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Sample records for surv prof pap

  1. Pap smear

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AGUS - Pap; Atypical squamous cells - Pap; HPV - Pap; Human papilloma virus - Pap cervix - Pap; Colposcopy - Pap Images Female reproductive anatomy Pap smear Uterus Pap smear Cervical erosion References ...

  2. Rama, Prof.

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1969 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Rama, Prof. Ph.D. (Mumbai), FNA, FNAAS. Date of birth: 16 March 1929. Specialization: Isotope Hydrology Address: Y-4, Sector 9, CBD, Navi Mumbai 400 614, Maharashtra Contact: Residence: (022) 2757 0081. Email: rama139@yahoo.co.in. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook ...

  3. Pap smear (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    During a Pap smear, cells from the outside and the canal of the cervix are retrieved by gently scraping the outside of the cervix. The Pap smear is performed to detect cancerous or precancerous conditions ...

  4. Marks, Prof. Tobin J

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 2011 Honorary. Marks, Prof. Tobin J. Date of birth: 25 November 1944. Address: Prof. of Materials Sci. & Engg., Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145, Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208, USA Contact: Office: (+1-847) 491 5658. Email: t-marks@northwestern.edu. YouTube; Twitter ...

  5. MethSurv: a web tool to perform multivariable survival analysis using DNA methylation data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modhukur, Vijayachitra; Iljasenko, Tatjana; Metsalu, Tauno; Lokk, Kaie; Laisk-Podar, Triin; Vilo, Jaak

    2017-12-21

    To develop a web tool for survival analysis based on CpG methylation patterns. We utilized methylome data from 'The Cancer Genome Atlas' and used the Cox proportional-hazards model to develop an interactive web interface for survival analysis. MethSurv enables survival analysis for a CpG located in or around the proximity of a query gene. For further mining, cluster analysis for a query gene to associate methylation patterns with clinical characteristics and browsing of top biomarkers for each cancer type are provided. MethSurv includes 7358 methylomes from 25 different human cancers. The MethSurv tool is a valuable platform for the researchers without programming skills to perform the initial assessment of methylation-based cancer biomarkers.

  6. Porsezian, Prof. Kuppuswamy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Porsezian, Prof. Kuppuswamy Ph.D. (Bharathidasan), FNASc. Date of birth: 5 June 1963. Specialization: Nonlinear Solitons, Bose-Einstein Condensates, Solitons, Modulational Instability, Nonlinear Fibre Optics, Partial Differential Equations Address: Department of Physics, Pondicherry University, Kalapet, Puducherry 605 ...

  7. Joffe, Prof. Abram Fiodorovich

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Academy Public Lecture. Posted on 19 January 2018. Seasonal and Pandemic Influenza by Prof. Kanta Subbarao 25 January 2018 at 1600 hrs. Ground floor, Main auditorium, New Biological Sciences Building, IISc. Event Poster ...

  8. Mark, Prof. Herman Francis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Academy Public Lecture. Posted on 19 January 2018. Seasonal and Pandemic Influenza by Prof. Kanta Subbarao 25 January 2018 at 1600 hrs. Ground floor, Main auditorium, New Biological Sciences Building, IISc. Event Poster ...

  9. Dale, Prof. Henry Hallett

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Academy Public Lecture. Posted on 19 January 2018. Seasonal and Pandemic Influenza by Prof. Kanta Subbarao 25 January 2018 at 1600 hrs. Ground floor, Main auditorium, New Biological Sciences Building, IISc. Event Poster ...

  10. Jagadish, Prof. Chennupati

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Academy Public Lecture. Posted on 19 January 2018. Seasonal and Pandemic Influenza by Prof. Kanta Subbarao 25 January 2018 at 1600 hrs. Ground floor, Main auditorium, New Biological Sciences Building, IISc. Event Poster ...

  11. Pauli, Prof. Wolfgang Armst

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Academy Public Lecture. Posted on 19 January 2018. Seasonal and Pandemic Influenza by Prof. Kanta Subbarao 25 January 2018 at 1600 hrs. Ground floor, Main auditorium, New Biological Sciences Building, IISc. Event Poster ...

  12. Hopkins, Prof. Frederick Gowland

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Academy Public Lecture. Posted on 19 January 2018. Seasonal and Pandemic Influenza by Prof. Kanta Subbarao 25 January 2018 at 1600 hrs. Ground floor, Main auditorium, New Biological Sciences Building, IISc. Event Poster ...

  13. Burma, Prof. Debi Prosad

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    , Prof. Debi Prosad D.Phil. (Calcutta), FNA, FNASc, FAMS. Date of birth: 1 February 1925. Date of death: 4 February 2005. Specialization: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Last known address: CF 186, Sector I, Salt Lake City, Kolkata 700 ...

  14. Bhatia, Prof. Suresh Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bhatia, Prof. Suresh Kumar Ph.D. (Pennsylvania). Date of birth: 8 September 1952. Specialization: Transport & Reaction in Nanostructured Porous Media, Adsorption and Mathematical Modelling Address: Professor, Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Brisbane, QLD 4072, Australia

  15. Athreya, Prof. Krishna Balasundaram

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1974 Section: Mathematical Sciences. Athreya, Prof. Krishna Balasundaram Ph.D. (Stanford). Date of birth: 12 December 1939. Specialization: Probability Theory, Stochastic Processes and Mathematical Statistics Address: Distinguished Professor Emeritus, Departments of Mathematics & Statistics, Iowa State ...

  16. Inamdar, Prof. Maneesha Shreedhar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Inamdar, Prof. Maneesha Shreedhar Ph.D. (Bombay). Date of birth: 25 February 1967. Specialization: Stem Cell Biology, Cardiovascular Development, Hematopoiesis & Angiogenesis Address: Molecular Biology & Genetics Unit, JN Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Jakkur, Bengaluru 560 064, Karnataka Contact:

  17. Mallik, Prof. Ranjan Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Academy Public Lecture. Posted on 19 January 2018. Seasonal and Pandemic Influenza by Prof. Kanta Subbarao 25 January 2018 at 1600 hrs. Ground floor, Main auditorium, New Biological Sciences Building, IISc. Event Poster ...

  18. Vishveshwara, Prof. Saraswathi

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Academy Public Lecture. Posted on 19 January 2018. Seasonal and Pandemic Influenza by Prof. Kanta Subbarao 25 January 2018 at 1600 hrs. Ground floor, Main auditorium, New Biological Sciences Building, IISc. Event Poster ...

  19. Bhargava, Prof. Manjul

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ACADEMY PUBLIC LECTURE: How Things Break – The Mechanics of Dynamic Fracture. Posted on 16th February 2018. by Prof. Krishnaswamy Ravi-Chandar. in Faculty Hall, Indian Institute of Science. on 23 February 2018, 1500 event poster ...

  20. Surolia, Prof. Namita

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Academy Public Lecture. Posted on 19 January 2018. Seasonal and Pandemic Influenza by Prof. Kanta Subbarao 25 January 2018 at 1600 hrs. Ground floor, Main auditorium, New Biological Sciences Building, IISc. Event Poster ...

  1. Chaudhari, Prof. Raghunath Vitthal

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1992 Section: Engineering & Technology. Chaudhari, Prof. Raghunath Vitthal Ph.D. (Mumbai), FNA, FNAE. Date of birth: 17 April 1948. Specialization: Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Catalysis, Biomass Conversion; Multiphase Reactors, Chemical Reaction Engineering and Kinetics & Mechanism Address: ...

  2. Sankara Rao, Prof. Kolluri

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sankara Rao, Prof. Kolluri Ph.D. (Bangalore). Date of birth: 15 December 1939. Specialization: Plant Developmental Biology, Biotechnology, Biodiversity Informatics & Plant Systematics Address: Distinguished Fellow, Centre for Ecological Sciences, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru 560 012, Karnataka Contact:

  3. Sarin, Prof. Manmohan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2000 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Sarin, Prof. Manmohan Ph.D. (Gujarat), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 26 July 1951. Specialization: Atmospheric & Aerosol Chemistry and Chemical Oceanography Address: INSA Senior Scientist, Physical Research laboratory, Navarangpura, Ahmedabad 380 009, Gujarat

  4. Venkatesh, Prof. Kareenhalli Viswanath

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2016 Section: Engineering & Technology. Venkatesh, Prof. Kareenhalli Viswanath Ph.D. (Purdue). Date of birth: 7 June 1967. Specialization: Biosystems Engineering, Synthetic Biology, Metabolic Engineering Address: Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Powai, Mumbai 400 076, ...

  5. Bhattacharya, Prof. Santanu

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2000 Section: Chemistry. Bhattacharya, Prof. Santanu Ph.D. (Rutgers), FNA, FTWAS. Date of birth: 23 April 1958. Specialization: Chemical Biology, Molecular Theranostics, Soft Materials, Supramolecular Analytical Chemistry, Nanoscience & Nanotechnology Address: Director, Indian Association for the Cultivation ...

  6. Krishnamoorthy, Prof. Guruswamy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2000 Section: General Biology. Krishnamoorthy, Prof. Guruswamy Ph.D. (Bombay), FNA. Date of birth: 10 May 1950. Specialization: Biophysical Chemistry, Laser Spectroscopy and Macromolecular Dynamics Address: Honorary Professor, Department of Biotechnology, Anna University, Guindy, Chennai 600 025, ...

  7. Rao, Prof. Madan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2011 Section: Physics. Rao, Prof. Madan Ph.D. (IISc). Date of birth: 11 July 1960. Specialization: Nonequilibrium Statistical Mechanics, Soft Condensed Matter Physics, Biological Physics Address: Theoretical Physics Group, Raman Research Institute, CV Raman Avenue, Bengaluru 560 080, Karnataka Contact:

  8. Pandit, Prof. Aniruddha Bhalachandra

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pandit, Prof. Aniruddha Bhalachandra Ph.D. (Mumbai), FNAE, FNA, FNASc, FTWAS. Date of birth: 7 December 1957. Specialization: Design of Multiphase Reactors, Cavitation Phenomena and Environmental & Energy Engineering Address: Dean (HR), Institute of Chemical Technology, N.P. Marg, Matunga, Mumbai 400 ...

  9. Ganesh, Prof. Subramaniam

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2016 Section: Medicine. Ganesh, Prof. Subramaniam Ph.D. (Banaras), FNASc. Date of birth: 23 May 1968. Specialization: Human Molecular Genetics, Neurobiology of Disease, Stress Biology Address: Department of Biological Sciences & Bioengineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208 016, U.P.

  10. Krishna, Prof. Padmanabhan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1979 Section: Physics. Krishna, Prof. Padmanabhan Ph.D. (Banaras), FNA. Date of birth: 13 January 1938. Specialization: Crystallography, Imperfection in Solids, Education and Science & Society Address: Adviser, Krishnamurti Foundation India, Rajghat Education Centre, Rajghat Fort, Varanasi 221 001, U.P.

  11. Dash, Prof. Debabrata

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dash, Prof. Debabrata Ph.D. (BHU). Date of birth: 12 April 1958. Specialization: Cell Biology, Signal Transduction, Nanobiotechnology Address: Head, Department of Biochemistry, Institute of Medical Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221 005, U.P.. Contact: Office: (0542) 670 3243. Residence: (0542) 236 9300

  12. Kumar, Prof. Har Darshan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1975 Section: Plant Sciences. Kumar, Prof. Har Darshan Ph.D. (London), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 25 February 1934. Specialization: Algology, Microbial Biotechnology, Genetics, Ecology and Environment Address: Mrigtrishna, B.32/32, H.K. 214, Saketnagar Colony, Naria, Varanasi 221 005, U.P.

  13. Jayaraman, Prof. Achuthan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 2006 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Jayaraman, Prof. Achuthan Ph.D. (Gujarat). Date of birth: 21 June 1957. Specialization: Atmospheric Science, Aerosols and Radiative Transfer Address: Director, National Atmospheric Research Laboratory, P. B. No. 123, Tirupati - 517 502, A.P.. Contact:

  14. Rangaswamy, Prof. Nanjangud Sreekantaiah

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1981 Section: Plant Sciences. Rangaswamy, Prof. Nanjangud Sreekantaiah Ph.D. (Delhi), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 8 May 1932. Specialization: Reproductive Physiology of Seed Plants, Plant Tissue Culture and Biotechnology Address: Apt. No. 241, III Floor, Block B-2, Kendriya Vihar, Bellary Road, Yelahanka, ...

  15. Tyagi, Prof. Akhilesh Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2004 Section: Plant Sciences. Tyagi, Prof. Akhilesh Kumar Ph.D. (Delhi), FNA, FNASc, FNAAS, FTWAS. Date of birth: 15 May 1956. Specialization: Genomics, Regulation Biology and Biotechnology Address: Department of Plant Molecular Biology, University of Delhi - South Campus, Benito Juarez Road, New Delhi ...

  16. Chakravorty, Prof. Animesh

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1975 Section: Chemistry. Chakravorty, Prof. Animesh Ph.D. (Calcutta), FNA, FTWAS Council Service: 1986-91. Date of birth: 30 June 1935. Specialization: Inorganic Chemistry Address: Flat 8/3, 6, Sunny Park, Ballygunge, Kolkata 700 019, W.B.. Contact: Residence: (033) 2485 8327. Mobile: 94338 01715

  17. Krebs, Prof. Hans Adolf

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Krebs, Prof. Hans Adolf Nobel Laureate (Medicine) - 1953. Date of birth: 25 August 1900. Date of death: 22 November 1981. YouTube; Twitter ... Summer Schools. Posted on 21 December 2017. ASTROPHYSICS: An Observational View of the Universe. Math Art and Design: MAD about Math, Math Education and Outreach.

  18. Pauling, Prof. Linus Carl

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pauling, Prof. Linus Carl Nobel Laureate (Chemistry) - 1954; Peace - 1962. Date of birth: 28 February 1901. Date of death: 19 August 1994 ... Posted on 21 December 2017. ASTROPHYSICS: An Observational View of the Universe. Math Art and Design: MAD about Math, Math Education and Outreach. Math and Finance ...

  19. Pavlov, Prof. Ivan Petrovich

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pavlov, Prof. Ivan Petrovich Nobel Laureate (Medicine) - 1904. Date of birth: 27 September 1849. Date of death: 27 February 1936. YouTube ... Posted on 21 December 2017. ASTROPHYSICS: An Observational View of the Universe. Math Art and Design: MAD about Math, Math Education and Outreach. Math and Finance ...

  20. Hardy, Prof. Godfrey Harold

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1935 Honorary. Hardy, Prof. Godfrey Harold. Date of birth: 7 February 1877. Date of death: 1 December 1947 ... Posted on 21 December 2017. ASTROPHYSICS: An Observational View of the Universe. Math Art and Design: MAD about Math, Math Education and Outreach. Math and Finance ...

  1. Richardson, Prof. Owen Willians

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Richardson, Prof. Owen Willians Nobel Laureate (Physics) - 1928. Date of birth: 26 April 1879. Date of death: 15 February 1959. YouTube ... Posted on 21 December 2017. ASTROPHYSICS: An Observational View of the Universe. Math Art and Design: MAD about Math, Math Education and Outreach. Math and Finance ...

  2. Brillouin, Prof. Leon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1939 Honorary. Brillouin, Prof. Leon. Date of birth: 7 August 1889. Date of death: 4 October 1969 ... Posted on 21 December 2017. ASTROPHYSICS: An Observational View of the Universe. Math Art and Design: MAD about Math, Math Education and Outreach. Math and Finance ...

  3. Rouxel, Prof. Jean

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1994 Honorary. Rouxel, Prof. Jean. Date of birth: 24 February 1935. Date of death: 19 March 1998 ... Posted on 21 December 2017. ASTROPHYSICS: An Observational View of the Universe. Math Art and Design: MAD about Math, Math Education and Outreach. Math and Finance ...

  4. Segre, Prof. Emilio Gino

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1971 Honorary. Segre, Prof. Emilio Gino. Date of birth: 1 February 1905. Date of death: 22 April 1989. YouTube; Twitter ... Posted on 21 December 2017. ASTROPHYSICS: An Observational View of the Universe. Math Art and Design: MAD about Math, Math Education and Outreach. Math and Finance ...

  5. Karrer, Prof. Paul

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1947 Honorary. Karrer, Prof. Paul Nobel Laureate (Chemistry) - 1937. Date of birth: 21 April 1889. Date of death: 18 June 1971 ... Posted on 21 December 2017. ASTROPHYSICS: An Observational View of the Universe. Math Art and Design: MAD about Math, Math Education and Outreach. Math and Finance ...

  6. Lundsgaard, Prof. Einar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1966 Honorary. Lundsgaard, Prof. Einar. Date of birth: 12 February 1899. Date of death: 18 December 1968. YouTube ... Summer Schools. Posted on 21 December 2017. ASTROPHYSICS: An Observational View of the Universe. Math Art and Design: MAD about Math, Math Education and Outreach.

  7. Bragg, Prof. William Henry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1935 Honorary. Bragg, Prof. William Henry Nobel Laureate (Physics) - 1915. Date of birth: 2 July 1862. Date of death: 10 March 1972 ... Posted on 21 December 2017. ASTROPHYSICS: An Observational View of the Universe. Math Art and Design: MAD about Math, Math Education and Outreach. Math and Finance ...

  8. Pitzer, Prof. Kenneth Sanborn

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1986 Honorary. Pitzer, Prof. Kenneth Sanborn. Date of birth: 6 January 1914. Date of death: 26 December 1997 ... Summer Schools. Posted on 21 December 2017. ASTROPHYSICS: An Observational View of the Universe. Math Art and Design: MAD about Math, Math Education and Outreach.

  9. Kock, Prof. Winston E.

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1970 Honorary. Kock, Prof. Winston E. Date of birth: 5 December 1909. Date of death: 25 November 1982. YouTube ... Summer Schools. Posted on 21 December 2017. ASTROPHYSICS: An Observational View of the Universe. Math Art and Design: MAD about Math, Math Education and Outreach.

  10. Rutherford, Prof. Ernest (Lord)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rutherford, Prof. Ernest (Lord) Nobel Laureate (Chemistry) - 1908. Date of birth: 30 August 1871. Date of death: 19 October 1937. YouTube ... Posted on 21 December 2017. ASTROPHYSICS: An Observational View of the Universe. Math Art and Design: MAD about Math, Math Education and Outreach. Math and Finance ...

  11. Bawden, Prof. Frederick Charles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1972 Honorary. Bawden, Prof. Frederick Charles. Date of birth: 18 August 1908. Date of death: 8 February 1972 ... Posted on 21 December 2017. ASTROPHYSICS: An Observational View of the Universe. Math Art and Design: MAD about Math, Math Education and Outreach. Math and Finance ...

  12. Bridgman, Prof. Percy Williams

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bridgman, Prof. Percy Williams Nobel Laureate (Physics) - 1946. Date of birth: 21 April 1882. Date of death: 20 August 1961. YouTube; Twitter ... Posted on 21 December 2017. ASTROPHYSICS: An Observational View of the Universe. Math Art and Design: MAD about Math, Math Education and Outreach. Math and Finance ...

  13. Russell, Prof. John

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1935 Honorary. Russell, Prof. John. Date of birth: 31 October 1872. Date of death: 12 July 1965 ... Posted on 21 December 2017. ASTROPHYSICS: An Observational View of the Universe. Math Art and Design: MAD about Math, Math Education and Outreach. Math and Finance ...

  14. Anderson, Prof. Basil Williams

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1964 Honorary. Anderson, Prof. Basil Williams. Date of birth: 3 July 1901. Date of death: 24 February 1984. YouTube ... Posted on 21 December 2017. ASTROPHYSICS: An Observational View of the Universe. Math Art and Design: MAD about Math, Math Education and Outreach. Math and Finance ...

  15. Bovet, Prof. Daniel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1967 Honorary. Bovet, Prof. Daniel Nobel Laureate (Medicine) - 1957. Date of birth: 23 March 1907. Date of death: 8 April 1992 ... Posted on 21 December 2017. ASTROPHYSICS: An Observational View of the Universe. Math Art and Design: MAD about Math, Math Education and Outreach. Math and Finance ...

  16. Morgan, Prof. Thomas Hunt

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Morgan, Prof. Thomas Hunt Nobel Laureate (Medicine) - 1933. Date of birth: 25 September 1866. Date of death: 4 December 1945. YouTube ... Posted on 21 December 2017. ASTROPHYSICS: An Observational View of the Universe. Math Art and Design: MAD about Math, Math Education and Outreach. Math and Finance ...

  17. Mecke, Prof. Reinhard

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1957 Honorary. Mecke, Prof. Reinhard. Date of birth: 14 July 1895. Date of death: 30 December 1969. YouTube; Twitter ... Summer Schools. Posted on 21 December 2017. ASTROPHYSICS: An Observational View of the Universe. Math Art and Design: MAD about Math, Math Education and Outreach.

  18. Kastler, Prof. Alfred

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1970 Honorary. Kastler, Prof. Alfred Nobel Laureate (Physics) - 1966. Date of birth: 3 May 1902. Date of death: 7 January 1984 ... Posted on 21 December 2017. ASTROPHYSICS: An Observational View of the Universe. Math Art and Design: MAD about Math, Math Education and Outreach. Math and Finance ...

  19. Bunning, Prof. Erwing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1986 Honorary. Bunning, Prof. Erwing. Date of birth: 23 January 1906. Date of death: 4 October 1990. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook ... Posted on 21 December 2017. ASTROPHYSICS: An Observational View of the Universe. Math Art and Design: MAD about Math, Math Education and Outreach. Math and Finance ...

  20. Chapman, Prof. Sydney

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1947 Honorary. Chapman, Prof. Sydney. Date of birth: 29 January 1888. Date of death: 16 June 1970. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook ... Posted on 21 December 2017. ASTROPHYSICS: An Observational View of the Universe. Math Art and Design: MAD about Math, Math Education and Outreach. Math and Finance ...

  1. Plyler, Prof. Earle Keith

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1962 Honorary. Plyler, Prof. Earle Keith. Date of birth: 26 April 1897. Date of death: 8 May 1976 ... Posted on 21 December 2017. ASTROPHYSICS: An Observational View of the Universe. Math Art and Design: MAD about Math, Math Education and Outreach. Math and Finance ...

  2. Bowen, Prof. Ira Sprague

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1956 Honorary. Bowen, Prof. Ira Sprague. Date of birth: 21 December 1898. Date of death: 6 February 1973. YouTube ... Posted on 21 December 2017. ASTROPHYSICS: An Observational View of the Universe. Math Art and Design: MAD about Math, Math Education and Outreach. Math and Finance ...

  3. Sebastian, Prof. Kizhakeyil Lukose

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sebastian, Prof. Kizhakeyil Lukose Ph.D. (IISc), FNA Council Service: 2016-. Date of birth: 18 November 1950. Specialization: Theoretical Chemistry and Chemistry of Interfaces Address: Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Ahalia Integrated Campus, Kozhippara Post, Palakkad 678 557, Kerala Contact:

  4. Indira Nath, Prof.

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1988 Section: Medicine. Indira Nath, Prof. M.D. (AIIMS), FRC Path., FAMS, FNA, FNASc, D.Sc. (h.c.) Council Service: 1992-94, 1998-2006; Vice-President 2001-2003. Date of birth: 14 January 1938. Specialization: Immunology, Leprosy and Pathology Address: 707, Sarvapriya ...

  5. Majumder, Prof. Partha Pratim

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Majumder, Prof. Partha Pratim Ph.D. (ISI, Calcutta), FNA, FNASc, FTWAS Council Service: 2016-. Date of birth: 6 September 1952. Specialization: Biostatistics, Human Genetics and Population Genetics Address: Distinguished Professor, National Institute of Biomedical Genomics, Post Netaji Subhas Sanitorium, Kalyani 741 ...

  6. Chandrashekaran, Prof. Maroli Krishnayya

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chandrashekaran, Prof. Maroli Krishnayya Ph.D. (Madras), D.Sc. (Madurai), FNA, FNASc, FTWAS Council Service: 1992-97. Date of birth: 4 January 1937. Date of death: 2 July 2009. Specialization: Chronobiology and Animal Behaviour Last known address: Evolutionary and Organismal Biology Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru ...

  7. Adiga, Prof Perdur Radhakantha

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Adiga, Prof Perdur Radhakantha Ph.D. (IISc), FNA. Date of birth: 5 May 1935. Date of death: 13 September 2006. Specialization: Endocrine Biochemistry, Reproductive Physiology & Growth, and Differentiation Last known address: Emeritus Professor, Department of Molecular Reproduction and Developmental, Genetics, ...

  8. Bhattacharjee, Prof. Somendra Mohan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 2000 Section: Physics. Bhattacharjee, Prof. Somendra Mohan Ph.D. (Carnegie Mellon), FNA. Date of birth: 24 January 1957. Specialization: Statistical Physics and Condensed Matter Physics Address: Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751 005, Orissa Contact:

  9. Agarwal, Prof Girish S

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    How to combat infectious diseases: The role of Science Academies · Academy Public Lecture and INSA–Leopoldina Lecture by Prof. Jörg Hacker, President, German Academy of Sciences Leopoldina. 4 December, 2017, 4 PM Faculty Hall, Indian Institute ...

  10. Aswathanarayana, Prof. Uppugunduri

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1976 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Aswathanarayana, Prof. Uppugunduri D.Sc. (Andhra), FNA, FTWAS. Date of birth: 1 July 1928. Date of death: 7 March 2016. Specialization: Nuclear Geology, Natural Resources Management and Environmental Geochemistry Last known address: Shanti ...

  11. Mishra, Prof. Santosh Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1987 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Mishra, Prof. Santosh Kumar Ph.D. (Pune), FNA. Date of birth: 1 March 1941. Specialization: Dynamic Meteorology and Numerical Modelling of the Atmosphere Address: Flat No. 4, 163/24 Mausam Vihar, Park Avenue, Off DP Road, Aundh, Pune 411 007, Maharashtra

  12. Gadgil, Prof. Sulochana

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1985 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Gadgil, Prof. Sulochana Ph.D. (Harvard), FNA. Date of birth: 7 June 1944. Specialization: Meteorology, Oceanography and Evolutionary Biology Address: A 18, Spring Flowers, Panchavati, Pashan, Pune 411 008, Maharashtra Contact:

  13. Bhattacharyya, Prof. Prabhat Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1976 Section: Chemistry. Bhattacharyya, Prof. Prabhat Kumar Ph.D. (Illinois), FNA. Date of birth: 22 October 1921. Date of death: 16 April 1996. Specialization: Bio-organic Chemistry and Chemical Microbiology Address: 177, Jodhpur Park, Flat - 1S, Calcutta 700 068. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook ...

  14. Panda, Prof. Sudhakar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Panda, Prof. Sudhakar Ph.D. (IoP, Bhubaneswar), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 23 February 1959. Specialization: High Energy Physics, String Theory, Cosmology, Quantum Field Theory Address: Director, Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751 005, Orissa Contact: Office: (0674) 230 1825, 230 6404

  15. Narayan, Prof. Ramesh

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Narayan, Prof. Ramesh FRS. Date of birth: 25 September 1950. Address: Harvard Smithsonian Centre for, Astrophysics, Harvard University, 60, Garden Street, MS-51, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA Contact: Office: (+1-617) 496 9393. Fax: (+1-617) 495 7053. Email: rnarayan@cfa.harvard.edu. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook ...

  16. Nicolaou, Prof. Kyriacos Costa

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 2007 Honorary. Nicolaou, Prof. Kyriacos Costa. Date of birth: 1946. Address: Department of Chemistry & BRC, Rice University, 6100, Main Street, MS 602, Houston, TX 77005, U.S.A.. Contact: Residence: (+1-713) 348 8860. Fax: (+1-713) 348 8865. Email: kcn@rice.edu. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook ...

  17. Bai, Prof. Chunli

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 2009 Honorary. Bai, Prof. Chunli. Date of birth: 1953. Address: Executive Vice-President, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 52, Sanlihe Road, Beijing 100864, China Contact: Office: (+86-10) 6859 7606. Fax: (+86-10) 6852 6316. Email: clbai@cas.cn. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook ...

  18. Chakravarty, Prof. Charusita

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chakravarty, Prof. Charusita Ph.D. (Cambridge). Date of birth: 5 May 1964. Date of death: 29 March 2016. Specialization: Chemical Physics, Theoretical & Computational Chemistry Last known address: Professor, Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi 110 016, U.T.. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook ...

  19. Bloembergen, Prof. Nicolaas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bloembergen, Prof. Nicolaas Nobel Laureate (Physics) - 1981. Date of birth: 11 March 1920. Address: Optical Sciences Center, University of Arizona, 1630E, University Blvd., Tucson, AZ 85721, U.S.A.. Contact: Residence: (+1-520) 647 3772. Email: nbloembergen@optics.arizona.edu. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  20. Gross, Prof. David J

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 2007 Honorary. Gross, Prof. David J. Date of birth: 1941. Address: Kavli Institute for Theoretical, Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-4030, U.S.A.. Contact: Office: (+1-805) 893 7337. Residence: (+1-805) 963 8324. Fax: (+1-893) 893 2431. Email: gross@kitp.ucsb.edu. YouTube ...

  1. Hartl, Prof. Daniel L

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hartl, Prof. Daniel L. Date of birth: 1 January 1943. Address: Higgins Professor of Biology, Dept. of Organismic & Evolutionary, Biology, The Biological Lab., Harvard University, 16 Divinity Ave, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA Contact: Office: (+1-617) 496 3917. Email: dhartl@oeb.harvard.edu. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  2. Hagenmuller, Prof. Paul

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hagenmuller, Prof. Paul. Date of birth: 3 August 1921. Address: Honorary Director, ICMCB-CNRS, Bordeaux University, 87 Avenue Dr Albert Schweitzer, 33608 Pessac Cedex, France Contact: Office: (+33-5) 40 00 63 25. Fax: (+33-5) 40 00 63 24. Email: hagen@icmcb.u-bordeaux.fr. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  3. Venkataramana, Prof. Tyakal Nanjundiah

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Venkataramana, Prof. Tyakal Nanjundiah Ph.D. (Mumbai), FNA. Date of birth: 14 February 1958. Specialization: Monodromy Groups, Rigidity & Arithmeticity of Lattices, Cohomology of Arithmetic Groups and Shimura Varieties Address: Professor, School of Mathematics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha ...

  4. Bhattacharyya, prof. Tirthankar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2016 Section: Mathematical Sciences. Bhattacharyya, prof. Tirthankar Ph.D. (ISI). Date of birth: 7 February 1968. Specialization: Functional Analysis, Hilbert Space, Operator Theory, Several Complex Variables Address: Department of Mathematics, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru 560 012, Karnataka Contact:

  5. Nadkarni, Prof. Mahendra Ganpatrao

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1989 Section: Mathematical Sciences. Nadkarni, Prof. Mahendra Ganpatrao Ph.D. (Brown), FNA. Date of birth: 17 January 1939. Specialization: Ergodic Theory and Commutative Harmonic Analysis Address: Emeritus Professor, Department of Mathematics, University of Bombay, Vidyanagari, Kalina, ...

  6. Rajan, Prof. Conjeeveram Srirangachari

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rajan, Prof. Conjeeveram Srirangachari Ph.D. (Bombay), FNA. Date of birth: 21 May 1961. Specialization: Automorphic Forms, Arithmetic Geometry and Representation Theory Address: Professor, School of Mathematics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400 005, Maharashtra Contact:

  7. Bhattacharyya, Prof. Kankan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bhattacharyya, Prof. Kankan Ph.D. (Calcutta), FNA, FNASc, FTWAS. Date of birth: 17 November 1954. Specialization: Femtosecond Laser Spectroscopy, Single Molecule Spectroscopy Address: Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science Education & Research, Bypass Road, Bhauri, Bhopal 462 066, M.P.. Contact:

  8. Ananthakrishnan, Prof. Taracad Narayanan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ananthakrishnan, Prof. Taracad Narayanan Ph.D. and D.Sc. (Madras), FNA, FNAAS Council Service: 1980-82. Date of birth: 15 December 1925. Date of death: 7 August 2015. Specialization: Entomology, Cecidology and Chemical Ecology Last known address: 4312, Zenith Avenue South, Minneapolis, MN 55410, USA.

  9. Einstein, Prof. Albert

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1936 Honorary. Einstein, Prof. Albert Nobel Laureate (Physics) - 1921. Date of birth: 14 March 1879. Date of death: 18 April 1955. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Theory Of Evolution. Posted on 23 January 2018. Joint Statement by the Three Science ...

  10. Anand, Prof. Anuranjan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2011 Section: Medicine. Anand, Prof. Anuranjan Ph.D. (IISc), FNASc, FNA. Date of birth: 5 April 1965. Specialization: Human Genetics & Genomics, Neurogenetics, Developmental Genetics Address: Molecular Biology & Genetics Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Jakkur, Bengaluru ...

  11. Rajaraman, Prof. Vaidyeswaran

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rajaraman, Prof. Vaidyeswaran S.M. (MIT), Ph.D. (Wisconsin), FNA, FNAE, FNASc. Date of birth: 8 September 1933. Specialization: Computer Science and Information Systems Design Address: Honorary Professor, Supercomputer Education and Research Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru 560 012, Karnataka

  12. Das, Prof. Prosad Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1975 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Das, Prof. Prosad Kumar D.Phil. (Calcutta), FNA Council Service: 1980-82. Date of birth: 20 May 1926. Date of death: 14 January 2011. Specialization: Numerical Weather Prediction, Ocean-Atmosphere Coupling, Storm Surges and Dynamic Meteorology

  13. Blumberg, Prof. Baruch Samuel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1987 Honorary. Blumberg, Prof. Baruch Samuel Nobel Laureate (Medicine) - 1976. Date of birth: 28 July 1925. Date of death: 5 April 2011. Last known address: Distinguished Scientist, Fox Chase Cancer Center, 333, Cottman Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19111, U.S.A.. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook ...

  14. Bhattacharya, Prof. Alok

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 2015 Section: General Biology. Bhattacharya, Prof. Alok Ph.D. (JNU), FNA. Date of birth: 2 February 1951. Specialization: Molecular Parasitology, Computational Genomics Address: School of Life Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110 067, U.T.. Contact: Office: (011) 2670 4516

  15. Sharma, Prof. Man Mohan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sharma, Prof. Man Mohan Ph.D. (Cantab), D.Sc. (h.c.), D.Engg. (h.c.), LL.D. (h.c.), FNA, FRS Council Service: 1986-88. Date of birth: 1 May 1937. Specialization: Multiphase Reactions/Reactors, Separations Address: 2/3, Jaswant Baug, Behind Akbarallys, V.N. Purav Marg, Chembur, Mumbai 400 071, Maharashtra Contact:

  16. Ramakrishnan, Prof. Palayanoor Sivaswamy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ramakrishnan, Prof. Palayanoor Sivaswamy Ph.D. (Banaras), FNA, FNASc, FTWAS. Date of birth: 24 December 1936. Specialization: Socio-ecology, Environment and Sustainable Development Address: INSA Honorary Scientist, School of Environmental Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110 067, U.T.

  17. Punniyamurthy, Prof. Tharmalingam

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Punniyamurthy, Prof. Tharmalingam Ph.D. (IIT, Kanpur), FRSC. Date of birth: 3 June 1964. Specialization: Synthetic Organic Chemistry Address: Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Guwahati 781 039, Assam Contact: Office: (0361) 258 2309. Residence: (0361) 258 4309. Mobile: 94351 02462

  18. Chowdhury, Prof. Debashish

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 2004 Section: Physics. Chowdhury, Prof. Debashish Ph.D. (IIT, Kanpur), FNASc, FNA. Date of birth: 10 September 1957. Specialization: Statistical Physics, Condensed Matter Physics and Biological Physics Address: Professor, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, ...

  19. Gadre, Prof. Shridhar Ramchandra

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1991 Section: Chemistry. Gadre, Prof. Shridhar Ramchandra Ph.D. (IIT, Kanpur), FNA. Date of birth: 20 May 1950. Specialization: Quantum Chemistry and Computer Applications Address: Interdisciplinary School of Scientific Computing, University of Pune, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411 007, Maharashtra

  20. Marimuthu, Prof. Ganapathy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Marimuthu, Prof. Ganapathy Ph.D. (MKU), D.Sc. (MKU), FNASc, FNA. Date of birth: 25 February 1954. Specialization: Animal Behaviour and Chronobiology Address: INSA Senior Scientist, Department of Animal Behaviour and Physiology, School of Biological Sciences, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai 625 021, T.N.

