION PARAMETERS WITHIN STEP-BY-STEP INTEGRATION FOR DYNAMIC EQUATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HuangQingfeng; WangQuanfeng; HuYunchang

    2004-01-01

    A method is presented that coordinates the calculation of the displacement, velocity and acceleration of structures within the time-steps of different types of step-by-step integration.The dynamic equation is solved using an energy equation and the calculating data of the original method. The method presented is better than the original method in terms of calculating postulations and is in better conformity with the system's movement. Take the Wilson-θ method as an example. By using the coordination process, the calculation precision has been greatly improved (reducing the errors by approximately 90% ), and the greater part of overshooting of the calculation result has been eliminated. The study suggests that the mal-coordination of the motion parameters within the time-step is the major factor that contributes to the result errors of step-by-step integration for the dynamic equation.

  3. A pipelined Reed-Solomon decoder based on a modified step-by-step algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xing-ru PENG; Wei ZHANG; Yan-yan LIU

    2016-01-01

    We propose a pipelined Reed-Solomon (RS) decoder for an ultra-wideband system using a modified step-by-step algorithm. To reduce the complexity, the modified step-by-step algorithm merges two cases of the original algorithm. The pipelined structure allows the decoder to work at high rates with minimum delay. Consequently, for RS(23,17) codes, the proposed architecture requires 42.5%and 24.4%less area compared with a modified Euclidean architecture and a pipelined degree-computationless modified Euclidean architecture, respectively. The area of the proposed decoder is 11.3% less than that of the previous step-by-step decoder with a lower critical path delay.

  4. A step-defined sedentary lifestyle index: <5000 steps/day.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudor-Locke, Catrine; Craig, Cora L; Thyfault, John P; Spence, John C

    2013-02-01

    Step counting (using pedometers or accelerometers) is widely accepted by researchers, practitioners, and the general public. Given the mounting evidence of the link between low steps/day and time spent in sedentary behaviours, how few steps/day some populations actually perform, and the growing interest in the potentially deleterious effects of excessive sedentary behaviours on health, an emerging question is "How many steps/day are too few?" This review examines the utility, appropriateness, and limitations of using a reoccurring candidate for a step-defined sedentary lifestyle index: 10 000) to lower (sedentary lifestyle index for adults is appropriate for researchers and practitioners and for communicating with the general public. There is little evidence to advocate any specific value indicative of a step-defined sedentary lifestyle index in children and adolescents.

  5. The Pediatrix BabySteps Data Warehouse and the Pediatrix QualitySteps improvement project system--tools for "meaningful use" in continuous quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzer, Alan R; Ellsbury, Dan L; Handler, Darren; Clark, Reese H

    2010-03-01

    The Pediatrix BabySteps Clinical Data Warehouse (CDW) is a rich and novel tool allowing unbiased extraction of information from an entire neonatal population care by physicians and advanced practice nurses in Pediatrix Medical Group. Because it represents the practice of newborn medicine ranging from small community intensive care units to some of the largest neonatal intensive care units in the United States, it is highly representative of scope of practice in this country. Its value in defining outcome measures, quality improvement projects, and research continues to grow annually. Now coupled with the BabySteps QualitySteps program for defined clinical quality improvement projects, it represents a robust methodology for meaningful use of an electronic health care record, as designated during this era of health care reform. Continued growth of the CDW should result in continued important observations and improvements in neonatal care.

  6. Anisotropic Spin Splitting in Step Quantum Wells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO Ya-Fei; CHEN Yong-Hai; HAO Guo-Dong; WANG Zhan-Guo

    2009-01-01

    By the method of finite difference,the anisotropic spin splitting of the Alx Ga1-x As/GaAs/Aly Ga1-y As/Alx Ga1-x As step quantum wells (QWs) are theoretically investigated considering the interplay of the bulk inversion asymmetry and structure inversion asymmetry induced by step quantum well structure and external electric field.We demonstrate that the anisotropy of the total spin splitting can be controlled by the shape of the QWs and the external electric field.The interface related Rashba effect plays an important effect on the anisotropic spin splitting by influencing the magnitude of the spin splitting and the direction of electron spin.The Rashba spin splitting presents in the step quantum wells due to the interface related Rashba effect even without external electric field or magnetic field.

  7. AND STEP-SHAPED DOWNSTREAM SECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bal'zannikov Mihail Ivanovich

    2012-10-01

    The article also presents the results of the hydraulic research of the pilot model of the proposed structure. The research has proven that the suppression of any excessive kinetic energy of the discharged water flows falling onto the step-shaped and curving section or the step-shaped section the shape of which is similar to the one made of geosynthetic shells is more efficient that the suppression provided by the smooth section by 50 % to 60 %, and the above suppression is almost equal to the one provided by the well-known step-shaped section. This conclusion can serve as the proof of the high rate of energy suppression demonstrated by the earth-filled dam designed at Samara University of Architecture and Civil Engineering. The dam in question has geosynthetic shells that connect the downstream section to the body of the dam.

  8. Following In the Steps of Emperors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FRANCISCO; LITTLE

    2008-01-01

    "The world is small,"said Confucius.When he made that comment he was standing 1,545 reelers above sea level on the top of Taishan Mountian.When I stood in the same spot,I wondered if the great sage had a premonition about globalization,or he just marveled at the bird’s-eye view. I lost count of the steps after 30 minutes. The part of my brain that switches off when I do anything strenuous signaled shutdown and my feet moved metronomically.I kept telling myself I was following in the foot- steps of 72 emperors,Confucius and even Chairman Mao Zedong himself.Suddenly the phrase"one step at a time"took on a

  9. Monitoring and Evaluating Projects : A Step-by-Step Primer on Monitoring, Benchmarking, and Impact Evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Rebekka E. Grun

    2006-01-01

    This paper attempts to be a practical step-by-step guide to prepare and carry out benchmarking and impact analyses of projects. It's purpose is to attempt to present analytical tools solidly grounded in economic theory all while focusing on the practical questions of evaluations. Little space is given to theory, in order to spend more time on the actual steps involved, trying to make this ...

  10. Community Construction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The trials and tribulations of a young woman working on the front lines of a Beijing community For five years, Wang Xuemei, a 28-year-old Beijinger, has been a director in charge of a neighborhood committee. While the job sounds innocuous, in China, such a career move is considered highly unusual for a young, modem woman with a college diploma. Committees link almost every neighborhood in the country and positions are largely filled by retired people who wear red armbands

  11. Interfirm communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergenholtz, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    . These results yield a paradox which the present paper aims to address. Based on an in-depth case study of how a high-tech small firm organizes its interfirm activity, I show how a hybrid social relation, that is neither weak nor strong, is a useful conception for interfirm communities. Hereby, the study also...... goes beyond a mere structural approach to the organization of social networks and hence proposes a tighter integration between research on social networks and organizational design....

  12. One-step fabrication of multifunctional micromotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wenlong; Liu, Mei; Liu, Limei; Zhang, Hui; Dong, Bin; Li, Christopher Y.

    2015-08-01

    Although artificial micromotors have undergone tremendous progress in recent years, their fabrication normally requires complex steps or expensive equipment. In this paper, we report a facile one-step method based on an emulsion solvent evaporation process to fabricate multifunctional micromotors. By simultaneously incorporating various components into an oil-in-water droplet, upon emulsification and solidification, a sphere-shaped, asymmetric, and multifunctional micromotor is formed. Some of the attractive functions of this model micromotor include autonomous movement in high ionic strength solution, remote control, enzymatic disassembly and sustained release. This one-step, versatile fabrication method can be easily scaled up and therefore may have great potential in mass production of multifunctional micromotors for a wide range of practical applications.Although artificial micromotors have undergone tremendous progress in recent years, their fabrication normally requires complex steps or expensive equipment. In this paper, we report a facile one-step method based on an emulsion solvent evaporation process to fabricate multifunctional micromotors. By simultaneously incorporating various components into an oil-in-water droplet, upon emulsification and solidification, a sphere-shaped, asymmetric, and multifunctional micromotor is formed. Some of the attractive functions of this model micromotor include autonomous movement in high ionic strength solution, remote control, enzymatic disassembly and sustained release. This one-step, versatile fabrication method can be easily scaled up and therefore may have great potential in mass production of multifunctional micromotors for a wide range of practical applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Videos S1-S4 and Fig. S1-S3. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr03574k

  13. Control Software for Piezo Stepping Actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Joel F.

    2013-01-01

    A control system has been developed for the Space Interferometer Mission (SIM) piezo stepping actuator. Piezo stepping actuators are novel because they offer extreme dynamic range (centimeter stroke with nanometer resolution) with power, thermal, mass, and volume advantages over existing motorized actuation technology. These advantages come with the added benefit of greatly reduced complexity in the support electronics. The piezo stepping actuator consists of three fully redundant sets of piezoelectric transducers (PZTs), two sets of brake PZTs, and one set of extension PZTs. These PZTs are used to grasp and move a runner attached to the optic to be moved. By proper cycling of the two brake and extension PZTs, both forward and backward moves of the runner can be achieved. Each brake can be configured for either a power-on or power-off state. For SIM, the brakes and gate of the mechanism are configured in such a manner that, at the end of the step, the actuator is in a parked or power-off state. The control software uses asynchronous sampling of an optical encoder to monitor the position of the runner. These samples are timed to coincide with the end of the previous move, which may consist of a variable number of steps. This sampling technique linearizes the device by avoiding input saturation of the actuator and makes latencies of the plant vanish. The software also estimates, in real time, the scale factor of the device and a disturbance caused by cycling of the brakes. These estimates are used to actively cancel the brake disturbance. The control system also includes feedback and feedforward elements that regulate the position of the runner to a given reference position. Convergence time for smalland medium-sized reference positions (less than 200 microns) to within 10 nanometers can be achieved in under 10 seconds. Convergence times for large moves (greater than 1 millimeter) are limited by the step rate.

  14. Using Aspen plus in thermodynamics instruction a step-by-step guide

    CERN Document Server

    Sandler, Stanley I

    2015-01-01

    A step-by-step guide for students (and faculty) on the use of Aspen in teaching thermodynamics Used for a wide variety of important engineering tasks, Aspen Plus software is a modeling tool used for conceptual design, optimization, and performance monitoring of chemical processes. After more than twenty years, it remains one of the most popular and powerful chemical engineering simulation programs used both industrially and academically. Using Aspen Plus in Thermodynamics Instruction: A Step by Step Guide introduces the reader to the use of Aspen Plus in courses in thermodynamics. It prov

  15. STEP - Product Model Data Sharing and Exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kroszynski, Uri

    1998-01-01

    - Product Data Representation and Exchange", featuring at present some 30 released parts, and growing continuously. Many of the parts are Application Protocols (AP). This article presents an overview of STEP, based upon years of involvement in three ESPRIT projects, which contributed to the development......During the last fifteen years, a very large effort to standardize the product models employed in product design, manufacturing and other life-cycle phases has been undertaken. This effort has the acronym STEP, and resulted in the International Standard ISO-10303 "Industrial Automation Systems...

  16. One-step lowrank wave extrapolation

    KAUST Repository

    Sindi, Ghada Atif

    2014-01-01

    Wavefield extrapolation is at the heart of modeling, imaging, and Full waveform inversion. Spectral methods gained well deserved attention due to their dispersion free solutions and their natural handling of anisotropic media. We propose a scheme a modified one-step lowrank wave extrapolation using Shanks transform in isotropic, and anisotropic media. Specifically, we utilize a velocity gradient term to add to the accuracy of the phase approximation function in the spectral implementation. With the higher accuracy, we can utilize larger time steps and make the extrapolation more efficient. Applications to models with strong inhomogeneity and considerable anisotropy demonstrates the utility of the approach.

  17. HPRF pulse Doppler stepped frequency radar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LONG Teng; REN LiXiang

    2009-01-01

    Stepped frequency radar Is a well known scheme to generate high range resolution profile (HRRP) of targets. Through appropriate radar parameter design, the radar enables both unambiguous velocity measurement and high resolution ranging within a single dwell in a high pulse repetition frequency (HPRF) mode. This paper analyzes in detail the design principle of the HPRF stepped frequency radar system, the solution to its ambiguity issue, as well as its signal processing method. Both theoretical analysis and simulation results demonstrate that the proposed radar scheme can work independently to solve the problem of motion compensation, and is therefore highly applicable to many new types of radar.

  18. Relative and absolute reliability of the new "Step-Ex" step-execution test in elderly people with and without balance problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halvarsson, Alexandra; Franzén, Erika; Olsson, Elisabeth; Ståhle, Agneta

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the relative and absolute test-re-test reliability of a new step-execution test, "Step-Ex", for clinical use in elderly with and without balance problems. Test-re-test design to assess intrarater reliability. Thirty-four healthy community-dwelling elderly (65-87 years), 16 with balance problems, were tested twice two weeks apart. Step-Ex consists of two portable force platforms that register vertical ground reaction forces connected to a computer for easy detection of temporal events and phases (reaction-, preparation-, stepping- and step execution phase). Standing with one foot on each platform, the subjects were given a tactile stimulus on the heel to initiate rapid steps forward. Test-re-test agreement was good to very good: ICC(2)(.6) 0.83-0.87 (without balance problems) and 0.71-0.83 (with balance problems) with no apparent systematic differences between the tests. The SEM, i.e. the smallest detectable change that may indicate a real clinical improvement for a group of individuals was small, 4.6-8.6%. The smallest real difference, representing the smallest change that reveals clinical improvement for a single individual, was 13-24%. Step-Ex is a highly reliable instrument and can be recommended as an outcome measure evaluating the effects of balance training in elderly people with and without balance deficits. • Balance deficits are common in the elderly population. • To evaluate the effects of treatment or changes over time it is of great importance to have reliable instruments. • Step-Ex is a highly reliable instrument and can be recommended as an outcome measure evaluating the effects of treatment or changes over time in elderly people with and without balance deficits.

  19. Taking steps to increase the trustworthiness of scientific research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarborough, Mark

    2014-09-01

    To enjoy the public's trust, the research community must first be clear about what it is expected to do and then avoid the incidents that prevent it from meeting those expectations. Among other things, there are expectations that published scientific results will be reliable, that research has the potential to contribute to the common good, and that research will be conducted ethically. Consequently, the scientific community needs to avoid lapses that prevent it from meeting these three expectations. This requires a strong commitment to trustworthy research practices, as well as mechanisms that diminish lapses that inevitably occur in complex endeavors such as scientific research. The author presents a model to assess the strength of commitment to trustworthy research and explores proven quality assurance mechanisms that can diminish lapses in research injurious to the public's trust. Some mechanisms identify in advance ways that things can go wrong so that steps can be taken to prevent them from going wrong in the first place. Other mechanisms investigate past errors or near misses to discover their causes so that they can be addressed to avoid similar future instances. The author explains why such methods are useful to efforts to promote research worthy of the public's trust.

  20. Statistical optimization for biodiesel production from waste frying oil through two-step catalyzed process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charoenchaitrakool, Manop [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kasetsart University, Bangkok (Thailand); Center for Advanced Studies in Nanotechnology and its Applications in Chemical, Food and Agricultural Industries, Kasetsart University, Bangkok (Thailand); Thienmethangkoon, Juthagate [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kasetsart University, Bangkok (Thailand)

    2011-01-15

    The aim of this work was to investigate the optimum conditions in biodiesel production from waste frying oil using two-step catalyzed process. In the first step, sulfuric acid was used as a catalyst for the esterification reaction of free fatty acid and methanol in order to reduce the free fatty acid content to be approximate 0.5%. In the second step, the product from the first step was further reacted with methanol using potassium hydroxide as a catalyst. The Box-Behnken design of experiment was carried out using the MINITAB RELEASE 14, and the results were analyzed using response surface methodology. The optimum conditions for biodiesel production were obtained when using methanol to oil molar ratio of 6.1:1, 0.68 wt.% of sulfuric acid, at 51 C with a reaction time of 60 min in the first step, followed by using molar ratio of methanol to product from the first step of 9.1:1, 1 wt.% KOH, at 55 C with a reaction time of 60 min in the second step. The percentage of methyl ester in the obtained product was 90.56 {+-} 0.28%. In addition, the fuel properties of the produced biodiesel were in the acceptable ranges according to Thai standard for community biodiesel. (author)

  1. Effect of step height on cardiorespiratory responses during aerobic step test in young Indian women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tirthankar Chatterjee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Step aerobics is practiced in health centres, fitness training gyms, and academic institutions in India. This exercise module is gaining popularity day by day. But, these kind of aerobic exercise tests are less investigated for Indian women population. Objective: A widely practiced aerobic step test was applied to a group of young female to explore the effect of step height on physiological responses and suggest the best height of stepping. Method: Eight physically fit and active female university students with mean age 19.7 (±2.3 yrs, height 156.2 (±6.5 cm, weight 51.2 (±7.9 kg, and VO2max 35.7 (±4.8 ml.min-1.kg-1 volunteered for the study. Each subject performed 30 minutes of step test in two Reebok steps heights (6 inch and 8 inches with a rhythm of 120 beats.min-1. At this cadence 30 cycles of stepping up and down were completed in 1 min. Relative work load (% VO2 max, energy expenditure (EE, Heart rate (HR, percentage of age predicted maximum HR were measured using K4b2 Cosmed system. Result: The results showed that eight inch step is offering a significant higher value across most of the parameters investigated compared to six inch step. So it can be inferred that the higher the step height the higher will be the physiological responses. Conclusion: The present study clearly demonstrates that aerobic stepping on 6 inch bench height for 30 minutes with a cadence of 120 beats. min-1 may be more suitable and safe exercise module to improve cardio respiratory fitness for Indian young females. Further investigations are required to identify suitable exercise modules in terms of bench height, cadence and duration for different age groups and according to their fitness level (trained/untrained and height on larger sample size.

  2. Next Steps in Signaling (NSIS): Framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hancock, R.; Loughney, J.; van den Bosch, S.; Hancock, R.; Karagiannis, Georgios; Loughney, J.; van den Bosch, S.

    2005-01-01

    The Next Steps in Signaling (NSIS) working group is considering protocols for signaling information about a data flow along its path in the network. The NSIS suite of protocols is envisioned to support various signaling applications that need to install and/or manipulate such state in the network. B

  3. Organic chemistry: A radical step forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenhao; Li, Ang

    2017-02-01

    Free radicals are notorious for unselective coupling reactions; however, the coupling of free radicals generated from acyl tellurides has now been shown to form C-C bonds with remarkable fidelity, which enables easy one-step assembly of densely oxygenated natural product motifs.

  4. Webinar: Stepped chute design for embankment dams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changing demographics in the vicinity of dams have led to hazard creep in a number of dams worldwide. Many of these dams now have insufficient spillway capacity as a result of these changes in hazard classification from low to significant or high hazard. Stepped chutes applied to the embankment da...

  5. Dynamics of hydrogen dissociation on stepped platinum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, I. M. N.; Schouten, K. J. P.; Kleyn, A. W.; Juurlink, L. B. F.

    2008-01-01

    We have studied the reactivity of hydrogen on the Pt(211) stepped surface using supersonic molecular beam techniques. We observe an energy dependence that is indicative of indirect adsorption below 9 kJ mol(-1) and direct adsorption between 0 and 37 kJ mol(-1). Comparison of our results to

  6. Small Steps towards Student-Centred Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, George M.; Toh-Heng, Hwee Leng

    2013-01-01

    Student centred learning classroom practices are contrasted with those in teacher centred learning classrooms. The discussion focuses on the theoretical underpinnings of the former, and provides nine steps and tips on how to implement student centred learning strategies, with the aim of developing the 21st century skills of self-directed and…

  7. AUDIOMETRY-FIRST STEP TO EARLY DETECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavco CADIEV

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available The problem of early detection of children with sense of hearing is very complicate. If the damage of sense of hearing is not detected on time and if You don’t take adequate treatment, after seven year that is impossible. Audiometry is one step to reestablishment diagnostic with help of electronic technology.

  8. "Stepping Up": A Focus on Facilitator Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostouros, Patricia; Warthe, D. Gaye; Carter-Snell, Catherine; Burnett, Che

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the impact on peer facilitators in "Stepping Up," a dating violence prevention program at a Canadian university. A focus group held eight months following the delivery of the program determined the personal impact of involvement in the program. Results indicate that peer facilitators experienced personal growth as…

  9. 15 CFR 732.1 - Steps overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... consider the various provisions of the EAR. (b) Facts about your transaction. The following five types of facts determine your obligations under the EAR and will be of help to you in reviewing these steps: (1...): Support of proliferation activities. (viii) General Prohibition Eight (In-Transit): In-transit...

  10. Steps You Can Take to Prevent Cancer

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-02-02

    This podcast discusses the main steps people can take to reduce their risk of getting cancer.  Created: 2/2/2012 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 2/2/2012.

  11. The CERCA School Report Card: Communities Creating Education Quality. Implementation Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guio, Ana Florez; Chesterfield, Ray; Siri, Carmen

    2006-01-01

    This manual provides a step-by-step methodology for promoting community participation in improving learning in local schools. The Civic Engagement for Education Reform in Central America (CERCA) School Report Card (SRC) approach empowers local school communities to gather information on the quality and conditions of teaching and learning in their…

  12. Fostering Autonomy through Syllabus Design: A Step-by-Step Guide for Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez Espinosa, Alexánder

    2016-01-01

    Promoting learner autonomy is relevant in the field of applied linguistics due to the multiple benefits it brings to the process of learning a new language. However, despite the vast array of research on how to foster autonomy in the language classroom, it is difficult to find step-by-step processes to design syllabi and curricula focused on the…

  13. Steps, Choices and Moral Accounting: Observations from a Step-Counting Campaign in the Workplace

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorm, Nanna; Shklovski, Irina

    2016-01-01

    Sedentary work is a contributing factor to growing obesity levels worldwide. Research shows that step-counters can offer a way to motivate greater physical mobility. We present an in-situ study of a nation-wide workplace step-counting campaign. Our findings show that in the context of the workplace...

  14. Impact of Preadmission Variables on USMLE Step 1 and Step 2 Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleshinski, James; Khuder, Sadik A.; Shapiro, Joseph I.; Gold, Jeffrey P.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the predictive ability of preadmission variables on United States Medical Licensing Examinations (USMLE) step 1 and step 2 performance, incorporating the use of a neural network model. Method: Preadmission data were collected on matriculants from 1998 to 2004. Linear regression analysis was first used to identify predictors of…

  15. Step Frequency and Step Length of 200-m Sprint in Able-bodied and Amputee Sprinters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobara, H; Sano, Y; Kobayashi, Y; Heldoorn, T A; Mochimaru, M

    2016-02-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the hypothesis that the difference in the 200-m sprint performance of amputee and able-bodied sprinters is due to a shorter step length rather than a lower step frequency. Men's elite-level 200-m races with a total of 16 able-bodied, 13 unilateral transtibial, 5 bilateral transtibial, and 16 unilateral transfemoral amputee sprinters were analyzed from publicly available internet broadcasts. For each run, the average forward velocity, step frequency, and step length over the entire 200-m distance were analyzed for each sprinter. The average forward velocity of able-bodied sprinters was faster than that of the other 3 groups, but there was no significant difference in average step frequency between able-bodied and transtibial amputee sprinters. However, the average step length of able-bodied sprinters was significantly longer than that of the transtibial amputee sprinters. In contrast, the step frequency and step length of transfemoral amputees were significantly lower and shorter than those of the other 3 groups. These results suggest that the differences in 200-m sprint performance between able-bodied and amputee sprinters are dependent on amputation level.

  16. On the Road towards Child-Centered Education: Step by Step in Moldova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cincilei, Cornelia

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses the outcome of the implementation of the Step by Step child-centered education model in Moldova. The implementation began with 12 classrooms of four-to five-year-old children in five kindergartens. The positive response from parents and teachers received at the end of the first year exceeded all expectations. As a result, 60…

  17. Two Steps Forward, One Step Backward: Must This Be the Future of Diversity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Johnnella E.

    2013-01-01

    Johnnella Butler writes here that the title of this article "Two Steps Forward, One Step Backward," expresses the "wicked problem" of diversity as a concrete goal in higher education. The concept of the "wicked problem," is a term coined in the late 1960s by social planners. Consulting Wikipedia, as so many of our…

  18. Listen to Me Listen to You: A Step-By-Step Guide to Communication Skills Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotzman, Mandy; Kotzman, Anne

    2008-01-01

    This step-by-step guide is a companion to the popular "Listen to Me, Listen to You: A Practical Guide to Self-Awareness, Communication Skills and Conflict Management" (New Expanded Edition, Penguin Books, 2007). It is designed for use by anyone working in communication skills and personal development training. Resource material is grouped under…

  19. Accuracy of Single-Step versus 2-Step Double-Mix Impression Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franco, Eduardo Batista; da Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes; Herrera, Francyle Simões

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the accuracy of dies obtained from single-step and 2-step double-mix impressions. Material and Methods. Impressions (n = 10) of a stainless steel die simulating a complete crown preparation were performed using a polyether (Impregum Soft Heavy and Light body) and a vinyl...

