WorldWideScience

Sample records for surrounding space environment

  1. Metrizamide demonstration of the subarachnoid space surrounding the Gasserian ganglion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christmann, D.; Babin, E.

    1980-05-01

    The chance opacification of the subarachnoid space surrounding the Gasserian ganglion, observed during metrizamide basal cisternography, is reported. This is compared to similar demonstrations of the optic subarachnoid space. Such infrequently observed images should be known because they may be related to the occurrence of trigeminal neuralgia.

  2. "Tilt" in color space: Hue changes induced by chromatic surrounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klauke, Susanne; Wachtler, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The perceived color of a chromatic stimulus is influenced by the chromaticity of its surround. To investigate these influences along the dimension of hue, we measured hue changes induced in stimuli of different hues by isoluminant chromatic surrounds. Generally, induced hue changes were directed in color space away from the hue of the inducing surround and depended on the magnitude on the hue difference between stimulus and surround. With increasing difference in hue between stimulus and surround, induced hue changes increased up to a maximum and then decreased for larger differences. This qualitative pattern was similar for different inducers, but quantitatively, induction was weaker along some directions in cone-opponent color space than along other directions. The strongest induction effects were found along an oblique, blue-yellow axis that corresponds to the daylight axis. The overall pattern of the induction effect shows similarities to the well-known tilt effect, where shifts in perceived angle of oriented stimuli are induced by oriented surrounds. This suggests analogous neural representations and similar mechanisms of contextual processing for different visual features such as orientation and color.

  3. Space Environment Modeling

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes presentation materials and outputs from operational space environment models produced by the NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC) and...

  4. Research on Two Types of Buffer Zone Impact on Surrounding Office Space Environment in Winter in Cold Climate Zone-a Fieldwork in Architectural Design Institute Building of Tsinghua University, Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YeHao Song; JunJie Li; Ning Zhu; JiaLiang Wang; ShiMeng Hao

    2014-01-01

    Building buffer zone space is not only one of essential approaches for better mental quality of interior building space, but also an important factor that may influence interior thermal comfort and energy consumption. This study aims to analyze regulative advantages of buffer zone to the surrounding functional spaces. Based on a fieldwork test in a typical office building in cold climate zone in Beijing, China, the monitor data show interior physical performance in the Winter. The research selects two types of different buffer zones in the same building. One is a south⁃faced greenhouse which has large dimension with plenty of vegetation, and the other is a simple atrium in the middle of five floor building with mount of skylights. The factors and their influence to surrounding functional spaces and the whole building are found out from the comparisons of collected data by floor to floor monitor test on both buffer zones at the same time. The comparisons of two types of buffer zones conclude that the greenhouse is more effective to air quality regulation but not so clearly well⁃performed to thermal buffering as expected due to the dominate active central heating in the Winter. This fieldwork test results for building performance can be helpful for both architects and engineers in the early phase of sustainable design.

  5. On the environment surrounding close-in exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidotto, A. A.; Fares, R.; Jardine, M.; Moutou, C.; Donati, J.-F.

    2015-06-01

    Exoplanets in extremely close-in orbits are immersed in a local interplanetary medium (i.e. the stellar wind) much denser than the local conditions encountered around the Solar system planets. The environment surrounding these exoplanets also differs in terms of dynamics (slower stellar winds, but higher Keplerian velocities) and ambient magnetic fields (likely higher for host stars more active than the Sun). Here, we quantitatively investigate the nature of the interplanetary media surrounding the hot Jupiters HD 46375b, HD 73256b, HD 102195b, HD 130322b and HD 179949b. We simulate the three-dimensional winds of their host stars, in which we directly incorporate their observed surface magnetic fields. With that, we derive mass-loss rates (1.9-8.0 × 10-13 M⊙ yr-1) and the wind properties at the position of the hot Jupiters' orbits (temperature, velocity, magnetic field intensity and pressure). We show that these exoplanets' orbits are supermagnetosonic, indicating that bow shocks are formed surrounding these planets. Assuming planetary magnetic fields similar to Jupiter's, we estimate planetary magnetospheric sizes of 4.1-5.6 planetary radii. We also derive the exoplanetary radio emission released in the dissipation of the stellar wind energy. We find radio fluxes ranging from 0.02 to 0.13 mJy, which are challenging to be observed with present-day technology, but could be detectable with future higher sensitivity arrays (e.g. Square Kilometre Array). Radio emission from systems having closer hot Jupiters, such as from τ Boo b or HD 189733b, or from nearby planetary systems orbiting young stars, are likely to have higher radio fluxes, presenting better prospects for detecting exoplanetary radio emission.

  6. On the environment surrounding close-in exoplanets

    CERN Document Server

    Vidotto, A A; Jardine, M; Moutou, C; Donati, J -F

    2015-01-01

    Exoplanets in extremely close-in orbits are immersed in a local interplanetary medium (i.e., the stellar wind) much denser than the local conditions encountered around the solar system planets. The environment surrounding these exoplanets also differs in terms of dynamics (slower stellar winds, but higher Keplerian velocities) and ambient magnetic fields (likely higher for host stars more active than the Sun). Here, we quantitatively investigate the nature of the interplanetary media surrounding the hot Jupiters HD46375b, HD73256b, HD102195b, HD130322b, HD179949b. We simulate the three-dimensional winds of their host stars, in which we directly incorporate their observed surface magnetic fields. With that, we derive mass-loss rates (1.9 to 8.0 $\\times 10^{-13} M_{\\odot}$/yr) and the wind properties at the position of the hot-Jupiters' orbits (temperature, velocity, magnetic field intensity and pressure). We show that these exoplanets' orbits are super-magnetosonic, indicating that bow shocks are formed surrou...

  7. Space Environment Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, William J.

    1984-04-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Space Environment Laboratory (SEL), along with several other NOAA programs, is slated for a major budget reduction in FY 1985, a reduction which would have a serious impact upon the space environment services now provided by the laboratory.SEL, jointly with the U.S. Air Force's Air Weather Service, operates the Space Environment Services Center (SESC) in Boulder, Colorado. SESC acquires, in near real-time, world-wide data on solar activity, on the terrestrial magnetic field, and on energetic particles at geostationary and polar orbiting satellite altitudes. Data are available to SESC from solar observatories operated by both the Air Force and a number of nongovernment organizations, the NOAA geostationary and polar orbiting satellites, and a U.S.-Canadian magnetometer network.

  8. Representing the egocentric auditory space: relationships of surrounding region concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Marcella C; Hermann, Thomas; Schack, Thomas; Bläsing, Bettina

    2013-03-01

    We investigated the representation of azimuthal directions of sound sources under two different conditions. In the first experiment, we examined the participants' mental representation of sound source directions via similarity judgments. Auditory stimuli originating from sixteen loudspeakers positioned equidistantly around the participant were presented in pairs, with the first stimulus serving as the anchor, and thereby providing the context for the second stimulus. For each pair of stimuli, participants had to rate the sound source directions as either similar or dissimilar. In the second experiment, the same participants categorized single sound source directions using verbal direction labels (front, back, left, right, and combinations of any two of these). In both experiments, the directions within the front and back regions were more distinctively categorized than those on the sides, and the sides' categories included more directions than those of the front or back. Furthermore, we found evidence that the left-right decision comprises the basic differentiation of the surrounding regions. These findings illustrate what seem to be central features of the representation of directions in auditory space.

  9. Isoperimetric inequalities in surround system and space science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JiaJin Wen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract By means of the algebraic, analysis, convex geometry, computer, and inequality theories we establish the following isoperimetric inequality in the centered 2-surround system S ( 2 { P , Γ , l } $S^{(2} \\{P,\\varGamma ,l \\}$ : ( 1 | Γ | ∮ Γ r ¯ P p 1 / p ⩽ | Γ | 4 π sin l π | Γ | [ csc l π | Γ | + cot 2 l π | Γ | ln ( tan l π | Γ | + sec l π | Γ | ] , ∀ p ⩽ − 2 . $$\\begin{aligned}& \\biggl(\\frac{1}{|\\varGamma |} \\oint_{\\varGamma }\\bar{r}_{P}^{p} \\biggr^{1/p}\\leqslant\\frac{|\\varGamma |}{4\\pi}\\sin\\frac{l\\pi}{|\\varGamma |} \\biggl[ \\csc \\frac{l\\pi}{|\\varGamma |}+\\cot^{2} \\frac{l\\pi}{|\\varGamma |} \\ln \\biggl(\\tan \\frac{l\\pi}{|\\varGamma |}+\\sec\\frac{l\\pi}{|\\varGamma |} \\biggr \\biggr], \\\\& \\quad \\forall p\\leqslant -2. \\end{aligned}$$ As an application of the inequality in space science, we obtain the best lower bounds of the mean λ-gravity norm ∥ F λ ( Γ , P ∥ ‾ $\\overline{\\Vert {\\mathbf{F}}_{\\lambda} ( \\varGamma ,P \\Vert }$ as follows: ∥ F λ ( Γ , P ∥ ‾ ≜ 1 | Γ | ∮ Γ 1 ∥ A − P ∥ λ ⩾ ( 2 π | Γ | λ , ∀ λ ⩾ 2 . $$\\overline{\\bigl\\Vert {\\mathbf{F}}_{\\lambda} ( \\varGamma ,P \\bigr\\Vert } \\triangleq\\frac{1}{|\\varGamma |} \\oint_{\\varGamma }\\frac{1}{\\|A-P\\|^{\\lambda }}\\geqslant \\biggl(\\frac{2\\pi}{|\\varGamma |} \\biggr^{\\lambda},\\quad \\forall \\lambda\\geqslant2. $$

  10. Development of Space Environment Research in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GONG Jiancun; XUE Bingsen; HUANG Jianguo; SHI Liqin

    2006-01-01

    Abstract This paper presents the recent research progress on space environment in China. The space environment here includes space environment models, forecast methodology and space environment effects on spacecrafts. Finally the development trends of China's space environment research are discussed.

  11. Space Flight Ionizing Radiation Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, Steve

    2017-01-01

    The space-flight ionizing radiation (IR) environment is dominated by very high-kinetic energy-charged particles with relatively smaller contributions from X-rays and gamma rays. The Earth's surface IR environment is not dominated by the natural radioisotope decay processes. Dr. Steven Koontz's lecture will provide a solid foundation in the basic engineering physics of space radiation environments, beginning with the space radiation environment on the International Space Station and moving outward through the Van Allen belts to cislunar space. The benefits and limitations of radiation shielding materials will also be summarized.

  12. Mercury's interior, surface, and surrounding environment latest discoveries

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, Pamela Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    This SpringerBrief details the MESSENGER Mission, the findings of which present challenges to widely held conventional views and remaining mysteries surrounding the planet. The work answers the question of why Mercury is so dense, and the implications from geochemical data on its planetary formation. It summarizes imaging and compositional data from the terrestrial planet surface processes and explains the geologic history of Mercury.  It also discusses the lack of southern hemisphere coverage. Our understanding of the planet Mercury has been in a transitional phase over the decades since Mariner 10. The influx of new data from the NASA MESSENGER Mission since it was inserted into the orbit of Mercury in March of 2011 has greatly accelerated that shift. The combined compositional data of relatively high volatiles (S, K), relatively low refractories (Al, Ca), and low crustal iron, combined with an active, partially molten iron rich core, has major implications for Mercury and Solar System formation. From a s...

  13. Space station particulate contamination environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, E. R.; Clifton, K. S.

    1988-01-01

    The origin of particulate contamination on the Space Station will mostly be from pre-launch operations. The adherence and subsequent release of these particles during space flight are discussed. Particle size, release velocity, and release direction are important in determining particle behavior in the vicinity of the vehicle. The particulate environment at the principal science instrument locations is compared to the space shuttle bay environment. Recommendations for possibly decreasing the particulate contamination are presented.

  14. The space radiation environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbins, D.E.

    1997-04-30

    There are three primary sources of space radiation: galactic cosmic rays (GCR), trapped belt radiation, and solar particle events (SPE). All are composed of ions, the nuclei of atoms. Their energies range from a few MeV u{sup -1} to over a GeV u{sup -1}. These ions can fragment when they interact with spacecraft materials and produce energetic neutrons and ions of lower atomic mass. Absorbed dose rates inside a typical spacecraft (like the Space Shuttle) in a low inclination (28.5 degrees) orbit range between 0.05 and 2 mGy d{sup -1} depending on the altitude and flight inclination (angle of orbit with the equator). The quality factor of radiation in orbit depends on the relative contributions of trapped belt radiation and GCR, and the dose rate varies both with orbital altitude and inclination. The corresponding equivalent dose rate ranges between 0.1 and 4 mSv d{sup -1}. In high inclination orbits, like that of the Mir Space Station and as is planned for the International Space Station, blood-forming organ (BFO) equivalent dose rates as high as 1.5 mSv d{sup -1}. Thus, on a 1 y mission, a crew member could obtain a total dose of 0.55 Sv. Maximum equivalent dose rates measured in high altitude passes through the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) were 10 mSv h{sup -1}. For an interplanetary space mission (e.g., to Mars) annual doses from GCR alone range between 150 mSv y{sup -1} at solar maximum and 580 mSv y{sup -1} at solar minimum. Large SPE, like the October 1989 series, are more apt to occur in the years around solar maximum. In free space, such an event could contribute another 300 mSv, assuming that a warning system and safe haven can be effectively used with operational procedures to minimize crew exposures. Thus, the total dose for a 3 y mission to Mars could exceed 2 Sv.

  15. Targeting Alzheimer's disease by investigating previously unexplored chemical space surrounding the cholinesterase inhibitor donepezil

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Greunen, DG

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A series of twenty seven acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, as potential agents for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, were designed and synthesised based upon previously unexplored chemical space surrounding the molecular skeleton of the drug...

  16. Immersive Environments: Using Flow and Sound to Blur Inhabitant and Surroundings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laverty, Luke

    ---in the form of a live-work vertical artist commune in New York City---the antithesis of intimate, human architectural environments---coupled with the design of a sound sensory experiential walk through the surrounding blurred neighborhood boundaries in the attempt to exploit and create an environment one becomes absorbed within and feels comfortable enough with which to experience flow. To do so, the characteristics of flow lead to the capturing of the senses, interaction, and flexibility. This thesis will explore and exploit how one perceives, interacts with, and becomes attached to when confronted with a space or artifact; reintroducing the humanity into contemporary architecture.

  17. Maximum geometrical hindrance to diffusion in brain extracellular space surrounding uniformly spaced convex cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, L; Nicholson, C

    2004-07-07

    Brain extracellular space (ECS) constitutes a porous medium in which diffusion is subject to hindrance, described by tortuosity, lambda = (D/D*)1/2, where D is the free diffusion coefficient and D* is the effective diffusion coefficient in brain. Experiments show that lambda is typically 1.6 in normal brain tissue although variations occur in specialized brain regions. In contrast, different theoretical models of cellular assemblies give ambiguous results: they either predict lambda-values similar to experimental data or indicate values of about 1.2. Here we constructed three different ECS geometries involving tens of thousands of cells and performed Monte Carlo simulation of 3-D diffusion. We conclude that the geometrical hindrance in the ECS surrounding uniformly spaced convex cells is independent of the cell shape and only depends on the volume fraction alpha (the ratio of the ECS volume to the whole tissue volume). This dependence can be described by the relation lambda = ((3-alpha)/2)1/2, indicating that the geometrical hindrance in such ECS cannot account for lambda > 1.225. Reasons for the discrepancy between the theoretical and experimental tortuosity values are discussed.

  18. Space Debris Environment Remediation Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.; Klinkrad, Heiner

    2009-01-01

    Long-term projections of the space debris environment indicate that even drastic measures, such as an immediate, complete halt of launch and release activities, will not result in a stable environment of man-made space objects. Collision events between already existing space hardware will within a few decades start to dominate the debris population, and result in a net increase of the space debris population, also in size regimes which may cause further catastrophic collisions. Such a collisional cascading will ultimately lead to a run-away situation ("Kessler syndrome"), with no further possibility of human intervention. The International Academy of Astronautics (IAA) has been investigating the status and the stability of the space debris environment in several studies by first looking into space traffic management possibilities and then investigating means of mitigating the creation of space debris. In an ongoing activity, an IAA study group looks at ways of active space debris environment remediation. In contrast to the former mitigation study, the current activity concentrates on the active removal of small and large objects, such as defunct spacecraft, orbital stages, and mission-related objects, which serve as a latent mass reservoir that fuels initial catastrophic collisions and later collisional cascading. The paper will outline different mass removal concepts, e.g. based on directed energy, tethers (momentum exchange or electrodynamic), aerodynamic drag augmentation, solar sails, auxiliary propulsion units, retarding surfaces, or on-orbit capture. Apart from physical principles of the proposed concepts, their applicability to different orbital regimes, and their effectiveness concerning mass removal efficiency will be analyzed. The IAA activity on space debris environment remediation is a truly international project which involves more than 23 contributing authors from 9 different nations.

  19. Space Ethics and Protection of the Space Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Mark

    2002-01-01

    The construction of the International Space Station in low Earth orbit and the formulation of plans to search for life on Mars - one day by means of manned missions - indicate that mankind is intent on making the space environment part of its domain. Publicity surrounding space tourism, in-space `burials' and the sale of lunar `real estate' suggests that, some time in the 21st century, the space environment will become an extraterrestrial extension of our current business and domestic environment. This prompts the question of our collective attitude towards the space environment and the degree to which we should regulate its use and protect it for future generations. What, indeed, are the ethical considerations of space exploration and development? Ethics can be defined as "the philosophical study of the moral value of human conduct, and of the rules or principles that ought to govern it". More practically, it represents "an approved code of behaviour" adopted, for example, by a group or profession. If a set of ethics is to be developed for space, it is important that what we refer to as the `space community', or `space profession', is intimately involved. Indeed, if it is not, the profession risks having the job done for it, for example by politicians and members of the general public, who for their own reasons may wish to place restrictions on space development, or ban it altogether. The terrestrial nuclear power industry, for example, has already suffered this fate, while widespread ignorance of the subject has led to a moratorium on the use of RTGs in spacecraft. However, there is a danger in the discussion of ethics that consideration is confined to the philosophical aspects, thus excusing those involved from providing practical solutions to the problems that emerge. The fact that mankind has already affected, and arguably damaged, the space environment transports the discussion beyond the philosophical realm. This paper offers a pragmatic analysis of one

  20. Space Weather, Environment and Societies

    CERN Document Server

    Lilensten, Jean

    2006-01-01

    Our planet exists within a space environment affected by constantly changing solar atmosphere producing cosmic particles and electromagnetic waves. This "space weather" profoundly influences the performance of our technology because we primarily use two means for transmitting information and energy; namely, electromagnetic waves and electricity. On an everyday basis, we have developed methods to cope with the normal conditions. However, the sun remains a fiery star whose 'angry' outbursts can potentially destroy spacecrafts, kill astronauts, melt electricity transformers, stop trains, and generally wreak havoc with human activities. Space Weather is the developing field within astronomy that aims at predicting the sun’s violent activity and minimizing the impacts on our daily lives. Space Weather, Environment, and Societies explains why our technological societies are so dependent on solar activity and how the Sun disturbs the transmission of information and energy. Footnotes expand specific points and the ...

  1. The infrared and molecular environment surrounding the Wolf-Rayet star WR130

    CERN Document Server

    Cichowolski, S; Pineault, S; Noriega-Crespo, A; Arnal, E M; Flagey, N

    2015-01-01

    We present a study of the molecular CO gas and mid/far infrared radiation arising from the environment surrounding the Wolf-Rayet (W-R) star 130. We use the multi-wavelength data to analyze the properties of the dense gas and dust, and its possible spatial correlation with that of Young Stellar Objects (YSOs). We use CO J=1-0 data from the FCRAO survey as tracer of the molecular gas, and mid/far infrared data from the recent WISE and Herschel space surveys to study the dust continuum radiation and to identify a population of associated candidate YSOs. The spatial distribution of the molecular gas shows a ring-like structure very similar to that observed in the HI gas, and over the same velocity interval. The relative spatial distribution of the HI and CO components is consistent with a photo-dissociation region. We have identified and characterized four main and distinct molecular clouds that create this structure. Cold dust is coincident with the dense gas shown in the CO measurements. We have found several ...

  2. Life activities in space environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Akihisa; Ohnishi, Ken; Ohnishi, Takeo [Nara Medical Univ., Kashihara (Japan)

    1999-03-01

    This review summarized biological life activities in space environment for investigating which many experiments had been done in spacecraft's. The space is characterized by a good view, high vacuum, scarce gravity and cosmic ray of which exposure dose in the craft at 4,000 km height is around 1,000 times higher than the dose on the ground. In humans, reductions of bone content, muscle strength, immune function are known as well as space intoxication and eye-flash. Authors carried out 17 experiments in American and Russian space stations from 1992. The experiments concerned DNA breakage by cosmic ray where they first visualized the DNA damage by the ray with autoradiographic method with [{sup 3}H]dATP in HMV1 cells; cell differentiation and morphogenesis in the space with the use of radio-sensitive cellular slime mold of {gamma}s13 strain; influences of the scarce gravity on the repair of broken artificially prepared double-strand DNA and on the induced-mutation in E. coli and yeast; and stress proteins which were shown to be accumulated in the space. The space experiments are concluded to be useful for radiation biology further in future. (K.H.)

  3. Thoughts in space: the impact of environmental surround on cognitive processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Jennifer A; Duffie, Vanessa; Vishton, Peter M

    2015-09-01

    The embodied cognition perspective has provided a formalization of the idea that the motor state is a characteristic of being that permeates all of human processing. We review this perspective and experimental evidence supporting its claim. It is further considered that the motor behaving human moves within various spaces, each affording different actions. To this end, it is proposed that the environmental surround is a critical variable in the embodied cognition perspective. Thoughts, inasmuch as they may be grounded in simulation of motor-behavioural responses, require time but also space. We suggest that these time-space considerations occur within a proposed concept of the potentiated state.

  4. Camouflaging in a complex environment--octopuses use specific features of their surroundings for background matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josef, Noam; Amodio, Piero; Fiorito, Graziano; Shashar, Nadav

    2012-01-01

    Living under intense predation pressure, octopuses evolved an effective and impressive camouflaging ability that exploits features of their surroundings to enable them to "blend in." To achieve such background matching, an animal may use general resemblance and reproduce characteristics of its entire surroundings, or it may imitate a specific object in its immediate environment. Using image analysis algorithms, we examined correlations between octopuses and their backgrounds. Field experiments show that when camouflaging, Octopus cyanea and O. vulgaris base their body patterns on selected features of nearby objects rather than attempting to match a large field of view. Such an approach enables the octopus to camouflage in partly occluded environments and to solve the problem of differences in appearance as a function of the viewing inclination of the observer.

  5. Camouflaging in a complex environment--octopuses use specific features of their surroundings for background matching.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noam Josef

    Full Text Available Living under intense predation pressure, octopuses evolved an effective and impressive camouflaging ability that exploits features of their surroundings to enable them to "blend in." To achieve such background matching, an animal may use general resemblance and reproduce characteristics of its entire surroundings, or it may imitate a specific object in its immediate environment. Using image analysis algorithms, we examined correlations between octopuses and their backgrounds. Field experiments show that when camouflaging, Octopus cyanea and O. vulgaris base their body patterns on selected features of nearby objects rather than attempting to match a large field of view. Such an approach enables the octopus to camouflage in partly occluded environments and to solve the problem of differences in appearance as a function of the viewing inclination of the observer.

  6. Space Environment Deteation of Chinese Meteorological Satellites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Ying; WANG Shijin; ZHU Guangwu; LIANG Jinbao

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the space environment detection of Chinese geosynchronous and sun-synchronous meteorological satellites and gives a short perspective of space environment observations on board meteorological satellites.

  7. Teamwork in high-risk environments analogous to space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanki, Barbara G.

    1990-01-01

    Mountaineering expeditions combine a number of factors which make them potentially good analogs to the planetary exploration facet of long-duration space missions. A study of mountain climbing teams was conducted in order to evaluate the usefulness of the environment as a space analog and to specifically identify the factors and issues surrounding teamwork and 'successful' team performance in two mountaineering environments. This paper focuses on social/organizational factors, including team size and structure, leadership styles and authority structure which were found in the sample of 22 climb teams (122 individuals). The second major issue discussed is the construction of a valid performance measure in this high-risk environment.

  8. Space Environment Testing of Photovoltaic Array Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Brandon; Schneider, Todd A.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Wright, Kenneth H.

    2015-01-01

    To successfully operate a photovoltaic (PV) array system in space requires planning and testing to account for the effects of the space environment. It is critical to understand space environment interactions not only on the PV components, but also the array substrate materials, wiring harnesses, connectors, and protection circuitry.

  9. The connection between AGN-driven dusty outflows and the surrounding environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, W.; Fabian, A. C.

    2016-04-01

    Significant reservoirs of cool gas are observed in the circumgalactic medium (CGM) surrounding galaxies. The CGM is also found to contain substantial amounts of metals and dust, which require some transport mechanism. We consider AGN (active galactic nucleus) feedback-driven outflows based on radiation pressure on dust. Dusty gas is ejected when the central luminosity exceeds the effective Eddington luminosity for dust. We obtain that a higher dust-to-gas ratio leads to a lower critical luminosity, implying that the more dusty gas is more easily expelled. Dusty outflows can reach large radii with a range of velocities (depending on the outflowing shell configuration and the ambient density distribution) and may account for the observed CGM gas. In our picture, dust is required in order to drive AGN feedback, and the preferential expulsion of dusty gas in the outflows may naturally explain the presence of dust in the CGM. On the other hand, the most powerful AGN outflow events can potentially drive gas out of the local galaxy group. We further discuss the effects of radiation pressure of the central AGN on satellite galaxies. AGN radiative feedback may therefore have a significant impact on the evolution of the whole surrounding environment.

  10. Uranium in the Surrounding of San Marcos-Sacramento River Environment (Chihuahua, Mexico)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rentería-Villalobos, Marusia; Cortés, Manuel Reyes; Mantero, Juan; Manjón, Guillermo; García-Tenorio, Rafael; Herrera, Eduardo; Montero-Cabrera, Maria Elena

    2012-01-01

    The main interest of this study is to assess whether uranium deposits located in the San Marcos outcrops (NW of Chihuahua City, Mexico) could be considered as a source of U-isotopes in its surrounding environment. Uranium activity concentrations were determined in biota, ground, and surface water by either alpha or liquid scintillation spectrometries. Major ions were analyzed by ICP-OES in surface water and its suspended matter. For determining uranium activity in biota, samples were divided in parts. The results have shown a possible lixiviation and infiltration of uranium from geological substrate into the ground and surface water, and consequently, a transfer to biota. Calculated annual effective doses by ingestion suggest that U-isotopes in biota could not negligibly contribute to the neighboring population dose. By all these considerations, it is concluded that in this zone there is natural enhancement of uranium in all environmental samples analyzed in the present work. PMID:22536148

  11. Uranium in the Surrounding of San Marcos-Sacramento River Environment (Chihuahua, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marusia Rentería-Villalobos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The main interest of this study is to assess whether uranium deposits located in the San Marcos outcrops (NW of Chihuahua City, Mexico could be considered as a source of U-isotopes in its surrounding environment. Uranium activity concentrations were determined in biota, ground, and surface water by either alpha or liquid scintillation spectrometries. Major ions were analyzed by ICP-OES in surface water and its suspended matter. For determining uranium activity in biota, samples were divided in parts. The results have shown a possible lixiviation and infiltration of uranium from geological substrate into the ground and surface water, and consequently, a transfer to biota. Calculated annual effective doses by ingestion suggest that U-isotopes in biota could not negligibly contribute to the neighboring population dose. By all these considerations, it is concluded that in this zone there is natural enhancement of uranium in all environmental samples analyzed in the present work.

  12. Uranium in the surrounding of San Marcos-Sacramento River environment (Chihuahua, Mexico).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rentería-Villalobos, Marusia; Cortés, Manuel Reyes; Mantero, Juan; Manjón, Guillermo; García-Tenorio, Rafael; Herrera, Eduardo; Montero-Cabrera, Maria Elena

    2012-01-01

    The main interest of this study is to assess whether uranium deposits located in the San Marcos outcrops (NW of Chihuahua City, Mexico) could be considered as a source of U-isotopes in its surrounding environment. Uranium activity concentrations were determined in biota, ground, and surface water by either alpha or liquid scintillation spectrometries. Major ions were analyzed by ICP-OES in surface water and its suspended matter. For determining uranium activity in biota, samples were divided in parts. The results have shown a possible lixiviation and infiltration of uranium from geological substrate into the ground and surface water, and consequently, a transfer to biota. Calculated annual effective doses by ingestion suggest that U-isotopes in biota could not negligibly contribute to the neighboring population dose. By all these considerations, it is concluded that in this zone there is natural enhancement of uranium in all environmental samples analyzed in the present work.

  13. ONERA's contribution to space environment standardization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maget, Vincent; Ecoffet, Robert; Roussel, Jean-Francois

    Ever since its creation in 1967, the Space Environment Department (DESP) at ONERA's objective has been to evaluate the environmental conditions of space missions and prevent the damage they may cause. The DESP studies and models the different components of the space mission environment (mainly charged particles) and evaluates the associated risks with on-board experiments and simulations on the ground. As the reference expert in space environment for both the French Space Agency and European space industries, the DESP has been named as the French representative in the ISO TC20 / SC14 / WG4 working group. In parallel to this contribution, the DESP is also involved in WG1 (Design engineering and production) and WG6 (Materials and Processes),as well as in the European Cooperation for Space Standardization (ECSS) committee dedicated to Space Environment standards (ECSS-10.04C). The purpose of this presentation is, first, to detail the ONERA’s contributions to space environment standardizations (its role as well as the standards developed at ONERA). In a second step, I shall also present some on-going works such as data assimilation and specifications model for other planets (Jupiter and Saturn) conducted at ONERA, in order to prepare the next generation standards and anticipate Space community needs.

  14. Agent-Based Context Consistency Management in Smart Space Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jih, Wan-Rong; Hsu, Jane Yung-Jen; Chang, Han-Wen

    Context-aware systems in smart space environments must be aware of the context of their surroundings and adapt to changes in highly dynamic environments. Data management of contextual information is different from traditional approaches because the contextual information is dynamic, transient, and fallible in nature. Consequently, the capability to detect context inconsistency and maintain consistent contextual information are two key issues for context management. We propose an ontology-based model for representing, deducing, and managing consistent contextual information. In addition, we use ontology reasoning to detect and resolve context inconsistency problems, which will be described in a Smart Alarm Clock scenario.

  15. Heat Dissipation from Suspended Carbon Nanotubes to their Surrounding Gas Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, I. Kai; Pettes, Michael T.; Aykol, Mehmet; Shi, Li; Cronin, Stephen

    2011-03-01

    The assistance of gas molecules to dissipate heat in 5- μ m-long, electrical heated suspended carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is observed by comparing the G band Raman phonon temperature profiles measured in different gas environments and in vacuum. The measurement results show that 50-60% of the heat generated in the CNT is carried away by its surrounding gas molecules. By analyzing the temperature profiles investigated in different gases, the thermal boundary conductance (TBC) between the gas molecules and the CNT can also be extracted. We find the TBC to be higher in carbon dioxide than in nitrogen, argon and helium. Moreover, we report another optical method to explore the heat spreading behavior on a longer suspended CNTs in air, in which one laser is used as a heat source while another laser is used as a local temperature probe. A fin-shape thermal transport model is applied to fit the exponentially decaying temperature profiles measured away from the heat source. These results yield a heat decay length and TBC for air to be around 6.5 μ m and 3 × 105 W/ m 2 K, respectively. I Kai Hsu et al. Journal of Applied Physics 2010, 108, (084307).

  16. Air pollution in surrounding environment of Sasa tailing dam – ambient air, plant dust and ceiling dust

    OpenAIRE

    Krstev, Boris; Krstev, Aleksandar; Golomeov, Blagoj; Golomeova, Mirjana; Zendelska, Afrodita; Danevski, Tome; Fidancev, Boris

    2013-01-01

    The current and recent activities in the lead-zinc Sasa mine or copper Bucim mine and flotation of galena and sphalerite or chalcopyrite, producing metals for market, are reason for possible troubles from tailing dam-pond and surrounding river, ambient air and plant or ceiling dust. This appearance is significant for the surrounding environment, but legislative and ecological law directive limited the quantity of these. In this paper will be present results of investigations from plant ...

  17. Application of phase space reconstruction and v-SVR algorithm in predicting displacement of underground engineering surrounding rock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Chao; CHEN Yi-feng; YU Zhi-xiong; YANG Kun

    2006-01-01

    A new method for predicting the trend of displacement evolution of surrounding rock was presented in this paper. According to the nonlinear characteristics of displacement time series of underground engineering surrounding rock, based on phase space reconstruction theory and the powerful nonlinear mapping ability of support vector machines, the information offered by the time series datum sets was fully exploited and the non-linearity of the displacement evolution system of surrounding rock was well described.The example suggests that the methods based on phase space reconstruction and modified v-SVR algorithm are very accurate, and the study can help to build the displacement forecast system to analyze the stability of underground engineering surrounding rock.

  18. Space Environment and Effects System (SEES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashio, Nana; Obara, Takahiro; Matsumoto, Haruhisa; Koga, Kiyokazu; Koshiishi, Hideki

    Space environment group in JAXA has installed insturments to measure space environment on eleven satellites. In the last year, the biggest instrument called SEDA-AP (Space Environment Data Acquision equipment -Attached Paylod) was atteched to the palette of JEM (ISS). On the other hand, we have a web site, "Space Environment and Effects System(SEES)". This system consisits of four parts. First part is to provide data that were obtained from these insturments. There are 18 kinds of mesurments, for example, radiation, magnetic field and so on. In 1994, Anik E-1 and Anik E-2 were broken by solar storm and we could catch the abnormal data from our instrument. Second part is a warning system. Many Japanese satellites are working around the earth and they are always exposed to radioactivity in space. So we predict the the radiation data in two days and if the expected value is over the threshold of safety, we inform a warning massage to users who want to keep their satellites safe. And we also provide the warning massage for Japanese astronauts who stay at ISS. Third part is the tool of the space environment /satellite environment models. There are 12 kinds of environment models which are constructed from 90 space environment models, for example, radiation model, solar activity model and so on. If you register your infomation in the SEES web site, you can simulate space environment by using them. Fourth part is providing the 2D and 3D infomations of satellite's orvits. This show the satelllite's position on the world map at a paticular time. If you want to use this system, please visit our SEES page at (http://seesproxy.tksc.jaxa.jp/fw/dfw/SEES/index.html ).

  19. Internal space charge measurement of materials in a space environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griseri, V.; Fukunaga, K.; Maeno, T.; Payan, D.; Laurent, C.; Levy, L.

    2003-09-01

    The charging/discharging effect produced by space environment on space vehicles are known but not fully identified yet. Experiments performed in laboratory in vacuum chamber that simulates spatial environment and the most realistic charge condition occurring in space have been developed in the last past forty years. A very small Pulse Electro-Acoustic space charge detection unit (mini-PEA) that can be mounted in a vacuum chamber, to measure internal space charges of materials in-situ during the irradiation has been developed. Several materials used in spatial environment such as Teflon®, and Kapton ® films on addition to PMMA films have been studied. The comparison and the good agreement between measured and calculated depth of penetration for electrons of given energy depending on the material nature contribute in the validation of the detection system and encourage us for further studies and development.

  20. Solar/Space Environment Data (Satellites)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) monitors the geospace and solar environments using a variety of space weather sensors aboard its fleet of...

  1. Molecular environment of the supernova remnant IC 443: Discovery of the molecular shells surrounding the remnant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Yang; Fang, Min; Yang, Ji [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Zhou, Ping; Chen, Yang [Department of Astronomy, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2014-06-20

    We have carried out {sup 12}CO, {sup 13}CO, and C{sup 18}O observations toward the mixed morphology supernova remnant (SNR) IC 443. The observations cover a 1.°5 × 1.°5 area and allow us to investigate the overall molecular environment of the remnant. Some northern and northeastern partial shell structure of CO gas is around the remnant. One of the partial shells, about 5' extending beyond the northeastern border of the remnant's bright radio shell, seems to just confine the faint radio halo. On the other hand, some faint CO clumps can be discerned along the eastern boundary of the faint remnant's radio halo. Connecting the eastern CO clumps, the northeastern partial shell structures, and the northern CO partial shell, we can see that a half molecular ring structure appears to surround the remnant. The LSR velocity of the half-ring structure is in the range of –5 km s{sup –1} to –2 km s{sup –1}, which is consistent with that of the –4 km s{sup –1} molecular clouds. We suggest that the half-ring structure of the CO emission at V {sub LSR} ∼ –4 km s{sup –1} is associated with the SNR. The structures are possibly swept up by the stellar winds of SNR IC 443's massive progenitor. Based on the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer and the Two Micron All Sky Survey near-IR database, 62 young stellar object (YSO) candidates are selected within the radio halo of the remnant. These YSO candidates concentrated along the boundary of the remnant's bright radio shell are likely to be triggered by the stellar winds from the massive progenitor of SNR IC 443.

  2. Benchmarking Ionizing Space Environment Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdarie, S.; Inguimbert, C.; Standarovski, D.; Vaillé, J.-R.; Sicard-Piet, A.; Falguere, D.; Ecoffet, R.; Poivey, C.; Lorfèvre, E.

    2017-08-01

    In-flight feedback data are collected, such as displacement damage doses, ionizing doses, and cumulated Single Event upset (SEU) on board various space vehicles and are compared to predictions performed with: 1) proton measurements performed with spectrometers data on board the same spacecraft if any and 2) protons spectrum predicted by the legacy AP8min model and the AP9 and Onera Proton Altitude Low models. When an accurate representation of the 3-D spacecraft shielding as well as appropriate ground calibrations are considered in the calculations, such comparisons provide powerful metrics to investigate engineering model accuracy. To describe >30 MeV trapped protons fluxes, the AP8 min model is found to provide closer predictions to observations than AP9 V1.30.001 (mean and perturbed mean).

  3. Space Environments and Spacecraft Effects Organization Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, David L.; Burns, Howard D.; Miller, Sharon K.; Porter, Ron; Schneider, Todd A.; Spann, James F.; Xapsos, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is embarking on a course to expand human presence beyond Low Earth Orbit (LEO) while also expanding its mission to explore the solar system. Destinations such as Near Earth Asteroids (NEA), Mars and its moons, and the outer planets are but a few of the mission targets. Each new destination presents an opportunity to increase our knowledge of the solar system and the unique environments for each mission target. NASA has multiple technical and science discipline areas specializing in specific space environments disciplines that will help serve to enable these missions. To complement these existing discipline areas, a concept is presented focusing on the development of a space environments and spacecraft effects (SENSE) organization. This SENSE organization includes disciplines such as space climate, space weather, natural and induced space environments, effects on spacecraft materials and systems and the transition of research information into application. This space environment and spacecraft effects organization will be composed of Technical Working Groups (TWG). These technical working groups will survey customers and users, generate products, and provide knowledge supporting four functional areas: design environments, engineering effects, operational support, and programmatic support. The four functional areas align with phases in the program mission lifecycle and are briefly described below. Design environments are used primarily in the mission concept and design phases of a program. Engineering effects focuses on the material, component, sub-system and system-level selection and the testing to verify design and operational performance. Operational support provides products based on real time or near real time space weather to mission operators to aid in real time and near-term decision-making. The programmatic support function maintains an interface with the numerous programs within NASA, other federal

  4. The Space of an Object: Object Attention Alters the Spatial Gradient in the Surround

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravitz, Dwight Jacob; Behrmann, Marlene

    2008-01-01

    Although object-based attention enhances perceptual processing of information appearing within the boundaries of a selected object, little is known about the consequences for information in the object's surround. The authors show that distance from an attended object's center of mass determines reaction time (RT) to targets in the surround. Of 2…

  5. Site Cleanup of Radioactive Isotope Container Rinsing Pool and Surrounding Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Radioactive isotope container rinsing pool and surrounding environmental site was a place of fabrication of container, and package, transportation and storage of radioactive isotopes. A heavy contamination existed in this area for burying of some radioactive wastes.

  6. An Evolution Model of Space Debris Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Various types of models including engineering models andevolution models have been developed to understand space debris environment since 1960s. Evolution model, consisting of a set of supporting models such as Launch Model, Breakup Model and Atmosphere Model, can reliably predicts the evolution of space debris environment. Of these supporting models, Breakup Model is employed to describe the distribution of debris and debris cloud during a explosion or collision case which is one of the main factors affecting the amount of total space debris. An analytical orbit debris environment model referred to as the “Particles-In-Boxes" model has been introduced. By regarding the orbit debris as the freedom particles running in the huge volume, the sources and sinks mechanism is established. Then the PIB model is expanded to the case of multiple-species in multiple-tier system. Combined with breakup model, the evolution of orbit debris environment is predicted.

  7. International Space Station External Contamination Environment for Space Science Utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Carlos E.; Mikatarian, Ronald R.; Steagall, Courtney A.; Huang, Alvin Y.; Koontz, Steven; Worthy, Erica

    2014-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) is the largest and most complex on-orbit platform for space science utilization in low Earth orbit. Multiple sites for external payloads, with exposure to the associated natural and induced environments, are available to support a variety of space science utilization objectives. Contamination is one of the induced environments that can impact performance, mission success and science utilization on the vehicle. The ISS has been designed, built and integrated with strict contamination requirements to provide low levels of induced contamination on external payload assets. This paper addresses the ISS induced contamination environment at attached payload sites, both at the requirements level as well as measurements made on returned hardware, and contamination forecasting maps being generated to support external payload topology studies and science utilization.

  8. Situative Space Tracking within Smart Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Surie, Dipak; Jäckel, Florian; Janlert, Lars-Erik

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes our efforts in modeling and tracking a human agent’s situation based on his/her possibilities to perceive and act upon objects (both physical and virtual) within smart environments. A Situative Space Model is proposed. WLAN signal-strength-based situative space tracking system...... that positions objects within individual situative spaces (without tracking their absolute positions) distributed across multiple modalities like vision, audio, and touch is presented. As a proofof- concept, a preliminary evaluation of the tracking system was performed by two subjects within a living...

  9. Radiation Effects in the Space Telecommunications Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleetwood, Daniel M.; Winokur, Peter S.

    1999-05-17

    Trapped protons and electrons in the Earth's radiation belts and cosmic rays present significant challenges for electronics that must operate reliably in the natural space environment. Single event effects (SEE) can lead to sudden device or system failure, and total dose effects can reduce the lifetime of a telecommmiications system with significant space assets. One of the greatest sources of uncertainty in developing radiation requirements for a space system is accounting for the small but finite probability that the system will be exposed to a massive solar particle event. Once specifications are decided, standard laboratory tests are available to predict the total dose response of MOS and bipolar components in space, but SEE testing of components can be more challenging. Prospects are discussed for device modeling and for the use of standard commercial electronics in space.

  10. Learning Spaces in Mobile Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solvberg, Astrid M.; Rismark, Marit

    2012-01-01

    Mobile learning (m-learning) environments open a wide range of new and exciting learning opportunities, and envision students who are continually on the move, learn across space and time, and move from topic to topic and in and out of interaction with technology. In this article we present findings from a study of how students manoeuvre and study…

  11. Space Environment's Effects on Seal Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    deGroh, Henry C., III; Daniels, Christopher C.; Dunlap, Patrick; Miller, Sharon; Dever, Joyce; Waters, Deborah; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2007-01-01

    A Low Impact Docking System (LIDS) is being developed by the NASA Johnson Space Center to support future missions of the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV). The LIDS is androgynous, such that each system half is identical, thus any two vehicles or modules with LIDS can be coupled. Since each system half is a replica, the main interface seals must seal against each other instead of a conventional flat metal surface. These sealing surfaces are also expected to be exposed to the space environment when vehicles are not docked. The NASA Glenn Research Center (NASA GRC) is supporting this project by developing the main interface seals for the LIDS and determining the durability of candidate seal materials in the space environment. In space, the seals will be exposed to temperatures of between 50 to 50 C, vacuum, atomic oxygen, particle and ultraviolet radiation, and micrometeoroid and orbital debris (MMOD). NASA GRC is presently engaged in determining the effects of these environments on our candidate elastomers. Since silicone rubber is the only class of seal elastomer that functions across the expected temperature range, NASA GRC is focusing on three silicone elastomers: two provided by Parker Hannifin (S0-899-50 and S0-383-70) and one from Esterline Kirkhill (ELA-SA-401). Our results from compression set, elastomer to elastomer adhesion, and seal leakage tests before and after various simulated space exposures will be presented.

  12. Skin in aviation and space environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjiv Grover

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aerospace environment is a dynamic interaction between man, machine and the environment. Skin diseases are not particularly significant aeromedically, yet they could permanently affect an aviator′s status for continued flying duty. A number of dermatological conditions lend themselves to flying restrictions for the aviator. Aircrew and ground crew are exposed to a myriad of elements that could also adversely impact their flying status. Inflight stresses during flights as well as space travel could impact certain behaviors from a dermatological standpoint. With the advent of space tourism, dermatological issues would form an integral part of medical clearances. With limited literature available on this subject, the review article aims to sensitize the readers to the diverse interactions of dermatology with the aerospace environment.

  13. Emissions of Escherichia coli Carrying Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase Resistance from Pig Farms to the Surrounding Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Gao

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The dissemination of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL-producing Escherichia coli (E. coli from food-producing animals to the surrounding environment has attracted much attention. To determine the emissions of ESBL-producing E. coli from pig farms to the surrounding environment, fecal and environmental samples from six pig farms were collected. In total, 119 ESBL-producing E. coli were isolated from feces, air samples, water, sludge and soil samples. Antibiotic susceptibility testing showed that the ESBL-producing isolates were resistant to multiple antibiotics and isolates of different origin within the same farm showed similar resistance phenotypes. Both CTX-M and TEM ESBL-encoding genes were detected in these isolates. CTX-M-14 and CTX-M-15 were the predominant ESBL genes identified. ESBL producers from feces and environmental samples within the same farm carried similar CTX-M types. The results indicated that the ESBL-producing E. coli carrying multidrug resistance could readily disseminate to the surrounding environment.

  14. International space station microgravity environment design & verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Basso, Steve

    1999-01-01

    A broad class of scientific experiments has evolved which utilize extreme low acceleration environments. The International Space Station will provide such a ``microgravity'' environment, in conjunction with an unparalleled combination of quiescent period duration, payload volume and power, and manned or telescience interaction. The International Space Station is the world's first manned space vehicle with microgravity requirements. These place limits on the acceleration levels within the pressurized laboratories and affect everything from flight altitude and attitude to the mechanical and acoustic energies emitted by an air circulation fan. To achieve such performance within the program's resource constraints, a microgravity control approach has been adopted which balances both source and receiver disturbance mitigation. The Active Rack Isolation System (ARIS) provides acceleration attenuation at the payload rack level, and dominant sources have been reduced either by isolation or design modifications. Analytical assessments indicate that the vehicle is capable of meeting the challenging microgravity requirements, although some current marginal non-compliances do exist. Assessment refinements will continue through the verification phase with greater reliance on test and on-orbit measured data as part of a long term effort to clearly define and understand the constitution of the acceleration environment. This process will assure that the design and operation of the International Space Station will support significant microgravity science research.

  15. Space environment's effect on MODIS calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, J. L.; Wenny, B. N.; Chiang, K.; Xiong, X.

    2010-09-01

    The MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer flies on board the Earth Observing System (EOS) satellites Terra and Aqua in a sun-synchronous orbit that crosses the equator at 10:30 AM and 2:30 PM, respectively, at a low earth orbit (LEO) altitude of 705 km. Terra was launched on December 18,1999 and Aqua was launched on May 4, 2002. As the MODIS instruments on board these satellites continue to operate beyond the design lifetime of six years, the cumulative effect of the space environment on MODIS and its calibration is of increasing importance. There are several aspects of the space environment that impact both the top of atmosphere (TOA) calibration and, therefore, the final science products of MODIS. The south Atlantic anomaly (SAA), spacecraft drag, extreme radiative and thermal environment, and the presence of orbital debris have the potential to significantly impact both MODIS and the spacecraft, either directly or indirectly, possibly resulting in data loss. Efforts from the Terra and Aqua Flight Operations Teams (FOT), the MODIS Instrument Operations Team (IOT), and the MODIS Characterization Support Team (MCST) prevent or minimize external impact on the TOA calibrated data. This paper discusses specific effects of the space environment on MODIS and how they are minimized.

  16. Advances in Research and Service of Space Environment in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Liqin; GONG Jiancun; LIU Siqing; HU Xiong; LIU Jing; HUANG Wengeng

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the recent progress of space environment research and service in China.During the past two years,many models of space environment forecast and analysis methods of space environment effects have been developed for tailored space environment service for Chinese space mission.A new Re-locatable Atmospheric Observatory(RAO)for monitoring atmospheric wind,temperature,density and pressure of the near space from 20 km up to 120 km altitudes is being constructed.In space environment service space environment safety was provided to ensure the safety of CE-1 for its launch and operation in 2007.

  17. EnviroNET - The Space Environment Information Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauriente, Michael

    1991-01-01

    The recent development of EnviroNET, the Space Environment Information Service, is discussed. The activities pursued by the Space Shuttle Working Group to establish a user-friendly database of current information on the Space Shuttle environment are described.

  18. Space Analogue Environments: Are the Populations Comparable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandal, G. M.

    Background: Much of our present understanding about psychology in space is based on studies of groups operating in so-called analogue environments where personnel are exposed to many of the same stressors as those experienced by astronauts in space. One possible problem with extrapolating results is that personnel operating in various hazardous and confined environments might differ in characteristics influencing coping, interaction, and performance. The object of this study was to compare the psychological similarity of these populations in order to get a better understanding of whether this extrapolation is justifiable. The samples investigated include polar crossings (N= 22), personnel on Antarctic research stations (N= 183), several military occupations (N= 187), and participants in space simulation studies (N=20). Methods: Personnel in each of these environments were assessed using the Personality Characteristic Inventory (PCI) and Utrecht Coping List (UCL). The PCI is a multidimensional trait assessment battery that measures various aspects of achievement orientation and social competence. The UCL is a questionnaire designed to assess habitual coping strategies when encountering stressful or demanding situations. Results: Only minor differences in use of habitual coping strategies were evident across the different samples. In relation to personality scores, the military subjects and participants in space simulation studies indicated higher competitiveness and negative instrumentality compared to both the personnel on Antarctic research stations and participants in polar expedition. Among the personnel on Antarctic research stations, significant gender differences were found with women scoring lower on competitiveness, negative instrumentality and impatience/irritability. Compared to the other samples, the participants in polar expeditions were found to be more homogeneous in personality and no significant gender differences were evident on the traits that

  19. Space Environment Effects on Silicone Seal Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    deGroh, Henry C., III; Daniels, Christopher C.; Dever, Joyce A.; Miller, Sharon K.; Waters, Deborah L.; Finkbeiner, Joshua R.; Dunlap, Patrick H.; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2010-01-01

    A docking system is being developed by the NASA to support future space missions. It is expected to use redundant elastomer seals to help contain cabin air during dockings between two spacecraft. The sealing surfaces are exposed to the space environment when vehicles are not docked. In space, the seals will be exposed to temperatures between 125 to -75 C, vacuum, atomic oxygen, particle and ultraviolet radiation, and micrometeoroid and orbital debris (MMOD). Silicone rubber is the only class of space flight-qualified elastomeric seal material that functions across the expected temperature range. NASA Glenn has tested three silicone elastomers for such seal applications: two provided by Parker (S0899-50 and S0383-70) and one from Esterline (ELA-SA-401). The effects of atomic oxygen (AO), UV and electron particle radiation, and vacuum on the properties of these three elastomers were examined. Critical seal properties such as leakage, adhesion, and compression set were measured before and after simulated space exposures. The S0899-50 silicone was determined to be inadequate for extended space seal applications due to high adhesion and intolerance to UV, but both S0383-70 and ELA-SA-401 seals were adequate.

  20. Microbial survival in deep space environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, G. J.

    1971-01-01

    Review of the knowledge available on the extent to which microorganisms (mainly microbial spores, vegetative cells, and fungi) are capable of surviving the environment of deep space, based on recent simulation experiments of deep space. A description of the experimental procedures used is followed by a discussion of deep space ecology, the behavior of microorganisms in ultrahigh vacuum, and factors influencing microbial survival. It is concluded that, so far, simulation experiments have proved far less lethal to microorganisms than to other forms of life. There are, however, wide gaps in the knowledge available, and no accurate predictions can as yet be made on the degree of lethality that might be incurred by a microbial population on a given mission. Therefore, sterilization of spacecraft surfaces is deemed necessary if induced panspermia (i.e., interplanetary life propagation) is to be avoided.

  1. Variable Ly alpha sheds light on the environment surrounding GRB 090426

    CERN Document Server

    Thöne, C C; Lazzati, D; Postigo, A de Ugarte; Fynbo, J P U; Christensen, L; Levan, A J; Aloy, M A; Hjorth, J; Jakobsson, P; Levesque, E M; Malesani, D; Milvang-Jensen, B; Roming, P W A; Tanvir, N R; Wiersema, K; Gladders, M; Wuyts, E; Dahle, H

    2011-01-01

    Long duration gamma-ray bursts are commonly associated with the deaths of massive stars. Spectroscopic studies using the afterglow as a light source provide a unique opportunity to unveil the medium surrounding it, probing the densest region of their galaxies. This material is usually in a low ionisation state and at large distances from the burst site, hence representing the normal interstellar medium in the galaxy. Here we present the case of GRB 090426 at z=2.609, whose optical spectrum indicates an almost fully ionised medium together with a low column density of neutral hydrogen. For the first time, we also observe variations in the Ly alpha absorption line. Photoionisation modeling shows that we are probing material from the vicinity of the burst (~80 pc). The host galaxy is a complex of two luminous interacting galaxies, which might suggest that this burst could have occurred in an isolated star-forming region outside its host galaxy created in the interaction of the two galaxies.

  2. The connection between AGN-driven dusty outflows and the surrounding environment

    CERN Document Server

    Ishibashi, W

    2016-01-01

    Significant reservoirs of cool gas are observed in the circumgalactic medium (CGM) surrounding galaxies. The CGM is also found to contain substantial amounts of metals and dust, which require some transport mechanism. We consider AGN (active galactic nucleus) feedback-driven outflows based on radiation pressure on dust. Dusty gas is ejected when the central luminosity exceeds the effective Eddington luminosity for dust. We obtain that a higher dust-to-gas ratio leads to a lower critical luminosity, implying that the more dusty gas is more easily expelled. Dusty outflows can reach large radii with a range of velocities (depending on the outflowing shell configuration and the ambient density distribution) and may account for the observed CGM gas. In our picture, dust is required in order to drive AGN feedback, and the preferential expulsion of dusty gas in the outflows may naturally explain the presence of dust in the CGM. On the other hand, the most powerful AGN outflow events can potentially drive gas out of ...

  3. Quality evaluation of commercially sold table water samples in Michael Okpara University of Agriculture, Umudike, Nigeria and surrounding environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.O. Okorie

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In Michael Okpara University of Agriculture, Umudike, Nigeria (MOUAU and surrounding environments, table water of different brands is commercially hawked by vendors. To the best of our knowledge, there is no scientific documentation on the quality of these water samples. Hence this study which evaluated the quality of different brands of water samples commercially sold in MOUAU and surrounding environments. The physicochemical properties (pH, total dissolved solids (TDS, biochemical oxygen demand (BOD, total hardness, dissolved oxygen, Cl, NO3, ammonium nitrogen (NH3N, turbidity, total suspended solids (TSS, Ca, Mg, Na and K of the water samples as indices of their quality were carried out using standard techniques. Results obtained from this study indicated that most of the chemical constituents of these table water samples commercially sold in Umudike environment conformed to the standards given by the Nigerian Industrial Standard (NIS, World Health Organization (WHO and American Public Health Association (APHA, respectively, while values obtained for ammonium nitrogen in these water samples calls for serious checks on methods of their production and delivery to the end users.

  4. The impact of Mpererwe landfill in Kampala Uganda, on the surrounding environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwiganga, M.; Kansiime, F.

    Mpererwe landfill site receives solid wastes from the city of Kampala, Uganda. This study was carried out to assess and evaluate the appropriateness of the location and operation of this landfill, to determine the composition of the solid waste dumped at the landfill and the extent of contamination of landfill leachate to the neighbouring environment (water, soil and plants). Field observations and laboratory measurements were carried out to determine the concentration of nutrients, metals and numbers of bacteriological indicators in the landfill leachate. The landfill is not well located as it is close to a residential area (waste by scavenger birds, flies and vermin. Industrial and hospital wastes are disposed of at the landfill without pre-treatment. The concentration of variables (nutrients, bacteriological indicators, BOD and heavy metals) in the leachate were higher than those recommended in the National Environment Standards for Discharge of Effluent into Water and on Land. A composite sample that was taken 1500 m down stream indicated that the wetland considerably reduced the concentration of the parameters that were measured except for sulfides. Despite the fact that there was accumulation of metals in the sediments, the concentration has not reached toxic levels to humans. Soil and plant analyses indicated deficiencies of zinc and copper. The concentration of these elements was lowest in the leachate canal.

  5. Measuring and modelling the radiological impact of a phosphogypsum deposition site on the surrounding environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bituh, Tomislav; Petrinec, Branko; Skoko, Božena; Vučić, Zlatko; Marović, Gordana

    2015-03-01

    Phosphogypsum (PG) is a waste product (residue) from the production of phosphoric acid characterized by technologically enhanced natural radioactivity. Croatia's largest PG deposition site is situated at the edge of Lonjsko Polje Nature Park, a sensitive ecosystem possibly endangered by PG particles. This field study investigates two aspects relevant for the general radiological impact of PG: risk assessment for the environment and risk assessment for occupationally exposed workers and local inhabitants. Activity concentrations of natural radionuclides ((238)U, (235)U, (232)Th, (226)Ra, (210)Pb, and (40)K) were measured in the PG (at the deposition site), soil, and grass samples (in the vicinity of the site). The ERICA Assessment Tool was used to estimate the radiological impact of PG particles on non-human biota of the Lonjsko Polje Nature Park. The average annual effective dose for occupationally exposed workers was 0.4 mSv which was within the worldwide range.

  6. Overview of the space debris environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshishnek, M. J.

    1995-03-01

    There is a component of the space environment that is man-made pollution, termed 'space debris' it exists at all inclinations and, primarily, at altitudes of roughly 350 km to 2000 km. The size of this debris ranges from several meters to a fraction of a micrometer in diameter, and the particle distribution follows an inverse power law, with the smaller size component far exceeding that of the larger. Debris is composed primarily of alumina from solid rocket motor exhausts, aluminum from spacecraft structures, and zinc and titanium oxides from thermal control coatings. The accepted model of the space debris environment is that of Kessler et al., a complex model that predicts the number of particles that will impact a surface as a function of altitude, inclination, solar cycle, and particle diameter, as well as their collision velocities. Recent data from LDEF has demonstrated both the accuracy and shortcomings of the Kessler model. Measured debris impactor fluxes are in good agreement with the model for ram surfaces. However, predictions of the model for other surfaces of a spacecraft are less accurate, most notably for the wake or trailing side. While the Kessler model is appropriate for long-term, average flux predictions, spatial-temporal impact fluxes measured on LDEF dramatically illustrated the presence of strong debris clouds that do not dissipate quickly in space and will encounter an orbiting spacecraft cyclically and repeatedly over its lifetime. LDEF data has also indicated the presence of debris in elliptical orbits, a fact not predicted by the Kessler model. This fact is responsible for the discrepancy between measured impact fluxes and predictions on trailing edge surfaces.