  1. Sarkar, Prof. Chitra

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sarkar, Prof. Chitra M.B.B.S. (Bangalore), M.D. (AIIMS), FRC Path. (London), FNASc, FAMS, FNA Council Service: 2013-15. Date of birth: 11 September 1955. Specialization: Neuropathology Address: Professor, Department of Pathology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, New Delhi 110 029, U.T.. Contact:

  2. Ramakrishna, Prof. Balakrishnan Siddartha

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ramakrishna, Prof. Balakrishnan Siddartha MD, DM & Ph.D. (Madras), FAMS, FNA. Date of birth: 26 October 1952. Specialization: Gastroenterology, Nutrition, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Gastrointestinal Microbiome Stem Cells Address: Flat No. 202-2-03, GVSPL Green Park, 342, Vaidyanathan Street, Nungambakkam, ...

  3. Radhakrishnan, Prof. Jaikumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Radhakrishnan, Prof. Jaikumar Ph.D. (Rutgers), FNA. Date of birth: 30 May 1964. Specialization: Algorithms, Information Theory, Computational Complexity, Combinatorics and Quantum Computing Address: Professor, School of Technology & Computer Science, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, ...

  4. Radhakrishnan, Prof. Thavarool Puthiyedath

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Radhakrishnan, Prof. Thavarool Puthiyedath Ph.D. (Princeton), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 25 May 1960. Specialization: Materials Chemistry Address: Professor, School of Chemistry, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500 046, A.P.. Contact: Office: (040) 2313 4827, (040) 2301 1068. Residence: (040) 2980 2989

  5. Chakravarti, Prof. Aravinda

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 2008 Honorary. Chakravarti, Prof. Aravinda. Date of birth: 6 February 1954. Address: Director - CCDG, McKusick-Nathans Inst. of Genetic, Medicine, Johns Hopkins Univ., School of Medicine, 733 N.Broadway, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA Contact: Office: (+1-410) 502 7525. Fax: (+1-410) 502 7544

  6. Ganeshaiah, Prof. Kotiganahalli Narayanagowda

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1992 Section: Plant Sciences. Ganeshaiah, Prof. Kotiganahalli Narayanagowda Ph.D. (UAS, Bangalore), FNA, FNAAS. Date of birth: 10 May 1953. Specialization: Plant Evolutionary Biology, Plant Genetics & Breeding, Foraging Ecology of Ants and Biodiversity & Conservation Address: 7, Pungavee Santosh Vihar, ...

  7. Ananthakrishnan, Prof. Ramakrishnaiyer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1938 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Ananthakrishnan, Prof. Ramakrishnaiyer D.Sc. (Madras), FNA 1962-64. Date of birth: 11 April 1911. Date of death: 21 July 1998. Specialization: Solar Physics and Atmospheric Physics Address: Flat No. 9, Praram Apartments, Lakaki Road, Pune 411 016.

  8. Moorthy, Prof. Jarugu Narasimha

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 2010 Section: Chemistry. Moorthy, Prof. Jarugu Narasimha Ph.D. (IISc). Date of birth: 1 July 1964. Specialization: Organic Photochemistry, Supramolecular Chemistry, Organic Synthesis Address: Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208 016, U.P.

  9. Ramasesha, Prof. Suryanarayana Sastry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ramasesha, Prof. Suryanarayana Sastry Ph.D. (IIT, Kanpur), FNA, FTWAS. Date of birth: 16 January 1950. Specialization: Many-Body Quantum Chemistry, Organic Solids, Molecular Electronics, Molecular Magnetism and Nonlinear Optics Address: Professor, Solid State & Structural Chemistry Unit, Indian Institute of Science ...

  10. Sankararaman, Prof. Sethuraman

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 2017 Section: Chemistry. Sankararaman, Prof. Sethuraman Ph.D. (Victoria). Date of birth: 15 October 1957. Specialization: Organometallic Chemistry, Organic Photochemistry, Time-resolved Spectroscopy Address: Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Chennai 600 036, T.N.

  11. Vanninathan, Prof. Muthusamy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1997 Section: Mathematical Sciences. Vanninathan, Prof. Muthusamy Ph.D. (Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris). Date of birth: 15 May 1951. Specialization: Fluid-Structure Interactions, Partial Differential Equations, Numerical Analysis, Asymptotic Analysis, Homogenization and Control of PDE Address: Department of ...

  12. Sane, Prof. Sharad Sadashiv

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 2010 Section: Mathematical Sciences. Sane, Prof. Sharad Sadashiv Ph.D. (IIT, Bombay). Date of birth: 20 November 1950. Specialization: Finite Geometries, Design Theory and Graph Theory Address: Department of Mathematics, Indian Institute of Technology, Powai, Mumbai 400 076, Maharashtra

  13. Bhosle, Prof. Ushadevi Narendra

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2000 Section: Mathematical Sciences. Bhosle, Prof. Ushadevi Narendra Ph.D. (Bombay), FNASc, FNA. Date of birth: 30 March 1949. Specialization: Algebraic Geometry Address: Flat No. 256, Jal Vayu Towers, NGEF Layout, Bennigannahalli, Bengaluru 560 038, Karnataka Contact: Residence: 99306 41136

  14. Johri, Prof. Man Mohan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1983 Section: General Biology. Johri, Prof. Man Mohan Ph.D. (Delhi), FNA. Date of birth: 15 September 1940. Specialization: Plant Biochemistry, Molecular Biology of Plants and Genetic Engineering Address: Flat No. 32, New Cosmos CHSL, Juhu-Versova Link Road, Andheri (W), Mumbai 400 053, Maharashtra

  15. Khare, Prof. Avinash Vasant

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1991 Section: Physics. Khare, Prof. Avinash Vasant Ph.D. (Calcutta), FNA. Date of birth: 20 June 1945. Specialization: High Energy & Elementary Particle Physics, Supersymmetric Quantum Mechanics and Nonlinear Dynamics Address: INSA Senior Scientist, Department of Physics, University of Pune, Ganeshkhind ...

  16. Narasimhan, Prof. Mudumbai Seshachalu

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Narasimhan, Prof. Mudumbai Seshachalu Ph.D. (Mumbai), FNA, FNASc, FRS Council Service: 1977-82; Vice-President: 1980-82. Date of birth: 7 June 1932. Specialization: Algebraic & Differential Geometry and Analysis Address: 9, Guruparadise Apartments, 24, 4th Main Road, Amarjyoti Layout, Sanjay Nagar, Bengaluru ...

  17. Ila, Prof. Hiriyakkanavar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1991 Section: Chemistry. Ila, Prof. Hiriyakkanavar Ph.D. (IIT, Kanpur), FNA. Date of birth: 11 September 1944. Specialization: Synthetic Organic Chemistry, Heterocyclic Chemistry, Medicinal Chemistry Address: Apt. 002, Block VIII, Heritage Estate, Doddaballapur Road, Yelahanka, Bengaluru 560 064, Karnataka

  18. Kulkarni, Prof. Sulabha Kashinath

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 2004 Section: Physics. Kulkarni, Prof. Sulabha Kashinath Ph.D. (Pune), FNASc, FNA. Date of birth: 1 June 1949. Specialization: Surface Physics, Materials Science and Nanoscience Address: Centre for Materials for Electronics Technology, Off Dr Homi Bhabha Road, Panchwati, ...

  19. About Prof. Satish Dhawan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 8; Issue 10. About Prof. Satish Dhawan. K Kasturirangan. General Article Volume 8 Issue 10 October 2003 pp 48-55. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/008/10/0048-0055. Keywords.

  20. Menon, Prof. Thuppalay Kochugovinda

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1974 Section: Physics. Menon, Prof. Thuppalay Kochugovinda Ph.D. (Harvard). Date of birth: 19 December 1928. Specialization: Astrophysics Address: 106-2803, 41st Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V6N 4B4, Canada Contact: Office: (+1-604) 822 0330. Residence: (+1-604) 266 1789

  1. Chander, Prof. Ramesh

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1993 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Chander, Prof. Ramesh Ph.D. (Columbia). Date of birth: 6 September 1939. Specialization: Seismology and Geophysics Address: House No. 290, Sector 4, Mansa Devi Complex, Panchkula 134 114, Haryana Contact: Residence: (0172) ...

  2. Ramachandran, Prof. Arcot

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1974 Section: Engineering & Technology. Ramachandran, Prof. Arcot Ph.D. (Purdue), D.Sc. (h.c.), D.lng. (h.c.), D.Eng. (h.c.), FNA, FNAE. Date of birth: 6 April 1923. Specialization: Energy, Heat and Mass Transfer Address: No. 3, Crescent Road, Bengaluru 560 001, Karnataka Contact: Residence: (080) 2225 5780

  3. Ramachandran, Prof. Raghavan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ramachandran, Prof. Raghavan Ph.D. (Chicago), FNASc. Date of birth: 15 February 1940. Specialization: Particle Physics Address: Flat 12, Khagol Society, Panchvati, Pashan, Pune 411 008, Maharashtra Contact: Residence: (020) 6607 5892. Mobile: 94220 04597. Email: rr_1940@yahoo.co.in, rr@imsc.res.in. YouTube ...

  4. Bose, Prof. Sujit Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1990 Section: Mathematical Sciences. Bose, Prof. Sujit Kumar D.Sc. (Calcutta). Date of birth: 10 October 1938. Specialization: Applied Mathematics, Solid Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics and Sediment Transport Address: BE-188, Salt Lake City, Kolkata 700 064, W.B.. Contact: Residence: 79805 77636

  5. Mahadevan, Prof. Priya

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2014 Section: Physics. Mahadevan, Prof. Priya Ph.D. (IISc). Date of birth: 19 August 1970. Specialization: Electronic Structure of Materials, Magnetism, Nanostructure Materials Address: Associate Professor, SN Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, JD Block, Sector 3, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700 098, W.B.. Contact:

  6. Sutherland, Prof. Bill

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 2000 Honorary. Sutherland, Prof. Bill. Date of birth: 1942. Address: Department of Physics, University of Utah, 115 S 1400 E Rm 201, Salt Lake City, UT 8412-0830, U.S.A.. Contact: Office: (+1-801) 581 6424. Residence: (+1-801) 355 8342. Fax: (+1-801) 581 4801. Email: suther@physics.utah.edu, ...

  7. Rao, Prof. Sumathi

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rao, Prof. Sumathi Ph.D. (SUNY, Stony Brook), FNASc. Date of birth: 5 December 1956. Specialization: Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics, Quantum field Theory Address: Harish Chandra Research Institute, Chhatnag Road, Jhusi, Allahabad 211 019, U.P.. Contact: Office: (0532) 227 4303. Residence: (0532) 227 4002

  8. Balaji, Prof. Vikraman

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 2007 Section: Mathematical Sciences. Balaji, Prof. Vikraman Ph.D. (Madras). Date of birth: 15 September 1962. Specialization: Algebraic Geometry, Representation Theory and Topology Address: Chennai Mathematical Institute, H1, Sipcot IT Park, Padur Post, Siruseri, Chennai 603 103, T.N.. Contact ...

  9. Venkataraman, Prof. Ganesan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    How to combat infectious diseases: The role of Science Academies · Academy Public Lecture and INSA–Leopoldina Lecture by Prof. Jörg Hacker, President, German Academy of Sciences Leopoldina. 4 December, 2017, 4 PM Faculty Hall, Indian Institute ...

  10. Vankar, Prof. Yashwant Dattatraya

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    How to combat infectious diseases: The role of Science Academies · Academy Public Lecture and INSA–Leopoldina Lecture by Prof. Jörg Hacker, President, German Academy of Sciences Leopoldina. 4 December, 2017, 4 PM Faculty Hall, Indian Institute ...

  11. Bapat, Prof. Ravindra Bhalchandra

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    How to combat infectious diseases: The role of Science Academies · Academy Public Lecture and INSA–Leopoldina Lecture by Prof. Jörg Hacker, President, German Academy of Sciences Leopoldina. 4 December, 2017, 4 PM Faculty Hall, Indian Institute ...

  12. Kodiyalam, Prof. Vijay

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    How to combat infectious diseases: The role of Science Academies · Academy Public Lecture and INSA–Leopoldina Lecture by Prof. Jörg Hacker, President, German Academy of Sciences Leopoldina. 4 December, 2017, 4 PM Faculty Hall, Indian Institute ...

  13. Goswami, Prof. Sreebrata

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    How to combat infectious diseases: The role of Science Academies · Academy Public Lecture and INSA–Leopoldina Lecture by Prof. Jörg Hacker, President, German Academy of Sciences Leopoldina. 4 December, 2017, 4 PM Faculty Hall, Indian Institute ...

  14. Ghosh, Prof. Sundargopal

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    How to combat infectious diseases: The role of Science Academies · Academy Public Lecture and INSA–Leopoldina Lecture by Prof. Jörg Hacker, President, German Academy of Sciences Leopoldina. 4 December, 2017, 4 PM Faculty Hall, Indian Institute ...

  15. Parthasarathy, Prof. Kalyanapuram Rangachari

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    How to combat infectious diseases: The role of Science Academies · Academy Public Lecture and INSA–Leopoldina Lecture by Prof. Jörg Hacker, President, German Academy of Sciences Leopoldina. 4 December, 2017, 4 PM Faculty Hall, Indian Institute ...

  16. Dasgupta, Prof. Indranil

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    How to combat infectious diseases: The role of Science Academies · Academy Public Lecture and INSA–Leopoldina Lecture by Prof. Jörg Hacker, President, German Academy of Sciences Leopoldina. 4 December, 2017, 4 PM Faculty Hall, Indian Institute ...

  17. Pontocorvo, Prof. Goido

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1984 Honorary. Pontocorvo, Prof. Goido. Date of birth: 29 November 1907. Date of death: 25 September 1999. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow. Posted on 1 January 2018. List of Fellows and Honorary Fellow elected ...

  18. Haddon, Prof. Alfred Cort

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1936 Honorary. Haddon, Prof. Alfred Cort. Date of birth: 24 May 1855. Date of death: 20 April 1940. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow. Posted on 1 January 2018. List of Fellows and Honorary Fellow elected during ...

  19. Ghosh, Prof. Anish

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 2018 Section: Mathematical Sciences. Ghosh, Prof. Anish Ph.D. (Brandeis). Date of birth: 25 December 1979. Specialization: Ergodic Theory, Lie Groups, Number Theory Address: School of Mathematics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400 005, Maharashtra

  20. Prasad, Prof. Dipendra

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1995 Section: Mathematical Sciences. Prasad, Prof. Dipendra Ph.D. (Harvard), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 22 March 1960. Specialization: Automorphic Forms and Number Theory Address: Distinguished Professor, School of Mathematics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, ...

  1. Khare, Prof. Avinash

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Khare, Prof. Avinash Ph.D. (PRL), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 23 July 1954. Specialization: Plasma Physics, Statistical Mechanics, Critical Phenomena, Plasma Astrophysics Address: Department of Physics & Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110 007, U.T.. Contact: Office: (011) 2766 7155. Residence: (011) 2766 6242

  2. Mahapatra, Prof. Souvik

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2018 Section: Engineering & Technology. Mahapatra, Prof. Souvik Ph.D. (IIT, Mumbai), FNAE, FIEEE. Date of birth: 26 October 1970. Specialization: Microelectronics & VLSI, Semiconductor Devices, Device Circuit Reliability Address: Department of Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Powai, ...

  3. Sane, Prof. Sanjay Prafullachandra

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sane, Prof. Sanjay Prafullachandra Ph.D. (Univ. Calif., Berkeley). Date of birth: 12 September 1970. Specialization: Neuroethology, Biomechanics, Fluid Mechanics Address: National Centre for Biological Sciences, GKVK Campus, Bengaluru 560 065, Karnatka Contact: Office: (080) 2366 7020. Residence: (080) 4097 0586

  4. Bhargava, Prof. Balram

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2018 Section: Medicine. Bhargava, Prof. Balram MD & DM (Lucknow), FNASc, FAMS, FRCP. Date of birth: 21 July 1961. Specialization: Cardiology, Medtech Innovation, Public Health Address: Department of Cardiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, New Delhi 110 029, U.T.. Contact:

  5. Sharma, Prof. Archana

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Annual Meetings · Mid Year Meetings · Discussion Meetings · Public Lectures · Lecture Workshops · Refresher Courses · Symposia · Live Streaming. Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1977 Section: Plant Sciences. Sharma, Prof. Archana Ph.D., D.Sc. (Calcutta), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 16 February 1932

  6. Prof. Dipankar Chatterji

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1994 Section: General Biology. Chatterji, Prof. Dipankar Ph.D. (IISc), FNA, FNASc, FTWAS Council Service: 2007-; Secretary 2010-12; President: 2013-2015. Date of birth: 20 April 1951. Specialization: Molecular Biology, Biophysical Chemistry and Biomolecular Spectroscopy Address: Honorary Professor ...

  7. Shaila, Prof. Melkote Subbarao

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1993 Section: General Biology. Shaila, Prof. Melkote Subbarao Ph.D. (IISc). Date of birth: 10 October 1945. Specialization: Molecular Virology and Viral Immunology Address: Professor Emeritus, Department of Microbiology and Cell Biology, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru 560 012, Karnataka

  8. Ramdorai, Prof. Sujatha

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 2004 Section: Mathematical Sciences. Ramdorai, Prof. Sujatha Ph.D. (Bombay), FNASc, FNA. Date of birth: 23 May 1962. Specialization: Algebra, Quadratic Forms, Number Theory and Iwasawa Theory Address: Professor, Department of Mathematics, University of British Columbia, ...

  9. Askey, Prof. Richard Allen

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1988 Honorary. Askey, Prof. Richard Allen. Date of birth: 4 June 1933. Address: 5915, American Parkway, Apt. 228, Madison, WI 43718, U.S.A.. Contact: Office: (+1-608) 262 2880. Residence: (+1-608) 233 7900. Fax: (+1-608) 263 8891. Email: askey@math.wisc.edu. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook ...

  10. Ramaswamy, Prof. Mythily

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ramaswamy, Prof. Mythily Ph.D. (Paris), FNASc. Date of birth: 6 June 1954. Specialization: Nonlinear Functional Analysis, Partial Differential Equations, and Applications to Control Problems Address: Professor, TIFR Centre for Applicable Mathematics, P.B. No. 6503, Sharada Nagar, Bengaluru 560 065, Karnataka Contact:

  11. Adimurthi, Prof. Adi

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1996 Section: Mathematical Sciences. Adimurthi, Prof. Adi Ph.D. (Mumbai), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 19 March 1952. Specialization: Nonlinear Differential Equations Address: TIFR Centre for Applicable Mathematics, P.B. No. 6503, Sharada Nagar, Bengaluru 560 065, Karnataka

  12. Balasubramanian, Prof. Ramachandran

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1987 Section: Mathematical Sciences. Balasubramanian, Prof. Ramachandran Ph.D. (Mumbai), FNA, FNASc. Council Service: 2007-2009. Date of birth: 15 March 1951. Specialization: Analytic Number Theory Address: Professor, The Institute of Mathematical Sciences, CIT Campus, Taramani, Chennai 600 113, ...

  13. Chaudhuri, Prof. Mihir Kanti

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chaudhuri, Prof. Mihir Kanti Ph.D. (IIT, Kharagpur), Dr rer nat (FRG), FNA. Date of birth: 21 July 1947. Specialization: Synthesis, Structure & Reactivity, Newer Reagents and Methodologies and Green Chemical Technology Address: Adviser (Education), Government of Assam, Sachivalaya, Dispur, Guwahati 781 006, Assam

  14. Lahiri, Prof. Goutam Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2005 Section: Chemistry. Lahiri, Prof. Goutam Kumar Ph.D. (Jadavpur). Date of birth: 1 January 1960. Specialization: Organometallic Chemistry and Catalysis Address: Professor, Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Powai, Mumbai 400 076, Maharashtra Contact: Office: (022) 2576 7159

  15. Chandrasekhar, Prof. Vadapalli

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chandrasekhar, Prof. Vadapalli Ph.D. (IISc), FNA, FNASc, FTWAS Council Service: 2010-12. Date of birth: 6 November 1958. Specialization: Organometallic Chemistry, Inorganic Rings & Polymers and Many-Group Chemistry Address: Director, National Institute of Science Education & Research, Jatni P.O., Khordha 752 ...

  16. Chakrabarti, Prof. Bikas Kanta

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chakrabarti, Prof. Bikas Kanta Ph.D. (Calcutta), FNA. Date of birth: 14 December 1952. Specialization: Statistical Physics, Condensed Matter Physics and Computational Physics & their Applications to Social Sciences Address: Senior Professor, Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics Divn., Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, ...

  17. Balaji, Prof. Kithiganahalli Naranayaswamy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 2016 Section: General Biology. Balaji, Prof. Kithiganahalli Naranayaswamy Ph.D. (IISc), FNASc, FNA. Date of birth: 7 March 1966. Specialization: Immunology, Infectious Diseases Address: Department of Microbiology & Cell Biology, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru 560 012, Karnataka Contact:

  18. Sharma, Prof. Shobhona

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sharma, Prof. Shobhona Ph.D. (Mumbai), FNA. Date of birth: 5 February 1953. Specialization: Molecular Parasitology, Parasite Immunology and Parasite Metabolism Address: Senior Professor & Chairperson, Department of Biological Sciences, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400 005, ...

  19. Chakraborti, Prof. Asit Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chakraborti, Prof. Asit Kumar Ph.D. (Jadavpur). Date of birth: 15 August 1954. Specialization: Synthetic Organic Chemistry, Green Chemistry, Medicinal Chemistry Address: Head, Department of Medicinal chemistry, National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education & Research, Sector 67, SAS Nagar 160 062, Panjab Contact:

  20. Patel, Prof. Bhisma Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2018 Section: Chemistry. Patel, Prof. Bhisma Kumar Ph.D. (IIT, Kanpur), FNASc. Date of birth: 6 August 1965. Specialization: Organic Synthesis, Reaction Mechanisms, Green Chemistry Address: Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Guwahati 781 039, Assam Contact: Office: (0361) 258 2307

  1. Lewis, Prof. Gilbert Newton

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1935 Honorary. Lewis, Prof. Gilbert Newton. Date of birth: 25 October 1875. Date of death: 24 March 1946. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Theory Of Evolution. Posted on 23 January 2018. Joint Statement by the Three Science Academies of India on ...

  2. Paulraj, Prof. Arogyaswami J

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 2014 Honorary. Paulraj, Prof. Arogyaswami J. Date of birth: 1944. Address: Information Systems Laboratory, Stanford University, 232, David Packard EE Building, 350, Serra Mall, Stanford, CA 94305-9510, USA Contact: Email: apaulraj@stanford.edu. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook ...

  3. Zare, Prof. Richard N

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Refresher Courses · Symposia · Live Streaming. Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 2009 Honorary. Zare, Prof. Richard N. Date of birth: 19 November 1939. Address: Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-5080, USA Contact: Email: zare@stanford.edu. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook ...

  4. Imry, Prof. Yoseph

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Imry, Prof. Yoseph. Date of birth: 1939. Address: Dept of Condensed Matter Physics, The Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100, Israel Contact: Office: (+972-8) 934 4064. Residence: (+972-8) 934 3506. Fax: (+972-8) 934 4477. Email: yoseph.imry@weizmann.ac.il. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  5. Muller, Prof. Paul Hermann

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1965 Honorary. Muller, Prof. Paul Hermann Nobel Laureate (Medicine) - 1948. Date of birth: 12 January 1899. Date of death: 13 October 1965. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Theory Of Evolution. Posted on 23 January 2018. Joint Statement by the ...

  6. Sarin, Prof. Shiv Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 2005 Section: Medicine. Sarin, Prof. Shiv Kumar D.M. (AIIMS), M.D. (Jaipur), FNA, FNASc, FAMS. Date of birth: 20 August 1952. Specialization: Hepatology Address: Director, Institute of Liver & Biliary Sciences, D1, Vasant Kunj, New Delhi 110 070, U.T.. Contact: Office: (011) 4630 ...

  7. Robinson, Prof. Robort

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1935 Honorary. Robinson, Prof. Robort Nobel Laureate (Chemistry) - 1947. Date of birth: 13 September 1886. Date of death: 8 February 1975. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Theory Of Evolution. Posted on 23 January 2018. Joint Statement by the ...

  8. Pai, Prof. Mangalore Anantha

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1979 Section: Engineering & Technology. Pai, Prof. Mangalore Anantha Ph.D. (UC, Berkeley), FNA, FNAE, FIEEE. Date of birth: 5 October 1931. Specialization: Smart Grid, Power Systems, Stability, Control and Computation Address: Emeritus Professor, Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, University ...

  9. Ginzburg, Prof. Vitaly Lasazevich

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Refresher Courses · Symposia · Live Streaming. Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1977 Honorary. Ginzburg, Prof. Vitaly Lasazevich. Date of birth: 4 October 1916. Date of death: 8 November 2009. Last known address: Professor and Member of the Russian, Academy of Sciences, P N Lebedev Physical Institute, ...

  10. Bondi, Prof. Sir Hermann

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Public Lectures · Lecture Workshops · Refresher Courses · Symposia · Live Streaming. Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1997 Honorary. Bondi, Prof. Sir Hermann KCB, FRS. Date of birth: 1 November 1919. Date of death: 10 September 2005. Last known address: Fellow, Churchill College, Cambridge, CB3 0DS, ...

  11. Oda, Prof. Minoru

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Annual Meetings · Mid Year Meetings · Discussion Meetings · Public Lectures · Lecture Workshops · Refresher Courses · Symposia · Live Streaming. Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1995 Honorary. Oda, Prof. Minoru. Date of birth: 24 February 1923. Date of death: 1 March 2001. Last known address: Tokyo ...

  12. Parthasarathy, Prof. Rajagopalan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    How to combat infectious diseases: The role of Science Academies · Academy Public Lecture and INSA–Leopoldina Lecture by Prof. Jörg Hacker, President, German Academy of Sciences Leopoldina. 4 December, 2017, 4 PM Faculty Hall, Indian Institute ...

  13. Rao, Prof. Maddali Nageswara

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    How to combat infectious diseases: The role of Science Academies · Academy Public Lecture and INSA–Leopoldina Lecture by Prof. Jörg Hacker, President, German Academy of Sciences Leopoldina. 4 December, 2017, 4 PM Faculty Hall, Indian Institute ...

  14. Pal, Prof. Arup Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    How to combat infectious diseases: The role of Science Academies · Academy Public Lecture and INSA–Leopoldina Lecture by Prof. Jörg Hacker, President, German Academy of Sciences Leopoldina. 4 December, 2017, 4 PM Faculty Hall, Indian Institute ...

  15. Mathur, Prof. Pradeep

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    How to combat infectious diseases: The role of Science Academies · Academy Public Lecture and INSA–Leopoldina Lecture by Prof. Jörg Hacker, President, German Academy of Sciences Leopoldina. 4 December, 2017, 4 PM Faculty Hall, Indian Institute ...

  16. Jain, Prof. Sanjay

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jain, Prof. Sanjay Ph.D. (Bombay). Date of birth: 31 January 1960. Specialization: Mathematical Modelling of Complex Systems, Structure, Dynamics and Evolution of Biological & Social Networks, Theoretical Systems Biology Address: Professor, Department of Physics & Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110 007, U.T.

  17. Saidapur, Prof. Srinivas Kishanrao

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1993 Section: Animal Sciences. Saidapur, Prof. Srinivas Kishanrao Ph.D. (Karnatak), FNA, FNASc, FTWAS. Date of birth: 7 March 1947. Specialization: Biology of Reproduction, Comparative Endocrinology, Herpetology and Animal Behaviour Address: Plot No. 108, Sripad Nagar, Saptapur, Dharwad ...

  18. Joshi, Prof. Amitabh

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Joshi, Prof. Amitabh Ph.D. (Washington State), FNASc, FNA. Date of birth: 4 March 1965. Specialization: Population & Quantitative Genetics, Evolutionary Genetics and Population Ecology Address: Professor, Evolutionary & Organismal Biology Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Jakkur P.O., ...

  19. Dharmalingam, Prof. Kuppamuthu

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1993 Section: General Biology. Dharmalingam, Prof. Kuppamuthu Ph.D. (MKU), FNASc. Date of birth: 3 January 1949. Specialization: Proteomics of Eye Diseases, Molecular Genetics, Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology Address: Director - Research, Aravind Medical Research Foundation, 1, ...

  20. Mishra, Prof. Manoj Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1999 Section: Chemistry. Mishra, Prof. Manoj Kumar Ph.D. (Florida), FNASc. Date of birth: 15 October 1952. Specialization: Electronic Structure Theory, Photo/Collisional Dynamics Address: Vice Chancellor, Birla Institute of Technology, Mesra, Ranchi 835 215, Jharkhand Contact:

  1. Balasubramanian, Prof. Sundaram

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Balasubramanian, Prof. Sundaram Ph.D. (IISc). Date of birth: 5 June 1966. Specialization: Ionic Liquids, Moulding Enzymes, Supramolecular Polymers, Molecular Simulations, Computational Chemistry Address: Chemistry & Physics of Materials Unit, JN Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Jakkur, Bengaluru 560 064, ...

  2. Balasubramanian, Prof. Aiylam Subramania

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Balasubramanian, Prof. Aiylam Subramania Ph.D. (Kerala), FAMS. Date of birth: 15 July 1937. Specialization: Neurochemistry and Enzymology Address: 16/7A, First New Street, Thirunagar, Vellore 632 006, T.N.. Contact: Residence: (0416) 224 6260. Email: balabsu7@hotmail.com. YouTube · Twitter · Facebook · Blog ...

  3. Bhalla, Prof. Upinder Singh

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bhalla, Prof. Upinder Singh Ph.D. (CIT), FNA. Date of birth: 21 June 1963. Specialization: Systems Biology, Computational Neuroscience and Systems Neurobiology Address: Associate Professor, National Centre for Biological Sciences, GKVK Campus, Bengaluru 560 065, Karnataka Contact: Office: (080) 2366 6130

  4. Pani, Prof. Amiya Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 2012 Section: Mathematical Sciences. Pani, Prof. Amiya Kumar Ph.D. (IIT, Kanpur), FNASc. Date of birth: 3 June 1957. Specialization: Numerical Analysis, Partial Differential Equations, Industrial Mathematics Address: Chair Professor, Department of Mathematics, Indian Institute of Technology, Powai, ...

  5. Bose, Prof. Indrani

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 2000 Section: Physics. Bose, Prof. Indrani Ph.D. (Calcutta), FNASc. Date of birth: 15 August 1951. Specialization: Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics, Statistical Physics, Biological Physics and Systems Biology Address: Emeritus Scientist, Department of Physics, Bose Institute, ...

  6. Balasubramanian, Prof. Kunissery Ananthasubramanian

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2002 Section: Medicine. Balasubramanian, Prof. Kunissery Ananthasubramanian Ph.D. (Madras), FNASc, FAMS. Date of birth: 6 April 1945. Specialization: Oxidative Stress, Gastrointestinal Mucosa and Pathophysiology Address: No. 49, Guruthoppu Phase 1, II Street, Sathuvachari, Vellore 632 009, T.N.. Contact:

  7. Ramasubramanian, Prof. Sundareswaran

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ramasubramanian, Prof. Sundareswaran Ph.D. (ISI). Date of birth: 3 March 1952. Specialization: Stochastic Processes, Stochastic Models in Insurance Address: Professor, Statistics & Mathematics Unit, Indian Statistical Institute, R.V. College P.O., Bengaluru 560 059, Karnataka Contact: Office: (080) 2848 3002-4&6/476

  8. Karman, Prof. Theodore von

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1961 Honorary. Karman, Prof. Theodore von. Date of birth: 11 May 1881. Date of death: 6 May 1963. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Theory Of Evolution. Posted on 23 January 2018. Joint Statement by the Three Science Academies of India on the ...

  9. Cabannes, Prof. Jean

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1949 Honorary. Cabannes, Prof. Jean. Date of birth: 12 August 1885. Date of death: 31 October 1959. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Theory Of Evolution. Posted on 23 January 2018. Joint Statement by the Three Science Academies of India on the ...

  10. Fischer, Prof. Hans

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1935 Honorary. Fischer, Prof. Hans Nobel Laureate (Chemistry) - 1930. Date of birth: 27 July 1881. Date of death: 31 March 1945. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Theory Of Evolution. Posted on 23 January 2018. Joint Statement by the Three Science ...

  11. Granit, Prof. Ragnar Arthur

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1964 Honorary. Granit, Prof. Ragnar Arthur Nobel Laureate (Medicine) - 1967. Date of birth: 30 October 1900. Date of death: 11 March 1991. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Theory Of Evolution. Posted on 23 January 2018. Joint Statement by the ...

  12. Cousteau, Prof. Jacques Yves

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1978 Honorary. Cousteau, Prof. Jacques Yves. Date of birth: 11 June 1910. Date of death: 25 June 1997. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Theory Of Evolution. Posted on 23 January 2018. Joint Statement by the Three Science Academies of India on ...

  13. Millikan, Prof. Robert Andrews

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1935 Honorary. Millikan, Prof. Robert Andrews Nobel Laureate (Physics) - 1923. Date of birth: 22 March 1868. Date of death: 19 December 1953. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Theory Of Evolution. Posted on 23 January 2018. Joint Statement by the ...

  14. Heisenberg, Prof. Werner Karl

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1935 Honorary. Heisenberg, Prof. Werner Karl Nobel Laureate (Physics) - 1932. Date of birth: 5 December 1901. Date of death: 1 February 1976. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Theory Of Evolution. Posted on 23 January 2018. Joint Statement by the ...

  15. Niggli, Prof. Paul

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1937 Honorary. Niggli, Prof. Paul. Date of birth: 26 June 1888. Date of death: 13 January 1953. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Theory Of Evolution. Posted on 23 January 2018. Joint Statement by the Three Science Academies of India on the teaching ...

  16. Hill, Prof. Archibald Vivian

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1935 Honorary. Hill, Prof. Archibald Vivian Nobel Laureate (Medicine) - 1922. Date of birth: 26 September 1886. Date of death: 3 June 1977. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Theory Of Evolution. Posted on 23 January 2018. Joint Statement by the ...

  17. Hess, Prof. Walter Rudolf

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1966 Honorary. Hess, Prof. Walter Rudolf Nobel Laureate (Medicine) - 1949. Date of birth: 17 March 1881. Date of death: 12 August 1973. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Theory Of Evolution. Posted on 23 January 2018. Joint Statement by the Three ...

  18. Herzberg, Prof. Gerhard

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1955 Honorary. Herzberg, Prof. Gerhard Nobel Laureate (Chemistry) - 1971. Date of birth: 25 December 1904. Date of death: 4 March 1999. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Theory Of Evolution. Posted on 23 January 2018. Joint Statement by the ...

  19. Eccles, Prof. John Carew

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1968 Honorary. Eccles, Prof. John Carew Nobel Laureate (Medicine) - 1963. Date of birth: 27 January 1903. Date of death: 2 May 1997. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Theory Of Evolution. Posted on 23 January 2018. Joint Statement by the Three ...

  20. Hadamard, Prof. Jacques

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1939 Honorary. Hadamard, Prof. Jacques. Date of birth: 8 December 1865. Date of death: 17 October 1963. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Theory Of Evolution. Posted on 23 January 2018. Joint Statement by the Three Science Academies of India on ...

  1. Prasad, Prof. Surendra

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prasad, Prof. Surendra Ph.D. (IIT, Delhi), FNA, FNAE, FNASc. Council Service: 2007-12. Date of birth: 10 July 1948. Specialization: Signal Processing, Communication Theory and Systems Address: Emeritus Professor, Department of Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Hauz Khas, New Delhi 110 016, U.T.

  2. Balaram, Prof. Padmanabhan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Balaram, Prof. Padmanabhan Ph.D. (Carnegie Mellon), FNA, FNASc. Council Service: 1995-2000. Date of birth: 19 February 1949. Specialization: Bio-organic Chemistry and Molecular Biophysics Address: Molecular Biophysics Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru 560 012, Karnataka Contact: Office: (080) 2293 3000

  3. Kesavan, Prof. Srinivasan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 2008 Section: Mathematical Sciences. Kesavan, Prof. Srinivasan Ph.D. (Pierre et Marie Curie), FNASc. Date of birth: 17 January 1952. Specialization: Partial Differential Equations, Homogenization and Isoperimetric Inequalities Address: 33/19, Barnaby Road, Kilpauk, Chennai 600 010, T.N.. Contact:

  4. Roy, Prof. Durga Prasad

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Roy, Prof. Durga Prasad Ph.D. (Mumbai), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 29 July 1941. Date of death: 17 March 2017. Specialization: Particle Physics, Astroparticle Physics Last known address: INSA Honorary Scientist, Homi Bhabha Centre for Science Education, V N Purav Marg, Mankhurd, Mumbai 400 088, Maharashtra.