  20. SPSS for Windows Step by Step: A Simple Guide and Reference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Darren; Mallery, Paul

    This book is designed to give step-by-step instructions necessary to do most major types of data analysis using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS). SPSS is a powerful tool that is capable of conducting nearly any type of data analysis used in the social sciences. This book should enable the reader to do 95% of what the program…

  1. Community Education and the Urban Indian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockart, Barbetta L.

    Because the circumstances and problems of the urban American Indian are unique and are not being met by public education and service agencies, urban Indians across the nation have joined together within their communities and taken steps to help address their special social, educational, cultural, economic, and political needs. The establishment of…

  2. Marketing: A Definition for Community Colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotler, Philip; Goldgehn, Leslie A.

    1981-01-01

    Defines marketing and discusses the eight steps of the marketing process. Emphasizes the necessity of having one individual or committee responsible for coordinating marketing functions. Notes that marketing's success depends on its acceptance by all levels of the institution. Lists the benefits of implementing marketing in a community college.…

  3. Marketing: A Definition for Community Colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotler, Philip; Goldgehn, Leslie A.

    1981-01-01

    Defines marketing and discusses the eight steps of the marketing process. Emphasizes the necessity of having one individual or committee responsible for coordinating marketing functions. Notes that marketing's success depends on its acceptance by all levels of the institution. Lists the benefits of implementing marketing in a community college.…

  4. Online Communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Henrik; Lassen, Astrid Heidemann; Gorm Hansen, Katrine

    ”Online Communities” er et medie for brugere og fagfolk, hvor de kan mødes digitalt for at dele erfaringer, og dette kan anvendes som inspiration indenfor Brugerdreven Innovation. Via ”desk research” kan virksomheder opnå adgang til varierende mængder af brugere på en forholdsvist enkelt måde. I...... denne rapport beskrives eksperimentets opbygning, resultater og mulige værdi. Vi håber hermed på at kunne give praktisk indsigt i, hvorledes virksomheder fra byggematerialeindustrien kan agere i online communities....

  5. Community capacity for sustainable community-based dengue prevention and control:domain, assessment tool and capacity building model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Charuai Suwanbamrung

    2010-01-01

    In order to understand the community capacity for sustainable community-based dengue prevention and control, this paper proposes the approach of a previous study about meaning and domains of dengue prevention and control, an assessment tool and a community capacity building model for sustainable community-based dengue prevention and control in the Southern Thailand. A study of dengue community capacity domains was conducted by utilizing a qualitative method, whereby ten initial community domains were identified by means of a literature review, in-depth interviews of sixty community leaders, and eight focus group discussions with sixty non-leaders in four sub-districts of southern Thailand. In the final study, there were 14 identifiable domains in leaders group and 11 domains in non-leaders. The resulting dengue community capacity-assessment tool (DCCAT) consisted of two parts:one for leaders (DCCAT-L) and the other for non-leaders (DCCAT-NL). DCCAT-L was composed of 115 items within 14 domains and 83 items within 11 domains for the DCCAT-NL. The key domains of leaders and non-leaders had a partial overlap of domains such as critical situation management, personal leadership, health care provider capacity, needs assessment, senses of community, leader group networking, communication of dengue information, community leadership, religious capacity, leader group and community networking, resource mobilization, dengue working group, community participation, and continuing activities. The application of the new tool consisted of five steps:1) community preparation, 2) assessment, 3) a community hearing meeting, 4) interventions, and 5) conclusion and improvement step. All stakeholders in the community should use the new tool based on a clear understanding of the measurement objectives, the desired outcomes, resources available and characteristics of their community. If communities need to develop and build dengue community capacity, then the designed pre

  6. The energy cost for the step-to-step transition in amputee walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houdijk, Han; Pollmann, Eveline; Groenewold, Marlies; Wiggerts, Han; Polomski, Wojtek

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the increased energy cost of amputee gait could be accounted for by an increase in the mechanical work dissipated during the step-to-step transition in walking. Eleven transtibial amputees (AMP) and 11 age-matched controls (CO) walked at both comfortable (CWS) and fixed (FWS, 1.3m/s) walking speed, while external mechanical work of each separate leg and metabolic energy consumption were measured. At FWS the metabolic energy consumption (E(met)) was significantly higher in AMP compared to CO (3.34 Jkg(-1)s(-1) vs. 2.73 Jkg(-1)s(-1)). At CWS, no difference in energy consumption was found (3.56 Jkg(-1)s(-1) vs. 3.58 Jkg(-1)s(-1)) but CWS was significantly lower in AMP compared to CO (1.35 ms(-1) vs. 1.52 ms(-1)). In conjunction with the higher E(met) at FWS, the negative work generated by the intact leading leg for the step-to-step transition in double support was significantly higher for AMP than CO at FWS. A moderate though significant correlation was found between negative mechanical power generated during the step-to-step transition and metabolic power (CWS: r=-0.56, p=0.007; FWS: r=-0.50, p=0.019). Despite the difference in negative work during the step-to-step transition, the total absolute mechanical work over a stride did not differ between groups. This could possibly be attributed to exchange of internal positive and negative work during single support, which remains unnoticed in the external work calculations. It was concluded that the increased mechanical work for the step-to-step transition from prosthetic to intact limb contributes to the increased metabolic energy cost of amputee walking.

  7. Stepping Stones: Relationships, Resiliency, and Reflective Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Victor J.; Lewis, Marva L.; Daniher, Kathy; Murphy, Keanna

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the story of resilience of a mother who achieved multiple successes despite challenges that included child abuse and homelessness. The factors that contributed to her success included consistent support from a team of staff of the family Assertive Community Treatment (FACT) Program. This agency serves mothers from 18 to 25…

  8. African American community members sustain favorable blood pressure outcomes through 12-month telephone motivational interviewing (MI) maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Community approaches offer promise for addressing disparities experienced by African Americans in hypertension prevalence, treatment, and control. HUB City Steps, a community-based participatory research lifestyle intervention, tracked participants through a 12-month MI maintenance phase following a...

  9. Achieving a shared vision for girls' health in a low-income community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M Elizabeth; Vaughn, Lisa M

    2015-01-01

    In response to a lack of information related to girls' health in a low-income community, an initiative was developed to create a community-wide vision for girls' health. A forum was conducted following a photovoice project to generate sustainable action steps. Forty-four participants attended the forum. Key action steps included decreasing barriers to participation in girls' programs, offering leadership roles and interpersonal communication skills for girls in the community, and engaging girls in community organizations. Integral to the forum's success were the initial photos, which provided a bridge from understanding the issues of girls' health to the development of the action steps.

  10. Effect of the Backward-Facing Step Location on the Aerodynamics of a Morphing Wing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadi Mishriky

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade, aircraft morphing technology has drawn a lot of attention in the aerospace community, because it is likely to improve the aerodynamic performance and the versatility of aircraft at different flight regimes. With the fast paced advancements in this field, a parallel stream of research is studying different materials and designs to develop reliable morphing skins. A promising candidate for a viable morphing skin is the sliding skin, where two or more rigid surfaces remain in contact and slide against each other during morphing. The overlapping between each two panels create a backward-facing step on the airfoil surface which has a critical effect on the aerodynamics of the wing. This paper presents a numerical study of the effect of employing a backward-facing step on the suction side of a National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA 2412 airfoil at a high Reynolds number of 5.9 × 106. The effects of the step location on the lift coefficient, drag coefficient and critical angle of attack are studied to find a favorable location for the step along the chord-wise direction. Results showed that employing a step on the suction side of the NACA 2412 airfoil can adversely affect the aforementioned aerodynamic properties. A drop of 21.1% in value of the lift coefficient and an increase of 120.8% in the drag coefficient were observed in case of a step located at 25% of the chord length. However, these effects are mitigated by shifting the step location towards the trailing edge. Introducing a step on the airfoil caused the airfoil’s thickness to change, which in turn has affected the transition point of the viscous boundary layer from laminar to turbulent. The location of the step, prior or post the transition point, has a noteworthy effect on the pressure and shear stress distribution, and consequently on the values of the lift and drag coefficients.

  11. Foot clearance strategy for step-over-step stair climbing in transfemoral amputees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobara, Hiroaki; Kobayashi, Yoshiyuki; Nakamura, Takashi; Yamasaki, Nobuya; Ogata, Toru

    2014-08-01

    Stair ascent is a particularly challenging task for transfemoral amputees. The aim of this clinical note was to describe the kinematic features of foot clearance in transfemoral amputee who can ascend stairs using a step-over-step strategy. The marker trajectories of the first metatarsophalangeal joint (Mt1) and clearance height were measured in two transfemoral amputees who could (TF1) and could not (TF2) climb stairs using a step-over-step strategy. The Mt1 marker trajectories of the TF1 moved backward in the early swing phase, and the trajectory followed an off-centered parabolic arc to achieve a similar clearance height as able-bodied subjects. TF2 could not climb the stairs without tripping in each step. An effective compensatory strategy to avoid tripping during stair climbing may be to use the hip joint for a backward extension and rapid flexion of the prosthetic leg during the early swing phase. The foot clearance strategy in transfemoral amputees who can climb stairs using a step-over-step strategy will help us better understand adaptive prosthetic control and thus develop more effective gait rehabilitation programs. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2013.

  12. Overlapping Community Detection based on Network Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Zhuanlian; Zhang, Xingyi; Sun, Dengdi; Luo, Bin

    2016-04-01

    Community detection in complex network has become a vital step to understand the structure and dynamics of networks in various fields. However, traditional node clustering and relatively new proposed link clustering methods have inherent drawbacks to discover overlapping communities. Node clustering is inadequate to capture the pervasive overlaps, while link clustering is often criticized due to the high computational cost and ambiguous definition of communities. So, overlapping community detection is still a formidable challenge. In this work, we propose a new overlapping community detection algorithm based on network decomposition, called NDOCD. Specifically, NDOCD iteratively splits the network by removing all links in derived link communities, which are identified by utilizing node clustering technique. The network decomposition contributes to reducing the computation time and noise link elimination conduces to improving the quality of obtained communities. Besides, we employ node clustering technique rather than link similarity measure to discover link communities, thus NDOCD avoids an ambiguous definition of community and becomes less time-consuming. We test our approach on both synthetic and real-world networks. Results demonstrate the superior performance of our approach both in computation time and accuracy compared to state-of-the-art algorithms.

  13. OPTIMUM PLASMA STATES FOR NEXT STEP TOKAMAKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LIN-LIU,YR; STAMBAUGH,RD

    2002-11-01

    OAK A271 OPTIMUM PLASMA STATES FOR NEXT STEP TOKAMAKS. The dependence of the ideal ballooning {beta} limit on aspect ratio, A, and elongation {kappa} is systematically explored for nearly 100% bootstrap current driven tokamak equilibria in a wide range of the shape parameters (A = 1.2-7.0, {kappa} = 1.5-6.0 with triangularity {delta} = 0.5). The critical {beta}{sub N} is shown to be optimal at {kappa} = 3.0-4.0 for all A studied and increases as A decreases with a dependence close to A{sup -0.5}. The results obtained can be used as a theoretical basis for the choice of optimum aspect ratio and elongation of next step burning plasma tokamaks or tokamak reactors.

  14. Ultrasharp magnetization steps in perovskite manganites.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahendiran, R.; Maignan, A.; Herbert, S.; Martin, C.; Hervieu, M.; Raveau, B.; Mitchell, J. F.; Schiffer, P.; Materials Science Division; Penn State Univ.; Lab. CRISMAT

    2002-12-31

    We report a detailed study of steplike metamagnetic transitions in polycrystalline Pr{sub 0.5}Ca{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 0.95}Co{sub 0.05}O{sub 3}. The steps have a sudden onset below a critical temperature, are extremely sharp (width <2x10{sup -4} T), and occur at critical fields which are linearly dependent on the absolute value of the cooling field in which the sample is prepared. Similar transitions are also observed at low temperature in non-Co doped manganites, including single crystal samples. These data show that the steps are an intrinsic property, qualitatively different from either previously observed higher temperature metamagnetic transitions in the manganites or metamagnetic transitions observed in other materials.

  15. The 7-Steps of the Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Y.; Bamba, A.; Hiraga, J. S.; Isobe, N.; Kubota, A.; Ota, N.; Ranalli, P.; Senda, A.; Suzuki, M.; Tamagawa, T.; Ozaki, M.; Ebisawa, K.; Ishisaki, Y.; Matsumoto, H.; Yamagishi, I.; Tamura, T.; Mukai, K.; Angelini, L.; Hamaguchi, K.; Suzaku Processing Members

    It may seem to be difficult to analyze the Suzaku data, but the datastructure and the tools are rather simple. We have constructed the way to process Suzaku FITS data and ftools for over ten years. We have prepared three kinds of manuals to analyze the data; Seven step manual of the XIS and the HXD for beginners, first step manual to walk through the analyses, and the ABC guide as a full manual. In the actual analyses, we have to be careful about events in operation and the limitations in the calibration of instruments. In this paper, the data structure, tools, and manuals with activities of help desks, current status of processing are summarized.

  16. Step index fibre using laser interferometer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A M Hamed

    2014-03-01

    model is suggested to describe the fringe shift which occurs due to the phase variations of cladded glass fibre introduced between the two plates of the liquid wedge interferometer illuminated with a He–Ne laser. The fringe shift of the phase object which appears in the denominator of the Airy distribution formula of the multiple beam interference is represented in the harmonic term. An experiment is conducted using liquid wedge interferometer where the step index glass fibre of a nearly quadratic thickness variation is introduced between the two plates of the interferometer. The obtained fringe shift shows a good agreement with the proposed quadratic model. The Matlab code is written to plot the interferometer fringes comprising the shift of the step index fibre. Secondly, recognition of elliptical fibres is outlined using tomographic imaging. Finally, results and concluding remarks are given.

  17. NEW STEPS IN SKETCHING MACHINE PARTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tocariu Liliana

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents new and main steps in sketching machine part, by using the Solid Edge program. The traditional method applied in the technical drawing is appreciably altered in the case of the computer-assisted and modern design. These modifications involve others: e.g., use of classic drawing rule in tool sketching. The author deals with them from three points of view, namely: technical drawing, technical education and advantages.

  18. Comprehensive Approach Workshop: Hard Problem First Steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    T being done and to be done. It is important to have the right people involved in these initial steps included those performing and managing the...attend the workshop: those performing as well as managing the science. Another lesson learned was to seek early endorsement of the science activity...Interagency, Multinational, Public », un regard historique, et d’explorer d’agilité organisationnelle comme un facteur essential d’améliorer

  19. STEP based Finish Machining CAPP system

    OpenAIRE

    A Arivazhagan; Mehta, NK; Jain, PK

    2012-01-01

    This research paper presents various methodologies developed in a STEP based Computer Aided Process Planning (CAPP) system named "Finish Machining – CAPP" (FM-CAPP). It is developed to generate automatic process plans for finish machining prismatic parts. It is designed in a modular fashion consisting of three main modules, namely (i) Feature Recognition module (FRM) (ii) Machining Planning Module (MPM) and (iii) Setup Planning Module (SPM). The FRM Module analyses the geometrical and topolog...

  20. The Hydroacoustics of Beveled Steps and Gaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    1984)) suggest that the timescale At= lc -ti is given by a Strouhal number of about one based on the reattachment length of the separation bubble...layer thickness in an anechoic wind-tunnel. Pressure fluctuations at locations in the vicinity of the step and at large distances upstream and...boundary layer thickness . Two flow speeds of U = 30 m/s and U = 60 m/s were used for each of the three different heights. Results showed that

  1. Optimizing step gauge measurements and uncertainties estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennebelle, F.; Coorevits, T.; Vincent, R.

    2017-02-01

    According to the standard ISO 10360-2 (2001 Geometrical product specifications (GPS)—acceptance and reverification tests for coordinate measuring machines (CMM)—part 2: CMMs used for measuring size (ISO 10360-2:2001)), we verify the coordinate measuring machine (CMM) performance against the manufacturer specification. There are many types of gauges used for the calibration and verification of CMMs. The step gauges with parallel faces (KOBA, MITUTOYO) are well known gauges to perform this test. Often with these gauges, only the unidirectional measurements are considered which avoids having to deal with a residual error that affects the tip radius compensation. However the ISO 10360-2 standard imposes the use of a bidirectional measurement. Thus, the bidirectional measures must be corrected by the residual constant offset probe. In this paper, we optimize the step gauge measurement and a method is given to mathematically avoid the problem of the constant offset of the tip radius. This method involves measuring the step gauge once and to measure it a second time with a shift of one slot in order to obtain a new set of equations. Uncertainties are also presented.

  2. Visual mislocalization during double-step saccades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eckart eZimmermann

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Visual objects presented briefly at the time of saccade onset appear compressed toward the saccade target. Compression strength depends on the presentation of a visual saccade target signal and is strongly reduced during the second saccade of a double-step saccade sequence (Zimmermann et al., 2014; 2014. Here, I tested whether perisaccadic compression is linked to saccade planning by contrasting two double-step paradigms. In the same-direction double-step paradigm, subjects were required to perform two rightward 10° saccades successively. At various times around execution of the saccade sequence a probe dot was briefly flashed. Subjects had to localize the position of the probe dot after they had completed both saccades. I found compression of visual space only at the time of the first but not at the time of the second saccade. In the reverse-direction paradigm, subjects performed first a rightward 10° saccade followed by a leftward 10° saccade back to initial fixation. In this paradigm compression was found in similar magnitude during both saccades. Analysis of the saccade parameters did not reveal indications of saccade sequence preplanning in this paradigm. I therefore conclude that saccade planning, rather than saccade execution factors, is involved in perisaccadic compression.

  3. Image Segmentation Using Two Step Splitting Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopal Kumar Jha

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Image processing and computer vision is widely using Level Set Method (LSM. In conventional level set formulation, irregularities are developed during evolution of level set function, which cause numerical errors and eventually destroy the stability of the evolution. Therefore a numerical remedy called re-initialization is typically applied periodically to replace the degraded level set function. However re –initialization raises serious problem that is when and how it should be performed and also affects numerical accuracy in an undesirable way. To overcome this drawback of re-initialization process, a new variation level set formulation called Distance regularization level set evolution (DRLSE is introduced in which the regularity of the level set function is internally maintained during the level set evolution. DRLSE allows more general and effective initialization of the level set function. But DRLSE uses relatively large number of steps to ensure efficient numerical accuracy. Here in this thesis we are implementing faster and equally efficient computation technique called two step splitting method (TSSM. TSSM is physio-chemical reaction diffusion equation in which firstly LSE equation get iterated and then regularize the level set function from the first step to ensure the stability and hence re-initialization is completely eliminated from LSE which also satisfy DRLSE.

  4. Microsoft® Visual Basic® 2010 Step by Step

    CERN Document Server

    Halvorson, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Your hands-on, step-by-step guide to learning Visual Basic® 2010. Teach yourself the essential tools and techniques for Visual Basic® 2010-one step at a time. No matter what your skill level, you'll find the practical guidance and examples you need to start building professional applications for Windows® and the Web. Discover how to: Work in the Microsoft® Visual Studio® 2010 Integrated Development Environment (IDE)Master essential techniques-from managing data and variables to using inheritance and dialog boxesCreate professional-looking UIs; add visual effects and print supportBuild com

  5. Designed communities?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Marie

    2013-01-01

    of a place is initially formed through the hands of architects, developers and estate agents, and further shaped and realized by residents, when taken into use. I suggest that by way of branding and iconic architecture these thoroughly designed environments reinforce the notion of residential space......In current residential spaces there seem to be an increasing emphasis on small-scale communities. A number of new, high profiled residential complexes thus seek to promote new ways of social living by rethinking architectural design, typologies and concepts. In this paper I explore the emergence...... as an identity unit. In Ørestad residents thus tend to identify by the name of the house they live in, rather than by the street name. These residential spaces may thus be seen as promoting micro-urban entities, as social and urban life is designed and staged within the residential complex, and activities...

  6. Developing Learning Communities: Using Communities of Practice within Community Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawthom, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    The idea that communities need to be inclusive is almost axiomatic. The process, whereby, community members engage in inclusive practices is far less understood. Similarly, UK universities are being encouraged to include the wider community and extent campus boundaries. Here, I suggest a particular theoretical lens which sheds light on engagement…

  7. Step-Step Random Walk Network with Power-Law Clique-Degree Distribution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Han-Xin; WANG Bing-Hong; LIU Jian-Guo; HAN Xiao-Pu; ZHOU Tao

    2008-01-01

    We propose a simple mechanism for generating scale-free networks with degree exponent γ=3, where the new node is connected to the existing nodes by step-by-step random walk. It is found that the clique-degree distribution based on our model obeys a power-law form, which is in agreement with the recently empirical evidences. In addition, our model displays the small-world effect and the hierarchical structure.

  8. MEASURING SYSTEM FOR FEEDBACK REALIZATION IN COORDINATE POSITIONERS IN LINEAR STEP-BY-STEP MOTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Jarski

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers development of non-hysteresis position sensor for a planar direct drive in a linear step-by-step motor (LSM on the basis of the Hall-effect converters. A magnetic equivalent circuit, a transformation mathematical model for the LSM inductor position relatively to a stator are developed in the paper. The paper contains an analysis of experimental results.

  9. The step-by-step CFD design method of pressure-compensating emitter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Zhengying

    2013-01-01

    In order to improve the design and research and development (R & D) efficiency of the pressure-compensating drip irrigation emitter,a step-by-step computational fluid dynamics (CFD) design method was proposed based on CFD theory combined with the finite element method.By analyzing its hydraulic performance through the step-by-step CFD method,the prediction pressure-flow curve(p-Q curve) of the pressure-compensat-ing emitter was obtained.Then the test samples were fabricated using rapid prototype and manufacturing (RP & M) technology.The emitters' hydraulic performance experiment was carried out and the experimental p-Q curve was obtained.The step-by-step CFD design method was verified by comparing the experimental p-Q curve with the prediction values,which showed that the prediction values met the experimental results well within the normal range of the emitter's working pressure.On this basis,the effect of the emitter structure on its pressure-compensating performance was studied,which showed that the height of the pressure-compensating region had significant effects on the emitter's pressure-compensating performance.Series products of the pressure-compensating emitter could be designed by changing the region's height.

  10. Efficient Modularity Optimization: Multi-Step Greedy Algorithm and Vertex Mover Refinement

    CERN Document Server

    Schuetz, Philipp

    2007-01-01

    Identifying strongly connected substructures in large networks provides insight in their coarse-grained organization. Several approaches based on the optimization of a quality function, e.g. the modularity, have been proposed. We have developed a multi-step extension of the greedy algorithm (MSG) for modularity optimization and combined it with a simplistic refinement procedure called ``Vertex Mover'' (VM) which reassigns vertices to neighboring communities to improve the final modularity value. With an appropriate choice of the step-width in the MSG, the combined MSG&VM algorithm is able to find solutions of higher modularity than those reported previously. The multi-step extension does not alter the running time expectation of the greedy algorithm. It has been reported earlier that the greedy algorithm is the most efficient modularity optimization procedure for a generic (sparse) network (Danon et al., J. Stat. Mech. P09008 (2005)). Therefore, we conclude that the combined MSG&VM algorithm yields ne...

  11. Step tracking program for concentrator solar collectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciobanu, D.; Jaliu, C.

    2016-08-01

    The increasing living standards in developed countries lead to increased energy consumption. The fossil fuel consumption and greenhouse gas effect that accompany the energy production can be reduced by using renewable energy. For instance, the solar thermal systems can be used in temperate climates to provide heating during the transient period or cooling during the warmer months. Most used solar thermal systems contain flat plate solar collectors. In order to provide the necessary energy for the house cooling system, the cooling machine uses a working fluid with a high temperature, which can be supplied by dish concentrator collectors. These collectors are continuously rotated towards sun by biaxial tracking systems, process that increases the consumed power. An algorithm for a step tracking program to be used in the orientation of parabolic dish concentrator collectors is proposed in the paper to reduce the consumed power due to actuation. The algorithm is exemplified on a case study: a dish concentrator collector to be implemented in Brasov, Romania, a location with the turbidity factor TR equal to 3. The size of the system is imposed by the environment, the diameter of the dish reflector being of 3 meters. By applying the proposed algorithm, 60 sub-programs are obtained for the step orientation of the parabolic dish collector over the year. Based on the results of the numerical simulations for the step orientation, the efficiency of the direct solar radiation capture on the receptor is up to 99%, while the energy consumption is reduced by almost 80% compared to the continuous actuation of the concentrator solar collector.

  12. MARKETING CONSIDERATIONS ON BRAND COMMUNITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.-C. Budac

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Most consumers spend an important part of their free time looking for online information about the brands before taking a decision to purchase. The Internet is the main factor which has led to a considerable increase of the time allotted by consumers for search and comparing information about brands, as a step preceding the decision to purchase and also one of the most important factors that influence the interaction between the brand and the consumer. Although the general trend is that the public to become more active and more involved in the choice of the brand, consumer's responses to its messages obviously depend on cultural, social or economic factors. The work has the purpose to clarify what brand community means and how it appeared - if it was really built from scratch or it has already existed in a latent way and it must only be recognized - the characteristics of successful communities, which of the objectives of the brands can be achieved by means of these groups, what is the role of social media in the development of these communities, what kind of types of mem¬bers are likely to be encountered inside of the online communities and what is their proportion for each and which are the research methodologies that can give support to companies in monitoring these groups.