  7. The importance of tissue environment surrounding the tumor on the development of cancer cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Fumihiro; Soda, Kuniyasu; Yamada, Shigeki; Tokutake, Yuka; Chohnan, Shigeru; Konishi, Fumio; Rikiyama, Toshiki

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between host factors and cancer cachexia was investigated. A single cell clone (clone 5 tumor) established from colon 26 adenocarcinoma by limiting dilution cell cloning methods was employed to eliminate the inoculation site-dependent differences in the composition of cell clones. Clone 5 tumor did not provoke manifestations of cancer cachexia when inoculated in subcutaneous tissue. However, when inoculated in the gastrocnemius muscle, the peritoneal cavity or the thoracic cavity of CD2F1 male mice, typical manifestations of cancer cachexia were observed in all groups of mice with intergroup variations. The blood levels of various cytokines, chemokines and hormones were increased but with wide intergroup variations. Analyses by stepwise multiple regression models revealed that serum interleukin-10 was the most significant factor associated with manifestations of cancer cachexia, suggesting the possible involvement of mechanisms similar to cancer patients suffering cancer cachexia. White blood cells, especially neutrophils, seemed to have some roles on the induction of cancer cachexia, because massive infiltrations and an increase in peripheral blood were observed in cachectic mice bearing clone 5 tumors. The amount of malonyl-CoA in liver correlated with manifestations of cancer cachexia, however the mRNA levels of spermidine/spermine N-1 acetyl transferase (SSAT) (of which overexpression has been shown to provoke manifestations similar to cancer cachexia) were not necessarily associated with cancer cachexia. These data suggest that the induction of cancer cachexia depends on the environment in which the tumor grows and that the infiltration of host immune cells into the tumor and the resultant increase in inflammation result in the production of cachectic factors, such as cytokines, leading to SSAT activation. Further, multiple factors likely mediate the mechanisms of cancer cachexia. Finally, this animal model was suitable for the investigation

  8. JPL Space Telecommunications Radio System Operating Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lux, James P.; Lang, Minh; Peters, Kenneth J.; Taylor, Gregory H.; Duncan, Courtney B.; Orozco, David S.; Stern, Ryan A.; Ahten, Earl R.; Girard, Mike

    2013-01-01

    A flight-qualified implementation of a Software Defined Radio (SDR) Operating Environment for the JPL-SDR built for the CoNNeCT Project has been developed. It is compliant with the NASA Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) Architecture Standard, and provides the software infrastructure for STRS compliant waveform applications. This software provides a standards-compliant abstracted view of the JPL-SDR hardware platform. It uses industry standard POSIX interfaces for most functions, as well as exposing the STRS API (Application Programming In terface) required by the standard. This software includes a standardized interface for IP components instantiated within a Xilinx FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array). The software provides a standardized abstracted interface to platform resources such as data converters, file system, etc., which can be used by STRS standards conformant waveform applications. It provides a generic SDR operating environment with a much smaller resource footprint than similar products such as SCA (Software Communications Architecture) compliant implementations, or the DoD Joint Tactical Radio Systems (JTRS).

  9. Geant4 models for space radiation environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivantchenko, Anton; Nieminen, Petteri; Incerti, Sebastien; Santin, Giovanni; Ivantchenko, Vladimir; Grichine, Vladimir; Allison, John

    The space radiation environment includes wide varieties of particles from electrons to heavy ions. In order to correctly predict the dose received by astronauts and devices the simulation models must have good applicability and produce accurate results from 10 MeV/u up to 10 GeV/u, where the most radioactive hazardous particles are present in the spectra. Appropriate models should also provide a good description of electromagnetic interactions down to very low energies (10 eV/u - 10 MeV/u) for understanding the damage mechanisms due to long-term low doses. Predictions of biological dose during long interplanetary journeys also need models for hadronic interactions of energetic heavy ions extending higher energies (10 GeV/u - 100 GeV/u, but possibly up to 1 TeV/u). Geant4 is a powerful toolkit, which in some areas well surpasses the needs from space radiation studies, while in other areas is being developed and/or validated to properly cover the modelling requirements outlined above. Our activities in ESA projects deal with the research and development of both Geant4 hadronic and electromagnetic physics. Recently the scope of verification tests and benchmarks has been extended. Hadronic tests and benchmarks run proton, pion, and ion interactions with matter at various energies. In the Geant4 hadronic sub-libraries, the most accurate cross sections have been identified and selected as a default for all particle types relevant to space applications. Significant developments were carried out for ion/ion interaction models. These now allow one to perform Geant4 simulations for all particle types and energies relevant to space applications. For the validation of ion models the hadronic testing suite for ion interactions was significantly extended. In this work the results of benchmarking versus data in a wide energy range for projectile protons and ions will be shown and discussed. Here we show results of the tests runs and their precision. Recommendations for Geant4

  10. A battery model that enables consideration of realistic anisotropic environment surrounding an active material particle and its application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xianke; Lu, Wei

    2017-07-01

    This paper proposes a model that enables consideration of the realistic anisotropic environment surrounding an active material particle by incorporating both diffusion and migration of lithium ions and electrons in the particle. This model makes it possible to quantitatively evaluate effects such as fracture on capacity degradation. In contrast, the conventional model assumes isotropic environment and only considers diffusion in the active particle, which cannot capture the effect of fracture since it would predict results contradictory to experimental observations. With the developed model we have investigated the effects of active material electronic conductivity, particle size, and State of Charge (SOC) swing window when fracture exists. The study shows that the low electronic conductivity of active material has a significant impact on the lithium ion pattern. Fracture increases the resistance for electron transport and therefore reduces lithium intercalation/deintercalation. Particle size plays an important role in lithium ion transport. Smaller particle size is preferable for mitigating capacity loss when fracture happens. The study also shows that operating at high SOC reduces the impact of fracture.

  11. Perlecan/Hspg2 deficiency alters the pericellular space of the lacunocanalicular system surrounding osteocytic processes in cortical bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, William R; Modla, Shannon; Grindel, Brian J; Czymmek, Kirk J; Kirn-Safran, Catherine B; Wang, Liyun; Duncan, Randall L; Farach-Carson, Mary C

    2011-03-01

    Osteocytes project long, slender processes throughout the mineralized matrix of bone, where they connect and communicate with effector cells. The interconnected cellular projections form the functional lacunocanalicular system, allowing fluid to pass for cell-to-cell communication and nutrient and waste exchange. Prevention of mineralization in the pericellular space of the lacunocanalicular pericellular space is crucial for uninhibited interstitial fluid movement. Factors contributing to the ability of the pericellular space of the lacunocanalicular system to remain open and unmineralized are unclear. Immunofluorescence and immunogold localization by transmission electron microscopy demonstrated perlecan/Hspg2 signal localized to the osteocyte lacunocanalicular system of cortical bone, and this proteoglycan was found in the pericellular space of the lacunocanalicular system. In this study we examined osteocyte lacunocanalicular morphology in mice deficient in the large heparan sulfate proteoglycan perlecan/Hspg2 in this tissue. Ultrastructural measurements with electron microscopy of perlecan/Hspg2-deficient mice demonstrated diminished osteocyte canalicular pericellular area, resulting from a reduction in the total canalicular area. Additionally, perlecan/Hspg2-deficient mice showed decreased canalicular density and a reduced number of transverse tethering elements per canaliculus. These data indicated that perlecan/Hspg2 contributed to the integrity of the osteocyte lacunocanalicular system by maintaining the size of the pericellular space, an essential task to promote uninhibited interstitial fluid movement in this mechanosensitive environment. This work thus identified a new barrier function for perlecan/Hspg2 in murine cortical bone.

  12. Targeted and comprehensive space-environment sensors: description and recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reeves, Geoffrey; O' Brien, Paul; Mazur, Joe; Ginet, Gregory

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the roles of the two classes of space-environment sensors on operational space systems: (1) Targeted sensors capable of measuring the environment and effects at a level sufficient for providing situational awareness for the host spacecraft and (2) Comprehensive sensors capable of providing detailed environment measurements that can be mapped to a broad region of near-Earth space, providing global situational awareness and quantitative characterization of the environment. Our purpose is to show the usefulness of a heterogeneous architecture with both classes of sensors for the near-term and long-term needs of National Security Space

  13. The Third Pole Environment Programme (TPE): A new base for the processes study of atmospheric physics and environment over the Tibetan Plateau and surrounding regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yaoming

    2016-04-01

    The Tibetan Plateau, with the most prominent and complicated terrain on the globe and an elevation of more than 4000 m on average above sea leave (msl), is often called the "Third Pole" due to its significance parallel with Antarctica and the Arctic. The exchange of energy, water vapor and some greenhouse gases between land surface and atmosphere over the Tibetan Plateau and the surrounding regions play an important role in the Asian monsoon system, which in turn is a major component of both the energy and water cycles of the global climate system. Supported by the Chinese Academy of Sciences and some international organizations, a Third Pole Environment (TPE) Research Platform (TPEP) is now implementing over the Tibetan Plateau and surrounding region. The background of the establishment of the TPEP, the establishing and monitoring plan of long-term scale (5-10 years) of the TPEP will be shown firstly. Then the preliminary observational analysis results, such as the characteristics of land surface heat fluxes, CO2 flux and evapotranspiration (ET) partitioning (diurnal variation, inter-monthly variation and vertical variation etc), aerosol optical properties between southern and northern sides of the Himalayas, the characteristics of atmospheric and soil variables, the structure of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) and the turbulent characteristics have also been shown in this study.

  14. The Influence of Space Environment on the Evolution of Mercury

    CERN Document Server

    Orsini, Stefano; Mura, Alessandro; Turrini, Diego; Massetti, Stefano; Milillo, Anna; Plainaki, Christina

    2014-01-01

    Mercury, due to its close location to the Sun, is surrounded by an environment whose conditions may be considered as "extreme" in the entire Solar System. Both solar wind and radiation are stronger with respect to other Solar System bodies, so that their interactions with the planet cause high emission of material from its surface. Moreover, the meteoritic precipitation plays a significant role in surface emission processes. This emitted material is partially lost in space. Although under the present conditions the surface particles loss rate does not seem to be able to produce significant erosion of the planetary mass and volume, the long-term effects over billions of years should be carefully considered to properly understand the evolution of the planet. In the early stages, under even more extreme conditions, some of these processes were much more effective in removing material from the planet's surface. This study attempts to provide a rough estimation of the material loss rate as a function of time, in o...

  15. Space Environment Data Acquisition with the Kibo Exposed Facility on the International Space Station (ISS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Obara

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The Space Environment Data Acquisition equipment (SEDA, which was mounted on the Exposed Facility (EF of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM, also known as "Kibo" on the International Space Station (ISS, was developed to measure the space environment along the orbit of the ISS. This payload module, called the SEDA-Attached Payload (AP, began to measure the space environment in August 2009. This paper reports the mission objectives, instrumentation, and current status of the SEDA-AP.

  16. Status Report of Simulated Space Radiation Environment Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Phil Hyun; Nho, Young Chang; Jeun, Joon Pyo; Choi, Jae Hak; Lim, Youn Mook; Jung, Chan Hee; Jeon, Young Kyu

    2007-11-15

    The technology for performance testing and improvement of materials which are durable at space environment is a military related technology and veiled and securely regulated in advanced countries such as US and Russia. This core technology cannot be easily transferred to other country too. Therefore, this technology is the most fundamental and necessary research area for the successful establishment of space environment system. Since the task for evaluating the effects of space materials and components by space radiation plays important role in satellite lifetime extension and running failure percentage decrease, it is necessary to establish simulated space radiation facility and systematic testing procedure. This report has dealt with the status of the technology to enable the simulation of space environment effects, including the effect of space radiation on space materials. This information such as the fundamental knowledge of space environment and research status of various countries as to the simulation of space environment effects of space materials will be useful for the research on radiation hardiness of the materials. Furthermore, it will be helpful for developer of space material on deriving a better choice of materials, reducing the design cycle time, and improving safety.

  17. A Survey of Deepwater Horizon (DWH Oil-Degrading Bacteria from the Eastern Oyster Biome and its Surrounding Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse eThomas

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The Deepwater Horizon (DWH accident led to the release of an estimated 794,936,474 liters of crude oil into the northern Gulf of Mexico over an 85 day period in 2010, resulting in the contamination of the Gulf of Mexico waters, sediments, permeable beach sands, coastal wetlands and marine life. This study examines the potential response of the Eastern oyster’s microbiome to hydrocarbon contamination and compares it with the bacterial community responses observed from the overlaying water column and the oyster bed sediments. For this purpose, microcosms seeded with DWH crude oil were established and inoculated separately with oyster tissue (OT, mantle fluid (MF, overlaying water column (WC and sediments (S collected from Apalachicola Bay, FL. Shifts in the microbial community structure in the amended microcosms was monitored over a 3-month period using automated ribosomal intergenic spacer region analysis (ARISA, which showed that the microbiome of the oyster tissue and mantle fluid were more similar to the sediment communities than those present in the overlaying water column. This pattern remained largely consistent, regardless of the concentration of crude oil or the enrichment period. Additionally, 72 oil-degrading bacteria were isolated from the microcosms containing OT, MF, WC and S and identified using 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA gene sequencing and compared by principal component analysis (PCA which clearly showed that the water column isolates were different to those identified from the sediment. Conversely, the oyster tissue and mantle fluid isolates clustered together; a strong indication that the oyster microbiome is uniquely structured relative to its surrounding environment. When selected isolates from the OT, MF, WC and S were assessed for their oil-degrading potential, we found that the DWH oil was biodegraded between 12%-42%, under the existing conditions.

  18. Basin-scale contributions of Cr, Ni and Co from Ortegal Complex to the surrounding coastal environment (SW Europe).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prego, Ricardo; Caetano, Miguel; Ospina-Alvarez, Natalia; Raimundo, Joana; Vale, Carlos

    2014-01-15

    The enrichment of Cr and Ni in the coastal zones is usually associated with anthropogenic sources such as the tanning, galvanization, ceramic, and cement industries. However, geological complexes of specific lithologic composition located near shorelines may act as natural sources of metals to the continental shelf. Cape Ortegal (SW Europe) is an ultramafic complex that has Cr, Ni and Co enriched in rocks due to the minerals chromite, chromospinel, gersdorfite and pentlandite. Thus, the hypothesis that this geological complex contributes to metal enrichment in Ortigueira and Barqueiro Rias and the adjacent continental shelf was tested. Chromium, Ni, and Co were determined in water and in suspended particulate matter of ria tributaries, rainfall, surface sediments, mussels, and algae. High contents of Cr (max. 1670mg·kg(-1)) and Ni (max. 1360 mg · kg(-1)) were found in the sediments surrounding Cape Ortegal and the Ortigueira Ria as a result of erosion of exposed cliffs. Dissolved Cr and Ni concentrations in fluvial waters were significantly higher in the rivers that crosses the Ortegal Complex, i.e. Lourido (0.47 μg Cr · L(-1); 9.4 μg Ni · L(-1)) and Landoi (0.37 μg Cr · L(-1); 4.3 μg Ni · L(-1)), in comparison with the nearby basin out of the complex influence (Sor River: fluvial contributions of Cr and Ni to the Ortigueira Ria were higher than fluxes into the Barqueiro Ria. Moreover, the increase in Cr and Ni in the rainfall in summer demonstrated the importance of the atmosphere pathway for introducing these elements into the aquatic environment. As a consequence, the contents of these metals in soft tissues and shell of mussels and algae from the Ortigueira Ria were higher than the organisms from Barqueiro Ria. Thus, geological complexes, such as the Cape Ortegal, located in an uncontaminated area, can increase the land-sea exchange of trace metals.

  19. A survey of deepwater horizon (DWH) oil-degrading bacteria from the Eastern oyster biome and its surrounding environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jesse C; Wafula, Denis; Chauhan, Ashvini; Green, Stefan J; Gragg, Richard; Jagoe, Charles

    2014-01-01

    The deepwater horizon (DWH) accident led to the release of an estimated 794,936,474 L of crude oil into the northern Gulf of Mexico over an 85 day period in 2010, resulting in the contamination of the Gulf of Mexico waters, sediments, permeable beach sands, coastal wetlands, and marine life. This study examines the potential response of the Eastern oyster's microbiome to hydrocarbon contamination and compares it with the bacterial community responses observed from the overlaying water column (WC) and the oyster bed sediments. For this purpose, microcosms seeded with DWH crude oil were established and inoculated separately with oyster tissue (OT), mantle fluid (MF), overlaying WC, and sediments (S) collected from Apalachicola Bay, FL, USA. Shifts in the microbial community structure in the amended microcosms was monitored over a 3-month period using automated ribosomal intergenic spacer region analysis, which showed that the microbiome of the OT and MF were more similar to the sediment communities than those present in the overlaying WC. This pattern remained largely consistent, regardless of the concentration of crude oil or the enrichment period. Additionally, 72 oil-degrading bacteria were isolated from the microcosms containing OT, MF, WC, and S and identified using 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing and compared by principal component analysis, which clearly showed that the WC isolates were different to those identified from the sediment. Conversely, the OT and MF isolates clustered together; a strong indication that the oyster microbiome is uniquely structured relative to its surrounding environment. When selected isolates from the OT, MF, WC, and S were assessed for their oil-degrading potential, we found that the DWH oil was biodegraded between 12 and 42%, under the existing conditions.

  20. Noise environment reduction foam spheres in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharton, Terry; Kern, Dennis; Badilla, Gloria

    1989-01-01

    The advent of lightweight fairings for new spacecraft and the increased thrust of new launch vehicles have intensified the need for better techniques for predicting and for reducing the low frequency noise environment of spacecraft at liftoff. This paper presents a VAPEPS (VibroAcoustic Payload Environment Prediction System) parametrical analysis of the noise reduction of spacecraft fairings and explores a novel technique for increasing the low frequency noise reduction of lightweight fairing by approximately 10 dB.

  1. Electro-Mechanical Systems for Extreme Space Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojarradi, Mohammad M.; Tyler, Tony R.; Abel, Phillip B.; Levanas, Greg

    2011-01-01

    form factor was designed to surround or be at the actuator. Communication with the slave controllers is accomplished by a bus, thus limiting the number of wires that must be routed to the extremity locations. Efforts have also been made to increase the power capability of these electronics for the ability to power and control actuators up to 2.5KW and still meet the environmental challenges. For commutation and control of the actuator, a resolver was integrated and tested with the actuator. Testing of this resolver demonstrated temperature limitations. Subsequent failure analysis isolated the low temperature failure mechanism and a design solution was negotiated with the manufacturer. Several years of work have resulted in specialized electro-mechanical hardware to meet extreme space exploration environments, a test history that verifies and finds limitations of the designs and a growing knowledge base that can be leveraged by future space exploration missions.

  2. Space Environment Prediction for SZ-4 and SZ-5

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Siqing; LIU Jing; SHI Liqin; HAN Jianwei; ZANG Zhenqun

    2004-01-01

    The Space Environment Prediction Center (SEPC) of the Center for Space Science and Applied Research of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CSSAR, CAS)took on the mission of offering the space environment parameters which may be of use to the safety of manned spacecraft. In order to complete the space environment safety guarantee mission for SZ-4 and SZ-5, SEPC improved the space environment monitoring system, database system, prediction result display system, prediction implementation system, etc. For guaranteeing the safety of the airship and cosmonaut in the first manned SZ-5, flying experiment mission,SEPC developed the software for analyzing radiation dose and early-warning software for large debris collision with SZ-5. Three months before the flights of SZ-4 and SZ-5, SEPC began to predict the safe launch period in view of the space environment, and offered timely and valid reference opinions for selecting the safety period. Especially during the mission of SZ-5, SEPC analyzed the space high-energy environment in a pre-arranged orbit and abnormal orbit andevaluated the radiation dose which cosmonauts may encounter in space. The evaluation offered an important reference for cosmonaut safety and decisionmaking in the SZ-5 mission. The calculation of the distribution of large debris and the collision risk assessment at different orbit entry times for SZ-5 provided an important base for the superior department to make flight decisions.

  3. Ecological Study of Lagoons Surrounding the John F. Kennedy Space Center, Brevard County, Florida . Volume 2; Theses and Project Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Many of the detailed studies done in connection with Ecological Study of the Lagoons surrounding the John F. Kennedy Space Port were performed as Master's Thesis investigations by various graduate students enrolled at F. I. T. during and subsequent to the report. The scope and purpose of what we came to call "the KSC Baseline Study" caught the imagination and interest of our student body. Many who were not financially or otherwise connected with the project found their inspiration in studies that were directly connected with project, and thus added materially to the totality of the knowledge gained. An example of one such study is the first article included in this Volume, A Master's Thesis study performed by Shen Phillip Chen, who chose the site for his investigation so that his results would correlate with and extend the results of others. In addition to the Master's Theses contained in this Volume, six other graduate studies must be acknowledged here as contributing to this Report, although they have not reached the stage of final publication. Ms. Sandra Fettes has completed a study of the amounts of five trace metals in mangrove leaves from plants at various locations around the Kennedy Space Center. Mr. Bernard Cohenour has isolated and identified a number of oil consuming bacteria endemic in the waters of the Indian Rivers. Mr. Charles Waterhouse has analyzed historic data of tidal gauges in the lagoonal area and correlated it with wind field records. Mr. Renkert Meyer has measured the vertical and horizontal currents of the lagoons and is attempting an interpretation of them in terms of the wind field as a driving force. Mr. Richard Campbell has measured the rate of nitrogen fixation in both the water columns and the sediments under them in the lagoons. Mr. Craig Weiderhold has measured thl3 annual variations in the populations of benthic invertebrates in the lagoons. An integral part of the F. I. T. curriculum is a requirement that each undergraduate

  4. Cytological Effects of Space Environment on Different Genotype of Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Li-jun; QIAN Yu; YANG Qian; XU Jian-long; WANG Jun-min; SUN Ye-qing

    2007-01-01

    For exploring the biological effect of space environment on different genotype of rice seeds, the cytological effects of M1 generation after space flight were studied.Twelve different genotypes of rice seeds which belong to different climate ecotype (early, medium and late) of indica and japonica were onboard "Shenzhou 4" spaceship for 162 h.After recovered the total number of mitosis cells and chromosomal aberration were observed.In all the lines the mitotic index (MIs) of space flight are much higher than control, which indicates the stimulate effect of space environment.The cell rate of chromosomal aberration (CRCA) of space flight is also much higher than control, but varies from line to line.It indicates that biological effect of space environment on rice seed dependents not only on flight duration but also on rice genotype.The radiosensitivities of different lines were also discussed according to CRCAs.

  5. ON MARKOV CHAINS IN SPACE-TIME RANDOM ENVIRONMENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Dihe; Hu Xiaoyu

    2009-01-01

    In Section 1, the authors establish the models of two kinds of Markov chains in space-time random environments (MCSTRE and MCSTRE(+)) with Abstract state space. In Section 2, the authors construct a MCSTRE and a MCSTRE(+) by an initial distribution Ф and a random Markov kernel (RMK) p(γ). In Section 3, the authors establish several equivalence theorems on MCSTRE and MCSTRE(+). Finally, the authors give two very important examples of MCMSTRE, the random walk in spce-time random environment and the Markov branching chain in space-time random environment.

  6. Passive Space Environment Effect Measurement on JEM/MPAC&SEED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimoto, Yugo; Ishizawa, Junichiro; Shimamura, Hiroyuki

    A space materials exposure experiment was conducted on the exterior of the International Space Station (ISS) using the Micro-Particles Capturer and Space Environment Exposure Device (MPAC&SEED) of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). The MPAC&SEED experiments were aboard both the Russian Service Module (SM/MPAC&SEED) and the exposed Facility of the Japanese Experiment Module, KIBO Exposed Facility (JEM/MPAC&SEED). The JEM/MPAC&SEED was attached to the Space Environment Data Acquisition Equipment-Attached Payload (SEDA-AP).

  7. Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication in the Space Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafley, Robert A.; Taminger, Karen M. B.; Bird, R. Keith

    2007-01-01

    The influence of reduced gravitational forces (in space and on the lunar or Martian surfaces) on manufacturing processes must be understood for effective fabrication and repair of structures and replacement parts during long duration space missions. The electron beam freeform fabrication (EBF3) process uses an electron beam and wire to fabricate metallic structures. The process efficiencies of the electron beam and the solid wire feedstock make the EBF3 process attractive for use in-space. This paper will describe the suitability of the EBF3 process in the space environment and will highlight preliminary testing of the EBF3 process in a zero-gravity environment.

  8. 11th International Space Conference on Protection of Materials and Structures from Space Environment

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    The proceedings published in this book document and foster the goals of the 11th International Space Conference on “Protection of Materials and Structures from Space Environment” ICPMSE-11 to facilitate exchanges between members of the various engineering and science disciplines involved in the development of space materials. Contributions cover aspects of interaction with space environment of LEO, GEO, Deep Space, Planetary environments, ground-based qualification and in-flight experiments, as well as lessons learned from operational vehicles that are closely interrelated to disciplines of atmospheric sciences, solar-terrestrial interactions and space life sciences.

  9. Microorganisms and biomolecules in space hard environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horneck, G.

    1981-01-01

    Microorganisms and biomolecules exposed to space vacuum and to different intensities of selected wavelengths of solar ultraviolet radiation is studied. The influence of these factors, applied singly or simultaneously, on the integrity of microbial systems and biomolecules is measured. Specifically, this experiment will study in Bacillus subtilis spores (1) disturbances in subsequent germination, outgrowth, and colony formation; (2) photochemical reactions of the DNA and protein in vivo and in vitro and their role in biological injury; and (3) the efficiency of repair processes in these events.

  10. Space Weather Monitoring for ISS Space Environments Engineering and Crew Auroral Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minow, Joseph; Pettit, Donald R.; Hartman, William A.

    2012-01-01

    Today s presentation describes how real time space weather data is used by the International Space Station (ISS) space environments team to obtain data on auroral charging of the ISS vehicle and support ISS crew efforts to obtain auroral images from orbit. Topics covered include: Floating Potential Measurement Unit (FPMU), . Auroral charging of ISS, . Real ]time space weather monitoring resources, . Examples of ISS auroral charging captured from space weather events, . ISS crew observations of aurora.

  11. Neuronal plasticity: adaptation and readaptation to the environment of space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, M. J.

    1998-01-01

    While there have been few documented permanent neurological changes resulting from space travel, there is a growing literature which suggests that neural plasticity sometimes occurs within peripheral and central vestibular pathways during and following spaceflight. This plasticity probably has adaptive value within the context of the space environment, but it can be maladaptive upon return to the terrestrial environment. Fortunately, the maladaptive responses resulting from neuronal plasticity diminish following return to earth. However, the literature suggests that the longer the space travel, the more difficult the readaptation. With the possibility of extended space voyages and extended stays on board the international space station, it seems worthwhile to review examples of plastic vestibular responses and changes in the underlying neural substrates. Studies and facilities needed for space station investigation of plastic changes in the neural substrates are suggested. Copyright 1998 Elsevier Science B.V.

  12. Optimization of application execution in the GridSpace environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Malawski; J. Kocot; I. Ryszka; M. Bubak; M. Wieczorek; T. Fahringer

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes an approach to optimization of execution of applications in the GridSpace environment. In this environment operations are invoked on special objects which reside on Grid resources what requires a specific approach to optimization of execution. This approach is implemented in the

  13. Space Environment Data Acquisition with KIBO Exposed Facility on the International Space Station (ISS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obara, Takahiro

    Space Environment Data Acquisition equipment with attached payload (SEDA-AP) which was mounted on the Exposed Facility (EF) of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM, also known as “Kibo”) on the International Space Station (ISS) started to measure the space environment along the orbit of ISS from Sept. 2009. This paper reports the mission objectives, instrumentation, and current status of SEDA-AP.

  14. Characterization of the Space Environment on Orbit of the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagata, Ichiro

    The material-exposure experiment was performed on the International Space Station using the Micro-Particles Capturer and Space Environment Exposure Device (MPAC & SEED) developed by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency. The experiment was executed on the exterior of the Russian Service Module (SM) of the International Space Station. The SM/MPAC & SEED consists of the MPAC, which captures the space debris, and the SEED, which exposes the polymeric material, the paints, the adhesive, the bearing, and the compound material. This paper is focused on space dust environment, and the results of the MPAC experiment are described.

  15. ISS External Contamination Environment for Space Science Utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Carlos; Mikatarian, Ron; Steagall, Courtney; Huang, Alvin; Koontz, Steven; Worthy, Erica

    2014-01-01

    (1) The International Space Station is the largest and most complex on-orbit platform for space science utilization in low Earth orbit, (2) Multiple sites for external payloads, with exposure to the associated natural and induced environments, are available to support a variety of space science utilization objectives, (3) Contamination is one of the induced environments that can impact performance, mission success and science utilization on the vehicle, and (4)The ISS has been designed, built and integrated with strict contamination requirements to provide low levels of induced contamination on external payload assets.

  16. The Living With a Star Space Environment Testbed Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xapsos, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    The focus of the Living With a Star (LWS) Space Environment Testbed (SET) program is to improve the performance of hardware in the space radiation environment. The program has developed a payload for the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) Demonstration and Science Experiments (DSX) spacecraft that is scheduled for launch in August 2015 on the SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket. The primary structure of DSX is an Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle (EELV) Secondary Payload Adapter (ESPA) ring. DSX will be in a Medium Earth Orbit (MEO). This oral presentation will describe the SET payload.

  17. Surface shapes and surrounding environment analysis of single- and double-stranded DNA-binding proteins in protein-DNA interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Liu, Juan; Sun, Lin

    2016-07-01

    Protein-DNA bindings are critical to many biological processes. However, the structural mechanisms underlying these interactions are not fully understood. Here, we analyzed the residues shape (peak, flat, or valley) and the surrounding environment of double-stranded DNA-binding proteins (DSBs) and single-stranded DNA-binding proteins (SSBs) in protein-DNA interfaces. In the results, we found that the interface shapes, hydrogen bonds, and the surrounding environment present significant differences between the two kinds of proteins. Built on the investigation results, we constructed a random forest (RF) classifier to distinguish DSBs and SSBs with satisfying performance. In conclusion, we present a novel methodology to characterize protein interfaces, which will deepen our understanding of the specificity of proteins binding to ssDNA (single-stranded DNA) or dsDNA (double-stranded DNA). Proteins 2016; 84:979-989. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Overview of International Space Station orbital environments exposure flight experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Carlos E.; Mikatarian, Ronald R.; Schmidl, Danny; Finckenor, Miria; Neish, Michael; Imagawa, Kichiro; Dinguirard, Magdeleine; van Eesbeek, Marc; Naumov, S. F.; Krylov, A. N.; Mishina, L. V.; Gerasimov, Y. I.; Sokolova, S. P.; Kurilyonok, A. O.; Alexandrov, N. G.; Smirnova, T. N.

    2004-10-01

    This paper presents an overview of International Space Station (ISS) on-orbit environments exposure flight experiments. International teams are flying, or preparing to fly, externally mounted materials exposure trays and sensor packages. The samples in these trays are exposed to a combination of induced molecular contamination, ultraviolet radiation, atomic oxygen, ionizing radiation, micrometeoroids and orbital debris. Exposed materials samples are analyzed upon return. Typical analyses performed on these samples include optical property measurements, X-ray photo spectroscopy (XPS) depth profiles, scanning electron microscope (SEM) surface morphology and materials properties measurements. The objective of these studies is to characterize the long-term effects of the natural and induced environments on spacecraft materials. Ongoing flight experiments include the U.S. Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE) program, the Japanese Micro-Particles Capturer and Space Environment Exposure Device (SM/MPAC&SEED) experiment, the Russian SKK and Kromka experiments from RSC-Energia, and the Komplast flight experiment. Flight experiments being prepared for flight, or in development stage, include the Japanese Space Environment Data Acquisition Attached Payload (SEDA-AP), the Russian BKDO monitoring package from RSC-Energia, and the European Materials Exposure and Degradation Experiment (MEDET). Results from these ISS flight experiments will be crucial to extending the performance and life of long-duration space systems such as Space Station, Space Transportation System, and other missions for Moon and Mars exploration.

  19. Modeling of space environment impact on nanostructured materials. General principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronina, Ekaterina; Novikov, Lev

    2016-07-01

    In accordance with the resolution of ISO TC20/SC14 WG4/WG6 joint meeting, Technical Specification (TS) 'Modeling of space environment impact on nanostructured materials. General principles' which describes computer simulation methods of space environment impact on nanostructured materials is being prepared. Nanomaterials surpass traditional materials for space applications in many aspects due to their unique properties associated with nanoscale size of their constituents. This superiority in mechanical, thermal, electrical and optical properties will evidently inspire a wide range of applications in the next generation spacecraft intended for the long-term (~15-20 years) operation in near-Earth orbits and the automatic and manned interplanetary missions. Currently, ISO activity on developing standards concerning different issues of nanomaterials manufacturing and applications is high enough. Most such standards are related to production and characterization of nanostructures, however there is no ISO documents concerning nanomaterials behavior in different environmental conditions, including the space environment. The given TS deals with the peculiarities of the space environment impact on nanostructured materials (i.e. materials with structured objects which size in at least one dimension lies within 1-100 nm). The basic purpose of the document is the general description of the methodology of applying computer simulation methods which relate to different space and time scale to modeling processes occurring in nanostructured materials under the space environment impact. This document will emphasize the necessity of applying multiscale simulation approach and present the recommendations for the choice of the most appropriate methods (or a group of methods) for computer modeling of various processes that can occur in nanostructured materials under the influence of different space environment components. In addition, TS includes the description of possible

  20. Operational characterisation of requirements and early validation environment for high demanding space systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barro, E.; Delbufalo, A.; Rossi, F.

    1993-01-01

    The definition of some modern high demanding space systems requires a different approach to system definition and design from that adopted for traditional missions. System functionality is strongly coupled to the operational analysis, aimed at characterizing the dynamic interactions of the flight element with its surrounding environment and its ground control segment. Unambiguous functional, operational and performance requirements are to be defined for the system, thus improving also the successive development stages. This paper proposes a Petri Nets based methodology and two related prototype applications (to ARISTOTELES orbit control and to Hermes telemetry generation) for the operational analysis of space systems through the dynamic modeling of their functions and a related computer aided environment (ISIDE) able to make the dynamic model work, thus enabling an early validation of the system functional representation, and to provide a structured system requirements data base, which is the shared knowledge base interconnecting static and dynamic applications, fully traceable with the models and interfaceable with the external world.

  1. Beyond a lesbian space? An investigation on the intergenerational discourse surrounding lesbian public social places in Amsterdam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fobear, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    This article investigates intergenerational discourse on public lesbian social spaces within Amsterdam, Netherlands. The author seeks to address how lesbian women from different generations talk about lesbian social spaces in Amsterdam through anthropological ethnographic research and semistructured interviews with 20 lesbian women who have or currently are attending these places. The author also addresses the gradual decline of lesbian specific spaces in the city and the current belief that lesbian women are beyond having a public social space that services only the lesbian community. The rise in popularity of mixed gay- and lesbian-friendly bars and girl circuit parties will be identified as a key area where generational tensions and discourse are being played out. Issues pertaining to generational disagreements over lesbian identity, visibility, and space will be addressed.

  2. Releases of phosphate fertilizer industry in the surrounding environment: investigation on heavy metals and polonium-210 in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoun, M; El Samrani, A G; Lartiges, B S; Kazpard, V; Saad, Z

    2010-01-01

    Distribution of Cu, Zn, Pb, Cr, Ni, Mn concentrations and the activity of polonium-210 in the surrounding area of a phosphate fertilizer industry located on the eastern coast of the Mediterranean Sea has been determined. Nineteen sampling sites were distributed around the industrial zone on a surface area of about 100,000 m2. Atomic absorption spectroscopy and Alpha spectroscopy were used to quantify the heavy elements and polonium-210, respectively. Investigation on a particle scale was conducted by TEM and SEM coupled to EDX and X-ray cartography to determine the nature of heavy elements carriers and their distribution. Heavy elements were mainly concentrated inside the particle size fraction Polonium-210 with an enrichment factor of about 56, showed the same behavior of the spatial distribution of the trace elements.

  3. The Space Environment Monitors of Shenzhou Manned Spacecrafts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Ying; WANG Chunqin; YE Haihua; JING Guiru; ZHU Guangwu; WANG Shijin; QIN Guotai; LIANG Jinbao; SUN Yueqiang; HUANG Xiuying; YANG Xiaochao; WANG Yue

    2004-01-01

    For the purpose of ensuring normal operations of Shenzhou (SZ) series of manned spacecrafts and cosmonauts' safety, Space Environment Monitors (SEM)are mounted on board SZ-2, 3, 4, 5. SEMs aim to detect the high energy particles, the low energy particles, charging potential, atmospheric desity and composition. Detection of SEMs enable us to understand better the space environment in the manned spacecraft's orbit, and to provide a good space environment services for the spacecraft and cosmonauts. In addition, by using the data from SEMs, we have achieved some scientific accomplishments, such as the energy spectra of precipitating electrons, the abnormal variety of atmospheric density and composition during geomagnetic disturbances, the electron angle distribution in the low orbit and so on.

  4. Lead-Free Experiment in a Space Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanche, J. F.; Strickland, S. M.

    2012-01-01

    This Technical Memorandum addresses the Lead-Free Technology Experiment in Space Environment that flew as part of the seventh Materials International Space Station Experiment outside the International Space Station for approximately 18 months. Its intent was to provide data on the performance of lead-free electronics in an actual space environment. Its postflight condition is compared to the preflight condition as well as to the condition of an identical package operating in parallel in the laboratory. Some tin whisker growth was seen on a flight board but the whiskers were few and short. There were no solder joint failures, no tin pest formation, and no significant intermetallic compound formation or growth on either the flight or ground units.

  5. Sensor Systems for Vehicle Environment Perception in a Highway Intelligent Space System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofeng Tang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A Highway Intelligent Space System (HISS is proposed to study vehicle environment perception in this paper. The nature of HISS is that a space sensors system using laser, ultrasonic or radar sensors are installed in a highway environment and communication technology is used to realize the information exchange between the HISS server and vehicles, which provides vehicles with the surrounding road information. Considering the high-speed feature of vehicles on highways, when vehicles will be passing a road ahead that is prone to accidents, the vehicle driving state should be predicted to ensure drivers have road environment perception information in advance, thereby ensuring vehicle driving safety and stability. In order to verify the accuracy and feasibility of the HISS, a traditional vehicle-mounted sensor system for environment perception is used to obtain the relative driving state. Furthermore, an inter-vehicle dynamics model is built and model predictive control approach is used to predict the driving state in the following period. Finally, the simulation results shows that using the HISS for environment perception can arrive at the same results detected by a traditional vehicle-mounted sensors system. Meanwhile, we can further draw the conclusion that using HISS to realize vehicle environment perception can ensure system stability, thereby demonstrating the method’s feasibility.

  6. Results of microbial research of environment of international space station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikova, N.; Poddubko, S.; Deshevaya, E.; Polikarpov, N.; Rakova, N.

    Many years of exploitation of orbital space stations have moved forward ecological problems among which microbial society of the environment plays a most important role. Qualitative and quantitative characteristics of microorganisms in the environment of a space object can change considerably under the influence of conditions of space flight. In the process of exploitation of the International Space Station (ISS) microflora of air, interior surfaces and equipment is monitored on a regular basis to keep continuous assessment of sanitary and microbiological state of the environment. Up to the present time 32 species of microorganisms have been recovered in the ISS, namely 15species f bacteria and 17 species of moldy fungi. In the composition of microbial species mainly nonpathogenic species have been found. However, a number of bacteria discovered on the ISS, particularly some representatives of human microflora, are capable of causing different diseases when human immune system is compromised. Moreover, some bacteria and a considerable number of fungi are known to be potential biodestructors of construction materials, which leads to biodeterioration of construction materials and equipment. Results of our research show that the existing set of life-supporting systems can maintain microbial contamination within regulated levels. Furthermore, constant microbial monitoring of the environment is an integral part, which provides for the safety of space missions.

  7. Protection of celestial environments and the law of outer space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennen, Leslie; Race, Margaret

    The law of outer space expressly addresses the matter of preservation and protection of natural celestial environments from harmful contamination and disruption by mankind in the explo-ration and use of outer space, including the moon and other celestial bodies. The Outer Space Treaty, however, does not prohibit all human impact to an extraterrestrial environment, but rather permits a wide range of activities that could have significant environmental ramifications. This legal regime may be in conflict with the interests of preserving celestial environments for scientific research, especially when considered in relation to activities conducted for commercial purposes. Nevertheless, the Moon Agreement provides a mechanism by which special protective measures can be implemented to protect particular areas of the moon and other celestial bodies for scientific investigation. This paper examines the current status of the law of outer space vis-a-vis the protection and preservation of natural celestial environments. Particular emphasis is placed on the policies on which the legal obligations are based, together with consideration of the non-appropriation principle, and the commercial use of lunar and other celestial resources and areas. In addition, the concepts of international scientific preserves, special regions, keep out zones, and planetary parks are compared and evaluated as potential means to limit the disturbance to celestial environments caused by the activities of mankind.

  8. Space industrialization. [space flight and environment for commercial/utilitarian purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disher, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    Space industrialization is defined as the use of space flight and the space environment for commercial or utilitarian purposes in contrast to other uses such as gains in basic scientific knowledge, national defense, or exploration. Some unique attributes of space that make it amenable to industrial use include overview of the earth, the 'zero gravity' effect, potential for near perfect vacuum, unlimited reservoir for disposal of waste products, availability of essentially uninterrupted flow of solar energy, and the 'perpetual motion' characteristic of orbital mechanics. The role of human participation in assembling and maintaining the large sophisticated systems that will be required for future space industrialization needs is considered.

  9. Research Environment and Information Service of the Space Weather Cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Watari

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available To optimize space weather research and information services, it is important to establish a comprehensive system that enables us to analyze observation and simulation data in an integrated manner. For this, we recently constructed a new computing environment called the "Space Weather Cloud Computing System" of the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT. Currently, the Space Weather Cloud contains a high performance computer, a distributed mass storage system using the Grid Data Farm (Gfarm technology, servers for analysis and visualization of data, a job service based on the RCM (R&D Chain Management system, servers for Solar-Terrestrial data Analysis, and the Reference System (STARS.

  10. NASA's Controlled Environment Agriculture Testing for Space Habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2014-01-01

    NASA and other space agencies have an interest in using plants for human life support in space. The plants could provide food and O2 for the humans, while removing CO2 and helping purify wastewater. Studies to date have shown that a wide range of crops can be grown in controlled environment conditions envisioned for space. Light is a critical factor both for crop productivity and system power costs, and recent improvements in LEDs make them a preferred lighting option for space. Because space systems would be tightly closed, issues such as ethylene build-up and management must be considered. Ultimately, the costs and reliability of biological life support options must be compared with more conventional life support approaches. Findings to date suggest that about 20-25 sq. meters of crops could supply the O2 for one human, while about 50 sq. meters would be required for food (dietary calories).

  11. Reproduction in the space environment: Part I. Animal reproductive studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santy, P. A.; Jennings, R. T.; Craigie, D.

    1990-01-01

    Mankind's exploration and colonization of the frontier of space will ultimately depend on men's and women's ability to live, work, and reproduce in the space environment. This paper reviews animal studies, from microorganisms to mammals, done in space or under space-simulated conditions, which identify some of the key areas which might interfere with human reproductive physiology and/or embryonic development. Those space environmental factors which impacted almost all species included: microgravity, artificial gravity, radiation, and closed life support systems. These factors may act independently and in combination to produce their effects. To date, there have been no studies which have looked at the entire process of reproduction in any animal species. This type of investigation will be critical in understanding and preventing the problems which will affect human reproduction. Part II will discuss these problems directly as they relate to human physiology.

  12. Space weather circulation model of plasma clouds as background radiation medium of space environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalu, A. E.

    A model for Space Weather (SW) Circulation with Plasma Clouds as background radiation medium of Space Environment has been proposed and discussed. Major characteristics of the model are outlined and the model assumes a baroclinic Space Environment in view of observed pronounced horizontal electron temperature gradient with prevailing weak vertical temperature gradient. The primary objective of the study is to be able to monitor and realistically predict on real- or near real-time SW and Space Storms (SWS) affecting human economic systems on Earth as well as the safety and Physiologic comfort of human payload in Space Environment in relation to planned increase in human space flights especially with reference to the ISS Space Shuttle Taxi (ISST) Programme and other prolonged deep Space Missions. Although considerable discussions are now available in the literature on SW issues, routine Meteorological operational applications of SW forecast data and information for Space Environment are still yet to receive adequate attention. The paper attempts to fill this gap in the literature of SW. The paper examines the sensitivity and variability in 3-D continuum of Plasmas in response to solar radiation inputs into the magnetosphere under disturbed Sun condition. Specifically, the presence of plasma clouds in the form of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) is stressed as a major source of danger to Space crews, spacecraft instrumentation and architecture charging problems as well as impacts on numerous radiation - sensitive human economic systems on Earth. Finally, the paper considers the application of model results in the form of effective monitoring of each of the two major phases of manned Spaceflights - take-off and re-entry phases where all-time assessment of spacecraft transient ambient micro-incabin and outside Space Environment is vital for all manned Spaceflights as recently evidenced by the loss of vital information during take-off of the February 1, 2003 US Columbia

  13. An Emulating Environment for Network Management of Space Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    An emulating environment for network management of the space network was presented . The emulating environment was developed with node-link model. The nodes of the satellite entities were controlled by the controlling network, which consist of sets of HLA/RTI based federates. These federates described the different aspect of the attributes of the satellites, such as orbit coordinate, routing table and the chain budget. We described the architecture of the emulation environment and the software design of federates. We measured the response time of the protocol data units and verified the detecting of the network topology in the environment. The environment was open that the on-board router and the simulator of satellite link which developed by third party could be integrated.

  14. Cold & Black Environment Design in Large Space Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Liu; Botao, Liu; Zijuan, Wang; Weiwei, Shan; Wenjing, Ding

    A space simulator provides a spacecraft with a specified environment during a thermal test of which a cold & black background is one of the important technical specifications. A shroud and nitrogen system used to simulate a cold & black environment with the effective space of 8500 mm × 9000 mm are studied in this article. In terms of the design of the shroud of the large space simulator, we should not only consider heat exchange and temperature uniformity, but also the feasibility of manufacture, transportation and installation. The cooling system adopts single-phase closed loop cycle. Based on the result of the test, it can be concluded that test data accord with the computational simulation result. The average temperature is 90 K and the temperature uniformity of the shroud meets the technical requirement.

  15. EnviroNET: An interactive space-environment information resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vampola, Alfred L.; Hall, William N.; Lauriente, Michael

    1988-01-01

    EnviroNET is an interactive menu-driven system set up as an information resource for experimenters, program managers, and design and test engineers involved in space missions. Its basic use is as a fundamental single source of data for the environment encountered by Shuttle and Space Station payloads, but it also has wider applicability in that it includes information on environments encountered by other satellites in both low altitude and high altitude (including geosynchronous) orbits. It incorporates both a text-retrieval mode and an interactive modeling code mode. The system is maintained on the ENVET MicroVAX computer at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center. Its services are available at no cost to any user who has access to a terminal and modem. It is a tail-node on SPAN, and so it is accessible either directly or through BITNET, ARPANET, and GTE/TELENET via NPSS.

  16. EnviroNET - An interactive space-environment information resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vampola, A. L.; Hall, William N.; Lauriente, Michael

    1989-01-01

    EnviroNET is an interactive menu-driven system set up as an information resource for experimenters, program managers, and design and test engineers involved in space missions. Its basic use is as a fundamental single source of data for the environment encountered by Shuttle and Space Station payloads, but is also has wider applicability in that it includes information on environments encountered by other satellites in both low altitude and high altitude (including geosynchronous) orbits. It incorporates both a text-retrieval mode and an interactive modeling code mode. The system is maintained on the ENVET MicroVAX computer at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center. Its services are available at no cost to any user who has access to a terminal and modem. It is a tail-node on SPAN, and so it is accessible either directly or through BITNET, ARPANET, and GTE/TELENET via NPSS.

  17. Space Use in the Commons: Evaluating a Flexible Library Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew D. Asher

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective – This article evaluates the usage and user experience of the Herman B Wells Library’s Learning Commons, a newly renovated technology and learning centre that provides services and spaces tailored to undergraduates’ academic needs at Indiana University Bloomington (IUB. Methods – A mixed-method research protocol combining time-lapse photography, unobtrusive observation, and random-sample surveys was employed to construct and visualize a representative usage and activity profile for the Learning Commons space. Results – Usage of the Learning Commons by particular student groups varied considerably from expectations based on student enrollments. In particular, business, first and second year students, and international students used the Learning Commons to a higher degree than expected, while humanities students used it to a much lower degree. While users were satisfied with the services provided and the overall atmosphere of the space, they also experienced the negative effects of insufficient space and facilities due to the space often operating at or near its capacity. Demand for collaboration rooms and computer workstations was particularly high, while additional evidence suggests that the Learning Commons furniture mix may not adequately match users’ needs. Conclusions – This study presents a unique approach to space use evaluation that enables researchers to collect and visualize representative observational data. This study demonstrates a model for quickly and reliably assessing space use for open-plan and learning-centred academic environments and for evaluating how well these learning spaces fulfill their institutional mission.

  18. The influence of environment and energy macro surroundings on the development of tourism in the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovicić, Dobrica

    2012-06-01

    Trying to anticipate the future of tourism may be a particularly fraught task. However, this does not mean that trying to predict the future of tourism is not without value. From a business perspective, examining the future enables firms to anticipate new business conditions and develop new strategies. From a destination perspective, reflections on the future enable consideration of how to maintain or improve the qualities of a destination. The paper is focused on an analysis of the impacts of the energy and ecological macro environments on tourism trends in 21st century. Mass international tourism has thrived on the abundant and cheap supply of energy, and this may be about to change as the world moves towards 'Peak Oil'. The resultant scarcity and high price of all energy fuels will produce changes in human activities, specifically in tourism. The basis of the health of the economy is the health of the environment. Therefore issues of global environmental changes are increasingly influencing consideration of trends in tourism. In this looming transitional era tourism needs to make some dramatic changes to harmonize with the new realities of a post-energy world affected additionaly by global warming and other environmental changes.

  19. Development, validation and application of numerical space environment models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honkonen, Ilja

    2013-10-01

    Currently the majority of space-based assets are located inside the Earth's magnetosphere where they must endure the effects of the near-Earth space environment, i.e. space weather, which is driven by the supersonic flow of plasma from the Sun. Space weather refers to the day-to-day changes in the temperature, magnetic field and other parameters of the near-Earth space, similarly to ordinary weather which refers to changes in the atmosphere above ground level. Space weather can also cause adverse effects on the ground, for example, by inducing large direct currents in power transmission systems. The performance of computers has been growing exponentially for many decades and as a result the importance of numerical modeling in science has also increased rapidly. Numerical modeling is especially important in space plasma physics because there are no in-situ observations of space plasmas outside of the heliosphere and it is not feasible to study all aspects of space plasmas in a terrestrial laboratory. With the increasing number of computational cores in supercomputers, the parallel performance of numerical models on distributed memory hardware is also becoming crucial. This thesis consists of an introduction, four peer reviewed articles and describes the process of developing numerical space environment/weather models and the use of such models to study the near-Earth space. A complete model development chain is presented starting from initial planning and design to distributed memory parallelization and optimization, and finally testing, verification and validation of numerical models. A grid library that provides good parallel scalability on distributed memory hardware and several novel features, the distributed cartesian cell-refinable grid (DCCRG), is designed and developed. DCCRG is presently used in two numerical space weather models being developed at the Finnish Meteorological Institute. The first global magnetospheric test particle simulation based on the

  20. High-Performance, Radiation-Hardened Electronics for Space Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keys, Andrew S.; Watson, Michael D.; Frazier, Donald O.; Adams, James H.; Johnson, Michael A.; Kolawa, Elizabeth A.

    2007-01-01

    The Radiation Hardened Electronics for Space Environments (RHESE) project endeavors to advance the current state-of-the-art in high-performance, radiation-hardened electronics and processors, ensuring successful performance of space systems required to operate within extreme radiation and temperature environments. Because RHESE is a project within the Exploration Technology Development Program (ETDP), RHESE's primary customers will be the human and robotic missions being developed by NASA's Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD) in partial fulfillment of the Vision for Space Exploration. Benefits are also anticipated for NASA's science missions to planetary and deep-space destinations. As a technology development effort, RHESE provides a broad-scoped, full spectrum of approaches to environmentally harden space electronics, including new materials, advanced design processes, reconfigurable hardware techniques, and software modeling of the radiation environment. The RHESE sub-project tasks are: SelfReconfigurable Electronics for Extreme Environments, Radiation Effects Predictive Modeling, Radiation Hardened Memory, Single Event Effects (SEE) Immune Reconfigurable Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) (SIRF), Radiation Hardening by Software, Radiation Hardened High Performance Processors (HPP), Reconfigurable Computing, Low Temperature Tolerant MEMS by Design, and Silicon-Germanium (SiGe) Integrated Electronics for Extreme Environments. These nine sub-project tasks are managed by technical leads as located across five different NASA field centers, including Ames Research Center, Goddard Space Flight Center, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Langley Research Center, and Marshall Space Flight Center. The overall RHESE integrated project management responsibility resides with NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Initial technology development emphasis within RHESE focuses on the hardening of Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA)s and Field Programmable Analog

  1. Space Environment Testing of Photovoltaic Array Systems at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Brandon S.; Schneider, Todd A.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Wright, Kenneth H., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    To successfully operate a photovoltaic (PV) array system in space requires planning and testing to account for the effects of the space environment. It is critical to understand space environment interactions not only on the PV components, but also the array substrate materials, wiring harnesses, connectors, and protection circuitry (e.g. blocking diodes). Key elements of the space environment which must be accounted for in a PV system design include: Solar Photon Radiation, Charged Particle Radiation, Plasma, and Thermal Cycling. While solar photon radiation is central to generating power in PV systems, the complete spectrum includes short wavelength ultraviolet components, which photo-ionize materials, as well as long wavelength infrared which heat materials. High energy electron radiation has been demonstrated to significantly reduce the output power of III-V type PV cells; and proton radiation damages material surfaces - often impacting coverglasses and antireflective coatings. Plasma environments influence electrostatic charging of PV array materials, and must be understood to ensure that long duration arcs do not form and potentially destroy PV cells. Thermal cycling impacts all components on a PV array by inducing stresses due to thermal expansion and contraction. Given such demanding environments, and the complexity of structures and materials that form a PV array system, mission success can only be ensured through realistic testing in the laboratory. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has developed a broad space environment test capability to allow PV array designers and manufacturers to verify their system's integrity and avoid costly on-orbit failures. The Marshall Space Flight Center test capabilities are available to government, commercial, and university customers. Test solutions are tailored to meet the customer's needs, and can include performance assessments, such as flash testing in the case of PV cells.

  2. Space Shuttle Orbiter logistics - Managing in a dynamic environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renfroe, Michael B.; Bradshaw, Kimberly

    1990-01-01

    The importance and methods of monitoring logistics vital signs, logistics data sources and acquisition, and converting data into useful management information are presented. With the launch and landing site for the Shuttle Orbiter project at the Kennedy Space Center now totally responsible for its own supportability posture, it is imperative that logistics resource requirements and management be continually monitored and reassessed. Detailed graphs and data concerning various aspects of logistics activities including objectives, inventory operating levels, customer environment, and data sources are provided. Finally, some lessons learned from the Shuttle Orbiter project and logistics options which should be considered by other space programs are discussed.

  3. The Orbital Space Environment and Space Situational Awareness Domain Ontology - Toward an International Information System for Space Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovetto, R.

    2016-09-01

    The orbital space environment is home to natural and artificial satellites, debris, and space weather phenomena. As the population of orbital objects grows so do the potential hazards to astronauts, space infrastructure and spaceflight capability. Orbital debris, in particular, is a universal concern. This and other hazards can be minimized by improving global space situational awareness (SSA). By sharing more data and increasing observational coverage of the space environment we stand to achieve that goal, thereby making spaceflight safer and expanding our knowledge of near-Earth space. To facilitate data-sharing interoperability among distinct orbital debris and space object catalogs, and SSA information systems, I proposed ontology in (Rovetto, 2015) and (Rovetto and Kelso, 2016). I continue this effort toward formal representations and models of the overall domain that may serve to improve peaceful SSA and increase our scientific knowledge. This paper explains the project concept introduced in those publications, summarizing efforts to date as well as the research field of ontology development and engineering. I describe concepts for an ontological framework for the orbital space environment, near-Earth space environment and SSA domain. An ontological framework is conceived as a part of a potential international information system. The purpose of such a system is to consolidate, analyze and reason over various sources and types of orbital and SSA data toward the mutually beneficial goals of safer space navigation and scientific research. Recent internationals findings on the limitations of orbital data, in addition to existing publications on collaborative SSA, demonstrate both the overlap with this project and the need for datasharing and integration.

  4. SEVO (Space Environment Viability of Organics) Preliminary Results from Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, A.; Ehrenfreund, P.; Mattioda, A.; Quinn, R.; Ricco, A. J.; Bramall, N.; Chittenden, J.; Bryson, K.; Minelli, G.

    2012-01-01

    SEVO (Space Environment Viability of Organics) is one of two astrobiology experiments onboard the NASA Organism/Organics Exposure to Orbital Stresses (O/OREOS) cubesat, launched in November 2010. The satellite is still operational with nominal performance and records data on a regular basis. In the SEVO experiment, four astrobiologically relevant organic thin films are exposed to radiation in low-earth orbit, including the unfiltered solar spectrum from approximately 120 - 2600 nm. The thin films are contained in each of four separate micro-environments: an atmosphere containing CO2, a low relative humidity (approximately 2%) atmosphere, an inert atmosphere representative of interstellar/interplanetary space, and a SiO2 mineral surface to measure the effects of surface catalysis. The UV/Vis spectrum of each sample is monitored in situ, with a spectrometer onboard the satellite.

  5. Studying the Earth and the Environment from Space

    OpenAIRE

    Cazenave, Anny

    2015-01-01

    We are all used to see images of the Earth’s atmosphere taken by meteorological satellites. These images, along with many other observations collected from space, from the ground and within the atmosphere itself, are used to feed models with which meteorologists are able to forecast the weather. Whereas meteorological maps are well known to the public, fewer people know that many other domains relating to the Earth’s environment also benefit from satellites’ constant monitoring. For example,...

  6. Simulated Space Environment Effects on a Candidate Solar Sail Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jin Ho; Bryant, Robert G.; Wilkie, W. Keats; Wadsworth, Heather M.; Craven, Paul D.; Nehls, Mary K.; Vaughn, Jason A.

    2017-01-01

    For long duration missions of solar sails, the sail material needs to survive harsh space environments and the degradation of the sail material controls operational lifetime. Therefore, understanding the effects of the space environment on the sail membrane is essential for mission success. In this study, we investigated the effect of simulated space environment effects of ionizing radiation, thermal aging and simulated potential damage on mechanical, thermal and optical properties of a commercial off the shelf (COTS) polyester solar sail membrane to assess the degradation mechanisms on a feasible solar sail. The solar sail membrane was exposed to high energy electrons (about 70 keV and 10 nA/cm2), and the physical properties were characterized. After about 8.3 Grad dose, the tensile modulus, tensile strength and failure strain of the sail membrane decreased by about 20 95%. The aluminum reflective layer was damaged and partially delaminated but it did not show any significant change in solar absorbance or thermal emittance. The effect on mechanical properties of a pre-cracked sample, simulating potential impact damage of the sail membrane, as well as thermal aging effects on metallized PEN (polyethylene naphthalate) film will be discussed.

  7. Charged dust phenomena in the near-Earth space environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scales, W. A.; Mahmoudian, A.

    2016-10-01

    Dusty (or complex) plasmas in the Earth’s middle and upper atmosphere ultimately result in exotic phenomena that are currently forefront research issues in the space science community. This paper presents some of the basic criteria and fundamental physical processes associated with the creation, evolution and dynamics of dusty plasmas in the near-Earth space environment. Recent remote sensing techniques to probe naturally created dusty plasma regions are also discussed. These include ground-based experiments employing high-power radio wave interaction. Some characteristics of the dusty plasmas that are actively produced by space-borne aerosol release experiments are discussed. Basic models that may be used to investigate the characteristics of such dusty plasma regions are presented.