  5. Ramachandran, Prof. Janakiraman

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ramachandran, Prof. Janakiraman Ph.D. (UC, Berkeley). Date of birth: 12 June 1935. Specialization: Molecular Biology Address: Chairman, Gangagen Biotechnologies Private Limited, 12, 5th Cross, Raghavendra Layout, Tumkuar Road, Yeshwantpur, Bengaluru 560 022, Karnataka Contact: Office: (080) 4062 1300-328

  6. Datta, Prof. Asis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Datta, Prof. Asis Ph.D and D.Sc. (Calcutta), FNA, FNASc, FTWAS. Date of birth: 2 February 1944. Specialization: Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Genetic Engineering Address: Distinguished Scientist, National Institute of Plant Genome Research, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, P.O. Box 10531, New Delhi 110 067, U.T.. Contact:

  7. Lorenz, Prof. Edward Norton

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1981 Honorary. Lorenz, Prof. Edward Norton. Date of birth: 23 May 1917. Date of death: 16 April 2008. Last known address: Department of Earth, Atmospheric &, Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of, Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, U.S.A.. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook ...

  8. Liepmann, Prof. Hans Wolfgang

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1985 Honorary. Liepmann, Prof. Hans Wolfgang. Date of birth: 3 July 1914. Date of death: 24 June 2009. Last known address: Theodore von Karman Professor of, Aeronautics (Emeritus), Graduate Aeronautical Laboratories, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, ...

  9. Parulkar, Prof. Gurukumar Bhalchandra

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Parulkar, Prof. Gurukumar Bhalchandra M.S. (Mumbai), FAMS. Date of birth: 1 December 1931. Specialization: Open Heart Surgery, Extracorporeal Circulation, Coronary Bypass Surgery and Vascular Surgery Address: Flat No. 31, Building 4, Haji Ali Government Colony, K K Marg, Mumbai 400 034, Maharashtra Contact:

  10. Mondal, Prof. Naba Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mondal, Prof. Naba Kumar Ph.D. (Bombay) D.Sc. (h.c.), FNA, FNASc, FTWAS. Date of birth: 11 March 1951. Specialization: Experimental Particle Physics, Accelerator-based Particle Physics and Neutrino Physics Address: Raja Ramanna Fellow, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF, Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700 064, W.B.

  11. Chakraborty, Prof. Ranajit

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2006 Honorary. Chakraborty, Prof. Ranajit. Date of birth: 1946. Address: Director, Center for Computational Genomics, University of North Texas, HSC, 3500 Camp Bowie Blvd, CBH 249, Fort Worth, TX 76107, U.S.A.. Contact: Office: (+1-817) 735 2421. Fax: (+1-817) 735 5016. Email: ranajit.chakraborty@unthsc.

  12. Bahadur, Prof. Raghu Raj

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1975 Section: Mathematical Sciences. Bahadur, Prof. Raghu Raj Ph.D. (North Carolina), FNA. Date of birth: 30 April 1924. Date of death: 7 June 1997. Specialization: Mathematical Statistics Address: No.9, Raj Narain Road, Apartment 4A, Civil Lines, Delhi 110 054. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  13. Kahn, Prof. Oliver

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1999 Honorary. Kahn, Prof. Oliver. Date of birth: 13 September 1942. Date of death: 8 December 1999. Last known address: Laboratoire des Sciences Moléculair, Institut de Chimie de la Matire, Condensée de Bordeaux, UPR CNRS No. 9048, 33608 Pessac, France. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook ...

  14. Rao, Prof. Valipe Ramgopal

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 2009 Section: Engineering & Technology. Rao, Prof. Valipe Ramgopal FNAE, FNASc, FNA, FIEEE. Date of birth: 16 August 1965. Specialization: Nanoelectronics and Nanotechnology Address: Director, Indian Institute of Technology, Hauz Khas, New Delhi 110 016, U.T.. Contact:

  15. Houssay, Prof. Bernardo Alberto

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SPEAKER: Prof. Krishnaswamy Ravi-Chandar. VENUE: Faculty Hall, Indian Institute of Science. 23 February 2018 ǀ 1500. Event poster · Introducing: Summer Schools. Posted on 21 December 2017. ASTROPHYSICS: An Observational View of the Universe. Math Art and Design: MAD about Math, Math Education and ...

  16. Born, Prof. Max

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1937 Honorary. Born, Prof. Max Nobel Laureate (Physics) - 1954. Date of birth: 11 December 1882. Date of death: 5 January 1970. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Theory Of Evolution. Posted on 23 January 2018. Joint Statement by the Three Science ...

  17. Compton, Prof. Arthur Holly

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1935 Honorary. Compton, Prof. Arthur Holly Nobel Laureate (Physics) - 1927. Date of birth: 10 September 1892. Date of death: 15 March 1962. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Theory Of Evolution. Posted on 23 January 2018. Joint Statement by the ...

  18. Salam, Prof. Abdus

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1988 Honorary. Salam, Prof. Abdus Nobel Laureate (Physics) - 1979. Date of birth: 29 January 1926. Date of death: 21 November 1996. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Theory Of Evolution. Posted on 23 January 2018. Joint Statement by the Three ...

  19. Leiper, Prof. Robert Thomson

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1938 Honorary. Leiper, Prof. Robert Thomson. Date of birth: 17 April 1881. Date of death: 21 May 1969. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Theory Of Evolution. Posted on 23 January 2018. Joint Statement by the Three Science Academies of India on the ...

  20. Bowen, Prof. Norman Levi

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SPEAKER: Prof. Krishnaswamy Ravi-Chandar. VENUE: Faculty Hall, Indian Institute of Science. 23 February 2018 ǀ 1500. Event poster · Introducing: Summer Schools. Posted on 21 December 2017. ASTROPHYSICS: An Observational View of the Universe. Math Art and Design: MAD about Math, Math Education and ...

  1. Anderson, Prof. John Stuart

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1978 Honorary. Anderson, Prof. John Stuart. Date of birth: 9 January 1908. Date of death: 25 December 1990. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Theory Of Evolution. Posted on 23 January 2018. Joint Statement by the Three Science Academies of India ...

  2. Ruzicka, Prof. Leopold Stephen

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SPEAKER: Prof. Krishnaswamy Ravi-Chandar. VENUE: Faculty Hall, Indian Institute of Science. 23 February 2018 ǀ 1500. Event poster · Introducing: Summer Schools. Posted on 21 December 2017. ASTROPHYSICS: An Observational View of the Universe. Math Art and Design: MAD about Math, Math Education and ...

  3. Halle, Prof. Thore Gustaf.

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1947 Honorary. Halle, Prof. Thore Gustaf. Date of birth: 25 September 1884. Date of death: 12 May 1964. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Theory Of Evolution. Posted on 23 January 2018. Joint Statement by the Three Science Academies of India on ...

  4. Engstrom, Prof. Arne Vilhelm

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1970 Honorary. Engstrom, Prof. Arne Vilhelm. Date of birth: 15 May 1920. Date of death: 19 July 1996. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Theory Of Evolution. Posted on 23 January 2018. Joint Statement by the Three Science Academies of India on the ...

  5. Hodgkin, Prof. Dorothy Crowfoot

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1972 Honorary. Hodgkin, Prof. Dorothy Crowfoot Nobel Laureate (Chemistry) - 1964. Date of birth: 12 May 1910. Date of death: 29 July 1994. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Theory Of Evolution. Posted on 23 January 2018. Joint Statement by the ...

  6. Mulliken, Prof. Robert Sanderson

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1969 Honorary. Mulliken, Prof. Robert Sanderson Nobel Laureate (Chemistry) - 1966. Date of birth: 7 June 1896. Date of death: 31 October 1986. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Theory Of Evolution. Posted on 23 January 2018. Joint Statement by the ...

  7. Charney, Prof. Jule Gregory

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1980 Honorary. Charney, Prof. Jule Gregory. Date of birth: 1 January 1917. Date of death: 16 June 1981. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Theory Of Evolution. Posted on 23 January 2018. Joint Statement by the Three Science Academies of India on ...

  8. Hahn, Prof. Otto

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1958 Honorary. Hahn, Prof. Otto Nobel Laureate (Chemistry) - 1944. Date of birth: 8 March 1879. Date of death: 28 July 1968. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Theory Of Evolution. Posted on 23 January 2018. Joint Statement by the Three Science ...

  9. Medawar, Prof. Peter Brian

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1968 Honorary. Medawar, Prof. Peter Brian Nobel Laureate (Medicine) - 1960. Date of birth: 28 February 1915. Date of death: 2 October 1987. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Theory Of Evolution. Posted on 23 January 2018. Joint Statement by the ...

  10. Seward, Prof. Albert Charles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SPEAKER: Prof. Krishnaswamy Ravi-Chandar. VENUE: Faculty Hall, Indian Institute of Science. 23 February 2018 ǀ 1500. Event poster · Introducing: Summer Schools. Posted on 21 December 2017. ASTROPHYSICS: An Observational View of the Universe. Math Art and Design: MAD about Math, Math Education and ...

  11. Cotton, Prof. Aime Auguste

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1935 Honorary. Cotton, Prof. Aime Auguste. Date of birth: 9 October 1869. Date of death: 16 April 1951. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Theory Of Evolution. Posted on 23 January 2018. Joint Statement by the Three Science Academies of India on the ...

  12. Minwalla, Prof. Shiraz

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 2011 Section: Physics. Minwalla, Prof. Shiraz Ph.D. (Princeton). Date of birth: 2 January 1972. Specialization: String Theory, Gravity, Quantum Field Theory Address: Department of Theoretical Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400 005, ...

  13. Pandian, Prof. Thavamani Jegajothivel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1985 Section: Animal Sciences. Pandian, Prof. Thavamani Jegajothivel Ph.D. (Madras), Dr. rer. nat. (Kiel, Germany), FNA, FNASc, FNAAS, FTWAS, D.Sc. (CIFE, Mumbai). Date of birth: 15 June 1939. Specialization: Genetics and Energetics: Aquaculture Address: 9, Old Natham Road, Opp. Balamandiram, Madurai ...

  14. Rao, Prof. Basuthkar Jagadeeshwar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rao, Prof. Basuthkar Jagadeeshwar Ph.D. (IISc), FNASc, FNA. Date of birth: 13 March 1956. Specialization: Genome Dynamics, Biology of Cellular Adaptations, Computational Biology Address: Department of Biological Sciences, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400 005, Maharashtra

  15. Haritsa, Prof. Jayant Ramaswamy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2011 Section: Engineering & Technology. Haritsa, Prof. Jayant Ramaswamy Ph.D. (Wisconsin), FNAE, FNASc, FIEEE. Date of birth: 10 March 1964. Specialization: Database Systems Address: FACM Professor, Dept. of Computational & Data Sciences, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru 560 012, Karnataka

  16. Chandru, Prof. Vijay

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1996 Section: Engineering & Technology. Chandru, Prof. Vijay Ph.D. (MIT). Date of birth: 7 June 1953. Specialization: Data Science, Computational Mathematics and Computational Biology Address: Chairman, Strand Life Sciences, 591, III Main Road, Sadashivanagar, Bengaluru 560 080, Karnataka

  17. Caspersson, Prof. Torbjorn Oskar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1963 Honorary. Caspersson, Prof. Torbjorn Oskar. Date of birth: 15 October 1910. Date of death: 7 December 1997. Last known address: Professor, Department of Tumor Pathology, Karolinska Sjukhuset, S-104 01 Stockholm 60, Sweden. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  18. Gandhi, Prof. Kandukuri Sivananda

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1990 Section: Engineering & Technology. Gandhi, Prof. Kandukuri Sivananda Ph.D. (UC, Berkeley). Date of birth: 23 December 1942. Specialization: Batteries and Fuel Cells, Multiphase Fluid Systems and Polymer Reaction Engineering Address: Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, ...

  19. Rao, Prof. Palle Rama

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rao, Prof. Palle Rama Ph.D. (Banaras), F.Eng. (UK), FNA, FNASc, FNAE, FASM, FTWAS, Foreign Member - US Natl. Acad. Engg. Council Service: 1989-2000; Vice-President: 1992-94; President: 1995-97. Date of birth: 30 June 1937. Specialization: Deformation, Fracture and Materials Development Address: Chairman ...

  20. Rao, Prof. Aroor Pramesh

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rao, Prof. Aroor Pramesh Ph.D. (Mumbai). Date of birth: 18 January 1948. Specialization: Sun & Solar Wind, Wave Propagation in Random Media, Aperture Synthesis and Radio Imaging Address: Flat 7, Khagol Housing Society, Panchavati, Pashan, Pune 411 008, Maharashtra Contact: Residence: (020) 6628 0183

  1. Rao, Prof. Kalya Jagannatha

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rao, Prof. Kalya Jagannatha Ph.D. (IIT, Kanpur), D.Sc. (IISc), FNA, FNASc, D.Sc. (h.c., Univ. Bordeaux, France) Council Service: 1998-2003. Date of birth: 7 December 1940. Specialization: Amorphous Solids & Ceramics and Phase Transitions Address: 187/1, Tadvanam Estate, Halasinganahalli Road, Kalya Post, Magadi ...

  2. Rao, Prof. Arikkala Raghurama

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2012 Section: Physics. Rao, Prof. Arikkala Raghurama Ph.D. (Mumbai). Date of birth: 14 June 1954. Specialization: X-ray Astronomy, X-ray Instrumentation, High Energy Astrophysics Address: Department of Astronomy & Astrophysics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400 005, ...

  3. Rao, Prof. Calyampudi Radhakrishna

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Date of birth: 10 September 1920. Specialization: Statistics with Applications to Biology, Signal Processing and Pattern Recognition Address: Distinguished Professor Emeritus, CR Rao Advanced Institute, University of Hyderabad Campus, Prof. CR Rao Road, Hyderabad 500 046, A.P.. Contact: Office: (040) 2313 1170

  4. Rao, Prof. Chebrolu Pulla

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rao, Prof. Chebrolu Pulla Ph.D. (IISc), FNASc, FNA. Date of birth: 13 May 1954. Specialization: Bioinorganic Chemistry, Supramolecular Chemistry, Ion & Molecular Receptors, Metalloproteins & Metalloenzymes Address: Institute Chair Professor, Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Powai, Mumbai 400 ...

  5. Bhattacharjee, Prof. Jayanta Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bhattacharjee, Prof. Jayanta Kumar Ph.D. (Maryland), FNASc. Date of birth: 10 April 1952. Specialization: Critical Phenomena, Turbulence and Nonlinear Dynamics Address: Distinguished Emeritus Fellow, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700 032, W.B.. Contact: Residence: 98307 47103

  6. Tandon, Prof. Prakash Narain

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1983 Section: Medicine. Tandon, Prof. Prakash Narain M.B.B.S. (Lucknow), M.S., D.Sc. (h.c.), FRCS, FNA, FNASc, FTWAS, FAMS. Date of birth: 13 August 1928. Specialization: Neurosciences and Neurosurgery Address: No. 1, Jagriti Enclave, Vikas Marg Extension, Delhi 110 092, ...

  7. Bera, Prof. Jitendra Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 2014 Section: Chemistry. Bera, Prof. Jitendra Kumar Ph.D. (IISc). Date of birth: 24 October 1968. Specialization: Organometallic Chemistry, Small Molecule Activation, Catalysis Address: Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208 016, U.P.. Contact: Office: ...

  8. Schmidt, Prof. Brian P

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 2014 Honorary. Schmidt, Prof. Brian P Nobel Laureate (Physics), FRS. Date of birth: 24 February 1967. Address: Vice Chancellor, The Australian National University, via Cotter Road, Weston Creek, ACT 2611, Australia Contact: Office: (+61-2) 6125 2510. Fax: (+61-2) 6125 0260

  9. Yadav, Prof. Veejendra Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 2007 Section: Chemistry. Yadav, Prof. Veejendra Kumar Ph.D. (Baroda). Date of birth: 13 June 1956. Specialization: Synthetic Organic Chemistry and Physical Organic Chemistry Address: Professor, Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208 016, U.P.

  10. Sarkar, Prof. Debi Prasad

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sarkar, Prof. Debi Prasad Ph.D. (Calcutta), FNASc, FNA. Date of birth: 15 January 1958. Specialization: Membrane Biology, Biochemistry, Molecular Virology, Cell Biology and Biotechnology Address: Director, Indian Institute of Science Education & Research, Sector 81, Manuli, SAS Nagar 140 306, Chandigarh Contact:

  11. Rao, Prof. Kaza Kesava

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1992 Section: Engineering & Technology. Rao, Prof. Kaza Kesava Ph.D. (Houston). Date of birth: 12 April 1956. Specialization: Flow of Granular Materials and Defluoridation of Drinking Water Address: Professor, Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru 560 012, Karnataka

  12. Semenov, Prof. Nikolai Nikolaevich

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1960 Honorary. Semenov, Prof. Nikolai Nikolaevich Nobel Laureate (Chemistry) - 1956. Date of birth: 16 April 1896. Date of death: 26 September 1986. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Theory Of Evolution. Posted on 23 January 2018. Joint Statement ...

  13. Garrett, Prof. Stephen Denis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1973 Honorary. Garrett, Prof. Stephen Denis. Date of birth: 1 November 1906. Date of death: 26 December 1989. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Theory Of Evolution. Posted on 23 January 2018. Joint Statement by the Three Science Academies of ...

  14. Cheetham, Prof. Antony Kevin

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 2001 Honorary. Cheetham, Prof. Antony Kevin FRS. Date of birth: 16 November 1946. Address: Dept. of Materials Science &, Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, 27, Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS, uk. Contact: Office: (+44-1223) 74 6733. Fax: (+44-1223) 33 4567

  15. Dighe, Prof. Rajan Ramakant

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 2010 Section: Animal Sciences. Dighe, Prof. Rajan Ramakant Ph.D. (IISc), FNASc, FNA. Date of birth: 21 March 1951. Specialization: Molecular Endocrinology, Reproductive Biology, Biochemistry Address: Molecular Reproduction & Developmental Genetics, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru 560 ...

  16. Kant, Prof. Tarun

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kant, Prof. Tarun Ph.D. (IIT, Bombay), FNA, FNAE, FNASc. Date of birth: 1 July 1946. Specialization: Solid & Structural Mechanics, Finite Element Methods and Mechanics of Composite Materials & Structures Address: Professor Emeritus &INSA Senior Scientist, Department of Civil Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, ...

  17. Kant, Prof. Rama

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2015 Section: Chemistry. Kant, Prof. Rama Ph.D. (IISc). Date of birth: 18 January 1963. Specialization: Complex Systems in Electrochemistry & Polymers, Theoretical Chemistry, Nanoelectrochemistry Address: Department of Chemistry, University of Delhi, Delhi 110 007, U.T.. Contact: Office: (011) 2766 6646/188

  18. Das, Prof. Prasanta Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2017 Section: Chemistry. Das, Prof. Prasanta Kumar Ph.D. (Osmania). Date of birth: 2 June 1971. Specialization: Bio-organic Chemistry, Supramolecular Self Assemblies, Enzymology, Soft Nanocomposite in Cellular Transportation Address: Department of Biological Chemistry, Indian Association for the Cultivation ...

  19. Khorana, Prof. Har Gobind

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1976 Honorary. Khorana, Prof. Har Gobind Nobel Laureate (Medicine) - 1968. Date of birth: 9 January 1922. Date of death: 9 November 2011. Last known address: Alfred P. Sloan Professor of, Biology and Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of, Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02139, U.S.A..

  20. Kamal, Prof. Aditya Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1974 Section: Engineering & Technology. Kamal, Prof. Aditya Kumar Dr. lng. (Paris). Date of birth: 5 July 1927. Specialization: Air Traffic Control, Surveillance, Automation, UAV, GPS, Cyber Security Address: 18, Crystal Circle, Burlington, MA 01803, USA Contact: Office: (+1-781) 890 3330/235. Residence: (+1-781) ...

  1. Dhavale, Prof. Dilip Dattatray

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2009 Section: Chemistry. Dhavale, Prof. Dilip Dattatray Ph.D. (Pune), FNASc. Date of birth: 18 February 1956. Specialization: Natural Products Chemistry, Carbohydrate Chemistry, Photochemistry, Reaction Mechanism, Medicinal Chemistry Address: Department of Chemistry, University of Pune, Pune 411 007, ...

  2. Kaliappan, Prof. Krishna Pillai

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2016 Section: Chemistry. Kaliappan, Prof. Krishna Pillai Ph.D. (IISc). Date of birth: 16 March 1968. Specialization: Organic Synthesis, Medicinal Chemistry, Natural Products Address: Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Powai, Mumbai 400 076, Maharashtra Contact: Office: (022) 2576 7177

  3. Dasgupta, Prof. Pallab

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 2015 Section: Engineering & Technology. Dasgupta, Prof. Pallab Ph.D. (IIT, Kharagpur), FNAE. Date of birth: 31 October 1967. Specialization: Electronic Design Automation, Artificial Intelligence, Formal Methods Address: Department of Computer Science & Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology ...

  4. Chakrabarti, Prof. Partha Pratim

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2000 Section: Engineering & Technology. Chakrabarti, Prof. Partha Pratim Ph.D. (IIT, Kharagpur), FNA, FNAE. Date of birth: 1 October 1962. Specialization: Artificial Intelligence, Computer Aided Design for VLSI and Algorithms Address: Director, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721 302, W.B.. Contact:

  5. Chhuttani, Prof. Pran Nath

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1975 Section: Medicine. Chhuttani, Prof. Pran Nath M.D., D.Sc. (h.c.). Date of birth: 26 February 1915. Date of death: 19 July 1996. Specialization: Gastroenterology and Internal Medicine Address: House No. 22, Sector 4, Chandigarh 160 001. YouTube · Twitter · Facebook · Blog ...

  6. Ramamritham, Prof. Krithivasan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2010 Section: Engineering & Technology. Ramamritham, Prof. Krithivasan Ph.D. (Utah), FNAE, FIEEE, FNASc. Date of birth: 28 February 1955. Specialization: Databases, Real-Time Systems, Use of Information & Communication Technology for Socioeconomic Development Address: Department of Computer ...

  7. Pitke, Prof. Madhukar Vishwanath

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1986 Section: Engineering & Technology. Pitke, Prof. Madhukar Vishwanath Ph.D. (Mumbai), FIEEE. Date of birth: 31 March 1936. Specialization: Electronics, Telecommunication & Information Technology, Technology Transfer and Wireless Communication Address: 002, Buniyad, Yashodham A2-15 ...

  8. Paul, Prof. Vinod Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 2016 Section: Medicine. Paul, Prof. Vinod Kumar Ph.D. (AIIMS), FAMS, FNASc. Date of birth: 1 August 1955. Specialization: Paediatrics, Newborn Health Address: Department of Paediatrics, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, New Delhi 110 029, U.T.. Contact:

  9. Vijayraghavan, Prof. Usha

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vijayraghavan, Prof. Usha Ph.D. (Caltech), FNA. Date of birth: 25 August 1961. Specialization: Plant Developmental Genetics, Microbial Genetics and Gene Regulation Address: Professor, Microbiology & Cell Biology Department, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru 560 012, Karnataka Contact: Office: (080) 2360 0168

  10. Mittal, Prof. Sanjay

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mittal, Prof. Sanjay Ph.D. (Minnesota), FNAE, FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 27 February 1968. Specialization: Unsteady Aerodynamics, Finite Element Analysis, High Performance Computing and Bluff-body Flows, Aerodynamic Shape Optimization Address: Department of Aerospace Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, ...

  11. Padmanaban, Prof. Govindarajan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Padmanaban, Prof. Govindarajan Ph.D. (IISc), FNA, FNASc, FTWAS Council Service: 1986-88, 1992-97; Vice-President: 1992-97. Date of birth: 20 March 1938. Specialization: Molecular Biology, Recombinant DNA and Malarial Parasite Address: NASI Senior Scientist, Department of Biochemistry, Indian Institute of Science, ...

  12. Gopalan, Prof. Kunchithapadam

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1983 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Gopalan, Prof. Kunchithapadam Ph.D. (IISc), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 12 August 1938. Specialization: Geo-& Cosmo-Chronology, Isotope Geology and Mass Spectrometry Address: 38765, Adcock Drive, Fremont, CA 94536, USA Contact: Residence: (+1-510) 386 4484

  13. Chaturvedi, Prof. Umesh Chandra

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chaturvedi, Prof. Umesh Chandra M.D. (Lucknow), FRC Path. (London), FAMS, FNA, FNASc, FAAM(USA). Date of birth: 2 March 1939. Specialization: Medical Microbiology, Virology and Immunology Address: 201, Annapurna Apartments, No. 1, Bishop Rocky Street, Faizabad Road, Lucknow 226 007, U.P.. Contact:

  14. Rao, Prof. Addicam Jagannadha

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rao, Prof. Addicam Jagannadha Ph.D. (IISc), FNA, FNASc, FAMS. Date of birth: 11 July 1942. Specialization: Regulation of Placental Function, Cellular Differentiation, Primate Biology, Oocyte Maturation Address: INSA Senior Scientist, Department of Biochemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru 560 012, Karnataka

  15. Madhusudana, Prof. Nelamangala Vedavyasachar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1974 Section: Physics. Madhusudana, Prof. Nelamangala Vedavyasachar Ph.D. (Mysore), FNA. Date of birth: 9 May 1944. Specialization: Liquid Crystals Address: INSA Senior Scientist, Liquid Crystal Laboratory, Raman Research Institute, CV Raman Avenue, Bengaluru 560 080, Karnataka Contact:

  16. Bhattacharya, Prof. Samaresh

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 2006 Section: Chemistry. Bhattacharya, Prof. Samaresh Ph.D. (Jadavpur). Date of birth: 24 August 1960. Specialization: Co-ordination Chemistry and Organometallic Chemistry Address: Professor, Inorganic Chemistry Section, Department of Chemistry, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032, W.B.

  17. Sengupta, Prof. Pulak

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 2011 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Sengupta, Prof. Pulak Ph.D. (Jadavpur), FNA. Date of birth: 5 December 1963. Specialization: Precambrian Geology, Metamorphic Petrology Address: Department of Geological Sciences, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032, W.B.

  18. Indrayan, Prof. Abhaya

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2010 Section: Medicine. Indrayan, Prof. Abhaya Ph.D. (Ohio State), FAMS. Date of birth: 11 November 1945. Specialization: Medical Biostatistics, Medical Research Methodology, Medical Informatics Address: A 037, Telecom City, B 9/6, Sector 62, Noida 201 309, U.P.. Contact: Residence: (0120) 240 0396

  19. Yegnanarayana, Prof. Bayya

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2004 Section: Engineering & Technology. Yegnanarayana, Prof. Bayya Ph.D. (IISc), FNA, FNAE, FIEEE. Date of birth: 9 January 1944. Specialization: Signal Processing, Speech & Vision and Artificial Neural Networks Address: Professor, International Institute of Information Technology, Gachi Bowli, Hyderabad 500 ...

  20. Shenoy, Prof. Vijay Balakrishna

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    How to combat infectious diseases: The role of Science Academies · Academy Public Lecture and INSA–Leopoldina Lecture by Prof. Jörg Hacker, President, German Academy of Sciences Leopoldina. 4 December, 2017, 4 PM Faculty Hall, Indian Institute ...

  1. Bhattacharya, Prof. Sourendra Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1994 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Bhattacharya, Prof. Sourendra Kumar Ph.D. (Gujarat), FNASc. Date of birth: 4 January 1948. Specialization: Isotope Geochemistry and Anomalous Isotope Fractionation Address: 406, Shri Raj Apartments, Vastrapur, Ahmedabad 380 015, Gujarat Contact:

  2. Nocera, Prof. Daniel G

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 2013 Honorary. Nocera, Prof. Daniel G. Date of birth: 1957. Address: Dept. of Chemistry & Chem. Biol., Harvard University, 12, Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA Contact: Office: (+1-617) 495 8904. Email: dnocera@fas.harvard.edu. http://chemistry.harvard.edu/people/daniel-g-nocera.

  3. Livage, Prof. Jacques

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 2004 Honorary. Livage, Prof. Jacques. Date of birth: 26 October 1938. Address: Chemie de la Matiere Condensee, UPMC, Tour 44, 4, Place Jussieu, 75005 Paris, France Contact: Office: (+33-1) 4427 6162. Residence: (+33-6) 6797 6839. Fax: (+33-1) 4427 4769

  4. Ashtekar, Prof. Abhay

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1996 Honorary. Ashtekar, Prof. Abhay. Date of birth: 5 July 1949. Address: Director, Inst. for Gravitation and, the Cosmos, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802-6300, U.S.A.. Contact: Office: (+1-814) 863 9605. Residence: (+1-814) 867 8406. Fax: (+1-814) 863 ...

  5. Fisher, Prof. Michael Ellis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 2001 Honorary. Fisher, Prof. Michael Ellis FRS. Date of birth: 3 September 1931. Address: Distinguished Professor Emeritus, Institute of Physical Science and, Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-2431, U.S.A.. Contact: Office: (+1-301) 405 4819

  6. Roesky, Prof. Herbert Walter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1997 Honorary. Roesky, Prof. Herbert Walter. Date of birth: 6 November 1935. Address: Director, Institut füer Anorganische Chemie, der Universität Göettingen, Tammannstrasse 4, D-37077 Göttingen, Germany Contact: Office: (+49-551) 393 0001. Residence: (+49-551) 76 183

  7. Anil Kumar, Prof.

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1987 Section: Chemistry. Anil Kumar, Prof. Ph.D. (IIT Kanpur), FNA, FNASc, FTWAS. Date of birth: 25 June 1941. Specialization: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, NMR ... Office: (080) 2293 2724. Residence: (080) 2366 2757. Mobile: 98454 21938. Fax: (080) 2360 1550

  8. Bhattacharyya, Prof. Archana

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 2007 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Bhattacharyya, Prof. Archana Ph.D. (Northwestern), FNASc, FNA. Date of birth: 1 June 1948. Specialization: Ionospheric Physics ... Office: (022) 2748 4147. Residence: (022) 2772 2014. Mobile: 96195 43004. Fax: (022) 2748 0762

  9. Das, Prof. Amita

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 2011 Section: Physics. Das, Prof. Amita Ph.D. (IIT, Kanpur). Date of birth: 3 August 1965. Specialization: Strongly Coupled & Dusty Plasma Systems, Laser Plasma Interactions, Plasma Physics, Turbulence, Electron Magnetohydrodynamics Address: ... Office: (079) 2396 2078

  10. Griffiths, Prof. Phillip

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 2004 Honorary. Griffiths, Prof. Phillip. Date of birth: 19 October 1938. Address: Director Emeritus Professor of, Mathematics, Institute for Advanced Study, No. 1, Einstein Drive, Princeton, NJ 08540, U.S.A.. Contact: Office: (+1-609)734 8041. Residence: (+1-410) 810 3103

  11. Anand, Prof. Gargeshwari Venkatasubbiah

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1997 Section: Engineering & Technology. Anand, Prof. Gargeshwari Venkatasubbiah Ph.D. (IISc), FNAE. Date of birth: 16 October 1943. Specialization: Statistical Signal ... III Stage, Bengaluru 560 085, Karnataka Contact: Office: (080) 2672 1983/838. Residence: (080) 2361 1263

  12. Veluthambi, Prof. Karuppanna

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Veluthambi, Prof. Karuppanna Ph.D. (IISc), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 7 March 1953. Specialization: Plant Genetic Engineering, Plant Biotechnology and Plant Molecular Biology Address: INSA Senior Scientist, Department of Plant Biotechnology, School of Biotechnology, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai 625 021, T.N.

  13. Tyagi, Prof. Jaya Sivaswami

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2008 Section: Medicine. Tyagi, Prof. Jaya Sivaswami Ph.D. (Delhi), FNASc, FNA. Date of birth: 19 May 1954. Specialization: Molecular Biology, Mycobacteriology and Gene Regulation Address: Head, Department of Biotechnology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, New Delhi 110 029, U.T.

  14. Raman, Prof. Rajiva

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1996 Section: Animal Sciences. Raman, Prof. Rajiva Ph.D. (Banaras), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 9 December 1948. Specialization: Human Molecular Genetics & Cytogenetics, Gene Expression & Chromatin Organization in Development and Sex Determination Address: Professor Emeritus, Department of Zoology, ...

  15. Lakshmanan, Prof. Muthusamy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1991 Section: Physics. Lakshmanan, Prof. Muthusamy Ph.D. (Madras), FNA, FNASc, FTWAS Council Service: 2010-12. Date of birth: 25 March 1946. Specialization: Nonlinear Dynamics, Theoretical Physics and Mathematical Physics Address: DST SERB Distinguished Fellow, Centre for Nonlinear Dynamics and, ...

  16. Mehta, Prof. Chandra Lal

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1982 Section: Physics. Mehta, Prof. Chandra Lal Ph.D. (Rochester). Date of birth: 31 July 1938. Specialization: Quantum & Statistical Optics and Mathematical Physics Address: B-43, Gyandeep Apartments, Mayur Vihar, Phase I, New Delhi 110 091, U.T.. Contact: Residence: (011) 2279 6410. Mobile: 90133 91375

  17. Das, Prof. Saumitra

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 2009 Section: General Biology. Das, Prof. Saumitra Ph.D. (Calcutta), FNASc, FNA. Date of birth: 20 January 1962. Specialization: Molecular Virology, Molecular Biology and Cell Biology Address: Microbiology and Cell Biology Department, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru 560 012, Karnataka

  18. Vijay Kumar, Prof. Panganamala

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2017 Section: Engineering & Technology. Vijay Kumar, Prof. Panganamala Ph.D. (Southern Calif.), FNAE, FNA, FIEEE. Date of birth: 22 September 1955. Specialization: Codes for Distributed Storage, Error Correcting Codes, Wireless Communication Address: Department of Electrical Communication Engineering, ...

  19. Meyer, Prof. Kurt H.

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1952 Honorary. Meyer, Prof. Kurt H. Date of birth: 29 September 1883. Date of death: 14 April 1952. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Theory Of Evolution. Posted on 23 January 2018. Joint Statement by the Three Science Academies of India on the ...

  20. Bhattacherjee, Prof. Satyendra Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bhattacherjee, Prof. Satyendra Kumar Ph.D. (Notre Dame). Date of birth: 2 October 1926. Date of death: 28 April 2013. Specialization: Experimental Nuclear Physics Last known address: 302B, Tribute, Rajkamal Studio Compound, Off Dr SS Rao Road, Behind Mahatma Gandhi Memorial Hospital, Parel, Mumbai 400 012.

  1. Ahluwalia, Prof. Jagdish Chander

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ahluwalia, Prof. Jagdish Chander Ph.D. (Purdue), FNA. Date of birth: 6 July 1935. Specialization: Thermodynamics of Biopolymers & Surfactants in Solutions and Solute-Solvent Interactions Address: 186, SFS Apartments, Hauz Khas, New Delhi 110 016, U.T.. Contact: Residence: (011) 2656 4519. Mobile: 92137 36359

  2. Datta, Prof. Swapan Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Datta, Prof. Swapan Kumar Ph.D. (Calcutta), FNA, FNASc, FNAAS, FTWAS. Date of birth: 28 January 1953. Specialization: Plant Biotechnology, Genetic Engineering, Crop Improvement Address: Vice Chancellor, Visva Bharati University, Santiniketan 731 235, W.B.. Contact: Office: (03463) 26 2451. Mobile: 87686 44777

  3. Agrawal, Prof. Manindra

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2004 Section: Engineering & Technology. Agrawal, Prof. Manindra Ph.D. (IIT, Kanpur), FNAE, FNA, FNASc, FTWAS Council Service: 2016-. Date of birth: 20 May 1966. Specialization: Computational Complexity Theory and Computation Number Theory Address: Professor, Department of Computer Science, Indian ...

  4. Goodenough, Prof. John B

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1980 Honorary. Goodenough, Prof. John B. Date of birth: 25 July 1922. Address: Virginia H Cockrell Centennial, Professor of Engineering, University of Texat at Austin, ETC 9.184, Stop C2200, Austin, TX 78712, U.S.A.. Contact: Office: (+1-512) 471 1646. Email: jgoodenough@mail.utexas.edu.

