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Sample records for surgically altered anatomy

  1. SURGICAL ANATOMY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SURGICAL ANATOMY. Rare high origin of the radial artery: a bilateral, symmetrical ease. I. O. ()koro and B. C. J iburum. Department of Anatomy, College of Medicine, lrno State University, Owerri, Nigeria. Reprint requests to: Dr I. O. 0k0r0, Department of Anatomy, [mo State University, P. M. B. 2000. Owerri, Nigeria.

  2. Endoscopic management of bile duct stones in patients with surgically altered anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakai, Yousuke; Kogure, Hirofumi; Yamada, Atsuo; Isayama, Hiroyuki; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2018-04-01

    Bile duct stones in patients with surgically altered anatomy still pose a challenge to endoscopists. For successful endoscopic management of bile duct stones, there are multiple hurdles: Intubation to the afferent limb, biliary cannulation, ampullary intervention and stone extraction. The major advancement in this area is the development of dedicated device-assisted endoscopes for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). In patients with Billroth II reconstruction, a high technical success rate is reported using a duodenoscope but can be complicated by a potentially high perforation rate. In patients with Roux-en-Y reconstruction, device-assisted ERCP shows high technical success and low adverse event rates. Meanwhile, endoscopic papillary large balloon dilation enables safe and effective stone extraction with less use of endoscopic mechanical lithotripsy in patients with a dilated distal bile duct, but intraductal lithotripsy is sometimes necessary for management of very large bile duct stones. In cases with difficult stones, alternative approaches such as laparoscopy-assisted ERCP and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided intervention are increasingly reported with preliminary but promising results. However, comparative studies are still lacking in this area and prospective randomized controlled trials are warranted in terms of safety, efficacy and cost-effectiveness. © 2018 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  3. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided hepaticogastrostomy and antegrade clearance of biliary lithiasis in patients with surgically-altered anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosmer, Amy; Abdelfatah, Mohamed M; Law, Ryan; Baron, Todd H

    2018-02-01

     Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC) in patients with complex surgically-altered anatomy (SAA) is technically demanding and has limitations. Developments in EUS-guided procedures allow alternative approaches for patients with altered gastrointestinal anatomy and biliary lithiasis.  Single-center, retrospective review of prospectively entered patients with SAA who underwent EUS-guided hepaticogastrostomy (HGS) followed by an interval antegrade endoscopic clearance of biliary lithiasis.  9 patients with Roux-en-Y anatomy underwent HGS to allow clearance of biliary lithiasis after a mean of 2.5 procedures. Technical success was achieved in 100 % of patients utilizing subsequent antegrade endoscopic techniques after HGS including: balloon sweep (9), transpapillary balloon dilation (8), cholangioscopy with electrohydraulic lithotripsy (4), and mechanical lithotripsy (1). HGS stents were removed in all patients. 1 adverse event (cholangitis) occurred after cholangioscopy and prolonged intraductal electrohydraulic lithotripsy.  EUS-guided antegrade therapy for the management of biliary lithiasis in patients with altered gastrointestinal anatomy appears efficacious with a low risk of adverse events. These preliminary results suggest this approach should be considered at centers with available expertise.

  4. Alterations in physiology and anatomy during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Eng Kien; Tan, Eng Loy

    2013-12-01

    Pregnant women undergo profound anatomical and physiological changes so that they can cope with the increased physical and metabolic demands of their pregnancies. The cardiovascular, respiratory, haematological, renal, gastrointestinal and endocrine systems all undergo important physiological alterations and adaptations needed to allow development of the fetus and to allow the mother and fetus to survive the demands of childbirth. Such alterations in anatomy and physiology may cause difficulties in interpreting signs, symptoms, and biochemical investigations, making the clinical assessment of a pregnant woman inevitably confusing but challenging. Understanding these changes is important for every practicing obstetrician, as the pathological deviations from the normal physiological alterations may not be clear-cut until an adverse outcome has resulted. Only with a sound knowledge of the physiology and anatomy changes can the care of an obstetric parturient be safely optimized for a better maternal and fetal outcome. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Computer assisted surgical anatomy mapping : applications in surgical anatomy research, tailor-made surgery and presonalized teaching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.L.A. Kerver (Anton)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractThis thesis presents a novel anatomy mapping tool named Computer Assisted Surgical Anatomy Mapping (CASAM). It allows researchers to map complex anatomy of multiple specimens and compare their location and course. Renditions such as safe zones or danger zones can be visualized,

  6. Surgical anatomy of the profunda brachii artery | Pulei | Anatomy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Knowledge of this unusual anatomy is important during brachial artery catheterization and harvesting of lateral arm flaps. One hundred and forty four arms from 72 cadavers of black Kenyans were dissected and examined for the origin and termination of PBA at the Department of Human Anatomy, University of Nairobi, ...

  7. The surgical anatomy of the nasolabial fold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogrel, M A; Shariati, S; Schmidt, B; Faal, Z H; Regezi, J

    1998-10-01

    The purpose of this cadaver dissection study was to investigate the anatomy of the nasolabial fold with a view to explaining the problems of surgical softening or elimination of the fold. Ten formalin-fixed cadavers and 6 fresh-frozen cadavers were used for this study. In 12 cadavers (8 formalin-fixed, 4 fresh-frozen), the nasolabial fold was sectioned at right angles to the fold for histologic examination, and in 4 cadavers (2 formalin-fixed, 2 fresh-frozen) the epithelium was dissected off the fold to allow for more detailed gross examination of the underlying musculature. The fold was clearly identified on 14 of the cadavers but was indistinct on 2 on gross examination. Beneath the fold were 2 muscle bundles. The more superficial muscle runs parallel to the fold whereas a deeper muscle runs at right angles to it. The buccal fat pad lies above the fold and appears to be retained by horizontal septae in the fat pad and also by the musculature of the fold. Cadavers showing a poorly defined nasolabial fold had fewer muscle bundles to support the fat and fewer fibrous septae running through the fat. The nasolabial fold is defined by structures that support the buccal fat pad and hold it above the fold. This appears to be a combination of muscle bundles that run both across and parallel to the fold and also by fibrous septae supporting the fat pad. This has implications for the development of surgical procedures to soften or eliminate the fold, which must separate the muscles from the dermis of the fold and allow the fat to descend and soften the fold.

  8. Surgical anatomy of greater occipital nerve and its relation to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The knowledge of the anatomy of greater occipital nerve and its relation to occipital artery is important for the surgeon. Blockage or surgical release of greater occipital nerve is clinically effective in reducing or eliminating chronic migraine symptoms. Aim: The aim of this research was to study the anatomy of ...

  9. Surgical anatomy of the nail apparatus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haneke, E.

    2006-01-01

    Nail surgery is an integral part of dermatologic surgery. An in-depth knowledge of the anatomy, biology, physiology, and gross pathology of the entire nail unit is essential. In particular, knowledge of nail histopathology is necessary to perform diagnostic nail biopsies and other nail procedures

  10. Surgical anatomy in obstetrics and gynaecology: the trainees' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgroi, Joseph; Abbott, Jason

    2014-04-01

    The aim of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RANZCOG) Integrated and Elective Training Program is to ensure trainees have both clinical and surgical competence. The capacity to recognise important anatomical structures underpins this aim; however, quantification of RANZCOG trainees' anatomical knowledge and their training and assessment is not available. To survey trainees at all levels relating to applied anatomy, training and assessment within the RANZCOG training program. All accredited RANZCOG trainees were invited to participate in an online survey relating to anatomy knowledge, application, assessment and means of improving anatomical training. At the commencement of training, 11% of trainees perceived their anatomical knowledge as adequate and this increased to 77% by the final year of training. For final-year trainees, 78% perceived their anatomy knowledge as sufficient to perform a total abdominal hysterectomy and 87% an ovarian cystectomy or salpingectomy. Eighty-four per cent of trainees perceived the RANZCOG training programme as providing inadequate anatomy teaching. 100% of respondents supported a RANZCOG approved anatomy training course. This is a survey-based study and therefore subjective. Consequently, accurate determination of anatomical knowledge for RANZCOG trainees is inexact. Trainees perceive limitations in their anatomical knowledge. A formalised RANZCOG anatomy course would be of value in providing structured education and assessment of trainees' knowledge and establishing whether there are improvements in surgical competencies. © 2014 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  11. A Literature Review of Renal Surgical Anatomy and Surgical Strategies for Partial Nephrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klatte, Tobias; Ficarra, Vincenzo; Gratzke, Christian; Kaouk, Jihad; Kutikov, Alexander; Macchi, Veronica; Mottrie, Alexandre; Porpiglia, Francesco; Porter, James; Rogers, Craig G; Russo, Paul; Thompson, R Houston; Uzzo, Robert G; Wood, Christopher G; Gill, Inderbir S

    2015-12-01

    A detailed understanding of renal surgical anatomy is necessary to optimize preoperative planning and operative technique and provide a basis for improved outcomes. To evaluate the literature regarding pertinent surgical anatomy of the kidney and related structures, nephrometry scoring systems, and current surgical strategies for partial nephrectomy (PN). A literature review was conducted. Surgical renal anatomy fundamentally impacts PN surgery. The renal artery divides into anterior and posterior divisions, from which approximately five segmental terminal arteries originate. The renal veins are not terminal. Variations in the vascular and lymphatic channels are common; thus, concurrent lymphadenectomy is not routinely indicated during PN for cT1 renal masses in the setting of clinically negative lymph nodes. Renal-protocol contrast-enhanced computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging is used for standard imaging. Anatomy-based nephrometry scoring systems allow standardized academic reporting of tumor characteristics and predict PN outcomes (complications, remnant function, possibly histology). Anatomy-based novel surgical approaches may reduce ischemic time during PN; these include early unclamping, segmental clamping, tumor-specific clamping (zero ischemia), and unclamped PN. Cancer cure after PN relies on complete resection, which can be achieved by thin margins. Post-PN renal function is impacted by kidney quality, remnant quantity, and ischemia type and duration. Surgical renal anatomy underpins imaging, nephrometry scoring systems, and vascular control techniques that reduce global renal ischemia and may impact post-PN function. A contemporary ideal PN excises the tumor with a thin negative margin, delicately secures the tumor bed to maximize vascularized remnant parenchyma, and minimizes global ischemia to the renal remnant with minimal complications. In this report we review renal surgical anatomy. Renal mass imaging allows detailed delineation of the

  12. Surgical anatomy of the temporal bone: an atlas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, L.L.; Manolidis, S.; Taber, K.H.; Hayman, L.A.

    2001-01-01

    This atlas demonstrates the usefulness of reconstructed high-resolution CT for planning temporal bone surgery. The first part focuses on a sagittal plane, the second on a rotated longitudinal plane, and the third on a rotated transverse plane. We believe knowledge of temporal bone anatomy in these planes facilitates surgical planning by showing anatomic relationships and providing a customized map for each patient. This decreases the likelihood of surgical mishap and improves teaching. (orig.)

  13. Surgical anatomy of the minimally invasive lateral lumbar approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bina, Robert W; Zoccali, Carmine; Skoch, Jesse; Baaj, Ali A

    2015-03-01

    The lateral lumbar interbody fusion approach (LLIF), which encompasses the extreme lateral interbody fusion or direct lateral interbody fusion techniques, has gained popularity as an alternative to traditional posterior approaches. With rapidly expanding applications, this minimally invasive surgery (MIS) approach is now utilized in basic degenerative pathologies as well as complex lumbar degenerative deformities and tumors. Given the intimate relationship of the psoas muscle, and hence the lumbar plexus, to this MIS approach, several authors have examined the surgical anatomy of this approach. Understanding this regional neural anatomy is imperative given the potential for serious injuries to both the motor and sensory nerves of the lumbar plexus. In this review, we critically and comprehensively discuss all published studies detailing the surgical anatomy of the lateral lumbar approach with respect to the MIS LLIF techniques. This is a timely review given the rapidly growing number of surgeons utilizing this technique. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Surgical Anatomy of the Vertebrobasilar Territory and Posterior ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: In the present era of microscopic and neuroendoscopic procedures, the surgical anatomy of the skull base vessels has gained increased significance. The pattern of the vertebrobasilar arterial complex and the posterior circle of Willis (COW) in Nigerians has not been previously reported despite various ...

  15. Surgical anatomy of greater occipital nerve and its relation to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nancy Mohamed El Sekily

    2014-08-19

    Aug 19, 2014 ... After 1 month, 60% of patients still showed improvement. Conclusion: The knowledge of the anatomy of greater occipital nerve and its relation to occipital artery is important for the surgeon. Blockage or surgical release of greater occipital nerve is clinically effective in eliminating chronic migraine headache.

  16. New insights into the surgical anatomy of the esophagus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijs, Teun J.; Ruurda, Jelle P.; Luyer, Michael D.P.; Cuesta, Miguel A.; van Hillegersberg, Richard; Bleys, Ronaldus L.A.W.

    Implementation of (robot assisted) minimally invasive esophagectomy and increased knowledge of the relation between the autonomic nervous system and the immune response have led to new insights regarding the surgical anatomy of the esophagus. First, two layers of connective tissue were identified;

  17. Clinical and Surgical Anatomy of the Neck

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández Russo, Gustavo A.H.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: to bring relevance on morphological details pertaining to medical and surgical applicability and demonstrate its value as an unavoidable mainstay for diagnosis and mangement of head and neck pathology.Materials and method: a. standarized dissections, of preserved adult human corpses, to obtain anatomical pieces for teaching purposes in school of medicine, axial slices and its comparative study with computed tomography (CT) images. b.application of normalized surgical techniques...

  18. Anatomy and Surgical Approaches to the Rabbit Nasal Septum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badran, Karam W; Chang, John C; Kuan, Edward C; Wong, Brian J F

    2017-09-01

    The rabbit is the primary animal model used to investigate aspects of nasal surgery. Although several studies have used this model, none has provided a comprehensive analysis of the surgical anatomy and techniques used to gain access to the rabbit nasal fossae and septum. To describe and optimize the surgical anatomy and approach to the rabbit nasal vault and septal cartilage. In an ex vivo animal study conducted at an academic medical center, preliminary cadaveric dissections were performed on rabbit head specimens to establish familiarity with relevant anatomy and rehearse various approaches. Live Pasteurella-free New Zealand white rabbits (3.5-4.0 kg) were used to further develop this surgical technique developed here. Access of the nasal vault was gained through a midline nasal dorsum incision and creation of an osteoplastic flap with a drill. Submucosal resection was performed with preservation of the mucoperichondrium. All rabbits were monitored daily for 4 weeks in the postoperative period for signs of infection, pain, and complications. The study was conducted from June 1, 2014, to December 1, 2014. Surgical anatomy and techniques used to gain access to the rabbit nasal vault and harvest septal cartilage. Four Pasteurella-free New Zealand white rabbits (Western Organ Rabbit Co), ranging in age from 9 to 12 months and weighing between 3.5 and 4.0 kg, were used in this study. Initial dissections demonstrated the feasibility of harvesting septal cartilage while preserving the mucoperichondrial envelope. Access to the nasal vault through this 3-osteotomy approach allowed for maximal exposure to the nasal cavity bilaterally while maintaining the integrity of the mucoperichondrium following septal cartilage harvest. The maximum amount of bulk, en bloc, cartilage harvested was 1.0 × 2.5 cm. Following surgical dissection, all animals maintained adequate airway patency and support to midface structures. Furthermore, all specimens preserved the integrity of the

  19. Surgical anatomy of reduction mammaplasty: A historical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aesthetics was in mind throughout this period as different skin incisions were developed and advanced following Dieffenbach's small submammary incision in 1848. Surgical landmarks that ensured reproducible aesthetic outcomes were described by Penn (1955) and Wise (1956). Liposuction-assisted reduction was ...

  20. Anatomical Considerations on Surgical Anatomy of the Carotid Bifurcation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adamantios Michalinos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgical anatomy of carotid bifurcation is of unique importance for numerous medical specialties. Despite extensive research, many aspects such as precise height of carotid bifurcation, micrometric values of carotid arteries and their branches as their diameter, length, and degree of tortuosity, and variations of proximal external carotid artery branches are undetermined. Furthermore carotid bifurcation is involved in many pathologic processes, atheromatous disease being the commonest. Carotid atheromatous disease is a major predisposing factor for disabling and possibly fatal strokes with geometry of carotid bifurcation playing an important role in its natural history. Consequently detailed knowledge of various anatomic parameters is of paramount importance not only for understanding of the disease but also for design of surgical treatment, especially selection between carotid endarterectomy and carotid stenting. Carotid bifurcation paragangliomas constitute unique tumors with diagnostic accuracy, treatment design, and success of operative intervention dependent on precise knowledge of anatomy. Considering those, it becomes clear that selection and application of proper surgical therapy should consider anatomical details. Further research might ameliorate available treatment options or even lead to innovative ones.

  1. Surgical anatomy of the anterior supralabyrinthine air cell tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluth, M B; Cohen, M A; Friedland, P L; Atlas, M D

    2011-10-01

    In order to safely explore the medial wall of the attic, a working knowledge of the anatomy of the anterior supralabyrinthine air cell tract is required. To clarify the surgically relevant anatomical relationships that comprise the anterior supralabyrinthine air cell tract. Surgical dissection of 10 fresh cadaveric temporal bones was undertaken, including measurement of distances between the key anterior supralabyrinthine anatomical landmarks. The following mean distances were calculated: the labyrinthine segment between the geniculate ganglion and the ampullated end of the superior semicircular canal, 2.33 mm (range 1.75-2.75); the tympanic segment between the anterior margin of the oval window niche and the geniculate ganglion, 3.58 mm (range 3.25-4); and from the tympanic segment adjacent to the anterior margin of the oval window niche to the labyrinthine segment adjacent to the superior semicircular canal, 3.48 mm (range 3-4.25). The key anatomical landmarks of the anterior supralabyrinthine air cell tract define a distinct triangular segment of bone, knowledge of which is helpful in surgical dissection.

  2. Clinical And Surgical Anatomy Of Lumbar Hernia: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Victor Souza Sanders

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Lumbar hernia is defined as the presence of failure in the transverse fascia or in the aponeurosis of the transverse abdominal muscle that results in the extrusion of intra or extra peritoneal organs through the discontinuity of the postero lateral abdominal wall. The aim of this study was to conduct a methodical review of the anatomy of the hernia form grynfelt dated from 2006 to 2017. For this, we performed a bibliographic review by means of electronic databases like SciELO, PubMed, Science Direct, LILACS and Bireme to get better approach to the subject. It has been found that the lumbar hernia is a disease little known by doctors whose diagnostics are often performed in the wrong way and for surgical correction needs a good anatomical knowledge. Lumbar hernias, although rare, must be taken into account, since ischemia of herniated intestinal segments can lead to the death of the patient, especially in the elderly. Knowledge about the anatomy of the lumbar region is of vital importance because it makes surgery safe and reduces risks of complications and recidivating of the hernia.

  3. Surgical anatomy of the thyroid and parathyroid glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fancy, Tanya; Gallagher, Daniel; Hornig, Joshua D

    2010-04-01

    This article describes the anatomy and embryology of the thyroid and parathyroid glands and the recurrent laryngeal nerve, discussing how the anatomy affects function and dysfunction of the glands. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. In vivo study of the surgical anatomy of the axilla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, A; Chakravorty, A; Gui, G P H

    2012-06-01

    Classical anatomical descriptions fail to describe variants often observed in the axilla as they are based on studies that looked at individual structures in isolation or textbooks of cadaveric dissections. The presence of variant anatomy heightens the risk of iatrogenic injury. The aim of this study was to document the nature and frequency of these anatomical variations based on in vivo peroperative surgical observations. Detailed anatomical relationships were documented prospectively during consecutive axillary dissections. Relationships between the thoracodorsal pedicle, course of the lateral thoracic vein, presence of latissimus dorsi muscle slips, variations in axillary and angular vein anatomy, and origins and branching of the intercostobrachial nerve were recorded. Among a total of 73 axillary dissections, 43 (59 per cent) revealed at least one anatomical variant. Most notable variants included aberrant courses of the thoracodorsal nerve in ten patients (14 per cent)--three variants; lateral thoracic vein in 12 patients (16 per cent)--four variants; bifid axillary veins in ten patients (14 per cent); latissimus dorsi muscle slips in four patients (5 per cent); and variants in intercostobrachial nerve origins and branching in 26 patients (36 per cent). The angular vein, a subscapular vein tributary, was found to be a constant axillary structure. Variations in axillary anatomical structures are common. Poor understanding of these variants can affect the adequacy of oncological clearance, lead to vascular injury, compromise planned microvascular procedures and result in chronic pain or numbness from nerve injury. Surgeons should be aware of the common anatomical variants to facilitate efficient and safe axillary surgery. Copyright © 2012 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Surgical anatomy of the radial nerve at the elbow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artico, M; Telera, S; Tiengo, C; Stecco, C; Macchi, V; Porzionato, A; Vigato, E; Parenti, A; De Caro, R

    2009-02-01

    An anatomical study of the brachial portion of the radial nerve with surgical implications is proposed. Thirty specimens of arm from 20 fresh cadavers (11 male, 9 female) were used to examine the topographical relations of the radial nerve with reference to the following anatomical landmarks: acromion angle, medial and lateral epicondyles, point of division between the lateral and long heads of the triceps brachii, lateral intermuscular septum, site of division of the radial nerve into its superficial and posterior interosseous branches and entry and exit point of the posterior interosseous branch into the supinator muscle. The mean distances between the acromion angle and the medial and lateral levels of crossing the posterior aspect of the humerus were 109 (+/-11) and 157 (+/-11) mm, respectively. The mean length and calibre of the nerve in the groove were 59 (+/-4) and 6 (+/-1) mm, respectively. The division of the lateral and long heads of the triceps was found at a mean distance of 126 (+/-13) mm from the acromion angle. The mean distances between the lateral point of crossing the posterior aspect of the humerus and the medial and lateral epicondyles were 125 (+/-13) and 121 (+/-13) mm, respectively. The mean distance between the lateral point of crossing the posterior aspect of the humerus and the entry point in the lateral intermuscular septum (LIS) was 29 (+/-6) mm. The mean distances between the entry point of the nerve in the LIS and the medial and lateral epicondyles were 133 (+/-14) and 110 (+/-23) mm, respectively. Our study provides reliable and objective data of surgical anatomy of the radial nerve which should be always kept in mind by surgeons approaching to the surgery of the arm, in order to avoid iatrogenic injuries.

  6. Compartmental endoscopic surgical anatomy of the medial intraconal orbital space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleier, Benjamin S; Healy, David Y; Chhabra, Nipun; Freitag, Suzanne

    2014-07-01

    Surgical management of intraconal pathology represents the next frontier in endoscopic endonasal surgery. Despite this, the medial intraconal space remains a relatively unexplored region, secondary to its variable and technically demanding anatomy. The purpose of this study is to define the neurovascular structures in this region and introduce a compartmentalized approach to enhance surgical planning. This study was an institutional review board (IRB)-exempt endoscopic anatomic study in 10 cadaveric orbits. After dissection of the medial intraconal space, the pattern and trajectory of the oculomotor nerve and ophthalmic arterial arborizations were analyzed. The position of all vessels as well as the length of the oculomotor trunk and branches relative to the sphenoid face were calculated. A mean of 1.5 arterial branches were identified (n = 15; range, 1-4) at a mean of 8.8 mm from the sphenoid face (range, 4-15 mm). The majority of the arteries (n = 7) inserted adjacent to the midline of medial rectus. The oculomotor nerve inserted at the level of the sphenoid face and arborized with a large proximal trunk 5.5 ± 1.1 mm in length and multiple branches extending 13.2 ± 2.7 mm from the sphenoid face. The most anterior nerve and vascular pedicle were identified at 17.0 and 15.0 mm from the sphenoid face, respectively. The neurovascular supply to the medial rectus muscle describes a varied but predictable pattern. This data allows the compartmentalization of the medial intraconal space into 3 zones relative to the neurovascular supply. These zones inform the complexity of the dissection and provide a guideline for safe medial rectus retraction relative to the fixed landmark of the sphenoid face. © 2014 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  7. Anatomy and Physiology. Module Set II: Major Body Systems. Teacher Edition [and] Student Edition. Surgical Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilley, Robert

    This document, which is the second part of a two-part set of modules on anatomy and physiology for future surgical technicians, contains the teacher and student editions of an introduction to anatomy and physiology that consists of modules on the following body systems: integumentary system; skeletal system; muscular system; nervous system;…

  8. Endoscopic Endonasal Transclival Approach for Resection of a Pontine Glioma: Surgical Planning, Surgical Anatomy, and Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes Cabral, David T; Zenonos, Georgios A; Nuñez, Maximiliano; Celtikci, Pinar; Snyderman, Carl; Wang, Eric; Gardner, Paul A; Fernandez-Miranda, Juan C

    2018-03-12

    The endoscopic endonasal approach (EEA) has been proposed as a potential alternative for ventral brainstem lesions. The surgical anatomy, feasibility, and limitations of the EEA for intrinsic brainstem lesions are still poorly understood. To describe the surgical planning, anatomy, and technique of an intrinsic pontine glioma operated via EEA. Six-human brainstems were prepared for white matter microdissection. Ten healthy subjects were studied with high-definition fiber tractography (HDFT). A 56-yr-old female with right-hemiparesis underwent EEA for an exophytic pontine glioma. Pre- and postoperative HDFTs were implemented. The corticospinal tracts (CSTs) are the most eloquent fibers in the ventral brainstem. At the pons, CSTs run between the pontine nuclei and the middle cerebellar peduncle (MCP). At the lower medulla, the pyramidal decussation leaves no room for safe ventral access. In our illustrative case, preoperative HDFT showed left-CST displaced posteromedially and partially disrupted, right-CST posteriorly displaced, and MCP severely disrupted. A transclival exposure was performed achieving a complete resection of the exophytic component with residual intra-axial tumor. Immediately postop, patient developed new left-side abducens nerve palsy and worse right-hemiparesis. Ten days postop, her strength returned to baseline. HDFT showed preservation and trajectory restoration of the CSTs. The EEA provides direct access to the ventral brainstem, overcoming the limitations of lateral approaches. For intrinsic pathology, HDFT helps choosing the most appropriate surgical route/boundaries for safer resection. Further experience is needed to determine the indications and limitations of this approach that should be performed by neurosurgeons with high-level expertise in EEA.

  9. Detailed anatomy knowledge: first step to approach petroclival meningiomas through the petrous apex. Anatomy lab experience and surgical series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altieri, Roberto; Sameshima, Tetsuro; Pacca, Paolo; Crobeddu, Emanuela; Garbossa, Diego; Ducati, Alessandro; Zenga, Francesco

    2017-04-01

    Petroclival meningiomas are a challenge for neurosurgeons due to the complex anatomy of the region that is rich of vessels and nerves. A perfect and detailed knowledge of the anatomy is very demanding in neurosurgery, especially in skull base surgery. The authors describe the microsurgical anatomy to perform an anterior petrosectomy based on their anatomical and surgical experience and perform a literature review. The temporal bone is the most complex and fascinating bone of skull base. The apex is located in the angle between the greater wing of the sphenoid and the occipital bone. Removing the petrous apex exposes the clivus. The approach directed through the temporal bone in this anatomical area is referred to as an anterior petrosectomy. The area that must be drilled is the rhomboid fossa that is defined by the Kawase, premeatal, and postmeatal triangles. In Division of Neurosurgery - University of Turin, 130 patients, from August 2013 to September 2015, underwent surgical resection of intracranial meningiomas. In this group, we have operated 7 PCMs and 5 of these were approached performing an anterior petrosectomy with good results. In our conclusions, we feel that this surgery require an advanced knowledge of human anatomy and a specialized training in interpretation of radiological and microsurgical anatomy both in the dissection lab and in the operating room.

  10. Surgical management of urinary stones with abnormal kidney anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergin, Giray; Kirac, Mustafa; Unsal, Ali; Kopru, Burak; Yordam, Mustafa; Biri, Hasan

    2017-04-01

    In spite of the fact that urologic surgical techniques used by urologists are becoming more and more minimally invasive and easier because of developing technologies, surgical approaches for the urinary stones in kidneys with abnormal anatomy are still confusing. The objective of this article is to determine the treatment options in these kidneys. For this purpose, between 2005 and 2015, we retrospectively evaluated patients operated for urolithiasis with various congenital renal anomalies in five referral urology clinics in our country. Of the 178 patients (110 male, 60 female), 96 had horseshoe kidneys, 42 had pelvic ectopic kidneys (PEKs), and 40 had isolated rotation anomalies (IRAs) of the kidney. We evaluated the patients for stone-free rate (SFR), mean operation time, mean hospitalization time, and complication rate. In horseshoe kidney, SFRs for retrograde intrarenal surgery (RIRS) and percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) groups were 72.2% and 90%, respectively. In PEKs, these rates were 83.6% and 100% for RIRS and laparoscopic pyelolithotomy, respectively. SFRs in kidneys with IRA were 75% for RIRS and 83.3% for PNL. The mean operation time for RIRS and PNL groups in horseshoe kidney was 40.5±11.2 minutes and 74.5±19.3 minutes, respectively. In PEKs, these times were 52.1±19.3 minutes and 53.1±24.3 minutes for RIRS and laparoscopic pyelolithotomy, respectively. Mean operation time in kidneys with IRA was 48.7±14.4 minutes for RIRS and 53.2±11.3 minutes for PNL. Mean hospitalization times for RIRS and PNL groups in horseshoe kidneys were 1.4±0.7 days and 2.2±1.4 days, respectively. In PEKs, these times were 2.7±1.8 days and 1.9±0.4 days for RIRS and laparoscopic pyelolithotomy, respectively. Mean operation time in kidneys with IRA was 1.5±0.9 days for RIRS and 1.8±0.6 days for PNL. The results of our study showed that RIRS could be used in all of types of abnormal kidneys with small- and medium-sized renal calculi safely and satisfactorily

  11. Surgical management of urinary stones with abnormal kidney anatomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giray Ergin

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In spite of the fact that urologic surgical techniques used by urologists are becoming more and more minimally invasive and easier because of developing technologies, surgical approaches for the urinary stones in kidneys with abnormal anatomy are still confusing. The objective of this article is to determine the treatment options in these kidneys. For this purpose, between 2005 and 2015, we retrospectively evaluated patients operated for urolithiasis with various congenital renal anomalies in five referral urology clinics in our country. Of the 178 patients (110 male, 60 female, 96 had horseshoe kidneys, 42 had pelvic ectopic kidneys (PEKs, and 40 had isolated rotation anomalies (IRAs of the kidney. We evaluated the patients for stone-free rate (SFR, mean operation time, mean hospitalization time, and complication rate. In horseshoe kidney, SFRs for retrograde intrarenal surgery (RIRS and percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL groups were 72.2% and 90%, respectively. In PEKs, these rates were 83.6% and 100% for RIRS and laparoscopic pyelolithotomy, respectively. SFRs in kidneys with IRA were 75% for RIRS and 83.3% for PNL. The mean operation time for RIRS and PNL groups in horseshoe kidney was 40.5±11.2 minutes and 74.5±19.3 minutes, respectively. In PEKs, these times were 52.1±19.3 minutes and 53.1±24.3 minutes for RIRS and laparoscopic pyelolithotomy, respectively. Mean operation time in kidneys with IRA was 48.7±14.4 minutes for RIRS and 53.2±11.3 minutes for PNL. Mean hospitalization times for RIRS and PNL groups in horseshoe kidneys were 1.4±0.7 days and 2.2±1.4 days, respectively. In PEKs, these times were 2.7±1.8 days and 1.9±0.4 days for RIRS and laparoscopic pyelolithotomy, respectively. Mean operation time in kidneys with IRA was 1.5±0.9 days for RIRS and 1.8±0.6 days for PNL. The results of our study showed that RIRS could be used in all of types of abnormal kidneys with small- and medium-sized renal calculi safely and

  12. Patient-specific surgical planning and hemodynamic computational fluid dynamics optimization through free-form haptic anatomy editing tool (SURGEM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekkan, Kerem; Whited, Brian; Kanter, Kirk; Sharma, Shiva; de Zelicourt, Diane; Sundareswaran, Kartik; Frakes, David; Rossignac, Jarek; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2008-11-01

    The first version of an anatomy editing/surgical planning tool (SURGEM) targeting anatomical complexity and patient-specific computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis is presented. Novel three-dimensional (3D) shape editing concepts and human-shape interaction technologies have been integrated to facilitate interactive surgical morphology alterations, grid generation and CFD analysis. In order to implement "manual hemodynamic optimization" at the surgery planning phase for patients with congenital heart defects, these tools are applied to design and evaluate possible modifications of patient-specific anatomies. In this context, anatomies involve complex geometric topologies and tortuous 3D blood flow pathways with multiple inlets and outlets. These tools make it possible to freely deform the lumen surface and to bend and position baffles through real-time, direct manipulation of the 3D models with both hands, thus eliminating the tedious and time-consuming phase of entering the desired geometry using traditional computer-aided design (CAD) systems. The 3D models of the modified anatomies are seamlessly exported and meshed for patient-specific CFD analysis. Free-formed anatomical modifications are quantified using an in-house skeletization based cross-sectional geometry analysis tool. Hemodynamic performance of the systematically modified anatomies is compared with the original anatomy using CFD. CFD results showed the relative importance of the various surgically created features such as pouch size, vena cave to pulmonary artery (PA) flare and PA stenosis. An interactive surgical-patch size estimator is also introduced. The combined design/analysis cycle time is used for comparing and optimizing surgical plans and improvements are tabulated. The reduced cost of patient-specific shape design and analysis process, made it possible to envision large clinical studies to assess the validity of predictive patient-specific CFD simulations. In this paper, model

  13. Intrahepatic Vascular Anatomy in Rats and Mice--Variations and Surgical Implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constanze Sänger

    Full Text Available The intra-hepatic vascular anatomy in rodents, its variations and corresponding supplying and draining territories in respect to the lobar structure of the liver have not been described. We performed a detailed anatomical imaging study in rats and mice to allow for further refinement of experimental surgical approaches.LEWIS-Rats and C57Bl/6N-Mice were subjected to ex-vivo imaging using μCT. The image data were used for semi-automated segmentation to extract the hepatic vascular tree as prerequisite for 3D visualization. The underlying vascular anatomy was reconstructed, analysed and used for determining hepatic vascular territories.The four major liver lobes have their own lobar portal supply and hepatic drainage territories. In contrast, the paracaval liver is supplied by various small branches from right and caudate portal veins and drains directly into the vena cava. Variations in hepatic vascular anatomy were observed in terms of branching pattern and distance of branches to each other. The portal vein anatomy is more variable than the hepatic vein anatomy. Surgically relevant variations were primarily observed in portal venous supply.For the first time the key variations of intrahepatic vascular anatomy in mice and rats and their surgical implications were described. We showed that lobar borders of the liver do not always match vascular territorial borders. These findings are of importance for the design of new surgical procedures and for understanding eventual complications following hepatic surgery.

  14. The Treaty of Anatomy, Descriptive and Surgical | Romero-Reverón ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Treaty of Anatomy, Descriptive and Surgical. Rafael Romero-Reverón. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's ...

