WorldWideScience

Sample records for surplus facilities management

  1. The ORNL Surplus Facilities Management Program Long Range Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myrick, T.E.

    1984-09-01

    The Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is part of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) National SFMP, administered by the Richland Operations Office. This program was established to provide for the management of DOE surplus radioactively contaminated facilities from the end of their operating life until final facility disposition is completed. As part of this program, the ORNL SFMP oversees some 76 individual surplus facilities, ranging in complexity from abandoned waste storage tanks to large experimental reactors. The ORNL SFMP has prepared this Long Range Plan to outline the long-term management strategy for those facilities included in the program. The primary objective of this plan are to: (1) develop a base of information for each ORNL SFMP facility, (2) conduct preliminary decommissioning analyses to identify feasible alternatives, (3) assess the current and future risk of each facility, (4) establish a priority list for the decommissioning projects, and (5) integrate the individual project costs and schedules into an overall program schedule and cost estimate for the ORNL site. The Long Range Plan also provides an overview of the ORNL SFMP management structure, specifies the decommissioning criteria to be employed, and identifies special technical problems, research and development needs, and special facilities and equipment that may be required for decommissioning operations.

  2. Westinghouse Hanford Company risk management strategy for retired surplus facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, W.E.; Coles, G.A.; Shultz, M.V.; Egge, R.G.

    1993-09-01

    This paper describes an approach that facilitates management of personnel safety and environmental release risk from retired, surplus Westinghouse Hanford Company-managed facilities during the predemolition time frame. These facilities are located in the 100 and 200 Areas of the 1,450-km 2 (570-mi 2 ) Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. The production reactors are located in the 100 Area and the chemical separation facilities are located in the 200 Area. This paper also includes a description of the risk evaluation process, shows applicable results, and includes a description of comparison costs for different risk reduction options

  3. Hanford surplus facilities hazards identification document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egge, R.G.

    1997-01-01

    This document provides general safety information needed by personnel who enter and work in surplus facilities managed by Bechtel Hanford, Inc. The purpose of the document is to enhance access control of surplus facilities, educate personnel on the potential hazards associated with these facilities prior to entry, and ensure that safety precautions are taken while in the facility

  4. Progress and problems in the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program and Surplus Facilities Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiore, J.J.; Turi, G.P.

    1988-01-01

    The Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) was established in 1974 to identify, evaluate, and as appropriate, conduct remedial actions at sites used in the early years of nuclear energy development by the Manhattan Engineer District and the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC). This program currently has 29 sites and is evaluating 350 other sites for possible inclusion in the program. Another remedial action program in the Department of Energy's (DOE) Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects is the Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP). The SFMP involves the safe management, decontamination and disposal of surplus DOE contaminated facilities which were not related to defense activities. There are currently 33 projects at 15 different sites in the program. These two programs have made steady progress over the last 10 or so years in cleaning up sites so that they can be reused or released for unrestricted use. Work has been completed at 8 of the FUSRAP sites and three of the SFMP sites

  5. ORNL Surplus Facilities Management Program maintenance and surveillance plan for fiscal year 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coobs, J.H.; Myrick, T.E.

    1986-10-01

    The Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) National SFMP, administered by the Richland Operations Office. The purpose and objectives of the national program are set forth in the current SFMP Program Plan and include (1) the maintenance and surveillance of facilities awaiting decommissioning, (2) planning for the orderly decommissioning of these facilities, and (3) implementation of a program to accomplish the facility disposition in a safe, cost-effective, and timely manner. As outlined in the national program plan, participating SFMP contractors are required to prepare a formal plan that documents the maintenance and surveillance (M and S) programs established for each site. This report has been prepared to provide this documentation for those facilties included in the ORNL SFMP

  6. Decommissioning of surplus facilities at ORNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myrick, T.E.; Coobs, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    The Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) National SFMP, administered by the Richland Operations Office. This program was established to provide for the management of certain DOE surplus radioactively contaminated facilities from the end of their operating life until final facility disposition is completed. As part of this program, the ORNL SFMP oversees some 75 facilities, ranging in complexity from abandoned waste storage tanks to large experimental reactors. This paper describes the scope of the ORNL program and outlines the decommissioning activities currently underway, including a brief description of the decontamination techniques being utilized. 4 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Hanford surplus facilities hazards identification document. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egge, R.G.

    1996-02-01

    This document provides general safety information needed by personnel who enter and work in surplus facilities managed by Bechtel Hanford, Inc. (BHI). The purpose of the document is to enhance access control of surplus facilities, educate personnel on the potential hazards associated with these facilities prior to entry, and ensure that safety precautions are taken while in the facility. Questions concerning the currency of this information should be directed to the building administrator (as listed in BHI-FS-01, Field Support Administration, Section 1.1, ''Access Control for ERC Surplus Facilities'')

  8. Savannah River Site Surplus Facilities Available for Reuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, R.M.; Owens, M.B.; Lentz, D.W.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide a current, centralized list of Savannah River Site facilities, which are surplus and available for reuse. These surplus facilities may be made available for other DOE site missions, commercial economic development reuse, or other governmental reuse. SRS procedures also require that before new construction can be approved, available surplus facilities are screened for possible reuse in lieu of the proposed new construction

  9. Niagara Falls Storage Site, Annual site environmental report, Lewiston, New York, Calendar year 1986: Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-06-01

    During 1986, the environmental monitoring program was continued at the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS), a US Department of Energy (DOE) surplus facility located in Niagara County, New York, presently used for the interim storage of radioactive residues and contaminated soils and rubble. The monitoring program is being conducted by Bechtel National, Inc. The monitoring program at the NFSS measures radon gas concentrations in air; external gamma radiation levels; and uranium and radium concentrations in surface water, groundwater, and sediment. To verify that the site is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard and to assess its potential effect on public health, the radiation dose was calculated for the maximally exposed individual. Based on the conservative scenario described in the report, this individual would receive an annual external exposure approximately equivalent to 6% of the DOE radiation protection standard of 100 mrem/yr. By comparison, the incremental dose received from living in a brick house versus a wooden house is 10 mrem/yr above background. The cumulative dose to the population within an 80-km (50-mi) radius of the NFSS that would result from radioactive materials present at the site would be indistinguishable from the dose that the same population would receive from naturally occurring radioactive sources. Results of the 1986 monitoring show that the NFSS is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard. 14 refs., 11 figs., 14 tabs

  10. Surplus Facilities and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Closure program plan, fiscal year 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, M.C.; Wahlen, R.K.; Winship, R.A.

    1991-10-01

    The Surplus Facilities and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Closure program is responsible to US Department of Energy Field Office, Richland for the safe, cost-effective surveillance, maintenance, and decommissioning of surplus facilities at the Hanford Site. The Surplus Facilities and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Closure program is also responsible to US Department of Energy Field Office, Richland for the program management of specific Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closures at the Hanford Site. This program plan addresses only the surplus facilities. The criteria used to evaluate each factor relative to decommissioning are based on the guidelines presented by the US Department of Energy Field Office, Richland, Environmental Restoration Division. The guidelines are consistent with the Westinghouse Hanford Company commitment to decommission Hanford Site retired facilities in the safest and most cost-effective way achievable. This document outlines the plan for managing these facilities until disposal

  11. Environmental restoration plan for the transfer of surplus facilities to the Facility Transition Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-08-01

    This report will provide guidance on management, coordination, and integration of plans to transition facilities to the Facility Transition Program and activities as related to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Restoration Program facilities. This report gives (1) guidance on the steps necessary for identifying ORNL surplus facilities, (2) interfaces of Surveillance and Maintenance (S and M) and Isotope Facility Deactivation program managers, (3) roles and responsibilities of the facility managers, and (4) initial S and M requirements upon acceptance into the Facility Transition Program

  12. Preliminary assessments the shortcut to remediation (category III-surplus facility assessments)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byars, L.L.

    1995-01-01

    This report presents the details of the preliminary assessments for the shortcut of decontamination of surplus nuclear facilities. Topics discussed include: environment, health and safety concerns; economic considerations; reduction of transition time; preliminary characterization reports; preliminary project plan; health and safety plan; quality assurance plan; surveillance and maintenance plan; and waste management plan

  13. Surplus Facilities Management Program. Post remedial action survey report for the Sodium Reactor Experiment (SRE) facility, Santa Susana Field Laboratories, Rockwell International, Ventura County, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wynveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Sholeen, C.M.; Flynn, K.F.; Justus, A.L.

    1984-02-01

    Decontamination of the Sodium Reactor Experiment (SRE) began in 1976 and was completed in 1982. In view of the concurrent and post-remedial-action surveys, the following conclusions can be stated. All the buildings and areas included in this decommissioning project have been decontaminated to below the limits specified in the draft ANSI Standard N13.12 and the NRC Guidelines for Decontamination of Facilities and Equipment Prior to Release for Unrestricted Use or Termination of Licenses for By-Product, Source, or Special Nuclear Material, dated July 1982. Radioactive contamination was found in appropriate access points of the sanitary sewer and storm drain systems included within the boundaries of this decommissioning project. One sample indicated a 90 Sr concentration dissolved in the water of approximately half the recommended water concentration for controlled areas and approximately 15 times the recommended water concentration for uncontrolled areas as stated in DOE-5480.1 Chg. 6, Chapter XI. Therefore, the interior inaccessible surfaces of these systems must be considered contaminated in accordance with statements found in the NRC Regulatory Guidelines issued in July 1982. Effluent from the outfall of this drain system must also be considered as being potentially contaminated. 1 reference, 32 figures, 8 tables

  14. Suitability of oil bioremediation in an Artic soil using surplus heating from an incineration facility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couto, Nazare; Fritt-Rasmussen, Janne; Jensen, Pernille Erland

    2014-01-01

    A 168-day period field study, carried out in Sisimiut, Greenland, assessed the potential to enhance soil remediation with the surplus heating from an incineration facility. This approach searches a feasible ex situ remediation process that could be extended throughout the year with low costs. Ind...... with low maintenance and using "waste heating" from an incineration facility....

  15. Feasibility Study on UAV-assisted Construction Surplus Soil Tracking Control and Management Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jieh Haur, Chen; Kuo, Lin Sheng; Fu, Chen Ping; Li Hsu, Yeh; Da Heng, Chen

    2018-01-01

    Construction surplus soil tracking management has been the key management issue in Taiwan since 1991. This is mainly due to the construction surplus soils were often regarded as disposable waste and were disposed openly without any supervision, leading to environmental pollution. Even though the surplus soils were gradually being viewed as reusable resources, some unscrupulous enterprises still dump them freely for their own convenience. In order to dispose these surplus soils, site offices are required to confirm with the soil treatment plant regarding the approximate soil volume for hauling vehicle dispatch. However, the excavated soil volume will transform from bank volume to loose volume upon excavation, which may differ by a certain speculative coefficient (1.3), depending on the excavation site and geological condition. For managing and tracking the construction surplus soils, local government authorities frequently performed on-site spot check, but the lack of rapid assessment tools for soil volume estimation increased the evaluation difficulty for on-site inspectors. This study adopted unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) in construction surplus soil tracking and rapidly acquired site photography and point cloud data, the excavated soil volume can be determined promptly after post-processing and interpretation, providing references to future surplus soil tracking management.

  16. Decontamination and decommissioning of the Argonne National Laboratory East Area radioactively contaminated surplus facilities: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kline, W.H.; Fassnacht, G.F.; Moe, H.J.

    1987-07-01

    ANL has decontaminated and decommissioned (D and D) seven radiologically contaminated surplus facilities at its Illinois site: a ''Hot'' Machine Shop (Building 17) and support facilities; Fan House No. 1 (Building 37), Fan House No. 2 (Building 38), the Pangborn Dust Collector (Building 41), and the Industrial Waste Treatment Plant (Building 34) for exhaust air from machining of radioactive materials. Also included were a Nuclear Materials Storage Vault (Building 16F) and a Nuclear Research Laboratory (Building 22). The D and D work involved dismantling of all process equipment and associated plumbing, ductwork, drain lines, etc. After radiation surveys, floor and wall coverings, suspended ceilings, room partitions, pipe, conduit and electrical gear were taken down as necessary. In addition, underground sewers were excavated. The grounds around each facility were also thoroughly surveyed. Contaminated materials and soil were packaged and shipped to a low-level waste burial site, while nonactive debris was buried in the ANL landfill. Clean, reusable items were saved, and clean metal scrap was sold for salvage. After the decommissioning work, each building was torn down and the site relandscaped. The project was completed in 1985, ahead of schedule, with substantial savings

  17. Suitability of oil bioremediation in an Artic soil using surplus heating from an incineration facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couto, Nazaré; Fritt-Rasmussen, Janne; Jensen, Pernille E; Højrup, Mads; Rodrigo, Ana P; Ribeiro, Alexandra B

    2014-05-01

    A 168-day period field study, carried out in Sisimiut, Greenland, assessed the potential to enhance soil remediation with the surplus heating from an incineration facility. This approach searches a feasible ex situ remediation process that could be extended throughout the year with low costs. Individual and synergistic effects of biostimulation were also tested, in parallel. An interim evaluation at the end of the first 42 days showed that biostimulation and active heating, as separate treatments, enhanced petroleum hydrocarbon (PHC) removal compared to natural attenuation. The coupling of both technologies was even more effective, corroborating the benefits of both techniques in a remediation strategy. However, between day 42 and day 168, there was an opposite remediation trend with all treatments suggesting a stabilization except for natural attenuation, where PHC values continued to decrease. This enforces the "self-purification" capacity of the system, even at low temperatures. Coupling biostimulation with active heating was the best approach for PHC removal, namely for a short period of time (42 days). The proposed remediation scheme can be considered a reliable option for faster PHC removal with low maintenance and using "waste heating" from an incineration facility.

  18. The food waste hierarchy as a framework for the management of food surplus and food waste

    OpenAIRE

    Papargyropoulou, E; Lozano, R; Steinberger, JK; Wright, N; Ujang, ZB

    2014-01-01

    The unprecedented scale of food waste in global food supply chains is attracting increasing attention due to its environmental, social and economic impacts. Drawing on interviews with food waste specialists, this study construes the boundaries between food surplus and food waste, avoidable and unavoidable food waste, and between waste prevention and waste management. This study suggests that the first step towards a more sustainable resolution of the food waste issue is to adopt a sustainable...

  19. Facility Environmental Management System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This is the Web site of the Federal Highway Administration's (FHWA's) Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Center (TFHRC) facility Environmental Management System (EMS)....

  20. Sustainable Facilities Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Susanne Balslev; Elle, Morten; Hoffmann, Birgitte

    2004-01-01

    The Danish public housing sector has more than 20 years of experience with sustainable facilities management based on user involvement. The paper outlines this development in a historical perspective and gives an analysis of different approaches to sustainable facilities management. The focus...

  1. Samarbejdsformer og Facilities Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storgaard, Kresten

    Resultater fra en surveyundersøgelse om fordele og ulemper ved forskellige samarbejdsformer indenfor Facilities Management fremlægges.......Resultater fra en surveyundersøgelse om fordele og ulemper ved forskellige samarbejdsformer indenfor Facilities Management fremlægges....

  2. Sustainable Facilities Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Susanne Balslev; Elle, Morten; Hoffmann, Birgitte

    2004-01-01

    The Danish public housing sector has more than 20 years of experience with sustainable facilities management based on user involvement. The paper outlines this development in a historical perspective and gives an analysis of different approaches to sustainable facilities management. The focus...... is on the housing departments and strateies for the management of the use of resources. The research methods used are case studies based on interviews in addition to literature studies. The paper explores lessons to be learned about sustainable facilities management in general, and points to a need for new...

  3. Management of surplus electricity-production from a fluctuating renewable-energy source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henrik; Münster, E.

    2003-01-01

    The paper discusses and analyses different national strategies for solving a surplus production problem in Denmark, caused by electricity production from turbines and CHP.......The paper discusses and analyses different national strategies for solving a surplus production problem in Denmark, caused by electricity production from turbines and CHP....

  4. APPLICATION OF THE ANALYTIC HIERARCHY PROCESS TO COMPARE ALTERNATIVES FOR THE LONG-TERM MANAGEMENT OF SURPLUS MERCURY

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper describes a systematic method for comparing options for the long-term management of surplus elemental mercury in the U.S., using the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) as embodied in commercially available Expert Choice software. A limited scope multi-criteria decision-a...

  5. FACILITIES MANAGEMENT AT CERN

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    Recently we have been confronted with difficulties concerning services which are part of a new contract for facilities management. Please see below for some information about this contract. Following competitive tendering and the Finance Committee decision, the contract was awarded to the Swiss firm 'Facilities Management Network (FMN)'. The owners of FMN are two companies 'M+W Zander' and 'Avireal', both very experienced in this field of facilities management. The contract entered into force on 1st July 2002. CERN has grouped together around 20 different activities into this one contract, which was previously covered by separate contracts. The new contract includes the management and execution of many activities, in particular: Guards and access control; cleaning; operation and maintenance of heating plants, cooling and ventilation equipment for buildings not related to the tunnel or the LHC; plumbing; sanitation; lifts; green areas and roads; waste disposal; and includes a centralised helpdesk for these act...

  6. Guide for radiological characterization and measurements for decommissioning of US Department of Energy surplus facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denahm, D. H.; Barnes, M. G.; Jaquish, R. E.; Corley, J. P.; Gilbert, R. O.; Hoenes, G. R.; Jamison, J. D.; McMurray, B. J.; Watson, E. C.

    1983-08-01

    This Guide describes the elements of radiological characterization at DOE excess facilities in preparation for, during, and subsequent to decommissioning operations. It is the intent of this Guide and accompanying appendices to provide the reader (user) with sufficient information to carry out that task with a minimum of confusion and to provide a uniform basis for evaluating site conditions and verifying that decommissioning operations are conducted according to a specific plan. Some areas of particular interest in this Guide are: the need to involve appropriate staff from the affected states in the early planning stages of decommissioning; the need for and suggested methods of radiological site characterization to complete a decommissioning project, including: historical surveys, environmental pathway analyses, statistical sampling design, and choosing appropriate instrumentation and measurements; the need for and emphasis on quality assurance, documentation and records retention; the establishment of a Design Objective approach to applying site-specific contamination limits based on the ALARA philosophy; the establishment of a ''de minimis'' or minimum dose level of concern for decommissioning operations based on existing standards, experience and ALARA considerations.

  7. Guide for radiological characterization and measurements for decommissioning of US Department of Energy surplus facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denahm, D.H.; Barnes, M.G.; Jaquish, R.E.; Corley, J.P.; Gilbert, R.O.; Hoenes, G.R.; Jamison, J.D.; McMurray, B.J.; Watson, E.C.

    1983-08-01

    This Guide describes the elements of radiological characterization at DOE excess facilities in preparation for, during, and subsequent to decommissioning operations. It is the intent of this Guide and accompanying appendices to provide the reader (user) with sufficient information to carry out that task with a minimum of confusion and to provide a uniform basis for evaluating site conditions and verifying that decommissioning operations are conducted according to a specific plan. Some areas of particular interest in this Guide are: the need to involve appropriate staff from the affected states in the early planning stages of decommissioning; the need for and suggested methods of radiological site characterization to complete a decommissioning project, including: historical surveys, environmental pathway analyses, statistical sampling design, and choosing appropriate instrumentation and measurements; the need for and emphasis on quality assurance, documentation and records retention; the establishment of a Design Objective approach to applying site-specific contamination limits based on the ALARA philosophy; the establishment of a ''de minimis'' or minimum dose level of concern for decommissioning operations based on existing standards, experience and ALARA considerations

  8. Nitrogen leaching: A crop rotation perspective on the effect of N surplus, field management and use of catch crops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Notaris, Chiara; Rasmussen, Jim; Sørensen, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Components of the field nitrogen (N) balance (input and surplus) are often used to predict nitrate leaching from agricultural lands. However, management factors, such as use of catch crops, greatly affect the actual loss and are a key to reduce N leaching. The present study is based on the 4th...... cycle of a long-term crop rotation experiment in Denmark, and it aims to quantify, from a crop rotation perspective, the influence on N leaching from N input and surplus or management factors. The experiment included three cropping systems (two organic and one conventional) with or without use of animal......, with legume-based catch crops being as effective as non-legumes. Animal manure increased N leaching in one of the organic systems. The organic system with two years of green manure per rotation cycle was the one at highest risk of N leaching, especially from crops following green manure incorporation. Spring...

  9. On the management of life insurance company risk by strategic choice of product mix, investment strategy and surplus appropriation schemes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohnert, Alexander; Gatzert, Nadine; Jørgensen, Peter Løchte

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyze the impact of management’s strategic choice of asset and liability composition in life insurance on shortfall risk and the shareholders’ fair risk charge. In contrast to previous work, we focus on the effectiveness of management decisions regarding the product...... depends on the surplus appropriation scheme offered to the customer and their impact on guaranteed benefit payments, which thus presents an important control variable for the insurer....

  10. Surplus plutonium disposition draft environmental impact statement. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-07-01

    On May 22, 1997, DOE published a Notice of Intent (NOI) in the Federal Register (62 Federal Register 28009) announcing its decision to prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) that would tier from the analysis and decisions reached in connection with the Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials Final Programmatic EIS (Storage and Disposition PEIS). DOE's disposition strategy allows for both the immobilization of surplus plutonium and its use as mixed oxide (MOX) fuel in existing domestic, commercial reactors. The disposition of surplus plutonium would also involve disposal of the immobilized plutonium and MOX fuel (as spent nuclear fuel) in a geologic repository. The Surplus Plutonium Disposition Environmental Impact Statement analyzes alternatives that would use the immobilization approach (for some of the surplus plutonium) and the MOX fuel approach (for some of the surplus plutonium); alternatives that would immobilize all of the surplus plutonium; and the No Action Alternative. The alternatives include three disposition facilities that would be designed so that they could collectively accomplish disposition of up to 50 metric tons (55 tons) of surplus plutonium over their operating lives: (1) the pit disassembly and conversion facility would disassemble pits (a weapons component) and convert the recovered plutonium, as well as plutonium metal from other sources, into plutonium dioxide suitable for disposition; (2) the immobilization facility would include a collocated capability for converting nonpit plutonium materials into plutonium dioxide suitable for immobilization and would be located at either Hanford or SRS. DOE has identified SRS as the preferred site for an immobilization facility; (3) the MOX fuel fabrication facility would fabricate plutonium dioxide into MOX fuel. Volume 2 contains the appendices to the report and describe the following: Federal Register notices; contractor nondisclosure statement; adjunct melter

  11. Risk management study for the retired Hanford Site facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coles, G.A.; Shultz, M.V.; Taylor, W.E.

    1993-04-01

    Risk from retired surplus facilities has always been assumed to be low at the Hanford Site as the facilities are inactive and have few potentials for causing an offsite hazardous material release. However,the fatal accident that occurred in the spring of 1992 in which an employee fell through a deteriorated roof at the 105-F Reactor Building has raised the possibility that retired facilities represent a greater risk than was originally assumed. Therefore, Westinghouse Hanford Company and the US Department of Energy management have determined that facility risk management strategies and programmatic plans should be reevaluated to assure risks are identified and appropriate corrective action plans are developed. To evaluate risk management strategies, accurate risk information about the current and projected condition of the facilities must be developed. This work procedure has been created to address the development of accurate and timely risk information. By using the evaluation results in this procedure, it will be possible to create a prioritized baseline for managing facility risk until all retired surplus facilities are demolished

  12. Life after facilities management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, C J

    1990-06-01

    Healthcare organizations stand to benefit greatly from facilities management. Nevertheless, there is a glaring lack of interest among organizations to consider this option. Healthcare consultant Charles Singer explores the potential advantages of bringing in a second party to handle part or all of a group's data processing operations.

  13. Sustainable Materials Management (SMM) Web Academy Webinar: Changing How We Think About Our Resources for a Better Tomorrow: How to Donate Surplus Food from K-12 Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is a webinar page for the Sustainable Management of Materials (SMM) Web Academy webinar titled Changing How We Think About Our Resources for a Better Tomorrow: How to Donate Surplus Food from K-12 Schools

  14. The food waste hierarchy as a framework for the management of food surplus and food waste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papargyropoulou, Effie; Lozano, Rodrigo; K. Steinberger, Julia; Wright, Nigel; Ujang, Zaini Bin

    2014-01-01

    The unprecedented scale of food waste in global food supply chains is attracting increasing attention due to its environmental, social and economic impacts. Drawing on interviews with food waste specialists, this study construes the boundaries between food surplus and food waste, avoidable and

  15. World Class Facilities Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmstrøm, Ole Emil; Jensen, Per Anker

    2013-01-01

    Alle der med entusiasme arbejder med Facilities Management drømmer om at levere World Class. DFM drømmer om at skabe rammer og baggrund for, at vi i Danmark kan bryste os at være blandt de førende på verdensplan. Her samles op på, hvor tæt vi er på at nå drømmemålet.......Alle der med entusiasme arbejder med Facilities Management drømmer om at levere World Class. DFM drømmer om at skabe rammer og baggrund for, at vi i Danmark kan bryste os at være blandt de førende på verdensplan. Her samles op på, hvor tæt vi er på at nå drømmemålet....

  16. Cryogenic Fluid Management Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhardt, R. N.; Bailey, W. J.

    1985-01-01

    The Cryogenic Fluid Management Facility is a reusable test bed which is designed to be carried within the Shuttle cargo bay to investigate the systems and technologies associated with the efficient management of cryogens in space. Cryogenic fluid management consists of the systems and technologies for: (1) liquid storage and supply, including capillary acquisition/expulsion systems which provide single-phase liquid to the user system, (2) both passive and active thermal control systems, and (3) fluid transfer/resupply systems, including transfer lines and receiver tanks. The facility contains a storage and supply tank, a transfer line and a receiver tank, configured to provide low-g verification of fluid and thermal models of cryogenic storage and transfer processes. The facility will provide design data and criteria for future subcritical cryogenic storage and transfer system applications, such as Space Station life support, attitude control, power and fuel depot supply, resupply tankers, external tank (ET) propellant scavenging, and ground-based and space-based orbit transfer vehicles (OTV).

  17. New Ideas on Facilities Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, James C.

    1986-01-01

    Examines trends in facilities management relating to products and people. Reviews new trends in products, including processes, techniques, and programs that are being expounded by business and industry. Discusses the "people factors" involved in facilities management. (ABB)

  18. Capital Ideas for Facilities Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golding, Stephen T.; Gordon, Janet; Gravina, Arthur

    2001-01-01

    Asserting that just like chief financial officers, higher education facilities specialists must maximize the long-term performance of assets under their care, describes strategies for strategic facilities management. Discusses three main approaches to facilities management (insourcing, cosourcing, and outsourcing) and where boards of trustees fit…

  19. A Program Management Framework for Facilities Managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Dan

    2012-01-01

    The challenge faced by senior facility leaders is not how to execute a single project, but rather, how to successfully execute a large program consisting of hundreds of projects. Senior facilities officers at universities, school districts, hospitals, airports, and other organizations with extensive facility inventories, typically manage project…

  20. 48 CFR 970.3770 - Facilities management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Facilities management. 970... REGULATIONS DOE MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACTS Facilities Management Contracting 970.3770 Facilities management. ...

  1. CLAIMS OF SUSTAINABLE FACILITIES MANAGEMENT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Susanne Balslev

    -creating of new socio-technical services and technologies These SFM understandings are concluded to be coexisting claims of SFM definitions. Practical Implications: Facilities managers will be able to identify the mindset behind different services and technologies that are promoted as SFM. But maybe just......Purpose: The purpose of the paper is to provide an overview of current practices within the emergent management discipline: Sustainable Facilities Management (SFM). Background: To develop a sustainable society, facilities managers must become change agents for sustainability in the built...... environment. Facilities Management (FM) is contributing to the environmental, social and economical problems, but can at the same time also be a part of the solution. However, to integrate sustainability in FM is still an emergent niche within FM, and the examples of SFM so far seems to come out of very...

  2. Draft principles, policy, and acceptance criteria for decommissioning of U.S. Department of Energy contaminated surplus facilities and summary of international decommissioning programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, B.K.

    1994-12-01

    Decommissioning activities enable the DOE to reuse all or part of a facility for future activities and reduce hazards to the general public and any future work force. The DOE Office of Environment, Health and Safety has prepared this document, which consists of decommissioning principles and acceptance criteria, in an attempt to establish a policy that is in agreement with the NRC policy. The purpose of this document is to assist individuals involved with decommissioning activities in determining their specific responsibilities as identified in Draft DOE Order 5820.DDD, ''Decommissioning of US Department of Energy Contaminated Surplus Facilities'' (Appendix A). This document is not intended to provide specific decommissioning methodology. The policies and principles of several international decommissioning programs are also summarized. These programs are from the IAEA, the NRC, and several foreign countries expecting to decommission nuclear facilities. They are included here to demonstrate the different policies that are to be followed throughout the world and to allow the reader to become familiar with the state of the art for environment, safety, and health (ES and H) aspects of nuclear decommissioning

  3. Technical Merits and Leadership in Facility Management

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shoemaker, Jerry

    1997-01-01

    .... The document is divided into six chapters; the introduction, facility management and leadership, building systems, facility operations, facility maintenance strategies, and the conclusion and final analysis...

  4. Knowledge Map of Facilities Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nenonen, Suvi; Jensen, Per Anker; Lindahl, Göran

    2014-01-01

    in creating an inventory of knowledge (i.e. the knowledge base) and developing/improving the processes of knowledge sharing in research, education and practice. Theory Knowledge mapping is discussed in terms of knowledge management. The research is connected to knowledge mapping in the facilities management......Purpose This paper aims to draft a knowledge map of the fragmented and multidisciplinary research of and relevant to FM. Facilities management knowledge map is a tool for presenting what relevant data and knowledge, a.k.a. knowledge, resides in different disciplines. Knowledge mapping is a step...... profession, research and education. The knowledge map aims to contrast perspectives on how to map interdisciplinary research. Design/methodology/approach The Knowledge map is based on classification of 83 articles, including volume 2013 of Facilities (40 articles) and of Journal of Facilities Management (21...

  5. Risk management study for the retired Hanford Site facilities: Risk management executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coles, G.A.; Shultz, M.V.; Taylor, W.E.

    1994-02-01

    This document provides a cost-comparison evaluation for implementing certain risk-reduction measures and their effect on the overall risk of the 100 and 200 Area retired, surplus facilities. The evaluation is based on conditions that existed at the time the risk evaluation team performed facility investigations, and does not acknowledge risk-reduction measures that occurred soon after risk identification. This evaluation is one part of an overall risk management study for these facilities. The retired facilities investigated for this evaluation are located in the 100 and 200 Areas of the 1450-km 2 Hanford Site. The Hanford Site is a semiarid tract of land in southeastern Washington State. The nearest population center is Richland, Washington, (population 32,000) 30 km southeast of the 200 Area. This document is the first in a four volume series that comprise the risk management study for the retired, surplus facilities. Volume 2 is the risk evaluation work procedure; volume 3 provides the results for the risk evaluation; and volume 4 is the risk-reduction cost comparison

  6. Wirtschaftlichkeit von Facilities Management, Rechnet sich Facilities Management?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redlein, Alexander

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Durch zunehmenden Wettbewerb und damit einhergehendem Kostendruck sowie einem sich rasch ändernden Arbeitsumfeld im Allgemeinen, und im Facility Management im Speziellen, ergibt sich die Notwendigkeit nach neuen Wegen für Synergien und Kosteneinsparungen zu suchen. Darüber hinaus nehmen sowohl der Komplexitätsgrad der Facilities aber auch die Gesetzlichen- und die Kundenanforderungen zu. Derzeit ist die Nutzung von Synergien zwischen den einzelnen Facility Services sehr gering. Eine Möglichkeit, um oben angeführte Anforderungen zu erfüllen, ist der „Integrated Facility Services“ (IFS Ansatz. Dieser, auf Business Process Reengineering und Value Engineering basierende Ansatz, setzt sich aus zwei Schritten zusammen: 1. Optimierung der internen (ManagementProzesse (Facility Management 2. Optimierung der operativen Leistungserbringung (Facility Services Im zweiten Schritt werden mit methodischen Ansätzen die möglichen Synergien zwischen den einzelnen Servicesilos wie haustechnische Dienstleistungen, Security, Catering, Reinigung etc. untersucht. Durch die Nutzung der Synergien ergibt sich ein verbessertes Verhältnis von Kosten zu Output.

  7. COGEMA's UMF [Uranium Management Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamorlette, G.; Bertrand, J.P.

    1988-01-01

    The French government-owned corporation, COGEMA, is responsible for the nuclear fuel cycle. This paper describes the activities at COGEMA's Pierrelatte facility, especially its Uranium Management Facility. UF6 handling and storage is described for natural, enriched, depleted, and reprocessed uranium. UF6 quality control specifications, sampling, and analysis (halocarbon and volatile fluorides, isotopic analysis, uranium assay, and impurities) are described. In addition, the paper discusses the filling and cleaning of containers and security at UMF

  8. Utilizing Interns in Facilities Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judkins, Clarissa; Morris, John P.; Molocznik, Chuck

    2011-01-01

    Facilities management is rapidly changing and developing from a position an individual stumbles into--or work one's way up through--to a discipline and vocation all of its own. There is a need for a collaborative strategy among leaders in practice, education, and research to share knowledge and experience and to establish professional and ethical…

  9. Facility Management's Role in Organizational Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Gregory K.

    2013-01-01

    Facility managers have questions about sustainability. How do an organization's physical facilities--its built environment--and the management of them, influence the sustainability of the organization or institution as a whole? How important is Facility Management (FM) to the overall sustainability profile of an organization? Facility managers…

  10. DKIST facility management system integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Charles R.; Phelps, LeEllen

    2016-07-01

    The Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST) Observatory is under construction at Haleakalā, Maui, Hawai'i. When complete, the DKIST will be the largest solar telescope in the world. The Facility Management System (FMS) is a subsystem of the high-level Facility Control System (FCS) and directly controls the Facility Thermal System (FTS). The FMS receives operational mode information from the FCS while making process data available to the FCS and includes hardware and software to integrate and control all aspects of the FTS including the Carousel Cooling System, the Telescope Chamber Environmental Control Systems, and the Temperature Monitoring System. In addition it will integrate the Power Energy Management System and several service systems such as heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC), the Domestic Water Distribution System, and the Vacuum System. All of these subsystems must operate in coordination to provide the best possible observing conditions and overall building management. Further, the FMS must actively react to varying weather conditions and observational requirements. The physical impact of the facility must not interfere with neighboring installations while operating in a very environmentally and culturally sensitive area. The FMS system will be comprised of five Programmable Automation Controllers (PACs). We present a pre-build overview of the functional plan to integrate all of the FMS subsystems.

  11. Design Integration of Facilities Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Anker

    2009-01-01

    One of the problems in the building industry is a limited degree of learning from experiences of use and operation of existing buildings. Development of professional facilities management (FM) can be seen as the missing link to bridge the gap between building operation and building design....... Strategies, methods and barriers for the transfer and integration of operational knowledge into the design process are discussed. Multiple strategies are needed to improve the integration of FM in design. Building clients must take on a leading role in defining and setting up requirements and procedures....... Involvement of professional facilities managers in the design process is an obvious strategy, but increased competences are needed among building clients, designers and the operational staff. More codification of operational knowledge is also needed, for instance in IT systems. The paper is based...

  12. Computer-Aided Facilities Management Systems (CAFM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyros, Kreon L.

    Computer-aided facilities management (CAFM) refers to a collection of software used with increasing frequency by facilities managers. The six major CAFM components are discussed with respect to their usefulness and popularity in facilities management applications: (1) computer-aided design; (2) computer-aided engineering; (3) decision support…

  13. Environmental surveillance for Waste Management Facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Annual report 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, K.C.; Wilhelmsen, R.N.; Borsella, B.W.; Miles, M.

    1995-08-01

    This report describes calendar year 1994 environmental surveillance activities of Environmental Monitoring of Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies, performed at Waste Management Facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The major facilities monitored include the Radioactive Waste Management Complex, the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility, the Mixed Waste Storage Facility, and two surplus facilities. Included are results of the sampling performed by the Radiological Environmental Surveillance Program, INEL Environmental Surveillance Program, and the United States Geological Survey. The primary purposes of monitoring are to evaluate environmental conditions, to provide and interpret data, to ensure compliance with applicable regulations or standards, and to ensure protection of human health and the environment. This report compares 1994 environmental surveillance data with US Department of Energy derived concentration guides and with data from previous years.

  14. The mixed waste management facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streit, R.D.

    1995-10-01

    During FY96, the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) Project has the following major objectives: (1) Complete Project Preliminary Design Review (PDR). (2) Complete final design (Title II) of MWMF major systems. (3) Coordinate all final interfaces with the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) for facility utilities and facility integration. (4) Begin long-lead procurements. (5) Issue Project Baseline Revision 2-Preliminary Design (PB2), modifying previous baselines per DOE-requested budget profiles and cost reduction. Delete Mediated Electrochemical Oxidation (MEO) as a treatment process for initial demonstration. (6) Complete submittal of, and ongoing support for, applications for air permit. (7) Begin detailed planning for start-up, activation, and operational interfaces with the Laboratory's Hazardous Waste Management Division (HWM). In achieving these objectives during FY96, the Project will incorporate and implement recent DOE directives to maximize the cost savings associated with the DWTF/MWMF integration (initiated in PB1.2); to reduce FY96 new Budget Authority to ∼$10M (reduced from FY97 Validation of $15.3M); and to keep Project fiscal year funding requirements largely uniform at ∼$10M/yr. A revised Project Baseline (i.e., PB2), to be issued during the second quarter of FY96, will address the implementation and impact of this guidance from an overall Project viewpoint. For FY96, the impact of this guidance is that completion of final design has been delayed relative to previous baselines (resulting from the delay in the completion of preliminary design); ramp-up in staffing has been essentially eliminated; and procurements have been balanced through the Project to help balance budget needs to funding availability

  15. Facilities Management and Added Value

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Anker

    2010-01-01

    Aim: This paper aims to present different models of the concept of the added value of Facilities Management (FM), including the FM Value Map, which forms the basis of research group in EuroFM, and to present some of the results of this research collaboration. Approach and methodology: The paper...... is based on literature reviews of the most influential journals within the academic fields of FM, Corporate Real Estate Management and Business to Business Marketing and discussions between participants of the research group working on a further exploration and testing of the FM Value Map. Conclusions......: The research shows a number of different definitions and focus points of Added Value of FM, dependent on the academic field and the area of application. The different research perspectives explored a holistic view on the added value of FM by the integration of an external market based view (with a focus...

  16. The Facilities Management Value Map

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Anker

    2008-01-01

    The paper is based on research from 21 cases studies on Facilities Management (FM) in the Nordic countries. The work also relates to a working group on “Highlighting the Added Value of FM” under Nordic FM. The aim has been to establish a conceptual framework to discuss, understand and explain the...... and the main stakeholder that benefits from the added value of FM. The framework will be presented together with an illustrative example from practice of how FM can create added value.......The paper is based on research from 21 cases studies on Facilities Management (FM) in the Nordic countries. The work also relates to a working group on “Highlighting the Added Value of FM” under Nordic FM. The aim has been to establish a conceptual framework to discuss, understand and explain...... the ways FM can create added value. The method has found inspiration in the strategic mapping from balanced score card methodology. The result is identification of the main resources, processes and products/deliveries in FM, the principal ways FM creates impacts on the core business as well as society...

  17. New Trends in Facility Asset Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Matt

    2000-01-01

    Explains new, positive trends in facility asset management that encompasses greater acceptance and involvement of facility managers in the financial planning process, greater awareness of the need for maintenance, and facility administrators taking a greater role with business officers. The new climate for alternative renewal financing proposals…

  18. Facilities Management Guide for Asbestos and Lead

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-11-01

    FACILITIES MANAGEMENT GUIDE FOR ASBESTOS AND LEAD 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e...and abatement of hazards The pertinent facilities management aspects of the asbestos program are: • Actively manage undamaged ACM in place, and...En su re tr ai ni ng in cl ud es th e to pi cs o ut lin ed in th e re gu la tio n FACILITIES MANAGEMENT Pa in t w ith L ea d, O SH

  19. Technical Merits and Leadership in Facility Management

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shoemaker, Jerry

    1997-01-01

    After almost ten years of experience and formal education in design, construction, and facility operations and maintenance, the challenges and complexity of facility management still seem overwhelming and intangible...

  20. OPG Western Waste Management Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Julian, J.

    2011-01-01

    The Ontario Power Generation (OPG) Western Waste Management Facility (WWMF) uses a computer based Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) system to monitor its facility, and control essential equipment. In 2007 the WWMF Low and Intermediate Level Waste (L&ILW) technical support section conducted a review of outstanding corrective maintenance work. Technical support divided all work on a system by system basis. One system under review was the Waste Volume Reduction Building (WVRB) control room SCADA system. Technical support worked with control maintenance staff to assess all outstanding work orders on the SCADA system. The assessment identified several deficiencies in the SCADA system. Technical support developed a corrective action plan for the SCADA system deficiencies, and in February of 2008 developed an engineering change package to correct the observed deficiencies. OPG Nuclear Waste Engineering approved the change package and the WVRB Control Room Upgrades construction project started in January of 2009. The WVRB control room upgrades construction work was completed in February of 2009. This paper provides the following information regarding the WWMF SCADA system and the 2009 WVRB Control Room Upgrades Project: A high-level explanation of SCADA system technology, and the various SCADA system components installed in the WVRB; A description of the state of the WVRB SCADA system during the work order assessment, identifying all deficiencies; A description of the new design package; A description of the construction project; and, A list of lessons learned during construction and commissioning, and a path forward for future upgrades. (author)

  1. Mitigating risks related to facilities management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Daniel P; Scarborough, Sydney

    2013-07-01

    By looking at metrics focusing on the functionality, age, capital investment, transparency, and sustainability (FACTS) of their organizations' facilities, facilities management teams can build potential business cases to justify upgrading the facilities. A FACTS analysis can ensure that capital spent on facilities will produce a higher or more certain ROI than alternatives. A consistent process for managing spending helps to avoid unexpected spikes that cost the enterprise more in the long run.

  2. Waste management considerations in nuclear facility decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elder, H.K.; Murphy, E.S.

    1981-01-01

    Decommissioning of nuclear facilities involves the management of significant quantities of radioactive waste. This paper summarizes information on volumes of waste requiring disposal and waste management costs developed in a series of decommissioning studies performed for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. These studies indicate that waste management is an important cost factor in the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. Alternatives for managing decommissioning wastes are defined and recommendations are made for improvements in waste management practices

  3. Integrated Facilities Management and Fixed Asset Accounting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golz, W. C., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    A record of a school district's assets--land, buildings, machinery, and equipment--can be a useful management tool that meets accounting requirements and provides appropriate information for budgeting, forecasting, and facilities management. (MLF)

  4. Does PDC Belong in Facilities Management?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessoff, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Whether planning, design, and construction (PDC) of buildings should be part of facilities management, with its traditional operations and maintenance functions, or separated from it, has been a divisive question on many campuses for a long time. Now, although it is not happening everywhere, facilities managers at a number of institutions, public…

  5. Evolution of Computer-Aided Facility Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, William D.

    1998-01-01

    Presents the benefits facilities managers could realize by converting blueprints, CADD information, and as-built drawings into a computer-aided facility management (CAFM) system. CAFM links graphics to databases, adding information on types of spaces, occupants, materials, equipment, costs, and other building systems. This helps facilities…

  6. Landfill gas management facilities design guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-03-15

    In British Columbia, municipal solid waste landfills generate over 1000 tonnes of methane per year; landfill gas management facilities are required to improve the environmental performance of solid waste landfills. The aim of this document, developed by the British Columbia Ministry of the Environment, is to provide guidance for the design, installation, and operation of landfill gas management facilities to address odor and pollutant emissions issues and also address health and safety issues. A review of technical experience and best practices in landfill gas management facilities was carried out, as was as a review of existing regulations related to landfill gas management all over the world. This paper provides useful information to landfill owners, operators, and other professionals for the design of landfill gas management facilities which meet the requirements of landfill gas management regulations.

  7. Risk management study for the Hanford Site facilities: Risk reduction cost comparison for the retired Hanford Site facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coles, G.A.; Egge, R.G.; Senger, E.; Shultz, M.W.; Taylor, W.E.

    1994-02-01

    This document provides a cost-comparison evaluation for implementing certain risk-reduction measures and their effect on the overall risk of the 100 and 200 Area retired, surplus facilities. The evaluation is based on conditions that existed at the time the risk evaluation team performed facility investigations, and does not acknowledge risk-reduction measures that occurred soon after risk identification. This evaluation is one part of an overall risk management study for these facilities. The retired facilities investigated for this evaluation are located in the 100 and 200 Areas of the 1450-km 2 Hanford Site. The Hanford Site is a semiarid tract of land in southeastern Washington State. The nearest population center is Richland, Washington, (population 32,000) 30 km southeast of the 200 Area. This cost-comparison evaluation (1) determines relative costs for reducing risk to acceptable levels; (2) compares the cost of reducing risk using different risk-reduction options; and (3) compares the cost of reducing risks at different facilities. The result is an identification of the cost effective risk-reduction measures. Supporting information required to develop costs of the various risk-reduction options also is included

  8. Risk management study for the Hanford Site facilities: Risk reduction cost comparison for the retired Hanford Site facilities. Volume 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coles, G.A.; Egge, R.G.; Senger, E.; Shultz, M.W.; Taylor, W.E.

    1994-02-01

    This document provides a cost-comparison evaluation for implementing certain risk-reduction measures and their effect on the overall risk of the 100 and 200 Area retired, surplus facilities. The evaluation is based on conditions that existed at the time the risk evaluation team performed facility investigations, and does not acknowledge risk-reduction measures that occurred soon after risk identification. This evaluation is one part of an overall risk management study for these facilities. The retired facilities investigated for this evaluation are located in the 100 and 200 Areas of the 1450-km{sup 2} Hanford Site. The Hanford Site is a semiarid tract of land in southeastern Washington State. The nearest population center is Richland, Washington, (population 32,000) 30 km southeast of the 200 Area. This cost-comparison evaluation (1) determines relative costs for reducing risk to acceptable levels; (2) compares the cost of reducing risk using different risk-reduction options; and (3) compares the cost of reducing risks at different facilities. The result is an identification of the cost effective risk-reduction measures. Supporting information required to develop costs of the various risk-reduction options also is included.

  9. Safety Management for Water Play Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Claude

    1986-01-01

    Modern aquatic facilities, which include wave pools, water slides, and shallow water activity play pools, have a greater potential for injuries and lawsuits than conventional swimming pools. This article outlines comprehensive safety management for such facilities, including potential accident identification and injury control planning. (MT)

  10. Facilities management and industrial safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-06-01

    This book lists occupation safety and health acts with purpose, definition and management system of safety and health, enforcement ordinance of occupation safety and health acts and enforcement regulations such as general rules, safety and health cover, system of management on safety and health, regulation of management on safety and health, regulations of harmfulness and protection of danger, heath management for workers, supervisor and command and inspection of machine and equipment.

  11. 50 CFR 30.2 - Disposition of surplus range animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Disposition of surplus range animals. 30.2... (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM RANGE AND FERAL ANIMAL MANAGEMENT Range Animals § 30.2 Disposition of surplus range animals. Disposition shall be made only during regularly scheduled disposal...

  12. 50 CFR 30.1 - Surplus range animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Surplus range animals. 30.1 Section 30.1... NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM RANGE AND FERAL ANIMAL MANAGEMENT Range Animals § 30.1 Surplus range animals. Range animals on fenced wildlife refuge areas, including buffalo and longhorn cattle, determined...

  13. Annual report -- 1992: Environmental surveillance for EG & G Idaho Waste Management Facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilhelmsen, R.N.; Wright, K.C.; McBride, D.W.

    1993-08-01

    This report describes the 1992 environmental surveillance activities of the Environmental Monitoring Unit of EG&G Idaho, Inc., at EG&G Idaho-operated Waste Management facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The major facilities monitored include the Radioactive Waste Management Complex, the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility, the Mixed Waste Storage Facility, and two surplus facilities. Included are some results of the sampling performed by the Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory and the United States Geological Survey. The primary purposes of monitoring are to evaluate environmental conditions, to provide and interpret data, to ensure compliance with applicable regulations or standards, and to ensure protection of human health and the environment. This report compares 1992 environmental surveillance data with DOE derived concentration guides, and with data from previous years.

  14. Service quality for facilities management in hospitals

    CERN Document Server

    Sui Pheng, Low

    2016-01-01

    This book examines the Facilities Management (FM) of hospitals and healthcare facilities, which are among the most complex, costly and challenging kind of buildings to manage. It presents and evaluates the FM service quality standards in Singapore’s hospitals from the patient’s perspective, and provides recommendations on how to successfully improve FM service quality and achieve higher patient satisfaction. The book also features valuable supplementary materials, including a checklist of 32 key factors for successful facilities management and another checklist of 24 service attributes for hospitals to achieve desirable service quality in connection with facilities management. The book adopts a unique approach of combining service quality and quality theory to provide a more holistic view of how FM service quality can be achieved in hospitals. It also integrates three instruments, namely the SERVQUAL model, the Kano model and the QFD model to yield empirical results from surveys for implementation in hosp...