  8. Atmospheric environment for space shuttle (STS-35) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasper, G. L.; Batts, G. W.

    1991-01-01

    A summary is given of selected atmospheric conditions observed near space shuttle STS-35 launch time on December 2, 1990, at Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observations (cloud), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of prelaunch Jimsphere-measured vertical wind profiles is given in this report. The final atmospheric tape, which consists of wind and thermodynamic parameters versus altitude, for STS-35 vehicle ascent has been constructed. The STS-35 ascent atmospheric data tape has been constructed by Marshall Space Flight Center's Earth Science and Applications Division to provide an internally consistent data set for use in postflight performance assessments and represents the best estimate of the launch environment to the 400,000-ft altitude that was traversed by the STS-35 vehicle.

  9. Atmospheric environment for Space Shuttle Atlantis (STS-43) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasper, G. L.; Batts, G. W.

    1992-01-01

    A summary of selected atmospheric conditions observed near Space Shuttle Atlantis (STS-43) launch time on August 2, 1991, at Kennedy Space Center, Florida is presented. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observations (cloud), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of prelaunch Jimsphere-measured vertical wind profiles is given. The final atmospheric profile, which consists of wind and thermodynamic parameters versus altitude, for STS-43 vehicle ascent was constructed. The STS-43 ascent atmospheric data profile was constructed by Marshall Space Flight Center's Earth Science and Applications Division to provide an internally consisted data set for use in postflight performance assessments and represents the best estimate of the launch environment to the 400,000-ft altitude that was traversed by the STS-43 vehicle.

  10. Atmospheric environment for space shuttle (STS-41) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasper, G. L.; Batts, G. W.

    1990-01-01

    A summary of selected atmospheric conditions observed near space shuttle STS-41 launch time on October 6, 1990, at Kennedy Space Center, Florida are presented. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observations (clouds), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of prelaunch Jimsphere-measured vertical wind profiles is given. The final atmospheric tape, which consists of wind and thermodynamic parameters versus altitude, for STS-41 vehicle ascent was constructed. The STS-41 ascent atmospheric data tape was constructed by Marshall Space Flight Center's Earth Science and Applications Division to provide an internally consistent data set for use in postflight performance assessments and represents the best estimate of the launch environment to the 400,000 ft altitude that was traversed by the STS-41 vehicle.

  11. Atmospheric environment for space shuttle (STS-38) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasper, G. L.; Batts, G. W.

    1991-01-01

    A summary of selected atmospheric conditions observed near space shuttle STS-38 launch time on November 15, 1990, at Kennedy Space Center is presented. STS-38 carried a Department of Defense payload and the flight azimuth in this report will be denoted by a reference flight azimuth, since the actual flight azimuth is not known. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observation (cloud), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of prelaunch Jimsphere-measured vertical wind profiles is presented. The final atmospheric tape, which consists of wind and thermodynamic parameters versus altitude, for STS-38 vehicle ascent was constructed. The STS-38 ascent atmospheric data tape was constructed by Marshall Space Flight Center's Earth Science and Applications Division to provide an internally consistent data set for use in postflight performance assessments and represents the best estimate of the launch environment to the 400,000-ft altitude that was traversed by the STS-38 vehicle.

  12. The Design Space of Multi-Language Development Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfeiffer, Rolf-Helge; Wasowski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    languages. By means of a literature survey, tool prototyping and experiments we study the design space of multi-language development environments (MLDEs)—tools that consider the cross-language relations as first artifacts. We ask: what is the state of the art in the MLDE space? What are the design choices...... and challenges faced by tool builders? To what extent MLDEs are desired by users, and for what support features? Our main conclusions are that (a) cross-language re- lations are ubiquitous and troublesome in multi-language systems, (b) users highly appreciated cross-language sup- port mechanisms of MLDEs and (c......, that implement two radically different choices in the design space....

  13. Space vehicle with artificial gravity and earth-like environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, V. H. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A space vehicle adapted to provide an artificial gravity and earthlike atmospheric environment for occupants is disclosed. The vehicle comprises a cylindrically shaped, hollow pressure-tight body, one end of which is tapered from the largest diameter of the body, the other end is flat and transparent to sunlight. The vehicle is provided with thrust means which rotates the body about its longitudinal axis, generating an artificial gravity effect upon the interior walls of the body due to centrifugal forces. The walls of the tapered end of the body are maintained at a temperature below the dew point of water vapor in the body and lower than the temperature near the transparent end of the body. The controlled environment and sunlight permits an earth like environment to be maintained wherein the CO2/O2 is balanced, and food for the travelers is supplied through a natural system of plant life grown on spacecraft walls where soil is located.

  14. Free space optical communication links in a marine environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadwal, Veena; Hammel, Stephen

    2006-08-01

    We present an analysis of Free Space Optical (FSO) signal attenuation experienced in a marine environment. This work is in support of the Communication Link Assessment in Marine Environments program (CLAIME), for the Navy's investment in a network infrastructure for high altitude tactical layer connectivity to the Global Information Grid. The expanded bandwidth requirement can be realized using FSO networking capabilities. The performance of the link needs to be evaluated for different platforms such as ship-to-ship, airborne-to-ship, as well as airborne-to-airborne links. Near surface horizontal links required for ship-to-ship communications will be described in detail. The challenges faced in this environment include determining the attenuation due to aerosol scattering as well as optical turbulence. Determining the attenuation due to fog, haze, rain and snow will be addressed as well.

  15. The Influence of Free Space Environment in the Mission Life Cycle: Material Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, David L.; Burns, Howard D.; de Groh, Kim K.

    2014-01-01

    The natural space environment has a great influence on the ability of space systems to perform according to mission design specification. Understanding the natural space environment and its influence on space system performance is critical to the concept formulation, design, development, and operation of space systems. Compatibility with the natural space environment is a primary factor in determining the functional lifetime of the space system. Space systems being designed and developed today are growing in complexity. In many instances, the increased complexity also increases its sensitivity to space environmental effects. Sensitivities to the natural space environment can be tempered through appropriate design measures, material selection, ground processing, mitigation strategies, and/or the acceptance of known risks. The design engineer must understand the effects of the natural space environment on the space system and its components. This paper will discuss the influence of the natural space environment in the mission life cycle with a specific focus on the role of material selection.

  16. Combined injury syndrome in space-related radiation environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dons, R. F.; Fohlmeister, U.

    The risk of combined injury (CI) to space travelers is a function of exposure to anomalously large surges of a broad spectrum of particulate and photon radiations, conventional trauma (T), and effects of weightlessness including decreased intravascular fluid volume, and myocardial deconditioning. CI may occur even at relatively low doses of radiation which can synergistically enhance morbidity and mortality from T. Without effective countermeasures, prolonged residence in space is expected to predispose most individuals to bone fractures as a result of calcium loss in the microgravity environment. Immune dysfunction may occur from residence in space independent of radiation exposure. Thus, wound healing would be compromised if infection were to occur. Survival of the space traveler with CI would be significantly compromised if there were delays in wound closure or in the application of simple supportive medical or surgical therapies. Particulate radiation has the potential for causing greater gastrointestinal injury than photon radiation, but bone healing should not be compromised at the expected doses of either type of radiation in space.

  17. Operational environments for electrical power wiring on NASA space systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavnes, Mark W.; Hammoud, Ahmad N.; Bercaw, Robert W.

    1994-01-01

    Electrical wiring systems are used extensively on NASA space systems for power management and distribution, control and command, and data transmission. The reliability of these systems when exposed to the harsh environments of space is very critical to mission success and crew safety. Failures have been reported both on the ground and in flight due to arc tracking in the wiring harnesses, made possible by insulation degradation. This report was written as part of a NASA Office of Safety and Mission Assurance (Code Q) program to identify and characterize wiring systems in terms of their potential use in aerospace vehicles. The goal of the program is to provide the information and guidance needed to develop and qualify reliable, safe, lightweight wiring systems, which are resistant to arc tracking and suitable for use in space power applications. This report identifies the environments in which NASA spacecraft will operate, and determines the specific NASA testing requirements. A summary of related test programs is also given in this report. This data will be valuable to spacecraft designers in determining the best wiring constructions for the various NASA applications.

  18. Extreme Environment Technologies for Space and Terrestrial Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balint, Tibor S.; Cutts, James A.; Kolawa, Elizabeth A.; Peterson, Craig E.

    2008-01-01

    Over the next decades, NASA's planned solar system exploration missions are targeting planets, moons and small bodies, where spacecraft would be expected to encounter diverse extreme environmental (EE) conditions throughout their mission phases. These EE conditions are often coupled. For instance, near the surface of Venus and in the deep atmospheres of giant planets, probes would experience high temperatures and pressures. In the Jovian system low temperatures are coupled with high radiation. Other environments include thermal cycling, and corrosion. Mission operations could also introduce extreme conditions, due to atmospheric entry heat flux and deceleration. Some of these EE conditions are not unique to space missions; they can be encountered by terrestrial assets from the fields of defense,oil and gas, aerospace, and automotive industries. In this paper we outline the findings of NASA's Extreme Environments Study Team, including discussions on state of the art and emerging capabilities related to environmental protection, tolerance and operations in EEs. We will also highlight cross cutting EE mitigation technologies, for example, between high g-load tolerant impactors for Europa and instrumented projectiles on Earth; high temperature electronics sensors on Jupiter deep probes and sensors inside jet engines; and pressure vessel technologies for Venus probes and sea bottom monitors. We will argue that synergistic development programs between these fields could be highly beneficial and cost effective for the various agencies and industries. Some of these environments, however, are specific to space and thus the related technology developments should be spear headed by NASA with collaboration from industry and academia.

  19. Characteristics of the road and surrounding environment in metropolitan shopping strips: association with the frequency and severity of single-vehicle crashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Karen L; Newstead, Stuart V

    2014-01-01

    Modeling crash risk in urban areas is more complicated than in rural areas due to the complexity of the environment and the difficulty obtaining data to fully characterize the road and surrounding environment. Knowledge of factors that impact crash risk and severity in urban areas can be used for countermeasure development and the design of risk assessment tools for practitioners. This research aimed to identify the characteristics of the road and roadside, surrounding environment, and sociodemographic factors associated with single-vehicle crash (SVC) frequency and severity in complex urban environments, namely, strip shopping center road segments. A comprehensive evidence-based list of data required for measuring the influence of the road, roadside, and other factors on crash risk was developed. The data included a broader range of factors than those traditionally considered in accident prediction models. One hundred and forty-two strip shopping segments located on arterial roads in metropolitan Melbourne, Australia, were identified. Police-reported casualty data were used to determine how many SVC occurred on the segments between 2005 and 2009. Data describing segment characteristics were collected from a diverse range of sources; for example, administrative government databases (traffic volume, speed limit, pavement condition, sociodemographic data, liquor licensing), detailed maps, on-line image sources, and digital images of arterial roads collected for the Victorian state road authority. Regression models for count data were used to identify factors associated with SVC frequency. Logistic regression was used to determine factors associated with serious and fatal outcomes. One hundred and seventy SVC occurred on the 142 selected road segments during the 5-year study period. A range of factors including traffic exposure, road cross section (curves, presence of median), road type, requirement for sharing the road with other vehicle types (trams and bicycles

  20. Pharmaceuticals Exposed to the Space Environment: Problems and Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworske, Donald A.; Myers, Jerry G.

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Human Research Program (HRP) Health Countermeasures Element maintains ongoing efforts to inform detailed risks, gaps, and further questions associated with the use of pharmaceuticals in space. Most recently, the Pharmacology Risk Report, released in 2010, illustrates the problems associated with maintaining pharmaceutical efficacy. Since the report, one key publication includes evaluation of pharmaceutical products stored on the International Space Station (ISS). This study shows that selected pharmaceuticals on ISS have a shorter shelf-life in space than corresponding terrestrial controls. The HRP Human Research Roadmap for planetary exploration identifies the risk of ineffective or toxic medications due to long-term storage during missions to Mars. The roadmap also identifies the need to understand and predict how pharmaceuticals will behave when exposed to radiation for long durations. Terrestrial studies of returned samples offer a start for predictive modeling. This paper shows that pharmaceuticals returned to Earth for post-flight analyses are amenable to a Weibull distribution analysis in order to support probabilistic risk assessment modeling. The paper also considers the prospect of passive payloads of key pharmaceuticals on sample return missions outside of Earth's magnetic field to gather additional statistics. Ongoing work in radiation chemistry suggests possible mitigation strategies where future work could be done at cryogenic temperatures to explore methods for preserving the strength of pharmaceuticals in the space radiation environment, perhaps one day leading to an architecture where pharmaceuticals are cached on the Martian surface and preserved cryogenically.

  1. Radiation Belt Environment Model: Application to Space Weather and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fok, Mei-Ching H.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics and variability of the radiation belts are of great scientific and space weather significance. A physics-based Radiation Belt Environment (RBE) model has been developed to simulate and predict the radiation particle intensities. The RBE model considers the influences from the solar wind, ring current and plasmasphere. It takes into account the particle drift in realistic, time-varying magnetic and electric field, and includes diffusive effects of wave-particle interactions with various wave modes in the magnetosphere. The RBE model has been used to perform event studies and real-time prediction of energetic electron fluxes. In this talk, we will describe the RBE model equation, inputs and capabilities. Recent advancement in space weather application and artificial radiation belt study will be discussed as well.

  2. Using semantics to extend the space physics data environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narock, T. W.; Szabo, A.; Merka, J.

    2009-04-01

    The space physics data environment is evolving with the advent of virtual observatories. With the primary function of most virtual observatories being data search and retrieval, an emphasis has been placed on providing value-added data processing services. That is, creating web services that take discovered data and provide common and routine processing such as coordinate transformations and data sub-setting. As these services proliferate, finding, accessing and using them no longer becomes a trivial task. This paper discusses a semantic registry that enables the searching of these services via ontology. We discuss the benefits of such a registry and illustrate how the web and application programming interfaces benefit the space physics community.

  3. Atmospheric Environment for Space Shuttle (STS-28) Launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasper, G. L.; Batts, G. W.

    1990-01-01

    A summary is presented of selected atmospheric conditions observed near Space Shuttle STS-28 launch time on August 8, 1989. STS-28 carried a Department of Defense payload and the flight azimuth is denoted by a reference flight azimuth, since the actual flight azimuth is not known. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observations (cloud), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of prelaunch Jimsphere-measured vertical wind profiles is given. The final atmospheric tape, which consists of wind and thermodynamic parameters versus altitude, for STS-28 vehicle ascent was constructed and represents the best estimate of the launch environment to 400,000 ft altitude that was traversed by the STS-28 vehicle. The STS-28 ascent atmospheric data tape was constructed by Marshall Space Flight Center's Earth Science and Applications Division to provide an internally consistent data set for use in post-flight performance assessments.

  4. Atmospheric environment for Space Shuttle (STS-37) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasper, G. L.; Batts, G. W.

    1991-01-01

    A summary of selected atmospheric conditions observed near Space Shuttle STS-37 launch time on 5 Apr. 1991 at KSC is presented. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observations (clouds), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of prelaunch Jimsphere-measured vertical wind profiles is given. The final atmospheric tape, which consists of wind and thermodynamic parameters versus altitude, for STS-37 vehicle ascent was constructed. The STS-37 ascent atmospheric data tape was constructed by Marshall Space Flight Center's Earth Science and Applications Division to provide an internally consistent data set for use in postflight performance assessments and represents the best estimate of the launch environment to the 400,000 ft. altitude that was traversed by the STS-37 vehicle.

  5. Atmospheric environment for space shuttle (STS-36) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasper, G. L.; Batts, G. W.

    1990-01-01

    A summary of selected atmospheric conditions observed near space shuttle STS-36 launch time on February 28, 1990, at Kennedy Space Center, Florida was presented. STS-36 carried a Department of Defense payload and the flight azimuth is not known. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observations (cloud), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of pre-launch Jimsphere-measured vertical wind profiles is given. The final atmospheric tape, which consists of wind and thermodynamic parameters versus altitude, for STS-36 vehicle ascent was constructed. The STS-36 ascent atmospheric data tape was constructed to provide an internally consistent data set for use in postflight performance assessments and represent the best estimate of the launch environment to the 400,000 feet altitude that was traversed by the STS-36 vehicle.

  6. Atmospheric environment for space shuttle (STS-34) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasper, G. L.; Batts, G. W.

    1989-01-01

    A summary of selected atmospheric conditions observed near space shuttle STS-34 launch time on October 18, 1989, at Kennedy Space Center, Florida is presented. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observations (clouds), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of pre-launch Jimsphere-measured vertical wind profiles is given. The final atmospheric tape, which consists of wind and thermodynamic parameters vs. altitude, for STS-34 vehicle ascent was constructed to provide an internally consistent data set for use in post-flight performance assessments. It represents the best estimates of the launch environment to the 400,000 feet altitude that was traversed by the STS-34 vehicle.

  7. Atmospheric environment for Space Shuttle (STS-32) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasper, G. L.; Batts, G. W.

    1990-01-01

    A summary of selected atmospheric conditions observed near space shuttle STS-32 launch time on January 9, 1990, at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, are presented. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observations (clouds), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of pre-launch Jimsphere-measured vertical wind profiles is also presented. The final atmospheric tape, which consists of wind and thermodynamic parameters versus altitude, for STS-32 vehicle ascent was constructed. The STS-32 ascent atmospheric data tape was constructed to provide an internally consistent data set for use in postflight performance assessments and represents the best estimate of the launch environment that was traversed by the STS-32 vehicle.

  8. Atmospheric environment for Space Shuttle Atlantis (STS-39) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasper, G. L.; Batts, G. W.

    1992-01-01

    A summary is presented of selected atmospheric conditions observed near space shuttle Atlantis STS-39 launch time on 28 April 1991, at Kennedy Space Center, FL. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observations (cloud), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of prelaunch Jimsphere measured vertical wind profiles is given. The final atmospheric tape, which consists of wind and thermodynamic parameters versus altitude, for STS-39 vehicle ascent was constructed. The STS-39 ascent atmospheric data tape was constructed by NASA-Marshall to provide an internally consistent data set for use in postflight performance assessments and represents the best estimate of the launch environment to the 400,000 ft altitude that was traversed by the STS-39 vehicle.

  9. Atmospheric environment for Space Shuttle (STS-31) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasper, G. L.; Batts, G. W.

    1990-01-01

    A summary of selected atmospheric conditions observed near space shuttle STS-31 launch time on April 24, 1990, at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, are presented. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observations (clouds), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of pre-launch Jimsphere-measured vertical wind profiles is also presented. The final atmospheric tape, which consists if wind and thermodynamic parameters versus altitude, for STS-31 vehicle ascent was constructed. The STS-31 ascent atmospheric data tape was constructed to provide an internally consistent data set for use in postflight performance assessments and represent the best estimated of the launch environment to the 400,000 feet altitude that was traversed by the STS-31 vehicle.

  10. Process material management in the Space Station environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, J. L.; Humphries, W. R.

    1988-01-01

    The Space Station will provide a unique facility for conducting material-processing and life-science experiments under microgravity conditions. These conditions place special requirements on the U.S. Laboratory for storing and transporting chemicals and process fluids, reclaiming water from selected experiments, treating and storing experiment wastes, and providing vacuum utilities. To meet these needs and provide a safe laboratory environment, the Process Material Management System (PMMS) is being developed. Preliminary design requirements and concepts related to the PMMS are addressed, and the MSFC PMMS breadboard test facility and a preliminary plan for validating the overall system design are discussed.

  11. Process material management in the Space Station environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, J. L.; Humphries, W. R.

    1988-01-01

    The Space Station will provide a unique facility for conducting material-processing and life-science experiments under microgravity conditions. These conditions place special requirements on the U.S. Laboratory for storing and transporting chemicals and process fluids, reclaiming water from selected experiments, treating and storing experiment wastes, and providing vacuum utilities. To meet these needs and provide a safe laboratory environment, the Process Material Management System (PMMS) is being developed. Preliminary design requirements and concepts related to the PMMS are addressed, and the MSFC PMMS breadboard test facility and a preliminary plan for validating the overall system design are discussed.

  12. A Deterministic Transport Code for Space Environment Electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nealy, John E.; Chang, C. K.; Norman, Ryan B.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Badavi, Francis F.; Adamczyk, Anne M.

    2010-01-01

    A deterministic computational procedure has been developed to describe transport of space environment electrons in various shield media. This code is an upgrade and extension of an earlier electron code. Whereas the former code was formulated on the basis of parametric functions derived from limited laboratory data, the present code utilizes well established theoretical representations to describe the relevant interactions and transport processes. The shield material specification has been made more general, as have the pertinent cross sections. A combined mean free path and average trajectory approach has been used in the transport formalism. Comparisons with Monte Carlo calculations are presented.

  13. Terrestrial Applications of Extreme Environment Stirling Space Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Rodger. W.

    2012-01-01

    NASA has been developing power systems capable of long-term operation in extreme environments such as the surface of Venus. This technology can use any external heat source to efficiently provide electrical power and cooling; and it is designed to be extremely efficient and reliable for extended space missions. Terrestrial applications include: use in electric hybrid vehicles; distributed home co-generation/cooling; and quiet recreational vehicle power generation. This technology can reduce environmental emissions, petroleum consumption, and noise while eliminating maintenance and environmental damage from automotive fluids such as oil lubricants and air conditioning coolant. This report will provide an overview of this new technology and its applications.

  14. Why Space is Unique? The Basic Environment Challenges for EEE Parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.; Sampson, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    This presentation includes an introduction the space radiation environment, the effects on electronics, the environment in action, flight projects, mission needs, and radiation hardness assurance (RHA).

  15. Sulphonamide and trimethoprim resistance genes persist in sediments at Baltic Sea aquaculture farms but are not detected in the surrounding environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Windi Indra Muziasari

    Full Text Available Persistence and dispersal of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs are important factors for assessing ARG risk in aquaculture environments. Here, we quantitatively detected ARGs for sulphonamides (sul1 and sul2 and trimethoprim (dfrA1 and an integrase gene for a class 1 integron (intI1 at aquaculture facilities in the northern Baltic Sea, Finland. The ARGs persisted in sediments below fish farms at very low antibiotic concentrations during the 6-year observation period from 2006 to 2012. Although the ARGs persisted in the farm sediments, they were less prevalent in the surrounding sediments. The copy numbers between the sul1 and intI1 genes were significantly correlated suggesting that class 1 integrons may play a role in the prevalence of sul1 in the farm sediments through horizontal gene transfer. In conclusion, the presence of ARGs may limit the effectiveness of antibiotics in treating fish illnesses, thereby causing a potential risk to the aquaculture industry. However, the restricted presence of ARGs at the farms is unlikely to cause serious effects in the northern Baltic Sea sediment environments around the farms.

  16. Analysis of the Thermo-Elastic Response of Space Reflectors to Simulated Space Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegri, G.; Ivagnes, M. M.; Marchetti, M.; Poscente, F.

    2002-01-01

    The evaluation of space environment effects on materials and structures is a key matter to develop a proper design of long duration missions: since a large part of satellites operating in the earth orbital environment are employed for telecommunications, the development of space antennas and reflectors featured by high dimensional stability versus space environment interactions represents a major challenge for designers. The structural layout of state of the art space antennas and reflectors is very complex, since several different sensible elements and materials are employed: particular care must be placed in evaluating the actual geometrical configuration of the reflectors operating in the space environment, since very limited distortions of the designed layout can produce severe effects on the quality of the signal both received and transmitted, especially for antennas operating at high frequencies. The effects of thermal loads due to direct sunlight exposition and to earth and moon albedo can be easily taken into account employing the standard methods of structural analysis: on the other hand the thermal cycling and the exposition to the vacuum environment produce a long term damage accumulation which affects the whole structure. The typical effects of the just mentioned exposition are the outgassing of polymeric materials and the contamination of the exposed surface, which can affect sensibly the thermo-mechanical properties of the materials themselves and, therefore, the structural global response. The main aim of the present paper is to evaluate the synergistic effects of thermal cycling and of the exposition to high vacuum environment on an innovative antenna developed by Alenia Spazio S.p.a.: to this purpose, both an experimental and numerical research activity has been developed. A complete prototype of the antenna has been exposed to the space environment simulated by the SAS facility: this latter is constituted by an high vacuum chamber, equipped by

  17. Mutagenesis of Bacillus subtilis spores exposed to simulated space environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munakata, N.; Natsume, T.; Takahashi, K.; Hieda, K.; Panitz, C.; Horneck, G.

    Bacterial spores can endure in a variety of extreme earthly environments. However, some conditions encountered during the space flight could be detrimental to DNA in the spore, delimiting the possibility of transpermia. We investigate the genetic consequences of the exposure to space environments in a series of preflight simulation project of EXPOSE. Using Bacillus subtilis spores of repair-proficient HA101 and repair-deficient TKJ6312 strains, the mutations conferring resistance to rifampicin were detected, isolated and sequenced. Most of the mutations were located in a N-terminal region of the rpoB gene encoding RNA polymerase beta-subunit. Among several potentially mutagenic factors, high vacuum, UV radiation, heat, and accelerated heavy ions induced mutations with varying efficiencies. A majority of mutations induced by vacuum exposure carried a tandem double-base change (CA to TT) at a unique sequence context of TCAGC. Results indicate that the vacuum and high temperature may act synergistically for the induction of mutations.

  18. Farming of Vegetables in Space-Limited Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jie

    2015-10-01

    Vegetables that contain most of the essential components of human nutrition are perishable and cannot be stocked. To secure vegetable supply in space limited cities such as Singapore, there are different farming methods to produce vegetables. These include low-cost urban community gardening and innovative rooftop and vertical farms integrated with various technologies such as hydroponics, aquaponics and aeroponics. However, for large-scale vegetable production in space-limited Singapore, we need to develop farming systems that not only increase productivity many-fold per unit of land but also produce all types of vegetable, all year-round for today and the future. This could be resolved through integrated vertical aeroponic farming system. Manipulation of root-zone (RZ) environments such as cooling the RZ, modifying mineral nutrients and introducing elevated RZ CO2 using aeroponics can further boost crop productivity beyond what can be achieved from more efficient use of land area. We could also adopt energy saving light emitting diodes (LEDs) for vertical aeroponic farming system to promote uniform growth and to improve the utilisation of limited space via shortening the growth cycle, thus improving vegetable production in a cost-effective manner.

  19. Adaptation of radiation shielding code to space environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okuno, Koichi; Hara, Akihisa (Hazama Corp., Tokyo (Japan))

    1992-12-01

    Recently, the trend to the development of space has heightened. To the development of space, many problems are related, and as one of them, there is the protection from cosmic ray. The cosmic ray is the radiation having ultrahigh energy, and there was not the radiation shielding design code that copes with cosmic ray so far. Therefore, the high energy radiation shielding design code for accelerators was improved so as to cope with the peculiarity that cosmic ray possesses. Moreover, the calculation of the radiation dose equivalent rate in the moon base to which the countermeasures against cosmic ray were taken was simulated by using the improved code. As the important countermeasures for the safety protection from radiation, the covering with regolith is carried out, and the effect of regolith was confirmed by using the improved code. Galactic cosmic ray, solar flare particles, radiation belt, the adaptation of the radiation shielding code HERMES to space environment, the improvement of the three-dimensional hadron cascade code HETCKFA-2 and the electromagnetic cascade code EGS 4-KFA, and the cosmic ray simulation are reported. (K.I.).

  20. Experimental Studies of NAK in a Simulated Space Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, M. A.; Sanzi, J.; Ljubanovic, D.

    Space fission power systems are being developed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and Department of Energy (DOE) with a short term goal of building a full scale, non-nuclear, Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU) test at NASA's Glenn Research Center. Due to the geometric constraints, mass restrictions, and fairly high tempera- tures associated with space reactors, liquid metals are typically used as the primary coolant. A eutectic mixture of sodium (22 percent) and potassium (78 percent), or NaK, has been chosen as the coolant for the TDU with a total system capacity of approximately 55L. NaK, like all alkali metals, is very reactive, and warrants certain safety considerations. To adequately examine the risk associated with the personnel, facility, and test hardware during a potential NaK leak in the large scale TDU test, a small scale experiment was performed in which NaK was released in a thermal vacuum chamber under controlled conditions. The study focused on detecting NaK leaks in the vacuum environment as well as the molecular flow of the NaK vapor. This paper reflects the work completed during the NaK experiment and provides results and discussion relative to the findings.

  1. Concept of Prostration in Traditional Malay Mosque Design to the Surrounding Environment with Case Study of Tranquerah Mosque in Malacca, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Sanusi Hassan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This study discusses symbol of prostration concept in the traditional Malay mosque design in Malacca. The literature review covers definition of the keywords, which are sustainable elements, traditional mosque design in Malacca and prostration. The purpose is to identify factors that have significant roles in defining symbol of obedience concept based on Islamic perspectives in the traditional Malay mosque design. In this study, concept of obedience is defined as the acts of prostration to the surrounding environment. The level of prostration is measured based on five Islamic laws as follows; obligation (wajib, desirability (sunat, permissibility (harus, undesirability (makruh and prohibition (haram. These laws are used as measurable scale in the research analysis to measure the level of prostration in the mosque design. Tranquerah Mosque located in Tranquerah district, Malacca is selected as the case study. This mosque is the oldest mosque in Malacca and second oldest mosque in Malaysia. The analysis shows that the mosque’s symbol of prostration concept is influenced by the local climatic context with reference to comfort and health as the primary indicators. The design elements comprise pyramid roof form, tiered roof system, roof overhangs, roof ridge form, building orientation, open veranda and wall openings.

  2. Seals Having Textured Portions for Protection in Space Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Christopher (Inventor); Garafolo, Nicholas (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A sealing construct for a space environment includes a seal-bearing object, a seal on the seal-bearing object, and a seal-engaging object. The seal includes a seal body having a sealing surface, and a textured pattern at the sealing surface, the textured pattern defining at least one shaded channel surface. The seal-engaging object is selectively engaged with the seal-bearing object through the seal. The seal-engaging object has a sealing surface, wherein, when the seal-engaging object is selectively engaged with the seal-bearing object, the sealing surface of the seal-engaging object engages the sealing surface of the seal, and the seal is compressed between the seal-bearing object and the seal-engaging object such that at least one shaded channel surface engages the sealing surface of the seal-engaging object.

  3. Atmospheric environment for space shuttle (STS-33) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasper, G. L.; Batts, G. W.

    1990-01-01

    A summary is presented of selected atmospheric conditions observed near space shuttle STS-33 at launch time. STS-33 carried a DOD payload and the flight azimuth is denoted by a reference flight azimuth, since the actual flight azimuth is not known. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observations (clouds), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of pre-launch Jimsphere measured vertical wind profiles is given. The final atmospheric tape, which consists of wind and thermodynamic parameters versus altitude, for STS-33 vehicle ascent, was constructed. The STS-33 ascent atmospheric data tape was constructed by NASA-Marshall to provide an internally consistent data set for use in postflight performance assessments and represents the best estimates of the launch environment to the 400,000 ft altitude that was traversed by the STS-33 vehicle.

  4. Atmospheric environment for Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-40) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasper, G. L.; Batts, G. W.

    1992-01-01

    A summary of selected atmospheric conditions observed near the Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-40) launch time on 5 Jun. 1991, at KSC is presented. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observation (cloud), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of prelaunch Jimsphere-measured vertical wind profiles is given. The final atmospheric tape, which consists of wind and thermodynamic parameters versus altitude, for STS-40 vehicle ascent was constructed. The STS-40 ascent atmospheric data tape was constructed by MSFC's Earth Science and Applications Division to provide an internally consistent data set for use in postflight performance assessments and represents the best estimate of the launch environment to the 400,000-ft altitude that was traversed by the STS-40 vehicle.

  5. Space Environment Simulation for Material Processing by Acoustic Levitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    解文军; 魏炳波

    2001-01-01

    Single-axis acoustic levitation of four polymer samples has been realized in air under the ground-based laboratory conditions for the purpose of space environment simulation of containerless processing. The levitation capabilities are investigated by numerical calculations based on a model of the boundary element method corresponding to our levitator and following Gor'kov and Barmatz's method. The calculated results, such as the resonant distance between the reflector and the vibrating source and the positions of levitated samples, agree well with experimental observation, and the effect of gravity on the time-averaged potential for levitation force is also revealed. As an application, the containerless melting and solidification of a liquid crystal, 4-Pentylphenyl-4'-methybenzoate, is successfully accomplished, in which undercooling up to 16 K is obtained and the rotation and oscillation of the sample during solidification may result in fragmentation of the usual radiating surface growth morphology.

  6. Planning and Construction of Green Space Surrounding City Libraries Under High-density Background%高密度背景下城市图书馆周边绿地规划与建设

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王滢

    2012-01-01

    随着我国城市化和经济建设的快速发展,一座座高楼大厦鳞次栉比拔地而起,塑造了高密度的新城市景观。由于土地资源本身固有属性的限制,土地供需矛盾,尤其是高密度地区用地供需矛盾日益尖锐。图书馆建筑也出现低层向多层纵向发展的态势,其周边绿地表现出新的空间特征。在这种背景下如何做好绿地规划与建设,本文提出一些原则和方法,以期图书馆空间环境质量得到不断提高。%In recent years,with the development of national economic construction,many of new landmark library building is emerging.Because of the limitation of land resource,in high density areas,the land supply and demand contradiction is increasingly sharp.Under this background,this paper puts forward some principle and ways of planning and construction of green space surrounding high-density city libraries,in order to improve the environment quality of library space.

  7. The International Space Station and the Space Debris Environment: 10 Years On

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Nicholas; Klinkrad, Heiner

    2009-01-01

    For just over a decade the International Space Station (ISS), the most heavily protected vehicle in Earth orbit, has weathered the space debris environment well. Numerous hypervelocity impact features on the surface of ISS caused by small orbital debris and meteoroids have been observed. In addition to typical impacts seen on the large solar arrays, craters have been discovered on windows, hand rails, thermal blankets, radiators, and even a visiting logistics module. None of these impacts have resulted in any degradation of the operation or mission of the ISS. Validating the rate of small particle impacts on the ISS as predicted by space debris environment models is extremely complex. First, the ISS has been an evolving structure, from its original 20 metric tons to nearly 300 metric tons (excluding logistics vehicles) ten years later. Hence, the anticipated space debris impact rate has grown with the increasing size of ISS. Secondly, a comprehensive visual or photographic examination of the complete exterior of ISS has never been accomplished. In fact, most impact features have been discovered serendipitously. Further complications include the estimation of the size of an impacting particle without knowing its mass, velocity, and angle of impact and the effect of shadowing by some ISS components. Inadvertently and deliberately, the ISS has also been the source of space debris. The U.S. Space Surveillance Network officially cataloged 65 debris from ISS from November 1998 to November 2008: from lost cameras, sockets, and tool bags to intentionally discarded equipment and an old space suit. Fortunately, the majority of these objects fall back to Earth quickly with an average orbital lifetime of less than two months and a maximum orbital lifetime of a little more than 15 months. The cumulative total number of debris object-years is almost exactly 10, the equivalent of one piece of debris remaining in orbit for 10 years. An unknown number of debris too small to be

  8. OverView of Space Applications for Environment (SAFE) initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamamoto, Ko; Fukuda, Toru; Tajima, Yoshimitsu; Takeuchi, Wataru; Sobue, Shinichi; Nukui, Tomoyuki

    2014-06-01

    Climate change and human activities have a direc or indirect influence on the acceleration of environmental problems and natural hazards such as forest fires, draughts and floods in the Asia-Pacific countries. Satellite technology has become one of the key information sources in assessment, monitoring and mitigation of these disasters and related phenomenon. However, there are still gaps between science and application of satellite technology in real-world usage. Asia-Pacific Regional Space Agency Forum (APRSAF) recommended to initiate the Space Applications for Environment (SAFE) proposal providing opportunity to potential user agencies in the Asia Pacific region to develop prototype applications of satellite technology for number of key issues including forest resources management, coastal monitoring and management, agriculture and food security, water resource management and development user-friendly tools for application of satellite technology. This paper describes the overview of SAFE initiative and outcomes of two selected prototypes; agricultural drought monitoring in Indonesia and coastal management in Sri Lanka, as well as the current status of on-going prototypes.

  9. Multispectral optical telescope alignment testing for a cryogenic space environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newswander, Trent; Hooser, Preston; Champagne, James

    2016-09-01

    Multispectral space telescopes with visible to long wave infrared spectral bands provide difficult alignment challenges. The visible channels require precision in alignment and stability to provide good image quality in short wavelengths. This is most often accomplished by choosing materials with near zero thermal expansion glass or ceramic mirrors metered with carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) that are designed to have a matching thermal expansion. The IR channels are less sensitive to alignment but they often require cryogenic cooling for improved sensitivity with the reduced radiometric background. Finding efficient solutions to this difficult problem of maintaining good visible image quality at cryogenic temperatures has been explored with the building and testing of a telescope simulator. The telescope simulator is an onaxis ZERODUR® mirror, CFRP metered set of optics. Testing has been completed to accurately measure telescope optical element alignment and mirror figure changes in a cryogenic space simulated environment. Measured alignment error and mirror figure error test results are reported with a discussion of their impact on system optical performance.

  10. The space environment monitor aboard FY-2 satellite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU; Guangwu; LI; Baoquan; WANG; Shijin; LIN; Hua'an; LIAN

    2005-01-01

    The space environment monitor (SEM) aboard FY-2 satellite consists of the high energy particle detector (HEPD) and the solar X-ray flux detector (SXFD). The SEM can provide real-time monitoring of flare and solar proton event for its operation at geostationary orbit and is also the first Chinese space system for monitoring and alerting solar proton event. During the 23rd solar maximum cycle, almost all the solar proton events that took place in this period are monitored and some of them are predicted successfully by analyzing the characteristics of X-ray flare monitored by the SEM. Some basic variation characteristics of particle at geostationary orbit are found such as day-night periodic variation of particle flux, the electron flux with energy >1.4 MeV in the scope from 10 to 200/cm2.s-sr and the proton flux with energy >1.1 MeV in the scope from 600 to 8000/cm2-s.sr during the time with no magnetic storm and solar eruption.

  11. AF-GEOSpace Version 2.5: Space Environment Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilmer, R. V.; Hall, T.; Roth, C.; Ling, A.; Ginet, G. P.; Madden, D.

    2010-12-01

    AF-GEOSpace is a graphics-intensive software program with space environment models and applications developed by the Space Weather Center of Excellence at AFRL. The software addresses a wide range of physical domains, e.g., solar disturbance propagation, geomagnetic field and radiation belt configurations, auroral particle precipitation, and ionospheric scintillation. AF-GEOSpace has become a platform for developing and prototyping space weather visualization products. The new AF-GEOSpace Version 2.5 (release scheduled for 2010) expands on the content of Version 2.1 by including modules addressing the following new topics: (1) energetic proton maps for the South Atlantic Anomaly (from Ginet et al. [2007]), (2) GPS scintillation outage simulation tools, (3) magnetopause location determination (Shue et al. [1998]), (4) a plasmasphere model (Global Core Plasma Model, 2009 version based on Gallagher et al. [2000]), (5) a standard ionospheric model (International Reference Ionosphere 2007), (6) the CAMMICE/MICS model of inner magnetosphere plasma population (based on Roeder et al. [2005]), (7) magnetic field models (e.g., Tsyganenko and Sitnov [2005]), and (8) loading and displaying externally-produced 3D gridded data sets within AF-GEOSpace. Improvements to existing Version 2.1 capabilities include: (1) a 2005 update to the geomagnetic cutoff rigidity model of Smart and Shea [2003], (2) a 2005 update to the ionospheric scintillation Wide-Band Model (WBMOD) of Secan and Bussey [1994], and (3) improved magnetic field flux mapping options for the existing set of AF-GEOSpace radiation belt models. A basic review of these new AF-GEOSpace capabilities will be provided. To obtain a copy of the software, please contact the first author.

  12. Fast Neutron Dosimeter for the Space Environment Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Secondary neutrons make a significant contribution to the total absorbed dose received by space crews during long duration space missions However, only a limited...

  13. Ultralightweight PV Array Materials for Deep Space Mission Environments Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Photovoltaic arrays for future deep space NASA missions demand multiple functionalities. They must efficiently generate electrical power, have very large areas and...

  14. A novel immune-to-CNS communication pathway: cells of the meninges surrounding the spinal cord CSF space produce proinflammatory cytokines in response to an inflammatory stimulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieseler-Frank, Julie; Jekich, Brian M; Mahoney, John H; Bland, Sondra T; Maier, Steven F; Watkins, Linda R

    2007-07-01

    Pain is enhanced in response to elevations of proinflammatory cytokines in spinal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), following either intrathecal injection of these cytokines or intrathecal immune challenge with HIV-1 gp120 that induces cytokine release. Spinal cord glia have been assumed to be the source of endogenous proinflammatory cytokines that enhance pain. However, assuming that spinal cord glia are the sole source of CSF cytokines may be an underestimate, as the cellular composition of the meninges surrounding the spinal cord CSF space includes several cell types known to produce proinflammatory cytokines. The present experiments provide the first investigation of the immunocompetent nature of the spinal cord meninges. Here, we explore whether rat meninges are responsive to intrathecal gp120. These studies demonstrate that: (a) intrathecal gp120 upregulates meningeal gene expression of proinflammatory signals, including tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), interleukin 6 (IL-6), and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and (b) intrathecal gp120 induces meningeal release of TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, and IL-6. In addition, stimulation of isolated meninges in vitro with gp120 induced the release of TNF-alpha and IL-1beta, indicating that the resident cells of the meninges are able to respond without immune cell recruitment. Taken together, these data document that the meninges are responsive to immunogenic stimuli in the CSF and that the meninges may be a source of immune products detected in CSF. The ability of the meninges to release to proinflammatory signals suggests a potential role in the modulation of pain.

  15. Mutations of photosystem II D1 protein that empower efficient phenotypes of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii under extreme environment in space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardi, Maria Teresa; Rea, Giuseppina; Lambreva, Maya D; Antonacci, Amina; Pastorelli, Sandro; Bertalan, Ivo; Johanningmeier, Udo; Mattoo, Autar K

    2013-01-01

    Space missions have enabled testing how microorganisms, animals and plants respond to extra-terrestrial, complex and hazardous environment in space. Photosynthetic organisms are thought to be relatively more prone to microgravity, weak magnetic field and cosmic radiation because oxygenic photosynthesis is intimately associated with capture and conversion of light energy into chemical energy, a process that has adapted to relatively less complex and contained environment on Earth. To study the direct effect of the space environment on the fundamental process of photosynthesis, we sent into low Earth orbit space engineered and mutated strains of the unicellular green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, which has been widely used as a model of photosynthetic organisms. The algal mutants contained specific amino acid substitutions in the functionally important regions of the pivotal Photosystem II (PSII) reaction centre D1 protein near the QB binding pocket and in the environment surrounding Tyr-161 (YZ) electron acceptor of the oxygen-evolving complex. Using real-time measurements of PSII photochemistry, here we show that during the space flight while the control strain and two D1 mutants (A250L and V160A) were inefficient in carrying out PSII activity, two other D1 mutants, I163N and A251C, performed efficient photosynthesis, and actively re-grew upon return to Earth. Mimicking the neutron irradiation component of cosmic rays on Earth yielded similar results. Experiments with I163N and A251C D1 mutants performed on ground showed that they are better able to modulate PSII excitation pressure and have higher capacity to reoxidize the QA (-) state of the primary electron acceptor. These results highlight the contribution of D1 conformation in relation to photosynthesis and oxygen production in space.

  16. Mutations of photosystem II D1 protein that empower efficient phenotypes of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii under extreme environment in space.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Teresa Giardi

    Full Text Available Space missions have enabled testing how microorganisms, animals and plants respond to extra-terrestrial, complex and hazardous environment in space. Photosynthetic organisms are thought to be relatively more prone to microgravity, weak magnetic field and cosmic radiation because oxygenic photosynthesis is intimately associated with capture and conversion of light energy into chemical energy, a process that has adapted to relatively less complex and contained environment on Earth. To study the direct effect of the space environment on the fundamental process of photosynthesis, we sent into low Earth orbit space engineered and mutated strains of the unicellular green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, which has been widely used as a model of photosynthetic organisms. The algal mutants contained specific amino acid substitutions in the functionally important regions of the pivotal Photosystem II (PSII reaction centre D1 protein near the QB binding pocket and in the environment surrounding Tyr-161 (YZ electron acceptor of the oxygen-evolving complex. Using real-time measurements of PSII photochemistry, here we show that during the space flight while the control strain and two D1 mutants (A250L and V160A were inefficient in carrying out PSII activity, two other D1 mutants, I163N and A251C, performed efficient photosynthesis, and actively re-grew upon return to Earth. Mimicking the neutron irradiation component of cosmic rays on Earth yielded similar results. Experiments with I163N and A251C D1 mutants performed on ground showed that they are better able to modulate PSII excitation pressure and have higher capacity to reoxidize the QA (- state of the primary electron acceptor. These results highlight the contribution of D1 conformation in relation to photosynthesis and oxygen production in space.

  17. A Comprehensive CFD Tool for Aerothermal Environment Around Space Vehicles Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goal of this SBIR project is to develop an innovative, high fidelity computational tool for accurate prediction of aerothermal environment around space vehicles....

  18. A Comprehensive CFD Tool for Aerothermal Environment Around Space Vehicles Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goal of this SBIR project is to develop an innovative, high fidelity computational tool for accurate prediction of aerothermal environment around space...

  19. High Performance Processors for Space Environments: A Subproject of the NASA Exploration Missions Systems Directorate "Radiation Hardened Electronics for Space Environments" Technology Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M.; Label, K.; McCabe, J.; Powell, W.; Bolotin, G.; Kolawa, E.; Ng, T.; Hyde, D.

    2007-01-01

    Implementation of challenging Exploration Systems Missions Directorate objectives and strategies can be constrained by onboard computing capabilities and power efficiencies. The Radiation Hardened Electronics for Space Environments (RHESE) High Performance Processors for Space Environments project will address this challenge by significantly advancing the sustained throughput and processing efficiency of high-per$ormance radiation-hardened processors, targeting delivery of products by the end of FY12.

  20. Evaluation of the effects of solar radiation on glass. [space environment simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firestone, R. F.; Harada, Y.

    1979-01-01

    The degradation of glass used on space structures due to electromagnetic and particulate radiation in a space environment was evaluated. The space environment was defined and a simulated space exposure apparatus was constructed. Four optical materials were exposed to simulated solar and particulate radiation in a space environment. Sapphire and fused silica experienced little change in transmittance, while optical crown glass and ultra low expansion glass darkened appreciably. Specimen selection and preparation, exposure conditions, and the effect of simulated exposure are discussed. A selective bibliography of the effect of radiation on glass is included.

  1. THE DECOMPOSITION OF STATE SPACE FOR MARKOV CHAIN IN RANDOM ENVIRONMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Dihe

    2005-01-01

    This paper is a continuation of [8] and [9]. The author obtains the decomposition of state space χof an Markov chain in random environment by making use of the results in [8] and [9], gives three examples, random walk in random environment, renewal process in random environment and queue process in random environment, and obtains the decompositions of the state spaces of these three special examples.

  2. Study on the effects of the space environment on laser transmission characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qiang; Liu, Peng; Tong, Shoufen; Zhang, Peng

    2014-11-01

    Laser space communication has obvious advantages in interstellar transmission - but the space environment will have a direct impact on laser communication system. The function of the analysis of space environment identity effectively could reduce and avoid the bug and invalidation produced by the overload to prolong the using span of effective load and increase the credibility of effective load, meanwhile it is also the main principle to design and research .This article summarizes the characteristics of vacuum space environment(Effect of vacuum outlet, Molecular contamination effect, Vacuum Mount, Cold welding effect, Heat radiation effect under vacuum), low temperature environment, background radiation (including space background radiation caused by thermal radiation, space background radiation caused by light noise). Space background radiation for the performance of space laser communication load is two aspects: one is the background of space radiation caused by thermal radiation, it mainly affects the satellite platform and payload of the thermal control design; Background spectrum caused by radiation and space, it will affect the space laser communication of the signal-to-noise ratio of the receiving unit, which affect the acquisition probability, tracking accuracy and error rate of communication, and particle radiation environment (Including total dose effects, single event effect), the plasma environment in five areas from the characteristics of space environment, for the problem of Space channel Influence the laser communication system performance. On this basis ,this article analysis the influence of space environment on the laser communication system with some examples, which will lay the foundation for the application of space laser communication system of our country.

  3. Using Space Weather Variability in Evaluation the Radiation Environment Specifications for NASA's Constellation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Victoria N.; Minow, Joseph I.; Bruce, Margaret; Howard, James W.

    2008-01-01

    Hardware design environments for NASA's Constellation Program-the Vision for Space Exploration program to design and build new vehicles for servicing low Earth orbit and the Moon and beyond-have been developed that are necessarily conservative in nature to assure robust hardware design and development required to build space systems which will meet operational goals in a wide range of space environments, This presentation will describe the rationale used to establish the space radiation and plasma design environments specified for a variety of applications including total ionizing radiation dose, dose rate effects, and spacecraft charging and will compare the design environments with "space weather" variability to evaluate the applicability of the design environments and potential vulnerabilities of the system to extreme space weather events.

  4. Atmospheric environment for Space Shuttle (STS-4) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D. L.; Hill, C. K.; Batts, G. W.

    1982-01-01

    Selected atmospheric conditions observed near space shuttle STS-4 launch time on June 27, 1982, at Kennedy Space Center, Florida are summarized. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observations (cloud), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of prelaunch Jimsphere measured vertical wind profiles is given as well as the wind and thermodynamic parameters measured at the surface and aloft in the SRB descent/impact ocean area. Final meteorological tapes, which consist of wind descent were constructed. The STS-4 ascent meteorological data tape was constructed by Marshall Space Flight Center in response to shuttle task agreement No. 989-13-22-368 with Johnson Space Center.

  5. Atmospheric environment for Space Shuttle (STS-9) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D. L.; Hill, C. K.; Batts, G. W.

    1984-01-01

    This report presents a summary of selected atmospheric conditions observed near Space Shuttle STS-9 launch time on November 28, 1983, at Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observations (cloud), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of prelaunch Jimsphere measured vertical wind profiles is given in this report. The final meteorological tape, which consists of wind and thermodynamic parameters versus altitude, for STS-9 vehicle ascent has been constructed. The STS-9 ascent meteorological data tape has been constructed by Marshall Space Flight Center in response to Shuttle task agreement No. 561-81-22-368 with Johnson Space Center.

  6. Atmospheric environment for space shuttle (STS-13) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D. L.; Hill, C. K.; Jasper, G.; Batts, G. W.

    1984-01-01

    Selected atmospheric conditions observed near Space Shuttle STS-13 launch time on April 6, 1984, at Kennedy Space Center Florida are summarized. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observations (cloud), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of prelaunch Jimsphere measured vertical wind profiles is given. The final meteorological tape, which consists of wind and thermodynamic parameters versus altitude, for STS-13 vehicle ascent was constructed by Marshall Space Flight Center in response to shuttle task agreement No. 561-81-22-368 with Johnson Space Center.

  7. Non-Uniform Plasma Discharges in Near Earth Space Environment and Ionosphere to Troposphere Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCanney, J. M.

    2009-05-01

    excess current of protons in the solar wind, which creates an overall capacitor with inherent non-uniform electric field surrounding the Sun. On a local scale the voltage gradients are quite low, but all objects in this solar capacitor, including the planets and their moon systems, discharge this capacitor over extensive trans-planetary distances, thus creating excessive current flows, which also respond to CMEs and solar flares which carry a far greater potential gradient in the passing solar wind. The key to understanding reactions to non-uniform electric fields in the LEB environment is based on the fact that planetary Debye shielding takes on a new form, which is extended from that of the neutral environment typically considered in previous theoretical models. An attempt is made to solve the fundamental problem of the source of energy that drives these systems. The effects of moons and their positions relative to the planet and solar wind, as well as multiple planetary electrical alignments, are shown to contribute to the overall discharge phenomenon. A connection is made between these energy sources and cyclonic storms, earthquakes and volcanic "trigger" mechanisms. The goal of this research is to create an overall space weather model that couples the single energy source (the non-uniform plasma environment of the Sun created by an excess current of positive charge in the solar wind) to the earth's magnetosphere and ionosphere (and other planetary environments) and ultimately to the low altitude weather systems.

  8. Amorphous and polycrystalline water ices in space environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Diana; Pilling, Sergio; Da Silveira, Enio; Barros, Ana

    2016-07-01

    Ices are an important reservoir of more complex molecular species in several space environments, containing information about the composition and formation of these regions. Water ice is the dominant constituent of interstellar ices in most lines of sight and is about 70 % of the composition in comets, being a key molecule in astrochemical models. It is believed that one of the reactive species possibly evaporated from the water ices is the hydronium ion, H_{3}O^{+}, which plays an important role in the oxygen chemistry network. This ion has been detected in the lunar surface of Enceladus and Titan, and toward the Sagittarius B2 molecular Clouds, where H_{2}O and OH were also identified. In this work, the ion desorption due to radiolysis in ices constituted by water at three different temperatures (40, 70 and 125 K) is studied, to investigate the different allotropic water ices. A discussion on the rate of H_{3}O^{+} and water delivered to gas phase, as well as the half-life of water ice grains, inside dense molecular clouds considering a constants cosmic ray flux is given. The ions desorbed from water ice have been mass/charge analyzed by a time-of-flight spectrometer. Among the results, it is seen that in the positive ion spectrum of high density amorphous water ice at 40 K the highest desorption yields (ejected ions/impact) correspond to H^{+}, H_{3}O^{+} and clusters formed by (H_{2}O)_{n}R^{+}, where R^{+} is H_{3}O^{+} and 1 ≤ n ≤ 25. At T = 125 K, the ice is in its low density polycrystalline form and new clusters are present, such as (H_{2}O)_{n}R^{+}, where R^{+} is H_{2}^{+} and H_{3}^{+} (for low n), beyond H_{3}O^{+}. Therefore, it is seen that (H_{2}O)_{n}H_{3}O^{+} series (with n between 1 and 25) is dominant in all cases. The H_{3}O^{+} desorption yield at 40 K is about 5times10^{-3} ions/impact. This value is 4-5 times higher than the one obtained at T > 125 K. This behavior is also seen to all series member and consequently to the sum (Yn).

  9. Effects of the space flight environment on the immune system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald; Butel, Janet S.; Shearer, William T.

    2003-01-01

    Space flight conditions have a dramatic effect on a variety of physiologic functions of mammals, including muscle, bone, and neurovestibular function. Among the physiological functions that are affected when humans or animals are exposed to space flight conditions is the immune response. The focus of this review is on the function of the immune system in space flight conditions during actual space flights, as well as in models of space flight conditions on the earth. The experiments were carried out in tissue culture systems, in animal models, and in human subjects. The results indicate that space flight conditions alter cell-mediated immune responses, including lymphocyte proliferation and subset distribution, and cytokine production. The mechanism(s) of space flight-induced alterations in immune system function remain(s) to be established. It is likely, however, that multiple factors, including microgravity, stress, neuroendocrine factors, sleep disruption, and nutritional factors, are involved in altering certain functions of the immune system. Such alterations could lead to compromised defenses against infections and tumors.

  10. Networked Environments that Create Hybrid Spaces for Learning Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otrel-Cass, Kathrin; Khoo, Elaine; Cowie, Bronwen

    2014-01-01

    Networked learning environments that embed the essence of the Community of Inquiry (CoI) framework utilise pedagogies that encourage dialogic practices. This can be of significance for classroom teaching across all curriculum areas. In science education, networked environments are thought to support student investigations of scientific problems,…

  11. Moonwalk Series. Program 2; Adapting to a Space Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1970-01-01

    This episode (second in a four-part series) shows the procedures Apollo operators used in order to make sure the astronauts would be able to survive in outer space, namely testing man's limitations and preferences (atmospheric pressure, temperature range, breathing gas, acceleration protection) and adapting the Columbia Module to account for these limitations. This show explains the function of the different stages of the moon rocket, i.e., how the stages separate and what becomes of them. We pick up the moonwalk story by looking back at some of the old classic space films that were a Hollywood perspective on future space travel.

  12. Atmospheric environment for space shuttle (STS-26) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasper, G. L.; Johnson, D. L.; Batts, G. W.

    1989-01-01

    A summary of selected atmospheric conditions observed near Space Shuttle STS-26 launch time on September 29, 1988, at Kennedy Space Center, Florida is given. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observations (cloud), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of pre-launch Jimsphere measured vertical wind profiles is given. The final atmospheric tape, which consists of wind and thermodynamic parameters versus altitude, for STS-26 vehicle ascent has been constructed. The STS-26 ascent atmospheric data tape has been constructed by Marshall Space Flight Center's Earth Science and Applications Division to provide an internally consistent data set for use in post-flight performance assessments.

  13. Atmospheric environment for Space Shuttle (STS-51D)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasper, G. L.; Johnson, D. L.; Hill, C. K.; Batts, G. W.

    1985-01-01

    A summary of selected atmospheric conditions observed near the space shuttle STS-51D launch time on April 12, 1985, at Kennedy Space Center Florida is presented. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observations (cloud), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of prelaunch Jimsphere measured vertical wind profiles is given in this report. The final atmospheric tape, which consists of wind and thermodynamic parameters versus altitude, for STS-51D vehicle ascent is constructed. The STS-51D ascent atmospheric data tape is compiled by Marshall Space Flight Center's Atmospheric Sciences Division to provide an internally consistent data set for use in post-flight performance assessments.

  14. Atmospheric environment for space shuttle (STS-51L) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasper, G. L.; Johnson, D. L.; Alexander, M.; Fichtl, G. H.; Batts, G. W.

    1986-01-01

    A summary is given of selected atmospheric conditions observed near Space Shuttle STS-51L launch time on January 28, 1986, at Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observations (cloud), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of pre-launch Jimsphere measured vertical wind profiles is given. The final atmospheric tape, which consists of wind and thermodynamic parameters versus altitude, for STS-51L vehicle ascent has been constructed. The STS-51L ascent atmospheric data tape has been constructed by Marshall Space Flight Center's Atmospheric Sciences Division to provide an internally consistent data set for use in post flight performance assessments.

  15. Atmospheric environment for space shuttle (STS-51B) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasper, G. L.; Johnson, D. L.; Hill, C. K.; Batts, G. W.

    1985-01-01

    A summary of selected atmospheric conditions observed near space shuttle STS-51B launch time on April 29, 1985, at Kennedy Space Center Florida is presented. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observations (cloud), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of prelaunch Jimsphere measured vertical wind profiles is given. The final atmospheric tape, which consists of wind and thermodynamic parameters versus altitude, for STS-51B vehicle ascent was constructed. The STS-51B ascent atmospheric data tape was constructed by Marshall Space Flight Center's Atmospheric Sciences Division to provide an internally consistent data set for use in post flight performance assessments.

  16. Using Space Weather Variability in Evaluating the Radiation Environment Design Specifications for NASA's Constellation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Victoria N.; Blackwell, William C.; Minow, Joseph I.; Bruce, Margaret B.; Howard, James W.

    2007-01-01

    NASA's Constellation program, initiated to fulfill the Vision for Space Exploration, will create a new generation of vehicles for servicing low Earth orbit, the Moon, and beyond. Space radiation specifications for space system hardware are necessarily conservative to assure system robustness for a wide range of space environments. Spectral models of solar particle events and trapped radiation belt environments are used to develop the design requirements for estimating total ionizing radiation dose, displacement damage, and single event effects for Constellation hardware. We first describe the rationale using the spectra chosen to establish the total dose and single event design environmental specifications for Constellation systems. We then compare variability of the space environment to the spectral design models to evaluate their applicability as conservative design environments and potential vulnerabilities to extreme space weather events

  17. Super Lightweight, Metal Rubber Fabric for Extreme Space Environments Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NanoSonic has fabricated revolutionary nanostructured, yet macroscale, multifunctional Metal RubberTM films via layer-by-layer, molecular self-assembly, which...

