WorldWideScience

Sample records for surprisingly small increase

  1. Small bowel obstruction- a surprise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Jeffrey Daniel; Cp, Ganesh Babu; M, Balachandar; M, Ramanathan

    2015-01-01

    Trans - omental hernia is very rare, accounting to 1-4% of all internal hernias which is an unusual cause of small bowel obstruction. Here we present a case report of a small bowel obstruction in a female due to trans - omental hernia presenting with central abdominal pain, distension and bilious vomiting. She had no previous history of trauma, surgery. Plain X-ray abdomen erect showed multiple air fluid levels with dilated small bowel loops. Emergency laparotomy revealed a segment of congested small bowel loop (ileum) through a defect in greater omentum. On table the herniated bowel loop was reduced and the defect in greater omentum was closed primarily. There was no necessity for bowel resection as it regained normal colour after reduction. Postoperative period was uneventful with complete resolution of symptoms. This case is presented for its rarity and its importance in clinical differential diagnosis of acute abdomen due to small bowel obstruction.

  2. Analyst Information Precision and Small Earnings Surprises

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Bissessur; D. Veenman

    2014-01-01

    Prior research attributes zero and small positive earnings surprises to managers’ incentives for earnings management. In contrast, this study introduces and empirically tests an explanation for zero and small positive earnings surprises based on predictable variation in analyst forecast errors. We a

  3. The surprisingly small but increasing role of international agricultural trade on the European Union’s dependence on mineral phosphorus fertiliser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesme, Thomas; Roques, Solène; Metson, Geneviève S.; Bennett, Elena M.

    2016-02-01

    Phosphorus (P) is subject to global management challenges due to its importance to both food security and water quality. The European Union (EU) has promoted policies to limit fertiliser over-application and protect water quality for more than 20 years, helping to reduce European P use. Over this time period, the EU has, however, become more reliant on imported agricultural products. These imported products require fertiliser to be used in distant countries to grow crops that will ultimately feed European people and livestock. As such, these imports represent a displacement of European P demand, possibly allowing Europe to decrease its apparent P footprint by moving P use to locations outside the EU. We investigated the effect of EU imports on the European P fertiliser footprint to better understand whether the EU’s decrease in fertiliser use over time resulted from P demand being ‘outsourced’ to other countries or whether it truly represented a decline in P demand. To do this, we quantified the ‘virtual P flow’ defined as the amount of mineral P fertiliser applied to agricultural soils in non-EU countries to support agricultural product imports to the EU. We found that the EU imported a virtual P flow of 0.55 Tg P/yr in 1995 that, surprisingly, decreased to 0.50 Tg P/yr in 2009. These results were contrary to our hypothesis that trade increases would be used to help the EU reduce its domestic P fertiliser use by outsourcing its P footprint abroad. Still, the contribution of virtual P flows to the total P footprint of the EU has increased by 40% from 1995 to 2009 due to a dramatic decrease in domestic P fertiliser use in Europe: in 1995, virtual P was equivalent to 32% of the P used as fertiliser domestically to support domestic consumption but jumped to 53% in 2009. Soybean and palm tree products from South America and South East Asia contributed most to the virtual P flow. These results demonstrate that, although policies in the EU have successfully

  4. Small renal tumor with lymph nodal enlargement: A histopathological surprise

    OpenAIRE

    Mujeeburahiman Thottathil; Ashish Verma; Nischith D′souza; Altaf Khan

    2016-01-01

    Renal cancer with lymph nodal mass on the investigation is clinically suggestive of an advanced tumor. Small renal cancers are not commonly associated with lymph nodal metastasis. Association of renal cell carcinoma with renal tuberculosis (TB) in the same kidney is also rare. We report here a case of small renal cancer with multiple hilar and paraaortic lymph nodes who underwent radical nephrectomy, and histopathology report showed renal and lymph nodal TB too.

  5. Surprise Gift” Purchases of Small Electric Appliances: A Pilot Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Vanhamme (Joëlle); C.J.P.M. de Bont (Cees)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractUnderstanding decision-making processes for gifts is of strategic importance for companies selling small electrical appliances as gifts account for a large part of their sales. Among all gifts, the ones that are surprising are the most valued by recipients. However, research about

  6. 20S small nuclear ribonucleoprotein U5 shows a surprisingly complex protein composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, M; Winkelmann, G; Lührmann, R

    1989-08-01

    U5 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP), purified from HeLa nuclear extracts (splicing extracts), shows a complex protein composition. In addition to the snRNP proteins B', B, D, D', E, F, and G, which are present in each of the major snRNPs U1, U2, U4/U6, and U5, U5 snRNP contains a number of unique proteins characterized by apparent molecular masses of 40, 52, 100, 102, 116, and 200 (mostly a double band) kDa. The latter set of proteins may be regarded as U5-specific for the following reasons. They are not only eluted specifically, together with snRNP particles, from anti-2,2,7-trimethylguanosine immunoaffinity columns by 7-methylguanosine, they also cofractionate with U5 snRNP during chromatography and, most importantly, in glycerol gradient centrifugation. These U5 snRNP particles show a high sedimentation constant of about 20S. U5 snRNPs that lack the U5-specific proteins are also found in nuclear extracts but have (in comparison) a lower sedimentation value of only 8-10S. Autoimmune sera from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus were identified that, on immunoblots with purified U5 snRNP proteins, reacted selectively with the 100- or 200-kDa proteins. This indicates that at least the high molecular mass U5-specific proteins are structurally distinct and not derived one from the other by proteolytic degradation. The existence of so many unique proteins in the U5 snRNP suggests that this snRNP particle may exert its function during splicing mainly by virtue of its protein components.

  7. Charming surprise

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2011-01-01

    The CP violation in charm quarks has always been thought to be extremely small. So, looking at particle decays involving matter and antimatter, the LHCb experiment has recently been surprised to observe that things might be different. Theorists are on the case.   The study of the physics of the charm quark was not in the initial plans of the LHCb experiment, whose letter “b” stands for “beauty quark”. However, already one year ago, the Collaboration decided to look into a wider spectrum of processes that involve charm quarks among other things. The LHCb trigger allows a lot of these processes to be selected, and, among them, one has recently shown interesting features. Other experiments at b-factories have already performed the same measurement but this is the first time that it has been possible to achieve such high precision, thanks to the huge amount of data provided by the very high luminosity of the LHC. “We have observed the decay modes of t...

  8. Charming surprise

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2011-01-01

    The CP violation in charm quarks has always been thought to be extremely small. So, looking at particle decays involving matter and antimatter, the LHCb experiment has recently been surprised to observe that things might be different. Theorists are on the case. The study of the physics of the charm quark was not in the initial plans of the LHCb experiment, whose letter “b” stands for “beauty quark”. However, already one year ago, the Collaboration decided to look into a wider spectrum of processes that involve charm quarks among other things. The LHCb trigger allows a lot of these processes to be selected, and, among them, one has recently shown interesting features. Other experiments at b-factories have already performed the same measurement but this is the first time that it has been possible to achieve such high precision, thanks to the huge amount of data provided by the very high luminosity of the LHC. “We have observed the decay modes of the D0, a pa...

  9. Nonlocal continuum electrostatic theory predicts surprisingly small energetic penalties for charge burial in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardhan, Jaydeep P

    2011-09-14

    We study the energetics of burying charges, ion pairs, and ionizable groups in a simple protein model using nonlocal continuum electrostatics. Our primary finding is that the nonlocal response leads to markedly reduced solvent screening, comparable to the use of application-specific protein dielectric constants. Employing the same parameters as used in other nonlocal studies, we find that for a sphere of radius 13.4 Å containing a single +1e charge, the nonlocal solvation free energy varies less than 18 kcal/mol as the charge moves from the surface to the center, whereas the difference in the local Poisson model is ∼35 kcal/mol. Because an ion pair (salt bridge) generates a comparatively more rapidly varying Coulomb potential, energetics for salt bridges are even more significantly reduced in the nonlocal model. By varying the central parameter in nonlocal theory, which is an effective length scale associated with correlations between solvent molecules, nonlocal-model energetics can be varied from the standard local results to essentially zero; however, the existence of the reduction in charge-burial penalties is quite robust to variations in the protein dielectric constant and the correlation length. Finally, as a simple exploratory test of the implications of nonlocal response, we calculate glutamate pK(a) shifts and find that using standard protein parameters (ε(protein) = 2-4), nonlocal results match local-model predictions with much higher dielectric constants. Nonlocality may, therefore, be one factor in resolving discrepancies between measured protein dielectric constants and the model parameters often used to match titration experiments. Nonlocal models may hold significant promise to deepen our understanding of macromolecular electrostatics without substantially increasing computational complexity.

  10. Ontological Surprises

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leahu, Lucian

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates how we might rethink design as the technological crafting of human-machine relations in the context of a machine learning technique called neural networks. It analyzes Google’s Inceptionism project, which uses neural networks for image recognition. The surprising output of...... a hybrid approach where machine learning algorithms are used to identify objects as well as connections between them; finally, it argues for remaining open to ontological surprises in machine learning as they may enable the crafting of different relations with and through technologies....

  11. Surprise Trips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korn, Matthias; Kawash, Raghid; Andersen, Lisbet Møller

    We report on a platform that augments the natural experience of exploration in diverse indoor and outdoor environments. The system builds on the theme of surprises in terms of user expectations and finding points of interest. It utilizes physical icons as representations of users' interests and a...

  12. Tolerance by surprise: evidence for a generalized reduction in prejudice and increased egalitarianism through novel category combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiljevic, Milica; Crisp, Richard J

    2013-01-01

    Prejudices towards different groups are interrelated, but research has yet to find a way to promote tolerance towards multiple outgroups. We devise, develop and implement a new cognitive intervention for achieving generalized tolerance based on scientific studies of social categorization. In five laboratory experiments and one field study the intervention led to a reduction of prejudice towards multiple outgroups (elderly, disabled, asylum seekers, HIV patients, gay men), and fostered generalized tolerance and egalitarian beliefs. Importantly, these effects persisted outside the laboratory in a context marked by a history of violent ethnic conflict, increasing trust and reconciliatory tendencies towards multiple ethnic groups in the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia. We discuss the implications of these findings for intervention strategies focused on reducing conflict and promoting peaceful intergroup relations.

  13. Many Private Colleges Report Small Tuition Increases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraghty, Mary

    1997-01-01

    Many private colleges are reporting the lowest percentage tuition increases in a decade or more, four to five% at many institutions, but most increases still outpace inflation. A major reason for increasing tuition is to meet rising demand for student aid. Also, many institutional expenses are higher than for the average consumer, and facilities…

  14. More Supernova Surprises

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-24

    SEP 2010 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2010 to 00-00-2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE More Supernova Surprises 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...PERSPECTIVES More Supernova Surprises ASTRONOMY J. Martin Laming Spectroscopic observations of the supernova SN1987A are providing a new window into high...a core-collapse supernova ) have stretched and motivated research that has expanded our knowledge of astrophysics. The brightest such event in

  15. Surprises with Nonrelativistic Naturalness

    CERN Document Server

    Horava, Petr

    2016-01-01

    We explore the landscape of technical naturalness for nonrelativistic systems, finding surprises which challenge and enrich our relativistic intuition already in the simplest case of a single scalar field. While the immediate applications are expected in condensed matter and perhaps in cosmology, the study is motivated by the leading puzzles of fundamental physics involving gravity: The cosmological constant problem and the Higgs mass hierarchy problem.

  16. Surprises in astrophysical gasdynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Balbus, Steven A

    2016-01-01

    Much of astrophysics consists of the study of ionised gas under the influence of gravitational and magnetic fields. Thus, it is not possible to understand the astrophysical universe without a detailed knowledge of the dynamics of magnetised fluids. Fluid dynamics is, however, a notoriously tricky subject, in which it is all too easy for one's a priori intuition to go astray. In this review, we seek to guide the reader through a series of illuminating yet deceptive problems, all with an enlightening twist. We cover a broad range of topics including the instabilities acting in accretion discs, the hydrodynamics governing the convective zone of the Sun, the magnetic shielding of a cooling galaxy cluster, and the behaviour of thermal instabilities and evaporating clouds. The aim of this review is to surprise and intrigue even veteran astrophysical theorists with an idiosynchratic choice of problems and counterintuitive results. At the same time, we endeavour to bring forth the fundamental ideas, to set out import...

  17. Evaluative Appraisals of Environmental Mystery and Surprise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasar, Jack L.; Cubukcu, Ebru

    2011-01-01

    This study used a desktop virtual environment (VE) of 15 large-scale residential streets to test the effects of environmental mystery and surprise on response. In theory, mystery and surprise should increase interest and visual appeal. For each VE, participants walked through an approach street and turned right onto a post-turn street. We designed…

  18. Evaluative Appraisals of Environmental Mystery and Surprise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasar, Jack L.; Cubukcu, Ebru

    2011-01-01

    This study used a desktop virtual environment (VE) of 15 large-scale residential streets to test the effects of environmental mystery and surprise on response. In theory, mystery and surprise should increase interest and visual appeal. For each VE, participants walked through an approach street and turned right onto a post-turn street. We designed…

  19. Surprises in astrophysical gasdynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbus, Steven A.; Potter, William J.

    2016-06-01

    Much of astrophysics consists of the study of ionized gas under the influence of gravitational and magnetic fields. Thus, it is not possible to understand the astrophysical universe without a detailed knowledge of the dynamics of magnetized fluids. Fluid dynamics is, however, a notoriously tricky subject, in which it is all too easy for one’s a priori intuition to go astray. In this review, we seek to guide the reader through a series of illuminating yet deceptive problems, all with an enlightening twist. We cover a broad range of topics including the instabilities acting in accretion discs, the hydrodynamics governing the convective zone of the Sun, the magnetic shielding of a cooling galaxy cluster, and the behaviour of thermal instabilities and evaporating clouds. The aim of this review is to surprise and intrigue even veteran astrophysical theorists with an idiosyncratic choice of problems and counterintuitive results. At the same time, we endeavour to bring forth the fundamental ideas, to set out important assumptions, and to describe carefully whatever novel techniques may be appropriate to the problem at hand. By beginning at the beginning, and analysing a wide variety of astrophysical settings, we seek not only to make this review suitable for fluid dynamic veterans, but to engage novice recruits as well with what we hope will be an unusual and instructive introduction to the subject.

  20. Surprises in astrophysical gasdynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbus, Steven A; Potter, William J

    2016-06-01

    Much of astrophysics consists of the study of ionized gas under the influence of gravitational and magnetic fields. Thus, it is not possible to understand the astrophysical universe without a detailed knowledge of the dynamics of magnetized fluids. Fluid dynamics is, however, a notoriously tricky subject, in which it is all too easy for one's a priori intuition to go astray. In this review, we seek to guide the reader through a series of illuminating yet deceptive problems, all with an enlightening twist. We cover a broad range of topics including the instabilities acting in accretion discs, the hydrodynamics governing the convective zone of the Sun, the magnetic shielding of a cooling galaxy cluster, and the behaviour of thermal instabilities and evaporating clouds. The aim of this review is to surprise and intrigue even veteran astrophysical theorists with an idiosyncratic choice of problems and counterintuitive results. At the same time, we endeavour to bring forth the fundamental ideas, to set out important assumptions, and to describe carefully whatever novel techniques may be appropriate to the problem at hand. By beginning at the beginning, and analysing a wide variety of astrophysical settings, we seek not only to make this review suitable for fluid dynamic veterans, but to engage novice recruits as well with what we hope will be an unusual and instructive introduction to the subject.

  1. Monotony and Surprise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolico, Alberto

    This paper reviews models and tools emerged in recent years in the author’s work in connection with the discovery of interesting or anomalous patterns in sequences. Whereas customary approaches to pattern discovery proceed from either a statistical or a syntactic characterization alone, the approaches described here present the unifying feature of combining these two descriptors in a solidly intertwined, composite paradigm, whereby both syntactic structure and occurrence lists concur to define and identify a pattern in a subject. In turn, this supports a natural notion of pattern saturation, which enables one to partition patterns into equivalence classes over intervals of monotonicity of commonly adopted scores, in such a way that the subset of class representatives, consisting solely of saturated patterns, suffices to account for all patterns in the subject. The benefits at the outset consist not only of an increased descriptive power, but especially of a mitigation of the often unmanageable roster of candidates unearthed in a discovery attempt, and of the daunting computational burden that goes with it.

  2. Increased Hydrogel Swelling Induced by Absorption of Small Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Changwoo; Zimudzi, Tawanda J; Geise, Geoffrey M; Hickner, Michael A

    2016-06-08

    The water and small molecule uptake behavior of amphiphilic diacrylate terminated poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMSDA)/poly(ethylene glycol diacrylate) (PEGDA) cross-linked hydrogels were studied using attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. These hydrogel networks absorbed more water as the PEGDA content of the network increased. In contrast to typical osmotic deswelling behavior that occurs when liquid water equilibrated hydrogels are immersed in small molecule solutions with water activities less than unity, water-swollen gels immersed in 2-acrylamido-2-methylpropanesulfonic acid (AMPS-H) solutions rapidly regained their water content within 4 min following an initial deswelling response. In situ ATR-FTIR analysis of the hydrogel film during the dynamic swelling experiment indicated that small molecule absorption into the gel played an important role in inducing gel reswelling in low water activity solutions. This aspect of polymer gel water uptake and interaction with small molecules is important for optimizing hydrogel coatings and hydrophilic polymer applications where there is an interaction between the internal chemical structure of the gel and electrolytes or other molecules in solution.

  3. Surprise... Surprise..., An Empirical Investigation on How Surprise is Connected to Customer Satisfaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Vanhamme (Joëlle)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThis research investigates the specific influence of the emotion of surprise on customer transaction-specific satisfaction. Four empirical studies-two field studies (a diary study and a cross section survey) and two experiments-were conducted. The results show that surprise positively

  4. Surprise... Surprise..., An Empirical Investigation on How Surprise is Connected to Customer Satisfaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Vanhamme (Joëlle)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThis research investigates the specific influence of the emotion of surprise on customer transaction-specific satisfaction. Four empirical studies-two field studies (a diary study and a cross section survey) and two experiments-were conducted. The results show that surprise positively [n

  5. Industrial Assessment Centers - Small Manufacturers Reduce Energy & Increase Productivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-11-06

    Since 1976, the Industrial Assessment Centers (IACs), administered by the US Department of Energy, have supported small and medium-sized American manufacturers to reduce energy use and increase their productivity and competitiveness. The 24 IACs, located at premier engineering universities around the country (see below), send faculty and engineering students to local small and medium-sized manufacturers to provide no-cost assessments of energy use, process performance and waste and water flows. Under the direction of experienced professors, IAC engineering students analyze the manufacturer’s facilities, energy bills and energy, waste and water systems, including compressed air, motors/pumps, lighting, process heat and steam. The IACs then follow up with written energy-saving and productivity improvement recommendations, with estimates of related costs and payback periods.

  6. Small doses of melatonin increase intestinal motility in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drago, Filippo; Macauda, Silvia; Salehi, Soudabeh

    2002-09-01

    Since melatonin receptors are present in the intestines, the possibility that this hormone may affect intestinal motility has been studied in the rat. Sprague-Dawley male rats were given a carmine cochineal powder meal and were injected intraperitoneally with 1, 10, 100, or 1000 microg/kg melatonin. Sixty minutes after treatment, intestinal transit was found to be faster in animals treated with small doses of melatonin (1 or 10 microg/kg) than in saline-injected controls. This effect, however, appear to be clearly reversed with 100 or 1000 microg/kg melatonin. In fact, these doses of the hormone reduced intestinal transit in rats. The nonselective melatonin receptor antagonist, luzindole (administered intraperitoneally in a dose of 0.25 mg/kg, 15 min prior to melatonin injection) totally prevented the accelerating effect of melatonin (10 microg/kg) on intestinal transit. Luzindole per se failed to affect gut motility. Injection of the reversible acetylcholinesterase inhibitor and cholinergic agent, neostigmine, accelerated intestinal transit but failed to influence melatonin effect on this parameter. In contrast, intraperitoneal injection of the muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine delayed intestinal transit per se but did not reduce the stimulating effect of melatonin on this parameter. Intestinal myoelectrical recording revealed that intestinal myoelectrical activity was increased by intraperitoneal injection of melatonin (10 microg/kg). Administration of luzindole totally prevented melatonin-induced increase of intestinal myoelectrical activity. These results indicate that melatonin may affect intestinal motility in rats when administered in small doses. This effect might be mediated by melatonin receptors in the intestines, although the involvement of central receptors for the hormone is also possible.

  7. Surprise as a design strategy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ludden, G.D.S.; Schifferstein, H.N.J.; Hekkert, P.P.M.

    2008-01-01

    Imagine yourself queuing for the cashier’s desk in a supermarket. Naturally, you have picked the wrong line, the one that does not seem to move at all. Soon, you get tired of waiting. Now, how would you feel if the cashier suddenly started to sing? Many of us would be surprised and, regardless of

  8. Surprise as a design strategy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ludden, G.D.S.; Schifferstein, H.N.J.; Hekkert, P.P.M.

    2008-01-01

    Imagine yourself queuing for the cashier’s desk in a supermarket. Naturally, you have picked the wrong line, the one that does not seem to move at all. Soon, you get tired of waiting. Now, how would you feel if the cashier suddenly started to sing? Many of us would be surprised and, regardless of th

  9. Natural methods for increasing reproductive efficiency in small ruminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, G B; Milton, J T B; Davidson, R H; Banchero Hunzicker, G E; Lindsay, D R; Blache, D

    2004-07-01

    This paper describes three strategies to improve the reproductive performance of small ruminants in ways that lead to "clean, green and ethical" animal production. The first is aimed at control of the timing of reproductive events for which we turn to the socio-sexual inputs of the "male effect" to induce synchronised ovulation in females that would otherwise be anovulatory. The second strategy, "focussed feeding", is based on our knowledge of the responses to nutrition and aims to develop short programs of nutritional supplements that are precisely timed and specifically designed for individual events in the reproductive process, such as gamete production, embryo survival, fetal programming and colostrum production. The third strategy aims to maximise offspring survival by a combination of management, nutrition and genetic selection for behavior (temperament). All of these approaches involve non-pharmacological manipulation of the endogenous control systems of the animals and complement the detailed information from ultrasound that is now becoming available. The use of such clean, green and ethical tools in the management of our animals can be cost-effective, increase productivity and, at the same time, greatly improve the image of meat and milk industries in society and the marketplace.

  10. Increasing Social Presence in Online Learning through Small Group Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akcaoglu, Mete; Lee, Eunbae

    2016-01-01

    Social presence is difficult to achieve, but an imperative component of online learning. In this study, we investigated the effect of group size on students' perceptions of social presence in two graduate-level online courses, comparing small group versus whole class discussions. Our results indicated that when in small group discussions, students…

  11. Brazilian rescue plan sparks surprise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    According to Financial Times,when Guido Mantega,Brazil's finance minister,suddenly proposed a “Bric” rescue package for the eurozone this week,he caught not only other world leaders by surprise but also many of his fellow countrymen.Even as officials from other members of the so-called Bric grouping,Russia,India and China,said it was the first they heard of the idea,many ordinary Brazilians expressed shock at the notion of bailing out the world's richest trading bloc.

  12. Surprise Leads to Noisier Perceptual Decisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta I Garrido

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Surprising events in the environment can impair task performance. This might be due to complete distraction, leading to lapses during which performance is reduced to guessing. Alternatively, unpredictability might cause a graded withdrawal of perceptual resources from the task at hand and thereby reduce sensitivity. Here we attempt to distinguish between these two mechanisms. Listeners performed a novel auditory pitch—duration discrimination, where stimulus loudness changed occasionally and incidentally to the task. Responses were slower and less accurate in the surprising condition, where loudness changed unpredictably, than in the predictable condition, where the loudness was held constant. By explicitly modelling both lapses and changes in sensitivity, we found that unpredictable changes diminished sensitivity but did not increase the rate of lapses. These findings suggest that background environmental uncertainty can disrupt goal-directed behaviour. This graded processing strategy might be adaptive in potentially threatening contexts, and reflect a flexible system for automatic allocation of perceptual resources.

  13. Some Surprises in Relativistic Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Santos, N O

    2016-01-01

    General Relativity has had tremendous success both on the theoretical and the experimental fronts for over a century now. However, the contents of the theory are far from exhausted. Only very recently, with the detection of gravitational waves from colliding black holes, we have started probing the behavior of gravity in the strongly non-linear regime. Even today, the studies of black holes keep revealing more and more paradoxes and bizarre results. In this paper, inspired by David Hilbert's startling observation, we show that, contrary to the conventional wisdom, a freely falling test particle feels gravitational repulsion by a black hole as seen by the asymptotic observer. We dig deeper into this surprising behavior of relativistic gravity and offer some explanations.

  14. Increased pheromone signaling by small male sea lamprey has distinct effects on female mate search and courtship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchinger, Tyler J.; Bussy, Ugo; Buchinger, Ethan G.; Fissette, Skye D.; Li, Weiming; Johnson, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    Male body size affects access to mates in many animals. Attributes of sexual signals often correlate with body size due to physiological constraints on signal production. Larger males generally produce larger signals, but costs of being large or compensation by small males can result in smaller males producing signals of equal or greater magnitude. Female choice following multiple male traits with different relationships to size might further complicate the effect of male body size on access to mates. We report the relationship between male body size and pheromone signaling, and the effects on female mate search and courtship in the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus). We predicted that pheromone production in the liver and the liver mass to body mass ratio would remain constant across sizes, resulting in similar mass-adjusted pheromone release rates across sizes but a positive relationship between absolute pheromone release and body mass. Our results confirmed positive relationships between body mass and liver mass, and liver mass and the magnitude of the pheromone signal. Surprisingly, decreasing body mass was correlated with higher pheromone concentrations in the liver, liver mass to body mass ratios, and mass-adjusted pheromone release rates. In a natural stream, females more often entered nests treated with small versus large male odors. However, close-proximity courtship behaviors were similar in nests treated with small or large male odors. We conclude that small males exhibit increased release of the main pheromone component, but female discrimination of male pheromones follows several axes of variation with different relationships to size.

  15. Some Surprising Introductory Physics Facts and Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallmann, A. James

    2016-01-01

    In the entertainment world, people usually like, and find memorable, novels, short stories, and movies with surprise endings. This suggests that classroom teachers might want to present to their students examples of surprising facts associated with principles of physics. Possible benefits of finding surprising facts about principles of physics are…

  16. Young Galaxy's Magnetism Surprises Astronomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    Astronomers have made the first direct measurement of the magnetic field in a young, distant galaxy, and the result is a big surprise. Looking at a faraway protogalaxy seen as it was 6.5 billion years ago, the scientists measured a magnetic field at least 10 times stronger than that of our own Milky Way. They had expected just the opposite. The GBT Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope CREDIT: NRAO/AUI/NSF The scientists made the discovery using the National Science Foundation's ultra-sensitive Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) in West Virginia. "This new measurement indicates that magnetic fields may play a more important role in the formation and evolution of galaxies than we have realized," said Arthur Wolfe, of the University of California-San Diego (UCSD). At its great distance, the protogalaxy is seen as it was when the Universe was about half its current age. According to the leading theory, cosmic magnetic fields are generated by the dynamos of rotating galaxies -- a process that would produce stronger fields with the passage of time. In this scenario, the magnetic fields should be weaker in the earlier Universe, not stronger. The new, direct magnetic-field measurement comes on the heels of a July report by Swiss and American astronomers who made indirect measurements that also implied strong magnetic fields in the early Universe. "Our results present a challenge to the dynamo model, but they do not rule it out," Wolfe said. There are other possible explanations for the strong magnetic field seen in the one protogalaxy Wolfe's team studied. "We may be seeing the field close to the central region of a massive galaxy, and we know such fields are stronger toward the centers of nearby galaxies. Also, the field we see may have been amplified by a shock wave caused by the collision of two galaxies," he said. The protogalaxy studied with the GBT, called DLA-3C286, consists of gas with little or no star formation occurring in it. The astronomers suspect that

  17. Cognitive and Social Perspectives on Surprise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhami, Mundler

    2007-01-01

    Meanings of "surprise" are wide and include uplifting and engaging facets like wonder and amazement on the one hand as well as ones that may be of the opposite nature like interruption and disrupt on the other. Pedagogically, educators who use surprise in class activities are focusing on students being "taken aback" by a situation, hopefully…

  18. Surprising characteristics of visual systems of invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Martín-Moro, J; Hernández-Verdejo, J L; Jiménez-Gahete, A E

    2017-01-01

    To communicate relevant and striking aspects about the visual system of some close invertebrates. Review of the related literature. The capacity of snails to regenerate a complete eye, the benefit of the oval shape of the compound eye of many flying insects as a way of stabilising the image during flight, the potential advantages related to the extreme refractive error that characterises the ocelli of many insects, as well as the ability to detect polarised light as a navigation system, are some of the surprising capabilities present in the small invertebrate eyes that are described in this work. The invertebrate eyes have capabilities and sensorial modalities that are not present in the human eye. The study of the eyes of these animals can help us to improve our understanding of our visual system, and inspire the development of optical devices. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Economic perspectives and social acceptance of possible increase in the small scale hydropower plants in Finland

    OpenAIRE

    Dewandelaere, Simon

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this thesis are to study the possibilities for increasing small scale hydropower in Finland, by studying the social acceptance and economical perspectives. It contains general information about the electricity market, production and consumption, as well as information collected about social acceptance and economical perspectives related to small scale hydropower plants. This thesis was conducted in Finland. The goals of this study are to determine why small scale hydropo...

  20. A toolkit for detecting technical surprise.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trahan, Michael Wayne; Foehse, Mark C.

    2010-10-01

    The detection of a scientific or technological surprise within a secretive country or institute is very difficult. The ability to detect such surprises would allow analysts to identify the capabilities that could be a military or economic threat to national security. Sandia's current approach utilizing ThreatView has been successful in revealing potential technological surprises. However, as data sets become larger, it becomes critical to use algorithms as filters along with the visualization environments. Our two-year LDRD had two primary goals. First, we developed a tool, a Self-Organizing Map (SOM), to extend ThreatView and improve our understanding of the issues involved in working with textual data sets. Second, we developed a toolkit for detecting indicators of technical surprise in textual data sets. Our toolkit has been successfully used to perform technology assessments for the Science & Technology Intelligence (S&TI) program.

  1. Deciphering network community structure by surprise

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Aldecoa, Rodrigo; Marín, Ignacio

    2011-01-01

    .... A fundamental, unsolved problem is how to characterize the community structure of a network. Here, using both standard and novel benchmarks, we show that maximization of a simple global parameter, which we call Surprise...

  2. A Surprising Culprit Behind Celiac Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... news/fullstory_164503.html A Surprising Culprit Behind Celiac Disease? Study suggests harmless viruses may set stage ... typically harmless type of virus might sometimes trigger celiac disease, a new study suggests. Celiac disease is ...

  3. Surprise disrupts cognition via a fronto-basal ganglia suppressive mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessel, Jan R; Jenkinson, Ned; Brittain, John-Stuart; Voets, Sarah H E M; Aziz, Tipu Z; Aron, Adam R

    2016-04-18

    Surprising events markedly affect behaviour and cognition, yet the underlying mechanism is unclear. Surprise recruits a brain mechanism that globally suppresses motor activity, ostensibly via the subthalamic nucleus (STN) of the basal ganglia. Here, we tested whether this suppressive mechanism extends beyond skeletomotor suppression and also affects cognition (here, verbal working memory, WM). We recorded scalp-EEG (electrophysiology) in healthy participants and STN local field potentials in Parkinson's patients during a task in which surprise disrupted WM. For scalp-EEG, surprising events engage the same independent neural signal component that indexes action stopping in a stop-signal task. Importantly, the degree of this recruitment mediates surprise-related WM decrements. Intracranially, STN activity is also increased post surprise, especially when WM is interrupted. These results suggest that surprise interrupts cognition via the same fronto-basal ganglia mechanism that interrupts action. This motivates a new neural theory of how cognition is interrupted, and how distraction arises after surprising events.

  4. Surprises in numerical expressions of physical constants

    CERN Document Server

    Amir, Ariel; Tokieda, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    In science, as in life, `surprises' can be adequately appreciated only in the presence of a null model, what we expect a priori. In physics, theories sometimes express the values of dimensionless physical constants as combinations of mathematical constants like pi or e. The inverse problem also arises, whereby the measured value of a physical constant admits a `surprisingly' simple approximation in terms of well-known mathematical constants. Can we estimate the probability for this to be a mere coincidence, rather than an inkling of some theory? We answer the question in the most naive form.

  5. Small Prizes Improve Food Selection in a School Cafeteria Without Increasing Waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudgens, Michelle E; Barnes, Allison S; Lockhart, Mary Kate; Ellsworth, Samantha C; Beckford, Monna; Siegel, Robert M

    2017-02-01

    We recently demonstrated that small prizes given for a "Power Plate" (plain fat-free milk, entrée, fruit and vegetable) can be used in an elementary school cafeteria to increase healthful food selection by over 300%. The purpose of this study was to measure changes in food waste when the Power Plate (PP) program is implemented. The PP intervention was conducted at an inner-city elementary school. Emoticons were placed next to the preferred foods and children were given a small prize if they selected the PP. Data were obtained by observation and cash register receipts. The trays of 111 students before the intervention and 96 after were examined for content and waste. PP selection increased from 2% to 73% ( P < .001). There was no significant change in waste. We conclude that small prizes as an incentive for better food selection does not lead to an increase food waste.

  6. A Shocking Surprise in Stephan's Quintet

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    This false-color composite image of the Stephan's Quintet galaxy cluster clearly shows one of the largest shock waves ever seen (green arc). The wave was produced by one galaxy falling toward another at speeds of more than one million miles per hour. The image is made up of data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope and a ground-based telescope in Spain. Four of the five galaxies in this picture are involved in a violent collision, which has already stripped most of the hydrogen gas from the interiors of the galaxies. The centers of the galaxies appear as bright yellow-pink knots inside a blue haze of stars, and the galaxy producing all the turmoil, NGC7318b, is the left of two small bright regions in the middle right of the image. One galaxy, the large spiral at the bottom left of the image, is a foreground object and is not associated with the cluster. The titanic shock wave, larger than our own Milky Way galaxy, was detected by the ground-based telescope using visible-light wavelengths. It consists of hot hydrogen gas. As NGC7318b collides with gas spread throughout the cluster, atoms of hydrogen are heated in the shock wave, producing the green glow. Spitzer pointed its infrared spectrograph at the peak of this shock wave (middle of green glow) to learn more about its inner workings. This instrument breaks light apart into its basic components. Data from the instrument are referred to as spectra and are displayed as curving lines that indicate the amount of light coming at each specific wavelength. The Spitzer spectrum showed a strong infrared signature for incredibly turbulent gas made up of hydrogen molecules. This gas is caused when atoms of hydrogen rapidly pair-up to form molecules in the wake of the shock wave. Molecular hydrogen, unlike atomic hydrogen, gives off most of its energy through vibrations that emit in the infrared. This highly disturbed gas is the most turbulent molecular hydrogen ever seen. Astronomers were surprised not only by the turbulence

  7. Surprising Connections between Partitions and Divisors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osler, Thomas J.; Hassen, Abdulkadir; Chandrupatla, Tirupathi R.

    2007-01-01

    The sum of the divisors of a positive integer is one of the most interesting concepts in multiplicative number theory, while the number of ways of expressing a number as a sum is a primary topic in additive number theory. In this article, we describe some of the surprising connections between and similarities of these two concepts.

  8. Surprises from extragalactic propagation of UHECRs

    CERN Document Server

    Boncioli, Denise; Grillo, Aurelio

    2015-01-01

    Ultra-high energy cosmic ray experimental data are now of very good statistical significance even in the region of the expected GZK feature. The identification of their sources requires sophisticate analysis of their propagation in the extragalactic space. When looking at the details of this propagation some unforeseen features emerge. We will discuss some of these "surprises".

  9. Antenatal education in small classes may increase childbirth self-efficacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brixval, Carina S; Axelsen, Solveig F; Thygesen, Lau C

    2016-01-01

    Antenatal education in small classes may increase childbirth self-efficacy. In this randomised trial we assessed the effect of a structured antenatal programme versus auditorium-based lectures on childbirth self-efficacy measured by three single items. We found that women in the intervention group...

  10. A Prompting Procedure for Increasing Sales in a Small Pet Store

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milligan, Jacqueline; Hantula, Donald A.

    2006-01-01

    A simple prompting procedure involving index cards was used to increase suggestive selling by the owner/operator of a small pet grooming business. Over a year of baseline data revealed that no sales prompts were given and few pet products were sold. When the owner was prompted by an index card to ask customers if they wanted to purchase pet…

  11. THE SMALL BUT SIGNIFICANT AND NONTRANSITORY INCREASE IN PRICES (SSNIP TEST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liviana Niminet

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The Small but Significant Nontransitory Increase in Price Test was designed to define the relevant market by concepts of product, geographical area and time. This test, also called the ,,hypothetical monopolistic test” is the subject of many researches both economical and legal as it deals with economic concepts as well as with legally aspects.

  12. Study Finds Small Increase in Cancer Risk after Childhood CT Scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    A study published in the June 6, 2012, issue of The Lancet shows that radiation exposure from computed tomography (CT) scans in childhood results in very small but increased risks of leukemia and brain tumors in the first decade after exposure.

  13. Rural Communities Matter: How PTAs Can Increase Parent Involvement in Our Nation's Small Towns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markell, Ginny

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the role of Parent Teacher Associations in increasing parent participation in rural and small town schools, noting facts about rural schools and describing how to reach out to parents and overcome such barriers as not feeling valued, not speaking English well, and not having transportation. (SM)

  14. Reduced lifespan and increased ageing driven by genetic drift in small populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohr, Jennifer N; David, Patrice; Haag, Christoph R

    2014-09-01

    Explaining the strong variation in lifespan among organisms remains a major challenge in evolutionary biology. Whereas previous work has concentrated mainly on differences in selection regimes and selection pressures, we hypothesize that differences in genetic drift may explain some of this variation. We develop a model to formalize this idea and show that the strong positive relationship between lifespan and genetic diversity predicted by this model indeed exists among populations of Daphnia magna, and that ageing is accelerated in small populations. Additional results suggest that this is due to increased drift in small populations rather than adaptation to environments favoring faster life histories. First, the correlation between genetic diversity and lifespan remains significant after statistical correction for potential environmental covariates. Second, no trade-offs are observed; rather, all investigated traits show clear signs of increased genetic load in the small populations. Third, hybrid vigor with respect to lifespan is observed in crosses between small but not between large populations. Together, these results suggest that the evolution of lifespan and ageing can be strongly affected by genetic drift, especially in small populations, and that variation in lifespan and ageing may often be nonadaptive, due to a strong contribution from mutation accumulation.

  15. Increases in duodenal glutamic acid supply linearly increase small intestinal starch digestion but not nitrogen balance in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, E J; Anderson, D E; Brake, D W

    2016-12-01

    Small intestinal starch digestion (SISD) in cattle is often limited; however, greater postruminal flow of high-quality protein (e.g., casein) can increase SISD, and Glu can mimic responses to casein for SISD. We evaluated effects of increasing Glu flows to the duodenum on SISD and N retention in cattle. Cattle received (DM basis) continuous duodenal infusion of raw cornstarch (1.5 ± 0.08 kg/d) and 0, 30.9 ± 0.6, 62.4 ± 1.2, or 120.4 ± 3.4 g/d Glu or 387.9 ± 17.5 g/d casein. As expected, the positive control (i.e., casein) increased ( = 0.05) SISD. Interestingly, SISD linearly increased ( = 0.02) with increasing amounts of Glu. Starch flow to the ileum linearly decreased ( = 0.04) in response to greater postruminal Glu and tended to decrease ( = 0.07) with duodenal casein infusion. Ileal flow of ethanol-soluble starch was not affected by duodenal Glu ( = 0.16) or casein ( = 0.42). There was a tendency ( = 0.08) for a quadratic response to Glu for ileal glucose flow with greater flows for intermediate levels of Glu, but casein had no effect ( = 0.81) on glucose flows to the ileum. Greater postruminal supplies of Glu (linear, = 0.05) and casein ( = 0.02) decreased fecal starch flow. Postruminal starch digestion was increased by both casein ( = 0.03) and Glu (linear, = 0.05). Nitrogen intake from feed was not different among treatments ( ≥ 0.23). By design, infusate N increased from 0 to 13 ± 1.5 g/d with greater amounts of Glu, and casein provided 61 ± 1.3 g N/d. Urinary N excretion was not affected ( ≥ 0.30) by postruminal Glu flow, but urine N was increased by casein ( Glutamic acid did not affect N retention ( ≥ 0.34), but casein increased N retention ( < 0.01). However, N retained as a percent of N intake (26.7 ± 1.7%) was not different when cattle were provided Glu ( ≥ 0.16) or casein ( = 0.38).

  16. Radar Design to Protect Against Surprise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Technological and doctrinal surprise is about rendering preparations for conflict as irrelevant or ineffective . For a sensor, this means essentially rendering the sensor as irrelevant or ineffective in its ability to help determine truth. Recovery from this sort of surprise is facilitated by flexibility in our own technology and doctrine. For a sensor, this mean s flexibility in its architecture, design, tactics, and the designing organizations ' processes. - 4 - Acknowledgements This report is the result of a n unfunded research and development activity . Sandia National Laboratories is a multi - program laboratory manage d and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE - AC04 - 94AL85000.

  17. Radar Design to Protect Against Surprise.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin W.

    2015-02-01

    Technological and doctrinal surprise is about rendering preparations for conflict as irrelevant or ineffective . For a sensor, this means essentially rendering the sensor as irrelevant or ineffective in its ability to help determine truth. Recovery from this sort of surprise is facilitated by flexibility in our own technology and doctrine. For a sensor, this mean s flexibility in its architecture, design, tactics, and the designing organizations ' processes. - 4 - Acknowledgements This report is the result of a n unfunded research and development activity . Sandia National Laboratories is a multi - program laboratory manage d and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE - AC04 - 94AL85000.

  18. Surprise-Based Learning for Autonomous Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-28

    for scientific theories containing recursive theoretical terms". British Journal of Philosophy of Science, 44. 641-652, 1993. Piaget J.. "The Origins...paradigm stems from Piaget’s theory of Developmental Psychology [5], Herben Simon’s theory on dual-space search for knowledge and problem solving [6...34, Twenty-First Conference on Uncertainty in Artificial Intelligence, Edinburgh, Scotland, July 2005. [34] Itti L., Baldi P., "A Surprising Theory of

  19. Small-for-Size Liver Transplantation Increases Pulmonary Injury in Rats: Prevention by NIM811

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinlong Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary complications after liver transplantation (LT often cause mortality. This study investigated whether small-for-size LT increases acute pulmonary injury and whether NIM811 which improves small-for-size liver graft survival attenuates LT-associated lung injury. Rat livers were reduced to 50% of original size, stored in UW-solution with and without NIM811 (5 μM for 6 h, and implanted into recipients of the same or about twice the donor weight, resulting in half-size (HSG and quarter-size grafts (QSG, respectively. Liver injury increased and regeneration was suppressed after QSG transplantation as expected. NIM811 blunted these alterations >75%. Pulmonary histological alterations were minimal at 5–18 h after LT. At 38 h, neutrophils and monocytes/macrophage infiltration, alveolar space exudation, alveolar septal thickening, oxidative/nitrosative protein adduct formation, and alveolar epithelial cell/capillary endothelial apoptosis became overt in the lungs of QSG recipients, but these alterations were mild in full-size and HSG recipients. Liver pretreatment with NIM811 markedly decreased pulmonary injury in QSG recipients. Hepatic TNFα and IL-1β mRNAs and pulmonary ICAM-1 expression were markedly higher after QSG transplantation, which were all decreased by NIM811. Together, dysfunctional small-for-size grafts produce toxic cytokines, leading to lung inflammation and injury. NIM811 decreased toxic cytokine formation, thus attenuating pulmonary injury after small-for-size LT.

  20. Specific protein homeostatic functions of small heat-shock proteins increase lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, Michel J; Carra, Serena; Kanon, Bart; Bosveld, Floris; Klauke, Karin; Sibon, Ody C M; Kampinga, Harm H

    2016-04-01

    During aging, oxidized, misfolded, and aggregated proteins accumulate in cells, while the capacity to deal with protein damage declines severely. To cope with the toxicity of damaged proteins, cells rely on protein quality control networks, in particular proteins belonging to the family of heat-shock proteins (HSPs). As safeguards of the cellular proteome, HSPs assist in protein folding and prevent accumulation of damaged, misfolded proteins. Here, we compared the capacity of all Drosophila melanogaster small HSP family members for their ability to assist in refolding stress-denatured substrates and/or to prevent aggregation of disease-associated misfolded proteins. We identified CG14207 as a novel and potent small HSP member that exclusively assisted in HSP70-dependent refolding of stress-denatured proteins. Furthermore, we report that HSP67BC, which has no role in protein refolding, was the most effective small HSP preventing toxic protein aggregation in an HSP70-independent manner. Importantly, overexpression of both CG14207 and HSP67BC in Drosophila leads to a mild increase in lifespan, demonstrating that increased levels of functionally diverse small HSPs can promote longevity in vivo.

  1. Increased concentration of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus sp. in small animals exposed to aerospace environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, R. K.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of increased concentrations of PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA AND STAPHYLOCOCCUS in the total bacterial flora of small animals exposed to simulated spacecraft environments were evaluated. Tests to detect changes in infectivity, effects of antibiotic treatments, immune responses to bacterial antigens, and effectiveness of immune responses in the experimental environment were conducted. The most significant results appear to be the differences in immune responses at simulated altitudes and the production of infection in the presence of a specific antibody.

  2. Small prizes increased healthful school lunch selection in a Midwestern school district.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Robert; Lockhart, Mary Kate; Barnes, Allison S; Hiller, Elizabeth; Kipp, Roger; Robison, Debora L; Ellsworth, Samantha C; Hudgens, Michelle E

    2016-04-01

    As obesity has become a pressing health issue for American children, greater attention has been focused on how schools can be used to improve how students eat. Previously, we piloted the use of small prizes in an elementary school cafeteria to improve healthful food selection. We hoped to increase healthful food selection in all the elementary schools of a small school district participating in the United States Department of Agriculture Lunch Program by offering prizes to children who selected a Power Plate (PP), which consisted of an entrée with whole grains, a fruit, a vegetable, and plain low-fat milk. In this study, the PP program was introduced to 3 schools sequentially over an academic year. During the kickoff week, green, smiley-faced emoticons were placed by preferred foods, and children were given a prize daily if they chose a PP on that day. After the first week, students were given a sticker or temporary tattoo 2 days a week if they selected a PP. Combining data from the 3 schools in the program, students increased PP selection from 4.5% at baseline to 49.4% (p < 0.0001) during an intervention period of 2.5 school weeks. The school with the longest intervention period, 6 months, showed a PP selection increase of from 3.9% to 26.4% (p < 0.0001). In conclusion, giving small prizes as rewards dramatically improves short-term healthful food selection in elementary school children.

  3. Pupil size tracks perceptual content and surprise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloosterman, Niels A; Meindertsma, Thomas; van Loon, Anouk M; Lamme, Victor A F; Bonneh, Yoram S; Donner, Tobias H

    2015-04-01

    Changes in pupil size at constant light levels reflect the activity of neuromodulatory brainstem centers that control global brain state. These endogenously driven pupil dynamics can be synchronized with cognitive acts. For example, the pupil dilates during the spontaneous switches of perception of a constant sensory input in bistable perceptual illusions. It is unknown whether this pupil dilation only indicates the occurrence of perceptual switches, or also their content. Here, we measured pupil diameter in human subjects reporting the subjective disappearance and re-appearance of a physically constant visual target surrounded by a moving pattern ('motion-induced blindness' illusion). We show that the pupil dilates during the perceptual switches in the illusion and a stimulus-evoked 'replay' of that illusion. Critically, the switch-related pupil dilation encodes perceptual content, with larger amplitude for disappearance than re-appearance. This difference in pupil response amplitude enables prediction of the type of report (disappearance vs. re-appearance) on individual switches (receiver-operating characteristic: 61%). The amplitude difference is independent of the relative durations of target-visible and target-invisible intervals and subjects' overt behavioral report of the perceptual switches. Further, we show that pupil dilation during the replay also scales with the level of surprise about the timing of switches, but there is no evidence for an interaction between the effects of surprise and perceptual content on the pupil response. Taken together, our results suggest that pupil-linked brain systems track both the content of, and surprise about, perceptual events.

  4. Postprandial increase of oleoylethanolamide mobilization in small intestine of the Burmese python (Python molurus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astarita, Giuseppe; Rourke, Bryan C; Andersen, Johnnie Bremholm

    2006-01-01

    to the induction of between-meal satiety. Here we examined whether feeding-induced OEA mobilization also occurs in Burmese pythons (Python molurus), a species of ambush-hunting snakes that consumes huge meals after months of fasting and undergoes massive feeding-dependent changes in gastrointestinal hormonal...... release and gut morphology. Using liquid-chromatography/mass-spectrometry (LC/MS), we measured OEA levels in the gastrointestinal tract of fasted (28 days) and fed (48h after feeding) pythons. We observed a nearly 300-fold increase in OEA levels in the small intestine of fed compared to fasted animals......-unsaturated, but not polyunsaturated fatty-acid ethanolamides (FAE) in the small intestine of fed pythons. The identification of OEA and other FAEs in the gastrointestinal tract of Python molurus suggests that this class of lipid messengers may be widespread among vertebrate groups and may represent an evolutionarily ancient means...

  5. Postprandial increase of oleoylethanolamide mobilization in small intestine of the Burmese python (Python molurus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astarita, Giuseppe; Rourke, Bryan C; Andersen, Johnnie Bremholm

    2006-01-01

    to the induction of between-meal satiety. Here we examined whether feeding-induced OEA mobilization also occurs in Burmese pythons (Python molurus), a species of ambush-hunting snakes that consumes huge meals after months of fasting and undergoes massive feeding-dependent changes in gastrointestinal hormonal...... release and gut morphology. Using liquid-chromatography/mass-spectrometry (LC/MS), we measured OEA levels in the gastrointestinal tract of fasted (28 days) and fed (48h after feeding) pythons. We observed a nearly 300-fold increase in OEA levels in the small intestine of fed compared to fasted animals......-unsaturated, but not polyunsaturated fatty-acid ethanolamides (FAE) in the small intestine of fed pythons. The identification of OEA and other FAEs in the gastrointestinal tract of Python molurus suggests that this class of lipid messengers may be widespread among vertebrate groups and may represent an evolutionarily ancient means...

  6. Effects of Surprisal and Locality on Danish Sentence Processing: An Eye-Tracking Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balling, Laura Winther; Kizach, Johannes

    2017-03-22

    An eye-tracking experiment in Danish investigates two dominant accounts of sentence processing: locality-based theories that predict a processing advantage for sentences where the distance between the major syntactic heads is minimized, and the surprisal theory which predicts that processing time increases with big changes in the relative entropy of possible parses, sometimes leading to anti-locality effects. We consider both lexicalised surprisal, expressed in conditional trigram probabilities, and syntactic surprisal expressed in the manipulation of the expectedness of the second NP in Danish constructions with two postverbal NP-objects. An eye-tracking experiment showed a clear advantage for local syntactic relations, with only a marginal effect of lexicalised surprisal and no effect of syntactic surprisal. We conclude that surprisal has a relatively marginal effect, which may be clearest for verbs in verb-final languages, while locality is a robust predictor of sentence processing.

  7. Some surprising facts about (the problem of) surprising facts (from the Dusseldorf Conference, February 2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, D

    2014-03-01

    A common intuition about evidence is that if data x have been used to construct a hypothesis H, then x should not be used again in support of H. It is no surprise that x fits H, if H was deliberately constructed to accord with x. The question of when and why we should avoid such "double-counting" continues to be debated in philosophy and statistics. It arises as a prohibition against data mining, hunting for significance, tuning on the signal, and ad hoc hypotheses, and as a preference for predesignated hypotheses and "surprising" predictions. I have argued that it is the severity or probativeness of the test--or lack of it--that should determine whether a double-use of data is admissible. I examine a number of surprising ambiguities and unexpected facts that continue to bedevil this debate.

  8. Stroke Recovery: Surprising Influences and Residual Consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Argye E. Hillis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There is startling individual variability in the degree to which people recover from stroke and the duration of time over which recovery of some symptoms occurs. There are a variety of mechanisms of recovery from stroke which take place at distinct time points after stroke and are influenced by different variables. We review recent studies from our laboratory that unveil some surprising findings, such as the role of education in chronic recovery. We also report data showing that the consequences that most plague survivors of stroke and their caregivers are loss of high level cortical functions, such as empathy or written language. These results have implications for rehabilitation and management of stroke.

  9. Surprises and mysteries in urban soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groffman, P. M.

    2015-12-01

    In the Baltimore Ecosystem Study, one of two urban long-term ecological research (LTER) projects funded by the U.S. National Science Foundation, we are using "the watershed approach" to integrate ecological, physical and social sciences. Urban and suburban watershed input/output budgets for nitrogen have shown surprisingly high retention which has led to detailed analysis of sources and sinks in soils these watersheds. Home lawns, thought to be major sources of reactive nitrogen in suburban watersheds, have more complex coupled carbon and nitrogen dynamics than previously thought, and are likely the site of much nitrogen retention. Riparian zones, thought to be an important sink for reactive nitrogen in many watersheds, have turned out be nitrogen sources in urban watersheds due to hydrologic changes that disconnect streams from their surrounding landscape. Urban effects on atmospheric carbon dioxide levels and nitrogen deposition have strong effects on soil nitrogen cycling processes and soil:atmosphere fluxes of nitrous oxide, carbon dioxide and methane. Efforts to manage urban soils and watersheds through geomorphic stream restoration, creation of stormwater management features and changes in lawn and forest management can have significant effects on watershed carbon and nitrogen dynamics. Urban soils present a basic and applied science frontier that challenges our understanding of biological, physical, chemical and social science processes. The watershed approach provides an effective platform for integrating these disciplines and for articulating critical questions that arise from surprising results. This approach can help us to meet the challenge of urban soils, which is critical to achieving sustainability goals in cities across the world.

  10. Obesity does not increase complications after anatomic resection for non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Philip W; Wang, Hongkun; Gazoni, Leo M; Shen, K Robert; Daniel, Thomas M; Jones, David R

    2007-10-01

    The effect of obesity on complications after resection for lung cancer is unknown. We hypothesized that obesity is associated with increased complications after anatomic resections for non-small cell lung cancer. A review of our prospective general thoracic database identified 499 consecutive anatomic resections for non-small cell lung cancer from November 2002 to May 2006. Body mass index (BMI) was used to group patients as nonobese (BMI > 18.5 to obese (BMI > or = 30). Patient characteristics and oncologic and operative variables were compared between groups. Multivariable logistic regression models were fit with BMI included at every level. Outcomes examined included in-hospital morbidity, mortality, length of stay, and readmission. Seventy-five percent (372 of 499) were nonobese, and 25% (127 of 499) were obese. Preoperative variables were similar, except for a greater incidence of diabetes mellitus (p obese group. Overall mortality was 1.4% (7 of 499) and was not different between groups (p = 0.85). Thirty-day readmission rates (p = 0.76) and length of stay (p = 0.30) were similar. Obese patients had a higher incidence of acute renal failure (p = 0.001). A complication occurred in 33% (124 of 372) of nonobese and 31% (39 of 127) of obese patients (p = 0.59). Respiratory complications occurred in 22% (81 of 372) of nonobese and 14% (18 of 127) of obese patients (p = 0.06). Significant predictors of any complication include performance status, diffusing capacity, and tumor stage. Significant predictors of respiratory complications include performance status, diffusing capacity, chronic renal insufficiency, prior thoracic surgery, and chest wall resection. In contrast to our hypothesis, obesity does not increase the incidence of perioperative complications, mortality, or length of stay after anatomic resection for non-small cell lung cancer.

  11. Increased response to glutamate in small diameter dorsal root ganglion neurons after sciatic nerve injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerui Gong

    Full Text Available Glutamate in the peripheral nervous system is involved in neuropathic pain, yet we know little how nerve injury alters responses to this neurotransmitter in primary sensory neurons. We recorded neuronal responses from the ex-vivo preparations of the dorsal root ganglia (DRG one week following a chronic constriction injury (CCI of the sciatic nerve in adult rats. We found that small diameter DRG neurons (30 µm were unaffected. Puff application of either glutamate, or the selective ionotropic glutamate receptor agonists alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA and kainic acid (KA, or the group I metabotropic receptor (mGluR agonist (S-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG, induced larger inward currents in CCI DRGs compared to those from uninjured rats. N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA-induced currents were unchanged. In addition to larger inward currents following CCI, a greater number of neurons responded to glutamate, AMPA, NMDA, and DHPG, but not to KA. Western blot analysis of the DRGs revealed that CCI resulted in a 35% increase in GluA1 and a 60% decrease in GluA2, the AMPA receptor subunits, compared to uninjured controls. mGluR1 receptor expression increased by 60% in the membrane fraction, whereas mGluR5 receptor subunit expression remained unchanged after CCI. These results show that following nerve injury, small diameter DRG neurons, many of which are nociceptive, have increased excitability and an increased response to glutamate that is associated with changes in receptor expression at the neuronal membrane. Our findings provide further evidence that glutamatergic transmission in the periphery plays a role in nociception.

  12. Epidermal growth factor induces increased mucosal thickness of the small intestine in mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, C; Ihse, I; Axelson

    1997-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is known to exert a mitogenic effect in different tissues, including the digestive tract. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether long-term infusion of EGF causes trophic effects in the gastrointestinal tract of female mice. The animals were infused subcutaneously in the neck with human recombinant EGF in a dose of 10 micrograms/kg/h (1.6 nmol/kg/h) using an osmotic minipump for 1, 3 and 7 days, respectively. Tritiated thymidine was continuously infused intraperitoneally during the same period, except in the 7-day group, where it was infused during the last 3 days. The mucosal thickness was measured microscopically. As a measurement of DNA synthesis, the amount of thymidine retained in the mucosa was registered using a scintillation counter. After 1 day of EGF infusion, the mucosal thickness was increased in the antrum and, after 3 days, in the fundus. In the proximal duodenum, an increased depth of the crypts was seen after 1 day, followed by increased villi height after 3 and 7 days; in the distal duodenum, EGF evoked increased villi height after 3 and 7 days. The height of villi was increased after 7 days in the jejunum and ileum in the EGF-treated animals. The tritium incorporation was increased in the fundus of the stomach and the proximal duodenum in the EGF-treated animals after 3 days, whereas no significant increase in tritiated thymidine incorporation could be detected in the EGF-treated animals after 1 and 7 days compared to the controls. In conclusion, continuous infusion of EGF evoked increased mucosal thickness in the small intestine, while the trophic effects were only of a short duration in the stomach and absent in the colon.

  13. A Neural Mechanism for Surprise-related Interruptions of Visuospatial Working Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessel, Jan R

    2016-11-30

    Surprising perceptual events recruit a fronto-basal ganglia mechanism for inhibition, which suppresses motor activity following surprise. A recent study found that this inhibitory mechanism also disrupts the maintenance of verbal working memory (WM) after surprising tones. However, it is unclear whether this same mechanism also relates to surprise-related interruptions of non-verbal WM. We tested this hypothesis using a change-detection task, in which surprising tones impaired visuospatial WM. Participants also performed a stop-signal task (SST). We used independent component analysis and single-trial scalp-electroencephalogram to test whether the same inhibitory mechanism that reflects motor inhibition in the SST relates to surprise-related visuospatial WM decrements, as was the case for verbal WM. As expected, surprising tones elicited activity of the inhibitory mechanism, and this activity correlated strongly with the trial-by-trial level of surprise. However, unlike for verbal WM, the activity of this mechanism was unrelated to visuospatial WM accuracy. Instead, inhibition-independent activity that immediately succeeded the inhibitory mechanism was increased when visuospatial WM was disrupted. This shows that surprise-related interruptions of visuospatial WM are not effected by the same inhibitory mechanism that interrupts verbal WM, and instead provides evidence for a 2-stage model of distraction.

  14. The conceptualization model problem—surprise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredehoeft, John

    2005-03-01

    The foundation of model analysis is the conceptual model. Surprise is defined as new data that renders the prevailing conceptual model invalid; as defined here it represents a paradigm shift. Limited empirical data indicate that surprises occur in 20-30% of model analyses. These data suggest that groundwater analysts have difficulty selecting the appropriate conceptual model. There is no ready remedy to the conceptual model problem other than (1) to collect as much data as is feasible, using all applicable methods—a complementary data collection methodology can lead to new information that changes the prevailing conceptual model, and (2) for the analyst to remain open to the fact that the conceptual model can change dramatically as more information is collected. In the final analysis, the hydrogeologist makes a subjective decision on the appropriate conceptual model. The conceptualization problem does not render models unusable. The problem introduces an uncertainty that often is not widely recognized. Conceptual model uncertainty is exacerbated in making long-term predictions of system performance. C'est le modèle conceptuel qui se trouve à base d'une analyse sur un modèle. On considère comme une surprise lorsque le modèle est invalidé par des données nouvelles; dans les termes définis ici la surprise est équivalente à un change de paradigme. Des données empiriques limitées indiquent que les surprises apparaissent dans 20 à 30% des analyses effectuées sur les modèles. Ces données suggèrent que l'analyse des eaux souterraines présente des difficultés lorsqu'il s'agit de choisir le modèle conceptuel approprié. Il n'existe pas un autre remède au problème du modèle conceptuel que: (1) rassembler autant des données que possible en utilisant toutes les méthodes applicables—la méthode des données complémentaires peut conduire aux nouvelles informations qui vont changer le modèle conceptuel, et (2) l'analyste doit rester ouvert au fait

  15. Small amounts of ammonium (NH4+) can increase growth of maize (Zea mays)

    KAUST Repository

    George, Jessey

    2016-09-16

    Nitrate (NOequation image) and ammonium (NHequation image) are the predominant forms of nitrogen (N) available to plants in agricultural soils. Nitrate concentrations are generally ten times higher than those of NHequation image and this ratio is consistent across a wide range of soil types. The possible contribution of these small concentrations of NHequation image to the overall N budget of crop plants is often overlooked. In this study the importance of this for the growth and nitrogen budget of maize (Zea mays L.) was investigated, using agriculturally relevant concentrations of NHequation image. Maize inbred line B73 was grown hydroponically for 30 d at low (0.5 mM) and sufficient (2.5 mM) levels of NOequation image. Ammonium was added at 0.05 mM and 0.25 mM to both levels of NOequation image. At low NOequation image levels, addition of NHequation image was found to improve the growth of maize plants. This increased plant growth was accompanied by an increase in total N uptake, as well as total phosphorus, sulphur and other micronutrients in the shoot. Ammonium influx was higher than NOequation image influx for all the plants and decreased as the total N in the nutrient medium increased. This study shows that agriculturally relevant proportions of NHequation image supplied in addition to NOequation image can increase growth of maize.

  16. Evaluation of an educational campaign to increase hand hygiene at a small animal veterinary teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Annie; Shaw, Scott

    2012-01-01

    To establish baseline data on rates of hand hygiene behavior, evaluate the effectiveness of an educational intervention aimed at improving hand hygiene, and determine whether methods similar to those applied in human hospitals to improve hand hygiene can be successfully applied in a small animal veterinary hospital. Prospective observational study. 568 and 187 observations of interactions between small animal patients and veterinary health-care providers before and after, respectively, educational intervention. Proper hand hygiene practices were defined as use of antibacterial foam or hand washing before or after physical interactions between health-care providers (veterinary medical faculty members, residents, interns, students, and technicians) and patients or proper use of gloves. Data were collected by anonymous direct observation. After an initial observation period, a multimodal educational campaign promoted proper hand hygiene with specific attention to increasing use of antibacterial foam. Two months later, data on proper hand hygiene practices after intervention were collected. At baseline, 117 of 568 (20.6%) interactions met criteria for proper hand hygiene practices; after intervention, a significantly greater proportion (78/187 [41.7%]) of interactions met criteria for proper hand hygiene practices. Use of antibacterial foam significantly increased from 34 of 568 (6.0%) to 67 of 187 (35.8%) interactions. Health-care providers were 4.1 times as likely to wash their hands with soap and water or to use antibacterial foam on their hands after the intervention than before the intervention. Initial low rates of proper hand hygiene practices at baseline were improved substantially 2 months after implementing a low-cost multimodal educational campaign.

