WorldWideScience

Sample records for surrounding gas atmosphere

  1. Evaluation of Changes and Stability on the Surroundings Adjacent to Exhaust-Gas Emitting Port

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AO Yong'an; Marc A. Rosen; WANG Yueren

    2011-01-01

    The exergy and entropy changes of the surroundings adjacent to exhaust-gas emitting ports, and the probable effects on the atmosphere, are investigated and the current stable state changing point of atmosphere is determined and compared in the paper. The potential of doing work is described and the effects of the amount of exhaust gas on the atmosphere are studied through exergy and entropy change functions. The exergy change function accounts for the flow direction of the exhaust gas without local wind. It appears that exergy can be used as a state function to describe the change, the stability and the order of a system.

  2. VARIABILITY OF ATMOSPHERIC CO2 OVER INDIA AND SURROUNDING OCEANS AND CONTROL BY SURFACE FLUXES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. K. Nayak

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, seasonal and inter-annual variability of atmospheric CO2 concentration over India and surrounding oceans during 2002–2010 derived from Atmospheric InfrarRed Sounder observation and their relation with the natural flux exchanges over terrestrial Indian and surrounding oceans were analyzed. The natural fluxes over the terrestrial Indian in the form of net primary productivity (NPP were simulated based on a terrestrial biosphere model governed by time varying climate parameters (solar radiation, air temperature, precipitation etc and satellite greenness index together with the land use land cover and soil attribute maps. The flux exchanges over the oceans around India (Tropical Indian Ocean: TIO were calculated based on a empirical model of CO2 gas dissolution in the oceanic water governed by time varying upper ocean parameters such as gradient of partial pressure of CO2 between ocean and atmosphere, winds, sea surface temperature and salinity. Comparison between the variability of atmospheric CO2 anomaly with the anomaly of surface fluxes over India and surrounding oceans suggests that biosphere uptake over India and oceanic uptake over the south Indian Ocean could play positive role on the control of seasonal variability of atmospheric carbon dioxide growth rate. On inter-annual scale, flux exchanges over the tropical north Indian Ocean could play positive role on the control of atmospheric carbon dioxide growth rate.

  3. Rotation of the Warm Molecular Gas Surrounding Ultracompact HII Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Klaassen, P D; Keto, E R; Zhang, Q

    2009-01-01

    We present molecular line and 1.4 mm continuum observations towards five massive star forming regions at arcsecond resolution using the Submillimeter Array (SMA). We find that the warm molecular gas surrounding each HII region (as traced by SO_2 and OCS) appears to be undergoing bulk rotation. From the molecular line emission and thermal component of the continuum emission, we independently derived gas masses for each region which are consistent with each other. From the free-free component of the continuum emission we estimate the minimum stellar mass required to power the HII region and find that this mass, when added to the derived gas mass, is a significant fraction of the dynamical mass for that region.

  4. Dense Ionized and Neutral Gas Surrounding Sgr A*

    CERN Document Server

    Shukla, Hemant; Scoville, N Z

    2004-01-01

    We present high resolution H41a hydrogen recombination line observations of the 1.2' (3 pc) region surrounding Sgr A* at 92 GHz using the OVRO Millimeter Array with an angular resolution of 7" x 3" and velocity resolution of 13 km/s. New observations of H31a, H35a, H41a, and H44a lines were obtained using the NRAO 12-m telescope, and their relative line strengths are interpreted in terms of various emission mechanisms. These are the most extensive and most sensitive observations of recombination line to date. Observations of HCO+ (1 - 0) transition at 89 GHz are also obtained simultaneously with a 40% improved angular resolution and 4-15 times improved sensitivity over previous observations, and the distribution and kinematics of the dense molecular gas in the circumnuclear disk (CND) are mapped and compared with those of the ionized gas. The line brightness ratios of the hydrogen recombination lines are consistent with purely spontaneous emission from 7000 K gas with n_e = 20,000 cm$^{-3}$ near LTE condition...

  5. Radio observations of Supernova Remnants and the surrounding molecular gas

    CERN Document Server

    Dubner, G

    2011-01-01

    Supernova Remnants (SNRs) are believed to be the main source of Galactic cosmic rays (CR). The strong SNR shocks provide ideal acceleration sites for particles of at least 10^14 eV/nucleon. Radio continuum studies of SNRs carried out with good sensitivity and high angular resolution convey information about three main aspects of the SNRs: morphology, polarization and spectrum. Based on this information it is possible to localize sites of higher compression and particle acceleration as well as the orientation and degree of order of the magnetic fields, and in some cases even its intensity. All this information, when complemented with the study of the distribution and kinematics of the surrounding interstellar gas, results in a very useful dataset to investigate the role of SNRs as cosmic ray accelerators. In this presentation, I analyze the radio observations of SNRs and surrounding molecular clouds, showing the contribution of these studies to the understanding of the role of SNRs as factories of CRs.

  6. Momentum Budget of the atmospheric boundary layer over the Greenland ice sheet and its surrounding seas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Angelen, J.H.; van den Broeke, M.R.; van de Berg, W.J.

    2011-01-01

    The atmospheric circulation patterns over the Greenland ice sheet and its surrounding seas are studied by explicitly calculating the momentum budget components, using data of a high‐resolution regional atmospheric climate model. In winter (DJF), the katabatic pressure gradient force (PGF) dominates

  7. Electron density change of atmospheric-pressure plasmas in helium flow depending on the oxygen/nitrogen ratio of the surrounding atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Kentaro; Urabe, Keiichiro; Shirai, Naoki; Sato, Yuta; Hassaballa, Safwat; Bolouki, Nima; Yoneda, Munehiro; Shimizu, Takahiro; Uchino, Kiichiro

    2016-06-01

    Laser Thomson scattering was applied to an atmospheric-pressure plasma produced in a helium (He) gas flow for measuring the spatial profiles of electron density (n e) and electron temperature (T e). Aside from the He core flow, the shielding gas flow of N2 or synthesized air (\\text{N}2:\\text{O}2 = 4:1) surrounding the He flow was introduced to evaluate the effect of ambient gas components on the plasma parameters, eliminating the effect of ambient humidity. The n e at the discharge center was 2.7 × 1021 m-3 for plasma generated with N2/O2 shielding gas, 50% higher than that generated with N2 shielding.

  8. Atmospheric mercury emissions from mine wastes and surrounding geologically enriched terrains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustin, M.S.; Coolbaugh, M.F.; Engle, M.A.; Fitzgerald, B.C.; Keislar, R.E.; Lindberg, S.E.; Nacht, D.M.; Quashnick, J.; Rytuba, J.J.; Sladek, C.; Zhang, H.; Zehner, R.E.

    2003-01-01

    Waste rock and ore associated with Hg, precious and base metal mining, and their surrounding host rocks are typically enriched in mercury relative to natural background concentrations (soil:air interface, and photo reduction of mercury containing phases. To determine the need for and effectiveness of regulatory controls on short-lived anthropogenic point sources the contribution of mercury from geologic non-point sources to the atmospheric mercury pool needs to be quantified. The atmospheric mercury contribution from small areas of mining disturbance with relatively high mercury concentrations are, in general, less than that from surrounding large areas of low levels of mercury enrichment. In the arid to semi-arid west-ern United States volatilization is the primary means by which mercury is released from enriched sites.

  9. Dangerous effects of methane gas in atmosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Mohajan, Haradhan

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the effects of methane gas which causes sever global warming in the atmosphere. Global warming becomes main issue in economics in the 21st century. Because global climate change becomes more dangerous and every nation realized that this is due to greenhouse gas emissions. Methane is dangerous greenhouse gas, since it is 21 times more global warming potential than carbon dioxide. All the nations talk about the reduction of only carbon dioxide and no nation stress on methan...

  10. Test studies of gas flow in rock and coal surrounding a mined coal seam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lv Youchang

    2012-01-01

    An analysis of the variation rule of abutment pressure at the mining working face in a single coal seam and the mechanical behavior of surrounding rock during stoping is presented.Consideration of the elastic and plastic deformation zones that develop during the mining process allowed the determination of a relationship between horizontal stress and vertical stress.Based on this,a confined pressure unloading test was conducted by the use of the "gas-containing coal thermo-fluid-solid coupling 3-axis servo seepage" experimental apparatus.Thus,gas flow patterns in the elastic and plastic zones were derived from an experimental point of view.Darcy's law and the Klinkenberg effect were used to derive a gas flow equation for the elastic and plastic stress fields.The study of gas flow phenomena at the working face during coal mining is of great importance for the study of gas migration and enrichment oatterns.

  11. Heat Dissipation from Suspended Carbon Nanotubes to their Surrounding Gas Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, I. Kai; Pettes, Michael T.; Aykol, Mehmet; Shi, Li; Cronin, Stephen

    2011-03-01

    The assistance of gas molecules to dissipate heat in 5- μ m-long, electrical heated suspended carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is observed by comparing the G band Raman phonon temperature profiles measured in different gas environments and in vacuum. The measurement results show that 50-60% of the heat generated in the CNT is carried away by its surrounding gas molecules. By analyzing the temperature profiles investigated in different gases, the thermal boundary conductance (TBC) between the gas molecules and the CNT can also be extracted. We find the TBC to be higher in carbon dioxide than in nitrogen, argon and helium. Moreover, we report another optical method to explore the heat spreading behavior on a longer suspended CNTs in air, in which one laser is used as a heat source while another laser is used as a local temperature probe. A fin-shape thermal transport model is applied to fit the exponentially decaying temperature profiles measured away from the heat source. These results yield a heat decay length and TBC for air to be around 6.5 μ m and 3 × 105 W/ m 2 K, respectively. I Kai Hsu et al. Journal of Applied Physics 2010, 108, (084307).

  12. Propagation mechanisms of guided streamers in plasma jets: the influence of electronegativity of the surrounding gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Bleker, Ansgar; Norberg, Seth A.; Winter, Jörn; Johnsen, Eric; Reuter, S.; Weltmann, K. D.; Kushner, Mark J.

    2015-06-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jets for biomedical applications are often sustained in He with small amounts of, for example, O2 impurities and typically propagate into ambient air. The resulting poorly controlled generation of reactive species has motivated the use of gas shields to control the interaction of the plasma plume with the ambient gas. The use of different gases in the shield yields different behavior in the plasma plume. In this paper, we discuss results from experimental and computational investigations of He plasma jets having attaching and non-attaching gas shields. We found that negative ion formation in the He-air mixing region significantly affects the ionization wave dynamics and promotes the propagation of negative guided streamers through an electrostatic focusing mechanism. Results from standard and phase resolved optical emission spectroscopy ratios of emission from states of N2 and He imply different electric fields in the plasma plume depending on the composition of the shielding gas. These effects are attributed to the conductivity in the transition region between the plasma plume and the shield gas, and the immobile charge represented by negative ions. The lower conductivity in the attaching mixtures enables more extended penetration of the electric field whereas the negative ions aid in focusing the electrons towards the axis.

  13. Torrefaction of empty fruit bunches under biomass combustion gas atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uemura, Yoshimitsu; Sellappah, Varsheta; Trinh, Thanh Hoai; Hassan, Suhaimi; Tanoue, Ken-Ichiro

    2017-06-13

    Torrefaction of oil palm empty fruit bunches (EFB) under combustion gas atmosphere was conducted in a batch reactor at 473, 523 and 573K in order to investigate the effect of real combustion gas on torrefaction behavior. The solid mass yield of torrefaction in combustion gas was smaller than that of torrefaction in nitrogen. This may be attributed to the decomposition enhancement effect by oxygen and carbon dioxide in combustion gas. Under combustion gas atmosphere, the solid yield for torrefaction of EFB became smaller as the temperature increased. The representative products of combustion gas torrefaction were carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide (gas phase) and water, phenol and acetic acid (liquid phase). By comparing torrefaction in combustion gas with torrefaction in nitrogen gas, it was found that combustion gas can be utilized as torrefaction gas to save energy and inert gas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Enormous disc of cool gas surrounding the nearby powerful radio galaxy NGC 612 (PKS 0131-36)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emonts, B. H. C.; Morganti, R.; Oosterloo, T. A.; Holt, J.; Tadhunter, C. N.; van der Hulst, J. M.; Ojha, R.; Sadler, E. M.

    2008-01-01

    We present the detection of an enormous disc of cool neutral hydrogen (HI) gas surrounding the S0 galaxy NGC612, which hosts one of the nearest powerful radio sources (PKS 0131-36). Using the Australia Telescope Compact Array, we detect MHI = 1.8 x 10(9) M(circle dot) of HI emission-line gas that is

  15. Enormous disc of cool gas surrounding the nearby powerful radio galaxy NGC 612 (PKS 0131-36)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emonts, B. H. C.; Morganti, R.; Oosterloo, T. A.; Holt, J.; Tadhunter, C. N.; van der Hulst, J. M.; Ojha, R.; Sadler, E. M.

    2008-01-01

    We present the detection of an enormous disc of cool neutral hydrogen (HI) gas surrounding the S0 galaxy NGC612, which hosts one of the nearest powerful radio sources (PKS 0131-36). Using the Australia Telescope Compact Array, we detect MHI = 1.8 x 10(9) M(circle dot) of HI emission-line gas that is

  16. Helium Ionization in the Diffuse Ionized Gas Surrounding UCH ii Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anish Roshi, D.; Churchwell, E.; Anderson, L. D.

    2017-04-01

    We present measurements of the singly ionized helium-to-hydrogen ratio ({n}{{He}+}/{n}{{{H}}+}) toward diffuse gas surrounding three ultracompact H ii (UCH ii) regions: G10.15-0.34, G23.46-0.20, and G29.96-0.02. We observe radio recombination lines of hydrogen and helium near 5 GHz using the GBT to measure the {n}{{He}+}/{n}{{{H}}+} ratio. The measurements are motivated by the low helium ionization observed in the warm ionized medium and in the inner Galaxy diffuse ionized regions. Our data indicate that the helium is not uniformly ionized in the three observed sources. Helium lines are not detected toward a few observed positions in sources G10.15-0.34 and G23.46-0.20, and the upper limits of the {n}{{He}+}/{n}{{{H}}+} ratio obtained are 0.03 and 0.05, respectively. The selected sources harbor stars of type O6 or hotter as indicated by helium line detection toward the bright radio continuum emission from the sources with mean {n}{{He}+}/{n}{{{H}}+} value 0.06 ± 0.02. Our data thus show that helium in diffuse gas located a few parsecs away from the young massive stars embedded in the observed regions is not fully ionized. We investigate the origin of the nonuniform helium ionization and rule out the possibilities (a) that the helium is doubly ionized in the observed regions and (b) that the low {n}{{He}+}/{n}{{{H}}+} values are due to additional hydrogen ionizing radiation produced by accreting low-mass stars. We find that selective absorption of ionizing photons by dust can result in low helium ionization but needs further investigation to develop a self-consistent model for dust in H ii regions.

  17. Optical IFU observations of gas pillars surrounding the super star cluster NGC 3603

    CERN Document Server

    Westmoquette, M S; Ercolano, B; Smith, L J

    2013-01-01

    We present optical integral field unit (IFU) observations of two gas pillars surrounding the Galactic young massive star cluster NGC 3603. The high S/N and spectral resolution of these data have allowed us to accurately quantify the H-alpha, [NII] and [SII] emission line shapes, and we find a mixture of broad (FWHM~70-100 km/s) and narrow (10000 cm-3. In one pillar we found that these high densities are only found in the narrow component, implying it must originate from deeper within the pillar than the broad component. From this, together with our kinematical data, we conclude that the narrow component traces a photoevaporation flow, and that the TML forms at the interface with the hot wind. On the pillar surfaces we find a consistent offset in radial velocity between the narrow (brighter) components of H-alpha and [NII] of ~5-8 km/s, for which we were unable to find a satisfactory explanation. We urge the theoretical community to simulate mechanical and radiative cloud interactions in more detail to address...

  18. An influence of the petrol pump for the atmospheric electric field distribution in the surroundings of the vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milovanović Alenka

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the potential and electric field distribution in the surroundings of the cargo vehicles is approximately numerically determined, when they are exposed to the Atmospheric Electric Field (AEF, having uniform intensity and vertical polarization. The cases of the cargo vehicles either isolated or near by petrol pumps are observed. Several results of total induced charge and electrical moment of the vehicle including maps of equipotential and equienergetic curves are presented. The Equivalent Electrode Method (EEM is used to solve this problem.

  19. Harsh Environment Gas Sensor Array for Venus Atmospheric Measurements Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Makel Engineering and the Ohio State University propose to develop a harsh environment tolerant gas sensor array for atmospheric analysis in future Venus missions....

  20. Harsh Environment Gas Sensor Array for Venus Atmospheric Measurements Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Makel Engineering and the Ohio State University propose to develop a harsh environment tolerant gas sensor array for atmospheric analysis in future Venus missions....

  1. Ocean-atmosphere exchange of organic carbon and CO2 surrounding the Antarctic Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Halpern, S.; Calleja, M. Ll.; Dachs, J.; Del Vento, S.; Pastor, M.; Palmer, M.; Agustí, S.; Duarte, C. M.

    2014-05-01

    Exchangeable organic carbon (OC) dynamics and CO2 fluxes in the Antarctic Peninsula during austral summer were highly variable, but the region appeared to be a net sink for OC and nearly in balance for CO2. Surface exchangeable dissolved organic carbon (EDOC) measurements had a 43 ± 3 (standard error, hereafter SE) μmol C L-1 overall mean and represented around 66% of surface non-purgeable dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in Antarctic waters, while the mean concentration of the gaseous fraction of organic carbon (GOC H-1) was 46 ± 3 SE μmol C L-1. There was a tendency towards low fugacity of dissolved CO2 (fCO2-w) in waters with high chlorophyll a (Chl a) content and high fCO2-w in areas with high krill densities. However, such relationships were not found for EDOC. The depth profiles of EDOC were also quite variable and occasionally followed Chl a profiles. The diel cycles of EDOC showed two distinct peaks, in the middle of the day and the middle of the short austral dark period, concurrent with solar radiation maxima and krill night migration patterns. However, no evident diel pattern for GOC H-1 or CO2 was observed. The pool of exchangeable OC is an important and active compartment of the carbon budget surrounding the Antarctic Peninsula and adds to previous studies highlighting its importance in the redistribution of carbon in marine environments.

  2. Numerical simulation of free surface incompressible liquid flows surrounded by compressible gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caboussat, A.; Picasso, M.; Rappaz, J.

    2005-03-01

    A numerical model for the three-dimensional simulation of liquid-gas flows with free surfaces is presented. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are assumed to hold in the liquid domain. In the gas domain, the velocity is disregarded, the pressure is supposed to be constant in each connected component of the gas domain and follows the ideal gas law. The gas pressure is imposed as a normal force on the liquid-gas interface. An implicit splitting scheme is used to decouple the physical phenomena. Given the gas pressure on the interface, the method described in [J. Comput Phys. 155 (1999) 439; Int. J. Numer. Meth. Fluids 42(7) (2003) 697] is used to track the liquid domain and to compute the velocity and pressure fields in the liquid. Then the connected components of the gas domain are found using an original numbering algorithm. Finally, the gas pressure is updated from the ideal gas law in each connected component of gas. The implementation is validated in the frame of mould filling. Numerical results in two and three space dimensions show that the effect of pressure in the bubbles of gas trapped by the liquid cannot be neglected.

  3. Composition of torched crude oil organic particulate emitted by refinery and its similarity to atmospheric aerosol in the surrounding area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassaa, Noureddine; Cecinato, Angelo

    2005-09-01

    The absolute contents and relative distributions of organic aerosols [n-alkanes, n-alkanoic and n-alkenoic acids, n-alkan-2-ones and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH)] were determined in torched gases emitted during the crude oil extraction and in the free atmosphere of the Hassi-Messaoud city (Algeria). Monocarboxylic acids, both saturated and monounsaturated (from 9802 to 20,057 ng m(-3)), accounted for the major fraction of the total particulate organic matter identified both in torch exhaust and atmospheric particulate. n-Alkanes were also abundant both in the direct emission (from 460 to 632 ng m(-3)) and city atmosphere (462 ng m(-3)) and displayed a peculiar fingerprint characterised by the presence of a set of branched congeners around even carbon-numbered homologues and a strong even-to-odd predominance along the whole carbon number range (C16-C34). Whilst n-alkan-2-ones were absent in the city and poor in smokes emitted from the torches (from 31 to 42 ng m(-3)), PAH were present at low extents in all sites (from 18 to 65 ng m(-3)). The incomplete thermal combustion of torched crude oil was very likely the main source of these particle-bound organic constituents in the city and its surrounding region.

  4. Molecular gas and triggered star formation surrounding Wolf-Rayet stars

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Tie; Zhang, Huawei

    2012-01-01

    The environments surrounding nine Wolf-Rayet stars were studied in molecular emission. Expanding shells were detected surrounding these WR stars (see left panels of Figure 1). The average masses and radii of the molecular cores surrounding these WR stars anti-correlate with the WR stellar wind velocities (middle panels of Figure 1), indicating the WR stars has great impact on their environments. The number density of Young Stellar Objects (YSOs) is enhanced in the molecular shells at $\\sim$5 arcmin from the central WR star (lower-right panel of Figure 1). Through detailed studies of the molecular shells and YSOs, we find strong evidences of triggered star formation in the fragmented molecular shells (\\cite[Liu et al. 2010]{liu_etal12}

  5. Dense gas dispersion in the atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Morten

    1998-09-01

    Dense gas dispersion is characterized by buoyancy induced gravity currents and reduction of the vertical mixing. Liquefied gas releases from industrial accidents are cold because of the heat of evaporation which determines the density for a given concentration and physical properties. The temperature deficit is moderated by the heat flux from the ground, and this convection is an additional source of turbulence which affects the mixing. A simple model as the soil heat flux is used to estimate the ability of the ground to sustain the heat flux during release. The initial enthalpy, release rate, initial entrainment and momentum are discussed for generic source types and the interaction with obstacles is considered. In the MTH project BA experiments source with and without momentum were applied. The continuously released propane gas passed a two-dimensional removable obstacle perpendicular to the wind direction. Ground-level gas concentrations and vertical profiles of concentration, temperature, wind speed and turbulence were measured in front of and behind the obstacle. Ultrasonic anemometers providing fast velocity and concentration signals were mounted at three levels on the masts. The observed turbulence was influenced by the stability and the initial momentum of the jet releases. Additional information were taken from the `Dessert tortoise` ammonia jet releases, from the `Fladis` experiment with transition from dense to passive dispersion, and from the `Thorney Island` continuous releases of isothermal freon mixtures. The heat flux was found to moderate the negative buoyancy in both the propane and ammonia experiments. The heat flux measurements are compared to an estimate by analogy with surface layer theory. (au) 41 tabs., 146 ills., 189 refs.

  6. Nitrogen Availability Of Nitriding Atmosphere In Controlled Gas Nitriding Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michalski J.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Parameters which characterize the nitriding atmosphere in the gas nitriding process of steel are: the nitriding potential KN, ammonia dissociation rate α and nitrogen availabilitymN2. The article discusses the possibilities of utilization of the nitriding atmosphere’s nitrogen availability in the design of gas nitriding processes of alloyed steels in atmospheres derived from raw ammonia, raw ammonia diluted with pre-dissociated ammonia, with nitrogen, as well as with both nitrogen and pre-dissociated ammonia. The nitriding processes were accomplished in four series. The parameters selected in the particular processes were: process temperature (T, time (t, value of nitriding potential (KN, corresponding to known dissociation rate of the ammonia which dissociates during the nitriding process (α. Variable parameters were: nitrogen availability (mN2, composition of the ingoing atmosphere and flow rate of the ingoing atmosphere (FIn.

  7. Impact of oil and gas field in sugar cane condition using landsat 8 in Indramayu area and its surrounding, West Java province, Republic of Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muji Susantoro, Tri; Wikantika, Ketut; Saskia Puspitasari, Alia; Saepuloh, Asep

    2017-01-01

    This study tried to monitor sugar cane condition surrounding of oil and gas field area. The spectral approaches were conducted for mapping sugar cane stress. As an initial stage Landsat-8 was corrected radiometrically and geometrically. Radiometric correction is an important stages for spectral approaching. Then all pixel values were transformed to the surface reflectance. Several vegetation indices were calculated to monitor vegetation stress surrounding of oil and gas field. NDVI, EVI, DVI, GVI, GRVI, GDVI and GNDVI were applied for generating tentative sugar cane stress images. The results indicated that sugar cane surrounding of oil and gas field has been influenced by oil and gas field.

  8. Upgrade of PARC2D to include real gas effects. [computer program for flowfield surrounding aeroassist flight experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saladino, Anthony; Praharaj, Sarat C.; Collins, Frank G.; Seaford, C. Mark

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a description of the changes and additions to the perfect gas PARC2D code to include chemical equilibrium effects, resulting in a code called PARCEQ2D. The work developed out of a need to have the capability of more accurately representing the flowfield surrounding the aeroassist flight experiment (AFE) vehicle. Use is made of the partition function of statistical mechanics in the evaluation of the thermochemical properties. This approach will allow the PARC code to be extended to thermal nonequilibrium when this task is undertaken in the future. The transport properties follow from formulae from the kinetic theory of gases. Results are presented for a two-dimensional AFE that compare perfect gas and real gas solutions at flight conditions, showing vast differences between the two cases.

  9. Chemical gas analyzers for proximate analysis of mine atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pochenkova, T.K.; Klassovskaya, N.A.; Zlenko, A.G.; Gus' kova, A.N. (Vsesoyuznyi Nauchno-Issledovatel' skii Institut Gornogo Dela, Donetsk (Ukraine))

    1992-09-01

    Describes a series of chemical gas analyzers developed by the VNIIGD institute for proximate analysis of mine atmosphere in coal mines. The new GKh-4, GKh-5, GKh-6, GKh CO-5 use detector tubes for carbon monoxide and dioxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, oxygen and hydrogen sulfide. These devices allow miners to determine gas concentrations in the mine atmosphere in less than 4 minutes with an accuracy of +/-25%. The series is now complemented by the GKh-M CH[sub 2]O-0.004 gas analyzer for measuring formaldehyde content in mine air during mine rescue operations conducted with the use of carbamide-formaldehyde resins. Key technical data on the gas analyzers are given.

  10. From Atmospheric Gas Spectroscopy to Climatological Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordov, E. P.; Kabanov, M. V.; Rodimova, O. B.; Fazliev, A. Z.

    2016-08-01

    Readers are offered a brief review of sample results obtained from spectroscopic investigations begun in Laboratory of Spectroscopy of V. D. Kuznetsov Siberian Physical-Technical Institute at Tomsk State University as early as the 1930s. Specifically, we present findings of theoretical studies of relevance to a description of the light absorption in atmospheric windows and hence to solutions of global climate problems associated with the processes involving frequencies lying far from line centers. In the course of years, a large amount of spectroscopic data has been accumulated, which led to rapid development of information-computational systems to be discussed in the present work. Not only are the considered systems capable of making computations according to preset algorithms, but they can also provide answers relating to the completeness and comparison of the data collected in the system, taking into account the structure of the subject domain in question. A prototype of a computational-information infrastructure (virtual research environment) supporting climate studies is proposed.

  11. Effect of surrounding gas condition on surface integrity in micro-drilling of SiC by ns pulsed laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Yasuhiro; Asako, Kiichi; Nishi, Norio; Sakagawa, Tomokazu; Okada, Akira

    2015-06-01

    The influence of the surrounding gas conditions on the surface integrity in the micro-drilling of silicon carbide was experimentally investigated using ns pulsed laser of 266 nm wavelength. Moreover, micro-machining characteristics were observed using high-speed shutter and video cameras in the micro-drilling of silicon carbide. The size and intensity of the laser-induced plasma were larger, and the plasma affected area was larger and deeper in argon than that in air. Although the intensity of the plasma was lower in helium than that in other gases, the surface around the drilled hole was roughened by the spread of the plasma in the vicinity of the drilled hole. Debris was removed along the flow field generated by laser shot in the opposite direction to the laser irradiation. The gas flow behavior and the spectrum and intensity of the laser-induced plasma were influenced by the surrounding gas type and pressure. The appearance of plasma generation affected the surface integrity at the circumference of the drilled hole, and the surface integrity was improved by reducing the pressure.

  12. Noble gas atmospheric monitoring at reprocessing facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakhleh, C.W.; Perry, R.T. Jr.; Poths, J.; Stanbro, W.D.; Wilson, W.B.; Fearey, B.L.

    1997-05-01

    The discovery in Iraq after the Gulf War of the existence of a large clandestine nuclear-weapon program has led to an across-the-board international effort, dubbed Programme 93+2, to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards. One particularly significant potential change is the introduction of environmental monitoring (EM) techniques as an adjunct to traditional safeguards methods. Monitoring of stable noble gas (Kr, Xe) isotopic abundances at reprocessing plant stacks appears to be able to yield information on the burnup and type of the fuel being processed. To estimate the size of these signals, model calculations of the production of stable Kr, Xe nuclides in reactor fuel and the subsequent dilution of these nuclides in the plant stack are carried out for two case studies: reprocessing of PWR fuel with a burnup of 35 GWd/tU, and reprocessing of CAND fuel with a burnup of 1 GWd/tU. For each case, a maximum-likelihood analysis is used to determine the fuel burnup and type from the isotopic data.

  13. Digital tabulation of stratigraphic data from oil and gas wells in Cuyama Valley and surrounding areas, central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweetkind, Donald S.; Bova, Shiera C.; Langenheim, V.E.; Shumaker, Lauren E.; Scheirer, Daniel S.

    2013-01-01

    Stratigraphic information from 391 oil and gas exploration wells from Cuyama Valley, California, and surrounding areas are herein compiled in digital form from reports that were released originally in paper form. The Cuyama Basin is located within the southeasternmost part of the Coast Ranges and north of the western Transverse Ranges, west of the San Andreas fault. Knowledge of the location and elevation of stratigraphic tops of formations throughout the basin is a first step toward understanding depositional trends and the structural evolution of the basin through time, and helps in understanding the slip history and partitioning of slip on San Andreas and related faults.

  14. Investigations of Flare Gas Emissions in Taq Taq Oil Field on the Surrounding Land

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafar A. Ali

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Environmental pollution caused by oil takes many different forms; one of the most damaging sources is simply the combustion of oil products, such as a well flare burn-off. This paper presents the results of a survey of the agriculture lands around the Taq Taq Oil Production Company. The aim of the survey was to determine the potential contamination caused by the gas emissions from the well flares. Taq Taq field is located in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq, 60 km north of the giant Kirkuk oil field, 85 km south-east of Erbil and 120 km north-west of Suleimani. Samples of soil were collected from several locations around the site and analyzed to determine the content of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons PAH present. A gas chromatography linked to a mass spectrometry (GCMS machine was used for these measurements. The PAH contamination at each location of soil was determined and the 16-PAHs, as listed in the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA documentation were investigated. The average content of total PAH in all samples of the agricultural soil was 0.654 mg·kg-1 with the concentrations ranging from 0.310 to 0.869 mg·kg-1. It was found that the PAH concentrations decreased with increasing distance from the TTOPCO oil field, indicating that pollution was evident, the area close to the field being more affected by the gas pollution.

  15. Wide-Area Interference Spectroscopy of the Ionized Gas Surrounding the OCL-352 (IC-1805) Stellar Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomos, Nikolaos

    We investigated the global kinematics of the giant ionized shell IC1805 centred a (l,b)=(134.7deg,+0.92deg)at a distance of -2.3 Kpc and surrounding the Ocl352, within Cassiopeia OB6 stellar association. Fabry-Perot interference spectroscopy data in the light of [SIII]9530.9A have been used to obtain the radial velocity field of the IC1795/IC1805 (W3/W4) region as a means to probe the large scale gas motions around Cass Ocl-352. The observations are discussed and interpreted in conjuction with radioastronomical and optical data available. A new empirical model is proposed to account for the complex kinematical structure of the region. As was suggested by Solomos (Ph.D Thesis, 1991)the region is a leaking HII shell with the ionized gas flowing to the North escaping from the galactic plane.

  16. Influence of surrounding gas, composition and pressure on plasma plume dynamics of nanosecond pulsed laser-induced aluminum plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud S. Dawood

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we present a comprehensive study of the plume dynamics of plasmas generated by laser ablation of an aluminum target. The effect of both ambient gas composition (helium, nitrogen or argon and pressure (from ∼5 × 10−7 Torr up to atmosphere is studied. The time- and space- resolved observation of the plasma plume are performed from spectrally integrated images using an intensified Charge Coupled Device (iCCD camera. The iCCD images show that the ambient gas does not significantly influence the plume as long as the gas pressure is lower than 20 Torr and the time delay below 300 ns. However, for pressures higher than 20 Torr, the effect of the ambient gas becomes important, the shortest plasma plume length being observed when the gas mass species is highest. On the other hand, space- and time- resolved emission spectroscopy of aluminum ions at λ = 281.6 nm are used to determine the Time-Of-Flight (TOF profiles. The effect of the ambient gas on the TOF profiles and therefore on the propagation velocity of Al ions is discussed. A correlation between the plasma plume expansion velocity deduced from the iCCD images and that estimated from the TOF profiles is presented. The observed differences are attributed mainly to the different physical mechanisms governing the two diagnostic techniques.

  17. Hydrodynamics of Embedded Planets' First Atmospheres. II. A Rapid Recycling of Atmospheric Gas

    CERN Document Server

    Ormel, Chris W; Kuiper, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    Following Paper I we investigate the properties of atmospheres that form around small protoplanets embedded in a protoplanetary disc by conducting hydrodynamical simulations. These are now extended to three dimensions, employing a spherical grid centred on the planet. Compression of gas is shown to reduce rotational motions. Contrasting the 2D case, no clear boundary demarcates bound atmospheric gas from disc material; instead, we find an open system where gas enters the Bondi sphere at high latitudes and leaves through the midplane regions, or, vice versa, when the disc gas rotates sub-Keplerian. The simulations do not converge to a time-independent solution; instead, the atmosphere is characterized by a time-varying velocity field. Of particular interest is the timescale to replenish the atmosphere by nebular gas, $t_\\mathrm{replenish}$. It is shown that the replenishment rate, $M_\\mathrm{atm}/t_\\mathrm{replenish}$, can be understood in terms of a modified Bondi accretion rate, $\\sim$$R_\\mathrm{Bondi}^2\\rho...

  18. Imaging galactic diffuse gas: Bright, turbulent CO surrounding the line of sight to NRAO150

    CERN Document Server

    Pety, Jérôme; Liszt, Harvey S

    2008-01-01

    To understand the environment and extended structure of the host galactic gas whose molecular absorption line chemistry, we previously observed along the microscopic line of sight to the blazar/radiocontinuum source NRAO150 (aka B0355+508), we used the IRAM 30m Telescope and Plateau de Bure Interferometer to make two series of images of the host gas: i) 22.5 arcsec resolution single-dish maps of 12CO J=1-0 and 2-1 emission over a 220 arcsec by 220 arcsec field; ii) a hybrid (interferometer+singledish) aperture synthesis mosaic of 12CO J=1-0 emission at 5.8 arcsec resolution over a 90 arcsec-diameter region. CO components that are observed in absorption at a moderate optical depth (0.5) and are undetected in emission at 1 arcmin resolution toward NRAO 150 remain undetected at 6 arcsec resolution. This implies that they are not a previously-hidden large-scale molecular component revealed in absorption, but they do highlight the robustness of the chemistry into regions where the density and column density are to...

  19. Ripping Apart at the Seams: The Network of Stripped Gas Surrounding M86

    CERN Document Server

    Ehlert, S; Simionescu, A; Allen, S W; Kenney, J D P; Million, E; Finoguenov, A

    2012-01-01

    We present a new study of the Virgo Cluster galaxies M86, M84, NGC 4338, and NGC 4438 using a mosaic of five separate pointings with XMM-Newton. Our observations allow for robust measurements of the temperature and metallicity structure of each galaxy along with the entire ~ 1 degree region between these galaxies. When combined with multiwavelength observations, the data suggest that all four of these galaxies are undergoing ram pressure stripping by the Intracluster Medium (ICM). The manner in which the stripped gas trailing the galaxies interacts with the ICM, however, is observably distinct. Consistent with previous observations, M86 is observed to have a long tail of ~ 1 keV gas trailing to the north-west for distances of ~ 100-150 kpc. However, a new site of ~ 0.6 keV thermal emission is observed to span to the east of M86 in the direction of the disturbed spiral galaxy NGC 4438. This region is spatially coincident with filaments of H-alpha emission, likely originating in a recent collision between the t...

  20. Resolution and Kinematics of Molecular Gas Surrounding the Cloverleaf Quasar at z=2.6 Using the Gravitational Lens

    CERN Document Server

    Yun, M S; Carrasco, J J; Blandford, R D

    1997-01-01

    Gravitational lenses have long been advertised as primitive telescopes, capable of magnifying cosmologically distant sources (Zwicky 1937). In this Letter, we present new 0''.9 resolution CO (7-6) observations of the z=2.56 Cloverleaf quasar (H 1413+117) and spatially resolved images. By modeling the gravitational lens, we infer a size scale of 0''.3 (~1 kpc) for the molecular gas structure surrounding the quasar, and the gas has a kinematic structure roughly consistent with a rotating disk. The observed properties of the CO emitting gas are similar to the nuclear starburst complexes found in the infrared luminous galaxies in the local universe, and metal enrichment by vigorous star formation within this massive nuclear gas complex can explain the abundance of carbon and oxygen in the interstellar medium of this system observed when the universe was only a few billion years old. Obtaining corresponding details in an unlensed object at similar distances would be well beyond the reach of current instruments, an...

  1. Enormous disc of cool gas surrounding the nearby powerful radio galaxy NGC 612 (PKS 0131-36)

    CERN Document Server

    Emonts, B H C; Oosterloo, T A; Holt, J; Tadhunter, C N; Van der Hulst, J M; Ojha, R; Sadler, E M

    2008-01-01

    We present the detection of an enormous disc of cool neutral hydrogen (HI) gas surrounding the S0 galaxy NGC 612, which hosts one of the nearest powerful radio sources (PKS 0131-36). Using the Australia Telescope Compact Array, we detect M_HI = 1.8 x 10^9 M_sun of HI emission-line gas that is distributed in a 140 kpc wide disc-like structure along the optical disc and dust-lane of NGC 612. The bulk of the gas in the disc appears to be settled in regular rotation with a total velocity range of 850 km/s, although asymmetries in this disc indicate that perturbations are being exerted on part of the gas, possibly by a number of nearby companions. The HI disc in NGC 612 suggests that the total mass enclosed by the system is M_enc ~ 2.9 x 10^12 sin^-2(i) M_sun, implying that this early-type galaxy contains a massive dark matter halo. We also discuss an earlier study by Holt et al. that revealed the presence of a prominent young stellar population at various locations throughout the disc of NGC 612, indicating that ...

  2. Atmospheric carbon tetrachloride in rural background and industry surrounded urban areas in Northern Iberian Peninsula: Mixing ratios, trends, and potential sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Blas, Maite; Uria-Tellaetxe, Iratxe; Gomez, Maria Carmen; Navazo, Marino; Alonso, Lucio; García, Jose Antonio; Durana, Nieves; Iza, Jon; Ramón, Jarol Derley

    2016-08-15

    Latest investigations on atmospheric carbon tetrachloride (CTC) are focused on its ozone depleting potential, adverse effects on the human health, and radiative efficiency and Global Warming Potential as a greenhouse gas. CTC mixing ratios have been thoroughly studied since its restriction under the Montreal Protocol, mostly in remote areas with the aim of reporting long-term trends after its banning. The observed decrease of the CTC background mixing ratio, however, was not as strong as expected. In order to explain this behavior CTC lifetime should be adjusted by estimating the relative significance of its sinks and by identifying ongoing potential sources. Looking for possible sources, CTC was measured with high-time resolution in two sites in Northern Spain, using auto-GC systems and specifically developed acquisition and processing methodologies. The first site, Bilbao, is an urban area influenced by the surrounding industry, where measurements were performed with GC-MSD for a one-year period (2007-2008). The second site, at Valderejo Natural Park (VNP), is a rural background area where measurements were carried out with GC-FID and covering CTC data a nonsuccessive five-year period (2003-2005, 2010-2011, and 2014-2015years). Median yearly CTC mixing ratios were slightly higher in the urban area (120pptv) than in VNP (80-100pptv). CTC was reported to be well mixed in the atmosphere and no sources were noticed to impact the rural site. The observed long-term trend in VNP was in agreement with the estimated global CTC emissions. In the urban site, apart from industrial and commercial CTC sources, chlorine-bleach products used as cleaning agents were reported as promotors of indoor sources.

  3. Silicon microring refractometric sensor for atmospheric CO(2) gas monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Guangcan; Horvath, Cameron; Aktary, Mirwais; Van, Vien

    2016-01-25

    We report a silicon photonic refractometric CO(2) gas sensor operating at room temperature and capable of detecting CO(2) gas at atmospheric concentrations. The sensor uses a novel functional material layer based on a guanidine polymer derivative, which is shown to exhibit reversible refractive index change upon absorption and release of CO(2) gas molecules, and does not require the presence of humidity to operate. By functionalizing a silicon microring resonator with a thin layer of the polymer, we could detect CO(2) gas concentrations in the 0-500ppm range with a sensitivity of 6 × 10(-9) RIU/ppm and a detection limit of 20ppm. The microring transducer provides a potential integrated solution in the development of low-cost and compact CO(2) sensors that can be deployed as part of a sensor network for accurate environmental monitoring of greenhouse gases.

  4. Environmental assessment survey of the vegetation surrounding a Lower Wilcox Group coal gas well site

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, John W.

    2004-01-01

    This environmental assessment was conducted to examine the impacts on vegetation of the drilling and operation of a coal gas well located along Hwy 134 about 5 miles (8 km) east of Fairbanks, La. The drill site is 85 meters north of Hwy 134 and operations at the well were performed by EnerVest Operating LLC. The site (privately owned) was formerly a mixed hardwood/pine forest that was clear-cut in 1998 and planted with loblolly pine. Once completed, the well site, with its associated pipeline covered about 1,560 m2 (11.5 percent of the survey area). This survey was conducted in coordination with Peter D. Warwick, Research Geologist, U.S. Geological Survey, and Jim York, contract geologist for EnerVest Operating, LLC.

  5. Atmospheric carbon tetrachloride in rural background and industry surrounded urban areas in Northern Iberian Peninsula: Mixing ratios, trends, and potential sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blas, Maite de, E-mail: maite.deblas@ehu.eus [School of Engineering of Bilbao, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU (Spain); Uria-Tellaetxe, Iratxe; Gomez, Maria Carmen [School of Engineering of Bilbao, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU (Spain); Navazo, Marino [University College of Engineering of Vitoria-Gasteiz, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU (Spain); Alonso, Lucio; García, Jose Antonio; Durana, Nieves; Iza, Jon; Ramón, Jarol Derley [School of Engineering of Bilbao, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU (Spain)

    2016-08-15

    Latest investigations on atmospheric carbon tetrachloride (CTC) are focused on its ozone depleting potential, adverse effects on the human health, and radiative efficiency and Global Warming Potential as a greenhouse gas. CTC mixing ratios have been thoroughly studied since its restriction under the Montreal Protocol, mostly in remote areas with the aim of reporting long-term trends after its banning. The observed decrease of the CTC background mixing ratio, however, was not as strong as expected. In order to explain this behavior CTC lifetime should be adjusted by estimating the relative significance of its sinks and by identifying ongoing potential sources. Looking for possible sources, CTC was measured with high-time resolution in two sites in Northern Spain, using auto-GC systems and specifically developed acquisition and processing methodologies. The first site, Bilbao, is an urban area influenced by the surrounding industry, where measurements were performed with GC–MSD for a one-year period (2007–2008). The second site, at Valderejo Natural Park (VNP), is a rural background area where measurements were carried out with GC-FID and covering CTC data a nonsuccessive five-year period (2003–2005, 2010–2011, and 2014–2015 years). Median yearly CTC mixing ratios were slightly higher in the urban area (120 pptv) than in VNP (80–100 pptv). CTC was reported to be well mixed in the atmosphere and no sources were noticed to impact the rural site. The observed long-term trend in VNP was in agreement with the estimated global CTC emissions. In the urban site, apart from industrial and commercial CTC sources, chlorine-bleach products used as cleaning agents were reported as promotors of indoor sources. - Highlights: • A methodology was developed to measure CTC using GC-MSD and GC-FID. • CTC ongoing sources were noticed in an industry surrounded urban area. • No noticeable nearby CTC sources impacted the rural site. • Long-term CTC trend in agreement

  6. Subtarget Effect on Laser Plasma Generated by Transversely Excited Atmospheric CO2 Laser at Atmospheric Gas Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagawa, Kiichiro; Lie, Tjung Jie; Hedwig, Rinda; Abdulmajid, Syahrun Nur; Suliyanti, Maria Margaretha; Kurniawan, Hendrik

    2000-05-01

    An experimental study has been carried out on the dynamical process taking place in the laser plasma generated by Transversely Excited Atmospheric CO2 laser (100 mJ, 50 ns) irradiation of a soft sample at surrounding helium pressure of 1 atm. It is shown that the presence of a copper subtarget behind the soft sample is crucial in raising the gushing speed of the atoms to the level adequate for the generation of shock wave laser plasma even at atmospheric pressure. It is also found that the time profiles of spatially integrated emission intensity of the target’s atoms and gas atoms exhibit a characteristic dynamical process that consists of successive excitation and cooling stages even at such a high pressure, which is typical of shock wave laser plasma. It is therefore suggested that the generation of the laser plasma at atmospheric pressure is more likely due to the shock wave mechanism than to the widely known breakdown mechanism. Initial spectrochemical analysis of water from the blow off of a boiler system was also carried out, showing a detection limit of as low as 5 ppm for calcium.

  7. Hydrocarbon and Carbon Dioxide Fluxes from Natural Gas Well Pad Soils and Surrounding Soils in Eastern Utah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyman, Seth N; Watkins, Cody; Jones, Colleen; Mansfield, Marc L; McKinley, Michael; Kenney, Donna; Evans, Jordan

    2017-09-07

    We measured fluxes of methane, non-methane hydrocarbons, and carbon dioxide from natural gas well pad soils and from nearby undisturbed soils in eastern Utah. Methane fluxes varied from less than zero to more than 38 g m-2 h-1. Fluxes from well pad soils were almost always greater than from undisturbed soils. Fluxes were greater from locations with higher concentrations of total combustible gas in soil and were inversely correlated with distance from well heads. Several lines of evidence show that the majority of emission fluxes (about 70%) were primarily due to subsurface sources of raw gas that migrated to the atmosphere, with the remainder likely caused primarily by re-emission of spilled liquid hydrocarbons. Total hydrocarbon fluxes during summer were only 39 (16, 97)% as high as during winter, likely because soil bacteria consumed the majority of hydrocarbons during summer months. We estimate that natural gas well pad soils account for 4.6×10-4 (1.6×10-4, 1.6×10-3)% of total emissions of hydrocarbons from the oil and gas industry in Utah's Uinta Basin. Our undisturbed soil flux measurements were not adequate to quantify rates of natural hydrocarbon seepage in the Uinta Basin.

  8. Imaging galactic diffuse gas: bright, turbulent CO surrounding the line of sight to NRAO150

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pety, J.; Lucas, R.; Liszt, H. S.

    2008-10-01

    Aims: To understand the environment and extended structure of the host galactic gas whose molecular absorption line chemistry, we previously observed along the microscopic line of sight to the blazar/radiocontinuum source NRAO150 (aka B0355+508). Methods: We used the IRAM 30 m Telescope and Plateau de Bure Interferometer to make two series of images of the host gas: i) 22.5'' resolution single-dish maps of 12CO J = 1-0 and 2-1 emission over a 220'' by 220'' field; ii) a hybrid (interferometer+singledish) aperture synthesis mosaic of 12CO J = 1-0 emission at 5.8'' resolution over a 90''-diameter region. Results: At 22.5'' resolution, the CO J = 1-0 emission toward NRAO150 is 30-100% brighter at some velocities than seen previously with 1' resolution, and there are some modest systematic velocity gradients over the 220'' field. Of the five CO components seen in the absorption spectra, the weakest ones are absent in emission toward NRAO150 but appear more strongly at the edges of the region mapped in emission. The overall spatial variations in the strongly emitting gas have Poisson statistics with rms fluctuations about equal to the mean emission level in the line wings and much of the line cores. The J = 2-1/J = 1-0 line ratios calculated pixel-by-pixel cluster around 0.7. At 6'' resolution, disparity between the absorption and emission profiles of the stronger components has been largely ameliorated. The 12CO J = 1-0 emission exhibits i) remarkably bright peaks, {T}_mb = 12-13 K, even as 4'' from NRAO150; ii) smaller relative levels of spatial fluctuation in the line cores, but a very broad range of possible intensities at every velocity; and iii) striking kinematics whereby the monotonic velocity shifts and supersonically broadened lines in 22.5'' spectra are decomposed into much stronger velocity gradients and abrupt velocity reversals of intense but narrow, probably subsonic, line cores. Conclusions: CO components that are observed in absorption at a moderate

  9. Thermally induced atmospheric pressure gas discharges using pyroelectric crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Michael J.; Linczer, John; Go, David B.

    2014-12-01

    Using a heated pyroelectric crystal, an atmospheric pressure gas discharge was generated through the input of heat. When put through a change in temperature, the polarization of a pyroelectric can change significantly, creating a substantial electric potential at its surface. When configured with a grounded sharp counter electrode, a large inhomogeneous electric field forms in the interstitial gas to initiate a corona-like discharge. Under constant heating conditions, gaseous ions drifting to the pyroelectric accumulate and screen the electric field, extinguishing the discharge. By thermally cycling the pyroelectric, negative and positive discharges are generated during heating and cooling, respectively, with peak currents on the order of 80 nA. Time-integrated visualization confirmed the generation of both a corona-like discharge and a surface discharge on the pyroelectric. Parametric studies identified that thermal cycling conditions significantly influence discharge formation for this new atmospheric pressure discharge approach.

  10. Ferrous alloys cast under high pressure gas atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pirowski Z.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this paper is describing the essence of the process of introducing nitrogen to the melt of ferrous alloys by application of overpressure above the metal bath. The problem was discussed in terms of both theory (the thermodynamic aspects of the process and practice (the technical and technological aspects, safety of the furnace stand operation, and technique of conducting the melt. The novel technique of melting under high pressure of the gas atmosphere (up to 5 MPa has not been used so far in the domestic industry, mainly because of the lack of proper equipment satisfyng the requirements of safe operation. Owing to cooperation undertaken with a partner from Bulgaria, a more detailed investigation of this technology has become possible and melting of selected ferrous alloys was conducted under the gas atmosphere at a pressure of about 3,5 MPa.

  11. Isobaric bubble growth: a consequence of altering atmospheric gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, R H; Kunkle, T D

    1974-11-01

    During certain treatments of decompression sickness following dives made with compressed air, the U.S. Navy advocates breathing helium-oxygen mixtures. However, stable nitrogen bubbles created within gelatin by decompression have been found to enlarge when the atmosphere was switched from nitrogen to helium without changing ambient pressure. This suggests that decompression sickness would be worsened by switching from nitrogen to helium in the breathing gas mixture.

  12. Atmospheric dispersion of natural gas from a rupture in a pressurized and valved subsea pipeline; Dispersao atmosferica de gas natural por ruptura em duto submarino pressurizado e valvulado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Fabio Coimbra Moreira de Macedo; Medeiros, Jose Luiz de; Araujo, Ofelia de Queiroz Fernandes [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Escola de Quimica. Dept. de Engenharia Quimica

    2008-04-15

    This paper presents a simplified approach to the problem of transient atmospheric dispersion of natural gas released accidentally under the ocean, caused by leaks in pressurized subsea pipelines. The model aims to estimate the transient spatial distribution of gas concentration in the atmosphere for subsequent risk analysis. In this scenario, shut-off valves are used to rapidly isolate the damaged stretch of the gas pipeline (pipeline shutdown). The analysis considers the transient behavior of the remaining inventory inside the pipes through a release-by-leakage model, and the subsequent effect on the atmosphere surrounding the epicenter of release. There are also scenarios formulated with occurrences of numerous ruptures, synchronized or not, with known spatial distribution. The spatial-temporal model of atmospheric dispersion employed is based on the resolution of the tridimensional diffusion equation under turbulence in semi-infinite domains. The model includes appropriate resources to deal with: an ample range of atmospheric conditions; different wind velocities; transient conditions of gas released into the atmosphere (i.e., outflow, pressure, and temperature); many depths of emission; multi-source configuration of release. In this work a simulation tool in MATLAB environment was developed for the analyses of scenarios of transient dispersion of gas into the atmosphere. In the case of ruptures in subsea gas lines, this tool is useful to determine the conditions of maximum risk on production platforms situated close to the occurrence, as well as the impact of the localization of the shut-off valves in the release transient behavior. (author)

  13. Isothermal evaporation of ethanol in a dynamic gas atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milev, Adriyan S; Wilson, Michael A; Kannangara, G S Kamali; Feng, Hai; Newman, Phillip A

    2012-01-12

    Optimization of evaporation and pyrolysis conditions for ethanol are important in carbon nanotube (CNT) synthesis. The activation enthalpy (ΔH(‡)), the activation entropy (ΔS(‡)), and the free energy barrier (ΔG(‡)) to evaporation have been determined by measuring the molar coefficient of evaporation, k(evap), at nine different temperatures (30-70 °C) and four gas flow rates (25-200 mL/min) using nitrogen and argon as carrier gases. At 70 °C in argon, the effect of the gas flow rate on k(evap) and ΔG(‡) is small. However, this is not true at temperatures as low as 30 °C, where the increase of the gas flow rate from 25 to 200 mL/min results in a nearly 6 times increase of k(evap) and decrease of ΔG(‡) by ~5 kJ/mol. Therefore, at 30 °C, the effect of the gas flow rate on the ethanol evaporation rate is attributed to interactions of ethanol with argon molecules. This is supported by simultaneous infrared spectroscopic analysis of the evolved vapors, which demonstrates the presence of different amounts of linear and cyclic hydrogen bonded ethanol aggregates. While the amount of these aggregates at 30 °C depends upon the gas flow rate, no such dependence was observed during evaporation at 70 °C. When the evaporation was carried out in nitrogen, ΔG(‡) was almost independent of the evaporation temperature (30-70 °C) and the gas flow rate (25-200 mL/min). Thus the evaporation of ethanol in a dynamic gas atmosphere at different temperatures may go via different mechanisms depending on the nature of the carrier gas.

  14. Atmospheric aerosol and gas sensing using Scheimpflug lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Liang; Brydegaard, Mikkel

    2015-04-01

    This work presents a new lidar technique for atmospheric remote sensing based on Scheimpflug principle, which describes the relationship between nonparallel image- and object-planes[1]. When a laser beam is transmitted into the atmosphere, the implication is that the backscattering echo of the entire illuminated probe volume can be in focus simultaneously without diminishing the aperture. The range-resolved backscattering echo can be retrieved by using a tilted line scan or two-dimensional CCD/CMOS camera. Rather than employing nanosecond-pulsed lasers, cascade detectors, and MHz signal sampling, all of high cost and complexity, we have developed a robust and inexpensive atmospheric lidar system based on compact laser diodes and array detectors. We present initial applications of the Scheimpflug lidar for atmospheric aerosol monitoring in bright sunlight, with a 3 W, 808 nm CW laser diode. Kilohertz sampling rates are also achieved with applications for wind speed and entomology [2]. Further, a proof-of-principle demonstration of differential absorption lidar (DIAL) based on the Scheimpflug lidar technique is presented [3]. By utilizing a 30 mW narrow band CW laser diode emitting at around 760 nm, the detailed shape of an oxygen absorption line can be resolved remotely with an integration time of 6 s and measurement cycle of 1 minute during night time. The promising results demonstrated in this work show potential for the Scheimpflug lidar technique for remote atmospheric aerosol and gas sensing, and renews hope for robust and realistic instrumentation for atmospheric lidar sensing. [1] F. Blais, "Review of 20 years of range sensor development," Journal of Electronic Imaging, vol. 13, pp. 231-243, Jan 2004. [2] M. Brydegaard, A. Gebru, and S. Svanberg, "Super resolution laser radar with blinking atmospheric particles - application to interacting flying insects " Progress In Electromagnetics Research, vol. 147, pp. 141-151, 2014. [3] L. Mei and M. Brydegaard

  15. Atmospheric Electrodeless Microwave Plasma-torch for Gas Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J. H.; Hong, Y. C.; Uhm, H. S.

    2001-10-01

    Increasing environmental awareness and regulation have motivated research into new method to remediate toxins from atmospheric pressure gas streams. Plasma remediation was identified as a promising technology treating contaminated gas streams and air. Plasma remediation of toxic gas streams from mobile emitting sources (i. e., Nox, Sox, soot emission from diesel truck engines) and cleaning processes (i.e., global warming gases) require inexpensive, compact, and reliable systems which efficiently and selectively convert the toxic gas to benign or more treatable products. Environmental clean-up and energy efficiency enhancement utilize plasma generated from air at the atmospheric pressure. Electrodes of the arc plasma torches oxidize very quickly due to the oxygen molecules in air. That is why the conventional thermal plasma torch can not be used in environmental applications. In order to solve this difficult problem, we developed a thermal plasma source operating without electrodes. One of electrodeless torches is the microwave plasma which can produce plasmas in large quantities. We can generate plasma at the atmospheric pressure by making use of magnetrons in microwave-ovens. Most of the magnetrons are operated at the frequency of 2.45GHz. Typical magnetron power of home-microwave oven is about 1kW. Electromagnetic waves from magnetron propagate through a waveguide. Plasma is generated under resonant condition, by initiation of an auxiliary ignition system. The plasma is stabilized by vortex stabilization. The eventual application of this research is in air pollution control. Perfluorocarbon Compounds(PFCs), , , and any other global warming gases from etching and cleaning processes have very long lifetime and high global warming potential. We will conduct an experiment to eliminate global warming gases. FT-IR and QMS will be used to analyze and identify by-products after plasma treatment.

  16. Carbothermal Reduction of Quartz in Different Gas Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Zhang, Guangqing; Tang, Kai; Ostrovski, Oleg; Tronstad, Ragnar

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the influence of gas atmosphere on the synthesis of silicon carbide by carbothermal reduction of quartz. The quartz was crushed to Synthesis of silicon carbide in hydrogen was close to completion in 270 minutes at 1673 K (1400 °C), 140 minutes at 1773 K (1500 °C), and 70 minutes at 1873 K (1600 °C). Faster carbothermal reduction rate in hydrogen was attributed to the involvement of hydrogen in the reduction reactions by directly reducing silica and/or indirectly, by reacting with graphite to form methane as an intermediate reductant.

  17. A history of atmospheric tritium gas (HT) 1950 2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happell, James D.; Östlund, Göte; Mason, Allen S.

    2004-07-01

    Data collected as a part of this study from 1968 2002 and data from other studies from 1950 1967 show that the maximum atmospheric concentration of tritium gas (HT) occurred in the early to mid 1970s, which corresponds to the era of frequent, large underground nuclear tests. These data clearly show that the major source of HT to the atmosphere between 1962 and the early 1990s was the underground testing of nuclear weapons. Samples collected at both our Alaska and Miami stations clearly show marked increases in the autumn of each year between 1970 and 1975 that were associated with large underground explosions conducted by the former Soviet Union at the Novaya Zemlya test site. Other significant sources of HT include accidental releases of HT used in the manufacture and maintenance of nuclear weapons stockpiles, the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel rods and emissions from nuclear power plants. Since the early 1990s, when underground testing largely ceased, emission estimates from our data agree very well with United Nations estimates of worldwide releases from fuel reprocessing and nuclear power plants, suggesting that the nuclear power industry is now the major source of HT to the atmosphere.

  18. Lake-Atmosphere Greenhouse Gas Exchange in Relation to Atmospheric Forcing and Water Clarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiskanen, J. J.; Ojala, A.; Mammarella, I.; Vesala, T.

    2015-12-01

    Even though lakes cover only 2 % of the world's land surface, it has been estimated that lakes release about 10 % of the carbon fixed annually by the terrestrial ecosystems back to the atmosphere. A critical parameter in the gas exchange estimates is the gas transfer velocity (k), which is governed by turbulence. The aim of our study was to assess the current global CO2 evasion estimates from lakes to the atmosphere by comparing parameterizations for kand the significance of wind and heat flux to the gas transfer in small lakes. To improve future predictions of gas evasion from lakes, we focused on the changes in water clarity and how they affect water column physics and processes in the air-water interface. We studied a small boreal lake and used the eddy covariance (EC) method for the high precision data needed, and therefore also aimed to improve the EC methodology on lakes. The air-water gas transfer was related to both wind and heat loss during times of seasonal stratification, but only to wind during autumn overturn. When wind-induced thermocline tilting and resulting spatial variability in surface water CO2 concentrations was accounted for, average k derived from the measurements dropped from 6.0 cm h-1 to 5.2 cm h-1. This was still over twice the estimate (2.2 cm h-1) calculated with a widely used model for kin lakes suggesting that the global estimates of gas evasion from lakes might be underestimations. Water clarity was a significant parameter defining the thermal stratification of the lake: a change from clear to dark water would lead to shorter stratification period and lower water column temperatures in small lakes and therefore have significant impact on the lake-atmosphere exchange processes. Figure 1. The isotherms of Lake Kuivajärvi throughout the open-water period 2013. The top left are the measured temperatures and the others are modeled with LAKE model using fixed light extinction coefficient, Kd. The horizontal dashed black line represents

  19. Laser Welding Test Results with Gas Atmospheres in Welding Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joung, Chang-Young; Hong, Jin-Tae; Ahn, Sung-Ho; Heo, Sung-Ho; Jang, Seo-Yun; Yang, Tae-Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The weld beads of specimens welded under identical conditions in the helium and argon gas were cleaner, more regular, and steadier than those in a vacuum. The penetration depth of the FZ in the vacuum was much deeper than those in the helium and argon gas. To measure the irradiation properties of nuclear fuel in a test reactor, a nuclear fuel test rod instrumented with various sensors must be fabricated with assembly processes. A laser welding system to assemble the nuclear fuel test rod was designed and fabricated to develop various welding technologies of the fuel test rods to joint between a cladding tube and end-caps. It is an air-cooling optical fiber type and its emission modes are a continuous (CW) mode of which the laser generates continuous emission, and pulse (QCW) mode in which the laser internally generates sequences of pulses. We considered the system welding a sample in a chamber that can weld a specimen in a vacuum and inert gas atmosphere, and the chamber was installed on the working plate of the laser welding system. In the chamber, the laser welding process should be conducted to have no defects on the sealing area between a cladding tube and an end-cap.

  20. The impact of atmospheric dust deposition and trace elements levels on the villages surrounding the former mining areas in a semi-arid environment (SE Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Bisquert, David; Matías Peñas Castejón, José; García Fernández, Gregorio

    2017-03-01

    It is understood that particulate matter in the atmosphere from metallic mining waste has adverse health effects on populations living nearby. Atmospheric deposition is a process connecting the mining wasteswith nearby ecosystems. Unfortunately, very limited information is available about atmospheric deposition surrounding rural metallic mining areas. This article will focus on the deposition from mining areas, combined with its impact on nearby rural built areas and populations. Particle samples were collected between June 2011 and March 2013. They were collected according to Spanish legislation in ten specialised dust collectors. They were located near populations close to a former Mediterranean mining area, plus a control, to assess the impact of mining waste on these villages. This article and its results have been made through an analysis of atmospheric deposition of these trace elements (Mn, Zn, As, Cd and Pb). It also includes an analysis of total dust flux. Within this analysis it has considered the spatial variations of atmospheric deposition flux in these locations. The average annual level of total bulk deposition registered was 42.0 g m-2 per year. This was higher than most of the areas affected by a Mediterranean climate or in semi-arid conditions around the world. Regarding the overall analysis of trace elements, the annual bulk deposition fluxes of total Zn far exceeded the values of other areas. While Mn, Cd and Pb showed similar or lower values, and in part much lower than those described in other Mediterranean mining areas. This study confirmed some spatial variability of dust and trace elements, contained within the atmospheric deposition. From both an environmental and a public health perspective, environmental managers must take into account the cumulative effect of the deposition of trace elements on the soil and air quality around and within the villages surrounding metallic mining areas.

  1. The Third Pole Environment Programme (TPE): A new base for the processes study of atmospheric physics and environment over the Tibetan Plateau and surrounding regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yaoming

    2016-04-01

    The Tibetan Plateau, with the most prominent and complicated terrain on the globe and an elevation of more than 4000 m on average above sea leave (msl), is often called the "Third Pole" due to its significance parallel with Antarctica and the Arctic. The exchange of energy, water vapor and some greenhouse gases between land surface and atmosphere over the Tibetan Plateau and the surrounding regions play an important role in the Asian monsoon system, which in turn is a major component of both the energy and water cycles of the global climate system. Supported by the Chinese Academy of Sciences and some international organizations, a Third Pole Environment (TPE) Research Platform (TPEP) is now implementing over the Tibetan Plateau and surrounding region. The background of the establishment of the TPEP, the establishing and monitoring plan of long-term scale (5-10 years) of the TPEP will be shown firstly. Then the preliminary observational analysis results, such as the characteristics of land surface heat fluxes, CO2 flux and evapotranspiration (ET) partitioning (diurnal variation, inter-monthly variation and vertical variation etc), aerosol optical properties between southern and northern sides of the Himalayas, the characteristics of atmospheric and soil variables, the structure of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) and the turbulent characteristics have also been shown in this study.

  2. Recuperated atmospheric SOFC/gas turbine hybrid cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundberg, Wayne

    2010-05-04

    A method of operating an atmospheric-pressure solid oxide fuel cell generator (6) in combination with a gas turbine comprising a compressor (1) and expander (2) where an inlet oxidant (20) is passed through the compressor (1) and exits as a first stream (60) and a second stream (62) the first stream passing through a flow control valve (56) to control flow and then through a heat exchanger (54) followed by mixing with the second stream (62) where the mixed streams are passed through a combustor (8) and expander (2) and the first heat exchanger for temperature control before entry into the solid oxide fuel cell generator (6), which generator (6) is also supplied with fuel (40).

  3. Recuperated atmosphere SOFC/gas turbine hybrid cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundberg, Wayne

    2010-08-24

    A method of operating an atmospheric-pressure solid oxide fuel cell generator (6) in combination with a gas turbine comprising a compressor (1) and expander (2) where an inlet oxidant (20) is passed through the compressor (1) and exits as a first stream (60) and a second stream (62) the first stream passing through a flow control valve (56) to control flow and then through a heat exchanger (54) followed by mixing with the second stream (62) where the mixed streams are passed through a combustor (8) and expander (2) and the first heat exchanger for temperature control before entry into the solid oxide fuel cell generator (6), which generator (6) is also supplied with fuel (40).

  4. Impact of surrounding environment evolution on long-term gas flux measurements in a temperate mixed forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurdebise, Quentin; Rixen, Toma; De Ligne, Anne; Vincke, Caroline; Heinesch, Bernard; Aubinet, Marc

    2016-04-01

    With the development of eddy covariance networks like Fluxnet, ICOS or NEON, long-term data series of carbon dioxide, water vapor and other gas exchanges between terrestrial ecosystems and atmosphere will become more and more numerous. However, long-term analyses of such exchanges require a good understanding of measurement conditions during the investigated period. Independently of climate drivers, measurements may indeed be influenced by measurement conditions themselves subjected to long-term variability due to vegetation growth or set-up changes. The present research refers to the Vielsalm Terrestrial Observatory (VTO) where fluxes of momentum, carbon dioxide, latent and sensible heat have been continuously measured by eddy covariance during twenty years. VTO is an ICOS site installed in a mixed forest (beech, silver fir, Douglas fir, Norway spruce) in the Belgian Ardennes. A multidisciplinary approach was developed in order to investigate the spatial and temporal evolution of several site characteristics: -displacement height (d) and relative measurement height (z-d) were determined using a spectral approach that compared observed and theoretical cospectra; -turbulence statistics were analyzed in the context of Monin-Obukhov similarity theory; -tree height during the measurement period was obtained by combining tree height inventories, a LIDAR survey and tree growth models; -measurement footprint was determined by using a footprint model. A good agreement was found between the three first approaches. Results show notably that z-d was subjected to both temporal and spatial evolution. Temporal evolution resulted from continuous tree growth as well as from a tower raise, achieved in 2009. Spatial evolution, due to canopy heterogeneity, was also observed. The impacts of these changes on measurements are investigated. In particular, it was shown that they affect measurement footprint, flux spectral corrections and flux quality. All these effects must be taken into

  5. A Fourier transform infrared trace gas analyser for atmospheric applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. W. T. Griffith

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Concern in recent decades about human impacts on Earth's climate has led to the need for improved and expanded measurement capabilities for greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. In this paper we describe in detail an in situ trace gas analyser based on Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR spectroscopy that is capable of simultaneous and continuous measurements of carbon dioxide (CO2, methane (CH4, carbon monoxide (CO, nitrous oxide (N2O and 13C in CO2 in air with high precision and accuracy. Stable water isotopes can also be measured in undried airstreams. The analyser is automated and allows unattended operation with minimal operator intervention. Precision and accuracy meet and exceed the compatibility targets set by the World Meteorological Organisation – Global Atmosphere Watch Programme for baseline measurements in the unpolluted troposphere for all species except 13C in CO2.

    The analyser is mobile and well suited to fixed sites, tower measurements, mobile platforms and campaign-based measurements. The isotopic specificity of the optically-based technique and analysis allows application of the analyser in isotopic tracer experiments, for example 13C in CO2 and 15N in N2O. We review a number of applications illustrating use of the analyser in clean air monitoring, micrometeorological flux and tower measurements, mobile measurements on a train, and soil flux chamber measurements.

  6. Sub-micron atmospheric aerosols in the surroundings of Marseille and Athens: physical characterization and new particle formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petäjä, T.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Dal Maso, M.; Junninen, H.; Koponen, I. K.; Hussein, T.; Aalto, P. P.; Andronopoulos, S.; Robin, D.; Hämeri, K.; Bartzis, J. G.; Kulmala, M.

    2007-05-01

    The properties of atmospheric aerosol particles in Marseille and Athens were investigated. The studies were performed in Marseille, France, during July 2002 and in Athens, Greece, during June 2003. The aerosol size distribution and the formation and growth rates of newly formed particles were characterized using Differential Mobility Particle Sizers. Hygroscopic properties were observed using a Hygroscopic Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer setup. During both campaigns, the observations were performed at suburban, almost rural sites, and the sites can be considered to show general regional background behavior depending on the wind direction. At both sites there were clear pattern for both aerosol number concentration and hygroscopic properties. Nucleation mode number concentration increased during the morning hours indicating new particle formation, which was observed during more than 30% of the days. The observed formation rate was typically more than 1 cm-3 s-1, and the growth rate was between 1.2-9.9 nm h-1. Based on hygroscopicity measurements in Athens, the nucleation mode size increase was due to condensation of both water insoluble and water soluble material. However, during a period of less anthropogenic influence, the growth was to a larger extent due to water insoluble components. When urban pollution was more pronounced, growth due to condensation of water soluble material dominated.

  7. Relating landfill gas emissions to atmospheric pressure using numerical modeling and state-space analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, T.G.; Christophersen, Mette; Moldrup, P.

    2003-01-01

    were applied: (I) State-space analysis was used to identify relations between gas flux and short-term (hourly) variations in atmospheric pressure. (II) A numerical gas transport model was fitted to the data and used to quantify short-term impacts of variations in atmospheric pressure, volumetric soil......-water content, soil gas permeability, soil gas diffusion coefficients, and biological CH4 degradation rate upon landfill gas concentration and fluxes in the soil. Fluxes and concentrations were found to be most sensitive to variations in volumetric soil water content, atmospheric pressure variations and gas...... permeability whereas variations in CH4 oxidation rate and molecular coefficients had less influence. Fluxes appeared to be most sensitive to atmospheric pressure at intermediate distances from the landfill edge. Also overall CH4 fluxes out of the soil over longer periods (years) were largest during periods...

  8. Computer realization of estimations of the atmospheric anomalies caused by gas-aerosol pollution of the near-ground atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chistyakova, Liliya K.; Isakova, Anna I.; Smal, Oksana V.; Penin, Sergei T.; Kataev, Mikhail Y.; Kopytin, Yurii D.