  15. Location - Managed Facility - St. Paul District (MVP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — St. Paul District - US Army Corps of Engineers Managed Facility locations. District headquarters, Natural Resource, Recreation, Lock and Dam, and Regulatory offices...

  16. How can facility managers add value?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Anker; van der Voordt, Theo

    2015-01-01

    Recent years have seen a growing interest in the concept of added value of facilities management (FM) and corporate real estate management (CREM), and how to attain and measure it. There is a wide variety of definitions in use, and recognition of different types of added value, such as user value......, customer value, financial value, environmental value and relationship value.......Recent years have seen a growing interest in the concept of added value of facilities management (FM) and corporate real estate management (CREM), and how to attain and measure it. There is a wide variety of definitions in use, and recognition of different types of added value, such as user value...

  17. Legal regime of water management facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salma Jožef

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the legal regime of water management facilities in the light of Serbian, foreign and European law. Different divisions of water management facilities are carried out (to public and private ones, natural and artificial ones, etc., with determination of their legal relevance. Account is taken of the issue of protection from harmful effects of waters to such facilities, as well. The paper points also to rules on the water management facilities, from acts of planning, to individual administrative acts and measures for maintenance of required qualitative and quantitative condition of waters, depending on their purpose (general use or special, commercial use o waters. Albeit special rules on water management facilities exist, due to the natural interlocking between all the components of the environment (water, air and soil, a comprehensive approach is required. A reference is made to other basic principles of protection of water management facilities as well, such as the principle of prevention, principle of sustainable development and the principle "polluter pays". The last one represents the achievement of contemporary law, which deviates from the idea accepted in the second half of 20th century that supported the socialization of risk from harmful effects of waters.

  18. Improvement of management systems for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The area of Quality Management/ Quality Assurance has been changed dramatically over the past years. The nuclear facilities moved from the 'traditional' Quality Assurance approach towards Quality Management Systems, and later a new concept of Integrated Management Systems was introduced. The IAEA is developing a new set of Standards on Integrated Management Systems, which will replace the current 50-C-Q/SG-Q1-Q14 Code. The new set of document will require the integration of all management areas into one coherent management system. The new set of standards on Management Systems promotes the concept of the Integrated Management Systems. Based on new set a big number of documents are under preparation. These documents will address the current issues in the management systems area, e.g. Management of Change, Continuous Improvement, Self-assessment, and Attributes of effective management, etc. Currently NPES is providing a number of TC projects and Extra Budgetary Programmes to assist Member States in this area. The new Standards on Management Systems will be published in 2006. A number of Regulatory bodies already indicated that they would take the new Management System Standards as a basis for the national regulation. This fact will motivate a considerable change in the management of nuclear utilities, requiring a new approach. This activity is suitable for all IAEA Members States with large or limited nuclear capabilities. The service is directed to provide assistance for the management of all organizations carrying on or regulating nuclear activities and facilities

  19. Best Practices in Facility Management

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Neve, Trevor

    1999-01-01

    .... While the Logistics Management Institute's benchmark database has served as a cornerstone in helping to initiate change, data and metrics go only so far in implementing better ways of doing business...

  20. Daily storage management of hydroelectric facilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chappin, E.J.L.; Ferrero, M.; Lazzeroni, P.; Lukszo, Z.; Olivero, M.; Repetto, M.

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a management procedure for hydroelectric facilities with daily storage. The water storage gives an additional degree of freedom allowing to shift in time power production when it is more convenient and to work at the maximum efficiency of hydraulic turbine. The management is

  1. The strategic facilities management organisation in housing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Susanne Balslev; Jensen, Per Anker; Jensen, Jesper Ole

    2012-01-01

    Two houses in the same street can be built in the same year, they can look the same, and still they might provide very different support for sustainable living. This article points to the Strategic Facilities Management Organisation (SFMO) as the most important concept, to understand and manage...... literature on sustainable facilities management, where it fills a gap as it deals with housing and strategic FM. Intended readers are those interested in housing administration and especially the transition of existing housing into more sustainable housing. Intended readers include building owners, policy...

  2. The strategic facilities management organisation in housing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Susanne Balslev; Jensen, Per Anker; Jensen, Jesper Ole

    2012-01-01

    Two houses in the same street can be built in the same year, they can look the same, and still they might provide very different support for sustainable living. This article points to the Strategic Facilities Management Organisation (SFMO) as the most important concept, to understand and manage...... implementation of sustainable facilities management in housing administration. The concept provides a frame for understanding the roles and relations of tenants, owners, administrators and operators. The paper is based on a Danish research project on environmentally sound building operation including literature...... literature on sustainable facilities management, where it fills a gap as it deals with housing and strategic FM. Intended readers are those interested in housing administration and especially the transition of existing housing into more sustainable housing. Intended readers include building owners, policy...

  3. Håndbog i Facilities Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Anker

    Facilities Management (FM) er et nyt nøgleord som mange nu anvender i forskellige forbindelser og sammenhænge. Dette hænger i høj grad sammen med manglen på en fælles dansk referenceramme for FM, der har givet frit spillerum for de mange forskellige definitioner af det engelske ord. Dansk...... Facilities Management netværk (DFM netværk) har i mange år arbejdet for en fælles definition af begrebet sammen med arbejdet for udbredelsen af kendskabet til FM, herunder uddannelse, erfaringsudveksling m.v. DFM netværk har udgivet en Håndbog i Facilities Management i samarbejde med bogens forfatter Per......, strategisk planlægning, space management, ejendomsdrift og services. Hertil kommer en generel introduktion til FM samt en status for udbredelsen af FM generelt i Danmark og internationalt....

  4. XML Based Scientific Data Management Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrotra, P.; Zubair, M.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The World Wide Web consortium has developed an Extensible Markup Language (XML) to support the building of better information management infrastructures. The scientific computing community realizing the benefits of XML has designed markup languages for scientific data. In this paper, we propose a XML based scientific data management ,facility, XDMF. The project is motivated by the fact that even though a lot of scientific data is being generated, it is not being shared because of lack of standards and infrastructure support for discovering and transforming the data. The proposed data management facility can be used to discover the scientific data itself, the transformation functions, and also for applying the required transformations. We have built a prototype system of the proposed data management facility that can work on different platforms. We have implemented the system using Java, and Apache XSLT engine Xalan. To support remote data and transformation functions, we had to extend the XSLT specification and the Xalan package.

  5. Los Alamos Plutonium Facility Waste Management System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, K.; Montoya, A.; Wieneke, R.; Wulff, D.; Smith, C.; Gruetzmacher, K.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the new computer-based transuranic (TRU) Waste Management System (WMS) being implemented at the Plutonium Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The Waste Management System is a distributed computer processing system stored in a Sybase database and accessed by a graphical user interface (GUI) written in Omnis7. It resides on the local area network at the Plutonium Facility and is accessible by authorized TRU waste originators, count room personnel, radiation protection technicians (RPTs), quality assurance personnel, and waste management personnel for data input and verification. Future goals include bringing outside groups like the LANL Waste Management Facility on-line to participate in this streamlined system. The WMS is changing the TRU paper trail into a computer trail, saving time and eliminating errors and inconsistencies in the process

  6. Håndbog i Facilities Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Anker

    Facilities Management netværk (DFM netværk) har i mange år arbejdet for en fælles definition af begrebet sammen med arbejdet for udbredelsen af kendskabet til FM, herunder uddannelse, erfaringsudveksling m.v. DFM netværk har udgivet en Håndbog i Facilities Management i samarbejde med bogens forfatter Per......Facilities Management (FM) er et nyt nøgleord som mange nu anvender i forskellige forbindelser og sammenhænge. Dette hænger i høj grad sammen med manglen på en fælles dansk referenceramme for FM, der har givet frit spillerum for de mange forskellige definitioner af det engelske ord. Dansk......, strategisk planlægning, space management, ejendomsdrift og services. Hertil kommer en generel introduktion til FM samt en status for udbredelsen af FM generelt i Danmark og internationalt....

  7. Configuration Management Maturity in Scientific Facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Niknam

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Since the effectiveness of the development and operation of scientific facilities (especially those presenting specific hazards, such as ionizing radiations relies heavily on state of the art practices, such as systems engineering and product lifecycle management, configuration management (CM is becoming a key management process. However, while some maturity models exist to assess the degree of the implementation and effectiveness of many management processes, such as project management or systems engineering, there is no specific framework available to assess the degree of maturity of an organization towards CM. This paper focuses on revealing the important maturity dimensions and levels for CM as a means towards developing a CM maturity model.

  8. Facilities management contracting: the key to effective change management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meads, S

    1993-01-01

    Facilities Management Contracting is a catalyst for developing high performance individuals and teams to deliver value for money in today's demanding funding environment. It is a key to unlocking individuals' creativity, and learning, through effective change management strategies, and to developing organisational processes and structures to promote this. Sarah Meads, General Manager of Serco Health Services, explores how health providers could make more effective use of Facilities Management Contracting to release the potential that already exists within their organisations by thinking of Facilities Management as a change management tool. Serco Health Services is the division of Serco Group NZ Limited responsible for assisting healthcare providers to review and manage a wide range of non-core support services.

  9. Potential of Computerized Maintenance Management System in Facilities Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor Farisya Azahar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available For some time it has been clear that managing buildings or estates has been carried out in the context of what has become known as facilities management. British Institute of Facilities Management defined facilities management is the integration of multi-disciplinary activities within the built environment and the management of their impact upon people and the workplace. Effective facilities management is vital to the success of an organisation by contributing to the delivery of its strategic and operational objectives. Maintenance of buildings should be given serious attention before (stage design, during and after a building is completed. But total involvement in building maintenance is after the building is completed and during its operations. Residents of and property owners require their building to look attractive, durable and have a peaceful indoor environment and efficient. The objective of the maintenance management system is to stream line the vast maintenance information system to improve the productivity of an industrial plant. a good maintenance management system makes equipment and facilities available. This paper will discuss the fundamental steps of maintenance management program and Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS

  10. Quality management in nuclear facilities decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garonis, Omar H.

    2002-01-01

    Internationally, the decommissioning organizations of nuclear facilities carry out the decommissioning according to the safety requirements established for the regulatory bodies. Some of them perform their activities in compliance with a quality assurance system. This work establishes standardization through a Specifications Requirement Document, for the management system of the nuclear facilities decommissioning organizations. It integrates with aspects of the quality, environmental, occupational safety and health management systems, and also makes these aspects compatible with all the requirements of the nuclear industry recommended for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). (author)

  11. Sustainability and the facilities management in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asbollah Asra Zaliza

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Facilities Management (FM in the industry of environment involves numerous expertise, especially from the management side. Other than that, technology and finance are the other factors involved as well. One essential aspect of FM, other than the emphasis on technical operation, is its performance. In parallel, the performance does impact occupant behaviour and, at the same time, this performance does affect the environment. In short, this indicates that FM is in a key position to participate in delivering a sustainable environment for the industry of built environment. Sustainable facilities Management (SFM is crucial because buildings consume more resources which will, in consequence, negatively impact the environment and generate large amounts of waste. This justifies the importance of sustainability under the umbrella of facilities management. However, FM is quite new in Malaysia’s environment. Government agencies, such as JKR, have adopted and are practicing FM at the moment. Fortunately, there has been an increasing trend and awareness of SFM adoption. Therefore, this paper aims to understand and identify the contribution and practices of Sustainable Facilities Management (SFM in Malaysia; focusing on the development taken in regards to SFM.

  12. Waste Management Facilities Cost Information Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feizollahi, F.; Shropshire, D.

    1992-10-01

    The Waste Management Facility Cost Information (WMFCI) Report, commissioned by the US Department of Energy (DOE), develops planning life-cycle cost (PLCC) estimates for treatment, storage, and disposal facilities. This report contains PLCC estimates versus capacity for 26 different facility cost modules. A procedure to guide DOE and its contractor personnel in the use of estimating data is also provided. Estimates in the report apply to five distinctive waste streams: low-level waste, low-level mixed waste, alpha contaminated low-level waste, alpha contaminated low-level mixed waste, and transuranic waste. The report addresses five different treatment types: incineration, metal/melting and recovery, shredder/compaction, solidification, and vitrification. Data in this report allows the user to develop PLCC estimates for various waste management options

  13. Waste Management Facilities Cost Information Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feizollahi, F.; Shropshire, D.

    1992-10-01

    The Waste Management Facility Cost Information (WMFCI) Report, commissioned by the US Department of Energy (DOE), develops planning life-cycle cost (PLCC) estimates for treatment, storage, and disposal facilities. This report contains PLCC estimates versus capacity for 26 different facility cost modules. A procedure to guide DOE and its contractor personnel in the use of estimating data is also provided. Estimates in the report apply to five distinctive waste streams: low-level waste, low-level mixed waste, alpha contaminated low-level waste, alpha contaminated low-level mixed waste, and transuranic waste. The report addresses five different treatment types: incineration, metal/melting and recovery, shredder/compaction, solidification, and vitrification. Data in this report allows the user to develop PLCC estimates for various waste management options.

  14. Surplus plutonium disposition draft environmental impact statement. Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-07-01

    On May 22, 1997, DOE published a Notice of Intent (NOI) in the Federal Register (62 Federal Register 28009) announcing its decision to prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) that would tier from the analysis and decisions reached in connection with the Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials Final Programmatic EIS (Storage and Disposition PEIS). DOE's disposition strategy allows for both the immobilization of surplus plutonium and its use as mixed oxide (MOX) fuel in existing domestic, commercial reactors. The disposition of surplus plutonium would also involve disposal of the immobilized plutonium and MOX fuel (as spent nuclear fuel) in a geologic repository. The Surplus Plutonium Disposition Environmental Impact Statement analyzes alternatives that would use the immobilization approach (for some of the surplus plutonium) and the MOX fuel approach (for some of the surplus plutonium); alternatives that would immobilize all of the surplus plutonium; and the No Action Alternative. The alternatives include three disposition facilities that would be designed so that they could collectively accomplish disposition of up to 50 metric tons (55 tons) of surplus plutonium over their operating lives: (1) the pit disassembly and conversion facility would disassemble pits (a weapons component) and convert the recovered plutonium, as well as plutonium metal from other sources, into plutonium dioxide suitable for disposition; (2) the immobilization facility would include a collocated capability for converting nonpit plutonium materials into plutonium dioxide suitable for immobilization and would be located at either Hanford or SRS. DOE has identified SRS as the preferred site for an immobilization facility; (3) the MOX fuel fabrication facility would fabricate plutonium dioxide into MOX fuel

  15. ICT Adoption in Facilities Management Supply Chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scupola, Ada

    2012-01-01

    This article involves a qualitative study of factors impacting the adoption of ICT solutions in the Danish facility management supply chain. The results show that there are a number of drivers and barriers that influence the adoption of ICT solutions in this service sector. These have been groupe...

  16. 7 CFR 210.13 - Facilities management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., the added text is set forth as follows: § 210.13 Facilities management. (c) Food safety program. The... points; (iii) Determine the critical limits; (iv) Establish procedures to monitor critical control points... critical limits; (iv) Monitoring procedures; (v) Corrective action procedures; (vi) Recordkeeping...

  17. Managing Educational Facilities and Students' Enrolment in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A Standardized research Instrument was used: Managing Educational Facilities and Students Enrolment Questionnaire (MEFSEQ). The Instrument was content, construct and face validated while its reliability co- efficient was established through the test -retest method of 0.84. Inferential Statistics of Pearson Product Moment ...

  18. 40 CFR 792.31 - Testing facility management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Testing facility management. 792.31... facility management. For each study, testing facility management shall: (a) Designate a study director as... personnel, resources, facilities, equipment, materials and methodologies are available as scheduled. (f...

  19. FFTF [Fast Flux Test Facility] management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, C.L.

    1986-11-01

    Fuel Management at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) involves more than just the usual ex-core and in-core management of standard fuel and non-fuel components between storage locations and within the core since it is primarily an irradiation test facility. This mission involves testing an ever increasing variety of fueled and non-fueled experiments, each having unique requirements on the reactor core as well as having its own individual impact on the reload design. This paper describes the fuel management process used by the Westinghouse Hanford Company Core Engineering group that has led to the successful reload design of nine operating cycles and the irradiation of over 120 tests

  20. Innovative Procurement and Partnerships in Facilities Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Anker

    2011-01-01

    A major study of facilities management best practice covering 36 cases from the Nordic countries in Europe shows, that the most outstanding examples of innovation in FM are initiated from the demand side and involves new forms of procurement with long term contracts. This paper considers in depth......-called operational partnerships with private providers concerning all municipal buildings and sports facilities in parts of a city. Each of the case studies has involved both the client and the provider side of the collaboration. The cases show that an essential element in a successful procurement and partnership...

  1. Formulary management in a military treatment facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, V F; Walker, J C

    1997-03-01

    In an environment of increased fiscal responsibility and cost constraints, the medical staff must take an active role in deciding how an institution's operating budget is spent. A major expense of a military treatment facility (MTF) is maintaining an adequate and cost-effective formulary. The large number of pharmaceuticals available on the market forces a decision regarding which products to stock. Decision analysis is a technique that helps a medical staff to manage its formulary by listing all of the objective and subjective considerations. The Department of Defense Pharmacoeconomic Center has developed a tri-service formulary to standardize a basic drug list that would be available in each military treatment facility. However, this list cannot be expected to answer all of the factors a medical staff must weigh in developing an MTF-specific formulary. Many considerations must be addressed in these decisions, including the beneficiary population, the potential diagnoses as defined by a database such as the Retrospective Case Mix Analysis System or the Military Health Services System, the institution's mission and defined scope of care, physician interests and specialization, and facility limitations. Military treatment facilities can maintain an appropriate stock of medications that is specific for the scope and practice of a medical staff and work within a budget through careful planning and employment of a decision matrix. This balance of appropriateness and fiscal responsibility allows the maximum range of services within a facility.

  2. Innovative Procurement and Partnerships in Facilities Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Anker

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the paper is to present, analyse and identify learning from two case studies of innovative procurement in Facilities Management (FM) concerning the establishments of partnerships between clients and providers. Approach and methodology: A major study of FM best practice covering 36...... municipal buildings and sports facilities in parts of the city of Copenhagen. Each of the case studies has involved both the client and the provider side of the collaboration. The paper presents, compare and analyze the two cases regarding intentions, procurement methods, forms of collaborations...... strong requirements on the management style and company culture. Limitations of the research: The research is only based on two case studies, which obviously limits the possibility to generalize the results. Practical applications: The research presents two specific examples of innovative procurement...

  3. National Ignition Facility Configuration Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabral, S G; Moore, T L

    2002-01-01

    This Configuration Management Plan (CMP) describes the technical and administrative management process for controlling the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Project configuration. The complexity of the NIF Project (i.e., participation by multiple national laboratories and subcontractors involved in the development, fabrication, installation, and testing of NIF hardware and software, as well as construction and testing of Project facilities) requires implementation of the comprehensive configuration management program defined in this plan. A logical schematic illustrating how the plan functions is provided in Figure 1. A summary of the process is provided in Section 4.0, Configuration Change Control. Detailed procedures that make up the overall process are referenced. This CMP is consistent with guidance for managing a project's configuration provided in Department of Energy (DOE) Order 430.1, Guide PMG 10, ''Project Execution and Engineering Management Planning''. Configuration management is a formal discipline comprised of the following four elements: (1) Identification--defines the functional and physical characteristics of a Project and uniquely identifies the defining requirements. This includes selection of components of the end product(s) subject to control and selection of the documents that define the project and components. (2) Change management--provides a systematic method for managing changes to the project and its physical and functional configuration to ensure that all changes are properly identified, assessed, reviewed, approved, implemented, tested, and documented. (3) Data management--ensures that necessary information on the project and its end product(s) is systematically recorded and disseminated for decision-making and other uses. Identifies, stores and controls, tracks status, retrieves, and distributes documents. (4) Assessments and validation--ensures that the planned configuration requirements match actual physical configurations and

  4. Mixed Waste Management Facility Groundwater Monitoring Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chase, J.

    1998-03-01

    During fourth quarter 1997, eleven constituents exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) in groundwater samples from downgradient monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility. No constituents exceeded final PDWS in samples from upgradient monitoring wells. As in previous quarters, tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread elevated constituents. The groundwater flow directions and rates in the three hydrostratigraphic units were similar to those of previous quarters.

  5. Håndbog i Facilities Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Anker

    Facilities Management (FM) er et nyt nøgleord som mange nu anvender i forskellige forbindelser og sammenhænge. Dette hænger i høj grad sammen med manglen på en fælles dansk referenceramme for FM, der har givet frit spillerum for de mange forskellige definitioner af det engelske ord. Dansk...... Facilities Management netværk (DFM netværk) har i mange år arbejdet for en fælles definition af begrebet sammen med arbejdet for udbredelsen af kendskabet til FM, herunder uddannelse, erfaringsudveksling m.v. DFM netværk har udgivet en Håndbog i Facilities Management i samarbejde med bogens forfatter Per...... gennemgår alle aspekter af FM. Bogen gennemgår således en række mere traditionelle begreber, men kommer også igennem nyere begreber som out-sourcing, sale- and leaseback, benchmarking og mange andre. Forfatteren gennemgår i 10 kapitler så forskellige elementer som ledelse og organisation, økonomistyring...

  6. Screening criteria for siting waste management facilities: Regional Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The Midwest Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Commission (Midwest Compact) seeks to define and place into operation a system for low-level waste management that will protect the public health and safety and the environment from the time the waste leaves its point of origin. Once the system is defined it will be necessary to find suitable sites for the components of that waste management system. The procedure for siting waste management facilities that have been chosen by the compact is one in which a host state is chosen for each facility. The host state is then given the freedom to select the site. Sites will be needed of low-level waste disposal facilities. Depending on the nature of the waste management system chosen by the host state, sites may also be needed for regional waste treatment facilities, such as compactors or incinerators. This report provides example criteria for use in selecting sites for low-level radioactive waste treatment and disposal facilities. 14 refs

  7. Niagara falls storage site: Annual site environmental report, Lewiston, New York, Calendar Year 1988: Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-04-01

    The monitoring program at the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) measures radon concentrations in air; external gamma radiation levels; and uranium and radium concentrations in surface water, groundwater, and sediment. To verify that the site is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard and to assess its potential effect on public health, the radiation dose was calculated for a hypothetical maximally exposed individual. Based on the conservative scenario described in this report, this hypothetical individual receives an annual external exposure approximately equivalent to 6 percent of the DOE radiation protection standard of 100 mrem/yr. This exposure is less than a person receives during two round-trip flights from New York to Los Angeles (because of the greater amounts of cosmic radiation at higher altitudes). The cumulative dose to the population within an 80-km (50-mi) radius of the NFSS that results from radioactive materials present at the site is indistinguishable from the dose that the same population receives from naturally occurring radioactive sources. Results of the 1988 monitoring show that the NFSS is in compliance with applicable DOE radiation protection standards. 17 refs., 31 figs., 20 tabs

  8. Radiological protection guidelines for the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program and Remote Surplus Facilities Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, T.L.

    1984-01-01

    The need for a definitive basis for radiological guidelines and criteria for FUSRAP became apparent by 1981 and led ORO to sponsor a joint ANL/BNI/LANL/ORO effort under the chairmanship of Wayne Hansen (LANL) that resulted in a final FUSRAP radiological guidelines document in March 1983. A separate effort to develop guidelines for remedial action criteria for SFMP was in progress at PNL. The need to coordinate both efforts with impending revisions of DOE Radiological Protection Standards and impending new developments in EPA and NRC Radiological Protection Standards led to convening of the first DOE Workshop on Remedial Action Criteria in Gaithersburg, Maryland, in February 1984, followed by a second workshop in June 1984 at ANL. The major decisions were to base the criteria on dosimetry models and basic limits currently recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection, to emphasize the development and use of site-specific rather than generic guidelines and criteria for residual radionuclide concentrations in the ground, and to prepare a manual to accompany the guidelines that would present procedures and tables for deriving site-specific soil guidelines and criteria for the remedial action programs. A joint ANL/LANL/ORNL/PNL effort to prepare a definitive set of guidelines and a manual has been initiated. The scope, status, and current plans for this effort, and some of the key issues, are presented. 10 references, 1 table

  9. Federal facilities compliance act waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowers, J.; Gates-Anderson, D.; Hollister, R.; Painter, S.

    1999-01-01

    Site Treatment Plans (STPs) developed through the Federal Facilities Compliance Act pose many technical and administrative challenges. Legacy wastes managed under these plans require Land Disposal Restriction (LDR) compliance through treatment and ultimate disposal. Although capacity has been defined for most of the Department of Energy wastes, many waste streams require further characterization and many need additional treatment and handling beyond LDR criteria to be able to dispose of the waste. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the Hazardous Waste Management Division has developed a comprehensive Legacy Waste Program. The program directs work to manage low level and mixed wastes to ensure compliance with nuclear facility rules and its STP. This paper provides a survey of work conducted on these wastes at LLNL. They include commercial waste treatment and disposal, diverse forms of characterization, inventory maintenance and reporting, on-site treatment, and treatability studies. These activities are conducted in an integrated fashion to meet schedules defined in the STP. The processes managing wastes are dynamic due to required integration of administrative, regulatory, and technical concerns spanning the gamut to insure safe proper disposal

  10. 40 CFR 160.31 - Testing facility management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Testing facility management. 160.31... GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Organization and Personnel § 160.31 Testing facility management. For each study, testing facility management shall: (a) Designate a study director as described in § 160.33...

  11. Radioactive waste management from nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-06-01

    This report has been published as a NSA (Nuclear Systems Association, Japan) commentary series, No. 13, and documents the present status on management of radioactive wastes produced from nuclear facilities in Japan and other countries as well. Risks for radiation accidents coming from radioactive waste disposal and storage together with risks for reactor accidents from nuclear power plants are now causing public anxiety. This commentary concerns among all high-level radioactive waste management from nuclear fuel cycle facilities, with including radioactive wastes from research institutes or hospitals. Also included is wastes produced from reactor decommissioning. For low-level radioactive wastes, the wastes is reduced in volume, solidified, and removed to the sites of storage depending on their radioactivities. For high-level radioactive wastes, some ten thousand years must be necessary before the radioactivity decays to the natural level and protection against seismic or volcanic activities, and terrorist attacks is unavoidable for final disposals. This inevitably results in underground disposal at least 300 m below the ground. Various proposals for the disposal and management for this and their evaluation techniques are described in the present document. (S. Ohno)

  12. National Ignition Facility Site Management Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, V.

    1997-09-01

    The purpose of the NIF Site Management Plan is to describe the roles, responsibilities, and interfaces for the major NIF Project organizations involved in construction of the facility, installation and acceptance testing of special equipment, and the NIF activation. The plan also describes the resolution of priorities and conflicts. The period covered is from Critical Decision 3 (CD3) through the completion of the Project. The plan is to be applied in a stepped manner. The steps are dependent on different elements of the project being passed from the Conventional Facilities (CF) Construction Manager (CM), to the Special Equipment (SE) CMs, and finally to the Activation/ Start-Up (AS) CM. These steps are defined as follows: The site will be coordinated by CF through Project Milestone 310, end of conventional construction. The site is defined as the fenced area surrounding the facility and the CF laydown and storage areas. The building utilities that are installed by CF will be coordinated by CF through the completion of Project Milestone 310, end of conventional construction. The building utilities are defined as electricity, compressed air, de-ionized water, etc. Upon completion of the CF work, the Optics Assembly Building/Laser and Target Area Building (OAB/LTAB) will be fully operational. At that time, an Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program building coordinator will become responsible for utilities and site activities. * Step 1. Mid-commissioning (temperature stable, +1{degree}C) of an area (e.g., Laser Bay 2, OAB) will precipitate the turnover of that area (within the four walls) from CF to SE. * Step 2. Interior to the turned-over space, SE will manage all interactions, including those necessary by CF. * Step 3. As the SE acceptance testing procedures (ATPS) are completed, AS will take over the management of the area and coordinate all interactions necessary by CF and SE. For each step, the corresponding CMs for CF, SE, or AS will be placed in charge of

  13. National Ignition Facility Site Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, V.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of the NIF Site Management Plan is to describe the roles, responsibilities, and interfaces for the major NIF Project organizations involved in construction of the facility, installation and acceptance testing of special equipment, and the NIF activation. The plan also describes the resolution of priorities and conflicts. The period covered is from Critical Decision 3 (CD3) through the completion of the Project. The plan is to be applied in a stepped manner. The steps are dependent on different elements of the project being passed from the Conventional Facilities (CF) Construction Manager (CM), to the Special Equipment (SE) CMs, and finally to the Activation/ Start-Up (AS) CM. These steps are defined as follows: The site will be coordinated by CF through Project Milestone 310, end of conventional construction. The site is defined as the fenced area surrounding the facility and the CF laydown and storage areas. The building utilities that are installed by CF will be coordinated by CF through the completion of Project Milestone 310, end of conventional construction. The building utilities are defined as electricity, compressed air, de-ionized water, etc. Upon completion of the CF work, the Optics Assembly Building/Laser and Target Area Building (OAB/LTAB) will be fully operational. At that time, an Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program building coordinator will become responsible for utilities and site activities. * Step 1. Mid-commissioning (temperature stable, +1 degree C) of an area (e.g., Laser Bay 2, OAB) will precipitate the turnover of that area (within the four walls) from CF to SE. * Step 2. Interior to the turned-over space, SE will manage all interactions, including those necessary by CF. * Step 3. As the SE acceptance testing procedures (ATPS) are completed, AS will take over the management of the area and coordinate all interactions necessary by CF and SE. For each step, the corresponding CMs for CF, SE, or AS will be placed in charge of

  14. Facilities Management research in the Nordic Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Anker

    2011-01-01

    to the establishment of the Centre for Facilities Management – Realdania Research (CFM), and updated information from keynote contributions to CFM’s Nordic FM Conference on 22-23 August 2011 by Suvi Nenonen (Finland), Jan Bröchner (Sweden), Geir K Hansen (Norway) and Per Anker Jensen (Denmark).......This article provides a brief overview of the short history of FM research in Denmark, Norway, Sweden and Finland, and presents current research topics and trends in these countries. It is based on information originally collected as part of the planning for the Danish research programme that led...

  15. Fast flux test facility noise data management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thie, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    An extensive collection of spectra from an automated data collection system at the Fast Flux Facility has features from neutron data extracted and managed by database software. Inquiry techniques, including screening, applied to database results show the influences of control rods on wideband noise and, more generally, abilities to detect diverse types of off-normal noise. Uncovering a temporary 0.1-Hz resonance shift gave additional diagnostic information on a 13-Hz mechanical motion characterized by the interference of two resonances. The latter phenomenon is discussed generically for possible application to other reactor types. (author)

  16. Surplus? What surplus? Did the pension funds second amendment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Pension Funds Second Amendment Act, 2001 required funds to provide statutory minimum benefits for exiting members and pensioners. Any surplus arising at the statutory valuation following the promulgation of this Act was to be distributed—initially to former members and pensioners to top up their benefits to the ...

  17. The facilities management market in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Anker

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To present the results of market surveys in Denmark, which have been based on and used to test a proposal for a new European standard for a taxonomy of Facilities Management (FM). Design/methodology: The market research included surveys of both the client side and the provider side...... and was carried out by a management consultant company by telephone interviews based on definitions developed from drafts for the European FM taxonomy standard by a university researcher, who is a member of the standardisation work group. Findings: The proposed taxonomy for FM is in general a good basis...... for researching the market but particular the definition of space including acquisition as well as development, administration, operation, maintenance and utilities in the same main product is problematic. Research limitations/implications: The market research is limited to the Danish market, but the results...

  18. The notion of strategy in facility management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holzweber, Markus

    2013-01-01

    and components of strategy in Facility Management (FM). Since strategy refers to a complex network of thoughts, insights, experiences, expertise, and expectations that provide general guidance for management action, organizations must keep pace with the changing environment to increase market shares and business...... success. Based on a literature review, the findings of the study report a service-strategy classification grid. Such a service-strategy grid provides for a better understanding of the business environment. The study findings are intended to enhance business managers’ understandings of the issues behind FM......Strategy implementation is critical for any type of organization. Strategy implementation is complex despite previous research describing mechanisms related to the construction of strategy and strategy use of organizations. In this article I attempt to fill this vacuity by examining strategy...

  19. Managing facilities in a Scandinavian manner:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elle, Morten; Engelmark, Jesper; Jørgensen, Bo

    2004-01-01

    Presents the aims and needs of research in facilities management (FM) at the section of Planning and Management of Building Processes at BYG*DTU. As the building stock in Denmark is rapidly increasing, socio-demographic developments implies profound changes in both the needs of inhabitants...... and the way that buildings are used, combined with an increased consciouness of sustainability. Buildings should be seen as long-term 'investments' while also keeping in mind the construction sector's needs for increased productivity, long-term product quality and enhanced value. This is the background...... for developing a research position. Identifies the Scandinavian Way as using FM on a multiactor level, rather than just to serve the interests of a single organisation. The aim is to focus on small and medium sized enterprises, non-profit associations and tenants, as well as the bodies administrating...

  20. Trends in Facility Management Technology: The Emergence of the Internet, GIS, and Facility Assessment Decision Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teicholz, Eric

    1997-01-01

    Reports research on trends in computer-aided facilities management using the Internet and geographic information system (GIS) technology for space utilization research. Proposes that facility assessment software holds promise for supporting facility management decision making, and outlines four areas for its use: inventory; evaluation; reporting;…

  1. Value Adding Management: A New Facilities Management Concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Anker; Katchamart, Akarapong

    2011-01-01

    theories on added value of FM and real estate and the related concept of Value Management from building projects. The study is related to the EuroFM research group on The Added Value of FM. Design/methodology/approach: The study outlines a preliminary theoretical based management concept, which...... the relevance of the basic concept and provides an important example of how Value Adding Management can be implemented and added value measured. Originality/value: The study develops a concept of Value Adding Management, which is new in FM literature. It is expected to increase the awareness of the impacts...... and strategic importance of FM for organisations and can be a practical tool for facilities managers in implementing value adding strategies and practices....

  2. Consumer surplus and CES demand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Raa, Thijs

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the consumer surplus formula for constant elasticity of substitution (CES) demands. The formula is used to compare the monopoly and optimum provisions of product variety. It is shown that a monopolist under-provides variety. This result is contrasted with Lambertini’s analysis

  3. Surplus yeast tank failing catastrophically

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedlund, Frank Huess

    2016-01-01

    GOOD REASON FOR CAUTION I A large surplus yeast tank shot into the air leaving the floor plate and the contents behind. Although not designed for overpressure, the tank was kept at “very slight overpressure” to suppress nuisance foaming. The brewery was unaware of the hazards of compressed air...

  4. ATF [Advanced Toroidal Facility] data management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kannan, K.L.; Baylor, L.R.

    1988-01-01

    Data management for the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF), a stellarator located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), is provided by DMG, a locally developed, VAX-based software system. DMG is a data storage and retrieval software system that provides the user interface to ATF raw and analyzed data. Data are described in terms of data models and data types and are organized as signals into files, which are internally documented. The system was designed with user accessibility, software maintainability, and extensibility as primary goals. Extensibility features include compatibility with ATF as it moves from pulsed to steady-state operation and capability for use of the DMG system with experiments other than ATF. DMG is implemented as a run-time library of routines available as a shareable image. General-purpose and specialized data acquisition and analysis applications have been developed using the DMG system. This paper describes the DMG system and the interfaces to it. 4 refs., 2 figs

  5. Usability: managing facilities for social outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexander, Keith; Blakstad, Siri; Hansen, Geir

    2013-01-01

    The paper argues for the development of usability concepts, methodologies and tools, in considering the effects of the built environment from a user, organisational and community perspective, in order to have a positive influence on social outcomes. Since it was formed over ten years ago, the CIB W......111 on Usability has been exploring concepts, methods and tools, developed in the evaluation of all kinds of consumer products, applied to the built environment. In the most recent phase of this work, conducted over the past three years, an international network of partners has collaborated to focus...... they used to understand, as well as to design and manage the relationship between activities and places. The paper describes and reviews the development of the field of research on usability. It concludes that the action and use of facilities is strongly related to experiences of the users and thus...

  6. Technical Facilities Management, Loan Pool, and Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    My work at JPL for the SURF program began on June 11, 2012 with the Technical Facilities Management group (TFM). As well as TFM, I worked with Loan Pool and Metrology to help them out with various tasks. Unlike a lot of other interns, I did not have a specific project rather many different tasks to be completed over the course of the 10 weeks.The first task to be completed was to sort through old certification reports in 6 different boxes to locate reports that needed to be archived into a digital database. There were no reports within these boxes that needed to be archived but rather were to be shredded. The reports went back to the early 1980's and up to the early 2000's. I was looking for reports dated from 2002 to 2012

  7. Wirtschaftlichkeit von Facility Management - Entwicklungen und Trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redlein, Alexander

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Das vorliegende Paper baut auf den jährlichen Umfragen bzw. Studien des Immobilien und Facility Management (IFM der Technischen Universität Wien (TU Wien und der Dissertation von Susanne Hauk aus dem Jahr 2007 auf. Neben der Darstellung allgemeiner Daten konzentriert sich die Arbeit im Wesentlichen auf folgende Forschungsfragen:  In welchen Bereichen können Einsparungen generiert werden?  In welchen Bereichen können Produktivitätssteigerungen lukriert werden?  Mit welchen Problemen/Kostentreibern sind Facility Manager bzw. FM-Abteilungen konfrontiert?  Welche (statistisch signifikanten Zusammenhänge bestehen zwischen verschiedenen Merkmalen/Variablen? Seit dem Jahr 2005 wurden jährlich FM-Verantwortliche von den 500 größten Unternehmen Österreichs befragt. Im Rahmen der Umfrage sollen wissenschaftlich fundiert die obigen Forschungsfragen geklärt werden. Als Werkzeuge für die Datenerhebung wurden das Telefon und/oder elektronische Wege gewählt. Die Umfrage wurde anhand eines standardisierten Fragebogens mit 36 Fragen zu den verschiedensten FM-Bereichen durchgeführt. Im Rahmen der vorliegenden Arbeit sollen die Ergebnisse der aktuellen Umfrage dargestellt und mit den Ergebnissen der Studien der letzten Jahre verglichen werden. Die vorliegende Arbeit beschäftigt sich vor allem mit jenem Teil der Umfrage, der die oben genannten Forschungsfragen behandelt. Ziel ist dabei, die wichtigsten Parameter und Einflussfaktoren in den Bereichen Einsparungen, Produktivitätssteigerungen und Kostentreiber zu identifizieren und die Entwicklungen und Trends näher darzustellen. Dabei zeigt sich, dass effizientes FM große Potentiale in den Bereichen Einsparungen und Produktivitätssteigerungen lukrieren kann. Auch wenn die Einführung von FM zu Beginn mit Kosten/Problemen verbunden ist, so kann dies durch spätere Einsparungen und Produktivitätssteigerungen kompensiert werden.

  8. A stochastic surplus production model in continuous time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Martin Wæver; Berg, Casper Willestofte

    2017-01-01

    surplus production model in continuous time (SPiCT), which in addition to stock dynamics also models the dynamics of the fisheries. This enables error in the catch process to be reflected in the uncertainty of estimated model parameters and management quantities. Benefits of the continuous-time state......Surplus production modelling has a long history as a method for managing data-limited fish stocks. Recent advancements have cast surplus production models as state-space models that separate random variability of stock dynamics from error in observed indices of biomass. We present a stochastic...... and improve estimation of reference points relative to discrete-time analysis of aggregated annual data. Finally, subannual data from five North Sea stocks are analysed with particular focus on using residual analysis to diagnose model insufficiencies and identify necessary model extensions such as robust...

  9. Effective Utilization Management in a Military Treatment Facility

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Belisle, Daniel

    1999-01-01

    Healthcare systems and facilities across the country have used utilization management as a response to the pressures of declining revenue, increasingly competitive markets, and escalating operating expenses...

  10. The SWAP SHOP: A surplus materials exchange network at DOE's Oak Ridge Reservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, L.H.; Birch-Kennedy, S.

    1993-01-01

    The diversity and continually changing nature of the research and production programs at the ORR plant sites, as well as the size of the facilities and their physical separation on the ORR, lead to the buildup of surplus equipment and materials from canceled or completed projects, changes in work orders or directives, or over-procurement of particular items or materials. Many times, for lack of a means to find legitimate uses for these excess items, they have been disposed of as wastes or sold as salvage. Recognizing that this situation prevails at most, if not all, government facilities, Congress has enacted legislation encouraging the establishment of waste minimization, pollution prevention, and cost avoidance measures throughout government-owned facilities. In response to this, the Secretary of Energy has instituted a high-priority DOE initiative to develop, promote, and implement waste minimization and pollution prevention at government installations. One result of the increased awareness and emphasis on environmental concerns and improved resource management is the recent grassroots development of a surplus materials exchange network developed and operated on a voluntary basis by Environmental Protection Officers (EPOs) at the Oak Ridge installations. The EPOs are full-time or part-time staff members employed by each division to provide guidance and assistance for achieving compliance with all environmental regulatory requirements and to resolve waste disposal problems. The materials exchange network, called the SWAP SHOP, provides an EPO communications and problem-solving network to help eliminate unnecessary disposal of usable surplus chemicals and equipment at the Oak Ridge plant sites

  11. Disposition of surplus fissile materials via immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, L.W.; Kan, T.; Sutcliffe, W.G.; McKibben, J.M.; Danker, W.

    1995-01-01

    In the Cold War aftermath, the US and Russia have agreed to large reductions in nuclear weapons. To aid in the selection of long-term management options, the USDOE has undertaken a multifaceted study to select options for storage and disposition of surplus plutonium (Pu). One disposition alternative being considered is immobilization. Immobilization is a process in which surplus Pu would be embedded in a suitable material to produce an appropriate form for ultimate disposal. To arrive at an appropriate form, we first reviewed published information on HLW immobilization technologies to identify forms to be prescreened. Surviving forms were screened using multi-attribute utility analysis to determine promising technologies for Pu immobilization. We further evaluated the most promising immobilization families to identify and seek solutions for chemical, chemical engineering, environmental, safety, and health problems; these problems remain to be solved before we can make technical decisions about the viability of using the forms for long-term disposition of Pu. All data, analyses, and reports are being provided to the DOE Office of Fissile Materials Disposition to support the Record of Decision that is anticipated in Summer of 1996

  12. Insect pest management decisions in food processing facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pest management decision making in food processing facilities such as flour mills, rice mills, human and pet food manufacturing facilities, distribution centers and warehouses, and retail stores is a challenging undertaking. Insect pest management programs require an understanding of the food facili...

  13. A Study on Governance for Cooperative Road Facilities Management

    OpenAIRE

    OHNO, Sachiko; TAKAGI, Akiyoshi; KURAUCHI, Fumitaka; DEMURA, Yoshifumi

    2012-01-01

    In Japan, much of road facilities have been built during 60s and 70s and the major maintenance should be carried out for these facilities in the near future. For this, Asset Management System is becoming very important nowadays. However, not many municipalities have implemented the Asset Management system because of the budget and human resource constraints. In order to keep important road facilities with the adequate maintenance level, it is impossible for local municipalities to maintain al...

  14. Management of Decommissioning on a Multi-Facility Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laraia, Michele; McIntyre, Peter; Visagie, Abrie

    2008-01-01

    The management of the decommissioning of multi-facility sites may be inadequate or inappropriate if based on approaches and strategies developed for sites consisting of only a single facility. The varied nature of activities undertaken, their interfaces and their interdependencies are likely to complicate the management of decommissioning. These issues can be exacerbated where some facilities are entering the decommissioning phase while others are still operational or even new facilities are being built. Multi-facility sites are not uncommon worldwide but perhaps insufficient attention has been paid to optimizing the overall site decommissioning in the context of the entire life cycle of facilities. Decommissioning management arrangements need to be established taking a view across the whole site. A site-wide decommissioning management system is required. This should include a project evaluation and approval process and specific arrangements to manage identified interfaces and interdependencies. A group should be created to manage decommissioning across the site, ensuring adequate and consistent practices in accordance with the management system. Decommissioning management should be aimed at the entire life cycle of facilities. In the case of multi facility sites, the process becomes more complex and decommissioning management arrangements need to be established with a view to the whole site. A site decommissioning management system, a group that is responsible for decommissioning on site, a site project evaluation and approval process and specific arrangements to manage the identified interfaces are key areas of a site decommissioning management structure that need to be addressed to ensure adequate and consistent decommissioning practices. A decommissioning strategy based on single facilities in a sequential manner is deemed inadequate

  15. Innovation in Services and Stakeholder Interactions: Cases from Facilities Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nardelli, Giulia

    organisations and their stakeholders navigate and manage such unfolding to reach successful outcomes. Grounded in the literature and theories on innovation in services, this dissertation adopts a qualitative approach and emphasises the empirical context of facilities management services. Facilities management...... to maximise the potential of interactions. Moreover, service organisations should evaluate how each set of stakeholders should be involved in different types of innovation processes, and manage interactions through change and expectation management........ Within the service context, specifically, empirical evidence and existing research suggest that interactions between stakeholders are an important element of innovation processes. Therefore, when managing and studying innovation in the service context, interactions between stakeholders should be taken...

  16. ESCO as Innovative Facilities Management in Danish Municipalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper Ole; Oesten, Pimmie; Balslev Nielsen, Susanne

     Purpose:  Increasing energy efficiency of existing buildings is high on the Facility Management (FM) agenda, therefore building owners and FM Managers need insight into a variety of organizational possibilities for energy renovation projects. This paper explores how ESCO can foster innovative....... It is the first publication from the project "Energy Service Concepts" carried out at the Danish Centre for Facilities Management (www.cfm.dtu.dk). Results have not been published before....

  17. Facilities Management and Value Adding - The LEGO case

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Anker; Katchamart, Akarapong

    on a case study of LEGO. Results: The study shows that the management model for FM creates a relevant starting point but also that stakeholder and relationship management is an essential aspect of Value Adding Management. The case study confirms the relevance of the basic concept and provides an important......Purpose: To investigate how Facilities Management (FM) can add value and develop a management concept that can assist facilities managers in implementing value adding strategies and practices. Background: Earlier research has shown an increased focus on added value of FM and a FM Value Map has been...... developed to analyse and demonstrate the different ways FM can add value. However, there is a need to develop management tools that can be used more directly and proactively by facilities managers to implement adding value strategies and practices. Approach: The development of the concept is based...

  18. Surplus plutonium disposition draft environmental impact statement. Volume 1, Part A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-07-01

    On May 22, 1997, DOE published a Notice of Intent (NOI) in the Federal Register (62 Federal Register 28009) announcing its decision to prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) that would tier from the analysis and decisions reached in connection with the Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials Final Programmatic EIS (Storage and Disposition PEIS). DOE's disposition strategy allows for both the immobilization of surplus plutonium and its use as mixed oxide (MOX) fuel in existing domestic, commercial reactors. The disposition of surplus plutonium would also involve disposal of the immobilized plutonium and MOX fuel (as spent nuclear fuel) in a geologic repository. The Surplus Plutonium Disposition Environmental Impact Statement analyzes alternatives that would use the immobilization approach (for some of the surplus plutonium) and the MOX fuel approach (for some of the surplus plutonium); alternatives that would immobilize all of the surplus plutonium; and the No Action Alternative. The alternatives include three disposition facilities that would be designed so that they could collectively accomplish disposition of up to 50 metric tons (55 tons) of surplus plutonium over their operating lives: (1) the pit disassembly and conversion facility would disassemble pits (a weapons component) and convert the recovered plutonium, as well as plutonium metal from other sources, into plutonium dioxide suitable for disposition; (2) the immobilization facility would include a collocated capability for converting nonpit plutonium materials into plutonium dioxide suitable for immobilization and would be located at either Hanford or SRS. DOE has identified SRS as the preferred site for an immobilization facility; (3) the MOX fuel fabrication facility would fabricate plutonium dioxide into MOX fuel. This volume includes background information; purpose of and need for the proposed action; alternatives for disposition of surplus weapons useable plutonium; and

  19. State Wildlife Management Area Public Facilities - points

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This point theme contains facilities and features for WMAs that are best represented as points. WMAs are part of the Minnesota state recreation system created to...

  20. State Wildlife Management Area Public Facilities - lines

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This line theme contains facilities and features for WMAs that are best represented as lines. WMAs are part of the Minnesota state recreation system created to...

  1. Sectoral innovation system foresight in practice: Nordic facilities management foresight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Per Dannemand; Dahl Andersen, Allan; Jensen, Per Anker

    2014-01-01

    . The paper originates in a foresight project in the Nordic facilities management sector. The goal of the foresight project was to identify the possible futures of the facilities management sector in the Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden) and, based on the findings, to establish...... a proposal for a common Nordic facilities management research agenda. The paper finds that three elements of the innovation system literature are of particular interest for the practice of foresight: innovation systems and context dependency, learning and user-producer interactions, and the role of knowledge...