  5. Arakeri, Prof. Vijay Hanumappa

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1991 Section: Engineering & Technology. Arakeri, Prof. Vijay Hanumappa Ph.D. (Caltech). Date of birth: 9 August 1945. Specialization: Cavitation, Hydrodynamics and Two-phase Flows Address: Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru 560 012, Karnataka

  6. Aide aux femmes ayant survécu à des actes de violence au cours ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Aide aux femmes ayant survécu à des actes de violence au cours des périodes de transition post-conflit en Indonésie, au Timor-Leste et au Myanmar. Les données sur la violence sexuelle à l'égard des femmes et des hommes, tant pendant qu'après les conflits, ont un caractère alarmant dans toutes les régions du monde.

  7. SurvExpress: an online biomarker validation tool and database for cancer gene expression data using survival analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raul Aguirre-Gamboa

    Full Text Available Validation of multi-gene biomarkers for clinical outcomes is one of the most important issues for cancer prognosis. An important source of information for virtual validation is the high number of available cancer datasets. Nevertheless, assessing the prognostic performance of a gene expression signature along datasets is a difficult task for Biologists and Physicians and also time-consuming for Statisticians and Bioinformaticians. Therefore, to facilitate performance comparisons and validations of survival biomarkers for cancer outcomes, we developed SurvExpress, a cancer-wide gene expression database with clinical outcomes and a web-based tool that provides survival analysis and risk assessment of cancer datasets. The main input of SurvExpress is only the biomarker gene list. We generated a cancer database collecting more than 20,000 samples and 130 datasets with censored clinical information covering tumors over 20 tissues. We implemented a web interface to perform biomarker validation and comparisons in this database, where a multivariate survival analysis can be accomplished in about one minute. We show the utility and simplicity of SurvExpress in two biomarker applications for breast and lung cancer. Compared to other tools, SurvExpress is the largest, most versatile, and quickest free tool available. SurvExpress web can be accessed in http://bioinformatica.mty.itesm.mx/SurvExpress (a tutorial is included. The website was implemented in JSP, JavaScript, MySQL, and R.

  8. Bjerknes, Prof. Vilheim Friman Koren

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Academy Public Lecture. Posted on 19 January 2018. Seasonal and Pandemic Influenza by Prof. Kanta Subbarao 25 January 2018 at 1600 hrs. Ground floor, Main auditorium, New Biological Sciences Building, IISc. Event Poster ...

  9. Varadhan, Prof. Srinivasa S R

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Varadhan, Prof. Srinivasa S R . Date of birth: 2 January 1940. Address: Department of Mathematics, Courant Institute, New York University, 251, Mercer Street, New York, NY 10012, U.S.A.. Contact: Office: (+1-212) 982 9883

  10. Alfven, Prof. Hannes Olof Gosta

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Alfven, Prof. Hannes Olof Gosta Nobel Laureate (Physics) - 1970. Date of birth: 30 May 1908. Date of death: 2 April 1995. YouTube; Twitter ... Posted on 21 December 2017. ASTROPHYSICS: An Observational View of the Universe. Math Art and Design: MAD about Math, Math Education and Outreach. Math and Finance ...

  11. Krogh, Prof. Schack August Steenberg

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Krogh, Prof. Schack August Steenberg Nobel Laureate (Medicine) - 1920. Date of birth: 15 November 1874. Date of death: 13 September 1949 ... Summer Schools. Posted on 21 December 2017. ASTROPHYSICS: An Observational View of the Universe. Math Art and Design: MAD about Math, Math Education and Outreach.

  12. Dirac, Prof. Paul Adrien Maurice

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dirac, Prof. Paul Adrien Maurice Nobel Laureate (Physics) - 1933. Date of birth: 8 August 1902. Date of death: 20 October 1984. YouTube ... Posted on 21 December 2017. ASTROPHYSICS: An Observational View of the Universe. Math Art and Design: MAD about Math, Math Education and Outreach. Math and Finance ...

  13. Heymaans, Prof. Corneille Jean Francois

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Heymaans, Prof. Corneille Jean Francois Nobel Laureate (Medicine) - 1938. Date of birth: 28 March 1892. Date of death: 18 July 1968 ... Posted on 21 December 2017. ASTROPHYSICS: An Observational View of the Universe. Math Art and Design: MAD about Math, Math Education and Outreach. Math and Finance ...

  14. Domagk, Prof. Gerhard Johannes Paul

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Domagk, Prof. Gerhard Johannes Paul Nobel Laureate (Medicine) - 1939. Date of birth: 30 October 1895. Date of death: 24 April 1964 ... Posted on 21 December 2017. ASTROPHYSICS: An Observational View of the Universe. Math Art and Design: MAD about Math, Math Education and Outreach. Math and Finance ...

  15. Brumpt, Prof. Emile Joseph Alexandre

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1936 Honorary. Brumpt, Prof. Emile Joseph Alexandre. Date of birth: 10 March 1877. Date of death: 8 July 1951 ... Posted on 21 December 2017. ASTROPHYSICS: An Observational View of the Universe. Math Art and Design: MAD about Math, Math Education and Outreach. Math and Finance ...

  16. Profile Interview: Prof. Rob Moodie

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    health leaders such as Jonathan Mann and Daniel Tarantola. We moved back ... We were starting to slow down our moves by then and we ... Profile Interview: Prof. Rob Moodie. “Get up. Do good. Be good. Be.” foundation to use a tax on tobacco to buy out and replace tobacco industry sponsorship in sports and the arts, and.

  17. Rao, Prof. Paranandi Venkata Suryanarayana

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1974 Section: Engineering & Technology. Rao, Prof. Paranandi Venkata Suryanarayana Ph.D. (Mumbai), FNA, FNASc, FNAE. Date of birth: 17 July 1936. Specialization: Computer Science & Speech Research, Natural Language Processing and Cursive Script Recognition Address: Flat No. 601, Vigyan, Sector 17, ...

  18. Bjerknes, Prof. Jacob Aall Bonneveie

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Mid Year Meetings · Discussion Meetings · Public Lectures · Lecture Workshops · Refresher Courses · Symposia · Live Streaming. Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1959 Honorary. Bjerknes, Prof. Jacob Aall Bonneveie. Date of birth: 2 November 1897. Date of death: 7 July 1975. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  19. Thomas, Prof. Sir John Meurig

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Thomas, Prof. Sir John Meurig FRS. Date of birth: 15 December 1932. Address: Department of Materials Science and, Metallurgy, New Museums Site, 27, Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS, U.K.. Contact: Office: (+44-1223) 33 4300. Fax: (+44-1223) 33 4567. Email: jmt2@cam.ac.uk. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  20. C V Prof. Yash Pal

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1967 Section: Physics. Pal, Prof. Yash Ph.D. (MIT), FNA Council Service: 1974-76. Date of birth: 26 November 1926. Date of death: 24 July 2017. Specialization: Physics, Astrophysics, Space Technology and Communications Last known address: 11B, Super Delux Flats, Sector 15A, Noida 201 301, U.P.. YouTube ...

  1. Forssmann, Prof. Werner Theodor Otto

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1967 Honorary. Forssmann, Prof. Werner Theodor Otto Nobel Laureate (Medicine) - 1956. Date of birth: 29 August 1904. Date of death: 1 June 1979. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Theory Of Evolution. Posted on 23 January 2018. Joint Statement by ...

  2. Valiathan, Prof. Marthanda Varma Sankaran

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Valiathan, Prof. Marthanda Varma Sankaran Ch.M. (Liverpool), FRCS (England, Edinburgh & Canada), FRCP (London), D.Sc. (h.c.), FNA, FNASc, FNAE, FAMS, FTWAS Council Service: 1980-91; Vice-President: 1986-91. Date of birth: 24 May 1934. Specialization: Cardiac Surgery, Cardiovascular Materials and Ayurveda

  3. Rao, Prof. Manchanahalli Rangaswamy Satyanarayana

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1988 Section: General Biology. Rao, Prof. Manchanahalli Rangaswamy Satyanarayana Ph.D. (IISc), FNA, FNASc, FTWAS, FAMS Council Service: 2013-; Vice President: 2013-. Date of birth: 21 January 1948. Specialization: RNA Biology, Molecular Biology, Cell Biology, Neurooncology Address: Honorary ...

  4. Mohan Ram, Prof. Holenarasipur Yoganarasimham

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mohan Ram, Prof. Holenarasipur Yoganarasimham Ph.D. (Delhi), FNA, FNASc, FNAAS Council Service: 1983-88; Vice-President: 1986-88. Date of birth: 24 September 1930. Specialization: Plant Growth & Development and Economic Botany Address: No. 174, SFS DDA Flats, Mukherjee Nagar, Delhi 110 009, U.T.

  5. Krishna Murty, Prof. Achyutuni Venkata

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1993 Section: Engineering & Technology. Krishna Murty, Prof. Achyutuni Venkata Ph.D. (IISc). Date of birth: 10 October 1938. Specialization: Aerospace Engineering, Structural Mechanics, Composites and Smart Structures Address: No. 8, 5th Main, II Cross, NTI Layout, RMV II Stage, Nagashettyhalli, ...

  6. Das Gupta, Prof. Chanchal Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1998 Section: General Biology. Das Gupta, Prof. Chanchal Kumar Ph.D. (Calcutta), FNASc, FNA. Date of birth: 9 November 1945. Specialization: Genetic Recombination and Protein Folding Address: EE-72/2, Sector II, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700 091, W.B.. Contact: Residence: (033) 4006 5279. Mobile: 90078 89857

  7. Murty, Prof. Sripada Venkata Satyasuryanarayana

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    How to combat infectious diseases: The role of Science Academies · Academy Public Lecture and INSA–Leopoldina Lecture by Prof. Jörg Hacker, President, German Academy of Sciences Leopoldina. 4 December, 2017, 4 PM Faculty Hall, Indian Institute ...

  8. Baba, Prof. Chanduri Venkatasatya Kusumahara

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1977 Section: Physics. Baba, Prof. Chanduri Venkatasatya Kusumahara Ph.D. (Mumbai). Date of birth: 2 October 1937. Date of death: 5 December 2006. Specialization: Nuclear Reactions Last known address: 8-3-169/113, 2D,, Pallavi Apartments, Siddarthnagar, Hyderabad 500 890. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook ...

  9. Levi-Civita, Prof. Tullio

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1938 Honorary. Levi-Civita, Prof. Tullio. Date of birth: 29 March 1873. Date of death: 29 December 1941. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow. Posted on 1 January 2018. List of Fellows and Honorary Fellow elected ...

  10. Dam, Prof. Carl Peter Henrik

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Meetings · Public Lectures · Lecture Workshops · Refresher Courses · Symposia · Live Streaming. Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1965 Honorary. Dam, Prof. Carl Peter Henrik Nobel Laureate (Medicine) - 1943. Date of birth: 21 February 1895. Date of death: 17 April 1976. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  11. Geim, Prof. Sir Andre Konstantin

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 2015 Honorary. Geim, Prof. Sir Andre Konstantin FRS. Date of birth: 21 October 1958. Address: Royal Society Research Professor, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL, UK Contact: Office: (+44-161) 275 4120. Email: geim@manchester.ac.uk. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook ...

  12. Hevesy, Prof. George Charles de

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1951 Honorary. Hevesy, Prof. George Charles de. Date of birth: 1 August 1885. Date of death: 5 July 1966. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Theory Of Evolution. Posted on 23 January 2018. Joint Statement by the Three Science Academies of India on ...

  13. Kohlrausch, Prof. Karl Wilhelm Friedrich

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1939 Honorary. Kohlrausch, Prof. Karl Wilhelm Friedrich. Date of birth: 7 July 1884. Date of death: 17 September 1953. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Theory Of Evolution. Posted on 23 January 2018. Joint Statement by the Three Science Academies ...

  14. Blackett, Prof. Patrick Maynerd Stuart.

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1949 Honorary. Blackett, Prof. Patrick Maynerd Stuart. Nobel Laureate (Physics) - 1948. Date of birth: 17 November 1897. Date of death: 14 July 1974. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Theory Of Evolution. Posted on 23 January 2018. Joint Statement ...

  15. Debye, Prof. Peter Joseph William

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1938 Honorary. Debye, Prof. Peter Joseph William Nobel Laureate (Chemistry) - 1936. Date of birth: 24 March 1884. Date of death: 2 November 1966. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Theory Of Evolution. Posted on 23 January 2018. Joint Statement ...

  16. Joliot-Curie, Prof. Irene

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1935 Honorary. Joliot-Curie, Prof. Irene Nobel Laureate (Chemistry) - 1935. Date of birth: 12 September 1897. Date of death: 17 March 1956. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Theory Of Evolution. Posted on 23 January 2018. Joint Statement by the ...

  17. Broglie, Prof. Louis Victor de

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1951 Honorary. Broglie, Prof. Louis Victor de. Nobel Laureate (Physics) - 1929. Date of birth: 15 August 1892. Date of death: 19 March 1987. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow. Posted on 1 January 2018. List of Fellows ...

  18. Bohr, Prof. Niels Henrik David

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1935 Honorary. Bohr, Prof. Niels Henrik David Nobel Laureate (Physics) - 1922. Date of birth: 7 October 1885. Date of death: 18 November 1962. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow. Posted on 1 January 2018.

  19. Patel, Prof. Chandra Kumar Naranbhai

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1995 Section: Patel, Prof. Chandra Kumar Naranbhai. Date of birth: 2 July 1938. Address: President & CEO, Pranalytica Inc., 1101, Colorado Avenue, Santa Monica, CA 90401, U.S.A.. Contact: Office: (+1-310) 458 0808. Residence: (+1-310) 471 6505. Fax: (+1-310) 458 0171. Email: patel@pranalytica.com.

  20. Bhattacharya, Prof. Sudha Fellow profile

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2001 Section: General Biology. Bhattacharya, Prof. Sudha Ph.D. (IARI, New Delhi), FNASc, FNA Council Service: 2016. Date of birth: 7 March 1952. Specialization: Molecular Biology, Molecular Parasitology and Genomics Address: Professor, School of Environmental Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New ...

  1. Guha-Mukherjee, Prof. Sipra

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1988 Section: Plant Sciences. Guha-Mukherjee, Prof. Sipra Ph.D. (Delhi), FNASc. Date of birth: 30 July 1938. Date of death: 15 September 2007. Specialization: Plant Molecular Biology, Plant Tissue Culture and Genetic Engineering Last known address: Garden Estate, M A 1/6-3C, Gurgaon 122 002.

  2. Factors Infuencing Women in Pap Smear Uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijayanti, K. E.; Alam, I. G.

    2017-03-01

    Objective: Pap smear has proven can decrease death caused by cervical cancer. However, in Indonesia, only few woman who already did pap smear. The aim of this study was to investigate women’s knowledge about pap smear cervical cancer, and to investigate factors influence women to do pap smear test. Methods: Quantitative data colected through questionairre towards 31 women who did pap smear and 55 women who did not do pap smear. Questionairre was made using Health Belief model as a guideline to examine percieved susceptibility, perceived serioussnes, perceived benefits and perceived barriers. Chi square and multiple logistic regresion were used to investigate difference in knowledge and what the most factor that influence women to take pap smear test. Results: There’s significance knowledge difference betweeen women who did and did not do pap smear. But furthermore, by using Multiple Logistic Regression test, appearantly knowledge was not a strong predictor factor for women to take pap smear test (koefisiensi β = -0,164) Conclusion: Perceived barriers were factors that affected pap smear uptake in women in Indonesia. Few respondents get the wrong informations about pap smear, cevical cancer and its symptoms

  3. King, Prof. Sir David Anthony

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1998 Honorary. King, Prof. Sir David Anthony Sc.D., FRS. Date of birth: 12 August 1939. Address: Chief Scientific Adivser & Head, Office of Science and Innovation, London SW1H 0ET, U.K.. Contact: Office: (+44-020) 7215 3821. Fax: (+44-020) 7215 0314. Email: mpst.king@dti.gsi.gov.uk, dak10@cus.cam.ac.uk.

  4. [Pap Smear after 65 years].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enderle, I; Le Baccon, F-A; Pinsard, M; Joueidi, Y; Lavoué, V; Levêque, J; Nyangoh Timoh, K

    2017-09-01

    The French recommendations (in favor of stopping cervical cancer screening by cervico-uterine smear from 65 years of age) are logical in the context of organized screening; however, it is not yet generalized in France. The proportion of invasive cervical cancer in the oldest patients is high and these cancers are more evolved and have a more pejorative prognosis. The prevalent infection with high-risk HPV virus remains important in elderly patients: if the HPV infection does not appear to be more risky in the elderly, HPV-induced lesions appear to be more evolving. Unfortunately, pap smear coverage rates are low in the most advanced age groups. Patients without adequate follow-up are exposed to invasive cancer after age 65: all studies insist on the protective effect of two or more normal pap smears between 50 and 65 years that would allow to stop screening. Recent publications in Europe insist, however, on the value of continuing screening beyond the age of 65 in populations that live longer. For the clinician, in France, patients who could benefit from systematic FCU after age 65 could be those: (1) who request it, (2) who have an HPV history, (3) who have not had more than 3 consecutive normal pap smears or (4) who have an associated pathogenic condition. The place of the HPV test deserves to be considered: because of its very high negative predictive value, it could be performed as an exit test or as an alternative test to the pap smear. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. External Quality Assurance System (EQAS) of the WHO Global Salmonella Surveillance and Laboratory Support Project (Global Salm-Surv)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, A.; Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Wong, S.

    laboratories in 35 countries participated. For serotyping, 76% of the results were correct. For susceptibility testing, 92% of the results for the eight Salmonella strains were in agreement with the expected results. However, 28% of the performed tests with the E. coli ATCC 25922 reference strain were out......To assure the quality of methods for serotyping and antimicrobial susceptibility testing among laboratories in WHO Global Salm-Surv, an international collaborative study on serotyping and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of eight Salmonella enterica strains was performed. A total of 44...

  6. Periodic abstinence from Pap (PAP) smear study: women's perceptions of Pap smear screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mindy; French, Linda; Barry, Henry C

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore attitudes, beliefs, and perceived barriers to risk-based cervical cancer screening through focus group interviews of patients. We conducted 8 focus group interviews of women using semistructured interviews. The investigators independently reviewed the focus group transcripts and identified the overall themes and themes unique to each question using an immersion and crystallization approach. Women are in agreement that cervical cancer screening is important and that women should get Pap smears regularly as an important way of protecting their health. They are not open to the idea of reducing the frequency of Papanicolaou (Pap) smears, however, because they perceive annual screening to be successful in reducing cervical cancer mortality. Additionally, they have concerns about test accuracy. Women are distrustful of the rationale for reducing the frequency of Pap smears. Women's previous bad experiences have reinforced their need for self-advocacy. Women are reluctant to engage in risk-based cervical cancer screening. In this environment, risk-based cervical cancer screening recommendations are likely to be met with resistance.

  7. Results of Use of WHO Global Salm-Surv External Quality Assurance System for Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Salmonella Isolates from 2000 to 2007

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendriksen, Rene S.; Seyfarth, Anne Mette; Jensen, Arne Bent

    2009-01-01

    An international External Quality Assurance System (EQAS) for antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Salmonella was initiated in 2000 by the World Health Organization (WHO) Global Salm-Surv in order to enhance the capacities of national reference laboratories to obtain reliable data for surveill......An international External Quality Assurance System (EQAS) for antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Salmonella was initiated in 2000 by the World Health Organization (WHO) Global Salm-Surv in order to enhance the capacities of national reference laboratories to obtain reliable data...

  8. In Memoriam- Prof. Dr. Andries Willem Lategan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Ligthelm

    1965-03-01

    Full Text Available Hierdie Curriculum Vitae sou voorgelees gewees het met die inougurele rede van wyle prof. dr. A. W. Lategan met die aanvaarding van 'n ereprofessoraat aan die P.U. vir C.H.O. op 29 Oktober 1965. Prof. Lategan is op 23 Oktober 1965 oor- lcde. Sy inougurele rede verskyn as ’n bylaag in hierdie uit- gawe.

  9. Anxiety and borderline PAP smear results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korfage, Ida J.; van Ballegooijen, Marjolein; Huveneers, Hans; Essink-Bot, Marie-Louise

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Low-grade abnormalities after cervical cancer screening, i.e. borderline (Pap 2) or mildly (Pap 3a1) dyskaryotic (BMD) smear results, are found in considerable numbers of women annually We compared quality of life and anxiety in women with BMD and a reference group of screening participants

  10. Comparison of visual inspection and Papanicolau (PAP) smears for cervical cancer screening in Honduras: should PAP smears be abandoned?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, R B; Langrish, S M; Stern, L J; Figueroa, J; Simon, C J

    2007-09-01

    To compare visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA) to Papanicolau (PAP) smears in a community setting in a developing nation. Women undergoing cervical cancer screening in Honduras received either VIA and PAP smears (VIA/PAP group) or PAP smears alone (PAP-only group). Local healthcare providers performed PAP screening. A VIA-trained nurse performed VIA exams. All PAP smears were processed in Honduras. PAP smears from the VIA/PAP group were reviewed in the United States. Women with positive VIA or PAP tests were offered colposcopy. We compared the relative accuracy of PAP smears and VIA and the proportions of women completing follow-up colposcopy after positive screening tests. In total, 1709 PAP smears were performed including women from both the VIA/PAP and PAP-only groups. Nine PAP smears were positive (0.5%). Three women completed colposcopy (33%). All three had biopsy-confirmed dysplasia. In the VIA/PAP group (n = 339), 49 VIA exams were abnormal (14%) and two PAP smears were abnormal when read in Honduras (0.6%). When reviewed in the United States, 14 of the 339 PAP smears were abnormal (4%). Forty women (83%) completed follow-up colposcopy after a positive VIA exam. Twenty-three had biopsy-proven dysplasia. All 23 dysplasia cases had negative PAP smear readings in Honduras; four PAP smears were reclassified as positive in the United States. Although few developing countries can maintain high-quality PAP smear programmes, many governments and charitable organizations support cervical cancer screening programmes that rely on PAP smears. This study underscores the need to promote alternative technologies for cervical cancer screening in low-resource settings.

  11. Frey-Wyssling, Prof. Albert Friedrich

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Academy Public Lecture. Posted on 19 January 2018. Seasonal and Pandemic Influenza by Prof. Kanta Subbarao 25 January 2018 at 1600 hrs. Ground floor, Main auditorium, New Biological Sciences Building, IISc. Event Poster ...

  12. Commemorating the passing of Prof. Kazuo Akiyama

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Masami Taniguchi

    2015-01-01

    On November 3, 2014, Prof. Kazuo Akiyama, who was the Director of Sagamihara National Hospital, Kanagawa, Japan and had served as the President of the Japanese Society of Allergology for two terms, passed away...

  13. WHO global salm-surv external quality assurance system (EQAS): an important step toward improving the quality of Salmonella serotyping and antimicrobial susceptibility testing worldwide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, A.; Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Angulo, F. J.

    2002-01-01

    susceptibility testing through international training courses and an External Quality Assurance System (EQAS). In 2000, 44 WHO Global Salm-Surv member laboratories from 35 countries determined the serotype and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern for eight "blinded" Salmonella isolates. For serotyping, 73......% of the results were correct. For susceptibility testing, 92% of the results were in agreement with the expected results. However, only 78% of the performed tests with the E. coli ATCC 25922 reference strain were within the quality control range specified by National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards...... (NCCLS) guidelines. These EQAS results demonstrate the need for further training to improve the performance of some of the laboratories. WHO Global Salm-Surv activities, including international training courses and EQAS, represent an important step toward improving the quality of Salmonella serotyping...

  14. Women's understanding of the term 'Pap smear'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, David L; Hostetter, Sarah Smith; Hunter, Jennifer; Johnson, Nicole; Cooper, Saladin; Malnar, Gerard

    2015-07-01

    To assess the understanding of the term 'Pap smear' among women across the entire adult lifespan after recent changes to the guidelines on cervical cancer screening. Women attending the Obstetrics and Gynecology clinic at a large safety net teaching hospital in a Midwestern city were provided one of two versions of a confidential and anonymous survey to complete. The difference between the two versions was the way the primary research question was worded. There were 174 participants ranging in age from 15 to 69 (mean = 33.9) years. Of the 73 women who completed version A of the survey, 74 % were able to identify at least one correct descriptor for the term 'Pap smear.' Women who could identify at least one correct descriptor for the term 'Pap smear' were on average older than those who could not (mean = 36.9 vs. 28.7 years; p = 0.012). Of the 94 patients completing survey version B, 67 % could not differentiate a pelvic exam from a Pap smear. There was no association between age and ability to differentiate a pelvic exam from a Pap smear. The majority of women cannot distinguish a Pap smear from a pelvic exam. The unexpected finding of less understanding among younger women prompts a need for further research and invites discussion of whether more cervical cancer prevention education, with more emphasis on HPV vaccines in recent years, has neglected the importance of Pap smears-which is beginning to show up in knowledge of younger women. Both these findings suggest a need for increased patient education during female preventive health clinic visits.

  15. papA gene of avian pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariyawasam, Subhashinie; Nolan, Lisa K

    2011-12-01

    P fimbrial adhesins may be associated with the virulence of avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC). However, most APECs are unable to express P fimbriae even when they are grown under conditions that favor P fimbrial expression. This failure can be explained by the complete absence of the pap operon or the presence of an incomplete pap operon in Pap-negative APEC strains. In the present study, we analyzed the pap operon, specifically the papA gene that encodes the major fimbrial shaft, to better understand the pap gene cluster at the genetic level. First, by PCR, we examined a collection of 500 APEC strains for the presence of 11 genes comprising the pap operon. Except for papA, all the other genes of the operon were present in 38% to 41.2% of APEC, whereas the papA was present only in 10.4% of the APEC tested. Using multiplex PCR to probe for allelic variants of papA, we sought to determine if the low prevalence of papA among APEC was related to genetic heterogeneity of the gene itself. It was determined that the papA of APEC always belongs to the F11 allelic variant. Finally, we sequenced the 'papA region' from two papA-negative strains, both of which contain all the other genes of the pap operon. Interestingly, both strains had an 11,104-bp contig interruptingpapA at the 281-bp position. This contig harbored a streptomycin resistance gene and a classic Tn10 transposon containing the genes that confer tetracycline resistance. However, we noted that the papA gene of every papA-negative APEC strain was not interrupted by an 11,104-bp contig. It is likely that transposons bearing antibiotic resistance genes have inserted within pap gene cluster of some APEC strains, and such genetic events may have been selected for by antibiotic use.

  16. Pap Tests and Foreign-Born Women

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-11-26

    Foreign-born women living in the U.S. are less likely to have Pap tests to detect cervical cancer than women born in this country. The problem is worse for women from certain countries or regions. Find out why this is a disturbing trend, who these women are and why they are less likely to get a Pap test, and what CDC is doing about it.  Created: 11/26/2007 by National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program.   Date Released: 12/7/2007.

  17. Euler-Chelpin, Prof. Hans von

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Euler-Chelpin, Prof. Hans von. Nobel Laureate (Chemistry) - 1929. Date of birth: 15 February 1873. Date of death: 6 November 1964 ... Posted on 21 December 2017. ASTROPHYSICS: An Observational View of the Universe. Math Art and Design: MAD about Math, Math Education and Outreach. Math and Finance ...

  18. Prakasa Rao, Prof. Bhagavatula Lakshmi Surya

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakasa Rao, Prof. Bhagavatula Lakshmi Surya Ph.D. (Michigan State), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 6 October 1942. Specialization: Statistics Address: Ramanujan Chair Professor, CR Rao Advanced Institute of Mathematics,, Statistics & Computer Science, University of Hyderabad Campus, Hyderabad 500 046, A.P.

  19. Sewell, Prof. R.B. Seymour

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Mid Year Meetings · Discussion Meetings · Public Lectures · Lecture Workshops · Refresher Courses · Symposia · Live Streaming. Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1949 Honorary. Sewell, Prof. R.B. Seymour. Date of birth: 5 March 1880. Date of death: 10 February 1964. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  20. Laue, Prof. Max Theodor Felix von

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1954 Honorary. Laue, Prof. Max Theodor Felix von. Nobel Laureate (Physics) - 1914. Date of birth: 9 October 1897. Date of death: 24 April 1960. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Theory Of Evolution. Posted on 23 January 2018. Joint Statement by the ...

  1. Prof. KS Krishnan and Crystal Magnetism

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 7; Issue 12. Prof. K S Krishnan and Crystal Magnetism. U S Ghosh. General Article Volume 7 Issue 12 December 2002 pp 65-70. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/007/12/0065-0070. Keywords.

  2. Sopory, Prof. Sudhir Kumar - IAS Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1992 Section: Plant Sciences. Sopory, Prof. Sudhir Kumar Ph.D. (Delhi), FNA, FNASc, FNAAS, FTWAS Council Service: 2001-2006. Date of birth: 7 January 1948. Specialization: Molecular Plant Physiology and Plant Tissue Culture & Transformation Address: 584, Sector 14, Faridabad 121 007, Haryana Contact:

  3. Prasad, Prof. Yellapregada Venkata Rama Krishna

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1991 Section: Engineering & Technology. Prasad, Prof. Yellapregada Venkata Rama Krishna Ph.D. (IISc), FNA. Date of birth: 21 May 1944. Specialization: Deformation Processing, Process Modelling, Deterministic Chaos and Microstructural Control Address: B/2, Hospital Extension, Vinayaka Nagar, ...

  4. Persistent inflammation on Pap smear: does it warrant evaluation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhutia, K; Puri, M; Gami, N; Aggarwal, K; Trivedi, S S

    2011-01-01

    Due to the low sensitivity of Pap smear, premalignant lesions of the cervix can be missed in women with inflammatory Pap smears. However, it is not practically possible to subject all women with inflammatory Pap smear to colposcopy. This study was carried out with the aim to evaluate whether women with persistent inflammation on Pap smear need further evaluation with colposcopy. Four hundred and twenty women were screened at a tertiary level hospital with Pap smear. Women with inflammation on Pap smear were given treatment as per WHO guidelines and Pap smear was repeated at an interval of 6-12 weeks. Women with persistent inflammation on Pap smear were then subjected to colposcopy and directed biopsy if required. Of the 420 women screened, 102 (24.3%) women had a Pap smear showing inflammation. Thirty six women (8.6%) had persistent inflammatory Pap smear. Thirty women were subjected to colposcopy and 16 (53.3%) had abnormal findings on colposcopy. Five out of these 30 women (16.67%) had Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) on biopsy. Nearly 16.67% women with persistent inflammation on Pap smear had cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. Hence, a large number of women with CIN would be missed if persistent inflammation on Pap smear is not evaluated further.

  5. Intraoperative BiPAP in OSA Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Bhavna P; Ns, Kodandaram

    2015-04-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) is characterized by recurrent episodes of partial or complete upper airway obstructions during sleep. Severe OSA presents with a number of challenges to the anesthesiologist, the most life threatening being loss of the airway. We are reporting a case where we successfully used intraoperative bi level positive pressure ventilation (BiPAP) with moderate sedation and a regional technique in a patient with severe OSA posted for total knee replacement (TKR). A 55-year-old lady with osteoarthritis of right knee joint was posted for total knee replacement. She had severe OSA with an apnea-hypopnea index of 35. She also had moderate pulmonary hypertension due to her long standing OSA. We successfully used in her a combined spinal epidural technique with intraoperative BiPAP and sedation. She had no complications intraoperatively or post operatively and was discharged on day 5. Patients with OSA are vulnerable to sedatives, anaesthesia and analgesia which even in small doses can cause complete airway collapse. The problem, with regional techniques is that it requires excellent patient cooperation. We decided to put our patient on intraoperative BiPAP hoping that this would allow us to sedate her adequately for the surgery. As it happened we were able to successfully sedate her with slightly lesser doses of the commonly used sedatives without any episodes of desaturation, snoring or exacerbation of pulmonary hypertension. Many more trials are required before we can conclusively say that intraoperative BiPAP allows us to safely sedate OSA patients but we hope that our case report draws light on this possibility. Planning ahead and having a BiPAP machine available inside the operating may allow us to use sedatives in these patients to keep them comfortable under regional anaesthesia.

  6. External Quality Assurance System (EQAS) of the WHO Global Salmonella Surveillance and Laboratory Support Project (Global Salm-Surv) Results from 2001

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, A.; Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Evans, M.C.

    susceptibility testing. A total of 103 laboratories in 60 countries participated. For serotyping, 78% of the results were correct. For susceptibility testing, 91% of the results were in agreement with the expected results. However, 17% of the performed tests with the E. coli ATCC 25922 reference strain were out......An international collaborative study on serotyping and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of eight Salmonella enterica strains was performed to enhance the capacity of national and regional reference laboratories in WHO Global Salm-Surv to conduct Salmonella serotyping and antimicrobial...

  7. Prof dr FJ van Zyl as sendingteoloog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. J.C. vanWyk

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available Prof Dr FJ van Zyl as mission theologian In this article, the theology of mission of Prof dr FJ van Zyl is being explored. This is done by way of his lectures in the Science of Mission at the University of Pretoria during 1960-1978 and also from articles in the magazines of the Nederduitsch Hervormde Kerk dating back approximately forty years. It is found that almost none of his dictions is outdated. The radical cataclysm in the theology of mission, especially after 1961, he sharply detected and exposed. His theology of mission is built on a very broad theological base which can be described as theology of the Word. To him mission is proclamation.

  8. Prof. Il-Hoi Kim: a tribute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huys, Rony

    2016-10-11

    Prof. Il-Hoi Kim was born during the Korean War on 28 February 1952 in Buan, North Jeolla Province (South Korea), near the coast of the Yellow Sea whose tidal flats would become one of his favourite sampling grounds during his scientific career. From an early age he developed an intense interest in natural history in general and marine biology in particular. He obtained his B.Sc. in 1974 at the Department of Biology Education, Gongju National College of Education. Between 1974 and 1976 he was conscripted into the South Korean military during which he progressed to the rank of lieutenant of artillery in the Reserve Officers' Training Corps (ROTC). After his graduation in 1980 at the Department of Zoology, Seoul National University, Il-Hoi Kim moved to the Department of Biology, Gangneung-Wonju National University on the East Sea coast where he was first appointed lecturer (1981) before taking up the position of assistant professor (1983), associate professor (1987) and full professor (1993). In 1985 he had previously completed his Ph.D. dissertation on Korean barnacles at Seoul National University under the supervision of the late Prof. Hoon Soo Kim, a pioneer in marine invertebrate taxonomy and renowned as the father of carcinology in Korea.

  9. Interview with Prof. Soeren M Bentzen (with english subtitles)

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella del Rosso

    2012-01-01

    Interview with Prof. Soeren M Benzen, University of Wisconsin, Madison, on the role of physics biology and genomics in cancer treatment today. Interview avec le prof. Soeren Benzen, Université de Wisconsin, Madison, sur le role de la physique, la biologie et la genomique dans le traitement du cancer aujourd'hui.

  10. Prof. Frank Shu | Academy – Springer Nature chair | About IASc ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Academy – Springer Nature chair. Prof Frank Shu. Prof. Frank Shu. Shu is known for pioneering theoretical work in a diverse set of fields of astrophysics, including the origin of meteorites, the birth and early evolution of stars and the structure of spiral galaxies. One of his most highly-cited works is a 1977 seminal paper ...

  11. Prof. S. Dhawan | History | About IASc | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prof. S. Dhawan. President from 1977 to 1979. Prof. S. Dhawan (1977-1979). Name: DHAWAN, Satish Elected 1970; Council Service: 1971-91; President: 1977-79; Vice-President: 1974-76. Member, Space Commission, Dept. of Space, Bengaluru Date of birth: 25 September 1920, Srinagar, Jammu & Kashmir

  12. Knowledge about Cervical Cancer and Pap Smear and the Factors Influencing the Pap test Screening among Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashtarian, Hossein; Mirzabeigi, Elaheh; Mahmoodi, Elham; Khezeli, Mehdi

    2017-04-01

    Although the Pap smear is known as one of the effective methods to detect the cervical cancer, a large group of women are reluctant to do the test because of various reasons. Therefore, we carried out this study to determine the level of knowledge about cervical cancer and Pap smear and the factors influencing the Pap test screening among women. In this cross-sectional study, 355 women referred to the health centers of Gilan-e gharb city were randomly recruited in 2015. The participants asked to complete a self-administered questionnaire including five parts (questions about: demographic factors, knowledge about cervical cancer and Pap smear, Pap smear performance, barriers and facilitators related to Pap smear and the sources of information). Data were analyzed through SPSS version 19, using descriptive statistics, Independent T-test, and logistic regression. The mean age of the participants was 34.08±7.81 years. Almost 50.4% of the subjects had a history of Pap smear test. Pap test performance was significantly higher in those who had higher knowledge (PPap smear and age was the most important predictors of the Pap test performance (PPap smear test were inadequate knowledge and the recommendations received from family, friends and healthcare professionals (44.3% and 40.2%, respectively). Knowledge about Pap smear and cervical cancer was important in predicting Pap test doing. In addition, inadequate knowledge was introduced as the most important barrier to screening test from the perspective of women. Therefore, we suggest that health education and health promotion studies as interdisciplinary and targeted interventions should be implemented to improve the women's knowledge.