  13. Lanczos steps to improve variational wave functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becca, Federico; Hu, Wen-Jun; Iqbal, Yasir; Parola, Alberto; Poilblanc, Didier; Sorella, Sandro

    2015-09-01

    Gutzwiller-projected fermionic states can be efficiently implemented within quantum Monte Carlo calculations to define extremely accurate variational wave functions for Heisenberg models on frustrated two-dimensional lattices, not only for the ground state but also for low-energy excitations. The application of few Lanczos steps on top of these states further improves their accuracy, allowing calculations on large clusters. In addition, by computing both the energy and its variance, it is possible to obtain reliable estimations of exact results. Here, we report the cases of the frustrated Heisenberg models on square and Kagome lattices.

  14. An additional step toward comprehensive paleoclimate reanalyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goosse, Hugues

    2016-09-01

    Although data assimilation in paleoclimatology has shown significant progress, the model data comparison step remains a limiting factor because paleoclimate (proxy) records have generally a complex response to both climatic and nonclimatic factors. In experiments performed in a controlled framework, Dee et al. (2016) have applied proxy system models that simulate tree ring width, isotopic composition of corals and isotopic composition of ice cores from the results of a climate model. The difference between those simulated variables and the value measured on the natural archive can then be computed directly, improving significantly the performance of the data assimilation method.

  15. The quality step; La demarche qualite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellenoue, K. [Awiplan (France); Noyon, N. [Agence de l' Environnement et de la Maitrise de l' Energie, ADEME, 75 - Paris (France); Bourmeau, E. [OVAL, France (FR)] [and others

    2000-07-01

    The 25 and 26 may 2000, took place at Lille two discussion days on the quality step concerning the collecting, processing and valorization of the domestic wastes, facing the environmental and energy policy. The organic wastes concerned were the domestic wastes and also the wastes from the gardens. This document presents all the papers discussed during these two days and makes the state of the art in the domain. A special interest is given to the quality insurance management, its objectives and its operating. Many european examples and the QUALORG program are provided and analyzed. (A.L.B.)

  16. One-step microwave foaming and curing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliani, J.; Lee, R.; Sorathia, U. A. K.; Wilcoxson, A. L.

    1981-01-01

    Process that combines microwave foaming and curing of polyimide precursors in single step produces fire-resistant foam slabs of much larger volume than has previously been possible. By adding selected conductive fillers to powder precursors and by using high-power microwave oven, foam slabs with dimensions in excess of 61 by 61 by 7.6 cm are made. Typical foaming and curing and curing time is 35 minutes in microwave oven with additional 1 to 2 hour postcure in conventional oven.

  17. RFID in libraries a step toward interoperability

    CERN Document Server

    Ayre, Lori Bowen

    2012-01-01

    The approval by The National Information Standards Organization (NISO) of a new standard for RFID in libraries is a big step toward interoperability among libraries and vendors. By following this set of practices and procedures, libraries can ensure that an RFID tag in one library can be used seamlessly by another, assuming both comply, even if they have different suppliers for tags, hardware, and software. In this issue of Library Technology Reports, Lori Bowen Ayre, an experienced implementer of automated materials handling systems, Provides background on the evolution of the standard

  18. Oblique Water Wave Diffraction by a Step

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolai P.

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the problem of diffraction of an obliquely incident surface water wave train on an obstacle in the form of a finite step. Havelock expansions of water wave potentials are used in the mathematical analysis to obtain the physical parameters reflection and transmission coefficients in terms of integrals. Appropriate multi-term Galerkin approximations involving ultraspherical Gegenbauer polynomials are utilized to obtain a very accurate numerical estimate for reflection and transmission coefficients which are depicted graphically. From these figures various interesting results are discussed.

  19. A FOUR STEP APPROACH IN TEACHING READING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1994-01-01

    Introduction "I…am…a…stu…de…nt…of…Eng…li…sh." This is the way my students read silently in English and it is only one of the problems they have. They are confusing reading aloud and silent reading. It will be difficult for them to use English efficiently after graduation unless they can read in different ways. This article aims to present some suggestions for discussion about teaching reading. The article will be presented in three sections: firstly, the students’ difficulties in reading; secondly, the present teaching work in colleges; thirdly, some possible suggestions for improvement. The third section is divided into four steps, each focusing on a different technique.

  20. Oblique Water Wave Diffraction by a Step

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolai, P.

    2017-02-01

    This paper is concerned with the problem of diffraction of an obliquely incident surface water wave train on an obstacle in the form of a finite step. Havelock expansions of water wave potentials are used in the mathematical analysis to obtain the physical parameters reflection and transmission coefficients in terms of integrals. Appropriate multi-term Galerkin approximations involving ultraspherical Gegenbauer polynomials are utilized to obtain a very accurate numerical estimate for reflection and transmission coefficients which are depicted graphically. From these figures various interesting results are discussed.

  1. Ten steps to successful poster presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardicre, Jayne; Devitt, Patric; Coad, Jane

    Receiving a letter confirming acceptance for you to present a poster at a conference can evoke mixed emotions. Joy, panic, fear and dread are among the many possible emotions and this is not exclusive to first time presenters. Developing an effective poster presentation is a skill that you can learn and can provide a rewarding way to present your work in a manner less intimidating than oral presentation (Shelledy, 2004). The key to successful poster presentation is meticulous, timely, well informed preparation. This article outlines ten steps to help guide you through the process to maximize your success.

  2. HETC-3STEP included fragmentation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shigyo, Nobuhiro; Iga, Kiminori; Ishibashi, Kenji [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1997-03-01

    High Energy Transport Code (HETC) based on the cascade-evaporation model is modified to calculate the fragmentation cross section. For the cascade process, nucleon-nucleon cross sections are used for collision computation; effective in-medium-corrected cross sections are adopted instead of the original free-nucleon collision. The exciton model is adopted for improvement of backward nucleon-emission cross section for low-energy nucleon-incident events. The fragmentation reaction is incorporated into the original HETC as a subroutine set by the use of the systematics of the reaction. The modified HETC (HETC-3STEP/FRG) reproduces experimental fragment yields to a reasonable degree. (author)

  3. Hip joint contact loads in older adults during recovery from forward loss of balance by stepping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, David F; Modenese, Luca; Trewartha, Grant; Carty, Christopher P; Constantinou, Maria; Lloyd, David G; Barrett, Rod S

    2016-09-06

    Hip joint contact loads during activities of daily living are not generally considered high enough to cause acute bone or joint injury. However there is some evidence that hip joint loads may be higher in stumble recovery from loss of balance. A common laboratory method used to evaluate balance recovery performance involves suddenly releasing participants from various static forward lean magnitudes (perturbation intensities). Prior studies have shown that when released from the same perturbation intensity, some older adults are able to recover with a single step, whereas others require multiple steps. The main purpose of this study was to use a musculoskeletal model to determine the effect of three balance perturbation intensities and the use of single versus multiple recovery steps on hip joint contact loads during recovery from forward loss of balance in community dwelling older adults (n=76). We also evaluated the association of peak hip contact loads with perturbation intensity, step length and trunk flexion angle at foot contact at each participant׳s maximum recoverable lean angle (MRLA). Peak hip joint contact loads were computed using muscle force estimates obtained using Static Optimisation and increased as lean magnitude was increased and were on average 32% higher for Single Steppers compared to Multiple Steppers. At the MRLA, peak hip contact loads ranged from 4.3 to 12.7 body weights and multiple linear stepwise regression further revealed that initial lean angle, step length and trunk angle at foot contact together explained 27% of the total variance in hip joint contact load. Overall findings indicated that older adults experience peak hip joint contact loads during maximal balance recovery by stepping that in some cases exceeded loads reported to cause mechanical failure of cadaver femurs. While step length and trunk flexion angle are strong predictors of step recovery performance they are at best moderate predictors of peak hip joint loading.

  4. Striving for Authentic Community Engagement: A Process Model from Urban Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, Jana

    2011-01-01

    This article presents an urban teacher education center as a process model of how a university can cultivate authentic community engagement. Tree essential steps of the process model are identified: (1) being physically located at the school or community site in order to build trust and become integrated into the life of the school or community,…

  5. Community Access to Atmospheric Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, J. J.; Batluck, G. R.; Durbin, P. B.; Gerard, R.; Larko, D. E.; Martin, A.; Tilmes, C. A.

    2007-05-01

    This poster provides an overview of the computer system that provides community access to atmosphere measurements derived from backscatter ultraviolet sources. It is funded by NASA's Advancing Collaborative Connections for Earth-Sun System Science (ACCESS), and is devoted to Measurements of Atmospheric Composition in the Ultraviolet. The purpose is to provide "one-stop shopping" for data and information of interested to the Backscattered Ultraviolet (BUV) community. It is built from the well-used, highly successful Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) web site, and is being evolved into a broader focus for the BUV community. This effort supports NASA's evolutionary step toward science measurement processing and analysis systems, and enables the BUV community to easily access information and expertise from multiple sources over a nearly 30 year history of space-based remote sensing of the atmosphere. It facilitates finding algorithms and scientific results from different parts of the BUV science community as well as from different instruments and missions. It provides the means to access the products of the Ozone Community Oriented Measurement-based Processing System (ComPS). The system contains components that store and manage data, manage user access to that data, provide multi-dimensional views of the data and other information, serve data based on user criteria, and facilitate on-line collaboration. The web site hosts Algorithm Theoretical Basis documents, quality assessment of data products, published papers, instrument descriptions, access to mission information, reports and assessments of events and issues, problem reporting and tracking, a moderated forum, and a user collaboration area. Visitors to the web site fall into several categories: the general public; students, educators, and researchers outside the BUV community; members of the BUV community who validate the measurements; members of the community who develop algorithms and software. Access to

  6. 48 CFR 14.503-1 - Step one.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Step one. 14.503-1 Section... AND CONTRACT TYPES SEALED BIDDING Two-Step Sealed Bidding 14.503-1 Step one. (a) Requests for... use the two step method. (3) The requirements of the technical proposal. (4) The evaluation...

  7. The Polytopic-k-Step Fibonacci Sequences in Finite Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ömür Deveci

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the polytopic-k-step Fibonacci sequences, the polytopic-k-step Fibonacci sequences modulo m, and the polytopic-k-step Fibonacci sequences in finite groups. Also, we examine the periods of the polytopic-k-step Fibonacci sequences in semidihedral group SD2m.

  8. Influence of ageing on self-etch adhesives: one-step vs. two-step systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchesi, Giulio; Frassetto, Andrea; Visintini, Erika; Diolosà, Marina; Turco, Gianluca; Salgarello, Stefano; Di Lenarda, Roberto; Cadenaro, Milena; Breschi, Lorenzo

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate microtensile bond strength (μTBS) to dentine, interfacial nanoleakage expression, and stability after ageing, of two-step vs. one-step self-etch adhesives. Human molars were cut to expose middle/deep dentine, assigned to groups (n = 15), and treated with the following bonding systems: (i) Optibond XTR (a two-step self-etch adhesive; Kerr), (ii) Clearfil SE Bond (a two-step self-etch adhesive; Kuraray), (iii) Adper Easy Bond (a one-step self-etch adhesive; 3M ESPE), and (iv) Bond Force (a one-step self-etch adhesive; Tokuyama). Specimens were processed for μTBS testing after 24 h, 6 months, or 1 yr of storage in artificial saliva at 37°C. Nanoleakage expression was examined in similarly processed additional specimens. At baseline the μTBS results ranked in the following order: Adper Easy Bond = Optibond XTR ≥Clearfil SE = Bond Force, and interfacial nanoleakage analysis showed Clearfil SE Bond = Adper Easy Bond = Optibond XTR> Bond Force. After 1 yr of storage, Optibond XTR, Clearfil SE Bond, and Adper Easy Bond showed higher μTBS and lower interfacial nanoleakage expression compared with Bond Force. In conclusion, immediate bond strength, nanoleakage expression, and stability over time were not related to the number of steps of the bonding systems, but to their chemical formulations. © 2012 Eur J Oral Sci.

  9. Product Information Platform Based on STEP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Taiyong; ZHANG Zhiwei

    2009-01-01

    The intemational standard ISO 10303.called STEP.has been used to deal with problems in the ex change of product models and the associated data between difierent computer-aided systems.A platform based on STEP for managing product information is presented.This platform includes three components:a product geometry information model,a product feature model and a product visualization model.An information extracting pattern,in which information is extracted from low level elements to high level ones,is adopted in establishing the product geometry information model.Relative elements lists are created based on the extracted product information.With the traversing of these lists,feature extraction methods are proposed,which take advantage of boundary information in product model and avoid the determination of concavity and convexity of curves.Information correlating to features iS stored in a structure named as feature block and the product visualization model iS founded from it.The feature block is used in the platform for information communication and synchronous update among the three components.

  10. Two-step procedures in Palm theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gert Nieuwenhuis

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Random time changes (RTCs are right-continuous and non-decreasing random functions passing the zero-level at 0. The behavior of such systems can be studied from a randomly chosen time-point and from a randomly chosen level. From the first point of view, the probability characteristics are described by the time-stationary distribution P. From the second point of view, the detailed Palm distribution (DPD is the ruling probability mechanism. The main topic of the present paper is a relationship between P and its DPD. Under P, the origin falls in a continuous part of the graph. Under the DPD, there are two typical situations: the origin lies in a jump-part of the extended graph or it lies in a continuous part. These observations lead to two conditional DPDs. We derive two-step procedures, which bridge the gaps between the several distributions. One step concerns the application of a shift, the second is just a change of measure arranged by a weight-function. The procedures are used to derive local characterization results for the distributions of Palm type. We also consider simulation applications. For instance, a procedure is mentioned to generate a simulation of the RTC as seen from a randomly chosen level in a jump-part when starting with simulations from a randomly chosen time-point. The point process with batch-arrivals is often used as an application.

  11. Surgical electronic logbook: A step forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Díaz, Carlos Javier; Luna Aufroy, Alexis; Rebasa Cladera, Pere; Serra Pla, Sheila; Jurado Ruiz, Cristina; Mora López, Laura; Serra Aracil, Xavier; Navarro Soto, Salvador

    2015-12-01

    The surgical electronic logbook (surgical e-logbook) aims to: simplify registration of the training activities of surgical residents, and to obtain reliable and detailed reports about these activities for resident evaluation. The surgical e-logbook is a unique and shared database. Residents prospectively record their activities in 3 areas: surgical, scientific and teaching. We can access activity reports that are constantly updated. Study period using the surgical e-logbook: Between June 2011 and May 2013. Number of surgeries reported: 4,255. Number of surgical procedures reported: 11,907. Number of surgeries per resident per year reported: 250. Number of surgical procedures per resident per year reported: 700. Surgical activity as a primary surgeon during the first year of residency is primarily in emergency surgery (68,01%) and by laparotomy (97,73%), while during the fifth year of residency 51,27% is performed in elective surgery and laparoscopy is used in 23,10% of cases. During this period, residents participated in a total of 11 scientific publications, 75 conference presentations and 69 continuing education activities. The surgical e-logbook is a useful tool that simplifies the recording and analysis of data about surgical and scientific activities of the residents. It is a step forward in the evaluation of the training of surgical residents, however, is only an intermediate step towards the development of a larger Spanish registry. Copyright © 2014 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. [Qualitative analysis: theory, steps and reliability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minayo, Maria Cecília de Souza

    2012-03-01

    This essay seeks to conduct in-depth analysis of qualitative research, based on benchmark authors and the author's own experience. The hypothesis is that in order for an analysis to be considered reliable, it needs to be based on structuring terms of qualitative research, namely the verbs 'comprehend' and 'interpret', and the nouns 'experience', 'common sense' and 'social action'. The 10 steps begin with the construction of the scientific object by its inclusion on the national and international agenda; the development of tools that make the theoretical concepts tangible; conducting field work that involves the researcher empathetically with the participants in the use of various techniques and approaches, making it possible to build relationships, observations and a narrative with perspective. Finally, the author deals with the analysis proper, showing how the object, which has already been studied in all the previous steps, should become a second-order construct, in which the logic of the actors in their diversity and not merely their speech predominates. The final report must be a theoretic, contextual, concise and clear narrative.

  13. TWO-STEP CONTROL GRADING METHOD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The incorrectness of function grading in value engineering has been an essential problem for de- cades. This paper proposes a new method, where the functions under consideration are ranked in queue ac- cording to their importance and then graded quantitatively. By using this method, the reviewers are more aware of the degrees of importance, and therefore will have an easier time grasping the standard and reducing the erroneous grading. In the first step, the sign test is used to discard incorrect data, to count the grading re- sult and to arrange in queue according to the degrees of functional importance. In the second step the queued up functions undergo quantitative grading, where the “average value of fluctuation coefficient” is proposed to determine the control levels and to delete unreasonable data outside the controlled region so as to get more sati- sfactory grading value. The proposed method solves the problem of the incorrectness of function grading in val- ue engineering. It has been proved that the correctness has been raised from the original 70% to over 95% . This new method is not only contributive to the discipline of value engineering but also suitable in the evalu- ation of technical economy.

  14. Albumin (BSA) adsorption onto graphite stepped surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Pereda, Pamela; Vilhena, J. G.; Takeuchi, Noboru; Serena, Pedro A.; Pérez, Rubén

    2017-06-01

    Nanomaterials are good candidates for the design of novel components with biomedical applications. For example, nano-patterned substrates may be used to immobilize protein molecules in order to integrate them in biosensing units. Here, we perform long MD simulations (up to 200 ns) using an explicit solvent and physiological ion concentrations to characterize the adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) onto a nano-patterned graphite substrate. We have studied the effect of the orientation and step size on the protein adsorption and final conformation. Our results show that the protein is stable, with small changes in the protein secondary structure that are confined to the contact area and reveal the influence of nano-structuring on the spontaneous adsorption, protein-surface binding energies, and protein mobility. Although van der Waals (vdW) interactions play a dominant role, our simulations reveal the important role played by the hydrophobic lipid-binding sites of the BSA molecule in the adsorption process. The complex structure of these sites, that incorporate residues with different hydrophobic character, and their flexibility are crucial to understand the influence of the ion concentration and protein orientation in the different steps of the adsorption process. Our study provides useful information for the molecular engineering of components that require the immobilization of biomolecules and the preservation of their biological activity.

  15. Early steps of retrovirus replicative cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saïb Ali

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract During the last two decades, the profusion of HIV research due to the urge to identify new therapeutic targets has led to a wealth of information on the retroviral replication cycle. However, while the late stages of the retrovirus life cycle, consisting of virus replication and egress, have been partly unraveled, the early steps remain largely enigmatic. These early steps consist of a long and perilous journey from the cell surface to the nucleus where the proviral DNA integrates into the host genome. Retroviral particles must bind specifically to their target cells, cross the plasma membrane, reverse-transcribe their RNA genome, while uncoating the cores, find their way to the nuclear membrane and penetrate into the nucleus to finally dock and integrate into the cellular genome. Along this journey, retroviruses hijack the cellular machinery, while at the same time counteracting cellular defenses. Elucidating these mechanisms and identifying which cellular factors are exploited by the retroviruses and which hinder their life cycle, will certainly lead to the discovery of new ways to inhibit viral replication and to improve retroviral vectors for gene transfer. Finally, as proven by many examples in the past, progresses in retrovirology will undoubtedly also provide some priceless insights into cell biology.

  16. Sutureless Cataract Surgery: Principles and Steps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Sandford-Smith

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Cataracts cause about 50% of world blindness. There is little likelihood of effective prevention becoming available in the next few years and so the only treatment will remain surgical. For many of the other major causes of world blindness, like trachoma, xerophthalmia and onchocerciasis, the remedy is community-based, not hospital-based, and requires prevention rather than treatment. The prevalence of blinding cataract will only increase as people live longer, so cataract will continue to be, by far, the most important treatable cause of blindness.

  17. Steps towards an integrated eco-economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Chris; Christensen, Bo Allesøe

    is well on the way. An important factor in the renaissance of Randers has been the project Randers Rainforest (RR). RR is a tropical zoo, which consists of an indoor exhibition within three domes, as well as an outdoor exhibition which includes the neighbouring meadows adjacent to the River Guden Since...... in Randers constitutes a case of an integrated rural and urban eco-economy, which transcends established borders between public and private organisations, private and community enterprise and between rural and urban spatial development....

  18. University of Aarhus - the stepping stones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kent T.

    is currently facing major challenges. Changes in the Danish University Act and a strong political wish for closer partnerships between the private business community, the public sector and the country's universities have gradually altered the role of the universities in Denmark today. This paper looks more...... closely at the history of the University of Aarhus, the importance of the University for the Aarhus region, and the opportunities and barriers facing an "old" comprehensive University in its attempts to adapt to the new role of universities in the knowledge society....

  19. Administration for Community Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Public Input Working Together, in Our Communities The Administration for Community Living was created around the fundamental ... Players U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Community Living

  20. The Community Energy Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellingham, Washington, is an EPA Climate Showcase Community. EPA’s Climate Showcase Communities Program helps local governments and tribal nations pilot innovative, cost-effective and replicable community-based greenhouse gas reduction projects.

  1. The Educative Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerensky, V. M.

    1975-01-01

    The educative community develops and mobilizes all resources, both human and physical, throughout the community in the development of human potential. The assumption that underpins the educative community is that all people are teachers and all are learners. (Author)

  2. Step-by-step deposition of synthetic dopamine-eumelanin and metal cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Vincent; Bour, Jérôme; Michel, Marc

    2013-09-01

    The photoprotection of skin depends mostly on a balance between two natural pigments: the black-brown eumelanin and the yellow-reddish pheomelanin. These pigments as well as their counterpart in the central nervous system, neuromelanin, interact strongly with metal cations like Fe(3+). In the mussel foot proteins, the coordination between catechol groups and these ions is also responsible for the strong hardness the mussel's cuticle. These examples are suggestive that coatings and materials can be made based on such materials, for instance, synthetic eumelanin colloids and metal cations. Herein, we demonstrate that films made from synthetic dopamine-eumelanin colloids and metal cations can be deposited on surfaces in a step-by-step manner. As typical metal cations, we used Cu(2+), Fe(3+), and La(3+) which are known to interact with eumelanins. In all cases, step-by-step deposition is only possible in the absence of water rinse between two deposition steps. It was found that trivalent cations allow for a faster increase in film deposition than Cu(2+). Complementary in PDADMAC-(eumelanin-Fe(3+))m films, iron III was found not to be reduced.

  3. A step-by-step guide to systematically identify all relevant animal studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenaars, Marlies; Hooijmans, Carlijn R; van Veggel, Nieky; ter Riet, Gerben; Leeflang, Mariska; Hooft, Lotty; van der Wilt, Gert Jan; Tillema, Alice; Ritskes-Hoitinga, Merel

    2012-01-01

    Before starting a new animal experiment, thorough analysis of previously performed experiments is essential from a scientific as well as from an ethical point of view. The method that is most suitable to carry out such a thorough analysis of the literature is a systematic review (SR). An essential first step in an SR is to search and find all potentially relevant studies. It is important to include all available evidence in an SR to minimize bias and reduce hampered interpretation of experimental outcomes. Despite the recent development of search filters to find animal studies in PubMed and EMBASE, searching for all available animal studies remains a challenge. Available guidelines from the clinical field cannot be copied directly to the situation within animal research, and although there are plenty of books and courses on searching the literature, there is no compact guide available to search and find relevant animal studies. Therefore, in order to facilitate a structured, thorough and transparent search for animal studies (in both preclinical and fundamental science), an easy-to-use, step-by-step guide was prepared and optimized using feedback from scientists in the field of animal experimentation. The step-by-step guide will assist scientists in performing a comprehensive literature search and, consequently, improve the scientific quality of the resulting review and prevent unnecessary animal use in the future.

  4. Community Mentoring: A Tool for Successful Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodge, Kathryn E.

    2015-01-01

    Mentoring occurs in an ad hoc and largely invisible manner in communities. This mentoring happens through modeling, storytelling, and asking open-ended questions. If Extension specialists and agents were more conscious and intentional about teaching community members and leaders about community mentoring, they would be more successful in resolving…

  5. Community Mentoring: A Tool for Successful Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodge, Kathryn E.

    2015-01-01

    Mentoring occurs in an ad hoc and largely invisible manner in communities. This mentoring happens through modeling, storytelling, and asking open-ended questions. If Extension specialists and agents were more conscious and intentional about teaching community members and leaders about community mentoring, they would be more successful in resolving…

  6. The moon as a stepping stone for a spacefaring civilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multhaup, K.

    2008-09-01

    After Columbia In early 2004, U.S. president George Bush introduced the Vision for Space Exploration (VSE). Conceived in the aftermath of the Columbia tragedy, it called for NASA to first return astronauts to the moon by 2020 and then send crews to Mars and beyond thereafter. Bush's plan has once again enlivened the long-lasting discussion of manned spaceflight vs. robotic exploration. Also, the plan to use the moon as a stepping stone has come under scrutiny and is being debated. Alternate approaches minimizing or deleting manned lunar exploration in the frame of the VSE were proposed. Fig. 1 A composite manned spacecraft departing Earth orbit en route to the moon. Image: NASA. In order to assess the value of us going back to the moon, it is necessary to debate without bias the meaning of human spaceflight in general and to discuss the role of science in future efforts. Lunar disenchantment Whithin the scientific community, manned exploration programs are put into question time and again. It is demanded that in light of supposedly immense costs any endeavour concerning this matter shall be justified by an indisputable scientific return — and in current debates, scientific value is not recognized in such a way that funding appears well-invested. It is lamented that funds are drawn from what is considered real science. In the past, robotic exploration has opended our eyes to the many wonders of the solar system. Through the eyes of Cassini , Mars Express, and other successful spacecraft, we have seen exotic landscapes—yet on second sight, some appeared all too familiar. BepiColombo will fly to Mercury to unravel its mysteries and the Jovian system may receive a new earthly visitor in the not too distant future. By means of machines like Spirit and Opportunity, we have roamed the surfaces of Mars—without actually ever setting foot there. Therefore, the question is often asked, "Why send crews?" Fig. 2 The upcoming Lunar Reconnisance Orbiter (LRO) as it circles

  7. A Deep Stochastic Model for Detecting Community in Complex Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jingcheng; Wu, Jianliang

    2017-01-01

    Discovering community structures is an important step to understanding the structure and dynamics of real-world networks in social science, biology and technology. In this paper, we develop a deep stochastic model based on non-negative matrix factorization to identify communities, in which there are two sets of parameters. One is the community membership matrix, of which the elements in a row correspond to the probabilities of the given node belongs to each of the given number of communities in our model, another is the community-community connection matrix, of which the element in the i-th row and j-th column represents the probability of there being an edge between a randomly chosen node from the i-th community and a randomly chosen node from the j-th community. The parameters can be evaluated by an efficient updating rule, and its convergence can be guaranteed. The community-community connection matrix in our model is more precise than the community-community connection matrix in traditional non-negative matrix factorization methods. Furthermore, the method called symmetric nonnegative matrix factorization, is a special case of our model. Finally, based on the experiments on both synthetic and real-world networks data, it can be demonstrated that our algorithm is highly effective in detecting communities.

