WorldWideScience

Sample records for surgically modifiable risk

  1. Modifiable risk factors for surgical site infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moucha, Calin S; Clyburn, Terry A; Evans, Richard P; Prokuski, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Multiple risk factors for orthopaedic surgical site infection have been identified. Some of these factors directly affect the wound-healing process, whereas others can lead to blood-borne sepsis or relative immunosuppression. Modifying a patient's medications; screening for comorbidities, such as HIV or diabetes mellitus; and advising the patient on options to diminish or eliminate adverse behaviors, such as smoking, should lower the risk for surgical site infections.

  2. Prevalence of modifiable surgical site infection risk factors in hip and knee joint arthroplasty patients at an urban academic hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruzansky, Jason S; Bronson, Michael J; Grelsamer, Ronald P; Strauss, Elton; Moucha, Calin S

    2014-02-01

    Surgical site infections after hip and knee arthroplasty can be devastating if they lead to periprosthetic joint infection. We examined the prevalence of the modifiable risk factors for surgical site infection described by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgery Patient Safety Committee. Our study of 300 cases revealed that only 20% of all cases and 7% of revision cases for infection had no modifiable risk factors. The most common risk factors were obesity (46%), anemia (29%), malnutrition (26%), and diabetes (20%). Cases with obesity or diabetes were associated with all histories of remote orthopedic infection, 89% of urinary tract infections, and 72% of anemia cases. The high prevalence of several modifiable risk factors demonstrates that there are multiple opportunities for perioperative optimization of such comorbidities.

  3. Foramen magnum meningiomas: surgical results and risks predicting poor outcomes based on a modified classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Da; Wu, Zhen; Ren, Cong; Hao, Shu-Yu; Wang, Liang; Xiao, Xin-Ru; Tang, Jie; Wang, Yong-Gang; Meng, Guo-Lu; Zhang, Li-Wei; Zhang, Jun-Ting

    2017-03-01

    tumor P/R. Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified nontotal resection (OR 4.06, 95% CI 1.16-14.2, p = 0.029) and pathological mitosis (OR 6.29, 95% CI 1.47-27.0, p = 0.013) as independent risks for poor outcome (KPS score < 80). CONCLUSIONS The modified classification helped to predict surgical outcome and P/R in addition to the position of the lower cranial nerves. Preoperative imaging studies and neurological function should be reviewed carefully to establish an individualized management strategy to improve long-term outcome.

  4. [Pancoast tumors ; modified surgical approaches and techniques].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunezuka, Yoshio; Yachi, T; Waseda, R; Yamamoto, D

    2010-01-01

    The surgical treatment of Pancoast tumors is associated with difficulties related to its anatomical locations. Different surgical approaches have been reported but every approaches have some advantages and disadvantages. We report 2 Pancoast tumors cases with unique surgical approaches and our techniques. Case 1 : A 38-year-old man complained of face edema. The chest computed tomography (CT) revealed an right anterior apical tumor with direct invasion of the 1st and 2nd rib. Preoperative chemotherapy with 2 courses of carboplatin [area under the blood concentration-time curve (AUC) 6, day 1] and paclitaxel (80 mg/m2, day1, 8, 15) and concurrent extracorporeal radiation (70 Gy) was used to treat the adenocarcinoma. The skin incision was performed according to Masaoka's anterior approach, and a proximal median sternotomy communicated with an incision in the 4th intercostal space. The clavicula was freed by the L-shaped incision on the manubrium and the 1st cartilage section according to Grunenwald method to retract the section. Case 2 : A 65-year-old man complained back pain. The chest CT revealed an right superior sulcus tumor, displaced bronchus (B1+B3 tracheal bronchus, B2) and pulmonary arteries anomalies. Combined Shaw-Paulson incision and 4 intercostal lateral thoracotomy was performed to right upper lobectomy and systematic lymph nodes dissection.

  5. Risk-factors for surgical delay following hip fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Reig, J; Salvador Marín, J; Ferrández Martínez, J; Orozco Beltrán, D; Martínez López, J F

    To identify pre-operative risk factors for surgical delay of more than 2 days after admission in patients older than 65 years with a hip fracture. A prospective observational study was conducted on 180 hip fractures in patients older than 65 years of age admitted to our hospital from January 2015 to April 2016. The data recorded included, patient demographics, day of admission, pre-fracture comorbidities, mental state, level of mobility and physical function, type of fracture, antiaggregant and anticoagulant medication, pre-operative haemoglobin value, type of treatment, and surgical delay. The mean age of the patients was 83.7 years. The mean Charlson Index was 2.8. The pre-fracture baseline co-morbidities were equal or greater than 2 in 70% of cases. Mean timing of surgery was 3.1 days. At the time of admission, 122 (67.7%) patients were fit for surgery, of which 80 (44.4%) underwent surgery within 2 days. A Charlson index greater than 2, anticoagulant therapy, and admission on Thursday to Saturday, were independently associated with a surgical delay greater than 2 days. The rate of hip fracture patients undergoing surgery within 2 days is low. Risk factors associated to surgical delay are non-modifiable. However, their knowledge should allow the development of protocols that can reduce surgical delay in this group of patients. Copyright © 2017 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. [Anesthesiological management of the high-risk surgical patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoldi, G; Avalle, M

    1980-03-01

    Evaluation of the anaesthesiological risk in surgical patients is described and an account is given of results obtained with an association of ketamin and NLA II in 57 high-risk patients subjected to general surgical management.

  7. Surgical risks associated with winter sport tourism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Stéphane; Payet, Cécile; Lifante, Jean-Christophe; Polazzi, Stéphanie; Chollet, François; Carty, Matthew J; Duclos, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    Mass tourism during winter in mountain areas may cause significant clustering of body injuries leading to increasing emergency admissions at hospital. We aimed at assessing if surgical safety and efficiency was maintained in this particular context. We selected all emergency admissions of open surgery performed in French hospitals between 2010 and 2012. After identifying mountain areas with increasing volume of surgical stays during winter, we considered seasonal variations in surgical outcomes using a difference-in-differences study design. We computed multilevel regressions to evaluate whether significant increase in emergency cases had an effect on surgical mortality, complications and length of stay. Clustering effect of patients within hospitals was integrated in analysis and surgical outcomes were adjusted for both patient and hospital characteristics. A total of 381 hospitals had 559,052 inpatient stays related to emergency open surgery over 3 years. Compared to other geographical areas, a significant peak of activity was noted during winter in mountainous hospitals (Alps, Pyrenees, Vosges), ranging 6-77% volume increase. Peak was mainly explained by tourists' influx (+124.5%, 4,351/3,496) and increased need for orthopaedic procedures (+36.8%, 4,731/12,873). After controlling for potential confounders, patients did not experience increased risk for postoperative death (ratio of OR 1.01, 95%CI 0.89-1.14, p = 0.891), thromboembolism (0.95, 0.77-1.17, p = 0.621) or sepsis (0.98, 0.85-1.12, p = 0.748). Length of stay was unaltered (1.00, 0.99-1.02, p = 0.716). Surgical outcomes are not compromised during winter in French mountain areas despite a substantial influx of major emergencies.

  8. Risk factors for surgical site infection of pilon fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingting Ren

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Pilon fracture is a complex injury that is often associated with severe soft tissue damage and high rates of surgical site infection. The goal of this study was to analyze and identify independent risk factors for surgical site infection among patients undergoing surgical fixation of a pilon fracture. METHODS: The medical records of all pilon fracture patients who underwent surgical fixation from January 2010 to October 2012 were reviewed to identify those who developed a surgical site infection. Then, we constructed univariate and multivariate logistic regressions to evaluate the independent associations of potential risk factors with surgical site infection in patients undergoing surgical fixation of a pilon fracture. RESULTS: A total of 519 patients were enrolled in the study from January 2010 to October 2012. A total of 12 of the 519 patients developed a surgical site infection, for an incidence of 2.3%. These patients were followed for 12 to 29 months, with an average follow-up period of 19.1 months. In the final regression model, open fracture, elevated postoperative glucose levels (≥125 mg/dL, and a surgery duration of more than 150 minutes were significant risk factors for surgical site infection following surgical fixation of a pilon fracture. CONCLUSIONS: Open fractures, elevated postoperative glucose levels (≥125 mg/dL, and a surgery duration of more than 150 minutes were related to an increased risk for surgical site infection following surgical fixation of a pilon fracture. Patients exhibiting the risk factors identified in this study should be counseled regarding the possible surgical site infection that may develop after surgical fixation.

  9. Modifiable risk factors for ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandros Gianoulakis

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke is the third leading cause of death after cardiac disease and cancer in the developed countries. In patients older than 65 years old, ischemic stroke is one of the main causes of disability. They are also responsible for approximately 4.5 million deaths each year globally.The aim of the present study was to review the literature about the modifiable risk factors related to the development of ischemic stroke.The method οf this study included bibliographic research from both reviews and researches from literature, mainly of the last 8 years. The words used in pub med data base, referred to the modifiable risk factors related to the development of ischemic stroke.Results: In the majority of research studies, responsible risk factors for ischemic stroke are classified according to their ability of modification, in modifiable and non–modifiable risk factors. Some of the modifiable risk factors have been fully documented whereas some others need further research. The main modifiable risk factor is hypertension because on the one hand it promotes atherosclerosis and, on the other hand, leads to deteriorative changes and constrictions of small brain vessels. Atrial fibrillation is the most significant risk factor for ischemic stroke, since it is responsible for more than 50% of thromboembolic cases. Also, patients with diabetes mellitus are in higher risk for developing ischemic stroke compared to healthy population, whereas the danger is increasing in insuline-depented individuals. Increase of lipids in blood and disorders of cholesterol are responsible for atherosclerosis in coronary vessels and carotid. More in detail, carotid stenosis >50% in individuals over than 65 years old consist a significant risk factor for ischemic stroke. Though, the relation of smoking to ischemic stroke is still not fully understood, however smokers are in high risk for developing ischemic stroke for the reason that smoking is significantly related to

  10. Reducing mortality for high risk surgical patients in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, B A; Carrothers, A D; Jones, Chris

    2012-06-01

    Over 40 million surgical procedures are performed per annum in the USA and Europe, including several million patients who are considered to be high risk (Bennett-Guerrero et al 2003). Overall, the risk of death or major complications after surgery in the general surgical patient population is low, with a post-operative mortality rate of less than1% during the same hospital admission (Niskanen et al 2001).

  11. Prime Incision and Modified Moving Window: A Minimally Invasive Access for Breast Cancer Surgical Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    E. Bromberg, Silvio; Giordano, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Conservative surgical treatment has been the treatment of choice for early breast cancer. It allows feasible oncological treatment with a satisfactory cosmetic approach and fast recovery. However, in some cases mastectomy is necessary. This study proposes a surgical approach with only one surgical access through the same incision, which is in line with precepts mentioned above. It is called the prime incision and modified moving window techniques. METHODS Thirty one patients with a...

  12. Risk factors associated with surgical site infection after breast surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Esmael Nezhadhoseini

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Breast surgical site infection is not only one of the main causes of the morbidity and mortality of cases under different types of surgeries, but also it results in longer hospitalization and additional expenses. Identifying various potential parameters related to the occurrence of surgical site infection after the surgery and getting accurate knowledge about them can be beneficial in preventing the surgical site infection. Various types of studies have been conducted to evaluate the possible risk parameters of surgical site infection in every surgery. In this study, we tried to provide a brief review of the available literature regarding the risk factors associated with breast surgical site infection. To this end, we searched the Pubmed database for the relevant articles. We selected eight articles, which have studied the parameters with statistically significant association with the breast surgical site infection. According to our review, further studies with larger sample size can be effective in better evaluating the associated risk factors and presenting the exact effect of some uncertain risk factors of the surgical site infection after breast surgeries.

  13. Modified Kocher-Langenbeck approach in combined surgical exposures for acetabular fractures management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narender Kumar Magu

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: We believe that modified K-L approach may be a good alternative for the standard K-L approach in the management of elementary fractures and associated fractures of the acetabulum when combined with an anterior surgical approach. It makes the procedure less invasive, shortens the operative time, minimizes blood loss and overcomes the exhaustion and fatigue of the surgical team.

  14. A modified minimally invasive technique for the surgical management of large trichobezoars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Javed

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Trichobezoar which were traditionally managed by open surgical retrieval are now often managed by minimally invasive surgical approach. Removal of a large trichobezoar by laparoscopy, however, needs an incision (usually 4-5 cm in size for specimen removal and has the risk of intra-peritoneal spillage of hair and inspissated secretions. Materials and Methods : The present paper describes a modified laparoscopy-assisted technique with temporary gastrocutaneopexy for the effective removal of a large trichobezoar using a camera port and a 4-5 cm incision (which is similar to that needed for specimen removal during laparoscopy. Results: Three patients with large trichobezoar were managed with the described technique. The average duration of surgery was 45 (30-60 min and the intraoperative blood loss was minimal. There was no peritoneal spillage and the trichobezoar could be retrieved through a 4-5 cm incision in all patients. All had an uneventful recovery and at a median followup of 6 months had excellent cosmetic and functional results. Conclusion: The described technique is a minimally invasive alternative for trichobezoar removal. There is no risk of peritoneal contamination and the technical ease and short operative time in addition to an incision limited to size required for the specimen removal, makes it an attractive option.

  15. e of the Surgical Glove in Modified Vacuum-Assisted Wound Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar Ram Hemmanur

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Vacuum-assisted wound healing has been proven to be more efficacious than conventionaldressings. Vacuum dressing has been frequently modified given the restrictions in resourcesavailable. Here we present a modified method of vacuum dressing by using surgical orgynaecological gloves for lower and upper limb wounds. Vacuum dressing was applied withparts of a surgical or gynaecological glove and Opsite with T-tailing of the suction outlet.Vacuum-assisted wound healing using the surgical gloves showed relatively good woundhealing in the amputation stump, finger, arm, and leg in the cases studied.

  16. [Risk assessment of genetically modified organisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Thadeu Estevam Moreira Maramaldo; Dias, Aline Peçanha Muzy; Scheidegger, Erica Miranda Damasio; Marin, Victor Augustus

    2011-01-01

    Since the commercial approve in 1996, the global area of transgenic crops has raised more than 50 times. In the last two decades, governments have been planning strategies and protocols for safety assessment of food and feed genetically modified (GM). Evaluation of food safety should be taken on a case-by-case analysis depending on the specific traits of the modified crops and the changes introduced by the genetic modification, using for this the concept of substantial equivalence. This work presents approaches for the risk assessment of GM food, as well as some problems related with the genetic construction or even with the expression of the inserted gene.

  17. Risk Assessment of Genetically Modified Microorganisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, B. L.; Wilcks, Andrea

    2001-01-01

    the industry, national administration and research institutions were gathered to discuss which elements should be considered in a risk assessment of genetically modified microorganisms used as food or food ingredients. The existing EU and national regulations were presented, together with the experiences......The rapid development of recombinant DNA techniques for food organisms urges for an ongoing discussion on the risk assessment of both new as traditional use of microorganisms in food production. This report, supported by the Nordic Council of Ministers, is the result of a workshop where people from...

  18. Patients at High-Risk for Surgical Site Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueck, Krislynn M; Kao, Lillian S

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are a significant healthcare quality issue, resulting in increased morbidity, disability, length of stay, resource utilization, and costs. Identification of high-risk patients may improve pre-operative counseling, inform resource utilization, and allow modifications in peri-operative management to optimize outcomes. Review of the pertinent English-language literature. High-risk surgical patients may be identified on the basis of individual risk factors or combinations of factors. In particular, statistical models and risk calculators may be useful in predicting infectious risks, both in general and for SSIs. These models differ in the number of variables; inclusion of pre-operative, intra-operative, or post-operative variables; ease of calculation; and specificity for particular procedures. Furthermore, the models differ in their accuracy in stratifying risk. Biomarkers may be a promising way to identify patients at high risk of infectious complications. Although multiple strategies exist for identifying surgical patients at high risk for SSIs, no one strategy is superior for all patients. Further efforts are necessary to determine if risk stratification in combination with risk modification can reduce SSIs in these patient populations.

  19. Gestational Exposure as Epigenetic Modifier of Breast Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0470 TITLE: Gestational Exposure as Epigenetic Modifier of Breast Cancer Risk PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Donato F...Gestational Exposure as Epigenetic Modifier of Breast Cancer Risk Ges Gestational Exposure as Epigenetic Modifier of Breast Cancer Risk tational Exposure...as Epigenetic Modifier of Breast Cancer Risk 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0470 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S

  20. Risk assessment of Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waigmann E

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available

    EFSA’s remit in the risk assessment of GMOs is very broad encompassing genetically modified plants, microorganisms and animals and assessing their safety for humans, animals and the environment. The legal frame for GMOs is set by Directive 2001/18/EC on their release into the environment, and Regulation (EC No 1829/2003 on GM food and feed. The main focus of EFSA’s GMO Panel and GMO Unit lies in the evaluation of the scientific risk assessment of new applications for market authorisation of GMOs, and in the development of corresponding guidelines for the applicants. The EFSA GMO Panel has elaborated comprehensive guidance documents on GM plants, GM microorganisms and GM animals, as well as on specific aspects of risk assessment such as the selection of comparators. EFSA also provides special scientific advice upon request of the European Commission; examples are post-market environmental monitoring of GMOs, and consideration of potential risks of new plant breeding techniques. The GMO Panel regularly reviews its guidance documents in the light of experience gained with the evaluation of applications, technological progress in breeding technologies and scientific developments in the diverse areas of risk assessment.

  1. Surgical errors and risks - the head and neck cancer patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harréus, Ulrich

    2013-12-13

    Head and neck surgery is one of the basic principles of head and neck cancer therapy. Surgical errors and malpractice can have fatal consequences for the treated patients. It can lead to functional impairment and has impact in future chances for disease related survival. There are many risks for head and neck surgeons that can cause errors and malpractice. To avoid surgical mistakes, thorough preoperative management of patients is mandatory. As there are ensuring operability, cautious evaluation of preoperative diagnostics and operative planning. Moreover knowledge of anatomical structures of the head and neck, of the medical studies and data as well as qualification in modern surgical techniques and the surgeons ability for critical self assessment are basic and important prerequisites for head and neck surgeons in order to make out risks and to prevent from mistakes. Additionally it is important to have profound knowledge in nutrition management of cancer patients, wound healing and to realize and to be able to deal with complications, when they occur. Despite all precaution and surgical care, errors and mistakes cannot always be avoided. For that it is important to be able to deal with mistakes and to establish an appropriate and clear communication and management for such events. The manuscript comments on recognition and prevention of risks and mistakes in the preoperative, operative and postoperative phase of head and neck cancer surgery.

  2. Aspirin increases the risk of venous thromboembolism in surgical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmparas, Galinos; Jain, Monica; Mehrzadi, Devorah; Melo, Nicolas; Chung, Rex; Bloom, Matthew; Ley, Eric J; Margulies, Daniel R

    2014-10-01

    The risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) for patients taking an antiplatelet agent is largely unknown. This study aimed to investigate the association between antiplatelet agent use before admission with the risk of in-hospital VTE in surgical intensive care unit (ICU) patients. A retrospective review of all patients admitted to the surgical ICU at a Level I trauma center over 30 months was performed. Patients who underwent diagnostic imaging for VTE were selected. Patients were divided based on whether or not antiplatelet agents were used before admission (APTA vs NAPTA). The primary outcome was VTE occurrence. A forward logistic regression model was used to identify factors independently associated with the primary outcome. During the study period, 461 (24%) patients met inclusion criteria: 70 (15%) APTA and 391 (85%) NAPTA. After adjusting for confounding factors, APTA patients were at a significantly higher risk for developing VTE (59 vs 40%; adjusted odds ratio, 1.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.0 to 3.0; adjusted P = 0.04). Whether or not antiplatelet agents were resumed during the hospital stay and the day on which they were resumed did not affect VTE risk. In conclusion, surgical ICU patients receiving antiplatelet agents before admission are at a significantly higher risk for development of VTE.

  3. [Results of surgical treatment for acromioclavicular dislocation using a modified Mitchell method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Król, M; Jarco, K; Sleczkowski, M; Delimat, J; Szot, J

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents the results of surgical treatment in acromioclavicular dislocation (grade III according to Tossy) in 53 patients. Joint reconstruction was performed using Mitchell's modified method--acromioclavicular reconstruction was achieved by applying a with Dallos poliester fiber prosthesis. Clinically in 90.5% of the cases a good or excellent result was achieved.

  4. A modified surgical technique for reconstruction of an acute acromioclavicular joint dislocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchie, Anthony; Kumar, Arun; Catre, Melanio

    2009-01-01

    We report a modified surgical technique for reconstruction of coracoclavicular and acromioclavicular ligaments after acute dislocation of acromioclavicular joint using suture anchors. We have repaired 3 consecutive type III acromioclavicular dislocations with good results. This technique is simple and safe and allows anatomical reconstruction of the ligaments in acute dislocations. PMID:20671868

  5. Risk factors for retained surgical items: a meta-analysis and proposed risk stratification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffatt-Bruce, Susan D; Cook, Charles H; Steinberg, Steven M; Stawicki, Stanislaw P

    2014-08-01

    Retained surgical items (RSI) are designated as completely preventable "never events". Despite numerous case reports, clinical series, and expert opinions few studies provide quantitative insight into RSI risk factors and their relative contributions to the overall RSI risk profile. Existing case-control studies lack the ability to reliably detect clinically important differences within the long list of proposed risks. This meta-analysis examines the best available data for RSI risk factors, seeking to provide a clinically relevant risk stratification system. Nineteen candidate studies were considered for this meta-analysis. Three retrospective, case-control studies of RSI-related risk factors contained suitable group comparisons between patients with and without RSI, thus qualifying for further analysis. Comprehensive Meta-Analysis 2.0 (BioStat, Inc, Englewood, NJ) software was used to analyze the following "common factor" variables compiled from the above studies: body-mass index, emergency procedure, estimated operative blood loss >500 mL, incorrect surgical count, lack of surgical count, >1 subprocedure, >1 surgical team, nursing staff shift change, operation "afterhours" (i.e., between 5 PM and 7 AM), operative time, trainee presence, and unexpected intraoperative factors. We further stratified resulting RSI risk factors into low, intermediate, and high risk. Despite the fact that only between three and six risk factors were associated with increased RSI risk across the three studies, our analysis of pooled data demonstrates that seven risk factors are significantly associated with increased RSI risk. Variables found to elevate the RSI risk include intraoperative blood loss >500 mL (odds ratio [OR] 1.6); duration of operation (OR 1.7); >1 subprocedure (OR 2.1); lack of surgical counts (OR 2.5); >1 surgical team (OR 3.0); unexpected intraoperative factors (OR 3.4); and incorrect surgical count (OR 6.1). Changes in nursing staff, emergency surgery, body

  6. Incidence and risk factors of surgical site infection following cesarean section at Dhulikhel Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, S; Shrestha, R; Shrestha, B; Dongol, A

    2014-01-01

    Cesarean Section (CS) is one of the most commonly performed surgical procedures in obstetrical and gynecological department. Surgical site infection (SSI) after a cesarean section increases maternal morbidity prolongs hospital stay and medical costs. The aim of this study was to find out the incidence and associated risk factors of surgical site infection among cesarean section cases. A prospective, descriptive study was conducted at Dhulikhel Hospital, department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology from July 2013 to June 2014. Total of 648 women who underwent surgical procedure for delivery during study period were included in the study. Data was collected from patient using structred pro forma and examination of wound till discharge was done. Data was compared in terms of presence of surgical site infection and study variables. Wound was evaluated for the development of SSI on third day, and fifth post-operative day, and on the day of discharge. Total of 648 cases were studied. The mean age was 24±4.18. Among the studied cases 92% were literate and 8% were illiterate. Antenatal clinic was attended by 97.7%. The incidence rate of surgical site infection was 82 (12.6%). SSI was found to be common in women who had rupture of membrane before surgery (p=0.020), who underwent emergency surgery (p=0.0004), and the women who had vertical skin incision (p=0.0001) and interrupted skin suturing (p=0.0001) during surgery. Surgical site infection following caesarean section is common. Various modifiable risk factors were observed in this study. Development of SSI is related to multifactorial rather than one factor. Development and strict implementation of protocol by all the health care professionals could be effective to minimize and prevent the infection rate after caesarean section.

  7. Effect of modified surgical method on subcutaneous hydrops of patients with breast cancer after modified radical mastectomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Li; Hua-Feng Pan; Gui-Lan Sun

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Through prospective randomized clinical study,to observe the preventive effect of improved surgical method to subcutaneous hydrops after modified radical mastec tomy.Method:A total of 80 cases of patients who have done modified radical mastectomy were selected, and randomly divided them into study group (40 cases) and control group (40 cases), then adopted different surgical methods as followed respectively, to observe the daily drainage volume at the first 3 d after surgery; when the drainage volume≤ 20 mL, 24 h after surgery, removed the drainage tubes, to record the drainage days, total cases who occured subcutaneous hydrops and all adverse events after surgery. Results:Study group: the first 3 d of daily drainage volume declined quickly, and were accordingly less than that in control group; and≤ 50 mL/24 h on the third day. Drainage total days median (4 d) were less than that in control group (7 d); subcutaneous hydrops occurrence rate was only 2%, which wasgreatly lower than that in control group (14%), statistics difference had significance. Through the comparison between study group and control group, this surgical method improvement will not bring any surgical safety problems, such as hematoma, wound infection, skin flap necrosis and upper limb LOM etc. Only extended the surgical time slightly. While in control group, drainage tubes fell into the dead space or were blocked frequently, then induced hydrops; but in study group, due to the suture of latissimus dorsi leading edge and chestwall, dead space disappeared at this spot, drainage tube were not blocked any more.Conclusion: In mastectomy and axillary lymph dissection, due to axillary dissection, ligation might lead to open lymphatic tissue, added that suture fixed latissimus dorsi leading edge and skin flap leading to disappeared dead space, compared with traditional surgical method, this improved surgical method could obviously reduce the occurrence rate of hydrops. Daily drainage volume

  8. Surgical video recording with a modified GoPro Hero 4 camera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin LK

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lily Koo Lin Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Science, University of California, Davis Eye Center, Sacramento, CA, USA Background: Surgical videography can provide analytical self-examination for the surgeon, teaching opportunities for trainees, and allow for surgical case presentations. This study examined if a modified GoPro Hero 4 camera with a 25 mm lens could prove to be a cost-effective method of surgical videography with enough detail for oculoplastic and strabismus surgery. Method: The stock lens mount and lens were removed from a GoPro Hero 4 camera, and was refitted with a Peau Productions SuperMount and 25 mm lens. The modified GoPro Hero 4 camera was then fixed to an overhead surgical light. Results: Camera settings were set to 1080p video resolution. The 25 mm lens allowed for nine times the magnification as the GoPro stock lens. There was no noticeable video distortion. The entire cost was less than 600 USD. Conclusion: The adapted GoPro Hero 4 with a 25 mm lens allows for high-definition, cost-effective, portable video capture of oculoplastic and strabismus surgery. The 25 mm lens allows for detailed videography that can enhance surgical teaching and self-examination. Keywords: teaching, oculoplastic, strabismus

  9. Stroke Prevention: Managing Modifiable Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Di Legge

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Prevention plays a crucial role in counteracting morbidity and mortality related to ischemic stroke. It has been estimated that 50% of stroke are preventable through control of modifiable risk factors and lifestyle changes. Antihypertensive treatment is recommended for both prevention of recurrent stroke and other vascular events. The use of antiplatelets and statins has been shown to reduce the risk of recurrent stroke and other vascular events. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs are indicated in stroke prevention because they also promote vascular health. Effective secondary-prevention strategies for selected patients include carotid revascularization for high-grade carotid stenosis and vitamin K antagonist treatment for atrial fibrillation. The results of recent clinical trials investigating new anticoagulants (factor Xa inhibitors and direct thrombin inhibitors clearly indicate alternative strategies in stroke prevention for patients with atrial fibrillation. This paper describes the current landscape and developments in stroke prevention with special reference to medical treatment in secondary prevention of ischemic stroke.

  10. SURGICAL RISK INDEX AND SURGICAL SITE INFECTION IN POSTPARTUM WOMEN SUBMITTED TO CESAREAN SECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana Machado Chianca

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Backgound and Objectives: Considering the use of active surveillance assists in infection identification and the need for studies that use Surgical Risk Index (SRI for assessment of Surgical Site Infection (SSI in cesareans, this study aims to determine the incidence of SSI and analyze the applicability of SRI in the prediction of SSI in women in the postpartum period after being submitted to a cesarean section at a university hospital between April 2012 and March of 2013. Methods: Prospective cohort study. Information notifying SSI by active surveillance was collected daily from the medical records. After hospital discharge, the mothers were contacted through telephone calls to identify infection criteria within 30 days after the cesarean. Descriptive and comparative analyses were performed. The chi-square test was used to compare groups. Results: 737 cesareans were performed. Telephone contact was achieved with 507 (68.8% women up to 30 days postpartum, with loss of follow-up of 230 cases (31.2%. The medical consultation in the post-partum period occurred with 188 (37.08% women, with whom telephone contact was obtained, on average, 17.28 days (SD=8.39 after delivery. It was verified that 21 patients met the criteria for SSI, with a 4.14% rate. A total of 12 cases (57.1% were classified as superficial SSI, 5 (23.8% as deep and 4 (19.1% as infection of organs and cavities. The SRI and its risk variables were not associated with SSI in patients submitted to cesarean sections. Conclusion: The SRI and the risk variables included in this index were not associated to SSI in patients submitted to cesarean sections. KEYWORDS: Cesarean Section; Surgical Wound Infection; Epidemiological Surveillance; Infection Control; Risk Index; Disease Notification.

  11. Infected primary knee arthroplasty: Risk factors for surgical treatment failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joao Gabriel Duarte Paes Pradella

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To present epidemiological data and risk factors associated with surgical out-comes favorable or unfavorable for the treatment of infection in infected total knee arthroplasty. METHODS: We reviewed medical records of 48 patients who underwent treatment of primary total knee arthroplasty for infection between January 1994 and December 2008, in the Orthopedics and Traumatology Department of the Santa Casa de Misericórdia de São Paulo. The variables associated with favorable outcome of surgical treatment (debridement and retention or exchange arthroplasty in two days or unfavorable (arthrodesis or death infection. RESULTS: A total of 39 cases of infection after primary total knee arthroplasty, 22 progressed to 17 for a favorable outcome and unfavorable outcome. Early infections (OR: 14.0, 95% CI 1.5-133.2, p = 0.016 and diabetes (OR: 11.3, 95% CI 1.4-89.3, p = 0.032 were associated with arthrodesis joint and death respectively. CONCLUSION: Patients with early infection had a higher risk of developing surgical procedure with unfavorable outcome (arthrodesis and diabetics had higher odds of death after infection of primary knee arthroplasties.

  12. Operative Duration and Risk of Surgical Site Infection in Neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekelis, Kimon; Coy, Shannon; Simmons, Nathan

    2016-10-01

    The association of surgical duration with the risk of surgical site infection (SSI) has not been quantified in neurosurgery. We investigated the association of operative duration in neurosurgical procedures with the incidence of SSI. We performed a retrospective cohort study involving patients who underwent neurosurgical procedures from 2005 to 2012 and were registered in the American College of Surgeons National Quality Improvement Project registry. To control for confounding, we used multivariable regression models and propensity score conditioning. During the study period there were 94,744 patients who underwent a neurosurgical procedure and met the inclusion criteria. Of these patients, 4.1% developed a postoperative SSI within 30 days. Multivariable logistic regression showed an association between longer operative duration with higher incidence of SSI (odds ratio [OR], 1.18; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.16-1.20). Compared with procedures of moderate duration (third quintile, 40th-60th percentile), patients undergoing the longest procedures (>80th percentile) had higher odds (OR, 2.07; 95% CI, 1.86-2.31) of developing SSI. The shortest procedures (surgical registry, longer operative duration was associated with increased incidence of SSI for neurosurgical procedures. These results can be used by neurosurgeons to inform operative management and to stratify patients with regard to SSI risk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Improving prediction of surgical site infection risk with multilevel modeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Saunders

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Surgical site infection (SSI surveillance is a key factor in the elaboration of strategies to reduce SSI occurrence and in providing surgeons with appropriate data feedback (risk indicators, clinical prediction rule. AIM: To improve the predictive performance of an individual-based SSI risk model by considering a multilevel hierarchical structure. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Data were collected anonymously by the French SSI active surveillance system in 2011. An SSI diagnosis was made by the surgical teams and infection control practitioners following standardized criteria. A random 20% sample comprising 151 hospitals, 502 wards and 62280 patients was used. Three-level (patient, ward, hospital hierarchical logistic regression models were initially performed. Parameters were estimated using the simulation-based Markov Chain Monte Carlo procedure. RESULTS: A total of 623 SSI were diagnosed (1%. The hospital level was discarded from the analysis as it did not contribute to variability of SSI occurrence (p  = 0.32. Established individual risk factors (patient history, surgical procedure and hospitalization characteristics were identified. A significant heterogeneity in SSI occurrence between wards was found (median odds ratio [MOR] 3.59, 95% credibility interval [CI] 3.03 to 4.33 after adjusting for patient-level variables. The effects of the follow-up duration varied between wards (p<10-9, with an increased heterogeneity when follow-up was <15 days (MOR 6.92, 95% CI 5.31 to 9.07]. The final two-level model significantly improved the discriminative accuracy compared to the single level reference model (p<10-9, with an area under the ROC curve of 0.84. CONCLUSION: This study sheds new light on the respective contribution of patient-, ward- and hospital-levels to SSI occurrence and demonstrates the significant impact of the ward level over and above risk factors present at patient level (i.e., independently from patient case-mix.

  14. Risk Factors for Surgical Site Infection After Cholecystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, David K; Nickel, Katelin B; Wallace, Anna E; Mines, Daniel; Tian, Fang; Symons, William J; Fraser, Victoria J; Olsen, Margaret A

    2017-01-01

    There are limited data on risk factors for surgical site infection (SSI) after open or laparoscopic cholecystectomy. A retrospective cohort of commercially insured persons aged 18-64 years was assembled using International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) procedure or Current Procedural Terminology, 4th edition codes for cholecystectomy from December 31, 2004 to December 31, 2010. Complex procedures and patients (eg, cancer, end-stage renal disease) and procedures with pre-existing infection were excluded. Surgical site infections within 90 days after cholecystectomy were identified by ICD-9-CM diagnosis codes. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to identify independent risk factors for SSI. Surgical site infections were identified after 472 of 66566 (0.71%) cholecystectomies; incidence was higher after open (n = 51, 4.93%) versus laparoscopic procedures (n = 421, 0.64%; P infection, laparoscopic approach with acute cholecystitis/obstruction (hazards ratio [HR], 1.58; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.27-1.96), open approach with (HR, 4.29; 95% CI, 2.45-7.52) or without acute cholecystitis/obstruction (HR, 4.04; 95% CI, 1.96-8.34), conversion to open approach with (HR, 4.71; 95% CI, 2.74-8.10) or without acute cholecystitis/obstruction (HR, 7.11; 95% CI, 3.87-13.08), bile duct exploration, postoperative chronic anemia, and postoperative pneumonia or urinary tract infection. Acute cholecystitis or obstruction was associated with significantly increased risk of SSI with laparoscopic but not open cholecystectomy. The risk of SSI was similar for planned open and converted procedures. These findings suggest that stratification by operative factors is important when comparing SSI rates between facilities.

  15. [Surgical management of intrauterine adhesions: is benefice bigger than risk?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piketty, M; Lesavre, M; Prat-Ellenberg, L; Benifla, J-L

    2010-09-01

    Management of intrauterine synechiae in a context of infertility remains a challenge, in spite of hysteroscopic microsurgery progress. There is no published prospective study to be used as a guideline. Anatomic, but most of all functional prognosis are directly correlated to the severity of adhesions and the number of surgical procedures required to complete treatment. Complications during surgery are not infrequent, but are well known and often benign. Obstetrical complications are much less frequent but often severe (abnormal placentation, uterine rupture). Recurrences are common enough to impose a systematic second-look diagnostic hysteroscopy. However, the benefit gained by the recovery of fertility (either spontaneous or not) remains superior, in my opinion, to the risks of the surgical management.

  16. Modifiable risk factors and colorectal adenomas among those at high risk of colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botma, A.

    2011-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have identified several modifiable risk factors for colorectal neoplasms in the general population. However, associations between modifiable risk factors, including body mass index (BMI), smoking, alcohol consumption and dietary patterns, and colorectal neoplasms in two

  17. Assessment scale of risk for surgical positioning injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Camila Mendonça de Moraes; Haas, Vanderlei José; Dantas, Rosana Aparecida Spadoti; Oliveira, Cheila Gonçalves de; Galvão, Cristina Maria

    2016-08-29

    to build and validate a scale to assess the risk of surgical positioning injuries in adult patients. methodological research, conducted in two phases: construction and face and content validation of the scale and field research, involving 115 patients. the Risk Assessment Scale for the Development of Injuries due to Surgical Positioning contains seven items, each of which presents five subitems. The scale score ranges between seven and 35 points in which, the higher the score, the higher the patient's risk. The Content Validity Index of the scale corresponded to 0.88. The application of Student's t-test for equality of means revealed the concurrent criterion validity between the scores on the Braden scale and the constructed scale. To assess the predictive criterion validity, the association was tested between the presence of pain deriving from surgical positioning and the development of pressure ulcer, using the score on the Risk Assessment Scale for the Development of Injuries due to Surgical Positioning (pcontenido de la escala e investigación de campo, con la participación de 115 pacientes. la Escala de Evaluación de Riesgo para el Desarrollo de Lesiones Debidas al Posicionamiento Quirúrgico contiene siete ítems, siendo que cada uno presenta cinco subítems. La puntuación de esa escala varia de siete a 35 puntos en que, cuanto mayor la puntuación, mayor el riesgo del paciente. El Índice de Validez de Contenido de la escala fue 0,88. Mediante la aplicación de la prueba t de Student, para igualdad de medias, fue constatada validez de criterio concurrente entre los scores de la escala de Braden y de la escala construida. Para evaluar la validez de criterio predictiva, fue testada la asociación de la presencia de dolor debido al posicionamiento quirúrgico y el desarrollo de úlcera por presión con el score de la Escala de Evaluación de Riesgo para el Desarrollo de Lesiones Debidas al Posicionamiento Quirúrgico (p<0,001). La confiabilidad

  18. Satisfactory surgical outcome of T2 gastric cancer after modified D2 lymphadenectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shupeng; Wu, Liangliang; Wang, Xiaona; Ding, Xuewei; Liang, Han

    2017-04-01

    Though D2 lymphadenectomy has been increasingly regarded as standard surgical procedure for advanced gastric cancer (GC), the modified D2 (D1 + 7, 8a and 9) lymphadenectomy may be more suitable than D2 dissection for T2 stage GC. The purpose of this study is to elucidate whether the surgical outcome of modified D2 lymphadenectomy was comparable to that of standard D2 dissection in T2 stage GC patients. A retrospective cohort study with 77 cases and 77 controls matched for baseline characteristics was conducted. Patients were categorized into two groups according to the extent of lymphadenectomy: the modified D2 group (mD2) and the standard D2 group (D2). Surgical outcome and recurrence date were compared between the two groups. The 5-year overall survival (OS) rate was 71.4% for patients accepted mD2 lymphadenectomy and 70.1% for those accepted standard D2, respectively, and the difference was not statistically significant. Multivariate survival analysis revealed that curability, tumor size, TNM stage and postoperative complications were independently prognostic factors for T2 stage GC patients. Patients in the mD2 group tended to have less intraoperative blood loss (P=0.001) and shorter operation time (PD2 group. While there were no significant differences in recurrence rate and types, especially lymph node recurrence, between the two groups. The surgical outcome of mD2 lymphadenectomy was equal to that of standard D2, and the use of mD2 instead of standard D2 can be a better option for T2 stage GC.

  19. Surgical Team Stability and Risk of Sharps-Related Blood and Body Fluid Exposures During Surgical Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Douglas J; Lipscomb, Hester J; Epling, Carol; Hunt, Debra; Richardson, William; Smith-Lovin, Lynn; Dement, John M

    2016-05-01

    To explore whether surgical teams with greater stability among their members (ie, members have worked together more in the past) experience lower rates of sharps-related percutaneous blood and body fluid exposures (BBFE) during surgical procedures. A 10-year retrospective cohort study. A single large academic teaching hospital. Surgical teams participating in surgical procedures (n=333,073) performed during 2001-2010 and 2,113 reported percutaneous BBFE were analyzed. A social network measure (referred to as the team stability index) was used to quantify the extent to which surgical team members worked together in the previous 6 months. Poisson regression was used to examine the effect of team stability on the risk of BBFE while controlling for procedure characteristics and accounting for procedure duration. Separate regression models were generated for percutaneous BBFE involving suture needles and those involving other surgical devices. RESULTS The team stability index was associated with the risk of percutaneous BBFE (adjusted rate ratio, 0.93 [95% CI, 0.88-0.97]). However, the association was stronger for percutaneous BBFE involving devices other than suture needles (adjusted rate ratio, 0.92 [95% CI, 0.85-0.99]) than for exposures involving suture needles (0.96 [0.88-1.04]). Greater team stability may reduce the risk of percutaneous BBFE during surgical procedures, particularly for exposures involving devices other than suture needles. Additional research should be conducted on the basis of primary data gathered specifically to measure qualities of relationships among surgical team personnel.

  20. Chances, risks and limitations of neoadjuvant therapy in surgical oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lordick Florian

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decades, neoadjuvant treatment has been established as a standard of care for a variety of tumor types in visceral oncology. Neoadjuvant treatment is recommended in locally advanced esophageal and gastric cancer as well as in rectal cancer. In borderline resectable pancreatic cancer, neoadjuvant therapy is an emerging treatment concept, whereas in resectable colorectal liver metastases, neoadjuvant treatment is often used, although the evidence for improvement of survival outcomes is rather weak. What makes neoadjuvant treatment attractive from a surgical oncology viewpoint is its ability to shrink tumors to a smaller size and to increase the chances for complete resection with clear surgical margins, which is a prerequisite for cure. Studies suggest that local tumor control is increased in some visceral tumor types, especially with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. In some other studies, a better control of systemic disease has contributed to significantly improved survival rates. Additionally, delaying surgery offers the chance to bring the patient into a better general condition for major surgery, but it also confers the risk of progression. Although it is a relatively rare event, cancers may progress locally during neoadjuvant treatment or distant metastases may occur, jeopardizing a curative surgical treatment approach. Although this is seen as risk of neoadjuvant treatment, it can also be seen as a chance to select only those patients for surgery who have a better control of systemic disease. Some studies showed increased perioperative morbidity in patients who underwent neoadjuvant treatment, which is another potential disadvantage. Optimal multidisciplinary teamwork is key to controlling that risk. Meanwhile, the neoadjuvant treatment period is also used as a “window of opportunity” for studying the activity of novel drugs and for investigating predictive and prognostic biomarkers of chemoradiotherapy and radiochemotherapy

  1. Risk of surgical glove perforation in oral and maxillofacial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroyanagi, N; Nagao, T; Sakuma, H; Miyachi, H; Ochiai, S; Kimura, Y; Fukano, H; Shimozato, K

    2012-08-01

    Oral and maxillofacial surgery, which involves several sharp instruments and fixation materials, is consistently at a high risk for cross-contamination due to perforated gloves, but it is unclear how often such perforations occur. This study aimed to address this issue. The frequency of the perforation of surgical gloves (n=1436) in 150 oral and maxillofacial surgeries including orthognathic surgery (n=45) was assessed by the hydroinsufflation technique. Orthognathic surgery had the highest perforation rate in at least 1 glove in 1 operation (91.1%), followed by cleft lip and palate surgery (55.0%), excision of oral soft tumour (54.5%) and dental implantation (50.0%). The perforation rate in scrub nurses was 63.4%, followed by 44.4% in surgeons and first assistants, and 16.3% in second assistants. The odds ratio for the perforation rate in orthognathic surgery versus other surgeries was 16.0 (95% confidence interval: 5.3-48.0). The protection rate offered by double gloving in orthognathic surgery was 95.2%. These results suggest that, regardless of the surgical duration and blood loss in all fields of surgery, orthognathic surgery must be categorized in the highest risk group for glove perforation, following gynaecological and open lung surgery, due to the involvement of sharp objects.

  2. Surgical menopause and nonvertebral fracture risk among older US women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesco, Kimberly K; Marshall, Lynn M; Nelson, Heidi D; Humphrey, Linda; Rizzo, Joanne; Pedula, Kathryn L; Cauley, Jane A; Ensrud, Kristine E; Hochberg, Marc C; Antoniucci, Diana; Hillier, Teresa A

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether older postmenopausal women with a history of bilateral oophorectomy before natural menopause (surgical menopause) have a higher risk of nonvertebral postmenopausal fracture than women with natural menopause. We used 21 years of prospectively collected incident fracture data from the ongoing Study of Osteoporotic Fractures, a cohort study of community-dwelling women without previous bilateral hip fracture who were 65 years or older at enrollment, to determine the risk of hip, wrist, and any nonvertebral fracture. χ(2) and t tests were used to compare the two groups on important characteristics. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models stratified by baseline oral estrogen use status were used to estimate the risk of fracture. Baseline characteristics differed significantly among the 6,616 women within the Study of Osteoporotic Fractures who underwent either surgical (1,157) or natural (5,459) menopause, including mean age at menopause (44.3 ± 7.4 vs 48.9 ± 4.9 y, P menopause, even among women who had never used oral estrogen (hip fracture: hazard ratio [HR], 0.87; 95% CI, 0.63-1.21; wrist fracture: HR, 1.10; 95% CI, 0.78-1.57; any nonvertebral fracture: HR, 1.11; 95% CI, 0.93-1.32). These data provide some reassurance that the long-term risk of nonvertebral fracture is not substantially increased for postmenopausal women who experienced premenopausal bilateral oophorectomy, compared with postmenopausal women with intact ovaries, even in the absence of postmenopausal estrogen therapy.

  3. Prolonged Operative Duration Increases Risk of Surgical Site Infections: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hang; Chen, Brian Po-Han; Soleas, Ireena M; Ferko, Nicole C; Cameron, Chris G; Hinoul, Piet

    The incidence of surgical site infection (SSI) across surgical procedures, specialties, and conditions is reported to vary from 0.1% to 50%. Operative duration is often cited as an independent and potentially modifiable risk factor for SSI. The objective of this systematic review was to provide an in-depth understanding of the relation between operating time and SSI. This review included 81 prospective and retrospective studies. Along with study design, likelihood of SSI, mean operative times, time thresholds, effect measures, confidence intervals, and p values were extracted. Three meta-analyses were conducted, whereby odds ratios were pooled by hourly operative time thresholds, increments of increasing operative time, and surgical specialty. Pooled analyses demonstrated that the association between extended operative time and SSI typically remained statistically significant, with close to twice the likelihood of SSI observed across various time thresholds. The likelihood of SSI increased with increasing time increments; for example, a 13%, 17%, and 37% increased likelihood for every 15 min, 30 min, and 60 min of surgery, respectively. On average, across various procedures, the mean operative time was approximately 30 min longer in patients with SSIs compared with those patients without. Prolonged operative time can increase the risk of SSI. Given the importance of SSIs on patient outcomes and health care economics, hospitals should focus efforts to reduce operative time.

  4. Evaluation of cardiovascular disease risk in women with surgically induced menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Nagihan; Engin-Üstün, Yaprak; Kiyak Çağlayan, Emel; Göçmen, Ayşe Yeşim; Polat, Muhammet Fevzi

    2016-06-01

    This study evaluates cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk among women undergoing natural menopause or surgically induced menopause through the measurement of serum growth differentiation factor-15 (GDF-15), B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), ischemia modified albumin (IMA), total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol (LDL-C), HDL cholesterol (HDL-C), triglyceride, fibrinogen, and C-reactive protein (CRP). The study included women with surgically induced menopause (n = 50) and women undergoing natural menopause (n = 50). The two study groups were matched according to age, body mass index, menopause duration. GDF-15, BNP, IMA, total cholesterol, LDL-C, HDL-C, triglyceride, fibrinogen, and CRP were measured. There was no significant difference in GDF-15, BNP, IMA, total cholesterol, LDL-C, HDL-C, triglyceride, fibrinogen, and CRP results between the two groups. We conclude that there is no increase in CVD risk among women aged 40-50 with surgically induced menopause relative to matched control subjects undergoing normal age-related menopause.

  5. Modified Risdon approach using periangular incision in surgical treatment of subcondylar mandibular fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Živorad S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. No consensus has been reached yet on the surgical approach for treatment of condylar fractures. Objective. The aim of this study was to present modified Risdon approach (without facial nerve identification in the treatment of subcondylar mandibular fractures. Method. This is a retrospective study of a period 2005-2012. During this seven-year period, 25 condylar mandibular fractures in 22 men and three women (19-68 years old were treated by modified Risdon approach without identifying the facial nerve. The main inclusion criterion was subcondylar fracture according to Lindahl classification. Results. No additional morbidity related to postoperative complications, such as infection or salivary fistula, was observed in this series. Only two (8% patients developed temporary weakness of the marginal branch of the facial nerve, which resolved six weeks postoperatively. Each patient achieved good mouth opening postoperatively. Scar was camouflaged in the first cervical wrinkle. Two patients developed temporomandibular joint dysfunction. No patient had postoperative occlusal disturbance. In all of the patients good aesthetic result was achieved in a two-year follow-up. Conclusion. In comparison with techniques described in the literature, the main advantages of the modified Risdon approach are the following: no need for facial vessels identification; direct, fast, and safe approach to mandibular angle and subcondylar region; relatively simple surgical technique and good cosmetic result - due to aesthetically placed incision. This approach could be recommended for subcondylar fracture as a simplified and safe procedure. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175075

  6. Individualized Risk of Surgical Complications: An Application of the Breast Reconstruction Risk Assessment Score

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlodinow, Alexei S.; Khavanin, Nima; Hume, Keith M.; Simmons, Christopher J.; Weiss, Michael J.; Murphy, Robert X.; Gutowski, Karol A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Risk discussion is a central tenet of the dialogue between surgeon and patient. Risk calculators have recently offered a new way to integrate evidence-based practice into the discussion of individualized patient risk and expectation management. Focusing on the comprehensive Tracking Operations and Outcomes for Plastic Surgeons (TOPS) database, we endeavored to add plastic surgical outcomes to the previously developed Breast Reconstruction Risk Assessment (BRA) score. Methods: The TOPS database from 2008 to 2011 was queried for patients undergoing breast reconstruction. Regression models were constructed for the following complications: seroma, dehiscence, surgical site infection (SSI), explantation, flap failure, reoperation, and overall complications. Results: Of 11,992 cases, 4439 met inclusion criteria. Overall complication rate was 15.9%, with rates of 3.4% for seroma, 4.0% for SSI, 6.1% for dehiscence, 3.7% for explantation, 7.0% for flap loss, and 6.4% for reoperation. Individualized risk models were developed with acceptable goodness of fit, accuracy, and internal validity. Distribution of overall complication risk was broad and asymmetric, meaning that the average risk was often a poor estimate of the risk for any given patient. These models were added to the previously developed open-access version of the risk calculator, available at http://www.BRAscore.org. Conclusions: Population-based measures of risk may not accurately reflect risk for many individual patients. In this era of increasing emphasis on evidence-based medicine, we have developed a breast reconstruction risk assessment calculator from the robust TOPS database. The BRA Score tool can aid in individualizing—and quantifying—risk to better inform surgical decision making and better manage patient expectations. PMID:26090295

  7. Employees' Modifiable Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease: The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal for Physical Activity and Health Sciences ... Blood pressure readings were taken and hypertension for the study was defined as ≥140/90 for ... This study confirms the high prevalence of modifiable risk factors for cardiovascular ...

  8. Modified surgical techniques for total alloplastic temporomandibular joint replacement: One institution's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ShanYong, Zhang; Liu, Huan; Yang, Chi; Zhang, XiaoHu; Abdelrehem, Ahmed; Zheng, JiSi; Jiao, ZiXian; Chen, MinJie; Qiu, YaTing

    2015-07-01

    To present three modified techniques of total alloplastic temporomandibular joint replacement (TMJ TJR) and to evaluate the outcomes regarding prosthesis stability and heterotopic bone formation. A total of 15 patients (19 joints), treated with the Biomet stock prosthesis from May 2006 to May 2013, were retrospectively analyzed. Surgical procedures were performed with the following three modifications: bone grafting of the glenoid fossa; salvage of TMJ discs; and harvesting of retro-mandibular subcutaneous fats. The glenoid fossa depth was measured preoperatively by Surgicase 5.0 software. All patients were evaluated by radiographic examination and surgical observation. The fossa was grafted with an autogenous bone in 15 joints (78.9%). In 4 joints (21.1%), only bone repair was performed. Radiographic evaluation revealed a good integration between the autogenous and host bones. All patients showed postoperative occlusal stability. In 5 joints (26.3%), the discs were salvaged. Both bleeding and operation time were reduced. Fat grafts were harvested in 17 joints (89.5%), in which there were no abnormalities in the periprosthetic bone structure. In 2 joints (10.5%), with no fat grafting, heterotopic bone formation was found. The modified techniques of TJR help to improve prostheses stability, reducing heterotopic bone formation and avoiding additional scars. Copyright © 2015 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A modified surgical technique in the management of eyelid burns: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Shudong

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Contractures, ectropion and scarring, the most common sequelae of skin grafts after eyelid burn injuries, can result in corneal exposure, corneal ulceration and even blindness. Split-thickness or full-thickness skin grafts are commonly used for the treatment of acute eyelid burns. Plasma exudation and infection are common early complications of eyelid burns, which decrease the success rate of grafts. Case presentation We present the cases of eight patients, two Chinese women and six Chinese men. The first Chinese woman was 36 years old, with 70% body surface area second or third degree flame burn injuries involving her eyelids on both sides. The other Chinese woman was 28 years old, with sulfuric acid burns on her face and third degree burn on her eyelids. The six Chinese men were aged 21, 31, 38, 42, 44, and 55 years, respectively. The 38-year-old patient was transferred from the ER with 80% body surface area second or third degree flame burn injuries and third degree burn injuries to his eyelids. The other five men were all patients with flame burn injuries, with 7% to 10% body surface area third degree burns and eyelids involved. All patients were treated with a modified surgical procedure consisting of separation and loosening of the musculus orbicularis oculi between tarsal plate and septum orbital, followed by grafting a large full-thickness skin graft in three days after burn injury. The use of our modified surgical procedure resulted in 100% successful eyelid grafting on first attempt, and all our patients were in good condition at six-month follow-up. Conclusions This new surgical technique is highly successful in treating eyelid burn injuries, especially flame burn injuries of the eyelid.

  10. Interobserver agreement of gleason score and modified gleason score in needle biopsy and in surgical specimen of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio G. Veloso

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Gleason score, which has a high interobserver variability, is used to classify prostate cancer. The most recent consensus valued the tertiary Gleason pattern and recommended its use in the final score of needle biopsies (modified Gleason score. This pattern is considered to be of high prognostic value in surgical specimens. This study emphasized the evaluation of the modified score agreement in needle biopsies and in surgical specimen, as well as the interobserver variability of this score MATERIALS AND METHODS: Three pathologists evaluated the slides of needle biopsies and surgical specimens of 110 patients, reporting primary, secondary and tertiary Gleason patterns and after that, traditional and modified Gleason scores were calculated. Kappa test (K assessed the interobserver agreement and the agreement between the traditional and modified scores of the biopsy and of the surgical specimen RESULTS: Interobserver agreement in the biopsy was K = 0.36 and K = 0.35, and in the surgical specimen it was K = 0.46 and K = 0.36, for the traditional and modified scores, respectively. The tertiary Gleason grade was found in 8%, 0% and 2% of the biopsies and in 8%, 0% and 13% of the surgical specimens, according to observers 1, 2 and 3, respectively. When evaluating the agreement of the traditional and modified Gleason scores in needle biopsy with both scores of the surgical specimen, a similar agreement was found through Kappa CONCLUSION: Contrary to what was expected, the modified Gleason score was not superior in the agreement between the biopsy score and the specimen, or in interobserver reproducibility, in this study.

  11. Risk-reduction surgery in pediatric surgical oncology: A perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, John A; Fernandez-Pineda, Israel; Malkan, Alpin D

    2016-04-01

    A small percentage of pediatric solid cancers arise as a result of clearly identified inherited predisposition syndromes and nongenetic lesions. Evidence supports preemptive surgery for children with genetic [multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN2), familial adenomatous polyposis syndrome (FAP), hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), and hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) and nongenetic [thyroglossal duct cysts (TGDC), congenital pulmonary airway malformations (CPAM), alimentary tract duplication cysts (ATDC), and congenital choledochal cysts (CCC)] developmental anomalies. Our aim was to explore the utility of risk reduction surgery to treat and prevent cancer in children. A systematic review of the available peer-reviewed literature on PubMed was performed using a PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) search strategy, where possible. Search items included "risk reduction surgery", "hereditary cancer predisposition syndrome", "multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2", "familial adenomatous polyposis", "hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer", "hereditary diffuse gastric cancer", "thyroglossal duct cysts", congenital pulmonary airway malformations", "alimentary tract duplication cysts", "malignant transformation", and "guidelines". We identified 67 articles that met the inclusion criteria describing the indications for prophylactic surgery in surgical oncology. For the genetic predisposition syndromes, 7 studies were related to professional endorsed guidelines, 7 were related to surgery for MEN2, 11 were related to colectomy for FAP, 6 were related to colectomy for HNPCC, and 12 related to gastrectomy for HDGC. Articles for the nongenetic lesions included 5 for techniques related to TGDC resection, 9 for surgery for CPAMs, and 10 for resection of ATDCs. Guidelines and strategies varied significantly especially related to the extent and timing of surgical intervention; the exception was for the timing of

  12. Surgical treatment of thoracic disc herniations using a modified transfacet approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xizhong Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ideal surgical treatment for thoracic disc herniation (TDH is controversial due to variations in patient presentation, pathology, and possible surgical approach. Althougth discectomy may lead to improvements in neurologic function, it can be complicated by approach related morbidity. Various posterior surgical approaches have been developed to treate TDH, but the gold standard remains transthoracic decompression. Certain patients have comorbidities and herniation that are not optimally treated with an anterior approach. A transfacet pedicle approach was first described in 1995, but outcomes and complications have not been well described. The aim of this work was to evaluate the clinical effect and complications in a consecutive series of patients with symptomatic thoracic disc herniations undergoing thoracic discectomy using a modified transfacet approach. Materials and Methods: 33 patients with thoracic disc herniation were included in this study. Duration of the disease was from 12 days to 36 months, with less than 1 month in 13 patients. Of these, 15 patients were diagnosed with simple thoracic disc herniation, 6 were associated with ossified posterior longitudinal ligament, and 12 with ossified or hypertrophied yellow ligament. A total of 45 discs were involved. All the herniated discs and the ossified posterior longitudinal ligaments were excised using a modified transfacet approach. Laminectomy and replantation were performed for patients with ossified or hypertrophied yellow ligament. The screw-rod system was used on both sides in 14 patients and on one side in l9 patients. Results: 29 patients were followed up for an average of 37 months (range 12-63 months and 4 patients were lost to followup. Evaluation was based on Epstein and Schwall criteria.5 15 were classified as excellent and 10 as good, accounting for 86.21% (25/29; 2 patients were classified as improved and 2 as poor. All the patients recovered neurologically after

  13. Risk factors associated with oroantral perforation during surgical removal of maxillary third molar teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Takumi; Tachibana, Akira; Takeda, Daisuke; Iwata, Eiji; Arimoto, Satomi; Sakakibara, Akiko; Akashi, Masaya; Komori, Takahide

    2016-12-01

    The relationship between radiographic findings and the occurrence of oroantral perforation is controversial. Few studies have quantitatively analyzed the risk factors contributing to oroantral perforation, and no study has reported multivariate analysis of the relationship(s) between these various factors. This retrospective study aims to fill this void. Various risk factors for oroantral perforation during maxillary third molar extraction were investigated by univariate and multivariate analysis. The proximity of the roots to the maxillary sinus floor (root-sinus [RS] classification) was assessed using panoramic radiography and classified as types 1-5. The relationship between the maxillary second and third molars was classified according to a modified version of the Archer classification. The relative depth of the maxillary third molar in the bone was classified as class A-C, and its angulation relative to the long axis of the second molar was also recorded. Performance of an incision (OR 5.16), mesioangular tooth angulation (OR 6.05), and type 3 RS classification (i.e., significant superimposition of the roots of all posterior maxillary teeth with the sinus floor; OR 10.18) were all identified as risk factors with significant association to an outcome of oroantral perforation. To our knowledge, this is the first multivariate analysis of the risk factors for oroantral perforation during surgical extraction of the maxillary third molar. This RS classification may offer a new predictive parameter for estimating the risk of oroantral perforation.

  14. Impact of preoperative nutritional support on clinical outcome in abdominal surgical patients at nutritional risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jie, Bin; Jiang, Zhu-Ming; Nolan, Marie T

    2012-01-01

    This multicenter, prospective cohort study evaluated the effect of preoperative nutritional support in abdominal surgical patients at nutritional risk as defined by the Nutritional Risk Screening Tool 2002 (NRS-2002)....

  15. The Midterm Surgical Outcome of Modified Expansive Open-Door Laminoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuang-Ting Yeh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Laminoplasty is a standard technique for treating patients with multilevel cervical spondylotic myelopathy. Modified expansive open-door laminoplasty (MEOLP preserves the unilateral paraspinal musculature and nuchal ligament and prevents facet joint violation. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the midterm surgical outcomes of this less invasive technique. We retrospectively recruited 65 consecutive patients who underwent MEOLP at our institution in 2011 with at least 4 years of follow-up. Clinical conditions were evaluated by examining neck disability index, Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA, Nurick scale, and axial neck pain visual analog scale scores. Sagittal alignment of the cervical spine was assessed using serial lateral static and dynamic radiographs. Clinical and radiographic outcomes revealed significant recovery at the first postoperative year and still exhibited gradual improvement 1–4 years after surgery. The mean JOA recovery rate was 82.3% and 85% range of motion was observed at the final follow-up. None of the patients experienced aggravated or severe neck pain 1 year after surgery or showed complications of temporary C5 nerve palsy and lamina reclosure by the final follow-up. As a less invasive method for reducing surgical dissection by using various modifications, MEOLP yielded satisfactory midterm outcomes.

  16. The modified Pirogoff's amputation in treating diabetic foot infections: surgical technique and case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz Nather

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: This paper describes the surgical technique of a modified Pirogoff's amputation performed by the senior author and reports the results of this operation in a single surgeon case series for patients with diabetic foot infections. Methods: Six patients with diabetic foot infections were operated on by the National University Hospital (NUH diabetic foot team in Singapore between November 2011 and January 2012. All patients underwent a modified Pirogoff's amputation for diabetic foot infections. Inclusion criteria included the presence of a palpable posterior tibial pulse, ankle brachial index (ABI of more than 0.7, and distal infections not extending proximally beyond the midfoot level. Clinical parameters such as presence of pulses and ABI were recorded. Preoperative blood tests performed included a glycated hemoglobin level, hemoglobin, total white blood cell count, C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, albumin, and creatinine levels. All patients were subjected to 14 sessions of hyperbaric oxygen therapy postoperatively and were followed up for a minimum of 10 months. Results: All six patients had good wound healing. Tibio-calcaneal arthrodesis of the stump was achieved in all cases by 6 months postoperatively. All patients were able to walk with the prosthesis. Conclusions: The modified Pirogoff's amputation has been found to show good results in carefully selected patients with diabetic foot infections. The selection criteria included a palpable posterior tibial pulse, distal infections not extending proximally beyond the midfoot level, ABI of more than 0.7, hemoglobin level of more than 10 g/dL, and serum albumin level of more than 30 g/L.

  17. Ecological Risk Assessment of Genetically Modified Higher Plants (GMHP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, C.; Damgaard, C.; Kjellsson, G.

    of the project Biotechnology: elements in environmental risk assessment of genetically modified plants. December 1999 Christian Kjær Introduction In ecological risk assessment of transgenic plants, information on a wide range of subjects is needed for an effective and reliable assessment procedure...... the actual risk assessment procedures and the risk evaluation, which must proceed the data collection. The report use the terminology ecological risk assessment rather than environmental risk assessment because at present this work does not include bio-geochemical effects and environmental impacts from...... for uncertainties in the extrapolation from limited laboratory studies to the species rich field environment. The relationship between the size of the safety factor and the number of species is therefore an issue of the risk assessment. Some of the issues raised in this report overlap with data needs...

  18. Infirmity and injury complexity are risk factors for surgical-site infection after operative fracture care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachoura, Abdo; Guitton, Thierry G; Smith, R Malcolm; Vrahas, Mark S; Zurakowski, David; Ring, David

    2011-09-01

    Orthopaedic surgical-site infections prolong hospital stays, double rehospitalization rates, and increase healthcare costs. Additionally, patients with orthopaedic surgical-site infections (SSI) have substantially greater physical limitations and reductions in their health-related quality of life. However, the risk factors for SSI after operative fracture care are unclear. We determined the incidence and quantified modifiable and nonmodifiable risk factors for SSIs in patients with orthopaedic trauma undergoing surgery. We retrospectively indentified, from our prospective trauma database and billing records, 1611 patients who underwent 1783 trauma-related procedures between 2006 and 2008. Medical records were reviewed and demographics, surgery-specific data, and whether the patients had an SSI were recorded. We determined which if any variables predicted SSI. Six factors independently predicted SSI: (1) the use of a drain, OR 2.3, 95% CI (1.3-3.8); (2) number of operations OR 3.4, 95% CI (2.0-6.0); (3) diabetes, OR 2.1, 95% CI (1.2-3.8); (4) congestive heart failure (CHF), OR 2.8, 95% CI (1.3-6.5); (5) site of injury tibial shaft/plateau, OR 2.3, 95% CI (1.3-4.2); and (6) site of injury, elbow, OR 2.2, 95% CI (1.1-4.7). The risk factors for SSIs after skeletal trauma are most strongly determined by nonmodifiable factors: patient infirmity (diabetes and heart failure) and injury complexity (site of injury, number of operations, use of a drain). Level II, prognostic study. See the Guideline for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  19. Early modifiable risk factors for childhood and adolescent mental health

    OpenAIRE

    Leung, Cherry

    2015-01-01

    Childhood and adolescent mental health is a major public health concern. Childhood behavioral problems and low self-esteem can predispose children to future depression. Mental health issues often emerge in adolescence making examination of potential early modifiable risk factors for these three mental health indicators crucial. Potential risk factors for mental health issues often reflect findings from Western settings where confounding by low socioeconomic position may occur, making it diffi...

  20. Modifiable risk factors for nursing home-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quagliarello, Vincent; Ginter, Sandra; Han, Ling; Van Ness, Peter; Allore, Heather; Tinetti, Mary

    2005-01-01

    This study sought to identify modifiable risk factors for pneumonia in elderly nursing home residents. A cohort of 613 elderly residents (age, >65 years) of 5 nursing homes in the New Haven, Connecticut, area was followed-up prospectively from February 2001 through March 2003. The primary outcome was radiographically documented pneumonia within a 12-month surveillance period. Baseline modifiable risk factors were evaluated for their independent association with pneumonia. Of 613 elderly nursing home residents, 131 (21%) died, and an additional 112 (18%) developed a radiographically documented case of pneumonia during the 12-month surveillance period. Among the 9 candidate modifiable risk factors that were evaluated individually in Cox proportional hazards models adjusting for covariates (i.e., nursing home facility, age, race, coexisting conditions, and immobility), inadequate oral care (hazard ratio [HR], 1.60; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.06-2.35; P=.024) and swallowing difficulty (HR, 1.65; 95% CI, 1.04-2.62; P=.033) were associated with pneumonia. When modifiable risk factors were evaluated simultaneously in the same Cox proportional hazards model, inadequate oral care (HR, 1.55; 95% CI, 1.04-2.30; P=.030) and swallowing difficulty (HR, 1.61; 95% CI, 1.02-2.55; P=.043) remained independently associated with pneumonia, adjusting for the same covariates. Calculation of population-based attributable fractions showed that 21% of all cases of pneumonia in our cohort could have been avoided if inadequate oral care and swallowing difficulty were not present. Two biologically plausible and modifiable risk factors increased the risk of pneumonia in elderly nursing home residents. These results provide a framework for the development and testing of a targeted pneumonia prevention strategy.

  1. Role of wound instillation with bupivacaine through surgical drains for postoperative analgesia in modified radical mastectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmala Jonnavithula

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Modified Radical Mastectomy (MRM is the commonly used surgical procedure for operable breast cancer, which involves extensive tissue dissection. Therefore, wound instillation with local anaesthetic may provide better postoperative analgesia than infiltration along the line of incision. We hypothesised that instillation of bupivacaine through chest and axillary drains into the wound may provide postoperative analgesia. Methods: In this prospective randomised controlled study 60 patients aged 45-60 years were divided into three groups. All patients were administered general anaesthesia. At the end of the surgical procedure, axillary and chest wall drains were placed before closure. Group C was the control with no instillation; Group S received 40 ml normal saline, 20 ml through each drain; and Group B received 40 ml of 0.25% bupivacaine and the drains were clamped for 10 min. After extubation, pain score for both static and dynamic pain was evaluated using visual analog scale and then 4 th hourly till 24 h. Rescue analgesia was injection tramadol, if the pain score exceeds 4. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS version 13. Results : There was a significant difference in the cumulative analgesic requirement and the number of analgesic demands between the groups (P: 0.000. The mean duration of analgesia in the bupivacaine group was 14.6 h, 10.3 in the saline group and 4.3 h in the control group. Conclusion : Wound instillation with local anaesthetics is a simple and effective means of providing good analgesia without any major side-effects.

  2. Pre-Diabetes Non-Modifiable Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Pre-diabetes Non-modifiable Risk Factors Updated:Nov 9,2015 ... This content was last reviewed August 2015. Pre-diabetes • Introduction • About Pre-diabetes • What's the Problem? Intro ...