  2. Study on archive management for nuclear facility decommissioning projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Ling; Gong Jing; Luo Ning; Liao Bing; Zhou Hao

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces the main features and status of the archive management for nuclear facility decommissioning projects, and explores and discusses the countermeasures in its archive management. Taking the practice of the archive management system of a reactor decommissioning project as an example, the paper illustrates the establishment of archive management system for the nuclear facility decommissioning projects. The results show that the development of a systematic archive management principle and system for nuclear decommissioning projects and the construction of project archives for the whole process from the design to the decommissioning by digitalized archive management system are one effective route to improve the complete, accurate and systematic archiving of project documents, to promote the standardization and effectiveness of the archive management and to ensure the traceability of the nuclear facility decommissioning projects. (authors)

  3. Operational performance management of priced facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    The Texas Department of Transportation and its agency partners have implemented various forms of lane management and pricing over the past three decades, including HOV lanes, managed lanes, and toll roads. As more of these complex transportation faci...

  4. Institutional management of core facilities during challenging financial times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, Rand

    2011-12-01

    The economic downturn is likely to have lasting effects on institutions of higher education, prioritizing proactive institutional leadership and planning. Although by design, core research facilities are more efficient and effective than supporting individual pieces of research equipment, cores can have significant underlying financial requirements and challenges. This paper explores several possible institutional approaches to managing core facilities during challenging financial times.

  5. Information security management system planning for CBRN facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenaeu, Joseph D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); O' Neil, Lori Ross [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Leitch, Rosalyn M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Glantz, Clifford S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Landine, Guy P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bryant, Janet L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lewis, John [National Nuclear Lab., Workington (United Kingdom); Mathers, Gemma [National Nuclear Lab., Workington (United Kingdom); Rodger, Robert [National Nuclear Lab., Workington (United Kingdom); Johnson, Christopher [National Nuclear Lab., Workington (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-01

    The focus of this document is to provide guidance for the development of information security management system planning documents at chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear (CBRN) facilities. It describes a risk-based approach for planning information security programs based on the sensitivity of the data developed, processed, communicated, and stored on facility information systems.

  6. Innovation Insights in the Danish Facility Management Sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scupola, Ada

    Purpose: This paper investigates innovation in the Danish facilities management sector and addresses the following research question: “Do Danish FM organizations innovate and if so what are the major types of innovations in the Danish FM sector?” Background: In the last three decades, Facilities ...

  7. The added value of Facility management in the educational environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, H.B.; Mobach, M.; Omta, S.W.F.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to define the added value of facility management (FM) in general and to develop a typology of facility services based on their added value in the educational environment. Design/methodology/approach – This paper is based on a literature review and first

  8. Facilities Management via Computer: Information at Your Fingertips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensey, Susan

    1996-01-01

    Computer-aided facilities management is a software program consisting of a relational database of facility information--such as occupancy, usage, student counts, etc.--attached to or merged with computerized floor plans. This program can integrate data with drawings, thereby allowing the development of "what if" scenarios. (MLF)

  9. Grout Treatment Facility Land Disposal Restriction Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendrickson, D.W.

    1991-01-01

    This document establishes management plans directed to result in the land disposal of grouted wastes at the Hanford Grout Facilities in compliance with Federal, State of Washington, and Department of Energy land disposal restrictions. 9 refs., 1 fig

  10. Drainage facility management system : final report, June 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    This research project identified requirements for a drainage facility management system for the Oregon Department of Transportation. It also estimated the personnel resources needed to collect the inventory to populate such a system with data. A tota...

  11. Effective and Innovative Practices for Stronger Facilities Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banick, Sarah

    2002-01-01

    Describes the five winners of the APPA's Effective & Innovative Practices Award. These facilities management programs and processes were recognized for enhancing service delivery, lowering costs, increasing productivity, improving customer service, generating revenue, or otherwise benefiting the educational institution. (EV)

  12. Executive Management Requirements Analysis for the Integrated Facilities System

    Science.gov (United States)

    facilities management information at the Chief of Staff, Secretariat, and Office of the Secretary of Defense levels were identified and a selection was made of those that are recommended for inclusion in the IFS data base.

  13. Army Facilities Management: A New Strategy for a New Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    the private sector and the DoD. Army’s regulations and guidance governing facilities management are not in harmony with the DoD’s general policy of decentralizing as much responsibility and authority as possible.

  14. Planning and Managing School Facilities for Agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staller, Bernie

    1976-01-01

    The Agribusiness Department at Janesville Parker Senior High in Wisconsin involves 360 students and three instructors in three different buildings. Facilities were provided through a variety of methods with major emphasis on utilizing the urban setting. Future Farmers of America students operate projects in orchards, greenhouse, gardens, and…

  15. [Managing the cold chain in healthcare facilities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, Mathilde; Breton Marchand, Justine; Pons, David

    2017-11-01

    The storage of temperature-sensitive healthcare products requires control of the cold chain. Healthcare facilities must have the appropriate equipment at their disposal and ensure the traceability and monitoring of temperatures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Analyse des Nutzens des Facility Managements bzw. einer Facility Management Abteilung am Beispiel Österreich

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redlein, Alexander

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Facility Management (FM stellt eine wichtige Managementstrategie für Unternehmen dar. Das die Einführung von FM Nutzenpotenziale eröffnen kann, ist weitestgehend unumstritten. Eine besondere Herausforderung stellt es allerdings dar, den Nutzen von FM greifbar bzw. messbar zu machen. Empirische Erhebungen weisen darauf hin, dass durch den Einsatz von FM-Instrumenten z.B. Einsparungseffekte bei Flächen, Kosten und Zeiten sowie Zeiteffekte durch die Bündelung von Aufgaben und Vermeidung von Datenredundanzen möglich und realistisch sind. Ein quantifizierbarer Nutzennachweis durch den Einsatz von FM wird allerdings nur in wenigen Fällen publiziert und die zumeist dargestellten Pauschalangaben sind kritisch zu hinterfragen. Aus diesem Grund beschäftigt sich die FM-Forschung mit der Erarbeitung von Modellen, um den Nutzen von FM deutlicher herauszuarbeiten. Das Immobilien und Facility Management (IFM der Technischen Universität Wien (TU Wien führt seit 2005 jährlich Studien zu Darstellung der Wirtschaftlichkeit von FM durch. Wichtige Ergebnisse konnten aufgrund der bisher durchgeführten Studien und Analysen bereits abgeleitet werden. So kam etwa die Studie von Susanne Hauk aus dem Jahr 2006 zu dem Schluss, „…dass FM trotz hoher Einführungskosten wesentlich zu einer wirtschaftlicheren und effizienteren Verwaltung von Immobilien beitragen kann“. Dies konnte auch entsprechend empirisch hinterlegt werden. Im Rahmen der vorliegenden Abhandlung soll nun, nach einer kurzen Darstellung der aktuellen Studie, der Schwerpunkt auf der statistischen Analyse und der Erarbeitung statistischer Modelle, zur Darstellung des Nutzens von FM bzw. einer FM-Abteilung liegen. Dabei sollen die wichtigsten Parameter und Einflussfaktoren, die diesen Nutzen beeinflussen, identifiziert werden.

  17. Assessment of facilities management process capability: a NHS facilities case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaratunga, Dilanthi; Haigh, Richard; Sarshar, Marjan; Baldry, David

    2002-01-01

    Describes a process to assess facilities management (FM) process capabilities: the structured process improvement for construction environments--facilities management (SPICE FM) approach. The SPICE FM framework is a method that FM organizations can use to monitor continuously and subsequently improve their performance. The SPICE FM framework is being tested in a series of case studies to ensure that its outputs are appropriate to the FM sector and of value in the real world. Documents the outcomes of a study undertaken at a facilities directorate of a healthcare NHS trust, in searching its applicability within the NHS. Further describes the study methodology and the key activities undertaken and reviews the key communication and management processes that are in place to support the implementation of the strategic FM objectives within the specific NHS facilities directorate.

  18. Innovation characteristics and intention to adopt sustainable facilities management practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, So Young; Kang, Mihyun

    2013-01-01

    Sustainable facilities management (SFM) is important because typical buildings consume more resources and energy than necessary, negatively impact the environment and generate lots of waste (US Department of Energy, 2003, Green Buildings). This study examined innovation characteristics that relate to facility managers' intention to adopt SFM practices. Based on the diffusion of innovations theory (Rogers 1962, 1995, Diffusion of Innovations. 4th ed. New York: The Free Press), an SFM innovation and adoption model was proposed. A survey was conducted with a convenience sample of 240 public facilities managers in 25 facilities management divisions in Seoul, Korea, and its metropolitan areas. Structural equation modelling was employed to analyse the data. The results showed that economic advantage and human comfort aspects are predictors for the intention of SFM adoption. Observability is positively relevant to the intention of SFM adoption. Complexity, however, is not a significant predictor for the intention of SFM adoption. Practical implications for sustainable products and systems and the built environment are suggested. To incorporate an innovation like sustainable practices, it is required to meet the needs of potential adopters. Innovation characteristics that influence facility managers' intention to adopt sustainable facilities management were examined. A survey was conducted. Economic advantage, human comfort and observability are predictors for the intention of adoption of sustainable practice.

  19. Two ways to handle a pension plan surplus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beautyman, M J

    1991-01-01

    A healthcare organization wanting to tap into its pension plan surplus may be reluctant to do so for fear of Medicare recapture. By following a recent court decision and a reasonable interpretation of Medicare regulations, however, a facility may terminate an existing pension plan, purchase a group annuity contract, and reduce Medicare recapture. Two methods for treating termination of a plan are in line with Medicare rules. A facility considering termination should analyze the effects of both and use the method likely to produce a better financial result.

  20. A review of sustainable facilities management knowledge and practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baaki Timothy Kurannen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sustainability is seen as a far-reaching issue now, and one which the facilities management [FM] profession cannot overlook. This paper explores current sustainable facilities management [SFM] knowledge and practice with specific focus on performance as part of a research focus toward proposing a sustainable FM performance management framework for sustainable healthcare waste management in Malaysia. This paper utilized a review of extant literature on the subject of SFM, FM performance and FM development in Malaysia as source of information. Findings reflect the increasing recognition of the need for the strategic FM function, and how facilities managers are best positioned to drive organizations’ sustainability agendas. In Malaysian context, this recognition is barely evident as findings show FM practice is still immature and predominantly operational. Unlike developed FM markets, FM relevance in Malaysia is being driven by the public sector. Also findings show a disharmony between organizations’ sustainability priority areas and the responsibilities for facilities managers to execute them where the sustainability policy of organizations prioritize one FM service and the facilities managers’ responsibilities prioritize another. As most of SFM implementation is driven by legislation this seems to strengthen the position that, organizations continue to view support services as non-value-adding, as unavoidable liabilities. The implication of this is the pressure on the FM function to continually express its strategic relevance to organizations by tangible value-adding performance output. This creates a new perspective to measuring and managing facilities performance. This paper therefore elevates the importance of FM performance management in SFM context taking into account the peculiar position of the facilities manager. This is seen as a way forward for FM to better express its value to the organization

  1. Supplement to the Surplus Plutonium Disposition Draft Environmental Impact Statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    On May 22, 1997, DOE published a Notice of Intent in the Federal Register (62 Federal Register 28009) announcing its decision to prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) that would tier from the analysis and decisions reached in connection with the ''Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials Final Programmatic EIS (Storage and Disposition PEIS)''. ''The Surplus Plutonium Disposition Draft Environmental Impact Statement'' (SPD Draft EIS) (DOWEIS-0283-D) was prepared in accordance with NEPA and issued in July 1998. It identified the potential environmental impacts of reasonable alternatives for the proposed siting, construction, and operation of three facilities for plutonium disposition. These three facilities would accomplish pit disassembly and conversion, immobilization, and MOX fuel fabrication. For the alternatives that included MOX fuel fabrication, the draft also described the potential environmental impacts of using from three to eight commercial nuclear reactors to irradiate MOX fuel. The potential impacts were based on a generic reactor analysis that used actual reactor data and a range of potential site conditions. In May 1998, DCE initiated a procurement process to obtain MOX fuel fabrication and reactor irradiation services. The request for proposals defined limited activities that may be performed prior to issuance of the SPD EIS Record of Decision (ROD) including non-site-specific work associated with the development of the initial design for the MOX fuel fabrication facility, and plans (paper studies) for outreach, long lead-time procurements, regulatory management, facility quality assurance, safeguards, security, fuel qualification, and deactivation. No construction on the proposed MOX facility would begin before an SPD EIS ROD is issued. In March 1999, DOE awarded a contract to Duke Engineering and Services; COGEMA, Inc.; and Stone and Webster (known as DCS) to provide the requested services. The procurement process

  2. Supplement to the Surplus Plutonium Disposition Draft Environmental Impact Statement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N/A

    1999-05-14

    On May 22, 1997, DOE published a Notice of Intent in the Federal Register (62 Federal Register 28009) announcing its decision to prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) that would tier from the analysis and decisions reached in connection with the ''Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials Final Programmatic EIS (Storage and Disposition PEIS)''. ''The Surplus Plutonium Disposition Draft Environmental Impact Statement'' (SPD Draft EIS) (DOWEIS-0283-D) was prepared in accordance with NEPA and issued in July 1998. It identified the potential environmental impacts of reasonable alternatives for the proposed siting, construction, and operation of three facilities for plutonium disposition. These three facilities would accomplish pit disassembly and conversion, immobilization, and MOX fuel fabrication. For the alternatives that included MOX fuel fabrication, the draft also described the potential environmental impacts of using from three to eight commercial nuclear reactors to irradiate MOX fuel. The potential impacts were based on a generic reactor analysis that used actual reactor data and a range of potential site conditions. In May 1998, DCE initiated a procurement process to obtain MOX fuel fabrication and reactor irradiation services. The request for proposals defined limited activities that may be performed prior to issuance of the SPD EIS Record of Decision (ROD) including non-site-specific work associated with the development of the initial design for the MOX fuel fabrication facility, and plans (paper studies) for outreach, long lead-time procurements, regulatory management, facility quality assurance, safeguards, security, fuel qualification, and deactivation. No construction on the proposed MOX facility would begin before an SPD EIS ROD is issued. In March 1999, DOE awarded a contract to Duke Engineering & Services; COGEMA, Inc.; and Stone & Webster (known as DCS) to provide the requested

  3. Management system for nuclear facilities and activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyei, Afrifa Yamoah

    2015-02-01

    A management system is set of procedures an organization need to order to meet its objectives. A management system is the framework of processes and procedures used to ensure that an organization can fufil all tasks require to achieve its objectives. A good efficiency of this system ensures proper safety culture in an organization. The aim of this project is to provide guidance for establishing, implementing, assessing and continually improving a management system that integrates safety, health, environmental, security, quality and economic elements, in order to meet the requirements established by the IAEA. Due to the number of nuclear and radiological accidents occurring over years. It is therefore necessary to have proper management systems to manage the situation. The management system shall be applicable to operators of nuclear reactors, activities using sources of ionizing radiation, radioactive waste management, the transport of radioactive material, radiation protection activities and any other practices or circumstances in which people may exposed to radiation from naturally occurring of artificial sources. An intergrated management system shall be employed to intergrate all of the organization's system and processes into one complete framework, to enable the organization to work as a single and with artificial objectives. (au)

  4. Facilities Management: A Manual for Plant Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Teresa Burnau, Ed.

    Major aspects of the management of the physical plant of campuses are considered in 42 chapters. The five major sections cover: personnel services; budgeting and accounting; maintenance management; plant operations; and planning, design, and construction. A conclusion describes proven methods and criteria for self-evaluation of the physical plant.…

  5. Facilities Management Practices in Malaysia: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isa Nordiana Mohd

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Facilities management in Malaysia has been practiced for decades. The development of its formal practice parallels the improvement of the built environment in the nation. Involvement of the public and private sectors teaming up in arranging the National Asset and Facilities Management (NAFAM in demonstrates the vital collaboration in the facilities management area in Malaysia. Facilities management is seen distinctively as indicated by diverse geographical locations, interests and schools of thought. Facilities management is delegated a service-based industry which gives proficient counsel and administration of clients’ building facilities including residential, commercial, industrial, airports terminals and offices. The aim of this paper is to review the gaps that exist, especially on how FM is being practice in comparison with the published FM body of knowledge. Very relying upon literature, this paper discovered a gap that is an unclear description of current FM applications. This research aims to give new bits of knowledge to upgrade comprehension of FM execution in Malaysia.

  6. Surplus plutonium disposition draft environmental impact statement. Volume 1, Part B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-07-01

    On May 22, 1997, DOE published a Notice of Intent (NOI) in the Federal Register (62 Federal Register 28009) announcing its decision to prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) that would tier from the analysis and decisions reached in connection with the Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials Final Programmatic EIS (Storage and Disposition PEIS). DOE's disposition strategy allows for both the immobilization of surplus plutonium and its use as mixed oxide (MOX) fuel in existing domestic, commercial reactors. The disposition of surplus plutonium would also involve disposal of the immobilized plutonium and MOX fuel (as spent nuclear fuel) in a geologic repository. The Surplus Plutonium Disposition Environmental Impact Statement analyzes alternatives that would use the immobilization approach (for some of the surplus plutonium) and the MOX fuel approach (for some of the surplus plutonium); alternatives that would immobilize all of the surplus plutonium; and the No Action Alternative. The alternatives include three disposition facilities that would be designed so that they could collectively accomplish disposition of up to 50 metric tons (55 tons) of surplus plutonium over their operating lives: (1) the pit disassembly and conversion facility would disassemble pits (a weapons component) and convert the recovered plutonium, as well as plutonium metal from other sources, into plutonium dioxide suitable for disposition; (2) the immobilization facility would include a collocated capability for converting nonpit plutonium materials into plutonium dioxide suitable for immobilization and would be located at either Hanford or SRS. DOE has identified SRS as the preferred site for an immobilization facility; (3) the MOX fuel fabrication facility would fabricate plutonium dioxide into MOX fuel. This volume has chapters on environmental consequences; environmental regulations, permits, and consultations; a glossary; list of preparers; distribution list

  7. Management of tritium at nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    This report presents extending summaries of the works of the participants to an IAEA co-ordinated research programme, ''Handling Tritium - bearing effluents and wastes''. The subjects covered include production of tritium in nuclear power plants (mainly heavy water and light water reactors), as well as at reprocessing plants; removal and enrichment of tritium at nuclear facilities; conditioning methods and characteristics of immobilized tritium of low and high concentration; some potential methods of storage and disposal of tritium. In addition to the conclusions of this three-years work, possible activities in the field are recommended

  8. 41 CFR 102-74.15 - What are the facility management responsibilities of occupant agencies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the facility management responsibilities of occupant agencies? 102-74.15 Section 102-74.15 Public Contracts and Property... PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management § 102-74.15 What are the facility management...

  9. Transuranic waste management program and facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clements, T.L. Jr.; Cook, L.A.; Stallman, R.M.; Hunter, E.K.

    1986-01-01

    Since 1954, defense-generated transuranic (TRU) waste has been received at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Prior to 1970, approximately 2.2 million cubic feet of transuranic waste were buried in shallow-land trenches and pits at the RWMC. Since 1970, an additional 2.1 million cubic feet of waste have been retrievably stored in aboveground engineered confinement. A major objective of the Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Waste Management Program is the proper management of defense-generated transuranic waste. Strategies have been developed for managing INEL stored and buried transuranic waste. These strategies have been incorporated in the Defense Waste Management Plan and are currently being implemented with logistical coordination of transportation systems and schedules for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The Stored Waste Examination Pilot Plant (SWEPP) is providing nondestructive examination and assay of retrievably stored, contact-handled TRU waste. Construction of the Process Experimental Pilot Plant (PREPP) was recently completed, and PREPP is currently undergoing system checkout. The PRFPP will provide processing capabilities for contact-handled waste not meeting WIPP-Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). In addition, ongoing studies and technology development efforts for managing the TRU waste such as remote-handled and buried TRU waste, are being conducted

  10. Risk management study for the retired Hanford Site facilities: Qualitative risk evaluation for the retired Hanford Site facilities. Volume 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coles, G.A.; Shultz, M.V.; Taylor, W.E.

    1993-09-01

    This document provides a risk evaluation of the 100 and 200 Area retired, surplus facilities on the Hanford Site. Also included are the related data that were compiled by the risk evaluation team during investigations performed on the facilities. Results are the product of a major effort performed in fiscal year 1993 to produce qualitative information that characterizes certain risks associated with these facilities. The retired facilities investigated for this evaluation are located in the 100 and 200 Areas of the 1,450-km{sup 2} (570-mi{sup 2}) Hanford Site. The Hanford Site is a semiarid tract of land in southeastern Washington State. The nearest population center is Richland, Washington, (population 32,000) 30-km (20 mi) southeast of the 200 Area. During walkdown investigations of these facilities, data on real and potential hazards that threatened human health or safety or created potential environmental release issues were identified by the risk evaluation team. Using these findings, the team categorized the identified hazards by facility and evaluated the risk associated with each hazard. The factors contributing to each risk, and the consequence and likelihood of harm associated with each hazard also are included in this evaluation.

  11. Risk management study for the retired Hanford Site facilities: Qualitative risk evaluation for the retired Hanford Site facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coles, G.A.; Shultz, M.V.; Taylor, W.E.

    1993-09-01

    This document provides a risk evaluation of the 100 and 200 Area retired, surplus facilities on the Hanford Site. Also included are the related data that were compiled by the risk evaluation team during investigations performed on the facilities. Results are the product of a major effort performed in fiscal year 1993 to produce qualitative information that characterizes certain risks associated with these facilities. The retired facilities investigated for this evaluation are located in the 100 and 200 Areas of the 1,450-km 2 (570-mi 2 ) Hanford Site. The Hanford Site is a semiarid tract of land in southeastern Washington State. The nearest population center is Richland, Washington, (population 32,000) 30-km (20 mi) southeast of the 200 Area. During walkdown investigations of these facilities, data on real and potential hazards that threatened human health or safety or created potential environmental release issues were identified by the risk evaluation team. Using these findings, the team categorized the identified hazards by facility and evaluated the risk associated with each hazard. The factors contributing to each risk, and the consequence and likelihood of harm associated with each hazard also are included in this evaluation

  12. Best practices for managing large CryoEM facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alewijnse, Bart; Ashton, Alun W; Chambers, Melissa G; Chen, Songye; Cheng, Anchi; Ebrahim, Mark; Eng, Edward T; Hagen, Wim J H; Koster, Abraham J; López, Claudia S; Lukoyanova, Natalya; Ortega, Joaquin; Renault, Ludovic; Reyntjens, Steve; Rice, William J; Scapin, Giovanna; Schrijver, Raymond; Siebert, Alistair; Stagg, Scott M; Grum-Tokars, Valerie; Wright, Elizabeth R; Wu, Shenping; Yu, Zhiheng; Zhou, Z Hong; Carragher, Bridget; Potter, Clinton S

    2017-09-01

    This paper provides an overview of the discussion and presentations from the Workshop on the Management of Large CryoEM Facilities held at the New York Structural Biology Center, New York, NY on February 6-7, 2017. A major objective of the workshop was to discuss best practices for managing cryoEM facilities. The discussions were largely focused on supporting single-particle methods for cryoEM and topics included: user access, assessing projects, workflow, sample handling, microscopy, data management and processing, and user training. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Surplus from and storage of electricity generated by intermittent sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Friedrich

    2016-12-01

    Data from the German electricity system for the years 2010, 2012, 2013, and 2015 are used and scaled up to a 100% supply by intermittent renewable energy sources (iRES). In the average, 330GW wind and PV power are required to meet this 100% target. A back-up system is necessary with the power of 89% of peak load. Surplus electricity accrues at high power levels. Curtailing surplus power to a large extent is found to be uneconomic. Demand-side management will suffer from the strong day-to-day variation of available surplus energy. A day storage is ineffective because of the day-night correlation of surplus power during winter. A seasonal storage loses its character when transformation losses are considered because it can contribute only after periods with excessive surplus production. The option of an oversized iRES system to feed the storage is also not effective because, in this case, energy can be taken directly from the large iRES supply, making storage superfluous. The capacities to be installed stress the difficulty to base heat supply and mobility also on iRES generated electricity in the future. As the German energy transition replaces one CO2-free electricity supply system by another one, no major reduction in CO2 emission can be expected till 2022, when the last nuclear reactor will be switched off. By 2022, an extremely oversized power supply system has to be created, which can be expected to continue running down spot-market electricity prices. The continuation of the economic response -to replace expensive gas fuel by cheap lignite- causes an overall increase in CO2 emission. The German GHG emission targets for 2020 and beyond are therefore in jeopardy.

  14. Decommissioning of nuclear facilities: Decontamination, disassembly and waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The term 'decommissioning', as used within the nuclear industry, means the actions taken at the end of a facility's useful life to retire the facility from service in a manner that provides adequate protection for the health and safety of the decommissioning workers, the general public, and for the environment. These actions can range from merely closing down the facility and a minimal removal of radioactive material coupled with continuing maintenance and surveillance, to a complete removal of residual radioactivity in excess of levels acceptable for unrestricted use of the facility and its site. This latter condition, unrestricted use, is the ultimate goal of all decommissioning actions at retired nuclear facilities. The purpose of this report is to provide an information base on the considerations important to decommissioning, the methods available for decontamination and disassembly of a nuclear facility, the management of the resulting radioactive wastes, and the areas of decommissioning methodology where improvements might be made. Specific sections are devoted to each of these topics, and conclusions are presented concerning the present status of each topic. A summary of past decommissioning experience in Member States is presented in the Appendix. The report, with its discussions of necessary considerations, available operational methods, and waste management practices, together with supporting references, provides an appreciation of the activities that comprise decommissioning of nuclear facilities. It is anticipated that the information presented in the report should prove useful to persons concerned with the development of plans for the decommissioning of retired nuclear facilities

  15. Facility information management system; Shisetsu joho kanri system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-01-10

    A facility management system (FMS) was developed as a tool for efficiently operating and managing building facilities and related equipment. The maintenance management data is designed to be collected through automatic formation of data base by using a work flow function and releasing the daily business from paper work. The data base thus formed can be retrieved and displayed by utilizing a network system. The plan view for construction facilities is made a minute plan comparable to the ground plan by taking in DXF type drawing data such as a completion drawing, making it a colored display for example to create an intuitive expression understandable at first sight. The plan is controlled by the level including equipment classification and is capable of superimposed display. Detailed management data is displayed by mouse clicking of registered icons, allowing required information to be readily taken out. (translated by NEDO)

  16. Radiation risk management at DOE accelerator facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyck, O.B. van.

    1997-01-01

    The DOE accelerator contractors have been discussing among themselves and with the Department how to improve radiation safety risk management. This activity-how to assure prevention of unplanned high exposures-is separate from normal exposure management, which historically has been quite successful. The ad-hoc Committee on the Accelerator Safety Order and Guidance [CASOG], formed by the Accelerator Section of the HPS, has proposed a risk- based approach, which will be discussed. Concepts involved are risk quantification and comparison (including with non-radiation risk), passive and active (reacting) protection systems, and probabilistic analysis. Different models of risk management will be presented, and the changing regulatory environment will also be discussed

  17. Safe disposal of surplus plutonium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, W. L.; Naz, S.; Lutze, W.; Busch, R.; Prinja, A.; Stoll, W.

    2001-06-01

    About 150 tons of weapons grade and weapons usable plutonium (metal, oxide, and in residues) have been declared surplus in the USA and Russia. Both countries plan to convert the metal and oxide into mixed oxide fuel for nuclear power reactors. Russia has not yet decided what to do with the residues. The US will convert residues into a ceramic, which will then be over-poured with highly radioactive borosilicate glass. The radioactive glass is meant to provide a deterrent to recovery of plutonium, as required by a US standard. Here we show a waste form for plutonium residues, zirconia/boron carbide (ZrO 2/B 4C), with an unprecedented combination of properties: a single, radiation-resistant, and chemically durable phase contains the residues; billion-year-old natural analogs are available; and criticality safety is given under all conceivable disposal conditions. ZrO 2/B 4C can be disposed of directly, without further processing, making it attractive to all countries facing the task of plutonium disposal. The US standard for protection against recovery can be met by disposal of the waste form together with used reactor fuel.

  18. Radiological safety management in medical cyclotron facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senthilkumar, M.; Nagalakshmi, B.; Manisha, V.I.; Pushpangadan, K.D.; Agarwal, S.P.

    2005-01-01

    A new era of Nuclear Medicine diagnosis has started with Medical Cyclotron technology. Medical Cyclotron produces positron emitters, which can be used in molecular imaging of the organs. In Medical Cyclotron, particles such as protons, deuterons are accelerated and made to bombard with suitable target material to produce radioisotopes, which are positron emitters. The positron emitters are produced by the (p,α), (p,n) or (d,n) reaction. The neutron activation of the surrounding medium draws the major attention in radiation safety. The license for such medical cyclotron facilities is issued by Atomic Energy Regulatory Board in India on the basis of regulations drawn from Radiation Protection Rules 1971 promulgated by Govt. of India under Atomic Energy Act, 1962. In this paper, the following aspects i) the steps involved in cyclotron installation ii) Design, Operational specifications and other features of various medical cyclotrons iii) Regulatory requirements for a cyclotron installation have been discussed

  19. Defense Surplus Equipment Disposal, Including the Law Enforcement 1033 Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-05

    Liquidity Services, Inc. a contract to be the primary manager for the receipt, storage, marketing , and disposition of virtually all usable defense surplus...Secretary of the Army’s authority to loan or donate small firearms, determined to be excess, for use during funerals and other ceremonial purposes;29...the Army to loan or donate excess small arms for funeral and other ceremonial purposes. H.R. 4310, Subtitle G., Miscellaneous Authorities and

  20. Time-Management Planning for Educational Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIsaac, Donald N.; And Others

    Three conference papers concerned with systems analysis and time management planning. One paper is concerned with techniques, especially the application of the "critical path method" or PERT (Program Evaluation Review Technique) in planning construction activities. A second paper concerns problems associated with collecting and communicating…

  1. Managing LLRW from decommissioning of nuclear facilities - a Canadian perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donders, R.E.; De, P.L.

    1994-03-01

    In Canada, considerable experience has been gained recently in decommissioning nuclear facilities and managing the resulting waste. This experience has raised important issues from both the decommissioning and waste management perspectives. This paper focuses on the waste management aspects of decommissioning. Past experience is reviewed, preliminary estimates of waste volumes and characteristics are provided, and the major technical and regulatory issues are discussed. (author). 5 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs

  2. The Mixed Waste Management Facility. Preliminary design review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    This document presents information about the Mixed Waste Management Facility. Topics discussed include: cost and schedule baseline for the completion of the project; evaluation of alternative options; transportation of radioactive wastes to the facility; capital risk associated with incineration; radioactive waste processing; scaling of the pilot-scale system; waste streams to be processed; molten salt oxidation; feed preparation; initial operation to demonstrate selected technologies; floorplans; baseline revisions; preliminary design baseline; cost reduction; and project mission and milestones.

  3. The Mixed Waste Management Facility. Preliminary design review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This document presents information about the Mixed Waste Management Facility. Topics discussed include: cost and schedule baseline for the completion of the project; evaluation of alternative options; transportation of radioactive wastes to the facility; capital risk associated with incineration; radioactive waste processing; scaling of the pilot-scale system; waste streams to be processed; molten salt oxidation; feed preparation; initial operation to demonstrate selected technologies; floorplans; baseline revisions; preliminary design baseline; cost reduction; and project mission and milestones

  4. Safety evaluation for regulatory management of Australian radioisotope production facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, S

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the approach of Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) in the regulatory management of Radioisotope Production facilities in Australia. ARPANSA is the regulatory authority for commonwealth entities operating nuclear installations including Radioisotope Production facilities. In assessing the application for operating nuclear installations the ARPANSA assessors prepare a Safety Evaluation Report, which is a recommendation to the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of ARPANSA whether to issue a licence to site, construct, operate and decommission facilities. In particular, the CEO must take into account international best practice in radiation protection and nuclear safety when making licence decisions.

  5. Mixed Waste Management Facility closure at the Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bittner, M.F.

    1991-08-01

    The Mixed Waste Management Facility of the Savannah River Plant received hazardous and solid low level radioactive wastes from 1972 until 1986. Because this facility did not have a permit to receive hazardous wastes, a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure was performed between 1987 and 1990. This closure consisted of dynamic compaction of the waste trenches and placement of a 3-foot clay cap, a 2-foot soil cover, and a vegetative layer. Operations of the waste disposal facility, tests performed to complete the closure design, and the construction of the closure cap are discussed herein

  6. Knowledge management and information tools for building maintenance and facility management

    CERN Document Server

    Talamo, Cinzia

    2015-01-01

    This book describes the latest methods and tools for the management of information within facility management services and explains how it is possible to collect, organize, and use information over the life cycle of a building in order to optimize the integration of these services and improve the efficiency of processes. The coverage includes presentation and analysis of basic concepts, procedures, and international standards in the development and management of real estate inventories, building registries, and information systems for facility management. Models of strategic management are discussed and the functions and roles of the strategic management center, explained.  Detailed attention is also devoted to building information modeling (BIM) for facility management and potential interactions between information systems and BIM applications. Criteria for evaluating information system performance are identified, and guidelines of value in developing technical specifications for facility management service...

  7. Realising the potential of shared space in facilities management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinkø, Rikke

    individuals or groups from different organisational contexts, and this PhD investigates the intricate processes con-cerning shared space in a facilities management context. The overall aim is divided in a theoretical and a practical part, with the theoretical focused on contributing with new knowledge...... of shared space, building towards a new method for efficient and sustainable facilities management operation of buildings and properties. The practical part is focused on connecting this new knowledge to practical applications and developing tools that can be used to work with shared spaces in a practice....... Grounded in literature from a variety of fields stretching from facilities management to urban planning and development, this PhD adopts a qualitative approach to the study of the intricate processes in-volved in working in, and with, shared space. The study employs case studies as the method of choice...

  8. Software application for a total management of a radioactive facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirpuri, E.; Escudero, R.; Macias, M.T.; Perez, J.; Sanchez, A.; Usera, F.

    2008-01-01

    The use of radiological material and/or equipment that generate ionizing radiation is widely extended in biological research. In every laboratory there are a large variety of methods, operations, techniques, equipment, radioisotopes and users related to the work with ionizing radiation. In order to control the radioactive material, users and the whole facility a large number of documents, databases and information is necessary to be created by the manager of the Radioactivity Facility. This kind of information is characterized by a constant and persistent manipulation and includes information of great importance such as the general management of the radioactive material and waste management, exposed workers vigilance, controlled areas access, laboratory and equipment reservations, radiological inspections, etc. These activities are often complicated by the fact that the main manager of the radioactive facility is also in charge of bio-safety and working prevention issues so the documents to generate and manipulate and the procedures to develop are multiplied. A procedure to access and manage all these files is highly recommended in order to optimize the general management of the facility, avoiding loss of information, automating all the activities and allowing data necessary for control easily accessible. In this work we present a software application for a total management of the facility. This software has been developed by the collaboration of six of the most important research centers from Spain in coordination with the company 'Appize soluciones'. This is a flexible and versatile application that adapts to any specific need of every research center, providing the appropriate reports and checklist that speed up to general management and increase the ease of writing the official documents, including the Operations Book. (author)

  9. 41 CFR 102-74.10 - What is the basic facility management policy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... facility management policy? 102-74.10 Section 102-74.10 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT General Provisions § 102-74.10 What is the basic facility management policy? Executive agencies...

  10. Construction Management for Conventional Facilities of Proton Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jun Yeon; Cho, Jang Hyung; Cho, Sung Won

    2013-01-01

    Proton Engineering Frontier Project, puts its aim to building 100MeV 20mA linear proton accelerator which is national facility for NT, BT, IT, and future technologies, expected to boost up the national industry competitiveness. This R and D, Construction Management is in charge of the supportive works such as site selection, architecture and engineering of conventional facilities, and overall construction management. The major goals of this work are as follows: At first, architecture and engineering of conventional facilities. Second, construction management, supervision and inspection on construction of conventional facilities. Lastly, cooperation with the project host organization, Gyeongju city, for adjusting technically interrelated work during construction. In this research, We completed the basic, detail, and field changed design of conventional facilities. Acquisition of necessary construction and atomic license, radiation safety analysis, site improvement, access road construction were successfully done as well. Also, we participated in the project host related work as follows: Project host organization and site selection, construction technical work for project host organization and procedure management, etc. Consequently, we so fulfilled all of the own goals which were set up in the beginning of this construction project that we could made contribution for installing and running PEFP's developed 100MeV 20mA linear accelerator

  11. Masterplan on facilities management project funded by government contribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, H. C.; Lim, I. C.; Ryu, W. S.; Song, K. S.; Jung, U. S.; Yang, S. D.

    2010-07-15

    {Omicron} Nuclear industry export and future challenges such as securing nuclear system is a source of technical support for the smooth promotion of the pending issues related to the nuclear energy Institute for large facilities and equipment you need to build long-term strategic business operations support system. - The emphasis is on strategy, goals, long-term roadmap and action plan, a plan to support the main strategy challenges {Omicron} Support for Industry and studies, and science facilities management of the users (open) is dedicated to industrial and citizen service provide stewardship function replace aging facilities and the introduction of facilities-of-the-art equipment, such as the establishment of the detailed action plans build roadmap needed - Customer satisfaction enhancement and strengthening the planning, monitoring, infrastructure facilities {Omicron} The main business performance evaluation management appeared at the introduction of goal-based management system for global research competitiveness - The main performance analysis and performance goals strategies, performance indicators, such as appropriateness and performance management in place feedback instruments - Domestic and international technology trends, competitive analysis of a foundation to establish.

  12. Masterplan on facilities management project funded by government contribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H. C.; Lim, I. C.; Ryu, W. S.; Song, K. S.; Jung, U. S.; Yang, S. D.

    2010-07-01

    Ο Nuclear industry export and future challenges such as securing nuclear system is a source of technical support for the smooth promotion of the pending issues related to the nuclear energy Institute for large facilities and equipment you need to build long-term strategic business operations support system. - The emphasis is on strategy, goals, long-term roadmap and action plan, a plan to support the main strategy challenges Ο Support for Industry and studies, and science facilities management of the users (open) is dedicated to industrial and citizen service provide stewardship function replace aging facilities and the introduction of facilities-of-the-art equipment, such as the establishment of the detailed action plans build roadmap needed - Customer satisfaction enhancement and strengthening the planning, monitoring, infrastructure facilities Ο The main business performance evaluation management appeared at the introduction of goal-based management system for global research competitiveness - The main performance analysis and performance goals strategies, performance indicators, such as appropriateness and performance management in place feedback instruments - Domestic and international technology trends, competitive analysis of a foundation to establish

  13. Delivering Sustainable Facilities Management in Danish Housing Estates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Susanne Balslev; Jensen, Jesper Ole; Jensen, Per Anker

    2009-01-01

    Housing plays a central role in sustainable development due to large resource consumption and as transition agent towards sustainable lifestyles. The aim is to evaluate current practice of housing administration in Denmark in order to evaluate if and how sustainable facilities management...... is supporting social, economical and environmental sustainable development. Sustainable facility management (SFM) is as an 'umbrella' for various ways of reducing flows of energy, water and waste in the daily operation of the buildings, for instance by regular monitoring the consumption, by using 'green...

  14. Længerevarende samarbejder inden for Facilities Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storgaard, Kresten; Friis, Freja

    Længerevarende strategiske samarbejde er interessant, fordi det anses for en måde at fremme produktivitet og forretning for både kunder og leverandører. I rapportenfremlægges resultaterne fra en caseanalyse blandt leverandører og købere af Facilities Management.......Længerevarende strategiske samarbejde er interessant, fordi det anses for en måde at fremme produktivitet og forretning for både kunder og leverandører. I rapportenfremlægges resultaterne fra en caseanalyse blandt leverandører og købere af Facilities Management....

  15. Facilities Management a new strategy at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Nonis, M; CERN. Geneva. ST Division

    2002-01-01

    Starting from 2002, the management of all the tertiary infrastructure of CERN in charge of ST Division shall be carried out through a single Contractor; this includes both maintenance activities on the buildings and their technical installations, and general services such as security, cleaning, gardening, and waste disposal. At present, all these activities are carried out by external contractors via several different contracts. The major purposes of the unification in one single contract is to transfer the coordination tasks of the contracts thus reducing the direct control operation costs, release internal resources in order to be better focused on the core business of the Division and the reduction of the costs of each activity by taking profit of the synergies among the different services. The authors will thoroughly report on the main aspects related to this new contract, focusing their attention in particular to the result oriented strategy through a Service Level Agreement, the key performance indicato...

  16. Dealing with a dangerous surplus from the cold war

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, L.

    1997-01-01

    The proliferation of nuclear materials is a threat to national security and world peace. This threat complicates the safeguarding and management of fissile materials that have become surplus since the end of the Cold War. The dismantling of weapons and the cessation of new nuclear weapons manufacturing, while positive for world peace, have raised a problem: what to do about the fissile materials recovered from the weapons or in inventories that will remain unused. These materials--primarily plutonium and highly enriched uranium--are environmental, safety, and health concerns. But of more urgency is the threat they pose to national and international security if they fall into the hands of terrorists or rogue nations. As arms reduction continues and amounts of surplus fissile materials increase, the potential for such security breaches will increase

  17. Operational experiences and upgradation of waste management facilities Trombay, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chander, Mahesh; Bodke, S.B.; Bansal, N.K.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Waste Management Facilities Trombay provide services for the safe management of radioactive wastes generated from the operation of non power sources at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, India. The paper describes in detail the current operational experience and facility upgradation by way of revamping of existing processes equipment and systems and augmentation of the facility by way of introducing latest processes and technologies to enhance the safety. Radioactive wastes are generated from the operation of research reactors, fuel fabrication, spent fuel reprocessing, research labs. manufacture of sealed sources and labeled compounds. Use of radiation sources in the field of medical, agriculture and industry also leads to generation of assorted solid waste and spent sealed radiation sources which require proper waste management. Waste Management Facilities Trombay comprise of Effluent Treatment Plant (ETP), Decontamination Centre (DC) and Radioactive Solid Waste Management Site (RSMS). Low level radioactive liquid effluents are received at ETP. Plant has 100 M 3 /day treatment capacity. Decontamination of liquid effluents is effected by chemical treatment method using co- precipitation as a process. Plant has 1800 M 3 of storage capacity. Chemical treatment system comprises of clarifloculator, static mixer and chemical feed tanks. Plant has concentrate management facility where chemical sludge is centrifuged to effect volume reduction of more that 15. Thickened sludge is immobilized in cement matrix. Decontamination Centre caters to the need of equipment decontamination from research reactors. Process used is ultrasonic chemical decontamination. Besides this DC provides services for decontamination of protective wears. Radioactive Solid Waste Management Site is responsible for the safe management of solid waste generated at various research reactors, plants, laboratories in Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. Spent sealed radiation sources are also stored

  18. Organization and management for decommissioning of large nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    For nuclear facilities, decommissioning is the final phase in the life-cycle after siting, design, construction, commissioning and operation. It is a complex process involving operations such as detailed surveys, decontamination and dismantling of plant equipment and facilities, demolition of buildings and structures, and management of resulting waste and other materials, whilst taking into account aspects of health and safety of the operating personnel and the general public, and protection of the environment. Careful planning and management is essential to ensure that decommissioning is accomplished in a safe and cost effective manner. Guidance on organizational aspects may lead to better decision making, reductions in time and resources, lower doses to the workers and reduced impact on public health and the environment. The objective of this report is to provide information and guidance on the organization and management aspects for the decommissioning of large nuclear facilities which will be useful for licensees responsible for discharging these responsibilities. The information contained in the report may also be useful to policy makers, regulatory bodies and other organizations interested in the planning and management of decommissioning. In this report, the term 'decommissioning' refers to those actions that are taken at the end of the useful life of a nuclear facility in withdrawing it from service with adequate regard for the health and safety of workers and members of the public and for the protection of the environment. The term 'large nuclear facilities' involves nuclear power plants, large nuclear research reactors and other fuel cycle facilities such as reprocessing plants, fuel conversion, fabrication and enrichment plants, as well as spent fuel storage and waste management plants. Information on the planning and management for decommissioning of smaller research reactors or other small nuclear facilities can be found elsewhere. The report covers

  19. Practices and outcomes: pressure ulcer management in nursing facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Mary Pat; Nelson, Francine; Slomka, Jacquelyn; Persson, Diane; Cron, Stanley G; Bergstrom, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare reported pressure ulcer prevention and treatment practices in nursing facilities with high prevalence of pressure ulcers versus nursing facilities with low prevalence of pressure ulcers. A 26-item survey on implementation of nationally accepted standards for pressure ulcer prevention and treatment was mailed to directors of nursing in all 68 nursing facilities in an urban county. There were no statistically significant differences on reported pressure ulcer prevention interventions based on pressure ulcer prevalence. When treating pressure ulcers, respondents of facilities with high prevalence of pressure ulcers reported more frequent pain assessments, more frequent use of low air-loss beds, and daily wound assessments. The study failed to support the hypothesis that nursing facilities with low prevalence of pressure ulcers report using more guideline-recommended pressure ulcer prevention and treatment interventions than facilities with high prevalence of pressure ulcers. Reported adherence to recommended interventions for repositioning and pressure relief measures, moisture management, and attention to nutrition exceeded 60% in all facilities. The disparity between reported interventions and pressure ulcer prevalence rates offers an opportunity for future collaborative quality improvement projects, research, and the need for leadership to develop systems of care to ensure the use of pressure ulcer prevention guidelines.

  20. Biosecurity Measures in 48 Isolation Facilities Managing Highly Infectious Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puro, Vincenzo; Schilling, Stefan; Thomson, Gail; De Iaco, Giuseppina; Brouqui, Philippe; Maltezou, Helena C.; Bannister, Barbara; Gottschalk, René; Brodt, Hans-Rheinhard; Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Biosecurity measures are traditionally applied to laboratories, but they may also be usefully applied in highly specialized clinical settings, such as the isolation facilities for the management of patients with highly infectious diseases (eg, viral hemorrhagic fevers, SARS, smallpox, potentially severe pandemic flu, and MDR- and XDR-tuberculosis). In 2009 the European Network for Highly Infectious Diseases conducted a survey in 48 isolation facilities in 16 European countries to determine biosecurity measures for access control to the facility. Security personnel are present in 39 facilities (81%). In 35 facilities (73%), entrance to the isolation area is restricted; control methods include electronic keys, a PIN system, closed-circuit TV, and guards at the doors. In 25 facilities (52%), identification and registration of all staff entering and exiting the isolation area are required. Access control is used in most surveyed centers, but specific lacks exist in some facilities. Further data are needed to assess other biosecurity aspects, such as the security measures during the transportation of potentially contaminated materials and measures to address the risk of an “insider attack.” PMID:22571373

  1. INFRASTRUCTURE FACILITIES FOR MONITORING AND INTELLECTUAL ROAD TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Belov

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Review of automatic management of road traffic technologies in major cities of Ukraine is carried out in the given article. Priority directions of studies are determined for producing modern and perspective technologies in the given area. The facilities for monitoring and intelligence management of the road traffic on the basis of the programmed logical controller, using the device of fuzzy logic are considered.

  2. 21 CFR 58.31 - Testing facility management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... deviations from these regulations reported by the quality assurance unit are communicated to the study... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Testing facility management. 58.31 Section 58.31 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL GOOD...

  3. Ureterolithiasis: Management in an Environment with Limited Facilities

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-05-22

    May 22, 2017 ... Ureterolithiasis: Management in an Environment with Limited Facilities ... ureteric stones in our environment is affected by delay in presentation, low level of .... Middle third. 11. 15.3. Lower one-third (intramural inclusive). 45. 62.5. Figure 4: Modalities of treatment. Figure 5: Percentage composition of 50 ...

  4. Tools for Stakeholder Involvement in Facility Management Service Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nardelli, Giulia; Scupola, Ada

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the tools that Facility Management (FM) companies use to involve different stakeholders, and more precisely the ones on the demand side, in the FM service design process. Stakeholder involvement may contribute to FM service innovatio...

  5. Facility management progettare, misurare, gestire e remunerare i servizi

    CERN Document Server

    Tronconi, Oliviero

    2014-01-01

    Il valore aggiunto del Facility Management consiste in una nuova dimensione e importanza dell'organizzazione: quella del fornitore che si affianca all'azienda/cliente per supportarla e risolvere qualsiasi problema inerente ai suoi diversi servizi/bisogni. Questo valore deriva da una maggior capacità di coordinamento e gestione del fornitore/partner e da una più elevata motivazione e qualità professionale delle risorse impiegate. Ma il contributo più significativo risiede della capacità di incrementare la qualità delle informazioni e, quindi, la conoscenza sui processi attuati e sui risultati raggiunti. Il Facility Management è, nella sua accezione più evoluta, il passaggio dal "fare artigianale" alla "gestione delle informazioni che sono causa ed effetto del fare". Una gestione sistematica che deve originare un più alto livello di conoscenza dei processi e che costituisce l'essenza, il nucleo fondamentale del Facility Management. Nella chiave di lettura proposta dal volume, il Facility Management è ...