  15. The postauricular fascia: classification, anatomy, and potential surgical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokrollahi, Kayvan; Taylor, James Paul; Le Roux, Cara M; Ashton, Mark W; Rozen, Warren M; Jones, Nicholas S; Payne, Anthony

    2014-07-01

    In recent times, there has been evolving interest in the fascial structure of the ear, especially in relation to otoplasty techniques. Although the fascial tissues used in these procedures are referred to as "postauricular/retroauricular fascia," the sparse anatomical studies that exist use this terminology to describe what is the adjacent thicker and more fibrous structure of the superficial temporal area continuous with the mastoid region, rather than the tissue actually used in these procedures which is adherent to the posterior surface of the ear. There are clear clinical differences in the properties of these two structures, and this study set out to identify the anatomical nature of these differences, looking in detail at the anatomy and vascularity of the fascia directly posterior and adherent to the ear itself, highlighting its unique properties, and how it interfaces with the rest of the fascia. We provide a nomenclature to differentiate the fascia adherent to the posterior of the ear (the intrinsic postauricular fascia) from the more fibrous tissues continuous with the scalp fascia (the extrinsic postauricular fascia). Clinical applications for the fascia are suggested based on the vascularity and anatomy described, and our clinical experience.

  16. Surgical neuroangiography. Vol. 1: Functional anatomy of craniofacial arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasjaunias, P.; Berenstein, A.

    1987-01-01

    The contents of this book are: Arterial Anatomy: Introduction. - The Internal Maxillary System. - The Pharyngo-occipital System. - The Upper Cervical Vertebral Column: The Cervical Arteries. - The Musculocutaneous Elements of the Head and Mouth. - Thyrolaryngeal Arteries. - The Transosseous Peripheral Nervous System Arterial Supply. - Dangerous Vessels. - Collateral Circulation. - The Pharyngoocipital Collateral Pattern. - The Internal Maxillary Collateral Pattern. - The Linguofacial Collateral Pattern. - Multiple Constraints and Chronology of the Collateral Response. - Angiographic Protocols. - Angiographic Protocol of the Parasellar Region. - Angiographic Protocol of the Posterior Base of the Skull. - Angiographic Protocol of the Carotid Region. - Angiographic Protocol of the Nasomaxillaary Region. - Angiographic Protocol of the Maxillomandibular Region. - Angiographic Protocol of the Temporofacial and Scalp Region. - Angiographic Protocol of the Thyrolaryngeal Region. - References. - Subject Index

  17. Surgical anatomy and pathology of the middle ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luers, Jan Christoffer; Hüttenbrink, Karl-Bernd

    2016-02-01

    Middle ear surgery is strongly influenced by anatomical and functional characteristics of the middle ear. The complex anatomy means a challenge for the otosurgeon who moves between preservation or improvement of highly important functions (hearing, balance, facial motion) and eradication of diseases. Of these, perforations of the tympanic membrane, chronic otitis media, tympanosclerosis and cholesteatoma are encountered most often in clinical practice. Modern techniques for reconstruction of the ossicular chain aim for best possible hearing improvement using delicate alloplastic titanium prostheses, but a number of prosthesis-unrelated factors work against this intent. Surgery is always individualized to the case and there is no one-fits-all strategy. Above all, both middle ear diseases and surgery can be associated with a number of complications; the most important ones being hearing deterioration or deafness, dizziness, facial palsy and life-threatening intracranial complications. To minimize risks, a solid knowledge of and respect for neurootologic structures is essential for an otosurgeon who must train him- or herself intensively on temporal bones before performing surgery on a patient. © 2015 Anatomical Society.

  18. The Surgical Anatomy of the Lumbosacroiliac Triangle: A Cadaveric Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoccali, Carmine; Skoch, Jesse; Patel, Apar S; Walter, Christina M; Avila, Mauricio J; Martirosyan, Nikolay L; Demitri, Silvio; Baaj, Ali A

    2016-04-01

    The anatomic area delineated medially by the lateral part of the L4-L5 vertebral bodies, distally by the anterior-superior surface of the sacral wing, and laterally by an imaginary line joining the base of the L4 transverse process to the proximal part of the sacroiliac joint, is of particular interest to spine surgeons. We are referring to this area as the lumbo-sacro-iliac triangle (LSIT). Knowledge of LSIT anatomy is necessary during approaches for L5 vertebral and sacral fractures, sacral and iliac tumors, and extraforaminal decompression of the L5 nerve roots. We performed an anatomic dissection of the LSIT in 3 embalmed cadavers (6 triangles), using an anterior and posterior approach. We identified 3 key tissue planes: the neurological plexus plane, constituted by L4 and L5 nerve roots; an intermediate level constituted by the ileosacral tunnel; and posteriorly, by the lumbosacral ligament, and the posterior muscular plane. Improving anatomic knowledge of the LSIT may help surgeons decrease the risk of possible complications. When LSIT pathology is present, a lateral approach corresponding to the tip of the L4 transverse process, medially, is suggested to decrease the risk of vessel and nerve root damage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The impact of gross anatomy laboratory on first year medical students' interest in a surgical career.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulcrano, Marisa E; Malekzadeh, Sonya; Kumar, Anagha

    2016-09-01

    This study sought to determine the impact of gross anatomy laboratory (GA) on first year medical students' (M1) interest in a surgical career. Secondary objectives included identifying other influences in M1s' career decision making. This prospective study included surveys before and after GA. All M1s enrolled in GA were invited to participate. Sixty students completed both the pre- and post-test surveys. A 5-point Likert-type scale surveyed participants' interests, specific personality traits, experience during the course of GA, and likelihood of pursuing a surgical career. Statistical analysis included Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test and (Polychotomous) Ordinal Logistic Regression Model. Students' desire to work with their hands increased (50 vs. 33.3%) and enjoyment working with instruments and tools similarly increased (50 vs. 41.7%). Likelihood of pursuing a surgical career after gross anatomy increased in 31.7% of students, decreased in 16.7%, and was unchanged in 51.7%. Over 75% of students with a prior interest in surgery and 21% of those who previously felt neutral agreed that they were likely to pursue a career in surgery at the conclusion of the laboratory. Students with a surgeon family member were 0.1976 times as likely to exhibit a positive change in interest (P values 0.024). Gross anatomy may influence up to a third of the class to consider a surgical career, especially those with a prior interest in surgery and those previously feeling ambivalent. Students with a surgeon family member became less likely to enter a surgical career after gross anatomy. Clin. Anat. 29:691-695, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Anatomy of the Ophthalmic Artery: A Review concerning Its Modern Surgical and Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adamantios Michalinos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Anatomy of ophthalmic artery has been thoroughly studied and reviewed in many anatomical and surgical textbooks and papers. Issues of interest are its intracranial and extracranial course, its branches, its importance for vision, and its interaction with various intracranial pathologies. Improvement of our understanding about pathophysiology of certain diseases like aneurysm formation, central retinal artery occlusion, and retinoblastoma and also invention of new therapeutic modalities like superselective catheterization, intra-arterial fibrinolysis, and intra-arterial chemotherapy necessitate a reappraisal of its anatomy from a clinical point of view. The aim of this review is to examine clinical anatomy of ophthalmic artery and correlate it with new diagnostic and therapeutic applications.

  1. Surgical anatomy of the round window-Implications for cochlear implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luers, J C; Hüttenbrink, K B; Beutner, D

    2018-04-01

    The round window is an important portal for the application of active hearing aids and cochlear implants. The anatomical and topographical knowledge about the round window region is a prerequisite for successful insertion for a cochlear implant electrode. To sum up current knowledge about the round window anatomy and to give advice to the cochlear implant surgeon for optimal placement of an electrode. Systematic Medline search. Search term "round window[Title]" with no date restriction. Only publications in the English Language were included. All abstracts were screened for relevance, that is a focus on surgical anatomy of the round window. The search results were supplemented with hand searching of selected reviews and reference lists from included studies. Subjective assessment. There is substantial variability in size and shape of the round window. The round window is regarded as the most reliable surgical landmark to safely locate the scala tympani. Factors affecting the optimal trajectory line for atraumatic electrode insertion are anatomy of the round window, the anatomy of the intracochlear hook region and the variable orientation and size of the cochlea's basal turn. The very close relation to the sensitive inner ear structures necessitates a thorough anatomic knowledge and careful insertion technique, especially when implanting patients with residual hearing. In order to avoid electrode migration between the scalae and to achieve protect the modiolus and the basilar membrane, it is recommended to aim for an electrode insertion vector from postero-superior to antero-inferior. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Surface anatomy scanning (SAS) in intracranial tumours: comparison with surgical findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumida, M.; Uozumi, T.; Kiya, K.; Arita, K.; Kurisu, K.; Onda, J.; Satoh, H.; Ikawa, F.; Yukawa, O.; Migita, K.; Hada, H.; Katada, K.

    1995-01-01

    We evaluated the usefulness of surface anatomy scanning (SAS) in intracranial tumours, comparing it with surgical findings. We examined 31 patients with brain tumours preoperatively. The tumours included 16 meningiomas, 8 gliomas, 4 metastases and 3 others. SAS clearly demonstrated the tumours, allowing them to be distinguished from the structures of the brain surface, including oedema, except in cases of metastasis. SAS clearly demonstrated large cortical veins. SAS is useful for three-dimensional delineation of the brain surface before surgery. (orig.)

  3. The cerebral isthmus: fiber tract anatomy, functional significance, and surgical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutsarnakis, Christos; Liakos, Faidon; Liouta, Evangelia; Themistoklis, Konstantinos; Sakas, Damianos; Stranjalis, George

    2016-02-01

    The cerebral isthmus is the white matter area located between the periinsular sulcus and the lateral ventricle. Studies demonstrating the fiber tract and topographic anatomy of this entity are lacking in current neurosurgical literature. Hence, the authors' primary aim was to describe the microsurgical white matter anatomy of the cerebral isthmus by using the fiber dissection technique, and they discuss its functional significance. In addition, they sought to investigate its possible surgical utility in approaching lesions located in or adjacent to the lateral ventricle. This study was divided into 2 parts and included 30 formalin-fixed cerebral hemispheres, 5 of which were injected with colored silicone. In the first part, 15 uncolored specimens underwent the Klinger's procedure and were dissected in a lateromedial direction at the level of the superior, inferior, and anterior isthmuses, and 10 were used for coronal and axial cuts. In the second part, the injected specimens were used to investigate the surgical significance of the superior isthmus in accessing the frontal horn of the lateral ventricle. The microsurgical anatomy of the anterior, superior, and inferior cerebral isthmuses was carefully studied and recorded both in terms of topographic and fiber tract anatomy. In addition, the potential role of the proximal part of the superior isthmus as an alternative safe surgical corridor to the anterior part of the lateral ventricle was investigated. Using the fiber dissection technique along with coronal and axial cuts in cadaveric brain specimens remains a cornerstone in the acquisition of thorough anatomical knowledge of narrow white matter areas such as the cerebral isthmus. The surgical significance of the superior isthmus in approaching the frontal horn of the lateral ventricle is stressed, but further studies must be carried out to elucidate its role in ventricular surgery.

  4. Preserving the Facial Nerve During Orbitozygomatic Craniotomy: Surgical Anatomy Assessment and Stepwise Illustration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayebi Meybodi, Ali; Lawton, Michael T; Yousef, Sonia; Sánchez, J J González; Benet, Arnau

    2017-09-01

    Surgical safety and efficiency during an orbitozygomatic (OZ) osteotomy rely on thorough knowledge of the surgical anatomy of the facial nerve. Although the anatomy of the facial nerve and its relation to the pterional craniotomy are described, a thorough assessment of facial nerve preservation techniques during the OZ approach and its variations is lacking. We assessed the surgical anatomy of the facial nerve related to the OZ approach and provided a thorough stepwise description on how to preserve it. The OZ approach was performed bilaterally in 15 cadaveric heads. The interfascial and subfascial techniques were performed to study their nuances in preserving the facial nerve. We compared the 2 techniques and provided a thorough description on how to preserve the facial nerve during each step of the OZ approach. At the zygomatic arch, the facial nerve was found between the galea and the superficial temporal fascia. A cut in the fascia at the posterior end of the zygomatic arch did not cross any facial nerve branches. The subfascial technique was simpler, more efficient, and provided more structural protection of the facial nerve branches than the interfascial technique. The frontal division of the facial nerve is related directly to dissection over the zygomatic bone and may be injured during fascial dissection or osteotomies. Both interfascial and subfascial techniques are feasible to use during the OZ craniotomy and provide ample exposure of the OZ unit. Regarding the preservation of the facial nerve branches, we favor the subfascial method. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The choroid plexus: a comprehensive review of its history, anatomy, function, histology, embryology, and surgical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, Martin M; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Adeeb, Nimer; Deep, Aman; Bavarsad Shahripour, Reza; Shahripour, Reza Bavarsad; Loukas, Marios; Tubbs, Richard Isaiah; Tubbs, R Shane

    2014-02-01

    The role of the choroid plexus in cerebrospinal fluid production has been identified for more than a century. Over the years, more intensive studies of this structure has lead to a better understanding of the functions, including brain immunity, protection, absorption, and many others. Here, we review the macro- and microanatomical structure of the choroid plexus in addition to its function and embryology. The literature was searched for articles and textbooks for data related to the history, anatomy, physiology, histology, embryology, potential functions, and surgical implications of the choroid plexus. All were gathered and summarized comprehensively. We summarize the literature regarding the choroid plexus and its surgical implications.

  6. Distal biceps brachii tendon anatomy revisited from a surgical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogg, Quentin A; Hess, Benjamin R; Rodgers, K Gary; Ashwood, Neil

    2009-04-01

    The distal biceps brachii tendon is commonly susceptible to traumatic injury. This study aimed to describe the morphology of the distal biceps brachii tendon in relation to the commonly used endobutton repair of tendon rupture. The results suggested that the distal tendon is a series of distinct bands of variable number. These bands are obscured surgically by the tendon sheath. Upon opening this sheath, blunt dissection of the tendon released fibrous connections between the tendon bands. Adjacent bands were variably connected via small oblique bands. The separations between bands were continuous onto the radius. They were therefore considered as separate force-conducting units. This notion is of high relevance to endobutton repairs, as the sutures are typically only passed through the margins of the tendon. Where few connections exist between tendinous bands, this represents a potential weakness, as central bands are therefore free to be pulled proximally. This is of primary concern in the early rehabilitative stages of postoperative care. It may be suggested that sutures that cross the width of the tendon will eliminate the give of central bands, improving postoperative results, reducing revision numbers, and potentially reducing rehabilitation time. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Surgical anatomy of the dorsal nerve of the clitoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginger, Van Anh T; Cold, Christopher J; Yang, Claire C

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the distal pathway of the dorsal nerve of the clitoris (DNC) from gross anatomical and histological studies of cadaver specimens. We performed dissections on 14 intact adult cadaver vulva specimens using 2× loupe magnification and microscopy. The DNC was identified by gross dissection and confirmed histologically by staining with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E), Masson's trichrome (MT), and S100 antibody. The DNC pathway and its branches were followed from the pubic rami to the glans clitoris. The DNC travels inferior to the inferior pubic ramus along the superior/posterior edge of the clitoral crus. At the angle of the clitoral body, inferior to the pubic symphysis, the DNC enters the deep component of the suspensory ligament, which attaches to the clitoral body and to the pubic symphysis. The dorsal nerves, at the angle of the clitoral body, travel along the dorsal aspect of the clitoral body at the 11 and 1 o'clock positions. At the base of the clitoral body, the DNC is suspended superiorly away from the tunica. Distally along the clitoral body, the DNC descends and runs along the tunica and enters the glans. Within the glans, the terminal fibers are widely dispersed, and numerous receptors populate the supporting tissue of the glans beneath the epithelium. The detailed description of the distal course of the nerve presented here has not been previously described in adult humans and is pertinent for surgical procedures involving the clitoris. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. [Specific features of surgical anatomy of the subhyoid region with special reference to tracheostomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernykh, A V; Mashkova, T A; Nerovnyĭ, A I; Maleev, Iu V

    2010-01-01

    Peculiarities of thyroid gland linear dimensions, volume, shape, and topographical features were investigated using the morphological material obtained from 426 human corpses of either gender with a view to using this information for planning and performing tracheostomy in residents of the Central Chernozem region, Russia. The study yielded new data on surgical anatomy of additional muscles of the subhyoid region, thyroid isthmus and pyramidal lobe. Rare and previously unknown variants of anatomical structure of the anterior cervical area are described that may play the role of risk factors of postoperative complications of tracheostomy. Relevant recommendations are provided for practicing otorhinolaryngologists.

  9. What motivates surgeons to teach dissection anatomy to medical students and surgical trainees?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Annette; Ramsey-Stewart, George

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Although a fading tradition in some institutions, having clinicians teach anatomy by whole-body dissection provides a clinical context to undergraduate and postgraduate medical students, increasing their depth of learning. The reasons for a clinician’s motivation to teach may be articulated in accordance with self-determination theory (SDT). SDT proposes that for individuals to be intrinsically motivated, three key elements are needed: 1) autonomy, 2) competence, and 3) relatedness. Materials and methods Data were collected through semistructured interviews with eight surgeons who were supervisors/facilitators in the anatomy by whole-body dissection course for undergraduate students in the Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery program and postgraduate students in the Master of Surgery program at the University of Sydney. Qualitative analysis methods were used to code and categorize data into themes. Results Our study used SDT as a conceptual framework to explore surgeons’ motivation to supervise students in the anatomy by whole-body dissection courses. Elements that facilitated their desire to teach included satisfaction derived from teaching, a sense of achievement in providing students with a clinical context, a strong sense of community within the dissection courses, and a sense of duty to the medical/surgical profession and to patient welfare. Conclusion The surgeons’ motivation for teaching was largely related to their desire to contribute to the training of the next generation of doctors and surgeons, and ultimately to future patient welfare. PMID:25565913

  10. The ventricular system of the brain: a comprehensive review of its history, anatomy, histology, embryology, and surgical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, M M; Adeeb, N; Griessenauer, C J; Sheikh, H; Shahidi, S; Tubbs, R I; Tubbs, R S

    2014-01-01

    The cerebral ventricles have been recognized since ancient medical history. Their true function started to be realized more than a thousand years later. Their anatomy and function are extremely important in the neurosurgical panorama. The literature was searched for articles and textbooks of different topics related to the history, anatomy, physiology, histology, embryology and surgical considerations of the brain ventricles. Herein, we summarize the literature about the cerebral ventricular system.

  11. Petrus Camper: A history and overview of the clinical importance of Camper's fascia in surgical anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mian, Asma; Bertino, Frederic; Shipley, Erik; Shoja, Mohammadali M; Tubbs, R Shane; Loukas, Marios

    2014-05-01

    Petrus Camper's contributions to modern anatomical science include descriptions of the foot, upper limb, axilla, and inguinal region. His explanation of the etiology of inguinal hernias revolutionized the surgical practice of their repair. Camper's description of abdominal anatomy was an invaluable contribution to the field of abdominal surgery. Current research reviewed in this article shows the importance of understanding the layers of the abdominal wall, notably Camper's fascia, the closure of which has been found to be vital to proper wound healing and patient recovery. This article begins with a biography of Petrus Camper and his research in the inguinal region. It continues with anatomical and histological descriptions of Camper's fascia and finishes with its clinical correlates in surgical practice. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Lateral transzygomatic middle fossa approach and its extensions: surgical technique and 3D anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chotai, Silky; Kshettry, Varun R; Petrak, Alex; Ammirati, Mario

    2015-03-01

    Various approaches to lesions involving the middle fossa and cavernous sinus (CS), with and without posterior fossa extension have been described. In the present study, we describe the surgical technique for the extradural lateral tranzygomatic middle fossa approach and its extensions, highlight relevant 3D anatomy. Simulations of the lateral transzygomatic middle fossa approach and its extensions were performed in four silicon-injected formalin fixed cadaveric heads. The step-by-step description and relevant anatomy was documented with 3D photographs. The lateral transzygomatic middle fossa approach is particularly useful for lesions involving the middle fossa with and without CS invasion, extending to the posterior fossa and involving the clinoidal region. This approach incorporates direct lateral positioning of patient, frontotemporal craniotomy with zygomatic arch osteotomy, extradural elevation of the temporal lobe, and delamination of the outer layer of the lateral CS wall. Extradural drilling of the sphenoid wing and anterior clinoid process allows entry into the CS through the superior wall and exposure of the clinoidal segment of the ICA. Posteriorly, drilling the petrous apex allows exposure of the ventral brainstem from trigeminal to facial nerve and can be extended to the interpeduncular fossa by division of the superior petrosal sinus. The present study illustrates 3D anatomical relationships of the lateral transzygomatic middle fossa approach with its extensions. This approach allows wide access to different topographic areas (clinoidal region and clinoidal ICA, the entire CS, and the posterior fossa from the interpeduncular fossa to the facial nerve) via a lateral trajectory. Precise knowledge of technique and anatomy is necessary to properly execute this approach. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. GROSS ANATOMY AND SURGICAL APPROACH TO THE HUMERAL SHAFT IN GIANT ANTEATER (MYRMECOPHAGA TRIDACTYLA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sesoko, Natália Ferreira; Rahal, Sheila Canevese; Bortolini, Zara; Merlini, Natalie Bertelis; Teixeira, Carlos Roberto

    2016-09-01

    Anteater forelimbs are distinguished morphologically from domestic animals, especially due to their unique movement and their natural habits. A knowledge of the pectoral limb anatomy and the proper surgical approach are fundamental to success in osteosynthesis and other surgeries. This study aimed to describe the muscles and neurovascular structures of the pectoral limb and the surgical approach to the humeral shaft of the giant anteater ( Myrmecophaga tridactyla ). Dissections of the forelimbs of seven cadavers were performed to identify the major muscles and neurovascular structures. Three of these animals' contralateral forearms were used to simulate the surgical approach to the humeral shaft. Some specific characteristics of the muscle morphology were biceps muscle had two heads, triceps muscle had three heads, and there was an olecranon-epicondylar muscle. To expose the shaft of the humerus, it was necessary to incise the superficial pectoral muscle and separate the heads of the biceps muscle. Due to the anatomical characteristics of the humerus, the craniomedial approach was the most appropriate because it accommodated the anatomical peculiarities of the giant anteater.

  14. From ancient to avant-garde: a review of traditional and modern multimodal approaches to surgical anatomy education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Minhao; Wattchow, David; de Fontgalland, Dayan

    2018-03-01

    The landscape of surgical anatomy education is progressively changing. Traditional methods, such as cadaveric dissection and didacticism are being increasingly phased out in undergraduate courses for multimodal approaches incorporating problem-based learning, radiology and computer-based simulations. Although effective at clinically contextualizing and integrating anatomical information, these approaches may be a poor substitute for fostering a grasp of foundational 'pure' anatomy. Dissection is ideal for this purpose and hence remains the cornerstone of anatomical education. However, novel methods and technological advancements continually give way to adjuncts such as cadaveric surgery, three-dimensional printing, virtual simulation and live surgical streaming, which have demonstrated significant efficacy alone or alongside dissection. Therefore, although divergent paradigms of 'new versus old' approaches have engulfed and divided the community, educators should seek to integrate the ancient and avant-garde to comprehensively satisfy all of the modern anatomy learner's educational needs. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  15. The surgical anatomy of the left ventricular outflow tract in hearts with ventricular septal defect and aortic arch obstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shiokawa, Y.; Becker, A. E.

    1998-01-01

    Profound understanding of the left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) anatomy is crucial to improve surgical results in patients with aortic arch obstruction, ventricular septal defect, and subaortic stenosis. We studied the morphology of the LVOT in 32 postmortem hearts with aortic arch obstruction

  16. Vulvar field resection: novel approach to the surgical treatment of vulvar cancer based on ontogenetic anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höckel, Michael; Schmidt, Katja; Bornmann, Karoline; Horn, Lars-Christian; Dornhöfer, Nadja

    2010-10-01

    Current local treatment of vulvar cancer is wide tumor excision and radical vulvectomy based on functional anatomy established from the adult and on the view of radial progressive tumor permeation. Standard surgery is associated with a considerable local failure rate and severe disturbance of the patients' body image. Vulvar field resection (VFR) is based on ontogenetic anatomy and on the concept of local tumor spread within permissive compartments. VFR combined with anatomical reconstruction (AR) is proposed as a new surgical approach to the treatment of vulvar cancer. A prospective trial was launched to test the compartment theory for vulvar cancer and to assess safety and effectiveness of the new therapy. In 54 consecutive patients 46 tumors were locally confined to the tissue compartment differentiated from the vulvar anlage. The 8 tumors having transgressed into adjacent tissue compartments of different embryonic origins exhibited signs of advanced malignant progression. 38 patients with vulvar cancer, stages T1-3 were treated with VFR and AR. The perioperative complication rate was low. At 19 (3-50) months follow-up no patient failed locally. 33 patients estimated their body image as undisturbed. Vulvar cancer permeates within ontogenetic tissue compartments and surgical treatment with VFR and AR appears to be safe and effective. Patients should benefit from the new approach as local tumor control is high and the preserved tissue can be successfully used for restoration of vulvar form and function. Confirmatory trials with more patients and longer follow-up are suggested. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Can a teaching assistant experience in a surgical anatomy course influence the learning curve for nontechnical skill development for surgical residents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidenreich, Mark J; Musonza, Tashinga; Pawlina, Wojciech; Lachman, Nirusha

    2016-01-01

    The foundation upon which surgical residents are trained to work comprises more than just critical cognitive, clinical, and technical skill. In an environment where the synchronous application of expertise is vital to patient outcomes, the expectation for optimal functioning within a multidisciplinary team is extremely high. Studies have shown that for most residents, one of the most difficult milestones in the path to achieving professional expertise in a surgical career is overcoming the learning curve. This view point commentary provides a reflection from the two senior medical students who have participated in the Student-as-Teacher program developed by the Department of Anatomy at Mayo Clinic, designed to prepare students for their teaching assistant (TA) role in anatomy courses. Both students participated as TAs in a six week surgical anatomy course for surgical first assistant students offered by the School of Health Sciences at Mayo Clinic. Development of teaching skills, nontechnical leadership, communication, and assessment skills, are discussed in relation to their benefits in preparing senior medical students for surgical residency. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists.

  18. The round window region and contiguous areas: endoscopic anatomy and surgical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchioni, Daniele; Alicandri-Ciufelli, Matteo; Pothier, David D; Rubini, Alessia; Presutti, Livio

    2015-05-01

    The round window region is a critical area of the middle ear; the aim of this paper is to describe its anatomy from an endoscopic perspective, emphasizing some structures, the knowledge of which could have important implications during surgery, as well as to evaluate what involvement cholesteatoma may have with these structures. Retrospective review of video recordings of endoscopic ear surgeries and retrospective database review were conducted in Tertiary university referral center. Videos from endoscopic middle ear procedures carried out between June 2010 and September 2012 and stored in a shared database were reviewed retrospectively. Surgeries in which an endoscopic magnification of the round window region and the inferior retrotympanum area was performed intraoperatively were included in the study. Involvement by cholesteatoma of those regions was also documented based on information obtained from the surgical database. Conformation of the tegmen of the round window niche may influence the surgical view of round window membrane. A structure connecting the round window area to the petrous apex, named the subcochlear canaliculus, is described. Cholesteatoma can invade the round window areas in some patients. Endoscopic approaches can guarantee a very detailed view and allow the exploration of the round window region. Exact anatomical knowledge of this region can have important advantages during surgery, since some pathology can invade inside cavities or tunnels otherwise not seen by instrumentation that produces a straight-line view (e.g. microscope).

  19. The beauty of anatomy: visual displays and surgical education in early-nineteenth-century London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowitz, Carin

    2011-01-01

    The early-nineteenth-century artist, anatomist, and teacher Sir Charles Bell saw anatomy and art as closely related subjects. He taught anatomy to artists and surgeons, illustrated his own anatomical texts, and wrote a treatise on the use of anatomy in art. The author explores the connections among visual displays representing human anatomy, aesthetics, and pedagogical practices for Bell and a particular group of British surgeon-anatomists. Creating anatomical models and drawings was thought to discipline the surgeon's hand, while the study of anatomy and comparative anatomy would discipline the artist's eye. And for Bell, beauty made drawings into better pedagogical tools.

  20. Surgically Relevant Bony and Soft Tissue Anatomy of the Proximal Femur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippon, Marc J.; Michalski, Max P.; Campbell, Kevin J.; Goldsmith, Mary T.; Devitt, Brian M.; Wijdicks, Coen A.; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hip endoscopy facilitates the treatment of extra-articular disorders of the proximal femur. Unfortunately, current knowledge of proximal femur anatomy is limited to qualitative descriptions and lacks surgically relevant landmarks. Purpose: To provide a quantitative and qualitative analysis of proximal femur anatomy in reference to surgically relevant bony landmarks. Study Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Methods: Fourteen cadaveric hemipelvises were dissected. A coordinate measuring device measured dimensions and interrelationships of the gluteal muscles, hip external rotators, pectineus, iliopsoas, and joint capsule in reference to osseous landmarks. Results: The vastus tubercle, superomedial border of the greater trochanter, and femoral head-neck junction were distinct and reliable osseous landmarks. The anteroinferior tip of the vastus tubercle was 17.1 mm (95% CI: 14.5, 19.8 mm) anteroinferior to the center of the gluteus medius lateral insertional footprint and was 22.9 mm (95% CI: 20.1, 25.7 mm) inferolateral to the center of the gluteus minimus insertional footprint. The insertions of the piriformis, conjoint tendon of the hip (superior gemellus, obturator internus, and inferior gemellus), and obturator externus were identified relative to the superomedial border of the greater trochanter. The relationship of the aforementioned footprints were 49% (95% CI: 43%, 54%), 42% (95% CI: 33%, 50%), and 64% (95% CI: 59%, 69%) from the anterior (0%) to posterior (100%) margins of the superomedial border of the greater trochanter, respectively. The hip joint capsule attached distally on the proximal femur 18.2 mm (95% CI: 14.2, 22.2 mm) from the head-neck junction medially on average. Conclusion: The vastus tubercle, superomedial border of the greater trochanter, and the femoral head-neck junction were reliable osseous landmarks for the identification of the tendinous and hip capsular insertions on the proximal femur. Knowledge of the

  1. Non-Surgical Retreatment of Maxillary Lateral Incisor with Unusual Anatomy: A Case Report and Mini Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubbar, Ashraf; Bolhari, Behnam; Fakhari, Nooshin; Alemi, Parvin; Nosrat, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge about internal anatomy plays a crucial role in the success of the root canal treatment. Many studies on internal anatomy have repeatedly reported that maxillary lateral incisors have only one canal. The primary aim of this article was to describe successful non-surgical retreatment of a permanent maxillary lateral incisor with two root canals and open apices. The treatment was carried out using dental operating microscope and the canals were obturated with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) as an apical plug. A review of literature was also conducted to evaluate the anatomical variations of maxillary lateral incisors. PMID:28808470

  2. Alteration of Leaf Anatomy of Handeuleum (Graptophyllum pictum L. Griff due to Gamma Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arrin Rosmala

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The leaves of the plant handeuleum (Graptophyllum pictum L. Griff have long been used for traditional medicine in several regions in Indonesia. This study was aimed to determine the effect of gamma irradiation rate on the anatomy and phytochemical content of the leaf. The rates of gamma rays used were 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, 90, and 105 Gy. Our results showed that gamma ray irradiation rate of 30 Gy produced leaves that contain anthocyanins and carotenoids, with the highest number of stomata and stomatal density compared with control plants. Stomatal index was found highest in the leaves with 45 Gy of gamma irradiation. High-rate gamma ray irradiation produced rigid, thick, and frangible leaves. A high rate of gamma irradiation, i.e. 75, 90, and 105 Gy, produces bigger palisade, sponges, and upper epidermis than the control plants, respectively. Our results showed an association between increasing rate of irradiation with alterations in the structure of leaf anatomy and phytochemical content of handeuleum.

  3. The galenic venous system: Surgical anatomy and its angiographic and magnetic resonance venographic correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilic, Tuerker; Ozduman, Koray; Cavdar, Safiye; Oezek, M. Memet; Pamir, M. Necmettin

    2005-01-01

    Objective: This study aims at evaluating the adequacy of digital subtraction angiography and magnetic resonance venography in imaging of the galenic venous system for surgical planning of approaches to the pineal region. Anatomical dissections were carried out in 10 cadavers of several age groups and these were compared to imaging findings in 10 living subjects. Methods: The presence or absence of 10 predetermined veins or vein groupings belonging to the galenic venous system were prospectively analyzed in 10 cadaver dissections and imaging findings of 10 age matched human subjects. The studied vessels were the vein of galen, the internal cerebral veins, both basal vein of Rosenthals, internal occipital vein, occipitotemporal veins, precentral cerebellar veins, tectal veins, pineal veins, superior vermian veins (including superior cerebellar veins (SCVs)) and posterior pericallosal veins. Each of the subjects had both digital subtraction angiography and magnetic resonance venography studies performed. Diagnostic digital subtraction angiography was performed using the transfemoral route and the venous phase was used for the study. Magnetic resonance venography was performed in 1.5 T MRI equipment using the 2D-TOF sequence. All studies were reported to be normal. Results: There was wide variation in the anatomy of the galenic venous system. There were interpersonal, intrapersonal and age related variations. Both the digital subtraction angiography and the magnetic resonance venography were efficient at demonstrating large veins. However, smaller veins were less readily demonstrated in either study. The general sensitivities of the digital subtraction angiography and the magnetic resonance venography for the galenic venous system were 45.5% and 32.5%, respectively. Surgically important veins were missed in most studies. Conclusions: Anatomically, the galenic venous system is highly variable. This variability is caused by interpersonal, intrapersonal and age related

  4. Endovascular optical coherence tomography ex vivo: venous wall anatomy and tissue alterations after endovenous therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meissner, Oliver A. [Ludwig Maximilians University, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Siemens AG Medical Solutions, Forchheim (Germany); Schmedt, Claus-Georg; Steckmeier, Bernd M. [Ludwig Maximilians University, Department of Vascular Surgery and Phlebology, Munich (Germany); Hunger, Kathrin; Reiser, Maximilian; Mueller-Lisse, Ullrich [Ludwig Maximilians University, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Hetterich, Holger; Rieber, Johannes [Ludwig Maximilians University, Division of Cardiology, Munich (Germany); Sroka, Ronald [Ludwig Maximilians University, Laser Research Laboratory, LIFE-Center, Munich (Germany); Babaryka, Gregor [Ludwig Maximilians University, Institute of Pathology, Munich (Germany); Siebert, Uwe [Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Institute for Technology Assessment and Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); University for Health Sciences, Medical Informatics and Technology, Department of Public Health, Medical Decision Making and Health Technology Assessment, Hall/Innsbruck (Austria)

    2007-09-15

    Endovascular optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a new imaging modality providing histology-like information of the venous wall. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and laser therapy (ELT) are accepted alternatives to surgery. This study evaluated OCT for qualitative assessment of venous wall anatomy and tissue alterations after RFA and ELT in bovine venous specimens. One hundred and thirty-four venous segments were obtained from ten ex-vivo bovine hind limbs. OCT signal characteristics for different wall layers were assessed in 180/216 (83%) quadrants from 54 normal venous cross-sections. Kappa statistics ({kappa}) were used to calculate intra- and inter-observer agreement. Qualitative changes after RFA (VNUS-Closure) and ELT (diode laser 980 nm, energy densities 15 Joules (J)/cm, 25 J/cm, 35 J/cm) were described in 80 venous cross-sections. Normal veins were characterized by a three-layered appearance. After RFA, loss of three-layered appearance and wall thickening at OCT corresponded with circular destruction of tissue structures at histology. Wall defects after ELT ranged from non-transmural punctiform damage to complete perforation, depending on the energy density applied. Intra- and inter-observer agreement for reading OCT images was very high (0.90 and 0.88, respectively). OCT allows for reproducible evaluation of normal venous wall and alterations after endovenous therapy. OCT could prove to be valuable for optimizing endovenous therapy in vivo. (orig.)