  3. Modifiable Lifestyle Risk Factors and Incident Diabetes in African Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Joshua J; Echouffo-Tcheugui, Justin B; Talegawkar, Sameera A; Effoe, Valery S; Okhomina, Victoria; Carnethon, Mercedes R; Hsueh, Willa A; Golden, Sherita H

    2017-08-14

    The associations of modifiable lifestyle risk factors with incident diabetes are not well investigated in African Americans (AAs). This study investigated the association of modifiable lifestyle risk factors (exercise, diet, smoking, TV watching, and sleep-disordered breathing burden) with incident diabetes among AAs. Modifiable lifestyle risk factors were characterized among 3,252 AAs in the Jackson Heart Study who were free of diabetes at baseline (2000-2004) using baseline questionnaires and combined into risk factor categories: poor (0-3 points), average (4-7 points), and optimal (8-11 points). Incidence rate ratios (IRR) for diabetes (fasting glucose ≥126 mg/dL, physician diagnosis, use of diabetes drugs, or glycosylated hemoglobin A1c ≥6.5%) were estimated using Poisson regression modeling adjusting for age, sex, education, occupation, systolic blood pressure, and BMI. Outcomes were collected 2005-2012 and data analyzed in 2016. Over 7.6 years, there were 560 incident diabetes cases (mean age=53.3 years, 64% female). An average or optimal compared to poor risk factor categorization was associated with a 21% (IRR=0.79, 95% CI=0.62, 0.99) and 31% (IRR=0.69, 95% CI=0.48, 1.01) lower risk of diabetes. Among participants with BMI <30, IRRs for average or optimal compared to poor categorization were 0.60 (95% CI=0.40, 0.91) and 0.53 (95% CI=0.29, 0.97) versus 0.90 (95% CI=0.67, 1.21) and 0.83 (95% CI=0.51, 1.34) among participants with BMI ≥30. A combination of modifiable lifestyle factors are associated with a lower risk of diabetes among AAs, particularly among those without obesity. Copyright © 2017 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Risk Factors for Surgical-Site Infection Following Common Femoral Artery Endarterectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derksen, Wouter J. M.; Verhoeven, Bart A. N.; van de Mortel, Rob H. W.; Moll, Frans L.; de Vries, Jean-Paul P. M.

    2009-01-01

    Surgical-site infection is a major complication following endarterectomy of the common femoral artery. The aim of this single-center study was to determine risk factors for surgical-site infection after endarterectomy of the common femoral artery and especially the possible association between patch

  5. Factors that modify risks of radiation-induced cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1988-11-01

    The collective influence of biologic and physical factors that modify risks of radiation-induced cancer introduces uncertainties sufficient to deny precision of estimates of human cancer risk that can be calculated for low-dose radiation in exposed populations. The important biologic characteristics include the tissue sites and cell types, baseline cancer incidence, minimum latent period, time-to-tumor recognition, and the influence of individual host (age and sex) and competing etiologic influences. Physical factors include radiation dose, dose rate, and radiation quality. Statistical factors include time-response projection models, risk coefficients, and dose-response relationships. Other modifying factors include other carcinogens, and other biological sources (hormonal status, immune status, hereditary factors).

  6. Factors that modify risks of radiation-induced cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1988-11-01

    The collective influence of biologic and physical factors that modify risks of radiation-induced cancer introduces uncertainties sufficient to deny precision of estimates of human cancer risk that can be calculated for low-dose radiation in exposed populations. The important biologic characteristics include the tissue sites and cell types, baseline cancer incidence, minimum latent period, time-to-tumor recognition, and the influence of individual host (age and sex) and competing etiologic influences. Physical factors include radiation dose, dose rate, and radiation quality. Statistical factors include time-response projection models, risk coefficients, and dose-response relationships. Other modifying factors include other carcinogens, and other biological sources (hormonal status, immune status, hereditary factors).

  7. Guidance on the environmental risk assessment of genetically modified plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartsch, Detlef; Chueca, Cristina; De-Schrijver, Adinda

    . This document describes the six steps for the ERA of GM plants, as indicated in Directive 2001/18/EC, starting with (1) problem formulation including hazard identification; (2) hazard characterisation; (3) exposure characterisation; (4) risk characterisation; (5) risk management strategies; and (6) an overall...... assessment; (5) impact of the specific cultivation, management and harvesting techniques; including consideration of the production systems and the receiving environment(s); (6) effects on biogeochemical processes; and (7) effects on human and animal health. Each specific area of concern is considered......This document provides guidance for the environmental risk assessment (ERA) of genetically modified (GM) plants submitted within the framework of Regulation (EC) No. 1829/2003 on GM food and feed or under Directive 2001/18/EC on the deliberate release into the environment of genetically modified...

  8. Hostility Modifies the Association between TV Viewing and Cardiometabolic Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Fabio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. It was hypothesized that television viewing is predictive of cardiometabolic risk. Moreover, people with hostile personality type may be more susceptible to TV-induced negative emotions and harmful health habits which increase occurrence of cardiometabolic risk. Purpose. The prospective association of TV viewing on cardiometabolic risk was examined along with whether hostile personality trait was a modifier. Methods. A total of 3,269 Black and White participants in the coronary artery risk development in young adults (CARDIA study were assessed from age 23 to age 35. A cross-lagged panel model at exam years 5, 10, 15, and 20, covering 15 years, was used to test whether hours of daily TV viewing predicted cardiometabolic risk, controlling confounding variables. Multiple group analysis of additional cross-lagged panel models stratified by high and low levels of hostility was used to evaluate whether the association was modified by the hostile personality trait. Results. The cross-lagged association of TV viewing at years 5 and 15 on clustered cardiometabolic risk score at years 10 and 20 was significant (B=0.058 and 0.051, but not at 10 to 15 years. This association was significant for those with high hostility (B=0.068 for exam years 5 to 10 and 0.057 for exam years 15 to 20 but not low hostility. Conclusion. These findings indicate that TV viewing is positively associated with cardiometabolic risk. Further, they indicate that hostility might be a modifier for the association between TV viewing and cardiometabolic risk.

  9. Evaluation of a modified surgical technique to correct urine pooling in cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, T M; Schumacher, J; Hayden, S S; Donnell, R L; Rohrbach, B W

    2007-06-01

    Various surgical techniques to correct urovagina in cows describe creating a mucosal extension from the urethral orifice to the labia; however, a fistula often forms in the mucosal extension. The objective of the present study was to determine if the incidence of fistula formation could be decreased by covering transposed submucosal tissue on the dorsal aspect of the urethral extension with a mucosal graft. Cows in both the control group (19) and the experimental group (19) received a modified McKinnon technique of urethral extension; cows in the experimental group also had a sheet of mucosa, obtained from the dorsal aspect of the vestibule, grafted to submucosa exposed during creation of the urethral extension. During histological examination of the biopsy of the graft and its recipient site (harvested 1 week after surgery), neither inosculation nor revascularization of the graft was evident in any sample. Fourteen of 19 (74%) cows in the control group and 10 of 19 (53%) cows in the experimental group developed a fistula in the extension (P=0.18). We concluded that application of a mucosal graft to the subcutaneous tissue exposed to the vestibule using the McKinnon technique of creating a urethral extension was of little or no benefit in preventing the formation of a fistula in the extension. Furthermore, during evaluation of the extensions, digital palpation alone was often insufficient for detection of a fistula.

  10. Incidence of and risk factors for surgical-site infections in a Peruvian hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Katherine; Ramos, Elizabeth; Seas, Carlos; Henostroza, German; Gotuzzo, Eduardo

    2005-05-01

    To determine the incidence of and risk factors for surgical-site infections (SSIs) after abdominal surgery. A cohort study was conducted from January to June 1998. CDC criteria for SSI and the NNIS System risk index were used. A tertiary-care hospital in Peru. Adult patients undergoing abdominal surgery who consented were enrolled and observed until 30 days after surgery. Patients who had undergone surgery at another hospital or who died or were transferred to another hospital within 24 hours after surgery were excluded. Four hundred sixty-eight patients were enrolled. Their mean age was 37.2 years. One hundred twenty-five patients developed SSIs, 18% of which were identified after discharge. The overall incidence rate (IR) was 26.7%. The IR was 13.9% for clean, 15.9% for clean-contaminated, 13.5% for contaminated, and 47.2% for dirty interventions. The IR was 3.6% for NNIS System risk index 0 and 60% for index 3. Risk factors for SSI on logistic regression analysis were dirty or infected wound (RR, 3.8; CI95, 1.7-8.4), drain use longer than 9 days (RR, 6.0; CI95, 2.5-12.5), and length of surgery greater than the 75th percentile (RR, 2.1; CI95, 1.0-4.4). Patients with SSI had a longer hospital stay than did non-infected patients (14.0 vs 6.1 days; p < .001). SSI is a major problem in this hospital, which has a higher IR (especially for clean interventions) than those of developed countries. In developing countries, prevention of SSI should include active surveillance and interventions targeting modifiable risk factors.

  11. Risk factors for acute surgical site infections after lumbar surgery: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Qi; Song, Quanwei; Guo, Runsheng; Bi, Haidi; Liu, Xuqiang; Yu, Xiaolong; Zhu, Jianghao; Dai, Min; Zhang, Bin

    2017-07-19

    Currently, many scholars are concerned about the treatment of postoperative infection; however, few have completed multivariate analyses to determine factors that contribute to the risk of infection. Therefore, we conducted a multivariate analysis of a retrospectively collected database to analyze the risk factors for acute surgical site infection following lumbar surgery, including fracture fixation, lumbar fusion, and minimally invasive lumbar surgery. We retrospectively reviewed data from patients who underwent lumbar surgery between 2014 and 2016, including lumbar fusion, internal fracture fixation, and minimally invasive surgery in our hospital's spinal surgery unit. Patient demographics, procedures, and wound infection rates were analyzed using descriptive statistics, and risk factors were analyzed using logistic regression analyses. Twenty-six patients (2.81%) experienced acute surgical site infection following lumbar surgery in our study. The patients' mean body mass index, smoking history, operative time, blood loss, draining time, and drainage volume in the acute surgical site infection group were significantly different from those in the non-acute surgical site infection group (p surgical site infection group were significantly different than those in the non-acute surgical site infection group (p surgical site infection following lumbar surgery. In order to reduce the risk of infection following lumbar surgery, patients should be evaluated for the risk factors noted above.

  12. Analysis of risk factors of surgical site infections in breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Yang-xu; XU Ling; YE Jing-ming; WANG Dong-min; ZHAO Jian-xin; ZHANG Lan-bo; DUAN Xue-ning; LIU Yin-hua

    2010-01-01

    Background Adjuvant chemotherapy has become an important component of standard therapy for breast cancer. However, until now, there have been few reports on the surgical site infections (SSI) after breast cancer surgery, specially after adjuvent chemotherapy. To study the risk factors of SSI of breast cancer, we analyzed patients diagnosed with breast cancer and treated with surgery. Methods Fifty-five patients diagnosed with breast cancer and received breast conserving or modified radical operations in our hospital during January 2008 to March 2008 were selected. Factors (patients' age, body mass index (BMI), diabetes mellitus, no or administered adjuvant chemotherapy, with or without onset of myelosuppression and the degree, surgical approaches, duration of operation, postoperative drainage duration and total drainage volume) associated with SSI were retrospectively reviewed and statistically analyzed by single factor analysis. Results Five patients suffered SSI (5/55, 9.1%); nineteen receiving adjuvant chemotherapy experienced Grade III+ myelosuppression, among which 4 had SSI; only 1 out of the remaining 36 patients without adjuvant chemotherapy had SSI. The difference between the two groups was significant (P=0.043). The incidence of SSI in patients with postoperative drainage tube indwelling longer than 10 days was 5/21, whereas no SSI occurred in that less than 10 days (R=0.009). in our study, there was no significient difference in other associated factors. Conclusions Concurrent Grade III+ myelosuppression after adjuvant chemotherapy is an important risk factor of SSI in breast cancer and needs further study. No SSI was detected with indwelling time of post operative drainage less than 10 days.

  13. Environmental risk assessment for medicinal products containing genetically modified organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anliker, B; Longhurst, S; Buchholz, C J

    2010-01-01

    Many gene therapy medicinal products and also some vaccines consist of, or contain, genetically modified organisms (GMOs), which require specific consideration in the environmental risk assessment (ERA) before marketing authorisation or clinical trial applications. The ERA is performed in order to identify the potential risks for public health and the environment, which may arise due to the clinical use of these medicinal products. If such environmental risks are identified and considered as not acceptable, the ERA should go on to propose appropriate risk management strategies capable to reduce these risks. This article will provide an overview of the legal basis and requirements for the ERA of GMO-containing medicinal products in the context of marketing authorisation in the EU and clinical trials in Germany. Furthermore, the scientific principles and methodology that generally need to be followed when preparing an ERA for GMOs are discussed.

  14. A Methodological Systematic Review on Surgical Site Infections Following Spinal Surgery: Part 1: Risk Factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pull ter Gunne, A.F.; Hosman, A.J.F.; Cohen, D.B.; Schuetz, M.; Habil, D.; Laarhoven, C.J. van; Middendorp, J.J. van

    2012-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN.: A methodological systematic review. OBJECTIVE.: To critically appraise the validity of risk factors for surgical site infection (SSI) after spinal surgery. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA.: SSIs lead to higher morbidity, mortality, and increased health care costs. Understanding which

  15. Risk factors for surgical site infection and delayed wound healing after orthopedic surgery in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadota, Yasutaka; Nishida, Keiichiro; Hashizume, Kenzo; Nasu, Yoshihisa; Nakahara, Ryuichi; Kanazawa, Tomoko; Ozawa, Masatsugu; Harada, Ryozo; Machida, Takahiro; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence and the risk factors of surgical-site infection (SSI) and delayed wound healing (DWH) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) underwent orthopedic surgery. We reviewed the records of 1036 elective orthopedic procedures undertaken in RA patients. Risk factors for SSI and DWH were assessed by logistic regression analysis using age, body mass index, disease duration, pre-operative laboratory data, surgical procedure, corticosteroid use, co-morbidity, and use of conventional synthetic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (csDMARDs) and biological DMARDs (bDMARDs) as variables. SSI and DWH were identified in 19 cases and 15 cases, respectively. One case of SSI and three cases of DWH were recorded among 196 procedures in patients using bDMARDs. Foot and ankle surgery was associated with an increased risk of SSI (odds ratio (OR), 3.167; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.256-7.986; p = 0.015). Total knee arthroplasty (TKA; OR, 4.044; 95% CI, 1.436-11.389; p = 0.008) and disease duration (OR, 1.004; 95% CI, 1.000-1.007; p = 0.029) were associated with an increased risk of DWH. Our results indicated foot and ankle surgery, and TKA and disease duration as risk factors for SSI and DWH, respectively. bDMARDs was not associated with an increased risk of SSI and DWH.

  16. Primary prevention of dementia: focus on modifiable risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srisuwan, Patsri

    2013-02-01

    Dementia will inevitably increase in the aging world. Moreover there is no cure for dementia. Therefore, primary prevention is very important. There are several factors possibly and/or certainly influencing dementia risk including non-modifiable and modifiable risk factors. There are evidences that the risk of developing dementia may be reduced by modifiable risk factors. LIFESTYLE FACTORS: The strategies are to encourage regular physical and mental exercise in midlife and in late-life. Those include cognitive activity and higher education, mentally demanding occupations or participation in mentally challenging leisure activities, being more socially active, a diet that is low in saturated fat, a diet with lots of fruits and vegetables, smoking cessation, and prevention of head injury, with loss of consciousness. Chronic disease factors: The strategies are to prevent high blood pressure, especially at midlife, diabetes, high serum cholesterol, especially at midlife, and depression or high depressive symptoms. It is important to develop a systematic public-health strategy and research specific to primary prevention of dementia in Thailand with the evidence-based medicine.

  17. Performance assessment of the risk index category for surgical site infection after colorectal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Masanori; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Nomura, Satoshi; Hanawa, Hidetsugu; Chihara, Naoto; Mizutani, Satoshi; Yoshino, Masanori; Uchida, Eiji

    2015-02-01

    The traditional National Healthcare Safety Network (previously National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance) risk index is used to predict the risk of surgical site infection across many operative procedures. However, this index may be too simple to predict risk in the various procedures performed in colorectal surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of the risk index by analyzing the impact of the risk index factors on surgical site infection after abdominal colorectal surgery. Using our surgical site infection surveillance database, we analyzed retrospectively 538 consecutive patients who underwent abdominal colorectal surgery between 2005 and 2010. Correlations between surgical site infection and the following risk index factors were analyzed: length of operation, American Society of Anesthesiologists score, wound classification, and use of laparoscopy. The 75th percentile for length of operation was determined separately for open and laparoscopic surgery in the study model. Univariate analyses showed that surgical site infection was more strongly associated with a >75th percentile length of operation in the study model (odds ratio [OR], 2.07) than in the traditional risk index model (OR, 1.64). Multivariable analysis found that surgical site infection was independently associated with a >75th percentile length of operation in the study model (OR, 2.75; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.66-4.55), American Society of Anesthesiologists score ≥3 (OR, 2.22; 95% CI, 1.10-4.34), wound classification ≥III (OR, 5.29; 95% CI, 2.62-10.69), and open surgery (OR, 2.21; 95% CI, 1.07-5.17). Performance of the risk index category was improved in the study model compared with the traditional model. The risk index category is sufficiently useful for predicting the risk of surgical site infection after abdominal colorectal surgery. However, the 75th percentile length of operation should be set separately for open and laparoscopic surgery.

  18. Assessing absolute changes in breast cancer risk due to modifiable risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quante, Anne S; Herz, Julia; Whittemore, Alice S; Fischer, Christine; Strauch, Konstantin; Terry, Mary Beth

    2015-07-01

    Clinical risk assessment involves absolute risk measures, but information on modifying risk and preventing cancer is often communicated in relative terms. To illustrate the potential impact of risk factor modification in model-based risk assessment, we evaluated the performance of the IBIS Breast Cancer Risk Evaluation Tool, with and without current body mass index (BMI), for predicting future breast cancer occurrence in a prospective cohort of 665 postmenopausal women. Overall, IBIS's accuracy (overall agreement between observed and assigned risks) and discrimination (AUC concordance between assigned risks and outcomes) were similar with and without the BMI information. However, in women with BMI > 25 kg/m(2), adding BMI information improved discrimination (AUC = 63.9 % and 61.4 % with and without BMI, P risk difference for a woman with high (27 kg/m(2)) versus low (21 kg/m(2)) BMI was only 0.3 % for a woman with neither affected first-degree relatives nor BRCA1 mutation, compared to 4.5 % for a mutation carrier with three such relatives. This contrast illustrates the value of using information on modifiable risk factors in risk assessment and in sharing information with patients of their absolute risks with and without modifiable risk factors.

  19. Quantifying Cardiometabolic Risk Using Modifiable Non–Self-Reported Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Miguel; Li, Yi; Pencina, Michael J.; D’Agostino, Ralph B.; Berkman, Lisa F.; Buxton, Orfeu M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Sensitive general cardiometabolic risk assessment tools of modifiable risk factors would be helpful and practical in a range of primary prevention interventions or for preventive health maintenance. Purpose To develop and validate a cumulative general cardiometabolic risk score that focuses on non–self-reported modifiable risk factors such as glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and BMI so as to be sensitive to small changes across a span of major modifiable risk factors, which may not individually cross clinical cut off points for risk categories. Methods We prospectively followed 2,359 cardiovascular disease (CVD)-free subjects from the Framingham offspring cohort over a 14–year follow-up. Baseline (fifth offspring examination cycle) included HbA1c and cholesterol measurements. Gender–specific Cox proportional hazards models were considered to evaluate the effects of non–self-reported modifiable risk factors (blood pressure, total cholesterol, high–density lipoprotein cholesterol, smoking, BMI, and HbA1c) on general CVD risk. We constructed 10–year general cardiometabolic risk score functions and evaluated its predictive performance in 2012–2013. Results HbA1c was significantly related to general CVD risk. The proposed cardiometabolic general CVD risk model showed good predictive performance as determined by cross-validated discrimination (male C-index=0.703, 95% CI=0.668, 0.734; female C-index=0.762, 95% CI=0.726, 0.801) and calibration (lack-of-fit χ2=9.05 [p=0.338] and 12.54 [p=0.128] for men and women, respectively). Conclusions This study presents a risk factor algorithm that provides a convenient and informative way to quantify cardiometabolic risk based on modifiable risk factors that can motivate an individual’s commitment to prevention and intervention. PMID:24951039

  20. Incidence of and risk factors for surgical site infections in women undergoing hysterectomy for endometrial carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuomi, Taru; Pasanen, Annukka; Leminen, Arto; Bützow, Ralf; Loukovaara, Mikko

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of, and risk factors for, surgical site infections in a contemporary cohort of women with endometrial carcinoma. We retrospectively studied 1164 women treated for endometrial carcinoma by hysterectomy at a single institution in 2007-2013. In all, 912 women (78.4%) had minimally invasive hysterectomy. Data on surgical site infections were collected from medical records. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to identify risk factors for incisional and organ/space infections. Ninety-four women (8.1%) were diagnosed with a surgical site infection. Twenty women (1.7%) had an incisional infection and 74 (6.4%) had an organ/space infection. The associations of 17 clinico-pathologic and surgical variables were tested by univariate analyses. Those variables that were identified as potential risk factors in univariate analyses (p infections as dependent variables. Obesity (body mass index ≥ 30 kg/m(2)), diabetes, and long operative time (>80th centile) were independently associated with a higher risk of incisional infection, whereas minimally invasive surgery was associated with a smaller risk. Smoking, conversion to laparotomy, and lymphadenectomy were associated with a higher risk of organ/space infection. Organ/space infections comprised the majority of surgical site infections. Risk factors for incisional and organ/space infections differed. Minimally invasive hysterectomy was associated with a smaller risk of incisional infections but not of organ/space infections. © 2015 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  1. Modifiable risk factors for schizophrenia and autism--shared risk factors impacting on brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlyn, Jess; Duhig, Michael; McGrath, John; Scott, James

    2013-05-01

    Schizophrenia and autism are two poorly understood clinical syndromes that differ in age of onset and clinical profile. However, recent genetic and epidemiological research suggests that these two neurodevelopmental disorders share certain risk factors. The aims of this review are to describe modifiable risk factors that have been identified in both disorders, and, where available, collate salient systematic reviews and meta-analyses that have examined shared risk factors. Based on searches of Medline, Embase and PsycINFO, inspection of review articles and expert opinion, we first compiled a set of candidate modifiable risk factors associated with autism. Where available, we next collated systematic-reviews (with or without meta-analyses) related to modifiable risk factors associated with both autism and schizophrenia. We identified three modifiable risk factors that have been examined in systematic reviews for both autism and schizophrenia. Advanced paternal age was reported as a risk factor for schizophrenia in a single meta-analysis and as a risk factor in two meta-analyses for autism. With respect to pregnancy and birth complications, for autism one meta-analysis identified maternal diabetes and bleeding during pregnancy as risks factors for autism whilst a meta-analysis of eight studies identified obstetric complications as a risk factor for schizophrenia. Migrant status was identified as a risk factor for both autism and schizophrenia. Two separate meta-analyses were identified for each disorder. Despite distinct clinical phenotypes, the evidence suggests that at least some non-genetic risk factors are shared between these two syndromes. In particular, exposure to drugs, nutritional excesses or deficiencies and infectious agents lend themselves to public health interventions. Studies are now needed to quantify any increase in risk of either autism or schizophrenia that is associated with these modifiable environmental factors.

  2. Ecological Risk Assessment of Genetically Modified Higher Plants (GMHP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, C.; Damgaard, C.; Kjellsson, G.

    Preface This publication is a first version of a manual identifying the data needs for ecological risk assessment of genetically modified higher plants (GMHP). It is the intention of the authors to stimulate further discussion of what data are needed in order to conduct a proper ecological risk...... assessment of GM plants when application for placing on the market is made. It is our hope that both the scientific community, the biotechnological industry and the regulatory bodies will participate in the process of improving the present draft, so that it can develop into a useful tool for both...... the industry as well as the national regulatory bodies. Furthermore, we hope that these efforts will improve the transparency of risk assessment and harmonisation of the requirements for data. The report suggests a structured way to identify the data need for risk assessment of GMHPs. It does not discuss...

  3. A modified potential probe for induction charging risk assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fast, Lars; Paasi, Jaakko

    2008-12-01

    Practical assessment of risks for Electrostatic Discharge (ESD) failures of semiconductor devices, due to charges induced on devices in a manufacturing or repair environment of electronics has been difficult, because easily measurable parameters such as the electrostatic field and the potential of a charged surface do not directly quantify the risk. In this paper a new method of assessing the risks with induction charging of a sensitive device is presented by introducing a well-defined dummy device, which is a simple modification of the probe of DC type non-contacting electrostatic voltmeter. By placing the modified potential probe (mimicking large sensitive device) in front of charged surface, risks of ESD failure for a device due to induction charging can be assessed. The electrostatic response of the probe at different distances between charged surface and the probe has been verified by numerical model calculations.

  4. Benefits and risks associated with genetically modified food products

    OpenAIRE

    Marta Kramkowska; Teresa Grzelak; Krystyna Czyżewska; Ewa Mierzejewska; Renata Welc-Faleciak; Andrzej Bohatyrewicz; Aleksandra Lanocha; Rafał Celiński; Agata Bielawska-Drózd; Justyna Joniec; Marcin Kołodziej; Grzegorz Graniak; Mariusz Goniewicz; Leszek Kubiak

    2013-01-01

    Scientists employing methods of genetic engineering have developed a new group of living organisms, termed ‘modified organisms’, which found application in, among others, medicine, the pharmaceutical industry and food distribution. The introduction of transgenic products to the food market resulted in them becoming a controversial topic, with their proponents and contestants. The presented study aims to systematize objective data on the potential benefits and risks resulting from the consumpt...

  5. Modifiable Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors among Indigenous Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam A. Lucero

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To identify modifiable cardio-metabolic and lifestyle risk factors among indigenous populations from Australia (Aboriginal Australians/Torres Strait Islanders, New Zealand (Māori, and the United States (American Indians and Alaska Natives that contribute to cardiovascular disease (CVD. Methods. National health surveys were identified where available. Electronic databases identified sources for filling missing data. The most relevant data were identified, organized, and synthesized. Results. Compared to their non-indigenous counterparts, indigenous populations exhibit lower life expectancies and a greater prevalence of CVD. All indigenous populations have higher rates of obesity and diabetes, hypertension is greater for Māori and Aboriginal Australians, and high cholesterol is greater only among American Indians/Alaska Natives. In turn, all indigenous groups exhibit higher rates of smoking and dangerous alcohol behaviour as well as consuming less fruits and vegetables. Aboriginal Australians and American Indians/Alaska Natives also exhibit greater rates of sedentary behaviour. Conclusion. Indigenous groups from Australia, New Zealand, and the United States have a lower life expectancy then their respective non-indigenous counterparts. A higher prevalence of CVD is a major driving force behind this discrepancy. A cluster of modifiable cardio-metabolic risk factors precede CVD, which, in turn, is linked to modifiable lifestyle risk factors.

  6. Transposition of Great Arteries with Intramural Coronary Artery: Experience with a Modified Surgical Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Mishra

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: Transposition of the great arteries is a common congenital heart disease. Arterial switch is the gold standard operation for this complex heart disease. Arterial switch operation in the presence of intramural coronary artery is surgically the most demanding even for the most experienced hands. We are presenting our experience with a modified technique for intramural coronary arteries in arterial switch operation. Methods: This prospective study involves 450 patients undergoing arterial switch operation at our institute from April 2006 to December 2013 (7.6 years. Eighteen patients underwent arterial switch operation with intramural coronary artery. The coronary patterns and technique used are detailed in the text. Results: The overall mortality found in the subgroup of 18 patients having intramural coronary artery was 16% (n=3. Our first patient had an accidental injury to the left coronary artery and died in the operating room. A seven-day old newborn died from intractable ventricular arrhythmia fifteen hours after surgery. Another patient who had multiple ventricular septal defects with type B arch interruption died from residual apical ventricular septal defect and sepsis on the eleventh postoperative day. The remainder of the patients are doing well, showing a median follow-up duration of 1235.34±815.26 days (range 369 - 2730. Conclusion: Transposition of the great arteries with intramural coronary artery is demanding in a subset of patients undergoing arterial switch operation. We believe our technique of coronary button dissection in the presence of intramural coronary arteries using coronary shunt is simple and can be a good addition to the surgeons' armamentarium.

  7. Transposition of Great Arteries with Intramural Coronary Artery: Experience with a Modified Surgical Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Amit; Jain, Anil; Hinduja, Manish; Wadhawa, Vivek; Patel, Ramesh; Vaidhya, Nikunj; Rodricks, Dayesh; Patel, Hardik

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Transposition of the great arteries is a common congenital heart disease. Arterial switch is the gold standard operation for this complex heart disease. Arterial switch operation in the presence of intramural coronary artery is surgically the most demanding even for the most experienced hands. We are presenting our experience with a modified technique for intramural coronary arteries in arterial switch operation. Methods: This prospective study involves 450 patients undergoing arterial switch operation at our institute from April 2006 to December 2013 (7.6 years). Eighteen patients underwent arterial switch operation with intramural coronary artery. The coronary patterns and technique used are detailed in the text. Results: The overall mortality found in the subgroup of 18 patients having intramural coronary artery was 16% (n=3). Our first patient had an accidental injury to the left coronary artery and died in the operating room. A seven-day old newborn died from intractable ventricular arrhythmia fifteen hours after surgery. Another patient who had multiple ventricular septal defects with type B arch interruption died from residual apical ventricular septal defect and sepsis on the eleventh postoperative day. The remainder of the patients are doing well, showing a median follow-up duration of 1235.34±815.26 days (range 369 - 2730). Conclusion: Transposition of the great arteries with intramural coronary artery is demanding in a subset of patients undergoing arterial switch operation. We believe our technique of coronary button dissection in the presence of intramural coronary arteries using coronary shunt is simple and can be a good addition to the surgeons' armamentarium. PMID:27074270

  8. Management of Limited Interocclusal Distance with the Aid of a Modified Surgical Guide: A Clinical Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh Geramipanah

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In completely edentulous patients, limited interarch distance can compromise conventional prosthetic fabrication. Bone reduction through various surgical procedures has been recommended to restore an acceptable interarch distance. In such circumstances, a surgical guide built on a mounted cast can be used to minimize and control the amount of bone reduction performed. In the present report, an innovative method of fabrication of surgical guide has been described.Keywords: Osteotomy; Stents; Dental Articulators; Denture, Complete

  9. Guidance on the environmental risk assessment of genetically modified animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Genetically Modified Organisms (GMO

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This document provides guidance for the environmental risk assessment (ERA of living genetically modified (GM animals, namely fish, insects and mammals and birds, to be placed on the European Union (EU market in accordance with Regulation (EC No 1829/2003 or Directive 2001/18/EC. It provides guidance for assessing potential effects of GM animals on animal and human health and the environment and the rationales for data requirements for a comprehensive ERA. The ERA should be carried out on a case-by-case basis, following a step-by-step assessment approach. This document describes the six sequential steps for the ERA of GM animals, as indicated in Directive 2001/18/EC: (1 problem formulation including hazard and exposure identification; (2 hazard characterisation; (3 exposure characterisation; (4 risk characterisation; (5 risk management strategies; and (6 an overall risk evaluation. The Scientific Panel on Genetically Modified Organisms of the European Food Safety Authority follows Annex II of Directive 2001/18/EC, considering specific areas of risk to be addressed by applicants and risk assessors during the ERA of GM fish, GM insects and GM mammals and birds. Each specific area of risk is considered in a structured and systematic way following the aforementioned six steps. In addition, this Guidance Document describes several generic cross-cutting considerations (e.g. choice of comparators, use of non-GM surrogates, experimental design and statistics, long-term effects, uncertainty analysis that need to be accounted for throughout the whole ERA.

  10. Modifiable risk factors for increased arterial stiffness in outpatient nephrology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usama Elewa

    Full Text Available Arterial stiffness, as measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV, is an independent predictor of cardiovascular events and mortality. Arterial stiffness increases with age. However, modifiable risk factors such as smoking, BP and salt intake also impact on PWV. The finding of modifiable risk factors may lead to the identification of treatable factors, and, thus, is of interest to practicing nephrologist. We have now studied the prevalence and correlates of arterial stiffness, assessed by PWV, in 191 patients from nephrology outpatient clinics in order to identify modifiable risk factors for arterial stiffness that may in the future guide therapeutic decision-making. PWV was above normal levels for age in 85/191 (44.5% patients. Multivariate analysis showed that advanced age, systolic BP, diabetes mellitus, serum uric acid and calcium polystyrene sulfonate therapy or calcium-containing medication were independent predictors of PWV. A new parameter, Delta above upper limit of normal PWV (Delta PWV was defined to decrease the weight of age on PWV values. Delta PWV was calculated as (measured PWV - (upper limit of the age-adjusted PWV values for the general population. Mean±SD Delta PWV was 0.76±1.60 m/sec. In multivariate analysis, systolic blood pressure, active smoking and calcium polystyrene sulfonate therapy remained independent predictors of higher delta PWV, while age, urinary potassium and beta blocker therapy were independent predictors of lower delta PWV. In conclusion, arterial stiffness was frequent in nephrology outpatients. Systolic blood pressure, smoking, serum uric acid, calcium-containing medications, potassium metabolism and non-use of beta blockers are modifiable factors associated with increased arterial stiffness in Nephrology outpatients.

  11. Modifiable risk factors for increased arterial stiffness in outpatient nephrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elewa, Usama; Fernandez-Fernandez, Beatriz; Alegre, Raquel; Sanchez-Niño, Maria D; Mahillo-Fernández, Ignacio; Perez-Gomez, Maria Vanessa; El-Fishawy, Hussein; Belal, Dawlat; Ortiz, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Arterial stiffness, as measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV), is an independent predictor of cardiovascular events and mortality. Arterial stiffness increases with age. However, modifiable risk factors such as smoking, BP and salt intake also impact on PWV. The finding of modifiable risk factors may lead to the identification of treatable factors, and, thus, is of interest to practicing nephrologist. We have now studied the prevalence and correlates of arterial stiffness, assessed by PWV, in 191 patients from nephrology outpatient clinics in order to identify modifiable risk factors for arterial stiffness that may in the future guide therapeutic decision-making. PWV was above normal levels for age in 85/191 (44.5%) patients. Multivariate analysis showed that advanced age, systolic BP, diabetes mellitus, serum uric acid and calcium polystyrene sulfonate therapy or calcium-containing medication were independent predictors of PWV. A new parameter, Delta above upper limit of normal PWV (Delta PWV) was defined to decrease the weight of age on PWV values. Delta PWV was calculated as (measured PWV) - (upper limit of the age-adjusted PWV values for the general population). Mean±SD Delta PWV was 0.76±1.60 m/sec. In multivariate analysis, systolic blood pressure, active smoking and calcium polystyrene sulfonate therapy remained independent predictors of higher delta PWV, while age, urinary potassium and beta blocker therapy were independent predictors of lower delta PWV. In conclusion, arterial stiffness was frequent in nephrology outpatients. Systolic blood pressure, smoking, serum uric acid, calcium-containing medications, potassium metabolism and non-use of beta blockers are modifiable factors associated with increased arterial stiffness in Nephrology outpatients.

  12. [Objective assessment of symptoms and informing patients of surgical risks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Tayrac, Renaud; Letouzey, Vincent; Marès, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Genital prolapse is a functional pathology presenting with numerous urinary, genito-sexual, and anorectal symptoms. These symptoms are responsible for an alteration of the quality of life, sometimes associated to a real anxiety-depressive syndrome. Because of these complex intricacies, the management of these disorders became multidisciplinary. Tools to measure the impact of prolapse symptoms on the quality of life became a necessity. Such instruments should allow a correlation of the functional symptomatology at the anatomic stage, raise a surgical indication based on the functional disturbance and evaluate the effectiveness and tolerance of the various therapeutic procedures. Two validated self-questionnaires in French (short versions of the Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory [PFDI-20] and the Pelvic Floor Impact Questionnaire [PFIQ-7]) are presently available. Moreover, the physician has the legal obligation to provide detailed presurgical information on frequent and severe hazards, expected benefits, functional consequences, therapeutic alternatives and the consequences of nonintervention. Before surgery takes place, the surgical approach, the benefit of using synthetic prostheses, the possibility of uterine and/or ovarian conservation, and some risky conditions such as smoking, obesity and estrogen deficiency should be discussed.

  13. Modifiable risk factors of obstetric anal sphincter injury in primiparous women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jango, Hanna; Langhoff-Roos, Jens; Rosthøj, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    To determine modifiable risk factors and incidence of obstetric anal sphincter injury (OASIS) in primiparous women.......To determine modifiable risk factors and incidence of obstetric anal sphincter injury (OASIS) in primiparous women....

  14. An evaluation of surgical outcome of bilateral cleft lip surgery using a modified Millard′s (Fork Flap technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W L Adeyemo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The central third of the face is distorted by the bilateral cleft of the lip and palate and restoring the normal facial form is one of the primary goals for the reconstructive surgeons. The history of bilateral cleft lip repair has evolved from discarding the premaxilla and prolabium and approximating the lateral lip elements to a definitive lip and primary cleft nasal repair utilising the underlying musculature. The aim of this study was to review surgical outcome of bilateral cleft lip surgery (BCLS done at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital. Materials and Methods: A review of all cases of BCLS done between January 2007 and December 2012 at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital was done. Data analysis included age and sex of patients, type of cleft deformity and type of surgery (primary or secondary and whether the cleft deformity was syndromic and non-syndromic. Techniques of repair, surgical outcome and complications were also recorded. Results: A total of 39 cases of BCLS involving 21 males and 18 females were done during the period. This constituted 10% (39/390 of all cases of cleft surgery done during the period. There were 5 syndromic and 34 non-syndromic cases. Age of patients at time of surgery ranged between 3 months and 32 years. There were 24 bilateral cleft lip and palate deformities and 15 bilateral cleft lip deformities. Thirty-one of the cases were primary surgery, while 8 were secondary (revision surgery. The most common surgical technique employed was modified Fork flap (Millard technique, which was employed in 37 (95% cases. Conclusion: Bilateral cleft lip deformity is a common cleft deformity seen in clinical practice, surgical repair of which can be a challenge to an experienced surgeon. A modified Fork flap technique for repair of bilateral cleft lip is a reliable and versatile technique associated with excellent surgical outcome.

  15. Submucosal anoderm-preserving hemorrhoidectomy revisited: a modified technique for the surgical management of hemorrhoidal crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodoropoulos, George E; Michalopoulos, Nikolaos V; Linardoutsos, Dimitrios; Flessas, Ioannis; Tsamis, Dimitrios; Zografos, George

    2013-11-01

    Submucosal hemorrhoidectomy (Parks' procedure) is a recognized method for treating acute hemorrhoidal crisis. Anoderm preservation has been stressed in various techniques described for elective or emergency excisional hemorrhoidal management. Mucopexy techniques have been proven useful as an adjunct to minimally resectional techniques. A modified submucosal technique with anoderm preservation and mucopexy was applied to 45 patients who presented on an emergency basis with hemorrhoidal crisis. External piles were minimally removed, the minimum possible amount of diseased mucosa was excised, a linear incision was used at the anoderm to enter the subanodermal/mucosal plane to achieve the submucosal excision, and a mucopexy was added at the approximation of the mucosal flaps. Postoperative morbidity was minimal and pain after the procedure remained at acceptable levels. This technique allows for an excision limited to the pathology with important anatomic tissue preservation. This results in conservation of the sensitive and useful anoderm, a decreased risk of stenosis, and addresses the mucosal prolapse. The level of postoperative pain with this technique is acceptable and long-term follow-up reveals a high degree of patient satisfaction.

  16. Assessing ecological risks and benefits of genetically modified crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bošković Jelena V.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetically modified (GM crops and biotechnology are providing new opportunities for increasing crop productivity and tackling agriculture problems, such as diseases, pests and weeds, abiotic stress and nutritional limitations of staple food crops. As GM crops are being adopted in various locations with different ecosystems, a scientifically based understanding of the environmental effects of cultivations of GM crops would assist decision makers worldwide in ensuring environmental safety and sustainability. In this paper are discussed some of the most important problems related to the GM crops into the environment such as: plant protection, hybridisation, ecological effects of HRCs, gene flow, biodiversity, stress, ecological risks (ERA, effects on the soil ecosystem etc.

  17. Nutritional risk and status of surgical patients; the relevance of nutrition training of medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, C; Lavinhas, C; Fernandes, L; Camilo, Ma; Ravasco, P

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of undernutrition among surgical patients is thought to be high, and negatively influencing outcomes. However, recent evidence shows the increase of overweight/obesity in hospitalised patients. A pilot cross-sectional study was conducted in 50 patients of a Surgical Department of the University Hospital of Santa Maria (CHLN) that aimed: 1) to assess nutritional risk and status through validated methods; 2) to explore the presence of overweight/obesity; 3) to evaluate the prevalence of metabolic risk associated with obesity. Nutritional risk was assessed by Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST), nutritional status by Body Mass Index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), & Subjective Global Assessment (SGA). Statistical significance was set for p nutrition discipline in the medical curricula, limits the multiprofessional management and a better understanding of the more adequate approaches to these patients. Further, the change in the clinical scenario argues for more studies to clarify the prevalence and consequences of sarcopenic obesity in surgical patients.

  18. Risk factors associated with positive surgical margins following radical prostatectomy for clinically localized prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røder, Martin Andreas; Thomsen, Frederik Birkebæk; Christensen, Ib Jarle

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of preoperative and surgical parameters, including nerve-sparing technique, on the risk of positive surgical margins (PSM) following radical prostatectomy for clinically localized prostate cancer. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A prospective...... consecutive single-institution Danish cohort of 1148 patients undergoing RP between 1995 and 2011 was investigated. To analyse the impact of covariates on risk of PSM, a multivariate logistic regression model was used, including cT category, biopsy Gleason score, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), percentage...... positive biopsies for cancer (PPB), surgeon and surgical technique. RESULTS: The overall rate of PSM was 31.4%. The risk of PSM depended (p value for Wald χ(2)) on PSA (p PSM...

  19. Risk assessment of genetically modified crops for nutrition and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magaña-Gómez, Javier A; de la Barca, Ana M Calderón

    2009-01-01

    The risk assessment of genetically modified (GM) crops for human nutrition and health has not been systematic. Evaluations for each GM crop or trait have been conducted using different feeding periods, animal models, and parameters. The most common result is that GM and conventional sources induce similar nutritional performance and growth in animals. However, adverse microscopic and molecular effects of some GM foods in different organs or tissues have been reported. Diversity among the methods and results of the risk assessments reflects the complexity of the subject. While there are currently no standardized methods to evaluate the safety of GM foods, attempts towards harmonization are on the way. More scientific effort is necessary in order to build confidence in the evaluation and acceptance of GM foods.

  20. Surgical treatment of larynx T1N0M0 cancer - partial laryngectomy modified Majer-Piquet's intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khujadze, M; Vashakidze, N; Kuliashvili, G; Khelashvili, B

    2013-04-01

    The increase of general radiation background in Georgia and some national characteristics such as spicy dishes, high level of alcohol and cigarette consumption, emotional, loud way of speaking result in a high percentage of people suffering from larynx malignant tumor. As generally known, the majority of larynx cancer cases represent surgical indications and only a small percentage submit to radio or chemotherapy. Since the beginning of the previous century, laryngologists have been intensely thinking about maintaining the larynx itself when giving surgical treatment. With this article we aim to introduce you to one of surgical techniques often applied in France. The method is Pr. B. Guerrier's modification of Majer-Piquet's cricohyoidoepiglotopexy, which is very popular in Europe. This consists in reconstructive operation maintaining cricoid cartilage and epiglottis with larynx's pexy when resecting partially. In cases of exact indications the, Majet-Piquet's modified operation provides a perfect: opportunity both to achieve the desirable outcome and maintain the main functions of larynx vocal, swallowing and breathing with a relatively less invasive surgical interference.

  1. Risk factors in patients surgically treated for peptic ulcer perforation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Morten Hylander; Shah, Kamran; Bendix, Jørgen;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The overall mortality for patients undergoing surgery for perforated peptic ulcer has increased despite improvements in perioperative monitoring and treatment. The objective of this study was to identify and describe perioperative risk factors in order to identify ways of optimizing...... the treatment and to improve the outcome of patients with perforated peptic ulcer. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Three hundred and ninety-eight patients undergoing emergency surgery in four university hospitals in Denmark were included in the study. Information regarding the pre-, intra- and postoperative phases were...... insufficiency upon admission and insufficient postoperative nutrition have been added to the list of independent risk factors for death within 30 days of surgery in patients with peptic ulcer perforation. Finding that shock upon admission, reduced albumin blood levels upon admission, renal insufficiency upon...

  2. Health risks associated with exposure to surgical smoke for surgeons and operation room personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoshi, Kae; Kobayashi, Katsutoshi; Kinoshita, Koichi; Tomizawa, Yasuko; Hasegawa, Suguru; Sakai, Yoshiharu

    2015-08-01

    Although surgical smoke contains potentially hazardous substances, such as cellular material, blood fragments, microorganisms, toxic gases and vapors, many operating rooms (ORs) do not provide protection from exposure to it. This article reviews the hazards of surgical smoke and the means of protecting OR personnel. Our objectives are to promote surgeons' acceptance to adopt measures to minimize the hazards. Depending on its components, surgical smoke can increase the risk of acute and chronic pulmonary conditions, cause acute headaches; irritation and soreness of the eyes, nose and throat; dermatitis and colic. Transmission of infectious disease may occur if bacterial or viral fragments present in the smoke are inhaled. The presence of carcinogens in surgical smoke and their mutagenic effects are also of concern. This review summarizes previously published reports and data regarding the toxic components of surgical smoke, the possible adverse effects on the health of operating room personnel and measures that can be used to minimize exposure to prevent respiratory problems. To reduce the hazards, surgical smoke should be removed by an evacuation system. Surgeons should assess the potential dangers of surgical smoke and encourage the use of evacuation devices to minimize potential health hazards to both themselves and other OR personnel.

  3. Preoperative delay of more than 1 hour increases the risk of surgical site infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radcliff, Kris E; Rasouli, Mohammad R; Neusner, Alex; Kepler, Christopher K; Albert, Todd J; Rihn, Jeffrey A; Hilibrand, Alan S; Vaccaro, Alexander R

    2013-07-01

    Retrospective institutional database review. To determine whether preoperative in-room time is a risk factor for surgical site infection (SSI). Prior to spine surgery, while the patient is in the operating room, several procedures may be performed that may delay surgery. During this time, the sterile field may be exposed and may become contaminated. The hypothesis of this study was that the length of time in the operative room prior to surgical incision (anesthesia ready time [ART]) was related to the risk of SSI. From 2005 to 2009, we identified 276 patients who developed SSI out of 7991 cases that underwent spine surgery from 2005 to 2009. Patient demographic factors, American Society of Anesthesiologists score, wound classification, number of levels, anatomic region, type of surgical approach, and length of surgery were extrapolated. ART was calculated as the time after the patient was brought into the operating room prior to surgical incision. Multivariate analysis was performed to identify risk factors for SSI. Mean ART was significantly (P = 0.001) higher in patients with infection (68 min) compared with those without infection (60 min). The infection rate was higher in cases with ART more than 1 hour compared with those with less than 1 hour (4.9% vs. 2.3%, P = 0.001). In multivariate analysis, ART more than 1 hour was an independent risk factor for SSI, along with number of levels, American Society of Anesthesiologists score and posterior approach. The highest percentage of cases with ART more than 1 hour occurred in August and September. Preoperative in-room time prior to the start of surgical incision is an independent risk factor for SSI. All possible steps should be taken prior to entry into the operating theater to reduce in-room time and opening of surgical sterile instrumentation be delayed until the surgery is ready to proceed.

  4. Length of preoperative hospital stay: a risk factor for reducing surgical infection in femoral fracture cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoberdan Oliveira Pereira

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To analyze infections of the surgical site among patients undergoing clean-wound surgery for correction of femoral fractures. METHODS: This was a historical cohort study developed in a large-sized hospital in Belo Horizonte. Data covering the period from July 2007 to July 2009 were gathered from the records in electronic medical files, relating to the characteristics of the patients, surgical procedures and surgical infections. The risk factors for infection were identified by means of statistical tests on bilateral hypotheses, taking the significance level to be 5%. Continuous variables were evaluated using Student'sttest. Categorical variables were evaluated using the chi-square test, or Fisher's exact test, when necessary. For each factor under analysis, a point estimate and the 95% confidence interval for the relative risk were obtained. In the final stage of the study, multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed. RESULTS: 432 patients who underwent clean-wound surgery for correcting femoral fractures were included in this study. The rate of incidence of surgical site infections was 4.9% and the risk factors identified were the presence of stroke (odds ratio, OR = 5.0 and length of preoperative hospital stay greater than four days (OR = 3.3. CONCLUSION: To prevent surgical site infections in operations for treating femoral fractures, measures involving assessment of patients' clinical conditions by a multiprofessional team, reduction of the length of preoperative hospital stay and prevention of complications resulting from infections will be necessary.

  5. Derivation and Validation of the Surgical Site Infections Risk Model Using Health Administrative Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Walraven, Carl; Jackson, Timothy D; Daneman, Nick

    2016-04-01

    OBJECTIVE Surgical site infections (SSIs) are common hospital-acquired infections. Tracking SSIs is important to monitor their incidence, and this process requires primary data collection. In this study, we derived and validated a method using health administrative data to predict the probability that a person who had surgery would develop an SSI within 30 days. METHODS All patients enrolled in the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) from 2 sites were linked to population-based administrative datasets in Ontario, Canada. We derived a multivariate model, stratified by surgical specialty, to determine the independent association of SSI status with patient and hospitalization covariates as well as physician claim codes. This SSI risk model was validated in 2 cohorts. RESULTS The derivation cohort included 5,359 patients with a 30-day SSI incidence of 6.0% (n=118). The SSI risk model predicted the probability that a person had an SSI based on 7 covariates: index hospitalization diagnostic score; physician claims score; emergency visit diagnostic score; operation duration; surgical service; and potential SSI codes. More than 90% of patients had predicted SSI risks lower than 10%. In the derivation group, model discrimination and calibration was excellent (C statistic, 0.912; Hosmer-Lemeshow [H-L] statistic, P=.47). In the 2 validation groups, performance decreased slightly (C statistics, 0.853 and 0.812; H-L statistics, 26.4 [P=.0009] and 8.0 [P=.42]), but low-risk patients were accurately identified. CONCLUSION Health administrative data can effectively identify postoperative patients with a very low risk of surgical site infection within 30 days of their procedure. Records of higher-risk patients can be reviewed to confirm SSI status.

  6. Midregional Proadrenomedullin Improves Risk Stratification beyond Surgical Risk Scores in Patients Undergoing Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Csordas

    Full Text Available Conventional surgical risk scores lack accuracy in risk stratification of patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR. Elevated levels of midregional proadrenomedullin (MR-proADM levels are associated with adverse outcome not only in patients with manifest chronic disease states, but also in the general population.We investigated the predictive value of MR-proADM for mortality in an unselected contemporary TAVR population.We prospectively included 153 patients suffering from severe aortic stenosis who underwent TAVR from September 2013 to August 2014. This population was compared to an external validation cohort of 205 patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing TAVR. The primary endpoint was all cause mortality.During a median follow-up of 258 days, 17 out of 153 patients who underwent TAVR died (11%. Patients with MR-proADM levels above the 75th percentile (≥ 1.3 nmol/l had higher mortality (31% vs. 4%, HR 8.9, 95% CI 3.0-26.0, P 6.8 only showed a trend towards higher mortality (18% vs. 9%, HR 2.1, 95% CI 0.8-5.6, P = 0.13. The Harrell's C-statistic was 0.58 (95% CI 0.45-0.82 for the EuroSCORE II, and consideration of baseline MR-proADM levels significantly improved discrimination (AUC = 0.84, 95% CI 0.71-0.92, P = 0.01. In bivariate analysis adjusted for EuroSCORE II, MR-proADM levels ≥1.3 nmol/l persisted as an independent predictor of mortality (HR 9.9, 95% CI (3.1-31.3, P <0.01 and improved the model's net reclassification index (0.89, 95% CI (0.28-1.59. These results were confirmed in the independent validation cohort.Our study identified MR-proADM as a novel predictor of mortality in patients undergoing TAVR. In the future, MR-proADM should be added to the commonly used EuroSCORE II for better risk stratification of patients suffering from severe aortic stenosis.

  7. The influence of physiological and surgical menopause on coronary heart disease risk markers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, Marieke O.; van der Mooren, Marius J.; Teerlink, Tom; Verheijen, Rene H. M.; Scheffer, Peter G.; Kenemans, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the influence of physiological and surgical menopause oil Serum concentrations of corollary heart disease (CHD) risk markers and sex hormones. Design: Physiological menopausal transition was investigated in two studies. In a longitudinal Study, 16 women were followed from 2

  8. The influence of physiological and surgical menopause on coronary heart disease risk markers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, Marieke O.; van der Mooren, Marius J.; Teerlink, Tom; Verheijen, Rene H. M.; Scheffer, Peter G.; Kenemans, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the influence of physiological and surgical menopause oil Serum concentrations of corollary heart disease (CHD) risk markers and sex hormones. Design: Physiological menopausal transition was investigated in two studies. In a longitudinal Study, 16 women were followed from 2

  9. Malnutrition risk predicts surgical outcomes in patients undergoing gastrointestinal operations: Results of a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Judy W C; Wu, Arthur H W; Lee, Michelle W K; Lau, So-ying; Lam, Pui-shan; Lau, Wai-shan; Kwok, Sam S S; Kwan, Rosa Y H; Lam, Cheuk-fan; Tam, Chun-kit; Lee, Suk-on

    2015-08-01

    Patients undergoing gastrointestinal operations are at risk of malnutrition which may increase the chance of adverse surgical outcomes. This prospective study aimed at correlating nutritional status of patients having gastrointestinal operations with their short-term surgical outcomes captured by a territory-wide Surgical Outcomes Monitoring and Improvement Program. The preoperative malnutrition risk of Chinese adult patients undergoing elective/emergency ultra-major/major gastrointestinal operations in two surgical departments over a 12-month period were assessed by Chinese version of Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool. Their perioperative risk factors and clinical outcomes, including length of hospital stay, mortality and morbidity, were retrieved from the above mentioned program. Correlation of malnutrition risk with clinical outcomes was assessed by logistic regression analysis after controlling for known confounders. 943 patients (58% male; mean age 65.9 ± 14.8 years) underwent gastrointestinal operations (40.3% emergency operation; 52.7% ultra-major procedures; 66.9% bowel resections) had analyzable data. 15.8% and 17.1% of patients were at medium and high risk of malnutrition, respectively. Malnutrition risk score according to the screening tool was an independent predictor of length of hospital stay, 30-day mortality, 60-day mortality and minor medical complications. Similar correlations were found for various sub-scores of malnutrition risk. Weight loss sub-score was predictive of 30-day mortality, 60-day mortality and minor medical complications. Body mass index was predictive of mortality (30- and 60- day) whereas the acute disease sub-score was predictive of length of hospital stay. Preoperative malnutrition was an important predictor of poor clinical outcomes in patients undergoing gastrointestinal operations in Hong Kong. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  10. Immediately modifiable risk factors attributable to colorectal cancer in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naing, Cho; Lai, Pei Kuan; Mak, Joon Wah

    2017-08-04

    This study aimed to estimate potential reductions in case incidence of colorectal cancer attributable to the modifiable risk factors such as alcohol consumption, overweight and physical inactivity amongst the Malaysian population. Gender specific population-attributable fractions (PAFs) for colorectal cancer in Malaysia were estimated for the three selected risk factors (physical inactivity, overweight, and alcohol consumptions). Exposure prevalence were sourced from a large-scale national representative survey. Risk estimates of the relationship between the exposure of interest and colorectal cancer were obtained from published meta-analyses. The overall PAF was then estimated, using the 2013 national cancer incidence data from the Malaysian Cancer Registry. Overall, the mean incidence rate for colorectal cancer in Malaysia from 2008 to 2013 was 21.3 per 100,000 population, with the mean age of 61.6 years (±12.7) and the majority were men (56.6%). Amongst 369 colorectal cancer cases in 2013, 40 cases (20 men, 20 women), 10 cases (9 men, 1 woman) or 20 cases (16 men,4 women) would be prevented, if they had done physical exercises, could reduce their body weight to normal level or avoided alcohol consumption, assuming that these factors are causally related to colorectal cancer. It was estimated that 66 (17.8%;66/369) colorectal cancer cases (42 men, 24 women) who had all these three risk factors for the last 10 years would have been prevented, if they could control these three risk factors through effective preventive measures. Findings suggest that approximately 18% of colorectal cancer cases in Malaysia would be prevented through appropriate preventive measures such as doing regular physical exercises, reducing their body weight to normal level and avoiding alcohol consumption, if these factors are causally related to colorectal cancer. Scaling-up nationwide public health campaigns tailored to increase physical activity, controlling body weight within normal

  11. Surgical risk for patients with Chagasic achalasia and its correlation with the degree of esophageal dilation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    José Garcia Neto; Roberto de Cleva; Bruno Zilberstein; Joaquim José Gama-Rodrigues

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the risk of cardiovascular complications in patients with indication for surgical treatment of Chagasic esophageal achalasia and to correlate the surgical risks with the degree of esophageal dilation,thereby proposing a risk scale index.METHODS: One hundred and twenty-four patients with Chagasic esophageal achalasia, who received surgical treatment at the Hospital das Clinicas of the Federal patients were mostly related to the postoperative complications due to the cardiovascular system. All the patients were submitted to: (1) clinical history to define the cardiac functional class (New York Heart Association);(2) conventional 12-lead electrocardiogram at rest; and (3) contrast imaging of the esophagus to determine esophageal dilatation according to Rezende's classification of Chagasic megaesophagus.RESULTS: An assessment of the functional classification (FC) of heart failure during the preoperative period determined that 67 patients (54.03%) were assigned functional class Ⅰ (FC Ⅰ), 46 patients (37.09%) were assigned functional class Ⅱ (FC Ⅱ), and 11 patients (8.87%) were assigned functional class Ⅲ (FC Ⅲ). None of the patients were assigned to functional class Ⅳ (FC Ⅳ). There was a positive correlation between the functional class and the postoperative complications (FC ⅠxFC Ⅱ: P<0.001; FC ⅠxFC Ⅲ: P<0.001). The ECG was normal in 44 patients (35.48%) and presented abnormalities in 80 patients (64.52%). There was a significant statistical correlation between abnormal ECG (arrhythmias and primary change in ventricular repolarization) and postoperative complications (P<0.001).With regard to the classification of the Chagasic esophageal achalasia, the following distribution was observed: group Ⅱ, 53 patients (42.74%); group Ⅲ, 37 patients (29.83%);and group Ⅳ, 34 patients (27.41%). There was a positive correlation between the degree of esophageal dilation and the increase in postoperative complications (grade

  12. What Risk Assessments of Genetically Modified Organisms Can Learn from Institutional Analyses of Public Health Risks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ravi Rajan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The risks of genetically modified organisms (GMOs are evaluated traditionally by combining hazard identification and exposure estimates to provide decision support for regulatory agencies. We question the utility of the classical risk paradigm and discuss its evolution in GMO risk assessment. First, we consider the problem of uncertainty, by comparing risk assessment for environmental toxins in the public health domain with genetically modified organisms in the environment; we use the specific comparison of an insecticide to a transgenic, insecticidal food crop. Next, we examine normal accident theory (NAT as a heuristic to consider runaway effects of GMOs, such as negative community level consequences of gene flow from transgenic, insecticidal crops. These examples illustrate how risk assessments are made more complex and contentious by both their inherent uncertainty and the inevitability of failure beyond expectation in complex systems. We emphasize the value of conducting decision-support research, embracing uncertainty, increasing transparency, and building interdisciplinary institutions that can address the complex interactions between ecosystems and society. In particular, we argue against black boxing risk analysis, and for a program to educate policy makers about uncertainty and complexity, so that eventually, decision making is not the burden that falls upon scientists but is assumed by the public at large.

  13. What risk assessments of genetically modified organisms can learn from institutional analyses of public health risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, S Ravi; Letourneau, Deborah K

    2012-01-01

    The risks of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are evaluated traditionally by combining hazard identification and exposure estimates to provide decision support for regulatory agencies. We question the utility of the classical risk paradigm and discuss its evolution in GMO risk assessment. First, we consider the problem of uncertainty, by comparing risk assessment for environmental toxins in the public health domain with genetically modified organisms in the environment; we use the specific comparison of an insecticide to a transgenic, insecticidal food crop. Next, we examine normal accident theory (NAT) as a heuristic to consider runaway effects of GMOs, such as negative community level consequences of gene flow from transgenic, insecticidal crops. These examples illustrate how risk assessments are made more complex and contentious by both their inherent uncertainty and the inevitability of failure beyond expectation in complex systems. We emphasize the value of conducting decision-support research, embracing uncertainty, increasing transparency, and building interdisciplinary institutions that can address the complex interactions between ecosystems and society. In particular, we argue against black boxing risk analysis, and for a program to educate policy makers about uncertainty and complexity, so that eventually, decision making is not the burden that falls upon scientists but is assumed by the public at large.

  14. SURGICAL TREATMENT OF PATIENTS WITH PROSTATE CANCER AT HIGH RISK OF PROGRESSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Nyushko

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PC is one of the most burning problems of modern urologic oncology. Patients at its high risk are characterized by a more aggressive course of the disease and significantly lower tumor-specific and relapse-free survival rates. Hormone therapy and radiotherapy are one of the conventional treatments in patients with PC at high risk of progression. Nonetheless, more and more publications demonstrating the efficiency and safety of surgical therapy in this contingent of patients are recently appearing. This paper presents the results of surgical treat-ment in 499 patients with PC at high risk of progression, who have undergone radical prostatectomy with extended pelvic lymphadenectomy at the Department of Urologic Oncology, P.A. Herzen Moscow Oncology Research Institute. 

  15. Pain Intensity and Patients’ Acceptance of Surgical Complication Risks With Lumbar Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bono, Christopher M.; Harris, Mitchel B.; Warholic, Natalie; Katz, Jeffrey N.; Carreras, Edward; White, Andrew; Schmitz, Miguel; Wood, Kirkham B.; Losina, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Cross-sectional study with prospective recruitment Objective To determine the relationship of pain intensity (back and leg) on patients’ acceptance of surgical complication risks when deciding whether or not to undergo lumbar spinal fusion. Background To formulate informed decisions regarding lumbar fusion surgery, preoperative discussions should include a review of the risk of complications balanced with the likelihood of symptom relief. Pain intensity has the potential to influence a patient’s decision to consent to lumbar fusion. We hypothesized that pain intensity is associated with a patient’s acceptance of surgical complication risks. Methods Patients being seen for the first time by a spine surgeon for treatment of a non-traumatic or non-neoplastic spinal disorder completed a structured questionnaire. It posed 24 scenarios, each presenting a combination of risks of 3 complications (nerve damage, wound infection, nonunion) and probabilities of symptom relief. For each scenario, the patient indicated whether he/she would/would not consent to a fusion for low back pain (LBP). The sum of the scenarios in which the patient responded that he or she would elect surgery was calculated to represent acceptance of surgical complication risks. A variety of other data were also recorded, including age, gender, education level, race, history of non-spinal surgery, duration of pain, and history of spinal injections. Data were analyzed using bivariate analyses and multivariate regression analyses. Results The mean number of scenarios accepted by 118 enrolled subjects was 10.2 (median 8, standard deviation 8.5, range 0 to 24, or 42.5% of scenarios). In general, subjects were more likely to accept scenarios with lower risks and higher efficacy. Spearman’s rank correlation estimates demonstrated a moderate association between the LBP intensity and acceptance of surgical complication risks (r=0.37, p=0.0001) while leg pain intensity had a weak but positive

  16. Attributable fractions, modifiable risk factors and risk stratification using a risk score for peri-implant pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araújo Nobre, Miguel; Mano Azul, António; Rocha, Evangelista; Maló, Paulo; Salvado, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to estimate the impact of risk factors for peri-implant pathology, to identify potentially modifiable factors, and to evaluate the accuracy of the risk algorithm, risk scores and risk stratification. This retrospective case-control study with 1275 patients (255 cases; 1020 controls) retrieved a model according to the predictors: history of Periodontitis, bacterial plaque, bleeding, bone level, lack of passive fit or non-optimal screw joint, metal-ceramic restoration, proximity to other implants/teeth, and smoking habits. Outcome measures were the attributable fraction; the positive and negative likelihood ratios at different disease cut-off points illustrated by the area under the curve statistic. Six predictors may be modified or controlled directly by either the patient or the clinician, accounting for a reduction in up to 95% of the peri-implant pathology cases. The positive and negative likelihood ratios were 9.69 and 0.13, respectively; the area under the curve was 0.96; a risk score was developed, making the complex statistical model useful to clinicians. Based on the results, six predictors for the incidence of peri-implant pathology can be modified to significantly improve the outcome. It was possible to stratify patients per risk category according to the risk score, providing a tool for clinicians to support their decision-making process. Copyright © 2016 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Modified Framingham Risk Factor Score for Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urowitz, Murray B; Ibañez, Dominique; Su, Jiandong; Gladman, Dafna D

    2016-05-01

    The traditional Framingham Risk Factor Score (FRS) underestimates the risk for coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We aimed to determine whether an adjustment to the FRS would more accurately reflect the higher prevalence of CAD among patients with SLE. Patients with SLE without a previous history of CAD or diabetes followed regularly at the University of Toronto Lupus Clinic were included. A modified FRS (mFRS) was calculated by multiplying the items by 1.5, 2, 3, or 4. In the first part of the study, using one-third of all eligible patients, we evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of the FRS and the different multipliers for the mFRS. In the second part of the study, using the remaining 2/3 of the eligible patients, we compared the predictive ability of the FRS to the mFRS. In the third part of the study, we assessed the prediction for CAD in a time-dependent analysis of the FRS and mFRS. There were 905 women (89.3%) with a total of 95 CAD events included. In part 1, we determined that a multiplier of 2 provided the best combination of sensitivity and specificity. In part 2, 2.4% of the patients were classified as moderate/high risk based on the classic FRS and 17.3% using the 2FRS (the FRS with a multiplier of 2). In part 3, a time-dependent covariate analysis for the prediction of the first CAD event revealed an HR of 3.22 (p = 0.07) for the classic FRS and 4.37 (p mFRS in which each item is multiplied by 2 more accurately predicts CAD in patients with SLE.

  18. 70. Surgical mitral valve replacement with modified Melody valve in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Badr Elwy

    2015-10-01

    Conclusions: The modified Melody valve is a viable option for children MV annular diameters, providing a valid alternative to existing prostheses. The technique is relatively easy and the short term result is very good. This prosthesis will be particularly attractive if maintaining competence after subsequent dilations as the child grows.

  19. Changes in quality of life associated with surgical risk in elderly patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Paola Severo; de Souza, Emiliane Nogueira; Rodrigues, Juliane; Moraes, Maria Antonieta

    2015-10-01

    The study aims to verify quality of life of elderly patients submitted to cardiac surgery, and correlating surgical risk to health-related quality of life instrument domains. Prospective cohort study, performed at a cardiology hospital. It included elderly patients who had undergone elective cardiac surgery. Pre- and postoperative quality of life was evaluated by applying the World Health Organization Quality of Life-Old (WHOQOL-OLD) scale and the Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) questionnaire. Surgical risk was stratified using the European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation (EuroSCORE). Fifty-four patients, mostly men (64.8%), were included, with a mean age of 69.3 ± 5.7 years. The eight domains of the SF-36 questionnaire, and the four facets presented for the WHOQOL-OLD scale showed improved quality of life 6 months after surgery (P quality of life instruments. The data showed improved quality of life of elderly people submitted to cardiac surgery, unrelated to surgical risk.

  20. Risk Assessment Tool for Pressure Ulcer Development in Indian Surgical Wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Sushma; Sharma, Deborshi; Rana, Anshika; Pathak, Reetesh; Lal, Romesh; Kumar, Ajay; Biswal, U C

    2015-06-01

    The aims of this paper were to compare the predictive validity of three pressure ulcer (PU) risk scales-the Norton scale, the Braden scale, and the Waterlow scale-and to choose the most appropriate calculator for predicting PU risk in surgical wards of India. This is an observational prospective cohort study in a tertiary educational hospital in New Delhi among 100 surgical ward patients from April to July 2011. The main outcomes measured included sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PVP) and negative predictive value (PVN), and the area under the curve of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of the three PU risk assessment scales. Based on the cutoff points found most appropriate in this study, the sensitivity, specificity, PVP, and PVN were as follows: the Norton scale (cutoff, 16) had the values of 95.6, 93.5, 44.8, and 98.6, respectively; the Braden scale (cutoff, 17) had values of 100, 89.6, 42.5, and 100, respectively; and the Waterlow scale (cutoff, 11) had 91.3, 84.4, 38.8, and 97, respectively. According to the ROC curve, the Norton scale is the most appropriate tool. Factors such as physical condition, activity, mobility, body mass index (BMI), nutrition, friction, and shear are extremely significant in determining risk of PU development (p nutrition, friction, and shear are the most significant factors in Indian surgical ward settings with necessity for future comparison with established scales.

  1. Risk factors of surgical site infections in patients with Crohn's disease complicated with gastrointestinal fistula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kun; Ren, Jianan; Li, Guanwei; Hu, Qiongyuan; Wu, Xiuwen; Wang, Zhiwei; Wang, Gefei; Gu, Guosheng; Ren, Huajian; Hong, Zhiwu; Li, Jieshou

    2017-05-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is the most common complication following surgical procedures. This study aimed to determine risk factors associated with SSI in patients with Crohn's disease (CD) complicated with gastrointestinal fistula. This was a retrospective review of patients who underwent surgical resection in gastrointestinal fistula patients with CD between January 2013 and January 2015, identified from a prospectively maintained gastrointestinal fistula database. Demographic information, preoperative medication, intraoperative findings, and postoperative outcome data were collected. Univariate and multivariate analysis was carried out to assess possible risk factors for SSI. A total of 118 patients were identified, of whom 75.4% were men, the average age of the patients was 34.1 years, and the average body mass index (BMI) was 18.8 kg/m(2). The rate of SSI was 31.4%. On multivariate analysis, preoperative anemia (P = 0.001, OR 7.698, 95% CI 2.273-26.075), preoperative bacteria present in fistula tract (P = 0.029, OR 3.399, 95% CI 1.131-10.220), and preoperative enteral nutrition (EN) fistula tract, and preoperative EN fistula complicated with CD. Preoperative identification of these risk factors may assist in risk assessment and then to optimize preoperative preparation and perioperative care.