  6. Building a GIS Database for Space and Facilities Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valcik, Nicolas A.; Huesca-Dorantes, Patricia

    2003-01-01

    Growth and technology have driven the University of Texas at Dallas (UTD) to build a geographic information system (GIS) database for its facilities and space management. This chapter reviews several issues concerning this implementation: (1) the challenges involved in implementing the system; (2) the lack of efficiency and accuracy that existed…

  7. Nye udbudsformer og partnerskaber inden for Facilities Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Anker

    2010-01-01

    I de senere år er der sket en stærk udvikling af nye udbuds- og samarbejdsformer inden for Facilities Management (FM). Velkendte eksempler er Offentlig-Private Partnerskaber (OPP ), hvor der sammen med FM-ydelser over typisk 30 år også indgår levering og finansiering af en bygning og ESCO (Energy...

  8. Stocking the Toolbox: Ideas for Successful Facility Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadzikowski, Ann

    2005-01-01

    From snow removal to dishwasher repair, from pest control to playground renovations, there are countless demands on a child care director's time and attention. A child care director is required to juggle a wide variety of roles and expectations related to facility management, often with very little training or expertise in this area. Some child…

  9. Ureterolithiasis: Management in an environment with limited facilities

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: In the past 2–3 decades, there has been a dramatic development in the techniques of stone removal. This study highlights the management of symptomatic ureteral stones in an environment without such facilities. Materials and Methods: Sixty‑nine patients, comprising 53 (76.8%) males and 16 (23.2%) females ...

  10. Adding Value to Facilities Management with Information Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbesen, Poul

    2016-01-01

    This PhD project investigates implementation and use of Information Systems (IS) and Information Technologies (IT) in the Facilities management (FM) business domain. This investigation is relevant because implementation and use of IS/IT in FM has potentials for improvements which can provide...

  11. Strategies for healthcare facilities, construction, and real estate management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, James G

    2012-05-01

    Adventist HealthCare offers the following lessons learned in improving the value of healthcare facilities, construction, and real estate management: Use an integrated approach. Ensure that the objectives of the approach align the hospital or health system's mission and values. Embrace innovation. Develop a plan that applies to the whole organization, rather than specific business units. Ensure commitment of senior leaders.

  12. 20 CFR 638.303 - Site selection and facilities management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Site selection and facilities management. 638.303 Section 638.303 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR JOB CORPS PROGRAM UNDER TITLE IV-B OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Funding, Site Selection, and...

  13. 41 CFR 102-72.40 - What are facility management delegations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are facility management delegations? 102-72.40 Section 102-72.40 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property... AUTHORITY Delegation of Authority § 102-72.40 What are facility management delegations? Facility management...

  14. Conceptual development of a test facility for spent fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S.W.; Lee, H.H.; Lee, J.Y.; Lee, J.S.; Ro, S.G.

    1997-01-01

    Spent fuel management is an important issue for nuclear power program, requiring careful planning and implementation. With the wait-and-see policy on spent fuel management in Korea, research efforts are directed at KAERI to develop advanced technologies for safer and more efficient management of the accumulating spent fuels. In support of these research perspectives, a test facility of pilot scale is being developed with provisions for integral demonstration of a multitude of technical functions required for spent fuel management. The facility, baptized SMART (Spent fuel MAnagement technology Research and Test facility), is to be capable of handling full size assembly of spent PWR fuel (as well as CANDU fuel) with a maximum capacity of 10 MTU/y (about 24 assemblies of PWR type). Major functions of the facility are consolidation of spent PWR fuel assembly into a half-volume package and optionally transformation of the fuel rod into a fuel of CANDU type (called DUPIC). Objectives of these functions are to demonstrate volume reduction of spent fuel (for either longer-term dry storage or direct disposal ) in the former case and direct refabrication of the spent PWR fuel into CANDU-type DUPIC fuel for reuse in CANDU reactors in the latter case, respectively. In addition to these major functions, there are other associated technologies to be demonstrated : such as waste treatment, remote maintenance, safeguards, etc. As the facility is to demonstrate not only the functional processes but also the safety and efficiency of the test operations, engineering criteria equivalent to industrial standards are incorporated in the design concept. The hot cell structure enclosing the radioactive materials is configured in such way to maximize costs within the given functional and operational requirements. (author). 3 tabs., 4 figs

  15. Immobilization as a route to surplus fissile materials disposition. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, L.W.; Kan, T.; McKibben, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    The safe management of surplus weapons plutonium is a very important and urgent task with profound environmental, national and international security implications. In the aftermath of the Cold War, Presidential Police Directive 13 and various analysis by renown scientific, technical and international policy organizations have brought about a focused effort within the Department of Energy to identify and implement paths forward for the long term disposition of surplus weapons usable plutonium. The central, overarching goal is to render surplus weapons plutonium as inaccessible and unattractive for reuse in nuclear weapons, as the much larger and growing stock of plutonium contained in civilian spent reactor fuel. One disposition alternative considered for surplus Pu is immobilization, in which plutonium would be emplaced in glass, ceramic or glass-bonded zeolite. This option, along with some of the progress over the last year is discussed

  16. Guidelines for operator competence - Optimising facility management processes; Leitfaden Betreiberkompetenz. Schritt fuer Schritt Facility Management Prozesse optimieren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moser, R.

    2005-06-15

    This brochure issued by IFMA (International Facility Management Association) Switzerland and the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents interactive guidelines for energy management in the area of facility management. These guidelines are based on the results of a project carried out by the International Energy Agency's Annex 40 'Operator competence'. The guidelines provide a step-by-step guide from initial analysis through to successful project completion and answer many questions that may crop up during the process. The focus is placed on energy aspects. Tools and 14 sample process descriptions are provided along with practical examples. Theoretical aspects are also presented and discussed, including models for operator roles and the processes involved. Also, change, risk and knowledge management are examined. Notes and information on possibilities for further education are presented.

  17. Management support and perceived consumer satisfaction in skilled nursing facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metlen, Scott; Eveleth, Daniel; Bailey, Jeffrey J

    2005-08-01

    How managers 'manage' employees influences important firm outcomes. Heskett, Sasser, and Schlesinger contend that the level of internal support for service workers will influence consumer satisfaction. This study empirically explores how skilled nursing facility (SNF) managers affect consumer satisfaction by encouraging employee effectiveness and listening to employees to determine how to improve employee effectiveness. We extend previous research by proposing management as a form of internal support and demonstrating its relationship to service process integration, as a distinct form of internal support. The results of our individual-level investigation of 630 nursing assistants from 45 SNFs provide support for our two-part hypothesis. First, active management support and process integration, as elements of internal support, do lead to increased employee satisfaction and employee effectiveness. Second, the increased employee satisfaction and effectiveness was positively related to consumer satisfaction, as evaluated by the service workers. Thus, there is a positive influence of management's internal support of nursing assistants on perceived consumer satisfaction.

  18. Development of a Commonwealth Radioactive Waste Management Facility in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hesterman, R.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: The Australian Government has commenced a process to build a Commonwealth Radioactive Waste Management Facility in the Northern Territory for management of radioactive wastes produced by Australian Government agencies. The Government is committed to safely managing its relatively small volume of low level radioactive waste (approximately 3800 cubic metres) and even smaller volume of intermediate level waste (around 400 cubic metres) that have been generated since the early 1950s from the research, medical and industrial use of radioactive materials. Australia has no high level radioactive waste as it does not have any nuclear power reactors. Australian states and territories are responsible for the safe and secure management of low level and intermediate level waste generated within their jurisdictions. They have jointly generated approximately 200 cubic metres of low level radioactive waste and under 100 cubic metres of intermediate level for the same period. In July 2004, the Prime Minister announced that the Australian Government would examine the suitability of Commonwealth land holdings, both onshore and offshore, for establishing the Facility. An initial assessment of offshore territories by the Department of Education, Science and Training (DEST) did not find any sufficiently suitable sites for hosting the Facility. This was due to the low elevation of most territories, inadequate infrastructure and incompatibility with existing land uses. In July 2005, Dr Nelson, then the Minister for Education, Science and Training, announced that three Department of Defence properties in the Northern Territory would be investigated for siting the Facility. The three properties are Fishers Ridge, about 43 kilometres southeast of Katherine; Harts Range, 100 kilometres directly northeast of Alice Springs; and Mt Everard, about 27 kilometres directly northwest of Alice Springs. In addition, the Commonwealth Radioactive Waste Management Act 2005, enacted in December

  19. Management of movement of visitors in a sports facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuzović Duško

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Management of movement of visitors in a facility is essential for a successful organization of a sports event. From a visitor's entrance into the premises of the sports facility to its place on the stands, corridors have to be defined. Depending on its position, a corridor is additionally divided into logical zones: a zone between a border of the plot and the facility, an outer zone, an internal zone, a zone of seats or stands. Precise specification of needs within a zone is used to organize movement of visitors safely and efficiently. Communications can be horizontal and vertical. Each group has set rules for design and maintenance. Depending on the applied technical solution, entrances have a defined capacity that must be taken into account when a sporting event is organized. Besides the entrance for visitors, there are many entrances dedicated to specific groups such as competitors, VIP, security, service, medical assistance, media, persons with special needs, etc. Management of movement of users in a facility must be a subject of careful analysis because it is of a great importance for the general impression on the quality of a sports facility.

  20. Environmental management at the El Cabril disposal facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quesada Bueno, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    In 1996, ENRESA decided to implement and certify an environmental management system based on the ISO 14001 standard. This article includes a description of the reasons that led the company to take decision to implement the system and of the different phases of the project. These phases include the main activities carried out to implement a management system at a facility already equipped with a mature and contrasted quality system, where the main environment issue is controlled both internally by the system and externally by the regulatory authority. Finally, the paper describes the most innovative characteristics of the system implemented, such as the environmental impact assessment method or the integration of procedures containing quality and environmental requirements. Finally, the most outstanding improvement actions performed since implementation of the system are described. It should be pointed out that this has been the first waste disposal facility to certify its environmental management system. (Author)

  1. ESCO as Innovative Facilities Management in Danish Municipalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper Ole; Oesten, Pimmie; Nielsen, Susanne Balslev

    2010-01-01

     Purpose:  Increasing energy efficiency of existing buildings is high on the Facility Management (FM) agenda, therefore building owners and FM Managers need insight into a variety of organizational possibilities for energy renovation projects. This paper explores how ESCO can foster innovative....... It is the first publication from the project "Energy Service Concepts" carried out at the Danish Centre for Facilities Management (www.cfm.dtu.dk). Results have not been published before....... changes in the municipal FM-function, including dissemination of their ESCO-competence to local building owners. Theory:  Theory of Public Innovation is used to see the new roles of local authorities in promoting energy renovations to building owners with a relatively limited FM-competence. Design/methodology...

  2. Radiological risks of transports to central waste management facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, F.

    1997-01-01

    Transports of radioactive waste from nuclear facilities have been a matter of frequent public concern in the recent past. News reports, protests and questions concerning the radiological risk tended to concentrate on transports to and from central waste management facilities, e.g. transports of spent fuel elements to reprocessing plants abroad (France, England), transports to intermediate storage sites (Ahaus, Gorleben), transports to operative (Morsleben) and projected (Konrad) final storage sites, and transports of vitrified high-activity waste from reprocessing plants to the intermediate storage site (Gorleben). (orig.) [de

  3. The value of the facilities management function in the UK NHS community health-care sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Featherstone, P; Baldry, D

    2000-01-01

    This paper stresses the importance of the strategic integration of the organisational facilities management function as being an essential prerequisite towards facilities and organisational effectiveness. The impact of both the strategic and operational facilities management function on community health-care facility users is also documented. The value of the facilities management function in terms of other health-care related organisational core deliverables is also observed. Mechanisms for general organisational facilities management improvement are identified and a number of facilities management performance measuring tools outlined.

  4. Waste Management and Remedial Action Division programs and facilities report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corrill, L.S.

    1994-12-01

    Routine waste management operations of the Energy Systems Waste Management Organization (ESWMO) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are the direct responsibility of the Waste Management and Remedial Action Division(WMRAD). This document provides a comprehensive description of WMRAD's site activities, describes how programs are conducted, and identifies those facilities used to manage waste as of July 1994. The ORNL waste management mission is reduction, collection, treatment, storage, and disposal of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) wastes, generated primarily in pursuit of ORNL missions, in order to protect human health and safety and the environment. In carrying out this mission, waste management staff in the WMRAD will (1) guide ORNL in optimizing waste reduction and waste management capabilities and in minimizing generation and (2) conduct waste management operations in a compliant, publicly acceptable, technically sound, environmentally correct, timely, and cost-efficient manner. Waste management requirements for DOE radioactive wastes are detailed in DOE Order 5820.2A, and the ORNL Waste Management Program encompasses all elements of this order. The requirements of this DOE order and other appropriate DOE orders, along with applicable Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency rules and regulations and local environmental, safety, and health requirements, provide the principal source of regulatory guidance for waste management operations at ORNL

  5. A Supply Chain Design Problem Integrated Facility Unavailabilities Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fouad Maliki

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A supply chain is a set of facilities connected together in order to provide products to customers. The supply chain is subject to random failures caused by different factors which cause the unavailability of some sites. Given the current economic context, the management of these unavailabilities is becoming a strategic choice to ensure the desired reliability and availability levels of the different supply chain facilities. In this work, we treat two problems related to the field of supply chain, namely the design and unavailabilities management of logistics facilities. Specifically, we consider a stochastic distribution network with consideration of suppliers' selection, distribution centres location (DCs decisions and DCs’ unavailabilities management. Two resolution approaches are proposed. The first approach called non-integrated consists on define the optimal supply chain structure using an optimization approach based on genetic algorithms (GA, then to simulate the supply chain performance with the presence of DCs failures. The second approach called integrated approach is to consider the design of the supply chain problem and unavailabilities management of DCs in the same model. Note that, we replace each unavailable DC by performing a reallocation using GA in the two approaches. The obtained results of the two approaches are detailed and compared showing their effectiveness.

  6. Strategic aspects on waste management in decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rannemalm, T.; Eliasson, S.; Larsson, A.; Lidar, P.; Bergh, N.; Hedin, G.

    2017-01-01

    A team composed of experts from the facility owner OKG, Westinghouse and Studsvik (today Cyclife Sweden and Studsvik Consulting) was asked to develop a basis for decision on an overall strategy for the management of the material and waste arising from the decommissioning of two BWR NPPs at the Oskarshamn site in Sweden. To be able to provide a good basis for decision the full waste management chain from generation to disposition, i.e. clearance or disposal had to be assessed, categorised, quantified and analysed with regards to costs, environmental impact and risks. A systematic approach was applied taking benefit of the decommissioning studies made previously for the two facilities, the decommissioning concepts developed by Ndcon (the partnership in decommissioning between Studsvik and Westinghouse) and the combined knowledge and experience in the project team. In total 4 different waste management concepts were compared individually and in combinations. The four concepts evaluated were based on: direct disposal in the national geological repository; treatment of the waste for volume reduction and where applicable clearance in an external waste treatment facility; decontamination and clearance in an on-site waste treatment facility; direct disposal in a near surface repository at the NPP site. It was important to be able to compare the different options in a quantifiable way. Therefore the project team set up a matrix with parameters for the different options gained from the utility, the national waste management company, external vendors and the experience of the team. In this way a quantitative analysis could be done with the four different waste management options. In addition to the quantitative analysis the team summarised decades of experience in radioactive waste management and decommissioning recommendations and risk analyses. Special attention was given to risk mitigation and redundancy in the waste management chain. The development of an overall waste

  7. Risk management program for the 283-W water treatment facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, W.E.

    1999-01-01

    This Risk Management (RM) Program covers the 283-W Water Treatment Facility (283W Facility), located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. A RM Program is necessary for this facility because it stores chlorine, a listed substance, in excess of or has the potential to exceed the threshold quantities defined in Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 68 (EPA, 1998). The RM Program contains data that will be used to prepare a RM Plan, which is required by 40 CFR 68. The RM Plan is a summary of the RM Program information, contained within this document, and will be submitted to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ultimately for distribution to the public. The RM Plan will be prepared and submitted separately from this document

  8. Crisis Management training at nuclear facilities: Simulations in bomb threats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, L.

    1993-01-01

    Substantial enhancements to the study of the theoretical and applied foundations of crisis management have been achieved in recent years. Whereas risk managers study 'the probability that a harmful consequence of a particular event will occur during a given time,' crisis management explores unexpected, potentially negative events with short or long-term implications involving injury to life or property. In this regard, crisis management focuses on the mitigation of organizational after-shock; risk management is preventative in scope. While the risk management function of nuclear facilities has been addressed widely in the literature, comparatively little has been written that addresses the myriad, interdisciplinary challenges associated with managing organizational disarray. The issue of crisis management has assumed paramount importance in recent years due to unexpected geopolitical events (e.g., Persian Gulf War), rampant violence facing organizations (e.g., mass shootings in Killeen, Texas and several U.S. Post Offices) and an acceleration of serious crisis impacting large organizations (e.g., Three Mile Island, Chernobyl, Exxon Valdez, NASA Challenger disaster). Without question, the public is increasingly demanding that organizational managers possess a fundamental understanding of crisis management and its principal underpinnings: effective public communication regarding the event and a return to normalcy, employee and public safety and evacuation measures, and other mitigation measures will protect life and property

  9. The grand challenge of managing the petascale facility.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aiken, R. J.; Mathematics and Computer Science

    2007-02-28

    This report is the result of a study of networks and how they may need to evolve to support petascale leadership computing and science. As Dr. Ray Orbach, director of the Department of Energy's Office of Science, says in the spring 2006 issue of SciDAC Review, 'One remarkable example of growth in unexpected directions has been in high-end computation'. In the same article Dr. Michael Strayer states, 'Moore's law suggests that before the end of the next cycle of SciDAC, we shall see petaflop computers'. Given the Office of Science's strong leadership and support for petascale computing and facilities, we should expect to see petaflop computers in operation in support of science before the end of the decade, and DOE/SC Advanced Scientific Computing Research programs are focused on making this a reality. This study took its lead from this strong focus on petascale computing and the networks required to support such facilities, but it grew to include almost all aspects of the DOE/SC petascale computational and experimental science facilities, all of which will face daunting challenges in managing and analyzing the voluminous amounts of data expected. In addition, trends indicate the increased coupling of unique experimental facilities with computational facilities, along with the integration of multidisciplinary datasets and high-end computing with data-intensive computing; and we can expect these trends to continue at the petascale level and beyond. Coupled with recent technology trends, they clearly indicate the need for including capability petascale storage, networks, and experiments, as well as collaboration tools and programming environments, as integral components of the Office of Science's petascale capability metafacility. The objective of this report is to recommend a new cross-cutting program to support the management of petascale science and infrastructure. The appendices of the report document current and projected

  10. Operation And Maintenance In Facilities Management Practices: A Gap Analysis In Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Zawawi Zuraihana Ahmad; Khalid Mohd Khazli Aswad; Ahmad Nur Azfahani; Zahari Nurul Fadzila; Agus Salim Nuzaihan Aras

    2016-01-01

    Facilities management in Malaysia has started as early as 1990s during the development of mega projects such as Putrajaya in 1999 [8, 9]. During this period, Malaysia was introduced to an integrated property management and maintenance services known as facilities management. However, its implementation according to the standard practice is still being disputed. The purpose of facilities management standard practices is to provide the facility management profession with a leading reference on ...

  11. Habit formation, surplus consumption and return predictability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engsted, Tom; Hyde, Stuart; Vinther Møller, Stig

    2010-01-01

    On an international post World War II dataset, we use an iterated GMM procedure to estimate and test the Campbell and Cochrane (1999, By force of habit: a consumption-based explanation of aggregate stock market behavior. Journal of Political Economy 107, 205–251.) habit formation model with a time...... empirical support in a variety of different dimensions, including reasonable estimates of risk-free rates. Further, for the majority of countries the surplus consumption ratio captures time-variation in expected returns. Together with the price-dividend ratio, the surplus consumption ratio contains...

  12. Graphics-based nuclear facility modeling and management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rod, S.R.

    1991-07-01

    Nuclear waste management facilities are characterized by their complexity, many unprecedented features, and numerous competing design requirements. This paper describes the development of comprehensive descriptive databases and three-dimensional models of nuclear waste management facilities and applies the database/model to an example facility. The important features of the facility database/model are its abilities to (1) process large volumes of site data, plant data, and nuclear material inventory data in an efficient, integrated manner; (2) produce many different representations of the data to fulfill information needs as they arise; (3) create a complete three-dimensional solid model of the plant with all related information readily accessible; and (4) support complete, consistent inventory control and plant configuration control. While the substantive heart of the system is the database, graphic visualization of the data vastly improves the clarity of the information presented. Graphic representations are a convenient framework for the presentation of plant and inventory data, allowing all types of information to be readily located and presented in a manner that is easily understood. 2 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  13. UK surplus source disposal programme - 16097

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John, Gordon H.; Reeves, Nigel; Nisbet, Amy C.; Garnett, Andrew; Williams, Clive R.

    2009-01-01

    The UK Surplus Source Disposal Programme (SSDP), managed by the Environment Agency, was designed to remove redundant radioactive sources from the public domain. The UK Government Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) was concerned that disused sources were being retained by hospitals, universities and businesses, posing a risk to public health and the environment. AMEC provided a range of technical and administrative services to support the SSDP. A questionnaire was issued to registered source holders and the submitted returns compiled to assess the scale of the project. A member of AMEC staff was seconded to the Environment Agency to provide technical support and liaise directly with source holders during funding applications, which would cover disposal costs. Funding for disposal of different sources was partially based on a sliding scale of risk as determined by the IAEA hazard categorisation system. This funding was also sector dependent. The SSDP was subsequently expanded to include the disposal of luminised aircraft instruments from aviation museums across the UK. These museums often hold significant radiological inventories, with many items being unused and in a poor state of repair. These instruments were fully characterised on site by assessing surface dose rate, dimensions, source integrity and potential contamination issues. Calculations using the Microshield computer code allowed gamma radiation measurements to be converted into total activity estimates for each source. More than 11,000 sources were disposed of under the programme from across the medical, industrial, museum and academic sectors. The total activity disposed of was more than 8.5 E+14 Bq, and the project was delivered under budget. (authors)

  14. Delivering Sustainable Facilities Management in Danish Housing Estates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Susanne Balslev; Jensen, Jesper Ole; Jensen, Per Anker

    2009-01-01

    is supporting social, economical and environmental sustainable development. Sustainable facility management (SFM) is as an 'umbrella' for various ways of reducing flows of energy, water and waste in the daily operation of the buildings, for instance by regular monitoring the consumption, by using 'green......Housing plays a central role in sustainable development due to large resource consumption and as transition agent towards sustainable lifestyles. The aim is to evaluate current practice of housing administration in Denmark in order to evaluate if and how sustainable facilities management...... accounting', by applying policies for sustainability, enhanced user awareness etc. In Denmark, despite attempts by government and NGO´s, implementation of sustainable resource consumption in existing buildings is still unsolved. Monitoring the resource consumption is part of the solution, but the entire FM...

  15. OPP og indkøb af Facilities Management ydelser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Kristian

    Dette er den 3. og sidste rapport i forskningsprojektet om OPP og indkøb af Facilities Management ydelser. Fokus er denne gang rettet mod bestræbelserne på at skabe større integration i byggeprocessen. Det vil blive undersøgt, hvorvidt sådanne bestræbelser – som der kan findes eksempler på både i...... UK og i Danmark – vil kunne fremme en inddragelse af Facilities Management viden i planlægning, projektering og udførelse. Denne problemstilling skal ses i forlængelse af det forudgående arbejde i forskningsprojektet....

  16. Management concepts and safety applications for nuclear fuel facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisner, H.; Scotti, R.S. [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States). School of Engineering and Applied Science; Delicate, W.S. [KEVRIC Co., Inc., Silver Spring, MD (United States)

    1995-05-01

    This report presents an overview of effectiveness of management control of safety. It reviews several modern management control theories as well as the general functions of management and relates them to safety issues at the corporate and at the process safety management (PSM) program level. Following these discussions, structured technique for assessing management of the safety function is suggested. Seven modern management control theories are summarized, including business process reengineering, the learning organization, capability maturity, total quality management, quality assurance and control, reliability centered maintenance, and industrial process safety. Each of these theories is examined for-its principal characteristics and implications for safety management. The five general management functions of planning, organizing, directing, monitoring, and integrating, which together provide control over all company operations, are discussed. Under the broad categories of Safety Culture, Leadership and Commitment, and Operating Excellence, key corporate safety elements and their subelements are examined. The three categories under which PSM program-level safety issues are described are Technology, Personnel, and Facilities.

  17. Management concepts and safety applications for nuclear fuel facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisner, H.; Scotti, R.S.

    1995-05-01

    This report presents an overview of effectiveness of management control of safety. It reviews several modern management control theories as well as the general functions of management and relates them to safety issues at the corporate and at the process safety management (PSM) program level. Following these discussions, structured technique for assessing management of the safety function is suggested. Seven modern management control theories are summarized, including business process reengineering, the learning organization, capability maturity, total quality management, quality assurance and control, reliability centered maintenance, and industrial process safety. Each of these theories is examined for-its principal characteristics and implications for safety management. The five general management functions of planning, organizing, directing, monitoring, and integrating, which together provide control over all company operations, are discussed. Under the broad categories of Safety Culture, Leadership and Commitment, and Operating Excellence, key corporate safety elements and their subelements are examined. The three categories under which PSM program-level safety issues are described are Technology, Personnel, and Facilities

  18. Study on Customer Satisfaction with Facilities Management Services in Lithuania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepkova, Natalija; Žūkaitė-Jefimovienė, Giedrė

    2012-12-01

    The article introduces the concept and content of facilities management (FM) services. The paper presents the concept of customer satisfaction and discusses the key factors which influence the opinions of customers and their satisfaction or dissatisfaction with the services provided. The article presents two studies: a brief survey of several FM service providers and a survey of customer satisfaction with FM services in Lithuania. The conclusions are given at the end of the article.

  19. Software Manages Documentation in a Large Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurneck, Joseph M.

    2001-01-01

    The 3MCS computer program assists and instrumentation engineer in performing the 3 essential functions of design, documentation, and configuration management of measurement and control systems in a large test facility. Services provided by 3MCS are acceptance of input from multiple engineers and technicians working at multiple locations;standardization of drawings;automated cross-referencing; identification of errors;listing of components and resources; downloading of test settings; and provision of information to customers.

  20. Facilities Management of Hospital Data Processing—An Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Stanley E.

    1981-01-01

    This article discusses a recent controversy over the value of facilities management (FM), describes four type of FM usage by hospitals, provides a listing of firms now providing FM services to hospitals together with the number of hospitals serviced by each, examines factors bearing upon the future growth of FM usage by hospitals, predicts the rate of proliferation, and identifies some of the lessons learned as the hospital FM industry has matured.

  1. Designing an Institutional Web-based Core Facility Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabarini, D.; Clisham, S.; John, D.; Hagen, A.

    2011-01-01

    The authors and their four institutions collaborated to (i) identify the key challenges to core facility management; (ii) identify the requirements for an effective core facility management system; (iii) design, test and deploy such a system. Through a series of interviews with all participants in the core work flow (customers, core staff, administrators), the team identified a number of key challenges, including: (i) difficulty for researchers in identifying available services; (ii) inconsistent processes for requesting services; (iii) inadequate controls for approving service requests; (iv) inefficient processes for tracking and communicating about project processes; (v) time-consuming billing practices; (vi) incomplete revenue capture; (vii) manual reporting processes. The team identified the following requirements for a system to address these challenges: (i) ability to support a broad range of core business practices such as complex quote generation and project management; calendaring/equipment reservation management; sample tracking; complex forms; and import of usage data from hardware; (ii) ability to offer services for both internal and external customers, including flexible pricing and off-site access; (iii) ability to interact with institutional financial systems (e.g. SAP, PeopleSoft, Lawson, SunGard Banner) and identify management systems (e.g. Microsoft Active Directory, LDAP, and other SAML 2.0-compliant services). The team developed and deployed this system across the collaborative partners, as well as other major research institutions.

  2. Management plan -- Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritz, R.L.

    1995-01-01

    This Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF) Management Plan provides guidance for execution WHC MWTF Project activities related to design, procurement, construction, testing, and turnover. This Management Plan provides a discussion of organizational responsibilities, work planning, project management systems, quality assurance (QA), regulatory compliance, personnel qualifications and training, and testing and evaluations. Classified by the US Department of Energy (DOE) as a major systems acquisition (MSA), the MWTF mission is to provide a safe, cost-effective, and environmentally sound method for interim storage of Hanford Site high-level wastes. This Management Plan provides policy guidance and direction to the Project Office for execution of the project activities

  3. Management plan -- Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritz, R.L.

    1995-01-11

    This Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF) Management Plan provides guidance for execution WHC MWTF Project activities related to design, procurement, construction, testing, and turnover. This Management Plan provides a discussion of organizational responsibilities, work planning, project management systems, quality assurance (QA), regulatory compliance, personnel qualifications and training, and testing and evaluations. Classified by the US Department of Energy (DOE) as a major systems acquisition (MSA), the MWTF mission is to provide a safe, cost-effective, and environmentally sound method for interim storage of Hanford Site high-level wastes. This Management Plan provides policy guidance and direction to the Project Office for execution of the project activities.

  4. Management and Development of the RT Research Facilities and Infrastructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Won Ho; Nho, Young Chang; Kim, Jae Sung

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this project are to operate the core facilities of the research for the Radiation Technology in stable and to assist the research activities efficiently in the industry, academic, and research laboratory. By developing the infrastructure of the national radio technology industry, we can activate the researching area of the RT and the related industry, and obtain the primary and original technology. The key point in the study of the RT and the assistance of the industry, academic, and research laboratory for the RT area smoothly, is managing the various of unique radiation facilities in our country. The gamma Phytotron and Gene Bank are essential in the agribiology because these facilities are used to preserve and utilize the genes and to provide an experimental field for the environment and biotechnology. The Radiation Fusion Technology research supporting facilities are the core support facilities, and are used to develop the high-tech fusion areas. In addition, the most advanced analytical instruments, whose costs are very high, should be managed in stable and be utilized in supporting works, and the experimental animal supporting laboratory and Gamma Cell have to be maintained in high level and managed in stable also. The ARTI have been developed the 30MeV cyclotron during 2005∼2006, aimed to produce radioisotopes and to research the beam applications as a result of the project, 'Establishment of the Infrastructure for the Atomic Energy Research Expansion', collaborated with the Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences. In addition, the ARTI is in the progress of establishing cyclotron integrated complex as a core research facility, using a proton beam to produce radioisotopes and to support a various research areas. The measurement and evaluation of the irradiation dose, and irradiation supporting technology of the Good Irradiation Practice(GIP) are essential in various researching areas. One thing to remember is that the publicity

  5. WIPP Facility Work Plan for Solid Waste Management Units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2001-02-25

    This 2001 Facility Work Plan (FWP) has been prepared as required by Module VII, Section VII.M.1 of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, NM4890139088-TSDF (the Permit); (NMED, 1999a), and incorporates comments from the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) received on December 6, 2000 (NMED, 2000a). This February 2001 FWP describes the programmatic facility-wide approach to future investigations at Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) and Areas of Concern (AOCs) specified in the Permit. The permittees are evaluating data from previous investigations of the SWMUs and AOCs against the newest guidance proposed by the NMED. Based on these data, the permittees expect that no further sampling will be required and that a request for No Further Action (NFA) at the SWMUs and AOCs will be submitted to the NMED. This FWP addresses the current Permit requirements. It uses the results of previous investigations performed at WIPP and expands the investigations as required by the Permit. As an alternative to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) specified in Module VII of the Permit, current NMED guidance identifies an Accelerated Corrective Action Approach (ACAA) that may be used for any SWMU or AOC (NMED, 1998). This accelerated approach is used to replace the standard RFI Work Plan and Report sequence with a more flexible decision-making approach. The ACAA process allows a Facility to exit the schedule of compliance contained in the Facility’s Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) permit module and proceed on an accelerated time frame. Thus, the ACAA process can be entered either before or after an RFI Work Plan. According to the NMED's guidance, a facility can prepare an RFI Work Plan or Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) for any SWMU or AOC (NMED, 1998). Based on this guidance, a SAP constitutes an acceptable alternative to the RFI Work Plan specified in the Permit.

  6. Representing and managing Real Estate: BIM for Facility Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Lo Turco

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is intended to explore the potential of the Building Information Modelling (BIM methodologies to be applied to the various stages of the construction process, particularly as far as international guidelines and best practices supporting virtuous operating flows are concerned: the IT component, mostly graphic during the design phase, is mainly integrated and renewed in an alphanumeric format, and becomes an integrating part of the management and maintenance of the artefacts. The case studies developed in collaboration with the Building and Logistics Service of the Polytechnic of Turin substantiate such procedures, which, even if they are not widely spread as of yet, reach interoperability targets: integrated approaches to information sharing processes aimed at defining adequate intervention schedules on both large and small scales, through the definition of strategies aimed at restricting the enforcement of incorrect solutions.

  7. A proactive method for safety management in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grecco, Claudio Henrique dos Santos; Carvalho, Paulo Victor Rodrigues de; Santos, Isaac Antonio Luquetti dos

    2014-01-01

    Due to the modern approach to address the safety of nuclear facilities which highlights that these organizations must be able to assess and proactively manage their activities becomes increasingly important the need for instruments to evaluate working conditions. In this context, this work presents a proactive method of managing organizational safety, which has three innovative features: 1) the use of predictive indicators that provide current information on the performance of activities, allowing preventive actions and not just reactive in safety management, different from safety indicators traditionally used (reactive indicators) that are obtained after the occurrence of undesired events; 2) the adoption of resilience engineering approach in the development of indicators - indicators are based on six principles of resilience engineering: top management commitment, learning, flexibility, awareness, culture of justice and preparation for the problems; 3) the adoption of the concepts and properties of fuzzy set theory to deal with subjectivity and consistency of human trials in the evaluation of the indicators. The fuzzy theory is used primarily to map qualitative models of decision-making, and inaccurate representation methods. The results of this study aim an improvement in performance and safety in organizations. The method was applied in a radiopharmaceutical shipping sector of a nuclear facility. The results showed that the method is a good monitoring tool objectively and proactively of the working conditions of an organizational domain

  8. Solid Waste Management Facilities with Permits by the Iowa DNR

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — All types of facilities that handle solid waste, including: sanitary landfills, appliance demanufacturing facilities, transfer stations, land application sites,...

  9. Risk communication on the siting of radioactive waste management facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okoshi, Minoru; Torii, Hiroyuki; Fujii, Yasuhiko

    2007-01-01

    Siting of radioactive waste management facilities frequently raise arguments among stakeholders such as a municipal government and the residents. Risk communication is one of the useful methods of promoting mutual understanding on related risks among stakeholders. In Finland and Sweden, siting selection procedures of repositories for spent nuclear fuels have been carried out successfully with risk communication. The success reasons are analyzed based on the interviews with those who belong to the regulatory authorities and nuclear industries in both countries. Also, in this paper, risk communication among the Japan Radioisotope Association (JRIA), a local government and the general public, which was carried out during the establishment process of additional radioactive waste treatment facilities in Takizawa Village, Iwate Prefecture, is analyzed based on articles in newspapers and interviews with persons concerned. The analysis results showed that good risk communication was not carried out because of the lack of confidence on the JRIA, decision making rules, enough communication chances and economic benefits. In order to make good use of these experiences for the future establishment of radioactive waste management facilities, the lessons learned from these cases are summarized and proposals for good risk communication (establishment of exploratory committee and technical support system for decision making, and measurements to increase familiarity of radioactive waste) are discussed. (author)

  10. Facilities management and corporate real estate management : FM/CREM or FREM?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Voordt, Theo

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to explore similarities and dissimilarities between facilities management (FM) and corporate real estate management (CREM) regarding its history and key issues, and whether the similarities may result in a further integration of FM and CREM. Design/methodology/approach:

  11. Waste Management facilities fault tree databank 1995 status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minnick, W.V.; Wellmaker, K.A.

    1995-08-16

    The Safety Information Management and Analysis Group (SIMA) of the Safety Engineering Department (SED) maintains compilations of incidents that have occurred in the Separations and Process Control, Waste Management, Fuel Fabrication, Tritium and SRTC facilities. This report records the status of the Waste Management (WM) Databank at the end of CY-1994. The WM Databank contains more than 35,000 entries ranging from minor equipment malfunctions to incidents with significant potential for injury or contamination of personnel. This report documents the status of the WM Databank including the availability, training, sources of data, search options, Quality Assurance, and usage to which these data have been applied. Periodic updates to this memorandum are planned as additional data or applications are acquired.

  12. Managerial issues in facilities management: The impact of facilities service on student productivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holzweber, Markus

    2017-01-01

    The study examines key issues and effects of managerial capability management in higher education premises at the University of Glasgow. A study was undertaken on the library’s ‘Learning Cafe’ area. This unique learning space provides complex process-oriented facilities- and IT services to students...... and users. The analysis of data related to the University of Glasgow Learning Cafe (UGLC) concept shows that developing and maintaining capabilities is strongly related to perceived productivity and performance of students and users. Findings are that managerial cognition and managerial human capital...

  13. CHANGE OF CONTRACTOR FOR THE FACILITIES MANAGEMENT ACTIVITIES AT CERN

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    The Facilities Management contract at CERN, under the responsibility of ST Division, Group FM, is in charge of the maintenance and minor works on tertiary installations (i.e. all structures and installations that have no direct relation to the running of the accelerators) for the following trades: - Technical: heating, ventilation, air conditioning, plumbing, electricity, civil engineering (painting, roofing, glazing, blinds, fencing, masonry etc.), cleansing, passenger and goods lifts, automatic and powered doors, kitchen equipment, roads, signs, keys and locks, office furniture, - Services: waste collection, security, green areas, cleaning and sanitary supplies, disinfection, rodent control and insect control. Starting from the 1st June the present contractor will stop some activities that will be taken under its responsibility by the new one, INGEST Facility. The remaining activities (including cleaning) will be moved on the 1st July. Minor perturbation in the service might occur. The contact number will ...

  14. CHANGE OF CONTRACTOR FOR THE FACILITIES MANAGEMENT ACTIVITIES AT CERN

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    The Facilities Management contract at CERN, under the responsibility of ST Division, Group FM, is in charge of the maintenance and minor works on tertiary installations (i.e. all structures and installations that have no direct relation to the running of the accelerators) for the following trades: - Technical: heating, ventilation, air conditioning, plumbing, electricity, civil engineering (painting, roofing, glazing, blinds, fencing, masonry etc.), cleansing, passenger and goods lifts, automatic and powered doors, kitchen equipment, roads, signs, keys and locks, office furniture, - Services: waste collection, security, green areas, cleaning and sanitary supplies, disinfection, rodent control and insect control. Starting from the 1st June the present contractor will stop some activities that will be taken under its responsibility by the new one, INGEST Facility. Others activities will be moved on the 1st July. Minor perturbation in the service might occur. The contact number will not change and will be opera...

  15. Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) groundwater monitoring report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, C.Y.

    1992-06-01

    During first quarter 1992, tritium, trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, lead, antimony, I,I-dichloroethylene, 1,2-dichloroethane, gross alpha, mercury, nickel, nitrate, nonvolatile beta, and total alpha-emitting radium (radium-224 and radium-226) exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) in groundwater samples from monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) and adjacent facilities. Tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread constituents; 57 (49%) of the 116 monitored wells contained elevated tritium activities, and 21 (18%) wells exhibited elevated trichloroethylene concentrations Sixty-one downgradient wells screened in Aquifer Zone IIB2 (Water Table), Aquifer Zone IIB[sub 2] (Barnwell/McBean), and Aquifer Unit IIA (Congaree) contained constituents that exceeded the PDWS during first quarter 1992. Upgradient wells BGO 1D and HSB 85A, BC, and 85C did not contain any constituents that exceeded the PDWS. Upgradient well BGO 2D contained elevated tritium.

  16. Comprehensive safety cases for radioactive waste management facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woollam, P.B.

    1993-01-01

    Probabilistic safety assessment methodology is being applied by Nuclear Electric plc (NE) to the development of comprehensive safety cases for the radioactive waste management processing and accumulation facilities associated with its 26 reactor systems. This paper describes the methodology and the safety case assessment criteria employed by NE. An overview of the results from facilities used by the first 16 reactors is presented, together with more detail of a specific safety analysis: storage of fuel element debris. No risk to the public greater than 10 -6 /y has been identified and the more significant risks arise from the potential for radioactive waste fires. There are no unacceptable risks from external hazards such as flooding, aircrash or seismic events. Some operations previously expected to have significant risks in fact have negligible risks, while the few faults with risks exceeding the assessment criteria were only identified as a result of this study

  17. 12 CFR 615.5330 - Minimum surplus ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... POLICIES AND OPERATIONS, AND FUNDING OPERATIONS Surplus and Collateral Requirements § 615.5330 Minimum... a least 7 percent of total surplus to the risk-adjusted asset base. (2) The risk-adjusted asset base...) and weighted on the basis of risk in accordance with § 615.5210. (b) Core surplus. (1) Each...

  18. National Ignition Facility Cryogenic Target Systems Interim Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warner, B

    2002-01-01

    Restricted availability of funding has had an adverse impact, unforeseen at the time of the original decision to projectize the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Cryogenic Target Handling Systems (NCTS) Program, on the planning and initiation of these efforts. The purpose of this document is to provide an interim project management plan describing the organizational structure and management processes currently in place for NCTS. Preparation of a Program Execution Plan (PEP) for NCTS has been initiated, and a current draft is provided as Attachment 1 to this document. The National Ignition Facility is a multi-megajoule laser facility being constructed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) in the Department of Energy (DOE). Its primary mission is to support the Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) by performing experiments studying weapons physics, including fusion ignition. NIF also supports the missions of weapons effects, inertial fusion energy, and basic science in high-energy-density physics. NIF will be operated by LLNL under contract to the University of California (UC) as a national user facility. NIF is a low-hazard, radiological facility, and its operation will meet all applicable federal, state, and local Environmental Safety and Health (ES and H) requirements. The NCTS Interim Management Plan provides a summary of primary design criteria and functional requirements, current organizational structure, tracking and reporting procedures, and current planning estimates of project scope, cost, and schedule. The NIF Director controls the NIF Cryogenic Target Systems Interim Management Plan. Overall scope content and execution schedules for the High Energy Density Physics Campaign (SSP Campaign 10) are currently undergoing rebaselining and will be brought into alignment with resources expected to be available throughout the NNSA Future Years National Security Plan (FYNSP). The revised schedule for

  19. Prioritizing interventions to manage polypharmacy in Australian aged care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokanovic, Natali; Wang, Kate N; Dooley, Michael J; Lalic, Samanta; Tan, Edwin Ck; Kirkpatrick, Carl M; Bell, J Simon

    Polypharmacy is highly prevalent in residential aged care facilities (RACFs). Although polypharmacy is sometimes unavoidable, polypharmacy has been associated with increased morbidity and mortality. To identify and prioritize a range of potential interventions to manage polypharmacy in RACFs from the perspectives of health care professionals, health policy and consumer representatives. Two nominal group technique (NGT) sessions were convened in August 2015. A purposive sample (n = 19) of clinicians, researchers, managers and representatives of consumer, professional and health policy organizations were asked to nominate interventions to address the prevalence and appropriateness of medication use. Participants were then asked to prioritize five interventions suitable for possible implementation at the system level. Six of 16 potential interventions were prioritized highest for possible implementation in clinical practice, with two interventions prioritized as second highest. The top interventions in rank order were 'implementation of a pharmacist-led medication reconciliation service for new residents,' 'conduct facility-level audits and feedback to staff and health care professionals,' 'develop deprescribing scripts to assist clinician-resident discussion,' 'develop or revise prescribing guidelines specific to older people with multimorbidity in RACFs,' 'implement electronic medication charts and records' and 'better support Medication Advisory Committees (MACs) to address medication appropriateness.' This study prioritized a range of potential interventions that may be used to assist clinicians and policy makers develop a comprehensive strategy to manage polypharmacy in RACFs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. THE COMBINED USE OF BUSINESS MANAGEMENT WITH FACILITY MANAGEMENT AS AN OPTION FOR INTELLIGENT BUILDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Dittmar Weise

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Words like Business Management (BM and Facility Management (FM are well known as separate management methods. FM offers transparency about their property costs and exploitation, starting from the planning phase until its demolition. The investor sees this in the property invested capital and its recoverable yield. This means they also want a profit with their real estates. Besides this, changes in the social and environmental requirements become necessary to adapt the properties. The solution is called Intelligent Building. Its primary aim is to collect and select previous knowledge and information about Facility Management and Business Management. It is an application, mainly with sight to characterize and describe the possibilities of use of intelligent buildings as a combination of Facility and Business Management. This paper is an indirect survey carried out through a documental procedure in the form of a bibliographic research and theoretician study. Intelligent Building as combination of FM and BM is new, but in our times necessary to satisfy the needs of the demand. This type of building needs to be flexible in its structure and services, open for changes in environmental requirements, e.g. saving energy, and needs a lot of technology to realize their functions. Consequently, it will be sustainable for a value enhancement. With a Computer Aided Facilities Management system this is possible and the company will be more flexible in relation to the competitors and future changes.

  1. New glass material oxidation and dissolution system facility: Direct conversion of surplus fissile materials, spent nuclear fuel, and other material to high-level-waste glass. Storage and disposition of weapons-usable fissile materials programmatic environmental impact statement data report: Predecisional draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Elam, K.R.; Reich, W.J.

    1995-01-01

    With the end of the Cold War, countries have excess plutonium and other materials from the reductions in inventories of nuclear weapons. It has been recommended that these surplus fissile materials (SFMs) be processed so that they are no more accessible than plutonium in spent nuclear fuel (SNF). This SNF standard, if adopted worldwide, would prevent rapid recovery of SFMs for the manufacture of nuclear weapons. This report provides for the PEIS the necessary input data on a new method for the disposition of SFMs: the simultaneous conversion of SFMs, SNF, and other highly radioactive materials into high-level-waste (HLW) glass. The SFMs include plutonium, neptunium, americium, and 233 U. The primary SFM is plutonium. The preferred SNF is degraded SNF, which may require processing before it can be accepted by a geological repository for disposal. The primary form of this SNF is Hanford-N SNF with preirradiation uranium enrichments between 0.95 and 1.08%. The final product is a plutonium, low-enriched-uranium, HLW, borosilicate glass for disposition in a geological repository. The proposed conversion process is the Glass Material Oxidation and Dissolution System (GMODS), which is a new process. The initial analysis of the GMODS process indicates that a MODS facility for this application would be similar in size and environmental impact to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site. Because of this, the detailed information available on DWPF was used as the basis for much of the GMODS input into the SFMs PEIS

  2. The combined use of business management with facility management as an option for intelligent building

    OpenAIRE

    Weise, Andreas Dittmar; Schultz, Charles Albino; Trierweiller, Andréa Cristina; Rocha, Rudimar Antunes da; Peixe, Blênio Cesar Severo

    2014-01-01

    Words like Business Management (BM) and Facility Management (FM) are well known as separate management methods. FM offers transparency about their property costs and exploitation, starting from the planning phase until its demolition. The investor sees this in the property invested capital and its recoverable yield. This means they also want a profit with their real estates. Besides this, changes in the social and environmental requirements become necessary to adapt the properties. The soluti...

  3. WIPP Facility Work Plan for Solid Waste Management Units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    This Facility Work Plan (FWP) has been prepared as required by Module VII,Section VII.M.1 of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Hazardous Waste Permit, NM4890139088-TSDF (the Permit); (NMED, 1999a). This work plan describes the programmatic facility-wide approach to future investigations at Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) and Areas of Concern (AOCs) specified in the Permit. This FWP addresses the current Permit requirements. It uses the results of previous investigations performed at WIPP and expands the investigations as required by the Permit. As an alternative to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) specified in Module VII of the Permit, current New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) guidance identifies an Accelerated Corrective Action Approach (ACAA) that may be used for any SWMU or AOC (NMED, 1998). This accelerated approach is used to replace the standard RFI Work Plan and Report sequence with a more flexible decision-making approach. The ACAA process allows a Facility to exit the schedule of compliance contained in the Facility's's Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) permit module and proceed on an accelerated time frame. Thus, the ACAA process can be entered either before or after an RFI Work Plan. According to NMED's guidance, a facility can prepare an RFI Work Plan or Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) for any SWMU or AOC (NMED, 1998). Based on this guidance, a SAP constitutes an acceptable alternative to the RFI Work Plan specified in the Permit. The scope of work for the RFI Work Plan or SAP is being developed by the Permittees. The final content of the RFI Work Plan or SAP will be coordinated with the NMED for submittal on May 24, 2000. Specific project-related planning information will be included in the RFI Work Plan or SAP. The SWMU program at WIPP began in 1994 under U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulatory authority. NMED subsequently received regulatory authority from EPA. A

  4. Nuclear Security Management for Research Reactors and Related Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-03-01

    This publication provides a single source guidance to assist those responsible for the implementation of nuclear security measures at research reactors and associated facilities in developing and maintaining an effective and comprehensive programme covering all aspects of nuclear security on the site. It is based on national experience and practices as well as on publications in the field of nuclear management and security. The scope includes security operations, security processes, and security forces and their relationship with the State’s nuclear security regime. The guidance is provided for consideration by States, competent authorities and operators

  5. Management of the high-level nuclear power facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preda, Marin

    2003-05-01

    This thesis approaches current issues in the management of the high power nuclear facilities and as such it appears to be important particularly for nuclear power plant operation topics. Of special interest are the failure events entailing possible catastrophic situations. The contents is structured onto ten chapters. The first chapter describes the operation regimes of the nuclear high power facilities. Highlighted here are the thesis scope and the original features of the work. The second chapter deals with operational policies developed in order to ensure the preventive maintenance of the nuclear installations. Also managing structures are described devoted to practical warranting the equipment safety function of non-classical power stations. In the third chapter cases of nuclear accidents are analyzed especially stressing the probabilistic risk and the operation regimes having in view the elimination of catastrophic events. In the fourth and fifth chapters the control of nuclear radiation emission is treated focusing the quality issue of nuclear installations required to avoid hazardous effects at level of nuclear reactor operation stage. At the same time set of operational measures is given here for preventing risks, catastrophes and chaotic situations. The chapter five presents both theoretical and practical approaches of the nuclear reactor core management concerning particularly the fuel testing, the water primary system and the quality of the involved equipment. In the sixth and seventh chapters issues of risk-quality correlations are approached as well as the structure of expert systems for monitoring the operational regimes of nuclear facilities. The efficiency of the power systems with nuclear injection is discussed and some original ideas developed in this work are evidenced in the eighth and ninth chapters. Presented are here both the operational principles and models of raising the efficiency of the interconnected nuclear stations and prices' policy

  6. Greening Federal Facilities: An Energy, Environmental, and Economic Resource Guide for Federal Facility Managers and Designers; Second Edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, A.