  5. Endovascular optical coherence tomography ex vivo: venous wall anatomy and tissue alterations after endovenous therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meissner, Oliver A.; Schmedt, Claus-Georg; Steckmeier, Bernd M.; Hunger, Kathrin; Reiser, Maximilian; Mueller-Lisse, Ullrich; Hetterich, Holger; Rieber, Johannes; Sroka, Ronald; Babaryka, Gregor; Siebert, Uwe

    2007-01-01

    Endovascular optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a new imaging modality providing histology-like information of the venous wall. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and laser therapy (ELT) are accepted alternatives to surgery. This study evaluated OCT for qualitative assessment of venous wall anatomy and tissue alterations after RFA and ELT in bovine venous specimens. One hundred and thirty-four venous segments were obtained from ten ex-vivo bovine hind limbs. OCT signal characteristics for different wall layers were assessed in 180/216 (83%) quadrants from 54 normal venous cross-sections. Kappa statistics (κ) were used to calculate intra- and inter-observer agreement. Qualitative changes after RFA (VNUS-Closure) and ELT (diode laser 980 nm, energy densities 15 Joules (J)/cm, 25 J/cm, 35 J/cm) were described in 80 venous cross-sections. Normal veins were characterized by a three-layered appearance. After RFA, loss of three-layered appearance and wall thickening at OCT corresponded with circular destruction of tissue structures at histology. Wall defects after ELT ranged from non-transmural punctiform damage to complete perforation, depending on the energy density applied. Intra- and inter-observer agreement for reading OCT images was very high (0.90 and 0.88, respectively). OCT allows for reproducible evaluation of normal venous wall and alterations after endovenous therapy. OCT could prove to be valuable for optimizing endovenous therapy in vivo. (orig.)

  6. Subtle Alterations in Brain Anatomy May Change an Individual’s Personality in Chronic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustin, Sylvia M.; McKay, Jamie G.; Petersen, Esben T.; Peck, Chris C.; Murray, Greg M.; Henderson, Luke A.

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that gross prefrontal cortex damage can affect an individual’s personality. It is also possible that subtle prefrontal cortex changes associated with conditions such as chronic pain, and not detectable until recent advances in human brain imaging, may also result in subtle changes in an individual’s personality. In an animal model of chronic neuropathic pain, subtle prefrontal cortex changes including altered basal dendritic length, resulted in altered decision making ability. Using multiple magnetic resonance imaging techniques, we found in humans, although gray matter volume and on-going activity were unaltered, chronic neuropathic pain was associated with reduced free and bound proton movement, indicators of subtle anatomical changes, in the medial prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex and mediodorsal thalamus. Furthermore, proton spectroscopy revealed an increase in neural integrity in the medial prefrontal cortex in neuropathic pain patients, the degree of which was significantly correlated to the personality temperament of novelty seeking. These data reveal that even subtle changes in prefrontal cortex anatomy may result in a significant change in an individual’s personality. PMID:25291361

  7. Graviresponsiveness of surgically altered primary roots of Zea mays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maimon, E.; Moore, R.

    1991-01-01

    We examined the gravitropic responses of surgically altered primary roots of Zea mays to determine the route by which gravitropic inhibitors move from the root tip to the elongating zone. Horizontally oriented roots, from which a 1-mm-wide girdle of epidermis plus 2-10 layers of cortex were removed from the apex of the elongating zone, curve downward. However, curvature occurred only apical to the girdle. Filling the girdle with mucilage-like material transmits curvature beyond the girdle. Vertically oriented roots with a half-girdle' (i.e. the epidermis and 2-10 layers of the cortex removed from half of the circumference of the apex of the elongating zone) curve away from the girdle. Inserting the half-girdle at the base of the elongating zone induces curvature towards the girdle. Filling the half-circumference girdles with mucilage-like material reduced curvature significantly. Stripping the epidermis and outer 2-5 layers of cortex from the terminal 1.5 cm of one side of a primary root induces curvature towards the cut, irrespective of the root's orientation to gravity. This effect is not due to desiccation since treated roots submerged in water also curved towards their cut surface. Coating a root's cut surface with a mucilage-like substance minimizes curvature. These results suggest that the outer cell-layers of the root, especially the epidermis, play an important role in root gravicurvature, and the gravitropic signals emanating from the root tip can move apoplastically through mucilage.

  8. Primary flexor tendon repair: surgical techniques based on the anatomy and biology of the flexor tendon system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonkin, M A

    1991-01-01

    The anatomy, biology and bio-mechanics of the flexor tendon system demand a precise approach to flexor tendon repair. Within the fibroosseous canal, the synovial fluid and a complex intratendinous vascular network provide nutrition for intrinsic flexor tendon healing. Retention of the synovial sheath theoretically maintains an enclosed tendon/tendon sheat environment in which the tendon repair is bathed in synovial fluid, and may glide within a smooth tunnel. The preservation of the intricate double tendon inter-relationship and the annular pulley system is vital to the efficiency of finger flexion. This review details surgical and postoperative techniques aimed at restoring the normal anatomy and providing optimal conditions for the return of flexor tendon function.

  9. Sap flow is Underestimated by Thermal Dissipation Sensors due to Alterations of Wood Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marañón-Jiménez, S.; Wiedemann, A.; van den Bulcke, J.; Cuntz, M.; Rebmann, C.; Steppe, K.

    2014-12-01

    The thermal dissipation technique (TD) is one of the most commonly adopted methods for sap flow measurements. However, underestimations of up to 60% of the tree transpiration have been reported with this technique, although the causes are not certainly known. The insertion of TD sensors within the stems causes damage of the wood tissue and subsequent healing reactions, changing wood anatomy and likely the sap flow path. However, the anatomical changes in response to the insertion of sap flow sensors and the effects on the measured flow have not been assessed yet. In this study, we investigate the alteration of vessel anatomy on wounds formed around TD sensors. Our main objectives were to elucidate the anatomical causes of sap flow underestimation for ring-porous and diffuse-porous species, and relate these changes to sap flow underestimations. Successive sets of TD probes were installed in early, mid and end of the growing season in Fagus sylvatica (diffuse-porous) and Quercus petraea (ring-porous) trees. They were logged after the growing season and additional sets of sensors were installed in the logged stems with presumably no healing reaction. The wood tissue surrounding each sensor was then excised and analysed by X-ray computed microtomography (X-ray micro CT). This technique allowed the quantification of vessel anatomical characteristics and the reconstruction of the 3-D internal microstructure of the xylem vessels so that extension and shape of the altered area could be determined. Gels and tyloses clogged the conductive vessels around the sensors in both beech and oak. The extension of the affected area was larger for beech although these anatomical changes led to similar sap flow underestimations in both species. The higher vessel size in oak may explain this result and, therefore, larger sap flow underestimation per area of affected conductive tissue. The wound healing reaction likely occurred within the first weeks after sensor installation, which

  10. Surgical anatomy and histology of the levator palpebrae superioris muscle for blepharoptosis correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đorđević Boban

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The detailed knowledge of the architecture of the upper eyelid is very important in numerous upper eyelid corrective surgeries. The article deals with the detailed anatomy of the major components of the upper lid, which are commonly seen in surgical practice. Methods. This study was conducted on 19 human cadavers (12 adults and 7 infants without pathologic changes in the orbital region and eyelids. Anatomic microdissection of the contents of the orbita was performed bilaterally on 12 orbits from 6 unfixed cadavers (3 male and 3 female. Micromorphologic investigations of the orbital tissue were performed on 8 en bloc excised and formalin-fixed orbits of infant cadavers. Specimens were fixed according to the Duvernoy method. An intra-arterial injection of 5% mixture of melt formalin and black ink was administered into the carotid arterial system. Using routine fixation, decalcination, dehydration, illumination, impregnation and molding procedures in paraplast, specimens were prepared for cross-sections. Results. The measurement of the muscle length and diameter in situ in 6 nonfixed cadavers (12 orbits showed an average length of the levator palpbrae superioris (LPS muscle body of the 42.0 ± 1.41 mm on the right, and 40.3 ± 1.63 mm on the left side. In all the cases, the LPS had blood supply from 4 different arterial systems: the lacrimal, supratrochlear, and supraorbital artery and muscle branches of the ophthalmic artery. The LPS muscle in all the specimens was supplied by the superior medial branch of the oculomotor nerve. The connective tissue associated with the LPS muscle contains two transverse ligaments: the superior (Whitnall’s and intermuscular transverse ligaments (ITL. The orbital septum in all the specimens originated from the arcus marginalis of the frontal bone, and consisted of two layers - the superficial and the inner layer. In addition, a detailed histological analysis revealed that the upper eyelid

  11. Surgical anatomy and histology of the levator palpebrae superioris muscle for blepharoptosis correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djordjević, Boban; Novaković, Marijan; Milisavljević, Milan; Milićević, Sasa; Maliković, Aleksandar

    2013-12-01

    The detailed knowledge of the architecture of the upper eyelid is very important in numerous upper eyelid corrective surgeries. The article deals with the detailed anatomy of the major components of the upper lid, which are commonly seen in surgical practice. This study was conducted on 19 human cadavers (12 adults and 7 infants) without pathologic changes in the orbital region and eyelids. Anatomic microdissection of the contents of the orbita was performed bilaterally on 12 orbits from 6 unfixed cadavers (3 male and 3 female). Micromorphologic investigations of the orbital tissue were performed on 8 en bloc excised and formalin-fixed orbits of infant cadavers. Specimens were fixed according to the Duvernoy method. An intra-arterial injection of 5% mixture of melt formalin and black ink was administered into the carotid arterial system. Using routine fixation, decalcination, dehydration, illumination, impregnation and molding procedures in paraplast, specimens were prepared for cross-sections. The measurement of the muscle length and diameter in situ in 6 nonfixed cadavers (12 orbits) showed an average length of the levator palpbrae superioris (LPS) muscle body of the 42.0 +/- 1.41 mm on the right, and 40.3 +/- 1.63 mm on the left side. In all the cases, the LPS had blood supply from 4 different arterial systems: the lacrimal, supratrochlear, and supraorbital artery and muscle branches of the ophthalmic artery. The LPS muscle in all the specimens was supplied by the superior medial branch of the oculomotor nerve. The connective tissue associated with the LPS muscle contains two transverse ligaments: the superior (Whitnall's) and intermuscular transverse ligaments (ITL). The orbital septum in all the specimens originated from the arcus marginalis of the frontal bone, and consisted of two layers--the superficial and the inner layer. In addition, a detailed histological analysis revealed that the upper eyelid's crease was formed by the conjoined fascia including the

  12. Review of the surgical anatomy of the axillary nerve and the anatomic basis of its iatrogenic and traumatic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apaydin, Nihal; Tubbs, R Shane; Loukas, Marios; Duparc, Fabrice

    2010-03-01

    The axillary nerve is invariably reported to be one of the most commonly injured nerves during surgical procedures of the shoulder, and the importance of protecting it cannot be overemphasized. Many researchers have tried to identify safe regions, but the results vary among published studies. The axillary nerve may also be injured during acute trauma to the shoulder or by chronic repeated trauma as has been described in the quadrilateral space syndrome. The nerve injury may occur together with shoulder dislocation and rotator cuff tear, thus comprising the so-called "unhappy triad" of the shoulder joint. Simple attention to potential variations in the origin and course of the axillary nerve and its relationship to the shoulder capsule and having a precise knowledge of "safe zones" during operations can enhance clinical outcomes. The objective of this review, therefore, is to discuss the surgical anatomy of the axillary nerve and further emphasize the clinical importance of the its injury following shoulder trauma.

  13. The amount of information provided in articles published in clinical anatomy and surgical and radiologic anatomy regarding human cadaveric materials and trends in acknowledging donors/cadavers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürses, İlke Ali; Coşkun, Osman; Gürtekin, Başak; Kale, Ayşin

    2016-12-01

    Appreciating the contribution of donor-cadavers to medical education is a well observed practice among anatomists. However, the appreciation of their contribution in research and scientific articles remains dubious. We aimed to evaluate how much data anatomists provide about specimens they have used and how frequently anatomists acknowledge their cadavers in published articles. We evaluated all articles performed on human cadaveric specimens that were published in Clinical Anatomy and Surgical and Radiologic Anatomy between January 2011 and December 2015. We evaluated how much data on the demographics, preservation method(s), source, and ethical/legal permissions regarding cadavers were provided. We also evaluated the number of articles that acknowledged donor-cadavers. The majority of articles provided demographic data (age and sex) and preservation method used in the article. The source of the specimens was not mentioned in 45.6 % of the articles. Only 26.2 % of the articles provided a degree of consent and only 32.4 % of the articles reported some form of ethical approval for the study. The cadavers and their families were acknowledged in 17.7 % of the articles. We observed that no standard method for reporting data has been established. Anatomists should collaborate to create awareness among the scientific community for providing adequate information regarding donor-cadavers, including source and consent. Acknowledging donor-cadavers and/or their families should also be promoted. Scientific articles should be used to create a transparent relationship of trust between anatomists and their society.

  14. Surgical assessment of the insula. Part 1: surgical anatomy and morphometric analysis of the transsylvian and transcortical approaches to the insula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benet, Arnau; Hervey-Jumper, Shawn L; Sánchez, Jose Juan González; Lawton, Michael T; Berger, Mitchel S

    2016-02-01

    Transcortical and transsylvian corridors have been previously described as the main surgical approaches to the insula, but there is insufficient evidence to support one approach versus the other. The authors performed a cadaveric comparative study regarding insular exposure, surgical window and freedom, between the transcortical and transsylvian approaches (with and without cutting superficial sylvian bridging veins). Surgical anatomy and skull surface reference points to the different insular regions are also described. Sixteen cadaveric specimens were embalmed with a customized formula to enhance neurosurgical simulation. Two different blocks were defined in the study: first, transsylvian without (TS) and with the superficial sylvian bridging veins cut (TSVC) and transcortical (TC) approaches to the insula were simulated in all (16) specimens. Insular surface exposure, surgical window and surgical freedom were calculated for each procedure and related to the Berger-Sanai insular glioma classification (Zones I-IV) in 10 specimens. Second, the venous drainage pattern and anatomical landmarks considered critical for surgical planning were studied in all specimens. In the insular Zone I (anterior-superior), the TC approach provided the best insular exposure compared with both TS and TSVC. The surgical window obtained with the TC approach was also larger than that obtained with the TS. The TC approach provided 137% more surgical freedom than the TS approach. Only the TC corridor provided complete insular exposure. In Zone II (posterior-superior), results depended on the degree of opercular resection. Without resection of the precentral gyrus in the operculum, insula exposure, surgical windows and surgical freedom were equivalent. If the opercular cortex was resected, the insula exposure and surgical freedom obtained through the TC approach was greater to that of the other groups. In Zone III (posterior-inferior), the TC approach provided better surgical exposure than

  15. The Treaty of Anatomy, Descriptive and Surgical | Romero-Reverón ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anatomy Journal of Africa. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 4, No 2 (2015) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should load ...

  16. Anatomy of a defective barrier: sequential glove leak detection in a surgical and dental environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albin, M S; Bunegin, L; Duke, E S; Ritter, R R; Page, C P

    1992-02-01

    a) To determine the frequency of perforations in latex surgical gloves before, during, and after surgical and dental procedures; b) to evaluate the topographical distribution of perforations in latex surgical gloves after surgical and dental procedures; and c) to validate methods of testing for latex surgical glove patency. Multitrial tests under in vitro conditions and a prospective sequential patient study using consecutive testing. An outpatient dental clinic at a university dental school, the operating suite in a medical school affiliated with the Veteran's Hospital, and a biomechanics laboratory. Surgeons, scrub nurses, and dental technicians participating in 50 surgical and 50 dental procedures. We collected 679 latex surgical gloves after surgical procedures and tested them for patency by using a water pressure test. We also employed an electronic glove leak detector before donning, after sequential time intervals, and upon termination of 47 surgical (sequential surgical), 50 dental (sequential dental), and in three orthopedic cases where double gloving was used. The electronic glove leak detector was validated by using electronic point-by-point surface probing, fluorescein dye diffusion, as well as detecting glove punctures made with a 27-gauge needle. The random study indicated a leak rate of 33.0% (224 out of 679) in latex surgical gloves; the sequential surgical study demonstrated patency in 203 out of 347 gloves (58.5%); the sequential dental study showed 34 leaks in the 106 gloves used (32.1%); and with double gloving, the leak rate decreased to 25.0% (13 of 52 gloves tested). While the allowable FDA defect rate for unused latex surgical gloves is 1.5%, we noted defect rates in unused gloves of 5.5% in the sequential surgical, 1.9% in the sequential dental, and 4.0% in our electronic glove leak detector validating study. In the sequential surgical study, 52% of the leaks had occurred by 75 mins, and in the sequential dental study, 75% of the leaks

  17. Do CBCT scans alter surgical treatment plans? Comparison of preoperative surgical diagnosis using panoramic versus cone-beam CT images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Carolina; Mücke, Thomas; Wagenpfeil, Stefan; Kanatas, Anastasios; Bissinger, Oliver; Deppe, Herbert

    2016-10-01

    Cone beam CT and/or panoramic images are often required for a successful diagnosis in oral and maxillofacial surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate if 3D diagnostic imaging information had a significant impact on the decision process in six different classes of surgical indications. Records of all patients who had undergone both panoramic X-ray and CBCT imaging due to surgical indications between January 2008 and December 2012 were examined retrospectively. In February 2013, all surgically relevant diagnoses of both conventional panoramic radiographs and CBCT scans were retrieved from the patient's charts. It was recorded whether (1) 3D imaging presented additional surgically relevant information and (2) if the final decision of surgical therapy had been based on 2D or 3D imaging. A total of 253 consecutive patients with both panoramic radiographs and CBCT analysis were eligible for the study. 3D imaging provided significantly more surgically relevant information in cases of implant dentistry, maxillary sinus diagnosis and in oral and maxillofacial traumatology. However, surgical strategies had not been influenced to any significant extent by 3D imaging. Within the limitations of this study it may be concluded that CBCT imaging results in significantly more surgically relevant information in implant dentistry, maxillary sinus diagnosis and in cases of oral and maxillofacial trauma. However, 3D imaging information did not alter significantly the surgical plan that was based on 2D panoramic radiography. Further studies are necessary to define indications for CBCT in detail. Copyright © 2016 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Injuries to posterolateral corner of the knee: a comprehensive review from anatomy to surgical treatment☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Bernardo; James, Evan W.; Metsavaht, Leonardo; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    Although injuries to the posterolateral corner of the knee were previously considered to be a rare condition, they have been shown to be present in almost 16% of all knee injuries and are responsible for sustained instability and failure of concomitant reconstructions if not properly recognized. Although also once considered to be the “dark side of the knee”, increased knowledge of the posterolateral corner anatomy and biomechanics has led to improved diagnostic ability with better understanding of physical and imaging examinations. The management of posterolateral corner injuries has also evolved and good outcomes have been reported after operative treatment following anatomical reconstruction principles. PMID:26401495

  19. The kleeblattschädel anomaly in Apert syndrome: intracranial anatomy, surgical correction, and subsequent cranial vault development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosain, A K; Moore, F O; Hemmy, D C

    1997-12-01

    We present a case of Apert syndrome in which intracranial anomalies of the cranial base were localized to the lesser wings of the sphenoid and sphenoid ridge. The lesser wings of the sphenoid were displaced superiorly to follow the fused coronal sutures bilaterally, where they met at a single point on the skull vertex. Careful preoperative study of the intracranial anatomy in the kleeblattschädel anomaly led to a surgical plan for early correction of the anomaly. The present report indicates that an aggressive approach to the correction of the kleeblattschädel anomaly beginning early in infancy can result in normalization of the trilobar skull configuration. Although this approach can correct the kleeblattschädel anomaly, 3.5-year follow-up in this patient with Apert syndrome demonstrates progressive turricephaly despite repeated cranial vault remodeling. Although the trilobar skull configuration can be corrected through early surgical intervention, the long-term correction of progressive turricephaly in patients with Apert syndrome remains an unsolved problem.

  20. Knowledge of skull base anatomy and surgical implications of human sacrifice among pre-Columbian Mesoamerican cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Serna, Raul; Gomez-Amador, Juan Luis; Barges-Coll, Juan; Arriada-Mendicoa, Nicasio; Romero-Vargas, Samuel; Ramos-Peek, Miguel; Celis-Lopez, Miguel Angel; Revuelta-Gutierrez, Rogelio; Portocarrero-Ortiz, Lesly

    2012-08-01

    Human sacrifice became a common cultural trait during the advanced phases of Mesoamerican civilizations. This phenomenon, influenced by complex religious beliefs, included several practices such as decapitation, cranial deformation, and the use of human cranial bones for skull mask manufacturing. Archaeological evidence suggests that all of these practices required specialized knowledge of skull base and upper cervical anatomy. The authors conducted a systematic search for information on skull base anatomical and surgical knowledge among Mesoamerican civilizations. A detailed exposition of these results is presented, along with some interesting information extracted from historical documents and pictorial codices to provide a better understanding of skull base surgical practices among these cultures. Paleoforensic evidence from the Great Temple of Tenochtitlan indicates that Aztec priests used a specialized decapitation technique, based on a deep anatomical knowledge. Trophy skulls were submitted through a stepwise technique for skull mask fabrication, based on skull base anatomical landmarks. Understanding pre-Columbian Mesoamerican religions can only be realized by considering them in their own time and according to their own perspective. Several contributions to medical practice might have arisen from anatomical knowledge emerging from human sacrifice and decapitation techniques.

  1. Interactive anatomical and surgical live stream lectures improve students' academic performance in applied clinical anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiozawa, Thomas; Butz, Benjamin; Herlan, Stephan; Kramer, Andreas; Hirt, Bernhard

    2017-01-01

    Tuebingen's Sectio Chirurgica (TSC) is an innovative, interactive, multimedia, and transdisciplinary teaching method designed to complement dissection courses. The Tuebingen's Sectio Chirurgica (TSC) allows clinical anatomy to be taught via interactive live stream surgeries moderated by an anatomist. This method aims to provide an application-oriented approach to teaching anatomy that offers students a deeper learning experience. A cohort study was devised to determine whether students who participated in the TSC were better able to solve clinical application questions than students who did not participate. A total of 365 students participated in the dissection course during the winter term of the 2012/2013 academic year. The final examination contained 40 standard multiple-choice (S-MC) and 20 clinically-applied multiple-choice (CA-MC) items. The CA-MC items referred to clinical cases but could be answered solely using anatomical knowledge. Students who regularly participated in the TSC answered the CA-MC questions significantly better than the control group (75% and 65%, respectively; P  0.05). The CA-MC questions had a slightly higher level of difficulty than the S-MC questions (0.725 and 0.801, respectively; P = 0.083). The discriminatory power of the items was comparable (S-MC median Pearson correlations: 0.321; CA-MC: 0.283). The TSC successfully teaches the clinical application of anatomical knowledge. Students who attended the TSC in addition to the dissection course were able to answer CA-MC questions significantly better than students who did not attend the TSC. Thus, attending the TSC in addition to the dissection course supported students' clinical learning goals. Anat Sci Educ 10: 46-52. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists.

  2. Topographic Surgical Anatomy of the Parasylvian Anterior Temporal Artery for Intracranial-Intracranial Bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meybodi, Ali Tayebi; Griswold, Dylan; Tabani, Halima; Lawton, Michael T; Mokhtari, Pooneh; Payman, Andre; Benet, Arnau

    2016-09-01

    The anterior temporal artery (ATA) is an appealing donor artery for intracranial-intracranial bypass procedures. However, its identification may be difficult. Current literature lacks useful landmarks to help identify the ATA at the surface of the sylvian fissure. The objective of this study was to define the topographic anatomy of the cortical segment of the ATA relative to constant landmarks exposed during the pterional approach. The temporopolar artery (TPA), ATA, and middle temporal artery (MTA) were examined in 16 cadaveric specimens. The topographic anatomy and key landmarks of the arteries at the sylvian fissure were recorded. The distance between the point of emergence from the sylvian fissure to the lesser sphenoid wing and anterior tip of the temporal lobe was measured. The features of the inferior frontal gyrus relative to each of the arteries at the sylvian fissure were also recorded. The average distances from the lesser sphenoid wing to the TPA, ATA, and MTA were 3.7 mm, 21.2 mm, and 37 mm. The mean distances from the temporal pole were TPA, 14.7 mm; ATA, 32.0 mm; and MTA, 45.4 mm. The differences between the average distances were statistically significant (P < 0.0001). The ATA most frequently faced pars triangularis, whereas the TPA always faced pars orbitalis. The MTA was always found posterior to the junction of pars triangularis and pars opercularis. This article provides topographic evidence for efficient identification of the ATA in the parasylvian space. The key relationship and landmarks identified in this study may increase efficiency and safety when harvesting the ATA for intracranial-intracranial bypass. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Surgical anatomy of the axillary nerve branches to the deltoid muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leechavengvongs, Somsak; Teerawutthichaikit, Tanawit; Witoonchart, Kiat; Uerpairojkit, Chairoj; Malungpaishrope, Kanchai; Suppauksorn, Sunikom; Chareonwat, Boonsong

    2015-01-01

    Variations in the innervation of the posterior deltoid muscle by the anterior branch of the axillary nerve have been reported. The objective of this study is to clarify the anatomy of the axillary nerve branches to the deltoid muscle. One hundred and twenty-nine arms (68 right and 61 left) from 88 embalmed cadavers (83 male and 46 female) were included in the study. The anterior and posterior branches of the axillary nerve were identified and their lengths were measured from the point of emergence from the axillary nerve to their terminations in the deltoid muscle. In all cases, the axillary nerves split into two branches (anterior and posterior) within the quadrangular space and none split within the deltoid muscle. In all specimens, the anterior and middle parts of the deltoid muscle received their nerve supplies from the anterior branch of the axillary nerve. The posterior part of the deltoid muscle was supplied only by the anterior branch of the axillary nerve in 2.3% of the specimens, from the posterior branch in 8.5%, and from both branches in 89.1%. There were two sub-branches of the anterior branch in 4.7% of the specimens. The anterior branch of the axillary nerve supplied not only the anterior and middle parts of the deltoid muscle but also the posterior part in most cases (91.5%). © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Surgical Anatomy of the Gastrointestinal Tract and Its Vasculature in the Laboratory Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vdoviaková, Katarína; Petrovová, Eva; Maloveská, Marcela; Krešáková, Lenka; Teleky, Jana; Elias, Mario Zefanias Joao; Petrášová, Darina

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe and illustrate the morphology of the stomach, liver, intestine, and their vasculature to support the planning of surgical therapeutic methods in abdominal cavity. On adult Wistar rats corrosion casts were prepared from the arterial system and Duracryl Dental and PUR SP were used as a casting medium and was performed macroscopic anatomical dissection of the stomach, liver, and intestine was performed. The rat stomach was a large, semilunar shaped sac with composite lining. On the stomach was very marked fundus, which formed a blind sac (saccus cecus). The rat liver was divided into six lobes, but without gall bladder. Intestine of the rat was simple, but cecum had a shape as a stomach. The following variations were observed in the origin of the cranial mesenteric artery. On the corrosion cast specimens we noticed the presence of the anastomosis between middle colic artery (a. colica media) and left colic artery (a. colica sinistra). We investigated the second anastomosis between middle colic artery and left colic artery. The results of this study reveal that the functional anatomical relationship between the rat stomach, liver and intestine is important for the development of surgical research in human and veterinary medicine. PMID:26819602

  5. Anatomy and biomechanics of the medial side of the knee and their surgical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPrade, Matthew D; Kennedy, Mitchell I; Wijdicks, Coen A; LaPrade, Robert F

    2015-06-01

    In order to reconstruct the medial knee to restore the original biomechanical function of its ligamentous structures, a thorough understanding of its anatomic placement and relationship with surrounding structures is required. To restore the knee to normal kinematics, the diagnosis and surgical approach have to be aligned, to successfully reconstruct the area of injury. Three important ligaments maintain primary medial knee stability: the superficial medial collateral ligament, posterior oblique ligament, and deep medial collateral ligament. It is important not to exclude the assistance that other ligaments of the medial knee provide, including support of patellar stability by the medial patellofemoral ligament and multiligamentous hamstring tendon attachments. Valgus gapping and medial knee stability is accounted for collectively by every primary medial knee stabilizing structure. The following will review the principal medial knee anatomic and biomechanical properties.

  6. The need for more workshops in laparoscopic surgery and surgical anatomy for European gynaecological oncology trainees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manchanda, Ranjit; Halaska, Michael J; Piek, Jurgen M

    2013-01-01

    subspecialties, and core surgical skills) reflecting different competencies trainees need to meet. There was no significant association between individual country of training and workshop preference. The mean duration of the workshop preferred by 71% of respondents was 2 days. Cronbach α of the 13-item......OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to highlight the relative preference of European gynecologic oncology trainees for workshops that could support and supplement their training needs. METHODS: A Web-based survey was sent to 900 trainees on the European Network of Young Gynaecological...... Oncologists database in November 2011. Respondents were asked to rate a 13-item questionnaire (using a 1- to 5-point Likert scale) on workshop topics they felt would most benefit their training requirements. Free text space for additional topics was also provided. Descriptive analysis was used to describe...

  7. The high cost of low-frequency events: the anatomy and economics of surgical mishaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couch, N P; Tilney, N L; Rayner, A A; Moore, F D

    1981-03-12

    We conducted a one-year prospective survey to identify adverse outcomes due to error during care in the field of general surgery. We identified 36 such cases among 5612 surgical admissions to the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, but in 23 cases the initiating mishap had occurred in another hospital before transfer. In two thirds of the cases the mishap was due to an error of commission: an unnecessary, defective or inappropriate operative procedure. Twenty of these patients died in the hospital, and in 11 death was directly attributable to the error. Five of the 16 survivors left the hospital with serious physical impairment. A satisfactory outcome was achieved in only 11 cases (31%). The average hospital stay was 42 days, with the duration ranging from one to 325 days; the total cost for the 36 patients was $1,732,432. We suggest that all hospitals develop comprehensive methods to identify and prevent these costly and unnecessary events.

  8. Understanding Tremor in Multiple Sclerosis: Prevalence, Pathological Anatomy, and Pharmacological and Surgical Approaches to Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Labiano-Fontcuberta

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Given that tremor is one of the most prevalent and disabling features of multiple sclerosis (MS, we will review the most significant milestones in tremor in this disease in recent years, focusing on prevalence, clinical features, anatomical basis, and treatment.Methods: Data for this review were identified by searching MEDLINE with the search terms “multiple sclerosis” and “tremor”. References were also identified from relevant articles published between January 1966 and May 2012.Results: The predominant type of MS tremor is a large-amplitude, postural, and kinetic tremor, which most commonly affects the arms, although tremor can also involve head, neck, vocal cords, and trunk. Involvement of the tongue, jaw, or palate has not been reported. Although the anatomical basis underlying tremor in MS is poorly understood, the link between the cerebellum and the MS-related tremor is supported by clinical and experimental studies. Currently available medication is often unsuccessful in most cases. Surgical treatment can be a satisfactory alternative to treat severe and disabling tremor.Discussion: Tremor in MS patients could be considered as an advanced consequence of the disease and its presence suggests a more aggressive course. MS tremor can be severe and very disabling for a small group of patients. Treatment of MS tremor remains a great challenge. Recent studies suggest that dissociating tremor from cerebellar dysfunction using selected clinical tests would be the key issue to successful surgical treatment. Understanding the pathophysiology and biochemistry of tremor production in MS may lead to new therapeutic approaches.

  9. Surgical anatomy of the supracarinal esophagus based on a minimally invasive approach : vascular and nervous anatomy and technical steps to resection and lymphadenectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuesta, Miguel A; van der Wielen, Nicole; Weijs, Teus J; Bleys, Ronald L A W; Gisbertz, Suzanne S; van Duijvendijk, Peter; van Hillegersberg, Richard; Ruurda, Jelle P; van Berge Henegouwen, Mark I; Straatman, Jennifer; Osugi, Harushi; van der Peet, Donald L

    BACKGROUND: During esophageal dissection and lymphadenectomy of the upper mediastinum by thoracoscopy in prone position, we observed a complex anatomy in which we had to resect the esophagus, dissect vessels and nerves, and take down some of these in order to perform a complete lymphadenectomy. In

  10. Morphohistological and surgical anatomy of the sinus interdigitalis in Egyptian native breeds of sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S. Awaad

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The current study aimed to characterize the gross and microscopic structures of the interdigital sinus in Egyptian native breeds of sheep and goats (Baladi sheep and goats to aid in conducting farther studies on such sinus and its surgical importance. The study was carried out on the distal fore and hind limb specimens (below the fetlock joint obtained from healthy mature ten Baladi sheep and ten Baladi goats of both sexes. For sheep, thirty specimens were subjected to gross anatomical investigation and the other ten specimens were used for histological examination. While, the forty goats fore and hind feet specimens were examined grossly. The results obtained revealed the presence of a well-developed interdigital sinus in Baladi sheep, but there was no evidence for the existence of this unique structure in all examined specimens of Baladi goats. Such sinus appeared grossly as a pipe-like, composed of two parts; body (corpus and neck (column which opened in the skin of the interdigital area with an external orifice. The body consisted of three distinct parts in the forefeet and a single part in the hind feet. Histologically, the wall in body and neck regions of the interdigital sinus composed of three distinct layers; epidermis, dermis and a fibrous capsule. Many sebaceous glands, hair follicles and sweat glands in addition to the glandular apocrine gland were distributed within the dermis. The secretory adenomers of the interdigital sinus arranged in different lobules and lined with cuboidal cells with bleb-like projections. It reacted positively with Periodic Acid Schiff (PAS, Sudan black and Sudan III stains, on the other hand it negatively reacted with Alcian blue stain (AB.

  11. Surgical anatomy and blood supply of the fascial layers of the temporal region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abul-Hassan, H S; von Drasek Ascher, G; Acland, R D

    1986-01-01

    In 15 fresh cadavers (30 sides), we studied the two layers of fascia in the temporal region, with particular regard to their blood supply and to their usefulness--together or separately--as microvascular free-tissue autografts. The superficial temporal fascia (temporoparietal fascia, epicranial aponeurosis) lies immediately deep to the hair follicles. It is part of the subcutaneous musculoaponeurotic system and is continuous in all directions with other structures belonging to that layer--including the galea above and the SMAS layer of the face below. The deep temporal fascia (temporalis fascia, investing fascia of temporalis) is separated from the superficial fascia by an avascular plane of loose areolar tissue. It completely invests the superficial aspect of the temporalis muscle down to (but not beyond) the zygomatic arch. It is firmly attached to periosteum all around the margin of the muscles. Below it is attached to the upper border of the zygomatic arch. We found the deep temporal fascia to be supplied solely by the middle temporal artery, a constant branch of the superficial temporal. The middle temporal artery arises 1 to 3 cm below the upper border of the zygomatic arch, runs always superficial to the arch, and enters the deep temporal fascia immediately above that layer's attachment to the zygomatic arch. If the middle temporal vessels are protected, the two layers of temporal fascia can be raised together as a fully vascularized tissue island. This island can be fashioned as a bilobed or a double-layered flap, depending on the manner of dissection. The potential surgical usefulness of these findings is discussed.

  12. Anatomy of Human Interventions on the Alteration of Drought Risk over the Conterminous US

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, X.; Wada, Y.; Wanders, N.; Sheffield, J.