  17. Surprises from Saturn: Implications for Other Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, A. J.

    2014-05-01

    The exploration of Saturn by Cassini has provided many surprises regarding: Saturn's rapidly rotating magnetosphere, interactions with its diverse moons, and interactions with the solar wind. Enceladus, orbiting at 4 Saturn radii (RS), was found to have plumes of water vapour and ice which are the dominant source for the inner magnetosphere. Charged water clusters, charged dust and photoelectrons provide key populations in the 'dusty plasma' observed. Direct pickup is seen near Enceladus and field-aligned currents create a spot in Saturn's aurora. At Titan, orbiting at 20 RS, unexpected heavy negative and positive ions are seen in the ionosphere, which provide the source for Titan's haze. Ionospheric plasma is seen in Titan's tail, enabling ion escape to be estimated at 7 tonnes per day. Saturn's ring ionosphere was seen early in the mission and a return will be made in 2017. In addition, highly accelerated electrons are seen at Saturn's high Mach number (MA˜100) quasi-parallel bow shock. Here we review some of these key new results, and discuss the implications for other solar system objects.

  18. Surprising Sensitivities in Simulations of Radiative Convective Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drotos, Gabor; Becker, Tobias; Mauritsen, Thorsten; Stevens, Bjorn

    2017-04-01

    The climate and climate-sensitivity of a global model run in radiative equilibrium is explored. Results from simulations with ECHAM6.3 coupled to a slab ocean and run in a wide range of configurations are presented. Simulations both with and without a parameterised representation of deep convection are conducted for CO2 concentrations ranging from one eighth of present day values to thirty-two times the present day, and for variations in the solar constant of more than a factor of two. Very long simulations, in some case more than a thousand years, are performed to adequately sample the attractor of the different climate states of the model, and provide robust estimates of the system's climate sensitivity parameter. For the standard configuration of the model the climate sensitivity progressively decreases from very large values (6-7K) for the coldest climates to well below 1 K for the warmest climates. For very high CO2 levels (16 and 32 times the present value) fluctuations of globally averaged temperature as large as 10 K arise on decadal time-scales. These fluctuations manifest as quasi-period coolings, driven by large and persistent global scale decks of stratiform low clouds, so that for a period of several years global temperatures drop to levels below the lowest temperatures of the climate with present day values of CO2. The same configuration of the model has more modest sensitivities when the insolation is reduced, but runaway warming results for small (10%) increases. Simulations without parameterised convection have colder (by roughly 10K) climates and smaller (1K) sensitivities, allowing a stable climate with earth-like temperatures even for insolation much (50%) larger than the present day. Such values of insolation are possible because over a large range of the insolation the climate sensitivity parameter is very near zero. The surprising sensitivities of the system, and the limit-cycle like behaviour of the very CO2 rich climates, can be traced to

  19. Increasing 14N NQR signal by 1H-14N level crossing with small magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, Kent R; Sauer, Karen L; Buess, Michael L; Klug, Christopher A; Miller, Joel B

    2005-11-01

    NQR detection of materials, such as TNT, is hindered by the low signal-to-noise ratio at low NQR frequencies. Sweeping small (0-26 mT) magnetic fields to shift the (1)H NMR frequency relative to the (14)N NQR frequencies can provide a significant increase of the (14)N NQR signal-to-noise ratio. Three effects of (1)H-(14)N level crossing are demonstrated in diglycine hydrochloride and TNT. These effects are (1) transferring (1)H polarization to one or more of the (14)N transitions, including the use of an adiabatic flip of the (1)H polarization during the field sweep, (2) shortening the effective (14)N T(1) by the interaction of (1)H with the (14)N transitions, (3) "level transfer" effect where the third (14)N (spin 1) energy level or other (14)N sites with different NQR frequency are used as a reservoir of polarization which is transferred to the measured (14)N transition by the (1)H. The (14)N NQR signal-to-noise ratio can be increased by a factor of 2.5 for one (14)N site in diglycine hydrochloride (and 2.2 in TNT), even though the maximum (1)H frequency used in this work, 111 6 kHz, is only 30% larger than the measured (14)N frequencies (834 kHz for diglycine hydrochloride and 843 kHz for TNT).

  20. Small-molecule CFTR activators increase tear secretion and prevent experimental dry eye disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Alyssa M; Casey, Scott D; Felix, Christian M; Phuan, Puay W; Verkman, A S; Levin, Marc H

    2016-05-01

    Dry eye disorders, including Sjögren's syndrome, constitute a common problem in the aging population, with limited effective therapeutic options available. The cAMP-activated Cl(-) channel cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a major prosecretory channel at the ocular surface. We investigated whether compounds that target CFTR can correct the abnormal tear film in dry eye. Small-molecule activators of human wild-type CFTR identified by high-throughput screening were evaluated in cell culture and in vivo assays, to select compounds that stimulate Cl(-)-driven fluid secretion across the ocular surface in mice. An aminophenyl-1,3,5-triazine, CFTRact-K089, fully activated CFTR in cell cultures with EC50 ∼250 nM and produced an ∼8.5 mV hyperpolarization in ocular surface potential difference. When delivered topically, CFTRact-K089 doubled basal tear volume for 4 h and had no effect in CF mice. CFTRact-K089 showed sustained tear film bioavailability without detectable systemic absorption. In a mouse model of aqueous-deficient dry eye produced by lacrimal ablation, topical administration of 0.1 nmol CFTRact-K089 3 times daily restored tear volume to basal levels, preventing corneal epithelial disruption when initiated at the time of surgery and reversing it when started after development of dry eye. Our results support the potential utility of CFTR-targeted activators as a novel prosecretory treatment for dry eye.-Flores, A. M., Casey, S. D., Felix, C. M., Phuan, P. W., Verkman, A. S., Levin, M. H. Small-molecule CFTR activators increase tear secretion and prevent experimental dry eye disease.

  1. Cerebral Small Vessel Disease Burden Is Increased in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiseman, Stewart J; Bastin, Mark E; Jardine, Charlotte L; Barclay, Gayle; Hamilton, Iona F; Sandeman, Elaine; Hunt, David; Amft, E Nicole; Thomson, Susan; Belch, Jill F F; Ralston, Stuart H; Wardlaw, Joanna M

    2016-11-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) increases stroke risk, but the mechanism is uncertain. This study aimed to determine the association between SLE and features on neuroimaging of cerebral small vessel disease (SVD), a risk factor for stroke. Consecutive patients attending a clinic for SLE were recruited. All patients underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging; had blood samples taken for markers of inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, cholesterol, and autoantibodies; and underwent cognitive and psychiatric testing. The data were compared with sex- and age-matched healthy controls and patients with minor stroke. Features of SVD were measured, a total SVD score calculated, and associations sought with vascular risk factors, cognition, SLE activity, and disease duration. Fifty-one SLE patients (age: 48.8 years; SD: 14.3 years) had a greater total SVD score compared with healthy controls (1 versus 0; PSVD features. The total SVD score was not associated with SLE activity, cognition, disease duration, or any blood measure. In this data set, SLE patients had a high burden of SVD features on magnetic resonance imaging, particularly perivascular spaces. A larger longitudinal study is warranted to determine the causes of SVD features in SLE and clinical implications. © 2016 The Authors.

  2. Conductive Gel Increases the Small Tumor Treatment With Electrochemotherapy Using Needle Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Daniela O H; Marques, Claudia M G; Rangel, Marcelo M M

    2016-07-01

    The combination of chemotherapy drugs and high electric field treatment in local cancer is named electrochemotherapy. The European Standard Operation Procedure of Electrochemotherapy (ESOPE) provides guidelines for treatment of cutaneous and subcutaneous tumors. The electrochemotherapy of numerous tumors varying in sizes is more convenient using needle electrodes. However, ESOPE recommends that needle electrodes are applied to deeper tumors. The application of needle electrodes to treatment of superficial small tumors seems to be practical in electrochemotherapy. Plate electrodes and gel improve the electrochemotherapy efficacy. This technique provides electric field homogeneity in irregularly shaped tissue structures (bulk tumors). We propose an investigation of needle electrode and gel in electrochemotherapy of superficial tumors. In vivo experiment with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) spontaneous nodules in dog was used to validate the mathematical tissue model. The numerical model considers the tissue conductivity dependent on local electric field. Our studies demonstrated that conductive gel is important for effective treatment of superficial tumors with needle electrodes. The needle electrodes and gel presented reduction of medium current, increased the tumor-free margin, and improved the practical application in relation to plate electrode.

  3. Increased intestinal barrier function in the small intestine of formula-fed neonatal piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huygelen, V; De Vos, M; Willemen, S; Tambuyzer, B; Casteleyn, C; Knapen, D; Van Cruchten, S; Van Ginneken, C

    2012-12-01

    Within-litter birth weight variation is adversely correlated to piglet survival and postnatal growth. A less efficient epithelial barrier function in light piglets may partly explain this inverse relationship between birth weight and zootechnical performance. A compromised epithelial barrier increases paracellular permeability; consequently, toxins, allergenic compounds, or bacteria may enter systemic circulation and induce inflammatory responses. Dietary effects on function of gut epithelium of piglet are largely unknown. This study investigated epithelial barrier function of the small intestine of normal birth weight (NBW) piglets (1.46 ± 0.10 kg) and low birth weight (LBW) piglets (excretion was measured using enzymatic spectrophotometry. Irrespective of birth weight, lactulose levels of FOR10 (4.4 ± 2.3 mmol/L) tended to be lower (P = 0.07) than SOW10 (26.4 ± 10.2 mmol/L) indicating a reduced paracellular intestinal permeability in FOR10. This reduction was associated with a 6-fold elevated (P < 0.01) protein expression of occludin, an important tight junction protein, in FOR10 compared to SOW10. Mannitol levels in FOR10 (31.0 ± 18.2 mmol/L) did not differ (P = 0.28) from SOW10 (61.1 ± 10.2 mmol/L). However, shorter villi (P < 0.01) in FOR10 indicated a reduced absorptive capacity. In conclusion, formula feeding caused minor symptoms of gastrointestinal dysfunction compared to sow-fed piglets irrespective of their birth weight.

  4. Small intestinal nematode infection of mice is associated with increased enterobacterial loads alongside the intestinal tract.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Rausch

    Full Text Available Parasitic nematodes are potent modulators of immune reactivity in mice and men. Intestinal nematodes live in close contact with commensal gut bacteria, provoke biased Th2 immune responses upon infection, and subsequently lead to changes in gut physiology. We hypothesized that murine nematode infection is associated with distinct changes of the intestinal bacterial microbiota composition. We here studied intestinal inflammatory and immune responses in mice following infection with the hookworm Heligmosomoides polygyrus bakeri and applied cultural and molecular techniques to quantitatively assess intestinal microbiota changes in the ileum, cecum and colon. At day 14 post nematode infection, mice harbored significantly higher numbers of γ-Proteobacteria/Enterobacteriaceae and members of the Bacteroides/Prevotella group in their cecum as compared to uninfected controls. Abundance of Gram-positive species such as Lactobacilli, Clostridia as well as the total bacterial load was not affected by worm infection. The altered microbiota composition was independent of the IL-4/-13 - STAT6 signaling axis, as infected IL-4Rα(-/- mice showed a similar increase in enterobacterial loads. In conclusion, infection with an enteric nematode is accompanied by distinct intestinal microbiota changes towards higher abundance of gram-negative commensal species at the small intestinal site of infection (and inflammation, but also in the parasite-free large intestinal tract. Further studies should unravel the impact of nematode-induced microbiota changes in inflammatory bowel disease to allow for a better understanding of how theses parasites interfere with intestinal inflammation and bacterial communities in men.

  5. Heat shock increases lifetime of a small RNA and induces its accumulation in cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatosyan, Karina A; Kramerov, Dmitri A

    2016-08-01

    4.5SH and 4.5SI RNA are two abundant small non-coding RNAs specific for several related rodent families including Muridae. These RNAs have a number of common characteristics such as the short length (about 100nt), transcription by RNA polymerase III, and origin from Short Interspersed Elements (SINEs). However, their stabilities in cells substantially differ: the half-life of 4.5SH RNA is about 20min, while that of 4.5SI RNA is 22h. Here we studied the influence of cell stress such as heat shock or viral infection on these two RNAs. We found that the level of 4.5SI RNA did not change in stressed cells; whereas heat shock increased the abundance of 4.5SH RNA 3.2-10.5 times in different cell lines; and viral infection, 5 times. Due to the significant difference in the turnover rates of these two RNAs, a similar activation of their transcription by heat shock increases the level of the short-lived 4.5SH RNA and has minor effect on the level of the long-lived 4.5SI RNA. In addition, the accumulation of 4.5SH RNA results not only from the induction of its transcription but also from a substantial retardation of its decay. To our knowledge, it is the first example of a short-lived non-coding RNA whose elongated lifetime contributes significantly to its accumulation in stressed cells.

  6. Increased Midkine and Estrogen Receptor-β Expression in Human Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi-hua Zhang; Guang-feng Zhao; Ya-hong Huang; Kai-hua Lu; Ya-yi Hou

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Midkine (MK), a new member of the heparin-binding growth factor family, has been found recently to have a high expression level in many tumor specimens including lung carcinoma. Estrogens may be involved in lung carcinogenesis, and estrogen receptors, mainly estrogen receptor-β (ER-β), are present and functional in normal lung and tumor cell lines and tissues. In addition, estrogens and growth factors may promote the progression of human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Previously, we have immunohistochemically demonstrated that MK and ER-β proteins were overexpressed in NSCLC and their expression levels were both significantly negatively correlated with the pathological classification. The purpose of this study was to further verify their expression and its correlation with NSCLC.Methods: Taking NSCLC tissues and their corresponding paraneoplastic and normal lung as research objects, we further examined the expression of MK and ER-β by meas of RT-PCR, in situ hybridization and Western blot analyses at the levels of messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein, respectively.Results: The increased MK and ER-β mRNA expression was found in NSCLC by RT-PCR and in situ hybridization analyses. Furthermore, Western blot analysis also displayed increased expression of MK and ER-β proteins in NSCLC. Finally, their correlation analysis at the levels of mRNA and protein expression in NSCLC demonstrated that MK protein level was significantly correlated to estrogen receptor-β (P0.05, r_s=0.178).Conclusion: All these results in the present study confirmed that MK and ER-β were overexpressed in human NSCLC.

  7. Increased level of circulating U2 small nuclear RNA fragments indicates metastasis in melanoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlmann, Jan Dominik; Wimberger, Pauline; Wilsch, Katja; Fluck, Michael; Suter, Ludwig; Brunner, Georg

    2015-03-01

    Background: Melanoma is the most aggressive skin cancer and, despite recent advances in therapy, about 20% of the patients die of their disease. Early relapse detection and monitoring of therapy response are crucial for efficient treatment of advanced melanoma. Thus, there is a need for blood-based biomarkers in melanoma management. Serum-derived U2 small nuclear RNA fragments (RNU2-1f) were previously shown to be blood-based biomarkers for gastrointestinal and gynecologic malignancies. Here we examined whether RNU2-1f may also serve as diagnostic biomarker in advanced melanoma. Circulating RNU2-1f levels were quantified by comparative reverse transcription PCR in a training cohort of patients with metastatic melanoma (n=33, thereof regionally metastasized to skin and lymph nodes, n=23, and distantly metastasized, n=10) vs. patients with benign naevi (n=16) vs. healthy controls (n=39). RESULTS were validated in an independent patient cohort with distant metastasis (n=16) vs. controls (n=18). Circulating RNU2-1f levels in the training cohort were significantly increased in serum of regionally and distantly metastatic patients, compared with patients with benign naevi or healthy controls (p<0.0001) and allowed accurate detection of regional (AUC 0.80) as well as distant (AUC 0.84) metastasis. In the validation cohort, increased RNU2-1f levels were confirmed and enabled highly specific detection of distant metastasis (sensitivity 81%, specificity 100%, AUC 0.94). This is the first report to suggest a blood-based snRNA serving as a diagnostic biomarker for melanoma metastasis. Our data provide a rationale for further defining clinical utility of circulating RNU2-1f in metastasis detection in the management of melanoma patients at risk of relapse and/or with advanced disease.

  8. Increasing the Mobility of Dismounted Marines. Small Unit Mobility Enhancement Technologies: Unmanned Ground Vehicles Market Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    a large dog or small mule, BigDog is about 3 feet long and 2.5 feet tall. It is powered by a small engine (a Leopard one-cylinder, two- stroke , water...DSTO http://www.dsto.defence.gov.au Austria Crayler BM Portable Forklift PALFINGER CRAYLER STAPLERTECHNIK GMBH www.palfinger.com Austria FMR

  9. Increasing Opportunities for Small and Local Businesses at the Naval Postgraduate School Through Simplified Acquisitions Contracting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    of subsectors. For instance, small business vendors have exclusivity in 13 NAICS subsectors ranging from Metal Working Machinery to Musical ...and the immense amount of information required are a heavy undertaking for a small business. Navigating the defense acquisitions system is

  10. Increased nitric oxide concentrations in the small airway of older normal subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelb, Arthur F; George, Steven C; Camacho, Fernando; Fraser, Christine; Flynn Taylor, Colleen; Shakkottai, Sreelakshmi

    2011-02-01

    There is a paucity of normal-age stratified data for fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (Feno). Our goal was to obtain normal data for large-airway nitric oxide flux (J'awno) and small-airway and/or alveolar nitric oxide concentration (Cano) in nonsmoking, healthy, adult subjects of various ages. In 106 normal volunteer subjects (60 women) aged 55 ± 20 years (mean ± SD), Feno (parts per billion [ppb]) was measured at 50, 100, 150, and 200 mL/s and J'awno (nL/s) and Cano (ppb) were calculated using a two-compartment model with correction for axial nitric oxide (NO) back diffusion. Fourteen older normal subjects were also treated with inhaled corticosteroid (540 μg budesonide bid) for 14 days. We studied 34 younger normal subjects (17 women) aged 18 to 39 years (younger), 26 middle-aged normal subjects (22 women) aged 40 to 59 years (middle-aged), and 46 older normal subjects (21 women) aged 60 to 86 years (older). Feno at 50 mL/s in the younger group was 21 (14-28) ppb (median, 1-3 interquartile); in the middle-aged group it was 22 (18-30) ppb, and in the older group it was 27 (21-33) ppb, (analysis of variance [ANOVA]) P = .02. For Feno, the younger vs older groups was (Mann-Whitney) P = .03, and Feno in the combined younger and middle-aged groups was 21 (15-29) ppb vs 27 (21-33) ppb, P = .006 for the older group. Corrected J'awno in the younger group was 1.5 (1.0-2.1) nL/s; in the middle-aged group it was 1.4 (1.0-2.0) nL/s, and in the older group it was 1.8 (1.2-2.4) nL/s, (ANOVA) P = .3. Corrected Cano in the younger group was 1.9 (0.8-3.0) ppb; in the middle-aged group it was 2.8 (0.8-5.1) ppb, and in the older group it was 3.9 (1.4-6.6) ppb, (ANOVA) P = .02. Cano in the younger vs older groups was P = .003, and the combined younger and middle-aged group result was 2.0 (0.8-3.8) vs 3.9 (1.4-6.6), P = .01 in the older group. There was no change in NO gas exchange with inhaled corticosteroids. In nonsmoking healthy subjects with normal spirometry, Feno at 50 m

  11. The Influence of Negative Surprise on Hedonic Adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Kieling

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available After some time using a product or service, the consumer tends to feel less pleasure with consumption. This reduction of pleasure is known as hedonic adaptation. One of the emotions that interfere in this process is surprise. Based on two experiments, we suggest that negative surprise – differently to positive – influences with the level of pleasure foreseen and experienced by the consumer. Study 1 analyzes the influence of negative (vs. positive surprise on the consumer’s post-purchase hedonic adaptation expectation. Results showed that negative surprise influences the intensity of adaptation, augmenting its strength. Study 2 verifies the influence of negative (vs positive surprise over hedonic adaptation. The findings suggested that negative surprise makes adaptation happen more intensively and faster as time goes by, which brings consequences to companies and consumers in the post-purchase process, such as satisfaction and loyalty.

  12. Effects of Surprisal and Locality on Danish Sentence Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balling, Laura Winther; Kizach, Johannes

    2017-01-01

    An eye-tracking experiment in Danish investigates two dominant accounts of sentence processing: locality-based theories that predict a processing advantage for sentences where the distance between the major syntactic heads is minimized, and the surprisal theory which predicts that processing time...... constructions with two postverbal NP-objects. An eye-tracking experiment showed a clear advantage for local syntactic relations, with only a marginal effect of lexicalised surprisal and no effect of syntactic surprisal. We conclude that surprisal has a relatively marginal effect, which may be clearest for verbs...

  13. Plant Breeding: Surprisingly, Less Sex Is Better.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Peter J; Rigola, Diana; Schauer, Stephen E

    2016-02-01

    Introduction of apomixis, asexual reproduction through seeds, into crop species has the potential to dramatically transform plant breeding. A new study demonstrates that traits can be stably transferred between generations in newly produced apomictic lines, and heralds a breeding revolution needed to increase food production for the growing planet.

  14. Physics Nobel prize 2004: Surprising theory wins physics Nobel

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    From left to right: David Politzer, David Gross and Frank Wilczek. For their understanding of counter-intuitive aspects of the strong force, which governs quarks inside protons and neutrons, on 5 October three American physicists were awarded the 2004 Nobel Prize in Physics. David J. Gross (Kavli Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara), H. David Politzer (California Institute of Technology), and Frank Wilczek (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) made a key theoretical discovery with a surprising result: the closer quarks are together, the weaker the force - opposite to what is seen with electromagnetism and gravity. Rather, the strong force is analogous to a rubber band stretching, where the force increases as the quarks get farther apart. These physicists discovered this property of quarks, known as asymptotic freedom, in 1976. It later became a key part of the theory of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and the Standard Model, the current best theory to describe the interac...

  15. Increasing Students' Empathy and Counseling Self-Efficacy through a Mindfulness Experiential Small Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohecker, Lynn; Doughty Horn, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    This study used the Solomon 4-group design to examine the relationship between a mindfulness experiential small group (MESG) and mindfulness skills, empathy, counseling self-efficacy, and perceived stress for counselors in training (CITs). Understanding how the MESG affects these characteristics provides essential information to inform the…

  16. Mesocosms Reveal Ecological Surprises from Climate Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fordham, Damien A

    2015-12-01

    Understanding, predicting, and mitigating the impacts of climate change on biodiversity poses one of the most crucial challenges this century. Currently, we know more about how future climates are likely to shift across the globe than about how species will respond to these changes. Two recent studies show how mesocosm experiments can hasten understanding of the ecological consequences of climate change on species' extinction risk, community structure, and ecosystem functions. Using a large-scale terrestrial warming experiment, Bestion et al. provide the first direct evidence that future global warming can increase extinction risk for temperate ectotherms. Using aquatic mesocosms, Yvon-Durocher et al. show that human-induced climate change could, in some cases, actually enhance the diversity of local communities, increasing productivity. Blending these theoretical and empirical results with computational models will improve forecasts of biodiversity loss and altered ecosystem processes due to climate change.

  17. Mesocosms Reveal Ecological Surprises from Climate Change.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien A Fordham

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Understanding, predicting, and mitigating the impacts of climate change on biodiversity poses one of the most crucial challenges this century. Currently, we know more about how future climates are likely to shift across the globe than about how species will respond to these changes. Two recent studies show how mesocosm experiments can hasten understanding of the ecological consequences of climate change on species' extinction risk, community structure, and ecosystem functions. Using a large-scale terrestrial warming experiment, Bestion et al. provide the first direct evidence that future global warming can increase extinction risk for temperate ectotherms. Using aquatic mesocosms, Yvon-Durocher et al. show that human-induced climate change could, in some cases, actually enhance the diversity of local communities, increasing productivity. Blending these theoretical and empirical results with computational models will improve forecasts of biodiversity loss and altered ecosystem processes due to climate change.

  18. Efforts to Increase the Success Rate of Artificial Insemination on Small Ruminant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismeth Inounu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The success rate of artificial insemination (AI technology in Indonesia is still low, especially on small ruminants. At experimental station condition, it was reported that the success rate of intrauterine AI was high (78.9% lambing percentage, while intracervix AI technique was still low (47.6% lambing percentage. Various things that could affect the success rate of AI program are discussed in this paper. Efforts to improve the success of artificial insemination in small ruminants (goats and sheep can be done through the selection of productive female with good reproductive cycle, accurate dose of hormonal synchronization, followed by proper estrous detection and semen placement at the right time. Each stage is still open for more detailed study in order to obtain satisfactory results.

  19. Tasks of institutional support to increase innovation activity of small business in the region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Aleksandrovich Bayev

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The reasons for the low innovation activity of Russian small enterprises are presented in the article from the standpoint of institutional theory. According to the authors, today the degree of influence of the institutional environment on meso- and mini-levels, as well as informal rules for the development of small forms of entrepreneurship, including their innovative activity are underestimated. The influence of informal component of mini-level institutional environment on the implementation of formal institutions in the examples of the phenomenon of «Old Believers» Entrepreneurship and institutions of the shadow economy is shown. The authors suggest that the shadow nature existing in Russia on mini-level informal institutions to be explained not only by the low level of trust in society (including trust in authority and leadership and the differences between the national mentality, but also inadequate distribution of transaction costs of doing business (including innovation between economic agents. Features of the institutional system of Russia  as well as transaction costs of the domestic system of patenting inventions  are investigated as the key causes of the problem. Methodological principles of institutional support of small innovative businesses are presented.

  20. Small Prizes Increased Plain Milk and Vegetable Selection by Elementary School Children without Adversely Affecting Total Milk Purchase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Emerson

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available (1 Background: Pediatric obesity continues to be a major public health issue. Poor food selection in the school cafeteria is a risk factor. Chocolate or strawberry flavored milk is favored by the majority of elementary school students. Previous health promotion efforts have led to increased selection of plain milk, but may compromise total milk purchased. In our study, we examined the effectiveness of small prizes as incentives to improve healthy food and beverage selection by elementary school students; (2 Methods: In a small Midwestern school district, small prizes were given to elementary school students who selected a “Power Plate” (PP, the healthful combination of a plain milk, a fruit, a vegetable and an entrée with whole grain over two academic school years; (3 Results: PP selection increased from 0.05 per student to 0.19, a 271% increase (p < 0.001. All healthful foods had increased selection with plain milk having the greatest increase, 0.098 per student to 0.255, a 159% increase (p < 0.001; (4 Total milk purchased increased modestly from 0.916 to 0.956 per student (p = 0.000331. Conclusion: Giving small prizes as a reward for healthful food selection substantially improves healthful food selection and the effect is sustainable over two academic years.

  1. Surprise and Sense Making: Undergraduate Placement Experiences in SMEs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walmsley, Andreas; Thomas, Rhodri; Jameson, Stephanie

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to explore undergraduate placement experiences in tourism and hospitality SMEs, focusing on the notions of surprise and sense making. It aims to argue that surprises and sense making are important elements not only of the adjustment process when entering new work environments, but also of the learning experience that…

  2. Neural Responses to Rapid Facial Expressions of Fear and Surprise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Zhao

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Facial expression recognition is mediated by a distributed neural system in humans that involves multiple, bilateral regions. There are six basic facial expressions that may be recognized in humans (fear, sadness, surprise, happiness, anger, and disgust; however, fearful faces and surprised faces are easily confused in rapid presentation. The functional organization of the facial expression recognition system embodies a distinction between these two emotions, which is investigated in the present study. A core system that includes the right parahippocampal gyrus (BA 30, fusiform gyrus, and amygdala mediates the visual recognition of fear and surprise. We found that fearful faces evoked greater activity in the left precuneus, middle temporal gyrus (MTG, middle frontal gyrus, and right lingual gyrus, whereas surprised faces were associated with greater activity in the right postcentral gyrus and left posterior insula. These findings indicate the importance of common and separate mechanisms of the neural activation that underlies the recognition of fearful and surprised faces.

  3. Laparoscopic ultrasound imaging in colorectal cancer resection may increase the detection rate of small liver metastases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellebæk, Signe Bremholm; Fristrup, Claus Wilki; Mortensen, Michael Bau

    2016-01-01

    Up to 20% of the patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) will have liver metastases at the time of the diagnosis, and some of these metastases may be missed during preoperative evaluation. While intraoperative ultrasound is considered the gold standard for liver evaluation during primary open CRC...... surgery, laparoscopic ultrasound (LUS) is not performed routinely during laparoscopic CRC surgery. Based on the available literature LUS had a higher detection rate for especially small liver metastases compared to preoperative imaging modalities, but better prospective trials are needed....

  4. DO INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY ACCESS AND INNOVATION INCREASE OUTSOURCING IN SMALL AND MEDIUM ENTERPRISES?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Verónica Alderete

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present an econometric model to determine whether an SME (Small and Medium Sized Enterprise’s probability of outsourcing depends on their levels of innovation and information and communication technology use. The predictions of the econometric model are tested by means of a LOGIT model using a cross section sample of an Argentinean SME for the year 2006. The model predicts that the level of innovation of an SME will significantly influence its probability of outsourcing. Besides, it stresses the negative incidence of the information and communication technologies (ICT access on the outsourcing decision.

  5. Computational surprisal analysis speeds-up genomic characterization of cancer processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravchenko-Balasha, Nataly; Simon, Simcha; Levine, R D; Remacle, F; Exman, Iaakov

    2014-01-01

    Surprisal analysis is increasingly being applied for the examination of transcription levels in cellular processes, towards revealing inner network structures and predicting response. But to achieve its full potential, surprisal analysis should be integrated into a wider range computational tool. The purposes of this paper are to combine surprisal analysis with other important computation procedures, such as easy manipulation of the analysis results--e.g. to choose desirable result sub-sets for further inspection--, retrieval and comparison with relevant datasets from public databases, and flexible graphical displays for heuristic thinking. The whole set of computation procedures integrated into a single practical tool is what we call Computational Surprisal Analysis. This combined kind of analysis should facilitate significantly quantitative understanding of different cellular processes for researchers, including applications in proteomics and metabolomics. Beyond that, our vision is that Computational Surprisal Analysis has the potential to reach the status of a routine method of analysis for practitioners. The resolving power of Computational Surprisal Analysis is here demonstrated by its application to a variety of cellular cancer process transcription datasets, ours and from the literature. The results provide a compact biological picture of the thermodynamic significance of the leading gene expression phenotypes in every stage of the disease. For each transcript we characterize both its inherent steady state weight, its correlation with the other transcripts and its variation due to the disease. We present a dedicated website to facilitate the analysis for researchers and practitioners.

  6. Computational surprisal analysis speeds-up genomic characterization of cancer processes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataly Kravchenko-Balasha

    Full Text Available Surprisal analysis is increasingly being applied for the examination of transcription levels in cellular processes, towards revealing inner network structures and predicting response. But to achieve its full potential, surprisal analysis should be integrated into a wider range computational tool. The purposes of this paper are to combine surprisal analysis with other important computation procedures, such as easy manipulation of the analysis results--e.g. to choose desirable result sub-sets for further inspection--, retrieval and comparison with relevant datasets from public databases, and flexible graphical displays for heuristic thinking. The whole set of computation procedures integrated into a single practical tool is what we call Computational Surprisal Analysis. This combined kind of analysis should facilitate significantly quantitative understanding of different cellular processes for researchers, including applications in proteomics and metabolomics. Beyond that, our vision is that Computational Surprisal Analysis has the potential to reach the status of a routine method of analysis for practitioners. The resolving power of Computational Surprisal Analysis is here demonstrated by its application to a variety of cellular cancer process transcription datasets, ours and from the literature. The results provide a compact biological picture of the thermodynamic significance of the leading gene expression phenotypes in every stage of the disease. For each transcript we characterize both its inherent steady state weight, its correlation with the other transcripts and its variation due to the disease. We present a dedicated website to facilitate the analysis for researchers and practitioners.

  7. HOW TO INCREASE THE COMPETITIVENESS OF SMALL SOY FARMERS IN PARAGUAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAYKELL LEITE DA COSTA

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Soybean is today the most traded commodity in the global market. Soy is a plant of great importance to human nutrition, animal feed and industries. Based on research efforts conducted in the main soy producing region in Paraguay, the study aimed to characterize the agents involved in the national soy industry and present an overview of the relations between them, particularly between business companies and farmers, with emphasis on small farmers. Emphasis will be given to contractual relations and how they impact the activity. The results indicate that contractual arrangements, formal or not, are tools that contribute to stable relations between the parties, especially in a business so dependent on exogenous factors, as is the case of agriculture. Therefore, it is crucial that the public and/or private organizations encourage the use of contracts to reduce costs and keep the agents in the productive activity.

  8. Impact of increasing market access on a tropical small-scale fishery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Kara; Irwin, Brian J.; Kramer, Daniel; Urquhart, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    Small-scale fisheries have historically been marginalized in management and policy investments, and they often remain under-reported in national economic and fisheries statistics. Even so, small-scale fisheries are not entirely buffered from the impacts of globalization, such as the introduction and expansion of markets. This study measures the long-term impact of market-access on a coastal fishery on Nicaragua׳s remote Atlantic Coast from approximately the time when fishermen had access to stable and predictable local markets until the present, when the region has been transformed by road connection. In the last four years, fisheries trade has expanded as road connection has facilitated export to distant markets. Fishery-independent surveys were used to measure changes in indicators of fish-community status such as length-frequency, mean trophic level, and relative biomass. Species-level changes in relative biomass of common snook Centropomus undecimalis and gafftopsail catfish Bagre marinus were also evaluated since these species are the most economically valuable and likely account for the most fish biomass in the system. Using historical records, reports, current observations and interviews, changes in indicators of fishing intensity and market access over the past 17 years were assessed. From 1994 to 2011, community and species-specific metrics of the lagoon fishery declined significantly across all indicators examined. The potential social and economic outcomes of the decline in the fishery are far-reaching for the region, because this tropical fishery comprises the main source of protein and income for residents of twelve indigenous and Afro-descendent communities.

  9. The Mixmasters: A Smart Marketing Mix Helps a Small College Dramatically Increase Student Enrollments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, R. Dana; Stark, Ken

    1983-01-01

    Adrian College's steady increase and confidence in enrollment projections stem from a research-based, thoughtfully planned, carefully implemented, highly controlled marketing programs. Four major elements of a successful marketing mix are identified: product, price, place, promotion. (MLW)

  10. The Mixmasters: A Smart Marketing Mix Helps a Small College Dramatically Increase Student Enrollments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, R. Dana; Stark, Ken

    1983-01-01

    Adrian College's steady increase and confidence in enrollment projections stem from a research-based, thoughtfully planned, carefully implemented, highly controlled marketing programs. Four major elements of a successful marketing mix are identified: product, price, place, promotion. (MLW)

  11. Chronic systemic treatment with epidermal growth factor in the rat increases the mucosal surface of the small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinter-Jensen, Lars; Smerup, Morten Holdgaard; Kissmeyer-Nielsen, Peter;

    1995-01-01

    . The histological composition and mucosal surface area of the perfusion-fixed small intestine was quantified with stereological principles. The length of the gut remained unchanged. The amount of tissue and surface area per length of gut (median (ranges)) were increased from 117 (101-131) mg/cm and 2.6 (2.1-3.5) cm......We examined the effects of treatment with human recombinant epidermal growth factor (EGF) on the functioning small intestine in the rat. Male Wistar rats, 7-8 weeks old, were treated with EGF administered subcutaneously in doses of 0 (n = 7) or 150 micrograms/kg/day (n = 8) for 4 weeks......2/cm in the controls to 146 (138-152) mg/cm and 3.5 (2.5-3.8) cm2/cm for the complete small intestine (both comparisons P intestine, whereas the surface area was only increased in proximal and middle parts. It is concluded...

  12. Activation of the SOS response increases the frequency of small colony variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Martin; Paulander, Wilhelm Erik Axel; Ingmer, Hanne

    2015-01-01

    failed to do so. The higher proportion of SCVs in cultures exposed to fluoroquinolones and mitomycin C compared to un-exposed cultures correlate with an increased mutation rate monitored by rifampicin resistance and followed induction of the SOS DNA damage response. CONCLUSION: Our observations suggest...... that environmental stimuli, including antimicrobials that reduce replication fidelity, increase the formation of SCVs through activation of the SOS response and thereby potentially promote persistent infections that are difficult to treat....

  13. Genotyping cows for the reference increase reliability of genomic prediction in a small breed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomasen, Jørn Rind; Sørensen, Anders Christian; Lund, Mogens Sandø

    2013-01-01

    compared to the H-B, at the same level of ∆F. T-C yielded 15% higher ∆G compared t o T-B. Changing the breeding scheme from H-B to H-C increased ∆G by 5.5%. The lowest ∆F was observed with genotyping of cows. Reliabilities of GEBV in the C schemes showed a steep increase in reliability during the first...

  14. Increased sensitivity of an adriamycin-resistant human small cell lung carcinoma cell line to mitochondrial inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Steven; Holtrop, M; de Vries, H; de Vries, Liesbeth; Mulder, N H

    1992-01-01

    The energy metabolism of an atypical multidrug resistant human small cell lung carcinoma cell line (GLC4/ADR) was studied. The glycolytic rate was 30% reduced and the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity 2-fold increased in GLC4/ADR compared to the parental sensitive line (GLC4). Although mito

  15. Small Businesses Save Big: A Borrower's Guide To Increase the Bottom Line Using Energy Efficiency (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2015-01-01

    Dollars saved through energy efficiency can directly impact your bottom line. Whether you are planning for a major renovation or upgrading individual pieces of building equipment, these improvements can help reduce operating costs, save on utility bills, and boost profits. This fact sheet provides a guide for small businesses to find the resources to increase the energy efficiency of their buildings.

  16. Stathmin1 increases radioresistance by enhancing autophagy in non-small-cell lung cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang X

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Xi Zhang,1,2 Jingfen Ji,3 Yu Yang,4 Juan Zhang,2 Liangfang Shen1 1Department of Oncology, Xiangya Hospital of Central South University, 2Department of Oncology, The Third Xiangya Hospital of Central South University, 3Department of General Surgery, The Second Xiangya Hospital of Central South University, 4Department of Oncology, 163 Hospital of PLA, Changsha, Hunan, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Radioresistance has been demonstrated to be involved in the poor prognosis of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC. However, the underlying mechanism remains largely unclear. Investigation on special therapeutic targets associated with radioresistance shows promises for the enhancement of clinical radiotherapy effect toward NSCLC. This study aimed to reveal the role of Stathmin1 (STMN1 in radioresistance in NSCLC as well as the underlying mechanism. Our data showed that the protein levels of STMN1 were significantly upregulated in NSCLC cells subjected to radiation, accompanied with the activation of autophagy. Knockdown of STMN1 expression enhanced the sensitivity of NSCLC cells to X-ray, and the radiation-induced autophagy was also inhibited. Molecular mechanism investigation showed that knockdown of STMN1 expression upregulated the activity of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR signaling pathway in NSCLC cells. Moreover, the activation of PI3K/mTOR signaling showed an inhibitory effect on the autophagy and radioresistance induced by STMN1 in NSCLC cells. In addition, luciferase reporter assay data indicated that STMN1 was a direct target gene of miR-101, which had been reported to be an inhibitor of autophagy. Based on these data, we suggest that as a target gene of miR-101, STMN1 promotes the radioresistance by induction of autophagy through PI3K/mTOR signaling pathway in NSCLC. Therefore, STMN1 may become a potential therapeutic target for NSCLC radiotherapy. Keywords: radioresistance, non-small

  17. Local rewiring algorithms to increase clustering and grow a small world

    CERN Document Server

    Alstott, Jeff; Pizza, Pamela B; Radcliffe, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Many real-world networks have high clustering among vertices: vertices that share neighbors are often also directly connected to each other. A network's clustering can be a useful indicator of its connectedness and community structure. Algorithms for generating networks with high clustering have been developed, but typically rely on adding or removing edges and nodes, sometimes from a completely empty network. Here, we introduce algorithms that create a highly clustered network by starting with an existing network and rearranging edges, without adding or removing them; these algorithms can preserve other network properties even as the clustering increases. These algorithms rely on local rewiring rules, in which a single edge changes one of its vertices in a way that is guaranteed to increase clustering. This greedy algorithm can be applied iteratively to transform a random network into a form with much higher clustering. Additionally, these algorithms grow the network's clustering faster than they increase it...

  18. Domains of increased thickness in microvillar membranes of the small intestinal enterocyte

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kunding, Andreas H; Christensen, Sune M; Danielsen, E Michael;

    2010-01-01

    in orchestrating absorptive/digestive action of dietary nutrients at this important cellular interface. Increased membrane thickness is believed to be a morphological characteristic of rafts. Thus, we investigated whether the high contents of lipid rafts in the microvillar membrane is reflected in local variations...... was clearly monophasic. The encountered domains of increased thickness (DITs) occupied 48% of the microvillar membrane and from the data we estimated the area of a single DIT to have a lower limit of 600 nm(2). In other experiments we mapped the organization of biochemically defined lipid rafts by immunogold...

  19. Activation of the SOS response increases the frequency of small colony variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Martin; Paulander, Wilhelm Erik Axel; Ingmer, Hanne

    2015-01-01

    with different mechanism of action influence the formation of SCVs that are resistant to otherwise lethal concentrations of the aminoglycoside, gentamicin. We found that exposure of S. aureus to fluoroquinolones and mitomycin C increased the frequency of gentamicin resistant SCVs, while other antibiotic classes...... failed to do so. The higher proportion of SCVs in cultures exposed to fluoroquinolones and mitomycin C compared to un-exposed cultures correlate with an increased mutation rate monitored by rifampicin resistance and followed induction of the SOS DNA damage response. CONCLUSION: Our observations suggest...

  20. Small Increase in Global Cotton Consumption Expected in 2011/12

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    According to ICAC, after a 4% drop in 2010/11, world cotton mill use is projected to resume slow growth in 2011/12. Cotton mill use is forecast at 24.7 million tons in 2011/12, 1.5% higher than in 2010/11. This rise will be facilitated by increased availability of cotton, but moderated by still relatively high cotton prices and competition from chemical fibers. However, the possibility of a double-dip global economic recession could reduce these expectations. China, India and Pakistan will drive the increase in global cotton mill use in 2011/12.

  1. Five key attributes can increase marine protected areas performance for small-scale fisheries management

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Franco, Antonio; Thiriet, Pierre; di Carlo, Giuseppe; Dimitriadis, Charalampos; Francour, Patrice; Gutiérrez, Nicolas L.; Jeudy de Grissac, Alain; Koutsoubas, Drosos; Milazzo, Marco; Otero, María Del Mar; Piante, Catherine; Plass-Johnson, Jeremiah; Sainz-Trapaga, Susana; Santarossa, Luca; Tudela, Sergi; Guidetti, Paolo

    2016-12-01

    Marine protected areas (MPAs) have largely proven to be effective tools for conserving marine ecosystem, while socio-economic benefits generated by MPAs to fisheries are still under debate. Many MPAs embed a no-take zone, aiming to preserve natural populations and ecosystems, within a buffer zone where potentially sustainable activities are allowed. Small-scale fisheries (SSF) within buffer zones can be highly beneficial by promoting local socio-economies. However, guidelines to successfully manage SSFs within MPAs, ensuring both conservation and fisheries goals, and reaching a win-win scenario, are largely unavailable. From the peer-reviewed literature, grey-literature and interviews, we assembled a unique database of ecological, social and economic attributes of SSF in 25 Mediterranean MPAs. Using random forest with Boruta algorithm we identified a set of attributes determining successful SSFs management within MPAs. We show that fish stocks are healthier, fishermen incomes are higher and the social acceptance of management practices is fostered if five attributes are present (i.e. high MPA enforcement, presence of a management plan, fishermen engagement in MPA management, fishermen representative in the MPA board, and promotion of sustainable fishing). These findings are pivotal to Mediterranean coastal communities so they can achieve conservation goals while allowing for profitable exploitation of fisheries resources.

  2. Effects of low humidity on small premature infants in servocontrol incubators. II. Increased severity of apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belgaumkar, T K; Scott, K E

    1975-01-01

    Apneic spells were recorded in 8 of 19 premature infants nursed in high and low humidity alternately in servocontrol incubators. A significantly greater proportion of severe apnea occurred in low than in high humidity. It is postulated that this frequency and severity was due to the increased (as well as widely fluctuating) ambient temperature during low humidity.

  3. Defense Science Board (DSB) Summer Study Report on Strategic Surprise

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    DSB Summer Study Report on Strategic Surprise July 2015 Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden...SUBTITLE DSB Summer Study Report on Strategic Surprise 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT...NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Defense Science Board ( DSB ),The Pentagon ,OUSD(AT&L

  4. Exendin-4, but not dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibition, increases small intestinal mass in GK rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Lotte; Pilgaard, Sofie; Orskov, Cathrine

    2007-01-01

    Long-term treatment with dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitors (DPPIV-I) or glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 analogs may potentially affect intestinal growth by down- or upregulating the intestinotrophic hormone GLP-2. This study compared the intestinotrophic effects of 12-wk administration of vehicle,...... GLP-2 receptor. DPPIV-I had no intestinal effects. In conclusion, the continued presence of Ex-4 is necessary to maintain weight loss in GK rats. Effective antihyperglycemic treatment with Ex-4 increases intestinal mass reversibly, whereas DPPIV-I lacks intestinal effects....

  5. Atom Surprise: Using Theatre in Primary Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peleg, Ran; Baram-Tsabari, Ayelet

    2011-10-01

    Early exposure to science may have a lifelong effect on children's attitudes towards science and their motivation to learn science in later life. Out-of-class environments can play a significant role in creating favourable attitudes, while contributing to conceptual learning. Educational science theatre is one form of an out-of-class environment, which has received little research attention. This study aims to describe affective and cognitive learning outcomes of watching such a play and to point to connections between theatrical elements and specific outcomes. "Atom Surprise" is a play portraying several concepts on the topic of matter. A mixed methods approach was adopted to investigate the knowledge and attitudes of children (grades 1-6) from two different school settings who watched the play. Data were gathered using questionnaires and in-depth interviews. Analysis suggested that in both schools children's knowledge on the topic of matter increased after the play with younger children gaining more conceptual knowledge than their older peers. In the public school girls showed greater gains in conceptual knowledge than boys. No significant changes in students' general attitudes towards science were found, however, students demonstrated positive changes towards science learning. Theatrical elements that seemed to be important in children's recollection of the play were the narrative, props and stage effects, and characters. In the children's memory, science was intertwined with the theatrical elements. Nonetheless, children could distinguish well between scientific facts and the fictive narrative.

  6. Small platform sleep deprivation selectively increases the average duration of rapid eye movement sleep episodes during sleep rebound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitka, Tamas; Katai, Zita; Pap, Dorottya; Molnar, Eszter; Adori, Csaba; Bagdy, Gyorgy

    2009-12-28

    The single platform-on-water (flower pot) method is extensively used for depriving rapid eye movement sleep (REMS). Detailed comparison of sleep-wake architecture, recorded during the rebound period after spending three days on either a small or large platform, could separate the effects of REMS deficit from other stress factors caused by the procedure. A further aim of the study was to find the most characteristic REMS parameter of the rebound originating from REMS deficit. Rats were kept on a small or large platform for 72 h. Their fronto-parietal electroencephalogram, electromyogram and motility were recorded during the 24 h rebound at the beginning of the passive phase. A similar period of a home cage group was also recorded. The most typical differences between the two rebound groups were the increased cumulative time and longer average duration of REMS episodes without significant change in the number of these episodes of the small platform animals during the passive phase. Results obtained by cosinor analysis were in accordance with the findings above. Since we did not find any difference in the average duration of REMS episodes comparing the large platform rebound group and the home cage group, we concluded that the increased mean duration of REMS episodes is a selective marker for the rebound caused by small platform sleep deprivation, while other changes in sleep architecture may be the consequence of stress and also some sleep deficit.

  7. ssDNA Pairing Accuracy Increases When Abasic Sites Divide Nucleotides into Small Groups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Peacock-Villada

    Full Text Available Accurate sequence dependent pairing of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA molecules plays an important role in gene chips, DNA origami, and polymerase chain reactions. In many assays accurate pairing depends on mismatched sequences melting at lower temperatures than matched sequences; however, for sequences longer than ~10 nucleotides, single mismatches and correct matches have melting temperature differences of less than 3°C. We demonstrate that appropriately grouping of 35 bases in ssDNA using abasic sites increases the difference between the melting temperature of correct bases and the melting temperature of mismatched base pairings. Importantly, in the presence of appropriately spaced abasic sites mismatches near one end of a long dsDNA destabilize the annealing at the other end much more effectively than in systems without the abasic sites, suggesting that the dsDNA melts more uniformly in the presence of appropriately spaced abasic sites. In sum, the presence of appropriately spaced abasic sites allows temperature to more accurately discriminate correct base pairings from incorrect ones.

  8. The small abnormal parathyroid gland is increasingly common and heralds operative complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Kelly L; Chen, Naomi H; Armstrong, Michaele J; Howell, Gina M; Stang, Michael T; Yip, Linwah; Carty, Sally E

    2014-06-01

    Over decades, improvements in presymptomatic screening and awareness of surgical benefits have changed the presentation and management of primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT). Unrecognized multiglandular disease (MGD) remains a major cause of operative failure. We hypothesized that during parathyroid surgery the initial finding of a mildly enlarged gland is now frequent and predicts both MGD and failure. A prospective database was queried to examine the outcomes of initial exploration for sporadic PHPT using intraoperative PTH monitoring (IOPTH) over 15 years. All patients had follow-up ≥6 months (mean = 1.8 years). Cure was defined by normocalcemia at 6 months and microadenoma by resected weight of <200 mg. Of the 1,150 patients, 98.9 % were cured and 15 % had MGD. The highest preoperative calcium level decreased over time (p < 0.001) and varied directly with adenoma weight (p < 0.001). Over time, single adenoma weight dropped by half (p = 0.002) and microadenoma was increasingly common (p < 0.01). MGD risk varied inversely with weight of first resected abnormal gland. Microadenoma required bilateral exploration more often than macroadenoma (48 vs. 18 %, p < 0.01). When at exploration the first resected gland was <200 mg, the rates of MGD (40 vs. 11 %, p = 0.001), inadequate initial IOPTH drop (67 vs. 79 %, p = 0.002), operative failure (6.6 vs. 0.7 %, p < 0.001), and long-term recurrence (1.6 vs. 0.3 %, p = 0.007) were higher. Single parathyroid adenomas are smaller than in the past and require more complex pre- and intraoperative management. During exploration for sporadic PHPT, a first abnormal gland <200 mg should heighten suspicion of MGD and presages a tenfold higher failure rate.

  9. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG increases Toll-like receptor 3 gene expression in murine small intestine ex vivo and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki-Yoshida, A; Saito, S; Fukiya, S; Aoki, R; Takayama, Y; Suzuki, C; Sonoyama, K

    2016-06-01

    Administration of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) has been reported to be therapeutically effective against acute secretory diarrhoea resulting from the structural and functional intestinal mucosal lesions induced by rotavirus infection; however, the underlying mechanisms remain to be completely elucidated. Because Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) plays a key role in the innate immune responses following the recognition of rotavirus, the present study examined whether LGG influences TLR3 gene expression in murine small intestine ex vivo and in vivo. We employed cultured intestinal organoids derived from small intestinal crypts as an ex vivo tissue model. LGG supplementation increased TLR3 mRNA levels in the intestinal organoids, as estimated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Likewise, single and 7-day consecutive daily administrations of LGG increased TLR3 mRNA levels in the small intestine of C57BL/6N mice. The mRNA levels of other TLRs were not substantially altered both ex vivo and in vivo. In addition, LGG supplementation increased the mRNA levels of an antiviral type 1 interferon, interferon-α (IFN-α), and a neutrophil chemokine, CXCL1, upon stimulation with a synthetic TLR3 ligand, poly(I:C) in the intestinal organoids. LGG administration did not alter IFN-α and CXCL1 mRNA levels in the small intestine in vivo. Supplementation of other bacterial strains, Bifidobacterium bifidum and Lactobacillus paracasei, failed to increase TLR3 and poly(I:C)-stimulated CXCL1 mRNA levels ex vivo. We propose that upregulation of TLR3 gene expression may play a pivotal role in the therapeutic efficacy of LGG against rotavirus-associated diarrhoea. In addition, we demonstrated that intestinal organoids may be a promising ex vivo tissue model for investigating host-pathogen interactions and the antiviral action of probiotics in the intestinal epithelium.

  10. Steady and transient forced convection heat transfer for water flowing in small tubes with exponentially increasing heat inputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibahara, M.; Fukuda, K.; Liu, Q. S.; Hata, K.

    2017-03-01

    Steady and transient heat transfer coefficients for water flowing in small tubes with exponentially increasing heat inputs were measured. Platinum tubes with inner diameters of 1.0 and 2.0 mm were used as test tubes, which were mounted vertically in the experimental water loop. In the experiment, the upward flow velocity ranged from 2 to 16 m/s, and the corresponding Reynolds numbers ranged from 4.77 × 103 to 9.16 × 104 at the inlet liquid temperatures ranged from 298 to 343 K. The heat generation rate exponentially increased with the function. The period of the heat generation rate ranged from 24 ms to 17.5 s. Experimental results indicate that steady heat transfer coefficients decreased with the increase in the inner diameter of the small tube. Moreover, the ratio of bulk viscosity to near-wall viscosity of water increased with the rise in surface temperature of the vertical tube. From the experimental data, correlations of steady-state heat transfer for inner diameters of 1.0 and 2.0 mm were obtained. The heat transfer coefficient increased with decreasing the period of the heat generation rate as the flow velocity decreased. Moreover, the Nusselt number under the transient condition was affected by the Fourier number and the Reynolds number.

  11. Increasing the gravimetric energy density of organic based secondary battery cathodes using small radius cations (Li+ and Mg2+).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Burgos, Kenneth; Rodríguez-Calero, Gabriel G; Zhou, Weidong; Burkhardt, Stephen E; Abruña, Héctor D

    2013-10-02

    One of the major challenges in electrochemical energy storage (EES) is increasing the gravimetric capacity and energy density of the cathode material. Here we demonstrate how to increase the gravimetric energy density of electrical energy storage devices based on the use of organic materials through exploitation of the strong ionic coupling between a reduced carbonyl functionality and small cations such as lithium (Li(+)) and magnesium (Mg(2+)). Binding of the cation to the reduced carbonyl results in a positive shift of the formal reduction potential of the carbonyl couple. This has the effect of increasing the cell voltage which, in turn, results in an increase in the energy density. We show how this interaction can be used to dramatically increase, by up to a factor of 2, the energy density for a selected case study using 1,2-di(thiophen-2-yl)ethane-1,2-dione (DTED). We have carried out electrochemical and computational studies in order to understand the thermodynamic (positive shift of 250 mV and 1 V in the formal potential for the first and second reductions, respectively, of the carbonyl groups of DTED) and kinetic effects between small radii cations (Li(+) and Mg(2+)) and the reduced carbonyl functionality of carbonyl-based organic molecules (C-bOMs).

  12. Steady and transient forced convection heat transfer for water flowing in small tubes with exponentially increasing heat inputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibahara, M.; Fukuda, K.; Liu, Q. S.; Hata, K.

    2016-06-01

    Steady and transient heat transfer coefficients for water flowing in small tubes with exponentially increasing heat inputs were measured. Platinum tubes with inner diameters of 1.0 and 2.0 mm were used as test tubes, which were mounted vertically in the experimental water loop. In the experiment, the upward flow velocity ranged from 2 to 16 m/s, and the corresponding Reynolds numbers ranged from 4.77 × 103 to 9.16 × 104 at the inlet liquid temperatures ranged from 298 to 343 K. The heat generation rate exponentially increased with the function. The period of the heat generation rate ranged from 24 ms to 17.5 s. Experimental results indicate that steady heat transfer coefficients decreased with the increase in the inner diameter of the small tube. Moreover, the ratio of bulk viscosity to near-wall viscosity of water increased with the rise in surface temperature of the vertical tube. From the experimental data, correlations of steady-state heat transfer for inner diameters of 1.0 and 2.0 mm were obtained. The heat transfer coefficient increased with decreasing the period of the heat generation rate as the flow velocity decreased. Moreover, the Nusselt number under the transient condition was affected by the Fourier number and the Reynolds number.

  13. Bagpipes and Artichokes: Surprise as a Stimulus to Learning in the Elementary Music Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobi, Bonnie Schaffhauser

    2016-01-01

    Incorporating surprise into music instruction can stimulate student attention, curiosity, and interest. Novelty focuses attention in the reticular activating system, increasing the potential for brain memory storage. Elementary ages are ideal for introducing novel instruments, pieces, composers, or styles of music. Young children have fewer…

  14. Efficient Institutions and External Trade Policy Management Can Increase the Influence of a Small Country on the International Stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Koleša

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on a country’s external trade policy management in relation to the processes within its sub national entities. Its main goal is to identify an optimal approach to realizing the national interests of a small EU member state at the international/sub national level. We argue that influence on certain decisions does not necessarily solely depend on the power (i. e., size of a country, but also depends on other factors, such as the country’s goals and ability to form alliances. We confirm that institutions are of key importance for efficient external trade policy management – small countries in particular can increase their influence at the international level substantially if they are capable of efficient process management and forming alliances with sub national actors. After analysing the systems in selected eu member states, we make proposals for enhancing the trade policy management process in Slovenia.

  15. Magnified Sediment Export of Small Mountainous Rivers in Taiwan: Chain Reactions from Increased Rainfall Intensity under Global Warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tsung-Yu; Huang, Jr-Chuan; Lee, Jun-Yi; Jien, Shih-Hao; Zehetner, Franz; Kao, Shuh-Ji

    2015-01-01

    Fluvial sediment export from small mountainous rivers in Oceania has global biogeochemical significance affecting the turnover rate and export of terrestrial carbon, which might be speeding up at the recognized conditions of increased rainfall intensity. In this study, the historical runoff and sediment export from 16 major rivers in Taiwan are investigated and separated into an early stage (1970-1989) and a recent stage (1990-2010) to illustrate the changes of both runoff and sediment export. The mean daily sediment export from Taiwan Island in the recent stage significantly increased by >80% with subtle increase in daily runoff, indicating more sediment being delivered to the ocean per unit of runoff in the recent stage. The medians of the runoff depth and sediment yield extremes (99.0-99.9 percentiles) among the 16 rivers increased by 6.5%-37% and 62%-94%, respectively, reflecting the disproportionately magnified response of sediment export to the increased runoff. Taiwan is facing increasing event rainfall intensity which has resulted in chain reactions on magnified runoff and sediment export responses. As the globe is warming, rainfall extremes, which are proved to be temperature-dependent, very likely intensify runoff and trigger more sediment associated hazards. Such impacts might occur globally because significant increases of high-intensity precipitation have been observed not only in Taiwan but over most land areas of the globe.

  16. Magnified Sediment Export of Small Mountainous Rivers in Taiwan: Chain Reactions from Increased Rainfall Intensity under Global Warming.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsung-Yu Lee

    Full Text Available Fluvial sediment export from small mountainous rivers in Oceania has global biogeochemical significance affecting the turnover rate and export of terrestrial carbon, which might be speeding up at the recognized conditions of increased rainfall intensity. In this study, the historical runoff and sediment export from 16 major rivers in Taiwan are investigated and separated into an early stage (1970-1989 and a recent stage (1990-2010 to illustrate the changes of both runoff and sediment export. The mean daily sediment export from Taiwan Island in the recent stage significantly increased by >80% with subtle increase in daily runoff, indicating more sediment being delivered to the ocean per unit of runoff in the recent stage. The medians of the runoff depth and sediment yield extremes (99.0-99.9 percentiles among the 16 rivers increased by 6.5%-37% and 62%-94%, respectively, reflecting the disproportionately magnified response of sediment export to the increased runoff. Taiwan is facing increasing event rainfall intensity which has resulted in chain reactions on magnified runoff and sediment export responses. As the globe is warming, rainfall extremes, which are proved to be temperature-dependent, very likely intensify runoff and trigger more sediment associated hazards. Such impacts might occur globally because significant increases of high-intensity precipitation have been observed not only in Taiwan but over most land areas of the globe.

  17. Avoiding surprises when implementing a single quality system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donawa, Maria

    2009-01-01

    European medical device manufacturers are sometimes surprised to learn that operating ISO 13485 alone is not sufficient to meet United States (US) quality system requirements. This article discusses important considerations for meeting US and European requirements when operating under a single quality system.

  18. Reconsiderations: Donald Murray and the Pedagogy of Surprise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballenger, Bruce

    2008-01-01

    Toward the end of his life, Donald Murray felt that his approach to writing instruction was no longer appreciated by journals in his field. Nevertheless, his emphasis on encouraging students to surprise themselves through informal writing still has considerable value. (Contains 1 note.)

  19. Reconsiderations: Donald Murray and the Pedagogy of Surprise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballenger, Bruce

    2008-01-01

    Toward the end of his life, Donald Murray felt that his approach to writing instruction was no longer appreciated by journals in his field. Nevertheless, his emphasis on encouraging students to surprise themselves through informal writing still has considerable value. (Contains 1 note.)

  20. Errors and surprise in patients with focal brain lesions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ullsperger, M.

    2016-01-01

    Recent theories of performance monitoring suggest that not only errors and negative action outcomes but also valence-free expectancy violations can trigger cognitive and behavioral adaptations. EEG and fMRI evidence suggests that monitoring of both errors and surprising but valence-free action

  1. Red kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris lectin stimulation increases the number of enterochromaffin cells in the small intestine of suckling piglets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zacharko-Siembida Anna

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The quantities and distribution patterns of serotonin-immunoreactive (serotonin-IR enterochromaffin cells (EC were studied immunohistochemically in the small intestine of suckling piglets stimulated with red kidney bean lectin, and in nonstimulated, control animals. The co-expression patterns of serotonin with somatostatin (SOM or corticotropin releasing-factor (CRF were also studied. After the lectin treatment, the increased numbers of EC were noted in the duodenum of experimental animals. Lectin stimulation did not change the proportions of EC in the jejunum and ileum. In the duodenal epithelium of the lectin-stimulated piglets, the vast majority of serotonin-IR EC were distributed at the basis of crypts. After the lectin administration, the proportions of serotonin-IR/SOM-IR EC were statistically similar in all sections of the small intestine. No upregulation of CRF was found in duodenal, jejunal, and ileal EC of lectin-treated animals. The findings demonstrated that red kidney bean lectin increased the serotonin reservoir in the duodenum, and thus may be an effective stimulant of the gut maturation in suckling mammals.

  2. How to interpret a small increase in AUC with an additional risk prediction marker: decision analysis comes through.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Stuart G; Schuit, Ewoud; Steyerberg, Ewout W; Pencina, Michael J; Vickers, Andrew; Vickers, Andew; Moons, Karel G M; Mol, Ben W J; Lindeman, Karen S

    2014-09-28

    An important question in the evaluation of an additional risk prediction marker is how to interpret a small increase in the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Many researchers believe that a change in AUC is a poor metric because it increases only slightly with the addition of a marker with a large odds ratio. Because it is not possible on purely statistical grounds to choose between the odds ratio and AUC, we invoke decision analysis, which incorporates costs and benefits. For example, a timely estimate of the risk of later non-elective operative delivery can help a woman in labor decide if she wants an early elective cesarean section to avoid greater complications from possible later non-elective operative delivery. A basic risk prediction model for later non-elective operative delivery involves only antepartum markers. Because adding intrapartum markers to this risk prediction model increases AUC by 0.02, we questioned whether this small improvement is worthwhile. A key decision-analytic quantity is the risk threshold, here the risk of later non-elective operative delivery at which a patient would be indifferent between an early elective cesarean section and usual care. For a range of risk thresholds, we found that an increase in the net benefit of risk prediction requires collecting intrapartum marker data on 68 to 124 women for every correct prediction of later non-elective operative delivery. Because data collection is non-invasive, this test tradeoff of 68 to 124 is clinically acceptable, indicating the value of adding intrapartum markers to the risk prediction model.

  3. Sleeping beauties in theoretical physics 26 surprising insights

    CERN Document Server

    Padmanabhan, Thanu

    2015-01-01

    This book addresses a fascinating set of questions in theoretical physics which will both entertain and enlighten all students, teachers and researchers and other physics aficionados. These range from Newtonian mechanics to quantum field theory and cover several puzzling issues that do not appear in standard textbooks. Some topics cover conceptual conundrums, the solutions to which lead to surprising insights; some correct popular misconceptions in the textbook discussion of certain topics; others illustrate deep connections between apparently unconnected domains of theoretical physics; and a few provide remarkably simple derivations of results which are not often appreciated. The connoisseur of theoretical physics will enjoy a feast of pleasant surprises skilfully prepared by an internationally acclaimed theoretical physicist. Each topic is introduced with proper background discussion and special effort is taken to make the discussion self-contained, clear and comprehensible to anyone with an undergraduate e...