    2001-05-16

    Greening Federal Facilities, Second Edition, is a nuts-and-bolts resource guide compiled to increase energy and resource efficiency, cut waste, and improve the performance of Federal buildings and facilities. The guide highlights practical actions that facility managers, design and construction staff, procurement officials, and facility planners can take to save energy and money, improve the comfort and productivity of employees, and benefit the environment. It supports a national effort to promote energy and environmental efficiency in the nation's 500,000 Federal buildings and facilities. Topics covered include current Federal regulations; environmental and energy decision-making; site and landscape issues; building design; energy systems; water and wastewater; materials; waste management, and recycling; indoor environmental quality; and managing buildings.

  7. Tritium and ignition target management at the National Ignition Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draggoo, Vaughn

    2013-06-01

    Isotopic mixtures of hydrogen constitute the basic fuel for fusion targets of the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A typical NIF fusion target shot requires approximately 0.5 mmoles of hydrogen gas and as much as 750 GBq (20 Ci) of 3H. Isotopic mix ratios are specified according to the experimental shot/test plan and the associated test objectives. The hydrogen isotopic concentrations, absolute amounts, gas purity, configuration of the target, and the physical configuration of the NIF facility are all parameters and conditions that must be managed to ensure the quality and safety of operations. An essential and key step in the preparation of an ignition target is the formation of a ~60 μm thick hydrogen "ice" layer on the inner surface of the target capsule. The Cryogenic Target Positioning System (Cryo-Tarpos) provides gas handling, cyro-cooling, x-ray imaging systems, and related instrumentation to control the volumes and temperatures of the multiphase (solid, liquid, and gas) hydrogen as the gas is condensed to liquid, admitted to the capsule, and frozen as a single spherical crystal of hydrogen in the capsule. The hydrogen fuel gas is prepared in discrete 1.7 cc aliquots in the LLNL Tritium Facility for each ignition shot. Post-shot hydrogen gas is recovered in the NIF Tritium Processing System (TPS). Gas handling systems, instrumentation and analytic equipment, material accounting information systems, and the shot planning systems must work together to ensure that operational and safety requirements are met.

  8. Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) groundwater monitoring report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-03-01

    During fourth quarter 1992, nine constituents exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) in one or more groundwater samples from monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) and adjacent facilities. As in previous quarters, tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread constituents. Fifty-seven (48%) of the 120 monitoring wells, contained elevated tritium activities, and 23 (19%) contained elevated trichloroethylene concentrations. Total alpha-emitting radium, tetrachloroethylene, chloroethene, cadmium, 1,1-dichloroethylene, lead, or nonvolatile beta levels exceeded standards in one or more wells. During 1992, elevated levels of 13 constituents were found in one or more of 80 of the 120 groundwater monitoring wells (67%) at the MWMF and adjacent facilities. Tritium and trichloroethylene exceeded their final PDWS more frequently and more consistently than did other constituents. Tritium activity exceeded its final PDWS m 67 wells and trichloroethylene was. elevated in 28 wells. Lead, tetrachloroethylene, total alpha-emitting radium, gross alpha, cadmium, chloroethene, 1,1-dichloroethylene 1,2-dichloroethane, mercury, or nitrate exceeded standards in one or more wells during the year. Nonvolatile beta exceeded its drinking water screening level in 3 wells during the year

  9. National ignition facility environment, safety, and health management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    The ES ampersand H Management Plan describes all of the environmental, safety, and health evaluations and reviews that must be carried out in support of the implementation of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Project. It describes the policy, organizational responsibilities and interfaces, activities, and ES ampersand H documents that will be prepared by the Laboratory Project Office for the DOE. The only activity not described is the preparation of the NIF Project Specific Assessment (PSA), which is to be incorporated into the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Stockpile Stewardship and Management (PEIS). This PSA is being prepared by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) with input from the Laboratory participants. As the independent NEPA document preparers ANL is directly contracted by the DOE, and its deliverables and schedule are agreed to separately with DOE/OAK

  10. Organisation of facilities management in relation to core business

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Anker

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to clarify the organisational relationships between Facilities Management (FM) and core business and how these relationships vary for strategic and operational support functions. Approach: The research takes a starting point in Michael Porter’s theory...... as mainly a specific customer orientation. It is concluded that a market relationship – internally or externally – is appropriate for non-strategic functions, while it is important to create a kind of coalition between strategic FM functions and the core business management. Originality/value: The paper...... provides a theoretical and empirical based analysis of the organisation of FM in relation to core business. The proposed solution of creating a strategic coalition has not been suggested before in scientific literature, but a recent example in practice has occurred. This supports the proposal and shows its...

  11. Controlling changes - lessons learned from waste management facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, B.M.; Koplow, A.S.; Stoll, F.E.; Waetje, W.D.

    1995-01-01

    This paper discusses lessons learned about change control at the Waste Reduction Operations Complex (WROC) and Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). WROC and WERF have developed and implemented change control and an as-built drawing process and have identified structures, systems, and components (SSCS) for configuration management. The operations have also formed an Independent Review Committee to minimize costs and resources associated with changing documents. WROC and WERF perform waste management activities at the INEL. WROC activities include storage, treatment, and disposal of hazardous and mixed waste. WERF provides volume reduction of solid low-level waste through compaction, incineration, and sizing operations. WROC and WERF's efforts aim to improve change control processes that have worked inefficiently in the past

  12. Impacts of building information modeling on facility maintenance management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahamed, Shafee; Neelamkavil, Joseph; Canas, Roberto [Centre for Computer-assisted Construction Technologies, National Research Council of Canada, London, Ontario (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Building information modeling (BIM) is a digital representation of the physical and functional properties of a building; it has been used by construction professionals for a long time and stakeholders are now using it in different aspects of the building lifecycle. This paper intends to present how BIM impacts the construction industry and how it can be used for facility maintenance management. The maintenance and operations of buildings are in most cases still managed through the use of drawings and spreadsheets although life cycle costs of a building are significantly higher than initial investment costs; thus, the use of BIM could help in achieving a higher efficiency and so important benefits. This study is part of an ongoing research project, the nD modeling project, which aims at predicting building energy consumption with better accuracy.

  13. Introducing Systematic Aging Management for Interim Storage Facilities in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spieth-Achtnich, Angelika; Schmidt, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    In Germany twelve at-reactor and three central (away from reactor) dry storage facilities are in operation, where the fuel is stored in combined transport-and-storage casks. The safety of the storage casks and facilities has been approved and is licensed for up to 40 years operating time. If the availability of a final disposal facility for the stored wastes (spent fuel and high-level wastes from reprocessing) will be further delayed the renewal of the licenses can become necessary in future. Since 2001 Germany had a regulatory guideline for at-reactor dry interim storage of spent fuel. In this guideline some elements of ageing were implemented, but no systematic approach was made for a state-of-the-art ageing management. Currently the guideline is updated to include all kind of storage facilities (central storages as well) and all kinds of high level waste (also waste from reprocessing). Draft versions of the update are under discussion. In these drafts a systematic ageing management is seen as an instrument to upgrade the available technical knowledge base for possible later regulatory decisions, should it be necessary to prolong storage periods to beyond the currently approved limits. It is further recognized as an instrument to prevent from possible and currently unrecognized ageing mechanisms. The generation of information on ageing can be an important basis for the necessary safety-relevant verifications for long term storage. For the first time, the demands for a systematic monitoring of ageing processes for all safety-related components of the storage system are described. In addition, for inaccessible container components such as the seal system, the neutron shielding, the baskets and the waste inventory, the development of a monitoring program is recommended. The working draft to the revised guideline also contains recommendations on non-technical ageing issues such as the long-term preservation of knowledge, long term personnel planning and long term

  14. Risk management plan for the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brereton, S.; Lane, M.; Smith, C.; Yatabe, J.

    1998-01-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a U.S. Department of Energy inertial confinement laser fusion facility, currently under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). NIF is a critical tool for the Department of Energy (DOE) science- based Stockpile Stewardship and Management Program. In addition, it represents a major step towards realizing inertial confinement fusion as a source of energy. The NIF will focus 192 laser beams onto spherical targets containing a mixture of deuterium and tritium, causing them to implode. This will create the high temperatures and pressures necessary for these targets to undergo fusion. The plan is for NIF to achieve ignition (i.e., self-heating of the fuel) and energy gain (i.e., more fusion energy produced than laser energy deposited) in the laboratory for the first time. A Risk Management Plan was prepared for the NIF design and construction Project. The plan was prepared in accordance with the DOE Life Cycle Asset Management Good Practice Guide. The objectives of the plan were to: (1) identify the risks to the completion of the Project in terms of meeting technical and regulatory requirements, cost, and schedule, (2) assess the risks in terms of likelihood of occurrence and their impact potential relative to technical performance, ES ampersand H (environment, safety and health), costs, and schedule, and (3) address each risk in terms of suitable risk management measures. Major risk elements were identified for the NIF Project. A risk assessment methodology was developed, which was utilized to rank the Project risks with respect to one another. Those elements presenting greater risk were readily identified by this process. This paper describes that methodology and the results

  15. Safety issues in fabricating mixed oxide fuel using surplus weapons plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buksa, J.; Badwan, F.; Barr, M.; Motley, F.

    1998-07-01

    This paper presents an assessment of the safety issues and implications of fabricating mixed oxide (MOX) fuel using surplus weapons plutonium. The basis for this assessment is the research done at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in identifying and resolving the technical issues surrounding the production of PuO 2 feed, removal of gallium from the PuO 2 feed, the fabrication of test fuel, and the work done at the LANL plutonium processing facility. The use of plutonium in MOX fuel has been successfully demonstrated in Europe, where the experience has been almost exclusively with plutonium separated from commercial spent nuclear fuel. This experience in safely operating MOX fuel fabrication facilities directly applies to the fabrication and irradiation of MOX fuel made from surplus weapons plutonium. Consequently, this paper focuses on the technical difference between plutonium from surplus weapons, and light-water reactor recycled plutonium. Preliminary assessments and research lead to the conclusion that no new process or product safety concerns will arise from using surplus weapons plutonium in MOX fuel

  16. Strategic sourcing and procurement of facilities management services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Anker

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose it to provide insights into strategic sourcing concerning Facilities Management (FM) and how it can contribute to a sourcing decision that combines the benefits of internal and external provision with consideration of business risk and cost. Design/methodology/approach: The p......Purpose: The purpose it to provide insights into strategic sourcing concerning Facilities Management (FM) and how it can contribute to a sourcing decision that combines the benefits of internal and external provision with consideration of business risk and cost. Design....../methodology/approach: The paper investigates a strategic sourcing and procurement process in a large public organisation in Denmark based on participating in internal meetings, a workshop, document studies and interviews. The process is compared to a new ISO standard with guidance on strategic sourcing and development of FM...... the organisation decided to change the sourcing strategy with insourcing the most critical building related activities and changing the procurement strategy from one integrated FM contract to 3 bundled and 7 single service contracts. The concept of right-sourcing is discussed. Research limitations...

  17. 41 CFR 102-74.155 - What energy conservation policy must Federal agencies follow in the management of facilities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... policy must Federal agencies follow in the management of facilities? 102-74.155 Section 102-74.155 Public... MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Energy Conservation § 102-74.155 What energy conservation policy must Federal agencies follow in the management of facilities...

  18. The mixed waste management facility: Cost-benefit for the Mixed Waste Management Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brinker, S.D.; Streit, R.D.

    1996-04-01

    The Mixed Waste Management Facility, or MWMF, has been proposed as a national testbed facility for the demonstration and evaluation of technologies that are alternatives to incineration for the treatment of mixed low-level waste. The facility design will enable evaluation of technologies at pilot scale, including all aspects of the processes, from receiving and feed preparation to the preparation of final forms for disposal. The MWMF will reduce the risk of deploying such technologies by addressing the following: (1) Engineering development and scale-up. (2) Process integration and activation of the treatment systems. (3) Permitting and stakeholder issues. In light of the severe financial constraints imposed on the DOE and federal programs, DOE/HQ requested a study to assess the cost benefit for the MWMF given other potential alternatives to meet waste treatment needs. The MVVMF Project was asked to consider alternatives specifically associated with commercialization and privatization of the DOE site waste treatment operations and the acceptability (or lack of acceptability) of incineration as a waste treatment process. The result of this study will be one of the key elements for a DOE decision on proceeding with the MWMF into Final Design (KD-2) vs. proceeding with other options

  19. National Ignition Facility and managing location, component, and state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foxworthy, Cemil; Fung, Tracy; Beeler, Rich; Li, Joyce; Dugorepec, Jasna; Chang, Cathy

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► NIF in comprised of over 100k serialized parts that must be tracked and maintained. ► We discuss a web-based integrated parts management system designed for NIF. ► The parts database stores associated calibration data with effective dates. ► The system interfaces with the NIF control system and performance models. ► Work activity (Permits, Problem Logs, Work Orders) are managed by the system. - Abstract: The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a stadium-sized facility that contains a 192-beam, 1.8-MJ, 500-TW, ultraviolet laser system coupled with a 10-m diameter target chamber. There are over 6200 Line Replaceable Units (LRUs) comprised of more than 104,000 serialized parts that make up the NIF. Each LRU is a modular unit typically composed of a mechanical housing, laser optics (glass, lenses, or mirrors), and utilities. To date, there are more than 120,000 data sets created to characterize the attributes of these parts. Greater than 51,000 Work Permits have been issued to install, maintain, and troubleshoot the components. One integrated system is used to manage these data, and more. The Location Component and State (LoCoS) system is a web application built using Java Enterprise Edition technologies and is accessed by over 1200 users. It is either directly or indirectly involved with each aspect of NIF work activity, and interfaces with ten external systems including the Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS) and the Laser Performance Operations Model (LPOM). Besides providing business functionality, LoCoS also acts as the NIF enterprise service bus. In this role, numerous integration approaches had to be adopted including: file exchange, database sharing, queuing, and web services in order to accommodate various business, technical, and security requirements. Architecture and implementation decisions are discussed.

  20. WIPP Facility Work Plan for Solid Waste Management Units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2000-02-25

    This Facility Work Plan (FWP) has been prepared as required by Module VII,Section VII.M.1 of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Hazardous Waste Permit, NM4890139088-TSDF (the Permit); (NMED, 1999a). This work plan describes the programmatic facility-wide approach to future investigations at Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) and Areas of Concern (AOCs) specified in the Permit. This FWP addresses the current Permit requirements. It uses the results of previous investigations performed at WIPP and expands the investigations as required by the Permit. As an alternative to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) specified in Module VII of the Permit, current New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) guidance identifies an Accelerated Corrective Action Approach (ACAA) that may be used for any SWMU or AOC (NMED, 1998). This accelerated approach is used to replace the standard RFI Work Plan and Report sequence with a more flexible decision-making approach. The ACAA process allows a Facility to exit the schedule of compliance contained in the Facility’s Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) permit module and proceed on an accelerated time frame. Thus, the ACAA process can be entered either before or after an RFI Work Plan. According to NMED’s guidance, a facility can prepare an RFI Work Plan or Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) for any SWMU or AOC (NMED, 1998). Based on this guidance, a SAP constitutes an acceptable alternative to the RFI Work Plan specified in the Permit. The scope of work for the RFI Work Plan or SAP is being developed by the Permittees. The final content of the RFI Work Plan or SAP will be coordinated with the NMED for submittal on May 24, 2000. Specific project-related planning information will be included in the RFI Work Plan or SAP. The SWMU program at WIPP began in 1994 under U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulatory authority. NMED subsequently received regulatory authority from EPA

  1. Facilities Management and Corporate Real Estate Management as Value Drivers: How to Manage and Measure Adding Value

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Facilities Management (FM) and Corporate Real Estate Management (CREM) are two closely related and relatively new management disciplines with developing international professions and increasing academic attention. Both disciplines have from the outset a strong focus on controlling and reducing cost...... for real estate, facilities and related services. In recent years there has been a change towards putting more focus on how FM/CREM can add value to the organisation. The book is research based with a focus on guidance to practice. It offers a transdisciplinary approach, integrating academic knowledge from...

  2. National Ignition Facility risk management plan, rev. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brereton, S J; Lane, M A

    1998-01-01

    The initial release of the National Ignition Facility (AUF) Risk Management Plan (LLNL, 1997a) was prepared in accordance with the DOE Life Cycle Asset Management Good Practice Guide (DOE, 1996a) and supported Critical Decision 3 (CD3), Approval to Initiate Construction (DOE, 1997a). The objectives of the plan were to: (1) Identify the risks to the completion of the Project in terms of meeting technical and regulatory requirements, cost, and schedule. (2) Assess the risks in terms of likelihood of occurrence and their impact potential relative to technical performance, ES and H (environmental, safety and health), costs, and schedule. (3) Address suitable risk mitigation measures for each identified risk. This revision of the Risk Management Plan considers project risks and vulnerabilities after CD3 (DOE, 1997a) was approved by the Secretary of Energy. During the one-year period since the initial release, the vulnerabilities of greatest concern have been the litigation of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) (DOE, 1996b) by a group of environmental organizations led by the Natural Resources Defense Council; the finding and successful clean-up of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-filled electrical capacitors at the NIF site excavation; the FY98 congressional budget authorization and request for the FY99 budget authorization; funding for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF)/NIF programmatic activities (including French and other sources of funding); and finally, progress in the core science and technology, and optics program that form the basis for the NIF design

  3. National Ignition Facility and Managing Location, Component, and State

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foxworthy, C.; Fung, T.; Beeler, R.; Li, J.; Dugorepec, J.; Chang, C.

    2011-01-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a stadium-sized facility that contains a 192-beam, 1.8-Megajoule, 500-Terawatt, ultraviolet laser system coupled with a 10-meter diameter target chamber. There are over 6,200 Line Replaceable Units (LRUs) comprised of more than 104,000 serialized parts that make up the NIF. Each LRU is a modular unit typically composed of a mechanical housing, laser optics (glass, lenses, or mirrors), and utilities. To date, there are more than 120,000 data sets created to characterize the attributes of these parts. Greater than 51,000 Work Permits have been issued to install, maintain, and troubleshoot the components. One integrated system is used to manage these data, and more. The Location Component and State (LoCoS) system is a web application built using Java Enterprise Edition technologies and is accessed by over 1,200 users. It is either directly or indirectly involved with each aspect of NIF work activity, and interfaces with ten external systems including the Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS) and the Laser Performance Operations Model (LPOM). Besides providing business functionality, LoCoS also acts as the NIF enterprise service bus. In this role, numerous integration approaches had to be adopted including: file exchange, database sharing, queuing, and web services in order to accommodate various business, technical, and security requirements. Architecture and implementation decisions are discussed.

  4. National Ignition Facility and Managing Location, Component, and State

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foxworthy, C; Fung, T; Beeler, R; Li, J; Dugorepec, J; Chang, C

    2011-07-25

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a stadium-sized facility that contains a 192-beam, 1.8-Megajoule, 500-Terawatt, ultraviolet laser system coupled with a 10-meter diameter target chamber. There are over 6,200 Line Replaceable Units (LRUs) comprised of more than 104,000 serialized parts that make up the NIF. Each LRU is a modular unit typically composed of a mechanical housing, laser optics (glass, lenses, or mirrors), and utilities. To date, there are more than 120,000 data sets created to characterize the attributes of these parts. Greater than 51,000 Work Permits have been issued to install, maintain, and troubleshoot the components. One integrated system is used to manage these data, and more. The Location Component and State (LoCoS) system is a web application built using Java Enterprise Edition technologies and is accessed by over 1,200 users. It is either directly or indirectly involved with each aspect of NIF work activity, and interfaces with ten external systems including the Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS) and the Laser Performance Operations Model (LPOM). Besides providing business functionality, LoCoS also acts as the NIF enterprise service bus. In this role, numerous integration approaches had to be adopted including: file exchange, database sharing, queuing, and web services in order to accommodate various business, technical, and security requirements. Architecture and implementation decisions are discussed.

  5. Waste Management Effluent Treatment Facility: Phase I. CAC basic data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gemar, D.W.; O'Leary, C.D.

    1984-01-01

    In order to expedite design and construction of the Waste Management Effluent Treatment Facility (WMETF), the project has been divided into two phases. Phase I consists of four storage basins and the associated transfer lines, diversion boxes, and control rooms. The design data pertaining to Phase I of the WMETF project are presented together with general background information and objectives for both phases. The project will provide means to store and decontaminate wastewater streams that are currently discharged to the seepage basins in F Area and H Area. This currently includes both routine process flows sent directly to the seepage basins and diversions of contaminated cooling water or storm water runoff that are stored in the retention basins before being pumped to the seepage basins

  6. Comprehensive safety cases for radioactive waste management facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woollam, P.B.; Cameron, H.M.; Davies, A.R.; Hiscox, A.W.

    1995-01-01

    Probabilistic safety assessment methodology has been applied by Nuclear Electric plc (NE) to the development of comprehensive safety cases for the radioactive waste management processing and accumulation facilities associated with its 26 reactor systems. This paper describes the methodology and the safety case assessment criteria employed by NE. An overview of the results is presented, together with more detail of a specific safety analysis: storage of fuel element debris. No risk to the public greater than 10 -6 /y has been identified and the more significant risks arise from the potential for radioactive waste fires. There are no unacceptable risks from external hazards such as flooding, aircrash or seismic events. Some operations previously expected to have significant risks in fact have negligible risks, while the few faults with risks exceeding the assessment criteria were only identified as a result of this study

  7. Sustainability in facilities management: an overview of current research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Susanne Balslev; Sarasoja, Anna-Liisa; Ramskov Galamba, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    the emerging sub-discipline of sustainable facilities management (SFM) on research, an overview of current studies is needed. The purpose of this literature review is to provide exactly this overview. Design/methodology/approach: This article identifies and examines current research studies on SFM through...... a comprehensive and systematic literature review. The literature review included screening of 85 identified scientific journals and almost 20,000 articles from the period of 2007-2012. Of the articles reviewed, 151 were identified as key articles and categorised according to topic. Findings: The literature review...... indicated that the current research varies in focus, methodology and application of theory, and it was concluded that the current research primary addresses environmental sustainability, whereas the current research which takes an integrated strategic approach to SFM is limited. The article includes lists...

  8. Information Technology in Facilities Management - A Literature Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbesen, Poul

    2015-01-01

    Purpose : The aim of this paper is to present the state of the art of research in Information Technology (IT) in Facilities Management (FM). Background : Initial studies indicate that investments into IT in FM often do not add the expected value, neither to the FM department itself nor...... on IT in FM were found. Relevant articles were organized in categories according to focus on 1. technology, 2. IT layer, 3. FM process, 4. theory and research method applied, and 5. type of findings. Finally research gaps were identified. Results and practical implications : There seems to be a general belief...... in technology combinations as a way to speed up the rather slow IT diffusion process in FM. It is documented that current research into IT in FM has an unbalanced focus on few specific technologies, IT layers and FM processes, and that further research should focus more on the IT implementation process and use...

  9. Managing risks during the construction of a power generation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loulakis, M.C.

    1992-01-01

    The construction of a power generation facility is a substantial undertaking that involves considerable risks to all parties involved. While contractors are accustomed to dealing with risks, construction owners are typically more naive about not only the risks they are assuming in the construction of a project, but also about the role they play on the project itself. Owners and developers of power facilities must understand at the outset that their role during the construction of a project is as integral to the success of the project as that of the designer and contractor. In addition, owners should also understand that there are virtually no risks on a construction project that cannot be shifted among the contracting parties as part of the business deal. Consequently, an owner may contractually be assuming the risks of (1) unusually severe weather, (2) unexpected subsurface conditions, (3) strikes at the turbine supplier's plant or (4) changes in law - as well as the increases in price and delays to project completion associated with such risks. In light of this, a prudent owner will evaluate more than just whether there is sufficient financing to complete the construction of a contemplated project. Prudent owners will conduct a risk management review of the project structure and the contracting terms, with the primary focus being (1) the identification and analysis of the most significant risks faced, (2) a determination of how such risks can be either mitigated or eliminated, and (3) the assessment of the financial exposure to the owner should the potential risk become a reality. This paper will present the framework that owners and developers of power generation projects can use in undertaking such a risk management review

  10. Managing Human Performance to Improve Nuclear Facility Operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    . It describes how human performance can be managed within an overall performance improvement model. The need for IAEA involvement in this area and to address key issues highlighted in IAEA Nuclear Energy Series No. NG-G-2.1 were reinforced during the meetings of the Technical Working Group on Managing Human Resources in the Field of Nuclear Energy (TWG-MHR) in 2008 and 2010. The importance of human performance in the safe operation of any nuclear facility is no longer in doubt. The contribution of human performance to the occurrence of significant events and, consequently, to overall performance in the nuclear field has been well documented. Monitoring and continually improving human performance has now become one of the key challenges in the management of human resources for nuclear facilities. To facilitate meeting the challenge of improving human performance, a model of performance improvement is presented that provides a framework which can be used to improve individual, process and organizational performance. It is generally postulated that without human performance improvement, a safe working environment is impossible to maintain. While there are many different perspectives from which safety issues might be addressed, there are several factors significant for human performance improvement that are consistent, useful and necessary to understand. This publication is not intended as an all encompassing guide to managing human performance, but, rather, provides a summary of concepts and good practices for organizations to consider in their design of various programmes and in the performance of activities. In addition, tools that are helpful for managing human performance are discussed, and references for more detailed information on these concepts and tools are provided

  11. Surplus Highly Enriched Uranium Disposition Program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide upper level guidance for the program that will downblend surplus highly enriched uranium for use as commercial nuclear reactor fuel or low-level radioactive waste. The intent of this document is to outline the overall mission and program objectives. The document is also intended to provide a general basis for integration of disposition efforts among all applicable sites. This plan provides background information, establishes the scope of disposition activities, provides an approach to the mission and objectives, identifies programmatic assumptions, defines major roles, provides summary level schedules and milestones, and addresses budget requirements

  12. 25 CFR 170.806 - What is an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Management System? 170.806 Section 170.806 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM BIA Road Maintenance § 170.806 What is an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System? An IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management...

  13. A distributed data base management facility for the CAD/CAM environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balza, R. M.; Beaudet, R. W.; Johnson, H. R.

    1984-01-01

    Current/PAD research in the area of distributed data base management considers facilities for supporting CAD/CAM data management in a heterogeneous network of computers encompassing multiple data base managers supporting a variety of data models. These facilities include coordinated execution of multiple DBMSs to provide for administration of and access to data distributed across them.

  14. 77 FR 55843 - Office of Facilities Management and Program Services; Submission for OMB Review; Background...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-11

    ... ADMINISTRATION Office of Facilities Management and Program Services; Submission for OMB Review; Background Investigations for Child Care Workers AGENCY: Office of Facilities Management and Program Services, Public... Act, the Regulatory Secretariat will be submitting to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) a...

  15. Field Research Facility Data Integration Framework Data Management Plan: Survey Lines Dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    ER D C/ CH L SR -1 6- 4 Coastal Ocean Data Systems Program Field Research Facility Data Integration Framework Data Management Plan...Systems Program ERDC/CHL SR-16-4 August 2016 Field Research Facility Data Integration Framework Data Management Plan Survey Lines Dataset Michael F...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Field Research Facility Data Integration Framework Data Management Plan: Survey Lines Dataset 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  16. A Note on Realistic Dividends in Actuarial Surplus Models

    OpenAIRE

    Benjamin Avanzi; Vincent Tu; Bernard Wong

    2016-01-01

    Because of the profitable nature of risk businesses in the long term, de Finetti suggested that surplus models should allow for cash leakages, as otherwise the surplus would unrealistically grow (on average) to infinity. These leakages were interpreted as 'dividends'. Subsequent literature on actuarial surplus models with dividend distribution has mainly focussed on dividend strategies that either maximise the expected present value of dividends until ruin or lead to a probability of ruin tha...

  17. Planning and managing future space facility projects. [management by objectives and group dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieber, J. E.; Wilhelm, J. A.; Tanner, T. A.; Helmreich, R. L.; Burgenbauch, S. F.

    1979-01-01

    To learn how ground-based personnel of a space project plan and organize their work and how such planning and organizing relate to work outcomes, longitudinal study of the management and execution of the Space Lab Mission Development Test 3 (SMD 3) was performed at NASA Ames Research Center. A view of the problems likely to arise in organizations and some methods of coping with these problems are presented as well as the conclusions and recommendations that pertain strictly to SMD 3 management. Emphasis is placed on the broader context of future space facility projects and additional problems that may be anticipated. A model of management that may be used to facilitate problem solving and communication - management by objectives (MBO) is presented. Some problems of communication and emotion management that MBO does not address directly are considered. Models for promoting mature, constructive and satisfying emotional relationships among group members are discussed.

  18. The management of carbon-14 in Canadian nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-07-01

    In Canada, Derived Emission Limits (DELs) for the release of radionuclides from nuclear facilities are set to ensure that the dose to a member of a critical group from one year's release does not exceed the limit on annual dose to a member of the public set by the Atomic Energy Control Regulations. The Advisory Committee on Radiological Protection (ACRP) has expressed concerns as to whether this procedure provides adequate protection to members of the public, including future generations, for certain radionuclides such as a carbon-14 ( 14 C), which can accumulate in the environment and which can be dispersed, through environmental processes, beyond the local region where the critical group is assumed to live. The ACRP subsequently established a Working Group to review the production, release, environmental levels, and waste management of 14 C arising in CANDU power reactors. The ACRP recommendations resulting from this review can be summarized as · Given the current levels of emissions from CANDU nuclear power stations resulting from the use of a carbon dioxide annulus gas and the limitations in the calculation and use of collective dose, the ACRP sees no need for and additional collective dose limit to be applied to these sources. · The AECB should require licensees of power reactors and waste management sites to provide an annual inventory of 14 C held within reactor buildings and waste management sites; to provide information on the stability of the ion exchange resins and their continuing ability to retain the 14 C; to demonstrate on an ongoing basis that releases of 14 C are maintained at a small fraction of the emission limits; and to report annually the critical group and local collective doses arising from releases of 14 C. 61 refs., 25 tabs., 4 figs

  19. Predisposal Management of Radioactive Waste from Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facilities. Specific Safety Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    This Safety Guide provides guidance on the predisposal management of all types of radioactive waste (including spent nuclear fuel declared as waste and high level waste) generated at nuclear fuel cycle facilities. These waste management facilities may be located within larger facilities or may be separate, dedicated waste management facilities (including centralized waste management facilities). The Safety Guide covers all stages in the lifetime of these facilities, including their siting, design, construction, commissioning, operation, and shutdown and decommissioning. It covers all steps carried out in the management of radioactive waste following its generation up to (but not including) disposal, including its processing (pretreatment, treatment and conditioning). Radioactive waste generated both during normal operation and in accident conditions is considered

  20. Materials and Fuels Complex Facilities Radioactive Waste Management Basis and DOE Manual 435.1-1 Compliance Tables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvego, Lisa; Bennett, Brion

    2011-01-01

    Department of Energy Order 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management,' along with its associated manual and guidance, requires development and maintenance of a radioactive waste management basis for each radioactive waste management facility, operation, and activity. This document presents a radioactive waste management basis for Idaho National Laboratory's Materials and Fuels Complex facilities that manage radioactive waste. The radioactive waste management basis for a facility comprises existing laboratory-wide and facility-specific documents. Department of Energy Manual 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management Manual,' facility compliance tables also are presented for the facilities. The tables serve as a tool for developing the radioactive waste management basis.

  1. Materials and Security Consolidation Complex Facilities Radioactive Waste Management Basis and DOE Manual 435.1-1 Compliance Tables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Department of Energy Order 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management,' along with its associated manual and guidance, requires development and maintenance of a radioactive waste management basis for each radioactive waste management facility, operation, and activity. This document presents a radioactive waste management basis for Idaho National Laboratory's Materials and Security Consolidation Center facilities that manage radioactive waste. The radioactive waste management basis for a facility comprises existing laboratory-wide and facility-specific documents. Department of Energy Manual 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management Manual,' facility compliance tables also are presented for the facilities. The tables serve as a tool for developing the radioactive waste management basis.

  2. Managing highly flexible facilities: an essential complementary asset at risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tierney, Robert; Tierney, R.; Groen, Arend J.; Harms, Rainer; Luizink, M.; Hetherington, D.; Steward, H.; Walsh, Steven Thomas; Linton, Jonathan; Linton, J.D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Twenty first century problems are increasingly being addressed by multi technology solutions developed by regional entrepreneurial and intreprepreneurial innovators. However, they require an expensive new type of fabrication facility. Multiple technology production facilities (MTPF) have

  3. Conceptual design of an in-space cryogenic fluid management facility, executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willen, G. S.; Riemer, D. H.; Hustvedt, D. C.

    1981-01-01

    The conceptual design of a Spacelab experiment to develop the technology associated with low gravity propellant management is summarized. The preliminary facility definition, conceptual design and design analysis, and facility development plan, including schedule and cost estimates for the facility, are presented.

  4. Waste receiving and processing facility module 1 data management system software project management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, R.E.

    1994-01-01

    This document provides the software development plan for the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Module 1 Data Management System (DMS). The DMS is one of the plant computer systems for the new WRAP 1 facility (Project W-026). The DMS will collect, store, and report data required to certify the low level waste (LLW) and transuranic (TRU) waste items processed at WRAP 1 as acceptable for shipment, storage, or disposal

  5. Investigating the Optimal Management Strategy for a Healthcare Facility Maintenance Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gaillard, Daria

    2004-01-01

    ...: strategic partnering with an equipment management firm. The objective of this study is to create a decision-model for selecting the optimal management strategy for a healthcare organization's facility maintenance program...

  6. Development techniques of computerized maintenance management system for nuclear fuel cycle examination facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Yon Woo; Kim, S. D.; Soong, W. S.; Kim, G. H.; Oh, W. H.; Kim, Y. G.

    2000-12-01

    Normal operation of the facility is one of the key factors in the accomplishments of research goals. As confirmed by a case study of the influence of the facility operation condition on the research results, emphasis should be put on the facility preserve management. Facilities should be maintained in solid operational condition and their malfunctions should be repaired as soon as possible. The purpose of this project is to make propositions on the development of the facility Preserve management system which is to maximize the efficiency of the budget execution, manpower organization and maintenance planning, and is to minimize the duration of the operational pause due to malfunctions with the least disbursement

  7. Development techniques of computerized maintenance management system for nuclear fuel cycle examination facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Yon Woo; Kim, S. D.; Soong, W. S.; Kim, G. H.; Oh, W. H.; Kim, Y. G

    2000-12-01

    Normal operation of the facility is one of the key factors in the accomplishments of research goals. As confirmed by a case study of the influence of the facility operation condition on the research results, emphasis should be put on the facility preserve management. Facilities should be maintained in solid operational condition and their malfunctions should be repaired as soon as possible. The purpose of this project is to make propositions on the development of the facility Preserve management system which is to maximize the efficiency of the budget execution, manpower organization and maintenance planning, and is to minimize the duration of the operational pause due to malfunctions with the least disbursement.

  8. Knowledge Management tools integration within DLR's concurrent engineering facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, R. P.; Soragavi, G.; Deshmukh, M.; Ludtke, D.

    The complexity of space endeavors has increased the need for Knowledge Management (KM) tools. The concept of KM involves not only the electronic storage of knowledge, but also the process of making this knowledge available, reusable and traceable. Establishing a KM concept within the Concurrent Engineering Facility (CEF) has been a research topic of the German Aerospace Centre (DLR). This paper presents the current KM tools of the CEF: the Software Platform for Organizing and Capturing Knowledge (S.P.O.C.K.), the data model Virtual Satellite (VirSat), and the Simulation Model Library (SimMoLib), and how their usage improved the Concurrent Engineering (CE) process. This paper also exposes the lessons learned from the introduction of KM practices into the CEF and elaborates a roadmap for the further development of KM in CE activities at DLR. The results of the application of the Knowledge Management tools have shown the potential of merging the three software platforms with their functionalities, as the next step towards the fully integration of KM practices into the CE process. VirSat will stay as the main software platform used within a CE study, and S.P.O.C.K. and SimMoLib will be integrated into VirSat. These tools will support the data model as a reference and documentation source, and as an access to simulation and calculation models. The use of KM tools in the CEF aims to become a basic practice during the CE process. The settlement of this practice will result in a much more extended knowledge and experience exchange within the Concurrent Engineering environment and, consequently, the outcome of the studies will comprise higher quality in the design of space systems.

  9. Management aspects of Gemini's base facility operations project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arriagada, Gustavo; Nitta, Atsuko; Adamson, A. J.; Nunez, Arturo; Serio, Andrew; Cordova, Martin

    2016-08-01

    Gemini's Base Facilities Operations (BFO) Project provided the capabilities to perform routine nighttime operations without anyone on the summit. The expected benefits were to achieve money savings and to become an enabler of the future development of remote operations. The project was executed using a tailored version of Prince2 project management methodology. It was schedule driven and managing it demanded flexibility and creativity to produce what was needed, taking into consideration all the constraints present at the time: Time available to implement BFO at Gemini North (GN), two years. The project had to be done in a matrix resources environment. There were only three resources assigned exclusively to BFO. The implementation of new capabilities had to be done without disrupting operations. And we needed to succeed, introducing the new operational model that implied Telescope and instrumentation Operators (Science Operations Specialists - SOS) relying on technology to assess summit conditions. To meet schedule we created a large number of concurrent smaller projects called Work Packages (WP). To be reassured that we would successfully implement BFO, we initially spent a good portion of time and effort, collecting and learning about user's needs. This was done through close interaction with SOSs, Observers, Engineers and Technicians. Once we had a clear understanding of the requirements, we took the approach of implementing the "bare minimum" necessary technology that would meet them and that would be maintainable in the long term. Another key element was the introduction of the "gradual descent" concept. In this, we increasingly provided tools to the SOSs and Observers to prevent them from going outside the control room during nighttime operations, giving them the opportunity of familiarizing themselves with the new tools over a time span of several months. Also, by using these tools at an early stage, Engineers and Technicians had more time for debugging

  10. Analysis of Operational and Management Cybersecurity Controls for Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Jin Seok; Ryou, Jae Cheol

    2014-01-01

    U.S. NRC developed this RG 5.71 by tailoring the baseline security controls described in NIST Special Publication 800-53 'Recommended Security Controls for Federal Information Systems and Organizations' to provide an acceptable method to comply with the 10 CFR 73.54. The purpose of this publication is to provide guidelines for selecting and specifying security controls for information systems. In this paper, we are going to analyze and compare the NRC RG 5.71 and the NIST SP800-53, in particular, for operational security controls and management security controls. If RG 5.71 omits the specific security control that is included in SP800-53, we would review that omitting is adequate or not. If RG 5.71 includes the specific security control that is not included in SP800-53, we would also review the rationale. And we are going to consider some security controls to strengthen cybersecurity of nuclear facilities

  11. Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, C.Y.

    1993-03-01

    During fourth quarter 1992, samples from 18 groundwater monitoring wells of the AMB series at the Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility were analyzed for certain heavy metals, indicator parameters, radionuclides, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Six parameters exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) and the Savannah River Site Flag 2 criteria during the quarter. The results for fourth quarter 1992 are fairly consistent with the rest of the year's data. Tetrachloroethylene exceeded the final PDWS in well AMB 4D only two of the four quarters; in the other three wells in which it was elevated, it was present at similar levels throughout the year. Trichloroethylene consistently exceeded its PDWS in wells AMB 4A, 4B, 4D, 5, and 7A during the year. Trichloroethylene was elevated in well AMB 6 only during third and fourth quarters and in well AMB 7 only during fourth quarter. Total alpha-emitting radium was above the final PDWS for total radium in well AMB 5 at similar levels throughout the year and exceeded the PDWS during one of the three quarters it was analyzed for (third quarter 1992) in well AMB 10B.

  12. Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, C.Y.

    1993-03-01

    During fourth quarter 1992, samples from 18 groundwater monitoring wells of the AMB series at the Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility were analyzed for certain heavy metals, indicator parameters, radionuclides, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Six parameters exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) and the Savannah River Site Flag 2 criteria during the quarter. The results for fourth quarter 1992 are fairly consistent with the rest of the year's data. Tetrachloroethylene exceeded the final PDWS in well AMB 4D only two of the four quarters; in the other three wells in which it was elevated, it was present at similar levels throughout the year. Trichloroethylene consistently exceeded its PDWS in wells AMB 4A, 4B, 4D, 5, and 7A during the year. Trichloroethylene was elevated in well AMB 6 only during third and fourth quarters and in well AMB 7 only during fourth quarter. Total alpha-emitting radium was above the final PDWS for total radium in well AMB 5 at similar levels throughout the year and exceeded the PDWS during one of the three quarters it was analyzed for (third quarter 1992) in well AMB 10B

  13. Coupling and quantifying resilience and sustainability in facilities management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cox, Rimante Andrasiunaite; Nielsen, Susanne Balslev; Rode, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to consider how to couple and quantify resilience and sustainability, where sustainability refers to not only environmental impact, but also economic and social impacts. The way a particular function of a building is provisioned may have significant repercus......Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to consider how to couple and quantify resilience and sustainability, where sustainability refers to not only environmental impact, but also economic and social impacts. The way a particular function of a building is provisioned may have significant...... repercussions beyond just resilience. The goal is to develop a decision support tool for facilities managers. Design/methodology/approach – A risk framework is used to quantify both resilience and sustainability in monetary terms. The risk framework allows to couple resilience and sustainability, so...... that the provisioning of a particular building can be investigated with consideration of functional, environmental, economic and, possibly, social dimensions. Findings – The method of coupling and quantifying resilience and sustainability (CQRS) is illustrated with a simple example that highlights how very different...

  14. Understanding and Managing Aging of Spent Nuclear Fuel and Facility Components in Wet Storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, A. B.

    2007-01-01

    Storage of nuclear fuel after it has been discharged from reactors has become the leading spent fuel management option. Many storage facilities are being required to operate longer than originally anticipated. Aging is a term that has emerged to focus attention on the consequences of extended operation on systems, structures, and components that comprise the storage facilities. The key to mitigation of age-related degradation in storage facilities is to implement effective strategies to understand and manage aging of the facility materials. A systematic approach to preclude serious effects of age-related degradation is addressed in this paper, directed principally to smaller facilities (test and research reactors). The first need is to assess the materials that comprise the facility and the environments that they are subject to. Access to historical data on facility design, fabrication, and operation can facilitate assessment of expected materials performance. Methods to assess the current condition of facility materials are summarized in the paper. Each facility needs an aging management plan to define the scope of the management program, involving identification of the materials that need specific actions to manage age-related degradation. For each material identified, one or more aging management programs are developed and become part of the plan Several national and international organizations have invested in development of comprehensive and systematic approaches to aging management. A method developed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is recommended as a concise template to organize measures to effectively manage age-related degradation of storage facility materials, including the scope of inspection, surveillance, and maintenance that is needed to assure successful operation of the facility over its required life. Important to effective aging management is a staff that is alert for evidence of materials degradation and committed to carry out the aging

  15. 40 CFR 271.12 - Requirements for hazardous waste management facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Requirements for Final Authorization § 271.12 Requirements for hazardous waste management facilities. The State shall have standards for hazardous waste management facilities which are equivalent to 40 CFR parts 264... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Requirements for hazardous waste...

  16. [The basic system for the management of a spa and resort facility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedotchenko, A A; Kholmogorov, N A

    2014-01-01

    The authors propose the basic system for the management of a spa and resort facility that ensures functioning of all its divisions as an integrated process. It is maintained that organization of a spa and resort facility must include measures aimed at improving its working structure, material and technical resources, marketing plans, financial management, medical services, informational support, and personnel administration.

  17. Professional Development through Organizational Assessment: Using APPA's Facilities Management Evaluation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medlin, E. Lander; Judd, R. Holly

    2013-01-01

    APPA's Facilities Management Evaluation Program (FMEP) provides an integrated system to optimize organizational performance. The criteria for evaluation not only provide a tool for organizational continuous improvement, they serve as a compelling leadership development tool essential for today's facilities management professional. The senior…

  18. A Qualitative Study Investigating Facility Managers' Perceptions of the Classroom Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parr, Eric Shannon

    2017-01-01

    Facility managers have the challenge of adhering to community college policies and procedures while fulfilling requirements of administration, students, and teachers concerning specific needs of classroom aesthetics. The role of facility manager and how specific entities affect perceptions of the design and implementation of classroom aesthetics…

  19. Guidelines for Development of a Base Commander’s Manual for Facilities Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-01

    of the Commander’s job in facilities management ?, (2) What information sources are available to prepare the new commander for these responsibilities...Commanders say they need to know about facilities management and civil engineering operations?, (5) where can this additional information be found?, (6) How

  20. [Quality management of nuclear medicine facilities and experience during JCI certification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhongke; Lou, Cen; Chen, Liang

    2010-03-01

    In 2003, JCI certification was introduced to create our new hospital quality management system. Our department imaging facilities management level and service quality markedly improved through JCI certification and re-evaluation. It played an important role in improving the efficiency and extending the life of medical facilities, reducing maintenance costs.

  1. Management of radioactive effluents and conditioning of solid waste from nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shekhar, P.; Banerjee, K.; Khan, S.S.; Gandhi, P.M.; Rastogi, R.C.

    1993-01-01

    An efficient radioactive waste management is an essential and integral part of various nuclear facilities in India. The salient features of waste management system design for low and intermediate level waste from the nuclear facilities, treatment and conditioning methods in use, processes and systems under development are described in the paper. (author). 2 figs., 2 tabs

  2. Developing Mobile BIM/2D Barcode-Based Automated Facility Management System

    OpenAIRE

    Yu-Cheng Lin; Yu-Chih Su; Yen-Pei Chen

    2014-01-01

    Facility management (FM) has become an important topic in research on the operation and maintenance phase. Managing the work of FM effectively is extremely difficult owing to the variety of environments. One of the difficulties is the performance of two-dimensional (2D) graphics when depicting facilities. Building information modeling (BIM) uses precise geometry and relevant data to support the facilities depicted in three-dimensional (3D) object-oriented computer-aided design (CAD). This pap...

  3. Success in siting low-level radioactive waste management facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, P.; McCauley, D.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The Government of Canada is about to conclude a legal agreement with three municipalities that will result in a $260-million 10-year multi-phase project to cleanup low-level radioactive wastes and contaminated soils and establish long-term low-level radioactive waste management facilities. Over the last two decades, numerous efforts were undertaken to resolve this long-standing environmental issue. Finally, the communities where the wastes are located came forward with resolutions that they were willing to develop local solutions to the problem. All three municipalities, facilitated by Government funding and assistance, put forward their own local solution to their own waste problem. Government accepted the municipalities' proposals as the basis of a comprehensive approach for dealing with the local problem. Negotiations ensued on Principles of Understanding under which the cleanup would proceed and new long-term waste management facilities would be established. Government's acceptance of the negotiated Principles led to the preparation of a legal agreement that was subsequently signed by each of the municipalities and is now about to be ratified by the Government of Canada. Resolution of the issue will be a major milestone in the Government's environmental agenda. The project will result in an environmentally-responsible, safe, and publicly-accepted approach to the long-term management of the wastes and remove one of the largest contaminated sites issues from the Government's agenda. It also advances the Government's nuclear waste policy and indicates to waste producers that the Government is developing and implementing solutions for wastes for which it is responsible. A key lesson for the Government of Canada in this process has been the advantages of a locally-generated solution. Through the process, the Government empowered the local municipalities to develop their own solution to the local waste problem. It facilitated and supported that effort

  4. Radonclose - the system of Soviet designed regional waste management facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horak, W.C.; Reisman, A.; Purvis, E.E. III.