    2017-12-01

    Drought attribution focusing on anthropogenic climate change has received wide attentions. However, human interventions (HIs), such as irrigation, reservoir operation, and water use, are less well known. In this study, using the large-scale water resources model PCR-GLOBWB, we perform a suite of high-resolution ( 10 km) simulations over the conterminous US (CONUS) in order to disentangle the fingerprints of individual HI elements on changes of hydrological drought. The results show significant trend differences between scenarios with and without HIs in certain regions of the CONUS. HIs cause increased trends in drought severity for the High Plains, California and Mid-Atlantic region, whereas decreased trend emerges in the California Central Valley, lower Mississippi basin and Pacific Northwest. The mechanism of altered drought severity can be broken down into three individual parts, with irrigation increasing the trend in the High Plains and Central Valley, reservoir operation decreasing the trend in Western US and water use amplifying the trend in the urban areas. Besides the trend analysis, we show the relative contribution of water abstraction and return flows to explain how each HI contributes to enhancing or mitigating drought. Results demonstrate that return flows from agricultural irrigation increase recharge and therefore can alleviate hydrological drought (e.g., by 60-80% in Mississippi embayment). Further examination of the water sources indicates that in these drought alleviation hotspots, non-fossil groundwater dominates the total water abstraction. However, for the hotspots of drought intensification (e.g., southern High Plains), extensive irrigational pumping causes severe depletion of fossil groundwater, which reduces the interaction between baseflow and channel flow, and therefore reduces the total streamflow. Return level analysis is further applied to quantify how different types of HIs could alter the probability of occurrence of recent major

  13. Gene expression profile altered by orthodontic tooth movement during healing of surgical alveolar defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eun-Kyung; Lee, Jae-Hyung; Baek, Seung-Hak; Kim, Su-Jung

    2017-06-01

    We explored the gene expression profile altered by orthodontic tooth movement (OTM) during the healing of surgical alveolar defects in beagles. An OTM-related healing model was established where a maxillary second premolar was protracted into the critical-sized defect for 6 weeks (group DT6). As controls, natural healing models without OTM were set at 2 weeks (group D2) and at 6 weeks (group D6) after surgery. Total RNAs were extracted from dissected tissue blocks containing the regenerated defects and additionally from sound alveolar bone as a baseline (group C). mRNA profiling was performed using microarray analysis. Functional annotations of gene clusters based on differentially expressed genes among groups indicated that the gene expression profile of group DT6 had a stronger similarity to that of group D2 than to group D6. The genes participating in high woven-bone fraction in group DT6 could be identified as TNFSF11, MMP13, SPP1, and DMP1, which were verified by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reactions. We investigated at the gene level that OTM can affect the healing state of surgical defects serving as favorable matrices for OTM with defect regeneration. It would be a basis on selecting putative genes to be therapeutically applied for tissue-friendly accelerated orthodontics in the future. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Surgical Anatomy of the Superior Mesenteric Vessels Related to Colon and Pancreatic Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negoi, Ionut; Beuran, Mircea; Hostiuc, Sorin; Negoi, Ruxandra Irina; Inoue, Yosuke

    2018-03-08

    The surgeon dissecting the base of the mesenterium, around the superior mesenteric vein (SMV) and artery, is facing a complex tridimensional vascular anatomy and should be aware of the anatomical variants in this area. The aim of this systematic review is to propose a standardized terminology of the superior mesenteric vessels, with impact in colon and pancreatic resections. We conducted a systematic search in PubMed/MEDLINE and Google Scholar databases up to March 2017. Forty-five studies, involving a total of 6090 specimens were included in the present meta-analysis. The pooled prevalence of the ileocolic, right colic and middle colic arteries was 99.8%, 60.1%, and 94.6%, respectively. The superior right colic vein and Henle trunk were present in 73.9%, and 89.7% of specimens, respectively. In conclusion, the infra-pancreatic anatomy of the superior mesenteric vessels is widely variable. We propose the term Henle trunk to be used for any venous confluence between gastric, pancreatic and colic veins, which drains between the inferior border of the pancreas and up to 20 mm downward on the right-anterior aspect of the SMV. The term gastrocolic trunk should not be synonymous, but a subgroup of the Henle trunk, together with to gastropancreatocolic, gastropancreatic, or colopancreatic trunk.

  15. Can a Teaching Assistant Experience in a Surgical Anatomy Course Influence the Learning Curve for Nontechnical Skill Development for Surgical Residents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidenreich, Mark J.; Musonza, Tashinga; Pawlina, Wojciech; Lachman, Nirusha

    2016-01-01

    The foundation upon which surgical residents are trained to work comprises more than just critical cognitive, clinical, and technical skill. In an environment where the synchronous application of expertise is vital to patient outcomes, the expectation for optimal functioning within a multidisciplinary team is extremely high. Studies have shown…

  16. Pharynx Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Pharynx Anatomy Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: 720x576 ... View Download Large: 3000x2400 View Download Title: Pharynx Anatomy Description: Anatomy of the pharynx; drawing shows the ...

  17. Larynx Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Larynx Anatomy Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: 648x576 ... View Download Large: 2700x2400 View Download Title: Larynx Anatomy Description: Anatomy of the larynx; drawing shows the ...

  18. Vulva Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Vulva Anatomy Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: 720x634 ... View Download Large: 3000x2640 View Download Title: Vulva Anatomy Description: Anatomy of the vulva; drawing shows the ...

  19. Variable Myocardial Response to Load Stresses in Infants with Single Left Ventricular Anatomy: Influence of Initial Physiology and Surgical Palliative Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horriat, Narges L; Deatsman, Sara L; Stelter, Jessica; Frommelt, Peter C; Hill, Garick D

    2016-12-01

    Initial surgical strategies in neonates with single left ventricular (LV) anatomy vary based on adequacy of pulmonary and systemic blood flow. Differing myocardial responses to these strategies, as reflected in indices of systolic function, ventricular size, and mass have not been well defined. We sought to evaluate single LV myocardial response to varied physiology and initial palliation and determine whether the response is consistent and predictable. Infants with single LV physiology were divided based on neonatal palliation: no palliation/PA band (NO); BT shunt only (BT); or Norwood procedure (NP). Echo measures were obtained at presentation, early post-bidirectional Glenn (BDG), late post-BDG follow-up, and post-Fontan procedure. Measures included ejection fraction, LV mass indexed to height 2.7 and end diastolic volume indexed to body surface area, and mass/volume ratio. The cohort included 38 children (13 NO, 13 BT, 12 NP). Ejection fraction was similar but depressed in all groups at all stages. LV mass was higher in the NP group than the BT group at early post-BDG (p = 0.03) and higher than both BT and NO groups (p < 0.01) at late post-BDG, but the difference was resolved by post-Fontan follow-up. The NP group had the most remarkable remodeling in LV size from BDG to Fontan, suggesting that volume unloading is most valuable in this subgroup. Ventricular remodeling can be identified by echocardiography in children with single LV physiology, despite variable initial surgical palliative strategies. Importantly, these initial surgical strategies do not result in significant differences after Fontan palliation during early childhood.

  20. The anatomy of anatomy

    OpenAIRE

    John Paul Judson

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between anatomy and surgeryhas been historic and epic, spanning many centuries,complementing each other in medical education andbeing independent as well as interdependent in manyways. However, curricular changes that have happenedglobally in recent years with the introduction of severalcontemporary styles of medical teaching have subtlydownplayed the importance of anatomy in medicine,allowing young doctors with poor knowledge of anatomyto become surgeons. With a whimsical in...

  1. Fontan procedure: imaging of normal post-surgical anatomy and the spectrum of cardiac and extracardiac complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navarro-Aguilar, V.; Flors, L.; Calvillo, P.; Merlos, P.; Buendía, F.; Igual, B.; Melero-Ferrer, J.; Soriano, J. Rueda; Leiva-Salinas, C.

    2015-01-01

    Univentricular congenital heart diseases include a range of entities that result in a functionally single ventricular chamber. Although the only curative therapy is cardiac transplantation, there are several palliative surgical techniques that prevent ventricular volume overload, diverting part or all the systemic venous circulation into the pulmonary arteries. The modern Fontan procedure, which consists of anastomosing both the superior (SVC) and inferior vena cava (IVC) to the right pulmonary artery (RPA), is nowadays the last step before transplantation. The importance of imaging in these entities lies not only in the understanding of the new circuit established after surgical correction, but also in the early detection of the wide spectrum of cardiac and extracardiac complications that can occur due to the new physiological condition. Due to the increased survival of these patients, long-term complications are becoming more common. The main cardiac complications are atrial enlargement, ventricular dysfunction, and stenosis or thrombosis of the conduit. Pulmonary artery stenosis, pulmonary arteriovenous fistulae (PAVF), systemic-pulmonary veno venous shunts (VVS), hepatic congestion, cardiac cirrhosis, and protein-losing enteropathy are potential extracardiac complications. - Highlights: • Fontan procedure is the main palliative surgical procedure for univentricular heart correction. • Fontan procedure entails the anastomosis of SVC and IVC to the RPA. • Complications are becoming more common due to the increased survival of patients with Fontan

  2. A review of the anterolateral ligament of the knee: current knowledge regarding its incidence, anatomy, biomechanics, and surgical dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomajzl, Ryan; Maerz, Tristan; Shams, Christienne; Guettler, Joseph; Bicos, James

    2015-03-01

    To systematically review current literature on the anterolateral ligament (ALL) of the knee. We searched the PubMed/Medline database for publications specifically addressing the ALL. We excluded studies not written in English, studies not using human cadavers or subjects, and studies not specifically addressing the ALL. Data extraction related to the incidence, anatomy, morphometry, biomechanics, and histology of the ALL and its relation to the Segond fracture was performed. The incidence of the ALL ranged from 83% to 100%, and this range occurs because of small discrepancies in the definition of the ALL's bony insertions. The ALL originates anterior and distal to the femoral attachment of the lateral collateral ligament. It spans the joint in an oblique fashion and inserts between the fibular head and Gerdy tubercle on the tibia. Exact anatomic and morphometric descriptions vary in the literature, and there are discrepancies regarding the ALL's attachment to the capsule and lateral meniscus. The ALL is a contributor to tibial internal rotation stability, and histologically, it exhibits parallel, crimped fibers consistent with a ligamentous microstructure. The footprint of the ALL has been shown to be at the exact location of the Segond fracture. The ALL is a distinct ligamentous structure at the anterolateral aspect of the knee, and it is likely involved in tibial internal rotation stability and the Segond fracture. Level IV, systematic review of anatomic and imaging studies. Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A virtual reality atlas of craniofacial anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Darren M; Oliker, Aaron; Carter, Christina R; Kirov, Miro; McCarthy, Joseph G; Cutting, Court B

    2007-11-01

    Head and neck anatomy is complex and represents an educational challenge to the student. Conventional two-dimensional illustrations inherently fall short in conveying intricate anatomical relationships that exist in three dimensions. A gratis three-dimensional virtual reality atlas of craniofacial anatomy is presented in an effort to address the paucity of readily accessible and customizable three-dimensional educational material available to the student of head and neck anatomy. Three-dimensional model construction was performed in Alias Maya 4.5 and 6.0. A basic three-dimensional skull model was altered to include surgical landmarks and proportions. Some of the soft tissues were adapted from previous work, whereas others were constructed de novo. Texturing was completed with Adobe Photoshop 7.0 and Maya. The Internet application was designed in Viewpoint Enliven 1.0. A three-dimensional computer model of craniofacial anatomy (bone and soft tissue) was completed. The model is compatible with many software packages and can be accessed by means of the Internet or downloaded to a personal computer. As the three-dimensional meshes are publicly available, they can be extensively manipulated by the user, even at the polygonal level. Three-dimensional computer graphics has yet to be fully exploited for head and neck anatomy education. In this context, the authors present a publicly available computer model of craniofacial anatomy. This model may also find applications beyond clinical medicine. The model can be accessed gratis at the Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Web site or obtained as a three-dimensional mesh, also gratis, by contacting the authors.

  4. A method for safely resecting anterior butterfly gliomas: the surgical anatomy of the default mode network and the relevance of its preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burks, Joshua D; Bonney, Phillip A; Conner, Andrew K; Glenn, Chad A; Briggs, Robert G; Battiste, James D; McCoy, Tressie; O'Donoghue, Daniel L; Wu, Dee H; Sughrue, Michael E

    2017-06-01

    OBJECTIVE Gliomas invading the anterior corpus callosum are commonly deemed unresectable due to an unacceptable risk/benefit ratio, including the risk of abulia. In this study, the authors investigated the anatomy of the cingulum and its connectivity within the default mode network (DMN). A technique is described involving awake subcortical mapping with higher attention tasks to preserve the cingulum and reduce the incidence of postoperative abulia for patients with so-called butterfly gliomas. METHODS The authors reviewed clinical data on all patients undergoing glioma surgery performed by the senior author during a 4-year period at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center. Forty patients were identified who underwent surgery for butterfly gliomas. Each patient was designated as having undergone surgery either with or without the use of awake subcortical mapping and preservation of the cingulum. Data recorded on these patients included the incidence of abulia/akinetic mutism. In the context of the study findings, the authors conducted a detailed anatomical study of the cingulum and its role within the DMN using postmortem fiber tract dissections of 10 cerebral hemispheres and in vivo diffusion tractography of 10 healthy subjects. RESULTS Forty patients with butterfly gliomas were treated, 25 (62%) with standard surgical methods and 15 (38%) with awake subcortical mapping and preservation of the cingulum. One patient (1/15, 7%) experienced postoperative abulia following surgery with the cingulum-sparing technique. Greater than 90% resection was achieved in 13/15 (87%) of these patients. CONCLUSIONS This study presents evidence that anterior butterfly gliomas can be safely removed using a novel, attention-task based, awake brain surgery technique that focuses on preserving the anatomical connectivity of the cingulum and relevant aspects of the cingulate gyrus.

  5. Hand Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons Anatomy The upper extremity is a term used to define the upper limb. This includes the shoulder, arm, forearm, wrist and hand. The hand is a very ...

  6. Tooth anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002214.htm Tooth anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, ... upper jawbone is called the maxilla. Images Tooth anatomy References Chan S, Alessandrini EA. Dental injuries. In: Selbst ...

  7. Paraganglioma Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Paraganglioma Anatomy Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: 648x576 ... View Download Large: 2700x2400 View Download Title: Paraganglioma Anatomy Description: Paraganglioma of the head and neck; drawing ...

  8. MR imaging of soft tissue alterations after total hip arthroplasty: comparison of classic surgical approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agten, Christoph A.; Sutter, Reto; Pfirrmann, Christian W.A. [Balgrist University Hospital, Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Zurich, Faculty of Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); Dora, Claudio [Balgrist University Hospital, Orthopedic Surgery, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Zurich, Faculty of Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2017-03-15

    To compare soft-tissue changes after total hip arthroplasty with posterior, direct-lateral, anterolateral, or anterior surgical approaches. MRI of 120 patients after primary total hip arthroplasty (30 per approach) were included. Each MRI was assessed by two readers regarding identification of surgical access, fatty muscle atrophy (Goutallier classification), tendon quality (0 = normal, 1 = tendinopathy, 2 = partial tear, 3 = avulsion), and fluid collections. Readers were blinded to the surgical approach. Surgical access was correctly identified in all cases. The direct lateral approach showed highest Goutallier grades and tendon damage for gluteus minimus muscle (2.07-2.67 and 2.00-2.77; p = 0.017 and p = 0.001 for readers 1 and 2, respectively) and tendon (2.30/1.67; p < 0.0005 for reader 1/2), and the lateral portion of the gluteus medius tendon (2.77/2.20; p < 0.0005 for reader 1/2). The posterior approach showed highest Goutallier grades and tendon damage for external rotator muscles (1.97-2.67 and 1.57-2.40; p < 0.0005-0.006 for reader 1/2) and tendons (1.41-2.45 and 1.93-2.76; p < 0.0005 for reader 1/2). The anterolateral and anterior approach showed less soft tissue damage. Fluid collections showed no differences between the approaches. MRI is well suited to identify surgical approaches after THA. The anterior and anterolateral approach showed less soft tissue damage compared to the posterior and direct lateral approach. (orig.)

  9. In-Person Communication Between Radiologists and Acute Care Surgeons Leads to Significant Alterations in Surgical Decision Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerson, Elliot C; Alam, Hasan B; Brown, Richard K J; Stojanovska, Jadranka; Davenport, Matthew S

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if direct in-person communication between an acute care surgical team and radiologists alters surgical decision making. Informed consent was waived for this institutional review board-exempt, HIPAA-compliant, prospective quality improvement study. From January 29, 2015 to December 10, 2015, semiweekly rounds lasting approximately 60 min were held between the on-call acute care surgery team (attending surgeon, chief resident, and residents) and one of three expert abdominal radiologists. A comprehensive imaging review was performed of recent and comparison examinations for cases selected by the surgeons in which medical and/or surgical decision making was pending. All reviewed examinations had available finalized reports known to the surgical team. RADPEER interradiologist concordance scores were assigned to all reviewed examinations. The impression and plan of the attending surgeon were recorded before and after each in-person review. One hundred patients were reviewed with 11 attending surgeons. The in-person meetings led to changes in surgeons' diagnostic impressions in 43% (43 of 100) and changes in medical and/or surgical planning in 43% (43 of 100; 20 acute changes, 23 nonacute changes, 19 changes in operative management) of cases. There were major discrepancies (RADPEER score ≥3) between the impression of the reviewing radiologist and the written report in 11% of cases (11 of 100). Targeted in-person collaboration between radiologists and acute care surgeons is associated with substantial and frequent changes in patient management, even when the original written report contains all necessary data. The primary mechanism seems to be promotion of a shared mental model that facilitates the exchange of complex information. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. 4D analysis of influence of patient movement and anatomy alteration on the quality of 3D U/S-based prostate HDR brachytherapy treatment delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milickovic, Natasa; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Tselis, Nikolaos; Nikolova, Iliyana; Katsilieri, Zaira; Kefala, Vasiliki; Zamboglou, Nikolaos; Baltas, Dimos

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Modern HDR brachytherapy treatment for prostate cancer based on the 3D ultrasound (U/S) plays increasingly important role. The purpose of this study is to investigate possible patient movement and anatomy alteration between the clinical image set acquisition, made after the needle implantation, and the patient irradiation and their influence on the quality of treatment. Methods: The authors used 3D U/S image sets and the corresponding treatment plans based on a 4D-treatment planning procedure: plans of 25 patients are obtained right after the needle implantation (clinical plan is based on this 3D image set) and just before and after the treatment delivery. The authors notice the slight decrease of treatment quality with increase of time gap between the clinical image set acquisition and the patient irradiation. 4D analysis of dose-volume-histograms (DVHs) for prostate: CTV1 = PTV, and urethra, rectum, and bladder as organs at risk (OARs) and conformity index (COIN) is presented, demonstrating the effect of prostate, OARs, and needles displacement. Results: The authors show that in the case that the patient body movement/anatomy alteration takes place, this results in modification of DVHs and radiobiological parameters, hence the plan quality. The observed average displacement of needles (1 mm) and of prostate (0.57 mm) is quite small as compared with the average displacement noted in several other reports [A. A. Martinez et al., Int. J. Radiat. Oncol., Biol., Phys. 49(1), 61-69 (2001); S. J. Damore et al., Int. J. Radiat. Oncol., Biol., Phys. 46(5), 1205-1211 (2000); P. J. Hoskin et al., Radiotherm. Oncol. 68(3), 285-288 (2003); E. Mullokandov et al., Int. J. Radiat. Oncol., Biol., Phys. 58(4), 1063-1071 (2004)] in the literature. Conclusions: Although the decrease of quality of dosimetric and radiobiological parameters occurs, this does not cause clinically unacceptable changes to the 3D dose distribution, according to our clinical protocol.

  11. Surgical incision can alter capsaicin-induced central sensitization in rat brainstem nociceptive neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, D K; Sessle, B J; Hu, J W

    2008-10-15

    Surgical trauma can affect spinal neuronal excitability, but there have been no studies of the effects of surgical cutaneous injury on central nociceptive processing of deep afferent inputs evoked by noxious stimuli such as capsaicin. Thus our aim was to test the effect of surgical cutaneous incision in influencing central sensitization induced by capsaicin injection into the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The activity of single nociceptive neurons activated by noxious mechanical stimulation of the TMJ was recorded in the trigeminal subnucleus caudalis/upper cervical cord of halothane-anesthetized rats. The cutaneous mechanoreceptive field (RF), cutaneous mechanical activation threshold (MAT) and TMJ MAT of neurons before and after both surgical cutaneous incision alone and capsaicin injection were compared with results of incision and lidocaine pretreatment of the facial skin overlying the TMJ and capsaicin injection into the TMJ. Incision itself induced a barrage of neuronal spikes and excitability increases reflecting central sensitization (cutaneous RF expansion, cutaneous MAT reduction) in most neurons tested whereas lidocaine pretreatment significantly attenuated the barrage and central sensitization. Capsaicin injection into the TMJ induced cutaneous RF expansion, cutaneous MAT reduction and TMJ MAT reduction following lidocaine pretreatment of the cutaneous incision site whereas capsaicin injection following incision alone not only failed to induce further central sensitization but also decreased the existing incision-induced central sensitization (no cutaneous RF expansion, increased cutaneous MAT and TMJ MAT) in most neurons tested. These findings suggest that central sensitization induced by capsaicin alone or by cutaneous incision alone can readily occur in TMJ-responsive nociceptive neurons and that following incision-induced excitability increases, capsaicin may result in a temporary suppression of nociceptive neuronal changes reflecting central

  12. The Surgical Management of Facial Nerve Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Rovak, Jason M.; Tung, Thomas H.; Mackinnon, Susan E.

    2004-01-01

    The surgical management of facial nerve injuries is dependent upon a thorough understanding of facial nerve anatomy, nerve physiology, and microsurgical techniques. When possible, primary neurorrhaphy is the “gold standard” repair technique. Injuries resulting in long nerve gaps or a significant delay between the time of injury and repair requires alterative techniques, such as nerve grafts, nerve transfers, regional muscle transfers, free tissue transfers, and static procedures. Scrupulous t...

  13. Does desflurane alter left ventricular function when used to control surgical stimulation during aortic surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyraud, D; Benmalek, F; Teugels, K; Bertrand, M; Mouren, S; Coriat, P

    1999-08-01

    Although desflurane is commonly used to control surgically induced hypertension, its effects on left ventricular (LV) function have not been investigated in this clinical situation. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the LV function response to desflurane, when used to control intraoperative hypertension. In 50 patients, scheduled for vascular surgery, anesthesia was induced with sufentanil 0.5 microg/kg, midazolam 0.3 mg/kg and atracurium 0.5 mg/kg. After tracheal intubation, anesthesia was maintained with increments of drugs with controlled ventilation (N2O/O2=60/40%) until the start of surgery. A 5 Mhz transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) probe was inserted after intubation. Pulmonary artery catheter and TEE measurements were obtained after induction (to)(control value), at surgical incision (t1) if it was associated with an increase in systolic arterial pressure (SAP) greater than 140 mmHg (hypertension) and after control of hemodynamic parameters by administration of desflurane (return of systolic arterial pressure to within 20% of the control value) (t2) in a fresh gas flow of 31/ min. Sixteen patients developed hypertension at surgical incision. SAP was controlled by desflurane in all 16 patients. Afterload assessed by systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI), end-systolic wall-stress (ESWS) and left-ventricular stroke work index (LVSWI) increased with incision until the hypertension returned to post-induction values with mean end-tidal concentration of 5.1+/-0.7% desflurane. No change in heart rate, cardiac index, mean pulmonary arterial pressure, stroke volume, end-diastolic and end-systolic cross-sectional areas, fractional area change and left ventricular circumferential fiber shortening was noted when desflurane was added to restore blood pressure. This study demonstrates that in patients at risk for cardiac morbidity undergoing vascular surgery, desflurane is effective to control intraoperative hypertension without fear of major

  14. Pre-prosthetic surgical alterations in maxillectomy to enhance the prosthetic prognoses as part of rehabilitation of oral cancer patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Fattah, H; Zaghloul, A; Pedemonte, E; Escuin, T

    2012-03-01

    After maxillectomy, prosthetic restoration of the resulting defect is an essential step because it signals the beginning of patient's rehabilitation. The obturator used to restore the defect should be comfortable, restore adequate speech, deglutition, mastication, and be cosmetically acceptable, success will depend on the size and location of the defect and the quantity and integrity of the remaining structures, in addition to pre-prosthetic surgical preparation of defect site. Preoperative cooperation between the oncologist surgeon and the maxillofacial surgeon may allow obturation of a resultant defect by preservation of the premaxilla or the tuberosity on the defect side and maintaining the alveolar bone or teeth adjacent to the defect. This study evaluates the importance of pre-prosthetic surgical alterations at the time maxillectomy on the enhancement of the prosthetic prognoses as part of the rehabilitation of oral cancer patient. The study was carried out between 2003- 2008, on 66 cancer patients(41 male-25 female) age ranged from 33 to 72 years, at National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, whom underwent maxillectomy surgery to remove malignant tumor as a part of cancer treatment. Patients were divided in two groups. Group A: Resection of maxilla followed by preprosthetic surgical preparation. Twenty-four cancer patients (13 male - 11 female). Group B: Resection of maxilla without any preprosthetic surgical preparation. Forty-two cancer patients (28 male-14 female). Outcome variables measured included facial contour and aesthetic results, speech understandability, ability to eat solid foods, oronasal separation, socializing outside the home, and return-to-work status. Flap success and donor site morbidity were also studied. To improve the prosthetic restoration of maxillary defect resulting maxillary resection as part treatment of maxillofacial tumor depends on the close cooperation between prosthodontist and surgeon, by combination of pre

  15. The association between thyroid malignancy and chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis: should it alter the surgical approach?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büyükaşık, Oktay; Hasdemir, Ahmet Oğuz; Yalçın, Erol; Celep, Bahadır; Sengül, Serkan; Yandakçı, Kemal; Tunç, Gündüz; Küçükpınar, Tevfik; Alkoy, Seval; Cöl, Cavit

    2011-01-01

    The relation between thyroid neoplasms and chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis (CLT) is controversial. While it is accepted that focal lymphocytic thyroiditis develops secondarily to malignancy, it is not clear whether diffuse lymphocytic thyroiditis has a tendency to develop into thyroid cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the relation between CLT and malignant tumours of the thyroid and evaluate the surgical approach to CLT cases. In this study, 917 patients operated on for thyroid diseases were investigated retrospectively. Seventy-seven (8.4%) patients histopathologically diagnosed as having CLT (either non-specific or Hashimoto's thyroiditis) were investigated for any concurrent malignant neoplasm. Fifteen patients in whom CLT and thyroid malignancy were coexisting were included in the study. In the pathological evaluation of 917 cases, malignancy in the thyroid was found in 97 (10.6%) cases. Seventy-seven cases were categorised as CLT. Of these 77, 16 (20.8%) were Hashimoto's thyroiditis (specific CLT) and the other 61 (79.2%) were non-specific CLT. In 15 cases, thyroid malignancy was found to be concurrent with CLT. Of the malignities, nine (60%) were papillary carcinoma, three (20%) medullar carcinoma, one (6.6%) follicular carcinoma, one (6.6%) Hurthle cell carcinoma, and one (6.6%) lymphoma. In our series, the rate of the development of malignancy against the background of CLT was 19.48%, while the rate in the groups without CLT was 9.76%, with a statistically significant difference between the groups (p = 0.008). CLT cases should be evaluated more carefully in terms of malignancy. If a nodule is detected on thyroiditis, the minimal surgical intervention should be lobectomy. Total thyroidectomy should be considered as preferable to subtotal thyroidectomy because of its many advantages such as controlling thyroiditis, removing the probability of reoperation, and hormonal stability.

  16. Integer anatomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doolittle, R. [ONR, Arlington, VA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    The title integer anatomy is intended to convey the idea of a systematic method for displaying the prime decomposition of the integers. Just as the biological study of anatomy does not teach us all things about behavior of species neither would we expect to learn everything about the number theory from a study of its anatomy. But, some number-theoretic theorems are illustrated by inspection of integer anatomy, which tend to validate the underlying structure and the form as developed and displayed in this treatise. The first statement to be made in this development is: the way structure of the natural numbers is displayed depends upon the allowed operations.

  17. VISUALIZATION OF REGISTERED SUBSURFACE ANATOMY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    A system and method for visualization of subsurface anatomy includes obtaining a first image from a first camera and a second image from a second camera or a second channel of the first camera, where the first and second images contain shared anatomical structures. The second camera and the second...... channel of the first camera are capable of imaging anatomy beneath the surface in ultra-violet, visual, or infra-red spectrum. A data processor is configured for computing registration of the first image to the second image to provide visualization of subsurface anatomy during surgical procedures...

  18. Classic versus millennial medical lab anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benninger, Brion; Matsler, Nik; Delamarter, Taylor

    2014-10-01

    This study investigated the integration, implementation, and use of cadaver dissection, hospital radiology modalities, surgical tools, and AV technology during a 12-week contemporary anatomy course suggesting a millennial laboratory. The teaching of anatomy has undergone the greatest fluctuation of any of the basic sciences during the past 100 years in order to make room for the meteoric rise in molecular sciences. Classically, anatomy consisted of a 2-year methodical, horizontal, anatomy course; anatomy has now morphed into a 12-week accelerated course in a vertical curriculum, at most institutions. Surface and radiological anatomy is the language for all clinicians regardless of specialty. The objective of this study was to investigate whether integration of full-body dissection anatomy and modern hospital technology, during the anatomy laboratory, could be accomplished in a 12-week anatomy course. Literature search was conducted on anatomy text, journals, and websites regarding contemporary hospital technology integrating multiple image mediums of 37 embalmed cadavers, surgical suite tools and technology, and audio/visual technology. Surgical and radiology professionals were contracted to teach during the anatomy laboratory. Literature search revealed no contemporary studies integrating full-body dissection with hospital technology and behavior. About 37 cadavers were successfully imaged with roentograms, CT, and MRI scans. Students were in favor of the dynamic laboratory consisting of multiple activity sessions occurring simultaneously. Objectively, examination scores proved to be a positive outcome and, subjectively, feedback from students was overwhelmingly positive. Despite the surging molecular based sciences consuming much of the curricula, full-body dissection anatomy is irreplaceable regarding both surface and architectural, radiological anatomy. Radiology should not be a small adjunct to understand full-body dissection, but rather, full-body dissection

  19. Alterations in Metabolism and Diurnal Rhythms following Bilateral Surgical Removal of the Superior Cervical Ganglia in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malena L. Mul Fedele

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian circadian rhythms are controlled by a master pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN, which is synchronized to the environment by photic and nonphotic stimuli. One of the main functions of the SCN is to regulate peripheral oscillators to set temporal variations in the homeostatic control of physiology and metabolism. In this sense, the SCN coordinate the activity/rest and feeding/fasting rhythms setting the timing of food intake, energy expenditure, thermogenesis, and active and basal metabolism. One of the major time cues to the periphery is the nocturnal melatonin, which is synthesized and secreted by the pineal gland. Under SCN control, arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AA-NAT—the main enzyme regulating melatonin synthesis in vertebrates—is activated at night by sympathetic innervation that includes the superior cervical ganglia (SCG. Bilateral surgical removal of the superior cervical ganglia (SCGx is considered a reliable procedure to completely prevent the nocturnal AA-NAT activation, irreversibly suppressing melatonin rhythmicity. In the present work, we studied the effects of SCGx on rat metabolic parameters and diurnal rhythms of feeding and locomotor activity. We found a significant difference between SCGx and sham-operated rats in metabolic variables such as an increased body weight/food intake ratio, increased adipose tissue, and decreased glycemia with a normal glucose tolerance. An analysis of locomotor activity and feeding rhythms showed an increased daytime (lights on activity (including food consumption in the SCGx group. These alterations suggest that superior cervical ganglia-related feedback mechanisms play a role in SCN-periphery phase coordination and that SCGx is a valid model without brain-invasive surgery to explore how sympathetic innervation affects daily (24 h patterns of activity, food consumption and, ultimately, its role in metabolism homeostasis.

  20. Regulatory Anatomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoeyer, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    , legal documents, technological devices, organizational structures, and work practices aimed at minimizing risk. I use this term to reorient the analytical attention with respect to safety regulation. Instead of evaluating whether safety is achieved, the point is to explore the types of “safety” produced...... they arise. In short, I expose the regulatory anatomy of the policy landscape....

  1. Anatomy of the inferior petro-occipital vein and its relation to the base of the skull: application to surgical and endovascular procedures of the skull base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, R Shane; Watanabe, Koichi; Loukas, Marios; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A

    2014-07-01

    Although the inferior petro-occipital vein has been recently used for vascular access to the cavernous sinus, few detailed descriptions of its anatomy are in the literature. We aimed to investigate the morphology and relationships of this vessel. Twelve latex-injected cadaveric heads (24 sides) were dissected to identify the inferior petro-occipital vein and anatomic details documented. The petro-occipital vein was identified on 83.3% of sides. Generally this vein united the internal carotid venous plexus to the superior jugular bulb. However, on 10% of sides, the anterior part of this vein communicated directly with the cavernous sinus, and on 15%, the posterior vein drained into the inferior petrosal sinus at its termination into the superior jugular bulb. The petro-occipital vein was separated from the overlying inferior petrosal sinus by a thin plate of bone. On 40% of sides, small venous connections were found between these two venous structures. The vein was usually larger if a nondominant transverse sinus was present. The overlying inferior petrosal sinus was smaller in diameter when an underlying inferior petro-occipital vein was present. On 20% of sides, the posterior aspect of the vein communicated with the hypoglossal canal veins. On three sides, diploic veins from the clivus drained into the inferior petro-occipital vein. The inferior petro-occipital vein is present in most humans. This primarily extracranial vessel communicates with intracranial venous sinuses and should be considered an emissary vein. Knowledge of this vessel's exact anatomy may be useful to cranial base surgeons and endovascular specialists. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. The Anatomy of Learning Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelmsson, Niklas; Dahlgren, Lars Owe; Hult, Hakan; Scheja, Max; Lonka, Kirsti; Josephson, Anna

    2010-01-01

    The experience of clinical teachers as well as research results about senior medical students' understanding of basic science concepts has much been debated. To gain a better understanding about how this knowledge-transformation is managed by medical students, this work aims at investigating their ways of setting about learning anatomy.…

  3. Anatomy Transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Dicko, Ali Hamadi; Liu, Tiantian; Gilles, Benjamin; Kavan, Ladislav; Faure, François; Palombi, Olivier; Cani, Marie-Paule

    2013-01-01

    International audience; Characters with precise internal anatomy are important in film and visual effects, as well as in medical applications. We propose the first semi-automatic method for creating anatomical structures, such as bones, muscles, viscera and fat tissues. This is done by transferring a reference anatomical model from an input template to an arbitrary target character, only defined by its boundary representation (skin). The fat distribution of the target character needs to be sp...