  4. The June surprises: balls, strikes, and the fog of war.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Charles

    2013-04-01

    At first, few constitutional experts took seriously the argument that the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act exceeded Congress's power under the commerce clause. The highly political opinions of two federal district judges - carefully chosen by challenging plaintiffs - of no particular distinction did not shake that confidence that the act was constitutional. This disdain for the challengers' arguments was only confirmed when the act was upheld by two highly respected conservative court of appeals judges in two separate circuits. But after the hostile, even mocking questioning of the government's advocate in the Supreme Court by the five Republican-appointed justices, the expectation was that the act would indeed be struck down on that ground. So it came as no surprise when the five opined the act did indeed exceed Congress's commerce clause power. But it came as a great surprise when Chief Justice John Roberts, joined by the four Democrat-appointed justices, ruled that the act could be sustained as an exercise of Congress's taxing power - a ground urged by the government almost as an afterthought. It was further surprising, even shocking, that Justices Antonin Scalia, Anthony Kennedy, Clarence Thomas, and Samuel Alito not only wrote a joint opinion on the commerce clause virtually identical to that of their chief, but that in writing it they did not refer to or even acknowledge his opinion. Finally surprising was the fact that Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Stephen Breyer joined the chief in holding that aspects of the act's Medicaid expansion were unconstitutional. This essay ponders and tries to unravel some of these puzzles.

  5. Are seismic hazard assessment errors and earthquake surprises unavoidable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossobokov, Vladimir

    2013-04-01

    Why earthquake occurrences bring us so many surprises? The answer seems evident if we review the relationships that are commonly used to assess seismic hazard. The time-span of physically reliable Seismic History is yet a small portion of a rupture recurrence cycle at an earthquake-prone site, which makes premature any kind of reliable probabilistic statements about narrowly localized seismic hazard. Moreover, seismic evidences accumulated to-date demonstrate clearly that most of the empirical relations commonly accepted in the early history of instrumental seismology can be proved erroneous when testing statistical significance is applied. Seismic events, including mega-earthquakes, cluster displaying behaviors that are far from independent or periodic. Their distribution in space is possibly fractal, definitely, far from uniform even in a single segment of a fault zone. Such a situation contradicts generally accepted assumptions used for analytically tractable or computer simulations and complicates design of reliable methodologies for realistic earthquake hazard assessment, as well as search and definition of precursory behaviors to be used for forecast/prediction purposes. As a result, the conclusions drawn from such simulations and analyses can MISLEAD TO SCIENTIFICALLY GROUNDLESS APPLICATION, which is unwise and extremely dangerous in assessing expected societal risks and losses. For example, a systematic comparison of the GSHAP peak ground acceleration estimates with those related to actual strong earthquakes, unfortunately, discloses gross inadequacy of this "probabilistic" product, which appears UNACCEPTABLE FOR ANY KIND OF RESPONSIBLE SEISMIC RISK EVALUATION AND KNOWLEDGEABLE DISASTER PREVENTION. The self-evident shortcomings and failures of GSHAP appeals to all earthquake scientists and engineers for an urgent revision of the global seismic hazard maps from the first principles including background methodologies involved, such that there becomes: (a) a

  6. Increased Oil Production and Reserves Utilizing Secondary/Terriary Recovery Techniques on Small Reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David E. Eby; Thomas C. Chidsey, Jr.

    1998-04-08

    The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced oil recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to about 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon dioxide-(CO -) 2 flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place in the Paradox basin within the Navajo Nation. Two activities continued this quarter as part of the geological and reservoir characterization of productive carbonate buildups in the Paradox basin: (1) diagenetic characterization of project field reservoirs, and (2) technology transfer.

  7. Increased Contractile Response to Noradrenaline Induced By Factors Associated with the Metabolic Syndrome in Cultured Small Mesenteric Arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blædel, Martin; Sams, Anette; Boonen, Harrie C M

    2016-01-01

    UNLABELLED: This study investigated the effect of the metabolic syndrome associated risk factors hyperglycemia (glucose [Glc]), hyperinsulinemia (insulin [Ins]) and low-grade inflammation (tumor necrosis factor α [TNFα]) on the vasomotor responses of resistance arteries. Isolated small mesenteric...... arteries from 3-month-old Sprague-Dawley rats, were suspended for 21-23 h in tissue cultures containing either elevated Glc (30 mmol/l), Ins (100 nmol/l), TNFα (100 ng/ml) or combinations thereof. After incubation, the vascular response to noradrenaline (NA), phenylephrine, isoprenaline and NA...... in the presence of propranolol (10 µmol/l) was measured by wire myography. RESULTS: Arteries exposed only to combinations of the risk factors showed a significant 1.6-fold increase in the contractile NA sensitivity, which suggests that complex combinations of metabolic risk factors might lead to changes...

  8. Increased Oil Production and Reserves Utilizing Secondary/Tertiary Recovery Techniques on Small Reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jr., Chidsey, Thomas C.; Allison, M. Lee

    1999-11-02

    The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by field demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced- oil-recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels (23,850,000-31,800,000 m3) of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon-dioxide-(CO2-) miscible flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place within the Navajo Nation, San Juan County, Utah.

  9. Afatinib increases sensitivity to radiation in non-small cell lung cancer cells with acquired EGFR T790M mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shirong; Zheng, Xiaoliang; Huang, Haixiu; Wu, Kan; Wang, Bing; Chen, Xufeng; Ma, Shenglin

    2015-03-20

    Afatinib is a second-generation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor and has shown a significant clinical benefit in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with EGFR-activating mutations. However, the potential therapeutic effects of afatinib combining with other modalities, including ionizing radiation (IR), are not well understood. In this study, we developed a gefitinib-resistant cell subline (PC-9-GR) with a secondary EGFR mutation (T790M) from NSCLC PC-9 cells after chronic exposures to increasing doses of gefitinib. The presence of afatinib significantly increases the cell killing effect of radiation in PC-9-GR cells harboring acquired T790M, but not in H1975 cells with de novo T790M or in H460 cells that express wild-type EGFR. In PC-9-GR cells, afatinib remarkable blocks baseline of EGFR and ERK phosphorylations, and causes delay of IR-induced AKT phosphorylation. Afatinib treatment also leads to increased apoptosis and suppressed DNA damage repair in irradiated PC-9-GR cells, and enhanced tumor growth inhibition when combined with IR in PC-9-GR xenografts. Our findings suggest a potential therapeutic impact of afatinib as a radiation sensitizer in lung cancer cells harboring acquired T790M mutation, providing a rationale for a clinical trial with combination of afatinib and radiation in NSCLCs with EGFR T790M mutation.

  10. Increased production of interleukin-21, but not interleukin-17A, in the small intestine characterizes pediatric celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, M A; Lindenbergh-Kortleve, D J; Raatgeep, H C; de Ruiter, L F; de Krijger, R R; Groeneweg, M; Escher, J C; Samsom, J N

    2013-11-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is caused by inflammatory CD4(+) T-cell responses to dietary gluten. It is unclear whether interleukin (IL)-21 and IL-17A contribute to CD onset and lesion severity; therefore, we investigated IL-21 and IL-17A expression in biopsies from pediatric CD patients with different histopathological scores. High numbers of IL-21-producing cells were observed in pediatric CD lesions, even Marsh 1-2 lesions, whereas increased numbers of IL-17 secreting cells were not observed. Intraepithelial lymphocytes, CD4(+) T cells and also neutrophils secreted IL-21. Flow cytometry of lamina propria cells revealed a large population of IL-21- and interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-secreting CD3(+) T cells that did not secrete IL-17A. Adult CD patient biopsies also contained high numbers of IL-21-positive cells; however, enhanced numbers of IL-17-positive cells were observed in a small subgroup of patients with severe lesions. As duodenal tissue damage increases contact with microbe-associated molecular patterns, we hypothesized that microbial sensing by Toll-like receptors (TLRs) modulates T cell-derived cytokine secretion. Costimulation with TLR3 ligands during polyclonal T-cell activation significantly increased IL-21 secretion, whereas TLR2 ligands selectively enhanced IL-17A. These results demonstrate that an IL-17A-independent increase in IL-21 production by CD4(+) T cells is characteristic of pediatric CD. We hypothesize that incidental IL-17 secretion is caused by tissue damage rather than gluten-specific responses.

  11. Participatory approach: from problem identification to setting strategies for increased productivity and sustainability in small scale irrigated agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habtu, Solomon; Ludi, Eva; Jamin, Jean Yves; Oates, Naomi; Fissahaye Yohannes, Degol

    2014-05-01

    Practicing various innovations pertinent to irrigated farming at local field scale is instrumental to increase productivity and yield for small holder farmers in Africa. However the translation of innovations from local scale to the scale of a jointly operated irrigation scheme is far from trivial. It requires insight on the drivers for adoption of local innovations within the wider farmer communities. Participatory methods are expected to improve not only the acceptance of locally developed innovations within the wider farmer communities, but to allow also an estimation to which extend changes will occur within the entire irrigation scheme. On such a base, more realistic scenarios of future water productivity within an irrigation scheme, which is operated by small holder farmers, can be estimated. Initial participatory problem and innovation appraisal was conducted in Gumselassa small scale irrigation scheme, Ethiopia, from Feb 27 to March 3, 2012 as part of the EAU4FOOD project funded by EC. The objective was to identify and appraise problems which hinder sustainable water management to enhance production and productivity and to identify future research strategies. Workshops were conducted both at local (Community of Practices) and regional (Learning Practice Alliance) level. At local levels, intensive collaboration with farmers using participatory methods produced problem trees and a "Photo Safari" documented a range of problems that negatively impact on productive irrigated farming. A range of participatory methods were also used to identify local innovations. At regional level a Learning Platform was established that includes a wide range of stakeholders (technical experts from various government ministries, policy makers, farmers, extension agents, researchers). This stakeholder group did a range of exercise as well to identify major problems related to irrigated smallholder farming and already identified innovations. Both groups identified similar problems

  12. Increased levels of mucins in the cystic fibrosis mouse small intestine, and modulator effects of the Muc1 mucin expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmberg, Emily K; Noaksson, Karin A; Phillipson, Mia; Johansson, Malin E V; Hinojosa-Kurtzberg, Marina; Holm, Lena; Gendler, Sandra J; Hansson, Gunnar C

    2006-08-01

    The mouse model (Cftr(tm1UNC)/Cftr(tm1UNC)) for cystic fibrosis (CF) shows mucus accumulation and increased Muc1 mucin mRNA levels due to altered splicing (Hinojosa-Kurtzberg AM, Johansson MEV, Madsen CS, Hansson GC, and Gendler SJ. Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol 284: G853-G862, 2003). However, it is not known whether Muc1 is a major mucin contributing to the increased mucus and why CF/Muc1-/- mice show lower mucus accumulation. To address this, we have purified mucins from the small intestine of CF mice using guanidinium chloride extraction, ultracentrifugation, and gel filtration and analyzed them by slot blot, gel electrophoresis, proteomics, and immunoblotting. Normal and CF mice with wild-type (WT) Muc1 or Muc1-/- or that are transgenic for human MUC1 (MUC1.Tg, on a Muc1-/- background) were analyzed. The total amount of mucins, both soluble and insoluble in guanidinium chloride, increased up to 10-fold in the CF mice compared with non-CF animals, whereas the CF mice lacking Muc1 showed intermediate levels between the CF and non-CF mice. However, the levels of Muc3 (orthologue of human MUC17) were increased in the CF/Muc1-/- mice compared with the CF/MUC1.Tg animals. The amount of MUC1 mucin was increased several magnitudes in the CF mice, but MUC1 did still not appear to be a major mucin. The amount of insoluble mucus of the large intestine was also increased in the CF mice, an effect that was partially restored in the CF/Muc1-/- mice. The thickness of the firmly adherent mucus layer of colon in the Muc1-/- mice was significantly lower than that of WT mice. The results suggest that MUC1 is not a major component in the accumulated mucus of CF mice and that MUC1 can influence the amount of other mucins in a still unknown way.

  13. NBS1 knockdown by small interfering RNA increases ionizing radiation mutagenesis and telomere association in human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Lim, Chang U K.; Williams, Eli S.; Zhou, Junqing; Zhang, Qinming; Fox, Michael H.; Bailey, Susan M.; Liber, Howard L.

    2005-01-01

    Hypomorphic mutations which lead to decreased function of the NBS1 gene are responsible for Nijmegen breakage syndrome, a rare autosomal recessive hereditary disorder that imparts an increased predisposition to development of malignancy. The NBS1 protein is a component of the MRE11/RAD50/NBS1 complex that plays a critical role in cellular responses to DNA damage and the maintenance of chromosomal integrity. Using small interfering RNA transfection, we have knocked down NBS1 protein levels and analyzed relevant phenotypes in two closely related human lymphoblastoid cell lines with different p53 status, namely wild-type TK6 and mutated WTK1. Both TK6 and WTK1 cells showed an increased level of ionizing radiation-induced mutation at the TK and HPRT loci, impaired phosphorylation of H2AX (gamma-H2AX), and impaired activation of the cell cycle checkpoint regulating kinase, Chk2. In TK6 cells, ionizing radiation-induced accumulation of p53/p21 and apoptosis were reduced. There was a differential response to ionizing radiation-induced cell killing between TK6 and WTK1 cells after NBS1 knockdown; TK6 cells were more resistant to killing, whereas WTK1 cells were more sensitive. NBS1 deficiency also resulted in a significant increase in telomere association that was independent of radiation exposure and p53 status. Our results provide the first experimental evidence that NBS1 deficiency in human cells leads to hypermutability and telomere associations, phenotypes that may contribute to the cancer predisposition seen among patients with this disease.

  14. Investigating locality effects and surprisal in written English syntactic choice phenomena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkumar, Rajakrishnan; van Schijndel, Marten; White, Michael; Schuler, William

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the extent to which syntactic choice in written English is influenced by processing considerations as predicted by Gibson's (2000) Dependency Locality Theory (DLT) and Surprisal Theory (Hale, 2001; Levy, 2008). A long line of previous work attests that languages display a tendency for shorter dependencies, and in a previous corpus study, Temperley (2007) provided evidence that this tendency exerts a strong influence on constituent ordering choices. However, Temperley's study included no frequency-based controls, and subsequent work on sentence comprehension with broad-coverage eye-tracking corpora found weak or negative effects of DLT-based measures when frequency effects were statistically controlled for (Demberg & Keller, 2008; van Schijndel, Nguyen, & Schuler 2013; van Schijndel & Schuler, 2013), calling into question the actual impact of dependency locality on syntactic choice phenomena. Going beyond Temperley's work, we show that DLT integration costs are indeed a significant predictor of syntactic choice in written English even in the presence of competing frequency-based and cognitively motivated control factors, including n-gram probability and PCFG surprisal as well as embedding depth (Wu, Bachrach, Cardenas, & Schuler, 2010; Yngve, 1960). Our study also shows that the predictions of dependency length and surprisal are only moderately correlated, a finding which mirrors Dember & Keller's (2008) results for sentence comprehension. Further, we demonstrate that the efficacy of dependency length in predicting the corpus choice increases with increasing head-dependent distances. At the same time, we find that the tendency towards dependency locality is not always observed, and with pre-verbal adjuncts in particular, non-locality cases are found more often than not. In contrast, surprisal is effective in these cases, and the embedding depth measures further increase prediction accuracy. We discuss the implications of our findings for theories of

  15. Increased Oil Production and Reserves Utilizing Secondary/Tertiary Recovery Techniques on Small Reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chidsey, T.C. Jr.; Lorenz, D.M.; Culham, W.E.

    1997-10-15

    The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced oil recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon dioxide- (CO{sub 2}-) flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place in the Paradox basin within the Navajo Nation. The results of this project will be transferred to industry and other researchers through a petroleum extension service, creation of digital databases for distribution, technical workshops and seminars, field trips, technical presentations at national and regional professional meetings, and publication in newsletters and various technical or trade journals.

  16. Increased Oil Production and Reserves Utilizing Secondary/Tertiary Recovery Techniques on Small Reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison, M. Lee; Chidsey, Jr., Thomas

    1999-11-03

    The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced oil recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to about 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million bbl of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon dioxide-(CO-) flood 2 project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place in the Paradox basin within the Navajo Nation. The results of this project will be transferred to industry and other researchers through a petroleum extension service, creation of digital databases for distribution, technical workshops and seminars, field trips, technical presentations at national and regional professional meetings, and publication in newsletters and various technical or trade journals.

  17. The chemokine CXCL1/growth related oncogene increases sodium currents and neuronal excitability in small diameter sensory neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wick Dayna M

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Altered Na+ channel expression, enhanced excitability, and spontaneous activity occur in nerve-injury and inflammatory models of pathological pain, through poorly understood mechanisms. The cytokine GRO/KC (growth related oncogene; CXCL1 shows strong, rapid upregulation in dorsal root ganglion in both nerve injury and inflammatory models. Neurons and glia express its receptor (CXCR2. CXCL1 has well-known effects on immune cells, but little is known about its direct effects on neurons. Results We report that GRO/KC incubation (1.5 nM, overnight caused marked upregulation of Na+ currents in acutely isolated small diameter rat (adult sensory neurons in vitro. In both IB4-positive and IB4-negative sensory neurons, TTX-resistant and TTX-sensitive currents increased 2- to 4 fold, without altered voltage dependence or kinetic changes. These effects required long exposures, and were completely blocked by co-incubation with protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. Amplification of cDNA from the neuronal cultures showed that 3 Na channel isoforms were predominant both before and after GRO/KC treatment (Nav 1.1, 1.7, and 1.8. TTX-sensitive isoforms 1.1 and 1.7 significantly increased 2 – 3 fold after GRO/KC incubation, while 1.8 showed a trend towards increased expression. Current clamp experiments showed that GRO/KC caused a marked increase in excitability, including resting potential depolarization, decreased rheobase, and lower action potential threshold. Neurons acquired a striking ability to fire repetitively; IB4-positive cells also showed marked broadening of action potentials. Immunohistochemical labelling confirmed that the CXCR2 receptor was present in most neurons both in dissociated cells and in DRG sections, as previously shown for neurons in the CNS. Conclusion Many studies on the role of chemokines in pain conditions have focused on their rapid and indirect effects on neurons, via release of inflammatory mediators

  18. Association of increased postoperative opioid administration with non-small-cell lung cancer recurrence: a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, D P; Wong, W; White, P F; McKenna, R; Rosner, H; Shamloo, B; Louy, C; Wender, R; Yumul, R; Zhang, V

    2014-07-01

    Evidence suggests that opioid-sparing anaesthetic techniques might be associated with increased cancer-free postoperative survival. This could be related to suppression of natural killer cells by opioid analgesics in the perioperative period. This retrospective analysis tested the hypothesis that greater opioid use in the postoperative period is associated with a higher incidence of recurrences after surgery for lung cancer. The medical records of 99 consecutive patients who underwent video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery with lobectomy for Stage I or IIa biopsy-proven non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were reviewed. Perioperative information including patient characteristics, laboratory data, and surgical, anaesthetic, nursing, and pharmacy reports were collected. Doses of opioids administered intra-operatively and for the first 96 h after operation were converted into equianalgesic doses of oral morphine using a standard conversion table. Data were then compared with the National Cancer Registry's incidence of disease-free survival for 5 yr. A total of 99 patients with similar characteristics were included in the final analysis, 73 of whom were NSCLC recurrence-free at 5 yr and 26 had NSCLC recurrence within 5 yr. Total opioid dose during the 96 h postoperative period was 124 (101) mg of morphine equivalents in the cancer-free group and 232 mg (355) mg in the recurrence group (P=0.02). This retrospective analysis suggests an association between increased doses of opioids during the initial 96 h postoperative period with a higher recurrence rate of NSCLC within 5 yr. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Cerebral White Matter Hypoperfusion Increases with Small-Vessel Disease Burden. Data From the Third International Stroke Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arba, Francesco; Mair, Grant; Carpenter, Trevor; Sakka, Eleni; Sandercock, Peter A G; Lindley, Richard I; Inzitari, Domenico; Wardlaw, Joanna M

    2017-07-01

    Leukoaraiosis is associated with impaired cerebral perfusion, but the effect of individual and combined small-vessel disease (SVD) features on white matter perfusion is unclear. We studied patients recruited with perfusion imaging in the Third International Stroke Trial. We rated individual SVD features (leukoaraiosis, lacunes) and brain atrophy on baseline plain computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Separately, we assessed white matter at the level of the lateral ventricles in the cerebral hemisphere contralateral to the stroke for visible areas of hypoperfusion (present or absent) on 4 time-based perfusion imaging parameters. We examined associations between SVD features (individually and summed) and presence of hypoperfusion using logistic regression adjusted for age, sex, baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, hypertension, and diabetes. A total of 115 patients with median (interquartile range) age of 81 (72-86) years, 78 (52%) of which were male, had complete perfusion data. Hypoperfusion was most frequent on mean transit time (MTT; 63 patients, 55%) and least frequent on time to maximum flow (19 patients, 17%). The SVD score showed stronger independent associations with hypoperfusion (e.g., MTT, odds ratio [OR] = 2.80; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.56-5.03) than individual SVD markers (e.g., white matter hypoattenuation score, MTT, OR = 1.49, 95% CI = 1.09-2.04). Baseline blood pressure did not differ by presence or absence of hypoperfusion or across strata of SVD score. Presence of white matter hypoperfusion increased with SVD summed score. The SVD summed score was associated with hypoperfusion more consistently than individual SVD features, providing validity to the SVD score concept. Increasing SVD burden indicates worse perfusion in the white matter. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The small molecule survivin inhibitor YM155 may be an effective treatment modality for colon cancer through increasing apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Wan Lu, E-mail: lvvlchina@msn.cn [Department of Pathology, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Mi-Ra, E-mail: mira1125@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Pathology, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Mee-Yon, E-mail: meeyon@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Pathology, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Genomic Cohort, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-04

    Survivin has a known beneficial role in the survival of both cancer cells and normal cells. Therapies targeting survivin have been proposed as an alternative treatment modality for various tumors; however, finding the proper indication for this toxic therapy is critical for reducing unavoidable side effects. We recently observed that high survivin expression in CD133{sup +} cells is related to chemoresistance in Caco-2 colon cancer cells. However, the effect of survivin-targeted therapy on CD133{sup +} colon cancer is unknown. In this study, we investigated the roles of CD133 and survivin expression in colon cancer biology in vitro and comparatively analyzed the anticancer effects of survivin inhibitor on CD133{sup +} cells (ctrl-siRNA group) and small interfering RNA (siRNA)-induced CD133{sup −} cells (CD133-siRNA group) obtained from a single colon cancer cell line. CD133 knockdown via siRNA transfection did not change the tumorigenicity of cells, although in vitro survivin expression levels in CD133{sup +} cells were higher than those in siRNA-induced CD133{sup −} cells. The transfection procedure seemed to induce survivin expression. Notably, a significant number of CD133{sup −} cells (33.8%) was found in the cell colonies of the CD133-siRNA group. In the cell proliferation assay after treatment, YM155 and a combination of YM155 and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) proved to be far more effective than 5-FU alone. A significantly increased level of apoptosis was observed with increasing doses of YM155 in all groups. However, significant differences in therapeutic effect and apoptosis among the mock, ctrl-siRNA, and CD133-siRNA groups were not detected. Survivin inhibitor is an effective treatment modality for colon cancer; however, the role of CD133 and the use of survivin expression as a biomarker for this targeted therapy must be verified.

  1. Estimations of expectedness and potential surprise in possibility theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prade, Henri; Yager, Ronald R.

    1992-01-01

    This note investigates how various ideas of 'expectedness' can be captured in the framework of possibility theory. Particularly, we are interested in trying to introduce estimates of the kind of lack of surprise expressed by people when saying 'I would not be surprised that...' before an event takes place, or by saying 'I knew it' after its realization. In possibility theory, a possibility distribution is supposed to model the relative levels of mutually exclusive alternatives in a set, or equivalently, the alternatives are assumed to be rank-ordered according to their level of possibility to take place. Four basic set-functions associated with a possibility distribution, including standard possibility and necessity measures, are discussed from the point of view of what they estimate when applied to potential events. Extensions of these estimates based on the notions of Q-projection or OWA operators are proposed when only significant parts of the possibility distribution are retained in the evaluation. The case of partially-known possibility distributions is also considered. Some potential applications are outlined.

  2. 10 years of surprises at Saturn: CAPS and INMS highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, A. J.; Waite, J. H.

    2014-04-01

    The Cassini mission at Saturn has provided many surprises on Saturn's rapidly rotating magnetosphere and its interaction with the diverse moons, as well as its interaction with the solar wind. One of the early discoveries was the water-rich composition of the magnetosphere. Its structure and dynamics indicate remarkable injections, periodicities and interchange events. Enceladus, orbiting at 4 RS, was found to have plumes of water vapour and ice which are the dominant source for the inner magnetosphere. Charged water clusters, charged dust and photoelectrons provide key populations in the 'dusty plasma' seen here, as well as chemical complexity in the plume material. Direct pickup is seen near Enceladus and field aligned currents create a spot in Saturn's aurora. At Titan, orbiting at 20 RS, heavy negative and positive ions are seen in the ionosphere, as well as neutrals, all of which have surprising chemical complexity. These provide the source for Titan's haze. Ionospheric plasma is seen in Titan's tail, enabling ion escape to be estimated at 7 tonnes per day. Saturn's ring ionosphere was seen early in the mission, which was oxygen rich and produced photoelectrons; a return will be made in 2017. At Rhea, pickup positive and negative ions indicated weak atmospheres sustained by energetic particle impact, seen in the neutrals also. A weak atmosphere was also seen at Dione. The exosphere production process operates at Jupiter's moons also. Here we review some of the key new results, and discuss the implications for other solar system contexts.

  3. Chandra Finds Surprising Black Hole Activity In Galaxy Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-09-01

    Scientists at the Carnegie Observatories in Pasadena, California, have uncovered six times the expected number of active, supermassive black holes in a single viewing of a cluster of galaxies, a finding that has profound implications for theories as to how old galaxies fuel the growth of their central black holes. The finding suggests that voracious, central black holes might be as common in old, red galaxies as they are in younger, blue galaxies, a surprise to many astronomers. The team made this discovery with NASA'S Chandra X-ray Observatory. They also used Carnegie's 6.5-meter Walter Baade Telescope at the Las Campanas Observatory in Chile for follow-up optical observations. "This changes our view of galaxy clusters as the retirement homes for old and quiet black holes," said Dr. Paul Martini, lead author on a paper describing the results that appears in the September 10 issue of The Astrophysical Journal Letters. "The question now is, how do these black holes produce bright X-ray sources, similar to what we see from much younger galaxies?" Typical of the black hole phenomenon, the cores of these active galaxies are luminous in X-ray radiation. Yet, they are obscured, and thus essentially undetectable in the radio, infrared and optical wavebands. "X rays can penetrate obscuring gas and dust as easily as they penetrate the soft tissue of the human body to look for broken bones," said co-author Dr. Dan Kelson. "So, with Chandra, we can peer through the dust and we have found that even ancient galaxies with 10-billion-year-old stars can have central black holes still actively pulling in copious amounts of interstellar gas. This activity has simply been hidden from us all this time. This means these galaxies aren't over the hill after all and our theories need to be revised." Scientists say that supermassive black holes -- having the mass of millions to billions of suns squeezed into a region about the size of our Solar System -- are the engines in the cores of

  4. 76 FR 54969 - Rate Increase Disclosure and Review: Definitions of “Individual Market” and “Small Group Market”

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-06

    ... ``Individual Market'' and ``Small Group Market'' AGENCY: Center for Consumer Information and Insurance... provided that, for purposes of rate review only, definitions of ``individual market'' and ``small group market'' under State rate filing laws would govern even if those definitions departed from...

  5. INCREASED OIL PRODUCTION AND RESERVES UTILIZING SECONDARY/TERTIARY RECOVERY TECHNIQUES ON SMALL RESERVOIRS IN THE PARADOX BASIN, UTAH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas C. Chidsey, Jr.

    2002-11-01

    exhibits a characteristic set of reservoir properties obtained from outcrop analogs, cores, and geophysical logs. The Anasazi and Runway fields were selected for geostatistical modeling and reservoir compositional simulations. Models and simulations incorporated variations in carbonate lithotypes, porosity, and permeability to accurately predict reservoir responses. History matches tied previous production and reservoir pressure histories so that future reservoir performances could be confidently predicted. The simulation studies showed that despite most of the production being from the mound-core intervals, there were no corresponding decreases in the oil in place in these intervals. This behavior indicates gravity drainage of oil from the supra-mound intervals into the lower mound-core intervals from which the producing wells' major share of production arises. The key to increasing ultimate recovery from these fields (and similar fields in the basin) is to design either waterflood or CO{sub 2}-miscible flood projects capable of forcing oil from high-storage-capacity but low-recovery supra-mound units into the high-recovery mound-core units. Simulation of Anasazi field shows that a CO{sub 2} flood is technically superior to a waterflood and economically feasible. For Anasazi field, an optimized CO{sub 2} flood is predicted to recover a total 4.21 million barrels (0.67 million m3) of oil representing in excess of 89 percent of the original oil in place. For Runway field, the best CO{sub 2} flood is predicted to recover a total of 2.4 million barrels (0.38 million m3) of oil representing 71 percent of the original oil in place. If the CO{sub 2} flood performed as predicted, it is a financially robust process for increasing the reserves in the many small fields in the Paradox Basin. The results can be applied to other fields in the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois Basins, and the Midcontinent.

  6. Increasing the accuracy of 18F-FDG PET/CT interpretation of "mildly positive" mediastinal nodes in the staging of non-small cell lung cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moloney, F

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to identify radiological factors that may reduce false-positive results and increase diagnostic accuracy when staging the mediastinum of patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC).

  7. Measured Zero Net Energy Performance: Results, Lessons, and Surprises

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Carrie; LaRue, Anna; Pigman, Margaret; Roberts, Jon; Kaneda, David; Connelly, Dylan; Elliott, John; Pless, Shanti; Pande, Abhijeet; Dean, Edward; Anbarlilar, Can

    2016-08-26

    As more and more zero net energy (ZNE) buildings are built and monitored, we can learn from both careful case studies of individual projects as well as a broader perspective of trends over time. In a forum sponsored by Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E), eight expert speakers discussed: results and lessons from monitoring occupied ZNE buildings; best practices for setting performance targets and getting actionable performance information, and; things that have surprised them about monitored ZNE buildings. This paper distills the content of the forum by laying out the most common hurdles that are encountered in setting up monitoring projects, frequent performance issues that the monitoring uncovers, and lessons learned that can be applied to future projects.

  8. Surprising hair analysis results following acute carbofuran intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulaurent, S; Gaulier, J M; Zouaoui, K; Moesch, C; François, B; Lachâtre, G

    2011-10-10

    We present two non fatal cases of intoxication with carbofuran (CBF) documented by hair analysis. Carbofuran and 3-hydroxycarbofuran (OHCBF, its main metabolite) hair concentrations were determined using a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method. The obtained results were surprising if we consider several hair analyses previously published and based on a theory of the presence of xenobiotic in the only segment that comprised its intake. Among the two intoxication cases, we noticed the presence of CBF and OHCBF in hair segments corresponding to 45 days before, and more than 100 days after, the day of intoxication. Additionally, repeated hair samplings and subsequent analysis revealed a decrease of the carbofuran's concentration during the hair life.

  9. Probability and Surprisal in Auditory Comprehension of Morphologically Complex Words

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balling, Laura Winther; Baayen, R. Harald

    2012-01-01

    Two auditory lexical decision experiments document for morphologically complex words two points at which the probability of a target word given the evidence shifts dramatically. The first point is reached when morphologically unrelated competitors are no longer compatible with the evidence....... Adapting terminology from Marslen-Wilson (1984), we refer to this as the word’s initial uniqueness point (UP1). The second point is the complex uniqueness point (CUP) introduced by Balling and Baayen (2008), at which morphologically related competitors become incompatible with the input. Later initial...... in the course of the word co-determines response latencies. The presence of effects of surprisal, both at the initial uniqueness point of complex words, and cumulatively throughout the word, challenges the Shortlist B model of Norris and McQueen (2008), and suggests that a Bayesian approach to auditory...

  10. 2014 Presidential elections in Romania – surprising result or strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Mihalache

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The presidential elections in Romania which took place in November 2014 were won by Klaus Iohannis, who clearly defeated the incumbent prime-minister Victor Ponta by 10%. The result was considered by many a surprise, as none of the opinion polls were able to predict it. This article reveals a part of the strategy of Klaus Iohannis’s campaign and it offers a few clues about how this is result was possible, without having the aim to explain it fully. As the authors were accountable for strategy and political message in the electoral campaign for Klaus Iohannis, the scientific approach is combined with the inside view, to provide the reader a better understanding of the November 2014 events.

  11. Surprising similarities: Recent monetary regimes of small economies / Andrew K. Rose

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Rose, Andrew K.

    2014-01-01

    Artikkel keskendub väikese majandusega riikide (sh Eesti) rahapoliitikale enne ja pärast ülemaailmset finantskriisi. Kokku analüüsitakse 170 riigi näitajaid aastatest 2007-2012 ning jõutakse järeldusele, et riikide rahapoliitika mõju makromajanduslikele ja finantstagajärgedele on tegelikult üllatavalt väike

  12. Surprising similarities: Recent monetary regimes of small economies / Andrew K. Rose

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Rose, Andrew K.

    2014-01-01

    Artikkel keskendub väikese majandusega riikide (sh Eesti) rahapoliitikale enne ja pärast ülemaailmset finantskriisi. Kokku analüüsitakse 170 riigi näitajaid aastatest 2007-2012 ning jõutakse järeldusele, et riikide rahapoliitika mõju makromajanduslikele ja finantstagajärgedele on tegelikult üllatavalt väike

  13. Exploring the concept of climate surprises. A review of the literature on the concept of surprise and how it is related to climate change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glantz, M.H.; Moore, C.M. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Streets, D.G.; Bhatti, N.; Rosa, C.H. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Decision and Information Sciences Div.; Stewart, T.R. [State Univ. of New York, Albany, NY (United States)

    1998-01-01

    This report examines the concept of climate surprise and its implications for environmental policymaking. Although most integrated assessment models of climate change deal with average values of change, it is usually the extreme events or surprises that cause the most damage to human health and property. Current models do not help the policymaker decide how to deal with climate surprises. This report examines the literature of surprise in many aspects of human society: psychology, military, health care, humor, agriculture, etc. It draws together various ways to consider the concept of surprise and examines different taxonomies of surprise that have been proposed. In many ways, surprise is revealed to be a subjective concept, triggered by such factors as prior experience, belief system, and level of education. How policymakers have reacted to specific instances of climate change or climate surprise in the past is considered, particularly with regard to the choices they made between proactive and reactive measures. Finally, the report discusses techniques used in the current generation of assessment models and makes suggestions as to how climate surprises might be included in future models. The report concludes that some kinds of surprises are simply unpredictable, but there are several types that could in some way be anticipated and assessed, and their negative effects forestalled.

  14. The surprising diversity of clostridial hydrogenases: a comparative genomic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calusinska, Magdalena; Happe, Thomas; Joris, Bernard; Wilmotte, Annick

    2010-06-01

    Among the large variety of micro-organisms capable of fermentative hydrogen production, strict anaerobes such as members of the genus Clostridium are the most widely studied. They can produce hydrogen by a reversible reduction of protons accumulated during fermentation to dihydrogen, a reaction which is catalysed by hydrogenases. Sequenced genomes provide completely new insights into the diversity of clostridial hydrogenases. Building on previous reports, we found that [FeFe] hydrogenases are not a homogeneous group of enzymes, but exist in multiple forms with different modular structures and are especially abundant in members of the genus Clostridium. This unusual diversity seems to support the central role of hydrogenases in cell metabolism. In particular, the presence of multiple putative operons encoding multisubunit [FeFe] hydrogenases highlights the fact that hydrogen metabolism is very complex in this genus. In contrast with [FeFe] hydrogenases, their [NiFe] hydrogenase counterparts, widely represented in other bacteria and archaea, are found in only a few clostridial species. Surprisingly, a heteromultimeric Ech hydrogenase, known to be an energy-converting [NiFe] hydrogenase and previously described only in methanogenic archaea and some sulfur-reducing bacteria, was found to be encoded by the genomes of four cellulolytic strains: Clostridum cellulolyticum, Clostridum papyrosolvens, Clostridum thermocellum and Clostridum phytofermentans.

  15. Novelty biases attention and gaze in a surprise trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstmann, Gernot; Herwig, Arvid

    2016-01-01

    While the classical distinction between task-driven and stimulus-driven biasing of attention appears to be a dichotomy at first sight, there seems to be a third category that depends on the contrast or discrepancy between active representations and the upcoming stimulus, and may be termed novelty, surprise, or prediction failure. For previous demonstrations of the discrepancy-attention link, stimulus-driven components (saliency) may have played a decisive role. The present study was conducted to evaluate the discrepancy-attention link in a display where novel and familiar stimuli are equated for saliency. Eye tracking was used to determine fixations on novel and familiar stimuli as a proxy for attention. Results show a prioritization of attention by the novel color, and a de-prioritization of the familiar color, which is clearly present at the second fixation, and spans over the next couple of fixations. Saliency, on the other hand, did not prioritize items in the display. The results thus reinforce the notion that novelty captures and binds attention.

  16. A Well-Known But Still Surprising Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugland, Ole Anton

    2014-12-01

    The bicycle generator is often mentioned as an example of a method to produce electric energy. It is cheap and easily accessible, so it is a natural example to use in teaching. There are different types, but I prefer the old side-wall dynamo. The most common explanation of its working principle seems to be something like the illustration in Fig. 1. The illustration is taken from a popular textbook in the Norwegian junior high school.1 Typically it is explained as a system of a moving magnet or coils that directly results in a varying magnetic field through the coils. According to Faraday's law a voltage is induced in the coils. Simple and easy! A few times I have had a chance to glimpse into a bicycle generator, and I was somewhat surprised to sense that the magnet rotated parallel to the turns of the coil. How could the flux through the coil change and induce a voltage when the magnet rotated parallel to the turns of the coil? When teaching electromagnetic induction I have showed the students a dismantled generator and asked them how this could work. They naturally found that this was more difficult to understand than the principle illustrated in Fig. 1. Other authors in this journal have discussed even more challenging questions concerning electric generators.2,3

  17. INCREASING OF EFFICIENCY OF NATURAL GAS COMBUSTION IN STEAM BOILERS OF SMALL AND MEDIUM CAPACITY DUE TO IMPROVED MIXTURE FORMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaponenko A. M.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents methods of industrial tests of the of technical device utility model designed for boilers E-1,0-0,9G-3 QL-500, D-721 of small and medium capacity. The research is aimed at improving the efficiency of fuel combustion in the boiler furnaces due to uniform distribution of airflow when supplying it to the boiler burner

  18. Properties and Surprises of Solar Activity XXIII Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishkov, V. N.

    2010-12-01

    The main properties of the 23rd cycle match almost completely those of average-magnitude solar cycles, and some of the features of the cycle may indicate a change in the generation mode of magnetic fields in the solar convection zone. If this is the case, the Sun enters a period of intermediate and weak cycles of solar activity (SA) in terms of the Wolf number, which may last for 3 to 6 solar cycles. The main development stages of solar cycle 23 are the following: minimum of solar cycle 22: April 1996 (W* = 8.0); maximum of the smoothed relative sunspot number: April 2000; global polarity reversal of the general solar magnetic field: July to December 2000; secondary maximum of the relative sunspot number: November 2001; maximum of the 10.7-cm radio flux: February 2002; phase of the cycle maximum: October 1999 to June 2002; beginning of the decrease phase: July 2002; the point of minimum of the current SA cycle: December 2008. Solar cycle 23 has presented two powerful flare-active sunspot groups, in September 2005 and December 2006 (+5.5 and +6.6 years from the maximum) which by flare potential occupy 4th and 20th place among the most flare-active regions for the last four solar cycles. The unprecedented duration of the relative sunspot numbers fall that has led to already record duration of the last solar cycle among authentic cycles (since 1849) became the next surprise of development of solar activity during the last cycle. The phase of the minimum began in May 2005 and lasted for 4.5 years. Thus, the new solar cycle 24 has begun in January 2009.

  19. Dracunculiasis eradication - Finishing the job before surprises arise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Benjamin Jelle Visser

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dracunculiasis(Guinea worm disease) is a preventable waterborne parasitic disease that affects the poorest people living in remote rural areas in sub-SaharanAfrican countries, who do not have access to safe drinking water.The Guinea Worm Eradication Program, a25-year old campaign to rid the world ofGuineaWorm disease has now reached its final stage accelerating to zero cases in all endemic countries.During the19th and20th centuries, dracunculiasis was common in much ofSouthernAsia and theAfrican continent.The overall number of cases has been reduced tremendously by≥99%, from the3.32 million cases estimated to have occurred in1986 inAfrica to only1797 cases reported in2010 reported in only five countries(Sudan,Mali,Ethiopia,Chad andGhana) andAsia free of the disease.This achievement is unique in its kind - the only previously eradicated disease is smallpox, a viral infection for which vaccination was possible - and it has been achieved through primary community-based prevention and health education programs.Most efforts need to be taken in two countries,SouthSudan(comprising94% or1698 out of1797 of the cases reported world-wide in2010) andMali because of frequent movements of nomads in a vast area inside and outsideMali’s borders.All factors favourable to dracunculiasis eradication are available including adequate financial resources, community and political support and high levels of advocacy.Thus there is no reason that this disabling parasitic disease cannot be eradicated soon before surprises arise such as new civil conflicts in currently endemic countries.

  20. The Effect of Holstein X Meat Cattle Breeds Crosses(F1 on Meat Production Increasing in Small Scale Farms Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Papa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available About 80 % of Albanian small scale farms farming 1-2 dairy cows. The small agriculture land surface on farm property (1-1,5 ha is the main limiting factor for cow’s number increasing. So the farmer interest is not to increasing the number of cows in their farm but to fattening of calf’s born both for nutritive need of the family and market. The main objective of the study was to show the effect of industrial crosses (F1 of Holstein Frison cows with meat breeds like as Piementese(P, Limousine(L, Kianina(C, Sharole(Sh and Markixhana(M on meat production increasing on small scale farms. To carried out this objective, two study methods were used: (i The survey - 284 small scale farms was observed in the Albanian coastal field and (ii Comparative essay of fattening calves (F1 in semi intensive small scale farm condition - 32 calves, F1 crosses of Holstein cows with above mentioned meat breeds were put in fattening in semi intensive small scale farm condition. 6 Holstein breed (H calves of 3-4 months age was used as control group. The feeding of animals was based on forages produced in farm: corn silage 30 % D.M, fresh alpha-alpha and its hay. 35 % of dry matter requirements were supplied by bought concentrate feedstuffs with 15 % crude protein on dry matter bases. The fattening period lasted 8 months . The average daily body weight increasing for each crosses and control group were respectively 889g (PxH, 998g (LxH, 850g (KxH, 1010g( ChxH, 953g (MxH and 702g (HxH. Multivariate analyses according to a linear model with constant factors ( genotype, sex, genotype x sex and covariance “live body weight in the beginning of experiment” showed that: (i The effect of crossbreds on average daily gain is evident under the small-scale farms conditions, also, (ii The average daily gain increases with 23 -38 % , depending on the type of crosses, (iii The crosses of dairy cattle with Limousine and Sharole result as most effective. The differences between F

  1. SMARCA4-inactivating mutations increase sensitivity to Aurora kinase A inhibitor VX-680 in non-small cell lung cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagal, Vural; Wei, Shuguang; Zhang, Wei; Brekken, Rolf A.; Posner, Bruce A.; Peyton, Michael; Girard, Luc; Hwang, TaeHyun; Wheeler, David A.; Minna, John D.; White, Michael A.; Gazdar, Adi F.; Roth, Michael G.

    2017-01-01

    Mutations in the SMARCA4/BRG1 gene resulting in complete loss of its protein (BRG1) occur frequently in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Currently, no single therapeutic agent has been identified as synthetically lethal with SMARCA4/BRG1 loss. We identify AURKA activity as essential in NSCLC cells lacking SMARCA4/BRG1. In these cells, RNAi-mediated depletion or chemical inhibition of AURKA induces apoptosis and cell death in vitro and in xenograft mouse models. Disc large homologue-associated protein 5 (HURP/DLGAP5), required for AURKA-dependent, centrosome-independent mitotic spindle assembly is essential for the survival and proliferation of SMARCA4/BRG1 mutant but not of SMARCA4/BRG1 wild-type cells. AURKA inhibitors may provide a therapeutic strategy for biomarker-driven clinical studies to treat the NSCLCs harbouring SMARCA4/BRG1-inactivating mutations. PMID:28102363

  2. Small Interfering RNA Targeting MDR1 Inhibits Ovarian Cancer Growth and Increases Efficacy of Chemotherapy in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu-jun Liu; Guo-lan Gao; Kai-jia Tu; Li-qun Yu; Jun Gao

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To further validate a knockdown approach for circumventing the multidrug resistance gene (MDR1), we used small interfering RNA(siRNA) targeting MDR1 gene to inhibit the expression of MDR1 gene and P-glycoprotein(P-gp) in vivo.Methods: Ascite tumor xenografts were established by implanting human ovarian carcinoma cells SKOV3/AR intraperitoneally into the nude mice. The mice were randomized into the following three treatment groups with each group six mice respectively: Taxol, Taxol with lipofectamine and Taxol with siRNA/MDR1- lipofectamine intraperitoneal injection. The tumor growth rate and the ascite growth rate of mice were investigated. The expressions of MDR1 gene and P-gp in mice were determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry respctively.Results: The growth of tumors and ascites in mice treated with Taxol and siRNA/MDR1- lipofectamine was significantly inhibited compared with those in mice of other groups. After 28 days' treatment, the average tumor weight and ascite volume decreased by 43.6% and 29.7% in the group treated with Taxol and siRNA/MDR1-lipofectamine compared with these treated with Taxol alone (P<0.001). The expressions of MDR1 gene and P-gp in the group treated with Taxol and siRNA/MDR1-lipofectamine were also decreased compared with those in the group treated with Taxol alone (P<0.001).Conclusion: Small interfering RNA targeting-MDR1 can effectively and specifically suppress the expression of MDR1(P-glycoprotein) and inhibit ovarian cancer growth in vivo.

  3. An alternative explanation for the occurrence of short circuit current increases in the small intestine following challenge by bacterial enterotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, M L

    2013-10-01

    Secretory diarrhoeal disease due to enterotoxins is thought to arise from the enhancement to pathologically high rates of normally occurring chloride ion and therefore fluid secretion from enterocytes. In support of this concept, many enterotoxins increase intestinal short-circuit current, regarded now as faithfully reflecting the increased chloride ion secretion. Contradicting this assumption, STa reduces absorption but does not cause secretion in vivo although short-circuit current is increased in vitro. There is therefore a mismatch between an assumed enterocyte mediated secretory event that should but does not cause net fluid secretion and an undoubtedly increased short-circuit current. It is proposed here that short-circuit current increases are not themselves secretory events but result from interrupted fluid absorption. A noteworthy feature of compounds that inhibit the increase in short-circuit current is that the majority are vasoactive, neuroactive or both. In general, vasodilator substances increase current. An alternative hypothesis for the origin of short-circuit current increases is that these result from reflex induction of electrogenic fluid absorption. This reflex enhances a compensatory response that is also present at a cellular level. An intestinal reflex is therefore proposed by which decreases in interstitial and intravascular volume or pressure within the intestine initiate an electrogenic fluid absorption mechanism that compensates for the loss of electrically neutral fluid absorption. This hypothesis would explain the apparently complex pharmacology of short-circuit current increases since many depressor substances have receptors in common with enterocytes and enteric nerves. The proposed alternative view of the origin of short-circuit current increases assumes that these do not represent chloride secretion from the enterocytes. This view may therefore aid the successful development of anti-diarrhoeal drugs to overcome a major cause of

  4. Stars Form Surprisingly Close to Milky Way's Black Hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-10-01

    The supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way has surprisingly helped spawn a new generation of stars, according to observations from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. This novel mode of star formation may solve several mysteries about the supermassive black holes that reside at the centers of nearly all galaxies. "Massive black holes are usually known for violence and destruction," said Sergei Nayakshin of the University of Leicester, United Kingdom, and coauthor of a paper on this research in an upcoming issue of the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. "So it's remarkable that this black hole helped create new stars, not just destroy them." Black holes have earned their fearsome reputation because any material -- including stars -- that falls within the so-called event horizon is never seen again. However, these new results indicate that the immense disks of gas known to orbit many black holes at a "safe" distance from the event horizon can help nurture the formation of new stars. Animation of Stars Forming Around Black Hole Animation of Stars Forming Around Black Hole This conclusion came from new clues that could only be revealed in X-rays. Until the latest Chandra results, astronomers have disagreed about the origin of a mysterious group of massive stars discovered by infrared astronomers to be orbiting less than a light year from the Milky Way's central black hole, a.k.a. Sagittarius A*, or Sgr A*. At such close distances to Sgr A*, the standard model for star formation predicts that gas clouds from which stars form should have been ripped apart by tidal forces from the black hole. Two models to explain this puzzle have been proposed. In the disk model, the gravity of a dense disk of gas around Sgr A* offsets the tidal forces and allows stars to form; in the migration model, the stars formed in a star cluster far away from the black hole and migrated in to form the ring of massive stars. The migration scenario predicts about a

  5. Capsaicin synergizes with camptothecin to induce increased apoptosis in human small cell lung cancers via the calpain pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Jamie R; Perry, Haley E; Brown, Kathleen C; Gao, Ying; Lin, Ju; Stevenson, Cathyrn D; Hurley, John D; Nolan, Nicholas A; Akers, Austin T; Chen, Yi Charlie; Denning, Krista L; Brown, Linda G; Dasgupta, Piyali

    2017-04-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is characterized by excellent initial response to chemotherapy and radiation therapy with a majority of the patients showing tumor shrinkage and even remission. However, the challenge with SCLC therapy is that patients inevitably relapse and subsequently do not respond to the first line treatment. Recent clinical studies have investigated the possibility of camptothecin-based combination therapy as first line treatment for SCLC patients. Conventionally, camptothecin is used for recurrent SCLC and has poor survival outcomes. Therefore, drugs which can improve the therapeutic index of camptothecin should be valuable for SCLC therapy. Extensive evidence shows that nutritional compounds like capsaicin (the spicy compound of chili peppers) can improve the anti-cancer activity of chemotherapeutic drugs in both cell lines and animal models. Statistical analysis shows that capsaicin synergizes with camptothecin to enhance apoptosis of human SCLC cells. The synergistic activity of camptothecin and capsaicin is observed in both classical and variant SCLC cell lines and, in vivo, in human SCLC tumors xenotransplanted on chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) models. The synergistic activity of capsaicin and camptothecin are mediated by elevation of intracellular calcium and the calpain pathway. Our data foster hope for novel nutrition based combination therapies in SCLC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Carbon Dioxide: Surprising Effects on Decision Making and Neurocognitive Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, John T.

    2013-01-01

    The occupants of modern submarines and the International Space Station (ISS) have much in common as far as their air quality is concerned. Air is polluted by materials offgassing, use of utility compounds, leaks of systems chemicals, and anthropogenic sources. The primary anthropogenic compound of concern to submariners and astronauts has been carbon dioxide (CO2). NASA and the US Navy rely on the National Research Council Committee on Toxicology (NRC-COT) to help formulate exposure levels to CO2 that are thought to be safe for exposures of 3-6 months. NASA calls its limits Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations (SMACs). Years of experience aboard the ISS and a recent publication on deficits in decision making in ground-based subjects exposed briefly to 0.25% CO2 suggest that exposure levels that have been presumed acceptable to preserve health and performance need to be reevaluated. The current CO2 exposure limits for 3-6 months set by NASA and the UK Navy are 0.7%, and the limit for US submariners is 0.5%, although the NRC-COT recommended a 90-day level of 0.8% as safe a few years ago. NASA has set a 1000-day SMAC at 0.5% for exploration-class missions. Anecdotal experience with ISS operations approaching the current 180-day SMAC of 0.7% suggest that this limit is too high. Temporarily, NASA has limited exposures to 0.5% until further peer-reviewed data become available. In the meantime, a study published last year in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives (Satish U, et al. 2012) demonstrated that complexdecision- making performance is somewhat affected at 0.1% CO2 and becomes "dysfunctional" for at least half of the 9 indices of performance at concentrations approaching 0.25% CO2. The investigators used the Strategic Management Simulation (SMS) method of testing for decisionmaking ability, and the results were so surprising to the investigators that they declared that their findings need to be independently confirmed. NASA has responded to the

  7. Non-small-cell lung cancer-induced immunosuppression by increased human regulatory T cells via Foxp3 promoter demethylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Xing; Zhang, Shuping; Xu, Jian; Liu, Genyan; Zhang, Lixia; Xie, Erfu; Gao, Li; Li, Daqian; Sun, Ruihong; Wang, Fang; Pan, Shiyang

    2016-05-01

    Patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have immune defects that are poorly understood. Forkhead box protein P3 (Foxp3) is crucial for immunosuppression by CD4(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs). It is not well known how NSCLC induces Foxp3 expression and causes immunosuppression in tumor-bearing patients. Our study found a higher percentage of CD4(+) Tregs in the peripheral blood of NSCLC compared with healthy donors. NSCLC patients showed demethylation of eight CpG sites within the Foxp3 promoter with methylation ratios negatively correlated with CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) T levels. Foxp3 expression in CD4(+) Tregs was directly regulated by Foxp3 promoter demethylation and was involved in immunosuppression by NSCLC. To verify the effect of tumor cells on the phenotype and function of CD4(+) Tregs, we established a coculture system using NSCLC cell line and healthy CD4(+) T cells and showed that SPC-A1 induced IL-10 and TGF-β1 secretion by affecting the function of CD4(+) Tregs. The activity of DNA methyltransferases from CD4(+) T was decreased during this process. Furthermore, eight CpG sites within the Foxp3 promoter also appeared to have undergone demethylation. Foxp3 is highly expressed in CD4(+) T cells, and this may be caused by gene promoter demethylation. These induced Tregs are highly immunosuppressive and dramatically inhibit the proliferative activity of naïve CD4(+) T cells. Our study provides one possible mechanism describing Foxp3 promoter demethylation changes by which NSCLC down-regulates immune responses and contributes to tumor progression. Foxp3 represents an important target for NSCLC anti-tumor immunotherapy.

  8. The nondigestible disaccharide epilactose increases paracellular Ca absorption via rho-associated kinase- and myosin light chain kinase-dependent mechanisms in rat small intestines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takuya; Nishimukai, Megumi; Takechi, Maki; Taguchi, Hidenori; Hamada, Shigeki; Yokota, Atsushi; Ito, Susumu; Hara, Hiroshi; Matsui, Hirokazu

    2010-02-10

    We previously showed that epilactose, a nondigestible disaccharide, increased calcium (Ca) absorption in the small intestines of rats. Here, we explored the mechanism(s) underlying the epilactose-mediated promotion of Ca absorption in a ligated intestinal segment of anesthetized rats. The addition of epilactose to the luminal solution increased Ca absorption and chromium (Cr)-EDTA permeability, a paracellular indicator, with a strong correlation (R = 0.93) between these changes. Epilactose induced the phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chains (MLCs), which is known to activate the paracellular route, without any change in the association of tight junction proteins with the actin cytoskeleton. The epilactose-mediated promotion of the Ca absorption was suppressed by specific inhibitors of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) and Rho-associated kinase (ROCK). These results indicate that epilactose increases paracellular Ca absorption in the small intestine of rats through the induction of MLC phosphorylation via MLCK- and ROCK-dependent mechanisms.

  9. Quark Gluon Plasma: Surprises from strongly coupled QCD matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacak, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Quantum Chromodynamics has long predicted a transition from normal hadronic matter to a phase where the quarks and gluons are no longer bound together and can move freely. Quark gluon plasma is now produced regularly in collisions of heavy nuclei at very high energy at both the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) in the U.S. and at the LHC in Europe. Quark gluon plasma exhibits remarkable properties. Its vanishingly small shear viscosity to entropy density ratio means that it flows essentially without internal friction, making it one of the most ``perfect'' liquids known. It is also very opaque to transiting particles including heavy charm quarks, though the exact mechanism for this is not yet understood. Recent data suggest that even very small colliding systems may produce a droplet of plasma. The similarities to strongly coupled or correlated systems in ultra-cold atoms and condensed matter are striking, and have inspired novel theoretical descriptions growing out of string theory. It remains a mystery how this plasma emerges from cold, dense gluonic matter deep inside nuclei. I will discuss how a future electron-ion collider can help address this question.

  10. Orally administered lactoperoxidase increases expression of the FK506 binding protein 5 gene in epithelial cells of the small intestine of mice: a DNA microarray study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Hiroyuki; Miyauchi, Hirofumi; Shin, Kouichirou; Yamauchi, Koji; Matsumoto, Ichiro; Abe, Keiko; Takase, Mitsunori

    2007-09-01

    Lactoperoxidase (LPO) is a component of milk and other external secretions. To study the influence of ingested LPO on the digestive tract, we performed DNA microarray analysis of the small intestine of mice administered LPO. LPO administration upregulated 78 genes, including genes involved in metabolism, immunity, apoptosis, and the cell cycle, and downregulated nine genes, including immunity-related genes. The most upregulated gene was FK506 binding protein 5 (FKBP5), a glucocorticoid regulating immunophilin. The upregulation of this gene was confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR in other samples. In situ hybridization revealed that expression of the FKBP5 gene in the crypt epithelial cells of the small intestine was enhanced by LPO. These results suggest that ingested LPO modulates gene expression in the small intestine and especially increases FKBP5 gene expression in the epithelial cells of the intestine.

  11. Native fungal endophytes suppress an exotic dominant and increase plant diversity over small and large spatial scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afkhami, Michelle E; Strauss, Sharon Y

    2016-05-01

    Understanding community dynamics and processes, such as the factors that generate and maintain biodiversity, drive succession, and affect invasion susceptibility, is a central goal in ecology and evolution. While most studies of how species interactions affect communities have focused on highly visible macroorganisms, we show that mutualistic microfungal endophytes have community-level effects across their host plant's range and provide the first example of fungal endophytes enhancing plant diversity. A three-year field study in which we experimentally manipulated endophyte abundance in a native Californian grass showed that despite their minute biomass, endophytes dramatically increased plant community diversity (~110% greater increase with endophytes) by suppressing a dominant invasive grass, Bromus diandrus. This effect was also detectable, but smaller, across five additional common gardens spanning ecologically diverse habitats, different climates, and > 400 km of the host grass' range as well as at microspatial scales within gardens. Our study illustrates that mutualistic microbes, while often hidden players, can have unexpectedly large ecological impacts across a wide range of habitats and scales and may be important for promoting diverse communities and ecosystems.

  12. Supermagnetic Neutron Star Surprises Scientists, Forces Revision of Theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    magnetars because their magnetic fields are 100-1,000 times stronger than those of typical pulsars. It is the decay of those incredibly strong fields that powers their strange X-ray emission. "The magnetic field from a magnetar would make an aircraft carrier spin around and point north quicker than a compass needle moves on Earth," said David Helfand, of Columbia University. A magnetar's field is 1,000 trillion times stronger than Earth's, Helfand pointed out. The new object -- named XTE J1810-197 -- was first discovered by NASA's Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer when it emitted a strong burst of X-rays in 2003. While the X-rays were fading in 2004, Jules Halpern of Columbia University and collaborators identified the magnetar as a radio-wave emitter using the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope in New Mexico. Any radio emission is highly unusual for a magnetar. Because magnetars had not been seen to regularly emit radio waves, the scientists presumed that the radio emission was caused by a cloud of particles thrown off the neutron star at the time of its X-ray outburst, an idea they soon would realize was wrong. With knowledge that the magnetar emitted some form of radio waves, Camilo and his colleagues observed it with the Parkes radio telescope in Australia in March and immediately detected astonishingly strong radio pulsations every 5.5 seconds, corresponding to the previously-determined rotation rate of the neutron star. As they continued to observe XTE J1810-197, the scientists got more surprises. Whereas most pulsars become weaker at higher radio frequencies, XTE J1810-197 does not, remaining a strong emitter at frequencies up to 140 GHz, the highest frequency ever detected from a radio pulsar. In addition, unlike normal pulsars, the object's radio emission fluctuates in strength from day to day, and the shape of the pulsations changes as well. These variations likely indicate that the magnetic fields around the pulsar are changing

  13. A recombinant matriptase causes an increase in caspase-3 activity in a small-intestinal epithelial IEC-6 line cultured on fibronectin-coated plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochida, Seiya; Tsuzuki, Satoshi; Inouye, Kuniyo; Fushiki, Tohru

    2014-05-01

    Matriptase is an epithelial-derived type-II transmembrane serine protease. This protease is expressed prominently in the villus tip of small-intestinal epithelia at which senescent cells undergo shedding and/or apoptosis. The basement membrane of epithelial cells, including small-intestinal epithelial cells, contains extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins such as fibronectin and laminin. We found previously that high concentrations of a recombinant matriptase catalytic domain (r-MatCD) (e.g. 1 μM) caused an increased detachment of and increases in the activity of apoptotic effector caspase-3 in a rat small-intestinal epithelial IEC-6 line cultured on laminin-coated plates and proposed that at sites with its high level of expression, matriptase contributes to promoting shedding and/or detachment-induced death of epithelial cells through a mechanism mediating loss of cell-ECM adhesion. In this study, we found that even without increasing cell detachment, a high concentration of r-MatCD causes an increase in caspase-3 activity in IEC-6 cells cultured on fibronectin-coated plates, suggesting that the recombinant matriptase can cause apoptosis by a mechanism unrelated to cell detachment. Also, r-MatCD-treated IEC-6 cells on fibronectin were found to display spindle-like morphological changes. We suggest that r-MatCD causes apoptosis of IEC-6 on fibronectin by a mechanism involving the disruption of cell integrity.

  14. A surprising exception. Himachal's success in promoting female education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreze, J

    1999-01-01

    Gender inequalities in India are derived partly from the economic dependence of women on men. Low levels of formal education among women reinforce the asymmetry of power between the sexes. A general pattern of sharp gender bias in education levels is noted in most Indian states; however, in the small state of Himachal Pradesh, school participation rates are almost as high for girls as for boys. Rates of school participation for girls at the primary level is close to universal in this state, and while gender bias persists at higher levels of education, it is much lower than elsewhere in India and rapidly declining. This was not the case 50 years ago; educational levels in Himachal Pradesh were no higher than in Bihar or Uttar Pradesh. Today, the spectacular transition towards universal elementary education in Himachal Pradesh has contributed to the impressive reduction of poverty, mortality, illness, undernutrition, and related deprivations.

  15. Does Proximity to Wetland Shrubland Increase the Habitat Value for Shrubland Birds of Small Patches of Upland Shrubland in the Northeastern United States?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bill Buffum

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The loss of shrubland habitat is linked to population declines for many wildlife species, including several bird species of conservation concern. Conservation agencies in the northeastern United States encourage private landowners to clearcut patches of forest to create shrubland habitat. Many private landowners are only willing to create small clearcuts; therefore, it is important to understand how to maximize the impact of small clearcuts on bird habitat use. In this study we examined whether proximity to wetland shrubland increases the habitat value of small patches of upland shrubland. We conducted point counts at 22 sites containing small patches of upland shrubland ranging in size from 0.1 to 7 ha. Shrubland bird species richness was significantly positively correlated with the proportion of wetland shrubland habitat within 100 m of a site, and with the extent of all shrubland habitat within 100 m, but not with the proportion of upland shrubland. Occupancy modeling indicated that the size of adjacent wetland shrub patches increased occupancy at the sites for five of eight species observed with sufficient rates of detection. Our results suggest that creating clearcuts adjacent to existing areas of wetland shrubland may enhance the habitat value of the patches for shrubland birds.