  2. Usefulness of administrative databases for risk adjustment of adverse events in surgical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo-Rincón, Isabel; Martin-Vizcaíno, Marta P; Tirapu-León, Belén; Zabalza-López, Pedro; Abad-Vicente, Francisco J; Merino-Peralta, Asunción; Oteiza-Martínez, Fabiola

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of clinical-administrative databases for the development of risk adjustment in the assessment of adverse events in surgical patients. The study was conducted at the Hospital of Navarra, a tertiary teaching hospital in northern Spain. We studied 1602 hospitalizations of surgical patients from 2008 to 2010. We analysed 40 comorbidity variables included in the National Surgical Quality Improvement (NSQIP) Program of the American College of Surgeons using 2 sources of information: The clinical and administrative database (CADB) and the data extracted from the complete clinical records (CR), which was considered the gold standard. Variables were catalogued according to compliance with the established criteria: sensitivity, positive predictive value and kappa coefficient >0.6. The average number of comorbidities per study participant was 1.6 using the CR and 0.95 based on CADB (p<.0001). Thirteen types of comorbidities (accounting for 8% of the comorbidities detected in the CR) were not identified when the CADB was the source of information. Five of the 27 remaining comorbidities complied with the 3 established criteria; 2 pathologies fulfilled 2 criteria, whereas 11 fulfilled 1, and 9 did not fulfil any criterion. CADB detected prevalent comorbidities such as comorbid hypertension and diabetes. However, the CABD did not provide enough information to assess the variables needed to perform the risk adjustment proposed by the NSQIP for the assessment of adverse events in surgical patients. Copyright © 2015. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  3. Health risk to medical personnel of surgical smoke produced during laparoscopic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miłosz Dobrogowski

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: During laparoscopic cholecystectomy, the removal of the gall bladder, pyrolysis occurs in the peritoneal cavity. Chemical substances which are formed during this process escape into the operating room through trocars in the form of surgical smoke. The aim of this study was to identify and quantitatively measure a number of selected chemical substances found in surgical smoke and to assess the risk they carry to medical personnel. Material and Methods: The study was performed at the Maria Skłodowska-Curie Memorial Provincial Specialist Hospital in Zgierz between 2011 and 2013. Air samples were collected in the operating room during laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Results: A complete qualitative and quantitative analysis of the air samples showed a number of chemical substances present, such as aldehydes, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene, ozone, dioxins and others. Conclusions: The concentrations of these substances were much lower than the hygienic standards allowed by the European Union Maximum Acceptable Concentration (MAC. The calculated risk of developing cancer as a result of exposure to surgical smoke during laparoscopic cholecystectomy is negligible. Yet it should be kept in mind that repeated exposure to a cocktail of these substances increases the possibility of developing adverse effects. Many of these compounds are toxic, and may possibly be carcinogenic, mutagenic or genotoxic. Therefore, it is necessary to remove surgical smoke from the operating room in order to protect medical personnel.

  4. Benefits and risks associated with genetically modified food products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Kramkowska

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Scientists employing methods of genetic engineering have developed a new group of living organisms, termed ‘modified organisms’, which found application in, among others, medicine, the pharmaceutical industry and food distribution. The introduction of transgenic products to the food market resulted in them becoming a controversial topic, with their proponents and contestants. The presented study aims to systematize objective data on the potential benefits and risks resulting from the consumption of transgenic food. Genetic modifications of plants and animals are justified by the potential for improvement of the food situation worldwide, an increase in yield crops, an increase in the nutritional value of food, and the development of pharmaceutical preparations of proven clinical significance. In the opinions of critics, however, transgenic food may unfavourably affect the health of consumers. Therefore, particular attention was devoted to the short- and long-lasting undesirable effects, such as alimentary allergies, synthesis of toxic agents or resistance to antibiotics. Examples arguing for the justified character of genetic modifications and cases proving that their use can be dangerous are innumerable. In view of the presented facts, however, complex studies are indispensable which, in a reliable way, evaluate effects linked to the consumption of food produced with the application of genetic engineering techniques. Whether one backs up or negates transgenic products, the choice between traditional and non-conventional food remains to be decided exclusively by the consumers.

  5. Benefits and risks associated with genetically modified food products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramkowska, Marta; Grzelak, Teresa; Czyżewska, Krystyna

    2013-01-01

    Scientists employing methods of genetic engineering have developed a new group of living organisms, termed 'modified organisms', which found application in, among others, medicine, the pharmaceutical industry and food distribution. The introduction of transgenic products to the food market resulted in them becoming a controversial topic, with their proponents and contestants. The presented study aims to systematize objective data on the potential benefits and risks resulting from the consumption of transgenic food. Genetic modifications of plants and animals are justified by the potential for improvement of the food situation worldwide, an increase in yield crops, an increase in the nutritional value of food, and the development of pharmaceutical preparations of proven clinical significance. In the opinions of critics, however, transgenic food may unfavourably affect the health of consumers. Therefore, particular attention was devoted to the short- and long-lasting undesirable effects, such as alimentary allergies, synthesis of toxic agents or resistance to antibiotics. Examples arguing for the justified character of genetic modifications and cases proving that their use can be dangerous are innumerable. In view of the presented facts, however, complex studies are indispensable which, in a reliable way, evaluate effects linked to the consumption of food produced with the application of genetic engineering techniques. Whether one backs up or negates transgenic products, the choice between traditional and non-conventional food remains to be decided exclusively by the consumers.

  6. Genetically modified organisms: do the benefits outweigh the risks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hug, Kristina

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this literature review is to analyze the implications of using genetically modified organisms (GMOs) as well as international and European position regarding such organisms. Review of international and European legal requirements and ethical guidelines and relevant publications, found and accessed with the help of PubMed and Lund University Library databases. The article discusses the main application areas of GMOs, the expansion of using GMOs in the world as well as the advantages and disadvantages of the implications of their usage. It further provides an overview of the suggested ways to tackle or avoid the GMO-related risks. The international and European positions regarding the application of GMOs are discussed and European Directives, Regulations, and ethical guidelines are overviewed. The article further presents the public attitudes towards GMOs in Europe as well as overviews surveys conducted at the national level. Suggested steps to tackle the challenge of developing and managing biotechnology for the benefit of public health and the environment are presented.

  7. Risks and risk-analysis for the development of pressure ulcers in surgical patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keller, Bastiaan Paul Johan Aart

    2006-01-01

    With prevalence figures of 13% for university hospitals and 23% for general hospitals, pressure ulcers are a major health care issue in The Netherlands. Pressure ulcers in surgical patients are frequently encountered, as is illustrated by reported incidence rates up to 66%. The number of patients at

  8. Surgical Site Infection (SSI) Rates in the United States, 1992-1998: The National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System Basic SSI Risk Index

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Robert P. Gaynes; David H. Culver; Teresa C. Horan; Jonathan R. Edwards; Chesley Richards; James S. Tolson; The National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System

    2001-01-01

    By use of the National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance (NNIS) System's surgical patient surveillance component protocol, the NNIS basic risk index was examined to predict the risk of a surgical site infection (SSI...

  9. Diabetes and Risk of Surgical Site Infection: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Emily T; Kaye, Keith S; Knott, Caitlin; Nguyen, Huong; Santarossa, Maressa; Evans, Richard; Bertran, Elizabeth; Jaber, Linda

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the independent association between diabetes and surgical site infection (SSI) across multiple surgical procedures. DESIGN Systematic review and meta-analysis. METHODS Studies indexed in PubMed published between December 1985 and through July 2015 were identified through the search terms "risk factors" or "glucose" and "surgical site infection." A total of 3,631 abstracts were identified through the initial search terms. Full texts were reviewed for 522 articles. Of these, 94 articles met the criteria for inclusion. Standardized data collection forms were used to extract study-specific estimates for diabetes, blood glucose levels, and body mass index (BMI). A random-effects meta-analysis was used to generate pooled estimates, and meta-regression was used to evaluate specific hypothesized sources of heterogeneity. RESULTS The primary outcome was SSI, as defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention surveillance criteria. The overall effect size for the association between diabetes and SSI was odds ratio (OR)=1.53 (95% predictive interval [PI], 1.11-2.12; I2, 57.2%). SSI class, study design, or patient BMI did not significantly impact study results in a meta-regression model. The association was higher for cardiac surgery 2.03 (95% PI, 1.13-4.05) compared with surgeries of other types (P=.001). CONCLUSIONS These results support the consideration of diabetes as an independent risk factor for SSIs for multiple surgical procedure types. Continued efforts are needed to improve surgical outcomes for diabetic patients. Infect. Control Hosp. Epidemiol. 2015;37(1):88-99.

  10. Obesity and the Risk for Surgical Site Infection in Abdominal Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winfield, Robert D; Reese, Stacey; Bochicchio, Kelly; Mazuski, John E; Bochicchio, Grant V

    2016-04-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for surgical site infection (SSI) after abdominal procedures; however, data characterizing the risk of SSI in obese patients during abdominal procedures are lacking. We hypothesized that obesity is an independent risk factor for SSI across wound classes. We analyzed American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) data for 2011. We calculated body mass index (BMI), classifying patients according to National Institute of Health (NIH) BMI groups. We excluded records in which height/weight was not recorded and patients with BMI less than 18.5. We examined patients undergoing open abdominal procedures, performing univariate and multivariate analyses to assess the relative contribution of obesity to SSI. Study criteria were met by 89,148 patients. Obese and morbidly obese patients had significantly greater SSI rates in clean and clean-contaminated cases but not contaminated or dirty/infected cases. Logistic regression confirmed obesity and morbid obesity as being independently associated with the overall SSI development, specifically in clean [Obesity odds ratio (OR) = 1.757, morbid obesity OR = 2.544, P obesity OR = 1.239, morbid obesity OR = 1.287, P Obesity is associated with increased risk of SSI overall, specifically in clean and clean-contaminated abdominal procedures; this is independent of diabetes mellitus. Novel techniques are needed to reduce SSI in this high-risk patient population.

  11. Risk for surgical complications after previous stereotactic body radiotherapy of the spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesch, Johannes; Cho, John B C; Fahim, Daniel K; Gerszten, Peter C; Flickinger, John C; Grills, Inga S; Jawad, Maha; Kersh, Ronald; Letourneau, Daniel; Mantel, Frederick; Sahgal, Arjun; Shin, John H; Winey, Brian; Guckenberger, Matthias

    2017-09-11

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for vertebral metastases has emerged as a promising technique, offering high rates of symptom relief and local control combined with low risk of toxicity. Nonetheless, local failure or vertebral instability may occur after spine SBRT, generating the need for subsequent surgery in the irradiated region. This study evaluated whether there is an increased incidence of surgical complications in patients previously treated with SBRT at the index level. Based upon a retrospective international database of 704 cases treated with SBRT for vertebral metastases, 30 patients treated at 6 different institutions were identified who underwent surgery in a region previously treated with SBRT. Thirty patients, median age 59 years (range 27-84 years) underwent SBRT for 32 vertebral metastases followed by surgery at the same vertebra. Median follow-up time from SBRT was 17 months. In 17 cases, conventional radiotherapy had been delivered prior to SBRT at a median dose of 30 Gy in median 10 fractions. SBRT was administered with a median prescription dose of 19.3 Gy (range 15-65 Gy) delivered in median 1 fraction (range 1-17) (median EQD2/10 = 44 Gy). The median time interval between SBRT and surgical salvage therapy was 6 months (range 1-39 months). Reasons for subsequent surgery were pain (n = 28), neurological deterioration (n = 15) or fracture of the vertebral body (n = 13). Open surgical decompression (n = 24) and/or stabilization (n = 18) were most frequently performed; Five patients (6 vertebrae) were treated without complications with vertebroplasty only. Increased fibrosis complicating the surgical procedure was explicitly stated in one surgical report. Two durotomies occurred which were closed during the operation, associated with a neurological deficit in one patient. Median blood loss was 500 ml, but five patients had a blood loss of more than 1 l during the procedure. Delayed wound healing was reported in two

  12. Characteristics of Pseudoaneurysms in Southern India; Risk Analysis, Clinical Profile, Surgical Management and Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafeezulla Lone

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the risk factors, clinical characteristics, surgical management and outcome of pseudoaneurysm secondary to iatrogenic or traumatic vascular injury. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study being performed in department of cardiovascular and thoracic surgery skims soura during a 4-year period. We included all the patients referring to our center with primary diagnosis of pseudoaneurysm. The pseudoaneurysm was diagnosed with angiography and color Doppler sonography. The clinical and demographic characteristics were recorded and the risk factors were identified accordingly. Patients with small swelling (less than 5-cm and without any complication were managed conservatively. They were followed for progression and development of complications in relation to swelling. Others underwent surgical repair and excision. The outcome of the patients was also recorded. Results: Overall we included 20 patients with pseudoaneurysm. The mean age of the patients was 42.1±0.6 years. Among them there were 11 (55% men and 9 (45% women. Nine (45% patients with end stage renal disease developed pseudoaneurysm after inadvertent femoral artery puncture for hemodialysis; two patients after interventional cardiology procedure; one after femoral embolectomy; one developed after fire arm splinter injury and one formed femoral artery related pseudoaneurysm after drainage of right inguinal abscess. The most common site of pseudoaneurysm was femoral artery followed by brachial artery. Overall surgical intervention was performed in 17 (85% patients and 3 (15% were managed conservatively. Conclusion: End stage renal disease is a major risk factor for pseudoaneurysm formation. Coagulopathy, either therapeutic or pathological is also an important risk factor. Patients with these risk factors need cannulation of venous structures for hemodialysis under ultrasound guide to prevent inadvertent arterial injury. Patients with end stage renal disease who

  13. Evaluation of Dentoalveolar Trauma in Children and Adolescents: a Modified Classification System and Surgical Treatment Strategies for Its Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theologie-Lygidakis, Nadia; Schoinohoriti, Ourania K; Leventis, Minas; Iatrou, Ioannis

    2017-06-01

    To retrospectively analyze dentoalveolar trauma in pediatric patients, propose a modified classification, and delineate an approach for its urgent care from the surgeon's perspective. Clinical records of patients, attended at the 'A. and P. Kyriakou' Children's Hospital Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery from 2000 to 2015, were retrieved and data were analyzed. A total of 365 cases of dentoalveolar trauma, affecting 363 children and adolescents (221 males and 142 females), with an age range from 1 to 15 years, were treated in the authors' department. The most common injury mechanism was falls. The trauma was graded as class II in most patients (41.65%). The anterior maxilla was injured in the majority of the patients (78.35%). In 230 patients (63%) the trauma involved the primary dentition. Two hundred eighty-nine of the patients were treated with local anesthesia on an emergency basis, while in the rest 76 patients general anesthesia was considered mandatory. Accurate diagnosis, timely treatment, and follow-up are critical for the management of dentoalveolar trauma in pediatric patients. A modified more detailed and severity-specific classification and guidelines for its surgical management may assist practitioners in decision making and effective treatment planning.

  14. Association between surgical delay and survival in high-risk emergency abdominal surgery. A population-based Danish cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vester-Andersen, Morten; Lundstrøm, Lars Hyldborg; Buck, David Levarett;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In patients with perforated peptic ulcer, surgical delay has recently been shown to be a critical determinant of survival. The aim of the present population-based cohort study was to evaluate the association between surgical delay by hour and mortality in high-risk patients undergoing...

  15. Nosocomial transmission of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: results from a risk-based assessment of surgical interventions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Pedro-Cuesta, Jesús; Mahillo-Fernández, Ignacio; Rábano, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Evidence of surgical transmission of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) remains debatable in part due to misclassification of exposure levels. In a registry-based case-control study, the authors applied a risk-based classification of surgical interventions to determine the association betw...

  16. Improving risk-adjusted measures of surgical site infection for the national healthcare safety network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Yi; Edwards, Jonathan R; Horan, Teresa C; Berrios-Torres, Sandra I; Fridkin, Scott K

    2011-10-01

    The National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) has provided simple risk adjustment of surgical site infection (SSI) rates to participating hospitals to facilitate quality improvement activities; improved risk models were developed and evaluated. Data reported to the NHSN for all operative procedures performed from January 1, 2006, through December 31, 2008, were analyzed. Only SSIs related to the primary incision site were included. A common set of patient- and hospital-specific variables were evaluated as potential SSI risk factors by univariate analysis. Some ific variables were available for inclusion. Stepwise logistic regression was used to develop the specific risk models by procedure category. Bootstrap resampling was used to validate the models, and the c-index was used to compare the predictive power of new procedure-specific risk models with that of the models with the NHSN risk index as the only variable (NHSN risk index model). From January 1, 2006, through December 31, 2008, 847 hospitals in 43 states reported a total of 849,659 procedures and 16,147 primary incisional SSIs (risk, 1.90%) among 39 operative procedure categories. Overall, the median c-index of the new procedure-specific risk was greater (0.67 [range, 0.59-0.85]) than the median c-index of the NHSN risk index models (0.60 [range, 0.51-0.77]); for 33 of 39 procedures, the new procedure-specific models yielded a higher c-index than did the NHSN risk index models. A set of new risk models developed using existing data elements collected through the NHSN improves predictive performance, compared with the traditional NHSN risk index stratification.

  17. Blocking Surgically Induced Lysyl Oxidase Activity Reduces the Risk of Lung Metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Rachman-Tzemah

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Surgery remains the most successful curative treatment for cancer. However, some patients with early-stage disease who undergo surgery eventually succumb to distant metastasis. Here, we show that in response to surgery, the lungs become more vulnerable to metastasis due to extracellular matrix remodeling. Mice that undergo surgery or that are preconditioned with plasma from donor mice that underwent surgery succumb to lung metastases earlier than controls. Increased lysyl oxidase (LOX activity and expression, fibrillary collagen crosslinking, and focal adhesion signaling contribute to this effect, with the hypoxic surgical site serving as the source of LOX. Furthermore, the lungs of recipient mice injected with plasma from post-surgical colorectal cancer patients are more prone to metastatic seeding than mice injected with baseline plasma. Downregulation of LOX activity or levels reduces lung metastasis after surgery and increases survival, highlighting the potential of LOX inhibition in reducing the risk of metastasis following surgery.

  18. Vertebral subluxation during three-column osteotomy in surgical correction of adult spine deformity: incidence, risk factors, and complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Jun; Xiao, Lingyan; Sun, Xu; Shi, Benlong; Liu, Zhen; Xu, Leilei; Zhu, Zezhang; Qian, Bangping; Qiu, Yong

    2017-08-24

    To investigate incidence, risk factors, and complications of vertebral subluxation (VS) during three-column osteotomy in surgical correction of adult spine deformity. Adult spine deformity patients who underwent three-column osteotomies including VCR, PSO, and other modified types from March 2000 to December 2014 in our center were retrospectively reviewed. The following parameters were measured pre- and postoperatively: Cobb angle of main curve, global kyphosis, sagittal vertical axis, and kyphosis flexibility. Radiographic parameters between groups (VCR vs. PSO and subluxation vs. non-subluxation) were compared. 171 ASD patients were recruited, 18 of which (10.5%) developed sagittal vertebral subluxation at the osteotomy site. 5 of 18 patients (27.8%) developed neurological complications after surgery. For these five patients, two patients got partial recovery, and three got complete recovery at 2-year follow-up. 116 patients underwent PSO, 12 of which (10.3%) developed sagittal vertebral subluxation. In 55 patients receiving VCR, 6 (10.9%) developed sagittal vertebral subluxation. No significant difference was noted between the two groups (P > 0.05). The mean age of VS group was larger than that of non-VS group (46.2 vs. 34.2, P column osteotomies, one-fourth of which would develop neurological deficits. Older age, rigid kyphosis, and the pre-existence of VS were risk factors for developing VS.

  19. Incidence and risk factors for surgically acquired pressure ulcers: a prospective cohort study investigators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Joan; Lister, Carolyn; Corry, Jean; Holland, Michelle; Coleman, Kerrie; Marquart, Louise

    2015-01-01

    To assess the incidence of hospital-acquired, surgery-related pressure injury (ulcers) and identify risk factors for these injuries. We used a prospective cohort study to investigate the research question. The study was conducted at a major metropolitan hospital in Brisbane, Australia. Five hundred thirty-four adult patients booked for any surgical procedure expected to last more than 30 minutes were eligible for inclusion. Patients who provided informed consent for study participation were assessed for pressure ulcers, using the European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel and National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel Guidelines, before entering the operating room and again in the post-anesthetic care unit (PACU). Research nurses and all PACU nurses were trained in skin assessment and in pressure ulcer staging. Patients were not assessed again after their discharge from the PACU. Seven patients (1.3%) had existing pressure injuries (ulcers) and a further 6 (1.3%) developed a surgery-related pressure ulcer. Risk factors associated with surgery-related pressure injuries were similar to non-surgically related risks and included older age, skin condition, and being admitted from a location other than one's own home. Length of surgery was not associated with pressure ulcer development in this cohort. Perioperative nurses play an important role in identifying existing or new pressure injuries. However, many of these nurses are unfamiliar with pressure ulcer classification, so education in this area is essential. Although the incidence of surgically acquired pressure ulcers was low in this cohort, careful skin inspection before and after surgery provides an opportunity for early treatment and may prevent existing lesions progressing to higher stages.

  20. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Lower Surgical Risk Patients: Review of Major Trials and Future Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saji, Mike; Lim, D Scott

    2016-10-01

    Following the first successful transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in 2002, TAVR has globally evolved to become a standard procedure in high-risk patients. Surgical aortic valve replacement in non-high-risk patients remains the gold standard for treatment of severe aortic stenosis. However, a paradigm shift appears to be occurring in the direction of treating lower-risk patients, and several studies have suggested its impact on clinical outcomes. In this review, we highlight the current status of TAVR in intermediate-risk patients and review major trials including Placement of AoRTic TraNscathetER (PARTNER) 2A randomized intermediate-risk trial using SAPIEN XT (Edwards Lifesciences Corp, Irvine, CA) recently presented with excellent outcomes and the lowest major complications rate at the American College of Cardiology's 65th Annual Scientific Session in Chicago. Clinical trials in low-risk patients using SAPIEN 3 and CoreValve Evolut R have just been launched, and they are going to be important milestones in the TAVR field.

  1. Oral surgery in elderly patients: clinical/surgical considerations and risk assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Ribeiro Barros de Alencar

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The need for oral surgery has been considerably increasing in elderly population in order to allow the balance of their masticatory, aesthetic, and phonetic functions through adapting the oral tissues for the appropriate placement of the prosthetic devices, thereby impacting positively on the subject’s health. Objective: This article aimed to review the literature on both clinical and surgical considerations required to the satisfactory treatment of elderly patients in clinical routine practice, focusing particularly on cases whose treatment choice is a surgical procedure. Literature review: The most commonly performed surgeries in elderly patients, nowadays, are tooth extractions, pre-prosthetic surgeries and osseointegrated implants. Therefore, the physiological features inherent to such cases should be considered, especially those that involve the monitoring of glycemic and blood pressure levels, osteoporosis, medication use, and many other conditions demanding special attention for elderly patient treatment at dental office. Conclusion: Due to the fragility intrinsic to elderly individuals, the surgery at this stage of life requires caution in relation to a comprehensive clinical examination and also to a careful evaluation of the surgical risks in order to analyze the correct indication of the surgery and thereby to ensure patient’s well-being.

  2. Surgical risks and perioperative complications of instrumented lumbar surgery in patients with liver cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tung-Yi Lin

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients with liver cirrhosis have high surgical risks due to malnutrition, impaired immunity, coagulopathy, and encephalopathy. However, there is no information in English literature about the results of liver cirrhotic patients who underwent instrumented lumbar surgery. The purpose of this study is to report the perioperative complications, clinical outcomes and determine the surgical risk factors in cirrhotic patients. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 29 patients with liver cirrhosis who underwent instrumented lumbar surgery between 1997 and 2009. The hepatic functional reserves of the patients were recorded according to the Child-Turcotte-Pugh scoring system. Besides, fourteen other variables and perioperative complications were also collected. To determine the risks, we divided the patients into two groups according to whether or not perioperative complications developed. Results: Of the 29 patients, 22 (76% belonged to Child class A and 7 (24% belonged to Child class B. Twelve patients developed one or more complications. Patients with Child class B carried a significantly higher incidence of complications than those with Child class A (p = 0.011. In the Child class A group, patients with 6 points had a significantly higher incidence of complications than those with 5 points (p = 0.025. A low level of albumin was significantly associated with higher risk, and a similar trend was also noted for the presence of ascites although statistical difference was not reached. Conclusion: The study concludes that patients with liver cirrhosis who have undergone instrumented lumbar surgery carry a high risk of developing perioperative complications, especially in those with a Child-Turcotte-Pugh score of 6 or more.

  3. Abdominal Hysterectomy: Reduced Risk of Surgical Site Infection Associated with Robotic and Laparoscopic Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colling, Kristin P; Glover, James K; Statz, Catherine A; Geller, Melissa A; Beilman, Greg J

    2015-10-01

    Hysterectomy is one of the most common procedures performed in the United States. New techniques utilizing laparoscopic and robotic technology are becoming increasingly common. It is unknown if these minimally invasive surgical techniques alter the risk of surgical site infections (SSI). We performed a retrospective review of all patients undergoing abdominal hysterectomy at our institution between January 2011 and June 2013. International Classification of Diseases, Ninth edition (ICD-9) codes and chart review were used to identify patients undergoing hysterectomy by open, laparoscopic, or robotic approach and to identify patients who developed SSI subsequently. Chi-square and analysis of variance (ANOVA) tests were used to identify univariate risk factors and logistic regression was used to perform multivariable analysis. During this time period, 986 patients were identified who had undergone abdominal hysterectomy, with 433 receiving open technique (44%), 116 laparoscopic (12%), 407 robotic (41%), and 30 cases that were converted from minimally invasive to open (3%). Patients undergoing laparoscopic-assisted hysterectomy were significantly younger and had lower body mass index (BMI) and American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) scores than those undergoing open or robotic hysterectomy. There were no significant differences between patients undergoing open versus robotic hysterectomy. The post-operative hospital stay was significantly longer for open procedures compared with those using laparoscopic or robotic techniques (5.1, 1.7, and 1.6 d, respectively; physterectomy procedures was 4.2%. More SSI occurred in open cases (6.5%) than laparoscopic (0%) or robotic (2.2%) (pobesity were all associated with increased risk of SSI. Laparoscopic and robotic hysterectomies were associated with a significantly lower risk of SSI and shorter hospital stays. Body mass index, advanced age, and wound class were also independent risk factors for SSI.

  4. The prevalence of risk factors for cardiovascular diseases among Polish surgical patients over 65 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kołtuniuk A

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Aleksandra Kołtuniuk, Joanna Rosińczuk Department of Nervous System Diseases, Faculty of Health Science, Wroclaw Medical University, Wroclaw, Poland Background: Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs are the leading cause of mortality among adults in Poland. A number of risk factors have significant influence on CVD incidence. Early identification of risk factors related to our lifestyle facilitates taking proper actions aiming at the reduction of their negative impact on health.Aim: The aim of the study was to compare the prevalence of CVD risk factors between patients aged over 65 years and patients of other age groups in surgical wards.Material and methods: The study was conducted for assessment and finding the distribution of major risk factors of CVD among 420 patients aged 18–84 years who were hospitalized in surgical wards. Interview, anthropometric measurements, blood pressure, and fasting blood tests for biochemical analysis were conducted in all subjects. Statistical analysis of the material was performed using Student’s t-test, chi-square test, Fisher’s exact test, Mann–Whitney U-test, and analysis of variance.Results: While abdominal obesity (83.3%, overweight and obesity (68%, hypertension (65.1%, hypercholesterolemia (33.3%, and low level of physical activity (29.1% were the most common CVD risk factors among patients over 65 years old, abdominal obesity (36.2%, overweight and obesity (36.1%, and current smoking were the most common CVD risk factors among patients up to the age of 35. In the age group over 65, the least prevalent risk factors for CVD were diabetes mellitus (14.8%, depressive episodes (13.6%, abuse of alcohol (11.4%, and smoking (7.8%. In the group under 35 years, we have not reported any cases of hypercholesterolemia and a lesser number of patients suffered from diabetes and HTN.Conclusion: Distribution of the major risk factors for CVD is quite high in the adult population, especially in the age group over 65

  5. Disease-modifying therapies and infectious risks in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelmann, Alexander; Loebermann, Micha; Reisinger, Emil C; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Zettl, Uwe K

    2016-04-01

    Immunomodulatory and immunosuppressive treatments for multiple sclerosis (MS) are associated with an increased risk of infection, which makes treatment of this condition challenging in daily clinical practice. Use of the expanding range of available drugs to treat MS requires extensive knowledge of treatment-associated infections, risk-minimizing strategies and approaches to monitoring and treatment of such adverse events. An interdisciplinary approach to evaluate the infectious events associated with available MS treatments has become increasingly relevant. In addition, individual stratification of treatment-related infectious risks is necessary when choosing therapies for patients with MS, as well as during and after therapy. Determination of the individual risk of infection following serial administration of different immunotherapies is also crucial. Here, we review the modes of action of the available MS drugs, and relate this information to the current knowledge of drug-specific infectious risks and risk-minimizing strategies.

  6. Are There Modifiable Risk Factors to Improve AKI?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasa Nie

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI is a common critical syndrome, with high morbidity and mortality. Patients with AKI typically have an adverse prognosis, from incident chronic kidney disease (CKD, progression to end-stage renal disease (ESRD, subsequent cardiovascular disease, and ultimately death. However, there is currently no effective therapy for AKI. Early detection of risk factors for AKI may offer a good approach to prevention or early intervention. Traditional risk factors include extreme age, many common comorbid diseases, such as preexisting CKD, some specific exposures, such as sepsis, and exposure to some nephrotoxic agents. Recently, several novel risk factors for AKI, such as hyperuricemia, hypoalbuminemia, obesity, anemia, and hyperglycemia, have been identified. The underlying mechanisms between these nontraditional risk factors and AKI and whether their correction can reduce AKI occurrence remain to be clarified. This review describes the current epidemiology of AKI, summarizes its outcome, outlines the traditional risk profile, and finally highlights some recently identified novel risk factors.

  7. Cigarette use and cardiovascular risk in chronic kidney disease: an unappreciated modifiable lifestyle risk factor.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Stack, Austin G

    2012-01-31

    Tobacco use is a major modifiable cardiovascular risk factor in the general population and contributes to excess cardiovascular risk. Emerging evidence from large-scale observational studies suggests that continued tobacco use is also an independent cardiovascular risk factor among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The benefits of smoking cessation programs on improving the heath status of patients and reducing mortality are unequivocal in the general population. Despite this, there has been little effort in pursuing tobacco cessation programs in dialysis cohorts or those with lesser degrees of kidney impairment. Most of our attention to date has focused on the development of "kidney-specific" interventions that reduce rates of renal disease progression and improve dialysis outcomes. The purpose of this current review is to describe the epidemiology of tobacco use among patients with CKD, draw attention to its negative impact on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and finally highlight potential strategies for successful intervention. We hope that this study heightens the importance of tobacco use in CKD, stimulates renewed interest in the barriers and challenges that exist in achieving smoking cessation, and endorses the efficacy of intervention strategies and the immeasurable benefits of quitting on cardiovascular and noncardiovascular outcomes.

  8. Risk of surgical site infection in paediatric herniotomies without any prophylactic antibiotics: A preliminary experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhananjay Vaze

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Different studies underline the use of pre-operative antibiotic prophylaxis in clean surgeries like herniotomy and inguinal orchiopexy. But, the meta-analyses do not recommend nor discard the use of prophylactic pre-operative antibiotics. The scarcity of controlled clinical trials in paediatric population further vitiates the matter. This study assessed the difference in the rate of early post-operative wound infection cases in children who received single dose of pre-operative antibiotics and children who did not receive antibiotics after inguinal herniotomy and orchiopexy. Materials and Methods: This randomised prospective study was conducted in Paediatric Surgery department of PGIMER Chandigarh. Out of 251 patients, 112 patients were randomised to the case group and 139 were ascribed to the control group. The patients in control group were given a standard regimen of single dose of intravenous antibiotic at the time of induction followed by 3-4 days of oral antibiotic. Case group patients underwent the surgical procedure in similar manner with no antibiotic either at the time of induction or post-operatively. Results: The incidence of surgical site infection in case group was 3.73 % and that in control group was 2.22%. The observed difference in the incidence of surgical site infection was statistically insignificant (P value = 0.7027. The overall infection rate in case and control group was 2.89%. Conclusions: Our preliminary experience suggests that there is no statistically significant difference in the proportion of early post-operative wound infection between the patients who received single dose of pre-operative antibiotics and the patients who received no antibiotics after inguinal herniotomy and orchiopexy. The risk of surgical site infection in paediatric heriotomies does not increase even if the child′s weight is less than his/her expected weight for age.

  9. A modified Glasgow Blatchford Score improves risk stratification in upper gastrointestinal bleed: a prospective comparison of scoring systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, D W; Lu, Y W; Teller, T; Sekhon, H K; Wu, B U

    2012-10-01

    Several risk scoring systems exist for upper gastrointestinal bleed (UGIB). We hypothesised that a modified Glasgow Blatchford Score (mGBS) that eliminates the subjective components of the GBS might perform as well as current scoring systems. To compare the performance of the mGBS to the most widely reported scoring systems for prediction of clinical outcomes in patients presenting with UGIB. Prospective cohort study from 9/2010 to 9/2011. Accuracy of the mGBS was compared with the full GBS, full Rockall Score (RS) and clinical RS using area under the receiver operating characterstics-curve (AUC). PRIMARY OUTCOME was need for clinical intervention: blood transfusion, endoscopic, radiological or surgical intervention. Secondary outcome was repeat bleeding or mortality. One hundred and ninety-nine patients were included. Median age was 56 with 40% women. Thirty-two per cent patients required blood transfusion, 24% endoscopic interventions, 0.5% radiological intervention, 0 surgical interventions, 5% had repeat bleeding and 0.5% mortality. the mGBS (AUC 0.85) performed as well as the GBS (AUC = 0.86, P = 0.81), and outperformed the full RS (AUC 0.75, P = 0.005) and clinical RS (AUC 0.66, P upper gastrointestinal bleed. By eliminating the subjective components of the Glasgow Blatchford Score, the modified Glasgow Blatchford Score may be easier to use and therefore more easily implemented into routine clinical practice. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Clinical results of a new strategy (modified CHIVA) for surgical treatment of anterior accessory great saphenous varicose veins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado-Fernández, Nicolás; Linares-Palomino, Jose Patricio; López-Espada, Cristina; Martínez-Gámez, Francisco Javier; Ros-Díe, Eduardo

    2016-03-01

    Traditionally, anterior accessory great saphenous vein insufficiency was managed by crossectomy and resection of varicose veins. The aim of this paper is to show the safety and efficacy of a new therapeutic strategy for anterior accessory great saphenous varicose veins. This non-randomised prospective study included 65 patients with varicose veins from the anterior accessory great saphenous vein. The novelty of the technique is to avoid the great saphenous vein crossectomy and perform just flebectomy of the visible veins. Venous duplex studies were performed preoperatively, a month and a year postoperatively. The clinical assessment was done by the Fligelstone scale. The baseline CEAP clinical classification was: 58% C2, 26% C3 and 15% C4-6. The new strategy was applied to all cases. 3 haematomas, 7 cases of asymptomatic partial anterior saphenous thrombosis. Reduction of the initial average diameter was from 6.4 mm anterior saphenous to 3.4 mm by one year (p <0.001). At twelve months a forward flow is maintained in 82% of cases. Recurrence of varicose veins was 8%. All patients improved their clinical status based on the Fligelstone scale. Cases with saphenous diameter bigger than 7.5 mm and obesity were identified as predictors of worse clinical and hemodynamic outcome. This modified surgical strategy for anterior saphenous varicose veins results in better clinical outcomes at one year postoperatively. Copyright © 2015 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Can the American College of Surgeons NSQIP surgical risk calculator identify patients at risk of complications following microsurgical breast reconstruction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Anne C; Bagher, Shaghayegh; Barandun, Marina; Hofer, Stefan O P; Zhong, Toni

    2016-10-01

    The American College of Surgeons National Surgery Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP) Surgical Risk Calculator is an open access online tool that estimates the risk of adverse post-operative events for a wide range of surgical procedures. This study evaluates the predictive value of the ACS NSQIP calculator in patients undergoing microvascular breast reconstruction. Details of 759 microvascular breast reconstructions in 515 patients were entered into the online calculator. The predicted rates of post-operative complications were recorded and compared to observed complications identified on chart review. The calculator was validated using three statistical measures described in the original development of the ACS NSQIP model. The calculator predicted that complications would occur in 11.1% of breast reconstructions while the observed rate was 10.5%. Hosmer-Lemeshow test did not find any statistical difference between these rates (p = 0.69) indicating that the calculator accurately measured what is was intended to measure. The area under the receiver operating curve or c-statistic (measure of discrimination) was found to be low at 0.548, indicating the model has random performance in this patient population. The Brier score was higher than that reported in the original ACS calculator development (0.094 vs 0.069) demonstrating poor correlation between predicted probability and actual probability. This study demonstrates that while the ACS NSQIP Universal risk calculator can predict the proportion of patients that will develop complications it cannot effectively discriminate between patients who are at risk of complications and those who are not. Copyright © 2016 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The effect of intraoral suction on oxygen-enriched surgical environments: a mechanism for reducing the risk of surgical fires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanCleave, Andrea M; Jones, James E; McGlothlin, James D; Saxen, Mark A; Sanders, Brian J; Vinson, LaQuia A

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a mechanical model was applied in order to replicate potential surgical fire conditions in an oxygen-enriched environment with and without high-volume suction typical for dental surgical applications. During 41 trials, 3 combustion events were measured: an audible pop, a visible flash of light, and full ignition. In at least 11 of 21 trials without suction, all 3 conditions were observed, sometimes with an extent of fire that required early termination of the experimental trial. By contrast, in 18 of 20 with-suction trials, ignition did not occur at all, and in the 2 cases where ignition did occur, the fire was qualitatively a much smaller, candle-like flame. Statistically comparing these 3 combustion events in the no-suction versus with-suction trials, ignition (P = .0005), audible pop (P = .0211), and flash (P = .0092) were all significantly more likely in the no-suction condition. These results suggest a possible significant and new element to be added to existing surgical fire safety protocols toward making surgical fires the "never-events" they should be.

  13. Risk factors for laboratory-confirmed bloodstream infection in neonates undergoing surgical procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Maia de Castro Romanelli

    Full Text Available Background Healthcare Associated Infections constitute an important problem in Neonatal Units and invasive devices are frequently involved. However, studies on risk factors of newborns who undergo surgical procedures are scarce. Objective To identify risk factors for laboratory-confirmed bloodstream infection in neonates undergoing surgical procedures. Methods This case–control study was conducted from January 2008 to May 2011, in a referral center. Cases were of 21 newborns who underwent surgery and presented the first episode of laboratory-confirmed bloodstream infection. Control was 42 newborns who underwent surgical procedures without notification of laboratory-confirmed bloodstream infection in the study period. Information was obtained from the database of the Hospital Infection Control Committee Notification of infections and related clinical data of patients that routinely collected by trained professionals and follow the recommendations of Agência Nacional de Vigilância Sanitária and analyzed with Statistical Package for Social Sciences. Results During the study period, 1141 patients were admitted to Neonatal Unit and 582 Healthcare Associated Infections were reported (incidence-density of 25.75 Healthcare Associated Infections/patient-days. In the comparative analysis, a higher proportion of laboratory-confirmed bloodstream infection was observed in preterm infants undergoing surgery (p = 0.03 and use of non-invasive ventilation was a protective factor (p = 0.048. Statistically significant difference was also observed for mechanical ventilation duration (p = 0.004, duration of non-invasive ventilation (p = 0.04, and parenteral nutrition duration (p = 0.003. In multivariate analysis duration of parenteral nutrition remained significantly associated with laboratory-confirmed bloodstream infection (p = 0.041. Conclusions Shortening time on parenteral nutrition whenever possible and preference for non-invasive ventilation in neonates

  14. Environmental Risk Assessment of Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strandberg, B.; Kjær, C.; Hindar, K.

    It was the aim of this NordTest project to propose improvements that prepare us to assess ecological risks to the environment associated with releases of existing and coming GMO cases. The report is separated into three sections. The first describes the frames of ecological risk assessment...

  15. Environmental Risk Assessment of Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strandberg, B.; Kjær, C.; Hindar, K.

    It was the aim of this NordTest project to propose improvements that prepare us to assess ecological risks to the environment associated with releases of existing and coming GMO cases. The report is separated into three sections. The first describes the frames of ecological risk assessment...

  16. Umbilical Hernia in Peritoneal Dialysis Patients: Surgical Treatment and Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banshodani, Masataka; Kawanishi, Hideki; Moriishi, Misaki; Shintaku, Sadanori; Ago, Rika; Hashimoto, Shinji; Nishihara, Masahiro; Tsuchiya, Shinichiro

    2015-12-01

    No previous reports have focused on surgical treatments and risk factors of umbilical hernia alone in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients. Herein, we evaluated the treatments and risk factors. A total of 411 PD patients were enrolled. Of the 15 patients with umbilical hernia (3.6%), six underwent hernioplasty. There was no recurrence in five patients treated with tension-free hernioplasty. The mean PD vintage after onset of hernia in the hernioplasty group tended to be longer than that in the non-hernioplasty group. An incarcerated hernia occurred in one non-hernioplasty patient. Although the incidence was significantly higher among women (P = 0.02), female sex was not a risk factor for umbilical hernia (P = 0.08). Our findings suggest that umbilical hernias should be repaired for continuing PD. Furthermore, there were no significant risk factors for umbilical hernia in PD patients. Future studies with larger sample groups are required to elucidate these risk factors.

  17. Risk Factors Leading to Free Flap Failure: Analysis From the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanati-Mehrizy, Paymon; Massenburg, Benjamin B; Rozehnal, John M; Ingargiola, Michael J; Hernandez Rosa, Jonatan; Taub, Peter J

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this study was to identify risk factors for free flap failure among various anatomically based free flap subgroups. The 2005 to 2012 American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database was queried for patients undergoing microvascular free tissue transfer based on current procedural terminology codes. Univariate analysis was performed to identify any association between flap failure and the following factors: age, gender, race, body mass index (BMI), diabetes, smoking, alcohol use, hypertension, intraoperative transfusion, functional health status, American Society of Anesthesiologists class, operative time, and flap location. Factors yielding a significance of P free flap reconstruction met inclusion criteria. Multivariate logistic regression identified BMI (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.07, P = 0.004) and male gender (AOR = 2.16, P = 0.033) as independent risk factors for flap failure. Among the "breast flaps" subgroup, BMI (AOR = 1.075, P = 0.012) and smoking (AOR = 3.35, P = 0.02) were independent variables associated with flap failure. In "head and neck flaps," operative time (AOR = 1.003, P = 0.018) was an independent risk factor for flap failure. No independent risk factors were identified for the "extremity flaps" or "trunk flaps" subtypes. BMI, smoking, and operative time were identified as independent risk factors for free flap failure among all flaps or within flap subsets.

  18. Rates and risk factors of unplanned 30-day readmission following general and thoracic pediatric surgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polites, Stephanie F; Potter, Donald D; Glasgow, Amy E; Klinkner, Denise B; Moir, Christopher R; Ishitani, Michael B; Habermann, Elizabeth B

    2017-08-01

    Postoperative unplanned readmissions are costly and decrease patient satisfaction; however, little is known about this complication in pediatric surgery. The purpose of this study was to determine rates and predictors of unplanned readmission in a multi-institutional cohort of pediatric surgical patients. Unplanned 30-day readmissions following general and thoracic surgical procedures in children Pediatric. Time-dependent rates of readmission per 30 person-days were determined to account for varied postoperative length of stay (pLOS). Patients were randomly divided into 70% derivation and 30% validation cohorts which were used for creation and validation of a risk model for readmission. Readmission occurred in 1948 (3.6%) of 54,870 children for a rate of 4.3% per 30 person-days. Adjusted predictors of readmission included hepatobiliary procedures, increased wound class, operative duration, complications, and pLOS. The predictive model discriminated well in the derivation and validation cohorts (AUROC 0.710 and 0.701) with good calibration between observed and expected readmission events in both cohorts (p>.05). Unplanned readmission occurs less frequently in pediatric surgery than what is described in adults, calling into question its use as a quality indicator in this population. Factors that predict readmission including type of procedure, complications, and pLOS can be used to identify at-risk children and develop prevention strategies. III. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Surgical risk factors for recurrence in inguinal hernia repair – a review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niebuhr Henning

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite all the progress made in inguinal hernia surgery driven by the development of meshes and laparoendoscopic operative techniques, the proportion of recurrent inguinal hernias is still from 12% to 13%. Recurrences can present very soon after primary inguinal hernia repair generally because of technical failure. However, they can also develop much later after the primary operation probably due to patient-specific factors. Supported by evidence-based data, this review presents the surgical risk factors for recurrent inguinal hernia after the primary operation. The following factors are implicated here: choice of operative technique and mesh, mesh fixation technique, mesh size, management of medial and lateral hernia sac, sliding hernia, lipoma in the inguinal canal, operating time, type of anesthesia, participation in a register database, femoral hernia, postoperative complications, as well as the center and surgeon volume. If these surgical risk factors are taken into account when performing primary inguinal hernia repair, a good outcome can be expected for the patient. Therefore, they should definitely be observed.

  20. Lowering triglycerides to modify cardiovascular risk: will icosapent deliver?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Daniel J; Nicholls, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    Despite the clinical benefits of lowering levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, many patients continue to experience cardiovascular events. This residual risk suggests that additional risk factors require aggressive modification to result in more effective prevention of cardiovascular disease. Hypertriglyceridemia has presented a considerable challenge with regard to understanding its role in the promotion of cardiovascular risk. Increasing evidence has established a clear causal role for elevated triglyceride levels in vascular risk. As a result, there is increasing interest in the development of specific therapeutic strategies that directly target hypertriglyceridemia. This has seen a resurgence in the use of omega-3 fatty acids for the therapeutic lowering of triglyceride levels. The role of these agents and other emerging strategies to reduce triglyceride levels in order to decrease vascular risk are reviewed. PMID:25848301

  1. Lowering triglycerides to modify cardiovascular risk: will icosapent deliver?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Daniel J; Nicholls, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    Despite the clinical benefits of lowering levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, many patients continue to experience cardiovascular events. This residual risk suggests that additional risk factors require aggressive modification to result in more effective prevention of cardiovascular disease. Hypertriglyceridemia has presented a considerable challenge with regard to understanding its role in the promotion of cardiovascular risk. Increasing evidence has established a clear causal role for elevated triglyceride levels in vascular risk. As a result, there is increasing interest in the development of specific therapeutic strategies that directly target hypertriglyceridemia. This has seen a resurgence in the use of omega-3 fatty acids for the therapeutic lowering of triglyceride levels. The role of these agents and other emerging strategies to reduce triglyceride levels in order to decrease vascular risk are reviewed.

  2. Mortality risk factors in critical post-surgical patients treated using continuous renal replacement techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estupiñán-Jiménez, J C; Castro-Rincón, J M; González, O; Lora, D; López, E; Pérez-Cerdà, F

    2015-04-01

    To determine the influence of demographics, medical, and surgical variables on 30-day mortality in patients who need continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). A retrospective-following study was conducted using the data of 112 patients admitted to the postoperative intensive care unit who required CRRT, between August 2006 and August 2011, and followed-up for 30 days. The following information was collected: age, gender, history of HBP, DM, cardiovascular disease, and CKD, urgent surgery, surgical speciality, organic dysfunction according to the SOFA scale, the number of organs with dysfunction, use of mechanical ventilation, diagnostic and origin of sepsis, type of CRRT, and 30-day mortality. General linear models were used for estimating the strength of association (relative risk [RR], and 95% confidence interval [CI] between variables and 30-day mortality. In the univariant analysis, the following variables were identified as risk factors for 30-day mortality: age (RR 1.04; 95% CI 1.01-1.06; P=.0005), and history of cardiovascular disease (RR 1.57; 95% CI 1.02-2.41; P=.039). Among the variables included in the multivariable analysis (age, history of cardiovascular disease, sepsis, and number of organs with dysfunction), only age was identified as an independent risk factor for 30-day mortality (RR 1.03; 95% CI 1.00-1.05; P=.007). Thirty-day mortality in postoperative, critically ill patients who require CRRT is high (41.07%). Age has been identified as an independent risk factor, with renal failure as the most common indication for the use of these therapies. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Little change of modifiable risk factors 1 year after stroke: a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornnes, Nete; Larsen, Klaus; Boysen, Gudrun

    2010-01-01

    Recurrent stroke accounts for about 25% of admissions for acute stroke. For the prevention of recurrent cerebro and cardiovascular disease, stroke patients are advised to change modifiable stroke risk factors before discharge from stroke units.......Recurrent stroke accounts for about 25% of admissions for acute stroke. For the prevention of recurrent cerebro and cardiovascular disease, stroke patients are advised to change modifiable stroke risk factors before discharge from stroke units....

  4. Little change of modifiable risk factors 1 year after stroke: a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornnes, Nete; Larsen, Klaus; Boysen, Gudrun

    2010-01-01

    Recurrent stroke accounts for about 25% of admissions for acute stroke. For the prevention of recurrent cerebro and cardiovascular disease, stroke patients are advised to change modifiable stroke risk factors before discharge from stroke units.......Recurrent stroke accounts for about 25% of admissions for acute stroke. For the prevention of recurrent cerebro and cardiovascular disease, stroke patients are advised to change modifiable stroke risk factors before discharge from stroke units....

  5. Lowering triglycerides to modify cardiovascular risk: will icosapent deliver?

    OpenAIRE

    Scherer DJ; Nicholls SJ

    2015-01-01

    Daniel J Scherer,1 Stephen J Nicholls2 1Cardiovascular Investigation Unit, Royal Adelaide Hospital, 2South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA, Australia Abstract: Despite the clinical benefits of lowering levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, many patients continue to experience cardiovascular events. This residual risk suggests that additional risk factors require aggressive modification to result in more effective prevention of c...

  6. Lowering triglycerides to modify cardiovascular risk: will icosapent deliver?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scherer DJ

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Daniel J Scherer,1 Stephen J Nicholls2 1Cardiovascular Investigation Unit, Royal Adelaide Hospital, 2South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA, Australia Abstract: Despite the clinical benefits of lowering levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, many patients continue to experience cardiovascular events. This residual risk suggests that additional risk factors require aggressive modification to result in more effective prevention of cardiovascular disease. Hypertriglyceridemia has presented a considerable challenge with regard to understanding its role in the promotion of cardiovascular risk. Increasing evidence has established a clear causal role for elevated triglyceride levels in vascular risk. As a result, there is increasing interest in the development of specific therapeutic strategies that directly target hypertriglyceridemia. This has seen a resurgence in the use of omega-3 fatty acids for the therapeutic lowering of triglyceride levels. The role of these agents and other emerging strategies to reduce triglyceride levels in order to decrease vascular risk are reviewed. Keywords: hypertriglyceridemia, omega-3 fatty acid, fish oil, cardiovascular risk, lipids

  7. Risk burdens of modifiable risk factors incorporating lipoprotein (a) and low serum albumin concentrations for first incident acute myocardial infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qin; He, Yong-Ming; Cai, Dong-Ping; Yang, Xiang-Jun; Xu, Hai-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Risk burdens of modifiable risk factors incorporating lipoprotein (a) (Lp(a)) and low serum albumin (LSA) concentrations for first incident acute myocardial infarction (AMI) haven’t been studied previously. Cross-sectional study of 1552 cases and 6125 controls was performed for identifying the association of risk factors with first incident AMI and their corresponding population attributable risks (PARs). Modifiable risk factors incorporating LSA and Lp(a) accounted for up to 92% of PAR for first incident AMI. Effects of these risk factors were different in different sexes across different age categories. Overall, smoking and LSA were the 2 strongest risk factors, together accounting for 64% of PAR for first incident AMI. After multivariable adjustment, Lp(a) and LSA accounted for 19% and 41%, respectively, and together for more than a half (54%) of PAR for first incident AMI. Modifiable risk factors incorporating LSA and Lp(a) have accounted for an overwhelmingly large proportion of the risk of first incident AMI, indicating most first incident AMI is preventable. The knowledge of risk burdens for first incident AMI incorporating Lp (a) and LSA may be beneficial for further reducing first incident AMI from a new angle. PMID:27748452

  8. Analysis of Surgical Site Infection after Musculoskeletal Tumor Surgery: Risk Assessment Using a New Scoring System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Nagano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgical site infection (SSI has not been extensively studied in musculoskeletal tumors (MST owing to the rarity of the disease. We analyzed incidence and risk factors of SSI in MST. SSI incidence was evaluated in consecutive 457 MST cases (benign, 310 cases and malignant, 147 cases treated at our institution. A detailed analysis of the clinical background of the patients, pre- and postoperative hematological data, and other factors that might be associated with SSI incidence was performed for malignant MST cases. SSI occurred in 0.32% and 12.2% of benign and malignant MST cases, respectively. The duration of the surgery (P=0.0002 and intraoperative blood loss (P=0.0005 was significantly more in the SSI group than in the non-SSI group. We established the musculoskeletal oncological surgery invasiveness (MOSI index by combining 4 risk factors (blood loss, operation duration, preoperative chemotherapy, and the use of artificial materials. The MOSI index (0–4 points score significantly correlated with the risk of SSI, as demonstrated by an SSI incidence of 38.5% in the group with a high score (3-4 points. The MOSI index score and laboratory data at 1 week after surgery could facilitate risk evaluation and prompt diagnosis of SSI.

  9. Patient-related risk factors for surgical site infection following eight types of gastrointestinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, H

    2016-08-01

    To identify patient-related risk factors for surgical site infection (SSI) following eight types of gastrointestinal surgery that could be collected as part of infection surveillance efforts. Record linkage from existing datasets comprising the Japan Nosocomial Infections Surveillance (JANIS) and Diagnosis Procedure Combination (DPC) programmes. Patient data from 35 hospitals were retrieved using JANIS and DPC from 2007 to 2011. Patient-related factors and the incidence of SSI were recorded and analysed. Risk factors associated with SSI were examined using multi-level mixed-effects logistic regression models. In total, 2074 appendectomies; 2084 bile duct, liver or pancreatic procedures; 3460 cholecystectomies; 7273 colonic procedures; 482 oesophageal procedures; 4748 gastric procedures; 2762 rectal procedures and 1202 small bowel procedures were analysed. Using multi-variate analyses, intra-operative blood transfusion was found to be a risk factor for SSI following all types of gastrointestinal surgery, except appendectomy and small bowel surgery. In addition, diabetes was found to be a risk factor for SSI following colon surgery [odds ratio (OR) 1.23, P=0.028] and gastric surgery (OR 1.70, PInfection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Combining the ASA Physical Classification System and Continuous Intraoperative Surgical Apgar Score Measurement in Predicting Postoperative Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jering, Monika Zdenka; Marolen, Khensani N; Shotwell, Matthew S; Denton, Jason N; Sandberg, Warren S; Ehrenfeld, Jesse Menachem

    2015-11-01

    The surgical Apgar score predicts major 30-day postoperative complications using data assessed at the end of surgery. We hypothesized that evaluating the surgical Apgar score continuously during surgery may identify patients at high risk for postoperative complications. We retrospectively identified general, vascular, and general oncology patients at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. Logistic regression methods were used to construct a series of predictive models in order to continuously estimate the risk of major postoperative complications, and to alert care providers during surgery should the risk exceed a given threshold. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) was used to evaluate the discriminative ability of a model utilizing a continuously measured surgical Apgar score relative to models that use only preoperative clinical factors or continuously monitored individual constituents of the surgical Apgar score (i.e. heart rate, blood pressure, and blood loss). AUROC estimates were validated internally using a bootstrap method. 4,728 patients were included. Combining the ASA PS classification with continuously measured surgical Apgar score demonstrated improved discriminative ability (AUROC 0.80) in the pooled cohort compared to ASA (0.73) and the surgical Apgar score alone (0.74). To optimize the tradeoff between inadequate and excessive alerting with future real-time notifications, we recommend a threshold probability of 0.24. Continuous assessment of the surgical Apgar score is predictive for major postoperative complications. In the future, real-time notifications might allow for detection and mitigation of changes in a patient's accumulating risk of complications during a surgical procedure.

  11. Incidence and Predicted Risk Factors of Pressure Ulcers in Surgical Patients: Experience at a Medical Center in Taipei, Taiwan

    OpenAIRE

    Ling Fu Shaw; Pao-Chu Chang; Jung-Fen Lee; Huei-Yu Kung; Tao-Hsin Tung

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To explore the context of incidence of and associated risk factors for pressure ulcers amongst the population of surgical patients. Methods. The initial study cohort was conducted with a total of 297 patients admitted to a teaching hospital for a surgical operation from November 14th to 27th 2006 in Taipei, Taiwan. The Braden scale, pressure ulcers record sheet, and perioperative patient outcomes free from signs and symptoms of injury related to positioning and related nursing interv...

  12. Population attributable risk of breast cancer in white women associated with immediately modifiable risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glaser Sally L

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Estrogen/progestin replacement therapy (EPRT, alcohol consumption, physical activity, and breast-feeding duration differ from other factors associated with breast cancer in being immediately modifiable by the individual, thereby representing attractive targets for future breast cancer prevention efforts. To justify such efforts, it is vital to quantify the potential population-level impacts on breast cancer considering population variations in behavior prevalence, risk estimate, and baseline incidence. Methods For each of these four factors, we calculated population attributable risk percents (PARs using population-based survey (2001 and cancer registry data (1998–2002 for 41 subpopulations of white, non-Hispanic California women aged 40–79 years, and ranges of relative risk (RR estimates from the literature. Results Using a single RR estimate, subpopulation PARs ranged from 2.5% to 5.6% for hormone use, from 0.0% to 6.1% for recent consumption of >= 2 alcoholic drinks daily, and 4.6% to 11.0% for physical inactivity. Using a range of RR estimates, PARs were 2–11% for EPRT use, 1–20% for alcohol consumption and 2–15% for physical inactivity. Subpopulation data were unavailable for breastfeeding, but PARs using published RR estimates ranged from 2% to 11% for lifetime breastfeeding >= 31 months. Thus, of 13,019 breast cancers diagnosed annually in California, as many as 1,432 attributable to EPRT use, 2,604 attributable to alcohol consumption, 1,953 attributable to physical inactivity, and 1,432 attributable to never breastfeeding might be avoidable. Conclusion The relatively feasible lifestyle changes of discontinuing EPRT use, reducing alcohol consumption, increasing physical activity, and lengthening breastfeeding duration could lower population breast cancer incidence substantially.

  13. Systematic review of risk factors for surgical site infection in pediatric scoliosis surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanyam, Rajeev; Schaffzin, Joshua; Cudilo, Elizabeth M; Rao, Marepalli B; Varughese, Anna M

    2015-06-01

    Risk factors for surgical site infection (SSI) in children derived from the studies in the adult population are potentially misleading because of differences in pathophysiology and management. This systematic review addresses the key question: What are the risk factors for SSI in pediatric patients undergoing scoliosis surgery? This is a qualitative systematic literature review. Retrospective and observational trials of children undergoing scoliosis surgery reported on the occurrence of risk factors for SSI and the occurrence of SSI. Pubmed (Medline), Ovid Evidence-Based Medicine Reviews (EBMR), Scopus, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health (CINAHL) were searched electronically for relevant articles in all the languages between January 1, 1991 and August 27, 2012, and cross-references were checked. Two independent reviewers identified articles and appraised quality with the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) criteria based on a weighted scoring of 0 to 100. Our search identified 135 abstracts and 14 studies meeting the inclusion criteria. The AHRQ grading showed that five articles were high quality with a score of greater than 67, and five articles were moderate quality with a score between 50 and 67. The percent agreement between the two independent reviewers was 84%, and kappa agreement score was 0.91 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.78-1.03). There were 76 risk factors identified, of which 22 factors were reported in more than one study. Odds ratios and 95% CIs were reported inconsistently. Pooled p analysis of high- and moderate-quality articles identified five risk factors predictive of SSI: inappropriate antibiotic use (p=.001), neuromuscular scoliosis (p=.014), instrumentation (p=.023), increased hospital stay days (p=.003), and residual postoperative curve (p=.003). The systematic review identified inappropriate antibiotic use, neuromuscular scoliosis, instrumentation, increased hospital stay days, and residual postoperative curve

  14. Short Operative Duration and Surgical Site Infection Risk in Hip and Knee Arthroplasty Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicks, Kristen V; Baker, Arthur W; Durkin, Michael J; Anderson, Deverick J; Moehring, Rebekah W; Chen, Luke F; Sexton, Daniel J; Weber, David J; Lewis, Sarah S

    2015-12-01

    To determine the association (1) between shorter operative duration and surgical site infection (SSI) and (2) between surgeon median operative duration and SSI risk among first-time hip and knee arthroplasties. Retrospective cohort study A total of 43 community hospitals located in the southeastern United States. Adults who developed SSIs according to National Healthcare Safety Network criteria within 365 days of first-time knee or hip arthroplasties performed between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2012. Log-binomial regression models estimated the association (1) between operative duration and SSI outcome and (2) between surgeon median operative duration and SSI outcome. Hip and knee arthroplasties were evaluated in separate models. Each model was adjusted for American Society of Anesthesiology score and patient age. A total of 25,531 hip arthroplasties and 42,187 knee arthroplasties were included in the study. The risk of SSI in knee arthroplasties with an operative duration shorter than the 25th percentile was 0.40 times the risk of SSI in knee arthroplasties with an operative duration between the 25th and 75th percentile (risk ratio [RR], 0.40; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.38-0.56; P<.01). Short operative duration did not demonstrate significant association with SSI for hip arthroplasties (RR, 1.04; 95% CI, 0.79-1.37; P=.36). Knee arthroplasty surgeons with shorter median operative durations had a lower risk of SSI than surgeons with typical median operative durations (RR, 0.52; 95% CI, 0.43-0.64; P<.01). Short operative durations were not associated with a higher SSI risk for knee or hip arthroplasty procedures in our analysis.

  15. Risk factors for aminoglycoside-associated nephrotoxicity in surgical intensive care unit patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, Anthony T; Stawicki, Stanislaw P; Cook, Charles H; Murphy, Claire

    2011-01-01

    Background: Aminoglycosides are commonly used antibiotics in the intensive care unit (ICU), but are associated with nephrotoxicity. This study evaluated the development of aminoglycoside-associated nephrotoxicity (AAN) in a single surgical intensive care unit. Materials and Methods: Adult patients in our surgical ICU who received more than two doses of aminoglycosides were retrospectively reviewed for demographics, serum creatinine, receipt of nephrotoxins [angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, angiotensin-II receptor blockers, diuretics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, cyclosporine, tacrolimus, vasopressors, vancomycin and intravenous iodinated contrast] and the need for dialysis. AAN was defined as an increase in serum creatinine >0.5 mg/dL on at least 2 consecutive days. Univariate and multiple regression analyses were performed. Results: Sixty-one patients (43 males) receiving aminoglycoside were evaluated. Mean age, weight, initial serum creatinine, and duration of aminoglycoside therapy were 58.7 (±15) years, 83.3 (±24.4) kg, 0.9 (±0.5) mg/dL, and 4 (±2.3) days, respectively. Thirty-one (51%) aminoglycoside recipients also received additional nephrotoxins. Seven aminoglycoside recipients (11.5%) developed AAN, four of whom required dialysis and all had received additional nephrotoxins. Only concurrent use of vasopressors (P = 0.041) and vancomycin (P = 0.002) were statistically associated with AAN. Receipt of vasopressors or vancomycin were independent predictors of acute kidney insufficiency (AKI) with odds ratios of 19.9 (95% CI: 1.6–245, P = 0.019) and 49.8 (95% CI: 4.1–602, P = 0.002), respectively. Four patients (6.6%) required dialysis. Conclusions: In critically ill surgical patients receiving aminoglycosides, AAN occurred in 11.5% of the patients. Concurrent use of aminoglycosides with other nephrotoxins increased the risk of AAN. PMID:22096769

  16. Spinal epidural abscesses: risk factors, medical versus surgical management, a retrospective review of 128 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Amit R; Alton, Timothy B; Bransford, Richard J; Lee, Michael J; Bellabarba, Carlo B; Chapman, Jens R

    2014-02-01

    Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is a rare, serious and increasingly frequent diagnosis. Ideal management (medical vs. surgical) remains controversial. The purpose of this study is to assess the impact of risk factors, organisms, location and extent of SEA on neurologic outcome after medical management or surgery in combination with medical management. Retrospective electronic medical record (EMR) review. We included 128 consecutive, spontaneous SEA from a single tertiary medical center, from January 2005 to September 11. There were 79 male and 49 female with a mean age of 52.9 years (range, 22-83). Patient demographics, presenting complaints, radiographic features, pre/post-treatment neurologic status (ASIA motor score [MS] 0-100), treatment (medical vs. surgical) and clinical follow-up were recorded. Neurologic status was determined before treatment and at last available clinical encounter. Imaging studies reviewed location/extent of pathology. Inclusion criteria were a diagnosis of a bacterial SEA based on radiographs and/or intraoperative findings, age greater than 18 years, and adequate EMR. Exclusion criteria were postinterventional infections, Pott's disease, isolated discitis/osteomyelitis, treatment initiated at an outside facility, and imaging suggestive of a SEA but negative intraoperative findings/cultures. The mean follow-up was 241 days. The presenting chief complaint was site-specific pain (100%), subjective fevers (50%), and weakness (47%). In this cohort, 54.7% had lumbar, 39.1% thoracic, 35.9% cervical, and 23.4% sacral involvement spanning an average of 3.85 disc levels. There were 36% ventral, 41% dorsal, and 23% circumferential infections. Risk factors included a history of IV drug abuse (39.1%), diabetes mellitus (21.9%), and no risk factors (22.7%). Pathogens were methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (40%) and methicillin-resistance S aureus (30%). Location, SEA extent, and pathogen did not impact MS recovery. Fifty-one patients were

  17. Surgical Techniques to Increase the Apicocoronal Dimension of the Attached Gingiva: A 1-Year Comparison Between the Free Gingival Graft and the Modified Apically Repositioned Flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnio, João; Camargo, Paulo M; Pirih, Paulo Q

    2015-01-01

    The attached gingiva is a desirable anatomical element for the maintenance of gingival health. The free gingival graft (FGG) and the modified apically repositioned flap (MARF) are predictable surgical techniques often employed to increase the zone of attached gingiva. This randomized study compared the FGG and the MARF in increasing the zone of attached gingiva in contralateral sides of 15 patients 1 year posttreatment. There was an increase in keratinized tissue and attached gingiva in both groups. Gingival recession did not significantly change between pre- and posttreatment levels in either group. The MARF surgical time was approximately half as long as that of the FGG. The authors conclude that both techniques are viable; however, the main advantages of the MARF were decreased surgical time and less postoperative discomfort.

  18. Surgical treatment of synovial osteochondromatosis of the hip using a modified-Hardinge approach with a Z-shaped capsular incision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Takeda

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Synovial osteochondromatosis of the hip is a rare condition, and the surgical treatment approach for this condition requires complete removal of loose bodies combined with synovectomy. While these, procedures are generally accepted as the optimal treatment method, this is still controversial topic. Recent studies have reported that open surgical procedures remain acceptable for synovial osteochondromatosis of the hip. These procedures include the dislocation of the femoral head, and complications such as femoral head necrosis and bursitis or great trochanter non-union due to trochanteric osteotomy have been reported. The present study reports a modified technique for surgical dislocation through a Z-shaped capsular incision without trochanteric flip osteotomy for the treatment of synovial osteochondromatosis of the hip.

  19. Performance of Surgical Risk Scores to Predict Mortality after Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Sinnott Silva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Predicting mortality in patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI remains a challenge. Objectives: To evaluate the performance of 5 risk scores for cardiac surgery in predicting the 30-day mortality among patients of the Brazilian Registry of TAVI. Methods: The Brazilian Multicenter Registry prospectively enrolled 418 patients undergoing TAVI in 18 centers between 2008 and 2013. The 30-day mortality risk was calculated using the following surgical scores: the logistic EuroSCORE I (ESI, EuroSCORE II (ESII, Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS score, Ambler score (AS and Guaragna score (GS. The performance of the risk scores was evaluated in terms of their calibration (Hosmer–Lemeshow test and discrimination [area under the receiver–operating characteristic curve (AUC]. Results: The mean age was 81.5 ± 7.7 years. The CoreValve (Medtronic was used in 86.1% of the cohort, and the transfemoral approach was used in 96.2%. The observed 30-day mortality was 9.1%. The 30-day mortality predicted by the scores was as follows: ESI, 20.2 ± 13.8%; ESII, 6.5 ± 13.8%; STS score, 14.7 ± 4.4%; AS, 7.0 ± 3.8%; GS, 17.3 ± 10.8%. Using AUC, none of the tested scores could accurately predict the 30-day mortality. AUC for the scores was as follows: 0.58 [95% confidence interval (CI: 0.49 to 0.68, p = 0.09] for ESI; 0.54 (95% CI: 0.44 to 0.64, p = 0.42 for ESII; 0.57 (95% CI: 0.47 to 0.67, p = 0.16 for AS; 0.48 (95% IC: 0.38 to 0.57, p = 0.68 for STS score; and 0.52 (95% CI: 0.42 to 0.62, p = 0.64 for GS. The Hosmer–Lemeshow test indicated acceptable calibration for all scores (p > 0.05. Conclusions: In this real world Brazilian registry, the surgical risk scores were inaccurate in predicting mortality after TAVI. Risk models specifically developed for TAVI are required.

  20. Surgical Margins and the Risk of Local-Regional Recurrence After Mastectomy Without Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Childs, Stephanie K. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Chen Yuhui [Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Duggan, Margaret M. [Department of Surgery, Faulkner Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Golshan, Mehra [Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Pochebit, Stephen [Department of Pathology, Faulkner Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Wong, Julia S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Bellon, Jennifer R., E-mail: jbellon@lroc.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: Although positive surgical margins are generally associated with a higher risk of local-regional recurrence (LRR) for most solid tumors, their significance after mastectomy remains unclear. We sought to clarify the influence of the mastectomy margin on the risk of LRR. Methods and Materials: The retrospective cohort consisted of 397 women who underwent mastectomy and no radiation for newly diagnosed invasive breast cancer from 1998-2005. Time to isolated LRR and time to distant metastasis (DM) were evaluated by use of cumulative-incidence analysis and competing-risks regression analysis. DM was considered a competing event for analysis of isolated LRR. Results: The median follow-up was 6.7 years (range, 0.5-12.8 years). The superficial margin was positive in 41 patients (10%) and close ({<=}2 mm) in 56 (14%). The deep margin was positive in 23 patients (6%) and close in 34 (9%). The 5-year LRR and DM rates for all patients were 2.4% (95% confidence interval, 0.9-4.0) and 3.5% (95% confidence interval, 1.6-5.3) respectively. Fourteen patients had an LRR. Margin status was significantly associated with time to isolated LRR (P=.04); patients with positive margins had a 5-year LRR of 6.2%, whereas patients with close margins and negative margins had 5-year LRRs of 1.5% and 1.9%, respectively. On univariate analysis, positive margins, positive nodes, lymphovascular invasion, grade 3 histology, and triple-negative subtype were associated with significantly higher rates of LRR. When these factors were included in a multivariate analysis, only positive margins and triple-negative subtype were associated with the risk of LRR. Conclusions: Patients with positive mastectomy margins had a significantly higher rate of LRR than those with a close or negative margin. However, the absolute risk of LRR in patients with a positive surgical margin in this series was low, and therefore the benefit of postmastectomy radiation in this population with otherwise favorable

  1. Genetic modifiers of CHEK2*1100delC-associated breast cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muranen, Taru A; Greco, Dario; Blomqvist, Carl

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: CHEK2*1100delC is a founder variant in European populations that confers a two- to threefold increased risk of breast cancer (BC). Epidemiologic and family studies have suggested that the risk associated with CHEK2*1100delC is modified by other genetic factors in a multiplicative fashion...