  13. Decision Making for Pap Testing among Pacific Islander Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Jie W.; Mouttapa, Michele; Sablan-Santos, Lola; DeGuzman Lacsamana, Jasmine; Quitugua, Lourdes; Park Tanjasiri, Sora

    2016-01-01

    This study employed a Multi-Attribute Utility (MAU) model to examine the Pap test decision-making process among Pacific Islanders (PI) residing in Southern California. A total of 585 PI women were recruited through social networks from Samoan and Tongan churches, and Chamorro family clans. A questionnaire assessed Pap test knowledge, beliefs and…

  14. Pap smear coverage among rural workers | London | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Data describing Papanicolaou smear coverage and factors related to .coverage are presented from 9 surveys ofrural women workers in the food canning and processing industry in the Cape. Adequacy of Pap smear coverage was assessed according to whether the l'espondent had ever previously had a Pap smear, or had ...

  15. Diagnosing pre-invasive cervical lesions – experience with pap ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diagnosing pre-invasive cervical lesions – experience with pap smear in a Nigerian teaching hospital. ... The relative frequencies of indications for Pap smears include routine screening (58.1%), vaginal discharge (20.3%), postcoital bleeding (12.0%) and postmenopausal bleeding 43 (7.6%). Of the total smears reported, ...

  16. Reversal of PAP Failure With the REPAP Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krakow, Barry; Ulibarri, Victor A; McIver, Natalia D; Yonemoto, Carli; Tidler, Alyssa; Obando, Jessica; Foley-Shea, Michelle R; Ornelas, Jonathan; Dawson, Spencer

    2017-04-01

    Re-titrations, an atypical approach to reverse PAP failure, was investigated retrospectively. Application of our re-titration of PAP (REPAP) protocol in subjects with previous PAP failure assessed original technology (masks, modes, and pressures) in 273 subjects, of which 70% reported co-occurring psychiatric conditions. The REPAP protocol emphasized changes in pressure modes and settings to address expiratory pressure intolerance and residual breathing events; mask changes were facilitated. Objective sleep and breathing metrics and subjective post-titration ratings were analyzed in subsequent PAP users and non-users. Following REPAP protocol (average follow-up = 2 y), 196 of 273 subjects with previous PAP failure were PAP users, and 77 were non-users. Previous PAP failure was attributed to technology factors, including pressure intolerance, mask discomfort, adaptation difficulties, and no benefits. At second opinion re-titration, mask changes resolved discomfort, mouth breathing, or leak (91.2% of sample); pressure mode changes resolved expiratory pressure intolerance (83.5%); and pressure setting changes decreased residual breathing events and improved air flow (96.7%), all of which were associated with renewed PAP use. PAP users showed objective sleep improvements on re-titrations and reported better sleep quality than non-users. Multiple logistic regressions showed 2 subjective, re-initiation predictors: (1) post-re-titration ratings of better sleep quality and (2) less anticipated difficulty in using PAP after initial or multiple re-titrations. User rates were significantly higher for subjects completing multiple (n = 158) versus one (n = 115) re-titration (80% vs 61%, P = .001). In multiple re-titration subjects, PAP users showed significance or a trend for lower apnea-hypopnea index (P = .02, g = 0.48) and respiratory disturbance index (P = .07, g = 0.36) compared with non-users. Available user downloads averaged >5 h/night. Technology-related problems due

  17. Screening for cancer of the cervix with simultaneous pap smear and colposcopy. The efficacy of pap smear and colposcopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuramoto, H; Sugimoto, N; Iida, M

    2011-01-01

    Some Japanese institutes have been performing a population screening program for cervix cancer involving the simultaneous use of Pap smear and colposcopy. This program may be a good model for evaluating the efficacy of Pap smears and colposcopy. The subjects included 2,000 women who underwent primary screening at the Kanagawa Health Service Association. 1) The incidence of ACF (atypical colposcopic findings) was 3.6%, whereas that of abnormal Pap smears (ASC-US and above) was 1.1%; 2) Of 88 women who showed abnormal findings on Pap smear and/or colposcopy, only three cases appeared abnormal in both methods, i.e., the two methods were complementary; 3) Colposcopy was more useful for detecting mild dysplasia than the Pap smear. However, colposcopy may possibly detect benign reparatory lesions; 4) The incidence of unsatisfactory colposcopic findings (UCF) was high (24.2%), whereas no unsatisfactory cases were found by Pap smear. The sensitivity of the Pap smear for detecting mild dysplasia is low, whereas that of colposcopy is high. However, colposcopy may not be suitable for primary screening due to its high UCF. The low sensitivity of Pap smears may be improved by repetition or adding ancillary HPV testing.

  18. Prof. Dr. Johannes Christiaan Coetzee as opvoedkundige denker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Snyman

    1953-03-01

    Full Text Available Dit is met genoëe dat ek voldoen aan die versoek om kortliks ’n paar gedagtes uit te spreek oor die opvoedkunde, veral die Calvinistiese opvoedkunde en die opvoedkundige praktyk van prof. Coetzee.

  19. Prof. John Wood, Chief Executive Designate, Dr Gordon Walker, Directorate, Chief Executive, Prof. Ken J. Peach, Head of the Particle Physics Department, CLRC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, United Kingdom

    CERN Document Server

    Patrice Loïez

    2001-01-01

    L. to. r.: Dr. Ian Wilson, CLIC Deputy Study Leader, Prof. Ken J. Peach, Head of the Particle Physics Department, Prof. John Wood, Chief Executive Designate, Dr. Gordon Walker, Directorate, Chief Executive

  20. [Future of gynecological exfoliative cytology specimen, the Pap test].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieminen, Pekka; Timonen, Tuomo

    2014-01-01

    Screenings of cervical cancer in Finland by using the Pap test have decreased the incidence of the disease by approx. 80%. Automation-assisted cytology and liquid-based Pap test have improved the technical quality of cytological examination. The HPV test allows the prevention of more cancers and its negative predictive value is crucially better than that of the Pap test. Its problem is the modest specificity in young age groups. When the HPV-vaccinated age groups reach the screening age, the HPV test should be adopted as the first-line screening test in all age groups. The Pap test will continue to have an important role as a further investigation and diagnostic specimen.

  1. Bacteriological quality of retail pap prepared from maizeand ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These included Acetobacter, Bacillus, Corynebacterium, E. coli, Citrobacter, Enterobacter, Klebsiella, Leuconostoc, Lactobacillus, Micrococcus, Neisseriae, Proteus, Pseudomonas, Staphylococcus and Streptococcus. The isolated genera that contaminated 24 pap samples prepared from guinea corn and their percentage ...

  2. Factors Influencing Pap Screening Use Among African Immigrant Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adegboyega, Adebola; Hatcher, Jennifer

    2016-07-28

    Papanicolau (Pap) screenings disparities exist for immigrant women in the United States. This study sought to have an understanding of factors influencing Pap screening among sub-Saharan African immigrant women. This is a qualitative descriptive study. Women were recruited from the community and by word of mouth following institutional review board approval. Data were gathered through in-depth focus group and demographic questionnaires. Interview sessions were digitally recorded and transcribed verbatim. Transcripts were analyzed for themes. Twenty-two women aged 24 to 65 years were interviewed. Barriers to screening included low knowledge of screening, cost, cultural beliefs, fear and communication issues. Motivators to improve Pap use include provider's recommendations, enlightenment, and family support. Interventions addressing the barriers peculiar to this population may alleviate these barriers and improve Pap screening use in this population. Providers have the opportunity to influence screening attitudes of African-born women by providing awareness and patient-targeted interventions. © The Author(s) 2016.

  3. Cloning and characterization of a novel human phosphatidic acid phosphatase type 2, PAP2d, with two different transcripts PAP2d_v1 and PAP2d_v2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Liyun; Gu, Shaohua; Sun, Yaqiong; Zheng, Dan; Wu, Qihan; Li, Xin; Dai, Jianfeng; Dai, Jianliang; Ji, Chaoneng; Xie, Yi; Mao, Yumin

    2005-04-01

    This study reports the cloning and characterization of a novel human phosphatidic acid phosphatase type 2 isoform cDNAs (PAP2d) from the foetal brain cDNA library. The PAP2d gene is localized on chromosome 1p21.3. It contains six exons and spans 112 kb of the genomic DNA. By large-scale cDNA sequencing we found two splice variants of PAP2d, PAP2d_v1 and PAP2d_v2. The PAP2d_v1 cDNA is 1722 bp in length and spans an open reading frame from nucleotide 56 to 1021, encoding a 321aa protein. The PAP2d_v2 cDNA is 1707 bp in length encoding a 316aa protein from nucleotide 56-1006. The PAP2d_v1 cDNA is 15 bp longer than the PAP2d_v2 cDNA in the terminal of the fifth exon and it creates different ORF. Both of the proteins contain a well-conserved PAP2 motif. The PAP2d_v1 is mainly expressed in human brain, lung, kidney, testis and colon, while PAP2d_v2 is restricted to human placenta, skeletal muscle, and kidney. The two splice variants are co-expressed only in kidney.

  4. The Frequency of Pap Smear Screening in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirovich, Brenda E; Welch, H Gilbert

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND U.S. professional medical societies and the national health systems of all other industrialized nations recommend that most women need not undergo Papanicolaou (Pap) smear screening annually. There are no data, however, regarding the frequency at which women actually undergo screening. OBJECTIVE To describe the frequency of cervical cancer screening in the United States. DESIGN National Health Interview Survey, a cross-sectional population-based telephone survey conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics. PARTICIPANTS Representative sample of U.S. women age 21 and older who denied a history of cancer (N = 16,467). MEASUREMENTS Pap smear screening frequency, categorized as no regular screening or screening at 1 of 3 discrete screening intervals (every year, every 2 years, or every 3 years) based on each woman's reported number of Pap smears in the previous 6 years. RESULTS The vast majority (93%) of American women report having had at least one Pap smear in their lifetime. Among women with no history of abnormal smears, 55% undergo Pap smear screening annually, 17% report a 2-year screening interval, 16% report being screened every 3 years, and 11% are not being screened regularly. Even the very elderly report frequent screening—38% of women age 75 to 84 and 20% of women age 85 and older reported annual Pap smears. Overall, 20% of women reported having had at least one abnormal Pap smear. Among these women, rates of frequent Pap smear screening are considerably higher—80% undergo annual screening, with only a modest decline in screening frequency with increasing age. CONCLUSIONS The majority of American women report being screened for cervical cancer more frequently than recommended. Lengthening the screening interval would not only reduce the volume of specimens that cytotechnologists are required to read, but would also reduce the follow-up testing after abnormal smears. PMID:15009779

  5. Variability study between Pap smear, Colposcopy and Cervical Histopathology findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhter, Shahida; Bari, Arifa; Hayat, Zartaj

    2015-12-01

    To determine the agreement/variability between colposcopic findings, Pap smear cytology and histopathological diagnosis in gynaecology patients. The cross-sectional cohort study was conducted from October 2010 to September 2011 at the Fauji Foundation Hospital, Rawalpindi, and comprised women who presented to the out-patient department with various gynaecological complaints. Colposcopy was performed in all women with unhealthy cervix during gynaecological examination, abnormal Pap smear report, recurrent vaginal discharge and postcoital bleeding. Pap smear was performed before colposcopy if not done earlier. Colposcopic findings were recorded on a specially-designed proforma. Biopsies from abnormal areas were taken and sent for histopathology. Colposcopic findings were compared with histopathology and Pap smear reports The agreement between the methods was evaluated by using Kappa coefficient and chi square test at a significance level of 5%. The mean age of the 143 women was 44 8.5 years (range: 25-72 years). Colposcopic findings were normal in 66(46%) women, while 77(54%) had abnormal findings and among the latter, 62(80.5%) had abnormal histopathology, indicating strong agreement (K=0.65; pPap smear report was abnormal in 48(33.5%) cases and among them histopathology was abnormal in 28(58%). In the remaining 95(66.4%) patients with normal Pap smear, histopathology was abnormal in 44((46%), indicating weak agreement between Pap smear and histopathological diagnosis (K=0.10; p=0.08). There was a strong agreement between colposcopic findings and histopathological diagnosis. However, agreement between cytological findings and colposcopic findings and cytology and histopathological diagnosis remained weak.

  6. Effect of Physician Gender on Demand for Pap Tests

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    Tsui-Fang Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available People’s demand for preventive medical care is one type of investment in health. The aim of this paper is to examine women’s demand for secondary prevention in Taiwan, focusing on the role a physician’s gender plays in women’s inclination to undergo Pap tests. Our estimation results show that regional ratio of female doctors has a positive and significant effect on utilization of Pap tests for the full sample and for women aged below 30. In addition, doctor’s gender matters only in utilization of Pap tests not in other types of preventive healthcare services in Taiwan. We suggest that the government may consider liberalizing medical laws to make it legal for trained female nurses or nurse practitioners to perform Pap tests in order to encourage the utilization of Pap tests, especially in rural and mountain areas. The government may also consider subsidizing the use of cervical cancer vaccines to help females prevent cervical cancer.

  7. Cytological Features Associated with Ureaplasma Urealyticum in Pap Cervical Smear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okodo, Mitsuaki; Kawamura, Jumpei; Okayama, Kaori; Kawai, Kenji; Fukui, Tadasi; Shiina, Natsuko; Caniz, Timothy; Yabusaki, Hiromi; Fujii, Masahiko

    2017-08-27

    Purpose: Ureaplasma urealyticum is associated with several obstetric complications and increases the importance of risk management in pregnant women. Furthermore, U. urealyticum has been identified as a cofactor that interacts with human papillomavirus infection in cervical cancer onset. The aim of this study was to assess specific cytological features of U. urealyticum infection in Pap smears to determine whether additional microbiological testing should be performed for pregnant women with a high possibility of U. urealyticum infection. Methods: Liquid-based cytology specimens (LBC) from cervical swabs of a total of 55 women, including 33 pregnant women who were negative for intraepithelial lesion or malignancy (NILM) on Pap testing and with U. urealyticum diagnosed without any other infectious microbes and 22 U. urealyticum-negative controls, were used in this study. We evaluated the localization of U. urealyticum by immunofluorescence, cytological features of secondary changes in squamous cells caused by inflammation, and the specimen background in Pap smears. Results: Based on analysis of Pap smears, a significant relationship was observed between U. urealyticum infection and cannonballs (p Pap smears of U. urealyticum infected samples, which have hardly been understood thus far, were assessed. The cytological features included cannonballs and predominance of coccoid bacteria. Our results might help in determining whether additional microbiological testing should be performed for pregnant women with a high possibility of U. urealyticum infection. Creative Commons Attribution License

  8. Socioeconomic and regional inequalities of pap smear coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manica, Silvia Troyahn; Drachler, Maria de Lourdes; Teixeira, Luciana Barcellos; Ferla, Alcindo Antônio; Gouveia, Helga Geremias; Anschau, Fernando; Oliveira, Dora Lúcia Leidens Correa de

    2016-03-01

    Objectives To identify socioeconomic and regional inequalities of pap smear coverage in the state of Rio Grande do Sul. Methods An ecological study based on data of the 2011-2012 national health information system to estimate the annual coverage of pap smears for the overall female population of the state and for women without private health insurance. We estimated annual pap smear coverage according to the Municipal Social Vulnerability Index and health macro-regions and regions of the state. Results The percentage of women without private health insurance ranged from 38.1% to 94.2% in the health regions. Pap smear coverage was 17.3% for the overall female population and 23.8% for women without private health insurance. Pap smear coverage was higher in more socially vulnerable municipalities and regions with a higher percentage of women with private health insurance. Conclusions The prevalence of private health insurance should be considered in studies that address the coverage of the Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS).

  9. Cervical pap smear- A prospective study in a tertiary hospital

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    S Pudasaini

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cervical cancer is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity among women worldwide and most common gynaecological cancer in developing countries. Papanicolaou smear is a simple and cost effective screening test for cervical cancer. The aim of this study is to evaluate and interpret the cervical pap smear cytology in a tertiary hospital. The interpretation and reporting of the pap smear is based on 2001Bethesda system.Materials and methods: This is a prospective study conducted in a tertiary hospital, Nepal Medical College over a period of two and a half years (January 2013 to June 2015. All cervical pap smears received in the department of Pathology in the study period were included.Results: A total of 4160 cervical pap smears were reported in the study period. Majority of the cases were Negative for Intraepithelial lesion or malignancy (87.9%. Bacterial vaginosis, atrophy and reactive cellular changes associated with inflammation were seen in 5.3%, 2.4% and 1.5% cases respectively.   Epithelial cell abnormalities (0.5% include Atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance, Low grade squamous intraepithelial lesion and High grade intraepithelial lesion. 88% of Low grade squamous intraepithelial lesion was seen in reproductive age group (20-45 years.Conclusion: Cervical cancer is the most common gynaecological cancer in the developing countries. Pap smear is the simple and cost effective screening tool to detect pre invasive cervical epithelial lesions.

  10. In Memoriam: Prof. Dr Dragutin Djurovic (1937-2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Prof. dr Dragutin Djurovic was born in Guca, Serbia, on December 20, 1937. He completed his primary and secondary education in Guca and Cacak. In the period 1956-1958, he studied at the General Military Academy in Belgrade. He enrolled at the Faculty of Sciences and Mathematics - Astronomy Group in 1958 and graduated in 1963. After graduation he went to study visits to Paris (1966) and Bruxelles (1972 and 1975). He obtained his MSc degree in 1970 from the University of Belgrade with a thesis entitled "Application of different types of telescopes for astronomical determination of time". His supervisor for the master thesis was Prof. Zaharije Brkic. Dragutin Djurovic defended his PhD thesis "Contribution to determination of Earth-rotation variations and polar motion" at the University of Belgrade in 1974. Most of the thesis-related research was done in Bruxelles during 1972 under the supervision of Prof. Paul Melchior.

  11. Sex Work as an Emerging Risk Factor for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Seroconversion Among People who Inject Drugs in the SurvUDI Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blouin, Karine; Leclerc, Pascale; Morissette, Carole; Roy, Élise; Blanchette, Caty; Parent, Raymond; Serhir, Bouchra; Alary, Michel

    2016-10-01

    Recent analyses have shown an emerging positive association between sex work and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) incidence among people who inject drugs (PWIDs) in the SurvUDI network. Participants who had injected in the past 6 months were recruited across the Province of Quebec and in the city of Ottawa, mainly in harm reduction programs. They completed a questionnaire and provided gingival exudate for HIV antibody testing. The associations with HIV seroconversion were tested with a Cox proportional hazard model using time-dependent covariables including the main variable of interest, sexual activity (sex work; no sex work; sexually inactive). The final model included significant variables and confounders of the associations with sexual activity. Seventy-two HIV seroconversions were observed during 5239.2 person-years (py) of follow-up (incidence rates: total = 1.4/100 py; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-1.7; sex work = 2.5/100 py; 95% CI, 1.5-3.6; no sex work = 0.8/100 py; 95% CI, 0.5-1.2; sexually inactive = 1.8/100 py; 95% CI, 1.1-2.5). In the final multivariate model, HIV incidence was significantly associated with sexual activity (sex work: adjusted hazard ratio [AHR], 2.19; 95% CI, 1.13-4.25; sexually inactive: AHR, 1.62; 95% CI, 0.92-2.88), and injection with a needle/syringe used by someone else (AHR, 2.84; 95% CI, 1.73-4.66). Sex work is independently associated with HIV incidence among PWIDs. At the other end of the spectrum of sexual activity, sexually inactive PWIDs have a higher HIV incidence rate, likely due to more profound dependence leading to increased vulnerabilities, which may include mental illness, poverty, and social exclusion. Further studies are needed to understand whether the association between sex work and HIV is related to sexual transmission or other vulnerability factors.

  12. Shape-based nuclei area of digitized pap smear images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhimmah, Izzati; Kurniawan, Rahadian

    2012-04-01

    Nuclei of the epithelial of Pap smear cells are important risk indicator of cervical cancers. Pathologist uses the changing of the area of the nuclei to determine whether cells are normal or abnormal. It means that having correct measurement of the area of nuclei is important on the pap smears assessment. Our paper present a novel approach to analyze the shape of nuclei in pap smear images and measuring the area of nuclei. We conducted a study to measure the area of nuclei automatically by calculating the number of pixels contained in each of the segmented nuclei. For comparison, we performed measurements of nuclei area using the ellipse area approximation. The result of the t-test confirmed that there were similarity between elliptical area approximation and automatic segmented nuclei-area at 0.5% level of significance.

  13. Cervical cancer and pap smear awareness and utilization of pap smear test among Federal civil servants in North Central Nigeria.

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    Hyacinth I Hyacinth

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is a leading cause of cancer death in women in developing countries. A key factor linked to the relatively high levels of cervical cancer in these populations is the lack of awareness and access to preventive methods. This study aimed to determine the level of awareness of cervical cancer and Papanicolaou test (Pap smear test and factors associated with the utilization of Pap test among female civil servants in Jos. Data was obtained from female workers (n = 388 aged 18-65 years in a Nigerian Federal establishment. Participants were randomly approached and instructed to complete validated questionnaires. Data was analyzed using Chi-square, t-tests and logistic regression analysis to determine if there was an association between variables and identify any predictors of awareness and utilization of the Pap test. Cervical cancer and Pap smear test awareness was 50.9% and 38.6% respectively, with the media as the major source of information. Pap smear test utilization rate was 10.2%, with routine antenatal care (ANC as the major reason for getting screened. Personal barriers to screening include the lack of awareness, and belief that cervical cancer is not preventable. Opportunistic screening, mass media campaigns and ANC education were suggested as ways of improving awareness and utilization of cervical cancer screening services.

  14. Cervical Cancer and Pap Smear Awareness and Utilization of Pap Smear Test among Federal Civil Servants in North Central Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyacinth, Hyacinth I.; Adekeye, Oluwatoyosi A.; Ibeh, Joy N.; Osoba, Tolulope

    2012-01-01

    Cervical cancer is a leading cause of cancer death in women in developing countries. A key factor linked to the relatively high levels of cervical cancer in these populations is the lack of awareness and access to preventive methods. This study aimed to determine the level of awareness of cervical cancer and Papanicolaou test (Pap smear test) and factors associated with the utilization of Pap test among female civil servants in Jos. Data was obtained from female workers (n = 388) aged 18–65 years in a Nigerian Federal establishment. Participants were randomly approached and instructed to complete validated questionnaires. Data was analyzed using Chi-square, t-tests and logistic regression analysis to determine if there was an association between variables and identify any predictors of awareness and utilization of the Pap test. Cervical cancer and Pap smear test awareness was 50.9% and 38.6% respectively, with the media as the major source of information. Pap smear test utilization rate was 10.2%, with routine antenatal care (ANC) as the major reason for getting screened. Personal barriers to screening include the lack of awareness, and belief that cervical cancer is not preventable. Opportunistic screening, mass media campaigns and ANC education were suggested as ways of improving awareness and utilization of cervical cancer screening services. PMID:23049708

  15. Knowledge and Awareness Among Iranian Women Regarding the Pap Smear

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    Farideh Dadkhah

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Background:Screening is a necessity for country health systems. In undeveloped countries that have no screening programs, cervical carcinoma is one of the major causes of mortality and morbidity. Although cervical cancer is preventable it is poorly controlled in some countries. The main cause of it is unawareness of people from cervical cancer and screening methods. Methods:The target population consisted of a consecutive sample of 1002 female patients, 15-45 years old, visiting the city health care centers in Tehran for any reason between January 2006 and January 2007. We used a self-administered,written, anonymous, multiple choice questionnaire that was developed by the study authors. Statistical significance was defined as P<0.05.Results: The mean of age was 31.23 ± 4.3 years. Five-hundred and twentytwo cases (52.1% had knowledge about Pap smear test. Only 230 cases (44.1%knew the correct time of the first Pap smear that should be done in women.And 408 cases (77.9% knew Pap smear can detect cancer of the cervix. 364 cases (71.9% had heard about cervical cancer,314 cases (59.9% had heard something about symptoms of cervical cancer. Conclusion: It is obvious that in Iran (and especially in Tehran, Pap smear awareness (52.1% is statistically similar to other developing countries, and only 45.9% had had at least one Pap smear test till the time of the interview. Thus, there is a need for an awareness campaign to increase the uptake of Pap smear testing.

  16. A Study of Pap Smear in HIV-Positive Females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madan, Apeksha; Patil, Sunita; Nakate, Leena

    2016-12-01

    HIV-positive females are more likely to have abnormal Pap smears than HIV-negative women. These abnormal Pap smears are usually associated with low CD4 cell counts and human papilloma virus infection. This was a prospective hospital-based study from April 2013 till March 2014. A total of 250 (both symptomatic and asymptomatic) HIV-positive females were examined in Gynaecology OPD at R.C.S.M. G.M.C and C.P.R. Hospital, Kolhapur, and their cervical smears were taken. They were categorized as per modified Bethesda system 2001. The findings in HIV-positive women were correlated with risk factors (age, disease duration, CD4 count and ART use). To study the spectrum of cytological abnormalities on Pap smear in HIV-positive females and classify precancerous and cancerous lesions in HIV-positive females according to Bethesda system 2001 and to be familiar with terminology and morphological criteria of Bethesda system 2001. To study the association of Pap smears abnormalities among HIV-positive women with their immune status (CD4 count). NILM is the commonest finding (83.2 %) which is subdivided into non-inflammatory, non-specific and specific inflammatory and atrophic smears. Candida vaginitis was the commonest cause of specific inflammatory condition accounted for (2.52 %) of all inflammatory smears. The percentage of squamous cell abnormalities was 12 %: ASCUS + ASC-H-6.22 %, LSIL-2.10 %, HSIL-3.4 % and SCC-0.8 %. The highest incidence of intraepithelial lesions in HIV-positive females was in the age group 31-40 years. There is no association of Pap smear abnormalities among HIV-positive women with their immune status (CD4 count) and duration of ART. Periodic, regular gynaecologic and Pap smear examination would help in early detection of intraepithelial lesions and their treatment so as to prevent invasive malignancy and mortality.

  17. Cost--effectiveness of pap smear in Kermanshah, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nokiani, Fariba Almassi; Akbari, Hossein; Rezaei, Mansour; Madani, Hamid; Ale Agha, Mohsen Emami

    2008-01-01

    To determine the incidence of pre invasive and invasive cervical lesions and also cost- effectiveness of Pap smears in Kermanshah, Iran (2004-2007). A descriptive, cross sectional study was performed between March 2004-March 2007 with all cytological smears analyzed according to the Bethesda II system. Efficacy was estimated as the ratio of HSIL and invasive carcinomas detected to all Pap smears. Data were analyzed with SPSS software and mean+/-SD for cost in each age. 148,472 smears were analyzed of which 99.7 % were negative, only 0.3% having cytological abnormalities. ASCUS, LSIL, HSIL and carcinoma positive rates were 205.4, 73.4, 21.6 and 5.4 per 100,000 Pap smears respectively. The incidence of HSIL and carcinoma in total was 26.9 per 100,000 women. Before age 35 there were no such lesions so that the effectiveness of Pap smear before age 35 was zero. The cost for one smear was 5 Euros and the cost for detection per HSIL or carcinoma was 18,559 Euros. The mean age of women for HSIL was 52.0+/-10.7 and for carcinoma 48.1+/-1.81 years. Since no HSIL or carcinomas were detected before age 35, and since for changing one LSIL to HSIL or carcinoma should take more than 5 years , the results of this study suggest that Pap smears before 35 years old is not effective and we suggest commencement of Pap smear in Iran from age 30.

  18. Klasifikasi Statistikal Tekstur Sel Pap Smear Dengan Decesion Tree

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    Toni Arifin

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAK Penelitian ini menyajikan analisis tekstur dan klasifikasi citra sel pap smear. Pada analisis tekstur difokuskan pada citra nukleus sel Pap smear, metode yang digunakan adalah metode Gray Level Co-occurrence Matrix (GLCM dengan menggunakan lima parameter yaitu korelasi, energi, homogenitas dan entropi ditambah dengan menghitung nilai Brightness pada citra yang diproses. Citra yang digunakan dalam penelitian ini menggunakan data citra Harlev, yang terdiri dari 280 citra yang sudah dikategorikan ke dalam 7 kelas yaitu 3 kelas sel normal yang meliputi Normal Superficial, Normal Intermediate, and Normal Columnar dan 4 kelas lainnya adalah kategori kelas citra sel abnormal yang meliputi Mild (Light Dyplasia, Moderate Dysplasia, Severe Dysplasia dan Carcinoma In Situ. Berdasarkan hasil pengolahan citra yang menghasilkan nilai matriks dari setiap parameter yang dihitung, citra sel Pap smear akan diklasifikasikan menurut jenisnya normal atau abnormal dan berdasarkan kelasnya dengan menggunakan decision tree yang diolah dengan algoritma clasifier J48 pada aplikasi weka. Untuk akurasi yang dihasilkan dari klasifikasi sel normal dan abnormal adalah 73% dan untuk akurasi klasifikasi tujuh kelas adalah 34,3%. Kata Kunci : Klasifikasi, Statistikal Tekstur, Sel Pap Smear, Decision Tree. ABSTRACT This research presents the texture analysis and classification of cells pap smear image. Texture analysis focused on the cell nucleus Pap smear image, the research method used the Gray Level Co-occurrence Matrix (GLCM method, by using five parameter that include contrast, correlation, energy, homogeneity, entropy and brightness. The image used in this research using image data Harlev. The images from 280 subjects are categorized into seven classes. Three classes of which are normal cell image class categories that include Normal Superficial, Normal Intermediate, and Normal Columnar, and the other four classes are categories of abnormal cell image class that

  19. Curriculum Vitae of Prof. Dr. Gürer GÜLSEVİN and Prof. Dr. Ayşe İLKER’s Impressions About Him Prof. Dr. Gürer GÜLSEVİN’in Özgeçmişi ve Prof. Dr. Ayşe İLKER’in Onun Hakkındaki İzlenimleri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özgür AY

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Curriculum Vitae of Prof. Dr. Gürer GÜLSEVİN and Prof. Dr. Ayşe İLKER’s Impressions About Him Prof. Dr. Gürer GÜLSEVİN’in Özgeçmişi ve Prof. Dr. Ayşe İLKER’in Onun Hakkındaki İzlenimleri

  20. Pap Smear: Do I Need One If I'm a Virgin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... if I'm a virgin? Do virgins need Pap smears? Answers from Shannon K. Laughlin-Tommaso, M.D. ... can still consider testing. The purpose of a Pap smear is to collect cells from your cervix, which ...

  1. Pap smear screening, pap smear abnormalities and psychosocial risk factors among women in a residential alcohol and drug rehabilitation facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soccio, Jacqui; Brown, Margaret; Comino, Elizabeth; Friesen, Emma

    2015-12-01

    To compare rates of late- screening, abnormal Pap smears and prevalence of psychosocial factors for cervical cancer between women in the community and women attending a residential drug and alcohol facility. Women with drug and alcohol addiction experience higher rates of abnormal Pap smears, late- or under- screening and psychosocial risk factors including domestic violence and sexual assault. A descriptive cross-sectional study of women attending publically funded women's health clinics in the community or in a live-in residential drug and alcohol rehabilitation facility. The study was approved in May 2012. Data were collected between October 2012-December 2013 using standardized women's health questionnaires, domestic violence screening tools and Pap smear tests. Women attending the rehabilitation facility had higher rates of abnormal Pap smears (16·7% vs. 1·6%) and self-reported history of abnormal Pap smears (44·4% vs. 20·6%). They also reported higher rates of smoking (72·2% vs. 29·2%), experience of sexual assault (44·1% vs. 16·9%), experience of domestic violence (65·7% vs. 10·9%) and other psychosocial risk factors, than women living in the general community. Unexpectedly, women in the rehabilitation facility reported similar levels of late screening as women in the community (52·8% vs. 55·4%). Women with drug and alcohol addiction have significantly higher incidence of risk factors for cervical cancer and abnormal Pap smears. Provision of opportunistic cervical cancer screening during residential treatment appears to reduce incidence of late-screening. Roles of Women's Health Nurses in providing services to vulnerable women should be explored further. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Continuous stress-induced dopamine dysregulation augments PAP-I and PAP-II expression in melanotrophs of the pituitary gland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konishi, Hiroyuki, E-mail: konishi@med.osaka-cu.ac.jp [Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); The 21st Century COE Program ' Base to Overcome Fatigue' , Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Department of Anatomy and Neuroscience, Nagoya University, Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Ogawa, Tokiko, E-mail: togawa@med.osaka-cu.ac.jp [Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); The 21st Century COE Program ' Base to Overcome Fatigue' , Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Kawahara, Shinichi, E-mail: kawahara@med.osaka-cu.ac.jp [Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Matsumoto, Sakiko, E-mail: s-matsumoto@med.osaka-cu.ac.jp [Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Department of Anatomy and Neuroscience, Nagoya University, Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Kiyama, Hiroshi, E-mail: kiyama@med.osaka-cu.ac.jp [Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); The 21st Century COE Program ' Base to Overcome Fatigue' , Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Department of Anatomy and Neuroscience, Nagoya University, Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan)

    2011-04-01

    Research highlights: {yields} We focused on the rat pituitary intermediate lobe (IL) under continuous stress (CS). {yields} CS induced PAP-I and PAP-II expression in melanotrophs of the IL. {yields} This gene induction was triggered by CS-related dopamine dysregulation. {yields} PAP-I and PAP-II may sustain homeostasis of the IL under CS. -- Abstract: Under continuous stress (CS) in rats, melanotrophs, the predominant cell-type in the intermediate lobe (IL) of the pituitary, are hyperactivated to secrete {alpha}-melanocyte-stimulating hormone and thereafter degenerate. Although these phenomena are drastic, the molecular mechanisms underlying the cellular changes are mostly unknown. In this study, we focused on the pancreatitis-associated protein (PAP) family members of the secretory lectins and characterized their expression in the IL of CS model rats because we had identified two members of this family as up-regulated genes in our previous microarray analysis. RT-PCR and histological studies demonstrated that prominent PAP-I and PAP-II expression was induced in melanotrophs in the early stages of CS, while another family member, PAP-III, was not expressed. We further examined the regulatory mechanisms of PAP-I and PAP-II expression and revealed that both were induced by the decreased dopamine levels in the IL under CS. Because the PAP family members are implicated in cell survival and proliferation, PAP-I and PAP-II secreted from melanotrophs may function to sustain homeostasis of the IL under CS conditions in an autocrine or a paracrine manner.

  3. CKI isoforms α and ε regulate Star–PAP target messages by controlling Star–PAP poly(A) polymerase activity and phosphoinositide stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laishram, Rakesh S.; Barlow, Christy A.; Anderson, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    Star–PAP is a non-canonical, nuclear poly(A) polymerase (PAP) that is regulated by the lipid signaling molecule phosphatidylinositol 4,5 bisphosphate (PI4,5P2), and is required for the expression of a select set of mRNAs. It was previously reported that a PI4,5P2 sensitive CKI isoform, CKIα associates with and phosphorylates Star–PAP in its catalytic domain. Here, we show that the oxidative stress-induced by tBHQ treatment stimulates the CKI mediated phosphorylation of Star–PAP, which is critical for both its polyadenylation activity and stimulation by PI4,5P2. CKI activity was required for the expression and efficient 3′-end processing of its target mRNAs in vivo as well as the polyadenylation activity of Star–PAP in vitro. Specific CKI activity inhibitors (IC261 and CKI7) block in vivo Star–PAP activity, but the knockdown of CKIα did not equivalently inhibit the expression of Star–PAP targets. We show that in addition to CKIα, Star–PAP associates with another CKI isoform, CKIε in the Star–PAP complex that phosphorylates Star–PAP and complements the loss of CKIα. Knockdown of both CKI isoforms (α and ε) resulted in the loss of expression and the 3′-end processing of Star–PAP targets similar to the CKI activity inhibitors. Our results demonstrate that CKI isoforms α and ε modulate Star–PAP activity and regulates Star–PAP target messages. PMID:21729869

  4. Ueber die von Prof. Dr. A. Gerstaecker beschriebenen Ascalaphidae (Neuroptera)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weele, van der H.W.