  16. Small Gallstone Size and Delayed Cholecystectomy Increase the Risk of Recurrent Pancreatobiliary Complications After Resolved Acute Biliary Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Bum; Kim, Tae Nyeun; Chung, Hyun Hee; Kim, Kook Hyun

    2017-03-01

    Acute biliary pancreatitis (ABP) is a severe complication of gallstone disease with considerable mortality, and its recurrence rate is reported as 50-90% for ABP patients who do not undergo cholecystectomy. However, the incidence of and risk factors for recurrent pancreatobiliary complications after the initial improvement of ABP are not well established in the literature. The aims of this study were to determine the risk factors for recurrent pancreatobiliary complications and to compare the outcomes between early (within 2 weeks after onset of pancreatitis) and delayed cholecystectomy in patients with ABP. Patients diagnosed with ABP at Yeungnam University Hospital from January 2004 to July 2016 were retrospectively reviewed. The following risk factors for recurrent pancreatobiliary complications (acute pancreatitis, acute cholecystitis, and acute cholangitis) were analyzed: demographic characteristics, laboratory data, size and number of gallstones, severity of pancreatitis, endoscopic sphincterotomy, and timing of cholecystectomy. Patients were categorized into two groups: patients with recurrent pancreatobiliary complications (Group A) and patients without pancreatobiliary complications (Group B). Of the total 290 patients with ABP (age 66.8 ± 16.0 years, male 47.9%), 56 (19.3%) patients developed recurrent pancreatobiliary complications, of which 35 cases were acute pancreatitis, 11 cases were acute cholecystitis, and 10 cases were acute cholangitis. Endoscopic sphincterotomy and cholecystectomy were performed in 134 (46.2%) patients and 95 (32.8%) patients, respectively. Age, sex, BMI, diabetes, number of stone, severity of pancreatitis, and laboratory data were not significantly correlated with recurrent pancreatobiliary complications. The risk of recurrent pancreatobiliary complications was significantly increased in the delayed cholecystectomy group compared with the early cholecystectomy group (45.5 vs. 5.0%, p gallstone less than or equal to 5

  17. Trait Anxiety Is Associated with Negative Interpretations When Resolving Valence Ambiguity of Surprised Faces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Gewnhi; Vasey, Michael W; Kim, Grace; Hu, Dixie D; Thayer, Julian F

    2016-01-01

    The current research examines whether trait anxiety is associated with negative interpretation bias when resolving valence ambiguity of surprised faces. To further isolate the neuro-cognitive mechanism, we presented angry, happy, and surprised faces at broad spatial frequency (BSF), high spatial frequency (HSF), and low spatial frequency (LSF) and asked participants to determine the valence of each face. High trait anxiety was associated with more negative interpretations of BSF (i.e., intact) surprised faces. However, the modulation of trait anxiety on the negative interpretation of surprised faces disappeared at HSF and LSF. The current study provides evidence that trait anxiety modulates negative interpretations of BSF surprised faces. However, the negative interpretation of LSF surprised faces appears to be a robust default response that occurs regardless of individual differences in trait anxiety.

  18. Trait anxiety is associated with negative interpretations when resolving valence ambiguity of surprised faces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gewnhi Park

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The current research examines whether trait anxiety is associated with negative interpretation bias when resolving valence ambiguity of surprised faces. To further isolate the neuro-cognitive mechanism, we presented angry, happy, and surprised faces at broad, high, and low spatial frequency and asked participants to determine the valence of each face. High trait anxiety was associated with more negative interpretations of broad spatial frequency (i.e., intact surprised faces. However, the modulation of trait anxiety on the negative interpretation of surprised faces disappeared at high and low spatial frequencies. The current study provides evidence that trait anxiety modulates negative interpretations of broad spatial frequency surprised faces. However, the negative interpretation of low spatial frequency surprised faces appears to be a robust default response that occurs regardless of individual differences in trait anxiety.

  19. Overfishing of small pelagic fishes increases trophic overlap between immature and mature striped dolphins in the Mediterranean Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Campos, Encarna; Borrell, Assumpció; Cardona, Luis; Forcada, Jaume; Aguilar, Alex

    2011-01-01

    The interactions among diet, ecology, physiology, and biochemistry affect N and C stable isotope signatures in animal tissues. Here, we examined if ecological segregation among animals in relation to sex and age existed by analyzing the signatures of δ(15)N and δ(13)C in the muscle of Western Mediterranean striped dolphins. Moreover, we used a Bayesian mixing model to study diet composition and investigated potential dietary changes over the last two decades in this population. For this, we compared isotope signatures in samples of stranded dolphins obtained during two epizootic events occurring in 1990 and 2007-2008. Mean δ(13)C values for females and males were not significantly different, but age-related variation indicated δ(13)C enrichment in both sexes, suggesting that females and males most likely fed in the same general areas, increasing their consumption of benthic prey with age. Enrichment of δ(15)N was only observed in females, suggesting a preference for larger or higher trophic level prey than males, which could reflect different nutritional requirements. δ(13)C values showed no temporal variation, although the mean δ(15)N signature decreased from 1990 to 2007-2008, which could indicate a dietary shift in the striped dolphin over the last two decades. The results of SIAR indicated that in 1990, hake and sardine together contributed to 60% on the diet of immature striped dolphins, and close to 90% for mature striped dolphins. Conversely, the diet of both groups in 2007-2008 was more diverse, as hake and sardine contributed to less than 40% of the entire diet. These results suggest a dietary change that was possibly related to changes in food availability, which is consistent with the depletion of sardine stocks by fishing.

  20. Changes in fish communities on a small spatial scale, an effect of increased habitat complexity by an offshore wind farm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hal, R; Griffioen, A B; van Keeken, O A

    2017-05-01

    The number of offshore wind farms (OWF) is increasing to meet the demands for renewable energy. The piles and hard substrate surrounding these piles creates new habitat for species with preference to hard substrates. We studied the impact of this hard substrate on the fish community in a Dutch OWF in the sandy southern North Sea, which had been in operation for five years. Multi-mesh gillnets were placed near the OWF structures on the hard substrate protection revetments and on the sandy bottom in the middle of the farm. The catches indicated attraction of cod, pouting, bullrout and edible and velvet crab, while attraction to the sandy habitat was shown for flatfish and whiting. Further, two species previously not caught in this area, goldsinny wrasse and grey trigger fish, were caught on the hard substrate. In addition a Dual-Frequency Identification Sonar (DIDSON) was used to record transects through the farm to observe individual fish in the water column throughout the farm and very near the OWF structures. High abundances of fish near the structure were observed during some days, while during other days equal distribution of fish in the area was observed. The area around the structures is thus only used temporarily for shelter or feeding. The DIDSON also allowed looking at the aggregation level of the fish. Seasonally the aggregation level differed most likely due to different species occurring in the area. In April, most fish were aggregated in schools, while in summer most observations were individual fish or loose aggregations. The wind farm structures had limited effect on the aggregation level compared to season or weather conditions.

  1. Overfishing of small pelagic fishes increases trophic overlap between immature and mature striped dolphins in the Mediterranean Sea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Encarna Gómez-Campos

    Full Text Available The interactions among diet, ecology, physiology, and biochemistry affect N and C stable isotope signatures in animal tissues. Here, we examined if ecological segregation among animals in relation to sex and age existed by analyzing the signatures of δ(15N and δ(13C in the muscle of Western Mediterranean striped dolphins. Moreover, we used a Bayesian mixing model to study diet composition and investigated potential dietary changes over the last two decades in this population. For this, we compared isotope signatures in samples of stranded dolphins obtained during two epizootic events occurring in 1990 and 2007-2008. Mean δ(13C values for females and males were not significantly different, but age-related variation indicated δ(13C enrichment in both sexes, suggesting that females and males most likely fed in the same general areas, increasing their consumption of benthic prey with age. Enrichment of δ(15N was only observed in females, suggesting a preference for larger or higher trophic level prey than males, which could reflect different nutritional requirements. δ(13C values showed no temporal variation, although the mean δ(15N signature decreased from 1990 to 2007-2008, which could indicate a dietary shift in the striped dolphin over the last two decades. The results of SIAR indicated that in 1990, hake and sardine together contributed to 60% on the diet of immature striped dolphins, and close to 90% for mature striped dolphins. Conversely, the diet of both groups in 2007-2008 was more diverse, as hake and sardine contributed to less than 40% of the entire diet. These results suggest a dietary change that was possibly related to changes in food availability, which is consistent with the depletion of sardine stocks by fishing.

  2. Increase in the number of small-scale (up to 300 kW) hydro-power installations; Zuwachs Kleinstwasserkraftwerke (Kraftwerke bis 300 kW)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leutwiler, H.; Bieri, F.; Chenal, R.

    2005-07-01

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) reports on the increase in the number of small-scale hydro-power installations in Switzerland with ratings of up to 300 kW. The report presents data on the increase in the number of such installations during the period 2002 - 2004 and updates the figures for 1985 - 2004. Also, new drinking-water hydropower stations are listed and the potential for this type of installation in drinking-water and waste-water networks is discussed. Figures and estimates of installed power are presented and recommendations are made on ways of improving the completeness and the accuracy of the statistics on small hydropower installations.

  3. Trait Anxiety Is Associated with Negative Interpretations When Resolving Valence Ambiguity of Surprised Faces

    OpenAIRE

    Gewnhi Park; Vasey, Michael W.; Grace Kim; Dixie D Hu; Thayer, Julian F

    2016-01-01

    The current research examines whether trait anxiety is associated with negative interpretation bias when resolving valence ambiguity of surprised faces. To further isolate the neuro-cognitive mechanism, we presented angry, happy, and surprised faces at broad, high, and low spatial frequency and asked participants to determine the valence of each face. High trait anxiety was associated with more negative interpretations of broad spatial frequency (i.e., intact) surprised faces. However, the mo...

  4. Small global effect on terrestrial net primary production due to increased fossil fuel aerosol emissions from East Asia since the turn of the century

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, M.; Rap, A.; Reddington, C. L.; Spracklen, D. V.; Gloor, M.; Buermann, W.

    2016-08-01

    The global terrestrial carbon sink has increased since the start of this century at a time of growing carbon emissions from fossil fuel burning. Here we test the hypothesis that increases in atmospheric aerosols from fossil fuel burning enhanced the diffuse light fraction and the efficiency of plant carbon uptake. Using a combination of models, we estimate that at global scale changes in light regimes from fossil fuel aerosol emissions had only a small negative effect on the increase in terrestrial net primary production over the period 1998-2010. Hereby, the substantial increases in fossil fuel aerosol emissions and plant carbon uptake over East Asia were effectively canceled by opposing trends across Europe and North America. This suggests that if the recent increase in the land carbon sink would be causally linked to fossil fuel emissions, it is unlikely via the effect of aerosols but due to other factors such as nitrogen deposition or nitrogen-carbon interactions.

  5. Small global effect on terrestrial net primary production due to increased fossil fuel aerosol emissions from East Asia since the turn of the century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, M; Rap, A; Reddington, C L; Spracklen, D V; Gloor, M; Buermann, W

    2016-08-16

    The global terrestrial carbon sink has increased since the start of this century at a time of growing carbon emissions from fossil fuel burning. Here we test the hypothesis that increases in atmospheric aerosols from fossil fuel burning enhanced the diffuse light fraction and the efficiency of plant carbon uptake. Using a combination of models, we estimate that at global scale changes in light regimes from fossil fuel aerosol emissions had only a small negative effect on the increase in terrestrial net primary production over the period 1998-2010. Hereby, the substantial increases in fossil fuel aerosol emissions and plant carbon uptake over East Asia were effectively canceled by opposing trends across Europe and North America. This suggests that if the recent increase in the land carbon sink would be causally linked to fossil fuel emissions, it is unlikely via the effect of aerosols but due to other factors such as nitrogen deposition or nitrogen-carbon interactions.

  6. Increasing the success rate of groundwater exploration in developing nation using geophysical methods: Case of a small community in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isiorho, S. A.; Omole, D.; Aizebeokhai, A.

    2016-12-01

    About 35 percent of Nigeria's population of the more than 180 M relies on groundwater. Due to the lack of an adequate water supply system within Ogun State, many homes result to drilling their own private wells. Most groundwater is sourced from shallow wells (less than 30 m) and is often of poor water quality. The number of borehole failures is also alarming. Several entrepreneurs have seized on the lack of adequate water supply to drill for groundwater. Several of these wells have either failed or are not adequate for the purposed use of the water. There also appears to be no proper coordination of the citing of these wells. To increase the success rates of the boreholes, the use of geophysical methods amongst others is recommended. This study examines the exploration for groundwater and water quality in Ogun State in Nigeria, using Ota as an example. Ogun State has both significant surface and groundwater resources. However, due to the indiscriminate and lack of proper waste disposal, the vast majority of the surface waters and shallow well waters are impaired making them unsuitable for many users. To access a deeper groundwater source, a geophysical survey was performed to assist in finding a possible location for a borehole. A geophysical survey using the vertical electric sounding (VES) with Schlumberger configuration was carried out. The data shows that there are five layers within the proposed borehole site. Based on the data, it was suggested that a well be placed at a depth between 65-75 m (213-246 ft.). The borehole was drilled to 67m. This depth, from the literature, corresponds to the Abeokuta formation. A pump was installed at 66 m (217 ft.) depth and the first 50 feet of the borehole was grouted to prevent surface water from getting into the hole. A pumping test was performed for about two hours. While this was noteworthy, the data is not made available to any centralized body. No water chemistry was undertaken and more still needs to be done with

  7. Inter-hospital transport of critically ill patients; expect surprises

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Droogh, Joep M.; Smit, Marije; Hut, Jakob; de Vos, Ronald; Ligtenberg, Jack J. M.; Zijlstra, Jan G.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Inter-hospital transport of critically ill patients is increasing. When performed by specialized retrieval teams there are less adverse events compared to transport by ambulance. These transports are performed with technical equipment also used in an Intensive Care Unit (ICU). As a

  8. The Surprisingly Modest Relationship between SES and Educational Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwell, Michael; Maeda, Yukiko; Bishop, Kyoungwon; Xie, Aolin

    2017-01-01

    Measures of socioeconomic status (SES) are routinely used in analyses of achievement data to increase statistical power, statistically control for the effects of SES, and enhance causality arguments under the premise that the SES-achievement relationship is moderate to strong. Empirical evidence characterizing the strength of the SES-achievement…

  9. New Technology's Surprising Security Threats. Building Digital Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huwe, Terence

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, security issues have increasingly come to dominate the technological development process--although still in a more reactive than proactive mode. It now seems more important than ever to monitor security trends and policy developments, especially if technology is regarded as a potential community builder. This article suggests…

  10. Latin America: how a region surprised the experts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sherbinin, A

    1993-02-01

    In 1960-1970, family planning specialists and demographers worried that poverty, limited education, Latin machismo, and strong catholic ideals would obstruct family planning efforts to reduce high fertility in Latin America. It had the highest annual population growth rate in the world (2.8%), which would increase the population 2-fold in 25 years. Yet, the UN's 1992 population projection for Latin America and the Caribbean in the year 2000 was about 20% lower than its 1963 projection (just over 500 vs. 638 million). Since life expectancy increased simultaneously from 57 to 68 years, this reduced projection was caused directly by a large decline in fertility from 5.9 to 3. A regression analysis of 11 Latin American and Caribbean countries revealed that differences in the contraceptive prevalence rates accounted for 90% of the variation in the total fertility rate between countries. Thus, contraception played a key role in the fertility decline. The second most significant determinant of fertility decline was an increase in the average age at first marriage from about 20 to 23 years. Induced abortion and breast feeding did not contribute significantly to fertility decline. The major socioeconomic factors responsible for the decline included economic development and urbanization, resulting in improvements in health care, reduced infant and child mortality, and increases in female literacy, education, and labor force participation. Public and private family planning programs also contributed significantly to the decline. They expanded from cities to remote rural areas, thereby increasing access to contraception. By the early 1990s, Brazil, Mexico, and Colombia had among the lowest levels of unmet need (13-24%) in developing countries. Other key factors of fertility decline were political commitment, strong communication efforts, and stress on quality services. Latin America provides hope to other regions where religion and culture promote a large family size.

  11. Paroxysmal atrial fibrillation occurs often in cryptogenic ischaemic stroke. Final results from the SURPRISE study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Louisa; Krieger, D W; Højberg, S;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Atrial fibrillation (AF) increases the risk of stroke fourfold and is associated with a poor clinical outcome. Despite work-up in compliance with guidelines, up to one-third of patients have cryptogenic stroke (CS). The prevalence of asymptomatic paroxysmal atrial...... fibrillation (PAF) in CS remains unknown. The SURPRISE project aimed at determining this rate using long-term cardiac monitoring. METHODS: Patients with CS after protocolled work-up including electrocardiography (ECG) and telemetry were included after informed consent. An implantable loop recorder (ILR...... patients (16.1%). In three patients PAF was detected by other methods before or after monitoring and was undiscovered due to device sensitivity in one case. The first event of PAF was documented at a mean of 109 days (SD ±48) after stroke onset. PAF was asymptomatic in all cases and occurred in episodes...

  12. Small global effect on terrestrial net primary production due to increased fossil fuel aerosol emissions from East Asia during the last decade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Michael; Rap, Alex; Reddington, Carly; Spracklen, Dominick; Buermann, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    The global terrestrial carbon sink has increased since the start of this century at a time of rapidly growing carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel burning. Here we test the hypothesis that increases in atmospheric aerosols from fossil fuel burning have increased the diffuse fraction of incoming solar radiation and the efficiency of photosynthesis leading to increased plant carbon uptake. Using a combination of atmospheric and biospheric models, we find that changes in diffuse light associated with fossil fuel aerosol emission accounts for only 2.8% of the increase in global net primary production (1.221 PgC/yr) over the study period 1998 to 2007. This relatively small global signal is however a result of large regional compensations. Over East Asia, the strong increase in fossil fuel emissions contributed nearly 70% of the increased plant carbon uptake (21 TgC/yr), whereas the declining fossil fuel aerosol emissions in Europe and North America contributed negatively (-16% and -54%, respectively) to increased plant carbon uptake. At global scale, we also find the CO2 fertilization effect on photosynthesis to be the dominant driver of increased plant carbon uptake, in line with previous studies. These results suggest that further research into alternative mechanisms by which fossil fuel emissions could increase carbon uptake, such as nitrogen deposition and carbon-nitrogen interactions, is required to better understand a potential link between the recent changes in fossil fuel emissions and terrestrial carbon uptake.

  13. Automated Atmospheric Composition Dataset Level Metadata Discovery. Difficulties and Surprises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strub, R. F.; Falke, S. R.; Kempler, S.; Fialkowski, E.; Goussev, O.; Lynnes, C.

    2015-12-01

    The Atmospheric Composition Portal (ACP) is an aggregator and curator of information related to remotely sensed atmospheric composition data and analysis. It uses existing tools and technologies and, where needed, enhances those capabilities to provide interoperable access, tools, and contextual guidance for scientists and value-adding organizations using remotely sensed atmospheric composition data. The initial focus is on Essential Climate Variables identified by the Global Climate Observing System - CH4, CO, CO2, NO2, O3, SO2 and aerosols. This poster addresses our efforts in building the ACP Data Table, an interface to help discover and understand remotely sensed data that are related to atmospheric composition science and applications. We harvested GCMD, CWIC, GEOSS metadata catalogs using machine to machine technologies - OpenSearch, Web Services. We also manually investigated the plethora of CEOS data providers portals and other catalogs where that data might be aggregated. This poster is our experience of the excellence, variety, and challenges we encountered.Conclusions:1.The significant benefits that the major catalogs provide are their machine to machine tools like OpenSearch and Web Services rather than any GUI usability improvements due to the large amount of data in their catalog.2.There is a trend at the large catalogs towards simulating small data provider portals through advanced services. 3.Populating metadata catalogs using ISO19115 is too complex for users to do in a consistent way, difficult to parse visually or with XML libraries, and too complex for Java XML binders like CASTOR.4.The ability to search for Ids first and then for data (GCMD and ECHO) is better for machine to machine operations rather than the timeouts experienced when returning the entire metadata entry at once. 5.Metadata harvest and export activities between the major catalogs has led to a significant amount of duplication. (This is currently being addressed) 6.Most (if not

  14. Interactions between demography, genetics, and landscape connectivity increase extinction probability for a small population of large carnivores in a major metropolitan area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, John F; Mahoney, Peter J; Sikich, Jeff A; Serieys, Laurel E K; Pollinger, John P; Ernest, Holly B; Riley, Seth P D

    2016-08-31

    The extinction vortex is a theoretical model describing the process by which extinction risk is elevated in small, isolated populations owing to interactions between environmental, demographic, and genetic factors. However, empirical demonstrations of these interactions have been elusive. We modelled the dynamics of a small mountain lion population isolated by anthropogenic barriers in greater Los Angeles, California, to evaluate the influence of demographic, genetic, and landscape factors on extinction probability. The population exhibited strong survival and reproduction, and the model predicted stable median population growth and a 15% probability of extinction over 50 years in the absence of inbreeding depression. However, our model also predicted the population will lose 40-57% of its heterozygosity in 50 years. When we reduced demographic parameters proportional to reductions documented in another wild population of mountain lions that experienced inbreeding depression, extinction probability rose to 99.7%. Simulating greater landscape connectivity by increasing immigration to greater than or equal to one migrant per generation appears sufficient to largely maintain genetic diversity and reduce extinction probability. We provide empirical support for the central tenet of the extinction vortex as interactions between genetics and demography greatly increased extinction probability relative to the risk from demographic and environmental stochasticity alone. Our modelling approach realistically integrates demographic and genetic data to provide a comprehensive assessment of factors threatening small populations. © 2016 The Author(s).

  15. Small-fiber neuropathy Nav1.8 mutation shifts activation to hyperpolarized potentials and increases excitability of dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jianying; Yang, Yang; Zhao, Peng; Gerrits, Monique M; Hoeijmakers, Janneke G J; Bekelaar, Kim; Merkies, Ingemar S J; Faber, Catharina G; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Waxman, Stephen G

    2013-08-28

    Idiopathic small-fiber neuropathy (I-SFN), clinically characterized by burning pain in distal extremities and autonomic dysfunction, is a disorder of small-caliber nerve fibers of unknown etiology with limited treatment options. Functional variants of voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.7, encoded by SCN9A, have been identified in approximately one-third of I-SFN patients. These variants render dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons hyperexcitable. Sodium channel Nav1.8, encoded by SCN10A, is preferentially expressed in small-diameter DRG neurons, and produces most of the current underlying the upstroke of action potentials in these neurons. We previously demonstrated two functional variants of Nav1.8 that either enhance ramp current or shift activation in a hyperpolarizing direction, and render DRG neurons hyperexcitable, in I-SFN patients with no mutations of SCN9A. We have now evaluated additional I-SFN patients with no mutations in SCN9A, and report a novel I-SFN-related Nav1.8 mutation I1706V in a patient with painful I-SFN. Whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings in small DRG neurons demonstrate that the mutation hyperpolarizes activation and the response to slow ramp depolarizations. However, it decreases fractional channels resistant to fast inactivation and reduces persistent currents. Current-clamp studies reveal that mutant channels decrease current threshold and increase the firing frequency of evoked action potentials within small DRG neurons. These observations suggest that the effects of this mutation on activation and ramp current are dominant over the reduced persistent current, and show that these pro-excitatory gating changes confer hyperexcitability on peripheral sensory neurons, which may contribute to pain in this individual with I-SFN.

  16. Selective nitration and bromination of surprisingly ruffled phosphorus corroles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomarico, Giuseppe; Tortora, Luca; Fronczek, Frank R; Smith, Kevin M; Paolesse, Roberto

    2016-05-01

    Phosphorus complexes of corrole have recently attracted increasing interest since these compounds can be easily prepared in good yields, are stable, and show unusual optical properties. For these reasons, phosphorus corroles represent a class of interesting compounds to be exploited in the field of material science or for biomedical investigations and the definition of synthetic pathways for their functionalization is an important step to optimize their properties for various applications. We report here the reactivity of the phosphorus complex of 5,10,15-tritolylcorrole in the nitration or bromination reaction. Both these attempts were successful, allowing the preparation of substituted phosphorus corroles, which can be used as intermediates of more complex architectures endowed with useful properties. Furthermore, the crystallographic characterization of both complexes shows that they have an unusual ruffled geometry of the corrole core, a conformation that has not been considered possible for such a macrocycle.

  17. Comparative analyses of immunoglobulin genes: surprises and portents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flajnik, Martin F

    2002-09-01

    The study of immunoglobulin genes in non-mouse and non-human models has shown that different vertebrate groups have evolved distinct methods of generating antibody diversity. By contrast, the development of T cells in the thymus is quite similar in all of the species that have been examined. The three mechanisms by which B cells uniquely modify their immunoglobulin genes -- somatic hypermutation, gene conversion and class switching -- are increasingly believed to share some fundamental mechanisms, which studies in different vertebrate groups have helped (and will continue to help) to resolve. When these mechanisms are better understood, we should be able to look to the constitutive pathways from which they have evolved and perhaps determine whether the rearrangement of variable, diversity and joining antibody gene segments -- V(D)J recombination -- was superimposed on an existing adaptive immune system.

  18. Surprisal-based comparison between a symbolic and a connectionist model of sentence processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frank, S.L.; Taatgen, N.; van Rijn, H.

    2009-01-01

    The 'unlexicalized surprisal' of a word in sentence context is defined as the negative logarithm of the probability of the word's part-of-speech given the sequence of previous parts-of-speech of the sentence. Unlexicalized surprisal is known to correlate with word reading time. Here, it is shown

  19. The role of surprising events in a math game on proportional reasoning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, P.; Oostendorp, van H.; Vrugte, ter J.; Jong, de T.; Vandercruysse, S.; Elen, J.

    2015-01-01

    This study examines whether surprising events can be used to stimulate students’ playful learning in a GBL environment in the domain of proportional reasoning. The assumed effect of surprise is that unexpected events interrupt an expectation and therefore triggers the player to evaluate the new situ

  20. Distinct medial temporal networks encode surprise during motivation by reward versus punishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murty, Vishnu P; LaBar, Kevin S; Adcock, R Alison

    2016-10-01

    Adaptive motivated behavior requires predictive internal representations of the environment, and surprising events are indications for encoding new representations of the environment. The medial temporal lobe memory system, including the hippocampus and surrounding cortex, encodes surprising events and is influenced by motivational state. Because behavior reflects the goals of an individual, we investigated whether motivational valence (i.e., pursuing rewards versus avoiding punishments) also impacts neural and mnemonic encoding of surprising events. During functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), participants encountered perceptually unexpected events either during the pursuit of rewards or avoidance of punishments. Despite similar levels of motivation across groups, reward and punishment facilitated the processing of surprising events in different medial temporal lobe regions. Whereas during reward motivation, perceptual surprises enhanced activation in the hippocampus, during punishment motivation surprises instead enhanced activation in parahippocampal cortex. Further, we found that reward motivation facilitated hippocampal coupling with ventromedial PFC, whereas punishment motivation facilitated parahippocampal cortical coupling with orbitofrontal cortex. Behaviorally, post-scan testing revealed that reward, but not punishment, motivation resulted in greater memory selectivity for surprising events encountered during goal pursuit. Together these findings demonstrate that neuromodulatory systems engaged by anticipation of reward and punishment target separate components of the medial temporal lobe, modulating medial temporal lobe sensitivity and connectivity. Thus, reward and punishment motivation yield distinct neural contexts for learning, with distinct consequences for how surprises are incorporated into predictive mnemonic models of the environment.

  1. Imaging enhancement of malignancy by cyclophosphamide: surprising chemotherapy opposite effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Kensuke; Yang, Meng; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Jiang, Ping; Xu, Mingxu; Yamamoto, Norio; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Tomita, Katsuro; Moossa, A. R.; Bouvet, Michael; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2008-02-01

    Although side effects of cancer chemotherapy are well known, "opposite effects" of chemotherapy which enhance the malignancy of the treated cancer are not well understood. We have observed a number of steps of malignancy that are enhanced by chemotherapy pre-treatment of mice before transplantation of human tumor cells. The induction of intravascular proliferation, extravasation, and colony formation by cancer cells, critical steps of metastasis was enhanced by pretreatment of host mice with the commonly-used chemotherapy drug cyclophosphamide. Cyclophosphamide appears to interfere with a host process that inhibits intravascular proliferation, extravasation, and extravascular colony formation by at least some tumor cells. Cyclophosphamide does not directly affect the cancer cells since cyclophosphamide has been cleared by the time the cancer cells were injected. Without cyclophosphamide pretreatment, human colon cancer cells died quickly after injection in the portal vein of nude mice. Extensive clasmocytosis (destruction of the cytoplasm) of the cancer cells occurred within 6 hours. The number of apoptotic cells rapidly increased within the portal vein within 12 hours of injection. However, when the host mice were pretreated with cyclophosphamide, the cancer cells survived and formed colonies in the liver after portal vein injection. These results suggest that a cyclophosphamide-sensitive host cellular system attacked the cancer cells. This review describes an important unexpected "opposite effects" of chemotherapy that enhances critical steps in malignancy rather than inhibiting them, suggesting that certain current approaches to cancer chemotherapy should be modified.

  2. The Surprising Composition of the Salivary Proteome of Preterm Human Newborn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castagnola, Massimo; Inzitari, Rosanna; Fanali, Chiara; Iavarone, Federica; Vitali, Alberto; Desiderio, Claudia; Vento, Giovanni; Tirone, Chiara; Romagnoli, Costantino; Cabras, Tiziana; Manconi, Barbara; Teresa Sanna, Maria; Boi, Roberto; Pisano, Elisabetta; Olianas, Alessandra; Pellegrini, Mariagiuseppina; Nemolato, Sonia; Wilhelm Heizmann, Claus; Faa, Gavino; Messana, Irene

    2011-01-01

    Saliva is a body fluid of a unique composition devoted to protect the mouth cavity and the digestive tract. Our high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-electrospray ionization-MS analysis of the acidic soluble fraction of saliva from preterm human newborn surprisingly revealed more than 40 protein masses often undetected in adult saliva. We were able to identify the following proteins: stefin A and stefin B, S100A7 (two isoforms), S100A8, S100A9 (four isoforms), S100A11, S100A12, small proline-rich protein 3 (two isoforms), lysozyme C, thymosins β4 and β10, antileukoproteinase, histone H1c, and α and γ globins. The average mass value reported in international data banks was often incongruent with our experimental results mostly because of post-translational modifications of the proteins, e.g. acetylation of the N-terminal residue. A quantitative label-free MS analysis showed protein levels altered in relation to the postconceptional age and suggested coordinate and hierarchical functions for these proteins during development. In summary, this study shows for the first time that analysis of these proteins in saliva of preterm newborns might represent a noninvasive way to obtain precious information of the molecular mechanisms of development of human fetal oral structures. PMID:20943598

  3. Previously seen and expected stimuli elicit surprise in the context of visual search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retell, James D; Becker, Stefanie I; Remington, Roger W

    2016-04-01

    In the context of visual search, surprise is the phenomenon by which a previously unseen and unexpected stimulus exogenously attracts spatial attention. Capture by such a stimulus occurs, by definition, independent of task goals and is thought to be dependent on the extent to which the stimulus deviates from expectations. However, the relative contributions of prior-exposure and explicit knowledge of an unexpected event to the surprise response have not yet been systematically investigated. Here observers searched for a specific color while ignoring irrelevant cues of different colors presented prior to the target display. After a brief familiarization period, we presented an irrelevant motion cue to elicit surprise. Across conditions we varied prior exposure to the motion stimulus - seen versus unseen - and top-down expectations of occurrence - expected versus unexpected - to assess the extent to which each of these factors contributes to surprise. We found no attenuation of the surprise response when observers were pre-exposed to the motion cue and or had explicit knowledge of its occurrence. Our results show that it is neither sufficient nor necessary that a stimulus be new and unannounced to elicit surprise and suggest that the expectations that determine the surprise response are highly context specific.

  4. Monensin, a small molecule ionophore, can be used to increase high mannose levels on monoclonal antibodies generated by Chinese hamster ovary production cell-lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pande, Sandhya; Rahardjo, Ayu; Livingston, Brittney; Mujacic, Mirna

    2015-07-01

    Asparagine-linked glycosylation of the constant region of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) plays an important role in their stability and efficacy and is a critical product quality attribute that needs to be consistent between various process changes and production lots. Exact product quality match is also of the utmost importance for the development of biosimilar protein therapeutics. This poses a process development challenge since mAb glycosylation profiles can fluctuate easily with changes in process parameters. Therefore, there is a need to identify methods to modulate glycosylation levels on therapeutic antibodies during a production run in order to maintain consistent product quality profiles between different drug lots. Here, we demonstrate the use of a small molecule ionophore, monensin, to increase high mannose levels on multiple therapeutic human immunoglobulins (IgGs) in both plate-based small scale production models as well as in production bioreactors. This method is simple to implement and readily applicable for multiple production cell lines. Moreover, high mannose levels can be increased without significant negative impact on titer or cell culture performance. As such, monensin gives us a manipulable product quality lever. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. A Statistical Analysis of the Relationship between Harmonic Surprise and Preference in Popular Music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Scott A; Rosen, David S; Grzywacz, Norberto M

    2017-01-01

    Studies have shown that some musical pieces may preferentially activate reward centers in the brain. Less is known, however, about the structural aspects of music that are associated with this activation. Based on the music cognition literature, we propose two hypotheses for why some musical pieces are preferred over others. The first, the Absolute-Surprise Hypothesis, states that unexpected events in music directly lead to pleasure. The second, the Contrastive-Surprise Hypothesis, proposes that the juxtaposition of unexpected events and subsequent expected events leads to an overall rewarding response. We tested these hypotheses within the framework of information theory, using the measure of "surprise." This information-theoretic variable mathematically describes how improbable an event is given a known distribution. We performed a statistical investigation of surprise in the harmonic structure of songs within a representative corpus of Western popular music, namely, the McGill Billboard Project corpus. We found that chords of songs in the top quartile of the Billboard chart showed greater average surprise than those in the bottom quartile. We also found that the different sections within top-quartile songs varied more in their average surprise than the sections within bottom-quartile songs. The results of this study are consistent with both the Absolute- and Contrastive-Surprise Hypotheses. Although these hypotheses seem contradictory to one another, we cannot yet discard the possibility that both absolute and contrastive types of surprise play roles in the enjoyment of popular music. We call this possibility the Hybrid-Surprise Hypothesis. The results of this statistical investigation have implications for both music cognition and the human neural mechanisms of esthetic judgments.

  6. October Surprises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Ushered in with the rampage of Hurricane Matthew, later days brightened in this month that has often been harbinger of both good and bad news for Cuba and the world. Hurricane Matthew ripped through Eastern Cuba, devastating the historic town of Baracoa (Cuba's first capital, founded in 1511) and the village of Maisí, where the morning sun first rises over Cuban territory. Wind and flood leveled hundreds of homes, brought down the power grid and destroyed crops. Yet there was no loss of human life, unlike in neighboring Haiti and other countries in Matthew's path, and unlike in Cuba in 1963, when Hurricane Flora caused more than 1200 deaths. In Haiti, efforts of health workers-including hundreds of Haitian graduates from Cuba's Latin American Medical School and 600 Cuban health professionals already there-were bolstered by dozens of specially trained Cuban disaster medical personnel in the wake of the storm.

  7. Surprising Resists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Stephie

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses an art adventure with her third, fourth, and fifth grade enrichment kids to the Fort Collins Museum of Contemporary Art in Colorado. The author demonstrates and teaches her students how to use the art tissue paper and oil pastel complementing the creative spirit of the Jaune Quick-to-See Smith work presented…

  8. Increasing the Endoplasmic Reticulum Pool of the F508del Allele of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Leads to Greater Folding Correction by Small Molecule Therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, W. Joon; Goeckeler-Fried, Jennifer L.; Havasi, Viktoria; Chiang, Annette; Rowe, Steven M.; Plyler, Zackery E.; Hong, Jeong S.; Mazur, Marina; Piazza, Gary A.; Keeton, Adam B.; White, E. Lucile; Rasmussen, Lynn; Weissman, Allan M.; Denny, R. Aldrin; Brodsky, Jeffrey L.; Sorscher, Eric J.

    2016-01-01

    Small molecules that correct the folding defects and enhance surface localization of the F508del mutation in the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane conductance Regulator (CFTR) comprise an important therapeutic strategy for cystic fibrosis lung disease. However, compounds that rescue the F508del mutant protein to wild type (WT) levels have not been identified. In this report, we consider obstacles to obtaining robust and therapeutically relevant levels of F508del CFTR. For example, markedly diminished steady state amounts of F508del CFTR compared to WT CFTR are present in recombinant bronchial epithelial cell lines, even when much higher levels of mutant transcript are present. In human primary airway cells, the paucity of Band B F508del is even more pronounced, although F508del and WT mRNA concentrations are comparable. Therefore, to augment levels of “repairable” F508del CFTR and identify small molecules that then correct this pool, we developed compound library screening protocols based on automated protein detection. First, cell-based imaging measurements were used to semi-quantitatively estimate distribution of F508del CFTR by high content analysis of two-dimensional images. We evaluated ~2,000 known bioactive compounds from the NIH Roadmap Molecular Libraries Small Molecule Repository in a pilot screen and identified agents that increase the F508del protein pool. Second, we analyzed ~10,000 compounds representing diverse chemical scaffolds for effects on total CFTR expression using a multi-plate fluorescence protocol and describe compounds that promote F508del maturation. Together, our findings demonstrate proof of principle that agents identified in this fashion can augment the level of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) resident “Band B” F508del CFTR suitable for pharmacologic correction. As further evidence in support of this strategy, PYR-41—a compound that inhibits the E1 ubiquitin activating enzyme—was shown to synergistically enhance F508del rescue by C

  9. Differential gene expression in liver and small intestine from lactating rats compared to age-matched virgin controls detects increased mRNA of cholesterol biosynthetic genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungsuwadee Paiboon

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lactation increases energy demands four- to five-fold, leading to a two- to three-fold increase in food consumption, requiring a proportional adjustment in the ability of the lactating dam to absorb nutrients and to synthesize critical biomolecules, such as cholesterol, to meet the dietary needs of both the offspring and the dam. The size and hydrophobicity of the bile acid pool increases during lactation, implying an increased absorption and disposition of lipids, sterols, nutrients, and xenobiotics. In order to investigate changes at the transcriptomics level, we utilized an exon array and calculated expression levels to investigate changes in gene expression in the liver, duodenum, jejunum, and ileum of lactating dams when compared against age-matched virgin controls. Results A two-way mixed models ANOVA was applied to detect differentially expressed genes. Significance calls were defined as a p Cyp7a1, which catalyzes the rate limiting step in the bile acid biosynthetic pathway, was also significantly increased in liver. In addition, decreased levels of mRNA associated with T-cell signaling were found in the jejunum and ileum. Several members of the Solute Carrier (SLC and Adenosine Triphosphate Binding Cassette (ABC superfamilies of membrane transporters were found to be differentially expressed; these genes may play a role in differences in nutrient and xenobiotic absorption and disposition. mRNA expression of SLC39a4_predicted, a zinc transporter, was increased in all tissues, suggesting that it is involved in increased zinc uptake during lactation. Microarray data are available through GEO under GSE19175. Conclusions We detected differential expression of mRNA from several pathways in lactating dams, including upregulation of the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway in liver and intestine, consistent with Srebp activation. Differential T-Cell signaling in the two most distal regions of the small intestine (ileum and

  10. Surprisal analysis characterizes the free energy time course of cancer cells undergoing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadran, Sohila; Arumugam, Rameshkumar; Herschman, Harvey; Phelps, Michael E; Levine, R D

    2014-09-09

    The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) initiates the invasive and metastatic behavior of many epithelial cancers. Mechanisms underlying EMT are not fully known. Surprisal analysis of mRNA time course data from lung and pancreatic cancer cells stimulated to undergo TGF-β1-induced EMT identifies two phenotypes. Examination of the time course for these phenotypes reveals that EMT reprogramming is a multistep process characterized by initiation, maturation, and stabilization stages that correlate with changes in cell metabolism. Surprisal analysis characterizes the free energy time course of the expression levels throughout the transition in terms of two state variables. The landscape of the free energy changes during the EMT for the lung cancer cells shows a stable intermediate state. Existing data suggest this is the previously proposed maturation stage. Using a single-cell ATP assay, we demonstrate that the TGF-β1-induced EMT for lung cancer cells, particularly during the maturation stage, coincides with a metabolic shift resulting in increased cytosolic ATP levels. Surprisal analysis also characterizes the absolute expression levels of the mRNAs and thereby examines the homeostasis of the transcription system during EMT.

  11. Increased Expression of Toll-Like Receptors 4, 5, and 9 in Small Bowel Mucosa from Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldona Dlugosz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to compare patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS and healthy controls regarding the expression of toll-like receptors 2, 4, 5, and 9 (TLR2, TLR4, TLR5, and TLR9, the primary mucosal receptors of bacterial components, in small and large bowel mucosa. Methods. We analysed biopsies from jejunum and sigmoid colon of 22 patients (17 females with IBS aged 18–66 (median: 39 years and 14 healthy volunteers (12 females aged 22–61 (median: 42 years. Eight patients had constipation-predominant IBS (C-IBS, 7 had diarrhoea-predominant IBS (D-IBS, and 7 had IBS without predominance of constipation or diarrhoea. We analysed mRNA levels for TLRs using quantitative PCR and distribution of TLRs in mucosa using immunohistochemistry. Results. We found increased mRNA expression of TLR4 (mean fold change 1.85±0.31 versus 1.0±0.20; p<0.05, TLR5 (1.96±0.36 versus 1.0±0.20; p<0.05 and TLR9 (2.00±0.24 versus 1.0±0.25; p<0.01 but not of TLR2 in the small bowel mucosa from patients with IBS compared to the controls. There was no significant difference in mRNA levels for TLRs in colon mucosa between patients and controls. Conclusion. Upregulation of TLR4, TLR5, and TLR9 suggests the involvement of bacteria or dysregulation of the immune response to commensal flora in small bowel mucosa in IBS patients.

  12. Increase of long-term 'diabesity' risk, hyperphagia, and altered hypothalamic neuropeptide expression in neonatally overnourished 'small-for-gestational-age' (SGA rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Schellong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Epidemiological data have shown long-term health adversity in low birth weight subjects, especially concerning the metabolic syndrome and 'diabesity' risk. Alterations in adult food intake have been suggested to be causally involved. Responsible mechanisms remain unclear. METHODS AND FINDINGS: By rearing in normal (NL vs. small litters (SL, small-for-gestational-age (SGA rats were neonatally exposed to either normal (SGA-in-NL or over-feeding (SGA-in-SL, and followed up into late adult age as compared to normally reared appropriate-for-gestational-age control rats (AGA-in-NL. SGA-in-SL rats displayed rapid neonatal weight gain within one week after birth, while SGA-in-NL growth caught up only at juvenile age (day 60, as compared to AGA-in-NL controls. In adulthood, an increase in lipids, leptin, insulin, insulin/glucose-ratio (all p<0.05, and hyperphagia under normal chow as well as high-energy/high-fat diet, modelling modern 'westernized' lifestyle, were observed only in SGA-in-SL as compared to both SGA-in-NL and AGA-in-NL rats (p<0.05. Lasercapture microdissection (LMD-based neuropeptide expression analyses in single neuron pools of the arcuate hypothalamic nucleus (ARC revealed a significant shift towards down-regulation of the anorexigenic melanocortinergic system (proopiomelanocortin, Pomc in SGA-in-SL rats (p<0.05. Neuropeptide expression within the orexigenic system (neuropeptide Y (Npy, agouti-related-peptide (Agrp and galanin (Gal was not significantly altered. In essence, the 'orexigenic index', proposed here as a neuroendocrine 'net-indicator', was increased in SGA-in-SL regarding Npy/Pomc expression (p<0.01, correlated to food intake (p<0.05. CONCLUSION: Adult SGA rats developed increased 'diabesity' risk only if exposed to neonatal overfeeding. Hypothalamic malprogramming towards decreased anorexigenic activity was involved into the pathophysiology of this neonatally acquired adverse phenotype. Neonatal overfeeding

  13. The role of loudness in detection of surprising events in music recordings

    OpenAIRE

    Holonowicz, Piotr; Herrera, Perfecto; Purwins, Hendrik

    2009-01-01

    The abrupt change of loudness is a salient event that is not always expected by a music listener. Therefore loudness is an important cue when seeking for events in a music stream that could violate human expectations. The concept of expectation and surprise in music has become recently the subject of extensive research, however mostly using symbolic data. The aim of this work is to investigate the circumstances when a change of sound intensity could be surprising for a listener. Then, using t...

  14. Understanding the null-to-small association between increased macroeconomic growth and reducing child undernutrition in India: role of development expenditures and poverty alleviation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joe, William; Rajaram, Ramaprasad; Subramanian, S V

    2016-05-01

    Empirical evidence suggests that macroeconomic growth in India is not correlated with any substantial reductions in the prevalence of child undernutrition over time. This study investigates the two commonly hypothesized pathways through which macroeconomic growth is expected to reduce child undernutrition: (1) an increase in public developmental expenditure and (2) a reduction in aggregate income-poverty levels. For the anthropometric data on children, we draw on the data from two cross-sectional waves of National Family Health Survey conducted in 1992-1993 and 2005-2006, while the data for per capita net state domestic product and per capita public spending on developmental expenditure and headcount ratio of poverty were obtained from the Reserve Bank of India and the Government of India expert committee reports. We find that between 1992-1993 and 2005-2006, state-level macroeconomic growth was not associated with any substantial increases in public development expenditure or substantial reductions in poverty at the aggregate level. Furthermore, the association between changes in public development expenditure or aggregate poverty and changes in undernutrition was small. In summary, it appears that the inability of macroeconomic growth to translate into reductions in child undernutrition in India is likely a consequence of the macroeconomic growth not translating into substantial investments in development expenditure that could matter for children's nutritional status and neither did it substantially improve incomes of the poor, a group where undernutrition is also the highest. The findings here build a case to advocate a 'support-led' strategy for reducing undernutrition rather than simply relying on a 'growth-mediated' strategy. Key messages Increases in macroeconomic growth have not been accompanied by substantial increases in public developmental spending or reduction in aggregate poverty headcount ratio in India. Association between increases in public

  15. The small-molecule TNF-α inhibitor, UTL-5g, delays deaths and increases survival rates for mice treated with high doses of cisplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Jiajiu; Media, Joseph; Chen, Ben; Valeriote, Fredrick

    2013-09-01

    UTL-5g is a novel small-molecule chemoprotector that lowers hepatotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, and myelotoxicity induced by cisplatin through TNF-α inhibition among other factors. The objective of this study was to investigate whether UTL-5g can reduce the overall acute toxicity of cisplatin and increase cisplatin tolerability in mice. BDF1 female mice were treated individually with UTL-5g (suspended in Ora-Plus) by oral gavage at 60 mg/kg, 30 min before i.p. injection of cisplatin at 10, 15, and 20 mg/kg, respectively, on Day 0. Starting from Day 1, individual mice were again treated daily by the same dose of UTL-5g for 4 consecutive days. Survivals and body weights were monitored. UTL-5g treatment increased the survival rate and delayed the time to death for mice treated with 150 % of the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of cisplatin (15 mg/kg). Likewise, at 200 % of the MTD of cisplatin (20 mg/kg), treatment of UTL-5g increased the survival rate and delayed the time to death. Treatment of UTL-5g did not have a significant effect on weight loss induced by cisplatin, indicating that body weight may not be a sensitive-enough measure for chemoprotection of UTL-5g against cisplatin. In summary, UTL-5g delayed deaths and increased survival rates of mice treated by high doses of cisplatin, indicating that UTL-5g is capable of reducing the overall acute toxicity of cisplatin and increased cisplatin tolerability in mice; this is in line with the specific chemoprotective effects of UTL-5g previously reported. Further investigation of UTL-5g in combination with cisplatin is warranted.

  16. The Nucleus of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko: Lots of Surprises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissman, Paul R.; Rosetta Science Working Team

    2016-10-01

    ESA's Rosetta mission has made many new and unexpected discoveries since its arrival at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in August 2014. The first of these was the unusual shape of the cometary nucleus. Although bilobate nuclei had been seen before, the extreme concavities on 67P were unexpected. Evidence gathered during the mission suggests that two independent bodies came together to form 67P, rather than the nucleus being a single body that was sculpted by sublimation and/or other processes. Although not a surprise, early observations showed that the nucleus rotation period had decreased by ~22 minutes since the previous aphelion passage. A similar rotation period decrease was seen post-perihelion during the encounter. These changes likely arise from asymmetric jetting forces from the irregular nucleus. Initially, Rosetta's instruments found little evidence for water ice on the surface; the presence of surface water ice increased substantially as the nucleus approached perihelion. The nucleus bulk density, 533 ± 6 kg/m3, was measured with Radio Science and OSIRIS imaging of the nucleus volume. This confirmed previous estimates based on indirect methods that the bulk density of cometary nuclei was on the order of 500-600 kg/m3 and on measurement of the density of 9P/Tempel 1's nucleus by Deep Impact. Nucleus topography proved to be highly varied, from smooth dust-covered plains to shallow circular basins, to the very rough terrain where the Philae lander came to rest. Evidence of thermal cracking is everywhere. The discovery of cylindrical pits on the surface, typically 100-200m in diameter with similar depths was a major surprise and has been interpreted as sinkholes. "Goose-bump" terrain consisting of apparently random piles of boulders 2-3 m in diameter was another unexpected discovery. Apparent layering with scales of meters to many tens of meters was seen but there was little or no evidence for impact features. Radar tomography of the interior of the "head

  17. Investigation of the heat source(s) of the Surprise Valley Geothermal System, Northern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, N.; Holt, C. D.; Hawkes, S.; McClain, J. S.; Safford, L.; Mink, L. L.; Rose, C.; Zierenberg, R. A.

    2016-12-01

    Concerns about environmental impacts and energy security have led to an increased interest in sustainable and renewable energy resources, including geothermal systems. It is essential to know the permeability structure and possible heat source(s) of a geothermal area in order to assess the capacity and extent of the potential resource. We have undertaken geophysical surveys at the Surprise Valley Hot Springs in Cedarville, California to characterize essential parameters related to a fault-controlled geothermal system. At present, the heat source(s) for the system are unknown. Igneous bodies in the area are likely too old to have retained enough heat to supply the system, so it is probable that fracture networks provide heat from some deeper or more distributed heat sources. However, the fracture system and permeability structure remain enigmatic. The goal of our research is to identify the pathways for fluid transport within the Surprise Valley geothermal system using a combination of geophysical methods including active seismic surveys and short- and long-period magnetotelluric (MT) surveys. We have collected 14 spreads, consisting of 24 geophones each, of active-source seismic data. We used a "Betsy Gun" source at 8 to 12 locations along each spread and have collected and analyzed about 2800 shot-receiver pairs. Seismic velocities reveal shallow lake sediments, as well as velocities consistent with porous basalts. The latter, with velocities of greater than 3.0 km/s, lie along strike with known hot springs and faulted and tilted basalt outcrops outside our field area. This suggests that basalts may provide a permeable pathway through impermeable lake deposits. We conducted short-period (10Hz-60kHz) MT measurements at 33 stations. Our short-period MT models indicate shallow resistive blocks (>100Ωm) with a thin cover of more conductive sediments ( 10Ωm) at the surface. Hot springs are located in gaps between resistive blocks and are connected to deeper low

  18. A small molecule modulator of prion protein increases human mesenchymal stem cell lifespan, ex vivo expansion, and engraftment to bone marrow in NOD/SCID mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Sindhu T; Cairney, Claire J; Chantry, Andrew D; Madan, Sanjeev; Fernandes, James A; Howe, Steven J; Moore, Harry D; Thompson, Mark J; Chen, Beining; Thrasher, Adrian; Keith, W Nicol; Bellantuono, Ilaria

    2012-06-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) have been shown to have potential in regenerative approaches in bone and blood. Most protocols rely on their in vitro expansion prior to clinical use. However, several groups including our own have shown that hMSCs lose proliferation and differentiation ability with serial passage in culture, limiting their clinical applications. Cellular prion protein (PrP) has been shown to enhance proliferation and promote self-renewal of hematopoietic, mammary gland, and neural stem cells. Here we show, for the first time, that expression of PrP decreased in hMSC following ex vivo expansion. When PrP expression was knocked down, hMSC showed significant reduction in proliferation and differentiation. In contrast, hMSC expanded in the presence of small molecule 3/689, a modulator of PrP expression, showed retention of PrP expression with ex vivo expansion and extended lifespan up to 10 population doublings. Moreover, cultures produced a 300-fold increase in the number of cells generated. These cells showed a 10-fold increase in engraftment levels in bone marrow 5 weeks post-transplant. hMSC treated with 3/689 showed enhanced protection from DNA damage and enhanced cell cycle progression, in line with data obtained by gene expression profiling. Moreover, upregulation of superoxide dismutase-2 (SOD2) was also observed in hMSC expanded in the presence of 3/689. The increase in SOD2 was dependent on PrP expression and suggests increased scavenging of reactive oxygen species as mechanism of action. These data point to PrP as a good target for chemical intervention in stem cell regenerative medicine.

  19. Increased efficacy of the 6-hydroxydopamine lesion of the median forebrain bundle in small rats, by modification of the stereotaxic coordinates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, E M; Lane, E L; Heuer, A; Smith, G A; Murphy, E; Dunnett, S B

    2011-08-30

    The 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesion is the most widely used rat model of Parkinson's disease. A single unilateral injection of 6-OHDA into the median forebrain bundle (MFB) selectively destroys dopamine neurons in the ipsilateral substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) and ventral tegmental area (VTA), removing more than 95% of the dopamine innervation from target areas. The stereotaxic coordinates used to deliver 6-OHDA to the MFB have been used in our laboratory successfully for more than 25 years. However, in recent years we have observed a decline in the success rate of this lesion. Previously regular success rates of >80% of rats lesioned, have become progressively more variable, with rates as low as 20% recorded in some experiments. Having excluded variability of the neurotoxin and operator errors, we hypothesized that the change seen might be due to the use of smaller rats at the time of first surgery. An attempt to proportionally adjust the lesion coordinates base on head size did not increase lesion efficacy. However, in support of the small rat hypothesis it was observed that, using the standard coordinates, rat's heads had a "nose-up" position in the stereotaxic fame. Adjustment of the nose bar to obtain a flat head position during surgery improved lesion success, and subsequent adjustments of the lesion coordinates to account for smaller head size led to a greatly increased lesion efficacy (>90%) as assessed by amphetamine induced rotation.

  20. Efficient reduction of complex noise in passive millimeter-wavelength video utilizing Bayesian surprise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundhenk, T. Nathan; Baron, Josh; Matic, Roy M.

    2011-06-01

    Passive millimeter wavelength (PMMW) video holds great promise given its ability to see targets and obstacles through fog, smoke and rain. However, current imagers produce undesirable complex noise. This can come as a mixture of fast shot (snow like) noise and a slower forming circular fixed pattern. Shot noise can be removed by a simple gain style filter. However, this can produce blurring of objects in the scene. To alleviate this, we measure the amount of Bayesian surprise in videos. Bayesian surprise is feature change in time which is abrupt, but cannot be accounted for as shot noise. Surprise is used to attenuate the shot noise filter in locations of high surprise. Since high Bayesian surprise in videos is very salient to observers, this reduces blurring particularly in places where people visually attend. Fixed pattern noise is removed after the shot noise using a combination of Non-uniformity correction (NUC) and Eigen Image Wavelet Transformation. The combination allows for online removal of time varying fixed pattern noise even when background motion may be absent. It also allows for online adaptation to differing intensities of fixed pattern noise. The fixed pattern and shot noise filters are all efficient allowing for real time video processing of PMMW video. We show several examples of PMMW video with complex noise that is much cleaner as a result of the noise removal. Processed video clearly shows cars, houses, trees and utility poles at 20 frames per second.

  1. Virtual Volatility, an Elementary New Concept with Surprising Stock Market Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prange, Richard; Silva, A. Christian

    2006-03-01

    Textbook investors start by predicting the future price distribution, PDF, of a candidate stock (or portfolio) at horizon T, e.g. a year hence. A (log)normal PDF with center (=drift =expected return) μT and width (=volatility) σT is often assumed on Central Limit Theorem grounds, i.e. by a random walk of daily (log)price increments δs. The standard deviation, stdev, of historical (ex post) δs `s is usually a fair predictor of the coming year's (ex ante) stdev(δs) = σdaily, but the historical mean E(δs) at best roughly limits the true, to be predicted, drift by μtrueT˜ μhistT ± σhistT. Textbooks take a PDF with σ ˜ σdaily and μ as somehow known, as if accurate predictions of μ were possible. It is elementary and presumably new to argue that an average of PDF's over a range of μ values should be taken, e.g. an average over forecasts by different analysts. We estimate that this leads to a PDF with a `virtual' volatility σ ˜ 1.3σdaily. It is indeed clear that uncertainty in the value of the expected gain parameter increases the risk of investment in that security by most measures, e. g. Sharpe's ratio μT/σT will be 30% smaller because of this effect. It is significant and surprising that there are investments which benefit from this 30% virtual increase in the volatility

  2. Conference of “Uncertainty and Surprise: Questions on Working with the Unexpected and Unknowable”

    CERN Document Server

    McDaniel, Reuben R; Uncertainty and Surprise in Complex Systems : Questions on Working with the Unexpected

    2005-01-01

    Complexity science has been a source of new insight in physical and social systems and has demonstrated that unpredictability and surprise are fundamental aspects of the world around us. This book is the outcome of a discussion meeting of leading scholars and critical thinkers with expertise in complex systems sciences and leaders from a variety of organizations sponsored by the Prigogine Center at The University of Texas at Austin and the Plexus Institute to explore strategies for understanding uncertainty and surprise. Besides distributions to the conference it includes a key digest by the editors as well as a commentary by the late nobel laureat Ilya Prigogine, "Surprises in half of a century". The book is intended for researchers and scientists in complexity science as well as for a broad interdisciplinary audience of both practitioners and scholars. It will well serve those interested in the research issues and in the application of complexity science to physical and social systems.

  3. What is a surprise earthquake? The example of the 2002, San Giuliano (Italy event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mucciarelli

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Both in scientific literature and in the mass media, some earthquakes are defined as «surprise earthquakes». Based on his own judgment, probably any geologist, seismologist or engineer may have his own list of past «surprise earthquakes». This paper tries to quantify the underlying individual perception that may lead a scientist to apply such a definition to a seismic event. The meaning is different, depending on the disciplinary approach. For geologists, the Italian database of seismogenic sources is still too incomplete to allow for a quantitative estimate of the subjective degree of belief. For seismologists, quantification is possible defining the distance between an earthquake and its closest previous neighbor. Finally, for engineers, the San Giuliano quake could not be considered a surprise, since probabilistic site hazard estimates reveal that the change before and after the earthquake is just 4%.

  4. Salience and Attention in Surprisal-Based Accounts of Language Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarcone, Alessandra; van Schijndel, Marten; Vogels, Jorrig; Demberg, Vera

    2016-01-01

    The notion of salience has been singled out as the explanatory factor for a diverse range of linguistic phenomena. In particular, perceptual salience (e.g., visual salience of objects in the world, acoustic prominence of linguistic sounds) and semantic-pragmatic salience (e.g., prominence of recently mentioned or topical referents) have been shown to influence language comprehension and production. A different line of research has sought to account for behavioral correlates of cognitive load during comprehension as well as for certain patterns in language usage using information-theoretic notions, such as surprisal. Surprisal and salience both affect language processing at different levels, but the relationship between the two has not been adequately elucidated, and the question of whether salience can be reduced to surprisal / predictability is still open. Our review identifies two main challenges in addressing this question: terminological inconsistency and lack of integration between high and low levels of representations in salience-based accounts and surprisal-based accounts. We capitalize upon work in visual cognition in order to orient ourselves in surveying the different facets of the notion of salience in linguistics and their relation with models of surprisal. We find that work on salience highlights aspects of linguistic communication that models of surprisal tend to overlook, namely the role of attention and relevance to current goals, and we argue that the Predictive Coding framework provides a unified view which can account for the role played by attention and predictability at different levels of processing and which can clarify the interplay between low and high levels of processes and between predictability-driven expectation and attention-driven focus. PMID:27375525

  5. Salience and attention in surprisal-based accounts of language processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra eZarcone

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The notion of salience has been singled out as the explanatory factor for a diverse range oflinguistic phenomena. In particular, perceptual salience (e.g. visual salience of objects in the world,acoustic prominence of linguistic sounds and semantic-pragmatic salience (e.g. prominence ofrecently mentioned or topical referents have been shown to influence language comprehensionand production. A different line of research has sought to account for behavioral correlates ofcognitive load during comprehension as well as for certain patterns in language usage usinginformation-theoretic notions, such as surprisal. Surprisal and salience both affect languageprocessing at different levels, but the relationship between the two has not been adequatelyelucidated, and the question of whether salience can be reduced to surprisal / predictability isstill open. Our review identifies two main challenges in addressing this question: terminologicalinconsistency and lack of integration between high and low levels of representations in salience-based accounts and surprisal-based accounts. We capitalise upon work in visual cognition inorder to orient ourselves in surveying the different facets of the notion of salience in linguisticsand their relation with models of surprisal. We find that work on salience highlights aspects oflinguistic communication that models of surprisal tend to overlook, namely the role of attentionand relevance to current goals, and we argue that the Predictive Coding framework provides aunified view which can account for the role played by attention and predictability at different levelsof processing and which can clarify the interplay between low and high levels of processes andbetween predictability-driven expectation and attention-driven focus.

  6. Increased oil production and reserves utilizing secondary/teritiary recovery techniques on small reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah. Quarterly report, July 1 - September 30, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison, M.L.

    1996-10-01

    The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced oil recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon dioxide flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place in the Paradox basin within the Navajo Nation. The results of this project will be transferred to industry and other researchers through a petroleum extension service, creation of digital databases for distribution, technical workshops and seminars, field trips, technical presentations at national and regional professional meeting, and publication in newsletters and various technical or trade journals. Four activities continued this quarter as part of the geological and reservoir characterization: (1) interpretation of outcrop analogues; (2) reservoir mapping, (3) reservoir engineering analysis of the five project fields; and (4) technology transfer.

  7. Increased oil production and reserves utilizing secondary/tertiary recovery techniques on small reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah. Technical progress report, January 1--March 31, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison, M.L.

    1996-04-30

    The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced oil recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon dioxide-(CO{sub 2}-)flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place in the Paradox basin within the Navajo Nation. The results of this project will be transferred to industry and other researchers through a petroleum extension service, creation of digital databases for distribution, technical workshops and seminars, field trips, technical presentations at national and regional professional meetings, and publication in newsletters and various technical or trade journals.

  8. Increased oil production and reserves utilizing secondary/tertiary recovery techniques on small reservoirs in the Paradox basin, Utah. Final technical progress report, October 1--December 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison, M.L.

    1996-01-15

    The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced oil recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon dioxide-(CO{sub 2}) flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place in the Paradox basin within the Navajo Nation. The results of this project will be transferred to industry and other researchers through a petroleum extension service, creation of digital databases for distribution, technical workshops and seminars, field trips, technical presentations at national and regional professional meeting, and publication in newsletters and various technical or trade journals. Five activities continued this quarter as part of the geological and reservoir characterization of carbonate mound buildups in the Paradox basin: (1) regional facies evaluation, (2) evaluation of outcrop analogues, (3) field-scale geologic analysis, (4) reservoir analysis, and (5) technology transfer.

  9. Blockade of Hedgehog Signaling Synergistically Increases Sensitivity to Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Cell Lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Yan Bai

    Full Text Available Aberrant activation of the hedgehog (Hh signaling pathway has been implicated in the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT and cancer stem-like cell (CSC maintenance; both processes can result in tumor progression and treatment resistance in several types of human cancer. Hh cooperates with the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR signaling pathway in embryogenesis. We found that the Hh signaling pathway was silenced in EGFR-TKI-sensitive non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC cells, while it was inappropriately activated in EGFR-TKI-resistant NSCLC cells, accompanied by EMT induction and ABCG2 overexpression. Upregulation of Hh signaling through extrinsic SHH exposure downregulated E-cadherin expression and elevated Snail and ABCG2 expression, resulting in gefitinib tolerance (P < 0.001 in EGFR-TKI-sensitive cells. Blockade of the Hh signaling pathway using the SMO antagonist SANT-1 restored E-cadherin expression and downregulate Snail and ABCG2 in EGFR-TKI-resistant cells. A combination of SANT-1 and gefitinib markedly inhibited tumorigenesis and proliferation in EGFR-TKI-resistant cells (P < 0.001. These findings indicate that hyperactivity of Hh signaling resulted in EGFR-TKI resistance, by EMT introduction and ABCG2 upregulation, and blockade of Hh signaling synergistically increased sensitivity to EGFR-TKIs in primary and secondary resistant NSCLC cells. E-cadherin expression may be a potential biomarker of the suitability of the combined application of an Hh inhibitor and EGFR-TKIs in EGFR-TKI-resistant NSCLCs.