  8. [Web-based education: learning surgical procedures step-by-step with 3D visualization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Velde, Susanne; Maljers, Jaap; Wiggers, Theo

    2014-01-01

    There is a need for more uniform, structured education focused on surgical procedures. We offer a standardized, step-by-step, web-based procedural training method with which surgeons can train more interns efficiently. The basis of this learning method is formed by 3D films in which surgical procedures are performed in clearly defined steps and the anatomic structures behind the surgical operating planes are further dissected. This basis is supported by online modules in which, aside from the operation, preparation and postoperative care are also addressed. Registrars can test their knowledge with exams. Trainers can see what the registrars studied, how they scored and how they progressed with their clinical skills. With the online portfolio we offer building blocks for certification and accreditation. With this clearly structured research method of constant quality, registrars are less dependent on the local trainer. In addition, through better preparation, the operation capacity can be used more efficiently for the training.

  9. Digital project management the complete step-by-step guide to a successful launch

    CERN Document Server

    Olson, Taylor

    2016-01-01

    The digital world is growing and changing at a rate that can seem overwhelming to those project managers who have to keep up with it to build customer-facing solutions and applications. It's rare for project managers working in this field to be provided with much direction or a process by which to carry out a project, and there has been next to nothing available specific to these types of projects in the literary marketplace. Digital Project Management: The Complete Step-by-Step Guide to a Successful Launch was developed to fill this gap by providing the knowledge, best practices and proven steps to consistently managing these types of project successfully from end-to-end now, and in the future with just minor adjustments to adapt to changes in technology.

  10. Climbing a ladder: a step-by-step approach to understanding the concept of agroecosystem health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkorta, I; Albizu, I; Amezaga, I; Onaindia, M; Buchner, V; Garbisu, C

    2004-01-01

    Population and individual health is linked to agroecosystem health. To comprehend the concept of agroecosystem health, one should climb a ladder consisting of several successive steps, each rung presenting a certain degree of instability (conceptual difficulty and uncertainty) in an advisable but not inevitable order. Here we suggest a ladder consisting of the following concepts: ecosystem, agroecosystem, biodiversity, sustainability, ecosystem health, and agroecosystem health. Although these concepts are to a certain extent well understood and grasped by scientists, politicians, natural resource managers, and environmentalists, some steps are still highly debatable, unclear, and present a considerable degree of reluctance to be defined and understood. Consequently, much empirical and theoretical effort must be made to construct solid conceptual ladders made up of such steps. In this enterprise, a traditional reductionistic approach confining interpretations to narrow scientific disciplines is unadvisable. Holistic, transdisciplinary approaches are required to reach the desired goal.

  11. Terrace-Width Distributions (TWDs) of Touching Steps: Modification of the Fermion Analogy, with Implications for Measuring Step-Step Interactions on Vicinals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einstein, T. L.; Sathiyanarayanan, Rajesh; Hamouda, Ajmi Bh.; Kim, Kwangmoo

    2010-03-01

    Using Monte Carlo simulations, we computefootnotetextRS, ABH, and TLE, Phys. Rev. B 80 (2009) 153415. the TWDs of surfaces in which steps can touch each other, forming multiple-atomic height steps, but cannot cross (no overhangs), and so inconsistent with the standard mapping to spinless fermions. Our numerical results show that the generalized Wigner distribution, with minor modifications at small step separations, gives a very good fit for TWDs of touching steps. (We also generate analytic results by generalizing results for extended fermions.footnotetextSiew-Ann Cheong and C.L. Henley, arXiv:0907.4228v1.) The interaction strength derived from the fit parameter indicates an effective attraction between steps, weakening the overall repulsion. The strength of this effective attraction decreases for larger mean-step separations and decreasing step-touching energies; describable via finite-size scaling. Hence, accurate extraction of the true repulsion strength requires multiple vicinalities.

  12. Fostering Autonomy Through Syllabus Design: A Step-by-Step Guide for Success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexánder Ramírez Espinosa

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Promoting learner autonomy is relevant in the field of applied linguistics due to the multiple benefits it brings to the process of learning a new language. However, despite the vast array of research on how to foster autonomy in the language classroom, it is difficult to find step-by-step processes to design syllabi and curricula focused on the development of learner autonomy. This paper presents a model of a successful English course, implemented at Universidad del Valle (Colombia, which is expected to serve as a practical guide to articulate the stages of design, implementation, and evaluation of an autonomy-fostering syllabus.

  13. Secondary amenorrhea in severe Asherman's syndrome: step by step fertility retrieval by Bettocchi's hysteroscope: some considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gizzo, Salvatore; Saccardi, Carlo; Di Gangi, Stefania; Bertocco, Anna; Vendemiati, Lucia; Righetto, Lara; Patrelli, Tito Silvio; D'antona, Donato; Nardelli, Giovanni Battista

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this report was to define the best diagnostic and therapeutic approach when secondary amenorrhea is related to undiagnosed Asherman syndrome. We present a single case of secondary amenorrhea with a previous diagnosis of alterated hypothalamic-hypophysary regulation, with a component of ovarian function in probable reduction, which was evaluated in our department and resulted affected by Asherman's syndrome IV stage. We describe step by step the diagnosis and treatment of a previously misdiagnosed case of severe Asherman's syndrome. An appropriate diagnosis and adequate treatment are mandatory to allow menses and fertility to be restored when severe Asherman's syndrome occurs.

  14. Microsoft® Office Excel® 2007 Step by Step

    CERN Document Server

    Frye, Curtis

    2009-01-01

    Experience learning made easy-and quickly teach yourself how to organize, analyze, and present data with Excel 2007. With Step By Step, you set the pace-building and practicing the skills you need, just when you need them! Create formulas, calculate values, and analyze dataPresent information visually with graphics, charts, and diagramsBuild PivotTable dynamic views-even easier with new data tablesReuse information from databases and other documentsShare spreadsheets for review and manage changesCreate macros to automate repetitive tasks and simplify your work Your all-in-one learning expe

  15. Improved step-by-step chromaticity compensation method for chromatic sextupole optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Gang-Wen; Jia, Qi-Ka; Li, Wei-Min; Wang, Lin

    2015-01-01

    The step-by-step chromaticity compensation method for chromatic sextupole optimization and dynamic aperture increase was proposed by E. Levichev and P. Piminov (E. Levichev and P. Piminov, 2006 [1]). Although this method can be used to enlarge the dynamic aperture of storage ring, it has some drawbacks. In this paper, we combined this method with evolutionary computation algorithms, and proposed an improved version of this method. In the improved method, the drawbacks are avoided, and thus better optimization results can be obtained.

  16. Microsoft® Office Visio® 2007 Step by Step

    CERN Document Server

    Lemke, Judy

    2009-01-01

    Experience learning made easy-and quickly teach yourself how to create professional-looking business and technical diagrams with Visio 2007. With Step By Step, you set the pace-building and practicing the skills you need, just when you need them! Build organization charts, floor plans, and other diagramsAdd color, text, and other effectsConnect shapes and create effective flowchartsVisualize and analyze data with new PivotDiagramsInsert and modify diagrams in other Microsoft Office documentsCreate your own shapes and templates and build custom diagrams Your all-in-one learning experience in

  17. Sewing Connection of Step-Step Solution for Singularly Perturbed Problems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Kang NI; V. I. GURMAN

    2012-01-01

    In view of singularly perturbed problems with complex inner layer phenomenon,including contrast structures (step-step solution and spike-type solution),corner layer behavior and right-hand side discontinuity,we carry out the process with sewing connection.The presented method of sewing connection for singularly perturbed equations is based on the two points singularly perturbed simple boundary problems.By means of sewing orbit smoothness,we get the uniformly valid solution in the whole interval.It is easy to prove the existence of solutions and deal with the high dimensional singularly perturbed problems.

  18. Large Plunging Ranula Presenting as Isolated Neck Swelling: Steps in Diagnosis and Surgical Steps in Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Neelima A.; Patil, Pankaj; Chapi, Mouneshkumar Devendrappa

    2015-01-01

    Ranula is a salivary gland cyst which typically present as localized superficial swelling over the floor of mouth. Complex or plunging ranulas develop when the mucus extravasation extends through or around the mylohyoid muscle, deeper into the neck, and present with neck lump along with or without swelling over floor of mouth. We report a case of large plunging ranula presenting as an isolated large neck mass in a 38-year-old female patient. The steps in diagnosis and surgical steps in management of the pathology are systematically described. PMID:26266141

  19. New Multi-step Worm Attack Model

    CERN Document Server

    Robiah, Y; Shahrin, S; Faizal, M A; Zaki, M Mohd; Marliza, R

    2010-01-01

    The traditional worms such as Blaster, Code Red, Slammer and Sasser, are still infecting vulnerable machines on the internet. They will remain as significant threats due to their fast spreading nature on the internet. Various traditional worms attack pattern has been analyzed from various logs at different OSI layers such as victim logs, attacker logs and IDS alert log. These worms attack pattern can be abstracted to form worms' attack model which describes the process of worms' infection. For the purpose of this paper, only Blaster variants were used during the experiment. This paper proposes a multi-step worm attack model which can be extended into research areas in alert correlation and computer forensic investigation.

  20. First Steps of Hydrogen Implementation in Belgium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulder Grietus; Martens Adwin [VITO Energy Technology, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol, (Belgium)

    2006-07-01

    Within the Belgian energy policy the knowledge on hydrogen was rather limited. To resolve this a project was started titled 'Development of Tools to Evaluate the Potential of Sustainable Hydrogen in Belgium' on behalf of Belgian Science Policy Office. It intends to be the first step in a scientific assessment of hydrogen in the Belgian context. The results of the project can be summarized as follows: - databases with international knowledge and experiences on hydrogen - hydrogen module within MARKAL-TIMES, illustrated by a scenario calculation - initial technology assessment on hydrogen, focussed on the scenario - translation of the progress in foreign legislation and licence procedures on hydrogen - definition of relevant policy issues concerning hydrogen. The conclusions of this study are shown in this presentation. The presentation starts showing the actual situation in Belgium around hydrogen and fuel cells. (authors)

  1. Ion drive - A step toward 'Star Trek'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, K. L.; Terwilliger, C.

    1976-01-01

    The design of a solar-powered electric propulsion system is seen as the first step in the ultimate development of an ion drive system which might incorporate many features of a spacecraft propulsion system described in a science fiction novel written by Anderson (1970). The considered ion propulsion systems would make it possible to augment significantly the operational capabilities of space transportation systems utilizing the Shuttle orbiter in combination with a solid-propellant interim upper stage. The use of the ion drive in a number of applications is discussed, giving attention to the resulting enhancement of national space capabilities, the role of the ion drive in the space transportation system, the development and the operation of a manned space station, satellite positioning and service, the elimination of space debris objects, the study of Halley's comet, interplanetary or lunar shuttle services, and space missions involving the outer planets.

  2. Recorded Step Directional Mutation for Faster Convergence

    CERN Document Server

    Dunning, Ted

    2008-01-01

    Two meta-evolutionary optimization strategies described in this paper accelerate the convergence of evolutionary programming algorithms while still retaining much of their ability to deal with multi-modal problems. The strategies, called directional mutation and recorded step in this paper, can operate independently but together they greatly enhance the ability of evolutionary programming algorithms to deal with fitness landscapes characterized by long narrow valleys. The directional mutation aspect of this combined method uses correlated meta-mutation but does not introduce a full covariance matrix. These new methods are thus much more economical in terms of storage for problems with high dimensionality. Additionally, directional mutation is rotationally invariant which is a substantial advantage over self-adaptive methods which use a single variance per coordinate for problems where the natural orientation of the problem is not oriented along the axes.

  3. A Step Towards CO2-Neutral Aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brankovic, Andreja; Ryder, Robert C.; Hendricks, Robert C.; Huber, Marcia L.

    2008-01-01

    An approximation method for evaluation of the caloric equations used in combustion chemistry simulations is described. The method is applied to generate the equations of specific heat, static enthalpy, and Gibb's free energy for fuel mixtures of interest to gas turbine engine manufacturers. Liquid-phase fuel properties are also derived. The fuels investigated include JP-8, synthetic fuel, and two blends of JP-8 and synthetic fuel. The complete set of fuel property equations for both phases are implemented into a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) flow solver database, and multiphase, reacting flow simulations of a well-tested liquid-fueled combustor are performed. The simulations are a first step in understanding combustion system performance and operational issues when using alternate fuels, at practical engine operating conditions.

  4. Buckling of stepped beams with elastic supports

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hong-sheng; LU Nian-li; LAN Peng

    2009-01-01

    The tangent stiffness matrix of Timoshenko beam element is applied in the buckling of multi-step beams under several concentrated axial forces with elastic supports. From the governing differential equation of lateral deflection including second-order effects, the relationship of force versus displacement is established. In the formulation of finite element method ( FEM), the stiffness matrix developed has the same accuracy with the solution of exact differential equations. The proposed tangent stiffness matrix will degenerate into the BernoulliEuler beam without the effects of shear deformation. The critical buckling force can be determined from the determinant element assemblage by FEM. The equivalent stiffness matrix constructed by the topmost deflection and slope is established by static condensation method, and then a recurrence formula is proposed. The validity and efficiency of the proposed method are shown by solving various numerical examples found in the literature.

  5. Nutrition recommendations and science: next parallel steps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogelholm, Mikael

    2016-03-15

    This article examines nutrition recommendations in relation to developments in nutrition science. Combining data on the genome, metabolome and microbiota is likely to open possibilities for personalized nutrition planning, but we are still far from practical applications. However, even these new steps are unlikely to challenge the role and importance of population-based nutrition recommendations as a tool to promote dietary patterns, policies and public health. Developments in science could help in deriving more benefits from nutrition recommendations. For instance, improved accuracy of dietary intake assessment is needed both for surveillance and for understanding the quantitative interplay between diet and health. Applying metabolomics together with food diaries or questionnaires, and also modern technologies such as digital photography, are potentially interesting methods in this respect. Research on consumer behaviour, attitudes and policy interventions, such as taxation of unhealthy foods and nutrition labelling, are needed to gain more insight into how to change eating behaviour for better health at the population level.

  6. Experimental results from a stepped frequency GPR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Signore

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of a nationally funded project, a Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR has been developed by the Italian Consortium for Research on Advanced Remote Sensing Systems (CO.RI.S.T.A.. The system was described in a previous paper (Alberti et al., 2002. As new aspects, the system is a stepped frequency GPR that can work both in gated and ungated mode, and the antennas can be moved automatically in a controlled fashion. As aspects of geophysical interest, the system is exploitable in situations wherein a high resolution and a shallow penetration in the soil (a few meters are required. Possibly, this is an example of probing a landscape. This paper completes the results of Alberti et al. (2002, wherein laboratory tests where described, by providing the main results obtained during an outdoor experimental campaign, performed fi rst in a controlled site and then in an archaeological site.

  7. The three steps of the carbonate biogenic dissolution process by microborers in coral reefs (New Caledonia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grange, J S; Rybarczyk, H; Tribollet, A

    2015-09-01

    Biogenic dissolution of carbonates by microborers is one of the main destructive forces in coral reefs and is predicted to be enhanced by eutrophication and ocean acidification by 2100. The chlorophyte Ostreobium sp., the main agent of this process, has been reported to be one of the most responsive of all microboring species to those environmental factors. However, very little is known about its recruitment, how it develops over successions of microboring communities, and how that influences rates of biogenic dissolution. Thus, an experiment with dead coral blocks exposed to colonization by microborers was carried out on a reef in New Caledonia over a year period. Each month, a few blocks were collected to study microboring communities and the associated rates of biogenic dissolution. Our results showed a drastic shift in community species composition between the 4th and 5th months of exposure, i.e., pioneer communities dominated by large chlorophytes such as Phaeophila sp. were replaced by mature communities dominated by Ostreobium sp. Prior the 4th month of exposure, large chlorophytes were responsible for low rates of biogenic dissolution while during the community shift, rates increased exponentially (×10). After 6 months of exposure, rates slowed down and reached a "plateau" with a mean of 0.93 kg of CaCO3 dissolved per m(2) of reef after 12 months of exposure. Here, we show that (a) Ostreobium sp. settled down in new dead substrates as soon as the 3rd month of exposure but dominated communities only after 5 months of exposure and (b) microbioerosion dynamics comprise three distinct steps which fully depend on community development stage and grazing pressure.

  8. Adaptations in bacterial and fungal communities to termite fungiculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Otani, Saria

    . We therefore propose that division of labour extends beyond the termites to their gut bacterial communities. We also show that Termitomyces-fed cockroaches undergo compositional changes in their gut microbiotas. A step-wise gradient pattern in gut bacterial community that correlated with an increase...... in the proportion of fungal material provided to the cockroaches. However, gut microbiotas remained distinct from those of termites after Termitomyces-feeding, indicating that a fungal diet can play a role in structuring gut community composition, but at the same time exemplifies how original community compositions...

  9. Robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical nephrectomy using the Da Vinci Si system: how to improve surgeon autonomy. Our step-by-step technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davila, Hugo H; Storey, Raul E; Rose, Marc C

    2016-09-01

    Herein, we describe several steps to improve surgeon autonomy during a Left Robotic-Assisted Laparoscopic Radical Nephrectomy (RALRN), using the Da Vinci Si system. Our kidney cancer program is based on 2 community hospitals. We use the Da Vinci Si system. Access is obtained with the following trocars: Two 8 mm robotic, one 8 mm robotic, bariatric length (arm 3), 15 mm for the assistant and 12 mm for the camera. We use curved monopolar scissors in robotic arm 1, Bipolar Maryland in arm 2, Prograsp Forceps in arm 3, and we alternate throughout the surgery with EndoWrist clip appliers and the vessel sealer. Here, we described three steps and the use of 3 robotic instruments to improve surgeon autonomy. Step 1: the lower pole of the kidney was dissected and this was retracted upwards and laterally. This maneuver was performed using the 3rd robotic arm with the Prograsp Forceps. Step 2: the monopolar scissors was replaced (robotic arm 1) with the robotic EndoWrist clip applier, 10 mm Hem-o-Lok. The renal artery and vein were controlled and transected by the main surgeon. Step 3: the superior, posterolateral dissection and all bleeders were carefully coagulated by the surgeon with the EndoWrist one vessel sealer. We have now performed 15 RALRN following these steps. Our results were: blood loss 300 cc, console time 140 min, operating room time 200 min, anesthesia time 180 min, hospital stay 2.5 days, 1 incisional hernia, pathology: (13) RCC clear cell, (1) chromophobe and (1) papillary type 1. Tumor Stage: (5) T1b, (8) T2a, (2) T2b. We provide a concise, step-by-step technique for radical nephrectomy (RN) using the Da Vinci Si robotic system that may provide more autonomy to the surgeon, while maintaining surgical outcome equivalent to standard laparoscopic RN.

  10. EXPANSION OF STEP-TRANSITION OPERATOR OF MULTI-STEP METHOD AND ITS APPLICATIONS (II)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-fa Tang

    2002-01-01

    We give some formulae for calculation of the expansions for (1) composition of step-transition operators (STO) of any two difference schemes (DS) for ODE's, (2) inverse operator of STO of any DS, and (3) conjugate operator of STO of any DS.

  11. A step-by-step guide for countries conducting a Technology Needs Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haselip, James Arthur; Narkeviciute, Rasa; Rogat Castillo, Jorge Enrique

    The purpose of this document is to summarise the various steps in the implementation of a TNA, serving as the ‘go-to’ document for national coordinators and consultants. It also points to the various materials that are available to further guide and support project management and methodology. For...

  12. Step-by-step magic state encoding for efficient fault-tolerant quantum computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Hayato

    2014-01-01

    Quantum error correction allows one to make quantum computers fault-tolerant against unavoidable errors due to decoherence and imperfect physical gate operations. However, the fault-tolerant quantum computation requires impractically large computational resources for useful applications. This is a current major obstacle to the realization of a quantum computer. In particular, magic state distillation, which is a standard approach to universality, consumes the most resources in fault-tolerant quantum computation. For the resource problem, here we propose step-by-step magic state encoding for concatenated quantum codes, where magic states are encoded step by step from the physical level to the logical one. To manage errors during the encoding, we carefully use error detection. Since the sizes of intermediate codes are small, it is expected that the resource overheads will become lower than previous approaches based on the distillation at the logical level. Our simulation results suggest that the resource requirements for a logical magic state will become comparable to those for a single logical controlled-NOT gate. Thus, the present method opens a new possibility for efficient fault-tolerant quantum computation. PMID:25511387

  13. Step-by-step magic state encoding for efficient fault-tolerant quantum computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Hayato

    2014-12-16

    Quantum error correction allows one to make quantum computers fault-tolerant against unavoidable errors due to decoherence and imperfect physical gate operations. However, the fault-tolerant quantum computation requires impractically large computational resources for useful applications. This is a current major obstacle to the realization of a quantum computer. In particular, magic state distillation, which is a standard approach to universality, consumes the most resources in fault-tolerant quantum computation. For the resource problem, here we propose step-by-step magic state encoding for concatenated quantum codes, where magic states are encoded step by step from the physical level to the logical one. To manage errors during the encoding, we carefully use error detection. Since the sizes of intermediate codes are small, it is expected that the resource overheads will become lower than previous approaches based on the distillation at the logical level. Our simulation results suggest that the resource requirements for a logical magic state will become comparable to those for a single logical controlled-NOT gate. Thus, the present method opens a new possibility for efficient fault-tolerant quantum computation.

  14. From Recombinant Expression to Crystals: A Step-by-Step Guide to GPCR Crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Arun K; Kumari, Punita; Ghosh, Eshan; Nidhi, Kumari

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the primary targets of drugs prescribed for many human pathophysiological conditions such as hypertension, allergies, schizophrenia, asthma, and various types of cancer. High-resolution structure determination of GPCRs has been a key focus area in GPCR biology to understand the basic mechanism of their activation and signaling and to materialize the long-standing dream of structure-based drug design on these versatile receptors. There has been tremendous effort at this front in the past two decades and it has culminated into crystal structures of 27 different receptors so far. The recent progress in crystallization and structure determination of GPCRs has been driven by innovation and cutting-edge developments at every step involved in the process of crystallization. Here, we present a step-by-step description of various steps involved in GPCR crystallization starting from recombinant expression to obtaining diffracting crystals. We also discuss the next frontiers in GPCR biology that are likely to be a primary focus for crystallography efforts in the next decade or so. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Community-based tourism in practice: evidence from three coastal communities in Bohuslän, Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindström Kristina N.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Local involvement in tourism development is defined as a key issue for sustainable tourism, however it is often questioned and less seldom implemented in reality. Reasons behind this condition are lack of knowledge and practical experience on community-based tourism as a bottom-up approach. In this paper it is argued that local involvement in tourism development is both a democratic right and a strategic destination management tool. The paper scrutinizes a process of collaboration and local participation in a tourism development project within three coastal communities on the Swedish West Coast. A mixed-methods approach was employed in the project with the specific aim of investigating attitudes to the community and tourism development and of involving community stakeholders in exploring alternative avenues of tourism development. The article describes four phases of the process of local involvement in a tourism development project: step 1, formation of a representative project group and negotiation of community-based approach; step 2, consulting local stakeholders and employing a mixed-methods approach; step 3, elaborating results with local stakeholders; step 4, increased community collaboration.