  2. Genetic modifiers of menopausal hormone replacement therapy and breast cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudolph, Anja; Hein, Rebecca; Lindström, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Women using menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) are at increased risk of developing breast cancer (BC). To detect genetic modifiers of the association between current use of MHT and BC risk, we conducted a meta-analysis of four genome-wide case-only studies followed by replication in 11 case...

  3. [Surgical therapeutic strategy in vital risk polytrauma with multiple organ injuries, case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munteanu, Iulia; Stefan, S; Isloi, Anca; Coca, I C; Baroi, Genoveva; Radu, L; Lăpuşneanu, A; Tamaş, Camelia

    2008-01-01

    The medical interest for trauma pathology is incresing, due to the gravity of the given injuries. The surgical therapeutic strategy used is directly related to the localization and to the type of the trauma. The supplementary lesions and their vital risk also matter. The multidisciplinary team approach is the key to resolve this type of lesions with a good outcome. We recently observed an increasing tendency toward the rise of number and variety of patients with trauma, due to the great diversity of the etiopathogenic agents. The most important factor, during the assessment of a politraumatised patient is to diagnose correctly the functional deficits of vital organs and establish the vital prognosis. It is necessary to adopt the best and fast therapeutic strategy in order to obtain rapid life-saving decisions.

  4. Scientific Opinion updating the risk assessment conclusions and risk management recommendations on the genetically modified insect resistant maize MON 810

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Genetically Modified Organisms (GMO

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Following a request from the European Commission, the Panel on Genetically Modified Organisms of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA GMO Panel compiled its previous risk assessment conclusions and risk management recommendations on the genetically modified insect resistant maize MON 810, and considered their validity in the light of new relevant scientific publications published from 2009 onwards. Following a search of the scientific literature published between 2009 and October 2012, the EFSA GMO Panel identified 165 peer-reviewed publications containing evidence specific to the risk assessment and/or management of maize MON 810, of which 68 publications were discussed and/or cited in previous EFSA GMO Panel scientific outputs. From the remaining 97 publications, eight were relevant for the molecular characterisation, 27 for food and feed safety assessment, 55 for the environmental risk assessment and/or risk management, two for the molecular characterisation and the environmental risk assessment and/or risk management and five for the food and feed safety assessment and the environmental risk assessment and/or risk management of maize MON 810. None of these publications reported new information that would invalidate the previous conclusions on the safety of maize MON 810 made by the EFSA GMO Panel. Therefore, the EFSA GMO Panel considers that its previous risk assessment conclusions on maize MON 810, as well as its previous recommendations on risk mitigation measures and monitoring, remain valid and applicable.

  5. Surgical Treatment of Malar Bone Fracture by a Modified Preauricular Temporal Approach (Al-Kayat-Brameley method) : Report of 2 cases

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    Although there have been various reports on improving visibility and safety in the surgical approach to the malar bone, post-operative problems such as sensory loss over the distribution of the auriculotemporal region and undersirable cosmetic results are not uncommon. In 1979, Al-Kayat and Brameley reported on a modified preauricular approach to the malar arch and temporomandibular joint. Since 1990, we have applied this method to malar arch fractures and the result revealed that the method ...

  6. Modifiable risk factors in periodontitis: at the intersection of aging and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Mark A

    2014-02-01

    Chronic inflammation is a prominent feature of aging and of common age-related diseases, including atherosclerosis, cancer and periodontitis. This volume examines modifiable risk factors for periodontitis and other chronic inflammatory diseases. Oral bacterial communities and viral infections, particularly with cytomegalovirus and other herpesviruses, elicit distinct immune responses and are central in the initiation of periodontal diseases. Risk of disease is dynamic and changes in response to complex interactions of genetic, environmental and stochastic factors over the lifespan. Many modifiable risk factors, such as smoking and excess caloric intake, contribute to increases in systemic markers of inflammation and can modify gene regulation through a variety of biologic mechanisms (e.g. epigenetic modifications). Periodontitis and other common chronic inflammatory diseases share multiple modifiable risk factors, such as tobacco smoking, psychological stress and depression, alcohol consumption, obesity, diabetes, metabolic syndrome and osteoporosis. Interventions that target modifiable risk factors have the potential to improve risk profiles for periodontitis as well as for other common chronic diseases.

  7. Epidemiology, classification, and modifiable risk factors of peripheral arterial disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas W Shammas

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Nicolas W ShammasMidwest Cardiovascular Research Foundation, Cardiovascular Medicine, PC, Davenport, IA, USAAbstract: Peripheral arterial disease (PAD is part of a global vascular problem of diffuse atherosclerosis. PAD patients die mostly of cardiac and cerebrovascular-related events and much less frequently due to obstructive disease of the lower extremities. Aggressive risk factors modification is needed to reduce cardiac mortality in PAD patients. These include smoking cessation, reduction of blood pressure to current guidelines, aggressive low density lipoprotein lowering, losing weight, controlling diabetes and the use of oral antiplatelet drugs such as aspirin or clopidogrel. In addition to quitting smoking and exercise, cilostazol and statins have been shown to reduce claudication in patients with PAD. Patients with critical rest limb ischemia or severe progressive claudication need to be treated with revascularization to minimize the chance of limb loss, reduce symptoms, and improve quality of life.Keywords: peripheral arterial disease, epidemiology, risk factors, classification

  8. Past history of skin infection and risk of surgical site infection after elective surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraday, Nauder; Rock, Peter; Lin, Elaina E; Perl, Trish M; Carroll, Karen; Stierer, Tracey; Robarts, Polly; McFillin, Angela; Ross, Tracy; Shah, Ashish S; Riley, Lee H; Tamargo, Rafael J; Black, James H; Blasco-Colmenares, Elena; Guallar, Eliseo

    2013-01-01

    To identify baseline patient characteristics associated with increased susceptibility to surgical site infection (SSI) after elective surgery. The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services considers SSI to be preventable through adherence to current infection control practices; however, the etiology of wound infection is incompletely understood. Prospective cohort study involving patients undergoing cardiac, vascular, craniotomy, and spinal surgery at 2 academic medical centers in Baltimore, MD. A comprehensive medical history was obtained at baseline, and participants were followed for 6 months using active inpatient and outpatient surveillance for deep SSI and infectious death. Infection control best practices were monitored perioperatively. The relative risk of SSI/infectious death was determined comparing those with versus those without a past medical history of skin infection using Cox proportional hazards models. Of 613 patients (mean [SD] = 62.3 [11.5] years; 42.1% women), 22.0% reported a history of skin infection. The cumulative incidence of deep SSI/infectious death was 6.7% versus 3.1% for those with and without a history of skin infection, respectively (unadjusted hazard ratio (HR) = 2.25; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 0.98-5.14; P = 0.055). Risk estimates increased after adjustments for demographic and socioeconomic variables (HR = 2.82; 95% CI, 1.18-6.74; P = 0.019) and after propensity score adjustment for all potential confounders (HR = 3.41; 95% CI, 1.36-8.59; P = 0.009). Adjustments for intraoperative infection risk factors and adherence to infection control best practice metrics had no impact on risk estimates. A history of skin infection identified a state of enhanced susceptibility to SSI at baseline that is independent of traditional SSI risk factors and adherence to current infection control practices.

  9. Risk factors for adjacent segment degeneration after surgical correction of degenerative lumbar scoliosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kee-yong Ha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Degenerative lumbar scoliosis surgery can lead to development of adjacent segment degeneration (ASD after lumbar or thoracolumbar fusion. Its incidence, risk factors, morbidity and correlation between radiological and clinical symptoms of ASD have no consensus. We evaluated the correlation between the occurrence of radiologic adjacent segment disease and certain imperative parameters. Materials and Methods: 98 patients who had undergone surgical correction and lumbar/thoracolumbar fusion with pedicle screw instrumentation for degenerative lumbar scoliosis with a minimum 5 year followup were included in the study. We evaluated the correlation between the occurrence of radiologic adjacent segment disease and imperative patient parameters like age at operation, sex, body mass index (BMI, medical comorbidities and bone mineral density (BMD. The radiological parameters taken into consideration were Cobb′s angle, angle type, lumbar lordosis, pelvic incidence, intercristal line, preoperative existence of an ASD on plain radiograph and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and surgical parameters were number of the fusion level, decompression level, floating OP (interlumbar fusion excluding L5-S1 level and posterolateral lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF. Clinical outcomes were assessed with the Visual Analogue Score (VAS and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI. Results: ASD was present in 44 (44.9% patients at an average period of 48.0 months (range 6-98 months. Factors related to occurrence of ASD were preoperative existence of disc degeneration (as revealed by MRI and age at operation ( P = 0.0001, 0.0364. There were no statistically significant differences between radiological adjacent segment degeneration and clinical results (VAS, P = 0.446; ODI, P = 0.531. Conclusions: Patients over the age of 65 years and with preoperative disc degeneration (as revealed by plain radiograph and MRI were at a higher risk of developing ASD.

  10. Risk Factors for Postoperative Fibrinogen Deficiency after Surgical Removal of Intracranial Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Naili; Jia, Yanfei; Wang, Xiu; Zhang, Yinian; Yuan, Guoqiang; Zhao, Baotian; Wang, Yao; Zhang, Kai; Zhang, Xinding; Pan, Yawen; Zhang, Jianguo

    2015-01-01

    Higher levels of fibrinogen, a critical element in hemostasis, are associated with increased postoperative survival rates, especially for patients with massive operative blood loss. Fibrinogen deficiency after surgical management of intracranial tumors may result in postoperative intracranial bleeding and severely worsen patient outcomes. However, no previous studies have systematically identified factors associated with postoperative fibrinogen deficiency. In this study, we retrospectively analyzed data from patients who underwent surgical removal of intracranial tumors in Beijing Tiantan Hospital date from 1/1/2013to12/31/2013. The present study found that patients with postoperative fibrinogen deficiency experienced more operative blood loss and a higher rate of postoperative intracranial hematoma, and they were given more blood transfusions, more plasma transfusions, and were administered larger doses of hemocoagulase compared with patients without postoperative fibrinogen deficiency. Likewise, patients with postoperative fibrinogen deficiency had poorer extended Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOSe), longer hospital stays, and greater hospital expenses than patients without postoperative fibrinogen deficiency. Further, we assessed a comprehensive set of risk factors associated with postoperative fibrinogen deficiency via multiple linear regression. We found that body mass index (BMI), the occurrence of postoperative intracranial hematoma, and administration of hemocoagulasewere positively associated with preoperative-to-postoperative plasma fibrinogen consumption; presenting with a malignant tumor was negatively associated with fibrinogen consumption. Contrary to what might be expected, intraoperative blood loss, the need for blood transfusion, and the need for plasma transfusion were not associated with plasma fibrinogen consumption. Considering our findings together, we concluded that postoperative fibrinogen deficiency is closely associated with postoperative

  11. Budding adult hypertensives with modifiable risk factors: "Catch them young"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aravind S.K. Ramanathan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Since the data of primary hypertension (HT in children is scanty in India, this study attempted to evaluate HT by a multidimensional investigation of the various risk factors in children and adolescents. Materials and Methods: A total of 3906 subjects were recruited, all of whom lived in Chennai, an urban area of Tamil Nadu. The children and adolescents aged from 10 to 17 years were selected by random sampling. The children/adolescents were randomized into one control and further divided into two groups. The National High Blood Pressure Education Program fourth report (2004 and anthropometric body mass index (BMI, food frequency questionnaire (PURE were followed in the study. Results: Out of 3906 children, 2107 were girls and 1799 boys. On screening, we found 9.5% to be hypertensive with the prevalence rate of boys and girls 8% and 10.8%, respectively. Overall obesity was 2.7%, (boys 2%, girls 3.32%; hypertensives and normotensives were 8.4% and 2.1%, respectively. We found that overweight (odds ratio [OR]: 2.06 [1.40-3.01] 95% confidence interval [CI], obese children (OR: 1.21 [2.72-6.48] 95% CI, and those with a family history of HT (OR: 1.66 [1.20-2.30] 95% CI had increased risk of hypertension. Females were 1.39 times (OR: 1.39 [1.11-1.72] 95% CI more at risk of getting HT. Multivariate analysis showed that obese children/adolescent were four times more likely to have HT than children with normal BMI (OR: 4.67 [3.00-7.26] 95% CI]. Conclusion: Family history of HT, obesity, and female gender are associated with a high risk of HT. The prevalence of HT was higher among obese adolescents than among slender subjects. This may be related to their sedentary lifestyle, faulty eating habits, high fat content in the diet and little physical activity.

  12. Using modified ballistic limit equations in spacecraft risk assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schonberg, William P.

    2016-09-01

    The fundamental components of any meteoroid/orbital debris (MOD) risk assessment calculation are environment models, damage response predictor equations, and failure criteria. In the case of a spacecraft operating in low earth orbit, the response predictor equation typically takes the form of a ballistic limit equation (BLE) that defines the threshold particle sizes that cause failure of a spacecraft wall or component. Spacecraft risk assessments often call for BLEs for spacecraft components that do not exist. In such cases, it is a common procedure to use an existing BLE after first equivalencing the actual materials and/or wall thicknesses to the materials that were used in the development of the existing BLE. The question naturally arises regarding how close are the predictions of such an 'adapted BLE' to the response characteristics of the actual materials/wall configurations under high speed projectile impacts. This paper presents the results of a study that compared the predictions of a commonly used BLE when adapted to the Soyuz OM wall configuration against those of a new BLE that was developed specifically for that Soyuz wall configuration. It was found that the critical projectile diameters predicted by the new Soyuz OM wall BLE can exceed those predicted by the adapted use of the existing BLE by as much as 50% of the existing BLE values. Thus, using the adapted version of the existing BLE in this particular case would contribute to a more conservative value of assessed risk. If the same trends were to hold true for other spacecraft wall configurations, then it is also possible that using existing BLEs, even after they have been adjusted for differences in materials, etc., may result in predictions of smaller critical diameters (i.e., increased assessed risk) than would using BLEs purposely developed for actual spacecraft configurations of interest.

  13. Incidence and Risk Factors of Surgical Site Infection Among Patients Undergoing Cesarean Section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanan Hussein Jasim

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Wound infections constitute a significant problem in surgical procedures. In cesarean sections (CS, this is particularly important as a wound infection not only results in increased morbidity but also has far-reaching implications by way of pelvic organ disease, disturbance of the bonding process between mother and baby in the puerperium, and a longer hospital stay with its inherent problems. Objective: This study was conducted with the aim to determine the incidence and risk factor associated with surgical site infection (SSI following cesarean section. Methodology: A retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted for 400 women undergoing cesarean section procedures during an 18-month period from January 2013 to June 2014 at Hospital Pulau Pinang, Malaysia. Patients’ socio-demographic, clinical data and incidence of SSI following the CS were noted using a standardized data collection form. SPSS v 21 was used for data analysis. Results: In total, 18.8% of the study participants developed SSI. Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified the following: higher body mass index (≥30 kg/m 2 (odds ratio [OR]: 0.555; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.313-0.985, P  = .044, increase in the blood loss during surgery (≥500 mL (OR: 0.757; 95% CI = 0.423-1.354, P  = .034, prolonged hospital stay (≥4 days (OR: 0.439; 95% CI = 0.260-0.740, P  = .002, spinal anesthesia (OR: 1.543; 95% CI = 1.230-1.937, P  = .021, breech baby presentation (OR:2.927 95% CI = 1.020-8.400, P  = .046, and intrathecal analgesia (OR:1.567; 95% CI = 1.246-1.970, P  = .001 had statistically significant association with incidence of SSI. Conclusions: Surgical site infections are common among women undergoing CS at Hospital Pulau Pinang. Special attention and enhanced clinical management of patients with identified risk factors for developing SSI may decrease its incidence.

  14. A modified risk assessment scoring system for post laser in situ keratomileusis ectasia in topographically normal patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Miraftab

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Our modified ectasia risk scoring system for patients with normal corneal topography can predict post LASIK ectasia risk with acceptable sensitivity and specificity. However, there are still unidentified risk factors for which further studies are required.

  15. Can we predict postoperative complications in elderly Chinese patients with hip fractures using the surgical risk calculator?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang X

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Xiao Wang, Bin Jiang Zhao, Yue Su Department of Anesthesiology, Beijing Shijitan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China Purpose: Hip fractures are associated with poor prognosis in elderly patients partly due to the high rate of postoperative complications. This study was aimed to investigate whether the surgical risk calculator is suitable for predicting postoperative complications in elderly Chinese patients with hip fractures.Methods: The incidence of postoperative complications among 410 elderly patients with hip fractures was predicted by the surgical risk calculator and then compared with the actual value. The risk calculator model was evaluated using the following three metrics: Hosmer–Lemeshow test for the goodness-of-fit of the model, receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC (also referred as C-statistic for the predictive specificity and sensitivity, and the Brier’s score test for predictive accuracy.Results: Preoperative risk factors including gender, age, preoperative functional status, American Society of Anesthesiologists grade, hypertension, dyspnea, dialysis, previous cardiovascular history, and cerebrovascular disease were positively correlated with the incidence of postoperative complications in elderly patients with hip fractures. The predicted complication incidence rate was well matched with the actual complication rate by Hosmer–Lemeshow test. The model had high sensitivity and specificity for predicting the mortality rate of these patients with a C-statistic index of 0.931 (95% CI [0.883, 0.980]. The surgical calculator model had an accuracy of 90% for predicting the reoperation rate (Brier’s score <0.01.Conclusions: The surgical risk calculator could be useful for predicting mortality and reoperation in elderly patients with hip fracture. Patients and surgeons may use this simple calculator to better manage the preoperative risks. Keywords: hip fracture, femoral head fracture, elder age, surgical

  16. Knowledge of modifiable risk factors of Coronary Atherosclerotic Heart Disease (CASHD among a sample in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ku Melvin

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of Coronary Atherosclerotic Heart Disease (CASHD is increasing in India. Several modifiable risk factors contribute directly to this disease burden. Public knowledge of such risk factors among the urban Indian population is largely unknown. This investigation attempts to quantify knowledge of modifiable risk factors of CASHD as sampled among an Indian population at a large metropolitan hospital. Methods A hospital-based, cross sectional study was conducted at All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS, a major tertiary care hospital in New Delhi, India. Participants (n = 217 recruited from patient waiting areas in the emergency room were provided with standardized questionnaires to assess their knowledge of modifiable risk factors of CASHD. The risk factors specifically included smoking, hypertension, elevated cholesterol levels, diabetes mellitus and obesity. Identifying 3 or less risk factors was regarded as a poor knowledge level, whereas identifying 4 or more risk factors was regarded as a good knowledge level. A multiple logistic regression model was used to isolate independent demographic markers predictive of a participant's level of knowledge. Results 41% of the sample surveyed had a good level of knowledge. 68%, 72%, 73% and 57% of the population identified smoking, obesity, hypertension, and high cholesterol correctly, respectively. 30% identified diabetes mellitus as a modifiable risk factor of CASHD. In multiple logistic regression analysis independent demographic predictors of a good knowledge level with a statistically significant (p Conclusion An Indian population in a hospital setting shows a lack of knowledge pertaining to modifiable risk factors of CASHD. By isolating demographic predictors of poor knowledge, such as current smokers and persons who do not exercise regularly, educational interventions can be effectively targeted and implemented as primary and secondary prevention strategies

  17. Population attributable risks for modifiable lifestyle factors and breast cancer in New Zealand women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, J; Richardson, A; Frampton, C

    2013-11-01

    Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed invasive cancer in New Zealand women and modifiable lifestyle risk factors may contribute to this. To estimate population attributable risks for modifiable lifestyle factors and breast cancer in New Zealand. Estimates of the magnitude of the impact of modifiable lifestyle risk factors for breast cancer (relative risks and odds ratios obtained from published epidemiological studies) and the prevalence of exposure in New Zealand were used to calculate the population attributable risk percent (PAR%) for each risk factor. The PAR% show the relative importance of these considered risk factors and give an indication of the potential impact of reducing the prevalence of these lifestyle risk factors on the incidence of breast cancer in New Zealand. Six modifiable lifestyle factors were identified for breast cancer. These were obesity, lack of physical activity, high alcohol intake, oral contraceptive use, hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and delayed first birth. The PAR% for these risk factors ranged from 1% for delayed first birth to 10% for obesity (16% for Maori women and 17% for Pacific women). The most important primary preventive strategies to reduce the risk of breast cancer in New Zealand are lifestyle changes to reduce obesity, promoting regular physical activity (which may in turn reduce the prevalence of obesity), reducing HRT use and avoiding high alcohol intake. Strategies that encourage regular physical activity and reduce obesity could also have other benefits, such as reduced risks of cardiovascular disease and diabetes. © 2013 The Authors; Internal Medicine Journal © 2013 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  18. High-risk surgical stage 1 endometrial cancer: analysis of treatment outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fogaroli Ricardo C

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To report the relapse and survival rates associated to treatment for patients with stage IC, grade 2 or grade 3 and IB grade 3 diseases considered high risk patients group for relapse. Materials and methods From January 1993 to December 2003, 106 patients with endometrial cancer stage I were managed surgically in our institution. Based on data from the medical records, 106 patients with epithelial endometrial cancer met the following inclusion criteria: stage IC grade 2 or 3 and IB grade 3 with or without lymphovascular invasion. Staging was defined according to the FIGO surgical staging system. Postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy consisted of external beam pelvic radiation, vaginal brachytherapy alone or both. The median age was 65 years (range, 32–83 years, lymph node dissection was performed in 45 patients (42.5% and 14 patients (13.2% received vaginal brachytherapy only, and 92 (86.8% received combined vaginal brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy. The median dose of external beam radiotherapy administered to the pelvis was 4500 cGy (range 4000 – 5040. The median dose to vaginal surface was 2400 cGy (range 2000 – 3000. Predominant pathological stage and histological grade were IC (73.6% and grade 3 (51.9%. The lymphovascular invasion was present in 33 patients (31.1% and pathological stage IC grade 2 was most common (48. 1% combination of risk factors in this group. Results With a follow up median of 58.3 months (range 12.8 – 154, five year overall survival and event free survival were 78.5% and 72.4%, respectively. Locoregional control in five year was 92.4%. Prognostic factors related with survival in univariate analyses were: lymphadenectomy (p = 0.045, lymphovascular invasion (p = 0.047 and initial failure site (p Conclusion In conclusion, our results showed that the stage IC, grade 2, 3 and IB grade 3 endometrial cancer was associated with significantly increased risk of distant relapse and endometrial

  19. Risk, ritual and health responsibilisation: Japan's 'safety blanket' of surgical face mask-wearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Adam; Horii, Mitsutoshi

    2012-11-01

    This article begins to develop an understanding of surgical mask-wearing in Japan, now a routine practice against a range of health threats. Their usage and associated meanings are explored through surveys conducted in Tokyo with both mask wearers and non-mask wearers. It contests commonly held cultural views of the practice as a fixed and distinctively Japanese collective courtesy to others. A historical analysis suggests that an originally collective, targeted and science-based response to public health threats has dispersed into a generalised practice lacking a clear end or purpose. Developed as part of the biomedical response to the Spanish flu of 1919, the practice resonated with folk assumptions as making a barrier between purity and pollution. But mask-wearing became socially embedded as a general protective practice only from the 1990s through a combination of commercial, corporate and political pressures that responsibilised individual health protection. These developments are usefully understood amidst the uncertainty created by Japan's 'second modernity' and the fracturing of her post-war order. Mask-wearing is only one form of a wider culture of risk; a self-protective risk ritual rather than a selfless collective practice.

  20. Accounting for incomplete postdischarge follow-up during surveillance of surgical site infection by use of the National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance system's risk index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biscione, Fernando Martín; Couto, Renato Camargos; Pedrosa, Tânia M G

    2009-05-01

    We examined the usefulness of a simple method to account for incomplete postdischarge follow-up during surveillance of surgical site infection (SSI) by use of the National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance (NNIS) system's risk index. Retrospective cohort study that used data prospectively collected from 1993 through 2006. Five private, nonuniversity healthcare facilities in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. Consecutive patients undergoing the following NNIS operative procedures: 20,981 operations on the genitourinary system, 11,930 abdominal hysterectomies, 7,696 herniorraphies, 6,002 cholecystectomies, and 6,892 laparotomies. For each operative procedure category, 2 SSI risk models were specified. First, a model based on the NNIS system's risk index variables was specified (hereafter referred to as the NNIS-based model). Second, a modified model (hereafter referred to as the modified NNIS-based model), which was also based on the NNIS system's risk index, was specified with a postdischarge surveillance indicator, which was assigned the value of 1 if the patient could be reached during follow-up and a value of 0 if the patient could not be reached. A formal comparison of the capabilities of the 2 models to assess the risk of SSI was conducted using measures of calibration (by use of the Pearson goodness-of-fit test) and discrimination (by use of receiver operating characteristic curves). Goodman-Kruskal correlations (G) were also calculated. The rate of incomplete postdischarge follow-up varied between 29.8% for abdominal hysterectomies and 50.5% for cholecystectomies. The modified NNIS-based model for laparotomy did not show any significant benefit over the NNIS-based model in any measure. For all other operative procedures, the modified NNIS-based model showed a significantly improved discriminatory ability and higher G statistics, compared with the NNIS-based model, with no significant impairment in calibration, except if used to assess the risk of SSI after operations

  1. Anorexia of aging: a modifiable risk factor for frailty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martone, Anna Maria; Onder, Graziano; Vetrano, Davide Liborio; Ortolani, Elena; Tosato, Matteo; Marzetti, Emanuele; Landi, Francesco

    2013-10-14

    Anorexia of aging, defined as a loss of appetite and/or reduced food intake, affects a significant number of elderly people and is far more prevalent among frail individuals. Anorexia recognizes a multifactorial origin characterized by various combinations of medical, environmental and social factors. Given the interconnection between weight loss, sarcopenia and frailty, anorexia is a powerful, independent predictor of poor quality of life, morbidity and mortality in older persons. One of the most important goals in the management of older, frail people is to optimize their nutritional status. To achieve this objective it is important to identify subjects at risk of anorexia and to provide multi-stimulus interventions that ensure an adequate amount of food to limit and/or reverse weight loss and functional decline. Here, we provide a brief overview on the relevance of anorexia in the context of sarcopenia and frailty. Major pathways supposedly involved in the pathogenesis of anorexia are also illustrated. Finally, the importance of treating anorexia to achieve health benefits in frail elders is highlighted.

  2. Breast Cancer Risk From Modifiable and Nonmodifiable Risk Factors Among White Women in the United States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maas, Paige; Barrdahl, Myrto; Joshi, Amit D;

    2016-01-01

    Importance: An improved model for risk stratification can be useful for guiding public health strategies of breast cancer prevention. Objective: To evaluate combined risk stratification utility of common low penetrant single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and epidemiologic risk factors. Design, ...

  3. The effect of quitting smoking on the risk of unfavorable events after surgical treatment of oral potentially malignant lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vladimirov, B S; Schiødt, Morten

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine if cessation of smoking after surgical excision of oral potentially malignant lesions in smokers reduced the risk of recurrences, development of new lesions or malignancies. 51 patients with oral leukoplakia or erythroplakia were included. They were daily...

  4. Risk of facial splashes in four major surgical specialties in a multicentre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, S; Kanemitsu, K; Ishii, H; Narita, M; Nemoto, T; Yaginuma, G; Mikami, Y; Unno, M; Hen, R; Tabayashi, K; Matsushima, T; Kunishima, H; Kaku, M

    2007-09-01

    This study analyses the results of face-shield blood spatter contamination at six medical facilities to determine exposure risk when facial protection is not used. Blood spatter exposure was evaluated on the basis of overall incidence, location of spatter on face shields, surgical specialty, risk for operating room staff, length of surgery and volume of blood loss. Six hundred face shields were evaluated for blood spatter contamination by visual inspection as well as by staining with leucomalachite green. The face shield was divided into three regions: Orbital (O-region), Paraorbital (P-region) and Mask (M-region). Visual examination detected blood spatter contamination in 50.5% (303/600) of the face shields, whereas leucomalachite green staining detected blood contamination in 66.0% (396/600). Blood contamination was 36.6% (220/600) in the O-region, 37.8% (227/600) in the P-region and 57.0% (342/600) in the M-region. Among operating room staff, the incidence of blood spatter was greatest among lead surgeons at 83.5% (167/200), followed by the first assistant at 68.5% (137/200) and the scrub nurse at 46.0% (92/200). By specialty, cardiovascular surgery was at highest risk with an incidence of 75.3% (113/150) followed by neurosurgery at 69.3% (104/150), gastrointestinal at 60.0% (90/150) and orthopaedic surgery at 60.0% (90/150).

  5. The media and genetically modified foods: evidence in support of social amplification of risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frewer, Lynn J; Miles, Susan; Marsh, Roy

    2002-08-01

    Empirical examinations of the "social amplification of risk" framework are rare, partly because of the difficulties in predicting when conditions likely to result in amplification effects will occur. This means that it is difficult to examine changes in risk perception that are contemporaneous with increases and/or decreases in social or media discussion of the risks associated with a particular risk event. However, the collection of attitude data before, during, and after the increased reporting of the risks of genetically modified food in the United Kingdom (spring 1999) has demonstrated that people's risk perceptions do increase and decrease in line with what might be expected upon examination of the amplification and attenuation mechanisms integral to the framework. Perceptions of benefit, however, appeared to be permanently depressed by negative reporting about genetically modified food. Trust in regulatory institutions with responsibility for protecting the public was not affected. It was concluded that the social amplification of risk framework is a useful framework for beginning to explain the potential impact on risk perceptions of a risk event, particularly if that risk event is presented to the public as a new hazard occurring in a crisis context.

  6. Modifying the risk of recurrent preterm birth: influence of trimester-specific changes in smoking behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Jessica L; Aland, Kristen L; Blatt, Kaitlin; Moore, Elizabeth; DeFranco, Emily A

    2017-03-01

    Women with at least 1 prior occurrence of premature birth often have demographic and medical risk factors that are not modifiable. However, smoking cessation could be a targeted intervention in which a woman with a history of premature birth may be able to reduce her future risk of recurrence. This study aims to assess how trimester-specific smoking patterns influence the risk of recurrent premature birth. This was a population-based retrospective cohort study of singleton nonanomalous live births in Ohio, 2006-2012 using vital statistics birth records. This analysis was limited to women with at least 1 prior premature birth. Rates of birth preterm birth has been studied extensively, and it is widely accepted that smoking in pregnancy increases preterm birth rates. However, this study provides novel information quantifying the risk of recurrent preterm birth and stratifies the increased risk of recurrent preterm birth by trimester-specific smoking behavior. Although women with even 1 prior premature birth are at an inherently high risk of recurrence, women who stopped smoking early in the first 2 trimesters experienced similar preterm birth rates compared with nonsmokers. However, delayed smoking cessation or smoking throughout pregnancy significantly increased recurrent premature birth risk. Smoking cessation is a potential modifiable risk factor for recurrent preterm birth in high-risk pregnancies. This study highlights the importance of early pregnancy smoking cessation in those at especially high risk, women with a prior preterm birth. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The Burden of Cardiovascular Disease Attributable to Major Modifiable Risk Factors in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Mohammad Akhtar; Al Mamun, Abdullah; Peters, Sanne AE; Woodward, Mark; Huxley, Rachel R.

    2016-01-01

    Background In Indonesia, coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke are estimated to cause more than 470 000 deaths annually. In order to inform primary prevention policies, we estimated the sex- and age-specific burden of CHD and stroke attributable to five major and modifiable vascular risk factors: cigarette smoking, hypertension, diabetes, elevated total cholesterol, and excess body weight. Methods Population attributable risks for CHD and stroke attributable to these risk factors individually were calculated using summary statistics obtained for prevalence of each risk factor specific to sex and to two age categories (Indonesian population. PMID:27021286

  8. A review of lifestyle, smoking and other modifiable risk factors for osteoporotic fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, Bo; Brask-Lindemann, Dorthe; Rubin, Katrine Hass

    2014-01-01

    could include reduction of excessive alcohol intake, smoking cessation, adequate nutrition, patient education, daily physical activity and a careful review of medications that could increase the risk of falls and fractures. There remains, however, an unmet need for high-quality intervention studies......Although many strong risk factors for osteoporosis-such as family history, fracture history and age-are not modifiable, a number of important risk factors are potential targets for intervention. Thus, simple, non-pharmacological intervention in patients at increased risk of osteoporotic fractures...

  9. Risk Adjustment for Determining Surgical Site Infection in Colon Surgery: Are All Models Created Equal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratore, Sydne; Statz, Catherine; Glover, J J; Kwaan, Mary; Beilman, Greg

    2016-04-01

    Colon surgical site infections (SSIs) are being utilized increasingly as a quality measure for hospital reimbursement and public reporting. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) now require reporting of colon SSI, which is entered through the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN). However, the CMS's model for determining expected SSIs uses different risk adjustment variables than does NHSN. We hypothesize that CMS's colon SSI model will predict lower expected infection rates than will NHSN. Colon SSI data were reported prospectively to NHSN from 2012-2014 for the six Fairview Hospitals (1,789 colon procedures). We compared expected quarterly SSIs and standardized infection ratios (SIRs) generated by CMS's risk-adjustment model (age and American Society of Anesthesiologist [ASA] classification) vs. NHSN's (age, ASA classification, procedure duration, endoscope [including laparoscope] use, medical school affiliation, hospital bed number, and incision class). The patients with more complex colon SSIs were more likely to be male (60% vs. 44%; p = 0.011), to have contaminated/dirty incisions (21% vs. 10%; p = 0.005), and to have longer operations (235 min vs. 156 min; p < 0.001) and were more likely to be at a medical school-affiliated hospital (53% vs. 40%; p = 0.032). For Fairview Hospitals combined, CMS calculated a lower number of expected quarterly SSIs than did the NHSN (4.58 vs. 5.09 SSIs/quarter; p = 0.002). This difference persisted in a university hospital (727 procedures; 2.08 vs. 2.33; p = 0.002) and a smaller, community-based hospital (565 procedures; 1.31 vs. 1.42; p = 0.002). There were two quarters in which CMS identified Fairview's SIR as an outlier for complex colon SSIs (p = 0.05 and 0.04), whereas NHSN did not (p = 0.06 and 0.06). The CMS's current risk-adjustment model using age and ASA classification predicts lower rates of expected colon

  10. Abdominal surgical site infections: incidence and risk factors at an Iranian teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabouri Kashani Ahmad

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abdominal surgical site infections are among the most common complications of inpatient admissions and have serious consequences for outcomes and costs. Different risk factors may be involved, including age, sex, nutrition and immunity, prophylactic antibiotics, operation type and duration, type of shaving, and secondary infections. This study aimed to determine the risk factors affecting abdominal surgical site infections and their incidence at Imam Khomeini, a major referral teaching hospital in Iran. Methods Patients (n = 802 who had undergone abdominal surgery were studied and the relationships among variables were analyzed by Student's t and Chi-square tests. The subjects were followed for 30 days and by a 20-item questionnaire. Data were collected through pre- and post-operative examinations and telephone follow-ups. Results Of the 802 patients, 139 suffered from SSI (17.4%. In 40.8% of the cases, the wound was dirty infected. The average age for the patients was 46.7 years. The operations were elective in 75.7% of the cases and 24.7% were urgent. The average duration of the operation was 2.24 hours, the average duration of pre-operative hospital stay 4.31 days and the average length of (pre- and post-operation hospital stay 11.2 days. Three quarters of the cases were shaved 12 hours before the operation. The increased operation time, increased bed stay, electivity of the operation, septicity of the wound, type of incision, the administration of prophylactic antibiotic, type of operation, background disease, and the increased time lapse between shaving and operation all significantly associated with SSI with a p-value less than 0.001. Conclusion In view of the high rate of SSI reported here (17.4% compared with the 14% quoted in literature, this study suggests that by reducing the average operation time to less than 2 hours, the average preoperative stay to 4 days and the overall stay to less than 11 days, and

  11. Validation of an age-modified caries risk assessment program (Cariogram) in preschool children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holgerson, Pernilla Lif; Twetman, Svante; Stecksèn-Blicks, Christina

    2009-01-01

    to children with a lower risk in the control group (pchildren remained in the same risk category at both ages, despite a largely unchanged consumption pattern...... of sugar. The majority of the children who changed category displayed a lowered risk at 7 years. The intervention program seemed to impair the predictive abilities of Cariogram. CONCLUSION: A modified Cariogram applied on preschool children was not particularly useful in identifying high caries risk......OBJECTIVES: (i) To validate caries risk profiles assessed with a computer program against actual caries development in preschool children, (ii) to study the possible impact of a preventive program on the risk profiles, and (iii) to compare the individual risk profiles longitudinally. MATERIAL...

  12. Modifiable Risk Factors in Atrial Fibrillation: The Role of Alcohol, Obesity, and Sleep Apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, Kiran; Tang, Anthony

    2017-07-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common arrhythmia affecting a growing number of Canadians. Traditional risk factors, such as hypertension, diabetes, and valvular disease, are often present in older patients with AF. Modifiable risk factors should also be sought in patients presenting with new-onset AF. Obesity is a rapidly growing epidemic in Canada. Emerging evidence is linking obesity and the often coexistent obstructive sleep apnea with an increased incidence of AF. Alcohol intake can also predispose to the development of AF. The purpose of this article is to review recent evidence looking at these modifiable risk factors and how intervention can mitigate these increased risks. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Scientific Opinion updating the risk assessment conclusions and risk management recommendations on the genetically modified insect resistant maize 1507

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Genetically Modified Organisms (GMO

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available

    Following a request from the European Commission, the Panel on Genetically Modified Organisms of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA GMO Panel compiled its previous risk assessment conclusions and risk management recommendations on the genetically modified insect resistant maize 1507, and considered their validity in the light of new relevant scientific publications published from 2005 onwards. The EFSA GMO Panel performed a search of the scientific literature published between 2005 and September 2012, and identified 61 peer-reviewed publications containing evidence specific to the risk assessment and/or management of maize 1507, of which two were relevant for the food and feed safety assessment, and 34 for the environmental risk assessment and/or risk management. None of these publications reported new information that would invalidate the previous conclusions on the safety of maize 1507 made by the EFSA GMO Panel. Therefore, the EFSA GMO Panel considers that its previous risk assessment conclusions on maize 1507, as well as its previous recommendations on risk mitigation measures and monitoring, remain valid and applicable.

  14. Scientific Opinion updating the risk assessment conclusions and risk management recommendations on the genetically modified insect resistant maize Bt11

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Genetically Modified Organisms (GMO

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Following a request from the European Commission, the Panel on Genetically Modified Organisms of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA GMO Panel compiled its previous risk assessment conclusions and risk management recommendations on the genetically modified insect resistant maize Bt11, and considered their validity in the light of new relevant scientific publications published from 2005 onwards. Following a search of the scientific literature published between 2005 and October 2012, the EFSA GMO Panel identified 287 peer-reviewed publications containing evidence specific to the risk assessment and/or management of maize Bt11, of which 270 publications were previously discussed and cited in relevant GM maize-related applications and/or the numerous EFSA GMO Panel scientific outputs. From the remaining 17 publications, three were relevant for the food and feed safety assessment, and 14 for the environmental risk assessment and/or risk management of maize Bt11. None of these publications reported new information that would invalidate the previous conclusions on the safety of maize Bt11 made by the EFSA GMO Panel. Therefore, the EFSA GMO Panel considers that its previous risk assessment conclusions on maize Bt11, as well as its previous recommendations on risk mitigation measures and monitoring, remain valid and applicable.

  15. The Contributions of Gamma Probe to Lesion Detectability and Surgical Safety in Recurrent Thyroid Cancer at Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salih Sinan Gültekin

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In patients, who underwent thyroid surgery or treated with I-131 radioiodine previously for differentiated thyroid cancer, a second surgical intervention carries higher risks due to distortion of the natural anatomy and development of fibrotic/cicatricial tissue. In addition, accurate assessment of current status about extent of the disease is important in terms of success of the surgery. In this case report, we present the positive contribution of intraoperative gamma probe used for lesion detectability and for surgical safety in a patient operated for several times and administered high cumulative dose of radioiodine therapy for diffentiated thyroid carcinoma previously.

  16. Neuroinflammation as a Common Mechanism Associated with the Modifiable Risk Factors for Alzheimer's and Parkinson`s Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Jordan Alexander; Spielman, Lindsay J; Pointer, Caitlin B; Lowry, Jessica R; Bajwa, Ekta; Lee, Carolyn W; Klegeris, Andis

    2017-03-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) are among the most common causes of dementia, which increasingly contribute to morbidity and mortality worldwide. A common hallmark in the pathogenesis of these two diseases is neuroinflammation, which is initially triggered by the presence of pathological structures associated with these disorders. Chronic neuroinflammation is sustained by persistent and aberrant microglial activation in the brain, which results in damage and death of neighboring cells, including neurons and glial cells. Two types of risk factors contribute to the development of AD and PD: non-modifiable risk factors and modifiable risk factors. Non-modifiable risk factors include genetic susceptibility that increases an individual's risk of developing the disease, whereas modifiable risk factors include a wide variety of health- and lifestyle-related factors that may be altered by changing individual behaviors. Exposure to environmental toxins could be viewed as a partially modifiable risk factor. This review focuses on four modifiable risk factors including physical inactivity, vascular disease-related conditions, obesity and type two diabetes mellitus, all of which have been identified as risk factors for the development of AD and PD. We highlight that control of the modifiable risk factors is a valid approach for managing the increased incidence of AD and PD. We describe neuroinflammatory mechanisms, which are common to AD and PD, that may link both these neurodegenerative diseases with the four common modifiable risk factors. Understanding these mechanisms could help identify novel therapeutic targets for combating these neurodegenerative diseases.

  17. Bringing policy relevance and scientific discipline to environmental risk assessment for genetically modified crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Rod A; Garcia-Alonso, Monica; Layton, Raymond; Raybould, Alan

    2013-09-01

    Although public opinion is important in deciding what is valued by society, governments have determined that scientific expertise is required to evaluate potential environmental effects of genetically modified (GM) crops. We suggest how to evaluate rigorously the environmental effects of GM crops in the context of a scientific investigation. Following a disciplined scientific approach to environmental risk assessment (ERA) for GM crops should help resolve controversy in identifying and addressing risk.

  18. Efficacy of Seprafilm for reducing reoperative risk in pediatric surgical patients undergoing abdominal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Mikihiro; Uchida, Keiichi; Miki, Chikao; Kusunoki, Masato

    2005-08-01

    The safety and efficacy of Seprafilm (Genzyme Corporation, Cambridge, Mass) in adult surgery patients have been established. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of Seprafilm in pediatric surgical patients. One hundred twenty-two pediatric abdominal surgery patients were enrolled. Sixty-seven patients received Seprafilm application. Of these patients, 18 again received Seprafilm at abdominal closure during a second surgery, and of the 18, 4 received Seprafilm at closure after a third surgery. Of the 55 control patients who did not receive Seprafilm, 14 had a second surgery, and of these 14 patients, 4 had a third surgery. Adverse events, operation time, and blood loss were compared with assessed Seprafilm safety. Seprafilm efficacy evaluations included incidence and severity of adhesions in those patients who required relaparotomy. The incidence (Seprafilm, 40.9%; control, 82.4%) and severity (Seprafilm: 59.1%, grade 0; control: 17.6%, grade 0) of adhesions under the abdominal incision site were significantly reduced in the Seprafilm group (P = .007 and P = .0009, respectively). In addition, mean relaparotomy operation time was significantly shorter for Seprafilm patients (P = .004). At relaparotomy, blood loss/body weight ratio for Seprafilm patients compared with control patients showed a trend toward but did not reach significance (P = .09). Decreased incidence and severity of postsurgical adhesions with Seprafilm in pediatric patients may lead to reduction of the risks associated with subsequent operation.

  19. Adjacent tooth trauma in complicated mandibular third molar surgery: Risk degree classification and digital surgical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zhou-Xi; Yang, Chi; Ge, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of adjacent tooth resistance is essential in wisdom teeth extraction to prevent adjacent tooth trauma, however it lacks adequate attention nowadays. This study aims at suggesting special extraction methods based on adjacent tooth resistance analysis for prevention of adjacent tooth damage. In this study, 136 complicated mandibular third molars extracted using piezosurgery were reviewed and classified based on the adjacent teeth resistances shown in orthopantomogram (OPG) during their mesio-distal rotations: degree I refers to teeth with no adjacent teeth resistance; degree II refers to teeth with resistance released after mesial-half crown sectioning; degree III refers to teeth which still had resistance after mesial-half crown sectioning. With the use of surgical simulations using cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT) reconstruction, all teeth in degree I were designed to rotate mesio-distally; 86.36%(38/44) teeth in degree II were designed to rotate mesio-distally after mesio-half crown sectioning; 69.09%(36/55) teeth in degree III were designed to rotate bucco-lingually. All teeth were extracted successfully, and only one adjacent tooth was subluxated due to the incomplete bone removal. Our study suggested that in order to prevent adjacent teeth trauma, complete bone removal is of importance, and impacted teeth with higher adjacent teeth trauma risks should consider bucco-lingual rotations. PMID:27974819

  20. Adjacent tooth trauma in complicated mandibular third molar surgery: Risk degree classification and digital surgical simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zhou-Xi; Yang, Chi; Ge, Jing

    2016-12-15

    Analysis of adjacent tooth resistance is essential in wisdom teeth extraction to prevent adjacent tooth trauma, however it lacks adequate attention nowadays. This study aims at suggesting special extraction methods based on adjacent tooth resistance analysis for prevention of adjacent tooth damage. In this study, 136 complicated mandibular third molars extracted using piezosurgery were reviewed and classified based on the adjacent teeth resistances shown in orthopantomogram (OPG) during their mesio-distal rotations: degree I refers to teeth with no adjacent teeth resistance; degree II refers to teeth with resistance released after mesial-half crown sectioning; degree III refers to teeth which still had resistance after mesial-half crown sectioning. With the use of surgical simulations using cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT) reconstruction, all teeth in degree I were designed to rotate mesio-distally; 86.36%(38/44) teeth in degree II were designed to rotate mesio-distally after mesio-half crown sectioning; 69.09%(36/55) teeth in degree III were designed to rotate bucco-lingually. All teeth were extracted successfully, and only one adjacent tooth was subluxated due to the incomplete bone removal. Our study suggested that in order to prevent adjacent teeth trauma, complete bone removal is of importance, and impacted teeth with higher adjacent teeth trauma risks should consider bucco-lingual rotations.

  1. Prevalence and risk factors of metallo β-lactamase producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter species in burns and surgical wards in a tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simit H Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The production of Metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs is one of the resistance mechanisms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter species. There is not much Indian data on the prevalence of MBLs in burns and surgical wards. Materials and Methods: A total of 145 non-duplicate isolates of carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter species, isolated from pus/wound swabs and endotracheal secretions from burns and surgical wards, were tested for MBL production by modified ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid (EDTA disc synergy and double disc synergy tests. Results: Prevalence of MBLs was 26.9% by both the above tests. All MBL-positive isolates were multidrug resistant. Only 6.06% (2/33 P.aeruginosa and 16.67% (1/06 Acinetobacter species were susceptible to piperacillin-tazobactam and netilmycin, respectively. These patients had multiple risk factors like >8 days hospital stay, catheterization, IV lines, previous antibiotic use, mechanical ventilation, etc. Graft application and surgical intervention were significant risk factors in MBL-positive patients. Overall mortality in MBL-positive patients was 34.21%. Conclusion: Emergence of MBL-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter species in this hospital is alarming, which reflect excessive use of carbapenems and at the same time, pose a therapeutic challenge to clinicians as well as to microbiologists. Therefore, a strict antibiotic policy and implementation of proper infection control practices will go a long way to prevent further spread of MBLs. Detection of MBLs should also become mandatory in all hospitals.

  2. 76 FR 36544 - Scientific Evaluation of Modified Risk Tobacco Product Applications; Public Workshop; Request for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-22

    ... produced by the consumption of that tobacco product, that may affect a disease or health-related condition... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Scientific Evaluation of Modified Risk Tobacco Product... of public workshop; request for comments. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Center for...

  3. Associations between Potentially Modifiable Risk Factors and Alzheimer Disease : A Mendelian Randomization Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ostergaard, Soren D.; Mukherjee, Shubhabrata; Sharp, Stephen J.; Proitsi, Petroula; Lotta, Luca A.; Day, Felix; Perry, John R. B.; Boehme, Kevin L.; Walter, Stefan; Kauwe, John S.; Gibbons, Laura E.; Larson, Eric B.; Powell, John F.; Langenberg, Claudia; Crane, Paul K.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Scott, Robert A.; van der Schouw, YT|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073449253

    2015-01-01

    Background Potentially modifiable risk factors including obesity, diabetes, hypertension, and smoking are associated with Alzheimer disease (AD) and represent promising targets for intervention. However, the causality of these associations is unclear. We sought to assess the causal nature of these a

  4. 75 FR 2879 - Use of Tobacco Marketing Descriptors to Convey Modified Risk; Request for Comments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-19

    ... information will be used to further FDA's efforts to reduce misleading and deceptive advertising practices..., labeling, or advertising of which uses the descriptors `light', `mild', or `low' or similar descriptors... label, labeling, or advertising of modified risk tobacco products. III. Comments Interested persons may...

  5. Classification of Dermal Exposure Modifiers and Assignment of Values for a Risk Assessment Toolkit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goede, H.A.; Tijssen, S.C.H.A.; Schipper, H.J.; Warren, N.; Oppl, R.; Kalberlah, F.; Hemmen, J.J. van

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes how default dermal exposure values can be adjusted with modifier values for specific work situations. The work presented here is supplementary to a toolkit developed for the EU RISKOFDERM project. This toolkit is intended for the assessment and management of dermal risks in smal

  6. Associations between Potentially Modifiable Risk Factors and Alzheimer Disease : A Mendelian Randomization Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ostergaard, Soren D.; Mukherjee, Shubhabrata; Sharp, Stephen J.; Proitsi, Petroula; Lotta, Luca A.; Day, Felix; Perry, John R. B.; Boehme, Kevin L.; Walter, Stefan; Kauwe, John S.; Gibbons, Laura E.; Larson, Eric B.; Powell, John F.; Langenberg, Claudia; Crane, Paul K.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Scott, Robert A.; van der Schouw, YT

    2015-01-01

    Background Potentially modifiable risk factors including obesity, diabetes, hypertension, and smoking are associated with Alzheimer disease (AD) and represent promising targets for intervention. However, the causality of these associations is unclear. We sought to assess the causal nature of these a

  7. The Pulmonary Thromboembolism as a Risk of Surgical Treatments and the Role of Anticoagulant Prophylaxiss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukic, Vesna

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Our objective is to show the number of patients with postoperative pulmonary thromboembolism (PPTE) treated in Intensive care unit of Clinic for pulmonary diseases an TB “Podhrastovi” in three-year period : from June 1, 2011 - June 1, 2014 and to indicate the importance of various surgical operations in the development of pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE). Material and methods: This is the retrospective study which shows the number of patients with PPTE treated in Intensive care unit of Clinic for pulmonary diseases an TB “Podhrastovi” in three-year period : from 01.06.2011.-01.06.2014. It represents the number of these patients, per cent of patients with PPTE of total patients with PTE, age and sex of patients, type of surgery, period expressed in days from surgery to diagnosis of PTE, presence of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) of lower extremities, massiveness of PPTE e.g. level of pulmonary artery with embolus. Results: In three-year period 232 patients with PTE were treated in Intensive care unit of Clinic “Podhrastovi”. 60 of them or 25.86% were patients with 24 males or 40% middle-aged 58.5 years, and 36 females or 60% middle-aged 56.3 years. PPTE developed in 15 patients with abdominal, 11 with urologic, 8 with gynecologic, 15 with orthopedic, 4 with cardiologic, 2 with vascular, 3 with neurosurgical, 1 with glandular and 1 with orl operations. The average period from operation to diagnosis of PPTE was 10.5 days for women, and 13.8 days for men. Only two patients had acute DVT after operation (one man and one woman), and five had amnesias of previous DVT or PTE. The level or the site of pulmonary embolus was different from segmental to main branches of pulmonary artery. Conclusion: Different surgical operations are the big risk factor for the development of PTE. There is great significance of anticoagulant prophylaxis before surgery even in patients with no anamnesis of previous DVT or PTE. PMID:25568626

  8. Efficacy of Chinese herbal medicine for stroke modifiable risk factors: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Wenbo; Lauche, Romy; Ferguson, Caleb; Frawley, Jane; Adams, Jon; Sibbritt, David

    2017-01-01

    The vast majority of stroke burden is attributable to its modifiable risk factors. This paper aimed to systematically summarise the evidence of Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) interventions on stroke modifiable risk factors for stroke prevention. A literature search was conducted via the MEDLINE, CINAHL/EBSCO, SCOPUS, and Cochrane Database from 1996 to 2016. Randomised controlled trials or cross-over studies were included. Risk of bias was assessed according to the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool. A total of 46 trials (6895 participants) were identified regarding the use of CHM interventions in the management of stroke risk factors, including 12 trials for hypertension, 10 trials for diabetes, eight trials for hyperlipidemia, seven trials for impaired glucose tolerance, three trials for obesity, and six trials for combined risk factors. Amongst the included trials with diverse study design, an intervention of CHM as a supplement to biomedicine and/or a lifestyle intervention was found to be more effective in lowering blood pressure, decreasing blood glucose level, helping impaired glucose tolerance reverse to normal, and/or reducing body weight compared to CHM monotherapy. While no trial reported deaths amongst the CHM groups, some papers do report moderate adverse effects associated with CHM use. However, the findings of such beneficial effects of CHM should be interpreted with caution due to the heterogeneous set of complex CHM studied, the various control interventions employed, the use of different participants' inclusion criteria, and low methodological quality across the published studies. The risk of bias of trials identified was largely unclear in the domains of selection bias and detection bias across the included studies. This study showed substantial evidence of varied CHM interventions improving the stroke modifiable risk factors. More rigorous research examining the use of CHM products for sole or multiple major stroke risk factors are warranted.

  9. Reliability of risk-adjusted outcomes for profiling hospital surgical quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krell, Robert W; Hozain, Ahmed; Kao, Lillian S; Dimick, Justin B

    2014-05-01

    Quality improvement platforms commonly use risk-adjusted morbidity and mortality to profile hospital performance. However, given small hospital caseloads and low event rates for some procedures, it is unclear whether these outcomes reliably reflect hospital performance. To determine the reliability of risk-adjusted morbidity and mortality for hospital performance profiling using clinical registry data. A retrospective cohort study was conducted using data from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program, 2009. Participants included all patients (N = 55,466) who underwent colon resection, pancreatic resection, laparoscopic gastric bypass, ventral hernia repair, abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, and lower extremity bypass. Outcomes included risk-adjusted overall morbidity, severe morbidity, and mortality. We assessed reliability (0-1 scale: 0, completely unreliable; and 1, perfectly reliable) for all 3 outcomes. We also quantified the number of hospitals meeting minimum acceptable reliability thresholds (>0.70, good reliability; and >0.50, fair reliability) for each outcome. For overall morbidity, the most common outcome studied, the mean reliability depended on sample size (ie, how high the hospital caseload was) and the event rate (ie, how frequently the outcome occurred). For example, mean reliability for overall morbidity was low for abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (reliability, 0.29; sample size, 25 cases per year; and event rate, 18.3%). In contrast, mean reliability for overall morbidity was higher for colon resection (reliability, 0.61; sample size, 114 cases per year; and event rate, 26.8%). Colon resection (37.7% of hospitals), pancreatic resection (7.1% of hospitals), and laparoscopic gastric bypass (11.5% of hospitals) were the only procedures for which any hospitals met a reliability threshold of 0.70 for overall morbidity. Because severe morbidity and mortality are less frequent outcomes, their mean

  10. A Retrospective Analysis of Pressure Ulcer Incidence and Modified Braden Scale Score Risk Classifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong-Lin; Cao, Ying-Juan; Wang, Jing; Huai, Bao-Sha

    2015-09-01

    The Braden Scale is the most widely used pressure ulcer risk assessment in the world, but the currently used 5 risk classification groups do not accurately discriminate among their risk categories. To optimize risk classification based on Braden Scale scores, a retrospective analysis of all consecutively admitted patients in an acute care facility who were at risk for pressure ulcer development was performed between January 2013 and December 2013. Predicted pressure ulcer incidence first was calculated by logistic regression model based on original Braden score. Risk classification then was modified based on the predicted pressure ulcer incidence and compared between different risk categories in the modified (3-group) classification and the traditional (5-group) classification using chi-square test. Two thousand, six hundred, twenty-five (2,625) patients (mean age 59.8 ± 16.5, range 1 month to 98 years, 1,601 of whom were men) were included in the study; 81 patients (3.1%) developed a pressure ulcer. The predicted pressure ulcer incidence ranged from 0.1% to 49.7%. When the predicted pressure ulcer incidence was greater than 10.0% (high risk), the corresponding Braden scores were less than 11; when the predicted incidence ranged from 1.0% to 10.0% (moderate risk), the corresponding Braden scores ranged from 12 to 16; and when the predicted incidence was less than 1.0% (mild risk), the corresponding Braden scores were greater than 17. In the modified classification, observed pressure ulcer incidence was significantly different between each of the 3 risk categories (P less than 0.05). However, in the traditional classification, the observed incidence was not significantly different between the high-risk category and moderate-risk category (P less than 0.05) and between the mild-risk category and no-risk category (P less than 0.05). If future studies confirm the validity of these findings, pressure ulcer prevention protocols of care based on Braden Scale scores can

  11. Surgical management of stress urinary incontinence: Burch colposuspension, modified Pereyra and Stamey bladder neck suspension, and collagen injection--Toa Payoh Hospital experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, K P; Lim, P H; Chng, H C

    1995-12-01

    A retrospective analysis was performed on 34 female patients who underwent corrective surgery for stress urinary incontinence over a 4-year period at the Toa Payoh Hospital. These patients were offered surgery only after an adequate trial of medical therapy, pelvic floor exercises and weight reduction. Bladder neck suspension operations were performed via the Burch, Stamey and modified Pereyra techniques. Towards the later part of this study, endoscopic injection of Collagen was performed as a salvage procedure in 2 patients. The Burch colposuspension gave uniformly good results, with all patients being completely dry. Seventy percent and sixty percent complete continence were achieved via the modified Pereyra and Stamey techniques respectively. Three patients required additional surgical procedures. Using these techniques, the overall results showed that 27 patients (79.4%) had complete urinary continence following surgery, while the remaining 7 patients (20.6%) experienced significant improvement of symptoms.

  12. Identification of risk factors for the development of clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea following treatment of polymicrobial surgical infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Rosemarie; Swenson, Brian R; Bonatti, Hugo; Hedrick, Traci L; Hranjec, Tjasa; Popovsky, Kimberley A; Pruett, Timothy L; Sawyer, Robert G

    2010-04-01

    To identify risk factors for Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD) in surgical patients following treatment of polymicrobial infections. Infections among surgical patients are frequently anaerobic or mixed aerobic-anaerobic infections and are therefore subject to polymicrobial antibiotic coverage, including metronidazole. While multiple antibiotics are known to contribute to the development of CDAD, the role of preventive antibiotics is unproven. An 11-year dataset of consecutive infections treated in surgical patients at a single hospital was reviewed. All intra-abdominal, surgical site, or skin/skin structure infections were identified. Each infection was evaluated for antibiotic coverage and subsequent CDAD. Antibiotic usage was assessed using chi analysis. A multiple logistic regression was used to identify independent predictors of CDAD. A total of 4178 intra-abdominal, surgical site, or skin/skin structure infections were identified. Of these infections, 98 were followed by CDAD. Only carbapenem use affected the incidence of CDAD: 3.5% of infections treated with a carbapenem were followed by CDAD, whereas only 2.1% of infections treated without carbapenems were followed by CDAD (P = 0.04). Metronidazole had no association with future CDAD. Only age and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) score were independently associated with CDAD by multiple logistic regression analysis. Older patients with a high severity of illness are at greatest risk for developing CDAD following treatment of polymicrobial infections. No specific antibiotic class, including fluoroquinolones, is associated with an increased incidence of CDAD in this population. Although use of metronidazole in the treatment of polymicrobial infections is appropriate for anaerobic coverage, it does not reduce the risk of future CDAD.

  13. Clinical effects of modified surgical crown lengthening%改良牙冠延长术临床疗效的观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    章彦彦; 陈才展; 邓燕; 杨旭; 黄继洪; 高丽萍

    2013-01-01

    AIM:To observe the clinical effects of modified crown lengthening surgery.METHODS:Modified crown lengthening was performed on 31 teeth with crown defects involved more than 3 mm subgingivally.Plaque index (PLI),bleeding index (BI),probing depth (PD) and tooth mobility (TM) were measured before and 1,3,9 and 15 months after operation at follow-up.RESULTS:PLI,BI,PD and TM were significantly decreased at 1,3,9and 15 months after modified crown lengthening (P < 0.05).Gingival health and gingival margin coordination were improved,prosthetic replacements were stable in all patienrs.CONCLUSION:Modified surgical crown lengthening is an effective surgical method for conventional crown lengthening.%目的:观察改良牙冠延长术的临床疗效.方法:对31例患者的31个牙体缺损延伸至龈下3.0 mm以上患牙行改良牙冠延长术,术后1、3、9、15个月随访,比较患牙术前后的菌斑指数(PLI)、出血指数(BI)、牙周探诊深度(PD)和松动度(TM).结果:31个患牙术后1,3,9,15个月的PD、BI、PLI、TM较术前改善明显(均为P<0.05);术后无松动、牙龈健康、龈缘协调;修复体稳定;患者自诉功能良好,疗效满意.结论:改良牙冠延长术可作为常规牙冠延长术不足的一种弥补.

  14. Incidence of bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw in high-risk patients undergoing surgical tooth extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodem, Jens Philipp; Kargus, Steffen; Eckstein, Stefanie; Saure, Daniel; Engel, Michael; Hoffmann, Jürgen; Freudlsperger, Christian

    2015-05-01

    As the most suitable approach for preventing bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ) in patients undergoing surgical tooth extraction is still under discussion, the present study evaluates the incidence of BRONJ after surgical tooth extraction using a standardized surgical protocol in combination with an adjuvant perioperative treatment setting in patients who are at high-risk for developing BRONJ. High-risk patients were defined as patients who received intravenous bisphosphonate (BP) due to a malignant disease. All teeth were removed using a standardized surgical protocol. The perioperative adjuvant treatment included intravenous antibiotic prophylaxis starting at least 24 h before surgery, a gastric feeding tube and mouth rinses with chlorhexidine (0.12%) three times a day. In the follow-up period patients were examined every 4 weeks for the development of BRONJ. Minimum follow-up was 12 weeks. In 61 patients a total number of 184 teeth were removed from 102 separate extraction sites. In eight patients (13.1%) BRONJ developed during the follow-up. A higher risk for developing BRONJ was found in patients where an additional osteotomy was necessary (21.4% vs. 8.0%; p = 0.0577), especially for an osteotomy of the mandible (33.3% vs. 7.3%; p = 0.0268). Parameters including duration of intravenous antibiotic prophylaxis, the use of a gastric feeding tube and the duration of intravenous BP therapy showed no statistical impact on the development of BRONJ. Furthermore, patients currently undergoing intravenous BP therapy showed no higher risk for BRONJ compared with patients who have paused or completed their intravenous BP therapy (p = 0.4232). This study presents a protocol for surgical tooth extraction in high-risk BP patients in combination with a perioperative adjuvant treatment setting, which reduced the risk for postoperative BRONJ to a minimum. However, the risk for BRONJ increases significantly if an additional osteotomy is necessary

  15. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer reduces surgical risks and lymph-vascular space involvement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue Wang; Guang Wang; Li-Hui Wei; Ling-Hui Huang; Jian-Liu Wang; Shi-Jun Wang; Xiao-Ping Li

    2011-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT),which can reduce the size and therefore increase the resectability of tumors,has recently evolved as a treatment for locally advanced cervical cancer.NACT has been reported to decrease the risk of pathologic factors related to prognosis of cervical cancer.To further assess the effects of NACT on surgery and the pathologic characteristics of cervicat cancer,we reviewed 110 cases of locally advanced cervical cancer treated with radical hysterectomy with or without NACT at the People's Hospital of Peking University between January 2006 and December 2010.Of 110 patients,68 underwent platinum-based NACT prior to surgery (NACT group) and 42 underwent pdmary surgery treatment (PST group).Our results showed 48 of 68 (70.6%) patients achieved a complete response or partial response to NACT.Estimated blood loss,operation time,and number of removed lymph nodes during surgery,as well as complication rates during and after surgery were not significantly different between the NACT group and the PST group.The rates of deep stromal invasion,positive parametria,positive surgical vaginal margins,and lymph node metastasis were not significantly different between the two groups.However,the rate of lymph-vascular space involvement (LVSI) was significantly lower in the NACT group than in the PST group (P = 0.021).In addition,the response rate of NACT was significantly higher in the patients with chemotherapeutic drugs administrated via artery than via vein.Our results suggest that NACT is a safe and effective treatment for locally advanced cervical cancer and significantly decreases the rate of LVSI.

  16. Surgical treatment of axillary hyperhidrosis with liposuction equipment: risks and benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieniek, Andrzej; Białynicki-Birula, Rafał; Baran, Wojciech; Kuniewska, Barbara; Okulewicz-Gojlik, Danuta; Szepietowski, Jacek C

    2005-01-01

    Axillary hyperhidrosis poses a serious problem to the affected patients. So far, the conservative measures employed seem to be disappointing, operations with axillary skin excision, undermining and/or skin reconstruction may cause secondary functional and cosmetic problems, whereas botulinum A toxin injections need to be repeated frequently. The aim of this study was to establish the safety, efficacy, and durability of subdermal (subcorial) suction sweat gland curettage in the treatment of axillary hyperhidrosis. So far, the method seems to be devoid of possible risks and drawbacks. In the last 4.5 years, 15 patients with axillary hyperhidrosis were operated on with the use of liposuction tools. First operations were performed in general anesthesia, then in tumescent anesthesia. The procedure of suction curettage was performed with the use of 3- to 4-mm wide liposuction cannulas. The patients were closely monitored during early stages of the healing process; then they were evaluated at 1 and 3 months, and finally at 1-4 years of the operation, when they were asked to assess the effects of the operation. Four patients had recurrence of the disease within 3 months; three of them were reoperated on, with good result. At 1-4 years of the operation, all our responders (ten of 15 patients) stated that the disease had completely subsided. The following complications were observed during the process of healing: hematomas, transient skin unevenness, and partial skin flap necrosis. In conclusion, subdermal suction curettage seems to be superior to botulinum A toxin injections by the effect durability, and to the surgical methods with skin excision and undermining by the probably lower complication rates.

  17. Preventing Disability: The Influence Of Modifiable Risk Factors On State And National Disability Prevalence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Neil K; Patel, Shivani A; Ali, Mohammed K; Narayan, K.M. Venkat

    2017-04-01

    Disability levels in the United States declined during the 1980s and 1990s, but these declines stalled more recently. Using data for 2013 from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, we estimated the percentages of national and state disability that could be prevented through reductions in five modifiable health risk factors associated with disability: cigarette smoking, obesity, diabetes, high cholesterol, and hypertension. Taking into account risk-factor prevalence and the association between each risk factor and disability, we evaluated the fraction of disability preventable if risk factors were reduced under two scenarios: complete elimination of risk factors and reduction in all states to the lowest levels observed in states. If all five risk factors were eliminated, 53 percent of disability could be prevented nationally. The largest contributors were smoking (17 percent), obesity (16 percent), and hypertension (12 percent). If all states reduced risk-factor levels to the lowest observed levels, up to 7 percent of disability could be prevented nationally. Many states in the South and Midwest could experience disability reductions of more than 10 percent by attaining the same risk-factor levels as in states that had the lowest levels. Improved risk-factor prevention could result in the resumption of longer-term declines in US disability. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  18. Percutaneous implantation of thoracic and abdominal aortic prostheses in patients at high surgical risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan C Ortiz

    2013-02-01

    intraluminal stent implantation is an alternative. Objective: to analyze the impact of percutaneous implantation of aortic stents in high-risk surgical patients with a minimum of one y ear follow-up. Method: Descriptive study conducted from December 2005 to March 2010 which included 125 patients with thoracic or abdominal aortic aneurysm, meeting surgical criteria by its diameter and that were rejected from surgery due to their high risk. The outcomes were intraoperative death from any cause and aneurysm-related at one, six and twelve months. Complications were defined as vascular occurred during the first thirty days. Results: Abdominal aneurysm was more frequent (70.4%. The overall mortality at 25.7 months follow-up was 14.8%. Of this percentage, 5.2% died from causes related to the aneurysm. One patient died during surgery. 4.3% were reoperated for leaks. There was higher aneurysm-related mortality in the thoracic (14.7 vs. 1.2% p = 0.003 and a trend in those of larger diameter (6.9 vs. 5.7 cm p = 0.210. There was no association between mortality and diabetes mellitus, smoking, heart disease, hypertension or dyslipidemia. Conclusions: aneurysm-related mortality in patients undergoing aortic stent graft is low. Mortality was associated with thoracic aneurysm and to its greater diameter. Complications did not imply an increase in mortality. In conclusion, in patients with aortic aneurysm and high surgical risk rejected for open surgery, percutaneous approach is a safe and effective treatment in a medium-term follow-up.

  19. Transapical Implantation of a 2nd-Generation JenaValve Device in Patient with Extremely High Surgical Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Mieres

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR is performed in patients who are poor surgical candidates. Many patients have inadequate femoral access, and alternative access sites have been used such as the transapical approach discussed in this paper. We present an elderly and fragile patient not suitable for surgery for unacceptable high risk, including poor ventricular function, previous myocardial infarction with percutaneous coronary intervention, pericardial effusion, and previous cardiac surgery with replacement of mechanical mitral valve. Transapical aortic valve replacement with a second-generation self-expanding JenaValve is performed. The JenaValve is a second-generation transapical TAVR valve consisting of a porcine root valve mounted on a low-profile nitinol stent. The valve is fully retrievable and repositionable. We discuss transapical access, implantation technique, and feasibility of valve implantation in this extremely high surgical risk patient.

  20. Comparison of gap arthroplasty versus creating a pseudoarthrosis – modified technique for surgical management of temporomandibular joint ankylosis: a new approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irfan ul Hassan Haji

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To compare the postoperative results like vertical ramus height, vertical facial height, anterior open bite, unilateral cross bite and reankylosis in patients with TMJ ankylosis after doing gap arthroplasty versus creating a pseudoarthrosis by this modified technique. Background: This surgical study done on 10 patients with TMJ ankylosis were 5 patients had unilateral ankylosis and 5 had bilateral ankylosis. Pseudoarthrosis was created by this modified technique in all 10 patients. Methods: In this technique, a pseudoarthrosis is created by two oblique osteotomies and resection of triangular shaped bony wedge between the articular cavity and subcondylar region involving ankylotic bony mass and sub-ankylotic normal bone and a surgical gap is created without interposing any material with gap of 1cm anteriorly and gap height decreasing posteriorly resulting in pseudoarthrosis at posterior border without any loss of vertical ramus height. Results and conclusion: The postoperative results show that this new approach of creating a pseudoarthrosis is effective and convenient method of treating TMJ ankylosis and has many advantages over conventional gap arthroplasty.