  4. [Simple rules for orientation in transcutaneous ptosis surgery--a contribution to the surgical anatomy or: how not to get lost in the upper eyelid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaudig, U; Schumacher, S

    2012-01-01

    Surgical preparation in the upper eyelid follows well defined anatomic structures. Nevertheless, even an experienced surgeon can loose orientation in the presence of fatty degeneration, oedema or bleeding. Some simple rules can help to stay oriented and identify the landmarks. The preaponeurotic fat has a distinct colour, structure and texture and is a landmark for the levator muscle lying underneath it. This defines a first simple rule: it is not preaponeurotic fat if it does not look like preaponeurotic fat. The orbital septum may weaken and allow orbital fat to prolapse, but it stays firmly attached at the upper orbital rim. A second simple rule therefore adresses its identification: if a structure does not move with inferior tension, it cannot be muscle or fat (it must be septum). Identifying the landmarks preaponeurotic fat, orbital septum and tarsus will facilitate anatomic correlation and surgical preparation. In summary: Rule No. 1--If it does not look like preaponeurotic fat, then it isn't. Rule No. 2--If it does not move with traction, it is neither muscle nor fat (but probably septum). Rule No. 3--If things get confusing, stop and consider rules 1 and 2. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Thymus Gland Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Thymus Gland, Adult, Anatomy Add to My Pictures View / ... 1500x1200 View Download Large: 3000x2400 View Download Title: Thymus Gland, Adult, Anatomy Description: Anatomy of the thymus ...

  6. Normal Pancreas Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Pancreas Anatomy Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: 761x736 ... View Download Large: 3172x3068 View Download Title: Pancreas Anatomy Description: Anatomy of the pancreas; drawing shows the ...

  7. Surgical Anatomy of the Radial Nerve at the Elbow and in the Forearm: Anatomical Basis for Intraplexus Nerve Transfer to Reconstruct Thumb and Finger Extension in C7 - T1 Brachial Plexus Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Dong, Zhen; Zhang, Chun-Lin; Gu, Yu-Dong

    2016-11-01

    Background  C7 - T1 palsy results in complete loss of finger motion and poses a surgical challenge. This study investigated the anatomy of the radial nerve in the elbow and forearm and the feasibility of intraplexus nerve transfer to restore thumb and finger extension. Methods  The radial nerves were dissected in 28 formalin-fixed upper extremities. Branching pattern, length, diameter, and number of myelinated fibers were recorded. Results  Commonly, the branching pattern (from proximal to distal) was to the brachioradialis, extensor carpi radialis longus, superficial sensory proximal to the lateral epicondyle, extensor carpi radialis brevis, supinator, extensor digitorum communis, extensor digiti minimi, extensor carpi ulnaris, abductor pollicis longus, extensor pollicis brevis, extensor pollicis longus, and extensor indicis distal to the lateral epicondyle. Conclusions  Branches to the brachioradialis, extensor carpi radialis longus, and supinator can be transferred to the posterior interosseous nerve to restore hand movement in patients with C7 - T1 brachial plexus palsies; the supinator branch is probably the best choice in this regard. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  8. Anatomy and physiology of cisternostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherian, Iype; Grasso, Giovanni; Bernardo, Antonio; Munakomi, Sunil

    2016-01-01

    Cisternostomy is defined as opening the basal cisterns to atmospheric pressure. This technique helps to reduce the intracranial pressure in severe head trauma as well as other conditions when the so-called sudden "brain swelling" troubles the surgeon. We elaborated the surgical anatomy of this procedure as well as the proposed physiology of how cisternostomy works. This novel technique may change the current trends in neurosurgery.

  9. Anatomy of a nonhost disease resistance response of pea to Fusarium solani: PR gene elicitation via DNase, chitosan and chromatin alterations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee A Hadwiger

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Of the multiplicity of plant pathogens in nature, only a few are virulent on a given plant species. Conversely, plants develop a rapid nonhost resistance response to the majority of the pathogens. The anatomy of the nonhost resistance of pea endocarp tissue against a pathogen of bean, Fusarium solani f.sp. phaseoli (Fsph and the susceptibility of pea to F. solani f sp. pisi (Fspi has been described cytologically, biochemically and molecular-biologically. Cytological changes have been followed by electron microscope and stain differentiation under white and UV light. The induction of changes in transcription, protein synthesis, expression of pathogenesis-related (PR genes, and increases in metabolic pathways culminating in low molecular weight, antifungal compounds are described biochemically. Molecular changes initiated by fungal signals to host organelles, primarily to the chromatin within host nuclei, are identified according to source of the signal and the mechanisms utilized in activating defense genes. The functions of some PR genes are defined. A hypothesis based on this data is developed to explain both why fungal growth is suppressed in nonhost resistance and why growth can continue in a susceptible reaction.

  10. Clinical relevance of distal biceps insertional and footprint anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bekerom, Michel P J; Kodde, Izaäk F; Aster, Asir; Bleys, Ronald L A W; Eygendaal, Denise

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this review was to present an overview, based on a literature search, of surgical anatomy for distal biceps tendon repairs, based on the current literature. A narrative review was performed using Pubmed/Medline using key words: Search terms were distal biceps, insertional, and anatomy. Last decade, the interest in both reconstruction techniques, as well as surgical anatomy of the distal biceps tendon, has increased. The insights into various aspects of distal biceps tendon anatomy (two tendons, bicipital tuberosity, lacertus fibrosis, bicipital-radial bursa, posterior interosseous nerve, and lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerve) have evolved significantly in the last years. Thorough knowledge of the anatomy is essential for the surgeon in order to understand the biomechanics of rupture and reconstruction of the distal biceps tendon and to avoid injuries of the nerves. Some tips and tricks are provided, and some pitfalls were described to avoid complications and optimize surgical outcome. IV.

  11. The anatomy lessons of the Amsterdam Guild of Surgeons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    IJpma, F.F.A.

    2014-01-01

    Mandatory lessons in anatomy, taught by the praelector anatomiae (lecturer in anatomy) of the Amsterdam Guild of Surgeons, were an important part of the surgical training starting in the 16th century. We describe how surgeons were trained approximately 350 years ago at the Surgeons’ Guild. The role

  12. Anatomy and Physiology. Revised Teacher Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Danene; And Others

    This curriculum guide contains 14 units of instruction for a course in anatomy and physiology for surgical technology students. The units cover the following topics: (1) organization of the body; (2) cells, tissues, and membranes; (3) integumentary system; (4) skeletal system; (5) muscular system; (6) nervous system; (7) special sense organs; (8)…

  13. A Biofilm Pocket Model to Evaluate Different Non-Surgical Periodontal Treatment Modalities in Terms of Biofilm Removal and Reformation, Surface Alterations and Attachment of Periodontal Ligament Fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hägi, Tobias T; Klemensberger, Sabrina; Bereiter, Riccarda; Nietzsche, Sandor; Cosgarea, Raluca; Flury, Simon; Lussi, Adrian; Sculean, Anton; Eick, Sigrun

    2015-01-01

    There is a lack of suitable in vitro models to evaluate various treatment modalities intending to remove subgingival bacterial biofilm. Consequently, the aims of this in vitro-study were: a) to establish a pocket model enabling mechanical removal of biofilm and b) to evaluate repeated non-surgical periodontal treatment with respect to biofilm removal and reformation, surface alterations, tooth hard-substance-loss, and attachment of periodontal ligament (PDL) fibroblasts. Standardized human dentin specimens were colonized by multi-species biofilms for 3.5 days and subsequently placed into artificially created pockets. Non-surgical periodontal treatment was performed as follows: a) hand-instrumentation with curettes (CUR), b) ultrasonication (US), c) subgingival air-polishing using erythritol (EAP) and d) subgingival air-polishing using erythritol combined with chlorhexidine digluconate (EAP-CHX). The reduction and recolonization of bacterial counts, surface roughness (Ra and Rz), the caused tooth substance-loss (thickness) as well as the attachment of PDL fibroblasts were evaluated and statistically analyzed by means of ANOVA with Post-Hoc LSD. After 5 treatments, bacterial reduction in biofilms was highest when applying EAP-CHX (4 log10). The lowest reduction was found after CUR (2 log10). Additionally, substance-loss was the highest when using CUR (128±40 µm) in comparison with US (14±12 µm), EAP (6±7 µm) and EAP-CHX (11±10) µm). Surface was roughened when using CUR and US. Surfaces exposed to US and to EAP attracted the highest numbers of PDL fibroblasts. The established biofilm model simulating a periodontal pocket combined with interchangeable placements of test specimens with multi-species biofilms enables the evaluation of different non-surgical treatment modalities on biofilm removal and surface alterations. Compared to hand instrumentation the application of ultrasonication and of air-polishing with erythritol prevents from substance-loss and

  14. Oral anatomy of the dog and cat in veterinary dentistry practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioso, Marco A; Carvalho, Vanessa G G

    2005-07-01

    The study of anatomy is important to accomplish any kind of surgical and medical procedure and to understand the physiology and diseases of animals. It is no different in veterinary dentistry. The study of oral anatomy helps the veterinarian to accomplish any kind of surgical procedure more quickly and with less damage to tissues, especially in cases of major oral surgery. In fact, under-standing the anatomy is easier when this knowledge is acquired directly, with surgical application. This article describes the essentials of the oral anatomy of the dog and cat, correlating this knowledge with the dental procedures to be used by veterinarians as a guide.

  15. Soul Anatomy: A virtual cadaver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moaz Bambi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the traditional science of medicine and medical education, teaching human anatomy in the class has always been done using human cadavers. Not only does this violate human sanctity, but according to our research, it is not adequate to provide students with the alleged educational value that it is supposed to deliver. It is very cumbersome to organise all the aspects of cadaver care. Cadavers are also very limited when it comes to controlling their structures and any benefit is almost completely altered the first time the cadaver is used (dissected, and ironically, it is very weak at delivering actual real-life scenarios of a human body to students. Virtual anatomy has been a promising solution that many are counting on. But even today, we have not found a complete solution that combines all the benefits of using human cadavers and those introduced by its technical counterparts. "Soul Anatomy" aims to do just that. It brings the best of all worlds, from a natural intuitive control system, life-like feel of organs, precise accuracy in moving and controlling bodily structures, to the smallest details of being able to show medical information overlays from various medical databases connected to the internet; thus making use of technology in teaching human anatomy by providing a modern learning experience.

  16. Normal Female Reproductive Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an inner lining called the endometrium. Normal female reproductive system anatomy. Topics/Categories: Anatomy -- Gynecologic Type: Color, Medical Illustration Source: National Cancer Institute Creator: Terese Winslow (Illustrator) AV Number: CDR609921 Date Created: November 17, 2014 Date Added: ...

  17. Laparoscopy: Learning a New Surgical Anatomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Angel Martin; Aguilar, Jose-Francisco Noguera

    2009-01-01

    Operative laparoscopy has progressed rapidly in recent years, and this alternative to the conventional approach for abdominal surgery has allowed the description of new planes, spaces, and anatomic references as a result of the artificial rupture of the "anatomical continuum". Magnified laparoscopic views and the ability to deeply explore anatomic…

  18. Clinical anatomy of the subserous layer: An amalgamation of gross and clinical anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabuki, Yoshihiko

    2016-05-01

    The 1998 edition of Terminologia Anatomica introduced some currently used clinical anatomical terms for the pelvic connective tissue or subserous layer. These innovations persuaded the present author to consider a format in which the clinical anatomical terms could be reconciled with those of gross anatomy and incorporated into a single anatomical glossary without contradiction or ambiguity. Specific studies on the subserous layer were undertaken on 79 Japanese women who had undergone surgery for uterine cervical cancer, and on 26 female cadavers that were dissected, 17 being formalin-fixed and 9 fresh. The results were as follows: (a) the subserous layer could be segmentalized by surgical dissection in the perpendicular, horizontal and sagittal planes; (b) the segmentalized subserous layer corresponded to 12 cubes, or ligaments, of minimal dimension that enabled the pelvic organs to be extirpated; (c) each ligament had a three-dimensional (3D) structure comprising craniocaudal, mediolateral, and dorsoventral directions vis-á-vis the pelvic axis; (d) these 3D-structured ligaments were encoded morphologically in order of decreasing length; and (e) using these codes, all the surgical procedures for 19th century to present-day radical hysterectomy could be expressed symbolically. The establishment of clinical anatomical terms, represented symbolically through coding as demonstrated in this article, could provide common ground for amalgamating clinical anatomy with gross anatomy. Consequently, terms in clinical anatomy and gross anatomy could be reconciled and compiled into a single anatomical glossary. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Anatomy in a modern medical curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turney, B W

    2007-03-01

    Anatomy in undergraduate education has been in decline for many years. Some suggest that it has fallen below a safe level. Balances between detail and safety, and assimilation and application of anatomy have yet to be established as the methods of teaching undergo another metamorphosis. For doctors, the human body is the focus of investigation and intervention on a daily basis; for this reason, the study of anatomy in some form will continue to be essential to safe medical practice. It is necessary for core knowledge of anatomy to be assimilated by all doctors in order to practice and communicate safely. It may be true that most doctors do not need to dissect a cadaver or study a prosection in order to practice, but if it can improve their understanding of what they do and why they do it, this surely has to be of benefit both for the safety of the patient and satisfaction of the doctor as a professional. Integration of newer teaching modalities and modern technology will encourage interest and retention of anatomical knowledge and its clinical relevance. Anatomy has a promising future in postgraduate specialist and surgical training. Detailed knowledge should be integrated into specialist training when it is clinically relevant allowing specialists of the future to practice safely and accurately and also to provide a strong base for future clinical developments.

  20. Approach to the study of human anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridola, Carlo

    2004-01-01

    The first thing to do to describe the human body is to define the anatomical position and the bilateral symmetry which characterise every Metazoi (man included) and permit us to study the body in its two symmetric halves; the left and right sides are the result of a virtual cut on a vertical and median plan. This is followed by a resume of the general structures and the vocabulary of the outer shapes of the human body; its direction (it will be helpful to use the virtual geometric parallelepiped made by three couples of planes one orthogonal to the other); levels of structural organization (chemical, cellular, tissue, organ and the system level; the highest is the organism level). After that, rules and principles are enunciated in the four fundamental laws of anatomy regarding the organ structures and their systems studied by the surface, gross (macroscopic), systemic, regional and constitutional type anatomy. There is also some information concerning education and research, the competence of the Human Anatomy as recommended by art. 1 of D.M. 23. XI. 1999 of the Italian law. Later what Richard Snell written in the preface to "Clinical Anatomy for Medical Students" about the importance of the knowledge of human anatomy for medical and surgical applications will be reported.

  1. Pelvic Organ Prolapse: New Concepts in Pelvic Floor Anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Pedro A; Wai, Clifford Y

    2016-03-01

    As the field of reconstructive pelvic surgery continues to evolve, with descriptions of new procedures to repair pelvic organ prolapse, it remains imperative to maintain a functional understanding of pelvic floor anatomy and support. The goal of this review was to provide a focused, conceptual approach to differentiating anatomic defects contributing to prolapse in the various compartments of the vagina. Rather than provide exhaustive descriptions of pelvic floor anatomy, basic pelvic floor anatomy is reviewed, new and historical concepts of pelvic floor support are discussed, and relevance to the surgical management of specific anatomic defects is addressed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Anatomy Comic Strips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin Seo; Kim, Dae Hyun; Chung, Min Suk

    2011-01-01

    Comics are powerful visual messages that convey immediate visceral meaning in ways that conventional texts often cannot. This article's authors created comic strips to teach anatomy more interestingly and effectively. Four-frame comic strips were conceptualized from a set of anatomy-related humorous stories gathered from the authors' collective…

  3. Clinical anatomy of the periocular region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Pari N; Ortiz-Pérez, Santiago; Joshi, Naresh

    2013-08-01

    The aims of this article are twofold: (1) to provide the facial plastic surgeon with a comprehensive and up-to-date overview of periocular anatomy including the brow, midface, and temporal region and (2) to highlight important anatomical relationships that must be appreciated in order to achieve the best possible functional and aesthetic surgical outcomes. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  4. Anatomy of the Corrugator Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Kun; Lee, Jung Hun; Lim, Hee Joong

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this article is to systematically review the anatomy and action of the corrugator muscle. PubMed and Scopus were searched using the terms "corrugator" AND "anatomy." Among the 60 full texts from the 145 relevant abstracts, 34 articles without sufficient content were excluded and 4 articles drawn from the reference lists were added. Among the 30 articles analyzed (721 hemifaces), 28% classified by oblique head and transverse head, and 72% did not. Corrugator originated mostly from the medial supraorbital rim (45%), followed by the medial frontal bone (31%), the medial infraorbital rim (17%), and the upper nasal process (7%). Corrugator extended through the frontalis and orbicularis oculi (41%), only the frontalis (41%), or only the orbicularis oculi (18%). Corrugator ran superolaterally (59%), or laterally (41%). Corrugators inserted mostly to the middle of the eyebrow (57%), or the medial half of the eyebrow (36%), but also to the glabella region (7%). The length of the corrugator ranged 38 to 53 mm. The transverse head (23.38 mm) was longer than the oblique head (19.75 mm). Corrugator was thicker at the medial canthus than at the midpupillary line. Corrugator was innervated by the temporal branch of the facial nerve (66%), the zygomatic branch (17%), or the angular nerve (zygomatic branch and buccal branch, 17%). Supraorbital nerve (60%) or supratrochlear nerve (40%) penetrated the corrugator. The action was depressing, pulling the eyebrow medially (91%), or with medial eyebrow elevation and lateral eyebrow depression (9%). Surgeons must keep this anatomy in mind during surgical procedures.

  5. In Vivo Evaluation of Two-Piece Implants Placed Following One-Stage and Two-Stage Surgical Protocol in Posterior Mandibular Region. Assessment of Alterations in Crestal Bone Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulati, Minkle; Govila, Vivek; Verma, Sunil; Rajkumar, Balakrishnan; Anand, Vishal; Aggarwal, Anuj; Jain, Nikil

    2015-10-01

    Endosseous implants can be placed following either two-stage technique requiring second-stage surgery or one-stage technique, which does not involve a second surgical intervention. The present study was undertaken to evaluate and compare the changes in crestal bone level when two-piece implants were placed in posterior mandibular region following one-stage and two-stage surgical protocol. A parallel group randomized prospective study was designed in which 20 two-piece implants were placed in the posterior mandibular region of 16 partially edentulous healthy patients following either one-stage (Group I) or a two-stage surgical protocol (Group II). Alterations in crestal bone level were assessed with the help of DentaScan at baseline, that is, at the time of implant placement, third month and sixth month. Nonsignificant differences were seen in both groups in terms of changes in crestal bone level at the final evaluation. Hence, it could be concluded that two-piece implants can be placed following one-stage surgical protocol as predictably as when two-stage surgical technique is followed. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Fascial Anatomy and Its Relevance in Safe Laparoscopic Hysterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puntambekar, Shailesh P; Puntambekar, Seema P; Gadkari, Yamini; Naval, Suyash

    2015-01-01

    To demonstrate the importance of being familiar with the anatomy of the endopelvic fascia as seen by laparoscopy to perform safe laparoscopic hysterectomies. Combination of surgical videos and design diagrams. Compiled high-definition surgical videos from the Galaxy Care Laparoscopy Institute, Pune, India. These videos clearly demonstrate the anatomy of the endopelvic fascia and describe tips to avoid damage to the major structures, including the major vessels, ureter, bowel, bladder, and endopelvic fascia. The laparoscopic view of the anatomy with the current camera system is an excellent tool to demonstrate and teach pelvic anatomy, which can be applied to surgical principles in difficult benign and oncological cases. We used a total laparoscopic approach to demonstrate the fasciae that were seen during various types of hysterectomies. The video shows the following: (1) the posterior leaf of the broad ligament was opened until it reached the apex of the uterosacral ligament; (2) the anterior leaf of broad ligament was opened until it reached the vesico-uterine peritoneal reflection; (3) the principles of bladder dissection; (4) the pubocervico-vesical fascia and its relevance to bladder dissection; (5) the relevance of the anatomy of the uterine artery, vein, and ureter with endopelvic fascia within the leaves of the broad ligament; (6) Denonvillier's fascia dissection technique for dissection of the rectum away from the vagina; (7) the anatomy of the vesicocervical ligaments, forming the ureteric tunnel; (8) the dissection principles of lateralizing the ureter in the retrovesical region; (9) the endopelvic fascia reflection, which continued caudally, covering the pelvic floor; and (10) the relevance of the anatomy of the endopelvic fascia and the stress urinary incontinence treatment technique. Understanding the anatomy of the fasciae of the pelvis helps to create avascular planes and is crucial for performing safe hysterectomies. Copyright © 2015 AAGL

  7. Anatomy of Sarcocaulon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. L. Verhoeven

    1983-11-01

    Full Text Available The anatomy of the leaf blade, petiole, stem and root of the genus Sarcocaulon (DC. Sweet is discussed. On the basis of the leaf anatomy, the four sections recognized by Moffett (1979 can be identified: section Denticulati (dorsiventral leaves, section Multifidi (isobilateral leaves and adaxial and abaxial palisade continuous at midvein, section Crenati (isobilateral leaves, short curved trichomes and glandular hairs, section Sarcocaulon (isobilateral leaves and glandular hairs only. The anatomy of the stem is typically that of a herbaceous dicotyledon with a thick periderm. The root structure shows that the function of the root is not food storage.

  8. Variant Anatomy of Intracranial Part of Middle Meningeal Artery in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anatomy of the intracranial part of middle meningeal artery is important during ligation or embolization in epidural haematomas, and in surgical approach to the middle cranial fossa. It shows population variations, but reports from African populations are scanty. This study aimed at describing the variant anatomy of ...

  9. Comparison of a Gross Anatomy Laboratory to Online Anatomy Software for Teaching Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathiowetz, Virgil; Yu, Chih-Huang; Quake-Rapp, Cindee

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the grades, self-perceived learning, and satisfaction between occupational therapy students who used a gross anatomy laboratory versus online anatomy software (AnatomyTV) as tools to learn anatomy at a large public university and a satellite campus in the mid-western United States. The goal was to determine if…

  10. Maxillary, mandibular, and chin advancement: treatment planning based on airway anatomy in obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schendel, Stephen; Powell, Nelson; Jacobson, Richard

    2011-03-01

    Surgical correction of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) syndrome involves understanding a number of parameters, of which the 3-dimensional airway anatomy is important. Visualization of the upper airway based on cone beam computed tomography scans and automated computer analysis is an aid in understanding normal and abnormal airway conditions and their response to surgery. The goal of surgical treatment of OSA syndrome is to enlarge the velo-oropharyngeal airway by anterior/lateral displacement of the soft tissues and musculature by maxillary, mandibular, and possibly, genioglossus advancement. Knowledge of the specific airway obstruction and characteristics based on 3-dimensional studies permits a directed surgical treatment plan that can successfully address the area or areas of airway obstruction. The end occlusal result can be improved when orthodontic treatment is combined with the surgical plan. The individual with OSA, though, is more complicated than the usual orthognathic patient, and both the medical condition and treatment length need to be judiciously managed when OSA and associated conditions are present. The perioperative management of the patient with OSA is more complex and the margin for error is reduced, and this needs to be taken into consideration and the care altered as indicated. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Surgical scar revision: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpa Garg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Scar formation is an inevitable consequence of wound healing from either a traumatic or a surgical intervention. The aesthetic appearance of a scar is the most important criteria to judge the surgical outcome. An understanding of the anatomy and wound healing along with experience, meticulous planning and technique can reduce complications and improve the surgical outcome. Scar revision does not erase a scar but helps to make it less noticeable and more acceptable. Both surgical and non-surgical techniques, used either alone or in combination can be used for revising a scar. In planning a scar revision surgeon should decide on when to act and the type of technique to use for scar revision to get an aesthetically pleasing outcome. This review article provides overview of methods applied for facial scar revision. This predominantly covers surgical methods.

  12. Pectoralis major tears: anatomy, classification, and diagnosis with ultrasound and MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiavaras, Mary M. [McMaster University, Department of Radiology, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Jacobson, Jon A. [University of Michigan, Department of Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Smith, Jay [Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Department of Anatomy, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Dahm, Diane L. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2014-09-09

    Accurate characterization of pectoralis major tears is important to guide management. Imaging evaluation with ultrasound and MR imaging can be difficult given the complex regional anatomy. In addition, recent literature has redefined the anatomy of the distal pectoralis major. The purpose of this study is to review pectoralis major injuries taking into account new anatomic descriptions using ultrasound and MR imaging, including cadaveric dissection, surgically produced pectoralis tears, and clinical pectoralis tendon tear with surgical correlation. (orig.)

  13. Abortion - surgical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suction curettage; Surgical abortion; Elective abortion - surgical; Therapeutic abortion - surgical ... Surgical abortion involves dilating the opening to the uterus (cervix) and placing a small suction tube into the uterus. ...

  14. Imaging of jaw with dental CT software program: Normal Anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Myong Gon; Seo, Kwang Hee; Jung, Hak Young; Sung, Nak Kwan; Chung, Duk Soo; Kim, Ok Dong; Lee, Young Hwan

    1994-01-01

    Dental CT software program can provide reformatted cross-sectional and panoramic images that cannot be obtained with conventional axial and direct coronal CT scan. The purpose of this study is to describe the method of the technique and to identify the precise anatomy of jaw. We evaluated 13 mandibles and 7 maxillae of 15 subjects without bony disease who were being considered for endosseous dental implants. Reformatted images obtained by the use of bone algorithm performed on GE HiSpeed Advantage CT scanner were retrospectively reviewed for detailed anatomy of jaw. Anatomy related to neurovascular bundle(mandibular foramen, inferior alveolar canal, mental foramen, canal for incisive artery, nutrient canal, lingual foramen and mylohyoid groove), muscular insertion(mylohyoid line, superior and inferior genial tubercle and digastric fossa) and other anatomy(submandibular fossa, sublingual fossa, contour of alveolar process, oblique line, retromolar fossa, temporal crest and retromolar triangle) were well delineated in mandible. In maxilla, anatomy related to neurovascular bundle(greater palatine foramen and groove, nasopalatine canal and incisive foramen) and other anatomy(alveolar process, maxillary sinus and nasal fossa) were also well delineated. Reformatted images using dental CT software program provided excellent delineation of the jaw anatomy. Therefore, dental CT software program can play an important role in the preoperative assessment of mandible and maxilla for dental implants and other surgical conditions

  15. Imaging of jaw with dental CT software program: Normal Anatomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Myong Gon; Seo, Kwang Hee; Jung, Hak Young; Sung, Nak Kwan; Chung, Duk Soo; Kim, Ok Dong [School of Medicine, Taegu Catholic University, Taegu (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young Hwan [Taegu Armed Forces General Hospital, Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-07-15

    Dental CT software program can provide reformatted cross-sectional and panoramic images that cannot be obtained with conventional axial and direct coronal CT scan. The purpose of this study is to describe the method of the technique and to identify the precise anatomy of jaw. We evaluated 13 mandibles and 7 maxillae of 15 subjects without bony disease who were being considered for endosseous dental implants. Reformatted images obtained by the use of bone algorithm performed on GE HiSpeed Advantage CT scanner were retrospectively reviewed for detailed anatomy of jaw. Anatomy related to neurovascular bundle(mandibular foramen, inferior alveolar canal, mental foramen, canal for incisive artery, nutrient canal, lingual foramen and mylohyoid groove), muscular insertion(mylohyoid line, superior and inferior genial tubercle and digastric fossa) and other anatomy(submandibular fossa, sublingual fossa, contour of alveolar process, oblique line, retromolar fossa, temporal crest and retromolar triangle) were well delineated in mandible. In maxilla, anatomy related to neurovascular bundle(greater palatine foramen and groove, nasopalatine canal and incisive foramen) and other anatomy(alveolar process, maxillary sinus and nasal fossa) were also well delineated. Reformatted images using dental CT software program provided excellent delineation of the jaw anatomy. Therefore, dental CT software program can play an important role in the preoperative assessment of mandible and maxilla for dental implants and other surgical conditions.

  16. SURGICAL EDUCATION

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2Department of Human Biology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Cape Town. 3Department of ... Methods: From 2012 to 2014, mean anatomy and physiology scores of medical students who attended anatomy workshops were compared to ... lectures were abbreviated in terms of time, similar principles taught in the ...

  17. Teaching surgical exposures to undergraduate medical students: an integration concept for anatomical and surgical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Niels; Hepp, Pierre; Löffler, Sabine; Schleifenbaum, Stefan; Steinke, Hanno; Klima, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    Decreasing numbers of students are interested in starting a surgical career, posing substantial challenges to patient care in the next years. The anatomy course is one of the key subjects in medical training, especially in surgical disciplines. Innovative teaching concepts that integrate surgically relevant anatomy and manual dexterity might help boost student interest in surgery. A preclinical workshop entitled "Surgical exposures" was developed. A team of anatomists and surgeons introduced the surgical exposures, demonstrating the procedures on Thiel-fixed body donors. Following this introduction, students practiced the exposures in an operating room-like manner. A six-point Likert scale was used to evaluate the workshop and to compare it to the first-year dissection course. The overall evaluation result for the surgical exposures was excellent, proving to be a significantly better result when compared to the first-year dissection course. The students were more satisfied with the teaching time invested by the peers and regarded the workshop as clinically highly relevant. Furthermore, they felt that questions were addressed better and that the overall atmosphere was better than in the gross anatomy course. Subject to criticism was the course size and practicing time in both cases. The surgical exposures workshop provides preclinical students with clinically relevant anatomy and manual dexterity. It may positively influence the decision to follow a surgical career. This course, however, requires extensive teaching resources. The given concept may help implement practical medical skills in the preclinical curriculum, strengthening the professional identity of surgeons and anatomists.

  18. The anatomy of forearm free flap phalloplasty for transgender surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S; Dennis, M; Holland, J; Terrell, M; Loukas, M; Schober, J

    2018-03-01

    Transgender surgeries are becoming more frequent and visual interpretation of anatomy is essential for both surgeons and patients. Since the forearm free flap phalloplasty was introduced in 1984, it has been known to provide reliable cosmetic and functional results for transitioning men compared with phalloplasty by different flaps. Surgical text descriptions were enhanced by the creation of new anatomic illustrations. The forearm free flap consists of the anterior forearm skin, subcutaneous tissue, fascia containing the radial artery as the perforator and its venae comitantes, cephalic and basilic veins, and lateral and medial antebrachial cutaneous nerves are demonstrated in relation to the surgically derived flap. Song's forearm free flap phalloplasty requires two surgical stages with a three-month interval between the stages: prelamination of a neourethra and construction of a neophallus. The neophallus created by forearm flap phalloplasty is reported to achieve acceptable aesthetical and psychological satisfaction, appropriate size and shape, and satisfying sexual intercourse. Despite increasing experiences in gender confirming surgery with modifications made by many authors, urethral complications including fistula and/or stricture formation are the leading causes of reoperation. The poor esthetic outcome of the forearm donor site and a decrease in rigidity of the neophallus are the main limitations. Illustrations of anatomy help inform surgical choice and understanding of risks and benefits by patients. The anatomy of the free forearm flap phalloplasty supports creation of a neophallus for transsexual anatomy revision. Clin. Anat. 31:145-151, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Clinical relevance of distal biceps insertional and footprint anatomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bekerom, Michel P J; Kodde, Izaäk F.; Aster, Asir; Bleys, Ronald L A W|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/134440455; Eygendaal, Denise

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this review was to present an overview, based on a literature search, of surgical anatomy for distal biceps tendon repairs, based on the current literature. Methods: A narrative review was performed using Pubmed/Medline using key words: Search terms were distal biceps,

  20. Premedical anatomy experience and student performance in medical gross anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondrashov, Peter; McDaniel, Dalton J; Jordan, Rebecca M

    2017-04-01

    Gross anatomy is considered one of the most important basic science courses in medical education, yet few medical schools require its completion prior to matriculation. The effect of taking anatomy courses before entering medical school on performance in medical gross anatomy has been previously studied with inconsistent results. The effect of premedical anatomy coursework on performance in medical gross anatomy, overall medical school grade point average (GPA), and Comprehensive Osteopathic Medical Licensing Examination Level 1 (COMLEX 1) score was evaluated in 456 first-year osteopathic medical students along with a survey on its perceived benefits on success in medical gross anatomy course. No significant differences were found in gross anatomy grade, GPA, or COMLEX 1 score between students with premedical anatomy coursework and those without. However, significant differences and higher scores were observed in students who had taken three or more undergraduate anatomy courses including at least one with cadaveric laboratory. There was significantly lower perceived benefit for academic success in the medical gross anatomy course (Pstudents who had taken premedical anatomy courses (5.9 of 10) compared with those who had not (8.2 of 10). Results suggest that requiring any anatomy course as a prerequisite for medical school would not have significant effect on student performance in the medical gross anatomy course. However, requiring more specific anatomy coursework including taking three or more undergraduate anatomy courses, one with cadaveric laboratory component, may result in higher medical gross anatomy grades, medical school GPA, and COMLEX 1 scores. Clin. Anat. 30:303-311, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Skull Base Anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Chirag R; Fernandez-Miranda, Juan C; Wang, Wei-Hsin; Wang, Eric W

    2016-02-01

    The anatomy of the skull base is complex with multiple neurovascular structures in a small space. Understanding all of the intricate relationships begins with understanding the anatomy of the sphenoid bone. The cavernous sinus contains the carotid artery and some of its branches; cranial nerves III, IV, VI, and V1; and transmits venous blood from multiple sources. The anterior skull base extends to the frontal sinus and is important to understand for sinus surgery and sinonasal malignancies. The clivus protects the brainstem and posterior cranial fossa. A thorough appreciation of the anatomy of these various areas allows for endoscopic endonasal approaches to the skull base. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Variation in root wood anatomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cutler, D.F.

    1976-01-01

    Variability in the anatomy of root wood of selected specimens particularly Fraxinus excelsior L. and Acer pseudoplatanus L. in the Kew reference microscope slide collection is discussed in relation to generalised statements in the literature on root wood anatomy.

  3. An interactive anatomy dissection DVD

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Sabah, Fadel YS

    2013-01-01

    Anatomy remains the cornerstone of medical education. Human anatomy has not changed, yet our understanding of the topic and the methods by which we teach anatomy continue to evolve. At present lectures, tutorials and human cadaveric dissection in the anatomy room remain central to anatomical education in the Republic of Ireland and throughout many parts of the world. With the emergence of new technologies, new teaching methods can be explored. In-house and on-line teaching of Radiology and...

  4. Synopsis of radiologic anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meschan, I.

    1987-01-01

    The book is a compact version of earlier publications that appeared in 1975 as a one- and a two-volume issue under the title 'Atlas of Radiologic Anatomy'. A chapter on computed tomography has been added as this novel technique requires a new approach to radiologic anatomy. The radiologist will find all the information on the anatomic conditions he needs for analysing radiographs and CT pictures. More than 600 radiographs and CT pictures are given that illustrate typical and rare findings. The book also is useful as a source of reference for making good radiographs and evaluating the quality of radiographs or CT pictures. With 1413 figs., 18 tabs [de

  5. Learning Anatomy Enhances Spatial Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorstenbosch, Marc A. T. M.; Klaassen, Tim P. F. M.; Donders, A. R. T.; Kooloos, Jan G. M.; Bolhuis, Sanneke M.; Laan, Roland F. J. M.

    2013-01-01

    Spatial ability is an important factor in learning anatomy. Students with high scores on a mental rotation test (MRT) systematically score higher on anatomy examinations. This study aims to investigate if learning anatomy also oppositely improves the MRT-score. Five hundred first year students of medicine ("n" = 242, intervention) and…

  6. Learning anatomy enhances spatial ability.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vorstenbosch, M.A.T.M.; Klaassen, T.P.; Donders, A.R.T.; Kooloos, J.G.M.; Bolhuis, S.M.; Laan, R.F.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Spatial ability is an important factor in learning anatomy. Students with high scores on a mental rotation test (MRT) systematically score higher on anatomy examinations. This study aims to investigate if learning anatomy also oppositely improves the MRT-score. Five hundred first year students of

  7. Anatomy of lead poisoning

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABEOLUGBENGAS

    Abstract. Objective: Lead poisoning and lead toxicity is usually often interchangeably used by different Scientists. The Anatomy of lead poisoning encompasses its effects on different organ-systems of different species of organisms. It also includes environmental, functional and biochemical components associated with most.