  16. Step-to-step spatiotemporal variables and ground reaction forces of intra-individual fastest sprinting in a single session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagahara, Ryu; Mizutani, Mirai; Matsuo, Akifumi; Kanehisa, Hiroaki; Fukunaga, Tetsuo

    2017-10-07

    We aimed to investigate the step-to-step spatiotemporal variables and ground reaction forces during the acceleration phase for characterising intra-individual fastest sprinting within a single session. Step-to-step spatiotemporal variables and ground reaction forces produced by 15 male athletes were measured over a 50-m distance during repeated (three to five) 60-m sprints using a long force platform system. Differences in measured variables between the fastest and slowest trials were examined at each step until the 22nd step using a magnitude-based inferences approach. There were possibly-most likely higher running speed and step frequency (2nd to 22nd steps) and shorter support time (all steps) in the fastest trial than in the slowest trial. Moreover, for the fastest trial there were likely-very likely greater mean propulsive force during the initial four steps and possibly-very likely larger mean net anterior-posterior force until the 17th step. The current results demonstrate that better sprinting performance within a single session is probably achieved by 1) a high step frequency (except the initial step) with short support time at all steps, 2) exerting a greater mean propulsive force during initial acceleration, and 3) producing a greater mean net anterior-posterior force during initial and middle acceleration.

  17. Tritium Issues in Next Step Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.H. Skinner; G. Federici

    2001-09-05

    Tritium issues will play a central role in the performance and operation of next-step deuterium-tritium (DT) burning plasma tokamaks and the safety aspects associated with tritium will attract intense public scrutiny. The orders-of-magnitude increase in duty cycle and stored energy will be a much larger change than the increase in plasma performance necessary to achieve high fusion gain and ignition. Erosion of plasma-facing components will scale up with the pulse length from being barely measurable on existing machines to centimeter scale. Magnetic Fusion Energy (MFE) devices with carbon plasma-facing components will accumulate tritium by co-deposition with the eroded carbon and this will strongly constrain plasma operations. We report on a novel laser-based method to remove co-deposited tritium from carbon plasma-facing components in tokamaks. A major fraction of the tritium trapped in a co-deposited layer during the deuterium-tritium (DT) campaign on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) was released by heating with a scanning laser beam. This technique offers the potential for tritium removal in a next-step DT device without the use of oxidation and the associated deconditioning of the plasma-facing surfaces and expense of processing large quantities of tritium oxide. The operational lifetime of alternative materials such as tungsten has significant uncertainties due to melt layer loss during disruptions. Production of dust and flakes will need careful monitoring and minimization, and control and accountancy of the tritium inventory will be critical issues. Many of the tritium issues in Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) are similar to MFE, but some, for example those associated with the target factory, are unique to IFE. The plasma-edge region in a tokamak has greater complexity than the core due to lack of poloidal symmetry and nonlinear feedback between the plasma and wall. Sparse diagnostic coverage and low dedicated experimental run time has hampered the

  18. Fermentation guide for potatoes. A step-by-step procedure for small-scale ethanol fuel production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-09-01

    This guide describes the steps involved in the successful batch starch conversion and fermentation of potatoes for the production of fuel grade ethanol. The first part of this manual provides an overview of ethanol production from feedstock to fermentation. The second part of the manual is a recipe section that gives step-by-step procedures necessary for successful fermentation. Chapter titles are: major steps in ethanol production; equipment and chemicals; water testing and treatment; feedstock cleaning and crushing; precooking; hydration and dextrinization; cooking; choosing the best enzymes; fermentation; core and cleaning, step-by-step procedure; refinements; and supplies. (DMC)

  19. Time Investment in Drug Supply Problems by Flemish Community Pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Weerdt, Elfi; Simoens, Steven; Casteels, Minne; Huys, Isabelle

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Drug supply problems are a known problem for pharmacies. Community and hospital pharmacies do everything they can to minimize impact on patients. This study aims to quantify the time spent by Flemish community pharmacies on drug supply problems. Materials and Methods: During 18 weeks, employees of 25 community pharmacies filled in a template with the total time spent on drug supply problems. The template stated all the steps community pharmacies could undertake to manage drug supply problems. Results: Considering the median over the study period, the median time spent on drug supply problems was 25 min per week, with a minimum of 14 min per week and a maximum of 38 min per week. After calculating the median of each pharmacy, large differences were observed between pharmacies: about 25% spent less than 15 min per week and one-fifth spent more than 1 h per week. The steps on which community pharmacists spent most time are: (i) "check missing products from orders," (ii) "contact wholesaler/manufacturers regarding potential drug shortages," and (iii) "communicating to patients." These three steps account for about 50% of the total time spent on drug supply problems during the study period. Conclusion: Community pharmacies spend about half an hour per week on drug supply problems. Although 25 min per week does not seem that much, the time spent is not delineated and community pharmacists are constantly confronted with drug supply problems.

  20. The Complex-Step-Finite-Difference method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Rafael; Stich, Daniel; Morales, Jose

    2015-07-01

    We introduce the Complex-Step-Finite-Difference method (CSFDM) as a generalization of the well-known Finite-Difference method (FDM) for solving the acoustic and elastic wave equations. We have found a direct relationship between modelling the second-order wave equation by the FDM and the first-order wave equation by the CSFDM in 1-D, 2-D and 3-D acoustic media. We present the numerical methodology in order to apply the introduced CSFDM and show an example for wave propagation in simple homogeneous and heterogeneous models. The CSFDM may be implemented as an extension into pre-existing numerical techniques in order to obtain fourth- or sixth-order accurate results with compact three time-level stencils. We compare advantages of imposing various types of initial motion conditions of the CSFDM and demonstrate its higher-order accuracy under the same computational cost and dispersion-dissipation properties. The introduced method can be naturally extended to solve different partial differential equations arising in other fields of science and engineering.

  1. Febrile Seizures: Four Steps Algorithmic Clinical Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Mohammadi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Febrile seizures (FS are the most common form of convulsive phenomena in human being and affect 2% to 14% of children. It is the most common type of seizures that every pediatrician is dealing with. It is the most benign type of all seizures occurring in childhood. There are many debates on how to approach to febrile seizures in pediatric neurology and there are many possible malpractices in this field. Some of the most common frequent queries are -How could we differentiate FS from seizures and fever associated with serious infections involving the central nervous system? - When should we refer the affected child for further investigations such as lumbar puncture, EEG, neuroimaging, and routine biochemical studies? - How should we treat FS in its acute phase? - How could we assess the risk for further recurrences as well as other risks threatening the childs health in future? - How could we select the patients for treatment or prophylaxis? - Which medication(s should be selected for treatment or prophylaxis? Trying to answer the above-mentioned questions, this review article will present a four steps algorithmic clinical approach model to a child with febrile seizures based on the current medical literature.

  2. Neuregulin: First Steps Towards a Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferree, D. S.; Malone, C. C.; Karr, L. J.

    2003-01-01

    Neuregulins are growth factor domain proteins with diverse bioactivities, such as cell proliferation, receptor binding, and differentiation. Neureguh- 1 binds to two members of the ErbB class I tyrosine kinase receptors, ErbB3 and ErbB4. A number of human cancers overexpress the ErbB receptors, and neuregulin can modulate the growth of certain cancer types. Neuregulin-1 has been shown to promote the migration of invasive gliomas of the central nervous system. Neuregulin has also been implicated in schizophrenia, multiple sclerosis and abortive cardiac abnormalities. The full function of neuregulin-1 is not known. In this study we are inserting a cDNA clone obtained from American Type Culture Collection into E.coli expression vectors to express neuregulin- 1 protein. Metal chelate affinity chromatography is used for recombinant protein purification. Crystallization screening will proceed for X-ray diffraction studies following expression, optimization, and protein purification. In spite of medical and scholarly interest in the neuregulins, there are currently no high-resolution structures available for these proteins. Here we present the first steps toward attaining a high-resolution structure of neuregulin- 1, which will help enable us to better understand its function

  3. Small steps to emerge from the tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dionisio Vianello

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Based on the experience and activities of the National Centre for Town Planning Studies of the National Council of Engineers (CNI, and AUDIS, the Disused Urban Areas Association, the author proposes some suggestions to emerge – with small steps – from the tunnel of the crisis. First of all, do what is necessary. Simplify the planning regulations and procedures. Measures to take in the short term and at no cost: town planning reform, taking up the Lupi-Mantini proposals previously discussed and shared in the last legislation by Commission VIII of the Chamber on the Territory and Environment; a new law on the landholding system, the proposal developed by CNA (National Confederation of Artisans and Small and Medium Enterprises, CNI, ANCE (Italian National Association of Construction Companies and Tecnoborsa. Secondly, do what is useful: quality and innovation in urban redevelopment projects. The AUDIS Charter on urban regeneration; the Quality Protocol for Roma Capitale. Thirdly, something extra: targeted projects for start-ups. Social Housing. The city to be scrapped. The renewal of residential assets. The divestment of state-owned properties. The reuse of obsolete industrial buildings.

  4. Febrile Seizures: Four Steps Algorithmic Clinical Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Mahmoud

    2010-01-01

    Febrile seizures (FS) are the most common form of convulsive phenomena in human being and affect 2% to 14% of children. It is the most common type of seizures that every pediatrician is dealing with. It is the most benign type of all seizures occurring in childhood. There are many debates on how to approach to febrile seizures in pediatric neurology and there are many possible malpractices in this field. Some of the most common frequent queries areHow could we differentiate FS from seizures and fever associated with serious infections involving the central nervous system?When should we refer the affected child for further investigations such as lumbar puncture, EEG, neuroimaging, and routine biochemical studies?How should we treat FS in its acute phase?How could we assess the risk for further recurrences as well as other risks threatening the child's health in future?How could we select the patients for treatment or prophylaxis?Which medication(s) should be selected for treatment or prophylaxis? Trying to answer the above-mentioned questions, this review article will present a four steps algorithmic clinical approach model to a child with febrile seizures based on the current medical literature. PMID:23056677

  5. Positive steps turning into a process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Božičević Goran

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The conclusion of the research conducted in Croatia for QPSW in 2003 is there is no systematic, accountable and structural confrontation with the past in Croatia, but there is growing concern within the civil society about the problems incurred by the lack of such a confrontation. Two different approaches can be discerned: individual work with particular persons or target groups and advocacy that could influence the alteration of the public opinion and decision-making. Both levels are necessary and they should unfold simultaneously. The systematization and regional cooperation of documentation centers, cooperation between victim organizations and peace initiatives, the inclusion of former warriors into peace building processes the cooperation of artists and activists - represent some of the new and promising steps on the civilian scene in Croatia. The constant strengthening of the independent media and the judiciary, coupled with constant efforts on both levels - the personal and the public - raises hopes that the confrontation with the past in Croatia is a process and not a trend.

  6. Space Transportation Engine Program (STEP), phase B

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-10-01

    The Space Transportation Engine Program (STEP) Phase 2 effort includes preliminary design and activities plan preparation that will allow smooth and time transition into a Prototype Phase and then into Phases 3, 4, and 5. A Concurrent Engineering approach using Total Quality Management (TQM) techniques, is being applied to define an oxygen-hydrogen engine. The baseline from Phase 1/1' studies was used as a point of departure for trade studies and analyses. Existing STME system models are being enhanced as more detailed module/component characteristics are determined. Preliminary designs for the open expander, closed expander, and gas generator cycles were prepared, and recommendations for cycle selection made at the Design Concept Review (DCR). As a result of July '90 DCR, and information subsequently supplied to the Technical Review Team, a gas generator cycle was selected. Results of the various Advanced Development Programs (ADP's) for the Advanced Launch Systems (ALS) were contributive to this effort. An active vehicle integration effort is supplying the NASA, Air Force, and vehicle contractors with engine parameters and data, and flowing down appropriate vehicle requirements. Engine design and analysis trade studies are being documented in a data base that was developed and is being used to organize information. To date, seventy four trade studies were input to the data base.

  7. Space Drive Physics: Introduction and Next Steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millis, M. G.

    Research toward the visionary goal of propellantless ``space drives'' is introduced, covering key physics issues and a listing of roughly 2-dozen approaches. The targeted advantage of a space drive is to circumvent the propellant constraints of rockets and the maneuvering limits of light sails by using the interactions between the spacecraft and its surrounding space for propulsion. At present, the scientific foundations from which to engineer a space drive have not been discovered and, objectively, might be impossible. Although no propulsion breakthroughs appear imminent, the subject has matured to where the relevant questions have been broached and are beginning to be answered. The critical make-break issues include; conservation of momentum, uncertain sources of reaction mass, and the net-external thrusting requirement. Note: space drives are not necessarily faster- than-light devices. Speed limits are a separate, unanswered issue. Relevant unsolved physics includes; the sources and mechanisms of inertial frames, coupling of gravitation and electromagnetism, and the nature of the quantum vacuum. The propulsion approaches span mostly stages 1 through 3 of the scientific method (defining the problem, collecting data, and articulating hypotheses), while some have matured to stage 4 (testing hypotheses). Nonviable approaches include `stiction drives,' `gyroscopic antigravity,' and `lifters.' No attempt is made to gauge the prospects of the remaining approaches. Instead, a list of next-step research questions is derived from the examination of these goals, unknowns, and concepts.

  8. First steps in qualitative data analysis: transcribing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Julia

    2008-04-01

    Qualitative research in primary care deepens understanding of phenomena such as health, illness and health care encounters. Many qualitative studies collect audio or video data (e.g. recordings of interviews, focus groups or talk in consultation), and these are usually transcribed into written form for closer study. Transcribing appears to be a straightforward technical task, but in fact involves judgements about what level of detail to choose (e.g. omitting non-verbal dimensions of interaction), data interpretation (e.g. distinguishing 'I don't, no' from 'I don't know') and data representation (e.g. representing the verbalization 'hwarryuhh' as 'How are you?'). Representation of audible and visual data into written form is an interpretive process which is therefore the first step in analysing data. Different levels of detail and different representations of data will be required for projects with differing aims and methodological approaches. This article is a guide to practical and theoretical considerations for researchers new to qualitative data analysis. Data examples are given to illustrate decisions to be made when transcribing or assigning the task to others.

  9. Universal Design: A Step toward Successful Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Carr

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of aging successfully has become increasingly important as demographics shift towards an aging population. Successful aging has been defined to include (1 a low probability of disease and disease-related disability; (2 a high level of physical and cognitive functioning; and (3 an active engagement in life. The built environment can create opportunities or constraints for seniors to participate in social and productive activities. Universally designed spaces are more easily accessed and used by a spectrum of people without specialized adaptations. Thus, a universally designed environment creates opportunities for older adults to participate in these activities without the stigmatization associated with adapted or accessible designs. Providing older adults with specific universal design options (e.g., lever handle faucets has the potential to increase the ease of completing activities of daily living, which promotes a continual engagement in life. Literature regarding universal design is promising; however, its theory requires further attention from professionals designing the built environment, evidence of the significance of its application from academics, and the embracement of its core principles from society. Overall, universal design has the potential to provide a stepping stone toward successful aging.

  10. Return probability and k-step measures

    CERN Document Server

    Dronen, Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    The notion of return probability -- explored most famously by George P\\'{o}lya on d-dimensional lattices -- has potential as a measure for the analysis of networks. We present an efficient method for finding return probability distributions for connected undirected graphs. We argue that return probability has the same discriminatory power as existing k-step measures -- in particular, beta centrality (with negative beta), the graph-theoretical power index (GPI), and subgraph centrality. We compare the running time of our algorithm to beta centrality and subgraph centrality and find that it is significantly faster. When return probability is used to measure the same phenomena as beta centrality, it runs in linear time -- O(n+m), where n and m are the number of nodes and edges, respectively -- which takes much less time than either the matrix inversion or the sequence of matrix multiplications required for calculating the exact or approximate forms of beta centrality, respectively. We call this form of return pr...

  11. Design Intelligent Robust Back stepping Controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Esmaieli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing demand for multi-degree-of-freedom (DOF continuum robot in presence of highly nonlinear dynamic parameters in a number of industries has motivated a flurry of research in the development of soft computing nonlinear methodology. The robust backstopping controller proposed in this research is used to further demonstrate the appealing features exhibited by the continuum robot. Robust feedback controller is used to position control of continuum robot in presence of uncertainties. Using Lyapunov type stability arguments, a robust backstopping controller is designed to achieve this objective. The controller developed in this research is designed into two steps. Firstly, a robust stabilizing torque is designed for the nominal continuum robot dynamics derived using the constrained Lagrangian formulation based on modified PD backstopping controller. Next, the fuzzy logic methodology applied to it to solution uncertainty problem. The fuzzy model free problem is formulated to estimate the nonlinear formulation of continuum robot. The eventual stability of the controller depends on the torque generating capabilities of the continuum robots.

  12. Mutual reciprocal inspections: Issues regarding next steps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, K.C.

    1996-02-27

    Pressures are mounting for a regime to verify the dismantlement of US and Russian warheads, as well as a system of international control over the weapons` fissile materials to assure irreversibility. There are at least four motivating factors for these measures: (1) as the United States and Russia lower their numbers of nuclear weapons, each side seeks assurance that the warheads are actually being dismantled; (2) by accounting for the fissile materials and placing them under effective controls, the potential for smuggling and theft is reduced; (3) a fissile materials cutoff is being discussed at the Conference on Disarmament in Geneva; verification of a US-Russian cutoff, as well as substantial reductions in fissile materials stockpiles, are seen as integral to the cutoff; (4) calls for total nuclear disarmament have greatly increased; dismantlement verification and international control of fissile materials are widely viewed as requisite steps toward this goal. There are many questions to be answered before the United States can agree to a warhead verification regime and international control over excess fissile materials, let alone total nuclear disarmament. Two of the most important are: What are the prospects for effective verification? and How much fissile material can be declared as excess, and possibly be given over to international control? These topics--compliance weaknesses and excess materials--are the focus of this paper.

  13. First steps towards a scatterometry reference standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodermann, Bernd; Hansen, Poul-Erik; Burger, Sven; Henn, Mark-Alexander; Gross, Hermann; Bär, Markus; Scholze, Frank; Endres, Johannes; Wurm, Matthias

    2012-10-01

    Supported by the European Commission and EURAMET, a consortium of 10 participants from national metrology institutes, universities and companies has recently started a joint research project with the aim of overcoming current challenges in optical scatterometry for traceable linewidth metrology and to establish scatterometry as a traceable and absolute metrological method for dimensional measurements. This requires a thorough investigation of the influence of all significant sample, tool and data analysis parameters, which affect the scatterometric measurement results. For this purpose and to improve the tool matching between scatterometers, CD-SEMs and CD-AFMs, experimental and modelling methods will be enhanced. The different scatterometry methods will be compared with each other and with specially adapted atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) measurement systems. Additionally novel methods for sophisticated data analysis will be developed and investigated to reach significant reductions of the measurement uncertainties in critical dimension (CD) metrology. To transfer traceability to industrial applications of scatterometry an important step and one final goal of this project is the realisation of different waferbased reference standard materials for calibration of scatterometers. The approaches to reach these goals and first design considerations and preliminary specification of the scatterometry standards are presented and discussed.

  14. Uncertainty Principles on Two Step Nilpotent Lie Groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S K Ray

    2001-08-01

    We extend an uncertainty principle due to Cowling and Price to two step nilpotent Lie groups, which generalizes a classical theorem of Hardy. We also prove an analogue of Heisenberg inequality on two step nilpotent Lie groups.

  15. A 3-step strategic approach to sustainable wastewater ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A 3-step strategic approach to sustainable wastewater managementage/gi. ... production principles, three intervention steps are proposed in this paper. ... Treatment technologies recommended make the best use of side products via reuse.

  16. Just Diagnosed: Next Steps After Testing Positive for HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    HIV Treatment Just Diagnosed: Next Steps After Testing Positive for HIV (Last updated 3/13/2017; last reviewed 3/ ... is the next step after testing positive for HIV? Testing positive for HIV often leaves a person ...

  17. First Steps in Using REBT in Life Coaching

    OpenAIRE

    Dryden, Windy

    2011-01-01

    This step-by-step guide shows the Life Coach how to help coachees deal with any emotional problems that might prevent them from achieving their life goals, using the theory and practice of REBT adapted to a coaching setting.

  18. PARALLEL MULTI-STAGE & MULTI-STEP METHOD IN ODES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-qiu Song

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, the theory of parallel multi-stage & multi-step method is dis cussed, which is a form of combining Runge-Kutta method with linear multi-step method that can be used for parallel computation.

  19. Sound from boundary layer flow over steps and gaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan Catlett, M.; Devenport, William; Glegg, Stewart A. L.

    2014-09-01

    This study is concerned with the radiated sound from boundary layer flows over small forward and backward steps and gap configurations of similar dimension. These measurements were performed in the Virginia Tech Anechoic Wall Jet Facility for step heights that ranged from approximately 10 percent to 100 percent of the incoming boundary layer height. The results show the influence of step height and boundary layer edge velocity on the far-field sound from forward and backward steps. Neither source shows clear dipole directivity and at least the larger step heights considered in this study are shown to not be acoustically compact. A new mixed scaling normalization is proposed for the far-field spectra from both types of step. Backward steps are shown to be much weaker producers of far-field sound than similarly sized forward steps. The implications of this behavior are discussed with respect to the far-field sound measured from various gap flows.

  20. Relative Therapeutic Efficacy of the Treadmill and Step Bench in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    umar

    KEY WORDS: Hemiparesis, gait, rehabilitation, treadmill, step-bench. INTRODUCTION. Stroke gait ... important impairment-level goals of stroke rehabilitation. (Mercer et al, 2009). Besides ..... step exercise training program. Journal of Physical ...

  1. The Complete Step-by-Step Guide to Designing and Teaching Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thormann, Joan; Zimmerman, Isa Kaftal

    2012-01-01

    In this valuable resource, experts share deep knowledge including practical "how-to" and preventive trouble-shooting tips. Instructors will learn about course design and development, instructional methods for online teaching, and student engagement and community building techniques. The book contains successful teaching strategies, guidance for…

  2. From Community Detection to Community Deception

    CERN Document Server

    Fionda, Valeria

    2016-01-01

    The community deception problem is about how to hide a target community C from community detection algorithms. The need for deception emerges whenever a group of entities (e.g., activists, police enforcements) want to cooperate while concealing their existence as a community. In this paper we introduce and formalize the community deception problem. To solve this problem, we describe algorithms that carefully rewire the connections of C's members. We experimentally show how several existing community detection algorithms can be deceived, and quantify the level of deception by introducing a deception score. We believe that our study is intriguing since, while showing how deception can be realized it raises awareness for the design of novel detection algorithms robust to deception techniques.

  3. Rediscovering community: Interethnic relationships and community gardening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    August John Hoffman

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Community service work, volunteerism and mentoring have recently become popular topics of research as effective methods in improving self-esteem and civic responsibility. In the current study we explored the relationship between participation in a community service gardening program and ethnocentrism. We hypothesised that an inverse correlation would emerge where students who participated in a community service-gardening program would increase their perceptions of the importance of community service work and decrease their scores in ethnocentrism. Results of the paired samples t-test strongly support the hypothesis that community service gardening work significantly reduces reports of ethnocentrism: t(10 = -2.52, (p < .03 for community college students. The ramifications of the study and ramifications for future research are offered.

  4. Community Changes Address Common Health Threat

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-09-30

    This podcast helps residents living in multiunit housing, like apartments and condos, understand the threat of secondhand smoke. It also helps residents understand what steps they can take to breathe a little easier if involuntarily exposed to secondhand smoke.  Created: 9/30/2013 by Division of Community Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion.   Date Released: 9/30/2013.

  5. NUMERICAL SIMULATION FOR THE STEPPED SPILLWAY OVERFLOW WITH TURBULENCE MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Stepped spillways have increasingly become a very important measure for flood discharge and energy dissipation. Therefore, the velocity, pressure and other characteristics of the flow on the stepped spillway should be known clearly. But so far the study for the stepped spillway overflow is only based on the model test. In this paper, the stepped spillway overflow was simulated by the Reynolds stress turbulence model. The simulation results were analyzed and compared with measured data, which shows they are satisfactory.

  6. A Step Into Service Learning Is A Step Into Higher Order Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, S.

    2010-12-01

    Students, especially beginning college students often consider science courses to be remembering and regurgitating, not creative and of little social relevance. As scientists we know this isn’t true. How do we counteract this sentiment among students? Incorporating service learning, probably better-called project learning into our class is one way. As one “non-science” student, who was taking two science service-learning courses said, “If it’s a service-learning course you know it’s going to be interesting.” Service learning means that some learning takes place in the community. The community component increases understanding of the material being studied, promotes higher order thinking, and provides a benefit for someone else. Students have confirmed that the experience shows them that their knowledge is need by the community and for some, reinforces their commitment to continued civic engagement. I’ll give three examples with the community activity growing in importance in the course and in the community, a single exercise, a small project, and a focus of the class. All of the activities use reflective writing to increase analysis and synthesis. An example of a single exercise could be participating in an event related to your course, for example, a zoning board meeting, or a trip to a wastewater treatment plant. Preparation for the trip should include reading. After the event students synthesize and analyze the activity through a series of questions emphasizing reflection. A two to four class assignment might include expanding the single-day activity or students familiarizing themselves with a course topic, interviewing a person, preparing a podcast of the interview and reflecting upon the experience. The most comprehensive approach is where the class focus is on a community project, e.g. Tim Ku’s geochemistry course (this session). Another class that lends itself easily to a comprehensive service learning approach is Geographic Information

  7. 48 CFR 14.503-2 - Step two.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Step two. 14.503-2 Section 14.503-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES SEALED BIDDING Two-Step Sealed Bidding 14.503-2 Step two. (a) Sealed bidding...