    1906-01-01

    In den Mitth. des naturw. Ver. für Neuvorpomm. und Rügen, Band XVI, XIX, XX. und XXV, hat Gerstaecker eine Reihe neuer Arten Planipennia beschrieben, von welchen ich durch die Freundlichkeit seines Nachfolgers Prof. G. W. Müller in Greifswald die Ascalaphiden zur Untersuchung bekommen habe. Obschon

  5. Editorial Prof Lundgren's significant contribution to SAJAA and its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof Chris Lundgren was the Editor-in-Chief of the Southern. African Journal of Anaesthesia and Analgesia (SAJAA) for a remarkable 14 years from 2001-2015. Under her excellent guidance, the journal has developed and grown to the point that the Academy of Science for South Africa's (ASSAf) review of scholarly ...

  6. Prof. Dr. A. J. H. van der Walt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Coetzee

    1956-03-01

    Full Text Available Prof. Van der Walt, die eerste prinsipaal van die Universiteit van Suid-Afrika en vroeër ook die eerste professor in die Geskiedenis aan die Potchefstroomse Universiteitskollege vir Christelike Hoër Onderwys, tree op 31 Maart 1956 uit die aktiewe universitêre diens.

  7. Itinerary for Prof. Nitash Balsara Arrival in Mumbai, November 4 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    RV

    2014-11-11

    Arrival in Mumbai, November 4. November 4-10 in and around Mumbai, will give lecture in IIT Bombay. November 11-15, in and around Kanpur, Prof Ashutosh Sharma will organize program. November 11, 2014. Mumbai-Lucknow: Air India AI-625; departs 10:30, reaches. 12:40. November 15, 2014. Lucknow-Bangalore.

  8. Missed Opportunities for Health Education on Pap Smears in Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Angela M.; Nussbaum, Lauren; Cabrera, Lilia; Paz-Soldan, Valerie A.

    2011-01-01

    Despite cervical cancer being one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths among women in Peru, cervical Pap smear coverage is low. This article uses findings from 185 direct clinician observations in four cities of Peru (representing the capital and each of the three main geographic regions of the country) to assess missed opportunities for…

  9. High prevalence of abnormal Pap smears among young women co ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... HIV prevalence .rate was 24.5% (95% confidence interval: 20.7 - 28.7%) and the prevalence of abnormal Pap smears was 16.9- 6.4% ASCUS (atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance), 9.2% LGSIL (low-grade squamous intra epithelial lesions), and 1.3% HGSIL (high-grade squamous intraepitheliallesions).

  10. [Is the PAP smear era coming to an end?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak-Markwitz, Ewa; Spaczyński, Marek

    2015-12-01

    After the discovery of the role human papilloma virus (HPV) plays in the development of cervical cancer we are witnesses to a change in the conception and interpretation of cervical cancer prevention processes. Primary prevention gained a new tool in the form of HPV vaccines. Secondary prevention, i.e. detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (GIN), acquired a new diagnostic method--the HPV test. Studies were initiated in order to determine the usefulness of HPV tests in cervical cancer prevention and screening. They revealed that the DNA HPV test used in screening has higher sensitivity in CIN detection than PAP smear and that HPV-negative patients are better and longer protected against developing cervical cancer in comparison to women with normal PAP smear results. HPV tests also possess a predictive value, which detects women more susceptible to developing cervical cancer in the future. PAP smear does not have a predictive value. Instead, it only detects a presence or an absence of neoplasia at that particular time. These results clearly indicate that the era of classic PAP smear is indeed coming to an end, replaced by a new primary CIN screening tool--HPV test. The entire cervical cancer screening system must therefore be redefined and reorganized.

  11. Automatic diagnosis of vulvovaginal candidiasis from Pap smear images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momenzadeh, M; Sehhati, M; Mehri Dehnavi, A; Talebi, A; Rabbani, H

    2017-09-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) is the most common genital infections that are seen every day in clinics. This infection is due to excessive growth of Candida that are normally present in the vagina in small numbers. Diagnosis of VVC is routinely done by direct microscopy of Pap smear samples and searching for the Candida in the Pap smear glass slides. This manual method is subjective, time consuming, labour-intensive and tedious. This study presents a computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) method to improve human diagnosis of VVC. The proposed CAD method reduces the diagnostic time and also can be worked as a second objective opinion for pathologists. Our main objective is detection and extraction of mycelium and conidium of Candida fungus from microscopic images of Pap smear samples. In this regard, the proposed method is composed of three main phases, namely preprocessing, segmentation, feature extraction and classification. At the first phase, bottom-hat filtering is used for elimination of the cervical cells and separating the background. Then decorrelation stretching and colour K-means clustering are used for Candida segmentation. Finally the extracted features used by a decision tree classifier to detect Candida from other parts of smear. The proposed method was evaluated on 200 Pap smear images and showed specificity of 99.83% and 99.62% and sensitivity of 92.18% and 94.53% for detection of mycelium and conidium, respectively. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  12. Women's experiences of abnormal Pap smear results - A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rask, Marie; Swahnberg, Katarina; Lindell, Gunnel; Oscarsson, Marie

    2017-06-01

    To describe women's experiences of abnormal Pap smear result. Ten women were recruited from a women's health clinic. Qualitative interviews based on six open-ended questions were conducted, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed by content analysis. The women believed that their abnormal Pap smear result was indicative of having cancer. This created anxiety in the women, which resulted in the need for emotional support and information. Testing positive with human papillomavirus (HPV) also meant consequences for the relatives as well as concerns about the sexually transmitted nature of the virus. Finally, the women had a need to be treated with respect by the healthcare professionals in order to reduce feelings of being abused. In general, women have a low level of awareness of HPV and its relation to abnormal Pap smear results. Women who receive abnormal Pap smear results need oral information, based on the individual women's situation, and delivered at the time the women receive the test result. It is also essential that a good emotional contact be established between the women and the healthcare professionals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Papshop: Not a 'melon'choly Pap smear workshop!

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, the benefit of reducing the incidence ... Pap smear training. These students volunteer for the after-hours student-run Student Health and Wellness Centres Organisation. (SHAWCO) clinics. There are six clinics on weekdays: two clinics each on ... A number of pertinent issues arise around procedural skills training.

  14. Development of the Usability of Sleep Apnea Equipment-Positive Airway Pressure (USE-PAP) questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Constance H; Martin, Jennifer L; Hays, Ron D; Rodriguez, Juan Carlos; Igodan, Uyi; Jouldjian, Stella; Dzierzewski, Joseph M; Kramer, B Josea; Josephson, Karen; Alessi, Cathy

    2015-05-01

    A growing number of positive airway pressure (PAP) device users will develop physical/sensory impairments such as arthritis. For these individuals, the usability of their PAP devices (e.g., efficiency and satisfaction) may impact the frequency and safety of device usage. Questionnaires to assess PAP usability are unavailable; therefore, we developed the Usability of Sleep Apnea Equipment-Positive Airway Pressure (USE-PAP) questionnaire. Questionnaire development included in-depth interviews to identify relevant content areas, a technical advisory panel to review/edit items, cognitive interviews to refine items, and a cross-sectional survey of Veterans Affairs sleep clinic patients assessing PAP device usability overall (one multi-item scale), usability of PAP components (multi-item scales for machine controls, mask/headgear, tubing, and humidifier), frequency of usability-related issues (one multi-item scale), PAP device characteristics, and demographics. After conducting 19 in-depth interviews, a panel meeting, and 10 cognitive interviews, we administered the survey to 100 PAP device users (67% ≥60 years; 90% male). The items assessing machine control usability received the least favorable ratings. Twenty percent of respondents reported difficulty getting equipment ready for use, and 33 percent had difficulty cleaning equipment. The six multi-item scales had excellent internal consistency reliability (alpha ≥0.84) and item-rest correlations (≥0.39). This study provides initial support for the USE-PAP for measuring PAP device usability. Studies that include large samples are needed to further evaluate the psychometric properties of the USE-PAP. In addition, comparisons of USE-PAP responses with direct observations of PAP-related tasks and objectively measured PAP adherence are needed to fully evaluate the questionnaire. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Study of 2 years follow-up of referral patients with abnormal Pap smear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behnamfar, Fariba; Zafarbakhsh, Azam; Allameh, Taj-Alsadat

    2015-12-01

    Abnormal Pap smear consists of premalignant or malignant cervical lesions. Many of premalignant cervical lesions will never progress to invasive malignancy, or even may regress over the time. Thus, there is always a risk of overtreatment of patients with an abnormal Pap smear. A long-term follow-up of these patients can reveal final events associated with each subtype of abnormal Pap smear, and, therefore, help us to prevent unnecessary interventions. The aim of our study was to present 2 years follow-up of referral patients with abnormal Pap smear. A total of 334 consecutive women aged more than 16 who were referred with an abnormal Pap smear were entered into the study. Patients were followed with biannual Pap smear and annual colposcopy and biopsy for 2 years. At baseline, the majority of patients with abnormal Pap smear were normal on colposcopy and biopsy (68% and 86%, respectively). Six months after first abnormal Pap smear majority of patients in each group showed a significant regress to normal or less invasive lesion (P Pap smear, whereas 313 (94%) had at least one stage improvement. Only nine (3%) patients had deteriorated Pap smear after 6 months. All 308 patients who underwent colposcopy and biopsy had normal Pap smear 24 months after the first abnormal Pap smear. Pap smear is associated with a high rate of false-positive results. In addition, the majority of low-grade cervical lesions can spontaneously regress. A long-term follow-up of a patient with abnormal Pap smear can help us to avoid needless interventions.

  16. Prof. Nanopoulos visits Hill Primary School in Greece

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    This video is an extract of a reportage broadcasted by SKAI TV in Greece about the visit of Prof. Dimitri Nanopoulos to Hill Primary School, the oldest operating school in Greece. The video describes a breakthrough education programme aimed at introducing big ideas in physics, particle physics and cosmology to K-6 students through a pedagogical approach that promotes inquiry, creativity and hands-on experimentation with the use everyday materials.

  17. Missed Opportunities for Health Education on Pap Smears in Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Angela M.; Nussbaum, Lauren; Cabrera, Lilia; Paz-Soldan, Valerie A.

    2013-01-01

    Despite cervical cancer being one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths among women in Peru, cervical Pap smear coverage is low. This article uses findings from 185 direct clinician observations in four cities of Peru (representing the capital and each of the three main geographic regions of the country) to assess missed opportunities for health education on Pap smears and other preventive women’s health behaviors during women’s visits to a health care provider. Various types of health establishments, provider settings, and provider types were observed. Opportunities for patient education on the importance of prevention were rarely exploited. In fact, health education provided was minimal. Policy and programmatic implications are discussed. PMID:21464205

  18. Corpora amylacea and molluscum contagiosum on a cervical pap smear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Kaila; Li, Zaibo

    2017-02-01

    When evaluating a Papanicolaou (Pap) smear, the cytology of the squamous epithelial cells is of utmost importance. This is what cytopathologists use to render a diagnosis, ranging from normal to atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS) to high grade squamous intraepithelial lesions, or even squamous cell carcinoma. However, occasionally the pathologist will run into microscopic noncellular material as in our case, such as corpora amylacea on the slides, or even uncommon viral inclusions such as Molluscum contagiosum (MCV). When these less common entities make their way on to a cervical Pap smear, it is important not only to correctly recognize them, but to understand their clinical implications as well. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2017;45:179-181. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Cytomorphology of unusual infectious entities in the Pap test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalbuss, Walid E.; Michelow, Pam; Benedict, Cynthia; Monaco, Sara E.; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2012-01-01

    Rare entities in the Pap test, including neoplastic and non-neoplastic conditions, pose challenges due to their infrequent occurrence in the daily practice of cytology. Furthermore, these conditions give rise to important diagnostic pitfalls. Infections such as tuberculosis cervicitis may be erroneously diagnosed as carcinoma, whereas others, such as schistosomiasis, are associated with squamous cell carcinoma. These cases include granuloma inguinale (donovanosis), tuberculosis, coccidioidomycosis, schistosomiasis, taeniasis, and molluscum contagiosum diagnosed in Pap tests. Granuloma inguinale shows histiocytes that contain intracytoplasmic bacteria (Donovan bodies). Tuberculosis is characterized by necrotizing granulomatous inflammation with Langhans-multinucleated giant cells. Coccidioidomycosis may show large intact or ruptured fungal spherules associated with endospores. Schistosoma haematobium is diagnosed by finding characteristic ova with a terminal spine. Molluscum contagiosum is characterized by the appearance of squamous cells with molluscum bodies. This article reviews the cytomorphology of selected rare infections and focuses on their cytomorphology, differential diagnosis, and role of ancillary diagnostic studies. PMID:22919422

  20. Cytomorphology of unusual infectious entities in the Pap test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walid E Khalbuss

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rare entities in the Pap test, including neoplastic and non-neoplastic conditions, pose challenges due to their infrequent occurrence in the daily practice of cytology. Furthermore, these conditions give rise to important diagnostic pitfalls. Infections such as tuberculosis cervicitis may be erroneously diagnosed as carcinoma, whereas others, such as schistosomiasis, are associated with squamous cell carcinoma. These cases include granuloma inguinale (donovanosis, tuberculosis, coccidioidomycosis, schistosomiasis, taeniasis, and molluscum contagiosum diagnosed in Pap tests. Granuloma inguinale shows histiocytes that contain intracytoplasmic bacteria (Donovan bodies. Tuberculosis is characterized by necrotizing granulomatous inflammation with Langhans-multinucleated giant cells. Coccidioidomycosis may show large intact or ruptured fungal spherules associated with endospores. Schistosoma haematobium is diagnosed by finding characteristic ova with a terminal spine. Molluscum contagiosum is characterized by the appearance of squamous cells with molluscum bodies. This article reviews the cytomorphology of selected rare infections and focuses on their cytomorphology, differential diagnosis, and role of ancillary diagnostic studies.

  1. Loaded hip thrust-based PAP protocol effects on acceleration and sprint performance of handball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dello Iacono, Antonio; Padulo, Johnny; Seitz, Laurent D

    2018-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the acute effects of two barbell hip thrust-based (BHT) post-activation potentiation (PAP) protocols on subsequent sprint performance. Using a crossover design, eighteen handball athletes performed maximal 15-m sprints before and 15s, 4min and 8min after two experimental protocols consisting of BHT loaded with either 50% or 85% 1RM (50PAP and 85PAP, respectively), in order to profile the transient PAP effects. The resulting sprint performances were significantly impaired at 15s only after the 85PAP protocol, which induced likely and very likely greater decreases compared to the 50PAP. At 4min and 8min, significant improvements and very likely beneficial effects were observed in the 10m and 15m performances following both protocols. Significant differences were found when comparing the two PAPs over time; the results suggested very likely greater performance improvements in 10m following the 85PAP after 4min and 8min, and possible greater performance improvements in 15m after 4min. Positive correlations between BHT 1RMs values and the greatest individual PAP responses on sprint performance were found. This investigation showed that both moderate and intensive BHT exercises can induce a PAP response, but the effects may differ according to the recovery following the potentiating stimulus and the individual`s strength level.

  2. A Pap1-Oxs1 signaling pathway for disulfide stress in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yumei; Chen, Yan; Song, Wen; Zhu, Lei; Dong, Zhicheng; Ow, David W

    2017-01-09

    We describe a Pap1-Oxs1 pathway for diamide-induced disulfide stress in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, where the nucleocytoplasmic HMG protein Oxs1 acts cooperatively with Pap1 to regulate transcription. Oxs1 and Pap1 form a complex when cells are exposed to diamide or Cd that causes disulfide stress. When examined for promoters up-regulated by diamide, effective Pap1 binding to these targets requires Oxs1, and vice versa. With some genes, each protein alone enhances transcription, but the presence of both exerts an additive positive effect. In other genes, although transcription is induced by diamide, Oxs1 or Pap1 plays a negative role with full de-repression requiring loss of both proteins. In a third class of genes, Oxs1 positively regulates expression, but in its absence, Pap1 plays a negative role. The Oxs1-Pap1 regulatory interaction appears evolutionarily conserved, as heterologous (human, mouse and Arabidopsis) Oxs1 and Pap1-homologues can bind interchangeably with each other in vitro, and at least in the fission yeast, heterologous Oxs1 and Pap1-homologues can substitute for S. pombe Oxs1 and Pap1 to enhance stress tolerance. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  3. The pap-smear test experience of women in Turkey: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabaci, Zeynep; Ozsoy, Suheyla

    2012-01-01

    The study was planned with the purpose of examining the attitude of women who have pap-smear test for the early diagnosis of cervical cancer, factors affecting their decisions and their feelings and experiences during this period. A phenomenological method was used. Data were collected between March 2012 and April 2012 using standard and purposive samplings from 17 women. A detailed interview with women were held in their houses and recorded. The data collection tool consisted of two parts, one of which is information form with 17 questions identifying sociodemographic and cervical cancer risk factors of women and the second part is made up of semi-structured interview form with 15 alternative questions taking literature and the pap-smear test into consideration. Collected data were put into a written document. Content analysis was held by loading the documents into NVIVO 8 Statistical Programme. The study comprised themes such as cervical risk factor, decision of taking pap-smear test, taking pap-smear test, knowledge about pap-smear test, relieving factors during pap-smear test, obstructive factors during pap-smear test, gynecological examination and feelings of women during and after pap-smear test while waiting for the results. As women perceive gynaecological examinations differently from other examinations, they have different feelings in each process of the Pap smear test. Medical staff should advise women more clearly on the nature and advantages of the Pap-smear test.

  4. Association of knowledge, attitude and demographic variables with cervical Pap smear practice in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranabhat, Sabin; Tiwari, Mamta; Dhungana, Govinda; Shrestha, Reshmi

    2014-01-01

    Coverage of cervical pap smear test in Nepal is below general global values. One of the reasons may be that cervical cancer prevention policy of Nepal has 'Visual Inspection of Cervix with Acetic Acid' as the only screening tool. The focus of present study was to find out association of demographic factors, knowledge and attitude regarding cervical Pap smear test with its practice by women in Nepal. This cross sectional analytical observational study was conducted between February 1, 2013 and April 30, 2013. Participants were interviewed with the help of a structured questionnaire. Chi square and multivariate logistic regression tests were used to detect associations of variables with pap smear practice. Chi square test showed that practice was significantly associated with knowledge about pap smear test and cervical cancer, having favourable attitude towards the test, urban residency and 36-50 years age-group. Pap smear utilization was not associated with age-at-marriage, parity and age-at-first-child-birth. Multivariate logistic regression showed favorable attitude towards pap smear test as the only variable which significantly influenced pap smear practice (p=0.006, OR: 2.4). Pap smear coverage has been found to be 15.7% which is lower than global average and that for developing countries. Health education programs which are effective not only in increasing knowledge about cervical cancer and pap smear test but also effective in positively changing attitude towards the test should be organized to increase pap smear coverage.

  5. Young Singaporean women's knowledge of cervical cancer and pap smear screening: a descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Juanna; Klainin-Yobas, Piyanee; Mackey, Sandra

    2013-12-01

    To assess the knowledge of young female Singaporeans regarding cervical cancer and pap smear, the intention to participate in pap smear and whether there is any relationship between knowledge and intention to participate in pap smear screening. While cervical cancer has poor prognosis in the later stages, pap smear is effective in identifying precancerous lesions, which are more treatable. Pap smear screening is available to women in Singapore, but its uptake is opportunistic. Research has shown that knowledge about pap smear and cervical cancer is important determinant of screening behaviour in Singaporean women. Cross-sectional descriptive correlational design was used. Three hundred and ninety-three young Singaporean undergraduates, aged 18-25 years, were recruited via convenience sampling from a local university over a four-month period. Data were collected through self-administered questionnaires. Majority of the participants knew the term 'pap smear' and its function. However, knowledge of the risk factors for cervical cancer was lacking among the young women. Knowledge of pap smear and cervical cancer had a weak correlation with the intention to go for the future uptake of pap smear. Educational efforts among younger Singaporean women on the knowledge of pap smear and risk factors for cervical cancer are needed. Improving knowledge will enable them to understand the importance of reducing exposure to risk factors and regular pap smear screening. All health professionals working with young Asian women should be prepared to educate and counsel young women to participate in pap smear screening according to current guidelines. In particular, knowledge of the age to attend the first pap smear and the recommended frequency for screening need to be targeted for health education. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Evaluation of a nurse-designed mobile health education application to enhance knowledge of Pap testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Stacy

    2014-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted using a 2-group randomized control pretest/ posttest design to determine if knowledge about Pap testing could be increased through use of a nurse-designed mobile smartphone app developed to educate individuals about the Pap test. A 14-item pretest survey of knowledge about Pap tests was distributed to women attending a university in New England. Participants in the intervention group were provided with an Android device on which a digital health education application on Pap testing had been downloaded. The control group was given a standard pamphlet on Pap testing., Paired t test results demonstrated that knowledge scores on the posttest increased significantly in both groups, but were significantly higher in the intervention group. User satisfaction with the app was high. The results of this study may enhance nursing care by informing nurses about a unique way of learning about Pap testing to recommend to patients.

  7. Dukungan Suami Mendorong Keikutsertaan Pap Smear Pasangan Usia Subur (Pus) Di Perumahan Pucang Gading Semarang

    OpenAIRE

    Linadi, Kinanthi Estu

    2013-01-01

    Pendahuluan: Kanker serviks menjadi penyebab kematian wanita tertinggi di Indonesia. Jawa Tengah merupakan salah satu provinsi dengan kasus kanker serviks yang tinggi sepanjang tahun 2004-2008 dengan prevalensi tertinggi di Kota Semarang. Deteksi dini dengan pap smear terbukti menurunkan angka kematian penderita tetapi keikutsertaan pap smear di Indonesia masih rendah (5%). Tujuan: Studi ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui faktor yang berhubungan dengan keikutsertaan pap smear oleh PUS di Perumaha...

  8. Factors Predicting Nurse Intent and Status Regarding Pap Smear Examination in Taiwan: a Cross-sectional Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shu-Ling; Tsai, Shu-Fang; Hsieh, Mei-Mei; Lee, Lin-Lin; Tzeng, Ya-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Nurses are the most visible, frontline personnel providing health education to patients. In particular, nurse experience with Pap examinations have the potential to influence women's attitudes toward screening for cervical cancer. However, nurses in Taiwan have lower rates of Pap testing than the general population. Understanding the factors predicting nurse intent to have a Pap exam and Pap exam status would inform interventions and policies to increase their Pap exam uptake. Therefore, the present study was undertaken. Data were collected by questionnaire from a convenient sample of 504 nurses at a regional hospital in central Taiwan between August and October 2011 and analyzed by descriptive statistics, confirmatory factor analysis, and logistic regression. Nurse intention to have a Pap exam was predicted by younger age, less negative attitudes toward Pap exams, and greater influence of others recommendations. However, nurses were more likely to actually have had a Pap exam if they were older, married, had sexual experience, and had a high intention to have a Pap exam. Nurses who are younger than 34 years old, unmarried, sexually inexperienced, and with low intention to have a Pap exam should be targeted with interventions to educate them not only about the importance of Pap exams in detecting cervical cancer, but also about strategies to decrease pain and embarrassment during exams. Nurses with less negative attitudes and experiences related to Pap exams would serve as role models to persuade women to have Pap exams, thus increasing the uptake rate of Pap exams in Taiwan.

  9. Multimodal control of transcription factor Pap1 in Schizosaccharomyces pombe under nitrosative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Puranjoy; Biswas, Pranjal; Ghosh, Sanjay

    2017-07-15

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe Pap1, a bZIP transcription factor, is highly homologous to the mammalian c-Jun protein that belongs to the AP1 family of transcriptional regulators. The role of transcription factor Pap1 has been extensively studied under oxidative stress. Two cysteine residues in Pap1p namely, C278 and C501 form disulfide linkage under oxidative stress resulting in nuclear accumulation. We first time showed the involvement of Pap1 in the protection against nitrosative stress. In the present study we show that pap1 deletion makes growth of S. pombe sensitive to nitrosative stress. pap1 deletion also causes delayed recovery in terms of mitotic index under nitrosative stress. Our flow cytometry data shows that pap1 deletion causes slower recovery from the slowdown of DNA replication under nitrosative stress. This is the first report where we show that Pap1 transcription factor is localized in the nucleus under nitrosative stress. From our study it is evident that nuclear localization of Pap1 under nitrosative stress was not due to reactive oxygen species formation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Crystal structure of the P pilus rod subunit PapA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Verger

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available P pili are important adhesive fibres involved in kidney infection by uropathogenic Escherichia coli strains. P pili are assembled by the conserved chaperone-usher pathway, which involves the PapD chaperone and the PapC usher. During pilus assembly, subunits are incorporated into the growing fiber via the donor-strand exchange (DSE mechanism, whereby the chaperone's G1 beta-strand that complements the incomplete immunoglobulin-fold of each subunit is displaced by the N-terminal extension (Nte of an incoming subunit. P pili comprise a helical rod, a tip fibrillum, and an adhesin at the distal end. PapA is the rod subunit and is assembled into a superhelical right-handed structure. Here, we have solved the structure of a ternary complex of PapD bound to PapA through donor-strand complementation, itself bound to another PapA subunit through DSE. This structure provides insight into the structural basis of the DSE reaction involving this important pilus subunit. Using gel filtration chromatography and electron microscopy on a number of PapA Nte mutants, we establish that PapA differs in its mode of assembly compared with other Pap subunits, involving a much larger Nte that encompasses not only the DSE region of the Nte but also the region N-terminal to it.

  11. Comparison of Visual Inspection with Acetic Acid and the Pap Smear for Cervical Cancer Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Parul; Srivastava, Pritika; Srivastava, Anand

    2017-11-15

    To evaluate the efficacy of visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA) in the early detection of cervical cancer and compare it with the Pap smear. This was a cross-sectional study conducted over a period of 3 months. A total of 316 patients who attended the Gynecology Outpatient Department of Era's Lucknow Medical College and Hospital, fulfilled the inclusion criteria, and gave their informed consent were included. VIA was found positive in 38 patients (12.6%). Pap smear was positive in 31 patients (10.3%). Twenty-eight patients had a positive VIA and a positive Pap smear, 3 had a negative VIA and a positive Pap smear, 10 had a positive VIA and a negative Pap smear, and 34 had a negative VIA and a negative Pap smear. The sensitivity of VIA and the Pap smear was found to be nearly equal, 93.3 and 93.8%, respectively. The Pap smear was found to be more specific than VIA, i.e., 72.9 versus 60%. In terms of test accuracy, the Pap smear was found to have greater test accuracy, i.e., 77.3 versus 66.7% for VIA. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Cost-effectiveness analysis for Pap smear screening and human papillomavirus DNA testing and vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Meng-Kan; Hung, Hui-Fang; Duffy, Stephen; Yen, Amy Ming-Fang; Chen, Hsiu-Hsi

    2011-12-01

    As the effectiveness of cytology-based screening programme for cervical cancer in mortality reduction has reached a plateau, various preventive strategies have been considered, including intensive Pap smear screening and the supplemental use of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA test or HPV vaccination. Cost and effectiveness of these various preventive strategies are therefore of great concern for health policy makers. We intended to assess whether the combination of HPV DNA testing or HPV vaccination with Pap smear screening programme or the sole annual Pap smear screening is more effective and cost-effective in prevention of cervical cancer than the existing triennial Pap smear screening programme. A Markov decision model was constructed to compare total costs and effectiveness between different preventive strategies (including annual Pap smear, HPV DNA testing or HPV vaccination together with Pap smear screening programme) as opposed to the triennial Pap smear screening alone (the comparator). Probabilistic cost-effectiveness (C-E) analysis was adopted to plot a series of simulated incremental C-E ratios scattered over C-E plane and also to yield the acceptability curve for different comparisons of strategies. The threshold of vaccine cost and the influence of attendance rate were also investigated. Compared with triennial Pap smear screening programme, most of preventive strategies cost more but gain additional life years (quadrant I of C-E plane) except HPV DNA testing with Pap smear every 5 years dominated by triennial Pap smear screening programme. The most cost-effective strategy was annual Pap smear (incremental C-E ratio = $31 698), followed by HPV DNA testing with Pap smear every 3 years ($36 627), and vaccination programme with triennial Pap smear screening ($44 688) with the corresponding cost-effective probabilities by the acceptability curve being 65.52%, 52.08% and 35.84% given the threshold of $40 000 of willingness to pay. Vaccination combined with

  13. Adolescents with obstructive sleep apnea adhere poorly to positive airway pressure (PAP), but PAP users show improved attention and school performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beebe, Dean W; Byars, Kelly C

    2011-03-17

    Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) is associated with medical and neurobehavioral morbidity across the lifespan. Positive airway pressure (PAP) treatment has demonstrated efficacy in treating OSA and has been shown to improve daytime functioning in adults, but treatment adherence can be problematic. There are nearly no published studies examining functional outcomes such as academic functioning in adolescents treated with PAP. This study was conducted as an initial step towards determining whether PAP treatment improves daytime functioning among adolescents with OSA. Self-reported academic grades, self- and parent-reported academic quality of life, and objectively-measured attention were assessed before and after PAP was clinically initiated in a sample of 13 obese adolescents with OSA, as well as 15 untreated obese Controls without OSA. Based on adherence data, the treated group was divided into PAP Users (n = 6) and Non-Adherent participants (n = 7). Though demographically similar, the three groups significantly differed in how their academic performance and attention scores changed from baseline to follow-up. Non-Adherent participants showed worsening functioning over time, while PAP Users showed stable or improved functioning, similar to controls. Although many adolescents prescribed PAP for OSA are non-adherent to the treatment, those who adhere to treatment can display improved attention and academic functioning.

  14. Adolescents with obstructive sleep apnea adhere poorly to positive airway pressure (PAP, but PAP users show improved attention and school performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dean W Beebe

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA is associated with medical and neurobehavioral morbidity across the lifespan. Positive airway pressure (PAP treatment has demonstrated efficacy in treating OSA and has been shown to improve daytime functioning in adults, but treatment adherence can be problematic. There are nearly no published studies examining functional outcomes such as academic functioning in adolescents treated with PAP. This study was conducted as an initial step towards determining whether PAP treatment improves daytime functioning among adolescents with OSA.Self-reported academic grades, self- and parent-reported academic quality of life, and objectively-measured attention were assessed before and after PAP was clinically initiated in a sample of 13 obese adolescents with OSA, as well as 15 untreated obese Controls without OSA. Based on adherence data, the treated group was divided into PAP Users (n = 6 and Non-Adherent participants (n = 7.Though demographically similar, the three groups significantly differed in how their academic performance and attention scores changed from baseline to follow-up. Non-Adherent participants showed worsening functioning over time, while PAP Users showed stable or improved functioning, similar to controls.Although many adolescents prescribed PAP for OSA are non-adherent to the treatment, those who adhere to treatment can display improved attention and academic functioning.

  15. Modifying and Pilot Testing the Pap Smear Belief Questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Ackerson

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study is a report on modifications and pilot testing of a measurement tool to predict Pap testing based on the Interaction Model of Client Health Behavior. Women have been found to avoid routine cervical cancer screening (CCS due to personal influencing factors. For this study, the Pap Smear Belief Questionnaire (PSBQ was modified by adding items and evaluated through content validity index (CVI = .89 and cognitive interviews (think-aloud protocol, resulting in a 31-item instrument with four subscales (Benefits, Barriers, Vulnerability, Experiences. Pilot testing the modified PSBQ was conducted at a local agency. Fifty-three women completed and returned the PSBQ, which had good internal consistency, with a Cronbach’s alpha coefficient of .81 (Benefits α = .51; Barriers α = .85; Vulnerability α = .78; Experiences α = .87. Test–retest reliability of the 31-item PSBQ was also good (.878. Univariate logistic regression indicated that the only significant predictor of seeking/avoiding routine screening by women’s background characteristics was social influence (p = .04. Subscales found to be significant predictors in Pap testing were Barriers (p = .003 and Gynecological Exam Experiences (p = .04. The refined 31-item PSBQ has good psychometric data supporting its use in predicting CCS. However, this research should be replicated in a larger sample enabling further validity and reliability testing of the PSBQ. Understanding women’s attitudes toward CCS will help health care providers, who deal with gynecological health, develop more effective screening programs and interventions facilitating better experiences for women contributing to an increase in routine screening.

  16. Pap-smear Benchmark Data For Pattern Classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jantzen, Jan; Norup, Jonas; Dounias, Georgios

    2005-01-01

    includes scatter plots and linear classification results, in order to provide domain knowledge and lower bounds on the acceptable performance of future classifiers. Students and researchers can access the database on the Internet, and use it to test and compare their own classification methods.......This case study provides data and a baseline for comparing classification methods. The data consists of 917 images of Pap-smear cells, classified carefully by cyto-technicians and doctors. Each cell is described by 20 numerical features, and the cells fall into 7 classes. A basic data analysis...

  17. Prof. Dr. Rer. Nat. Burkhard Rauhut - Rector of RWTH Aachen University - Germany sign the golden book of the CERN. Greeting from Mr Sigurd Lettow, CERN Chief Financial Officer and Prof. Carlo Rubbia (ex CERN Director-General).

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2007-01-01

    Prof. Dr. Rer. Nat. Burkhard Rauhut - Rector of RWTH Aachen University - Germany sign the golden book of the CERN. Greeting from Mr Sigurd Lettow, CERN Chief Financial Officer and Prof. Carlo Rubbia (ex CERN Director-General).

  18. Predictors of Cervical Pap Smear Screening Awareness, Intention, and Receipt Among Vietnamese-American Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tung T.; McPhee, Stephen J.; Nguyen, Thoa; Lam, Tram; Mock, Jeremiah

    2006-01-01

    Background Compared with white women, Vietnamese women in the United States have a higher rate of cervical cancer and lower Papanicolau (Pap) test utilization. We evaluated factors associated with awareness of the Pap test, intention to obtain it, and its receipt in Vietnamese-American women. Methods In 2000, we conducted a telephone survey of Vietnamese-American women aged ≥18 years living in Santa Clara County, California, and Harris County, Texas. We collected data on sociodemographics, healthcare system access and attitudes, as well as Pap test awareness, attitudes, intentions, and practices. Results Of 1566 subjects, 74% had heard of the Pap test, and 76% had had at least one. Only 42% of those who never had a Pap test had considered obtaining one. There were no significant differences between the two sites. Women aged ≥65 had the lowest rates for all three outcomes. For all women, younger age, being married, having requested a Pap test, physician recommendation, and preferring a female standby if the doctor was male were associated with Pap test intention. Being married, higher level of education, having a female doctor, having a respectful doctor, having requested the test, and physician recommendation were associated with Pap test receipt. Conclusion Vietnamese-American women have low rates of Pap test awareness, intention, and receipt. The patient–doctor interaction is an important determinant. Efforts to increase Pap test utilization in this population need to be directed at encouraging physicians to offer the Pap test and empowering women to ask for the test. PMID:12350454

  19. Human Papillomavirus Vaccination and Pap Smear Uptake Among Young Women in the United States: Role of Provider and Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Fangjian; Hirth, Jacqueline M; Berenson, Abbey B

    2017-10-01

    It has been reported that Pap smear use is higher among U.S. women who received the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine than unvaccinated women. This study assessed the role of provider and patient in the difference of Pap smear use by vaccination status. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 5416 young women (21-30 years of age) with detailed information on Pap smear use and HPV vaccination status from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) 2013-2015. Vaccinated women received at least one dose of HPV vaccine. Main outcomes included Pap smear in the past year, provider's recommendation for Pap smear, and patient-initiated Pap smear. The prevalence of Pap smear in the past year was much higher among vaccinated women than unvaccinated women (67.5% vs. 52.8%, p Pap testing (60.8% vs. 50.8%, p Pap testing after receiving a provider's recommendation (75.1% vs. 67.9%, p = 0.004), and to initiate Pap testing themselves (57.7% vs. 38.2%, p Pap smear recommendation and uptake vanished. Unvaccinated women who have not visited an OB/GYN in the past year are less likely to receive a recommendation for Pap testing from their providers or to initiate Pap testing themselves without a provider's recommendation. They should be encouraged to visit an OB/GYN provider for cervical cancer screening.

  20. Prof. M. G. K. Menon | History | About IASc | Indian Academy of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prof. M. G. K. Menon. President from 1974 to 1976. Prof. M. G. K. Menon. Name: MENON, Mambillikalathil Govind Kumar Elected 1964; Council Service: 1968-85; President: 1974-76; Vice-President: 1971-73. Member of Parliament, New Delhi Date of birth: 28 August 1928, Mangalore, Karnataka. Edn.: Jaswant College ...