  1. Genetic risk factors for venous thrombosis : key players or minor risk modifiers?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vossen, Carolina Yvonne

    2005-01-01

    Venous thrombosis is a common disease, which manifests itself mostly in the deep veins of the leg, with a reported incidence of 1-2 per 1000 individuals per year. Several genetic risk factors have been identified for venous thrombosis. It is, however, difficult to predict the risk of venous

  2. Diabetes Mellitus as a Risk Factor in Glaucoma’s Physiopathology and Surgical Survival Time: A Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, L.; Cunha, JP; Amado, D. (David); Abegão Pinto, L; Ferreira,J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Glaucoma is a multifactorial condition under serious influence of many risk factors. The role of diabetes mellitus (DM) in glaucoma etiology or progression remains inconclusive. Although, the diabetic patients have different healing mechanism comparing to the general population and it has a possible-negative role on surgical outcomes. This review article attempts to analyze the association of both diseases, glaucoma and DM, before and after the surgery. The epidemiological studies, b...

  3. Modifiable Coronary Heart Disease Risk Factors in the Population Aged 20-49 Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Carlos Valladares Mas

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: evidence provided by the Framingham Heart Study established the critical role of risk factors in the development of coronary heart disease. Over half a century later, current detection and control are still inadequate. Objective: to identify modifiable risk factors of coronary heart disease in individuals aged 20 to 49 years. Methods: a descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted in 276 individuals from the doctor’s office No. 1 of the Fabio di Celmo Community Teaching Polyclinic in Cienfuegos. Patients were examined in the clinic visit and/or whole family visit. The studied variables included age, sex, skin color, risk factors (excess weight/obesity, physical inactivity, smoking, hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia and psychosocial factors, which were obtained from the medical interview, physical examination, laboratory tests (total cholesterol and triglycerides and review of individual medical records and family history. Results: risk factors most frequently identified were excess weight/obesity (42.4 %, physical inactivity (34.4 % and smoking (20.3 %. Presence of these risk factors increased with age, showing differences in the distribution by sex and was associated with psychosocial factors. Their coexistence and progress with age was significant. Conclusion: prevalence of modifiable risk factors for coronary heart disease in a young population was high, with frequent association, predominating factors related to unhealthy lifestyles.

  4. Fluoroscopy-Guided Percutaneous Gallstone Removal Using a 12-Fr Sheath in High-Risk Surgical Patients with Acute Cholecystitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Hwan [Keimyung University, College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Joo [Andong General Hospital, Andong (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Tae Beom [Gyeonsang National University, College of Medicine, Jinju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-04-15

    To evaluate the technical feasibility and clinical efficacy of percutaneous transhepatic cholecystolithotomy under fluoroscopic guidance in high-risk surgical patients with acute cholecystitis. Sixty-three consecutive patients of high surgical risk with acute calculous cholecystitis underwent percutaneous transhepatic gallstone removal under conscious sedation. The stones were extracted through the 12-Fr sheath using a Wittich nitinol stone basket under fluoroscopic guidance on three days after performing a percutaneous cholecystostomy. Large or hard stones were fragmented using either the snare guide wire technique or the metallic cannula technique. Gallstones were successfully removed from 59 of the 63 patients (94%). Reasons for stone removal failure included the inability to grasp a large stone in two patients, and the loss of tract during the procedure in two patients with a contracted gallbladder. The mean hospitalization duration was 7.3 days for acute cholecystitis patients and 9.4 days for gallbladder empyema patients. Bile peritonitis requiring percutaneous drainage developed in two patients. No symptomatic recurrence occurred during follow-up (mean, 608.3 days). Fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous gallstone removal using a 12-Fr sheath is technically feasible and clinically effective in high-risk surgical patients with acute cholecystitis

  5. Risk of surgical site infection in older patients in a cohort survey: targets for quality improvement in antibiotic prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agodi, Antonella; Quattrocchi, Annalisa; Barchitta, Martina; Adornetto, Veronica; Cocuzza, Aldo; Latino, Rosalia; Li Destri, Giovanni; Di Cataldo, Antonio

    2015-03-01

    The aims of the present study were to: (1) assess surgical site infection (SSI) incidence in a cohort of surgical patients and (2) estimate the compliance with national guidelines for perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis (PAP). SSIs, among the most common health care-associated infections, are an important target for surveillance and an official priority in several European countries. SSI commonly complicates surgical procedures in older people and is associated with substantial attributable mortality and costs. The implementation of PAP guidelines is difficult among surgeons, and failure to comply with the standard of care has been widely reported. A 12-month prospective survey was performed in accordance with the methods, protocols, and definitions of the Hospital in Europe Link for Infection Control through Surveillance (HELICS) protocol. The compliance of the current PAP practices with the published national guidelines was assessed. A total of 249 patients were enrolled. The cumulative SSI incidence was 3.2 per 100 operative procedures. Cumulative compliance for PAP was 12.4%. Overall, only infection risk index ≥ 1 was confirmed as a significant risk factor for SSI (odds ratio, 6.65; 95% confidence interval, 1.04-42.59; P = 0.045). When only older patients (age >65 years) were considered, no significant risk factors for SSI were identified. Our study indicates an overall inadequate compliance with PAP recommendations, thus highlighting the need to develop multimodal and targeted intervention programs to improve compliance with PAP guidelines.

  6. Recommendations for prevention of surgical site infection in adult elective arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Chuluyán

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Surgical site infections complicating orthopedic implant surgeries prolong hospital stay and increase risk of readmission, hospitalization costs and mortality. These recommendations are aimed at: (i optimizing compliance and incorporating habits in all surgery phases by detecting risk factors for surgical site infections which are potentially correctable or modifiable; and (ii optimizing preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis as well as intraoperative and postoperative care

  7. Adjustable muscle plication: a new surgical technique for strabismic patients with high risk for anterior segment ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Carlos; Laria; David; P.Pi?ero

    2015-01-01

    <正>INTRODUCTION Anterior ciliary arteries provide 70%of the vascular supply of the anterior segment.A significant interruption of the vascular flow of these arteries increases the risk for anterior ischemia.Although the frequency of this special condition is low after strabismus surgery(1:13 000)[1],its effects may involve substantial visual problems[2].We report the successful outcome of a new surgical approach for strabismus management in a case of high risk for anterior ischemia.Specifically,we show the correction of the horizontal ocular deviation by means of an adjustable muscle

  8. Surgical treatment of uterine prolapse in women with bladder exstrophy: report of two cases with modified Prolift procedure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartelink, L.R.; Feitz, W.F.J.; Kluivers, K.B.; Withagen, M.I.J.; Vierhout, M.E.

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of pelvic organ prolapse is 18% in women with bladder exstrophy. A vaginal technique to correct the prolapse may be preferable in these women with multiple abdominal operations in their histories. We have performed a modified Prolift procedure for the repair of severe uterine prolapse

  9. Modifiable health risks in Atlantic Canadian employees: a 5-year report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makrides, L; Sawatzky, C; Petrie, J; Veinot, P

    2010-12-01

    A number of modifiable health risks, such as smoking, inactivity and obesity have been linked to increased employer costs, including decreased productivity and increased absenteeism and health claims. The purpose of this paper is to report on the health profile and prevalence of modifiable health risks in an Atlantic Canadian Employee Database. Data were collected over a 5-year period (2001-2006) by the Atlantic Health and Wellness Institute, the research arm of Creative Wellness Solutions, in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. Each employee of 51 workplaces (n = 6067; 2665 males, 3402 females; average age 41.3 years) completed a Health Risk Assessment questionnaire on smoking, nutrition and physical activity behaviours. Clinical data measurements were blood pressure, blood cholesterol, weight and height. Data were compared for private, public and health sectors. Sixteen percent had elevated blood pressure (≥ 140/90 mmHg), 20% smoked cigarettes, 70% were overweight [body mass index (BMI) ≥ 25 kg/m(2)], 31% were obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2)), 38% had elevated non-fasting cholesterol levels (≥ 5.20 mmol/l) and 49% were inactive (health risks (i.e. daily tobacco smoking, physical inactivity, overweight and high blood pressure). Health care sector employees were healthier overall, but there was substantial room for improvement. The present analysis identified an alarming prevalence of modifiable health risks in Atlantic Canadian employees. Workplaces need to invest in workplace wellness to reduce the risks and promote better health among employees, thus increasing productivity and decreasing the financial burden on employers.

  10. Genetically modified lactic acid bacteria: applications to food or health and risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renault, Pierre

    2002-11-01

    Lactic acid bacteria have a long history of use in fermented food products. Progress in gene technology allows their modification by introducing new genes or by modifying their metabolic functions. These modifications may lead to improvements in food technology (bacteria better fitted to technological processes, leading to improved organoleptic properties em leader ), or to new applications including bacteria producing therapeutic molecules that could be delivered by mouth. Examples in these two fields will be discussed, at the same time evaluating their potential benefit to society and the possible risks associated with their use. Risk assessment and expected benefits will determine the future use of modified bacteria in the domains of food technology and health.

  11. Prediction of Outcome After Emergency High-Risk Intra-abdominal Surgery Using the Surgical Apgar Score

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cihoric, Mirjana; Toft Tengberg, Line; Bay-Nielsen, Morten

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: With current literature quoting mortality rates up to 45%, emergency high-risk abdominal surgery has, compared with elective surgery, a significantly greater risk of death and major complications. The Surgical Apgar Score (SAS) is predictive of outcome in elective surgery, but has never...... been validated exclusively in an emergency setting. METHODS: A consecutive prospective single-center cohort study of 355 adults undergoing emergency high-risk abdominal surgery between June 2013 and May 2014 is presented. The primary outcome measure was 30-day mortality. Secondary outcome measures were...... the incidence of both outcomes. Area under the curve was used to demonstrate the scores' discriminatory power. RESULTS: One hundred eighty-one (51.0%) patients developed minor or no complications. The overall incidence of major complications was 32.7% and the overall death rate was 16.3%. Risk of major...

  12. Patient-prosthesis mismatch: surgical aortic valve replacement versus transcatheter aortic valve replacement in high risk patients with aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanta, Ravi K; Kron, Irving L

    2016-10-01

    Patient prosthesis mismatch (PPM) can occur when a prosthetic aortic valve has an effective orifice area (EOA) less than that of a native valve. A recent study by Zorn and colleagues evaluated the incidence and significance of PPM in high risk patients with severe aortic stenosis who were randomized to transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) or surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). TAVR is associated with decreased incidence of severe PPM compared to traditional SAVR valves. Severe PPM increases risk for death at 1 year postoperatively in high risk patients. The increased incidence of PPM is largely due to differences in valve design and should encourage development of newer SAVR valves to reduce risk for PPM. In addition more vigorous approaches to root enlargement in small annulus should be performed with SAVR to prevent PPM.

  13. Obesity, Exercise, Obstructive Sleep Apnea, and Modifiable Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors in Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jared D; Aronis, Konstantinos N; Chrispin, Jonathan; Patil, Kaustubha D; Marine, Joseph E; Martin, Seth S; Blaha, Michael J; Blumenthal, Roger S; Calkins, Hugh

    2015-12-29

    Classically, the 3 pillars of atrial fibrillation (AF) management have included anticoagulation for prevention of thromboembolism, rhythm control, and rate control. In both prevention and management of AF, a growing body of evidence supports an increased role for comprehensive cardiac risk factor modification (RFM), herein defined as management of traditional modifiable cardiac risk factors, weight loss, and exercise. In this narrative review, we summarize the evidence demonstrating the importance of each facet of RFM in AF prevention and therapy. Additionally, we review emerging data on the importance of weight loss and cardiovascular exercise in prevention and management of AF.

  14. Proteinuria, a modifiable risk factor: angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykeman-Sharpe, Jennifer

    2003-01-01

    Microalbuminuria and proteinuria have been determined to be modifiable risk factors for the progression of chronic kidney disease as well as risk factors for cardiovascular events. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers have been demonstrated to decrease proteinuria at all stages and slow the progression of renal disease. Proteinuria can be used as a marker of successful treatment in patients with chronic kidney disease in combination with other established targets. This article discusses the various diagnostic tests used for the detection of microalbuminuria and proteinuria and appropriate pharmaceutical treatment.

  15. A risk-based classification scheme for genetically modified foods. I: Conceptual development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Eunice; Krewski, Daniel

    2008-12-01

    The predominant paradigm for the premarket assessment of genetically modified (GM) foods reflects heightened public concern by focusing on foods modified by recombinant deoxyribonucleic acid (rDNA) techniques, while foods modified by other methods of genetic modification are generally not assessed for safety. To determine whether a GM product requires less or more regulatory oversight and testing, we developed and evaluated a risk-based classification scheme (RBCS) for crop-derived GM foods. The results of this research are presented in three papers. This paper describes the conceptual development of the proposed RBCS that focuses on two categories of adverse health effects: (1) toxic and antinutritional effects, and (2) allergenic effects. The factors that may affect the level of potential health risks of GM foods are identified. For each factor identified, criteria for differentiating health risk potential are developed. The extent to which a GM food satisfies applicable criteria for each factor is rated separately. A concern level for each category of health effects is then determined by aggregating the ratings for the factors using predetermined aggregation rules. An overview of the proposed scheme is presented, as well as the application of the scheme to a hypothetical GM food.

  16. Modified radical mastectomy:Indications and surgical standardization%乳腺癌改良根治术的适应证与手术规范

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王殊; 杨后圃

    2015-01-01

    随着乳腺癌综合治疗的进步,保乳手术和前哨淋巴结活检已经成为早期乳腺癌首选手术方式。但对于部分有保乳禁忌和腋窝淋巴结阳性的患者,改良根治术仍然是最常用的手术方式。乳房切除和腋窝清扫所带来的手术并发症相对较多,术后美容效果差,如何严格把握改良根治术的手术适应证,规范手术操作,减少手术并发症,是现阶段乳腺外科必须面对的话题。%Although breast conserving therapy and sentinel lymph node biopsy are widely used, complete mastectomy combined with axillary lymph node dissection, which was defined as modified radical mastectomy, still remains a viable option for patients with breast cancer and positive axillary lymph node.As a relatively more aggressive technique, modified radical mastectomy is associated with more adverse effect and worse cosmetic outcome. This topic is to address the evolving history, indications and surgical standardization of modified radical mastectomy.

  17. A systematic review on the safety and efficacy of percutaneous edge-to-edge mitral valve repair with the MitraClip system for high surgical risk candidates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munkholm-Larsen, Stine; Wan, Benjamin; Tian, David H

    2014-01-01

    after implantation. One year survival ranged from 75-90%. No long term outcomes have been reported for high surgical risk patients. CONCLUSIONS: MitraClip implantation is an option in managing selected high surgical risk patients with severe MR. The current evidence suggests that MitraClip can......BACKGROUND: MitraClip implantation has emerged as a viable option in high surgical risk patients with severe mitral regurgitation (MR). We performed the present systematic review to assess the safety and efficacy of the MitraClip system for high surgical risk candidates with severe organic and....../or functional MR. METHODS: Six electronic databases were searched for original published studies from January 2000 to March 2013. Two reviewers independently appraised studies, using a standard form, and extracted data on methodology, quality criteria, and outcome measures. All data were extracted and tabulated...

  18. Combined Lumbar-Sacral Plexus Block in High Surgical Risk Geriatric Patients undergoing Early Hip Fracture Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petchara S

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the postoperative outcome after using combined lumbar and sacral plexus block (CLSB, as a sole anesthetic method in hip fracture (HF surgery in highrisk geriatric patients. Materials and Methods: A single-center retrospective study was conducted, between 2010 and 2012, on 70 elderly HF patients with American Society of Anesthesiologists grading III-IV who underwent early surgical intervention with our CLSB protocol. Perioperative data, outcome, and complications were recorded. Results: Forty-eight patients (69% had ongoing anticoagulant medication. Postoperatively, all patients were hemodynamically stable and awake. None of them required general anesthesia conversion. Minor anesthetic-related complications were found in nine patients. One patient (1% died from sepsis due to pneumonia. Patients’ satisfactions were all rated as very good or excellent. Conclusion: CLSB is an interesting anesthetic option in HF surgery, especially in high surgical risk geriatric patients. This method offers an excellent clinical efficiency and high patients’ satisfaction without serious complications.

  19. Unhealthy habits persist: The ongoing presence of modifiable risk factors for disease in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szoeke, Cassandra; Dang, Christa; Lehert, Philippe; Hickey, Martha; Morris, Meg E; Dennerstein, Lorraine; Campbell, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Vascular disease remains a leading cause of death. There are several vascular risk factors identified that can mitigate development of disease in ageing. We examine reported rates of modifiable risk factors in women responding to an online health questionnaire advertised by popular media. A sample of 26 620 women aged over 18 was examined in 2015 with a cross-sectional health questionnaire. The questionnaire included self-reported health, mood, lifestyle and vascular risk factors. There remains high rates of modifiable risk factors present in women. The vast majority of women (80%) reported not eating enough fruit and vegetables. Compared to the guidelines for health, the majority did not perform enough weekly physical activity (70%) and more than half the participants were overweight (54%). Sufficient fruit, vegetables, fish, legumes and physical activity were reported in less than 30% of women! Women continue to report low rates of physical activity, fruit and vegetable intake and higher BMI than recommended for good health, despite worldwide health promotion activities aimed at changing these lifestyle factors. Programs to support healthy living need to be reviewed and revised to reduce the burden of vascular disease and dementia in women. Previous guidelines are not having the important impact they should, particularly in women.

  20. Periodontitis as a Modifiable Risk Factor for Dementia: A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yao-Tung; Lee, Hsin-Chien; Hu, Chaur-Jongh; Huang, Li-Kai; Chao, Shu-Ping; Lin, Chia-Pei; Su, Emily Chia-Yu; Lee, Yi-Chen; Chen, Chu-Chieh

    2017-02-01

    To determine whether periodontitis is a modifiable risk factor for dementia. Prospective cohort study. National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. Individuals aged 65 and older with periodontitis (n = 3,028) and an age- and sex-matched control group (n = 3,028). Individuals with periodontitis were compared age- and sex-matched controls with for incidence density and hazard ratio (HR) of new-onset dementia. Periodontitis was defined according to International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes 523.3-5 diagnosed by dentists. To ensure diagnostic validity, only those who had concurrently received antibiotic therapies, periodontal treatment other than scaling, or scaling more than twice per year performed by certified dentists were included. Dementia was defined according to ICD-9-CM codes 290.0-290.4, 294.1, 331.0-331.2. After adjustment for confounding factors, the risk of developing dementia was calculated to be higher for participants with periodontitis (HR = 1.16, 95% confidence interval = 1.01-1.32, P = .03) than for those without. Periodontitis is associated with greater risk of developing dementia. Periodontal infection is treatable, so it might be a modifiable risk factor for dementia. Clinicians must devote greater attention to this potential association in an effort to develop new preventive and therapeutic strategies for dementia. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  1. Modifiable risk factors for mechanical ventilator-associated pneumonia in intensive care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel de Mendonça Nepomuceno

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Backgound and Objectives: Ventilator-associated pneumonia is a pulmonary infection that occurs 48 to 72 hours after endotracheal intubation and institution of mechanical ventilation, being considered one of the most feared adverse effects of intensive care therapy. Its incidence affects 10-30% of patients as an important cause of morbidity and mortality, of which mortality rate can exceed 25%. Modifiable risk factors are seen as crucial in decision-making for its treatment and prevention. Thus, the modifiable risk factors for pneumonia associated with invasive mechanical ventilation in patients admitted to the intensive care unit were described. Methods: This is a literature review carried out at Lilacs, SciELO, MEDLINE and Bdenf databases, to collect and summarize publications and subsequently, critically evaluate the risk factors for ventilator-associated pneumonia. Results: The inappropriate or indiscriminate use of antibiotics, lack of knowledge about the microbiota of the ICU and non compliance of the team regarding preventive measures predominated. Conclusion: Professionals must be made aware of the identified risk factors in order to carry out direct actions with short-term impact in the prevention and effective control of ventilator-associated pneumonia.

  2. The effect of modifiable risk factors on geographic mortality differentials: a modelling study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevenson Christopher E

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Australian mortality rates are higher in regional and remote areas than in major cities. The degree to which this is driven by variation in modifiable risk factors is unknown. Methods We applied a risk prediction equation incorporating smoking, cholesterol and blood pressure to a national, population based survey to project all-causes mortality risk by geographic region. We then modelled life expectancies at different levels of mortality risk by geographic region using a risk percentiles model. Finally we set high values of each risk factor to a target level and modelled the subsequent shift in the population to lower levels of mortality risk and longer life expectancy. Results Survival is poorer in both Inner Regional and Outer Regional/Remote areas compared to Major Cities for men and women at both high and low levels of predicted mortality risk. For men smoking, high cholesterol and high systolic blood pressure were each associated with the mortality difference between Major Cities and Outer Regional/Remote areas--accounting for 21.4%, 20.3% and 7.7% of the difference respectively. For women smoking and high cholesterol accounted for 29.4% and 24.0% of the difference respectively but high blood pressure did not contribute to the observed mortality differences. The three risk factors taken together accounted for 45.4% (men and 35.6% (women of the mortality difference. The contribution of risk factors to the corresponding differences for inner regional areas was smaller, with only high cholesterol and smoking contributing to the difference in men-- accounting for 8.8% and 6.3% respectively-- and only smoking contributing to the difference in women--accounting for 12.3%. Conclusions These results suggest that health intervention programs aimed at smoking, blood pressure and total cholesterol could have a substantial impact on mortality inequities for Outer Regional/Remote areas.

  3. The surgical rate and recurrence rate in right colonic diverticulitis using the CT-based modified hinchey classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Hwan; Kim, Hyuk Jung; Jang, Suk Ki; Yeon, Jae Woo [Dept. of Radiology, Daejin Medical Center Bundang Jesaeng General Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Ko, You Sun; Lee, Kyoung Ho [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    The purpose of this report is to retrospectively analyze the need for surgery, and the recurrence rate, using a CT-based method in patients with right colonic diverticulitis. For the purposes of our study, we included 416 patients with a mean age of 41.9 (238 of which were men), with a diagnosis of colonic diverticulitis that was based on CT findings. These findings were reviewed by two independent radiologists, who localized diverticulitis and determined it using a modified Hinchey classification. We were able to follow-up with 384 patients over a period of 30 months. Out of the 416 patients, 396 of them had right colonic diverticulitis. In right colonic diverticulitis, the κ value in determining the modified Hinchey classification was 0.80. 98.2% (389/396) of the patients with right colonic diverticulitis had stages Ia-II. The surgery rate was 4.6% (17/366) and 28% (5/18) for right and left colonic diverticulitis, respectively (p < 0.001). In the instances of right colonic diverticulitis, the surgery rate was 2.8% (10/359) for stages Ia-II, while all seven patients with stage III or IV underwent surgery. The recurrence rate was 6.5% (23/356) and 15% (2/13) for right and left colonic diverticulitis, respectively (p = 0.224). The CT-based modified Hinchey classification of right colonic diverticulitis showed good interobserver agreement. Most patients with right colonic diverticulitis had lower stages (Ia-II) at the point of CT, rarely needed surgery, and had a low recurrence rate.

  4. Optimal Surgical Management Using a Classic Blalock-Taussig Shunt for an Infected Pseudoaneurysm After a Modified Blalock-Taussig Shunt Procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Noritaka; Murayama, Hiroomi; Hasegawa, Hiroki

    2016-05-01

    We present 2 cases of a 3-month-old girl and boy who were diagnosed with an infected pseudoaneurysm 2 months after undergoing left-sided modified Blalock-Taussig shunt (mBTS) operations for pulmonary atresia. Because the shunts in both cases were nearly obstructed, they underwent a 2-stage surgical approach: classic BTS operations through a right thoracotomy to establish sufficient pulmonary flow and infected graft removal through a median sternotomy after close observation of the state of the aneurysms. By utilizing autologous tissue from a different thoracic entry, both patients were successfully managed and recovered without any recurrence of infection. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. SURGICAL TREATMENT OF HALLUX VALGLUS BY RECONSTRUCTION OF METATARSAL ARCH AND MODIFIED MCBRIDE OPERATION (40 CASES REPORT)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    翁习生; 贺仁诚; 李柯; 廉清宇; 李秉璐

    1995-01-01

    72 feet with hallux valges among 40 patients treated by recoestruction of metatarsal arch and modified McBride operation are reported in this paper. After an average of 4. 5 years of postoperative follow-up , the results showed an overll 9° and 3° correction of the hallux abductes angle and the intermetatarsal angle, re-spectively. 95% of the cases of bunions disappeared, 66% calli under the heads of the first and second metatarsal disappeared, and 91% patients were satisfied with the changes of their feet appearance.

  6. Incidence of surgical site infection following adult spinal deformity surgery: an analysis of patient risk.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pull ter Gunne, A.F.; Laarhoven, C.J.H.M. van; Cohen, D.B.

    2010-01-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) following spinal surgery is a frequent complication and results in higher morbidity, mortality and healthcare costs. Patients undergoing surgery for spinal deformity (scoliosis/kyphosis) have longer surgeries, involving more spinal levels and larger blood losses than ty

  7. Risk factors for and consequences of inadequate surgical margins in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawaetz, Mads; Homøe, Preben

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to examine which factors are associated with inadequate surgical margins and to assess the postoperative consequences. STUDY DESIGN: A retrospective cohort of 110 patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma treated with surgery during a 2-year period...

  8. Lentigo maligna - anatomic location as a potential risk factor for recurrences after non-surgical treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Greveling (Karin); van der Klok, T. (Th.); M.B.A. van Doorn (Martijn); V. Noordhoek Hegt (Vincent); E.P. Prens (Errol)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: A higher incidence of lentigo maligna (LM) recurrences on the nose was previously observed in our cohort after non-surgical treatment. Objectives: To determine histological parameters that might be related to the previously observed higher incidence of LM recurrences on the n

  9. Incidence of surgical site infection following adult spinal deformity surgery: an analysis of patient risk.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pull ter Gunne, A.F.; Laarhoven, C.J.H.M. van; Cohen, D.B.

    2010-01-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) following spinal surgery is a frequent complication and results in higher morbidity, mortality and healthcare costs. Patients undergoing surgery for spinal deformity (scoliosis/kyphosis) have longer surgeries, involving more spinal levels and larger blood losses than

  10. Hypoxaemia in the general surgical ward--a potential risk factor?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, J

    1994-01-01

    signs or symptoms of coronary artery disease. Experimental studies have shown an adverse effect of tissue hypoxia on wound healing and on resistance to bacterial wound infections. Finally, mental confusion and surgical delirium may be related to inadequate arterial oxygenation during the late...

  11. Certain modifiable risk factors in essential hypertension: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil M. Sagare, S. S. Rajderkar B. S. Girigosavi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Essential hypertension accounts for 90% of all cases of hypertension. Though it is a one of major risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, it is a condition with its own risk factors. Overall prevalence of hypertension is increasing over the years in India (from 3.57% in 1977 to 20-30% after 1995. Considering the public health importance of ‘Essential Hypertension’ the present study was conducted. The objective was to study role of certain risk factors in essential hypertension. A case control study was conducted in rural township of Tasgaon; in Sangli district of Maharashtra during 2001-2002, to study role of certain modifiable risk factors in essential hypertension in 21-60 years age group. 165 cases of essential hypertension were selected by systematic random sampling from two private hospitals & O.P.D. of RHTC, Tasgaon and 330, age & sex matched controls were selected in the ratio of 1:2. A significant association was found between essential hypertension and various risk factors including smoking, its frequency and duration, alcoholic status, leisure time physical inactivity, restless sleep, BMI, mental stress, mixed diet and salt intake. Smoking of more than 10 cigarettes or bidi had 3.23 times risk of developing hypertension than smoking up to 10 cigarettes or bidi.

  12. WCRF/AICR recommendation adherence and breast cancer incidence among postmenopausal women with and without non-modifiable risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Sarah J O; Inoue-Choi, Maki; Lazovich, DeAnn; Robien, Kim

    2016-06-01

    Taller height, family history of breast cancer, greater number of years of potential fertility and nulliparity are established non-modifiable risk factors for postmenopausal breast cancer. Greater adherence to the World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research (WCRF/AICR) diet, physical activity and body weight recommendations has previously been shown to be associated with lower breast cancer risk. However, no prior studies have evaluated whether women with non-modifiable risk factors receive similar benefits from recommendation adherence compared to women without these risk factors. In the Iowa Women's Health Study prospective cohort, we investigated whether associations of WCRF/AICR recommendation adherence differed by the presence/absence of non-modifiable breast cancer risk factors. Baseline (1986) questionnaire data from 36,626 postmenopausal women were used to create adherence scores for the WCRF/AICR recommendations (maximum score = 8.0). Overall and single recommendation adherence in relation to breast cancer risk (n = 3,189 cases) across levels of non-modifiable risk factors were evaluated using proportional hazards regression. Mean adherence score was 5.0 points (range: 0.5-8.0). Higher adherence scores (score ≥ 6.0 vs. ≤ 3.5, HR = 0.76, 95% CI = 0.67-0.87), and adherence to the individual recommendations for body weight and alcohol intake were associated with a lower breast cancer incidence. While not statistically significant among women with more non-modifiable risk factors (score ≥ 6.0 vs. ≤ 3.5, HR = 0.76, 95% CI = 0.36-1.63), hazard ratios were comparable to women with the no non-modifiable risk factors (score ≥ 6.0 vs. ≤ 3.5, HR = 0.74, 95% CI = 0.49-0.93) (p-interaction = 0.57). WCRF/AICR recommendation adherence is associated with lower breast cancer risk, regardless of non-modifiable risk factor status.

  13. Effect of femoral head size and surgical approach on risk of revision for dislocation after total hip arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zijlstra, Wierd P; De Hartog, Bas; Van Steenbergen, Liza N; Scheurs, B Willem; Nelissen, Rob G H H

    2017-08-01

    Background and purpose - Recurrent dislocation is the commonest cause of early revision of a total hip arthropasty (THA). We examined the effect of femoral head size and surgical approach on revision rate for dislocation, and for other reasons, after total hip arthroplasty (THA). Patients and methods - We analyzed data on 166,231 primary THAs and 3,754 subsequent revision THAs performed between 2007 and 2015, registered in the Dutch Arthroplasty Register (LROI). Revision rate for dislocation, and for all other causes, were calculated by competing-risk analysis at 6-year follow-up. Multivariable Cox proportional hazard regression ratios (HRs) were used for comparisons. Results - Posterolateral approach was associated with higher dislocation revision risk (HR =1) than straight lateral, anterolateral, and anterior approaches (HR =0.5-0.6). However, the risk of revision for all other reasons (especially stem loosening) was higher with anterior and anterolateral approaches (HR =1.2) and lowest with posterolateral approach (HR =1). For all approaches, 32-mm heads reduced the risk of revision for dislocation compared to 22- to 28-mm heads (HR =1 and 1.6, respectively), while the risk of revision for other causes remained unchanged. 36-mm heads increasingly reduced the risk of revision for dislocation but only with the posterolateral approach (HR =0.6), while the risk of revision for other reasons was unchanged. With the anterior approach, 36-mm heads increased the risk of revision for other reasons (HR =1.5). Interpretation - Compared to the posterolateral approach, direct anterior and anterolateral approaches reduce the risk of revision for dislocation, but at the cost of more stem revisions and other revisions. For all approaches, there is benefit in using 32-mm heads instead of 22- to 28-mm heads. For the posterolateral approach, 36-mm heads can safely further reduce the risk of revision for dislocation.

  14. Modified Sauve-Kapandji procedure for disorders of the distal radioulnar joint in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Surgical technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Satoru; Masada, Kazuhiro; Takeuchi, Eiji; Yasuda, Masataka; Komatsubara, Yoshio; Hashimoto, Hideo

    2006-03-01

    The Sauvé-Kapandji procedure has become popular for the treatment of disorders of the distal radioulnar joint in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, but this procedure is impossible to perform in patients with poor bone quality in the distal part of the ulna. We have modified the procedure for patients with poor bone quality in the distal part of the ulna. The modified procedure involves resecting the distal part of the ulna, making a drill-hole in the ulnar cortex of the distal part of the radius, rotating the resected portion of the ulna 90 degrees, inserting it into the distal part of the radius, and fixing it at that site with use of an AO cancellous-bone screw. In the present report, we describe the new operative technique and report the results after a minimum duration of follow-up of three years. This operation was performed in fifty-six patients (sixty-six wrists) with rheumatoid arthritis. The mean age at the time of the operation was 59.3 years. The mean duration of follow-up was forty-eight months. Patients were evaluated in terms of wrist pain, grip strength, and range of motion. Radiographic evaluation included calculation of the carpal translation index to assess the extent of ulnar translation of the carpus. Osseous union was achieved in all cases. Wrist pain resolved or decreased in all patients. The mean total range of forearm rotation increased from 144 degrees preoperatively to 167 degrees at the time of the most recent follow-up (p Kapandji procedure results in rigid fixation of the grafted bone. The technique provides sufficient osseous support of the carpus even in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and poor bone quality in the distal part of the ulna.

  15. GAB2 Alleles Modify Alzheimer’s Risk in APOE ε4 Carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiman, Eric M.; Webster, Jennifer A.; Myers, Amanda J.; Hardy, John; Dunckley, Travis; Zismann, Victoria L.; Joshipura, Keta D.; Pearson, John V.; Hu-Lince, Diane; Huentelman, Matthew J.; Craig, David W.; Coon, Keith D.; Liang, Winnie S.; Herbert, RiLee H.; Beach, Thomas; Rohrer, Kristen C.; Zhao, Alice S.; Leung, Doris; Bryden, Leslie; Marlowe, Lauren; Kaleem, Mona; Mastroeni, Diego; Grover, Andrew; Heward, Christopher B.; Ravid, Rivka; Rogers, Joseph; Hutton, Michael L.; Melquist, Stacey; Petersen, Ron C.; Alexander, Gene E.; Caselli, Richard J.; Kukull, Walter; Papassotiropoulos, Andreas; Stephan, Dietrich A.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY The apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 allele is the best established genetic risk factor for late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD). We conducted genome-wide surveys of 502,627 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to characterize and confirm other LOAD susceptibility genes. In ε4 carriers from neuropathologically verified discovery, neuropathologically verified replication, and clinically characterized replication cohorts of 1411 cases and controls, LOAD was associated with six SNPs from the GRB-associated binding protein 2 (GAB2) gene and a common haplotype encompassing the entire GAB2 gene. SNP rs2373115 (p = 9 × 10−11) was associated with an odds ratio of 4.06 (confidence interval 2.81–14.69), which interacts with APOE ε4 to further modify risk. GAB2 was overexpressed in pathologically vulnerable neurons; the Gab2 protein was detected in neurons, tangle-bearing neurons, and dystrophic neuritis; and interference with GAB2 gene expression increased tau phosphorylation. Our findings suggest that GAB2 modifies LOAD risk in APOE ε4 carriers and influences Alzheimer’s neuropathology. PMID:17553421

  16. Prospective Validation of Modified NEXUS Cervical Spine Injury Criteria in Low-risk Elderly Fall Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Tran

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The National Emergency X-radiography Utilization Study (NEXUS criteria are used extensively in emergency departments to rule out C-spine injuries (CSI in the general population. Although the NEXUS validation set included 2,943 elderly patients, multiple case reports and the Canadian C-Spine Rules question the validity of applying NEXUS to geriatric populations. The objective of this study was to validate a modified NEXUS criteria in a low-risk elderly fall population with two changes: a modified definition for distracting injury and the definition of normal mentation. Methods: This is a prospective, observational cohort study of geriatric fall patients who presented to a Level I trauma center and were not triaged to the trauma bay. Providers enrolled non-intoxicated patients at baseline mental status with no lateralizing neurologic deficits. They recorded midline neck tenderness, signs of trauma, and presence of other distracting injury. Results: We enrolled 800 patients. One patient fall event was excluded due to duplicate enrollment, and four were lost to follow up, leaving 795 for analysis. Average age was 83.6 (range 65-101. The numbers in parenthesis after the negative predictive value represent confidence interval. There were 11 (1.4% cervical spine injuries. One hundred seventeen patients had midline tenderness and seven of these had CSI; 366 patients had signs of trauma to the face/neck, and 10 of these patients had CSI. Using signs of trauma to the head/neck as the only distracting injury and baseline mental status as normal alertness, the modified NEXUS criteria was 100% sensitive (CI [67.9-100] with a negative predictive value of 100 (98.7-100. Conclusion: Our study suggests that a modified NEXUS criteria can be safely applied to low-risk elderly falls.

  17. Changes in Intraocular Pressure due to Surgical Positioning Studying Potential Risk for Postoperative Vision Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    surgical position on IOP and perfusion to the optic nerve during spine surgery is not known. Moreover, most surgeons and anesthesiologists do not record...needed at some point during surgery, be vigilant to return to less risky positions when appropriate. 3. Consider anesthesiologists recording the...massive blood loss after lumbar spine surgery. Spine 1994;19:468–9. 18. Brown R, Schauble J, Miller N. Anemia and hypotension as contributors to

  18. Reducing the risk of surgical site infection using a multidisciplinary approach: an integrative review

    OpenAIRE

    Gillespie BM; Kang E.; Roberts S; Lin F; Morley N; Finigan T; Homer A; Chaboyer W

    2015-01-01

    Brigid M Gillespie,1 Evelyn Kang,1 Shelley Roberts,1 Frances Lin,1,2 Nicola Morley,3 Tracey Finigan,3 Allison Homer,3 Wendy Chaboyer1 1National Health and Medical Research Council Research Centre for Clinical Excellence in Nursing Interventions (NCREN) and Centre for Healthcare Practice Innovation (HPI), Menzies Health Institute, 2School of Nursing and Midwifery, Griffith University, 3Surgical and Procedural Services, Gold Coast University Hospital, Gold Coast, QLD, Australia Purpose: To iden...

  19. Genetic modifiers of CHEK2*1100delC associated breast cancer risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muranen, Taru A.; Greco, Dario; Blomqvist, Carl; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Khan, Sofia; Hogervorst, Frans; Verhoef, Senno; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Dunning, Alison M.; Shah, Mitul; Luben, Robert; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Schoemaker, Minouk; Swerdlow, Anthony; García-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine; Dörk, Thilo; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Hall, Per; Li, Jingmei; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Bermisheva, Marina; Kristensen, Vessela; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Peto, Julian; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet E.; Hillemans, Peter; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian; Lambrechts, Diether; Moisse, Matthieu; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Martens, John W.M.; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Giles, Graham G.; Milne, Roger L.; Brenner, Hermann; Arndt, Volker; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Devilee, Peter; Seynaeve, Caroline; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa C.; John, Esther M.; Whittemore, Alice S.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Dennis, Joe; Easton, Douglas F.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Nevanlinna, Heli

    2016-01-01

    Purpose CHEK2*1100delC is a founder variant in European populations conferring a 2–3 fold increased risk of breast cancer (BC). Epidemiologic and family studies have suggested that the risk associated with CHEK2*1100delC is modified by other genetic factors in a multiplicative fashion. We have investigated this empirically using data from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). Methods With genotype data of 39,139 (624 1100delC carriers) BC patients and 40,063 (224) healthy controls from 32 BCAC studies, we analyzed the combined risk effects of CHEK2*1100delC and 77 common variants in terms of a polygenic risk score (PRS) and pairwise interaction. Results The PRS conferred an odds ratio (OR) of 1.59 [95% CI 1.21–2.09] per standard deviation for BC for CHEK2*1100delC carriers and 1.58 [1.55–1.62] for non-carriers. No evidence for deviation from the multiplicative model was found. The OR for the highest quintile of the PRS was 2.03 [0.86–4.78] for CHEK2*1100delC carriers placing them to the high risk category according to UK NICE guidelines. OR for the lowest quintile was 0.52 [0.16–1.74], indicating life-time risk close to population average. Conclusion Our results confirm the multiplicative nature of risk effects conferred by CHEK2*1100delC and the common susceptibility variants. Furthermore, the PRS could identify the carriers at a high life-time risk for clinical actions. PMID:27711073

  20. Interactions of infectious symptoms and modifiable risk factors in sudden infant death syndrome. The Nordic Epidemiological SIDS study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helweg-Larsen, K; Banner, Jytte; Oyen, N

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of infection on sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and to analyse whether modifiable risk factors of SIDS, prone sleeping, covered head and smoking act as effect modifiers. In a consecutive multicentre case-control study of SIDS in Denmark, Norway...... growth and toxin or cytokine production, and also adds further support to a possible association between infection and SIDS by loss of protective mechanisms, such as arousal. The risk of SIDS among infants with the combined presence of infectious symptoms and either of the other modifiable risk factors......, prone sleeping, head covered or parental smoking, was far greater than the sum of each individual factor. These risk factors thus modify the dangerousness of infection in infancy....

  1. What is the role of modifiable environmental and lifestyle risk factors in young onset dementia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cations, Monica; Withall, Adrienne; Low, Lee-Fay; Draper, Brian

    2016-02-01

    Young onset dementia (YOD) is associated with significant costs and burden, but its cause is poorly understood. The aim of this review was to determine whether environmental and lifestyle factors are associated with risk for non-autosomal dominant degenerative and vascular YOD. Academic databases were searched to March 2015 for studies assessing the impact of modifiable factors (e.g. education, cardiovascular illness, psychiatric illness, alcohol use) in participants under 65 years at symptom onset. Cardiovascular illness, traumatic brain injury, psychiatric illness, heavy alcohol use and estrogen-related factors were identified as potential risk factors for YOD. Evidence for education, childhood development, smoking and heavy metal exposure was inconsistent or of poor quality. A dose-response relationship was found between cumulative and/or increasing severity of exposure and risk for YOD. Environmental and lifestyle risk factors may be relevant to YOD, particularly with severe or cumulative exposure. More high quality research is required to confirm which factors confer risk and when.

  2. Modified Karhunen-Loéve expansion for evaluating skin-colour-associated melanoma risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevenini, G; Borzelli, G; Rubegni, P; Massai, M R; Andreassi, L; Barbini, P

    2000-07-01

    An approach based on the modified Karhunen-Loéve expansion (MKLE) of constitutive and facultative skin colour data acquired by colorimeters in melanoma patients and healthy control subjects, was used to identify two colour features defining skin-colour-associated risk of melanoma. None of four common statistical classifiers trained on colour features were sufficiently accurate for allowing skin colour alone to be used for classification purposes, though a Bayesian quadratic classifier matched the transformed data well. This study supersedes the indeterminate character of most common clinical criteria based on qualitative factors and, irrespective of the results of classification, provides objective skin colour information for the prevention of melanoma.

  3. Lung cancer biomarkers for the assessment of modified risk tobacco products: an oxidative stress perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Frazer J; Luettich, Karsta; Gregg, Evan O

    2013-05-01

    Manufacturers have developed prototype cigarettes yielding reduced levels of some tobacco smoke toxicants, when tested using laboratory machine smoking under standardised conditions. For the scientific assessment of modified risk tobacco products, tests that offer objective, reproducible data, which can be obtained in a much shorter time than the requirements of conventional epidemiology are needed. In this review, we consider whether biomarkers of biological effect related to oxidative stress can be used in this role. Based on published data, urinary 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2-deoxyguanosine, thymidine glycol, F2-isoprostanes, serum dehydroascorbic acid to ascorbic acid ratio and carotenoid concentrations show promise, while 4-hydroxynonenal requires further qualification.

  4. Samango monkeys (Cercopithecus albogularis labiatus) manage risk in a highly seasonal, human-modified landscape in Amathole Mountains, South Africa.

    OpenAIRE

    Nowak, K.; Wimberger, K.; Richards, S A; Hill, R. A.; Le Roux, A

    2016-01-01

    Wild species use habitats that vary in risk across space and time. This risk can derive from natural predators and also from direct and indirect human pressures. A starving forager will often take risks that a less hungry forager would not. At a highly seasonal and human-modified site, we predicted that arboreal samango monkeys (Cercopithecus albogularis labiatus) would show highly flexible, responsive, risk-sensitive foraging. We first determined how monkeys use horizontal and vertical space...

  5. Epidemiological characteristics of thyroid nodules and risk factors for malignant nodules: a retrospective study from 6 304 surgical cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huan Qin; Wang Kun; Lou Fuchen; Zhang Li; Huang Qingxian; Han Yunfeng; Sun Hancheng

    2014-01-01

    Background The prevalence of thyroid nodules (TN) is increasing rapidly.This study analyzed the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of TN in surgically treated patients and identified the risk factors for malignant nodules (MN) to provide more understanding of the differential diagnosis of TN.Methods A total of 6 304 TN cases who underwent thyroid surgery were included in this retrospective study.The clinical data were collected to evaluate the clinical and epidemiological characteristics and related risk factors for MN.The nature of TN (benign nodules (BN) or MN),medical records,laboratory data,and imaging data were analyzed.The risk factors for MN were screened using Spearman's rank correlation analysis and nonconditional binary Logistic regression analysis.Results The number of surgically treated TN cases increased yearly.A total of 34.33% of cases were MN and 65.67% were BN.Up to 56.74% of these cases underwent unnecessary surgery.Among the MN cases,papillary thyroid carcinoma accounted for 94%,in which 46.71% coexisted with benign thyroid disease and 32.28% with multiple foci.Single-related factor analysis showed that age,employment,disease duration,history of breast nodules and/or hypertension,the levels of serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH),thyroglobulin antibody (TgAb),and thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPoAb),and ultrasound features of TN were related to MN.Stepwise nonconditional binary Logistic regression analysis showed that 13 factors may be the independent risk factors for MN,including <40 years old,previous history of breast nodules and/or hypertension,disease duration <1 month,employment,hypoechoic nodule,irregular nodules,nodule calcification,solid echo nodule,fuzzy boundary,rich blood flow within nodules,abnormal lymph nodes around the neck,nodule diameter <1 cm,and abnormally high TgAb.Conclusions Our results demonstrate a rapid increase in surgically treated TN cases and ratio of MN and indicate unnecessary

  6. Obesity as an effect modifier of the risk of death in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Holly; Dugas, Lara; Shoham, David

    2013-11-01

    In the general population, obesity is associated with increased risk of end-stage renal disease (ESRD), especially if obesity occurs during young adulthood. Obesity is also associated with increased cardiovascular risk and mortality in the general population. However, observational studies which focused on populations with ESRD have demonstrated a more indirect association between body mass index and mortality, and this association has been termed paradoxical. Some have questioned whether the association between obesity and mortality is modified by ESRD. In this review, we discuss effect modification and interaction and factors that may lead to an assumption of effect modification when we observe decreased mortality among obese adults with ESRD. We show that assumptions of the existence of effect modification may be incorrect when the analysis is conditioned on a particular disease state that is influenced by obesity.

  7. A comparison of modified versions of the Static-99 and the Sex Offender Risk Appraisal Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Kevin L; Firestone, Philip; Bradford, John M; Greenberg, David M; Broom, Ian

    2002-07-01

    The predictive validity of 2 risk assessment instruments for sex offenders, modified versions of the Static-99 and the Sex Offender Risk Appraisal Guide, was examined and compared in a sample of 258 adult male sex offenders. In addition, the independent contributions to the prediction of recidivism made by each instrument and by various phallometric indices were explored. Both instruments demonstrated moderate levels of predictive accuracy for sexual and violent (including sexual) recidivism. They were not significantly different in terms of their predictive accuracy for sexual or violent recidivism, nor did they contribute independently to the prediction of sexual or violent recidivism. Of the phallometric indices examined, only the pedophile index added significantly to the prediction of sexual recidivism, but not violent recidivism, above the Static-99 alone.

  8. Recurrent pneumonia: a review with focus on clinical epidemiology and modifiable risk factors in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, T T; Majumdar, S R; Marrie, T J; Eurich, D T

    2015-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is one of the most common reasons for physician visits and hospitalizations in North America. Rates of CAP increase with age and CAP is associated with significant morbidity and mortality, especially in the elderly. Though there is much written about the epidemiology and risk factors of incident (first episode) pneumonia, much less is known about recurrent pneumonia. Rates of recurrent pneumonia within 3-5-years of an episode of CAP are 9-12% with a median time to recurrence of 123-317 days and mortality ranging from 4 to 10%. Age ≥65-years-old and impaired functional status are the only patient characteristics that are independently associated with increased risk of recurrence. In terms of modifiable risk factors, only the use of proton-pump inhibitors and systemic and inhaled corticosteroids have consistently been associated with increased risk of recurrent pneumonia, while angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors may exert a protective effect. Many chronic medical conditions typically associated with increased incident pneumonia-such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), neurological disease (resulting in dysphagia or silent aspiration), and heart failure-were not associated with increased risk of recurrent pneumonia. However, those who are immune-suppressed (e.g., immunoglobulin deficiencies) may be at increased risk of recurrent pneumonia. In summary, among those who survive an episode of pneumonia, recurrence is not uncommon, particularly in the elderly. Following recovery from an episode of pneumonia, patients should be evaluated for risk factors that would predispose to a second episode including seeking evidence of immunosuppression in younger patients and medication optimization, particularly in the elderly.

  9. Reducing the risk of surgical site infection using a multidisciplinary approach: an integrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillespie BM

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Brigid M Gillespie,1 Evelyn Kang,1 Shelley Roberts,1 Frances Lin,1,2 Nicola Morley,3 Tracey Finigan,3 Allison Homer,3 Wendy Chaboyer1 1National Health and Medical Research Council Research Centre for Clinical Excellence in Nursing Interventions (NCREN and Centre for Healthcare Practice Innovation (HPI, Menzies Health Institute, 2School of Nursing and Midwifery, Griffith University, 3Surgical and Procedural Services, Gold Coast University Hospital, Gold Coast, QLD, Australia Purpose: To identify and describe the strategies and processes used by multidisciplinary teams of health care professionals to reduce surgical site infections (SSIs.Materials and methods: An integrative review of the research literature was undertaken. Searches were conducted in April 2015. Following review of the included studies, data were abstracted using summary tables and the methodological quality of each study assessed using the Standards for Quality Improvement Reporting Excellence guidelines by two reviewers. Discrepancies were dealt with through consensus. Inductive content analysis was used to identify and describe the strategies/processes used by multidisciplinary health care teams to prevent SSI.Results and discussion: In total, 13 studies met the inclusion criteria. Of these, 12 studies used quantitative methods, while a single study used qualitative interviews. The majority of the studies were conducted in North America. All quantitative studies evaluated multifaceted quality-improvement interventions aimed at preventing SSI in patients undergoing surgery. Across the 13 studies reviewed, the following multidisciplinary team-based approaches were enacted: using a bundled approach, sharing responsibility, and, adhering to best practice. The majority of studies described team collaborations that were circumscribed by role. None of the reviewed studies used strategies that included the input of allied health professionals or patient participation in SSI prevention

  10. Individualized Venous Thromboembolism Risk Stratification Using the 2005 Caprini Score to Identify the Benefits and Harms of Chemoprophylaxis in Surgical Patients: A Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannucci, Christopher J; Swistun, Lukasz; MacDonald, John K; Henke, Peter K; Brooke, Benjamin S

    2017-06-01

    We performed a meta-analysis to investigate benefits and harms of chemoprophylaxis among surgical patients individually risk stratified for venous thromboembolism (VTE) using Caprini scores. Individualized VTE risk stratification may identify high risk surgical patients who benefit from peri-operative chemoprophylaxis. MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library (CENTRAL) databases were queried. Eligible studies contained data on postoperative VTE and/or bleeding events with and without chemoprophylaxis. Primary outcomes included rates of VTE and clinically relevant bleeding after surgical procedures, stratified by Caprini score. A meta-analysis was conducted using a random-effects model. Among 13 included studies, 11 (n = 14,776) contained data for VTE events and 8 (n = 7590) contained data for clinically relevant bleeding with and without chemoprophylaxis. The majority of patients received mechanical prophylaxis. A 14-fold variation in VTE risk (from 0.7% to 10.7%) was identified among surgical patients who did not receive chemoprophylaxis, and patients at increased levels of Caprini risk were significantly more likely to have VTE. Patients with Caprini scores of 7 to 8 [odds ratio (OR) 0.60, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.37-0.97] and >8 (OR 0.41, 95% CI 0.26-0.65) had significant VTE risk reduction after surgery with chemoprophylaxis. Patients with Caprini scores ≤6 comprised 75% of the overall population, and these patients did not have a significant VTE risk reduction with chemoprophylaxis. No association between postoperative bleeding risk and Caprini score was identified. The benefit of peri-operative VTE chemoprophylaxis was only found among surgical patients with Caprini scores ≥7. Precision medicine using individualized VTE risk stratification helps ensure that chemoprophylaxis is used only in appropriate surgical patients and may minimize bleeding complications.

  11. Scientific opinion on risks for animal health related to the presence of zearalenone and its modified forms in feed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Annette

    Zearalenone (ZEN), a mycotoxin primarily produced by Fusarium fungi, occurs predominantly in cereal grains. The European Commission asked EFSA for a scientific opinion on the risk to animal health related to ZEN and its modified forms in feed. Modified forms of ZEN occurring in feed include phase I......-censored data (ZEN about 60%, ZAN about 70%, others close to 100%). Samples for ZEN were collected between 2001 and 2015 in 25 different European countries, whereas samples for the modified forms were collected mostly between 2013 and 2015 from three Member States. Based on exposure estimates, the risk...

  12. Lack of motivation: a new modifiable risk factor for peritonitis in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudel, Klara; Namagondlu, Girish; Samad, Nasreen; McKitty, Khadija; Fan, Stanley L

    2015-03-01

    Can we identify modifiable risk factors for peritonitis in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis (PD)? We aimed to determine whether housing standard, PD exchange technique or patient motivation might be modifiable risks for peritonitis. We also explored the relationship between lack of motivation and depression. Nurse home visits assessed PD exchange technique, environment and patient motivation. Motivation scores were correlated separately with an Apathy Evaluation Score and a depression score using PHQ-9 questionnaires. Home hygiene, exchange technique and motivation were above average in 53%, 56% and 60%, respectively in 104 patients undergoing PD. After 15 months, 25.9% patients developed peritonitis but nurses' ratings of homes and exchange techniques were not predictive. Low patient motivation was predictive. Patients rated to have above or below median motivation had significantly different Apathy Scores (p = 0.0002). Unmotivated depressed patients were significantly more likely to develop peritonitis compared to motivated depressed patients. Lack of motivation predicted peritonitis particularly if associated with depression. Further studies are required focusing on specific motivation scoring schemes and the psychosocial support that might lead to better outcomes. © 2014 European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association.

  13. Deformidade de Sprengel: tratamento cirúrgico pela técnica de green modificada Sprengel's deformity: surgical correction by a modified green procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro da Silva Reginaldo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Demonstrar os resultados estéticos e funcionais de pacientes submetidos à correção cirúrgica de escápula alta congênita - deformidade de Sprengel - por uma modificação da técnica de Green, bem como avaliar o grau de satisfação dos pacientes e as complicações da técnica utilizada. MÉTODOS: Foram avaliados nove pacientes operados pela técnica de Green modificada, no período de setembro de 1993 a abril de 2008. Como modificação da técnica original foram realizados descolamento muscular subperiosteal, ressecção apenas da porção súpero-medial da escápula e, em vez da utilização de tração esquelética, optou-se pela fixação com fio de aço subcutâneo da porção medial da espinha da escápula à crista ilíaca posterior contralateral. A idade média dos pacientes foi de sete anos e três meses. O seguimento pós-operatório médio foi de três anos e sete meses. RESULTADOS: Houve incremento médio na elevação de cerca de 39º (variando de 0º a 80º . Segundo a classificação de Cavendish, obteve-se a melhora estética de dois graus em oito casos e de três graus em um. Todos os pacientes ficaram satisfeitos com o resultado. CONCLUSÕES: Os pacientes com deformidade de Sprengel submetidos a tratamento cirúrgico por meio de uma modificação da técnica de Green, com fixação da escápula na crista ilíaca posterior contralateral em vez de se utilizar tração esquelética, apresentaram melhora tanto funcional como estética; todos os pacientes e/ou familiares ficaram satisfeitos e as complicações relacionadas com a técnica cirúrgica não interferiram no resultado final.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the cosmetic and functional results of patients submitted to surgical correction of Congenital High Scapula (Sprengel's Deformity using modified Green's Procedure, as well as patients' satisfaction and complications. METHODS: Nine patients submitted to surgical treatment from September 1993 to April 2008 have

  14. Extracellular matrix proteins interact with cell-signaling pathways in modifying risk of achilles tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Colleen J; van der Merwe, Lize; Cook, Jill; Handley, Christopher J; Collins, Malcolm; September, Alison V

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate interactions between variants within genes encoding components of the collagen fibril and components of cell-signaling pathways within the extracellular matrix, and determine the relative contribution of these variants to Achilles tendinopathy risk in a polygenic model. A total of 339 asymptomatic control participants and 179 participants clinically diagnosed with Achilles tendinopathy were genotyped for variants within six genes encoding components of the collagen fibril and three genes encoding components of cell-signaling pathways. Logistic regression, stepwise selection, and receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis was used to select and evaluate genetic interactions and determine the relative contribution of these variants to overall genetic risk. The strongest, best fit polygenic risk model included the variables sex, three COL27A1 variants (rs4143245; rs1249744; rs946053), COL5A1 rs12722, CASP8 rs1045485, and CASP8 rs2824129 with an area under the ROC curve of 0.737 and the maximum sum of sensitivity and specificity indicators equal to 134%. Significant interactions between genes encoding components of the collagen fibril and genes encoding components of the cell-signaling pathways modify risk of Achilles tendinopathy.

  15. Preoperative prealbumin level as a risk factor for surgical site infection following elective spine surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Salvetti

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Our results reinforce the relationship between preoperative nutritional status and outcomes in elective spine surgery. The data indicate that preoperative prealbumin levels may be useful in risk stratification. Further study is needed to determine whether nutritional supplementation may reduce the risk of infection.

  16. Impact of occupational mechanical exposures on risk of lateral and medial inguinal hernia requiring surgical repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vad, Marie Vestergaard; Frost, Poul; Bay-Nielsen, Morten;

    2012-01-01

    We undertook a register-based cohort study to evaluate exposure-response relations between cumulative occupational mechanical exposures, and risk of lateral and medial inguinal hernia repair.......We undertook a register-based cohort study to evaluate exposure-response relations between cumulative occupational mechanical exposures, and risk of lateral and medial inguinal hernia repair....

  17. Clinical risk factors and urodynamic predictors prior to surgical treatment for stress urinary incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bing, Mette Hornum; Gimbel, Helga; Greisen, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: Knowledge about clinical risk factors and the value of urodynamic testing is important to optimize treatment strategy and secure true informed consent. METHODS: We reviewed the relevant literature to clarify the evidence regarding clinical risk factors and the predict...

  18. Communicating about the risks and benefits of genetically modified foods: the mediating role of trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frewer, Lynn J; Scholderer, Joachim; Bredahl, Lone

    2003-12-01

    Recent research suggests that public attitudes toward emerging technologies are mainly driven by trust in the institutions promoting and regulating these technologies. Alternative views maintain that trust should be seen as a consequence rather than a cause of such attitudes. To test its actual role, direct as well as mediating effects of trust were tested in an attitude change experiment involving 1,405 consumers from Denmark, Germany, Italy, and the United Kingdom. After prior attitudes to genetic modification in food production had been assessed, participants received different information materials (either product-specific information or balanced/general information about genetic modification in food production) and were asked to evaluate different types of genetically modified foods (either beer or yoghurt). The information materials were attributed to different information sources (either an industry association, a consumer organization, or a government source). After completion, perceived risk and perceived benefit were assessed, and participants indicated their trust in the information sources to which the materials had been attributed. Direct and trust-mediated attitude change effects were estimated in a multi-sample structural equation model. The results showed that information provision had little effect on people's attitudes toward genetically modified foods, and that perceptions of information source characteristics contributed very little to attitude change. Furthermore, the type of information strategy adopted had almost no impact on postexperimental attitudes. The extent to which people trusted the information sources appeared to be driven by people's attitudes to genetically modified foods, rather than trust influencing the way that people reacted to the information. Trust was not driving risk perception-rather, attitudes were informing perceptions of the motivation of the source providing the information.

  19. Identification and Prevention of Medical Legal Risks of Surgical Complications%手术并发症医疗法律风险的识别与防范

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘玉莹

    2016-01-01

    Surgical complications are the main medical risks in hospitals, and the medical risk prevention and control of surgical complications is the main part of the hospital risk management. From the perspective of proper performance of care duty and informed consent duty , this paper discussed the legal risks of surgical com-plications, and the countermeasures from the perspective of medical administration and medical safety manage-ment.%手术并发症是医院所面对的主要医疗风险,而其防控则是医院风险防控的重点内容。文章从适当履行注意义务和说明义务的角度,探讨手术并发症的法律风险点,并从医疗行政和医疗安全管理角度探讨防范措施。

  20. Regulating genetically modified food. Policy trajectories, political culture, and risk perceptions in the U.S., Canada, and EU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlers, Anton E

    2010-09-01

    This paper examines whether national differences in political culture add an explanatory dimension to the formulation of policy in the area of biotechnology, especially with respect to genetically modified food. The analysis links the formulation of protective regulatory policies governing genetically modified food to both country and region-specific differences in uncertainty tolerance levels and risk perceptions in the United States, Canada, and European Union. Based on polling data and document analysis, the findings illustrate that these differences matter. Following a mostly opportunistic risk perception within an environment of high tolerance for uncertainty, policymakers in the United States and Canada modified existing regulatory frameworks that govern genetically modified food in their respective countries. In contrast, the mostly cautious perception of new food technologies and low tolerance for uncertainty among European Union member states has contributed to the creation of elaborate and stringent regulatory policies governing genetically modified food.

  1. Surgical site infection prevention and control: an emerging paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Richard P; Clyburn, Terry A; Moucha, Calin S; Prokuski, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Examining the current state of infection in orthopaedic surgery provides tools and techniques to reduce the risks of nosocomial infections and prevent and treat infections from drug-resistant organisms. It is important for surgeons to recognize modifiable surgical risk factors and be aware of the importance of preoperative patient screening in reducing surgical site infections. The latest evidence-based data from scientific exhibits, instructional course lectures, and the Orthopaedic Knowledge Online continuing medical education module gathered during the past 5 years by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Patient Safety Committee are useful in understanding and controlling the increasing and vital problem of surgical site infection.

  2. Association between surgical indications, operative risk, and clinical outcome in infective endocarditis: a prospective study from the International Collaboration on Endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Vivian H; Park, Lawrence P; Athan, Eugene; Delahaye, Francois; Freiberger, Tomas; Lamas, Cristiane; Miro, Jose M; Mudrick, Daniel W; Strahilevitz, Jacob; Tribouilloy, Christophe; Durante-Mangoni, Emanuele; Pericas, Juan M; Fernández-Hidalgo, Nuria; Nacinovich, Francisco; Rizk, Hussien; Krajinovic, Vladimir; Giannitsioti, Efthymia; Hurley, John P; Hannan, Margaret M; Wang, Andrew

    2015-01-13

    Use of surgery for the treatment of infective endocarditis (IE) as related to surgical indications and operative risk for mortality has not been well defined. The International Collaboration on Endocarditis-PLUS (ICE-PLUS) is a prospective cohort of consecutively enrolled patients with definite IE from 29 centers in 16 countries. We included patients from ICE-PLUS with definite left-sided, non-cardiac device-related IE who were enrolled between September 1, 2008, and December 31, 2012. A total of 1296 patients with left-sided IE were included. Surgical treatment was performed in 57% of the overall cohort and in 76% of patients with a surgical indication. Reasons for nonsurgical treatment included poor prognosis (33.7%), hemodynamic instability (19.8%), death before surgery (23.3%), stroke (22.7%), and sepsis (21%). Among patients with a surgical indication, surgical treatment was independently associated with the presence of severe aortic regurgitation, abscess, embolization before surgical treatment, and transfer from an outside hospital. Variables associated with nonsurgical treatment were a history of moderate/severe liver disease, stroke before surgical decision, and Staphyloccus aureus etiology. The integration of surgical indication, Society of Thoracic Surgeons IE score, and use of surgery was associated with 6-month survival in IE. Surgical decision making in IE is largely consistent with established guidelines, although nearly one quarter of patients with surgical indications do not undergo surgery. Operative risk assessment by Society of Thoracic Surgeons IE score provides prognostic information for survival beyond the operative period. S aureus IE was significantly associated with nonsurgical management. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Associations between Potentially Modifiable Risk Factors and Alzheimer Disease: A Mendelian Randomization Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren D Østergaard

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Potentially modifiable risk factors including obesity, diabetes, hypertension, and smoking are associated with Alzheimer disease (AD and represent promising targets for intervention. However, the causality of these associations is unclear. We sought to assess the causal nature of these associations using Mendelian randomization (MR.We used SNPs associated with each risk factor as instrumental variables in MR analyses. We considered type 2 diabetes (T2D, NSNPs = 49, fasting glucose (NSNPs = 36, insulin resistance (NSNPs = 10, body mass index (BMI, NSNPs = 32, total cholesterol (NSNPs = 73, HDL-cholesterol (NSNPs = 71, LDL-cholesterol (NSNPs = 57, triglycerides (NSNPs = 39, systolic blood pressure (SBP, NSNPs = 24, smoking initiation (NSNPs = 1, smoking quantity (NSNPs = 3, university completion (NSNPs = 2, and years of education (NSNPs = 1. We calculated MR estimates of associations between each exposure and AD risk using an inverse-variance weighted approach, with summary statistics of SNP-AD associations from the International Genomics of Alzheimer's Project, comprising a total of 17,008 individuals with AD and 37,154 cognitively normal elderly controls. We found that genetically predicted higher SBP was associated with lower AD risk (odds ratio [OR] per standard deviation [15.4 mm Hg] of SBP [95% CI]: 0.75 [0.62-0.91]; p = 3.4 × 10(-3. Genetically predicted higher SBP was also associated with a higher probability of taking antihypertensive medication (p = 6.7 × 10(-8. Genetically predicted smoking quantity was associated with lower AD risk (OR per ten cigarettes per day [95% CI]: 0.67 [0.51-0.89]; p = 6.5 × 10(-3, although we were unable to stratify by smoking history; genetically predicted smoking initiation was not associated with AD risk (OR = 0.70 [0.37, 1.33]; p = 0.28. We saw no evidence of causal associations between glycemic traits, T2D, BMI, or educational attainment and risk of AD (all p > 0.1. Potential limitations of this study

  4. Do parental coronary heart disease risk factors(non-modifiable) effect their young ones?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Arun; Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To study the differences between the lipid profiles of the subjects whose parents are having known non-modifiable risk factors such as obesity,hypertension(HTN),myocardial infarction and diabetes,and compare them with the lipid profiles of the subjects whose parents are not having those risk factors.Methods:A total of 402 subjects were recruited to this study.A detailed questionnaire which included information on the past medical history,height,weight,blood pressure,physical activity,smoke,alcohol,family history of coronary heart disease,HTN.diabetics and obesity.Basic demographic data and dietary habits were completed by all participants.Blood samples were obtained from all subjects after 14 h.Lipid profiles were analyzed using automated analyzer.The results were analyzed using SPSS software packages.Results:The mean body mass index of the population was well below the cut-off value of obesity(>24.5 kg/m") and high risk of future cardiovascular disorder(CVD) events in this age group.The mean levels of total cholesterol(TC),triglycerides(TG) and TC/high density lipoprotein(HDL) were less than the risk levels indicative of future CVD events according to the ATP Ⅲ cut-off values.However the mean HDL level in our population was slightly greater than the cut-off value while the mean low density lipoprotein level was almost similar to the risk level.Differences were observed when the subjects without history of maternal obesity were compared with subjects with history of maternal obesity.The greater percentage of subjects who are having risk levels of body mass index.TC.low density lipoprotein.TG.and TC/HDI.indicated that maternal obesity contributed to the greater susceptibility of developing CVD risk in their offspring.Conclusions:Advancing age may result in changes that could be atherogenic in the future.Such atherogenic changes have already initialed when the subjects are about 21 years old.The incidence of atherogenic changes is far greater when mothers

  5. Identification of a BRCA2-Specific Modifier Locus at 6p24 Related to Breast Cancer Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaudet, Mia M; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Vijai, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Common genetic variants contribute to the observed variation in breast cancer risk for BRCA2 mutation carriers; those known to date have all been found through population-based genome-wide association studies (GWAS). To comprehensively identify breast cancer risk modifying loci for BRCA2 mutation...

  6. Risk of biochemical recurrence and positive surgical margins in patients with pT2 prostate cancer undergoing radical prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røder, Martin Andreas; Thomsen, Frederik Birkebæk; Berg, Kasper Drimer

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: To investigate risk factors associated with positive surgical margins (PSM) and biochemical recurrence (BR) in organ confined tumors (pT2) after radical prostatectomy (RP) for localized prostate cancer (PCa). METHODS: Between 1995 and 2011, 1,649 patients underwent RP...... at our institution. The study includes the 1,133 consecutive patients with pT2 tumors at final histopathology. Logistic regression analysis was used for risk of PSM. Risk of BR, defined as the first PSA ≥ 0.2 ng/ml, was analyzed with Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analysis. RESULTS: Median follow......-up was 3.6 years (range: 0.5-15.5 years). In logistic regression, NS surgery was independently associated with an increased risk of pT2 PSM (OR = 1.68, 95% CI: 1.3-2.0, P = 0.01) relative to non-NS surgery. NS surgery was not independently associated with BR but the interaction of PSM and NS surgery...

  7. Pelvic Surgical Site Infections in Gynecologic Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark P. Lachiewicz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of surgical site infection (SSI remains the most common complication of gynecologic surgical procedures and results in significant patient morbidity. Gynecologic procedures pose a unique challenge in that potential pathogenic microorganisms from the skin or vagina and endocervix may migrate to operative sites and can result in vaginal cuff cellulitis, pelvic cellulitis, and pelvic abscesses. Multiple host and surgical risk factors have been identified as risks that increase infectious sequelae after pelvic surgery. This paper will review these risk factors as many are modifiable and care should be taken to address such factors in order to decrease the chance of infection. We will also review the definitions, microbiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management of pelvic SSIs after gynecologic surgery.