  8. Morphology of monatomic step edges on vicinal Si(001)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zandvliet, H.J.W.; Elswijk, H.B.

    1993-01-01

    The roughness of monatomic A- and B-type step edges on 0.5° misoriented Si(001) has been analyzed on an atomic scale with scanning tunneling microscopy. On small length scales, measured along the step edge (<200 Å), one-dimensional random-walk behavior is observed for both types of step edges. For t

  9. 40 CFR 35.2109 - Step 2+3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Step 2+3. 35.2109 Section 35.2109... ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works § 35.2109 Step 2+3. The Regional Administrator may award a Step 2+3 grant which will provide the Federal share of an allowance under appendix B and...

  10. 40 CFR 35.909 - Step 2+3 grants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Water and Waste Management finds to have unusually high costs of construction, the Regional... design (step 2) and construction (step 3) of a waste water treatment works. (b) Limitations. The Regional... ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works-Clean Water Act § 35.909 Step 2+3 grants. (a)...

  11. Changing step width alters lower extremity biomechanics during running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brindle, Richard A; Milner, Clare E; Zhang, Songning; Fitzhugh, Eugene C

    2014-01-01

    Step width is a spatiotemporal parameter that may influence lower extremity biomechanics at the hip and knee joint. The purpose of this study was to determine the biomechanical response of the lower extremity joints to step width changes during running. Lower extremity data from 30 healthy runners, half of them male, were collected during running in three step width conditions: preferred, wide, and narrow. Dependent variables and step width were analyzed using a mixed model ANOVA and pairwise t-tests for post hoc comparisons. Step width was successfully altered in the wide and narrow conditions. Generally, frontal plane peak values decreased as step width increased from narrow to preferred to wide. Peak hip adduction and rearfoot eversion angles decreased as step width increased from narrow to wide. Peak knee abduction moment and knee abduction impulse also decreased as step width increased from narrow to wide. Although men and women ran differently, gender only influenced the effect of step width on peak rearfoot inversion moment. In conclusion, step width influences lower extremity biomechanics in healthy runners. When step width increased from narrow to wide, peak values of frontal plane variables decreased. In addition to previously reported changes at the rearfoot, the hip and knee joint biomechanics were also influenced by changes in step width.

  12. USAID steps up anti-AIDS program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    This article considers the epidemic proportion of AIDS in developing countries, and discusses the U.S. Agency for International Development's (USAID) reworked and intensified strategy for HIV infection and AIDS prevention and control over the next 5 years. Developing and launching over 650 HIV and AIDS activities in 74 developing countries since 1986, USAID is the world's largest supporter of anti-AIDS programs. Over $91 million in bilateral assistance for HIV and AIDS prevention and control have been committed. USAID has also been the largest supporter of the World Health Organization's Global Program on AIDS since 1986. Interventions have included training peer educators, working to change the norms of sex behavior, and condom promotion. Recognizing that the developing world will increasingly account for an ever larger share of the world's HIV-infected population, USAID announced an intensified program of estimated investment increasing to approximately $400 million over a 5-year period. Strategy include funding for long-term, intensive interventions in 10-15 priority countries, emphasizing the treatment of other sexually transmitted diseases which facilitate the spread of HIV, making AIDS-related policy dialogue an explicit component of the Agency's AIDS program, and augmenting funding to community-based programs aimed at reducing high-risk sexual behaviors. The effect of AIDS upon child survival, adult mortality, urban populations, and socioeconomic development in developing countries is discussed. Program examples are also presented.

  13. Malaria vaccine: a step toward elimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jindal, Harashish; Bhatt, Bhumika; Malik, Jagbir S; Sk, Shashikantha; Mehta, Bharti

    2014-01-01

    Malaria has long been recognized as a public health problem. At the community level, vector control, and antimalarial medicines are the main means for reducing incidence, morbidity, and mortality of malaria. A vaccine not only would bring streamlining in the prevention of morbidity and mortality from malaria but also would be more accessible if integrated with Expanded Programme of Immunization (EPI). Globally, an estimated 3.4 billion people are at risk of malaria. Most cases (80%) and deaths (90%) occurred in Africa, and most deaths (77%) are in children under 5 years of age. An effective vaccine has long been envisaged as a valuable addition to the available tools for malaria control. Although research toward the development of malaria vaccines has been pursued since the 1960s, there are no licensed malaria vaccines. The RTS,S/AS01 vaccine, which targets P. falciparum, has reached phase 3 clinical trials and results are promising. Malaria Vaccine Technology Road Map 2013 has envisaged the world aiming for a licensed vaccine by 2030 that would reduce malaria cases by 75% and be capable of eliminating malaria. It will not only fill the gaps of today's interventions but also be a cost-effective method of decreasing morbidity and mortality from malaria.

  14. Lateral stepping for postural correction in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Laurie A; Horak, Fay B

    2008-03-01

    To characterize the lateral stepping strategies for postural correction in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and the effect of their anti-parkinson medication. Observational study. Outpatient neuroscience laboratory. Thirteen participants with idiopathic PD in their on (PD on) and off (PD off) levodopa state and 14 healthy elderly controls. Movable platform with lateral translations of 12 cm at 14.6 cm/s ramp velocity. The incidence and characteristics of 3 postural strategies were observed: lateral side-step, crossover step, or no step. Corrective stepping was characterized by latency to step after perturbation onset, step velocity, and step length and presence of an anticipatory postural adjustment (APA). Additionally, percentages of trials resulting in falls were identified for each group. Whereas elderly control participants never fell, PD participants fell in 24% and 35% of trials in the on and off medication states, respectively. Both PD and control participants most often used a lateral side-step strategy; 70% (control), 67% (PD off), and 73% (PD on) of all trials, respectively. PD participants fell most often when using a crossover strategy (75% of all crossover trials) or no-step strategy (100% of all no-step trials). In the off medication state, PD participants' lateral stepping strategies were initiated later than controls (370+/-37 ms vs 280+/-10 ms, Pcorrective stepping characteristics. Unlike control participants, PD participants often (56% of side-step strategy trials) failed to activate an APA before stepping, although their APAs, when present, were of similar latency and magnitude as for control participants. Levodopa on or off state did not significantly affect falls, APAs, or lateral step latency, velocity, or amplitude (P>.05). PD participants showed significantly more postural instability and falls than age-matched controls when stepping was required for postural correction in response to lateral disequilibrium. Although PD participants

  15. Computer aided virtual manufacturing using Creo parametric easy to learn step by step guide

    CERN Document Server

    Kanife, Paul Obiora

    2016-01-01

    Providing a step-by-step guide for the implementation of virtual manufacturing using Creo Parametric software (formerly known as Pro-Engineer), this book creates an engaging and interactive learning experience for manufacturing engineering students. Featuring graphic illustrations of simulation processes and operations, and written in accessible English to promote user-friendliness, the book covers key topics in the field including: the engraving machining process, face milling, profile milling, surface milling, volume rough milling, expert machining, electric discharge machining (EDM), and area turning using the lathe machining process. Maximising reader insights into how to simulate material removal processes, and how to generate cutter location data and G-codes data, this valuable resource equips undergraduate, postgraduate, BTech and HND students in the fields of manufacturing engineering, computer aided design (CAD) and computer aided engineering (CAE) with transferable skills and knowledge. This book is...

  16. The Paczynski-Wiita potential: A step-by-step "derivation"

    CERN Document Server

    Abramowicz, Marek A

    2009-01-01

    Paczynski realized that a properly chosen gravitational potential may accurately model (in a "pseudo Newtonian" theory) general relativistic effects that determine motion of matter near a non-rotating black hole. Paczynski's choice, known today as the "Paczynski-Wiita potential", proved to be very practical. It was used by numerous researchers in the black hole accretion theory, and became a standard tool in relativistic astrophysics. The model is an example of Paczynski's admired ability to invent "out of nowhere" simple ideas that were brilliant, deep and useful. Paczynski has guessed intuitively the form of the potential. However, it could be also derived by a a step-by-step formal procedure. I show the derivation here. My derivation is based on a standard definition of the relativistic "effective potential" in the Schwarzschild spacetime. The relativistic effective potential may be uniquely divided into its "gravitational" and "centrifugal" part. The gravitational part differs from the Paczynski-Wiita pot...

  17. A Step by Step Method to Improve the Performance of Decision Making Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Izadikhah

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present the concept of context-dependent DEA based on the FDH model by introducing the FDH-attractiveness and FDH-progress for each DMU. By the presented method, not only we can improve the performance of inefficient DMUs, but we can find a target for improvement among the existing efficient DMUs. These targets are observed DMUs and are not some virtual points on the efficiency frontier. Also, the paper presents a step by step method to improve the performance of DMUs by measuring FDH-attractiveness and FDH-progress. One numerical example and a case study consists of 20 Iranian bank branches are given for illustration.

  18. Step-by-step isolated resection of segment 1 of the liver using the hanging maneuver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Andújar, Rafael; Montalvá, Eva; Bruna, Marcos; Jiménez-Fuertes, Montiel; Moya, Angel; Pareja, Eugenia; Mir, Jose

    2009-09-01

    The caudate lobe can be the origin of primary liver tumours or the sole site of liver metastases. This lobe is anatomically divided into 3 parts: Spiegel's lobe (Couinaud's segment 1), paracaval portion (Couinaud's segment 9), and the caudate process. In this series of 4 cases, we provide a step-by-step description of a surgical technique variation that can be applied to resections of lesions localized in segment 1. We believe that other than size, lesion removal in this hepatic anatomic area, which is difficult to perform, can be done more easily using this new approach because it requires minimal mobilization without unnecessary parenchyma transection of other liver parts. Therefore, it reduces the risk of lesions in the inferior vena cava and the middle hepatic vein and respects adequate margins without the use of clamping maneuvers and in an acceptable surgical time.

  19. A Step-by-step Guide to the Realisation of Advanced Optical Tweezers

    CERN Document Server

    Pesce, Giuseppe; Marago, Onofrio M; Jones, Philip H; Gigain, Sylvain; Sasso, Antonio; Volpe, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Since the pioneering work of Arthur Ashkin, optical tweezers have become an indispensable tool for contactless manipulation of micro- and nanoparticles. Nowadays optical tweezers are employed in a myriad of applications demonstrating the importance of these tools. While the basic principle of optical tweezers is the use of a strongly focused laser beam to trap and manipulate particles, ever more complex experimental set-ups are required in order to perform novel and challenging experiments. With this article, we provide a detailed step- by-step guide for the construction of advanced optical manipulation systems. First, we explain how to build a single-beam optical tweezers on a home-made microscope and how to calibrate it. Improving on this design, we realize a holographic optical tweezers, which can manipulate independently multiple particles and generate more sophisticated wavefronts such as Laguerre-Gaussian beams. Finally, we explain how to implement a speckle optical tweezers, which permit one to employ ...

  20. Designing webliographies in an effective and simple manner: a step by step process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dariush Alimohammadi

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper explains web-based information retrieval as one of the main research interests of information professionals during the last decade, and introduces machine-oriented and human-oriented approaches in the designing process of Internet search tools and concerns with the second approach as a basis for the discussion. Then it defines the concept of webliography as a special type human-edited search tools. It is in fact an enumerative list of hypertext links and a gateway to the scientific sources of information on the Net, whether annotated or not. The existence and development of webliographies on the Net are justified based on a brief literature review. 14 phases of webliography production process are also enumerated step by step and a conclusion is provided finally.

  1. Comparative Analysis for NN-Based Adaptive Back-stepping Controller and Back-stepping Controller

    OpenAIRE

    Margarita Gjonaj; BetimÇiço; ArnisaMyrtellari

    2016-01-01

    This work primarily addresses the design and implementation of a neural network based controller for the trajectory tracking of a differential drive mobile robot. The proposed control algorithm is an NN-based adaptive controller which tunes the gains of the back-stepping controller online according to the robot reference trajectory and its initial posture. In this method, a neural network is needed to learn the characteristics of the plant dynamics and make use of it to determine the future i...

  2. Step-by-step external fixation of unstable pelvis with separate anterior and posterior modules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ivan Viktorovich Borozda; Nikolay Alexandrovich Ganzhurov; Alexander Alexandrovich Kapustyansky; Roman Valerievich Nikolaev; Kirill Sergeevich Golokhvast

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the treatment outcomes of patients with pelvic ring injury by applying step-by-step external pelvic fixation and circular external fixation device.Methods: A total of 28 patients suffering from disintegrated pelvic ring injury are involved in the study. Fourteen patients(the treatment group) underwent step-by-step external pelvic fixation by applying anterior(anti-shock) and posterior modules. For the rest 14 patients(the experimental group), the osteosynthesis were conducted by means of a circular external fixation device. The long-term outcomes were evaluated in a year after the injury.Results: The residual deformity of 5(4–7) mm was observed in 10 patients(71.4%) from the experimental group. In the treatment group, the residual deformity was evident only in 4(28.6%) cases being 2.5(2–3) mm(P = 0.000 319) on the average. The functional result(according to the Majeed scale) was statistically better in the treatment group(P = 0.000 319). Nine(64.3%) and five(35.7%) patients in treatment group showed excellent and positive results, respectively. The excellent result was demonstrated by 3patients(21.4%) of the experimental group, the positive outcomes were observed in 6 cases(42.9%) and the unsatisfactory one was displayed by 1 patient(7.1%) of the same group.Conclusions: The modular approach applied is the advantage of the transosseous osteosynthesis allowing for a separate anterior(anti-shock) fixation and final posterior reposition of the pelvic ring preceded by the stabilization of vital functions. The above mentioned method gives an opportunity to increase the amount of techniques applied for the pelvic external fixation in polytrauma cases.

  3. A STEP-BY-STEP INTEGRAL METHOD FOR ACTIVELY CONTROLLED STRUCTURES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡国平; 黄金枝

    2002-01-01

    A new active control method was proposed, in which the analytical control law was deduced by using astep-by-step integral method to differential equation of motion under the condition of static error being zero. Thiscontrol law is terse in mathematical expression and convenient for practical use. The simulation results demon-strate that the proposed method can provide much more remarkable peak-response reduction of seismically excitedstructures than the classical LQR method.

  4. Step by step error assessment in braided river sediment budget using airborne LiDAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lallias-Tacon, S.; Liébault, F.; Piégay, H.

    2014-06-01

    Sequential airborne LiDAR surveys were used to reconstruct the sediment budget of a 7-km-long braided river channel in southeastern France following a 14-year return period flood and to improve its accuracy step by step. Data processing involved (i) surface matching of the sequential point clouds, (ii) spatially distributed propagation of uncertainty based on surface conditions of the channel, and (iii) water depth subtraction from the digital elevation models based on water depths measured in the field. The respective influence of each processing step on sediment budget computation was systematically documented. This showed that surface matching and water depth subtraction both have a considerable effect on the net sediment budget. Although DEM of difference thresholding based on uncertainty analysis on absolute elevation values had a smaller effect on the sediment budget, this step is crucial for the production of a comprehensive map of channel deformations. A large independent data set of RTK-GPS checkpoints was used to control the quality of the LiDAR altimetry. The results showed that high density (7-9 points/m2) airborne LiDAR surveys can provide a very high level of detection of elevation changes on the exposed surfaces of the channel, with a 95% confidence interval level of detection between 19 and 30 cm. Change detection from LiDAR data revealed that 54% of the pre-flood active channel was reworked by the flood. The braided channel pattern was highly disturbed by the flood owing to the occurrence of several channel avulsions.

  5. [My first steps in laparoscopic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez de Badajoz, Eduardo

    2007-10-01

    The author describes his first steps in laparoscopic surgery and the sources of some of his ideas. He thanks his father's influence and the technical stimuli that catalysed his scientific curiosity. For the benefit of young urologists at the beginning of their careers he shows how the frustrations of working with the early instruments became the vital challenges that inspired creative solutions. His urological surgeon father inspired in his young son a passion for his calling. He developed an immediate and compelling interest in the shape and function of urological instruments like, for example, Freyer's lithotripter and the Iglesias resectoscope. Books of urological history and the works of pioneer urologists fascinated him. Watching José María Gil Vernet operate particularly impressed him and he says that Gil Vernet was the first urologist he saw using a laparoscope to diagnose an abdominal testicle. While working in an Oxford University hospital in 1985, he designed a balloon device to dissect the retropubic space. This procedure was the precursor of what several years later became extraperitoneal surgery The following year, he read the manual of Semm's laparoscopy and later described a laparoscopic varicocelectomy. In 1993, he published the first description of a laparoscopic radical cystectomy and ileal conduit. In 1997, he adapted a surgical robotic system with a master-slave arm to carry out firstly a transurethral resection. He says that a good idea is beyond price because it helps the inspired individual to make true a long-held ambition and achieve the signal success that lifts him out of the mud of mediocrity.

  6. A renal registry for Africa: first steps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davids, M Razeen; Eastwood, John B; Selwood, Neville H; Arogundade, Fatiu A; Ashuntantang, Gloria; Benghanem Gharbi, Mohammed; Jarraya, Faiçal; MacPhee, Iain A M; McCulloch, Mignon; Plange-Rhule, Jacob; Swanepoel, Charles R; Adu, Dwomoa

    2016-02-01

    There is a dearth of data on end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in Africa. Several national renal registries have been established but have not been sustainable because of resource limitations. The African Association of Nephrology (AFRAN) and the African Paediatric Nephrology Association (AFPNA) recognize the importance of good registry data and plan to establish an African Renal Registry. This article reviews the elements needed for a successful renal registry and gives an overview of renal registries in developed and developing countries, with the emphasis on Africa. It then discusses the proposed African Renal Registry and the first steps towards its implementation. A registry requires a clear purpose, and agreement on inclusion and exclusion criteria, the dataset and the data dictionary. Ethical issues, data ownership and access, the dissemination of findings and funding must all be considered. Well-documented processes should guide data collection and ensure data quality. The ERA-EDTA Registry is the world's oldest renal registry. In Africa, registry data have been published mainly by North African countries, starting with Egypt and Tunisia in 1975. However, in recent years no African country has regularly reported national registry data. A shared renal registry would provide participating countries with a reliable technology platform and a common data dictionary to facilitate joint analyses and comparisons. In March 2015, AFRAN organized a registry workshop for African nephrologists and then took the decision to establish, for the first time, an African Renal Registry. In conclusion, African nephrologists have decided to establish a continental renal registry. This initiative could make a substantial impact on the practice of nephrology and the provision of services for adults and children with ESRD in many African countries.

  7. It Takes a Community to Create a Library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth William Williment

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the course of four years, Working Together Community Development Librarians in Vancouver, Regina, Toronto and Halifax worked in diverse urban neighbourhoods and with diverse communities, traditionally considered marginalized or socially excluded. This practitioner-community based project allowed community voice to drive the projects process, not librarian generated beliefs, literature or other professional discourse. Community members identified barriers which impacted their ability to enter and use public libraries, and expressed that public libraries were not playing an important role addressing their daily needs. Socially excluded community members stay away from public libraries because traditional library service planning and delivery is based upon middle class values and worldviews. In response, based upon long-term work in diverse and socially excluded communities, the Working Together Project conceptualized and reviewed the traditional library service planning model and developed a new community based service model: the Community-Led Service Planning Model. Community-led service planning builds upon the traditional library service planning model and provides a new method that brings library staff together with community members in an effort to identify and meet community needs. Socially excluded community members are involved in each step of the community-led service development process, from needs assessment to evaluation. This non-prescriptive model is flexible and can be applied in all library settings, by all librarians, and to all program and service development. This paper, a synopsis of a 2008 CLA conference presentation, presents weaknesses associated with only using the traditional service model and provides examples, from each of the four sites, of the benefits of using the newly developed service model. It establishes that the Community-Led Service Planning Model provides libraries with a sustainable approach to working

  8. Selection of Yeasts as Starter Cultures for Table Olives: a Step-by-Step Procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio eBevilacqua

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In the past yeasts were traditionally regarded as the spoiling microorganisms for table olives; however, their role and impact for product quality and for the correct course of fermentation has been revised and nowadays many authors suggest a controlled inoculum of yeasts both in alkali-treated and untreated olives.The selection of a starter is a complex process, involving different steps. After strain isolation from raw material, the first step is the identification through phenotyping and genotypic methods; then, isolates should be characterized to assess their GRAS (generally recognized as safe status and technological properties (growth with salt added, at various temperatures and pHs, pectolytic and xylanolytic activity, lipolytic activity, resistance to some preservatives, functional impact.After studying these properties, the results can be submitted to data analysis (many times a statistical multivariate approach and strain selection. The number of strains to be selected depends on several factors, above all on the main goal: obtaining a single or a multiple-strain starter.After this step, starter should be used for a pilot fermentation on a lab scale, highlighting its performances, limits and benefits, as well as all the issues related to its production, storage and stability throughout the time. Finally, starter optimization conducted on a lab scale should be verified on real conditions.

  9. A step-by-step procedure for pH model construction in aquatic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. F. Hofmann

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available We present, by means of a simple example, a comprehensive step-by-step procedure to consistently derive a pH model of aquatic systems. As pH modeling is inherently complex, we make every step of the model generation process explicit, thus ensuring conceptual, mathematical, and chemical correctness. Summed quantities, such as total inorganic carbon and total alkalinity, and the influences of modeled processes on them are consistently derived. The model is subsequently reformulated until numerically and computationally simple dynamical solutions, like a variation of the operator splitting approach (OSA and the direct substitution approach (DSA, are obtained. As several solution methods are pointed out, connections between previous pH modelling approaches are established. The final reformulation of the system according to the DSA allows for quantification of the influences of kinetic processes on the rate of change of proton concentration in models containing multiple biogeochemical processes. These influences are calculated including the effect of re-equilibration of the system due to a set of acid-base reactions in local equilibrium. This possibility of quantifying influences of modeled processes on the pH makes the end-product of the described model generation procedure a powerful tool for understanding the internal pH dynamics of aquatic systems.

  10. [Community health in primary health care teams: a management objective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebot Adell, Carme; Pasarin Rua, Maribel; Canela Soler, Jaume; Sala Alvarez, Clara; Escosa Farga, Alex

    2016-12-01

    To describe the process of development of community health in a territory where the Primary Health Care board decided to include it in its roadmap as a strategic line. Evaluative research using qualitative techniques, including SWOT analysis on community health. Two-steps study. Primary care teams (PCT) of the Catalan Health Institute in Barcelona city. The 24 PCT belonging to the Muntanya-Dreta Primary Care Service in Barcelona city, with 904 professionals serving 557,430 inhabitants. Application of qualitative methodology using SWOT analysis in two steps (two-step study). Step 1: Setting up a core group consisting of local PCT professionals; collecting the community projects across the territory; SWOT analysis. Step 2: From the needs identified in the previous phase, a plan was developed, including a set of training activities in community health: basic, advanced, and a workshop to exchange experiences from the PCTs. A total of 80 team professionals received specific training in the 4 workshops held, one of them an advanced level. Two workshops were held to exchange experiences with 165 representatives from the local teams, and 22 PCTs presenting their practices. In 2013, 6 out of 24 PCTs have had a community diagnosis performed. Community health has achieved a good level of development in some areas, but this is not the general situation in the health care system. Its progression depends on the management support they have, the local community dynamics, and the scope of the Primary Health Care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Antibiotics promote aggregation within aquatic bacterial communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca eCorno

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The release of antibiotics (AB into the environment poses several threats for human health due to potential development of ABresistant natural bacteria. Even though the use of low-dose antibiotics has been promoted in health care and farming, significant amounts of AB are observed in aquatic environments. Knowledge on the impact of AB on natural bacterial communities is missing both in terms of spread and evolution of resistance mechanisms, and of modifications of community composition and productivity. New approaches are required to study the response of microbial communities rather than individual resistance genes. In this study a chemostat-based experiment with 4 coexisting bacterial strains has been performed to mimicking the response of a freshwater bacterial community to the presence of antibiotics in low and high doses. Bacterial abundance rapidly decreased by 75% in the presence of AB, independently of their concentration, and remained constant until the end of the experiment. The bacterial community was mainly dominated by Aeromonas hydrophila and Brevundimonas intermedia while the other two strains, Micrococcus luteus and Rhodococcus sp. never exceed 10%. Interestingly, the bacterial strains, which were isolated at the end of the experiment, were not AB-resistant, while reassembled communities composed of the 4 strains, isolated from treatments under AB stress, significantly raised their performance (growth rate, abundance in the presence of AB compared to the communities reassembled with strains isolated from the treatment without AB. By investigating the phenotypic adaptations of the communities subjected to the different treatments, we found that the presence of AB significantly increased co-aggregation by 5-6 fold.These results represent the first observation of co-aggregation as a successful strategy of AB resistance based on phenotype in aquatic bacterial communities, and can represent a fundamental step in the understanding of

  12. Cohesion Based Personalized Community Recommendation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Mamunur Rashid

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Our life is totally engaged by the progressive growth of online social networking. Because, millions of users are interconnecting with each other using different social media sites like Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Google+, Pinterest, Instagram etc. Most of the social sites like Facebook, Google+ allow users to join different groups or communities where people can share their common interests and express opinions around a common cause, problem or activity. However, an information overloading issue has disturbed users as thousands of communities or groups are creating each day. To resolve this problem, we have presented a community or group recommendation system centered on cohesion where cohesion represents high degree of connectedness among users in social network. In this paper, we emphasis on suggesting useful communities (or groups in term of Facebook that users personally attracted in to join; reducing the effort to find useful information based on cohesion. Our projected framework contains of the steps like: extracting sub-network from a social networking site (SNS, computing the impact of amity(both real-life or social and SNS connected, measuring user proclivity factor, calculating threshold from existing communities or groups of a user and lastly recommending community or group based on derived threshold. In result analysis part, we consider the precision-recall values by discarding community or group one at a time from the list of communities or groups of a certain user and checking whether the removed community or group is recommended by our proposed system. We have evaluated our system with 20 users and found 76% F1 accuracy measure.