    1997-01-01

    The Soviet Union established a system of specialized regional facilities to dispose of radioactive waste generated by sources other than the nuclear fuel cycle. The system had 16 facilities in Russia, 5 in Ukraine, one in each of the other CIS states, and one in each of the Baltic Republics. These facilities are still being used. The major generators of radioactive waste they process these are research and industrial organizations, medical and agricultural institution and other activities not related to nuclear power. Waste handled by these facilities is mainly beta- and gamma-emitting nuclides with half lives of less than 30 years. The long-lived and alpha-emitting isotopic content is insignificant. Most of the radwaste has low and medium radioactivity levels. The facilities also handle spent radiation sources, which are highly radioactive and contain 95-98 percent of the activity of all the radwaste buried at these facilities

  5. The Appropriate Disposal of Retirement Fund Surpluses | Asher ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper attempts to clarify the different paradigms from which defined benefit funds are viewed, and the financial nature of the contracts implicit in their rules. Suggestions are made as to the principles that trustees might follow in applying the surpluses for the benefit of stakeholders. KEYWORDS: Pension funds; surpluses ...

  6. The impacts of motivation, personal traits of managers and management education on the performances of public healthcare facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karanović Nevena

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Exposed to increasing needs of users for better and faster services, more medications and innovative health technologies, managers of healthcare services in the public sector need motivation, permanent updating of information and constant personal development. The aim of this paper was to evaluate, on the basis of experienced healthcare managers, the impact of their motivation, selected character traits, managerial skills and formal education in management on healthcare facilities performances in the public sector. Methods. For the purposes of this study, 97 experienced managers from public hospitals and primary health centers in Serbia answered to 30 questions on the motivation of managers, essential skills for successful management and formal education in management in health facilities. The obtained data about their motivation, governing experience, personal skills and formal education in management were systematized and processed by the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS. Healthcare facilities performances were expressed by the healthcare facilities ranks in the official annual rankings according to the quality improvement, conducted by the Institute of Public Health of Serbia. Pearson's or Spearman's correlation coefficients were used for proving the potential impact of selected factors on performances of healthcare facilities. Results. This study confirmed the association between the healthcare facilities ranks and managers' abilities to organize the working process (t = -2.453; p = 0.018; expressed high managers’ motivation (ρS = 0.206; p = 0.048 and the length of governing experience (r = -0.198; p = 0.043. Within a 3-year follow-up, this study also confirmed a positive correlation between annual ranks of healthcare facilities and managers quality management courses (ρS = -0.238; p = 0.017 and managers education in human resources management (ρS = -0.234; p = 0.027. Conclusion. In addition to management

  7. Nuclear facilities maintenance in the core of management-advanced trend in IBM Maximo asset management applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seino, Satoshi; Ujihara, Satoshi; Kikuyama, Kaoru

    2009-01-01

    European and US plant owners have attached importance to plant maintenance, such as prompt grasp of plant states, implementation of maintenance and planning of maintenance programs, as one of asset management. The US advanced trend was introduced in this feature article through the applications of IBM Maximo Asset Management for nuclear facilities maintenance. World trends of nuclear power and related problems, need of nuclear facilities management, key items for introduction of maintenance management systems, required systems for nuclear maintenance management and introduction of functions of the IBM strategic asset management solution-Maximo were described respectively. (T. Tanaka)

  8. Assessment of management policies and practices for occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens in dialysis facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbaeyi, Chukwuma; Panlilio, Adelisa L; Hobbs, Cynthia; Patel, Priti R; Kuhar, David T

    2012-10-01

    Occupational exposure management is an important element in preventing the transmission of bloodborne pathogens in health care settings. In 2008, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention conducted a survey to assess procedures for managing occupational bloodborne pathogen exposures in outpatient dialysis facilities in the United States. A cross-sectional survey of randomly selected outpatient dialysis facilities. 339 outpatient dialysis facilities drawn from the 2006 US end-stage renal disease database. Hospital affiliation (free-standing vs hospital-based facilities), profit status (for-profit vs not-for-profit facilities), and number of health care personnel (≥100 vs facilities reporting occupational bloodborne pathogen exposures and offering occupational exposure management services. We analyzed bloodborne pathogen exposures and provision of postexposure prophylaxis by facility type. Nearly all respondents (99.7%) had written policies and 95% provided occupational exposure management services to health care personnel during the daytime on weekdays, but services were provided infrequently during other periods of the week. Approximately 10%-15% of facilities reported having HIV, HBV, or HCV exposures in health care personnel in the 12 months prior to the survey, but inconsistencies were noted in procedures for managing such exposures. Despite 86% of facilities providing HIV prophylaxis for exposed health care personnel, only 37% designated a primary HIV postexposure prophylaxis regimen. For-profit and free-standing facilities reported fewer exposures, but did not as reliably offer HBV prophylaxis or have a primary HIV postexposure prophylaxis regimen relative to not-for-profit and hospital-based facilities. The survey response rate was low (37%) and familiarity of individuals completing the survey with facility policies or national guidelines could not be ascertained. Significant improvements are required in the implementation of guidelines for managing

  9. Facility management - from internal conditioner to successful business sector; Facility Management - vom internen Fitmacher zum erfolgreichen Geschaeftsfeld

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenberg, I. [Mannheimer Versorgungs- und Verkehrsgesellschaft mbH (MVV), Mannheim (Germany)

    1999-04-01

    The deregulation of the energy markets has given rise to sustained motion in the prevailing structures and market conditions of the supply industry. Dramatic declines in profits in the electricity sector have, in many companies, prompted reflex-like cost reduction programs which, however, frequently prejudice long-term growth prospects and viable future structures in favour of the results of the next fiscal year. The danger of sacrificing all flexibility and therefore market perspectives by corporate anorexia nervosa is immense. The MVV Energie AG, Mannheim, has reacted speedily to this situation and is pursuing a growth-oriented strategy which regards the challenges of competition as opportunity for on-going development. (orig.) [Deutsch] Kapitaldienst oder Miete, Energie, Wartung und Instandsetzung technischer Anlagen, Gebaeudeunterhalt-, -reinigung, Sicherheitsdienste, Versicherungen und vieles mehr uebersteigen ueber Jahre hinweg kumuliert die Baukosten um ein vielfaches und erhoehen bei Immobilieneigentuemern und -nutzern den Kostendruck. Beim Facility Management (FM) stehen nicht mehr nur die Investitionskosten fuer ein Gebaeude im Vordergrund, sondern sein gesamter Lebenszyklus, beginnend mit Idee, Konzeption und Investitionsentscheidung ueber Planung und Errichtung. Nutzung inklusive spaeterer Umbauten und Sanierungen bis hin zu Abriss und Neubau. Mit ihrer Dienstleistung FM bietet die MVV Energie AG ihren Kunden Gesamtkonzeption von der Beratung ueber die Planung und Umsetzung bis hin zur Uebernahme des FM an. (orig.)

  10. 41 CFR 102-72.45 - What are the different types of delegations related to facility management?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... types of delegations related to facility management? 102-72.45 Section 102-72.45 Public Contracts and... different types of delegations related to facility management? The principal types of delegations involved in the management of facilities are— (a) Real property management and operation authority; (b...

  11. Staff teamwork in long-term care facilities: the influence of management style, training, and feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Denise A; Parker, Victoria A

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the organizational factors associated with high and low amounts of teamwork among direct-care workers in long-term care (LTC) facilities. A systematic analysis of observation data collected at 20 LTC facilities was first used to categorize facilities as high-, moderate-, or low-teamwork facilities. Next, qualitative analysis of 59 interviews collected in 4 high-teamwork and 5 low-teamwork facilities was used to identify the organizational factors associated with high and low teamwork. Findings showed that high- and low-teamwork LTC facilities in this study differed in three organizational areas: management style, training, and feedback and recognition. As such, improved teamwork in LTC facilities may result from changes to basic management practices, such as training and employee feedback. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. A Study on Governance and Human Resources for Cooperative Road Facilities Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Sachiko; Takagi, Akiyoshi; Kurauchi, Fumitaka; Demura, Yoshifumi

    Within today's infrastructure management, Asset Management systems are becoming a mainstream feature. For region where the risk is low, it is necessary to create a "cooperative road facilities management system". This research both examined and suggested what kind of cooperative road facilities management system should be promoted by the regional society. Concretely, this study defines the operational realities of a previous case. It discusses the problem of the road facilities management as a governance. Furthermore, its realization depends on "the cooperation between municipalities", "the private-sector initiative", and "residents participation" .Also, it discusses the problem of human resources for governance. Its realization depends on "the engineers' promotion", and "creation of a voluntary activity of the resident" as a human resources. Moreover, it defines that the intermediary is important because the human resources tied to the governance. As a result, the prospect of the road facilities management is shown by the role of the player and the relation among player.

  13. Facility Management as a Way of Reducing Costs in Transport Companies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matusova, Dominika; Gogolova, Martina

    2017-10-01

    For facility management exists a several interpretations. These interpretations emerged progressively. At the time of the notion of facility management was designed to manage an administrative building, in the United States (US). They can ensure their operation and maintenance. From the US, this trend is further moved to Europe and now it start becoming a current and actual topic also in Slovakia. Facility management is contractually agreed scheme of services, semantically recalls traditional building management. There by finally pushed for activities related to real estates. For facility management is fundamental - certification and certification systems. Therefore, is essential to know, the cost structure of certification. The most commonly occurring austerity measures include: heat pumps, use of renewable energy, solar panels and water savings. These measures can reduce the cost.

  14. Does identity shape leadership and management practice? Experiences of PHC facility managers in Cape Town, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daire, Judith; Gilson, Lucy

    2014-01-01

    In South Africa, as elsewhere, Primary Health Care (PHC) facilities are managed by professional nurses. Little is known about the dimensions and challenges of their job, or what influences their managerial practice. Drawing on leadership and organizational theory, this study explored what the job of being a PHC manager entails, and what factors influence their managerial practice. We specifically considered whether the appointment of professional nurses as facility managers leads to an identity transition, from nurse to manager. The overall intention was to generate ideas about how to support leadership development among PHC facility managers. Adopting case study methodology, the primary researcher facilitated in-depth discussions (about their personal history and managerial experiences) with eight participating facility managers from one geographical area. Other data were collected through in-depth interviews with key informants, document review and researcher field notes/journaling. Analysis involved data triangulation, respondent and peer review and cross-case analysis. The experiences show that the PHC facility manager’s job is dominated by a range of tasks and procedures focused on clinical service management, but is expected to encompass action to address the population and public health needs of the surrounding community. Managing with and through others, and in a complex system, requiring self-management, are critical aspects of the job. A range of personal, professional and contextual factors influence managerial practice, including professional identity. The current largely facility-focused management practice reflects the strong nursing identity of managers and broader organizational influences. However, three of the eight managers appear to self-identify an emerging leadership identity and demonstrate related managerial practices. Nonetheless, there is currently limited support for an identity transition towards leadership in this context. Better

  15. A guideline for interpersonal capabilities enhancement to support sustainable facility management practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarpin, Norliana; Kasim, Narimah; Zainal, Rozlin; Noh, Hamidun Mohd

    2018-04-01

    Facility management is the key phase in the development cycle of an assets and spans over a considerable length of time. Therefore, facility managers are in a commanding position to maximise the potential of sustainability through the development phases from construction, operation, maintenance and upgrade leading to decommission and deconstruction. Sustainability endeavours in facility management practices will contribute to reducing energy consumption, waste and running costs. Furthermore, it can also help in improving organisational productivity, financial return and community standing of the organisation. Facility manager should be empowered with the necessary knowledge and capabilities at the forefront facing sustainability challenge. However, literature studies show a gap between the level of awareness, specific knowledge and the necessary skills required to pursue sustainability in the facility management professional. People capability is considered as the key enabler in managing the sustainability agenda as well as being central to the improvement of competency and innovation in an organisation. This paper aims to develop a guidelines for interpersonal capabilities to support sustainability in facility management practice. Starting with a total of 7 critical interpersonal capabilities factors identified from previous questionnaire survey, the authors conducted an interview with 3 experts in facility management to assess the perceived importance of these factors. The findings reveal a set of guidelines for the enhancement of interpersonal capabilities among facility managers by providing what can be done to acquire these factors and how it can support the application of sustainability in their practice. The findings of this paper are expected to form the basis of a mechanism framework developed to equip facility managers with the right knowledge, to continue education and training and to develop new mind-sets to enhance the implementation of sustainability

  16. Risk management technique for liquefied natural gas facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedor, O. H.; Parsons, W. N.

    1975-01-01

    Checklists have been compiled for planning, design, construction, startup and debugging, and operation of liquefied natural gas facilities. Lists include references to pertinent safety regulations. Methods described are applicable to handling of other hazardous materials.

  17. The social surplus of broadband initiatives in compulsory education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Peter Parsons

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In 2010, the New Zealand government embarked upon an ambitious programme of broadband infrastructure investment, a process that will continue until at least 2019. Part of this investment is specifically targeted at compulsory education, with initiatives that include bringing fibre connections to the school gate, supporting on-site network upgrades (including wireless and providing teaching, learning and support services delivered through these networks. Such investments are not made without some projections of the likely rate of return, but calculating return on investment (ROI in educational broadband is complex, as it encompasses a range of factors. This article reports on an interview-based study engaging a range of stakeholders in educational broadband provision. The study utilises a research model that considers the various elements of social surplus, namely; producer surplus (savings, producer surplus (profit and consumer surplus (perceived value over and above cost, to explore the elements of social surplus that have been used to define educational broadband ROI calculations and justify the scale of investment. The results indicate that all three components of social surplus are relevant, though the concept of profit can only be seen in the broader context of long term contributions to the economy. A note of caution is that projections of ROI based only on positive returns fail to acknowledge the potential for some innovations to actually increase costs. Further, purely quantitative models do not properly take into account qualitative components of consumer surplus.

  18. Nuclear Facility Isotopic Content (NFIC) Waste Management System to provide input for safety envelope definition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genser, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    The Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) is aggressively applying environmental remediation and radioactive waste management activities at the US Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS) to ensure compliance with today's challenging governmental laws and regulatory requirements. This report discusses a computer-based Nuclear Facility Isotopic Content (NFIC) Waste Management System developed to provide input for the safety envelope definition and assessment of site-wide facilities. Information was formulated describing the SRS ''Nuclear Facilities'' and their respective bounding inventories of nuclear materials and radioactive waste using the NFIC Waste Management System

  19. Supervision of Waste Management and Environmental Protection at the Swedish Nuclear Facilities 2001

    CERN Document Server

    Persson, M

    2003-01-01

    The report summarizes the supervision of waste management and environmental protection at the nuclear facilities that was carried out by the Swedish Radiation Protection Authority in 2001. A summary of the inspections and a description of important issues connected with the supervision of the nuclear facilities are given.The inspections during 2001 have focused on theme inspections of waste management, environmental inspections considering the environmental monitoring at the Swedish nuclear facilities and review safety analysis and research programs from the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co.The Swedish Radiation Protection Authority finds that the operations are mainly performed according to current regulations

  20. The Core Services of the Facilities Management Based Company in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Zawawi Zuraihana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Many questions rose on defining the implementation of Facilities Management (FM in Malaysia. To date, the FM player only provided services sufficiently without the desires to enhance their services by taking into account the standard of practice which should form the basis. The extent of the services in Facilities Management based companies in Malaysia is not known and this paper aimed to identify within the context. The scope of study is limited to respondents in Klang Valley area. Literature review is used as a basis and questionnaires survey distributed to 20 companies, representing 56% of the total FM companies in Klang Valley are used to capture the data. The senior management level is assessed to represent. The results revealed that the implementation of facilities management services is limited, but still evolving. The majority of the FM based companies provides facilities services under the category of building operation and maintenance as their core business and procured them by in-house. The core services comprise of Electrical System, Cleaning, mechanical, HVAC system, plumbing & Sewerage , Fire Protection, Landscape, Lifts and Escalator, Security & Safety, Parking Management, Consultancy & Advisory Services, Waste Management, ICT System, Pest Control, Energy Management & Conservation, Building Audit Services, Customer Care Management, Transition Management, Catering &Vending Services. Based on what FM can offer, there is the necessity to reinforce the awareness to ensure continuously improve the management of national assets and facilities.

  1. Use of Information Technology for Management of U.S. Postal Service Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-05-01

    Steven Herrera, Manager of Facilities, Ritz - Carlton Hotels. 2 LMI Report PS406MR2, Facilities Staffing Requirements at the U.S. Postal Service, John...documents: ♦ Facility Planning Concept (FPC). The FPC is a computerized program used for planning small, standard plan buildings with less than 6,500...contract actions constitute a major portion of the paperwork that is generated. (Refer to Appendix I for an explanation of the concept

  2. 48 CFR 801.602-80 - Legal and technical review-Office of Construction and Facilities Management and National Cemetery...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...-Office of Construction and Facilities Management and National Cemetery Administration. 801.602-80 Section... Responsibilities 801.602-80 Legal and technical review-Office of Construction and Facilities Management and National Cemetery Administration. An Office of Construction and Facilities Management or National Cemetery...

  3. SNL/CA Facilities Management Design Standards Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabb, David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Clark, Eva [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-12-01

    At Sandia National Laboratories in California (SNL/CA), the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of facilities is guided by industry standards, a graded approach, and the systematic analysis of life cycle benefits received for costs incurred. The design of the physical plant must ensure that the facilities are "fit for use," and provide conditions that effectively, efficiently, and safely support current and future mission needs. In addition, SNL/CA applies sustainable design principles, using an integrated whole-building design approach, from site planning to facility design, construction, and operation to ensure building resource efficiency and the health and productivity of occupants. The safety and health of the workforce and the public, any possible effects on the environment, and compliance with building codes take precedence over project issues, such as performance, cost, and schedule.

  4. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Management Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mather, James [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Mission and Vision Statements for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Mission The ARM Climate Research Facility, a DOE scientific user facility, provides the climate research community with strategically located in situ and remote-sensing observatories designed to improve the understanding and representation, in climate and earth system models, of clouds and aerosols as well as their interactions and coupling with the Earth’s surface. Vision To provide a detailed and accurate description of the Earth atmosphere in diverse climate regimes to resolve the uncertainties in climate and Earth system models toward the development of sustainable solutions for the nation's energy and environmental challenges.

  5. Governance Change In Facilities Management: An Institutional Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Kaleem Zahirul Hassan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Governance of a specific field is shaped by not only the instrumental rationality but also the institutional rationality. In this research the instrumental rationality was manifested by the service providers and consultants who played a pivotal role in the construction of new governance in the field of facilities services in the Netherlands. Further, the role of institutional rationality was investigated wherein it was found that the logic of rationalization shaped the governance in the field of facilities services. Moreover, the implication for the explanation of practice variation by institutional theory is discussed.

  6. KSC facilities status and planned management operations. [for Shuttle launches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, R. H.; Omalley, T. J.

    1979-01-01

    A status report is presented on facilities and planned operations at the Kennedy Space Center with reference to Space Shuttle launch activities. The facilities are essentially complete, with all new construction and modifications to existing buildings almost finished. Some activity is still in progress at Pad A and on the Mobile Launcher due to changes in requirements but is not expected to affect the launch schedule. The installation and testing of the ground checkout equipment that will be used to test the flight hardware is now in operation. The Launch Processing System is currently supporting the development of the applications software that will perform the testing of this flight hardware.

  7. Stochastic inventory management at a service facility with a set of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stochastic inventory management at a service facility with a set of reorder levels. VSS Yadavalli∗. B Sivakumar†. G Arivarignan‡. Received: 6 March 2006; Revised: 20 February 2007; Accepted: 8 March 2007. Abstract. We consider a continuous review perishable inventory system at a service facility with a finite waiting ...

  8. A randomized trial of heart failure disease management in skilled nursing facilities (SNF Connect): Lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daddato, Andrea; Wald, Heidi L; Horney, Carolyn; Fairclough, Diane L; Leister, Erin C; Coors, Marilyn; Capell, Warren H; Boxer, Rebecca S

    2017-06-01

    Conducting clinical trials in skilled nursing facilities is particularly challenging. This manuscript describes facility and patient recruitment challenges and solutions for clinical research in skilled nursing facilities. Lessons learned from the SNF Connect Trial, a randomized trial of a heart failure disease management versus usual care for patients with heart failure receiving post-acute care in skilled nursing facilities, are discussed. Description of the trial design and barriers to facility and patient recruitment along with regulatory issues are presented. The recruitment of Denver-metro skilled nursing facilities was facilitated by key stakeholders of the skilled nursing facilities community. However, there were still a number of barriers to facility recruitment including leadership turnover, varying policies regarding research, fear of litigation and of an increased workload. Engagement of facilities was facilitated by their strong interest in reducing hospital readmissions, marketing potential to hospitals, and heart failure management education for their staff. Recruitment of patients proved difficult and there were few facilitators. Identified patient recruitment challenges included patients being unaware of their heart failure diagnosis, patients overwhelmed with their illness and care, and frequently there was no available proxy for cognitively impaired patients. Flexibility in changing the recruitment approach and targeting skilled nursing facilities with higher rates of admissions helped to overcome some barriers. Recruitment of skilled nursing facilities and patients in skilled nursing facilities for clinical trials is challenging. Strategies to attract both facilities and patients are warranted. These include aligning study goals with facility incentives and flexible recruitment protocols to work with patients in "transition crisis."

  9. Mixed Waste Management Facility Preliminary Safety Analysis Report. Chapters 1 to 20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    This document provides information on waste management practices, occupational safety, and a site characterization of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A facility description, safety engineering analysis, mixed waste processing techniques, and auxiliary support systems are included.

  10. Mixed Waste Management Facility Preliminary Safety Analysis Report. Chapters 1 to 20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    This document provides information on waste management practices, occupational safety, and a site characterization of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A facility description, safety engineering analysis, mixed waste processing techniques, and auxiliary support systems are included

  11. Characterization and environmental management of stormwater runoff from road-salt storage facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess the quantity and quality of salt-contaminated water generated from stormwater runoff at VDOT's salt storage facilities and to evaluate management/treatment alternatives to reduce costs and better protect th...

  12. Mixed Waste Management Facility Groundwater Monitoring Report, Fourth Quarter 1998 and 1998 Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chase, J.

    1999-04-29

    During fourth quarter 1998, ten constituents exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) in groundwater samples from downgradient monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility. No constituents exceeded final PDWS in samples from the upgradient monitoring wells.

  13. Research notes : drainage facility asset management : more than an inventory of pipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-01

    The primary objectives for the research project were twofold: 1) To develop and implement an Oregon-specific system for inventorying and evaluating the condition of pipes, culverts, and stormwater facilities based on the FHWA Culvert Management Syste...

  14. Facility effluent monitoring plan determinations for the 100 Area facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brendel, D.E.

    1991-11-01

    The determination for Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans arose from evaluations conducted for the Westinghouse Hanford Company 100 Area facilities on the Hanford Site. The Facility Effluent Monitoring Plant determinations have been prepared in accordance with A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan, WHC-EP-0438 (WHC 1991). Ten Westinghouse Hanford Company facilities in the 100 Areas were evaluated: N Reactor, KE/KW Reactors, 1706 KE Laboratory, and the Surplus Reactors (B, C, D, DR, F, and H). The N Reactor, KE/KW Reactors, and 1706 KE Laboratory Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determinations were prepared by Columbia Energy and Environmental Services of Richland, Washington. The determination for the Surplus Reactors was prepared by Westinghouse Hanford Company. Of the 10 facilities evaluated, two will require a Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan: N Reactor and the active spent fuel storage facilities and their contiguous support facilities at 100 KE and 100 KW

  15. A Facilities Manager's Guide to Green Building Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Walter

    2001-01-01

    Explains how the "green building" approach to educational facilities design creates healthy, naturally lit, attractive buildings with lower operating and life cycle costs. Tips on getting started on a green design and overcoming the barriers to the green design concept are discussed. (GR)

  16. Centralization and Decentralization of Schools' Physical Facilities Management in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikoya, Peter O.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This research aims to examine the difference in the availability, adequacy and functionality of physical facilities in centralized and decentralized schools districts, with a view to making appropriate recommendations to stakeholders on the reform programmes in the Nigerian education sector. Design/methodology/approach: Principals,…

  17. An energetical and economic optimization of the facility management; Energetische und wirtschaftliche Optimierung der GA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roon, Serafin von; Gobmaier, Thomas; Mauch, Wolfgang [Forschungsstelle fuer Energiewirtschaft e.V., Muenchen (Germany)

    2009-06-15

    In the context of a project promoted by the Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology (Berlin, Federal Republic of Germany), the data of the facility management of an office building were evaluated by means of computer assistance in order to determine the optimal operating parameters and connected energy potentials. The contribution under consideration reports on the approach used for the analysis of the data of facility management and illustrates them with the results of the project.

  18. Application of surplus and waste materials in roads pavement making

    OpenAIRE

    Mousavi, S. M.; Fazli, A. H.; Rouzmehr, F.

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays there are a lot of problems about surpluses and debris made by humans all around the world. Lots of these surpluses seriously harm our natural environment. Reuse of this kind of materials in other processes like building constructions or pavement help our natural environment in every aspect. Asphalt concrete is the main part of pavements in most parts of the world with an increasing rate of production in need of more ways and roads. In this paper we will provide...

  19. Transfert de risques et création de surplus

    OpenAIRE

    Courtault, Jean-Michel; Gayant, Jean-Pascal

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, we use the certain benefit function of Luenberger, which is a generalization of the notion of distributable surplus by Allais, to characterize the classical notions of willingness to pay and willingness to accept. These concepts allow us to study the transfer of one or several risks between two agents or more. Specifically, we determine the conditions under which the maximization of the total distributable surplus leads to a Pareto efficient allocation of risks.; Dans cet artic...

  20. Science facilities and stakeholder management: how a pan-European research facility ended up in a small Swedish university town

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomasson, Anna; Carlile, Colin

    2017-06-01

    This is the story of how a large research facility of broad European and global interest, the European Spallation Source (ESS), ended up in the small university town of Lund in Sweden. This happened in spite of the fact that a number of influential European countries were at one time or another competitors to host the facility. It is also a story about politics which attempts to illustrate how closely intertwined politics and science are, and how the interplay between those interests affects scientific progress. ESS became an arena for individual ambitions and political manoeuvring. The different stakeholders, in their striving to ensure that their own interests were realised, in various ways and with different degrees of success over the years, have influenced the key decisions that, during the already 30 year history of ESS, have driven the course that this project has taken. What emerges is that the interests of the stakeholders and the interests of the project itself are frequently not in harmony. This imposes challenges on the management of large research facilities as they have to not only navigate in the scientific landscape, which they often are more familiar with, but also in the political landscape. This story is therefore an attempt to shed light on the role of managers of large research facilities and the often delicate balancing act they have to perform when trying to comply with the different and often conflicting stakeholder interests. What is especially worthwhile examining, as we do in this paper, is the role that individuals, and the interaction between individuals, have played in the process. This shows that the focus of stakeholder theory on organisations, rather than the people in the organisations, needs to be redirected on to the individuals representing those organisations and their inter-relationships. At the same time it is clear that the developing field of stakeholder management theory has not emerged into the consciousness of science

  1. Waste management, waste resource facilities and waste conversion processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demirbas, Ayhan

    2011-01-01

    In this study, waste management concept, waste management system, biomass and bio-waste resources, waste classification, and waste management methods have been reviewed. Waste management is the collection, transport, processing, recycling or disposal, and monitoring of waste materials. A typical waste management system comprises collection, transportation, pre-treatment, processing, and final abatement of residues. The waste management system consists of the whole set of activities related to handling, treating, disposing or recycling the waste materials. General classification of wastes is difficult. Some of the most common sources of wastes are as follows: domestic wastes, commercial wastes, ashes, animal wastes, biomedical wastes, construction wastes, industrial solid wastes, sewer, biodegradable wastes, non-biodegradable wastes, and hazardous wastes.

  2. The technological safety in facilities that manage radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lizcano, D.

    2014-10-01

    The sealed radioactive sources are used inside a wide range of applications in the medicine, industry and investigation around the world. These sources can contain a great radionuclides variety, exhibiting a wide spectrum of activities and radiological half lives. This way, we can find pattern sources of radionuclides as Americium-241, Plutonium-238, Plutonium-239, Thorium-228 and Thorium-230, etc., with some activity of kBq in research laboratories, Iridium-192 and Cesium-137 sources used in brachytherapy with GBq activities, until sources with P Bq activities in industrial irradiators of Cobalt-60 and Cesium-137. This document approach the physical safety that entities like the IAEA recommends for the facilities that contain sealed sources, especially the measures that are taking in the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ) and others government facilities. (Author)

  3. Predictive Analytics to Support Real-Time Management in Pathology Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessard, Lysanne; Michalowski, Wojtek; Chen Li, Wei; Amyot, Daniel; Halwani, Fawaz; Banerjee, Diponkar

    2016-01-01

    Predictive analytics can provide valuable support to the effective management of pathology facilities. The introduction of new tests and technologies in anatomical pathology will increase the volume of specimens to be processed, as well as the complexity of pathology processes. In order for predictive analytics to address managerial challenges associated with the volume and complexity increases, it is important to pinpoint the areas where pathology managers would most benefit from predictive capabilities. We illustrate common issues in managing pathology facilities with an analysis of the surgical specimen process at the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine (DPLM) at The Ottawa Hospital, which processes all surgical specimens for the Eastern Ontario Regional Laboratory Association. We then show how predictive analytics could be used to support management. Our proposed approach can be generalized beyond the DPLM, contributing to a more effective management of pathology facilities and in turn to quicker clinical diagnoses. PMID:28269873

  4. Predictive Analytics to Support Real-Time Management in Pathology Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessard, Lysanne; Michalowski, Wojtek; Chen Li, Wei; Amyot, Daniel; Halwani, Fawaz; Banerjee, Diponkar

    2016-01-01

    Predictive analytics can provide valuable support to the effective management of pathology facilities. The introduction of new tests and technologies in anatomical pathology will increase the volume of specimens to be processed, as well as the complexity of pathology processes. In order for predictive analytics to address managerial challenges associated with the volume and complexity increases, it is important to pinpoint the areas where pathology managers would most benefit from predictive capabilities. We illustrate common issues in managing pathology facilities with an analysis of the surgical specimen process at the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine (DPLM) at The Ottawa Hospital, which processes all surgical specimens for the Eastern Ontario Regional Laboratory Association. We then show how predictive analytics could be used to support management. Our proposed approach can be generalized beyond the DPLM, contributing to a more effective management of pathology facilities and in turn to quicker clinical diagnoses.

  5. Rainier Biogas Manure Management and Renewable Energy Generation Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smyth, John [King County, WA (United States)

    2017-06-06

    The Rainier Biogas project is a community manure processing and renewable energy generation facility. Construction was completed and operation initiated in 2012. It is owned and operated by Rainier Biogas, LLC in collaboration with local dairy farmers, Washington State University, and the King County Department of Natural Resources and Parks. The project receives manure from three to four partner dairy farms mostly by underground pipe. The project is located at 43218 208th Ave SE; Enumclaw, WA 98022.

  6. Robotics for radioactive waste management in AEA technology facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legg, S.A.; Watson, C.J.H.; Staples, A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the use of robotic technology in two AEA Technology facilities. In the first application, the task is standardized and repetitive, and is undertaken using a conventional industrial robot, operating in teach-and-repeat mode. In the second application, the task is non-repetitive, and requires the use of a variety of different tools. it is therefore undertaken by a nuclear engineered telerobot, with a tool change station

  7. A Change Management Approach to Enhance Facility Maintenance Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    second Delphi rounds. The researcher analyzes the responses from the first round and performs qualitative coding to generate common themes...provided the steps to collect qualitative data from SMEs to help enhance the implementation procedures for BUILDER TM . The Delphi study technique was...key AM principles such as asset condition and remaining service life. A Delphi study was utilized to elicit expert field knowledge on facility

  8. 41 CFR 102-37.195 - Does a SASP have to have a donee in mind to request surplus property?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Does a SASP have to have...) Screening and Requesting Property § 102-37.195 Does a SASP have to have a donee in mind to request surplus property? Generally yes, you should have a firm requirement or an anticipated demand for any property that...

  9. Operation And Maintenance In Facilities Management Practices: A Gap Analysis In Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zawawi Zuraihana Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Facilities management in Malaysia has started as early as 1990s during the development of mega projects such as Putrajaya in 1999 [8, 9]. During this period, Malaysia was introduced to an integrated property management and maintenance services known as facilities management. However, its implementation according to the standard practice is still being disputed. The purpose of facilities management standard practices is to provide the facility management profession with a leading reference on facilities management activities and standards. Therefore, the determination of how far the gap in FM current practice is essential to help our FM industry. Thus, the aim of this study is to establish the gap between the current practices and the standard practices and also how far the gap should be satisfied. A set of questionnaire was designed upon literature and previous research done to gather the required information. The study is subjected to FM organizations in private sectors and only the personnel at management level are assessed. There were certified that most of the practices that assessed by means of gap analysis had an acceptable result which the gap between the current practices and the standard practices are not too far.

  10. Development of aging management standard guidelines for HVAC facilities of NPPs in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Won, Se Youl; Lee, Jae Gon; Oh, Seung Jin

    2014-01-01

    Inspection and maintenance activities for air conditioning facilities within the plant are managed mainly for active facilities, and as the years of operation pass, a method for detecting in advance aging-related integrity problems of passive facilities and taking necessary measures against them is required. Therefore, this paper establishes a standard aging management guideline for air conditioning facilities by selecting systems for which those facilities are to be managed, analyzing degradation mechanisms and reviewing the current status of aging degradation management. According to the review of additional equipment-specific aging degradation mechanisms and the current status of management to apply the aging degradation program to air conditioning facilities, it has been found that internal and external visual inspection procedures for fans, dampers, coils, filters and housings have to be added. It has been confirmed that among additional equipment s, fire dampers, fan bearings and belts and air cleaning/conditioning units with charcoal filters do not require additional inspection as they are periodically inspected. It has been found, however, that air cleaning/conditioning units without charcoal filters are to be inspected along with fans, ducts and coils

  11. Does identity shape leadership and management practice? Experiences of PHC facility managers in Cape Town, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daire, Judith; Gilson, Lucy

    2014-09-01

    In South Africa, as elsewhere, Primary Health Care (PHC) facilities are managed by professional nurses. Little is known about the dimensions and challenges of their job, or what influences their managerial practice. Drawing on leadership and organizational theory, this study explored what the job of being a PHC manager entails, and what factors influence their managerial practice. We specifically considered whether the appointment of professional nurses as facility managers leads to an identity transition, from nurse to manager. The overall intention was to generate ideas about how to support leadership development among PHC facility managers. Adopting case study methodology, the primary researcher facilitated in-depth discussions (about their personal history and managerial experiences) with eight participating facility managers from one geographical area. Other data were collected through in-depth interviews with key informants, document review and researcher field notes/journaling. Analysis involved data triangulation, respondent and peer review and cross-case analysis. The experiences show that the PHC facility manager's job is dominated by a range of tasks and procedures focused on clinical service management, but is expected to encompass action to address the population and public health needs of the surrounding community. Managing with and through others, and in a complex system, requiring self-management, are critical aspects of the job. A range of personal, professional and contextual factors influence managerial practice, including professional identity. The current largely facility-focused management practice reflects the strong nursing identity of managers and broader organizational influences. However, three of the eight managers appear to self-identify an emerging leadership identity and demonstrate related managerial practices. Nonetheless, there is currently limited support for an identity transition towards leadership in this context. Better

  12. Project management for the decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klasen, Joerg; Wilhelm, Oliver; Seizer, Burkhard; Schuetz, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    The decommissioning of nuclear power plants is executed in a classic project manner as it is known from other construction projects. It is obvious to use the known portfolio of project management tools. The complexity that is created by the large size of the project in combination with safety requirements of the nuclear industry has to be handled. Complexity can only be managed addressing two main drivers: Prioritization and speed (agility) in project execution. Prioritization can be realized by applying tools like Earned Value Management. A high speed of project execution is established by applying Agile Management like SCRUM-methods. This method is adopted in the context of the cooperation ''Complex Projects'' to the needs of nuclear industry.

  13. Waste management facilities cost information for transuranic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shropshire, D.; Sherick, M.; Biagi, C.

    1995-06-01

    This report contains preconceptual designs and planning level life-cycle cost estimates for managing transuranic waste. The report's information on treatment and storage modules can be integrated to develop total life-cycle costs for various waste management options. A procedure to guide the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractor personnel in the use of cost estimation data is also summarized in this report

  14. Construction of BIM-based SMART-ITL Facility Management System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Woo-Jin; Yi, Sung-Jae; Park, Hyun-Sik; Ryu, Sung-Uk; Bae, Hwang; Hwang, Sang-Chul; Min, Byung-Eui

    2015-01-01

    The flow area and volume are scaled down to 1/49. The ratio of the hydraulic diameter is 1/7. Therefore, SMART-ITL is a large-scale thermalhydraulic test facility with about 45 m height, which is consisted of 10 m underground and 35 m from the ground level. Until now, the management of design data and maintenance of large scale test facilities have been managed based on hard-copy information. Recently, Thermal Hydraulics Safety Research Division (THSRD) at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has developed Facility Management System (FMS) based Building Information Modeling (BIM) to manage its design data more effectively for these large scale test facilities of SMART-ITL and ATLAS, and this BIM technology has been applied to SMART-ITL at the first. This study proposed a method of effective management and maintenance of design data applied to the SMART-ITL. That is, a FMS was developed based on the BIM technology for SMART-ITL. Figure 2 shows an overview of FMS development process based on BIM technology. SMART-ITL FMS facilitates its management and maintenance more effectively and accurately by 3- dimensional visualization. It enables the shape information of large scale test facilities to be visualized intuitively in a virtual space, and the efficient maintenance of data and instruments is possible by linking 3D shape information

  15. Construction of BIM-based SMART-ITL Facility Management System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Woo-Jin; Yi, Sung-Jae; Park, Hyun-Sik; Ryu, Sung-Uk; Bae, Hwang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Sang-Chul; Min, Byung-Eui [DDRsoft Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The flow area and volume are scaled down to 1/49. The ratio of the hydraulic diameter is 1/7. Therefore, SMART-ITL is a large-scale thermalhydraulic test facility with about 45 m height, which is consisted of 10 m underground and 35 m from the ground level. Until now, the management of design data and maintenance of large scale test facilities have been managed based on hard-copy information. Recently, Thermal Hydraulics Safety Research Division (THSRD) at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has developed Facility Management System (FMS) based Building Information Modeling (BIM) to manage its design data more effectively for these large scale test facilities of SMART-ITL and ATLAS, and this BIM technology has been applied to SMART-ITL at the first. This study proposed a method of effective management and maintenance of design data applied to the SMART-ITL. That is, a FMS was developed based on the BIM technology for SMART-ITL. Figure 2 shows an overview of FMS development process based on BIM technology. SMART-ITL FMS facilitates its management and maintenance more effectively and accurately by 3- dimensional visualization. It enables the shape information of large scale test facilities to be visualized intuitively in a virtual space, and the efficient maintenance of data and instruments is possible by linking 3D shape information.

  16. Materials and Fuels Complex Facilities Radioactive Waste Management Basis and DOE Manual 435.1-1 Compliance Tables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisa Harvego; Brion Bennett

    2011-09-01

    Department of Energy Order 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management,' along with its associated manual and guidance, requires development and maintenance of a radioactive waste management basis for each radioactive waste management facility, operation, and activity. This document presents a radioactive waste management basis for Idaho National Laboratory's Materials and Fuels Complex facilities that manage radioactive waste. The radioactive waste management basis for a facility comprises existing laboratory-wide and facility-specific documents. Department of Energy Manual 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management Manual,' facility compliance tables also are presented for the facilities. The tables serve as a tool for developing the radioactive waste management basis.

  17. Advanced Test Reactor Complex Facilities Radioactive Waste Management Basis and DOE Manual 435.1-1 Compliance Tables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisa Harvego; Brion Bennett

    2011-11-01

    U.S. Department of Energy Order 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management,' along with its associated manual and guidance, requires development and maintenance of a radioactive waste management basis for each radioactive waste management facility, operation, and activity. This document presents a radioactive waste management basis for Idaho National Laboratory's Advanced Test Reactor Complex facilities that manage radioactive waste. The radioactive waste management basis for a facility comprises existing laboratory-wide and facility-specific documents. U.S. Department of Energy Manual 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management Manual,' facility compliance tables also are presented for the facilities. The tables serve as a tool to develop the radioactive waste management basis.

  18. Value Adding Management (VAM) of buildings and facility services in four steps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Voordt, Theo; Jensen, Per Anker; Hoendervanger, Jan Gerard; Bergsma, Feike

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a new Value Adding Management (VAM) model that aims to support decision makers in identifying appropriate interventions in buildings, other facilities and services that add value to the organisation, to manage its implementation, and to measure the output and outcomes. The paper

  19. Bureau of Indian Affairs Schools: New Facilities Management Information System Promising, but Improved Data Accuracy Needed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC.

    A General Accounting Office (GAO) study evaluated the Bureau of Indian Affairs' (BIA) new facilities management information system (FMIS). Specifically, the study examined whether the new FMIS addresses the old system's weaknesses and meets BIA's management needs, whether BIA has finished validating the accuracy of data transferred from the old…

  20. Facilities management innovation in public-private collaborations: Danish ESCO projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nardelli, Giulia; Jensen, Jesper Ole; Nielsen, Susanne Balslev

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the article is to investigate how Facilities Management (FM) units navigate Energy Service Company (ESCO) collaborations, here defined as examples of public collaborative innovation within the context of FM. The driving motivation is to inform and inspire internal FM units of local...... institutions on how to navigate and manage collaboration of different, intra- and inter-organisational actors throughout ESCO projects.......The purpose of the article is to investigate how Facilities Management (FM) units navigate Energy Service Company (ESCO) collaborations, here defined as examples of public collaborative innovation within the context of FM. The driving motivation is to inform and inspire internal FM units of local...

  1. Native American Technical Assistance and Training for Renewable Energy Resource Development and Electrical Generation Facilities Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. David Lester

    2008-10-17

    The Council of Energy Resource Tribes (CERT) will facilitate technical expertise and training of Native Americans in renewable energy resource development for electrical generation facilities, and distributed generation options contributing to feasibility studies, strategic planning and visioning. CERT will also provide information to Tribes on energy efficiency and energy management techniques.This project will provide facilitation and coordination of expertise from government agencies and private industries to interact with Native Americans in ways that will result in renewable energy resource development, energy efficiency program development, and electrical generation facilities management by Tribal entities. The intent of this cooperative agreement is to help build capacity within the Tribes to manage these important resources.

  2. Waste Acceptance Decisions and Uncertainty Analysis at the Oak Ridge Environmental Management Waste Management Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redus, K. S.; Patterson, J. E.; Hampshire, G. L.; Perkins, A. B.

    2003-02-25

    The Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) Attainment Team (AT) routinely provides the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations with Go/No-Go decisions associated with the disposition of over 1.8 million yd3 of low-level radioactive, TSCA, and RCRA hazardous waste. This supply of waste comes from 60+ environmental restoration projects over the next 15 years planned to be dispositioned at the Oak Ridge Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF). The EMWMF WAC AT decision making process is accomplished in four ways: (1) ensure a clearly defined mission and timeframe for accomplishment is established, (2) provide an effective organization structure with trained personnel, (3) have in place a set of waste acceptance decisions and Data Quality Objectives (DQO) for which quantitative measures are required, and (4) use validated risk-based forecasting, decision support, and modeling/simulation tools. We provide a summary of WAC AT structure and performance. We offer suggestions based on lessons learned for effective transfer to other DOE.

  3. Waste Acceptance Decisions and Uncertainty Analysis at the Oak Ridge Environmental Management Waste Management Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redus, K. S.; Patterson, J. E.; Hampshire, G. L.; Perkins, A. B.

    2003-01-01

    The Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) Attainment Team (AT) routinely provides the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations with Go/No-Go decisions associated with the disposition of over 1.8 million yd3 of low-level radioactive, TSCA, and RCRA hazardous waste. This supply of waste comes from 60+ environmental restoration projects over the next 15 years planned to be dispositioned at the Oak Ridge Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF). The EMWMF WAC AT decision making process is accomplished in four ways: (1) ensure a clearly defined mission and timeframe for accomplishment is established, (2) provide an effective organization structure with trained personnel, (3) have in place a set of waste acceptance decisions and Data Quality Objectives (DQO) for which quantitative measures are required, and (4) use validated risk-based forecasting, decision support, and modeling/simulation tools. We provide a summary of WAC AT structure and performance. We offer suggestions based on lessons learned for effective transfer to other DOE

  4. Facility accident considerations in the US Department of Energy Waste Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, C.

    1994-01-01

    A principal consideration in developing waste management strategies is the relative importance of Potential radiological and hazardous releases to the environment during postulated facility accidents with respect to protection of human health and the environment. The Office of Environmental Management (EM) within the US Department of Energy (DOE) is currently formulating an integrated national program to manage the treatment, storage, and disposal of existing and future wastes at DOE sites. As part of this process, a Programmatic Environmental impact Statement (PEIS) is being prepared to evaluate different waste management alternatives. This paper reviews analyses that have been Performed to characterize, screen, and develop source terms for accidents that may occur in facilities used to store and treat the waste streams considered in these alternatives. Preliminary results of these analyses are discussed with respect to the comparative potential for significant releases due to accidents affecting various treatment processes and facility configurations. Key assumptions and sensitivities are described

  5. Improving heart failure disease management in skilled nursing facilities: lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolansky, Mary A; Hitch, Jeanne A; Piña, Ileana L; Boxer, Rebecca S

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of the study was to design and evaluate an improvement project that implemented HF management in four skilled nursing facilities (SNFs). Kotter's Change Management principles were used to guide the implementation. In addition, half of the facilities had an implementation coach who met with facility staff weekly for 4 months and monthly for 5 months. Weekly and monthly audits were performed that documented compliance with eight key aspects of the protocol. Contextual factors were captured using field notes. Adherence to the HF management protocols was variable ranging from 17% to 82%. Facilitators of implementation included staff who championed the project, an implementation coach, and physician involvement. Barriers were high staff turnover and a hierarchal culture. Opportunities exist to integrate HF management protocols to improve SNF care.

  6. Nutrient management strategies on Dutch dairy farms: an empirical analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ondersteijn, C.J.M.

    2002-01-01

    Key Words: MINAS; nitrogen surplus; phosphate surplus; nutrient efficiency; nutrient productivity; financial consequences; strategic management; perceived environmental uncertainty; nutrient management planning; dairy farming; The Netherlands.

    Agricultural nutrients are a

  7. Screensaver: an open source lab information management system (LIMS) for high throughput screening facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolopko, Andrew N; Sullivan, John P; Erickson, Sean D; Wrobel, David; Chiang, Su L; Rudnicki, Katrina; Rudnicki, Stewart; Nale, Jennifer; Selfors, Laura M; Greenhouse, Dara; Muhlich, Jeremy L; Shamu, Caroline E

    2010-05-18

    Shared-usage high throughput screening (HTS) facilities are becoming more common in academe as large-scale small molecule and genome-scale RNAi screening strategies are adopted for basic research purposes. These shared facilities require a unique informatics infrastructure that must not only provide access to and analysis of screening data, but must also manage the administrative and technical challenges associated with conducting numerous, interleaved screening efforts run by multiple independent research groups. We have developed Screensaver, a free, open source, web-based lab information management system (LIMS), to address the informatics needs of our small molecule and RNAi screening facility. Screensaver supports the storage and comparison of screening data sets, as well as the management of information about screens, screeners, libraries, and laboratory work requests. To our knowledge, Screensaver is one of the first applications to support the storage and analysis of data from both genome-scale RNAi screening projects and small molecule screening projects. The informatics and administrative needs of an HTS facility may be best managed by a single, integrated, web-accessible application such as Screensaver. Screensaver has proven useful in meeting the requirements of the ICCB-Longwood/NSRB Screening Facility at Harvard Medical School, and has provided similar benefits to other HTS facilities.

  8. Screensaver: an open source lab information management system (LIMS for high throughput screening facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nale Jennifer

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shared-usage high throughput screening (HTS facilities are becoming more common in academe as large-scale small molecule and genome-scale RNAi screening strategies are adopted for basic research purposes. These shared facilities require a unique informatics infrastructure that must not only provide access to and analysis of screening data, but must also manage the administrative and technical challenges associated with conducting numerous, interleaved screening efforts run by multiple independent research groups. Results We have developed Screensaver, a free, open source, web-based lab information management system (LIMS, to address the informatics needs of our small molecule and RNAi screening facility. Screensaver supports the storage and comparison of screening data sets, as well as the management of information about screens, screeners, libraries, and laboratory work requests. To our knowledge, Screensaver is one of the first applications to support the storage and analysis of data from both genome-scale RNAi screening projects and small molecule screening projects. Conclusions The informatics and administrative needs of an HTS facility may be best managed by a single, integrated, web-accessible application such as Screensaver. Screensaver has proven useful in meeting the requirements of the ICCB-Longwood/NSRB Screening Facility at Harvard Medical School, and has provided similar benefits to other HTS facilities.

  9. Challenges in the management of decommission waste of nuclear facilities in Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glover, E.T.; Fletcher, J.J.