    2004-02-01

    In the paper, algorithms of the techniques incorporated in subsystems of the program complex are presented for calculation and estimation of atmospheric anomalies, caused by industrial emissions in the atmosphere. The complex is included in the gas analyzer DAN-2, developed for registration of emission and absorption of optical and the microwave radiation initiated by gas-aerosol pollution in the atmosphere. The complex DAN-2 has been developed in the Institute of Atmospheric Optics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Science. Techniques include: calculation of gas concentration in a plume of industrial emission taking into account gas-aerosol attenuation, an azimuth of the device sighting at a direction of the source and the allocated illumination of the day-time sky; numerical modeling of formation and distribution of gas-aerosol emission fields in the atmosphere with use of various models (Gaussian, Berlyand, etc); the forecast of optical noise in the atmosphere at operating hardware DAN-2 taking into account different types of underground surfaces under various hydro meteorological conditions; algorithm of restoration of the plume structure under its image. In the paper, results of testing of the specified algorithms are presented with use of the data of natural measurements of NO2 and SO2 concentration in the emission plume of the thermal power station GRES-2 in Tomsk, which were received by the complex DAN-2. Calculation of atmospheric background noise and distributions of the gas-aerosol plume has been carried out by various methods with use of these data.

  9. Miniaturized Hollow-Waveguide Gas Correlation Radiometer (GCR) for Trace Gas Detection in the Martian Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Emily L.; Georgieva, E. M.; Melroy, H. R.

    2012-01-01

    Gas correlation radiometry (GCR) has been shown to be a sensitive and versatile method for detecting trace gases in Earth's atmosphere. Here, we present a miniaturized and simplified version of this instrument capable of mapping multiple trace gases and identifying active regions on the Mars surface. Reduction of the size and mass of the GCR instrument has been achieved by implementing a lightweight, 1 mm inner diameter hollow-core optical fiber (hollow waveguide) for the gas correlation cell. Based on a comparison with an Earth orbiting CO2 gas correlation instrument, replacement of the 10 meter mUltipass cell with hollow waveguide of equivalent pathlength reduces the cell mass from approx 150 kg to approx 0.5 kg, and reduces the volume from 1.9 m x 1.3 m x 0.86 m to a small bundle of fiber coils approximately I meter in diameter by 0.05 m in height (mass and volume reductions of >99%). This modular instrument technique can be expanded to include measurements of additional species of interest including nitrous oxide (N2O), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), methanol (CH3OH), and sulfur dioxide (SO2), as well as carbon dioxide (CO2) for a simultaneous measure of mass balance.

  10. Atmospheric Gas-Phase Reactions of Fluorinated Compounds and Alkenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østerstrøm, Freja From

    3)2CHOCH3, (CF3)2CHOCHO, CF3C(0)OCH3, Z- and E-CF 3CH=CHCF3. These studies include determining the kinetics of the reactions of the compounds with atmospheric oxidants, the products of the reactions, and assessing the atmospheric impact of the compounds by estimating their atmospheric lifetime...

  11. Advancement and application of gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry techniques for atmospheric trace gas analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giebel, Brian M.

    2011-12-01

    The use of gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-IRMS) for compound specific stable isotope analysis is an underutilized technique because of the complexity of the instrumentation and high analytical costs. However stable isotopic data, when coupled with concentration measurements, can provide additional information on a compounds production, transformation, loss, and cycling within the biosphere and atmosphere. A GC-IRMS system was developed to accurately and precisely measure delta13C values for numerous oxygenated volatile organic compounds having natural and anthropogenic sources. The OVOCs include methanol, ethanol, acetone, methyl ethyl ketone, 2-pentanone, and 3-pentanone. Guided by the requirements for analysis of trace components in air, the GC-IRMS system was developed with the goals of increasing sensitivity, reducing dead-volume and peak band broadening, optimizing combustion and water removal, and decreasing the split ratio to the IRMS. The technique relied on a two-stage preconcentration system, a low-volume capillary reactor and water trap, and a balanced reference gas delivery system. Measurements were performed on samples collected from two distinct sources (i.e. biogenic and vehicle emissions) and ambient air collected from downtown Miami and Everglades National Park. However, the instrumentation and the method have the capability to analyze a variety of source and ambient samples. The measured isotopic signatures that were obtained from source and ambient samples provide a new isotopic constraint for atmospheric chemists and can serve as a new way to evaluate their models and budgets for many OVOCs. In almost all cases, OVOCs emitted from fuel combustion were enriched in 13C when compared to the natural emissions of plants. This was particularly true for ethanol gas emitted in vehicle exhaust, which was observed to have a uniquely enriched isotopic signature that was attributed to ethanol's corn origin and use as an alternative

  12. Transparency, consultation and conflict: Assessing the micro-level risks surrounding the drive to develop Peru's Amazonian oil and gas resources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haselip, James Arthur

    2011-01-01

    Since the 1990s, successive Governments in Peru have sought to expand the exploration and production of the country's oil and gas resources. This economic agenda poses significant opportunities and risks which are usually considered at the macro-level and framed by debates regarding the so......-called “natural resource curse”. While risks such as “Dutch disease” are important to consider, a worrying set of short-term issues surrounds the impacts of rapid changes brought on by oil and gas industrial development at the micro-level, namely, those that affect local communities and the environment....... In the case of Peru, this is especially relevant to the vast areas of ecologically sensitive and previously under-developed Amazonia that are now under concession to oil and gas companies. Low levels of industry transparency combined with a lack of uniform free, prior and informed consent are exacerbating...

  13. Atmospheric Gas-Phase Reactions of Fluorinated Compounds and Alkenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østerstrøm, Freja From

    for Atmospheric Research, Denmark. All setups consist of a chamber and uses UV light to initiate the experiments and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy for the analysis of the data. The atmospheric chemistry of new chlorofluorocarbon replacements is discussed. Experimental studies have been performed on: (CF......3)2CHOCH3, (CF3)2CHOCHO, CF3C(0)OCH3, Z- and E-CF 3CH=CHCF3. These studies include determining the kinetics of the reactions of the compounds with atmospheric oxidants, the products of the reactions, and assessing the atmospheric impact of the compounds by estimating their atmospheric lifetime...... and global warming potential. A mechanistic study of the hydrofluorocarbon CH2F2 has been performed in the absence and presence of hydrocarbons, investigating the possibility of formation of fluorinated alcohols. The reaction mechanism was studied in detail, examining competition between peroxy and alkoxy...

  14. Trace Atmospheric Gas Analyzer (TAGA) Dispersant Data for BP Spil/Deepwater Horizon - August 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Trace Atmospheric Gas Analyzer (TAGA) buses are self-contained mobile laboratories that conduct instant-result monitoring of air quality at particular locations....

  15. Simulation of rarefied gas flows in atmospheric pressure interfaces for mass spectrometry systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garimella, Sandilya; Zhou, Xiaoyu; Ouyang, Zheng

    2013-12-01

    The understanding of the gas dynamics of the atmospheric pressure interface is very important for the development of mass spectrometry systems with high sensitivity. While the gas flows at high pressure (>1 Torr) and low pressure (pressure stage (1 to 10(-3) Torr) remains challenging. In this study, we used the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DMSC) method to develop the gas dynamic simulations for the continuous and discontinuous atmospheric pressure interfaces (API), with different focuses on the ion transfer by gas flows through a skimmer or directly from the atmospheric pressure to a vacuum stage, respectively. The impacts by the skimmer location in the continuous API and the temporal evolvement of the gas flow with a discontinuous API were characterized, which provide a solid base for the instrument design and performance improvement.

  16. Atmospheric emissions and air quality impacts from natural gas production and use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, David T

    2014-01-01

    The US Energy Information Administration projects that hydraulic fracturing of shale formations will become a dominant source of domestic natural gas supply over the next several decades, transforming the energy landscape in the United States. However, the environmental impacts associated with fracking for shale gas have made it controversial. This review examines emissions and impacts of air pollutants associated with shale gas production and use. Emissions and impacts of greenhouse gases, photochemically active air pollutants, and toxic air pollutants are described. In addition to the direct atmospheric impacts of expanded natural gas production, indirect effects are also described. Widespread availability of shale gas can drive down natural gas prices, which, in turn, can impact the use patterns for natural gas. Natural gas production and use in electricity generation are used as a case study for examining these indirect consequences of expanded natural gas availability.

  17. Continuous measurements of atmospheric oxygen and carbon dioxide on a North Sea gas platform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laan-Luijkx, I.T. van der; Neubert, R.E.M.; Laan, S. van der; Meijer, H.A.J.; Toohey, D.

    2010-01-01

    A new atmospheric measurement station has been established on the North Sea oil and gas production platform F3, 200 km north off the Dutch coast (54 degrees 51' N, 4 degrees 44' E). Atmospheric concentrations of O(2) and CO(2) are continuously measured using fuel cell technology and compact infrared

  18. Continuous measurements of atmospheric oxygen and carbon dioxide on a North Sea gas platform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laan-Luijkx, van der I.T.; Neubert, R.E.M.; Laan, van der S.; Meijer, H.A.J.

    2010-01-01

    A new atmospheric measurement station has been established on the North Sea oil and gas production platform F3, 200 km north off the Dutch coast (54°51' N, 4°44' E). Atmospheric concentrations of O2 and CO2 are continuously measured using fuel cell technology and compact infrared absorption instrume

  19. Energy saving avoiding the centrifugal motor-compressors air vents discharge to the surrounding atmosphere; Ahorro de energia evitando venteo de aire a la atmosfera en motocompresores centrifugos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrano, Alex [Compressor Controls Corporation, Houston, TX (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The motor-compressors are a key part of the industrial processes. The reliability and efficient operation of a compressor is critical. The surge phenomenon is a threat in the reliability of a compressor and therefore for the process. Surge, in a centrifugal compressor is defined as a dramatic flow and pressure drop, including back-flow. This is always a significant process disturbance. Continuous surge results into costly process shutdowns and mechanical damages. To prevent surge, and control the discharge pressure with simple or obsolete controls it is needed to vent air to the surrounding atmosphere. This form of control is very inefficient and costly. An advanced control with leading technology, besides providing an economical value preventing surge damages, offers substantial energy saving reducing or eliminating the venting of air to the atmosphere. [Espanol] Los motocompresores son un aparte clave de los procesos industriales. La confiable y eficiente operacion de un compresor es critica. El fenomeno de surge es una amenaza a la confiabilidad de un compresor y por lo tanto del proceso. El surge en un compresor centrifugo es definido como una dramatica caida de flujo y presion, incluyendo flujo inverso. Esto es siempre un significante disturbio del proceso. El surge continuo resulta en costosos paros de proceso y danos mecanicos. Para prevenir el surge y controlar la presion de descarga con controles simples u obsoletos, es necesario ventear aire a la atmosfera. Esta forma de control es muy ineficiente y costosa. Un control avanzado con tecnologia de punta ademas de proveer valor economico previniendo danos por surge, provee sustanciales ahorros de energia reduciendo o eliminando el venteo de aire a la atmosfera.

  20. A SUBSTANTIAL MASS OF COOL, METAL-ENRICHED GAS SURROUNDING THE PROGENITORS OF MODERN-DAY ELLIPTICALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prochaska, J. Xavier [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Hennawi, Joseph F. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69115 Heidelberg (Germany); Simcoe, Robert A. [MIT-Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2013-01-10

    The hosts of luminous z {approx} 2 quasars evolve into today's massive elliptical galaxies. Current theories predict that the circumgalactic medium (CGM) of these massive, dark matter halos (M{sub DM} {approx} 10{sup 12.5} M{sub Sun }) should be dominated by a T {approx} 10{sup 7} K virialized plasma. We test this hypothesis with observations of 74 close-projected quasar pairs, using spectra of the background QSO to characterize the CGM of the foreground one. Surprisingly, our measurements reveal a cool (T Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 4} K), massive (M{sub CGM} > 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }), and metal-enriched (Z {approx}> 0.1 Z{sub Sun }) medium extending to at least the expected virial radius (r{sub vir} = 160 kpc). The average equivalent widths of H I Ly{alpha} (W-bar{sub Ly{alpha}}= 2.1{+-}0.15 A for impact parameters R < 200 kpc) and C II 1334 (W-bar{sub 1334}= 0.7{+-}0.1) exceed the corresponding CGM measurements of these transitions from all galaxy populations studied previously. Furthermore, we conservatively estimate that the quasar CGM has a 64{sup +6}{sub -7}% covering fraction of optically thick gas (N{sub HI} > 10{sup 17.2} cm{sup -2}) within r{sub vir}; this covering factor is twice that of the contemporaneous Lyman break galaxy population. This unexpected reservoir of cool gas is rarely detected 'down-the-barrel' to quasars, and hence it is likely that our background sight lines intercept gas that is shadowed from the quasar ionizing radiation by the same obscuring medium often invoked in models of active galactic nucleus unification. Because the high-z halos inhabited by quasars predate modern groups and clusters, these observations are also relevant to the formation and enrichment history of the intragroup/intracluster medium.

  1. Beyond Science and Hysteria: Reality and Perceptions of Environmental Justice Concerns Surrounding Marcellus and Utica Shale Gas Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann M. Eisenberg

    2016-01-01

    This Article argues that a nuanced characterization of the HF controversy should include a more robust discussion of both environmental justice and discourse in order to account for the inordinate burden residents of Appalachia have historically borne in fossil fuel production.  Part I examines relevant regional economic and social dynamics, including the natural resource curse, Appalachia’s unique vulnerabilities, efforts to portray opponents of shale gas development as “anti-science,” and the environmental justice movement’s relationship to extractive industries.  Part II reviews the use of modern HF technology and applicable legal frameworks in West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and New York.  Part III argues that across Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia, environmental justice issues have arisen from shale gas development, including problems stemming from information asymmetries, power asymmetries, and limited access to justice.  In Part IV, the Article argues that the “anti-science” portrayal of shale gas opponents is unjustified, and that such “discourse-framing” obfuscates the actual costs and limitations on benefits of HF use, and thus, becomes an environmental justice issue itself.  Part IV also argues that environmental justice concerns shaped public sentiment in New York, and that the resulting “moral outrage” added to New York’s policy decision to ban HF altogether.  In Part V, the Article suggests that ideas which transcend the study of “moral outrage”/risk assessment and environmental justice advocacy may offer a way forward.

  2. Enormous Disc of Cool Gas Surrounding the Nearby Powerful Radio Galaxy NGC 612 (PKS 0131-36)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-22

    with a small overlap region Figure 1. Radio continuum map (contours) – constructed from the 750C array data – overlaid on to an optical SDSS image...optical SDSS image (grey-scale). Contour levels H I: 0.8, 1.1, 1.5, 1.9, 2.8, 4.0, 5.1, 6.5, 7.8 ×1019 cm−2. Left: HI absorption profile against the...I gas stretches 219 kpc toward the south-west. This H I tail has no identi- fiable counterpart in the optical Sloan Digital Sky Survey ( SDSS ) image

  3. Gas-temperature-dependent generation of cryoplasma jet under atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noma, Yuri; Choi, Jai Hyuk; Tomai, Takaaki; Terashima, Kazuo

    2008-09-01

    Plasma with a gas temperature below room temperature is not yet fully understood although it is expected to be an attractive tool for applications to material processing. In the present work, gas-temperature-dependent generation of a cryoplasma jet was studied. So far, we have generated a helium cryoplasma jet (296-5K) under atmospheric pressure. At gas temperatures below 20K, the helium excimer, He2, was observed clearly from by optical emission spectroscopy.

  4. The structure of the protoplanetary disk surrounding three young intermediate mass stars. II. Spatially resolved dust and gas distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Fedele, D; Acke, B; van der Plas, G; Van Boekel, R; Wittkowski, M; Henning, T; Bouwman, J; Meeus, G; Rafanelli, P

    2008-01-01

    [Abridged] We present the first direct comparison of the distribution of the gas, as traced by the [OI] 6300 AA emission, and the dust, as traced by the 10 micron emission, in the protoplanetary disk around three intermediate-mass stars: HD 101412, HD 135344 B and HD 179218. N-band visibilities were obtained with VLTI/MIDI. Simple geometrical models are used to compare the dust emission to high-resolution optical spectra in the 6300 AA [OI] line of the same targets. The disks around HD 101412 and HD 135344 B appear strongly flared in the gas, but self-shadowed in the dust beyond ~ 2 AU. In both systems, the 10 micron emission is rather compact (< 2 AU) while the [OI] brightness profile shows a double peaked structure. The inner peak is strongest and is consistent with the location of the dust, the outer peak is fainter and is located at 5-10 AU. Spatially extended PAH emission is found in both disks. The disk around HD 179218 is flared in the dust. The 10 micron emission emerges from a double ring-like str...

  5. Theory and technique of permeability enhancement and coal mine gas extraction by fracture network stimulation of surrounding beds and coal beds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Geng

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The existing reservoir stimulating technologies are only applicable to hard coal but helpless for soft coal, which is one of the main factors hindering the CBM industrialization in China. Therefore, it is urgent to develop a universal stimulating technology which can increase the permeability in various coal reservoirs. Theoretical analysis and field tests were used to systematically analyze the mechanical mechanisms causing the formation of various levels and types of fractures, such as radial tensile fractures, peripheral tensile fractures, and shear fractures in hydraulic fracturing, and reveal the mechanism of permeability enhancement by fracture network stimulating in surrounding beds and coal reservoirs. The results show that multi-staged perforation fracturing of horizontal wells, hydraulic-jet staged fracturing, four-variation hydraulic fracturing and some auxiliary measures are effective technical approaches to fracture network stimulation, especially the four-variation hydraulic fracturing can stimulate the fracture network in vertical and cluster wells. It is concluded that the fracture network stimulating technology for surrounding beds has significant advantages, such as safe drilling operation, strong stimulation effect, strong adaptability to stress-sensitive and velocity-sensitive beds, and is suitable for coal reservoirs of any structure. Except for the limitation in extremely water-sensitive and high water-yield surrounding beds, the technology can be universally used in all other beds. The successful industrial tests in surface coal bed methane and underground coal mines gas extraction prove that the theory and technical system of fracture network stimulating in surrounding beds and coal reservoirs, as a universally applicable measure, will play a role in the CBM development in China.

  6. Thermochromatography study of volatile polonium species in various gas atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Maugeri, Emilio Andrea; Eichler, Robert; Piguet,David; Mendonça, Tania Melo; Stora, Thierry; Schumann, Dorothea

    2014-01-01

    Phenomena related to the volatilization of polonium and its compounds are critical issues for the safety assessment of the innovative lead–bismuth cooled type of nuclear reactor or accelerator driven systems. The formation and volatilization of different species of polonium and their interaction with fused silica was studied by thermochromatography using carrier gases with varied redox potential. The obtained results show that under inert and reducing conditions in the absence of moisture, elemental polonium is formed. Polonium compounds more volatile than elemental polonium can be formed if traces of moisture are present in both inert and reducing carrier gas. The use of dried oxygen as carrier gas leads to the formation of polonium oxides, which are less volatile than elemental polonium. It was also found that the volatility of polonium oxides increases with increasing oxidation state. In the presence of moisture in an oxidizing carrier gas, species are formed that are more volatile than the oxides and le...

  7. Shock jump relations for a dusty gas atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, R. K.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents simplified forms of jump relations for one dimensional shock waves propagating in a dusty gas. The dusty gas is assumed to be a mixture of a perfect gas and spherically small solid particles, in which solid particles are continuously distributed. The simplified jump relations for the pressure, the temperature, the density, the velocity of the mixture and the speed of sound have been derived in terms of the upstream Mach number. The expressions for the adiabatic compressibility of the mixture and the change-in-entropy across the shock front have also been derived in terms of the upstream Mach number. Further, the handy forms of shock jump relations have been obtained in terms of the initial volume fraction of small solid particles and the ratio of specific heats of the mixture, simultaneously for the two cases viz., (i) when the shock is weak and, (ii) when it is strong. The simplified shock jump relations reduce to the Rankine-Hugoniot conditions for shock waves in an ideal gas when the mass fraction (concentration) of solid particles in the mixture becomes zero. Finally, the effects due to the mass fraction of solid particles in the mixture, and the ratio of the density of solid particles to the initial density of the gas are studied on the pressure, the temperature, the density, the velocity of the mixture, the speed of sound, the adiabatic compressibility of the mixture and the change-in-entropy across the shock front. The results provided a clear picture of whether and how the presence of dust particles affects the flow field behind the shock front. The aim of this paper is to contribute to the understanding of how the shock waves behave in the gas-solid particle two-phase flows.

  8. Gas adsorption and desorption effects on high pressure small volume cylinders and their relevance to atmospheric trace gas analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satar, Ece; Nyfeler, Peter; Pascale, Céline; Niederhauser, Bernhard; Leuenberger, Markus

    2017-04-01

    Long term atmospheric monitoring of trace gases requires great attention to precision and accuracy of the measurement setups. For globally integrated and well established greenhouse gas observation networks, the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) has set recommended compatibility goals within the framework of its Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) Programme [1]. To achieve these challenging limits, the measurement systems are regularly calibrated with standard gases of known composition. Therefore, the stability of the primary and secondary gas standards over time is an essential issue. Past studies have explained the small instabilities in high pressure standard gas cylinders through leakage, diffusion, regulator effects, gravimetric fractionation and surface processes [2, 3]. The latter include adsorption/desorption, which are functions of temperature, pressure and surface properties. For high pressure standard gas mixtures used in atmospheric trace gas analysis, there exists only a limited amount of data and few attempts to quantify the surface processes [4, 5]. Specifically, we have designed a high pressure measurement chamber to investigate trace gases and their affinity for adsorption on different surfaces over various temperature and pressure ranges. Here, we focus on measurements of CO2, CH4 and CO using a cavity ring down spectroscopy analyzer and quantify the concentration changes due to adsorption/desorption. In this study, the first results from these prototype cylinders of steel and aluminum will be presented. References [1] World Meteorological Organization (WMO), Global Atmosphere Watch.(GAW): Report No. 229, 18th WMO/IAEA Meeting on Carbon Dioxide, Other Greenhouse Gases and Related Tracers Measurement Techniques (GGMT-2015), 2016. [2] Keeling, R. F., Manning, A. C., Paplawsky, W. J., and Cox, A. C.: On the long-term stability of reference gases for atmospheric O2 /N2 and CO2 measurements, Tellus B, 59, 10.3402/tellusb.v59i1.16964, 2007. [3

  9. Study of the dense molecular gas surrounding the "Extended Green Object" G35.03+0.35

    CERN Document Server

    Paron, S; Petriella, A; Rubio, M; Giacani, E; Dubner, G

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of a new study of the molecular gas associated with the "extended green object" (EGO) G35.03+0.35. This object, very likely a massive young stellar object, is embedded in a molecular cloud at the border of an HII region. The observations were performed with the Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment (ASTE) in the 12CO and 13CO J=3-2, HCO+ J=4-3, and CS J=7-6 lines with an angular resolution about 22". From the 12CO J=3-2 line we discovered outflowing activity of the massive young stellar object. We obtained a total mass and kinetic energy for the outflows of 30 M_sun and 3000 M_sun (km/s)^2 (6 x 10^{46} ergs), respectively. We discovered a HCO+ and CS clump towards the EGO G35.03+0.35. The detection of these molecular species supports the presence of molecular outflows and a dense molecular envelope with temperatures and densities above 40 K and 6 x 10^{6} cm^{-3}, respectively. Using public near- and mid-IR, and sub-mm data we investigated the spectral energy distribution confirmin...

  10. Gas exchanges in soybean as affected by landfill biogas atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchiol, L.; Zerbi, G. (Univ. di Udine (Italy). Dipt. di Produzione Vegetale e Tecnologie Agrarie); Mori, A.; Leita, L. (Ist. Sperimentale per la Nutrizione delle Piante-Sezione di Gorizia (Italy))

    A problem in the ecological restoration of closed landfills is the production of potentially toxic gases by decomposition of refuse that affects the root system and physiology of plants growing on these sites. The aim of the present study was to assess the effects induced by landfill biogas contamination on gas-exchanges of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.]. Simulated landfill and control gases were supplied to soybean plants under laboratory conditions for 10 d. The composition of the simulated landfill gas used was: 16% O[sub 2], 8% CO[sub 2], 3% CH[sub 4], and 73% N[sub 2]; a control gas was also tested. Photosynthesis and stomatal conductance were significantly affected by the gas treatment after 3 d; in the course of the experiment, biogas treatment progressively reduced A[sub max] in light-saturation curves. The fresh and dry weight, leaf area and leaf chlorophyll content were not affected by the treatment. A metabolic adaptation to the biogas in the roots of treated plants was related to the disappearance of a fraction of the protein pool.

  11. Flared natural gas-based onsite atmospheric water harvesting (AWH) for oilfield operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikramanayake, Enakshi D.; Bahadur, Vaibhav

    2016-03-01

    Natural gas worth tens of billions of dollars is flared annually, which leads to resource waste and environmental issues. This work introduces and analyzes a novel concept for flared gas utilization, wherein the gas that would have been flared is instead used to condense atmospheric moisture. Natural gas, which is currently being flared, can alternatively power refrigeration systems to generate the cooling capacity for large scale atmospheric water harvesting (AWH). This approach solves two pressing issues faced by the oil-gas industry, namely gas flaring, and sourcing water for oilfield operations like hydraulic fracturing, drilling and water flooding. Multiple technical pathways to harvest atmospheric moisture by using the energy of natural gas are analyzed. A modeling framework is developed to quantify the dependence of water harvest rates on flared gas volumes and ambient weather. Flaring patterns in the Eagle Ford Shale in Texas and the Bakken Shale in North Dakota are analyzed to quantify the benefits of AWH. Overall, the gas currently flared annually in Texas and North Dakota can harvest enough water to meet 11% and 65% of the water consumption in the Eagle Ford and the Bakken, respectively. Daily harvests of upto 30 000 and 18 000 gallons water can be achieved using the gas currently flared per well in Texas and North Dakota, respectively. In fifty Bakken sites, the water required for fracturing or drilling a new well can be met via onsite flared gas-based AWH in only 3 weeks, and 3 days, respectively. The benefits of this concept are quantified for the Eagle Ford and Bakken Shales. Assessments of the global potential of this concept are presented using data from countries with high flaring activity. It is seen that this waste-to-value conversion concept offers significant economic benefits while addressing critical environmental issues pertaining to oil-gas production.

  12. Contribution of mine wastes to atmospheric metal deposition in the surrounding area of an abandoned heavily polluted mining district (Rio Tinto mines, Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Sonia; de la Rosa, Jesús D; Sánchez de la Campa, Ana M; González-Castanedo, Yolanda; Fernández-Caliani, Juan C; Gonzalez, Isabel; Romero, Antonio

    2013-04-01

    The present study seeks to estimate the impact of abandoned mine wastes on the levels and chemical profile of total atmospheric deposition in one of the oldest and largest mining districts in Europe (Rio Tinto mines, Iberian Pyrite Belt), on the basis of a complete geochemical characterization of particulate matter samples periodically collected in five sampling stations located around the mining district between March 2009 and February 2011. The annual levels of total bulk deposition (soluble and insoluble fractions) registered in the Rio Tinto Mining District ranged between 18 and 43 g/m(2) depending on the distance from the sampling station with regard to the mine waste deposits. As a general pattern in the area, high mass levels of Zn and Cu were deposited in a range of 9-62 mg/m(2) not only in the insoluble but also in the soluble fraction. Other potentially toxic trace elements such as As, Sb, Ba, Pb, Sn and Bi showed greater deposition fluxes in the locations closest to the mine waste deposits. A principal component analysis with a Multilinear Regression Analysis certifies the presence of two common sources in the mining area: 1) a mineral factor composed mainly of elements derived from silicate minerals (Al, Ca, Sr, Ti, Li, Mg, Mn, K, Na and Fe), mixed with other anthropogenic species (NH4(+), SO4(2-), NO3(-)) within the village closest to the mine; and 2) a marine factor composed of Na, Cl, Mg, SO4(2-) and Sr. In addition, a mine waste factor made up of toxic elements (Cu, Zn, Ga, As, Sb, Ba, Pb, Sn, Cd and Bi) has been recognized in the sampling sites exposed to dust-bearing winds downwind of the mining area, suggesting that mine wastes are a relevant source of heavy-mineral particles with potentially adverse environmental effects to surrounding soils, plants and humans.

  13. Dissolved atmospheric gas in xylem sap measured with membrane inlet mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, H Jochen; Espino, Susana; Visser, Ate; Esser, Bradley K

    2016-04-01

    A new method is described for measuring dissolved gas concentrations in small volumes of xylem sap using membrane inlet mass spectrometry. The technique can be used to determine concentrations of atmospheric gases, such as argon, as reported here, or for any dissolved gases and their isotopes for a variety of applications, such as rapid detection of trace gases from groundwater only hours after they were taken up by trees and rooting depth estimation. Atmospheric gas content in xylem sap directly affects the conditions and mechanisms that allow for gas removal from xylem embolisms, because gas can dissolve into saturated or supersaturated sap only under gas pressure that is above atmospheric pressure. The method was tested for red trumpet vine, Distictis buccinatoria (Bignoniaceae), by measuring atmospheric gas concentrations in sap collected at times of minimum and maximum daily temperature and during temperature increase and decline. Mean argon concentration in xylem sap did not differ significantly from saturation levels for the temperature and pressure conditions at any time of collection, but more than 40% of all samples were supersaturated, especially during the warm parts of day. There was no significant diurnal pattern, due to high variability between samples.

  14. The Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer on the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaffy, Paul R.; Benna, Mehdi; King, Todd; Harpold, Daniel N.; Arvey, Robert; Barciniak, Michael; Bendt, Mirl; Carrigan, Daniel; Errigo, Therese; Holmes, Vincent; Kellogg, James; Jaeger, Ferzan; Raaen, Eric; Tan, Florence

    2014-01-01

    The Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer (NGIMS) of the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution Mission (MAVEN) is designed to measure the composition, structure, and variability of the upper atmosphere of Mars. The NGIMS complements two other instrument packages on the MAVEN spacecraft designed to characterize the neutral upper atmosphere and ionosphere of Mars and the solar wind input to this region of the atmosphere. The combined measurement set is designed to quantify atmosphere escape rates and provide input to models of the evolution of the martian atmosphere. The NGIMS is designed to measure both surface reactive and inert neutral species and ambient ions along the spacecraft track over the 125-500 km altitude region utilizing a dual ion source and a quadrupole analyzer.

  15. Radon Like atmospheric pollutant; El gas Radon como contaminante atmosferico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quindos Poncela, L. S.; Sainz Fernandez, C.; Quindos Lopez, L.; Fuente Merino, I.; Arteche, J. L.

    2008-07-01

    In this work different aspects about the problem of the radon in dwellings are approached. This gas of natural origin is virtually present in all the soils in the earths crust due to the presence of uranium and radium in the composition of them. Depending on architectural factors and of occupancy habits of the house, high concentrations of this gas can be reached indoors. In these situations, there is a quantifiable increment of the risk of developing lung cancer in the inhabitants of the housing. In the last years the methodological improvements in the realization of epidemiologic studies have led to the obtaining of scientific evidence about the relationship between the presence of indoor radon and the risk of lung cancer. This relationship fund years ago in workers of uranium mines, has been corroborated in the case of the residential radon by the light of several recent meta-analysis performed on groups of epidemiologic studies. More than 4000 radon measurements have been carried out in spain during the las 25 years. A summary of the results obtained from the main national radon surveys are also presented, as well as the criteria recently established by the Spanish Nuclear Safety Council concerning radon action levels in dwellings and workplaces. (Author) 18 refs.

  16. Coupled gas flow/solid dynamics model for predicting the formation of fracture patterns in gas well simulation experiments. [Propellant mixture used instead of explosives to fracture rock surrounding borehole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, L.M.; Swenson, D.V.; Cooper, P.W.

    1984-07-01

    A two-dimensional finite element model for predicting fracture patterns obtained in high energy gas fracture experiments is presented. In these experiments, a mixture of propellants is used instead of explosives to fracture the rock surrounding the borehole. The propellant mixture is chosen to tailor the pressure pulse so that multiple fractures emanate from the borehole. The model allows the fracture pattern and pressure pulse to be calculated for different combinations of propellant mixture, in situ stress conditions, and rock properties. The model calculates the amount of gas generated by the burning propellants using a burn rate given by a power law in pressure. By assuming that the gas behaves as a perfect gas and that the flow down the fractures is isothermal, the loss of gas from the borehole due to flow down the cracks is accounted for. The flow of gas down the cracks is included in an approximate manner by assuming self-similar pressure profiles along the fractures. Numerical examples are presented and compared to three different full-scale experiments. Results show a good correlation with the experimental data over a wide variety of test parameters. 9 reference, 10 figures, 3 tables.

  17. Evaluated kinetic and photochemical data for atmospheric chemistry: Volume III ? gas phase reactions of inorganic halogens

    OpenAIRE

    Atkinson, R.; Baulch, D. L.; Cox, R A; J. N. Crowley; Hampson, R. F.; Hynes, R. G.; Jenkin, M. E.; M. J. Rossi; Troe, J.

    2007-01-01

    International audience; This article, the third in the series, presents kinetic and photochemical data evaluated by the IUPAC Subcommittee on Gas Kinetic Data Evaluation for Atmospheric Chemistry. It covers the gas phase and photochemical reactions of inorganic halogen species, which were last published in J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data, in 2000 (Atkinson et al., 2000), were updated on the IUPAC website in 2003 and are updated again in the present evaluation. The article consists of a summary sheet...

  18. Ionometric method for measuring priority gas atmospheric pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorina, M.Yu.; Piskunova, L.P.; Pivovarova, N.O.; Shor, N.B.

    1985-01-01

    It is noted that a fundamental task today for protecting the environment is controlling atmospheric pollutants. The ionometric procedure described in the present article provides efficient and accurate monitoring of SO/sub 2/, H/sub 2/S, Cl/sub 2/, O/sub 3/, NO and NO/sub 2/. Preparation of electrodes and standards for monitoring are discussed. Experiments to establish the dependability and accuracy of the tests were conducted over 3-6 months. Results were compared to those received by gravimetric procedures with readily ignited gases, and by photocolorimeter tests for other gases. Results showed that iodide concentration in the solution prior to SO/sub 2/ absorption should not be less than 5.10/sup -5/ mol/l. Hydrogen sulfide could be detected either with neutral or slightly alkaline solutions, or in strong alkaline solutions. NO/sub 2/ and NO in concentrations of 10 to 240 mg/m/sup 3/ could be measured with nitrate-coated electrodes, while for lower (0.01-10 mg/m/sup 3/), iron-containing electrodes were effective. Results were accurate to +/-3%, and did not diverge from gravimetric tests by more than 1%; these results were better than those obtained by photocolorimetry. 13 references.

  19. Simulation of the impact of thunderstorm activity on atmospheric gas composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyshlyaev, S. P.; Mareev, E. A.; Galin, V. Ya.

    2010-08-01

    A chemistry-climate model of the lower and middle atmosphere has been used to estimate the sensitivity of the atmospheric gas composition to the rate of thunderstorm production of nitrogen oxides at upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric altitudes. The impact that nitrogen oxides produced by lightning have on the atmospheric gas composition is treated as a subgrid-scale process and included in the model parametrically. The natural uncertainty in the global production rate of nitrogen oxides in lightning flashes was specified within limits from 2 to 20 Tg N/year. Results of the model experiments have shown that, due to the variability of thunderstorm-produced nitrogen oxides, their concentration in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere can vary by a factor of 2 or 3, which, given the influence of nitrogen oxides on ozone and other gases, creates the potential for a strong perturbation of the atmospheric gas composition and thermal regime. Model calculations have shown the strong sensitivity of ozone and the OH hydroxyl to the amount of lightning nitrogen oxides at different atmospheric altitudes. These calculations demonstrate the importance of nitrogen oxides of thunderstorm origin for the balance of atmospheric odd ozone and gases linked to it, such as ozone and hydroxyl radicals. Our results demonstrate that one important task is to raise the accuracy of estimates of the rate of nitrogen oxide production by lightning discharges and to use physical parametrizations that take into account the local lightning effects and feedbacks arising in this case rather than climatological data in models of the gas composition and general circulation of the atmosphere.

  20. Soil greenhouse gas emissions reduce the contribution of mangrove plants to the atmospheric cooling effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guangcheng; Chen, Bin; Yu, Dan; Tam, Nora F. Y.; Ye, Yong; Chen, Shunyang

    2016-12-01

    Mangrove soils have been recognized as sources of greenhouse gases, but the atmospheric fluxes are poorly characterized, and their adverse warming effect has rarely been considered with respect to the potential contribution of mangrove wetlands to climate change mitigation. The current study balanced the warming effect of soil greenhouse gas emissions with the plant carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration rate derived from the plants’ net primary production in a productive mangrove wetland in South China to assess the role of mangrove wetlands in reducing the atmospheric warming effect. Soil characteristics were also studied in the summer to examine their relationships with gas fluxes. The soil to atmosphere fluxes of nitrous oxide (N2O), methane (CH4) and CO2 ranged from -1.6 to 50.0 μg m-2 h-1, from -1.4 to 5360.1 μg m-2 h-1 and from -31 to 512 mg m-2 h-1, respectively, which indicated that the mangrove soils act as sources of greenhouse gases in this area. The gas fluxes were higher in summer than in the cold seasons and were variable across mangrove sites. Gas fluxes in summer were positively correlated with the soil organic carbon, total nitrogen, and ammonia contents. The mangrove plants sequestered a considerable amount of atmospheric CO2 at rates varying from 3652 to 7420 g CO2 m-2 yr-1. The ecosystem acted as a source of CH4 and N2O gases but was a more intense CO2 sink. However, the warming effect of soil gas emissions accounted for 9.3-32.7% of the plant CO2 sequestration rate, partially reducing the benefit of mangrove plants, and the two trace gases comprised 9.7-33.2% of the total warming effect. We therefore propose that an assessment of the reduction of atmospheric warming effects by a mangrove ecosystem should consider both soil greenhouse gas emissions and plant CO2 sequestration.

  1. Investigations of gas-to-particle conversion in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juozaitis, Arvydas; Trakumas, Saulius; Girgždien≐, Rasa; Girgždys, Aloyzas; Šopauskien≐, Dalia; Ulevičius, Vidmantas

    Continental aerosol particle size distributions were measured as a function of time at the] background station Aisetas and in the suburb of Vilnius. Marine aerosol particle formation was studied in outdoor photochemical chamber experiments performed on the coast of the Baltic sea. The functional dependence of the particle diameter growth rate on the particle size was calculated from the aerosol particle size distribution data and was compared with the theoretical predictions for the particle growth due to vapor condensation or due to the adsorption of aerosol precursor gases on the particle surface or within an airborne droplet. It was shown that during summer months condensation of low pressure vapors formed by gas phase homogeneous chemical reactions was predominant mechanism of the continental aerosol particle growth. While in winter growth of a submicrometer continental aerosol particle was frequently governed by two competing processes: condensation of low pressure vapors and heterogeneous oxidation of aerosol precursor gases inside the liquid droplet. Ozone was found to be an active oxidant in the heterogeneous aqueous phase chemical reactions. The outdoor photochemical chamber experiments showed that aqueous phase chemical reactions were responsible for the formation of marine sulfuric acid aerosol particles from the dimethylsulfide. After these particles were partially neutralized by ammonia to the ammonium sulfate or bisulfate, their further growth was observed to be surface limited.

  2. ObsPack: a framework for the preparation, delivery, and attribution of atmospheric greenhouse gas data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Masarie, K. A.; Peters, W.; Jacobson, A. R.; Tans, P. P.

    2014-01-01

    Observation Package (ObsPack) is a framework designed to bring together atmospheric greenhouse gas observations from a variety of sampling platforms, prepare them with specific applications in mind, and package and distribute them in a self-consistent and well-documented product. Data products creat

  3. ObsPack: a framework for the preparation, delivery, and attribution of atmospheric greenhouse gas measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Masarie, K. A.; Peters, W.; Jacobson, A. R.; Tans, P. P.

    2014-01-01

    Observation Package (ObsPack) is a framework designed to bring together atmospheric greenhouse gas observations from a variety of sampling platforms, prepare them with specific applications in mind, and package and distribute them in a self-consistent and well-documented product. Data products creat

  4. Small hydrocarbon molecules in cloud-forming Brown Dwarf and giant gas planet atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Bilger, Camille; Helling, Christiane

    2013-01-01

    We study the abundances of complex carbon-bearing molecules in the oxygen-rich dust- forming atmospheres of Brown Dwarfs and giant gas planets. The inner atmospheric re- gions that form the inner boundary for thermochemical gas-phase models are investigated. Results from Drift-phoenix atmosphere simulations, which include the feedback of phase- non-equilibrium dust cloud formation on the atmospheric structure and the gas-phase abun- dances, are utilised. The resulting element depletion leads to a shift in the carbon-to-oxygen ratio such that several hydrocarbon molecules and cyanopolycyanopolyynene molecules can be present. An increase in surface gravity and/or a decrease in metallicity support the increase in the partial pressures of these species. CO, CO2, CH4, and HCN contain the largest fraction of carbon. In the upper atmosphere of low-metallicity objects, more carbon is contained in C4H than in CO, and also CH3 and C2H2 play an increasingly important role as carbon-sink. We determine chemical relaxation...

  5. High-resolution modelling of atmospheric dispersion of dense gas using TWODEE-2.1: application to the 1986 Lake Nyos limnic eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folch, Arnau; Barcons, Jordi; Kozono, Tomofumi; Costa, Antonio

    2017-06-01

    Atmospheric dispersal of a gas denser than air can threat the environment and surrounding communities if the terrain and meteorological conditions favour its accumulation in topographic depressions, thereby reaching toxic concentration levels. Numerical modelling of atmospheric gas dispersion constitutes a useful tool for gas hazard assessment studies, essential for planning risk mitigation actions. In complex terrains, microscale winds and local orographic features can have a strong influence on the gas cloud behaviour, potentially leading to inaccurate results if not captured by coarser-scale modelling. We introduce a methodology for microscale wind field characterisation based on transfer functions that couple a mesoscale numerical weather prediction model with a microscale computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model for the atmospheric boundary layer. The resulting time-dependent high-resolution microscale wind field is used as input for a shallow-layer gas dispersal model (TWODEE-2.1) to simulate the time evolution of CO2 gas concentration at different heights above the terrain. The strategy is applied to review simulations of the 1986 Lake Nyos event in Cameroon, where a huge CO2 cloud released by a limnic eruption spread downslopes from the lake, suffocating thousands of people and animals across the Nyos and adjacent secondary valleys. Besides several new features introduced in the new version of the gas dispersal code (TWODEE-2.1), we have also implemented a novel impact criterion based on the percentage of human fatalities depending on CO2 concentration and exposure time. New model results are quantitatively validated using the reported percentage of fatalities at several locations. The comparison with previous simulations that assumed coarser-scale steady winds and topography illustrates the importance of high-resolution modelling in complex terrains.

  6. Atmospheric radon, CO2 and CH4 dynamics in an Australian coal seam gas field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, D. R.; Santos, I. R.; Maher, D. T.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric radon (222Rn), carbon dioxide (CO2), and methane concentrations (CH4) as well as carbon stable isotope ratios (δ13C) were used to gain insight into atmospheric chemistry within an Australian coal seam gas (CSG) field (Surat Basin, Tara region, Queensland). A˜3 fold increase in maximum 222Rn concentration was observed inside the gas field compared to outside of it. There was a significant relationship between maximum and average 222Rn concentrations and the number of gas wells within a 2 km to 4 km radius of the sampling sites (n = 5 stations; p gas field related to point sources (well heads, pipelines, etc.) and diffse soil sources due to changes in the soil structural and hydrological characteristics. A rapid qualitative assessment of CH4 and CO2 concentration, and carbon isotopes using a mobile cavity ring-down spectrometer system showed a widespread enrichment of both CH4 and CO2 within the production gas field. Concentrations of CH4 and CO2 were as high as 6.89 ppm and 541 ppm respectively compared average concentrations of 1.78 ppm (CH4) and 388 ppm (CO2) outside the gas field. The δ13C values showed distinct differences between areas inside and outside the production field with the δ13C value of the CH4 source within the field matching that of the methane in the CSG.

  7. [Investigation on the gas temperature of a plasma jet at atmospheric pressure by emission spectrum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue-chen; Yuan, Ning; Jia, Peng-ying; Niu, Dong-ying

    2010-11-01

    A plasma jet of a dielectric barrier discharge in coaxial electrode was used to produce plasma plume in atmospheric pressure argon. Spatially and temporally resolved measurement was carried out by photomultiplier tubes. The light emission signals both from the dielectric barrier discharge and from the plasma plume were analyzed. Furthermore, emission spectrum from the plasma plume was collected by high-resolution optical spectrometer. The emission spectra of OH (A 2sigma + --> X2 II, 307.7-308.9 nm) and the first negative band of N2+ (B2 sigma u+ --> X2 IIg+, 390-391.6 nm) were used to estimate the rotational temperature of the plasma plume by fitting the experimental spectra to the simulated spectra. The rotational temperature obtained is about 443 K by fitting the emission spectrum from the OH, and that from the first negative band of N2+ is about 450 K. The rotational temperatures obtained by the two method are consistent within 5% error band. The gas temperature of the plasma plume at atmospheric pressure was obtained because rotational temperature equals to gas temperature approximately in gas discharge at atmospheric pressure. Results show that gas temperature increases with increasing the applied voltage.

  8. Super-Earth Atmospheres: Self-Consistent Gas Accretion and Retention

    CERN Document Server

    Ginzburg, Sivan; Sari, Re'em

    2015-01-01

    Some recently discovered short-period Earth to Neptune sized exoplanets (super Earths) have low observed mean densities which can only be explained by voluminous gaseous atmospheres. Here, we study the conditions allowing the accretion and retention of such atmospheres. We self-consistently couple the nebular gas accretion onto solid cores and the subsequent evolution of gas envelopes following the dispersal of the protoplanetary disk. Specifically, we address mass-loss due to both photo-evaporation and cooling of the planet. We find that planets shed their outer layers (dozens of percents in mass) following the disk's dispersal (even without photo-evaporation), and their atmospheres shrink in a few Myr to a thickness comparable to the radius of the underlying solid core. At this stage, atmospheres containing less particles than the core (equivalently, lighter than a few % of the planet's mass) are blown away completely by heat coming from the cooling core, while heavier atmospheres cool and contract on a tim...

  9. Super-Earth Atmospheres: Self-consistent Gas Accretion and Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginzburg, Sivan; Schlichting, Hilke E.; Sari, Re'em

    2016-07-01

    Some recently discovered short-period Earth- to Neptune-sized exoplanets (super-Earths) have low observed mean densities that can only be explained by voluminous gaseous atmospheres. Here, we study the conditions allowing the accretion and retention of such atmospheres. We self-consistently couple the nebular gas accretion onto rocky cores and the subsequent evolution of gas envelopes following the dispersal of the protoplanetary disk. Specifically, we address mass-loss due to both photo-evaporation and cooling of the planet. We find that planets shed their outer layers (dozens of percent in mass) following the disk's dispersal (even without photo-evaporation), and their atmospheres shrink in a few Myr to a thickness comparable to the radius of the underlying rocky core. At this stage, atmospheres containing less particles than the core (equivalently, lighter than a few percent of the planet's mass) can be blown away by heat coming from the cooling core, while heavier atmospheres cool and contract on a timescale of Gyr at most. By relating the mass-loss timescale to the accretion time, we analytically identify a Goldilocks region in the mass-temperature plane in which low-density super-Earths can be found: planets have to be massive and cold enough to accrete and retain their atmospheres, but not too massive or cold, such that they do not enter runaway accretion and become gas giants (Jupiters). We compare our results to the observed super-Earth population and find that low-density planets are indeed concentrated in the theoretically allowed region. Our analytical and intuitive model can be used to investigate possible super-Earth formation scenarios.

  10. Qualitative gas temperature distribution in positive DC glow corona using spectral image processing in atmospheric air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Takao; Inada, Yoichi; Shimizu, Daisuke; Izawa, Yasuji; Nishijima, Kiyoto

    2015-01-01

    An experimental method of determining a qualitative two-dimensional image of the gas temperature in stationary atmospheric nonthermal plasma by spectral image processing was presented. In the experiment, a steady-state glow corona discharge was generated by applying a positive DC voltage to a rod-plane electrode in synthetic air. The changes in the gas temperature distribution due to the amplitude of applied voltage and the ambient gas pressure were investigated. Spectral images of a positive DC glow corona were taken using a gated ICCD camera with ultranarrow band-pass filters, corresponding to the head and tail of a N2 second positive system band (0-2). The qualitative gas temperature was obtained from the emission intensity ratio between the head and tail of the N2 second positive system band (0-2). From the results, we confirmed that the gas temperature and its distribution of a positive DC glow corona increased with increasing applied voltage. In particular, just before the sparkover voltage, a distinctly high temperature region was formed in the positive DC glow at the tip of the rod electrode. In addition, the gas temperature decreased and its distribution spread diffusely with decreasing ambient gas pressure.

  11. Propagation of atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet into ambient air at laminar gas flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinchuk, M.; Stepanova, O.; Kurakina, N.; Spodobin, V.

    2017-05-01

    The formation of an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) in a gas flow passing through the discharge gap depends on both gas-dynamic properties and electrophysical parameters of the plasma jet generator. The paper presents the results of experimental and numerical study of the propagation of the APPJ in a laminar flow of helium. A dielectric-barrier discharge (DBD) generated inside a quartz tube equipped with a coaxial electrode system, which provided gas passing through it, served as a plasma source. The transition of the laminar regime of gas flow into turbulent one was controlled by the photography of a formed plasma jet. The corresponding gas outlet velocity and Reynolds numbers were revealed experimentally and were used to simulate gas dynamics with OpenFOAM software. The data of the numerical simulation suggest that the length of plasma jet at the unvarying electrophysical parameters of DBD strongly depends on the mole fraction of ambient air in a helium flow, which is established along the direction of gas flow.

  12. [Comparative study on the gas temperature of a plasma jet at atmospheric pressure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Peng-Ying; Li, Xue-Chen; Yuan, Ning

    2011-08-01

    A plasma jet of a dielectric barrier discharge in coaxial electrode was used to produce jet plasma in flowing work gas (argon mixed with trace nitrogen) at atmospheric pressure. The relation between the plasma length and the gas flow rate was obtained by taking the images of the jet plasma. A high-resolution optical spectrometer was used to collect the optical emission spectrum. The emission spectra of the first negative band of N(2+) (B2 Sigma(u+)-->Chi2 Sigma(g+), 390-391.6 nm) were used to estimate the rotational temperature of the plasma plume by fitting the experimental spectra to the simulated spectra. The gas temperature was investigated by this optical method and results show that the gas temperature increases with increasing the applied voltage. For comparison, a thermometer was used to measure the temperature of the gas emitted from the jet. The results also show that the gas temperature increases with increasing the applied voltage. The gas temperatures obtained by the two methods are consistent. The difference was analyzed.

  13. Simulating the escaping atmospheres of hot gas planets in the solar neighborhood

    CERN Document Server

    Salz, M; Schneider, P C; Schmitt, J H M M

    2016-01-01

    Absorption of high-energy radiation in planetary thermospheres is believed to lead to the formation of planetary winds. The resulting mass-loss rates can affect the evolution, particularly of small gas planets. We present 1D, spherically symmetric hydrodynamic simulations of the escaping atmospheres of 18 hot gas planets in the solar neighborhood. Our sample only includes strongly irradiated planets, whose expanded atmospheres may be detectable via transit spectroscopy. The simulations were performed with the PLUTO-CLOUDY interface, which couples a detailed photoionization and plasma simulation code with a general MHD code. We study the thermospheric escape and derive improved estimates for the planetary mass-loss rates. Our simulations reproduce the temperature-pressure profile measured via sodium D absorption in HD 189733 b, but show unexplained differences in the case of HD 209458 b. In contrast to general assumptions, we find that the gravitationally more tightly bound thermospheres of massive and compact...

  14. Impacts from Partial Removal of Decommissioned Oil and Gas Platforms on Fish Biomass and Production on the Remaining Platform Structure and Surrounding Shell Mounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy T Claisse

    Full Text Available When oil and gas platforms become obsolete they go through a decommissioning process. This may include partial removal (from the surface to 26 m depth or complete removal of the platform structure. While complete removal would likely eliminate most of the existing fish biomass and associated secondary production, we find that the potential impacts of partial removal would likely be limited on all but one platform off the coast of California. On average 80% of fish biomass and 86% of secondary fish production would be retained after partial removal, with above 90% retention expected for both metrics on many platforms. Partial removal would likely result in the loss of fish biomass and production for species typically found residing in the shallow portions of the platform structure. However, these fishes generally represent a small proportion of the fishes associated with these platforms. More characteristic of platform fauna are the primarily deeper-dwelling rockfishes (genus Sebastes. "Shell mounds" are biogenic reefs that surround some of these platforms resulting from an accumulation of mollusk shells that have fallen from the shallow areas of the platforms mostly above the depth of partial removal. We found that shell mounds are moderately productive fish habitats, similar to or greater than natural rocky reefs in the region at comparable depths. The complexity and areal extent of these biogenic habitats, and the associated fish biomass and production, will likely be reduced after either partial or complete platform removal. Habitat augmentation by placing the partially removed platform superstructure or some other additional habitat enrichment material (e.g., rock boulders on the seafloor adjacent to the base of partially removed platforms provides additional options to enhance fish production, potentially mitigating reductions in shell mound habitat.

  15. Atmospheric occurrence, transport and gas-particle partitioning of polychlorinated biphenyls over the northwestern Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zilan; Lin, Tian; Li, Zhongxia; Li, Yuanyuan; Guo, Tianfeng; Guo, Zhigang

    2017-10-01

    Ship-board air samples were collected during March to May 2015 from the East China Sea (ECS) to the northwestern Pacific Ocean (NWP) to explore the atmospheric occurrence and gas-particle partitioning of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) when the westerly East Asian Monsoon prevailed. Total PCB concentrations in the atmosphere ranged from 56.8 to 261 pg m-3. Higher PCB levels were observed off the coast and minor temperature-induced changes showed that continuous emissions from East Asia remain as an important source to the regional atmosphere. A significant relationship between Koa (octanol-air partition coefficient) and KP (gas-particle partition coefficient) for PCBs was observed under continental air masses, suggesting that land-derived organic aerosols affected the PCB gas-particle partitioning after long-range transport, while an absence of this correlation was identified in marine air masses. The PCB partitioning cannot be fully explained by the absorptive mechanism as the predicted KP were found to be 2-3 orders of magnitude lower than the measured Kp, while the prediction was closely matched when soot adsorption was considered. The results suggested the importance of soot carbon as a transport medium for PCBs during their long-range transport and considerable impacts of continental outflows on PCBs across the downwind area. The estimated transport mass of particulate PCBs into the ECS and NWP totals 2333 kg during the spring, constituting ca. 17% of annual emission inventories of unintentionally produced PCB in China.

  16. Quantification Approach of Gas Temperate Distribution in Atmospheric Positive DC Glow Discharge Measured by Spectroscopic Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasamoto, Ryo; Orii, Hideaki; Matsumoto, Takao; Izawa, Yasuji; Nishijima, Kiyoto

    2015-09-01

    In our previous work, a two-dimensional (2D) gas temperature distribution in a positive DC steady-state glow corona was qualitatively measured by spectroscopic imaging. Spectral images of its glow corona were taken using ICCD camera with ultra-narrow band-pass filters, and they were corresponded to the head and tail of a second positive system bands of nitrogen (2PS N2 (0-2)). The qualitative gas temperature was obtained from the emission intensity ratio (I2 Ptail/I2 Phead) between the head and tail of 2PS N2 (0-2). This emission intensity ratio also equals the rotational temperature (TR) , and TR almost equals the gas temperature (TG) in atmospheric pressure. In this work, the qualitative 2D gas temperature distribution was derived from 2D I2 Ptail/I2 Phead plots, and the calibration date of I2 Ptail/I2 Phead for TR was accumulated by investigating the relationship between the spatially average absolute gas temperature (Tav) obtained by single-point spectroscopic measurement and the average value of I2 Ptail/I2 Phead plots. On the basis of the calibration date, a spectroscopically-imaged qualitative 2D I2 Ptail/I2 Phead distribution in a positive DC glow corona was converted to a quantitative 2D image of gas rotational temperature.

  17. Interplay of discharge and gas flow in atmospheric pressure plasma jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Nan; Yang, JingLong; He, Feng; Cao, Zexian

    2011-05-01

    Interplay of discharge and gas flow in the atmospheric pressure plasma jets generated with three different discharge modes [N. Jiang, A. L. Ji, and Z. X. Cao, J. Appl. Phys. 106, 013308 (2009); N. Jiang, A. L. Ji, and Z. X. Cao, J. Appl. Phys. 108, 033302 (2010)] has been investigated by simultaneous photographing of both plasma plumes and gas flows in the ambient, with the former being visualized by using an optical schlieren system. Gas flow gains a forward momentum from discharge except for the case of overflow jets at smaller applied voltages. Larger applied voltage implies an elongated plasma jet only for single-electrode mode; for dielectric barrier discharge jet the plume length maximizes at a properly applied voltage. These findings can help understand the underlying processes, and are useful particularly for the economic operation of tiny helium plasma jets and jet arrays.

  18. An atmospheric photochemical source of the persistent greenhouse gas CF4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jubb, Aaron M.; McGillen, Max R.; Portmann, Robert W.; Daniel, John S.; Burkholder, James B.

    2015-11-01

    A previously uncharacterized atmospheric source of the persistent greenhouse gas tetrafluoromethane, CF4, has been identified in the UV photolysis of trifluoroacetyl fluoride, CF3C(O)F, which is a degradation product of several halocarbons currently present in the atmosphere. CF4 quantum yields in the photolysis of CF3C(O)F were measured at 193, 214, 228, and 248 nm, wavelengths relevant to stratospheric photolysis, to be (75.3 ± 1) × 10-4, (23.7 ± 0.4) × 10-4, (6.6 ± 0.2) × 10-4, and ≤0.4 × 10-4, respectively. A 2-D atmospheric model was used to estimate the contribution of the photochemical source to the global CF4 budget. The atmospheric photochemical production of CF4 from CF3CH2F (HFC-134a), CF3CHFCl (HCFC-124), and CF3CCl2F (CFC-114a) per molecule emitted was calculated to be (1-2.5) × 10-5, 1.0 × 10-4, and 2.8 × 10-3, respectively. Although CF4 photochemical production was found to be relatively minor at the present time, the identified mechanism demonstrates that long-lived products with potential climate impacts can be formed from the atmospheric breakdown of shorter-lived source gases.

  19. Surface waters as a sink and source of atmospheric gas phase ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, G Brooks; Foley, Laura; Carroll, Angela L; Roebuck, Jesse Alan; Guy, Amanda; Mead, Ralph N; Kieber, Robert J; Willey, Joan D; Skrabal, Stephen A; Felix, J David; Mullaugh, Katherine M; Helms, John R

    2016-02-01

    This study reports the first ethanol concentrations in fresh and estuarine waters and greatly expands the current data set for coastal ocean waters. Concentrations for 153 individual measurements of 11 freshwater sites ranged from 5 to 598 nM. Concentrations obtained for one estuarine transect ranged from 56 to 77 nM and levels in five coastal ocean depth profiles ranged from 81 to 334 nM. Variability in ethanol concentrations was high and appears to be driven primarily by photochemical and biological processes. 47 gas phase concentrations of ethanol were also obtained during this study to determine the surface water degree of saturation with respect to the atmosphere. Generally fresh and estuarine waters were undersaturated indicating they are not a source and may be a net sink for atmospheric ethanol in this region. Aqueous phase ethanol is likely converted rapidly to acetaldehyde in these aquatic ecosystems creating the undersaturated conditions resulting in this previously unrecognized sink for atmospheric ethanol. Coastal ocean waters may act as either a sink or source of atmospheric ethanol depending on the partial pressure of ethanol in the overlying air mass. Results from this study are significant because they suggest that surface waters may act as an important vector for the uptake of ethanol emitted into the atmosphere including ethanol from biofuel production and usage.

  20. On the detectability of trace chemical species in the martian atmosphere using gas correlation filter radiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, J. A.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Calcutt, S. B.; Wilson, E. L.

    2015-11-01

    The martian atmosphere is host to many trace gases including water (H2O) and its isotopologues, methane (CH4) and potentially sulphur dioxide (SO2), nitrous oxide (N2O) and further organic compounds, which would serve as indirect tracers of geological, chemical and biological processes on Mars. With exception of the recent detection of CH4 by Curiosity, previous detections of these species have been unsuccessful or considered tentative due to the low concentrations of these species in the atmosphere (∼10-9 partial pressures), limited spectral resolving power and/or signal-to-noise and the challenge of discriminating between telluric and martian features when observing from the Earth. In this study, we present radiative transfer simulations of an alternative method for detection of trace gas species - the gas correlation radiometry method. Two potential observing scenarios were explored where a gas correlation filter radiometer (GCFR) instrument: (1) performs nadir and/or limb sounding of the martian atmosphere in the thermal infrared (200-2000 cm-1 from an orbiting spacecraft or (2) performs solar occultation measurements in the near-infrared (2000-5000 cm-1) from a lander on the martian surface. In both scenarios, simulations of a narrowband filter radiometer (without gas correlation) were also generated to serve as a comparison. From a spacecraft, we find that a gas correlation filter radiometer, in comparison to a filter radiometer (FR), offers a greater discrimination between temperature and dust, a greater discrimination between H2O and HDO, and would allow detection of N2O and CH3OH at concentrations of ∼10 ppbv and ∼2 ppbv, respectively, which are lower than previously-derived upper limits. However, the lowest retrievable concentration of SO2 (approximately 2 ppbv) is comparable with previous upper limits and CH4 is only detectable at concentrations of approximately 10 ppbv, which is an order of magnitude higher than the concentration recently measured

  1. Trace Atmospheric Gas Analyzer (TAGA) Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Data for BP Spill/Deepwater Horizon - August 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Trace Atmospheric Gas Analyzer (TAGA) buses are self-contained mobile laboratories that conduct instant-result monitoring of air quality at particular locations....

  2. Trace Atmospheric Gas Analyzer (TAGA) Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Data for BP Spill/Deepwater Horizon - July 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Trace Atmospheric Gas Analyzer (TAGA) buses are self-contained mobile laboratories that conduct instant-result monitoring of air quality at particular locations....

  3. Trace Atmospheric Gas Analyzer (TAGA) Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Data for BP Spill/Deepwater Horizon - May 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Trace Atmospheric Gas Analyzer (TAGA) buses are self-contained mobile laboratories that conduct instant-result monitoring of air quality at particular locations....

  4. Trace Atmospheric Gas Analyzer (TAGA) Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Data for BP Spill/Deepwater Horizon - June 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Trace Atmospheric Gas Analyzer (TAGA) buses are self-contained mobile laboratories that conduct instant-result monitoring of air quality at particular locations....

  5. Effects of cold atmospheric gas phase plasma on anthocyanins and color in pomegranate juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bursać Kovačević, Danijela; Putnik, Predrag; Dragović-Uzelac, Verica; Pedisić, Sandra; Režek Jambrak, Anet; Herceg, Zoran

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate effects of cold atmospheric gas phase plasma on anthocyanins and color in pomegranate juice. Outcomes of plasma treatment were observed at different operating conditions: (i) treatment time (3, 5, 7 min), (ii) treated juice volume (3, 4, 5 cm(3)), and (iii) gas flow (0.75, 1, 1.25 dm(3)/min). The greatest anthocyanin stability was found at: 3 min treatment time, 5 cm(3) sample volume, and 0.75 dm(3)/min gas flow. Plasma treatment yielded higher anthocyanin content from 21% to 35%. Multivariate analysis showed that total color change was not associated with sample volume and treatment time, however it declined with increased gas flow. The change of color increased in comparison treated vs. untreated pomegranate juice. Constructed mathematical equation confirmed that increase of anthocyanin content increased with gas flow, sample volume and change in color. In summary, this study showed that plasma treatment had positive influences on anthocyanins stability and color change in cloudy pomegranate juice.

  6. On the Role of Metastable Argon in Cold Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jets with Shielding Gas Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Bleker, Ansgar; Winter, Jorn; Sousa, Joao Santos; Puech, Vincent; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Reuter, Stephan; ZIK plasmatis at the INP Greifswald e. V. Team; Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Plasmas (LPGP), CNRS; Université Paris-Sud Team

    2014-10-01

    Shielding gas devices are a valuable tool for controlling the reactive species output of Cold Atmospheric Pressure Plasma (CAPP) Jets for biomedical applications. In this work we investigate the effect of different shielding gas compositions using a CAPP jet (kinpen) operated with argon. As shielding gas various mixtures of N2 and O2 are used. Metastable argon (Ar*) has been quantified using laser absorption spectroscopy and was identified as an important energy carrier in the CAPP jets effluent. The Ar* excitation dynamics was studied using phase resolve optical emission spectroscopy. Based on these findings a kinetic model for the gas phase chemistry has been developed that uses the Ar* density and dynamics as input and yields densities of O3, NO2, HNO2, HNO3, N2O5, H2O2 and N2O produced by the CAPP jet for different shielding gas compositions. The results are in good agreement with Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy measurements on these species. Authors gratefully acknowledge the funding by German Federal Ministry of Education a Research (BMBF) (Grant # 03Z2DN12).

  7. Determination of nitrogen monoxide in high purity nitrogen gas with an atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, K.

    1985-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometric (API-MS) method was studied for the determination of residual NO in high purity N2 gas. The API-MS is very sensitive to NO, but the presence of O2 interferes with the NO measurement. Nitrogen gas in cylinders as sample gas was mixed with NO standard gas and/or O2 standard gas, and then introduced into the API-MS. The calibration curves of NO and O2 has linearity in the region of 0 - 2 ppm, but the slopes changed with every cylinder. The effect of O2 on NO+ peak was additive and proportional to O2 concentration in the range of 0 - 0.5 ppm. The increase in NO+ intensity due to O2 was (0.07 - 0.13)%/O2, 1 ppm. Determination of NO and O2 was carried out by the standard addition method to eliminate the influence of variation of slopes. The interference due to O2 was estimated from the product of the O2 concentration and the ratio of slope A to Slope B. Slope A is the change in the NO+ intensity with the O2 concentration. Slope B is the intensity with O2 concentration.

  8. Noble gas patterns in the atmospheres of Mars and Earth: A comparison via the SNC meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepin, R. O.; Becker, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    Noble gas and nitrogen compositions in the glassy phase of the EETA 79001 shergottite correspond closely with Viking measurements. This direct evidence for the origin of the SNC meteorites on Mars, and for trapping of an unfractionated sample of Martian atmospheric gases in the 79001 glass, provides a reasonable basis for comparing the Martian and terrestrial atmospheres with more precision than that afforded by the Viking data set. Results are that, with one exception, elemental and isotopic compositions of nonradiogenic Martian noble gases are similar to those in the Earth's atmosphere; relatively small isotopic discrepancies in Kr and perhaps Xe may be attributable to different degrees of mass fractionation of a common parent reservoir. The anomaly is in Ar composition, where Martian Ar-36/AR-38 approx. 4 is strikingly lower than the values near 5.3 that characterize both the Earth and major meteoritic gas carriers. Although a primordial Martian ratio of 5.3 could in principle be altered by some planet specific process (e.g., cosmic ray spallation of surface materials) operating over geologic time, one has not been found that works.

  9. Hydrostatic Simulation of Earth's Atmospheric Gas Using Multi-particle Collision Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattisahusiwa, Asis; Purqon, Acep; Viridi, Sparisoma

    2016-01-01

    Multi-particle collision dynamics (MPCD) is a mesoscopic simulation method to simulate fluid particle-like flows. MPCD has been widely used to simulate various problems in condensed matter. In this study, hydrostatic behavior of gas in the Earth's atmospheric layer is simulated by using MPCD method. The simulation is carried out by assuming the system under ideal state and is affected only by gravitational force. Gas particles are homogeneous and placed in 2D box. Interaction of the particles with the box is applied through implementation of boundary conditions (BC). Periodic BC is applied on the left and the right side, specular reflection on the top side, while bounce-back on the bottom side. Simulation program is executed in Arch Linux and running in notebook with processor Intel i5 @2700 MHz with 10 GB DDR3 RAM. The results show behaviors of the particles obey kinetic theory for ideal gas when gravitational acceleration value is proportional to the particle mass. Density distribution as a function of altitude also meets atmosphere's hydrostatic theory.

  10. Atmospheric contribution of gas emissions from Augustine volcano, Alaska during the 2006 eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, K.A.; Doukas, M.P.; McGimsey, R.G.; Neal, C.A.; Wessels, R.L.

    2008-01-01

    Airborne surveillance of gas emissions from Augustine for SO2, CO2 and H2S showed no evidence of anomalous degassing from 1990 through May 2005. By December 20, 2005, Augustine was degassing 660 td-1 of SO2, and ten times that by January 4, 2006. The highest SO2 emission rate measured during the 2006 eruption was 8650 td-1 (March 1); for CO2, 13000 td-1 (March 9), and H2S, 8 td-1 (January 19). Thirty-four SO2 measurements were made from December 2005 through 2006, with 9 each for CO2 and H2S. Augustine released 1 ?? 106 tonnes of CO2 to the atmosphere during 2006, a level similar to the output of a medium-sized natural gas-fired power plant, and thus was not a significant contributor of greenhouse gas to the atmosphere compared to anthropogenic sources. Augustine released about 5 ?? 105 tonnes of SO2 during 2006, similar to that released in 1976 and 1986.

  11. Improvement of saturation magnetization of Fe nanoparticles by post-annealing in a hydrogen gas atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kin, Masane, E-mail: masane-kin@denso.co.jp; Tanaka, Masaaki; Hayashi, Yasushi; Hasaegawa, Jun [Research Laboratories, DENSO CORPORATION, 500-1, Minamiyama, Komenoki-cho, Nisshin, Aichi 470-0111 (Japan); Kura, Hiroaki; Ogawa, Tomoyuki [Department of Electronic Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-05 Aza-Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)

    2015-05-07

    Fe nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized by the thermal decomposition of Fe(CO){sub 5} and then post-annealing in a hydrogen gas atmosphere to produce highly monodisperse Fe NPs with high saturation magnetization (M{sub s}). The as-synthesized pre-anneal Fe NPs had an expanded α-Fe structure and M{sub s} was only 39% of that for bulk Fe because of the low crystallinity and the inclusion of a surfactant. Post-annealing of the Fe NPs in a hydrogen gas atmosphere at 200 °C improved the crystallinity of the Fe NPs from an amorphous-like structure to a body centered cubic (bcc) structure without any lattice expansion. This result indicates that hydrogen gas plays a significant role in improvement of the crystallinity of Fe NPs. Accompanying the improvement in crystallinity, M{sub s} for the Fe NPs increased from 86 to 190 emu/g{sub net} at 300 K, the values of which include the weight of surfactant. This enhanced M{sub s} is almost the same as that of bulk Fe (218 emu/{sub Fe}). It was concluded that the crystallinity has a significant influence on the M{sub s} of the Fe NPs because long-range ordering of the lattice can maintain strong direct exchange interactions between Fe atoms.

  12. The role of ozone atmosphere-snow gas exchange on polar, boundaru-layer tropospheric ozone - a review sensitivity analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmig, D.; Ganzeveld, L.N.; Butler, T.; Oltmans, S.

    2007-01-01

    Recent research on snowpack processes and atmosphere-snow gas exchange has demonstrated that chemical and physical interactions between the snowpack and the overlaying atmosphere have a substantial impact on the composition of the lower troposphere. These observations also imply that ozone depositio

  13. The role of ozone atmosphere-snow gas exchange on polar, boundaru-layer tropospheric ozone - a review sensitivity analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmig, D.; Ganzeveld, L.N.; Butler, T.; Oltmans, S.

    2007-01-01

    Recent research on snowpack processes and atmosphere-snow gas exchange has demonstrated that chemical and physical interactions between the snowpack and the overlaying atmosphere have a substantial impact on the composition of the lower troposphere. These observations also imply that ozone

  14. Atmospheric inverse modeling with known physical bounds: an example from trace gas emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Miller

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Many inverse problems in the atmospheric sciences involve parameters with known physical constraints. Examples include non-negativity (e.g., emissions of some urban air pollutants or upward limits implied by reaction or solubility constants. However, probabilistic inverse modeling approaches based on Gaussian assumptions cannot incorporate such bounds and thus often produce unrealistic results. The atmospheric literature lacks consensus on the best means to overcome this problem, and existing atmospheric studies rely on a limited number of the possible methods with little examination of the relative merits of each. This paper investigates the applicability of several approaches to bounded inverse problems and is also the first application of Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC to estimation of atmospheric trace gas fluxes. The approaches discussed here are broadly applicable. A common method of data transformations is found to unrealistically skew estimates for the examined example application. The method of Lagrange multipliers and two MCMC methods yield more realistic and accurate results. In general, the examined MCMC approaches produce the most realistic result but can require substantial computational time. Lagrange multipliers offer an appealing alternative for large, computationally intensive problems when exact uncertainty bounds are less central to the analysis. A synthetic data inversion of US anthropogenic methane emissions illustrates the strengths and weaknesses of each approach.