  10. Increased NQO1 but Not c-MET and Survivin Expression in Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma with KRAS Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Yilmaz

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cigarette smoking is one of the most significant public health issues and the most common environmental cause of preventable cancer deaths worldwide. EGFR (Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-targeted therapy has been used in the treatment of LC (lung cancer, mainly caused by the carcinogens in cigarette smoke, with variable success. Presence of mutations in the KRAS (Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog driver oncogene may confer worse prognosis and resistance to treatment for reasons not fully understood. NQO1 (NAD(PH:quinone oxidoreductase, also known as DT-diaphorase, is a major regulator of oxidative stress and activator of mitomycins, compounds that have been targeted in over 600 pre-clinical trials for treatment of LC. We sequenced KRAS and investigated expression of NQO1 and five clinically relevant proteins (DNMT1, DNMT3a, ERK1/2, c-MET, and survivin in 108 patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC. NQO1, ERK1/2, DNMT1, and DNMT3a but not c-MET and survivin expression was significantly more frequent in patients with KRAS mutations than those without, suggesting the following: (1 oxidative stress may play an important role in the pathogenesis, worse prognosis, and resistance to treatment reported in NSCLC patients with KRAS mutations, (2 selecting patients based on their KRAS mutational status for future clinical trials may increase success rate, and (3 since oxidation of nucleotides also specifically induces transversion mutations, the high rate of KRAS transversions in lung cancer patients may partly be due to the increased oxidative stress in addition to the known carcinogens in cigarette smoke.

  11. One In Five Inpatient Emergency Department Cases May Lead To Surprise Bills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garmon, Christopher; Chartock, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    A surprise medical bill is a bill from an out-of-network provider that was not expected by the patient or that came from an out-of-network provider not chosen by the patient. In 2014, 20 percent of hospital inpatient admissions that originated in the emergency department (ED), 14 percent of outpatient visits to the ED, and 9 percent of elective inpatient admissions likely led to a surprise medical bill. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  12. Risk, surprises and black swans fundamental ideas and concepts in risk assessment and risk management

    CERN Document Server

    Aven, Terje

    2014-01-01

    Risk, Surprises and Black Swans provides an in depth analysis of the risk concept with a focus on the critical link to knowledge; and the lack of knowledge, that risk and probability judgements are based on.Based on technical scientific research, this book presents a new perspective to help you understand how to assess and manage surprising, extreme events, known as 'Black Swans'. This approach looks beyond the traditional probability-based principles to offer a broader insight into the important aspects of uncertain events and in doing so explores the ways to manage them.

  13. Surprising Complexity of a Small Molecule: Photofragmentation Dynamics of Icn, ICN...Ar_n and ICN...(CO_2)_n

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Anne B.; Case, Amanda S.; Martin, Joshua P.; Lineberger, W. Carl

    2012-06-01

    The photofragmentation dynamics of ICN^- in isolation and in complexes with argon or CO_2 are investigated through a combination of experimental and theoretical studies. Experimentally, we probe the excited state dynamics of ICN^- following excitation to the lowest energy state that correlates to I^- + CN products. In the absence of solvating atoms or molecules, most of the excess charge localizes on I^-, although ≈ 3% of the products have the charge localized on the CN^-. The introduction of a single CO_2 or argon atom changes the branching ratio between the three possible product channels (I^- , CN^- or ICN^-). Interestingly when one argon atom is introduced roughly 5% of the products undergo cage recombination to form ICN^-, providing an example of single atom caging. When CO_2 is introduced, cage recombination is only seen in larger complexes, but a significant fraction of the photoproducts obtained following excitation of ICN^-... CO_2 have the charge localized on the CN. These results will be discussed and analyzed using potential surfaces evaluated at the MR-SOCISD level of theory. A. S. Case, E. M. Miller, J. P. Martin, Y.-J. Lu, L. Sheps, A. B. McCoy and W. C. Lineberger, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 51, 2651 (2012) A. B. McCoy, { IJQC}, (in press).

  14. Surprise and Opportunity for Learning in Grand Canyon: the Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melis, T. S.; Walters, C. J.; Korman, J.

    2013-12-01

    With a focus on resources of the Colorado River ecosystem downstream of Glen Canyon Dam in Glen Canyon National Recreation Area (GCNRA) and Grand Canyon National Park (GCNP) of northern Arizona, the Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Program has evaluated experimental flow and nonflow policy tests since 1990. Flow experiments have consisted of a variety of water releases from the dam within pre-existing annual downstream delivery agreements. The daily experimental dam operation, termed the Modified Low Fluctuating Flow (MLFF), implemented in 1996 to increase daily low flows and decrease daily peaks were intended to limit daily flow range to conserve tributary sand inputs and improve navigation among other objectives, including hydropower energy. Other flow tests have included controlled floods with some larger releases bypassing the dam's hydropower plant to rebuild and maintain eroded sandbars in GCNP. Experimental daily hydropeaking tests beyond MLFF have also been evaluated for managing the exotic recreational rainbow trout fishery in the dam's GCNRA tailwater. Experimental nonflow policies, such as physical removal of exotic fish below the tailwater, and experimental translocation of endangered native humpback chub from spawning habitats in the Little Colorado River (the largest natal origin site for chub in the basin) to other tributaries within GCNP have also been monitored. None of these large-scale field experiments has yet produced unambiguous results in terms of management prescriptions, owing to inadequate monitoring programs and confounding of treatment effects with effects of ongoing natural changes; most notably, a persistent warming of the river resulting from reduced storage in the dam's reservoir after 2003. But there have been several surprising results relative to predictions from models developed to identify monitoring needs and evaluate experimental design options at the start of the adaptive ecosystem assessment and management program in 1997

  15. Did the FED Surprise the Markets in 2001? A Case Study for Vars with Sign Restrictions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uhlig, H.F.H.V.S.

    2001-01-01

    In 2001, the Fed has lowered interest rates in a series of cuts, starting from 6.5 % at the end of 2000 to 2.0 % by early November.This paper asks, whether the Federal Reserve Bank has been surprising the markets, taking as given the conventional view about the effect of monetary policy shocks.New

  16. Surprising convergence of the Monte Carlo renormalization group for the three-dimensional Ising model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ron, Dorit; Brandt, Achi; Swendsen, Robert H

    2017-05-01

    We present a surprisingly simple approach to high-accuracy calculations of the critical properties of the three-dimensional Ising model. The method uses a modified block-spin transformation with a tunable parameter to improve convergence in the Monte Carlo renormalization group. The block-spin parameter must be tuned differently for different exponents to produce optimal convergence.

  17. The Educational Philosophies of Mordecai Kaplan and Michael Rosenak: Surprising Similarities and Illuminating Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schein, Jeffrey; Caplan, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The thoughts of Mordecai Kaplan and Michael Rosenak present surprising commonalities as well as illuminating differences. Similarities include the perception that Judaism and Jewish education are in crisis, the belief that Jewish peoplehood must include commitment to meaningful content, the need for teachers to teach from a position of…

  18. Surprise, Memory, and Retrospective Judgment Making: Testing Cognitive Reconstruction Theories of the Hindsight Bias Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, Ivan K.

    2009-01-01

    Hindsight bias has been shown to be a pervasive and potentially harmful decision-making bias. A review of 4 competing cognitive reconstruction theories of hindsight bias revealed conflicting predictions about the role and effect of expectation or surprise in retrospective judgment formation. Two experiments tested these predictions examining the…

  19. Did the FED Surprise the Markets in 2001? A Case Study for Vars with Sign Restrictions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uhlig, H.F.H.V.S.

    2001-01-01

    In 2001, the Fed has lowered interest rates in a series of cuts, starting from 6.5 % at the end of 2000 to 2.0 % by early November.This paper asks, whether the Federal Reserve Bank has been surprising the markets, taking as given the conventional view about the effect of monetary policy shocks.New e

  20. Dithiolethione modified valproate and diclofenac increase E-cadherin expression and decrease proliferation of non-small cell lung cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, Terry W.; Switzer, Christopher; Santana-Flores, Wilmarie; Ridnour, Lisa A.; Berna, Marc; Thill, Michelle; Jensen, Robert T.; Sparatore, Anna; Del Soldato, Piero; Yeh, Grace C; Roberts, David D.; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Wink, David A.

    2009-01-01

    The effects of dithiolethione-modified valproate, diclofenac and sulindac on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells were investigated. Sulfur(S)-valproate and S-diclofenac at 1 μg/ml concentrations significantly reduced prostaglandin (PG)E2 levels in NSCLC cell lines A549 and NCI-H1299 as did the COX-2 inhibitor DuP-697. In vitro, S-valproate, S-diclofenac and S-sulindac half-maximally inhibited the clonal growth of NCI-H1299 cells at 6, 6 and 15 μg/ml, respectively. Using the MTT assay, 10 μg/ml S-valproate, NO-aspirin and Cay10404, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, but not SC-560, a selective COX-1 inhibitor, inhibited the growth of A549 cells. In vivo, 18 mg/kg i.p. of S-valproate and S-diclofenac, but not S-sulindac, significantly inhibited A549 or NCI-H1299 xenograft proliferation in nude mice, but had no effect on the nude mouse body weight. The mechanism by which S-valproate and S-diclofenac inhibited the growth of NSCLC cells was investigated. Nitric oxide-aspirin but not S-valproate caused apoptosis of NSCLC cells. By Western blot, S-valproate and S-diclofenac increased E-cadherin but reduced vimentin and ZEB1 (a transcriptional suppressor of E-cadherin) protein expression in NSCLC cells. Because S-valproate and S-diclofenac inhibit the growth of NSCLC cells and reduce PGE2 levels, they may prove beneficial in the chemoprevention and/or therapy of NSCLC, PMID:19628293

  1. Online Self-Tracking Groups to Increase Fruit and Vegetable Intake: A Small-Scale Study on Mechanisms of Group Effect on Behavior Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Jingbo; Peng, Wei; Shin, Soo Yun; Chung, Minwoong

    2017-03-06

    between a focal participant and his/her group members during the experiment), such that participants who had a low performance discrepancy from other group members had greater fruit and vegetable consumption than participants who had a high performance discrepancy from other group members (P=.002). A mediation test showed that low performance discrepancy led to greater downward contrast (b=-0.78, 95% CI -2.44 to -0.15), which in turn led to greater fruit and vegetable consumption. Online self-tracking groups were more effective than self-tracking alone in promoting fruit and vegetable consumption for early young adults. Low performance discrepancy from other group members lead to downward contrast, which in turn increased participants' fruit and vegetable consumption over time. The study highlighted social comparison processes in online groups that allow for sharing personal health information. Lastly, given the small scale of this study, nonsignificant results with small effect sizes might be subject to bias.

  2. Online Self-Tracking Groups to Increase Fruit and Vegetable Intake: A Small-Scale Study on Mechanisms of Group Effect on Behavior Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Wei; Shin, Soo Yun; Chung, Minwoong

    2017-01-01

    , difference in fruit and vegetable consumption between a focal participant and his/her group members during the experiment), such that participants who had a low performance discrepancy from other group members had greater fruit and vegetable consumption than participants who had a high performance discrepancy from other group members (P=.002). A mediation test showed that low performance discrepancy led to greater downward contrast (b=–0.78, 95% CI –2.44 to –0.15), which in turn led to greater fruit and vegetable consumption. Conclusions Online self-tracking groups were more effective than self-tracking alone in promoting fruit and vegetable consumption for early young adults. Low performance discrepancy from other group members lead to downward contrast, which in turn increased participants’ fruit and vegetable consumption over time. The study highlighted social comparison processes in online groups that allow for sharing personal health information. Lastly, given the small scale of this study, nonsignificant results with small effect sizes might be subject to bias. PMID:28264793

  3. Down-regulation of NKD1 increases the invasive potential of non-small-cell lung cancer and correlates with a poor prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai Shun-Dong

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As a negative modulator of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway, Naked1 (NKD1 is widely expressed in many normal tissues. However, the expression pattern and clinicopathological significance of NKD1 in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC is still unclear. Methods Immunohistochemical studies were performed on 35 cases of normal lung tissues and 100 cases of NSCLC, including 66 cases with complete follow-up records. The NKD1 protein and mRNA expressions were detected by western blot and Real-time PCR, respectively. To examine the effect of NKD1 on the invasiveness of lung cancer cells, NKD1 was down-regulated by siRNA in lung cancer cell lines and the invasive ability was then evaluated by the Matrigel invasion assay. In addition, the expressions of Dishevelled-1 and β-catenin proteins, as well as MMP mRNA were also examined in NKD1 knockdown cells. Results In 35 fresh lung cancer tissues examined, 27(79% of them exhibited lower levels of NKD1 protein in comparison with their corresponding normal tissue (P = 0.009. However, the NKD1 mRNA level was significantly higher in cancerous lung tissues, compared with the adjacent normal tissues. In 100 NSCLC tissues, NKD1 was significantly lower in 78 cases (78% than in the normal specimens, determined by immunohistochemical staining. The reduced NKD1 expression was correlated with histological type (P = 0.003, poor differentiation (P = 0.004, lymph node metastasis (P = 0.013, TNM stage (P = 0.002 and poor survival (62.88 ± 3.23 versus 23.61 ± 2.18 months, P = 0.03. In addition, NKD1 knockdown could up-regulate Dishevelled-1 and β-catenin protein levels, as well as increased MMP-7 transcription and the invasive ability of lung cancer cells. Furthermore, when the NKD1-knockdown cells were treated with Dishevelled-1 antibody, their invasive potential was significantly reduced. Conclusion NKD1 protein is reduced but NKD1 mRNA is elevated in NSCLC. Reduced NKD1 protein

  4. Increased expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) predicts tumour recurrence and unfavourable outcome in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinonen, Tero; Pirinen, Risto; Böhm, Jan; Johansson, Risto; Kosma, Veli-Matti

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and its extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and to evaluate their significance to predict tumour behaviour. The study consists of 212 patients treated by the resection of the tumour. Tumour samples were stained immunohistochemically, and the expression of MMP-2 and EMMPRIN was evaluated both in tumour cells and in peritumoural stromal tissue. The results were compared with clinicopathological factors and survival of the patients. High expression of MMP-2 in tumour cells was found in 83 out of 191 cases (44%). Adenocarcinomas showed more often high expression of MMP-2 as compared with squamous cell or large cell carcinomas (p=0.001). High cancer cell associated MMP-2 expression was associated with increased tumour recurrence (p=0.001). Tumour stroma showed positive staining in 162 (98%) cases and was considered highly stained in 120 (72%) cases. The high stromal MMP-2 expression was noticed more often among large cell carcinomas as compared with other histological types (p=0.007). High cancer cell associated EMMPRIN expression was found in 115 (61%) cases and was associated only with high MMP-2 expression in tumour cells (p=0.006). In overall survival (OS) and disease free survival (DFS) analyses, type of tumour (p=0.001 and p=0.0004), advanced stage (p=0.001 and p=0.013) and high MMP-2 expression in tumour cells (p=0.018 and p=0.001) were associated with poor survival. Also, high stromal MMP-2 expression was related to poor outcome in both OS and DFS analyses (p=0.010 and 0.045, respectively). In multivariate analysis, stromal MMP-2 expression retained its prognostic value to predict OS and DFS (p=0.028 and p=0.039, respectively), together with tumour type and stage (p=0.017, p=0.001 and p=0.021, p=0.008, respectively). The present study shows the significant prognostic value of MMP-2 in NSCLC suggesting that the

  5. An Iterative, Low-Cost Strategy to Building Information Systems Allows a Small Jurisdiction Local Health Department to Increase Efficiencies and Expand Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovelace, Kay A; Shah, Gulzar H

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this case study was to describe the process and outcomes of a small local health department's (LHD's) strategy to build and use information systems. The case study is based on a review of documents and semi-structured interviews with key informants in the Pomperaug District Health Department. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, coded, and analyzed. The case study here suggests that small LHDs can use a low-resource, incremental strategy to build information systems for improving departmental effectiveness and efficiency. Specifically, we suggest that the elements for this department's success were simple information systems, clear vision, consistent leadership, and the involvement, training, and support of staff.

  6. Surprising electronic structure of the BeH- dimer: a full-configuration-interaction study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdicchio, Marco; Bendazzoli, Gian Luigi; Evangelisti, Stefano; Leininger, Thierry

    2013-01-10

    The electronic structure of the beryllium hydride anion, BeH(-), was investigated at valence full-configuration-interaction (FCI) level, using large cc-pV6Z basis sets. It appears that there is a deep change of the wave function nature as a function of the internuclear distance: the ion structure goes from a weakly bonded Be···H(-) complex, at long distance, to a rather strongly bonded system (more than 2 eV) at short distance, having a (:Be-H)(-) Lewis structure. In this case, it is the beryllium atom that formally bears the negative charge, a surprising result in view of the fact that it is the hydrogen atom that has a larger electronegativity. Even more surprisingly, at very short distances the average position of the total electronic charge is close to the beryllium atom but on the opposite side with respect to the hydrogen position.

  7. Using Video Self-Modelling to Increase Active Learning Responses during Small-Group Reading Instruction for Primary School Pupils with Social Emotional and Mental Health Difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young-Pelton, Cheryl A.; Bushman, Samantha L.

    2015-01-01

    Effectiveness of a video self-modelling (VSM) intervention was examined with primary schoolchildren who attended a full-time special education programme for pupils with social emotional and behavioural difficulties and who exhibited inappropriate behaviour during small-group reading instruction. A randomised multiple-probe baseline design was used…

  8. Surprise and sense making: what newcomers experience in entering unfamiliar organizational settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, M R

    1980-06-01

    Growing disillusionment among new members of organizations has been traced to inadequacies in approaches to organizational entry. Current directions of research on organizational entry and their limitations are described, and a new perspective is proposed. The new perspective identifies key features of newcomers' entry experiences, including surprise, contrast, and change, and describes the sense-making processes by which individuals cope with their entry experiences. Implications for research and practice on organizational entry are drawn.

  9. Each individual is a surprise: a conversation with Marianne Horney Eckardt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Jeffrey B

    2014-06-01

    "Each Individual is a Surprise" is a brief account of a dialogue between Marianne Horney Eckardt and myself about the state of psychoanalysis and the psychoanalytic process, the danger of idolatry, the damaging impact of psychoanalytic schools when they create a standardized and pathologizing approach to people, the value of curiosity and humility and retaining one's clinical creativity. The role of Rank, Horney, Sullivan, and Fromm in Dr. Eckardt's long life and rich work is touched upon.

  10. Surprise and Opportunity for Learning in Grand Canyon: the Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore S. Melis

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available With a focus on resources of the Colorado River ecosystem below Glen Canyon Dam, the Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Program has included a variety of experimental policy tests, ranging from manipulation of water releases from the dam to removal of non-native fish within Grand Canyon National Park. None of these field-scale experiments has yet produced unambiguous results in terms of management prescriptions. But there has been adaptive learning, mostly from unanticipated or surprising resource responses relative to predictions from ecosystem modeling. Surprise learning opportunities may often be viewed with dismay by some stakeholders who might not be clear about the purpose of science and modeling in adaptive management. However, the experimental results from the Glen Canyon Dam program actually represent scientific successes in terms of revealing new opportunities for developing better river management policies. A new long-term experimental management planning process for Glen Canyon Dam operations, started in 2011 by the U.S. Department of the Interior, provides an opportunity to refocus management objectives, identify and evaluate key uncertainties about the influence of dam releases, and refine monitoring for learning over the next several decades. Adaptive learning since 1995 is critical input to this long-term planning effort. Embracing uncertainty and surprise outcomes revealed by monitoring and ecosystem modeling will likely continue the advancement of resource objectives below the dam, and may also promote efficient learning in other complex programs.

  11. Surprise and Uncertainty—Framing Regional Geohazards in the Theory of Complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beate M. W. Ratter

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the concepts of uncertainty and surprise as key variables of a socio-ecological system’s behavior in the context of the theory of complexity. Experiences from the past have shown that living with uncertainty is part of our daily life and surprises are only surprising because our perspective of system trajectories is basically linear and non-dynamic. The future of humanity is dependent on the understanding of the system’s behavior and needs a change in perspective of linearity to non-linearity and from the planning imperative to a management hedging uncertainty and surprise. In the context of humanity’s future, the theory of complexity offers a new perspective on system trajectories and their understanding of surprises and uncertainty. There is a need for a Gestaltwechsel—a change in perception—which helps to see things differently and fosters the search for new answers to emerging questions at the human-nature interface. Drawing on the case study of hazard management the paper will explain the necessity of analysis system’s behavior and the taking into account of multi-agent behavior on the micro level which led to emergent behavior on the macro-level of the system. Regional geohazards are explained as the regional impact of an uncontrolled risk based on a state of a natural feature that has a direct impact on a regional population being affected by the appearance of a hazard and its development into damage. By acting in space, time and connectivity, people construct hazardscapes and change risk into regional geohazards. This concept shows relevance for future mitigation and adaptation measures. The theory of complexity can help in engendering the necessary shift in perspective. What is non-linear dynamic thinking as suggested by the theory of complexity? Why is the consideration of the system’s behavior crucial and not just the number of system’s elements? What is the role of agents in these systems? In

  12. An Iterative, Low-Cost Strategy to Building Information Systems Allows a Small Jurisdiction Local Health Department to Increase Efficiencies and Expand Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Gulzar H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective and Methods: The objective of this case study was to describe the process and outcomes of a small local health department's (LHD's) strategy to build and use information systems. The case study is based on a review of documents and semi-structured interviews with key informants in the Pomperaug District Health Department. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, coded, and analyzed. Results and Conclusions: The case study here suggests that small LHDs can use a low-resource, incremental strategy to build information systems for improving departmental effectiveness and efficiency. Specifically, we suggest that the elements for this department's success were simple information systems, clear vision, consistent leadership, and the involvement, training, and support of staff. PMID:27684628

  13. Multiple Small Diameter Drillings Increase Femoral Neck Stability Compared with Single Large Diameter Femoral Head Core Decompression Technique for Avascular Necrosis of the Femoral Head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Philip J; Mannava, Sandeep; Seyler, Thorsten M; Plate, Johannes F; Van Sikes, Charles; Stitzel, Joel D; Lang, Jason E

    2016-10-26

    Femoral head core decompression is an efficacious joint-preserving procedure for treatment of early stage avascular necrosis. However, postoperative fractures have been described which may be related to the decompression technique used. Femoral head decompressions were performed on 12 matched human cadaveric femora comparing large 8mm single bore versus multiple 3mm small drilling techniques. Ultimate failure strength of the femora was tested using a servo-hydraulic material testing system. Ultimate load to failure was compared between the different decompression techniques using two paired ANCOVA linear regression models. Prior to biomechanical testing and after the intervention, volumetric bone mineral density was determined using quantitative computed tomography to account for variation between cadaveric samples and to assess the amount of bone disruption by the core decompression. Core decompression, using the small diameter bore and multiple drilling technique, withstood significantly greater load prior to failure compared with the single large bore technique after adjustment for bone mineral density (pcore decompression techniques. When considering core decompression for the treatment of early stage avascular necrosis, the multiple small bore technique removed less bone volume, thereby potentially leading to higher load to failure.

  14. The Most Distant Mature Galaxy Cluster - Young, but surprisingly grown-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    Astronomers have used an armada of telescopes on the ground and in space, including the Very Large Telescope at ESO's Paranal Observatory in Chile to discover and measure the distance to the most remote mature cluster of galaxies yet found. Although this cluster is seen when the Universe was less than one quarter of its current age it looks surprisingly similar to galaxy clusters in the current Universe. "We have measured the distance to the most distant mature cluster of galaxies ever found", says the lead author of the study in which the observations from ESO's VLT have been used, Raphael Gobat (CEA, Paris). "The surprising thing is that when we look closely at this galaxy cluster it doesn't look young - many of the galaxies have settled down and don't resemble the usual star-forming galaxies seen in the early Universe." Clusters of galaxies are the largest structures in the Universe that are held together by gravity. Astronomers expect these clusters to grow through time and hence that massive clusters would be rare in the early Universe. Although even more distant clusters have been seen, they appear to be young clusters in the process of formation and are not settled mature systems. The international team of astronomers used the powerful VIMOS and FORS2 instruments on ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) to measure the distances to some of the blobs in a curious patch of very faint red objects first observed with the Spitzer space telescope. This grouping, named CL J1449+0856 [1], had all the hallmarks of being a very remote cluster of galaxies [2]. The results showed that we are indeed seeing a galaxy cluster as it was when the Universe was about three billion years old - less than one quarter of its current age [3]. Once the team knew the distance to this very rare object they looked carefully at the component galaxies using both the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope and ground-based telescopes, including the VLT. They found evidence suggesting that most of the

  15. Increased oil production and reserves utilizing secondary/tertiary recovery techniques on small reservoirs in the Paradox basin, Utah. Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chidsey, T.C. Jr.

    1997-02-01

    The Paradox basin of Utah, Colorado, and Arizona contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate buildups or mounds within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to four wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels of oil per field at a 15 to 20% recovery rate. At least 200 million barrels of oil is at risk of being unrecovered in these small fields because of inefficient recovery practices and undrained heterogeneous reservoirs. Five fields (Anasazi, mule, Blue Hogan, heron North, and Runway) within the Navajo Nation of southeastern utah are being evaluated for waterflood or carbon-dioxide-miscible flood projects based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling. The results can be applied to other fields in the Paradox basin and the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois basins, and the Midcontinent. The reservoir engineering component of the work completed to date included analysis of production data and well tests, comprehensive laboratory programs, and preliminary mechanistic reservoir simulation studies. A comprehensive fluid property characterization program was completed. Mechanistic reservoir production performance simulation studies were also completed.

  16. Small interfering RNAs targeting peste des petits ruminants virus M mRNA increase virus-mediated fusogenicity and inhibit viral replication in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fuxiao; Wu, Xiaodong; Zou, Yanli; Li, Lin; Liu, Shan; Chi, Tianying; Wang, Zhiliang

    2015-11-01

    Peste des petits ruminants (PPR), caused by peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV), is an acute or subacute, highly contagious and economically important disease of small ruminants. The PPRV is classified into the genus Morbillivirus in the family Paramyxoviridae. The PPRV matrix (M) protein possesses an intrinsic ability to bind to lipid membranes, and plays a crucial role in viral assembly and further budding. In this study, three different small interfering RNAs (siRNA) were designed on the basis of translated region for PPRV Nigeria 75/1M mRNA, and were subsequently synthesized for their transfection into Vero-SLAM cells, followed by infection with PPRVs. The results showed that two out of three siRNAs robustly induced cell-to-cell fusion as early as 36h post-infection with PPRVs, effectively suppressed expression of the M protein by interference for the M mRNA, and eventually inhibited viral replication in vitro. These findings led us to speculate that siRNA-mediated knockdown of the M protein would alter its interaction with viral glycoproteins, thus exacerbating intercellular fusion but hampering virus release. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. A strange and surprising debate: mountains, original sin and 'science' in seventeenth-century England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wragge-Morley, Alexander

    2009-06-01

    It could come as a shock to learn that some seventeenth-century men of science and learning thought that mountains were bad. Even more alarmingly, some thought that God had imposed them on the earth to punish man for his sins. By the end of the seventeenth century, surprisingly many English natural philosophers and theologians were engaged in a debate about whether mountains were 'good' or 'bad', useful or useless. At stake in this debate were not just the careers of its participants, but arguments about the best ways of looking at and reckoning with 'nature' itself.

  18. Short Maternal Stature Increases Risk of Small-for-Gestational-Age and Preterm Births in Low- and Middle-Income Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kozuki, Naoko; Katz, Joanne; Lee, Anne Cc

    2015-01-01

    population-based cohort studies and the WHO Global Survey on Maternal and Perinatal Health (13 of 24 available data sets used) from low- and middle-income countries (LMIC). We included those with weight taken within 72 h of birth, gestational age, and maternal height data (n = 177,000). For each....../or preterm births in LMIC may be associated with short maternal stature annually. A reduction in this burden requires primary prevention of SGA, improvement in postnatal growth through early childhood, and possibly further intervention in late childhood and adolescence. It is vital for researchers to broaden......BACKGROUND: Small-for-gestational-age (SGA) and preterm births are associated with adverse health consequences, including neonatal and infant mortality, childhood undernutrition, and adulthood chronic disease. OBJECTIVES: The specific aims of this study were to estimate the association between...

  19. Increased oil production and reserves utilizing secondary/tertiary recovery techniques on small reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah. Annual report, February 9, 1997--February 8, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chidsey, T.C. Jr. [ed.] [comp.

    1998-03-01

    The Paradox basin of Utah, Colorado, and Arizona contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate buildups or mounds within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to four wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels (111,300-318,000 m{sup 3}) of oil per field at a 15 to 20 percent recovery rate. At least 200 million barrels (31,800,000 m{sup 3}) of oil are at risk of being unrecovered in these small fields because of inefficient recovery practices and undrained heterogeneous reservoirs. Five fields (Anasazi, Mule, Blue Hogan, Heron North, and Runway) within the Navajo Nation of southeastern Utah are being evaluated for waterflood or carbon-dioxide (CO{sub 2})-miscible flood projects based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling. The results can be applied to other fields in the Paradox basin and the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois basins, and the Midcontinent. Geological characterization on a local scale focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity as well as possible compartmentalization within each of the five project fields. This study utilized representative core and modern geophysical logs to characterize and grade each of the five fields for suitability of enhanced recovery projects. The typical vertical sequence or cycle of lithofacies from each field, as determined from conventional core, was tied to its corresponding log response. The diagenetic fabrics and porosity types found in the various hydrocarbon-bearing rocks of each field can be an indicator of reservoir flow capacity, storage capacity, and potential for water- and/or CO{sub 2}-flooding. Diagenetic histories of the various Desert Creek reservoirs were determined from 50 representative samples selected from the conventional cores of each field. Thin sections were also made of each sample for petrographic description.

  20. Increased function of the TRPV1 channel in small sensory neurons after local inflammation or in vitro exposure to the pro-inflammatory cytokine GRO/KC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fei Dong; Yi-Ru Du; Wenrui Xie; Judith A.Strong; Xi-Jing He; Jun-Ming Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Objective Inflammation at the level of the sensory dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) leads to robust mechanical pain behavior and the local inflammation has direct excitatory effects on sensory neurons including small,primarily nociceptive,neurons.These neurons express the transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV 1) channel,which integrates multiple signals of pain and inflammation.The aim of this study was to characterize the regulation of the TRPV1 channel by local DRG inflammation and by growth-related oncogene (GRO/KC,systemic name:CXCL1),a cytokine known to be upregulated in inflamed DRGs.Methods Activation of the TRPV1 receptor with capsaicin was studied with patch clamp methods in acutely isolated small-diameter rat sensory neurons in primary culture.In vivo,behavioral effects of TRPV1 and GRO/KC were examined by paw injections.Results Neurons isolated from lumbar DRGs 3 days after local inflammation showed enhanced TRPV1 function:tachyphylaxis (the decline in response to repeated applications of capsaicin) was significantly reduced.A similar effect on tachyphylaxis was observed in neurons pre-treated for 4 h in vitro with GRO/KC.This effect was blocked by H-89,a protein kinase A inhibitor.Consistent with the in vitro results,in vivo behavioral responses to paw injection of capsaicin were enhanced and prolonged by pre-injecting the paw with GRO/KC 4 h before the capsaicin injection.GRO/KC paw injections alone did not elicit pain behaviors.Conclusion Function of the TRPV 1 channel is enhanced by DRG inflammation and these effects are preserved in vitro during short-term culture.The effects (decreased tachyphylaxis) are mimicked by incubation with GRO/KC,which has previously been found to be strongly upregulated in this and other pain models.

  1. Increased oil production and reserves utilizing secondary/tertiary recovery techniques on small reservoirs in the Paradox basin, Utah. Annual report, February 9, 1996--February 8, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chidsey, T.C. Jr.

    1997-08-01

    The Paradox basin of Utah, Colorado, and Arizona contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate buildups or mounds within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to four wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels of oil per field at a 15 to 20% recovery rate. At least 200 million barrels of oil is at risk of being unrecovered in these small fields because of inefficient recovery practices and undrained heterogeneous reservoirs. Five fields (Anasazi, Mule, Blue Hogan, Heron North, and Runway) within the Navajo Nation of southeastern Utah are being evaluated for waterflood or carbon-dioxide-miscible flood projects based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling. The results can be applied to other fields in the Paradox basin and the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois basins, and the Midcontinent. The Anasazi field was selected for the initial geostatistical modeling and reservoir simulation. A compositional simulation approach is being used to model primary depletion, waterflood, and CO{sub 2}-flood processes. During this second year of the project, team members performed the following reservoir-engineering analysis of Anasazi field: (1) relative permeability measurements of the supra-mound and mound-core intervals, (2) completion of geologic model development of the Anasazi reservoir units for use in reservoir simulation studies including completion of a series of one-dimensional, carbon dioxide-displacement simulations to analyze the carbon dioxide-displacement mechanism that could operate in the Paradox basin system of reservoirs, and (3) completion of the first phase of the full-field, three-dimensional Anasazi reservoir simulation model, and the start of the history matching and reservoir performance prediction phase of the simulation study.

  2. Expectation and surprise determine neural population responses in the ventral visual stream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egner, Tobias; Monti, Jim M; Summerfield, Christopher

    2010-12-08

    Visual cortex is traditionally viewed as a hierarchy of neural feature detectors, with neural population responses being driven by bottom-up stimulus features. Conversely, "predictive coding" models propose that each stage of the visual hierarchy harbors two computationally distinct classes of processing unit: representational units that encode the conditional probability of a stimulus and provide predictions to the next lower level; and error units that encode the mismatch between predictions and bottom-up evidence, and forward prediction error to the next higher level. Predictive coding therefore suggests that neural population responses in category-selective visual regions, like the fusiform face area (FFA), reflect a summation of activity related to prediction ("face expectation") and prediction error ("face surprise"), rather than a homogenous feature detection response. We tested the rival hypotheses of the feature detection and predictive coding models by collecting functional magnetic resonance imaging data from the FFA while independently varying both stimulus features (faces vs houses) and subjects' perceptual expectations regarding those features (low vs medium vs high face expectation). The effects of stimulus and expectation factors interacted, whereby FFA activity elicited by face and house stimuli was indistinguishable under high face expectation and maximally differentiated under low face expectation. Using computational modeling, we show that these data can be explained by predictive coding but not by feature detection models, even when the latter are augmented with attentional mechanisms. Thus, population responses in the ventral visual stream appear to be determined by feature expectation and surprise rather than by stimulus features per se.

  3. Infants’ Looking to Surprising Events: When Eye-Tracking Reveals More than Looking Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, H. Henny; Denison, Stephanie; Johnson, Scott P.

    2016-01-01

    Research on infants’ reasoning abilities often rely on looking times, which are longer to surprising and unexpected visual scenes compared to unsurprising and expected ones. Few researchers have examined more precise visual scanning patterns in these scenes, and so, here, we recorded 8- to 11-month-olds’ gaze with an eye tracker as we presented a sampling event whose outcome was either surprising, neutral, or unsurprising: A red (or yellow) ball was drawn from one of three visible containers populated 0%, 50%, or 100% with identically colored balls. When measuring looking time to the whole scene, infants were insensitive to the likelihood of the sampling event, replicating failures in similar paradigms. Nevertheless, a new analysis of visual scanning showed that infants did spend more time fixating specific areas-of-interest as a function of the event likelihood. The drawn ball and its associated container attracted more looking than the other containers in the 0% condition, but this pattern was weaker in the 50% condition, and even less strong in the 100% condition. Results suggest that measuring where infants look may be more sensitive than simply how much looking there is to the whole scene. The advantages of eye tracking measures over traditional looking measures are discussed. PMID:27926920

  4. Increasing Radiation Therapy Dose Is Associated With Improved Survival in Patients Undergoing Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Stage I Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koshy, Matthew, E-mail: mkoshy@radonc.uchicago.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Malik, Renuka [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Weichselbaum, Ralph R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Sher, David J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the comparative effectiveness of different stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) dosing regimens for early-stage non–small-cell lung cancer, using a large national database, focusing on the relative impact of dose as a function of tumor stage. Methods and Materials: The study included patients in the National Cancer Database from 2003 to 2006 with T1-T2N0M0 inoperable lung cancer (n=498). The biologically effective dose (BED) was calculated according to the linear quadratic formula using an α/β ratio of 10. High versus lower-dose (HD vs LD) SBRT was defined as a calculated BED above or below 150 Gy. Overall survival was estimated using Kaplan-Meier methods and Cox proportional hazard regression. Results: The 5 most common dose fractionation schemes (percentage of cohort) used were 20 Gy × 3 (34%), 12 Gy × 4 (16%), 18 Gy × 3 (10%), 15 Gy × 3 (10%), and 16 Gy × 3 (4%). The median calculated BED was 150 Gy (interquartile range 106-166 Gy). The 3-year overall survival (OS) for patients who received HD versus LD was 55% versus 46% (log–rank P=.03). On subset analysis of the T1 cohort there was no association between calculated BED and 3-year OS (61% vs 60% with HD vs LD, P=.9). Among the T2 cohort, patients receiving HD experienced superior 3-year OS (37% vs 24%, P=.01). On multivariable analysis, factors independently prognostic for mortality were female gender (hazard ratio [HR] 0.76, P=.01), T2 tumor (HR 1.99, P=.0001), and HD (HR 0.68, P=.001). Conclusions: This comparative effectiveness analysis of SBRT dose for patients with stage I non–small-cell lung cancer suggests that higher doses (>150 Gy BED) are associated with a significant survival benefit in patients with T2 tumors.

  5. Similar diversity-disturbance responses to different physical impacts: three cases of small-scale biodiversity increase in the Belgian part of the North Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Backer, Annelies; Van Hoey, Gert; Coates, Delphine; Vanaverbeke, Jan; Hostens, Kris

    2014-07-15

    Human activities at sea are still increasing. As biodiversity is a central topic in the management of our seas, it is important to understand how diversity responds to different disturbances related with physical impacts. We investigated the effects of three impacts, i.e. sand extraction, dredge disposal and offshore wind energy exploitation, on the soft-bottom macrobenthic assemblages in the Belgian part of the North Sea. We found similar diversity-disturbance responses, mainly related to the fact that different impacts caused similar environmental changes. We observed a sediment refinement which triggered a shift towards a heterogenic, dynamic (transitional) soft-bottom macrobenthic assemblage, with several species typically associated with muddy sands. This led to a local unexpected biodiversity increase in the impacted area. On a wider regional scale, the ever increasing human impacts might lead to a homogenization of the sediment, resulting in a more uniform, yet less diverse benthic ecosystem.

  6. Increase in soluble PD-1 is associated with prolonged survival in patients with advanced EGFR-mutated non-small cell lung cancer treated with erlotinib

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Steffen Filskov; Demuth, Christina; Weber, Britta;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The central immune co-inhibitory programmed cell death receptor/ligand 1 (PD-1/PD-L1) pathway plays a key role in tumor immune evasion in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Soluble PD-1 (sPD-1) can be detected in the blood, and preclinical evidence suggests that sPD-1 blocks PD-1/-L1...... interaction and improves anti-tumor immunity. The present study compares the concentration of sPD-1 in the serum of advanced NSCLC patients with Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) mutation prior to erlotinib treatment and at the time of progression and correlates these results to patient outcome....... MATERIALS AND METHODS: Blood samples from 38 patients with EGFR-mutated advanced NSCLC treated with erlotinib were analyzed for sPD-1 by sandwich ELISA. EGFR mutational status was assessed in circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) and tumor biopsies. RESULTS: sPD-1 could be detected in 21% of patients prior...

  7. Automated patch-clamp technique: increased throughput in functional characterization and in pharmacological screening of small-conductance Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrøder, Rikke L; Friis, Søren; Sunesen, Morten; Mathes, Chris; Willumsen, Niels J

    2008-08-01

    The suitability of an automated patch clamp for the characterization and pharmacological screening of calcium release-activated calcium (CRAC) channels endogenously expressed in RBL-2H3 cells was explored with the QPatch system. CRAC currents (I( CRAC)) are small, and thus precise recordings require high signal-to-noise ratios obtained by high seal resistances. Automated whole-cell establishment resulted in membrane resistances of 1728 +/- 226 MOmega (n = 44). CRAC channels were activated by a number of methods that raise intracellular calcium concentration, including EGTA, ionomycin, Ins(1,4,5)P3, and thapsigargin. I(CRAC) whole-cell currents ranged from 30 to 120 pA with rise times of 40 to 150 s. An initial delay in current activation was observed in particular when I(CRAC) was activated by passive store depletion using EGTA. Apparent rundown of I(CRAC) was commonly observed, and the current could be reactivated by subsequent addition of thapsigargin. I(CRAC) was blocked by SKF-96365 and 2-APB with IC50 values of 4.7 +/- 1.1 microM (n = 9) and 7.5 +/- 0.7 (n = 9) microM, respectively. The potencies of these blockers were similar to values reported for I(CRAC) in similar conventional patch-clamp experiments. The study demonstrates that CRAC channels can be rapidly and efficiently targeted with automated patch-clamp techniques for characterization of physiological and pharmacological properties.

  8. Can small wildlife conservancies maintain genetically stable populations of large mammals? Evidence for increased genetic drift in geographically restricted populations of Cape buffalo in East Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heller, R; Okello, J B A; Siegismund, H

    2010-01-01

    . Patterns of genetic variation reveal large effective population sizes and indicate that Cape buffalos have historically been interbreeding across considerable distances. Throughout much of its range, the Cape buffalo is now largely confined to protected areas due to habitat fragmentation and increasing...

  9. Increase in number of circulating disseminated epithelial cells after surgery for non-small cell lung cancer monitored by MAINTRAC® is a predictor for relapse: A preliminary report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Höffken Klaus

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lung cancer still remains one of the most commonly occurring solid tumors and even in stage Ia, surgery fails in 30% of patients who develop distant metastases. It is hypothesized that these must have developed from occult circulating tumor cells present at the time of surgery, or before. The aim of the present study was to detect such cells in the peripheral blood and to monitor these cells following surgery. Methods 30 patients treated for lung cancer with surgery were monitored for circulating epithelial cells (CEC by taking peripheral blood samples before, 2 weeks and 5 months after surgery and/or radiotherapy (RT chemotherapy (CT or combined RT/CT using magnetic bead enrichment and laser scanning cytometry (MAINTRAC® for quantification of these cells. Results In 86% of the patients CEC were detected before surgery and in 100% at 2 weeks and 5 months after surgery. In the control group, which consisted of 100 normal donors without cancer, 97 % were negative for CEC. A significantly higher number of CEC was found preoperatively in patients with squamous cell carcinoma than in those with adenocarcinoma. In correlation to the extent of parenchymal manipulation 2 weeks after surgery, an increase in numbers of CEC was observed with limited resections (18/21 whereas pneumonectomy led to a decrease (5/8 of CEC, 2 weeks after surgery. The third analysis done 5 months after surgery identified 3 groups of patients. In the group of 5 patients who received neo- or adjuvant chemo/radiotherapy there was evidence that monitoring of CEC can evaluate the effects of therapy. Another group of 7 patients who underwent surgery only showed a decrease of CEC and no signs of relapse. A third group of 11 patients who had surgery only, showed an increase of CEC (4 with an initial decrease after surgery and 7 with continuous increase. In the group with a continuous increase during the following 24 months, 2 early relapses in patients with stage Ia

  10. Increased cytochrome P450 and aryl hydrocarbon receptor in bronchial epithelium of heavy smokers with non-small cell lung carcinoma carries a poor prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, Tsunehiro; Sugio, Kenji; Uramoto, Hidetaka; Iwata, Teruo; Onitsuka, Takamitsu; Isse, Toyohi; Nozoe, Tadahiro; Kagawa, Norio; Yasumoto, Kosei; Kawamoto, Toshihiro

    2007-05-01

    Smoking induces mutations via the formation of DNA-adducts in the bronchial and alveolar epithelium and contributes to the development of lung cancer. Benz(a)pyrene and nitrosamine, typical carcinogens in cigarette smoke, undergo metabolic activation by the phase I enzymes, such as cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1, CYP2A6 and CYP2E1. The transcriptional regulation of these phase I enzymes is regulated by arylhydrocarbon receptor (AH-R) which binds many well-known carcinogens. To identify a cause and effect relationship, the expression of cytochrome CYP and AH-R in the bronchial epithelium was correlated with the history of cigarette smoking in patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). Although CYP3A+ cells were absent in the bronchial epithelium of all patients, there were many CYP2E1+ cells in heavy (>1000 cigarette/day x year) smokers (38.5%). In contra-distinction, there was significantly less number of CYP2E1+ cells in light (less than 1000 cigarette/day x year) smokers (15.6%) or non-smokers (10.0%). Similarly, there were more CYP1A1+ (19.2%) and CYP2A6+ cells in heavy (65.4%) smokers as compared to non-smokers. The number of AH-R+ cells was also significantly higher in cases with p53 mutation (62.5%) than those without (12.2%) mutation. Since in patients with early NSCLC, CYP positivity showed a close correlation with a poor survival (p less than 0.01), expression of CYP in bronchial epithelium has a prognostic potential.

  11. Altered walking strategy and increased unsteadiness in participants with impaired glucose tolerance and Type 2 diabetes relates to small-fibre neuropathy but not vitamin D deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almurdhi, M M; Brown, S J; Bowling, F L; Boulton, A J M; Jeziorska, M; Malik, R A; Reeves, N D

    2017-06-01

    To investigate alterations in walking strategy and dynamic sway (unsteadiness) in people with impaired glucose tolerance and people with Type 2 diabetes in relation to severity of neuropathy and vitamin D levels. A total of 20 people with Type 2 diabetes, 20 people with impaired glucose tolerance and 20 people without either Type 2 diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance (control group) underwent gait analysis using a motion analysis system and force platforms, and detailed assessment of neuropathy and serum 25 hydroxy-vitamin D levels. Ankle strength (P = 0.01) and power (P = 0.003) during walking and walking speed (P = 0.008) were preserved in participants with impaired glucose tolerance but significantly lower in participants with Type 2 diabetes compared with control participants; however, step width (P = 0.005) and dynamic medio-lateral sway (P = 0.007) were significantly higher and posterior maximal movement (P = 0.000) was lower in participants with impaired glucose tolerance, but preserved in those with Type 2 diabetes compared with the control group. Dynamic medio-lateral sway correlated with corneal nerve fibre length (P = 0.001) and corneal nerve branch density (P = 0.001), but not with vibration perception threshold (P = 0.19). Serum 25 hydroxy-vitamin D levels did not differ significantly among the groups (P = 0.10) and did not correlate with any walking variables or measures of dynamic sway. Early abnormalities in walking strategy and dynamic sway were evident in participants with impaired glucose tolerance, whilst there was a reduction in ankle strength, power and walking speed in participants with Type 2 diabetes. Unsteadiness correlated with small-, but not large-fibre neuropathy and there was no relationship between vitamin D levels and walking variables. © 2017 Diabetes UK.

  12. SNPs in the TGF-β signaling pathway are associated with increased risk of brain metastasis in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qianxia Li

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Brain metastasis (BM from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC is relatively common, but identifying which patients will develop brain metastasis has been problematic. We hypothesized that genotype variants in the TGF-β signaling pathway could be a predictive biomarker of brain metastasis. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We genotyped 33 SNPs from 13 genes in the TGF-β signaling pathway and evaluated their associations with brain metastasis risk by using DNA from blood samples from 161 patients with NSCLC. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to assess brain metastasis risk; Cox hazard analyses were used to evaluate the effects of various patient and disease characteristics on the risk of brain metastasis. RESULTS: The median age of the 116 men and 45 women in the study was 58 years; 62 (39% had stage IIIB or IV disease. Within 24 months after initial diagnosis of lung cancer, brain metastasis was found in 60 patients (37%. Of these 60 patients, 16 had presented with BM at diagnosis. Multivariate analysis showed the GG genotype of SMAD6: rs12913975 and TT genotype of INHBC: rs4760259 to be associated with a significantly higher risk of brain metastasis at 24 months follow-up (hazard ratio [HR] 2.540, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.204-5.359, P = 0.014; and HR 1.885, 95% CI 1.086-3.273, P = 0.024, compared with the GA or CT/CC genotypes, respectively. When we analyzed combined subgroups, these rates showed higher for those having both the GG genotype of SMAD6: rs12913975 and the TT genotype of INHBC: rs4760259 (HR 2.353, 95% CI 1.390-3.985, P = 0.001. CONCLUSIONS: We found the GG genotype of SMAD6: rs12913975 and TT genotype of INHBC: rs4760259 to be associated with risk of brain metastasis in patients with NSCLC. This finding, if confirmed, can help to identify patients at high risk of brain metastasis.

  13. Blood spots as an alternative to whole blood collection and the effect of a small monetary incentive to increase participation in genetic association studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ringer Danny

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Collection of buccal cells from saliva for DNA extraction offers a less invasive and convenient alternative to venipuncture blood collection that may increase participation in genetic epidemiologic studies. However, dried blood spot collection, which is also a convenient method, offers a means of collecting peripheral blood samples from which analytes in addition to DNA can be obtained. Methods To determine if offering blood spot collection would increase participation in genetic epidemiologic studies, we conducted a study of collecting dried blood spot cards by mail from a sample of female cancer cases (n = 134 and controls (n = 256 who were previously selected for a breast cancer genetics study and declined to provide a venipuncture blood sample. Participants were also randomized to receive either a $2.00 bill or no incentive with the blood spot collection kits. Results The average time between the venipuncture sample refusal and recruitment for the blood spot collection was 4.4 years. Thirty-seven percent of cases and 28% of controls provided a dried blood spot card. While the incentive was not associated with participation among controls (29% for $2.00 incentive vs. 26% for no incentive, p = 0.6, it was significantly associated with participation among the breast cancer cases (48% vs. 27%, respectively, p = 0.01. There did not appear to be any bias in response since no differences between cases and controls and incentive groups were observed when examining several demographic, work history and radiation exposure variables. Conclusion This study demonstrates that collection of dried blood spot cards in addition to venipuncture blood samples may be a feasible method to increase participation in genetic case-control studies.

  14. Nonheme-iron absorption from a phytate-rich meal is increased by the addition of small amounts of pork meat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boech, S.B.; Hansen, M.; Bukhave, Klaus

    2003-01-01

    roll) and (B) the basic meal with either 25, 50, or 75 g pork (longissimus muscle). Meal A contained 2.3 mg nonheme iron, 7.4 mg vitamin C, and 220 mg (358 mumol) phytate. Each meal was served twice, and the order of the meals was ABBA or BAAB. The meals were extrinsically labeled with Fe-55 or Fe-59...... (greater than or equal to 50 g) significantly increase nonheme-iron absorption from a phytate-rich meal low in vitamin C....

  15. Surprises from the resummation of ladders in the ABJ(M) cusp anomalous dimension

    CERN Document Server

    Bonini, Marisa; Preti, Michelangelo; Seminara, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    We study the cusp anomalous dimension in N=6 ABJ(M) theory, identifying a scaling limit in which the ladder diagrams dominate. The resummation is encoded into a Bethe-Salpeter equation that is mapped to a Schroedinger problem, exactly solvable due to the surprising supersymmetry of the effective Hamiltonian. In the ABJ case the solution implies the diagonalization of the U(N) and U(M) building blocks, suggesting the existence of two independent cusp anomalous dimensions and an unexpected exponentiation structure for the related Wilson loops. While consistent with previous perturbative analysis, the strong coupling limit of our result does not agree with the string theory computation, emphasizing a difference with the analogous resummation in the N=4 case.

  16. Probing Critical Point Energies of Transition Metal Dichalcogenides: Surprising Indirect Gap of Single Layer WSe 2

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Chendong

    2015-09-21

    By using a comprehensive form of scanning tunneling spectroscopy, we have revealed detailed quasi-particle electronic structures in transition metal dichalcogenides, including the quasi-particle gaps, critical point energy locations, and their origins in the Brillouin zones. We show that single layer WSe surprisingly has an indirect quasi-particle gap with the conduction band minimum located at the Q-point (instead of K), albeit the two states are nearly degenerate. We have further observed rich quasi-particle electronic structures of transition metal dichalcogenides as a function of atomic structures and spin-orbit couplings. Such a local probe for detailed electronic structures in conduction and valence bands will be ideal to investigate how electronic structures of transition metal dichalcogenides are influenced by variations of local environment.

  17. OCEAN CIRCULATION. Observing the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation yields a decade of inevitable surprises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srokosz, M A; Bryden, H L

    2015-06-19

    The importance of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) heat transport for climate is well acknowledged. Climate models predict that the AMOC will slow down under global warming, with substantial impacts, but measurements of ocean circulation have been inadequate to evaluate these predictions. Observations over the past decade have changed that situation, providing a detailed picture of variations in the AMOC. These observations reveal a surprising degree of AMOC variability in terms of the intraannual range, the amplitude and phase of the seasonal cycle, the interannual changes in strength affecting the ocean heat content, and the decline of the AMOC over the decade, both of the latter two exceeding the variations seen in climate models. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  18. Probing Critical Point Energies of Transition Metal Dichalcogenides: Surprising Indirect Gap of Single Layer WSe2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chendong; Chen, Yuxuan; Johnson, Amber; Li, Ming-Yang; Li, Lain-Jong; Mende, Patrick C; Feenstra, Randall M; Shih, Chih-Kang

    2015-10-14

    By using a comprehensive form of scanning tunneling spectroscopy, we have revealed detailed quasi-particle electronic structures in transition metal dichalcogenides, including the quasi-particle gaps, critical point energy locations, and their origins in the Brillouin zones. We show that single layer WSe2 surprisingly has an indirect quasi-particle gap with the conduction band minimum located at the Q-point (instead of K), albeit the two states are nearly degenerate. We have further observed rich quasi-particle electronic structures of transition metal dichalcogenides as a function of atomic structures and spin-orbit couplings. Such a local probe for detailed electronic structures in conduction and valence bands will be ideal to investigate how electronic structures of transition metal dichalcogenides are influenced by variations of local environment.

  19. Beyond surprise: the puzzle of infants' expressive reactions to expectancy violation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Klaus R; Zentner, Marcel R; Stern, Daniel

    2004-12-01

    The reactions of 58 infants to expectancy violation by digitally filtering the experimenter's voice were studied in a cross-sectional design for ages 5, 7, 9, 11-12, and 14 months. The results show that behavioral freezing and changes in gaze direction, but not facial or vocal expression, are reliable responses to expectancy violation. The pattern suggests that a transition in the infant's capacity for cognitive evaluation of novel and discrepant events may occur around age 9 months. These findings confirm the consistent failure to find prototypical facial surprise reactions in research on novel or impossible situations. Componential theories of emotion, which predict adaptive behavior patterns from appraisal processes, may provide clues for underlying mechanisms and generate hypotheses on age-related changes in emotional expression. copyright (c) 2004 APA, all rights reserved.

  20. Surprising judgments about robot drivers: Experiments on rising expectations and blaming humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Danielson

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available N-Reasons is an experimental Internet survey platform designed to enhance public participation in applied ethics and policy. N-Reasons encourages individuals to generate reasons to support their judgments, and groups to converge on a common set of reasons pro and con various issues.  In the Robot Ethics Survey some of the reasons contributed surprising judgments about autonomous machines. Presented with a version of the trolley problem with an autonomous train as the agent, participants gave unexpected answers, revealing high expectations for the autonomous machine and shifting blame from the automated device to the humans in the scenario. Further experiments with a standard pair of human-only trolley problems refine these results. While showing the high expectations even when no autonomous machine is involved, human bystanders are only blamed in the machine case. A third experiment explicitly aimed at responsibility for driverless cars confirms our findings about shifting blame in the case of autonomous machine agents. We conclude methodologically that both results point to the power of an experimental survey based approach to public participation to explore surprising assumptions and judgments in applied ethics. However, both results also support using caution when interpreting survey results in ethics, demonstrating the importance of qualitative data to provide further context for evaluating judgments revealed by surveys. On the ethics side, the result about shifting blame to humans interacting with autonomous machines suggests caution about the unintended consequences of intuitive principles requiring human responsibility.http://dx.doi.org/10.5324/eip.v9i1.1727

  1. Small HDL subclasses become cholesterol-poor during postprandial period after a fat diet intake in subjects with high triglyceridemia increases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintanilla-Cantú, Armando; Peña-de-la-Sancha, Paola; Flores-Castillo, Cristobal; Mejía-Domínguez, Ana María; Posadas-Sánchez, Rosalinda; Pérez-Hernández, Nonanzit; Bautista-Pérez, Rocío; Enriquez-Calderón, Reyna Esmeralda; Juárez-Oropeza, Marco Antonio; Fragoso, José Manuel; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Pérez-Méndez, Oscar

    2017-01-01

    Postprandial triglyceridemia may transitory affect the structure of HDL subclasses and probably their antiatherogenic properties but little is known in this field. We analyzed the HDL subclasses lipid content along postprandial period. Fifteen metabolic syndrome (MS) patients and 15 healthy controls were enrolled. HDL were isolated from plasma samples obtained at fasting and every 2-h up to 8-h, after a 75-g fat meal. Cholesterol (C), triglycerides (TAG), and phospholipid (Ph) plasma concentrations of five HDL subclasses were determined by densitometry of electrophoresis gels enzymatically stained. The increase of postprandial triglyceridemia expressed as the incremental area under the curve (iAUC) was twice in MS patients than in controls. Only large HDL2b-TAG were higher in MS than controls at 4, 6 and 8h after meal intake, whereas cholesterol of HDL2a, 3a and 3b were lower at 8h. HDL size distribution shifted towards large HDL and HDL3a-, 3b- and 3c-subclasses had a lower content of cholesterol (estimated by the C-to-Ph ratio) in subjects whose iAUC>289.5mgh/dl (n=15) in comparison with those subjects with iAUC below this cutoff point (n=15), independently of the MS status and fasting TAG. Triglycerides content of HDL subclasses changed only discreetly along the postprandial period, whereas paraoxonase-1 remained unchanged. A high postprandial triglyceridemia conditions the shift of HDL size distribution towards large particles and the decrease of cholesterol in HDL3 subclasses. These data demonstrate that postprandial hypertriglyceridemia contributes to a transitory hypoalphalipoproteinemia that may increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Dietary fat and bile juice, but not obesity, are responsible for the increase in small intestinal permeability induced through the suppression of tight junction protein expression in LETO and OLETF rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzuki Takuya

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An increase in the intestinal permeability is considered to be associated with the inflammatory tone and development in the obesity and diabetes, however, the pathogenesis of the increase in the intestinal permeability is poorly understood. The present study was performed to determine the influence of obesity itself as well as dietary fat on the increase in intestinal permeability. Methods An obese rat strain, Otsuka Long Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF, and the lean counter strain, Long Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LETO, were fed standard or high fat diets for 16 weeks. Glucose tolerance, intestinal permeability, intestinal tight junction (TJ proteins expression, plasma bile acids concentration were evaluated. In addition, the effects of rat bile juice and dietary fat, possible mediators of the increase in the intestinal permeability in the obesity, on TJ permeability were explored in human intestinal Caco-2 cells. Results The OLETF rats showed higher glucose intolerance than did the LETO rats, which became more marked with the prolonged feeding of the high fat diet. Intestinal permeability in the OLETF rats evaluated by the urinary excretion of intestinal permeability markers (Cr-EDTA and phenolsulfonphthalein was comparable to that in the LETO rats. Feeding the high fat diet increased intestinal permeability in both the OLETF and LETO rats, and the increases correlated with decreases in TJ proteins (claudin-1, claudin-3, occludin and junctional adhesion molecule-1 expression in the small, but not in the large intestine (cecum or colon. The plasma bile acids concentration was higher in rats fed the high fat diet. Exposure to bile juice and the fat emulsion increased TJ permeability with concomitant reductions in TJ protein expression (claudin-1, claudin-3, and junctional adhesion molecule-1 in the Caco-2 cell monolayers. Conclusion Excessive dietary fat and/or increased levels of luminal bile juice, but not genetic obesity, are

  3. Food insecurity and mental health: surprising trends among community health volunteers in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia during the 2008 food crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, Kenneth C; Hadley, Craig; Tesfaye, Fikru; Shifferaw, Selamawit

    2010-05-01

    The 2008 food crisis may have increased household food insecurity and caused distress among impoverished populations in low-income countries. Policy researchers have attempted to quantify the impact that a sharp rise in food prices might have on population wellbeing by asking what proportion of households would drop below conventional poverty lines given a set increase in prices. Our understanding of the impact of food crises can be extended by conducting micro-level ethnographic studies. This study examined self-reported household food insecurity (FI) and common mental disorders (CMD) among 110 community health AIDS care volunteers living in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia during the height of the 2008 food crisis. We used generalized estimating equations that account for associations between responses given by the same participants over 3 survey rounds during 2008, to model the longitudinal response profiles of FI, CMD symptoms, and socio-behavioral and micro-economic covariates. To help explain the patterns observed in the response profiles and regression results, we examine qualitative data that contextualize the cognition and reporting behavior of AIDS care volunteers, as well as potential observation biases inherent in longitudinal, community-based research. Our data show that food insecurity is highly prevalent, that is it associated with household economic factors, and that it is linked to mental health. Surprisingly, the volunteers in this urban sample did not report increasingly severe FI or CMD during the peak of the 2008 food crisis. This is a counter-intuitive result that would not be predicted in analyses of population-level data such as those used in econometrics simulations. But when these results are linked to real people in specific urban ecologies, they can improve our understanding of the psychosocial consequences of food price shocks.

  4. Surprising results on phylogenetic tree building methods based on molecular sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonnet Gaston H

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We analyze phylogenetic tree building methods from molecular sequences (PTMS. These are methods which base their construction solely on sequences, coding DNA or amino acids. Results Our first result is a statistically significant evaluation of 176 PTMSs done by comparing trees derived from 193138 orthologous groups of proteins using a new measure of quality between trees. This new measure, called the Intra measure, is very consistent between different groups of species and strong in the sense that it separates the methods with high confidence. The second result is the comparison of the trees against trees derived from accepted taxonomies, the Taxon measure. We consider the NCBI taxonomic classification and their derived topologies as the most accepted biological consensus on phylogenies, which are also available in electronic form. The correlation between the two measures is remarkably high, which supports both measures simultaneously. Conclusions The big surprise of the evaluation is that the maximum likelihood methods do not score well, minimal evolution distance methods over MSA-induced alignments score consistently better. This comparison also allows us to rank different components of the tree building methods, like MSAs, substitution matrices, ML tree builders, distance methods, etc. It is also clear that there is a difference between Metazoa and the rest, which points out to evolution leaving different molecular traces. We also think that these measures of quality of trees will motivate the design of new PTMSs as it is now easier to evaluate them with certainty.

  5. Pooling designs with surprisingly high degree of error correction in a finite vector space

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Pooling designs are standard experimental tools in many biotechnical applications. It is well-known that all famous pooling designs are constructed from mathematical structures by the "containment matrix" method. In particular, Macula's designs (resp. Ngo and Du's designs) are constructed by the containment relation of subsets (resp. subspaces) in a finite set (resp. vector space). Recently, we generalized Macula's designs and obtained a family of pooling designs with more high degree of error correction by subsets in a finite set. In this paper, as a generalization of Ngo and Du's designs, we study the corresponding problems in a finite vector space and obtain a family of pooling designs with surprisingly high degree of error correction. Our designs and Ngo and Du's designs have the same number of items and pools, respectively, but the error-tolerant property is much better than that of Ngo and Du's designs, which was given by D'yachkov et al. \\cite{DF}, when the dimension of the space is large enough.

  6. IP Eri: A surprising long-period binary system hosting a He white dwarf

    CERN Document Server

    Merle, T; Masseron, T; Van Eck, S; Siess, L; Van Winckel, H

    2014-01-01

    We determine the orbital elements for the K0 IV + white dwarf (WD) system IP Eri, which appears to have a surprisingly long period of 1071 d and a significant eccentricity of 0.25. Previous spectroscopic analyses of the WD, based on a distance of 101 pc inferred from its Hipparcos parallax, yielded a mass of only 0.43 M$_\\odot$, implying it to be a helium-core WD. The orbital properties of IP Eri are similar to those of the newly discovered long-period subdwarf B star (sdB) binaries, which involve stars with He-burning cores surrounded by extremely thin H envelopes, and are therefore close relatives to He WDs. We performed a spectroscopic analysis of high-resolution spectra from the HERMES/Mercator spectrograph and concluded that the atmospheric parameters of the K0 component are $T_{\\rm eff} = 4960$ K, $\\log{g} = 3.3$, [Fe/H] = 0.09 and $\\xi = 1.5$ km/s. The detailed abundance analysis focuses on C, N, O abundances, carbon isotopic ratio, light (Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti) and s-process (Sr, Y, Zr, Ba, La, Ce, N...