    2002-01-01

    It is inevitable that every nuclear facility must one day be safely decommissioned. When considering decommissioning, large amounts of radioactive and non-radioactive waste have to be taken into account. Disposal of such materials can have large economic impact on the overall decommissioning cost. In developing countries like Ghana, the perception of environmental protection through waste management, is often not very high as compared to many other pressing needs. Therefore limited resources are allocated for environmental problems. Ghana operates a tank-in- pool type research reactor, 30kW output for research in neutron activation analysis, radioisotope preparation, education and training, a radiotherapy unit that utilizes a 185TBq Co-60 radioactive sources for the treatment of cancer and a gamma irradiation facility which utilizes 1.85PBq Co-60 radioactive source for the irradiation of various materials. All these facilities are operating without designed decommissioning in mind, an inadequate waste management infrastructure as well as a lack of a repository to handling the resulting waste. It is today's beneficials of the nuclear facility that has to deal with the legacies of the future decommissioning activities. The paper outlines some of the challenges and issues to be expected in the management of waste from future decommissioning of nuclear facilities in Ghana with the absence of a waste management infrastructure and inadequate financial resources. The paper puts forth a concept to perform meaningful and significant plans whilst the facilities are still operating. (author)

  10. Barriers to Optimal Pain Management in Aged Care Facilities: An Australian Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veal, Felicity; Williams, Mackenzie; Bereznicki, Luke; Cummings, Elizabeth; Thompson, Angus; Peterson, Gregory; Winzenberg, Tania

    2017-11-15

    Up to 80% of residents in aged care facilities (ACFs) experience pain, which is often suboptimally managed. To characterize pain management in ACFs and identify the barriers to optimal pain management. An exploratory descriptive qualitative study using semistructured interviews. Five Southern Tasmania, Australian ACFs. 23 staff members (18 nurses and 5 facility managers). Interviews were conducted from September to November 2015. Interviews included questions about how pain was measured or assessed, what happened if pain was identified, barriers to pain management, and potential ways to overcome these barriers. Interviewees noted that there were no formal requirements regarding pain assessment at the ACFs reviewed; however, pain was often informally assessed. Staff noted the importance of adequate pain management for the residents' quality of life and employed both nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic techniques to reduce pain when identified. The barriers to optimal pain management included difficulty identifying and assessing pain, residents' resistance to reporting pain and/or taking medications, and communication barriers between the nursing staff and GPs. Staff interviewed were dedicated to managing residents' pain effectively; however, actions in a number of areas could improve resident outcomes. These include a more consistent approach to documenting pain in residents' progress notes and improving nurse-GP communications to ensure that new or escalating pain is identified and expedient changes can be made to the resident's management. Additionally, resident, family, nurse, and carer education, conducted within the facilities on a regular basis, could help improve the pain management of residents. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Inputs to quality: supervision, management, and community involvement in health facilities in Egypt in 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krumholz Harlan M

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As low- and middle-income countries experience economic development, ensuring quality of health care delivery is a central component of health reform. Nevertheless, health reforms in low- and middle-income countries have focused more on access to services rather than the quality of these services, and reporting on quality has been limited. In the present study, we sought to examine the prevalence and regional variation in key management practices in Egyptian health facilities within three domains: supervision of the facility from the Ministry of Health and Population (MOHP, managerial processes, and patient and community involvement in care. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of data from 559 facilities surveyed with the Egyptian Service Provision Assessment (ESPA survey in 2004, the most recent such survey in Egypt. We registered on the Measure Demographic and Health Survey (DHS website http://legacy.measuredhs.com/login.cfm to gain access to the survey data. From the ESPA sampled 559 MOHP facilities, we excluded a total of 79 facilities because they did not offer facility-based 24-hour care or have at least one physician working in the facility, resulting in a final sample of 480 facilities. The final sample included 76 general service hospitals, 307 rural health units, and 97 maternal and child health and urban health units (MCH/urban units. We used standard frequency analyses to describe facility characteristics and tested the statistical significance of regional differences using chi-square statistics. Results Nearly all facilities reported having external supervision within the 6 months preceding the interview. In contrast, key facility-level managerial processes, such as having routine and documented management meetings and applying quality assurance approaches, were uncommon. Involvement of communities and patients was also reported in a minority of facilities. Hospitals and health units located in Urban

  12. Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) Site-Specific Health and Safety Plan, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flynn, N.C. Bechtel Jacobs

    2008-04-21

    The Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) policy is to provide a safe and healthy workplace for all employees and subcontractors. The implementation of this policy requires that operations of the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF), located one-half mile west of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex, be guided by an overall plan and consistent proactive approach to environment, safety and health (ES&H) issues. The BJC governing document for worker safety and health, BJC/OR-1745, 'Worker Safety and Health Program', describes the key elements of the BJC Safety and Industrial Hygiene (IH) programs, which includes the requirement for development and implementation of a site-specific Health and Safety Plan (HASP) where required by regulation (refer also to BJC-EH-1012, 'Development and Approval of Safety and Health Plans'). BJC/OR-1745, 'Worker Safety and Health Program', implements the requirements for worker protection contained in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 851. The EMWMF site-specific HASP requirements identifies safe operating procedures, work controls, personal protective equipment, roles and responsibilities, potential site hazards and control measures, site access requirements, frequency and types of monitoring, site work areas, decontamination procedures, and outlines emergency response actions. This HASP will be available on site for use by all workers, management and supervisors, oversight personnel and visitors. All EMWMF assigned personnel will be briefed on the contents of this HASP and will be required to follow the procedures and protocols as specified. The policies and procedures referenced in this HASP apply to all EMWMF operations activities. In addition the HASP establishes ES&H criteria for the day-to-day activities to prevent or minimize any adverse effect on the environment and personnel safety and health and to meet standards that define acceptable

  13. Recommendations for Emergency Management Planning for School Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    Numerous events, such as hurricanes, floods, and tornadoes, constitute a natural disaster for public schools. Human-caused disasters include hazardous-material emergencies, civil riots, fires, and nuclear accidents. This document contains emergency-management planning guidelines, developed by the Texas Education Agency, to help local school…

  14. Simulation Modeling of a Facility Layout in Operations Management Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazici, Hulya Julie

    2006-01-01

    Teaching quantitative courses can be challenging. Similarly, layout modeling and lean production concepts can be difficult to grasp in an introductory OM (operations management) class. This article describes a simulation model developed in PROMODEL to facilitate the learning of layout modeling and lean manufacturing. Simulation allows for the…

  15. Radioactive and mixed waste management plan for the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Hazardous Waste Handling Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-01-01

    This Radioactive and Mixed Waste Management Plan for the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is written to meet the requirements for an annual report of radioactive and mixed waste management activities outlined in DOE Order 5820.2A. Radioactive and mixed waste management activities during FY 1994 listed here include principal regulatory and environmental issues and the degree to which planned activities were accomplished.

  16. Technology requirements to be addressed by the NASA Lewis Research Center Cryogenic Fluid Management Facility program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydelott, J. C.; Rudland, R. S.

    1985-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center is responsible for the planning and execution of a scientific program which will provide advance in space cryogenic fluid management technology. A number of future space missions were identified that require or could benefit from this technology. These fluid management technology needs were prioritized and a shuttle attached reuseable test bed, the cryogenic fluid management facility (CFMF), is being designed to provide the experimental data necessary for the technology development effort.

  17. Use of the project management methodology to establish physical protection system at nuclear facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gramotkin, F.; Kuzmyak, I.; Kravtsov, V.

    2015-01-01

    The paper considers the possibility of using the project management methodology developed by the Project Management Institute (USA) in nuclear security in terms of modernization or development of physical protection system at nuclear facility. It was demonstrated that this methodology allows competent and flexible management of the projects on physical protection, ensuring effective control of their timely implementation in compliance with the planned budget and quality

  18. Conceptual design report for the spent fuel management technology research and test (SMATER) facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, S.W.; Ro, S.G.; Lee, J.S.; Min, D.K.; Shin, Y.J. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1998-10-01

    This study was intended to develop concept for a pilot-scale remote operation facility for longer term management of spent fuel and therefrom to provide technical requirement for later basic design of the facility. Main scope of work for the study was to revise the past (1990) conceptual design in functions, scale, hot cell layout etc. based on user requirements. Technical reference was made to the PKA facility in Germany, through collaboration with appropriate partner, to elaborate the design and requirements. The study was focused on establishing design criteria and conceptual design of the SMATER facility. The results of this study should be an essential and useful basis upon optimization for further work to basic design of the facility. (author). 17 figs., 12 tabs.

  19. PIMS sequencing extension: a laboratory information management system for DNA sequencing facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troshin, Peter V; Postis, Vincent Lg; Ashworth, Denise; Baldwin, Stephen A; McPherson, Michael J; Barton, Geoffrey J

    2011-03-07

    Facilities that provide a service for DNA sequencing typically support large numbers of users and experiment types. The cost of services is often reduced by the use of liquid handling robots but the efficiency of such facilities is hampered because the software for such robots does not usually integrate well with the systems that run the sequencing machines. Accordingly, there is a need for software systems capable of integrating different robotic systems and managing sample information for DNA sequencing services. In this paper, we describe an extension to the Protein Information Management System (PIMS) that is designed for DNA sequencing facilities. The new version of PIMS has a user-friendly web interface and integrates all aspects of the sequencing process, including sample submission, handling and tracking, together with capture and management of the data. The PIMS sequencing extension has been in production since July 2009 at the University of Leeds DNA Sequencing Facility. It has completely replaced manual data handling and simplified the tasks of data management and user communication. Samples from 45 groups have been processed with an average throughput of 10000 samples per month. The current version of the PIMS sequencing extension works with Applied Biosystems 3130XL 96-well plate sequencer and MWG 4204 or Aviso Theonyx liquid handling robots, but is readily adaptable for use with other combinations of robots. PIMS has been extended to provide a user-friendly and integrated data management solution for DNA sequencing facilities that is accessed through a normal web browser and allows simultaneous access by multiple users as well as facility managers. The system integrates sequencing and liquid handling robots, manages the data flow, and provides remote access to the sequencing results. The software is freely available, for academic users, from http://www.pims-lims.org/.

  20. PIMS sequencing extension: a laboratory information management system for DNA sequencing facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baldwin Stephen A

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Facilities that provide a service for DNA sequencing typically support large numbers of users and experiment types. The cost of services is often reduced by the use of liquid handling robots but the efficiency of such facilities is hampered because the software for such robots does not usually integrate well with the systems that run the sequencing machines. Accordingly, there is a need for software systems capable of integrating different robotic systems and managing sample information for DNA sequencing services. In this paper, we describe an extension to the Protein Information Management System (PIMS that is designed for DNA sequencing facilities. The new version of PIMS has a user-friendly web interface and integrates all aspects of the sequencing process, including sample submission, handling and tracking, together with capture and management of the data. Results The PIMS sequencing extension has been in production since July 2009 at the University of Leeds DNA Sequencing Facility. It has completely replaced manual data handling and simplified the tasks of data management and user communication. Samples from 45 groups have been processed with an average throughput of 10000 samples per month. The current version of the PIMS sequencing extension works with Applied Biosystems 3130XL 96-well plate sequencer and MWG 4204 or Aviso Theonyx liquid handling robots, but is readily adaptable for use with other combinations of robots. Conclusions PIMS has been extended to provide a user-friendly and integrated data management solution for DNA sequencing facilities that is accessed through a normal web browser and allows simultaneous access by multiple users as well as facility managers. The system integrates sequencing and liquid handling robots, manages the data flow, and provides remote access to the sequencing results. The software is freely available, for academic users, from http://www.pims-lims.org/.

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF BIM/GIS INTEROPERABLE PLATFORM FOR FACILITY MANAGEMENT IN KOREA

    OpenAIRE

    Chunjoo Yoon; Changhee Hong

    2017-01-01

    South Korea is making facility design using Building Information Modeling (BIM) mandatory and expanding the use of BIM. However, BIM technology has been used limitedly only from the design to construction phases but it has rarely been applied to the maintenance phase in Korea. To overcome this problem, data management and related technologies are needed during the entire life cycle of the facility construction process. This study developed a platform by which BIM data at the constru...

  2. Computer software configuration management plan for 200 East/West Liquid Effluent Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graf, F.A. Jr.

    1995-01-01

    This computer software management configuration plan covers the control of the software for the monitor and control system that operates the Effluent Treatment Facility and its associated truck load in station and some key aspects of the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility that stores condensate to be processed. Also controlled is the Treated Effluent Disposal System's pumping stations and monitors waste generator flows in this system as well as the Phase Two Effluent Collection System

  3. Replacing natural wetlands with stormwater management facilities: biophysical and perceived social values

    OpenAIRE

    Rooney, R.C.; Foote, L.; Krogman, N.; Pattison, J.K.; Wilson, M.J.; Bayley, S.E.

    2015-01-01

    Urban expansion replaces wetlands of natural origin with artificial stormwater management facilities. The literature suggests that efforts to mimic natural wetlands in the design of stormwater facilities can expand the provision of ecosystem services. Policy developments seek to capitalize on these improvements, encouraging developers to build stormwater wetlands in place of stormwater ponds; however, few have compared the biophysical values and social perceptions of these created wetlands to...

  4. A local area network and information management system for a submarine overhaul facility

    OpenAIRE

    Bushmire, Jeffrey D

    1990-01-01

    A preliminary design of a local area network for a submarine overhaul facility is developed using System Engineering concepts. SOFLAN, the Submarine Overhaul Facility Local Area Network, is necessary to provide more timely and accurate information to submarine overhaul managers in order to decrease the overhaul time period and become more competitive. The network is a microcomputer based system following the Ethernet and IEEE 802.3 standards with a server .. client architecture. SOFLAN serves...

  5. Risk Management Technique for design and operation of facilities and equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedor, O. H.; Parsons, W. N.; Coutinho, J. De S.

    1975-01-01

    The Risk Management System collects information from engineering, operating, and management personnel to identify potentially hazardous conditions. This information is used in risk analysis, problem resolution, and contingency planning. The resulting hazard accountability system enables management to monitor all identified hazards. Data from this system are examined in project reviews so that management can decide to eliminate or accept these risks. This technique is particularly effective in improving the management of risks in large, complex, high-energy facilities. These improvements are needed for increased cooperation among industry, regulatory agencies, and the public.

  6. Characterization of Representative Materials in Support of Safe, Long Term Storage of Surplus Plutonium in DOE-STD-3013 Containers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narlesky, Joshua E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stroud, Mary Ann [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smith, Paul Herrick [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wayne, David M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mason, Richard E. [MET-1: ACTINIDE PROCESSING SUPPORT; Worl, Laura A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2013-02-15

    The Surveillance and Monitoring Program is a joint Los Alamos National Laboratory/Savannah River Site effort funded by the Department of Energy-Environmental Management to provide the technical basis for the safe, long-term storage (up to 50 years) of over 6 metric tons of plutonium stored in over 5,000 DOE-STD-3013 containers at various facilities around the DOE complex. The majority of this material is plutonium that is surplus to the nuclear weapons program, and much of it is destined for conversion to mixed oxide fuel for use in US nuclear power plants. The form of the plutonium ranges from relatively pure metal and oxide to very impure oxide. The performance of the 3013 containers has been shown to depend on moisture content and on the levels, types and chemical forms of the impurities. The oxide materials that present the greatest challenge to the storage container are those that contain chloride salts. Other common impurities include oxides and other compounds of calcium, magnesium, iron, and nickel. Over the past 15 years the program has collected a large body of experimental data on 54 samples of plutonium, with 53 chosen to represent the broader population of materials in storage. This paper summarizes the characterization data, moisture analysis, particle size, surface area, density, wattage, actinide composition, trace element impurity analysis, and shelf life surveillance data and includes origin and process history information. Limited characterization data on fourteen nonrepresentative samples is also presented.

  7. Fast flux test facility performance monitoring management information, July 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newland, D J

    1988-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide management with performance data on key performance indicators selected from the FFTF Early Warning System performance indicators. This report contains the results for key performance indicators divided into two categories of ``overall`` and ``other.`` The ``overall`` performance indicators, when considered in the aggregate, provide one means of monitoring overall plant performance. The data should be used in conjunction with the results of other management assessment activities to focus improvement efforts. Use of these key performance indicators as a group is stressed, since focusing on a single indicator or a narrow set of indicators can be counterproductive both to safety and to long-term performance improvement.

  8. Rationalization of bioassay for radiation protection management in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Keiichiro; Hattori, Takatoshi

    1989-01-01

    In this study, the objective is the rationalization of the technique of radiation protection management for internal irradiation, and we improved on utility of bioassay method. The major results obtained are as follows: 1. We develop the computing code which can analyze the behavior of excretion of radioactive nuclides and estimate the effective dose equivalent. And, we proposed the direct evaluation method of the effective dose equivalent of internal irradiation using the curve of the excretion. 2. We develop the Tiolet Monitor which can monitor the intake of 54 Mn, 137 Cs, etc. Practical screening level of Toilet Monitor is investigated as usable. 3. Any kinds of correction factors of bioassay data are investigated. 4. Practical usage of the bioassay system for management of internal irradiation protection is proposed. (author)

  9. Utilization Management in Department of Defense Military Treatment Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-07-01

    unnecessary tests, both of which Dr. C. E. Jarret (1992), Director of Utilization Managewent/Quality Assurance, Baylor Medical Center , states can occur for...for Quality Assurance/Utilization Review, Baylor Medical Center , nurses are the backbone of an effective utilization management program. They are...to preadmission authorization. Baylor Medical Center uses one full-time nurse to do precertification, which equates to approximately 60 requests per

  10. CSNI Technical Opinion Papers No. 15 - Ageing management of nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nocture, Pierre; Daubard, Jean-Paul; Lhomme, Veronique; Martineau, Dominique; Blundell, Neil; Conte, Dorothee; Dobson, Martin; Gmal, Bernhard; Hiltz, Thomas; Ueda, Yoshinori

    2012-01-01

    Managing the ageing of fuel cycle facilities (FCFs) means, as for other nuclear installations, ensuring the availability of required safety functions throughout their service life while taking into account the changes that occur with time and use. This technical opinion paper identifies a set of good practices by benchmarking strategies and good practices on coping with physical ageing and obsolescence from the facility design stage until decommissioning. It should be of particular interest to nuclear safety regulators, fuel cycle facilities operators and fuel cycle researchers [fr

  11. Development of a spent fuel management technology research and test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S. W.; Noh, S. K.; Lee, J. S. and others

    1997-12-01

    This study was intended to develop concept for a pilot-scale remote operation facility for longer term management of spent fuel and therefrom to provide technical requirement for later basic design of the facility. Main scope of work for the study was to revise the past (1990) conceptual design in functions, scale, hot cell layout, etc. based on user requirements. Technical reference was made to the PKA facility in Germany, through collaboration with appropriate partner, to elaborate the design and requirements. A simulator of the conceptual design was also developed by use of virtual reality technique by 3-D computer graphics for equipment and building. (author). 18 tabs., 39 figs

  12. A Note on Realistic Dividends in Actuarial Surplus Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Avanzi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Because of the profitable nature of risk businesses in the long term, de Finetti suggested that surplus models should allow for cash leakages, as otherwise the surplus would unrealistically grow (on average to infinity. These leakages were interpreted as ‘dividends’. Subsequent literature on actuarial surplus models with dividend distribution has mainly focussed on dividend strategies that either maximise the expected present value of dividends until ruin or lead to a probability of ruin that is less than one (see Albrecher and Thonhauser, Avanzi for reviews. An increasing number of papers are directly interested in modelling dividend policies that are consistent with actual practice in financial markets. In this short note, we review the corporate finance literature with the specific aim of fleshing out properties that dividend strategies should ideally satisfy, if one wants to model behaviour that is consistent with practice.

  13. Adaptive management: a paradigm for remediation of public facilities following a terrorist attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whicker, Jeffrey J; Janecky, David R; Doerr, Ted B

    2008-10-01

    Terrorist actions are aimed at maximizing harm (health, psychological, economical, and political) through the combined physical impacts of the act and fear. Immediate and effective response to a terrorist act is critical to limit human and environmental harm, effectively restore facility function, and maintain public confidence. Though there have been terrorist attacks in public facilities that we have learned from, overall our experiences in restoration of public facilities following a terrorist attack are limited. Restoration of public facilities following a release of a hazardous material is inherently far more complex than in industrial settings and has many unique technical, economic, social, and political challenges. For example, there may be a great need to quickly restore the facility to full operation and allow public access even though it was not designed for easy or rapid restoration, and critical information is needed for quantitative risk assessment and effective restoration must be anticipated to be incomplete and uncertain. Whereas present planning documents have substantial linearity in their organization, the "adaptive management" paradigm provides a constructive parallel paradigm for restoration of public facilities that anticipates and plans for uncertainty, inefficiencies, and stakeholder participation. Adaptive management grew out of the need to manage and restore natural resources in highly complex and changing environments with limited knowledge about causal relationships and responses to restoration actions. Similarities between natural resource management and restoration of a public facility after a terrorist attack suggest that integration of adaptive management principles explicitly into restoration processes will result in substantially enhanced and flexible responses necessary to meet the uncertainties of potential terrorist attacks.

  14. The Practice of Sustainable Facilities Management: Design Sentiments and the Knowledge Chasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Elmualim

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The construction industry with its nature of project delivery is very fragmented in terms of the various processes that encompass design, construction, facilities and assets management. Facilities managers are in the forefront of delivering sustainable assets management and hence further the venture for mitigation and adaptation to climate change. A questionnaire survey was conducted to establish perceptions, level of commitment and knowledge chasm in practising sustainable facilities management (FM. This has significant implications for sustainable design management, especially in a fragmented industry. The majority of questionnaire respondents indicated the importance of sustainability for their organization. Many of them stated that they reported on sustainability as part of their organization annual reporting with energy efficiency, recycling and waste reduction as the main concern for them. The overwhelming barrier for implementing sound, sustainable FM is the lack of consensual understanding and focus of individuals and organizations about sustainability. There is a knowledge chasm regarding practical information on delivering sustainable FM. Sustainability information asymmetry in design, construction and FM processes render any sustainable design as a sentiment and mere design aspiration. Skills and training provision, traditionally offered separately to designers and facilities managers, needs to be re-evaluated. Sustainability education and training should be developed to provide effective structures and processes to apply sustainability throughout the construction and FM industries coherently and as common practice. Published in the Journal AEDM - Volume 5, Numbers 1-2, 2009 , pp. 91-102(12

  15. Radioactive Waste Management and Nuclear Facility Decommissioning Progress in Iraq - 13216

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Musawi, Fouad; Shamsaldin, Emad S.; Jasim, Hadi; Cochran, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Management of Iraq's radioactive wastes and decommissioning of Iraq's former nuclear facilities are the responsibility of Iraq's Ministry of Science and Technology (MoST). The majority of Iraq's former nuclear facilities are in the Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center located a few kilometers from the edge of Baghdad. These facilities include bombed and partially destroyed research reactors, a fuel fabrication facility and radioisotope production facilities. Within these facilities are large numbers of silos, approximately 30 process or waste storage tanks and thousands of drums of uncharacterised radioactive waste. There are also former nuclear facilities/sites that are outside of Al-Tuwaitha and these include the former uranium processing and waste storage facility at Jesira, the dump site near Adaya, the former centrifuge facility at Rashdiya and the former enrichment plant at Tarmiya. In 2005, Iraq lacked the infrastructure needed to decommission its nuclear facilities and manage its radioactive wastes. The lack of infrastructure included: (1) the lack of an organization responsible for decommissioning and radioactive waste management, (2) the lack of a storage facility for radioactive wastes, (3) the lack of professionals with experience in decommissioning and modern waste management practices, (4) the lack of laws and regulations governing decommissioning or radioactive waste management, (5) ongoing security concerns, and (6) limited availability of electricity and internet. Since its creation eight years ago, the MoST has worked with the international community and developed an organizational structure, trained staff, and made great progress in managing radioactive wastes and decommissioning Iraq's former nuclear facilities. This progress has been made, despite the very difficult implementing conditions in Iraq. Within MoST, the Radioactive Waste Treatment and Management Directorate (RWTMD) is responsible for waste management and the Iraqi Decommissioning

  16. Annual evaluation of routine radiological survey/monitoring frequencies for the High Ranking Facilities Deactivating Project at Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-12-01

    The Bethel Valley Watershed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has several Environmental Management (EM) facilities that are designated for deactivation and subsequent decontamination and decommissioning (D and D). The Surplus Facilities Program at ORNL provides surveillance and maintenance support for these facilities as deactivation objectives are completed to reduce the risks associated with radioactive material inventories, etc. The Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC Radiological Control (RADCON) Program has established requirements for radiological monitoring and surveying radiological conditions in these facilities. These requirements include an annual evaluation of routine radiation survey and monitoring frequencies. Radiological survey/monitoring frequencies were evaluated for two High Ranking Facilities Deactivation Project facilities, the Bulk Shielding Facility and Tower Shielding Facility. Considerable progress has been made toward accomplishing deactivation objectives, thus the routine radiological survey/monitoring frequencies are being reduced for 1999. This report identifies the survey/monitoring frequency adjustments and provides justification that the applicable RADCON Program requirements are also satisfied

  17. The Mixed Waste Management Facility monthly report, October 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streit, R.

    1994-11-01

    During October, significant progress was made on both the management and technical activities of the Project. These activities were accomplished within the scope and effort described in the MWMF FY95 Plan (currently in draft within the Project), which reflects the reduced DOE FY95 funding guidance received September 29, 1994. DOE/OAK approved Revision 1 of the MWMF Baseline (reflecting KD-1 guidance), thus providing a basis for Revision 2 (reflecting DWTF/MWW integration). Considerable management and senior-engineering resources were directed toward addressing the issues that are summarized below. The proposed technical scope and schedule for the FY95 Plan was largely completed during October, along with consistent (but less detailed) tasks and estimates for the remainder of the project; this latter information will also be used as a basis for the Rebaseline. However, the FY95 Plan cannot be finalized until mid-November when LLNL tax rates will be established. MWMF project personnel completed most of the input and draft documentation required by the LLNL permitting group to prepare the modified RD&D permit application that reflects the DWTF/MWMF integration. The PSAR continued through the LLNL approval chain. Revisions to the EA began to reflect the DWTF/MWMF integration. Two significant reviews of the project were addressed: the DOE Office of the Inspector General (OIG) and the Options Analysis Team (OAT). Draft documents were prepared and discussed with DOE/OAK and HQ to provide for a coordinated response.

  18. The European HST Science Data Archive. [and Data Management Facility (DMF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasian, F.; Pirenne, B.; Albrecht, R.; Russo, G.

    1993-01-01

    The paper describes the European HST Science Data Archive. Particular attention is given to the flow from the HST spacecraft to the Science Data Archive at the Space Telescope European Coordinating Facility (ST-ECF); the archiving system at the ST-ECF, including the hardware and software system structure; the operations at the ST-ECF and differences with the Data Management Facility; and the current developments. A diagram of the logical structure and data flow of the system managing the European HST Science Data Archive is included.

  19. Risk management for existing energy facilities. A global approach to numerical safety goals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pate-Cornell, M.E.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a structured set of numerical safety goals for risk management of existing energy facilities. The rationale behind these safety goals is based on principles of equity and economic efficiency. Some of the issues involved when using probabilistic risk analyses results for safety decisions are discussed. A brief review of existing safety targets and open-quotes floating numbersclose quotes is presented, and a set of safety goals for industrial risk management is proposed. Relaxation of these standards for existing facilities, the relevance of the lifetime of the plant, the treatment of uncertainties, and problems of failure dependencies are discussed briefly. 17 refs., 1 fig

  20. Capability challenges of facility management (FM) personnel toward sustainability agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halim, Ahmad Ilyas Ahmad; Sarpin, Norliana; Kasim, Narimah Binti; Zainal, Rozlin Binti

    2017-10-01

    The industries business play a significant role to contribute toward economic growth in develop and developing country. However, they always face serious problems such as time overrun, waste generation, and cost overrun during their operation and maintenance. Traditional practice is found unable to control that situation. These challenges accent the need for practitioners to rethink and improve their process management. This show that industries business has major potential when applying sustainable development by focusing on three pillars (economic, environment, and social). By adopting sustainability, it can reduce energy consumption and waste, while increasing productivity, financial return and corporate standing in community. FM personnel are most suitable position to lead organizations toward sustainability implementation. However, lack of skill and capability among FM personnel to achieve sustainable goal had become barrier that need to overcome. This paper focus to identify capability challenges of FM personnel toward sustainability. A multiple researches were conducted and data were gathered through literature review from previous studies.

  1. Waste management facilities cost information: System cost model product description. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundeen, A.S.; Hsu, K.M.; Shropshire, D.E.

    1996-02-01

    In May of 1994, Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company (LITCO) in Idaho Falls, Idaho and subcontractors developed the System Cost Model (SCM) application. The SCM estimates life-cycle costs of the entire US Department of Energy (DOE) complex for designing; constructing; operating; and decommissioning treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facilities for mixed low-level, low-level, transuranic, and mixed transuranic waste. The SCM uses parametric cost functions to estimate life-cycle costs for various treatment, storage, and disposal modules which reflect planned and existing facilities at DOE installations. In addition, SCM can model new facilities based on capacity needs over the program life cycle. The SCM also provides transportation costs for DOE wastes. Transportation costs are provided for truck and rail and include transport of contact-handled, remote-handled, and alpha (transuranic) wastes. The user can provide input data (default data is included in the SCM) including the volume and nature of waste to be managed, the time period over which the waste is to be managed, and the configuration of the waste management complex (i.e., where each installation's generated waste will be treated, stored, and disposed). Then the SCM uses parametric cost equations to estimate the costs of pre-operations (designing), construction costs, operation management, and decommissioning these waste management facilities

  2. Conjunctive operation of river facilities for integrated water resources management in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kim

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available With the increasing trend of water-related disasters such as floods and droughts resulting from climate change, the integrated management of water resources is gaining importance recently. Korea has worked towards preventing disasters caused by floods and droughts, managing water resources efficiently through the coordinated operation of river facilities such as dams, weirs, and agricultural reservoirs. This has been pursued to enable everyone to enjoy the benefits inherent to the utilization of water resources, by preserving functional rivers, improving their utility and reducing the degradation of water quality caused by floods and droughts. At the same time, coordinated activities are being conducted in multi-purpose dams, hydro-power dams, weirs, agricultural reservoirs and water use facilities (featuring a daily water intake of over 100 000 m3 day−1 with the purpose of monitoring the management of such facilities. This is being done to ensure the protection of public interest without acting as an obstacle to sound water management practices. During Flood Season, each facilities contain flood control capacity by limited operating level which determined by the Regulation Council in advance. Dam flood discharge decisions are approved through the flood forecasting and management of Flood Control Office due to minimize flood damage for both upstream and downstream. The operational plan is implemented through the council's predetermination while dry season for adequate quantity and distribution of water.

  3. Case management of severe malaria--a forgotten practice: experiences from health facilities in Uganda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Achan

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Severe malaria is a life-threatening medical emergency and requires prompt and effective treatment to prevent death. There is paucity of published information on current practices of severe malaria case management in sub-Saharan Africa; we evaluated the management practices for severe malaria in Ugandan health facilities METHODS AND FINDINGS: We did a cross sectional survey, using multi-stage sampling methods, of health facilities in 11 districts in the eastern and mid-western parts of Uganda. The study instruments were adapted from the WHO hospital care assessment tools. Between June and August 2009, 105 health facilities were surveyed and 181 health workers and 868 patients/caretakers interviewed. None of the inpatient facilities had all seven components of a basic care package for the management of severe malaria consistently available during the 3 months prior to the survey. Referral practices were appropriate for <10% (18/196 of the patients. Prompt care at any health facility was reported by 29% (247/868 of patients. Severe malaria was correctly diagnosed in 27% of patients (233.Though the quinine dose and regimen was correct in the majority (611/868, 70.4% of patients, it was administered in the correct volumes of 5% dextrose in only 18% (147/815. Most patients (80.1% had several doses of quinine administered in one single 500 ml bottle of 5% dextrose. Medications were purchased by 385 (44% patients and medical supplies by 478 patients (70.6%. CONCLUSIONS: Management of severe malaria in Ugandan health facilities was sub-optimal. These findings highlight the challenges of correctly managing severe malaria in resource limited settings. Priority areas for improvement include triage and emergency care, referral practises, quality of diagnosis and treatment, availability of medicines and supplies, training and support supervision.

  4. Development of a standardized transfusion ratio as a metric for evaluating dialysis facility anemia management practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiannong; Li, Suying; Gilbertson, David T; Monda, Keri L; Bradbury, Brian D; Collins, Allan J

    2014-10-01

    Because transfusion avoidance has been the cornerstone of anemia treatment for patients with kidney disease, direct measurement of red blood cell transfusion use to assess dialysis facility anemia management performance is reasonable. We aimed to explore methods for estimating facility-level standardized transfusion ratios (STfRs) to assess provider anemia treatment practices. Retrospective cohort study. Point prevalent US hemodialysis patients on January 1, 2009, with Medicare as primary payer and dialysis duration of 90 days or longer were included (n = 223,901). All dialysis facilities with eligible patients were included (n = 5,345). Dialysis facility assignment. Receiving a red blood cell transfusion in the inpatient or outpatient setting. We evaluated 3 approaches for estimating STfR: ratio of observed to expected numbers of transfusions (STfR(obs)), a Bayesian approach (STfR(Bayes)), and a modified version of the Bayesian approach (STfR(modBayes)). The overall national transfusion rate in 2009 was 23.2 per 100 patient-years. Our model for predicting the expected number of transfusions performed well. For large facilities, all 3 STfRs worked well. However, for small facilities, while the STfR(modBayes) worked well, STfR(obs) values demonstrated instability and the STfR(Bayes) may produce more bias. Administration of transfusions to dialysis patients reflects medical practice both within and outside the dialysis unit. Some transfusions may be deemed unavoidable and transfusion practices are subject to considerable regional variation. Development of an STfR metric is feasible and reasonable for assessing anemia treatment at dialysis facilities. The STfR(obs) is simple to calculate and works well for larger dialysis facilities. The STfR(modBayes) is more analytically complex, but facilitates comparisons across all dialysis facilities, including small facilities. Copyright © 2014 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Environmental monitoring for EG and G Idaho facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tkachyk, J.W.; Wright, K.C.; Wilhelmsen, R.N.

    1990-08-01

    This report describes the 1989 environmental-monitoring activities of the Environmental Monitoring Unit of EG ampersand G Idaho, Inc., at EG ampersand G-operated facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The major facilities monitored include the Radioactive Waste Management Complex, the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility, the Mixed Waste Storage Facility, and two surplus facilities. Additional monitoring activities performed by Environmental Monitoring are also discussed, including drinking-water monitoring and nonradiological liquid-effluent monitoring, as well as data management. The primary purposes of monitoring are to evaluate environmental conditions and to provide and interpret data, in compliance with applicable regulations, to ensure protection of human health and the environment. This report compares 1989 environmental-monitoring data with derived concentration guides and with data from previous years. This report also presents results of sampling performed by the Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory and by the United States Geological Survey. 17 refs., 49 figs., 11 tabs

  6. Engagement of Facilities Management in Design Stage through BIM: Framework and a Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering facilities management (FM at the early design stage could potentially reduce the efforts for maintenance during the operational phase of facilities. Few efforts in construction industry have involved facility managers into the design phase. It was suggested that early adoption of facilities management will contribute to reducing the needs for major repairs and alternations that will otherwise occur at the operational phase. There should be an integrated data source providing information support for the building lifecycle. It is envisaged that Building Information Modelling (BIM would fill the gap by acting as a visual model and a database throughout the building lifecycle. This paper develops a framework of how FM can be considered in design stage through BIM. Based on the framework, the paper explores how BIM will beneficially support FM in the design phase, such as space planning and energy analysis. A case study of using BIM to design facility managers’ travelling path in the maintenance process is presented. The results show that early adoption of FM in design stage with BIM can significantly reduce life cycle costs.

  7. Project Management Plan for the Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    The purpose of the Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Project (IFDP) is to place former isotopes production facilities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in a safe, stable, and environmentally sound condition suitable for an extended period of minimum surveillance and maintenance (S ampersand M) and as quickly and economically as possible. Implementation and completion of the deactivation project will further reduce the already small risks to the environment and to public safety and health. Furthermore, the project should result in significant S ampersand M cost savings in the future. The IFDP management plan has been prepared to document the project objectives, define organizational relationships and responsibilities, and outline the management control systems to be employed in the management of the project. The project has adopted a strategy to deactivate the simple facilities first, to reduce the scope of the project, and to gain experience before addressing more difficult facilities. A decision support system is being developed to identify those activities, that best promote the project mission and result in largest cost savings. The Work Plan for the Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Energy Systems 1994) defines the project schedule, the cost estimate, and the technical approach for the project

  8. Using Tools of Strategic Management in Medical Facilities of Lublin Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaworzynska Magdalena

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to evaluate the use of tools of strategic management in hospitals in Lublin region. The study was conducted among 14 medical entities from the area of Lublin Voivodeship. The survey was addressed to economic directors or chief accountants of health care facilities and sent by post. The questionnaire was also helpful in conducting an in-depth interview as it provided a required structure. As part of the interviews with managers of health care facilities, information beyond the questionnaire was acquired, e.g. about the mission. According to studies, most health care facilities develop strategic plans (71.4%. For 21.4% of the studied facilities, the strategic plan is known mainly to management. In contrast, 28.6% of entities do not have a strategic plan. The presented results of the research can increase the effectiveness of activities in each area of the health care facility, continuous process improvement and rapid response to changes in the environment.

  9. Optimization of the Operation of Green Buildings applying the Facility Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somorová Viera

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, in the field of civil engineering there exists an upward trend towards environmental sustainability. It relates mainly to the achievement of energy efficiency and also to the emission reduction throughout the whole life cycle of the building, i.e. in the course of its implementation, use and liquidation. These requirements are fulfilled, to a large extent, by green buildings. The characteristic feature of green buildings are primarily highly-sophisticated technical and technological equipments which are installed therein. The sophisticated systems of technological equipments need also the sophisticated management. From this point of view the facility management has all prerequisites to meet this requirement. The paper is aimed to define the facility management as an effective method which enables the optimization of the management of supporting activities by creating conditions for the optimum operation of green buildings viewed from the aspect of the environmental conditions

  10. Conceptual Design of an In-Space Cryogenic Fluid Management Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willen, G. S.; Riemer, D. H.; Hustvedt, D. C.

    1981-01-01

    The conceptual design of a Spacelab experiment to develop the technology associated with low gravity propellant management is presented. The proposed facility consisting of a supply tank, receiver tank, pressurization system, instrumentation, and supporting hardware, is described. The experimental objectives, the receiver tank to be modeled, and constraints imposed on the design by the space shuttle, Spacelab, and scaling requirements, are described. The conceptual design, including the general configurations, flow schematics, insulation systems, instrumentation requirements, and internal tank configurations for the supply tank and the receiver tank, is described. Thermal, structural, fluid, and safety and reliability aspects of the facility are analyzed. The facility development plan, including schedule and cost estimates for the facility, is presented. A program work breakdown structure and master program schedule for a seven year program are included.

  11. LLNL MOX fuel lead assemblies data report for the surplus plutonium disposition environmental impact statement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Connor, D.G.; Fisher, S.E.; Holdaway, R. [and others

    1998-08-01

    The purpose of this document is to support the US Department of Energy (DOE) Fissile Materials Disposition Program`s preparation of the draft surplus plutonium disposition environmental impact statement. This is one of several responses to data call requests for background information on activities associated with the operation of the lead assembly (LA) mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication facility. The DOE Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (DOE-MD) has developed a dual-path strategy for disposition of surplus weapons-grade plutonium. One of the paths is to disposition surplus plutonium through irradiation of MOX fuel in commercial nuclear reactors. MOX fuel consists of plutonium and uranium oxides (PuO{sub 2} and UO{sub 2}), typically containing 95% or more UO{sub 2}. DOE-MD requested that the DOE Site Operations Offices nominate DOE sites that meet established minimum requirements that could produce MOX LAs. LLNL has proposed an LA MOX fuel fabrication approach that would be done entirely inside an S and S Category 1 area. This includes receipt and storage of PuO{sub 2} powder, fabrication of MOX fuel pellets, assembly of fuel rods and bundles, and shipping of the packaged fuel to a commercial reactor site. Support activities will take place within a Category 1 area. Building 332 will be used to receive and store the bulk PuO{sub 2} powder, fabricate MOX fuel pellets, and assemble fuel rods. Building 334 will be used to assemble, store, and ship fuel bundles. Only minor modifications would be required of Building 332. Uncontaminated glove boxes would need to be removed, petition walls would need to be removed, and minor modifications to the ventilation system would be required.

  12. LLNL MOX fuel lead assemblies data report for the surplus plutonium disposition environmental impact statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connor, D.G.; Fisher, S.E.; Holdaway, R.

    1998-08-01

    The purpose of this document is to support the US Department of Energy (DOE) Fissile Materials Disposition Program's preparation of the draft surplus plutonium disposition environmental impact statement. This is one of several responses to data call requests for background information on activities associated with the operation of the lead assembly (LA) mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication facility. The DOE Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (DOE-MD) has developed a dual-path strategy for disposition of surplus weapons-grade plutonium. One of the paths is to disposition surplus plutonium through irradiation of MOX fuel in commercial nuclear reactors. MOX fuel consists of plutonium and uranium oxides (PuO 2 and UO 2 ), typically containing 95% or more UO 2 . DOE-MD requested that the DOE Site Operations Offices nominate DOE sites that meet established minimum requirements that could produce MOX LAs. LLNL has proposed an LA MOX fuel fabrication approach that would be done entirely inside an S and S Category 1 area. This includes receipt and storage of PuO 2 powder, fabrication of MOX fuel pellets, assembly of fuel rods and bundles, and shipping of the packaged fuel to a commercial reactor site. Support activities will take place within a Category 1 area. Building 332 will be used to receive and store the bulk PuO 2 powder, fabricate MOX fuel pellets, and assemble fuel rods. Building 334 will be used to assemble, store, and ship fuel bundles. Only minor modifications would be required of Building 332. Uncontaminated glove boxes would need to be removed, petition walls would need to be removed, and minor modifications to the ventilation system would be required

  13. Determinants of rural household marketed surplus for cereal crops ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... and supply of cereal crops to the market (market surplus). The study utilized cross sectional data obtained through multistage random sampling method. Ordinary least square method was used for the analysis. Finding revealed that the quantity of food crops reserved for home consumption by households increased their ...

  14. Analysis of yam marketable surplus in Imo state, Nigeria | Onyenobi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted in Imo State in the southeastern agricultural zone of Nigeria, to determine socio-economic characteristics of farmers; cost and return of farmers and factors that determine the marketable surplus of farmers. Among the farm enterprises in the state, yam has high- income elasticity of demand by ...

  15. The Democratic Surplus that Constitutionalised the European Union

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harste, Gorm

    2015-01-01

    This article questions the very foundation of the doctrine of a so-called “democratic deficit” in the EU. Yet in order to argue beyond nationalist myths, clear-cut concepts are necessary. Speaking about democracy in the EU, the article exposes four dimensions that constitute a “democratic surplus...

  16. Design of a graphical user interface for a multimedia DBMS: query management facility

    OpenAIRE

    Peabody, Charles B.

    1991-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited This thesis presents criteria and necessary features by which to evaluate and design a good graphical user interface (GUI) for a Multimedia Database Management System (MDBMS). This material is also applicable to a traditional DBMS. Included in the thesis is the specifications for a Query Management Facility (QMF) for a MDMBS user interface. The nature and benefits of the GUI environment, requires that we consider GUI concepts early ...

  17. The mixed waste management facility. Monthly report, January 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streit, R.

    1995-02-01

    During January, technical progress continued in general accordance with the MWMF FY95 Plan. Engineering development and design continued in support of preliminary design of MWMF major subsystems. Certain activities are being delayed due to DOE guidance for reduced funding profiles that would not warrant new hiring, early procurements, etc. Peer reviews and system preliminary design reviews are now being scheduled for project elements. We continued pursuing integration of MWMF and DWTF functions maximize cost savings. We also expended considerable engineering effort to provide technical and cost tradeoff information for the FY97 Validation. Management focus during January centered upon addressing the rebaseline for MWMF for FY97 Validation in March, and upon progressing with the RD&D permit. Funding baselines for preparing for FY97 Validation in March were obtained from DOE; based on the baseline, detailed scope, schedule, and budget guidance was issued to the project staff to develop Validation information. For reasons of cost-effectiveness, Validation cost estimates will be based on revised CDR estimates, since bottom-up estimates will be completed in July as part of Preliminary Design. We have directed Significant effort toward meeting the TPC and fiscal year profile costs while still maintaining the essential elements of the project. Final review and editorial changes were completed for the RD&D permit application. Based on the meeting with DTSC in December and revised operational requirements, we held a review of the overall permitting strategy prior to routing for signature approval. A simplified strategy is under review. The revised Environmental Assessment (EA) is ready for release to DOE, but is being held up pending results of the permitting strategy review.

  18. System Configuration Management Implementation Procedure for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Monitoring and Control System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ANGLESEY, M.O.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to establish the System Configuration Management Implementation Procedure (SCMIP) for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) Monitoring and Control System (MCS). This procedure provides configuration management for the process control system. The process control system consists of equipment hardware and software that controls and monitors the instrumentation and equipment associated with the CVDF processes. Refer to SNF-3090, Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Monitoring and Control System Design Description, HNF-3553, Annex B, Safety Analysis Report for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility, and AP-CM-6-037-00, SNF Project Process Automation Software and Equipment Configuration. This SCMIP identifies and defines the system configuration items in the control system, provides configuration control throughout the system life cycle, provides configuration status accounting, physical protection and control, and verifies the completeness and correctness of these items

  19. ANL-W MOX fuel lead assemblies data report for the surplus plutonium disposition environmental impact statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connor, D.G.; Fisher, S.E.; Holdaway, R.

    1997-08-01

    The purpose of this document is to support the US Department of Energy (DOE) Fissile Materials Disposition Program's preparation of the draft surplus plutonium disposition environmental impact statement (EIS). This is one of several responses to data call requests for background information on activities associated with the operation of the lead assembly (LA) mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication facility. The DOE Office of fissile Materials Disposition (DOE-MD) has developed a dual-path strategy for disposition of surplus weapons-grade plutonium. One of the paths is to disposition surplus plutonium through irradiation of MOX fuel in commercial nuclear reactors. MOX fuel consists of plutonium and uranium oxides (PuO 2 and UO 2 ), typically containing 95% or more UO 2 . DOE-MD requested that the DOE Site Operations Offices nominate DOE sites that meet established minimum requirements that could produce MOX LAs. The paper describes the following: Site map and the LA facility; process descriptions; resource needs; employment requirements; wastes, emissions, and exposures; accident analysis; transportation; qualitative decontamination and decommissioning; post-irradiation examination; LA fuel bundle fabrication; LA EIS data report assumptions; and LA EIS data report supplement

  20. ANL-W MOX fuel lead assemblies data report for the surplus plutonium disposition environmental impact statement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Connor, D.G.; Fisher, S.E.; Holdaway, R. [and others

    1997-08-01

    The purpose of this document is to support the US Department of Energy (DOE) Fissile Materials Disposition Program`s preparation of the draft surplus plutonium disposition environmental impact statement (EIS). This is one of several responses to data call requests for background information on activities associated with the operation of the lead assembly (LA) mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication facility. The DOE Office of fissile Materials Disposition (DOE-MD) has developed a dual-path strategy for disposition of surplus weapons-grade plutonium. One of the paths is to disposition surplus plutonium through irradiation of MOX fuel in commercial nuclear reactors. MOX fuel consists of plutonium and uranium oxides (PuO{sub 2} and UO{sub 2}), typically containing 95% or more UO{sub 2}. DOE-MD requested that the DOE Site Operations Offices nominate DOE sites that meet established minimum requirements that could produce MOX LAs. The paper describes the following: Site map and the LA facility; process descriptions; resource needs; employment requirements; wastes, emissions, and exposures; accident analysis; transportation; qualitative decontamination and decommissioning; post-irradiation examination; LA fuel bundle fabrication; LA EIS data report assumptions; and LA EIS data report supplement.