  15. Future atmospheric conditions increase the greenhouse gas intensity of rice production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Groenigen, K.; Van Kessel, C.; Hungate, B. A.

    2012-12-01

    Elevated levels of atmospheric CO2 and rising temperatures are both expected to alter rice yields and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from rice paddies. This is important, because rice cultivation is one of the largest anthropogenic sources of the potent GHG methane (CH4) and rice is the world's second-most produced staple crop. Because global food demand is growing, it makes sense to assess GHG emissions from croplands on the basis of yield rather than land area, so that efforts to reduce GHG emissions occur with taking into consideration the effects on food production. However, it is unclear whether or how the GHG intensity (that is, yield-scaled GHG emissions) of cropping systems will be affected by future atmospheric conditions. Using meta-analysis, we show that elevated atmospheric CO2 (ranging from 550 to 743 ppmV) and warming (ranging from +0.8°C to +6°C) both increase the GHG intensity of rice cultivation. Elevated atmospheric CO2 increased GHG intensity by 31.4%, because CH4 emissions are stimulated more than rice yields. Warming increased GHG intensity by 11.8% per 1°C, largely due to a decrease in yield. Our findings underscore the need for mitigation and adaptation efforts to secure global food supply while at the same time keeping GHG emissions in check.

  16. Increased greenhouse-gas intensity of rice production under future atmospheric conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Groenigen, Kees Jan; van Kessel, Chris; Hungate, Bruce A.

    2013-03-01

    Increased atmospheric CO2 and rising temperatures are expected to affect rice yields and greenhouse-gas (GHG) emissions from rice paddies. This is important, because rice cultivation is one of the largest human-induced sources of the potent GHG methane (CH4) and rice is the world's second-most produced staple crop. The need for meeting a growing global food demand argues for assessing GHG emissions from croplands on the basis of yield rather than land area, such that efforts to reduce GHG emissions take into consideration the consequences for food production. However, it is unclear whether or how the GHG intensity (that is, yield-scaled GHG emissions) of cropping systems will be affected by future atmospheric conditions. Here we show, using meta-analysis, that increased atmospheric CO2 (ranging from 550 to 743ppmV) and warming (ranging from +0.8°C to +6°C) both increase the GHG intensity of rice cultivation. Increased atmospheric CO2 increased GHG intensity by 31.4%, because CH4 emissions are stimulated more than rice yields. Warming increased GHG intensity by 11.8% per 1°C, largely owing to a decrease in yield. This analysis suggests that rising CO2 and warming will approximately double the GHG intensity of rice production by the end of the twenty-first century, stressing the need for management practices that optimize rice production while reducing its GHG intensity as the climate continues to change.

  17. The Use of Biofilter to Reduce Atmospheric Global Warming Gas (CH4) Eemissions from Landfills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, S.; Thomas, J. C.; Brown, K. W.; Sung, K.

    2001-12-01

    The emission of greenhouse gasses resulting from anthropogenic activities is increasing the atmospheric concentration of these gases, which can influence the climatic system by changing the temperature, precipitation, wind and other climate factors. Methane (CH4) is a very potent greenhouse gas and CH4 emission from landfills in US has been reported as 37% of total anthropogenic source of CH4 emission. Properly designed soil biofilters may reduce atmospheric CH4 emissions from landfills and help reduce the accumulation of greenhouse gasses in the atmosphere. Biofilter performance was tested under a variety of environmental and design conditions. The results showed that biofilters have the potential to reduce CH4 emissions from landfills by as much as 83%. A quadratic equation was developed to describe the dependence of methane oxidation rate in a sandy loam textured soil as a function of soil temperature, soil moisture and ammonium nitrogen concentration. Using this equation and the averaged soil temperature and moisture contents, and census data for the largest cities of each of the 48 contiguous states, oxidation rates was calculated. A methane emission model was also developed to estimate the methane emission from municipal waste landfills with different covers. Older landfills with soil covers emitted an average of 83% of the generated CH4. Landfills with RCRA covers emitted 90% of the generated CH4 without biofilters and only 10% with biofilters. Thus, the installation of properly sized biofilters should significantly reduce atmospheric CH4 emissions from landfills.

  18. Note: Development of fast heating inert gas annealing apparatus operated at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, S. C.; Majumdar, A.; Shripathi, T.; Hippler, R.

    2012-04-01

    Here, we report the development of a simple, small, fast heating, and portable, homemade, inert gas (Ar) atmospheric annealing setup. Instead of using a conventional heating element, a commercial soldering rod having an encapsulated fast heating heater is used here. The sample holder is made of a block of stainless steel. It takes 200 s to reach 700 °C, and 10 min to cool down. The probability of oxidation or surface contamination has been examined by means of x ray photoelectron spectroscopy of virgin Cu sample after annealing at 600 °C. In addition, we compare the annealing of a hydrogenated carbon nitride film (HCNx) in both a conventional vacuum and our newly developed ambient Ar atmosphere setup.

  19. Application of atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry to cover gas analysis in fast reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Harano, H

    2002-01-01

    This paper proposes to apply atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry to on-line real-time monitoring gas analysis in fast reactors. The experimental results have shown that the quantitative analysis of the low ppt level can be achieved for all isotopes of krypton and xenon contained in argon except for the species, sup 7 sup 8 Kr, sup 8 sup 0 Kr, sup 1 sup 2 sup 4 Xe and sup 1 sup 2 sup 6 Xe that suffer interference by cluster ions. The excellent sensitivity is attributed to an ion concentration effect in an atmospheric pressure ionization process driven by the difference in ionization potential between argon and krypton or xenon. The detection limits (3 sigma) are estimated to be 20 ppt for sup 8 sup 4 Kr and 2.3 ppt for sup 1 sup 3 sup 2 Xe in the present condition.

  20. Gas Diffusion Barriers Prepared by Spatial Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Enhanced ALD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Lukas; Theirich, Detlef; Pack, Sven; Kocak, Firat; Schlamm, Daniel; Hasselmann, Tim; Fahl, Henry; Räupke, André; Gargouri, Hassan; Riedl, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we report on aluminum oxide (Al2O3) gas permeation barriers prepared by spatial ALD (SALD) at atmospheric pressure. We compare the growth characteristics and layer properties using trimethylaluminum (TMA) in combination with an Ar/O2 remote atmospheric pressure plasma for different substrate velocities and different temperatures. The resulting Al2O3 films show ultralow water vapor transmission rates (WVTR) on the order of 10(-6) gm(-2)d(-1). In notable contrast, plasma based layers already show good barrier properties at low deposition temperatures (75 °C), while water based processes require a growth temperature above 100 °C to achieve equally low WVTRs. The activation energy for the water permeation mechanism was determined to be 62 kJ/mol.

  1. Gas permeation barriers deposited by atmospheric pressure plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, Lukas, E-mail: lhoffmann@uni-wuppertal.de; Theirich, Detlef; Hasselmann, Tim; Räupke, André; Schlamm, Daniel; Riedl, Thomas, E-mail: t.riedl@uni-wuppertal.de [Institute of Electronic Devices, University of Wuppertal, Rainer-Gruenter-Str. 21, 42119 Wuppertal (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    This paper reports on aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) thin film gas permeation barriers fabricated by atmospheric pressure atomic layer deposition (APPALD) using trimethylaluminum and an Ar/O{sub 2} plasma at moderate temperatures of 80 °C in a flow reactor. The authors demonstrate the ALD growth characteristics of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films on silicon and indium tin oxide coated polyethylene terephthalate. The properties of the APPALD-grown layers (refractive index, density, etc.) are compared to that deposited by conventional thermal ALD at low pressures. The films films deposited at atmospheric pressure show water vapor transmission rates as low as 5 × 10{sup −5} gm{sup −2}d{sup −1}.

  2. Relative contributions of hypoxia and natural gas extraction to atmospheric methane emissions from Lake Erie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disbennett, D. A.; Townsend-Small, A.; Bourbonniere, R.; Mackay, R.

    2013-12-01

    Reduced oxygen availability in lakes due to summer stratification can create conditions suitable for methanogenic activity, which ultimately contributes to atmospheric methane emissions. Lake Erie has persistent low oxygen conditions in bottom waters during summer, which contributes to methane production through anaerobic organic matter respiration. Lake Erie also has substantial subsurface natural gas deposits that are currently being extracted in Canadian waters. We hypothesized that the lake would be a source of methane to the atmosphere in late summer, prior to fall turnover, and that natural gas wells and pipelines would contribute to additional methane emissions from resource extraction areas in Canadian waters. Initial sampling was conducted at a total of 20 sites in central and western Lake Erie during early September 2012. Sites were selected to collect samples from a wide range of environmental conditions in order to better establish the baseline flux from these areas. We selected an array of sites in the offshore environment, sites from a very shallow bay and sites within the Canadian gas fields. Air samples were gathered using floating flux chambers tethered to the research vessel. Dissolved gas water samples were collected using a Van Dorn bottle. We found a consistent positive flux of methane throughout the lake during late summer, with flux rates adjacent to natural gas pipelines up to an order of magnitude greater than elsewhere. Stable isotope analysis yielded results that were not entirely expected. The δ13C of surface samples from areas of fossil fuel extraction and suspected biogenic sources were very similar, likely due to oxidation of methane in the water column. Additional sampling occurred during 2012 and 2013 concentrating on bottom waters and surface fluxes which should allow us to further constrain sources of CH4 from Lake Erie. This project is an effort to constrain the global warming potential of hypoxia in the Great Lakes, and

  3. Assessing Greenhouse Gas emissions in the Greater Toronto Area using atmospheric observations (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, F. R.; Chan, E.; Huang, L.; Levin, I.; Worthy, D.

    2013-12-01

    Urban areas are said to be responsible for approximately 75% of anthropogenic Greenhouse Gases (GHGs) emissions while comprising only two percent of the land area [1]. This limited spatial expansion should facilitate a monitoring of anthropogenic GHGs from atmospheric observations. As major sources of emissions, cities also have a huge potential to drive emissions reductions. To effectively manage emissions, cities must however, first measure and report these publicly [2]. Modelling studies and measurements of CO2 from fossil fuel burning (FFCO2) in densely populated areas does, however, pose several challenges: Besides continuous in-situ observations, i.e. finding an adequate atmospheric transport model, a sufficiently fine-grained FFCO2 emission model and the proper background reference observations to distinguish the large-scale from the local/urban contributions to the observed FFCO2 concentration offsets ( ΔFFCO2) are required. Pilot studies which include the data from two 'sister sites*' in the vicinity of Toronto, Canada helped to derive flux estimates for Non-CO2 GHGs [3] and improve our understanding of urban FFCO2 emissions. Our 13CO2 observations reveal that the contribution of natural gas burning (mostly due to domestic heating) account for 80%×7% of FFCO2 emissions in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA) during winter. Our 14CO2 observations in the GTA, furthermore, show that the local offset of CO2 (ΔCO2) between our two sister sites can be largely attributed to urban FFCO2 emissions. The seasonal cycle of the observed ΔFFCO2 in Toronto, combined with high-resolution atmospheric modeling, helps to independently assess the contribution from different emission sectors (transportation, primary energy and industry, domestic heating) as predicted by a dedicated city-scale emission inventory, which deviates from a UNFCCC-based inventory. [1] D. Dodman. 2009. Blaming cities for climate change? An analysis of urban greenhouse gas emissions inventories

  4. Atmospheric CO{sub 2}, trace gas and CN concentrations in Vaerrioe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahonen, T.; Aalto, P.; Kulmala, M.; Rannik, U.; Vesala, T. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Physics; Hari, P.; Pohja, T. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Forest Ecology

    1995-12-31

    The Vaerrioe environmental measurement station is founded in 1991. The aim of the station is to obtain more information on air quality influenced by Kola industrial areas and effects of pollutants on photosynthesis in subarctic climate. In the station air quality and meteorological quantities are measured together with photosynthesis, which makes it quite unique in comparison with other measurement stations located in northern Finland. The measurements also provide information of aerosol and trace gas concentrations in order to study the direct and indirect aerosol effects on climate. These measurements also increase the knowledge of atmospheric chemistry and deposition in subarctic conditions

  5. A novel aircraft-based tandem mass spectrometer for atmospheric ion and trace gas measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moehler, O.; Reiner, Th.; Arnold, F.

    1993-05-01

    The general design and operation of a novel aircraft-based triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer (TQMS) developed for the improved detection and collisional analysis of atmospheric ions and trace gases are described. The instrument is also suitable for laboratory collision-induced dissociation measurements, studies of ion-molecule reactions, and analytical applications. Highly sensitive and selective trace gas detection by chemical ionization mass spectrometry is also possible using a novel ion injection technique. Result of aircraft-based measurements made with the TQMS are summarized.

  6. Chemical and Physical Effects of the Carrier Gas on the Atmospheric Pressure PECVD of Fluorinated Precursors

    CERN Document Server

    Hubert, Julie; Mertens, Jérémy; Viville, Pascal; Dufour, Thierry; Barroo, Cédric; de Bocarmé, Thierry Visart; Lazzaroni, Roberto; Reniers, François

    2016-01-01

    The atmospheric pressure PECVD deposition and texturization of hydrophobic coatings using liquid fluorinated C6F12 and C6F14 precursors are investigated. The effect of the carrier gas (argon and helium) is discussed in terms of the behavior of the gas phase and of the characteristics of the deposited film. Mass spectrom-etry measurements indicate that the fragmentation is higher with argon while helium reacts very easily with oxygen impurities leading to the formation of CxFyOz compounds. These observations are consistent with the chemical composition of the films determined by XPS and the variation in the deposition rate. Moreover, the streamers present in the argon discharge affect the morphology of the surface by increasing the roughness, which leads to the increase in the hydrophobicity of the coatings.

  7. Atmospheric dc discharges with miniature gas flow as microplasma generation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoyama, Takuma; Hamada, Shuhei; Ibuka, Shinji; Yasuoka, Koichi; Ishii, Shozo [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan)

    2005-06-07

    An atmospheric microplasma is generated by direct-current (dc) discharge in air with a miniature gas flow through a nozzle, which limits plasma volume. Two discharge modes appear in a nozzle-to-mesh electrode system with helium or argon. One is a repetitive pulsed discharge with a current of 10-30 mA and a short pulse width. The fast pulsed current is powered by electric charges stored in the parasitic capacitance, which depends on the spatial arrangement of the electrodes and the power leads. The pulsed discharge makes it possible to develop a discharge scheme for microplasma generation without a high-voltage pulse generator. The other is a sustained dc discharge, which develops with increasing applied voltage. In the case of helium, a glow discharge configuration is observed with a positive column and a layered structure near the cathode. The length of the positive column is affected by electrode separation and gas flow rate.

  8. Atmospheric Consequences of the Hydration in Gas Phase of Aldehydes and Ketones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaida, V.; Axson, J. L.; Maron, M. K.

    2010-12-01

    Aldehydes and ketones are known oxidation products of biogenic and anthropogenic VOCs and have been observed by field studies to be present in aerosol and cloud particles. While the gas-phase chemistry of these compounds is fairly well understood, their modeled concentration and role in SOA formation remains controversial. In aqueous solution aldehydes and ketones hydrate to form alcohols. We explore the hydration of these compounds in the gas phase and examine the water and photon mediated processes of these hydrates. The formation of hydrates can contribute to aerosol growth and formation by partitioning into clouds and aerosols because of their lower vapor pressure and tendency to form intermolecular hydrogen bonds. Hydration of aldehydes and ketones has important consequences to the atmospheric photochemistry of these organic compounds. The experimental approaches employ Fourier transform spectroscopy (FTS) and cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS) to observe the formation of diols and hydrates by these molecules as a function of relative humidity.

  9. Gas mixing enhanced by power modulations in atmospheric pressure microwave plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voráč, J.; Potočňáková, L.; Synek, P.; Hnilica, J.; Kudrle, V.

    2016-04-01

    Microwave plasma jet operating in atmospheric pressure argon was power modulated by audio frequency sine envelope in the 102 W power range. Its effluent was imaged using interference filters and ICCD camera for several different phases of the modulating signal. The combination of this fast imaging with spatially resolved optical emission spectroscopy provides useful insights into the plasmachemical processes involved. Phase-resolved schlieren photography was performed to visualize the gas dynamics. The results show that for higher modulation frequencies the plasma chemistry is strongly influenced by formation of transient flow perturbation resembling a vortex during each period. The perturbation formation and speed are strongly influenced by the frequency and power variations while they depend only weakly on the working gas flow rate. From application point of view, the perturbation presence significantly broadened lateral distribution of active species, effectively increasing cross-sectional area suitable for applications.

  10. A sensitive gas chromatography detector based on atmospheric pressure chemical ionization by a dielectric barrier discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Ansgar T; Last, Torben; Zimmermann, Stefan

    2017-02-03

    In this work, we present a novel concept for a gas chromatography detector utilizing an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization which is initialized by a dielectric barrier discharge. In general, such a detector can be simple and low-cost, while achieving extremely good limits of detection. However, it is non-selective apart from the use of chemical dopants. Here, a demonstrator manufactured entirely from fused silica capillaries and printed circuit boards is shown. It has a size of 75×60×25mm(3) and utilizes only 2W of power in total. Unlike other known discharge detectors, which require high-purity helium, this detector can theoretically be operated using any gas able to form stable ion species. Here, purified air is used. With this setup, limits of detection in the low parts-per-billion range have been obtained for acetone.

  11. Biosequestration of atmospheric CO2 and flue gas-containing CO2 by microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheah, Wai Yan; Show, Pau Loke; Chang, Jo-Shu; Ling, Tau Chuan; Juan, Joon Ching

    2015-05-01

    The unceasing rise of greenhouse gas emission has led to global warming and climate change. Global concern on this phenomenon has put forward the microalgal-based CO2 sequestration aiming to sequester carbon back to the biosphere, ultimately reducing greenhouse effects. Microalgae have recently gained enormous attention worldwide, to be the valuable feedstock for renewable energy production, due to their high growth rates, high lipid productivities and the ability to sequester carbon. The photosynthetic process of microalgae uses atmospheric CO2 and CO2 from flue gases, to synthesize nutrients for their growth. In this review article, we will primarily discuss the efficiency of CO2 biosequestration by microalgae species, factors influencing microalgal biomass productions, microalgal cultivation systems, the potential and limitations of using flue gas for microalgal cultivation as well as the bio-refinery approach of microalgal biomass.

  12. Gas in Galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Reynolds, R. J.

    2000-01-01

    The interstellar medium (ISM) can be thought of as the galactic atmosphere which fills the space between stars. When clouds within the ISM collapse, stars are born. When the stars die, they return their matter to the surrounding gas. Therefore the ISM plays a vital role in galactic evolution. The medium includes starlight, gas, dust, planets, comets, asteroids, fast moving charged particles (cosmic rays) and magnetic fields. The gas can be further divided into hot, warm and cold components, e...

  13. Method of and apparatus for the discharge of a flue gas into the atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoelter, H.; Igelbuescher, H.; Gresch, H.; Dewert, H.; Hein, K.R.G.; Gebhard, G.

    1989-03-28

    Desulfurized flue gas from a fossil-fuel power plant, for example, is discharged into the atmosphere through a low-slung cooling tower by passing this gas upwardly through a duct within the tower and terminating at a level with respect to the mist, dust, and smoke collector of the tower such that the collector is not traversed by the flue gas as it rises in the tower to mix with the cooling air. The duct is formed as an additional washing stretch so as to effect an afterwashing of the flue gas. This duct opens at a level above the level of the collector, and may be provided with a droplet separator which lies at or near the duct mouth. The additional scrubbing stage formed by the duct can be supplied with fresh scrubbing water. This eliminates any need for special treatment of the sump liquids of the cooling tower since droplets from the flue gas are not contributng anything to the sump. Furthermore, additional treatment of the flue gases in the duct significantly reduces the SO/sub 2/ content of the gases traversing the tower. Any traces of toxic and noxious components which may remain are diluted. The further scrubbing in the duct reduces cooling of the flue gases which might otherwise cause condensate formation and the deposit of fine droplets therefrom to cause deterioration of the sump liquid of the tower. The water which is collected from the duct and is thus enriched in SO/sub 2/ can be returned as the process water required for the original flue gas scrubbing step. 2 figs.

  14. Effect of growth regulators on 'Brookfield' apple gas diffusion and metabolism under controlled atmosphere storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auri Brackmann

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of growth regulators on gas diffusion and on metabolism of 'Brookfield' apple, and to determine their correlation with quality characteristics of fruit stored in controlled atmosphere. A completely randomized design was used with four replicates. After eight months of storage, the effects of water (control, aminoethoxyvinylglycine (AVG, AVG + ethephon, AVG + naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA, ethephon + NAA, sole NAA, 1-MCP, ethylene absorption by potassium permanganate (ABS, AVG + ABS, and of AVG + 1-MCP - applied at different rates and periods - were evaluated on: gas diffusion rate, ethylene production, respiratory rate, internal ethylene concentration, internal CO2 content, mealiness, and intercellular space. Fruit from the control and sole NAA treatments had the highest mealiness occurrence. Growth regulators significantly changed the gaseous diffusion through the pulp of 'Brookfield' apple, mainly in the treatment AVG + ABS, which kept the highest gas diffusion rate. NAA spraying in the field, with or without another growth regulator, increased ripening metabolism by rising ethylene production and respiration rate, and reduced gas diffusion during shelf life. AVG spraying cannot avoid the ethephon effect during the ripening process, and reduces both the internal space and mealiness incidence, but it is not able to induce ethylene production or to increase respiration rates.

  15. Effect of sheath gas in atmospheric-pressure plasma jet for potato sprouting suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, S.; Monma, M.; Sasaki, K.

    2016-09-01

    Recently, low-temperature atmospheric-pressure plasma jets (APPJs) attract much interest for medical and agricultural applications. We try to apply APPJs for the suppression of potato sprouting in the long-term storage. In this study, we investigated the effect of sheath gas in APPJ on the suppression efficiency of the potato sprouting. Our APPJ was composed of an insulated thin wire electrode, a glass tube, a grounded electrode which was wound on the glass tube, and a sheath gas nozzle which was attached at the end of the glass tube. The wire electrode was connected to a rectangular-waveform power supply at a frequency of 3 kHz and a voltage of +/- 7 kV. Helium was fed through the glass tube, while we tested dry nitrogen, humid nitrogen, and oxygen as the sheath gas. Eyes of potatoes were irradiated by APPJ for 60 seconds. The sprouting probability was evaluated at two weeks after the plasma irradiation. The sprouting probability was 28% when we employed no sheath gases, whereas an improved probability of 10% was obtained when we applied dry nitrogen as the sheath gas. Optical emission spectroscopy was carried out to diagnose the plasma jet. It was suggested that reactive species originated from nitrogen worked for the efficient suppression of the potato sprouting.

  16. Non-solar noble gas abundances in the atmosphere of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunine, Jonathan I.; Stevenson, David J.

    1986-01-01

    The thermodynamic stability of clathrate hydrate is calculated to predict the formation conditions corresponding to a range of solar system parameters. The calculations were performed using the statistical mechanical theory developed by van der Waals and Platteeuw (1959) and existing experimental data concerning clathrate hydrate and its components. Dissociation pressures and partition functions (Langmuir constants) are predicted at low pressure for CO clathrate (hydrate) using the properties of chemicals similar to CO. It is argued that nonsolar but well constrained noble gas abundances may be measurable by the Galileo spacecraft in the Jovian atmosphere if the observed carbon enhancement is due to bombardment of the atmosphere by clathrate-bearing planetesimals sometime after planetary formation. The noble gas abundances of the Jovian satellite Titan are predicted, assuming that most of the methane in Titan is accreted as clathrate. It is suggested that under thermodynamically appropriate conditions, complete clathration of water ice could have occurred in high-pressure nebulas around giant planets, but probably not in the outer solar nebula. The stability of clathrate in other pressure ranges is also discussed.

  17. Gas chromatography–triple quadrupole mass spectrometry for the determination of atmospheric polychlorinated naphthalenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Fang [Key Laboratory of Separation Science for Analytical Chemistry, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 457 Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116023 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Jin, Jing [Key Laboratory of Separation Science for Analytical Chemistry, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 457 Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116023 (China); Sun, Xiaoli [Key Laboratory of Separation Science for Analytical Chemistry, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 457 Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116023 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Wang, Xueli; Li, Yun; Shah, Syed Mazhar [Key Laboratory of Separation Science for Analytical Chemistry, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 457 Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116023 (China); Chen, Jiping, E-mail: chenjp@dicp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Separation Science for Analytical Chemistry, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 457 Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Atmospheric PCNs were detected by isotope-dilution GC–MS/MS. • The pollution levels of PCNs covering from mono- to octa-CNs were investigated comprehensively in air samples. • The dioxin-like toxicity and human exposure levels of PCNs in air samples were estimated. - Abstract: Atmospheric polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs) ranging from mono-CNs to octa-CNs were detected using isotope-dilution gas chromatography coupled with triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC–MS/MS). The developed instrumental method was successfully applied to the determination of PCNs in technical products. It was observed that there were significant differences in concentrations, homologue profiles, chlorinated contents and total toxic equivalents (∑TEQs) of PCNs for four Halowax products. Subsequently, the validation of the analytical method was evaluated for the determination of PCNs in air samples in terms of method detection limit (MDL), recovery and matrix effect. The results demonstrated that this method could provide satisfactory sensitivity and adequate selectivity with lower cost. It was conducted to comprehensively evaluate the levels, composition patterns, ∑TEQs, and daily intake exposure of PCNs in indoor and outdoor air samples. Concentrations and ∑TEQs of PCNs in air samples ranged 47.7–832.7 pg m{sup −3} and 1.31–5.99 fg m{sup −3}, respectively, and the predominant homologues were di- and tri-CNs in the gas phase. The results indicated that this analytical method was useful for the accurate and specific evaluation of dioxin-like toxicity and human exposure levels of PCNs in the atmosphere.

  18. New SI-traceable reference gas mixtures for fluorinated gases at atmospheric concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillevic, Myriam; Wyss, Simon A.; Pascale, Céline; Vollmer, Martin K.; Niederhauser, Bernhard; Reimann, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    In order to better support the monitoring of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, we develop a method to produce reference gas mixtures for fluorinated gases (F-gases, i.e. gases containing fluorine atoms) in a SI-traceable way, meaning that the amount of substance fraction in mole per mole is traceable to SI-units. These research activities are conducted in the framework of the HIGHGAS and AtmoChem-ECV projects. First, single-component mixtures in synthetic air at ~85 nmol/mol (ppb) are generated for HFC-125 (pentafluoroethane, a widely used HFC) and HFC-1234yf (2,3,3,3-tetrafluoropropene, a car air conditioner fluid of growing importance). These mixtures are first dynamically produced by permeation: a permeator containing the pure substance loses mass linearly over time under a constant gas flow, in the permeation chamber of a magnetic suspension balance, which is regularly calibrated. This primary mixture is then pressurised into Silconert2000-coated stainless steel cylinders by cryo-filling. In a second step these mixtures are dynamically diluted using 2 subsequent dilution steps piloted by mass flow controllers (MFC) and pressure controllers. The assigned mixture concentration is calculated mostly based on the permeator mass loss, on the carrier gas purity and on the MFCs flows. An uncertainty budget is presented, resulting in an expanded uncertainty of 2% for the HFC-125 reference mixture and of 2.5% for the HFC-1234yf mixture (95% confidence interval). The final gas, with near-atmospheric concentration (17.11 pmol/mol for HFC-125, 2.14 pmol/mol for HFC-1234yf) is then measured with Medusa-GC/MS technology against standards calibrated on existing reference scales. The assigned values of the dynamic standards are in excellent agreement with measurements vs the existing reference scales, SIO-14 from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography for HFC-125 and Empa-2013 for HFC-1234yf. Moreover, the Medusa-GC/MS measurements show the excellent purity of the SI

  19. Hydrostatic Simulation of Earth's Atmospheric Gas Using Multi-particle Collision Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Pattisahusiwa, Asis; Virid, Sparisoma

    2015-01-01

    Multi-particle collision dynamics (MPCD) is a mesoscopic simulation method to simulate fluid particle-like flows. MPCD has been widely used to simulate various problems in condensed matter. In this study, hydrostatic behavior of gas in the Earth's atmospheric layer is simulated by using MPCD method. The simulation is carried out by assuming the system under ideal state and is affected only by gravitational force. Gas particles are homogeneous and placed in 2D box. Interaction of the particles with the box is applied through implementation of boundary conditions (BC). Periodic BC is applied on the left and the right side, specular reflection on the top side, while bounce-back on the bottom side. Simulation program is executed in Arch Linux and running in notebook with processor Intel i5 @2700 MHz with 10 GB DDR3 RAM. The results show behaviors of the particles obey kinetic theory for ideal gas when gravitational acceleration value is proportional to the particle mass. Density distribution as a function of alti...

  20. Locating hazardous gas leaks in the atmosphere via modified genetic, MCMC and particle swarm optimization algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ji; Zhang, Ru; Yan, Yuting; Dong, Xiaoqiang; Li, Jun Ming

    2017-05-01

    Hazardous gas leaks in the atmosphere can cause significant economic losses in addition to environmental hazards, such as fires and explosions. A three-stage hazardous gas leak source localization method was developed that uses movable and stationary gas concentration sensors. The method calculates a preliminary source inversion with a modified genetic algorithm (MGA) and has the potential to crossover with eliminated individuals from the population, following the selection of the best candidate. The method then determines a search zone using Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling, utilizing a partial evaluation strategy. The leak source is then accurately localized using a modified guaranteed convergence particle swarm optimization algorithm with several bad-performing individuals, following selection of the most successful individual with dynamic updates. The first two stages are based on data collected by motionless sensors, and the last stage is based on data from movable robots with sensors. The measurement error adaptability and the effect of the leak source location were analyzed. The test results showed that this three-stage localization process can localize a leak source within 1.0 m of the source for different leak source locations, with measurement error standard deviation smaller than 2.0.

  1. Continuous measurements of atmospheric oxygen and carbon dioxide on a North Sea gas platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. T. Luijkx

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available A new atmospheric measurement station has been established on the North Sea oil and gas production platform F3, 200 km north off the Dutch coast (54°51' N, 4°44' E. Atmospheric mixing ratios of O2 and CO2 are continuously measured using fuel cell technology and compact infrared absorption instruments, respectively. Furthermore, the station includes an automated air flask sampler for laboratory analysis of the atmospheric mixing ratios of CO2, CH4, CO and O2 and isotope measurements of δ13C, δ18O and Δ14C from CO2. This station is – to our knowledge – the first fixed sea based station with on-site continuous O2 and CO2 measurements and therefore yields valuable additional information about the CO2 uptake in coastal marine regions, specifically the North Sea. This paper presents the measurement station and the used methodologies in detail. Additionally, the first data is presented showing the seasonal cycle as expected during August 2008 through June 2009. In comparison to land-based stations, the data show low day-to-day variability, as they are practically free of nightly inversions. Therefore, the data set collected at this measurement station serves directly as background data for the coastal northwest European region. Additionally, some short-term O2 and CO2 signals are presented, including very large (over 200 per meg and fast negative atmospheric O2 excursions.

  2. A gas chromatographic instrument for measurement of hydrogen cyanide in the lower atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Ambrose

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A gas-chromatographic (GC instrument was developed for measuring hydrogen cyanide (HCN in the lower atmosphere. The main features of the instrument are (1 a cryogen-free cooler for sample dehumidification and enrichment, (2 a porous polymer PLOT column for analyte separation, (3 a flame thermionic detector (FTD for sensitive and selective detection, and (4 a dynamic dilution system for calibration. We deployed the instrument for a ∼4 month period from January–June, 2010 at the AIRMAP atmospheric monitoring station Thompson Farm 2 (THF2 in rural Durham, NH. A subset of measurements made during 3–31 March is presented here with a detailed description of the instrument features and performance characteristics. The temporal resolution of the measurements was ~20 min, with a 75 s sample capture time. The 1σ measurement precision was <10% and the instrument response linearity was excellent on a calibration scale of 0.10–0.75 ppbv (±5%. The estimated method detection limit (MDL and accuracy were 0.021 ppbv and 15%, respectively. From 3–31 March 2010, ambient HCN mixing ratios ranged from 0.15–1.0 ppbv (±15%, with a mean value of 0.36 ± 0.16 ppbv (1σ. The approximate mean background HCN mixing ratio of 0.20 ± 0.04 ppbv appeared to agree well with tropospheric column measurements reported previously. The GC-FTD HCN measurements were strongly correlated with acetonitrile (CH3CN measured concurrently with a proton transfer-reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS, as anticipated given our understanding that the nitriles share a common primary biomass burning source to the global atmosphere. The nitriles were overall only weakly correlated with carbon monoxide (CO, which is reasonable considering the greater diversity of sources for CO. However, strong correlations with CO were observed on several nights under stable atmospheric conditions and suggest regional combustion-based sources for the nitriles. These results demonstrate that

  3. [On-line method for measurement of the carbon isotope ratio of atmospheric methane and its application to atmosphere of Yakela condensed gas field].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jun-Hong; Bao, Zheng-Yu; Xiang, Wu; Qiao, Sheng-Ying; Li, Bing

    2006-01-01

    An on-line method for measurement of the 13C/12C ratio of methane by a gas chromatography/high-temperature conversion/ isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/MS) technique was developed. This method is less laborious, more rapid (45 min), of high precision (+/- 0.4 x 10(-3)) and by using a small amount of sample (about 200 mL of atmosphere). Its application to isotopic characterization, and hence methane source identification, was demonstrated by examination of atmosphere sample collected in Yakela condensed gas field, China. The average 13C/12C ratio of atmospheric methane in Yakela field was -45.0 x 10(-3) heavier by 1.2 x 10(-3) -2.0 x 10(-3) than the global average. This is caused by seepage and diffusing of methane from Yakela condensed gas reservoir. The concentrations of atmospheric methane in daytimes are found to be lower than those in nighttimes, and the corresponding 13C/12C ratios in daytimes are lighter compared to those in nighttimes, a phenomena probably caused by the fact that a small part of methane from Yakela condensate reservoir is consumed in soil's surface under sunlight.

  4. 2D fluid simulations of discharges at atmospheric pressure in reactive gas mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdon, Anne

    2015-09-01

    Since a few years, low-temperature atmospheric pressure discharges have received a considerable interest as they efficiently produce many reactive chemical species at a low energy cost. This potential is of great interest for a wide range of applications as plasma assisted combustion or biomedical applications. Then, in current simulations of atmospheric pressure discharges, there is the need to take into account detailed kinetic schemes. It is interesting to note that in some conditions, the kinetics of the discharge may play a role on the discharge dynamics itself. To illustrate this, we consider the case of the propagation of He-N2 discharges in long capillary tubes, studied for the development of medical devices for endoscopic applications. Simulation results put forward that the discharge dynamics and structure depend on the amount of N2 in the He-N2 mixture. In particular, as the amount of N2 admixture increases, the discharge propagation velocity in the tube increases, reaches a maximum for about 0 . 1 % of N2 and then decreases, in agreement with experiments. For applications as plasma assisted combustion with nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges, there is the need to handle the very different timescales of the nanosecond discharge with the much longer (micro to millisecond) timescales of combustion processes. This is challenging from a computational point of view. It is also important to better understand the coupling of the plasma induced chemistry and the gas heating. To illustrate this, we present the simulation of the flame ignition in lean mixtures by a nanosecond pulsed discharge between two point electrodes. In particular, among the different discharge regimes of nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges, a ``spark'' regime has been put forward in the experiments, with an ultra-fast local heating of the gas. For other discharge regimes, the gas heating is much weaker. We have simulated the nanosecond spark regime and have observed shock waves

  5. Miniaturized Gas Correlation Radiometer for the Detection of Trace Gases in the Martian Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melroy, Hilary R.; Wilson, Emily L.; Georgieva, Elena

    2012-01-01

    We present a miniaturized and simplified version of a gas correlation radiometer (GCR) capable of simultaneously mapping multiple trace gases and identifying active regions on the Mars surface. Gas correlation radiometry (GCR) has been shown to be a sensitive and versatile method for detecting trace gases in Earth's atmosphere. Reduction of the size and mass of the GCR was achieved by implementing compact, light-weight 1 mm inner diameter hollow-core optical fibers (hollow waveguides) as the gas correlation cells. In a comparison with an Earth orbiting CO2 GCR instrument, exchanging the 10 m multipass cells with hollow waveguide gas correlation cells of equivalent path length reduces the mass from approximately 150 kg to approximately 0.5 kg, and reduces the volume from 1.9 m x 1.3 m x 0.86 m to a small bundle of fiber coils approximately 1 meter in diameter by 0.05 m in height (mass and volume reductions of greater than 99%). A unique feature of this instrument is its stackable module design, with a single module for each trace gas. Each of the modules is self-contained, and fundamentally identical; differing by the bandpass filter wavelength range and gas mixtures inside the hollow-waveguide absorption cells. The current configuration contains four stacked modules for simultaneous measurements of methane (CH4), formaldehyde (H2CO), water vapor (H2O), and deuterated water vapor (HDO) but could easily be expanded to include measurements of additional species of interest including nitrous oxide (N2O), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), methanol (CH3OH), and sulfur dioxide (SO2), as well as carbon dioxide (CO2) for a simultaneous measure of mass balance. Preliminary results indicate that a 1 ppb detection limit is possible for both formaldehyde and methane with one second of averaging. Using non-optimized components, we have demonstrated an instrument sensitivity equivalent to approximately 30 ppb for formaldehyde, and approximately 500 ppb for methane. We expect custom

  6. Miniaturized Gas Correlation Radiometer for the Detection of Trace Gases in the Martian Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melroy, H.; Wilson, E. L.; Georgieva, E.

    2012-12-01

    We present a miniaturized and simplified version of a gas correlation radiometer (GCR) capable of simultaneously mapping multiple trace gases and identifying active regions on the Mars surface. Gas correlation radiometry (GCR) has been shown to be a sensitive and versatile method for detecting trace gases in Earth's atmosphere. Reduction of the size and mass of the GCR was achieved by implementing compact, light-weight 1 mm inner diameter hollow-core optical fibers (hollow waveguides) as the gas correlation cells. In a comparison with an Earth orbiting CO2 GCR instrument, exchanging the 10 m multipass cells with hollow waveguide gas correlation cells of equivalent pathlength reduces the mass from ~150 kg to ~0.5 kg, and reduces the volume from 1.9 m x 1.3 m x 0.86 m to a small bundle of fiber coils approximately 1 meter in diameter by 0.05 m in height (mass and volume reductions of >99%). A unique feature of this instrument is its stackable module design, with a single module for each trace gas. Each of the modules is self-contained, and fundamentally identical; differing by the bandpass filter wavelength range and gas mixtures inside the hollow-waveguide absorption cells. The current configuration contains four stacked modules for simultaneous measurements of methane (CH4), formaldehyde (H2CO), water vapor (H2O), and deuterated water vapor (HDO) but could easily be expanded to include measurements of additional species of interest including nitrous oxide (N2O), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), methanol (CH3OH), and sulfur dioxide (SO2), as well as carbon dioxide (CO2) for a simultaneous measure of mass balance. Preliminary results indicate that a 1 ppb detection limit is possible for both formaldehyde and methane with one second of averaging. Using non-optimized components, we have demonstrated an instrument sensitivity equivalent to ~30 ppb for formaldehyde, and ~500 ppb for methane. We expect custom bandpass filters and 6 m long waveguides to significantly improve these

  7. The escaping "pneuma" - gas of ancient earthquake concepts in relation to animal, atmospheric and thermal precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmut, Tributsch

    2013-04-01

    The escaping "pneuma" - gas of ancient earthquake concepts in relation to animal, atmospheric and thermal precursors Helmut Tributsch Present affiliation: Carinthian University for Applied Sciences, Bio-mimetics program, Europastrasse 4, 9524 Villach, Austria, helmut.tributsch@alice.it Retired from: Free University Berlin, Institute for physical and theoretical chemistry, Takustr. 3, 14195 Berlin, Germany. For two thousand years ancient European and medieval (including islamic) natural philosophers have considered a dry, warm gas, the "pneuma" ( breath, exhalation), escaping from the earth, as precursor and trigger of earthquakes. Also in China an escaping gas or breath (the qi) was considered the cause of earthquake, first in a document from 780 BC. We know today that escaping gas is not causing earthquakes. But it may be that natural phenomena that supported such a pneuma-concept have again and again been observed. The unpolluted environment and the largely absence of distracting artificial stimuli may have allowed the recognition of distinct earthquake precursors, such as described by ancient observers: (1) the sun becomes veiled and has a dim appearance, turns reddish or dark (2) a narrow long stretched cloud becomes visible, like a line drawn by a ruler, (3) earthquakes preceded by a thin streak of cloud stretching over a wide space. (4) earthquakes in the morning sometimes preceded by a still and a strong frost, (5) a surf - line of the air sea is forming (near the horizon). The described phenomena may be interpreted as a kind of smog forming above the ground prior to an earthquake, a smog exhaled from the ground, which is triggering water condensation, releasing latent heat, changing visibility, temperature, heat conduction and radiation properties. This could perfectly match the phenomenon, which is at the origin of satellite monitored temperature anomalies preceding earthquakes. Based on a few examples it will be shown that the time window of temperature

  8. Gas Chromatography/Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry for Fingerprinting the Macondo Oil Spill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobodin, Vladislav V; Maksimova, Ekaterina V; Rodgers, Ryan P

    2016-07-05

    We report the first application of a new mass spectrometry technique (gas chromatography combined to atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry, GC/APCI-MS/MS) for fingerprinting a crude oil and environmental samples from the largest accidental marine oil spill in history (the Macondo oil spill, the Gulf of Mexico, 2010). The fingerprinting of the oil spill is based on a trace analysis of petroleum biomarkers (steranes, diasteranes, and pentacyclic triterpanes) naturally occurring in crude oil. GC/APCI enables soft ionization of petroleum compounds that form abundant molecular ions without (or little) fragmentation. The ability to operate the instrument simultaneously in several tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) modes (e.g., full scan, product ion scan, reaction monitoring) significantly improves structural information content and sensitivity of analysis. For fingerprinting the oil spill, we constructed diagrams and conducted correlation studies that measure the similarity between environmental samples and enable us to differentiate the Macondo oil spill from other sources.

  9. Detectability of trace gases in the Martian atmosphere using gas correlation filter radiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, J.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Wilson, E.; Calcutt, S.

    2015-10-01

    We present the results of radiative transfer simulations of a gas correlation filter radiometer (GCFR) in the detection of trace species in the Martian atmosphere. We investigated two scenarios: 1) nadir and/or limb sounding from a Mars orbiter in the thermal infrared, 2) solar occultation measurements in the near-infrared from the Martian surface. In both scenarios, a GCFR would allow detection of trace gases at a lower concentration than that detectable by a conventional filter radiometer. In nadir/limb sounding, we find that CH4, SO2, N2O, C2H2 and CH3OH are detectable at concentrations lower than previously-derived upper limits. From solar occultation measurements, we find that CH4, SO2, C2H2, C2H6 are detectable at concentrations lower than previously-derived upper limits but only in low dust conditions.

  10. The characterization of atmospheric aerosols: Application to heterogeneous gas-particle reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, J.M.; Henson, B.F.; Wilson, K.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Prather, K.A.; Noble, C.A. [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States)

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this collaborative research project is the measurement and modeling of atmospheric aerosols and heterogeneous (gas/aerosol) chemical reactions. The two major accomplishments are single particle characterization of tropospheric particles and experimental investigation of simulated stratospheric particles and reactions thereon. Using aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry, real-time and composition measurements of single particles are performed on ambient aerosol samples. This technique allows particle size distributions for chemically distinct particle types to be described. The thermodynamics and chemical reactivity of polar stratospheric clouds are examined using vapor deposited thin ice films. Employing nonlinear optical methods, as well as other techniques, phase transitions on both water and acid ices are monitored as a function of temperature or the addition of gases.

  11. Piezoelectric transformers for low-voltage generation of gas discharges and ionic winds in atmospheric air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Michael J.; Go, David B.

    2015-12-01

    To generate a gas discharge (plasma) in atmospheric air requires an electric field that exceeds the breakdown threshold of ˜30 kV/cm. Because of safety, size, or cost constraints, the large applied voltages required to generate such fields are often prohibitive for portable applications. In this work, piezoelectric transformers are used to amplify a low input applied voltage (corona-like discharges on its corners or on adjacent electrodes. In the proper configuration, these discharges can be used to generate a bulk air flow called an ionic wind. In this work, PT-driven discharges are characterized by measuring the discharge current and the velocity of the induced ionic wind with ionic winds generated using input voltages as low as 7 V. The characteristics of the discharge change as the input voltage increases; this modifies the resonance of the system and subsequent required operating parameters.

  12. Detecting Methane From Leaking Pipelines and as Greenhouse Gas in the Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riris, Haris; Numata, Kenji; Li, Steven; Wu, Stewart; Ramanathan, Anand; Dawsey, Martha

    2012-01-01

    Laser remote sensing measurements of trace gases from orbit can provide unprecedented information about important planetary science and answer critical questions about planetary atmospheres. Methane (CH4) is the second most important anthropogenically produced greenhouse gas. Though its atmospheric abundance is much less than that of CO2 (1.78 ppm vs. 380 ppm), it has much larger greenhouse heating potential. CH4 also contributes to pollution in the lower atmosphere through chemical reactions, leading to ozone production. Atmospheric CH4 concentrations have been increasing as a result of increased fossil fuel production, rice farming, livestock, and landfills. Natural sources of CH4 include wetlands, wild fires, and termites, and perhaps other unknown sources. Important sinks for CH4 include non-saturated soils and oxidation by hydroxyl radicals in the atmosphere. Remotely measuring CH4 and other biogenic molecules (such as ethane and formaldehyde) on Mars also has important implications on the existence of life on Mars. Measuring CH4 at very low (ppb) concentrations from orbit will dramatically improve the sensitivity and spatial resolution in the search for CH4 vents and sub-surface life on other planets. A capability has been developed using lasers and spectroscopic detection techniques for the remote measurements of trace gases in open paths. Detection of CH4, CO2, H2O, and CO in absorption cells and in open paths, both in the mid- IR and near-IR region, has been demonstrated using an Optical Parametric Amplifier laser transmitter developed at GSFC. With this transmitter, it would be possible to develop a remote sensing methane instrument. CH4 detection also has very important commercial applications. Pipeline leak detection from an aircraft or a helicopter can significantly reduce cost, response time, and pinpoint the location. The main advantage is the ability to rapidly detect CH4 leaks remotely. This is extremely important for the petrochemical industry

  13. Aerosol lidar observations of atmospheric mixing in Los Angeles: Climatology and implications for greenhouse gas observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, John; Kort, Eric A; DeCola, Phil; Duren, Riley

    2016-08-27

    Atmospheric observations of greenhouse gases provide essential information on sources and sinks of these key atmospheric constituents. To quantify fluxes from atmospheric observations, representation of transport-especially vertical mixing-is a necessity and often a source of error. We report on remotely sensed profiles of vertical aerosol distribution taken over a 2 year period in Pasadena, California. Using an automated analysis system, we estimate daytime mixing layer depth, achieving high confidence in the afternoon maximum on 51% of days with profiles from a Sigma Space Mini Micropulse LiDAR (MiniMPL) and on 36% of days with a Vaisala CL51 ceilometer. We note that considering ceilometer data on a logarithmic scale, a standard method, introduces, an offset in mixing height retrievals. The mean afternoon maximum mixing height is 770 m Above Ground Level in summer and 670 m in winter, with significant day-to-day variance (within season σ = 220m≈30%). Taking advantage of the MiniMPL's portability, we demonstrate the feasibility of measuring the detailed horizontal structure of the mixing layer by automobile. We compare our observations to planetary boundary layer (PBL) heights from sonde launches, North American regional reanalysis (NARR), and a custom Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model developed for greenhouse gas (GHG) monitoring in Los Angeles. NARR and WRF PBL heights at Pasadena are both systematically higher than measured, NARR by 2.5 times; these biases will cause proportional errors in GHG flux estimates using modeled transport. We discuss how sustained lidar observations can be used to reduce flux inversion error by selecting suitable analysis periods, calibrating models, or characterizing bias for correction in post processing.

  14. Aerosol lidar observations of atmospheric mixing in Los Angeles: Climatology and implications for greenhouse gas observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, John; Kort, Eric A.; DeCola, Phil; Duren, Riley

    2016-08-01

    Atmospheric observations of greenhouse gases provide essential information on sources and sinks of these key atmospheric constituents. To quantify fluxes from atmospheric observations, representation of transport—especially vertical mixing—is a necessity and often a source of error. We report on remotely sensed profiles of vertical aerosol distribution taken over a 2 year period in Pasadena, California. Using an automated analysis system, we estimate daytime mixing layer depth, achieving high confidence in the afternoon maximum on 51% of days with profiles from a Sigma Space Mini Micropulse LiDAR (MiniMPL) and on 36% of days with a Vaisala CL51 ceilometer. We note that considering ceilometer data on a logarithmic scale, a standard method, introduces, an offset in mixing height retrievals. The mean afternoon maximum mixing height is 770 m Above Ground Level in summer and 670 m in winter, with significant day-to-day variance (within season σ = 220m≈30%). Taking advantage of the MiniMPL's portability, we demonstrate the feasibility of measuring the detailed horizontal structure of the mixing layer by automobile. We compare our observations to planetary boundary layer (PBL) heights from sonde launches, North American regional reanalysis (NARR), and a custom Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model developed for greenhouse gas (GHG) monitoring in Los Angeles. NARR and WRF PBL heights at Pasadena are both systematically higher than measured, NARR by 2.5 times; these biases will cause proportional errors in GHG flux estimates using modeled transport. We discuss how sustained lidar observations can be used to reduce flux inversion error by selecting suitable analysis periods, calibrating models, or characterizing bias for correction in post processing.

  15. Evaluated kinetic and photochemical data for atmospheric chemistry: Volume IV ? gas phase reactions of organic halogen species

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    International audience; This article, the fourth in the series, presents kinetic and photochemical data sheets evaluated by the IUPAC Subcommittee on Gas Kinetic Data Evaluation for Atmospheric Chemistry. It covers the gas phase and photochemical reactions of organic halogen species, which were last published in 1997, and were updated on the IUPAC website in 2006. The article consists of a summary sheet, containing the recommended kinetic parameters for the evaluated reactions, and four appen...

  16. Evaluated kinetic and photochemical data for atmospheric chemistry: Volume II – gas phase reactions of organic species

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    This article, the second in the series, presents kinetic and photochemical data evaluated by the IUPAC Subcommittee on Gas Kinetic Data Evaluation for Atmospheric Chemistry. It covers the gas phase and photochemical reactions of Organic species, which were last published in 1999, and were updated on the IUPAC website in late 2002, and subsequently during the preparation of this article. The article consists of a summary table of the recommended rate coefficients, containing the...

  17. Evaluated kinetic and photochemical data for atmospheric chemistry: Volume I - gas phase reactions of Ox, HOx, NOx and SOx species

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    This article, the first in the series, presents kinetic and photochemical data evaluated by the IUPAC Subcommittee on GasKinetic Data Evaluation for Atmospheric Chemistry. It covers the gas phase and photochemical reactions of Ox, HOx, NOx and SOx species, which were last published in 1997, and were updated on the IUPAC website in late 2001. The article consists of a summary sheet, containing the recommended kinetic parameters for the evaluated reactions, and five appendi...

  18. Design and fabrication of a data logger for atmospheric pressure, temperature and relative humidity for gas-filled detector development

    CERN Document Server

    Sahu, S; Rudra, Sharmili; Biswas, S; Mohanty, B; Sahu, P K

    2015-01-01

    A novel instrument has been developed to monitor and record the ambient pa- rameters such as temperature, atmospheric pressure and relative humidity. These parameters are very essential for understanding the characteristics such as gain of gas filled detectors like Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) and Multi Wire Propor- tional Counter (MWPC). In this article the details of the design, fabrication and operation processes of the device has been presented.

  19. Atmospheric dust accumulation on native and non-native species: effects on gas exchange parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Juan A; Prado, Fernando E; Piacentini, Ruben D

    2014-05-01

    Plants are continuously exposed to atmospheric particulate matter (dust), and their leaves are the main receptors of deposited dust. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of dust deposition on leaf gas exchange parameters of 17 native and non-native tree and shrub species growing in Gran San Miguel de Tucumán in northwestern Argentina. Maximum assimilation rate (), stomatal conductance (), transpiration rate (), internal CO concentration (), and instantaneous water-use efficiency (WUE) were measured in cleaned leaves (CL) and dusted leaves (DL) of different species on November 2010, July 2011, and September 2011. In almost all studied species, gas exchange parameters were significantly affected by dust deposition. Values for , , and of DL were significantly reduced in 11, 12, and 14 species compared with CL. Morphological leaf traits seem to be related to reduction. Indeed, L. and (Mart. ex DC.) Standl. species with pubescent leaves and thick ribs showed the highest reduction percentages. Contrarily, and WUE were increased in DL but were less responsive to dust deposition than other parameters. Increases of and WUE were significant in 5 and 11 species, respectively. Correlation analyses between /, /, and / pairs showed significant positive linear correlations in CL and DL of many studied species, including small and tall plants. These results suggest that leaf stomatal factors and shade-induced effect by accumulated dust are primarily responsible for the observed reductions in photosynthesis rate of DL.

  20. High quality diesel by hydrotreating of atmospheric gas oil/light cycle oil blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georgina C. Laredo; Ricardo Saint-Martin; Maria C. Martinez; Jesus Castillo; Jose L. Cano [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Mexico (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    An improved process for high-quality diesel fuel production by hydrotreating atmospheric gas oil (SRGO) and light cycle oil (LCO) blends is presented in this paper. For this purpose, a set of blends of 5, 10 and 15% by volume of LCO with final boiling points of 300, 325 and 350{sup o}C with a full range gas oil (FBP 350{sup o}C) was hydrotreated in a pilot plant at 340-380{sup o}C, 5.4 MPa, 2.5 h-1 LHSV using a commercial Co-Mo catalyst. A relationship between the concentration of refractory sulfur compounds (those boiling above 316{sup o}C) and aromatics content in the feedstock with the hydrotreating temperature required for meeting a 0.05% sulfur specification was found. The experimental data obtained during the desulfurization was quantitatively represented by a 1.50 to 1.56 order rate equation, with activation energies between 18.9 and 34.1 kcal/mol, depending on the feedstock. 32 refs., 10 figs., 9 tabs.

  1. A Field-Reversed Configuration Plasma Translated into a Neutral Gas Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiguchi, Jun'ichi; Asai, Tomohiko; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Ando, Hirotoshi; Arai, Mamiko; Katayama, Seri; Takahashi, Toshiki

    2014-10-01

    A field-reversed configuration (FRC) is a compact toroid dominantly with poloidal magnetic field. Because of its simply-connected configuration, an FRC can be translated axially along a gradient of guide magnetic field, and trapped in a confinement region with quasi-static external magnetic field. FRC translation experiments have been performed several facilities. Translation speed of those translated FRCs is comparable with super-Alfvenic speed of approximately 200 km/s. In this experiments, FRC translation has been performed on the FAT (FRC Amplification via Translation) facility. Achieved translation speed in the case of translation into a confinement chamber maintained as the vacuum state is in the range from 130 to 210 km/s. On the other hand, FRC translation into a statically filled deuterium gas atmosphere has also been performed. In the case of translation into filled neutral gas, FRC translation speed is approximately 80 km/s and the separatrix volume has extremely expanded compared with the case of a vacuum state. The phenomenon suggests the presence of regeneration process of translation kinetic energy back into the internal plasma energy during the translation process. This work was partially supported by ``Nihon University Symbolic Project.'' The authors gratefully acknowledge contributions from Nac Image Technology Inc. on the fast camera measurements.

  2. Gas chromatography-microchip atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostman, Pekka; Luosujärvi, Laura; Haapala, Markus; Grigoras, Kestas; Ketola, Raimo A; Kotiaho, Tapio; Franssila, Sami; Kostiainen, Risto

    2006-05-01

    An atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) microchip is presented for combining a gas chromatograph (GC) to a mass spectrometer (MS). The chip includes capillary insertion channel, stopper, vaporizer channel, nozzle and nebulizer gas inlet fabricated on the silicon wafer, and a platinum heater sputtered on a glass wafer. These two wafers are joined by anodic bonding creating a two-dimensional version of an APCI microchip. The sample from GC is directed via heated transfer line capillary to the vaporizer channel of the APCI chip. The etched nozzle forms narrow sample plume, which is ionized by an external corona discharge needle, and the ions are analyzed by a mass spectrometer. The GC-microchip APCI-MS combination provides an efficient method for qualitative and quantitative analysis. The spectra produced by microchip APCI show intensive protonated molecule and some fragmentation products as in classical chemical ionization for structure elucidation. In quantitative analysis the GC-microchip APCI-MS showed good linearity (r(2) = 0.9989) and repeatability (relative standard deviation 4.4%). The limits of detection with signal-to-noise ratio of three were between 0.5 and 2 micromol/L with MS mode using selected ion monitoring and 0.05 micromol/L with MS/MS using multiple reaction monitoring.

  3. Recent Developments in Film and Gas Research in Modified Atmosphere Packaging of Fresh Foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Meng, Xiangyong; Bhandari, Bhesh; Fang, Zhongxiang

    2016-10-01

    Due to the rise of consumer's awareness of fresh foods to health, in the past few years, the consumption of fresh and fresh-cut produces has increased sturdily. Modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) possesses a potential to become one of the most appropriate technologies for packaging fresh and fresh-cut produces. The MAP has advantages of extending the shelf-life, preserving or stabilizing the desired properties of fresh produces, and convenience in handing and distribution. The success of MAP-fresh foods depends on many factors including types of fresh foods, storage temperature and humidity, gas composition, and the characteristics of package materials. This paper reviews the recent developments highlighting the most critical factors of film and gas on the quality of MAP fresh foods. Although the innovations and development of food packaging technology will continue to promote the development of novel MAP, concentrated research and endeavors from scientists and engineers are still important to the development of MAP that focuses on consumers' requirements, enhancing product quality, environmental friendly design, and cost-effective application.

  4. Fighting global warming by greenhouse gas removal: destroying atmospheric nitrous oxide thanks to synergies between two breakthrough technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Tingzhen; de Richter, Renaud; Shen, Sheng; Caillol, Sylvain

    2016-04-01

    Even if humans stop discharging CO2 into the atmosphere, the average global temperature will still increase during this century. A lot of research has been devoted to prevent and reduce the amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions in the atmosphere, in order to mitigate the effects of climate change. Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) is one of the technologies that might help to limit emissions. In complement, direct CO2 removal from the atmosphere has been proposed after the emissions have occurred. But, the removal of all the excess anthropogenic atmospheric CO2 will not be enough, due to the fact that CO2 outgases from the ocean as its solubility is dependent of its atmospheric partial pressure. Bringing back the Earth average surface temperature to pre-industrial levels would require the removal of all previously emitted CO2. Thus, the atmospheric removal of other greenhouse gases is necessary. This article proposes a combination of disrupting techniques to transform nitrous oxide (N2O), the third most important greenhouse gas (GHG) in terms of current radiative forcing, which is harmful for the ozone layer and possesses quite high global warming potential. Although several scientific publications cite "greenhouse gas removal," to our knowledge, it is the first time innovative solutions are proposed to effectively remove N2O or other GHGs from the atmosphere other than CO2.

  5. A cylindrical multiwire high-pressure gas proportional chamber surrounding a gaseous $_{2} target with a mylar separation foil $6 \\mu m thick

    CERN Document Server

    Gastaldi, Ugo; Averdung, H; Bailey, J; Beer, G A; Dreher, B; Erdman, K L; Klempt, E; Merle, K; Neubecker, K; Sabev, C; Schwenk, H; Wendling, R D; White, B L; Wodrich, R

    1978-01-01

    The characteristics and performances of a cylindrical multiwire proportional chamber built and used at CERN in experiment S142 for the study of the pp atom spectroscopy are presented. The chamber surrounds a high-pressure gaseous H/sub 2/ target, from which it is separated by a very thin window (6 mu m mylar foil). The active volume (90 cm long; 2 cm thick, internal diameter=30 cm) is divided into 36 equal and independent cells each covering 10 degrees in azimuth. At 4 abs. atm the detection efficiency for X-rays is higher than 20% in the whole energy range 1.5-15 keV. Typical resolutions are 35% fwhm for the 3 ke V Ar fluorescence line and 25% fwhm for the 5.5 keV /sup 54/Mn line. Working pressures from 0.5 to 16 abs. atm have been used. (8 refs).

  6. O VI Emission Imaging of a Galaxy with the Hubble Space Telescope: a Warm Gas Halo Surrounding the Intense Starburst SDSS J115630.63+500822.1

    CERN Document Server

    Hayes, Matthew; Östlin, Göran; Scarlata, Claudia; Lehnert, Matthew D; Mannerström-Jansson, Gustav

    2016-01-01

    We report results from a new HST study of the OVI 1032,1038\\AA\\ doublet in emission around intensely star-forming galaxies. The programme aims to characterize the energy balance in starburst galaxies and gas cooling in the difficult-to-map coronal temperature regime of 2-5 x $10^5$K. We present the first resolved image of gas emission in the OVI line. Our target, SDSS J1156+5008, is very compact in the continuum but displays OVI emission to radii of 23 kpc. The surface brightness profile is well fit by an exponential with a scale of 7.5kpc. This is ten times the size of the photoionized gas, and we estimate that 1/6 the total OVI luminosity comes from resonantly scattered continuum radiation. Spectroscopy - which closely resembles a stacked sample of archival spectra - confirms the OVI emission, and determines the column density and outflow velocity from blueshifted absorption. The combination of measurements enables several new calculations with few assumptions. The OVI regions fill only ~$10^{-3}$ of the vo...

  7. Enrichment of radon and carbon dioxide in the open atmosphere of an Australian coal seam gas field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, Douglas R; Santos, Isaac R; Maher, Damien T; Cyronak, Tyler J; Davis, Rachael J

    2013-04-02

    Atmospheric radon ((222)Rn) and carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations were used to gain insight into fugitive emissions in an Australian coal seam gas (CSG) field (Surat Basin, Tara region, Queensland). (222)Rn and CO2 concentrations were observed for 24 h within and outside the gas field. Both (222)Rn and CO2 concentrations followed a diurnal cycle with night time concentrations higher than day time concentrations. Average CO2 concentrations over the 24-h period ranged from ~390 ppm at the control site to ~467 ppm near the center of the gas field. A ~3 fold increase in maximum (222)Rn concentration was observed inside the gas field compared to outside of it. There was a significant relationship between maximum and average (222)Rn concentrations and the number of gas wells within a 3 km radius of the sampling sites (n = 5 stations; p radon relationship was a response to enhanced emissions within the gas field related to both point (well heads, pipelines, etc.) and diffuse soil sources. Radon may be useful in monitoring enhanced soil gas fluxes to the atmosphere due to changes in the geological structure associated with wells and hydraulic fracturing in CSG fields.

  8. On the plasma chemistry of a cold atmospheric argon plasma jet with shielding gas device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Bleker, Ansgar; Winter, Jörn; Bösel, André; Reuter, Stephan; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter

    2016-02-01

    A novel approach combining experimental and numerical methods for the study of reaction mechanisms in a cold atmospheric \\text{Ar} plasma jet is introduced. The jet is operated with a shielding gas device that produces a gas curtain of defined composition around the plasma plume. The shielding gas composition is varied from pure {{\\text{N}}2} to pure {{\\text{O}}2} . The density of metastable argon \\text{Ar}≤ft(4\\text{s}{{,}3}{{\\text{P}}2}\\right) in the plasma plume was quantified using laser atom absorption spectroscopy. The density of long-living reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS), namely {{\\text{O}}3} , \\text{N}{{\\text{O}}2} , \\text{NO} , {{\\text{N}}2}\\text{O} , {{\\text{N}}2}{{\\text{O}}5} and {{\\text{H}}2}{{\\text{O}}2} , was quantified in the downstream region of the jet in a multipass cell using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The jet produces a turbulent flow field and features guided streamers propagating at several \\text{km}~{{\\text{s}}-1} that follow the chaotic argon flow pattern, yielding a plasma plume with steep spatial gradients and a time dependence on the \\text{ns} scale while the downstream chemistry unfolds within several seconds. The fast and highly localized electron impact reactions in the guided streamer head and the slower gas phase reactions of neutrals occurring in the plasma plume and experimental apparatus are therefore represented in two separate kinetic models. The first electron impact reaction kinetics model is correlated to the LAAS measurements and shows that in the guided streamer head primary reactive oxygen and nitrogen species are dominantly generated from \\text{Ar}≤ft(4\\text{s}{{,}3}{{\\text{P}}2}\\right) . The second neutral species plug-flow model hence uses an \\text{Ar}≤ft(4\\text{s}{{,}3}{{\\text{P}}2}\\right) source term as sole energy input and yields good agreement with the RONS measured by FTIR spectroscopy.

  9. Climate and site management as driving factors for the atmospheric greenhouse gas exchange of a restored wetland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herbst, Mathias; Friborg, Thomas; Schelde, Kirsten;

    2013-01-01

    The atmospheric greenhouse gas (GHG) budget of a restored wetland in western Denmark was established for the years 2009–2011 from eddy covariance measurements of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) fluxes. The water table in the wetland, which was restored in 2002, was unregulated, and the veg......The atmospheric greenhouse gas (GHG) budget of a restored wetland in western Denmark was established for the years 2009–2011 from eddy covariance measurements of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) fluxes. The water table in the wetland, which was restored in 2002, was unregulated...... the atmosphere. However, in terms of the full annual GHG budget (assuming that 1 g CH4 is equivalent to 25 g CO2 with respect to the greenhouse effect over a time horizon of 100 years) the wetland was a sink in 2009, a source in 2010 and neutral in 2011. Complementary observations of meteorological factors...

  10. Compilation and evaluation of gas phase diffusion coefficients of reactive trace gases in the atmosphere: volume 1. Inorganic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, M. J.; Cox, R. A.; Kalberer, M.

    2014-09-01

    Diffusion of gas molecules to the surface is the first step for all gas-surface reactions. Gas phase diffusion can influence and sometimes even limit the overall rates of these reactions; however, there is no database of the gas phase diffusion coefficients of atmospheric reactive trace gases. Here we compile and evaluate, for the first time, the diffusivities (pressure-independent diffusion coefficients) of atmospheric inorganic reactive trace gases reported in the literature. The measured diffusivities are then compared with estimated values using a semi-empirical method developed by Fuller et al. (1966). The diffusivities estimated using Fuller's method are typically found to be in good agreement with the measured values within ±30%, and therefore Fuller's method can be used to estimate the diffusivities of trace gases for which experimental data are not available. The two experimental methods used in the atmospheric chemistry community to measure the gas phase diffusion coefficients are also discussed. A different version of this compilation/evaluation, which will be updated when new data become available, is uploaded online (google.com/site/mingjintang/home/diffusion"target="_blank">https://sites.google.com/site/mingjintang/home/diffusion).

  11. Peru's Amazonian oil and gas industry: Risks, interests and the politics of grievance surrounding the development of block 76, Madre de Dios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haselip, James Arthur; Romera, B. Martinez

    2011-01-01

    investment in developing Amazonian oil and gas reserves. Specifically, this article aims to understand grievance-based conflict risk by documenting the positions and motivations of various organisations and local communities affected by exploration work conducted in block 76 overlapping the Amarakaeri...... Communal Reserve (ACR) in the region of Madre de Dios. An account is offered of how these positions have been steered and governed by a government-sanctioned management framework for the ACR, and by a limited and selected consultation process which lies at the heart of wider conflict over the large...

  12. A Fourier transform infrared trace gas and isotope analyser for atmospheric applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. W. T. Griffith

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Concern in recent decades about human impacts on Earth's climate has led to the need for improved and expanded measurement capabilities of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. In this paper we describe in detail an in situ trace gas analyser based on Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR spectroscopy that is capable of simultaneous and continuous measurements of carbon dioxide (CO2, methane (CH4, carbon monoxide (CO, nitrous oxide (N2O and 13C in CO2 in air with high precision. High accuracy is established by reference to measurements of standard reference gases. Stable water isotopes can also be measured in undried airstreams. The analyser is automated and allows unattended operation with minimal operator intervention. Precision and accuracy meet and exceed the compatibility targets set by the World Meteorological Organisation – Global Atmosphere Watch for baseline measurements in the unpolluted troposphere for all species except 13C in CO2.

    The analyser is mobile and well suited to fixed sites, tower measurements, mobile platforms and campaign-based measurements. The isotopic specificity of the optically-based technique and analysis allows its application in isotopic tracer experiments, for example in tracing variations of 13C in CO2 and 15N in N2O. We review a number of applications illustrating use of the analyser in clean air monitoring, micrometeorological flux and tower measurements, mobile measurements on a train, and soil flux chamber measurements.

  13. Hydrocarbon gas standards at the pmol/mol level to support ambient atmospheric measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoderick, George C; Duewer, David L; Ning, Li; DeSirant, Kathryn

    2010-02-01

    Studies of climate change increasingly recognize the diverse influences exerted by hydrocarbons in the atmosphere, including roles in particulates and ozone formation. Measurements of key non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) suggest atmospheric concentrations ranging from low pmol/mol to nmol/mol, depending on location and compound. To accurately establish concentration trends and to relate measurement records from many laboratories and researchers, it is essential to have good calibration standards. Several of the world's National Metrology Institutes (NMIs) are developing primary and secondary reference gas standards at the nmol/mol level. While the U.S. NMI, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), has developed pmol/mol standards for halocarbons and some volatile organics, the feasibility of preparing well-characterized, stable standards for NMHCs at the pmol/mol level is not yet established. NIST recently developed a suite of primary standards by gravimetric dilution that contains 18 NMHCs covering the concentration range of 60 pmol/mol to 230 pmol/mol. Taking into account the small but chemically significant contribution of NMHCs in the high-purity diluent nitrogen used in their preparation, the relative concentrations and short-term stability (2 to 3 months) of these NMHCs in the primary standards have been confirmed by chromatographic analysis. The gravimetric values assigned from the methods used to prepare the materials and the analytical concentrations determined from chromatographic analysis generally agree to within +/-2 pmol/mol. However, anomalous results for several of the compounds reflect the difficulties inherent in avoiding contamination and making accurate measurements at these very low levels.

  14. Gas blower for use in potentially explosive atmosphere; Ventilatoren fuer den Einsatz in explosionsgefaehrdeten Bereichen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frobese, D.-H.; Waldmann, R.

    1996-12-31

    The extension of emission control requirements during the last years lead to an increasing demand for blowers suited for the transport of explosive waste gas. Concerning hazardous explosive atmosphere which is classified as zone 1 or zone 2, the ``VDMA-Einheitsblaetter`` give guidance to appropriate constructional requirements for blowers. However, for zone 0-applications, there do not exist fixed construction requirements up til now. In the range of validity of the ``Verordnung fuer brennbare Fluessigkeiten - VbF`` a type approval is requested for blowers to be used for zone 0. Equipment intended for use in potentially explosive atmospheres will fall under the new Directive 94/9/EC (explosion protection directive) in future; equipment to be used for zone 0 will need an EC-type-examination certificate which shall be issued by a notified body in accordance to the Directive. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die zunehmende Erfassung von Anlagen durch emissionsrechtliche Anforderungen hat in den letzten Jahren zu einem immer groesseren Bedarf an Ventilatoren zur Foerderung von explosionsfaehiger Abluft gefuehrt. Fuer den Einsatz in explosionsgefaehrdeten Bereichen der Zonen 1 und 2 gelten VDMA-Einheitsblaetter, nach denen Ventilatoren konstruiert werden koennen; fuer den Einsatz im Bereich der Zone 0 hingegen existieren bislang keine festgelegten Konstruktionsanforderungen. Im Geltungsbereich der Verordnung ueber brennbare Fluessigkeiten (VbF) wird fuer den Einsatz in Zone 0 eine Bauartzulassung gefordert. Zukuenftig unterliegen Geraete, die in explosionsgefaehrdeten Bereichen eingesetzt werden, der neuen EG-Richtlinie 94/9/EG (Explosionsschutzrichtlinie), wonach fuer Geraete, die in Zone 0 eingesetzt werden, eine Baumusterpruefbescheinigung einer benannten Zertifizierstelle erforderlich ist. (orig.)