  18. Atmospheric environment for Space Shuttle (STS-5) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D. L.; Hill, C. K.; Batts, G. W.

    1983-01-01

    This report presents a summary of selected atmospheric conditions observed near Space Shuttle STS-5 launch time on November 11, 1982, at Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observations (cloud), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of prelaunch Jimsphere measured vertical wind profiles is given in this report. Also presented are the wind and thermodynamic parameters measured at the surface and aloft in he SRB descent/impact ocean area. Final meteorological tapes, which consist of wind and thermodynamic parameters versus altitude, for STS-5 vehicle ascent and SRB descent have been constructed. The STS-5 ascent meteorological data tape has been constructed by Marshall Space Flight Center in response to Shuttle task agreement No. 936-53-22-368 with Johnson Space Center.

  19. Atmospheric environment for Space Shuttle (STS-7) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D. L.; Hill, C. K.; Batts, G. W.

    1983-01-01

    Selected atmospheric conditions observed near Space Shuttle STS-7 launch time on June 18, 1983, at Kennedy Space Center, Florida are summarized. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observations (cloud), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of prelaunch Jimsphere measured vertical wind profiles is given in this report. Also presented are wind and thermodynamic parameters representative of surface and aloft conditions in the SRB descent/impact ocean area. Final meteorological tapes, which consist of wind and thermodynamic parameters versus altitude, for STS-7 vehicle ascent and Acoustic/SRB descent have been constructed. The STS-7 ascent meteorological data tape has been constructed by Marshall Space Flight Center in response to Shuttle task agreement No. 936-53-22-368 with Johnson Space Center.

  20. Atmospheric environment for Space Shuttle (STS-6) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D. L.; Hill, C. K.; Batts, G. W.

    1983-01-01

    Selected atmospheric conditions observed near Space Shuttle STS-6 launch time on April 4, 1983, at Kennedy Space Center, Florida are summarized. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observations (cloud), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of prelaunch Jimsphere measured vertical wind profiles is given. Also presented are the wind and thermodynamic parameters measured at the surface and aloft in the SRB descent/impact ocean area. Final meteorological tapes, which consist of wind and thermodynamic parameters versus altitude, for STS-6 veicle ascent and SRB descent were constructed. The STS-6 ascent meteorological data tape was constructed by Marshall Space Flight Center in response to Shuttle task agreement No. 936-53-22-368 with Johnson Space Center.

  1. Striction-based Power Monitoring in Space Environment Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The program will leverage recent advances in striction materials and coupled striction devices as to enable highly isolated (analog) voltage and current flow sensors...

  2. Striction-based Power Monitoring in Space Environment Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The program delivers a completely new technology solution to isolation and sensing of power flow (current and voltage). Based on striction materials technology,...

  3. Fast Neutron Dosimeter for the Space Environment Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Model calculations and risk assessment estimates indicate that secondary neutrons, with energies ranging between 0.5 to >150 MeV, make a significant contribution...

  4. Locally Bounded Function Spaces as the External Environment for Nonlinear Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valery G. Fetisov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available . In this paper we consider locally bounded function spaces that act as the external environment for nonlinear dynamic systems. We give non-traditional examples of above spaces in which the basis of the selected function Orlicz space

  5. Space Environment Effects on Materials at Different Positions and Operational Periods of ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimoto, Yugo; Ichikawa, Shoichi; Miyazaki, Eiji; Matsumoto, Koji; Ishizawa, Junichiro; Shimamura, Hiroyuki; Yamanaka, Riyo; Suzuki, Mineo

    2009-01-01

    A space materials exposure experiment was condcuted on the exterior of the Russian Service Module (SM) of the International Space Station (ISS) using the Micro-Particles Capturer and Space Environment Exposure Device (MPAC&SEED) of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). Results reveal artificial environment effects such as sample contamination, attitude change effects on AO fluence, and shading effects of UV on ISS. The sample contamination was coming from ISS components. The particles attributed to micrometeoroids and/or debris captured by MPAC might originate from the ISS solar array. Another MPAC&SEED will be aboard the Exposure Facility of the Japanese Experiment Module, KIBO Exposure Facility (EF) on ISS. The JEM/MPAC&SEED is attached to the Space Environment Data Acquisition Equipment-Attached Payload (SEDA-AP) and is exposed to space. Actually, SEDA-AP is a payload on EF to be launched by Space Shuttle flight 2J/A. In fact, SEDA-AP has space environment monitors such as a high-energy particle monitor, atomic oxygen monitor, and plasma monitor to measure in-situ natural space environment data during JEM/MPAC&SEED exposure. Some exposure samples for JEM/MPAC&SEED are identical to SM/MPAC&SEED samples. Consequently, effects on identical materials at different positions and operation periods of ISS will be evaluated. This report summarizes results from space environment monitoring samples for atomic oxygen analysis on SM/MPAC&SEED, along with experimental plans for JEM/MPAC&SEED.

  6. Space Environments and Effects Concept: Transitioning Research to Operations and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, David L.; Spann, James; Burns, Howard D.; Schumacher, Dan

    2012-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is embarking on a course to expand human presence beyond Low Earth Orbit (LEO) while expanding its mission to explore the solar system. Destinations such as Near Earth Asteroids (NEA), Mars and its moons, and the outer planets are but a few of the mission targets. NASA has established numerous offices specializing in specific space environments disciplines that will serve to enable these missions. To complement these existing discipline offices, a concept focusing on the development of space environment and effects application is presented. This includes space climate, space weather, and natural and induced space environments. This space environment and effects application is composed of 4 topic areas; characterization and modeling, engineering effects, prediction and operation, and mitigation and avoidance. These topic areas are briefly described below. Characterization and modeling of space environments will primarily focus on utilization during Program mission concept, planning, and design phases. Engineering effects includes materials testing and flight experiments producing data to be used in mission planning and design phases. Prediction and operation pulls data from existing sources into decision-making tools and empirical data sets to be used during the operational phase of a mission. Mitigation and avoidance will develop techniques and strategies used in the design and operations phases of the mission. The goal of this space environment and effects application is to develop decision-making tools and engineering products to support the mission phases of mission concept through operations by focusing on transitioning research to operations. Products generated by this space environments and effects application are suitable for use in anomaly investigations. This paper will outline the four topic areas, describe the need, and discuss an organizational structure for this space environments and effects

  7. Atmospheric environment for Space Shuttle (STS-41D) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D. L.; Hill, C. K.; Jasper, G.; Batts, G. W.

    1984-01-01

    Selected atmospheric conditions observed near Space Shuttle STS-41D launch time on August 30, 1984, at Kennedy Space Center, Florida are summarized. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observations (cloud), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of prelaunch Jimsphere measured vertical wind profiles is given as well as wind and thermodynamic parameters representative of surface and aloft conditions in the SRB descent/impact ocean area. Final atmospheric tapes, which consist of wind and thermodynamic parameters versus altitude, for STS-41D vehicle ascent and SRB descent/impact were constructed. The STS-41D ascent meteorological data tape was constructed by Marshall Space Flight Center's Atmospheric Science Division to provide an internally consistent data set for use in post flight performance assessments.

  8. Atmospheric environment for space shuttle (STS-30) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasper, G. L.; Batts, G. W.

    1989-01-01

    This report presents a summary of selected atmospheric conditions observed near Space Shuttle STS-30 launch time on May 4, 1989, at Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observations (cloud), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of pre-launch Jimsphere-measured vertical wind profiles is given in this report. The final atmospheric tape, which consists of wind and thermodynamic parameters versus altitude, for STS-30 vehicle ascent has been constructed. The STS-30 ascent atmospheric data tape has been constructed by Marshall Space Flight Center's Earth Science and Applications Division to provide an internally consistent data set for use in post-flight performance assessments.

  9. Atmospheric environment for Space Shuttle (STS-41G) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D. L.; Hill, C. K.; Jasper, G.; Batts, G. W.

    1984-01-01

    Selected atmospheric conditions that were observed near Space Shuttle STS-41G launch time on October 5, 1984 at Kennedy Space Center in Florida are summarized. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual obsrvations (cloud), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of prelaunch Jimsphere-measured vertical wind profiles is given. The final atmospheric tape consisting of wind and thermodynamic parameters versus altitude for STS-41G vehicle ascent was constructed. The STS-41G ascent atmospheric data tape was constructed. The STS-41G ascent atmospheric data tape was constructed by Marshall Space Flight Center's Atmospheric Sciences Division to provide an internally consistent data set for use in post flight performance assessments.

  10. Atmospheric environment for space shuttle (STS-29) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasper, G. L.; Batts, G. W.

    1989-01-01

    This report presents a summary of selected atmospheric conditions observed near Space Shuttle STS-29 launch time on March 13, 1989, at Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observations (cloud), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of pre-launch Jimsphere-measured vertical wind profiles is given in this report. The final atmospheric tape, which consists of wind and thermodynamic parameters versus altitude, for STS-29 vehicle ascent has been constructed. The STS-29 ascent atmospheric data tape has been constructed by Marshall Space Flight Center's Earth Science and Applications Division to provide an internally consistent data set for use in post-flight performance assessments.

  11. Atmospheric environment for Space Shuttle (STS-27) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasper, G. L.; Johnson, D. L.; Batts, G. W.

    1989-01-01

    Selected articles on atmospheric conditions observed near Space Shuttle STS-27 launch time on December 2, 1988, at Kennedy Space Center, Florida are summarized. STS-27 carried a Department of Defense payload and the flight azimuth in this report will be denoted by reference flight azimuth, since the actual flight azimuth is not known. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observations (cloud), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of pre-launch Jimsphere-measured vertical wind profiles is given. The final atmospheric tape, which consists of wind and thermodynamic parameters versus altitude, for STS-27 vehicle ascent was constructed. The STS-27 ascent atmospheric data tape was constructed by Marshall Space Flight Center's Earth Science and Applications Division to provide an internally consistent data set for use in post-flight performance assessments.

  12. The Behavior of Systems in the Space Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-07-19

    representing Canada, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, India, Ireland, the Netherlands, the Republic of China , Turkey, the United Kingdom, and the xi United...most of the problema , the choice of the E.F.I.E. formulation is more powerful because of its generality. It is more difficult to solve than M.F.I.E...Neish Taipei, Taiwan 10636 R.O.C. Space Sciences Unit Univ. of Kent at CanterburyCalvin R. Johnson Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NR Space Power Institute

  13. Atmospheric environment for space shuttle (STS-8) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D. L.; Hill, C. K.; Turner, R. E.; Batts, G. W.

    1983-01-01

    Selected atmospheric conditions observed near Space Shuttle STS-8 launch time on August 30, 1983, at Kennedy Space Center, Florida are summarized. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observations (cloud), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of prelaunch Jimsphere measured vertical wind profiles is given. Also presented are wind and thermodynamic parameters representative of surface and aloft conditions in the SRB descent/impact ocean area. Final meteorological tapes, which consist of wind and thermodynamic parameters versus altitude, for STS-8 vehicle ascent and SRB descent/impact were constructed. The STS-8 ascent meteorological data tape was constructed.

  14. Atmospheric environment for Space Shuttle (STS-11) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D. L.; Hill, C. K.; Batts, G. W.

    1984-01-01

    Atmospheric conditions observed near Space Shuttle STS-11 launch time on February 3, 1984, at Kennedy Space Center, Florida are summarized. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observations (cloud), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of prelaunch Jimsphere measured vertical wind profiles are reported. Wind and thermodynamic parameters representative of surface and aloft conditions in the SRB descent/impact ocean area are presented. Meteorological tapes, which consist of wind and thermodynamic parameters vesus altitude, for STS-11 vehicle ascent and SRB descent/impact were constructed.

  15. Atmospheric environment for space shuttle (STS-1) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D. L.; Jasper, G.; Brown, S. C.

    1981-01-01

    Atmospheric conditions near space shuttle STS-1 launch time on April, 12, 1981, at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, are reported. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observations (cloud), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of prelaunch Jimsphere measured vertical wind profiles is presented. Also presented are the wind and thermodynamic parameters measured at the surface and aloft in the SRB descent/impact ocean area. Final meteorological data tapes for STS-1 vehicle ascent, and SRB descent have been constructed which consist of wind and thermodynamic parameters versus altitude.

  16. Atmospheric environment for space shuttle (STS-51C) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasper, G.; Johnson, D. L.; Hill, C. K.; Batts, G. W.

    1985-01-01

    Selected atmospheric conditions observed near space shuttle STS-51C launch time on January 24, 1985, at Kennedy Space Center, Florida are summarized. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observations (cloud), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of prelaunch Jimsphere measured vertical wind profiles are presented. The final atmospheric tape, which consists of wind and thermodynamic parameters versus altitude, for STS-51C vehicle ascent was constructed. The STS-51C ascent atmospheric data tape was constructed to provide an internally consistent data set for use in postflight performance assessments.

  17. Atmospheric environment for Space Shuttle (STS-3) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D. L.; Brown, S. C.; Batts, G. W.

    1982-01-01

    Selected atmospheric conditions observed near Space Shuttle STS-3 launch time on March 22, 1982, at Kennedy Space Center, Florida are summarized. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observations (cloud), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of prlaunch Jimsphere measured vertical wind profiles and the wind and thermodynamic parameters measured at the surface and aloft in the SRB descent/impact ocean area are presented. Final meteorological tapes, which consist of wind and thermodynamic parameters versus altitude, for STS-3 vehicle ascent and SRB descent were constructed. The STS-3 ascent meteorological data tape is constructed.

  18. Atmospheric environment for Space Shuttle (STS-2) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D. L.; Brown, S. C.

    1981-01-01

    Selected atmospheric conditions observed near Space Shuttle STS-2 launch time on November 12, 1981, or Kennedy Space Center, Florida are summarized. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observations (cloud), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of prelaunch Jimsphere measured vertical wind profiles is given in this report. Wind and thermodynamic parameters measured at the surface and aloft in the SRB descent/impact ocean area are also presented. Final meteorological tapes, which consist of wind and thermodynamic parameters versus altitude, for STS-2 vehicle ascent and SRB descent have been constructed. The STS-2 ascent meteorological data tape was constructed.

  19. Architecture for space habitats. Role of architectural design in planning artificial environment for long time manned space missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Vera

    2007-02-01

    The paper discusses concepts about the role of architecture in the design of space habitats and the development of a general evaluation criteria of architectural design contribution. Besides the existing feasibility studies, the general requisites, the development studies, and the critical design review which are mainly based on the experience of human space missions and the standards of the NASA-STD-3000 manual and which analyze and evaluate the relation between man and environment and between man and machine mainly in its functionality, there is very few material about design of comfort and wellbeing of man in space habitat. Architecture for space habitat means the design of an artificial environment with much comfort in an "atmosphere" of wellbeing. These are mainly psychological effects of human factors which are very important in the case of a long time space mission. How can the degree of comfort and "wellbeing atmosphere" in an artificial environment be measured? How can the quality of the architectural contribution in space design be quantified? Definition of a criteria catalogue to reach a larger objectivity in architectural design evaluation. Definition of constant parameters as a result of project necessities to quantify the quality of the design. Architectural design analysis due the application and verification within the parameters and consequently overlapping and evaluating results. Interdisciplinary work between architects, astronautics, engineers, psychologists, etc. All the disciplines needed for planning a high quality habitat for humans in space. Analysis of the principles of well designed artificial environment. Good quality design for space architecture is the result of the interaction and interrelation between many different project necessities (technological, environmental, human factors, transportation, costs, etc.). Each of this necessities is interrelated in the design project and cannot be evaluated on its own. Therefore, the design

  20. Spacecraft Environments Interactive: Space Radiation and Its Effects on Electronic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, J. W., Jr.; Hardage, D. M.

    1999-01-01

    The natural space environment is characterized by complex and subtle phenomena hostile to spacecraft. Effects of these phenomena impact spacecraft design, development, and operation. Space systems become increasingly susceptible to the space environment as use of composite materials and smaller, faster electronics increases. This trend makes an understanding of space radiation and its effects on electronic systems essential to accomplish overall mission objectives, especially in the current climate of smaller/better/cheaper faster. This primer outlines the radiation environments encountered in space, discusses regions and types of radiation, applies the information to effects that these environments have on electronic systems, addresses design guidelines and system reliability, and stresses the importance of early involvement of radiation specialists in mission planning, system design, and design review (part-by-part verification).

  1. Children, Spaces, Relations: Metaproject for an Environment for Young Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceppi, Giulio, Ed.; Zini, Michele, Ed.

    This book describes a project on designing spaces for young children; the aim of the project is to enable a "meeting of minds" between the pedagogical philosophy of Reggio Emilia preschools and the innovative experiences within the culture of design and architecture. The book presents the project in three main sections: (1) a critical analysis of…

  2. The contribution of woody plant materials on the several conditions in a space environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita-Yokotani, Kaori; Baba, Keiichi; Suzuki, Toshisada; Kimura, Shunta; Sato, Seigo; Katoh, Hiroshi; Abe, Yusuke; Katayama, Takeshi

    Woody plant materials have several utilization elements in our habitation environment on earth. The studies of woody plants under a space-environment in the vegetable kingdom have a high contribution to the study of various and exotic environmental responses, too. Woody plants can produce an excess oxygen, woody materials for the living cabin, and provide a biomass by cultivating crops and other species of creatures. Tree material would become to be a tool in closed bio-ecosystems such as an environment in a space. We named the trees used as material for the experiment related to space environments “CosmoBon”, small tree bonsai. Japanese cherry tree, “Sakura”, is famous and lovely tree in Japan. One species of “Sakura”, “Mamezakura, Prunus incisa”, is not only lovely tree species, but also suitable tree for the model tree of our purpose. The species of Prunus incisa is originally grown in volcano environment. That species of Sakura is originally grown on Mt. Fuji aria, oligotrophic place. We will try to build the best utilization usage of woody plant under the space environment by “Mamezakura” as a model tree. Here, we will show the importance of uniformity of materials when we will use the tree materials in a space environment. We will also discuss that tree has a high possibility of utilization under the space environments by using our several results related to this research.

  3. Space experiment "Rad Gene"-report 1; p53-Dependent gene expression in human cultured cells exposed to space environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Akihisa; Ohnishi, Takeo; Suzuki, Hiromi; Omori, Katsunori; Seki, Masaya; Hashizume, Toko; Shimazu, Toru; Ishioka, Noriaki

    The space environment contains two major biologically significant influences: space radiations and microgravity. A p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a role as a guardian of the genome through the activity of p53-centered signal transduction pathways. The aim of this study was to clarify the biological effects of space radiations, microgravity and a space environment on the gene and protein expression of p53-dependent regulated genes. Space experiments were performed with two human cultured lymphoblastoid cell lines: one cells line (TSCE5) bears a wild-type p53 gene status, and another cells line (WTK1) bears a mutated p53 gene status. Un-der one gravity or microgravity condition, the cells were grown in the cell biology experimental facility (CBEF) of the International Space Station (ISS) for 8 days without experiencing the stress during launching and landing because the cells were frozen during these periods. Ground control samples also were cultured for 8 days in the CBEF on the ground during the same periods as space flight. Gene and protein expression was analyzed by using DNA chip (a 44k whole human genome microarray, Agilent Technologies Inc.) and protein chip (PanoramaTM Ab MicroArray, Sigma-Aldrich Co.), respectively. In addition, we analyzed the gene expression in cultured cells after space flight during 133 days with frozen condition. We report the results and discussion from the viewpoint of the functions of the up-regulated and down-regulated genes after an exposure to space radiations and/or microgravity. The initial goal of this space experiment was completely achieved. It is expected that data from this type of work will be helpful in designing physical protection from the deleterious effects of space radiations during long term stays in space.

  4. Office Space: How Will Technology Affect the Education Office Environment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, C. William

    2009-01-01

    The office environment 10 years from now will be different from the one today. More office personnel will be organized around processes rather than functions. More work activities will be done by teams rather than individuals, and those teams will change over time, as will the nature of the work projects and the people who constitute the team. The…

  5. Office Space: How Will Technology Affect the Education Office Environment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, C. William

    2009-01-01

    The office environment 10 years from now will be different from the one today. More office personnel will be organized around processes rather than functions. More work activities will be done by teams rather than individuals, and those teams will change over time, as will the nature of the work projects and the people who constitute the team. The…

  6. Acoustic and vibration environments for laboratory experiments in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rader, W. P.

    1981-01-01

    The basic parameters of random noise and vibration are described, and typical environments for the launch phase and orbital operations are presented. For the latter, both acoustically induced and structure-borne, thruster-included vibration are addressed, using data obtained during the Skylab and Titan programs.

  7. An Overview of the Space Environments and Spacecraft Effects Organization Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, David L.; Burns, Howard D.; Garrett, Henry B.; Miller, Sharon K.; Peddie, Darilyn; Porter Ron; Spann, James F.; Xapsos, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is embarking on a course to expand human presence beyond Low Earth Orbit (LEO) while also expanding its mission to explore our Earth, and the solar system. Destinations such as Near Earth Asteroids (NEA), Mars and its moons, and the outer planets are but a few of the mission targets. Each new destination presents an opportunity to increase our knowledge on the solar system and the unique environments for each mission target. NASA has multiple technical and science discipline areas specializing in specific space environments fields that will serve to enable these missions. To complement these existing discipline areas, a concept is presented focusing on the development of a space environment and spacecraft effects (SESE) organization. This SESE organization includes disciplines such as space climate, space weather, natural and induced space environments, effects on spacecraft materials and systems, and the transition of research information into application. This space environment and spacecraft effects organization will be composed of Technical Working Groups (TWG). These technical working groups will survey customers and users, generate products, and provide knowledge supporting four functional areas: design environments, engineering effects, operational support, and programmatic support. The four functional areas align with phases in the program mission lifecycle and are briefly described below. Design environments are used primarily in the mission concept and design phases of a program. Environment effects focuses on the material, component, sub-system, and system-level response to the space environment and include the selection and testing to verify design and operational performance. Operational support provides products based on real time or near real time space weather to mission operators to aid in real time and near-term decision-making. The programmatic support function maintains an interface with

  8. Space Environments and Spacecraft Effects Concept: Transitioning Research to Operations and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, D. L.; Burns, H. D.; Clinton, R. G.; Schumacher, D.; Spann, J. F.

    2012-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is embarking on a course to expand human presence beyond Low Earth Orbit (LEO) while expanding its mission to explore the solar system. Destinations such as Near Earth Asteroids (NEA), Mars and its moons, and the outer planets are but a few of the mission targets. NASA has established numerous organizations specializing in specific space environments disciplines that will serve to enable these missions. To complement these existing discipline organizations, a concept is presented focusing on the development of a space environment and spacecraft effects organization. This includes space climate, space weather, natural and induced space environments, and effects on spacecraft materials and systems. This space environment and spacecraft effects organization would be comprised of Technical Working Groups (TWG) focusing on, for example: a) Charged Particles (CP), b) Space Environmental Effects (SEE), and c) Interplanetary and Extraterrestrial Environments (IEE). These technical working groups will generate products and provide knowledge supporting four functional areas: design environments, environment effects, operational support, and programmatic support. The four functional areas align with phases in the program mission lifecycle and are briefly described below. Design environments are used primarily in the mission concept and design phases of a program. Environment effects focuses on the material, component, sub-system and system-level selection and the testing to verify design and operational performance. Operational support provides products based on real time or near real time space weather observations to mission operators to aid in real time and near-term decision-making. The programmatic support function maintains an interface with the numerous programs within NASA and other federal agencies to ensure that communications are well established and the needs of the programs are being met. The programmatic

  9. Distributed computing environments for future space control systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viallefont, Pierre

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the results of a CNES research project on distributed computing systems. The purpose of this research was to study the impact of the use of new computer technologies in the design and development of future space applications. The first part of this study was a state-of-the-art review of distributed computing systems. One of the interesting ideas arising from this review is the concept of a 'virtual computer' allowing the distributed hardware architecture to be hidden from a software application. The 'virtual computer' can improve system performance by adapting the best architecture (addition of computers) to the software application without having to modify its source code. This concept can also decrease the cost and obsolescence of the hardware architecture. In order to verify the feasibility of the 'virtual computer' concept, a prototype representative of a distributed space application is being developed independently of the hardware architecture.

  10. Human-like robots for space and hazardous environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    The three year goal for the Kansas State USRA/NASA Senior Design team is to design and build a walking autonomous robotic rover. The rover should be capable of crossing rough terrain, traversing human made obstacles (such as stairs and doors), and moving through human and robot occupied spaces without collision. The rover is also to evidence considerable decision making ability, navigation, and path planning skills.

  11. Challenges in the Multipolar Space-Power Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-01

    1. “ Acupuncture ” point attacks: specialized attack, jamming, and destruction of the enemy’s space-war command-and- control systems’ important...Language Independent Programme Subtitles (LIPS) also al­ low India’s state broadcaster, Doordarshan, to feed the same signal to all parts of India via...resistant public regulated signal (PRS), which is encrypted and not commercially available.23 Europe plans on using Galileo’s PRS to support regional

  12. Guidelines for Evaluating the Thermal Environment of Enclosed Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    with a variety of instruments. For example, air movement can be measured as mechanical force by cup and propeller anemometers ; electronically, as...Young 3001) Combined unit with cup anemometer and wind vane Air velocity Extech Model 407123 Hot Wire Thermo- Anemometer Hot wire anemometer ...overcome the inertia or stall speed of the familiar cup anemometers . Space limitations and the stall speed of mechanical anemometers usually make

  13. 10th meeting of the International Conference on Protection of Materials and Structures from Space Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Tagawa, Masahito; Kimoto, Yugo; Protection of Materials and Structures From the Space Environment

    2013-01-01

    The goals of the 10th International Space Conference on “Protection of Materials and Structures from Space Environment” ICPMSE-10J, since its inception in 1992, have been to facilitate exchanges between members of the various engineering and science disciplines involved in the development of space materials, including aspects of LEO, GEO and Deep Space environments, ground-based qualification, and in-flight experiments and lessons learned from operational vehicles that are closely interrelated to disciplines of the atmospheric sciences, solar-terrestrial interactions and space life sciences. The knowledge of environmental conditions on and around the Moon, Mars, Venus and the low Earth orbit as well as other possible candidates for landing such as asteroids have become an important issue, and protecting both hardware and human life from the effects of space environments has taken on a new meaning in light of the increased interest in space travel and colonization of other planets.  And while many materia...

  14. Creating the Thermal Environment for Safely Testing the James Webb Space Telescope at the Johnson Space Center's Chamber A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homan, Jonathan L.; Lauterbach, John; Garcia, Sam

    2016-01-01

    Chamber A is the largest thermal vacuum chamber at the Johnson Space Center and is one of the largest space environment chambers in the world. The chamber is 19.8 m (65 ft) in diameter and 36.6 m (120 ft) tall and is equipped with cryogenic liquid nitrogen panels (shrouds) and gaseous helium shrouds to create a simulated space environment. The chamber was originally built to support testing of the Apollo Service and Command Module for lunar missions, but underwent major modifications to be able to test the James Webb Space Telescope in a simulated deep space environment. To date seven tests have been performed in preparation of testing the flight optics for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). Each test has had a uniquie thermal profile and set of thermal requirements for cooling down and warming up, controlling contamination, and releasing condensed air. These range from temperatures from 335K to 15K, with tight uniformity and controllability for maintining thermal stability and pressure control. One unique requirement for two test was structurally proof loading hardware by creating thermal gradients at specific temperatures. This paper will discuss the thermal requirements and goals of the tests, the original requirements of the chamber thermal systems for planned operation, and how the new requirements were met by the team using the hardware, system flexiblilty, and engineering creativity. It will also discuss the mistakes and successes to meet the unique goals, especially when meeting the thermal proof load.

  15. The impact of atmospheric dust deposition and trace elements levels on the villages surrounding the former mining areas in a semi-arid environment (SE Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Bisquert, David; Matías Peñas Castejón, José; García Fernández, Gregorio

    2017-03-01

    It is understood that particulate matter in the atmosphere from metallic mining waste has adverse health effects on populations living nearby. Atmospheric deposition is a process connecting the mining wasteswith nearby ecosystems. Unfortunately, very limited information is available about atmospheric deposition surrounding rural metallic mining areas. This article will focus on the deposition from mining areas, combined with its impact on nearby rural built areas and populations. Particle samples were collected between June 2011 and March 2013. They were collected according to Spanish legislation in ten specialised dust collectors. They were located near populations close to a former Mediterranean mining area, plus a control, to assess the impact of mining waste on these villages. This article and its results have been made through an analysis of atmospheric deposition of these trace elements (Mn, Zn, As, Cd and Pb). It also includes an analysis of total dust flux. Within this analysis it has considered the spatial variations of atmospheric deposition flux in these locations. The average annual level of total bulk deposition registered was 42.0 g m-2 per year. This was higher than most of the areas affected by a Mediterranean climate or in semi-arid conditions around the world. Regarding the overall analysis of trace elements, the annual bulk deposition fluxes of total Zn far exceeded the values of other areas. While Mn, Cd and Pb showed similar or lower values, and in part much lower than those described in other Mediterranean mining areas. This study confirmed some spatial variability of dust and trace elements, contained within the atmospheric deposition. From both an environmental and a public health perspective, environmental managers must take into account the cumulative effect of the deposition of trace elements on the soil and air quality around and within the villages surrounding metallic mining areas.

  16. Fictional space in participatory design of engaging interactive environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dindler, Christian

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation addresses the topic of designing engaging interactive environments and is positioned in the intersection between participatory design, design theory, and interaction design. This topic has been addressed through a research program on designing engaging interactive exhibition...... perspective on how people as resourceful individuals and groups invest their time, skill, and knowledge in interactive environments. Within this overarching perspective, the notion of means of engagement is presented denoting the intentional constructs that mediate engagement. The notion stretches beyond...... individual technologies and interfaces to encompass the multitude of interconnected aspects that are arranged through design and that, in concert, mediate engagement. Through a discussion of the issue of motivation it is argued that museums might spur visitors engagement by mediating between the everyday...

  17. Low-gravity Orbiting Research Laboratory Environment Potential Impact on Space Biology Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jules, Kenol

    2006-01-01

    One of the major objectives of any orbital space research platform is to provide a quiescent low gravity, preferably a zero gravity environment, to perform fundamental as well as applied research. However, small disturbances exist onboard any low earth orbital research platform. The impact of these disturbances must be taken into account by space research scientists during their research planning, design and data analysis in order to avoid confounding factors in their science results. The reduced gravity environment of an orbiting research platform in low earth orbit is a complex phenomenon. Many factors, among others, such as experiment operations, equipment operation, life support systems and crew activity (if it is a crewed platform), aerodynamic drag, gravity gradient, rotational effects as well as the vehicle structural resonance frequencies (structural modes) contribute to form the overall reduced gravity environment in which space research is performed. The contribution of these small disturbances or accelerations is precisely why the environment is NOT a zero gravity environment, but a reduced acceleration environment. This paper does not discuss other factors such as radiation, electromagnetic interference, thermal and pressure gradient changes, acoustic and CO2 build-up to name a few that affect the space research environment as well, but it focuses solely on the magnitude of the acceleration level found on orbiting research laboratory used by research scientists to conduct space research. For ease of analysis this paper divides the frequency spectrum relevant to most of the space research disciplines into three regimes: a) quasi-steady, b) vibratory and c) transient. The International Space Station is used as an example to illustrate the point. The paper discusses the impact of these three regimes on space biology research and results from space flown experiments are used to illustrate the potential negative impact of these disturbances (accelerations

  18. RF environment survey of Space Shuttle related EEE frequency bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, J.; Prigel, B.; Postelle, J.

    1977-01-01

    Radio frequency assignments within the continental United States in frequency bands between 121 MHz abd 65 GHz were surveyed and analyzed in order to determine current utilization of anticipated frequency bands for the shuttle borne electromagnetic environment experiment. Data from both government and nongovernment files were used. Results are presented in both narrative form and in histograms which show the total number of unclassified assignments versus frequency and total assigned power versus frequency.

  19. Atmospheric environment for Space Shuttle (STS-51A) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D. L.; Jasper, G.; Hill, C. K.; Batts, G. W.

    1984-01-01

    Selected atmospheric conditions observed near Space Shuttle STS-51A launch time on November 8, 1984, are summarized. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observations (cloud), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of prelaunch Jimsphere measured vertical wind profiles is reported. The final atmospheric tape, which consists of wind and thermodynamic parameters versus altitude, for STS-51A vehicle ascent was constructed. The STS-51A ascent atmospheric data tape is constructed to provide an internally consistent data set for use in postflight performance assessments.

  20. Healing environments in cancer treatment and care. Relations of space and practice in hematological cancer treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høybye, Mette Terp

    2013-01-01

    of the individual patient ’ s needs, values and experiences is key to developing the environment to support the patient quality of life. The present study holds implications for practice to inform design of future hospital environments for cancer treatment. The study points to the importance for being attentive...... these concepts, the study demonstrates how the hospital environment is a fl ow of relations between space and practice that changes and challenges a structural idea of design and healing. Patients ’ sense of healing changes with the experience of progression in treatment and the capacity of the hospital space...... to incite an experience of homeliness and care. Furthermore, cancer patients continuously challenge the use and limits of space by individual objects and practices of privacy and home. Discussion. Healing environments are complex relations between practices, space and care, where recognition...

  1. Marketing the use of the space environment for the processing of biological and pharmaceutical materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    The perceptions of U.S. biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies concerning the potential use of the space environment for the processing of biological substances was examined. Physical phenomena that may be important in space-base processing of biological materials are identified and discussed in the context of past and current experiment programs. The capabilities of NASA to support future research and development, and to engage in cooperative risk sharing programs with industry are discussed. Meetings were held with several biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies to provide data for an analysis of the attitudes and perceptions of these industries toward the use of the space environment. Recommendations are made for actions that might be taken by NASA to facilitate the marketing of the use of the space environment, and in particular the Space Shuttle, to the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries.

  2. Free space propagation of concentric vortices through underwater turbid environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, K. S.; Miller, J. K.; Cochenour, B. M.; Li, W.; Li, Y.; Watkins, R. J.; Johnson, E. G.

    2016-10-01

    Concentric optical vortex beams of 3-petal, 5-petal, and 6-petal spatial profiles are generated at 450 nm using a single diffractive optical element. The spatial and temporal propagation characteristics of these beams are then studied in a scattering underwater environment. Experimental results demonstrate a less than 5% reduction in the spatial pattern for turbidities in excess of 10 attenuation lengths. The temporal properties of concentric vortex beams are studied by temporally encoding an on-off keyed, non-return-to-zero (OOK-NRZ) data stream at 1.5 GHz.

  3. A research on the excavation, support, and environment control of large scale underground space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Pil Chong; Kwon, Kwang Soo; Jeong, So Keul [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-12-01

    With the growing necessity of the underground space due to the deficiency of above-ground space, the size and shape of underground structures tend to be complex and diverse. This complexity and variety force the development of new techniques for rock mass classification, excavation and supporting of underground space, monitoring and control of underground environment. All these techniques should be applied together to make the underground space comfortable. To achieve this, efforts have been made on 5 different areas; research on the underground space design and stability analysis, research on the techniques for excavation of rock by controlled blasting, research on the development of monitoring system to forecast the rock behaviour of underground space, research on the environment inspection system in closed space, and research on dynamic analysis of the airflow and environmental control in the large geos-spaces. The 5 main achievements are improvement of the existing structure analysis program(EXCRACK) to consider the deformation and failure characteristics of rock joints, development of new blasting design (SK-cut), prediction of ground vibration through the newly proposed wave propagation equation, development and In-Situ application of rock mass deformation monitoring system and data acquisition software, and trial manufacture of the environment inspection system in closed space. Should these techniques be applied to the development of underground space, prevention of industrial disaster, cut down of construction cost, domestication of monitoring system, improvement of tunnel stability, curtailment of royalty, upgrade of domestic technologies will be brought forth. (Abstract Truncated)

  4. Healing environments in cancer treatment and care. Relations of space and practice in hematological cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høybye, Mette Terp

    2013-02-01

    Given the growing attention to the importance of design in shaping healing hospital environments this study extends the understanding of healing environments, beyond causal links between environmental exposure and health outcome by elucidating how environments and practices interrelate. The study was conducted as an ethnographic fieldwork from March 2011 to September 2011 at the Department of Haematology at Odense University Hospital, Denmark, systematically using participant observation and interviews as research strategies. It included 20 patients, four of who were followed closely over an extended time period. Through thematic analysis five key concepts emerged about the social dynamics of hospital environments: practices of self; creating personal space; social recognition; negotiating space; and ambiguity of space and care. Through these concepts, the study demonstrates how the hospital environment is a flow of relations between space and practice that changes and challenges a structural idea of design and healing. Patients' sense of healing changes with the experience of progression in treatment and the capacity of the hospital space to incite an experience of homeliness and care. Furthermore, cancer patients continuously challenge the use and limits of space by individual objects and practices of privacy and home. Healing environments are complex relations between practices, space and care, where recognition of the individual patient's needs, values and experiences is key to developing the environment to support the patient quality of life. The present study holds implications for practice to inform design of future hospital environments for cancer treatment. The study points to the importance for being attentive to the need for flexible spaces in hospitals that recognize the dynamics of healing, by providing individualized care, relating to the particular and changing needs of patients supporting their potential and their challenged condition with the best

  5. Responses of Bacillus subtilis spores to space environment: results from experiments in space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horneck, G

    1993-02-01

    Onboard of several spacecrafts (Apollo 16, Spacelab 1, LDEF), spores of Bacillus subtilis were exposed to selected parameters of space, such as space vacuum, different spectral ranges of solar UV-radiation and cosmic rays, applied separately or in combination, and we have studied their survival and genetic changes after retrieval. The spores survive extended periods of time in space--up to several years--, if protected against the high influx of solar UV-radiation. Water desorption caused by the space vacuum leads to structural changes of the DNA; the consequences are an increased mutation frequency and altered photobiological properties of the spores. UV-effects, such as killing and mutagenesis, are augmented, if the spores are in space vacuum during irradiation. Vacuum-specific photoproducts which are different from the 'spore photoproduct' may cause the synergistic response of spores to the simultaneous action of UV and vacuum. The experiments provide an experimental test of certain steps of the panspermia hypothesis.

  6. Shuttle measured contaminant environment and modeling for payloads. Preliminary assessment of the space telescope environment in the shuttle bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scialdone, J. J.

    1983-01-01

    A baseline gaseous and particulate environment of the Shuttle bay was developed based on the various measurements which were made during the first four flights of the Shuttle. The environment is described by the time dependent pressure, density, scattered molecular fluxes, the column densities and including the transient effects of water dumps, engine firings and opening and closing of the bay doors. The particulate conditions in the ambient and on surfaces were predicted as a function of the mission time based on the available data. This basic Shuttle environment when combined with the outgassing and the particulate contributions of the payloads, can provide a description of the environment of a payload in the Shuttle bay. As an example of this application, the environment of the Space Telescope in the bay, which may be representative of the environment of several payloads, was derived. Among the many findings obtained in the process of modeling the environment, one is that the payloads environment in the bay is not substantially different or more objectionable than the self-generated environment of a large payload or spacecraft. It is, however, more severe during ground facilities operations, the first 15 to 20 hours of the flight, during and for a short period after ater was dumped overboard, and the reaction control engines are being fired.

  7. Electrical behaviour of a silicone elastomer under simulated space environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roggero, A.; Dantras, E.; Paulmier, T.; Tonon, C.; Balcon, N.; Rejsek-Riba, V.; Dagras, S.; Payan, D.

    2015-04-01

    The electrical behavior of a space-used silicone elastomer was characterized using surface potential decay and dynamic dielectric spectroscopy techniques. In both cases, the dielectric manifestation of the glass transition (dipole orientation) and a charge transport phenomenon were observed. An unexpected linear increase of the surface potential with temperature was observed around Tg in thermally-stimulated potential decay experiments, due to molecular mobility limiting dipolar orientation in one hand, and 3D thermal expansion reducing the materials capacitance in the other hand. At higher temperatures, the charge transport process, believed to be thermally activated electron hopping with an activation energy of about 0.4 eV, was studied with and without the silica and iron oxide fillers present in the commercial material. These fillers were found to play a preponderant role in the low-frequency electrical conductivity of this silicone elastomer, probably through a Maxwell-Wagner-Sillars relaxation phenomenon.

  8. Evasive Maneuvers in Space Debris Environment and Technological Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio D. C. Jesus

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a study of collisional dynamics between space debris and an operational vehicle in LEO. We adopted an approach based on the relative dynamics between the objects on a collisional course and with a short warning time and established a semianalytical solution for the final trajectories of these objects. Our results show that there are angular ranges in 3D, in addition to the initial conditions, that favor the collisions. These results allowed the investigation of a range of technological parameters for the spacecraft (e.g., fuel reserve that allow a safe evasive maneuver (e.g., time available for the maneuver. The numerical model was tested for different values of the impact velocity and relative distance between the approaching objects.

  9. Recent improvements in atmospheric environment models for Space Station applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, B. Jeffrey; Suggs, Ronnie J.; Smith, Robert E.; Hickey, Michael; Catlett, Karen

    1991-01-01

    The capability of empirical models of the earth's thermosphere must continually be updated if they are to keep pace with their many applications in the aerospace industry. This paper briefly summarizes the progress of several such efforts in support of the Space Station Program. The efforts consists of the development of data bases, analytical studies of the data, and evaluation and intercomparison of thermosphere models. A geomagnetic storm model of Slowey does not compare as well to the MSIS-86 model as does the Marshall Engineering Thermosphere (MET). LDEF orbit decay data is used to evaluate the performance of the MET and MSIS-86 during a period of high solar activity; equal to or exceeding the highest levels that existed during the time of the original data sets upon which these models are based.

  10. National Air Space (NAS) Data Exchange Environment Through 2060

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Aloke

    2015-01-01

    NASA's NextGen Concepts and Technology Development (CTD) Project focuses on capabilities to improve safety, capacity and efficiency of the National Air Space (NAS). In order to achieve those objectives, NASA sought industry-Government partnerships to research and identify solutions for traffic flow management, dynamic airspace configuration, separation assurance, super density operations, airport surface operations and similar forward-looking air-traffic modernization (ATM) concepts. Data exchanges over NAS being the key enabler for most of these ATM concepts, the Sub-Topic area 3 of the CTD project sought to identify technology candidates that can satisfy air-to-air and air/ground communications needs of the NAS in the year 2060 timeframe. Honeywell, under a two-year contract with NASA, is working on this communications technology research initiative. This report summarizes Honeywell's research conducted during the second year of the study task.

  11. Maintaining space shuttle safety within an environment of change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfield, Michael A.

    1999-09-01

    In the 10 years since the Challenger accident, NASA has developed a set of stable and capable processes to prepare the Space Shuttle for safe launch and return. Capitalizing on the extensive experience gained from a string of over 50 successful flights, NASA today is changing the way it does business in an effort to reduce cost. A single Shuttle Flight Operations Contractor (SFOC) has been chosen to operate the Shuttle. The Government role will change from direct "oversight" to "insight" gained through understanding and measuring the contractor's processes. This paper describes the program management changes underway and the NASA Safety and Mission Assurance (S&MA) organization's philosophy, role, and methodology for pursuing this new approach. It describes how audit and surveillance will replace direct oversight and how meaningful performance metrics will be implemented.

  12. ImageSpace: An Environment for Image Ontology Management

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Shiyong; Chebotko, Artem; Deng, Yu; Fotouhi, Farshad

    2009-01-01

    More and more researchers have realized that ontologies will play a critical role in the development of the Semantic Web, the next generation Web in which content is not only consumable by humans, but also by software agents. The development of tools to support ontology management including creation, visualization, annotation, database storage, and retrieval is thus extremely important. We have developed ImageSpace, an image ontology creation and annotation tool that features (1) full support for the standard web ontology language DAML+OIL; (2) image ontology creation, visualization, image annotation and display in one integrated framework; (3) ontology consistency assurance; and (4) storing ontologies and annotations in relational databases. It is expected that the availability of such a tool will greatly facilitate the creation of image repositories as islands of the Semantic Web.

  13. Collaborative Spaces for GIS-Based Multimedia Cartography in Blended Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balram, Shivanand; Dragicevic, Suzana

    2008-01-01

    The interaction spaces between instructors and learners in the traditional face-to-face classroom environment are being changed by the diffusion and adoption of many forms of computer-based pedagogy. An integrated understanding of these evolving interaction spaces together with how they interconnect and leverage learning are needed to develop…

  14. The contamination of personal space : boundary construction in a prison environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sibley, David; van Hoven, Bettina

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, inmates in dormitories in a prison in New Mexico, USA, talk about their everyday lives. We are particularly interested in the ways in which they think about space. Their principal concern appears to be the definition of personal space in an environment where boundaries are weak. The p

  15. Establishment of the Experimental System for Clarifying Plant Responses to Space Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Kitaya, Yoshiaki; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Yamashita, Masamichi; Goto, Eiji; Saito, Takahiro; Tani, Akira; Tsuchiya, Hiroshi; Tako, Yasuhiro; Tayama, Ichiro; Kamisaka, Seiichiro; Hoson, Takayuki; Higashitani, Atsushi; Takaoki, Muneo; Yano, Sachiko; Kamada, Motoshi

    2006-01-01

    In order to develop the experimental system for carrying out experiments with plants in space successfully, a working group was organized. The main objective is to clarify the effects of space environment on vegetative growth and reproductive growth of plants in their life cycles.

  16. Collaborative Spaces for GIS-Based Multimedia Cartography in Blended Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balram, Shivanand; Dragicevic, Suzana

    2008-01-01

    The interaction spaces between instructors and learners in the traditional face-to-face classroom environment are being changed by the diffusion and adoption of many forms of computer-based pedagogy. An integrated understanding of these evolving interaction spaces together with how they interconnect and leverage learning are needed to develop…

  17. Space CoBot: modular design of an holonomic aerial robot for indoor microgravity environments

    OpenAIRE

    Roque, Pedro; Ventura, Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the design of a small aerial robot for inhabited microgravity environments, such as orbiting space stations (e.g., ISS). In particular, we target a fleet of robots, called Space CoBots, for collaborative tasks with humans, such as telepresence and cooperative mobile manipulation. The design is modular, comprising an hexrotor based propulsion system, and a stack of modules including batteries, cameras for navigation, a screen for telepresence, a robotic arm, space for exten...

  18. Can Breast Tumors Affect the Oxidative Status of the Surrounding Environment? A Comparative Analysis among Cancerous Breast, Mammary Adjacent Tissue, and Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panis, C; Victorino, V J; Herrera, A C S A; Cecchini, A L; Simão, A N C; Tomita, L Y; Cecchini, R

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we investigated the oxidative profile of breast tumors in comparison with their normal adjacent breast tissue. Our study indicates that breast tumors present enhanced oxidative/nitrosative stress, with concomitant augmented antioxidant capacity when compared to the adjacent normal breast. These data indicate that breast cancers may be responsible for the induction of a prooxidant environment in the mammary gland, in association with enhanced TNF-α and nitric oxide.

  19. ISS And Space Environment Interactions Without Operating Plasma Contactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carruth, M. R., Jr.; Ferguson, Dale; Suggs,Rob; McCollum, Matt

    2001-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) will be the largest, highest power spacecraft placed in orbit. Because of this the design of the electrical power system diverged markedly from previous systems. The solar arrays will operate at 160 V and the power distribution voltage will be 120 V. The structure is grounded to the negative side of the solar arrays so under the right circumstances it is possible to drive the ISS potential very negative. A plasma contactor has been added to the ISS to provide control of the ISS structure potential relative to the ambient plasma. The ISS requirement is that the ISS structure not be greater than 40 V positive or negative of local plasma. What are the ramifications of operating large structures with such high voltage power systems? The application of a plasma contactor on ISS controls the potential between the structure and the local plasma, preventing degrading effects. It is conceivable that there can be situations where the plasma contactor might be non-functional. This might be due to lack of power, the need to turn it off during some of the build-up sequences, the loss of functionality for both plasma contactors before a replacement can be installed, similar circumstances. A study was undertaken to understand how important it is to have the contactor functioning and how long it might be off before unacceptable degradation to ISS could occur. The details of interaction effects on spacecraft have not been addressed until driven by design. This was true for ISS. If the structure is allowed to float highly negative impinging ions can sputter exposed conductors which can degrade the primary surface and also generate contamination due to the sputtered material. Arcing has been known to occur on solar arrays that float negative of the ambient plasma. This can also generate electromagnetic interference and voltage transients. Much of the ISS structure and pressure module surfaces exposed to space is anodized aluminum. The anodization

  20. Space Environment Stability and Physical Properties of New Materials for Space Power and Commercial Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambourger, Paul D.

    1997-01-01

    To test and evaluate suitability of materials for use in space power systems and related space and commercial applications, and to achieve sufficient understanding of the mechanisms by which, the materials perform in their intended applications. Materials and proposed applications included but were not limited to: Improved anodes for lithium ion batteries, highly-transparent arc-proof solar array coatings, and improved surface materials for solar dynamic concentrators and receivers. Cooperation and interchange of data with industrial companies as appropriate.

  1. Space perception of strabismic observers in the real world environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, Teng Leng; He, Zijiang J

    2015-02-19

    Space perception beyond the near distance range (>2 m) is important for target localization, and for directing and guiding a variety of daily activities, including driving and walking. However, it is unclear whether the absolute (egocentric) localization of a single target in the intermediate distance range requires binocular vision, and if so, whether having subnormal stereopsis in strabismus impairs one's ability to localize the target. We investigated this by measuring the perceived absolute location of a target by observers with normal binocular vision (n = 8; mean age, 24.5 years) and observers with strabismus (n = 8; mean age, 24.9 years) under monocular and binocular conditions. The observers used the blind walking-gesturing task to indicate the judged location of a target located at various viewing distances (2.73-6.93 m) and heights (0, 30, and 90 cm) above the floor. Near stereopsis was assessed with the Randot Stereotest. Both groups of observers accurately judged the absolute distance of the target on the ground (height = 0 cm) either with monocular or binocular viewing. However, when the target was suspended in midair, the normal observers accurately judged target location with binocular viewing, but not with monocular viewing (mean slant angle, 0.8° ± 0.5° vs. 7.4° ± 1.4°; P monocular viewing (r(2) = 0.0002, P = 0.963). Locating a single target on the ground is sufficient with monocular depth information, but binocular depth information is required when the target is suspended in midair. Since the absolute binocular disparity information of the single target is weak beyond 2 m, we suggest the visual system localizes the single target using the relative binocular disparity information between the midair target and the visible ground surface. Consequently, strabismic observers with residual stereopsis localize a target more accurately than their counterparts without stereo ability. Copyright 2015 The Association for Research in Vision and

  2. Space Environment Data Acquisition Equipment -Attached Payload (SEDA-AP) on the ISS -"Kibo" Exposed Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Kiyokazu; Matsumoto, Haruhisa; Kimoto, Yugo; Obara, Takahiro; Goka, Tateo

    To support future space activities, it is very important to acquire space environmental data related to space radiation degradation of space parts and materials and spacecraft anomalies. Such data are useful for spacecraft design and manned space activity. On several satellite of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) since the Engineering Test Satellite-V (ETS-V), Technical Data Acquisition Equipment (TEDA) and Space Environment Data Acquisition Equipment (SEDA) have been installed for obtaining the data described above. SEDA-Attached Payload (AP) was mounted on Japanese experimental module, "Kibo" , at International Space Station (ISS) to take continuous measurements of the 400 kilometres altitude space station's tra-jectory for a period of around 3 years. SEDA-AP comprises common bus equipment supporting launch, RMS handling, the power/communication interface with JEM-EF, an extendible mast that extends the neutron monitor sensor 1 m separate from the bus structure, and equipment that measures space environment data. SEDA-AP has been fitted with 8 kinds of instruments. It will continuously and simultaneously measure neutrons, heavy ions, plasma, high-energy electrons and protons, atomic oxygen, space debris and dusts, etc. Furthermore, by exposing electronic devices and materials directory to the space environment, it will examine how they are affected by the environment. SEDA-AP was lanced on July 16 in 2009, and attached to EF of "Kibo" on July 25 using the robot arm of "Kibo". Initial checkout was started on Au-gust 4 and successfully ended on September 17. This paper will report the mission objectives, instrumentation, and current status of SEDA-AP.

  3. Impossible spaces: maximizing natural walking in virtual environments with self-overlapping architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suma, Evan A; Lipps, Zachary; Finkelstein, Samantha; Krum, David M; Bolas, Mark

    2012-04-01

    Walking is only possible within immersive virtual environments that fit inside the boundaries of the user's physical workspace. To reduce the severity of the restrictions imposed by limited physical area, we introduce "impossible spaces," a new design mechanic for virtual environments that wish to maximize the size of the virtual environment that can be explored with natural locomotion. Such environments make use of self-overlapping architectural layouts, effectively compressing comparatively large interior environments into smaller physical areas. We conducted two formal user studies to explore the perception and experience of impossible spaces. In the first experiment, we showed that reasonably small virtual rooms may overlap by as much as 56% before users begin to detect that they are in an impossible space, and that the larger virtual rooms that expanded to maximally fill our available 9.14 m x 9.14 m workspace may overlap by up to 31%. Our results also demonstrate that users perceive distances to objects in adjacent overlapping rooms as if the overall space was uncompressed, even at overlap levels that were overtly noticeable. In our second experiment, we combined several well-known redirection techniques to string together a chain of impossible spaces in an expansive outdoor scene. We then conducted an exploratory analysis of users' verbal feedback during exploration, which indicated that impossible spaces provide an even more powerful illusion when users are naive to the manipulation.

  4. Handbook for the USAF space environment standard (MIL-STD-1809)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    The Handbook for the Space Environment Standard (MIL-STD-1809) is a companion document to the Standard. The Standard is necessarily a very concise document, so that the Handbook is intended to make its usage easier. The Handbook describes the sources of the environmental models cited in the Standard, as well as the usage of the models, and their limitations. Means for obtaining the cited models are given as well. With the exception of the space debris model, the Handbook covers only the natural space environment. The Handbook provides a general overview of the various components of the space environment and the generally accepted understanding of them at the current time. A bibliography is provided to aid in understanding the materials presented in the Handbook and Standard.

  5. Sequence Planning for On-Orbit Assembly of Large Space Truss Structures in a Multirobot Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Jifeng; WANG Ping; CUI Naigang

    2006-01-01

    An approach to sequence planning for on-orbit assembly of large space truss structures in a multirobot environment is presented. A hierarchical representation of large space truss structures at the structural volume element level and strut level is adopted. The representation of connectivity matrix and directed graph is respectively presented at the strut level and SVE level. The multirobot environment that consists of autonomous space robots and struts is supposed. Then the multirobot serial assembly strategy, assembly states, assembly tasks and assembly sequences are described. The assembly sequence planning algorithms at the strut level and SVE level are respectively discussed. The results of the simulations show that this approach is feasible and efficient. Two extensions of this approach include more accurate assessment of the efficiency representation and improvements in planning algorithm. In the future, the assembly sequence planning of more large space truss structures and complex multirobot environments and assembly tasks will be considered.

  6. Research on early warning technology for spacecraft in-orbit fault influenced by space environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhenyan, Zhao; Ping, Yang; Wendong, Li; Xi, Chen; Peng, Liu; Zhihui, Wang; Zhen, Wu

    2016-07-01

    The number of China's current satellite on orbit is nearly 150. Satellites are often influenced by space environment, and the on-orbit operation tasks are interrupted. Analysis of relevant data and looking for the right warning method become one of the important means, which can ensure the safety of satellite in orbit. Firstly, the data of satellite on-orbit from 2008 to 2015 and space environment are studied. Through the methods of correlation analysis and ratio analysis, we select the sensitive parameters which are more affected by the environment change. Through the analysis of the satellite fault which often happens, we get the location distribution, time distribution of the fault and the characteristic data such as environmental changes. Using the comprehensive factor calculation method, according to environment data and sensitive parameters, data information such as failure characteristics, we calculate the early warning value, which can provide the basis for the spacecraft operation management when the space environment changes. At the same time, we put forward the possible suggestion for space-based early warning information application, and the further suggestion of using sensitive parameter study on space environment change.

  7. Rover Low Gain Antenna Qualification for Deep Space Thermal Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesham, Rajeshuni; Amaro, Luis R.; Brown, Paula R.; Usiskin, Robert; Prater, Jack L.

    2013-01-01

    A method to qualify the Rover Low Gain Antenna (RLGA) for use during the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission has been devised. The RLGA antenna must survive all ground operations, plus the nominal 670 Martian sol mission that includes the summer and winter seasons of the Mars thermal environment. This qualification effort was performed to verify that the RLGA design, its bonding, and packaging processes are adequate. The qualification test was designed to demonstrate a survival life of three times more than all expected ground testing, plus a nominal 670 Martian sol missions. Baseline RF tests and a visual inspection were performed on the RLGA hardware before the start of the qualification test. Functional intermittent RF tests were performed during thermal chamber breaks over the course of the complete qualification test. For the return loss measurements, the RLGA antenna was moved to a test area. A vector network analyzer was calibrated over the operational frequency range of the antenna. For the RLGA, a simple return loss measurement was performed. A total of 2,010 (3 670 or 3 times mission thermal cycles) thermal cycles was performed. Visual inspection of the RLGA hardware did not show any anomalies due to the thermal cycling. The return loss measurement results of the RLGA antenna after the PQV (Package Qualification and Verification) test did not show any anomalies. The antenna pattern data taken before and after the PQV test at the uplink and downlink frequencies were unchanged. Therefore, the developed design of RLGA is qualified for a long-duration MSL mission.

  8. Identification of Environment Chase in Surround of Sermo Reservoir; and the Influence Possibility for Function and at the Age of Reservoi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudarmadji Sudarmadji

    2004-01-01

    materials from land slide occuring around the reservoir; due to distruction of land in constructing the relatively new ring-road close to the shore line of the reservoir: Of course, the sediment is also coming from rivers entering die reservoir. Sermo reservoir is a relatively young reservoir; the early observation of environmental changes of the reservoir could hopely be used as indicator to study ecological changes of the area within and around of the reservoir; and could be used as a comparison to other reservoirs, as well as basic environmental management of the reservoir and its surrounding.

  9. Healing environments in cancer treatment and care. Relations of space and practice in hematological cancer treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høybye, Mette Terp

    2013-01-01

    to incite an experience of homeliness and care. Furthermore, cancer patients continuously challenge the use and limits of space by individual objects and practices of privacy and home. Discussion. Healing environments are complex relations between practices, space and care, where recognition...... to the need for fl exible spaces in hospitals that recognize the dynamics of healing, by providing individualized care, relating to the particular and changing needs of patients supporting their potential and their challenged condition with the best care possible....... these concepts, the study demonstrates how the hospital environment is a fl ow of relations between space and practice that changes and challenges a structural idea of design and healing. Patients ’ sense of healing changes with the experience of progression in treatment and the capacity of the hospital space...

  10. Development of a simulation environment to test space missions COTS technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraf, S.; Knoll, A.; Melanson, P.; Tafazoli, M.