  7. Surprising dissimilarities in a newly formed pair of 'identical twin' stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stassun, Keivan G; Mathieu, Robert D; Cargile, Phillip A; Aarnio, Alicia N; Stempels, Eric; Geller, Aaron

    2008-06-19

    The mass and chemical composition of a star are the primary determinants of its basic physical properties-radius, temperature and luminosity-and how those properties evolve with time. Accordingly, two stars born at the same time, from the same natal material and with the same mass, are 'identical twins,' and as such might be expected to possess identical physical attributes. We have discovered in the Orion nebula a pair of stellar twins in a newborn binary star system. Each star in the binary has a mass of 0.41 +/- 0.01 solar masses, identical to within 2 per cent. Here we report that these twin stars have surface temperatures differing by approximately 300 K ( approximately 10 per cent) and luminosities differing by approximately 50 per cent, both at high confidence level. Preliminary results indicate that the stars' radii also differ, by 5-10 per cent. These surprising dissimilarities suggest that one of the twins may have been delayed by several hundred thousand years in its formation relative to its sibling. Such a delay could only have been detected in a very young, definitively equal-mass binary system. Our findings reveal cosmic limits on the age synchronization of young binary stars, often used as tests for the age calibrations of star-formation models.

  8. Marine Protected Areas, Multiple-Agency Management, and Monumental Surprise in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John N. Kittinger

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Large, regional-scale marine protected areas (MPAs and MPA networks face different challenges in governance systems than locally managed or community-based MPAs. An emerging theme in large-scale MPA management is the prevalence of governance structures that rely on institutional collaboration, presenting new challenges as agencies with differing mandates and cultures work together to implement ecosystem-based management. We analyzed qualitative interview data to investigate multi-level social interactions and institutional responses to the surprise establishment of the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument (monument in the northwestern Hawaiian Islands (NWHI. The governance arrangement for the monument represents a new model in US MPA management, requiring two federal agencies and the State of Hawai‘i to collaboratively manage the NWHI. We elucidate the principal barriers to institutional cotrusteeship, characterize institutional transformations that have occurred among the partner agencies in the transition to collaborative management, and evaluate the governance arrangement for the monument as a model for MPAs. The lessons learned from the NWHI governance arrangement are critical as large-scale MPAs requiring multiple-agency management become a prevalent feature on the global seascape.

  9. You'll Never Guess Who Wrote That: 78 Surprising Authors of Psychological Publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilienfeld, Scott O; Lynn, Steven Jay

    2016-07-01

    One can find psychological authors in the most unexpected places. We present a capsule summary of scholarly publications of psychological interest authored or coauthored by 78 surprising individuals, most of whom are celebrities or relatives of celebrities, historical figures, or people who have otherwise achieved visibility in academic circles, politics, religion, art, and diverse realms of popular culture. Still other publications are authored by individuals who are far better known for their contributions to popular than to academic psychology. The publications, stretching across more than two centuries, encompass a wide swath of domains of psychological inquiry and highlight the intersection of psychology with fields that fall outside its traditional borders, including public health, economics, law, neurosurgery, and even magic. Many of these scholarly contributions have enriched psychology and its allied disciplines, such as psychiatry, in largely unappreciated ways, and they illustrate the penetration of psychological knowledge into multiple scientific disciplines and everyday life. At the same time, our author list demonstrates that remarkable intellectual accomplishments in one scientific domain, such as physics, do not necessarily translate into success in psychology and underscores the distinction between intelligence, on the one hand, and critical thinking and wisdom, on the other.

  10. Surprise responses in the human brain demonstrate statistical learning under high concurrent cognitive demand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, Marta Isabel; Teng, Chee Leong James; Taylor, Jeremy Alexander; Rowe, Elise Genevieve; Mattingley, Jason Brett

    2016-06-01

    The ability to learn about regularities in the environment and to make predictions about future events is fundamental for adaptive behaviour. We have previously shown that people can implicitly encode statistical regularities and detect violations therein, as reflected in neuronal responses to unpredictable events that carry a unique prediction error signature. In the real world, however, learning about regularities will often occur in the context of competing cognitive demands. Here we asked whether learning of statistical regularities is modulated by concurrent cognitive load. We compared electroencephalographic metrics associated with responses to pure-tone sounds with frequencies sampled from narrow or wide Gaussian distributions. We showed that outliers evoked a larger response than those in the centre of the stimulus distribution (i.e., an effect of surprise) and that this difference was greater for physically identical outliers in the narrow than in the broad distribution. These results demonstrate an early neurophysiological marker of the brain's ability to implicitly encode complex statistical structure in the environment. Moreover, we manipulated concurrent cognitive load by having participants perform a visual working memory task while listening to these streams of sounds. We again observed greater prediction error responses in the narrower distribution under both low and high cognitive load. Furthermore, there was no reliable reduction in prediction error magnitude under high-relative to low-cognitive load. Our findings suggest that statistical learning is not a capacity limited process, and that it proceeds automatically even when cognitive resources are taxed by concurrent demands.

  11. A surprisingly simple correlation between the classical and quantum structural networks in liquid water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamm, Peter; Fanourgakis, George S.; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2017-08-14

    Nuclear quantum effects in liquid water have profound implications for several of its macroscopic properties related to structure, dynamics, spectroscopy and transport. Although several of water’s macroscopic properties can be reproduced by classical descriptions of the nuclei using potentials effectively parameterized for a narrow range of its phase diagram, a proper account of the nuclear quantum effects is required in order to ensure that the underlying molecular interactions are transferable across a wide temperature range covering different regions of that diagram. When performing an analysis of the hydrogen bonded structural networks in liquid water resulting from the classical (class.) and quantum (q.m.) descriptions of the nuclei with the transferable, flexible, polarizable TTM3-F interaction potential, we found that the two results can be superimposed over the temperature range of T=270-350 K using a surprisingly simple, linear scaling of the two temperatures according to T(q.m.)=aT(class)- T , where a=1.2 and T=51 K. The linear scaling and constant shift of the temperature scale can be considered as a generalization of the previously reported temperature shifts (corresponding to structural changes and the melting T) induced by quantum effects in liquid water.

  12. Polar F-layer model-observation comparisons: a neutral wind surprise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Sojka

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The existence of a month-long continuous database of incoherent scatter radar observations of the ionosphere from the EISCAT Savlbard Radar (ESR at Longyearbyen, Norway, provides an unprecedented opportunity for model/data comparisons. Physics-based ionospheric models, such as the Utah State University Time Dependent Ionospheric Model (TDIM, are usually only compared with observations over restricted one or two day events or against climatological averages. In this study, using the ESR observations, the daily weather, day-to-day variability, and month-long climatology can be simultaneously addressed to identify modeling shortcomings and successes. Since for this study the TDIM is driven by climatological representations of the magnetospheric convection, auroral oval, neutral atmosphere, and neutral winds, whose inputs are solar and geomagnetic indices, it is not surprising that the daily weather cannot be reproduced. What is unexpected is that the horizontal neutral wind has come to the forefront as a decisive model input parameter in matching the diurnal morphology of density structuring seen in the observations.

  13. Carbon monoxide in biology and microbiology: surprising roles for the "Detroit perfume".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidge, Kelly S; Motterlini, Roberto; Mann, Brian E; Wilson, Jayne Louise; Poole, Robert K

    2009-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is a colorless, odorless gas with a reputation for being an anthropogenic poison; there is extensive documentation of the modes of human exposure, toxicokinetics, and health effects. However, CO is also generated endogenously by heme oxygenases (HOs) in mammals and microbes, and its extraordinary biological activities are now recognized and increasingly utilized in medicine and physiology. This review introduces recent advances in CO biology and chemistry and illustrates the exciting possibilities that exist for a deeper understanding of its biological consequences. However, the microbiological literature is scant and is currently restricted to: 1) CO-metabolizing bacteria, CO oxidation by CO dehydrogenase (CODH) and the CO-sensing mechanisms that enable CO oxidation; 2) the use of CO as a heme ligand in microbial biochemistry; and 3) very limited information on how microbes respond to CO toxicity. We demonstrate how our horizons in CO biology have been extended by intense research activity in recent years in mammalian and human physiology and biochemistry. CO is one of several "new" small gas molecules that are increasingly recognized for their profound and often beneficial biological activities, the others being nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S). The chemistry of CO and other heme ligands (oxygen, NO, H2S and cyanide) and the implications for biological interactions are briefly presented. An important advance in recent years has been the development of CO-releasing molecules (CO-RMs) for aiding experimental administration of CO as an alternative to the use of CO gas. The chemical principles of CO-RM design and mechanisms of CO release from CO-RMs (dissociation, association, reduction and oxidation, photolysis, and acidification) are reviewed and we present a survey of the most commonly used CO-RMs. Amongst the most important new applications of CO in mammalian physiology and medicine are its vasoactive properties and the

  14. Corn Ethanol: The Surprisingly Effective Route for Natural Gas Consumption in the Transportation Sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szybist, James P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Curran, Scott [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Proven reserves and production of natural gas (NG) in the United States have increased dramatically in the last decade, due largely to the commercialization of hydraulic fracturing. This has led to a plentiful supply of NG, resulting in a significantly lower cost on a gallon of gasoline-equivalent (GGE) basis. Additionally, NG is a domestic, non-petroleum source of energy that is less carbon-intensive than coal or petroleum products, and thus can lead to lower greenhouse gas emissions. Because of these factors, there is a desire to increase the use of NG in the transportation sector in the United States (U.S.). However, using NG directly in the transportation sector requires that several non-trivial challenges be overcome. One of these issues is the fueling infrastructure. There are currently only 1,375 NG fueling stations in the U.S. compared to 152,995 fueling stations for gasoline in 2014. Additionally, there are very few light-duty vehicles that can consume this fuel directly as dedicated or bi-fuel options. For example, in model year 2013Honda was the only OEM to offer a dedicated CNG sedan while a number of others offered CNG options as a preparation package for LD trucks and vans. In total, there were a total of 11 vehicle models in 2013 that could be purchased that could use natural gas directly. There are additional potential issues associated with NG vehicles as well. Compared to commercial refueling stations, the at-home refueling time for NG vehicles is substantial – a result of the small compressors used for home refilling. Additionally, the methane emissions from both refueling (leakage) and from tailpipe emissions (slip) from these vehicles can add to their GHG footprint, and while these emissions are not currently regulated it could be a barrier in the future, especially in scenarios with broad scale adoption of CNG vehicles. However, NG consumption already plays a large role in other sectors of the economy, including some that are important to

  15. Central nervous system penetration for small molecule therapeutic agents does not increase in multiple sclerosis- and Alzheimer's disease-related animal models despite reported blood-brain barrier disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ziqiang; Zhang, Jinqiang; Liu, Houfu; Li, Yi; Zhao, Yonggang; Yang, Eric

    2010-08-01

    Therapy for central nervous system (CNS) diseases requires drugs that can cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). BBB disruption has been reported in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) and the related animal models as evidenced by increased infiltration of inflammatory cells or increased staining of Igs in the central nervous system. Although CNS penetration of therapeutic agents under pathological conditions has rarely been investigated, it is commonly assumed that BBB disruption may lead to enhanced CNS penetration and also provide a "window of opportunity" through which drugs that do not normally cross BBB are able to do so. In this article, we have compared brain penetration of eight small molecules in naive animals and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mice, streptozotocin-induced mice, and TASTPM transgenic mice. The tool compounds are lipophilic transcellular drugs [GlaxoSmithKline (GSK)-A, GSK-B, GSK-C, and naproxen], lipophilic P-glycoprotein (P-gp) substrates (amprenavir and loperamide), and hydrophilic paracellular compounds (sodium fluorescein and atenolol). Our data showed that rate and extent of CNS penetration for lipophilic transcellular drugs and P-gp substrates are similar in naive and all tested animal models. The brain penetration for paracellular drugs in EAE mice is transiently increased but similar to that in naive mice at steady state. Our data suggest that, despite reported BBB disruption, CNS penetration for small molecule therapeutic agents does not increase in MS- and AD-related animal models.

  16. Surprisingly low compliance to local guidelines for risk factor based screening for gestational diabetes mellitus - A population-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winkvist Anna

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Screening for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM is routine during pregnancy in many countries in the world. The screening programs are either based on general screening offered to all pregnant women or risk factor based screening stipulated in local clinical guidelines. The aims of this study were to investigate: 1 the compliance with local guidelines of screening for GDM and 2 the outcomes of pregnancy and birth in relation to risk factors of GDM and whether or not exposed to oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT. Methods This study design was a population-based retrospective cross-sectional study of 822 women. A combination of questionnaire data and data collected from medical records was applied. Compliance to the local guidelines of risk factor based screening for GDM was examined and a comparison of outcomes of pregnancy and delivery in relation to risk factor groups for GDM was performed. Results Of the 822 participants, 257 (31.3% women fulfilled at least one criterion for being exposed to screening for GDM according to the local clinical guidelines. However, only 79 (30.7% of these women were actually exposed to OGTT and of those correctly exposed for screening, seven women were diagnosed with GDM. Women developing risk factors for GDM during pregnancy had a substantially increased risk of giving birth to an infant with macrosomia. Conclusion Surprisingly low compliance with the local clinical guidelines for screening for GDM during pregnancy was found. Furthermore, the prevalence of the risk factors of GDM in our study was almost doubled compared to previous Swedish studies. Pregnant women developing risk factors of GDM during pregnancy were found to be at substantially increased risk of giving birth to an infant with macrosomia. There is a need of actions improving compliance to the local guidelines.

  17. Geophysical Investigation of the Lake City Fault Zone, Surprise Valley, California, and Implications for Geothermal Circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhee, D. K.; Glen, J. M.; Egger, A. E.; Chuchel, B. A.

    2009-12-01

    New audiomagnetotelluric (AMT), gravity, and magnetic data were collected in Surprise Valley, northwestern Basin and Range, in order to investigate the role that the Lake City Fault Zone (LCFZ) may play in controlling geothermal circulation in the area. Surprise Valley hosts an extensional geothermal system currently undergoing exploration for development on several scales. The focus of much of that exploration has been the LCFZ, a set of NW-SE-trending structures that has been suggested on the basis of (1) low-relief scarps in the NW portion of the zone, (2) dissolved mineral-rich groundwater chemistry along its length, and (3) parallelism with a strong regional fabric that includes the Brothers Fault Zone. The LCFZ extends across the valley at a topographic high, intersecting the N-S-trending basin-bounding faults where major hot springs occur. This relationship suggests that the LCFZ may be a zone of permeability for flow of hydrothermal fluids. Previous potential field data indicate that there is no vertical offset along this fault zone, and little signature at all in either the gravity or magnetic data; along with the lack of surface expression along most of its length, the subsurface geometry of the LCFZ and its influence on geothermal fluid circulation remains enigmatic. The LCFZ therefore provides an ideal opportunity to utilize AMT data, which measures subsurface resistivity and therefore - unlike potential field data - is highly sensitive to the presence of saline fluids. AMT data and additional gravity and magnetic data were collected in 2009 along 3 profiles perpendicular to the LCFZ in order to define the subsurface geometry and conductivity of the fault zone down to depths of ~ 500 m. AMT soundings were collected using the Geometrics Stratagem EH4 system, a four channel, natural and controlled-source tensor system recording in the range of 10 to 92,000 Hz. To augment the low signal in the natural field a transmitter of two horizontal-magnetic dipoles

  18. Crystal structure of di-μ-chlorido-bis[dichloridobis(methanol-κOiridium(III] dihydrate: a surprisingly simple chloridoiridium(III dinuclear complex with methanol ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph S. Merola

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The reaction between IrCl3·xH2O in methanol led to the formation of small amounts of the title compound, [Ir2Cl6(CH3OH4]·2H2O, which consists of two IrCl4O2 octahedra sharing an edge via chloride bridges. The molecule lies across an inversion center. Each octahedron can be envisioned as being comprised of four chloride ligands in the equatorial plane with methanol ligands in the axial positions. A lattice water molecule is strongly hydrogen-bonded to the coordinating methanol ligands and weak interactions with coordinating chloride ligands lead to the formation of a three-dimensional network. This is a surprising structure given that, while many reactions of iridium chloride hydrate are carried out in alcoholic solvents, especially methanol and ethanol, this is the first structure of a chloridoiridium compound with only methanol ligands.

  19. Lymphocytic alveolitis: A surprising index of poor prognosis in patients with primary Sjogren's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalavanga, Y A; Voulgari, P V; Georgiadis, A N; Leontaridi, C; Katsenos, S; Vassiliou, M; Drosos, A A; Constantopoulos, S H

    2006-07-01

    Twelve years ago we reported that lymphocytic alveolitis [or bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) lymphocytosis] correlates with clinical pulmonary involvement in primary Sjogren's syndrome (pSS). Our thesis was based on subtle clinical and functional evidence of interstitial lung disease (ILD) in pSS patients with "high lymphocytic alveolitis" (>15% lymphocytes in BAL). This report is a follow-up study of these patients. Basic clinical and functional re-evaluation of the 22 patients with pSS, studied in 1991, emphasized the differences between those with alveolitis and those without alveolitis. There was no significant functional decline. There were, however, two statistically significant differences between the two groups: (1) only patients with BAL lymphocytosis had to be treated with steroids (5/12 vs. 0/10, P < 0.05) and (2) only patients with BAL lymphocytosis had died in the mean time (6/12 vs. 0/10, P < 0.01). The causes of death were various. On only two occasions were they related to respiratory infections while there were no deaths from respiratory failure secondary to ILD. BAL lymphocytosis appears to be a surprisingly serious index of dismal prognosis in patients with pSS. We offer no unifying pathophysiologic mechanism for it and, therefore, all we propose is that BAL is performed early, in as many patients with pSS as possible. These patients should then be followed up systematically, in order to evaluate if BAL lymphocytosis has any pathophysiologic importance in the development of clinically serious pSS, which is serious enough to lead to death.

  20. A post-genomic surprise. The molecular reinscription of race in science, law and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duster, Troy

    2015-03-01

    The completion of the first draft of the Human Genome Map in 2000 was widely heralded as the promise and future of genetics-based medicines and therapies - so much so that pundits began referring to the new century as 'The Century of Genetics'. Moreover, definitive assertions about the overwhelming similarities of all humans' DNA (99.9 per cent) by the leaders of the Human Genome Project were trumpeted as the end of racial thinking about racial taxonomies of human genetic differences. But the first decade of the new century brought unwelcomed surprises. First, gene therapies turned out to be far more complicated than any had anticipated - and instead the pharmaceutical industry turned to a focus on drugs that might be 'related' to population differences based upon genetic markers. While the language of 'personalized medicine' dominated this frame, research on racially and ethnically designated populations differential responsiveness to drugs dominated the empirical work in the field. Ancestry testing and 'admixture research' would play an important role in a new kind of molecular reification of racial categories. Moreover, the capacity of the super-computer to map differences reverberated into personal identification that would affect both the criminal justice system and forensic science, and generate new levels of concern about personal privacy. Social scientists in general, and sociologists in particular, have been caught short by these developments - relying mainly on assertions that racial categories are socially constructed, regionally and historically contingent, and politically arbitrary. While these assertions are true, the imprimatur of scientific legitimacy has shifted the burden, since now 'admixture research' can claim that its results get at the 'reality' of human differentiation, not the admittedly flawed social constructions of racial categories. Yet what was missing from this framing of the problem: 'admixture research' is itself based upon socially

  1. Explanatory models of health and disease: surprises from within the former Soviet Union

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana I Andreeva

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Extract The review of anthropological theories as applied to public health by Jennifer J. Carroll (Carroll, 2013 published in this issue of TCPHEE made me recollect my first and most surprising discoveries of how differently same things can be understood in different parts of the world. Probably less unexpectedly, these impressions concern substance abuse and addiction behaviors, similarly to many examples deployed by Jennifer J. Carroll. The first of these events happened soon after the break-up of the Soviet Union when some of the most active people from the West rushed to discover what was going on behind the opening iron curtain. A director of an addiction clinic, who had just come into contact with a Dutch counterpart, invited me to join the collaboration and the innovation process he planned to launch. Being a participant of the exchange program started within this collaboration, I had an opportunity to discover how addictive behaviors were understood and explained in books (English, 1961; Kooyman, 1992; Viorst, 1986 recommended by the colleagues in the Netherlands and, as I could observe with my own eyes, addressed in everyday practice. This was a jaw-dropping contrast to what I learnt at the soviet medical university and some post-graduate courses, where all the diseases related to alcohol, tobacco, or drug abuse were considered predominantly a result of the substance intake. In the Soviet discourse, the intake itself was understood as 'willful and deliberate' or immoral behavior which, in some cases, was to be rectified in prison-like treatment facilities. In the West, quite oppositely, substance abuse was seen rather as a consequence of a constellation of life-course adversities thoroughly considered by developmental psychology. This approach was obviously deeply ingrained in how practitioners diagnosed and treated their patients.

  2. The genome of Pelobacter carbinolicus reveals surprising metabolic capabilities and physiological features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aklujkar Muktak

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bacterium Pelobacter carbinolicus is able to grow by fermentation, syntrophic hydrogen/formate transfer, or electron transfer to sulfur from short-chain alcohols, hydrogen or formate; it does not oxidize acetate and is not known to ferment any sugars or grow autotrophically. The genome of P. carbinolicus was sequenced in order to understand its metabolic capabilities and physiological features in comparison with its relatives, acetate-oxidizing Geobacter species. Results Pathways were predicted for catabolism of known substrates: 2,3-butanediol, acetoin, glycerol, 1,2-ethanediol, ethanolamine, choline and ethanol. Multiple isozymes of 2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase, ATP synthase and [FeFe]-hydrogenase were differentiated and assigned roles according to their structural properties and genomic contexts. The absence of asparagine synthetase and the presence of a mutant tRNA for asparagine encoded among RNA-active enzymes suggest that P. carbinolicus may make asparaginyl-tRNA in a novel way. Catabolic glutamate dehydrogenases were discovered, implying that the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle can function catabolically. A phosphotransferase system for uptake of sugars was discovered, along with enzymes that function in 2,3-butanediol production. Pyruvate:ferredoxin/flavodoxin oxidoreductase was identified as a potential bottleneck in both the supply of oxaloacetate for oxidation of acetate by the TCA cycle and the connection of glycolysis to production of ethanol. The P. carbinolicus genome was found to encode autotransporters and various appendages, including three proteins with similarity to the geopilin of electroconductive nanowires. Conclusions Several surprising metabolic capabilities and physiological features were predicted from the genome of P. carbinolicus, suggesting that it is more versatile than anticipated.

  3. Surprising results from abiotic enzyme digestion of dissolved organic matter at the molecular scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, N. J.; Tfaily, M. M.; Heredia-Langnar, A.; Rodriguez, L.; Purvine, E.; Todd-Brown, K. E.

    2016-12-01

    Sometimes even the simplest of experiments leads to unexpected results and new understanding. We extract dissolved organic matter using water from peat soil obtained from the S1 bog at the Marcell Experimental Forest in northern Minnesota. We characterized the dissolved organic matter in the water extract before and after adding glucosidase, peroxidase and β-N-Acetylglucosaminidase enzymes using electrospray Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry in negative ion mode. Based on mass measurement accuracy of less than 1 ppm for singly charged ions, we assigned putative chemical formula to greater than 80% of the measured mass spectrometry features. For each enzyme tested we are able to easily distinguish between the types and composition of dissolved organic molecules that are susceptible to enzyme degradation - and those that are not - based on the presence new compounds in reacted extracts and loss of compounds from the initial water extract. Next, we created a consensus molecular network analysis based on the neutral mass loss between the measured compounds for each enzyme. The connectivity within these networks suggested a unique, distinctive chemistry for each enzyme. Some results were expected, like the nondiscriminatory oxidation of organic molecules by peroxidase and preferential loss of lignin and tannin-like molecules by glucosidase. However, surprising results include the apparent reactivity of glucosidase enzymatic products to reassemble, forming larger mass organic molecules. While these experiments were conducted abiotically, these molecular-resolved results suggest that biotic enzymatic processes may result in product compounds with unexpected chemistry and reactivity, implying that our current conceptual model of microbial enzymatic activity may be overly simplistic.

  4. The analysis of eight transcriptomes from all poriferan classes reveals surprising genetic complexity in sponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesgo, Ana; Farrar, Nathan; Windsor, Pamela J; Giribet, Gonzalo; Leys, Sally P

    2014-05-01

    Sponges (Porifera) are among the earliest evolving metazoans. Their filter-feeding body plan based on choanocyte chambers organized into a complex aquiferous system is so unique among metazoans that it either reflects an early divergence from other animals prior to the evolution of features such as muscles and nerves, or that sponges lost these characters. Analyses of the Amphimedon and Oscarella genomes support this view of uniqueness-many key metazoan genes are absent in these sponges-but whether this is generally true of other sponges remains unknown. We studied the transcriptomes of eight sponge species in four classes (Hexactinellida, Demospongiae, Homoscleromorpha, and Calcarea) specifically seeking genes and pathways considered to be involved in animal complexity. For reference, we also sought these genes in transcriptomes and genomes of three unicellular opisthokonts, two sponges (A. queenslandica and O. carmela), and two bilaterian taxa. Our analyses showed that all sponge classes share an unexpectedly large complement of genes with other metazoans. Interestingly, hexactinellid, calcareous, and homoscleromorph sponges share more genes with bilaterians than with nonbilaterian metazoans. We were surprised to find representatives of most molecules involved in cell-cell communication, signaling, complex epithelia, immune recognition, and germ-lineage/sex, with only a few, but potentially key, absences. A noteworthy finding was that some important genes were absent from all demosponges (transcriptomes and the Amphimedon genome), which might reflect divergence from main-stem lineages including hexactinellids, calcareous sponges, and homoscleromorphs. Our results suggest that genetic complexity arose early in evolution as shown by the presence of these genes in most of the animal lineages, which suggests sponges either possess cryptic physiological and morphological complexity and/or have lost ancestral cell types or physiological processes.

  5. Young stars in old galaxies - surprising discovery with the world's leading telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-06-01

    similar to the way a palaeontologist uses the skeletons of dinosaurs to deduce information about the era in which they lived. A surprising discovery The team combined images of a number of galaxies from Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 with infrared images obtained from the multi-mode ISAAC instrument on the 8.2m VLT Antu telescope at the ESO Paranal Observatory (Chile). To their great surprise, they discovered that many of the globular clusters in one of these galaxies, NGC 4365, a member of the large Virgo cluster of galaxies, were only a few thousand million years old, much younger than most of the other stars in this galaxy (roughly 12 thousand million years old). The astronomers were able to identify three major groups of stellar clusters. There is an old population of clusters of metal-poor stars, some clusters of old but metal-rich stars and now, seen for the first time, a population of clusters with young and metal-rich stars. These results have been fully confirmed by spectroscopic observations made with another of the world's giant telescopes, the 10-metre Keck on Hawaii. "It is a great pleasure to see two projects wholly or partly funded by Europe - VLT and Hubble - work in concert to produce such an important scientific result", says Piero Benvenuti, ESA Hubble Project Scientist. "The synergy between the most advanced ground and space telescopes continues to prove its effectiveness, paving the way to impressive new discoveries that would not otherwise be possible." The discovery of young globular clusters within old galaxies is surprising since the stars in the giant elliptical galaxies were until now believed to have formed during a single period early in the history of the Universe. It is now clear that some of the galaxies may be hiding their true nature and have indeed experienced much more recent periods of major star formation. Notes for editors This press release is issued in coordination between ESA and ESO. The Hubble Space Telescope project

  6. A conceptual review of the psychosocial genomics of expectancy and surprise: neuroscience perspectives about the deep psychobiology of therapeutic hypnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Ernest L

    2002-10-01

    This conceptual review explores some speculative associations between the neuroscience of expectancy and surprise during stress and therapeutic hypnosis. Current neuroscience is exploring how novel interactions between the organism and the environment initiate cascades of gene expression, protein synthesis, neurogenesis, and healing that operate via Darwinian principles of natural variation and selection on all levels from the molecular-genomic to the subjective states of consciousness. From a neuroscience perspective, the novel and surprising experiences of consciousness appear to have as important a role as expectancy in memory, learning and behavior change in the psychobiology of therapeutic hypnosis. This paper explores how we may integrate the psychosocial genomics of expectancy and surprise in therapeutic hypnosis as a complex system of creative adaptation on all levels of human experience from mind to gene expression.

  7. How to Produce a Surprise Ending for Readers---Writing Strategies in O. Henry’s The Last Leaf

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚雪莹

    2014-01-01

    “Twist ending”is well used by writers in a novel in order to leave readers a strong impression. In this essay, the author will focus on the narrative strategies that produce such a surprise ending in a short story, using as the example O. Henry’s The Last Leaf (1907). The author gives each of strategies O. Henry used in the novel a name and explains how it is used to produce a surprise ending, standing at the readers’perspective.

  8. Erythropoietin and small molecule agonists of the tissue-protective erythropoietin receptor increase FXN expression in neuronal cells in vitro and in Fxn-deficient KIKO mice in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, James L; Rai, Myriam; Frigon, Normand L; Pandolfo, Massimo; Punnonen, Juha; Spencer, Jeffrey R

    2017-09-01

    Friedreich's ataxia (FA) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease caused by reduced levels of the mitochondrial protein frataxin (FXN). Recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO) increased FXN protein in vitro and in early clinical studies, while no published reports evaluate rhEPO in animal models of FA. STS-E412 and STS-E424 are novel small molecule agonists of the tissue-protective, but not the erythropoietic EPO receptor. We find that rhEPO, STS-E412 and STS-E424 increase FXN expression in vitro and in vivo. RhEPO, STS-E412 and STS-E424 increase FXN by up to 2-fold in primary human cortical cells and in retinoic-acid differentiated murine P19 cells. In primary human cortical cells, the increase in FXN protein was accompanied by an increase in FXN mRNA, detectable within 4 h. RhEPO and low nanomolar concentrations of STS-E412 and STS-E424 also increase FXN in normal and FA patient-derived PBMC by 20%-40% within 24 h, an effect that was comparable to that by HDAC inhibitor 4b. In vivo, STS-E412 increased Fxn mRNA and protein in wild-type C57BL6/j mice. RhEPO, STS-E412, and STS-E424 increase FXN expression in the heart of FXN-deficient KIKO mice. In contrast, FXN expression in the brains of KIKO mice increased following treatment with STS-E412 and STS-E424, but not following treatment with rhEPO. Unexpectedly, rhEPO-treated KIKO mice developed severe splenomegaly, while no splenomegaly was observed in STS-E412- or STS-E424-treated mice. RhEPO, STS-E412 and STS-E424 upregulate FXN expression in vitro at equal efficacy, however, the effects of the small molecules on FXN expression in the CNS are superior to rhEPO in vivo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Stocking characteristics and perceived increases in sales among small food store managers/owners associated with the introduction of new food products approved by the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, Guadalupe X; Laska, Melissa N; Zenk, Shannon N; Tester, June; Rose, Donald; Odoms-Young, Angela; McCoy, Tara; Gittelsohn, Joel; Foster, Gary D; Andreyeva, Tatiana

    2012-09-01

    The present study assessed the impact of the 2009 food packages mandated by the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) on perceived sales, product selection and stocking habits of small, WIC-authorized food stores. A cross-sectional study involving in-depth interviews with store managers/owners. Small, WIC-authorized food stores in eight major cities in the USA. Fifty-two store managers/owners who had at least 1 year of experience in the store prior to study participation. The WIC-approved food products (fresh, canned and frozen fruits; fresh, canned and frozen vegetables; wholegrain/whole-wheat bread; white corn/whole-wheat tortillas; brown rice; lower-fat milk (new WIC-approved foods including those considered most profitable (wholegrain/whole-wheat bread (89 %), lower-fat milk (89 %), white corn/whole wheat tortillas (54 %)), but perceived no changes in sales of processed fruits and vegetables. Supply mechanisms and frequency of supply acquisition were only moderately associated with perceived sales increases. Regardless of type or frequency of supply acquisition, perceived increases in sales provided some evidence for the potential sustainability of these WIC policy efforts and translation of this policy-based strategy to other health promotion efforts aimed at improving healthy food access in underserved communities.

  10. Gallic acid inhibits gastric cancer cells metastasis and invasive growth via increased expression of RhoB, downregulation of AKT/small GTPase signals and inhibition of NF-κB activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Hsieh-Hsun [Institute of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Chang, Chi-Sen [Department of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Division of Gastroenterology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Ho, Wei-Chi [Division of Gastroenterology, Jen-Ai Hospital, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Liao, Sheng-You [Institute of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Lin, Wea-Lung [Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Department of Pathology, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Wang, Chau-Jong, E-mail: wcj@csmu.edu.tw [Institute of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Research, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China)

    2013-01-01

    Our previous study demonstrated the therapeutic potential of gallic acid (GA) for controlling tumor metastasis through its inhibitory effect on the motility of AGS cells. A noteworthy finding in our previous experiment was increased RhoB expression in GA-treated cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of RhoB expression on the inhibitory effects of GA on AGS cells. By applying the transfection of RhoB siRNA into AGS cells and an animal model, we tested the effect of GA on inhibition of tumor growth and RhoB expression. The results confirmed that RhoB-siRNA transfection induced GA to inhibit AGS cells’ invasive growth involving blocking the AKT/small GTPase signals pathway and inhibition of NF-κB activity. Finally, we evaluated the effect of GA on AGS cell metastasis by colonization of tumor cells in nude mice. It showed GA inhibited tumor cells growth via the expression of RhoB. These data support the inhibitory effect of GA which was shown to inhibit gastric cancer cell metastasis and invasive growth via increased expression of RhoB, downregulation of AKT/small GTPase signals and inhibition of NF-κB activity. Thus, GA might be a potential agent in treating gastric cancer. Highlights: ► GA could downregulate AKT signal via increased expression of RhoB. ► GA inhibits metastasis in vitro in gastric carcinoma. ► GA inhibits tumor growth in nude mice model.

  11. Cordyceps militaris (L. Link Fruiting Body Reduces the Growth of a Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cell Line by Increasing Cellular Levels of p53 and p21

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Bizarro

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Cordyceps militaris (L. Link, an edible entomopathogenic fungus widely used in traditional Chinese medicine, has numerous potential medicinal properties including antitumor activity. The methanolic extract of C. militaris fruiting body was recently shown to have tumor cell growth inhibitory activity in several human tumor cell lines. Nonetheless, the mechanism of action involved is still not known. This work aimed at further studying the effect of the methanolic extract of C. militaris regarding its antitumor mechanism of action, using the non-small cell lung cancer cell line (NCI-H460 as a model. Results showed that treatment with the extract decreased cellular proliferation, induced cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 and increased apoptosis. In addition, the extract increased the levels of p53 and p21. Moreover, an increase in p-H2A.X and 53BP1 levels, together with an increase in the number of 53BP1 foci/cell (all indicative of DNA damage, were also observed after treatment with the extract. This work suggests that this extract affected NCI-H460 cellular viability through a mechanism involving DNA damage and p53 activation. This further supports the potential of this extract as a source of bioactive compounds, which may be used in anticancer strategies.

  12. VICTÓRIA GROCERY: CHALLENGES AND SURPRISES IN THAT “BE ENTREPREUNER”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Claudia Afra Neitzke

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The analytical framework outlined in the case at hand presents a business woman facing management decisions that impact business’ financial welfare. Lacking funds for both venture opening and short and long term support strategies, Amelia often resorts to family resources, and as a result, the financial crisis gets worse. Inasmuch, the case illustrates the importance of using financial controls in small businesses. However, it does not limit itself to this, since it describes everyday situations directly related to these businesses. The crime of embezzlement is also contextualized by the case, regarding the poor attitude of the accounting professional. The situation narrated actually happened with an entrepreneur who, while not possessing managerial skills, decided to open a business. Although centered in the perspective of a single subject, the case above fits into the story of many Brazilian entrepreneurs - since the lack of managerial expertise reveals one of the main reasons factors related to mortality in these businesses. Fateful situations in the context of failures in management process and insufficient working capital of small enterprise may lead to the early death of business.

  13. Young Adult Literature and the Common Core: A Surprisingly Good Fit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostenson, Jonathan; Wadham, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    Advocates have long argued that an increased role for young adult literature in the classroom would help students' reading development. At first glance, the widely adopted Common Core State Standards might seem in opposition to an increased role for such literature. A closer examination of the common core documents suggests, however, that young…

  14. Improving Therapeutic Outcomes in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer not Suitable for Curative Intent Therapy - A Review of the Role of Radiation Therapy in an Era of Increasing Systemic Therapy Options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, M

    2016-05-01

    Lung cancer is the highest cause of mortality from cancer worldwide. Most patients present with disease not suitable for curative therapeutic options. In these patients, radiation therapy provides durable palliation of symptoms due to intrathoracic disease, whereas systemic chemotherapy improves survival compared with best supportive care. Over recent years the systemic therapeutic options available for the non-curative management of advanced lung cancer, particularly non-small cell lung cancer, have expanded to include molecularly targeted agents and immune modulating agents. The aim of this overview is to review the role and future of radiation therapy in this era of increasing systemic therapy options with particular emphasis on how radiation therapy can be used to improve therapeutic outcomes.

  15. Otters Increasing - Threats Increasing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Kranz

    1994-10-01

    Full Text Available In some parts of Central Europe populations of otters are apparently increasing. Until recently, no research was being conducted on the ecology of otters in mainly artificial habitats like fish farms. Otters are not only a new source of conflict requiring species management, but appear once again threatened by illegal hunting. Austria is dealing with this problem using compensation for otter damage, electric fencing and translocation of problem otters. Despite a rise in illegal killing, Austria does not formally recognise this as a threat.

  16. The surprising outcome of a giant primary mediastinal synovial sarcoma treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balieiro, Marcos Alexandre; Lopes, Agnaldo José; Costa, Bruno Pinheiro; Veras, Gustavo Perissé Moreira; Perelson, Paulo Sergio; Acatauassú Nunes, Rodolfo; Saito, Eduardo Haruo

    2013-02-01

    There are only a few cases of primary mediastinal synovial sarcoma in the literature. Normally, they do not respond well to chemotherapy. In our case, a 30-year-old patient was admitted due to thoracic pain, dyspnea, orthopnea, cough, hoarseness and weight loss over a 3-month period as well as a dramatic worsening a week before the admission. A chest radiography showed a completely white left hemithorax and contralateral mediastinal shift; in addition, a chest tomography revealed a giant heterogeneous mediastinal mass, lung atelectasia and a small pleural effusion. The patient was submitted to Chamberlain procedure (biopsy) under local anesthesia and the diagnosis of a synovial sarcoma was obtained after immunohistochemical analysis. Due to his poor general condition, he received chemotherapy first, with a dramatic response, after what, the mass that had been reduced was removed surgically. After a 5-year- follow-up period there are no signs of disease recurrence.

  17. Direct terrestrial–marine correlation demonstrates surprisingly late onset of the last interglacial in central Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sier, Mark J.; Roebroeks, Wil; Bakels, Corrie C.; Dekkers, Mark J.; Brühl, Enrico; De Loecker, Dimitri; Gaudzinski-Windheuser, Sabine; Hesse, Norbert; Jagich, Adam; Kindler, Lutz; Kuijper, Wim J.; Laurat, Thomas; Mücher, Herman J.; Penkman, Kirsty E.H.; Richter, Daniel; van Hinsbergen, Douwe J.J.

    2011-01-01

    An interdisciplinary study of a small sedimentary basin at Neumark Nord 2 (NN2), Germany, has yielded a high-resolution record of the palaeomagnetic Blake Event, which we are able to place at the early part of the last interglacial pollen sequence documented from the same section. We use this data to calculate the duration of this stratigraphically important event at 3400 ± 350 yr. More importantly, the Neumark Nord 2 data enables precise terrestrial–marine correlation for the Eemian stage in central Europe. This shows a remarkably large time lag of ca. 5000 yr between the MIS 5e ‘peak’ in the marine record and the start of the last interglacial in this region. PMID:26523075

  18. A surprising cause of wheezing in a morbidly obese patient: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurnutala LN

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Lakshmi N Kurnutala, Minal Joshi, Hattiyangadi Kamath, Joel Yarmush Department of Anesthesiology, New York Methodist Hospital, Brooklyn, NY, USA Abstract: A typical patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease has small airway disease, which often responds to bronchodilators. If the patient is obese, he or she may be further compromised and not tolerate being in the supine position. We present a case of a patient with history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and obstructive sleep apnea with acute renal failure and urosepsis scheduled for an emergent debridement of Fournier's gangrene. In this patient, the fiberoptic intubation was performed in semi-Fowler's position, and tracheomalacia was observed. Keywords: tracheomalacia, difficult airway, fiberoptic intubation, COPD

  19. Sermon and surprise: The meaning of scheduling in broadcast radio history - and - CBC Radio 3: A disquieting revolution

    OpenAIRE

    Sahota, Anu

    2006-01-01

    Essay 1 : 'Sermon & Surprise' explores the importance of scheduling to radio's communicative uses. The essay argues that its capacity for continuous transmission and promotion of shared listening is unique to terrestrial radio. The strengths of traditional radio relative to contemporary on-demand audio media are explored. Early Canadian and British broadcasting policies and scheduling practices demonstrate how radio's programming conceits may innovatively accommodate broadcasting philosop...

  20. Lepr(db/db Mice with senescence marker protein-30 knockout (Lepr(db/dbSmp30(Y/- exhibit increases in small dense-LDL and severe fatty liver despite being fed a standard diet.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshitaka Kondo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/AIMS: The senescence marker protein-30 (SMP30 is a 34 kDa protein originally identified in rat liver that shows decreased levels with age. Several functional studies using SMP30 knockout (Smp30(Y/- mice established that SMP30 functions as an antioxidant and protects against apoptosis. To address the potential role of SMP30 in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD pathogenesis, we established Smp30(Y/- mice on a Lepr(db/db background (Lepr(db/dbSmp30(Y/- mice. RESEARCH DESIGN/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Male Lepr(db/dbSmp30(Y/- mice were fed a standard diet (340 kcal/100 g, fat 5.6% for 16 weeks whereupon the lipid/lipoprotein profiles, hepatic expression of genes related to lipid metabolism and endoplasmic reticulum stress markers were analyzed by HPLC, quantitative RT-PCR and western blotting, respectively. Changes in the liver at a histological level were also investigated. The amount of SMP30 mRNA and protein in livers was decreased in Lepr(db/dbSmp30(Y/+ mice compared with Lepr(db/+Smp30(Y/+ mice. Compared with Lepr(db/dbSmp30(Y/+ mice, 24 week old Lepr(db/dbSmp30(Y/- mice showed: i increased small dense LDL-cho and decreased HDL-cho levels; ii fatty liver accompanied by numerous inflammatory cells and increased oxidative stress; iii decreased mRNA expression of genes involved in fatty acid oxidation (PPARα and lipoprotein uptake (LDLR and VLDLR but increased CD36 levels; and iv increased endoplasmic reticulum stress. CONCLUSION: Our data strongly suggest that SMP30 is closely associated with NAFLD pathogenesis, and might be a possible therapeutic target for NAFLD.

  1. Quality, Quantity, And Surprise! Trade-Offs In X-Raser ASAT Attrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaham, Michael B.; Scibilia, Frank M.

    1984-08-01

    In order to characterize the effects of technological superiority, numerical superiority, and pre-emption on space battle outcomes, we have constructed a battle simulation in which "Red" and "Blue" ASATs, each armed with a specified number of x-ray lasers of specified range, move along specified orbits and fire on one another according to a pair of battle management algorithms. The simulated battle proceeds until apparent steady-state force levels are reached. Battle outcomes are characterized by terminal force ratio and by terminal force-exchange ratio as effective weapon range, multiplicity (x-rasers per ASAT), and pre-emptive role are varied parametrically. A major conclusion is that pre-emptive advantage increases with increasing x-raser range and multiplicity (x-rasers per ASAT) and with increasing force size. That is, the "use 'em or lose 'em" dilemma will become more stark as such weapons are refined and proliferated.

  2. MicroRNA-106b-25 cluster targets β-TRCP2, increases the expression of Snail and enhances cell migration and invasion in H1299 (non small cell lung cancer) cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savita, Udainiya; Karunagaran, Devarajan, E-mail: karuna@iitm.ac.in

    2013-05-17

    Highlights: •miR-106b-25 cluster directly targets the 3′UTR of the β-TRCP2 transcript. •β-TRCP2 mRNA was lower in H1299 cells stably expressing miR-106b-25 cluster. •miR-106b-25 cluster increased the expression of Snail. •miR-106b-25 cluster promoted the migration, colony formation and invasion. •miR-106b-25 cluster enhanced endothelial tube formation. -- Abstract: Lung cancer causes high mortality without a declining trend and non small cell lung cancer represents 85% of all pulmonary carcinomas. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) serve as fine regulators of proliferation, migration, invasion/metastasis and angiogenesis of normal and cancer cells. Using TargetScan6.2, we predicted that the ubiquitin ligase, β-TRCP2, could be a target for two of the constituent miRNAs of the miR-106b-25 cluster (miR-106b and miR-93). We generated a stable clone of miR-106b-25 cluster (CL) or the empty vector (EV) in H1299 (non small cell lung cancer) cells. The expression of β-TRCP2 mRNA was significantly lower in CL than that in EV cells. Transient expression of miR-93 but not antimiR-93 decreased the expression of β-TRCP2 mRNA in H1299 cells. β-TRCP2-3′UTR reporter assay revealed that its activity in CL cells was only 60% of that in EV cells. Snail protein expression was higher in CL than that in EV cells and H1299 cells exhibited an increase in the expression of Snail upon transient transfection with miR-93. miR-106b-25 cluster-induced migration of CL measured by scratch assay was more than that in EV cells and no significant difference in migration was observed between antimiR-93-transfected H1299 cells and the corresponding control-oligo-transfected cells. miR-106b-25 cluster-induced migration of CL cells was again confirmed in a Boyden chamber assay without the matrigel. CL cells were more invasive than EV cells when assessed using Boyden chambers with matrigel but there were no significant changes in the cell viabilities between EV and CL cells. Colony formation assay

  3. Driving Technological Surprise: DARPA’s Mission in a Changing World

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    fundamental ways. Our research, innovation, and entrepreneurial capacity is the envy of the world, but others are building universities, labs, and...through deep engagement with companies, universities, and DoD and other labs. Our success hinges on having a healthy U.S. R&D ecosystem . Within...contest our ability to project military power. Our economy is increasingly interdependent with a China that is redefining its own position in

  4. Mitigating Aviation Communication and Satellite Orbit Operations Surprises from Adverse Space Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobiska, W. Kent

    2008-01-01

    Adverse space weather affects operational activities in aviation and satellite systems. For example, large solar flares create highly variable enhanced neutral atmosphere and ionosphere electron density regions. These regions impact aviation communication frequencies as well as precision orbit determination. The natural space environment, with its dynamic space weather variability, is additionally changed by human activity. The increase in orbital debris in low Earth orbit (LEO), combined with lower atmosphere CO2 that rises into the lower thermosphere and causes increased cooling that results in increased debris lifetime, adds to the environmental hazards of navigating in near-Earth space. This is at a time when commercial space endeavors are posed to begin more missions to LEO during the rise of the solar activity cycle toward the next maximum (2012). For satellite and aviation operators, adverse space weather results in greater expenses for orbit management, more communication outages or aviation and ground-based high frequency radio used, and an inability to effectively plan missions or service customers with space-based communication, imagery, and data transferal during time-critical activities. Examples of some revenue-impacting conditions and solutions for mitigating adverse space weather are offered.

  5. Self-organizing weights for Internet AS-graphs and surprisingly simple routing metrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholz, Jan Carsten; Greiner, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The transport capacity of Internet-like communication networks and hence their efficiency may be improved by a factor of 5–10 through the use of highly optimized routing metrics, as demonstrated previously. The numerical determination of such routing metrics can be computationally demanding...... metrics. The new metrics have negligible computational cost and result in an approximately 5-fold performance increase, providing distinguished competitiveness with the computationally costly counterparts. They are applicable to very large networks and easy to implement in today's Internet routing...... protocol on the AS-level....

  6. Im/Ex in August,2010: Trade Surplus in Surprise Drop

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    @@ On September 10,2010,General Administration of Customs of the People's Republic of China (GAC) released the profile of China foreign trade import and export in August and the first eight months of this year.China's foreign trade in the first eight months totaled US$1.88 trillion,a year-on-year increase of 40 percent,according to the GAC.Trade surplus for the first eight months of the year totaled US$103.9 billion,down 14.6 percent from the same period last year.

  7. Short- and long-lasting consequences of novelty, deviance and surprise on brain and cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schomaker, J; Meeter, M

    2015-08-01

    When one encounters a novel stimulus this sets off a cascade of brain responses, activating several neuromodulatory systems. As a consequence novelty has a wide range of effects on cognition; improving perception and action, increasing motivation, eliciting exploratory behavior, and promoting learning. Here, we review these benefits and how they may arise in the brain. We propose a framework that organizes novelty's effects on brain and cognition into three groups. First, novelty can transiently enhance perception. This effect is proposed to be mediated by novel stimuli activating the amygdala and enhancing early sensory processing. Second, novel stimuli can increase arousal, leading to short-lived effects on action in the first hundreds of milliseconds after presentation. We argue that these effects are related to deviance, rather than to novelty per se, and link them to activation of the locus-coeruleus norepinephrine system. Third, spatial novelty may trigger the dopaminergic mesolimbic system, promoting dopamine release in the hippocampus, having longer-lasting effects, up to tens of minutes, on motivation, reward processing, and learning and memory.

  8. The surprising magnetic topology of τ Sco: fossil remnant or dynamo output?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donati, J.-F.; Howarth, I. D.; Jardine, M. M.; Petit, P.; Catala, C.; Landstreet, J. D.; Bouret, J.-C.; Alecian, E.; Barnes, J. R.; Forveille, T.; Paletou, F.; Manset, N.

    2006-08-01

    We report the discovery of a medium-strength (~0.5 kG) magnetic field on the young, massive star τ Sco (B0.2V), which becomes the third-hottest magnetic star known. Circularly polarized Zeeman signatures are clearly detected in observations collected mostly with the ESPaDOnS spectropolarimeter, recently installed on the 3.6-m Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope; temporal variability is also clearly established in the polarimetry, and can be unambiguously attributed to rotational modulation with a period close to 41 d. Archival ultraviolet (UV) spectra confirm that this modulation repeats over time-scales of decades, and refine the rotation period to 41.033 +/- 0.002 d. Despite the slow rotation rate of τ Sco, we none the less succeed in reconstructing the large-scale structure of its magnetic topology. We find that the magnetic structure is unusually complex for a hot star, with significant power in spherical-harmonic modes of degree up to 5. The surface topology is dominated by a potential field, although a moderate toroidal component is probably present. We fail to detect intrinsic temporal variability of the magnetic structure over the 1.5-yr period of our spectropolarimetric observations (in agreement with the stable temporal variations of the UV spectra), and infer that any differential surface rotation must be very small. The topology of the extended magnetic field that we derive from the photospheric magnetic maps is also more complex than a global dipole, and features in particular a significantly warped torus of closed magnetic loops encircling the star (tilted at about 90° to the rotation axis), with additional, smaller, networks of closed-field lines. This topology appears to be consistent with the exceptional X-ray properties of τ Sco and also provides a natural explanation of the variability observed in wind-formed UV lines. Although we cannot completely rule out the possibility that the field is produced through dynamo processes of an exotic kind, we

  9. Increased oil production and reserves utilizing secondary/tertiary recovery techniques on small reservoirs in the Paradox basin, Utah. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1996--June 30, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison, M.L.

    1996-08-01

    The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced oil recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}-)flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place in the Paradox basin within the Navajo Nation. The results of this project will be transferred to industry and other researchers through a petroleum extension service, creation of digital databases for distribution, technical workshops and seminars, field trips, technical presentations at national and regional professional meetings, and publication in newsletters and various technical or trade journals.

  10. Photovoltaic Small Molecules of TPA(FxBT-T-Cz)3: Tuning Open-Circuit Voltage over 1.0 V for Their Organic Solar Cells by Increasing Fluorine Substitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiong; Duan, Linrui; Tao, Qiang; Peng, Wenhong; Chen, Jianhua; Tan, Hua; Yang, Renqiang; Zhu, Weiguo

    2016-11-09

    To simultaneously improve both open-circuit voltage (Voc) and short-circuit current density (Jsc) for organic solar cells, a novel D(A-π-Ar)3 type of photovoltaic small molecules of TPA(FxBT-T-3Cz)3 was designed and synthesized, which contain central triphenylamine (TPA), terminal carbazole (Cz), armed fluorine-substituted benzothiadiazole (FxBT, where x = 1 or 2), and bridged thiophene (T) units. A narrowed ultraviolet-visible absorption and a decreasing highest occupied molecular orbital energy level were observed from TPA(F1BT-T-3Cz)3 to TPA(F2BT-T-3Cz)3 with increasing fluorine substitution. However, the TPA(F2BT-T-3Cz)3/PC71BM-based solar devices showed a rising Voc of 1.01 V and an enhanced Jsc of 10.84 mA cm(-2) as well as a comparable power conversion efficiency of 4.81% in comparison to the TPA(F1BT-T-3Cz)3/PC71BM-based devices. Furthermore, in comparison to the parent TPA(BT-T-3Cz)3 molecule without fluorine substitution, the fluorine-substituted TPA(FxBT-T-3Cz)3 molecules exhibited significantly incremental Voc and Jsc values in their bulk heterojunction organic solar cells, owing to fluorine incorporation in the electron-deficient benzothiadiazole unit.

  11. Unilateral and Immediate Stimulation of Acupuncture Points Xiaohai (SI8) and Jianwaishu (SI14) of the Small Intestine Meridian Increases Electromyographic Activity and Strength in the Ipsilateral and Contralateral Upper Trapezius Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Leandro L; de Araujo, Fernanda L B; da Silva, Fernanda A M; Mucciaroni, Thaís S; de Araujo, João E

    2016-10-01

    We previously showed that a yin meridian of the upper limb decreased electromyographic activity (root mean square) and muscle strength ipsilateral and contralateral to the side of stimulation. Here, we tested the upper trapezius (UT) muscle response after stimulation of a yang meridian of the upper limb, the small intestine (SI). Thirty-eight healthy volunteers were randomized into the following groups: UT muscle (SI14), distant of the UT muscle (SI8), without stimulation (CG), and sham (R3). An acupuncturist certificated by the Brazilian Society of Physical Therapists and Acupuncturists performed the needle insertion. Each volunteer received only one stimulation to the right upper limb. The evaluation occurred before, 5 minutes after, and 20 minutes after needle withdrawal. The root mean square activity increased on the right side in the UT muscle for the SI8 and SI14 groups (F3,37 = 4.67; p muscle strength at the 20-minute evaluation (F3,37 = 3.41; p muscle response.

  12. Pressure-dependent surface viscosity and its surprising consequences in interfacial lubrication flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikantan, Harishankar; Squires, Todd M.

    2017-02-01

    The surface shear rheology of many insoluble surfactants depends strongly on the surface pressure (or concentration) of that surfactant. Here we highlight the dramatic consequences that surface-pressure-dependent surface viscosities have on interfacially dominant flows, by considering lubrication-style geometries within high Boussinesq (Bo) number flows. As with three-dimensional lubrication, high-Bo surfactant flows through thin gaps give high surface pressures, which in turn increase the local surface viscosity, further amplifying lubrication stresses and surface pressures. Despite their strong nonlinearity, the governing equations are separable, so that results from two-dimensional Newtonian lubrication analyses may be immediately adapted to treat surfactant monolayers with a general functional form of ηs(Π ) . Three paradigmatic systems are analyzed to reveal qualitatively new features: a maximum, self-limiting value for surfactant fluxes and particle migration velocities appears for Π -thickening surfactants, and kinematic reversibility is broken for the journal bearing and for suspensions more generally.

  13. Self-organizing weights for Internet AS-graphs and surprisingly simple routing metrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholz, Jan Carsten; Greiner, Martin

    The transport capacity of Internet-like communication networks and hence their efficiency may be improved by a factor of 5-10 through the use of highly optimized routing metrics, as demonstrated previously. Numerical determination of such routing metrics can be computationally demanding to an ext......The transport capacity of Internet-like communication networks and hence their efficiency may be improved by a factor of 5-10 through the use of highly optimized routing metrics, as demonstrated previously. Numerical determination of such routing metrics can be computationally demanding...... metrics. The new metrics have negligible computational cost and result in an approximately 5-fold performance increase, providing distinguished competitiveness with the computationally costly counterparts. They are applicable to very large networks and easy to implement in today's Internet routing...... protocol on the AS-level....

  14. Structural surprises in friction-deposited films of poly(tetrafluoroethylene)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breiby, Dag Werner; Sølling, Theis Ivan; Bunk, Oliver

    2005-01-01

    Thin films of poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) produced by friction deposition were studied using grazing incidence X-ray diffraction as the principal tool. The structure of the deposited thin films was compared with that of the surface of the PTFE bar used for depositing the films. Both exhibited...... the 15/7 helix conformation characteristic of crystal PTFE phase IV. A high degree of biaxial orientation was found for the highly crystalline thin films. Whereas the unit cell of the bar surface material appeared to be single-stem hexagonal, the film displayed diffraction characteristics consistent...... with a larger multistem unit cell. The origin of this increase of the unit cell is attributed to a higher degree of regular packing, possibly related to alternating right- and left-handed PTFE helices-a structure which has never been verified experimentally for PTFE in the 15/7 configuration. We discuss...

  15. Increasing Flexibility and Agility at the National Reconnaissance Office: Lessons from Modular Design, Occupational Surprise, and Commercial Research and Development Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    flexibility comes at a price: The tools in the Swiss Army knife will never perform as well as a dedicated knife, cork- screw , or pair of scissors. Different...primary function of the camera, which is to take photographs. Another example is bedding, which comes in standard sizes (e.g., twin , queen, king). This...longer document greatly expands on these topics, includ- ing additional context on our hypotheses and data collection methods, along with additional

  16. Communication Management and Trust: Their Role in Building Resilience to "Surprises" Such As Natural Disasters, Pandemic Flu, and Terrorism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. H. Longstaff

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available In times of public danger such as natural disasters and health emergencies, a country's communication systems will be some of its most important assets because access to information will make individuals and groups more resilient. Communication by those charged with dealing with the situation is often critical. We analyzed reports from a wide variety of crisis incidents and found a direct correlation between trust and an organization's preparedness and internal coordination of crisis communication and the effectiveness of its leadership. Thus, trust is one of the most important variables in effective communication management in times of "surprise."

  17. Organometallic Ru(II) Photosensitizers Derived from π-Expansive Cyclometalating Ligands: Surprising Theranostic PDT Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainuddin, Tariq; McCain, Julia; Pinto, Mitch; Yin, Huimin; Gibson, Jordan; Hetu, Marc; McFarland, Sherri A

    2016-01-04

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the influence of π-expansive cyclometalating ligands on the photophysical and photobiological properties of organometallic Ru(II) compounds. Four compounds with increasing π conjugation on the cyclometalating ligand were prepared, and their structures were confirmed by HPLC, 1D and 2D (1)H NMR, and mass spectrometry. The properties of these compounds differed substantially from their Ru(II) polypyridyl counterparts. Namely, they were characterized by red-shifted absorption, very weak to no room temperature phosphorescence, extremely short phosphorescence state lifetimes ( 300 μM) but was phototoxic to cells in the nanomolar regime. Exceptionally large phototherapeutic margins, exceeding 3 orders of magnitude in some cases, were accompanied by bright ligand-centered intracellular fluorescence in cancer cells. Thus, Ru(II) organometallic systems derived from π-expansive cyclometalating ligands, such 4,9,16-triazadibenzo[a,c]napthacene (pbpn), represent the first class of potent light-responsive Ru(II) cyclometalating agents with theranostic potential.

  18. Complex Outcomes from Insect and Weed Control with Transgenic Plants: Ecological Surprises?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Bøhn

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Agriculture is fundamental for human survival through food production and is performed in ecosystems that, while simplified, still operate along ecological principles and retain complexity. Agricultural plants are thus part of ecological systems, and interact in complex ways with the surrounding terrestrial, soil, and aquatic habitats. We discuss three case studies that demonstrate how agricultural solutions to pest and weed control, if they overlook important ecological and evolutionary factors, cause “surprises”: (i the fast emergence of resistance against the crop-inserted Bt-toxin in South Africa, (ii the ecological changes generated by Bt-cotton landscapes in China, and (iii the decline of the monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus, in North America. The recognition that we work with complex systems is in itself important, as it should limit the belief in reductionist solutions. Agricultural practices lacking eco-evolutionary understanding result in “surprises” like resistance evolution both in weeds and pest insects, risking the reappearance of the “pesticide treadmill”—with increased use of toxic pesticides as the follow-up. We recommend prioritization of research that counteracts the tendencies of reductionist approaches. These may be beneficial on a short term, but with trade-off costs on a medium- to long-term. Such costs include loss of biodiversity, ecosystem services, long-term soil productivity, pollution, and reduced food quality.

  19. Surprises perilous: toxic health hazards for employees unloading fumigated shipping containers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preisser, Alexandra M; Budnik, Lygia T; Hampel, Eva; Baur, Xaver

    2011-08-01

    The fumigation of freight containers to protect transported goods from fungal and pest infestation has increased worldwide in the last five years due to international regulations requiring fumigation or heat treatment of wooden packaging material and dunnage. We have found in 2008 that every sixth container and its contents do retain harmful concentrations of various fumigants and chemicals, representing a significant health risk for port and transport workers, customs officials, warehousemen, store employees and consumers. The shipping documents of these containers did not provide any information about the fumigation procedure or the used fumigant. We report here the cases of 26 patients introduced to our outpatient clinic with presumed intoxication to fumigants, or with symptoms due to inhaling the air out of fumigated containers. All patients were examined from 2007 to 2010 according to a standardized comprehensive diagnostic program. We were able to confirm the diagnosis based on typical symptoms and extensive clinical examination; by laboratory analysis we identified ethylene dichloride, methyl bromide, phosphine and methylene chloride. The predominant symptoms were headaches, concentration and memory problems, dizziness and nausea, irritation of the skin and mucous membranes and a reduced ability to do exercise. In addition to the neurological and neuropsychological impairments our analyses verified the development of reactive airways dysfunction syndrome (RADS) in 14 of 26 patients with long lasting symptoms due to their contact with fumigants. Intoxications with fumigants are serious and could be avoided. These systematical explored cases show the sustainable impact for health and socio-economic wellbeing. These findings also emphasize the necessity for international standards on permitted fumigants, appropriate labeling in the shipping documents and handling of fumigated containers.

  20. The heart and brain imaging in lone atrial fibrillation - are we surprised?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shantsila, Eduard; Haeusler, Karl Georg; Fiebach, Jochen B; Breithardt, Gunter; Kirchhof, Paulus

    2015-01-01

    "Lone" atrial fibrillation (AF) is generally used to refer to patients with AF in the absence of structural heart disease. When the decision for oral anticoagulation is discussed, "lone" AF refers to patients who do not have established stroke risk factors. Imaging is often used to rule out structural heart disease, e.g. coronary artery disease, peripheral vascular disease, mitral stenosis or left ventricular (LV) dysfunction. Imaging of the heart has a central role in establishing the "lone" aspect in patients with "lone"AF, similar to the measurement of blood glucose and blood pressure: Patients with structural heart disease, defined as e.g. reduced LV ejection fraction, clinical evidence for heart failure, or evidence for coronary artery disease, will not be considered as patients with "lone" AF. The search for these conditions requires some cardiac imaging, often done by echocardiography and non-invasive tests for coronary artery disease or ischemia. Increasingly, brain imaging is used to define the clinical diagnosis of a stroke, thus also contributing to the detection of stroke risk factors. Cerebral imaging in AF patients without competing causes for silent strokes or microbleeds ("lone" AF, rather used in the context of anticoagulation, i.e. clinical absence of structural heart disease) would allow to better understand the contribution of AF to these brain lesions. The assumption that silent strokes are likely drivers of cognitive dysfunction, and the fact that microbleeds put patients at risk for intracerebral hemorrhage, illustrates the need to collect information on brain imaging. In this review article, we summarize current data on heart and brain imaging in patients with "lone" AF and discuss their clinical implications for risk assessment and management of patients with "lone" AF.