  8. The Anatomy Puzzle Book.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Willis H.; Carter, Robert, III

    This document features review questions, crossword puzzles, and word search puzzles on human anatomy. Topics include: (1) Anatomical Terminology; (2) The Skeletal System and Joints; (3) The Muscular System; (4) The Nervous System; (5) The Eye and Ear; (6) The Circulatory System and Blood; (7) The Respiratory System; (8) The Urinary System; (9) The…

  9. Illustrated Speech Anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, William M.

    Written for students in the fields of speech correction and audiology, the text deals with the following: structures involved in respiration; the skeleton and the processes of inhalation and exhalation; phonation and pitch, the larynx, and esophageal speech; muscles involved in articulation; muscles involved in resonance; and the anatomy of the…

  10. Anatomy for Biomedical Engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, Stephen W.; Robb, Richard A.

    2008-01-01

    There is a perceived need for anatomy instruction for graduate students enrolled in a biomedical engineering program. This appeared especially important for students interested in and using medical images. These students typically did not have a strong background in biology. The authors arranged for students to dissect regions of the body that…

  11. Anatomy of the Spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Osteoporosis Back Pain Basics Book RESOURCES Patient Information Feature Articles Patient Q&A Success Stories Definitions Anatomy of the Spine Definitions A-Z Spine Specialists Videos 9 for Spine Epidural Steroid Injections Exercise: The Backbone of Spine Treatment ... Bones Vertebrae Each individual vertebra has unique features depending on the region in which it is ...

  12. Cerebellar anatomy as applied to cerebellar microsurgical resections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Ramos

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To define the anatomy of dentate nucleus and cerebellar peduncles, demonstrating the surgical application of anatomic landmarks in cerebellar resections. METHODS: Twenty cerebellar hemispheres were studied. RESULTS: The majority of dentate nucleus and cerebellar peduncles had demonstrated constant relationship to other cerebellar structures, which provided landmarks for surgical approaching. The lateral border is separated from the midline by 19.5 mm in both hemispheres. The posterior border of the cortex is separated 23.3 mm from the posterior segment of the dentate nucleus; the lateral one is separated 26 mm from the lateral border of the nucleus; and the posterior segment of the dentate nucleus is separated 25.4 mm from the posterolateral angle formed by the junction of lateral and posterior borders of cerebellar hemisphere. CONCLUSIONS: Microsurgical anatomy has provided important landmarks that could be applied to cerebellar surgical resections.

  13. Can image-based virtual reality help teach anatomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seixas-Mikelus, Stéfanie A; Adal, Adaffaras; Kesavadas, Thenkurussi; Baheti, Ankur; Srimathveeravalli, Govindarajan; Hussain, Abid; Chandrasekhar, Rameela; Wilding, Gregory E; Guru, Khurshid A

    2010-04-01

    To assess the utilization of a novel virtual reality robotic surgical simulator (RoSS) in surgical anatomy training and pattern recognition. Ten surgical trainees (medical students and residents) were recruited to participate in a study that evaluated the efficacy of a robotic simulator in anatomy training. The subjects were divided into two groups of five individuals each. Each participant received a syllabus consisting of line diagrams and color pictures of the human anatomy. All participants were later tested on identifying the same five anatomical landmarks from photographs from actual laparoscopic procedures. Group I studied the syllabus and took the test. Group II similarly studied the syllabus, but were trained on the RoSS system using cognitive skill sets and then took the same test. Group II were asked to complete a posttest survey. Mean time to complete the test was 142.8 seconds for group I and 118.4 seconds for group II. Mean number of errors committed by the group trained on RoSS was 0.4 out of 5, whereas the group that did not undergo training on RoSS committed 1.7 out of 5. The mean number of correct answers given by group I was 2.9 out of 5, whereas group II answered 4.2 out 5 correctly. All results were statistically significant. The subjects rated the anatomy module helpful, with a mean rating of 3.6 out of 5. RoSS is an effective tool in anatomy training. Further testing is underway to illustrate its important role in medical education and robotic surgical training.

  14. Authenticity in Anatomy Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkins, Jessica

    2017-01-12

    The aim of this paper is to observe the evolution and evaluate the 'realness' and authenticity in Anatomy Art, an art form I define as one which incorporates accurate anatomical representations of the human body with artistic expression. I examine the art of 17th century wax anatomical models, the preservations of Frederik Ruysch, and Gunther von Hagens' Body Worlds plastinates, giving consideration to authenticity of both body and art. I give extra consideration to the works of Body Worlds since the exhibit creator believes he has created anatomical specimens with more educational value and bodily authenticity than ever before. Ultimately, I argue that von Hagens fails to offer Anatomy Art 'real human bodies,' and that the lack of bodily authenticity of his plastinates results in his creations being less pedagogic than he claims.

  15. Breast development and anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Sonali; Moore, Richard G

    2011-03-01

    In this article, the development of the female breast, as well as the functional anatomy, blood supply, innervation and lymphatic drainage are described. A thorough understanding of the breast anatomy is an important adjunct to a meticulous clinical breast examination. Breast examination is a complex skill involving key maneuvers, including careful inspection and palpation. Clinical breast examination can provide an opportunity for the clinician to educate patients about their breast and about breast cancer, its symptoms, risk factors, early detection, and normal breast composition, and specifically variability. Clinical breast examination can help to detect some cancers not found by mammography, and clinicians should not override their examination findings if imaging is not supportive of the physical findings.

  16. Papercraft temporal bone in the first step of anatomy education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraumi, Harukazu; Sato, Hiroaki; Ito, Juichi

    2017-06-01

    (1) To compare temporal bone anatomy comprehension taught to speech therapy students with or without a papercraft model. (2) To explore the effect of papercraft simulation on the understanding of surgical approaches in first-year residents. (1) One-hundred and ten speech therapy students were divided into three classes. The first class was taught with a lecture only. The students in the second class were given a lecture and a papercraft modeling task without instruction. The third class modeled a papercraft with instruction after the lecture. The students were tested on their understanding of temporal bone anatomy. (2) A questionnaire on the understanding of surgical approaches was completed by 10 residents before and after the papercraft modeling. The papercraft models were cut with scissors to simulate surgical approaches. (1) The average scores were 4.4/8 for the first class, 4.3/8 for the second class, and 6.3/8 for the third class. The third class had significantly better results than the other classes (panatomy using a papercraft temporal bone model is effective in the first step of learning temporal bone anatomy and surgical approaches. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Microsatellite alteration and immunohistochemical expression profile of chromosome 9p21 in patients with sporadic renal cell carcinoma following surgical resection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Mokadem, Ismail; Lim, Alison; Kidd, Thomas; Garret, Katherine; Pratt, Norman; Batty, David; Fleming, Stewart; Nabi, Ghulam

    2016-01-01

    Long-term prognostic significance of loss of heterozygosity on chromosome 9p21 for localized renal cell carcinoma following surgery remains unreported. The study assessed the frequency of deletions of different loci of chromosome 9p along with immunohistochemical profile of proteins in surgically resected renal cancer tissue and correlated this with long-term outcomes. DNA was extracted from renal tumours and corresponding normal kidney tissues in prospectively collected samples of 108 patients who underwent surgical resection for clinically localized disease between January 2001 and December 2005, providing a minimum of 9 years follow-up for each participant. After checking quality of DNA, amplified by PCR, loss of heterozygosity (LOH) on chromosome 9p was assessed using 6 microsatellite markers in 77 clear cell carcinoma. Only 5 of the markers showed LOH (D9S1814, D9S916, D9S974, D9S942, and D9S171). Protein expression of p15(INK4b), p16(INK4a), p14(ARF), CAIX, and adipose related protein (ADFP) were demonstrated by immunostaining in normal and cancer tissues. Loss of heterozygosity for microsatellite analysis was correlated with tumour characteristics, recurrence free, cancer specific, and overall survival, including significance of immunohistochemical profile of protein expressions. The main deletion was found at loci telomeric to CDKN2A region at D9S916. There was a significant correlation between frequency of LOH stage (p = 0.005) and metastases (p = 0.006) suggesting a higher LOH for advanced and aggressive renal cell carcinoma. Most commonly observed LOH in the 3 markers: D9S916, D9S974, and D9S942 were associated with poor survival, and were statistically significant on multivariate analysis. Immunohistochemical expression of p14, p15, and p16 proteins were either low or absent in cancer tissue compared to normal. Loss of heterozygosity of p921 chromosome is associated with aggressive tumours, and predicts cancer specific or recurrence free survival on

  18. Comparison of a gross anatomy laboratory to online anatomy software for teaching anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathiowetz, Virgil; Yu, Chih-Huang; Quake-Rapp, Cindee

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the grades, self-perceived learning, and satisfaction between occupational therapy students who used a gross anatomy laboratory versus online anatomy software (AnatomyTV) as tools to learn anatomy at a large public university and a satellite campus in the mid-western United States. The goal was to determine if equivalent learning outcomes could be achieved regardless of learning tool used. In addition, it was important to determine why students chose the gross anatomy laboratory over online AnatomyTV. A two group, post-test only design was used with data gathered at the end of the course. Primary outcomes were students' grades, self-perceived learning, and satisfaction. In addition, a survey was used to collect descriptive data. One cadaver prosection was available for every four students in the gross anatomy laboratory. AnatomyTV was available online through the university library. At the conclusion of the course, the gross anatomy laboratory group had significantly higher grade percentage, self-perceived learning, and satisfaction than the AnatomyTV group. However, the practical significance of the difference is debatable. The significantly greater time spent in gross anatomy laboratory during the laboratory portion of the course may have affected the study outcomes. In addition, some students may find the difference in (B+) versus (A-) grade as not practically significant. Further research needs to be conducted to identify what specific anatomy teaching resources are most effective beyond prosection for students without access to a gross anatomy laboratory. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists.

  19. Introduction to anatomy on Wikipedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledger, Thomas Stephen

    2017-09-01

    Wikipedia (www.wikipedia.com) is the largest encyclopaedia in existence. Of over five million English-language articles, about 6000 relate to Anatomy, which are viewed roughly 30 million times monthly. No work parallels the amount of attention, scope or interdisciplinary layout of Wikipedia, and it offers a unique opportunity to improve the anatomical literacy of the masses. Anatomy on Wikipedia is introduced from an editor's perspective. Article contributors, content, layout and accuracy are discussed, with a view to demystifying editing for anatomy professionals. A final request for edits or on-site feedback from anatomy professionals is made. © 2017 Anatomical Society.

  20. Surgical disaster in temporomandibular joint: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Machado De Carvalho

    2014-07-01

    Conclusion: Since there is no corrective treatment for this type of injuries, the craniomaxillofacial surgeon and other professionals who carry out interventions of this nature need perfect knowledge of the anatomy of the temporal bone and lateral skull base, taking into account the risk of surgical disasters like the one here reported.

  1. Problems associated with basic oral surgical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapatkin, A.S.; Marretta, S.M.; Schloss, A.J.

    1990-01-01

    The veterinarian must be able to diagnose several types of dental problems. History, physical examination, clinical pathology, and radiography are important in making an accurate diagnosis. Basic oral surgery includes various extraction techniques and management of their associated complications. Knowledge of dental anatomy and proper surgical technique can make an extraction curative rather than a frustrating procedure with multiple complications

  2. Dynamic cervicomedullary cord compression and alterations in cerebrospinal fluid dynamics in children with achondroplasia: review of an 11-year surgical case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Debraj; Pressman, Barry D; Krakow, Deborah; Rimoin, David L; Danielpour, Moise

    2014-09-01

    Achondroplasia may be associated with compression at the cervicomedullary junction. Determining which patients are at greatest risk for neurological complications of cervicomedullary compression can be difficult. In the current study the authors reviewed their records to determine the incidence and clinical significance of dynamic cervicomedullary stenosis and obstruction of CSF flow along with surgical outcomes following posterior fossa decompression. The authors reviewed 34 consecutive cases involving symptomatic children with achondroplasia undergoing cervicomedullary decompression performed by a single surgeon over 11 years. Of these patients, 29 had undergone preoperative dynamic MRI of the cervicomedullary junction with cine (cinema) CSF flow studies; 13 of these patients underwent postoperative dynamic MRI studies. Clinical outcomes included changes in polysomnography, head circumference percentile, and fontanel characteristics. Radiographic outcomes included changes in dynamic spinal cord diameter, improvement in CSF flow at the foramen magnum, and change in the Evans ratio. Patients were predominantly female, with a mean age at presentation of 6.6 years and mean follow-up of 3.7 years (range 1-10 years). All patients had moderate to excellent improvement in postoperative polysomnography, slight decrease in average head circumference percentile (from 46.9th percentile to 45.7th percentile), and no subjective worsening of fontanel characteristics. The Evans ratio decreased by 2%, spinal cord diameter increased an average of 3.1 mm, 5.2 mm, and 0.2 mm in the neutral, flexed, and extended positions, respectively, and CSF flow improved qualitatively in all 3 positions. There were no postoperative infections, CSF leaks, or other major complications. None of the patients undergoing initial foramen magnum decompression performed at our medical center required reoperation. Patients with achondroplasia and symptomatic cervicomedullary compression have increased risk

  3. Surgical extractions for periodontal disease in a Western Lowland gorilla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, John F

    2010-01-01

    This case report describes surgical exraction of multiple premolar and molar teeth in a Western Lowland gorilla. Postoperative photographs and radiographs indicated complete healing of the extraction sites. This case report includes a review of gorilla dental anatomy, oral disease in primates, pathogenesis of periodontal disease, predisposing factors to periodontal disease, and principles of surgical tooth extraction.

  4. Who Is Repeating Anatomy? Trends in an Undergraduate Anatomy Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutte, Audra F.

    2016-01-01

    Anatomy courses frequently serve as prerequisites or requirements for health sciences programs. Due to the challenging nature of anatomy, each semester there are students remediating the course (enrolled in the course for a second time), attempting to earn a grade competitive for admissions into a program of study. In this retrospective study,…

  5. The anatomy and physiology of the avian endocrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, Midge; Pilny, Anthony A

    2008-01-01

    The endocrine system of birds is comparable to that of mammals, although there are many unique aspects to consider when studying the anatomy, physiology, and biochemistry. Avian endocrinology is a field of veterinary medicine that is unfamiliar to many practitioners; however, it is important to have a comprehensive understanding when evaluating companion birds in clinical practice. This article covers the anatomy and physiology of the normal avian, and readers are referred to other articles for a more detailed explanation of altered physiology and pathology.

  6. Health Instruction Packages: Cardiac Anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Gwen; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in these five learning modules to instruct nurses, students, and other health care professionals in cardiac anatomy and functions and in fundamental electrocardiographic techniques. The first module, "Cardiac Anatomy and Physiology: A Review" by Gwen Phillips, teaches the learner to draw…

  7. Archives: Anatomy Journal of Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 13 of 13 ... Archives: Anatomy Journal of Africa. Journal Home > Archives: Anatomy Journal of Africa. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives. 1 - 13 of 13 Items. 2017 ...

  8. CONTRIBUTIONS OF SUSHRUTA TO ANATOMY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2005-08-08

    Aug 8, 2005 ... Probably, the exhaustive knowledge of basic sciences he had would have made him a versatile surgeon. This article has compiled the contributions of this great stalwart to anatomy and interprets his perspective towards teaching this subject. Keywords: Sushruta, Dissection, Cadaver, Anatomy, Preservation.

  9. Da Vinci's codex and the anatomy of healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens-Borg, Keith

    2012-08-01

    We usually display a laid-back approach to medical jargon throughout our theatre work. The word 'perioperative' is built from the Greek word 'peri' (around) and the Latin 'operari' (to work). Latin and Greek became the prefixed language of choice for Leonardo da Vinci, and his research was pivotal in determining the way in which surgical procedures are documented. Ancient manuscripts aided the unfolding of the secrets of anatomy, and Leonardo revealed that art was the key in expressive detailed explanation.

  10. SURGICAL NCOLOGY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2001-12-03

    Dec 3, 2001 ... Reprint Requests to: Kornla Attipou, P. O. Box 80288, Lomé~Togo. Anatomy Laboratory and ... forms. Histological examination of any excised piece must be systematic. 3'4. Two particular forms are the .... association with human papillomavirus responsible for cutaneous warts. J Am Acad. Dermatol 1990 ...

  11. The quail anatomy portal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruparelia, Avnika A; Simkin, Johanna E; Salgado, David; Newgreen, Donald F; Martins, Gabriel G; Bryson-Richardson, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    The Japanese quail is a widely used model organism for the study of embryonic development; however, anatomical resources are lacking. The Quail Anatomy Portal (QAP) provides 22 detailed three-dimensional (3D) models of quail embryos during development from embryonic day (E)1 to E15 generated using optical projection tomography. The 3D models provided can be virtually sectioned to investigate anatomy. Furthermore, using the 3D nature of the models, we have generated a tool to assist in the staging of quail samples. Volume renderings of each stage are provided and can be rotated to allow visualization from multiple angles allowing easy comparison of features both between stages in the database and between images or samples in the laboratory. The use of JavaScript, PHP and HTML ensure the database is accessible to users across different operating systems, including mobile devices, facilitating its use in the laboratory.The QAP provides a unique resource for researchers using the quail model. The ability to virtually section anatomical models throughout development provides the opportunity for researchers to virtually dissect the quail and also provides a valuable tool for the education of students and researchers new to the field. DATABASE URL: http://quail.anatomyportal.org (For review username: demo, password: quail123).

  12. Patient specific anatomy: the new area of anatomy based on computer science illustrated on liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, Luc; Mutter, Didier; Pessaux, Patrick; Marescaux, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Over the past century, medical imaging has brought a new revolution: internal anatomy of a patient could be seen without any invasive technique. This revolution has highlighted the two main limits of current anatomy: the anatomical description is physician dependent, and the average anatomy is more and more frequently insufficient to describe anatomical variations. These drawbacks can sometimes be so important that they create mistakes but they can be overcome through the use of 3D patient-specific surgical anatomy. In this article, we propose to illustrate such improvement of standard anatomy on liver. We first propose a general scheme allowing to easily compare the four main liver anatomical descriptions by Takasaki, Goldsmith and Woodburne, Bismuth and Couinaud. From this general scheme we propose four rules to apply in order to correct these initial anatomical definitions. Application of these rules allows to correct usual vascular topological mistakes of standard anatomy. We finally validate such correction on a database of 20 clinical cases compared to the 111 clinical cases of a Couinaud article. Out of the 20 images of the database, we note a revealing difference in 14 cases (70%) on at least one important branch of the portal network. Only six cases (30%) do not present a revealing difference between both labellings. We also show that the right portal fissure location on our 20 cases defined between segment V and VI of our anatomical definition is well correlated with the real position described by Couinaud on 111 cases, knowing that the theoretical position was only found in 46 cases out of 111, i.e., 41.44% of cases with the non-corrected Couinaud definition. We have proposed a new anatomical segmentation of the liver based on four main rules to apply in order to correct topological errors of the four main standard segmentations. Our validation clearly illustrates that this new definition corrects the large amount of mistakes created by the current

  13. The status of oral hygiene in cleft lip, palate patients after surgical correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandey S

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The cleft lip and palate patients usually present a number of problems viz. altered oral anatomy leading to changes in oral physiology diminishing the self-cleansing ability of individual. The handicapped children are unable to maintain their oral hygiene properly. The present study was formulated with the aim that does normalization of oral anatomy have its effect on improvement of oral hygiene? An assessment of oral hygiene index-simplified was performed between preoperative and postoperative values in the same patient at KGMU and KGDU. A total of 50 cases were recorded in two groups of 25 each: (i < 6 years old and (ii > 6 years. The observations are statistically analyzed by paired ′t′ test to get the significance of results. Results: The data analyzed showed the significant decrease in oral hygiene indices observed in both groups. A relative significance in oral hygiene status following surgery was observed. Both groups expressed greater significance when compared pre and postoperatively which is indicative of considerable improvement of oral hygiene after surgical correction. The study concludes that oral hygiene improves more in older cleft lip-palate cases following reconstruction of palatal vault, premaxilla and anterior lip seal by secondary bone grafting method when compared with oral hygiene indices results in primary periosteoplasty cases. The surgical correction of cleft lip palate enhances self-cleaning ability and better compliance to maintain oral hygiene in children as the age advances.

  14. Best teaching practices in anatomy education: A critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estai, Mohamed; Bunt, Stuart

    2016-11-01

    In this report we review the range of teaching resources and strategies used in anatomy education with the aim of coming up with suggestions about the best teaching practices in this area. There is much debate about suitable methods of delivering anatomical knowledge. Competent clinicians, particularly surgeons, need a deep understanding of anatomy for safe clinical procedures. However, because students have had very limited exposure to anatomy during clinical training, there is a concern that medical students are ill-prepared in anatomy when entering clerkships and residency programs. Therefore, developing effective modalities for teaching anatomy is essential to safe medical practice. Cadaver-based instruction has survived as the main instructional tool for hundreds of years, however, there are differing views on whether full cadaver dissection is still appropriate for a modern undergraduate training. The limitations on curricular time, trained anatomy faculty and resources for gross anatomy courses in integrated or/and system-based curricula, have led many medical schools to abandon costly and time-consuming dissection-based instruction in favour of alternative methods of instruction including prosection, medical imaging, living anatomy and multimedia resources. To date, no single teaching tool has been found to meet curriculum requirements. The best way to teach modern anatomy is by combining multiple pedagogical resources to complement one another, students appear to learn more effectively when multimodal and system-based approaches are integrated. Our review suggests that certain professions would have more benefit from certain educational methods or strategies than others. Full body dissection would be best reserved for medical students, especially those with surgical career intentions, while teaching based on prosections and plastination is more suitable for dental, pharmacy and allied health science students. There is a need to direct future research

  15. The cranial dura mater: a review of its history, embryology, and anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeeb, Nimer; Mortazavi, Martin M; Tubbs, R Shane; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A

    2012-06-01

    The dura mater is important to the clinician as a barrier to the internal environment of the brain, and surgically, its anatomy should be well known to the neurosurgeon and clinician who interpret imaging. The medical literature was reviewed in regard to the morphology and embryology of specifically, the intracranial dura mater. A historic review of this meningeal layer is also provided. Knowledge of the cranial dura mater has a rich history. The embryology is complex, and the surgical anatomy of this layer and its specializations are important to the neurosurgeon.

  16. Micro-endoscopic ear anatomy of guinea pig applied to experimental surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Bruno Borges de Carvalho; Andrade, José Santos Cruz de; Garcia, Leandro Borborema; Pifaia, Gustavo Ribeiro; Cruz, Oswaldo Laércio Mendonça; Onishi, Ektor Tsuneo; Penido, Norma de Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    To describe topographic and endoscopic anatomy of guinea pig ear for development of surgical approaches in experimental studies. Experimental study. Eight adult guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus) were used in this study. Four animals were described through endoscopic view and four animals were used to describe topographic anatomy. The main structures of middle ear were well identified through endoscopy view: oval and round window, ossicles and vascular structures. Temporal bone position, landmarks and its relations to skull are perceived with topographic description. Topographic anatomic description allowed exposition of temporal bone relations for external surgical approaches. Alternatively, grooves and middle ear structures were identified and may be used to transcanal accesses.

  17. Anatomy Journal of Africa: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This journal has its editorial office based at the department of Human Anatomy, University of Nairobi, and has biannual issues (January and July issues). We accept and publish a wide variety of papers including: - Applied anatomy - Clinical anatomy - Morphology, - Embryology - Anatomical techniques and Variant anatomy.

  18. The Anatomy of Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Onofrio, Mauro; Rampazzo, Roberto; Zaggia, Simone; Longair, Malcolm S.; Ferrarese, Laura; Marziani, Paola; Sulentic, Jack W.; van der Kruit, Pieter C.; Laurikainen, Eija; Elmegreen, Debra M.; Combes, Françoise; Bertin, Giuseppe; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Calzetti, Daniela; Moss, David L.; Matteucci, Francesca; Djorgovski, Stanislav George; Fraix-Burnet, Didier; Graham, Alister W. McK.; Tully, Brent R.

    Just after WWII Astronomy started to live its "Golden Age", not differently to many other sciences and human activities, especially in the west side countries. The improved resolution of telescopes and the appearance of new efficient light detectors (e.g. CCDs in the middle eighty) greatly impacted the extragalactic researches. The first morphological analysis of galaxies were rapidly substituted by "anatomic" studies of their structural components, star and gas content, and in general by detailed investigations of their properties. As for the human anatomy, where the final goal was that of understanding the functionality of the organs that are essential for the life of the body, galaxies were dissected to discover their basic structural components and ultimately the mystery of their existence.

  19. Blended learning in anatomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Gert Værge; Brogner, Heidi Marie

    behind DBR is that new knowledge is generated through processes that simultaneously develop, test and improve a design, in this case, an educational design (1) The main principles used in the project is blended learning and flipped learning (2). …"I definitely learn best in practice, but the theory...... in working with the assignments in the classroom."... External assesor, observer and interviewer Based on the different evaluations, the conclusion are that the blended learning approach combined with the ‘flipped classroom’ is a very good way to learn and apply the anatomy, both for the students......The aim of the project was to bridge the gap between theory and practice by working more collaboratively, both peer-to-peer and between student and lecturer. Furthermore the aim was to create active learning environments. The methodology of the project is Design-Based Research (DBR). The idea...

  20. Clinical anatomy of fecal incontinence in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadam-Halani, Priyanka K; Arya, Lily A; Andy, Uduak U

    2017-10-01

    Fecal incontinence is a devastating condition that has a severe impact on quality of life. This condition disproportionately affects women and its incidence is increasing with the aging United States population. Fecal continence is maintained by coordination of a functioning anal sphincter complex, intact sensation of the anorectum, rectal compliance, and the ability to consciously control defecation. Particularly important are the puborectalis sling of the levator ani muscle complex and intact innervation of the central and peripheral nervous systems. An understanding of the intricate anatomy required to maintain continence and regulate defecation will help clinicians to provide appropriate medical and surgical management and diminish the negative impact of fecal incontinence. In this article, we describe the anatomic and neural basis of fecal continence and normal defecation as well as changes that occur with fecal incontinence in women. Clin. Anat. 30:901-911, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Editorial: Anatomy Journal Of Africa | Kramer | Anatomy Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anatomy Journal of Africa. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 2, No 2 (2013) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  2. Lifelike Vascular Reperfusion of a Thiel-Embalmed Pig Model and Evaluation as a Surgical Training Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willaert, Wouter; Tozzi, Francesca; Van Hoof, Tom; Ceelen, Wim; Pattyn, Piet; D''Herde, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    Vascular reperfusion of Thiel cadavers can aid surgical and anatomical instruction. This study investigated whether ideal embalming circumstances provide lifelike vascular flow, enabling surgical practice and enhancing anatomical reality. Pressure-controlled pump-driven administration of blue embalming solution was assessed directly postmortem in a pig model (n = 4). Investigation of subsequent pump-driven vascular injection of red paraffinum perliquidum (PP) included assessment of flow parameters, intracorporeal distribution, anatomical alterations, and feasibility for surgical training. The microscopic distribution of PP was analyzed in pump-embalmed pig and gravity-embalmed human small intestines. Embalming lasted 50-105 min, and maximum arterial pressure was 65 mm Hg. During embalming, the following consecutive alterations were observed: arterial filling, organ coloration, venous perfusion, and further tissue coloration during the next weeks. Most organs were adequately preserved. PP generated low arterial pressures (embalmed pig small intestines, PP flowed from artery to vein through the capillaries without extravasation. In contrast, arterioles were blocked in gravity-embalmed human tissues. In a pig model, immediate postmortem pressure-controlled pump embalming generates ideal circumstances for (micro)vascular reperfusion with PP, permitting lifelike anatomy instruction and surgical training. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. 3D Printing in Surgical Management of Double Outlet Right Ventricle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Shi-Joon; van Arsdell, Glen S

    2017-01-01

    Double outlet right ventricle (DORV) is a heterogeneous group of congenital heart diseases that require individualized surgical approach based on precise understanding of the complex cardiovascular anatomy. Physical 3-dimensional (3D) print models not only allow fast and unequivocal perception of the complex anatomy but also eliminate misunderstanding or miscommunication among imagers and surgeons. Except for those cases showing well-recognized classic surgical anatomy of DORV such as in cases with a typical subaortic or subpulmonary ventricular septal defect, 3D print models are of enormous value in surgical decision and planning. Furthermore, 3D print models can also be used for rehearsal of the intended procedure before the actual surgery on the patient so that the outcome of the procedure is precisely predicted and the procedure can be optimally tailored for the patient's specific anatomy. 3D print models are invaluable resource for hands-on surgical training of congenital heart surgeons.

  4. 3D Printing in Surgical Management of Double Outlet Right Ventricle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Joon Yoo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Double outlet right ventricle (DORV is a heterogeneous group of congenital heart diseases that require individualized surgical approach based on precise understanding of the complex cardiovascular anatomy. Physical 3-dimensional (3D print models not only allow fast and unequivocal perception of the complex anatomy but also eliminate misunderstanding or miscommunication among imagers and surgeons. Except for those cases showing well-recognized classic surgical anatomy of DORV such as in cases with a typical subaortic or subpulmonary ventricular septal defect, 3D print models are of enormous value in surgical decision and planning. Furthermore, 3D print models can also be used for rehearsal of the intended procedure before the actual surgery on the patient so that the outcome of the procedure is precisely predicted and the procedure can be optimally tailored for the patient’s specific anatomy. 3D print models are invaluable resource for hands-on surgical training of congenital heart surgeons.

  5. Generative Anatomy Modeling Language (GAML).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirel, Doga; Yu, Alexander; Baer-Cooper, Seth; Halic, Tansel; Bayrak, Coskun

    2017-12-01

    This paper presents the Generative Anatomy Modeling Language (GAML) for generating variation of 3D virtual human anatomy in real-time. This framework provides a set of operators for modification of a reference base 3D anatomy. The perturbation of the 3D models is satisfied with nonlinear geometry constraints to create an authentic human anatomy. GAML was used to create 3D difficult anatomical scenarios for virtual simulation of airway management techniques such as Endotracheal Intubation (ETI) and Cricothyroidotomy (CCT). Difficult scenarios for each technique were defined and the model variations procedurally created with GAML. This study presents details of the GAML design, set of operators, types of constraints. Cases of CCT and ETI difficulty were generated and confirmed by expert surgeons. Execution performance pertaining to an increasing complexity of constraints using nonlinear programming was in real-time execution. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Olfaction: anatomy, physiology and behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Benignus, Vernon A.; Prah, James D.

    1982-01-01

    The anatomy, physiology and function of the olfactory system are reviewed, as are the normal effects of olfactory stimulation. It is speculated that olfaction may have important but unobtrusive effects on human behavior.

  7. Skeletal anatomy of the hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchal-Kildare, Surbhi; Malone, Kevin

    2013-11-01

    The skeletal anatomy of the hand is composed of phalanges, metacarpal bones, and carpal bones. Its function is a product of the complex interactions between the power provided by the intrinsic and extrinsic musculature, the stability provided by the ligaments, and the structure provided by the bones, which serve as insertion and attachment sites for the muscles and ligaments. This article provides a detailed description of the skeletal anatomy of the human hand. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Surgical Audit

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-01-06

    Jan 6, 2010 ... A good way to describe the first surgical audits is that they were 'polite, restrained discussions'. This was the situation before the development of quality assurance in the business world. As this slowly infiltrated into the medical profession the discussions changed to more cri- teria based surgical audits.

  9. Rectocele and anal sphincter defect – surgical anatomy and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    carefully directed translabial ultrasound scan of the rectum and anal sphincters. The ultrasound examination was performed by a radi- ologist with specific understanding of the pathology. Conventional two-dimensional ultrasound imaging was performed using a 4 - 8. MHz curved array probe. The patient was in the left ...

  10. [The parapharyngeal adipose corpus: Surgical anatomy and imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colin, V; Gavid, M; Timochenko, A; Prades, J M

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study is to define the parapharyngeal adiposis corpus (PAC) and its anatomical relationships originally described by P. Sebileau in 1892 to assess the potential clinical implications. Seven frozen fresh cadavers were used, 3 of which after injection of latex neoprene colored in cervicocephalic arterial network. A MRI was performed in 10 patients without cervical pathology. The analysis was done on the frontal and transverse T1-weighted sections. The PAC, which is a yellowish fat formation, fills the paratonsillar space. It measures an average of 4.8cm (4.5 to 5.2cm) in length and 1.2cm (1.1 to 1.5cm) for subjects of varying size and sex. Its arterial supply is mainly provided by the ascending palatine artery, an early branch of the facial artery. A left-right symmetry was found on MRI analyses regardless of sex or age. It is found in all the medial and ventral cases on the pharyngeal extension of the parotid gland in homogeneous hyperintense T1. The PAC is a constant fat structure. Its vascularization depends mainly on the ascending palatine artery. Through its association with fatty peripharyngeal space, it could be a functionally sliding space. In imaging, it may be helpful in the interpretation of images of the pharyngeal extension of the parotid gland tumors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Rectocele and anal sphincter defect – surgical anatomy and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    During the perineal operation for repair, further investigation by transillumination and measurements with calipers were done in 50 patients. All patients received routine postoperative care, and were followed up for at least 6 months. From 1995 to 2009 a total of 117 patients, all female, underwent perineal repair by a single ...

  12. Surgical anatomy of the pyramidal lobe and its significance in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    33:35-37. 10. Harjeet A, Shani D, Jit I, Aggarwal AK. Shape, measurements and weight of the thyroid gland in northwest Indians. Surg Radiol Anat 2004;26:91-95. TABLE III. INVOLVEMENT OF THE PYRAMIDAL LOBE IN VARIOUS THYROID ...

  13. Surgical anatomy of the pyramidal lobe and its significance in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In diffuse thyroid diseases, the lobes were always pathologically involved and significantly longer. Conclusion. Since the pyramidal lobe is a normal component of the thyroid gland, of varying position and size, with pathological changes in benign and malignant diseases, it should always be examined during thyroid surgery ...

  14. The role of student surgical interest groups and surgical Olympiads in anatomical and surgical undergraduate training in Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dydykin, Sergey; Kapitonova, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Traditional department-based surgical interest groups in Russian medical schools are useful tools for student-based selection of specialty training. They also form a nucleus for initiating research activities among undergraduate students. In Russia, the Departments of Topographical Anatomy and Operative Surgery play an important role in initiating student-led research and providing learners with advanced, practical surgical skills. In tandem with department-led activities, student surgical interest groups prepare learners through surgical competitions, known as "Surgical Olympiads," which have been conducted in many Russian centers on a regular basis since 1988. Surgical Olympiads stimulate student interest in the development of surgical skills before graduation and encourage students to choose surgery as their postgraduate specialty. Many of the participants in these surgical Olympiads have become highly qualified specialists in general surgery, orthopedic surgery, neurosurgery, urology, gynecology, and emergency medicine. The present article emphasizes the role of student interest groups and surgical Olympiads in clinical anatomical and surgical undergraduate training in Russia. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists.