  15. PD-FiTE - an efficient method for calculating gas / liquid equilibria in atmospheric aerosol particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topping, D.; Lowe, D.; McFiggans, G.; Barley, M.

    2009-04-01

    Assessing the impact of atmospheric aerosol particles on the environment requires adequate representation of appropriate key processes within large scale models. In the absence of primary particulate material, interactions between the atmospheric gaseous components and particles means that the chemical nature of the particles is largely determined by the availability of condensable gaseous material, such as sulphuric and nitric acids, and by the ambient environmental conditions. Gas to particle mass transfer of semi-volatile components,driven by a difference in equilibrium and actual partial pressures above an aerosol particle, is an important factor in determining the evolving chemical composition of the particle and is necessary for predicting aerosol loading and composition. The design of an appropriate framework required for parameterizations of key variables is challenging. These thermodynamic frameworks are often numerically very complex, resulting in significant computational expense. Three dimensional chemical and aerosol transport models demand that computational expense be kept at a minimum,resulting in a trade-off between accuracy and efficiency. To calculate the equilibrium vapour pressure above a solution requires treatment of solution nonideality. This is manifest through activity coefficients of components pertinent to each condensing specie. However, activity coefficients are complex functions of the solution composition. Parameterisation of activity coefficients provides the main focus of this work largely because reducing the numerical complexity whilst retaining a good level of accuracy is very challenging. The approach presented here, the hybrid Partial Derivative Fitted Taylor Expansion (PDFiTE) (Topping et al 2008), builds on previously reported work, with an aim to derive parameters for an accurate and computationally efficient framework through coupling with a complex thermodynamic model. Such a reduction in complexity is important as it is

  16. Piezoelectric transformers for low-voltage generation of gas discharges and ionic winds in atmospheric air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Michael J. [Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indianapolis 46556 (United States); Go, David B., E-mail: dgo@nd.edu [Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indianapolis 46556 (United States); Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indianapolis 46556 (United States)

    2015-12-28

    To generate a gas discharge (plasma) in atmospheric air requires an electric field that exceeds the breakdown threshold of ∼30 kV/cm. Because of safety, size, or cost constraints, the large applied voltages required to generate such fields are often prohibitive for portable applications. In this work, piezoelectric transformers are used to amplify a low input applied voltage (<30 V) to generate breakdown in air without the need for conventional high-voltage electrical equipment. Piezoelectric transformers (PTs) use their inherent electromechanical resonance to produce a voltage amplification, such that the surface of the piezoelectric exhibits a large surface voltage that can generate corona-like discharges on its corners or on adjacent electrodes. In the proper configuration, these discharges can be used to generate a bulk air flow called an ionic wind. In this work, PT-driven discharges are characterized by measuring the discharge current and the velocity of the induced ionic wind with ionic winds generated using input voltages as low as 7 V. The characteristics of the discharge change as the input voltage increases; this modifies the resonance of the system and subsequent required operating parameters.

  17. Inactivation of Acanthamoeba spp. and Other Ocular Pathogens by Application of Cold Atmospheric Gas Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shama, Gilbert; Andrew, Peter W.

    2016-01-01

    Currently there are estimated to be approximately 3.7 million contact lens wearers in the United Kingdom and 39.2 million in North America. Contact lens wear is a major risk factor for developing an infection of the cornea known as keratitis due to poor lens hygiene practices. While there is an international standard for testing disinfection methods against bacteria and fungi (ISO 14729), no such guidelines exist for the protozoan Acanthamoeba, which causes a potentially blinding keratitis most commonly seen in contact lens wearers, and as a result, many commercially available disinfecting solutions show incomplete disinfection after 6 and 24 h of exposure. Challenge test assays based on international standard ISO 14729 were used to determine the antimicrobial activity of cold atmospheric gas plasma (CAP) against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Candida albicans, and trophozoites and cysts of Acanthamoeba polyphaga and Acanthamoeba castellanii. P. aeruginosa and C. albicans were completely inactivated in 0.5 min and 2 min, respectively, and trophozoites of A. polyphaga and A. castellanii were completely inactivated in 1 min and 2 min, respectively. Furthermore, for the highly resistant cyst stage of both species, complete inactivation was achieved after 4 min of exposure to CAP. This study demonstrates that the CAP technology is highly effective against bacterial, fungal, and protozoan pathogens. The further development of this technology has enormous potential, as this approach is able to deliver the complete inactivation of ocular pathogens in minutes, in contrast to commercial multipurpose disinfecting solutions that require a minimum of 6 h. PMID:26994079

  18. Inactivation of Acanthamoeba spp. and Other Ocular Pathogens by Application of Cold Atmospheric Gas Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaselgrave, Wayne; Shama, Gilbert; Andrew, Peter W; Kong, Michael G

    2016-05-15

    Currently there are estimated to be approximately 3.7 million contact lens wearers in the United Kingdom and 39.2 million in North America. Contact lens wear is a major risk factor for developing an infection of the cornea known as keratitis due to poor lens hygiene practices. While there is an international standard for testing disinfection methods against bacteria and fungi (ISO 14729), no such guidelines exist for the protozoan Acanthamoeba, which causes a potentially blinding keratitis most commonly seen in contact lens wearers, and as a result, many commercially available disinfecting solutions show incomplete disinfection after 6 and 24 h of exposure. Challenge test assays based on international standard ISO 14729 were used to determine the antimicrobial activity of cold atmospheric gas plasma (CAP) against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Candida albicans, and trophozoites and cysts of Acanthamoeba polyphaga and Acanthamoeba castellanii P. aeruginosa and C. albicans were completely inactivated in 0.5 min and 2 min, respectively, and trophozoites of A. polyphaga and A. castellanii were completely inactivated in 1 min and 2 min, respectively. Furthermore, for the highly resistant cyst stage of both species, complete inactivation was achieved after 4 min of exposure to CAP. This study demonstrates that the CAP technology is highly effective against bacterial, fungal, and protozoan pathogens. The further development of this technology has enormous potential, as this approach is able to deliver the complete inactivation of ocular pathogens in minutes, in contrast to commercial multipurpose disinfecting solutions that require a minimum of 6 h.

  19. Relationships between atmospheric positive electric charge densities and gas bubble concentrations in the Baltic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zygmunt Klusek

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous measurements of bubble density in the sea subsurface and positive ions in the lower atmosphere were performed in the Baltic Sea in the summer of 1999. Bubbles in two size ranges, around 27 and 100 µm, were measured acoustically. Airborne positive charge was measured with a Gerdien instrument. Observed concentrations of air ions varied from 60 cm-3 up to 600 cm-3.      The relative role of bubbles and wind speed on the positive air ion concentrations over the brackish water of the Baltic Sea is discussed. The parameters of a model of a log-log dependence between charge concentration and bubble density are calculated.      The correlation functions between time series of concentrations of positive charges over the sea and gas bubbles averaged over a depth range from 0.4 to 4 m and wind speed are presented. There was zero lag between the cross-correlation maxima of charge and bubbles, but there was a phase lag of one and a half hours between charge and wind speed.

  20. Inactivation of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium on fresh produce by cold atmospheric gas plasma technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, A; Noriega, E; Thompson, A

    2013-02-01

    Cold atmospheric gas plasma treatment (CAP) is an alternative approach for the decontamination of fresh and minimally processed food. In this study, the effects of growth phase, growth temperature and chemical treatment regime on the inactivation of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) by Nitrogen CAP were examined. Furthermore, the efficacy of CAP treatment for decontaminating lettuce and strawberry surfaces and potato tissue inoculated with S. Typhimurium was evaluated. It was found that the rate of inactivation of S. Typhimurium was independent of the growth phase, growth temperature and chemical treatment regime. Under optimal conditions, a 2 min treatment resulted in a 2.71 log-reduction of S. Typhimurium viability on membrane filters whereas a 15 min treatment was necessary to achieve 2.72, 1.76 and 0.94 log-reductions of viability on lettuce, strawberry and potato, respectively. We suggest that the differing efficiency of CAP treatment on the inactivation of S. Typhimurium on these different types of fresh foods is a consequence of their surface features. Scanning electron microscopy of the surface structures of contaminated samples of lettuce, strawberry and potato revealed topographical features whereby S. Typhimurium cells could be protected from the active species generated by plasma. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A whiff of nebular gas in Titan's atmosphere - Potential implications for the conditions and timing of Titan's formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glein, Christopher R.

    2017-09-01

    In situ data from the GCMS instrument on the Huygens probe indicate that Titan's atmosphere contains small amounts of the primordial noble gases 36Ar and 22Ne (tentative detection), but it is unknown how they were obtained by the satellite. Based on the apparent similarity in the 22Ne/36Ar (atom) ratio between Titan's atmosphere and the solar composition, a previously neglected hypothesis for the origin of primordial noble gases in Titan's atmosphere is suggested - these species may have been acquired near the end of Titan's formation, when the moon could have gravitationally captured some nebular gas that would have been present in its formation environment (the Saturnian subnebula). These noble gases may be remnants of a primary atmosphere. This could be considered the simplest hypothesis to explain the 22Ne/36Ar ratio observed at Titan. However, the 22Ne/36Ar ratio may not be exactly solar if these species can be fractionated by external photoevaporation in the solar nebula, atmospheric escape from Titan, or sequestration on the surface of Titan. While the GCMS data are consistent with a 22Ne/36Ar ratio of 0.05 to 2.5 times solar (1σ range), simple estimates that attempt to account for some of the effects of these evolutionary processes suggest a sub-solar ratio, which may be depleted by approximately one order of magnitude. Models based on capture of nebular gas can explain why the GCMS did not detect any other primordial noble gas isotopes, as their predicted abundances are below the detection limits (especially for 84Kr and 132Xe). It is also predicted that atmospheric Xe on Titan should be dominated by radiogenic 129Xe if the source of primordial Xe is nebular gas. Of order 10-2-10-1 bar of primordial H2 may have been captured along with the noble gases from a gas-starved disk, but this H2 would have quickly escaped from the initial atmosphere. To have the opportunity to capture nebular gas, Titan should have formed within ∼10 Myr of the formation of the

  2. Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Indianapolis using a High-Density Surface Tower Network and an Atmospheric Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauvaux, T.; Miles, N. L.; Davis, K. J.; Richardson, S.; Deng, A.; Sarmiento, D. P.; Wu, K.; Sweeney, C.; Karion, A.; Hardesty, R. M.; Brewer, A.; Turnbull, J. C.; Iraci, L. T.; Hillyard, P. W.; Podolske, J. R.; Gurney, K. R.; Patarasuk, R.; Cambaliza, M. O. L.; Shepson, P. B.; Whetstone, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    The Indianapolis Flux Experiment (INFLUX) was designed to develop and evaluate methods of detection and attribution of greenhouse gas fluxes from urban environments. Determination of greenhouse gas fluxes and uncertainty bounds is essential for the evaluation of the effectiveness of mitigation strategies. Indianapolis is intended to serve as a test bed for these methods; the results will inform efforts at measuring emissions from urban centers worldwide, including megacities. The generally accepted method for determining urban greenhouse gas emissions is inventories, which are compiled from records of land use and human activity. Atmospheric methods, in which towers are instrumented with sensors to measure greenhouse gas mole fractions and these data are used in an inversion model, have the potential to provide independent determination of emissions. The current INFLUX observation network includes twelve in-situ tower-based, continuous measurements of CO2. A subset of five towers additionally measure CH4, and a different subset measure CO. The subset measuring CO also include weekly flask samples of a wide variety of trace gases including 14CO2. Here we discuss the observed urban spatial and temporal patterns in greenhouse gas mole fraction in Indianapolis, with the critical result being the detectability of city emissions with this high-density network. We also present the first atmospheric inversion results for both CO2 and CH4, compare these results to inventories, and discuss the effects of critical assumptions in the inversion framework. The construction of unbiased atmospheric modeling systems and well-defined prior errors remains an important step in atmospheric emissions monitoring over urban areas. In order to minimize transport model errors, we developed a WRF-Chem FDDA modeling system ingesting surface and profile measurements of horizontal mean wind, temperature, and moisture. We demonstrate the impact of the meteorological data assimilation system on

  3. Climate and site management as driving factors for the atmospheric greenhouse gas exchange of a restored wetland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herbst, Mathias; Friborg, Thomas; Schelde, Kirsten;

    2012-01-01

    The full atmospheric greenhouse gas (GHG) budget of a restored wetland in Western Denmark could be established for the years 2009–2011 from eddy covariance measurements of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) fluxes. The water table in the wetland, being restored in 2002, was unregulated...... the atmosphere. However, in terms of the annual GHG budget (assuming that 1 g CH4 is equivalent to 25 g CO2 with respect to the greenhouse effect) the wetland was a sink in 2009, a source in 2010 and neutral in 2011. Complementary observations of meteorological factors and management activities were used...

  4. Evaluated kinetic and photochemical data for atmospheric chemistry: Volume IV – gas phase reactions of organic halogen species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Atkinson

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available This article, the fourth in the series, presents kinetic and photochemical data sheets evaluated by the IUPAC Subcommittee on Gas Kinetic Data Evaluation for Atmospheric Chemistry. It covers the gas phase and photochemical reactions of organic halogen species, which were last published in 1997, and were updated on the IUPAC website in 2006/07. The article consists of a summary sheet, containing the recommended kinetic parameters for the evaluated reactions, and four appendices containing the data sheets, which provide information upon which the recommendations are made.

  5. Evaluated kinetic and photochemical data for atmospheric chemistry: Volume II – gas phase reactions of organic species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Atkinson

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This article, the second in the series, presents kinetic and photochemical data evaluated by the IUPAC Subcommittee on Gas Kinetic Data Evaluation for Atmospheric Chemistry. It covers the gas phase and photochemical reactions of Organic species, which were last published in 1999, and were updated on the IUPAC website in late 2002, and subsequently during the preparation of this article. The article consists of a summary table of the recommended rate coefficients, containing the recommended kinetic parameters for the evaluated reactions, and eight appendices containing the data sheets, which provide information upon which the recommendations are made.

  6. The Stefan outflow in a multicomponent vapor-gas atmosphere around a droplet and its role for cloud expansion

    CERN Document Server

    Kuchma, A E; Martyukova, D S

    2016-01-01

    A new comprehensive analysis of Stefan's flow caused by a free growing droplet in vapor-gas atmosphere with several condensing components is presented. This analysis, based on the nonstationary heat and material balance and diffusion transport equations, shows the appearance of the Stefan inflow in the vicinity of the growing droplet and the outflow at large distances from the droplet as a consequence of nonisothermal condensation. For an ensemble of droplets in the atmospheric cloud, this flow provides an increase of the total volume of the cloud, which can be treated as cloud thermal expansion and leads to floating the cloud as a whole due to buoyancy. We have formulated the self-similar solutions of the nonstationary diffusion and heat conduction equations for a growing multicomponent droplet and have derived analytical expressions for the nonstationary velocity profile of Stefan's flow and the expansion volume of the vapor-gas mixture around the growing droplet. To illustrate the approach, we computed the...

  7. Influences of hydrogen-enriched atmosphere under coke oven gas injection on reduction swelling behaviors of oxidized pellet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龙红明; 王宏涛; 狄瞻霞; 春铁军; 柳政根

    2016-01-01

    It is of great importance to elucidate reduction swelling behaviors and reaction mechanism of oxidized pellet in hydrogen-enriched atmosphere under coke oven gas injection. In this work, the effects of hydrogen concentration in N2−CO−H2 atmosphere with unchanged CO content on reduction swelling behaviors of oxidized pellet at 1173 K were studied, to clarify the mechanism of hydrogen-enriched reduction and exclude the influences of CO. Then, the reduction swelling behaviors of oxidized pellet at 1173 K in actual atmosphere under coke oven gas (COG) injection, got from the simulation results of multi-fluid blast furnace model, were investigated. The results show that with the concentration of hydrogen increasing in N2−CO−H2 gas from 2% to 18%, the reduction swelling index of pellet decreases from 10.12% to 5.57% while the reduction ratio of pellet increases obviously from 39.85% to 69.58%. In addition, with COG injection rate increasing from 0 to 152.34 m3/t, the reduction swelling index of pellet decreases slightly from 10.71% to 9.54% while the reduction ratio of pellet is increased from 31.57% to 36.39%. The microstructures of pellet are transformed from the platy structure to the flocculent structure.

  8. Adsorption and reaction of trace gas-phase organic compounds on atmospheric water film surfaces: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, D J; Valsaraj, Kalliat T

    2010-02-01

    The air-water interface in atmospheric water films of aerosols and hydrometeors (fog, mist, ice, rain, and snow) presents an important surface for the adsorption and reaction of many organic trace gases and gaseous reactive oxidants (hydroxyl radical (OH(.)), ozone (O(3)), singlet oxygen (O(2)((1)Delta(g))), nitrate radicals (NO(3)(.)), and peroxy radicals (RO(2)(.)). Knowledge of the air-water interface partition constant of hydrophobic organic species is necessary for elucidating the significance of the interface in atmospheric fate and transport. Various methods of assessing both experimental and theoretical values of the thermodynamic partition constant and adsorption isotherm are described in this review. Further, the reactivity of trace gases with gas-phase oxidants (ozone and singlet oxygen) at the interface is summarized. Oxidation products are likely to be more water-soluble and precursors for secondary organic aerosols in hydrometeors. Estimation of characteristic times shows that heterogeneous photooxidation in water films can compete effectively with homogeneous gas-phase reactions for molecules in the atmosphere. This provides further support to the existing thesis that reactions of organic compounds at the air-water interface should be considered in gas-phase tropospheric chemistry.

  9. A Mathematical Model of the Modified Atmosphere Packaging (MAP System for the Gas Transmission Rate of Fruit Produce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Li

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model to predict oxygen, carbon dioxide, and water vapour exchanges in non-perforated and micro-perforated modified atmosphere packaging films has successfully been proposed. The transmission rate of gases was measured for films with thickness of 0.03 and 0.05 mm, perforation diameters of 0.5 and 2.0 mm, and temperatures of 0, 10 and 20 °C. Under most conditions, the increase in temperature and perforation diameter increased the transmission rate of oxygen, carbon dioxide, and water vapour, whereas the increase in film thickness decreased the transmission rate of the various gases. Validation of the proposed modified atmosphere packaging model was found to yield good prediction for gas concentrations and percentage losses in the mass of the produce after comparison with the experimental results of modified atmosphere packaging for tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum.

  10. Analysis of cave atmospheres by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC with flame ionization detection (FID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan C. Blase

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we describe a simple method for sampling, pre-concentrating, and separating volatile and semi-volatile components from two different cave atmospheres. Sampling is performed by capturing a volume of cave atmosphere in a Tedlar bag or Suma canister for sample storage and transport back to the laboratory. Loading a portion of the sample on a multi-bed sorption trap allows for sample pre-concentration prior to separation and detection of components on a comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatograph (GC×GC. Comparison of two Texas caves reveals the power of comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC for volatile separation and detection, and to our knowledge marks the first use of GC×GC for the analysis of cave atmospheres. Analysis of the results revealed 138 and 146 chromatographic signals over an S/N threshold of 500 and direct comparison of the two samples revealed 50 identical chromatographic signals. This study is a first step toward demonstrating the ability of GC×GC to separate the complex volatiles and semi-volatiles in the cave atmosphere as a fingerprinting tool.

  11. Development of an Electrostatic Precipitator to Remove Martian Atmospheric Dust from ISRU Gas Intakes During Planetary Exploration Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, J. Sidney; Thompson, Samuel M.; Cox, Nathan D.; Johansen, Michael R.; Williams, Blakeley S.; Hogue, Michael D.; Lowder, M. Loraine; Calle, Carlos I.

    2011-01-01

    Manned exploration missions to Mars will need dependable in situ resource utilization (ISRU) for the production of oxygen and other commodities. One of these resources is the Martian atmosphere itself, which is composed of carbon dioxide (95.3%), nitrogen (2.7%), argon (1.6%), oxygen (0.13%), carbon monoxide (0.07%), and water vapor (0.03%), as well as other trace gases. However, the Martian atmosphere also contains relatively large amounts of dust, uploaded by frequent dust devils and high Winds. To make this gas usable for oxygen extraction in specialized chambers requires the removal of most of the dust. An electrostatic precipitator (ESP) system is an obvious choice. But with an atmospheric pressure just one-hundredth of Earth's, electrical breakdown at low voltages makes the implementation of the electrostatic precipitator technology very challenging. Ion mobility, drag forces, dust particle charging, and migration velocity are also affected because the low gas pressure results in molecular mean free paths that are approximately one hundred times longer than those at Earth .atmospheric pressure. We report here on our efforts to develop this technology at the Kennedy Space Center, using gases with approximately the same composition as the Martian atmosphere in a vacuum chamber at 9 mbars, the atmospheric pressure on Mars. We also present I-V curves and large particle charging data for various versions of wire-cylinder and rod-cylinder geometry ESPs. Preliminary results suggest that use of an ESP for dust collection on Mars may be feasible, but further testing with Martian dust simulant is required.

  12. 大气压氦气多路低温等离子体射流%Plasma jet seven-array discharge at atmospheric helium gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李喜; 李杰; 董攀; 龙继东; 章林文

    2016-01-01

    A low temperature plasma jet array device using seven single electrodes surrounded with insulated organic glass is designed to study the discharge properties of atmospheric plasma jet.The ambient gas is atmospheric Helium gas,whose flow rate is controlled from 0 L/min to 10 L/min.This discharge device is driven by a sub-microsecond repetitive high voltage pulsed power with the pulse width about 230 ns,the rising edge about 120 ns.Using a repetitive frequency rate about 500 Hz,the high speed photographs are taken and the current pulse width is about 1 10 ns.The average jet length was measured under the condi-tions of changing gas flow rate and pulse voltage amplitudes in the experiment,in order to acquire the interactions of every plasma jet discharge.It is found that the average plasma jet length increases with the increasing voltage amplitude when the voltage am-plitude is less than 20 kV and that it increases slowly when the voltage amplitude is higher,up to 35 kV.It is also found that the average jet length reaches the maximum when the gas flowrate is at a regular value,that is,the average length decreases if the gas flowrate is over or under the regular range.Besides,it is also discovered that the central electrode discharge is affected extremely by the gas flowrate.The central jet length is almost invisible when the gas flowrate is very high or very low,while the central jet with a weak discharge is longer than the surrounding jets when the gas flow rate is 1 L/min.The main reasons are that the air blocks the jet developing and the central electrode jet channel is impeded by the surrounding jets.It is easier for the surrounding e-lectrode to develop jets.%为了研究大气压低温等离子体多路射流阵列的放电特性,设计一个实现7路低温等离子体射流的放电装置,采用单电极放电结构,在开放的大气环境下通入氦气。采用高压窄脉冲重复频率电源激励驱动该放电装置,电源脉冲宽度约230 ns

  13. Reversal of global atmospheric ethane and propane trends largely due to US oil and natural gas production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmig, Detlev; Rossabi, Samuel; Hueber, Jacques; Tans, Pieter; Montzka, Stephen A.; Masarie, Ken; Thoning, Kirk; Plass-Duelmer, Christian; Claude, Anja; Carpenter, Lucy J.; Lewis, Alastair C.; Punjabi, Shalini; Reimann, Stefan; Vollmer, Martin K.; Steinbrecher, Rainer; Hannigan, James W.; Emmons, Louisa K.; Mahieu, Emmanuel; Franco, Bruno; Smale, Dan; Pozzer, Andrea

    2016-07-01

    Non-methane hydrocarbons such as ethane are important precursors to tropospheric ozone and aerosols. Using data from a global surface network and atmospheric column observations we show that the steady decline in the ethane mole fraction that began in the 1970s halted between 2005 and 2010 in most of the Northern Hemisphere and has since reversed. We calculate a yearly increase in ethane emissions in the Northern Hemisphere of 0.42 (+/-0.19) Tg yr-1 between mid-2009 and mid-2014. The largest increases in ethane and the shorter-lived propane are seen over the central and eastern USA, with a spatial distribution that suggests North American oil and natural gas development as the primary source of increasing emissions. By including other co-emitted oil and natural gas non-methane hydrocarbons, we estimate a Northern Hemisphere total non-methane hydrocarbon yearly emission increase of 1.2 (+/-0.8) Tg yr-1. Atmospheric chemical transport modelling suggests that these emissions could augment summertime mean surface ozone by several nanomoles per mole near oil and natural gas production regions. Methane/ethane oil and natural gas emission ratios could suggest a significant increase in associated methane emissions; however, this increase is inconsistent with observed leak rates in production regions and changes in methane's global isotopic ratio.

  14. Final Report on Testing of Off-Gas Treatment Technologies for Abatement of Atmospheric Emissions of Chlorinated Volatile Organic Compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarosch, T.R.; Haselow, J.S.; Rossabi, J.; Burdick, S.A.; Raymond, R.; Young, J.E.; Lombard, K.H.

    1995-01-23

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the results of the program for off-gas treatment of atmospheric emissions of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs), in particular trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene (PCE). This program was funded through the Department of Energy Office of Technology Development`s VOC`s in Non-Arid Soils Integrated Demonstration (VNID). The off-gas treatment program was initiated after testing of in-situ air stripping with horizontal wells was completed (Looney et al., 1991). That successful test expectedly produced atmospheric emissions of CVOCs that were unabated. It was decided after that test that an off-gas treatment is an integral portion of remediation of CVOC contamination in groundwater and soil but also because several technologies were being developed across the United States to mitigate CVOC emissions. A single platform for testing off-gas treatment technologies would facilitate cost effective evaluation of the emerging technologies. Another motivation for the program is that many CVOCs will be regulated under the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 and are already regulated by many state regulatory programs. Additionally, compounds such as TCE and PCE are pervasive subsurface environmental contaminants, and, as a result, a small improvement in terms of abatement efficiency or cost will significantly reduce CVOC discharges to the environment as well as costs to United States government and industry.

  15. High Pressure Atmospheric Sampling Inlet System for Venus or the Gas Giants Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Thorleaf Research, Inc. proposes to develop a miniaturized high pressure atmospheric sampling inlet system for sample acquisition in extreme planetary environments,...

  16. Study of Atmospheric Trace Gas Amounts at the Stara Zagora Ground-Based Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, R.; Valev, D.; Kostadinov, I.; Atanassov, At.; Giovanelli, G.; Petritoli, A.; Bortoli, D.; Ravegnani, F.

    2006-03-01

    Since the end of August 1999 twilight daily measurements of scattered zenith sky radiation have been carried out at Stara Zagora for determination of trace gas amounts, deploying GASCOD instrument. It was developed at the Institute of Atmospheric Science and Climate, Bologna. Reference spectra are obtained at midday. The instrument, appearing a UV-VIS spectrometer, registers the zenith sky spectra automatically and 410 nm to 460 nm spectral interval is used to retrieve NO2 and O3 slant column amounts (SCA) by application of the DOAS methodology. The spectral analysis uses minimum least squares fitting of the cross sections at the expected absorbers to a logarithm of the twilight spectrum and a reference spectrum. The accumulated time series show the well-known typical seasonal variations, caused by the solar insulation. The residual time series of the removed semi-annual seasonal cycles from the measured original series show many different variations, with short periods up to inter-annual variations. Single spikes of SCA are detected and we consider them a result of over-passing weather fronts and/or lightning. Variations of SCA with time scale up to about 10 days are the consequence of weather cyclones. Some short-term variations of NO2 and O3 SCA are a result of intensive stratospheric-tropospheric exchange. Other residual time series periods are caused by Rossby waves, by over-passing of the polar vortex filaments. The inter-annual variations can be affected by QBO and NAO. Applying wavelet analysis of the obtained NO2 slant column amount data series, and the total O3 amount obtained by the GOME instrument, during the 23-rd solar cycle maximum, time intervals are found with periods of 27 days on the time scale. The applied cross-correlation analysis demonstrates a phase lag of some days of the NO2 and O3 response to the 27-days solar cycle. The calculated vertical column amounts of NO2 are used for validation of the satellite measurements, e.g. SCIAMACHY NO2

  17. Atmospheric concentration characteristics and gas/particle partitioning of PCBs from the North Pacific to the Arctic Ocean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhen; NA Guangshui; GAO Hui; WANG Yanjie; YAO Ziwei

    2014-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were measured in atmospheric samples collected from the North Pacific to the Arctic Ocean between July and September 2012 to study the atmospheric concentration characteris-tics of PCBs and their gas/particle partitioning. The mean concentration of 26 PCBs (vapor plus particulate phase) (ƩPCBs) was 19.116 pg/m3with a standard deviation of 13.833 pg/m3. Three most abundant conge-ners were CB-28, -52 and -77, accounting for 43.0% toƩPCBs. The predominance of vapor PCBs (79.0% toƩPCBs) in the atmosphere was observed.ƩPCBs were negative correlated with the latitudes and inverse of the absolute temperature (1/T). The significant correlation for most congeners was also observed between the logarithm of gas/particle partition coefficient (logKP) and 1/T. Shallower slopes (from −0.15 to −0.46, average −0.27) were measured from the regression of the logarithm of sub-cooled liquid vapor pressures (logpºL) and logKP for all samples. The difference of the slopes and intercepts among samples was insignifi-cant (p>0.1), implying adsorption and/or absorption processes and the aerosol composition did not differ significantly among different samples. By comparing three models, the J-P adsorption model, the octanol/air partition coefficient (KOA) based model and the soot-air model, the gas/particle partitioning of PCBs in the Arctic atmosphere was simulated more precisely by the soot-air model, and the adsorption onto el-emental carbon is more sensitive than the absorption into organic matters of aerosols, especially for low-chlorinated PCB congeners.

  18. Practices Surrounding Event Photos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vyas, Dhaval; Nijholt, Antinus; van der Veer, Gerrit C.; Kotzé, P.; Marsden, G.; Lindgaard, G.; Wesson, J.; Winckler, M.

    Sharing photos through mobile devices has a great potential for creating shared experiences of social events between co-located as well as remote participants. In order to design novel event sharing tools, we need to develop indepth understanding of current practices surrounding these so called

  19. Effect of Light Intensities and Atmospheric Gas Conditions on Biohydrogen Production of Microalgae Isolated from Fisheries Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mujalin Pholchan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the fishery farming industry has been developed rapidly due to increasing demand and consumption as well as the depletion of wild fish resources. Production processes in the industry usually generate large amounts of wastewater containing high nutrients, posing a threat to downstream water. However, phytoplankton removal techniques commonly used to counteract the threat, though appearing to have low efficiency, are timeconsuming and less sustainable. Microalgae are photosynthetic microorganisms that convert solar energy into hydrogen. Using the isolated algae from fish farms as a source of renewable energy production could be a promising choice for handling fisheries wastewater in a more efficient manner. However, hydrogen production processes from algae still need more studies as their efficiencies vary between algae species and growth factors. In this work, the efficiency of hydrogen production from Scenedesmus accuminatus and Arthrospira platensis harvested from fish farms under three different light intensity conditions and three atmospheric gas conditions was determined. The results showed that the best conditions for hydrogen production from both species included 24 h darkness and carbon dioxide addition. Under the atmospheric gas combination of 99% argon and 1% carbon dioxide, S. accuminatus could produce hydrogen gas as high as 0.572 mol H2/mgCh h within 12 h, while the highest hydrogen production (0.348 mol H2/mgCh h obtained from A. platensis was found under the atmospheric gas mixture of 98% argon and 2% carbon dioxide. Interestingly, S. accuminatus appeared to produce more hydrogen than A. platensis under the same conditions.

  20. Validation of gas temperature measurements by OES in an atmospheric air glow discharge with water electrode using Rayleigh scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verreycken, T; Van Gessel, A F H; Pageau, A; Bruggeman, P, E-mail: p.j.bruggeman@tue.n [Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Applied Physics, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2011-04-15

    Rayleigh scattering is used to determine the gas temperature of an atmospheric pressure dc excited glow discharge in air with a water electrode. The obtained temperatures are compared with calculated rotational temperatures measured by optical emission spectroscopy of OH(A-X) and N{sub 2}(C-B). At a current of 15 mA a deviation is found between T{sub rot}(OH) and the gas temperature obtained from Rayleigh scattering of about 1000 K. The gas temperatures obtained from Rayleigh scattering, N{sub 2}(C) and OH(A) in the positive column are, respectively, 2600 {+-} 100 K, 2700 {+-} 150 K and 3600 {+-} 200 K. It is shown that the rotational temperature of N{sub 2}(C) is a reliable measurement of the gas temperature while this is not the case for OH(A). The results are explained in the context of quenching processes of the excited states. Spatially resolved gas temperatures in both longitudinal and radial directions are presented. The observed strong temperature gradients near the electrodes are checked to be consistent with the power dissipation and the heat transfer in the discharge. The effect of the polarity of the water electrode and filamentation on the measured temperatures is discussed.

  1. Gas chromatography coupled to atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry (GC-API-MS): review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Du-Xin; Gan, Lin; Bronja, Amela; Schmitz, Oliver J

    2015-09-03

    Although the coupling of GC/MS with atmospheric pressure ionization (API) has been reported in 1970s, the interest in coupling GC with atmospheric pressure ion source was expanded in the last decade. The demand of a "soft" ion source for preserving highly diagnostic molecular ion is desirable, as compared to the "hard" ionization technique such as electron ionization (EI) in traditional GC/MS, which fragments the molecule in an extensive way. These API sources include atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI), atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI), atmospheric pressure laser ionization (APLI), electrospray ionization (ESI) and low temperature plasma (LTP). This review discusses the advantages and drawbacks of this analytical platform. After an introduction in atmospheric pressure ionization the review gives an overview about the history and explains the mechanisms of various atmospheric pressure ionization techniques used in combination with GC such as APCI, APPI, APLI, ESI and LTP. Also new developments made in ion source geometry, ion source miniaturization and multipurpose ion source constructions are discussed and a comparison between GC-FID, GC-EI-MS and GC-API-MS shows the advantages and drawbacks of these techniques. The review ends with an overview of applications realized with GC-API-MS.

  2. Effects of various reactive gas atmospheres on the properties of bio-oil using microwave pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fast pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass produces organic liquids (bio-oil), bio-char, water, and non-condensable gases. The non-condensable gas component typically contains syngas (H2, CO and CO2) as well as small hydrocarbons (CH4, C2H6, and C3H8). Tail Gas Reactive Pyrolysis (TGRP), a patent p...

  3. Atmospheric concentration characteristics and gas-particle partitioning of PCBs in a rural area of eastern Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandalakis, Manolis [Environmental Chemical Processes Laboratory (ECPL), Department of Chemistry, University of Crete, P.O. Box 2208, GR-71003, Heraklion (Greece)]. E-mail: mandalakis@chemistry.uoc.gr; Stephanou, Euripides G. [Environmental Chemical Processes Laboratory (ECPL), Department of Chemistry, University of Crete, P.O. Box 2208, GR-71003, Heraklion (Greece)

    2007-05-15

    Atmospheric concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were measured in 14 successive daytime and nighttime air samples collected from Melpitz, a rural site in eastern Germany. The average total concentration of PCBs was 110+/-80pgm{sup -3} and they were predominately present in the gas phase ({approx}95%). Composition of individual congeners closely resembled those of Clophen A30 and Aroclor 1232. Partial vapor pressures of PCBs were well correlated with temperature and the steep slopes obtained from Clausius-Clapeyron plots (-4500 to -8000) indicated that evaporation from adjacent land surfaces still controls the atmospheric levels of these pollutants. Particle-gas partitioning coefficients (K{sub P}) of PCBs were well correlated with the respective sub-cooled vapor pressures (P{sub L}{sup o}), but the slopes obtained from logK{sub P} versus logP{sub L}{sup o} plots (-0.16 to -0.59) deviated significantly from the expected value of -1. Overall, gas-particle partitioning of PCBs was better simulated by Junge-Pankow than octanol/air partition coefficient-based model.

  4. Particle-size distribution and gas/particle partitioning of atmospheric polybrominated diphenyl ethers in urban areas of Greece

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandalakis, Manolis; Besis, Athanasios [Environmental Chemical Processes Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Crete, GR-71003 Heraklion-Voutes (Greece); Stephanou, Euripides G. [Environmental Chemical Processes Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Crete, GR-71003 Heraklion-Voutes (Greece)], E-mail: stephanou@chemistry.uoc.gr

    2009-04-15

    Ambient concentrations, gas/particle partitioning and particle-size distribution of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were investigated in two urban areas (Athens and Heraklion) of Greece. Atmospheric (gas + particle) concentrations of {sigma}PBDE varied from 21 to 30 pg m{sup -3} in the center of Athens and from 4 to 44 pg m{sup -3} in the suburbs of Heraklion. A predominance of particulate PBDEs was observed in Athens (71-76% in particles), whereas the opposite was evident in Heraklion (69-92% in gas phase). In both urban areas, PBDE particle-size distribution featured a distinct enrichment in smaller particles. A similar trend was also observed in aerosols of a background marine site. For all sampling sites, more than 46% of {sigma}PBDE was associated with particles of <0.57 {mu}m in diameter. Our results imply that particulate PBDEs may have long atmospheric residence time and they may be capable of reaching the deeper parts of the human respiratory system. - Analysis of size-segregated aerosol samples indicates a predominance of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in the small particle-size fraction.

  5. Fabrication and characterization of a CNT forest integrated micromechanical resonator for a rarefied gas analyzer in a medium vacuum atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugano, Koji; Matsumoto, Ryu; Tsutsui, Ryota; Kishihara, Hiroyuki; Matsuzuka, Naoki; Yamashita, Ichiro; Uraoka, Yukiharu; Isono, Yoshitada

    2016-07-01

    This study focuses on the development of a multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) forest integrated micromechanical resonator working as a rarefied gas analyzer for nitrogen (N2) and hydrogen (H2) gases in a medium vacuum atmosphere. The resonant response is detected in the form of changes in the resonant frequency or damping effects, depending on the rarefied gas species. The carbon nanotube (CNT) forest on the resonator enhances the effective specific surface area of the resonator, such that the variation of the resonant frequency and the damping effect based on the gas species increase significantly. We developed the fabrication process for the proposed resonator, which consists of standard micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) processes and high-density CNT synthesis on the resonator mass. The high-density CNT synthesis was realized using multistep alternate coating of two types of ferritin proteins that act as catalytic iron particles. Two devices with different CNT densities were fabricated and characterized to evaluate the effect of the surface area of the CNT forest on the resonant response as a function of gas pressures ranging from 0.011 to 1 Pa for N2 and H2. Considering the damping effect, we found that the device with higher density was able to distinguish N2 and H2 clearly, whereas the device with lower density showed no difference between N2 and H2. We confirmed that a larger surface area showed a higher damping effect. These results were explained based on the kinetic theory of gases. In the case of resonant frequency, the relative resonant frequency shift increased with gas pressure and surface area because of the adsorption of gas molecules on the resonator surfaces. Higher density CNT forest adsorbed more gas molecules on the surfaces. The developed CNT forest integrated micromechanical resonator could successfully detect N2 and H2 gases and distinguish between them under pressures of 1 Pa.

  6. A Fast-Response Atmospheric Turbulence (FRAT) Probe with Gas-Sampling Ducts Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this proposal is to design, construct and test a high-frequency-response air-data probe, the Fast Response Atmospheric Turbulence probe (FRAT probe)...

  7. Soil-atmosphere greenhouse-gas exchange in a bioretention system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, E.; Chan, H.; Beringer, J.; Livesley, S. J.

    2011-12-01

    Bioretention systems are a popular green-technology for the management of urban stormwater runoff in many countries. They typically consist of a trench filled with a highly permeable soil medium that supports vegetation; runoff is diverted to bioretention systems and, by percolating through the filter medium, is subjected to a number of treatment processes. Nitrogen (N) is one of the key pollutants targeted by bioretention systems, which are able to reduce N concentrations considerably from inflow to outflow. To increase N removal, a saturated zone at the bottom of the filter medium is often artificially generated, to both enhance the denitrification process and increase the water available to the vegetation between inflow events. Although studies on the N-removal performance of bioretention systems are widely available in the literature, less is known about the exchange of greenhouse gases (GHG), especially nitrous oxide (N2O), between the bioretention systems and the atmosphere. Here, we present an experimental pilot study to measure N2O and CO2 soil emissions in a bioretention system installed on the Clayton Campus of Monash University in Melbourne, Australia. The bioretention system is divided into three cells, each 15 m2; the system as a whole receives water run-off from 4500 m2 of impervious car park. We monitored two cells with mostly sandy-loam vegetated with native sedges (mainly Carex Appressa and Lomandra Longifolia), one with and one without a saturated zone. Three manual flux chambers were installed in both cells. Gas flux samples were taken twice a week at about 11 am between the 2nd of March and the 18th of May 2011 (late summer and fall). Since October 2010, air-phase soil CO2 concentration profiles were measured continuously using solid-state infrared CO2 transmitters (GMT-221 model, Vaisala, Finland), along with soil moisture and soil temperature. Preliminary analysis of the chamber data (March only) showed that N2O fluxes were in general below 50

  8. Brominated flame retardants in the urban atmosphere of Northeast China: Concentrations, temperature dependence and gas-particle partitioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Hong; Li, Wen-Long; Liu, Li-Yan; Song, Wei-Wei; Ma, Wan-Li, E-mail: mawanli002@163.com; Li, Yi-Fan, E-mail: ijrc_pts_paper@yahoo.com

    2014-09-01

    57 pairs of air samples (gas and particle phases) were collected using a high volume air sampler in a typical city of Northeast China. Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) including 13 polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs, including BDEs 17, 28, 47, 49, 66, 85, 99, 100, 138, 153, 154, 183, and 209) and 9 alternative BFRs (p-TBX, PBBZ, PBT, PBEB, DPTE, HBBZ, γ-HBCD, BTBPE, and DBDPE) were analyzed. The annual average total concentrations of the 13 PBDEs and the 9 alternative BFRs were 69 pg/m{sup 3} and 180 pg/m{sup 3}, respectively. BDE 209 and γ-HBCD were the dominant congeners, according to the one-year study. The partial pressure of BFRs in the gas phase was significantly correlated with the ambient temperature, except for BDE 85, γ-HBCD and DBDPE, indicating the important influence of ambient temperature on the behavior of BFRs in the atmosphere. It was found that the gas–particle partitioning coefficients (logK{sub p}) for most low molecular weight BFRs were highly temperature dependent as well. Gas–particle partitioning coefficients (logK{sub p}) also correlated with the sub-cooled liquid vapor pressure (logP{sub L}{sup o}). Our results indicated that absorption into organic matter is the main control mechanism for the gas–particle partitioning of atmospheric PBDEs. - Highlights: • Both PBDEs and alternative BFRs were analyzed in the atmosphere of Northeast China. • Partial pressure of BFRs was significantly correlated with the ambient temperature. • A strong temperature dependence of gas-particle partitioning was found. • Absorption into organic matter was the control mechanism for G-P partitioning.

  9. A single gas chromatograph for accurate atmospheric mixing ratio measurements of CO2, CH4, N2O, SF6 and CO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Laan, S.; Neubert, R. E. M.; Meijer, H. A. J.; Simpson, W.R.

    2009-01-01

    We present an adapted gas chromatograph capable of measuring simultaneously and semi-continuously the atmospheric mixing ratios of the greenhouse gases CO2, CH4, N2O and SF6 and the trace gas CO with high precision and long-term stability. The novelty of our design is that all species are measured

  10. A single gas chromatograph for accurate atmospheric mixing ratio measurements of CO2, CH4, N2O, SF6 and CO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Laan, S.; Neubert, R. E. M.; Meijer, H. A. J.; Simpson, W.R.

    2009-01-01

    We present an adapted gas chromatograph capable of measuring simultaneously and semi-continuously the atmospheric mixing ratios of the greenhouse gases CO2, CH4, N2O and SF6 and the trace gas CO with high precision and long-term stability. The novelty of our design is that all species are measured w

  11. Russian contribution to ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter: Atmospheric Chemistry Suite (ACS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakun, Alexey; Korablev, Oleg; Trokhimovskiy, Alexander; Grigoriev, Alexey; Anufreychik, Konstantin; Fedorova, Anna; Ignatiev, Nikolay; Ivanov, Yuriy; Moshkin, Boris; Kalinnikov, Yuriy; Montmessin, Franck

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric Chemistry Suite (ACS) is a part of science payload of Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO), ExoMars mission. This project developed by European Space Agency (ESA) in collaboration with Russian Space Agency (Roscosmos). Russian contribution to ExoMars TGO is the Proton rocket and two science instruments ACS (three infrared spectrometers) and FREND (neutron detector). ACS consists of three infrared spectrometers (ACS/NIR, ACS/MIR and ACS/TIRVIM) capable to take spectral measurements from near to thermal infrared range simultaneously or separately. Spectrometric channels of ACS share common mechanical, electrical, and thermal interfaces. Electronic box (ACS/BE) provides to spectrometric channels power and data transfer interfaces. SpaceWire link is used for science data transfer and MIL-1553 link - for commanding and housekeeping data transfer. The NIR channel is an echelle spectrometer with acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) for the selection of diffraction orders. ACS NIR is capable to perform nadir and occultation observations. NIR covers the spectral range of 0.7-1.7 μm with resolving power of ~25000. NIR will perform unique for TGO instruments nightglow science (searching for O2, OH, NO nightglow emissions on Mars). From the 1.38 μm band NIR will do water vapour mapping in nadir and H2O vertical profiling in solar occultations. High resolution NIR measurements of 1.27 μm O2(a1Δg) dayglow will supply indirect ozone observations on the dayside on nadir. In solar occultation mode, the O2 vertical profiles will be measured from the surface (in case of low dust activity) to the 40 km altitude based on 0.76 μm absorption band. Together with MIR channel in solar occultation NIR will support the measurements of CO2 density profiles (based on 1.43 μm band) and aerosols characterization from 0.7 to 4 μm. The wide spectral range will allow not just determine aerosol particle sizes and density at different altitudes, but also distinguish between dust and ice particles

  12. Shallow-ocean methane leakage and degassing to the atmosphere: triggered by offshore oil-gas and methane hydrate explorations

    OpenAIRE

    Yong eZHANG; Weidong eZhai

    2015-01-01

    Both offshore oil-gas exploration and marine methane hydrate recovery can trigger massive CH4 release from seafloor. During upward transportation of CH4 plume through water column, CH4 is subjected to dissolution and microbial consumption despite the protection of hydrate and oil coating on bubbles surface. The ultimate CH4 degassing to the atmosphere appears to be water-depth dependent. In shallow oceans with water depth less than 100 m, the natural or human-induced leakages or both lead to ...

  13. Gas temperature determination in an argon non-thermal plasma at atmospheric pressure from broadenings of atomic emission lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yubero, C.; Rodero, A.; Dimitrijevic, M. S.; Gamero, A.; García, M. C.

    2017-03-01

    In this work a new spectroscopic method, allowing gas temperature determination in argon non-thermal plasmas sustained at atmospheric pressure, is presented. The method is based on the measurements of selected pairs of argon atomic lines (Ar I 603.2 nm/Ar I 549.6 nm, Ar I 603.2 nm/Ar I 522.1 nm, Ar I 549.6 nm/Ar I 522.1 nm). For gas temperature determination using the proposed method, there is no need of knowing the electron density, neither making assumptions on the degree of thermodynamic equilibrium existing in the plasma. The values of the temperatures obtained using this method, have been compared with the rotational temperatures derived from the OH ro-vibrational bands, using both, the well-known Boltzmann-plot technique and the best fitting to simulated ro-vibrational bands. A very good agreement has been found.

  14. An atmospheric pressure flow reactor: Gas phase kinetics and mechanism in tropospheric conditions without wall effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, Steven L.; Davis, Dennis D.; Hansen, Merrill

    1988-01-01

    A new type of gas phase flow reactor, designed to permit the study of gas phase reactions near 1 atm of pressure, is described. A general solution to the flow/diffusion/reaction equations describing reactor performance under pseudo-first-order kinetic conditions is presented along with a discussion of critical reactor parameters and reactor limitations. The results of numerical simulations of the reactions of ozone with monomethylhydrazine and hydrazine are discussed, and performance data from a prototype flow reactor are presented.

  15. Influence of Oil and Gas Emissions on Ambient Atmospheric Volatile Organic Compounds in Residential Areas of Northeastern Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, C. R.; Evans, J. M.; Wang, W.; Jacques, H.; Smith, K. R.; Terrell, R.; Helmig, D.

    2014-12-01

    The Northern Front Range (NFR) region of Colorado has experienced rapid expansion in drilling of shale and tight sands oil and gas reservoirs in recent years due to advances in hydraulic fracturing technology, with over 24,000 wells currently in operation. This region has also been designated as a federal ozone non-attainment area by the U.S. EPA. High ozone levels are a significant health concern, as are potential health impacts from chronic exposure to primary emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) for residents living near wells. Here we present observations of ambient atmospheric VOC present in residential areas located in close proximity to wells in Erie, Colorado, and show that the C2-C5 alkanes are enhanced by a factor of 18 - 77 relative to the regional background, and present at higher levels than typically found in large urban centers. These data are combined with VOC observations from downtown Denver and Platteville, as well as with measurements conducted this summer in conjunction with the FRAPPE and DISCOVER-AQ flight campaigns, to investigate the spatial distribution of VOC enhancements in correlation with proximity to oil and gas production areas. We show that these compounds, including the BTEX aromatics, are elevated across the NFR, with highest levels in communities within the Greater Wattenberg Gas Field. These analyses demonstrate that VOC emissions from oil and gas operations represent a large area source for ozone precursors in the NFR.

  16. S. Miller’s Experiments in Modelling of Non-Equilibrium Conditions with Gas Electric Discharge Simulating Primary Atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignat Ignatov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper are submited data on the possibility of applying the coronal gas discharge effect (CGDE in modeling non-equilibrium conditions with gas electric discharge simulating conditions occurying in the primary atmosphere (electric sparks, lightning imitating S. Miller’s experiments. The physical basis and technique of visualization of gas discharge (GD glowing of water drops in alternating electric fields of high electrical voltage (5–30 kV and frequency (10–150 kHz, as well as the possible electrosynthesis of organic molecules from a mixture of inorganic substances as hydrogen (H2, methane (CH4, ammonia (NH3 and carbon monoxide (CO in aqueous solutions of water exposed under the electrical discharge, UV-radiation and thermal heating to t = +100 0C were examined. The colour coronal spectral gas discharge analysis was applied for investigation of water samples of various origin, the samples of hot mineral, sea and mountain water obtained from various water sources of Bulgaria.

  17. Atmospheric gas phase chemistry of CH2═NH and HNC. A first-principles approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunkan, Arne Joakim C; Tang, Yizhen; Sellevåg, Stig R; Nielsen, Claus J

    2014-07-17

    Quantum chemical methods were used to investigate the OH initiated atmospheric degradation of methanimine, CH2═NH, the major primary product in the atmospheric photo-oxidation of methylamine, CH3NH2. Energies of stationary points on potential energy surfaces of reaction were calculated using multireference perturbation theory and coupled cluster theory. The results show that hydrogen abstraction dominates over the addition route in the CH2═NH + OH reaction, and that the major primary product is HCN, while HNC and CHONH2 are minor primary products. HNC is found to react with OH exclusively via addition to the carbon atom followed by O-H scission leading to HNCO; N2O is not a product in the atmospheric photo-oxidation of HNC. Additional G4 calculations of the CH2═NH + O3 reaction show that this is too slow to be of importance at atmospheric conditions. Rate coefficients for the CH2═NH + OH and HNC + OH reactions were calculated as a function of temperature and pressure using a master equation model based on the coupled cluster theory results. The rate coefficients for OH reaction with CH2═NH and HNC at 1000 mbar and room temperature are calculated to be 3.0 × 10(-12) and 1.3 × 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), respectively. The atmospheric fate of CH2═NH is discussed and a gas phase photo-oxidation mechanism is presented.

  18. Gas-particle partitioning of atmospheric aerosols: interplay of physical state, non-ideal mixing and morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraiwa, Manabu; Zuend, Andreas; Bertram, Allan K; Seinfeld, John H

    2013-07-21

    Atmospheric aerosols, comprising organic compounds and inorganic salts, play a key role in air quality and climate. Mounting evidence exists that these particles frequently exhibit phase separation into predominantly organic and aqueous electrolyte-rich phases. As well, the presence of amorphous semi-solid or glassy particle phases has been established. Using the canonical system of ammonium sulfate mixed with organics from the ozone oxidation of α-pinene, we illustrate theoretically the interplay of physical state, non-ideality, and particle morphology affecting aerosol mass concentration and the characteristic timescale of gas-particle mass transfer. Phase separation can significantly affect overall particle mass and chemical composition. Semi-solid or glassy phases can kinetically inhibit the partitioning of semivolatile components and hygroscopic growth, in contrast to the traditional assumption that organic compounds exist in quasi-instantaneous gas-particle equilibrium. These effects have significant implications for the interpretation of laboratory data and the development of improved atmospheric air quality and climate models.

  19. A comparison between micro hollow cathode discharges and atmospheric pressure plasma jets in Ar/O2 gas mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzaroni, C.; Chabert, P.

    2016-12-01

    Using global models, micro hollow cathode discharges (MHCDs) are compared to radiofrequency atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) in terms of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Ar/O2 gas mixtures are investigated, typically with a small percentage of oxygen in argon. The same chemical reaction set, involving 17 species and 128 chemical reactions in the gas phase, is used for both devices, operated in the typical geometries previously published; the APPJ is driven by a radiofrequency voltage across a 1 mm gap, at atmospheric pressure, while the MHCD is driven by a DC voltage source, at 100 Torr and in a 400 μm hole. The MHCD may be operated either in the self-pulsing or in the normal (stationary) regime, depending on the driving voltage. The comparison shows that in both regimes, the MHCD produces larger amounts of \\text{O}2\\ast , while the APPJ produces predominantly reactive oxygen ground state species, \\text{O} and {{\\text{O}}3} . These large differences in ROS composition are mostly due to the higher plasma density produced in the MHCD. The difference in operating pressure is a second order effect.

  20. Effect of additive oxygen gas on cellular response of lung cancer cells induced by atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joh, Hea Min; Choi, Ji Ye; Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T H; Kang, Tae-Hong

    2014-10-16

    The atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet driven by pulsed dc voltage was utilized to treat human lung cancer cells in vitro. The properties of plasma plume were adjusted by the injection type and flow rate of additive oxygen gas in atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet. The plasma characteristics such as plume length, electric current and optical emission spectra (OES) were measured at different flow rates of additive oxygen to helium. The plasma plume length and total current decreased with an increase in the additive oxygen flow rate. The electron excitation temperature estimated by the Boltzmann plot from several excited helium emission lines increased slightly with the additive oxygen flow. The oxygen atom density in the gas phase estimated by actinometry utilizing argon was observed to increase with the additive oxygen flow. The concentration of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) measured by fluorescence assay was found to be not exactly proportional to that of extracellular ROS (measured by OES), but both correlated considerably. It was also observed that the expression levels of p53 and the phospho-p53 were enhanced in the presence of additive oxygen flow compared with those from the pure helium plasma treatment.

  1. Analysis of selective androgen receptor modulators by gas chromatography-microchip atmospheric pressure photoionization-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luosujärvi, Laura; Haapala, Markus; Thevis, Mario; Saarela, Ville; Franssila, Sami; Ketola, Raimo A; Kostiainen, Risto; Kotiaho, Tapio

    2010-02-01

    A gas chromatography-microchip atmospheric pressure photoionization-mass spectrometric (GC-microAPPI-MS) method was developed and used for the analysis of three 2-quinolinone-derived selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs). SARMs were analyzed from spiked urine samples, which were hydrolyzed and derivatized with N-methyl-N-(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide before analysis. Trimethylsilyl derivatives of SARMs formed both radical cations (M(+*)) and protonated molecules ([M + H](+)) in photoionization. Better signal-to-noise ratios (S/N) were obtained in MS/MS analysis using the M(+*) ions as precursor ions than using the [M + H](+) ions, and therefore the M(+*) ions were selected for the precursor ions in selected reaction monitoring (SRM) analysis. Limits of detection (LODs) with the method ranged from 0.01 to 1 ng/mL, which correspond to instrumental LODs of 0.2-20 pg. Limits of quantitation ranged from 0.03 to 3 ng/mL. The mass spectrometric response to the analytes was linear (R > or = 0.995) from the LOQ concentration level up to 100 ng/mL concentration, and intra-day repeatabilities were 5%-9%. In addition to the GC-microAPPI-MS study, the proof-of-principle of gas chromatography-microchip atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-Orbitrap MS (GC-microAPCI-Orbitrap MS) was demonstrated.

  2. Assessment of an atmospheric fluidized-bed coal-combustion gas-turbine cogeneration system for industrial application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graves, R. L.; Holcomb, R. S.; Tallackson, J. R.

    1979-10-01

    This study was initiated to provide information on the future potential industrial market for a cogeneration system consisting of a fluidized-bed coal combustor coupled to a gas-turbine (Brayton cycle) power system that uses air as the working fluid. In assessing the potential applications for the system, the process heat energy consumption by industry is identified, with special detail included on the six most energy-intensive industries. The potential impact on the nation's oil and natural gas consumption that would result from wide-spread utilization of coal for process heat is also estimated. The fraction of industrial process heat that the system could feasibly satisfy from a thermodynamic viewpoint is estimated, and the performance (potential fuel efficiency and heat/power ratio) of the atmospheric fluidized-bed gas-turbine system is calculated. Also treated are several specific case studies of industries in which the system could be incorporated. Major parameters are specified, and flow sheets are derived for systems that would satisfy the heat and power requirements of the process or industry. The overall fuel utilization efficiency, thermal power rating, and potential number of installations are specified for these case studies. The findings of the study indicate that there is a sizable potential market for the system, with over 1000 possible installations disclosed after reviewing only 8 specific industries from 6 major Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) groups. The potential displacement of oil and gas by coal in process heating is shown to be about 1.60 m/sup 3//sec (870,000 bbl/d) of oil and 4590 m/sup 3//sec (14.0 billion ft/sup 3//d) of natural gas for all industries combined. Continued development of the fluidized-bed coal combustor and power system is recommended so that this potential may be at least partially realized.

  3. Improved characterization of gas-particle partitioning for per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances in the atmosphere using annular diffusion denuder samplers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, Lutz; Harner, Tom; Shoeib, Mahiba; Lane, Douglas A; Murphy, Jennifer G

    2012-07-03

    Gas-phase perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids (PFCAs) sorb strongly on filter material (i.e., GFF, QFF) used in conventional high volume air samplers, which results in an overestimation of the particle-phase concentration. In this study, we investigated an improved technique for measuring the gas-particle partitioning of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) using an annular diffusion denuder sampler. Samples were analyzed for 7 PFAS classes [i.e., PFCAs, perfluoroalkane sulfonic acids (PFSAs), fluorotelomer alcohols (FTOHs), fluorotelomer methacrylates (FTMACs), fluorotelomer acrylates (FTACs), perfluorooctane sulfonamides (FOSAs), and perfluorooctane sulfonamidoethanols (FOSEs)]. The measured particulate associated fraction (Φ') using the diffusion denuder sampler generally followed the trend FTACs (0%) < FTOHs (~8%) < FOSAs (~21%) < PFSAs (~29%) < FOSEs (~66%), whereas the Φ' of the C(8)-C(18) PFCAs increased with carbon chain length, and ranged from 6% to 100%. The ionizability of some PFASs, when associated with particles, is an important consideration when calculating the gas-particle partitioning coefficient as both ionic and neutral forms can be present in the particles. Here we differentiate between a gas-particle partitioning coefficient for neutral species, K(p), and one that accounts for both ionic and neutral species of a compound, K(p)'. The measured K(p)' for PFSAs and PFCAs was 4-5 log units higher compared to the interpolated K(p) for the neutral form only. The measured K(p)' can be corrected (to apply to the neutral form only) with knowledge of the pK(a) of the chemical and the pH of the condensed medium ("wet" particle or aqueous aerosol). The denuder-based sampling of PFASs has yielded a robust data set that demonstrates the importance of atmospheric pH and chemical pK(a) values in determining gas-particle partitioning of PFASs.

  4. The influence of gas-particle partitioning and surface-atmosphere exchange on ammonia during BAQS-Met

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, R. A.; Murphy, J. G.; Markovic, M. Z.; Vandenboer, T. C.; Makar, P. A.; Brook, J.; Mihele, C.

    2011-01-01

    The Border Air Quality and Meteorology study (BAQS-Met) was an intensive field campaign conducted in Southwestern Ontario during the summer of 2007. The focus of BAQS-Met was determining the causes of the formation of ozone and fine particulate matter (PM2.5), and of the regional significance of trans-boundary transport and lake breeze circulations on that formation. Fast (1 Hz) measurements of ammonia were acquired using a Quantum Cascade Laser Tunable Infrared Differential Absorption Spectrometer (QC-TILDAS) at the Harrow supersite. Measurements of PM2.5 ammonium, sulfate and nitrate were made using an Ambient Ion Monitor Ion Chromatograph (AIM-IC) with hourly time resolution. The median mixing ratio of ammonia was 2.5 ppb, with occasional high spikes at night resulting from local emissions. Measurements were used to assess major local emissions of NH3, diurnal profiles and gas-particle partitioning. The measurements were compared with results from A Unified Regional Air-quality Modelling System (AURAMS). While the fraction of total ammonia (NHx≡NH3 + NH4+) observed in the gas phase peaks between 0.1 and 0.8, AURAMS tended to predict fractions of either less than 0.05 or greater than 0.8. The model frequently predicted acidic aerosol, in contrast with observations wherein NHx almost always exceeded the observed equivalents of sulfate. One explanation for our observations is that the net flux of ammonia from the land surface to the atmosphere increases when aerosol sulfate is present, effectively buffering the mixing ratio of gas phase ammonia, a process not included in the model. A simple representation of an offline bi-directional flux parameterization using the ISORROPIA thermodynamic model was successful at reducing the population of zero gas fraction points, but not the higher gas fraction points.

  5. Assessment of an atmospheric fluidized-bed coal-combustion gas-turbine cogeneration system for industrial application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graves, R. L.; Holcomb, R. S.; Tallackson, J. R.

    1979-10-01

    This study was initiated to provide information on the future potential industrial market for a cogeneration system consisting of a fluidized-bed coal combustor coupled to a gas-turbine (Brayton cycle) power system that uses air as the working fluid. In assessing the potential applications for the system, the process heat energy consumption by industry is identified, with special detail included on the six most energy-intensive industries. The potential impact on the nation's oil and natural gas consumption that would result from wide-spread utilization of coal for process heat is also estimated. The fraction of industrial process heat that the system could feasibly satisfy from a thermodynamic viewpoint is estimated, and the performance (potential fuel efficiency and heat/power ratio) of the atmospheric fluidized-bed gas-turbine system is calculated. Also treated are several specific case studies of industries in which the system could be incorporated. Major parameters are specified, and flow sheets are derived for systems that would satisfy the heat and power requirements of the process or industry. The overall fuel utilization efficiency, thermal power rating, and potential number of installations are specified for these case studies. The findings of the study indicate that there is a sizable potential market for the system, with over 1000 possible installations disclosed after reviewing only 8 specific industries from 6 major Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) groups. The potential displacement of oil and gas by coal in process heating is shown to be about 1.60 m/sup 3//sec (870,000 bbl/d) of oil and 4590 m/sup 3//sec (14.0 billion ft/sup 3//d) of natural gas for all industries combined. Continued development of the fluidized-bed coal combustor and power system is recommended so that this potential may be at least partially realized.

  6. The Aliso Canyon Natural Gas Leak : Large Eddy Simulations for Modeling Atmospheric Dynamics and Interpretation of Observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, K.; Thorpe, A. K.; Duren, R. M.; Thompson, D. R.; Whetstone, J. R.

    2016-12-01

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has supported the development and demonstration of a measurement capability to accurately locate greenhouse gas sources and measure their flux to the atmosphere over urban domains. However, uncertainties in transport models which form the basis of all top-down approaches can significantly affect our capability to attribute sources and predict their flux to the atmosphere. Reducing uncertainties between bottom-up and top-down models will require high resolution transport models as well as validation and verification of dispersion models over an urban domain. Tracer experiments involving the release of Perfluorocarbon Tracers (PFTs) at known flow rates offer the best approach for validating dispersion / transport models. However, tracer experiments are limited by cost, ability to make continuous measurements, and environmental concerns. Natural tracer experiments, such as the leak from the Aliso Canyon underground storage facility offers a unique opportunity to improve and validate high resolution transport models, test leak hypothesis, and to estimate the amount of methane released.High spatial resolution (10 m) Large Eddy Simulations (LES) coupled with WRF atmospheric transport models were performed to simulate the dynamics of the Aliso Canyon methane plume and to quantify the source. High resolution forward simulation results were combined with aircraft and tower based in-situ measurements as well as data from NASA airborne imaging spectrometers. Comparison of simulation results with measurement data demonstrate the capability of the LES models to accurately model transport and dispersion of methane plumes over urban domains.

  7. Atmospheric benzene observations from oil and gas production in the Denver-Julesburg Basin in July and August 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliday, Hannah S.; Thompson, Anne M.; Wisthaler, Armin; Blake, Donald R.; Hornbrook, Rebecca S.; Mikoviny, Tomas; Müller, Markus; Eichler, Philipp; Apel, Eric C.; Hills, Alan J.

    2016-09-01

    High time resolution measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were collected using a proton-transfer-reaction quadrupole mass spectrometry (PTR-QMS) instrument at the Platteville Atmospheric Observatory (PAO) in Colorado to investigate how oil and natural gas (O&NG) development impacts air quality within the Wattenburg Gas Field (WGF) in the Denver-Julesburg Basin. The measurements were carried out in July and August 2014 as part of NASA's "Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality" (DISCOVER-AQ) field campaign. The PTR-QMS data were supported by pressurized whole air canister samples and airborne vertical and horizontal surveys of VOCs. Unexpectedly high benzene mixing ratios were observed at PAO at ground level (mean benzene = 0.53 ppbv, maximum benzene = 29.3 ppbv), primarily at night (mean nighttime benzene = 0.73 ppbv). These high benzene levels were associated with southwesterly winds. The airborne measurements indicate that benzene originated from within the WGF, and typical source signatures detected in the canister samples implicate emissions from O&NG activities rather than urban vehicular emissions as primary benzene source. This conclusion is backed by a regional toluene-to-benzene ratio analysis which associated southerly flow with vehicular emissions from the Denver area. Weak benzene-to-CO correlations confirmed that traffic emissions were not responsible for the observed high benzene levels. Previous measurements at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory (BAO) and our data obtained at PAO allow us to locate the source of benzene enhancements between the two atmospheric observatories. Fugitive emissions of benzene from O&NG operations in the Platteville area are discussed as the most likely causes of enhanced benzene levels at PAO.

  8. Snowpack-atmosphere gas exchanges of carbon dioxide, ozone, and nitrogen oxides at a hardwood forest site in northern Michigan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Seok

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Snowpack-atmosphere gas exchanges of CO2, O3, and NOx (NO + NO2 were investigated at the University of Michigan Biological Station (UMBS, a mid-latitude, low elevation hardwood forest site, during the 2007–2008 winter season. An automated trace gas sampling system was used to determine trace gas concentrations in the snowpack at multiple depths continuously throughout the snow-covered period from two adjacent plots. One natural plot and one with the soil covered by a Tedlar sheet were setup for investigating whether the primary source of measured trace gases was biogenic (i.e., from the soil or non-biogenic (i.e., from the snowpack. The results were compared with the “White on Green” study conducted at the Niwot Ridge (NWT Long Term Ecological Research site in Colorado. The average winter CO2 flux ± s.e. from the soil at UMBS was 0.54 ± 0.037 µmol m-2 s-1 using the gradient diffusion method and 0.71 ± 0.012 µmol m-2 s-1 using the eddy covariance method, and in a similar range as found for NWT. Observed snowpack-O3 exchange was also similar to NWT. However, nitrogen oxides (NOx fluxes from snow at UMBS were 10 times smaller than those at NWT, and fluxes were bi-directional with the direction of the flux dependent on NOx concentrations in ambient air. The compensation point for the change in the direction of NOx flux was estimated to be 0.92 nmol mol-1. NOx in snow also showed diurnal dependency on incident radiation. These NOx dynamics in the snow at UMBS were notably different compared to NWT, and primarily determined by snow-atmosphere interactions rather than by soil NOx emissions.

  9. The jet-stream channels of gas and plasma in atmospheric-pressure plasma jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Guangsup; Kim, Yunjung; Uhm, Han Sup

    2016-08-01

    A solution to the fluid momentum equation for incompressible steady-state flow is obtained for the streams of gas and plasma inside a jet nozzle and in the open-air space. Three pressure forces are considered in the equation. The first is the pressure force of the shear stress resulting from the flow viscosity and is balanced against the second pressure force of the gas stream that is ejected into the air. The third pressure force is due to the radial expansion of the fluid channel, reducing the velocity of the fluid to zero so that we obtain the reaching distance of the fluid after ejection from the nozzle. From the solution for the fluid channel, the regional profile and the density profile of the plasma flow are also determined. The maximum distance of the gas flow with a critical Reynolds number of R nc ≈ 2000 is calculated to be 100 times that of the nozzle diameter for Ar, Ne, and He. Because the radial expansion of the plasma is ten times larger than that of neutral gases, the length of the plasma flume is a few tens of the nozzle diameter, which is significantly shorter than the gas flow distance. In the experiments, the maximum length of the plasma plume increases and then saturates as the operation voltage increases.

  10. Jump relations for magnetrohydrodynamic shock waves in a dusty gas atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Anand, R K

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, jump relations for one dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shock waves propagating in a dusty gas environment are expressed in a simple form in terms of dimensionless variables. The dusty gas is assumed to be a mixture of a perfect gas and spherically small solid particles, in which solid particles are continuously distributed. The jump relations across the MHD shock front for the pressure, the density and the velocity of mixture have been derived, respectively in terms of a compression ratio across the shock front in a gas-solid particle two-phase flow. The expressions for the speed of sound, adiabatic compressibility of mixture and the change-in-entropy across the MHD shock front have also been derived in terms of the compression ratio. Further, the handy forms of MHD shock jump relations have been obtained in terms of the initial volume fraction of small solid particles and the ratio of specific heats of the mixture, simultaneously for the two cases viz., (i) when the shock is strong and, ...

  11. Periodic modulation of gas giant magnetospheres by the neutral upper atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. G. A. Smith

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Periodic signatures present in the magnetospheres of both Jupiter and Saturn have yet to be fully explained. At Jupiter the unexplained signatures are related to emissions from the Io torus ("System IV"; at Saturn they are observed in emissions of kilometric radiation (SKR and in magnetometer data. These signatures are often interpreted in terms of magnetic field anomalies. This paper describes an alternative mechanism by which the neutral atmosphere may impose such periodic signatures on the magnetosphere. The mechanism invokes a persistent zonal asymmetry in the neutral wind field that rotates with the planet. This asymmetry must be coupled to substantial ionospheric conductivity. It is then able to drive divergent currents in the upper atmosphere that close in and perturb the magnetosphere. We estimate the conductivities and wind speeds required for these perturbations to be significant, and argue that they are most likely to be important at auroral latitudes where the conductivity may be enhanced by particle precipitation.

  12. A Miniaturized Laser Heterodyne Radiometer for Greenhouse Gas Measurements in the Atmospheric Column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, Emily Wilson

    2015-01-01

    Laser Heterodyne Radiometry is a technique adapted from radio receiver technology has been used to measure trace gases in the atmosphere since the 1960s.By leveraging advances in the telecommunications industry, it has been possible to miniaturize this technology.The mini-LHR (Miniaturized Laser Heterodyne Radiometer) has been under development at NASA Goddard Space flight Center since 2009. This sun-viewing instrument measures carbon dioxide and methane in the atmospheric column and operates in tandem with an AERONET sun photometer producing a simultaneous measure of aerosols. The mini-LHR has been extensively field tested in a range of locations ranging in the continental US as well as Alaska and Hawaii and now operates autonomously with sensitivities of approximately 0.2 ppmv and approximately10 ppbv, for carbon dioxide and methane respectively, for 10 averaged scans under clear sky conditions.

  13. Impact of atmospheric clutter on Doppler-limited gas sensors in the submillimeter/terahertz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedev, Ivan R; Neese, Christopher F; Plummer, Grant M; De Lucia, Frank C

    2011-06-20

    It is well known that clutter (spectral interference) from atmospheric constituents can be a severe limit for spectroscopic point sensors, especially where high sensitivity and specificity are required. In this paper, we will show for submillimeter/terahertz (SMM/THz) sensors that use cw electronic techniques the clutter limit for the detection of common target gases with absolute specificity (probability of false alarm ≪ 10⁻¹⁰) is in the ppt (1 part in 10¹²) range or lower. This is because the most abundant atmospheric gases are either transparent to SMM/THz radiation (e.g., CO₂) or have spectra that are very sparse relative to the 10⁵ Doppler-limited resolution elements available (e.g., H₂O). Moreover, the low clutter limit demonstrated for cw electronic systems in the SMM/THz is independent of system size and complexity.