  13. Community resilience elements and community preparedness at Bukit Antarabangsa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridzuan, Ahmad Azan; Kadir, Mohd Juraimy Hj; Yaacob, Safar; Oktari, Rina Suryani; Zainol, Noor Azmi Mohd; Zain, Mazura Mat

    2017-07-01

    This study was conducted to measure the relationship between community resilience elements (community education, community engagement, community leadership) and community preparedness using questionnaires gathered from 318 samples of the Bukit Antarabangsa community at Ampang Jaya Municipal in Malaysia. The outcomes of SmartPLS path model showed three important findings: firstly, community education significantly correlated with community preparedness. Second, community engagement significantly correlated with community preparedness. Third, community leadership significantly correlated with community preparedness. Statistically, this result confirms that the implementation of community resilience elements such as community education, community engagement, and community leadership act as an important determinant of community preparedness towards disasters in the studied community area sample. In addition, discussion, implications and conclusion are elaborated.

  14. High-resolution seismic wave propagation using local time stepping

    KAUST Repository

    Peter, Daniel

    2017-03-13

    High-resolution seismic wave simulations often require local refinements in numerical meshes to accurately capture e.g. steep topography or complex fault geometry. Together with explicit time schemes, this dramatically reduces the global time step size for ground-motion simulations due to numerical stability conditions. To alleviate this problem, local time stepping (LTS) algorithms allow an explicit time stepping scheme to adapt the time step to the element size, allowing nearoptimal time steps everywhere in the mesh. This can potentially lead to significantly faster simulation runtimes.

  15. Step- vs. kink-formation energies on Pt(111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FEIBELMAN,PETER J.

    2000-05-01

    Ab-initio kink-formation energies are about 0.25 and 0.18 eV on the (100)- and (111)-microfacet steps of Pt(111), while the sum of the step-formation energies is 0.75 eV/atom. These results imply a specific ratio of formation energies for the two step types, namely 1.14, in excellent agreement with experiment. If kink-formation costs the same energy on the two step types, an inference recently drawn from scanning probe observations of step wandering, this ratio ought to be 1.

  16. Formation of step bunches induced by flow in solution

    OpenAIRE

    Inaba, Masashi; Sato, Masahide

    2012-01-01

    We study the formation of step bunches induced by flow in solution during growth. In our previous study [M. Inaba and M. Sato: J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 80 (2011) 074606], we showed that the step-down flow in solution causes bunching. In this research, we study the dependence of step behavior on some parameters. With a slow flow, the separation and coalescence between steps and bunches occur frequently during step bunching. With increasing flow rate, the frequency decreases and tight bunches are for...

  17. Effects of body mass index and step rate on pedometer error in a free-living environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyo, Brian M; Fitzhugh, Eugene C; Bassett, David R; John, Dinesh; Feito, Yuri; Thompson, Dixie L

    2011-02-01

    Pedometers could provide great insights into walking habits if they are found to be accurate for people of all weight categories. the purposes of this study were to determine whether the New Lifestyles NL-2000 (NL) and the Digi-Walker SW-200 (DW) yield similar daily step counts as compared with the StepWatch 3 (SW) in a free-living environment and to determine whether pedometer error is influenced by body mass index (BMI) and speed of walking. The SW served as the criterion because of its accuracy across a range of speeds and BMI categories. Slow walking was defined as ≤80 steps per minute. fifty-six adults (mean ± SD: age = 32.7 ± 14.5 yr) wore the devices for 7 d. There were 20 normal weight, 18 overweight, and 18 obese participants. A two-way repeated-measures ANOVA was performed to determine whether BMI and device were related to number of steps counted per day. Stepwise linear regressions were performed to determine what variables contributed to NL and DW error. both the NL and the DW recorded fewer steps than the SW (P < 0.001). In the normal weight and overweight groups, error was similar for the DW and NL. In the obese group, the DW underestimated steps more than the NL (P < 0.01). DW error was positively related to BMI and percentage of slow steps, whereas NL error was linearly related to percentage of slow steps. A surprising finding was that many healthy, community-dwelling adults accumulated a large percentage of steps through slow walking. the NL is more accurate than the DW for obese individuals, and neither pedometer is accurate for people who walk slowly. Researchers and practitioners must weigh the strengths and limitations of step counters before making an informed decision about which device to use.

  18. Why you need to look where you step for precise foot placement : The effects of gaze eccentricity on stepping errors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smid, K. A.; den Otter, A. R.

    2013-01-01

    Previous research has shown that accurate stepping involves the fixation of gaze on the intended step location. One possible explanation for this visual strategy is that the fixation of locations that are eccentric relative to the step target, results in systematic localization errors, as has previo

  19. Step count recommendations for children based on body fat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, J Scott; Schofield, Grant; Duncan, Elizabeth K

    2007-01-01

    Current recommendations for pedometer-determined physical activity in children (boys, 15,000 steps/day; girls, 12,000 steps/day) were based on the association between weekday step counts and body mass index. The objective of this study was to develop new targets using both weekday and weekend step counts with percentage body fat (%BF) as the criterion reference. The %BF of 969 New Zealand European, Polynesian, and Asian children (515 male, 454 female) aged 5-12 years was measured in 2004 using hand-to-foot bioelectrical impedance analysis. Weekday and weekend step counts, assessed using sealed multi-day-memory pedometers over 5 days, were combined into a scaled mean step count. The contrasting groups method for determining criterion-referenced cut-off points was used to establish the optimal step count values for predicting overweight (%BF>85th percentile) and non-overweight (%BFcut-off points were 16,000 steps/day for boys and 13,000 steps/day for girls. Step count targets for reducing the risk of excess body fat in children are 1000 steps/day higher than existing BMI-referenced guidelines.

  20. Community, subjectivity, and intersubjectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronick, Karen

    2002-08-01

    This paper deals with the notions of "subjectivity," "intersubjectivity," and "community" from several different points of view that include subjective and intersubjective agency, a sense of community, the community as a social institution, and the idea of social justice. The context of these considerations can be found in the Community-Social-Psychological approach to social action as it is often practiced in Latin America. A review of these themes is considered important because different models of community intervention and practice may lead to different expressions of community interaction.

  1. Two-phase flow simulation of aeration on stepped spillway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Xiangju; LUO Lin; ZHAO Wenqian; LI Ran

    2004-01-01

    Stepped spillways have existed as escape works for a very long time. It is found that water can trap a lot of air when passing through steps and then increasing oxygen content in water body, so stepped spillways can be used as a measure of re-aeration and to improve water quality of water body. However, there is no reliable theoretical method on quantitative calculation of re-aeration ability for the stepped spillways. By introducing an air-water two-phase flow model, this paper used k-ε turbulence model to calculate the characteristic variables of free-surface aeration on stepped spillway. The calculated results fit with the experimental results well. It supports that the numerical modeling method is reasonable and offers firm foundation on calculating re-aeration ability of stepped spillways. The simulation approach can provide a possible optimization tool for designing stepped spillways of more efficient aeration capability.

  2. Investigation on the stepping arc stud welding process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chi Qiang; Zhang Jianxun; Fu Jifei; Zhang Youquan

    2005-01-01

    Through the investigation on traditional arc stud welding process, a new welding gun and its control system were developed in this paper. The stepping arc stud welding gun was mainly made by a stepping motor as actuating unit and a screw-driven device as moving unit. A control system with a MCS-51 single-chip microcomputer as main control component was used to realize the new stud welding procedure. This new welding process with stepping stud welding gun is named as stepping arc stud welding. In the new welding process, the stud action can be looked as constituted by some micro steps. The setting and adjusting of the stepping arc welding gun behavior parameters are accomplished independently. It is indicated from the results of process tests and bending test that the stepping arc stud welding process is practicable.

  3. Hibbing Community College's Community Computer Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regional Technology Strategies, Inc., Carrboro, NC.

    This paper reports on the development of the Community Computer Center (CCC) at Hibbing Community College (HCC) in Minnesota. HCC is located in the largest U.S. iron mining area in the United States. Closures of steel-producing plants are affecting the Hibbing area. Outmigration, particularly of younger workers and their families, has been…

  4. Community Bioethics: The Health Decisions Community Council.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, Tom; Mrgudic, Kate

    1993-01-01

    Sees health care decision making posing variety of complex issues for individuals, families, and providers. Describes Health Decisions Community Council (HDCC), community-based bioethics committee established to offer noninstitutional forum for discussion of health care dilemmas. Notes that social work skills and values for autonomy and…

  5. Two steps forward, one step back: The limits of foreign aid on Malawi's democratic consolidation

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Since the era of one-party rule, Malawi's relationship with the donor community has proved erratic and contentious. During the second term of Malawi's current president, Bingu wa Mutharika, this trend has continued apace, with important implications for the consolidation of the country's nascent democracy. Donors providing democracy aid have assisted with the conduct of elections and improved the technical capacity of parliamentarians. However, inconsistency across programme cycles, the conce...

  6. Online community detection for large complex networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Pan

    Full Text Available Complex networks describe a wide range of systems in nature and society. To understand complex networks, it is crucial to investigate their community structure. In this paper, we develop an online community detection algorithm with linear time complexity for large complex networks. Our algorithm processes a network edge by edge in the order that the network is fed to the algorithm. If a new edge is added, it just updates the existing community structure in constant time, and does not need to re-compute the whole network. Therefore, it can efficiently process large networks in real time. Our algorithm optimizes expected modularity instead of modularity at each step to avoid poor performance. The experiments are carried out using 11 public data sets, and are measured by two criteria, modularity and NMI (Normalized Mutual Information. The results show that our algorithm's running time is less than the commonly used Louvain algorithm while it gives competitive performance.

  7. Culture-independent methods for identifying microbial communities in cheese

    OpenAIRE

    Jany, Jean-Luc; Barbier, Georges

    2008-01-01

    International audience; This review focuses on the culture-independent methods available for the description of both bacterial and fungal communities in cheese. Important steps of the culture-independent strategy, which relies on bulk DNA extraction from cheese and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of selected sequences, are discussed. We critically evaluate the identification techniques already used for monitoring microbial communities in cheese, including PCR-denaturing gradient...

  8. Community-Wide Zero Energy Ready Home Standard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herk, A. [IBACOS, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Beggs, T. [IBACOS, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2016-02-05

    This report outlines the steps a developer can take when creating and implementing high performance standards such as the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Zero Energy Ready Home (ZERH) standards on a community-wide scale. The report also describes the specific examples of how this process is underway in the Stapleton community in Denver, Colorado, by the developer Forest City.

  9. Salt Lake Community College Veterans Services: A Model of Serving Veterans in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahern, Aaron; Foster, Michael; Head, Darlene

    2015-01-01

    This chapter outlines the birth and growth of a veterans' program in Salt Lake City, Utah, and discusses next steps in spurring additional innovations and advancements to improve service for student veterans in community colleges.

  10. Integrated Modelling - the next steps (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R. V.

    2010-12-01

    modelling demonstrations and to achieve a critical mass of accessible linkable models. These models will be spread across the world and there will need to be a search mechanism to find them. If the benefits of integrated modelling are to become widely available, ways will have to be found to automate and hide the linking process. All the above will require considerable resources. It is proposed to build these resources by creating an international community of practice based upon the open source model. The talk will expand upon the research and development required.

  11. Considering Resilience: Steps Towards an Assessment Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Kallaos

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available As threats from climate change related hazards increase in cities around the world, communities are faced with an urgent requirement for self-evaluation. It is essential to expose and assess potential hazards facing cities, as well as to consider potential impacts and responses. While the promotion of efficiency and promise of protection have been common approaches to hazards in the past, recent events have exposed weaknesses in existing tactics. It has also become more apparent that existing mitigation efforts will be insufficient to prevent some level of climate change, associated hazards, and impacts. Complete protection against all threats is not only impossible but potentially hazardous, as extreme or unanticipated events can exceed the capacity for defence, potentially resulting in catastrophic failures. From this realization of the fallibility of the existing paradigm, resilience has emerged as a useful concept for framing the response of cities to an expanding collection of potential threats. The aim of this article is to consider resilience as it applies to cities, their architecture and infrastructure systems, subsystems, and components, as well as their inhabitants. Resilience characteristics are identified and considered in order to inform the eventual development of a resilience framework with which to assess architecture and infrastructure resilience. This state of the art is instrumental to determine the conditions under which architecture and infrastructure resilience can be defined and measured, in order to guide the consideration of attributes and determine suitable criteria to select and elaborate indicators to help guide future actions and investments.   Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm

  12. Community Environmental Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Rosemary

    1995-01-01

    In British Columbia, the Boundary Bay Conservation Committee informed and educated the community and politicians about environmental issues and commercial development. Critical thinking, citizen participation, community building, and use of resources were strategies that led to successful social action. (SK)

  13. Community Nursing Home (CNH)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Community Nursing Home (CNH) database contains a list of all Community Nursing Home facilities under local contract to Veterans Health Administration (VHA). CNH...

  14. Community Based Distribution

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Community Based Distribution (CBD) is a relatively new concept. It is a service that reaches ... neration; Resupply systems; Pricing of contraceptives; Mix of services ... tion on how best to design and implement the project and the community in ...

  15. A la Carte Community

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gundelach, Peter; Brincker, Benedikte

    2010-01-01

    The exchange of open source software is a phenomenon that is becoming in- creasingly significant to IT users. This article presents the results of a study of the TYPO3 community, a community related to an open source CMS software. The article explores the community, identity and values of TYPO3...... and shows that there are high levels of virtual as well as face-to-face interaction among the members. The participants feel that they belong to the community and many also feel that they are recognised as part of the community. However, the members do not share common values neither in relation to software...... pro- duction nor generally. Instead, they stress that you are free to choose your own values. Against this background, the authors introduce the notion of an ‘a la carte community', i.e. a community where individuals pick and choose their degree of participation and integra- tion into the community...

  16. Strategies for Sustainable Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    The guidebook offers potential strategies for reducing greenhouse gas emissions using smart growth strategies, indicators to track progress, and resources for 10 community types ranging from major cities to rural communities.

  17. ACS Community Activities Contests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgener, Marisa

    2007-08-01

    The Committee on Community Activities and the Office of Community Activities announce the winners of the Illustrated Haiku Contest, Earth Day 2007 and the Poster Contest, National Chemistry Week 2006.

  18. Community Education at Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dryden, Gordon; Thomson, Peter

    1981-01-01

    The authors describe the situation in Leicestershire, England, where a group of users and staff formed The Association for Community Education to oppose severe budget cuts in the community education service. (Editor/SJL)

  19. Bayesian community detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Morten; Schmidt, Mikkel N

    2012-01-01

    Many networks of scientific interest naturally decompose into clusters or communities with comparatively fewer external than internal links; however, current Bayesian models of network communities do not exert this intuitive notion of communities. We formulate a nonparametric Bayesian model...... for community detection consistent with an intuitive definition of communities and present a Markov chain Monte Carlo procedure for inferring the community structure. A Matlab toolbox with the proposed inference procedure is available for download. On synthetic and real networks, our model detects communities...... consistent with ground truth, and on real networks, it outperforms existing approaches in predicting missing links. This suggests that community structure is an important structural property of networks that should be explicitly modeled....

  20. Community Challenge Grantees

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — HUD's Community Challenge Grants aim to reform and reduce barriers to achieving affordable, economically vital and sustainable communities. The funds are awarded to...

  1. Unsewered Communities in Iowa

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — The unsewered communities file was originally conceived as a representation of communities without a municipal sewer system or on-site septic systems. The selection...

  2. Considerations for the independent reaction times and step-by-step methods for radiation chemistry simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Ianik; Devroye, Luc

    2017-10-01

    Ionizing radiation interacts with the water molecules of the tissues mostly by ionizations and excitations, which result in the formation of the radiation track structure and the creation of radiolytic species such as H.,.OH, H2, H2O2, and e-aq. After their creation, these species diffuse and may chemically react with the neighboring species and with the molecules of the medium. Therefore radiation chemistry is of great importance in radiation biology. As the chemical species are not distributed homogeneously, the use of conventional models of homogeneous reactions cannot completely describe the reaction kinetics of the particles. Actually, many simulations of radiation chemistry are done using the Independent Reaction Time (IRT) method, which is a very fast technique to calculate radiochemical yields but which do not calculate the positions of the radiolytic species as a function of time. Step-by-step (SBS) methods, which are able to provide such information, have been used only sparsely because these are time-consuming in terms of calculation. Recent improvements in computer performance now allow the regular use of the SBS method in radiation chemistry. The SBS and IRT methods are both based on the Green's functions of the diffusion equation (GFDE). In this paper, several sampling algorithms of the GFDE and for the IRT method are presented. We show that the IRT and SBS methods are exactly equivalent for 2-particles systems for diffusion and partially diffusion-controlled reactions between non-interacting particles. We also show that the results obtained with the SBS simulation method with periodic boundary conditions are in agreement with the predictions by classical reaction kinetics theory, which is an important step towards using this method for modelling of biochemical networks and metabolic pathways involved in oxidative stress. Finally, the first simulation results obtained with the code RITRACKS (Relativistic Ion Tracks) are presented.

  3. Step-by-step towards PSS – Evaluating, Deciding and Executing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neugebauer, Line Maria; Mougaard, Krestine; McAloone, Tim C.;

    2012-01-01

    being a product to a product-service provider they should carefully consider internal and external aspects with regard to their organization, their market and their network. The paper proposes a three step process labelled the Evaluate-Decide-Execute approach; an approach that should enable the company......Successful implementation of product-service system (PSS) as business strategy has proven lucrative through many industry examples. However, companies should tread carefully before committing to a costly restructuring towards PSS business creation. This paper claims that before a company moves from...

  4. Successful Project Management A Step-by-Step Approach with Practical Examples

    CERN Document Server

    Rosenau, Milton D

    2011-01-01

    The Fourth Edition of this internationally bestseller details the quick and easy way to master the basics of project management. Using a lively, conversational style, project management gurus Mickey Rosenau and Gregory Githens equip readers with fundamental principles and "tested-in-the-trenches" techniques for managing projects in any type of organization. They arm readers with easy-to-use tools for resolving any technical, mechanical, or personnel problem that may arise over the course of a project and break project management down into twenty-two chronological steps. Extensively revised and

  5. Statistics translated a step-by-step guide to analyzing and interpreting data

    CERN Document Server

    Terrell, Steven R

    2012-01-01

    Written in a humorous and encouraging style, this text shows how the most common statistical tools can be used to answer interesting real-world questions, presented as mysteries to be solved. Engaging research examples lead the reader through a series of six steps, from identifying a researchable problem to stating a hypothesis, identifying independent and dependent variables, and selecting and interpreting appropriate statistical tests. All techniques are demonstrated both manually and with the help of SPSS software. The book provides students and others who may need to read and interpret sta

  6. Microsoft® SQL Server® 2008 MDX Step by Step

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Bryan; Consulting, Hitachi

    2009-01-01

    Teach yourself the Multidimensional Expressions (MDX) query language-one step at a time. With this practical, learn-by-doing tutorial, you'll build the core techniques for using MDX with Analysis Services to deliver high-performance business intelligence solutions. Discover how to: Construct and execute MDX queriesWork with tuples, sets, and expressionsBuild complex sets to retrieve the exact data users needPerform aggregation functions and navigate data hierarchiesAssemble time-based business metricsCustomize an Analysis Services cube through the MDX scriptImplement dynamic security to cont

  7. Microsoft® SQL Server® 2008 Step by Step

    CERN Document Server

    Hotek, Mike

    2009-01-01

    Teach yourself SQL Server 2008-one step at a time. Get the practical guidance you need to build database solutions that solve real-world business problems. Learn to integrate SQL Server data in your applications, write queries, develop reports, and employ powerful business intelligence systems.Discover how to:Install and work with core components and toolsCreate tables and index structuresManipulate and retrieve dataSecure, manage, back up, and recover databasesApply tuning plus optimization techniques to generate high-performing database applicationsOptimize availability through clustering, d

  8. Microsoft® Windows® Communication Foundation Step by Step

    CERN Document Server

    Sharp, John

    2009-01-01

    Teach yourself the essentials of Windows Communication Foundation-one step at a time. With this practical tutorial, you get hands-on guidance for creating the Web services you need to implement robust business applications for Windows. Discover how to: Build and host a Web service Design service contracts and data contractsMaintain state information and support transactionsProgrammatically configure bindings and endpoints Use load-balancing and perform content-based message routingImplement message encryption, authentication, authorizationOptimize performance with service throttling, encodi

  9. Microsoft® SQL Server® 2008 Analysis Services Step by Step

    CERN Document Server

    Cameron, Scott

    2009-01-01

    Teach yourself to use SQL Server 2008 Analysis Services for business intelligence-one step at a time. You'll start by building your understanding of the business intelligence platform enabled by SQL Server and the Microsoft Office System, highlighting the role of Analysis Services. Then, you'll create a simple multidimensional OLAP cube and progressively add features to help improve, secure, deploy, and maintain an Analysis Services database. You'll explore core Analysis Services 2008 features and capabilities, including dimension, cube, and aggregation design wizards; a new attribute relatio

  10. Steps toward fault-tolerant quantum chemistry.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taube, Andrew Garvin

    2010-05-01

    MPI alone is insufficient to achieve parallel scaling; QC developers have been forced to use alternative approaches to achieve scalability and would be receptive to radical shifts in the programming paradigm. Initial work in adapting the simplest QC method, Hartree-Fock, to this the new programming model indicates that the approach is beneficial for QC applications. However, the advantages to being able to scale to exascale computers are greatest for the computationally most expensive algorithms; within QC these are the high-accuracy coupled-cluster (CC) methods. Parallel coupledcluster programs are available, however they are based on the conventional MPI paradigm. Much of the effort is spent handling the complicated data dependencies between the various processors, especially as the size of the problem becomes large. The current paradigm will not survive the move to exascale computers. Here we discuss the initial steps toward designing and implementing a CC method within this model. First, we introduce the general concepts behind a CC method, focusing on the aspects that make these methods difficult to parallelize with conventional techniques. Then we outline what is the computational core of the CC method - a matrix multiply - within the task-based approach that the FAST-OS project is designed to take advantage of. Finally we outline the general setup to implement the simplest CC method in this model, linearized CC doubles (LinCC).

  11. PEDOMETER ACCURACY DURING STAIR CLIMBING AND BENCH STEPPING EXERCISES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroaki Tanaka

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present investigation was to examine pedometer accuracy during stair climbing and descending as well as during the performance of a bench stepping exercise. Ten healthy men participated in the present investigation. All subjects ascended and descended an 18 cm high public staircase, and performed a bench stepping exercise by using a 10, 20 and 30 cm high platforms, while wearing three different commercial pedometers (DW-800, YM, HJ- 700IT; OM, Lifecorder; KZ. In both situations, the stepping rate was controlled at 40, 50, 80, 100 and 120 steps·min-1. The pedometer scores tended to underestimate the actual number of steps during stair climbing with a slower stepping rate and/or the lower height of a platform. During the stair ascending and descending and the bench stepping exercise using 20 to 30 cm high platforms at 80 to 120 steps·min-1, the magnitude of the measurement error was -3.8 ± 10. 8 % for KZ, -2.1 ± 9.8 % for YM and -11.0 ± 18.9 % for OM. These results indicate that the KZ and the YM can accurately assess the number of steps during stair climbing using 20 to 30 cm high platforms at 80 to 120 steps·min-1

  12. The surface temperatures of the earth: steps towards integrated understanding of variability and change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, C. J.; Matthiesen, S.; Rayner, N. A.; Remedios, J. J.; Jones, P. D.; Olesen, F.; Trewin, B.; Thorne, P. W.; Auchmann, R.; Corlett, G. K.; Guillevic, P. C.; Hulley, G. C.

    2013-06-01

    Surface temperature is a key aspect of weather and climate, but the term may refer to different quantities that play interconnected roles and are observed by different means. In a community-based activity in June 2012, the EarthTemp Network brought together 55 researchers from five continents to improve the interaction between scientific communities who focus on surface temperature in particular domains, to exploit the strengths of different observing systems and to better meet the needs of different communities. The workshop identified key needs for progress towards meeting scientific and societal requirements for surface temperature understanding and information which are presented in this community paper. A "whole-Earth" perspective is required with more integrated, collaborative approaches to observing and understanding Earth's various surface temperatures. It is necessary to build understanding of the relationships between different surface temperatures, where presently inadequate, and undertake large-scale systematic intercomparisons. Datasets need to be easier to obtain and exploit for a wide constituency of users, with the differences and complementarities communicated in readily understood terms, and realistic and consistent uncertainty information provided. Steps were also recommended to curate and make available data that are presently inaccessible, develop new observing systems and build capacities to accelerate progress in the accuracy and usability of surface temperature datasets.