  1. Increasing the accuracy of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT interpretation of “mildly positive” mediastinal nodes in the staging of non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moloney, F., E-mail: fiachramoloney@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Cork University Hospital, Cork - 00353214922000 (Ireland); Ryan, D., E-mail: ryansurgeon@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Cork University Hospital, Cork - 00353214922000 (Ireland); McCarthy, L., E-mail: lauraghmccarthy1@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Cork University Hospital, Cork - 00353214922000 (Ireland); McCarthy, J., E-mail: julie.mccarthy@hse.ie [Department of Pathology, Cork University Hospital, Cork - 0214922000 (Ireland); Burke, L., E-mail: louise.burke@hse.ie [Department of Pathology, Cork University Hospital, Cork - 0214922000 (Ireland); Henry, M.T., E-mail: michael.henry@hse.ie [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Cork University Hospital, Cork - 00353214922000 (Ireland); Kennedy, M.P., E-mail: marcus.kennedy@hse.ie [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Cork University Hospital, Cork - 00353214922000 (Ireland); Hinchion, J., E-mail: John.Hinchion@hse.ie [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Cork University Hospital, Cork - 00353214922000 (Ireland); McSweeney, S., E-mail: Sean.McSweeny@hse.ie [Department of Radiology, Cork University Hospital, Cork - 00353214922000 (Ireland); Maher, M.M., E-mail: m.maher@ucc.ie [Department of Radiology, Cork University Hospital, Cork - 00353214922000 (Ireland); O’Regan, K., E-mail: kevin.ORegan1@hse.ie [Department of Radiology, Cork University Hospital, Cork - 00353214922000 (Ireland)

    2014-05-15

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to identify radiological factors that may reduce false-positive results and increase diagnostic accuracy when staging the mediastinum of patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). Methods: This was a retrospective, interdisciplinary, per-node analysis study. We included patients with NSCLC and mediastinal nodes with an SUV max in the range of 2.5–4.0 on PET-CT. We hypothesized that the greatest number of false positive cases would occur in this cohort of patients. Results: A total of 92 mediastinal lymph nodes were analyzed in 44 patients. Mediastinal disease (N2/N3) was histologically confirmed in 15 of 44 patients and in 34 of 92 lymph nodes; positive predictive value of 37% and false positive rate of 63%. Lymph node SUV max, tumor size, ratio of node SUV max to tumor SUV max (SUVn/SUVp), and ratio of node SUV max to node size (SUV n/SADn) were significantly higher in true positive cases. Using a threshold of 0.3 for SUV node/tumor and 3 for SUV node/size yielded sensitivities of 91% and 71% and specificities of 71% and 69% respectively for the detection of mediastinal disease. Using both ratios in combination resulted in a sensitivity of 65% and a specificity of 88%. Concurrent benign lung disease was observed significantly more frequently in false-positive cases. Conclusion: SUVn/SUVpt and SUVn/SADn may be complimentary to conventional visual interpretation and SUV max measurement in the assessment of mediastinal disease in patients with NSCLC.

  2. The APE1 Asp/Asp genotype and the combination of APE1 Asp/Asp and hOGG1-Cys variants are associated with increased p53 mutation in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chun-Hsuan; Chen, Po-Ming; Cheng, Ya-Wen; Chen, Chih-Yi; Yuan, Chiun-Jye; Lee, Huei

    2012-01-01

    The hOGG1 Ser326Cys polymorphism is associated with lung cancer risk, but there are limited data regarding an association between the APE1 Asp148Glu polymorphism and lung cancer. Biological evidence shows that the hOGG1-Cys allele results in less DNA repair activity; however, this is not associated with p53 mutation in lung cancer. Therefore, we investigated whether an interaction between hOGG1 and APE1 is associated with the frequency of p53 mutation in lung cancer. We studied 217 Taiwanese adults with primary lung cancer. DNA polymorphisms of hOGG1 and APE1 were determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based restriction fragment length polymorphism. Mutations in p53 exons 5-8 were detected by direct sequencing. Multiple logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% CIs for the risk of p53 mutation associated with polymorphisms of hOGG1 and APE1 in lung cancer. As expected, no association between hOGG1 polymorphism and p53 mutation was observed in this population. However, a higher risk of p53 mutation was found in participants with the APE1 Asp/Asp genotype than in those with the APE1-Glu allele (OR, 2.15; 95% CI, 1.19-3.87; P = 0.011). The risk of p53 mutation was also higher in participants with APE1 Asp/Asp plus hOGG1-Cys than in those with APE1-Glu plus hOGG1 Ser/Ser (OR, 3.72; 95% CI, 1.33-10.40; P = 0.012). These results suggest that the APE1 Asp/Asp genotype and the combination of the APE1 Asp/Asp and hOGG1-Cys variants are associated with increased risk of p53 mutation in non-small cell lung cancer.

  3. Small Area Fair Market Rent

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — Due to the increasing demand for more localized rents for a variety of purposes, HUD is making Small Area FMRs for all metropolitan areas available. Small Area FMRs...

  4. No surprises, please!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Dena S

    2013-01-01

    This narrative symposium examines the relationship of bioethics practice to personal experiences of illness. A call for stories was developed by Tod Chambers, the symposium editor, and editorial staff and was sent to several commonly used bioethics listservs and posted on the Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics website. The call asked authors to relate a personal story of being ill or caring for a person who is ill, and to describe how this affected how they think about bioethical questions and the practice of medicine. Eighteen individuals were invited to submit full stories based on review of their proposals. Twelve stories are published in this symposium, and six supplemental stories are published online only through Project MUSE. Authors explore themes of vulnerability, suffering, communication, voluntariness, cultural barriers, and flaws in local healthcare systems through stories about their own illnesses or about caring for children, partners, parents and grandparents. Commentary articles by Arthur Frank, Bradley Lewis, and Carol Taylor follow the collection of personal narratives.

  5. Tohoku earthquake: a surprise?

    CERN Document Server

    Kagan, Yan Y

    2011-01-01

    We consider three issues related to the 2011 Tohoku mega-earthquake: (1) how to evaluate the earthquake maximum size in subduction zones, (2) what is the repeat time for the largest earthquakes in Tohoku area, and (3) what are the possibilities of short-term forecasts during the 2011 sequence. There are two quantitative methods which can be applied to estimate the maximum earthquake size: a statistical analysis of the available earthquake record and the moment conservation principle. The latter technique studies how much of the tectonic deformation rate is released by earthquakes. For the subduction zones, the seismic or historical record is not sufficient to provide a reliable statistical measure of the maximum earthquake. The moment conservation principle yields consistent estimates of maximum earthquake size: for all the subduction zones the magnitude is of the order 9.0--9.7, and for major subduction zones the maximum earthquake size is statistically indistinguishable. Starting in 1999 we have carried out...

  6. A Pleasant Goat Surprise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JING XIAOLEI

    2010-01-01

    @@ For decades,Chinese children have sat in front of television sets mesmerized as American cartoon cat Tom chased mouse rival Jerry,or as the Japanese manga robot feline Doraemon helped his schoolboy companion Nobita Nobi.Now,the animated tables are turning and foreign kids are able to enjoy Chinese cartoons from the comfort of their couches.

  7. More statistics, less surprise

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso & the LHCb collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The LHCb collaboration has recently announced new results for a parameter that measures the CP violation effect in particles containing charm quarks. The new values obtained with a larger data set and with a new independent method are showing that the effect is smaller than previous measurements had  suggested. The parameter is back into the Standard Model picture.   CP violation signals – in particles containing charm quarks, such as the D0 particle, is a powerful probe of new physics. Indeed, such effects could result in unexpected values of parameters whose expectation values in the Standard Model are known. Although less precise than similar approaches used in particles made of b quarks, the investigation of the charm system has proven  to be intriguing. The LHCb collaboration has reported new measurements of ΔACP, the difference in CP violation between the D0→K+K– and D0→π+π– decays. The results are ob...

  8. Surprised by selectivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Krijn P|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/06885580X

    2016-01-01

    Lower olefins, particularly ethylene (C2H4), propylene (C3H6), and butylene (C4H8), are important intermediates in the manufacture of products such as plastics, solvents, paints, and medicines. They are produced worldwide in amounts exceeding 200 million tons per year (see the photo) (1), mostly

  9. The surprising superconductor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taner Yildirim

    2002-04-01

    The serendipitous discovery by Akimitsu’s group1 of the superconductivity of MgB2 at Tc=39 K, almost twice the temperature of other simple intermetallic compounds, has sparked a race to uncover its basic properties and to find other related diborides with even higher Tcs. After the first announcement, the number of preprints appearing on the Los Alamos preprint server (Fig. 1 grew almost exponentially, reaching a maximum of about 60 studies in March (two papers a day, then decreasing linearly down to a paper every other day in August, and staying steady at about this rate until now. During the first year of the MgB2 era, more than 300 studies were published, exploring both fundamental and practical issues, such as the mechanism of the superconductivity; synthesis of MgB2 in the form of powder, thin films, wires, and tapes; the effect on Tc of substitution with various elements and on critical current and fields.

  10. Surprises in aperiodic diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    Baake, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Mathematical diffraction theory is concerned with the diffraction image of a given structure and the corresponding inverse problem of structure determination. In recent years, the understanding of systems with continuous and mixed spectra has improved considerably. Moreover, the phenomenon of homometry shows various unexpected new facets. Here, we report on some of the recent results in an exemplary and informal fashion.

  11. Jordan: Surprisingly Stable

    OpenAIRE

    Ådnegard, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Over the years, research has demonstrated that conflict spreads to the host country as a consequence of massive influx of refugees. Most studies gathered empirical evidence from African countries and focused on cases where conflict had already spread. In contrast to this literature, the main objective of this thesis is to examine the absence of conflict in Jordan after receiving Syrian refugees that amount to about 10 percent of Jordan s original population over the past three years, 2011-201...

  12. Surprising quantum bounces

    CERN Document Server

    Nesvizhevsky, Valery

    2015-01-01

    This unique book demonstrates the undivided unity and infinite diversity of quantum mechanics using a single phenomenon: quantum bounces of ultra-cold particles. Various examples of such "quantum bounces" are: gravitational quantum states of ultra-cold neutrons (the first observed quantum states of matter in a gravitational field), the neutron whispering gallery (an observed matter-wave analog of the whispering gallery effect well known in acoustics and for electromagnetic waves), and gravitational and whispering gallery states for anti-matter atoms that remain to be observed. These quantum states are an invaluable tool in the search for additional fundamental short-range forces, for exploring the gravitational interaction and quantum effects of gravity, for probing physics beyond the standard model, and for furthering studies into the foundations of quantum mechanics, quantum optics, and surface science.

  13. No More Surprises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrel, Amy

    2016-05-01

    Texas Medical Association research shows that health plans' shrinking networks, caps on payments for medical care, inaccurate directories, and other tactics - not physician billing - are bearing down on patients in the form of unexpected, out-of-network balance bills.

  14. Surprising radiation detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Fleischer, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Radiation doses received by the human body can be measured indirectly and retrospectively by counting the tracks left by particles in ordinary objects like pair of spectacles, glassware, compact disks...This method has been successfully applied to determine neutron radiation doses received 50 years ago on the Hiroshima site. Neutrons themselves do not leave tracks in bulk matter but glass contains atoms of uranium that may fission when hurt by a neutron, the recoil of the fission fragments generates a track that is detectable. The most difficult is to find adequate glass items and to evaluate the radiation shield they benefited at their initial place. The same method has been used to determine the radiation dose due to the pile-up of radon in houses. In that case the tracks left by alpha particles due to the radioactive decay of polonium-210 have been counted on the superficial layer of the window panes. Other materials like polycarbonate plastics have been used to determine the radiation dose due to heavy io...

  15. Neurotransmitter Switching? No Surprise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzer, Nicholas C

    2015-06-03

    Among the many forms of brain plasticity, changes in synaptic strength and changes in synapse number are particularly prominent. However, evidence for neurotransmitter respecification or switching has been accumulating steadily, both in the developing nervous system and in the adult brain, with observations of transmitter addition, loss, or replacement of one transmitter with another. Natural stimuli can drive these changes in transmitter identity, with matching changes in postsynaptic transmitter receptors. Strikingly, they often convert the synapse from excitatory to inhibitory or vice versa, providing a basis for changes in behavior in those cases in which it has been examined. Progress has been made in identifying the factors that induce transmitter switching and in understanding the molecular mechanisms by which it is achieved. There are many intriguing questions to be addressed.

  16. Surprise Trips 

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korn, Matthias; Kawash, Raghid; Andersen, Lisbet Møller

    2010-01-01

    Little treasures in nature often go unnoticed by visitors when roaming about in a national park. Ubiquitous technology with its less intrusive character may be apt to enhance this natural experience of exploration. In this paper, we report on a system that augments this experience. It builds on t...

  17. Spontaneous resolution of a small extradural haematoma in a child.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sinha, A K

    2009-02-01

    We report the rapid spontaneous resolution of a small extradural haematoma (EDH) in a 19-month-old child. The haematoma was managed conservatively. The child went on to make a full recovery. The authors discuss the significance of this surprising clinical finding.

  18. Microhydrodynamics of deformable particles: surprising responses of drops and vesicles to uniform electric field or shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlahovska, Petia

    2015-11-01

    Particle motion in a viscous fluid is a classic problem that continues to surprise researchers. In this talk, I will discuss some intriguing, experimentally-observed behaviors of droplets and giant vesicles (cell-size lipid membrane sacs) in electric or flow fields. In a uniform electric field, a droplet deforms into an ellipsoid that can either be steadily tilted relative to the applied field direction or undergo unsteady motions (periodic shape oscillations or irregular flipping); a spherical vesicle can adopt a transient square shape or reversibly porate. In a steady shear flow, a vesicle can tank-tread, tumble or swing. Theoretical models show that the nonlinear drop dynamics originates from the interplay of Quincke rotation and interface deformation, while the vesicle dynamics stems from the membrane inextensibility. The practical motivation for this research lies in an improved understanding of technologies that rely on the manipulation of drops and cells by flow or electric fields.

  19. Collaborative Resilience to Episodic Shocks and Surprises: A Very Long-Term Case Study of Zanjera Irrigation in the Philippines 1979–2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Yabes

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This thirty-year case study uses surveys, semi-structured interviews, and content analysis to examine the adaptive capacity of Zanjera San Marcelino, an indigenous irrigation management system in the northern Philippines. This common pool resource (CPR system exists within a turbulent social-ecological system (SES characterized by episodic shocks such as large typhoons as well as novel surprises, such as national political regime change and the construction of large dams. The Zanjera nimbly responded to these challenges, although sometimes in ways that left its structure and function substantially altered. While a partial integration with the Philippine National Irrigation Agency was critical to the Zanjera’s success, this relationship required on-going improvisation and renegotiation. Over time, the Zanjera showed an increasing capacity to learn and adapt. A core contribution of this analysis is the integration of a CPR study within an SES framework to examine resilience, made possible the occurrence of a wide range of challenges to the Zanjera’s function and survival over the long period of study. Long-term analyses like this one, however rare, are particularly useful for understanding the adaptive and transformative dimensions of resilience.

  20. Increased abundance of aromatase and follicle stimulating hormone receptor mRNA and decreased insulin-like growth factor-2 receptor mRNA in small ovarian follicles of cattle selected for twin births

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattle genetically selected for twin ovulations and births (Twinner) exhibit increased ovarian follicular development, increased ovulation rate, and greater blood and follicular fluid IGF 1 concentrations compared with contemporary cattle not selected for twins (Control). Experimental objectives wer...

  1. Optimizing sealed transports of small ornamental fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Esteves da Silva

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This is a report on multiple simulated long-term transports of small ornamental fish inside plastic bags. The species involved were Diplodus sargus, Gobius paganellus, Gobiusculus flavescens, Lepadogaster lepadogaster and Lipophrys pholis. The objective of such simulations was moving the maximum bioload possible while ensuring 100% survivorship, ultimately resulting in savings for the end-receiver. Transports were simulated over 24, 48 and 72 hours, with increasing animal bioloads per bag. Half of the trials were performed with “regular” saltwater while the other half involved seawater buffered with Amquel ®, sodium carbonate and sodium bicarbonate, with the objective of keeping ammonia low and pH similar to initial baseline values. At the end of each trial, temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH and ammonia were analized and the survival rate calculated and recorded. L. lepadogaster endured the highest bioloads at 100% survivorship (i.e. up to 30 g / L, which is not surprising given the intertidal nature of this species. D. sargus exhibited mortalities with bioloads as low as 3,23 g / L, which echoes its predominantly pelagic nature and relatively lesser ability to endure confinement. The three remaining species showed varying degrees of tolerance to increasing bioloads in transport: L. pholis, also an intertidal species, handled up to 20 g/L over 72 hours, while G. paganellus handled up to 7 g/L over 72 hours, and G. flavescens (a predominantly pelagic species could deal with no more than 6 g/L up to 72 hours.

  2. Small - Display Cartography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Flemming; Hvas, Anders; Münster-Swendsen, Jørgen

    This report comprises the work carried out in the work-package of small display cartography. The work-package has aimed at creating a general framework for the small-display cartography. A solid framework facilitates an increased use of spatial data in mobile devices - thus enabling, together...... with the rapidly evolving positioning techniques, a new category of position-dependent, map-based services to be introduced. The report consists of the following parts: Part I: Categorization of handheld devices, Part II: Cartographic design for small-display devices, Part III: Study on the GiMoDig Client ? Portal...... Service Communication and finally, Part IV: Concluding remarks and topics for further research on small-display cartography. Part II includes a separate Appendix D consisting of a cartographic design specification. Part III includes a separate Appendix C consisting of a schema specification, a separate...

  3. The plant host can affect the encapsidation of brome mosaic virus (BMV) RNA: BMV virions are surprisingly heterogeneous.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Peng; Vaughan, Robert C; Tragesser, Brady; Hoover, Haley; Kao, C Cheng

    2014-03-01

    Brome mosaic virus (BMV) packages its genomic and subgenomic RNAs into three separate viral particles. BMV purified from barley, wheat, and tobacco have distinct relative abundances of the encapsidated RNAs. We seek to identify the basis for the host-dependent differences in viral RNA encapsidation. Sequencing of the viral RNAs revealed recombination events in the 3' untranslated region of RNA1 of BMV purified from barley and wheat, but not from tobacco. However, the relative amounts of the BMV RNAs that accumulated in barley and wheat are similar and RNA accumulation is not sufficient to account for the difference in RNA encapsidation. Virions purified from barley and wheat were found to differ in their isoelectric points, resistance to proteolysis, and contacts between the capsid residues and the RNA. Mass spectrometric analyses revealed that virions from the three hosts had different post-translational modifications that should impact the physiochemical properties of the virions. Another major source of variation in RNA encapsidation was due to the purification of BMV particles to homogeneity. Highly enriched BMV present in lysates had a surprising range of sizes, buoyant densities, and distinct relative amounts of encapsidated RNAs. These results show that the encapsidated BMV RNAs reflect a combination of host effects on the physiochemical properties of the viral capsids and the enrichment of a subset of virions. The previously unexpected heterogeneity in BMV should influence the timing of the infection and also the host innate immune responses.

  4. Benford's law predicted digit distribution of aggregated income taxes: the surprising conformity of Italian cities and regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir, Tariq Ahmad; Ausloos, Marcel; Cerqueti, Roy

    2014-11-01

    The yearly aggregated tax income data of all, more than 8000, Italian municipalities are analyzed for a period of five years, from 2007 to 2011, to search for conformity or not with Benford's law, a counter-intuitive phenomenon observed in large tabulated data where the occurrence of numbers having smaller initial digits is more favored than those with larger digits. This is done in anticipation that large deviations from Benford's law will be found in view of tax evasion supposedly being widespread across Italy. Contrary to expectations, we show that the overall tax income data for all these years is in excellent agreement with Benford's law. Furthermore, we also analyze the data of Calabria, Campania and Sicily, the three Italian regions known for strong presence of mafia, to see if there are any marked deviations from Benford's law. Again, we find that all yearly data sets for Calabria and Sicily agree with Benford's law whereas only the 2007 and 2008 yearly data show departures from the law for Campania. These results are again surprising in view of underground and illegal nature of economic activities of mafia which significantly contribute to tax evasion. Some hypothesis for the found conformity is presented.

  5. Medial superior olivary neurons receive surprisingly few excitatory and inhibitory inputs with balanced strength and short-term dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couchman, Kiri; Grothe, Benedikt; Felmy, Felix

    2010-12-15

    Neurons in the medial superior olive (MSO) process microsecond interaural time differences, the major cue for localizing low-frequency sounds, by comparing the relative arrival time of binaural, glutamatergic excitatory inputs. This coincidence detection mechanism is additionally shaped by highly specialized glycinergic inhibition. Traditionally, it is assumed that the binaural inputs are conveyed by many independent fibers, but such an anatomical arrangement may decrease temporal precision. Short-term depression on the other hand might enhance temporal fidelity during ongoing activity. For the first time we show that binaural coincidence detection in MSO neurons may require surprisingly few but strong inputs, challenging long-held assumptions about mammalian coincidence detection. This study exclusively uses adult gerbils for in vitro electrophysiology, single-cell electroporation and immunohistochemistry to characterize the size and short-term plasticity of inputs to the MSO. We find that the excitatory and inhibitory inputs to the MSO are well balanced both in strength and short-term dynamics, redefining this fastest of all mammalian coincidence detector circuits.

  6. Investigating Whether Contacting Absent Students Increases Course Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stucky, Thomas D.

    2008-01-01

    Studies suggest that student attendance in college classes increases course success. Yet, surprisingly few studies have examined strategies to increase student attendance. The goal of the current study is to consider whether contacting consistently absent students increases success in an undergraduate research methods course. Results of this…

  7. Small Orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Borsten, L; Ferrara, S; Marrani, A; Rubens, W

    2012-01-01

    We study both the "large" and "small" U-duality charge orbits of extremal black holes appearing in D = 5 and D = 4 Maxwell-Einstein supergravity theories with symmetric scalar manifolds. We exploit a formalism based on cubic Jordan algebras and their associated Freudenthal triple systems, in order to derive the minimal charge representatives, their stabilizers and the associated "moduli spaces". After recalling N = 8 maximal supergravity, we consider N = 2 and N = 4 theories coupled to an arbitrary number of vector multiplets, as well as N = 2 magic, STU, ST^2 and T^3 models. While the STU model may be considered as part of the general N = 2 sequence, albeit with an additional triality symmetry, the ST^2 and T^3 models demand a separate treatment, since their representative Jordan algebras are Euclidean or only admit non-zero elements of rank 3, respectively. Finally, we also consider minimally coupled N = 2, matter coupled N = 3, and "pure" N = 5 theories.

  8. A new in vivo model of pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration reveals a surprising role for transcriptional regulation in pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varun ePandey

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Pantothenate Kinase-Associated Neurodegeneration (PKAN is a neurodegenerative disorder with a poorly understood molecular mechanism. It is caused by mutations in Pantothenate Kinase, the first enzyme in the Coenzyme A (CoA biosynthetic pathway. Here, we developed a Drosophila model of PKAN (tim-fbl flies that allows us to continuously monitor the modeled disease in the brain. In tim-fbl flies, downregulation of fumble, the Drosophila PanK homologue in the cells containing a circadian clock results in characteristic features of PKAN such as developmental lethality, hypersensitivity to oxidative stress, and diminished life span. Despite quasi-normal circadian transcriptional rhythms, tim-fbl flies display brain-specific aberrant circadian locomotor rhythms, and a unique transcriptional signature. Comparison with expression data from flies exposed to paraquat demonstrates that, as previously suggested, pathways others than oxidative stress are affected by PANK downregulation. Surprisingly we found a significant decrease in the expression of key components of the photoreceptor recycling pathways, which could lead to retinal degeneration, a hallmark of PKAN. Importantly, these defects are not accompanied by changes in structural components in eye genes suggesting that changes in gene expression in the eye precede and may cause the retinal degeneration. Indeed tim-fbl flies have diminished response to light transitions, and their altered day/night patterns of activity demonstrates defects in light perception. This suggest that retinal lesions are not solely due to oxidative stress and demonstrates a role for the transcriptional response to CoA deficiency underlying the defects observed in dPanK deficient flies. Moreover, in the present study we developed a new fly model that can be applied to other diseases and that allows the assessment of neurodegeneration in the brains of living flies.

  9. Tool compounds robustly increase turnover of an artificial substrate by glucocerebrosidase in human brain lysates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdenek Berger

    Full Text Available Mutations in glucocerebrosidase (GBA1 cause Gaucher disease and also represent a common risk factor for Parkinson's disease and Dementia with Lewy bodies. Recently, new tool molecules were described which can increase turnover of an artificial substrate 4MUG when incubated with mutant N370S GBA1 from human spleen. Here we show that these compounds exert a similar effect on the wild-type enzyme in a cell-free system. In addition, these tool compounds robustly increase turnover of 4MUG by GBA1 derived from human cortex, despite substantially lower glycosylation of GBA1 in human brain, suggesting that the degree of glycosylation is not important for compound binding. Surprisingly, these tool compounds failed to robustly alter GBA1 turnover of 4MUG in the mouse brain homogenate. Our data raise the possibility that in vivo models with humanized glucocerebrosidase may be needed for efficacy assessments of such small molecules.

  10. The surprising negative correlation of gene length and optimal codon use--disentangling translational selection from GC-biased gene conversion in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoletzki, Nina

    2011-04-11

    Surprisingly, in several multi-cellular eukaryotes optimal codon use correlates negatively with gene length. This contrasts with the expectation under selection for translational accuracy. While suggested explanations focus on variation in strength and efficiency of translational selection, it has rarely been noticed that the negative correlation is reported only in organisms whose optimal codons are biased towards codons that end with G or C (-GC). This raises the question whether forces that affect base composition--such as GC-biased gene conversion--contribute to the negative correlation between optimal codon use and gene length. Yeast is a good organism to study this as equal numbers of optimal codons end in -GC and -AT and one may hence compare frequencies of optimal GC- with optimal AT-ending codons to disentangle the forces. Results of this study demonstrate in yeast frequencies of GC-ending (optimal AND non-optimal) codons decrease with gene length and increase with recombination. A decrease of GC-ending codons along genes contributes to the negative correlation with gene length. Correlations with recombination and gene expression differentiate between GC-ending and optimal codons, and also substitution patterns support effects of GC-biased gene conversion. While the general effect of GC-biased gene conversion is well known, the negative correlation of optimal codon use with gene length has not been considered in this context before. Initiation of gene conversion events in promoter regions and the presence of a gene conversion gradient most likely explain the observed decrease of GC-ending codons with gene length and gene position.

  11. A surprise at the bottom of the main sequence: Rapid rotation and NO H-alpha emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basri, Gibor; Marcy, Geoffrey W.

    1995-01-01

    We report Kech Observatory high-resolution echelle spectra from 640-850 nm for eight stars near the faint end of the main sequence. These spectra are the highest resolution spectra of such late-type stars, and clearly resolve the TiO, VO, and atomic lines. The sample includes the field brown-dwarf candidate, BRI 0021-0214 (M9.5+). Very unexpectedly, it shows the most rapid rotation in the entire samples, v sin i approximately 40 km/s, which is 20x faster than typical field nonemission M stars. Equally surprising is that BRI 0021 exhibits no emission or absorptionat H-alpha. We argue that this absence is not simply due to its cool photosphere, but that stellar activity declines in a fundamental way at the end of the main sequence. As it is the first very late M dwarf observed at high spectral resolution, BRI 0021 may be signaling a qualitative change in the angular momentum loss rate among the lowest mass stars. Conventionally, its rapid rotation would have marked BRI 0021 as very young, consistent with the selection effect which arises if the latest-type dwarfs are really brown dwarfs on cooling curves. In any case, it is unprecedented to find no sign of stellar activity in such a rapidly rotating convective star. We also discuss the possible conflict between this observation and the extremely strong H-alpha seen in another very cool star, PC 0025+0447. Extrapolation of M-L relations for BRI 0021 yields M approximately 0.065 solar mass, and the other sample objects have expected masses near the H-burning limit. These include two Pleiades brown-dwarf candidates, four field M6 dwarfs and one late-type T Tauri star. The two Pleiades M6 dwarfs have v sin i of 26 and 37 km/s, H-alpha in emission, and radial velocities consistent with Pleiades M6 dwarfs have v sin i of 26 and 37 km/s, H-alpha in emission, and radial velocities consistent with Pleiades membership. Similarly, the late-type T Tauri star has v sin i approximately 30 km/s and H alpha emission indicate of its

  12. Immune modulations during chemoimmunotherapy & novel vaccine strategies - In metastatic melanoma and non small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Trine Zeeberg

    2013-01-01

    cell responses against well-known MM tumour specific antigens. Overall, we have verified that TMZ in addition to being an alkylating and cytotoxic chemotherapy, also posess immune modulatory effect in MM patients treated with standard dosage of TMZ. In the second part of the thesis we examined how......This thesis describes the treatment of metastatic melanoma (MM) and non small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) from an immunotherapeutic approach. The purpose of the first part of the thesis was to assess how treatment with Temozolomide (TMZ) chemotherapy affects the immune system in patients...... cells increased. In particular, we demonstrated that mature CD8+ T cells increased during treatment. Analyses of peripheral blood before and after treatment showed that T cell responses against common viral epitopes were conserved despite chemotherapy. Surprisingly, we found a significant increase in T...

  13. Surprising Impact of Remote Groups on the Folding-Unfolding and Dimer-Chain Equilibria of Bifunctionl H-Bonding Unimers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Rui; Cheng, Shuang; Baker, Erin Shammel; Smith, Richard D.; Zeng, Xiao Cheng; Gong, Bing

    2016-01-28

    Oligoamide 1, consisting of two H-bonding units linked by a trimethylene linker, was previously found to form a very stable, folded dimer. In this work, replacing the side chains and end groups of 1 led to derivatives that show the surprising impact of end groups on the folding and dimer-chain equilibria of the resultant molecules.

  14. Bonding, Structure, and Stability of Clusters: Some Surprising Results from an Experimental and Theoretical Investigation in Gas Phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa S. Caetano

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Structure and stability of clusters in the ground state were analyzed at the theoretical and experimental levels. Our experimental and theoretical findings showed that the clusters in gas phase tend to form mainly planar rings of four members. The symmetry and the small dipole moment in these specific configurations suggested that their stability could be associated with an alignment of the water molecules, maximizing attractive electrostatic interactions caused by changes in the charge distribution of the clusters.

  15. Price increase

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Please take note that after five years of stable prices at Restaurant No 1 a price increase will come into force on 1st January 2006. This increase has been agreed after discussions between the CSR (Comité de Surveillance des Restaurants) and the catering company Novae and will reflect the inflation rate of the last few years. In addition, a new children's menu will be introduced, as well as 'Max Havelaar' fair-trade coffee at a price of 1.70 CHF.

  16. Price increase

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Please take note that after five years of stable prices at Restaurant No 1 a price increase will come into force on 1st January 2006. This increase has been agreed after discussions between the CSR (Comité de Surveillance des Restaurants) and the catering company Novae and will reflect the inflation rate of the last few years. In addition, a new children's menu will be introduced as well as 'Max Havelaar' fair-trade coffee at a price of 1.70 CHF.

  17. mTOR Hyperactivation by Ablation of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex 2 in the Mouse Heart Induces Cardiac Dysfunction with the Increased Number of Small Mitochondria Mediated through the Down-Regulation of Autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taneike, Manabu; Nishida, Kazuhiko; Omiya, Shigemiki; Zarrinpashneh, Elham; Misaka, Tomofumi; Kitazume-Taneike, Rika; Austin, Ruth; Takaoka, Minoru; Yamaguchi, Osamu; Gambello, Michael J; Shah, Ajay M; Otsu, Kinya

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is a key regulator of cell growth, proliferation and metabolism. mTORC1 regulates protein synthesis positively and autophagy negatively. Autophagy is a major system to manage bulk degradation and recycling of cytoplasmic components and organelles. Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) 1 and 2 form a heterodimeric complex and inactivate Ras homolog enriched in brain, resulting in inhibition of mTORC1. Here, we investigated the effects of hyperactivation of mTORC1 on cardiac function and structure using cardiac-specific TSC2-deficient (TSC2-/-) mice. TSC2-/- mice were born normally at the expected Mendelian ratio. However, the median life span of TSC2-/- mice was approximately 10 months and significantly shorter than that of control mice. TSC2-/- mice showed cardiac dysfunction and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy without considerable fibrosis, cell infiltration or apoptotic cardiomyocyte death. Ultrastructural analysis of TSC2-/- hearts revealed misalignment, aggregation and a decrease in the size and an increase in the number of mitochondria, but the mitochondrial function was maintained. Autophagic flux was inhibited, while the phosphorylation level of S6 or eukaryotic initiation factor 4E -binding protein 1, downstream of mTORC1, was increased. The upregulation of autophagic flux by trehalose treatment attenuated the cardiac phenotypes such as cardiac dysfunction and structural abnormalities of mitochondria in TSC2-/- hearts. The results suggest that autophagy via the TSC2-mTORC1 signaling pathway plays an important role in maintenance of cardiac function and mitochondrial quantity and size in the heart and could be a therapeutic target to maintain mitochondrial homeostasis in failing hearts.

  18. Small Business Development Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Small Business Administration — Small Business Development Centers (SBDCs) provide assistance to small businesses and aspiring entrepreneurs throughout the United States and its territories. SBDCs...

  19. Increases in Physical Activity Result in Diminishing Increments in Daily Energy Expenditure in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neal, Timothy J; Friend, Danielle M; Guo, Juen; Hall, Kevin D; Kravitz, Alexxai V

    2017-02-06

    Exercise is a common component of weight loss strategies, yet exercise programs are associated with surprisingly small changes in body weight [1-4]. This may be due in part to compensatory adaptations, in which calories expended during exercise are counteracted by decreases in other aspects of energy expenditure [1, 5-10]. Here we examined the relationship between a rodent model of voluntary exercise- wheel running- and total daily energy expenditure. Use of a running wheel for 3 to 7 days increased daily energy expenditure, resulting in a caloric deficit of ∼1 kcal/day; however, total daily energy expenditure remained stable after the first week of wheel access, despite further increases in wheel use. We hypothesized that compensatory mechanisms accounted for the lack of increase in daily energy expenditure after the first week. Supporting this idea, we observed a decrease in off-wheel ambulation when mice were using the wheels, indicating behavioral compensation. Finally, we asked whether individual variation in wheel use within a group of mice would be associated with different levels of daily energy expenditure. Despite a large variation in wheel running, we did not observe a significant relationship between the amount of daily wheel running and total daily energy expenditure or energy intake across mice. Together, our experiments support a model in which the transition from sedentary to light activity is associated with an increase in daily energy expenditure, but further increases in physical activity produce diminishingly small increments in daily energy expenditure.

  20. Progress to extinction: increased specialisation causes the demise of animal clades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raia, P.; Carotenuto, F.; Mondanaro, A.; Castiglione, S.; Passaro, F.; Saggese, F.; Melchionna, M.; Serio, C.; Alessio, L.; Silvestro, D.; Fortelius, M.

    2016-08-01

    Animal clades tend to follow a predictable path of waxing and waning during their existence, regardless of their total species richness or geographic coverage. Clades begin small and undifferentiated, then expand to a peak in diversity and range, only to shift into a rarely broken decline towards extinction. While this trajectory is now well documented and broadly recognised, the reasons underlying it remain obscure. In particular, it is unknown why clade extinction is universal and occurs with such surprising regularity. Current explanations for paleontological extinctions call on the growing costs of biological interactions, geological accidents, evolutionary traps, and mass extinctions. While these are effective causes of extinction, they mainly apply to species, not clades. Although mass extinctions is the undeniable cause for the demise of a sizeable number of major taxa, we show here that clades escaping them go extinct because of the widespread tendency of evolution to produce increasingly specialised, sympatric, and geographically restricted species over time.

  1. Otimização da hidrólise da caseína para elevar o teor de pequenos peptídeos: emprego da pepsina Optimization of casein hydrolysis to increase small peptide contents: use of pepsin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Linhares Carreira

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Visando à produção de hidrolisados de caseína para uso como suplemento dietético, estudou-se a otimização das condições hidrolíticas, empregando-se a pepsina para elevar os teores de di e tripeptídeos. Os hidrolisados foram fracionados pela CLAE de exclusão molecular, seguida da quantificação dos peptídeos nas frações cromatográficas pelo método rápido da Área Corrigida da Fração. Pelos resultados obtidos, infere-se que a obtenção do melhor perfil peptídico, para uso em dietas especiais, depende da definição de alguns parâmetros, tais como, pH, relação enzima:susbtrato e temperatura. Além disso, o custo envolvido na preparação deve ser considerado.With the aim of producing casein hydrolysates for dietary use, the optimization of the hydrolysis conditions, using pepsin, for increasing di- and tripeptide contents was studied. The hydrolysates were fractionated by size-exclusion HPLC and the rapid Correct Fraction Area method was used for quantifying the peptides. The results showed that in order to have the best peptide profile for special diets, certain parameters, such as pH, enzyme:substrate ratio and temperature need to be fixed. Also, the production costs must be taken into account.

  2. Policy instruments force climate protection by increasing the energy efficiency of electric appliances and electrical systems in private households and the commercial and small-scale sector; Politikinstrumente zur Effizienzsteigerung von Elektrogeraeten und -anlagen in Privathaushalten, Bueros und im Kleinverbrauch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duscha, Markus; Seebach, Dominik; Griessmann, Benjamin [ifeu-Institut fuer Energie- und Umweltforschung GmbH, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2006-06-15

    The implementation of new, more market-oriented instruments represents an additional starting point for future developments. This path was started on in the EU in 2005 with the CO{sub 2} emission trade. The price signals that could be expected for end customers in households and trade from this alone would most likely be too low to be a sufficient motivation for exhausting the electricity efficiency potential. At this point, we must again point out that only rarely are there economic hindrances to the complete use of potential, but rather a lack of information and organization leads to increased transaction costs in the implementation. This must be corrected by accompanying efficiency instruments and programs. However, implementing these programs does not (yet) represent an economic alternative to the efficiency measures in their own systems for the industry and power company involved in the emission trade due to such transaction costs. Otherwise there would be initiatives in the meantime for this type of privately organized program, as these have been suggested in this report as tasks for a national electricity fund. Therefore, the instrument of the EU emission trade must be supplemented in the foreseeable future with the instruments presented here. There is not much evidence as to how much a comparable implementation of tradable energy efficiency certificates (often referred to as ''white certificates'') is a suitable start for concluding efficiency potential at the level of the very inhomogeneous group of end consumers. We still see a need for research before such an instrument can be recommended as a guide for Germany or even Europe. The questions still to be clarified include, among other things, the ability of standardizing the assignment rules as well as the amount of the transaction costs to be expected, even in dependency on the market level at which the trade is started (end consumer, energy service provider, electronic equipment

  3. Are Subject Small Clauses Really Small Clauses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Miori

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses the ongoing debate over small clauses concerning the structure of the verb phrase in "I consider Bill smart." It is demonstrated that the subject constituent in question is not a small clause, but a Noun Phrase (NP), following Noun (N). It is shown that some peculiar phenomena under the small clause analysis are natural…

  4. Using cytology to increase small animal practice revenue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Joanne

    2013-11-01

    Diagnostic cytology is a useful, noninvasive test with practical foundations in high-quality medicine and applications to practice building. Cytology will generate practice revenue whether assessed in-house or sent to a clinical pathologist. Thorough in-house evaluation is adequate in some cases, but expert opinion is important in many cases. Specimen slides should at least be reviewed in-house for assessment of cellularity and potential artifacts before submission to a reference laboratory. Reference laboratories also provide special stains and advanced molecular diagnostics to help further characterize many neoplastic processes, search for organisms, identify pigments, and address other important aspects of the lesion. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Hedging their bets. Strong market performance is delivering pleasantly surprising results for investments made by not-for-profits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Paul

    2004-09-20

    CFOs aren't partying like it's the 1990s, but healthcare portfolios did deliver double-digit increases in 2003, a Commonfund Institute survey said. Executives, seeking to avoid losses, have invested in controversial hedge funds, which have become a little too popular, says the institute's executive director, John Griswold, left.

  6. The Japanese Attack on Darwin: 19 February 1942: A Case Study in Surprise at the Operational Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-03-30

    cognitive dissonance and intolerance of ambiguity. The former, defined by Leon Festinger , is concerned with ways in which a decisionmaker tries to increase...situation and are reluctant to suspend judgement while examining evidence. Leon Festinger , A Theory of Cognitive Dissonance (Stanford, California...The Coastwatchers. Melbourne: Oxford University Press, 1946. 65 18. Festinger , Leon . A Theory of Cognitive Dissonance. Stanford: Stanford University

  7. Transforming Your Regional Economy through Uncertainty and Surprise: Learning from Complexity Science, Network Theory and the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holley, June

    The field of regional development blossomed in the last decade, as researchers and practitioners increasingly asserted that the region was the most effective geographic unit for supporting the excellence and innovation of entrepreneurs. See, for example, the many studies by the European Union and the work by Michael Porter.

  8. Acceleration and loss of relativistic electrons during small geomagnetic storms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, B R; Millan, R M; Reeves, G D; Friedel, R H W

    2015-12-16

    Past studies of radiation belt relativistic electrons have favored active storm time periods, while the effects of small geomagnetic storms (Dst > -50 nT) have not been statistically characterized. In this timely study, given the current weak solar cycle, we identify 342 small storms from 1989 through 2000 and quantify the corresponding change in relativistic electron flux at geosynchronous orbit. Surprisingly, small storms can be equally as effective as large storms at enhancing and depleting fluxes. Slight differences exist, as small storms are 10% less likely to result in flux enhancement and 10% more likely to result in flux depletion than large storms. Nevertheless, it is clear that neither acceleration nor loss mechanisms scale with storm drivers as would be expected. Small geomagnetic storms play a significant role in radiation belt relativistic electron dynamics and provide opportunities to gain new insights into the complex balance of acceleration and loss processes.

  9. What controls dryland soil stability? The surprising importance of biocrusts and their possible sensitivity to climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowker, M. A.; Belnap, J.; Maestre, F. T.; Chaudhary, V. B.

    2012-04-01

    In drylands of the world, wind and water erosion is controlled by the interplay of erosivity--the propensity of wind and water to move sediment--and erodibility--the mobility of soil particles. Land use can have several impacts on this interplay, particularly by increasing erodibility. Here we examine the system underlying dryland erodibility, which is determined by the interrelationships of inherent soil properties and dynamic biotic features, including plants and their root symbionts and soil biocrusts. We applied structural equation models to 7 datasets from drylands, mostly drawn from the Colorado Plateau of the United States but also from parts of Spain. The datasets spanned spatial resolutions of 25 cm2 up to 2 ha. Our models were able to explain 20-79% of the variation in soil aggregate stability (SAS), an attribute of erodibility. We found: 1. Dynamic biotic attributes tend to be more influential in determining SAS than inherent soil properties; 2. The magnitude of the effect of inherent soil properties on SAS? is remarkably stable among different datasets and scales; 3. Of the dynamic biotic attributes, biocrust abundance was the strongest predictor of SAS in 5 of the 6 datasets in which they were measured; 4. Plants may exert a strong positive effect on SAS, but this effect is highly variable among datasets. Because these dynamic biota are expected to respond to climate change, we can also expect climate change to affect soil erodibility. In a recent spatial modeling effort at the scale of the entire Colorado Plateau, we found that the most informative predictor of biocrust abundance was a negative effect of the ratio of summer to winter precipitation. Because climate projections suggest a decrease in cool season precipitation, and some suggest an increase in summer monsoonal precipitation (with much uncertainty) across the studied areas, the ratio of summer to winter precipitation is likely to increase, and soil erodibility may increase with it.

  10. How small is a small cloud?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Koren

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The interplay between clouds and aerosols and their contribution to the radiation budget is one of the largest uncertainties of climate change. Most work to date has separated cloudy and cloud-free areas in order to evaluate the individual radiative forcing of aerosols, clouds, and aerosol effects on clouds.

    Here we examine the size distribution and the optical properties of small, sparse cumulus clouds and the associated optical properties of what is considered a cloud-free atmosphere within the cloud field. We show that any separation between clouds and cloud free atmosphere will incur errors in the calculated radiative forcing.

    The nature of small cumulus cloud size distributions suggests that at any resolution, a significant fraction of the clouds are missed, and their optical properties are relegated to the apparent cloud-free optical properties. At the same time, the cloudy portion incorporates significant contribution from non-cloudy pixels.

    We show that the largest contribution to the total cloud reflectance comes from the smallest clouds and that the spatial resolution changes the apparent energy flux of a broken cloudy scene. When changing the resolution from 30 m to 1 km (Landsat to MODIS the average "cloud-free" reflectance at 1.65 μm increases from 0.0095 to 0.0115 (>20%, the cloud reflectance decreases from 0.13 to 0.066 (~50%, and the cloud coverage doubles, resulting in an important impact on climate forcing estimations. The apparent aerosol forcing is on the order of 0.5 to 1 Wm−2 per cloud field.

  11. Unbundling the retail gas market: Current activities and guidance for serving residential and small customers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costello, K.W.; Lemon, J.R.

    1996-05-01

    The restructuring of retail gas services has followed a typical pattern for previously heavily regulated industries: large customers are initially given rights to purchase unbundled services from different entities, with the same rights dispersed over time to smaller customers. For about ten years now industrial customers in most states have been able to {open_quotes}play the market{close_quotes}. Since the passage of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) Order 636 in 1992, interest has centered on expanding service unbundling to small retail customers, including residential customers. Importantly, the Order prohibited pipelines from providing bundled sales service. This is not surprising - in the telecommunications industry, for example, the unbundling of wholesale services was a strong stimulant for developing competition in the local exchange market. The push for small-customer service unbundling has derived from the basic but politically attractive idea that all retail customers should directly benefit from competitive forces in the natural gas industry. When one looks at the movement of prices since 1985, it is easy to see that large retail customers have enjoyed more favorable prices than other retail customers. For example, over the period 1985 to 1994 gas prices to industrial customers and electric utilities fell around 23 percent and 36 percent, respectively. In comparison, gas prices to residential customers increased by around 5 percent while gas prices to commercial customers decreased slightly by about 1 percent. This report examines various aspects of unbundling to small retail gas customers, with special emphasis on residential customers.

  12. Unbundling the retail gas market: Current activities and guidance for serving residential and small customers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costello, K.W.; Lemon, J.R.

    1996-05-01

    The restructuring of retail gas services has followed a typical pattern for previously heavily regulated industries: large customers are initially given rights to purchase unbundled services from different entities, with the same rights dispersed over time to smaller customers. For about ten years now industrial customers in most states have been able to {open_quotes}play the market{close_quotes}. Since the passage of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) Order 636 in 1992, interest has centered on expanding service unbundling to small retail customers, including residential customers. Importantly, the Order prohibited pipelines from providing bundled sales service. This is not surprising - in the telecommunications industry, for example, the unbundling of wholesale services was a strong stimulant for developing competition in the local exchange market. The push for small-customer service unbundling has derived from the basic but politically attractive idea that all retail customers should directly benefit from competitive forces in the natural gas industry. When one looks at the movement of prices since 1985, it is easy to see that large retail customers have enjoyed more favorable prices than other retail customers. For example, over the period 1985 to 1994 gas prices to industrial customers and electric utilities fell around 23 percent and 36 percent, respectively. In comparison, gas prices to residential customers increased by around 5 percent while gas prices to commercial customers decreased slightly by about 1 percent. This report examines various aspects of unbundling to small retail gas customers, with special emphasis on residential customers.

  13. Small Multiples with Gaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meulemans, Wouter; Dykes, Jason; Slingsby, Aidan; Turkay, Cagatay; Wood, Jo

    2017-01-01

    Small multiples enable comparison by providing different views of a single data set in a dense and aligned manner. A common frame defines each view, which varies based upon values of a conditioning variable. An increasingly popular use of this technique is to project two-dimensional locations into a gridded space (e.g. grid maps), using the underlying distribution both as the conditioning variable and to determine the grid layout. Using whitespace in this layout has the potential to carry information, especially in a geographic context. Yet, the effects of doing so on the spatial properties of the original units are not understood. We explore the design space offered by such small multiples with gaps. We do so by constructing a comprehensive suite of metrics that capture properties of the layout used to arrange the small multiples for comparison (e.g. compactness and alignment) and the preservation of the original data (e.g. distance, topology and shape). We study these metrics in geographic data sets with varying properties and numbers of gaps. We use simulated annealing to optimize for each metric and measure the effects on the others. To explore these effects systematically, we take a new approach, developing a system to visualize this design space using a set of interactive matrices. We find that adding small amounts of whitespace to small multiple arrays improves some of the characteristics of 2D layouts, such as shape, distance and direction. This comes at the cost of other metrics, such as the retention of topology. Effects vary according to the input maps, with degree of variation in size of input regions found to be a factor. Optima exist for particular metrics in many cases, but at different amounts of whitespace for different maps. We suggest multiple metrics be used in optimized layouts, finding topology to be a primary factor in existing manually-crafted solutions, followed by a trade-off between shape and displacement. But the rich range of possible

  14. Lung cancer - small cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC are ...

  15. Increasing SLEDed Linac Gradient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farkas, Zoltan D

    2001-11-08

    This note will show how to increase the SLED [1] gradient by varying Q{sub e}, the external Q of the SLED cavity, by increasing its Q{sub 0} and by increasing the compression ratio. If varying the external Q is to be effective, then the copper losses should be small so that Q{sub 0} >> Q{sub e}. Methods of varying Q{sub e} will be indicated but no experimental data will be presented. If we increase the klystron pulse width from 3.5 to 5 {micro}S and increase Q{sub 0} from the present 100000 to 300000, then the gradient increases by 19% and the beam energy increases from 50 to 60 GeV. This note will also discuss SLED operation at 11424 MHz, the NLC frequency. Without Q{sub e} switching, using SLED at 11424 MHz increases the SLAC gradient from 21 MV/m to 34 MV/m, and at the same repetition rate, uses about 1/5 of rf average power. If we also double the compression ratio, we reach 47 MV/m and over 100 GeV beam energy.

  16. Small store presence in Japan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Carree (Martin); J.C.A. Potjes; A.R. Thurik (Roy)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractThe determinants of the development of small store presence in Japan are investigated using a fixed effects multinomial logit market share model. Large stores tend to have higher market shares in shop-types with increasing shares in consumer expenditures, increasing inventory turnover,

  17. Small store presence in Japan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Carree (Martin); J.C.A. Potjes; A.R. Thurik (Roy)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractThe determinants of the development of small store presence in Japan are investigated using a fixed effects multinomial logit market share model. Large stores tend to have higher market shares in shop-types with increasing shares in consumer expenditures, increasing inventory turnover, a

  18. Small Business Size Standards

    Data.gov (United States)

    Small Business Administration — Certain government programs, such as SBA loan programs and contracting opportunities, are reserved for small business concerns. In order to qualify, businesses must...

  19. Rolling at small scales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kim L.; Niordson, Christian F.; Hutchinson, John W.

    2016-01-01

    The rolling process is widely used in the metal forming industry and has been so for many years. However, the process has attracted renewed interest as it recently has been adapted to very small scales where conventional plasticity theory cannot accurately predict the material response. It is well....... Metals are known to be stronger when large strain gradients appear over a few microns; hence, the forces involved in the rolling process are expected to increase relatively at these smaller scales. In the present numerical analysis, a steady-state modeling technique that enables convergence without...... dealing with the transient response period is employed. This allows for a comprehensive parameter study. Coulomb friction, including a stick-slip condition, is used as a first approximation. It is found that length scale effects increase both the forces applied to the roll, the roll torque, and thus...

  20. Moderate rates of late Quaternary slip along the northwestern margin of the Basin and Range Province, Surprise Valley fault, northeastern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Personius, Stephen F.; Crone, Anthony J.; Machette, Michael N.; Mahan, Shannon; Lidke, David J.

    2009-01-01

    The 86-km-long Surprise Valley normal fault forms part of the active northwestern margin of the Basin and Range province in northeastern California. We use trench mapping and radiocarbon, luminescence, and tephra dating to estimate displacements and timing of the past five surface-rupturing earthquakes on the central part of the fault near Cedarville. A Bayesian OxCal analysis of timing constraints indicates earthquake times of 18.2 ± 2.6, 10.9 ± 3.2, 8.5 ± 0.5, 5.8 ± 1.5, and 1.2 ± 0.1 ka. These data yield recurrence intervals of 7.3 ± 4.1, 2.5 ± 3.2, 2.7 ± 1.6, and 4.5 ± 1.5 ka and an elapsed time of 1.2 ± 0.1 ka since the latest surface-rupturing earthquake. Our best estimate of latest Quaternary vertical slip rate is 0.6 ?? 0.1 mm/a. This late Quaternary rate is remarkably similar to long-term (8-14 Ma) minimum vertical slip rates (>0.4-0.5 ± 0.3 mm/a) calculated from recently acquired seismic reflection and chronologic and structural data in Surprise Valley and the adjacent Warner Mountains. However, our slip rate yields estimates of extension that are lower than recent campaign GPS determinations by factors of 1.5-4 unless the fault has an unusually shallow (30°-35°) dip as suggested by recently acquired seismic reflection data. Coseismic displacements of 2-4.5 ± 1 m documented in the trench and probable rupture lengths of 53-65 km indicate a history of latest Quaternary earthquakes of M 6.8-7.3 on the central part of the. Surprise Valley fault.

  1. Surprisal analysis of transcripts expression levels in the presence of noise: a reliable determination of the onset of a tumor phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayelet Gross

    Full Text Available Towards a reliable identification of the onset in time of a cancer phenotype, changes in transcription levels in cell models were tested. Surprisal analysis, an information-theoretic approach grounded in thermodynamics, was used to characterize the expression level of mRNAs as time changed. Surprisal Analysis provides a very compact representation for the measured expression levels of many thousands of mRNAs in terms of very few - three, four - transcription patterns. The patterns, that are a collection of transcripts that respond together, can be assigned definite biological phenotypic role. We identify a transcription pattern that is a clear marker of eventual malignancy. The weight of each transcription pattern is determined by surprisal analysis. The weight of this pattern changes with time; it is never strictly zero but it is very low at early times and then rises rather suddenly. We suggest that the low weights at early time points are primarily due to experimental noise. We develop the necessary formalism to determine at what point in time the value of that pattern becomes reliable. Beyond the point in time when a pattern is deemed reliable the data shows that the pattern remain reliable. We suggest that this allows a determination of the presence of a cancer forewarning. We apply the same formalism to the weight of the transcription patterns that account for healthy cell pathways, such as apoptosis, that need to be switched off in cancer cells. We show that their weight eventually falls below the threshold. Lastly we discuss patient heterogeneity as an additional source of fluctuation and show how to incorporate it within the developed formalism.

  2. Utility of the NECPAL CCOMS-ICO(©) tool and the Surprise Question as screening tools for early palliative care and to predict mortality in patients with advanced chronic conditions: A cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Batiste, Xavier; Martínez-Muñoz, Marisa; Blay, Carles; Amblàs, Jordi; Vila, Laura; Costa, Xavier; Espaulella, Joan; Villanueva, Alicia; Oller, Ramon; Martori, Joan Carles; Constante, Carles

    2017-09-01

    The Surprise Question (SQ) identifies patients with palliative care needs. The NECPAL CCOMS-ICO(©) (NECPAL) tool combines the Surprise Question with additional clinical parameters for a more comprehensive assessment. The capacity of these screening tools to predict mortality is still unknown. To explore the predictive validity of the NECPAL and SQ to determine 12- to 24-month mortality. Longitudinal, prospective and observational cohort study. Three primary care centres, one general hospital, one intermediate care centre, and four nursing homes. Population cohort with advanced chronic conditions and limited life prognosis. Patients were classified according to SQ and NECPAL criteria and followed for 24 months. Data available to assess 1059 of 1064 recruited patients (99.6%) at 12 and 24 months: 837 patients were SQ+ and 780 were NECPAL+. Mortality rates at 24 months were as follows: 44.6% (SQ+) versus 15.8% (SQ-) and 45.8% (NECPAL+) versus 18.3% (NECPAL-) ( p = 0.000). SQ+ and NECPAL+ identification was significantly correlated with 24-month mortality risk (hazard ratios: 2.719 and 2.398, respectively). Both tools were highly sensitive (91.4, CI: 88.7-94.1 and 87.5, CI: 84.3-90.7) with high negative predictive values (84.2, CI: 79.4-89.0 and 81.7, CI: 77.2-86.2), with low specificity and positive predictive value. The prognostic accuracy of SQ and NECPAL was 52.9% and 55.2%, respectively. The predictive validity was slightly better for NECPAL. SQ and NECPAL are valuable screening instruments to identify patients with limited life prognosis who may require palliative care. More research is needed to increase its prognostic utility in combination with other parameters.

  3. The effects of black-tailed prairie dogs on plant communities within a complex urban landscape: an ecological surprise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beals, Stower C; Hartley, Laurel M; Prevéy, Janet S; Seastedt, Timothy R

    2014-05-01

    Historically, prairie dogs (Cynomys spp.) have been considered essential keystone species of western United States grassland ecosystems because they provide unique services and increase vegetation community richness, evenness, and diversity. However, the effects of black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) on lands adjacent to or surrounded by urban areas may not result in the same ecosystem benefits historically associated with their presence. An urban landscape presents prairie dogs with movement challenges unparalleled in natural landscapes, as well as suites of nonnative plant species that are more common in disturbed areas. This study examined a complex ecosystem where vegetation communities are being influenced by directional environmental change, and quantified the synergistic effects resulting from the protective management of a native keystone species. The data set for this analysis was comprised of 71 paired (occupied by prairie dogs vs. unoccupied) vegetation surveys and 156 additional unpaired surveys collected from around the city of Boulder, Colorado, USA for 14 yr. Linear mixed models were used to compare data from transects occupied and unoccupied by prairie dogs, as well as to evaluate the effect of prairie dog occupation duration. In the absence of prairie dogs, vegetation in this region exhibited declines in native grasses, no changes in introduced grasses, and increases in native and nonnative forbs and bare soil over the study interval. In the presence of prairie dogs, these observed directional changes were nearly all amplified at rates four to 10 times greater than when prairie dogs were absent. Areas in Boulder occupied by prairie dogs also had significantly lower richness, evenness, and diversity of plant species, compared to unoccupied areas. Analysis of plant functional groups revealed the significant reduction of perennial native grasses, as well as a significantly higher cover of introduced forbs in occupied areas. Prairie dogs

  4. The Origin of Carbon-bearing Volatiles in Surprise Valley Hot Springs in the Great Basin: Carbon Isotope and Water Chemistry Characterizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Q.; Socki, R.; Niles, P. B.; Romanek, C. S.; Datta, S.; Darnell, M.; Bissada, A. K.

    2013-12-01

    There are numerous hydrothermal fields within the Great Basin of North America, some of which have been exploited for geothermal resources. With methane and other carbon-bearing compounds being observed, however, their origins and formation conditions remain unknown. Thus, studying hydrothermal springs in this area provides us an opportunity to understand subsurface (bio)chemical processes that generate organic compounds, and aid in future development and exploration of potential energy resources as well. While isotope measurement has long been used for identification of their origins, there are secondary processes that may generate variations in isotopic compositions: oxidation, re-equilibration of methane and other alkanes with CO2, mixing with compounds of other sources, etc. Therefore, in addition to isotopic analysis, other lines of evidence, including water chemistry and rock compositions, are necessary to identify origins of volatile compounds. Surprise Valley Hot Springs (SVHS, 41°32'N, 120°5'W), located in a typical basin and range province in northeastern California, is a terrestrial hydrothermal spring system of the Great Basin. Previous geophysical studies indicated the presence of clay-rich volcanic and sedimentary rocks of Tertiary age beneath the lava flows during late Tertiary and Quaternary. Water and gas samples were collected for a variety of chemical and isotope composition analyses, including in-situ pH, alkalinity, oxidation reduction potential (ORP), major and trace elements, and C and H isotope measurements. Fluids issuing from SVHS can be classified as Na-(Cl)-SO4 type, with the major cation and anion being Na+ and SO42-, respectively. Thermodynamic calculation using ORP and major element data indicated that sulfate is the most dominant sulfur species, which is consistent with anion analysis results. Aquifer temperatures at depth estimated by both dissolved SiO2 and Na-K-Ca geothermometers are in the range of 125.0 to 135.4 °C, and

  5. The Origin of Carbon-bearing Volatiles in Surprise Valley Hot Springs in the Great Basin: Carbon Isotope and Water Chemistry Characterizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qi; Socki, Richard A.; Niles, Paul B.; Romanek, Christopher; Datta, Saugata; Darnell, Mike; Bissada, Adry K.

    2013-01-01

    There are numerous hydrothermal fields within the Great Basin of North America, some of which have been exploited for geothermal resources. With methane and other carbon-bearing compounds being observed, in some cases with high concentrations, however, their origins and formation conditions remain unknown. Thus, studying hydrothermal springs in this area provides us an opportunity to expand our knowledge of subsurface (bio)chemical processes that generate organic compounds in hydrothermal systems, and aid in future development and exploration of potential energy resources as well. While isotope measurement has long been used for recognition of their origins, there are several secondary processes that may generate variations in isotopic compositions: oxidation, re-equilibration of methane and other alkanes with CO2, mixing with compounds of other sources, etc. Therefore, in addition to isotopic analysis, other evidence, including water chemistry and rock compositions, are necessary to identify volatile compounds of different sources. Surprise Valley Hot Springs (SVHS, 41 deg 32'N, 120 deg 5'W), located in a typical basin and range province valley in northeastern California, is a terrestrial hydrothermal spring system of the Great Basin. Previous geophysical studies indicated the presence of clay-rich volcanic and sedimentary rocks of Tertiary age beneath the lava flows in late Tertiary and Quaternary. Water and gas samples were collected for a variety of chemical and isotope composition analyses, including in-situ pH, alkalinity, conductivity, oxidation reduction potential (ORP), major and trace elements, and C and H isotope measurements. Fluids issuing from SVHS can be classified as Na-(Cl)-SO4 type, with the major cation and anion being Na+ and SO4(2-), respectively. Thermodynamic calculation using ORP and major element data indicated that sulfate is the most dominant sulfur species, which is consistent with anion analysis results. Aquifer temperatures at depth

  6. The Origin of Carbon-bearing Volatiles in Surprise Valley Hot Springs in the Great Basin: Carbon Isotope aud Water Chemistry Characterizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qi; Socki, Richard A.; Niles, Paul B.; Romanek, Christopher; Datta, Saugata; Darnell, Mike; Bissada, Adry K.

    2013-01-01

    There are numerous hydrothermal fields within the Great Basin of North America, some of which have been exploited for geothermal resources. With methane and other carbon-bearing compounds being observed, in some cases with high concentrations, however, their origins and formation conditions remain unknown. Thus, studying hydrothermal springs in this area provides us an opportunity to expand our knowledge of subsurface (bio)chemical processes that generate organic compounds in hydrothermal systems, and aid in future development and exploration of potential energy resources as well. While isotope measurement has long been used for recognition of their origins, there are several secondary processes that may generate variations in isotopic compositions: oxidation, re-equilibration of methane and other alkanes with CO2, mixing with compounds of other sources, etc. Therefore, in addition to isotopic analysis, other evidence, including water chemistry and rock compositions, are necessary to identify volatile compounds of different sources. Surprise Valley Hot Springs (SVHS, 41º32'N, 120º5'W), located in a typical basin and range province valley in northeastern California, is a terrestrial hydrothermal spring system of the Great Basin. Previous geophysical studies indicated the presence of clay-rich volcanic and sedimentary rocks of Tertiary age beneath the lava flows in late Tertiary and Quaternary. Water and gas samples were collected for a variety of chemical and isotope composition analyses, including in-situ pH, alkalinity, conductivity, oxidation reduction potential (ORP), major and trace elements, and C and H isotope measurements. Fluids issuing from SVHS can be classified as Na-(Cl)-SO4 type, with the major cation and anion being Na+ and SO4 2-, respectively. Thermodynamic calculation using ORP and major element data indicated that sulfate is the most dominant sulfur species, which is consistent with anion analysis results. Aquifer temperatures at depth estimated

  7. Catalytic site inhibition of insulin-degrading enzyme by a small molecule induces glucose intolerance in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deprez-Poulain, Rebecca; Hennuyer, Nathalie; Bosc, Damien; Liang, Wenguang G; Enée, Emmanuelle; Marechal, Xavier; Charton, Julie; Totobenazara, Jane; Berte, Gonzague; Jahklal, Jouda; Verdelet, Tristan; Dumont, Julie; Dassonneville, Sandrine; Woitrain, Eloise; Gauriot, Marion; Paquet, Charlotte; Duplan, Isabelle; Hermant, Paul; Cantrelle, François-Xavier; Sevin, Emmanuel; Culot, Maxime; Landry, Valerie; Herledan, Adrien; Piveteau, Catherine; Lippens, Guy; Leroux, Florence; Tang, Wei-Jen; van Endert, Peter; Staels, Bart; Deprez, Benoit

    2015-09-23

    Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) is a protease that cleaves insulin and other bioactive peptides such as amyloid-β. Knockout and genetic studies have linked IDE to Alzheimer's disease and type-2 diabetes. As the major insulin-degrading protease, IDE is a candidate drug target in diabetes. Here we have used kinetic target-guided synthesis to design the first catalytic site inhibitor of IDE suitable for in vivo studies (BDM44768). Crystallographic and small angle X-ray scattering analyses show that it locks IDE in a closed conformation. Among a panel of metalloproteases, BDM44768 selectively inhibits IDE. Acute treatment of mice with BDM44768 increases insulin signalling and surprisingly impairs glucose tolerance in an IDE-dependent manner. These results confirm that IDE is involved in pathways that modulate short-term glucose homeostasis, but casts doubt on the general usefulness of the inhibition of IDE catalytic activity to treat diabetes.