  14. Discharge Characteristics in Atmospheric Pressure Glow Surface Discharge in Helium Gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xue-Chen; WANG Long

    2005-01-01

    @@ Atmospheric pressure glow discharge is observed for the first time in a surface discharge generator in flowing helium. Electrical and optical methods are used to measure the characteristics of atmospheric pressure glow discharge for different voltages. The results show that discharge current waveforms are asymmetric for the different polarities of the applied voltage. A continuous discharge profile with a width of several microseconds appears for per half cycle of the applied voltage when the voltage is increased to a certain value. The short-pulsed discharge and the continuous current would result from the Townsend breakdown and glow discharge mechanisms respectively. The properties of surface discharge in stagnant helium are completely different from that in flowing helium.

  15. Physical features of atmospheric pressure microdischarge system with vortex gas flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prysiazhnevych Iryna

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The parameters for microdischarges of plasma medicine in air and argon vortex flows at atmospheric pressure for different shapes of electrodes (outlet nozzle and axis electrode diameters ratio set have been investigated. The current-voltage characteristics of the designed systems have been analyzed, the parameters of the generated jets plasma have been investigated by means of the optical emission spectroscopy, and the form of plasma jets has been studied by using video camera.

  16. Evolution of the gas atmosphere during filing the sand moulds with iron alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mocek

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Evolution of atmosphere of the mould cavity when pouring the cast iron has been analyzed. It was find that in dry sand mold the cavity is filled by air throughout the casting time. In green sand the air is removed by the water vapor the hydrogen or carbon oxides formed in contact with the liquid metal. The theoretical results have been confirmed experimentally.

  17. Gas chromatography for space exploration : application to the in situ analysis of Titan's atmosphere, comets nucleus and martian soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, R.; Szopa, C.; Buch, A.; Mettetal, F.; Coscia, D.; Coll, P.; Cabane, M.; Rodier, C.; Vidal-Madjar, C.; Raulin, F.

    Gas chromatography is one of the most powerful technique for the in situ chemical investigation of extraterrestrial environments Its successful use in past planetary missions to Mars 1976-78 and Venus 1978-85 made it the main method selected for the in situ molecular characterization of the Titan s atmosphere comets and the Martian soil Indeed gas chromatography fully meet the severe constraints required in space instrumentation such as small weight and size low power consumption high mechanical strength and resistance to deep space conditions vacuum cosmic rays This paper presents the gas chromatographic subsystems which have been developed at LISA and SA respectively for the Huygens probe of the Cassini-Huygens mission to Titan 1 the Philae probe of the Rosetta mission to a comet 2 and the future landing probe of the MSL 2009 mission to Mars 3 The coupling of these GC subsystems with pyrolysis and chemical derivatization techniques allows the chemical analysis of a wide range of molecules including non-volatiles complex organics such as aminoacides and nucleobases the search of wich is of particular interest for exobiology The analytical capabilities of these subsystems with a particular emphasis of their exobiological aspects and implications are described 1 G Israel C Szopa F Raulin M Cabane P Coll R Sternberg et al Nature vol438 796-799 2005 2 C Szopa R Sternberg F Raulin and H Rosenbauer PSS 863-877 2003 3 Cabane M P Coll C Szopa G Isra e l F Raulin

  18. Dependence of Ozone Generation on Gas Temperature Distribution in AC Atmospheric Pressure Dielectric Barrier Discharge in Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Go; Akashi, Haruaki

    AC atmospheric pressure multi-filament dielectric barrier discharge in oxygen has been simulated using two dimensional fluid model. In the discharge, three kinds of streamers have been obtained. They are primary streamers, small scale streamers and secondary streamers. The primary streamers are main streamers in the discharge and the small scale streamers are formed after the ceasing of the primary streamers. And the secondary streamers are formed on the trace of the primary streamers. In these streamers, the primary and the small scale streamers are very effective to generate O(3P) oxygen atoms which are precursor of ozone. And the ozone is generated mainly in the vicinity of the dielectrics. In high gas temperature region, ozone generation decreases in general. However, increase of the O(3P) oxygen atom density in high gas temperature region compensates decrease of ozone generation rate coefficient. As a result, amount of ozone generation has not changed. But if the effect of gas temperature was neglected, amount of ozone generation increases 10%.

  19. Dynamic terahertz spectroscopy of gas molecules mixed with unwanted aerosol under atmospheric pressure using fibre-based asynchronous-optical-sampling terahertz time-domain spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Yi-Da; Nakamura, Shota; Abdelsalam, Dahi Ghareab; Minamikawa, Takeo; Mizutani, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Hirotsugu; Iwata, Tetsuo; Hindle, Francis; Yasui, Takeshi

    2016-06-15

    Terahertz (THz) spectroscopy is a promising method for analysing polar gas molecules mixed with unwanted aerosols due to its ability to obtain spectral fingerprints of rotational transition and immunity to aerosol scattering. In this article, dynamic THz spectroscopy of acetonitrile (CH3CN) gas was performed in the presence of smoke under the atmospheric pressure using a fibre-based, asynchronous-optical-sampling THz time-domain spectrometer. To match THz spectral signatures of gas molecules at atmospheric pressure, the spectral resolution was optimized to 1 GHz with a measurement rate of 1 Hz. The spectral overlapping of closely packed absorption lines significantly boosted the detection limit to 200 ppm when considering all the spectral contributions of the numerous absorption lines from 0.2 THz to 1 THz. Temporal changes of the CH3CN gas concentration were monitored under the smoky condition at the atmospheric pressure during volatilization of CH3CN droplets and the following diffusion of the volatilized CH3CN gas without the influence of scattering or absorption by the smoke. This system will be a powerful tool for real-time monitoring of target gases in practical applications of gas analysis in the atmospheric pressure, such as combustion processes or fire accident.

  20. Simulation of a wire-cylinder-plate positive corona discharge in nitrogen gas at atmospheric pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Alexandre A. [Institute for Plasmas and Nuclear Fusion and Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2012-06-15

    In this work, we are going to perform a simulation of a wire-cylinder-plate positive corona discharge in nitrogen gas, and compare our results with already published experimental results in air for the same structure. We have chosen to simulate this innovative geometry because it has been established experimentally that it can generate a thrust per unit electrode length transmitted to the gas of up to 0.35 N/m and is also able to induce an ion wind top velocity in the range of 8-9 m/s in air. In our model, the used ion source is a small diameter wire, which generates a positive corona discharge in nitrogen gas directed to the ground electrode, after which the generated positive ions are further accelerated in the acceleration channel between the ground and cathode. By applying the fluid dynamic and electrostatic theories, all hydrodynamic and electrostatic forces that act on the considered geometries will be computed in an attempt to theoretically confirm the generated ion wind profile and also the thrust per unit electrode length. These results are important to establish the validity of this simulation tool for the future study and development of this effect for practical purposes.

  1. Simulation of a wire-cylinder-plate positive corona discharge in nitrogen gas at atmospheric pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Martins, Alexandre A

    2012-01-01

    In this work we are going to perform a simulation of a wire-cylinder-plate positive corona discharge in nitrogen gas, and compare our results with already published experimental results in air for the same structure. We have chosen to simulate this innovative geometry because it has been established experimentally that it can generate a thrust per unit electrode length transmitted to the gas of up to 0.35 N/m and is also able to induce an ion wind top velocity in the range of 8-9 m/s in air. In our model, the used ion source is a small diameter wire, which generates a positive corona discharge in nitrogen gas directed to the ground electrode, after which the generated positive ions are further accelerated in the acceleration channel between the ground and cathode. By applying the fluid dynamic and electrostatic theories all hydrodynamic and electrostatic forces that act on the considered geometries will be computed in an attempt to theoretically confirm the generated ion wind profile and also the thrust per u...

  2. Performance testing of cross flow heat exchanger operating in the atmosphere of flue gas particulate with vapor condensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuntaphan, A.

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Performance testing of a cross flow heat exchanger operating under the atmosphere of flue gas particulate from combustion was carried out in this work. This heat exchanger exchanges heat between flue gas from the fuel oil combustion and cold water. The heat exchanger is composed of a spiral finned tube bank having 3 rows and 8 tubes per row with a staggered arrangement. The fin spacings considered are 2.85 and 6.10 mm. The theories of thermodynamics and heat transfer are used for analyzing the performance of this system.In this experiment, the flue gas temperature of 200ºC from combustion having 0.35 kg/s mass flow rate flows along outside surface of the heat exchanger and transfers heat to the 25ºC cooling water having 0.15 kg/s mass flow rate flowing in the tube side. Each experiment uses 750 hr for testing. During the testing, part of flue gas condenses on the heat transfer surface.From the experiment, it was found that the heat transfer rate of both heat exchangers tended to decrease with time while the airside pressure drop increased. These results come from the fouling on the heat transfer surface. Moreover, it is found that the heat exchanger having 2.85 mm fin spacing has an approximately 4 times higher fouling resistance than that of the 6.10 mm fin spacing.In this work a model for calculating the fouling resistance is also developed as a the function of time. The model is developed from that of Kern and Seaton and the mean deviation of the model is 0.789.

  3. Influence of oil and gas emissions on ambient atmospheric non-methane hydrocarbons in residential areas of Northeastern Colorado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsea R. Thompson

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Northern Front Range (NFR region of Colorado has experienced rapid expansion of oil and gas extraction from shale and tight sands reservoirs in recent years due to advances in hydraulic fracturing technology, with over 25,000 wells currently in operation. This region has also been designated as a federal ozone non-attainment area by the U.S. EPA. High ozone levels are a significant health concern, as are potential health impacts from chronic exposure to primary emissions of non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC for residents living near wells. From measurements of ambient atmospheric NMHC present in residential areas located in close proximity to wells in Erie, Colorado, we find that mean mole fractions of the C2–C5 alkanes are enhanced by a factor of 18–77 relative to the regional background, and present at higher levels than typically found in large urban centers. When combined with NMHC observations from downtown Denver and Platteville, it is apparent that these compounds are elevated across the NFR, with highest levels within the Greater Wattenberg Gas Field. This represents a large area source for ozone precursors in the NFR. The BTEX aromatic compounds in Erie were comparable to (e.g., benzene or lower than (e.g., toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene in large urban centers, however, benzene was significantly higher in Platteville, and within the range of chronic health-based exposure levels. An initial look at comparisons with data sets from previous years reveal that ambient levels for oil and gas-related NMHC in Erie, as well as further downwind in Boulder, have not decreased, but appear to have been increasing, despite tightening of emissions standards for the oil and gas industries in 2008.

  4. Gas chromatographic vapor pressure determination of atmospherically relevant oxidation products of β-caryophyllene and α-pinene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartonen, Kari; Parshintsev, Jevgeni; Vilja, Vesa-Pekka; Tiala, Heidi; Knuuti, Sinivuokko; Lai, Ching Kwan; Riekkola, Marja-Liisa

    2013-12-01

    Vapor pressures (subcooled liquid, pliquid) of atmospherically relevant oxidation products of β-caryophyllene (β-caryophyllene aldehyde 0.18 ± 0.03 Pa and β-nocaryophyllene aldehyde 0.17 ± 0.03 Pa), and α-pinene (pinonaldehyde 16.8 ± 0.20 Pa, cis-pinic acid 0.12 ± 0.06 Pa, and cis-pinonic acid 0.99 ± 0.19 Pa) at 298 K were obtained by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (FID) and mass spectrometric (MS) detection. The effects of stationary phase polarity and column film thickness on the vapor pressure values were investigated. Increase in stationary phase polarity provided smaller values, while increase in film thickness gave slightly higher values. Values for vapor pressure were at least two orders of magnitude lower when obtained by a method utilizing vaporization enthalpy (determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry) than by retention index method. Finally, the results were compared with values calculated by group contribution theory. For the β-caryophyllene oxidation products, the values measured by gas chromatography were slightly lower than those obtained by theoretical calculations. The opposite trend was observed for the α-pinene oxidation products. The methods based on gas chromatography are concluded to be highly useful for the determination of vapor pressures of semi-volatile compounds. Except for the most polar pinic and pinonic acids, differences between vapor pressure values obtained by GC-FID and GC-MS were small. Since GC-MS provides structural information simultaneously, the use of GC-MS is recommended.

  5. Role of microorganisms for cycling of atmospheric constituents, emphasizing the greenhouse gas methane (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, R.

    2013-12-01

    Microorganisms have contributed significantly to the formation of the atmosphere and the habitability of Earth. Microbial methanogenesis probably helped overcoming the faint sun problem on young Earth. Later on, cyanobacterial photosynthesis produced oxygen and thus restricted the life zone of methanogenic microbial communities, which nowadays contribute only about 1% to total carbon cycle. Nevertheless, methanogenesis still dominates the budget of atmospheric methane and contributes significantly to the greenhouse effect. There are numerous habitats, which exchange methane with the atmosphere, and even more in which methane is intensively cycled albeit little emitted. Methane can be a byproduct of chemical reactions in plant leaves, or of aerobic methyl phosphonate consumption in ocean water. Most commonly, however, methane is a stoichiometric catabolic product in the degradation of organic matter by anaerobic microorganisms. The degradation is achieved by a complex microbial community consisting of various species of hydrolytic and fermentative Bacteria that produce hydrogen, carbon dioxide and acetate as major end products, and of methanogenic Archaea that eventually convert these compounds to methane and carbon dioxide. The composition of such methanogenic microbial communities, the rates and paths of methane formation, and the isotopic composition of the produced methane all exhibit quite some variability across the different habitats in which methane is produced from organic matter decomposition, such as flooded soils, lake sediments, peatlands, animal gut systems. The structure of the microbial communities often strongly affects their function. It is a challenging task to understand the environmental and biochemical basis of the interactions of abiotic factors and microorganisms shaping the structure and function of the microbial communities in the different methanogenic habitats.

  6. Mesoscale Backtracking by Means of Atmospheric Transport Modeling of Xenon Plumes Measured by Radionuclide Gas Stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armand, P. P.; Achim, P.; Taffary, T.

    2006-12-01

    The monitoring of atmospheric radioactive xenon concentration is performed for nuclear safety regulatory requirements. It is also planned to be used for the detection of hypothetical nuclear tests in the framework of the Comprehensive nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). In this context, the French Atomic Energy Commission designed a high sensitive and automated fieldable station, named SPALAX, to measure the activity concentrations of xenon isotopes in the atmosphere. SPALAX stations were set up in Western Europe and have been operated quite continuously for three years or more, detecting principally xenon-133 and more scarcely xenon-135, xenon-133m and xenon-131m. There are around 150 nuclear power plants in the European Union, research reactors, reprocessing plants, medical production and application facilities releasing radioactive xenon in normal or incidental operations. A numerical study was carried out aiming to explain the SPALAX measurements. The mesoscale Atmospheric Transport Modelling involves the MM5 suite (PSU- NCAR) to predict the wind fields on nested domains, and FLEXPART, a 3D Lagrangian particle dispersion code, used to simulate the backward transport of xenon plumes detected by the SPALAX. For every event of detection, at least one potential xenon source has a significant efficiency of emission. The identified likely sources are located quite close to the SPALAX stations (some tens of kilometres), or situated farther (a few hundreds of kilometres). A base line of some mBq per cubic meter in xenon-133 is generated by the nuclear power plants. Peaks of xenon-133 ranging from tens to hundreds of mBq per cubic meter originate from a radioisotope production facility. The calculated xenon source terms required to obtain the SPALAX measurements are discussed and seem consistent with realistic emissions from the xenon sources in Western Europe.

  7. The impacts of recent permafrost thaw on land-atmosphere greenhouse gas exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Daniel J.; Kicklighter, David W.; McGuire, Anthony; Chen, Min; Zhuang, Qianlai; Yuan, Fengming; Melillo, Jerry M.; Wullschleger, Stan D.

    2014-01-01

    Permafrost thaw and the subsequent mobilization of carbon (C) stored in previously frozen soil organic matter (SOM) have the potential to be a strong positive feedback to climate. As the northern permafrost region experiences as much as a doubling of the rate of warming as the rest of the Earth, the vast amount of C in permafrost soils is vulnerable to thaw, decomposition and release as atmospheric greenhouse gases. Diagnostic and predictive estimates of high-latitude terrestrial C fluxes vary widely among different models depending on how dynamics in permafrost, and the seasonally thawed 'active layer' above it, are represented. Here, we employ a process-based model simulation experiment to assess the net effect of active layer dynamics on this 'permafrost carbon feedback' in recent decades, from 1970 to 2006, over the circumpolar domain of continuous and discontinuous permafrost. Over this time period, the model estimates a mean increase of 6.8 cm in active layer thickness across the domain, which exposes a total of 11.6 Pg C of thawed SOM to decomposition. According to our simulation experiment, mobilization of this previously frozen C results in an estimated cumulative net source of 3.7 Pg C to the atmosphere since 1970 directly tied to active layer dynamics. Enhanced decomposition from the newly exposed SOM accounts for the release of both CO2 (4.0 Pg C) and CH4 (0.03 Pg C), but is partially compensated by CO2 uptake (0.3 Pg C) associated with enhanced net primary production of vegetation. This estimated net C transfer to the atmosphere from permafrost thaw represents a significant factor in the overall ecosystem carbon budget of the Pan-Arctic, and a non-trivial additional contribution on top of the combined fossil fuel emissions from the eight Arctic nations over this time period.

  8. Catchment-Wide Atmospheric Greenhouse Gas Exchange as Influenced by Land Use Diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herbst, Mathias; Friborg, Thomas; Ringgaard, Rasmus

    2011-01-01

    The turbulent fl uxes of carbon dioxide between the land surface and the atmosphere were measured with the eddy covariance technique above three contrasO ng land use types in the Skjern River catchment in western Denmark, namely an agricultural area, a forest plantation, and a wet grassland....... The measurements also included the turbulent fl uxes of methane above the wet grassland and of nitrous oxide above the agricultural area and ran continuously throughout the year 2009. The highest CO2 uptake rates (around 30 µmol m-2 s-1) were observed at the agricultural site; however, the site was a CO2 sink only...

  9. Particulate and gas-phase products from the atmospheric degradation of chlorpyrifos and chlorpyrifos-oxon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrás, Esther; Ródenas, Milagros; Vázquez, Mónica; Vera, Teresa; Muñoz, Amalia

    2015-12-01

    The phosphorothioate structure is highly present in several pesticides. However, there is a lack of information about its degradation process in air and the secondary pollutants formed. Herein, the atmospheric reactions of chlorpyrifos, one of the most world-used insecticide, and its main degradation product - chlorpyrifos-oxon - are described. The photo-oxidation under the presence of NOx was studied in a large outdoor simulation chamber for both chlorpyrifos and chlorpyrifos-oxon, observing a rapid degradation (Half lifetime < 3.5 h for both compounds). Also, the photolysis reactions of both were studied. The formation of particulate matter (aerosol mass yield ranged 6-59%) and gaseous products were monitored. The chemical composition of minor products was studied, identifying 15 multi-oxygenated derivatives. The most abundant products were ring-retaining molecules such as 3,5,6-trichloropyridin-2-ol and ethyl 3,5,6-trichloropyridin-2-yl hydrogen phosphate. An atmospheric degradation mechanism has been amplified based on an oxidation started with OH-nucleophilic attack to Pdbnd S bond.

  10. A thermo-acoustic gas sensor array for photochemically critical species in the martian atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zent, Aaron P.; Quinn, Richard C.; Madou, Marc

    1998-02-01

    We describe the development of a thermoacoustic oxidant sensor (TAOS) array to quantify gases that play critical roles in the chemical evolution of the martian surface and atmosphere. The sensor combines a chemiresistor with an acoustic wave-plate device, micro-fabricated on thermally isolated hot-plates; their measurement modes are respectively: conductivity changes of chemically sensitive films, and mass changes of the same coatings. Metal Phthalocyanines (MePcs) and other organic semiconductors such as 1,4-polybutadiene are used as chemical coatings because of their chemical stability and the fact that these compounds have been shown to exhibit selectivity to oxidizing gases. The specific target gases of this experiment are H 2O 2, H 2O, O 3 and CO. Identification and quantification of these gases at the martian surface would contribute to both atmospheric and soil chemistry studies. The species H 2O 2 and/or O 3, may be responsible for the unique reactive properties of the martian regolith, as discovered in the Viking biology experiments. In addition, each of the target gases are believed to play a role in the photochemical recycling of CO 2.

  11. Benchmark experiments with global climate models applicable to extra-solar gas giant planets in the shallow atmosphere approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Bending, V L; Kolb, U

    2012-01-01

    The growing field of exoplanetary atmospheric modelling has seen little work on standardised benchmark tests for its models, limiting understanding of the dependence of results on specific models and conditions. With spatially resolved observations as yet difficult to obtain, such a test is invaluable. Although an intercomparison test for models of tidally locked gas giant planets has previously been suggested and carried out, the data provided were limited in terms of comparability. Here, the shallow PUMA model is subjected to such a test, and detailed statistics produced to facilitate comparison, with both time means and the associated standard deviations displayed, removing the time dependence and providing a measure of the variability. Model runs have been analysed to determine the variability between resolutions, and the effect of resolution on the energy spectra studied. Superrotation is a robust and reproducible feature at all resolutions.

  12. Shallow-ocean methane leakage and degassing to the atmosphere: Triggered by offshore oil-gas and methane hydrate explorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong eZHANG

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Both offshore oil-gas exploration and marine methane hydrate recovery can trigger massive CH4 release from seafloor. During upward transportation of CH4 plume through water column, CH4 is subjected to dissolution and microbial consumption despite the protection of hydrate and oil coating on bubbles surface. The ultimate CH4 degassing to the atmosphere appears to be water-depth dependent. In shallow oceans with water depth less than 100 m, the natural or human-induced leakages or both lead to significant sea-to-air CH4 degassing from 3.00 to 1.36 × 105 μmol m-2 d-1. To quantify the human-perturbation induced CH4 degassing, the combination of top-down modeling and bottom-up calculations is essential due to spatial and temporal variability of diffusion and ebullition at water-air interface.

  13. The ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter NOMAD Spectrometer Suite for Nadir and Solar Occultation Observations of Mars' Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Ian; Carine Vandaele, Ann; López-Moreno, José Juan; Patel, Manish; Bellucci, Giancarlo; Drummond, Rachel; Neefs, Eduard; Depiesse, Cedric; Daerden, Frank; Rodriguez-Gómez, Julio; Neary, Lori; Robert, Séverine; Willame, Yannick; Mahieux, Arnaud

    2015-04-01

    NOMAD (Nadir and Occultation for MArs Discovery) is one of four instruments on board the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter, scheduled for launch in January 2016 and to begin nominal science mission around Mars in late 2017. It consists of a suite of three high-resolution spectrometers - Solar Occultation (SO), LNO (Limb Nadir and Occultation) and UVIS (Ultraviolet-Visible) - which will generate a huge dataset of Martian atmospheric observations during the mission, across a wide spectral range. Specifically, the SO spectrometer channel will perform occultation measurements, operating between 2.2-4.3μm at a resolution of 0.15cm-1, with 180-1000m vertical spatial resolution and an SNR of 1500-3000. LNO will perform limb scanning, nadir and occultation measurements, operating between 2.2-3.8μm at a resolution of 0.3cm-1. In nadir, global coverage will extend between ±74O latitude with an IFOV of 0.5x17km on the surface. This channel can also make occultation measurements should the SO channel fail. UVIS will make limb, nadir and occultation measurements between 200-650nm, at a resolution of 1nm. It will have 300-1000m vertical resolution during occultation and 5x60km ground resolution during 15s nadir observations. An order-of-magnitude increase in spectral resolution over previous instruments will allow NOMAD to map previously unresolvable gas species, such as important trace gases and isotopes. CO, CO2, H2O, C2H2, C2H4, C2H6, H2CO, CH4, SO2, H2S, HCl, O3 and several isotopologues of methane and water will be detectable, providing crucial measurements of the Martian D/H and methane isotope ratios. It will also be possible to map the sources and sinks of these gases, such as regions of surface volcanism/outgassing and atmospheric production, over the course of an entire Martian year, to further constrain atmospheric dynamics and climatology. NOMAD will also continue to monitor the Martian water, carbon, ozone and dust cycles, extending existing datasets made by successive

  14. Elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide effects on soybean and sorghum gas exchange in conventional and no-tillage systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, S A; Runion, G B; Rogers, H H; Arriaga, F J

    2010-01-01

    Increasing atmospheric CO(2) concentration has led to concerns about potential effects on production agriculture. In the fall of 1997, a study was initiated to compare the response of two crop management systems (conventional tillage and no-tillage) to elevated CO(2). The study used a split-plot design replicated three times with two management systems as main plots and two atmospheric CO(2) levels (ambient and twice ambient) as split plots using open-top chambers on a Decatur silt loam soil (clayey, kaolinitic, thermic Rhodic Paleudults). The conventional system was a grain sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench.] and soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] rotation with winter fallow and spring tillage practices. In the no-tillage system, sorghum and soybean were rotated, and three cover crops were used [crimson clover (Trifolium incarnatum L.), sunn hemp (Crotalaria juncea L.), and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)]. Over multiple growing seasons, the effect of management and CO(2) concentration on leaf-level gas exchange during row crop (soybean in 1999, 2001, and 2003; sorghum in 2000, 2002, and 2004) reproductive growth were evaluated. Treatment effects were fairly consistent across years. In general, higher photosynthetic rates were observed under CO(2) enrichment (more so with soybean) regardless of residue management practice. Elevated CO(2) led to decreases in stomatal conductance and transpiration, which resulted in increased water use efficiency. The effects of management system on gas exchange measurements were infrequently significant, as were interactions of CO(2) and management. These results suggest that better soil moisture conservation and high rates of photosynthesis can occur in both tillage systems in CO(2)-enriched environments during reproductive growth.

  15. Gas phase spectra of HOBr and Br2O and their atmospheric significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Deters

    Full Text Available The HOBr molecule is a potential reservoir of Br compounds in the atmosphere. In this work, the UV-visible spectrum of HOBr was measured over the range 242–400 nm. Its absorption consists of two maxima at 280 nm (σmax=2.7±0.4×10–19 cm2 molecules–1 and 355 nm (σmax=7.0±1.1×10–20 cm2 molecules–1, respectively, where the error is ±1Σ. Atmospheric photolysis lifetime calculations for HOBr in the lower stratosphere have been made using the PHOTOGT model. The results show a strong dependence on the solar zenith angle (SZA implying a longer lifetime at high latitudes and a relatively short lifetime at low latitudes for example 714 s (albedo of 25%, SZA of 20° and an altitude of 17 km, and 3226 s (albedo of 25%, SZA of 88° and an altitude of 17 km. The UV-visible absorption spectrum of Br2O, which is an intermediate in the preparation, used in this study and is together with H2O in equilibrium with HOBr, was measured from 205 to 450 nm. The spectrum shows a maximum at 315 nm (σmax=2.3±0.3×10–18 cm2 molecules–1 with a shoulder at 355 nm. From the results of the atmospheric lifetime calculations for Br2O, it is clear that this molecule has a short stratospheric lifetime and is not likely to have a large daytime concentration, for example, 20 s (albedo of 25%, SZA of 20° and an altitude of 17 km, and 83 s (albedo and 25%, SZA of 88° and an altitude of 17 km.

  16. An Initial Investigation into the Use of a Flux Chamber Technique to Measure Soil-Atmosphere Gas Exchanges from Application of Biosolids to UK Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Donovan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available While a significant amount of work has been conducted to assess the concentration of pollutants in soils and waterways near land that has been amended with biosolids, a relatively small body of research investigating emissions to atmosphere is available in the literature. Some studies have indicated that while the CO2 emissions from soils decrease with fertiliser application, the CH4 and N2O emissions might be increased, offsetting the benefit. The objective of the research presented in this paper was to address this gap, by the use of a flux chamber technique to measure soil-atmosphere gas exchanges from the application of biosolids to land. This was done by applying three different types of biosolids to soils and measuring gases at the soil-atmosphere interface. The measurements were taken on areas with three different types of vegetation. The gases were collected using a flux chamber technique and analysed by gas chromatography. The results presented here are preliminary findings of an ongoing experiment. Insignificant variation appeared to occur between different areas of vegetation; however, small variations in gas concentrations were observed indicating a need for continued monitoring of soil-atmosphere gas exchanges to determine the long-term impacts on the atmosphere and the environment.

  17. Effect of Additional Structure on Effective Stack Height of Gas Dispersion in Atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takenobu Michioka

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Wind-tunnel experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of additional structure (building, sea wall and banking on the effective stack height, which is usually used in safety analyses of nuclear power facilities in Japan. The effective stack heights were estimated with and without the additional structure in addition to the reactor building while varying several conditions such as the source height, the height of additional structure and the distance between the source position and the additional structure. When the source height is equivalent to the reactor building height, the additional structure enhances both the vertical and horizontal gas dispersion widths and decreases the ground gas concentration, and it means that the additional structure does not decrease the effective stack height. When the source height is larger than the reactor height, the additional structures might affect the effective stack height. As the distance between the source and the additional structure decreases, or as the height of the additional structure increases, the structure has a larger effect on the effective stack height.

  18. Atmospheric pressure flow reactor: Gas phase chemical kinetics under tropospheric conditions without wall effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, Steven L. (Inventor); Davis, Dennis D. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A flow reactor for simulating the interaction in the troposphere is set forth. A first reactant mixed with a carrier gas is delivered from a pump and flows through a duct having louvers therein. The louvers straighten out the flow, reduce turbulence and provide laminar flow discharge from the duct. A second reactant delivered from a source through a pump is input into the flowing stream, the second reactant being diffused through a plurality of small diffusion tubes to avoid disturbing the laminar flow. The commingled first and second reactants in the carrier gas are then directed along an elongated duct where the walls are spaced away from the flow of reactants to avoid wall interference, disturbance or turbulence arising from the walls. A probe connected with a measuring device can be inserted through various sampling ports in the second duct to complete measurements of the first and second reactants and the product of their reaction at selected XYZ locations relative to the flowing system.

  19. Development of a code to simulate dispersion of atmospheric released tritium gas in the environmental media and to evaluate doses. TRIDOSE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murata, Mikio [Nuclear Engineering Co., Ltd., Hitachi, Ibaraki (Japan); Noguchi, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Sumi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2000-11-01

    A computer code (TRIDOSE) was developed to assess the environmental impact of atmospheric released tritium gas (T{sub 2}) from nuclear fusion related facilities. The TRIDOSE simulates dispersion of T{sub 2} and resultant HTO in the atmosphere, land, plant, water and foods in the environment, and evaluates contamination concentrations in the media and exposure doses. A part of the mathematical models in TRIDOSE were verified by comparison of the calculation with the results of the short range (400 m) dispersion experiment of HT gas performed in Canada postulating a short-time (30 minutes) accidental release. (author)

  20. Effects of background gas on sulfur hexafluoride removal by atmospheric dielectric barrier discharge plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoxing; Xiao, Hanyan; Hu, Xiongxiong; Gui, Yingang

    2016-11-01

    The effects of background gases (He, Ar, N2 and air) on SF6 removal in a dielectric barrier reactor were investigated at atmospheric pressure. A comparison among these background gases was performed in terms of discharge voltage, discharge power, mean electron energy, electron density, removal efficiency and energy yield for the destruction of SF6. Results showed that the discharge voltage of He and Ar was lower than that of N2 and air, but the difference of their discharge power was small. Compared with three other background gases, Ar had a relatively superior destruction and removal rate and energy yield since the mean electron energy and electron density in SF6/H2O/Ar plasma were both maintained at a high level. Complete removal of 2% SF6 could be achieved at a discharge power of 48.86 W with Ar and the corresponding energy yield can reach 4.8 g/kWh.

  1. Effects of background gas on sulfur hexafluoride removal by atmospheric dielectric barrier discharge plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxing Zhang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The effects of background gases (He, Ar, N2 and air on SF6 removal in a dielectric barrier reactor were investigated at atmospheric pressure. A comparison among these background gases was performed in terms of discharge voltage, discharge power, mean electron energy, electron density, removal efficiency and energy yield for the destruction of SF6. Results showed that the discharge voltage of He and Ar was lower than that of N2 and air, but the difference of their discharge power was small. Compared with three other background gases, Ar had a relatively superior destruction and removal rate and energy yield since the mean electron energy and electron density in SF6/H2O/Ar plasma were both maintained at a high level. Complete removal of 2% SF6 could be achieved at a discharge power of 48.86 W with Ar and the corresponding energy yield can reach 4.8 g/kWh.

  2. The Influence of Coronal Mass Ejections on the Gas Dynamics of the Atmosphere of a "Hot~Jupiter" Exoplanet

    CERN Document Server

    Bisikalo, D V

    2016-01-01

    The results of three-dimensional numerical simulations of the gas dynamics of the atmosphere of a "hot Jupiter" exoplanet during the passage of a coronal mass ejection (CME) from the central star are presented. These computations assumed the parameters for the stellar wind and the CME to be typical of the solar values. The characteristic variations of the flow pattern are considered for quasi-closed and closed (but appreciably distorted by the gravitational influence of the star) gaseous envelopes of the exoplanet. It is shown that a typical CME is sufficient to tear off the outer part of an asymmetric envelope that is located beyond the Roche lobe and carry it away from the exoplanet. This leads to a substantial increase in the mass-loss rate from the exoplanet envelope during the passage of CMEs. The mass-loss rate grows by about a factor of 11 for a closed envelope, and by about a factor of 14 for a quasi-closed envelope. Possible evolutionary consequences of the loss of part of the atmosphere during the p...

  3. Infrared spectroscopy of methoxyphenols involved as atmospheric secondary organic aerosol precursors: Gas-phase vibrational cross-sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuisset, A.; Coeur, C.; Mouret, G.; Ahmad, W.; Tomas, A.; Pirali, O.

    2016-08-01

    Methoxyphenols are emitted in the atmosphere from biomass burning and recent works have shown the potential role of these oxygenated aromatic species in the formation of secondary organic aerosols. IR spectroscopic data that would enable their remote measurement in the atmosphere remain scarce in the literature. Room temperature Far-IR cross-sections of 4 methoxyphenols (2-methoxyphenol or guaiacol, 3-methoxyphenol, 4-methoxyphenol and 2,6-dimethoxyphenol or syringol) have been determined using the THz synchrotron radiation available at SOLEIL. Mid- and near-IR regions have also been investigated with a conventional Fourier transform IR setup and allowed to provide a set of vibrational cross-sections of the studied methoxyphenols. Finally, gas-phase cross sections of two nitroguaiacol isomers (4-nitroguaiacol and 5-nitroguaiacol), two intermediate products involved in the formation of secondary organic aerosols have been measured in the mid- and near-IR with a heated multi-pass cell. Harmonic and anharmonic density functional theory calculations were carried out for all the studied compounds and allowed a full assignment of the recorded rovibrational bands.

  4. Trace determination of the flame retardant tetrabromobisphenol A in the atmosphere by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie Zhiyong [GKSS Research Centre, Institute for Coastal Research, Department of Environmental Chemistry, Max-Planck-Str. 1, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany) and Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Frankfurt at Main, Institute of Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences, Department of Analytical Environmental Chemistry, Georg-Voigt-Str. 14, 60054 Frankfurt (Germany)]. E-mail: zhiyong.xie@gkss.de; Ebinghaus, Ralf [GKSS Research Centre, Institute for Coastal Research, Department of Environmental Chemistry, Max-Planck-Str. 1, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Lohmann, Rainer [Graduate School of Oceanography, University of Rhode Island, Narragansett, RI 02882-1197 (United States); Heemken, Olaf [LAVES, Philosophenweg 36/38, D-26121 Oldenburg (Germany); Caba, Armando [GKSS Research Centre, Institute for Coastal Research, Department of Environmental Chemistry, Max-Planck-Str. 1, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Puettmann, Wilhelm [Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Frankfurt at Main, Institute of Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences, Department of Analytical Environmental Chemistry, Georg-Voigt-Str. 14, 60054 Frankfurt (Germany)

    2007-02-19

    A simple and effective method has been developed for analysis of the flame retardant tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) in environmental samples by using modified soxhlet extraction in combination with silica gel clean-up, derivatization with silylation reagent and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in selected ion monitoring mode (SIM). Satisfactory recoveries were achieved for the large volume sampling, soxhlet extraction and silica gel clean-up. The overall recovery is 79 {+-} 1%. The derivatization procedure is simple and fast, and produces stable TBBPA derivative. GC-MS with electronic impact (EI) ionization mode shows better detection power than using negative chemical ionization (NCI) mode. EI gives a method detection limit of 0.04 pg m{sup -3} and enables to determine trace TBBPA in ambient air in remote area. The method was successfully applied to the determination of TBBPA in atmospheric samples collected over land and coastal regions. The concentrations of TBBPA ranged from below the method detection limit (0.04 pg m{sup -3}) to 0.85 pg m{sup -3}. A declining trend with increasing latitude was present from the Wadden Sea to the Arctic. The atmospheric occurrence of TBBPA in the Arctic is significant and might imply that TBBPA has long-range transport potential.

  5. A multiple system of high-mass YSOs surrounded by disks in NGC 7538 IRS1 . Gas dynamics on scales of 10-700 AU from CH3OH maser and NH3 thermal lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscadelli, L.; Goddi, C.

    2014-06-01

    Context. It has been claimed that NGC 7538 IRS1 is a high-mass young stellar object (YSO) with 30 M⊙, surrounded by a rotating Keplerian disk, probed by a linear distribution of methanol masers. The YSO is also powering a strong compact Hii region or ionized wind, and is driving at least one molecular outflow. The axis orientations of the different structures (ionized gas, outflow, and disk) are, however, misaligned, which has led to the different competing models proposed to explain individual structures. Aims: We investigate the 3D kinematics and dynamics of circumstellar gas with very high linear resolution, from tens to 1500 AU, with the ultimate goal of building a comprehensive dynamical model for what is considered the best high-mass accretion disk candidate around an O-type young star in the northern hemisphere. Methods: We used high-angular resolution observations of 6.7 GHz CH3OH masers with the EVN, NH3 inversion lines with the JVLA B-Array, and radio continuum with the VLA A-Array. In particular, we employed four different observing epochs of EVN data at 6.7 GHz, spanning almost eight years, which enabled us to measure line-of-sight (l.o.s.) accelerations and proper motions of CH3OH masers, besides l.o.s. velocities and positions (as done in previous works). In addition, we imaged highly excited NH3 inversion lines, from (6,6) to (13,13), which enabled us to probe the hottest molecular gas very close to the exciting source(s). Results: We confirm previous results that five 6.7 GHz maser clusters (labeled from "A" to "E") are distributed over a region extended N-S across ≈1500 AU, and are associated with three components of the radio continuum emission. We propose that these maser clusters identify three individual high-mass YSOs in NGC 7538 IRS1, named IRS1a (associated with clusters "B" and "C"), IRS1b (associated with cluster "A"), and IRS1c (associated with cluster "E"). We find that the 6.7 GHz masers distribute along a line, with a regular

  6. Rich soil carbon and nitrogen but low atmospheric greenhouse gas fluxes from North Sulawesi mangrove swamps in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guang C; Ulumuddin, Yaya I; Pramudji, Sastro; Chen, Shun Y; Chen, Bin; Ye, Yong; Ou, Dan Y; Ma, Zhi Y; Huang, Hao; Wang, Jing K

    2014-07-15

    The soil to atmosphere fluxes of greenhouse gases N2O, CH4 and CO2 and their relationships with soil characteristics were investigated in three tropical oceanic mangrove swamps (Teremaal, Likupang and Kema) in North Sulawesi, Indonesia. Mangrove soils in North Sulawesi were rich in organic carbon and nitrogen, but the greenhouse gas fluxes were low in these mangroves. The fluxes ranged -6.05-13.14 μmol m(-2)h(-1), -0.35-0.61 μmol m(-2)h(-1) and -1.34-3.88 mmol m(-2)h(-1) for N2O, CH4 and CO2, respectively. The differences in both N2O and CH4 fluxes among different mangrove swamps and among tidal positions in each mangrove swamp were insignificant. CO2 flux was influenced only by mangrove swamps and the value was higher in Kema mangrove. None of the measured soil parameters could explain the variation of CH4 fluxes among the sampling plots. N2O flux was negatively related to porewater salinity, while CO2 flux was negatively correlated with water content and organic carbon. This study suggested that the low gas emissions due to slow metabolisms would lead to the accumulations of organic matters in North Sulawesi mangrove swamps.

  7. An atmospheric pressure high-temperature laminar flow reactor for investigation of combustion and related gas phase reaction systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oßwald, Patrick; Köhler, Markus [Institute of Combustion Technology, German Aerospace Center (DLR), Pfaffenwaldring 38-40, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    A new high-temperature flow reactor experiment utilizing the powerful molecular beam mass spectrometry (MBMS) technique for detailed observation of gas phase kinetics in reacting flows is presented. The reactor design provides a consequent extension of the experimental portfolio of validation experiments for combustion reaction kinetics. Temperatures up to 1800 K are applicable by three individually controlled temperature zones with this atmospheric pressure flow reactor. Detailed speciation data are obtained using the sensitive MBMS technique, providing in situ access to almost all chemical species involved in the combustion process, including highly reactive species such as radicals. Strategies for quantifying the experimental data are presented alongside a careful analysis of the characterization of the experimental boundary conditions to enable precise numeric reproduction of the experimental results. The general capabilities of this new analytical tool for the investigation of reacting flows are demonstrated for a selected range of conditions, fuels, and applications. A detailed dataset for the well-known gaseous fuels, methane and ethylene, is provided and used to verify the experimental approach. Furthermore, application for liquid fuels and fuel components important for technical combustors like gas turbines and engines is demonstrated. Besides the detailed investigation of novel fuels and fuel components, the wide range of operation conditions gives access to extended combustion topics, such as super rich conditions at high temperature important for gasification processes, or the peroxy chemistry governing the low temperature oxidation regime. These demonstrations are accompanied by a first kinetic modeling approach, examining the opportunities for model validation purposes.

  8. Photoemission study of fluorination atmospheric pressure plasma processes on EPDM: Influence of the carrier and fluorinating gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, L., E-mail: lidia.martinez@icmm.csic.es [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (ICMM-CSIC) Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Huttel, Y. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (ICMM-CSIC) Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Verheyde, B.; Vanhulsel, A. [Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO), Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Roman, E. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (ICMM-CSIC) Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2010-11-15

    Fluorination plasma treatments at atmospheric pressure were used to modify the surface composition of EPDM elastomer. In this study, two different precursors (CF{sub 4} and SF{sub 6}) and two carrier gases (He and Ar) were used for the surface modification of EPDM elastomer. The surface modifications were studied by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. We have observed a strong influence of the gas selection on the extent of the surface modification induced with these treatments. In general terms, the use of CF{sub 4} generates a higher concentration of fluorine in the elastomer surface. On the other hand, the use of He as carrier gas also increases the effectiveness of the modification process. The fluorine uptake varies between 2 and 13%, although the formation of fluorine-containing functional groups was detected when the amount of fluorine on the surface exceeded 7%. After all treatments, an important oxygen uptake was observed, with amounts three or four times higher than the untreated elastomer.

  9. NO density and gas temperature measurements in atmospheric pressure nanosecond repetitively pulsed (NRP) discharges by Mid-IR QCLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeni Simeni, Marien; Stancu, Gabi-Daniel; Laux, Christophe

    2014-10-01

    Nitric oxide is a key species for many processes: in combustion, in human skin physiology... Recently, NO-ground state absolute density measurements produced by atmospheric pressure NRP discharges were carried out in air as a function of the discharge parameters, using Quantum Cascade Laser Absorption Spectroscopy. These measurements were space averaged and performed in the post-discharge region in a large gas volume. Here we present radial profiles of NO density and temperature measured directly in the discharge for different configurations. Small plasma volume and species densities, high temperature and EM noise environment make the absorption diagnostic challenging. For this purpose the QCLAS sensitivity was improved using a two-detector system. We conducted lateral absorbance measurements with a spatial resolution of 300 μm for two absorption features at 1900.076 and 1900.517 cm-1. The radial temperature and NO density distributions were obtained from the Abel inverted lateral measurements. Time averaged NO densities of about 1.E16 cm-3 and gas temperature of about 1000K were obtained in the center of the discharge. PLASMAFLAME Project (Grant No ANR-11-BS09-0025).

  10. MS2 virus inactivation by atmospheric-pressure cold plasma using different gas carriers and power levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yan; Liang, Yongdong; Wei, Kai; Li, Wei; Yao, Maosheng; Zhang, Jue; Grinshpun, Sergey A

    2015-02-01

    In this study, airborne MS2 bacteriophages were exposed for subsecond time intervals to atmospheric-pressure cold plasma (APCP) produced using different power levels (20, 24, and 28 W) and gas carriers (ambient air, Ar-O2 [2%, vol/vol], and He-O2 [2%, vol/vol]). In addition, waterborne MS2 viruses were directly subjected to the APCP treatment for up to 3 min. MS2 viruses with and without the APCP exposure were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR), and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Viral inactivation was shown to exhibit linear relationships with the APCP generation power and exposure time (R(2) > 0.95 for all energy levels tested) up to 95% inactivation (1.3-log reduction) after a subsecond airborne exposure at 28 W; about the same inactivation level was achieved for waterborne viruses with an exposure time of less than 1 min. A larger amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as atomic oxygen, in APCP was detected for a higher generation power with Ar-O2 and He-O2 gas carriers. SEM images, SDS-PAGE, and agarose gel analysis of exposed waterborne viruses showed various levels of damage to both surface proteins and their related RNA genes after the APCP exposure, thus leading to the loss of their viability and infectivity.

  11. Gas Chromatography Coupled to Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry for Improvement of Data Reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwemer, Theo; Rüger, Christopher P; Sklorz, Martin; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2015-12-15

    Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) offers the advantage of molecular ion information with low fragmentation. Hyphenating APCI to gas chromatography (GC) and ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) enables an improved characterization of complex mixtures. Data amounts acquired by this system are very huge, and existing peak picking algorithms are usually extremely time-consuming, if both gas chromatographic and ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometric data are concerned. Therefore, automatic routines are developed that are capable of handling these data sets and further allow the identification and removal of known ionization artifacts (e.g., water- and oxygen-adducts, demethylation, dehydrogenation, and decarboxylation). Furthermore, the data quality is enhanced by the prediction of an estimated retention index, which is calculated simply from exact mass data combined with a double bond equivalent correction. This retention index is used to identify mismatched elemental compositions. The approach was successfully tested for analysis of semivolatile components in heavy fuel oil and diesel fuel as well as primary combustion particles emitted by a ship diesel research engine. As a result, 10-28% of the detected compounds, mainly low abundant species, classically assigned by using only the mass spectrometric information, were identified as not valid and removed. Although GC separation is limited by the slow acquisition rate of the FT-ICR MS (information.

  12. The influence of gas-particle partitioning and surface-atmosphere exchange on ammonia during BAQS-Met

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Ellis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Border Air Quality and Meteorology study (BAQS-Met was an intensive field campaign conducted in Southwestern Ontario during the summer of 2007. The focus of BAQS-Met was determining the causes of the formation of ozone and fine particulate matter (PM2.5, and of the regional significance of trans-boundary transport and lake breeze circulations on that formation. Fast (1 Hz measurements of ammonia were acquired using a Quantum Cascade Laser Tunable Infrared Differential Absorption Spectrometer (QC-TILDAS at the Harrow supersite. Measurements of PM2.5 ammonium, sulfate and nitrate were made using an Ambient Ion Monitor Ion Chromatograph (AIM-IC with hourly time resolution. The median mixing ratio of ammonia was 2.5 ppb, with occasional high spikes at night resulting from local emissions. Measurements were used to assess major local emissions of NH3, diurnal profiles and gas-particle partitioning. The measurements were compared with results from A Unified Regional Air-quality Modelling System (AURAMS. While the fraction of total ammonia (NHx≡NH3 + NH4+ observed in the gas phase peaks between 0.1 and 0.8, AURAMS tended to predict fractions of either less than 0.05 or greater than 0.8. The model frequently predicted acidic aerosol, in contrast with observations wherein NHx almost always exceeded the observed equivalents of sulfate. One explanation for our observations is that the net flux of ammonia from the land surface to the atmosphere increases when aerosol sulfate is present, effectively buffering the mixing ratio of gas phase ammonia, a process not included in the model. A simple representation of an offline bi-directional flux parameterization using the ISORROPIA thermodynamic model was successful at reducing the population of zero gas fraction points, but not the higher gas fraction points.

  13. On measurements of aerosol-gas composition of the atmosphere during two expeditions in 2013 along the Northern Sea Route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakerin, S. M.; Bobrikov, A. A.; Bukin, O. A.; Golobokova, L. P.; Pol'kin, Vas. V.; Pol'kin, Vik. V.; Shmirko, K. A.; Kabanov, D. M.; Khodzher, T. V.; Onischuk, N. A.; Pavlov, A. N.; Potemkin, V. L.; Radionov, V. F.

    2015-11-01

    We presented the results of expedition measurements of the set of physical-chemical characteristics of atmospheric aerosol in areas of the Arctic and Far East seas, performed onboard RV Akademik Fedorov (17 August-22 September 2013) and RV Professor Khljustin (24 July-7 September 2013). The specific features of spatial distribution and time variations of aerosol optical depth (AOD) of the atmosphere in the wavelength range of 0.34-2.14 μm and boundary layer height, aerosol and black carbon mass concentrations, and disperse and chemical composition of aerosol are discussed. Over the Arctic Ocean (on the route of RV Akademik Fedorov) there is a decrease in aerosol and black carbon concentrations in a northeastern direction: higher values were observed in the region of Spitsbergen and near the Kola Peninsula; and minimum values were observed at northern margins of the Laptev Sea. Average AOD (0.5 μm) values in this remote region were 0.03; the aerosol and black carbon mass concentrations were 875 and 22 ng m-3, respectively. The spatial distributions of most aerosol characteristics over Far East seas show their latitudinal decrease in the northern direction. On transit of RV Professor Khljustin from the Japan Sea to the Chukchi Sea, the aerosol number concentration decreased on average from 23.7 to 2.5 cm-3, the black carbon mass concentration decreased from 150 to 50 ng m-3, and AOD decreased from 0.19 to 0.03. We analyzed the variations in the boundary layer height, measured by ship-based lidar: the average value was 520 m, and the maximal value was 1200 m. In latitudinal distribution of the boundary layer height, there is a characteristic minimum at a latitude of ~ 55° N. For water basins of eight seas, we present the chemical compositions of the water-soluble aerosol fraction (ions, elements) and small gas-phase species, as well as estimates of their vertical fluxes. It is shown that substances are mainly (75-89 %) supplied from the atmosphere to the sea

  14. Changes in concentration, composition and source contribution of atmospheric organic aerosols by shifting coal to natural gas in Urumqi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yanqin; Wang, Gehui; Wu, Can; Wang, Jiayuan; Li, Jianjun; Zhang, Lu; Han, Yanni; Liu, Lang; Cao, Cong; Cao, Junji; He, Qing; Liu, Xinchun

    2017-01-01

    Size-segregated aerosols were collected in Urumqi, a megacity in northwest China, during two heating seasons, i.e., before (heating season І: January-March 2012) and after (heating season II: January-March 2014) the project "shifting coal to natural gas", and determined for n-alkanes, PAHs and oxygenated PAHs to investigate the impact of replacement of coal by natural gas on organic aerosols in the urban atmosphere. Our results showed that compared to those in heating season I concentrations of n-alkanes, PAHs and OPAHs decreased by 74%, 74% and 82% in heating season II, respectively. Source apportionment analysis suggested that coal combustion, traffic emission and biomass burning are the major sources of the determined organics during the heating seasons in Urumqi. Traffic emission is the main source for n-alkanes in the city. Coal combustion is the dominant source of PAHs and OPAHs in heating season І, but traffic emission becomes their major source in heating season ІI. Relative contributions of coal combustion to n-alkanes, PAHs and OPAHs in Urumqi decreased from 21 to 75% in heating season I to 4.0-21% in heating season II due to the replacement of coal with natural gas for house heating. Health risk assessment further indicated that compared with that in heating season I the number of lung cancer related to PAHs exposure in Urumqi decreased by 73% during heating season II due to the project implementation. Our results suggest that replacing coal by clean energy sources for house heating will significantly mitigate air pollution and improve human health in China.

  15. Attaining the Steady State of the Nitriding Potential after a Change of NH3 Atmosphere Flow Rate during the Gas Nitriding Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jerzy Michalski; Jan Tacikowski; Piotr Wach; Tomasz Babul; Nabil Tarfa

    2004-01-01

    In single and multi-stage nitriding processes, each stage is characterized by the following parameters:temperature and time, type and composition of incoming atmosphere, as well as the set value of the nitriding potential. In the case of an atmosphere composed of raw ammonia and dissociated ammonia (NH3- NH3diss), the set value of the nitriding potential can be achieved by a change of the incoming atmosphere make-up, while in the case of atmospheres comprising NH3 and NH3 - N2 - by a change of the atmosphere flow rate. The time needed to reach a stabilized state, after the initiation of a change in the atmosphere gas mix can be assessed relatively easily. The problem is much more complex if we want to predict the time of reaching a new stabilized state following a change in atmosphere flow rate. The time of reaching stabilized state is, in this case, a complex function of the flow rate of the atmosphere which forces the potential change, and of temperature. This problem, in the case of the NH3 type atmosphere, is the subject of investigation in this work. Factors are discussed, affecting the rate at which stabilized state is reached by the system after the introduction of a disturbance, necessary to attain the required nitriding potential.

  16. Development of a mirror pointing mechanism for an atmospheric gas measurement instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Michael; Belous, Adel; Brown, Jeff; Podolske, James

    1998-01-01

    Development of the Open Path Tunable Infrared Monitor of the Atmosphere (OPTIMA) instrument involved designing a pair of motion systems that could maintain a precise alignment and spatial distance between two mirrors installed on the NASA DC-8 research laboratory aircraft. This is the first airborne optical instrument that allows direct measurement of the gases in the freestream airflow on the exterior of the aircraft. One mirror is mounted within a specially constructed open port cavity in the cabin of the aircraft and the second is mounted 6 meters away on top of the inboard port side (number 2) engine pylon. Three co-aligned laser beams are reflected between the two mirrors 64 times in a Herriott pattern. The resulting sample path length of 384 meters is used to perform a spectral absorption analysis of the airflow between the mirrors. To compensate for normal wing movement and engine oscillations both mirrors were designed as continuously driven mechanisms to maintain alignment within allowable limits. The motion systems of the two mirror assemblies provide five degrees of freedom and are designed to maintain a pointing accuracy within seven arc-sec with a response frequency in excess of 10 Hz. The pylon motion system incorporates controlled pitch and yaw movement. The fuselage motion system compensates for pitch variation as well as linear translation for focal length and vertical aiming of the laser beam via a controlled beam guidance mechanism.

  17. Degradation and emission of carbonyl sulfide, an atmospheric trace gas, by fungi isolated from forest soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masaki, Yoshihito; Ozawa, Rie; Kageyama, Kei; Katayama, Yoko

    2016-09-01

    Soil is thought to be important both as a source and a sink of carbonyl sulfide (COS) in the troposphere, but the mechanism affecting COS uptake, especially for fungi, remains uncertain. Fungal isolates that were collected randomly from forest soil showed COS-degrading ability at high frequencies: 38 out of 43 isolates grown on potato dextrose agar showed degradation of 30 ppmv COS within 24 h. Of these isolates, eight degraded 30 ppmv of COS to below the detection limit within 2 h. These isolates also showed an ability to degrade COS included in ambient air (around 500 pptv) and highly concentrated (12 500 ppmv) level, even though the latter is higher than the lethal level for mammals. COS-degrading activity was estimated by using ergosterol as a biomass index for fungi. Trichoderma sp. THIF08 had the highest COS-degrading activity of all the isolates. Interestingly, Umbelopsis/Mortierella spp. THIF09 and THIF13 were unable to degrade 30 ppmv COS within 24 h, and actually emitted COS during the cultivation in ambient air. These results indicate a fungal contribution to the flux of COS between the terrestrial and atmospheric environments.

  18. Climate and site management as driving factors for the atmospheric greenhouse gas exchange of a restored wetland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Herbst

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The atmospheric greenhouse gas (GHG budget of a restored wetland in western Denmark was established for the years 2009–2011 from eddy covariance measurements of carbon dioxide (CO2 and methane (CH4 fluxes. The water table in the wetland, which was restored in 2002, was unregulated, and the vegetation height was limited through occasional grazing by cattle and grass cutting. The annual net CO2 uptake varied between 195 and 983 g m−2 and the annual net CH4 release varied between 11 and 17 g m−2. In all three years the wetland was a carbon sink and removed between 42 and 259 g C m−2 from the atmosphere. However, in terms of the full annual GHG budget (assuming that 1 g CH4 is equivalent to 25 g CO2 with respect to the greenhouse effect over a time horizon of 100 years the wetland was a sink in 2009, a source in 2010 and neutral in 2011. Complementary observations of meteorological factors and management activities were used to explain the large inter-annual variations in the full atmospheric GHG budget of the wetland. The largest impact on the annual GHG fluxes, eventually defining their sign, came from site management through changes in grazing duration and animal stocking density. These changes accounted for half of the observed variability in the CO2 fluxes and about two thirds of the variability in CH4 fluxes. An unusually long period of snow cover in 2010 had the second largest effect on the annual CO2 flux, whose interannual variability was larger than that of the CH4 flux. Since integrated CO2 and CH4 flux data from restored wetlands are still very rare, it is concluded that more long-term flux measurements are needed to quantify the effects of ecosystem disturbance, in terms of management activities and exceptional weather patterns, on the atmospheric GHG budget more

  19. Reforming of biogas to synthesis gas by a rotating arc plasma at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Woo-Jae; Park, Hyun-Woo; Liu, Jing-Lin; Park, Dong-Wha

    2015-09-01

    In order to produce synthesis gas, reforming of biogas composed with 60 percent for CH4 and 40 percent for CO2 was performed by a novel rotating arc plasma process. The effect of O2/CH4 ratio on the conversion, syngas composition and energy cost was investigated to evaluate the performance of proposed system compared with conventional gliding arc plasma process. When the O2/CH4 ratio was increased from 0.4 to 0.9, the conversions of CH4 and O2 increased up to 97.5 percent and 98.8 percent, respectively, while CO2 conversion was almost constant to be 38.6 percent. This is due to more enhance the partial oxidation of CH4 to CO and H2 than that of dry reforming by increasing the O2/CH4 ratio. In this work, energy cost of 32 kJ/mol was achieved with high syngas composition of 71 percent using pure O2 as oxidant reactant. These are lower than those of different arc plasma processes (energy cost of 122 - 1870 kJ/mol) such as spark, spark-shade and gliding arc plasma. Because, this rotating arc plasma can remain in a long arc length and a large volume of plasma with constant arc length mode.

  20. Nitrogen metastable (N2(A3 Σu + )) in a cold argon atmospheric pressure plasma jet: Shielding and gas composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iseni, Sylvain; Bruggeman, Peter J.; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Reuter, Stephan

    2016-05-01

    N 2 ( A 3 Σu + ) metastable species are detected and measured in a non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma jet by laser induced fluorescence. A shielding device is used to change the ambient conditions additionally to the feeding gas composition. Varying the amount of N2 and air admixed to the feeding gas as well as changing the shielding gas from N2 to air reveals that the highest N 2 ( A 3 Σu + ) is achieved in the case of air admixtures in spite of the enhanced collisional quenching due to the presence of O2. The reasons for these observations are discussed in detail.

  1. Technical Note: A trace gas climatology derived from the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer dataset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Jones

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment-Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS aboard the Canadian satellite SCISAT (launched in August 2003 was designed to investigate the composition of the upper troposphere, stratosphere, and mesosphere. ACE-FTS utilizes solar occultation to measure temperature and pressure as well as vertical profiles of over thirty chemical species including O3, H2O, CH4, N2O, CO, NO, NO2, N2O5, HNO3, HCl, ClONO2, CCl3F, CCl2F2, and HF. Global coverage for each species is obtained approximately over a three month period and measurements are made with a vertical resolution of typically 3–4 km. A quality-controlled climatology has been created for each of these 14 baseline species, where individual profiles are averaged over the period of February 2004 to February 2009. Measurements used are from the ACE-FTS version 2.2 data set including updates for O3 and N2O5. The climatological fields are provided on a monthly and three-monthly basis (DJF, MAM, JJA, SON at 5 degree latitude and equivalent latitude spacing and on 28 pressure surfaces (26 of which are defined by the Stratospheric Processes And their Role in Climate (SPARC Chemistry Climate Model validation activity. The ACE-FTS climatological dataset is available through the ACE website.

  2. On the Application of Hall Thruster Working with Ambient Atmospheric Gas for Orbital Station-Keeping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Duhopel'nikov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the application of the Hall thruster using the ambient atmospheric air for orbital station keeping. This is a relevant direction at the up-to-date development stage of propulsion systems. Many teams of designers of electric rocket thrusters evaluate the application of different schemes of particle acceleration at the low-earth orbit. Such technical solution allows us to abandon the storage systems of the working agent on the spacecraft board. Thus, lifetime of such a system at the orbit wouldn`t be limited by fuel range. The paper suggests a scheme of the propulsion device with a parabolic confuser that provides a required compression ratio of the ambient air for correct operation. Formulates physical and structural restrictions on ambient air to be used as a working agent of the thruster. Pointes out that the altitudes from 200 to 300 km are the most promising for such propulsion devices. Shows that for operation at lower altitudes are required the higher capacities that are not provided by modern onboard power supply systems. For the orbit heightening the air intakes with significant compression rate are of necessity. The size of such air intakes would exceed nose fairing of exploited space launch systems. To perform further design calculations are shown dependencies that allow us to calculate an effective diameter of the thruster channel and a critical voltage to be desirable for thrust force excess over air resistance. The dependencies to calculate minimal and maximal fluxes of neutral particles of oxygen and nitrogen, that are necessary for normal thruster operation, are also shown. Calculation results of the propulsion system parameters for the spacecrafts with cross-sectional area within 1 - 3 m2 and inlet diameter of air intake within 1 - 3 m are demonstrated. The research results have practical significance in design of advanced propulsion devices for lowaltitude spacecrafts. The work has been supported by the RFFR

  3. Influence of gas atmospheres and ceria on the stability of nanoporous gold studied by environmental electron microscopy and In situ ptychography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baier, Sina; Wittstock, Arne; Damsgaard, Christian Danvad

    2016-01-01

    was determined by IR thermography. While using elevated temperatures (room temperature - 400 °C) and realistic gas atmospheres (1 bar) we achieved for the first time a spatial resolution of about 20 nm during hard X-ray ptychography. The annealing of pure and ceria stabilized nanoporous gold in different...

  4. Application of gas chromatography–(triple quadrupole) massspectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization for thedetermination of multiclass pesticides in fruits and vegetables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cherta, L.; Portoles, T.; Beltran, J.; Pitarch, E.; Mol, J.G.J.; Hernandez, F.

    2013-01-01

    A multi-residue method for the determination of 142 pesticide residues in fruits and vegetables has been developed using a new atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source for coupling gas chromatography (GC) to tandem mass spectrometry (MS). Selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode has bee

  5. Electrical and optical properties of thin indium tin oxide films produced by pulsed laser ablation in oxygen or rare gas atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thestrup, B.; Schou, Jørgen; Nordskov, A.

    1999-01-01

    Films of indium tin oxide (ITO) have been produced in different background gases by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The Films deposited in rare gas atmospheres on room temperature substrates were metallic, electrically conductive, but had poor transmission of visible light. For substrate...

  6. Validation of a qualitative screening method for pesticides in fruits and vegetables by gas chromatography quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Portoles, T.; Mol, J.G.J.; Sancho, J.V.; Lopez, F.J.; Hernandez, F.

    2014-01-01

    A wide-scope screening method was developed for the detection of pesticides in fruit and vegetables. The method was based on gas chromatography coupled to a hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source (GC-(APCI)QTOF MS). A non-target acq

  7. Gas chromatography interfaced with atmospheric pressure ionization-quadrupole time-of-flight-mass spectrometry by low-temperature plasma ionization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norgaard, Asger W.; Kofoed-Sorensen, Vivi; Svensmark, Bo

    2013-01-01

    A low temperature plasma (LTP) ionization interface between a gas chromatograph (GC) and an atmospheric pressure inlet mass spectrometer, was constructed. This enabled time-of-flight mass spectrometric detection of GC-eluting compounds. The performance of the setup was evaluated by injection...

  8. Recent history of atmospheric trace gas concentrations deduced from measurement in the deep sea: application to sulfur hexa-fluoride and carbon tetrachlordie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, A.J.; Liddicoat, M.I.

    1985-01-01

    On a time scale of several decades, an increase in the atmospheric burden of certain stable trace gases results in a characteristic oceanic depth profile for the concentration of the dissolved gas. If the atmosphere is the only source of the gas to the sea, the time delay inherent in its downward penetration from the surface results in a profile which decreases with depth. By referencing to compounds such as Freon 11 or Freon 12, the atmospheric histories of which are relatively well known, limits can be placed on the increase of a trace gas whose history is unknown. The method may be particularly valuable in distinguishing the contributions of natural and anthropogenic sources of gases such as CCl/sub 4/ and CF/sub 4/, which may have both. The method is here applied to estimate the concentration of atmospheric SF/sub 6/ since 1970. Both exponential and linear fits are investigated, but the best fit is a linear increase, C = 0.34 + 0.084 (Yr-1970), where Yr is the calendar year and C is the concentration in pptv. A preliminary look at two CCl/sub 4/ profiles suggests that at least 50% of the atmospheric burden is of recent anthropogenic origin.

  9. Pesticides in the atmosphere: a comparison of gas-particle partitioning and particle size distribution of legacy and current-use pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degrendele, C.; Okonski, K.; Melymuk, L.; Landlová, L.; Kukučka, P.; Audy, O.; Kohoutek, J.; Čupr, P.; Klánová, J.

    2016-02-01

    This study presents a comparison of seasonal variation, gas-particle partitioning, and particle-phase size distribution of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and current-use pesticides (CUPs) in air. Two years (2012/2013) of weekly air samples were collected at a background site in the Czech Republic using a high-volume air sampler. To study the particle-phase size distribution, air samples were also collected at an urban and rural site in the area of Brno, Czech Republic, using a cascade impactor separating atmospheric particulates according to six size fractions. Major differences were found in the atmospheric distribution of OCPs and CUPs. The atmospheric concentrations of CUPs were driven by agricultural activities while secondary sources such as volatilization from surfaces governed the atmospheric concentrations of OCPs. Moreover, clear differences were observed in gas-particle partitioning; CUP partitioning was influenced by adsorption onto mineral surfaces while OCPs were mainly partitioning to aerosols through absorption. A predictive method for estimating the gas-particle partitioning has been derived and is proposed for polar and non-polar pesticides. Finally, while OCPs and the majority of CUPs were largely found on fine particles, four CUPs (carbendazim, isoproturon, prochloraz, and terbuthylazine) had higher concentrations on coarse particles ( > 3.0 µm), which may be related to the pesticide application technique. This finding is particularly important and should be further investigated given that large particles result in lower risks from inhalation (regardless the toxicity of the pesticide) and lower potential for long-range atmospheric transport.

  10. Soil-atmosphere trace gas exchange from tropical oil palm plantations on peat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arn Teh, Yit; Manning, Frances; Zin Zawawi, Norliyana; Hill, Timothy; Chocholek, Melanie; Khoon Kho, Lip

    2015-04-01

    Oil palm is the largest agricultural crop in the tropics, accounting for 13 % of all tropical land cover. Due to its large areal extent, oil palm cultivation may have important implications not only for terrestrial stores of C and N, but may also impact regional and global exchanges of material and energy, including fluxes of trace gases and water vapor. In particular, recent expansion of oil palm into tropical peatlands has raised concerns over enhanced soil C emissions from degradation of peat, and elevated N-gas fluxes linked to N fertilizer application. Here we report our preliminary findings on soil carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) fluxes from a long-term, multi-scale project investigating the C, N and greenhouse gas (GHG) dynamics of oil palm ecosystems established on peat soils in Sarawak, Malaysian Borneo. Flux chamber measurements indicate that soil CO2, CH4 and N2O fluxes averaged 20.0 ± 16.0 Mg CO2-C ha-1 yr-1, 37.4 ± 29.9 kg CH4-C ha-1 yr-1 and 4.7 ± 4.2 g N2O-N ha-1 yr-1, respectively. Soil CO2 fluxes were on par with other drained tropical peatlands; whereas CH4 fluxes exceeded observations from similar study sites elsewhere. Nitrous oxide fluxes were in a similar range to fluxes from other drained tropical peatlands, but lower than emissions from mineral-soil plantations by up to three orders of magnitude. Fluxes of soil CO2 and N2O were spatially stratified, and contingent upon the distribution of plants, deposited harvest residues, and soil moisture. Soil CO2 fluxes were most heavily influenced by the distribution of palms and their roots. On average, autotrophic (root) respiration accounted for approximately 78 % of total soil CO2 flux, and total soil respiration declined steeply away from palms; e.g. soil CO2 fluxes in the immediate 1 m radius around palms were up to 6 times greater than fluxes in inter-palm spaces due to higher densities of roots. Placement of harvest residues played an important - but secondary

  11. Determination of alkyl amines in atmospheric aerosol particles: a comparison of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and ion chromatography approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.-J. Huang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years low molecular weight alkyl amines have been recognized to play an important role in particle formation and growth in the lower atmosphere. However, major uncertainties are associated with their atmospheric processes, sources and sinks, mostly due to the lack of ambient measurements and the difficulties in accurate quantification of alkyl amines at trace level. In this study, we present the evaluation and optimization of two analytical approaches, i.e., gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS and ion chromatography (IC, for the determination of alkyl amines in aerosol particles. Alkyl amines were converted to carbamates through derivatization with isobutyl chloroformate for GC-MS determination. A set of parameters affecting the analytical performances of the GC-MS approach, including reagent amount, reaction time and pH value, was evaluated and optimized. The accuracy is 84.3–99.1%, and the limits of detection obtained are 1.8–3.9 pg. For the IC approach, a solid phase extraction (SPE column was used to separate alkyl amines from interfering cations before IC analysis. 1–2% (v/v of acetone (or 2–4% (v/v of acetonitrile was added to the eluent to improve the separation of alkyl amines on the IC column. The limits of detection obtained are 2.1–15.9 ng and the accuracy is 55.1–103.4%. The lower accuracy can be attributed to evaporation losses of amines during the sample concentration procedure. Measurements of ambient aerosol particle samples collected in Hong Kong show that the GC-MS approach is superior to the IC approach for the quantification of primary and secondary alkyl amines due to its lower detection limits and higher accuracy.

  12. Potential of gas chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry for screening and quantification of hexabromocyclododecane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales, Carlos; Portolés, Tania; Sancho, Juan Vicente; Abad, Esteban; Ábalos, Manuela; Sauló, Jordi; Fiedler, Heidelore; Gómara, Belén; Beltrán, Joaquim

    2016-01-01

    A fast method for the screening and quantification of hexabromocyclododecane (sum of all isomers) by gas chromatography using a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (GC-APCI-QqQ) is proposed. This novel procedure makes use of the soft atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source, which results in less fragmentation of the analyte than by conventional electron impact (EI) and chemical ionization (CI) sources, favoring the formation of the [M - Br](+) ion and, thus, enhancing sensitivity and selectivity. Detection was based on the consecutive loses of HBr from the [M - Br](+) ion to form the specific [M - H5Br6](+) and [M - H4Br5](+) ions, which were selected as quantitation (Q) and qualification (q) transitions, respectively. Parameters affecting ionization and MS/MS detection were studied. Method performance was also evaluated; calibration curves were found linear from 1 pg/μL to 100 pg/μL for the total HBCD concentration; instrumental detection limit was estimated to be 0.10 pg/μL; repeatability and reproducibility, expressed as relative standard deviation, were better than 7% in both cases. The application to different real samples [polyurethane foam disks (PUFs), food, and marine samples] pointed out a rapid way to identify and allow quantification of this compound together with a number of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (BDE congeners 28, 47, 66, 85, 99, 100, 153, 154, 183, 184, 191, 196, 197, and 209) and two other novel brominated flame retardants [i.e., decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) and 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE)] because of their presence in the same fraction when performing the usual sample treatment.