    2002-07-01

    The Canadian Space Agency's (CSA) Software and Ground Segment Section (SGS) has the mandate to develop innovative emerging software and on-board satellite and ground segment computer technologies. To that end, there is an ongoing development of a simulation environment to test COTS (Commercial-Of-The-Shelf) technologies. There are severe cost constraints in all aspects of many space missions due to the limited return on investment and scarce commercialization opportunities that come with many science missions. There is an opportunity to explore the innovative implementation of COTS technologies to reduce the mission cost and maximize performance available from COTS components. However, using COTS technologies in the space environment has ist constraints and therefore designing a spacecraft mission has to involve some new techniques that allow implementation of these components and minimize the risk of failure. The goal of our project is to develop a simulation environment, itself using COTS components, and then to allow the seamless integration of various components to test spacecraft mission concepts. For example, one of the aspects of using COTS processors in space is to protect them from the radiation environment. The current state of the simulation tests an innovative software EDAC (Error Detection and Correction) package and a redundant processor configuration to investigate protection against the effects of radiation and other failures on a generic mission. It also includes the capability to test formation-flying concepts that have the potential to revolutionize cost reduction efforts for space missions and to enable new space applications. This paper describes the simulation environment in detail and illustrates some of the technologies being tested for possible future space missions. The paper concludes with a look at the future development of the simulation environment and possible benefits of its use as well as the lessons learned to date.

  11. Characterization of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans, dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls, and polychlorinated naphthalenes in the environment surrounding secondary copper and aluminum metallurgical facilities in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jicheng; Zheng, Minghui; Liu, Wenbin; Nie, Zhiqiang; Li, Changliang; Liu, Guorui; Xiao, Ke

    2014-10-01

    Unintentionally produced persistent organic pollutants (UP-POPs) were determined in ambient air from around five secondary non-ferrous metal processing plants in China, to investigate the potential impacts of the emissions of these plants on their surrounding environments. The target compounds were polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs), dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (dl-PCBs), and polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs). The PCDD/F, dl-PCB, and PCN concentrations in the ambient air downwind of the plants were 4.70-178, 8.23-7520 and 152-4190 pg/m(3), respectively, and the concentrations upwind of the plants were lower. Clear correlations were found between ambient air and stack gas concentrations of the PCDD/Fs, dl-PCBs, and PCNs among the five plants, respectively. Furthermore, the UP-POPs homolog and congener patterns in the ambient air were similar to the patterns in the stack gas samples. These results indicate that UP-POPs emissions from the plants investigated have obvious impacts on the environments surrounding the plants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. PREVALENCE AND ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE OF SALMONELLA ISOLATED FROM CARCASSES, PROCESSING FACILITIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT SURROUNDING SMALL SCALE POULTRY SLAUGHTERHOUSES IN THAILAND.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chotinun, Suwit; Rojanasthien, Suvichai; Unger, Fred; Tadee, Pakpoom; Patchanee, Prapas

    2014-11-01

    Salmonella is a major food-borne pathogen worldwide, including Thai- land, and poultry meat plays a role as a vehicle for the spread of the disease from animals to humans. The prevalence and characteristics of Salmonella isolated from 41 small scale poultry slaughterhouses in Chiang Mai, Thailand were determined during July 2011 through May 2012. Salmonella's prevalence in live poultry, car- casses, waste water, and soil around processing plants were 3.2%, 7.3%, 22.0% and 29.0%, respectively. Eighteen different serotypes were identified, the most common being Corvallis (15.2%), followed by Rissen (13.9%), Hadar (12.7%), Enteritidis (10.1%), [I. 4,5,12:i:-] (8.8%), Stanley (8.8%), and Weltevreden (8.8%). Antimicrobial susceptibility tests revealed that 68.4% of the Salmonella spp were resistant to at least one antimicrobial while 50.6% showed multiple drug resis- tance (MDR). Specifically, 44.3% of Salmonella were resistant to nalidixic acid, followed by streptomycin (41.8%), ampicillin (34.2%), tetracycline (34.2%), and sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim (20.3%). Salmonella contamination was found in processing lines, carcasses, and in the environment around the processing sta- tions. These findings indicate that improving hygiene management in small scale poultry slaughterhouses as well as prudent use of antimicrobial drugs is urgently needed if Salmonella contamination is to be reduced.

  13. Operational Impact of Improved Space Tracking on Collision Avoidance in the Future LEO Space Debris Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibert, D.; Borgeson, D.; Peterson, G.; Jenkin, A.; Sorge, M.

    2010-09-01

    Even if global space policy successfully curtails on orbit explosions and ASAT demonstrations, studies indicate that the number of debris objects in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) will continue to grow solely from debris on debris collisions and debris generated from new launches. This study examines the threat posed by this growing space debris population over the next 30 years and how improvements in our space tracking capabilities can reduce the number of Collision Avoidance (COLA) maneuvers required keep the risk of operational satellite loss within tolerable limits. Particular focus is given to satellites operated by the Department of Defense (DoD) and Intelligence Community (IC) in Low Earth Orbit (LEO). The following debris field and space tracking performance parameters were varied parametrically in the experiment to study the impact on the number of collision avoidance maneuvers required: - Debris Field Density (by year 2009, 2019, 2029, and 2039) - Quality of Track Update (starting 1 sigma error ellipsoid) - Future Propagator Accuracy (error ellipsoid growth rates - Special Perturbations in 3 axes) - Track Update Rate for Debris (stochastic) - Track Update Rate for Payloads (stochastic) Baseline values matching present day tracking performance for quality of track update, propagator accuracy, and track update rate were derived by analyzing updates to the unclassified Satellite Catalog (SatCat). Track update rates varied significantly for active payloads and debris and as such we used different models for the track update rates for military payloads and debris. The analysis was conducted using the System Effectiveness Analysis Simulation (SEAS) an agent based model developed by the United States Air Force Space Command’s Space and Missile Systems Center to evaluate the military utility of space systems. The future debris field was modeled by The Aerospace Corporation using a tool chain which models the growth of the 10cm+ debris field using high fidelity

  14. Conceptual Design and Demonstration of Space Scale for Measuring Mass in Microgravity Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youn-Kyu; Lee, Joo-Hee; Choi, Gi-Hyuk; Choi, Ik-Hyeon

    2015-12-01

    In this study, a new idea for developing a space scale for measuring mass in a microgravity environment was proposed by using the inertial force properties of an object to measure its mass. The space scale detected the momentum change of the specimen and reference masses by using a load-cell sensor as the force transducer based on Newton's laws of motion. In addition, the space scale calculated the specimen mass by comparing the inertial forces of the specimen and reference masses in the same acceleration field. By using this concept, a space scale with a capacity of 3 kg based on the law of momentum conservation was implemented and demonstrated under microgravity conditions onboard International Space Station (ISS) with an accuracy of ±1 g. By the performance analysis on the space scale, it was verified that an instrument with a compact size could be implemented and be quickly measured with a reasonable accuracy under microgravity conditions.

  15. Conceptualizing and comparing neighborhood and activity space measures for food environment research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Thomas W; Jilcott Pitts, Stephanie B; McGuirt, Jared T; Keyserling, Thomas C; Ammerman, Alice S

    2014-11-01

    Greater accessibility to geospatial technologies has led to a surge of spatialized public health research, much of which has focused on food environments. The purpose of this study was to analyze differing spatial measures of exposure to supermarkets and farmers׳ markets among women of reproductive age in eastern North Carolina. Exposure measures were derived using participant-defined neighborhoods, investigator-defined road network neighborhoods, and activity spaces incorporating participants׳ time space behaviors. Results showed that mean area for participant-defined neighborhoods (0.04 sq. miles) was much smaller than 2.0 mile road network neighborhoods (3.11 sq. miles) and activity spaces (26.36 sq. miles), and that activity spaces provided the greatest market exposure. The traditional residential neighborhood concept may not be particularly relevant for all places. Time-space approaches capturing activity space may be more relevant, particularly if integrated with mixed methods strategies.

  16. Measurement result of the neutron monitor onboard the Space Environment Data Acquisition Equipment - Attached Payload (SEDA-AP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, K.; Muraki, Y.; Shibata, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Matsumoto, H.; Okudaira, O.; Kawano, H.; Yumoto, K.

    2013-12-01

    To support future space activities, it is crucial to acquire space environmental data related to the space-radiation degradation of space parts and materials, and spacecraft anomalies. Such data are useful for spacecraft design and manned space activity. SEDA-AP was mounted on 'Kibo' of the ISS (International Space Station) to measure the space environment at a 400-kilometer altitude. Neutrons are very harmful radiation, with electrical neutrality that makes them strongly permeable. SEDA-AP measures the energy of neutrons from thermal to 100 MeV in real time using a Bonner Ball Detector (BBND) and a Scintillation Fiber Detector (FIB). BBND detects neutrons using He-3 counters, which have high sensitivity to thermal neutrons. Neutron energy is derived using the relative response function of polyethylene moderators of 6 different thicknesses. FIB measures the tracks of recoil protons caused by neutrons within a cubic arrayed sensor of 512 scintillation fibers. The charged particles are excluded using an anti-scintillator which surrounds the cube sensor, and the neutron energy is obtained from the track length of a recoil proton. There are three sources of neutrons in space; 1. Albedo Neutrons Produced by reactions of galactic cosmic rays or radiation belt particles with the atmosphere 2. Local Neutrons Produced by the reactions of galactic cosmic rays or radiation belt particles with spacecraft 3. Solar Neutrons Produced by accelerated particles in solar flares An accurate energy spectrum of the solar neutrons includes important information on high-energy particle generation mechanism in a solar flare, because neutrons are unaffected by interplanetary magnetic fields. These data will become useful to forecast solar energetic particles in future. Some candidate events involving solar neutrons were found as a result of analyzing data of the solar flare of M>2 since September 2009. Moreover, it is important to measure albedo neutrons, since protons generated by neutron

  17. The Los Alamos dynamic radiation environment assimilation model (DREAM) for space weather specification and forecasting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reeves, Geoffrey D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Friedel, Reiner H W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chen, Yue [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Koller, Josef [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Henderson, Michael G [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    The Dynamic Radiation Environment Assimilation Model (DREAM) was developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory to assess, quantify, and predict the hazards from the natural space environment and the anthropogenic environment produced by high altitude nuclear explosions (HANE). DREAM was initially developed as a basic research activity to understand and predict the dynamics of the Earth's Van Allen radiation belts. It uses Kalman filter techniques to assimilate data from space environment instruments with a physics-based model of the radiation belts. DREAM can assimilate data from a variety of types of instruments and data with various levels of resolution and fidelity by assigning appropriate uncertainties to the observations. Data from any spacecraft orbit can be assimilated but DREAM was designed to function with as few as two spacecraft inputs: one from geosynchronous orbit and one from GPS orbit. With those inputs, DREAM can be used to predict the environment at any satellite in any orbit whether space environment data are available in those orbits or not. Even with very limited data input and relatively simple physics models, DREAM specifies the space environment in the radiation belts to a high level of accuracy. DREAM has been extensively tested and evaluated as we transition from research to operations. We report here on one set of test results in which we predict the environment in a highly-elliptical polar orbit. We also discuss long-duration reanalysis for spacecraft design, using DREAM for real-time operations, and prospects for 1-week forecasts of the radiation belt environment.

  18. Investigation of Arsenic Pollution in Surrounding Environment of the Phosphate Mine%磷矿周围环境砷污染情况调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万洁妤; 施云刚; 吴荣华; 李进国; 翁林; 艾淼; 欧德渊

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate the arsenic pollution and the enrichment regularity in Kan-yang arsenic mine area in Guizhou,to provide theoretical basis of researching and grasping the food safety in live-stock around the phosphate mine.All samples were determined with method of atomic absorption spectrophotome-try.The results showed that the highest content of arsenic in the environment is in water,followed by cabbage, soil,rice,corn,then grasses.The peppers and radishes were not detected for arsenic;The arsenic accumulation from high to low in chicken tissues is as follows:kidney,lung,heart,liver,spleen,muscle;The arsenic accumu-lation from high to low in duck tissues is as follows:kidney,liver,lung,muscle,spleen,heart.The arsenic accu-mulation from high to low in swine tissues is as follows:intestine,kidney,liver,spleen and the heart.Lung and muscle were not detected for arsenic.The results indicated that the serious arsenic pollution exists in livestock a-round the phosphate mine.%调查磷矿周围环境和畜禽组织砷含量,为掌握磷矿区周围畜禽产品安全提供依据。采用原子吸收光谱法进行测定。结果表明,环境中砷含量从高到低依次为水体、白菜、土壤、大米、玉米、牧草,而辣椒和萝卜未检出砷;鸡内脏及肌肉砷含量从高到低依次为肾脏、肺脏、心脏、肝脏、脾脏、肌肉;鸭内脏及肌肉砷含量从高到低依次为肾脏、肝脏、肺脏、肌肉、脾脏、心脏;猪内脏及肌肉砷含量从高到低依次为肠、肾脏、肝脏、脾脏,而心脏、肺脏和肌肉未检出。说明磷矿周围饲养的畜禽存在砷污染现象。

  19. A Monte Carlo transport code study of the space radiation environment using FLUKA and ROOT

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, T; Carminati, F; Brun, R; Ferrari, A; Sala, P; Empl, A; MacGibbon, J

    2001-01-01

    We report on the progress of a current study aimed at developing a state-of-the-art Monte-Carlo computer simulation of the space radiation environment using advanced computer software techniques recently available at CERN, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics in Geneva, Switzerland. By taking the next-generation computer software appearing at CERN and adapting it to known problems in the implementation of space exploration strategies, this research is identifying changes necessary to bring these two advanced technologies together. The radiation transport tool being developed is tailored to the problem of taking measured space radiation fluxes impinging on the geometry of any particular spacecraft or planetary habitat and simulating the evolution of that flux through an accurate model of the spacecraft material. The simulation uses the latest known results in low-energy and high-energy physics. The output is a prediction of the detailed nature of the radiation environment experienced in space as well a...

  20. High-performing simulations of the space radiation environment for the International Space Station and Apollo Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Matthew Lawrence

    The space radiation environment is a significant challenge to future manned and unmanned space travels. Future missions will rely more on accurate simulations of radiation transport in space through spacecraft to predict astronaut dose and energy deposition within spacecraft electronics. The International Space Station provides long-term measurements of the radiation environment in Low Earth Orbit (LEO); however, only the Apollo missions provided dosimetry data beyond LEO. Thus dosimetry analysis for deep space missions is poorly supported with currently available data, and there is a need to develop dosimetry-predicting models for extended deep space missions. GEANT4, a Monte Carlo Method, provides a powerful toolkit in C++ for simulation of radiation transport in arbitrary media, thus including the spacecraft and space travels. The newest version of GEANT4 supports multithreading and MPI, resulting in faster distributive processing of simulations in high-performance computing clusters. This thesis introduces a new application based on GEANT4 that greatly reduces computational time using Kingspeak and Ember computational clusters at the Center for High Performance Computing (CHPC) to simulate radiation transport through full spacecraft geometry, reducing simulation time to hours instead of weeks without post simulation processing. Additionally, this thesis introduces a new set of detectors besides the historically used International Commission of Radiation Units (ICRU) spheres for calculating dose distribution, including a Thermoluminescent Detector (TLD), Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counter (TEPC), and human phantom combined with a series of new primitive scorers in GEANT4 to calculate dose equivalence based on the International Commission of Radiation Protection (ICRP) standards. The developed models in this thesis predict dose depositions in the International Space Station and during the Apollo missions showing good agreement with experimental measurements

  1. Polymerisation processes in expoy resins under influence of free space environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondyurin, A.; Lauke, B.; Kondyurina, I.

    A creation of large size constructions in space or on celestial bodies is possible by the way of chemical reactions of liquid viscous components under space environment conditions [1-2]. In particular, a new technology for large-size space module for electronic components, energy and materials production is developed on the basis of polymerisation technique. The factors of free space environment have a significant influence on the polymerisation processes. The polymerisation processes in active liquid components are sensitive to microgravitation, temperature variations (-150{ldots}+1500C), high vacuum (10-3{ldots}10-7 Pa), atomic oxygen flux (on LEO), UV and VUV irradiations, X-ray and γ -irradiations, high energy electron and ion fluxes. Experiments of polymerisation processes under simulated free space conditions were conducted. The influences of high vacuum, high energy ion beam and rf- and mw-plasma on polymerisation of epoxy resins were observed. The effects of low molecular components evaporations, free radical formations, additional chemical reactions and mixing processes during polymerisation were observed. Our results showed, that the space factors can initiate the polymerisation reaction in epoxy matrix of glass and carbon fibre composites. The result can be used for a technology for large size constructions on Earth orbit, in far space and on space bodies as for deployed antennas, solar sail stringers, solar shield stringers, frame for large-size space station, frame for Moon, Mars, asteroids bases, frame for space plant on Earth orbit and on other celestial bodies. The study was partially supported by Alexander von Humboldt Foundation (A. Kondyurin) and European Space Agency, ESTEC (contract 17083/03/NL/Sfe "Space Environmental Effects on the Polymerisation of Composite Structures"). 1. A.Kondyurin, B.Lauke, Polymerisation processes in simulated free space conditions, Proceedings of the 9th International Symposium on Materials in a Space Environment

  2. Exploration Technology Developments Program's Radiation Hardened Electronics for Space Environments (RHESE) Project Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keys, Andrew S.; Adams, James H.; Darty, Ronald C.; Patrick, Marshall C.; Johnson, Michael A.; Cressler, John D.

    2008-01-01

    Primary Objective: 1) A computational tool to accurately predict electronics performance in the presence of space radiation in support of spacecraft design: a) Total dose; b) Single Event Effects; and c) Mean Time Between Failure. (Developed as successor to CR ME96.) Secondary Objectives: 2) To provide a detailed description of the natural radiation environment in support of radiation health and instrument design: a) In deep space; b) Inside the magnetosphere; and c) Behind shielding.

  3. Neighbourhood green space, social environment and mental health: an examination in four European cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruijsbroek, Annemarie; Mohnen, Sigrid M; Droomers, Mariël; Kruize, Hanneke; Gidlow, Christopher; Gražulevičiene, Regina; Andrusaityte, Sandra; Maas, Jolanda; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J; Triguero-Mas, Margarita; Masterson, Daniel; Ellis, Naomi; van Kempen, Elise; Hardyns, Wim; Stronks, Karien; Groenewegen, Peter P

    2017-07-01

    This study examines the relationship between neighbourhood green space, the neighbourhood social environment (social cohesion, neighbourhood attachment, social contacts), and mental health in four European cities. The PHENOTYPE study was carried out in 2013 in Barcelona (Spain), Stoke-on-Trent (United Kingdom), Doetinchem (The Netherlands), and Kaunas (Lithuania). 3771 adults living in 124 neighbourhoods answered questions on mental health, neighbourhood social environment, and amount and quality of green space. Additionally, audit data on neighbourhood green space were collected. Multilevel regression analyses examined the relation between neighbourhood green space and individual mental health and the influence of neighbourhood social environment. Mental health was only related to green (audit) in Barcelona. The amount and quality of neighbourhood green space (audit and perceived) were related to social cohesion in Doetinchem and Stoke-on-Trent and to neighbourhood attachment in Doetinchem. In all four cities, mental health was associated with social contacts. Neighbourhood green was related to mental health only in Barcelona. Though neighbourhood green was related to social cohesion and attachment, the neighbourhood social environment seems not the underlying mechanism for this relationship.

  4. Development of a Temperature Sensor for Jet Engine and Space Missions Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad; Culley, Dennis E.; Elbuluk, Malik

    2008-01-01

    Electronic systems in aerospace and in space exploration missions are expected to encounter extreme temperatures and wide thermal swings. To address the needs for extreme temperature electronics, research efforts exist at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) to develop and evaluate electronics for extreme temperature operations, and to establish their reliability under extreme temperature operation and thermal cycling; conditions that are typical of both the aerospace and space environments. These efforts are supported by the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics/Subsonic Fixed Wing Program and by the NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP) Program. This work reports on the results obtained on the development of a temperature sensor geared for use in harsh environments.

  5. YingHuo-1——Martian Space Environment Exploration Orbiter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Hua

    2008-01-01

    This paper gives a brief introduction of YingHuo-1 (YH-1), a Chinese Martian Space Environment Exploration Orbiter. YH-1 is a micro-satellite developed by Chinese Aerospace Industry,and will be launched together with Russian spacecraft, Phobos-Grunt, to orbit Mars in September,2009. Four payloads are selected for the mission, plasma package, including of electron analyzer, ion energy and mass analyzer; sat-sat occultation receiver; flux-gate magnetometer; and optical monitor.YH-1 mission focus on the investigation of the characteristics and its evolution of the Martian space Environment, and identifying major plasma processes, which provide channels for Martian volatiles escaping.

  6. Agreement for NASA/OAST - USAF/AFSC space interdependency on spacecraft environment interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, C. P.; Stevens, N. J.

    1980-01-01

    A joint AF/NASA comprehensive program on spacecraft environment interactions consists of combined contractual and in house efforts aimed at understanding spacecraft environment ineraction phenomena and relating ground test results to space conditions. Activities include: (1) a concerted effort to identify project related environmental interactions; (2) a materials investigation to measure the basic properties of materials and develop or modify materials as needed; and (3) a ground simulation investigation to evaluate basic plasma interaction phenomena and provide inputs to the analytical modeling investigation. Systems performance is evaluated by both ground tests and analysis. There is an environmental impact investigation to determine the effect of future large spacecraft on the charged particle environment. Space flight investigations are planned to verify the results. The products of this program are test standards and design guidelines which summarize the technology, specify test criteria, and provide techniques to minimize or eliminate system interactions with the charged particle environment.

  7. Tardigrades living in extreme environments have naturally selected prerequisites useful to space conquer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidetti, Roberto; Tiziana, Altiero; Cesari, Michele; Rizzo, Angela Maria; Bertolani, Roberto; Galletta, Giuseppe; Dalessandro, Maurizio; Rebecchi, Lorena

    Extreme habitats are highly selective and can host only living organisms possessing specific adaptations to stressors. Among extreme habitats, space environment has particular charac-teristics of radiations, vacuum, microgravity and temperature, which induce rapid changes in living systems. Consequently, the response of multicellular complex organisms, able to colo-nize extreme environments, to space stresses can give very useful information on the ability to withstand a single stress or stress combinations. This knowledge on changes in living systems in space, with their similarity to the ageing processes, offers the opportunity to improve human life both on Earth and in space. Even though experimentation in space has often been carried out using unicellular organisms, multicellular organisms are very relevant in order to develop the appropriate countermeasures to avoid the risks imposed by environmental space in humans. The little attention received by multicellular organisms is probably due, other than to difficul-ties in the manipulation of biological materials in space, to the presence of only few organisms with the potential to tolerate environmental space stresses. Among them, tardigrades are small invertebrates representing an attractive animal model to study adaptive strategies for surviving extreme environments, including space environment. Tardigrades are little known microscopic aquatic animals (250-800 m in body length) distributed in different environments (from the deep sea to high mountains and deserts all over the world), and frequently inhabiting very unstable and unpredictable habitats (e.g. interstices of mosses, lichens, leaf litter, freshwater ponds, cryoconite holes). Their ability to live in the extreme environments is related to a wide variety of their life histories and adaptive strategies. A widespread and crucial strategy is cryptobiosis, a form of quiescence. It includes strategies such as anhydrobiosis and cryobiosis, characterized by

  8. Space Weather Impacts on Spacecraft Design and Operations in Auroral Charging Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Parker, Linda N.

    2012-01-01

    Spacecraft in low altitude, high inclination (including sun-synchronous) orbits are widely used for remote sensing of the Earth s land surface and oceans, monitoring weather and climate, communications, scientific studies of the upper atmosphere and ionosphere, and a variety of other scientific, commercial, and military applications. These systems are episodically exposed to environments characterized by a high flux of energetic (approx.1 to 10 s kilovolt) electrons in regions of very low background plasma density which is similar in some ways to the space weather conditions in geostationary orbit responsible for spacecraft charging to kilovolt levels. While it is well established that charging conditions in geostationary orbit are responsible for many anomalies and even spacecraft failures, to date there have been relatively few such reports due to charging in auroral environments. This presentation first reviews the physics of the space environment and its interactions with spacecraft materials that control auroral charging rates and the anticipated maximum potentials that should be observed on spacecraft surfaces during disturbed space weather conditions. We then describe how the theoretical values compare to the observational history of extreme charging in auroral environments and discuss how space weather impacts both spacecraft design and operations for vehicles on orbital trajectories that traverse auroral charging environments.

  9. Impact of Huangshigang District School Surrounding Community Ecological Environment to Build Healthy Classroom%黄石港区学校周边社区生态环境对构建健康课堂的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭玉平

    2015-01-01

    社区生态环境是物质环境和精神环境的总和,良好的社区生态环境有利于净化师生的心灵、有利于素质教育的开展、有利于规范师生的心理和行为习惯,也有利于良好师生关系、生生关系的形成。相反,不良的社区生态环境容易扰乱师生的心境、诱发青少年不良的行为习惯,容易使学生形成不良的思想道德品质,也不利于良好师生关系的构建。通过了解黄石港区部分学校周边社区生态环境的现状以及对构建健康课堂的影响,笔者提出了构建黄石港区学校周边社区生态环境的一些思考。%Community ecological environment is the sum of the physical environment and the spiritual environment, good community ecological environment conducive to purify the hearts of teachers and students, contributing to the de-velopment of quality education, teachers and students in favor of standardized psychological and behavior, but also con-ducive to good teacher-student relationship form life and relationships. Conversely, poor ecological community of tea-chers and students easily disrupt mood, induced bad teen behavior, easy for students to form a poor moral quality, is not conducive to building a good relationship between teachers and students. By understanding the current situation surro-unding community school district Huangshigang ecological environment as well as on the construction of part of the health class, I made some thinking to build schools in the districts surrounding communities Huangshigang ecological environment.

  10. Evidence of Molecular Adaptation to Extreme Environments and Applicability to Space Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipović, M. D.

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This is initial investigation of gene signatures responsible for adapting microscopic life to the extreme Earth environments. We present preliminary results on identification of the clusters of orthologous groups (COGs common to several hyperthermophiles and exclusion of those common to a mesophile (non-hyperthermophile: {it Escherichia coli (E. coli K12}, will yield a group of proteins possibly involved in adaptation to life under extreme temperatures. Comparative genome analyses represent a powerful tool in discovery of novel genes responsible for adaptation to specific extreme environments. Methanogens stand out as the only group of organisms that have species capable of growth at 0D C ({it Metarhizium frigidum (M.~frigidum} and {it Methanococcoides burtonii (M.~burtonii} and 110D C ({it Methanopyrus kandleri (M.~kandleri}. Although not all the components of heat adaptation can be attributed to novel genes, the {it chaperones} known as heat shock proteins stabilize the enzymes under elevated temperature. However, highly conserved {it chaperons} found in bacteria and eukaryots are not present in hyperthermophilic Archea, rather, they have a unique {it chaperone TF55}. Our aim was to use software which we specifically developed for extremophile genome comparative analyses in order to search for additional novel genes involved in hyperthermophile adaptation. The followinghyperthermophile genomes incorporated in this software were used forthese studies: {it Methanocaldococcus jannaschii (M.~jannaschii, M.~kandleri, Archaeoglobus fulgidus (A.~fulgidus} and threespecies of {it Pyrococcus}. Common genes were annotated and groupedaccording to their roles in cellular processes where such informationwas available and proteins not previously implicated in theheat-adaptation of hyperthermophiles were identified. Additionalexperimental data are needed in order to learn more about theseproteins. To address non-gene based components of thermaladaptation

  11. Evidence of molecular adaptation to extreme environments and applicability to space environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipović M.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This is initial investigation of gene signatures responsible for adapting microscopic life to the extreme Earth environments. We present preliminary results on identification of the clusters of orthologous groups (COGs common to several hyperthermophiles and exclusion of those common to a mesophile (non-hyperthermophile: Escherichia coli (E. coli K12, will yield a group of proteins possibly involved in adaptation to life under extreme temperatures. Comparative genome analyses represent a powerful tool in discovery of novel genes responsible for adaptation to specific extreme environments. Methanogens stand out as the only group of organisms that have species capable of growth at 0ºC (Metarhizium frigidum (M. frigidum and Methanococcoides burtonii (M. burtonii and 110ºC (Methanopyrus kandleri (M. kandleri. Although not all the components of heat adaptation can be attributed to novel genes, the chaperones known as heat shock proteins stabilize the enzymes under elevated temperature. However, highly conserved chaperons found in bacteria and eukaryots are not present in hyperthermophilic Archea, rather, they have a unique chaperone TF55. Our aim was to use software which we specifically developed for extremophile genome comparative analyses in order to search for additional novel genes involved in hyperthermophile adaptation. The following hyperthermophile genomes incorporated in this software were used for these studies: Methanocaldococcus jannaschii (M. jannaschii, M. kandleri, Archaeoglobus fulgidus (A. fulgidus and three species of Pyrococcus. Common genes were annotated and grouped according to their roles in cellular processes where such information was available and proteins not previously implicated in the heat-adaptation of hyperthermophiles were identified. Additional experimental data are needed in order to learn more about these proteins. To address non-gene based components of thermal adaptation, all sequenced extremophiles were

  12. Practices Surrounding Event Photos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vyas, Dhaval; Nijholt, Antinus; van der Veer, Gerrit C.; Kotzé, P.; Marsden, G.; Lindgaard, G.; Wesson, J.; Winckler, M.

    Sharing photos through mobile devices has a great potential for creating shared experiences of social events between co-located as well as remote participants. In order to design novel event sharing tools, we need to develop indepth understanding of current practices surrounding these so called

  13. Impact of space environment on stability of medicines: Challenges and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Priti; Bhayani, Dhara

    2017-03-20

    To upkeep health of astronauts in a unique, isolated, and extreme environment of space is the primary goal for a successful space mission, hence, safe and efficacious medications are essential for the wellness of astronauts. Space medication has been challenged with problems related to efficacy. Along with altered physiology, one of the possible reasons could be instability of space medications in the presence of harsh spaceflight environmental conditions. Altered physical and chemical stability can result in reduced potency which can result in reduced efficacy. Right now, medicines from the International Space Station are replaced before their expiration. But, for longer duration missions to Mars or any other asteroid, there will not be any chance of replacement of medicines. Hence, it is desired that medicines maintain the shelf-life throughout the space mission. Stability of medicines used for short term or long term space missions cannot be judged by drug stability guidelines based on terrestrial environmental factors. Unique environmental conditions related to spaceflight include microgravity, excessive vibration, hard vacuum, humidity variation, temperature differences and excessive radiation, which may cause instability of medicines. This write-up provides a review of the problem and countermeasure approaches for pharmaceuticals exposed to the space environment. The first part of the article discusses thought processes behind outlining of International Conference on Harmonization drug stability guidelines, Q1A (R2) and Q1B, and its acceptance limits for accelerated stability study. The second part of the article describes the difference in the radiation environment of deep space compared to radiation environment inside the space shuttle based on penetration power of different types of radiation. In the third part of the article, various promising approaches are listed which can be used for assurance of space medicine stability. One of the approaches is the

  14. Vertebrate development in the environment of space: models, mechanisms, and use of the medaka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolgemuth, D. J.; Herrada, G.; Kiss, S.; Cannon, T.; Forsstrom, C.; Pranger, L. A.; Weismann, W. P.; Pearce, L.; Whalon, B.; Phillips, C. R.

    1997-01-01

    With the advent of space travel, it is of immediate interest and importance to study the effects of exposure to various aspects of the altered environment of space, including microgravity, on Earth-based life forms. Initial studies of space travel have focused primarily on the short-term effects of radiation and microgravity on adult organisms. However, with the potential for increased lengths of time in space, it is critical to now address the effects of space on all phases of an organism's life cycle, from embryogenesis to post-natal development to reproduction. It is already possible for certain species to undergo multiple generations within the confines of the Mir Space Station. The possibility now exists for scientists to consider the consequences of even potentially subtle defects in development through multiple phases of an organism's life cycle, or even through multiple generations. In this discussion, we highlight a few of the salient observations on the effects of the space environment on vertebrate development and reproductive function. We discuss some of the many unanswered questions, in particular, in the context of the choice of appropriate models in which to address these questions, as well as an assessment of the availability of hardware already existing or under development which would be useful in addressing these questions.

  15. Robust online belief space planning in changing environments: Application to physical mobile robots

    KAUST Repository

    Agha-mohammadi, Ali-akbar

    2014-05-01

    © 2014 IEEE. Motion planning in belief space (under motion and sensing uncertainty) is a challenging problem due to the computational intractability of its exact solution. The Feedback-based Information RoadMap (FIRM) framework made an important theoretical step toward enabling roadmap-based planning in belief space and provided a computationally tractable version of belief space planning. However, there are still challenges in applying belief space planners to physical systems, such as the discrepancy between computational models and real physical models. In this paper, we propose a dynamic replanning scheme in belief space to address such challenges. Moreover, we present techniques to cope with changes in the environment (e.g., changes in the obstacle map), as well as unforeseen large deviations in the robot\\'s location (e.g., the kidnapped robot problem). We then utilize these techniques to implement the first online replanning scheme in belief space on a physical mobile robot that is robust to changes in the environment and large disturbances. This method demonstrates that belief space planning is a practical tool for robot motion planning.

  16. Thermal Influence of a Large Green Space on a Hot Urban Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Hirofumi; Shimizu, Shogo; Takahashi, Hideo; Hagiwara, Shinsuke; Narita, Ken-Ichi; Mikami, Takehiko; Hirano, Tatsuki

    2016-01-01

    City-scale warming is becoming a serious problem in terms of human health. Urban green spaces are expected to act as a countermeasure for urban warming, and therefore better understanding of the micro-climate benefits of urban green is needed. This study quantified the thermal influence of a large green park in Tokyo, Japan on the surrounding urban area by collecting long-term measurements. Apparent variations in the temperature difference between the park and surrounding town were found at both the diurnal and seasonal scales. Advection by regional-scale wind and turbulent mixing transfers colder air from the park to urban areas in its vicinity. The extent of the park's thermal influence on the town was greater on the downwind side of the park (450 m) than on the upwind side (65 m). The extent was also greater in an area where the terrain slopes down toward the town. Even on calm nights, the extent of the thermal influence extended by the park breeze to an average of 200 m from the park boundary. The park breeze was characterized by its divergent flow in a horizontal plane, which was found to develop well in calm conditions late at night (regional scale wind green space tempered the hot summer nights on a city block scale. These findings can help urban planners in designing a heat-adapted city. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  17. Evidence of molecular adaptation to extreme environments and applicability to space environments

    CERN Document Server

    Filipovic, M D; Ognjanovic, M

    2008-01-01

    This is initial study of a gene signatures responsible for adapting microscopic life to the life in extreme Earth environments. We present a results on ID of the clusters of COGs common to several hyperthermophiles and exclusion of those common to a mesophile: E.coli.K12, will yield a group of proteins possibly involved in adaptation to life under extreme T. Methanogens stand out as the only group of organisms that have species capable of growth at 0C (M.frigidum and M.burtonii) and 110C (M.kandleri). Not all the components of heat adaptation can be attributed to novel genes, the chaperones known as heat shock proteins stabilize the enzymes under elevated temperature. Highly conserved chaperons found in bacteria and eukaryots are not present in hyperthermophilic Archea, rather, they have a unique chaperone TF55. Our aim is to use software which we specifically developed for extremophile genome comparative analyses in order to search for additional novel genes involved in hyperthermophile adaptation. The follo...

  18. The Built Environment and Health: Introducing Individual Space-Time Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry Timmermans

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Many studies have examined the relationship between the built environment and health. Yet, the question of how and why the environment influences health behavior remains largely unexplored. As health promotion interventions work through the individuals in a targeted population, an explicit understanding of individual behavior is required to formulate and evaluate intervention strategies. Bringing in concepts from various fields, this paper proposes the use of an activity-based modeling approach for understanding and predicting, from the bottom up, how individuals interact with their environment and each other in space and time, and how their behaviors aggregate to population-level health outcomes.

  19. Geostationary Communications Satellites as Sensors for the Space Weather Environment: Telemetry Event Identification Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlton, A.; Cahoy, K.

    2015-12-01

    Reliability of geostationary communication satellites (GEO ComSats) is critical to many industries worldwide. The space radiation environment poses a significant threat and manufacturers and operators expend considerable effort to maintain reliability for users. Knowledge of the space radiation environment at the orbital location of a satellite is of critical importance for diagnosing and resolving issues resulting from space weather, for optimizing cost and reliability, and for space situational awareness. For decades, operators and manufacturers have collected large amounts of telemetry from geostationary (GEO) communications satellites to monitor system health and performance, yet this data is rarely mined for scientific purposes. The goal of this work is to acquire and analyze archived data from commercial operators using new algorithms that can detect when a space weather (or non-space weather) event of interest has occurred or is in progress. We have developed algorithms, collectively called SEER (System Event Evaluation Routine), to statistically analyze power amplifier current and temperature telemetry by identifying deviations from nominal operations or other events and trends of interest. This paper focuses on our work in progress, which currently includes methods for detection of jumps ("spikes", outliers) and step changes (changes in the local mean) in the telemetry. We then examine available space weather data from the NOAA GOES and the NOAA-computed Kp index and sunspot numbers to see what role, if any, it might have played. By combining the results of the algorithm for many components, the spacecraft can be used as a "sensor" for the space radiation environment. Similar events occurring at one time across many component telemetry streams may be indicative of a space radiation event or system-wide health and safety concern. Using SEER on representative datasets of telemetry from Inmarsat and Intelsat, we find events that occur across all or many of

  20. Is green space in the living environment associated with people's feelings of social safety?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, J.; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Winsum-Westra, van M.; Verheij, R.A.; Vries, de S.; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2009-01-01

    The authors investigate whether the percentage of green space in people’s living environment affects their feelings of social safety positively or negatively. More specifically they investigate the extent to which this relationship varies between urban and rural areas, between groups in the

  1. Is green space in the living environment associated with people's feelings of social safety?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, J.; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Winsum-Westra, M. van; Verheij, R.A.; Vries, S. de; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract. The authors investigate whether the percentage of green space in people's living environ- ment affects their feelings of social safety positively or negatively. More specifically they investigate the extent to which this relationship varies between urban and rural areas, between groups in

  2. Extreme Space Weather Events and Charging Hazard Assessments in Lunar Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Parker, Linda N.; Blackwell, William C., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    The sunlit lunar surface charges to positive potentials with mean values of a few tens of volts where photoelectron currents dominate the charging process. In contrast, surfaces in darkness may charge to negative potentials on the order of a few hundred volts when the charging process is dominated by hot electron populations in the absence of solar photons. Recently, observations of electron beams measured by instruments on spacecraft in low lunar orbit have been interpreted as evidence for extreme lunar surface potentials exceeding a few kilovolts suggesting that lunar orbital and surface plasma environments may contain charging risks similar to geostationary orbit during extreme space weather conditions. Space system design for successful operation in a wide range of lunar environments will therefore require evaluation of charging hazards during extreme space weather conditions. We present results from a study of space weather environments conducted to obtained credible extreme charging environments for use in charging hazard assessments for lunar missions including extreme conditions encountered when the Moon is in the solar wind, the magnetosheath, and the Earth's magnetotail.

  3. Spaces for Geometric Work: Figural, Instrumental, and Discursive Geneses of Reasoning in a Technological Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Chacón, Inés Ma; Kuzniak, Alain

    2015-01-01

    The main goal of this research was to assess the effect of a dynamic environment on relationships between the three geneses (figural, instrumental, and discursive) of Spaces for Geometric Work. More specifically, it was to determine whether the interactive geometry program GeoGebra could play a specific role in the geometric work of future…

  4. State Space Composition Technique for Intelligent Wheel Chair Adapting to Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamagami, Tomoki; Hirata, Hironori

    This paper describes a state space composition technique for the adaptation to environment in the autonomous behavior of intelligent wheel chair (IWC).In the product like IWC with actual sensors, composing state space is difficult problem since environmental information can not be observed sufficiently from restricted sensor inputs.A lot of states observed from same environment position raise the fail of the learning and adaptation with active learning approach.In order to compensate for the effects of the sensor configuration, that is sensor position, angle and precision, a normalization processing of position detector is introduced.In sensor normalization process, IWC scans present environment via range sensors with executing spot-turn, and prepare scan-patterns of each sensor.Then the normalization process adjusts the phase and dynamic range of each pattern to the reference sensor scan-pattern, analyzing phase differences and scale factors of each pattern against reference pattern.Using phase difference and scale factors, automated state space composition is possible.From the simulation experiment with both artificial and real-worlddraft, the automated state space construction is confirmed as a practical approach for pre-processing for environment learning and adaptation.

  5. Is green space in the living environment associated with people's feelings of social safety?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, J.; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Winsum-Westra, M. van; Verheij, R.A.; Vries, S. de; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract. The authors investigate whether the percentage of green space in people's living environ- ment affects their feelings of social safety positively or negatively. More specifically they investigate the extent to which this relationship varies between urban and rural areas, between groups in

  6. Is green space in the living environment associated with people's feelings of social safety?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, J.; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Winsum-Westra, M. van; Verheij, R.A.; Vries, S. de; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2009-01-01

    The authors investigate whether the percentage of green space in people’s living environment affects their feelings of social safety positively or negatively. More specifically they investigate the extent to which this relationship varies between urban and rural areas, between groups in the communit

  7. The Outdoor Environment in Norwegian Kindergartens as Pedagogical Space for Toddlers' Play, Learning and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Thomas; Martinsen, Marianne T.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines some characteristics of the outdoor environment in Norwegian kindergartens. Understood as pedagogical space, outdoor conditions may enhance or restrict the youngest children's possibilities for play, learning and development. In 117 of 133 kindergartens (response rate: 87 %) participating in a longitudinal study, the heads of…

  8. Effects of a Closed Space Environment on Gene Expression in Hair Follicles of Astronauts in the International Space Station.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Terada

    Full Text Available Adaptation to the space environment can sometimes pose physiological problems to International Space Station (ISS astronauts after their return to earth. Therefore, it is important to develop healthcare technologies for astronauts. In this study, we examined the feasibility of using hair follicles, a readily obtained sample, to assess gene expression changes in response to spaceflight adaptation. In order to investigate the gene expression changes in human hair follicles during spaceflight, hair follicles of 10 astronauts were analyzed by microarray and real time qPCR analyses. We found that spaceflight alters human hair follicle gene expression. The degree of changes in gene expression was found to vary among individuals. In some astronauts, genes related to hair growth such as FGF18, ANGPTL7 and COMP were upregulated during flight, suggesting that spaceflight inhibits cell proliferation in hair follicles.

  9. Effects of a Closed Space Environment on Gene Expression in Hair Follicles of Astronauts in the International Space Station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Masahiro; Seki, Masaya; Takahashi, Rika; Yamada, Shin; Higashibata, Akira; Majima, Hideyuki J; Sudoh, Masamichi; Mukai, Chiaki; Ishioka, Noriaki

    2016-01-01

    Adaptation to the space environment can sometimes pose physiological problems to International Space Station (ISS) astronauts after their return to earth. Therefore, it is important to develop healthcare technologies for astronauts. In this study, we examined the feasibility of using hair follicles, a readily obtained sample, to assess gene expression changes in response to spaceflight adaptation. In order to investigate the gene expression changes in human hair follicles during spaceflight, hair follicles of 10 astronauts were analyzed by microarray and real time qPCR analyses. We found that spaceflight alters human hair follicle gene expression. The degree of changes in gene expression was found to vary among individuals. In some astronauts, genes related to hair growth such as FGF18, ANGPTL7 and COMP were upregulated during flight, suggesting that spaceflight inhibits cell proliferation in hair follicles.

  10. Study on the mechanical property of polyimide film in space radiation environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zicai; Mu, Yongqiang; Ding, Yigang; Liu, Yuming; Zhao, Chunqing

    2016-01-01

    Polyimide films are widely used in spacecraft, but their mechanical properties would degrade in space environments, such as electron, proton, near ultraviolet or far ultraviolet, etc. The mechanical property and mechanism of polyimide film in electron, proton, near ultraviolet and far ultraviolet was studied by Φ800 combined space radiation test facility of Beijing Institute of Space Environment Engineering (BISSE. Rupture elongation of Kapton film decrease with the increase of the tensile deformation rate. The tensile strength and the rupture elongation of Kapton film decrease with the increase of electron and proton radiation, while tensile strength and the rupture elongation of Kapton film decrease firstly and then increase with near ultraviolet and far ultraviolet.

  11. Development and Testing of Mechanism Technology for Space Exploration in Extreme Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Tony R.; Levanas, Greg; Mojarradi, Mohammad M.; Abel, Phillip B.

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Jet Propulsion Lab (JPL), Glenn Research Center (GRC), Langley Research Center (LaRC), and Aeroflex, Inc. have partnered to develop and test actuator hardware that will survive the stringent environment of the moon, and which can also be leveraged for other challenging space exploration missions. Prototype actuators have been built and tested in a unique low temperature test bed with motor interface temperatures as low as 14 degrees Kelvin. Several years of work have resulted in specialized electro-mechanical hardware to survive extreme space exploration environments, a test program that verifies and finds limitations of the designs at extreme temperatures, and a growing knowledge base that can be leveraged by future space exploration missions.

  12. Construction of English-Chinese bilingual interaction environment in virtual space teleconferencing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongmei; Qi, Yue; Wang, Ting; Chen, Huowang

    2003-04-01

    Virtual Space Teleconferencing System (VST), which based on video teleconferencing system, is a combination of Virtual Reality and several other techniques, such as Network Communication and Natural Language Processing. Participants appear in computer-generated virtual spaces as avatars in VST, and these avatars can locate, view, manipulate virtual objects, communicate with others face to face, so participants could share 'the same space' and do cooperative work. When participants use different kinds of natural language to communicate, language barrier would arise in interaction. So, besides the basic natural language processing, VST should provide translation service based on Machine Translation. First, this paper introduces the features of VST. Second, it describes the techniques of English-Chinese Bi-directional Machine Translation. Third, it analyzes the special requirements of English-Chinese bilingual interaction environment in VST. Finally it discusses the key issues of English-Chinese bilingual interaction environment and proposes a method of construction.

  13. Designing new collaborative learning spaces in clinical environments: experiences from a children's hospital in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bines, Julie E; Jamieson, Peter

    2013-09-01

    Hospitals are complex places that provide a rich learning environment for students, staff, patients and their families, professional groups and the community. The "new" Royal Children's Hospital opened in late 2011. Its mission is focused on improving health and well-being of children and adolescents through leadership in healthcare, research and education. Addressing the need to create "responsive learning environments" aligned with the shift to student-centred pedagogy, two distinct learning environments were developed within the new Royal Children's Hospital; (i) a dedicated education precinct providing a suite of physical environments to promote a more active, collaborative and social learning experience for education and training programs conducted on the Royal Children's Hospital campus and (ii) a suite of learning spaces embedded within clinical areas so that learning becomes an integral part of the daily activities of this busy Hospital environment. The aim of this article is to present the overarching educational principles that lead the design of these learning spaces and describe the opportunities and obstacles encountered in the development of collaborative learning spaces within a large hospital development.

  14. Gene expression of rice seeds surviving 13- and 20-month exposure to space environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Manabu; Oono, Youko; Kawahara, Yoshihiro; Gusev, Oleg; Maekawa, Masahiko; Matsumoto, Takashi; Levinskikh, Margarita; Sychev, Vladimir; Novikova, Natalia; Grigoriev, Anatoly

    2016-11-01

    Rice seeds were exposed outside of the international space station to assess the risk of space environment exposure on gene expression associated with seed germination. The germination percentages of the space-stored and ground-stored seeds exposed for 13 months were 48 and 96% respectively. Those for 20 months were 7 and 76%, respectively. Germination was defined 3 days after imbibition, except for the space-stored seeds exposed for 20 months, which germinated 5 days after imbibition. Subsequent RNA-seq analyses of the dry seeds, germinated seeds, and roots and shoots of seedlings revealed that the mutation rates of mRNA sequences were not significantly different between space-stored and ground-stored samples exposed for 13 months and 20 months. In all, 4 and 16 transcripts of glycolysis-related genes were increased in the germinated seeds after 13-month and 20-month exposure, respectively. Also, 2 and 39 transcripts of long-lived mRNA required for germination were decreased more than 2-fold in the dry seeds after 13-month and 20-month exposure, respectively. These results suggest that damage to long-lived mRNA in seeds by a space environment delays and reduces germination.

  15. Gene expression of rice seeds surviving 13- and 20-month exposure to space environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Manabu; Oono, Youko; Kawahara, Yoshihiro; Gusev, Oleg; Maekawa, Masahiko; Matsumoto, Takashi; Levinskikh, Margarita; Sychev, Vladimir; Novikova, Natalia; Grigoriev, Anatoly

    2016-11-01

    Rice seeds were exposed outside of the international space station to assess the risk of space environment exposure on gene expression associated with seed germination. The germination percentages of the space-stored and ground-stored seeds exposed for 13 months were 48 and 96% respectively. Those for 20 months were 7 and 76%, respectively. Germination was defined 3 days after imbibition, except for the space-stored seeds exposed for 20 months, which germinated 5 days after imbibition. Subsequent RNA-seq analyses of the dry seeds, germinated seeds, and roots and shoots of seedlings revealed that the mutation rates of mRNA sequences were not significantly different between space-stored and ground-stored samples exposed for 13 months and 20 months. In all, 4 and 16 transcripts of glycolysis-related genes were increased in the germinated seeds after 13-month and 20-month exposure, respectively. Also, 2 and 39 transcripts of long-lived mRNA required for germination were decreased more than 2-fold in the dry seeds after 13-month and 20-month exposure, respectively. These results suggest that damage to long-lived mRNA in seeds by a space environment delays and reduces germination.

  16. The Canadian Space Agency, Space Station, Strategic Technologies for Automation and Robotics Program technology development activity in protection of materials from the low Earth orbit space environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francoeur, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    The Strategic Technologies in Automation and Robotics (STEAR) program is managing a number of development contracts to improve the protection of spacecraft materials from the Low Earth Orbit (LEO) space environment. The project is structured in two phases over a 3 to 4 year period with a budget of 3 to 4 million dollars. Phase 1 is designed to demonstrate the technical feasibility and commercial potential of a coating/substrate system and its associated application process. The objective is to demonstrate a prototype fabrication capability using a full scale component of a commercially viable process for the protection of materials and surface finishes from the LEO space environment, and to demonstrate compliance with a set of performance requirements. Only phase 1 will be discussed in this paper.

  17. Initial Characterization of the Microgravity Environment of the International Space Station: Increments 2 Through 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jules, K.; McPherson, K.; Hrovat, K.; Kelly, E.

    2002-01-01

    The primary objective of the International Space Station (ISS) is to provide a long-term reduced gravity environment for the conduct of scientific research for a variety of microgravity science disciplines. With the completion of flight of STS-100 (ISS flight 6A), the Microgravity Environment Program at the NASA Glenn Research Center delivered two acceleration measurement systems to the International Space Station. These acceleration measurement systems provide a generic service to microgravity payloads by measuring the quasi-steady and the vibratory acceleration environments on board the station. The Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System measures accelerations in the quasi-steady regime, including the contributions of aerodynamic drag, vehicle rotation, and vehicle venting effects. The Space Acceleration Measurement System-II measures on-board disturbances in the vibratory regime resulting from vehicle systems, crew activity, and experiment hardware. This paper presents to the microgravity scientific community the results of the initial characterization of the microgravity environment of the International Space Station for increments 2 through 4. Also, the role of the Principal Investigator Microgravity Services (PIMS) project is described in terms of ISS acceleration data distribution, processing, achieving, analyzing and characterization of the ISS as well as its interaction with the principal investigator teams. The results discussed in this paper covered both the quasi-steady and the vibratory acceleration environment of the station during its first year of operation. The ISS quasi-steady microgravity environment is described for increments 2 through 4. Results are presented and discussed for the following: Torque Equilibrium Attitude (TEA) and the X Axis Perpendicular to the Orbital Plane (XPOP) ISS attitudes; ISS docking attitudes and their effect on the quasi-steady acceleration environment as well as the impact of STS joint operation with ISS on the

  18. Modified polymeric materials for durability in the atomic oxygen space environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, R. L.; Anderson, R. A.; Kim, M.-H. Y.; Thibeault, S. A.

    2003-08-01

    Organometallic compounds have been incorporated into organic polymers to improve their durability to the environment of the low earth orbit (LEO), particularly their resistance to erosion by atomic oxygen (AO). Bis(triphenyltin) oxide (BTO) was added to a thermoplastic polyetherimide, Ultem, and exposed on the Mir space station. The addition of the BTO to Ultem significantly reduced the mass loss in LEO. Aluminum acetylacetonate was added to a thermoset, PMDA-ODA polyimide. that is currently deployed on the International Space Station. Two films are placed in the ram direction exposed to AO and space radiation. Three films are placed in the wake direction and are exposed to space radiation but not AO. The doped films show superior resistance to AO.

  19. Technology Development Activities for the Space Environment and its Effects on Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, Billy; Hardage, Donna; Minor, Jody; Barth, Janet; LaBel, Ken

    2003-01-01

    Reducing size and weight of spacecraft, along with demanding increased performance capabilities, introduces many uncertainties in the engineering design community on how emerging microelectronics will perform in space. The engineering design community is forever behind on obtaining and developing new tools and guidelines to mitigate the harmful effects of the space environment. Adding to this complexity is the push to use Commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) and shrinking microelectronics behind less shielding and the potential usage of unproven technologies such as large solar sail structures and nuclear electric propulsion. In order to drive down these uncertainties, various programs are working together to avoid duplication, save what resources are available in this technical area and possess a focused agenda to insert these new developments into future mission designs. This paper will describe the relationship between the Living With a Star (LWS): Space Environment Testbeds (SET) Project and NASA's Space Environments and Effects (SEE) Program and their technology development activities funded as a result from the recent SEE Program's NASA Research Announcement.

  20. Can we colonize the solar system? Human biology and survival in the extreme space environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Launius, Roger D

    2010-09-01

    Throughout the history of the space age the dominant vision for the future has been great spaceships plying the solar system, and perhaps beyond, moving living beings from one planet to another. Spacesuited astronauts would carry out exploration, colonization, and settlement as part of a relentlessly forward looking movement of humanity beyond Earth. As time has progressed this image has not changed appreciably even as the full magnitude of the challenges it represents have become more and more apparent. This essay explores the issues associated with the human movement beyond Earth and raises questions about whether humanity will ever be able to survive in the extreme environment of space and the other bodies of the solar system. This paper deals with important historical episodes as well as wider conceptual issues about life in space. Two models of expansion beyond Earth are discussed: (1) the movement of microbes and other types of life on Earth that can survive the space environment and (2) the modification of humans into cyborgs for greater capability to survive in the extreme environments encountered beyond this planet.

  1. Growth of 48 built environment bacterial isolates on board the International Space Station (ISS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coil, David A; Neches, Russell Y; Lang, Jenna M; Brown, Wendy E; Severance, Mark; Cavalier, Darlene; Eisen, Jonathan A

    2016-01-01

    Background. While significant attention has been paid to the potential risk of pathogenic microbes aboard crewed spacecraft, the non-pathogenic microbes in these habitats have received less consideration. Preliminary work has demonstrated that the interior of the International Space Station (ISS) has a microbial community resembling those of built environments on Earth. Here we report the results of sending 48 bacterial strains, collected from built environments on Earth, for a growth experiment on the ISS. This project was a component of Project MERCCURI (Microbial Ecology Research Combining Citizen and University Researchers on ISS). Results. Of the 48 strains sent to the ISS, 45 of them showed similar growth in space and on Earth using a relative growth measurement adapted for microgravity. The vast majority of species tested in this experiment have also been found in culture-independent surveys of the ISS. Only one bacterial strain showed significantly different growth in space. Bacillus safensis JPL-MERTA-8-2 grew 60% better in space than on Earth. Conclusions. The majority of bacteria tested were not affected by conditions aboard the ISS in this experiment (e.g., microgravity, cosmic radiation). Further work on Bacillus safensis could lead to interesting insights on why this strain grew so much better in space.

  2. Molecular chaperones-related studies using latent stages of invertebrates exposed to space environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusev, O. A.; Alexeev, V. R.; Sychev, V. N.; Okuda, T.; Saigusa, M.

    The latent stages of certain groups of invertebrates such as Artemia and Daphnia cyst Crustacea tuns of water bears Tardigrada are very perspective material for the investigation of the boundaries of the survival of the living organisms in the space environment While the number of authors showed that exposition the space flight causes the alteration in the survivability of the Artemia cysts there is no data about the changes in the stress response on the molecular level after short and long-termed space flight In this report we present preliminary results of the analysis of the expression of hsp90 chaperon in response to the heat shock in the larvae of the Artemia obtained from the cyst exposed to the real space flight onboard ISS for 1 and 6 month in the frame of the Aquarium program 2005-2006 and control ground group The perspectives of the usage of the molecular chaperons hsp in the studies for elucidation of the influence of the open space environment BIORISK and EXPOSE research programs on the immune response end general physiology of the invertebrates in their latent stages are discussed

  3. Growth of 48 built environment bacterial isolates on board the International Space Station (ISS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Coil

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. While significant attention has been paid to the potential risk of pathogenic microbes aboard crewed spacecraft, the non-pathogenic microbes in these habitats have received less consideration. Preliminary work has demonstrated that the interior of the International Space Station (ISS has a microbial community resembling those of built environments on Earth. Here we report the results of sending 48 bacterial strains, collected from built environments on Earth, for a growth experiment on the ISS. This project was a component of Project MERCCURI (Microbial Ecology Research Combining Citizen and University Researchers on ISS. Results. Of the 48 strains sent to the ISS, 45 of them showed similar growth in space and on Earth using a relative growth measurement adapted for microgravity. The vast majority of species tested in this experiment have also been found in culture-independent surveys of the ISS. Only one bacterial strain showed significantly different growth in space. Bacillus safensis JPL-MERTA-8-2 grew 60% better in space than on Earth. Conclusions. The majority of bacteria tested were not affected by conditions aboard the ISS in this experiment (e.g., microgravity, cosmic radiation. Further work on Bacillus safensis could lead to interesting insights on why this strain grew so much better in space.

  4. Experiencing Personal Learning Environments and Networks using a 3D Space Metaphor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Di Cerbo

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes our proposal for adopting 3D spatial representation, based on suitable indications and metrics, for the evaluation of experiences conducted in a Personal Learning Environment (PLE and its social extension, the Personal Learning Network (PLN.The use of 3D space is a mean for integrating different perspectives (e.g., structured and non-structured learning but also to foster the cooperation between users. Moreover, information coming from the use of 3D space can represent a precious feedback for better understanding ongoing learning activities, but it will be extremely useful for enhancing and improving the development of existing PLE-PLN support tool.

  5. SSPI - Space Service Provider Infrastructure: Image Information Mining and Management Prototype for a Distributed Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela, L.; Ruggieri, G.; Giancaspro, A.

    2004-09-01

    In the sphere of "Multi-Mission Ground Segment" Italian Space Agency project, some innovative technologies such as CORBA[1], Z39.50[2], XML[3], Java[4], Java server Pages[4] and C++ has been experimented. The SSPI system (Space Service Provider Infrastructure) is the prototype of a distributed environment aimed to facilitate the access to Earth Observation (EO) data. SSPI allows to ingests, archive, consolidate, visualize and evaluate these data. Hence, SSPI is not just a database of or a data repository, but an application that by means of a set of protocols, standards and specifications provides a unified access to multi-mission EO data.

  6. The Sound Environment Evaluation of Urban Commercial Space Users in Urban Commercial Area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Gang-ting

    2003-01-01

    With the globe getting highly internationalized, commercial activities have transformed from traditional buying and selling functions into more complicated functions. Thus, sounds coming from commercial activities are becoming much more multifarious, at the same time, more annoying. This is because of Taiwan's special residence custom. In Taiwan, most people live in the residence-commercial complex zoning, which means residents expose to the commercial activities noise in daily lives. In order to investigate residence-commercial complex zoning sound environment from user's point of view, there were 800 questionnaires handed round, and 273 questionnaires were replied. There are six evaluation factors in influencing molding commercial space sound environment. According to the users' observation and experience, three factors play important roles in influencing users' evaluation regarding sound environment design, including amenity(pleasant, comfortable or unpleasant, uncomfortable), vitality(active or inactive) , and atmosphere of warmth (warm or cold). In the regression analysis, amenity and volume (Leq)have a negative relationship(r=- 0. 558), which means volume is an important factor in commercial space sound environment molding. In the past, high volume amplifier system was applied extensively in commercial district to attract more crowds. However, amenity is declined under such noisy environment. It is a very important issue to study the trade-off relationship between these two situations and improve noise problem in residence-commercial complex zoning.