  8. Genetically modified foods: safety, risks and public concerns-a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bawa, A S; Anilakumar, K R

    2013-12-01

    Genetic modification is a special set of gene technology that alters the genetic machinery of such living organisms as animals, plants or microorganisms. Combining genes from different organisms is known as recombinant DNA technology and the resulting organism is said to be 'Genetically modified (GM)', 'Genetically engineered' or 'Transgenic'. The principal transgenic crops grown commercially in field are herbicide and insecticide resistant soybeans, corn, cotton and canola. Other crops grown commercially and/or field-tested are sweet potato resistant to a virus that could destroy most of the African harvest, rice with increased iron and vitamins that may alleviate chronic malnutrition in Asian countries and a variety of plants that are able to survive weather extremes. There are bananas that produce human vaccines against infectious diseases such as hepatitis B, fish that mature more quickly, fruit and nut trees that yield years earlier and plants that produce new plastics with unique properties. Technologies for genetically modifying foods offer dramatic promise for meeting some areas of greatest challenge for the 21st century. Like all new technologies, they also pose some risks, both known and unknown. Controversies and public concern surrounding GM foods and crops commonly focus on human and environmental safety, labelling and consumer choice, intellectual property rights, ethics, food security, poverty reduction and environmental conservation. With this new technology on gene manipulation what are the risks of "tampering with Mother Nature"?, what effects will this have on the environment?, what are the health concerns that consumers should be aware of? and is recombinant technology really beneficial? This review will also address some major concerns about the safety, environmental and ecological risks and health hazards involved with GM foods and recombinant technology.

  9. Modifiable cardiovascular risk factors among apparently healthy adult Nigerian population - a cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gbadamosi Maruf

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD remains a major cause of morbidity and a leading contributor to mortality worldwide. Over the next 2 decades, it is projected that there will be a rise in CVD mortality rates in the developing countries, linked to demographic changes and progressive urbanization. Nigeria has witnessed tremendous socio-economic changes and rural-urban migration which have led to the emergence of non-communicable diseases. We set out to determine the prevalence of modifiable CVD risk factors among apparently healthy adult Nigerians. This is a descriptive cross-sectional study carried out at Katsina, northwestern Nigeria from March to May 2006. Subjects for the study were recruited consecutively from local residents, hospital staff and relations of in-patients of the Federal Medical Centre, Katsina using convenience sampling. Socio-demographic information, anthropometric measurements and blood pressure were obtained from the subjects in a standardized manner. Venous samples were collected for necessary investigations and analyzed at the hospital central laboratory. Findings Three hundred subjects (129 males and 171 females with a mean age of 37.6 ± 10.6 (range 18-75 years were studied. Prevalence of the modifiable cardiovascular risk factors screened for were as follows: generalized obesity 21.3% (males 10.9%, females 29.2%, p 0.05, type 2 diabetes mellitus 5.3% (males 5.4%, females 5.3%, p > 0.05, hypercholesterolaemia 28.3% (males 23.3%, females 32.2%, p 0.05, low HDL-cholesterol 59.3% (males 51.9%, females 65%, p 0.05 and metabolic syndrome 22% (males 10.9%, females 30.4%, p Conclusions We found high prevalence of CVD risk factors among apparently healthy adult Nigerians. In order to reduce this high prevalence and prevent subsequent cardiovascular events, encouragement of a healthy lifestyle is suggested.

  10. Carotid Stenting with Distal Protection in High-Surgical-Risk Patients: One-Year Results of the ASTI Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosiers, Marc, E-mail: marc.bosiers@telenet.be [A.Z. Sint-Blasius, Department of Vascular Surgery (Belgium); Scheinert, Dierk, E-mail: dierk.scheinert@gmx.de [Park Hospital, Center for Vascular Medicine-Angiology and Vascular Surgery (Germany); Mathias, Klaus, E-mail: k.mathias@asklepios.com [Klinikum Dortmund GmbH (Germany); Langhoff, Ralf, E-mail: ralf.langhoff@sankt-gertrauden.de [Sankt Gertrauden-Krankenhaus (Germany); Mudra, Harald, E-mail: haraldmudra@aol.com [Klinikum Neuperlach (Germany); Diaz-Cartelle, Juan, E-mail: juan.diazcartelle@bostonscientific.com [One Boston Scientific Place, Boston Scientific Corporation (United States)

    2015-04-15

    PurposeThis prospective, multicenter, nonrandomized study evaluated the periprocedural and 1-year outcomes in high-surgical-risk patients with carotid artery stenosis treated with the Adapt Carotid Stent plus FilterWire EZ distal protection catheter (Boston Scientific Corporation, Natick, MA).Materials and MethodsThe study enrolled 100 patients (32 symptomatic, 63 asymptomatic, 5 unknown) at high risk for carotid endarterectomy due to prespecified anatomical criteria and/or medical comorbidities. Thirty-day and 1-year follow-up included clinical evaluation, carotid duplex ultrasound, and independent neurologic and NIH stroke scale assessments. One-year endpoints included the composite rate of major adverse events (MAE), defined as death, stroke, and myocardial infarction (MI) and the rates of late ipsilateral stroke (31–365 days), target lesion revascularization, and in-stent restenosis.ResultsOf the 100 enrolled patients, technical success was achieved in 90.9 % (90/99). The 30-day MAE rate (5.1 %) consisted of major stroke (2.0 %) and minor stroke (3.1 %); no deaths or MIs occurred. The 1-year MAE rate (12.2 %) consisted of death, MI, and stroke rates of 4.4, 3.3, and 8.9 %, respectively. Late ipsilateral stroke (31–365 days) rate was 1.1 %. Symptomatic patients had higher rates of death (11.1 vs. 1.7 %) and MI (7.4 vs. 1.7 %), but lower rates of major (7.4 vs. 10.0 %) and minor stroke (0.0 vs. 6.7 %), compared with asymptomatic patients.ConclusionResults through 1 year postprocedure demonstrated that carotid artery stenting with Adapt Carotid Stent and FilterWire EZ is safe and effective in high-risk-surgical patients.

  11. NATIONAL SURGICAL QUALITY IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM UNDERESTIMATES THE RISK ASSOCIATED WITH MILD AND MODERATE POSTOPERATIVE ACUTE KIDNEY INJURY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bihorac, Azra; Brennan, Meghan; Baslanti, Tezcan Ozrazgat; Bozorgmehri, Shahab; Efron, Philip A.; Moore, Frederick A.; Segal, Mark S; Hobson, Charles E

    2013-01-01

    Objective In a single-center cohort of surgical patients we assessed the association between postoperative change in serum creatinine (sCr) and adverse outcomes and compared the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP)’s definition for acute kidney injury (NSQIP-AKI) with consensus RIFLE (Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss, and End-stage Kidney) and KDIGO (Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes) definitions. Design Retrospective single center cohort. Setting Academic tertiary medical center. Patients 27,841 adult patients with no previous history of chronic kidney disease undergoing major surgery. Intervention RIFLE defines AKI as change in sCr greater than or equal to 50% while KDIGO uses 0.3 mg/dl change from the reference sCr. Since NSQIP defines AKI as sCr change > 2mg/dl, it may underestimate the risk associated with less severe AKI. Measurements The optimal discrimination limits (ODL) for both percent and absolute sCr changes were calculated by maximizing sensitivity and specificity along the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves for postoperative complications and mortality. Main Results Although prevalence of RIFLE-AKI was 37%, only 7% of RIFLE-AKI patients would be diagnosed with AKI using the NSQIP definition. In multivariable logistic models patients with RIFLE or KDIGO-AKI had a 10 times higher odds of dying compared to patients without AKI. The ODLs for change in sCr associated with adverse postoperative outcomes were as low as 0.2 mg/dl while the NSQIP discrimination limit of 2.0 mg/dl had low sensitivity (0.05 – 0.28). Conclusion Current ACS NSQIP definition underestimates the risk associated with mild and moderate AKI otherwise captured by the consensus RIFLE and KDIGO criteria. PMID:23928835

  12. Cardiovascular risk among stable individuals suspected of having coronary artery disease with no modifiable risk factors: Results from an international multicenter study of 5262 patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Leipsic (Jonathon); C.W. Taylor (Carolyn); G. Grunau (Gilat); J. Heilbron (Johan); G.B.J. Mancini (John); S. Achenbach (Stephan); M. Al-Mallah (Mouaz); D.S. Berman (Daniel); M.J. Budoff (Matthew); F. Cademartiri (Filippo); T.Q. Callister (Tracy); H.-J. Chang (Hyuk-Jae); V.Y. Cheng (Victor); K. Chinnaiyan (Kavitha); B.J.W. Chow (Benjamin); A. Delago (Augustin); M. Hadamitzky (Martin); R.C. Cury (Ricardo); G.M. Feuchtner (Gudrun); Y-J. Kim (Yong-Jin); P.A. Kaufmann (Philipp); F.Y. Lin (Fay); E. Maffei (Erica); G.L. Raff (Gilbert); L.J. Shaw (Leslee); T.C. Villines (Todd); J.K. Min (James)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: To assess the prevalence, extent, severity, and risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients suspected of having CAD but with no medically modifiable risk factors. Materials and Methods: Institutional review board approval or waiver of consent was obtained at each center. T

  13. Cardiovascular risk among stable individuals suspected of having coronary artery disease with no modifiable risk factors: Results from an international multicenter study of 5262 patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Leipsic (Jonathon); C.W. Taylor (Carolyn); G. Grunau (Gilat); J. Heilbron (Johan); G.B.J. Mancini (John); S. Achenbach (Stephan); M. Al-Mallah (Mouaz); D.S. Berman (Daniel); M.J. Budoff (Matthew); F. Cademartiri (Filippo); T.Q. Callister (Tracy); H.-J. Chang (Hyuk-Jae); V.Y. Cheng (Victor); K. Chinnaiyan (Kavitha); B.J.W. Chow (Benjamin); A. Delago (Augustin); M. Hadamitzky (Martin); R.C. Cury (Ricardo); G.M. Feuchtner (Gudrun); Y-J. Kim (Yong-Jin); P.A. Kaufmann (Philipp); F.Y. Lin (Fay); E. Maffei (Erica); G.L. Raff (Gilbert); L.J. Shaw (Leslee); T.C. Villines (Todd); J.K. Min (James)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: To assess the prevalence, extent, severity, and risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients suspected of having CAD but with no medically modifiable risk factors. Materials and Methods: Institutional review board approval or waiver of consent was obtained at each center. T

  14. is there an increased risk of post-operative surgical site infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-09-06

    Sep 6, 2012 ... respiratory, gastrointestinal and genitourinary systems are not opened (7). ... we searched for publications in the Pubmed, Embase and. CENTRAL ...... with haemophilia have higher risks of infection due to frequent bleeding ...

  15. Pulmonary dysfunction and surgical risk. How to assess and minimize the hazards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okeson, G C

    1983-11-01

    Postoperative deterioration of pulmonary function can be considerable, resulting in hypoxemia and atelectasis, if such effects are not anticipated and efforts made to prevent or minimize them. The risk of postoperative pulmonary complications depends on the patient's age, degree of obesity, and cigarette consumption; the type of surgery to be performed; and the anesthetic agent used. Assessment of risk is based primarily on clinical and laboratory evaluations. The tests performed may vary from patient to patient, and specialized studies of regional pulmonary function are frequently required. Even though a patient may be identified as having a high risk of postoperative pulmonary complications, risk can often be decreased through a number of preoperative and intraoperative measures as well as a postoperative therapeutic program.

  16. Existing general population models inaccurately predict lung cancer risk in patients referred for surgical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isbell, James M; Deppen, Stephen; Putnam, Joe B; Nesbitt, Jonathan C; Lambright, Eric S; Dawes, Aaron; Massion, Pierre P; Speroff, Theodore; Jones, David R; Grogan, Eric L

    2011-01-01

    Patients undergoing resections for suspicious pulmonary lesions have a 9% to 55% benign rate. Validated prediction models exist to estimate the probability of malignancy in a general population and current practice guidelines recommend their use. We evaluated these models in a surgical population to determine the accuracy of existing models to predict benign or malignant disease. We conducted a retrospective review of our thoracic surgery quality improvement database (2005 to 2008) to identify patients who underwent resection of a pulmonary lesion. Patients were stratified into subgroups based on age, smoking status, and fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) results. The probability of malignancy was calculated for each patient using the Mayo and solitary pulmonary nodules prediction models. Receiver operating characteristic and calibration curves were used to measure model performance. A total of 189 patients met selection criteria; 73% were malignant. Patients with preoperative PET scans were divided into four subgroups based on age, smoking history, and nodule PET avidity. Older smokers with PET-avid lesions had a 90% malignancy rate. Patients with PET-nonavid lesions, PET-avid lesions with age less than 50 years, or never smokers of any age had a 62% malignancy rate. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for the Mayo and solitary pulmonary nodules models was 0.79 and 0.80, respectively; however, the models were poorly calibrated (p<0.001). Despite improvements in diagnostic and imaging techniques, current general population models do not accurately predict lung cancer among patients referred for surgical evaluation. Prediction models with greater accuracy are needed to identify patients with benign disease to reduce nontherapeutic resections. Copyright © 2011 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Modifying Effects of IL-6 Polymorphisms on Body Size–Associated Breast Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slattery, Martha L.; Curtin, Karen; Sweeney, Carol; Wolff, Roger K.; Baumgartner, Richard N.; Baumgartner, Kathy B.; Giuliano, Anna R.; Byers, Tim

    2010-01-01

    Objective The association between obesity and breast cancer risk is complex. We examined whether the association between body size and breast cancer risk is modified by interleukin-6 (IL6) genotype. Methods and Procedures Five polymorphisms in the IL-6 gene (rs1800797/-596A>G, rs1800796/-572G>C, rs1800795/-174G>C, rs2069832/IVS2G>A, and rs2069849 exon 5 C>T) were studied. We investigated IL6 genotypes and haplotypes with indicators of body size among non-Hispanic white (NHW) and Hispanic/American Indian (AI) breast cancer cases and controls living in the Southwestern United States. Results We observed lower mean levels of BMI among NHW women who carried one or two copies of the GGCAC haplotype (in order: rs1800797, rs1800796, rs1800795, rs2069832, and rs2069849; P trend 0.02). This haplotype, with an estimated frequency of 43% in NHW study controls, was considerably less common in Hispanic/AI controls (19%). We did not detect significant interactions between IL6 genotypes or haplotypes and BMI categorized as low/normal (C genotype for breast cancer risk. These associations were restricted to postmenopausal NHW women. Among women without recent hormone exposure, those with a WHR >0.9 and the rs1800795 GG genotype had a greater than threefold increased risk of breast cancer (odds ratios (ORs) 3.22, 95% confidence intervals (CIs) 1.27, 817) when compared with women with a WHR <0.8 and the rs1800795 GG genotype (P interaction 0.01). Discussion These data suggest that IL-6 genotypes may influence breast cancer risk in conjunction with central adiposity. PMID:18239642

  18. Standardized surgical techniques for adult living donor liver transplantation using a modified right lobe graft: a video presentation from bench to reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Shin; Ha, Tae-Yong; Ahn, Chul-Soo; Moon, Deok-Bog; Kim, Ki-Hun; Song, Gi-Won; Jung, Dong-Hwan; Park, Gil-Chun; Lee, Sung-Gyu

    2016-08-01

    After having experienced more than 2,000 cases of adult living donor liver transplantation (LDLT), we established the concepts of right liver graft standardization. Right liver graft standardization intends to provide hemodynamics-based and regeneration-compliant reconstruction of vascular inflow and outflow. Right liver graft standardization consists of the following components: Right hepatic vein reconstruction includes a combination of caudal-side deep incision and patch venoplasty of the graft right hepatic vein to remove the acute angle between the graft right hepatic vein and the inferior vena cava; middle hepatic vein reconstruction includes interposition of a uniform-shaped conduit with large-sized homologous or prosthetic grafts; if the inferior right hepatic vein is present, its reconstruction includes funneling and unification venoplasty for multiple short hepatic veins; if donor portal vein anomaly is present, its reconstruction includes conjoined unification venoplasty for two or more portal vein orifices. This video clip that shows the surgical technique from bench to reperfusion was a case presentation of adult LDLT using a modified right liver graft from the patient's son. Our intention behind proposing the concept of right liver graft standardization is that it can be universally applicable and may guarantee nearly the same outcomes regardless of the surgeon's experience. We believe that this reconstruction model would be primarily applied to a majority of adult LDLT cases.

  19. Modified lumbopelvic fixation for sacral and L5 fractures associated with spinopelvic instability: a case report and introduction of the surgical technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YI Cheng-la

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Posterior lumbopelvic fixation with iliac screws is the most commonly used method for unstable spinopelvic injuries. It has certain limitations including inability to use distraction along the spinopelvic rod as an indirect reduction maneuver, need for complex 3-dimensional rod contouring and complications such as hardware prominence and soft tissue coverage. In the present case report, we described a surgical technique of lumbopelvic fixation with sacral alar screws for traumatic spinopelvic instability resulted from a unilateral Denis-III comminuted sacral fracture and the L5 burst fracture. On the opposite side of the sacral fracture, caudal screws were implanted into the pedicle of the S1, whereas on the side of sacral fracture, two sacral alar screws were placed parallel to the superior sacral endplate as well as the plane of sacroiliac joint. In addition, horizontal stabilization was conducted with cross-link connections to maintain the longitudinal traction. For sacral fracture associated with traumatic spinopelvic instability, this modified lumbopelvic fixation technique using sacral alar screws makes longitudinal reduction easier, requires less rod contouring, and reduces hardware prominence without compromising the stability. Key words: Sacrum; Lumbar vertebrae; Fracture fixation

  20. Surveillance for surgical site infection (SSI) after neurosurgery: influence of the US or Brest (France) National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance risk index on SSI rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lietard, Claire; Thébaud, Véronique; Besson, Gérard; Lejeune, Benoist

    2008-11-01

    A total of 5,628 neurosurgical patients were observed in France to assess the occurrence of surgical site infection (SSI). Their risk of SSI was defined by calculating both the US National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance and the Brest National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance risk indexes. This study compares SSI rates stratified according to either the US or Brest (France) National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance risk index. The SSI rates were correlated with National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance data involving only local operation durations.

  1. Risk factors associated with recurrence of surgically resected node-positive non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtaki, Yoichi; Shimizu, Kimihiro; Kaira, Kyoichi; Nagashima, Toshiteru; Obayashi, Kai; Nakazawa, Seshiru; Kakegawa, Seiichi; Igai, Hitoshi; Kamiyoshihara, Mitsuhiro; Nishiyama, Masahiko; Takeyoshi, Izumi

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to identify risk factors for recurrence in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with lymph node metastases after surgical resection. We reviewed 66 consecutive patients with surgically resected NSCLC who had pathologically proven positive lymph nodes (pN1 or pN2). All patients underwent a preoperative 2-[(18)F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) evaluation. We analyzed the recurrence-free survival (RFS) and recurrence-free proportion (RFP) according to the clinicopathological factors. A total of 27 patients were pathologically N1 and 39 were N2. The 5-year overall survival rate and the RFS rate were 47.2 and 27.7 %, respectively. The cut-off values for the SUVmax of the tumor and the lymph node ratio (LNR) were determined to be 6.5 and 0.12, respectively, using a receiver operating characteristics curve analysis. Both univariate and multivariate analyses revealed three significant independent factors for RFS: namely, the SUVmax of the tumor, the LNR, and the use of adjuvant chemotherapy. Only the SUVmax was an independent significant predictor of the RFP. Both the SUVmax and the LNR can serve as prognostic factors for patients with pN + NSCLC. Our study suggests that the LNR could be a stronger prognostic factor than the N classification of the TNM system and the SUVmax may predict recurrence in node-positive NSCLC patients.

  2. Effect of Surgical Atrial Fibrillation Ablation at the Time of Cardiac Surgery on Risk of Postoperative Pacemaker Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Chami, Mikhael F; Binongo, José Nilo G; Levy, Mathew; Merchant, Faisal M; Halkos, Michael; Thourani, Vinod; Lattouf, Omar; Guyton, Robert; Puskas, John; Leon, Angel R

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to retrospectively investigate whether performing surgical atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation in conjunction with cardiac surgery (CS) increases the risk for postoperative permanent pacemaker (PPM) requirement. The 30-day risk for PPM requirement was analyzed in consecutive patients who underwent CS from January 2007 to August 27, 2013. Patients were divided into 3 groups: (1) those who underwent AF ablation concomitant with CS (AF ABL), (2) patients with any history of AF who underwent surgery who did not undergo ablation (AF NO ABL), and (3) those with no histories of AF who underwent surgery (NO AF). Logistic regression analysis was performed adjusting for age, gender, and surgery type. Of 13,453 CS patients, 353 (3%) were in the AF ABL group, 1,701 (12%) in the AF NO ABL group, and 11,399 (85%) in the NO AF group. A total of 7,651 patients (57%) underwent coronary artery bypass grafting, 4,384 (33%) underwent valve surgery, and 1,418 (10%) underwent coronary artery bypass grafting and valve surgery. The overall PPM risk was 1.6% (212 of 13,453); risk was 5.7% (20 of 353) in the AF ABL group, 3.1% (53 of 1,701) in the AF NO ABL group, and 1.2% (139 of 11,399) in the NO AF group. The unadjusted and adjusted odds of PPM were higher in the AF ABL and AF NO ABL groups than in the NO AF group (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 2.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.7 to 4.4, and adjusted OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.2 to 2.4, respectively). The unadjusted OR comparing the AF ABL group and the AF NO ABL group was significant (unadjusted OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.9 to 3.2); however, the OR adjusted for surgery type, age, and gender showed a trend toward significance (adjusted OR 1.6, 95% CI 0.9 to 2.7). In conclusion, in this large cohort of patients who underwent CS, surgical AF ablation appeared to carry an increased risk for postoperative PPM implantation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Development and Validation of a Preoperative Surgical Site Infection Risk Score for Primary or Revision Knee and Hip Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everhart, Joshua S; Andridge, Rebecca R; Scharschmidt, Thomas J; Mayerson, Joel L; Glassman, Andrew H; Lemeshow, Stanley

    2016-09-21

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is a major complication following total joint arthroplasty. Host susceptibility to infection has emerged as an important predictor of SSI. The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a preoperative SSI risk-assessment tool for primary or revision knee and hip arthroplasty. Data for 6,789 patients who underwent total joint arthroplasty (from the years 2000 to 2011) were obtained from a single hospital system. SSI was defined as a superficial infection within 30 days or deep infection within 1 year. Logistic regression modeling was utilized to create a risk scoring system for a derivation sample (n = 5,789; 199 SSIs), with validation performed on a hold-out sample (a subset of observations chosen randomly from the initial sample to form a testing set; n = 1,000; 41 SSIs). On the basis of logistic regression modeling, we created a scoring system to assess SSI risk (range, 0 to 35 points) that is the point sum of the following: primary hip arthroplasty (0 points); primary knee (1); revision hip (3); revision knee (3); non-insulin-dependent diabetes (1); insulin-dependent diabetes (1.5); chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (1); inflammatory arthropathy (1.5); tobacco use (1.5); lower-extremity osteomyelitis or pyogenic arthritis (2); pelvis, thigh, or leg traumatic fracture (2); lower-extremity pathologic fracture (2.5); morbid obesity (2.5); primary bone cancer (4); reaction to prosthesis in the last 3 years (4); and history of staphylococcal septicemia (4.5). The risk score had good discriminatory capability (area under the ROC [receiver operating characteristic] curve = 0.77) and calibration (Hosmer-Lemeshow chi-square test, p = 0.34) and was validated using the independent sample (area under the ROC curve = 0.72). A small subset of patients (5.9%) had a >10% estimated infection risk. The patient comorbidities composing the risk score heavily influenced SSI risk for primary or revision knee and hip arthroplasty. We

  4. Prophylactic beta-blockade to prevent myocardial infarction perioperatively in high-risk patients who undergo general surgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Rebecca C; Pagliarello, Giuseppe

    2003-06-01

    The benefit of administering beta-adrenergic blocking agents perioperatively to surgical patients at high risk for myocardial ischemia has been demonstrated in several well-designed randomized controlled trials. These benefits have included a reduction in the incidence of myocardial complications and an improvement in overall survival for patients with evidence of or at risk for coronary artery disease (CAD). We designed a retrospective study at the Ottawa Civic Hospital to investigate the use of beta-blockers in the perioperative period for high-risk general surgery patients who underwent laparotomy and to explore the reasons for failure to prescribe or administer beta-blockers when indicated. All 236 general surgery patients over the age of 50 years who underwent laparotomy for major gastrointestinal surgery between Jan. 1, 2001, and Dec. 31, 2001, were assigned a cardiac risk classification using the risk stratification described by Mangano and colleagues. The perioperative prescription and administration of beta-blockers were noted as were the patient's heart rate and blood pressure parameters for the first postoperative week, in-hospital adverse cardiac events and death. Of the 143 patients classified as being at risk for CAD or having definite evidence of CAD, 87 (60.8%) did not receive beta-blockers perioperatively. Of those who did, 43 were previously on beta-blockers and 13 had them ordered preoperatively. Patients with definite CAD were significantly more likely than others to receive beta-blockers perioperatively (p nurses irrespective of nil par os status. The mean heart rate and blood pressure parameters for patients receiving beta-blockers postoperatively was 82 beats/min and 110 mm Hg, respectively, and these values were not significantly different from the mean heart rate of patients not receiving beta-blockers. The number of postoperative cardiac events was significantly higher in patients with definite evidence of CAD, and among this group, the

  5. Early Life and Environmental Risk Factors Modify the Effect of Acculturation on Hispanic Children's Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez-Payan, Paola; Grineski, Sara E; Collins, Timothy W

    2015-01-01

    Acculturation tends to erode Hispanic immigrants' initial health advantage. Using a more nuanced conceptualization of acculturation than previous studies, we explore the associations between acculturation and Hispanic children's asthma. Data came from an observational mail survey of caretakers of Hispanic schoolchildren in El Paso, Texas (N = 1,513). Results from generalized linear models (GzLMs) demonstrate that acculturation was a significant positive predictor of asthma. The addition of interaction terms revealed that prenatal smoking, low birth weight, breastfeeding, and pest exposure significantly modified the effect of acculturation on asthma. Results suggest that although higher levels of acculturation were detrimental overall, the effects were not equally damaging for all Hispanic children. Findings foster an understanding of how the effect of acculturation on Hispanic children's asthma is intensified or attenuated by distinct individual-level risk factors.

  6. Genetic and modifying factors that determine the risk of brain tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montelli, Terezinha de Cresci Braga; Peraçoli, Maria Terezinha Serrão; Rogatto, Silvia Regina

    2011-01-01

    of tumor escape, CNS tumor immunology, immune defects that impair anti-tumor systemic immunity in brain tumor patients and local immuno-suppressive factors within CNS are also reviewed. New hope to treatment perspectives, as dendritic-cell-based vaccines is summarized too. Concluding, it seems well...... of these treatments, the prognosis for patients is poor. In this review, we highlight general aspects concerning genetic alterations in brain tumors, namely astrocytomas, glioblastomas, oligodendrogliomas, medulloblastomas and ependymomas. The influence of these genetic alterations in patients' prognosis is discussed....... Mutagen sensitivity is associated with cancer risk. The convincing studies that linked DNA damages and DNA repair alterations with brain tumors are also described. Another important modifying factor is immunity. General immune response against cancer, tumor microenvironment and immune response, mechanisms...

  7. Type 2 diabetes mellitus and psychological stress - a modifiable risk factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackett, Ruth A; Steptoe, Andrew

    2017-09-01

    Psychological stress is common in many physical illnesses and is increasingly recognized as a risk factor for disease onset and progression. An emerging body of literature suggests that stress has a role in the aetiology of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) both as a predictor of new onset T2DM and as a prognostic factor in people with existing T2DM. Here, we review the evidence linking T2DM and psychological stress. We highlight the physiological responses to stress that are probably related to T2DM, drawing on evidence from animal work, large epidemiological studies and human laboratory trials. We discuss population and clinical studies linking psychological and social stress factors with T2DM, and give an overview of intervention studies that have attempted to modify psychological or social factors to improve outcomes in people with T2DM.

  8. A risk-based classification scheme for genetically modified foods. II: Graded testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Eunice; Krewski, Daniel

    2008-12-01

    This paper presents a graded approach to the testing of crop-derived genetically modified (GM) foods based on concern levels in a proposed risk-based classification scheme (RBCS) and currently available testing methods. A graded approach offers the potential for more efficient use of testing resources by focusing less on lower concern GM foods, and more on higher concern foods. In this proposed approach to graded testing, products that are classified as Level I would have met baseline testing requirements that are comparable to what is widely applied to premarket assessment of GM foods at present. In most cases, Level I products would require no further testing, or very limited confirmatory analyses. For products classified as Level II or higher, additional testing would be required, depending on the type of the substance, prior dietary history, estimated exposure level, prior knowledge of toxicity of the substance, and the nature of the concern related to unintended changes in the modified food. Level III testing applies only to the assessment of toxic and antinutritional effects from intended changes and is tailored to the nature of the substance in question. Since appropriate test methods are not currently available for all effects of concern, future research to strengthen the testing of GM foods is discussed.

  9. The relative risk of neurosensory deficit following removal of mandibular third molar teeth: the influence of radiography and surgical technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, W P

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the relative risk of damage to the inferior dental (ID) and lingual nerves in patients undergoing lower third molar removal. A single surgeon reviewed 1,000 patients. Temporary ID neurosensory deficit was highest (11%) when root apices were intimate to the ID nerve and lowest (0.9%) when close or distant from the nerve. Permanent ID neurosensory deficit was 0.4% per tooth but only when intimate to the canal. Bone removal, tooth division, and lingual split technique increase the risk of excessive hemorrhage which appears to be linked to the highest risk of temporary ID neurosensory deficit (20%). Permanent lingual nerve injury was rare (0.06%) and not related to lingual retraction. Preoperative warning for lower third molar removal can be individually tailored depending on the intimacy of the ID canal to the root apices and the anticipated surgical technique. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. General recommendations for soil ecotoxicological tests suitable for the environmental risk assessment of genetically modified plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Römbke, Jörg; Jänsch, Stephan; Meier, Matthias; Hilbeck, Angelika; Teichmann, Hanka; Tappeser, Beatrix

    2010-04-01

    Before a genetically modified plant (GMP) can be placed on the market in the European Union (EU), an environmental risk assessment has to be conducted according to EU-Directive 2001/18/EC or Regulation (EC) No. 1829/2003 of the European Parliament and of the Council. However, no harmonized concept for ecotoxicological testing is available today that considers the characteristics of GMPs as a whole. In fact, to date, mainly ecotoxicological tests originally developed and standardized for pesticides are used for this purpose. Frequently in these tests, not the whole GMP is tested but only specific transgene products (mainly toxins). In this contribution, ecotoxicological methods developed for the testing of pesticides are evaluated for whether they are suitable for risk assessment of GMPs as well. In total, 105 test methods covering a wide range of terrestrial invertebrates, microbes, and plants (laboratory, semifield, and field levels) were assessed. Only 7 of them had already been used with GMPs, and in about 20 studies the existing tests methods were modified, mostly in a way such that nonstandard species were used. In the laboratory, few earthworm and nontarget arthropod (NTA) species as well as collembolans and isopods were tested, and, in the field, only the litter-bag test was used. Clearly, more species than these few standard organisms currently in use have to be selected for testing purposes. A more detailed analysis of GMP tests with soil invertebrates published in the literature revealed that some of the relevant GMP exposure routes, such as via bulk soil, soil porewater, and litter from GMPs, are well covered. However, studies addressing either consumption of GMPs themselves or secondary exposure after GMPs have been taken up by invertebrates that feed on living or dead GMPs are underrepresented. (c) 2009 SETAC.

  11. Risk of cardiovascular thrombotic events after surgical castration versus gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists in Chinese men with prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy YC Teoh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the cardiovascular thrombotic risk after surgical castration (SC versus gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists (GnRHa in Chinese men with prostate cancer. All Chinese prostate cancer patients who were treated with SC or GnRHa from year 2000 to 2009 were reviewed and compared. The primary outcome was any new-onset of cardiovascular thrombotic events after SC or GnRHa, which was defined as any event of acute myocardial infarction or ischemic stroke. The risk of new-onset cardiovascular thrombotic event was compared between the SC group and the GnRHa group using Kaplan-Meier method. Multivariate Cox regression analysis was performed to adjust for other potential confounding factors. A total of 684 Chinese patients was included in our study, including 387 patients in the SC group and 297 patients in the GnRHa group. The mean age in the SC group (75.3 ± 7.5 years was significantly higher than the GnRHa group (71.8 ± 8.3 years (P < 0.001. There was increased risk of new cardiovascular thrombotic events in the SC group when compared to the GnRHa group upon Kaplan-Meier analysis (P = 0.014. Upon multivariate Cox regression analysis, age (hazard ratio [HR] 1.072, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.04-1.11, P< 0.001, hyperlipidemia (HR 2.455, 95% CI 1.53-3.93, P< 0.001, and SC (HR 1.648, 95% CI 1.05-2.59, P= 0.031 were significant risk factors of cardiovascular thrombotic events. In conclusion, SC was associated with increased risk of cardiovascular thrombotic events when compared to GnRHa. This is an important aspect to consider while deciding on the method of androgen deprivation therapy, especially in elderly men with known history of hyperlipidemia.

  12. Effect of Pre-Operative Use of Medications on the Risk of Surgical Site Infections in Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eton, Vic; Sinyavskaya, Liliya; Langlois, Yves; Morin, Jean François; Suissa, Samy; Brassard, Paul

    2016-10-01

    Median sternotomy, the most common means of accessing the heart for cardiac procedures, is associated with higher risk of surgical site infections (SSIs). A limited number of studies reporting the impact of medication use prior to cardiac surgery on the subsequent risk of SSIs usually focused on antibacterial prophylaxis. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the effect of medications prescribed commonly to cardiac patients on the risk of incident SSIs. The study analyzed data on consecutive cardiac surgery patients undergoing median sternotomy at a McGill University teaching hospital between April 1, 2011 and October 31, 2013. Exposure of interest was use of medications for heart disease and cardiovascular conditions in the seven days prior to surgery and those for comorbid conditions. The main outcome was SSIs occurring within 90 d after surgery. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]) was used to evaluate the effect. The cohort included 1,077 cardiac surgery patients, 79 of whom experienced SSIs within 90 d of surgery. The rates for sternal site infections and harvest site infections were 5.8 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.4-7.3) and 2.5 (95% CI: 1.4-3.7) per 100 procedures, respectively. The risk of SSI was increased with the pre-operative use of immunosuppressors/steroids (AOR 3.47, 95% CI: 1.27-9.52) and α-blockers (AOR 3.74, 95% CI: 1.21-1.47). Our findings support the effect of immunosuppressors/steroids on the risk of SSIs and add evidence to the previously reported association between the use of anti-hypertensive medications and subsequent development of infection/sepsis.

  13. Surgical extraction of impacted inferior third molars at risk for inferior alveolar nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallesio, Cesare; Berrone, Mattia; Ruga, Emanuele; Boffano, Paolo

    2010-11-01

    The objective of the study was to prospectively assess the intraoperative findings and the radiographic signs of a study population of patients with impacted third molars at risk of inferior alveolar nerve injury. One hundred thirty-four patients with impacted mandibular third molars at risk for nerve injury were included in the study. Radiographic signs of possible close relationship between the 2 structures and intraoperative exposition or damage of the inferior alveolar nerve were recorded. The follow-up controls comprised clinical examinations and assessment for the sensation of the lower lip and chin. In 24 patients, a real contiguity was encountered between the third molars and nerve. Among these, intraoperative neural exposition was observed in 19 patients. Four patients complained of postoperative temporary hypoesthesia. No deficit of sensibility was found in cases with no exposition of the nerve. The accidental exposition of the inferior alveolar nerve is associated with an increased risk for neural injuries. At panoramic radiograph, the presence of signs of bifid and radiolucent apex, superimposition, and radiolucent root band should be considered at high risk for neural damage.

  14. Hypertension Risk Subsequent to Gestational Dysglycemia Is Modified by Race/Ethnicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley-Lewis, Rhonda; Huynh, Jennifer; Li, Sylvia; Wenger, Julia; Thadhani, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension. Additionally, gestational dysglycemia has been associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus but not yet associated with hypertension subsequent to pregnancy in long-term follow-up. Therefore, we set out to examine this relationship as well as the role of race/ethnicity in modifying this relationship. We analyzed a prospective observational cohort followed between 1998 and 2007. There were 17 655 women with self-reported race/ethnicity and full-term, live births. A 1-hour 50 g oral glucose-load test and a 3-hour 100 g oral glucose-tolerance test enabled third trimester stratification of women into 1 of 4 glucose-tolerance groups: (1) normal (n=15 056); (2) abnormal glucose-load test (n=1558); (3) abnormal glucose-load and -tolerance tests (n=520); and (4) gestational diabetes mellitus (n=521). Women were then followed for a mean±standard deviation of 4.1±2.9 years after delivery for the development of hypertension. Although gestational diabetes mellitus was associated with an increased risk of hypertension after pregnancy (odds ratio [95% confidence interval]: 1.58 [1.02, 2.45]; P=0.04), dysglycemia defined by an abnormal glucose-load test predicted hypertension only among black women (4.52 [1.24, 16.52]; P=0.02). The risk of hypertension after pregnancy among dysglycemia groups not meeting criteria for gestational diabetes mellitus varied based on the race/ethnicity of the population. Further research on the implications of the intersection of race/ethnicity and gestational dysglycemia on subsequent hypertension is warranted.

  15. Risk Factors for Surgical Site Infections Following Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Michael V; Du, Dongyi Tony; Hua, Wei; Cortez, Karoll J; Butler, Melissa G; Davis, Robert L; DeCoster, Thomas A; Johnson, Laura; Li, Lingling; Nakasato, Cynthia; Nordin, James D; Ramesh, Mayur; Schum, Michael; Von Worley, Ann; Zinderman, Craig; Platt, Richard; Klompas, Michael

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the effect of graft choice (allograft, bone-patellar tendon-bone autograft, or hamstring autograft) on deep tissue infections following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructions. DESIGN Retrospective cohort study. SETTING AND POPULATION Patients from 6 US health plans who underwent ACL reconstruction from January 1, 2000, through December 31, 2008. METHODS We identified ACL reconstructions and potential postoperative infections using claims data. A hierarchical stratified sampling strategy was used to identify patients for medical record review to confirm ACL reconstructions and to determine allograft vs autograft tissue implanted, clinical characteristics, and infection status. We estimated infection rates overall and by graft type. We used logistic regression to assess the association between infections and patients' demographic characteristics, comorbidities, and choice of graft. RESULTS On review of 1,452 medical records, we found 55 deep wound infections. With correction for sampling weights, infection rates varied by graft type: 0.5% (95% CI, 0.3%-0.8%) with allografts, 0.6% (0.1%-1.5%) with bone-patellar tendon-bone autografts, and 2.5% (1.9%-3.1%) with hamstring autograft. After adjusting for potential confounders, we found an increased infection risk with hamstring autografts compared with allografts (odds ratio, 5.9; 95% CI, 2.8-12.8). However, there was no difference in infection risk among bone-patellar tendon-bone autografts vs allografts (odds ratio, 1.2; 95% CI, 0.3-4.8). CONCLUSIONS The overall risk for deep wound infections following ACL reconstruction is low but it does vary by graft type. Infection risk was highest in hamstring autograft recipients compared with allograft recipients and bone-patellar tendon-bone autograft recipients. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:827-833.

  16. Surgical risk factors and maxillary nerve function after Le Fort I osteotomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Torben; Bardow, Allan; Norholt, Sven Erik;

    2009-01-01

    with a number of possible intraoperative risk factors. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Twelve men and 13 women (mean +/- standard deviation: aged 25+/-10 years) participated in 4 sessions: 1 before LFO (baseline), and the rest at 3, 6, and 12 months after LFO. At each session, somatosensory sensitivity was assessed......: The thresholds of tactile stimuli on the gingiva and palate were increased 12 months after LFO (Pdiscrimination detection thresholds (P

  17. Association between periodontitis needing surgical treatment and subsequent diabetes risk: a population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shih-Yi; Lin, Cheng-Li; Liu, Jiung-Hsiun; Wang, I-Kuan; Hsu, Wu-Huei; Chen, Chao-Jung; Ting, I-Wen; Wu, I-Ting; Sung, Fung-Chang; Huang, Chiu-Ching; Chang, Yen-Jung

    2014-06-01

    It is well known that patients with diabetes have higher extent and severity of periodontitis, but the backward relationship is little investigated. The relationship between periodontitis needing dental surgery and subsequent type 2 diabetes mellitus (DMT2) in those individuals without diabetes was assessed. This is a retrospective cohort study using data from the national health insurance system of Taiwan. The periodontitis cohort involved 22,299 patients, excluding those with diabetes already or those diagnosed with diabetes within 1 year from baseline. Each study participant was randomly frequency matched by age, sex, and index year with one individual from the general population without periodontitis. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was used to estimate the influence of periodontitis on the risk of diabetes. The mean follow-up period is 5.47 ± 3.54 years. Overall, the subsequent incidence of DMT2 was 1.24-fold higher in the periodontitis cohort than in the control cohort, with an adjusted hazard ratio of 1.19 (95% confidence interval = 1.10 to 1.29) after controlling for sex, age, and comorbidities. This is the largest nation-based study examining the risk of diabetes in Asian patients with periodontitis. Those patients with periodontitis needing dental surgery have increased risk of future diabetes within 2 years compared with those participants with periodontitis not requiring dental surgery.

  18. How good are experienced interventional cardiologists in predicting the risk and difficulty of a coronary angioplasty procedure? A prospective study to optimize surgical standby.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brueren, B R; Mast, E G; Suttorp, M J; Ernst, J M; Bal, E T; Plokker, H W

    1999-03-01

    The prediction of the risk of a percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty has either been based on coronary lesion morphology or on clinical parameters, but a combined angiographic and clinical risk assessment system has not yet been evaluated prospectively. Five experienced interventionalists categorized 7,144 patients with 10,081 stenoses (1.4 lesion/patient) for both the risk and the difficulty of the procedure. Risk categories are as follows: 1 = low risk; 2 = intermediate risk; 3 = high risk. This division was made for percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty planning purposes. Category 1 patients denotes those in whom surgical standby is not required; category 2 patients, surgical standby not required but available within 1 hr; category 3 patients, surgical standby required. Difficulty categories are as follows: 1 = easy lesion; 2 = moderately difficult lesion; 3 = difficult lesion. Success was defined as a reduction of the degree of stenosis to less than 50%, without acute myocardial infarction, emergency redilatation, emergency bypass grafting, or death within 1 week. The procedure was not successful in difficulty category 1 in 1.6%, in category 2 in 3.5%, and in category 3 in 9.9%. Complications occurred in risk category 1 in 3.5%, in category 2 in 5.2%, and in category 3 in 12.4%. All differences were statistically significant (P < 0.05). Experienced cardiologists can well predict the risk and success of a coronary angioplasty procedure. This helps to optimize surgical standby, although even in the lowest-risk category complications can occur.

  19. Periodontal disease and subgingival microbiota as contributors for rheumatoid arthritis pathogenesis: modifiable risk factors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scher, Jose U; Bretz, Walter A; Abramson, Steven B

    2014-07-01

    Since the early 1900s, the role of periodontal disease in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis has been a matter of intense research. The last decade has witnessed many advances supporting a link between periodontitis, the presence of specific bacterial species (i.e. Porphyromonas gingivalis) and their effects in immune response. This review will examine available evidence on the individuals. Epidemiological studies have stressed the commonalities shared by periodontal disease and rheumatoid arthritis. Many groups have focused their attention toward understanding the periodontal microbiota and its alterations in states of health and disease. The presence of circulating antibodies against periodontopathic bacteria and associated inflammatory response has been found in both rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and individuals at-risk for disease development. Most recently, the periodontal microbiota of smokers and patients with RA has been elucidated, revealing profound changes in the bacterial communities compared with those of healthy controls. This has led to several small clinical trials of progressive disease treatment as adjuvant for disease-modifying therapy in RA. Smoking and periodontal disease are emerging risk factors for the development of RA. Epidemiological, clinical, and basic research has further strengthened this association, pointing toward changes in the oral microbiota as possible contributors to systemic inflammation and arthritis.

  20. Periodontal Disease and Subgingival Microbiota as Contributors for RA Pathogenesis: Modifiable Risk Factors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scher, Jose U.; Bretz, Walter A.; Abramson, Steven B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Since the early 1900s, the role of periodontal disease in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis has been a matter of intense research. The last decade has witnessed many advances supporting a link between periodontitis, the presence of specific bacterial species (i.e., Porphyromonas ginigivalis) and their effects in immune response. This review will examine available evidence on the subject. Recent findings Epidemiological studies have stressed the commonalities shared by periodontal disease and rheumatoid arthritis. Many groups have focused their attention towards understanding the periodontal microbiota and its alterations in states of health and disease. The presence of circulating antibodies against periodontopathic bacteria and associated inflammatory response has been found in both RA patients and subjects at-risk for disease development. Most recently, the periodontal microbiota of smokers and patients with RA has been elucidated, revealing profound changes in the bacterial communities compared to that of healthy controls. This has led to several small clinical trials of PD treatment as adjuvant for disease-modifying therapy in RA. Summary Smoking and periodontal disease are emerging risk factors for the development of RA. Epidemiological, clinical and basic research has further strengthened this association, pointing towards changes in the oral microbiota as possible contributors to systemic inflammation and arthritis. PMID:24807405

  1. Genetic variants in interleukin-6 modified risk of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiuqin; Liu, Reng-Yun; Lei, Zhe; Zhu, Yehan; Huang, Jian-An; Jiang, Xiefang; Liu, Zeyi; Liu, Xia; Peng, Xiaobei; Hu, Huacheng; Zhang, Hong-Tao

    2009-04-01

    Obesity and inflammation are known to correlate with the pathogenesis of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Interleukin (IL)-6, an important regulator of obesity and inflammation, was reported to phenotypically increase in patients with OSAS. This study aimed to investigate whether genetic variants in IL-6 confer susceptibility to OSAS. The study population consisted of 151 patients with OSAS and 75 healthy controls from Southeast China. Five haplotype-tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (tSNPs) were selected across 21 kb of the IL-6 locus using Haploview software V4.1. The tSNPs were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and genotyped by restriction enzyme digestion followed by gel electrophoresis. Linkage disequilibrium (LD) and haplotype reconstruction were carried out by means of a SHEsis program. No distribution difference of any of the five tSNPs between OSAS patients and controls was observed. However, in non-obese individuals (n=117), the minor allele G (rs1800796) decreased risk of OSAS compared with the major allele C [odds ratio (OR), 0.48; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.26-0.86; p=0.014], and the haplotype TG (rs1880242, rs1800796) conferred a significantly decreased risk of OSAS than single allele G (rs1800796) (OR, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.20-0.74; p=0.003). Moreover, the severity of sleep-disordered breathing (measured by apnea hypopnea index) increased linearly in carriers of the C variant of IL-6 -572G/C polymorphism (14.3+/-5.1, 22.0+/-3.6 and 34.8+/-3.5 for GG, CG and CC, respectively; p=0.012). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to suggest that genetic variants in IL-6 could modify OSAS susceptibility. SNP genotyping of IL-6 is a potential strategy for detecting the risk of breathing disordered diseases in non-obese individuals.

  2. Risk perception of genetically modified foods: a comparison between Russia and the United Kingdom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darkhovskaya, M. [Central European University, Dept. of Environmental Sciences and Policy, Budapest (Hungary); Frewer, L. [Institute of Food Research, Reading (United Kingdom); Urge-Vorsatz, D. [Central European University, Dept. of Environmental Sciences and Policy, Budapest (Hungary)

    1998-07-01

    The appearance of genetically modified products on the shelves of Western supermarkets has given rise to a number of questions regarding food safety, nutrition, environmental manipulation as well as ethical concerns. Public perception of gene technology has been shown to be an important factor influencing its future development. Many studies have been carried out to assess public attitudes to genetic engineering in the UK, while in Russia this research is in its embryonic stage yet. The study seeks to compare public concerns in the UK and Russia. Students studying Food Sciences and Biotechnology were surveyed with the use of standardised questionnaire. The results indicated that the views of students were in many ways similar to each other and the differences found were likely to be caused by the differences in economic, social and cultural contexts. The data analysis showed that students' attitudes and the Russians' in particular have not been shaped yet and can be characterised as 'positively neutral'. The lack of knowledge and discrepancy between the necessity to trust in regulators and the real trust pointed to the need of risk-benefit communication. Additionally, student-groups were compared with the general English public to determine the impact of knowledge and education on public perception of risks and benefits related to modem biotechnology. The general public was found to perceive gene technology as more risky and lower in benefits than the students. On the whole all English respondents were more concerned about the risk than the surveyed Russians. This research can serve a starting point for further development in the field of studying public perception of 'novel' food in Russia. (authors)

  3. Can neoadjuvant chemotherapy reduce the surgical risks for localized neuroblastoma patients with image-defined risk factors at the time of diagnosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Akihiro; Nishikawa, Masanori; Uehara, Shuichiro; Oue, Takaharu; Usui, Noriaki; Inoue, Masami; Fukuzawa, Masahiro; Okuyama, Hiroomi

    2016-03-01

    To date, no detailed study of the changes in the image-defined risk factors (IDRFs) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy has been performed. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of chemotherapy on IDRFs for stage L2 neuroblastomas. Fifteen stage L2 patients treated by neoadjuvant chemotherapy were selected. Changes after chemotherapy in the number of positive IDRFs, tumor size and major surgical complications were evaluated. All IDRFs disappeared after chemotherapy in four patients (group A) and a reduction in the number of IDRFs, but not disappearance, after chemotherapy was observed in five patients (group B). No change in the number of IDRFs after chemotherapy was observed in six patients (group C). All tumors in groups A shrunk to negative for IDRFs after chemotherapy. For negative IDRFs, tumors should shrink to chemotherapy.

  4. Surgical site infection in women undergoing surgery for gynecologic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdi, Haider; Gojayev, Anar; Buechel, Megan; Knight, Jason; SanMarco, Janice; Lockhart, David; Michener, Chad; Moslemi-Kebria, Mehdi

    2014-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to describe the rate and predictors of surgical site infection (SSI) after gynecologic cancer surgery and identify any association between SSI and postoperative outcome. Patients with endometrial, cervical, or ovarian cancers from 2005 to 2011 were identified from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program. The extent of surgical intervention was categorized into modified surgical complexity scoring (MSCS) system. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used. Odds ratios were adjusted for patient demographics, comorbidities, preoperative laboratory values, and operative factors. Of 6854 patients, 369 (5.4%) were diagnosed with SSI. Surgical site infection after laparotomy was 3.5 times higher compared with minimally invasive surgery (7% vs 2%; P Surgical site infection was associated with longer mean hospital stay and higher rate of reoperation, sepsis, and wound dehiscence. Surgical site infection was not associated with increased risk of acute renal failure or 30-day mortality. These findings were consistent in subset of patients with deep or organ space SSI. Seven percent of patients undergoing laparotomy for gynecologic malignancy developed SSI. Surgical site infection is associated with longer hospital stay and more than 5-fold increased risk of reoperation. In this study, we identified several risk factors for developing SSI among gynecologic cancer patients. These findings may contribute toward identification of patients at risk for SSI and the development of strategies to reduce SSI rate and potentially reduce the cost of care in gynecologic cancer surgery.

  5. Abdominoperineal Resection, Pelvic Exenteration, and Additional Organ Resection Increase the Risk of Surgical Site Infection after Elective Colorectal Surgery: An American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwaan, Mary R; Melton, Genevieve B; Madoff, Robert D; Chipman, Jeffrey G

    2015-12-01

    Determining predictors of surgical site infection (SSI) in a large cohort is important for the design of accurate SSI surveillance programs. We hypothesized that additional organ resection and pelvic exenterative procedures are associated independently with a higher risk of SSI. Patients in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program® (ACS NSQIP®; American College of Surgeons, Chicago, IL) database (2005-2012) were identified (n=112,282). Surgical site infection (superficial or deep SSI) at 30 d was the primary outcome. Using primary and secondary CPT® codes (American Medical Association, Chicago, IL) pelvic exenteration was defined and additional organ resection was defined as: bladder resection/repair, hysterectomy, partial vaginectomy, additional segmental colectomy, small bowel, gastric, or diaphragm resection. Univariable analysis of patient and procedure factors identified significant (p40 (OR: 2.51), pulmonary comorbidities (OR: 1.22), smoking (OR: 1.24), bowel obstruction (OR: 1.40), wound classification 3 or 4 (OR: 1.18), and abdominoperineal resection (OR: 1.58). Laparoscopic or laparoscopically assisted procedures offered a protective effect against incision infection (OR: 0.55). Additional organ resection (OR: 1.08) was also associated independently with SSI, but the magnitude of the effect was decreased after accounting for operative duration. In the analysis that excludes operative duration, pelvic exenteration is associated with SSI (OR: 1.38), but incorporating operative duration into the model results in this variable becoming non-significant. In addition to other factors, obesity, surgery for bowel obstruction, abdominoperineal resection, and additional organ resection are independently associated with a higher risk of SSI. Surgical site infection risk in pelvic exenteration and multiple organ resection cases appears to be mediated by prolonged operative duration. In these established high-risk sub-groups of

  6. Common variants associated with breast cancer in genome-wide association studies are modifiers of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Xianshu; Pankratz, V. Shane; Fredericksen, Zachary; Tarrell, Robert; Karaus, Mary; McGuffog, Lesley; Pharaoh, Paul D. P.; Ponder, Bruce A. J.; Dunning, Alison M.; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Houdayer, Claude; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Hooning, Maartje J.; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J.; Spurdle, Amanda; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Singer, Christian F.; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Dressler, Catherina; Fink, Anneliese; Szabo, Csilla I.; Zikan, Michal; Foretova, Lenka; Claes, Kathleen; Thomas, Gilles; Hoover, Robert N.; Hunter, David J.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Easton, Douglas F.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Couch, Fergus J.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that significantly modify breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Since these risk modifiers were originally identified as genetic risk factors for breast cancer in genome-wide association studies (GWASs), additio

  7. Common variants associated with breast cancer in genome-wide association studies are modifiers of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, X.; Pankratz, V.S.; Fredericksen, Z.; Tarrell, R.; Karaus, M.; McGuffog, L.; Pharaoh, P.D.; Ponder, B.A.J.; Dunning, A.M.; Peock, S.; Cook, M.; Oliver, C.; Frost, D.; Sinilnikova, O.M.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, D.; Mazoyer, S.; Houdayer, C.; Hogervorst, F.B.L.; Hooning, M.J.; Ligtenberg, M.J.L.; Spurdle, A.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; Schmutzler, R.K.; Wappenschmidt, B.; Engel, C.; Meindl, A.; Domchek, S.M.; Nathanson, K.L.; Rebbeck, T.R.; Singer, C.F.; Gschwantler-Kaulich, D.; Dressler, C.; Fink, A.; Szabo, C.I.; Zikan, M.; Foretova, L.; Claes, K.; Thomas, G.; Hoover, R.N.; Hunter, D.J.; Chanock, S.J.; Easton, D.F.; Antoniou, A.C.; Couch, F.J.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that significantly modify breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Since these risk modifiers were originally identified as genetic risk factors for breast cancer in genome-wide association studies (GWASs), additio

  8. 改良术式治疗腮腺良性肿瘤19例%Modified Surgical Treatment of Parotid Benign Tumor in 19 Cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴建中

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical ef ect about the application of modified parotidectomy in the treatment of parotid gland tumor. Methods using the classical face-lift operation incision, flap in the parotid fascia, first before tragus zygomatic arch zygomatic branch nerve anatomic presence, and then along the explicit temporal appearance neural stem and the facial nerve, then according to the tumor location along the total dry selective dissection of the facial nerve neck surface dry and each branch, tumor and partial parotidectomy. Final y using pedicled sternocleidomastoid myocutaneous flap after resection of parotid gland packing depressed area transfer at the top of the chest, avoids the conventional surgical postoperative preauricular deformity. Results the operation on 19 patients of parotid benign tumor resection, al the operation were successful, Frey syndrome occurred after operation in 3 cases, 1 cases of salivary fistula, temporary facial nerve function in 4 cases. The fol ow-up of 2-18 months, patients with facial scar is not obvious, the shape recovery, facial nerve injury were recovered completely. Conclusion the modified surgical treatment of tumors of the parotid gland is easy to expose and protection of facial nerve, reduce the incidence of complications, improve the postoperative facial deformity.%目的评价了解腮腺切除改良术式治疗腮腺肿瘤的临床疗效。方法采用经典的面部除皱手术切口,在腮腺嚼肌筋膜下翻瓣,先在耳屏前颧弓下解剖显露面神经的颧支,然后沿该支显露面神经的颞面干及面神经总干,再根据肿瘤的位置沿总干选择性地解剖面神经颈面干及各分支,行肿瘤及腮腺部分切除术。最后采用蒂在上方的胸锁乳突肌肌瓣转移填塞腮腺切除后的凹陷区,避免了常规术式术后耳前区的凹陷畸形。结果采用该术式对19例患者行腮腺良性肿瘤切除术,所有手术均顺利完

  9. A prospective cohort study of modifiable risk factors for gestational diabetes among Hispanic women: design and baseline characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasan-Taber, Lisa; Fortner, Renée Turzanski; Gollenberg, Audra; Buonnaccorsi, John; Dole, Nancy; Markenson, Glenn

    2010-01-01

    Women diagnosed with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) are at high risk for future diabetes, with rates of GDM consistently higher in Hispanic than non-Hispanic white women. Currently recognized risk factors for GDM are absent in up to half of affected women, and studies addressing modifiable risk factors for GDM in Hispanic women are sparse. Proyecto Buena Salud is an ongoing prospective cohort study of Hispanic women in Massachusetts designed to assess physical activity, psychosocial stress, and GDM risk. Bilingual interviewers recruit prenatal care patients early in pregnancy and assess activity, trait anxiety, perceived stress, and depressive symptoms using validated questionnaires. Baseline characteristics of the first 632 participants are presented. Women were predominantly young (69% Buena Salud represents a high-risk population of pregnant Hispanic women who are predominantly inactive, with higher levels of perceived stress, trait anxiety, and depressive symptoms compared to predominantly non-Hispanic white cohorts studied earlier. Therefore, Proyecto Buena Salud provides a unique opportunity to prospectively evaluate modifiable risk factors for GDM. Findings will inform prenatal behavioral intervention programs designed to address modifiable GDM risk factors.

  10. Risk Factors of Otitis Media in Children Associated With Surgical Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aylin Gül

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionAn analysis of the factors contributing to the risk of repeat ventilation tube placement among patients undergoing ventilation tube placement with adenoidectomy and patients undergoing ventilation tube placement only.MethodologyWe conducted a retrospective review of the medical records of 66 patients ages 3 to 10 who underwent ventilation tube placement only or adenoidectomy plus ventilation tube placement at Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery Clinic between January 2011 and January 2013.ResultsThe analysis revealed no significant relationships between the risk factors evaluated and the need for repeated ventilation tube placement. A repeat ventilation tube placement procedure was required in 7.7% of patients in the age 6-10 age group. This rate of incidence was significant relative to the other age groups evaluated.ConclusionsAdenoidectomy during the initial ventilation tube placement procedure may reduce the need for repeat ventilation tube placement in patients of 6 to 10 years of age with otitis media.

  11. Implementation of a care bundle and evaluation of risk factors for surgical site infection in cranial neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Benjamin M; Jones, Anna; Patel, Hiren C

    2016-05-01

    Surgical site infection [SSI] increases mortality, morbidity and length of hospital stay. Peri-operative 'care bundles' have reduced SSI in some fields of surgery. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of bundle compliance on SSI in patients undergoing a craniotomy. Cohort study of patients [N=1253] undergoing a craniotomy over 17 months at a single centre. SSI was defined as arising within 30days of operation or 1year where an implant(s) remains. 'Bundle compliance' required administration of antibiotics 36°C. SSI incidence was compared between bundle compliant and non-compliant groups. Case mix adjustment was performed using binary logistic regression. Over the study period, 1253 procedures were carried out and 66 patients (5.3%) developed a SSI. The majority (38, 57.6%) of these cultured Staphyloccoccus species. Only the use of an implant was found to be an independent risk factor for SSI [AOR 2.5, p<0.005, 95%CI 1.4, 4.3]. The use of the bundle did not reduce the occurrence of SSI. An evidence-based bundle did not reduce SSI in this neurosurgical series. The use of an implant was an independent risk factor of its occurrence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Abortion - surgical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suction curettage; Surgical abortion; Elective abortion - surgical; Therapeutic abortion - surgical ... Surgical abortion involves dilating the opening to the uterus (cervix) and placing a small suction tube into the uterus. ...

  13. Treatment of refractory lateral epicondylitis with modified Nirschl surgical technique%改良Nirschl术式治疗顽固性肱骨外上髁炎

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张川; 张作君; 王俊颀; 牛素玲; 昌中孝; 赵明; 杨林平; 许海燕; 夏凯

    2013-01-01

    目的:探讨改良Nirschl术式治疗顽固性肱骨外上髁炎的临床疗效.方法:2009年3月至2011年1月,共收治顽固性单纯肱骨外上髁炎21例(21肘),男8例,女13例;年龄25~59岁,平均(48.3±13.4)岁;优势侧16例,非优势侧5例.发病时间8~33个月,平均(17.1±7.7)个月,患者均接受过多种非手术治疗.采用小切口下桡侧腕短伸肌腱起点清理术,即改良Nirschl术式进行治疗,病变涉及指总伸肌腱者予以指总伸肌腱病变部分切除.术后切口部位冰敷2d,石膏托行肘关节制动1周后开始肘部力量和活动度锻炼,腕关节制动2周后行手部和腕部活动度和力量锻炼及正常日常活动.术后随访记录患者休息疼痛情况、手部握力和患者满意度,根据Verhaar网球肘疗效评分评价恢复情况.结果:21例失访4例,17例术后获得随访,时间13~22个月,平均16.3个月.根据Verhaar网球肘疗效评价,结果仇15例,良2例,无肘关节不稳定等并发症出现.结论:单纯顽固性肱骨外上髁炎可通过行改良Nirschl术式取得良好疗效,其关键在于对并发疾病的排除和准确诊断,以及术中病变组织准确切除.%To investigate the clinical effects of modified Nirschl surgical technique in treating refractory lateral epicondylitis. Methods:From March 2009 to January 2011,21 patients (21 elbows) with refractory lateral epicondylitis were treated in our hospital. There were 8 males and 13 females,ranged in age from 25 to 59 years with an average of (48.3± 13.4) years and the duration time from 8 to 33 months with an average of (17.1 ±7.7) months;affected position in dominant sides of 16 cases and non-dominant sides of 5 cases. The patients had already received multiple non-operative treatments. Modified Nirschl surgical technique was performed, and operative origination from origin of musculus extensor carpi radialis brevis to discard process with small incision, the process place of extensor digitorum

  14. Practical Recommendations for Long-term Management of Modifiable Risks in Kidney and Liver Transplant Recipients: A Guidance Report and Clinical Checklist by the Consensus on Managing Modifiable Risk in Transplantation (COMMIT) Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuberger, James M; Bechstein, Wolf O; Kuypers, Dirk R J; Burra, Patrizia; Citterio, Franco; De Geest, Sabina; Duvoux, Christophe; Jardine, Alan G; Kamar, Nassim; Krämer, Bernhard K; Metselaar, Herold J; Nevens, Frederik; Pirenne, Jacques; Rodríguez-Perálvarez, Manuel L; Samuel, Didier; Schneeberger, Stefan; Serón, Daniel; Trunečka, Pavel; Tisone, Giuseppe; van Gelder, Teun

    2017-04-01

    Short-term patient and graft outcomes continue to improve after kidney and liver transplantation, with 1-year survival rates over 80%; however, improving longer-term outcomes remains a challenge. Improving the function of grafts and health of recipients would not only enhance quality and length of life, but would also reduce the need for retransplantation, and thus increase the number of organs available for transplant. The clinical transplant community needs to identify and manage those patient modifiable factors, to decrease the risk of graft failure, and improve longer-term outcomes.COMMIT was formed in 2015 and is composed of 20 leading kidney and liver transplant specialists from 9 countries across Europe. The group's remit is to provide expert guidance for the long-term management of kidney and liver transplant patients, with the aim of improving outcomes by minimizing modifiable risks associated with poor graft and patient survival posttransplant.The objective of this supplement is to provide specific, practical recommendations, through the discussion of current evidence and best practice, for the management of modifiable risks in those kidney and liver transplant patients who have survived the first postoperative year. In addition, the provision of a checklist increases the clinical utility and accessibility of these recommendations, by offering a systematic and efficient way to implement screening and monitoring of modifiable risks in the clinical setting.

  15. Predicting pressure ulcer risk with the modified Braden, Braden, and Norton scales in acute care hospitals in Mainland China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, Enid; Pang, Samantha; Wong, Thomas; Ho, Jacqueline; Shao-ling, Xue; Li-jun, Tao

    2005-05-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a modified Braden scale, to evaluate its predictive validity, and to identify a more valid pressure ulcer risk calculator for application in acute care hospitals in Mainland China among the modified Braden, Braden, and Norton scales. The initial modified Braden scale, with the addition of skin type and body build for height, was proposed in this study. Four hundred twenty-nine subjects who were admitted to two acute care hospitals in Mainland China within 24 hr and free of pressure ulcers upon admission were assessed with the initial modified Braden, Braden, and Norton scales by three nurse assessors. This was followed by a daily skin assessment to note any pressure ulcer by a nurse assessor. Nine subjects had pressure ulcers detected at Stages I (89%) and II (11%) after an average stay of 11 days. The descriptive analysis of each subscale scoring item in the initial modified Braden scale indicated that skin type and body build for height were the most distinct predictive factors whereas nutrition was the least distinct factor for predicting pressure ulcer development. Based on these findings, the modified Braden scale was further developed with the addition of skin type and body build for height and by exclusion of nutrition. The predictive validity test reported that the modified Braden scale demonstrated a better balance of sensitivity (89%) and specificity (75%) at a cutoff score of 16, with a higher positive predictive value (7%), than the Braden and Norton scales. This finding revealed that for this sample, the modified Braden scale is more effective in pressure ulcer risk prediction than the other two scales. Because the modified Braden scale is not 100% sensitive and specific, to increase clinical efficacy in the prevention of pressure ulcer, it is recommended that it be adopted combined with nursing judgment to predict pressure ulcer development in acute care settings in Mainland China.

  16. Incidence and risk factors for surgical site infection after open reduction and internal fixation of tibial plateau fracture: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Jiashen; Chang, Hengrui; Zhu, Yanbin; Chen, Wei; Zheng, Zhanle; Zhang, Huixin; Zhang, Yingze

    2017-05-01

    This study aimed to quantitatively summarize the risk factors associated with surgical site infection after open reduction and internal fixation of tibial plateau fracture. Medline, Embase, CNKI, Wanfang database and Cochrane central database were searched for relevant original studies from database inception to October 2016. Eligible studies had to meet quality assessment criteria according to the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale, and had to evaluate the risk factors for surgical site infection after open reduction and internal fixation of tibial plateau fracture. Stata 11.0 software was used for this meta-analysis. Eight studies involving 2214 cases of tibial plateau fracture treated by open reduction and internal fixation and 219 cases of surgical site infection were included in this meta-analysis. The following parameters were identified as significant risk factors for surgical site infection after open reduction and internal fixation of tibial plateau fracture (p internal fixation of tibial plateau fracture. Surgeons should be cognizant of these risks and give relevant preoperative advice. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Surgical closure of the larynx for intractable aspiration pneumonia: cannula-free care and minimizing the risk of developing trachea-innominate artery fistula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ise, Kazuya; Kano, Makoto; Yamashita, Michitoshi; Ishii, Show; Shimizu, Hirofumi; Nakayama, Kei; Gotoh, Mitsukazu

    2015-10-01

    There is a risk of developing a fatal trachea-innominate artery fistula following laryngotracheal separation for the prevention of intractable aspiration pneumonia. We developed a novel technique of surgical closure of the larynx to avoid this complication and provide long-term cannula-free care.

  18. Acetabular Dysplasia and Surgical Approaches Other Than Direct Anterior Increases Risk for Malpositioning of the Acetabular Component in Total Hip Arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gromov, Kirill; Greene, Meridith E; Huddleston, James I

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Persistent acetabular dysplasia (AD) after periacetabular osteotomy has been hypothesized to increase the risk for malpositioning of the acetabular component. In this study, we investigate whether AD is an independent risk factor for cup malpositioning during primary total hip...... arthroplasty (THA). METHODS: Patient demographics, surgical approach, presence of AD assessed using the lateral center-edge angle, and acetabular cup positioning determined using Martell Hip Analysis Suite were investigated in 836 primary THA patients enrolled in a prospective multicenter study. RESULTS: We...

  19. Diabetes mellitus is associated with increased risk of surgical site infections: A meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Zheng, Qiu-Jian; Wang, Sheng; Zeng, Shi-Xing; Zhang, You-Ping; Bai, Xue-Jiao; Hou, Tie-Ying

    2015-08-01

    Observational studies have suggested an association between diabetes mellitus and the risk of surgical site infections (SSIs), but the results remain inconclusive. We conducted a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies to elucidate the relationship between diabetes mellitus and SSIs. We searched PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science databases and reviewed the reference lists of the retrieved articles to identify relevant studies. Associations were tested in subgroups representing different patient characteristics and study quality criteria. The random-effect model was used to calculate the overall relative risk (RR). Fourteen prospective cohort studies (N = 91,094 participants) were included in this meta-analysis, and the pooled crude RR was 2.02 (95% confidence interval, 1.68-2.43) with significant between-study heterogeneity observed (I(2) = 56.50%). Significant association was also detected after we derived adjusted RRs for studies not reporting the adjusted RRs and calculated the combined adjusted RR of the 14 studies (RR, 1.69; 95% confidence interval, 1.33-2.13). Results were consistent and statistically significant in all subgroups. Stratified analyses found the number of confounders adjusted for, sample size, and method of diabetes case ascertainment might be the potential sources of heterogeneity. Sensitivity analysis further demonstrated the robustness of the result. This meta-analysis suggests diabetes mellitus is significantly associated with increased risk of SSIs. Future studies are encouraged to reveal the mechanisms underlying this association. Copyright © 2015 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Unplanned Hospital Return for Infection following Ureteroscopy-Can We Identify Modifiable Risk Factors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Rachel A; Ghali, Fady M; Pais, Vernon M; Hyams, Elias S

    2016-04-01

    Genitourinary infection after ureteroscopy with laser lithotripsy is a clinically significant event that may lead to expensive and morbid return to the hospital. We evaluate factors associated with infection after ureteroscopy with laser lithotripsy leading to unplanned hospital return. We performed a retrospective chart review evaluating all ureteroscopy with laser lithotripsy performed at a single academic institution from April 2011 to August 2014. Data were extracted including patient demographics, comorbidities, surgical encounter characteristics, preoperative urine culture status, antibiotic type/duration and compliance with the AUA Best Practice Statement for antibiotic prophylaxis. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine factors associated with unplanned return to the hospital. Among 550 patients undergoing ureteroscopy with laser lithotripsy 45% (248) were female with an average age of 56.8 (± 14.8) years. Overall 3.4% (19 patients) had an unplanned return for genitourinary infection, with most (78.9%, 15 of 19) requiring inpatient readmission. Overall compliance with AUA Best Practice Statement for antibiotic prophylaxis was 48.7% (268 of 550). Rates of infection related returns were higher in patients undergoing preoperative stenting (84.2% vs 58.6%, p=0.025), those with an operative time greater than 120 minutes (89.5% vs 32.6% p risk of infection, underscoring the need for locally appropriate prophylaxis strategies and further study of optimal prophylaxis regimens. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Direct inguinal hernias and anterior surgical approach are risk factors for female inguinal hernia recurrences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burcharth, Jakob; Andresen, Kristoffer; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Bisgaard, Thue; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish the risk of recurrence after direct and indirect inguinal hernia operation in a large-scale female population and to establish the relationship between the type of hernia at the primary and recurrent procedure. Using data from the Danish Hernia Database (DHDB), a cohort was generated: all females operated on electively for a primary inguinal hernia by either Lichtenstein’s technique or laparoscopy from 1998 to 2012. Within this prospectively collected cohort, the hernia type at the primary procedure (direct inguinal hernia (DIH), indirect inguinal hernia (IIH), combination hernia), the hernia type at the recurrent procedure (DIH, IIH, combination hernia, femoral hernia), anesthesia type, and time from primary procedure to reoperation were registered. A total of 5,893 females with primary elective inguinal hernia operation on in the study period (61 % IIH, 37 % DIH, 2 % combined hernias) were included with a median follow-up time of 72 months (range 0 to 169). A total of 305 operations for suspected recurrences were registered (61 % inguinal recurrences, 38 % femoral recurrences, 1 % no hernias), which corresponded to an overall reoperation rate of 5.2 %. All femoral recurrences occurred after a previous open anterior operation. The crude reoperation rate after primary DIH operation was 11.0 %, 3.0 % after primary IIH operation and 0.007 % after combined hernia operation (p hernia recurrences exclusively existed after anterior open primary operation.