  13. Ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) for on- and offline analysis of atmospheric gas and aerosol species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krechmer, Jordan E.; Groessl, Michael; Zhang, Xuan; Junninen, Heikki; Massoli, Paola; Lambe, Andrew T.; Kimmel, Joel R.; Cubison, Michael J.; Graf, Stephan; Lin, Ying-Hsuan; Budisulistiorini, Sri H.; Zhang, Haofei; Surratt, Jason D.; Knochenmuss, Richard; Jayne, John T.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Jimenez, Jose-Luis; Canagaratna, Manjula R.

    2016-07-01

    Measurement techniques that provide molecular-level information are needed to elucidate the multiphase processes that produce secondary organic aerosol (SOA) species in the atmosphere. Here we demonstrate the application of ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) to the simultaneous characterization of the elemental composition and molecular structures of organic species in the gas and particulate phases. Molecular ions of gas-phase organic species are measured online with IMS-MS after ionization with a custom-built nitrate chemical ionization (CI) source. This CI-IMS-MS technique is used to obtain time-resolved measurements (5 min) of highly oxidized organic molecules during the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) ambient field campaign in the forested SE US. The ambient IMS-MS signals are consistent with laboratory IMS-MS spectra obtained from single-component carboxylic acids and multicomponent mixtures of isoprene and monoterpene oxidation products. Mass-mobility correlations in the 2-D IMS-MS space provide a means of identifying ions with similar molecular structures within complex mass spectra and are used to separate and identify monoterpene oxidation products in the ambient data that are produced from different chemical pathways. Water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) constituents of fine aerosol particles that are not resolvable with standard analytical separation methods, such as liquid chromatography (LC), are shown to be separable with IMS-MS coupled to an electrospray ionization (ESI) source. The capability to use ion mobility to differentiate between isomers is demonstrated for organosulfates derived from the reactive uptake of isomers of isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX) onto wet acidic sulfate aerosol. Controlled fragmentation of precursor ions by collisionally induced dissociation (CID) in the transfer region between the IMS and the MS is used to validate MS peak assignments, elucidate structures of oligomers, and confirm the

  14. Prediction of gas collection efficiency and particle collection artifact for atmospheric semivolatile organic compounds in multicapillary denuders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Mark D; Perlinger, Judith A

    2010-01-15

    A modeling approach is presented to predict the sorptive sampling collection efficiency of gaseous semivolatile organic compounds (SOCs) and the artifact caused by collection of particle-associated SOCs in multicapillary diffusion denuders containing polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stationary phase. Approaches are presented to estimate the equilibrium PDMS-gas partition coefficient (K(pdms)) from a solvation parameter model for any compound, and, for nonpolar compounds, from the octanol-air partition coefficient (K(oa)) if measured K(pdms) values are not available. These estimated K(pdms) values are compared with K(pdms) measured by gas chromatography. Breakthrough fraction was measured for SOCs collected from ambient air using high-flow (300 L min(-1)) and low-flow (13 L min(-1)) denuders under a range of sampling conditions (-10 to 25 degrees C; 11-100% relative humidity). Measured breakthrough fraction agreed with predictions based on frontal chromatography theory using K(pdms) and equations of Golay, Lövkvist and Jönsson within measurement precision. Analytes included hexachlorobenzene, 144 polychlorinated biphenyl congeners, and polybrominated diphenyl ethers 47 and 99. Atmospheric particle transmission efficiency was measured for the high-flow denuder (0.037-6.3 microm diameter), and low-flow denuder (0.015-3.1 microm diameter). Particle transmission predicted using equations of Gormley and Kennedy, Pich, and a modified filter model, agreed within measurement precision (high-flow denuder) or were slightly greater than (low-flow denuder) measured particle transmission. As an example application of the model, breakthrough volume and particle collection artifact for the two denuder designs were predicted as a function of K(oa) for nonpolar SOCs. The modeling approach is a necessary tool for the design and use of denuders for sorptive sampling with PDMS stationary phase.

  15. Temperature response of the troposphere and stratosphere to changes in gas and aerosol composition of the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyominov, I. G.; Zadorozhny, A. M.; Elansky, N. F.

    2003-04-01

    A numerical 2-D zonally averaged interactive model of the troposphere and stratosphere including aerosol physics is used for investigation of temperature changes caused by discharges to the atmosphere of sulphate species during the Pinatubo eruption and by anthropogenic pollution of the atmosphere by CO_2, CH_4, N_2O, CFCs, HCFCs, HFCs, CH_3CCl_3 and CCl_4. The model calculates self-consistently diabatic circulation, temperature, distributions of 45 minor gas constituents, and condensed particles of sulphuric acid hydrate with radii 6.4 nm discharges of sulphate species to the atmosphere during the Pinatubo eruption led to significant changes of sulfate aerosol layer, ozone, and temperature regime of the troposphere and stratosphere. For example, we have in tropics (20oS-20oN) a temperature increase of bout 2.5-3.5 K at altitudes of 22-24 km and decrease of about 0.8-1.0 K at altitudes of 5-8 km. Discharges of sulphate species from the Pinatubo eruption significantly increased also the aerosol optical thickness of the stratosphere, which led to an about 0.3 K decrease in monthly mean global temperature at the Earth's surface by the end of 1992. The calculations of the long-term temperature variations due to anthropogenic emission show that the greatest temperature changes are observed in the Southern Hemisphere in winter/spring periods. For example, the temperature changes at a height of 40 km at 45oS in December 2050 are about -4.85 K, 0.89 K, -2.21 K, and -4.32 K respectively for anthropogenic discharges of CO_2, CH_4, N_2O, and chlorine species. The changes in the Northern Hemisphere are smaller. They are equal to about -4.5 K, 0.68 K, -1.46 K, and -3.17 K at 45oN. The temperature changes in the stratosphere are caused by the corresponding ozone variations and temperature feedbacks. In the troposphere, the temperature changes are determined by the greenhouse effect caused by optically active pollutants. For example, temperature increases near the Earth's surface

  16. Clinical Application of Surrounding Puncture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Yao-jie; HAN Chou-ping

    2003-01-01

    Surrounding puncture can stop pathogenic qi from spreading, consolidate the connection between local meridians and enrich local qi and blood, which can eventually supplement anti-pathogenic qi and remove pathogenic qi, and consequently remedy diseases. The author of this article summrized and analyzed the clinical application of surrounding puncture for the purpose of studying this technique and improving the therapeutic effect.

  17. Surface water and atmospheric carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide observations by shipboard automated gas chromatography: Results from expeditions between 1977 and 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, R.F.; Van Woy, F.A.; Salameh, P.K. (Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA (United States)); Sepanski, R.J. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Energy, Environment and Resources Center)

    1992-12-01

    This document presents the results of surface water and atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO[sub 2]) and nitrous oxide (N[sub 2]O) measurements carried out by shipboard gas chromatography over the period 1977--1990. These data include results from 11 different oceanic surveys for a total of 41 expedition legs. Collectively, they represent a globally distributed sampling that includes locations in the Atlantic, Pacific, Indian, and Southern Oceans, as well as the Mediterranean and Red Seas. The measurements were made by an automated high-precision shipboard gas chromatographic system developed during the late 1970s and used extensively over the intervening years. This instrument measures CO[sub 2] by flame ionization after quantitative reaction to methane in a stream of hydrogen. Nitrous oxide is measured by a separate electron capture detector. The chromatographic system measures 196 dry-gas samples a day, divided equally among the atmosphere, gas equilibrated with surface water, a low-range gas standard, and a high-range gas standard.

  18. Quantification of methane fluxes from hydrocarbon seeps to the ocean and atmosphere: Development of an in situ and online gas flux measuring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Pengfei; Chen, Qinghua; Chen, Duofu

    2017-06-01

    Natural hydrocarbon seeps in the marine environment are important contributors to greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Such gases include methane, which plays a significant role in global carbon cycling and climate change. To accurately quantify the methane flux from hydrocarbon seeps on the seafloor, a specialized in situ and online gas flux measuring (GFM) device was designed to obtain high-resolution time course gas fluxes using the process of equal volume exchange. The device consists of a 1.0-m diameter, 0.9-m tall, inverted conical tent and a GFM instrument that contains a solenoid valve, level transducer, and gas collection chamber. Rising gas bubbles from seeps were measured by laboratory-calibrated GFM instruments attached to the top of the tent. According to the experimental data, the optimal anti-shake time interval was 5 s. The measurement range of the device was 0-15 L min-1, and the relative error was ± 1.0%. The device was initially deployed at an active seep site in the Lingtou Promontory seep field in South China Sea. The amount of gas released from a single gas vent was 30.5 m3 during the measurement period, and the gas flow rate ranged from 22 to 72 L h-1, depending on tidal period, and was strongly negatively correlated with water depth. The measurement results strongly suggest that oceanic tides and swells had a significant forcing effect on gas flux. Low flow rates were associated with high tides and vice versa. The changes in gas volume escaping from the seafloor seeps could be attributed to the hydrostatic pressure induced by water depth. Our findings suggest that in the marine environment, especially in the shallow shelf area, sea level variation may play an important role in controlling methane release into the ocean. Such releases probably also affect atmospheric methane levels.

  19. Murphree efficiency for calculating column height in CO{sub 2} absorption from atmospheric gas using amines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oi, L.E. [Telemark Univ. College, Porsgrunn (Norway)

    2009-07-01

    Murphree efficiencies (EMURPHREE) are used to improve the calculation of column height for carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) removal. This presentation reported on a study in which EMURPHREE was calculated for typical conditions for CO{sub 2} absorption into monoethanol amine (MEA) from atmospheric exhaust using a structured packing with specific area 250 m{sup 2}/m{sup 3}. When the inlet gas and liquid temperature was 40 degrees C, the temperatures at top stage and bottom stage conditions were 44 and 42 degrees C. The EMURPHREE calculations were based on a pseudo first order reaction between CO{sub 2} and MEA. The calculated EMURPHREE increased as temperature increased. EMURPHREE was also calculated with approximation methods from literature. The deviation in calculated EMURPHREE was less than 5 per cent when the inlet temperature was 40 degrees C. The deviation increased with temperature and CO{sub 2} loading. It was concluded that Murphree efficiencies are as accurate as more rigorous models, as long as the absorption is in the pseudo first order regime. A more rigorous model has the same uncertainties in estimation of effective specific area, CO{sub 2} solubilities and in the concentration of molecular amine in the bulk liquid. Murphree efficiencies for CO{sub 2} absorption calculations have an advantage because they can be used in robust stage by stage column models that are currently used in commercial process simulation programs.

  20. Filtration efficiency validation of glass wool during thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometer analysis of fine atmospheric particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Liang; Wu, Dapeng; Ding, Kun; Meng, Hu; Yan, Xiaohui; Guan, Yafeng

    2015-02-06

    Thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (TD-GC-MS) technique has been widely used for analysis of semi-violate organic compounds on atmospheric aerosol. To prevent GC column from being damaged by fine solid particles during thermal desorption process, glass wool as filter mat is indispensible. However, the filtration efficiency has never been validated. In this paper, the most penetrating particle size and the minimum packing thickness of glass wool were calculated based on classical filtration theory. According to the calculation results, packing parameters of glass wool were optimized experimentally using silica particles. It is demonstrated that glass wool with a packing thickness of 30 mm, solidity of 0.039 can effectively block these fine solid particles from penetrating at normal thermal desorption conditions (T=300°C, u=0.4-4 cm/s). Finally, the filtration efficiency of glass wool was further confirmed with real PM2.5 samples. Under the validated filtration condition, TD-GC-MS was applied for the analysis of non-polar organic compounds on real PM2.5 samples, and very good results were obtained.

  1. Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry for the Analysis of Selected Emerging Brominated Flame Retardants in Foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Surong; Niu, Yumin; Zhang, Jing; Shao, Bing; Du, Zhenxia

    2017-03-01

    Emerging brominated flame retardants (eBFRs) other than polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) and their derivatives in foods have been in focus in recent years due to their increasing production volumes, indefinite information on toxicities and the lack of data on occurrence in environments, foods as well as humans. In this study, gas chromatography was coupled to an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (APGC-MS/MS) for the analysis of six eBFRs in pork, chicken, egg, milk and fish. A short section of unpacked capillary column coupled to the end of the analytical column was applied to improve the chromatographic behaviors of high boiling point compounds. The method was comprehensively validated with method limit of quantification (mLOQ) lower than 8 pg/g wet weight (w.w.). Samples from Chinese Total Diet study were quantified following the validated APGC-MS/MS method. 2,3,4,5-pentabromo-6-ethylbenzene (PBEB), hexabromobenzene (HBB), pentabromotoluene (PBT) and 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE) were most frequently detected in samples. The highest concentration was found in fish with 351.9 pg/g w.w. of PBT. This is the first report on the presence of PBT in food samples with non-ignorable concentrations and detection rate.

  2. He Bulge Detection by MAVEN Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer (NGIMS) in the Upper Atmosphere of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elrod, Meredith; Bougher, Stephen; Benna, Mehdi; Yelle, Roger; Jakosky, Bruce; Bell, Jared; Mahaffy, Paul; Stone, Shane

    2016-07-01

    Studies of the Venusian atmospheres have demonstrated enhanced He densities at high latitudes and on the night-side detections. To determine if Mars has a similar enhanced He 'bulge' in the same region, we compared several periapsis passes from night to dayside. The first six weeks of the MAVEN prime mission had periapsis at high latitudes on the night-side, followed by the next three months at mid latitudes on the dayside moving to low latitudes on the night-side. In addition to its normal orbit, which has a periapsis of approximately 150 km, MAVEN conducts a few deep dip orbits where the spacecraft has a periapsis closer to 125km. The first deep dip was at dusk at mid latitudes, the second at noon at the equator, with the third going from dawn to night in the southern hemisphere. Initial analysis of the Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer (NGIMS) closed source data from all orbits with good pointing revealed an enhanced He density on the night-side orbits and a decreased He density on the dayside. This enhancement of He demonstrates a bulge at Mars that will continue to be explored over the course of the mission.

  3. Feed gas humidity: a vital parameter affecting a cold atmospheric-pressure plasma jet and plasma-treated human skin cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, J.; Wende, K.; Masur, K.; Iseni, S.; Dünnbier, M.; Hammer, M. U.; Tresp, H.; Weltmann, K.-D.; Reuter, S.

    2013-07-01

    In this study, the effect of feed gas humidity on the reactive component generation of an atmospheric-pressure argon plasma jet and its effect on human skin cells are investigated. Feed gas humidity is identified as one key parameter that strongly influences stability and reproducibility of plasma medical studies. The plasma jet is investigated by absorption spectroscopy in the ultraviolet and infrared spectral region for its ozone production depending on the humidity concentration in the feed gas. By optical emission spectroscopy the dependence of present excited plasma species such as hydroxyl radicals, molecular nitrogen, argon and atomic oxygen on the feed gas humidity is investigated. As an interface layer between the plasma jet effluent and the biological cell, a buffer solution is treated and the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production is studied with two independent colorimetric assays as a function of humidity admixture to the feed gas. Ultimately, the effect of varying feed gas humidity on the cell viability of indirect plasma treated adherent HaCAT cells is investigated. The highest viability is found for the driest feed gas condition. Furthermore, this work shows answers for the relevance of unwanted—or intended—feed gas humidity in plasma medical experiments and their comparatively large relevance with respect to ambient humidity. The findings will lead to more reproducible experiments in the field of plasma medicine.

  4. The Interstellar Cloud Surrounding the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisch, P. C.

    Ultraviolet spectral data of nearby stars indicate that the cloud surrounding the solar system has an average neutral density n(HI)~0.1 cm-3, temperature ~6800 K, and turbulence ~1.7 km/s. Comparisons between the anomalous cosmic ray data and ultraviolet data suggest that the electron density is in the range n(e-)~0.22 to 0.44 cm-3. This cloud is flowing past the Sun from a position centered in the Norma-Lupis region. The cloud properties are consistent with interstellar gas which originated as material evaporated from the surfaces of embedded clouds in the Scorpius-Centaurus Association, and which was then displaced towards the Sun by a supernova event about 4 Myrs ago. The Sun and surrounding cloud velocities are nearly perpendicular in space, and this cloud is sweeping past the Sun. The morphology of this cloud can be reconstructed by assuming that the cloud moves in a direction parallel to the surface normal. With this assumption, the Sun entered the surrounding cloud 2000 to 8000 years ago, and is now about 0.05 to 0.16 pc from the cloud surface. Prior to its recent entry into the surrounding cloud complex, the Sun was embedded in a region of space with average density lower than 0.0002 cm-3. If a denser cloud velocity component seen towards alpha Cen A,B is real, it will encounter the solar system within 50,000 yr. The nearby magnetic field seen upwind has a spatial orientation that is parallel to the cloud surface. The nearby star Sirius is viewed through the wake of the solar system, but this direction also samples the hypothetical cloud interface. Comparisons of anomalous cosmic ray and interstellar absorption line data suggest that trace elements in the surrounding cloud are in ionization equilibrium. Data towards nearby white dwarfs indicate partial helium ionization, N(N(HI)(/N(HeI)>~13.7, which is consistent with pickup ion data within the solar system if less than 40% hydrogen ionization occurs in the heliopause region. However, the white dwarfs may

  5. Validation of ammonia diffusive and active samplers in a controlled atmosphere test facility using traceable Primary Standard Gas Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Nicholas A.; Ferracci, Valerio; Cassidy, Nathan; Hook, Josh; Battersby, Ross M.; Tang, Yuk S.; Stevens, Amy C. M.; Jones, Matthew R.; Braban, Christine F.; Gates, Linda; Hangartner, Markus; Stoll, Jean-Marc; Sacco, Paolo; Pagani, Diego; Hoffnagle, John A.

    2017-04-01

    Intensive animal farming, the increased use of fertilizers, and certain industrial processes are believed to be responsible for the observed increases in the amount fraction of ammonia (NH3) found in Europe. NH3 contributes to eutrophication and acidification of land and freshwater, potentially leading to a loss of biodiversity and undesirable changes to the ecosystem. It also contributes to the formation of secondary particulate matter (PM) formation, which is associated with poor air quality and adverse health outcomes. Measurements of ambient ammonia are principally carried out with low-cost diffusive samplers or by active sampling with denuders, with each method delivering time-integrated values over the monitoring period. However, such techniques have not yet been extensively validated. The goal of this work was to provide improvements in the metrological traceability through the determination of NH3 diffusive sampling rates. Five different designs of commercial diffusive samplers (FSM Radiello radial sampler, Gradko diffusion tube, Gradko DIFRAM-400, Passam ammonia sampler, and CEH ALPHA sampler) were employed, together with a pumped denuder sampler (CEH DELTA denuder) for comparison. All devices were simultaneously exposed for either 28 days or 14 days (dependent on sampler type) in a controlled atmosphere test facility (CATFAC) containing traceable amount fractions of humidified ammonia using new stable ammonia Primary Standard Gas Mixtures developed by gravimetry at NPL, under a wide range of conditions that are relevant to ambient monitoring. Online continuous monitoring of the ammonia test atmospheres was carried out by extractive sampling, employing a calibrated cavity ring-down spectrometer, which had been modified to account for cross interference by water vapour. Each manufacturer extracted the captured ammonia on the exposed samplers in the form of ammonium (NH4+) using their own accredited traceable wet chemical techniques, and then reported data

  6. Visual surround suppression in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Samuel Tibber

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Compared to unaffected observers patients with schizophrenia show characteristic differences in visual perception, including a reduced susceptibility to the influence of context on judgements of contrast - a manifestation of weaker surround suppression. To examine the generality of this phenomenon we measured the ability of 24 individuals with schizophrenia to judge the luminance, contrast, orientation and size of targets embedded in contextual surrounds that would typically influence the target’s appearance. Individuals with schizophrenia demonstrated weaker surround suppression compared to matched controls for stimuli defined by contrast or size, but not for those defined by luminance or orientation. As perceived luminance is thought to be regulated at the earliest stages of visual processing our findings are consistent with a suppression deficit that is predominantly cortical in origin. In addition, we propose that preserved orientation surround suppression in schizophrenia may reflect the sparing of broadly tuned mechanisms of suppression. We attempt to reconcile these data with findings from previous studies.

  7. Educational Success and Surrounding Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Garrison

    2016-01-01

    The curriculum, instruction, and services we provide in schools, colleges, and universities matter a lot, but if we continue to ignore our students' "surrounding culture," progress toward a more educated nation will continue to be disappointing.

  8. Educational Success and Surrounding Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Garrison

    2016-01-01

    The curriculum, instruction, and services we provide in schools, colleges, and universities matter a lot, but if we continue to ignore our students' "surrounding culture," progress toward a more educated nation will continue to be disappointing.

  9. Development of open air silicon deposition technology by silane-free atmospheric pressure plasma enhanced chemical transport under local ambient gas control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Teruki; Konno, Nobuaki; Yoshida, Yukihisa

    2016-07-01

    Open air silicon deposition was performed by combining silane-free atmospheric pressure plasma-enhanced chemical transport and a newly developed local ambient gas control technology. The effect of air contamination on silicon deposition was investigated using a vacuum chamber, and the allowable air contamination level was confirmed to be 3 ppm. The capability of the local ambient gas control head was investigated numerically and experimentally. A safe and clean process environment with air contamination less than 1 ppm was achieved. Combining these technologies, a microcrystalline silicon film was deposited in open air, the properties of which were comparable to those of silicon films deposited in a vacuum chamber.

  10. Thermodynamic and transport properties of air and its products of combustion with ASTMA-A-1 fuel and natural gas at 20, 30, and 40 atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poferl, D. J.; Svehla, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    The isentropic exponent, molecular weight, viscosity, specific heat at constant pressure, thermal conductivity, Prandtl number, and enthalpy were calculated for air, the combustion products of ASTM-A-1 jet fuel and air, and the combustion products of natural gas and air. The properties were calculated over a temperature range from 300 to 2800 K in 100 K increments and for pressures of 20, 30 and 40 atmospheres. The data for natural gas and ASTM-A-1 were calculated for fuel-air ratios from zero to stoichiometric in 0.01 increments.

  11. Multichannel spatial surround sound system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RAO Dan; XIE Bosun

    2004-01-01

    Based on the consideration of being compatible with 5.1 channel horizontal surround sound system, a spatial surround sound system is proposed. Theoretical and experimental results show that the system has a wide listening area. It can not only recreate stable image in the front and rear direction, but also eliminate the defect of poor lateral image of 5.1 channel system. The system can be used to reproduce special 3D sound effect and the spaciousness of hall.

  12. Biomass-Ash-Induced Agglomeration in a Fluidized Bed. Part 1: Experimental Study on the Effects of a Gas Atmosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Teng; Fan, Chuigang; Hao, Lifang

    2016-01-01

    . Understanding of the agglomeration in various atmospheres is crucial to optimize the design and operation conditions. This study focuses on the effects of gases on agglomeration tendency with different types of biomass, including corn straw, rice straw, and wheat straw. The biomass ash samples are mixed...... atmospheres are much lower than that in air. It appears that, in a steam atmosphere, the agglomeration of corn straw and rice straw ash is predominantly coating-induced. The agglomeration in both H2 and air atmospheres are melting-induced. In a H2 atmosphere, K2SO4 in the ash samples disappears, caused...

  13. Atmospheric Gas Concentrations in the pre- and post-production Phases of an Unconventional Oil and Gas Recovery Operation at the MSEEL Test Site, West Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J. P.; Reeder, M.; Pekney, N.; Osborne, J.; Risk, D. A.; McCawley, M.

    2016-12-01

    The Marcellus Shale Energy and Environment Laboratory (MSEEL) in West Virginia provides a unique opportunity in the field of unconventional energy research. By studying near-surface atmospheric chemistry over several phases of a hydraulic fracturing event, the project will help evaluate the impact of current practices, as well as new techniques and mitigation technologies. A total of 10 mobile surveys were conducted around the MSEEL site that contains 3 test wells (1 science well and 2 natural gas producing wells) and over several miles of nearby regional routes. Our surveying technique involved using a vehicle-mounted Los Gatos Research Ultraportable Methane/Acetylene Analyzer that provided geo-located measurements of methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2). The ratios of super-ambient concentrations of CO2 and CH4 were used to separate drilling- and fracturing-related observations from the natural background concentrations over the various well pad developmental stages. We found that regional background methane concentrations were elevated in all surveys, with a mean concentration of 3.21ppm (n = 99376), which simply reflected the mix of anthropogenic and natural CH4 sources in this riverine urban location. Over time and through successive stages of well development, we noted a progressive rise in the occurrence of enriched methane in the vicinity of the developed wells. While there was a moderate degree of variability over time, we did observe a higher occurrence of CH4-enriched observations during and after production began at the test site ( 25% of measurements within 500 meters of the test wells) compared to the baseline surveys (>10% of measurements). This change was expected, as we anticipated some level of increased emissions from the well pads as production began. However, we did not expect the rise to be so noticeable. The results of this study show that there is a statistically significant increase in the occurrence of enriched methane values in the

  14. Optimal use of buffer volumes for the measurement of atmospheric gas concentration in multi-point systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cescatti, Alessandro; Marcolla, Barbara; Goded, Ignacio; Gruening, Carsten

    2016-09-01

    Accurate multi-point monitoring systems are required to derive atmospheric measurements of greenhouse gas concentrations both for the calculation of surface fluxes with inversion transport models and for the estimation of non-turbulent components of the mass balance equation (i.e. advection and storage fluxes) at eddy covariance sites. When a single analyser is used to monitor multiple sampling points, the deployment of buffer volumes (BVs) along sampling lines can reduce the uncertainty due to the discrete temporal sampling of the signal. In order to optimize the use of buffer volumes we explored various set-ups by simulating their effect on time series of high-frequency CO2 concentration collected at three Fluxnet sites. Besides, we proposed a novel scheme to calculate half-hourly weighted arithmetic means from discrete point samples, accounting for the probabilistic fraction of the signal generated in the averaging period. Results show that the use of BVs with the new averaging scheme reduces the mean absolute error (MAE) up to 80 % compared to a set-up without BVs and up to 60 % compared to the case with BVs and a standard, non-weighted averaging scheme. The MAE of CO2 concentration measurements was observed to depend on the variability of the concentration field and on the size of BVs, which therefore have to be carefully dimensioned. The optimal volume size depends on two main features of the instrumental set-up: the number of measurement points and the time needed to sample at one point (i.e. line purging plus sampling time). A linear and consistent relationship was observed at all sites between the sampling frequency, which summarizes the two features mentioned above, and the renewal frequency associated with the volume. Ultimately, this empirical relationship can be applied to estimate the optimal volume size according to the technical specifications of the sampling system.

  15. Gas Sensing Properties of NiSb2O6 Micro- and Nanoparticles in Propane and Carbon Monoxide Atmospheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica-M. Rodríguez-Betancourtt

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Micro- and nanoparticles of NiSb2O6 were synthesized by the microwave-assisted colloidal method. Nickel nitrate, antimony chloride, ethylenediamine, and ethyl alcohol were used. The oxide was obtained at 600°C and was analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD and Raman spectroscopy, showing a trirutile-type structure with cell parameters a = 4.641 Å, c = 9.223 Å, and a space group P42/mnm (136. Average crystal size was estimated at ~31.19 nm, according to the XRD-peaks. The microstructure was scrutinized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, observing microrods measuring ~3.32 μm long and ~2.71 μm wide, and microspheres with an average diameter of ~8 μm; the size of the particles shaping the microspheres was measured in the range of ~0.22 to 1.8 μm. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM revealed that nanoparticles were obtained with sizes in the range of 2 to 20 nm (~10.7 nm on average. Pellets made of oxide’s powders were tested in propane (C3H8 and carbon monoxide (CO atmospheres at different concentrations and temperatures. The response of the material increased significantly as the temperature and the concentration of the test gases rose. These results show that NiSb2O6 may be a good candidate for gas sensing applications.

  16. Atmospheric pressure plasma chemical vapor deposition reactor for 100 mm wafers, optimized for minimum contamination at low gas flow rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anand, Venu, E-mail: venuanand@cense.iisc.ernet.in, E-mail: venuanand83@gmail.com; Shivashankar, S. A. [Centre for Nano Science and Engineering (CeNSE), Indian Institute of Science (IISc), Bangalore 560012 (India); Nair, Aswathi R.; Mohan Rao, G. [Department of Instrumentation and Applied Physics (IAP), Indian Institute of Science (IISc), Bangalore 560012 (India)

    2015-08-31

    Gas discharge plasmas used for thinfilm deposition by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) must be devoid of contaminants, like dust or active species which disturb the intended chemical reaction. In atmospheric pressure plasma systems employing an inert gas, the main source of such contamination is the residual air inside the system. To enable the construction of an atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) system with minimal contamination, we have carried out fluid dynamic simulation of the APP chamber into which an inert gas is injected at different mass flow rates. On the basis of the simulation results, we have designed and built a simple, scaled APP system, which is capable of holding a 100 mm substrate wafer, so that the presence of air (contamination) in the APP chamber is minimized with as low a flow rate of argon as possible. This is examined systematically by examining optical emission from the plasma as a function of inert gas flow rate. It is found that optical emission from the plasma shows the presence of atmospheric air, if the inlet argon flow rate is lowered below 300 sccm. That there is minimal contamination of the APP reactor built here, was verified by conducting an atmospheric pressure PECVD process under acetylene flow, combined with argon flow at 100 sccm and 500 sccm. The deposition of a polymer coating is confirmed by infrared spectroscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows that the polymer coating contains only 5% of oxygen, which is comparable to the oxygen content in polymer deposits obtained in low-pressure PECVD systems.

  17. Emission of gas and atmospheric dispersion of SO2 during the December 2013 eruption at San Miguel volcano (El Salvador)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, Giuseppe G.; Granieri, Domenico; Liuzzo, Marco; La Spina, Alessandro; Giuffrida, Giovanni B.; Caltabiano, Tommaso; Giudice, Gaetano; Gutierrez, Eduardo; Montalvo, Francisco; Burton, Michael; Papale, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    San Miguel volcano, also known as Chaparrastique, is a basaltic volcano along the Central American Volcanic Arc (CAVA). Volcanism is induced by the convergence of the Cocos Plate underneath the Caribbean Plate, along a 1200-km arc, extending from Guatemala to Costa Rica and parallel to the Central American Trench. The volcano is located in the eastern part of El Salvador, in proximity to the large communities of San Miguel, San Rafael Oriente, and San Jorge. Approximately 70,000 residents, mostly farmers, live around the crater and the city of San Miguel, the second largest city of El Salvador, ten km from the summit, has a population of ~180,000 inhabitants. The Pan-American and Coastal highways cross the north and south flanks of the volcano.San Miguel volcano has produced modest eruptions, with at least 28 VEI 1-2 events between 1699 and 1967 (datafrom Smithsonian Institution http://www.volcano.si.edu/volcano.cfm?vn=343100). It is characterized by visible milddegassing from a summit vent and fumarole field, and by intermittent lava flows and Strombolian activity. Since the last vigorous fire fountaining of 1976, San Miguel has only experienced small steam explosions and gas emissions, minor ash fall and rock avalanches. On 29 December 2013 the volcano erupted producing an eruption that has been classified as VEI 2. While eruptions tend to be low-VEI, the presence of major routes and the dense population in the surrounding of the volcano increases the risk that weak explosions with gas and/or ash emission may pose. In this study, we present the first inventory of SO2, CO2, HCl, and HF emission rates on San Miguel volcano, and an analysis of the hazard from volcanogenic SO2 discharged before, during, and after the December 2013 eruption. SO2 was chosen as it is amongst the most critical volcanogenic pollutants, which may cause acute and chronicle disease to humans. Data were gathered by the geochemical monitoring network managed by the Ministerio de Medio Ambiente

  18. Conditions for the formation and atmospheric dispersion of a toxic, heavy gas layer during thermal metamorphism of coal and evaporite deposits by sill intrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storey, Michael; Hankin, Robin K. S.

    2010-05-01

    There is compelling evidence for massive discharge of volatiles, including toxic species, into the atmosphere at the end of the Permian. It has been argued that most of the gases were produced during thermal metamorphism of coal and evaporite deposits in the East Siberia Tunguska basin following sill intrusion (Retallack and Jahren, 2008; Svensen et al., 2009). The release of the volatiles has been proposed as a major cause of environmental and extinction events at the end of the Permian, with venting of carbon gases and halocarbons to the atmosphere leading to global warming and atmospheric ozone depletion (Svensen et al., 2009) Here we consider the conditions required for the formation and dispersion of toxic, heavier than air, gas plumes, made up of a mixture of CO2, CH4, H2S and SO2 and formed during the thermal metamorphism of C- and S- rich sediments. Dispersion models and density considerations within a range of CO2/CH4 ratios and volatile fluxes and temperatures, for gas discharge by both seepage and from vents, allow the possibility that following sill emplacement much of the vast East Siberia Tunguska basin was - at least intermittently - covered by a heavy, toxic gas layer that was unfavorable for life. Dispersion scenarios for a heavy gas layer beyond the Siberian region during end-Permian times will be presented. REFERENCES G. J. Retallack and A. H. Jahren, Methane release from igneous intrusion of coal during Late Permian extinction events, Journal of Geology, volume 116, 1-20, 2008 H. Svensen et al., Siberian gas venting and the end-Permian environmental crisis, Earth and Planetary Science Letters, volume 277, 490-500, 2009

  19. Methods of gas purification and effect on the ion composition in an RF atmospheric pressure plasma jet investigated by mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosse-Kreul, Simon; Huebner, Simon; Schneider, Simon; Keudell, Achim von; Benedikt, Jan [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Institute for Experimental Physics II, Bochum (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    The analysis of the ion chemistry of atmospheric pressure plasmas is essential to evaluate ionic reaction pathways during plasma-surface or plasma-analyte interactions. In this contribution, the ion chemistry of a radio-frequency atmospheric pressure plasma jet (μ-APPJ) operated in helium is investigated by mass spectrometry (MS). It is found, that the ion composition is extremely sensitive to impurities such as N{sub 2}, O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. Without gas purification, protonated water cluster ions of the form H{sup +}(H{sub 2}O){sub n} are dominating downstream the positive ion mass spectrum. However, even after careful feed gas purification to the sub-ppm level using a molecular sieve trap and a liquid nitrogen trap as well as operation of the plasma in a controlled atmosphere, the positive ion mass spectrum is strongly influenced by residual trace gases. The observations support the idea that species with a low ionization energy serve as a major source of electrons in atmospheric pressure helium plasmas. Similarly, the neutral density of atomic nitrogen measured by MS in a He/N{sub 2} mixture is varying up to a factor 3, demonstrating the significant influence of impurities on the neutral species chemistry as well. (orig.)

  20. Study of Eu{sup 3+} → Eu{sup 2+} reduction in BaAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}:Eu prepared in different gas atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezende, Marcos V. dos S., E-mail: mvsrezende@gmail.com [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, Campus Universitário, 49100-000 Itabaiana-SE (Brazil); Valerio, Mário E.G. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, Campus Universitário, 49100-000 São Cristovão-SE (Brazil); Jackson, Robert A. [School of Physical and Geographical Sciences, Keele University, Keele, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • The effect of different gas atmospheres on the Eu reduction process was studied. • The Eu reduction was monitored analyzing XANES region at the Eu L{sub III}-edge. • Hydrogen reducing agent are the most appropriate gas for Eu{sup 2+} stabilization. • Only a part of the Eu ions can be stabilized in the divalent state. • A model of Eu reduction process is proposed. - Abstract: The effect of different gas atmospheres such as H{sub 2}(g), synthetic air, carbon monoxide (CO) and nitrogen (N{sub 2}) on the Eu{sup 3+} → Eu{sup 2+} reduction process during the synthesis of Eu-doped BaAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} was studied using synchrotron radiation. The Eu{sup 3+} → Eu{sup 2+} reduction was monitored analyzing XANES region when the sample are excited at the Eu L{sub III}-edge. The results show that the hydrogen reducing agent are the most appropriate gas for Eu{sup 2+} stabilization in BaAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} and that only a part of the Eu ions can be stabilized in the divalent state. A model of Eu reduction process, based on the incorporation of charge compensation defects, is proposed.

  1. Design and application of a mobile ground-based observatory for continuous measurements of atmospheric trace gas and criteria pollutant species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, S. E.; Hopkins, F. M.; Randerson, J. T.; Lai, C.-T.; Ehleringer, J. R.

    2015-08-01

    Ground-based measurements of atmospheric trace gas species and criteria pollutants are essential for understanding emissions dynamics across space and time. Gas composition in the lower 50 m of the atmosphere has the greatest direct impacts on human health as well as ecosystem processes; hence data at this level are necessary for addressing carbon-cycle- and public-health-related questions. However, such surface data are generally associated with stationary measurement towers, where spatial representation is limited due to the high cost of establishing and maintaining an extensive network of measurement stations. We describe here a compact mobile laboratory equipped to provide high-precision, high-frequency, continuous, on-road synchronous measurements of CO2, CO, CH4, H2O, NOx, O3, aerosol, meteorological, and geospatial position data. The mobile laboratory has been deployed across the western USA. In addition to describing the vehicle and its capacity, we present data that illustrate the use of the laboratory as a powerful tool for investigating the spatial structure of urban trace gas emissions and criteria pollutants at spatial scales ranging from single streets to whole ecosystem and regional scales. We assess the magnitude of known point sources of CH4 and also identify fugitive urban CH4 emissions. We illustrate how such a mobile laboratory can be used to better understand emissions dynamics and quantify emissions ratios associated with trace gas emissions from wildfire incidents. Lastly, we discuss additional mobile laboratory applications in health and urban metabolism.

  2. A comparison of minor trace gas retrievals from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) and the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cady-Pereira, K. E.; Shephard, M. W.; Henze, D. K.; Millet, D. B.; Gombos, D.; Van Damme, M.; Clarisse, L.; Coheur, P. F.; Pommier, M.; Clerbaux, C.

    2014-12-01

    The advent of hyperspectral infrared instruments orbiting the Earth has allowed for detecting and measuring numerous trace gas species that play important roles in atmospheric chemistry and impact air quality, but for which there is a dearth of information on their distribution and temporal variability. Here we will present global and regional comparisons of measurements from the NASA TES and the European MetOp IASI instruments of three of these gases: ammonia (NH3), formic acid (HCOOH) and methanol (CH3OH). Ammonia is highly reactive and thus very variable in space and time, while the sources and sinks of methanol and formic acid are poorly quantified: thus space-based measurements have the potential of significantly increasing our knowledge of the emissions and distributions of these gases. IASI and TES have many similarities but some significant differences. TES has significantly higher spectral resolution (0.06 cm-1), and its equator crossing times are ~1:30 am and 1:30 pm, local time, while IASI has lower resolution (0.5 cm-1) and an earlier equator crossing time (9:30 am and 9:30 pm), which leads to lower thermal contrast; however IASI provides much greater temporal and spatial coverage due to its cross-track scanning. Added to the instrumental differences are the differences in retrieval algorithms. The IASI team uses simple but efficient methods to estimate total column amounts of the species above, while the TES team performs full optimal estimation retrievals. We will compare IASI and TES total column measurements averaged on a 2.5x2.5 degree global grid for each month in 2009, and we will examine the seasonal cycle in some regions of interest, such as South America, eastern China, and the Midwest and the Central Valley in the US. In regions where both datasets are in agreement this analysis will provide confidence that the results are robust and reliable. In regions where there is disagreement we will look for the causes of the discrepancies, which will

  3. High-precision quasi-continuous atmospheric greenhouse gas measurements at Trainou tower (Orléans forest, France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, M.; Lopez, M.; Yver Kwok, C.; Messager, C.; Ramonet, M.; Wastine, B.; Vuillemin, C.; Truong, F.; Gal, B.; Parmentier, E.; Cloué, O.; Ciais, P.

    2014-07-01

    Results from the Trainou tall tower measurement station installed in 2006 are presented for atmospheric measurements of CO2, CH4, N2O, SF6, CO, H2 mole fractions and radon-222 activity. Air is sampled from four sampling heights (180, 100, 50 and 5 m) of the Trainou 200 m television tower in the Orléans forest in France (47°57'53" N, 2°06'45" E, 131 m a.s.l.). The station is equipped with a custom-built CO2 analyser (CARIBOU), which is based on a commercial non-dispersive, infrared (NDIR) analyser (Licor 6252), and a coupled gas chromatography (GC) system equipped with an electron capture detector (ECD) and a flame ionization detector (FID) (HP6890N, Agilent) and a reduction gas detector (PP1, Peak Performer). Air intakes, pumping and air drying system are shared between the CARIBOU and the GC systems. The ultimately achieved short-term repeatability (1 sigma, over several days) for the GC system is 0.05 ppm for CO2, 1.4 ppb for CH4, 0.25 ppb for N2O, 0.08 ppb for SF6, 0.88 ppb for CO and 3.8 for H2. The repeatability of the CARIBOU CO2 analyser is 0.06 ppm. In addition to the in situ measurements, weekly flask sampling is performed, and flask air samples are analysed at the Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement (LSCE) central laboratory for the same species as well for stable isotopes of CO2. The comparison between in situ measurements and the flask sampling showed averaged differences of 0.08 ± 1.40 ppm for CO2, 0.7 ± 7.3 ppb for CH4, 0.6 ± 0.6 ppb for N2O, 0.01 ± 0.10 ppt for SF6, 1.5± 5.3 ppb for CO and 4.8± 6.9 ppb for H2 for the years 2008-2012. At Trainou station, the mean annual increase rates from 2007 to 2011 at the 180 m sampling height were 2.2 ppm yr-1 for CO2, 4 ppb yr-1 for CH4, 0.78 ppb yr-1 for N2O and 0.29 ppt yr-1 for SF6. For all species, the 180 m sampling level showed the smallest diurnal variation. Mean diurnal gradients between the 50 m and the 180 m sampling level reached up to 30 ppm CO2, 15 ppm CH4 or 0.5 ppb N2

  4. New methods to study composition and processes of atmospheric organics in the gas and the condensed phase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsimkouski, I.

    2015-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and organic aerosols (OA) play an important role in the Earth’s atmosphere due to their influence on human health and climate. To be able to control amounts of VOCs and OA in the atmosphere, one has to understand the main sources of them and the effect of external

  5. Positioning of the Precursor Gas Inlet in an Atmospheric Dielectric Barrier Reactor, and its Effect on the Quality of Deposited TiOx Thin Film Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Píchal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Thin film technology has become pervasive in many applications in recent years, but it remains difficult to select the best deposition technique. A further consideration is that, due to ecological demands, we are forced to search for environmentally benign methods. One such method might be the application of cold plasmas, and there has already been a rapid growth in studies of cold plasma techniques. Plasma technologies operating at atmospheric pressure have been attracting increasing attention. The easiest way to obtain low temperature plasma at atmospheric pressure seems to be through atmospheric dielectric barrier discharge (ADBD. We used the plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD method applying atmospheric dielectric barrier discharge (ADBD plasmafor TiOx thin films deposition, employing titanium isopropoxide (TTIP and oxygen as reactants, and argon as a working gas. ADBD was operated in filamentary mode. The films were deposited on glass. We studied the quality of the deposited TiOx thin film surface for various precursor gas inlet positions in the ADBD reactor. The best thin films quality was achieved when the precursor gases were brought close to the substrate surface directly through the inlet placed in one of the electrodes.High hydrophilicity of the samples was proved by contact angle tests (CA. The film morphology was tested by atomic force microscopy (AFM. The thickness of the thin films varied in the range of (80 ÷ 210 nm in dependence on the composition of the reactor atmosphere. XPS analyses indicate that composition of the films is more like the composition of TiOxCy.

  6. A laboratory flow reactor with gas particle separation and on-line MS/MS for product identification in atmospherically important reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. Bennett

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A system to study the gas and particle phase products from gas phase hydrocarbon oxidation is described. It consists of a gas phase photochemical flow reactor followed by a diffusion membrane denuder to remove gases from the reacted products, or a filter to remove the particles. Chemical analysis is performed by an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. A diffusion membrane denuder is shown to remove trace gases to below detectable limits so the particle phase can be studied. The system was tested by examining the products of the oxidation of m-xylene initiated by HO radicals. Dimethylphenol was observed in both the gas and particle phases although individual isomers could not be identified. Two furanone isomers, 5-methyl-2(3Hfuranone and 3-methyl-2(5Hfuranone were identified in the particulate phase, but the isobaric product 2,5 furandione was not observed. One isomer of dimethyl-nitrophenol was identified in the particle phase but not in the gas phase.

  7. A laboratory flow reactor with gas particle separation and on-line MS/MS for product identification in atmospherically important reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. Bennett

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A system to study the gas and particle phase products from gas phase hydrocarbon oxidation is described. It consists of a gas phase photochemical flow reactor followed by a diffusion membrane denuder to remove gases from the reacted products, or a filter to remove the particles. Chemical analysis is performed by an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. A diffusion membrane denuder is shown to remove trace gases to below detectable limits so the particle phase can be studied. The system was tested by examining the products of the oxidation of m-xylene initiated by HO radicals. Dimethylphenol was observed in both the gas and particle phases although individual isomers could not be identified. Two furanone isomers, 5-methyl-2(3Hfuranone and 3-methyl-2(5Hfuranone were identified in the particulate phase, but the isobaric product 2,5 furandione was not observed. One isomer of dimethyl-nitrophenol was identified in the particle phase but not in the gas phase.

  8. Control and enhancement of the oxygen storage capacity of ceria films by variation of the deposition gas atmosphere during pulsed DC magnetron sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltayeb, Asmaa; Vijayaraghavan, Rajani K.; McCoy, Anthony; Venkatanarayanan, Anita; Yaremchenko, Aleksey A.; Surendran, Rajesh; McGlynn, Enda; Daniels, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    In this study, nanostructured ceria (CeO2) films are deposited on Si(100) and ITO coated glass substrates by pulsed DC magnetron sputtering using a CeO2 target. The influence on the films of using various gas ambients, such as a high purity Ar and a gas mixture of high purity Ar and O2, in the sputtering chamber during deposition are studied. The film compositions are studied using XPS and SIMS. These spectra show a phase transition from cubic CeO2 to hexagonal Ce2O3 due to the sputtering process. This is related to the transformation of Ce4+ to Ce3+ and indicates a chemically reduced state of CeO2 due to the formation of oxygen vacancies. TGA and electrochemical cyclic voltammetry (CV) studies show that films deposited in an Ar atmosphere have a higher oxygen storage capacity (OSC) compared to films deposited in the presence of O2. CV results specifically show a linear variation with scan rate of the anodic peak currents for both films and the double layer capacitance values for films deposited in Ar/O2 mixed and Ar atmosphere are (1.6 ± 0.2) × 10-4 F and (4.3 ± 0.5) × 10-4 F, respectively. Also, TGA data shows that Ar sputtered samples have a tendency to greater oxygen losses upon reduction compared to the films sputtered in an Ar/O2 mixed atmosphere.

  9. Evaluation of variations in CO2 gas exchange in the atmosphere of the BTLSS with plants grown in a conveyor mode on the soil-like substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velichko, Vladimir; Tikhomirov, Alexander A.; Tikhomirova, Natalia; Ushakova, Sofya

    2016-07-01

    The soil-like substrate (SLS) included in the bioregenerative life support system (BLSS) exerts a substantial effect on its gas exchange. This effect is determined by the non-uniform rate of organic matter degradation in the SLS, on the one hand, and by the variable intensity of photosynthesis of the plants grown on it, on the other. The purpose of this study was to compare CO2 variations in the atmosphere of the higher plants - SLS system at different intervals in uneven-aged higher plant conveyers. The study showed that CO2 concentration could reach and exceed the levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide acceptable for humans (over 1%) even when the conveyer interval was rather short. CO2 variations in the atmosphere of the higher plants - SLS system were determined not only by the frequency of adding plant waste to the SLS and the mass of the waste but also by the amount of the harvested actively photosynthesizing plant biomass. At the same time, no significant differences were found in the mineral and production components between the plants in different experiments. Results of the study can be used to optimize the conveyor interval and the associated effectiveness of mineralization of the plant waste added to the SLS and to stabilize the CO2 gas exchange. This study was carried out in the IBP SB RAS and supported by the grant of the Russian Science Foundation (Project No. 14-14-00599).

  10. Continuous on-line calibration of diffusive soil-atmosphere trace gas transport using vertical {sup 220}Rn- and {sup 222}Rn-activity profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmann, B.E. [Bern Univ. (Switzerland). Physics Inst.; Neftel, A. [Inst. of Environmental Protection and Agriculture, Bern (Switzerland); Tarakanov, S.V. [Inst. of Silicate Chemistry, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2001-07-01

    Continuous monitoring of {sup 220}Rn- and {sup 222}Rn-activities above and below the soil surface combined with sporadic direct {sup 222}Rn-flux measurements is used to quantify diffusive trace gas transport in the air-filled pore space of soil, through the soil-atmosphere interface and in the lowest layers of the atmosphere. In a calm night, {sup 222}Rn-activities above the surface first build-up near the ground (z < 10 cm) and subsequently with a delay of 2-3 hours at higher altitudes (z < 5 m). Knowing (1) the {sup 222}Rn-flux from activity profiles measured in soil gas, (2) from direct flux determinations and (3) using information about atmospheric diffusion parameters from {sup 220}Rn-activities measured near the surface it is possible to model the temporal evolution of the vertical {sup 222}Rn-profiles in a night with stable weather and constant soil conditions. The system operates automatically for extended periods of time in the field enabling a better understanding of transport processes in response to changing environmental conditions (wind, rain, soil humidity). (orig.)

  11. A new portable generator to dynamically produce SI-traceable reference gas mixtures for VOCs and water vapour at atmospheric concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillevic, Myriam; Pascale, Céline; Ackermann, Andreas; Leuenberger, Daiana; Niederhauser, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    In the framework of the KEY-VOCs and AtmoChem-ECV projects, we are currently developing new facilities to dynamically generate reference gas mixtures for a variety of reactive compounds, at concentrations measured in the atmosphere and in a SI-traceable way (i.e. the amount of substance fraction in mole per mole is traceable to SI-units). Here we present the realisation of such standards for water vapour in the range 1-10 μmol/mol and for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as limonene, alpha-pinene, MVK, MEK, in the nmol/mol range. The matrix gas can be nitrogen or synthetic air. Further development in gas purification techniques could make possible to use purified atmospheric air as carrier gas. The method is based on permeation and dynamic dilution: one permeator containing a pure substance (either water, limonene, MVK, MEK or α-pinene) is kept into a permeation chamber with a constant gas flow. The mass loss is precisely calibrated using a magnetic suspension balance. The carrier gas is purified beforehand from the compounds of interest to the required level, using commercially available purification cartridges. This primary mixture is then diluted to reach the required amount of substance fraction. All flows are piloted by mass flow controllers which makes the production process flexible and easily adaptable to generate the required concentration. All parts in contact with the gas mixture are passivated using coated surfaces, to reduce adsorption/desorption processes as much as possible. Two setups are currently developed: one already built and fixed in our laboratory in Bern as well as a portable generator that is still under construction and that could be used anywhere in the field. The permeation chamber of the portable generator has multiple individual cells allowing the generation of mixtures up to 5 different components if needed. Moreover the presented technique can be adapted and applied to a large variety of molecules (e.g., NO2, BTEX, CFCs

  12. Adsorption of volatile polonium and bismuth species on metals in various gas atmospheres. Pt. I. Adsorption of volatile polonium and bismuth on gold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maugeri, Emilio Andrea; Neuhausen, Joerg; Dressler, Rugard; Piguet, David; Voegele, Alexander; Schumann, Dorothea [Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland). Lab. for Radiochemistry; Eichler, Robert [Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland). Lab. for Radiochemistry; Bern Univ. (Switzerland). Dept. for Chemistry and Biochemistry; Rijpstra, Kim [Ghent Univ., Zwijnaarde (Belgium). Center for Molecular Modeling (CMM); Cottenier, Stefaan [Ghent Univ., Zwijnaarde (Belgium). Center for Molecular Modeling (CMM); Ghent Univ., Zwijnaarde (Belgium). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    2016-07-01

    Polonium isotopes are considered the most hazardous radionuclides produced during the operation of accelerator driven systems (ADS) when lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) is used as the reactor coolant and as the spallation target material. In this work the use of gold surfaces for capturing polonium from the cover gas of the ADS reactor was studied by thermochromatography. The results show that gaseous monoatomic polonium, formed in dry hydrogen, is adsorbed on gold at 1058 K. Its adsorption enthalpy was calculated as -250±7 kJ mol{sup -1}, using a Monte Carlo simulation code. Highly volatile polonium species that were observed in similar experiments in fused silica columns in the presence of moisture in both inert and reducing gas were not detected in the experiments studying adsorption on gold surfaces. PoO{sub 2} is formed in both dry and moist oxygen, and its interaction with gold is characterized by transport reactions. The interaction of bismuth, present in large amounts in the atmosphere of the ADS, with gold was also evaluated. It was found that bismuth has a higher affinity for gold, compared to polonium, in an inert, reducing, and oxidizing atmosphere. This fact must be considered when using gold as a material for filtering polonium in the cover gas of ADS.

  13. Technical Note: A minimally invasive experimental system for pCO2 manipulation in plankton cultures using passive gas exchange (atmospheric carbon control simulator)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Brooke A.; Olson, M. Brady; Wuori, Tristen

    2017-05-01

    As research into the biotic effects of ocean acidification has increased, the methods for simulating these environmental changes in the laboratory have multiplied. Here we describe the atmospheric carbon control simulator (ACCS) for the maintenance of plankton under controlled pCO2 conditions, designed for species sensitive to the physical disturbance introduced by the bubbling of cultures and for studies involving trophic interaction. The system consists of gas mixing and equilibration components coupled with large-volume atmospheric simulation chambers. These chambers allow gas exchange to counteract the changes in carbonate chemistry induced by the metabolic activity of the organisms. The system is relatively low cost, very flexible, and when used in conjunction with semi-continuous culture methods, it increases the density of organisms kept under realistic conditions, increases the allowable time interval between dilutions, and/or decreases the metabolically driven change in carbonate chemistry during these intervals. It accommodates a large number of culture vessels, which facilitate multi-trophic level studies and allow the tracking of variable responses within and across plankton populations to ocean acidification. It also includes components that increase the reliability of gas mixing systems using mass flow controllers.

  14. Occurrence of gaseous and particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the urban atmosphere: study of sources and ambient temperature effect on the gas/particle concentration and distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsapakis, Manolis [Environmental Chemical Processes Laboratory (ECPL), Department of Chemistry, University of Crete, EL-71409 Heraklion (Greece); Stephanou, Euripides G. [Environmental Chemical Processes Laboratory (ECPL), Department of Chemistry, University of Crete, EL-71409 Heraklion (Greece)]. E-mail: stephanou@chemistry.uoc.gr

    2005-01-01

    The presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in an urban region (Heraklion, Greece) and processes that govern their atmospheric fate were studied from November 2000 until February 2002. Sixteen samples were collected, by using an artifact-free sampling device, on a monthly basis and the concentration of PAHs in gas and particulate phase was determined. The most abundant members (gas + particles) were phenanthrene (20.0 {+-} 7.0 ng m{sup -3}), fluoranthene (6.5 {+-} 1.7 ng m{sup -3}), pyrene (6.6 {+-} 2.4 ng m{sup -3}), and chrysene (3.1 {+-} 1.5 ng m{sup -3}). Total concentration (gas + particulate) of PAH ranged from 44.3 to 129.2 ng m{sup -3}, with a mean concentration of 79.3 ng m{sup -3}. Total concentration of PAHs in gas phase ranged from 31.4 to 84.7 ng m{sup -3} with non-observable seasonal variation. Conversely, maximum PAH concentrations in the particulate phase occurred during winter months. Particulate concentration varied from 11.4 to 44.9 ng m{sup -3}, with an average of 25.2 ng m{sup -3}. PAH distribution between gas and particulate phase was in agreement with the sub-cooled vapor pressure. Shift in gas/particle distribution due to difference in ambient temperature elucidated to some extent the seasonal variation of the concentration of PAHs in particles. - Capsule: Ambient PAH partitioning between gas and particle phases vary between compounds and with environmental conditions.

  15. Visual Surround Suppression in Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibber, Marc S.; Anderson, Elaine J.; Bobin, Tracy; Antonova, Elena; Seabright, Alice; Wright, Bernice; Carlin, Patricia; Shergill, Sukhwinder S.; Dakin, Steven C.

    2013-01-01

    Compared to unaffected observers patients with schizophrenia (SZ) show characteristic differences in visual perception, including a reduced susceptibility to the influence of context on judgments of contrast – a manifestation of weaker surround suppression (SS). To examine the generality of this phenomenon we measured the ability of 24 individuals with SZ to judge the luminance, contrast, orientation, and size of targets embedded in contextual surrounds that would typically influence the target’s appearance. Individuals with SZ demonstrated weaker SS compared to matched controls for stimuli defined by contrast or size, but not for those defined by luminance or orientation. As perceived luminance is thought to be regulated at the earliest stages of visual processing our findings are consistent with a suppression deficit that is predominantly cortical in origin. In addition, we propose that preserved orientation SS in SZ may reflect the sparing of broadly tuned mechanisms of suppression. We attempt to reconcile these data with findings from previous studies. PMID:23450069

  16. Star-forming regions at the periphery of the supershell surrounding the Cyg OB1 association. I. The star cluster vdB 130 and its ambient gas and dust medium

    CERN Document Server

    Sitnik, T G; Lozinskaya, T A; Moiseev, A V; Rastorguev, A S; Tatarnikov, A M; Tatarnikova, A A; Wiebe, D S; Zabolotskikh, M V

    2015-01-01

    Stellar population and the interstellar gas-dust medium in the vicinity of the open star cluster vdB 130 are analysed using optical observations taken with the 6-m telescope of the SAO RAS and the 125-cm telescope of the SAI MSU along with the data of Spitzer and Herschel. Based on proper motions and BV and JHKs 2MASS photometric data, we select additional 36 stars as probable cluster members. Some stars in vdB 130 are classified as B stars. Our estimates of minimum colour excess, apparent distance modulus and the distance are consistent with young age (from 5 to 10 Myrs) of the cluster vdB 130. We suppose the large deviations from the conventional extinction law in the cluster direction, with $R_V$ ~ 4 - 5. The cluster vdB 130 appears to be physically related to the supershell around Cyg OB1, a cometary CO cloud, ionized gas, and regions of infrared emission. There are a few regions of bright mid-infrared emission in the vicinity of vdB 130. The largest of them is also visible on H-alpha and [SII] emission m...

  17. Simultaneous monitoring of atmospheric methane and speciated non-methane hydrocarbon concentrations using Peltier effect sub-ambient pre-concentration and gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, D; Seakins, P W; Lewis, A C

    2000-02-01

    Sub-ambient trapping, used to pre-concentrate atmospheric samples for non-methane hydrocarbon (NMHC) analysis by gas chromatography, can also be used to measure ambient methane concentrations. Above a sample volume of 40 ml, a dynamic equilibrium is established between ambient and trapped methane allowing for simultaneous quantitative determinations of methane and NMHC. The temperature stability of the trap is critical for quantitative methane analysis and this can be achieved by Peltier effect cooling. Simultaneous measurements of methane and NMHC reduce the equipment required for field trips and can ease the interpretation and modelling of atmospheric data. The feasibility for deployment of the system in remote locations was demonstrated by running the apparatus virtually unattended for a 5-day period. The correlations between the concentrations of methane, ethane and ethene measured during this period are discussed.

  18. Occurrence and gas/particle partitioning of short- and medium-chain chlorinated paraffins in the atmosphere of Fildes Peninsula of Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xindong; Zhang, Haijun; Zhou, Hongqiang; Na, Guangshui; Wang, Zhen; Chen, Chen; Chen, Jingwen; Chen, Jiping

    2014-06-01

    Chlorinated paraffins (CPs) were measured in air samples at a remote air monitoring site established in Georgia King Island, Fildes Peninsula of Antarctica (Great Wall Station, China) to study the long-range atmospheric transport of these anthropogenic pollutants to the Antarctic. Gas- and particle-phase CPs were collected using polyurethane foam plugs (PUF) and glass fiber filters (GFF) respectively during summertime of 2012. The total atmospheric levels of SCCPs and MCCPs ranged from 9.6 to 20.8 pg m-3 (average: 14.9 pg m-3) and 3.7-5.2 pg m-3 (average: 4.5 pg m-3), respectively. C10 and C11 carbon chain homologues with Cl5 and Cl6 chlorine atoms predominated in SCCP formula groups both in gas- and particle-phase. Significant linear correlation was found between gas/particle partition coefficients (KP) and sub-cooled liquid vapor pressures (pL°) (R2 = 0.437, p < 0.01), as well as KP and octanol-air partition coefficients (KOA) (R2 = 0.442, p < 0.01). Absolute slope values of two regression models (0.31 and 0.39) were less than 0.6 indicating that the way of absorption into organic matter of aerosol played a more important role on atmospheric partitioning and transferring of CPs in remote Antarctic area. Both the Junge-Pankow model and the KOA-based model tended to underestimate the sorption of lower chlorinated CPs and overestimate the sorption of highly chlorinated CPs.

  19. An Evaluation of Short Term Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Soil and Atmosphere Exchange in Response to Controlling Edaphic Factgors of Eucalyptus Plantation, Gujarat, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmal Kumar

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A considerable amount of atmospheric GHG is produced and consumed through soil processes. Soils provide the largest terrestrial store for carbon (C as well as the largest atmospheric CO2 sources through autotrophic and heterotrophic organisms. Soils are also the greatest source (∼60% of CH4 and N2O through microbially mediated processes of methanogensis, nitrification and denitrification. Short term CO2, CH4 and N2O gas fluxes from soil under a Eucalyptus plantation in central Gujarat, Western India were measured for three month duration (February to April, 2013 at fifteen days interval using closed static chamber technique and gas chromatography method. Simultaneously soils were analyzed at 0.0-10, 10-20, and 20-30 cm depth for pH, conductivity, organic carbon, nitrogen, phosphate, sulphate to correlate with gas emissions. The results showed that the soil in our study was a sink of atmospheric CO2, CH4 and N2O which the flux varied from -65.27 to 14.6, -0.005 to 0.07 and -0.03 to 0.33 mg m-2 h-1respectively. CO2 emissions were found maximum as compared to other two gases. Variations in soil N2O emissions could be primarily explained by litter C:N ratio and soil total N stock. Differences in soil CH4 uptake could be mostly attributed to the soil CO2 flux and water filled pore space (WFPS. Soil C:N ratio could largely account for variations in soil CO2 emissions. A strong positive relationship existed between CH4 flux and soil temperature. The N2O flux correlated with WFPS and the global warming potential of N2O is highest compared to other two principal gases. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/ije.v3i3.11064 International Journal of Environment Vol.3(3 2014: 59-77

  20. Evidence for large methane releases to the atmosphere from deep-sea gas-hydrate dissociation during the last glacial episode

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Garidel-Thoron, Thibault; Beaufort, Luc; Bassinot, Franck; Henry, Pierre

    2004-01-01

    Past atmospheric methane-concentration oscillations recorded in polar ice cores vary together with rapid global climatic changes during the last glacial episode. In the “clathrate gun hypothesis,” massive releases of deep-sea methane from marine gas-hydrate dissociation led to these well known, global, abrupt warmings in the past. If evidence for such releases in the water column exists, however, the mechanism and eventual transfer to the atmosphere has not yet been documented clearly. Here we describe a high-resolution marine-sediment record of stable carbon isotopic changes from the Papua Gulf, off Papua New Guinea, which exhibits two extremely depleted excursions (down to -9‰) at ≈39,000 and ≈55,000 years. Morphological, isotopic, and trace metal evidence dismisses authigenic calcite as the main source of depleted carbon. Massive methane release associated with deep-sea gas-hydrate dissociation is the most likely cause for such large depletions of δ13C. The absence of a δ13C gradient in the water column during these events implies that the methane rose through the entire water column, reaching the sea–air interface and thus the atmosphere. Foraminiferal δ18O composition suggests that the rise of the methane in the water column created an upwelling flow. These inferred emission events suggest that during the last glacial episode, this process was likely widespread, including tropical regions. Thus, the release of methane from the ocean floor into the atmosphere cannot be dismissed as a strong positive feedback in climate dynamics processes. PMID:15197255

  1. Control of Formation of Lithological Reservoirs by Surrounding Mudstone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Taking the Jiyang depression as an example, this paper discusses the control of the formation of lithological reservoir by surrounding rocks by integrated application of geological analysis, physical simulation, and the analysis of oil & gas accumulation mechanism. Geological statistical shows that the major burial depth and interval of lithological reservoirs in the Jiyang depression are related to the hydrocarbon generation in and expulsion from the Lower Tertiary source rocks and the time of the formation of most lithological reservoirs coincides with the peak of hydrocarbon generation and expulsion. The lithological traps located in the center of effective source rocks are propitious to high oil saturation than those located on the margin of effective source rocks. The hydrocarbon charge degree of the lithological reservoir has a positive correlation with the intensity of hydrocarbon expulsion from surrounding source rocks.Geological analyses and NMR experiments also show that the oil saturation of surrounding source rocks control the hydrocarbon potential of lithological traps, and a critical value for oil saturation of surrounding mudstone is required, that is, when the oil saturation of surrounding mudstone is lower than this critical value, no oil and gas accumulate in the lithological trap. The control of surrounding mudstone on the oil-bearing properties of lithological reservoirs is also analyzed by the mechanisms of hydrocarbon generation and expulsion as well as accumulation.

  2. Rapid Detection of Gas Hazards and Leaks with an Atmospheric Sampling, High Resolution, Mass Spectrometer with Low Pumping Requirements Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Miniaturization of mass spectrometers is restricted almost exclusively by the ability of small vacuum pumps to remove gas loads during operation of the instrument....

  3. Design and application of a mobile ground-based observatory for continuous measurements of atmospheric trace-gas and criteria pollutant species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Bush

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ground-based measurements of atmospheric trace gas species and criteria pollutants are essential for understanding emissions dynamics across space and time. Gas composition in the surface 50 m has the greatest direct impacts on human health as well as ecosystem processes, hence data at this level is necessary for addressing carbon cycle and public health related questions. However, such surface data are generally associated with stationary measurement towers, where spatial representation is limited due to the high cost of establishing and maintaining an extensive network of measurement stations. We describe here a compact mobile laboratory equipped to provide high-precision, high-frequency, continuous, on-road synchronous measurements of CO2, CO, CH4, H2O, NOx, O3, aerosol, meteorological, and geospatial position data. The mobile laboratory has been deployed across the western USA. In addition to describing the vehicle and its capacity, we present data that illustrate the use of the laboratory as a powerful tool for investigating the spatial structure of urban trace gas emissions and criteria pollutants at spatial scales ranging from single streets to whole ecosystem and regional scales. We identify fugitive urban CH4 emissions and assess the magnitude of CH4 emissions from known point sources. We illustrate how such a mobile laboratory can be used to better understand emissions dynamics and quantify emissions ratios associated with trace gas emissions from wildfire incidents. Lastly, we discuss additional mobile laboratory applications in health and urban metabolism.

  4. Design and application of a mobile ground-based observatory for continuous measurements of atmospheric trace-gas and criteria pollutant species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, S. E.; Hopkins, F. M.; Randerson, J. T.; Lai, C.-T.; Ehleringer, J. R.

    2015-01-01

    Ground-based measurements of atmospheric trace gas species and criteria pollutants are essential for understanding emissions dynamics across space and time. Gas composition in the surface 50 m has the greatest direct impacts on human health as well as ecosystem processes, hence data at this level is necessary for addressing carbon cycle and public health related questions. However, such surface data are generally associated with stationary measurement towers, where spatial representation is limited due to the high cost of establishing and maintaining an extensive network of measurement stations. We describe here a compact mobile laboratory equipped to provide high-precision, high-frequency, continuous, on-road synchronous measurements of CO2, CO, CH4, H2O, NOx, O3, aerosol, meteorological, and geospatial position data. The mobile laboratory has been deployed across the western USA. In addition to describing the vehicle and its capacity, we present data that illustrate the use of the laboratory as a powerful tool for investigating the spatial structure of urban trace gas emissions and criteria pollutants at spatial scales ranging from single streets to whole ecosystem and regional scales. We identify fugitive urban CH4 emissions and assess the magnitude of CH4 emissions from known point sources. We illustrate how such a mobile laboratory can be used to better understand emissions dynamics and quantify emissions ratios associated with trace gas emissions from wildfire incidents. Lastly, we discuss additional mobile laboratory applications in health and urban metabolism.

  5. Oxygenated volatile organic carbon in the western Pacific convective center: ocean cycling, air–sea gas exchange and atmospheric transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Schlundt

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A suite of oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs – acetaldehyde, acetone, propanal, butanal and butanone were measured concurrently in the surface water and atmosphere of the South China Sea and Sulu Sea in November 2011. A strong correlation was observed between all OVOC concentrations in the surface seawater along the entire cruise track, except for acetaldehyde, suggesting similar sources and sinks in the surface ocean. Additionally, several phytoplankton groups, such as haptophytes or pelagophytes, were also correlated to all OVOCs, indicating that phytoplankton may be an important source of marine OVOCs in the South China and Sulu seas. Humic- and protein-like fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM components seemed to be additional precursors for butanone and acetaldehyde. The measurement-inferred OVOC fluxes generally showed an uptake of atmospheric OVOCs by the ocean for all gases, except for butanal. A few important exceptions were found along the Borneo coast, where OVOC fluxes from the ocean to the atmosphere were inferred. The atmospheric OVOC mixing ratios over the northern coast of Borneo were relatively high compared with literature values, suggesting that this coastal region is a local hotspot for atmospheric OVOCs. The calculated amount of OVOCs entrained into the ocean seemed to be an important source of OVOCs to the surface ocean. When the fluxes were out of the ocean, marine OVOCs were found to be enough to control the locally measured OVOC distribution in the atmosphere. Based on our model calculations, at least 0.4 ppb of marine-derived acetone and butanone can reach the upper troposphere, where they may have an important influence on hydrogen oxide radical formation over the western Pacific Ocean.

  6. Earth’s Interaction Region: Plasma-Neutral Interactions in the Weakly Ionized gas of Earth’s High Latitude Upper Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thayer, Jeffrey; Hsu, Vicki

    2015-04-01

    The high-latitude regions of Earth’s upper atmosphere are strongly influenced by plasma-neutral interactions. These interactions couple electrodynamic processes of the ionosphere with hydrodynamic processes of the more abundant thermosphere neutral gas, consequently connecting the high-latitude upper atmosphere to distant regions of the geoplasma environment. This produces a complex spatial and temporal interplay of competing processes that results in a myriad of physical and chemical responses and a rich array of neutral and plasma morphologies that constitute the high-latitude thermosphere and ionosphere. The altitude extent from the lower thermosphere to the upper ionosphere (90km - 1000km) can be considered Earth’s space-atmosphere interaction region - likened to the solar chromosphere’s interaction region where radiative processes and hydrodynamic waves from the dense lower atmosphere produce a cold lower boundary that quickly transitions over a few 100 kilometers to neutral and plasma temperatures that are five times hotter. A thousand or more kilometers further in altitude, Earth's upper atmosphere becomes a hot, collisionless, geomagnetically controlled protonosphere whose neutral and plasma population originates from the thermosphere and ionosphere. A grand challenge in the study of Earth’s interaction region is how the collision-dominated thermosphere/ionosphere system exchanges energy, mass and momentum with the collisionless magnetosphere. This talk will focus primarily on collision-dominated processes of the high-latitude ionosphere and the electromagnetic energy transfer processes that lead to frictional heating of ions and neutrals, and plasma instability phenomenon that leads to extreme electron heating. Observations of the ionosphere response to these processes will be illustrated using incoherent scatter radar measurements. Relevance to the solar chromosphere will be identified where appropriate and outstanding issues in Earth

  7. Impact of nitrogen fertilization on soil–Atmosphere greenhouse gas exchanges in eucalypt plantations with different soil characteristics in southern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai; Zheng, Hua; Chen, Falin; Li, Ruida; Yang, Miao; Ouyang, Zhiyun; Lan, Jun; Xiang, Xuewu

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) fertilization is necessary to sustain productivity in eucalypt plantations, but it can increase the risk of greenhouse gas emissions. However, the response of soil greenhouse gas emissions to N fertilization might be influenced by soil characteristics, which is of great significance for accurately assessing greenhouse gas budgets and scientific fertilization in plantations. We conducted a two-year N fertilization experiment (control [CK], low N [LN], middle N [MN] and high N [HN] fertilization) in two eucalypt plantations with different soil characteristics (higher and lower soil organic carbon sites [HSOC and LSOC]) in Guangxi, China, and assessed soil–atmosphere greenhouse gas exchanges. The annual mean fluxes of soil CO2, CH4, and N2O were separately 153–266 mg m-2 h-1, -55 –-40 μg m-2 h-1, and 11–95 μg m-2 h-1, with CO2 and N2O emissions showing significant seasonal variations. N fertilization significantly increased soil CO2 and N2O emissions and decreased CH4 uptake at both sites. There were significant interactions of N fertilization and SOC level on soil CO2 and N2O emissions. At the LSOC site, the annual mean flux of soil CO2 emission was only significantly higher than the CK treatment in the HN treatment, but, at the HSOC site, the annual mean flux of soil CO2 emission was significantly higher for both the LN (or MN) and HN treatments in comparison to the CK treatment. Under the CK and LN treatments, the annual mean flux of N2O emission was not significantly different between HSOC and LSOC sites, but under the HN treatment, it was significantly higher in the HSOC site than in the LSOC site. Correlation analysis showed that changes in soil CO2 and N2O emissions were significantly related to soil dissolved organic carbon, ammonia, nitrate and pH. Our results suggested significant interactions of N fertilization and soil characteristics existed in soil–atmosphere greenhouse gas exchanges, which should be considered in assessing

  8. Climate and site management as driving factors for the atmospheric greenhouse gas exchange of a restored wetland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herbst, Mathias; Friborg, Thomas; Schelde, K.;

    2013-01-01

    and management activities were used to explain the large inter-annual variations in the full atmospheric GHG budget of the wetland. The largest impact on the annual GHG fluxes, eventually defining their sign, came from site management through changes in grazing duration and animal stocking density. These changes...