  7. Addressing Challenges to the Design & Test of Operational Lighting Environments for the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Toni A.

    2014-01-01

    In our day to day lives, the availability of light, with which to see our environment, is often taken for granted. The designers of land based lighting systems use sunlight and artificial light as their toolset. The availability of power, quantity of light sources, and variety of design options are often unlimited. The accessibility of most land based lighting systems makes it easy for the architect and engineer to verify and validate their design ideas. Failures with an implementation, while sometimes costly, can easily be addressed by renovation. Consider now, an architectural facility orbiting in space, 260 miles above the surface of the earth. This human rated architectural facility, the International Space Station (ISS) must maintain operations every day, including life support and appropriate human comforts without fail. The facility must also handle logistics of regular shipments of cargo, including new passengers. The ISS requires accommodations necessary for human control of machine systems. Additionally, the ISS is a research facility and supports investigations performed inside and outside its livable volume. Finally, the facility must support remote operations and observations by ground controllers. All of these architectural needs require a functional, safe, and even an aesthetic lighting environment. At Johnson Space Center, our Habitability and Human Factors team assists our diverse customers with their lighting environment challenges, via physical test and computer based analysis. Because of the complexity of ISS operational environment, our team has learned and developed processes that help ISS operate safely. Because of the dynamic exterior lighting environment, uses computational modeling to predict the lighting environment. The ISS' orbit exposes it to a sunrise every 90 minutes, causing work surfaces to quickly change from direct sunlight to earthshine to total darkness. Proper planning of vehicle approaches, robotics operations, and crewed

  8. 佛山市“一环”快速干线绿化养护及环境整治%Green Space Conservation and Environment Improvement along Ring One Express in Fushan City

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖颖殷

    2011-01-01

    Ring One Express of Fushan City has been constructed and put in use for years,and some greening tree species have degraded.In this context,how to conserve the green space and maintain surrounding environment have become a difficult issue to tackle.The paper introduced the green space conservation technologies and environment improvement of urban expresses adopted in the overall upgrading of green space along Ring One Express of Fushan City.With the conservation technology and environment improvement,better landscape effect along the express has been achieved and economic and ecological objectives also taken account of.%文章阐述了城市快速干线绿化养护管理技术及环境整治,以期达到既保证"一环"快速干线绿化的景观效果,又兼顾经济、生态的目标。

  9. Personal exposure to cough released droplets in quiescent environment and ventilated spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Licina, Dusan; Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Pantelic, Jovan;

    2014-01-01

    This study shows the results of an experimental investigation of personal exposure to cough released droplets. Human body is resembled by a thermal manikin with a body shape and surface temperature distribution of a real person. The objective of the study is to examine personal exposure of the ma......This study shows the results of an experimental investigation of personal exposure to cough released droplets. Human body is resembled by a thermal manikin with a body shape and surface temperature distribution of a real person. The objective of the study is to examine personal exposure...... of the manikin exposed to cough released droplets in a calm indoor environment and under uniform air patterns relative to a human body. The findings show that human body orientation relative to the direction and magnitude of invading flow from the surroundings considerably modifies personal exposure. Surrounding...... uniform flows is most of the scenarios decrease the exposure to cough droplets, however not in all scenarios. Study results show that understanding of the air patterns should be prioritized in ventilation design practice....

  10. Polymerisation of composite materials in space environment for development of moon base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondyurina, I.; Kondyurin, A.; Lauke, B.

    The best way for a Moon base creation is a deployment of light construction on Moon surface after landing. The construction has to be light in deployment and hard at exploitation. A number of proposals for solidification of deployed constructions in space were presented, but the best way is a chemical reaction which leads to a formation of hard frame of space construction. A technology of large-size moon module for industrial and scientific applications is developed on the base of polymerisation technique of composite material with liquid polymer matrix. Experiments with chemical reactions of polymerisation in composite materials under high vacuum, ion beam and plasma discharge showed a possibility to use a liquid viscous polymer matrix of composite materials under space conditions without hermetic coating. Epoxy resins with thermal and photo initiation system of polymerisation were studied. The effects of initiation of the polymerisation reaction under simulated space factors were observed. The polymerised frames can be used in energetic, electronic and other industries on Moon surface. The investigations were partially supported by Alexander von Humboldt Foundation and European Space Agency, ESTEC (contract 17083/03/NL/Sfe "Space Environmental Effects on the Polymerisation of Composite Structures"). 1. A.Kondyurin, B.Lauke, Polymerisation processes in simulated free space conditions, Proceedings of the 9th International Symposium on Materials in a Space Environment, Noordwijk, The Netherlands, 16-20 June, 2003, ESA SP-540, September 2003, pp.75-80. 2. V.A.Briskman, T.M.Yudina, K.G.Kostarev, A.V.Kondyurin, V.B.Leontyev, M.G.Levkovich, A.L.Mashinsky, G.S.Nechitailo, Polymerization in microgravity as a new process in space technology, Acta Astronautica, vol.48, N2-3, 2001, pp.169-180.

  11. Implications for space radiation environment models from CREAM & CREDO measurements over half a solar cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, C S; Truscott, P R; Peerless, C L; Watson, C J; Evans, H E; Knight, P; Cosby, M; Underwood, C; Cousins, T; Noulty, R; Maag, C

    1999-10-01

    Flight data obtained between 1990 and 1997 from the Cosmic Radiation Environment Monitors CREAM & CREDO carried on UoSAT-3, Space Shuttle, STRV-1a (Space Technology Research Vehicle) and APEX (Advanced Photovoltaic and Electronics Experiment Spacecraft) provide coverage over half a solar cycle. The modulation of cosmic rays and evolution of the South Atlantic Anomaly are observed, the former comprising a factor of three increase at high latitudes and the latter a general increase accompanied by a north-westward drift. Comparison of particle fluxes and linear energy transfer (LET) spectra is made with improved environment & radiation transport calculations which account for shield distributions and secondary particles. While there is an encouraging convergence between predictions and observations, significant improvements are still required, particularly in the treatment of locally produced secondary particles. Solar-particle events during this time period have LET spectra significantly below the October 1989 event which has been proposed as a worst case model.

  12. Simulation of the space debris environment in LEO using a simplified approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebschull, Christopher; Scheidemann, Philipp; Hesselbach, Sebastian; Radtke, Jonas; Braun, Vitali; Krag, H.; Stoll, Enrico

    2017-01-01

    Several numerical approaches exist to simulate the evolution of the space debris environment. These simulations usually rely on the propagation of a large population of objects in order to determine the collision probability for each object. Explosion and collision events are triggered randomly using a Monte-Carlo (MC) approach. So in many different scenarios different objects are fragmented and contribute to a different version of the space debris environment. The results of the single Monte-Carlo runs therefore represent the whole spectrum of possible evolutions of the space debris environment. For the comparison of different scenarios, in general the average of all MC runs together with its standard deviation is used. This method is computationally very expensive due to the propagation of thousands of objects over long timeframes and the application of the MC method. At the Institute of Space Systems (IRAS) a model capable of describing the evolution of the space debris environment has been developed and implemented. The model is based on source and sink mechanisms, where yearly launches as well as collisions and explosions are considered as sources. The natural decay and post mission disposal measures are the only sink mechanisms. This method reduces the computational costs tremendously. In order to achieve this benefit a few simplifications have been applied. The approach of the model partitions the Low Earth Orbit (LEO) region into altitude shells. Only two kinds of objects are considered, intact bodies and fragments, which are also divided into diameter bins. As an extension to a previously presented model the eccentricity has additionally been taken into account with 67 eccentricity bins. While a set of differential equations has been implemented in a generic manner, the Euler method was chosen to integrate the equations for a given time span. For this paper parameters have been derived so that the model is able to reflect the results of the numerical MC

  13. Evaluation of Parental Satisfaction of Children's Spaces Within High Rise Apartment Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharghi Ali

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In the design process of open spaces within residential apartments, little attention is paid to children and their attitude to the environment is often ignored. Children, especially those who live in high-rise apartments, were found to have less connection with nature. Children supposedly need to engage in physical activities within outdoor areas, but urban planners, with the approval of managers or parents, must adequately design the open space for children. This paper initially reviews different research in this area. It consequently attempts to evaluate parental satisfaction regarding children's connectivity to open spaces as a dependent variable, and their preferences and perception of safety as independent variables. The research method is based on a questionnaire survey addressed to 261 parents and adults, in two localities in Tehran, Iran. The result of this research shows that parental attitude to open space has an effect on children's outdoor activities. Moreover, parents with young children express lower satisfaction to open spaces than those adults without young children. Families with children need open spaces in residential high-rise apartments for their siblings’ physical activities, and the designers should consider such an important need.

  14. A temporal forecast of radiation environments for future space exploration missions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y; Cucinotta, Francis A; Wilson, John W

    2007-06-01

    The understanding of future space radiation environments is an important goal for space mission operations, design, and risk assessment. We have developed a solar cycle statistical model in which sunspot number is coupled to space-related quantities, such as the galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) deceleration potential (phi) and the mean occurrence frequency of solar particle events (SPEs). Future GCR fluxes were derived from a predictive model, in which the temporal dependence represented by phi was derived from GCR flux and ground-based Climax neutron monitor rate measurements over the last four decades. These results showed that the point dose equivalent inside a typical spacecraft in interplanetary space was influenced by solar modulation by up to a factor of three. It also has been shown that a strong relationship exists between large SPE occurrences and phi. For future space exploration missions, cumulative probabilities of SPEs at various integral fluence levels during short-period missions were defined using a database of proton fluences of past SPEs. Analytic energy spectra of SPEs at different ranks of the integral fluences for energies greater than 30 MeV were constructed over broad energy ranges extending out to GeV for the analysis of representative exposure levels at those fluences. Results will guide the design of protection systems for astronauts during future space exploration missions.

  15. Environment Sculpture and Space Structure%环境雕塑与空间结构

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何力平

    2011-01-01

    In the places with public art, there exists a complex relationship between sculpture and various elements of environment such as buildings, grass belts, crowds and the sky, etc.. In this relationship space has been put at the centre of unprecedented attention, as it first determines the quality of the environment. Therefore, when discussing environment sculpture, we have to give priority to sculpture and its space in the environment. The paper makes great efforts in exploring the problems concerning environment sculpture and space structure.%在公共艺术场所中,雕塑与环境之中的诸多因素——建筑、绿地、人流、天空形成了一个复杂的组织关系,在这个关系之中,空间被推到了一个被空前瞩目的地位,决定着环境的质量,因而,当我们讨论环境雕塑的时候,不得不对雕塑自身及其环境的空间关注放到首位。本文着重探讨环境雕塑与空间结构方面的问题。空间作为环境雕塑语言,这在当代已是一种众所周知的客观现象。它有着自身的特性,有着自身结构方式,有着诸种影响其构成的因素。那么,环境雕塑空间结构指的是什么呢?

  16. Experience of Multisensory Environments in Public Space among People with Visual Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Gavin R; Yuen, Hon K; Vogtle, Laura K

    2015-07-23

    This qualitative study explored the role of sensory characteristics embedded in the built environment and whether they support or hinder people with visual impairment in their use of public spaces. An online survey link was e-mailed to the presidents and committee members of each state's chapters and associations of the National Federation of the Blind in the United States, resulting in 451 direct invitations to participate. Written responses of the survey questions from 48 respondents with visual impairment were analyzed. Three main themes: Barriers, Supporters, and Context-Dependence emerged from the respondents' experience of multisensory characteristics within the built environment. The four subthemes subsumed in Barriers were: (1) Population specific design, (2) Extreme sensory backgrounds, (3) Uneven ground surfaces and objects, and (4) Inconsistent lighting. For Supporters, respondents provided specific examples of various sensory characteristics in built environments, including audible cues and echoes, smells, tactile quality of the ground surface, and temperature. Context-Dependence referred to the effects of sensory characteristics embedded in public spaces depending on one's vision condition, the proximity to the sensory cues and the purpose of the activities one was performing at that moment. Findings provide occupational therapy practitioners an in-depth understanding of the transactional relationship between embedded sensory characteristics in the built environment, occupations, and people with visual impairment in order to make appropriate modifications or removal of barriers that affect occupational performance and engagement. Suggestions for occupational therapists as well as architects, designers, planners, policy makers/legislators related to functional sensory cues in the design of built environments were provided to increase accessibility in the use of public spaces by people with visual impairment.

  17. Experience of Multisensory Environments in Public Space among People with Visual Impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavin R. Jenkins

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative study explored the role of sensory characteristics embedded in the built environment and whether they support or hinder people with visual impairment in their use of public spaces. An online survey link was e-mailed to the presidents and committee members of each state’s chapters and associations of the National Federation of the Blind in the United States, resulting in 451 direct invitations to participate. Written responses of the survey questions from 48 respondents with visual impairment were analyzed. Three main themes: Barriers, Supporters, and Context-Dependence emerged from the respondents’ experience of multisensory characteristics within the built environment. The four subthemes subsumed in Barriers were: (1 Population specific design, (2 Extreme sensory backgrounds, (3 Uneven ground surfaces and objects, and (4 Inconsistent lighting. For Supporters, respondents provided specific examples of various sensory characteristics in built environments, including audible cues and echoes, smells, tactile quality of the ground surface, and temperature. Context-Dependence referred to the effects of sensory characteristics embedded in public spaces depending on one’s vision condition, the proximity to the sensory cues and the purpose of the activities one was performing at that moment. Findings provide occupational therapy practitioners an in-depth understanding of the transactional relationship between embedded sensory characteristics in the built environment, occupations, and people with visual impairment in order to make appropriate modifications or removal of barriers that affect occupational performance and engagement. Suggestions for occupational therapists as well as architects, designers, planners, policy makers/legislators related to functional sensory cues in the design of built environments were provided to increase accessibility in the use of public spaces by people with visual impairment.

  18. Effects of a Green Space Layout on the Outdoor Thermal Environment at the Neighborhood Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Ming Lai

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This study attempted to address the existing urban design needs and computer-aided thermal engineering and explore the optimal green space layout to obtain an acceptable thermal environment at the neighborhood scale through a series of building energy and computational fluid dynamics (CFD simulations. The building-energy analysis software eQUEST and weather database TMY2 were adopted to analyze the electric energy consumed by air conditioners and the analysis results were incorporated to derive the heat dissipated from air conditioners. Then, the PHOENICS CFD software was used to analyze how the green space layout influences outdoor thermal environment based on the heat dissipated from air conditioners and the solar heat reemitted from the built surfaces. The results show that a green space located in the center of this investigated area and at the far side of the downstream of a summer monsoon is the recommended layout. The layouts, with green space in the center, can decrease the highest temperature by 0.36 °C.

  19. Data Acquisition System Architecture and Capabilities at NASA GRC Plum Brook Station's Space Environment Test Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Richard K.; Hill, Gerald M.

    2014-01-01

    Very large space environment test facilities present unique engineering challenges in the design of facility data systems. Data systems of this scale must be versatile enough to meet the wide range of data acquisition and measurement requirements from a diverse set of customers and test programs, but also must minimize design changes to maintain reliability and serviceability. This paper presents an overview of the common architecture and capabilities of the facility data acquisition systems available at two of the world's largest space environment test facilities located at the NASA Glenn Research Center's Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio; namely, the Space Propulsion Research Facility (commonly known as the B-2 facility) and the Space Power Facility (SPF). The common architecture of the data systems is presented along with details on system scalability and efficient measurement systems analysis and verification. The architecture highlights a modular design, which utilizes fully-remotely managed components, enabling the data systems to be highly configurable and support multiple test locations with a wide-range of measurement types and very large system channel counts.

  20. Data analysis and interpretation related to space system/environment interactions at LEO altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raitt, W. John; Schunk, Robert W.

    1991-01-01

    Several studies made on the interaction of active systems with the LEO space environment experienced from orbital or suborbital platforms are covered. The issue of high voltage space interaction is covered by theoretical modeling studies of the interaction of charged solar cell arrays with the ionospheric plasma. The theoretical studies were complemented by experimental measurements made in a vacuum chamber. The other active system studied was the emission of effluent from a space platform. In one study the emission of plasma into the LEO environment was studied by using initially a 2-D model, and then extending this model to 3-D to correctly take account of plasma motion parallel to the geomagnetic field. The other effluent studies related to the releases of neutral gas from an orbiting platform. One model which was extended and used determined the density, velocity, and energy of both an effluent gas and the ambient upper atmospheric gases over a large volume around the platform. This model was adapted to study both ambient and contaminant distributions around smaller objects in the orbital frame of reference with scale sizes of 1 m. The other effluent studies related to the interaction of the released neutral gas with the ambient ionospheric plasma. An electrostatic model was used to help understand anomalously high plasma densities measured at times in the vicinity of the space shuttle orbiter.

  1. The Ascent Study - Understanding the Market Environment for the Follow-on to the Space Shuttle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Derek

    2002-01-01

    The ASCENT Study - Understanding the Market Environment for the Follow-on to NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, awarded a contract (base plus option amounting to twenty months of analysis) to Futron Corporation in June 2001 to investigate the market environment, and explore the price elasticity attributes, relevant for the introduction of the Second Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle (the follow-on to the Space Shuttle) in the second decade of this century. This work is known as the ASCENT Study (Analysis of Space Concepts Enabled by New Transportation) and data collection covering a total of 42 different sectors took place during 2001. Modeling and forecasting activities for 26 of these markets (all of them international in nature) have been taking place throughout 2002, and the final results of the ASCENT Study, which include 20 year forecasts, are due by the end of January, 2003. This paper describes the markets being analyzed for the ASCENT Study, and includes some preliminary findings in terms of launch vehicle demand during the next 20 years, broken down by mass class and mission type. Amongst these markets are the potential public space travel opportunities. When completed, the final report of the ASCENT Study is expected to represent a significant reference document for all business development, financing and planning activities in the space industry for some time to come. One immediate use will be as a key factor in determining the cargo capability and launch rates to be used for designing the follow-on to the Space Shuttle. The Study will also provide NASA with a quantified indication of the extent to which the lower cost to orbit, made possible by a new class of launch vehicle, will bring into being new markets.

  2. An Empirical Study on Augmented Virtuality Space for Tele-Inspection of Built Environments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiangyu Wang; Rui Chen

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes an empirical study on an augmented virtuality (AV)-based system dedicated for tele-inspection of built environments. This system is regarded as a solution that allows users to experi-ence the real remote built environment without the need of physically stepping into that actual place. Such experience is realized by using AV technology to enrich the virtual counterparts of the place with captured real images from the real space. Those integrated into the AV environment are real photos that represent key landmarks/features of the real place, live video streams of on-site crew, and 3D virtual design geome-tries. The focus of this paper is the implementation and evaluation of the AV system in its current state as compared with traditional photo-based methods. Results from this preliminary empirical study show that the AV system achieves good overall satisfaction, although it involves certain general usability issues.

  3. A space radiation shielding model of the Martian radiation environment experiment (MARIE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwell, W.; Saganti, P.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Zeitlin, C. J.

    2004-01-01

    The 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft was launched towards Mars on April 7, 2001. Onboard the spacecraft is the Martian radiation environment experiment (MARIE), which is designed to measure the background radiation environment due to galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar protons in the 20-500 MeV/n energy range. We present an approach for developing a space radiation-shielding model of the spacecraft that includes the MARIE instrument in the current mapping phase orientation. A discussion is presented describing the development and methodology used to construct the shielding model. For a given GCR model environment, using the current MARIE shielding model and the high-energy particle transport codes, dose rate values are compared with MARIE measurements during the early mapping phase in Mars orbit. The results show good agreement between the model calculations and the MARIE measurements as presented for the March 2002 dataset. c2003 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Our experience in the evaluation of the thermal comfort during the space flight and in the simulated space environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novák, Ludvik

    The paper presents the results of the mathematical modelling the effects of hypogravity on the heat output by the spontaneous convection. The theoretical considerations were completed by the experiments "HEAT EXCHANGE 1" performed on the biosatellite "KOSMOS 936". In the second experiment "HEAT EXCHANGE 2" acomplished on the board of the space laboratory "SALYUT 6" was studied the effect of the microgravity on the thermal state of a man during the space flight. Direct measurement in weightlessness prowed the capacity of the developed electric dynamic katathermometer to check directly the effect of the microgravity on the heat output by the spontaneous convection. The role of the heat partition impairment's in man as by the microgravity, so by the inadequate forced convection are clearly expressed in changes of the skin temperature and the subjective feeling of the cosmonaut's thermal comfort. The experimental extension of the elaborated methods for the flexible adjustment of the thermal environment to the actual physiological needs of man and suggestions for the further investigation are outlined.

  5. Application of Advanced Materials Protecting from Influence of Free Space Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotsenko, Oleg; Shovkoplyas, Yuriy

    2016-07-01

    High cost and low availability of the components certified for use in the space environment forces satellite designers to using industrial and even commercial items. Risks associated with insufficient knowledge about behavior of these components in radiation environment are parried, mainly, by careful radiating designing of a satellite where application of special protective materials with improved space radiation shielding characteristics is one of the most widely used practices. Another advantage of protective materials application appears when a satellite designer needs using equipment in more severe space environment conditions then it has been provided at the equipment development. In such cases only expensive repeated qualification of the equipment hardness can be alternative to protective materials application. But mostly this way is unacceptable for satellite developers, being within strong financial and temporal restrictions. To apply protective materials effectively, the developer should have possibility to answer the question: "Where inside a satellite shall I place these materials and what shall be their shape to meet the requirements on space radiation hardness with minimal mass and volume expenses?" At that, the minimum set of requirements on space radiation hardness include: ionizing dose, nonionizing dose, single events, and internal charging. The standard calculative models and experimental techniques, now in use for space radiation hardness assurance of a satellite are unsuitable for the problem solving in such formulation. The sector analysis methodology, widely used in satellite radiating designing, is applicable only for aluminium shielding and doesn't allow taking into account advantages of protective materials. The programs simulating transport of space radiations through a substance with the use of Monte-Carlo technique, such as GEANT4, FLUKA, HZETRN and others, are fully applicable in view of their capabilities; but time required for

  6. Use of microgravity sensors for quantification of space shuttle orbiter vernier reaction control system induced environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friend, Robert B.

    1998-01-01

    In the modeling of spacecraft dynamics it is important to accurately characterize the environment in which the vehicle operates, including the environments induced by the vehicle itself. On the Space Shuttle these induced environmental factors include reaction control system plume. Knowledge of these environments is necessary for performance of control systems and loads analyses, estimation of disturbances due to thruster firings, and accurate state vector propagation. During the STS-71 mission, while the Orbiter was performing attitude control for the mated Orbiter/Mir stack, it was noted that the autopilot was limit cycling at a rate higher than expected from pre-flight simulations. Investigations during the mission resulted in the conjecture that an unmodelled plume impingement force was acting upon the orbiter elevons. The in-flight investigations were not successful in determining the actual magnitude of the impingement, resulting in several sequential post-flight investigations. Efforts performed to better quantify the vernier reaction control system induced plume impingement environment of the Space Shuttle orbiter are described in this paper, and background detailing circumstances which required the more detailed knowledge of the RCS self impingement forces, as well as a description of the resulting investigations and their results is presented. The investigations described in this paper applied microgravity acceleration data from two shuttle borne microgravity experiments, SAMS and OARE, to the solution of this particular problem. This solution, now used by shuttle analysts and mission planners, results in more accurate propellant consumption and attitude limit cycle estimates in preflight analyses, which are critical for pending International Space Station missions.

  7. A New Handbook for the Development of Space Vehicle Terrestrial Environment Design Requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Dale L.; Vaughan, William W.

    2008-01-01

    A new NASA document entitled "Terrestrial Environment (Climatic) Criteria Handbook for Use in Aerospace Vehicle Development (NASA-HDBK-1001A) has been developed. The Handbook provides terrestrial environment information, data bases, models, recommendations, etc. for use in the design, development, trade studies, testing, and mission analyses for space (or launch) .vehicles. This document is organized into fourteen specific natural environment disciplines of which some are winds, atmospheric models, thermal radiation, precipitation-for-icing, cloud cover, atmospheric electricity, geologic hazards, toxic chemical release by propulsion systems, and sea state. Atmospheric phenomena play a significant role in the design and flight of aerospace vehicles and in the integrity of the associated aerospace systems and structures. Environmental design criteria guidelines in this document are based on measurements and observations of atmospheric and climatic phenomena relative to various aerospace development, operational, and vehicle launch locations. The natural environment criteria guidelines data presented in this Handbook were formulated based on discussions with and requests from engineers involved in aerospace vehicle development and operations. Therefore, they represent responses to actual engineering problems and are not just a general compilation of environmental data. The Handbook addresses the basis for the information presented, the interpretations of the terrestrial environment guideline given in the Handbook, and its application to the development of aerospace vehicle design requirements. Specific examples of the Handbook content and associated "lessons lenmed" are given in this paper.

  8. Space invaders - A netnographic study of how artefacts in nursing home environments exercise disciplining structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzmann-Erikson, Martin

    2016-06-01

    This study aims to present culturally situated artefacts as depicted in nursing home environments and to analyse the underlying understandings of disciplining structures that are manifested in these kinds of places. Our personal geographies are often taken for granted, but when moving to a nursing home, geographies are glaringly rearranged. The study design is archival and cross-sectional observational, and the data are comprised of 38 photographs and 13 videos showing environments from nursing homes. The analysis was inspired by the methodological steps in Roper's and Shapira's description of conducting ethnography. The results are presented in four categories: (i) public areas, (ii) orderliness, (iii) staff's places and (iv) devices. The rearrangement of geography implies a degrading of agency and loss of authority over one's place. The places should be understood in their relation to the agents and their temporarily claims upon them. The material and immaterial artefacts, that is the items, people and behaviours, transform the nursing staff into 'space invaders'. Future inquiries may take into consideration the ways that space invasion in participative space intersect and construct the identities of the agents it invades upon.

  9. The Value of Biomedical Simulation Environments to Future Human Space Flight Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulugeta, Lealem; Myers, Jerry G.; Skytland, Nicholas G.; Platts, Steven H.

    2010-01-01

    With the ambitious goals to send manned missions to asteroids and onto Mars, substantial work will be required to ensure the well being of the men and women who will undertake these difficult missions. Unlike current International Space Station or Shuttle missions, astronauts will be required to endure long-term exposure to higher levels of radiation, isolation and reduced gravity. These new operation conditions will pose health risks that are currently not well understood and perhaps unanticipated. Therefore, it is essential to develop and apply advanced tools to predict, assess and mitigate potential hazards to astronaut health. NASA s Digital Astronaut Project (DAP) is working to develop and apply computational models of physiologic response to space flight operation conditions over various time periods and environmental circumstances. The collective application and integration of well vetted models assessing the physiology, biomechanics and anatomy is referred to as the Digital Astronaut. The Digital Astronaut simulation environment will serve as a practical working tool for use by NASA in operational activities such as the prediction of biomedical risks and functional capabilities of astronauts. In additional to space flight operation conditions, DAP s work has direct applicability to terrestrial biomedical research by providing virtual environments for hypothesis testing, experiment design, and to reduce animal/human testing. A practical application of the DA to assess pre and post flight responses to exercise is illustrated and the difficulty in matching true physiological responses is discussed.

  10. Two New Pieces of Emergency Response Equipment for use in Confined Space Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, John

    2011-01-01

    NASA is developing two new pieces of emergency response equipment that recognize and address the constraints of a confined space environment. One piece of equipment is a respirator designed for use in a post fire environment. Traditional first responders generally use supplied air respirators - they provide cool, dry, safe breathing air to the first responder, and because they are supplied at above ambient pressure, the system is tolerant to a loose-fitting mask. Supplied air respirators have a limited supply of air, but because the traditional first responder intends to address the emergency from outside and then retreat, this limited air supply does not pose a serious problem. NASA uses a supplied oxygen respirator for first response to an emergency affecting air quality on the International Space Station. The air supply is rated for 15 minutes - ISS program managers sponsored a hardware development activity to provide the astronauts up to 8 hours of breathing protection after the supplied air system is exhausted. Size and weight limitations prevent the use of a supplied air system for 8 hours for six crew members. A trade study resulted in the selection of a filtering respirator system over a re-breather system; due to design simplicity, operational simplicity, and likely threats to air quality on ISS. The respirator cartridge that filters smoke particles, adsorbs organics and acid gases, and catalytically converts carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide has been qualified for use on ISS, and was delivered on STS-135, the final mission of the Space Shuttle Program.

  11. Monitoring and telemedicine support in remote environments and in human space flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cermack, M

    2006-07-01

    The common features of remote environments are geographical separation, logistic problems with health care delivery and with patient retrieval, extreme natural conditions, artificial environment, or combination of all. The exposure can have adverse effects on patients' physiology, on care providers' performance and on hardware functionality. The time to definite treatment may vary between hours as in orbital space flight, days for remote exploratory camp, weeks for polar bases and months to years for interplanetary exploration. The generic system architecture, used in any telematic support, consists of data acquisition, data-processing and storage, telecommunications links, decision-making facilities and the means of command execution. At the present level of technology, a simple data transfer and two-way voice communication could be established from any place on the earth, but the current use of mobile communication technologies for telemedicine applications is still low, either for logistic, economic and political reasons, or because of limited knowledge about the available technology and procedures. Criteria for selection of portable telemedicine terminals in remote terrestrial places, characteristics of currently available mobile telecommunication systems, and the concept of integrated monitoring of physiological and environmental parameters are mentioned in the first section of this paper. The second part describes some aspects of emergency medical support in human orbital spaceflight, the limits of telemedicine support in near-Earth space environment and mentions some open issues related to long-term exploratory missions beyond the low Earth orbit.

  12. Predictors of Behavior and Performance in Extreme Environments: The Antarctic Space Analogue Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palinkas, Lawrence A.; Gunderson, E K. Eric; Holland, A. W.; Miller, Christopher; Johnson, Jeffrey C.

    2000-01-01

    To determine which, if any, characteristics should be incorporated into a select-in approach to screening personnel for long-duration spaceflight, we examined the influence of crewmember social/ demographic characteristics, personality traits, interpersonal needs, and characteristics of station physical environments on performance measures in 657 American men who spent an austral winter in Antarctica between 1963 and 1974. During screening, subjects completed a Personal History Questionnaire which obtained information on social and demographic characteristics, the Deep Freeze Opinion Survey which assessed 5 different personality traits, and the Fundamental Interpersonal Relations Orientation-Behavior (FIRO-B) Scale which measured 6 dimensions of interpersonal needs. Station environment included measures of crew size and severity of physical environment. Performance was assessed on the basis of combined peer-supervisor evaluations of overall performance, peer nominations of fellow crewmembers who made ideal winter-over candidates, and self-reported depressive symptoms. Social/demographic characteristics, personality traits, interpersonal needs, and characteristics of station environments collectively accounted for 9-17% of the variance in performance measures. The following characteristics were significant independent predictors of more than one performance measure: military service, low levels of neuroticism, extraversion and conscientiousness, and a low desire for affection from others. These results represent an important first step in the development of select-in criteria for personnel on long-duration missions in space and other extreme environments. These criteria must take into consideration the characteristics of the environment and the limitations they place on meeting needs for interpersonal relations and task performance, as well as the characteristics of the individuals and groups who live and work in these environments.

  13. Predictors of Behavior and Performance in Extreme Environments: The Antarctic Space Analogue Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palinkas, Lawrence A.; Gunderson, E K. Eric; Holland, A. W.; Miller, Christopher; Johnson, Jeffrey C.

    2000-01-01

    To determine which, if any, characteristics should be incorporated into a select-in approach to screening personnel for long-duration spaceflight, we examined the influence of crewmember social/ demographic characteristics, personality traits, interpersonal needs, and characteristics of station physical environments on performance measures in 657 American men who spent an austral winter in Antarctica between 1963 and 1974. During screening, subjects completed a Personal History Questionnaire which obtained information on social and demographic characteristics, the Deep Freeze Opinion Survey which assessed 5 different personality traits, and the Fundamental Interpersonal Relations Orientation-Behavior (FIRO-B) Scale which measured 6 dimensions of interpersonal needs. Station environment included measures of crew size and severity of physical environment. Performance was assessed on the basis of combined peer-supervisor evaluations of overall performance, peer nominations of fellow crewmembers who made ideal winter-over candidates, and self-reported depressive symptoms. Social/demographic characteristics, personality traits, interpersonal needs, and characteristics of station environments collectively accounted for 9-17% of the variance in performance measures. The following characteristics were significant independent predictors of more than one performance measure: military service, low levels of neuroticism, extraversion and conscientiousness, and a low desire for affection from others. These results represent an important first step in the development of select-in criteria for personnel on long-duration missions in space and other extreme environments. These criteria must take into consideration the characteristics of the environment and the limitations they place on meeting needs for interpersonal relations and task performance, as well as the characteristics of the individuals and groups who live and work in these environments.

  14. Re-engineering NASA's space communications to remain viable in a constrained fiscal environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornstein, Rhoda Shaller; Hei, Donald J., Jr.; Kelly, Angelita C.; Lightfoot, Patricia C.; Bell, Holland T.; Cureton-Snead, Izeller E.; Hurd, William J.; Scales, Charles H.

    1994-11-01

    Along with the Red and Blue Teams commissioned by the NASA Administrator in 1992, NASA's Associate Administrator for Space Communications commissioned a Blue Team to review the Office of Space Communications (Code O) Core Program and determine how the program could be conducted faster, better, and cheaper. Since there was no corresponding Red Team for the Code O Blue Team, the Blue Team assumed a Red Team independent attitude and challenged the status quo, including current work processes, functional distinctions, interfaces, and information flow, as well as traditional management and system development practices. The Blue Team's unconstrained, non-parochial, and imaginative look at NASA's space communications program produced a simplified representation of the space communications infrastructure that transcends organizational and functional boundaries, in addition to existing systems and facilities. Further, the Blue Team adapted the 'faster, better, cheaper' charter to be relevant to the multi-mission, continuous nature of the space communications program and to serve as a gauge for improving customer services concurrent with achieving more efficient operations and infrastructure life cycle economies. This simplified representation, together with the adapted metrics, offers a future view and process model for reengineering NASA's space communications to remain viable in a constrained fiscal environment. Code O remains firm in its commitment to improve productivity, effectiveness, and efficiency. In October 1992, the Associate Administrator reconstituted the Blue Team as the Code O Success Team (COST) to serve as a catalyst for change. In this paper, the COST presents the chronicle and significance of the simplified representation and adapted metrics, and their application during the FY 1993-1994 activities.

  15. The physics of positively biased conductors surrounded by dielectrics in contact with a plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, Daniel E.; Chang, Patrick

    1989-01-01

    The physics of a positively biased conductor surrounded by dielectrics in contact with plasma is investigated. It is shown that because of the presence of secondary emission from the surrounding dielectrics, the voltage of the surfaces near the conductor has three solutions. The high- and low-voltage solutions are stable, while the intermediate-voltage solution is unstable. This theory is applied to explain the snapover effect observed on high-voltage solar arrays that involve the use of highly biased surfaces in contact with the space environment.

  16. Contamination Control Assessment of the World's Largest Space Environment Simulation Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Aaron; Henry, Michael W.; Grisnik, Stanley P.; Sinclair, Stephen M.

    2012-01-01

    The Space Power Facility s thermal vacuum test chamber is the largest chamber in the world capable of providing an environment for space simulation. To improve performance and meet stringent requirements of a wide customer base, significant modifications were made to the vacuum chamber. These include major changes to the vacuum system and numerous enhancements to the chamber s unique polar crane, with a goal of providing high cleanliness levels. The significance of these changes and modifications are discussed in this paper. In addition, the composition and arrangement of the pumping system and its impact on molecular back-streaming are discussed in detail. Molecular contamination measurements obtained with a TQCM and witness wafers during two recent integrated system tests of the chamber are presented and discussed. Finally, a concluding remarks section is presented.

  17. Degradation of thermal control materials under a simulated radiative space environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, A. K.; Sridhara, N.

    2012-11-01

    A spacecraft with a passive thermal control system utilizes various thermal control materials to maintain temperatures within safe operating limits. Materials used for spacecraft applications are exposed to harsh space environments such as ultraviolet (UV) and particle (electron, proton) irradiation and atomic oxygen (AO), undergo physical damage and thermal degradation, which must be considered for spacecraft thermal design optimization and cost effectiveness. This paper describes the effect of synergistic radiation on some of the important thermal control materials to verify the assumptions of beginning-of-life (BOL) and end-of-life (EOL) properties. Studies on the degradation in the optical properties (solar absorptance and infrared emittance) of some important thermal control materials exposed to simulated radiative geostationary space environment are discussed. The current studies are purely related to the influence of radiation on the degradation of the materials; other environmental aspects (e.g., thermal cycling) are not discussed. The thermal control materials investigated herein include different kind of second-surface mirrors, white anodizing, white paints, black paints, multilayer insulation materials, varnish coated aluminized polyimide, germanium coated polyimide, polyether ether ketone (PEEK) and poly tetra fluoro ethylene (PTFE). For this purpose, a test in the constant vacuum was performed reproducing a three year radiative space environment exposure, including ultraviolet and charged particle effects on North/South panels of a geostationary three-axis stabilized spacecraft. Reflectance spectra were measured in situ in the solar range (250-2500 nm) and the corresponding solar absorptance values were calculated. The test methodology and the degradations of the materials are discussed. The most important degradations among the low solar absorptance materials were found in the white paints whereas the rigid optical solar reflectors remained quite

  18. In-Situ VIS/NIR Measurements of Space Environment Effects on Spacecraft Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedard, D.; Seitzer, P.; Willison, A.; Somers, P.

    2016-09-01

    Laboratory material characterization experiments have shown that passive observational techniques that measure the spectral energy distribution of reflected sunlight from spacecraft and space debris could potentially be used to determine an object's surface compositional make-up and even possibly its orientation. Such techniques, if proven to be reliable and consistent, would represent non-intrusive and cost effective tools that would benefit the overall space situational awareness (SSA) mission. However, to date, observations using either colour photometry or spectrophotometry to determine surface material characteristics of such objects have not produced encouraging results. One common problem that has plagued these attempts is the lack of understanding on how the spectral reflectance of the spacecraft surfaces evolves with time. There are a number of spacecraft materials whose spectral reflectance characteristics have been studied before and after spaceflight in LEO; there are no measurements on how the space environment gradually modifies the spectral scattering characteristics of these materials as a function of time. Furthermore, there are little or no in-situ observations of environmental effects on individually identifiable materials in MEO and GEO. This complicates the task of interpreting the spectral measurements of spatially unresolved spacecraft and orbital debris. This paper presents instrument concepts whose sole purpose will be to acquire on-orbit spectral reflectance measurements, at different observational geometries, of either witness samples or materials covering the surface of the host spacecraft. Such instruments could be flown as a hosted payload on an operational GEO satellite or as a dedicated payload on a microsatellite. Measurements would be acquired over the lifetime of the satellite and would observe how the spectral reflectance characteristics evolve during its lifetime. Furthermore, installation of one of the proposed instruments on

  19. The AFP-675 Far Ultraviolet Cameras experiment - Observations of the far-UV space environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carruthers, George R.; Morrill, Jeff S.; Dohne, Brian C.; Christensen, Susan A.

    1993-01-01

    The NRL's Far UV Cameras experiment flew aboard the Shuttle Orbiter on STS-39, in 1991: obtaining 105-200 nm measurements of the upper atmosphere, astronomical targets, and the Shuttle environment. Attention is presently given to observations of O2 density vs altitude in the nighttime atmosphere, the nocturnal ionosphere, Space Shuttle FUV glow, and photometry for both the stars and diffuse sources of 12 star fields at high and low galactic latitudes. The first FUV observations of the extended region of reflection nebulosity in Scorpius are included.

  20. The effect of space environment exposure on the properties of polymer matrix composite materials (A0180)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennyson, R. C.; Hansen, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    The objective of this experiment is to determine the effect of various lengths of exposure to a space environment on the mechanical properties of selected commercial polymer matrix composite materials. Fiber materials will include graphite, boron, S-glass, and PRD-49. The mechanical properties to be investigated are orthotropic elastic constants, strength parameters (satisfying the tensor polynomial relation), coefficients of thermal expansion, impact resistance, crack propagation, and fracture toughness. In addition, the effect of laminate thickness on property changes will also be investigated.

  1. Design and Implementation of a Space Environment Simulation Toolbox for Small Satellites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amini, Rouzbeh; Larsen, Jesper A.; Izadi-Zamanabadi, Roozbeh

    This paper presents a developed toolbox for space environment model in SIMULINK that facilitates development and design of Attitude Determination and Control Systems (ADCS) for a Low Earth Orbit (LEO) spacecraft. The toolbox includes, among others, models of orbit propagators, disturbances, Earth...... gravity field, Earth magnetic field and eclipse. The structure and facilities within the toolbox are described and exemplified using a student satellite case (AAUSAT-II). The validity of developed models is confirmed by comparing the simulation results with the realistic data obtained from the Danish...... Ørsted satellite....

  2. Design and Implementation of a Space Environment Simulation Toolbox for Small Satellites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amini, Rouzbeh; Larsen, Jesper A.; Izadi-Zamanabadi, Roozbeh

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a developed toolbox for space environment model in SIMULINK that facilitates development and design of Attitude Determination and Control Systems (ADCS) for a Low Earth Orbit (LEO) spacecraft. The toolbox includes, among others, models of orbit propagators, disturbances, Earth...... gravity field, Earth magnetic field and eclipse. The structure and facilities within the toolbox are described and exemplified using a student satellite case (AAUSAT-II). The validity of developed models is confirmed by comparing the simulation results with the realistic data obtained from the Danish...... Ørsted satellite....

  3. Ada compiler evaluation on the Space Station Freedom Software Support Environment project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badal, D. L.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the work in progress to select the Ada compilers for the Space Station Freedom Program (SSFP) Software Support Environment (SSE) project. The purpose of the SSE Ada compiler evaluation team is to establish the criteria, test suites, and benchmarks to be used for evaluating Ada compilers for the mainframes, workstations, and the realtime target for flight- and ground-based computers. The combined efforts and cooperation of the customer, subcontractors, vendors, academia and SIGAda groups made it possible to acquire the necessary background information, benchmarks, test suites, and criteria used.

  4. Application of Markov chain theory to ASTP natural environment launch criteria at Kennedy Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, M. E.; Perlmutter, M.

    1974-01-01

    To aid the planning of the Apollo Soyuz Test Program (ASTP), certain natural environment statistical relationships are presented, based on Markov theory and empirical counts. The practical results are in terms of conditional probability of favorable and unfavorable launch conditions at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). They are based upon 15 years of recorded weather data which are analyzed under a set of natural environmental launch constraints. Three specific forecasting problems were treated: (1) the length of record of past weather which is useful to a prediction; (2) the effect of persistence in runs of favorable and unfavorable conditions; and (3) the forecasting of future weather in probabilistic terms.

  5. Natural Environment Corrosion Testing at the Kennedy Space Center Beachside Atmospheric Corrosion Test Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz M.

    2017-01-01

    This presentation will provide an overview of how NASA has been conducting corrosion testing in the Natural Marine Environment at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, U.S. The following questions will be addressed: What factors should be considered when selecting and constructing a test site? What are the attributes of a good test site? Is more severe always better? What environmental parameters should be monitored? How frequently? What factors should be considered when designing test specimens? Are current test standards sufficient? How do diurnal, annual and other fluctuations in corrosivity influence tests? How are test results interpreted? Can they be quantified?

  6. Studying the Earth's Environment from Space: Computer Laboratory Exercised and Instructor Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Elizabeth A.; Alfultis, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Studying the Earth's Environment From Space is a two-year project to develop a suite of CD-ROMs containing Earth System Science curriculum modules for introductory undergraduate science classes. Lecture notes, slides, and computer laboratory exercises, including actual satellite data and software, are being developed in close collaboration with Carla Evans of NASA GSFC Earth Sciences Directorate Scientific and Educational Endeavors (SEE) project. Smith and Alfultis are responsible for the Oceanography and Sea Ice Processes Modules. The GSFC SEE project is responsible for Ozone and Land Vegetation Modules. This document constitutes a report on the first year of activities of Smith and Alfultis' project.

  7. Basic mechanisms of radiation effects in the natural space radiation environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwank, J.R.

    1994-06-01

    Four general topics are covered in respect to the natural space radiation environment: (1) particles trapped by the earth`s magnetic field, (2) cosmic rays, (3) radiation environment inside a spacecraft, (4) laboratory radiation sources. The interaction of radiation with materials is described by ionization effects and displacement effects. Total-dose effects on MOS devices is discussed with respect to: measurement techniques, electron-hole yield, hole transport, oxide traps, interface traps, border traps, device properties, case studies and special concerns for commercial devices. Other device types considered for total-dose effects are SOI devices and nitrided oxide devices. Lastly, single event phenomena are discussed with respect to charge collection mechanisms and hard errors. (GHH)

  8. Magnetic fluctuations in anisotropic space plasmas: The effect of the plasma environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivia, J. A.; Toledo, B. A.; Gallo, N.; Muñoz, V.; Rogan, J.; Stepanova, M.; Moya, P. S.; Navarro, R. E.; Viñas, A. F.; Araneda, J.; López, R. A.; Díaz, M.

    2016-11-01

    The observations in the solar wind, which are usually organized in a beta-anisotropy diagram, seem to be constrained by linear instability thresholds. Unexpectedly, under these quasi-stable conditions, there is a finite level of electromagnetic fluctuations. A relevant component of these fluctuations can be understood in terms of the electromagnetic fields produced by the thermal motion of the charged particles. For the simple case of parallel propagating fields in an electron-proton plasma, we study the effect of the parameter ωpp /Ωc that characterizes the different space physics environments, and can affect the continuum spectrum produced by these fluctuations, which in turn may be used to understand the relevance of these processes occurring in a specific plasma environment.

  9. Challenges for Life Support Systems in Space Environments, Including Food Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2012-01-01

    Environmental Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) refer to the technologies needed to sustain human life in space environments. Histor ically these technologies have focused on providing a breathable atmo sphere, clean water, food, managing wastes, and the associated monitoring capabilities. Depending on the space agency or program, ELCSS has sometimes expanded to include other aspects of managing space enviro nments, such as thermal control, radiation protection, fire detection I suppression, and habitat design. Other times, testing and providing these latter technologies have been associated with the vehicle engi neering. The choice of ECLSS technologies is typically driven by the mission profile and their associated costs and reliabilities. These co sts are largely defined by the mass, volume, power, and crew time req uirements. For missions close to Earth, e.g., low-Earth orbit flights, stowage and resupply of food, some 0 2, and some water are often the most cost effective option. But as missions venture further into spa ce, e.g., transit missions to Mars or asteroids, or surface missions to Moon or Mars, the supply line economics change and the need to clos e the loop on life support consumables increases. These are often ref erred to as closed loop or regenerative life support systems. Regardless of the technologies, the systems must be capable of operating in a space environment, which could include micro to fractional g setting s, high radiation levels, and tightly closed atmospheres, including perhaps reduced cabin pressures. Food production using photosynthetic o rganisms such as plants by nature also provides atmospheric regenerat ion (e.g., CO2 removal and reduction, and 0 2 production), yet to date such "bioregenerative" technologies have not been used due largely t o the high power requirements for lighting. A likely first step in te sting bioregenerative capabilities will involve production of small a mounts of fresh foods to supplement to crew

  10. Analysis of peg formation in cucumber seedlings grown on clinostats and in a microgravity (space) environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, B. M.; Cosgrove, D. J.

    1999-01-01

    In young cucumber seedlings, the peg is a polar out-growth of tissue that functions by snagging the seed coat, thereby freeing the cotyledons. Previous studies have indicated that peg formation is gravity dependent. In this study we analyzed peg formation in cucumber seedlings (Cucumis sativus L. cv Burpee Hybrid II) grown under conditions of normal gravity, microgravity, and simulated microgravity (clinostat rotation). Seeds were germinated on the ground, in clinostats and on board the space shuttle (STS 95) for 1-2 days, frozen and subsequently examined for their stage of development, degree of hook formation, number of pegs formed, and peg morphology. The frequency of peg formation in space grown seedlings was found to be nearly identical to that of clinostat grown seedlings and to differ from that of seedlings germinated under normal gravity only in a minority of cases; approximately 6% of the seedlings formed two pegs and nearly 2% of the seedlings lacked pegs, whereas such abnormalities did not occur in ground controls. The degree of hook formation was found to be less pronounced for space grown seedlings, compared to clinostat grown seedlings, indicating a greater degree of decoupling between peg formation and hook formation in space. Nonetheless, in all seedlings having single pegs and a hook, the peg was found to be positioned correctly on the inside of the hook, showing that there is coordinate development even in microgravity environments. Peg morphologies were altered in space grown samples, with the pegs having a blunt appearance and many pegs showing alterations in expansion, with the peg extending out over the edges of the seed coat and downwards. These phenotypes were not observed in clinostat or ground grown seedlings.

  11. Investigation of Mercury Pollution in Surrounding Environment of Mercury Mine%汞矿周围环境与动植物汞污染情况的调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施云刚; 李秀富; 万洁妤; 欧德渊

    2014-01-01

    To understand the mercury pollution and the enrichment regularity in Wanshan mercury miner ar-ea in Guizhou,this paper researched the mercury contents in grains,vegetables,soil,water and livestock in surrounding atea of mercury mine.The results showed that the highest content of mercury in the environ-ment is the soil,followed by grass,cabbage,rice,corn,radishes;The mercury accumulation in pigs is as follows:muscle>kidney>heart>liver> lung>spleen;The mercury accumulation in cattle is as follows:muscle>kidney>liver>spleen>lung>heart;The mercury accumulation in sheep is as follows:muscle>liver> kidney > lung> spleen> heart.The content of mercury in poultry is not out of limits.The result showed that the mercury accumulation of muscle,kidney and liver of livestock is severely out of limits, which indicates that the serious food safety problems is exist in livestock around mercury mine.%以汞矿周围环境和畜禽为研究对象,调查汞含量和富集规律。结果表明,环境中除水体外,其余测定值均高于国家限量值。环境中汞含量最高的为土壤,其次为牧草、白菜、大米、玉米、萝卜;猪体内汞蓄积量为肌肉>肾脏>心脏>肝脏>肺脏>脾脏;牛体内汞蓄积量为肌肉>肾脏>肝脏>脾脏>肺脏>心脏;羊体内汞蓄积量为肌肉>肝脏>肾脏>肺脏>脾脏>心脏;家禽未见超标现象。本研究结果表明,家畜肌肉、肾脏、肝脏中汞蓄积量严重超过国家限量值,汞矿周围饲养的家畜存在严重的食品安全问题。

  12. 新城金矿深部热环境分析及围岩温度测试%Analysis on Deep Thermal Environment and Temperature Measurement of Surrounding Rock in Xincheng Gold Mine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘凯; 朱兆文; 朱万成; 刘洪磊; 侯晨

    2016-01-01

    随着开采深度的增加,新城金矿已经进入深部开采阶段,逐步面临高温热害问题。鉴于此,开展地下深部热环境分析,分析矿区主要热源及其形成机理,应用工程热力学手段量测不同开采深度下巷道风流温度、湿度以及风速等环境因素。采用深孔测量法测定不同深度的围岩温度,研究地温梯度变化规律。测试结果表明,巷道风温、水温均随着开采深度的增加而增大,主要生产中段相对湿度在80% RH以上,矿区恒温带温度为23℃,正常地温梯度为0.018℃/m,调热圈半径为17~18 m。该结果为有效控制井下作业场所的热环境状况以及热害防治研究提供了基础数据。%With the increase of mining depth,Xincheng Gold Mine has entered the stage of deep mining,and is gradually facing with the problem of high temperature stress. In this regard,an analysis of deep underground thermal environment was conducted,the main heat sources and the formation mechanism in the mining area were analyzed,environmental factors such as air temperature,humidity and wind speed of different mining depths of roadways were measured by means of Engineering Ther-modynamics. The temperature of surrounding rock in different depths was determined by Deep Hole Measurement Method and the variation regularity of geothermal gradient was studied. Test results show that the air temperature and water temperature of the roadways increase with the increasing of mining depth,the relative humidity of main mining levels are above 80% RH,the temperature of underground constant temperature zone in the mine area is 23 ℃, the normal geothermal gradient is 0. 018 ℃/m,and the radius of heat adjustment circle is 17~18 m,all these will provide basic data for the effective control of thermal environment conditions in underground workplaces and the prevention and treatment of thermal hazard.

  13. Characterization of System Level Single Event Upset (SEU) Responses using SEU Data, Classical Reliability Models, and Space Environment Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Melanie; Label, Kenneth; Campola, Michael; Xapsos, Michael

    2017-01-01

    We propose a method for the application of single event upset (SEU) data towards the analysis of complex systems using transformed reliability models (from the time domain to the particle fluence domain) and space environment data.

  14. Observed Versus Modeled O 1356 Å and N2 LBH Emissions from the Earth's Space Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, J.; Eastes, R.

    2011-12-01

    The O/N2 ratio, which can be derived from the O 1356 Å to N2 LBH (Lyman-Birge-Hopfield) emission ratio, is frequently used to quantify changes in the state of Earth's space environment. The brightness of these emissions also provides important constraints on the state of the space environment and its drivers, e.g., the solar irradiance. In this work, the observed O 1356 Å and LBH emissions from the GUVI (Global Ultraviolet Imager) on the TIMED (Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics) satellite is compared to the calculated O 1356 Å and LBH emissions from the GLOW model. These comparisons allow us to examine the agreement between the observed and calculated emissions as well as their dependence on the emission cross sections. GUVI observations from 2010-2011 and coincident with solar irradiance observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), both at 30 second cadence, are used in the analysis. In addition, recent experimental excitation cross-section data are used to determine the N2 LBH brightness and its ratio to O 1356 Å. The observed 1356/LBH emission ratio (which is proportional to the O/N2 ratio) is approximately half that calculated, while the calculated emissions are both brighter than those observed. While uncertainties in both the calibrations of the instruments and the neutral densities of the atmosphere may contribute to the lack of agreement, the differences in the emission ratios indicate a need for better O 1356 Å emission cross sections.

  15. Influence of simulated space environment on the performance of optical solar reflector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bingsen; Qiu, Jiawen; Wang, Bin; Chang, Tianhai

    1990-08-01

    The inf1ere of simulated space environment on the prcpert ies of the satel 1 i te temperature-control coat ing --- Optical Sol ar Ref1etor (OSR) is discussed. I kinds of CSR sample are tested in the simu1at1 space environment . The simulat ion i tens include vacuum US? irradi at on, electron and proton i rradiat ion . The surface charge/discharge test is carried out tcx . After the ecron, proton and UV accelerat ive irradiat ion of total dosage equivalent to 7 years at the south or north pale of geosyixthrcrx,us satellite, the solar aI:sorptaire increases from 0 .068 to 0 . 078 for cczxkt ive C , and from 0 . 066 to 0 . 085 for ncn-oonduct ive OSR; the normal ni ttance decreases from 0 .83 to 0.72 for conditive OSR, and from 0.82 to 0.76 for non-conductive OSR. Also, it is shown from the charge/discharge test that the surface charge potential is only I5--40 V for conduct ive CSR, and about 1 --1 0 Ky for non-conduct ive CSR.

  16. Progress in Spacecraft Environment Interactions: International Space Station (ISS) Development and Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, Steve; Suggs, Robb; Schneider, Todd; Minow, Joe; Alred, John; Cooke, Bill; Mikatarian, Ron; Kramer, Leonard; Boeder, paul; Soares, Carlos

    2007-01-01

    The set of spacecraft interactions with the space flight environment that have produced the largest impacts on the design, verification, and operation of the International Space Station (ISS) Program during the May 2000 to May 2007 time frame are the focus of this paper. In-flight data, flight crew observations, and the results of ground-based test and analysis directly supporting programmatic and operational decision-making are reported as are the analysis and simulation efforts that have led to new knowledge and capabilities supporting current and future space explorations programs. The specific spacecraft-environment interactions that have had the greatest impact on ISS Program activities during the first several years of flight are: 1) spacecraft charging, 2) micrometeoroids and orbital debris effects, 3) ionizing radiation (both total dose to materials and single event effects [SEE] on avionics), 4) hypergolic rocket engine plume impingement effects, 5) venting/dumping of liquids, 6) spacecraft contamination effects, 7) neutral atmosphere and atomic oxygen effects, 8) satellite drag effects, and 9) solar ultraviolet effects. Orbital inclination (51.6deg) and altitude (nominally between 350 km and 460 km) determine the set of natural environment factors affecting the performance and reliability of materials and systems on ISS. ISS operates in the F2 region of Earth s ionosphere in well-defined fluxes of atomic oxygen, other ionospheric plasma species, solar UV, VUV, and x-ray radiation as well as galactic cosmic rays, trapped radiation, and solar cosmic rays. The micrometeoroid and orbital debris environment is an important determinant of spacecraft design and operations in any orbital inclination. The induced environment results from ISS interactions with the natural environment as well as environmental factors produced by ISS itself and visiting vehicles. Examples include ram-wake effects, hypergolic thruster plume impingement, materials out-gassing, venting

  17. Sleep in space as a new medical frontier: the challenge of preserving normal sleep in the abnormal environment of space missions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandi-Perumal, Seithikurippu R; Gonfalone, Alain A

    2016-01-01

    Space agencies such as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration of the United States, the Russian Federal Space Agency, the European Space Agency, the China National Space Administration, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, and Indian Space Research Organization, although differing in their local political agendas, have a common interest in promoting all applied sciences that may facilitate man's adaptation to life beyond the earth. One of man's most important adaptations has been the evolutionary development of sleep cycles in response to the 24 hour rotation of the earth. Less well understood has been man's biological response to gravity. Before humans ventured into space, many questioned whether sleep was possible at all in microgravity environments. It is now known that, in fact, space travelers can sleep once they leave the pull of the earth's gravity, but that the sleep they do get is not completely refreshing and that the associated sleep disturbances can be elaborate and variable. According to astronauts' subjective reports, the duration of sleep is shorter than that on earth and there is an increased incidence of disturbed sleep. Objective sleep recordings carried out during various missions including the Skylab missions, space shuttle missions, and Mir missions all support the conclusion that, compared to sleep on earth, the duration in human sleep in space is shorter, averaging about six hours. In the new frontier of space exploration, one of the great practical problems to be solved relates to how man can preserve "normal" sleep in a very abnormal environment. The challenge of managing fatigue and sleep loss during space mission has critical importance for the mental efficiency and safety of the crew and ultimately for the success of the mission itself. Numerous "earthly" examples now show that crew fatigue on ships, trucks, and long-haul jetliners can lead to inadequate performance and sometimes fatal consequences, a reality which has

  18. Space environment effect on cell cycle of proliferating FRTL-5 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curcio, Francesco; Saverio Ambesi-Impiombato, Francesco; Meli, Antonella; Perrella, Giuseppina; Spelat, Renza; Zambito, Anna Maria

    The space environment is a unique laboratory to study the response of living organisms to microgravity and cosmic radiation at the molecular and cellular levels. Significant results obtained by us during the Eneide Mission (Soyuz 9S and 10S 2005) showed a different sensitivity to space environment of cells in proliferative state as compared to those in physiological stand-by. The main object of our investigation was to validate these important findings and to study the molecular mechanisms underlying the phenomenon. To this purpose, a cell model of normal cells derived from rat thyroids which can be kept unattended for up to 20 days in a proliferative medium and at room temperature (FRTL-5) were used in a 10 days experiment on a FOTON satellite and in a 15 days experiment in the STS-120 shuttle mission. Experimental design for both flights was planned on the basis of the "ENEIDE" mission results. Microarray analysis has been performed on the samples from Foton M3 and STS-120. Background subtraction, quality assessment and normalization as well as the definition of specific evaluation algorithms have been performed. Based on the hyper G Test function we computed the Hyper geometric p-values for over representation of genes at all Gene Ontology (GO) terms in the induced GO graphs; this test was performed for each GO category and applied also to KEGG pathways. Results show the good quality of the experiment and our data show that the pathways mostly affected by the flight are: a) the cell cycle, b) the ubiquitin mediated proteolysis, c) the repair mechanisms, d) the adherens junction and e) the pyrimidine metabolism. The patways studied indicate that the cells suffer a slowing of cell cycle as well as upregulation of the DNA and RNA repair processes and even further corroborate the validity of using the FRTL5 cells as biosensors for monitoring the effectiveness of countermeasures to damage caused by the Space.