  15. Endoscopic anatomy of the orbital floor and maxillary sinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Corey C; Bromwich, Matthew; Roth, Kathy; Matic, Damir B

    2008-01-01

    Endoscopic repair of orbital blow-out fractures could become a predictable and efficient treatment alternative to traditional methods. However, maxillary sinus endoscopy provides a complex and disorienting view of the orbital floor. To be a useful and consistent technique for providing access to the orbital floor, specific knowledge of maxillary endoscopic anatomy is required. The purpose of the study was to provide an anatomic description of the orbital floor via the endoscopic approach. Objectives include defining consistent landmarks for use in endoscopic repair of orbital floor fractures. Using 0- and 30-degree rigid endoscopes, 6 fresh cadavers (12 maxillary sinuses) were examined via a standard Caldwell-Luc approach. Computed tomographic scans, plastic molds, and digital images were used to compare observable averages within bony anatomy. Potential bony landmarks were correlated with soft-tissue anatomy in fresh specimens. The maxillary ostium, orbital floor, and lateral ethmoid air cells were visualized, and their structures were described. Observations were made in relation to the anatomy of the orbital floor and maxillary sinus, including fracture pattern and force transmission pathways. An "orbitomaxillary" sinus bony thickening was identified and described for the first time. This study provides the basis for further refinement of surgical technique and opens the door for future clinical trials using endoscopic repair.

  16. Penile Embryology and Anatomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny H. Yiee

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of penile embryology and anatomy is essential to any pediatric urologist in order to fully understand and treat congenital anomalies. Sex differentiation of the external genitalia occurs between the 7thand 17th weeks of gestation. The Y chromosome initiates male differentiation through the SRY gene, which triggers testicular development. Under the influence of androgens produced by the testes, external genitalia then develop into the penis and scrotum. Dorsal nerves supply penile skin sensation and lie within Buck's fascia. These nerves are notably absent at the 12 o'clock position. Perineal nerves supply skin sensation to the ventral shaft skin and frenulum. Cavernosal nerves lie within the corpora cavernosa and are responsible for sexual function. Paired cavernosal, dorsal, and bulbourethral arteries have extensive anastomotic connections. During erection, the cavernosal artery causes engorgement of the cavernosa, while the deep dorsal artery leads to glans enlargement. The majority of venous drainage occurs through a single, deep dorsal vein into which multiple emissary veins from the corpora and circumflex veins from the spongiosum drain. The corpora cavernosa and spongiosum are all made of spongy erectile tissue. Buck's fascia circumferentially envelops all three structures, splitting into two leaves ventrally at the spongiosum. The male urethra is composed of six parts: bladder neck, prostatic, membranous, bulbous, penile, and fossa navicularis. The urethra receives its blood supply from both proximal and distal directions.

  17. The functional anatomy of psychomotor disturbances in major depressive disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benny eLiberg

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Psychomotor disturbances (PMD are a classic feature of depressive disorder that provide rich clinical information. The aim our narrative review was to characterize the functional anatomy of PMD by summarizing findings from neuroimaging studies. We found evidence across several neuroimaging modalities that suggest involvement of fronto-striatal neurocircuitry, and monoaminergic pathways and metabolism. We suggest that PMD in major depressive disorder emerge from an alteration of limbic signals, which influence emotion, volition, higher-order cognitive functions, and movement.

  18. Bariatric surgery: A review of normal postoperative anatomy and complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quigley, S.; Colledge, J.; Mukherjee, S.; Patel, K.

    2011-01-01

    The number of bariatric surgery procedures performed is increasing every year. Patients may be referred for radiological investigations to exclude complications not only in the early postoperative period but many months later. Radiologists who do not work in bariatric centres are therefore required to have an understanding of the complex normal anatomy and complications associated with bariatric surgery to interpret imaging studies correctly. The purpose of this article is to describe the surgical techniques and normal anatomy of the four bariatric operations performed today, review the most common problems encountered in this patient group, and to describe the imaging findings that allow the accurate diagnosis of complications. In particular, we focus on identification of the internal hernia, a grave complication of bariatric surgery often missed by radiologists.

  19. Bariatric surgery: A review of normal postoperative anatomy and complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quigley, S., E-mail: shaun.quigley@bartsandthelondon.nhs.uk [Radiology Department, Homerton University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Colledge, J. [Radiology Department, Homerton University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Mukherjee, S. [Bariatric Surgery Unit, Homerton University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Patel, K. [Radiology Department, Homerton University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-15

    The number of bariatric surgery procedures performed is increasing every year. Patients may be referred for radiological investigations to exclude complications not only in the early postoperative period but many months later. Radiologists who do not work in bariatric centres are therefore required to have an understanding of the complex normal anatomy and complications associated with bariatric surgery to interpret imaging studies correctly. The purpose of this article is to describe the surgical techniques and normal anatomy of the four bariatric operations performed today, review the most common problems encountered in this patient group, and to describe the imaging findings that allow the accurate diagnosis of complications. In particular, we focus on identification of the internal hernia, a grave complication of bariatric surgery often missed by radiologists.

  20. Photorealistic virtual anatomy based on Chinese Visible Human data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, P A; Zhang, S X; Xie, Y M; Wong, T T; Chui, Y P; Cheng, C Y

    2006-04-01

    Virtual reality based learning of human anatomy is feasible when a database of 3D organ models is available for the learner to explore, visualize, and dissect in virtual space interactively. In this article, we present our latest work on photorealistic virtual anatomy applications based on the Chinese Visible Human (CVH) data. We have focused on the development of state-of-the-art virtual environments that feature interactive photo-realistic visualization and dissection of virtual anatomical models constructed from ultra-high resolution CVH datasets. We also outline our latest progress in applying these highly accurate virtual and functional organ models to generate realistic look and feel to advanced surgical simulators. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Anatomy training for surgeons: Which way for the future? | Ogeng'o ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    to undergraduate medical students should be rationalized, horizontally and vertically integrated with other medical subjects and taught using a variety of techniques. Dissection should still be central to the teaching of anatomy and especially for those pursuing surgical careers. Combined efforts between departments of ...

  2. Physician Opinions about an Anatomy Core Curriculum: A Case for Medical Imaging and Vertical Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsbon, Courtney P.; Kaiser, Rebecca S.; Ross, Callum F.

    2014-01-01

    Pre-clinical anatomy curricula must provide medical students with the knowledge needed in a variety of medical and surgical specialties. But do physicians within specialties agree about what anatomical knowledge is most important in their practices? And, what is the common core of anatomical knowledge deemed essential by physicians in different…

  3. Papilian's anatomy - celebrating six decades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitraşcu, Dinu Iuliu; Crivii, Carmen Bianca; Opincariu, Iulian

    2017-01-01

    Victor Papilian was born an artist, during high school he studied music in order to become a violinist in two professional orchestras in Bucharest. Later on he enrolled in the school of medicine, being immediately attracted by anatomy. After graduating, with a briliant dissertation, he became a member of the faculty and continued to teach in his preferred field. His masters, Gh. Marinescu and Victor Babes, proposed him for the position of professor at the newly established Faculty of Medicine of Cluj. Here he reorganized the department radically, created an anatomy museum and edited the first dissection handbook and the first Romanian anatomy (descriptive and topographic) treatise, both books received with great appreciation. He received the Romanian Academy Prize. His knowledge and skills gained him a well deserved reputation and he created a prestigious school of anatomy. He published over 250 scientific papers in national and international journals, ranging from morphology to functional, pathological and anthropological topics. He founded the Society of Anthropology, with its own newsletter; he was elected as a member of the French Society of Anatomy. In parallel he had a rich artistic and cultural activity as writer and playwright: he was president of the Transylvanian Writers' Society, editor of a literary review, director of the Cluj theater and opera, leader of a book club and founder of a symphony orchestra.

  4. [Anatomy and pathogenesis of diverticular disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedel, T; Böttner, M

    2014-04-01

    Although diverticular disease is one of the most frequent gastrointestinal disorders the pathogenesis is not yet sufficiently clarified. The aim is to define the anatomy and pathogenesis of diverticular disease considering the risk factors and description of structural and functional alterations of the bowel wall. This article gives an appraisal of the literature, presentation and evaluation of classical etiological factors, analysis and discussion of novel pathogenetic concepts. Colonic diverticulosis is defined as an acquired out-pouching of multiple and initially asymptomatic pseudodiverticula through muscular gaps in the colon wall. Diverticular disease is characterized by diverticular bleeding and/or inflammatory processes (diverticulitis) with corresponding complications (e.g. abscess formation, fistula, covered and open perforation, peritonitis and stenosis). Risk factors for diverticular disease include increasing age, genetic predisposition, congenital connective tissue diseases, low fiber diet, high meat consumption and pronounced overweight. Alterations of connective tissue cause a weakening of preformed exit sites of diverticula and rigidity of the bowel wall with reduced flexibility. It is assumed that intestinal innervation disorders and structural alterations of the musculature induce abnormal contractile patterns with increased intraluminal pressure, thereby promoting the development of diverticula. Moreover, an increased release of pain-mediating neurotransmitters is considered to be responsible for persistent pain in chronic diverticular disease. According to the present data the pathogenesis of diverticular disease cannot be attributed to a single factor but should be considered as a multifactorial event.

  5. Anatomy and physiology of the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serlin, Yonatan; Shelef, Ilan; Knyazer, Boris; Friedman, Alon

    2015-02-01

    Essential requisite for the preservation of normal brain activity is to maintain a narrow and stable homeostatic control in the neuronal environment of the CNS. Blood flow alterations and altered vessel permeability are considered key determinants in the pathophysiology of brain injuries. We will review the present-day literature on the anatomy, development and physiological mechanisms of the blood-brain barrier, a distinctive and tightly regulated interface between the CNS and the peripheral circulation, playing a crucial role in the maintenance of the strict environment required for normal brain function. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Surgical rejuvenation of the brow and forehead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, J M

    1999-01-01

    The position and orientation of eyebrows plays an important part in the overall appearance of the face. Many incisions and approaches have been described to elevate a ptotic eyebrow. It is essential to understand the periorbital anatomy and the biomechanics of elevation and fixation of the brow and forehead soft tissues. If properly planned and executed, surgical brow lifts can restore a youthful appearance to eyelids and the orbit.

  7. Surgical planning for a complex double-outlet right ventricle using 3D printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatla, Puneet; Tretter, Justin T; Chikkabyrappa, Sathish; Chakravarti, Sujata; Mosca, Ralph S

    2017-05-01

    Rapid prototyping may be beneficial in properly selected cases of complex congenital heart disease, providing detailed anatomical understanding that helps to guide potential surgical and cardiac catheterization interventions. We present a case of double-outlet right ventricle, where the decision to obtain a three-dimensional printed model helped for better understanding of the anatomy, with the additional advantage of surgical simulation in planning the surgical approach and type of surgical repair. © 2017, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Neurovascular anatomy: a practical guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Randy; Severson, Meryl A; Armonda, Rocco A

    2009-07-01

    Students of cerebrovascular anatomy and physiology tend to model their learning based on normal patterns of blood flow. As such, the focus tends toward arterial physiology and pathology with less than adequate understanding of the significance of the venous system. This article presents a different approach to neurovascular anatomy, starting with the venous system and demonstrating both normal and pathologic states. It reviews the cerebral circulation with attention to the microsurgical relationships, angiographic patterns, and fusion of dual-volume imaging. The importance of bony, sulcal, and ventricular anatomy is presented as it relates to the angiographic representation of pathologic lesions. Examples are given of anatomic variants seen with the operating microscope, biplanar angiography, and three-dimensional rotational angiography." Note that in the synopsis and throughout the article, first person usage has been changed to third person per journal style.

  9. Anatomy of a Cancer Treatment Scam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Comment Report An Antitrust Violation File Documents in Adjudicative Proceedings You are here Home » News & Events » Audio/Video » Anatomy of a Cancer Treatment Scam Anatomy of a Cancer Treatment Scam ...

  10. Pocket atlas of radiographic anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, T.B.; Reif, E.; Stark, P.

    1993-01-01

    The 'Pocket Atlas of Radiographic Anatomy' presents 170 radiographs of the various body regions of adults, showing only the normal radiographic anatomy. Each radiograph is supplemented on the opposite page by a drawing of the particular body region. There is no commenting text, but the drawings are provided with captions in English. The atlas is a useful guide for interpreting radiographs. The pictures are arranged in chapters entitled as follows: Skeletal Imaging (skull, spine, upper extremity), lower extremity; Miscellaneous Plain Films (chest, mammogram, trachea, lung tomograms); Contrast Examinations (gastrointestinal tract, intravenous contrast examinations, arthrography, angiography); Special Examinations (myelograms, lymphangiograms, bronchograms, sialograms). (UWA). 348 figs [de

  11. Altered Passive Eruption and Familial Trait: A Preliminary Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Rossi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Altered passive eruption is described as a condition in which the relationship between teeth, alveolar bone, and the soft tissues creates an excessive gingival display and, in turn, in some circumstances, it may reveal a clinical aspect also known as the “gummy smile.” The surgical management of such cases is well understood and has been widely described, with mucogingival and osseous resective procedures being predictable surgical means leading to more balanced aesthetics and proper display of the teeth anatomy. The possible familial trait in case of passive eruption and therefore the possibility of recurrence of the same condition in families of siblings or parents of affected patients have been investigated in this study. 20 patients have been selected and treated in both a private practice and university settings and their immediate family trees were evaluated in order to understand the incidence of the condition. 65% of the treated patients had one or more family members with the same condition leading to seeking further investigation on the possible genetic correlation.

  12. Association of a Surgical Task During Training With Team Skill Acquisition Among Surgical Residents: The Missing Piece in Multidisciplinary Team Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Jessica L; Crouch, Dustin L; Sobba, Kathryn; Evans, Douglas; Zhang, Jing; Johnson, James E; Saunders, Ian; Thomas, John; Bodin, Sarah; Tonidandel, Ashley; Carter, Jeff; Westcott, Carl; Martin, R Shayn; Hildreth, Amy

    2017-09-01

    The human patient simulators that are currently used in multidisciplinary operating room team training scenarios cannot simulate surgical tasks because they lack a realistic surgical anatomy. Thus, they eliminate the surgeon's primary task in the operating room. The surgical trainee is presented with a significant barrier when he or she attempts to suspend disbelief and engage in the scenario. To develop and test a simulation-based operating room team training strategy that challenges the communication abilities and teamwork competencies of surgeons while they are engaged in realistic operative maneuvers. This pre-post educational intervention pilot study compared the gains in teamwork skills for midlevel surgical residents at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center after they participated in a standardized multidisciplinary team training scenario with 3 possible levels of surgical realism: (1) SimMan (Laerdal) (control group, no surgical anatomy); (2) "synthetic anatomy for surgical tasks" mannequin (medium-fidelity anatomy), and (3) a patient simulated by a deceased donor (high-fidelity anatomy). Participation in the simulation scenario and the subsequent debriefing. Teamwork competency was assessed using several instruments with extensive validity evidence, including the Nontechnical Skills assessment, the Trauma Management Skills scoring system, the Crisis Resource Management checklist, and a self-efficacy survey instrument. Participant satisfaction was assessed with a Likert-scale questionnaire. Scenario participants included midlevel surgical residents, anesthesia providers, scrub nurses, and circulating nurses. Statistical models showed that surgical residents exposed to medium-fidelity simulation (synthetic anatomy for surgical tasks) team training scenarios demonstrated greater gains in teamwork skills compared with control groups (SimMan) (Nontechnical Skills video score: 95% CI, 1.06-16.41; Trauma Management Skills video score: 95% CI, 0.61-2.90) and

  13. Anatomy of the Adductor Magnus Origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obey, Mitchel R.; Broski, Stephen M.; Spinner, Robert J.; Collins, Mark S.; Krych, Aaron J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The adductor magnus (AM) has historically been a potential source of confusion in patients with suspected proximal hamstring avulsion injuries. Purpose: To investigate the anatomic characteristics of the AM, including its osseous origin, anatomic dimensions, and relationship to the proximal hamstring tendons. Study Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Methods: Dissection of the AM origin was performed in 11 (8 cadavers) fresh-frozen hip-to-foot cadaveric hemipelvis specimens. The gross anatomy and architecture of the proximal hamstring and AM tendons were studied. After dissecting the hamstring tendons away from their origin, the dimension, shape, and orientation of the tendon footprints on the ischial tuberosity were determined. Results: The AM was identified in all cadaveric specimens. The mean tendon thickness (anterior to posterior [AP]) was 5.7 ± 2.9 mm. The mean tendon width (medial to lateral [ML]) was 7.1 ± 2.2 mm. The mean tendon length was 13.1 ± 8.7 cm. The mean footprint height (AP dimension) was 12.1 ± 2.9 mm, and mean footprint width (ML dimension) was 17.3 ± 7.1 mm. The mean distance between the AM footprint and the most medial aspect of the conjoint tendon footprint was 8.5 ± 4.2 mm. Tendon measurements demonstrated a considerable degree of both intra- and interspecimen variability. Conclusion: The AM tendon is consistently present just medial to the conjoint tendon at the ischial tuberosity, representing the lateral-most portion of the AM muscle. This study found wide variation in the dimensional characteristics of the AM tendon between specimens. Its shape and location can mimic the appearance of an intact hamstring (conjoint or semimembranosus) tendon intraoperatively or on diagnostic imaging, potentially misleading surgeons and radiologists. Therefore, detailed knowledge of the AM tendon anatomy, footprint anatomy, and its relationship to the hamstring muscle complex is paramount when planning surgical approach and technique

  14. Clinical anatomy research in a research-driven anatomy department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, D Gareth; Dias, G J; Mercer, S; Zhang, M; Nicholson, H D

    2002-05-01

    Clinical anatomy is too often viewed as a discipline that reiterates the wisdom of the past, characterized more by description of what is known than by active investigation and critical analysis of hypotheses and ideas. Various misconceptions follow from an acceptance of this premise: the teaching of clinical anatomists is textbook based, there is no clinical anatomy research worthy of the name, and any research that does exist fails to utilize modern technology and does not stand comparison with serious biomedical research as found in cell and molecular biology. The aim of this paper is to challenge each of these contentions by reference to ongoing clinical research studies within this department. It is argued that all teaching (including that of clinical anatomy) should be research-informed and that the discipline of clinical anatomy should have at its base a vigorous research ethos driven by clinically related problems. In interacting with physicians, the role of the clinical anatomist should be to promulgate a questioning scientific spirit, with its willingness to test and challenge accepted anatomic dicta. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. 3D virtual table in anatomy education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Mads Ronald; Simonsen, Eivind Ortind

    The ‘Anatomage’ is a 3D virtual human anatomy table, with touchscreen functionality, where it is possible to upload CT-scans and digital. Learning the human anatomy terminology requires time, a very good memory, anatomy atlas, books and lectures. Learning the 3 dimensional structure, connections...... and intersections can be supported by technology like the Anatomage....

  16. The Utility of Cadaver-Based Approaches for the Teaching of Human Anatomy: A Survey of British and Irish Anatomy Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balta, Joy Y.; Cronin, Michael; Cryan, John F.; O'Mahony, Siobhain M.

    2017-01-01

    Utilizing reality anatomy such as dissection and demonstrating using cadavers has been described as a superior way to create meaning. The chemicals used to embalm cadavers differentially alter the tissue of the human body, which has led to the usage of different processes along the hard to soft-fixed spectrum of preserved cadavers. A questionnaire…

  17. Image-guided surgical navigation in otology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohan, Darius; Jethanamest, Daniel

    2012-10-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of image-guided surgical navigation (IGSN) in otologic surgery and establish practice guidelines. Prospective study. Between January 2003 and January 2010, all patients requiring complicated surgery for chronic otitis media, glomus jugulare, atresia, cerebrospinal fluid leak with or without encephalocele, and cholesterol granuloma of the petrous apex were offered IGSN. The accuracy of IGSN relative to pertinent pathology and 11 anatomic landmarks was established. Additionally IGSN-related operative time, complications, and surgical outcome were recorded. In the study period there were 820 otologic procedures, among 94 patients (96 ears) with disease meeting proposed criteria. Thirteen patients (15 procedures) consented to the use of IGSN. All patients had a minimum 6 months of follow-up. The average additional operative time required was 36.7 minutes. The mean accuracy error was 1.1 mm laterally at the tragus but decreased to 0.8 mm medially at the level of the oval window. The mean accuracy of IGSN was within 1 mm in 10 of the 11 targeted surgical anatomic landmarks. Interactive image-guided surgical navigation during complex otologic surgery may improve surgical outcome and decrease morbidity by providing an accurate real-time display of surgical instrumentation relative to patient anatomy and pathology. In select cases, the extra cost of imaging immediately prior to surgery and extra operating room time may be compensated by enhancing the ability to distinguish distorted anatomy relative to disease, potentially improving surgical outcome. IGSN, although useful, does not replace surgical expertise and experience. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  18. [Anatomy and physiology of the nasolacrimal ducts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, F; Garreis, F; Schicht, M; Bräuer, L; Ali, M J; Sel, S

    2016-06-01

    Ophthalmologists and interventional radiologists are not the only professionals for whom diseases of the efferent tear duct system occupy centre stage; this applies also to ENT specialists involving endonasal conservative or surgical treatment. On the basis of current knowledge and taking account of results yielded by own research in recent years and of clinical aspects, we here give an overview of basic knowledge on the anatomy and physiology of the nasolacrimal system. In doing so functional aspects regarding tear transport as well as embryological and pathophysiological issues are integrated.

  19. Anatomy of the pleura: reflection lines and recesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertin, François; Deslauriers, Jean

    2011-05-01

    Knowledge of the anatomy of the lines of pleural reflection, triangular ligaments, and pleural recesses is important to thoracic surgeons because their anatomic areas are used daily for radiographic interpretation as well as for the performance of procedures such as chest tube insertion, thoracentesis, and pericardiocentesis. Their knowledge is also important for thoracic surgeons doing surgical procedures such as parietal pleurectomies, extrapleural mobilization and resection of the lungs, and pleuroneumonectomies for destroyed lungs or malignant pleural neoplasms. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Giulio Cesare Aranzio (Arantius) (1530-89) in the pageant of anatomy and surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurunluoglu, Raffi; Shafighi, Maziar; Gurunluoglu, Aslin; Cavdar, Safiye

    2011-05-01

    Giulio Cesare Aranzio in Italian (Julius Caesar Arantius in Latin) has not received full acclaim for his achievements in the field of anatomy and surgery that remain unknown to most physicians. His anatomical books Observationes Anatomicas, and De Humano Foetu Opusculum and surgical books De Tumoribus Secundum Locos Affectos and Hippocratis librum de vulneribus capitis commentarius brevis printed in Latin and additional existing literature on Aranzio from medical history books and journals were analysed extensively. Aranzio became Professor of Anatomy and Surgery at the University of Bologna in 1556. He established anatomy as a distinguished branch of medicine for the first time in medical history. Aranzio combined anatomy with a description of pathological processes. He discovered the 'Nodules of Aranzio' in the semilunar valves of the heart. He gave the first description of the superior levator palpebral and the coracobrachialis muscles. Aranzio wrote on surgical techniques for a wide spectrum of conditions that range from hydrocephalus, nasal polyp, goitre and tumours to phimosis, ascites, haemorrhoids, anal abscess and fistulae, and much more. Aranzio had an extensive knowledge in surgery and anatomy based in part on the ancient Greek and his contemporaries in the 16th century but essentially on his personal experience and practice.

  1. Anatomy of the thymus gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safieddine, Najib; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2011-05-01

    In the case of the thymus gland, the most common indications for resection are myasthenia gravis or thymoma. The consistency and appearance of the thymus gland make it difficult at times to discern from mediastinal fatty tissues. Having a clear understanding of the anatomy and the relationship of the gland to adjacent structures is important. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. DAGAL: Detailed Anatomy of Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapen, Johan H.

    2017-03-01

    The current IAU Symposium is closely connected to the EU-funded network DAGAL (Detailed Anatomy of Galaxies), with the final annual network meeting of DAGAL being at the core of this international symposium. In this short paper, we give an overview of DAGAL, its training activities, and some of the scientific advances that have been made under its umbrella.

  3. Curriculum Guidelines for Microscopic Anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Dental Education, 1993

    1993-01-01

    The American Association of Dental Schools' guidelines for curricula in microscopic anatomy offer an overview of the histology curriculum, note primary educational goals, outline specific content for general and oral histology, suggest prerequisites, and make recommendations for sequencing. Appropriate faculty and facilities are also suggested.…

  4. Stem anatomy variation in cottonwood

    Science.gov (United States)

    A.N. Foulger; J. Hacskaylo

    1968-01-01

    Investigations of mineral nutrient-tree growth relationships have dealt mainly with associations involving foliage composition, root formation, or volume production of wood. Few studies have been concerned with changes in wood anatomy associated with element deficiency. In 1949 Davis reported that calcium deficiency was accompanied by a reduction of primary tissue and...

  5. Anatomy of the trigeminal nerve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijden, T.M.G.J.; Langenbach, G.E.J.; Baart, J.A.; Brand, H.S.

    2017-01-01

    The trigeminal nerve is the fifth cranial nerve (n. V), which plays an important role in the innervation of the head and neck area, together with other cranial and spinal nerves. Knowledge of the nerve’s anatomy is very important for the correct application of local anaesthetics.

  6. SURGICAL TECHNIQUE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion:Foraminotomy with or without discectomy is a simple posterior surgical approach to T B spine with good neurological outcome. It is adapted to our ... of the spine also referred to as. (HIV/AIDS) further challenge the outcome. These .... treatment; or for spinal cord or nerve root from 2 weeks depending on patient ...

  7. Upper abdominal teratomas in infants: radiological findings and importance of the vascular anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, Jonathan; Mazrani, Waseem; McHugh, Kieran; Jones, Niall; Kiely, Edward M.; Sebire, Neil J.

    2008-01-01

    Primary upper abdominal teratomas are extremely rare tumours, most commonly arising in infants. The radiological literature relating to them is sparse. Surgical resection is difficult due to distortion of the vascular anatomy. To reassess the value of preoperative imaging with specific reference to the presence/absence of typical features of teratoma, anatomical location and adjacent vascular anatomy. The histopathology database was used to identify infants with upper abdominal teratoma. Pathological, surgical and radiological data were reviewed. The search of the database identified 12 infants (10 girls, 2 boys) with an abdominal/retroperitoneal teratoma during the period 1993 to 2006. All teratomas were benign. In the majority of infants, typical radiological features of teratoma were demonstrated (fat, calcium). Identification of the major abdominal vessels on CT scan (most commonly the inferior vena cava) was not possible in all infants. Distortion (and commonly encasement) of the adjacent major abdominal vessels was usually evident. Upper abdominal teratomas in infants have typical radiological features. Preoperative delineation of the major vascular anatomy is often imprecise. Significant distortion of vascular anatomy was present in all infants and awareness of this feature impacts on surgical planning. (orig.)

  8. Anatomy of Teaching Anatomy: Do Prosected Cross Sections Improve Students Understanding of Spatial and Radiological Anatomy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. B. Samarakoon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Cadaveric dissections and prosections have traditionally been part of undergraduate medical teaching. Materials and Methods. Hundred and fifty-nine first-year students in the Faculty of Medicine, University of Colombo, were invited to participate in the above study. Students were randomly allocated to two age and gender matched groups. Both groups were exposed to identical series of lectures regarding anatomy of the abdomen and conventional cadaveric prosections of the abdomen. The test group (n=77, 48.4% was also exposed to cadaveric cross-sectional slices of the abdomen to which the control group (n=82, 51.6% was blinded. At the end of the teaching session both groups were assessed by using their performance in a timed multiple choice question paper as well as ability to identify structures in abdominal CT films. Results. Scores for spatial and radiological anatomy were significantly higher among the test group when compared with the control group (P<0.05, CI 95%. Majority of the students in both control and test groups agreed that cadaveric cross section may be useful for them to understand spatial and radiological anatomy. Conclusion. Introduction of cadaveric cross-sectional prosections may help students to understand spatial and radiological anatomy better.

  9. Dancers' Perceived and Actual Knowledge of Anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotler, Dana H; Lynch, Meaghan; Cushman, Daniel; Hu, Jason; Garner, Jocelyn

    2017-06-15

    Dancers are highly susceptible to musculoskeletal injuries and frequently require interaction with medical professionals. While many dancers have a finely tuned awareness of their bodies, their knowledge of the fundamentals of human anatomy is not uniform. There is a paucity of literature on the benefits of human anatomy education in dancers, though it seems intuitive that there should be a relationship. The purpose of this study was to assess dancers' perceived and actual knowledge of basic musculoskeletal anatomy and its relationship to function. Adult dancers at the undergraduate, pre-professional, and professional levels were surveyed through an anonymous online questionnaire. Questions included demographic information, dance techniques studied, anatomy training, and injury history. Subjects rated their perceived knowledge of anatomy and were tested with 15 multiple-choice questions on basic musculoskeletal anatomy. Four hundred seventy-five surveys were completed. Ordinal regression showed a correlation of perceived to actual knowledge of anatomy (p < 0.001). Factors that correlated with increases in both perceived and actual knowledge of anatomy included having taken an anatomy course of any type (p < 0.001) and increased age (p ≤ 0.001). Years of dance training and professional dancer status both significantly correlated with increased knowledge of anatomy (p < 0.001) but not perceived knowledge. Chi-square analysis showed that dancers with training in either modern or jazz dance had a significantly higher perceived, but not actual, knowledge when compared to those without training in those styles of dance (p < 0.001 and p = 0.011, respectively). In conclusion, dancers generally scored well on questions pertaining to basic musculoskeletal anatomy, and their perception correlated with their actual knowledge of anatomy. Factors that contribute to dancers' knowledge of anatomy include age, years of experience, professional dancer status, and anatomy training.

  10. Surgical Navigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azarmehr, Iman; Stokbro, Kasper; Bell, R. Bryan

    2017-01-01

    body removal, respectively. The average technical system accuracy and intraoperative precision reported were less than 1 mm and 1 to 2 mm, respectively. In general, SN is reported to be a useful tool for surgical planning, execution, evaluation, and research. The largest numbers of studies and patients......Purpose: This systematic review investigates the most common indications, treatments, and outcomes of surgical navigation (SN) published from 2010 to 2015. The evolution of SN and its application in oral and maxillofacial surgery have rapidly developed over recent years, and therapeutic indications...... surgery, skull-base surgery, and foreign body removal were the areas of interests. Results: The search generated 13 articles dealing with traumatology; 5, 6, 2, and 0 studies were found that dealt with the topics of orthognathic surgery, cancer and reconstruction surgery, skull-base surgery, and foreign...

  11. [Flexor tendon pulley system: anatomy, pathology, treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutet, F

    2003-02-01

    Flexor tendon pulley has been very early noticed and described. Terminology usually accepted recognizes 6 arcifom pulleys (A0 to A5) and 3 cruciform pulleys (C1 to C3). Anatomy and physiology of this flexor tendon gliding and reflection system at the level of the digital sheet are exposed. The integrity necessity of this system became obvious regarding the flexor tendons repair. Four main pathologies may be concerned: the trigger finger congenital or progressive, due to a chondroid metaplasia of the A1 pulley; tenosynovial ganglions arising at the weak point between A1 and A2 pulley; lesions of the flexor tendon sheet during traumatic lacerations or surgical repairs; quite experimental lesions creating isolated ruptures of one or several pulleys which occur during sport practice, especially high level rock climbing. The repair techniques are exposed to allow to graduate and hierarchy the reparation technique regarding the pathology. A2 and A4 repair is always indicated. The best reconstruction material is an extensor retinaculum graft. But its poor surface available often draws to use conventional palmaris longus free graft.

  12. Microvascular anatomy of the cerebellar parafloccular perforating space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa, Pablo; Dujovny, Manuel; Onyekachi, Ibe; Sockwell, Noressia; Cremaschi, Fabián; Savastano, Luis E

    2016-02-01

    The cerebellopontine angle is a common site for tumor growth and vascular pathologies requiring surgical manipulations that jeopardize cranial nerve integrity and cerebellar and brainstem perfusion. To date, a detailed study of vessels perforating the cisternal surface of the middle cerebellar peduncle-namely, the paraflocculus or parafloccular perforating space-has yet to be published. In this report, the perforating vessels of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) in the parafloccular space, or on the cisternal surface of the middle cerebellar peduncle, are described to elucidate their relevance pertaining to microsurgery and the different pathologies that occur at the cerebellopontine angle. Fourteen cadaveric cerebellopontine cisterns (CPCs) were studied. Anatomical dissections and analysis of the perforating arteries of the AICA and posterior inferior cerebellar artery at the parafloccular space were recorded using direct visualization by surgical microscope, optical histology, and scanning electron microscope. A comprehensive review of the English-language and Spanish-language literature was also performed, and findings related to anatomy, histology, physiology, neurology, neuroradiology, microsurgery, and endovascular surgery pertaining to the cerebellar flocculus or parafloccular spaces are summarized. A total of 298 perforating arteries were found in the dissected specimens, with a minimum of 15 to a maximum of 26 vessels per parafloccular perforating space. The average outer diameter of the cisternal portion of the perforating arteries was 0.11 ± 0.042 mm (mean ± SD) and the average length was 2.84 ± 1.2 mm. Detailed schematics and the surgical anatomy of the perforating vessels at the CPC and their clinical relevance are reported. The parafloccular space is a key entry point for many perforating vessels toward the middle cerebellar peduncle and lateral brainstem, and it must be respected and protected during surgical approaches to the

  13. 3D digital anatomy modelling - Practical or pretty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murgitroyd, Ellen; Madurska, Marta; Gonzalez, Jasmina; Watson, Angus

    2015-06-01

    With an increasing move towards digitalisation of medical records and medical teaching, such as online exams and webinars, one of the questions that persists asks 'is there a place for digital anatomy teaching and can it effectively replace the traditional teaching methods such as cadaveric dissection?' Cadaveric dissection has a number of benefits as a teaching method but it also has its limitations. Although these can be partially addressed by prosections and new more "life-like" fixatives, it does not address the lack of resources and the increasing pressure to be able to study and learn at home. This paper reviews the literature with regards to the suitability of digital models for teaching and the wider uses a 3D digital anatomy model could have, such as postgraduate teaching, patient education and surgical planning. It also looks briefly at the learning model that anatomy as art contributes. The literature has scattered examples of digital models used for teaching at both undergraduate and postgraduate level, which demonstrate a number of positive outcomes, mostly surrounding user satisfaction and convenience. 3D modelling for patient education and operation planning has less exploration, and these papers generate a number of discussion points, mostly surrounding the practicality of digital models, which can be more time consuming and require the technology to be widely available and reliable. 3D digital anatomy is a useful adjunct to teaching and its use in patient education and operation planning have interesting possibilities still to be fully explored. Copyright © 2014 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Surface and superficial surgical anatomy of the posterolateral cranial base: significance for surgical planning and approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, J D; Kellogg, J X; Tschabitscher, M; Fukushima, T

    1996-06-01

    We have performed an anatomic study, 15 using fixed cadaveric preparations, with the goal of identifying surface landmarks that will reliably locate the underlying transverse and sigmoid sinus complex. Simple morphometric relationships were first determined on both sides of each specimen to yield 30 sides measured. The following relationships were determined: 1) zygoma root-asterion, 2) asterion-mastoid tip, 3) zygoma root-suprameatal spine (Henle's spine), 4) asterion-suprameatal spine, 5) mastoid tip-suprameatal spine. The relationship of the asterion to the transverse-sigmoid junction was determined by bone removal. Also, the distances from the asterion to the sigmoid sinus-superior petrosal sinus junction and the superior margin of the transverse sinus were studied. Surface and marks were found to have definitive relationships to underlying anatomic substrates in all specimens studied. The critical relationships that were concluded from this study can be described in terms of two easily identified lines between bony surface structures. A line drawn from the zygoma root to the inion, i.e., the superior nuchal line, reliably located the rostrocaudal level of the transverse sinus in all specimens. Although the asterion did not consistently fall on this line, the transverse-sigmoid junction could reliably be placed at the anteroposterior level of the asterion. Further, a line drawn from the squamosal-parietomastoid suture junction to the mastoid tip reliably defined the axis of the sigmoid sinus through the mastoid. We also found that the junction of the squamosal and parietomastoid sutures lay over the anterior border of the upper curve of the sigmoid sinus. The anterior portion of the supramastoid crest correlated with the level of the middle fossa. These surface relationships all have significance for posterolateral approaches to the cranial base. Since performing this study, these relationships have been found reliable for operative planning in our clinical cases.