  9. A Critical Review of Published Data on the Gas Temperature and the Electron Density in the Electrolyte Cathode Atmospheric Glow Discharges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamás Cserfalvi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Electrolyte Cathode Discharge (ELCAD spectrometry, a novel sensitive multielement direct analytical method for metal traces in aqueous solutions, was introduced in 1993 as a new sensing principle. Since then several works have tried to develop an operational mechanism for this exotic atmospheric glow plasma technique, however these attempts cannot be combined into a valid model description. In this review we summarize the conceptual and technical problems we found in this upcoming research field of direct sensors. The TG gas temperature and the ne electron density values published up to now for ELCAD are very confusing. These data were evaluated by three conditions. The first is the gas composition of the ELCAD plasma, since TG was determined from the emitted intensity of the N2 and OH bands. Secondly, since the ELCAD is an atmospheric glow discharge, thus, the obtained TG has to be close to the Te electron temperature. This can be used for the mutual validation of the received temperature data. Thirdly, as a consequence of the second condition, the values of TG and ne have to agree with the Engel-Brown approximation of the Saha-equation related to weakly ionized glow discharge plasmas. Application of non-adequate experimental methods and theoretical treatment leads to unreliable descriptions which cannot be used to optimize the detector performance.

  10. Numerical studies of independent control of electron density and gas temperature via nonlinear coupling in dual-frequency atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z. L.; Nie, Q. Y.; Wang, Z. B.; Gao, X. T.; Kong, F. R.; Sun, Y. F.; Jiang, B. H.

    2016-07-01

    Dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) provide a promising technology of generating non-equilibrium cold plasmas in atmospheric pressure gases. For both application-focused and fundamental studies, it is important to explore the strategy and the mechanism for enabling effective independent tuning of key plasma parameters in a DBD system. In this paper, we report numerical studies of effects of dual-frequency excitation on atmospheric DBDs, and modulation as well as separate tuning mechanism, with emphasis on dual-frequency coupling to the key plasma parameters and discharge evolution. With an appropriately applied low frequency to the original high frequency, the numerical calculation demonstrates that a strong nonlinear coupling between two frequencies governs the process of ionization and energy deposition into plasma, and thus raises the electron density significantly (e.g., three times in this case) in comparisons with a single frequency driven DBD system. Nevertheless, the gas temperature, which is mainly determined by the high frequency discharge, barely changes. This method then enables a possible approach of controlling both averaged electron density and gas temperature independently.

  11. Atmospheric measurements of gas-phase HNO3 and SO2 using chemical ionization mass spectrometry during the MINATROC field campaign 2000 on Monte Cimone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hanke

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The EU-project MINATROC (MINeral dust And TROpospheric Chemistry aims at enabling an estimation of the influence of mineral dust, a major, but to date largely ignored component of tropospheric aerosol, on tropospheric oxidant cycles. Within the scope of this project continuous atmospheric measurements of gas-phase HNO3 and SO2 were conducted in June and July 2000 at the CNR WMO station, situated on Monte Cimone (MTC (44°11' N --10°42' E, 2165 m asl, Italy. African air transporting dust is occasionally advected over the Mediterranean Sea to the site, thus mineral aerosol emitted from Africa will encounter polluted air masses and provide ideal conditions to study their interactions. HNO3 and SO2 were measured with an improved CIMS (chemical ionization mass spectrometry system for ground-based measurements that was developed and built at MPI-K Heidelberg. Since HNO3  is a very sticky compound special care was paid for the air-sampling and background-measurement system. Complete data sets could be obtained before, during and after major dust intrusions. For the first time these measurements might provide a strong observational indication of efficient uptake of gas-phase HNO3 by atmospheric mineral-dust aerosol particles.

  12. U.S. Natural Gas System Methane Emissions: State of Knowledge from LCAs, Inventories, and Atmospheric Measurements (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heath, G.

    2014-04-01

    Natural gas (NG) is a potential "bridge fuel" during transition to a decarbonized energy system: It emits less carbon dioxide during combustion than other fossil fuels and can be used in many industries. However, because of the high global warming potential of methane (CH4, the major component of NG), climate benefits from NG use depend on system leakage rates. Some recent estimates of leakage have challenged the benefits of switching from coal to NG, a large near-term greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction opportunity. During this presentation, Garvin will review evidence from multiple perspectives - life cycle assessments (LCAs), inventories and measurements - about NG leakage in the US. Particular attention will be paid to a recent article in Science magazine which reviewed over 20 years of published measurements to better understand what we know about total methane emissions and those from the oil and gas sectors. Scientific and policy implications of the state of knowledge will be discussed.

  13. Studies of two stage gas turbine combustor for biomass powder. Part 1, Atmospheric cyclone gasification experiments with wood powder. Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degerman, Bengt; Hedin, Johan; Fredriksson, Christian; Kjellstroem, Bjoern; Salman, Hassan [Luleaa Univ. of Technology (Sweden). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2000-10-01

    This report summarises the research and development work regarding development of a two stage gas turbine combustor for wood powder carried out at the Luleaa University of Technology from July 1993 to December 1996. The process being studied is based on cyclone gasification of the wood powder and combustion of the product gas in a suitably adapted gas turbine combustion chamber, without other gas cleaning than that obtained by the cyclone. A critical issue to be studied in the project is if the burned gases from such a cyclone gasifier lead to acceptably low deposition rates for K- and Na-compounds in a gas turbine with 850 deg C inlet temperature. The project strategy has been to study wood powder feeding and cyclone gasification first at atmospheric pressure, then run separate pressurised cyclone gasification tests for studies of the possibilities to achieve stable operation when the air flow is supplied by a separate compressor and finally to run integrated gasifier/gas turbine tests for studies of the deposition problem in practical operation. During the period covered by this report the atmospheric test facility has been designed, built and commissioned. It has been used mainly for studies of injector feeding of wood powder into a cyclone gasifier and for gasification experiments where in particular the fate of ash elements introduced with the wood powder has been studied. The results of these experiments have shown that steam injection of wood powder is possible with a steam consumption of about 0.3 kg steam/kg wood. The effects of injector geometry on the performance has also been studied. The gasification experiments show clearly that ash elements, including K and Na remain in the ash until very late in the thermal conversion process, also at gas temperatures exceeding 900 deg C. The separation of K with the cyclone bottom char has been 50 - 60% and the separation of Na about 80% with the cyclone geometry and the wood powder tested. The resulting load of K

  14. Advancement of atmospheric-vacuum interfaces for mass spectrometers with a focus on increasing gas throughput for improving sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Satendra; Wouters, Eloy R; Dunyach, Jean-Jacques

    2015-08-18

    Ion sampling from an electrospray ionization (ESI) source was improved by increasing gas conductance of the MS inlet by 4.3-fold. Converting the gas throughput (Q) into sensitivity improvement was dependent on ion desolvation and handling of the gas load. Desolvation was addressed by using a novel slot shaped inlet that exhibited desolvation properties identical to the 0.58 mm i.d capillary. An assay tailored for "small molecules" at high chromatographic flow rate (500 μL/min) yielded a compound dependent 6.5 to 14-fold signal gain while analysis at nano chromatographic flow rate (300 nL/min) showed 2 to 3.5-fold improvement for doubly charged peptides. Improvement exceeding the Q (4.3-fold) at high chromatographic flow rate was explained by superior sampling of the spatially dispersed ion spray when using the slot shaped capillary. Sensitivity improvement across a wide range of chromatographic flow rate confirmed no compromise in ion desolvation with the increase in Q. Another improvement included less overflow of gas into the mass analyzer from the foreline region owing to the slot shape of the capillary. By doubling the roughing pump capacity and operating the electrodynamic ion funnel (EDIF) at ∼4 Torr, a single pumping stage was sufficient to handle the gas load. The transport of solvent clusters from the LC effluent into the mass analyzer was prevented by a "wavy shaped" transfer quadrupole and was compared with a benchmark approach that delivered ions orthogonally into a differentially pumped dual EDIF at comparable gas Q.

  15. Adsorption of volatile polonium species on metals in various gas atmospheres. Pt. II. Adsorption of volatile polonium on platinum, silver and palladium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maugeri, Emilio Andrea; Joerg Neuhausen; Dressler, Rugard; Piguet, David; Voegele, Alexander; Schumann, Dorothea [Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland). Lab. for Radiochemistry; Misiak, Ryszard [The Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow (Poland); Eichler, Robert [Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland). Lab. for Radiochemistry; Bern Univ. (Switzerland). Dept. for Chemistry and Biochemistry

    2016-07-01

    This work presents the results obtained from studying the interaction between polonium compounds formed in different atmospheres and platinum, palladium and silver surfaces obtained by thermochromatography. These results are of crucial importance for the design of cover gas filter systems for lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE)-based nuclear facilities such as accelerator driven systems (ADS). The results obtained from studying the interaction of polonium and platinum under inert atmosphere and reducing atmospheres with and without addition of moisture show that polonium is deposited at temperatures between 993 and 1221 K, with adsorption enthalpies ranging from -235 to -291 kJ mol{sup -1}, indicating a very strong adsorption of the polonium species present on platinum surfaces. The interaction between polonium and silver was investigated using purified inert, reducing and oxidizing carrier gases. Results show a deposition temperature between 867 and 990 K, with adsorption enthalpies ranging from -205 to -234 kJ mol{sup -1}. The interaction of polonium and palladium was studied in purified helium and purified hydrogen. For both conditions a deposition temperature of 1221 K was observed corresponding to an adsorption enthalpy of -340 kJ mol{sup -1}. No highly volatile polonium species was formed at any of the applied experimental conditions.

  16. Carbon Disulfide (CS2) Mechanisms in Formation of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Formation from Unconventional Shale Gas Extraction and Processing Operations and Global Climate Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Alisa L; Patel, Jay T

    2015-01-01

    Carbon disulfide (CS2) has been historically associated with the production of rayon, cellophane, and carbon tetrachloride. This study identifies multiple mechanisms by which CS2 contributes to the formation of CO2 in the atmosphere. CS2 and other associated sulfide compounds were found by this study to be present in emissions from unconventional shale gas extraction and processing (E&P) operations. The breakdown products of CS2; carbonyl sulfide (COS), carbon monoxide (CO), and sulfur dioxide (SO2) are indirect greenhouse gases (GHGs) that contribute to CO2 levels in the atmosphere. The heat-trapping nature of CO2 has been found to increase the surface temperature, resulting in regional and global climate change. The purpose of this study is to identify five mechanisms by which CS2 and the breakdown products of CS2 contribute to atmospheric concentrations of CO2. The five mechanisms of CO2 formation are as follows: Chemical Interaction of CS2 and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) present in natural gas at high temperatures, resulting in CO2 formation;Combustion of CS2 in the presence of oxygen producing SO2 and CO2;Photolysis of CS2 leading to the formation of COS, CO, and SO2, which are indirect contributors to CO2 formation;One-step hydrolysis of CS2, producing reactive intermediates and ultimately forming H2S and CO2;Two-step hydrolysis of CS2 forming the reactive COS intermediate that reacts with an additional water molecule, ultimately forming H2S and CO2. CS2 and COS additionally are implicated in the formation of SO2 in the stratosphere and/or troposphere. SO2 is an indirect contributor to CO2 formation and is implicated in global climate change.

  17. Influence of Additive Gas on Electrical and Optical Characteristics of Non-equilibrium Atmospheric Pressure Argon Plasma Jet%Influence of Additive Gas on Electrical and Optical Characteristics of Non-equilibrium Atmospheric Pressure Argon Plasma Jet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    费小猛; Shin-ichi KURODA; Yuki KONDO; Tamio MORI; Katsuhiko HOSOI

    2011-01-01

    Electrical and optical properties of an argon plasma jet were characterized. In particular, effects of an additive gas, namely nitrogen or oxygen, on these properties were studied in detail. The plasma jet was found to be of a glow-like discharge, which scarcely changed upon the injection of an additive gas, either directly or through a glass capillary. Optical emission spectroscopy characterization revealed that excited argon atoms were the predominant active species in this plasma jet. Metastable argon atoms were highly quenched, and N2(C3yIu) became the main energy carrier following nitrogen injection. When oxygen was added to the afterglow zone through a glass capillary, no significant quenching effect was observed and the number of oxygen atoms decreased with the increase in oxygen concentration. Finally, to demonstrate an application of this plasma jet, a high-density polyethylene surface was treated with argon, argon/nitrogen, and argon/oxygen plasmas.

  18. Experimental Investigation of Gas/Slag/Matte/Tridymite Equilibria in the Cu-Fe-O-S-Si System in Controlled Gas Atmospheres: Experimental Results at 1473 K (1200 °C) and P(SO2) = 0.25 atm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallah-Mehrjardi, Ata; Hidayat, Taufiq; Hayes, Peter C.; Jak, Evgueni

    2017-08-01

    Experimental studies were undertaken to determine the gas/slag/matte/tridymite equilibria in the Cu-Fe-O-S-Si system at 1473 K (1200 °C), P(SO2) = 0.25 atm, and a range of P(O2)'s. The experimental methodology involved high-temperature equilibration using a substrate support technique in controlled gas atmospheres (CO/CO2/SO2/Ar), rapid quenching of equilibrium phases, followed by direct measurement of the chemical compositions of the phases with Electron Probe X-ray Microanalysis (EPMA). The experimental data for slag and matte were presented as a function of copper concentration in matte (matte grade). The data provided are essential for the evaluation of the effect of oxygen potential under controlled atmosphere on the matte grade, liquidus composition of slag and chemically dissolved copper in slag. The new data provide important accurate and reliable quantitative foundation for improvement of the thermodynamic databases for copper-containing systems.

  19. Advantages of Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization in Gas Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry: Pyrethroid Insecticides as a Case Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Portolés, T.; Mol, J.G.J.; Sancho, J.V.; Hernández, F.

    2012-01-01

    Gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC/MS) has been extensively applied for determination of volatile, nonpolar, compounds in many applied fields like food safety, environment, or toxicology. The wide majority of methods reported use electron ionization (EI), which may result in extensi

  20. Atmosphere and Ambient Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Ulrik

    Atmosphere and Ambient Space This paper explores the relation between atmosphere and ambient space. Atmosphere and ambient space share many salient properties. They are both ontologically indeterminate, constantly varying and formally diffuse and they are both experienced as a subtle, non......-signifying property of a given space. But from a certain point of view, the two concepts also designate quite dissimilar experiences of space. To be ’ambient’ means to surround. Accordingly, ambient space is that space, which surrounds something or somebody. (Gibson 1987: 65) Since space is essentially...... of a surrounding character, all space can thus be described as having a fundamentally ambient character. So what precisely is an ambient space, then? As I will argue in my presentation, ambient space is a sensory effect of spatiality when a space is experienced as being particularly surrounding: a ‘space effect...

  1. Atmosphere and Ambient Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Ulrik

    Atmosphere and Ambient Space This paper explores the relation between atmosphere and ambient space. Atmosphere and ambient space share many salient properties. They are both ontologically indeterminate, constantly varying and formally diffuse and they are both experienced as a subtle, non......-signifying property of a given space. But from a certain point of view, the two concepts also designate quite dissimilar experiences of space. To be ’ambient’ means to surround. Accordingly, ambient space is that space, which surrounds something or somebody. (Gibson 1987: 65) Since space is essentially...... of a surrounding character, all space can thus be described as having a fundamentally ambient character. So what precisely is an ambient space, then? As I will argue in my presentation, ambient space is a sensory effect of spatiality when a space is experienced as being particularly surrounding: a ‘space effect...

  2. Coincidence or not? Interconnected gas/fluid migration and ocean-atmosphere oscillations in the Levant Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Michael; Lang, Guy; Schattner, Uri

    2016-08-01

    A growing number of studies on shallow marine gas/fluid systems from across the globe indicate their abundance throughout geological epochs. However, these episodic events have not been fully integrated into the fundamental concepts of continental margin development, which are thought to be dictated by three elements: tectonics, sedimentation and eustasy. The current study focuses on the passive sector of the Levant Basin on the eastern Mediterranean continental margin where these elements are well constrained, in order to isolate the contribution of gas/fluid systems. Single-channel, multichannel and 3D seismic reflection data are interpreted in terms of variance, chaos, envelope and sweetness attributes. Correlation with the Romi-1 borehole and sequence boundaries constrains interpretation of seismic stratigraphy. Results show a variety of fluid- or gas-related features such as seafloor and subsurface pockmarks, volumes of acoustic blanking, bright spots, conic pinnacle mounds, gas chimneys and high sweetness zones that represent possible secondary reservoirs. It is suggested that gas/fluid migrate upwards along lithological conduits such as falling-stage systems tracts and sequence boundaries during both highstands and lowstands. In all, 13 mid-late Pleistocene sequence boundaries are accompanied by independent evidence of 13 eustatic sea-level drops. Whether this connection is coincidental or not requires further research. These findings fill gaps between previously reported sporadic appearances throughout the Levant Basin and margin and throughout geological time from the Messinian until the present day, and create a unified framework for understanding the system as a whole. Repetitive appearance of these features suggests that their role in the morphodynamics of continental margins is more important than previously thought and thus may constitute one of the key elements of continental margin development.

  3. Interactions of Gas-Phase Nitric/Nitrous Acids and Primary Organic Aerosol in the Atmosphere of Houston, TX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemba, L. D.; Griffin, R. J.; Dibb, J. E.; Anderson, C. H.; Whitlow, S. I.; Lefer, B. L.; Flynn, J.; Rappenglück, B.

    2007-12-01

    Concentrations of aerosol and gas-phase pollutants were measured on the roof of an 18-story building during the Texas Air Quality Study II Radical and Aerosol Measurement Project (TRAMP) from August 15 through September 28, 2006. Aerosol measurements included size-resolved, non-refractory mass concentrations of ammonium, nitrate, sulfate, chloride, and organic aerosol in submicron particles using an Aerodyne quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer (Q-AMS). Particulate water-soluble organic carbon (PWSOC) was quantified using a mist chamber/total organic carbon analysis system. Concentration data for gas-phase pollutants included those for nitric acid (HNO3), nitrous acid (HONO), and hydrochloric acid (HCl) collected using a mist chamber/ion chromatographic technique, oxides of nitrogen (NOx) collected using a chemiluminescent method, and carbon monoxide (CO) collected using an infrared gas correlation wheel instrument. Coincident increases in nitrate and organic aerosol mass concentrations were observed on many occasions throughout the measurement campaign, most frequently during the morning rush hour. Based on the lack of organic aerosol processing (defined by the ratio of m/z = 44/57 in the Q-AMS spectra), strong correlation with NOx and CO, and a lack of significant increase in PWSOC concentration, the spikes in organic aerosol were likely associated with primary organic aerosol (POA). During these events, gas-phase HNO3 concentration decreases were observed simultaneously with increases in gas-phase HONO concentrations. These data likely indicate uptake of HNO3 and subsequent heterogeneous conversion to HONO involving POA. Preliminary calculations show that HNO3 partitioning could account for the majority of the observed HONO and aerosol nitrate concentrations during these events. Q-AMS chloride and HCl data also indicate uptake of chloride by particles during these events. This phenomenon was also observed during the night, but these nocturnal events were less

  4. SI-traceable and dynamic reference gas mixtures for water vapour at polar and high troposphere atmospheric levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillevic, Myriam; Pascale, Céline; Mutter, Daniel; Wettstein, Sascha; Niederhauser, Bernhard

    2017-04-01

    In the framework of METAS' AtmoChem-ECV project, new facilities are currently being developed to generate reference gas mixtures for water vapour at concentrations measured in the high troposphere and polar regions, in the range 1-20 µmol/mol (ppm). The generation method is dynamic (the mixture is produced continuously over time) and SI-traceable (i.e. the amount of substance fraction in mole per mole is traceable to the definition of SI-units). The generation process is composed of three successive steps. The first step is to purify the matrix gas, nitrogen or synthetic air. Second, this matrix gas is spiked with the pure substance using a permeation technique: a permeation device contains a few grams of pure water in liquid form and loses it linearly over time by permeation through a membrane. In a third step, to reach the desired concentration, the first, high concentration mixture exiting the permeation chamber is then diluted with a chosen flow of matrix gas with one or two subsequent dilution steps. All flows are piloted by mass flow controllers. All parts in contact with the gas mixture are passivated using coated surfaces, to reduce adsorption/desorption processes as much as possible. The mixture can eventually be directly used to calibrate an analyser. The standard mixture produced by METAS' dynamic setup was injected into a chilled mirror from MBW Calibration AG, the designated institute for absolute humidity calibration in Switzerland. The used chilled mirror, model 373LX, is able to measure frost point and sample pressure and therefore calculate the water vapour concentration. This intercomparison of the two systems was performed in the range 4-18 ppm water vapour in synthetic air, at two different pressure levels, 1013.25 hPa and 2000 hPa. We present here METAS' dynamic setup, its uncertainty budget and the first results of the intercomparison with MBW's chilled mirror.

  5. Atmospheric Retrieval for Direct Imaging Spectroscopy of Gas Giants In Reflected Light II: Orbital Phase and Planetary Radius

    CERN Document Server

    Nayak, Michael; Marley, Mark; Fortney, Jonathan; Robinson, Tyler; Lewis, Nikole

    2016-01-01

    Future space-based telescopes, such as the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST), will observe the reflected-light spectra of directly imaged extrasolar planets. Interpretation of such data presents a number of novel challenges, including accounting for unknown planet radius and uncertain stellar illumination phase angle. Here we report on our continued development of Markov Chain Monte Carlo retrieval methods for addressing these issues in the interpretation of such data. Specifically we explore how the unknown planet radius and potentially poorly known observer-planet-star phase angle impacts retrievals of parameters of interest such as atmospheric methane abundance, cloud properties and surface gravity. As expected, the uncertainty in retrieved values is a strong function of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the observed spectra, particularly for low metallicity atmospheres, which lack deep absorption signatures. Meaningful results may only be possible above certain SNR thresholds; for cases across a ...

  6. Electronic quenching of OH(A) by water in atmospheric pressure plasmas and its influence on the gas temperature determination by OH(A-X) emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruggeman, Peter; Schram, Daan C [Department of Applied Physics, Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Iza, Felipe; Kong, Michael G [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Loughborough University, Loughborough, Leicestershire LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Guns, Peter; Lauwers, Daniel; Leys, Christophe [Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, Jozef Plateaustraat 22, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Gonzalvo, Yolanda Aranda [Plasma and Surface Analysis Division, Hiden Analytical Ltd, 420 Europa Boulevard, Warrington WA5 7UN (United Kingdom)], E-mail: p.j.bruggeman@tue.nl

    2010-02-15

    In this paper it is shown that electronic quenching of OH(A) by water prevents thermalization of the rotational population distribution of OH(A). This means that the observed ro-vibrational OH(A-X) emission band is (at least partially) an image of the formation process and is determined not only by the gas temperature. The formation of negative ions and clusters for larger water concentrations can contribute to the non-equilibrium. The above is demonstrated in RF excited atmospheric pressure glow discharges in He-water mixtures in a parallel metal plate reactor by optical emission spectroscopy. For this particular case a significant overpopulation of high rotational states appears around 1000 ppm H{sub 2}O in He. The smallest temperature parameter of a non-Boltzmann (two-temperature) distribution fitted to the experimental spectrum of OH(A-X) gives a good representation of the gas temperature. Only the rotational states with the smallest rotational numbers (J {<=} 7) are thermalized and representative for the gas temperature.

  7. Comparison of optical-feedback cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy and gas chromatography for ground-based and airborne measurements of atmospheric CO concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventrillard, Irène; Xueref-Remy, Irène; Schmidt, Martina; Yver Kwok, Camille; Faïn, Xavier; Romanini, Daniele

    2017-05-01

    We present the first comparison of carbon monoxide (CO) measurements performed with a portable laser spectrometer that exploits the optical-feedback cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (OF-CEAS) technique, against a high-performance automated gas chromatograph (GC) with a mercuric oxide reduction gas detector (RGD). First, measurements of atmospheric CO mole fraction were continuously collected in a Paris (France) suburb over 1 week. Both instruments showed an excellent agreement within typically 2 ppb (part per billion in volume), fulfilling the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) recommendation for CO inter-laboratory comparison. The compact size and robustness of the OF-CEAS instrument allowed its operation aboard a small aircraft employed for routine tropospheric air analysis over the French Orléans forest area. Direct OF-CEAS real-time CO measurements in tropospheric air were then compared with later analysis of flask samples by the gas chromatograph. Again, a very good agreement was observed. This work establishes that the OF-CEAS laser spectrometer can run unattended at a very high level of sensitivity ( < 1 ppb) and stability without any periodic calibration.

  8. A Review of Atmospheric Chemistry Research in China: Photochemical Smog, Haze Pollution, and Gas-Aerosol Interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Jianzhong; XU Xiaobin; ZHAO Chunsheng; YAN Peng

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present a review of atmospheric chemistry research in China over the period 2006-2010,focusing on tropospheric ozone,aerosol chemistry,and the interactions between trace gases and aerosols in the polluted areas of China.Over the past decade,China has suffered severe photochemical smog and haze pollution,especially in North China,the Yangtze River Delta,and the Pearl River Delta.Much scientific work on atmospheric chemistry and physics has been done to address this large-scale,complex environmental problem.Intensive field experiments,satellite data analyses,and model simulations have shown that air pollution is significantly changing the chemical and physical characters of the natural atmosphere over these parts of China.In addition to strong emissions of primary pollutants,photochemical and heterogeneous reactions play key roles in the formation of complex pollution.More in-depth research is recommended to reveal the formation mechanism of photochemical smog and haze pollution and their climatic effects at the urban,regional,and global scales.

  9. Atmospheric chemistry of perfluorocyclopentene (cyc-CF2CF2CF2CF=CF-): Kinetics, products and mechanism of gas-phase reactions with OH radicals, and atmospheric implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ni; Uchimaru, Tadafumi; Guo, Qin; Qing, Feiyao; Chen, Liang; Mizukado, Junji

    2017-07-01

    As a high-profile etching gas, perfluorocyclopentene (cyc-CF2CF2CF2CF=CF-) should be assessed for its atmospheric chemistry and environmental impact prior to expanding its industrial applications. However, the corresponding studies have been limited. In this study, the rate constants for the gas-phase reactions of cyc-CF2CF2CF2CF=CF- with OH radicals were determined by a relative rate method, and shown to be consistent with a theoretical computational results: k1-exp.(298 K) = (4.43 ± 0.10) × 10-14, k1-cal.(298 K) = 4.3 × 10-14, and k1-exp.(253-328 K) = (3.39 ± 0.86) × 10-13 exp(-(616 ± 78)/T) cm3 molecule-1 s-1. The atmospheric lifetime of cyc-CF2CF2CF2CF=CF- is 0.715 year, and its photochemical ozone creation potential is 0.48. Furthermore, the products and mechanism of the OH radical-initiated oxidation reactions were studied for the first time. The major products COF2, CO2, CO, and FC(O)OH are considered to have a negligible environmental effect. The radiative efficiency was determined as 0.246 W m-2 ppb-1, and the global warming potentials (GWPs) with 20-, 100-, and 500- year time horizon were estimated as 188, 51, and 15, respectively. The GWP100 value is significantly lower than those of the replacing targets (6630, 11100, 16 100, 23 500, and 9540 for CF4, C2F6, NF3, SF6, and c-C4F8, respectively).

  10. An improved, automated whole air sampler and gas chromatography mass spectrometry analysis system for volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Brian M.; Gilman, Jessica B.; Aikin, Kenneth C.; Atlas, Elliot L.; Goldan, Paul D.; Graus, Martin; Hendershot, Roger; Isaacman-VanWertz, Gabriel A.; Koss, Abigail; Kuster, William C.; Lueb, Richard A.; McLaughlin, Richard J.; Peischl, Jeff; Sueper, Donna; Ryerson, Thomas B.; Tokarek, Travis W.; Warneke, Carsten; Yuan, Bin; de Gouw, Joost A.

    2017-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds were quantified during two aircraft-based field campaigns using highly automated, whole air samplers with expedited post-flight analysis via a new custom-built, field-deployable gas chromatography-mass spectrometry instrument. During flight, air samples were pressurized with a stainless steel bellows compressor into electropolished stainless steel canisters. The air samples were analyzed using a novel gas chromatograph system designed specifically for field use which eliminates the need for liquid nitrogen. Instead, a Stirling cooler is used for cryogenic sample pre-concentration at temperatures as low as -165 °C. The analysis system was fully automated on a 20 min cycle to allow for unattended processing of an entire flight of 72 sample canisters within 30 h, thereby reducing typical sample residence times in the canisters to less than 3 days. The new analytical system is capable of quantifying a wide suite of C2 to C10 organic compounds at part-per-trillion sensitivity. This paper describes the sampling and analysis systems, along with the data analysis procedures which include a new peak-fitting software package for rapid chromatographic data reduction. Instrument sensitivities, uncertainties and system artifacts are presented for 35 trace gas species in canister samples. Comparisons of reported mixing ratios from each field campaign with measurements from other instruments are also presented.

  11. Development of a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for the determination of pesticides in gaseous and particulate phases in the atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borras, E.; Sanchez, P.; Munoz, A. [Instituto Universitario Centro de Estudios Ambientales del Mediterraneo CEAM-UMH (Fundacion CEAM-UMH), 46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Tortajada-Genaro, L.A., E-mail: luitorge@qim.upv.es [Instituto IDM, Departamento de Quimica, Universitat Politecnica de Valencia, Cami de Vera s/n 46022 Valencia (Spain)

    2011-08-05

    Highlights: {yields} An efficient method for the determination of sixteen pesticides in atmospheric samples. {yields} XAD-4 is an interesting support for collecting gas-phase pesticides, with similar performances than the conventional XAD-2. {yields} The ultrasonic extraction is cheaper, less aggressive and time-consuming with excellent analytical parameters. {yields} The method has been successfully tested by using high volume atmospheric simulation chamber and field campaigns. - Abstract: A reliable multi-residue method for determining gaseous and particulate phase pesticides in atmospheric samples has been developed. This method, based on full scan gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), allowed the proper determination of sixteen relevant pesticides, in a wide range of concentrations and without the influence of interferences. The pesticides were benfluralin, bitertanol, buprofezin, chlorfenvinphos, chlorpyrifos, chlorpyrifos-methyl, ethalfluralin, fenthion, lindane, malathion, methidathion, propachlor, propanil, pyriproxifen, tebuconazol and trifluralin. Comparisons of two types of sampling filters (quartz and glass fibre) and four types of solid-phase cartridges (XAD-2, XAD-4, Florisil and Orbo-49P) showed that the most suitable supports were glass fibre filter for particulate pesticides and XAD-2 and XAD-4 cartridges for gaseous pesticides (>95% recovery). Evaluations of elution solvents for ultrasonic-assisted extraction demonstrated that isooctane is better than ethylacetate, dichloromethane, methanol or a mixture of acetone:hexane (1:1). Recovery assays and the standard addition method were performed to validate the proposed methodology. Moreover, large simulator chamber experiments allowed the best study of the gas-particle partitioning of pesticides for testing the sampling efficiency for the validation of an analytical multiresidue method for pesticides in air. Satisfactory analytical parameters were obtained, with a repeatability of 5 {+-} 1%, a

  12. Daily changes of radon concentration in soil gas under influence of atmospheric factors: room temperature, soil surface temperature and relative humidity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lara, Evelise G.; Oliveira, Arno Heeren de, E-mail: evelise.lara@gmail.com, E-mail: heeren@nuclear.ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear; Rocha, Zildete; Rios, Francisco Javier, E-mail: rochaz@cdtn.br, E-mail: javier@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    This work aims at relating the daily change in the radon concentration in soil gas in a Red Yellow Acrisol (SiBCS) under influence of atmospheric factors: room temperature, soil surface temperature and relative humidity. The {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th, U content and permeability were also performed. The measurements of radon soil gas were carried out by using an AlphaGUARD monitor. The {sup 226}Ra activity concentration was made by Gamma Spectrometry (HPGe); the permeability was carried out using the RADON-JOK permeameter and ICP-MS analysis to {sup 232}Th and U content. The soil permeability is 5.0 x 10{sup -12}, which is considered average. The {sup 226}Ra (22.2 ± 0.3 Bq.m{sup -3}); U content (73.4 ± 3.6 Bq.kg{sup -1}) and {sup 232}Th content (55.3 ± 4.0 Bq.kg{sup -1}) were considered above of average concentrations, according to mean values for soils typical (~ 35.0 Bq.kg{sup -1}) by UNSCEAR. The results showed a difference of 26.0% between the highest and the lowest concentration of radon in soil gas: at midnight (15.5 ± 1.0 kBq.m{sup -3}) and 3:00 pm, the highest mean radon concentration (21.0 ± 1.0 kBq.m{sup -3}). The room temperature and surface soil temperature showed equivalent behavior and the surface soil temperature slightly below room temperature during the entire monitoring time. Nevertheless, the relative humidity showed the highest cyclical behavior, showing a higher relationship with the radon concentration in soil gas. (author)

  13. Soil-Atmosphere Greenhouse Gas Fluxes on the Margins of the Congo Forest: Effects of Forest Conversion towards Smallholder Agricultural Lands and Agricultural Intensification

    Science.gov (United States)

    kwatcho Kengdo, S.; Sonwa, D. J.; Njine-Bememba, C. B.; Djatsa, L. D.; Rufino, M. C.; Verchot, L. V.; Tejedor, J.; Dannenmann, M.

    2016-12-01

    The forests of the Congo Basin are subject to deforestation and land use change, which may severely influence the soil-atmosphere exchange of greenhouse gases (GHG). However, due to absence of analytical capacities in Central Africa, there is a lack of knowledge on fluxes of CO2, CH4 and N2O at the soil-atmosphere interface for natural and managed ecosystems, which introduces large uncertainties into regional and national GHG reporting. The objectives of this study were to quantify GHG emissions from typical land use on the margins of the Congo forests, to analyze seasonal variability and environmental controls of soil-atmosphere GHG fluxes across a land use gradient and explore options of sustainable intensification of maize cultivation. In Cameroon, we quantified fluxes of CO2, CH4, and N2O at the soil - atmosphere interface in secondary forests, cocoa agroforests, unfertilized mixed crop fields, and three different types of maize cultivation: unfertilized control, maize intercropped with N fixing beans, maize applied with mineral nitrogen fertilizer. We used manual static chamber techniques with approximately weekly temporal resolution over a full year and analyzed gas samples using a gas chromatograph. Soil temperature and moisture data were permanently recorded at main sites and soil sampling provided information on soil mineral N content. We found highest CO2 and N2O emissions, net CH4 uptake and soil mineral N concentrations in the secondary forest with lower values observed in cocoa agroforest and in particular in extensive mixed crop. Soil moisture changes were the dominant driver of seasonal changes of GHG fluxes at all study sites. Intercropping with N fixing beans did not alter soil N2O emissions from maize fields. In contrast, application of mineral N increased soil N2O emissions by more than a factor of five. Our work highlights the importance of soil moisture as the driver of GHG fluxes and in particular for N2O indicates a strong decrease in soil

  14. Atmospheric Retrieval for Direct Imaging Spectroscopy of Gas Giants in Reflected Light. II. Orbital Phase and Planetary Radius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Michael; Lupu, Roxana; Marley, Mark S.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Robinson, Tyler; Lewis, Nikole

    2017-03-01

    Future space-based telescopes, such as the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST), will observe the reflected light spectra of directly imaged extrasolar planets. Interpretation of such data presents a number of novel challenges, including accounting for unknown planet radius and uncertain stellar illumination phase angle. Here, we report on our continued development of Markov Chain Monte Carlo retrieval methods for addressing these issues in the interpretation of such data. Specifically, we explore how the unknown planet radius and potentially poorly known observer-planet-star phase angle impacts retrievals of parameters of interest such as atmospheric methane abundance, cloud properties, and surface gravity. As expected, the uncertainty in retrieved values is a strong function of the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of the observed spectra, particularly for low metallicity atmospheres, which lack deep absorption signatures. Meaningful results may only be possible above certain S/N thresholds; for cases across a metallicity range of 1–50 times solar, we find that only an S/N of 20 systematically reproduces a value close to the correct methane abundance at all phase angles. However, even in cases where the phase angle is poorly known we find that the planet radius can be constrained to within a factor of two. We find that uncertainty in planet radius decreases at phase angles past quadrature, as the highly forward-scattering nature of the atmosphere at these geometries limits the possible volume of phase space that relevant parameters can occupy. Finally, we present an estimation of possible improvement that can result from combining retrievals against observations at multiple phase angles.

  15. Binaural Rendering in MPEG Surround

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristofer Kjörling

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes novel methods for evoking a multichannel audio experience over stereo headphones. In contrast to the conventional convolution-based approach where, for example, five input channels are filtered using ten head-related transfer functions, the current approach is based on a parametric representation of the multichannel signal, along with either a parametric representation of the head-related transfer functions or a reduced set of head-related transfer functions. An audio scene with multiple virtual sound sources is represented by a mono or a stereo downmix signal of all sound source signals, accompanied by certain statistical (spatial properties. These statistical properties of the sound sources are either combined with statistical properties of head-related transfer functions to estimate “binaural parameters” that represent the perceptually relevant aspects of the auditory scene or used to create a limited set of combined head-related transfer functions that can be applied directly on the downmix signal. Subsequently, a binaural rendering stage reinstates the statistical properties of the sound sources by applying the estimated binaural parameters or the reduced set of combined head-related transfer functions directly on the downmix. If combined with parametric multichannel audio coders such as MPEG Surround, the proposed methods are advantageous over conventional methods in terms of perceived quality and computational complexity.

  16. Reduced surround inhibition in musicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hae-Won; Kang, Suk Y; Hallett, Mark; Sohn, Young H

    2012-06-01

    To investigate whether surround inhibition (SI) in the motor system is altered in professional musicians, we performed a transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) study in 10 professional musicians and 15 age-matched healthy non-musicians. TMS was set to be triggered by self-initiated flexion of the index finger at different intervals ranging from 3 to 1,000 ms. Average motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitudes obtained from self-triggered TMS were normalized to average MEPs of the control TMS at rest and expressed as a percentage. Normalized MEP amplitudes of the abductor digiti minimi (ADM) muscles were compared between the musicians and non-musicians with the primary analysis being the intervals between 3 and 80 ms (during the movement). A mixed-design ANOVA revealed a significant difference in normalized ADM MEPs during the index finger flexion between groups, with less SI in the musicians. This study demonstrated that the functional operation of SI is less strong in musicians than non-musicians, perhaps due to practice of movement synergies involving both muscles. Reduced SI, however, could lead susceptible musicians to be prone to develop task-specific dystonia.

  17. Binaural Rendering in MPEG Surround

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breebaart, Jeroen; Villemoes, Lars; Kjörling, Kristofer

    2008-12-01

    This paper describes novel methods for evoking a multichannel audio experience over stereo headphones. In contrast to the conventional convolution-based approach where, for example, five input channels are filtered using ten head-related transfer functions, the current approach is based on a parametric representation of the multichannel signal, along with either a parametric representation of the head-related transfer functions or a reduced set of head-related transfer functions. An audio scene with multiple virtual sound sources is represented by a mono or a stereo downmix signal of all sound source signals, accompanied by certain statistical (spatial) properties. These statistical properties of the sound sources are either combined with statistical properties of head-related transfer functions to estimate "binaural parameters" that represent the perceptually relevant aspects of the auditory scene or used to create a limited set of combined head-related transfer functions that can be applied directly on the downmix signal. Subsequently, a binaural rendering stage reinstates the statistical properties of the sound sources by applying the estimated binaural parameters or the reduced set of combined head-related transfer functions directly on the downmix. If combined with parametric multichannel audio coders such as MPEG Surround, the proposed methods are advantageous over conventional methods in terms of perceived quality and computational complexity.

  18. Automatic on-line monitoring of atmospheric volatile organic compounds: gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-flame ionization detection as complementary systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Blas, Maite; Navazo, Marino; Alonso, Lucio; Durana, Nieves; Iza, Jon

    2011-11-15

    Traditionally air quality networks have been carrying out the continuous, on-line measurement of volatile organic compounds (VOC) in ambient air with GC-FID. In this paper some identification and coelution problems observed while using this technique in long-term measurement campaigns are described. In order to solve these problems a GC-MS was set up and operated simultaneously with a GC-FID for C2-C11 VOCs measurement. There are few on-line, unattended, long term measurements of atmospheric VOCs performed with GC-MS. In this work such a system has been optimized for that purpose, achieving good repeatability, linearity, and detection limits of the order of the GC-FID ones, even smaller in some cases. VOC quantification has been made by using response factors, which is not frequent in on-line GC-MS. That way, the identification and coelution problems detected in the GC-FID, which may led to reporting erroneous data, could be corrected. The combination of GC-FID and GC-MS as complementary techniques for the measurement of speciated VOCs in ambient air at sub-ppbv levels is proposed. Some results of the measurements are presented, including concentration values for some compounds not found until now on public ambient air VOC databases, which were identified and quantified combining both techniques. Results may also help to correct previously published VOC data with wrongly identified compounds by reprocessing raw chromatographic data.

  19. Automatic on-line monitoring of atmospheric volatile organic compounds: Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-flame ionization detection as complementary systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blas, Maite de, E-mail: maite.deblas@ehu.es [Chemical and Environmental Engineering Department, University College of Technical Mining and Civil Engineering, University of the Basque Country, Colina de Beurco s/n, 48902 Barakaldo (Spain); Navazo, Marino; Alonso, Lucio; Durana, Nieves [Chemical and Environmental Engineering Department, School of Engineering, University of the Basque Country, Alameda de Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain); Iza, Jon [Chemical and Environmental Engineering Department, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of the Basque Country, Paseo de la Universidad, 7, 01006, Vitoria-Gasteiz (Spain)

    2011-11-15

    Traditionally air quality networks have been carrying out the continuous, on-line measurement of volatile organic compounds (VOC) in ambient air with GC-FID. In this paper some identification and coelution problems observed while using this technique in long-term measurement campaigns are described. In order to solve these problems a GC-MS was set up and operated simultaneously with a GC-FID for C{sub 2}-C{sub 11} VOCs measurement. There are few on-line, unattended, long term measurements of atmospheric VOCs performed with GC-MS. In this work such a system has been optimized for that purpose, achieving good repeatability, linearity, and detection limits of the order of the GC-FID ones, even smaller in some cases. VOC quantification has been made by using response factors, which is not frequent in on-line GC-MS. That way, the identification and coelution problems detected in the GC-FID, which may led to reporting erroneous data, could be corrected. The combination of GC-FID and GC-MS as complementary techniques for the measurement of speciated VOCs in ambient air at sub-ppbv levels is proposed. Some results of the measurements are presented, including concentration values for some compounds not found until now on public ambient air VOC databases, which were identified and quantified combining both techniques. Results may also help to correct previously published VOC data with wrongly identified compounds by reprocessing raw chromatographic data.

  20. Hurricane Gustav Aerial Photography: Rapid ResponseImagery of the Surrounding Regions After Landfall

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The imagery posted on this site is of the surrounding regionsafter Hurricane Gustav made landfall. The aerial photography missions wereconducted by the NOAA Remote...

  1. Hurricane Dennis Aerial Photography: Draft Image Mosaics of the Florida Panhandle and Surrounding Regions After Landfall

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The imagery posted on this site is of the Florida panhandle and surrounding regions after Hurricane Dennis made landfall. The regions photographed range from...

  2. Hurricane Ike Aerial Photography: Rapid ResponseImagery of the Surrounding Regions After Landfall

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The imagery posted on this site is of the surrounding regionsafter Hurricane Ike made landfall. The aerial photography missions wereconducted by the NOAA Remote...

  3. A gas laser design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syudzo, Y.; Nooya, Kh.

    1984-05-28

    A gas laser design that excludes direct contact between the gas medium and the atmosphere is proposed. The laser operates at a reduced gas pressure. After shutdown, a special system is used to increase the gas pressure inside the discharge chamber, which approaches atmospheric pressure. The laser employs an internal optical resonator. The electrical discharge which excites the gas medium originates from three electrodes located within the gas discharge tube.

  4. Simulation of the growth kinetics of boride layers formed on Fe during gas boriding in H2-BCl3 atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulka, M.; Makuch, N.; Pertek, A.; Małdziński, L.

    2013-03-01

    The modeling of the boriding kinetics is considered as a necessary tool to select the suitable process parameters for obtaining boride layer of an adequate thickness. Therefore, the simulation of the growth kinetics of boride layers has gained much attention for last years. The majority of the published works described the kinetics of the pack-boriding or paste-boriding. In this study, the model of growth kinetics of two-phase boride layer (FeB+Fe2B) on pure Fe was proposed for gas boriding. Displacements of the two interfaces (FeB/Fe2B and Fe2B/substrate) resulted from a difference of the arrival flux of interstitial boron atoms to one phase and the departure flux of the boron atoms from this phase to the second phase. The mass balance equations were formulated. The measurements of thickness of both zones (FeB and Fe2B), for different temperature of boriding, were used for calculations. Based on the experimental data, the parabolic growth constants AFeB and B versus the temperature of boriding were determined. The linear relationships were accepted. As a consequence, the activation energies (QFeB and Q) were calculated. The calculated values were comparable to other data derived from gas boriding. The presented model can predict the thicknesses of the FeB and Fe2B zones (XFeB and Y, respectively) formed on pure Fe during gas boriding. Additionally, the diffusion annealing after boriding was analyzed. This process was carried out in order to obtain a single-phase boride layer (Fe2B). The relationship between the reduction in FeB zone (dXFeB) and the growth in Fe2B phase (dY) was determined. The time tXFeB=0, needed for the total elimination of FeB phase in the boride layer was calculated and compared to the experimental data.

  5. Atmospheric chemistry of dimethyl sulfide. Kinetics of the CH3SCH2O2 + NO2 reaction in the gas phase at 296 K

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O.J.; Sehested, J.; Wallington, T.J.

    1995-01-01

    The pulse radiolysis of SF6/CH3SCH3/O-2/NO2 gas mixtures was used to generate CH3SCH2O2 radicals in the presence of NO2. By monitoring the rate of NO2 decay using its absorption at 400 nm, rate constants for the reaction of CH3SCH2O2 radicals with NO2 were measured to be (9.2 +/- 0.9) x 10......(-12) and (7.1 +/- 0.9) X 10(-12) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) at room temperature in 1000 and 300 mbar of SF6 diluent, respectively. Results are discussed with respect to the atmospheric chemistry of dimethyl sulfide....

  6. THE IMPACT OF SELECTED PROCESSES AND TECHNOLOGICAL PARAMETERS ON THE GEOMETRY OF THE WELD POOL WHEN WELDING IN SHIELS GAS ATMOSPHERE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Bradáč

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper is focused on welding with a consumable electrode in a gas shield atmosphere and its main aim is to show the influence of selected processes and technological parameters on the geometry of the weld pool in terms of theoretical and experimental views. For this purpose, the parametric areas defined by the change of the welding current and welding rate were determined. Apart from the influence of these parametric areas, the influence of other technological input variables, including the wire diameter and preheating temperature, was also studied. The experimentally obtained geometric data of the weld pool can be used for technological welding procedures WPS and especially for simulation calculations to obtain a more accurate numerical model of the heat source. This makes it possible to get accurate simulation results and to better understand the impact of other variables that influence the welding process. This all helps to the optimization of the welding process for several applications.

  7. Levels, profiles and gas-particle distribution of atmospheric PCDD/Fs in vehicle parking lots of a South China metropolitan area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huiru; Zhou, Lin; Ren, Man; Sheng, Guoying; Fu, Jiamo; Peng, Ping'an

    2014-01-01

    Vehicle exhaust is one important PCDD/F source in urban areas. In this study, occurrence and inhalation of atmospheric PCDD/Fs in three enclosed/semi-enclosed large-scale vehicle parks were investigated. The park for heavy-duty diesel-trucks exhibited the highest atmospheric 2,3,7,8-PCDD/F concentrations (17.7 ± 4.3 pg m(-3), 0.818 ± 0.264 pg I-TEQm(-3)), followed sequentially by those for liquefied petroleum gas-buses and for unleaded gasoline-cars. High-chlorinated congeners/homologues dominated 2,3,7,8-PCDD/F profiles. Principal component analysis indicated their similarities with tailpipe studies. More than 70% of PCDD/Fs were particle-bound and their congener/homologue patterns differed from those of gaseous PCDD/Fs. In all studied parks logarithms of the gas/particle partitioning coefficients (Kps) of PCDD/F homologues were linearly correlated with those of their sub-cooled vapor pressures (pLs). Daily PCDD/F doses inhaled by park-workers were estimated to be between 0.099-0.227 pg I-TEQ kg(-1)d(-1). Their probabilistic incremental lifetime cancer risks were 1.08 × 10(-5)-2.07 × 10(-5), which were in the acceptable range (1.0 × 10(-4)-1.0 × 10(-6)). However, all data from the diesel-truck park significantly exceeded the upper limit for PCDD/Fs in ambient air of Japan (0.6 pg TEQm(-3)). Hence, air pollution and adequate ventilation should be considered during the design and construction of such enclosed/semi-enclosed parks.

  8. Atmospheric pressure gas chromatography quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry for simultaneous determination of fifteen organochlorine pesticides in soil and water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhipeng; Dong, Fengshou; Xu, Jun; Liu, Xingang; Wu, Xiaohu; Chen, Zenglong; Pan, Xinglu; Zheng, Yongquan

    2016-02-26

    In this study, the application of atmospheric pressure gas chromatography quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (APGC-QTOF-MS) has been investigated for simultaneous determination of fifteen organochlorine pesticides in soil and water. Soft ionization of atmospheric pressure gas chromatography was evaluated by comparing with traditional more energetic electron impact ionization (EI). APGC-QTOF-MS showed a sensitivity enhancement by approximately 7-305 times. The QuEChERs (Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged, and Safe) method was used to pretreat the soil samples and solid phase extraction (SPE) cleanup was used for water samples. Precision, accuracy and stability experiments were undertaken to evaluate the feasibility of the method. The results showed that the mean recoveries for all the pesticides from the soil samples were 70.3-118.9% with 0.4-18.3% intra-day relative standard deviations (RSD) and 1.0-15.6% inter-day RSD at 10, 50 and 500 μg/L levels, while the mean recoveries of water samples were 70.0-118.0% with 1.1-17.8% intra-day RSD and 0.5-12.2% inter-day RSD at 0.1, 0.5 and 1.0 μg/L levels. Excellent linearity (0.9931 ≦ r(2)≤ 0.9999) was obtained for each pesticides in the soil and water matrix calibration curves within the range of 0.01-1.0mg/L. The limits of detection (LOD) for each of the 15 pesticides was less than 3.00 μg/L, while the limit of quantification (LOQ) was less than 9.99 μg/L in soil and water. Furthermore, the developed method was successfully applied to monitor the targeted pesticides in real soil and water samples.

  9. A single gas chromatograph for accurate atmospheric mixing ratio measurements of CO2, CH4, N2O, SF6 and CO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. A. J. Meijer

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available We present an adapted gas chromatograph capable of measuring simultaneously and semi-continuously the atmospheric mixing ratios of the greenhouse gases CO2, CH4, N2O and SF6 and the trace gas CO with high precision and long-term stability. The novelty of our design is that all species are measured with only one device, making it a very cost-efficient system. No time lags are introduced between the measured mixing ratios. The system is designed to operate fully autonomously which makes it ideal for measurements at remote and unmanned stations. Only a small amount of sample air is needed, which makes this system also highly suitable for flask air measurements. In principle, only two reference cylinders are needed for daily operation and only one calibration per year against international WMO standards is sufficient to obtain high measurement precision and accuracy. The system described in this paper is in use since May 2006 at our atmospheric measurement site Lutjewad near Groningen, The Netherlands at 6°21´ E, 53°24´N, 1 m a.s.l. Results show the long-term stability of the system. Observed measurement precisions at our remote research station Lutjewad were: ±0.04 ppm for CO2, ±0.8 ppb for CH4, ±0.8 ppb for CO, ±0.3 ppb for N2O, and ±0.1 ppt for SF6. The ambient mixing ratios of all measured species as observed at station Lutjewad for the period of May 2007 to August 2008 are presented as well.

  10. Experimental Investigation of Gas/Slag/Matte/Tridymite Equilibria in the Cu-Fe-O-S-Si System in Controlled Atmospheres: Development of Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallah-Mehrjardi, Ata; Hidayat, Taufiq; Hayes, Peter C.; Jak, Evgueni

    2017-08-01

    The majority of primary pyrometallurgical copper making processes involve the formation of two immiscible liquid phases, i.e., matte product and the slag phase. There are significant gaps and discrepancies in the phase equilibria data of the slag and the matte systems due to issues and difficulties in performing the experiments and phase analysis. The present study aims to develop an improved experimental methodology for accurate characterisation of gas/slag/matte/tridymite equilibria in the Cu-Fe-O-S-Si system under controlled atmospheres. The experiments involve high-temperature equilibration of synthetic mixtures on silica substrates in CO/CO2/SO2/Ar atmospheres, rapid quenching of samples into water, and direct composition measurement of the equilibrium phases using Electron Probe X-ray Microanalysis (EPMA). A four-point-test procedure was applied to ensure the achievement of equilibrium, which included the following: (i) investigation of equilibration as a function of time, (ii) assessment of phase homogeneity, (iii) confirmation of equilibrium by approaching from different starting conditions, and (iv) systematic analysis of the reactions specific to the system. An iterative improved experimental methodology was developed using this four-point-test approach to characterize the complex multi-component, multi-phase equilibria with high accuracy and precision. The present study is a part of a broader overall research program on the characterisation of the multi-component (Cu-Fe-O-S-Si-Al-Ca-Mg), multi-phase (gas/slag/matte/metal/solids) systems with minor elements (Pb, Zn, As, Bi, Sn, Sb, Ag, and Au).

  11. Bacterial spore inactivation by atmospheric-pressure plasmas in the presence or absence of UV photons as obtained with the same gas mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudam, M K [Groupe de Physique des Plasmas, Universite de Montreal, CP 6128, Succursale Centre-Ville, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3J7 (Canada); Moisan, M [Groupe de Physique des Plasmas, Universite de Montreal, CP 6128, Succursale Centre-Ville, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3J7 (Canada); Saoudi, B [Groupe de Physique des Plasmas, Universite de Montreal, CP 6128, Succursale Centre-Ville, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3J7 (Canada); Popovici, C [Groupe de Physique des Plasmas, Universite de Montreal, CP 6128, Succursale Centre-Ville, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3J7 (Canada); Gherardi, N [Laboratoire de Genie Electrique de Toulouse, Universite Paul Sabatier, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex (France); Massines, F [Laboratoire de Genie Electrique de Toulouse, Universite Paul Sabatier, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex (France)

    2006-08-21

    This paper comprises two main parts: a review of the literature on atmospheric-pressure discharges used for micro-organism inactivation, focused on the inactivation mechanisms, and a presentation of our research results showing, in particular, that UV photons can be the dominant species in the inactivation process. The possibility of achieving spore inactivation through UV radiation using an atmospheric-pressure discharge or its flowing afterglow is the object of a continuing controversy. In fact, the review of the literature that we present shows that a majority of researchers have come to the conclusion that, at atmospheric pressure, chemically reactive species such as free radicals, metastable atoms and molecules always control the inactivation process, while UV photons play only a minor role or no role at all. In contrast, only a few articles suggest or claim that UV photons coming from atmospheric-pressure discharges can, in some cases, inactivate micro-organisms, but the experimental data presented and the supporting arguments brought forward in that respect are relatively incomplete. Using a dielectric-barrier discharge operated at atmospheric pressure in an N{sub 2}-N{sub 2}O mixture, we present, for the first time, experiments where micro-organisms are subjected to plasma conditions such that, on the one hand, UV radiation is strong or, on the other hand, there is no UV radiation, the two different situations being obtained with the same experimental arrangement, including the same gas mixture, N{sub 2}-N{sub 2}O. To achieve maximum UV radiation, the concentration of the oxidant molecule (N{sub 2}O) added to N{sub 2} needs to be tuned carefully, resulting then in the fastest inactivation rate. The concentration range of the oxidant molecule in the mixture for which the UV intensity is significant is extremely narrow, a fact that possibly explains why such a mode of plasma sterilization was not readily observed. The survival curves obtained under dominant

  12. On measurements of aerosol-gas composition of the atmosphere during two expeditions in 2013 along Northern Sea Route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakerin, S. M.; Bobrikov, A. A.; Bukin, O. A.; Golobokova, L. P.; Pol'kin, Vas. V.; Pol'kin, Vik. V.; Shmirko, K. A.; Kabanov, D. M.; Khodzher, T. V.; Pavlov, A. N.; Potemkin, V. L.; Radionov, V. F.

    2015-06-01

    We presented the results of expedition measurements of the set of physical-chemical characteristics of atmospheric aerosol in water basins of Arctic and Far East seas, performed onboard RV Akademik Fedorov (17 August-22 September 2013) and RV Professor Khljustin (24 July-7 September 2013). The specific features of spatial distribution and time variations of aerosol optical depth (AOD) of the atmosphere in the wavelength range of 0.34-2.14 μm and boundary layer height, aerosol and black carbon mass concentrations, and disperse and chemical composition of aerosol are discussed. Over the Arctic Ocean (on the route of RV Akademik Fedorov) there is a decrease in aerosol and black carbon concentrations in northeastern direction: higher values were observed in the region of Spitsbergen and near the Kola Peninsula; and minimum values were observed at northern margins of the Laptev Sea. Average AOD (0.5 μm) values in this remote region were 0.03; the aerosol and black carbon mass concentrations were 875 and 22 ng m-3, respectively. The spatial distributions of most aerosol characteristics over Far East seas show their latitudinal decrease in the northern direction. On transit of RV Professor Khljustin from Japan to Chukchi Sea, the aerosol number concentration decreased, on the average, from 23.7 to 2.5 cm-3, the black carbon mass concentration decreased from 150 to 50 ng m-3, and AOD decreased from 0.19 to 0.03. We analyzed the variations in the boundary layer height, measured by ship-based lidar: the average value was 520 m, and the maximal value was 1200 m. In latitudinal distribution of the boundary layer height, there is a characteristic minimum at latitude of ∼ 55° N. For water basins of eight seas, we present the chemical compositions of water-soluble aerosol fraction (ions, elements) and small gaseous impurities, as well as estimates of their vertical fluxes. It is shown that substances are mainly (75-89 %) supplied from the atmosphere to the sea surface

  13. On measurements of aerosol–gas composition of the atmosphere during two expeditions in 2013 along Northern Sea Route

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Sakerin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We presented the results of expedition measurements of the set of physical-chemical characteristics of atmospheric aerosol in water basins of Arctic and Far East seas, performed onboard RV Akademik Fedorov (17 August–22 September 2013 and RV Professor Khljustin (24 July–7 September 2013. The specific features of spatial distribution and time variations of aerosol optical depth (AOD of the atmosphere in the wavelength range of 0.34–2.14 μm and boundary layer height, aerosol and black carbon mass concentrations, and disperse and chemical composition of aerosol are discussed. Over the Arctic Ocean (on the route of RV Akademik Fedorov there is a decrease in aerosol and black carbon concentrations in northeastern direction: higher values were observed in the region of Spitsbergen and near the Kola Peninsula; and minimum values were observed at northern margins of the Laptev Sea. Average AOD (0.5 μm values in this remote region were 0.03; the aerosol and black carbon mass concentrations were 875 and 22 ng m-3, respectively. The spatial distributions of most aerosol characteristics over Far East seas show their latitudinal decrease in the northern direction. On transit of RV Professor Khljustin from Japan to Chukchi Sea, the aerosol number concentration decreased, on the average, from 23.7 to 2.5 cm-3, the black carbon mass concentration decreased from 150 to 50 ng m-3, and AOD decreased from 0.19 to 0.03. We analyzed the variations in the boundary layer height, measured by ship-based lidar: the average value was 520 m, and the maximal value was 1200 m. In latitudinal distribution of the boundary layer height, there is a characteristic minimum at latitude of ∼ 55° N. For water basins of eight seas, we present the chemical compositions of water-soluble aerosol fraction (ions, elements and small gaseous impurities, as well as estimates of their vertical fluxes. It is shown that substances are mainly (75–89 % supplied from the atmosphere to

  14. A modified cryostat for photo-electrical characterization of porous materials in controlled atmosphere at very low gas dosage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Cultrera

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We developed an integrated system for photo-electrical characterization of materials for sensing applications in strictly controlled environment conditions. The peculiar aspect of this setup is the capability of a fine-tuned gas dosage and a fast dynamic chamber pressure control, coupled with current and voltage sensing within a modified cryostat. To illustrate the capabilities of our system we have characterised both p+-type mesoporous silicon (meso-PS membranes and nano-crystalline mesoporous titanium dioxide (nc-TiO2 films. In particular, as a main topic is presented a well-resolved characterization of mesoporous silicon electrical conductivity changes induced by presence of ethanol. At low pore filling level adsorbate-shunted conduction is avoided, while dielectric screening effects on frozen doping centres are observable. Beside we presented observation of mesoporous titanium dioxide photo-conductivity as a function of different gas pressure reporting opposite effects of relatively low- and high-pressure regimes. High reproducibility provided by the system is discussed as a final remark.

  15. Atmospheric pressure ionization and gas phase ion mobility studies of isomeric dihalogenated benzenes using different ionization techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsdorf, H.; Nazarov, E. G.; Eiceman, G. A.

    2004-03-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) featuring different ionization techniques was used to analyze isomeric ortho-, meta- and para-dihalogenated benzenes in order to assess how structural features affect ion formation and drift behavior. The structure of the product ions formed was investigated by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) mass spectrometry (MS) and IMS-MS coupling. Photoionization provided [M]+ ions for chlorinated and fluorinated compounds while bromine was cleaved from isomers of dibromobenzene and bromofluorobenzene. This ionization technique does not permit the different isomers to be distinguished. Comparable ions and additional clustered ions were obtained using 63Ni ionization. Depending on the chemical constitution, different clustered ions were observed in ion mobility spectra for the separate isomers of dichlorobenzene and dibromobenzene. Corona discharge ionization permits the most sensitive detection of dihalogenated compounds. Only clustered product ions were obtained. Corona discharge ionization enables the classification of different structural isomers of dichlorobenzene, dibromobenzene and bromofluorobenzene.

  16. Estimating greenhouse gas emissions at the soil-atmosphere interface in forested watersheds of the US Northeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Joshua; Vidon, Philippe; Gross, Jordan; Beier, Colin; Caputo, Jesse; Mitchell, Myron

    2016-05-01

    Although anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG: CO2, CH4, N2O) are unequivocally tied to climate change, natural systems such as forests have the potential to affect GHG concentration in the atmosphere. Our study reports GHG emissions as CO2, CH4, N2O, and CO2eq fluxes across a range of landscape hydrogeomorphic classes (wetlands, riparian areas, lower hillslopes, upper hillslopes) in a forested watershed of the Northeastern USA and assesses the usability of the topographic wetness index (TWI) as a tool to identify distinct landscape geomorphic classes to aid in the development of GHG budgets at the soil atmosphere interface at the watershed scale. Wetlands were hot spots of GHG production (in CO2eq) in the landscape owing to large CH4 emission. However, on an areal basis, the lower hillslope class had the greatest influence on the net watershed CO2eq efflux, mainly because it encompassed the largest proportion of the study watershed (54 %) and had high CO2 fluxes relative to other land classes. On an annual basis, summer, fall, winter, and spring accounted for 40, 27, 9, and 24 % of total CO2eq emissions, respectively. When compared to other approaches (e.g., random or systematic sampling design), the TWI landscape classification method was successful in identifying dominant landscape hydrogeomorphic classes and offered the possibility of systematically accounting for small areas of the watershed (e.g., wetlands) that have a disproportionate effect on total GHG emissions. Overall, results indicate that soil CO2eq efflux in the Archer Creek Watershed may exceed C uptake by live trees under current conditions.

  17. Carbonation of alkaline paper mill waste to reduce CO{sub 2} greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Lopez, R. [Laboratoire de Geophysique Interne et Tectonophysique, CNRS-OSUG-UJF, Universite Joseph Fourier Grenoble I, Maison des Geosciences, BP 53, 38041 Grenoble Cedex (France); Department of Geology, University of Huelva, Campus ' El Carmen' , 21071 Huelva (Spain)], E-mail: rafael.perez@dgeo.uhu.es; Montes-Hernandez, G. [Laboratoire de Geophysique Interne et Tectonophysique, CNRS-OSUG-UJF, Universite Joseph Fourier Grenoble I, Maison des Geosciences, BP 53, 38041 Grenoble Cedex (France); Nieto, J.M. [Department of Geology, University of Huelva, Campus ' El Carmen' , 21071 Huelva (Spain); Renard, F. [Laboratoire de Geodynamique des Chaines Alpines, CNRS-OSUG-UJF, Universite Joseph Fourier Grenoble I, Maison des Geosciences, BP 53, 38041 Grenoble Cedex (France); Physics of Geological Processes, University of Oslo (Norway); Charlet, L. [Laboratoire de Geophysique Interne et Tectonophysique, CNRS-OSUG-UJF, Universite Joseph Fourier Grenoble I, Maison des Geosciences, BP 53, 38041 Grenoble Cedex (France)

    2008-08-15

    The global warming of Earth's near-surface, air and oceans in recent decades is a direct consequence of anthropogenic emission of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere such as CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O and CFCs. The CO{sub 2} emissions contribute approximately 60% to this climate change. This study investigates experimentally the aqueous carbonation mechanisms of an alkaline paper mill waste containing about 55 wt% portlandite (Ca(OH){sub 2}) as a possible mineralogical CO{sub 2} sequestration process. The overall carbonation reaction includes the following steps: (1) Ca release from portlandite dissolution, (2) CO{sub 2} dissolution in water and (3) CaCO{sub 3} precipitation. This CO{sub 2} sequestration mechanism was supported by geochemical modelling of final solutions using PHREEQC software, and observations by scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction of final reaction products. According to the experimental protocol, the system proposed would favour the total capture of approx. 218 kg of CO{sub 2} into stable calcite/ton of paper waste, independently of initial CO{sub 2} pressure. The final product from the carbonation process is a calcite (ca. 100 wt%)-water dispersion. Indeed, the total captured CO{sub 2} mineralized as calcite could be stored in degraded soils or even used for diverse industrial applications. This result demonstrates the possibility of using the alkaline liquid-solid waste for CO{sub 2} mitigation and reduction of greenhouse effect gases into the atmosphere.

  18. Atmospheric concentrations, sources and gas-particle partitioning of PAHs in Beijing after the 29th Olympic Games

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma Wanli [International Joint Research Center for Persistent Toxic Substances (IJRC-PTS), State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); Sun Dezhi [International Joint Research Center for Persistent Toxic Substances (IJRC-PTS), State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Beijing Forestry University, Beijing 100083 (China); Shen Weiguo [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Beijing Forestry University, Beijing 100083 (China); Yang Meng [IJRC-PTS, Dalian Maritime University, Dalian (China); Qi Hong; Liu Liyan; Shen Jimin [International Joint Research Center for Persistent Toxic Substances (IJRC-PTS), State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); Li Yifan, E-mail: ijrc_pts_paper@yahoo.com [International Joint Research Center for Persistent Toxic Substances (IJRC-PTS), State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); Science and Technology Branch, Environment Canada, Toronto, Ontario M3H5T4 (Canada)

    2011-07-15

    A comprehensive sampling campaign was carried out to study atmospheric concentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Beijing and to evaluate the effectiveness of source control strategies in reducing PAHs pollution after the 29th Olympic Games. The sub-cooled liquid vapor pressure (logP{sub L}{sup o})-based model and octanol-air partition coefficient (K{sub oa})-based model were applied based on each seasonal dateset. Regression analysis among log K{sub P}, logP{sub L}{sup o} and log K{sub oa} exhibited high significant correlations for four seasons. Source factors were identified by principle component analysis and contributions were further estimated by multiple linear regression. Pyrogenic sources and coke oven emission were identified as major sources for both the non-heating and heating seasons. As compared with literatures, the mean PAH concentrations before and after the 29th Olympic Games were reduced by more than 60%, indicating that the source control measures were effective for reducing PAHs pollution in Beijing. - Highlights: > This is the first comprehensive study of PAHs in atmosphere after the 29th Olympics in Beijing, China. > The air quality before and after 29th Olympics has attracted much attention worldwide. > The study was helpful for other countries to understand how the Olympics affected PAHs emissions. > The study would act as a case study to know the effects that big events can impose on the host cities. - The source control measures implemented before and during the 29th Olympic Games were effective for reducing the emissions of air pollutants in Beijing.

  19. Tidal heating of young super-Earth atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginzburg, Sivan; Sari, Re'em

    2017-02-01

    Short-period Earth to Neptune-sized exoplanets (super-Earths) with voluminous gas envelopes seem to be very common. These gas atmospheres are thought to have originated from the protoplanetary disc in which the planets were embedded during their first few million years. The accretion rate of gas from the surrounding nebula is determined by the ability of the gas to cool and radiate away its gravitational energy. Here, we demonstrate that heat from the tidal interaction between the star and the young (and therefore inflated) planet can inhibit the gas cooling and accretion. Quantitatively, we find that the growth of super-Earth atmospheres halts for planets with periods of about 10 d, provided that their initial eccentricities are of the order of 0.2. Thus, tidal heating provides a robust and simple mechanism that can simultaneously explain why these planets did not become gas giants and account for the deficit of low-density planets closer to the star, where the tides are even stronger. We suggest that tidal heating may be as important as other factors (such as the nebula's lifetime and atmosphere evaporation) in shaping the observed super-Earth population.

  20. Effects of the electrical parameters and gas flow rate on the generation of reactive species in liquids exposed to atmospheric pressure plasma jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Eun Jeong; Joh, Hea Min; Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T. H.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, an atmospheric pressure plasma jet was fabricated and studied for plasma-liquid interactions. The plasma jet consists of a quartz-covered pin electrode and outer quartz tube with a tapered nozzle. Using the current-voltage (I-V) and optical emission characteristics of the plasma jet, the plasma density and the speed of the plume were investigated. The optical emission spectra clearly indicated the excited NO, O, OH, N2, and N2+ in the plasma plumes. Then the plasma jets were applied to the deionized water. We investigated the effects of the operating parameters such as applied voltage, pulse frequency, and gas flow rate on the generation of reactive species in the gas and liquid phases. The densities of reactive species including OH radicals were obtained at the plasma-liquid surface and inside the plasma-treated liquids using ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy and chemical probe method. The nitrite concentration was detected by Griess assay. The data are very suggestive that there is a strong correlation among the production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) in the plasmas and liquids.

  1. Effect of helium plasma gas flow rate on the properties of WC-12 wt.%Co coatings sprayed by atmospheric plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihailo R. Mrdak

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The cermet coatings of WC-12wt.%Co are extensively used to improve the wear resistance of a wide range of technical components. This paper analyses the influence of the plasma gas flow of helium on the microstructure and mechanical properties of WC-12wt.%Co coatings deposited by plasma spraying at atmospheric pressure (APS. In order to obtain homogeneous and denser coatings, three different flows of He ( 8 l/min., 16 l/min. and 32 l/min were used in the research. With the application of He, coatings achieved higher values of hardness due to less degradation of the primary WC carbides. The main goal was to deposit dense and homogeneous layers of WC-12wt.%Co coatings with improved wear resistance for different applications. The test results of the microstructure of the layers were evaluated under a light microscope. The analysis of the microstructure and the mechanical properties of the deposited layers was made in accordance with the standard of Pratt-Whitney. The morphology of the powder particles and the microstructure of the best coating was examined on the SEM (scanning electron microscope. The evaluation of the mechanical properties of the layers was done by applying the HV0.3 method for microhardness testing and by applying tensile testing to test the bond strength. The research has shown that the flow of He plasma gas significantly affects the microstructure, the mechanical properties and the structure of WC-12 wt.%Co coatings.