  19. A navigation and control system for an autonomous rescue vehicle in the space station environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkel, Lawrence

    1991-01-01

    A navigation and control system was designed and implemented for an orbital autonomous rescue vehicle envisioned to retrieve astronauts or equipment in the case that they become disengaged from the space station. The rescue vehicle, termed the Extra-Vehicular Activity Retriever (EVAR), has an on-board inertial measurement unit ahd GPS receivers for self state estimation, a laser range imager (LRI) and cameras for object state estimation, and a data link for reception of space station state information. The states of the retriever and objects (obstacles and the target object) are estimated by inertial state propagation which is corrected via measurements from the GPS, the LRI system, or the camera system. Kalman filters are utilized to perform sensor fusion and estimate the state propagation errors. Control actuation is performed by a Manned Maneuvering Unit (MMU). Phase plane control techniques are used to control the rotational and translational state of the retriever. The translational controller provides station-keeping or motion along either Clohessy-Wiltshire trajectories or straight line trajectories in the LVLH frame of any sufficiently observed object or of the space station. The software was used to successfully control a prototype EVAR on an air bearing floor facility, and a simulated EVAR operating in a simulated orbital environment. The design of the navigation system and the control system are presented. Also discussed are the hardware systems and the overall software architecture.

  20. Space environment of an asteroid preserved on micrograins returned by the Hayabusa spacecraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Eizo; Makishima, Akio; Moriguti, Takuya; Kobayashi, Katsura; Tanaka, Ryoji; Kunihiro, Tak; Tsujimori, Tatsuki; Sakaguchi, Chie; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Ota, Tsutomu; Yachi, Yusuke; Yada, Toru; Abe, Masanao; Fujimura, Akio; Ueno, Munetaka; Mukai, Toshifumi; Yoshikawa, Makoto; Kawaguchi, Jun'ichiro

    2012-03-13

    Records of micrometeorite collisions at down to submicron scales were discovered on dust grains recovered from near-Earth asteroid 25143 (Itokawa). Because the grains were sampled from very near the surface of the asteroid, by the Hayabusa spacecraft, their surfaces reflect the low-gravity space environment influencing the physical nature of the asteroid exterior. The space environment was examined by description of grain surfaces and asteroidal scenes were reconstructed. Chemical and O isotope compositions of five lithic grains, with diameters near 50 μm, indicate that the uppermost layer of the rubble-pile-textured Itokawa is largely composed of equilibrated LL-ordinary-chondrite-like material with superimposed effects of collisions. The surfaces of the grains are dominated by fractures, and the fracture planes contain not only sub-μm-sized craters but also a large number of sub-μm- to several-μm-sized adhered particles, some of the latter composed of glass. The size distribution and chemical compositions of the adhered particles, together with the occurrences of the sub-μm-sized craters, suggest formation by hypervelocity collisions of micrometeorites at down to nm scales, a process expected in the physically hostile environment at an asteroid's surface. We describe impact-related phenomena, ranging in scale from 10(-9) to 10(4) meters, demonstrating the central role played by impact processes in the long-term evolution of planetary bodies. Impact appears to be an important process shaping the exteriors of not only large planetary bodies, such as the moon, but also low-gravity bodies such as asteroids.

  1. Plant-centered biosystems in space environments: technological concepts for developing a plant genetic assessment and control system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomax, Terri L; Findlay, Kirk A; White, T J; Winner, William E

    2003-06-01

    Plants will play an essential role in providing life support for any long-term space exploration or habitation. We are evaluating the feasibility of an adaptable system for measuring the response of plants to any unique space condition and optimizing plant performance under those conditions. The proposed system is based on a unique combination of systems including the rapid advances in the field of plant genomics, microarray technology for measuring gene expression, bioinformatics, gene pathways and networks, physiological measurements in controlled environments, and advances in automation and robotics. The resulting flexible module for monitoring and optimizing plant responses will be able to be inserted as a cassette into a variety of platforms and missions for either experimental or life support purposes. The results from future plant functional genomics projects have great potential to be applied to those plant species most likely to be used in space environments. Eventually, it will be possible to use the plant genetic assessment and control system to optimize the performance of any plant in any space environment. In addition to allowing the effective control of environmental parameters for enhanced plant productivity and other life support functions, the proposed module will also allow the selection or engineering of plants to thrive in specific space environments. The proposed project will advance human exploration of space in the near- and mid-term future on the International Space Station and free-flying satellites and in the far-term for longer duration missions and eventual space habitation.

  2. Electric Propulsion Test & Evaluation Methodologies for Plasma in the Environments of Space and Testing (EP TEMPEST) (Briefing Charts)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    transitioned to FalconSat-6, NASA, industry, and academia • Correlated thruster plasma oscillations with transient ion flux impacting chamber...Research PAYOFF - Pervasive Space Capability for Increased Payload Transition Improved T&E Methods Cannot fully replicate space environment in ground

  3. Space Suit Portable Life Support System (PLSS) 2.0 Unmanned Vacuum Environment Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Carly; Vogel, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    For the first time in more than 30 years, an advanced space suit Portable Life Support System (PLSS) design was operated inside a vacuum chamber representative of the flight operating environment. The test article, PLSS 2.0, was the second system-level integrated prototype of the advanced PLSS design, following the PLSS 1.0 Breadboard that was developed and tested throughout 2011. Whereas PLSS 1.0 included five technology development components with the balance the system simulated using commercial-off-the-shelf items, PLSS 2.0 featured first generation or later prototypes for all components less instrumentation, tubing and fittings. Developed throughout 2012, PLSS 2.0 was the first attempt to package the system into a flight-like representative volume. PLSS 2.0 testing included an extensive functional evaluation known as Pre-Installation Acceptance (PIA) testing, Human-in-the-Loop testing in which the PLSS 2.0 prototype was integrated via umbilicals to a manned prototype space suit for 19 two-hour simulated EVAs, and unmanned vacuum environment testing. Unmanned vacuum environment testing took place from 1/9/15-7/9/15 with PLSS 2.0 located inside a vacuum chamber. Test sequences included performance mapping of several components, carbon dioxide removal evaluations at simulated intravehicular activity (IVA) conditions, a regulator pressure schedule assessment, and culminated with 25 simulated extravehicular activities (EVAs). During the unmanned vacuum environment test series, PLSS 2.0 accumulated 378 hours of integrated testing including 291 hours of operation in a vacuum environment and 199 hours of simulated EVA time. The PLSS prototype performed nominally throughout the test series, with two notable exceptions including a pump failure and a Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME) leak, for which post-test failure investigations were performed. In addition to generating an extensive database of PLSS 2.0 performance data, achievements included requirements and

  4. Derivation and Testing of Computer Algorithms for Automatic Real-Time Determination of Space Vehicle Potentials in Various Plasma Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-05-31

    COMPUTER ALGORITHMS FOR AUTOMATIC REAL-TIME DETERMINATION OF SPACE VEHICLE POTENTIALS IN VARIOUS PLASMA ENVIRONMENTS May 31, 1988 Stanley L. Spiegel...crrnaion DiviSiofl 838 12 2 DERIVATION AND TESTING OF COMPUTER ALGORITHMS FOR AUTOMATIC REAL-TIME DETERMINATION OF SPACE VEHICLE POTENTIALS IN VARIOUS...S.L., "Derivation and testing of computer algorithms for automatic real time determination of space vehicle poteuatials in various plasma

  5. Measurements of indoor thermal environment and energy analysis in a large space building in typical seasons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Chen; Zou, Zhijun; Li, Meiling; Wang, Xin; Huang, Wugang; Yang, Jiangang [University of Shanghai for Science and Technology, Shanghai (China); Li, Wei; Xiao, Xueqin [Shanghai International Gymnastics Stadium, Shanghai (China)

    2007-05-15

    Shanghai International Gymnastics Stadium is the selected object for site-measurement. The site-measurements have been carried out during summer, winter, and the transitional seasons. Their indoor thermal environments were controlled by continuous air-conditioning, intermittent air-conditioning and natural ventilation, respectively. The site-measurement includes outdoor environment (the weather conditions and peripheral hallway), indoor air temperature distribution (the occupant zone temperature, radial temperature near upper openings and the vertical temperature distributions, etc.), and the heat balance of air-conditioning system, etc. It is found that temperature stratification in winter with air-conditioning is most obvious. The maximum difference of vertical temperature is 15{sup o}C in winter. The second largest one is 12{sup o}C in summer, and less than 2{sup o}C in the transitional season. The results of measurements indicate that it is different in the characteristics on energy saving of upper openings during the different seasons. With heat balance measurements, it is discovered that the roof load and ventilated and infiltrated load account for larger percentages in terms of cooling and heating load. In this paper, many discussions on the results of site measurements show some characteristics and regulations of indoor thermal environment in large space building. (author)

  6. Space Launch System Base Heating Test: Environments and Base Flow Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Manish; Knox, Kyle S.; Seaford, C. Mark; Dufrene, Aaron T.

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Space Launch System (SLS) vehicle is composed of four RS-25 liquid oxygen- hydrogen rocket engines in the core-stage and two 5-segment solid rocket boosters and as a result six hot supersonic plumes interact within the aft section of the vehicle during ight. Due to the complex nature of rocket plume-induced ows within the launch vehicle base during ascent and a new vehicle con guration, sub-scale wind tunnel testing is required to reduce SLS base convective environment uncertainty and design risk levels. This hot- re test program was conducted at the CUBRC Large Energy National Shock (LENS) II short-duration test facility to simulate ight from altitudes of 50 kft to 210 kft. The test program is a challenging and innovative e ort that has not been attempted in 40+ years for a NASA vehicle. This presentation discusses the various trends of base convective heat ux and pressure as a function of altitude at various locations within the core-stage and booster base regions of the two-percent SLS wind tunnel model. In-depth understanding of the base ow physics is presented using the test data, infrared high-speed imaging and theory. The normalized test design environments are compared to various NASA semi- empirical numerical models to determine exceedance and conservatism of the ight scaled test-derived base design environments. Brief discussion of thermal impact to the launch vehicle base components is also presented.

  7. Clinical Application of Surrounding Puncture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Yao-jie; HAN Chou-ping

    2003-01-01

    Surrounding puncture can stop pathogenic qi from spreading, consolidate the connection between local meridians and enrich local qi and blood, which can eventually supplement anti-pathogenic qi and remove pathogenic qi, and consequently remedy diseases. The author of this article summrized and analyzed the clinical application of surrounding puncture for the purpose of studying this technique and improving the therapeutic effect.

  8. LDPC concatenated space-time block coded system in multipath fading environment: Analysis and evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surbhi Sharma

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Irregular low-density parity-check (LDPC codes have been found to show exceptionally good performance for single antenna systems over a wide class of channels. In this paper, the performance of LDPC codes with multiple antenna systems is investigated in flat Rayleigh and Rician fading channels for different modulation schemes. The focus of attention is mainly on the concatenation of irregular LDPC codes with complex orthogonal space-time codes. Iterative decoding is carried out with a density evolution method that sets a threshold above which the code performs well. For the proposed concatenated system, the simulation results show that the QAM technique achieves a higher coding gain of 8.8 dB and 3.2 dB over the QPSK technique in Rician (LOS and Rayleigh (NLOS faded environments respectively.

  9. Dynamic characteristic prediction of inverted pendulum under the reduced-gravity space environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guohui; Liu, Xue

    2010-09-01

    A new multi-local linear model based on the Tkakgi-Sugeno approach is presented to carry out controlling of a nonlinear unsteady system and to make a design of inverted pendulum fuzzy controller. Nonlinear multi-variance behaviors are transformed to a multi-local linear model using a fuzzy approximation method, which is used to implement control steadily and rapidly for the global system. Detailed investigations on dynamic behaviors of inverted pendulum under reduced-gravity space environments are performed using Simulink simulations. Results showed that stabilization of an inverted pendulum is greatly affected by reduced-gravity conditions and effects of θ angle variation are the largest. When θ is greater than 1.571 rad threshold value, balances will be lost under earth, lunar and microgravity conditions. Furthermore, microgravity is favorable for keeping balance status. An appropriate compensation controlling provided by the presented fuzzy controller can keep a better balance for inverted pendulum.

  10. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy of Alloys in a Simulated Space Shuttle Launch Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, L. M.; Kolody, M. R.; Vinje, R. D.; Whitten, M. C.; Li, D.

    2005-01-01

    Corrosion studies began at NASA/Kennedy Space Center in 1966 during the Gemini/Apollo Programs with the evaluation of long-term protective coatings for the atmospheric protection of carbon steel. An outdoor exposure facility on the beach near the launch pad was established for this purpose at that time. The site has provided over 35 years of technical information on the evaluation of the long-term corrosion performance of many materials and coatings as well as on maintenance procedures. Results from these evaluations have helped NASA find new materials and processes that increase the safety and reliability of our flight hardware, launch structures, and ground support equipment. The launch environment at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is extremely corrosive due to the combination of ocean salt spray, heat, humidity, and sunlight. With the introduction of the Space Shuttle in 1981, the already highly corrosive conditions at the launch pad were rendered even more severe by the acidic exhaust from the solid rocket boosters. Over the years, many materials have been evaluated for their corrosion performance under conditions similar to those found at the launch pads. These studies have typically included atmospheric exposure and evaluation with conventional electrochemical methods such as open circuit potential (OCP) measurements, polarization techniques, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The atmosphere at the Space Shuttle launch site is aggressive to most metals and causes severe pitting in many of the common stainless steel alloys such as type 304L stainless steel (304L SS). A study was undertaken to find a more corrosion resistant material to replace the existing 304L SS tubing. This paper presents the results from atmospheric exposure as well as electrochemical measurements on the corrosion resistance of AL-6XN (UNS N08367) and 254-SMO (UNS S32154). Type 304L SS (UNS S30403) was used as a control. Conditions at the Space Shuttle launch pad were

  11. Using parallel computing for the display and simulation of the space debris environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möckel, M.; Wiedemann, C.; Flegel, S.; Gelhaus, J.; Vörsmann, P.; Klinkrad, H.; Krag, H.

    2011-07-01

    Parallelism is becoming the leading paradigm in today's computer architectures. In order to take full advantage of this development, new algorithms have to be specifically designed for parallel execution while many old ones have to be upgraded accordingly. One field in which parallel computing has been firmly established for many years is computer graphics. Calculating and displaying three-dimensional computer generated imagery in real time requires complex numerical operations to be performed at high speed on a large number of objects. Since most of these objects can be processed independently, parallel computing is applicable in this field. Modern graphics processing units (GPUs) have become capable of performing millions of matrix and vector operations per second on multiple objects simultaneously. As a side project, a software tool is currently being developed at the Institute of Aerospace Systems that provides an animated, three-dimensional visualization of both actual and simulated space debris objects. Due to the nature of these objects it is possible to process them individually and independently from each other. Therefore, an analytical orbit propagation algorithm has been implemented to run on a GPU. By taking advantage of all its processing power a huge performance increase, compared to its CPU-based counterpart, could be achieved. For several years efforts have been made to harness this computing power for applications other than computer graphics. Software tools for the simulation of space debris are among those that could profit from embracing parallelism. With recently emerged software development tools such as OpenCL it is possible to transfer the new algorithms used in the visualization outside the field of computer graphics and implement them, for example, into the space debris simulation environment. This way they can make use of parallel hardware such as GPUs and Multi-Core-CPUs for faster computation. In this paper the visualization software

  12. Based on the Characteristics of Respondents and the Voice of the Urban Neighborhood Public Space Business Facilities Noise Environment Evaluation Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JunYan Dong; Wen Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Comfort is one of the important indicators evaluation of voice. In order to understand the urban neighborhood public space environment of comfort, this paper is to explore characteristics of consumer society on the public space environment evaluation of the effect, and using the questionnaire survey method, to evaluate the Harbin city neighborhood area public space as the typical case analysis. Based on one of the main sound source in neighborhood public space, environment, business facilities environment as the breakthrough point, it is to consider neighborhood public space environment evaluation and social characteristics.

  13. Analytical and experimental studies of leak location and environment characterization for the international space station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woronowicz, Michael; Blackmon, Rebecca; Brown, Martin [Stinger Ghaffarian Technologies, Inc, 7701 Greenbelt Rd, Greenbelt, MD 20770 (United States); Abel, Joshua; Hawk, Doug [Alliant Techsystems, Inc, 5050 Powder Mill Road, Beltsville, Maryland 20705 (United States); Autrey, David; Glenn, Jodie [Lockheed Martin, 1300 Hercules, Houston, TX 77058 (United States); Bond, Tim; Buffington, Jesse [NASA Johnson Space Flight Center, 2101 NASA Pkwy, Houston, TX 77058 (United States); Cheng, Edward; Ma, Jonathan; Rossetti, Dino [Conceptual Analytics, 8209 Woburn Abbey Rd, Glenn Dale, MD 20769 (United States); DeLatte, Danielle [ASRC Federal Space and Defense, 7000 Muirkirk Meadows Drive, Suite 100, Beltsville, MD 20705 (United States); Garcia, Kelvin; Mohammed, Jelila; Montt de Garcia, Kristina; Perry, Radford [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Rd, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Tull, Kimathi [Jackson and Tull, 7375 Executive Pl, Lanham, MD 20706 (United States); Warren, Eric [Wyle STE Group, 1290 Hercules Ave, Houston, TX 77058-2769 (United States)

    2014-12-09

    The International Space Station program is developing a robotically-operated leak locator tool to be used externally. The tool would consist of a Residual Gas Analyzer for partial pressure measurements and a full range pressure gauge for total pressure measurements. The primary application is to demonstrate the ability to detect NH{sub 3} coolant leaks in the ISS thermal control system. An analytical model of leak plume physics is presented that can account for effusive flow as well as plumes produced by sonic orifices and thruster operations. This model is used along with knowledge of typical RGA and full range gauge performance to analyze the expected instrument sensitivity to ISS leaks of various sizes and relative locations (“directionality”). The paper also presents experimental results of leak simulation testing in a large thermal vacuum chamber at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. This test characterized instrument sensitivity as a function of leak rates ranging from 1 lb{sub m/}/yr. to about 1 lb{sub m}/day. This data may represent the first measurements collected by an RGA or ion gauge system monitoring off-axis point sources as a function of location and orientation. Test results are compared to the analytical model and used to propose strategies for on-orbit leak location and environment characterization using the proposed instrument while taking into account local ISS conditions and the effects of ram/wake flows and structural shadowing within low Earth orbit.

  14. Analytical and experimental studies of leak location and environment characterization for the international space station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woronowicz, Michael; Abel, Joshua; Autrey, David; Blackmon, Rebecca; Bond, Tim; Brown, Martin; Buffington, Jesse; Cheng, Edward; DeLatte, Danielle; Garcia, Kelvin; Glenn, Jodie; Hawk, Doug; Ma, Jonathan; Mohammed, Jelila; de Garcia, Kristina Montt; Perry, Radford; Rossetti, Dino; Tull, Kimathi; Warren, Eric

    2014-12-01

    The International Space Station program is developing a robotically-operated leak locator tool to be used externally. The tool would consist of a Residual Gas Analyzer for partial pressure measurements and a full range pressure gauge for total pressure measurements. The primary application is to demonstrate the ability to detect NH3 coolant leaks in the ISS thermal control system. An analytical model of leak plume physics is presented that can account for effusive flow as well as plumes produced by sonic orifices and thruster operations. This model is used along with knowledge of typical RGA and full range gauge performance to analyze the expected instrument sensitivity to ISS leaks of various sizes and relative locations ("directionality"). The paper also presents experimental results of leak simulation testing in a large thermal vacuum chamber at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. This test characterized instrument sensitivity as a function of leak rates ranging from 1 lbm//yr. to about 1 lbm/day. This data may represent the first measurements collected by an RGA or ion gauge system monitoring off-axis point sources as a function of location and orientation. Test results are compared to the analytical model and used to propose strategies for on-orbit leak location and environment characterization using the proposed instrument while taking into account local ISS conditions and the effects of ram/wake flows and structural shadowing within low Earth orbit.

  15. Quantitative orientation preference and susceptibility to space motion sickness simulated in a virtual reality environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Chao, Jian-Gang; Chen, Xue-Wen; Wang, Jin-Kun; Tan, Cheng

    2015-04-01

    Orientation preference should appear when variable weightings of spatial orientation cues are used between individuals. It is possible that astronauts' orientation preferences could be a potential predictor for susceptibility to space motion sickness (SMS). The present study was conducted to confirm this relationship on Earth by quantifying orientation preferences and simulating SMS in a virtual reality environment. Two tests were carried out. The first was to quantitatively determine one's orientation preference. Thirty-two participants' vision and body cue preferences were determined by measuring perceptual up (PU) orientations. The ratio of vision and body vector (ROVB) was used as the indicator of one's orientation preference. The second test was to visually induce motion sickness symptoms that represent similar sensory conflicts as SMS using a virtual reality environment. Relationships between ROVB values and motion sickness scores were analyzed, which revealed cubic functions by using optimal fits. According to ROVB level, participants were divided into three groups - body group, vision group, and confusion group - and the factor of gender was further considered as a covariate in the analysis. Consistent differences in motion sickness scores were observed between the three groups. Thus, orientation preference had a significant relationship with susceptibility to simulated SMS symptoms. This knowledge could assist with astronaut selection and might be a useful countermeasure when developing new preflight trainings. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. UVMag: stellar formation, evolution, structure and environment with space UV and visible spectropolarimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Neiner, C; Fullerton, A; Gry, C; Hussain, G; Lebre, A; Morin, J; Petit, P; Sundqvist, J O; ud-Doula, A; Vidotto, A A; Wade, G A

    2014-01-01

    Important insights into the formation, structure, evolution and environment of all types of stars can be obtained through the measurement of their winds and possible magnetospheres. However, this has hardly been done up to now mainly because of the lack of UV instrumentation available for long periods of time. To reach this aim, we have designed UVMag, an M-size space mission equipped with a high-resolution spectropolarimeter working in the UV and visible spectral range. The UV domain is crucial in stellar physics as it is very rich in atomic and molecular lines and contains most of the flux of hot stars. Moreover, covering the UV and visible spectral domains at the same time will allow us to study the star and its environment simultaneously. Adding polarimetric power to the spectrograph will multiply tenfold the capabilities of extracting information on stellar magnetospheres, winds, disks, and magnetic fields. Examples of science objectives that can be reached with UVMag are presented for pre-main sequence,...

  17. Multiscale, Intermittent, Turbulent Fluctuations in Space Plasmas and Their Influence on the Interscale Behavior of the Space Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-26

    Belgium Institute of Spatial Aeronomy and Center of Excellence in Solar-Terrestrial Physics, 2010. Invited Lectures: 1. Invited Lecturer, (ROMA...NM 87545, USA 4Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy , 1180 Brussels, Belgium 5Institute for Space Sciences, 077125 Bucharest, Romania 6Plasma and

  18. The spatial analysis of the great leveling of Chichen Itza and its surrounding spaceEl análisis espacial de la Gran Nivelación de Chichén Itzá y su espacio circundante

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Guida Navarro

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to discuses the spatial relationships that we think to exist at the principal plaza of archaeological site of Chichén Itzá, and your relation with the environment. We also analyze the way that this great space is organized. This kind of analyses is realized with comparisons among the architecture and spatial organization of the structures on Great Terrace associated with others plazas of the archaeological zone.Este artículo tiene como objetivo discutir las relaciones espaciales que pensamos existir en la principal plaza del sitio de Chichén Itzá, la Gran Explanada, y su relación con el entorno. Se analiza la manera que la explanada se organiza en el espacio y buscase entender como la Gran Nivelación se emplaza en el medio circundante. Este tipo de análisis es logrado a través de la comparación del patrón de asentamiento, arquitectura y distribución espacial de los edificios de la explanada con otras plazas del sitio.

  19. Space Radiation Environment Prediction for VLSI microelectronics devices onboard a LEO Satellite using OMERE-Trad Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajid, Muhammad

    This tutorial/survey paper presents the assessment/determination of level of hazard/threat to emerging microelectronics devices in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) space radiation environment with perigee at 300 Km, apogee at 600Km altitude having different orbital inclinations to predict the reliability of onboard Bulk Built-In Current Sensor (BBICS) fabricated in 350nm technology node at OptMA Lab. UFMG Brazil. In this context, the various parameters for space radiation environment have been analyzed to characterize the ionizing radiation environment effects on proposed BBICS. The Space radiation environment has been modeled in the form of particles trapped in Van-Allen radiation belts(RBs), Energetic Solar Particles Events (ESPE) and Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) where as its potential effects on Device- Under-Test (DUT) has been predicted in terms of Total Ionizing Dose (TID), Single-Event Effects (SEE) and Displacement Damage Dose (DDD). Finally, the required mitigation techniques including necessary shielding requirements to avoid undesirable effects of radiation environment at device level has been estimated /determined with assumed standard thickness of Aluminum shielding. In order to evaluate space radiation environment and analyze energetic particles effects on BBICS, OMERE toolkit developed by TRAD was utilized.

  20. Glow phenomenon surrounding the vertical stabilizer and OMS pods

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This 35mm frame, photographed as the Space Shuttle Columbia was orbiting Earth during a 'night' pass, documents the glow phenomenon surrounding the vertical stabilizer and the Orbital Maneuvering System (OMS) pods of the spacecraft.

  1. Automation of closed environments in space for human comfort and safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    The Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) for the Space Station Freedom and future colonization of the Moon and Mars presents new challenges for present technologies. Current plans call for a crew of 8 to live in a safe, shirt-sleeve environment for 90 days without ground support. Because of these requirements, all life support systems must be self-sufficient and reliable. The ECLSS is composed of six subsystems. The temperature and humidity control (THC) subsystem maintains the cabin temperature and humidity at a comfortable level. The atmosphere control and supply (ACS) subsystem insures proper cabin pressure and partial pressures of oxygen and nitrogen. To protect the space station from fire damage, the fire detection and suppression (FDS) subsystem provides fire sensing alarms and extinguishers. The waste management (WM) subsystem compacts solid wastes for return to Earth, and collects urine for water recovery. Because it is impractical, if not impossible, to supply the station with enough fresh air and water for the duration of the space station's extended mission, these elements are recycled. The atmosphere revitalization (AR) subsystem removes CO2 and other dangerous contaminants from the air. The water recovery and management (WRM) subsystem collects and filters condensate from the cabin to replenish potable water supplies, and processes urine and other waste waters to replenish hygiene water supplies. These subsystems are not fully automated at this time. Furthermore, the control of these subsystems is not presently integrated; they are largely independent of one another. A fully integrated and automated ECLSS would increase astronauts' productivity and contribute to their safety and comfort. The Kansas State University Advanced Design Team is in the process of researching and designing controls for the automation of the ECLSS for Space Station Freedom and beyond. The approach chosen to solve this problem is to divide the design into three

  2. Quantitative modeling of Escherichia coli chemotactic motion in environments varying in space and time.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Jiang

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli chemotactic motion in spatiotemporally varying environments is studied by using a computational model based on a coarse-grained description of the intracellular signaling pathway dynamics. We find that the cell's chemotaxis drift velocity v(d is a constant in an exponential attractant concentration gradient [L] proportional, variantexp(Gx. v(d depends linearly on the exponential gradient G before it saturates when G is larger than a critical value G(C. We find that G(C is determined by the intracellular adaptation rate k(R with a simple scaling law: G(C infinity k(1/2(R. The linear dependence of v(d on G = d(ln[L]/dx directly demonstrates E. coli's ability in sensing the derivative of the logarithmic attractant concentration. The existence of the limiting gradient G(C and its scaling with k(R are explained by the underlying intracellular adaptation dynamics and the flagellar motor response characteristics. For individual cells, we find that the overall average run length in an exponential gradient is longer than that in a homogeneous environment, which is caused by the constant kinase activity shift (decrease. The forward runs (up the gradient are longer than the backward runs, as expected; and depending on the exact gradient, the (shorter backward runs can be comparable to runs in a spatially homogeneous environment, consistent with previous experiments. In (spatial ligand gradients that also vary in time, the chemotaxis motion is damped as the frequency omega of the time-varying spatial gradient becomes faster than a critical value omega(c, which is controlled by the cell's chemotaxis adaptation rate k(R. Finally, our model, with no adjustable parameters, agrees quantitatively with the classical capillary assay experiments where the attractant concentration changes both in space and time. Our model can thus be used to study E. coli chemotaxis behavior in arbitrary spatiotemporally varying environments. Further experiments are

  3. Visual surround suppression in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Samuel Tibber

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Compared to unaffected observers patients with schizophrenia show characteristic differences in visual perception, including a reduced susceptibility to the influence of context on judgements of contrast - a manifestation of weaker surround suppression. To examine the generality of this phenomenon we measured the ability of 24 individuals with schizophrenia to judge the luminance, contrast, orientation and size of targets embedded in contextual surrounds that would typically influence the target’s appearance. Individuals with schizophrenia demonstrated weaker surround suppression compared to matched controls for stimuli defined by contrast or size, but not for those defined by luminance or orientation. As perceived luminance is thought to be regulated at the earliest stages of visual processing our findings are consistent with a suppression deficit that is predominantly cortical in origin. In addition, we propose that preserved orientation surround suppression in schizophrenia may reflect the sparing of broadly tuned mechanisms of suppression. We attempt to reconcile these data with findings from previous studies.

  4. Educational Success and Surrounding Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Garrison

    2016-01-01

    The curriculum, instruction, and services we provide in schools, colleges, and universities matter a lot, but if we continue to ignore our students' "surrounding culture," progress toward a more educated nation will continue to be disappointing.

  5. Educational Success and Surrounding Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Garrison

    2016-01-01

    The curriculum, instruction, and services we provide in schools, colleges, and universities matter a lot, but if we continue to ignore our students' "surrounding culture," progress toward a more educated nation will continue to be disappointing.

  6. Multichannel spatial surround sound system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RAO Dan; XIE Bosun

    2004-01-01

    Based on the consideration of being compatible with 5.1 channel horizontal surround sound system, a spatial surround sound system is proposed. Theoretical and experimental results show that the system has a wide listening area. It can not only recreate stable image in the front and rear direction, but also eliminate the defect of poor lateral image of 5.1 channel system. The system can be used to reproduce special 3D sound effect and the spaciousness of hall.

  7. FOREWORD: Tackling inverse problems in a Banach space environment: from theory to applications Tackling inverse problems in a Banach space environment: from theory to applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Thomas; Hofmann, Bernd; Kaltenbacher, Barbara

    2012-10-01

    Inverse problems can usually be modelled as operator equations in infinite-dimensional spaces with a forward operator acting between Hilbert or Banach spaces—a formulation which quite often also serves as the basis for defining and analyzing solution methods. The additional amount of structure and geometric interpretability provided by the concept of an inner product has rendered these methods amenable to a convergence analysis, a fact which has led to a rigorous and comprehensive study of regularization methods in Hilbert spaces over the last three decades. However, for numerous problems such as x-ray diffractometry, certain inverse scattering problems and a number of parameter identification problems in PDEs, the reasons for using a Hilbert space setting seem to be based on conventions rather than an appropriate and realistic model choice, so often a Banach space setting would be closer to reality. Furthermore, non-Hilbertian regularization and data fidelity terms incorporating a priori information on solution and noise, such as general Lp-norms, TV-type norms, or the Kullback-Leibler divergence, have recently become very popular. These facts have motivated intensive investigations on regularization methods in Banach spaces, a topic which has emerged as a highly active research field within the area of inverse problems. Meanwhile some of the most well-known regularization approaches, such as Tikhonov-type methods requiring the solution of extremal problems, and iterative ones like the Landweber method, the Gauss-Newton method, as well as the approximate inverse method, have been investigated for linear and nonlinear operator equations in Banach spaces. Convergence with rates has been proven and conditions on the solution smoothness and on the structure of nonlinearity have been formulated. Still, beyond the existing results a large number of challenging open questions have arisen, due to the more involved handling of general Banach spaces and the larger variety

  8. Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentini, Chiara

    2017-01-01

    The term environment refers to the internal and external context in which organizations operate. For some scholars, environment is defined as an arrangement of political, economic, social and cultural factors existing in a given context that have an impact on organizational processes and structures....... For others, environment is a generic term describing a large variety of stakeholders and how these interact and act upon organizations. Organizations and their environment are mutually interdependent and organizational communications are highly affected by the environment. This entry examines the origin...... and development of organization-environment interdependence, the nature of the concept of environment and its relevance for communication scholarships and activities....

  9. A search for free quarks in the micro gravity environment of the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudspeth, Paul; Klingler, Robert

    2000-01-01

    Authors propose using the zero-gravity environment of the International Space Station to gather evidence for or against quark particles existing as free radicals in nature. Their proposed method is based on a micro gravity version of 1923 Nobel Prize winner Robert Millikan's oil drop method of determining the fundamental charge on a single electron. Although Millikan's original experiments were carried out in 1909, and showed that all electrical charge exists as whole integer multiples of the fundamental electron unit, Millikan observed and recorded in lab notebooks, the existence of a tiny oil droplet which had a +1/3 partial charge, which he dismissed as an error. Not until the 1960's did quark theory and Particle Accelerators show that protons and neutrons were actually composed of smaller particles called ``quarks'' which indeed bear unique fractional charges. Authors propose observing one millimeter or larger grounded metal spheres suspended in micro gravity between oppositely charged metal plates for telltale motion behavior caused by the fractional charge unique to the quark particle. The ability afforded by micro gravity to use test objects of much greater mass than that of oil droplets equates to being able to perform 100 million Millikan tests in a single run -more by far than the sum total of all the tests ever performed on earth. The significant breakthroughs in terms of deep space propulsion and energy production, hinging on the question of free quark existence, are noted. Preliminary results of basic experimental apparatus construction and testing aboard NASA KC-135 zero-gravity flights are reported, along with recommendations for future experiments. Authors note ideal nature of the experiment in terms of possible student interaction with astronauts and real-time exhibition of testing via the Internet. .

  10. AF-GEOSpace Version 2.0: Space Environment Software Products for 2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilmer, R. V.; Ginet, G. P.; Hall, T.; Holeman, E.; Tautz, M.

    2002-05-01

    AF-GEOSpace Version 2.0 (release 2002 on WindowsNT/2000/XP) is a graphics-intensive software program developed by AFRL with space environment models and applications. It has grown steadily to become a development tool for automated space weather visualization products and helps with a variety of tasks: orbit specification for radiation hazard avoidance; satellite design assessment and post-event analysis; solar disturbance effects forecasting; frequency and antenna management for radar and HF communications; determination of link outage regions for active ionospheric conditions; and physics research and education. The object-oriented C++ code is divided into five module classes. Science Modules control science models to give output data on user-specified grids. Application Modules manipulate these data and provide orbit generation and magnetic field line tracing capabilities. Data Modules read and assist with the analysis of user-generated data sets. Graphics Modules enable the display of features such as plane slices, magnetic field lines, line plots, axes, the Earth, stars, and satellites. Worksheet Modules provide commonly requested coordinate transformations and calendar conversion tools. Common input data archive sets, application modules, and 1-, 2-, and 3-D visualization tools are provided to all models. The code documentation includes detailed examples with click-by-click instructions for investigating phenomena that have well known effects on communications and spacecraft systems. AF-GEOSpace Version 2.0 builds on the success of its predecessors. The first release (Version 1.21, 1996/IRIX on SGI) contained radiation belt particle flux and dose models derived from CRRES satellite data, an aurora model, an ionosphere model, and ionospheric HF ray tracing capabilities. Next (Version 1.4, 1999/IRIX on SGI) science modules were added related to cosmic rays and solar protons, low-Earth orbit radiation dosages, single event effects probability maps, ionospheric

  11. [Particulate matter in indoor environments--exposure situation in residences, schools, pubs, and related recreational spaces].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromme, H

    2006-11-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies have been carried out during the last decades which have demonstrated an association between the pollution of outside air with toxic substances and the occurrence of health-related effects. Against the background of these findings, particularly in recent years, the focus of research has clearly shifted towards particulate matter (PM), notable fine and ultrafine particles. While diverse measurements of PM in the outside air have been conducted, only few data on indoor air pollution are available. The concentration of PM in the indoor environment is highly variable in time and space due to various influencing factors like type of the source, building and room characteristics, the activities of users and the airing behaviour. In this article we aim to summarise and discuss the exposure situation regarding PM in indoor environments. In residences, European studies have found mean PM (2.5) values between 10 and 87 microg/m (3). Especially in smokers' homes, a high background level was observed, reaching very high concentrations of some hundred microg/m (3) when active smoking took place. There are some studies on air quality in schools and similar public places which show that exposure to particulate matter in these environments is high. The main causes of this situation appear to be an insufficient ventilation routine as well as the low frequency and quality of cleaning. In combination with the high number of pupils in relation to room area and volume and their sometimes high physical activity, this leads to a continued resuspension of particles from the room's surfaces. A very high concentration of PM can be observed in those recreational places where smoking is not prohibited, such as discotheques, pubs and restaurants. Here, the mean PM values can reach some hundred microg/m (3). Specific strategies are necessary to especially protect the health of non-smokers in such places. Further investigations are needed to characterise the

  12. The Strategic Technologies for Automation and Robotics (STEAR) program: Protection of materials in the space environment subprogram

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, L.R.; Francoeur, J.; Aguero, A.; Wertheimer, M.R.; Klemberg-Sapieha, J.E.; Martinu, L.; Blezius, J.W.; Oliver, M.; Singh, A. [Cametoid Advanced Technologies, Inc., Whitby, Ontario (Canada)]|[Ecole Polytechnique, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)]|[MPB Technologies, Inc., Pointe Claire, Quebec (Canada)]|[National Optics Inst., Ste-Foy, Quebec (Canada)

    1995-02-01

    Three projects are currently underway for the development of new coatings for the protection of materials in the space environment. These coatings are based on vacuum deposition technologies. The projects will go as far as the proof-of-concept stage when the commercial potential for the technology will be demonstrated on pilot-scale fabrication facilities in 1996. These projects are part of a subprogram to develop supporting technologies for automation and robotics technologies being developed under the Canadian Space Agency`s STEAR Program, part of the Canadian Space Station Program.

  13. The Online Learning Environment: Creating a space for Mauritian women learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushita Gokool-Ramdoo

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines how online distance education acts to democratize access to, and suit the ontologies of, Mauritian women who seek to empower themselves for development. Data from semi-structured interviews of 30 middle class couples are presented in this paper. Interviews and analyses are premised on a feminist perspective and conducted within the social relations analysis framework. The objective of this research was to understand what types of supportive environments (social spaces enable Mauritian women to engage in educational endeavours that promote their personal potentials and creativities which, in turn, advance democracy for all citizens of Mauritius. Husbands were also interviewed to provide ground for analysis and to decrease bias, which can be generated by women-only data. (1 Marriage/ family and (2 occupation, represent the ‘social spaces’ selected for this study. Discretion, degree of learner control, and the outreach capacity inherent in distance learning makes the online modality a natural choice to democratize women’s access to education. Based on interviewees’ experiences and perceptions, this study concludes that online learning can enhance and democratize women’s access to education for personal development – but only if the power relationships in the two ‘social spaces’ are well understood and well negotiated by these women. The findings in this paper shed light on the importance of understanding ‘learner spaces’ when establishing and setting-up open learning organisations.

  14. Diversity and Stability Study on Rice Mutants Induced in Space Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-Hong Lu; Xin-Zhu Wang; Qi Zheng; Shuang-Hong Guan; Ping Xin; Ye-Qing Sun

    2008-01-01

    To further study the characteristics of changes on the molecular level of rice mutants induced in space environment, we analyzed proteins in leaves and seeds of four rice mutants (two high-tillering and two low-tillering) in the 8th and 9th generations after a 15-day spaceflight, and compared with their ground controls by two-dimentional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and reverse phase liquid chromatography (RPLC). In addition, the albumin, globulin, prolamine, glutelin, and amylose of the mutant seeds were analyzed by RPLC and ultra-violet spectrometry. The results showed that the low-abundance proteins of leaves in the peak tillering stage are more likely to be induced compared with their corresponding controls. The albumin, globulin, and prolamine of the mutant seeds revealed changes when compared with their controls, and the characteristics of changes in different mutants were stably inherited in the 8th and 9th generations, suggesting that they can be used as biomarkers to identity the mutants induced by spaceflight. Moreover, two proteins (SSP9111 and SSP6302) were found to be expressed with high intensity (two-fold change) in different mutants, which were both correlated with photosystem according to mass spectrometry and database searching.

  15. On HMI solar oblateness during solar cycle 24 and impact of the space environment on results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meftah, M.; Hauchecorne, A.; Bush, R. I.; Irbah, A.

    2016-10-01

    Solar oblateness is a fundamental parameter of the Sun, which provides indirect information on the inner rotation profile and on the distribution of matter. It also puts constraints on General Relativity. But this quantity is difficult to measure due to its very small value where the solar equator-to-pole radius difference is less than 10 milli-arcsecond (mas). Indeed, the measurements can be affected by magnetic activity and by instrumental effects linked to the space environment. The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) instrument onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) has produced accurate determinations of the solar oblateness from 2010 to 2015. The HMI measurements of the solar shape are obtained during special roll maneuvers of the spacecraft by 11.25 degrees steps around the spacecraft to the Sun line. HMI roll maneuver has been repeated ten times after the commissioning phase from October 2010 to July 2015. From HMI data, we observed a slight anti-correlation between solar oblateness and solar activity. From a new correction method, we found a mean solar equator-to-pole radius difference of 8.36 ± 0.49 mas (i.e. 6.06 ± 0.35 km at one σ) at 617.3 nm during the period 2010-2015.

  16. A space-for-time (SFT substitution approach to studying historical phenological changes in urban environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Buyantuyev

    Full Text Available Plant phenological records are crucial for predicting plant responses to global warming. However, many historical records are either short or replete with data gaps, which pose limitations and may lead to erroneous conclusions about the direction and magnitude of change. In addition to uninterrupted monitoring, missing observations may be substituted via modeling, experimentation, or gradient analysis. Here we have developed a space-for-time (SFT substitution method that uses spatial phenology and temperature data to fill gaps in historical records. To do this, we combined historical data for several tree species from a single location with spatial data for the same species and used linear regression and Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA to build complementary spring phenology models and assess improvements achieved by the approach. SFT substitution allowed increasing the sample size and developing more robust phenology models for some of the species studied. Testing models with reduced historical data size revealed thresholds at which SFT improved historical trend estimation. We conclude that under certain circumstances both the robustness of models and accuracy of phenological trends can be enhanced although some limitations and assumptions still need to be resolved. There is considerable potential for exploring SFT analyses in phenology studies, especially those conducted in urban environments and those dealing with non-linearities in phenology modeling.

  17. Particle-In-Cell Simulation on the Characteristics of a Receiving Antenna in Space Plasma Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Yohei; Usui, Hideyuki; Kojima, Hirotsugu; Omura, Yoshiharu

    2008-12-01

    We applied the electromagnetic Particle-In-Cell simulation to the analysis of receiving antenna characteristics in space plasma environment. In the analysis, we set up external waves in a simulation region and receive them with a numerical antenna model placed in the simulation region. Using this method, we evaluated the effective length of electric field antennas used for plasma wave investigations conducted by scientific spacecraft. We particularly focused on the effective length of an electric field instrument called MEFISTO for a future mission to Mercury: BepiColombo. We first confirmed that the effective length of the MEFISTO-type antenna is basically longer than that of a simple dipole antenna for both electrostatic and electromagnetic plasma waves. By applying the principle of a voltmeter, the effective length of the MEFISTO-type antenna is predicted to become identical to the separation between two sensor-conductor's midpoints. However, the numerical result revealed that the actual effective length becomes shorter than the prediction, which is caused by the shorting-out effect due to the presence of a center boom conductor between the two sensor conductors. Since the above effect is difficult to treat theoretically, the present numerical method is a powerful tool for further quantitative evaluation of the antenna characteristics.

  18. Development of a Flexible Lead-Free Piezoelectric Transducer for Health Monitoring in the Space Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Laurenti

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work we report on the fabrication process for the development of a flexible piezopolymeric transducer for health monitoring applications, based on lead-free, piezoelectric zinc oxide (ZnO thin films. All the selected materials are compatible with the space environment and were deposited by the RF magnetron sputtering technique at room temperature, in view of preserving the total flexibility of the structures, which is an important requirement to guarantee coupling with cylindrical fuel tanks whose integrity we want to monitor. The overall transducer architecture was made of a c-axis-oriented ZnO thin film coupled to a pair of flexible Polyimide foils coated with gold (Au electrodes. The fabrication process started with the deposition of the bottom electrode on Polyimide foils. The ZnO thin film and the top electrode were then deposited onto the Au/Polyimide substrates. Both the electrodes and ZnO layer were properly patterned by wet-chemical etching and optical lithography. The assembly of the final structure was then obtained by gluing the upper and lower Polyimide foils with an epoxy resin capable of guaranteeing low outgassing levels, as well as adequate thermal and electrical insulation of the transducers. The piezoelectric behavior of the prototypes was confirmed and evaluated by measuring the mechanical displacement induced from the application of an external voltage.

  19. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of metal alloys in the space transportation system launch environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz

    1990-01-01

    AC impedance measurements were performed to investigate the corrosion resistance of 18 alloys under conditions similar to the Space Transportation System (STS) launch environment. The alloys were: (1) zirconium 702; (2) Hastelloy C-22, C-276, C-4, and B-2; (3) Inconel 600 and 825; (4) Ferralium 255; (5) Inco Alloy G-3; (6) 20Cb-3; (7) SS 904L, 304LN, 316L, 317L, and 304L; (8) ES 2205; and (9) Monel 400. AC impedance data were gathered for each alloy at various immersion times in 3.55 percent NaCl-0.1N HCl. Polarization resistance values were obtained for the Nyguist plots at each immersion time using the EQUIVALENT CIRCUIT software package available with the 388 electrochemical impedance software. Hastelloy C-22 showed the highest overall values for polarization resistance while Monel 400 and Inconel 600 had the lowest overall values. There was good general correlation between the corrosion performance of the alloys at the beach corrosion testing site, and the expected rate of corrosion as predicted based on the polarization resistance values obtained. The data indicate that electrochemical impedance spectroscopy can be used to predict the corrosion performance of metal alloys.

  20. Pluto's interaction with its space environment: Solar wind, energetic particles, and dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagenal, F; Horányi, M; McComas, D J; McNutt, R L; Elliott, H A; Hill, M E; Brown, L E; Delamere, P A; Kollmann, P; Krimigis, S M; Kusterer, M; Lisse, C M; Mitchell, D G; Piquette, M; Poppe, A R; Strobel, D F; Szalay, J R; Valek, P; Vandegriff, J; Weidner, S; Zirnstein, E J; Stern, S A; Ennico, K; Olkin, C B; Weaver, H A; Young, L A

    2016-03-18

    The New Horizons spacecraft carried three instruments that measured the space environment near Pluto as it flew by on 14 July 2015. The Solar Wind Around Pluto (SWAP) instrument revealed an interaction region confined sunward of Pluto to within about 6 Pluto radii. The region's surprisingly small size is consistent with a reduced atmospheric escape rate, as well as a particularly high solar wind flux. Observations from the Pluto Energetic Particle Spectrometer Science Investigation (PEPSSI) instrument suggest that ions are accelerated and/or deflected around Pluto. In the wake of the interaction region, PEPSSI observed suprathermal particle fluxes equal to about 1/10 of the flux in the interplanetary medium and increasing with distance downstream. The Venetia Burney Student Dust Counter, which measures grains with radii larger than 1.4 micrometers, detected one candidate impact in ±5 days around New Horizons' closest approach, indicating an upper limit of <4.6 kilometers(-3) for the dust density in the Pluto system.

  1. Triggered Star Formation Surrounding Wolf-Rayet Star HD 211853

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tie; Wu, Yuefang; Zhang, Huawei; Qin, Sheng-Li

    2012-05-01

    The environment surrounding Wolf-Rayet (W-R) star HD 211853 is studied in molecular, infrared, as well as radio, and H I emission. The molecular ring consists of well-separated cores, which have a volume density of 103 cm-3 and kinematic temperature ~20 K. Most of the cores are under gravitational collapse due to external pressure from the surrounding ionized gas. From the spectral energy distribution modeling toward the young stellar objects, the sequential star formation is revealed on a large scale in space spreading from the W-R star to the molecular ring. A small-scale sequential star formation is revealed toward core "A," which harbors a very young star cluster. Triggered star formations are thus suggested. The presence of the photodissociation region, the fragmentation of the molecular ring, the collapse of the cores, and the large-scale sequential star formation indicate that the "collect and collapse" process functions in this region. The star-forming activities in core "A" seem to be affected by the "radiation-driven implosion" process.

  2. Triggered star formation surrounding Wolf-Rayet star HD 211853

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Tie; Zhang, Huawei; Qin, Sheng-Li

    2012-01-01

    The environment surrounding Wolf-Rayet star HD 211853 is studied in molecular emission, infrared emission, as well as radio and HI emission. The molecular ring consists of well-separated cores, which have a volume density of 10$^{3}$ cm$^{-3}$ and kinematic temperature $\\sim$20 K. Most of the cores are under gravitational collapse due to external pressure from the surrounding ionized gas. From SED modeling towards the young stellar objects (YSOs), sequential star formation is revealed on a large scale in space spreading from the Wolf-Rayet star to the molecular ring. A small scale sequential star formation is revealed towards core A, which harbors a very young star cluster. Triggered star formations is thus suggested. The presence of PDR, the fragmentation of the molecular ring, the collapse of the cores, the large scale sequential star formation indicate the "Collect and Collapse" process functions in this region. The star forming activities in core A seem to be affected by the "Radiation-Driven Implosion" (...

  3. TRIGGERED STAR FORMATION SURROUNDING WOLF-RAYET STAR HD 211853

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Tie; Wu Yuefang; Zhang Huawei [Department of Astronomy, Peking University, 100871 Beijing (China); Qin Shengli, E-mail: liutiepku@gmail.com [I. Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Str. 77, 50937 Koeln (Germany)

    2012-05-20

    The environment surrounding Wolf-Rayet (W-R) star HD 211853 is studied in molecular, infrared, as well as radio, and H I emission. The molecular ring consists of well-separated cores, which have a volume density of 10{sup 3} cm{sup -3} and kinematic temperature {approx}20 K. Most of the cores are under gravitational collapse due to external pressure from the surrounding ionized gas. From the spectral energy distribution modeling toward the young stellar objects, the sequential star formation is revealed on a large scale in space spreading from the W-R star to the molecular ring. A small-scale sequential star formation is revealed toward core 'A', which harbors a very young star cluster. Triggered star formations are thus suggested. The presence of the photodissociation region, the fragmentation of the molecular ring, the collapse of the cores, and the large-scale sequential star formation indicate that the 'collect and collapse' process functions in this region. The star-forming activities in core 'A' seem to be affected by the 'radiation-driven implosion' process.

  4. Inventorying the molecular potential of Cupriavidus and Ralstonia strains surviving harsh space-related environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijnendonckx, Kristel; van Houdt, Rob; Provoost, Ann; Bossus, Albert; Ott, C. Mark; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Leys, Natalie

    The craving of modern man to explore life beyond earth presents a lot of challenges. The control of microbial contamination of the confined manned spacecraft is an important aspect that has to be taken into account in this journey. Because the human body contains a huge amount of microorganisms, the crew itself is the most important contamination source. But contamination can also originate from residing environmental microorganisms or from materials that are supplied from the Earth. These microbial contaminations can cause problems for the astronauts -well documented to have a decreased immunity -and the infrastructure of the space station. In this study, 14 different Cupriavidus metallidurans and Ralstonia pickettii strains, isolated from such space-related environments, where characterised in detail. These unique strains were isolated from drinking water that returned from ISS (3), from the cooling water system of the American ISS segment (4), from a swab sample of the Mars Odyssey Orbitor surface prior to flight (4), and from an air sample taken in the space assembly facility PHSF during Mars exploration Rover assembly (3). Their resistance to heavy metals and antibiotics was screened. The C. metallidurans isolates were more resistant to Zn2+ and Hg+ but more sensitive to Ni2+ than the R. pickettii strains. The MIC values for Cu2+ ranged from 1,5mM to 12mM, for Co2+ from 1,58mM to 12,63mM and for Cd2+ from 0,25mM to 1mM. For Ni2+ , the MIC values were between 2 and 8mM, except for the strain C. metallidurans IV (0502478) that was able to grow on Ni+2 concentrations up to 48mM. A metal of special interest was Ag+ because it is used to sanitize ISS drinking water. The strains isolated from air and surface samples showed a MIC value ranging from 0,35µM to 4µM. The isolates from the water samples had MIC values from 0,3µM to 2µM, which is lower than (or comparable with) the lowest limit of the silver concentration used in the ISS (1,9µM -4,6µM). However, all

  5. The Interstellar Cloud Surrounding the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisch, P. C.

    Ultraviolet spectral data of nearby stars indicate that the cloud surrounding the solar system has an average neutral density n(HI)~0.1 cm-3, temperature ~6800 K, and turbulence ~1.7 km/s. Comparisons between the anomalous cosmic ray data and ultraviolet data suggest that the electron density is in the range n(e-)~0.22 to 0.44 cm-3. This cloud is flowing past the Sun from a position centered in the Norma-Lupis region. The cloud properties are consistent with interstellar gas which originated as material evaporated from the surfaces of embedded clouds in the Scorpius-Centaurus Association, and which was then displaced towards the Sun by a supernova event about 4 Myrs ago. The Sun and surrounding cloud velocities are nearly perpendicular in space, and this cloud is sweeping past the Sun. The morphology of this cloud can be reconstructed by assuming that the cloud moves in a direction parallel to the surface normal. With this assumption, the Sun entered the surrounding cloud 2000 to 8000 years ago, and is now about 0.05 to 0.16 pc from the cloud surface. Prior to its recent entry into the surrounding cloud complex, the Sun was embedded in a region of space with average density lower than 0.0002 cm-3. If a denser cloud velocity component seen towards alpha Cen A,B is real, it will encounter the solar system within 50,000 yr. The nearby magnetic field seen upwind has a spatial orientation that is parallel to the cloud surface. The nearby star Sirius is viewed through the wake of the solar system, but this direction also samples the hypothetical cloud interface. Comparisons of anomalous cosmic ray and interstellar absorption line data suggest that trace elements in the surrounding cloud are in ionization equilibrium. Data towards nearby white dwarfs indicate partial helium ionization, N(N(HI)(/N(HeI)>~13.7, which is consistent with pickup ion data within the solar system if less than 40% hydrogen ionization occurs in the heliopause region. However, the white dwarfs may

  6. Measurement result of the neutron monitor onboard Space Environment Data Acquisition Equipment - Attached Payload (SEDA-AP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, K.; Matsumoto, H.; Okudaira, O.; Obara, T.; Yamamoto, T.; Muraki, Y.

    2011-12-01

    To support future space activities, it is very important to acquire the space environmental data which causes the degradation of space parts and spacecraft anomalies. Such data are useful for spacecraft design and manned space activity. Space Environment Data Acquisition - Attached Payload (SEDA-AP) measures the space environment around the International Space Station (ISS) by being attached to the Exposed Facility(EF) of the Japanese Experimental Module ("Kibo"). The Neutron Monitor (NEM) is one of the detectors in SEDA-AP. This instrument was developed to measure the solar neutrons which are produced by solar flare event. The solar neutron is a good indicator to clarify the acceleration mechanism of charged particles at the solar flare. Because of the energy of solar neutron is not influenced by the interplanetary magnetic field, it has the information of the energy of the accelerated charged particle directly. We have been analyzing the neutron data at several M or X class solar flare from September 2009. The mission objectives, instrumentation and measurement status of the neutron monitor are reported.

  7. Mitigating Stress and Supporting Health in Deprived Urban Communities: The Importance of Green Space and the Social Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catharine Ward Thompson

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Environment-health research has shown significant relationships between the quantity of green space in deprived urban neighbourhoods and people’s stress levels. The focus of this paper is the nature of access to green space (i.e., its quantity or use necessary before any health benefit is found. It draws on a cross-sectional survey of 406 adults in four communities of high urban deprivation in Scotland, United Kingdom. Self-reported measures of stress and general health were primary outcomes; physical activity and social wellbeing were also measured. A comprehensive, objective measure of green space quantity around each participant’s home was also used, alongside self-report measures of use of local green space. Correlated Component Regression identified the optimal predictors for primary outcome variables in the different communities surveyed. Social isolation and place belonging were the strongest predictors of stress in three out of four communities sampled, and of poor general health in the fourth, least healthy, community. The amount of green space in the neighbourhood, and in particular access to a garden or allotment, were significant predictors of stress. Physical activity, frequency of visits to green space in winter months, and views from the home were predictors of general health. The findings have implications for public health and for planning of green infrastructure, gardens and public open space in urban environments.

  8. Mitigating Stress and Supporting Health in Deprived Urban Communities: The Importance of Green Space and the Social Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward Thompson, Catharine; Aspinall, Peter; Roe, Jenny; Robertson, Lynette; Miller, David

    2016-04-22

    Environment-health research has shown significant relationships between the quantity of green space in deprived urban neighbourhoods and people's stress levels. The focus of this paper is the nature of access to green space (i.e., its quantity or use) necessary before any health benefit is found. It draws on a cross-sectional survey of 406 adults in four communities of high urban deprivation in Scotland, United Kingdom. Self-reported measures of stress and general health were primary outcomes; physical activity and social wellbeing were also measured. A comprehensive, objective measure of green space quantity around each participant's home was also used, alongside self-report measures of use of local green space. Correlated Component Regression identified the optimal predictors for primary outcome variables in the different communities surveyed. Social isolation and place belonging were the strongest predictors of stress in three out of four communities sampled, and of poor general health in the fourth, least healthy, community. The amount of green space in the neighbourhood, and in particular access to a garden or allotment, were significant predictors of stress. Physical activity, frequency of visits to green space in winter months, and views from the home were predictors of general health. The findings have implications for public health and for planning of green infrastructure, gardens and public open space in urban environments.

  9. Simulating the Effect of Space Vehicle Environments on Directional Solidification of a Binary Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westra, D. G.; Heinrich, J. C.; Poirier, D. R.