  1. Evaluating malaria case management at public health facilities in two provinces in Angola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plucinski, Mateusz M; Ferreira, Manzambi; Ferreira, Carolina Miguel; Burns, Jordan; Gaparayi, Patrick; João, Lubaki; da Costa, Olinda; Gill, Parambir; Samutondo, Claudete; Quivinja, Joltim; Mbounga, Eliane; de León, Gabriel Ponce; Halsey, Eric S; Dimbu, Pedro Rafael; Fortes, Filomeno

    2017-05-03

    Malaria accounts for the largest portion of healthcare demand in Angola. A pillar of malaria control in Angola is the appropriate management of malaria illness, including testing of suspect cases with rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) and treatment of confirmed cases with artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT). Periodic systematic evaluations of malaria case management are recommended to measure health facility readiness and adherence to national case management guidelines. Cross-sectional health facility surveys were performed in low-transmission Huambo and high-transmission Uíge Provinces in early 2016. In each province, 45 health facilities were randomly selected from among all public health facilities stratified by level of care. Survey teams performed inventories of malaria commodities and conducted exit interviews and re-examinations, including RDT testing, of a random selection of all patients completing outpatient consultations. Key health facility readiness and case management indicators were calculated adjusting for the cluster sampling design and utilization. Availability of RDTs or microscopy on the day of the survey was 71% (54-83) in Huambo and 85% (67-94) in Uíge. At least one unit dose pack of one formulation of an ACT (usually artemether-lumefantrine) was available in 83% (66-92) of health facilities in Huambo and 79% (61-90) of health facilities in Uíge. Testing rates of suspect malaria cases in Huambo were 30% (23-38) versus 69% (53-81) in Uíge. Overall, 28% (13-49) of patients with uncomplicated malaria, as determined during the re-examination, were appropriately treated with an ACT with the correct dose in Huambo, compared to 60% (42-75) in Uíge. Incorrect case management of suspect malaria cases was associated with lack of healthcare worker training in Huambo and ACT stock-outs in Uíge. The results reveal important differences between provinces. Despite similar availability of testing and ACT, testing and treatment rates were lower in

  2. Management of aging in technical facilities of E.ON Kernkraft plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reese, Sven H.; Brast, Gerhard; Schoeckle, Friedrich

    2009-01-01

    The publication explains, by means of specific measures, the management of aging in technical facilities as practiced in the plants of E.ON Kernkraft GmbH. First, the historical background is outlined and the reasons for introducing management of aging in order to limit and control factors influencing the lifetime of nuclear power plants are described. This is followed by a definition of management of aging in important safety-related facilities as against lifetime management of technical systems relevant to plant availability. This is the context in which the scope of the survey of continuous management of aging is defined in respect of physical aging. A classification is then made in accordance with the staggered requirements to be met in the quality of technical facilities. On the basis of the quality to be assured, the different component groups are assigned corresponding operational measures and explained. These continuous measures extend from failure-oriented maintenance to preventive maintenance to the integrity concept for technical installations. To document the findings and evaluate the effectiveness of the measures taken, the integration of the process is described and reference is made to continuous optimization according to PDCA principles. The explicit introduction of the process of management of aging creates a platform which allows a documentation to be accumulated of the manifold and comprehensive measures taken to control phenomena of aging in technical installations. (orig.)

  3. BIM Guidelines Inform Facilities Management Databases: A Case Study over Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Kensek

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A building information model (BIM contains data that can be accessed and exported for other uses during the lifetime of the building especially for facilities management (FM and operations. Working under the guidance of well-designed BIM guidelines to insure completeness and compatibility with FM software, architects and contractors can deliver an information rich data model that is valuable to the client. Large owners such as universities often provide these detailed guidelines and deliverable requirements to their building teams. Investigation of the University of Southern California (USC Facilities Management Service’s (FMS website showed a detailed plan including standards, file names, parameter lists, and other requirements of BIM data, which were specifically designated for facilities management use, as deliverables on new construction projects. Three critical details were also unearthed in the reading of these documents: Revit was the default BIM software; COBie was adapted to help meet facilities management goals; and EcoDomus provided a display of the collected data viewed through Navisworks. Published accounts about the Cinema Arts Complex developed with and under these guidelines reported positive results. Further examination with new projects underway reveal the rapidly changing relational database landscape evident in the new USC “Project Record Revit Requirement Execution Plan (PRxP”.

  4. Cost Implications of an Interim Storage Facility in the Waste Management System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarrell, Joshua J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Joseph, III, Robert Anthony [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Howard, Rob L [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Petersen, Gordon M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Nutt, Mark [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Carter, Joe [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Cotton, Thomas [Complex Systems Group, Bozeman, MT (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This report provides an evaluation of the cost implications of incorporating a consolidated interim storage facility (ISF) into the waste management system (WMS). Specifically, the impacts of the timing of opening an ISF relative to opening a repository were analyzed to understand the potential effects on total system costs.

  5. Wireless Occupancy Sensors for Lighting Controls: An Applications Guide for Federal Facility Managers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-03-15

    This guide provides federal facility managers with an overview of the energy savings potential of wireless lighting occupancy sensors for various room types, cost considerations, key steps to successful installation of wireless sensors, pros and cons of various technology options, light source considerations, and codes and standards.

  6. How Can Facilities Management Add Value To Organisations As Well As To Society?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jensen, P.A.; Sarasoja, A.L.; van der Voordt, D.J.M.; Coenen, C.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present lessons learnt from a 3 year collaborative research project on the added value of Facilities Management (FM) involving institutions in five European countries. The starting point was the so-called FM Value Map developed earlier by the leader of the research

  7. Assessment of Behavior Management and Behavioral Interventions in State Child Welfare Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Stephen E.

    2006-01-01

    Official state program reviews of 204 substitute care facilities were assessed for the types of behavior management and behavioral interventions used and the extent to which agency practices were consistent with learning theory principles. Data were also collected on the type and number of professional staff available to implement and oversee…

  8. Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) closure, Savannah River Plant: Clay cap test section construction report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-02-26

    This report contains appendices 3 through 6 for the Clay Cap Test Section Construction Report for the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) closure at the Savannah River Plant. The Clay Cap Test Program was conducted to evaluate the source, lab. permeability, in-situ permeability, and compaction characteristics, representative of kaolin clays from the Aiken, South Carolina vicinity. (KJD)

  9. Operation, Maintenance and Management of Wastewater Treatment Facilities: A Bibliography of Technical Documents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himes, Dottie

    This is an annotated bibliography of wastewater treatment manuals. Fourteen manuals are abstracted including: (1) A Planned Maintenance Management System for Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plants; (2) Anaerobic Sludge Digestion, Operations Manual; (3) Emergency Planning for Municipal Wastewater Treatment Facilities; (4) Estimating Laboratory Needs…

  10. Innovation-system foresight in practice: A Nordic facilities management foresight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Per Dannemand; Andersen, Allan Dahl; Jensen, Per Anker

    2012-01-01

    foresight processes. The paper originates in a practical foresight project in the Nordic fa-cilities management (FM) industry. The goal of the foresight project was to identify possible futures of the FM sector in the Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden) and, based on the findings...

  11. Productive use of IT in support of FM (facilities management) solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagstaff, T

    1997-01-01

    Drawing on the author's personal experience within the UK National Health Service, outlines at the macro level what information is needed, and why, in facilities management. Suggests that top-level data gathering is a priority, describes the processes required, and finally considers the advantages of sharing information with competitors and others.

  12. Analyzing the impact of intermodal facilities to the design and management of biofuels supply chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    This paper analyzes the impact that an intermodal facility has on location and transportation : decisions for biofuel production plants. Location decisions impact the management of the in-bound and out-bound logistics of a plant. We model this supply...

  13. Identifying concepts for studying implementation of information technology in facilities management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbesen, Poul; Bonke, Sten

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To contribute to identifying a conceptual framework for describing and understanding the processes involved when implementing and using Information Technology (IT) in Facilities Management (FM). This paper discusses how basic concepts from different theories can be applied in parallel when...

  14. Forum Guide to Facilities Information Management: A Resource for State and Local Education Agencies. NFES 2012-808

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Forum on Education Statistics, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Safe and secure facilities that foster learning are crucial to providing quality education services, and developing and maintaining these facilities requires considerable resources and organization. Facility information systems allow education organizations to collect and manage data that can be used to inform and guide decisionmaking about the…

  15. Facilities management: Structuring a body of knowledge for continuing and tertiary education in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. C. Hauptfleisch

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Globally the development of property and infrastructure, being part of the creation of  fixed investment and wealth, is taking place unabated. In support of this process is a multitude of highly skilled built environment professionals such as engineers, architects, quantity surveyors, construction managers, town and regional planners, land surveyors, etc. The absence of a universally acknowledged profession of the same standing, designated to manage and optimise the utilisation of the ever-compounding  fixed investments in the products of the collective built environment (buildings, engineering structures and infrastructure, is observed. In practice it manifests itself in the attempts, by the previously mentioned professionals and others, to cast themselves into the role of facilities managers. Of concern is the resultant diverse group of “facilities management” practitioners, sometimes without basic built environment education, often lacking any noteworthy specialised education or experience. For obvious reasons, the more developed a country, the more evident it becomes that a specific facilities management profession is taking root and is practised at various managerial levels. The term “facilities management” reportedly came into use in the United States of America during the 1970’s when a Facility Management Institute was founded in the USA and the first known formal symposium was held in Washington DC in 1989. Although perhaps lacking some of the prestige associated with other professions, there are reasons to believe that facilities management is in the process of becoming a driving force, not only in the scientific management and optimisation of fixed assets, but as a knowledge-based initiator of development in the built environment. The lack of a highly developed facilities management profession manifests itself in the alarming rate at which infrastructure and buildings are deteriorating in South Africa. This situation

  16. [On the temporary surplus population in the elementary stage of socialism in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Chen, L

    1988-07-01

    The causes and patterns of China's surplus population are analyzed for the period 1951-1980. The authors view the surplus population as a temporary phenomenon that is advantageous to social development.

  17. Availability above anything else: Schott glass refrigeration concept is connected to facility management; Verfuegbarkeit ist alles: Kaeltekonzept bei Schott Glas ist in Facility Management eingebunden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachmann, O.

    2003-10-01

    Schott Glas at Mainz is Europe's biggest producer of industrial glass, TV screens, etc. The refrigeration and facility management system is described. [German] Die KI-Redaktion stellt in regelmaessigen Abstaenden interessante Unternehmen und deren Loesungen bei Klima-, Kaelte- und Waermeversorgung vor. Wir berichten ueber Kuehlhausbetreiber, Chemieunternehmen und heute ueber so aussergewoehnliche Konzerne wie Schott Glas mit Hauptsitz in Mainz. Der nach eigenen Angaben groesste Spezialglashersteller Europas betreibt in Mainz seine groesste Fertigungsstaette fuer die Produktion von Fernsehbildschirmen und vielen weiteren technischen Glaesern, darunter auch die bekannten Ceran-Glaskeramik-Kochflaechen, von denen in den letzten 30 Jahren bereits ueber 50 Millionen Stueck gefertigt wurden. (orig.)

  18. Realizing Sustainability in Facilities Management: a pilot study at the Technical University of Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Susanne Balslev; Møller, Jacob Steen; Jäschke, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    shared value. The paper presents a pilot case study on sustainability in facilities management and is intended for a mixed audience of practitioners and researchers. It draws upon the case study findings to establish a baseline of performance and presents practical management implications of integrating...... from both practice and research. The lessons learned at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) are particularly relevant for universities and other public building owners, their Facilities Managers and consultants. Research limitations and implications: The paper is based on literature studies...... and value: The paper is based on action research to establish a collaborative framework in late 2011 and the findings of the pilot study, and have not been published before....

  19. An evaluation related to the effect of strategic facility management on choice of medical tourism destination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarcan Ertugrul

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study based on literature review aims to evaluate and emphasize the affect of the strategic facility management (SFM on choice of medical tourism destination. Medical Tourism, which ranges from the health care services involving a cure to the wellness services involving no specific health trouble to pleasure and amusement services, is one of the most growing sectors in the world. Cost and quality of medical services are among the main reasons for the choice of destination. Strategic facility management has a positive correlation on the levels of quality, cost and customer satisfaction. Thus medical tourism and destination managers should take into account of the potential advantages of value creation offered through SFM in order to be chosen by customers (stakeholders.

  20. Environmental justice: Implications for siting of Federal Radioactive Waste Management Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Easterling, J.B.; Poles, J.S.

    1994-01-01

    Environmental justice is a term that has developed as a result of our need to address whether some of the environmental decisions we have made -- and others we will make -- are fair. The idea of environmental justice has been actively pursued by the Clinton Administration, and this consideration has resulted in Executive Order 12898, which was signed by President Clinton on February 11, 1994. The Executive Order calls for adverse impacts of Federal actions on minority or low-income populations to be identified before decisions implementing those actions are made. Numerous studies show that noxious facilities, such as incinerators and landfills, have been constructed in minority or low-income communities. And since the Department has not yet decided on sites for high-level waste storage or disposal facilities, it will have to take the new Executive Order into consideration as another piece in the complicated quilt of requirements that cover facility siting. An interesting twist to this is the fact that twenty Native American Indian Tribes expressed interest in voluntarily hosting a high-level radioactive waste management facility for temporary storage. They made these expressions on their own initiative, and several Tribes continue to pursue the idea of negotiations with either the Federal Government or private entities to locate a temporary storage site on Tribal land. The Executive Order goes beyond simply studying the effect of siting a facility and addresses in spirit a criticism that the Federal Government has been guilty of open-quotes environmental racismclose quotes in its siting policies -- that it has intentionally picked minority or low-income communities for waste management facilities. What Department of Energy staff and others may have considered foregone conclusions in terms of interim storage facility siting and transportation options will have to be reevaluated for compatibility with provisions of the new Executive Order

  1. 25 CFR 170.807 - What must BIA include when it develops an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... What must BIA include when it develops an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What must BIA include when it develops an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System? 170.807 Section 170.807 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS...

  2. Safe operation of existing radioactive waste management facilities at Dalat Nuclear Research Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham Van Lam; Ong Van Ngoc; Nguyen Thi Nang

    2000-01-01

    The Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor was reconstructed from the former TRIGA MARK-II in 1982 and put into operation in March 1984. The combined technology for radioactive waste management was newly designed and put into operation in 1984. The system for radioactive waste management at the Dalat Nuclear Research Institute (DNRI) consists of radioactive liquid waste treatment station and disposal facilities. The treatment methods used for radioactive liquid waste are coagulation and precipitation, mechanical filtering and ion- exchange. Near-surface disposal of radioactive wastes is practiced at DNRI In the disposal facilities eight concrete pits are constructed for solidification and disposal of low level radioactive waste. Many types of waste generated in DNRI and in some Nuclear Medicine Departments in the South of Vietnam are stored in the disposal facilities. The solidification of sludge has been done by cementation. Hydraulic compactor has done volume reduction of compatible waste. This paper presents fifteen-years of safe operation of radioactive waste management facilities at DNRI. (author)

  3. [Security Management in Clinical Laboratory Departments and Facilities: Current Status and Issues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Haku; Nakamura, Junji; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Koike, Masaru; Inoue, Yuji

    2014-11-01

    We conducted a questionnaire survey regarding the current activities for protecting patients' privacy and the security of information systems (IS) related to the clinical laboratory departments of university hospitals, certified training facilities for clinical laboratories, and general hospitals in Yamaguchi Prefecture. The response rate was 47% from 215 medical institutions, including three commercial clinical laboratory centers. The results showed that there were some differences in management activities among facilities with respect to continuing education, the documentation or regulation of operational management for paper records, electronic information, remaining samples, genetic testing, and laboratory information for secondary use. They were suggested to be caused by differences in functions between university and general hospitals, differences in the scale of hospitals, or whether or not hospitals have received accreditation or ISO 15189. Regarding the IS, although the majority of facilities had sufficiently employed the access control to IS, there was some room for improvement in the management of special cases such as VIPs and patients with HIV infection. Furthermore, there were issues regarding the login method for computers shared by multiple staff, the showing of the names of personnel in charge of reports, and the risks associated with direct connections to systems and the Internet and the use of portable media such as USB memory sticks. These results indicated that further efforts are necessary for each facility to continue self-assessment and make improvements.

  4. Developing mobile BIM/2D barcode-based automated facility management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Cheng; Su, Yu-Chih; Chen, Yen-Pei

    2014-01-01

    Facility management (FM) has become an important topic in research on the operation and maintenance phase. Managing the work of FM effectively is extremely difficult owing to the variety of environments. One of the difficulties is the performance of two-dimensional (2D) graphics when depicting facilities. Building information modeling (BIM) uses precise geometry and relevant data to support the facilities depicted in three-dimensional (3D) object-oriented computer-aided design (CAD). This paper proposes a new and practical methodology with application to FM that uses an integrated 2D barcode and the BIM approach. Using 2D barcode and BIM technologies, this study proposes a mobile automated BIM-based facility management (BIMFM) system for FM staff in the operation and maintenance phase. The mobile automated BIMFM system is then applied in a selected case study of a commercial building project in Taiwan to verify the proposed methodology and demonstrate its effectiveness in FM practice. The combined results demonstrate that a BIMFM-like system can be an effective mobile automated FM tool. The advantage of the mobile automated BIMFM system lies not only in improving FM work efficiency for the FM staff but also in facilitating FM updates and transfers in the BIM environment.

  5. Developing Mobile BIM/2D Barcode-Based Automated Facility Management System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Cheng Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Facility management (FM has become an important topic in research on the operation and maintenance phase. Managing the work of FM effectively is extremely difficult owing to the variety of environments. One of the difficulties is the performance of two-dimensional (2D graphics when depicting facilities. Building information modeling (BIM uses precise geometry and relevant data to support the facilities depicted in three-dimensional (3D object-oriented computer-aided design (CAD. This paper proposes a new and practical methodology with application to FM that uses an integrated 2D barcode and the BIM approach. Using 2D barcode and BIM technologies, this study proposes a mobile automated BIM-based facility management (BIMFM system for FM staff in the operation and maintenance phase. The mobile automated BIMFM system is then applied in a selected case study of a commercial building project in Taiwan to verify the proposed methodology and demonstrate its effectiveness in FM practice. The combined results demonstrate that a BIMFM-like system can be an effective mobile automated FM tool. The advantage of the mobile automated BIMFM system lies not only in improving FM work efficiency for the FM staff but also in facilitating FM updates and transfers in the BIM environment.

  6. Developing Mobile BIM/2D Barcode-Based Automated Facility Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Pei

    2014-01-01

    Facility management (FM) has become an important topic in research on the operation and maintenance phase. Managing the work of FM effectively is extremely difficult owing to the variety of environments. One of the difficulties is the performance of two-dimensional (2D) graphics when depicting facilities. Building information modeling (BIM) uses precise geometry and relevant data to support the facilities depicted in three-dimensional (3D) object-oriented computer-aided design (CAD). This paper proposes a new and practical methodology with application to FM that uses an integrated 2D barcode and the BIM approach. Using 2D barcode and BIM technologies, this study proposes a mobile automated BIM-based facility management (BIMFM) system for FM staff in the operation and maintenance phase. The mobile automated BIMFM system is then applied in a selected case study of a commercial building project in Taiwan to verify the proposed methodology and demonstrate its effectiveness in FM practice. The combined results demonstrate that a BIMFM-like system can be an effective mobile automated FM tool. The advantage of the mobile automated BIMFM system lies not only in improving FM work efficiency for the FM staff but also in facilitating FM updates and transfers in the BIM environment. PMID:25250373

  7. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knox, N.P.; Webb, J.R.; Ferguson, S.D.; Goins, L.F.; Owen, P.T.

    1990-09-01

    The 394 abstracted references on environmental restoration, nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the eleventh in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types -- technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions -- have been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Major sections are (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Programs, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Grand Junction Remedial Action Program, (7) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (8) Technical Measurements Center, (9) Remedial Action Program, and (10) Environmental Restoration Program. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication title. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and keywords. This report is a product of the Remedial Action Program Information Center (RAPIC), which selects and analyzes information on remedial actions and relevant radioactive waste management technologies.

  8. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knox, N.P.; Webb, J.R.; Ferguson, S.D.; Goins, L.F.; Owen, P.T.

    1990-09-01

    The 394 abstracted references on environmental restoration, nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the eleventh in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types -- technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions -- have been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Major sections are (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Programs, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Grand Junction Remedial Action Program, (7) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (8) Technical Measurements Center, (9) Remedial Action Program, and (10) Environmental Restoration Program. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication title. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and keywords. This report is a product of the Remedial Action Program Information Center (RAPIC), which selects and analyzes information on remedial actions and relevant radioactive waste management technologies

  9. Waste Management facilities cost information: System Cost Model Software Quality Assurance Plan. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, B.L.; Lundeen, A.S.

    1996-02-01

    In May of 1994, Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company (LITCO) in Idaho Falls, Idaho and subcontractors developed the System Cost Model (SCM) application. The SCM estimates life-cycle costs of the entire US Department of Energy (DOE) complex for designing; constructing; operating; and decommissioning treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facilities for mixed low-level, low-level, transuranic, and mixed transuranic waste. The SCM uses parametric cost functions to estimate life-cycle costs for various treatment, storage, and disposal modules which reflect planned and existing facilities at DOE installations. In addition, SCM can model new facilities based on capacity needs over the program life cycle. The SCM also provides transportation costs for truck and rail, which include transport of contact-handled, remote-handled, and alpha (transuranic) wastes. The user can provide input data (default data is included in the SCM) including the volume and nature of waste to be managed, the time period over which the waste is to be managed, and the configuration of the waste management complex (i.e., where each installation`s generated waste will be treated, stored, and disposed). Then the SCM uses parametric cost equations to estimate the costs of pre-operations (designing), construction costs, operation management, and decommissioning these waste management facilities. For the product to be effective and useful the SCM users must have a high level of confidence in the data generated by the software model. The SCM Software Quality Assurance Plan is part of the overall SCM project management effort to ensure that the SCM is maintained as a quality product and can be relied on to produce viable planning data. This document defines tasks and deliverables to ensure continued product integrity, provide increased confidence in the accuracy of the data generated, and meet the LITCO`s quality standards during the software maintenance phase. 8 refs., 1 tab.

  10. Waste Management facilities cost information: System Cost Model Software Quality Assurance Plan. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, B.L.; Lundeen, A.S.

    1996-02-01

    In May of 1994, Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company (LITCO) in Idaho Falls, Idaho and subcontractors developed the System Cost Model (SCM) application. The SCM estimates life-cycle costs of the entire US Department of Energy (DOE) complex for designing; constructing; operating; and decommissioning treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facilities for mixed low-level, low-level, transuranic, and mixed transuranic waste. The SCM uses parametric cost functions to estimate life-cycle costs for various treatment, storage, and disposal modules which reflect planned and existing facilities at DOE installations. In addition, SCM can model new facilities based on capacity needs over the program life cycle. The SCM also provides transportation costs for truck and rail, which include transport of contact-handled, remote-handled, and alpha (transuranic) wastes. The user can provide input data (default data is included in the SCM) including the volume and nature of waste to be managed, the time period over which the waste is to be managed, and the configuration of the waste management complex (i.e., where each installation's generated waste will be treated, stored, and disposed). Then the SCM uses parametric cost equations to estimate the costs of pre-operations (designing), construction costs, operation management, and decommissioning these waste management facilities. For the product to be effective and useful the SCM users must have a high level of confidence in the data generated by the software model. The SCM Software Quality Assurance Plan is part of the overall SCM project management effort to ensure that the SCM is maintained as a quality product and can be relied on to produce viable planning data. This document defines tasks and deliverables to ensure continued product integrity, provide increased confidence in the accuracy of the data generated, and meet the LITCO's quality standards during the software maintenance phase. 8 refs., 1 tab

  11. 50 CFR 31.2 - Methods of surplus wildlife population control and disposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Surplus Wildlife § 31.2 Methods of surplus wildlife population control and disposal. Upon a determination... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Methods of surplus wildlife population control and disposal. 31.2 Section 31.2 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE...

  12. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Facility Registry Service (FRS) Emergency Response (ER) Risk Management Plan (RMP) Facilities - Oil and Hazardous Materials

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The purpose of this web feature service is to provide users with access to integrated facility information from FRS, limited to the subset of facilities that link to...

  13. The partnership approach to siting and developing radioactive waste management facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-03-01

    History shows that the search for sites for radioactive waste management facilities has been marred by conflicts and delays. Affected communities have often objected that their concerns and interests were not addressed. In response, institutions have progressively turned away from the traditional 'decide, announce and defend' model, and are learning to 'engage, interact and co-operate'. This shift has fostered the emergence of partnerships between the proponent of the facility and the potential host community. Working in partnership with potential host communities enables pertinent issues and concerns to be raised and addressed, and creates an opportunity for developing a relationship of mutual understanding and mutual learning, as well as for developing solutions that will add value to the host community and region. Key elements of the partnership approach are being incorporated into waste management strategies, leading increasingly to positive outcomes. National radioactive waste management programmes are in various phases of siting facilities and rely on different technical approaches for the various categories of waste. In all cases, it is necessary for institutional actors and the potential or actual host community to build a meaningful, workable relationship. Partnership approaches are effective in achieving a desirable combination of licensable site and management concept while meeting the sometimes competing requirements of fair representation and competent participation. Partnership arrangements facilitate reaching agreement on measures for local control, financial support and future development

  14. Public sector effects and social impact assessment of nuclear generating facilities: Information for community mitigation management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pijawka, K.D.

    1984-01-01

    One of the major issues in community impact management is the gap between revenues generated by energy projects and expenditures for public facilities and services because of project-induced growth. Of issue is the experience of communities experiencing rapid growth where project revenues are not generated until operations commence and yet, considerable investments are needed to accommodate growth during the construction phase. Such revenue imbalances have resulted in communities demanding ''up-front'' capital investments or revenue prior to and during construction. However, with the construction and operation of nuclear facilities, the few available studies have found substantial revenue gains allocated to local jurisdiction and little adverse expenditure effects. The analyses of twelve nuclear stations found that the demand for new and expanded public facilities and the social services attributable to the plants were generally small, that adverse impacts were controllable and mitigatable, and that utility revenue payments varied substantially amount the host areas

  15. Field and laboratory test methods for geomembranes during waste management facility construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, S.R.; McCutchan, J.B.

    1991-01-01

    Hazardous waste management facilities are required to use approved lining and leak detection systems to prevent the migration of waste into the environment. Synthetic flexible membrane liners (FMLs) have effectively served as the critical barrier for waste containment and fluid migration. The U.S. EPA has established minimum technology requirements for the construction of lined facilities that include detailed and documented Construction Quality Assurance (CQA) plans. The U.S. EPA (EPA) recognizes that CQA during field construction is imperative for successful completion of project work and long-term facility operation. This paper discusses the importance of CQA during FML installation and the practical aspects of implementing a successful CQA program. Standard methods used for FML evaluation, in both the field and laboratory, are discussed and specific aspects of seam testing and data evaluation are addressed. The general importance of comprehensive definition of geomembrane seam field failures is strongly emphasized so that an appropriate response to test failures can be recommended

  16. Trends in decision making for the siting of waste management facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vari, A.

    2000-01-01

    Over the last two decades a number of research studies on waste management facility siting have been produced. A Facility Siting Credo exists (Kunreuther et al., 1993). It identifies a comprehensive set of criteria for successful siting, but relationships between them (complementary, conflicting) have not been investigated. An attempt has been made to identify a conceptual framework which helps to structure siting criteria based on Competing Values Approach (CVA) to organisational analysis (Quinn and Rohrbaugh, 1983). Competing values include goal-centred, data-based, participatory, and adaptable processes, as well as efficient, accountable, supportable, and legitimate decisions. Case studies: Analysing LLRW disposal facility siting processes in the US (California, Illinois, Nebraska, New York, and Texas), Canada, France, the Netherlands, Sweden, and Switzerland (1980-1993) by using the CVA framework (Vari et al., 1994). Analysis of LALW siting processes in Hungary (1985-99) (Juhasz et al., 1993; Ormai et al., 1998; Ormai, 1999). (author)

  17. Share-of-Surplus Product Line Optimisation with Price Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. G. Luo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Kraus and Yano (2003 established the share-of-surplus product line optimisation model and developed a heuristic procedure for this nonlinear mixed-integer optimisation model. In their model, price of a product is defined as a continuous decision variable. However, because product line optimisation is a planning process in the early stage of product development, pricing decisions usually are not very precise. In this research, a nonlinear integer programming share-of-surplus product line optimization model that allows the selection of candidate price levels for products is established. The model is further transformed into an equivalent linear mixed-integer optimisation model by applying linearisation techniques. Experimental results in different market scenarios show that the computation time of the transformed model is much less than that of the original model.

  18. Caught in the middle: The role of the Facilities Manager in organisational energy use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goulden, Murray; Spence, Alexa

    2015-01-01

    This study analyses the role of the Facilities Manager [FM] as a key actor in organisational energy management. This builds on the idea that ‘middle’ agents in networks can be an important lever for socio-technical change. The study demonstrates the considerable impact the FM can have on workplace energy consumption, whilst identifying a number of factors that constrain their agency and capacity to act. These include demands to meet workforce expectations of comfort; a lack of support from senior management; and a shortage of resources. Underlying these challenges, the study identifies three different energy rationales – that is to say conceptual frameworks – which are deployed by different groups of organisational actors. The challenges of reconciling these at-times-contradictory rationales results in a picture of energy management which to the outsider can appear highly irrational. The paper concludes with a consideration of how policy makers can apply these insights to support energy reduction in workplaces. -- Highlights: •Facilities Managers are increasingly critical node in organisational use of energy. •Potential for FMs to make significant reductions to organisational energy use. •Their ability to do so is constrained by the organisational environment. •Three ‘energy rationales’ which the shape organisational context are identified. •Opportunities exist for policy makers to improve organisational energy management

  19. Managing nuclear projects: a design agency experience in the design-build of waste management facilities in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brewer, R.; Calzolari, L.

    2006-01-01

    Quality Assurance guarantees the quality of a product; it does not guarantee that it is a quality product. As procedures develop to satisfy QA programs and regulatory needs it is necessary to find ways to ensure that procedural management reinforces project management and does not detract from it. CANATOM NPM's experience in bidding for and executing the design or design and construction of nuclear waste management facilities demonstrates how design excellence and innovation can still be achieved while successfully managing the challenge of technical administration. The sourcing of expertise, the intricacies of design definition and the coordinating efforts required in the execution of the projects (one fully completed, the other into its engineering phase) will provide a valuable insight into the role and activities of an engineering company engaged in a 'Design Agency' (DA) role. (author)

  20. Current Account Surpluses and the Interest Rate Island in Switzerland

    OpenAIRE

    Paolo Mauro

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes some long-run aspects of the Swiss balance of payments, highlighting two macroeconomic phenomena that make Switzerland stand out among other countries: first, it has had a persistent current account surplus and the largest ratio of net foreign assets to GDP in the world; second, its real interest rates have been significantly lower than those of most other industrialized countries, earning it the label “interest rate island”. These two distinctive features may be related,...

  1. Understanding and overcoming the “positive profits with negative surplus-value” paradox

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GUSTAVO DAOU LUCAS

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This paper explains the “positive profits with negative surplus-value” example of Steedman (1975 and shows that while in joint production systems individual labour values can be negative, the claim that the total labour embodied in the surplus product of the economy (surplus-value can also be negative is based on assumptions that have no economic meaning (such as negative activity levels.The paper also provides a way to measure the surplus-value of joint production systems which overcomes the problems of the traditional concept and restates the proposition that a positive amount of surplus labour is a necessary condition for positive profits.

  2. Monitoring plan for routine organic air emissions at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex Waste Storage Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galloway, K.J.; Jolley, J.G.

    1994-06-01

    This monitoring plan provides the information necessary to perform routine organic air emissions monitoring at the Waste Storage Facilities located at the Transuranic Storage Area of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The Waste Storage Facilities include both the Type I and II Waste Storage Modules. The plan implements a dual method approach where two dissimilar analytical methodologies, Open-Path Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (OP-FTIR) and ancillary SUMMA reg-sign canister sampling, following the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) analytical method TO-14, will be used to provide qualitative and quantitative volatile organic concentration data. The Open-Path Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy will provide in situ, real time monitoring of volatile organic compound concentrations in the ambient air of the Waste Storage Facilities. To supplement the OP-FTIR data, air samples will be collected using SUMMA reg-sign, passivated, stainless steel canisters, following the EPA Method TO-14. These samples will be analyzed for volatile organic compounds with gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry analysis. The sampling strategy, procedures, and schedules are included in this monitoring plan. The development of this monitoring plan is driven by regulatory compliance to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, State of Idaho Toxic Air Pollutant increments, Occupational Safety and Health Administration. The various state and federal regulations address the characterization of the volatile organic compounds and the resultant ambient air emissions that may originate from facilities involved in industrial production and/or waste management activities

  3. On the value of architecture and facility management in health administration education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verderber, Stephen F

    2002-01-01

    This article discusses the role and function of architecture and facility management in health administration education vis-à-vis an interdisciplinary set of courses taught in a graduate-level health administration program. These courses provide the future health care executive with theory and applied knowledge on a variety of topics. These include the history of health care facilities, issues in facility planning and management, principles of patient and staff-focused design, campus master planning, participatory methods to involve end users in the design of their work, and care settings. Additional skills acquired include an introduction to contract negotiations, the reading of technical documents such as blueprints, the post-occupancy assessment of facilities-in-use, and familiarity with future trends. Students address the topic of managerial ethics in relation to the built environment in some detail as a vehicle to illustrate the nature of key fine-grain issues of importance to the health administration scholar and professional. The discussion concludes with the presentation of a model curriculum in this subject area.

  4. NOMINATION FOR THE PROJECT MANAGEMENT INSTITUTE (PMI) PROJECT OF THE YEAR AWARD INTEGRATED DISPOSAL FACILITY (IDF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MCLELLAN, G.W.

    2007-02-07

    CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CH2M HILL) is pleased to nominate the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) project for the Project Management Institute's consideration as 2007 Project of the Year, Built for the U.S, Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of River Protection (ORP) at the Hanford Site, the IDF is the site's first Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)-compliant disposal facility. The IDF is important to DOE's waste management strategy for the site. Effective management of the IDF project contributed to the project's success. The project was carefully managed to meet three Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) milestones. The completed facility fully satisfied the needs and expectations of the client, regulators and stakeholders. Ultimately, the project, initially estimated to require 48 months and $33.9 million to build, was completed four months ahead of schedule and $11.1 million under budget. DOE directed construction of the IDF to provide additional capacity for disposing of low-level radioactive and mixed (i.e., radioactive and hazardous) solid waste. The facility needed to comply with federal and Washington State environmental laws and meet TPA milestones. The facility had to accommodate over one million cubic yards of the waste material, including immobilized low-activity waste packages from the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP), low-level and mixed low-level waste from WTP failed melters, and alternative immobilized low-activity waste forms, such as bulk-vitrified waste. CH2M HILL designed and constructed a disposal facility with a redundant system of containment barriers and a sophisticated leak-detection system. Built on a 168-area, the facility's construction met all regulatory requirements. The facility's containment system actually exceeds the state's environmental requirements for a hazardous waste landfill. Effective management of the IDF construction project required working through highly political and legal

  5. NOMINATION FOR THE PROJECT MANAGEMENT INSTITUTE (PMI) PROJECT OF THE YEAR AWARD. INTEGRATED DISPOSAL FACILITY (IDF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MCLELLAN, G.W.

    2007-01-01

    CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CH2M HILL) is pleased to nominate the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) project for the Project Management Institute's consideration as 2007 Project of the Year, Built for the U.S, Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of River Protection (ORP) at the Hanford Site, the IDF is the site's first Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)-compliant disposal facility. The IDF is important to DOE's waste management strategy for the site. Effective management of the IDF project contributed to the project's success. The project was carefully managed to meet three Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) milestones. The completed facility fully satisfied the needs and expectations of the client, regulators and stakeholders. Ultimately, the project, initially estimated to require 48 months and $33.9 million to build, was completed four months ahead of schedule and $11.1 million under budget. DOE directed construction of the IDF to provide additional capacity for disposing of low-level radioactive and mixed (i.e., radioactive and hazardous) solid waste. The facility needed to comply with federal and Washington State environmental laws and meet TPA milestones. The facility had to accommodate over one million cubic yards of the waste material, including immobilized low-activity waste packages from the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP), low-level and mixed low-level waste from WTP failed melters, and alternative immobilized low-activity waste forms, such as bulk-vitrified waste. CH2M HILL designed and constructed a disposal facility with a redundant system of containment barriers and a sophisticated leak-detection system. Built on a 168-area, the facility's construction met all regulatory requirements. The facility's containment system actually exceeds the state's environmental requirements for a hazardous waste landfill. Effective management of the IDF construction project required working through highly political and legal issues as well as challenges with

  6. 2005 dossier: clay. Tome: architecture and management of the geologic disposal facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    This document makes a status of the researches carried out by the French national agency of radioactive wastes (ANDRA) about the design of a geologic disposal facility for high-level and long-lived radioactive wastes in argilite formations. Content: 1 - approach of the study: goal, main steps of the design study, iterative approach, content; 2 - general description: high-level and long-lived radioactive wastes, purposes of a reversible disposal, geologic context of the Meuse/Haute-Marne site - the Callovo-Oxfordian formation, design principles of the disposal facility architecture, role of the different disposal components; 3 - high-level and long-lived wastes: production scenarios, description of primary containers, inventory model, hypotheses about receipt fluxes of primary containers; 4- disposal containers: B-type waste containers, C-type waste containers, spent fuel disposal containers; 5 - disposal modules: B-type waste disposal modules, C-type waste disposal modules, spent-fuel disposal modules; 6 - overall underground architecture: main safety questions, overall design, dimensioning factors, construction logic and overall exploitation of the facility, dimensioning of galleries, underground architecture adaptation to different scenarios; 7 - boreholes and galleries: general needs, design principles retained, boreholes description, galleries description, building up of boreholes and galleries, durability of facilities, backfilling and sealing up of boreholes and galleries; 8 - surface facilities: general organization, nuclear area, industrial and administrative area, tailings area; 9 - nuclear exploitation means of the facility: receipt of primary containers and preparation of disposal containers, transfer of disposal containers from the surface to the disposal alveoles, setting up of containers inside alveoles; 10 - reversible management of the disposal: step by step disposal process, mastery of disposal behaviour and action capacity, observation and

  7. WIPP Facility Work Plan for Solid Waste Management Units and Areas of Concern

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This 2001 Facility Work Plan (FWP) has been prepared as required by Module VII, Section VII.M.1 of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, NM4890139088-TSDF (the Permit); (NMED, 1999a), and incorporates comments from the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) received on December 6, 2000 (NMED, 2000a). This February 2001 FWP describes the programmatic facility-wide approach to future investigations at Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) and Areas of Concern (AOCs) specified in the Permit. The permittees are evaluating data from previous investigations of the SWMUs and AOCs against the newest guidance proposed by the NMED. Based on these data, the permittees expect that no further sampling will be required and that a request for No Further Action (NFA) at the SWMUs and AOCs will be submitted to the NMED. This FWP addresses the current Permit requirements. It uses the results of previous investigations performed at WIPP and expands the investigations as required by the Permit. As an alternative to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) specified in Module VII of the Permit, current NMED guidance identifies an Accelerated Corrective Action Approach (ACAA) that may be used for any SWMU or AOC (NMED, 1998). This accelerated approach is used to replace the standard RFI Work Plan and Report sequence with a more flexible decision-making approach. The ACAA process allows a Facility to exit the schedule of compliance contained in the Facility's Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) permit module and proceed on an accelerated time frame. Thus, the ACAA process can be entered either before or after an RFI Work Plan. According to the NMED's guidance, a facility can prepare an RFI Work Plan or Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) for any SWMU or AOC (NMED, 1998). Based on this guidance, a SAP constitutes an acceptable alternative to the RFI Work Plan specified in the Permit.

  8. Project management of the build of the shore test facility for the prototype of PWR II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarkson, D.T.

    1987-01-01

    The PWR II is a new design of nuclear steam raising plant for the Royal Navy's submarines. It features improved engineering for safety, increased power, increased shock resistance, reduced noise transmission to sea and reduced manning requirement. It is to be tested in a new prototype testing facility, the Shore Test Facility, which is a section of submarine hull containing a prototype of the nuclear steam raising plant and its support system. It is installed at the Vulcan Naval Reactor Test establishment at Dounreay in Scotland. The function of the establishment is to test new designs of core and reactor plant, validate the mathematical models used in their design, develop improved methods of operation and maintenance of the plant and test new items of equipment. The Shore Test Facility was built in large sections at Barrow-in-Furness and transported to Scotland. The project management for the construction of the Shore Test Facility is explained. It involves personnel from the Royal Navy, and a large number of people working for the contractors involved in the buildings, transportation, operation and maintenance of the Facility. (U.K.)

  9. The Mixed Waste Management Facility. Design basis integrated operations plan (Title I design)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-12-01

    The Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) will be a fully integrated, pilotscale facility for the demonstration of low-level, organic-matrix mixed waste treatment technologies. It will provide the bridge from bench-scale demonstrated technologies to the deployment and operation of full-scale treatment facilities. The MWMF is a key element in reducing the risk in deployment of effective and environmentally acceptable treatment processes for organic mixed-waste streams. The MWMF will provide the engineering test data, formal evaluation, and operating experience that will be required for these demonstration systems to become accepted by EPA and deployable in waste treatment facilities. The deployment will also demonstrate how to approach the permitting process with the regulatory agencies and how to operate and maintain the processes in a safe manner. This document describes, at a high level, how the facility will be designed and operated to achieve this mission. It frequently refers the reader to additional documentation that provides more detail in specific areas. Effective evaluation of a technology consists of a variety of informal and formal demonstrations involving individual technology systems or subsystems, integrated technology system combinations, or complete integrated treatment trains. Informal demonstrations will typically be used to gather general operating information and to establish a basis for development of formal demonstration plans. Formal demonstrations consist of a specific series of tests that are used to rigorously demonstrate the operation or performance of a specific system configuration

  10. THE NEW FACILITIES MANAGEMENT CONTRACT AT CERN FROM 1st JULY 2002

    CERN Document Server

    Mauro Nonis

    2002-01-01

    Within the ST Division, all the Facilities Management activities have been under the ST/TFM group responsibility until the 30th June 2002, who has performed them using around 20 industrial support contracts. Starting from the 1st July 2002 a new unit, ST/FM, will take over these activities that will be unified into one single contract that has been adjudicated to the company Facilities Management Network SA. This contract will be in charge of the maintenance and minor works on tertiary installations (i.e. all structures and installations that have no direct relation to the running of the accelerators) for the following trades: Technical: heating, ventilation, air conditioning, plumbing, electricity, civil engineering (painting, roofing, glazing, blinds, fencing, masonry etc.), passenger and goods lifts, automatic and powered doors, kitchen equipment, roads, signs, keys and locks, office furniture, Services: waste collection, security, green areas, cleaning and sanitary supplies, disinfection, rodent contro...

  11. The new Facilities Management contract at CERN from 1st July 2002

    CERN Document Server

    Mauro Nonis

    2002-01-01

    Within the ST Division, all the Facilities Management activities have been under the ST/TFM group responsibility until the 30th June 2002, who has performed them using around 20 industrial support contracts. Starting from the 1st July 2002 a new unit, ST/FM, will take over these activities that will be unified into one single contract that has been adjudicated to the company Facilities Management Network SA. This contract will be in charge of the maintenance and minor works on tertiary installations (i.e. all structures and installations that have no direct relation to the running of the accelerators) for the following trades: - Technical: heating, ventilation, air conditioning, plumbing, electricity, civil engineering (painting, roofing, glazing, blinds, fencing, masonry etc.), passenger and goods lifts, automatic and powered doors, kitchen equipment, roads, signs, keys and locks, office furniture, - Services: waste collection, security, green areas, cleaning and sanitary supplies, disinfection, rodent cont...

  12. Investigation of development and management of treatment planning systems for BNCT at foreign facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    A new computational dosimetry system for BNCT: JCDS is developed by JAERI in order to carry out BNCT with epithermal neutron beam at present. The development and management situation of computational dosimetry system, which are developed and are used in BNCT facilities in foreign countries, were investigated in order to accurately grasp functions necessary for preparation of the treatment planning and its future subjects. In present state, 'SERA', which are developed by Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), is used in many BNCT facilities. Followings are necessary for development and management of the treatment planning system. (1) Reliability confirmation of system performance by verification as comparison examination of calculated value with actual experimental measured value. (2) Confirmation systems such as periodic maintenance for retention of the system quality. (3) The improvement system, which always considered relative merits and demerits with other computational dosimetry system. (4) The development of integrated system with patient setting. (author)

  13. Standard Guide for Preparing Waste Management Plans for Decommissioning Nuclear Facilities

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This guide addresses the development of waste management plans for potential waste streams resulting from decommissioning activities at nuclear facilities, including identifying, categorizing, and handling the waste from generation to final disposal. 1.2 This guide is applicable to potential waste streams anticipated from decommissioning activities of nuclear facilities whose operations were governed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) or Agreement State license, under Department of Energy (DOE) Orders, or Department of Defense (DoD) regulations. 1.3 This guide provides a description of the key elements of waste management plans that if followed will successfully allow for the characterization, packaging, transportation, and off-site treatment or disposal, or both, of conventional, hazardous, and radioactive waste streams. 1.4 This guide does not address the on-site treatment, long term storage, or on-site disposal of these potential waste streams. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address ...

  14. Closure of hazardous and mixed radioactive waste management units at DOE facilities. [Contains glossary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-06-01

    This is document addresses the Federal regulations governing the closure of hazardous and mixed waste units subject to Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements. It provides a brief overview of the RCRA permitting program and the extensive RCRA facility design and operating standards. It provides detailed guidance on the procedural requirements for closure and post-closure care of hazardous and mixed waste management units, including guidance on the preparation of closure and post-closure plans that must be submitted with facility permit applications. This document also provides guidance on technical activities that must be conducted both during and after closure of each of the following hazardous waste management units regulated under RCRA.

  15. Closure of hazardous and mixed radioactive waste management units at DOE facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-06-01

    This is document addresses the Federal regulations governing the closure of hazardous and mixed waste units subject to Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements. It provides a brief overview of the RCRA permitting program and the extensive RCRA facility design and operating standards. It provides detailed guidance on the procedural requirements for closure and post-closure care of hazardous and mixed waste management units, including guidance on the preparation of closure and post-closure plans that must be submitted with facility permit applications. This document also provides guidance on technical activities that must be conducted both during and after closure of each of the following hazardous waste management units regulated under RCRA

  16. Application of probabilistic methods to accident analysis at waste management facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banz, I.

    1986-01-01

    Probabilistic risk assessment is a technique used to systematically analyze complex technical systems, such as nuclear waste management facilities, in order to identify and measure their public health, environmental, and economic risks. Probabilistic techniques have been utilized at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico, to evaluate the probability of a catastrophic waste hoist accident. A probability model was developed to represent the hoisting system, and fault trees were constructed to identify potential sequences of events that could result in a hoist accident. Quantification of the fault trees using statistics compiled by the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) indicated that the annual probability of a catastrophic hoist accident at WIPP is less than one in 60 million. This result allowed classification of a catastrophic hoist accident as ''not credible'' at WIPP per DOE definition. Potential uses of probabilistic techniques at other waste management facilities are discussed

  17. Opting for cooperation: A case study in siting a low level radioactive waste management facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armour, A.

    1991-01-01

    In 1976, the Canadian federal government called a halt to efforts by a crown corporation to site a low-level radioactive waste management facility when it became apparent that continuation of the siting process would likely result in significant social disruption and political conflict. It established an independent six-person Task Force to advise it on how to proceed. Twelve months later, the Task Force put forward a radically different siting process based on the voluntary participation of communities and collaborative, joint problem-solving and decision making. Cabinet endorsed the approach and in September 1988 authorized the Task Force to begin implementing the recommended process. The first three phases of the process have been implemented and so far it appears to be achieving its desired objective -- to encourage less confrontation and more cooperation in the siting of the low-level radioactive waste management facility

  18. Value Adding Management of buildings and facility services in four steps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Voordt, Theo; Jensen, Per Anker; Hoendervanger, Jan Gerard

    2016-01-01

    , risk, cost, value of assets, sustainability and Corporate Social Responsibility. The new VAM model follows the steps from the well-known Plan-Do-Check-Act cycle, which are supported by various tools that were found in the literature or came to the fore in the state-of-the-art sections. In order...... builds on value adding management theories and models that use the triplet input-throughput-output, a distinction between output, outcome and added value, and concepts, theories and data on the impact of interventions in corporate real estate and facility services, change management and performance...... to be able to select appropriate interventions in the Plan-phase, this paper includes a typology of typical interventions in corporate real estate and facility services that may add value to the organisation. The Check-phase is supported by an overview of ways to measure the 12 value parameters and related...

  19. Knowledge transfer from facilities management to building projects: A typology of transfer mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Anker

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present a typology of mechanisms for knowledge transfer from Facilities Management (FM) to building projects. One of the problems in the building industry is a limited degree of learning. The development of professional FM can be the missing link to bridge the gap...... between building operation and building design. To fulfill this role facilities managers not only need the necessary competences but also appropriate methods and tools to be able to influence the building project. The research is based on literature reviews as well as various empirical studies....... The typology is divided in two parts, both based on mechanisms of knowledge push and knowledge pull. The first part has the main focus on the effectiveness of the building requirements and design by knowledge transfer from FM to building project from the front end. Briefing is a central element in this part...

  20. The evolution of facility management business models in supplier–client relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nardelli, Giulia; Rajala, Risto

    2018-01-01

    Purpose – The study improves the current understanding of business model innovation by outlining how business models unfold over time within supplier–client relationships in facilities management (FM) services. Design/methodology/approach – This study of FM services in Denmark consists...... of an explorative case study and three case studies of facilities management clients. Both phases, related and overlapping, involved collection and analysis of in-depth, semi-structured interviews and archive data. Findings – Findings shows that business model innovation entails interorganisational collaboration...... – This paper suggests that by observing the business models of the value network over time, organisations could learn from the interdependencies between intra- and interorganisational stakeholders, thereby supporting the monitoring of risks and uncertainties as well as the anticipation of potential...