  8. Targeting of the MET receptor tyrosine kinase by small molecule inhibitors leads to MET accumulation by impairing the receptor downregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiser, Dominic; Pochon, Benoît; Blank-Liss, Wieslawa; Francica, Paola; Glück, Astrid A; Aebersold, Daniel M; Zimmer, Yitzhak; Medová, Michaela

    2014-03-03

    The MET receptor tyrosine kinase is deregulated primarily via overexpression or point mutations in various human cancers and different strategies for MET inhibition are currently evaluated in clinical trials. We observed by Western blot analysis and by Flow cytometry that MET inhibition by different MET small molecule inhibitors surprisingly increases in a dose-dependent manner total MET levels in treated cells. Mechanistically, this inhibition-related MET accumulation was associated with reduced Tyr1003 phosphorylation and MET physical association with the CBL ubiquitin ligase with concomitant decrease in MET ubiquitination. These data may suggest careful consideration for design of anti-MET clinical protocols. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Small cryptopredators contribute to high predation rates on coral reefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goatley, Christopher H. R.; González-Cabello, Alonso; Bellwood, David R.

    2017-03-01

    Small fishes suffer high mortality rates on coral reefs, primarily due to predation. Although studies have identified the predators of early post-settlement fishes, the predators of small cryptobenthic fishes remain largely unknown. We therefore used a series of mesocosm experiments with natural habitat and cryptobenthic fish communities to identify the impacts of a range of small potential predators, including several invertebrates, on prey fish populations. While there was high variability in predation rates, many members of the cryptobenthic fish community act as facultative cryptopredators, being prey when small and piscivores when larger. Surprisingly, we also found that smashing mantis shrimps may be important fish predators. Our results highlight the diversity of the predatory community on coral reefs and identify previously unknown trophic links in these complex ecosystems.

  10. Aesthetic Surprise of Artistic Expression in Chinese Ancient Literature%审美惊奇在中国古代文学中的艺术表现

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李潇云

    2015-01-01

    Aesthetic surprise is an appreciation of wonder beauty of literature, art and natural beauty. It is related with ideological content of expression, prefers to the artistic form and artistic expression, but also closely related with the aesthetic psychology and aesthetic experience. With the main identifications as aesthetic psychological effects which appeared as "surprising" "astonishing""touched"and so on, its reason can be roughly analyzed from four aspects:imagery, artistic conception, rhetoric and language.%审美惊奇是对具有奇异之美的文学艺术甚至奇特自然美的一种激赏,它和表现的思想内容有关,偏重于艺术形式、艺术表现,也和审美心理和审美经验密不可分,其主要标识为审美心理效果,体现为“惊人”“惊心动魄”“动心惊耳”等,其原因大致可以从四个方面来分析:语言、修辞、意象、意境。

  11. Novel modulators of senescence, aging, and longevity: Small non-coding RNAs enter the stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grillari, Johannes; Grillari-Voglauer, Regina

    2010-04-01

    During the last decade evidence has accumulated that the aging process is driven by limited allocation of energy to somatic maintenance resulting in accumulation of stochastic damage. This damage, affecting molecules, cells, and tissues, is counteracted by genetically programmed repair, the efficiency of which thus importantly determines the life and 'health span' of organisms. Therefore, understanding the regulation of gene expression during cellular and organismal aging as well as upon exposure to various damaging events is important to understand the biology of aging and to positively influence the health span. The recent identification of small non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), has added an additional layer of complexity to the regulation of gene expression with the classes of endogenous small inhibitory RNAs (siRNAs), PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs), QDE1-interacting RNAs (qiRNAs) and microRNAs (miRNAs). Some of these ncRNAs have not yet been identified in mammalian cells and are dependent on RNA-dependent RNA polymerases. The first mammalian enzyme with such activity has only now emerged and surprisingly consists of the catalytic subunit of telomerase (hTERT) together with RMPR, an alternative RNA component. The so far most studied small non-coding RNAs, miRNAs, however, are now increasingly found to operate in the complex network of cellular aging. Recent findings show that (i) miRNAs are regulated during cellular senescence in vitro, (ii) they contribute to tissue regeneration by regulation of stem cell function, and (iii) at least one miRNA modulates the life span of the model organism C. elegans. Additionally, (iv) they act as inhibitors of proteins mediating the insulin/IGF1 and target of rapamycin (TOR) signalling, both of which are conserved modulators of organism life span. Here we will give an overview on the current status of these topics. Since little is so far known on the functions of small ncRNAs in the context of aging and longevity, the entry of the

  12. Small is different: RPC observations of a small scale comet interacting with the solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Hans; Burch, James L.; Carr, Christopher M.; Eriksson, Anders I.; Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz; Henri, Pierre; Rosetta Plasma Consortium Team

    2016-10-01

    Rosetta followed comet 67P from low activity at more than 3 AU heliocentric distance to peak activity at perihelion and then out again. We study the evolution of the dynamic plasma environment using data from the Rosetta Plasma Consortium (RPC). Observations of cometary plasma began in August 2014, at a distance of 100 km from the comet nucleus and at 3.6 AU from the Sun. As the comet approached the Sun, outgassing from the comet increased, as did the density of the cometary plasma. Measurements showed a highly heterogeneous cold ion environment, permeated by the solar wind. The solar wind was deflected due to the mass loading from newly added cometary plasma, with no discernible slowing down. The magnetic field magnitude increased significantly above the background level, and strong low frequency waves were observed in the magnetic field, a.k.a. the "singing comet". Electron temperatures were high, leading to a frequently strongly negative spacecraft potential. In mid to late April 2015 the solar wind started to disappear from the observation region. This was associated with a solar wind deflection reaching nearly 180°, indicating that mass loading became efficient enough to form a solar wind-free region. Accelerated water ions, moving mainly in the anti-sunward direction, kept being observed also after the solar wind disappearance. Plasma boundaries began to form and a collisionopause was tentatively identified in the ion and electron data. At the time around perihelion, a diamagnetic cavity was also observed, at a surprisingly large distance from the comet. In late 2016 the solar wind re-appeared at the location of Rosetta, allowing for studies of asymmetry of the comet ion environment with respect to perihelion. A nightside excursion allowed us to get a glimpse of the electrodynamics of the innermost part of the plasma tail. Most of these phenomena are dependent on the small-scale physics of comet 67P, since for most of the Rosetta mission the solar wind

  13. Cryoablation for Small Renal Masses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Dominguez-Escrig

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Advances in imaging techniques (CT and MRI and widespread use of imaging especially ultrasound scanning have resulted in a dramatic increase in the detection of small renal masses. While open partial nephrectomy is still the reference standard for the management of these small renal masses, its associated morbidity has encouraged clinicians to exploit the advancements in minimally invasive ablative techniques. The last decade has seen the rapid development of laparoscopic partial nephrectomy and novel ablative techniques such as, radiofrequency ablation (RFA, high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU, and cryoablation (CA. In particular, CA for small renal masses has gained popularity as it combines nephron-sparing surgery with a minimally invasive approach. Studies with up to 5-year followup have shown an overall and cancer-specific 5-year survival of 82% and 100%, respectively. This manuscript will focus on the principles and clinical applications of cryoablation of small renal masses, with detailed review of relevant literature.

  14. BRANDING IN SMALL BUSINESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai Răzvan Constantin BARBU

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we analyzed the branding in small business. Using a desk research on Internet and the press we have identified the practices small businesses use to enhance their brand and the brand dynamics in small business. Our main contribution is that we tried to figure out the strategy of branding in small business. This need further to be investigated in order to understand how branding works in small business and to better capture the role of branding in small business.

  15. Surprising Beauty in Technical Photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidhazy, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    The Imaging and Photographic Technology area, in which the author teaches, is an applications- and technology-oriented photography program designed to prepare students for work in technical, corporate, industrial, and scientific environments. One day, the author received an e-mail message from an editor who had found his Web site and thought he…

  16. Surprised by the Parimutuel Odds?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottaviani, Marco; Sørensen, Peter Norman

    2009-01-01

    Empirical analyses of parimutuel betting markets have documented that market probabilities of favorites (longshots) tend to underestimate (overestimate) the corresponding empirical probabilities. We argue that this favorite-longshot bias is consistent with bettors taking simultaneous positions...... on the basis of private information about the likelihood of different outcomes. The ex post realization of a high market probability indicates favorable information about the occurrence of an outcome -- and the opposite is true for longshots. This explanation for the bias relies on the bettors' inability...

  17. Conversation Simulation and Sensible Surprises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchens, Jason L.

    I have entered the Loebner Prize five times, winning the "most humanlike program" category in 1996 with a surly ELIZA-clone named HeX, but failed to repeat the performance in subsequent years with more sophisticated techniques. Whether this is indicative of an unanticipated improvement in "conversation simulation" technology, or whether it highlights the strengths of ELIZA-style trickery, is as an exercise for the reader. In 2000, I was invited to assume the role of Chief Scientist at Artificial Intelligence Ltd. (Ai) on a project inspired by the advice given by Alan Turing in the final section of his classic paper - our quest was to build a "child machine" that could learn and use language from scratch. In this chapter, I will discuss both of these experiences, presenting my thoughts regarding the Chinese Room argument and Artificial Intelligence (AI) in between.

  18. Some new surprises in chaos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunimovich, Leonid A., E-mail: bunimovh@math.gatech.edu [ABC Program, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); School of Mathematics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Vela-Arevalo, Luz V., E-mail: luzvela@math.gatech.edu [School of Mathematics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    A brief review is presented of some recent findings in the theory of chaotic dynamics. We also prove a statement that could be naturally considered as a dual one to the Poincaré theorem on recurrences. Numerical results demonstrate that some parts of the phase space of chaotic systems are more likely to be visited earlier than other parts. A new class of chaotic focusing billiards is discussed that clearly violates the main condition considered to be necessary for chaos in focusing billiards.

  19. Surprising results from cosmic rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilk, G. [Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Warsaw (Poland); Wlodarczyk, Z. [Institute for Physics, Pedagogical University, Kielce (Poland)

    1996-10-01

    A number of seemingly exotic phenomena seen in the highest cosmic-ray experiments are briefly discussed. We argue that they indicate existence of non-statistical fluctuations and strong correlations in the fragmentation region of multiparticle production processes unaccessible to the present accelerators. (author) 12 refs, 3 figs

  20. Education in Japan: Surprising Lessons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deasy, Richard J.

    1986-01-01

    Reports on an indepth probe of the Japanese educational system by American educators. This study shows that the United States cannot expect to achieve economic growth by copying the Japanese system, which has been shaped largely by its geography and culture and society. (MD)

  1. What is the mechanism of Ketamine's rapid-onset antidepressant effect? A concise overview of the surprisingly large number of possibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasburger, S E; Bhimani, P M; Kaabe, J H; Krysiak, J T; Nanchanatt, D L; Nguyen, T N; Pough, K A; Prince, T A; Ramsey, N S; Savsani, K H; Scandlen, L; Cavaretta, M J; Raffa, R B

    2017-04-01

    Abundant clinical data now confirm that ketamine produces a remarkable rapid-onset antidepressant effect - hours or days - in contrast to the delayed onset (typically weeks) of current antidepressant drugs. This surprising and revolutionary finding may lead to the development of life-saving pharmacotherapy for depressive illness by reducing the high suicide risk associated with the delayed onset of effect of current drugs. As ketamine has serious self-limiting drawbacks that restrict its widespread use for this purpose, a safer alternative is needed. Our objective is to review the proposed mechanism(s) of ketamine's rapid-onset antidepressant action for new insights into the physiological basis of depressive illness that may lead to new and novel targets for antidepressant drug discovery. A search was conducted on published literature (e.g. PubMed) and Internet sources to identify information relevant to ketamine's rapid-acting antidepressant action and, specifically, to the possible mechanism(s) of this action. Key search words included 'ketamine', 'antidepressant', 'mechanism of action', 'depression' and 'rapid acting', either individually or in combination. Information was sought that would include less well-known, as well as well-known, basic pharmacologic properties of ketamine and that identified and evaluated the several hypotheses about ketamine's mechanism of antidepressant action. Whether the mechanistic explanation for ketamine's rapid-onset antidepressant action is related to its well-known antagonism of the NMDA (N-Methyl-d-aspartate) subtype of glutamate receptor or to something else has not yet been fully elucidated. The evidence from pharmacologic, medicinal chemistry, animal model and drug-discovery sources reveals a wide variety of postulated mechanisms. The surprising discovery of ketamine's rapid-onset antidepressant effect is a game-changer for the understanding and treatment of depressive illness. There is some convergence on NMDA receptor

  2. The small subunit 1 of the Arabidopsis isopropylmalate isomerase is required for normal growth and development and the early stages of glucosinolate formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imhof, Janet; Huber, Florian; Reichelt, Michael; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Wiegreffe, Christoph; Lächler, Kurt; Binder, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana the evolutionary and functional relationship between Leu biosynthesis and the Met chain elongation pathway, the first part of glucosinolate formation, is well documented. Nevertheless the exact functions of some pathway components are still unclear. Isopropylmalate isomerase (IPMI), an enzyme usually involved in Leu biosynthesis, is a heterodimer consisting of a large and a small subunit. While the large protein is encoded by a single gene (isopropylmalate isomerase large subunit1), three genes encode small subunits (isopropylmalate isomerase small subunit1 to 3). We have now analyzed small subunit 1 (isopropylmalate isomerase small subunit1) employing artificial microRNA for a targeted knockdown of the encoding gene. Strong reduction of corresponding mRNA levels to less than 5% of wild-type levels resulted in a severe phenotype with stunted growth, narrow pale leaf blades with green vasculature and abnormal adaxial-abaxial patterning as well as anomalous flower morphology. Supplementation of the knockdown plants with leucine could only partially compensate for the morphological and developmental abnormalities. Detailed metabolite profiling of the knockdown plants revealed changes in the steady state levels of isopropylmalate and glucosinolates as well as their intermediates demonstrating a function of IPMI SSU1 in both leucine biosynthesis and the first cycle of Met chain elongation. Surprisingly the levels of free leucine slightly increased suggesting an imbalanced distribution of leucine within cells and/or within plant tissues.

  3. The small subunit 1 of the Arabidopsis isopropylmalate isomerase is required for normal growth and development and the early stages of glucosinolate formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet Imhof

    Full Text Available In Arabidopsis thaliana the evolutionary and functional relationship between Leu biosynthesis and the Met chain elongation pathway, the first part of glucosinolate formation, is well documented. Nevertheless the exact functions of some pathway components are still unclear. Isopropylmalate isomerase (IPMI, an enzyme usually involved in Leu biosynthesis, is a heterodimer consisting of a large and a small subunit. While the large protein is encoded by a single gene (isopropylmalate isomerase large subunit1, three genes encode small subunits (isopropylmalate isomerase small subunit1 to 3. We have now analyzed small subunit 1 (isopropylmalate isomerase small subunit1 employing artificial microRNA for a targeted knockdown of the encoding gene. Strong reduction of corresponding mRNA levels to less than 5% of wild-type levels resulted in a severe phenotype with stunted growth, narrow pale leaf blades with green vasculature and abnormal adaxial-abaxial patterning as well as anomalous flower morphology. Supplementation of the knockdown plants with leucine could only partially compensate for the morphological and developmental abnormalities. Detailed metabolite profiling of the knockdown plants revealed changes in the steady state levels of isopropylmalate and glucosinolates as well as their intermediates demonstrating a function of IPMI SSU1 in both leucine biosynthesis and the first cycle of Met chain elongation. Surprisingly the levels of free leucine slightly increased suggesting an imbalanced distribution of leucine within cells and/or within plant tissues.

  4. Deletion of the Novel Oocyte-Enriched Gene, Gpr149, Leads to Increased Fertility in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edson, Mark A.; Lin, Yi-Nan; Matzuk, Martin M.

    2010-01-01

    Through in silico subtraction and microarray analysis, we identified mouse Gpr149, a novel, oocyte-enriched transcript that encodes a predicted orphan G-protein-coupled receptor (GPR). Phylogenetic analysis of GPR149 from fish to mammals suggests that it is widely conserved in vertebrates. By multitissue RT-PCR analysis, we found that Gpr149 is highly expressed in the ovary and also in the brain and the digestive tract at low levels. Gpr149 levels are low in newborn ovaries but increase throughout folliculogenesis. In the ovary, we found that granulosa cells did not express Gpr149, whereas germinal vesicle and meiosis II stage oocytes showed high levels of Gpr149 expression. After fertilization, Gpr149 expression declined, becoming undetectable by the two-cell stage. To study the function of GPR149 in oocyte growth and maturation, we generated Gpr149 null mice. Surprisingly, Gpr149 null mice are viable and have normal folliculogenesis, but demonstrate increased fertility, enhanced ovulation, increased oocyte Gdf9 mRNA levels, and increased levels of FSH receptor and cyclin D2 mRNA levels in granulosa cells. Thus, Gpr149 null mice are one of the few models with enhanced fertility, and GPR149 could be a target for small molecules to enhance fertility in the assisted reproductive technology clinic. PMID:19887567

  5. Benefits of Group Foraging Depend on Prey Type in a Small Marine Predator, the Little Penguin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Grace J; Hoskins, Andrew J; Arnould, John P Y

    2015-01-01

    Group foraging provides predators with advantages in over-powering prey larger than themselves or in aggregating small prey for efficient exploitation. For group-living predatory species, cooperative hunting strategies provide inclusive fitness benefits. However, for colonial-breeding predators, the benefit pay-offs of group foraging are less clear due to the potential for intra-specific competition. We used animal-borne cameras to determine the prey types, hunting strategies, and success of little penguins (Eudyptula minor), a small, colonial breeding air-breathing marine predator that has recently been shown to display extensive at-sea foraging associations with conspecifics. Regardless of prey type, little penguins had a higher probability of associating with conspecifics when hunting prey that were aggregated than when prey were solitary. In addition, success was greater when individuals hunted schooling rather than solitary prey. Surprisingly, however, success on schooling prey was similar or greater when individuals hunted on their own than when with conspecifics. These findings suggest individuals may be trading-off the energetic gains of solitary hunting for an increased probability of detecting prey within a spatially and temporally variable prey field by associating with conspecifics.

  6. Benefits of Group Foraging Depend on Prey Type in a Small Marine Predator, the Little Penguin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace J Sutton

    Full Text Available Group foraging provides predators with advantages in over-powering prey larger than themselves or in aggregating small prey for efficient exploitation. For group-living predatory species, cooperative hunting strategies provide inclusive fitness benefits. However, for colonial-breeding predators, the benefit pay-offs of group foraging are less clear due to the potential for intra-specific competition. We used animal-borne cameras to determine the prey types, hunting strategies, and success of little penguins (Eudyptula minor, a small, colonial breeding air-breathing marine predator that has recently been shown to display extensive at-sea foraging associations with conspecifics. Regardless of prey type, little penguins had a higher probability of associating with conspecifics when hunting prey that were aggregated than when prey were solitary. In addition, success was greater when individuals hunted schooling rather than solitary prey. Surprisingly, however, success on schooling prey was similar or greater when individuals hunted on their own than when with conspecifics. These findings suggest individuals may be trading-off the energetic gains of solitary hunting for an increased probability of detecting prey within a spatially and temporally variable prey field by associating with conspecifics.

  7. As a Nucleus Enters a Small Pore, Chromatin Stretches and Maintains Integrity, Even with DNA Breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irianto, Jerome; Xia, Yuntao; Pfeifer, Charlotte R; Greenberg, Roger A; Discher, Dennis E

    2017-02-07

    As a cell pushes or pulls its nucleus through a small constriction, the chromatin must distort and somehow maintain genomic stability despite ever-present double-strand breaks in the DNA. Here we visualize within a living cell the pore-size dependent deformation of a specific locus engineered into chromosome-1 and cleaved. An mCherry-tagged nuclease targets the submicron locus, causing DNA cleavage and recruiting repair factors such as GFP-53BP1 to a large region around the locus. Aspiration of a cell and its nucleus into a micropipette shows that chromatin aligns and stretches parallel to the pore. Extension is largest in small pores, increasing >10-fold but remaining 30-fold shorter than the DNA contour length in the locus. Brochard and de Gennes' blob model for tube geometry fits the data, with a simple modification for chromatin crowding. Continuity of the highly extended, cleaved chromatin is also maintained, consistent with folding and cross bridging of the DNA. Surprisingly, extensional integrity is unaffected by an inhibitor of the DNA repair scaffold. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Benefits of Group Foraging Depend on Prey Type in a Small Marine Predator, the Little Penguin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Grace J.; Hoskins, Andrew J.; Arnould, John P. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Group foraging provides predators with advantages in over-powering prey larger than themselves or in aggregating small prey for efficient exploitation. For group-living predatory species, cooperative hunting strategies provide inclusive fitness benefits. However, for colonial-breeding predators, the benefit pay-offs of group foraging are less clear due to the potential for intra-specific competition. We used animal-borne cameras to determine the prey types, hunting strategies, and success of little penguins (Eudyptula minor), a small, colonial breeding air-breathing marine predator that has recently been shown to display extensive at-sea foraging associations with conspecifics. Regardless of prey type, little penguins had a higher probability of associating with conspecifics when hunting prey that were aggregated than when prey were solitary. In addition, success was greater when individuals hunted schooling rather than solitary prey. Surprisingly, however, success on schooling prey was similar or greater when individuals hunted on their own than when with conspecifics. These findings suggest individuals may be trading-off the energetic gains of solitary hunting for an increased probability of detecting prey within a spatially and temporally variable prey field by associating with conspecifics. PMID:26674073

  9. Small-scale Biorefining

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, de C.L.M.; Ree, van R.

    2016-01-01

    One promising way to accelerate the market implementation of integrated biorefineries is to promote small (regional) biorefinery initiatives. Small-scale biorefineries require relatively low initial investments, and therefore are often lacking the financing problems that larger facilities face. They

  10. Chairing a Small Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowker, Lee H.; Lynch, David M.

    Ten management problems for chairs of small departments in small colleges are discussed, along with problem-solving strategies for these administrators. Serious disagreements within a small and intimate department may create a country club culture in which differences are smoothed over and the personal idiosyncrasies of individual members are…

  11. Small group discussion: Students perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annamalai, Nachal; Manivel, Rajajeyakumar; Palanisamy, Rajendran

    2015-08-01

    Various alternative methods are being used in many medical colleges to reinforce didactic lectures in physiology. Small group teaching can take on a variety of different tasks such as problem-solving, role play, discussions, brainstorming, and debate. Research has demonstrated that group discussion promotes greater synthesis and retention of materials. The aims of this study were to adopt a problem-solving approach by relating basic sciences with the clinical scenario through self-learning. To develop soft skills, to understand principles of group dynamics, and adopt a new teaching learning methodology. Experimental study design was conducted in Phase I 1(st) year medical students of 2014-2015 batch (n = 120). On the day of the session, the students were grouped into small groups (15 each). The session started with the facilitator starting off the discussion. Feedback forms from five students in each group was taken (n = 40). A five point Likert scale was used ranging from strongly agree to strongly disagree. Data were analyzed using IBM SPSS Statistics for Windows, Version 21.0. Armonk, NY: IBM Corp. Our results show that 70% of the students opined that small group discussion were interactive, friendly, innovative, built interaction between teacher and student. Small group discussion increased their thought process and helped them in better communication. The small group discussion was interactive, friendly, and bridged the gap between the teacher and student. The student's communication skills are also improved. In conclusion, small group discussion is more effective than the traditional teaching methods.

  12. Small Proteins Can No Longer Be Ignored

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storz, Gisela; Wolf, Yuri I.; Ramamurthi, Kumaran S.

    2014-01-01

    Small proteins, here defined as proteins of 50 amino acids or less in the absence of processing, have traditionally been overlooked due to challenges in their annotation and biochemical detection. In the past several years however, increasing numbers of small proteins have been identified either through the realization that mutations in “intergenic” regions actually are within unannotated small protein genes, or through the discovery that some small, regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) encode small proteins. These insights together with comparative sequence analysis indicate that tens if not hundreds of small proteins are synthesized in a given organism. This review will summarize what has been learned about the functions of several of these bacterial small proteins, most of which act at the membrane, illustrating the astonishing range of processes in which the small proteins act and pointing to several general conclusions. Important questions for future studies of these overlooked proteins also will be discussed. PMID:24606146

  13. Maternal obesity in females born small: Pregnancy complications and offspring disease risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahizir, Dayana; Briffa, Jessica F; Hryciw, Deanne H; Wadley, Glenn D; Moritz, Karen M; Wlodek, Mary E

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a major public health crisis, with 1.6 billion adults worldwide being classified as overweight or obese in 2014. Therefore, it is not surprising that the number of women who are overweight or obese at the time of conception is increasing. Obesity during pregnancy is associated with the development of gestational diabetes and preeclampsia. The developmental origins of health and disease hypothesis proposes that perturbations during critical stages of development can result in adverse fetal changes that leads to an increased risk of developing diseases in adulthood. Of particular concern, children born to obese mothers are at a greater risk of developing cardiometabolic disease. One subset of the population who are predisposed to developing obesity are children born small for gestational age, which occurs in 10% of pregnancies worldwide. Epidemiological studies report that these growth-restricted children have an increased susceptibility to type 2 diabetes, obesity, and hypertension. Importantly during pregnancy, growth-restricted females have a higher risk of developing cardiometabolic disease, indicating that they may have an exacerbated phenotype if they are also overweight or obese. Thus, the development of early pregnancy interventions targeted to obese mothers may prevent their children from developing cardiometabolic disease in adulthood.

  14. Coalescence In Draining Foams Made of Very Small Bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briceño-Ahumada, Zenaida; Drenckhan, Wiebke; Langevin, Dominique

    2016-03-01

    We studied the stability of foams containing small bubbles (radius ≲ 50 μ m ). The foams are made from aqueous surfactant solutions containing various amounts of glycerol. The foams start breaking at their top, when the liquid volume fraction has decreased sufficiently during liquid drainage. Unlike in foams with larger bubbles, the liquid fraction at which the foam destabilizes is surprisingly high. In order to interpret this observation we propose that film rupture occurs during reorganization events (T 1 ) induced by bubble coarsening, which is particularly rapid in the case of small bubbles. New films are therefore formed rapidly and if their thickness is too small, they cannot be sufficiently covered by surfactant and they break. Using literature data for the duration of T 1 events and the thickness of the new films, we show that this mechanism is consistent with the behavior of the foams studied.

  15. Small-world patterns in Chinese phrase networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yong; WEI Luoxia; LI Wei; NIU Yi; LUO Shiyu

    2005-01-01

    @@ Recently, the structure and function of complex networks have become one of the hottest topics in statistical physics and interdisciplinary sciences[1-5]. Studies have shown that real networks containing a huge mount of nodes do not form and evolve in a random way as expected, but they display peculiar features. The most surprising one is the small-world effect, which is commonly shared by food webs[1], the web of human sexual contacts[2], word networks[3], etc. Moreover, the scale-free property of degree distributions also emerges on Internet and protein networks[6,7].

  16. Small cell glioblastoma or small cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbrandt, Christine; Sathyadas, Sathya; Dahlrot, Rikke H

    2013-01-01

    was admitted to the hospital with left-sided loss of motor function. A MRI revealed a 6 cm tumor in the right temporoparietal area. The histology was consistent with both glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) but IHC was suggestive of a SCLC metastasis. PET-CT revealed...

  17. Over-expression of monoacylglycerol lipase (MGL in small intestine alters endocannabinoid levels and whole body energy balance, resulting in obesity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Hyoun Chon

    Full Text Available The function of small intestinal monoacylglycerol lipase (MGL is unknown. Its expression in this tissue is surprising because one of the primary functions of the small intestine is to convert diet-derived MGs to triacylglycerol (TG, and not to degrade them. To elucidate the function of intestinal MGL, we generated transgenic mice that over-express MGL specifically in small intestine (iMGL mice. After only 3 weeks of high fat feeding, iMGL mice showed an obese phenotype; body weight gain and body fat mass were markedly higher in iMGL mice, along with increased hepatic and plasma TG levels compared to wild type littermates. The iMGL mice were hyperphagic and displayed reduced energy expenditure despite unchanged lean body mass, suggesting that the increased adiposity was due to both increased caloric intake and systemic effects resulting in a hypometabolic rate. The presence of the transgene resulted in lower levels of most MG species in intestinal mucosa, including the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG. The results therefore suggest a role for intestinal MGL, and intestinal 2-AG and perhaps other MG species, in whole body energy balance via regulation of food intake as well as metabolic rate.

  18. Over-expression of monoacylglycerol lipase (MGL) in small intestine alters endocannabinoid levels and whole body energy balance, resulting in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chon, Su-Hyoun; Douglass, John D; Zhou, Yin Xiu; Malik, Nashmia; Dixon, Joseph L; Brinker, Anita; Quadro, Loredana; Storch, Judith

    2012-01-01

    The function of small intestinal monoacylglycerol lipase (MGL) is unknown. Its expression in this tissue is surprising because one of the primary functions of the small intestine is to convert diet-derived MGs to triacylglycerol (TG), and not to degrade them. To elucidate the function of intestinal MGL, we generated transgenic mice that over-express MGL specifically in small intestine (iMGL mice). After only 3 weeks of high fat feeding, iMGL mice showed an obese phenotype; body weight gain and body fat mass were markedly higher in iMGL mice, along with increased hepatic and plasma TG levels compared to wild type littermates. The iMGL mice were hyperphagic and displayed reduced energy expenditure despite unchanged lean body mass, suggesting that the increased adiposity was due to both increased caloric intake and systemic effects resulting in a hypometabolic rate. The presence of the transgene resulted in lower levels of most MG species in intestinal mucosa, including the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG). The results therefore suggest a role for intestinal MGL, and intestinal 2-AG and perhaps other MG species, in whole body energy balance via regulation of food intake as well as metabolic rate.

  19. Small asteroid system evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Jacobson, Seth A.

    2014-01-01

    Observations with radar, photometric and direct imaging techniques have discovered that multiple asteroid systems can be divided clearly into a handful of different morphologies, and recently, the discovery of small unbound asteroid systems called asteroid pairs have revolutionized the study of small asteroid systems. Simultaneously, new theoretical advances have demonstrated that solar radiation dictates the evolution of small asteroids with strong implications for asteroid internal structur...

  20. Small asteroid system evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Jacobson, Seth A.

    2014-01-01

    Observations with radar, photometric and direct imaging techniques have discovered that multiple asteroid systems can be divided clearly into a handful of different morphologies, and recently, the discovery of small unbound asteroid systems called asteroid pairs have revolutionized the study of small asteroid systems. Simultaneously, new theoretical advances have demonstrated that solar radiation dictates the evolution of small asteroids with strong implications for asteroid internal structur...

  1. Small Intestine Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease Crohn's disease Infections Intestinal cancer Intestinal obstruction Irritable bowel syndrome Ulcers, such as peptic ulcer Treatment of disorders of the small intestine depends on the cause.

  2. Small-ductprimarysclerosingcholangitis withhepatocellularcarcinomarequiringliver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sharif Ali; Veena Shah

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a chronic progressive cholestatic liver disease, which usually affects young adults and is diagnosed by cholangiography. On a few occasions, the disease either starts in or exclusively involves the small intrahepatic bile ducts, referred to as small-duct PSC. METHODS: A 31-year-old man presented with severe hematemesis secondary to liver cirrhosis. Over a course of 8 years, his liver decompensated and required an orthotopic liver transplantation. In this report we discuss his disease presentation, course of management, and the post-transplantation course of manage-ment, and review the morphologic diagnosis, and differential diagnosis of the disease with large-duct type and other diseases that involve small intrahepatic bile ducts. RESULTS:The patient's explanted liver showed changes of PSC affecting only the small- and medium-sized bile ducts in addition to three incidental nodules of hepatocellular carcinoma. CONCLUSIONS: Small-duct PSC has a substantially better prognosis than the large-duct type, with less chance of developing cirrhosis and an equal risk for developing hepato-cellular carcinoma, but no increased risk for developing cholangiocarcinoma. Treatment seems to help relieve the symptoms but not necessarily improve survival. Liver transplantation remains the ultimate cure.

  3. Adsorption of small hydrocarbons on rutile TiO2(110)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Long; Smith, R. Scott; Kay, Bruce D.; Dohnálek, Zdenek

    2016-08-01

    Temperature programmed desorption and molecular beam scattering were used to study the adsorption and desorption of small hydrocarbons (n-alkanes, 1-alkenes and 1-alkynes of C1-C4) on rutile TiO2(110). We show that the sticking coefficients for all the hydrocarbons are close to unity (> 0.95) at an adsorption temperature of 60 K. The desorption energies for hydrocarbons of the same chain length increase from n-alkanes to 1-alkenes and to 1-alkynes. This trend is likely a consequence of additional dative bonding of the alkene and alkyne π system to the coordinatively unsaturated Ti5c sites. Similar to previous studies on the adsorption of n-alkanes on metal and metal oxide surfaces, we find that the desorption energies within each group (n-alkanes vs. 1-alkenes vs. 1-alkynes) from Ti5c sites increase linearly with the chain length. The absolute saturation coverages of each hydrocarbon on Ti5c sites were also determined. The saturation coverage of CH4, is found to be ~ 2/3 monolayer (ML). The saturation coverages of C2-C4 hydrocarbons are found nearly independent of the chain length with values of ~ 1/2 ML for n-alkanes and 1-alkenes and 2/3 ML for 1-alkynes. This result is surprising considering their similar sizes.

  4. Adsorption of small hydrocarbons on rutile TiO2(110)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Long; Smith, R. Scott; Kay, Bruce D.; Dohnalek, Zdenek

    2016-08-01

    Temperature programmed desorption and molecular beam scattering were used to study the adsorption and desorption of small hydrocarbons (n-alkanes, 1-alkenes and 1-alkynes with 1 - 4 carbon atoms of C1-C4) on rutile TiO2(110). We show that the sticking coefficients for all the hydrocarbons are close to unity (> 0.95) at an adsorption temperature of 60 K. The desorption energies for hydrocarbons of the same chain length increase from n-alkanes to 1-alkenes and to 1-alkynes. This trend is likely a consequence of an additional dative bonding of the alkene and alkyne π system to the coordinatively unsaturated Ti5c sites. Similar to previous studies on the adsorption of n-alkanes on metal and metal oxide surfaces, we find the desorption energies within each group (n-alkanes vs. 1-alkenes vs. 1-alkynes) from Ti5c sites increase linearly with the chain length. The absolute saturation coverages of each hydrocarbon on Ti5c sites were also determined. The saturation coverage of CH4, is found to be ~ 2/3 monolayer (ML). The saturation coverages of C2-C4 hydrocarbons are found nearly independent of the chain length with values of ~1/2 ML for n-alkanes and 1-alkenes and 2/3 ML for 1-alkynes. This result is surprising considering their similar sizes.

  5. Golden age of RyR and GABA-R diamide and isoxazoline insecticides: common genesis, serendipity, surprises, selectivity, and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casida, John E

    2015-04-20

    The serendipitous observation of the insecticidal activity of a candidate herbicide was the first in a series of surprises that changed the course of insecticide research and opened the "Golden Age of Diamide and Isoxazoline Insecticides" which have a common genesis. Two novel modes of action were discovered, one involving the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor of the chloride channel and the other the ryanodine receptor (RyR) of the calcium-activated calcium channel. These are old insecticide targets, but physiological assays and radioligand binding studies reveal that the new diamides and isoxazolines act at previously unrecognized sites without cross-resistance to other chemotypes and more important differing between insects and mammals resulting in selective toxicity and mechanistically based safety. The phthalic diamide flubendiamide and anthranilic diamides chlorantraniliprole and cyantraniliprole act at an allosteric site of the RyR to activate calcium release in insects but not mammals. They are the most important insecticide introductions of the past decade. Isoxazoline and meta-diamide insecticides and their previously unrecognized GABA-R target are more recent discoveries. Isoxazolines are currently important in flea and tick control in dogs and cats, and meta-diamides show promise for pest management and crop protection. These 21st century RyR and GABA-R diamides and isoxazolines were serendipitous discoveries and developments showing the importance of mechanism studies in maintaining the arsenal of safe and effective insecticides.

  6. A surprisingly poor correlation between in vitro and in vivo testing of biomaterials for bone regeneration: results of a multicentre analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulsart-Billström, G; Dawson, J I; Hofmann, S; Müller, R; Stoddart, M J; Alini, M; Redl, H; El Haj, A; Brown, R; Salih, V; Hilborn, J; Larsson, S; Oreffo, R O

    2016-05-24

    New regenerative materials and approaches need to be assessed through reliable and comparable methods for rapid translation to the clinic. There is a considerable need for proven in vitro assays that are able to reduce the burden on animal testing, by allowing assessment of biomaterial utility predictive of the results currently obtained through in vivo studies. The purpose of this multicentre review was to investigate the correlation between existing in vitro results with in vivo outcomes observed for a range of biomaterials. Members from the European consortium BioDesign, comprising 8 universities in a European multicentre study, provided data from 36 in vivo studies and 47 in vitro assays testing 93 different biomaterials. The outcomes of the in vitro and in vivo experiments were scored according to commonly recognised measures of success relevant to each experiment. The correlation of in vitro with in vivo scores for each assay alone and in combination was assessed. A surprisingly poor correlation between in vitro and in vivo assessments of biomaterials was revealed indicating a clear need for further development of relevant in vitro assays. There was no significant overall correlation between in vitro and in vivo outcome. The mean in vitro scores revealed a trend of covariance to in vivo score with 58 %. The inadequacies of the current in vitro assessments highlighted here further stress the need for the development of novel approaches to in vitro biomaterial testing and validated pre-clinical pipelines.

  7. Density of very small meteoroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikwaya Eluo, Jean-Baptiste

    2015-08-01

    Knowing the density of meteoroids helps to determine the physical structure and gives insight into the composition of their parent bodies. The density of meteoroids can provide clues to their origins, whether cometary or asteroidal. Density helps also to characterize the risk meteoroids may pose to artificial satellites.Ceplecha (1968) calculated the density of small meteoroids based on a parameter KB (meteoroid beginning height) and classified them in four categories (A,B,C,D) with densities going from 2700 to 180 kgm-3.Babadzhanov(2002) applied a model based on quasi-continuous fragmentation (QCF) on 413 photographic Super-Schmidt meteors by solely fitting their light curves. Their densities range from 400 to 7800 kgm-3. Bellot Rubio et al. (2002) analyzed the same 413 photographic meteors assuming the single body theory based on meteoroid dynamical properties and found densities ranging from 400 to 4800 kgm-3. A thermal erosion model was used by Borovicka et al. (2007) to analyze, simultaneously, the observed decelerations and light curves of six Draconid meteors. The density was found to be 300 kgm-3, consistent with the fact that the Draconid meteors are porous aggregates of grains associated with the Jupiter-family-comet 21P/Giacobini-Zinner (Jacchia, L.G., 1950).We used the Campbell-Brown and Koschny (2004) model of meteoroid ablation to determine the density of faint meteoroids from the analysis of both observed decelerations and light curves of meteoroids (Kikwaya et al., 2009; Kikwaya et al., 2011). Our work was based on a collection of six and ninety-two sporadic meteors. The grain masses used in the modeling ranged from 10-12 Kg to 10-9 Kg. We computed the orbit of each meteoroid and determined its Tisserand parameter. We found that meteoroids with asteroidal orbits have bulk densities ranging from 3000-5000 kgm-3. Meteoroids consistent with HTC/NIC parents have bulk densities from 400 kgm-3 to 1600 kg m-3. JFC meteoroids were found to have surprisingly

  8. Small Animal Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livesey, Dennis W.; Fong, Stephen

    This small animal care course guide is designed for students who will be seeking employment in veterinary hospitals, kennels, grooming shops, pet shops, and small-animal laboratories. The guide begins with an introductory section that gives the educational philosophy of the course, job categories and opportunities, units of instruction required…

  9. Small Schools, Big Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halsey, R. John

    2011-01-01

    Historically, small schools have played a very important role in the provision of schooling in Australia. Numerically, using an enrollment of 200 or less, small schools represent approximately 45% of the schools in Australia. Population growth and the consequences of this, in particular for food production, water and energy, mean that the…

  10. Hume = Small Hume

    OpenAIRE

    Ketland, Jeffrey

    2002-01-01

    We can modify Hume’s Principle in the same manner that George Boolos suggested for modifying Frege’s Basic Law V. This leads to the principle Small Hume. Then, we can show that Small Hume is interderivable with Hume’s Principle.

  11. Small School Reform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carroll E. Bronson

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative ethnographic case study explored the evolution of a public urban high school in its 3rd year of small school reform. The study focused on how the high school proceeded from its initial concept, moving to a small school program, and emerging as a new small high school. Data collection included interviews, observations, and document review to develop a case study of one small high school sharing a multiplex building. The first key finding, “Too Many Pieces, Not Enough Glue,” revealed that the school had too many new programs starting at once and they lacked a clear understanding of their concept and vision for their new small school, training on the Montessori philosophies, teaching and learning in small schools, and how to operate within a teacher-cooperative model. The second key finding, “A Continuous Struggle,” revealed that the shared building space presented problems for teachers and students. District policies remain unchanged, resulting in staff and students resorting to activist approaches to get things done. These findings offer small school reform leaders suggestions for developing and sustaining a small school culture and cohesion despite the pressures to revert back to top-down, comprehensive high school norms.

  12. IBM Small Business Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Business Machines Corp., Armonk, NY.

    A telephone survey conducted March 15-22, 1991, examined how small businesses are currently performing. Interviewees were 400 small business owners randomly selected from a Dun and Bradstreet list of companies with 50 or fewer employees. Major findings were as follows: (1) owners were survivors, highly confident in their own abilities, and…

  13. Small Wind Information (Postcard)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America initiative maintains a website section devoted to information about small wind turbines for homeowners, ranchers, and small businesses. This postcard is a marketing piece that stakeholders can provide to interested parties; it will guide them to this online resource.

  14. Small business & employment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lieshout, Harm van

    2015-01-01

    Understanding SMEs is essential to our aspired succes as an economic partner. Small enterprises are not small big enterprises, and differ substantially among them The key ingredient to our help from education remains the education of a new highly skilled generation of workers … and entrepreneurs.

  15. Small Group Inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koller, Martin M.

    Learning in small groups is a practical way to bring about behavior change. The inquiry learning process is perceived to be the most natural and scientific way of learning. Skills developed include those of problem-solving task analysis, decision-making, value formation and adaptability. The art of small group interaction is developed. Factual…

  16. Small GTPases and cilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yujie; Hu, Jinghua

    2011-01-01

    Small GTPases are key molecular switches that bind and hydrolyze GTP in diverse membrane- and cytoskeleton-related cellular processes. Recently, mounting evidences have highlighted the role of various small GTPases, including the members in Arf/Arl, Rab, and Ran subfamilies, in cilia formation and function. Once overlooked as an evolutionary vestige, the primary cilium has attracted more and more attention in last decade because of its role in sensing various extracellular signals and the association between cilia dysfunction and a wide spectrum of human diseases, now called ciliopathies. Here we review recent advances about the function of small GTPases in the context of cilia, and the correlation between the functional impairment of small GTPases and ciliopathies. Understanding of these cellular processes is of fundamental importance for broadening our view of cilia development and function in normal and pathological states and for providing valuable insights into the role of various small GTPases in disease processes, and their potential as therapeutic targets.

  17. Small-quantity, lipid-based nutrient supplements provided to women during pregnancy and 6 mo postpartum and to their infants from 6 mo of age increase the mean attained length of 18-mo-old children in semi-urban Ghana: a randomized controlled trial12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimond, Mary; Vosti, Stephen; Dewey, Kathryn G

    2016-01-01

    Background: Childhood stunting usually begins in utero and continues after birth; therefore, its reduction must involve actions across different stages of early life. Objective: We evaluated the efficacy of small-quantity, lipid-based nutrient supplements (SQ-LNSs) provided during pregnancy, lactation, and infancy on attained size by 18 mo of age. Design: In this partially double-blind, individually randomized trial, 1320 women at ≤20 wk of gestation received standard iron and folic acid (IFA group), multiple micronutrients (MMN group), or SQ-LNS (LNS group) daily until delivery, and then placebo, MMNs, or SQ-LNS, respectively, for 6 mo postpartum; infants in the LNS group received SQ-LNS formulated for infants from 6 to 18 mo of age (endline). The primary outcome was child length by 18 mo of age. Results: At endline, data were available for 85% of 1228 infants enrolled; overall mean length and length-for-age z score (LAZ) were 79.3 cm and −0.83, respectively, and 12% of the children were stunted (LAZ supplement provided at enrollment, stunting prevalences were 8.9% compared with 15.1% and 11.5%, respectively (P = 0.045). Conclusion: Provision of SQ-LNSs to women from pregnancy to 6 mo postpartum and to their infants from 6 to 18 mo of age may increase the child’s attained length by age 18 mo in similar settings. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00970866. PMID:27534634

  18. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jan; Bures; Jiri; Cyrany; Darina; Kohoutova; Miroslav; Frstl; Stanislav; Rejchrt; Jaroslav; Kvetina; Viktor; Vorisek; Marcela; Kopacova

    2010-01-01

    Human intestinal microbiota create a complex polymi-crobial ecology. This is characterised by its high population density, wide diversity and complexity of interaction. Any dysbalance of this complex intestinal microbiome, both qualitative and quantitative, might have serious health consequence for a macro-organism, including small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome (SIBO).SIBO is defined as an increase in the number and/or alteration in the type of bacteria in the upper gastro-intestinal tract. There...

  19. Radiation Hardness Assurance (RHA) for Small Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campola, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Varied mission life and complexity is growing for small spacecraft. Small missions benefit from detailed hazard definition and evaluation as done in the past. Requirements need to flow from the system down to the parts level and aid system level radiation tolerance. RHA is highlighted with increasing COTS usage.

  20. The Way For Maintaning Customer Loyalty and Using of E-Commerce in Developing Company Such as Small and Medium Entreprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Ridwan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Way for Maintaining Customer Loyality and Using of E-Commece in Developing Company Such as Small And Medium Enterproses. This paper aims to analyze the way of maintaining customer loyalty of company in developing their business. One of the way is providing of customer loyalty program with the reward point given to their customer. Beside that, this study analyze also the usefulness of e-commerce in developing Small and Medium Enterprises. Definitely ,the use of e-commerce able to drive business of small and Medium Enterprises quickly and promptly. Involving e-commerce in developing small and medium enterprises (SMEsis very crucial and important. There are some potential benefits derived from the strategic use of e-commerce provide: i Enhanced customer services, ii Reduced transaction costs, iii Increased business efficiencies, iv Improved operational flexibility, v. Obtaining competitive advantages and vi. Improved product and service delivery. . This study use Descriptive Qualitative Analysis Method based on the observation of the current situation of e-commerce usefulness in developing company such as small and medium enterprises and the way of maintaining customer loyalty in business development This study shows that both low customer awareness about point-based reward programs and, not surprisingly, low redemption rates. More specifically, lack of awareness about the reward points programs and the redemption procedure was shown. The important conditions positively affecting redemption of reward points were found to include awareness of the reward point program, a positive attitude about the incentives, and average frequency of credit card usage. Also, redemption rates were higher for cards that had been issued more recently. This study find also that e-commerce has big part role in developing Small and Medium Enterprises. In this, e-commerce can develop promotion and selling volume of Small and Medium Enterprises by the smart electronic

  1. Small-World Propensity and Weighted Brain Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muldoon, Sarah Feldt; Bridgeford, Eric W; Bassett, Danielle S

    2016-02-25

    Quantitative descriptions of network structure can provide fundamental insights into the function of interconnected complex systems. Small-world structure, diagnosed by high local clustering yet short average path length between any two nodes, promotes information flow in coupled systems, a key function that can differ across conditions or between groups. However, current techniques to quantify small-worldness are density dependent and neglect important features such as the strength of network connections, limiting their application in real-world systems. Here, we address both limitations with a novel metric called the Small-World Propensity (SWP). In its binary instantiation, the SWP provides an unbiased assessment of small-world structure in networks of varying densities. We extend this concept to the case of weighted brain networks by developing (i) a standardized procedure for generating weighted small-world networks, (ii) a weighted extension of the SWP, and (iii) a method for mapping observed brain network data onto the theoretical model. In applying these techniques to compare real-world brain networks, we uncover the surprising fact that the canonical biological small-world network, the C. elegans neuronal network, has strikingly low SWP. These metrics, models, and maps form a coherent toolbox for the assessment and comparison of architectural properties in brain networks.

  2. Small-World Propensity and Weighted Brain Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muldoon, Sarah Feldt; Bridgeford, Eric W.; Bassett, Danielle S.

    2016-02-01

    Quantitative descriptions of network structure can provide fundamental insights into the function of interconnected complex systems. Small-world structure, diagnosed by high local clustering yet short average path length between any two nodes, promotes information flow in coupled systems, a key function that can differ across conditions or between groups. However, current techniques to quantify small-worldness are density dependent and neglect important features such as the strength of network connections, limiting their application in real-world systems. Here, we address both limitations with a novel metric called the Small-World Propensity (SWP). In its binary instantiation, the SWP provides an unbiased assessment of small-world structure in networks of varying densities. We extend this concept to the case of weighted brain networks by developing (i) a standardized procedure for generating weighted small-world networks, (ii) a weighted extension of the SWP, and (iii) a method for mapping observed brain network data onto the theoretical model. In applying these techniques to compare real-world brain networks, we uncover the surprising fact that the canonical biological small-world network, the C. elegans neuronal network, has strikingly low SWP. These metrics, models, and maps form a coherent toolbox for the assessment and comparison of architectural properties in brain networks.

  3. SmallSat Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petropulos, Dolores; Bittner, David; Murawski, Robert; Golden, Bert

    2015-01-01

    The SmallSat has an unrealized potential in both the private industry and in the federal government. Currently over 70 companies, 50 universities and 17 governmental agencies are involved in SmallSat research and development. In 1994, the U.S. Army Missile and Defense mapped the moon using smallSat imagery. Since then Smart Phones have introduced this imagery to the people of the world as diverse industries watched this trend. The deployment cost of smallSats is also greatly reduced compared to traditional satellites due to the fact that multiple units can be deployed in a single mission. Imaging payloads have become more sophisticated, smaller and lighter. In addition, the growth of small technology obtained from private industries has led to the more widespread use of smallSats. This includes greater revisit rates in imagery, significantly lower costs, the ability to update technology more frequently and the ability to decrease vulnerability of enemy attacks. The popularity of smallSats show a changing mentality in this fast paced world of tomorrow. What impact has this created on the NASA communication networks now and in future years? In this project, we are developing the SmallSat Relational Database which can support a simulation of smallSats within the NASA SCaN Compatability Environment for Networks and Integrated Communications (SCENIC) Modeling and Simulation Lab. The NASA Space Communications and Networks (SCaN) Program can use this modeling to project required network support needs in the next 10 to 15 years. The SmallSat Rational Database could model smallSats just as the other SCaN databases model the more traditional larger satellites, with a few exceptions. One being that the smallSat Database is designed to be built-to-order. The SmallSat database holds various hardware configurations that can be used to model a smallSat. It will require significant effort to develop as the research material can only be populated by hand to obtain the unique data

  4. Small Vehicle Launch Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-09-19

    the art will appreciate that release 21 mechanisms 41 can be a spring-loaded release pin with a lanyard 22 pull initiated by an actuator mechanism or...an explosive squib 23 which breaks the attachment latching on the small UUV. Whatever 1 release mechanism is used, it is controlled by the host...carries four small 1 UUV’s, it will be understood that, depending on the size of the 3 small UUV’s employed, greater or fewer numbers of UUV’s can be 4

  5. Small scale optics

    CERN Document Server

    Yupapin, Preecha

    2013-01-01

    The behavior of light in small scale optics or nano/micro optical devices has shown promising results, which can be used for basic and applied research, especially in nanoelectronics. Small Scale Optics presents the use of optical nonlinear behaviors for spins, antennae, and whispering gallery modes within micro/nano devices and circuits, which can be used in many applications. This book proposes a new design for a small scale optical device-a microring resonator device. Most chapters are based on the proposed device, which uses a configuration know as a PANDA ring resonator. Analytical and nu

  6. Small diameter carbon nanopipettes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Riju; Bhattacharyya, Sayan; Orynbayeva, Zulfiya; Vitol, Elina; Friedman, Gary; Gogotsi, Yury

    2010-01-01

    Nanoscale multifunctional carbon probes facilitate cellular studies due to their small size, which makes it possible to interrogate organelles within living cells in a minimally invasive fashion. However, connecting nanotubes to macroscopic devices and constructing an integrated system for the purpose of fluid and electrical signal transfer is challenging, as is often the case with nanoscale components. We describe a non-catalytic chemical vapor deposition based method for batch fabrication of integrated multifunctional carbon nanopipettes (CNPs) with tip diameters much smaller (10-30 nm) than previously reported (200 nm and above) and approaching those observed for multiwalled carbon nanotubes. This eliminates the need for complicated attachment/assembly of nanotubes into nanofluidic devices. Variable tip geometries and structures were obtained by controlled deposition of carbon inside and outside quartz pipettes. We have shown that the capillary length and gas flow rate have a marked effect on the carbon deposition. This gives us a flexible protocol, useful for growing carbon layers of different thicknesses at selective locations on a glass pipette to yield a large variety of cellular probes in bulk quantities. The CNPs possess an open channel for fluid transfer with the carbon deposited inside at 875 °C behaving like an amorphous semiconductor. Vacuum annealing of the CNP tips at temperatures up to 2000 °C yields graphitic carbon structures with an increase in conductivity of two orders of magnitude. Penetration of the integrated carbon nanoprobes into cells was shown to produce minimal Ca2+ signals, fast recovery of basal Ca2+ levels and no adverse activation of the cellular metabolism during interrogation times as long as 0.5-1 h.

  7. Syntheses and surprising regioselectivity of 5- and 6-substituted decaboranyl ethers via the nucleophilic attack of alcohols on 6- and 5-halodecaboranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, William C; Carroll, Patrick J; Sneddon, Larry G

    2011-05-02

    The selective syntheses of new classes of decaboranyl ethers containing a range of functional groups substituted at the B5 or B6 positions were achieved through the reaction of alcohols with halodecaboranes. The surprising regioselectivity of the reaction, where the reaction of the 6-halodecaboranes (6-X-B(10)H(13)) with alcohols yielded the 5-substituted decaboranyl ethers (5-RO-B(10)H(13)) and the reaction with 5-halodecaboranes (5-X-B(10)H(13)) gave the 6-substituted decaboranyl ethers (6-RO-B(10)H(13)), was confirmed by NMR and X-ray crystallographic analyses. The crystallographic determinations also showed that the decaboranyl ethers had shortened B-O bonds and apparent sp(2) hybridization at oxygen indicating significant π-backbonding from oxygen to the cage boron. A possible substitution mechanism was computationally identified involving: (1) initial nucleophilic attack by the alcohol-oxygen at a site adjacent to the 5- or 6-halo-substituted boron, (2) movement of the terminal hydrogen at the point of attack to a bridging position, (3) formation of a 5-membered (B-O-H-Cl-B) cyclic transition state allowing the acidic methanolic-hydrogen to bond to the halogen, (4) release of HX, and finally (5) movement of a bridging hydrogen into the vacated terminal position. Deuterium labeling studies confirmed the movement of hydrogen from a bridging position of the halodecaborane into the halogen-vacated terminal position on the decaboranyl ether product. The relative reaction rates of the 6-X-B(10)H(13) compounds (X = F, Cl, Br, I) with alcohols were likewise found to be consistent with this mechanism.

  8. Accurate reaction barrier heights of pericyclic reactions: Surprisingly large deviations for the CBS-QB3 composite method and their consequences in DFT benchmark studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karton, Amir; Goerigk, Lars

    2015-04-05

    Accurate barrier heights are obtained for the 26 pericyclic reactions in the BHPERI dataset by means of the high-level Wn-F12 thermochemical protocols. Very often, the complete basis set (CBS)-type composite methods are used in similar situations, but herein it is shown that they in fact result in surprisingly large errors with root mean square deviations (RMSDs) of about 2.5 kcal mol(-1). In comparison, other composite methods, particularly G4-type and estimated coupled cluster with singles, doubles, and quasiperturbative triple excitations [CCSD(T)/CBS] approaches, show deviations well below the chemical-accuracy threshold of 1 kcal mol(-1). With the exception of SCS-MP2 and the herein newly introduced MP3.5 approach, all other tested Møller-Plesset perturbative procedures give poor performance with RMSDs of up to 8.0 kcal mol(-1). The finding that CBS-type methods fail for barrier heights of these reactions is unexpected and it is particularly troublesome given that they are often used to obtain reference values for benchmark studies. Significant differences are identified in the interpretation and final ranking of density functional theory (DFT) methods when using the original CBS-QB3 rather than the new Wn-F12 reference values for BHPERI. In particular, it is observed that the more accurate Wn-F12 benchmark results in lower statistical errors for those methods that are generally considered to be robust and accurate. Two examples are the PW6B95-D3(BJ) hybrid-meta-general-gradient approximation and the PWPB95-D3(BJ) double-hybrid functionals, which result in the lowest RMSDs of the entire DFT study (1.3 and 1.0 kcal mol(-1), respectively). These results indicate that CBS-QB3 should be applied with caution in computational modeling and benchmark studies involving related systems.

  9. Task-Irrelevant Expectation Violations in Sequential Manual Actions: Evidence for a "Check-after-Surprise" Mode of Visual Attention and Eye-Hand Decoupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foerster, Rebecca M

    2016-01-01

    When performing sequential manual actions (e.g., cooking), visual information is prioritized according to the task determining where and when to attend, look, and act. In well-practiced sequential actions, long-term memory (LTM)-based expectations specify which action targets might be found where and when. We have previously demonstrated (Foerster and Schneider, 2015b) that violations of such expectations that are task-relevant (e.g., target location change) cause a regression from a memory-based mode of attentional selection to visual search. How might task-irrelevant expectation violations in such well-practiced sequential manual actions modify attentional selection? This question was investigated by a computerized version of the number-connection test. Participants clicked on nine spatially distributed numbered target circles in ascending order while eye movements were recorded as proxy for covert attention. Target's visual features and locations stayed constant for 65 prechange-trials, allowing practicing the manual action sequence. Consecutively, a task-irrelevant expectation violation occurred and stayed for 20 change-trials. Specifically, action target number 4 appeared in a different font. In 15 reversion-trials, number 4 returned to the original font. During the first task-irrelevant change trial, manual clicking was slower and eye scanpaths were larger and contained more fixations. The additional fixations were mainly checking fixations on the changed target while acting on later targets. Whereas the eyes repeatedly revisited the task-irrelevant change, cursor-paths remained completely unaffected. Effects lasted for 2-3 change trials and did not reappear during reversion. In conclusion, an unexpected task-irrelevant change on a task-defining feature of a well-practiced manual sequence leads to eye-hand decoupling and a "check-after-surprise" mode of attentional selection.

  10. ‘Surprise’: Outbreak of Campylobacter infection associated with chicken liver pâté at a surprise birthday party, Adelaide, Australia, 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Denehy

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In July 2012, an outbreak of Campylobacter infection was investigated by the South Australian Communicable Disease Control Branch and Food Policy and Programs Branch. The initial notification identified illness at a surprise birthday party held at a restaurant on 14 July 2012. The objective of the investigation was to identify the potential source of infection and institute appropriate intervention strategies to prevent further illness.Methods: A guest list was obtained and a retrospective cohort study undertaken. A combination of paper-based and telephone questionnaires were used to collect exposure and outcome information. An environmental investigation was conducted by Food Policy and Programs Branch at the implicated premises.Results: All 57 guests completed the questionnaire (100% response rate, and 15 met the case definition. Analysis showed a significant association between illness and consumption of chicken liver pâté (relative risk: 16.7, 95% confidence interval: 2.4–118.6. No other food or beverage served at the party was associated with illness. Three guests submitted stool samples; all were positive for Campylobacter. The environmental investigation identified that the cooking process used in the preparation of chicken liver pâté may have been inconsistent, resulting in some portions not cooked adequately to inactivate potential Campylobacter contamination.Discussion: Chicken liver products are a known source of Campylobacter infection; therefore, education of food handlers remains a high priority. To better identify outbreaks among the large number of Campylobacter notifications, routine typing of Campylobacter isolates is recommended.

  11. Antimicrobial stewardship in small animal veterinary practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guardabassi, Luca; Prescott, John F

    2015-01-01

    Despite the increasing recognition of the critical role for antimicrobial stewardship in preventing the spread of multidrug-resistant bacteria, examples of effective antimicrobial stewardship programs are rare in small animal veterinary practice. This article highlights the basic requirements...

  12. Small Intestine Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... intestine . The digestive system removes and processes nutrients ( vitamins , minerals , carbohydrates , fats, proteins , and water) from foods ... a microscope to see whether they contain cancer. Bypass : Surgery to allow food in the small intestine ...

  13. Small Mammal Trapping 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Small mammal traps were placed in the Baring division and in the Edmunds division of Moosehom National Wildlife Refuge. There were a total of 98 traps set for up to...

  14. Small bowel bacterial overgrowth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Surgical procedures that create a loop of small intestine where excess bacteria can grow. An example is a Billroth II type of stomach removal ( gastrectomy ). Some cases of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

  15. Small public private partnerships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Christian; Jensen, Jesper Ole

    2009-01-01

    by the authorities, which recommend sizes over 13,5 million € (100 million DKr). PPP is here understood as Design, Build, Finance and Operate projects. The paper shows, when looking at Germany, Italy and United Kingdom, that small PPP (below 13,5 million €) are widespread in two investigated countries; United...... Kingdom and Italy, whereas German projects are still emerging. Quantitative material on small PPP in Italy and UK shows no lower limit in size for these established PPPs. This apparent paradox is then qualitatively investigated. Only small projects are investigated, and these seem largely to be sound...... businesses and represent operable units for the clients and citizens. Cases are focused within education and healthcare. The analysis suggests that another type of economy apparently is in play. It is thus characteristic within education projects in UK that the largest portion of small PPPs are of a size...

  16. Small intestine (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The small intestine is the portion of the digestive system most responsible for absorption of nutrients from food into the bloodstream. The pyloric sphincter governs the passage of partly digested food ...

  17. Impact on Small Mammals

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abundance and diversity of the small mammal community on burnt and unbumt habitats of the area using .... Captured animals were shaken gently ..... Wetlands Management Project: Environ- ... ofrodents, SwedishNatural Science Research.

  18. Small Satellite Transporter Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The primary objective is to determine whether this small satellite transporter is capable of transporting at least four 6U CubeSats is possible for a given set of...

  19. Small simple impact craters

    CERN Document Server

    Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

    2010-01-01

    The paper discusses some examples of image processing applied to improve optical satellite imagery of small craters (Kamil, Veevers, Haviland). The examples show that image processing can be quite useful for further in-situ researches, because the resultant imagery helps to have a better picture of the crater shape and of the distribution of debris about it. The paper is also disclosing an interesting underwater structure, with shape and size of a small crater, located on the coast-line of Sudan.

  20. Small test SDHW systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejen, Niels Kristian

    1999-01-01

    Three small test SDHW systems was tested in a laboratory test facility.The three SDHW systems where all based on the low flow principe and a mantle tank but the design of the systems where different.......Three small test SDHW systems was tested in a laboratory test facility.The three SDHW systems where all based on the low flow principe and a mantle tank but the design of the systems where different....