  2. Prospective Study of Surgical Treatment of Acromegaly: Effects on Ghrelin, Weight, Adiposity, and Markers of CV Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Vidal, Carlos; Fernandez, Jean Carlos; Bruce, Jeffrey N.; Crisman, Celina; Conwell, Irene M.; Kostadinov, Jane; Geer, Eliza B.; Post, Kalmon D.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Although epidemiological studies have found that GH and IGF-1 normalization reduce the excess mortality of active acromegaly to expected rates, cross-sectional data report some cardiovascular (CV) risk markers to be less favorable in remission than active acromegaly. Objective: The objective of the study was to test the hypothesis that remission of acromegaly after surgical therapy increases weight and adiposity and some CV risk markers and these changes are paralleled by a rise in ghrelin. Design: Forty-two adults with untreated, active acromegaly were studied prospectively. Changes in outcome measures from before to after surgery were assessed in 26 subjects achieving remission (normal IGF-1) and 16 with persistent active acromegaly (elevated IGF-1) after surgery. Setting: The study was conducted at tertiary referral centers for pituitary tumors. Main Outcome Measures: Endocrine, metabolic, and CV risk parameters, anthropometrics, and body composition by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry were measured. Results: Remission increased total ghrelin, body weight, waist circumference, C-reactive protein, homocysteine, high-density lipoprotein, and leptin and reduced systolic blood pressure, homeostasis model assessment score, triglycerides, and lipoprotein (a) by 6 months and for 32 ± 4 months after surgery. The ghrelin rise correlated with the fall in the levels of GH, IGF-1, and insulin and insulin resistance. Weight, waist circumference, and ghrelin did not increase significantly in the persistent active acromegaly group. Total body fat, trunk fat, and perentage total body fat increased by 1 year after surgery in 15 remission subjects: the increase in body fat correlated with the rise in total ghrelin. Conclusions: Although most markers of CV risk improve with acromegaly remission after surgery, some markers and adiposity increase and are paralleled by a rise in total ghrelin, suggesting that these changes may be related. Understanding the mechanisms and

  3. Candidate genetic modifiers for breast and ovarian cancer risk inBRCA1andBRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Peterlongo (Paolo); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); K.B. Moysich (Kirsten); A. Rudolph (Anja); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); J. Simard (Jacques); P. Soucy (Penny); R. Eeles (Rosalind); D.F. Easton (Douglas); U. Hamann (Ute); S. Wilkening (Stefan); B. Chen (Bowang); M.A. Rookus (Matti); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka K.); F.H. Van Der Baan (Frederieke H.); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); L.C. Walker (Logan); F. Lose (Felicity); A.-T. Maia (Ana-Teresa); M. Montagna (Marco); L. Matricardi (Laura); J. Lubinski (Jan); A. Jakubowska (Anna); E.B.G. Garcia; O.I. Olopade (Olofunmilayo); R.L. Nussbaum (Robert L.); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); S.M. Domchek (Susan); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); B.K. Arun (Banu); B. Karlan; S. Orsulic (Sandra); K.J. Lester (Kathryn); W.K. Chung (Wendy K.); A. Miron (Alexander); M.C. Southey (Melissa); D. Goldgar (David); S.S. Buys (Saundra); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); C.M. Dorfling (Cecilia); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); Y.C. Ding (Yuan Chun); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); A.-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); L. Jønson (Lars); A. Osorio (Ana); C. Martínez-Bouzas (Cristina); J. Benítez (Javier); E.E. Conway (Edye E.); K.R. Blazer (Kathleen R.); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); B. Peissel (Bernard); D. Zaffaroni (Daniela); G. Scuvera (Giulietta); M. Barile (Monica); F. Ficarazzi (Filomena); F. Mariette (F.); S. Fortuzzi (S.); A. Viel (Alessandra); G. Giannini (Giuseppe); L. Papi (Laura); A. Martayan (Aline); M.G. Tibiletti (Maria Grazia); P. Radice (Paolo); A. Vratimos (Athanassios); F. Fostira (Florentia); J. Garber (Judy); A. Donaldson (Alan); C. Brewer (Carole); C. Foo (Claire); D.G. Evans (Gareth); D. Frost (Debra); D. Eccles (Diana); A. Brady (A.); J. Cook (Jackie); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); L. Adlard; J. Barwell (Julian); L.J. Walker (Lisa); L. Izatt (Louise); L. Side (Lucy); M.J. Kennedy (John); M.T. Rogers (Mark); M.E. Porteous (Mary); P.J. Morrison (Patrick); R. Platte (Radka); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); S. Hodgson (Shirley); S.D. Ellis (Steve); T. Cole (Trevor); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); K.B.M. Claes (Kathleen B.M.); T. Van Maerken (Tom); A. Meindl (Alfons); P.A. Gehrig (Paola A.); C. Sutter (Christian); C. Engel (Christoph); D. Niederacher (Dieter); D. Steinemann (Doris); H. Plendl (Hansjoerg); K. Kast (Karin); K. Rhiem (Kerstin); N. Ditsch (Nina); N. Arnold (Norbert); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); B. Bressac-de Paillerets (Brigitte); B. Buecher (Bruno); C.D. Delnatte (Capucine); C. Houdayer (Claude); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); F. Damiola (Francesca); I. Coupier (Isabelle); L. Barjhoux (Laure); L. Vénat-Bouvet (Laurence); L. Golmard (Lisa); N. Boutry-Kryza (N.); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); O. Caron (Olivier); P. Pujol (Pascal); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); M. Belotti (Muriel); M. Piedmonte (Marion); M.L. Friedlander (Michael L.); G. Rodriguez (Gustavo); L.J. Copeland (Larry J.); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); P. Perez-Segura (Pedro); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); T.A.M. van Os (Theo); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); A.H. van der Hout (Annemarie); M.P. Vreeswijk (Maaike); N. Hoogerbrugqe (N.); M.G.E.M. Ausems (Margreet); H.C. van Doorn (Helena); J.M. Collee (Margriet); E. Olah; O. Díez (Orland); I. Blanco (Ignacio); C. Lazaro (Conxi); J. Brunet (Joan); L. Feliubadaló (L.); C. Cybulski (Cezary); J. Gronwald (Jacek); K. Durda (Katarzyna); K. Jaworska-Bieniek (Katarzyna); G. Sukiennicki (Grzegorz); A. Arason (Adalgeir); J. Chiquette (Jocelyne); P.J. Teixeira; C. Olswold (Curtis); F.J. Couch (Fergus); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); X. Wang (X.); C. Szabo (Csilla); K. Offit (Kenneth); M. Corines (Marina); L. Jacobs (Lauren); M.E. Robson (Mark E.); L. Zhang (Lingling); V. Joseph (Vijai); A. Berger (Andreas); C.F. Singer (Christian); C. Rappaport (Christine); D.G. Kaulich (Daphne Gschwantler); G. Pfeiler (Georg); M.-K. Tea; C. Phelan (Catherine); M.H. Greene (Mark); P.L. Mai (Phuong); G. Rennert (Gad); A.-M. Mulligan (Anna-Marie); G. Glendon (Gord); S. Tchatchou (Sandrine); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); A.E. Toland (Amanda); A. Bojesen (Anders); I.S. Pedersen (Inge Sokilde); M. Thomassen (Mads); U.B. Jensen; Y. Laitman (Yael); J. Rantala (Johanna); A. von Wachenfeldt (Anna); H. Ehrencrona (Hans); M.S. Askmalm (Marie); Å. Borg (Åke); K.B. Kuchenbaecker (Karoline); L. McGuffog (Lesley); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); S. Healey (Sue); A. Lee (Andrew); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul D.P.); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis C.); E. Friedman (Eitan)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer. The incomplete penetrance coupled with the variable age at diagnosis in carriers of the same mutation suggests the existence of genetic and nongenetic modifying

  4. Candidate genetic modifiers for breast and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peterlongo, P.; Chang-Claude, J.; Moysich, K.B.; Rudolph, A.; Schmutzler, R.K.; Simard, J.; Soucy, P.; Eeles, R.A.; Easton, D.F.; Hamann, U.; Wilkening, S.; Chen, B.; Rookus, M.A.; Schmidt, M.K.; Baan, F.H. van der; Spurdle, A.B.; Walker, L.C.; Lose, F.; Maia, A.T.; Montagna, M.; Matricardi, L.; Lubinski, J.; Jakubowska, A.; Garcia, E.B.; Olopade, O.I.; Nussbaum, R.L.; Nathanson, K.L.; Domchek, S.M.; Rebbeck, T.R.; Arun, B.K.; Karlan, B.Y.; Orsulic, S.; Lester, J.; Chung, W.K.; Miron, A.; Southey, M.C.; Goldgar, D.E.; Buys, S.S.; Janavicius, R.; Dorfling, C.M.; Rensburg, E.J. van; Ding, Y.C.; Neuhausen, S.L.; Hansen, T.V.; Gerdes, A.M.; Ejlertsen, B.; Jonson, L.; Osorio, A.; Martinez-Bouzas, C.; Benitez, J.; Conway, E.E.; Blazer, K.R.; Weitzel, J.N.; Manoukian, S.; Peissel, B.; Zaffaroni, D.; Scuvera, G.; Barile, M.; Ficarazzi, F.; Mariette, F.; Fortuzzi, S.; Viel, A.; Giannini, G.; Papi, L.; Martayan, A.; Tibiletti, M.G.; Radice, P.; Vratimos, A.; Fostira, F.; Garber, J.E.; Donaldson, A.; Brewer, C.; Foo, C.; Evans, D.G.; Frost, D.; Eccles, D.; Brady, A.; Cook, J.; Tischkowitz, M.; Adlard, J.; Barwell, J.; Walker, L.; Izatt, L.; Side, L.E.; Kennedy, M.J.; Rogers, M.T.; Porteous, M.E.; Morrison, P.J.; Platte, R.; Davidson, R.; Hodgson, S.V.; Ellis, S.; Cole, T.; Godwin, A.K.; Claes, K.; Maerken, T. Van; Meindl, A.; Gehrig, A.; Sutter, C.; Engel, C.; Hoogerbrugge, N.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer. The incomplete penetrance coupled with the variable age at diagnosis in carriers of the same mutation suggests the existence of genetic and nongenetic modifying factors. In thi

  5. Effect of Interventions on Potential, Modifiable Risk Factors for Knee Injury in Team Ball Sports : A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Stege, Marloes H. P.; Dallinga, Joan M.; Benjaminse, Anne; Lemmink, Koen A. P. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Knee injuries are one of the most common types of injuries in team ball sports, and prevention is crucial because of health and economic implications. To set up effective prevention programs, these programs must be designed to target potential, modifiable risk factors. In addition, it is

  6. Candidate genetic modifiers for breast and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peterlongo, Paolo; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Moysich, Kirsten B

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer. The incomplete penetrance coupled with the variable age at diagnosis in carriers of the same mutation suggests the existence of genetic and nongenetic modifying factors. In ...

  7. CYP2C9 genotypes modify benzodiazepine-related fall risk: Original results from three studies with meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ham, A.C.; Ziere, Gijsbertus; Broer, Linda; Wijngaarden, van J.P.; Zwaluw, van der N.L.; Brouwer, E.M.; Dhonukshe-Rutten, R.A.M.; Groot, de C.P.G.M.; Witkamp, R.F.

    2017-01-01

    Objective.
    To investigate whether the CYP2C9*2 and *3 variants modify benzodiazepine-related fall risk.
    Design.
    Three prospective studies; the Rotterdam Study, B-PROOF, and LASA.
    Setting.
    Community-dwelling individuals living in or near five Dutch cities.
    Participants.
    Th

  8. Candidate Genetic Modifiers for Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peterlongo, Paolo; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Rudolph, Anja; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Simard, Jacques; Soucy, Penny; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Easton, Douglas F.; Hamann, Ute; Wilkening, Stefan; Chen, Bowang; Rookus, Matti A.; Schmidt, MarjankaK.; van der Baan, Frederieke H.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Walker, Logan C.; Lose, Felicity; Maia, Ana-Teresa; Montagna, Marco; Matricardi, Laura; Lubinski, Jan; Jakubowska, Anna; Garcia, Encarna B. Gomez; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Arun, Banu K.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Orsulic, Sandra; Lester, Jenny; Chung, Wendy K.; Miron, Alex; Southey, Melissa C.; Goldgar, David E.; Buys, Saundra S.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Jonson, Lars; Osorio, Ana; Martinez-Bouzas, Cristina; Benitez, Javier; Conway, Edye E.; Blazer, Kathleen R.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Scuvera, Giulietta; Barile, Monica; Ficarazzi, Filomena; Mariette, Frederique; Fortuzzi, Stefano; Viel, Alessandra; Giannini, Giuseppe; Papi, Laura; Martayan, Aline; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Radice, Paolo; Vratimos, Athanassios; Fostira, Florentia; Garber, Judy E.; Donaldson, Alan; Brewer, Carole; Foo, Claire; Evans, D. Gareth R.; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Brady, Angela; Cook, Jackie; Tischkowitz, Marc; Adlard, Julian; Barwell, Julian; Walker, Lisa; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy E.; Kennedy, M. John; Rogers, Mark T.; Porteous, Mary E.; Morrison, Patrick J.; Platte, Radka; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley V.; Ellis, Steve; Cole, Trevor; Godwin, Andrew K.; Claes, Kathleen; Van Maerken, Tom; Meindl, Alfons; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Engel, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Steinemann, Doris; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Buecher, Bruno; Delnatte, Capucine; Houdayer, Claude; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Damiola, Francesca; Coupier, Isabelle; Barjhoux, Laure; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Golmard, Lisa; Boutry-Kryza, Nadia; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Caron, Olivier; Pujol, Pascal; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Belotti, Muriel; Piedmonte, Marion; Friedlander, Michael L.; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Copeland, Larry J.; de la Hoya, Miguel; Perez Segura, Pedro; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomaeki, Kristiina; van Os, Theo A. M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Vreeswijk, Maaike P. G.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; van Doorn, Helena C.; Collee, J. Margriet; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Arason, Adalgeir; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Olswold, Curtis; Couch, Fergus J.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Wang, Xianshu; Szabo, Csilla I.; Offit, Kenneth; Corines, Marina; Jacobs, Lauren; Robson, Mark E.; Zhang, Liying; Joseph, Vijai; Berger, Andreas; Singer, Christian F.; Rappaport, Christine; Kaulich, Daphne Geschwantler; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng M.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Rennert, Gad; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Andrulis, Irene L.; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Thomassen, Mads; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Laitman, Yael; Rantala, Johanna; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Ehrencrona, Hans; Askmalm, Marie Stenmark; Borg, Ake; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Healey, Sue; Lee, Andrew; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Friedman, Eitan; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Ligtenberg, Jakobus J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer. The incomplete penetrance coupled with the variable age at diagnosis in carriers of the same mutation suggests the existence of genetic and nongenetic modifying factors. In thi

  9. Candidate genetic modifiers for breast and ovarian cancer risk inBRCA1andBRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Peterlongo (Paolo); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); K.B. Moysich (Kirsten); A. Rudolph (Anja); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); J. Simard (Jacques); P. Soucy (Penny); R. Eeles (Rosalind); D.F. Easton (Douglas); U. Hamann (Ute); S. Wilkening (Stefan); B. Chen (Bowang); M.A. Rookus (Matti); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka K.); F.H. Van Der Baan (Frederieke H.); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); L.C. Walker (Logan); F. Lose (Felicity); A.-T. Maia (Ana-Teresa); M. Montagna (Marco); L. Matricardi (Laura); J. Lubinski (Jan); A. Jakubowska (Anna); E.B.G. Garcia; O.I. Olopade (Olofunmilayo); R.L. Nussbaum (Robert L.); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); S.M. Domchek (Susan); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); B.K. Arun (Banu); B. Karlan; S. Orsulic (Sandra); K.J. Lester (Kathryn); W.K. Chung (Wendy K.); A. Miron (Alexander); M.C. Southey (Melissa); D. Goldgar (David); S.S. Buys (Saundra); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); C.M. Dorfling (Cecilia); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); Y.C. Ding (Yuan Chun); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); A.-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); L. Jønson (Lars); A. Osorio (Ana); C. Martínez-Bouzas (Cristina); J. Benítez (Javier); E.E. Conway (Edye E.); K.R. Blazer (Kathleen R.); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); B. Peissel (Bernard); D. Zaffaroni (Daniela); G. Scuvera (Giulietta); M. Barile (Monica); F. Ficarazzi (Filomena); F. Mariette (F.); S. Fortuzzi (S.); A. Viel (Alessandra); G. Giannini (Giuseppe); L. Papi (Laura); A. Martayan (Aline); M.G. Tibiletti (Maria Grazia); P. Radice (Paolo); A. Vratimos (Athanassios); F. Fostira (Florentia); J. Garber (Judy); A. Donaldson (Alan); C. Brewer (Carole); C. Foo (Claire); D.G. Evans (Gareth); D. Frost (Debra); D. Eccles (Diana); A. Brady (A.); J. Cook (Jackie); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); L. Adlard; J. Barwell (Julian); L.J. Walker (Lisa); L. Izatt (Louise); L. Side (Lucy); M.J. Kennedy (John); M.T. Rogers (Mark); M.E. Porteous (Mary); P.J. Morrison (Patrick); R. Platte (Radka); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); S. Hodgson (Shirley); S.D. Ellis (Steve); T. Cole (Trevor); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); K.B.M. Claes (Kathleen B.M.); T. Van Maerken (Tom); A. Meindl (Alfons); P.A. Gehrig (Paola A.); C. Sutter (Christian); C. Engel (Christoph); D. Niederacher (Dieter); D. Steinemann (Doris); H. Plendl (Hansjoerg); K. Kast (Karin); K. Rhiem (Kerstin); N. Ditsch (Nina); N. Arnold (Norbert); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); B. Bressac-de Paillerets (Brigitte); B. Buecher (Bruno); C.D. Delnatte (Capucine); C. Houdayer (Claude); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); F. Damiola (Francesca); I. Coupier (Isabelle); L. Barjhoux (Laure); L. Vénat-Bouvet (Laurence); L. Golmard (Lisa); N. Boutry-Kryza (N.); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); O. Caron (Olivier); P. Pujol (Pascal); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); M. Belotti (Muriel); M. Piedmonte (Marion); M.L. Friedlander (Michael L.); G. Rodriguez (Gustavo); L.J. Copeland (Larry J.); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); P. Perez-Segura (Pedro); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); T.A.M. van Os (Theo); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); A.H. van der Hout (Annemarie); M.P. Vreeswijk (Maaike); N. Hoogerbrugqe (N.); M.G.E.M. Ausems (Margreet); H.C. van Doorn (Helena); J.M. Collee (Margriet); E. Olah; O. Díez (Orland); I. Blanco (Ignacio); C. Lazaro (Conxi); J. Brunet (Joan); L. Feliubadaló (L.); C. Cybulski (Cezary); J. Gronwald (Jacek); K. Durda (Katarzyna); K. Jaworska-Bieniek (Katarzyna); G. Sukiennicki (Grzegorz); A. Arason (Adalgeir); J. Chiquette (Jocelyne); P.J. Teixeira; C. Olswold (Curtis); F.J. Couch (Fergus); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); X. Wang (X.); C. Szabo (Csilla); K. Offit (Kenneth); M. Corines (Marina); L. Jacobs (Lauren); M.E. Robson (Mark E.); L. Zhang (Lingling); V. Joseph (Vijai); A. Berger (Andreas); C.F. Singer (Christian); C. Rappaport (Christine); D.G. Kaulich (Daphne Gschwantler); G. Pfeiler (Georg); M.-K. Tea; C. Phelan (Catherine); M.H. Greene (Mark); P.L. Mai (Phuong); G. Rennert (Gad); A.-M. Mulligan (Anna-Marie); G. Glendon (Gord); S. Tchatchou (Sandrine); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); A.E. Toland (Amanda); A. Bojesen (Anders); I.S. Pedersen (Inge Sokilde); M. Thomassen (Mads); U.B. Jensen; Y. Laitman (Yael); J. Rantala (Johanna); A. von Wachenfeldt (Anna); H. Ehrencrona (Hans); M.S. Askmalm (Marie); Å. Borg (Åke); K.B. Kuchenbaecker (Karoline); L. McGuffog (Lesley); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); S. Healey (Sue); A. Lee (Andrew); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul D.P.); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis C.); E. Friedman (Eitan)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer. The incomplete penetrance coupled with the variable age at diagnosis in carriers of the same mutation suggests the existence of genetic and nongenetic modifying fac

  10. Effect of Interventions on Potential, Modifiable Risk Factors for Knee Injury in Team Ball Sports : A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Stege, Marloes H. P.; Dallinga, Joan M.; Benjaminse, Anne; Lemmink, Koen A. P. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Knee injuries are one of the most common types of injuries in team ball sports, and prevention is crucial because of health and economic implications. To set up effective prevention programs, these programs must be designed to target potential, modifiable risk factors. In addition, it is

  11. Does influence at work modify the relation between high occupational physical activity and risk of heart disease in women?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allesøe, Karen; Holtermann, Andreas; Rugulies, Reiner

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate whether influence at work modifies the association between demanding and strenuous occupational physical activity (OPA) and risk of ischaemic heart disease (IHD). METHODS: A sample of 12,093 nurses aged 45-64 years from the Danish Nurse Cohort Study was followed for 20.6 y...

  12. The enhanced healing of a high-risk, clean, sutured surgical incision by prophylactic negative pressure wound therapy as delivered by Prevena™ Customizable™: cosmetic and therapeutic results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalise, Alessandro; Tartaglione, Caterina; Bolletta, Elisa; Calamita, Roberto; Nicoletti, Giovanni; Pierangeli, Marina; Grassetti, Luca; Di Benedetto, Giovanni

    2015-04-01

    According to the literature, incisional closure complications may range from postoperative surgical site infections, representing 17-22% of health care-associated infections, surgical wound dehiscence and formation of haematomas or seromas, and can lead to delayed or impaired incision healing. These kinds of situations are more common when wounds are closed under tension or in specific patient morbidities. Obesity, in particular, is associated with an impaired blood flow to tissues, predisposing the patient to increased risk of wound complications by various mechanisms. Incisional complications can become relevant economic burdens for health care systems because of an increase in the average length of hospital stay and readmissions, and additional medical and surgical procedures. Thus, a preventive therapy may have a critical role in the management of healing. Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) technology as delivered by Prevena™ Customizable™ (Kinetic Concepts Inc., San Antonio, TX) has recently been the focus of a new investigation, as a prophylactic measure to prevent complications via immediate postoperative application in high-risk, clean, closed surgical incisions. The authors present a 62-year-old class II obese female, who underwent bilateral inguinal dermolipectomy. Prophylactic NPWT as delivered by Prevena™ was performed successfully over surgical incisions. Cosmetic and therapeutic results are shown.

  13. Apolipoprotein E genotype modifies the risk of behavior problems after infant cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaynor, J William; Nord, Alex S; Wernovsky, Gil; Bernbaum, Judy; Solot, Cynthia B; Burnham, Nancy; Zackai, Elaine; Heagerty, Patrick J; Clancy, Robert R; Nicolson, Susan C; Jarvik, Gail P; Gerdes, Marsha

    2009-07-01

    The goal was to evaluate polymorphisms of the APOE gene as modifiers of neurobehavioral outcomes for preschool-aged children with congenital heart defects, after cardiac surgery. A prospective observational study with neurodevelopmental evaluation between the fourth and fifth birthdays was performed. Attention and behavioral skills were assessed through parental report. Parents of 380 children completed the neurobehavioral measures. Child Behavior Checklist scores for the pervasive developmental problem scale were in the at-risk or clinically significant range for 15% of the cohort, compared with 9% for the normative data (P Behavior Checklist indices, including somatic complaints (P = .009), pervasive developmental problems (P = .032), and internalizing problems (P = .009). In each case, the epsilon4 allele was associated with a better outcome. APOE epsilon2 carriers had impaired social skills, compared with epsilon4 carriers (P = .009). For preschool-aged children with congenital heart defects requiring surgery, parental rating scales showed an increased prevalence of restricted behavior patterns, inattention, and impaired social interactions. The APOE epsilon2 allele was associated with increased behavior problems, impaired social interactions, and restricted behavior patterns.

  14. A modified HEART risk score in chest pain patients with suspected non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-Peng MA; Xiao WANG; Qing-Sheng WANG; Xiao-Li LIU; Xiao-Nan HE; Shao-Ping NIE

    2016-01-01

    ObjectiveTo validate a modified HEART [History, Electrocardiograph (ECG), Age, Risk factors and Troponin] risk score in chest pain patients with suspected non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE-ACS) in the emergency department (ED).Methods This retrospective cohort study used a prospectively acquired database and chest pain patients admitted to the emergency department with suspected NSTE-ACS were enrolled. Data recorded on arrival at the ED were used. The serum sample of high-sensitivity cardiac Troponin I other than conventional cardiac Troponin I used in the HEART risk score was tested. The modified HEART risk score was calculated. The end point was the occurrence of major adverse cardiac events (MACE) defined as a composite of acute myocardial infarction (AMI), percu-taneous intervention (PCI), coronary artery bypass graft (CABG), or all-cause death, within three months after initial presentation.Results A total of 1,300 patients were enrolled. A total of 606 patients (46.6%) had a MACE within three months: 205 patients (15.8%) were diag-nosed with AMI, 465 patients (35.8%) underwent PCI, and 119 patients (9.2%) underwent CABG. There were 10 (0.8%) deaths. A progres-sive, significant pattern of increasing event rate was observed as the score increased (P < 0.001 byχ2 for trend). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.84. All patients were classified into three groups: low risk (score 0–2), intermediate risk (score 3–4), and high risk (score 5–10). Event rates were 1.1%, 18.5%, and 67.0%, respectively (P < 0.001).ConclusionsThe modified HEART risk score was validated in chest pain patients with suspected NSTE-ACS and may complement MACE risk assessment and patients triage in the ED. A prospective study of the score is warranted.

  15. Ultrasound guided percutaneous cholecystostomy in high-risk patients for surgical intervention

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huseyin Bakkaloglu; Hakan Yanar; Recep Guloglu; Korhan Taviloglu; Fatih Tunca; Murat Aksoy; Cemalettin Ertekin; Arzu Poyanli

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To assess the efficacy and safety of ultrasound guided percutaneous cholecystostomy (PC) in the treatment of acute cholecystitis in a well-defined high risk patients under general anesthesia.METHODS: The data of 27 consecutive patients who underwent percutaneous transhepatic cholecystostomy for the management of acute cholecystitis from January 1999 to June 2003 was retrospectively evaluated. All of the patients had both clinical and sonographic signs of acute cholecystitis and had comorbid diseases.RESULTS: Ultrasound revealed gallbladder stones in 25 patients and acalculous cholecystitis in two patients.Cholecystostomy catheters were removed 14-32 d (mean 23 d) after the procedure in cases where complete regression of all symptoms was achieved. There were statistically significant reductions in leukocytosis, (13.7× 103± 1.3× 103μg/L vs 13× 103± 1× 103μg/L,P<0.05 for 24 h after PC; 13.7 × 103 ± 1.3 × 103 μg/L vs8.3 × 103 ± 1.2 × 103 μg/L, P < 0.0001 for 72 h after PC), C -reactive protein (51.2 ± 18.5 mg/L vs 27.3 ±10.4 mg/L, P < 0.05 for 24 h after PC; 51.2 ± 18.5 mg/Lvs 5.4 ± 1.5 mg/L, P < 0.0001 for 72 h after PC), and fever (38 ± 0.35℃ vs 37.3 ± 0.32℃, P < 0.05 for 24h after PC; 38 ± 0.35℃ vs 36.9 ± 0.15℃, P < 0.0001 for 72 h after PC). Sphincterotomy and stone extraction was performed successfully with endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography (ERCP) in three patients.After cholecystostomy, 5 (18%) patients underwent delayed cholecystectomy without any complications.Three out of 22 patients were admitted with recurrent acute cholecystitis during the follow-up and recovered with medical treatment. Catheter dislodgement occurred in three patients spontaneously, and two of them were managed by reinsertion of the catheter.CONCLUSION: As an alternative to surgery, percutaneous cholecystostomy seems to be a safe method in critically ill patients with acute cholecystitis and can be performed with low mortality

  16. Establishing a risk-assessment process for release of genetically modified wine yeast into the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeman, Heidi; Wolfaardt, Gideon M; Botha, Alfred; van Rensburg, Pierre; Pretorius, Isak S

    2009-08-01

    The use and release of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) is an issue of intense public concern and, in the case of food and beverages, products containing GMOs or products thereof carry the risk of consumer rejection. The recent commercialization of 2 GM wine yeasts in the United States and Canada has made research and development of risk assessments for GM microorganisms a priority. The purpose of this study was to take a first step in establishing a risk-assessment process for future use and potential release of GM wine yeasts into the environment. The behaviour and spread of a GM wine yeast was monitored in saturated sand columns, saturated sand flow cells, and conventional flow cells. A widely used commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeast, VIN13, a VIN13 transgenic strain (LKA1, which carries the LKA1 alpha-amylase gene of Lipomyces kononenkoae), a soil bacterium (Dyadobacter fermentens), and a nonwine soil-borne yeast (Cryptococcus laurentii) were compared in laboratory-scale microcosm systems designed to monitor microbial mobility behaviour, survival, and attachment to surfaces. It was found that LKA1 cells survived in saturated sand columns, but showed little mobility in the porous matrix, suggesting that the cells attached with high efficiency to sand. There was no significant difference between the mobility patterns of LKA1 and VIN13. All 3 yeasts (VIN13, LKA1, and C. laurentii) were shown to form stable biofilms; the 2 S. cerevisiae strains either had no difference in biofilm density or the LKA1 biofilm was less dense than that of VIN13. When co-inoculated with C. laurentii, LKA1 had no negative influence on the breakthrough of the Cryptococcus yeast in a sand column or on its ability to form biofilms. In addition, LKA1 did not successfully integrate into a stable mixed-biofilm community, nor did it disrupt the biofilm community. Overall, it was concluded that the LKA1 transgenic yeast had the same reproductive success as VIN13 in these 3

  17. Smoking modifies the associated increased risk of future cardiovascular disease by genetic variation on chromosome 9p21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamrefors, Viktor; Hedblad, Bo; Hindy, George; Smith, J Gustav; Almgren, Peter; Engström, Gunnar; Sjögren, Marketa; Gränsbo, Klas; Orho-Melander, Marju; Melander, Olle

    2014-01-01

    Genetic predisposition for cardiovascular disease (CVD) is likely to be modified by environmental exposures. We tested if the associated risk of CVD and CVD-mortality by the single nucleotide polymorphism rs4977574 on chromosome 9p21 is modified by life-style factors. A total of 24,944 middle-aged subjects (62% females) from the population-based Malmö-Diet-and-Cancer-Cohort were genotyped. Smoking, education and physical activity-levels were recorded. Subjects were followed for 15 years for incidence of coronary artery disease (CAD; N = 2309), ischemic stroke (N = 1253) and CVD-mortality (N = 1156). Multiplicative interactions between rs4977574 and life-style factors on endpoints were tested in Cox-regression-models. We observed an interaction between rs4977574 and smoking on incident CAD (P = 0.035) and CVD-mortality (P = 0.012). The hazard ratios (HR) per risk allele of rs4977574 were highest in never smokers (N = 9642) for CAD (HR = 1.26; 95% CI 1.13-1.40; PSmoking may modify the associated risk of CAD and CVD-mortality conferred by genetic variation on chromosome 9p21. Whether the observed attenuation of the genetic risk reflects a pathophysiological mechanism or is a result of smoking being such a strong risk-factor that it may eliminate the associated genetic effect, requires further investigation.

  18. [Surgical scrub: evaluation of its adequacy in preventing biological risks in surgery: I. Its use in surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz, M S; Lacerda, R A; Monteiro, C E; da Conceição, V P

    2000-03-01

    The study elaborated approaches for adequate use of the surgical scrub and it evaluated, through systematized observation, the performance of the surgical team during the surgery. The adopted procedure was very valid, allowing to recognize positive and problematic aspects. Except the protecting glasses, all the other components of the surgical scrub were used. The subject located in the use form, where caps and masks were more problematic among anaesthesists and circulate nurses; apron and gloves among surgeons and, mainly, scrub nurses.

  19. Preoperatively Assessable Clinical and Pathological Risk Factors for Parametrial Involvement in Surgically Treated FIGO Stage IB-IIA Cervical Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canaz, Emel; Ozyurek, Eser Sefik; Erdem, Baki; Aldikactioglu Talmac, Merve; Yildiz Ozaydin, Ipek; Akbayir, Ozgur; Numanoglu, Ceyhun; Ulker, Volkan

    2017-06-14

    Determining the risk factors associated with parametrial involvement (PMI) is of paramount importance to decrease the multimodality treatment in early-stage cervical cancer. We investigated the preoperatively assessable clinical and pathological risk factors associated with PMI in surgically treated stage IB1-IIA2 cervical cancer. A retrospective cohort study of women underwent Querleu-Morrow type C hysterectomy for cervical cancer stage IB1-IIA2 from 2001 to 2015. All patients underwent clinical staging examination under anesthesia by the same gynecological oncologists during the study period. Evaluated variables were age, menopausal status, body mass index, smoking status, FIGO (International Federation of Obstetrics and Gynecology) stage, clinically measured maximal tumor diameter, clinical presentation (exophytic or endophytic tumor), histological type, tumor grade, lymphovascular space invasion, clinical and pathological vaginal invasion, and uterine body involvement. Endophytic clinical presentation was defined for ulcerative tumors and barrel-shaped morphology. Two-dimensional transvaginal ultrasonography was used to measure tumor dimensions. Of 127 eligible women, 37 (29.1%) had PMI. On univariate analysis, endophytic clinical presentation (P = 0.01), larger tumor size (P PMI. In multivariate analysis endophytic clinical presentation (odds ratio, 11.34; 95% confidence interval, 1.34-95.85; P = 0.02) and larger tumor size (odds ratio, 32.31; 95% confidence interval, 2.46-423.83; P = 0.008) were the independent risk factors for PMI. Threshold of 31 mm in tumor size predicted PMI with 71% sensitivity and 75% specificity. We identified 18 patients with tumor size of more than 30 mm and endophytic presentation; 14 (77.7%) of these had PMI. Endophytic clinical presentation and larger clinical tumor size (>3 cm) are independent risk factors for PMI in stage IB-IIA cervical cancer. Approximately 78% of the patients with a tumor size of more than 3 cm and endophytic

  20. A retrospective study of risk factors for poor outcomes in methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA infection in surgical patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Middleton Scott D

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since its isolation, Methicillin-resistant Staphlococcus aureus (MRSA has become a major cause of hospital acquired infection (HAI, adverse patient outcome and overall resource utilisation. It is endemic in Scotland and widespread in Western hospitals. MRSA has been the subject of widespread media interest- a manifestation of concerns about sterile surgical techniques and hospital cleanliness. This study aimed to investigate patient outcome of MRSA infections over the last decade at a major orthopaedic trauma centre. The objective was to establish the association of variables, such as patient age and inpatient residence, against patient outcome, in order to quantify significant relationships; facilitating the evaluation of management strategies with an aim to improving patient outcomes and targeting high-risk procedures. Methods This is a retrospective study of the rates and outcomes of MRSA infection in orthopaedic trauma at the Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh. Data was collated using SPSS 14.0 for Windows(R. Shapiro-Wilkes testing was performed to investigate the normality of continuous data sets (e.g: age. Data was analysed using both Chi-Squared and Fisher's exact tests (in cases of expected values under 5 Results This study found significant associations between adverse patient outcome (persistent deep infection, osteomyelitis, the necessity for revision surgery, amputation and mortality and the following patient variables: Length of inpatient stay, immuno-compromise, pre-admission residence in an institutional setting (such as a residential nursing home and the number of antibiotics used in patient care. Despite 63% of all infections sampled resulting from proximal femoral fractures, no association between patient outcome and site of infection or diagnosis was found. Somewhat surprisingly, the relationship between age and outcome of infection was not proved to be significant, contradicting previous studies suggesting a

  1. A PROSPECTIVE STUDY TO ASSESS RISK FACTORS FOR SURGICAL SITE INFECTI ONS IN A TERTIARY CARE CENTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Surgical site infections (SSI remain a significant problem following an operation and the second most frequently reported nosocomial infections. Aim: The current study was undertaken to identify various risk factors for SSI. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The prospective study was carried out on 50 abdominal surgeries of class III and class IV contamination. Details various functional parameters, laboratory inve stigation and surgery of patient were evaluated and analyzed with occurrence of wound infection . RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: The infection rate was 36.0% in our study population. The SSI rate was 19.04 % in contaminated ones and 48.2% in dirty surgeries. Male patients were affected more (21% than the female patients (18.88%. The SSI rate increased with increasing age and it also increased in patients with low hemoglobin. The SSI rate was higher in emergency surgeries as compared to the elective surgeries. Th e infection rate was significantly higher as the order and the duration of the surgery increased.

  2. Can perineural invasion detected in prostate needle biopsy specimens predict surgical margin positivity in D’Amico low risk patients?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozgur Haki Yuksel

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: In this study, our aim was to estimate the value of perineural invasion (PNI in prostate needle biopsy (PNB specimens in the prediction of surgical margin positivity (SMP and its prognostic significance (upgrade Gleason Score in patients who had undergone radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP with low risk prostate cancer according to D’Amico risk assessment. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the data of 65 patients who were diagnosed as clinical stage T1c prostate cancer (PC and underwent RRP between January 2010 and June 2013. Pathological specimens of PNB and RRP were separately examined for the parameters of PNI, vascular invasion (VI, Gleason Score (GS and SMP. Results: The patients’ mean age was 63.65 ± 4.93 (range 47- 75 years. PNI in PNB specimens were identified in 12 of 65 patients and 11 of 12 patients showed SMP on RRP specimens. While 53 of 65 patients had not PNI on PNB, only 11 of them demonstrated SMP on RRP specimens. SMP was 30.64-fold more frequently encountered in PNB specimens obtained from PNI-positive patients relative to PNI-negative patients. In our study, PNI detected in PNB specimens was statistically significantly associated with SMP on RRP specimens (P = 0.0001. Conclusion: It is well known that higher PSA values and GS were independent predictors of SMP in clinically localized prostate cancer (CLPC. We think that PNI in PNB specimens may be a useful prognostic factor for predicting SMP in cases with CLPC.

  3. "Best Case/Worst Case": Training Surgeons to Use a Novel Communication Tool for High-Risk Acute Surgical Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruser, Jacqueline M; Taylor, Lauren J; Campbell, Toby C; Zelenski, Amy; Johnson, Sara K; Nabozny, Michael J; Steffens, Nicole M; Tucholka, Jennifer L; Kwekkeboom, Kris L; Schwarze, Margaret L

    2017-04-01

    Older adults often have surgery in the months preceding death, which can initiate postoperative treatments inconsistent with end-of-life values. "Best Case/Worst Case" (BC/WC) is a communication tool designed to promote goal-concordant care during discussions about high-risk surgery. The objective of this study was to evaluate a structured training program designed to teach surgeons how to use BC/WC. Twenty-five surgeons from one tertiary care hospital completed a two-hour training session followed by individual coaching. We audio-recorded surgeons using BC/WC with standardized patients and 20 hospitalized patients. Hospitalized patients and their families participated in an open-ended interview 30 to 120 days after enrollment. We used a checklist of 11 BC/WC elements to measure tool fidelity and surgeons completed the Practitioner Opinion Survey to measure acceptability of the tool. We used qualitative analysis to evaluate variability in tool content and to characterize patient and family perceptions of the tool. Surgeons completed a median of 10 of 11 BC/WC elements with both standardized and hospitalized patients (range 5-11). We found moderate variability in presentation of treatment options and description of outcomes. Three months after training, 79% of surgeons reported BC/WC is better than their usual approach and 71% endorsed active use of BC/WC in clinical practice. Patients and families found that BC/WC established expectations, provided clarity, and facilitated deliberation. Surgeons can learn to use BC/WC with older patients considering acute high-risk surgical interventions. Surgeons, patients, and family members endorse BC/WC as a strategy to support complex decision making. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Gastrointestinal stromal tumours: Correlation of modified NIH risk stratification with diffusion-weighted MR imaging as an imaging biomarker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Tae Wook [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seong Hyun, E-mail: kshyun@skku.edu [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Kyung Mi; Choi, Dongil [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Sang Yun; Kim, Kyoung-Mee [Department of Pathology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Won Ki [Division of Oncology, Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Min Ji [Biostatics Unit, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Except size and necrosis, conventional MR findings of GISTs were not significantly different according to the modified NIH criteria. • The ADC values of GISTs were negatively correlated with the modified NIH criteria. • The ADC value can be helpful for the determination of intermediate or high-risk GISTs. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the correlation of risk grade of gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) based on modified National Institutes of Health (NIH) criteria with conventional magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and diffusion-weighted (DW) imaging. Methods: We included 22 patients with histopathologically proven GISTs in the stomach or small bowel who underwent pre-operative gadoxetic acid-enhanced MR imaging and DW imaging. We retrospectively assessed correlations between morphologic findings, qualitative (signal intensity, consensus from two observers) and quantitative (degree of dynamic enhancement using signal intensity of tumour/muscle ratio and apparent diffusion coefficient [ADC]) values, and the modified NIH criteria for risk stratification. Spearman partial correlation analysis was used to control for tumour size as a confounding factor. The optimal cut-off level of ADC values for intermediate or high risk GISTs was analyzed using a receiver operating characteristic analysis. Results: Except tumour size and necrosis, conventional MR imaging findings, including the degree of dynamic enhancement, were not significantly different according to the modified NIH criteria (p > 0.05). Tumour ADC values were negatively correlated with the modified NIH criteria, before and after adjustment of tumour size (ρ = −0.754; p < 0.001 and ρ = −0.513; p = 0.017, respectively). The optimal cut-off value for the determination of intermediate or high-risk GISTs was 1.279 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s (100% sensitivity, 69.2% specificity, 81.8% accuracy). Conclusion: Except tumour size and necrosis, conventional MR imaging findings did not

  5. Candidate genetic modifiers for breast and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterlongo, Paolo; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Rudolph, Anja; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Simard, Jacques; Soucy, Penny; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Easton, Douglas F.; Hamann, Ute; Wilkening, Stefan; Chen, Bowang; Rookus, Matti A.; Schmidt, Marjanka K; van der Baan, Frederieke H.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Walker, Logan C.; Lose, Felicity; Maia, Ana-Teresa; Montagna, Marco; Matricardi, Laura; Lubinski, Jan; Jakubowska, Anna; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Arun, Banu K.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Orsulic, Sandra; Lester, Jenny; Chung, Wendy K.; Miron, Alex; Southey, Melissa C.; Goldgar, David E.; Buys, Saundra S.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Jønson, Lars; Osorio, Ana; Martínez-Bouzas, Cristina; Benitez, Javier; Conway, Edye E.; Blazer, Kathleen R.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Scuvera, Giulietta; Barile, Monica; Ficarazzi, Filomena; Mariette, Frederique; Fortuzzi, Stefano; Viel, Alessandra; Giannini, Giuseppe; Papi, Laura; Martayan, Aline; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Radice, Paolo; Vratimos, Athanassios; Fostira, Florentia; Garber, Judy E.; Donaldson, Alan; Brewer, Carole; Foo, Claire; Evans, D. Gareth R.; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Brady, Angela; Cook, Jackie; Tischkowitz, Marc; Adlard, Julian; Barwell, Julian; Walker, Lisa; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy E.; Kennedy, M. John; Rogers, Mark T.; Porteous, Mary E.; Morrison, Patrick J.; Platte, Radka; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley V.; Ellis, Steve; Cole, Trevor; Godwin, Andrew K.; Claes, Kathleen; Van Maerken, Tom; Meindl, Alfons; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Engel, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Steinemann, Doris; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Buecher, Bruno; Delnatte, Capucine; Houdayer, Claude; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Damiola, Francesca; Coupier, Isabelle; Barjhoux, Laure; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Golmard, Lisa; Boutry-Kryza, Nadia; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Caron, Olivier; Pujol, Pascal; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Belotti, Muriel; Piedmonte, Marion; Friedlander, Michael L.; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Copeland, Larry J; de la Hoya, Miguel; Segura, Pedro Perez; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; van Os, Theo A.M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E.J.; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Vreeswijk, Maaike P.G.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Ausems, Margreet G.E.M.; van Doorn, Helena C.; Collée, J. Margriet; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Arason, Adalgeir; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Olswold, Curtis; Couch, Fergus J.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Wang, Xianshu; Szabo, Csilla I.; Offit, Kenneth; Corines, Marina; Jacobs, Lauren; Robson, Mark E.; Zhang, Liying; Joseph, Vijai; Berger, Andreas; Singer, Christian F.; Rappaport, Christine; Kaulich, Daphne Geschwantler; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng M.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Rennert, Gad; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Andrulis, Irene L.; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Thomassen, Mads; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Laitman, Yael; Rantala, Johanna; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Ehrencrona, Hans; Askmalm, Marie Stenmark; Borg, Åke; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Healey, Sue; Lee, Andrew; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Friedman, Eitan

    2014-01-01

    Background BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer. The incomplete penetrance coupled with the variable age at diagnosis in carriers of the same mutation suggests the existence of genetic and non-genetic modifying factors. In this study we evaluated the putative role of variants in many candidate modifier genes. Methods Genotyping data from 15,252 BRCA1 and 8,211 BRCA2 mutation carriers, for known variants (n=3,248) located within or around 445 candidate genes, were available through the iCOGS custom-designed array. Breast and ovarian cancer association analysis was performed within a retrospective cohort approach. Results The observed p-values of association ranged between 0.005-1.000. None of the variants was significantly associated with breast or ovarian cancer risk in either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers, after multiple testing adjustments. Conclusion There is little evidence that any of the evaluated candidate variants act as modifiers of breast and/or ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. Impact Genome-wide association studies have been more successful at identifying genetic modifiers of BRCA1/2 penetrance than candidate gene studies. PMID:25336561

  6. Modified Mediterranean diet score and cardiovascular risk in a North American working population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Yang

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Greater adherence to a Mediterranean diet is linked to lower risk for cardiovascular morbidity/mortality in studies of Mediterranean cohorts, older subjects, and/or those with existing health conditions. No studies have examined the effects of this dietary pattern in younger working populations in the United States. We investigated the effects of Mediterranean diet adherence on cardiovascular disease (CVD biomarkers, metabolic syndrome and body composition in an occupationally active, non-Mediterranean cohort. METHODS: A cross-sectional study in a cohort of 780 career male firefighters, ages 18 years or older, from the United States Midwest. No dietary intervention was performed. A modified Mediterranean diet score (mMDS was developed for assessment of adherence to a Mediterranean dietary pattern from a previously administered life-style questionnaire that examined pre-existing dietary habits. Clinical data from fire department medical examinations were extracted and analyzed. RESULTS: Obese subjects had significantly lower mMDS, and they reported greater fast/take-out food consumption (p<0.001 and intake of sweetened drinks during meals (p = 0.002. After multivariate adjustment, higher mMDS was inversely related to risk of weight gain over the past 5 years (odds ratio [OR]: 0.57, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.39-0.84, p for trend across score quartiles: 0.01; as well as the presence of metabolic syndrome components (OR: 0.65, 95% CI: 0.44-0.94, p for trend across score quartiles: 0.04. Higher HDL-cholesterol (p = 0.008 and lower LDL-cholesterol (p = 0.04 were observed in those with higher mMDS in linear regression after multivariate adjustment for age, BMI and physical activity. CONCLUSIONS: In a cohort of young and active US adults, greater adherence to a Mediterranean-style dietary pattern had significant inverse associations with metabolic syndrome, LDL-cholesterol and reported weight gain, and was significantly and

  7. Approaches in the risk assessment of genetically modified foods by the Hellenic Food Safety Authority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varzakas, Theodoros H; Chryssochoidis, G; Argyropoulos, D

    2007-04-01

    Risk analysis has become important to assess conditions and take decisions on control procedures. In this context it is considered a prerequisite in the evaluation of GM food. Many consumers worldwide worry that food derived from genetically modified organisms (GMOs) may be unhealthy and hence regulations on GMO authorisations and labelling have become more stringent. Nowadays there is a higher demand for non-GM products and these products could be differentiated from GM products using the identity preservation system (IP) that could apply throughout the grain processing system. IP is the creation of a transparent communication system that encompasses HACCP, traceability and related systems in the supply chain. This process guarantees that certain characteristics of the lots of food (non-GM origin) are maintained "from farm to fork". This article examines the steps taken by the Hellenic Food Safety Authority to examine the presence of GMOs in foods. The whole integrated European legislation framework currently in place still needs to be implemented in Greece. Penalties should be enforced to those who import, process GMOs without special licence and do not label those products. Similar penalties should be enforced to those companies that issue false certificates beyond the liabilities taken by the food enterprises for farmers' compensation. We argue that Greece has no serious reasons to choose the use of GMOs due to the fact that the structural and pedologic characteristics of the Greek agriculture favour the biological and integrated cultivation more. Greece is not in favour of the politics behind coexistence of conventional and GM plants and objects to the use of GMOs in the food and the environment because the processor has a big burden in terms of money, time and will suffer a great deal in order to prove that their products are GMO free or that any contamination is adventitious or technically unavoidable. Moreover, Greece owns a large variety of genetic

  8. DNA barcoding simplifies environmental risk assessment of genetically modified crops in biodiverse regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinyere V Nzeduru

    Full Text Available Transgenes encoding for insecticidal crystal (Cry proteins from the soil-dwelling bacterium Bacillus Thuringiensis have been widely introduced into Genetically Modified (GM crops to confer protection against insect pests. Concern that these transgenes may also harm beneficial or otherwise valued insects (so-called Non Target Organisms, NTOs represents a major element of the Environmental Risk Assessments (ERAs used by all countries prior to commercial release. Compiling a comprehensive list of potentially susceptible NTOs is therefore a necessary part of an ERA for any Cry toxin-containing GM crop. In partly-characterised and biodiverse countries, NTO identification is slowed by the need for taxonomic expertise and time to enable morphological identifications. This limitation represents a potentially serious barrier to timely adoption of GM technology in some developing countries. We consider Bt Cry1A cowpea (Vigna unguiculata in Nigeria as an exemplar to demonstrate how COI barcoding can provide a simple and cost-effective means of addressing this problem. Over a period of eight weeks, we collected 163 insects from cowpea flowers across the agroecological and geographic range of the crop in Nigeria. These individuals included 32 Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs spanning four Orders and that could mostly be assigned to genus or species level. They included 12 Lepidopterans and two Coleopterans (both potentially sensitive to different groups of Cry proteins. Thus, barcode-assisted diagnoses were highly harmonised across groups (typically to genus or species level and so were insensitive to expertise or knowledge gaps. Decisively, the entire study was completed within four months at a cost of less than 10,000 US$. The broader implications of the findings for food security and the capacity for safe adoption of GM technology are briefly explored.

  9. Evaluation of Rint1 as a modifier of intestinal tumorigenesis and cancer risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otterpohl, Karla L.; Gould, Karen A.

    2017-01-01

    The Rad50 Interacting Protein 1 (Rint1) influences cellular homeostasis through maintenance of endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi and centrosome integrity and regulation of vesicle transport, autophagy and the G2/M checkpoint. Rint1 has been postulated to function as a tumor suppressor as well as an oncogene, with its role depending perhaps upon the precise cellular and/or experimental context. In humans, heterozygosity for germline missense variants in RINT1 have, in some studies, been associated with increased risk of both breast and Lynch syndrome type cancers. However, it is not known if these germline variants represent loss of function alleles or gain of function alleles. Based upon these findings, as well as our initial consideration of Rint1 as a potential candidate for Mom5, a genetic modifier of intestinal tumorigenesis in ApcMin/+ mice, we sought to explicitly examine the impact of Rint1 on tumorigenesis in ApcMin/+ mice. However, heterozygosity for a knockout of Rint1 had no impact on tumorigenesis in Rint1+/-; ApcMin/+ mice. Likewise, we found no evidence to suggest that the remaining Rint1 allele was lost somatically in intestinal tumors in ApcMin/+ mice. Interestingly, in contrast to what has been observed in Rint1+/- mice on a mixed genetic background, Rint1+/- mice on a pure C57BL/6J background did not show spontaneous tumor development. We also evaluated colorectal cancer data available in the COSMIC and ONCOMINE databases and found that RINT1 overexpression, as well as the presence of somatic missense mutations in RINT1 were associated with colorectal cancer development. In vitro evaluation of two missense variants in RINT1 suggested that such variants do have the potential to impact RINT1 function. PMID:28264000

  10. Biosafety risk assessment approaches for insect-resistant genetically modified crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inaam Ullah

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Environmental risk assessment (ERA is imperative for commercial release of insect resistant, genetically modified crops (IR-GMCs.An insect specific, spider venom peptideω-HXTX-Hv1a (Hvt was successfully expressed in cotton plants. The cotton plants producing Hvt protein have demonstrated resistance against economically important insect pest species. The study was performed to assess the effects of Hvt producing cotton plants on Honey bees (Apis mellifera. Methods: Three approaches were used to evaluate the effects of Hvt protein on adults of honeybees; whole plant assays in flight cages, in vitro assays with pollen of Hvt-cotton, and assays with elevated levels of purified Hvt protein. Pollens of Bt cotton or purified Bt proteins were used as control. Results: The field experiments did not yield any meaningful data due to high rate of mortality in all treatments including the control. However, the laboratory experiments provided conclusive results in which Hvt, purified or in pollens, did not affect the survival or longevity of the bees compared to the control. During the course of study we were able to compare the quality, effectiveness and economics of different experiments. Conclusions: We conclude that Hvt either purified or produced in cotton plants do not affect the survival or longevity of honey bees. We are also of the view that starting at laboratory level assays not only gives meaningful data but also saves a lot of time and money that can be spent on other important questions regarding safety of a particular transgenic crop. Hence, a purpose-based, tiered approach could be the best choice for pre-release ERA of IR-GMCs.

  11. Assessing genetically modified crops to minimize the risk of increased food allergy: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Richard E; Hefle, Susan L; Taylor, Steven L; van Ree, Ronald

    2005-06-01

    The first genetically modified (GM) crops approved for food use (tomato and soybean) were evaluated for safety by the United States Food and Drug Administration prior to commercial production. Among other factors, those products and all additional GM crops that have been grown commercially have been evaluated for potential increases in allergenic properties using methods that are consistent with the current understanding of food allergens and knowledge regarding the prediction of allergenic activity. Although there have been refinements, the key aspects of the evaluation have not changed. The allergenic properties of the gene donor and the host (recipient) organisms are considered in determining the appropriate testing strategy. The amino acid sequence of the encoded protein is compared to all known allergens to determine whether the protein is a known allergen or is sufficiently similar to any known allergen to indicate an increased probability of allergic cross-reactivity. Stability of the protein in the presence of acid with the stomach protease pepsin is tested as a risk factor for food allergenicity. In vitro or in vivo human IgE binding are tested when appropriate, if the gene donor is an allergen or the sequence of the protein is similar to an allergen. Serum donors and skin test subjects are selected based on their proven allergic responses to the gene donor or to material containing the allergen that was matched in sequence. While some scientists and regulators have suggested using animal models, performing broadly targeted serum IgE testing or extensive pre- or post-market clinical tests, current evidence does not support these tests as being predictive or practical. Based on the evidence to date, the current assessment process has worked well to prevent the unintended introduction of allergens in commercial GM crops.

  12. Effect of Modifiable Risk Factors on Preterm Birth: A Population Based-Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengyel, Candice S; Ehrlich, Shelley; Iams, Jay D; Muglia, Louis J; DeFranco, Emily A

    2017-04-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study is to evaluate the prevalence, impact, and interaction of short interpregnancy interval (IPI), pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) category, and pregnancy weight gain (PWG) on the rate of preterm birth. Methods This is a population-based retrospective cohort study using vital statistics birth records from 2006 to 2011 in OH, US, analyzing singleton live births to multiparous mothers with recorded IPI (n = 393,441). Preterm birth rate at preterm birth rate of 7.6 % for this group. Short IPIs of preterm birth rate to 12.9 and 10.4 %, respectively. Low PWG compared to IOM recommendations for pre-pregnancy BMI class was also associated with increased preterm birth rate of 13.2 % for all BMI classes combined. However, the highest rate of preterm birth of 25.2 % occurred in underweight women with short IPI and inadequate weight gain with adjOR 3.44 (95 % CI 2.80, 4.23). The fraction of preterm births observed in this cohort that can be attributed to short IPIs is 5.9 %, long IPIs is 8.3 %, inadequate PWG is 7.5 %, and low pre-pregnancy BMI is 2.2 %. Conclusions Our analysis indicates that a significant proportion of preterm births in Ohio are associated with potentially modifiable risk factors. These data suggest public health initiatives focused on preterm birth prevention could include counseling and interventions to optimize preconception health and prenatal nutrition.

  13. 3-D nasal cultures: Systems toxicological assessment of a candidate modified-risk tobacco product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskandar, Anita R; Mathis, Carole; Martin, Florian; Leroy, Patrice; Sewer, Alain; Majeed, Shoaib; Kuehn, Diana; Trivedi, Keyur; Grandolfo, Davide; Cabanski, Maciej; Guedj, Emmanuel; Merg, Celine; Frentzel, Stefan; Ivanov, Nikolai V; Peitsch, Manuel C; Hoeng, Julia

    2017-01-01

    In vitro toxicology approaches have evolved from a focus on molecular changes within a cell to understanding of toxicity-related mechanisms in systems that can mimic the in vivo environment. The recent development of three dimensional (3-D) organotypic nasal epithelial culture models offers a physiologically robust system for studying the effects of exposure through inhalation. Exposure to cigarette smoke (CS) is associated with nasal inflammation; thus, the nasal epithelium is relevant for evaluating the pathophysiological impact of CS exposure. The present study investigated further the application of in vitro human 3-D nasal epithelial culture models for toxicological assessment of inhalation exposure. Aligned with 3Rs strategy, this study aimed to explore the relevance of a human 3-D nasal culture model to assess the toxicological impact of aerosols generated from a candidate modified risk tobacco product (cMRTP), the Tobacco Heating System (THS) 2.2, as compared with smoke generated from reference cigarette 3R4F. A series of experimental repetitions, where multiple concentrations of THS2.2 aerosol and 3R4F smoke were applied, were conducted to obtain reproducible measurements to understand the cellular/molecular changes that occur following exposure. In agreement with "Toxicity Testing in the 21st Century - a Vision and a Strategy", this study implemented a systems toxicology approach and found that for all tested concentrations the impact of 3R4F smoke was substantially greater than that of THS2.2 aerosol in terms of cytotoxicity levels, alterations in tissue morphology, secretion of pro-inflammatory mediators, impaired ciliary function, and increased perturbed transcriptomes and miRNA expression profiles.

  14. Pre-operative urinary tract infection: is it a risk factor for early surgical site infection with hip fracture surgery? A retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassa, Rafik Rd; Khalfaoui, Mahdi Y; Veravalli, Karunakar; Evans, D Alun

    2017-03-01

    The aims of the current study were to determine whether pre-operative urinary tract infections in patients presenting acutely with neck of femur fractures resulted in a delay to surgery and whether such patients were at increased risk of developing post-operative surgical site infections. A retrospective review of all patients presenting with a neck of femur fracture, at a single centre over a one-year period. The hospital hip fracture database was used as the main source of data. UK University Teaching Hospital. All patients (n = 460) presenting across a single year study period with a confirmed hip fracture. The presence of pre-operative urinary tract infection, the timing of surgical intervention, the occurrence of post-operative surgical site infection and the pathogens identified. A total of 367 patients were operated upon within 24 hours of admission. Urinary infections were the least common cause of delay. A total of 99 patients (21.5%) had pre-operative urinary tract infection. Post-operatively, a total of 57 (12.4%) patients developed a surgical site infection. Among the latter, 31 (54.4%) did not have a pre-operative urinary infection, 23 (40.4%) patients had a pre-operative urinary tract infection, 2 had chronic leg ulcers and one patient had a pre-operative chest infection. Statistically, there was a strong relationship between pre-operative urinary tract infection and the development of post-operative surgical site infection (p-value: 0.0005). The results of our study indicate that pre-operative urinary tract infection has a high prevalence amongst those presenting with neck of femur fractures, and this is a risk factor for the later development of post-operative surgical site infection.

  15. Groundwater vulnerability and pollution risk assessment of porous aquifers to nitrate: Modifying the DRASTIC method using quantitative parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazakis, Nerantzis; Voudouris, Konstantinos S.

    2015-06-01

    In the present study the DRASTIC method was modified to estimate vulnerability and pollution risk of porous aquifers to nitrate. The qualitative parameters of aquifer type, soil and impact of the vadose zone were replaced with the quantitative parameters of aquifer thickness, nitrogen losses from soil and hydraulic resistance. Nitrogen losses from soil were estimated based on climatic, soil and topographic data using indices produced by the GLEAMS model. Additionally, the class range of each parameter and the final index were modified using nitrate concentration correlation with four grading methods (natural breaks, equal interval, quantile and geometrical intervals). For this reason, seventy-seven (77) groundwater samples were collected and analyzed for nitrate. Land uses were added to estimate the pollution risk to nitrates. The two new methods, DRASTIC-PA and DRASTIC-PAN, were then applied in the porous aquifer of Anthemountas basin together with the initial versions of DRASTIC and the LOSN-PN index. The two modified methods displayed the highest correlations with nitrate concentrations. The two new methods provided higher discretisation of the vulnerability and pollution risk, whereas the high variance of the (ANOVA) F statistic confirmed the increase of the average concentrations of NO3-, increasing from low to high between the vulnerability and pollution risk classes. The importance of the parameters of hydraulic resistance of the vadose zone, aquifer thickness and land use was confirmed by single-parameter sensitivity analysis.

  16. Surgical Lasers In Gynecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellhas, Helmut F.; Barnes, Alfonso E.

    1982-12-01

    Multipurpose surgical CO2 lasers marketed in the USA have been developed to be applicable to a variety of surgical procedures in many surgical fields. They are all suited for endoscopic surgical procedures and can be fitted to all standard surgical microscopes. They all can adjust the focal length of the laser beam to the different standard focal lengths of the surgical microscope which for instance in laryngoscopy is 400 mm and in colposcopy 300 mm. One laser instrument can even change the spot size in a given focal distance which is very advantageous for some microsurgical procedures (Merrimack Laboratories 820). All multipurpose surgical CO2 laser systems provide a multi-articulated surgical arm for free-hand surgery. The surgical arms are cumbersome to use but they are adapted to the surgeons needs with ingenuity. The practicality of the multi-articulated surgical arms depends mostly on the distance of the handpiece from the surgical console which now is also overbridged by the laser tube in most surgical laser system. The spot size of the beam is variable in most handpieces by interchangeable lenses which modify the focal distance of the beam and the power density. Another common feature in all systems is a coaxial He-Ne pilot light which provides a red spot which unfortunately becomes invisible in a bleeding surgical field. Most surgical laser systems have a spacial mode of TEM 00 which is essential for incisional surgery. The continuous mode of beam delivery is used for incisional surgery and also for most endoscopic procedures.

  17. Surgical Assisting

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Insert and remove Foley urinary bladder catheter Place pneumatic tourniquet Confirm procedure with surgeon Drape patient within ... Technology and Surgical Assisting (NBSTSA) offers the CertifiedSurgical First Assistant (CSFA) credential, and the National Surgical Assistant ...

  18. Analysis of risk factors for loss of lumbar lordosis in patients who had surgical treatment with segmental instrumentation for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trobisch, Per D; Samdani, Amer F; Betz, Randal R; Bastrom, Tracey; Pahys, Joshua M; Cahill, Patrick J

    2013-06-01

    Iatrogenic flattening of lumbar lordosis in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) was a major downside of first generation instrumentation. Current instrumentation systems allow a three-dimensional scoliosis correction, but flattening of lumbar lordosis remains a significant problem which is associated with decreased health-related quality of life. This study sought to identify risk factors for loss of lumbar lordosis in patients who had surgical correction of AIS with the use of segmental instrumentation. Patients were included if they had surgical correction for AIS with segmental pedicle screw instrumentation Lenke type 1 or 2 and if they had a minimum follow-up of 24 months. Two groups were created, based on the average loss of lumbar lordosis. The two groups were then compared and multivariate analysis was performed to identify parameters that correlated to loss of lumbar lordosis. Four hundred and seventeen patients were analyzed for this study. The average loss of lumbar lordosis at 24 months follow-up was an increase of 10° lordosis for group 1 and a decrease of 15° for group 2. Risk factors for loss of lumbar lordosis included a high preoperative lumbar lordosis, surgical decrease of thoracic kyphosis, and the particular operating surgeon. The lowest instrumented vertebra or spinopelvic parameters were two of many parameters that did not seem to influence loss of lumbar lordosis. This study identified important risk factors for decrease of lumbar lordosis in patients who had surgical treatment for AIS with segmental pedicle screw instrumentation, including a high preoperative lumbar lordosis, surgical decrease of thoracic kyphosis, and factors attributable to a particular operating surgeon that were not quantified in this study.

  19. Metric properties of the "timed get up and go- modified version" test, in risk assessment of falls in active women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonso Mora, Margareth Lorena

    2017-03-30

    To analyse the metric properties of the Timed Get up and Go-Modified Version Test (TGUGM), in risk assessment of falls in a group of physically active women. A sample was constituted by 202 women over 55 years of age, were assessed through a crosssectional study. The TGUGM was applied to assess their fall risk. The test was analysed by comparison of the qualitative and quantitative information and by factor analysis. The development of a logistic regression model explained the risk of falls according to the test components. The TGUGM was useful for assessing the risk of falls in the studied group. The test revealed two factors: the Get Up and the Gait with dual task. Less than twelve points in the evaluation or runtimes higher than 35 seconds was associated with high risk of falling. More than 35 seconds in the test indicated a risk fall probability greater than 0.50. Also, scores less than 12 points were associated with a delay of 7 seconds more in the execution of the test (p= 0.0016). Factor analysis of TGUGM revealed two dimensions that can be independent predictors of risk of falling: The Get up that explains between 64% and 87% of the risk of falling, and the Gait with dual task, that explains between 77% and 95% of risk of falling.

  20. In-hospital Surgical Delay Does Not Increase the Risk for Perforated Appendicitis in Children: A Single-center Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almström, Markus; Svensson, Jan F; Patkova, Barbora; Svenningsson, Anna; Wester, Tomas

    2017-03-01

    To investigate the correlation between in-hospital surgical delay before appendectomy for suspected appendicitis and the finding of perforated appendicitis in children. All children undergoing acute appendectomy for suspected acute appendicitis at Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden from 2006 to 2013 were reviewed for the exposure of surgical delay. Primary endpoint was the histopathologic finding of perforated appendicitis. The main explanatory variable was in-hospital surgical delay, using surgery within 12 hours as reference. Secondary endpoints were postoperative wound infection, intra-abdominal abscess, reoperation, length of hospital stay, and readmission. To adjust for selection bias, a logistic regression model was created to estimate odds ratios for the main outcome measures. Missing data were replaced using multiple imputation. The study comprised 2756 children operated for acute appendicitis. Six hundred sixty-one (24.0%) had a histopathologic diagnosis of perforated appendicitis. In the multivariate logistic regression analysis, increased time to surgery was not associated with increased risk of histopathologic perforation. There was no association between the timing of surgery and postoperative wound infection, intra-abdominal abscess, reoperation, or readmission. In-hospital delay of acute appendectomy in children was not associated with an increased rate of histopathologic perforation. Timing of surgery was not an independent risk factor for postoperative complications. The results were not dependent on the magnitude of the surgical delay. The findings are analogous with previous findings in adults and may aid the utilization of available hospital- and operative resources.

  1. Smoking modifies the associated increased risk of future cardiovascular disease by genetic variation on chromosome 9p21.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Hamrefors

    Full Text Available AIMS: Genetic predisposition for cardiovascular disease (CVD is likely to be modified by environmental exposures. We tested if the associated risk of CVD and CVD-mortality by the single nucleotide polymorphism rs4977574 on chromosome 9p21 is modified by life-style factors. METHODS AND RESULTS: A total of 24,944 middle-aged subjects (62% females from the population-based Malmö-Diet-and-Cancer-Cohort were genotyped. Smoking, education and physical activity-levels were recorded. Subjects were followed for 15 years for incidence of coronary artery disease (CAD; N = 2309, ischemic stroke (N = 1253 and CVD-mortality (N = 1156. Multiplicative interactions between rs4977574 and life-style factors on endpoints were tested in Cox-regression-models. We observed an interaction between rs4977574 and smoking on incident CAD (P = 0.035 and CVD-mortality (P = 0.012. The hazard ratios (HR per risk allele of rs4977574 were highest in never smokers (N = 9642 for CAD (HR = 1.26; 95% CI 1.13-1.40; P<0.001 and for CVD-mortality (HR = 1.40; 95% CI 1.20-1.63; P<0.001, whereas the risk increase by rs4977574 was attenuated in current smokers (N = 7000 for both CAD (HR = 1.05; 95%CI 0.95-1.16; P = 0.326 and CVD-mortality (HR = 1.08; 95%CI 0.94-1.23; P = 0.270. A meta-analysis supported the finding that the associated increased risk of CAD by the risk-allele was attenuated in smokers. Neither education nor physical activity-levels modified the associated risk of CAD, ischemic stroke and CVD mortality conferred by rs4977574. CONCLUSION: Smoking may modify the associated risk of CAD and CVD-mortality conferred by genetic variation on chromosome 9p21. Whether the observed attenuation of the genetic risk reflects a pathophysiological mechanism or is a result of smoking being such a strong risk-factor that it may eliminate the associated genetic effect, requires further investigation.