  1. Inequalities in Pap smear screening for cervical cancer in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Mesa, Jeovany; Werutsky, Gustavo; Campani, Raquel Barth; Wehrmeister, Fernando César; Barrios, Carlos Henrique

    2013-10-01

    To examine the risk factors associated with never being screened for cervical cancer (CC) in Brazil. Using the National Household Sample Survey 2008 (PNAD), we analyzed data from 102,108 Brazilian women ages 25-64years. The patients were analyzed as having been or never having been screened with a Pap smear (Yes/No). Age-adjusted prevalence of never-screening was analyzed using a Chi-squared test. Crude and adjusted models using Poisson regression were performed. The prevalence of never-screened women for CC was 12.9%, 11.5% and 22.2% in Brazil in general, urban and rural areas, respectively. The Brazilian region with the highest prevalence of never-screening was the North (17.4%, 14.7% and 27.3% in general, urban and rural areas, respectively). The factors associated with a higher risk for never being screened were the following: poverty, younger age, lower educational level, non-white skin color, a greater number of children, no supplemental health insurance and not having visited a doctor in the past 12months. Socioeconomic and demographic conditions lead to inequalities in access to Pap smear screening in Brazil. Public health policy addressing these risk groups is necessary. © 2013.

  2. Iodamoeba butschlii in an anal pap test confirmed by iodine stain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuetz, Audrey N; Pritt, Bobbi S; Schreiner, Andrew M

    2014-09-01

    We report the finding of Iodamoeba butschlii amebic cysts on a liquid-based anal Pap smear from an HIV-positive male. Iodine staining of the smear confirmed the diagnosis. It is important to distinguish I. butschlii from pathogenic ameobae and other organisms seen on anal Pap smears. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. How Often to Get a Pap Test (A Cup of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-01-10

    Cervical cancer has declined in the U.S., and the decline is largely due to Pap testing and follow-up. Screening recommendations have changed. In this podcast, Meg Watson discusses Pap testing.  Created: 1/10/2013 by MMWR.   Date Released: 1/10/2013.

  4. Factors related to poor practice of Pap smear screening among secondary school teachers in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Fauziah; Aziz, Norlaili Abdul; Su, Tin Tin

    2011-01-01

    The Pap smear test has been regarded as a promising cervical screening tool since 1940s. Yet its importance has been overlooked by beneficiaries in Malaysia. This underlines the need to identify the prevalence of Pap smear practice and influencing factors towards the practice among educated working women. A survey was conducted with 403 female teachers from 40 public secondary schools in Malaysia selected by cluster random sampling. Data were collected from January to March 2010 using a self-administered questionnaire. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to identify the factors related to the Pap smear practice. The rate for participants who ever had Pap test was only 38% and poor practice of was significantly higher among: those with aged less than 35 years; those practicing hormonal contraceptive method; and individuals perceiving barriers to the Pap smear screening test. In contrast, the findings were significantly lower in women with longer duration of teaching service; higher income groups; ever pregnant; having chronic diseases; health insurance coverage; and who had perceived benefit of Pap smear screening. Barriers towards practicing Pap smear exist even among educated career women. Tailor-made health promotion and education on cervical cancer and the benefit of Pap smear screening are essential to change the behavior of the study population.

  5. DUKUNGAN SUAMI MENDORONG KEIKUTSERTAAN PAP SMEAR PASANGAN USIA SUBUR (PUS DI PERUMAHAN PUCANG GADING SEMARANG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinanthi Estu Linadi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Pendahuluan: Kanker serviks menjadi penyebab kematian wanita tertinggi di Indonesia. Jawa Tengah merupakan salah satu provinsi dengan kasus kanker serviks yang tinggi sepanjang tahun 2004-2008 dengan prevalensi tertinggi di Kota Semarang. Deteksi dini dengan pap smear terbukti menurunkan angka kematian penderita tetapi keikutsertaan pap smear di Indonesia masih rendah (5%. Tujuan: Studi ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui faktor yang berhubungan dengan keikutsertaan pap smear oleh PUS di Perumahan Pucang Gading Semarang. Metode : Penelitian ini merupakan studi kuantitatifdengan pendekatan potong lintang. Data PUS didapat dari kader (N=316 dan sebanyak 75 sampel ditentukan secara acak sederhan. Data dianalisis dengan distribusi frekuensi dan metode chi squareuntuk mengetahui hubungan antar variabel. Hasil : Sebanyak 15 responden (20% melakukan pap smear. Dukungan suami dan pengetahuan memiliki hubungan signifikan terhadap keikutsertaan pap smear (p<0,05. Sedangkan variabel sikap memiliki sedikit hubungan (p=0,066. Kesimpulan : Karakteristik dan persepsi responden mengenai sosialisasitidak berhubungan dengan keikutsertaan pap smear. Pengetahuan, sikap, dan dukungan suami menjadi faktor yang meningkatkan keikutsertaan PUS melakukan pap smear. Kata kunci: pap smear, dukungan suami, Semarang

  6. Pap Smear Test Prevalence within Three Years (Age 18+) - Small Area Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    For Pap smear test, a woman 18 years of age or older must have reported having at least one Pap smear test in her life. Furthermore, she should have had one within the last three years by the time of interview.

  7. Roles of phagocytosis activating protein (PAP) in Aeromonas hydrophila infected Cyprinus carpio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wonglapsuwan, Monwadee; Kongmee, Pataraporn; Suanyuk, Naraid; Chotigeat, Wilaiwan

    2016-06-01

    Cyprinus carpio (koi) is one of the most popular ornamental fish. A major problem for C. carpio farming is bacterial infections especially by Aeromonas hydrophila. Previously studies had shown that the Phagocytosis Activating Protein (PAP) gene was involved in the innate immune response of animals. Therefore, we attempted to identify a role for the PAP gene in the immunology of C. carpio. The expression of the PAP was found in C. carpio whole blood and increased when the fish were stimulated by inactivated A. hydrophila. In addition, PAP-phMGFP DNA was injected as an immunostimulant. The survival rate and the phagocytic index were significantly increased in the A. hydrophila infected fish that received the PAP-phMGFP DNA immunostimulant. A chitosan-PAP-phMGFP nanoparticle was then developed and feeded into fish which infected with A. hydrophila. These fish had a significantly lower mortality rate than the control. Therefore, this research confirmed a key role for PAP in protection fish from bacterial infection and the chitosan-PAP-phMGFP nanoparticle could be a good prototype for fish immunostimulant in the future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. [Cloning and sequencing of the papA gene from uropathogenic Escherichia coli 4030 strain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qinggang; Zhang, Jingping; Zhao, Chuncheng; Zhu, Jianguo

    2008-09-01

    Cloning and sequencing of the papA gene from uropathogenic Escherichia coli 4030 strain to investigate the differences of the sequences of the papA of UPEC4030 strain and the ones of related genes, in order to make whether or not it was a new genotype. Cloning and sequencing methods were used to analyze the sequence of the papA of UPEC4030 strain in comparison with related sequences. The sequence analysis of papA revealed a 722 bp gene and encode 192 amino acid polypeptide. The overall homology of the papA genes between UPEC4030 and the standard strains of ten F types were 36.11%-77.95% and 22.20%-78.34% at nucleotide and deduced amino acid levels. The homology between the sequence of the reverse primers and the corresponding sequence of UPEC4030 papA was 10%-66.67%. The results confirmed that UPEC4030 strain contained a novel papA variant. UPEC4030 strain could contain an unknown papA variant or the novel genotype. The pathogenic mechanism and epidemiology related need to be further studied.

  9. PapR peptide maturation: role of the NprB protease in Bacillus cereus 569 PlcR/PapR global gene regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomerantsev, Andrei P.; Pomerantseva, Olga M.; Camp, Andrew S.; Mukkamala, Radhika; Goldman, Stanley; Leppla, Stephen H.

    2009-01-01

    The global transcriptional regulator PlcR controls gene expression in Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis. Activity of PlcR is regulated by PapR, the product of an open reading frame located immediately downstream of plcR. To be active in B. cereus, PapR must be secreted and then processed to the mature peptide by an unknown protease. This peptide is transported by an oligopeptide permease into the cell where it activates PlcR. In this study, we show that the neutral protease B (NprB) secreted by B. cereus 569 is required for extracellular PapR maturation. Purified recombinant NprB processed the synthetic PapR propeptide to produce a set of peptides derived from the C-terminal domain of PapR. Supplementation of growth media with synthetic PapR-derived C-terminal 5-, 7-, 8-, and 27-amino acid peptides caused activation of intracellular PlcR in a PapR-deficient strain of B. cereus 569 while only the 5- and 7-amino acid peptides activated PlcR in a nprB mutant. The maximum activity was found for the 7-mer peptide. However, even the 7-mer peptide could not activate PlcR with a C-terminal truncation of as few as six amino acids. This indicates that interactions of the C-terminal regions of both PlcR and PapR are important in transcriptional activation of the B. cereus 569 PlcR regulon. PMID:19159431

  10. Genomic and proteomic analyses of the terminally redundant genome of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa phage PaP1: establishment of genus PaP1-like phages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuguang Lu

    Full Text Available We isolated and characterized a new Pseudomonas aeruginosa myovirus named PaP1. The morphology of this phage was visualized by electron microscopy and its genome sequence and ends were determined. Finally, genomic and proteomic analyses were performed. PaP1 has an icosahedral head with an apex diameter of 68-70 nm and a contractile tail with a length of 138-140 nm. The PaP1 genome is a linear dsDNA molecule containing 91,715 base pairs (bp with a G+C content of 49.36% and 12 tRNA genes. A strategy to identify the genome ends of PaP1 was designed. The genome has a 1190 bp terminal redundancy. PaP1 has 157 open reading frames (ORFs. Of these, 143 proteins are homologs of known proteins, but only 38 could be functionally identified. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry allowed identification of 12 ORFs as structural protein coding genes within the PaP1 genome. Comparative genomic analysis indicated that the Pseudomonas aeruginosa phage PaP1, JG004, PAK_P1 and vB_PaeM_C2-10_Ab1 share great similarity. Besides their similar biological characteristics, the phages contain 123 core genes and have very close phylogenetic relationships, which distinguish them from other known phage genera. We therefore propose that these four phages be classified as PaP1-like phages, a new phage genus of Myoviridae that infects Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  11. Public Lecture | The long road to the LHC | Prof. Lyn Evans, Dr. Daniel Treille and Prof. Peter Jenni | 9 October

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    “The long road to the LHC” by Prof. Lyn Evans, Dr. Daniel Treille and Prof. Peter Jenni. Thursday 9 October, 7.30 p.m. in the Globe of Science and Innovation. Talk in English with simultaneous interpreting into French.  Entrance free. Limited number of seats. Reservation essential: +41 22 767 76 76 or cern.reception@cern.ch   Lyn Evans. Lecture by Lyn Evans Abstract The key to the discovery of the Higgs boson has been the development of particle accelerators at CERN over the years. I will explain how a particle accelerator works and will follow the path from the construction of the Proton Synchrotron in the 1950s to the world’s most powerful colliding beam machine, the Large Hadron Collider. Biography Born in 1945, Lyn Evans has spent his whole career in the field of high energy physics and particle accelerators, participating in all the great projects of CERN. From 1993 he led the team that designed, built and commissioned the LHC. He is currently ...

  12. Access to Adequate Healthcare for Hmong Women: A Patient Navigation Program to Increase Pap Test Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moon S. Chen, Jr

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the development and implementation of a Hmong Cervical Cancer Intervention Program utilizing a patient navigation model to raise cervical cancer awareness for Hmong women through educational workshops and to assist Hmong women in obtaining a Pap test. Out of 402 women who participated in a baseline survey, the Patient Navigation Program was able to enroll 109 participants who had not had a Pap test in the past 3 years and had never had a Pap test. Through utilization of outreach, an awareness campaign and patient navigation support, at least 38 percent of 109 participants obtained a Pap test. Overall, 21 workshops and 43 outreach activities were conducted by the Hmong Women’s Heritage Association, leading to 63 percent of those enrolled in the Patient Navigation Program who could be contacted to obtain a Pap test.

  13. Species identification of processed animal proteins (PAPs) in animal feed containing feed materials from animal origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axmann, Sonja; Adler, Andreas; Brandstettner, Agnes Josephine; Spadinger, Gabriela; Weiss, Roland; Strnad, Irmengard

    2015-01-01

    Since June 2013 the total feed ban of processed animal proteins (PAPs) was partially lifted. Now it is possible to mix fish feed with PAPs from non-ruminants (pig and poultry). To guarantee that fish feed, which contains non-ruminant PAPs, is free of ruminant PAPs, it has to be analysed with a ruminant PCR assay to comply with the total ban of feeding PAPs from ruminants. However, PCR analysis cannot distinguish between ruminant DNA, which originates from proteins such as muscle and bones, and ruminant DNA, which comes from feed materials of animal origin such as milk products or fat. Thus, there is the risk of obtaining positive ruminant PCR signals based on these materials. The paper describes the development of the combination of two analysis methods, micro-dissection and PCR, to eliminate the problem of 'false-positive' PCR signals. With micro-dissection, single particles can be isolated and subsequently analysed with PCR.

  14. Influence of acetic acid on a pap smear of dysplastic lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoellen, Friederike; Bohlmann, Michael K; Brade, Joachim; Rody, Achim; Diedrich, Klaus; Husstedt, Wolf-Diedrich; Hornemann, Amadeus

    2013-03-01

    Cervical cancer prevention is performed by taking Pap smears. The correct execution of the smear is crucial as an inadequate smear might result in underdiagnosis. The second means of cervical cancer prevention is visual inspection of the cervix uteri with acetic acid, while often both methods are combined. We investigated whether the application of acetic acid compromises the Pap smear. A total of 100 patients with dysplasia were prospectively included; Pap smears were obtained before and after the application of acetic acid. We observed an alteration of the result of the Pap smear after acetic acid application in 41%. However, these alterations did not result in a dysplastic case being classed as a normal smear or vice versa. The application of acetic acid to the transformation zone of the cervix uteri may enhance changes of the Pap smear in dysplasia, however, the changes affect subgroups of dysplasia and thus do not change therapeutic management.

  15. Relationship Between Pelvic Organ Prolapse and Non-Human Papillomavirus Pap Smear Abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menhaji, Kimia; Harvie, Heidi S; Cheston, Emily; Levin, Pamela J; Arya, Lily A; Andy, Uduak U

    2017-07-13

    The aim of this study was to determine the association between pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and non-human papillomavirus (HPV) Papanicolaou (Pap) smear abnormalities. This was a retrospective cohort study of women aged 40 to 70 years who presented for consultation at our institution between 2010 and 2015 and had results of a Pap smear and HPV test available within 5 years of their visit. We extracted demographic information, medical and social history, Pap smear, and HPV results from the electronic medical record. Associations between the presence of POP and non-HPV Pap smear abnormalities were estimated using univariable and multivariable analyses. We reviewed 1590 charts and excluded 980 women, leaving 610 women in the study: 183 with POP and 427 without POP. Women with POP were significantly older (58.2 ± 7.2 vs 55.6 ± 6.6, P 10 year) history of abnormal Pap smear (24.0% vs 14.8%, P Pap smears was higher in the POP group than in the non-POP group (12/183 [6.6%] vs 12/427 [2.8%], P = 0.029). In the POP group, the rate of non-HPV Pap smear abnormality was significantly associated with increasing prolapse stage (stage 1: 0/16 [0%], stage 2: 5/77 [6.5%], stage 3: 3/73 [4.1%], stage 4: 4/17 [23.5%]; P = 0.02). After controlling for age and remote history of abnormal Pap smear, the odds ratio for non-HPV Pap smear abnormalities in the POP group remained significant (2.49; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-5.79). Human papillomavirus-negative Pap smear abnormalities may be related to POP. Our findings have important implications for surgeons seeking to leave the cervix in situ in women with POP.

  16. Molecular dynamics studies of the P pilus rod subunit PapA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitagliano, Luigi; Ruggiero, Alessia; Pedone, Carlo; Berisio, Rita

    2009-03-01

    Adhesion of uropathogenic Escherichia coli to host tissues is mediated by pili, which extend from the outer cell membrane of the bacterium. Here we report molecular dynamics (MD) characterizations of the major constituent of P pili from the uropathogenic E. coli, PapA, in unliganded state and in complex with the G1 strand of the chaperone PapD. To mimic the PapA response to the gradual dissociation of the PapD G1 strand and to evaluate the role of PapA chaperone recognition sites, we also carried out MD simulations of complexes of PapA with fragments of PapD G1 strand, that leave either the P4 or both P3 and P4 sites unoccupied. Data on the unbound form of PapA indicate that, upon release of the chaperone, PapA evolves toward compact states that are likely not prone to subunit-subunit association. In line with recent experimental reports, this finding implies that chaperone release and subunit-subunit association must be concerted. Our data also indicated that the gradual unbinding of the chaperone from the PapA groove has increasingly strong structural consequences. Indeed, the release of the chaperone from the site P4, which is closest to the initiation site (P5), does not have dramatic effects on the domain structure, whereas its release from both the P4 and the adjacent P3 sites induces a quick structural transition toward a collapsed state, where the subunit groove is obstructed.

  17. Speakers at CERN's LEP celebration on 9 October 2000 - L. to r. : M. Philippe Busquin, Commissioner for Research European Union; Prof. Marino Gago, Minister of Science and Technology Portugal; Prof. Dimitar Dimitrov, Minister of Education and Science Bulgaria; M. Lubomir Fogas, Deputy Prime Minister Slovak Republic and Prof. Andrzej Wiszniewski Minister of Science Poland : during the LEP celebration.

    CERN Document Server

    Laurent Guiraud

    2000-01-01

    Speakers at CERN's LEP celebration on 9 October 2000 - L. to r. : M. Philippe Busquin, Commissioner for Research European Union; Prof. Marino Gago, Minister of Science and Technology Portugal; Prof. Dimitar Dimitrov, Minister of Education and Science Bulgaria; M. Lubomir Fogas, Deputy Prime Minister Slovak Republic and Prof. Andrzej Wiszniewski Minister of Science Poland : during the LEP celebration.

  18. Prof dr FJ van Zyl as mens, kerkman en godsdiensfilosoof

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. van der Merwe

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available Prof Dr FJ van Zyl as person, church personality and philosopher of religion Professor Francois Jacobus van Zyl (1913-05-06 - served as Head of the Department of Science of Religion and Missiology, Faculty of Theology (Section: Nederduitsch Hervormde Kerk, University of Pretoria, during the period 1960-1978. This article (written by a former student of his and present Head of the same Department contains a short biography, a discussion of his views on Theology, Science of Religion and Philosophy of Religion, and a bibliography. He is portrayed as a theologian with Barthian convictions, while been influenced by Emil Brunner and to a lesser extent by Hendrik Kraemer also. His primary audience was the Nederduitsch Hervormde Kerk and his theological activities (especially in the period 1960-1983 must be seen in relation to his influential role in same church.

  19. Pap smears for men: a vision of the future?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Oon, S F

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) rarely receives as much publicity as its neighbouring orifice, the cervix. As in the cervix, intraepithelial neoplasias are precursors to cancer in the anal canal. AIN and cervical interstitial neoplasia (CIN) undergo dysplasia as a consequence of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Since the advent of screening with the Pap smear in CIN, cervical cancer has plummeted to a fifth of its initial incidence. Anal cancer, however, has been rising, with a predilection for human immunodeficiency virus-infected men. HPV causes a squamous epithelial dysplasia and converts healthy tissue into AINs of increasing severity until anal cancer manifests. CLINICAL CASE: This article describes a clinical case of anogenital HPV infection refractory to medical and surgical therapy. It also describes an effective surgical excision technique associated with a good cosmetic outcome. CONCLUSIONS: The paper concludes by briefly discussing the implications of a national screening programme against AIN in the future.

  20. Automated classification of Pap smear images to detect cervical dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bora, Kangkana; Chowdhury, Manish; Mahanta, Lipi B; Kundu, Malay Kumar; Das, Anup Kumar

    2017-01-01

    The present study proposes an intelligent system for automatic categorization of Pap smear images to detect cervical dysplasia, which has been an open problem ongoing for last five decades. The classification technique is based on shape, texture and color features. It classifies the cervical dysplasia into two-level (normal and abnormal) and three-level (Negative for Intraepithelial Lesion or Malignancy, Low-grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesion and High-grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesion) classes reflecting the established Bethesda system of classification used for diagnosis of cancerous or precancerous lesion of cervix. The system is evaluated on two generated databases obtained from two diagnostic centers, one containing 1610 single cervical cells and the other 1320 complete smear level images. The main objective of this database generation is to categorize the images according to the Bethesda system of classification both of which require lots of training and expertise. The system is also trained and tested on the benchmark Herlev University database which is publicly available. In this contribution a new segmentation technique has also been proposed for extracting shape features. Ripplet Type I transform, Histogram first order statistics and Gray Level Co-occurrence Matrix have been used for color and texture features respectively. To improve classification results, ensemble method is used, which integrates the decision of three classifiers. Assessments are performed using 5 fold cross validation. Extended experiments reveal that the proposed system can successfully classify Pap smear images performing significantly better when compared with other existing methods. This type of automated cancer classifier will be of particular help in early detection of cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Method comparison between Munich II and III nomenclature for Pap smear samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirkel, Christoph; Barop, Claudia; Beyer, Daniel A

    2015-01-01

    Munich Nomenclature III for cervical smear evaluation also known as Papanicolaou (Pap) smear was launched in Germany in July 2014, and it is the only used system in Germany. The study aims at a method comparison between the previously used nomenclature Munich II and the currently used Munich III. A method comparison was performed by analyzing 117 Pap smear samples (pss) in the cytological laboratory of the department of Obstetrics and Gynecology of Luebeck University between January and March 2014. The samples were evaluated twice using both nomenclatures (Munich II and Munich III). One out of the 117 pss showed a loss of cellular material. According to Munich III, this Pap smear should be linked to group 0. Concerning Pap I, Munich II showed 0/117 pss (0%) and Munich III showed 55/117 pss (47%) cases (pPap II results were seen less frequently in Munich III than in Munich II (47% vs 93%, pPap IVa, IVb, and V stay similar in both nomenclatures [IVa: 1/117 pss (0.85%), IVb: 0/117 pss (0%) and V: 1/117 pss (0.85%)]. Patients at risk are clearly separated by Munich III from those with no evidence of pathology. The former clusters have been extended by distinctly defined subgroups, resulting in a more precise way to differentiate cytological findings. Differentiating between Pap IIID 1 and IIID 2 clearly separates mild and moderate dysplasia [cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) 1 (CIN 1) and CIN 2)].

  2. Conventional Pap Smear Screening in HIV Seropositive Women in South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabha Devi, Kodey; Bindhu Priya, Narigapalli

    2013-03-01

    To assess the prevalence of Pap smear abnormalities and to characterize the associated risk factors in HIV seropositive women. We conducted a cross-sectional study on 252 HIV seropositive women in and around Krishna district, Andhra Pradesh, India by screening them for cervical cytological abnormalities by means of conventional Pap smear screening and the abnormalities reported as per modified Bethesda system. The prevalence of Pap smear abnormalities in HIV seropositive women was found to be 7.17 % which was a twofold increased risk as compared to the general population. On analysis of the risk factors like younger age for abnormal pap smears, mean CD4 count, duration of disease, and ART/HAART therapy the difference between the two groups of HIV seropositive women with normal pap smears and seropositive women with abnormal pap smears was found to be not statistically significant. HIV/AIDS is associated with a twofold increased risk for cervical cytological abnormalities, and hence the need for periodic pap smear screening in this high risk group to reduce the global burden of cervical cancer.

  3. Does oral contraceptive pill increase the risk of abnormal Pap smear?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binesh, Fariba; Akhavan, Ali; Pirdehghan, Azar; Davoodi, Mahnoosh

    2013-09-01

    It is noted that oral contraceptive pills increase the risk of abnormal Pap smear but results have been inconsistent across the populations. This study aimed to evaluate the association between oral contraceptive pill (OCP) consumption and abnormal Pap smear in women who referred to Shahid Sadoughi and Madar hospitals in Yazd. A cross sectional descriptive study was carried out and a database of all Pap smear reports from 2009-2011 at Cytopathology Department of Shahid Sadoughi and Madar hospitals in Yazd, Iran was reviewed. A total number of 1286 women with history of OCP consumption were selected as the case group and 1218 women applying other contraceptive methods were selected as control group for evaluation. Both case and control groups were matched by age, parity and socioeconomic status. All of the women in this study maintained a single partner as their husband and none of them were considered as smokers. The duration of OCP use was at least 5 years. Abnormal Pap smear results were observed in 0.4% of cases and 0.2% of controls. There was no significant association between OCP consumption and abnormal Pap smear (p=0.727). Our findings did not show any specific association between OCP consumption and abnormal Pap smear results. In addition, the number of abnormal Pap smears in women who consumed OCP was lower than that of western countries. More prospective studies are required.

  4. Divergent coverage, frequency and costs of organised and opportunistic Pap testing in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salo, Heini; Nieminen, Pekka; Kilpi, Terhi; Auranen, Kari; Leino, Tuija; Vänskä, Simopekka; Tiihonen, Petri; Lehtinen, Matti; Anttila, Ahti

    2014-07-01

    We evaluated the overall coverage, frequency and costs of Pap testing by screening modality and health care provider in Finland. Information about Pap testing in the Finnish female population of 2.7 million was obtained from nationwide population-based registry data. Among women aged 25-69 years, 87% had had a Pap test taken within or outside the organised programme at least once during the last 5 years and half of those screened in the organised programme had also had at least one Pap test taken outside the programme. Of the annual average of 530,000 Pap tests taken, 84% were taken for screening purposes and 16% as follow-up. Forty percent of the 446,000 annual screening tests were taken in the organised programme, 55% as opportunistic tests in public primary or student health care or by private providers and 5% in public secondary health care. One-fifth of all opportunistic screening Pap tests were taken from women aged <25. The voluminous opportunistic Pap testing in public primary health care was concentrated in young women aged 25-29 whereas the bulk of opportunistic testing in private health occurred in age groups eligible for organised screening. The total cost of all screening Pap tests was €22.4 million, of which 71% incurred in opportunistic screening. Of the 84,000 annual follow-up Pap tests and their €8.3 million total costs, ∼60% incurred in organised screening or in secondary health care. © 2013 UICC.

  5. Pattern of epithelial cell abnormality in Pap smear: A clinicopathological and demographic correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banik, Urmila; Bhattacharjee, Pradip; Ahamad, Shahab Uddin; Rahman, Zillur

    2011-01-01

    In the low resource settings of a developing country, a conventional Papanicolaou (Pap) test is the mainstay screening system for cervical cancer. In order to counsel women and to organize a public health system for cervical cancer screening by Pap smear examination, it is imperative to know the pattern of premalignant and malignant lesions. This study was undertaken to find out the prevalence of an abnormal Pap smear, in a tertiary hospital of a developing country, and to carry out a clinicopathological and demographical analysis for establishing the pattern of epithelial cell abnormality in a Pap smear. A cross-sectional descriptive study was carried out in a total of 1699 patients who underwent Pap smear examination. The prevalence of epithelial cell abnormality in the Pap smear was calculated in proportions / percentages. Specimen adequacy and reporting was assessed according to the revised Bethesda system. Among the total of 1699 patients who had their Pap smear done, 139 (8.18%) revealed epithelial cell abnormality. Altogether 26 smears revealed high-grade lesions and malignancy, most of which were found to be in women belonging to the 30 - 39 and ≥ 45 age group. A total of 75 (53.96%) women were in the 20 - 44 age group and 64 (46.04%) were in the ≥ 45 age group. A bimodal age distribution was detected in the epithelial cell abnormality, with the bulk being diagnosed in patients aged 45 or above. Overall one-third of the patients with an abnormal Pap smear result showed healthy cervix in per vaginal examination. A raised prevalence of epithelial cell abnormality reflects the lack of awareness about cervical cancer screening. Women aged 45 or above harbor the bulk of premalignant and malignant lesions in the Pap smear, signifying that these women are among the under users of cytological screening.

  6. Disability and Pap smear receipt among U.S. Women, 2000 and 2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Julia A Rivera; Short, Susan E

    2010-12-01

    Sexually experienced women are at risk of cervical cancer, one of the most common female reproductive cancers. Nearly 20% of U.S. women aged 18-64 have a disability, and disability is associated with health care access; however, the relationship between disability and Pap smear receipt remains underexplored. Data on 20,907 women aged 21-64 from the 2000 and 2005 National Health Interview Surveys were used to investigate the relationship between disability and cervical cancer screening. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to assess the association between disability and both women's receipt of a Pap smear and their receipt of a doctor's recommendation for a Pap smear in the past year. Having a disability was negatively associated with Pap smear receipt (odds ratio, 0.6). Compared with women with no disabilities, those with mobility limitations and those with other types of limitations had reduced odds of having received a Pap smear (0.5-0.7). Disability was positively associated with having received a recommendation for a Pap smear (1.2); however, among women who had received a recommendation, those with disabilities had reduced odds of having received a Pap smear (0.5). Among women who had not received a Pap smear, 31% of those with disabilities and 13% of others cited cost or lack of insurance as the primary reason. The negative relationship between Pap smear receipt and multiple types of disability suggests barriers beyond the human-made physical features of the environment. Efforts to reduce inequalities in reproductive health care access should consider the needs of women with disabilities. Copyright © 2010 by the Guttmacher Institute.

  7. Perception and opinion of medical students about Pap smear test: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Naggar, Redhwan Ahmed; Isa, Zaleha Md

    2010-01-01

    the objective of this study is to explore the perceptions of medical students regarding the Pap smear test. Focus group discussion was held with twenty three medical students. The students were divided into three focus groups; two groups of female participants consisting of 9 and 8 students; respectively. The third group consisted of 6 male students. Questions regarding Pap smear testing included barriers that prevented women from taking the test, gender preference for the physician to conduct the cervical screening test, willingness to suggest Pap smear test to the family or friends. The data obtained were classified into various categories and analyzed manually. Most of the study participants mentioned that the main barriers for women to not perform Pap smear test is lack of awareness 16 (70%), followed by shyness 12 (52%) and the cost of the test 12 (52%). Most agreed that the gender of the physician will affect the women decision to do Pap smear test. All mentioned that the advantage of a regular Pap smear test is to detect the abnormality at the early stage of cervical cancer. Some of the participants 9 (39%) mentioned that the disadvantages are expense, possible injury in the vagina due to the test procedures 8 (35%), associated infection 7(30.4%) and pain 7(30.4%) . The majority, 20 (87%) mentioned that the most effective prevention methods for cervical cancer are having sex only after getting married with the spouse only, HPV vaccination 15 (65%) and Pap smear 14 (61%). The main barriers for women to not perform Pap smear test is lack of awareness, shyness and the cost of the test. Gender of the physician will affect the women decision to do Pap smear test.

  8. An autoregulatory feedback loop involving PAP1 and TAS4 in response to sugars in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Qing-Jun; Mittal, Amandeep; Jia, Fan; Rock, Christopher D

    2012-09-01

    miR828 in Arabidopsis triggers the cleavage of Trans-Acting SiRNA Gene 4 (TAS4) transcripts and production of small interfering RNAs (ta-siRNAs). One siRNA, TAS4-siRNA81(-), targets a set of MYB transcription factors including PAP1, PAP2, and MYB113 which regulate the anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway. Interestingly, miR828 also targets MYB113, suggesting a close relationship between these MYBs, miR828, and TAS4, but their evolutionary origins are unknown. We found that PAP1, PAP2, and TAS4 expression is induced specifically by exogenous treatment with sucrose and glucose in seedlings. The induction is attenuated in abscisic acid (ABA) pathway mutants, especially in abi3-1 and abi5-1 for PAP1 or PAP2, while no such effect is observed for TAS4. PAP1 is under regulation by TAS4, demonstrated by the accumulation of PAP1 transcripts and anthocyanin in ta-siRNA biogenesis pathway mutants. TAS4-siR81(-) expression is induced by physiological concentrations of Suc and Glc and in pap1-D, an activation-tagged line, indicating a feedback regulatory loop exists between PAP1 and TAS4. Bioinformatic analysis revealed MIR828 homologues in dicots and gymnosperms, but only in one basal monocot, whereas TAS4 is only found in dicots. Consistent with this observation, PAP1, PAP2, and MYB113 dicot paralogs show peptide and nucleotide footprints for the TAS4-siR81(-) binding site, providing evidence for purifying selection in contrast to monocots. Extended sequence similarities between MIR828, MYBs, and TAS4 support an inverted duplication model for the evolution of MIR828 from an ancestral gymnosperm MYB gene and subsequent formation of TAS4 by duplication of the miR828* arm. We obtained evidence by modified 5'-RACE for a MYB mRNA cleavage product guided by miR828 in Pinus resinosa. Taken together, our results suggest that regulation of anthocyanin biosynthesis by TAS4 and miR828 in higher plants is evolutionarily significant and consistent with the evolution of TAS4 since the dicot

  9. A qualitative study exploring factors associated with Pap test use among North Korean refugees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyounghae; Kim, Soohyun; Chung, Yoonkyung

    2017-10-01

    Lack of medical care in North Korea and vulnerability to human trafficking during their migration increase risks of cervical cancer among North Korean refugees. To better understand factors influencing Pap test use, we conducted a qualitative study of eight North Korean refugees in South Korea. Individual barriers were limited knowledge, lack of perceived need for preventive services, and concerns about costs. Environmental facilitators included having female providers, receiving family support, and free screenings. Refugees' health outlook, including viewing cancers as fatal diseases, hindered seeking Pap tests. Multi-faceted approaches to address individual and environmental factors in promoting Pap tests are warranted.

  10. Influencing Factors of Intention to Receive Pap Tests in Vietnamese Women who Immigrated to Taiwan for Marriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Fang-Hsin; Wang, Hsiu-Hung; Yang, Yung-Mei; Huang, Joh-Jong; Tsai, Hsiu-Min

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to explore the factors associated with the intention to receive a Pap test among married immigrant women of Vietnamese origin living in Taiwan. This was a cross-sectional community-based study. We enrolled 281 women aged 30 years and over in the study, from July 2013 to January 2014. The participants' characteristics, cervical cancer knowledge, Pap test knowledge, attitudes toward cervical cancer, barriers to receiving a Pap test, fatalism, and intention to receive a Pap test, were measured using self-report questionnaires. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were performed to examine the variables associated with participants' intentions to receive a Pap test. Vietnamese women with low scores on the measures of cervical cancer knowledge and perceived barriers to receiving a Pap test were more willing to receive the test, as were those with high scores on the measures of Pap test knowledge and fatalism. Women who received a Pap test in the previous year were more willing to receive a Pap test within the next 3 years. Preventive healthcare for immigrant women should be a focus of nurses. The development of culturally appropriate health education and strategies should enhance their knowledge of Pap tests and reduce perceived barriers to Pap test participation. This study's results can be a reference for nurses who work with immigrant women. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. HPV triage testing or repeat Pap smear for the management of atypical squamous cells (ASCUS) on Pap smear: is there evidence of process utility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Kirsten; Salkeld, Glenn; McCaffery, Kirsten; Irwig, Les

    2008-05-01

    A two-stage standard gamble was used to evaluate women's preferences for alternative managements of atypical squamous cells of undermined significance (ASCUS) on Pap smear (repeat Pap smear compared with immediate HPV test), and to test for the evidence of process utility. Women's utilities for the health state scenarios were clustered towards the upper end of the 0-1 scale with considerable variability in women's preferences. There was evidence of process utility, with immediate human papillomavirus (HPV) testing strategies having lower valuations than repeat Pap smear, where the clinical outcome was the same. Mean (95% CI) utilities for HPV testing (negative test) followed by resolution were 0.9967 (0.9957-0.9978) compared with repeat Pap smear followed by resolution: 0.9972 (0.9964-0.9980). Mean (95% CI) utilities for immediate HPV testing (positive test), followed by colposcopy, biopsy and treatment were 0.9354 (0.8544-1.0) compared with repeat Pap smear followed by colposcopy, biopsy and treatment: 0.9656 (0.9081-1.0). Our results add to the existing evidence that the impact of healthcare interventions on well-being is not limited to the effect of the intervention on the health outcomes expected from the intervention; process of care can have quality of life implications for the individual. A modelled application of trial-based data will allow characterisation of the true population costs, benefits, risks and harms of alternative triage strategies and subsequent policy implications thereof.