  13. The surface temperatures of Earth: steps towards integrated understanding of variability and change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, C. J.; Matthiesen, S.; Rayner, N. A.; Remedios, J. J.; Jones, P. D.; Olesen, F.; Trewin, B.; Thorne, P. W.; Auchmann, R.; Corlett, G. K.; Guillevic, P. C.; Hulley, G. C.

    2013-12-01

    Surface temperature is a key aspect of weather and climate, but the term may refer to different quantities that play interconnected roles and are observed by different means. In a community-based activity in June 2012, the EarthTemp Network brought together 55 researchers from five continents to improve the interaction between scientific communities who focus on surface temperature in particular domains, to exploit the strengths of different observing systems and to better meet the needs of different communities. The workshop identified key needs for progress towards meeting scientific and societal requirements for surface temperature understanding and information, which are presented in this community paper. A "whole-Earth" perspective is required with more integrated, collaborative approaches to observing and understanding Earth's various surface temperatures. It is necessary to build understanding of the relationships between different surface temperatures, where presently inadequate, and undertake large-scale systematic intercomparisons. Datasets need to be easier to obtain and exploit for a wide constituency of users, with the differences and complementarities communicated in readily understood terms, and realistic and consistent uncertainty information provided. Steps were also recommended to curate and make available data that are presently inaccessible, develop new observing systems and build capacities to accelerate progress in the accuracy and usability of surface temperature datasets.

  14. Pedometer accuracy during stair climbing and bench stepping exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayabe, Makoto; Aoki, Junichiro; Ishii, Kojiro; Takayama, Kohsaku; Tanaka, Hiroaki

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to examine pedometer accuracy during stair climbing and descending as well as during the performance of a bench stepping exercise. Ten healthy men participated in the present investigation. All subjects ascended and descended an 18 cm high public staircase, and performed a bench stepping exercise by using a 10, 20 and 30 cm high platforms, while wearing three different commercial pedometers (DW-800, YM, HJ- 700IT; OM, Lifecorder; KZ). In both situations, the stepping rate was controlled at 40, 50, 80, 100 and 120 steps·min(-1). The pedometer scores tended to underestimate the actual number of steps during stair climbing with a slower stepping rate and/or the lower height of a platform. During the stair ascending and descending and the bench stepping exercise using 20 to 30 cm high platforms at 80 to 120 steps·min(-1), the magnitude of the measurement error was -3.8 ± 10. 8 % for KZ, -2.1 ± 9.8 % for YM and -11.0 ± 18.9 % for OM. These results indicate that the KZ and the YM can accurately assess the number of steps during stair climbing using 20 to 30 cm high platforms at 80 to 120 steps·min(-1). Key pointsPedometers can assess the number of step accurately within an acceptable range of measurement error during the stair climbing activities at a stepping rate of 80 step·min(-1) or faster with 18 cm or higher stairs.

  15. Knowledge Communities in fives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andriessen, J.H.E.

    2006-01-01

    Many modern knowledge intensive organisations rely on knowledge sharing communities, often called ‘communities of practice. These communities can be found in many organisations, but their forms and functions appear to be quite diverse. This implies that questions concerning the functioning of commun

  16. Absences of Community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.B. Benammar

    1994-01-01

    Humans always search for a sense of community, in order to transcent their individuality and project themselves as part of a group. This human craving is actually a desire for an absence of community; an "empty place to bury our ineradicable solitude", a form of universal community which is yet to c

  17. Community College Periodicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pederson, Eldor O.

    Drawing from an examination of community college periodicals, their availability and characteristics, the academic affiliations of contributing authors, and the topics of their articles, this paper discusses the minor role which community college periodicals appear to play. A list of 35 periodicals dealing primary with community college education…

  18. Community Engagement? Let's Dance!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Paul

    2008-01-01

    School districts across the nation are reaching out to their communities in hopes of creating support for their programs. Toward that end, this article provides a rationale for and an overview of the elements of effective community engagement. The author outlines the need and analyzes the shift toward new approaches in community engagement. Next,…

  19. Logic in the Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligman, Jeremy; Liu, Fenrong; Girard, Patrick

    Communities consist of individuals bounds together by social relationships and roles. Within communities, individuals reason about each other's beliefs, knowledge and preferences. Knowledge, belief, preferences and even the social relationships are constantly changing, and yet our ability to keep track of these changes is an important part of what it means to belong to a community.

  20. Performance of a Voltage Step-Up/Step-Down Transformerless DC/DC Converter: Analytical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suskis, P.; Rankis, I.

    2012-01-01

    The authors present an analytical model for a voltage step-up/step-down DC/DC converter without transformers. The proposed topology is a combination of classic buck and boost converters in one single circuit but with differing operational principles. The converter is developed for a wind power autonomous supply system equipped with a hydrogen electrolytic tank and a fuel cell for energy stabilization. The main power source of the hydrogen-based autonomous supply system is energized by a synchronous generator operating on permanent magnets and equipped with a diode bridge. The input voltage of the converter in this case varies in the range 0-700 V, while its output DC voltage must be 540 V according to the demand of other parts of the system. To maintain the rated voltage, a special electrical load regulation is introduced. The calculations of the converter, the generator (equipped with a diode bridge) as element of the power system supply joint, and the load replaced by resistance are verified with PSIM software.

  1. Efficacy of a step-by-step carving technique for dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilistoff, Alan J; Mackenzie, Louis; D'Eon, Marcel; Trinder, Krista

    2013-01-01

    This study demonstrates the effectiveness of a step-by-step carving technique that is quickly and efficiently mastered by dental students. Thirty-six final-year dental students volunteered to participate in this study. The students were given pre-prepared lower right first molar simulation teeth that had the occlusal half replaced in carving wax. The study was conducted in three time phases: pre-test (Time 1), participative learning (Time 2), and post-test (Time 3). The pre-test had the students carve the wax with no instruction. Instruction and demonstration of the technique were given at Time 2, and the post-test had the students carve the tooth again with no guidance but with training. A statistically significant increase with a nearly medium effect size was found from Time 1 to Time 2. A statistically significant increase with a medium effect size was found when comparing Time 2 to Time 3. A statistically significant increase with a large effect size was found when comparing Time 1 to Time 3. This technique has proved to be an effective method of simultaneously teaching a large cohort of predoctoral dental students. The technique is consistent with constructivist learning theory.

  2. Step-by-Step Model for the Study of the Apriori Algorithm for Predictive Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Grigore ROŞCA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this paper was to develop an educational oriented application based on the Data Mining Apriori Algorithm which facilitates both the research and the study of data mining by graduate students. The application could be used to discover interesting patterns in the corpus of data and to measure the impact on the speed of execution as a function of problem constraints (value of support and confidence variables or size of the transactional data-base. The paper presents a brief overview of the Apriori Algorithm, aspects about the implementation of the algorithm using a step-by-step process, a discussion of the education-oriented user interface and the process of data mining of a test transactional data base. The impact of some constraints on the speed of the algorithm is also experimentally measured without a systematic review of different approaches to increase execution speed. Possible applications of the implementation, as well as its limits, are briefly reviewed.

  3. Comparative Analysis for NN-Based Adaptive Back-stepping Controller and Back-stepping Controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Gjonaj

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This work primarily addresses the design and implementation of a neural network based controller for the trajectory tracking of a differential drive mobile robot. The proposed control algorithm is an NN-based adaptive controller which tunes the gains of the back-stepping controller online according to the robot reference trajectory and its initial posture. In this method, a neural network is needed to learn the characteristics of the plant dynamics and make use of it to determine the future inputs that will minimize error performance index so as to compensate the back-stepping controller gains. The advantages and disadvantages of theproposed control algorithms will be discussed in each section with illustrations.Comprehensive system modeling including robot kinematics and dynamics modeling has been done. The dynamic modeling is done using Newtonian and Lagrangian methodologies for nonholonomic systems and the results are compared to verify the accuracy of each method. Simulation of the robot model and different controllers has been done using Matlab and Matlab Simulink.

  4. Algal biomass conversion to bioethanol - a step-by-step assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harun, Razif; Yip, Jason W S; Thiruvenkadam, Selvakumar; Ghani, Wan A W A K; Cherrington, Tamara; Danquah, Michael K

    2014-01-01

    The continuous growth in global population and the ongoing development of countries such as China and India have contributed to a rapid increase in worldwide energy demand. Fossil fuels such as oil and gas are finite resources, and their current rate of consumption cannot be sustained. This, coupled with fossil fuels' role as pollutants and their contribution to global warming, has led to increased interest in alternative sources of energy production. Bioethanol, presently produced from energy crops, is one such promising alternative future energy source and much research is underway in optimizing its production. The economic and temporal constraints that crop feedstocks pose are the main downfalls in terms of the commercial viability of bioethanol production. As an alternative to crop feedstocks, significant research efforts have been put into utilizing algal biomass as a feedstock for bioethanol production. Whilst the overall process can vary, the conversion of biomass to bioethanol usually contains the following steps: (i) pretreatment of feedstock; (ii) hydrolysis; and (iii) fermentation of bioethanol. This paper reviews different technologies utilized in the pretreatment and fermentation steps, and critically assesses their applicability to bioethanol production from algal biomass. Two different established fermentation routes, single-stage fermentation and two-stage gasification/fermentation processes, are discussed. The viability of algal biomass as an alternative feedstock has been assessed adequately, and further research optimisation must be guided toward the development of cost-effective scalable methods to produce high bioethanol yield under optimum economy.

  5. Uniform step-by-step observer for aerobic bioreactor based on super-twisting algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Fonseca, N; Chairez, I; Poznyak, A

    2014-12-01

    This paper describes a fixed-time convergent step-by-step high order sliding mode observer for a certain type of aerobic bioreactor system. The observer was developed using a hierarchical structure based on a modified super-twisting algorithm. The modification included nonlinear gains of the output error that were used to prove uniform convergence of the estimation error. An energetic function similar to a Lyapunov one was used for proving the convergence between the observer and the bioreactor variables. A nonsmooth analysis was proposed to prove the fixed-time convergence of the observer states to the bioreactor variables. The observer was tested to solve the state estimation problem of an aerobic bioreactor described by the time evolution of biomass, substrate and dissolved oxygen. This last variable was used as the output information because it is feasible to measure it online by regular sensors. Numerical simulations showed the superior behavior of this observer compared to the one having linear output error injection terms (high-gain type) and one having an output injection obtaining first-order sliding mode structure. A set of numerical simulations was developed to demonstrate how the proposed observer served to estimate real information obtained from a real aerobic process with substrate inhibition.

  6. Step-by-Step robotic heminephrectomy for duplicated renal collecting system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homayoun Zargar

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction A duplicated renal collecting system is a relatively common congenital anomaly rarely presenting in adults. Aim In this video we demonstrate our step-by-step technique of Robotic heminephrectomy in a patient with non-functioning upper pole moiety. Materials and Methods Following cystoscopy and ureteral catheter insertion the patient was placed in 600 modified flank position with the ipsilateral arm positioned at the side of the patient. A straight-line, three arm robotic port configuration was employed. The robot was docked at a 90-degree angle, perpendicular to the patient. Following mobilization the colon and identifying both ureters of the duplicated system, the ureters were followed cephalically toward, hilar vessels where the hilar anatomy was identified. The nonfunctioning pole vasculature was ligated using hem-o-lok clips. The ureter was sharply divided and the proximal ureteral stump was passed posterior the renal hilum. Ureteral stump was used as for retraction and heminephrectomy is completed along the line demarcating the upper and lower pole moieties. Renorrhaphy was performed using 0-Vicryl suture with a CT-1 needle. The nonfunctioning pole ureter was then dissected caudally toward the bladder hiatus, ligated using clips, and transected. Results The operating time was 240 minutes and blood loss was 100 cc. There was no complication post-operatively. Conclusions Wrist articulation and degree of freedom offered by robotic platform facilitates successful performance of minimally invasive heminephrectomy in the setting of an atrophic and symptomatic renal segment.

  7. Step-by-Step Simulation of Radiation Chemistry Using Green Functions for Diffusion-Influenced Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Ianik; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    Radiolytic species are formed approximately 1 ps after the passage of ionizing radiation through matter. After their formation, they diffuse and chemically react with other radiolytic species and neighboring biological molecules, leading to various oxidative damage. Therefore, the simulation of radiation chemistry is of considerable importance to understand how radiolytic species damage biological molecules [1]. The step-by-step simulation of chemical reactions is difficult, because the radiolytic species are distributed non-homogeneously in the medium. Consequently, computational approaches based on Green functions for diffusion-influenced reactions should be used [2]. Recently, Green functions for more complex type of reactions have been published [3-4]. We have developed exact random variate generators of these Green functions [5], which will allow us to use them in radiation chemistry codes. Moreover, simulating chemistry using the Green functions is which is computationally very demanding, because the probabilities of reactions between each pair of particles should be evaluated at each timestep [2]. This kind of problem is well adapted for General Purpose Graphic Processing Units (GPGPU), which can handle a large number of similar calculations simultaneously. These new developments will allow us to include more complex reactions in chemistry codes, and to improve the calculation time. This code should be of importance to link radiation track structure simulations and DNA damage models.

  8. Postural instability in Parkinson Disease: to step or not to step.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmell, Kristopher; Pulusu, Vinay K; Bharucha, Kersi J; Ross, Elliott D

    2015-10-15

    Postural instability is a key feature of Parkinson Disease that is associated with falls and morbidity. We designed a pull apparatus to quantitatively measure the force needed to pull subjects off-balance. Thirteen Controls and eight individuals with Parkinson Disease (PD) were evaluated. All individuals with PD reported subjective symptoms of postural instability and were symptomatic for approximately 9.4years when tested. No significant differences were found between Controls and PD subjects in the magnitude of force required to pull them off-balance. None of the Controls fell and all took a step into the direction of pull to maintain their balance. 59% of the time PD subjects fell because they did not take a step in the direction of pull to maintain their center of mass (COM) over their feet, thus indicating a deficiency in postural reflexes. If they fell on the first pull, PD subjects did not show a learning effect when pulled multiple times in the same direction. The utility of the Pull Test to detect postural instability is related to the subject's behavioral response, not the force needed to pull them off balance. Our findings may also help explain certain features of the PD gait as an attempt by subjects to avoid postural instability by not placing their COM in gravitationally unstable positions.

  9. Two steps back, one step forward: reconstructing the dynamic Danube riverscape under human influence in Vienna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohensinner, Severin; Sonnlechner, Christoph; Schmid, Martin; Winiwarter, Verena

    As part of an interdisciplinary project on the environmental history of the Viennese Danube, the past river landscape was reconstructed. This article describes the different types of historical sources used for the GIS-based reconstruction, the underlying methodological approach and its limitations regarding reliability and information value. The reconstruction was based on three cornerstones: (1) the available historical sources; (2) knowledge about morphological processes typical for the Austrian Danube prior to regulation; and (3) the interpretation of past hydraulic measures with respect to their effectiveness and their impact on the river's behaviour. We compiled ten historical states of the riverscape step-by-step going backwards in time to the early 16th century. After one historical situation had been completed, we evaluated its relevance for the temporally younger situations and whether corrections would have to be made. Such a regressive-iterative approach allows for permanent critical revision of the reconstructed time segments already processed. The resulting maps of the Danube floodplain from 1529 to 2010 provide a solid basis for interpreting the environmental conditions for Vienna's urban development. They also help to localise certain riverine and urban landmarks (such as river arms or bridges) relevant for the history of Vienna. We conclude that the diversity of approaches and findings of the historical and natural sciences (river morphology, hydrology) provide key synergies.

  10. Extracorporeal gas exchange in acute lung injury: step by step towards expanded indications?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembinski, Rolf; Kuhlen, Ralf

    2010-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is widely accepted as a rescue therapy in patients with acute life-threatening hypoxemia in the course of severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). However, possible side effects and complications are considered to limit beneficial outcome effects. Therefore, widening indications with the aim of reducing ventilator induced lung injury (VILI) is still controversial. Consequently, technological progress is an important strategy. Miniaturized ECMO systems are believed to simplify handling and reduce side effects and complications. Mueller and co-workers evaluated such a small-sized device in 60 patients with severe ARDS. They accomplished both the treatment of severe hypoxemia and reduction of VILI, demonstrating feasibility, a moderate rate of severe complications, and a 45% intensive care survival rate. Although neither randomized nor controlled, this study should encourage others to implement such systems in clinical practice. From a strategic perspective, this is another small but useful step towards implementing extracorporeal gas exchange for the prevention of VILI. It is already common sense that the prevention of acute life-threatening hypoxemia usually outweighs the risks of this technique. The next step should be to prove that prevention of life-threatening VILI balances the risks too.

  11. Quality partnerships: The community stakeholders' view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vhonani Netshandama

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Since 1997 universities in South Africa have been encouraged to be responsive to the needs of communities, to encourage broader participation and to address issues of access in higher education (Department of Education 1997. This transformative agenda was found to be especially compelling in the case of rural-based South African universities, which often serve historically disadvantaged black populations in areas that are both under-resourced and underdeveloped (Nkomo & Sehoole 2007, pp. 235–36. In 2006 the traditional leadership of a local community approached the University of Venda to propose a partnership. This prompted the researcher to conduct a qualitative study, which sought to explore and describe community members’ views of what they understood to be a quality partnership. Thirty-seven community representatives were engaged in individual as well as focus group interviews. These representatives were identified first through a stakeholder analysis procedure that sought to determine who in the community would have valuable input for the university-community partnership. As a point of departure, the following two questions were asked consecutively: What are your needs and expectations of a partnership with the university and what would you regard as a quality partnership between the HEI and the community? The sample selection was purposive, utilising the snowball technique. Data was transcribed and analysed using Tesch’s eight-step method (Tesch 1990, in Creswell 1994, p. 155. Interview data and field notes were co-coded, crosschecked and triangulated. Feedback workshops were conducted with the community to confirm the findings. A consensus was reached that four main requirements emerged from the data: —Balance the partnership objectives of both parties —Ensure an unexploitative partnership —Share power and control in the partnership —Maintain and monitor the partnership. This article provides a brief overview of the national

  12. Statistical determination of the step size of molecular motors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuman, K C; Saleh, O A; Lionnet, T; Lia, G; Allemand, J-F; Bensimon, D; Croquette, V [Laboratoire de Physique Statistique, Ecole Normale Superieure, 24 rue Lhomond, Paris 75005 (France)

    2005-11-30

    Molecular motors are enzymatic proteins that couple the consumption of chemical energy to mechanical displacement. In order to elucidate the translocation mechanisms of these enzymes, it is of fundamental importance to measure the physical step size. The step size can, in certain instances, be directly measured with single-molecule techniques; however, in the majority of cases individual steps are masked by noise. The step size can nevertheless be obtained from noisy single-molecule records through statistical methods. This analysis is analogous to determining the charge of the electron from current shot noise. We review methods for obtaining the step size based on analysing, in both the time and frequency domains, the variance in position from noisy single-molecule records of motor displacement. Additionally, we demonstrate how similar methods may be applied to measure the step size in bulk kinetic experiments.

  13. Properties of pedestrians walking in line: Stepping behavior

    CERN Document Server

    Jelić, Asja; Lemercier, Samuel; Pettré, Julien

    2012-01-01

    In human crowds, interactions among individuals give rise to a variety of self-organized collective motions that help the group to effectively solve the problem of coordination. However, it is still not known how exactly are the humans adjusting their behavior locally, nor what are the direct consequences on the emergent organization. One of the underlying mechanisms of adjusting individual motions is the stepping dynamics. In this paper, we present first quantitative analysis on the stepping behavior in a one-dimensional pedestrian flow studied under controlled laboratory conditions. We find that the step length is proportional to the velocity of the pedestrian, and is directly related to the space available in front of him, while the variations of the step duration are much weaker. Furthermore, we study the phenomena of synchronization --walking in lock-steps-- and show its dependence on the flow densities. We show that the synchronization of steps is particularly important at high densities, which has dire...

  14. SYD-1 Promotes Multiple Developmental Steps Leading to Neuronal Connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan; Quinn, Christopher C

    2016-12-01

    The establishment of neuronal connectivity requires precise orchestration of multiple developmental steps, including axon specification, axon guidance, selection of synaptic target sites, and development of synaptic specializations. Although these are separate developmental steps, evidence indicates that some of the signaling molecules that regulate these steps are shared. In this review, we focus on SYD-1, a RhoGAP-like protein that has been implicated in each step of axonal development. We discuss interactions between SYD-1, UNC-40(DCC) and RhoGTPases and highlight both similarities and differences in how SYD-1 functions to regulate the different steps of axonal development. These observations reveal an example of how a signaling protein can be repurposed across sequential developmental steps.

  15. Continuous versus step-by-step scanning mode of a novel 3D scanner for CyberKnife measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Kafi, M Abdullah; Mwidu, Umar; Moftah, Belal

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of the study is to investigate the continuous versus step-by-step scanning mode of a commercial circular 3D scanner for commissioning measurements of a robotic stereotactic radiosurgery system. The 3D scanner was used for profile measurements in step-by-step and continuous modes with the intent of comparing the two scanning modes for consistency. The profile measurements of in-plane, cross-plane, 15 degree, and 105 degree were performed for both fixed cones and Iris collimators at depth of maximum dose and at 10cm depth. For CyberKnife field size, penumbra, flatness and symmetry analysis, it was observed that the measurements with continuous mode, which can be up to 6 times faster than step-by-step mode, are comparable and produce scans nearly identical to step-by-step mode. When compared with centered step-by-step mode data, a fully processed continuous mode data gives rise to maximum of 0.50% and 0.60% symmetry and flatness difference respectfully for all the fixed cones and Iris collimators studied.

  16. Issues in defining and measuring veteran community reintegration: Proceedings of the Working Group on Community Reintegration, VA Rehabilitation Outcomes Conference, Miami, Florida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Resnik, PT, PhD

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In January 2010, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA Rehabilitation Research and Development Service convened a State of the Art (SOTA conference to advance the field of outcome measurement for rehabilitation-related studies. This article reports on the proceedings of the SOTA Working Group on Community Reintegration. We explored the use of the International Classification of Health, Disability, and Functioning as a theoretical framework for measuring community reintegration; identified key dimensions of community reintegration that could and/or should be measured; discussed challenges in measuring community reintegration; suggested steps to enhance community reintegration measurement; proposed future research that focuses on outcomes measures for community reintegration and the study of community reintegration outcomes; and made policy recommendations that would facilitate community reintegration research within the VA.

  17. Issues in defining and measuring veteran community reintegration: proceedings of the Working Group on Community Reintegration, VA Rehabilitation Outcomes Conference, Miami, Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnik, Linda; Bradford, Daniel W; Glynn, Shirley M; Jette, Alan M; Johnson Hernandez, Caitlin; Wills, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    In January 2010, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Rehabilitation Research and Development Service convened a State of the Art (SOTA) conference to advance the field of outcome measurement for rehabilitation-related studies. This article reports on the proceedings of the SOTA Working Group on Community Reintegration. We explored the use of the International Classification of Health, Disability, and Functioning as a theoretical framework for measuring community reintegration; identified key dimensions of community reintegration that could and/or should be measured; discussed challenges in measuring community reintegration; suggested steps to enhance community reintegration measurement; proposed future research that focuses on outcomes measures for community reintegration and the study of community reintegration outcomes; and made policy recommendations that would facilitate community reintegration research within the VA.

  18. Interface modes at step edges of media with anisotropic dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toedt, Jan-Niklas; Mansfeld, Sebastian; Mellem, Daniel; Hansen, Wolfgang; Heitmann, Detlef; Mendach, Stefan

    2016-05-01

    Time-resolved scanning Kerr microscopy data are presented that illustrate the refraction and total reflection of spin waves in a Ni80Fe20 film at a film-thickness step. In our experiments spin waves are excited with microwaves on coplanar wave guides. By changing the orientation of an externally applied magnetic field, we can manipulate the group velocity of the wave and hence control the angle of incidence on the step. An interface mode bound at the step is observed, when the magnetic field vector is perpendicular to the step. We point out the general conditions under which such interface modes can be expected in media with strongly anisotropic dispersion.

  19. Stepped Care for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: An Open Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Gilliam, Christina M.; Diefenbach, Gretchen J.; Whiting, Sara E.; Tolin, David F.

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness and treatment costs associated with a stepped care protocol of exposure and response prevention (EX/RP) for obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). In the current open trial, patients (N = 14) began with self-directed EX/RP and minimal therapist guidance over the course of six weeks (Step 1). During this phase of treatment, no therapist-directed exposures were conducted. Those who did not respond optimally to Step 1 went on to Step 2, which consisted of 15 ...

  20. Stabilization of STEP electrolyses in lithium-free molten carbonates

    CERN Document Server

    Licht, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    This communication reports on effective electrolyses in lithium-free molten carbonates. Processes that utilize solar thermal energy to drive efficient electrolyses are termed Solar Thermal Electrochemical Processes (STEP). Lithium-free molten carbonates, such as a sodium-potassium carbonate eutectic using an iridium anode, or a calcium-sodium-potassium carbonate eutectic using a nickel anode, can provide an effective medium for STEP electrolyses. Such electrolyses are useful in STEP carbon capture, and the production of staples including STEP fuel, iron, and cement.