  2. Effect of diet- and lifestyle-based metabolic risk-modifying interventions on preeclampsia: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Rebecca; Rogozinska, Ewelina; Sivarajasingam, Priya; Khan, Khalid S; Thangaratinam, Shakila

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the effect of dietary and lifestyle interventions with the potential to modify metabolic risk factors on the risk of preeclampsia. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane from inception until February 2013. Randomized trials in pregnant women evaluating the effect of dietary and lifestyle interventions with the potential to modify metabolic risks such as obesity, hyperlipidemia, hyperglycemia and hypertension on the risk of preeclampsia were included. Two independent reviewers selected studies, extracted data and assessed quality. Results were summarized as pooled relative risks (RR) for dichotomous data. Eighteen studies (8712 women) met our search criteria for inclusion. Six studies evaluated diet (2695 women), six studied mixed interventions with diet, physical activity and lifestyle (1438 women) and six assessed essential fatty acid supplementation (4579 women). The interventions overall reduced the risk of preeclampsia (RR 0.81, 95% CI 0.69-0.94; p = 0.006 I(2) = 0%) compared with the control group. Dietary interventions reduced the risk of preeclampsia by 33% (RR 0.67, 95% CI 0.53-0.85; p = 0.001; I(2) = 0%). There was no reduction in the risk of preeclampsia with mixed interventions (RR 0.93, 95% CI 0.66-1.32, p = 0.68, I(2) = 0%) or fatty acid supplementation (RR 0.92, 95% CI 0.71-1.18; p = 0.49, I(2) = 15%). Meta-regression showed a borderline impact of gestational diabetes status (p = 0.05) on the observed effect. Dietary and lifestyle interventions have the potential to reduce the risk of preeclampsia. The effect of additional therapeutic interventions in women with gestational diabetes mellitus on preeclampsia is not known. © 2014 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  3. Predicting the risk of death following coronary artery bypass graft made simple: a retrospective study using the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Paul J; Carter, Timothy I; Burack, Joshua H; Tam, Sophia; Alfonso, Antonio; Sugiyama, Gainosuke

    2015-04-29

    Risk models to predict 30-day mortality following isolated coronary artery bypass graft is an active area of research. Simple risk predictors are particularly important for cardiothoracic surgeons who are coming under increased scrutiny since these physicians typically care for higher risk patients and thus expect worse outcomes. The objective of this study was to develop a 30-day postoperative mortality risk model for patients undergoing CABG using the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database. Data was extracted and analyzed from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Participant Use Files (2005-2010). Patients that had ischemic heart disease (ICD9 410-414) undergoing one to four vessel CABG (CPT 33533-33536) were selected. To select for acquired heart disease, only patients age 40 and older were included. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to create a risk model. The C-statistic and the Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit test were used to evaluate the model. Bootstrap-validated C-statistic was calculated. A total of 2254 cases met selection criteria. Forty-nine patients (2.2%) died within 30 days. Six independent risk factors predictive of short-term mortality were identified including age, preoperative sodium, preoperative blood urea nitrogen, previous percutaneous coronary intervention, dyspnea at rest, and history of prior myocardial infarction. The C-statistic for this model was 0.773 while the bootstrap-validated C-statistic was 0.750. The Hosmer-Lemeshow test had a p-value of 0.675, suggesting the model does not overfit the data. The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program risk model has good discrimination for 30-day mortality following coronary artery bypass graft surgery. The model employs six independent variables, making it easy to use in the clinical setting.

  4. Risks and benefits of genetically modified maize donations to southern Africa: views from Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muula, Adamson S; Mfutso-Bengo, Joseph M

    2003-02-01

    In 2001 and 2002, many countries in the Southern African Development Community (SADC) have suffered from severe food shortages resulting in an estimated 14 million people facing starvation due to inadequate quantities of the staple maize. The international community's response has been the donation of foodstuffs, including genetically modified maize. Reactions of the recipient countries of Zambia, Zimbabwe, and Malawi have been different. Zambia appealed to the donors not to send genetically modified maize, whereas Malawi accepted the maize donations. Malawi is currently facing many public health challenges because 10% of its 10-million population is HIV-positive, maternal mortality rate has almost doubled between 1992 and 2000, and there are also an estimated 1 million orphans due to HIV/AIDS. In the European Union, genetically modified maize falls under "Novel Foods" and its marketing and distribution are strictly regulated by law. This has never been the case in the southern African countries. In this article, we discuss the ethical challenges associated with genetically modified maize donations to southern Africa. Although genetically modified food offers a way to avoid many adverse effects of food shortages, we believe that some of the ethical questions of genetically modified food donations should be solved first, under the leadership of the donor countries and partnership of the developing countries. There are fears that consummation of genetically modified maize could have adverse health effects. These fears must be addressed if the confidence of developing countries in the donor community is to be maintained.

  5. Risk Factors for Local and Distant Recurrence After Surgical Treatment in Patients With Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziedzic, Dariusz Adam; Rudzinski, Piotr; Langfort, Renata; Orlowski, Tadeusz

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify independent perioperative and pathologic variables associated with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) recurrence after complete surgical resection. A retrospective examination was performed of a prospectively maintained database of patients who underwent resection for NSCLC from January 2009 to January 2014 at a multi-institution. Clinicopathologic variables were evaluated for their influence on frequency of recurrence. Cox proportional regression hazard model analysis examined the association of recurrence in NSCLC. Of these patients, 2816 (19.3%) experienced recurrence of primary cancer. Local or distant recurrence was found in 20.5% and 79.5% of patients, respectively. Median follow-up was 27.9 months (range, 11.4-66.0 months). The analysis indicated independent effects of the following risk factors on the risk of recurrence: age 64-90 years (hazard ratio [HR], 1.136; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.024-1.261), histologic type adenocarcinoma (HR, 1.117; 95% CI 1.005-1.24), blood vessel invasion (HR, 1.236; 95% CI, 1.124-1.359), lymphatic vessel invasion (HR, 1.287; 95% CI, 1.176-1.409), visceral pleural invasion (HR, 1.641; 95% CI, 1.215-2.218), N1 disease (HR, 1.142; 95% CI, 0.99-1.316), N2 disease (HR, 1.596; 95% CI, 1.271-1.649), tumor size of 20-30 mm (HR, 1.235; 95% CI, 1.081-1.41), 30-50 mm (HR, 1.544; 95% CI, 1.33-1.792), 50-70 mm (HR, 1.521; 95% CI, 1.275-1.815), and 70-100 mm (HR, 1.71; 95% CI, 1.385-2.11), pneumonectomy (HR, 1.08; 95% CI, 0.97-1.203), and sublobar resection (HR, 1.762; 95% CI, 1.537-2.019). In the largest series reported to date on postresection recurrence of NSCLC, increasing pathologic stage, advanced age, pneumonectomy, sublobar resection, lymphatic and blood vessel invasion, and visceral pleural invasion were independently associated with local and distant recurrence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluating levels and health risk of heavy metals in exposed workers from surgical instrument manufacturing industries of Sialkot, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junaid, Muhammad; Hashmi, Muhammad Zaffar; Malik, Riffat Naseem

    2016-09-01

    The study aimed to monitor heavy metal (chromium, Cr; cadmium, Cd; nickel, Ni; copper, Cu; lead, Pb; iron, Fe; manganese, Mn; and zinc, Zn) footprints in biological matrices (urine, whole blood, saliva, and hair), as well as in indoor industrial dust samples, and their toxic effects on oxidative stress and health risks in exposed workers. Overall, blood, urine, and saliva samples exhibited significantly higher concentrations of toxic metals in exposed workers (Cr; blood 16.30 μg/L, urine 58.15 μg/L, saliva 5.28 μg/L) than the control samples (Cr; blood 5.48 μg/L, urine 4.47 μg/L, saliva 2.46 μg/L). Indoor industrial dust samples also reported to have elevated heavy metal concentrations, as an example, Cr quantified with concentration of 299 mg/kg of dust, i.e., more than twice the level of Cr in household dust (136 mg/kg). Superoxide dismutase (SOD) level presented significant positive correlation (p ≤ 0.01) with Cr, Zn, and Cd (Cr > Zn > Cd) which is an indication of heavy metal's associated raised oxidative stress in exposed workers. Elevated average daily intake (ADI) of heavy metals resulted in cumulative hazard quotient (HQ) range of 2.97-18.88 in workers of different surgical units; this is an alarming situation of health risk implications. Principal component analysis-multiple linear regression (PCA-MLR)-based pie charts represent that polishing and cutting sections exhibited highest metal inputs to the biological and environmental matrices than other sources. Heavy metal concentrations in biological matrices and dust samples showed a significant positive correlation between Cr in dust, urine, and saliva samples. Current study will help to generate comprehensive base line data of heavy metal status in biomatrices and dust from scientifically ignored industrial sector. Our findings can play vital role for health departments and industrial environmental management system (EMS) authorities in policy making and implementation.

  7. CORRECTION OF POTENTIALLY MODIFIED RISK FACTORS IN THE HEMODIALYSIS : STANDARDS OF TREATMENT AND INDIVIDUALISED PROGRAMS OF DIALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. L. Kuchma

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In the effect prognosis of dialysis a possible adjustment of the modified potential death risk factors of patients who are on renal replacement therapy by hemodialysis techniques are discussed. The conclusions about the possibility of modern dialysis techniques to effectively influence on arterial hypertension of patients with chronic kidney disease stage 5 - D and the need for further study in order to develop treatment standards using mathematical models for individualised dialysis programs.

  8. Pattern of normal age-related regional differences in white matter microstructure is modified by vascular risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Kristen M; Raz, Naftali

    2009-11-10

    Even successful aging is associated with regional brain shrinkage and deterioration of the cerebral white matter. Aging also brings about an increase in vascular risk, and vascular impairment may be a potential mechanism behind the observed patterns of aging. The goals of this study were to characterize the normal age differences in white matter integrity in several brain regions across the adult life span and to assess the modifying effect of vascular risk on the observed pattern of regional white matter integrity. We estimated fractional anisotropy and diffusivity of white matter in nine cerebral regions of interest in 77 healthy adults (19-84 years old). There was a widespread reduction of white matter anisotropy with age, and prefrontal and occipital regions evidenced the greatest age-related differences. Diffusivity increased with age, and the magnitude of age differences increased beginning with the middle of the fifth decade. Vascular risk factors modified age differences in white matter integrity. Clinically diagnosed and treated arterial hypertension was associated with reduced white matter anisotropy and increased diffusivity beyond the effects of age. In the normotensive participants, elevation of arterial pulse pressure (a surrogate of arterial stiffness) was linked to deterioration of the white matter integrity in the frontal regions. Although the causal role of vascular risk in brain aging is unclear, the observed pattern of effects suggests that vascular risk may drive the expansion of age-related white matter damage from anterior to posterior regions.

  9. Logistic Regression Analysis and Nursing Interven-tions for High-risk Factors for Pressure Sores in Pa-tients in a Surgical Intensive Care Unit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-Ran Wang∗; Bin-Ru Han

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the risk factors related to the development of pressure sores in critically ill surgical patients and to establish a basis for the formulation of effective precautions. Methods: A questionnaire regarding the factors for pressure sores in critically ill surgical patients was created using a case control study with reference to the pertinent literature. After being exam-ined and validated by experts, the questionnaire was used to collect data about critically ill surgical patients in a grade A tertiary hospital. Among the 47 patients enrolled into the study, the 14 who developed nosocomial pressure sores were allocated to the pressure sore group, and the remaining 33 patients who met the inclusion criteria and did not exhibit pressure sores were allocated to the control group. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were employed to examine the differences in 22 indicators between the two groups in an attempt to identify the risk factors for pressure sores. Results: According to the univariate analyses, the maximum value of lactic acid in the arterial blood, the number of days of norepinephrine use, the number of days of mechanical ventilation, the number of days of blood purification, and the number of days of bowel incontinence were sta-tistically greater in the pressure sore group than in the control group ( P Conclusions: The best method for preventing and control pressure sores in surgical critically ill patients is to strongly emphasize the duration of the critical status and to give special attention to patients in a continuous state of shock. The adoption of measures specific to high-risk patient groups and risk factors, including the active control of primary diseases and the application of de-compression measures during the treatment of the patients, are helpful for improving the quality of care in the prevention and control of pressure sores in critically ill patients.

  10. Testicular neoplasia in undescended testes of cryptorchid boys-does surgical strategy have an impact on the risk of invasive testicular neoplasia?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortes, Dina; Thorup, Jorgen; Petersen, Bodil Laub

    2004-01-01

    UNLABELLED: We investigated whether or not surgical strategy has an impact on the risk of invasive testicular neoplasia in cases of cryptorchidism. We made a database study of the incidence of testicular neoplasia at surgery for cryptorchidism in childhood, and evaluated if such abnormalities were...... other than cryptorchidism, or diagnosed abnormal karyotype, versus no case in the 1281 patients without these characteristics (Fisher's exact test, p ... (Fisher's exact test, p

  11. Risk factors of positive surgical margin and biochemical recurrence of patients treated with radical prostatectomy:a single-center 10-year report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Kin; LI Hong; YANG Yong; Ian Lap-hong; Pun Wai-hong; Ho Son-fat

    2011-01-01

    Background Many studies have shown that positive surgical margin and biochemical recurrence could impact the life of patients with prostate cancer treated with radical prostatectomy. With more and more patients with prostate cancer appeared in recent 20 years in China,it is necessary to investigate the risk of positive surgical margin and biochemical recurrence,and their possible impact on the prognosis of patients treated with radical prostatectomy. In this study,we analyzed the characteristics of patients with prostate cancer who had undergone radical prostatectomy in Macau area and tried to find any risk factor of positive surgical margin and biochemical recurrence and their relationship with the prognosis of these patients.Methods From 2000 to 2009,149 patients with prostate cancer received radical prostatectomy and were followed up.Among these patients,111 received retropubic radical prostatectomies,38 received laparoscopic radical prostatectomies.All patients were followed-up on in the 3rd month,6th month and from that point on every 6 months after operation. At each follow-up a detailed record of any complaint,serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA),full biochemical test and uroflowmetry was acquired.Results The average age was (69.0±6.1) years,preoperative average serum PSA was (10.1 ±12.1) ng/ml and average Gleason score was 6.4±1.3. The incidence of total complications was about 47.7%,the incidence of the most common complication,bladder outlet obstruction,was about 26.8%,and that of the second most common complication,urinary stress incontinence,was about 16.1% (mild 9.4% and severe 6.7%). The incidence of positive surgical margin was about 38.3%. The preoperative serum PSA ((13.4±17.6) ng/ml),average Gleason score (7.1±1.3) and pathological T stage score (7.0±1.4) were higher in patients with positive surgical margins than those with negative margins ((8.0±5.8) ng/ml,6.0±1.2 and 5.4±1.4,respectively) (P=0.004,P=0.001 and P=0.001,respectively). A

  12. Seroprevalence and modifiable risk factors for Toxocara spp. in Brazilian schoolchildren.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex J F Cassenote

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Toxocariasis is a worldwide helminthic zoonosis caused by infection with the larvae of the ascarid worms that comprise the Toxocara spp. Children are particularly prone to infection because they are exposed to the eggs in sandboxes and playgrounds contaminated with dog and cat feces. Certain behaviors, such as a geophagy habit, poor personal hygiene, a lack of parental supervision, close contact with young dogs, and ingestion of raw meat, as well as gender, age, and socioeconomic status, affect the prevalence of the disease. However, previous studies of the risk factors for toxocariasis have generally produced inconsistent results. An epidemiological cross-sectional study was conducted to evaluate the seroprevalence of IgG anti-Toxocara spp. antibodies and associated factors in schoolchildren from a region in the southeast of Brazil. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A total of 252 schoolchildren aged 1 to 12 years (120 males and 132 females were assessed. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay based on Toxocara canis larval excretory-secretory antigens was used to determine outcomes. A questionnaire was used to collect information on children, family, and home characteristics. Clinical and laboratory data completed the dataset investigated in this study. Seroprevalence was 15.5% (95%CI 11.5-19.8. Geophagy (aPR 2.38 [95%CI 1.36-4.18], p-value 0.029 and the habit of hand washing before meals (aPR 0.04 [95%CI 0.01-0.11], p-value ≤ 0.001 were factors associated with increased and decreased seroprevalence, respectively. The income factor and its related variables lost statistical significance after adjustment with a multiple Poisson regression model. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The current study confirms that toxocariasis is a public health problem in the evaluated area; modifiable factors such as soil contact and personal hygiene appear to have a greater influence on the acquisition of infection than sociodemographic attributes, thus

  13. [Assessment of antibiotic use and impact of an intervention intended to modify the prescribing behavior in surgical prophylaxis in 6hospitals in the metropolitan area of Monterrey, Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios-Saucedo, Gerardo Del Carmen; de la Garza-Camargo, Mauricio; Briones-Lara, Evangelina; Carmona-González, Sandra; García-Cabello, Ricardo; Islas-Esparza, Luis Arturo; Saldaña-Flores, Gustavo; González-Cano, Juan Roberto; González-Ruvalcaba, Román; Valadez-Botello, Francisco Javier; Muñoz-Maldonado, Gerardo Enrique; Montero-Cantú, Carlos Alberto; Díaz-Ramos, Rita Delia; Solórzano-Santos, Fortino

    2017-01-04

    Improper use of antibiotics increases antimicrobial resistance. Evaluate the use of antibiotics and the impact of an intervention designed to improve antibiotic prescription for surgical prophylaxis in 6 hospitals of Monterrey, Mexico. Design: A prospective multicenter survey and a pretest-postest experimental study. Phase 1: Survey to evaluate the use of antibiotics through an especially designed guide. Phase 2: Intervention designed to improve antibiotic prescription for surgical prophylaxis by the medical staff by using printed, audiovisual and electronic messages. Phase 3: Survey to evaluate the impact of the intervention. Frequencies, percentages, medians, ranges and X(2) test. Phase 1: We evaluated 358 surgical patients, 274 prophylactic antibiotic regimens. A total of 96% of antibiotics regimens began with inappropriate timing (290/302), 82.8% were inappropriate regimens (274/331), 77.7% were in inappropriate dosage (230/296), 86% of inadequate length (241/280), and in 17.4% restricted antibiotics were used (52/299). Phase 2: 9 sessions including 189 physicians (14 department chairs, 58 general practitioners and 117 residents). Phase 3: We evaluated 303 surgical patients, 218 prophylactic antibiotics regimens. Inappropriate treatment commencement was reduced to 84.1% (180/214) (P<0.001), inappropriate regimens to 75.3% (162/215) (P=0.03), inappropriate dosages to 51.2% (110/215) (P<0.001), and use of restricted antibiotics to 8.3% (18/215) (P=0.003). Inappropriate use of prophylactic antibiotics in surgery is a frequent problem in Monterrey. The intervention improved the antibiotic prescription for surgical prophylaxis by reducing inappropriate treatment commencement, regimens, dosages, and overuse of restricted antibiotics. It is necessary to strengthen strategies to improve the prescription of antibiotics in surgical prophylaxis. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  14. Epidemiological Investigation of Lifestyle Associated Modifiable Risk Factors among Medical Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anurag Srivastava

    2013-06-01

    Conclusion: The study shows a high prevalence of NCD related risk factors in medical students. Primary prevention may be one way to lower the risk burden of NCDs. [Natl J Med Res 2013; 3(3.000: 210-215

  15. Is there an increased risk of post-operative surgical site infection after orthopaedic surgery in HIV patients? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kigera, James W M; Straetemans, Masja; Vuhaka, Simplice K; Nagel, Ingeborg M; Naddumba, Edward K; Boer, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    There is dilemma as to whether patients infected with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) requiring implant orthopaedic surgery are at an increased risk for post-operative surgical site infection (SSI). We conducted a systematic review to determine the effect of HIV on the risk of post-operative SSI and sought to determine if this risk is altered by antibiotic use beyond 24 hours. We searched electronic databases, manually searched citations from relevant articles, and reviewed conference proceedings. The risk of postoperative SSI was pooled using Mantel-Haenszel method. We identified 18 cohort studies with 16 mainly small studies, addressing the subject. The pooled risk ratio of infection in the HIV patients when compared to non-HIV patients was 1.8 (95% Confidence Interval [CI] 1.3-2.4), in studies in Africa this was 2.3 (95% CI 1.5-3.5). In a sensitivity analysis the risk ratio was reduced to 1.4 (95% CI 0.5-3.8). The risk ratio of infection in patients receiving prolonged antibiotics compared to patients receiving antibiotics for up to 24 hours was 0.7 (95% CI 0.1-4.2). The results may indicate an increased risk in HIV infected patients but these results are not robust and inconclusive after conducting the sensitivity analysis removing poor quality studies. There is need for larger good quality studies to provide conclusive evidence. To better develop surgical protocols, further studies should determine the effect of reduced CD4 counts, viral load suppression and prolonged antibiotics on the risk for infection.

  16. Modifiable risk factors predicting major depressive disorder at four year follow-up: a decision tree approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christensen Helen

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Relative to physical health conditions such as cardiovascular disease, little is known about risk factors that predict the prevalence of depression. The present study investigates the expected effects of a reduction of these risks over time, using the decision tree method favoured in assessing cardiovascular disease risk. Methods The PATH through Life cohort was used for the study, comprising 2,105 20-24 year olds, 2,323 40-44 year olds and 2,177 60-64 year olds sampled from the community in the Canberra region, Australia. A decision tree methodology was used to predict the presence of major depressive disorder after four years of follow-up. The decision tree was compared with a logistic regression analysis using ROC curves. Results The decision tree was found to distinguish and delineate a wide range of risk profiles. Previous depressive symptoms were most highly predictive of depression after four years, however, modifiable risk factors such as substance use and employment status played significant roles in assessing the risk of depression. The decision tree was found to have better sensitivity and specificity than a logistic regression using identical predictors. Conclusion The decision tree method was useful in assessing the risk of major depressive disorder over four years. Application of the model to the development of a predictive tool for tailored interventions is discussed.

  17. Modifiable lifestyle and social factors affect chronic kidney disease in high-risk individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunkler, Daniela; Kohl, Maria; Heinze, Georg; Teo, Koon K; Rosengren, Annika; Pogue, Janice; Gao, Peggy; Gerstein, Hertzel; Yusuf, Salim; Oberbauer, Rainer; Mann, Johannes F E

    2015-04-01

    This observational study examined the association between modifiable lifestyle and social factors on the incidence and progression of early chronic kidney disease (CKD) among those with type 2 diabetes. All 6972 people from the Ongoing Telmisartan Alone and in Combination with Ramipril Global Endpoint Trial (ONTARGET) with diabetes but without macroalbuminuria were studied. CKD progression was defined as decline in GFR of more than 5% per year, progression to end-stage renal disease, microalbuminuria, or macroalbuminuria at 5.5 years. Lifestyle/social factors included tobacco and alcohol use, physical activity, stress, financial worries, the size of the social network and education. Adjustments were made for known risks such as age, diabetes duration, GFR, albuminuria, gender, body mass index, blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin-receptor blockers use. Competing risk of death was considered. At study end, 31% developed CKD and 15% had died. The social network score (SNS) was a significant independent risk factor of CKD and death, reducing the risk by 11 and 22% when comparing the third to the first tertile of the SNS (odds ratios of CKD 0.89 and death 0.78). Education showed a significant association with CKD but stress and financial worries did not. Those with moderate alcohol consumption had a significantly decreased CKD risk compared with nonusers. Regular physical activity significantly decreased the risk of CKD. Thus, lifestyle is a determinant of kidney health in people at high cardiovascular risk with diabetes.

  18. Problem formulation and hypothesis testing for environmental risk assessments of genetically modified crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raybould, Alan

    2006-01-01

    Environmental risk assessments can provide high confidence of minimal risk by testing theories, "risk hypotheses", that predict the likelihood of unacceptable harmful events. The creation of risk hypotheses and a plan to test them is called problem formulation. Effective problem formulation seeks to maximize the possibility of detecting effects that indicate potential risk; if such effects are not detected, minimal risk is indicated with high confidence. Two important implications are that artificial test conditions can increase confidence, whereas prescriptive data requirements can reduce confidence (increase uncertainty) if they constrain problem formulation. Poor problem formulation can increase environmental risk because it leads to the collection of superfluous data that may delay or prevent the introduction of environmentally beneficial products.

  19. Global and regional effects of potentially modifiable risk factors associated with acute stroke in 32 countries (INTERSTROKE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Donnell, Martin J; Chin, Siu Lim; Rangarajan, Sumathy

    2016-01-01

    -based or community-based individuals with no history of stroke, and were matched with cases, recruited in a 1:1 ratio, for age and sex. All participants completed a clinical assessment and were requested to provide blood and urine samples. Odds ratios (OR) and their population attributable risks (PARs) were......BACKGROUND: Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability, especially in low-income and middle-income countries. We sought to quantify the importance of potentially modifiable risk factors for stroke in different regions of the world, and in key populations and primary pathological subtypes...... to 97·4% in southeast Asia), sex (90·6% in men and in women), and age groups (92·2% in patients aged ≤55 years, 90·0% in patients aged >55 years). We observed regional variations in the importance of individual risk factors, which were related to variations in the magnitude of ORs (rather than direction...

  20. The effectiveness of surgical correction of uterine prolapse: cervical amputation with uterosacral ligament plication (modified Manchester) versus vaginal hysterectomy with high uterosacral ligament plication.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, T.A. de; Milani, A.L.; Kluivers, K.B.; Withagen, M.I.J.; Vierhout, M.E.

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: The objective of this study is to evaluate cervical amputation with uterosacral ligament plication (modified Manchester) and compare it to vaginal hysterectomy with high uterosacral ligament plication procedure with special regard to the middle compartment. METHODS:

  1. Evaluation of a candidate breast cancer associated SNP in ERCC4 as a risk modifier in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Results from the consortium of investigators of modifiers of BRCA1/BRCA2 (CIMBA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Osorio (Ana); R.L. Milne (Roger); G. Pita (G.); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); T. Heikinen (Tuomas); J. Simard (Jacques); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); J. Beesley (Jonathan); X.C. Chen (X. C.); S. Healey (Sue); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); Y.C. Ding (Yuan); F.J. Couch (Fergus); X. Wang (Xing); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); M. Barile (Monica); A. Viel (Alessandra); L. Tizzoni (Laura); C. Szabo (Csilla); L. Foretova (Lenka); M. Zikan (Michal); K. Claes (Kathleen); M.H. Greene (Mark); P.L. Mai (Phuong); G. Rennert (Gad); F. Lejbkowicz (Flavio); O. Barnett-Griness (Ofra); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); H. Ozcelik (Hilmi); N. Weerasooriya (Nayana); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); M. Thomassen (Mads); D. Cruger (Dorthe); M.A. Caligo (Maria); E. Friedman (Eitan); B. Kaufman (Bella); Y. Laitman (Yael); S. Cohen (Shimrit); T. Kontorovich (Tair); R. Gershoni-Baruch; E. Dagan (Efrat); H. Jernström (H.); M.S. Askmalm (Marie); B. Arver (Brita Wasteson); B. Malmer (Beatrice); S.M. Domchek (Susan); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); J. Brunet (Joan); T. Ramon Y Cajal; D. Yannoukakos (Drakoulis); U. Hamann (Ute); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); S. Verhoef; E.B.G. Garcíla (E.B. Gómez); J.T. Wijnen (Juul); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); D.F. Easton (Douglas); S. Peock (Susan); M. Cook (Margaret); C.T. Oliver (Clare); D. Frost (Debra); C. Luccarini (Craig); D.G. Evans (Gareth); F. Lalloo (Fiona); R. Eeles (Rosalind); G. Pichert (Gabriella); J. Cook (Jackie); S.V. Hodgson (Shirley); P.J. Morrison (Patrick); F. Douglas (Fiona); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); L. Barjhoux (Laure); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); V. Moncoutier (Virginie); S. Giraud (Sophie); C. Cassini (C.); L. Faivre (Laurence); F. Révillion (Françoise); J.-P. Peyrat; D.W. Muller (Danièle); J.P. Fricker (Jean Pierre); H. Lynch (Henry); E.M. John (Esther); S.S. Buys (Saundra); M.B. Daly (Mary); J.L. Hopper (John); M.-B. Terry (Mary-Beth); A. Miron (Alexander); Y. Yassin (Yosuf); D. Goldgar (David); C.F. Singer (Christian); D. Gschwantler-Kaulich (Daphne); G. Pfeiler (Georg); E. Spiess (Eberhard); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); O.T. Johannson (Oskar); T. Kircchoff (Tomas); K. Offit (Kenneth); K. Kosarin (Kristi); M. Piedmonte (Marion); G.C. Rodriguez (Gustavo); K. Wakeley (Katie); J.F. Boggess (John); J. Basil (Jack); P.E. Schwartz (Peter); S.V. Blank (Stephanie); A.E. Toland (Amanda); M. Montagna (Marco); C. Casella (Cinzia); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); A. Allavena (Anna); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); B. Versmold (Beatrix); C. Engel (Christoph); A. Meindl (Alfons); N. Ditsch (Nina); N. Arnold (Norbert); D. Niederacher (Dieter); H. Deiler (H.); B. Fiebig (Britta); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); D. Schaefer (D.); U.G. Froster (U.); T. Caldes (Trinidad); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); L. McGuffog (Lesley); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); P. Radice (Paolo); J. Benítez (Javier)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground: In this study we aimed to evaluate the role of a SNP in intron 1 of the ERCC4 gene (rs744154), previously reported to be associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer in the general population, as a breast cancer risk modifier in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Methods:

  2. Evaluation of a candidate breast cancer associated SNP in ERCC4 as a risk modifier in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Results from the consortium of investigators of modifiers of BRCA1/BRCA2 (CIMBA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Osorio (Ana); R.L. Milne (Roger); G. Pita (G.); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); T. Heikinen (Tuomas); J. Simard (Jacques); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); J. Beesley (Jonathan); X.C. Chen (X. C.); S. Healey (Sue); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); Y.C. Ding (Yuan); F.J. Couch (Fergus); X. Wang (Xing); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); M. Barile (Monica); A. Viel (Alessandra); L. Tizzoni (Laura); C. Szabo (Csilla); L. Foretova (Lenka); M. Zikan (Michal); K. Claes (Kathleen); M.H. Greene (Mark); P.L. Mai (Phuong); G. Rennert (Gad); F. Lejbkowicz (Flavio); O. Barnett-Griness (Ofra); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); H. Ozcelik (Hilmi); N. Weerasooriya (Nayana); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); M. Thomassen (Mads); D. Cruger (Dorthe); M.A. Caligo (Maria); E. Friedman (Eitan); B. Kaufman (Bella); Y. Laitman (Yael); S. Cohen (Shimrit); T. Kontorovich (Tair); R. Gershoni-Baruch; E. Dagan (Efrat); H. Jernström (H.); M.S. Askmalm (Marie); B. Arver (Brita Wasteson); B. Malmer (Beatrice); S.M. Domchek (Susan); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); J. Brunet (Joan); T. Ramon Y Cajal; D. Yannoukakos (Drakoulis); U. Hamann (Ute); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); S. Verhoef; E.B.G. Garcíla (E.B. Gómez); J.T. Wijnen (Juul); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); D.F. Easton (Douglas); S. Peock (Susan); M. Cook (Margaret); C.T. Oliver (Clare); D. Frost (Debra); C. Luccarini (Craig); D.G. Evans (Gareth); F. Lalloo (Fiona); R. Eeles (Rosalind); G. Pichert (Gabriella); J. Cook (Jackie); S.V. Hodgson (Shirley); P.J. Morrison (Patrick); F. Douglas (Fiona); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); L. Barjhoux (Laure); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); V. Moncoutier (Virginie); S. Giraud (Sophie); C. Cassini (C.); L. Faivre (Laurence); F. Révillion (Françoise); J.-P. Peyrat; D.W. Muller (Danièle); J.P. Fricker (Jean Pierre); H. Lynch (Henry); E.M. John (Esther); S.S. Buys (Saundra); M.B. Daly (Mary); J.L. Hopper (John); M.-B. Terry (Mary-Beth); A. Miron (Alexander); Y. Yassin (Yosuf); D. Goldgar (David); C.F. Singer (Christian); D. Gschwantler-Kaulich (Daphne); G. Pfeiler (Georg); E. Spiess (Eberhard); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); O.T. Johannson (Oskar); T. Kircchoff (Tomas); K. Offit (Kenneth); K. Kosarin (Kristi); M. Piedmonte (Marion); G.C. Rodriguez (Gustavo); K. Wakeley (Katie); J.F. Boggess (John); J. Basil (Jack); P.E. Schwartz (Peter); S.V. Blank (Stephanie); A.E. Toland (Amanda); M. Montagna (Marco); C. Casella (Cinzia); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); A. Allavena (Anna); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); B. Versmold (Beatrix); C. Engel (Christoph); A. Meindl (Alfons); N. Ditsch (Nina); N. Arnold (Norbert); D. Niederacher (Dieter); H. Deiler (H.); B. Fiebig (Britta); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); D. Schaefer (D.); U.G. Froster (U.); T. Caldes (Trinidad); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); L. McGuffog (Lesley); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); P. Radice (Paolo); J. Benítez (Javier)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground: In this study we aimed to evaluate the role of a SNP in intron 1 of the ERCC4 gene (rs744154), previously reported to be associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer in the general population, as a breast cancer risk modifier in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Methods:

  3. Evaluation of a candidate breast cancer associated SNP in ERCC4 as a risk modifier in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/BRCA2 (CIMBA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osorio, A.; Milne, R.L.; Pita, G.

    2009-01-01

    genotyped rs744154 in 9408 BRCA1 and 5632 BRCA2 mutation carriers from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA) and assessed its association with breast cancer risk using a retrospective weighted cohort approach. RESULTS: We found no evidence of association with breast cancer risk...

  4. Modifiable Risk Factors for Marijuana Use Among Adolescents in a Youth Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-08

    thereby reducing the risk of adolescent substance abuse and dependence later in young adulthood [2]. These types of programs usually employ a...development programs to reduce the risk of marijuana use among young people . This study assessed the relationship between drug-related attitudes...Drug Use and Abuse in Adolescence and Young Adulthood: Evidence of Generalized Risk . Drug Alcohol Depend 2009;102:78-87. 2. Creemers, HE, Korhonen, T

  5. RELEVANCE OF CROP BIOLOGY FOR ENVIRONMENTAL RISK ASSESSMENT OF GENETICALLY MODIFIED CROPS IN AFRICA

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge about the crop biology of economic crops in Africa is needed for regulators to accurately review dossiers and conduct comprehensive environmental risk assessments (ERA). This information allows regulators to decide whether biotech crops present a risk to biodiversity, since crossing between domesticated crops and their wild relatives could affect the adaptations of the wild species. The criteria that should be used in the evaluation of African crops for environmental risk assessmen...

  6. Foaling rates and risk factors for abortion in pregnant mares presented for medical or surgical treatment of colic: 153 cases (1993–2005)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenier, Tracey S.; Whitehead, Ashley E.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine foaling rates in mares presented for medical or surgical treatment of colic, and to examine risk factors associated with abortion following colic. A retrospective analysis of 153 medical records found that mares treated surgically for colic (P = 0.0007) were 3.5 times more likely to have a negative pregnancy outcome than were mares treated medically for colic. Anesthetic time (P = 0.01) and intra-operative hypotension (P = 0.03) were significantly associated with negative pregnancy outcome. Mares with an anesthetic time ≥ 3 h were 6 times more likely to abort. Signs of endotoxemia (P = 0.30), hypoxia (P = 0.89), flunixin meglumine administration (P = 0.13), mucous membrane color at the time of presentation (P = 0.82) and capillary refill time (P = 0.76) were not associated with pregnancy outcome. There was no difference in the foaling rate for mares that had received progestin supplementation versus those that had not (P = 0.42). In this study, the significant risk factors for abortion were surgically treated colic, long anesthetic time, and intraoperative hypotension. PMID:19436632

  7. Risk factors for superficial surgical site infection after elective rectal cancer resection: a multivariate analysis of 8880 patients from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Elie; Miyagaki, Hiromichi; Bellini, Geoffrey; Shantha Kumara, H M C; Yan, Xiaohong; Howe, Brett; Feigel, Amanda; Whelan, Richard L

    2017-01-01

    Superficial surgical site infection (sSSI) is one of the most common complications after colorectal resection. The goal of this study was to determine the comorbidities and operative characteristics that place patients at risk for sSSI in patients who underwent rectal cancer resection. The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database was queried (via diagnosis and Current Procedural Terminology codes) for patients with rectal cancer who underwent elective resection between 2005 and 2012. Patients for whom data concerning 27 demographic factors, comorbidities, and operative characteristics were available were eligible. A univariate and multivariate analysis was performed to identify possible risk factors for sSSI. A total of 8880 patients met the entry criteria and were included. sSSIs were diagnosed in 861 (9.7%) patients. Univariate analysis found 14 patients statistically significant risk factors for sSSI. Multivariate analysis revealed the following risk factors: male gender, body mass index (BMI) >30, current smoking, history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), American Society of Anesthesiologists III/IV, abdominoperineal resection (APR), stoma formation, open surgery (versus laparoscopic), and operative time >217 min. The greatest difference in sSSI rates was noted in patients with COPD (18.9 versus 9.5%). Of note, 54.2% of sSSIs was noted after hospital discharge. With regard to the timing of presentation, univariate analysis revealed a statistically significant delay in sSSI presentation in patients with the following factors and/or characteristics: BMI Multivariate analysis suggested that only laparoscopic surgery (versus open) and preoperative RT were risk factors for delay. Rectal cancer resections are associated with a high incidence of sSSIs, over half of which are noted after discharge. Nine patient and operative characteristics, including smoking, BMI, COPD, APR, and open surgery were found to be

  8. Alcohol based surgical prep solution and the risk of fire in the operating room: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Rajiv

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A few cases of fire in the operating room are reported in the literature. The factors that may initiate these fires are many and include alcohol based surgical prep solutions, electrosurgical equipment, flammable drapes etc. We are reporting a case of fire in the operating room while operating on a patient with burst fracture C6 vertebra with quadriplegia. The cause of the fire was due to incomplete drying of the covering drapes with an alcohol based surgical prep solution. This paper discusses potential preventive measures to minimize the incidence of fire in the operating room.

  9. [Food additives and genetically modified food--a risk for allergic patients?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wüthrich, B

    1999-04-01

    Adverse reactions to food and food additives must be classified according to pathogenic criteria. It is necessary to strictly differentiate between an allergy, triggered by a substance-specific immunological mechanism, and an intolerance, in which no specific immune reaction can be established. In contrast to views expressed in the media, by laymen and patients, adverse reactions to additives are less frequent than is believed. Due to frequently "alternative" methods of examination, an allergy to food additives is often wrongly blamed as the cause of a wide variety of symptoms and illness. Diagnosing an allergy or intolerance to additives normally involves carrying out double-blind, placebo-controlled oral provocation tests with food additives. Allergic reactions to food additives occur particularly against additives which are organic in origin. In principle, it is possible that during the manufacture of genetically modified plants and food, proteins are transferred which potentially create allergies. However, legislation exists both in the USA (Federal Drug Administration, FDA) and in Switzerland (Ordinance on the approval process for GM food, GM food additives and GM accessory agents for processing) which require a careful analysis before a genetically modified product is launched, particularly where foreign genes are introduced. Products containing genetically modified organisms (GMO) as additives must be declared. In addition, the source of the foreign protein must be identified. The "Round-up ready" (RR) soya flour introduced in Switzerland is no different from natural soya flour in terms of its allergenic potential. Genetically modified food can be a blessing for allergic individuals if gene technology were to succeed in removing the allergen (e.g. such possibilities exist for rice). The same caution shown towards genetically modified food might also be advisable for foreign food in our diet. Luckily, the immune system of the digestive tract in healthy people

  10. Do parental coronary heart disease risk factors (non-modifiable effect their young ones?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Kumar

    2015-02-01

    Conclusions:: Advancing age may result in changes that could be atherogenic in the future. Such atherogenic changes have already initiated when the subjects are about 21 years old. The incidence of atherogenic changes is far greater when mothers who are having any of the risk factors such as obesity, diabetes, HTN and myocardial infarction than that fathers who are having similar risk factors.

  11. The Media and Genetically Modified Foods : Evidence in Support of Social Amplification of Risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frewer, L.J.; Miles, S.; Marsh, R.

    2002-01-01

    Empirical examinations of the "social amplification of risk" framework are rare, partly because of the difficulties in predicting when conditions likely to result in amplification effects will occur. This means that it is difficult to examine changes in risk perception that are contemporaneous with

  12. The Media and Genetically Modified Foods : Evidence in Support of Social Amplification of Risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frewer, L.J.; Miles, S.; Marsh, R.

    2002-01-01

    Empirical examinations of the "social amplification of risk" framework are rare, partly because of the difficulties in predicting when conditions likely to result in amplification effects will occur. This means that it is difficult to examine changes in risk perception that are contemporaneous with

  13. A PROSPECTIVE TRIAL OF THE FETAL BIOPHYSICAL PROFILE VERSUS MODIFIED BIOPHYSICAL PROFILE IN THE MANAGEMENT OF HIGH RISK PREGNANCIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Jamal

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available "nThe original biophysical profile is time consuming and costly. This study was performed to compare diagnostic value of the original fetal biophysical profile to the modified biophysical profile. Patients were selected from high risk pregnancies referred for fetal assessment and were randomly assigned to two groups. The measures of outcomes were perinatal mortality, Cesarean section for abnormal test, meconium-stained amniotic fluid and 5-minute Apgar score < 7. Diagnostic values of tests were assessed in terms of the incidence of abnormal outcome. In addition comparisons between the positive and negative predictive values of each of these tests as well as the sensitivity and specificity of the tests were reviewed. A total of 200 patients were entered into the study; 104 pregnancies were managed by the original biophysical profile and 96 pregnancies by the modified biophysical profile. There were 30 abnormal (31.3% in modified biophysical profile and 24 (23.1% abnormal tests in original one. There was significant difference in the incidence of meconium passage between two groups. Cesarean section for abnormal tests was 27 of 30 abnormal test (90% in modified and 22 of 24 (91.6% in original profile that was similar in both groups. There was not significant difference in Apgar score < 7 between two groups. We did not find significant difference with comparison of the sensitivity, specificity and negative predictive value of two tests for all measures of outcome except the positive predictive value of meconium passage. Original biophysical profile is more costly and time consuming than modified one.

  14. Identification of a BRCA2-specific modifier locus at 6p24 related to breast cancer risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mia M Gaudet

    Full Text Available Common genetic variants contribute to the observed variation in breast cancer risk for BRCA2 mutation carriers; those known to date have all been found through population-based genome-wide association studies (GWAS. To comprehensively identify breast cancer risk modifying loci for BRCA2 mutation carriers, we conducted a deep replication of an ongoing GWAS discovery study. Using the ranked P-values of the breast cancer associations with the imputed genotype of 1.4 M SNPs, 19,029 SNPs were selected and designed for inclusion on a custom Illumina array that included a total of 211,155 SNPs as part of a multi-consortial project. DNA samples from 3,881 breast cancer affected and 4,330 unaffected BRCA2 mutation carriers from 47 studies belonging to the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 were genotyped and available for analysis. We replicated previously reported breast cancer susceptibility alleles in these BRCA2 mutation carriers and for several regions (including FGFR2, MAP3K1, CDKN2A/B, and PTHLH identified SNPs that have stronger evidence of association than those previously published. We also identified a novel susceptibility allele at 6p24 that was inversely associated with risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers (rs9348512; per allele HR = 0.85, 95% CI 0.80-0.90, P = 3.9 × 10(-8. This SNP was not associated with breast cancer risk either in the general population or in BRCA1 mutation carriers. The locus lies within a region containing TFAP2A, which encodes a transcriptional activation protein that interacts with several tumor suppressor genes. This report identifies the first breast cancer risk locus specific to a BRCA2 mutation background. This comprehensive update of novel and previously reported breast cancer susceptibility loci contributes to the establishment of a panel of SNPs that modify breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers. This panel may have clinical utility for women with BRCA2 mutations weighing options for

  15. Common genetic polymorphisms modify the effect of smoking on absolute risk of bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Rothman, Nathaniel; Figueroa, Jonine D; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Han, Summer S; Baris, Dalsu; Jacobs, Eric J; Malats, Nuria; De Vivo, Immaculata; Albanes, Demetrius; Purdue, Mark P; Sharma, Sapna; Fu, Yi-Ping; Kogevinas, Manolis; Wang, Zhaoming; Tang, Wei; Tardón, Adonina; Serra, Consol; Carrato, Alfredo; García-Closas, Reina; Lloreta, Josep; Johnson, Alison; Schwenn, Molly; Karagas, Margaret R; Schned, Alan; Andriole, Gerald; Grubb, Robert; Black, Amanda; Gapstur, Susan M; Thun, Michael; Diver, William Ryan; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Virtamo, Jarmo; Hunter, David J; Caporaso, Neil; Landi, Maria Teresa; Hutchinson, Amy; Burdett, Laurie; Jacobs, Kevin B; Yeager, Meredith; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Chanock, Stephen J; Silverman, Debra T; Chatterjee, Nilanjan

    2013-04-01

    Bladder cancer results from the combined effects of environmental and genetic factors, smoking being the strongest risk factor. Evaluating absolute risks resulting from the joint effects of smoking and genetic factors is critical to assess the public health relevance of genetic information. Analyses included up to 3,942 cases and 5,680 controls of European background in seven studies. We tested for multiplicative and additive interactions between smoking and 12 susceptibility loci, individually and combined as a polygenic risk score (PRS). Thirty-year absolute risks and risk differences by levels of the PRS were estimated for U.S. males aged 50 years. Six of 12 variants showed significant additive gene-environment interactions, most notably NAT2 (P = 7 × 10(-4)) and UGT1A6 (P = 8 × 10(-4)). The 30-year absolute risk of bladder cancer in U.S. males was 6.2% for all current smokers. This risk ranged from 2.9% for current smokers in the lowest quartile of the PRS to 9.9% for current smokers in the upper quartile. Risk difference estimates indicated that 8,200 cases would be prevented if elimination of smoking occurred in 100,000 men in the upper PRS quartile compared with 2,000 cases prevented by a similar effort in the lowest PRS quartile (P(additive) = 1 × 10(-4)). Thus, the potential impact of eliminating smoking on the number of bladder cancer cases prevented is larger for individuals at higher than lower genetic risk. Our findings could have implications for targeted prevention strategies. However, other smoking-related diseases, as well as practical and ethical considerations, need to be considered before any recommendations could be made. ©2012 AACR.

  16. Constrained simulations and excursion sets: understanding the risks and benefits of `genetically modified' haloes

    CERN Document Server

    Porciani, Cristiano

    2016-01-01

    Constrained realisations of Gaussian random fields are used in cosmology to design special initial conditions for numerical simulations. We review this approach and its application to density peaks providing several worked-out examples. We then critically discuss the recent proposal to use constrained realisations to modify the linear density field within and around the Lagrangian patches that form dark-matter haloes. The ambitious concept is to forge `genetically modified' haloes with some desired properties after the non-linear evolution. We demonstrate that the original implementation of this method is not exact but approximate because it tacitly assumes that protohaloes sample a set of random points with a fixed mean overdensity. We show that carrying out a full genetic modification is a formidable and daunting task requiring a mathematical understanding of what determines the biased locations of protohaloes in the linear density field. We discuss approximate solutions based on educated guesses regarding ...

  17. Risk of Local Failure in Breast Cancer Patients With Lobular Carcinoma In Situ at the Final Surgical Margins: Is Re-excision Necessary?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadek, Betro T.; Shenouda, Mina N.; Abi Raad, Rita F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Niemierko, Andrzej [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Statistics Section, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Keruakous, Amany R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Goldberg, Saveli I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Statistics Section, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Taghian, Alphonse G., E-mail: ataghian@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To compare the outcome of patients with invasive breast cancer both with and without lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS)-positive/close surgical margins after breast-conserving treatment. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively studied 2358 patients with T1-T2 invasive breast cancer treated with lumpectomy and radiation therapy from January 1980 to December 2009. Median age was 57 years (range, 24-91 years). There were 82 patients (3.5%) with positive/close LCIS margins (<0.2 cm) and 2232 patients (95.7%) with negative margins. A total of 1789 patients (76%) had negative lymph nodes. Patients who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy were excluded. A total of 1783 patients (76%) received adjuvant systemic therapy. Multivariable analysis (MVA) was performed using Cox's proportional hazards model. Results: The 5-year cumulative incidence of locoregional recurrence (LRR) was 3.2% (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.5%-4.1%) for the 2232 patients with LCIS-negative surgical margins (median follow-up 104 months) and 2.8% (95% CI 0.7%-10.8%) for the 82 patients with LCIS-positive/close surgical margins (median follow-up 90 months). This was not statistically significant (P=.5). On MVA, LCIS-positive margins after the final surgery were not associated with increased risk of LRR (hazard ratio [HR] 3.4, 95% CI 0.5-24.5, P=.2). Statistically significant prognostic variables on Cox's MVA for risk of LRR included systemic therapy (HR 0.5, 95% CI 0.33-0.75, P=.001), number of positive lymph nodes (HR 1.11, 95% CI 1.05-1.18, P=.001), menopausal status (HR 0.96, 95% CI 0.95-0.98, P=.001), and histopathologic grade (grade 3 vs grade 1/2) (HR 2.6, 95% CI 1.4-4.7, P=.003). Conclusion: Our results suggest that the presence of LCIS at the surgical margin after lumpectomy does not increase the risk of LRR or the final outcome. These findings suggest that re-excision or mastectomy in patients with LCIS-positive/close final surgical margins is unnecessary.

  18. Relationship between risk factors and activities of daily living using modified Shah Barthel Index in stroke patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusumaningsih, W.; Rachmayanti, S.; Werdhani, R. A.

    2017-08-01

    Hypertension and diabetes mellitus are the most common risk factors of stroke. The study aimed to determine the relationship between hypertension and diabetes mellitus risk factors and dependence on assistance with activities of daily living in chronic stroke patients. The study used an analytical observational cross-sectional design. The study’s sample included 44 stroke patients selected using the quota sampling method. The relationship between the variables was analyzed using the bivariate chi-squared test and multivariate logistic regression. Based on the chi-squared test, the relationship between the Modified Shah Barthel Index (MSBI) score and hypertension and diabetes mellitus as stroke risk factors, were p = 0.122 and p = 0.002, respectively. The logistic regression results suggest that hypertension and diabetes mellitus are stroke risk factors related to the MSBI score: p = 0.076 (OR 4.076; CI 95% 0.861-19.297) and p = 0.007 (OR 22.690; CI 95% 2.332-220.722), respectively. Diabetes mellitus is the most prominent risk factor of severe dependency on assistance with activities of daily living in chronic stroke patients.

  19. Workplace social capital and risk of long-term sickness absence. Are associations modified by occupational grade?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rugulies, Reiner; Hasle, Peter; Hyld Pejtersen, Jan;

    2016-01-01

    Background: Workplace social capital (WSC) is an emerging topic among both work environment professionals and researchers. We examined (i) whether high WSC protected against risk of long-term sickness absence (LTSA) in a random sample of the Danish workforce during a 1-year follow-up and (ii......) whether the association of WSC with sickness absence was modified by occupational grade. Methods: We measured WSC by self-report in a cohort of 3075 employees and linked responses to a national register of sickness absence. We calculated hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of onset...

  20. Constrained simulations and excursion sets: understanding the risks and benefits of `genetically modified' haloes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porciani, Cristiano

    2016-12-01

    Constrained realizations of Gaussian random fields are used in cosmology to design special initial conditions for numerical simulations. We review this approach and its application to density peaks providing several worked-out examples. We then critically discuss the recent proposal to use constrained realizations to modify the linear density field within and around the Lagrangian patches that form dark-matter haloes. The ambitious concept is to forge `genetically modified' haloes with some desired properties after the non-linear evolution. We demonstrate that the original implementation of this method is not exact but approximate because it tacitly assumes that protohaloes sample a set of random points with a fixed mean overdensity. We show that carrying out a full genetic modification is a formidable and daunting task requiring a mathematical understanding of what determines the biased locations of protohaloes in the linear density field. We discuss approximate solutions based on educated guesses regarding the nature of protohaloes. We illustrate how the excursion-set method can be adapted to predict the non-linear evolution of the modified patches and thus fine tune the constraints that are necessary to obtain pre-selected halo properties. This technique allows us to explore the freedom around the original algorithm for genetic modification. We find that the quantity which is most sensitive to changes is the halo mass-accretion rate at the mass scale on which the constraints are set. Finally, we discuss constraints based on the protohalo angular momenta.

  1. Population attributable fraction of ‎modifiable risk factors for ‎Alzheimer disease: A systematic ‎review of systematic reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narjes Hazar

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Alzheimer’s disease (AD is the most common type of dementia. Demonstrating the modifiable risk factors of AD can help to plan for prevention of this disease. The aim of the current review was to characterize modifiable cardiovascular risk factors of AD using existing data and determine their contribution in AD development in Iran and the world.Methods: The systematic search was done in Medline, Scopus, and Cochrane databases from inception to May 2014 to find systematic reviews or meta-analyses about association between AD and cardiovascular modifiable risk factors included diabetes, hypertension (HTN, physical inactivity, smoking, hypercholesterolemia, and overweight and obesity. The population attributable fraction (PAF was calculated for these risk factors in Iran and the world.Results: Of 2651 articles, 11 were eligible for data extraction after assessing relevancy and quality. Diabetes mellitus (DM type 2, smoking, physical inactivity, overweight and obesity were significantly associated with increased risk of AD. Physical inactivity with 22.0% and smoking with 15.7% had the highest PAF for AD in Iran and the world, respectively.Conclusion: Our findings demonstrated that modifiable cardiovascular risk factors could increase the risk of AD. Moreover, about one-third of AD cases were attributed to five modifiable risk factors.

  2. Heparin as a risk factor for perigraft seroma complicating the modified Blalock-Taussig shunt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berger, R M; Bol-Raap, G; Hop, W J; Bogers, A J; Hess, J

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to determine the risk factors associated with the occurrence of perigraft seromas complicating systemic-to-pulmonary polytetrafluoroethylene grafts. METHODS: Clinical and perioperative variables were reexamined, blinded for the outcome variable perigraft

  3. Relevance of Crop Biology for Environmental Risk Assessment of Genetically Modified Crops in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge about the crop biology of economic crops in Africa is needed for regulators to accurately review dossiers and conduct comprehensive environmental risk assessments (ERAs). This information allows regulators to decide whether biotech crops present a risk to biodiversity, since crossing between domesticated crops and their wild relatives could affect the adaptations of the wild species. The criteria that should be used in the evaluation of African crops for ERA include growth habit, ce...

  4. The maternal-age-associated risk of congenital heart disease is modifiable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulkey, Claire E; Regmi, Suk D; Magnan, Rachel A; Danzo, Megan T; Luther, Herman; Hutchinson, Alayna K; Panzer, Adam A; Grady, Mary M; Wilson, David B; Jay, Patrick Y

    2015-04-09

    Maternal age is a risk factor for congenital heart disease even in the absence of any chromosomal abnormality in the newborn. Whether the basis of this risk resides with the mother or oocyte is unknown. The impact of maternal age on congenital heart disease can be modelled in mouse pups that harbour a mutation of the cardiac transcription factor gene Nkx2-5 (ref. 8). Here, reciprocal ovarian transplants between young and old mothers establish a maternal basis for the age-associated risk in mice. A high-fat diet does not accelerate the effect of maternal ageing, so hyperglycaemia and obesity do not simply explain the mechanism. The age-associated risk varies with the mother's strain background, making it a quantitative genetic trait. Most remarkably, voluntary exercise, whether begun by mothers at a young age or later in life, can mitigate the risk when they are older. Thus, even when the offspring carry a causal mutation, an intervention aimed at the mother can meaningfully reduce their risk of congenital heart disease.

  5. Acute cholecystitis in high risk surgical patients: percutaneous cholecystostomy versus laparoscopic cholecystectomy (CHOCOLATE trial): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortram, Kirsten; van Ramshorst, Bert; Bollen, Thomas L; Besselink, Marc G H; Gouma, Dirk J; Karsten, Tom; Kruyt, Philip M; Nieuwenhuijzen, Grard A P; Kelder, Johannes C; Tromp, Ellen; Boerma, Djamila

    2012-01-12

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy in acute calculous cholecystitis in high risk patients can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Percutaneous cholecystostomy may be an alternative treatment option but the current literature does not provide the surgical community with evidence based advice. The CHOCOLATE trial is a randomised controlled, parallel-group, superiority multicenter trial. High risk patients, defined as APACHE-II score 7-14, with acute calculous cholecystitis will be randomised to laparoscopic cholecystectomy or percutaneous cholecystostomy. During a two year period 284 patients will be enrolled from 30 high volume teaching hospitals. The primary endpoint is a composite endpoint of major complications within three months following randomization and need for re-intervention and mortality during the follow-up period of one year. Secondary endpoints include all other complications, duration of hospital admission, difficulty of procedures and total costs. The CHOCOLATE trial is designed to provide the surgical community with an evidence based guideline in the treatment of acute calculous cholecystitis in high risk patients. Netherlands Trial Register (NTR): NTR2666.

  6. Acute cholecystitis in high risk surgical patients: percutaneous cholecystostomy versus laparoscopic cholecystectomy (CHOCOLATE trial: Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kortram Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Laparoscopic cholecystectomy in acute calculous cholecystitis in high risk patients can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Percutaneous cholecystostomy may be an alternative treatment option but the current literature does not provide the surgical community with evidence based advice. Methods/Design The CHOCOLATE trial is a randomised controlled, parallel-group, superiority multicenter trial. High risk patients, defined as APACHE-II score 7-14, with acute calculous cholecystitis will be randomised to laparoscopic cholecystectomy or percutaneous cholecystostomy. During a two year period 284 patients will be enrolled from 30 high volume teaching hospitals. The primary endpoint is a composite endpoint of major complications within three months following randomization and need for re-intervention and mortality during the follow-up period of one year. Secondary endpoints include all other complications, duration of hospital admission, difficulty of procedures and total costs. Discussion The CHOCOLATE trial is designed to provide the surgical community with an evidence based guideline in the treatment of acute calculous cholecystitis in high risk patients. Trial Registration Netherlands Trial Register (NTR: NTR2666

  7. Role of Pre-Operative Blood Transfusion and Subcutaneous Fat Thickness as Risk Factors for Surgical Site Infection after Posterior Thoracic Spine Stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterhoff, Georg; Burla, Laurin; Werner, Clément M L; Jentzsch, Thorsten; Wanner, Guido A; Simmen, Hans-Peter; Sprengel, Kai

    2015-06-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) increase morbidity and mortality rates and generate additional cost for the healthcare system. Pre-operative blood transfusion and the subcutaneous fat thickness (SFT) have been described as risk factors for SSI in other surgical areas. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of pre-operative blood transfusion and the SFT on the occurrence of SSI in posterior thoracic spine surgery. In total, 244 patients (median age 55 y; 97 female) who underwent posterior thoracic spine fusions from 2008 to 2012 were reviewed retrospectively. Patient-specific characteristics, pre-operative hemoglobin concentration/hematocrit values, the amount of blood transfused, and the occurrence of a post-operative SSI were documented. The SFT was measured on pre-operative computed tomography scans. Surgical site infection was observed in 26 patients (11%). The SFT was 13 mm in patients without SSI and 14 mm in those with infection (p=0.195). The odds ratio for patients with pre-operative blood transfusion to present with SSI was 3.1 (confidence interval [CI] 1.4-7.2) and 2.7 (CI 1.1-6.4) when adjusted for age. There was no difference between the groups with regard to pre-operative hemoglobin concentration (p=0.519) or hematocrit (p=0.908). The SFT did not differ in the two groups. Allogeneic red blood cell transfusion within 48 h prior to surgery was an independent risk factor for SSI after posterior fusion for the fixation of thoracic spine instabilities. Pre-operative blood transfusion tripled the risk, whereas SFT had no influence on the occurrence of SSI.

  8. Review of MRSA screening and antibiotics prophylaxis in orthopaedic trauma patients; The risk of surgical site infection with inadequate antibiotic prophylaxis in patients colonized with MRSA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, H J; Ponniah, N; Long, S; Rath, N; Kent, M

    2017-07-01

    The primary aim of this study was to determine whether orthopaedic trauma patients receive appropriate antibiotic prophylaxis keeping in view the results of their MRSA screening. The secondary aim was to analyse the risk of developing MRSA surgical site infection with and without appropriate antibiotic prophylaxis in those colonized with MRSA. We reviewed 400 consecutive orthopaedic trauma patient episodes. Preoperative MRSA screening results, operative procedures, prophylactic antibiotics and postoperative course were explored. In addition to these consecutive patients, the hospital MRSA database over the previous 5 years identified 27 MRSA colonized acute trauma patients requiring surgery. Of the 400 consecutive patient episodes, 395(98.7%) had MRSA screening performed on admission. However, in 236 (59.0%) cases, the results were not available before the surgery. Seven patient episodes (1.8%) had positive MRSA colonization. Analysis of 27 MRSA colonized patients revealed that 20(74%) patients did not have the screening results available before the surgery. Only 5(18.5%) received Teicoplanin and 22(81.4%) received cefuroxime for antibiotic prophylaxis before their surgery. Of those receiving cefuroxime, five (22.73%) patients developed postoperative MRSA surgical site infection (SSI) but none of those (0%) receiving Teicoplanin had MRSA SSI. The absolute risk reduction for SSI with Teicoplanin as antibiotic prophylaxis was 22.73% (CI=5.22%-40.24%) and NNT (Number Needed to Treat) was 5 (CI=2.5-19.2) CONCLUSION: Lack of available screening results before the surgery may lead to inadequate antibiotic prophylaxis increasing the risk of MRSA surgical site infection. Glycopeptide (e.g.Teicoplanin) prophylaxis should be considered when there is history of MRSA colonization or MRSA screening results are not available before the surgery. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Risk factors for surgical site infection after posterior cervical spine surgery: an analysis of 5,441 patients from the ACS NSQIP 2005-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, Arjun; Huddleston, Paul; Kakar, Sanjeev; Habermann, Elizabeth; Wagie, Amy; Nassr, Ahmad

    2016-04-01

    The incidence of surgical site infection (SSI) following posterior cervical surgery has been reported as high as 18% in the literature. Few large studies have specifically examined posterior cervical procedures. The study aims to examine the incidence, timing, and risk factors for SSI following posterior cervical surgery. This is a retrospective cohort study of prospectively collected data in a national surgical outcomes database. The sample includes patients who underwent posterior cervical spine surgery between 2005 and 2012 identified in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Project (ACS NSQIP) Participant Use Data File. The 30-day rate of postoperative SSI, timing of diagnosis, and associated risk factors were determined. The ACS NSQIP was used to identify 5,441 patients who underwent posterior cervical spine surgery by Current Procedural Terminology codes from 2005 to 2012. Thirty-day readmission data were obtained for 2011-2012. The incidence and timing of SSI were determined. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was then performed to identify significant risk factors. Of the 5,441 patients identified as having undergone posterior cervical surgery, 3,724 had a posterior cervical decompression, 1,310 had a posterior cervical fusion, and 407 underwent cervical laminoplasty. Surgical site infection within 30 days was identified in 160 patients (2.94%), with 80 of those cases being superficial SSI. There was no significant difference in SSI rate among the three procedure groups. The average time for diagnosis of SSI was over 2 weeks. In 2011-2012, 36.9% of patients with SSI were readmitted within 30 days. Several significant predictors of SSI were identified in univariate analysis, including body mass index (BMI) >35, chronic steroid use, albumin 35 (odds ratio [OR]=1.78, p=.003), chronic steroid use (OR=1.73, p=.049), and operative time >197 minutes (OR=2.08, p=.005), were identified in multivariable analysis. Optimization

  10. Homocysteine and Stroke Risk: Modifying Effect of Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase C677T Polymorphism and Folic Acid Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Min; Wang, Xiaobin; He, Mingli; Qin, Xianhui; Tang, Genfu; Huo, Yong; Li, Jianping; Fu, Jia; Huang, Xiao; Cheng, Xiaoshu; Wang, Binyan; Hou, Fan Fan; Sun, Ningling; Cai, Yefeng

    2017-05-01

    Elevated blood homocysteine concentration increases the risk of stroke, especially among hypertensive individuals. Homocysteine is largely affected by the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T polymorphism and folate status. Among hypertensive patients, we aimed to test the hypothesis that the association between homocysteine and stroke can be modified by the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T polymorphism and folic acid intervention. We analyzed the data of 20 424 hypertensive adults enrolled in the China Stroke Primary Prevention Trial. The participants, first stratified by methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase genotype, were randomly assigned to receive double-blind treatments of 10-mg enalapril and 0.8-mg folic acid or 10-mg enalapril only. The participants were followed up for a median of 4.5 years. In the control group, baseline log-transformed homocysteine was associated with an increased risk of first stroke among participants with the CC/CT genotype (hazard ratio, 3.1; 1.1-9.2), but not among participants with the TT genotype (hazard ratio, 0.7; 0.2-2.1), indicating a significant gene-homocysteine interaction (P=0.008). In the folic acid intervention group, homocysteine showed no significant effect on stroke regardless of genotype. Consistently, folic acid intervention significantly reduced stroke risk in participants with CC/CT genotypes and high homocysteine levels (tertile 3; hazard ratio, 0.73; 0.55-0.97). In Chinese hypertensive patients, the effect of homocysteine on the first stroke was significantly modified by the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T genotype and folic acid supplementation. Such information may help to more precisely predict stroke risk and develop folic acid interventions tailored to individual genetic background and nutritional status. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00794885. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Principles for the risk assessment of genetically modified microorganisms and their food products in the European Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera, Jaime; Gomes, Ana R; Olaru, Irina

    2013-10-01

    Genetically modified microorganisms (GMMs) are involved in the production of a variety of food and feed. The release and consumption of these products can raise questions about health and environmental safety. Therefore, the European Union has different legislative instruments in place in order to ensure the safety of such products. A key requirement is to conduct a scientific risk assessment as a prerequisite for the product to be placed on the market. This risk assessment is performed by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), through its Scientific Panels. The EFSA Panel on Genetically Modified Organisms has published complete and comprehensive guidance for the risk assessment of GMMs and their products for food and/or feed use, in which the strategy and the criteria to conduct the assessment are explained, as well as the scientific data to be provided in applications for regulated products. This Guidance follows the main risk assessment principles developed by various international organisations (Codex Alimentarius, 2003; OECD, 2010). The assessment considers two aspects: the characterisation of the GMM and the possible effects of its modification with respect to safety, and the safety of the product itself. Due to the existing diversity of GMMs and their products, a categorisation is recommended to optimise the assessment and to determine the extent of the required data. The assessment starts with a comprehensive characterisation of the GMM, covering the recipient/parental organism, the donor(s) of the genetic material, the genetic modification, and the final GMM and its phenotype. Evaluation of the composition, potential toxicity and/or allergenicity, nutritional value and environmental impact of the product constitute further cornerstones of the process. The outcome of the assessment is reflected in a scientific opinion which indicates whether the product raises any safety issues. This opinion is taken into account by the different European regulatory

  12. CARDIOVASCULAR RISK IN PATIENTS WITH EARLY RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS BEFORE DISEASE-MODIFYING ANTIRHEUMATIC THERAPY (PRELIMINARY DATA OF THE REMARCА STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. N. Gorbunova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to estimate the level of cardiovascular risk in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA before therapy with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs.Subjects and methods: Seventy-three patients with early RA who had not previously taken DMARDs or glucocorticoids were examined. Disease activity was assessed by the DAS28, SDAI, and CDAI. All the patients were examined by a cardiologist. The investigators assessed traditional risk factors (RF, by determining the overall coronary risk according tothe modified SCORE scale, the degree of a risk for cardiovascular events (CVE, carried out 24-hour ECG and blood pressure monitoring, echocardiography (EchoCG, and carotid duplex scanning, identified coronary artery calcification by multislice spiral computed tomography, and, if indicated, performed stress EchoCG and coronary angiography.Results. The diagnosis of coronary heart disease was established in 13 patients. NYHA functional class I or II chronic heart failure (HF was diagnosed in 8 patients, systolic HF in 2, HF with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction in 6 cases. There was left ventricular hypertrophy in 22 (30.1% patients, carotid atherosclerotic plaques in 26 (35.6%, coronary artery calcification in 30 (41.1%, hypertension in 38 (52.1%, abdominal obesity in 34 (46.6%, dyslipidemia in 40 (54.8%, hypercholesterolemia in 37 (50.7%, hypoalphalipoproteinemia in 21 (28.8%, hypertriglyceridemia in 12 (16.4%, low physical activity in 30 (41.1%, and smoking in 13 (17.8%. Thirty-three of 53 women weremenopausal. Fasting hyperglycemia was found in 11 (15.1% patients; type 2 diabetes mellitus in 4 (5.5%. Thirty-one (42.5% patients had at least three RFs. In accordance with the current classification of the degree of cardiovascular risk, very high, high, moderate, and low risks for CVE were observed in 58, 8, 8, and 26% of the RA patients, respectively.Conclusion. Most rheumatoid factor- and anticyclic citrullinated

  13. Short-term surgical outcome and safety of risk reducing salpingo-oophorectomy in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kenkhuis, M. J. A.; de Bock, G. H.; Elferink, P. Oude; Arts, H. J. G.; Oosterwijk, J. C.; Jansen, L.; Mourits, M. J. E.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Women with a BRCA1/2 mutation or members of a hereditary breast ovarian cancer family (HBOC) have an increased risk of developing ovarian cancer. The only effective strategy to reduce this risk is a risk reducing salpingo-oophorectomy (RRSO). The aim of this study was to evaluate the shor

  14. Modifying Risk Factors for Total Joint Arthroplasty: Strategies That Work Nicotine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Bryan D

    2016-08-01

    Smoking and nicotine use remain a major health care crisis in the United States. Although rates have dropped dramatically over the last 50 years, approximately 18% of the US adult population still smokes. The musculoskeletal effects of nicotine and other byproducts of smoking place patients at increased risk for perioperative complications including medical complication, wound healing problems, infection, and death. A comprehensive behavioral modification program with or without the use of nicotine replacement therapy has been shown to be most effective at smoking cessation around the time of planned surgery. Although literature suggests that smoking cessation 4-6 weeks before surgery can diminish risk, both current and former smokers are at increased risk for perioperative complications compared with those that have never smoked. Cotinine, a metabolite of nicotine, can be used to monitor smoking cessation before surgery.