  12. Voordrag vir die toekenning van die graad Doctor Educationis, honoris causa, aan prof. dr. Jan Waterink.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Coetzee

    1955-03-01

    Full Text Available Die Raad en die Senaat het op hul vergaderinge in November 1954 besluit om aan prof. dr. Jan Waterink, gebore 20 Oktober 1890, die graad Doctor Educationis honoris causa toe te ken.

  13. NSA Prof. Ostovar Publishes on Iran's Foreign Policy in the Middle East

    OpenAIRE

    Grant, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    National Security Affairs (NSA) News NSA Prof. Afshon Ostovar has written an article titled “From Tehran to Mosul: Iran and the Middle East's Great Game” for the November issue of Foreign Affairs.

  14. Negative HPV screening test predicts low cervical cancer risk better than negative Pap test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Based on a study that included more than 1 million women, investigators at NCI have determined that a negative test for HPV infection compared to a negative Pap test provides greater safety, or assurance, against future risk of cervical cancer.

  15. 10. cervical cancer awareness and uptake of pap-smear services

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Esem

    Cervical cancer is a significant public health problem among women in ... is visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA) application is used. VIA has .... expanded surveillance case definition for AIDS ... and Pap smear: Issues in Promotion. Journal ...

  16. Paediatric ED BiPAP continuous quality improvement programme with patient analysis: 2005-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramo, Thomas; Williams, Abby; Mushtaq, Samaiya; Meredith, Mark; Sepaule, Rawle; Crossman, Kristen; Burney Jones, Cheryl; Godbold, Suzanne; Hu, Zhuopei; Nick, Todd

    2017-01-16

    In paediatric moderate-to-severe asthmatics, there is significant bronchospasm, airway obstruction, air trapping causing severe hyperinflation with more positive intraplural pressure preventing passive air movement. These effects cause an increased respiratory rate (RR), less airflow and shortened inspiratory breath time. In certain asthmatics, aerosols are ineffective due to their inadequate ventilation. Bilevel positive airway pressure (BiPAP) in acute paediatric asthmatics can be an effective treatment. BiPAP works by unloading fatigued inspiratory muscles, a direct bronchodilation effect, offsetting intrinsic PEEP and recruiting collapsed alveoli that reduces the patient's work of breathing and achieves their total lung capacity quicker. Unfortunately, paediatric emergency department (PED) BiPAP is underused and quality analysis is non-existent. A PED BiPAP Continuous Quality Improvement Program (CQIP) from 2005 to 2013 was evaluated using descriptive analytics for the primary outcomes of usage, safety, BiPAP settings, therapeutics and patient disposition. PED BiPAP CQIP descriptive analytics. Academic PED. 1157 patients. A PED BiPAP CQIP from 2005 to 2013 for the usage, safety, BiPAP settings, therapeutic response parameters and patient disposition was evaluated using descriptive analytics. Safety, usage, compliance, therapeutic response parameters, BiPAP settings and patient disposition. 1157 patients had excellent compliance without complications. Only 6 (0.5%) BiPAP patients were intubated. BiPAP median settings: IPAP 18 (16,20) cm H2O range 12-28; EPAP 8 cmH2O (8,8) range 6-10; inspiratory-to-expiratory time (I:E) ratio 1.75 (1.5,1.75). Pediatric Asthma Severity score and RR decreased (p<0.001) while tidal volume increased (p<0.001). Patient disposition: 325 paediatric intensive care units (PICU), 832 wards, with 52 of these PED ward patients were discharged home with only 2 hours of PED BiPAP with no returning to the PED within 72 hours. BiPAP is

  17. Light and the E3 ubiquitin ligase COP1/SPA control the protein stability of the MYB transcription factors PAP1 and PAP2 involved in anthocyanin accumulation in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Alexander; Schrader, Andrea; Kokkelink, Leonie; Falke, Christian; Welter, Bastian; Iniesto, Elisa; Rubio, Vicente; Uhrig, Joachim F; Hülskamp, Martin; Hoecker, Ute

    2013-05-01

    Anthocyanins are natural pigments that accumulate only in light-grown and not in dark-grown Arabidopsis plants. Repression of anthocyanin accumulation in darkness requires the CONSTITUTIVELY PHOTOMORPHOGENIC1/SUPPRESSOR OF PHYA-105 (COP1/SPA) ubiquitin ligase, as cop1 and spa mutants produce anthocyanins also in the dark. Here, we show that COP1 and SPA proteins interact with the myeloblastosis (MYB) transcription factors PRODUCTION OF ANTHOCYANIN PIGMENT1 (PAP)1 and PAP2, two members of a small protein family that is required for anthocyanin accumulation and for the expression of structural genes in the anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway. The increased anthocyanin levels in cop1 mutants requires the PAP1 gene family, indicating that COP1 functions upstream of the PAP1 gene family. PAP1 and PAP2 proteins are degraded in the dark and this degradation is dependent on the proteasome and on COP1. Hence, the light requirement for anthocyanin biosynthesis results, at least in part, from the light-mediated stabilization of PAP1 and PAP2. Consistent with this conclusion, moderate overexpression of PAP1 leads to an increase in anthocyanin levels only in the light and not in darkness. Here we show that SPA genes are also required for reducing PAP1 and PAP2 transcript levels in dark-grown seedlings. Taken together, these results indicate that the COP1/SPA complex affects PAP1 and PAP2 both transcriptionally and post-translationally. Thus, our findings have identified mechanisms via which the COP1/SPA complex controls anthocyanin levels in Arabidopsis that may be useful for applications in biotechnology directed towards increasing anthocyanin content in plants. © 2013 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Knowledge, Attitudes and Practice about Pap Smear among Women Reffering to A Public Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedighe Rezaie-Chamani

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The Pap smear is a reliable, inexpensive and effective screening test for cervical cancer; thesecond most common cancer among women worldwide. We aimed to determine women’s knowledge,attitudes and practice towards Pap smear and barriers for the screening in a public hospital.Materials and methods: This study, was carried out on 350 outpatient married women reffering for avisit at the clinics of the Alzahra educational hospital, Rasht- Iran, 2011. A questionnaire includingdemographic characteristics (24 questions, knowledge (14 questions, attitudes (11 statments andpractice (10 questions towards Pap smear was completed by interview with the women. The data wereanalyzed using SPSS ver.13.Results: Mean age of participants was 32 (SD 12 years. Of the respondents, only 44.3% were aware ofthe Pap smear and 27.1% had had it at least once in their life. The most common reason for having thetest was physicians’ or other health workers’ advise and for not having the test was no recommendationby health providers and lack of knowledge about Pap smear. Embarrassing, fear of the test result oreconomic problems mentioned by only 12 (4.2% as the main barrier. Mean (±SD knowledge score ofthe women who had heard about the Pap smear was 59.4 (24.3 and attitudes score of all participantswas 48.5 (11.6 from possible range score of 0-100. Women with a history of Pap smear had had higherawareness and attitudes score.Conclusion: The knowledge and practice of the women was inadequate and need to be promoted.Considering the main reason mentioned by the participants for not having the test, all health providersshould educate and encourage women to do regular Pap smear.

  19. A community-based participatory research approach to understanding pap testing adherence among Vietnamese American immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen-Truong, Connie K Y; Lee-Lin, Frances; Leo, Michael C; Gedaly-Duff, Vivian; Nail, Lillian M; Wang, Pei-Ru; Tran, Tri

    2012-01-01

    To explore factors potentially influencing Pap testing practices among Vietnamese American immigrant women (VIW, foreign-born) and describe their awareness of cervical cancer screening resources in their community. Descriptive study guided by the ecological model and community-based participatory research principles. Portland, Oregon, metropolitan area. Vietnamese American immigrant women (211) who were age 21 and older. We used descriptive statistics and logistic regression analyses to analyze a self-administered questionnaire that was pretested and translated using a team approach. Approximately 74% of VIW who completed the survey reported at least one Pap test, and 69% reported Pap testing history adherent to national guidelines. The factor most strongly associated with Pap testing receipt was suggestion from a friend, followed by longer residency in the United States, lower perceived common barriers, and lower perceived cultural barriers, for example, lack of family support and use of Eastern/Asian medicine. The factor most strongly associated with guideline adherence was having health insurance, followed by a recommendation from a physician or nurse practitioner. Only 11% of VIW knew where to obtain a free or low-cost Pap tests. Nurses can influence rates of Pap testing among VIW by providing health education through outreach programs targeted at lay health workers and their social networks, identifying at-risk patients such as recently immigrated women, reducing perceived common and cultural barriers to Pap testing, and helping women seek alternative payment options if they lack health insurance. Primary health care providers should be reminded of their essential role in increasing Pap testing adherence. © 2012 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  20. Decision making about Pap test use among Korean immigrant women: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyounghae; Kim, Soohyun; Gallo, Joseph J; Nolan, Marie T; Han, Hae-Ra

    2017-08-01

    Understanding how individuals make decisions about Pap tests concerning their personal values helps health-care providers offer tailored approaches to guide patients' decision making. Yet research has largely ignored decision making about Pap tests among immigrant women who experience increased risk of cervical cancer. To explore decision making about Pap tests among Korean immigrant women. We conducted a qualitative descriptive study using 32 semi-structured, in-depth interviews with Korean immigrant women residing in a north-eastern metropolitan area. Data were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using inductive coding. Although most women with positive decisions made their own decisions, some women deferred to their providers, and others made decisions in collaboration with their providers and significant others. While women making positive decisions tended to consider both barriers to and facilitators of having Pap tests, women making negative decisions predominantly discussed the barriers to having Pap tests, such as modesty and differences between the South Korean and US health-care systems. The women's reflections on their decisions differed regarding their Pap test decisions. Women's desired roles in the decision-making process and reflection on their decision outcome appeared to vary, although most participants with positive decisions made their own decisions and were satisfied with their decisions. Future research should conduct longitudinal, quantitative studies to test our findings regarding decision-making processes and outcomes about Pap tests. The findings should be incorporated into cervical cancer screening practices to fulfil the unmet needs of immigrant women in patient-provider communication and to facilitate women's decision making about Pap tests. © 2016 The Authors. Health Expectations published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Application of molecular genotyping to determine prevalence of HPV strains in Pap smears of Kazakhstan women

    OpenAIRE

    Niyazmetova, Luiza; Aimagambetova, Gulzhanat; Stambekova, Nazigul; Abugalieva, Zaurech; Seksembayeva, Korlukain; Ali, Syed; Azizan, Azliyati

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Human papillomavirus is the main causative agent for cervical cancer. However, few data are available about HPV prevalence in Kazakhstan. The aims of this study were to genotype HPV DNA in Pap smear samples of women to determine prevalence of carcinogenic HPV types in Astana, Kazakhstan and to analyze the association between HPV positivity and the cytology results of patient samples. Methods: Pap smear materials were obtained from 140 patients aged 18-59, who visited the outpat...

  2. Perceptions and concerns of women undergoing Pap smear examination in a tertiary care hospital of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, A; Kishore, J; Tiwari, A

    2011-01-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the major causes of deaths due to cancer among women in India. Pap smear is one of the best methods to detect early changes in cervix. However, there is lack of data on awareness level of women about Pap smear and various risk factors for cervical cancer. To study the awareness about various risk factors for cervical cancer, health-seeking behavior and hygienic practices among women and to assess the distress experienced by these women before the Pap smear examination. This cross-sectional study was carried out on women coming for a Pap smear examination in a tertiary teaching hospital in New Delhi. A pretested interview schedule was used to get information after obtaining their informed consent. Fifty-seven percent stated that they did not consult a doctor when they noticed the symptoms the first time. Sixty-one percent did not know what a cervical cancer is and a same percentage of women did not know what a Pap smear examination was. Older age group, Muslim and literate women had higher number of abnormal Pap smear results. Women who reported being stressed in their lives had higher number of abnormal smears as compared to women who claimed to lead a stress free life. Poor hygienic practices among these women from urban areas were also associated with abnormal Pap smear results. The study concluded that factors such as poor awareness, shyness, poor hygiene, and old age could be responsible for abnormal Pap smears and this needs special attention in cancer prevention activities of the government.

  3. A percepção dos papéis do coordenador de curso e as expectativas da IES privada sobre esses papéis

    OpenAIRE

    Tittanegro, Pedro Angelo

    2008-01-01

    Este estudo nasce da necessidade de re-pensar e organizar o trabalho, para atingir os objetivos pessoais e institucionais, enquanto coordenador de cursos de graduação. O objetivo deste trabalho foi contribuir para a discussão sobre os papéis do coordenador de curso nas IES Instituições de Ensino Superior privadas. Especificamente, estudar como se caracterizam esses papéis à luz das demandas do mercado sobre o sistema educacional. Procurou-se apresentar: 1)os conceitos sobre o ensino superio...

  4. Perception and use of Pap smear screening among rural and urban women in Romania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigore, Mihaela; Popovici, Razvan; Pristavu, Anda; Grigore, Ana Maria; Matei, Mioara; Gafitanu, Dumitru

    2017-12-01

    In 2012 the National Screening Program for all women between 25 and 64 years of age was launched in Romania. Public awareness is an important factor in the success of a screening program. For this reason, we intended to assess the perception and the level of awareness of Romanian women regarding the Pap test in the prevention of cervical cancer. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 454 women from rural and urban areas. For our study, we used a questionnaire covering general characteristics, awareness, knowledge and practices regarding cervical cancer and Pap smear. 431 participants (95%) had heard of cervical cancer and Pap smear but only 71.8% knew the exact role of it. Bivariate analysis showed that knowledge about the importance of the Pap smear, early detection and treatment of early-stage cervical cancer was reduced among women with low socio-economic status, mainly living in rural area. The most frequent reasons for avoiding Pap smear screening were: lack of money, embarrassment or fear of gynaecological consultation and pain, the feeling that they don't need it, misconceptions about cervical cancer, fatalistic attitude, perceived low susceptibility to cervical cancer. Because the uptake and the success of cervical cancer screening are determined by women's knowledge and awareness of Pap smear, it is critical to improve these perceptions in the near future especially in rural area characterized by a low socio-economic status.

  5. Factors Related to Regular Undergoing Pap-smear Test: Application of Theory of Planned Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalilian, Farzad; Emdadi, Shohreh

    2011-11-04

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer among women in the world and the most common cancer in developing countries. Pap smear is and effective tool that can prevent death due to cervical cancer. The aim of this study was to determine the factors related to doing regular Pap-smear test based on the theory of planned behavior. In this cross-sectional study, conducted in Hamadan County, the west of Iran, during 2009, a total of 400 women's aged 20 to 70 years old, were ran-domly selected to participate voluntarily in the study. Participants filled out a self-administered questionnaire including the expanded theory of planned behavior components. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 13 using chi-square, t-test, and logistic regression statistical tests at 95% significant level. Almost 63.8% of the participants had already done Pap-smear test at least once. About 28.3% of volunteers had followed a regular Pap-smear pro-gram. There was a significant correlation (PPap-smear test. In addition, there was a significant correlation (PPap-smear test. The best predictor for regular Pap-smear testing was subjective norms with odds ratio estimate of 1.14 [95% CI: 1.04, 1.23]. Based on our findings, subjective norms may be one of the most effective factors among women for doing regular Pap-smear test.

  6. Age and Pattern of Pap Smear Abnormalities: Implications for Cervical Cancer Control in a Developing Country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinfolarin, Adepiti Clement; Olusegun, Ajenifuja Kayode; Omoladun, Okunola; Omoniyi-Esan, G O; Onwundiegu, Uche

    2017-01-01

    To characterize the age and pattern of Pap smear abnormalities in a major teaching hospital in Southwestern Nigeria. This is a review of medical records of patients that came for cervical cancer screening. The Pap smear results of women between May 2013 and April 2015 were retrieved. A total of 2048 Pap smear results were retrieved during the study period and analyzed with Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 20. A total of 252 (12.3%) samples were excluded from the analysis. The mean age of the women was 45.77 ± 9.9 years and the mode was 50 years. Normal Pap smear result was reported in 728 (40.6%) women. Only 20 women has had more than one more than one Pap smear done. The most common abnormality was inflammatory smear result as this was reported in 613 (29.9%) women. Atypical squamous cell of undetermined significance, low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LGSIL), and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HGSIL) were reported in 117 (5.7%), 209 (10.2%), and 111 (5.4%) women, respectively. Atypical glandular cell and squamous cell carcinoma were reported in 12 (6.0%) and 3 (1.0%), respectively. There is a high incidence of abnormal Pap smear in this environment and women start cervical cancer screening late in their reproductive life, past the age at which cervical premalignant lesions peak. This may be a contributing factor to the high burden of cervical cancer in developing countries.

  7. Nutritional Composition of Five Varieties of Pap Commonly Consumed in Maroua (Far-North, Cameroon

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    Ponka Roger

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the nutritional composition of five varieties of pap (cereal product commonly consumed in Maroua, city of the Far-North Region of Cameroon. The proximate composition (moisture, ash, protein, lipid, and crude fibre was determined by standard AOAC methods. Minerals (calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, iron, zinc, copper and manganese were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry and phosphorus was determined colorimetrically. Amino acid composition was determined by ion-exchange chromatography. All the pap varieties had a very high carbohydrate content (79.47-85.29 g/100 g dry matter. Appreciable levels of phosphorus and potassium were recorded in all the pap varieties (137.5-231.0 mg/100 g dry matter and 198.20-322.22 mg/100 g dry matter, respectively. Consumption of each pap (100 g by children 1-2 year old would meet 9.86-17.46% and 0.08-19.51% of their daily recommended intake respectively for protein and minerals. Leucine and glutamic acid were the most abundant essential amino acids and non-essential amino acids respectively in the pap. Essential amino acids in most of the pap samples met the recommended children requirement of the FAO/WHO/UNU for 1-2 year old children except methionine+cysteine and lysine.

  8. Pap, gruel, and panada: early approaches to artificial infant feeding.

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    Obladen, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This paper collects information on artificial infant feeding published before 1860, the year when commercial formula became available. We have extensive artifactual evidence of thousands of feeding vessels since the Bronze Age. Special museum collections can be found in London, Paris, Cologne, Fécamp, Toronto, New Mexico, and elsewhere. The literature on the use of animal milk for infant feeding begins with Soranus in the 2nd century CE. Literature evidence from the very first printed books in the 15th century proves that physicians, surgeons, midwives, and the laity were aware of the opportunities and risks of artificial infant feeding. Most 17th to 19th century books on infant care contained detailed recipes for one or several of the following infant foods: pap, a semisolid food made of flour or bread crumbs cooked in water with or without milk; gruel, a thin porridge resulting from boiling cereal in water or milk, and panada, a preparation of various cereals or bread cooked in broth. During the 18th century, the published opinion on artificial feeding evolved from health concerns to a moral ideology. This view ignored the social and economic pressures which forced many mothers to forego or shorten breast-feeding. Bottle-feeding has been common practice throughout history.

  9. The limits of pap smear in diagnosing preinvasive cervical neoplasias

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    Dorina Neacsu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The cervical-vaginal cytology can be interpreted after many classifications, starting from Babeú- Papanicolaou and ending with the Bethesda system, but no matter what the interpretation manner is it is really important to have a good quality of the smears and an experienced cytologist. If we refer to the total number of cases from the lot presented - 16732 cases, the results are satisfactory; 83% smears having normal limits, 10.14% MCB, 2.71% L-SIL, 0.82% H-SIL, 2.77% ASCUS, 0.10% AGC. In Iaúi there are significantly more patients with benign cell changes and L- SIL, while in Buzău there are significantly more patients with a normal smear, but there is also a higher frequency of theatypical squamous cells with an undetermined significance. Classically specialists say that 50-75% of the false negative results are due to the errors made when harvesting the sample. In conclusion we estimate that considering the present conditions in our country where the lack of interest and financial possibilities do not allow an action of detecting the lesions of the cervix organized nationwide, we can still make a selection of the cases with a high risk by making a free Pap smear for all the patients that come to a specialized service, either state or private, provided they respect the protocol of harvesting the cervical secretions, of preparing and reading/interpreting the smears.

  10. ABNORMAL FINDINGS IN PAP SMEARS: ISFAHAN PROVIENCE 1997-1998

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    G.H SADRI

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cervical cancer is a common female malignancy in developing countries. In our health care system, the screening program is performed by doing pap smears with the interval of three years. This study was designed to determine the prevalence and frequency disturbation of abnormal smears. Methods. This is a cross sectional study was done in 1997-1998. Sample group were all the under coverage married women aged 20-65 years who have a factor of referal criteria. Papsmears samples were interpreted by a pathologist. Papsmear results were documented by colposcopy and biopsy. Results. The prevalence of abnormal smears in under coverage women is 0.05 percent. Results of abnormal papsmears due to more investigations (colposcopy and biopsy were: Normal 25 percent, ASCUS 57 percent, CIN 14 percent, CIN 2 1 percent, CIN 3 1 percent invasive cancer 2 percent. Conclusion. Refering of women with abnormal signs such as leukoplakia, cervical erosion, and history of contact bleeding is necessary. The number of false positive results in cytotechnologlsts diagtlosfs is high. This result shows that on-job-training for cytotechnologists is important.

  11. Novel chromatin texture features for the classification of pap smears

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    Bejnordi, Babak E.; Moshavegh, Ramin; Sujathan, K.; Malm, Patrik; Bengtsson, Ewert; Mehnert, Andrew

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents a set of novel structural texture features for quantifying nuclear chromatin patterns in cells on a conventional Pap smear. The features are derived from an initial segmentation of the chromatin into bloblike texture primitives. The results of a comprehensive feature selection experiment, including the set of proposed structural texture features and a range of different cytology features drawn from the literature, show that two of the four top ranking features are structural texture features. They also show that a combination of structural and conventional features yields a classification performance of 0.954±0.019 (AUC±SE) for the discrimination of normal (NILM) and abnormal (LSIL and HSIL) slides. The results of a second classification experiment, using only normal-appearing cells from both normal and abnormal slides, demonstrates that a single structural texture feature measuring chromatin margination yields a classification performance of 0.815±0.019. Overall the results demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed structural approach and that it is possible to detect malignancy associated changes (MACs) in Papanicoloau stain.

  12. Star-PAP, a poly(A) polymerase, functions as a tumor suppressor in an orthotopic human breast cancer model.

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    Yu, C; Gong, Y; Zhou, H; Wang, M; Kong, L; Liu, J; An, T; Zhu, H; Li, Y

    2017-02-02

    Star-PAP is a noncanonical poly(A) polymerase and required for the expression of a select set of mRNAs. However, the pathological role of Star-PAP in cancer largely remains unknown. In this study, we observed decreased expression of Star-PAP in breast cancer cell lines and tissues. Ectopic Star-PAP expression inhibited proliferation as well as colony-forming ability of breast cancer cells. In breast cancer patients, high levels of Star-PAP correlated with an improved prognosis. Moreover, by regulating the expression of BIK (BCL2-interacting killer), Star-PAP induced apoptosis of breast cancer cells through the mitochondrial pathway. The growth of breast cancer xenografts in NOD/SCID mice was also inhibited by the doxycycline-induced Star-PAP overexpression. Furthermore, Star-PAP sensitized breast cancer cells to chemotherapy drugs both in vitro and in vivo. In mammary epithelial cells, Star-PAP knockdown partially transformed these cells and induced them to undergo epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). These findings suggested that Star-PAP possesses tumor-suppressing activity and can be a valuable target for developing new cancer therapeutic strategies.

  13. Pap screening goals and perceptions of pain among black, Latina, and Arab women: steps toward breaking down psychological barriers.

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    Gauss, Julie W; Mabiso, Athur; Williams, Karen Patricia

    2013-06-01

    Understanding women's psychological barriers to getting Papanicolaou (Pap) screening has potential to impact cancer disparities. This study examined pain perceptions of Pap testing among black, Latina, and Arab women and goal setting to receive Pap tests. Data on 420 women, in a longitudinal study, were analyzed using Chi-square tests of differences and generalized linear mixed models. At baseline, 30.3 % of black and 35.5 % of Latina women perceived Pap tests to be very painful compared to 24.2 % of Arab women. Perceptions of pain influenced goal settings, such as scheduling a first ever Pap test (odds ratio=0.58, 95 % confidence interval 0.14-0.94). Immediately following the intervention, women's perception that Pap tests are very painful significantly declined (P value <0.001) with Arab and black women registering the greatest improvements (20.3 and 17.3 % reduction, respectively, compared to 8.4 % for Latina). Having the perception that the Pap test is very painful significantly reduces the likelihood of black, Latina, and Arab women setting the goal to schedule their first ever Pap test. Latina women are the least likely to improve their perception that the Pap test is very painful, though national statistics show they have the highest rates of morbidity and mortality from cervical cancer. These findings are instructive for designing tailored interventions to break down psychological barriers to Pap screening among underserved women.

  14. Awareness of Pap testing and factors associated with intent to undergo Pap testing by level of sexual experience in unmarried university students in Korea: results from an online survey.

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    Kim, Hae Won

    2014-08-27

    Young and unmarried women have not been a target group for cervical cancer prevention in Korea. No previous studies have investigated the awareness of Pap testing, the intention to undergo Pap testing, or the factors associated with that intention, in this group of women. This information would be useful for an expansion in the focus of primary cervical cancer prevention. This study aimed to compare the awareness of Pap testing between groups of unmarried university students in Korea, and to investigate the factors associated with the intention to undergo Pap testing, by level of sexual experience. A total of 475 unmarried university students who had never undergone a Pap test completed a web-based survey. Differences in awareness of the importance of the Pap test, confidence in Pap testing, intention to undergo the test, attitudes, subjective norms, perceived control, stigma, and shame by level of sexual experience were analysed using independent t-tests. Associations between measurement variables and intention to undergo Pap testing were analysed using correlation analysis. Variables yielding significant associations (p multiple regression model of intention to undergo Pap testing. Most participants perceived that the need for regular Pap testing was less important (score, 77.76) than other methods of cervical cancer prevention. They were not confident that is was an effective method of cervical cancer prevention for themselves (score, 59.56). There were differences in confidence in Pap testing and in the factors associated with intention to undergo Pap testing between sexually experienced and sexually inexperienced students. Regardless of level of sexual experience, the subjective norm was the most important predictor of intention to undergo Pap testing. There was a low level of Pap screening awareness among the students. The factors associated with intention to undergo Pap testing differed by level of sexual experience. Social influence was an important

  15. siRNA GENE KNOCKDOWN OF PANCREATITIS-ASSOCIATED PROTEINS (PAP) IN RAT ACUTE PANCREATITIS

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    Lin, Yin-Yao; Viterbo, Domenico; Mueller, Cathy M.; Stanek, Albert E.; Smith-Norowitz, Tamar; Drew, Hazel; Wadgaonkar, Raj; Zenilman, Michael E.; Bluth, Martin H.

    2009-01-01

    Background The pancreatitis-associated protein (PAP) family of genes is induced in acute pancreatitis. We have previously demonstrated that antisense mediated gene knockdown of PAP in vivo decreased PAP gene expression and worsened pancreatitis. Here we investigated the effect of a more stable inhibition of PAP using siRNA gene knockdown in vitro and in an in vivo model of experimental pancreatitis. Methods In vitro, pancreatic acinar cell line, AR42J, was cultured with Dexamethasone and IL6 (Dex/IL6) to induce expression of PAP with subsequent transfection of siRNA into stimulated AR42J cells. In vivo, acute pancreatitis was induced in Sprague Dawley rats by retrograde infusion of 4% sodium taurocholate (NaT) into the pancreatic duct. PAP-specific siRNA was subsequently administrated, subcapsularly, after infusion of NaT. Controls included administration of scrambled siRNA (SC-RNA) or vehicle alone. After 24hr, pancreata were harvested and assessed for worsening pancreatitis by histopathology; serum was analyzed for PAP, amylase, lipase and cytokines protein levels. In both models endogenous PAP (PAPI, PAPII, PAPIII) gene expression was assessed at 24 hrs using real time RT-PCR. Results In vitro, PAP isoform (PAPI, PAPII, PAPIII) protein and mRNA levels were reduced (PAPI: 76%, PAPII: 8%, PAPIII: 24%) in cells treated with PAP siRNA when compared with control treatment. In vivo, induction of pancreatitis was confirmed by histopathology, serum amylase and lipase levels. PAP isoforms I and III expression were reduced (PAPI: 36%, PAPIII: 66%) in siRNA treated rats, compared with controls; there was no difference in PAP II isoform mRNA expression and serum protein levels. Serum amylase levels decreased after administration of siRNA compared with vehicle control (1583 ±312.U/L vs. 3013±317 U/L; p<0.05). In addition, serum lipase levels decreased after administration of PAP siRNA compared with vehicle control (162 ±42 U/L vs. 478±125 U/L; p<0.05). Serum levels of IL

  16. Changes in cervical cancer screening behavior for women attending Pap Test Week clinics

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    Poliquin V

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available V Poliquin,1 K Decker,2,3 AD Altman,1,2,4 R Lotocki1,2,4 1Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, University of Manitoba, Canada; 2CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada; 3Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, 4Division of Gynecologic Oncology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada Objective: This retrospective study of all women who accessed the 2006 Manitoba Pap Test Week clinics was designed to determine factors associated with inadequate cervical cancer screening and changes in cervical cancer screening behavior. Methods: Data were acquired using the CervixCheck Manitoba registry and an ancillary database of demographic information collected from clinic attendees. Results: The study included 1124 women. Of these, 53% (n = 598 were under-screened (no Pap test in the previous 2 years prior to accessing the clinics. Logistic regression analyses demonstrated that older age (odds ratio [OR] = 1.02, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01–1.03, no doctor (OR = 1.4, 95% CI 1.05–1.54, and living in Canada < 1 year (OR = 5.5, 95% CI 2.73–11.12 were associated with being under-screened prior to accessing the Pap Test Week clinics. Thirty-seven percent (n = 223 of under-screened women demonstrated improved screening status subsequent to the 2006 Pap Test Week (had a subsequent Papanicolaou [Pap] test performed within 2 years and these women were more likely to live in an urban setting (P = 0.003, be younger (P < 0.001, originate outside Canada (P = 0.006, have lived in Canada for less than 1 year (P = 0.006, and have had an abnormal Pap test result in 2006 (P < 0.001. Previously under-screened women were less likely to become adequately-screened subsequent to 2006 if they had a Pap test performed at a Pap Test Week clinic compared to having a Pap test performed elsewhere (37% versus 60%, P < 0.001. Conclusion: This study identified a subset of under

  17. The utilization and barriers of Pap smear among women with visual impairment.

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    Fang, Wen-Hui; Yen, Chia-Feng; Hu, Jung; Lin, Jin-Ding; Loh, Ching-Hui

    2016-04-12

    Many evidences illustrate that the Pap smear screening successfully reduces if the cervical cancer could be detected and treated sufficiently early. People with disability were higher comorbidity prevalence, and less likely to use preventive health care and health promotion activities. There were also to demonstrate that people with visual impairment has less access to appropriate healthcare services and is less likely to receive screening examinations. In Taiwan, there was no study to explore utilization of Pap smear, associated factors and use barriers about Pap smear screening test among women with visual impairment. The purpose is to explore the utilization and barriers of using Pap smear for women with visual impairment in Taiwan. To identify the barriers of women with visual from process of receiving Pap smear screening test. The cross-sectional study was conducted and the totally 316 participators were selected by stratified proportional and random sampling from 15 to 64 year old women with visual impairment who lived in Taipei County during December 2009 to January 2010. The data was been collected by phone interview and the interviewers were well trained before interview. The mean age was 47.1 years old and the highest percentage of disabled severity was mile (40.2 %). Totally, 66.5 % of participators were ever using Pap smear and 38.9 % used it during pass 1 year. Their first time to accept Pap smear was 38.8 year old. There was near 50 % of them not to be explained by professionals before accepting the Pap smear. For non-using cases, the top two percentage of barriers were "feel still younger" (22.3 %), the second was "there's no sexual experience" (21.4 %). We found the gynecology experiences was key factor for women with visual impairment to use Pap smear, especially the experiences was during 1 year (OR = 4). Associated factors and barriers to receive Pap smear screening test for women with visual impairment can be addressed through interventions

  18. Pap Smear Abnormalities in Women Admitted to a Tertiary Health Center in Southeast Turkey

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    Alev Ozer

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To analyze the cervical cytological abnormalities which are detected in women undergoing Pap screening in a tertiary health care center within Siirt, a southeastern province of Turkey. Material and Method: A total of 3000 women who underwent Pap screening at the study center between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2009 were recruited for the study. The women who were diagnosed with benign epithelial changes, infectious alterations, as well as atypical squamous cells with undetermined significance (ASC-US, atypical squamous cells of high significance (ASC-H, and low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL were included. Results: Benign epithelial alterations, infectious changes, ASCUS, ASC-H, and LSIL were detected in 83.7%, 15.3%, 0.8%, 0.1% and 0.1% of the Pap smears respectively. A significant correlation was found between the patient age and the histopathological alterations in the Pap smears (r=0.072, p=0.001. Although no correlation could be detected between gravidity and Pap smear results (r=0.033, p=0.067, a significant correlation existed between parity and the histopathological findings within the Pap smears (r=0.051, p=0.005. Interestingly, the Pap smear results were found to be unrelated to socioeconomic status (r=0.088, p=0.168, education level (r=0.048, p=0.257, and smoking habit (r=0.086, p=0.077. Discussion: The present study has reported a value of 1.0% for the overall prevalence of cervical cytological abnormalities, which is much lower than in western countries. Thus, rather than being dependent on the data reported by clinical studies that have been conducted in western countries, Turkish health care policy should be based on the data obtained from national studies.

  19. [ASC-US Pap Smear follow-up in a French department in 2077].

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    Giuria, Clara; Guiheneuc, Elise; Coimet, Flore; Caillez, Eric; Baron, Céline

    2015-01-01

    In the event of an ASC-US Pap smear, colposcopy, 6-month Pap smear or screening for oncogenic HPV are recommended as first-line testing options by the French National Authority for Health -HAS. The primary objective of this study was to determine the preferred option chosen by general practitioners and to assess their follow-up care. The Maine-et-Loire cancer screening database was used to extract 283 files of women, aged 25 to 65, in whom ASC-US Pap smear was performed by their general practitioners (GPs) in 2011. 265 women (93.6%) underwent their first test (C1]. GPs performed 64.5% of tests: 93% of which were Pap smears, 5.3% were HPV tests and 1.7% were Pap smears combined with HPV tests. 164 patients (58%) received comprehensive follow-up, i.e 2 tests after the first ASC-US pap smear or a therapeutic intervention after an abnormal Cl. 14 patients were lost to follow-up. Follow-up rate was 57.6% in the case of a normal C1 and 83.3% in the case of an abnormal C1. 79.2% of first tests were normal and a total of 16 high-grade lesions were diagnosed (5.7%). The fact that liquid-based Pap smears were rarely used might explain why HPV testing is rarely prescribed. The rarity of ASC-US anomalies, the variable potential for progression and the possibility to choose between several follow-up options proved to be obstacles for GPs to apply guidelines. The poor coordination . between gynaecologists and GPs, the difficulties in planning follow-up and the lack of precision of test reports may limit the efficacy of monitoring.

  20. Awareness and uptake of the Pap smear among market women in Lagos, Nigeria

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    Wright, Kikelomo O.; Faseru, Babalola; Kuyinu, Yetunde A.; Faduyile, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    Our study evaluates the effect of an educational programme on awareness and uptake of the cervical cancer screening test (Pap smear) by women in a model market in Lagos, Nigeria. This was a quasi-experimental study using a multistage sampling technique. A total of 350 women were divided into two groups. A baseline survey on awareness of the Pap test and screening practices was carried out using pre-tested, interviewer administered, structured questionnaires. Participants in the intervention group received sessions of community based health information on cervical cancer screening tests while participants in the control group received health information on hypertension. Subsequently, participants in both groups were reassessed to evaluate the effect of the educational programme on the Pap test and cervical screening uptake. Data were analysed with the Epi-info version 6.04. Awareness about the Pap test was low at baseline; only 6.9% and 12.0% of participants in the intervention and control groups, respectively, had heard of Pap smears. Furthermore, less than 10% had correct information on the use of the Pap test. Post-intervention, there was a significant and proportional increase in the knowledge of the Pap test in the intervention group (P<0.05). However, uptake of the test was quite low in the intervention and control groups both pre- and post-intervention and there was no significant change in uptake. We concluded that essential schemes are required to enhance access to screening, as knowledge alone is insufficient to promote acceptance and use of cervical cytological screening tests. PMID:28299055