  2. Simultaneous determination of 16 brominated flame retardants in food and feed of animal origin by fast gas chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry using atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bichon, E; Guiffard, I; Vénisseau, A; Lesquin, E; Vaccher, V; Brosseaud, A; Marchand, P; Le Bizec, B

    2016-08-12

    A gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method using atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation was developed for the monitoring of 16 brominated flame retardants (7 usually monitored polybromodiphenylethers (PBDEs) and BDE #209 and 8 additional emerging and novel BFRs) in food and feed of animal origin. The developed analytical method has decreased the run time by three compared to conventional strategies, using a 2.5m column length (5% phenyl stationary phase, 0.1mm i.d., 0.1μmf.t.), a pulsed split injection (1:5) with carrier gas helium flow rate at 0.48mLmin(-1) in one run of 20 min. For most BFRs, analytical data were compared with the current analytical strategy relying on GC/EI/HRMS (double sector, R=10000 at 10% valley). Performances in terms of sensitivity were found to meet the Commission recommendation (118/2014/EC) for nBFRs. GC/APCI/MS/MS represents a promising alternative for multi-BFRs analysis in complex matrices, in that it allows the monitoring of a wider list of contaminants in a single injection and a shorter run time.

  3. Experimental and numerical study of gas-to-particle conversion in an emission plume from mining and metallurgical industry based on airborne sounding in a polar atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonenkov, Denis V.; Raputa, Vladimir F.; Yaroslavtseva, Tatyana V.; Belan, Boris D.

    2016-11-01

    The results of an airborne survey of plumes from the Norilsk Mining and Metallurgical Plant by an Optik-É AN-30 aircraft laboratory on November 10, 2002 are discussed. Most pollutants are blown out of the city in the gas phase in the form of acidic oxides (mainly sulfur). Mapping of the substances is performed along the main trajectory of air mass transport at a distance of 20-140 km from the city. Horizontal flights were performed at 400, 600, 800, and 1200 m above sea level at equidistant traverses (from 3 to 6 at each height) normally to the main flow direction. Most pollution was concentrated above the 400-m level. An active gas-to-particle conversion was observed at a distance of 60-100 km from the emission source. In the plume areas distant from the source there was a sulfate anion increase from 4% to 51% in aerosol composition weight and a calcium decrease from 64% to 9%. Under the conditions of low humidity in the polar atmosphere in winter, SO2 is apparently removed from the air mainly due to dry heterogeneous condensation with calcium oxide as the main counteragent of industrial origin. The concentrations of these active pollutants in the plume are well approximated by a two-parameter transformation model.

  4. Cu-Doped ZnO Thin Films Deposited by a Sol-Gel Process Using Two Copper Precursors: Gas-Sensing Performance in a Propane Atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heberto Gómez-Pozos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A study on the propane gas-sensing properties of Cu-doped ZnO thin films is presented in this work. The films were deposited on glass substrates by sol-gel and dip coating methods, using zinc acetate as a zinc precursor, copper acetate and copper chloride as precursors for doping. For higher sensitivity values, two film thickness values are controlled by the six and eight dippings, whereas for doping, three dippings were used, irrespective of the Cu precursor. The film structure was analyzed by X-ray diffractometry, and the analysis of the surface morphology and film composition was made through scanning electron microscopy (SEM and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS, respectively. The sensing properties of Cu-doped ZnO thin films were then characterized in a propane atmosphere, C3H8, at different concentration levels and different operation temperatures of 100, 200 and 300 °C. Cu-doped ZnO films doped with copper chloride presented the highest sensitivity of approximately 6 × 104, confirming a strong dependence on the dopant precursor type. The results obtained in this work show that the use of Cu as a dopant in ZnO films processed by sol-gel produces excellent catalysts for sensing C3H8 gas.

  5. Gas-phase reactivity of peptide thiyl (RS•), perthiyl (RSS•), and sulfinyl (RSO•) radical ions formed from atmospheric pressure ion/radical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Lei; Xia, Yu

    2013-04-01

    In this study, we demonstrated the formation of gas-phase peptide perthiyl (RSS•) and thiyl (RS•) radical ions besides sulfinyl radical (RSO•) ions from atmospheric pressure (AP) ion/radical reactions of peptides containing inter-chain disulfide bonds. The identity of perthiyl radical was verified from characteristic 65 Da (•SSH) loss in collision-induced dissociation (CID). This signature loss was further used to assess the purity of peptide perthiyl radical ions formed from AP ion/radical reactions. Ion/molecule reactions combined with CID were carried out to confirm the formation of thiyl radical. Transmission mode ion/molecule reactions in collision cell (q2) were developed as a fast means to estimate the population of peptide thiyl radical ions. The reactivity of peptide thiyl, perthiyl, and sulfinyl radical ions was evaluated based on ion/molecule reactions toward organic disulfides, allyl iodide, organic thiol, and oxygen, which followed in order of thiyl (RS•) > perthiyl (RSS•) > sulfinyl (RSO•). The gas-phase reactivity of these three types of sulfur-based radicals is consistent with literature reports from solution studies.

  6. Novel analytical methods for flame retardants and plasticizers based on gas chromatography, comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography, and direct probe coupled to atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-high resolution time-of-flight-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballesteros-Gómez, Ana; de Boer, Jacob; Leonards, Pim E G

    2013-10-15

    In this study, we assess the applicability of different analytical techniques, namely, direct probe (DP), gas chromatography (GC), and comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC × GC) coupled to atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) with a high resolution (HR)-time-of-flight (TOF)-mass spectrometry (MS) for the analysis of flame retardants and plasticizers in electronic waste and car interiors. APCI-HRTOFMS is a combination scarcely exploited yet with GC or with a direct probe for screening purposes and to the best of our knowledge, never with GC × GC to provide comprehensive information. Because of the increasing number of flame retardants and questions about their environmental fate, there is a need for the development of wider target and untargeted screening techniques to assess human exposure to these compounds. With the use of the APCI source, we took the advantage of using a soft ionization technique that provides mainly molecular ions, in addition to the accuracy of HRMS for identification. The direct probe provided a very easy and inexpensive method for the identification of flame retardants without any sample preparation. This technique seems extremely useful for the screening of solid materials such as electrical devices, electronics and other waste. GC-APCI-HRTOF-MS appeared to be more sensitive compared to liquid chromatography (LC)-APCI/atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI)-HRTOF-MS for a wider range of flame retardants with absolute detection limits in the range of 0.5-25 pg. A variety of tri- to decabromodiphenyl ethers, phosphorus flame retardants and new flame retardants were found in the samples at levels from microgram per gram to milligram per gram levels.

  7. Contribution of Oil and Gas Production to Atmospheric CH4 in the South-Central United States: Reconciling Bottom-up and Top-down Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z.; Pinto, J. P.; Turner, A. J.; Bruhwiler, L.; Henze, D. K.; Brioude, J. F.; Bousserez, N.; Sargsyan, K.; Safta, C.; Najm, H. N.; LaFranchi, B. W.; Bambha, R.; Michelsen, H. A.

    2014-12-01

    Estimates of anthropogenic CH4 emissions in the United States have been largely inconsistent, particularly for oil and gas production (OGP) in the South-Central United States. We have quantified the contribution of OGP to the South-Central US (TX/OK/KS) CH4 budget through atmospheric regional transport modeling with the Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ). This model is driven by a new process-based, spatially resolved OGP CH4 emissions inventory. We employed Bayesian inference to calibrate CMAQ emissions inputs using continuous CH4 measurements at the DOE Southern Great Plains (SGP) central facility and evaluated model predictions against a subset of aircraft and surface flask measurements that are assimilated by NOAA's CarbonTracker-CH4. Our results suggest that OGP emissions are the largest source of CH4 observed at the DOE SGP site and the largest source of CH4 in TX/OK/KS, constituting ~45% of total CH4 emission in the region. The next largest source in the region is livestock, with other sources being relatively less important. We estimate OGP emissions in TX/OK/KS contribute about one half of national total OGP emissions. Using continuous CH4 measurements, we found evidence of rapid nocturnal transport by the Great Plains low-level jet (LLJ) and sporadic oil and gas emissions. Our study demonstrates the importance of improved knowledge of the spatial and temporal features of oil and gas emissions in reconciling CH4 budgets derived using bottom-up and top-down approaches at regional and national scales.

  8. On-site and off-site atmospheric PBDEs in an electronic dismantling workshop in south China: Gas-particle partitioning and human exposure assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An Taicheng, E-mail: antc99@gig.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangdong Key Laboratory of Environmental Resources Utilization and Protection, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Zhang Delin [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangdong Key Laboratory of Environmental Resources Utilization and Protection, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Li Guiying; Mai Bixian; Fu Jiamo [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangdong Key Laboratory of Environmental Resources Utilization and Protection, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2011-12-15

    Gas samples and total suspended particle during work and off work time were investigated on-site and off-site electronic waste dismantling workshop (I- and O-EWDW), then compared with plastic recycling workshop (PRW) and waste incineration plant (WIP). TSP concentrations and total PBDE were 0.36-2.21 mg/m{sup 3} and 27-2975 ng/m{sup 3} at different workshops, respectively. BDE-47, -99, and -209 were major {Sigma}PBDE congeners at I-EWDW and WIP, while BDE-209 was only dominant congener in PRW and control sites during work time and all sites during off work time. The gas-particle partitioning result was well correlated with the subcooled liquid vapor pressure for all samples, except for WIP and I-EDWD, at park during work time, and residential area during off work time. The predicted urban curve fitted well with measured {phi} values at O-DEWD during work time, whereas it was slightly overestimated or underestimated for others. Exposure assessment revealed the highest exposure site was I-EDWD. - Highlights: > On- and off-site atmospheric PBDEs was monitored in e-waste dismantling workshops in south China. > The gas-particle partitioning result was well correlated with the subcooled liquid vapor pressure for some samples. > Exposure assessment revealed that workers in I-EDWD were the highest exposure population. - The findings of this study may serve as a valuable reference for future risk assessment and environmental management in Guiyu, South China.

  9. A gas chromatography/pyrolysis/isotope ratio mass spectrometry system for high-precision deltaD measurements of atmospheric methane extracted from ice cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Michael; Schmitt, Jochen; Behrens, Melanie; Möller, Lars; Schneider, Robert; Sapart, Celia; Fischer, Hubertus

    2010-03-15

    Air enclosures in polar ice cores represent the only direct paleoatmospheric archive. Analysis of the entrapped air provides clues to the climate system of the past in decadal to centennial resolution. A wealth of information has been gained from measurements of concentrations of greenhouse gases; however, little is known about their isotopic composition. In particular, stable isotopologues (deltaD and delta(13)C) of methane (CH(4)) record valuable information on its global cycle as the different sources exhibit distinct carbon and hydrogen isotopic composition. However, CH(4) isotope analysis is limited by the large sample size required and the demanding analysis as high precision is required. Here we present a highly automated, high-precision online gas chromatography/pyrolysis/isotope ratio monitoring mass spectrometry (GC/P/irmMS) technique for the analysis of deltaD(CH(4)). It includes gas extraction from ice, preconcentration, gas chromatographic separation and pyrolysis of CH(4) from roughly 500 g of ice with CH(4) concentrations as low as 350 ppbv. Ice samples with approximately 40 mL air and only approximately 1 nmol CH(4) can be measured with a precision of 3.4 per thousand. The precision for 65 mL air samples with recent atmospheric concentration is 1.5 per thousand. The CH(4) concentration can be obtained along with isotope data which is crucial for reporting ice core data on matched time scales and enables us to detect flaws in the measurement procedure. Custom-made script-based processing of MS raw and peak data enhance the system's performance with respect to stability, peak size dependency, hence precision and accuracy and last but not least time requirement.

  10. Method for measuring changes in the atmospheric O2/N2 ratio by a gas chromatograph equipped with a thermal conductivity detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohjima, Yasunori

    2000-06-01

    We present a method for measuring changes in the atmospheric O2/N2 ratio based on data from a gas chromatograph (GC) equipped with a thermal conductivity detector (TCD). In this method, O2 and N2 in an air sample are separated on a column filled with molecular sieve 5A with H2 carrier gas. Since the separated O2 includes Ar, which has a retention time similar to that of O2, the (O2+Ar)/N2 ratio is actually measured. The change in the measured (O2+Ar)/N2 ratio can be easily converted to that in the O2/N2 ratio with a very small error based on the fact that the atmospheric Ar/N2 ratio is almost constant. The improvements to achieve the high-precision measurement include stabilization of the pressure at the GC column head and at the outlets of the TCD and the sample loop. Additionally, the precision is improved statistically by repeating alternate analyses of sample and a reference gas. The standard deviation of the replicate cycles of reference and sample analyses is about 18 per meg (corresponding to 3.8 parts per million (ppm) O2 in air). This means that the standard error is about 7 per meg (1.5 ppm O2 in air) for seven cycles of alternate analyses, which takes about 70 min. The response of this method is likely to have a 2% nonlinearity. Ambient air samples are collected under pressure in glass flasks equipped with two stopcocks sealed by Viton O-rings at both ends. Pressure depletion in the flask during the O2/N2 measurement does not cause any detectable change in the O2/N2 ratio, but the O2/N2 ratio in the flask was found to gradually decrease during the storage period. We also present preliminary results from air samples collected at Hateruma Island (latitude 24°03'N, longitude 123°49') from July 1997 through March 1999. The observed O2/N2 ratios clearly show a seasonal variation, increasing in spring and summer and decreasing in autumn and winter.

  11. Model atmospheres for massive gas giants with thick clouds: Application to the HR 8799 planets and predictions for future detections

    CERN Document Server

    Madhusudhan, Nikku; Currie, Thayne

    2011-01-01

    We have generated an extensive new suite of massive giant planet atmosphere models and used it to obtain fits to photometric data for the planets HR 8799b, c, and d. We consider a wide range of cloudy and cloud-free models. The cloudy models incorporate different geometrical and optical thicknesses, modal particle sizes, and metallicities. For each planet and set of cloud parameters, we explore grids in gravity and effective temperature, with which we determine constraints on the planet's mass and age. Our new models yield statistically significant fits to the data, and conclusively confirm that the HR 8799 planets have much thicker clouds than those required to explain data for typical L and T dwarfs. Both models with 1) physically thick forsterite clouds and a 60-micron modal particle size and 2) clouds made of 1 micron-sized pure iron droplets and 1% supersaturation fit the data. The range of best-estimated masses for HR 8799b, HR 8799c, and HR 8799d conservatively span 2-12 M_J, 7-13 M_J, and 3-11 M_J, re...

  12. FTIR gas kinetic study of the reactions of ozone with a series of hexenols at atmospheric pressure and 298 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibilisco, Rodrigo G.; Bejan, Iustinian; Barnes, Ian; Wiesen, Peter; Teruel, Mariano A.

    2015-01-01

    Relative rate coefficients of the reactions of O3 with (Z)-3-hexen-1-ol, (E)-3-hexen-1-ol and (E)-2-hexen-1-ol have been determined in an environmental chamber with in situ FTIR detection of the reactants at 298 K and 760 Torr. The following rate coefficients (in units of 10-17 cm3 molecule-1 s-1) have been determined: (6.04 ± 0.95) for (Z)-CH2(OH)CH2CHdbnd CHCH2CH3; (5.83 ± 0.86) for (E)-CH2(OH)CH2CHdbnd CHCH2CH3; (5.98 ± 0.73) for (E)-CH2(OH)CHdbnd CH(CH2)2CH3. This is the first kinetic study for the reactions of O3 with (E)-2-hexen-1-ol and (E)-3-hexen-1-ol. Reactivity trends are developed and the atmospheric persistence of these compounds is calculated based on the rate coefficients.

  13. Fast gas chromatographic residue analysis in animal feed using split injection and atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tienstra, M; Portolés, T; Hernández, F; Mol, J G J

    2015-11-27

    Significant speed improvement for instrumental runtime would make GC–MS much more attractive for determination of pesticides and contaminants and as complementary technique to LC–MS. This was the trigger to develop a fast method (time between injections less than 10 min) for the determination of pesticides and PCBs that are not (or less) amenable to LC–MS. A key factor in achieving shorter analysis time was the use of split injection (1:10) which allowed the use of a much higher initial GC oven temperature. A shorter column (15 m), higher temperature ramp, and higher carrier gas flow rate (6 mL/min) further contributed to analysis-time reduction. Chromatographic resolution was slightly compromised but still well fit-for-purpose. Due to the high sensitivity of the technique used (GC–APCI-triple quadrupole MS/MS), quantification and identification were still possible down to the 10 μg/kg level, which was demonstrated by successful validation of the method for complex feed matrices according to EU guidelines. Other advantages of the method included a better compatibility of acetonitrile extracts (e.g. QuEChERS) with GC, and a reduced transfer of co-extractants into the GC column and mass spectrometer.

  14. The Asymptotical Analysis for the Problem of Modeling the Gas Admixture in the Surface Layer of the Atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Davydova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work the model boundary value problem for a stationary singularly perturbed reaction-diffusion-advection equation arising at the description of gas impurity transfer processes in an ecosystem ”forest – swamp” is considered. Application of a boundary functions method and an asymptotic method of differential inequalities allow to construct an asymptotics of the boundary layer type solution, to prove the existence of the solution with such an asymptotics and its asymptotic stability by Lyapunov as the stationary solution of the corresponding parabolic problem with the definition of local area of boundary layer type solution formation. The latter has a certain importance for applications, since it allows to reveal the solution describing one of the most probable conditions of the ecosystem. In the final part of the work sufficient conditions for existence of solutions with interior transitional layers (contrast structures are discussed.

  15. Technical Note: A trace gas climatology derived from the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS data set

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Jones

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment-Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS aboard the Canadian satellite SCISAT (launched in August 2003 was designed to investigate the composition of the upper troposphere, stratosphere, and mesosphere. ACE-FTS utilizes solar occultation to measure temperature and pressure as well as vertical profiles of over thirty chemical species including O3, H2O, CH4, N2O, CO, NO, NO2, N2O5, HNO3, HCl, ClONO2, CCl3F, CCl2F2, and HF. Global coverage for each species is obtained approximately over a three month period and measurements are made with a vertical resolution of typically 3–4 km. A quality-controlled climatology has been created for each of these 14 baseline species, where individual profiles are averaged over the period of February 2004 to February 2009. Measurements used are from the ACE-FTS version 2.2 data set including updates for O3 and N2O5. The climatological fields are provided on a monthly and three-monthly basis (DJF, MAM, JJA, SON at 5 degree latitude and equivalent latitude spacing and on 28 pressure surfaces (26 of which are defined by the Stratospheric Processes And their Role in Climate (SPARC Chemistry-Climate Model Validation Activity. The ACE-FTS climatological data set is available through the ACE website.

  16. Spatial and temporal variation in domestic biofuel consumption rates and patterns in Zimbabwe: implications for atmospheric trace gas emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludwig, J.; Andreae, M.O.; Helas, G. [Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Mainz (Germany). Dept. of Biogeochemistry; Marufu, L. [Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Mainz (Germany). Dept. of Biogeochemistry; University of Utrecht, (Netherlands). Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research Utrecht; Lelieveld, J. [University of Utrecht, (Netherlands). Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research Utrecht

    1999-05-01

    An ecologically nationwide and all-year-round domestic biofuel consumption study was conducted in Zimbabwe from January 1996 to March 1997. The study aimed at (a) establishing the determinants and magnitudes of spatial and temporal variations in biofuel consumption rates, (b) estimating the overall mean national rural and urban consumption rates, and (c) estimating the contribution of domestic biomass burning in Zimbabwe to the emission of atmospheric trace gases. The main source of spatial variation in biofuel consumption rates was found to be settlement type (rural or urban). Within a settlement type, per capita consumption rates varied in time and space with household size, ambient temperature, and physical availability. In rural areas wood and agricultural residues were consumed at national average rates of 1.3{+-}0.2 and 0.07{+-}0.01 tonnes capita{sup -1} year{sup -1}, respectively. In urban centres wood was consumed at an average rate of 0.4{+-}0.26 tonnes capita{sup -1} year{sup -1}. These consumption rates translate into emission outputs from Zimbabwe of 4.6 Tg CO{sub 2}-C year{sup -1}, 0.4 Tg CO-C year{sup -1}, 5.3 Gg NO-N year{sup -1}, 14.5 Gg CH{sub 4}-C year{sup -1}, 24.2 Gg NMHC-C year{sup -1}, 2.9 Gg organic acid-C year{sup -1} (formic and acetic acids) and 48.4 Gg aerosol-C year{sup -1}. For CO{sub 2}, CO, and NO, these domestic biofuel emissions represent 41{+-}6%, 67{+-}6%, and 8{+-}1%, respectively, of the total output of all sources evaluated and documented in Zimbabwe to date. This means that of the studied sources, domestic biomass burning is the major source of CO{sub 2} and CO emission in Zimbabwe.

  17. Use of electron ionization and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization in gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spetrometry for screening and identification of organic pollutants in waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Portoles, T.; Mol, J.G.J.; Sancho, J.V.; Hernandez, F.

    2014-01-01

    A new approach has been developed for multiclass screening of organic contaminants in water based on the use of gas chromatography coupled to hybrid quadrupole high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (GC–(APCI)QTOF MS). The soft ionization promo

  18. The effect of O2 in a humid O2/N2/NOx gas mixture on NOx and N2O remediation by an atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teodoru, Steluta; Kusano, Yukihiro; Bogaerts, Annemie

    2012-01-01

    A numerical model for NxOy remediation in humid air plasma produced with a dielectric barrier discharge at atmospheric pressure is presented. Special emphasis is given to NO2 and N2O reduction with the decrease of O2 content in the feedstock gas. A detailed reaction mechanism including electronic...

  19. Measurement of volatile organic compounds in the urban atmosphere of Yokohama, Japan, by an automated gas chromatographic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Noriko; Okayasu, Hideki; Murayama, Satoru; Mori, Sachiko; Hunahashi, Kenji; Suzuki, Koji

    Urban air concentrations of six selected volatile aromatic and five selected volatile chlorinated compounds were measured at Hiyoshi in Yokohama, Japan, from November 1994 to October 1997 using an automated gas chromatographic (GC) system. Continuous measurements were made with 1 h cycles over a 1- or 2-day period. The data from these studies were analyzed and interpreted with respect to variabilities in the urban air concentrations and the diurnal changes in relation to prevailing sources. The mean concentrations of aromatic hydrocarbons were in the range of 0.38-1.13 ppb benzene, 1.23-8.95 ppb toluene, 0.12-0.88 ppb ethylbenzene, 0.03-0.18 ppb m-, p-xylene, 0.23-0.46 ppb o-xylene and 0.24-0.38 ppb 1.2.4-trimethylbenzene. Although variations exist in the measurements, the mean distributions in the aromatic hydrocarbons were 10.4% benzene, 69.7% toluene, 7.7% ethylbenzene, 5.4% m-, p-xylene, 1.6% o-xylene and 5.3% 2.4-trimethybenzene. Diurnal variations in the aromatic hydrocarbons were found to be very similar to each other and positively correlated with traffic activities. On the other hand, the mean concentrations of 1,1-dichloroethene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, trichloroethene, tetrachloroethene and 1,4-dichlorobenzene were 0.08-0.86, 0.08-0.93, 0.24-0.79, 0.03-0.24 and 0.07-0.42 ppb, respectively. The concentrations of these chlorinated hydrocarbons were always lower and less variable than those of the aromatic hydrocarbons.

  20. Trace gas retrievals from Airborne Compact Atmospheric Mapper (ACAM) observations during the 2011 DISCOVER-AQ flight campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X.; Kowalewski, M. G.; Janz, S. J.; Bhartia, P. K.; Chance, K.; Krotkov, N. A.; Pickering, K. E.; Crawford, J. H.

    2011-12-01

    The DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) mission has just finished its first flight campaign in the Baltimore-Washington D.C. area in July 2011. The ACAM, flown on board the NASA UC-12 aircraft, includes two spectrographs covering the spectral region 304-900 nm and a high-definition video camera, and is expected to provide column measurements of several important air quality trace gases and aerosols for the DISCOVER-AQ mission. The quick look results for NO2 have been shown to very useful in capturing the strong spatiotemporal variability of NO2. Preliminary fitting of UV/Visible spectra has shown that ACAM measurements have adequate signal to noise ratio to measure the trace gases O2, NO2, HCHO, and maybe SO2 and CHOCHO, at individual pixel resolution, although a great deal of effort is needed to improve the instrument calibration and derive proper reference spectrum for retrieving absolute trace gas column densities. In this study, we present analysis of ACAM instrument calibration including slit function, wavelength registration, and radiometric calibration for both nadir-viewing and zenith-sky measurements. Based on this analysis, an irradiance reference spectrum at ACAM resolution will be derived from a high-resolution reference spectrum with additional correction to account for instrument calibration. Using the derived reference spectrum and/or the measured zenith sky measurements, we will perform non-linear least squares fitting to investigate the retrievals of slant column densities of these trace gases from ACAM measurements, and also use an optimal estimation based algorithm including full radiative transfer calculations to derive the vertical column densities of these trace gases. The initial results will be compared with available in-situ and ground-based measurements taken during the DISCOVER-AQ campaign.

  1. Seasonal variations of particle-associated nitrosamines by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in the atmospheric environment of Zonguldak, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyüz, Mehmet; Ata, Şevket

    2013-10-01

    A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method has been proposed for the determination of low-level mutagenic and carcinogenic nitrosamines in particulate matter. The method includes the collection of particulate matters (PM2.5 and PM10) using a dichotomous Partisol 2025 sampler and extraction of the compounds from aqueous solution with dichloromethane/2-propanol after sonication with a slightly basic water solution prior to their GC-MS analysis in electron impact mode. The obtained recoveries of nitrosamines ranged from 92.4 to 99.2 %, and the precision of this method, as indicated by the relative standard deviations, was within the range of 0.95-2.46 %. The detection limits obtained from calculations using the GC-MS results based on S/N=3 were found within the range from 4 to 22 pg/m(3). The predominant nitrosamines determined in particulate matter were N-nitrosodimethylamine, N-nitrosodiethylamine, N-nitrosodibutylamine and N-nitrosomorpholine. Furthermore, N-mono- and dinitrosopiperazine and N-nitrosoethylbutylamine were also determined. N-dinitrosopiperazine was detected in PM2.5 samples at the highest concentrations of up to 22.85 ng/m(3) and in PM2.5-10 samples at concentrations up to 7.60 ng/m(3) in winter, whereas it was found in PM2.5 samples up to 5.15 ng/m(3) and in PM2.5-10 samples up to 3.12 ng/m(3) in summer. The total concentrations of nitrosamines were up to 161.4 ng/m(3) in fine and 53.90 ng/m(3) in coarse fractions in winter, whereas in summer were up to 35.24 and 12.60 ng/m(3), respectively. The concentration levels of nitrosamines fluctuated significantly within a year, with higher means and peak concentrations in the winter compared to that in the summertime. The seasonal variations of particle-associated nitrosamine concentrations were investigated together with their relationships with meteorological parameters using Pearson's correlation analysis in the winter and summer periods. Analysis of variance was used to determine which

  2. An economic analysis of US oil and gas laws:a case study of the legal issues surrounding shale gas in Pennsylvania%美国油气法特殊规则的经济实质分析--以宾夕法尼亚州页岩气司法实践为例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁华江

    2014-01-01

    美国页岩气的发展与政府的财税支持和私营企业的技术突破紧密相关,页岩气革命的成功推动了美国经济的复苏,促进了美国财产法在社会发展中的适用创新。关于页岩气的司法实践是美国发展本国经济的制度要求,突出体现了判例法的灵活性、反映社会发展的及时性优点。美国页岩气产权的特殊确权规则可为我国矿产资源管理提供法制参考。%US shale gas development is closely related to government ifscal support and to the technological advances made by private enterprise. The success of the shale gas revolution has promoted the economic recovery of the US, and the application of American property law has been used to deal with various concerns regarding shale gas exploitation. The requirements of the American economy have led to legal action with regard to shale gas, and this has highlighted the advantages of the lfexibility of case law. While the particular laws afifrming US shale gas rights provide a legal reference for rationalizing shale gas rights and exploitation, coalbed methane property rights in China are not similarly rationalized.

  3. Developing Atmospheric Retrieval Methods for Direct Imaging Spectroscopy of Gas Giants in Reflected Light. I. Methane Abundances and Basic Cloud Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupu, Roxana E.; Marley, Mark S.; Lewis, Nikole; Line, Michael; Traub, Wesley A.; Zahnle, Kevin

    2016-12-01

    Upcoming space-based coronagraphic instruments in the next decade will perform reflected light spectroscopy and photometry of cool directly imaged extrasolar giant planets. We are developing a new atmospheric retrieval methodology to help assess the science return and inform the instrument design for such future missions, and ultimately interpret the resulting observations. Our retrieval technique employs a geometric albedo model coupled with both a Markov chain Monte Carlo Ensemble Sampler (emcee) and a multimodal nested sampling algorithm (MultiNest) to map the posterior distribution. This combination makes the global evidence calculation more robust for any given model and highlights possible discrepancies in the likelihood maps. As a proof of concept, our current atmospheric model contains one or two cloud layers, methane as a major absorber, and a H2-He background gas. This 6-to-9 parameter model is appropriate for Jupiter-like planets and can be easily expanded in the future. In addition to deriving the marginal likelihood distribution and confidence intervals for the model parameters, we perform model selection to determine the significance of methane and cloud detection as a function of expected signal-to-noise ratio in the presence of spectral noise correlations. After internal validation, the method is applied to realistic spectra of Jupiter, Saturn, and HD 99492c, a model observing target. We find that the presence or absence of clouds and methane can be determined with high confidence, while parameter uncertainties are model dependent and correlated. Such general methods will also be applicable to the interpretation of direct imaging spectra of cloudy terrestrial planets.

  4. Changes in gas exchange characteristics during the life span of giant sequoia: Implications for response to current and future concentrations of atmospheric ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grulke, N.E.; Miller, P.R. (USDA Forest Service, Riverside, CA (United States))

    Native stands of giant sequoia are being exposed to relatively high concentrations of atmospheric ozone produced in urban and agricultural areas upwind. The expected change in environmental conditions over the next 100 y is likely to be unprecendented in the life span (ca 2,500 y) of giant sequoia. Changes in the physiological responses of three age classes of giant sequoia (current year, 12 y and 25 y) to different concentrations of ozone were determined, and age-related differences in sensitivity to pollutants were assessed by examining physiological changes (gas exchange, water use efficiency) across the life span of giant sequoia. The CO[sub 2] exchange rate (CER) was greater in current year (12.1 [mu]mol CO[sub 2]/m[sup 2]s) and 2 year old seedlings (4.8 [mu]mol CO[sub 2]/m[sup 2]s) than in all older trees (average of 3.0 [mu]mol CO[sub 2]/m[sup 2]s). Dark respiration was highest for current year seedlings and was increased twofold in symptotic individuals exposed to elevated ozone concentrations. Stomatal conductance was greater in current-year and 2 year old seedlings (335 and 200 mmol H[sub 2]O/m[sup 2]s), respectively, than in all older trees (50 mmol H[sub 2]O/m[sup 2]s), indicating that the ozone concentration in substomatol cavities is higher in young seedlings than in older trees. Significant changes in water use efficiency occurred in trees between ages 5 and 20 years. It is concluded that giant sequoia seedlings are sensitive to atmospheric ozone until they are ca 5 y old. Low conductance, high water use efficiency, and compact mesophyll all contribute to a natural ozone tolerance, or defense, or both, in foliage of older trees. 11 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  5. Spectrometers for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) Upgrade to Full Sun-Sky-Cloud-Trace Gas Spectrometry Capability for Airborne Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunagan, S. E.; Flynn, C. J.; Johnson, R. R.; Kacenelenbogen, M. S.; Knobelspiesse, K. D.; LeBlanc, S. E.; Livingston, J. M.; Redemann, J.; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, B.; Segal-Rosenhaimer, M.; Shinozuka, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The Spectrometers for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) instrument has been developed at NASA Ames in collaboration with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and NASA Goddard, supported substantially since 2009 by NASA's Radiation Science Program and Earth Science Technology Office. It combines grating spectrometers with fiber optic links to a tracking, scanning head to enable sun tracking, sky scanning, and zenith viewing. 4STAR builds on the long and productive heritage of the NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometers (AATS-6 and -14), which have yielded more than 100 peer-reviewed publications and extensive archived data sets in many NASA Airborne Science campaigns from 1986 to the present. The baseline 4STAR instrument has provided extensive data supporting the TCAP (Two Column Aerosol Project, July 2012 & Feb. 2013), SEAC4RS (Studies of Emissions, Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys, 2013), and ARISE (Arctic Radiation - IceBridge Sea and Ice Experiment, 2014), field campaigns.This poster presents plans and progress for an upgrade to the 4STAR instrument to achieve full science capability, including (1) direct-beam sun tracking measurements to derive aerosol optical depth spectra, (2) sky radiance measurements to retrieve aerosol absorption and type (via complex refractive index and mode-resolved size distribution), (3) cloud properties via zenith radiance, and (4) trace gas spectrometry. Technical progress in context with the governing physics is reported on several upgrades directed at improved light collection and usage, particularly as related to spectrally and radiometrically stable propagation through the collection light path. In addition, improvements to field calibration and verification, and flight operability and reliability are addressed.

  6. Gas chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization/mass spectrometry for the analysis of organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls in human serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Dawei; Jogsten, Ingrid Ericson; Dunstan, Jody; Hagberg, Jessika; Wang, Thanh; Ruzzin, Jerome; Rabasa-Lhoret, Rémi; van Bavel, Bert

    2016-07-01

    A method using a novel atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source for coupling gas chromatography (GC/APCI) to triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (MS/MS) for the determination of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) regulated by the Stockholm Convention is presented. One microliter injection of a six-point calibration curve of native PCBs and OCPs, ranging from 0.04 to 300pg/μL, was performed. The relative standard deviation (RSD) of the relative response factors (RRFs) was less than 15% with a coefficient of determination (r(2))>0.995. Meanwhile, two calibration solutions (CS), CS 2 (0.4pg/μL) and CS 3 (4pg/μL) were analyzed to study the repeatability calculated for both area and RRFs. The RSD for RRF ranged from 3.1 to 16% and 3.6 to 5.5% for CS 2 and CS 3, respectively. The limits of detection (LOD) determined by peak-to-peak signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of 3 were compared between the GC/APCI/MS/MS and a GC coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry (GC/HRMS) system. GC/APCI/MS/MS resulted in lower LOD for most of the compounds, except for PCB#74, cis-chlordane and trans-chlordane. GC/APCI/MS/MS and GC/HRMS were also compared by performing analysis on 75 human serum samples together with eight QA/QC serum samples. The comparison between GC/APCI/MS/MS system and GC/HRMS system for 16 of the targeted compounds was carried out. No statistically significant difference was discovered. Due to increased sensitivity and user friendly operation under atmospheric pressure, GC/APCI/MS/MS is a powerful alternative technique that can easily meet the specification of GC/HRMS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Emissão de mercúrio para a atmosfera pela queima de gás natural no Brasil Mercury emissions to the atmosphere from natural gas burning in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Drude de Lacerda

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Increasing natural gas use in Brazil triggered a discussion of its role as a Hg source. We show that Hg emissions to the atmosphere from fossil fuel combustion for power generation in Brazil contribute with 6.2% (4.2 t yr-1 to the total anthropogenic Hg atmospheric emissions, with coal combustion and biomass burning as major sources. Natural gas contributes with 0.04 t yr-1, mostly from electricity generation (88% and industrial uses (7.6%. Preliminary results on Hg concentrations in natural gas suggest that a large fraction of it is trapped during refining and transport, which may create Hg point sources between extraction and consumption.

  8. In-Line Ozonation for Sensitive Air-Monitoring of a Mustard-Gas Simulant by Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Akihiko

    2015-09-01

    A highly sensitive method for real-time air-monitoring of mustard gas (bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide, HD), which is a lethal blister agent, is proposed. Humidified air containing a HD simulant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (2CEES), was mixed with ozone and then analyzed by using an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap tandem mass spectrometer. Mass-spectral ion peaks attributable to protonated molecules of intact, monooxygenated, and dioxygenated 2CEES (MH+, MOH+, and MO2H+, respectively) were observed. As ozone concentration was increased from zero to 30 ppm, the signal intensity of MH+ sharply decreased, that of MOH+ increased once and then decreased, and that of MO2H+ sharply increased until reaching a plateau. The signal intensity of MO2H+ at the plateau was 40 times higher than that of MH+ and 100 times higher than that of MOH+ in the case without in-line ozonation. Twenty-ppm ozone gas was adequate to give a linear calibration curve for 2CEES obtained by detecting the MO2H+ signal in the concentration range up to 60 μg/m3, which is high enough for hygiene management. In the low concentration range lower than 3 μg/m3, which is equal to the short-term exposure limit for HD, calibration plots unexpectedly fell off the linear calibration curve, but 0.6-μg/m3 vapor was actually detected with the signal-to-noise ratio of nine. Ozone was generated from instrumentation air by using a simple and inexpensive home-made generator. 2CEES was ozonated in 1-m extended sampling tube in only 1 s.

  9. Potential of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source in gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry for the screening of urinary exogenous androgenic anabolic steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raro, M; Portolés, T; Pitarch, E; Sancho, J V; Hernández, F; Garrostas, L; Marcos, J; Ventura, R; Segura, J; Pozo, O J

    2016-02-04

    The atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source for gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis has been evaluated for the screening of 16 exogenous androgenic anabolic steroids (AAS) in urine. The sample treatment is based on the strategy currently applied in doping control laboratories i.e. enzymatic hydrolysis, liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) and derivatization to form the trimethylsilyl ether-trimethylsilyl enol ether (TMS) derivatives. These TMS derivatives are then analyzed by gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry using a triple quadrupole instrument (GC-QqQ MS/MS) under selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode. The APCI promotes soft ionization with very little fragmentation resulting, in most cases, in abundant [M + H](+) or [M + H-2TMSOH](+) ions, which can be chosen as precursor ions for the SRM transitions, improving in this way the selectivity and sensitivity of the method. Specificity of the transitions is also of great relevance, as the presence of endogenous compounds can affect the measurements when using the most abundant ions. The method has been qualitatively validated by spiking six different urine samples at two concentration levels each. Precision was generally satisfactory with RSD values below 25 and 15% at the low and high concentration level, respectively. Most the limits of detection (LOD) were below 0.5 ng mL(-1). Validation results were compared with the commonly used method based on the electron ionization (EI) source. EI analysis was found to be slightly more repeatable whereas lower LODs were found for APCI. In addition, the applicability of the developed method has been tested in samples collected after the administration of 4-chloromethandienone. The highest sensitivity of the APCI method for this compound, allowed to increase the period in which its administration can be detected.

  10. Development of a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for the determination of pesticides in gaseous and particulate phases in the atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrás, E; Sánchez, P; Muñoz, A; Tortajada-Genaro, L A

    2011-08-05

    A reliable multi-residue method for determining gaseous and particulate phase pesticides in atmospheric samples has been developed. This method, based on full scan gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), allowed the proper determination of sixteen relevant pesticides, in a wide range of concentrations and without the influence of interferences. The pesticides were benfluralin, bitertanol, buprofezin, chlorfenvinphos, chlorpyrifos, chlorpyrifos-methyl, ethalfluralin, fenthion, lindane, malathion, methidathion, propachlor, propanil, pyriproxifen, tebuconazol and trifluralin. Comparisons of two types of sampling filters (quartz and glass fibre) and four types of solid-phase cartridges (XAD-2, XAD-4, Florisil and Orbo-49P) showed that the most suitable supports were glass fibre filter for particulate pesticides and XAD-2 and XAD-4 cartridges for gaseous pesticides (>95% recovery). Evaluations of elution solvents for ultrasonic-assisted extraction demonstrated that isooctane is better than ethylacetate, dichloromethane, methanol or a mixture of acetone:hexane (1:1). Recovery assays and the standard addition method were performed to validate the proposed methodology. Moreover, large simulator chamber experiments allowed the best study of the gas-particle partitioning of pesticides for testing the sampling efficiency for the validation of an analytical multiresidue method for pesticides in air. Satisfactory analytical parameters were obtained, with a repeatability of 5±1%, a reproducibility of 13±3% and detection limits of 0.05-0.18 pg m(-3) for the particulate phase and 26-88 pg m(-3) for the gaseous phase. Finally, the methodology was successfully applied to rural and agricultural samples in the Mediterranean area.

  11. Isotope modeling of nitric acid formation in the atmosphere using ISO-RACM: testing the importance of NO oxidation, heterogeneous reactions, and trace gas chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Michalski

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Here we present ISO-RACM, an isotope mass balance model that utilizes the Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanism to predict Δ17O values in atmospheric nitrate. A large number of simulations were carried out that varied atmospheric parameters that are important in altering the magnitude and range of Δ17O values generated in photochemically produce nitrate. These parameters included temperature, relative humidity, actinic flux, aerosol surface area and chemical speciation, and three different N2O5 uptake parameterizations. Trace gas mixing ratios were also varied including CH4, CO, NOx, O3, volatile organic compounds and biogenic organic compounds. The model predicts that there are seasonal, latitudinal and diurnal variations in Δ17O values due to changes in actinic flux with lower values corresponding to higher actinic fluxes. There was also a minor positive correlation between higher Δ17O values and increased temperature. There were distinct differences in Δ17O depending on which N2O5 parameterization was used, mostly the result of changing relative humidity being a factor in two of the parameterization schemes. Changing CO and CH4 mixing ratios had negligible impact on Δ17O values but significant variation in magnitude and range were predicted with NOx, O3, and organic loading. High NOx and O3 generated high Δ17O with a narrow (10 ‰ range, while high organics led to low Δ17O values and a wider range of possible values. Implications for using Δ17O to evaluate NOx-NOy chemistry and aerosol formation processes are discussed, as is needed future research.

  12. Contour detection by surround suppression of texture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petkov, Nicolai; Tavares, JMRS; Jorge, RMN

    2007-01-01

    Based on a keynote lecture at Complmage 2006, Coimbra, Oct. 20-21, 2006, an overview is given of our activities in modelling and using surround inhibition for contour detection. The effect of suppression of a line or edge stimulus by similar surrounding stimuli is known from visual perception studie

  13. Influence of the growing parameters on the size distribution of PbTe nanoparticles produced by laser ablation under inert gas atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, D. B.; Rodriguez, E.; Agouram, S.; Moreira, R. S.; Cesar, C. L.; Jimenez, E.; Barbosa, L. C.

    2012-03-01

    We report the fabrication of PbTe quantum dots grown under inert gas (Ar and He) atmosphere by pulsed laser deposition using the second harmonic of a Q-Switched Quantel Nd:YAG laser. For characterization, samples were prepared onto a 40Å carbon film deposited on a copper grid. The influence of background pressure, and number of laser pulses on the size distribution of the PbTe nanoparticles was investigated by transmission electron microscopy using a 200 kV TECNAI G2 F20 electron microscope with 0.27 nm point resolution. The size distribution was obtained by manually outlining the particles from several dozens of low- and high-resolution TEM images. Once digitized and saved in a proper format, the image was processed using the J-image software. Characterizations reveal an increase of the nanoparticle size both with the amount of material deposited (number of laser pulses) and the background pressure. Furthermore, measurements reveal a narrower nanoparticle size distribution by increasing the number of laser pulses or by decreasing the background pressure. HRTEM studies of the influence of different ambient gases on the structural properties of the PbTe nanoparticles are being conducted.

  14. Potential of gas chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry for the determination of sterols in human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matysik, S; Schmitz, G; Bauer, S; Kiermaier, J; Matysik, F-M

    2014-04-11

    The application of Gas Chromatography (GC)-Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization (APCI)-Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (TOF-MS) is presented for sterol analysis in human plasma. A commercial APCI interface was modified to ensure a well-defined humidity which is essential for controlled ionization. In the first step, optimization regarding flow rates of auxiliary gases was performed by using a mixture of model analytes. Secondly, the qualitative and quantitative analysis of sterols including oxysterols, cholesterol precursors, and plant sterols as trimethylsilyl-derivatives was successfully carried out. The characteristics of APCI together with the very good mass accuracy of TOF-MS data enable the reliable identification of relevant sterols in complex matrices. Linear calibration lines and plausible results for healthy volunteers and patients could be obtained whereas all mass signals were extracted with an extraction width of 20 ppm from the full mass data set. One advantage of high mass accuracy can be seen in the fact that from one recorded run any search for m/z can be performed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. In-situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy gas phase studies of vanadium (IV) oxide coating by atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition using vanadyl (IV) acetylacetonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vernardou, D. [Institute for Materials Research, University of Salford, Cockroft Building, Salford, Manchester, M5 4WT (United Kingdom); Pemble, M.E. [Tyndall National institute, Lee Maltings, Prospect Row, Cork (Ireland)], E-mail: martyn.pemble@tyndall.ie; Sheel, D.W. [Institute for Materials Research, University of Salford, Cockroft Building, Salford, Manchester, M5 4WT (United Kingdom)

    2008-05-30

    This paper describes the use of in-situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to monitor the gas phase reactions of the formation of VO{sub 2} thin films from VO(acac){sub 2} under atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition conditions. In the absence of O{sub 2}, it is found that anhydride species may form, while there is also some evidence of ester species. In the presence of O{sub 2}, the spectra obtained are almost identical to those in the absence of O{sub 2}. However in this case, there is also some indication for the enhanced production of CO and the suppression of the formation of C-H species. A possible mechanism for the formation of VO{sub 2} is proposed, which involves the release of two C{sub 3}H{sub 4} molecules and the decomposition of vanadyl (IV) acetylacetonate into VO(CH{sub 3}COO){sub 2}, which then further decomposes to yield (CH{sub 3}CO){sub 2}O and VO{sub 2}. However, while spectroscopic evidence for the formation of these species is presented, the mechanism proposed cannot be confirmed on the basis of these data alone.

  16. Kinetics and dynamics of nanosecond streamer discharge in atmospheric-pressure gas bubble suspended in distilled water under saturated vapor pressure conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Sharma, Ashish

    2016-09-08

    We perform computational studies of nanosecond streamer discharges generated in helium bubbles immersed in distilled water under atmospheric pressure conditions. The model takes into account the presence of water vapor in the gas bubble for an accurate description of the discharge kinetics. We find that the dynamic characteristics of the streamer discharge are different at low and high positive trigger voltages with the axial streamer evolution dominant for low voltages and a surface hugging mode favored for high voltages. We also find a substantial difference in initiation, transition and evolution stages of discharge for positive and negative trigger voltages with the volumetric distribution of species in the streamer channel much more uniform for negative trigger voltages on account of the presence of multiple streamers. We observe that the presence of water vapor does not affect the breakdown voltage even for oversaturated conditions but significantly influences the composition of dominant species in the trail of the streamer as well as the flux of the dominant species on the bubble surface. © 2016 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  17. Emission of gas and atmospheric dispersion of SO2 during the December 2013 eruption at San Miguel volcano (El Salvador, Central America)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granieri, Domenico; Salerno, Giuseppe; Liuzzo, Marco; La Spina, Alessandro; Giuffrida, Giovanni; Caltabiano, Tommaso; Giudice, Gaetano; Gutierrez, Eduardo; Montalvo, Francisco; Burton, Michael R.; Papale, Paolo

    2015-07-01

    San Miguel volcano, El Salvador, erupted on 29 December 2013, after a 46 year period characterized by weak activity. Prior to the eruption a trend of increasing SO2 emission rate was observed, with all values measured after mid-November greater than the average value of the previous year (~310 t d-1). During the eruption, SO2 emissions increased from the level of ~330 t d-1 to 2200 t d-1, dropping after the eruption to an average level of 680 t d-1. Wind measurements and SO2 emission rates during the preeruptive, syneruptive, and posteruptive stages were used to model SO2 dispersion around the volcano. Atmospheric SO2 concentration exceeded the dangerous threshold of 5 ppm in the crater region and in some sectors with medium elevation of the highly visited volcanic cone. Combining the SO2 emission rate with measured CO2/SO2, HCl/SO2, and HF/SO2 plume gas ratios, we estimate the CO2, HCl, and HF outputs for the first time on this volcano.

  18. ON THE SYNTHESIS OF MOLYBDENUM CARBIDE WITH COBALT ADDITION VIA GAS-SOLID REACTIONS IN A CH4/H2 ATMOSPHERE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. P. B. Araujo

    Full Text Available Abstract Due to ever more severe environmental regulations regarding SOx, NOx and other pollutants' emissions, there has been an interest in developing new and improved catalysts for hydroprocessing reactions. Mo2C has been reported to display good selectivity and activity for those reactions, especially for HDS. Addition of another metal to the carbide structure may improve catalytic properties. Mo2C with low cobalt addition (2.5 and 5% was obtained via gas-solid reaction in a fixed bed reactor with CH4 (5%/H2 atmosphere. XRD and TG/DTA analysis of the precursors were carried out in order to understand its mass loss profile, doping metal presence and phase distributions. CoMoO4 as well as MoO3 were identified after calcining doped precursors at 600 °C/180min. SEM, XRD, XRF, TOC, BET and laser granulometric analysis of the reaction products were also performed. Compositions verified by XRF and theoretical values were compatible. At 700 °C both carbide (Mo2C and oxide (MoO2 phases are present, as identified in XRD analysis and observed by SEM. At 750 °C only single phase Mo2C was verified by XRD, indicating Co dispersion on the carbide matrix. Morphology at this temperature is compatible with pure Mo2C, though XRF indicates Co presence on the material.

  19. Kinetics and dynamics of nanosecond streamer discharge in atmospheric-pressure gas bubble suspended in distilled water under saturated vapor pressure conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ashish; Levko, Dmitry; Raja, Laxminarayan L.; Cha, Min Suk

    2016-10-01

    We perform computational studies of nanosecond streamer discharges generated in helium bubbles immersed in distilled water under atmospheric pressure conditions. The model takes into account the presence of water vapor in the gas bubble for an accurate description of the discharge kinetics. We find that the dynamic characteristics of the streamer discharge are different at low and high positive trigger voltages with the axial streamer evolution dominant for low voltages and a surface hugging mode favored for high voltages. We also find a substantial difference in initiation, transition and evolution stages of discharge for positive and negative trigger voltages with the volumetric distribution of species in the streamer channel much more uniform for negative trigger voltages on account of the presence of multiple streamers. We observe that the presence of water vapor does not affect the breakdown voltage even for oversaturated conditions but significantly influences the composition of dominant species in the trail of the streamer as well as the flux of the dominant species on the bubble surface.

  20. Tidal Heating of Young Super-Earth Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Ginzburg, Sivan

    2016-01-01

    Short-period Earth to Neptune size exoplanets (super-Earths) with voluminous gas envelopes seem to be very common. These gas atmospheres are thought to have originated from the protoplanetary disk in which the planets were embedded during their first few Myr. The accretion rate of gas from the surrounding nebula is determined by the ability of the gas to cool and radiate away its gravitational energy. Here we demonstrate that heat from the tidal interaction between the star and the young (and therefore inflated) planet can inhibit the gas cooling and accretion. Quantitatively, we find that the growth of super-Earth atmospheres halts for planets with periods of about 10 days, provided that their initial eccentricities are of the order of 0.2. Thus, tidal heating provides a robust and simple mechanism that can simultaneously explain why these planets did not become gas giants and account for the deficit of low-density planets closer to the star, where the tides are even stronger. We suggest that tidal heating m...

  1. Adjoint Sensitivity Analysis of Radiative Transfer Equation: Temperature and Gas Mixing Ratio Weighting Functions for Remote Sensing of Scattering Atmospheres in Thermal IR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustinov, E.

    1999-01-01

    Sensitivity analysis based on using of the adjoint equation of radiative transfer is applied to the case of atmospheric remote sensing in the thermal spectral region with non-negligeable atmospheric scattering.

  2. Description and evaluation of the Multiscale Online Nonhydrostatic AtmospheRe CHemistry model (NMMB-MONARCH) version 1.0: gas-phase chemistry at global scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badia, Alba; Jorba, Oriol; Voulgarakis, Apostolos; Dabdub, Donald; Pérez García-Pando, Carlos; Hilboll, Andreas; Gonçalves, María; Janjic, Zavisa

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive description and benchmark evaluation of the tropospheric gas-phase chemistry component of the Multiscale Online Nonhydrostatic AtmospheRe CHemistry model (NMMB-MONARCH), formerly known as NMMB/BSC-CTM, that can be run on both regional and global domains. Here, we provide an extensive evaluation of a global annual cycle simulation using a variety of background surface stations (EMEP, WDCGG and CASTNET), ozonesondes (WOUDC, CMD and SHADOZ), aircraft data (MOZAIC and several campaigns), and satellite observations (SCIAMACHY and MOPITT). We also include an extensive discussion of our results in comparison to other state-of-the-art models. We note that in this study, we omitted aerosol processes and some natural emissions (lightning and volcano emissions). The model shows a realistic oxidative capacity across the globe. The seasonal cycle for CO is fairly well represented at different locations (correlations around 0.3-0.7 in surface concentrations), although concentrations are underestimated in spring and winter in the Northern Hemisphere, and are overestimated throughout the year at 800 and 500 hPa in the Southern Hemisphere. Nitrogen species are well represented in almost all locations, particularly NO2 in Europe (root mean square error - RMSE - below 5 ppb). The modeled vertical distributions of NOx and HNO3 are in excellent agreement with the observed values and the spatial and seasonal trends of tropospheric NO2 columns correspond well to observations from SCIAMACHY, capturing the highly polluted areas and the biomass burning cycle throughout the year. Over Asia, the model underestimates NOx from March to August, probably due to an underestimation of NOx emissions in the region. Overall, the comparison of the modeled CO and NO2 with MOPITT and SCIAMACHY observations emphasizes the need for more accurate emission rates from anthropogenic and biomass burning sources (i.e., specification of temporal variability). The resulting

  3. Changes in gas exchange characteristics during the life span of giant sequoia: implications for response to current and future concentrations of atmospheric ozone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grulke, N. E.; Miller, P. R.

    1994-01-01

    Native stands of giant sequoia (Sequoiadendron giganteum Bucholz) are being exposed to relatively high concentrations of atmospheric ozone produced in urban and agricultural areas upwind. The expected change in environmental conditions over the next 100 years is likely to be unprecedented in the life span (about 2,500 years) of giant sequoia. We determined changes in physiological responses of three age classes of giant sequoia (current-year, 12-, and 125-year-old) to differing concentrations of ozone, and assessed age-related differences in sensitivity to pollutants by examining physiological changes (gas exchange, water use efficiency) across the life span of giant sequoia (current-year, 2-, 5-, 20-, 125-, and > 2,000-year-old trees). The CO(2) exchange rate (CER) was greater in current-year (12.1 micro mol CO(2) m(-2) s(-1)) and 2-year-old seedlings (4.8 micro mol CO(2) m(-2) s(-1)) than in all older trees (3.0 micro mol CO(2) m(-2) s(-1), averaged across the four older age classes). Dark respiration was highest for current-year seedlings (-6.5 +/- 0.7 micro mol CO(2) m(-2) s(-1)) and was increased twofold in symptomatic individuals exposed to elevated ozone concentrations. Stomatal conductance (g(s)) was greater in current-year (355 mmol H(2)O m(-2) s(-1)) and 2-year-old seedlings (200 mmol H(2)O m(-2) s(-1)) than in all older trees (50 mmol H(2)O m(-2) s(-1)), indicating that the ozone concentration in substomatal cavities is higher in young seedlings than in trees. Significant changes in water use efficiency, as indicated by C(i)/C(a), occurred in trees between ages 5 and 20 years. We conclude that giant sequoias seedlings are sensitive to atmospheric ozone until they are about 5 years old. Low conductance, high water use efficiency, and compact mesophyll all contribute to a natural ozone tolerance, or defense, or both, in foliage of older trees.

  4. Military installation sequestered more carbon than surrounding areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, S.; Liu, S.; Li, Z.; Sohl, T.

    2008-12-01

    Land use activities greatly affect the temporal trends and spatial patterns of regional land-atmospheric exchange of carbon. Military installations generally have drastically different land management strategies from surrounding areas, and the carbon consequences have never been quantified and assessed. Here, we used the General Ensemble Biogeochemical Modeling System (GEMS) to simulate and compare ecosystem carbon dynamics between Fort Benning and surrounding areas from 1992 to 2050. GEMS was driven by unique combinations of spatial and temporal dynamics of major driving forces, such as climate, soil properties, nitrogen deposition, and land use and land cover changes (predicted by FOREcasting SCEnarios of land cover change (FORE-SCE)). Our results indicated that the military installation sequestered more carbon than surrounding areas (0.77 vs. 0.16 Mg C ha-1 y-1 averaged from 1992 to 2007). Differences in land use activities were the primary cause behind the difference in carbon sequestration rates. From 1992 to 2007, no urban/residential expansion occurred at the installation, and transitional barren (primarily caused by forest harvesting) slightly increased from 0 to 0.2%. In contrast, urban land increased from 5.6 to 7.6% and transitional barren increased from 0.1 to 0.7% in the surrounding areas. Live biomass accumulation accounted for most of the carbon sink in both Fort Benning and surrounding areas (0.75 vs. 0.15 Mg C ha-1 y-1), while soil organic carbon accumulation was small (0.02 vs. 0.01 Mg C ha- 1 y-1), suggesting biomass removal caused by urbanization and harvesting resulted in much less carbon sequestration in surrounding areas. Fort Benning is likely to sequester more carbon in the future, although the rate of carbon sequestered per year will gradually reduce. The future carbon source/sink strength in the surrounding areas varied greatly, from a small sink to a strong source, depending on the path of land use change (e.g., increase of clear

  5. Agroforestry practice in villages surrounding Nyamure former ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cntaganda

    Key words: Agroforestry, fuel wood, tree products, woodlot, forest plantation. INTRODUCTION ... The study area included three administrative cells in the surroundings of Nyamure ..... Table 6: Distance and time spent on firewood collection.

  6. Explaining preferences for home surroundings and locations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Skifter Andersen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is based on a survey carried out in Denmark that asked a random sample of the population about their preferences for home surroundings and locations. It shows that the characteristics of social surroundings are very important and can be divided into three independent dimensions: avoiding social nuisances, preferring social homogeneity and living close to one’s social network and place of origin. The study shows that most people have many detailed preferences, whereas some have very few. This confirms an earlier theory that some people are very connected to certain places with given characteristics and thus do not have priorities regarding home surroundings and locations. For others, mostly young people and singles, home is just a place to sleep and relax, whereas life is lived elsewhere. For this group, there are only preferences for location and there are few specific preferences for surroundings.

  7. Investigation of time-resolved atmospheric conditions and indoor/outdoor particulate matter concentrations in homes with gas and biomass cook stoves in Nogales, Sonora, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Heather A; Pardyjak, Eric R

    2014-07-01

    This paper reports findings from a case study designed to investigate indoor and outdoor air quality in homes near the United States-Mexico border During the field study, size-resolved continuous particulate matter (PM) concentrations were measured in six homes, while outdoor PM was simultaneously monitored at the same location in Nogales, Sonora, Mexico, during March 14-30, 2009. The purpose of the experiment was to compare PM in homes using different fuels for cooking, gas versus biomass, and to obtain a spatial distribution of outdoor PM in a region where local sources vary significantly (e.g., highway, border crossing, unpaved roads, industry). Continuous PM data were collected every 6 seconds using a valve switching system to sample indoor and outdoor air at each home location. This paper presents the indoor PM data from each home, including the relationship between indoor and outdoor PM. The meteorological conditions associated with elevated ambient PM events in the region are also discussed. Results indicate that indoor air pollution has a strong dependence on cooking fuel, with gas stoves having hourly averaged median PM3 concentrations in the range of 134 to 157 microg m(-3) and biomass stoves 163 to 504 microg m(-1). Outdoor PM also indicates a large spatial heterogeneity due to the presence of microscale sources and meteorological influences (median PM3: 130 to 770 microg m(-3)). The former is evident in the median and range of daytime PM values (median PM3: 250 microg m(-3), maximum: 9411 microg m(-3)), while the meteorological influences appear to be dominant during nighttime periods (median PM3: 251 microg m(-3), maximum: 10,846 microg m(-3)). The atmospheric stability is quantified for three nighttime temperature inversion episodes, which were associated with an order of magnitude increase in PM10 at the regulatory monitor in Nogales, AZ (maximum increase: 12 to 474 microg m(-3)). Implications: Regulatory air quality standards are based on outdoor

  8. Potential of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source in gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry for the screening of urinary exogenous androgenic anabolic steroids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raro, M.; Portolés, T.; Pitarch, E.; Sancho, J.V.; Hernández, F. [Research Institute for Pesticides and Water, University Jaume I, E-12071 Castellón (Spain); Garrostas, L. [Bioanalysis Research Group, IMIM, Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute, Doctor Aiguader 88, 08003 Barcelona (Spain); Marcos, J.; Ventura, R.; Segura, J. [Bioanalysis Research Group, IMIM, Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute, Doctor Aiguader 88, 08003 Barcelona (Spain); Department of Experimental and Health Sciencies, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Doctor Aiguader 88, 08003 Barcelona (Spain); Pozo, O.J., E-mail: opozo@imim.es [Bioanalysis Research Group, IMIM, Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute, Doctor Aiguader 88, 08003 Barcelona (Spain)

    2016-02-04

    The atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source for gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis has been evaluated for the screening of 16 exogenous androgenic anabolic steroids (AAS) in urine. The sample treatment is based on the strategy currently applied in doping control laboratories i.e. enzymatic hydrolysis, liquid–liquid extraction (LLE) and derivatization to form the trimethylsilyl ether-trimethylsilyl enol ether (TMS) derivatives. These TMS derivatives are then analyzed by gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry using a triple quadrupole instrument (GC-QqQ MS/MS) under selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode. The APCI promotes soft ionization with very little fragmentation resulting, in most cases, in abundant [M + H]{sup +} or [M + H-2TMSOH]{sup +} ions, which can be chosen as precursor ions for the SRM transitions, improving in this way the selectivity and sensitivity of the method. Specificity of the transitions is also of great relevance, as the presence of endogenous compounds can affect the measurements when using the most abundant ions. The method has been qualitatively validated by spiking six different urine samples at two concentration levels each. Precision was generally satisfactory with RSD values below 25 and 15% at the low and high concentration level, respectively. Most the limits of detection (LOD) were below 0.5 ng mL{sup −1}. Validation results were compared with the commonly used method based on the electron ionization (EI) source. EI analysis was found to be slightly more repeatable whereas lower LODs were found for APCI. In addition, the applicability of the developed method has been tested in samples collected after the administration of 4-chloromethandienone. The highest sensitivity of the APCI method for this compound, allowed to increase the period in which its administration can be detected. - Highlights: • APCI source has been evaluated for the screening of 16 exogenous AAS in urine. • Suitable

  9. The dynamic chamber method: trace gas exchange fluxes (NO, NO2, O3 between plants and the atmosphere in the laboratory and in the field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. X. Meixner

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available We describe a dynamic chamber system to determine reactive trace gas exchange fluxes between plants and the atmosphere under laboratory and, with small modifications, also under field conditions. The system allows measurements of the flux density of the reactive NO-NO2-O3 triad and additionally of the non-reactive trace gases CO2 and H2O. The chambers are made of transparent and chemically inert wall material and do not disturb plant physiology. For NO2 detection we used a highly NO2 specific blue light converter coupled to chemiluminescence detection of the photolysis product, NO. Exchange flux densities derived from dynamic chamber measurements are based on very small concentration differences of NO2 (NO, O3 between inlet and outlet of the chamber. High accuracy and precision measurements are therefore required, and high instrument sensitivity (limit of detection and the statistical significance of concentration differences are important for the determination of corresponding exchange flux densities, compensation point concentrations, and deposition velocities. The determination of NO2 concentrations at sub-ppb levels (2 analyzer with a lower detection limit (3σ-definition of 0.3 ppb or better. Deposition velocities and compensation point concentrations were determined by bi-variate weighted linear least-squares fitting regression analysis of the trace gas concentrations, measured at the inlet and outlet of the chamber. Performances of the dynamic chamber system and data analysis are demonstrated by studies of Picea abies L. (Norway Spruce under field and laboratory conditions. Our laboratory data show that the quality selection criterion based on the use of only significant NO2 concentration differences has a considerable impact on the resulting compensation point concentrations yielding values closer to zero. The results of field experiments demonstrate the need to consider photo-chemical reactions of NO, NO2, and O3 inside the chamber for

  10. Characterization and optimization of an online system for the simultaneous measurement of atmospheric water-soluble constituents in the gas and particle phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markovic, Milos Z; VandenBoer, Trevor C; Murphy, Jennifer G

    2012-07-01

    In this work we present the results of extensive characterization and optimization of the Ambient Ion Monitor-Ion Chromatograph (AIM-IC) system, an instrument developed by URG Corp. and Dionex Inc. for simultaneous hourly measurements of the water-soluble chemical composition of atmospheric fine particulate matter (PM(2.5)) and associated precursor gases. The sampling assembly of the AIM-IC consists of an inertial particle size-selection assembly, a parallel-plate wet denuder (PPWD) for the collection of soluble gases, and a particle supersaturation chamber (PSSC) for collection of particles, in series. The analytical assembly of the AIM-IC consists of anion and cation IC units. The system detection limits were determined to be 41 ppt, 5 ppt, and 65 ppt for gas phase NH(3(g)), SO(2(g)), and HNO(3(g)) and 29 ng m(-3), 3 ng m(-3), and 45 ng m(-3) for particle phase NH(4)(+), SO(4)(2-), and NO(3)(-) respectively. From external trace gas calibrations with permeation sources, we determined that the AIM-IC is biased low for NH(3(g)) (11%), SO(2(g)) (19%), and HNO(3(g)) (12%). The collection efficiency of SO(2(g)) was found to strongly depend on the composition of the denuder solution and was found to be the most quantitative with 5 mM H(2)O(2) solution for mixing ratios as high as 107 ppb. Using a cellulose membrane in the PPWD, the system responded to changes in SO(2(g)) and HNO(3(g)) within an hour, however for NH(3(g)), the timescale can be closer to 20 h. With a nylon membrane, the instrument response time for NH(3(g)) was significantly improved, becoming comparable to the responses for SO(2(g)) and HNO(3(g)). Performance of the AIM-IC for collection and analysis of PM(2.5) was evaluated by generating known number concentrations of ammonium sulfate and ammonium nitrate particles (with an aerodynamic diameter of 300 nm) under laboratory conditions and by comparing AIM-IC measurements to measurements from a collocated Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) during a field

  11. Screening and quantification of pesticide residues in fruits and vegetables making use of gas chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervera, M I; Portolés, T; López, F J; Beltrán, J; Hernández, F

    2014-11-01

    An atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source has been used to enhance the potential of gas chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) mass spectrometry (MS) for screening and quantification purposes in pesticide residue analysis. A screening method developed in our laboratory for around 130 pesticides has been applied to fruit and vegetable samples, including strawberries, oranges, apples, carrots, lettuces, courgettes, red peppers, and tomatoes. Samples were analyzed together with quality control samples (at 0.05 mg/kg) for each matrix and for matrix-matched calibration standards. The screening strategy consisted in first rapid searching and detection, and then a refined identification step using the QTOF capabilities (MS(E) and accurate mass). Identification was based on the presence of one characteristic m/z ion (Q) obtained with the low collision energy function and at least one fragment ion (q) obtained with the high collision energy function, both with mass errors of less than 5 ppm, and an ion intensity ratio (q/Q) within the tolerances permitted. Following this strategy, 15 of 130 pesticides were identified in the samples. Afterwards, the quantitation capabilities were tested by performing a quantitative validation for those pesticides detected in the samples. To this aim, five matrices were selected (orange, apple, tomato, lettuce, and carrot) and spiked at two concentrations (0.01 and 0.1 mg/kg), and quantification was done using matrix-matched calibration standards (relative responses versus triphenyl phosphate used as an internal standard). Acceptable average recoveries and relative standard deviations were obtained for many but not all pesticide-matrix combinations. These figures allowed us to perform a retrospective quantification of positives found in the screening without the need for additional analysis. Taking advantage of the accurate-mass full-spectrum data provided by QTOF MS, we searched for a higher number of compounds

  12. Surround-Masking Affects Visual Estimation Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastrzebski, Nicola R.; Hugrass, Laila E.; Crewther, Sheila G.; Crewther, David P.

    2017-01-01

    Visual estimation of numerosity involves the discrimination of magnitude between two distributions or perceptual sets that vary in number of elements. How performance on such estimation depends on peripheral sensory stimulation is unclear, even in typically developing adults. Here, we varied the central and surround contrast of stimuli that comprised a visual estimation task in order to determine whether mechanisms involved with the removal of unessential visual input functionally contributes toward number acuity. The visual estimation judgments of typically developed adults were significantly impaired for high but not low contrast surround stimulus conditions. The center and surround contrasts of the stimuli also differentially affected the accuracy of numerosity estimation depending on whether fewer or more dots were presented. Remarkably, observers demonstrated the highest mean percentage accuracy across stimulus conditions in the discrimination of more elements when the surround contrast was low and the background luminance of the central region containing the elements was dark (black center). Conversely, accuracy was severely impaired during the discrimination of fewer elements when the surround contrast was high and the background luminance of the central region was mid level (gray center). These findings suggest that estimation ability is functionally related to the quality of low-order filtration of unessential visual information. These surround masking results may help understanding of the poor visual estimation ability commonly observed in developmental dyscalculia.

  13. Description and Evaluation of the Multiscale Online Nonhydrostatic AtmospheRe CHemistry Model (NMMB-MONARCH) Version 1.0: Gas-Phase Chemistry at Global Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badia, Alba; Jorba, Oriol; Voulgarakis, Apostolos; Dabdub, Donald; Garcia-Pando, Carlos Perez; Hilboll, Andreas; Goncalves, Maria; Janjic, Zavisa

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive description and benchmark evaluation of the tropospheric gas-phase chemistry component of the Multiscale Online Nonhydrostatic AtmospheRe CHemistry model (NMMBMONARCH), formerly known as NMMB/BSC-CTM, that can be run on both regional and global domains. Here, we provide an extensive evaluation of a global annual cycle simulation using a variety of background surface stations (EMEP, WDCGG and CASTNET), ozonesondes (WOUDC, CMD and SHADOZ), aircraft data (MOZAIC and several campaigns), and satellite observations (SCIAMACHY and MOPITT).We also include an extensive discussion of our results in comparison to other state-of-the-art models. We note that in this study, we omitted aerosol processes and some natural emissions (lightning and volcano emissions). The model shows a realistic oxidative capacity across the globe. The seasonal cycle for CO is fairly well represented at different locations (correlations around 0.3-0.7 in surface concentrations), although concentrations are underestimated in spring and winter in the Northern Hemisphere, and are overestimated throughout the year at 800 and 500 hPa in the Southern Hemisphere. Nitrogen species are well represented in almost all locations, particularly NO2 in Europe (root mean square error - RMSE - below 5 ppb). The modeled vertical distributions of NOx and HNO3 are in excellent agreement with the observed values and the spatial and seasonal trends of tropospheric NO2 columns correspond well to observations from SCIAMACHY, capturing the highly polluted areas and the biomass burning cycle throughout the year. Over Asia, the model underestimates NOx from March to August, probably due to an underestimation of NOx emissions in the region. Overall, the comparison of the modeled CO and NO2 with MOPITT and SCIAMACHY observations emphasizes the need for more accurate emission rates from anthropogenic and biomass burning sources (i.e., specification of temporal variability).

  14. Validation of a qualitative screening method for pesticides in fruits and vegetables by gas chromatography quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portolés, T; Mol, J G J; Sancho, J V; López, Francisco J; Hernández, F

    2014-08-01

    A wide-scope screening method was developed for the detection of pesticides in fruit and vegetables. The method was based on gas chromatography coupled to a hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source (GC-(APCI)QTOF MS). A non-target acquisition was performed through two alternating scan events: one at low collision energy and another at a higher collision energy ramp (MS(E)). In this way, both protonated molecule and/or molecular ion together with fragment ions were obtaine