    2003-01-01

    Space microgravity missions are designed to provide a microgravity environment for scientific experiments, but these missions cannot provide a perfect environment, due to vibrations caused by crew activity, on-board experiments, support systems (pumps, fans, etc.), periodic orbital maneuvers, and water dumps. Therefore, it is necessary to predict the impact of these vibrations on space experiments, prior to performing them. Simulations were conducted to study the effect of the vibrations on the directional solidification of a dendritic alloy. Finite element ca!cu!attie?ls were dme with a simd2titcr based on a continuum model of dendritic solidification, using the Fractional Step Method (FSM). The FSM splits the solution of the momentum equation into two steps: the viscous intermediate step, which does not enforce continuity; and the inviscid projection step, which calculates the pressure and enforces continuity. The FSM provides significant computational benefits for predicting flows in a directionally solidified alloy, compared to other methods presently employed, because of the efficiency gains in the uncoupled solution of velocity and pressure. finite differences, arises when the interdendritic liquid reaches the eutectic temperature and concentration. When a node reaches eutectic temperature, it is assumed that the solidification of the eutectic liquid continues at constant temperature until all the eutectic is solidified. With this approach, solidification is not achieved continuously across an element; rather, the element is not considered solidified until the eutectic isotherm overtakes the top nodes. For microgravity simulations, where the convection is driven by shrinkage, it introduces large variations in the fluid velocity. When the eutectic isotherm reaches a node, all the eutectic must be solidified in a short period, causing an abrupt increase in velocity. To overcome this difficulty, we employed a scheme to numerically predict a more accurate value

  10. Simulation of organic molecule formation in solar system environments-The Miller-Urey Experiment in Space project overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotler, J. Michelle; Ehrenfruend, Pascale; Botta, Oliver; Blum, Jurgen; Schrapler, Rainer; van Dongen, Joost; Palmans, Anja; Sephton, Mark A.; Martins, Zita; Cleaves, Henderson J.; Ricco, Antonio

    The Miller-Urey Experiment in space (MUE) investigates the formation of potential prebiotic organic compounds in the early solar system environment. The MUE experiment will be sent to and retrieved from the International Space Station (ISS), where it will be performed inside the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG). The goal of this space experiment is to understand prebiotic reactions in microgravity by simulating environments of the early solar nebula. The dynamic environment of the solar nebula with the simultaneous presence of gas, particles, and energetic processes, including shock waves, lightning, and radiation may trigger a rich organic chemistry leading to organic molecules. These environments will be simulated in six fabricated vials containing various gas mixtures as well as solid particles. Two gas mixture compositions will be tested and subjected to continuous spark discharges for 48, 96, and 192 hours. Silicate particles will serve as surfaces on which thin water ice mantles can accrete. The particles will move repeatedly through a high-voltage spark discharge in microgravity, enabling chemical re-actions analogous to the original Miller-Urey experiment. The experiment will be performed at low temperatures (-5 C), slowing hydrolysis and improving chances of detection of interme-diates, initial products, and their distributions. Executing the Miller-Urey experiment in the space environment (microgravity) allows us to simulate conditions that could have prevailed in the energetic early solar nebula and provides insights into the chemical pathways that may occur in forming planetary systems. Analysis will be performed post-flight using chemical analytical methods. The anticipated results will provide information about chemical reaction pathways to form organic compounds in space environment, emphasizing abiotic chemical pathways and mechanisms that could have been crucial in the formation of biologically relevant compounds such as amino acids and

  11. Use of Color in Child Care Environments: Application of Color for Wayfinding and Space Definition in Alabama Child Care Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Marilyn A.

    2003-01-01

    Compared the use of color in physical design features associated with the exterior and interior designs of 101 child care centers in Alabama. Found that color was evidenced on the exterior of the centers at just over half of the sample. The interior environments had warm colors and bright accents in the setting; however, the majority of centers…

  12. Fighting in a Contested Space Environment: Training Marines for Operations with Degraded or Denied Space-Enabled Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    WARNING AND ATTACK ASSESSMENT ..............................6 E. ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING...........................................................7...Figure 7. Debris Spread from the Iridium -Cosmos Collision over Time, from [23]. .....17 Figure 8. Results of a Half-Inch-Wide Impactor Striking a 7...and attack assessment; and environmental monitoring [3]. Figures 1–5 are examples of space systems on orbit that are enabling each of the respective

  13. Activity space environment and dietary and physical activity behaviors: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenk, Shannon N; Schulz, Amy J; Matthews, Stephen A; Odoms-Young, Angela; Wilbur, JoEllen; Wegrzyn, Lani; Gibbs, Kevin; Braunschweig, Carol; Stokes, Carmen

    2011-09-01

    This study examined relationships among individual demographics, environmental features (e.g., fast food outlet density, park land use) of residential neighborhoods and activity spaces, and weight-related behaviors (diet, physical activity). Participants' movement was tracked for 7 days using global positioning systems (GPS). Two activity space measures (one standard deviation ellipse, daily path area) were derived from the GPS data. Activity spaces were generally larger than residential neighborhoods; environmental features of residential neighborhoods and activity spaces were weakly associated; and some activity space environmental features were related to dietary behaviors. Activity spaces may provide new insights into environmental influences on obesity-related behaviors.

  14. Space and crime in Dutch built environments: macro and micro scale spatial conditions for residential burglaries and thefts from cars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lopez, M.J.J.; Van Nes, A.

    2007-01-01

    At this moment, more knowledge is available on the physical characteristics of the built environment and their relationship to criminal opportunity rather than the spatial characteristics of potential targets and the public and private space between them. To improve this situation, a research

  15. Effects of the Extraterrestrial Environment on Plants: Recommendations for Future Space Experiments for the MELiSSA Higher Plant Compartment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Silje A; Coelho, Liz H; Karoliussen, Irene; Jost, Ann-Iren Kittang

    2014-05-05

    Due to logistical challenges, long-term human space exploration missions require a life support system capable of regenerating all the essentials for survival. Higher plants can be utilized to provide a continuous supply of fresh food, atmosphere revitalization, and clean water for humans. Plants can adapt to extreme environments on Earth, and model plants have been shown to grow and develop through a full life cycle in microgravity. However, more knowledge about the long term effects of the extraterrestrial environment on plant growth and development is necessary. The European Space Agency (ESA) has developed the Micro-Ecological Life Support System Alternative (MELiSSA) program to develop a closed regenerative life support system, based on micro-organisms and higher plant processes, with continuous recycling of resources. In this context, a literature review to analyze the impact of the space environments on higher plants, with focus on gravity levels, magnetic fields and radiation, has been performed. This communication presents a roadmap giving directions for future scientific activities within space plant cultivation. The roadmap aims to identify the research activities required before higher plants can be included in regenerative life support systems in space.

  16. Effects of the Extraterrestrial Environment on Plants: Recommendations for Future Space Experiments for the MELiSSA Higher Plant Compartment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silje A. Wolff

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Due to logistical challenges, long-term human space exploration missions require a life support system capable of regenerating all the essentials for survival. Higher plants can be utilized to provide a continuous supply of fresh food, atmosphere revitalization, and clean water for humans. Plants can adapt to extreme environments on Earth, and model plants have been shown to grow and develop through a full life cycle in microgravity. However, more knowledge about the long term effects of the extraterrestrial environment on plant growth and development is necessary. The European Space Agency (ESA has developed the Micro-Ecological Life Support System Alternative (MELiSSA program to develop a closed regenerative life support system, based on micro-organisms and higher plant processes, with continuous recycling of resources. In this context, a literature review to analyze the impact of the space environments on higher plants, with focus on gravity levels, magnetic fields and radiation, has been performed. This communication presents a roadmap giving directions for future scientific activities within space plant cultivation. The roadmap aims to identify the research activities required before higher plants can be included in regenerative life support systems in space.

  17. Digitally intensive DC-DC converter for extreme space environments Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Space Micro –Arizona State University (ASU) team will develop an all-digitally controlled, wide temperature range point-of-load switch-mode DC-DC regulator...

  18. Digitally intensive DC-DC converter for extreme space environments Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Space Micro-Arizona State University (ASU) team will develop an all-digitally controlled, wide temperature range point-of-load switch-mode DC-DC regulator core...

  19. Animal experiments using mammals are essential to the study on the mechanisms of phenomena produced in the human body in the space environment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yamasaki, Masao; Shimizu, Tsuyoshi

    2004-01-01

    .... In particular, the numerous mammals have been used for the medical researches. Similarly, to investigate the phenomena in the human body that occur in the space environment, the various mammals have been used for the medical researches in space...

  20. Assessment of the effects of space debris and meteoroids environment on the space station solar array assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahra, Henry K.

    1988-01-01

    The methodology used to assess the probability of no impact of space debris and meteoroids on a spacecraft structure is applied to the Space Station solar array assembly. Starting with the space debris and meteoroids flux models, the projected surface area of the solar cell string circuit of the solar array panel and the mast longeron, and the design lifetime, the possibility of no impact on the solar array mast and solar cell string circuits was determined as a function of particle size. The probability of no impact on the cell string circuits was used to derive the probability of no open circuit panel. The probability of meeting a certain power requirement at the end of the design lifetime was then calculated as a function of impacting particle size. Coupled with a penetration and damage models/correlations which relate the particle size to the penetration depth and damage, the results of this analysis can be used to determine the probability of meeting the lower power requirement given a degree of redundancy, and the probability of no impact on the solar array mast.

  1. 3D Room Visualization on Android Based Mobile Device (with Philips™’ Surround Sound Music Player

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durio Etgar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This project’s specifically purposed as a demo application, so anyone can get the experience of a surround audio room without having to physically involved to it, with a main idea of generating a 3D surround sound room scenery coupled with surround sound in a handier package, namely, a “Virtual Listen Room”. Virtual Listen Room set a foundation of an innovative visualization that later will be developed and released as one of way of portable advertisement. This application was built inside of Android environment. Android device had been chosen as the implementation target, since it leaves massive development spaces and mostly contains essential components needed on this project, including graphic processor unit (GPU.  Graphic manipulation can be done using an embedded programming interface called OpenGL ES, which is planted in all Android devices generally. Further, Android has a Accelerometer Sensor that is needed to be coupled with scene to produce a dynamic movement of the camera. Surround sound effect can be reached with a decoder from Phillips called MPEG Surround Sound Decoder. To sum the whole project, we got an application with sensor-dynamic 3D room visualization coupled with Philips’ Surround Sound Music Player. We can manipulate several room’s properties; Subwoofer location, Room light, and how many speakers inside it, the application itself works well despite facing several performance problems before, later to be solved. [Keywords : Android,Visualization,Open GL; ES; 3D; Surround Sensor

  2. Creating Welcoming Spaces for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Patients: An Evaluation of the Health Care Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClain, Zachary; Hawkins, Linda A; Yehia, Baligh R

    2016-01-01

    Health outcomes are affected by patient, provider, and environmental factors. Previous studies have evaluated patient-level factors; few focusing on environment. Safe clinical spaces are important for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) communities. This study evaluates current models of LGBT health care delivery, identifies strengths and weaknesses, and makes recommendations for LGBT spaces. Models are divided into LGBT-specific and LGBT-embedded care delivery. Advantages to both models exist, and they provide LGBT patients different options of healthcare. Yet certain commonalities must be met: a clean and confidential system. Once met, LGBT-competent environments and providers can advocate for appropriate care for LGBT communities, creating environments where they would want to seek care.

  3. Integration of a sensor based multiple robot environment for space applications: The Johnson Space Center Teleoperator Branch Robotics Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, James; Campbell, Perry; Ross, Mike; Price, Charles R.; Barron, Don

    1989-01-01

    An integrated operating environment was designed to incorporate three general purpose robots, sensors, and end effectors, including Force/Torque Sensors, Tactile Array sensors, Tactile force sensors, and Force-sensing grippers. The design and implementation of: (1) the teleoperation of a general purpose PUMA robot; (2) an integrated sensor hardware/software system; (3) the force-sensing gripper control; (4) the host computer system for dual Robotic Research arms; and (5) the Ethernet integration are described.

  4. Integration of the Radiation Belt Environment Model Into the Space Weather Modeling Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glocer, A.; Toth, G.; Fok, M.; Gombosi, T.; Liemohn, M.

    2009-01-01

    We have integrated the Fok radiation belt environment (RBE) model into the space weather modeling framework (SWMF). RBE is coupled to the global magnetohydrodynamics component (represented by the Block-Adaptive-Tree Solar-wind Roe-type Upwind Scheme, BATS-R-US, code) and the Ionosphere Electrodynamics component of the SWMF, following initial results using the Weimer empirical model for the ionospheric potential. The radiation belt (RB) model solves the convection-diffusion equation of the plasma in the energy range of 10 keV to a few MeV. In stand-alone mode RBE uses Tsyganenko's empirical models for the magnetic field, and Weimer's empirical model for the ionospheric potential. In the SWMF the BATS-R-US model provides the time dependent magnetic field by efficiently tracing the closed magnetic field-lines and passing the geometrical and field strength information to RBE at a regular cadence. The ionosphere electrodynamics component uses a two-dimensional vertical potential solver to provide new potential maps to the RBE model at regular intervals. We discuss the coupling algorithm and show some preliminary results with the coupled code. We run our newly coupled model for periods of steady solar wind conditions and compare our results to the RB model using an empirical magnetic field and potential model. We also simulate the RB for an active time period and find that there are substantial differences in the RB model results when changing either the magnetic field or the electric field, including the creation of an outer belt enhancement via rapid inward transport on the time scale of tens of minutes.

  5. Quantum harmonic Brownian motion in a general environment: A modified phase-space approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, L. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-06-23

    After extensive investigations over three decades, the linear-coupling model and its equivalents have become the standard microscopic models for quantum harmonic Brownian motion, in which a harmonically bound Brownian particle is coupled to a quantum dissipative heat bath of general type modeled by infinitely many harmonic oscillators. The dynamics of these models have been studied by many authors using the quantum Langevin equation, the path-integral approach, quasi-probability distribution functions (e.g., the Wigner function), etc. However, the quantum Langevin equation is only applicable to some special problems, while other approaches all involve complicated calculations due to the inevitable reduction (i.e., contraction) operation for ignoring/eliminating the degrees of freedom of the heat bath. In this dissertation, the author proposes an improved methodology via a modified phase-space approach which employs the characteristic function (the symplectic Fourier transform of the Wigner function) as the representative of the density operator. This representative is claimed to be the most natural one for performing the reduction, not only because of its simplicity but also because of its manifestation of geometric meaning. Accordingly, it is particularly convenient for studying the time evolution of the Brownian particle with an arbitrary initial state. The power of this characteristic function is illuminated through a detailed study of several physically interesting problems, including the environment-induced damping of quantum interference, the exact quantum Fokker-Planck equations, and the relaxation of non-factorizable initial states. All derivations and calculations axe shown to be much simplified in comparison with other approaches. In addition to dynamical problems, a novel derivation of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem which is valid for all quantum linear systems is presented.

  6. Genomic polymorphism and protein changes of soybean mutant induced by space environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, J.; Gao, Y.; Sun, Y.

    Soybean 194 4126 of excellent agricultural qualities such as high yield and rounder and wider leaf was selected in six generation after abroad recoverable satellite 15 days in 1996 from Soybean 72163 featured with long-leaf white-blossom grey-hair and infinitude-poding To explore the mechanisms of plant mutation induced by space environment we have experimented at genome and proteome level on Soybean 194 4126 and its control Soybean 72163 Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism AFLP was used to identify mutated sits and the result shows that 36 polymorphic bands varying between 100 and 900 bp in 2022 DNA bands varying between 100 and 1500 bp have been amplified out of 64 pairs of primer combinations between mutant Soybean 194 4126 and the control plant So the mutation degree of DNA is 3 56 The protein two-dimensional electrophoresis 2-DE and peptide mass fingerprint PMF assays were used to investigate the difference of proteins in fruits and leaves between Soybean 194 4126 and its control Results indicate that 62 protein dots specially appear in Soybean 72163 and 39 dots specially in the mutant Soybean 194 4126 by image analysis software PDQuest in the 2-DE maps of soybean seeds Using PMF assay and protein data-base searching to investigate two distinct protein dots we found that the protein specially expressed in the seed of mutant Soybean 194 4126 may be Dehydrin and the other protein specially expressed in the seed of the control Soybean 72163 may be maturation-associated protein MAT1 Because Dehydrin and MAT1 are

  7. The Rocks From Space outreach initiative and The Space Safari: the development of virtual learning environments for planetary science outreach in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, V. K.; Greenwood, R. C.; Bridges, J.; Watson, J.; Brooks, V.

    The Rocks From Space outreach initiative and The Space Safari: the development of virtual learning environments for planetary science outreach in the UK. V.K. Pearson (1), R.C. Greenwood (1), J. Bridges (1), J. Watson (2) and V. Brooks (2) (1) Plantetary and Space Sciences Research Institute (PSSRI), The Open University, Milton Keynes, MK7 6AA. (2) Stockton-on-Tees City Learning Centre, Marsh House Avenue, Billingham, TS23 3QJ. (v.k.pearson@open.ac.uk Fax: +44 (0) 858022 Phone: +44 (0) 1908652814 The Rocks From Space (RFS) project is a PPARC and Open University supported planetary science outreach initiative. It capitalises on the successes of Open University involvement in recent space missions such as Genesis and Stardust which have brought planetary science to the forefront of public attention.Our traditional methods of planetary science outreach have focussed on activities such as informal school visits and public presentations. However, these traditional methods are often limited to a local area to fit within time and budget constraints and therefore RFS looks to new technologies to reach geographically dispersed audiences. In collaboration with Stockton-on-Tees City Learning Centre, we have conducted a pilot study into the use of Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs) for planetary science outreach. The pilot study was undertaken under the guise of a "Space Safari" in which pupils dispersed across the Teesside region of the UK could collaboratively explore the Solar System. Over 300 students took part in the pilot from 11 primary schools (ages 6-10). Resources for their exploration were provided by Open University scientists in Milton Keynes and hosted on the VLE. Students were encouraged to post their findings, ideas and questions via wikis and a VLE forum. This combination of contributions from students, teachers and scientists encouraged a collaborative learning environment. These asynchronous activities were complemented by synchronous virtual classroom

  8. Performances of Kevlar and Polyethylene as radiation shielding on-board the International Space Station in high latitude radiation environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narici, Livio; Casolino, Marco; Di Fino, Luca; Larosa, Marianna; Picozza, Piergiorgio; Rizzo, Alessandro; Zaconte, Veronica

    2017-05-10

    Passive radiation shielding is a mandatory element in the design of an integrated solution to mitigate the effects of radiation during long deep space voyages for human exploration. Understanding and exploiting the characteristics of materials suitable for radiation shielding in space flights is, therefore, of primary importance. We present here the results of the first space-test on Kevlar and Polyethylene radiation shielding capabilities including direct measurements of the background baseline (no shield). Measurements are performed on-board of the International Space Station (Columbus modulus) during the ALTEA-shield ESA sponsored program. For the first time the shielding capability of such materials has been tested in a radiation environment similar to the deep-space one, thanks to the feature of the ALTEA system, which allows to select only high latitude orbital tracts of the International Space Station. Polyethylene is widely used for radiation shielding in space and therefore it is an excellent benchmark material to be used in comparative investigations. In this work we show that Kevlar has radiation shielding performances comparable to the Polyethylene ones, reaching a dose rate reduction of 32 ± 2% and a dose equivalent rate reduction of 55 ± 4% (for a shield of 10 g/cm(2)).

  9. A Nanotechnology Approach to Lightweight Multifunctional Polyethylene Composite Materials for Use Against the Space Environment Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Polyethylene-based composite materials are under consideration as multifunctional structural materials, with the expectation that they can provide radiation...

  10. Real Time On-line Space Research Laboratory Environment Monitoring with Off-line Trend and Prediction Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jules, Kenol; Lin, Paul P.

    2006-01-01

    One of the responsibilities of the NASA Glenn Principal Investigator Microgravity Services is to support NASA sponsored investigators in the area of reduced-gravity acceleration data analysis, interpretation and the monitoring of the reduced-gravity environment on-board various carriers. With the International Space Station currently operational, a significant amount of acceleration data is being down-linked and processed on ground for both the space station onboard environment characterization (and verification) and scientific experiments. Therefore, to help principal investigator teams monitor the acceleration level on-board the International Space Station to avoid undesirable impact on their experiment, when possible, the NASA Glenn Principal Investigator Microgravity Services developed an artificial intelligence monitoring system, which detects in near real time any change in the environment susceptible to affect onboard experiments. The main objective of the monitoring system is to help research teams identify the vibratory disturbances that are active at any instant of time onboard the International Space Station that might impact the environment in which their experiment is being conducted. The monitoring system allows any space research scientist, at any location and at any time, to see the current acceleration level on-board the Space Station via the World Wide Web. From the NASA Glenn s Exploration Systems Division web site, research scientists can see in near real time the active disturbances, such as pumps, fans, compressor, crew exercise, re-boost, extra-vehicular activity, etc., and decide whether or not to continue operating or stopping (or making note of such activity for later correlation with science results) their experiments based on the g-level associated with that specific event. A dynamic graphical display accessible via the World Wide Web shows the status of all the vibratory disturbance activities with their degree of confidence as well as

  11. Visual Surround Suppression in Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibber, Marc S.; Anderson, Elaine J.; Bobin, Tracy; Antonova, Elena; Seabright, Alice; Wright, Bernice; Carlin, Patricia; Shergill, Sukhwinder S.; Dakin, Steven C.

    2013-01-01

    Compared to unaffected observers patients with schizophrenia (SZ) show characteristic differences in visual perception, including a reduced susceptibility to the influence of context on judgments of contrast – a manifestation of weaker surround suppression (SS). To examine the generality of this phenomenon we measured the ability of 24 individuals with SZ to judge the luminance, contrast, orientation, and size of targets embedded in contextual surrounds that would typically influence the target’s appearance. Individuals with SZ demonstrated weaker SS compared to matched controls for stimuli defined by contrast or size, but not for those defined by luminance or orientation. As perceived luminance is thought to be regulated at the earliest stages of visual processing our findings are consistent with a suppression deficit that is predominantly cortical in origin. In addition, we propose that preserved orientation SS in SZ may reflect the sparing of broadly tuned mechanisms of suppression. We attempt to reconcile these data with findings from previous studies. PMID:23450069

  12. An Assessment of the Space Radiation Environment in a Near Equatorial Low Earth Orbit Based on Razaksat-1 Satellite

    CERN Document Server

    Suparta, Wayan

    2015-01-01

    The Malaysian satellite RazakSAT-1 was designed to operate in a near-equatorial orbit (NEqO) and low earth orbit (LEO). However, after one year of operation in 2010, communication to the satellite was lost. This study attempted to identify whether space radiation sources could have caused the communication loss by comparing RazakSAT-1 with two functional satellites. Data on galactic cosmic rays (GCR), trapped protons, trapped electrons, and solar energetic particles (SEPs) obtained from Space Environment Information System (SPENVIS) was analyzed.

  13. An Environment for Analyzing Space Optimizations in Call-by-Need Functional Languages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Dallmeyer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an implementation of an interpreter LRPi for the call-by-need calculus LRP, based on a variant of Sestoft's abstract machine Mark 1, extended with an eager garbage collector. It is used as a tool for exact space usage analyses as a support for our investigations into space improvements of call-by-need calculi.

  14. Making Space: A Gay-Straight Alliance's Fight to Build Inclusive Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin, Ross

    2013-01-01

    Background: Education researchers are paying increasing attention to student activism and to the social production of school spaces. Few studies, however, have brought these two concerns together to examine how student activists work to rebuild school spaces in line with their political commitments. In the present study, I address this gap at the…

  15. Exploration and Analysis of Space Molding by Plants in Landscape Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁文欣

    2016-01-01

    The plant population can not only effectively divide the space, but can also set off and decorate the space. The great plantation of plants should be systematic to express and emphasize the site layout, which plays an irreplaceable role in landscape design.

  16. Virtual Learning Environments through a Different Lens: Potentials of the Intermediate Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Andrew G.; Zentgraf, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to explore the concept of Winnicott's intermediate space as a method of understanding the role of learning spaces in the development of technology-enhanced educational organisations. Design/methodology/approach: The approach takes the form of a comparative analysis of interaction within face-to-face and online learning…

  17. Developing Near Real-time Data-assimilative Models and Tools for the Space Environment Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The IDA4D and AMIE data assimilation methods are currently of limited use for real-time space weather applications because either they don't run in real-time (IDA4D)...

  18. A study of System Interface Sets (SIS) for the host, target and integration environments of the Space Station Program (SSP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckay, Charles; Auty, David; Rogers, Kathy

    1987-01-01

    System interface sets (SIS) for large, complex, non-stop, distributed systems are examined. The SIS of the Space Station Program (SSP) was selected as the focus of this study because an appropriate virtual interface specification of the SIS is believed to have the most potential to free the project from four life cycle tyrannies which are rooted in a dependance on either a proprietary or particular instance of: operating systems, data management systems, communications systems, and instruction set architectures. The static perspective of the common Ada programming support environment interface set (CAIS) and the portable common execution environment (PCEE) activities are discussed. Also, the dynamic perspective of the PCEE is addressed.

  19. CONTROLLING VIRTUAL CLOUDS AND MAKING IT RAIN PARTICLE SYSTEMS IN REAL SPACES USING SITUATED AUGMENTED SIMULATION AND PORTABLE VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Hedley

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The research described in this paper reports on the design, rationale, development and implementation of a set of new geospatial interfaces that combine multi-touch interaction, portable virtual environments, 'geosimulation gaming', and mobile augmented reality. The result is a set of new ways for us to combine the capabilities of geospatial virtual environments, augmented realitiy and geosimulation. These new hybrid interfaces deliver new geospatial information experiences – new ways of connecting spatial data, simulations, and abstract concepts to real spaces. Their potential to enhance environmental perception and learning must be explored.

  20. The Study of Indicatrices of Space Object Coatings in a Controlled Laboratory Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshkin, N.; Burlak, N.; Petrov, M.; Strakhova, S.

    The indicatrices of light scattering by radiation balance coatings used on space objects (SO) were determined in the laboratory experiment in a controlled condition. The laboratory device for the physical simulation of photometric observations of space objects in orbit, which was used in this case to study optical properties of coating samples, is described. The features of light reflection off plane coating samples, including multi-layer insulation (MLI) blankets, metal surfaces coated with several layers of enamel EP-140, special polyacrylate enamel AK-512 and matte finish Tp-CO-2, were determined. The indicated coatings are compound reflectors which exhibit both diffuse and specular reflections. The data obtained are to be used in the development of computer optical-geometric models of space objects or their fragments (space debris) to interpret the photometry results for real space objects.

  1. Preserving the Environment of Outer Space - Legal, Regulatory and Institutional Aspects of Active Orbital Debris Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankata Nyampong, Y. O.

    2012-01-01

    In view of the massive quantities of space debris already deposited in outer space, any effort aimed at guaranteeing the sustainability of mankind's access to outer space and the continued safety of space operations must not be limited exclusively to mitigating the creation of new debris, but must also focus on the active removal of existing pieces of debris from space (remediation) as a matter of necessity. Presently, technologies that will enable active debris removal (ADR) are only just emerging. As the technology develops, however, several legal, regulatory and institutional issues that may hinder the conduct of ADR activities must also be addressed. This paper highlights and explores some of the foregoing issues in an effort to draw international attention to these matters and ultimately to pave the way for the smooth conduct of ADR activities once the technology matures.

  2. Maintenance and resupply in the unpressurized environment - Design and operational concepts for the Space Station Freedom logistics carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creps, Gary M.; Ernst, Steven A.; Crawford, Robert D.

    1991-01-01

    A significant percentage of the maintenance tasks for Space Station Freedom are anticipated to be conducted in the unpressurized environment. The maintenance concept for this environment essentially involves the removal and replacement of relatively large orbital replacement units (ORUs). Major constraints will be the on-orbit availability of both crew time and spare ORUs. The challenge presented to the program will be the performance of unpressurized cargo resupply that provides maximum cargo-carrying capability (mass and volume) and flexibility (type and quantity), while minimizing the impact to maintenance task times. The design of the logistics carriers is a critical component for successful resupply and maintenance operations, and to the success of Space Station Freedom.

  3. Improving measurement of forest light environments with hemispherical photography: the use of non-RGB color spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prohaska, N.; Wu, J.; Stark, S. C.; Albert, L.; Smith, M.; Taylor, T.; Wiedemann, K.; da Silva, R.; Saleska, S. R.

    2013-12-01

    Light environments are fundamental determinants of leaf growth and function within forest canopies, and improved methods to quickly and easily measure light micro-environments can contribute to our ability to understand how light drives ecosystem processes. Upward facing hemispherical photographs are a common tool for quantifying the light environment of forest canopies, by classifying the photo (image segmentation) into ';sky' and ';not-sky' regions. However, accurate image segmentation of hemispherical photos into ';sky' and ';not sky' is difficult except under uniform diffuse light, which occurs only rarely (e.g. at dawn, dusk, or with uniform cloud conditions). This constraint on image acquisition greatly reduces the ability to obtain data in the field. Here, we develop and assess a new approach to using hemispherical image data acquired under non-ideal conditions in a broadleaf evergreen tropical forest in the Amazon of Brazil. Unlike one common approach that uses blue channel data only, we use information from all three channels by mathematically transforming images into other 3-channel color spaces. We compared results of image segmentation into sky and not-sky canopy regions across 14 non-RGB color spaces as well as the original RGB color space, as derived from 15 digital photos acquired at various positions within the forest canopy. Images were selected for variation in presence and absence of bright sun, overexposed leaves, specular highlights, blue-sky, and not-blue sky. We applied two widely used techniques (interactive thresholding and 2-dimensional maximum entropy) to classify the single-channel image from each color space into sky and not-sky regions for all photos. We assessed classification accuracy with confusion matrices that compared the automatic classifications to a user-defined ';true' classification. We found that the 14 non-RGB color spaces included four independent channels that were consistently superior to RGB channels in their

  4. Web-based description of the space radiation environment using the Bethe-Bloch model

    CERN Document Server

    Cazzola, Emanuele; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Space weather is a rapidly growing area not only in scientific and engineering applications but also in physics education and in the interest of the public. We focus especially on space radiation and its impact on space exploration. The topic is highly interdisciplinary bringing together fundamental concepts of nuclear physics with aspects of radiation protection and space science. We present a new approach to presenting the topic by developing a web-based tool that combines some of the fundamental concepts from these two fields in a single tool that can be developed in the context of advanced secondary or undergraduate university education. We present DREADCode, an outreach or teaching tool to asses rapidly the current conditions of the radiation field in space. DREADCode uses the available data feeds from a number of ongoing space missions to produce a first order approximation of the dose an astronaut would receive during a mission of exploration in deep space. DREADcode is based on a intuitive GUI interfa...

  5. Reproduction in the space environment: Part II. Concerns for human reproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, R. T.; Santy, P. A.

    1990-01-01

    Long-duration space flight and eventual colonization of our solar system will require successful control of reproductive function and a thorough understanding of factors unique to space flight and their impact on gynecologic and obstetric parameters. Part II of this paper examines the specific environmental factors associated with space flight and the implications for human reproduction. Space environmental hazards discussed include radiation, alteration in atmospheric pressure and breathing gas partial pressures, prolonged toxicological exposure, and microgravity. The effects of countermeasures necessary to reduce cardiovascular deconditioning, calcium loss, muscle wasting, and neurovestibular problems are also considered. In addition, the impact of microgravity on male fertility and gamete quality is explored. Due to current constraints, human pregnancy is now contraindicated for space flight. However, a program to explore effective countermeasures to current constraints and develop the required health care delivery capability for extended-duration space flight is suggested. A program of Earth- and space-based research to provide further answers to reproductive questions is suggested.

  6. Effects of the Extraterrestrial Environment on Plants: Recommendations for Future Space Experiments for the MELiSSA Higher Plant Compartment

    OpenAIRE

    Silje A. Wolff; Coelho, Liz H.; Irene Karoliussen; Ann-Iren Kittang Jost

    2014-01-01

    Due to logistical challenges, long-term human space exploration missions require a life support system capable of regenerating all the essentials for survival. Higher plants can be utilized to provide a continuous supply of fresh food, atmosphere revitalization, and clean water for humans. Plants can adapt to extreme environments on Earth, and model plants have been shown to grow and develop through a full life cycle in microgravity. However, more knowledge about the long term effects of the ...

  7. Microtubules as key cytoskeletal elements in cellular transport and shape changes: their expected responses to space environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, G. W.; Conrad, A. H.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    Application of reference standard reagents to alternatively depolymerize or stabilize microtubules in a cell that undergoes very regular cytoskeleton-dependent shape changes provides a model system in which some expected components of the environments of spacecraft and space can be tested on Earth for their effects on the cytoskeleton. The fertilized eggs of Ilyanassa obsoleta undergo polar lobe formation by repeated, dramatic, constriction and relaxation of a microfilamentous band localized in the cortical cytoplasm and activated by microtubules.

  8. The formation of organic molecules in solar system environments: The Miller-Urey Experiment in Space preflight overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotler, J.; Ehrenfreund, P.; Martins, Z.; Ricco, A.; Blum, J.; Schraepler, R.; van Dongen, J.; Palmans, A.; Sephton, M.; Cleaves, H. J.

    2011-12-01

    The Miller-Urey Experiment in space (MUE) will investigate the formation of prebiotic organic compounds in the early solar system environment when it is sent to, and later retrieved from, the International Space Station in 2012. The dynamic environment of the solar nebula with the simultaneous presence of gas, particles, and energetic processes, including shock waves, electrical discharges, and radiation may trigger a rich organic chemistry leading to organic molecules. Two gas mixture compositions (CH4, NH3, H2 and N2, H2, CO) will be tested and subjected to continuous spark discharges for 48, 96, and 192 hours. Silicate particles will serve as surfaces on which thin water ice mantles can accrete. The experiment will be performed at low temperatures (-5 °C), slowing hydrolysis and improving chances of detection of initial products, intermediates and their abundances. Conducting the Miller-Urey experiment in the space environment (microgravity) allows us to simulate conditions that could have prevailed in the low gravity, energetic early solar nebula and provides insights into the chemical pathways that may occur as planetary systems form.

  9. Determining the solution space for a coordinated whole body movement in a noisy environment: application to the upstart in gymnastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiley, Michael J; Yeadon, Maurice R

    2014-08-01

    The upstart is a fundamental skill in gymnastics, requiring whole body coordination to transfer the gymnast from a swing beneath the bar to a support position above the bar. The aim of this study was to determine the solution space within which a gymnast could successfully perform an upstart. A previous study had shown that the underlying control strategy for the upstart could be accounted for by maximizing the likelihood of success while operating in a noisy environment. In the current study, data were collected on a senior gymnast and a computer simulation model of a gymnast and bar was used to determine the solution space for maximizing success while operating in a noisy environment. The effects of timing important actions, gymnast strength, and movement execution noise on the success of the upstart were then systematically determined. The solution space for the senior gymnast was relatively large. Decreasing strength and increasing movement execution noise reduced the size of the solution space. A weaker gymnast would have to use a different technique than that used by the senior gymnast to produce an acceptable success rate.

  10. Wireless System for Continuous Cardiopulmonary Monitoring in a Space Environment Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop the NJM Sense-It system based on small sensor tags, which include a cardiopulmonary MEMS sensor for measuring heartbeat and breath rates...

  11. Ultra-Lightweight High Efficiency Nanostructured Materials and Coatings for Deep Space Mission Environments Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NanoSonic has developed a nanostructured spray self-assembly manufacturing method that has resulted in ultra-lightweight (< 0.4g/cc) textile interconnects for...

  12. Extreme environment, rad hard, high performance, low power FPGA for space applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To enable NASA's next-generation missions, there is a critical need for a reconfigurable FPGA that can withstand the wide temperatures ranges and radiation of the...

  13. Microorganisms and biomolecules in space environment experiment ES 029 on spacelab-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horneck, G.; Bücker, H.; Reitz, G.; Requardt, H.; Dose, K.; Martens, K. D.; Bieger, A.; Mennigmann, H. D.; Weber, P.

    Bacterial spores are proper test organisms for studying problems of space biology and exobiology. During the Spacelab 1 mission, studies on the limiting factors for survival of Bacillus subtilis spores in free space have been performed. An exposure tray on the pallet of Spacelab 1 accomodated 316 samples of dry spores for treatment with space vacuum and/or the following selected wavelengths of solar UV: > 170 nm, 220 nm, 240nm, 260nm and 280 nm. After recovery, inactivation, mutation induction, reparability, and photochemical damages in DNA and protein have been studied. The results contribute to the understanding of the mechanisms of increased UV sensitivity of bacterial spores in vacuo and to a better assessment of the chance of survival of resistant forms in space and of interplanetary transfer of life.

  14. Space Environment Automated Alerts and Anomaly Analysis Assistant (SEA^5) for NASA Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — OBJECTIVESNASA has a strong program of exploration, technology development, and scientific research, in which satellite missions play a pivotal role.  The...

  15. Measuring the food environment: shelf space of fruits, vegetables, and snack foods in stores

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Farley, Thomas A; Rice, Janet; Bodor, J Nicholas; Cohen, Deborah A; Bluthenthal, Ricky N; Rose, Donald

    2009-01-01

    .... We conducted measurements of the length of shelf space used for fruits, vegetables, and snack foods items in 419 stores in 217 urban census tracts in southern Louisiana and in Los Angeles County...

  16. Wireless System for Continuous Cardiopulmonary Monitoring in a Space Environment Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop the NJM Sense-It system based on small sensor tags, which include a cardiopulmonary MEMS sensor for measuring heartbeat and breath rates...

  17. Geomagnetic observatories: monitoring the Earth’s magnetic and space weather environment

    OpenAIRE

    Thomson, Alan W.P.

    2014-01-01

    Geomagnetism research provides insight into the Earth’s properties and processes, from the core out to space. For this reason continuous geomagnetic field observations have been carried out in the UK for more than 170 years. Geomagnetism also has diverse applications, in navigation, maps, even smart phone apps, and in the monitoring and prediction of space weather impacts on technology. Modern instruments, together with digital sampling, real-time data processing and product dissemination, su...

  18. Role of co-occurring competition and facilitation in plant spacing hydrodynamics in water-limited environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trautz, Andrew C; Illangasekare, Tissa H; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Ignacio

    2017-08-29

    Plant performance (i.e., fecundity, growth, survival) depends on an individual's access to space and resources. At the community level, plant performance is reflected in observable vegetation patterning (i.e., spacing distance, density) often controlled by limiting resources. Resource availability is, in turn, strongly dependent on plant patterning mediated by competitive and facilitative plant-plant interactions. Co-occurring competition and facilitation has never been specifically investigated from a hydrodynamic perspective. To address this knowledge gap, and to overcome limitations of field studies, three intermediate-scale laboratory experiments were conducted using a climate-controlled wind tunnel-porous media test facility to simulate the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum. The spacing between two synthetic plants, a design consideration introduced by the authors in a recent publication, was varied between experiments; edaphic and mean atmospheric conditions were held constant. The strength of the above- and belowground plant-plant interactions changed with spacing distance, allowing the creation of a hydrodynamic conceptual model based on established ecological theories. Greatest soil water loss was observed for the experiment with the smallest spacing where competition dominated. Facilitation dominated at the intermediate spacing; little to no interactions were observed for the largest plant spacing. Results suggest that there exists an optimal spacing distance range that lowers plant environmental stress, thus improving plant performance through reduced atmospheric demand and conservation of available soil water. These findings may provide a foundation for improving our understanding of many climatological, ecohydrological, and hydrological problems pertaining to the hydrodynamics of water-limited environments where plant-plant interactions and community self-organization are important.

  19. Analysis of the Surrounding Environment Influence Caused by Rectangular Pipe Jacking Construction in Shanghai%上海地区某大口径矩形顶管施工周边环境影响监测分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙亚峰

    2015-01-01

    顶管技术作为非开挖的技术中的一种,可以在不用开挖地表土的情况下将管道铺设完毕,具有其他开挖方式无可比拟的优点,其应用也越来越广泛。但是在顶管施工中,不可避免地会破坏管道周围土体原有的平衡,造成地面的沉降,对周边环境造成影响。相对于圆形顶管,矩形顶管对周围土体的扰动更大,从而引起的地面变形也更大。本文以上海市徐汇区某地下通道矩形顶管工程为背景,通过现场监测数据分析,得出了一些有益的结论。%As one of Trench less Technology ,Pipe jacking has the unparalleled advantage of finishing pipeline laying without excavating surface soil ,and has become widely used .However ,pipe jacking will inevitably break the original soil balance around the pipe ,leading to land subsidence and affect buildings surrounded ,even endangers their safety .Rela-tive to circular pipe jacking ,rectangular pipe jacking construction may disturb the soil more heavily and cause more sur-face deformation.This thesis based on the rectangular pipe jacking construction project of Shanghai Xuhui District under -ground passage .Through on-site monitoring data analysis ,some useful conclusions are obtained .

  20. Survey report of JSUP Space Environment Utilization Research Committee in fiscal year 1992: Functional New Materials Session

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamakawa, Yoshihiro; Kinbara, Akira; Takimoto, Hiroshi; Takakura, Hideyuki; Hori, Takanobu; Shinohara, Joji; Ishikawa, Yoji; Sano, Kenichi; Okada, Shigenobu; Yamamoto, Yoshinobu

    1993-03-01

    Materials with super high purity can be obtained that benefit from the evolution in material refining and high-vacuum technologies for these past ten years. Taking advantages of microgravity environment, amorphous semiconductors made a remarkable improvement both in quality and quantity. Although there has not been an experiment utilizing the merit of high-vacuum environment, the environment is essential for film fabrication, from spattering to MBE (Molecular Beam Epitaxy) and plasma CVD (Chemical Vapor Deposition). It also has a potential function as a heat sink. Space is considered to be a favorable environment for many things including the followings that were investigated: semiconductor joining by atomic adhesion, fabrication of thin films of diamond and amorphous silicon alloys, CVD processes, production of super-minute grains, light element analysis by SIMS (Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry), and anti-proton generation by laser accelerators. A solar breeder allows for the amount of solar batteries transported from the earth to be minimized, cutting down transportation costs tremendously. This report reviews the potentials of material processing in space. Processing technologies of spacecraft construction materials, thin solid films, and fine alloys are reviewed. Light element analyzing method and antiproton storing technology for liquid metal MHD (Magnetohydrodynamic) power generator are also reviewed.

  1. Improvement of the equivalent sphere model for better estimates of skin or eye dose in space radiation environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Z.W., E-mail: linz@ecu.ed [Department of Physics, East Carolina University, C-209 Howell Science Complex, Greenville, NC 27858-4353 (United States)

    2011-04-15

    It is often useful to get a quick estimate of the dose or dose equivalent of an organ, such as blood-forming organs, the eye or the skin, in a radiation field. Sometimes an equivalent sphere is used to represent the organ for this purpose. For space radiation environments, recently it has been shown that the equivalent sphere model does not work for the eye or the skin in solar particle event environments. In this study, we improve the representation of the eye and the skin using a two-component equivalent sphere model. Motivated by the two-peak structure of the body organ shielding distribution for the eye and the skin, we use an equivalent sphere with two radius parameters, for example a partial spherical shell of a smaller thickness over a proper fraction of the full solid angle combined with a concentric partial spherical shell of a larger thickness over the rest of the full solid angle, to represent the eye or the skin. We find that using an equivalent sphere with two radius parameters instead of one drastically improves the accuracy of the estimates of dose and dose equivalent in space radiation environments. For example, in solar particle event environments the average error in the estimate of the skin dose equivalent using an equivalent sphere with two radius parameters is about 8%, while the average error of the conventional equivalent sphere model using one radius parameter is around 100%.

  2. 3D Room Visualization on Android Based Mobile Device (with Philips™’ Surround Sound Music Player

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durio Etgar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This project’s specifically purposed as a demo application, so anyone can get the experience of a surround audio room without having to physically involved to it, with a main idea of generating a 3D surround sound room scenery coupled with surround sound in a handier package, namely, a “Virtual Listen Room”. Virtual Listen Room set a foundation of an innovative visualization that later will be developed and released as one of way of portable advertisement. This application was built inside of Android environment. Android device had been chosen as the implementation target, since it leaves massive development spaces and mostly contains essential components needed on this project, including graphic processor unit (GPU. Graphic manipulation can be done using an embedded programming interface called OpenGL ES, which is planted in all Android devices generally. Further, Android has a Accelerometer Sensor that is needed to be coupled with scene to produce a dynamic movement of the camera. Surround sound effect can be reached with a decoder from Phillips called MPEG Surround Sound Decoder. To sum the whole project, we got an application with sensor-dynamic 3D room visualization coupled with Philips’ Surround Sound Music Player. We can manipulate several room’s properties; Subwoofer location, Room light, and how many speakers inside it, the application itself works well despite facing several performance problems before, later to be solved.

  3. Modeling Electrostatic Fields Generated by Internal Charging of Materials in Space Radiation Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minow, Joseph I.

    2011-01-01

    Internal charging is a risk to spacecraft in energetic electron environments. DICTAT, NU MIT computational codes are the most widely used engineering tools for evaluating internal charging of insulator materials exposed to these environments. Engineering tools are designed for rapid evaluation of ESD threats, but there is a need for more physics based models for investigating the science of materials interactions with energetic electron environments. Current tools are limited by the physics included in the models and ease of user implementation .... additional development work is needed to improve models.

  4. Web-based description of the space radiation environment using the Bethe-Bloch model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzola, Emanuele; Calders, Stijn; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Space weather is a rapidly growing area of research not only in scientific and engineering applications but also in physics education and in the interest of the public. We focus especially on space radiation and its impact on space exploration. The topic is highly interdisciplinary, bringing together fundamental concepts of nuclear physics with aspects of radiation protection and space science. We give a new approach to presenting the topic by developing a web-based application that combines some of the fundamental concepts from these two fields into a single tool that can be used in the context of advanced secondary or undergraduate university education. We present DREADCode, an outreach or teaching tool to rapidly assess the current conditions of the radiation field in space. DREADCode uses the available data feeds from a number of ongoing space missions (ACE, GOES-13, GOES-15) to produce a first order approximation of the radiation dose an astronaut would receive during a mission of exploration in deep space (i.e. far from the Earth’s shielding magnetic field and from the radiation belts). DREADCode is based on an easy-to-use GUI interface available online from the European Space Weather Portal (www.spaceweather.eu/dreadcode). The core of the radiation transport computation to produce the radiation dose from the observed fluence of radiation observed by the spacecraft fleet considered is based on a relatively simple approximation: the Bethe-Bloch equation. DREADCode also assumes a simplified geometry and material configuration for the shields used to compute the dose. The approach is approximate and sacrifices some important physics on the altar of rapid execution time, which allows a real-time operation scenario. There is no intention here to produce an operational tool for use in space science and engineering. Rather, we present an educational tool at undergraduate level that uses modern web-based and programming methods to learn some of the most important

  5. Numerical simulation and analysis of surrounding environment deformation influenced by excavation of foundation pits under complex conditions%复杂条件下基坑开挖对周边环境变形影响的数值模拟分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯晓腊; 熊宗海; 莫云; 庞建成

    2014-01-01

    For the deep foundation pit of Laopupian Commercial and Residential Building, the whole process of its excavation is simulated and analyzed by use of the finite element software PLAXIS. The situations of stress and deformation of supporting structures of foundation pit and surrounding environment under complex conditions are studied. The numerical analysis and monitoring results show that the deformations of supporting structure system of the foundation pit and the surrounding environment can meet the requirements of the specifications for deformation control. It proves that PLAXIS HS model can effectively simulate and analyze the deformation of the surrounding environment influenced by excavation of the foundation pit, and the semi-inverse method used in this project can effectively control the deformation of the surrounding environment influenced by excavation of the foundation pit under complex conditions.%以武汉老铺片商业及住宅项目深基坑工程为背景,采用有限元软件 PLAXIS 对其进行了基坑开挖全过程的数值模拟分析,结合模拟计算结果分析了复杂条件下基坑支护结构体系及周边环境的受力、变形情况。数值模拟计算及实测结果表明:支护结构、周边建(构)筑物及土体的变形均满足规范关于变形控制的要求,证明采用PlAXIS HS模型能够较好的完成复杂条件下基坑开挖对周边环境变形影响的数值模拟分析,同时也证明本工程采用的支护及半逆作施工方法,能够对复杂条件下基坑开挖对周边环境变形的影响起到有效控制作用。

  6. Polymerisation of composite materials in space environment for development of a Moon base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondyurina, I.; Kondyurin, A.; Lauke, B.; Figiel, Ł.; Vogel, R.; Reuter, U.

    Deployment of light construction on the Moon surface after landing is a real way to create a Moon base. The construction has to be soft at deployment and hard at exploitation. A number of methods for solidification of deployed constructions in space was proposed, but the best way is a chemical reaction which leads to formation of the hard frame of space construction. The technology of large-size Moon module for industrial and scientific applications is developed by the way of the polymerisation process in composite material with liquid polymer matrix. Experiments with chemical reactions of polymerisation in composite materials under high vacuum, ion beam and plasma discharge have shown a possibility to use the liquid polymer matrix of composite materials under space conditions without hermetic coating. Epoxy resins with thermal initiation system of polymerisation were studied. The effects of initiation of the polymerisation reaction under simulated space factors were observed. Structure and mechanical properties of cured composite under simulated space conditions were analysed and compared with composite cured by usual ground technology. The proposed frame technology can be used for energetic, electronic and other industry building on the Moon.

  7. Walkability and walking for transport: characterizing the built environment using space syntax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koohsari, Mohammad Javad; Owen, Neville; Cerin, Ester; Giles-Corti, Billie; Sugiyama, Takemi

    2016-11-24

    Neighborhood walkability has been shown to be associated with walking behavior. However, the availability of geographical data necessary to construct it remains a limitation. Building on the concept of space syntax, we propose an alternative walkability index, space syntax walkability (SSW). This study examined associations of the full walkability index and SSW with walking for transport (WT). Data were collected in 2003-2004 from 2544 adults living in 154 Census Collection Districts (CCD) in Adelaide, Australia. Participants reported past week WT frequency. Full walkability (consisting of net residential density, intersection density, land use mix, and net retail area ratio) and SSW (consisting of gross population density and a space syntax measure of street integration) were calculated for each CCD using geographic information systems and space syntax software. Generalized linear models with negative binomial variance and logarithmic link functions were employed to examine the associations of each walkability index with WT frequency, adjusting for socio-demographic variables. Two walkability indices were closely correlated (ρ = 0.76, p space syntax provide a novel approach to further understanding how urban design influences walking behaviors.

  8. Human–environment interactions in urban green spaces — A systematic review of contemporary issues and prospects for future research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabisch, Nadja, E-mail: nadja.kabisch@geo.hu-berlin.de [Institute of Geography, Humboldt-University Berlin, Unter den Linden 6, 10099 Berlin (Germany); Department of Urban and Environmental Sociology, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research — UFZ, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Qureshi, Salman [Institute of Geography, Humboldt-University Berlin, Unter den Linden 6, 10099 Berlin (Germany); School of Architecture, Birmingham Institute of Art and Design, Birmingham City University, The Parkside Building, 5 Cardigan Street, Birmingham B4 7BD (United Kingdom); Haase, Dagmar [Institute of Geography, Humboldt-University Berlin, Unter den Linden 6, 10099 Berlin (Germany); Department of Computational Landscape Ecology, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research — UFZ, 04318 Leipzig (Germany)

    2015-01-15

    Scientific papers on landscape planning underline the importance of maintaining and developing green spaces because of their multiple environmental and social benefits for city residents. However, a general understanding of contemporary human–environment interaction issues in urban green space is still incomplete and lacks orientation for urban planners. This review examines 219 publications to (1) provide an overview of the current state of research on the relationship between humans and urban green space, (2) group the different research approaches by identifying the main research areas, methods, and target groups, and (3) highlight important future prospects in urban green space research. - Highlights: • Reviewed literature on urban green pins down a dearth of comparative studies. • Case studies in Africa and Russia are marginalized – the Europe and US dominate. • Questionnaires are used as major tool followed by GIS and quantitative approaches. • Developing countries should contribute in building an urban green space agenda. • Interdisciplinary, adaptable and pluralistic approaches can satiate a knowledge gap.

  9. Enhancing engagement in multimodality environments by sound movement in a virtual space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Götzen, Amalia De

    2004-01-01

    . Medea, Adriano Guarnieri's "video opera", is an innovative work stemming from research in multimedia that demonstrates the importance and amount of research dedicated to sound movement in space. Medea is part of the Multi-sensory Expressive Gesture Application project (http://www.megaproject.org). Among......Since 1959, when electronic music was established as a new way of music composition, the rules of traditional music performance and enjoyment have changed to include space, motion, and gesture as musical parameters. For example, musicians are often located somewhere other than the stage - sometimes...... even in the audience - and where the music will be performed often influences compositional thinking. Loudspeakers move sound through the space at varying speeds (based on other musical parameters). In addition, the development of live electronics - that is, computers applied to real-time processing...

  10. Alteration of Lunar Rock Surfaces through Interaction with the Space Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frushour, A. M.; Noble, S. K; Christoffersen, R.; Keller, L P.

    2014-01-01

    Space weathering occurs on all ex-posed surfaces of lunar rocks, as well as on the surfaces of smaller grains in the lunar regolith. Space weather-ing alters these exposed surfaces primarily through the action of solar wind ions and micrometeorite impact processes. On lunar rocks specifically, the alteration products produced by space weathering form surface coatings known as patina. Patinas can have spectral reflectance properties different than the underlying rock. An understanding of patina composition and thickness is therefore important for interpreting re-motely sensed data from airless solar system bodies. The purpose of this study is to try to understand the physical and chemical properties of patina by expanding the number of patinas known and characterized in the lunar rock sample collection.

  11. Study of energetic particle dynamics in Harbin Dipole eXperiment (HDX) on Space Plasma Environment Research Facility (SPERF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhibin, W.; Xiao, Q.; Wang, X.; Xiao, C.; Zheng, J.; E, P.; Ji, H.; Ding, W.; Lu, Q.; Ren, Y.; Mao, A.

    2015-12-01

    Zhibin Wang1, Qingmei Xiao1, Xiaogang Wang1, Chijie Xiao2, Jinxing Zheng3, Peng E1, Hantao Ji1,5, Weixing Ding4, Quaming Lu6, Y. Ren1,5, Aohua Mao11 Laboratory for Space Environment and Physical Sciences, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, China 150001 2 State Key Lab of Nuclear Physics & Technology, and School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing, China 100871 3ASIPP, Hefei, China, 230031 4University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, 90095 5Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08543 6University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, China, 230026 A new terrella device for laboratory studies of space physics relevant to the inner magnetospheric plasmas, Harbin Dipole eXperiment (HDX), is scheduled to be built at Harbin Institute of Technology (HIT), China. HDX is one of two essential parts of Space Plasma Environment Research Facility (SPERF), which is a major national research facility for space physics studies. HDX is designed to provide a laboratory experimental platform to reproduce the earth's magnetospheric structure for investigations on the mechanism of acceleration/loss and wave-particle interaction of energetic particles in radiation belt, and on the influence of magnetic storms on the inner magnetosphere. It can be operated together with Harbin Reconnection eXperiment (HRX), which is another part of SPERF, to study the fundamental processes during interactions between solar wind and Earth's magnetosphere. In this presentation, the scientific goals and experimental plans for HDX, together with the means applied to generate the plasma with desired parameters, including multiple plasma sources and different kinds of coils with specific functions, as well as advanced diagnostics designed to be equipped to the facility for multi-functions, are reviewed. Three typical scenarios of HDX with operations of various coils and plasma sources to study specific physical processes in space plasmas will also be

  12. IoT-based user-driven service modeling environment for a smart space management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hoan-Suk; Rhee, Woo-Seop

    2014-11-20

    The existing Internet environment has been extended to the Internet of Things (IoT) as an emerging new paradigm. The IoT connects various physical entities. These entities have communication capability and deploy the observed information to various service areas such as building management, energy-saving systems, surveillance services, and smart homes. These services are designed and developed by professional service providers. Moreover, users' needs have become more complicated and personalized with the spread of user-participation services such as social media and blogging. Therefore, some active users want to create their own services to satisfy their needs, but the existing IoT service-creation environment is difficult for the non-technical user because it requires a programming capability to create a service. To solve this problem, we propose the IoT-based user-driven service modeling environment to provide an easy way to create IoT services. Also, the proposed environment deploys the defined service to another user. Through the personalization and customization of the defined service, the value and dissemination of the service is increased. This environment also provides the ontology-based context-information processing that produces and describes the context information for the IoT-based user-driven service.

  13. Performance of super-orthogonal space-time trellis code in a multipath environment

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sokoya, OA

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the performance of Super-Orthogonal Space-time Trellis Code (SOSTTC) designed primarily for non-frequency selective (i.e. flat) fading channel but now applied to a frequency selective fading channel. A new decoding trellis...

  14. NASA University Research Centers Technical Advances in Education, Aeronautics, Space, Autonomy, Earth and Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamshidi, M. (Editor); Lumia, R. (Editor); Tunstel, E., Jr. (Editor); White, B. (Editor); Malone, J. (Editor); Sakimoto, P. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    This first volume of the Autonomous Control Engineering (ACE) Center Press Series on NASA University Research Center's (URC's) Advanced Technologies on Space Exploration and National Service constitute a report on the research papers and presentations delivered by NASA Installations and industry and Report of the NASA's fourteen URC's held at the First National Conference in Albuquerque, New Mexico from February 16-19, 1997.

  15. Cohesion, Sharing and Integration? Migrant Languages and Cultural Spaces in Northern Ireland's Urban Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Philip

    2012-01-01

    This article investigates the position of migrant languages in Northern Ireland's two largest cities, Belfast and Derry/Londonderry. The paper comments on how deliberations around public policy objectives in a post-conflict era have led to a broader understanding of cultural identity and consequently to an "opening-up" of urban spaces for speakers…

  16. Effects of space environment on biological characters of tissue cultured rose seedlings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Huai; LIU Min; LU Jinying; PAN Yi; ZHANG Chunhua

    2005-01-01

    Tissue cultured rose seedlings were carried into space by SHENZHOU-4 spacecraft and then used as the experimental material to investigate effects of the space environmental conditions on morphology, cytology, physiology and molecular biology of the seedlings. After loaded on the space flight, the plant's height, number of leaves, and fresh weight per seedling were all increased significantly compared to the ground controls. The content of chlorophyll was basically unchanged. In some cells, the ultrastructural changes involved twist, contraction and deformation of cell wall, curvature and loose arrangement of lamellae of some chloroplasts, and a significant increase in number of starch grains per chloroplast. In addition, the number of mitochondria increased, but some mitochondrial outer membrane broke, and some mitochondrial cristae disappeared. The activities of the defense enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase, peroxidase and catalyse, in rose leaves increased and the content of malondialdehyde decreased. In the RAPD analysis with 40 10-mer primers, 36 primers generated 148 DNA bands from both of the space flight treated seedlings and the ground controls, and five primers amplified polymorphic products. The rate of DNA variation was 6.34 %.

  17. Does Digitized Virtual Space Allow for Effective Learning in Creating Environments for Theatrical Productions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magruder, Lewis

    2016-01-01

    Learning how to transform an empty space into one alive with dramatic possibilities is one of the challenges facing students in several disciplines--for example, graphic design, filmmaking, gaming, architecture, interior design, visual arts, and designing and directing for the theatre. The author, a professor of directing for the theatre,…

  18. Virtual Learning Spaces in the Web: An Agent-Based Architecture of Personalized Collaborative Learning Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunez Esquer, Gustavo; Sheremetov, Leonid

    This paper reports on the results and future research work within the paradigm of Configurable Collaborative Distance Learning, called Espacios Virtuales de Apredizaje (EVA). The paper focuses on: (1) description of the main concepts, including virtual learning spaces for knowledge, collaboration, consulting, and experimentation, a…

  19. Does Digitized Virtual Space Allow for Effective Learning in Creating Environments for Theatrical Productions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magruder, Lewis

    2016-01-01

    Learning how to transform an empty space into one alive with dramatic possibilities is one of the challenges facing students in several disciplines--for example, graphic design, filmmaking, gaming, architecture, interior design, visual arts, and designing and directing for the theatre. The author, a professor of directing for the theatre,…

  20. Problem-Based Learning: Formation of Material Environment Design in Urban Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Jakaitis

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aiming to achieve environmental, economic and social sustainability, is important to explore the interaction between integrated management of policy issues concerning urban architecture and the development of the design for material environment. Innovative teaching methods are important for achieving coexistence and harmony. The problem-based learning (PBL method is analysed to understand its peculiarities and applications. The goal is to reveal practical applications of problem-based learning using a variety of concepts for developing urban structures on the macro level and creating a material environment design on the local level. Based on the attitude of the academic community, the problem-based learning method can be an effective and meaningful tool, which would help us develop urban spatial structures and material environment design.