  15. Controlling the vocabulary for anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baud, R H; Lovis, C; Rassinoux, A M; Ruch, P; Geissbuhler, A

    2002-01-01

    When confronted with the representation of human anatomy, natural language processing (NLP) system designers are facing an unsolved and frequent problem: the lack of a suitable global reference. The available sources in electronic format are numerous, but none fits adequately all the constraints and needs of language analysis. These sources are usually incomplete, difficult to use or tailored to specific needs. The anatomist's or ontologist's view does not necessarily match that of the linguist. The purpose of this paper is to review most recognized sources of knowledge in anatomy usable for linguistic analysis. Their potential and limits are emphasized according to this point of view. Focus is given on the role of the consensus work of the International Federation of Associations of Anatomists (IFAA) giving the Terminologia Anatomica.

  16. Lower extremity compartmental anatomy: clinical relevance to radiologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toomayan, Glen A.; Robertson, Fabienne; Major, Nancy M. [Duke University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Durham (United States)

    2005-06-01

    A thorough understanding of compartmental anatomy is necessary for the radiologist participating in the care of a patient with a lower extremity musculoskeletal malignancy. Localization of tumor to compartment of origin and identification of extracompartmental spread preoperatively are needed to correctly stage a tumor and determine the appropriate surgical management. An understanding of the locations of fascial boundaries, extracompartmental tissues, and neurovascular structures of the thigh and lower leg facilitates this diagnostic process. For the radiologist planning to biopsy a suspicious musculoskeletal lesion, consultation with the referring orthopaedic surgeon is recommended in order to jointly select an appropriate percutaneous biopsy approach. Adequate preprocedural planning ensures selection of an approach which prevents iatrogenic tumor spread beyond the compartment of origin, protects neurovascular structures, and allows complete resection of the biopsy tract and scar at the time of surgical resection without jeopardizing a potential limb-sparing procedure. Cross-sectional anatomic review and case examples demonstrate the importance of a detailed understanding of compartmental anatomy when approaching the patient with a lower extremity musculoskeletal tumor. (orig.)

  17. Ecological anatomy of ferns fronds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina M. Derzhavina

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Structural types of frond anatomy are distinguished on the basis of investigation of 30 species of homosporous ferns and with regard for literature: hydromorphic, hygromorphic, mesomorphic, subxeromorphic, and subsucculent (cryptic succulent. Following frond traits are of highest adaptive value: their area and thickness, type of mesophyll, dry weight of an area unit – specific superficial density, cellular volume, and number of cells per unit of frond area.

  18. Postpartum Coccydynia: an Anatomy Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Maulana, Reza; Wahyuniati, Nur; Indra, Imai

    2015-01-01

    Coccydynia is a term that refers to a painful condition in and around the coccyx. This symptom is typically a discomfort or pain which is felt when sitting for long time and when rising from sitting position. Many physiologic and psychological factors contribute to its etiology, but the majority of cases were found to be aggravated by pregnancy and childbirth (postpartum). Luxation and fracture of the coccyx are the two most common lesion of postpartum coccydynia. This poster shows an anatomy...

  19. Magkänslans anatomi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlström, Kristoffer

    Varför dog 1500 personer i onödan i biltrafiken efter den 11 september 2001? Vad har FBI-agenter gemensamt med barn till alkoholister? Och vad fick författaren George Orwell att börja utöva svart magi? Magkänslans anatomi är en fascinerande kartläggning av de psykologiska mekanismer som ligger ba...

  20. Anatomy of the distal biceps brachii tendon and its clinical relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulshreshtha, Rajiv; Singh, Raminder; Sinha, Joydeep; Hall, Susan

    2007-03-01

    Rupture of the distal biceps tendon is a relatively uncommon injury. Different methods have been described for its surgical repair. According to published reports, current surgical techniques result in decreased strength and endurance of upper extremity functions requiring supination and flexion. In our anatomic study of 74 cadaveric elbows, we observed that the distal biceps tendon spirals in a predictable manner and has a complex fiber arrangement. Successful surgical repair of a ruptured distal biceps tendon should be predicated on an understanding of the tendon anatomy, but current surgical techniques do not take into account the salient anatomic features of the distal biceps tendon. To our knowledge, there is no description in the surgical literature of the fiber arrangement of the distal biceps tendon. We provide a basis for developing an anatomically accurate protocol for repairing a distal biceps tendon rupture.

  1. Surgical endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrotte, P

    2005-01-22

    Root canal treatment usually fails because infection remains within the root canal. An orthograde attempt at re-treatment should always be considered first. However, when surgery is indicated, modern microtechniques coupled with surgical magnification will lead to a better prognosis. Careful management of the hard and soft tissues is essential, specially designed ultrasonic tips should be used for root end preparation which should ideally be sealed with MTA. All cases should be followed up until healing is seen, or failure accepted, and should form a part of clinical audit.

  2. Surgical Management of Enterocutaneous Fistula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Suk Hwan

    2012-01-01

    Enterocutaneous (EC) fistula is an abnormal connection between the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and skin. The majority of EC fistulas result from surgery. About one third of fistulas close spontaneously with medical treatment and radiologic interventions. Surgical treatment should be reserved for use after sufficient time has passed from the previous laparotomy to allow lysis of the fibrous adhesion using full nutritional and medical treatment and until a complete understanding of the anatomy of the fistula has been achieved. The successful management of GI fistula requires a multi-disciplinary team approach including a gastroenterologist, interventional radiologist, enterostomal therapist, dietician, social worker and surgeons. With this coordinated approach, EC fistula can be controlled with acceptable morbidity and mortality.

  3. Surgical Management of Enterocutaneous Fistula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Suk Hwan [Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    Enterocutaneous (EC) fistula is an abnormal connection between the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and skin. The majority of EC fistulas result from surgery. About one third of fistulas close spontaneously with medical treatment and radiologic interventions. Surgical treatment should be reserved for use after sufficient time has passed from the previous laparotomy to allow lysis of the fibrous adhesion using full nutritional and medical treatment and until a complete understanding of the anatomy of the fistula has been achieved. The successful management of GI fistula requires a multi-disciplinary team approach including a gastroenterologist, interventional radiologist, enterostomal therapist, dietician, social worker and surgeons. With this coordinated approach, EC fistula can be controlled with acceptable morbidity and mortality.

  4. Brachial Plexus Anatomy: Normal and Variant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven L. Orebaugh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Effective brachial plexus blockade requires a thorough understanding of the anatomy of the plexus, as well as an appreciation of anatomic variations that may occur. This review summarizes relevant anatomy of the plexus, along with variations and anomalies that may affect nerve blocks conducted at these levels. The Medline, Cochrane Library, and PubMed electronic databases were searched in order to compile reports related to the anatomy of the brachial plexus using the following free terms: "brachial plexus", "median nerve", "ulnar nerve", "radial nerve", "axillary nerve", and "musculocutanous nerve". Each of these was then paired with the MESH terms "anatomy", "nerve block", "anomaly", "variation", and "ultrasound". Resulting articles were hand searched for additional relevant literature. A total of 68 searches were conducted, with a total of 377 possible articles for inclusion. Of these, 57 were found to provide substantive information for this review. The normal anatomy of the brachial plexus is briefly reviewed, with an emphasis on those features revealed by use of imaging technologies. Anomalies of the anatomy that might affect the conduct of the various brachial plexus blocks are noted. Brachial plexus blockade has been effectively utilized as a component of anesthesia for upper extremity surgery for a century. Over that period, our understanding of anatomy and its variations has improved significantly. The ability to explore anatomy at the bedside, with real-time ultrasonography, has improved our appreciation of brachial plexus anatomy as well.

  5. MR Imaging of Prostate Zonal Anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yacoub, Joseph H; Oto, Aytekin

    2018-03-01

    McNeal first described the zonal anatomy of the prostate about 40 years ago, outlining 4 zones of the prostate and defining their relation to the urethra and the ejaculatory ducts. The zonal anatomy remains the accepted model for describing the prostate and the zones are well-depicted on MR imaging, including the central zone, which until recently was grouped with the transition zone in the radiology literature. An accurate understanding of the zonal anatomy and periprostatic anatomy is key for accurate interpretation of the prostate MR imaging. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The anatomy in relation to injury of the lateral collateral ligaments of the ankle: a current concepts review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bekerom, Michel P. J.; Oostra, Roelof Jan; Alvarez, Pau Golano; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2008-01-01

    Injuries to the lateral ligament complex of the ankle are common problems in acute care practice. We believe that a well-developed knowledge of the anatomy provides a foundation for understanding the basic mechanism of injury, diagnosis, and treatment, especially surgical treatment, of lateral

  7. SURGICAL NUTRITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny Kurniawan Darianto

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A patient undergoing surgery faces great physiologic and psychologic stress. so nutritional demands are greatly increased during this period and deficiencies can easily develop. If these deficiencies are allowed to develop and are not in screening, serious malnutrition and clinical problem can occur. Therefore careful attention must be given to a patient's nutritional status in preparation of surgery, as well as to the individual nutritional needs. If these needs are met, complications are less likely developing. Natural resources provide for rapid recovery. Proper nutrition can speed healing in surgical patients with major trauma, severe malnutition, burns, and other severe illnesses. New techniques for tube feeding, intravenous nutrition for patients with serious weight loss due to gastrointestinal disorders, and use of supplements can hasten wound healing and shorten recovery times.

  8. Anatomy of the capsulolabral complex and rotator interval related to glenohumeral instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoigawa, Yoshiaki; Itoi, Eiji

    2016-02-01

    The glenohumeral joint with instability is a common diagnosis that often requires surgery. The aim of this review was to present an overview of the anatomy of the glenohumeral joint with emphasis on instability based on the current literature and to describe the detailed anatomy and anatomical variants of the glenohumeral joint associated with anterior and posterior shoulder instability. A review was performed using PubMed/MEDLINE using key words: Search terms were "glenohumeral", "shoulder instability", "cadaver", "rotator interval", "anatomy", and "anatomical study". During the last decade, the interest in both arthroscopic repair techniques and surgical anatomy of the glenohumeral ligament (superior, middle, and inferior), labrum, and rotator interval has increased. Understanding of the rotator interval and attachment of the inferior glenohumeral ligament on the glenoid or humeral head have evolved significantly. The knowledge of the detailed anatomy and anatomical variations is essential for the surgeon in order to understand the pathology, make a correct diagnosis of instability, and select proper treatment options. Proper understanding of anatomical variants can help us avoid misdiagnosis. Level of evidence V.

  9. Venous chest anatomy: clinical implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chasen, M.H.; Charnsangavej, C.

    1998-01-01

    This article provides a practical approach to the clinical implications and importance of understanding the collateral venous anatomy of the thorax. Routine radiography, conventional venography, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging studies provide correlative anatomic models for the demonstration of how interconnecting collateral vascular networks within the thorax maintain venous stability at all times. Five major systems comprise the collateral venous network of the thorax ( Fig. 1 ). These include the paravertebral, azygos-hemiazygos, internal mammary, lateral thoracic, and anterior jugular venous systems (AJVS). The five systems are presented in the following sequence: (a) a brief introduction to the importance of catheter position and malposition in understanding access to the thoracic venous system, (b) the anatomy of the azygos-hemiazygos systems and their relationship with the paravertebral plexus, (c) the importance of the AJVS, (d) 'loop' concepts interconnecting the internal mammary and azygos-hemiazygos systems by means of the lateral thoracic and intercostal veins, and (e) the interconnecting venous networks on the thoracic side of the thoracoabdominal junction. Certain aspects of the venous anatomy of the thorax will not be discussed in this chapter and include (a) the intra-abdominal anastomoses between the superior and inferior vena cavae (IVC) via the internal mammary, lateral thoracic, and azygos-hemiazygos systems (beyond the scope of this article), (b) potential collateral vessels involving vertebral, parascapular, thyroidal, thymic, and other smaller veins that might anastomose with the major systems, and (c) anatomic variants and pitfalls that may mimic pathologic conditions (space limitations). (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  10. Gross anatomy of network security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, Thomas J.

    2002-01-01

    Information security involves many branches of effort, including information assurance, host level security, physical security, and network security. Computer network security methods and implementations are given a top-down description to permit a medically focused audience to anchor this information to their daily practice. The depth of detail of network functionality and security measures, like that of the study of human anatomy, can be highly involved. Presented at the level of major gross anatomical systems, this paper will focus on network backbone implementation and perimeter defenses, then diagnostic tools, and finally the user practices (the human element). Physical security measures, though significant, have been defined as beyond the scope of this presentation.

  11. A new chapter in Anatomy

    OpenAIRE

    Şengül, Gülgün

    2015-01-01

    Gülgün Şengül (MD) is a Professor of Anatomy in Ege University, School of Medicine, Izmir, Turkey. Her research field is neuroanatomy. She is one of the authors of the comprehensive spinal cord text book The Spinal Cord: A Christopher and Dana Reeve Foundation Text and Atlas (Elsevier, 2009). Her recent work Atlas of the Spinal Cord of the Rat, Mouse, Marmoset, Rhesus, and Human (Elsevier, 2013) comprises the first marmoset and rhesus monkey and human spinal cord atlases published. These prov...

  12. ZBrush Digital Sculpting Human Anatomy

    CERN Document Server

    Spencer, Scott

    2010-01-01

    Taking into account that many of today?s digital artists?particularly 3D character animators?lack foundational artistic instruction, this book teaches anatomy in a coherent and succinct style. A clear writing style explains how to sculpt an accurate human figure, starting with the skeleton and working out to muscle, fat, and skin. Insightful explanations enable you to quickly and easily create and design characters that can be used in film, game, or print, and allows you to gain a strong understanding of the foundational artistic concepts.

  13. Design Projects in Human Anatomy & Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polizzotto, Kristin; Ortiz, Mary T.

    2008-01-01

    Very often, some type of writing assignment is required in college entry-level Human Anatomy and Physiology courses. This assignment can be anything from an essay to a research paper on the literature, focusing on a faculty-approved topic of interest to the student. As educators who teach Human Anatomy and Physiology at an urban community college,…

  14. Frontal anatomy and reaction time in Autism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitz, Nicole; Daly, Eileen; Murphy, Declan

    2007-01-01

    Widespread frontal lobe abnormalities, encompassing anatomy and function, are known to be implicated in Autistic Spectrum Disorders (ASD). The correlation between neurobiology and behaviour, however, is poorly understood in ASD. The aim of this study was to investigate frontal lobe anatomy and

  15. Anatomy of a Cancer Treatment Scam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... All Events Weekly Calendar Weekly Calendar Archive Speeches Audio/Video Featured Videos FTC Events For Consumers For ... Adjudicative Proceedings You are here Home » News & Events » Audio/Video » Anatomy of a Cancer Treatment Scam Anatomy ...

  16. Gender Bias in Human Anatomy Textbook Illustrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomini, M.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Surveyed anatomy texts currently in use in a major western medical school. In text sections dealing with standard (nongender-specific) anatomy, male subjects were shown in 64 percent of the illustrations in which gender was discernible, females in ll percent, and gender-neutral representations, 25 percent. Females and males were represented…

  17. An introduction to human brain anatomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forstmann, B.U.; Keuken, M.C.; Alkemade, A.; Forstmann, B.U.; Wagenmakers, E.-J.

    2015-01-01

    This tutorial chapter provides an overview of the human brain anatomy. Knowledge of brain anatomy is fundamental to our understanding of cognitive processes in health and disease; moreover, anatomical constraints are vital for neurocomputational models and can be important for psychological

  18. Shark Attack! Sinking Your Teeth into Anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, Herbert

    2002-01-01

    Presents a real life shark attack story and studies arm reattachment surgery to teach human anatomy. Discusses how knowledge of anatomy can be put to use in the real world and how the arm functions. Includes teaching notes and suggestions for classroom management. (YDS)

  19. Anatomy of a Cancer Treatment Scam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Anatomy of a Cancer Treatment Scam Anatomy of a Cancer Treatment Scam January 19, 2012 Curious about a product that claims to treat or cure cancer? ... Center Competition Guidance I Would Like To... Submit a Consumer Complaint to the FTC Apply for a ...

  20. Mapping selection within Drosophila melanogaster embryo's anatomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salvador-Martínez, Irepan; Coronado-Zamora, Marta; Castellano, David

    2018-01-01

    We present a survey of selection across Drosophila melanogaster embryonic anatomy. Our approach integrates genomic variation, spatial gene expression patterns and development, with the aim of mapping adaptation over the entire embryo's anatomy. Our adaptation map is based on analyzing spatial gen...

  1. Journal of Experimental and Clinical Anatomy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Journal of Experimental and Clinical Anatomy accepts for publication manuscripts of high standard containing reports of original scientific research in the morphology, mechanical functioning and development of man and animals. The scope the journal embraces articles of human and comparative anatomy, embryology ...

  2. Abdominal Wall Hernias: Various Imaging Features Correlated with the Anatomy of Abdominal Wall at MDCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Shin Young; Shin, Hyeong Cheol; Kim, Sang Won; Kim, Il Young; Kim, Young Tong [Soonchunhyang University Cheonan Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-07-15

    Abdominal wall hernias are a common condition. However, they may develop acute complications and require surgical correction in most cases. Hence, the correct radiological examination is requisite for an accurate diagnosis. A multi-detector row CT (MDCT) provides an accurate identification of the anatomy of the abdominal wall, precise hernia type, and helps in the detection of early signs of complication. We report various imaging features of abdominal wall hernias via a MDCT.

  3. Anatomy-Specific Virtual Reality Simulation in Temporal Bone Dissection: Perceived Utility and Impact on Surgeon Confidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locketz, Garrett D; Lui, Justin T; Chan, Sonny; Salisbury, Kenneth; Dort, Joseph C; Youngblood, Patricia; Blevins, Nikolas H

    2017-06-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of anatomy-specific virtual reality (VR) surgical rehearsal on surgeon confidence and temporal bone dissection performance. Study Design Prospective pre- and poststudy of a novel virtual surgical rehearsal platform. Setting Academic otolaryngology-head and neck surgery residency training programs. Subjects and Methods Sixteen otolaryngology-head and neck surgery residents from 2 North American training institutions were recruited. Surveys were administered to assess subjects' baseline confidence in performing 12 subtasks of cortical mastoidectomy with facial recess. A cadaver temporal bone was randomly assigned to each subject. Cadaver specimens were scanned with a clinical computed tomography protocol, allowing the creation of anatomy-specific models for use in a VR surgical rehearsal platform. Subjects then rehearsed a virtual mastoidectomy on data sets derived from their specimens. Surgical confidence surveys were administered again. Subjects then dissected assigned cadaver specimens, which were blindly graded with a modified Welling scale. A final survey assessed the perceived utility of rehearsal on dissection performance. Results Of 16 subjects, 14 (87.5%) reported a significant increase in overall confidence after conducting an anatomy-specific VR rehearsal. A significant correlation existed between perceived utility of rehearsal and confidence improvement. The effect of rehearsal on confidence was dependent on trainee experience and the inherent difficulty of the surgical subtask. Postrehearsal confidence correlated strongly with graded dissection performance. Subjects rated anatomy-specific rehearsal as having a moderate to high contribution to their dissection performance. Conclusion Anatomy-specific virtual rehearsal improves surgeon confidence in performing mastoid dissection, dependent on surgeon experience and task difficulty. The subjective confidence gained through rehearsal correlates positively with subsequent

  4. Human fetal anatomy: MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinreb, J C; Lowe, T; Cohen, J M; Kutler, M

    1985-12-01

    Twenty-four pregnant women carrying 26 fetuses (two sets of twins) were imaged with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging at 0.35 T following sonographic evaluation. Each study was retrospectively evaluated to determine which of 33 normal fetal structures were visible on the images and which imaging parameters were most useful for depicting fetal anatomy. Fetal motion degraded fetal images in all but two cases, both with oligohydramnios and in the third trimester of gestation. Nevertheless, many fetal structures were identifiable, particularly in the third trimester. Visualization of fetal anatomy improved with intravenous maternal sedation in five cases. Relatively T1-weighted images occasionally offered the advantage of less image degradation owing to fetal motion and improved contrast between different fetal structures. More T2 weighting was believed to be advantageous in one case for outlining the fetal head and in one case for delineation of the brain. In many cases, structures were similarly identifiable (though with different signal intensities) regardless of the parameters selected. The authors conclude that MR imaging of many fetal structures is currently unsatisfactory and is probably of limited value, particularly in the first and second trimesters. However, the relative frequency and detail with which the fetal head and liver can be depicted indicate that these may be areas for further investigation, and the potential utility of imaging fetal fat warrants further investigation.

  5. Anatomy of the Spinal Meninges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakka, Laurent; Gabrillargues, Jean; Coll, Guillaume

    2016-06-01

    The spinal meninges have received less attention than the cranial meninges in the literature, although several points remain debatable and poorly understood, like their phylogenesis, their development, and their interactions with the spinal cord. Their constancy among the chordates shows their crucial importance in central nervous system homeostasis and suggests a role far beyond mechanical protection of the neuraxis. This work provides an extensive study of the spinal meninges, from an overview of their phylogenesis and embryology to a descriptive and topographic anatomy with clinical implications. It examines their involvement in spinal cord development, functioning, and repair. This work is a review of the literature using PubMed as a search engine on Medline. The stages followed by the meninges along the phylogenesis could not be easily compared with their development in vertebrates for methodological aspects and convergence processes throughout evolution. The distinction between arachnoid and pia mater appeared controversial. Several points of descriptive anatomy remain debatable: the functional organization of the arterial network, and the venous and lymphatic drainages, considered differently by classical anatomic and neuroradiological approaches. Spinal meninges are involved in neurodevelopment and neurorepair producing neural stem cells and morphogens, in cerebrospinal fluid dynamics and neuraxis functioning by the synthesis of active molecules, and the elimination of waste products of central nervous system metabolism. The spinal meninges should be considered as dynamic functional formations evolving over a lifetime, with ultrastructural features and functional interactions with the neuraxis remaining not fully understood.

  6. Novel Surgical Approaches to the Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Ashley A.; Grob, Seanna R.; Yoon, Michael K.

    2015-01-01

    Determining safe surgical access to the orbit can be difficult given the complex anatomy and delicacy of the orbital structures. When considering biopsy or removal of an orbital tumor or repair of orbital fractures, careful planning is required to determine the ideal approach. Traditionally, this has at times necessitated invasive procedures with large incisions and extensive bone removal. The purpose of this review was to present newly techniques and devices in orbital surgery that have been reported over the past decade, with aims to provide better exposure and/or minimally invasive approaches and to improve morbidity and/or mortality. PMID:26692713

  7. Quantitative comparison of cranial approaches in the anatomy laboratory: A neuronavigation based research method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doglietto, Francesco; Qiu, Jimmy; Ravichandiran, Mayoorendra; Radovanovic, Ivan; Belotti, Francesco; Agur, Anne; Zadeh, Gelareh; Fontanella, Marco Maria; Kucharczyk, Walter; Gentili, Fred

    2017-12-26

    To describe the development and validation of a novel neuronavigation-based method, which allows the quantification of the anatomical features that define an approach, as well as real-time visualization of the surgical pyramid. The method was initially developed with commercially-available hardware for coordinate collection (a digitizer and a frameless navigation system) and software for volume rendering; dedicated neuronavigation software (ApproachViewer, part of GTx-UHN) was then developed. The accuracy of measurements and the possibility of volumetric rendering of surgical approaches simulated in a phantom were compared among three different methods and commercially-available radiological software. In the anatomy laboratory, ApproachViewer was applied to the comparative quantitative analysis of multiple neurosurgical approaches and was used by many surgeons who were untrained for the research method. The accuracy of ApproachViewer is comparable to commercially-available radiological software. In the anatomy laboratory, the method appears versatile. The system can be easily used after brief training. ApproachViewer allows for real-time evaluation and comparison of surgical approaches, as well as post-dissection analyses of collected data. The accuracy of the method depends on the navigation registration: with a 1-2 mm registration error, it is adequate for evaluation and comparison of most neurosurgical approaches. This new research method and software allows semi-automated visualization, quantification, and comparison of neurosurgical approaches in the anatomy laboratory.

  8. The feasibility of surgical site tagging with CT virtual reality of the paranasal sinuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, K D; Iyriboz, A T; Wise, S W; Fornadley, J A

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate the feasibility of tagging (highlighting) surgical sites using volumetric CT virtual reality of the paranasal sinuses in the planning for endoscopic sinus surgery. Twenty-five patients with significant paranasal sinus disease had a planned surgical site marked on 2D coronal images. This planned surgical site was then tagged and included on CT volumetric virtual reality imaging. Each case was evaluated as to the ability of the CT virtual reality to demonstrate the planned surgical site and its orientation with respect to adjacent superficial anatomy. For all 25 planned surgeries, the virtual images showed the entire surgical site marked on the 2D coronal images. In all 25 cases, the orientation of the planned surgical site to adjacent normal anatomy was well demonstrated. For surgery into the maxillary sinuses, tagging and electronic removal of the middle turbinates and uncinate processes mimicked the actual surgery and allowed complete visualization of the infundibulum and the planned surgical site. Planned endoscopic paranasal sinus surgical sites can be easily and reliably highlighted using CT virtual reality techniques with respect to the patient's normal endoscopic anatomy.

  9. Effect of surgical procedures on prostate tumor gene expression profiles

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Jie; Zhang, Zhi-Hong; Yin, Chang-Jun; Pavlovich, Christian; Luo, Jun; Getzenberg, Robert; Zhang, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Current surgical treatment of prostate cancer is typically accomplished by either open radical prostatectomy (ORP) or robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALRP). Intra-operative procedural differences between the two surgical approaches may alter the molecular composition of resected surgical specimens, which are indispensable for molecular analysis and biomarker evaluation. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of different surgical procedures on RNA quali...

  10. KELAINAN BANGUN ANATOMIS KUKU KUDA KOLEKSI LABORATORIUM ANATOMI FKH IPB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemaz A Dewangga

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to observe the anatomical structure of horse hooves collected from the Laboratory of Anatomy FKH IPB. Twenty five hoof specimens, consisting of ten fore hooves and fifteen hind hooves were used as research materials. The external morphology such as color, angle, structure and condition of the hoof wall were described. The observation on external morphology showed that the hooves have two basic colors, black and white. Generally, all of the hoof specimens showed abnormalities in such aspect as angle, structure and condition of the wall. The structures of fore hoof and hind hoof from this study are classified into 8 categories, they are: flat foot, flared foot, knol hoef, fever rings, sand crack, club foot, contracted foot and bull nosed foot.

  11. Panel 2: Anatomy (Eustachian Tube, Middle Ear, and Mastoid-Anatomy, Physiology, Pathophysiology, and Pathogenesis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alper, Cuneyt M; Luntz, Michal; Takahashi, Haruo; Ghadiali, Samir N; Swarts, J Douglas; Teixeira, Miriam S; Csákányi, Zsuzsanna; Yehudai, Noam; Kania, Romain; Poe, Dennis S

    2017-04-01

    Objective In this report, we review the recent literature (ie, past 4 years) to identify advances in our understanding of the middle ear-mastoid-eustachian tube system. We use this review to determine whether the short-term goals elaborated in the last report were achieved, and we propose updated goals to guide future otitis media research. Data Sources PubMed, Web of Science, Medline. Review Methods The panel topic was subdivided, and each contributor performed a literature search within the given time frame. The keywords searched included middle ear, eustachian tube, and mastoid for their intersection with anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology, and pathology. Preliminary reports from each panel member were consolidated and discussed when the panel met on June 11, 2015. At that meeting, the progress was evaluated and new short-term goals proposed. Conclusions Progress was made on 13 of the 20 short-term goals proposed in 2011. Significant advances were made in the characterization of middle ear gas exchange pathways, modeling eustachian tube function, and preliminary testing of treatments for eustachian tube dysfunction. Implications for Practice In the future, imaging technologies should be developed to noninvasively assess middle ear/eustachian tube structure and physiology with respect to their role in otitis media pathogenesis. The new data derived from these structure/function experiments should be integrated into computational models that can then be used to develop specific hypotheses concerning otitis media pathogenesis and persistence. Finally, rigorous studies on medical or surgical treatments for eustachian tube dysfunction should be undertaken.

  12. Smooth extrapolation of unknown anatomy via statistical shape models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grupp, R. B.; Chiang, H.; Otake, Y.; Murphy, R. J.; Gordon, C. R.; Armand, M.; Taylor, R. H.

    2015-03-01

    Several methods to perform extrapolation of unknown anatomy were evaluated. The primary application is to enhance surgical procedures that may use partial medical images or medical images of incomplete anatomy. Le Fort-based, face-jaw-teeth transplant is one such procedure. From CT data of 36 skulls and 21 mandibles separate Statistical Shape Models of the anatomical surfaces were created. Using the Statistical Shape Models, incomplete surfaces were projected to obtain complete surface estimates. The surface estimates exhibit non-zero error in regions where the true surface is known; it is desirable to keep the true surface and seamlessly merge the estimated unknown surface. Existing extrapolation techniques produce non-smooth transitions from the true surface to the estimated surface, resulting in additional error and a less aesthetically pleasing result. The three extrapolation techniques evaluated were: copying and pasting of the surface estimate (non-smooth baseline), a feathering between the patient surface and surface estimate, and an estimate generated via a Thin Plate Spline trained from displacements between the surface estimate and corresponding vertices of the known patient surface. Feathering and Thin Plate Spline approaches both yielded smooth transitions. However, feathering corrupted known vertex values. Leave-one-out analyses were conducted, with 5% to 50% of known anatomy removed from the left-out patient and estimated via the proposed approaches. The Thin Plate Spline approach yielded smaller errors than the other two approaches, with an average vertex error improvement of 1.46 mm and 1.38 mm for the skull and mandible respectively, over the baseline approach.

  13. Cochlear implant simulator for surgical technique analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turok, Rebecca L.; Labadie, Robert F.; Wanna, George B.; Dawant, Benoit M.; Noble, Jack H.

    2014-03-01

    Cochlear Implant (CI) surgery is a procedure in which an electrode array is inserted into the cochlea. The electrode array is used to stimulate auditory nerve fibers and restore hearing for people with severe to profound hearing loss. The primary goals when placing the electrode array are to fully insert the array into the cochlea while minimizing trauma to the cochlea. Studying the relationship between surgical outcome and various surgical techniques has been difficult since trauma and electrode placement are generally unknown without histology. Our group has created a CI placement simulator that combines an interactive 3D visualization environment with a haptic-feedback-enabled controller. Surgical techniques and patient anatomy can be varied between simulations so that outcomes can be studied under varied conditions. With this system, we envision that through numerous trials we will be able to statistically analyze how outcomes relate to surgical techniques. As a first test of this system, in this work, we have designed an experiment in which we compare the spatial distribution of forces imparted to the cochlea in the array insertion procedure when using two different but commonly used surgical techniques for cochlear access, called round window and cochleostomy access. Our results suggest that CIs implanted using round window access may cause less trauma to deeper intracochlear structures than cochleostomy techniques. This result is of interest because it challenges traditional thinking in the otological community but might offer an explanation for recent anecdotal evidence that suggests that round window access techniques lead to better outcomes.

  14. [The place and the role of topographic and clinical anatomy in the modern system of higher medical education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bol'shakov, O P

    2008-01-01

    Modern data on studying and teaching topographic and clinical anatomy in Russia and in the foreign countries at the boundary between the XX and the XXI centuries are analyzed. Definitions of some concepts are given; methodological and organizational bases of studying topographic and clinical anatomy are examined in historical aspect. Various approaches to the teaching and studying of these disciplines in different countries, are demonstrated. Special attention is given to the use of new technologies in teaching; the experience of virtual mode of studying of applied anatomy and surgical techniques is critically evaluated. Article presents author's own opinion and analyzes the conceptions of the foreign authors on the necessity of rational combination of computer and other modem technologies with traditional methods of work using biological materials and experiments on laboratory animals. The longstanding experience of the departments of operative surgery and clinical anatomy is summarized and the benefits of the national system of teaching of applied (topographic and clinical) anatomy are shown. Modem tendencies and priorities in the development of topographic and clinical anatomy are demonstrated.

  15. Scoliosis convexity and organ anatomy are related.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlösser, Tom P C; Semple, Tom; Carr, Siobhán B; Padley, Simon; Loebinger, Michael R; Hogg, Claire; Castelein, René M

    2017-06-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a respiratory syndrome in which 'random' organ orientation can occur; with approximately 46% of patients developing situs inversus totalis at organogenesis. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between organ anatomy and curve convexity by studying the prevalence and convexity of idiopathic scoliosis in PCD patients with and without situs inversus. Chest radiographs of PCD patients were systematically screened for existence of significant lateral spinal deviation using the Cobb angle. Positive values represented right-sided convexity. Curve convexity and Cobb angles were compared between PCD patients with situs inversus and normal anatomy. A total of 198 PCD patients were screened. The prevalence of scoliosis (Cobb >10°) and significant spinal asymmetry (Cobb 5-10°) was 8 and 23%, respectively. Curve convexity and Cobb angle were significantly different within both groups between situs inversus patients and patients with normal anatomy (P ≤ 0.009). Moreover, curve convexity correlated significantly with organ orientation (P scoliosis (8 situs inversus and 8 normal anatomy), except for one case, matching of curve convexity and orientation of organ anatomy was observed: convexity of the curve was opposite to organ orientation. This study supports our hypothesis on the correlation between organ anatomy and curve convexity in scoliosis: the convexity of the thoracic curve is predominantly to the right in PCD patients that were 'randomized' to normal organ anatomy and to the left in patients with situs inversus totalis.

  16. Coaptation Triangle and Golden Proportion in mitral valve anatomy. Does nature play with geometry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deorsola, Luca; Bellone, Alessandra

    2018-01-01

    The Coaptation Triangle, or Tenting Area, can be identified on long-axis 2D images. Its assessment is a routine practice during echocardiographic mitral evaluation. The Golden Proportion is a particular geometric ratio between two segments. Its value is an irrational number, commonly rounded to 0.618 and showing unique geometrical/mathematical properties. Interestingly, its presence has been documented in an extremely variable number of natural settings. Hypothesizing the presence of the Golden Proportion in normal mitral anatomy, we examined the Coaptation Triangle of healthy valves to investigate such a theory. A total of 41 healthy adults, with normal mitral valves, underwent 2D echocardiography. Adequate images were chosen and loaded into custom software. Firstly, the Coaptation Triangle was manually drawn by the operator. Then, a second Coaptation Triangle, with the same base, but based on Golden Proportion, was automatically built by the software. Eventually, the two triangles were analyzed and compared. All retrieved measurements were investigated for differences and correlations. Ratios close to the Golden Proportion were found in several locations of the manually drawn Coaptation Triangle. On the other hand, comparing the manually drawn Coaptation Triangle with the automatically built one, no significant differences were revealed, and very strong correlations were demonstrated. The Golden Proportion appears present in the geometry of normal mitral valves. Studying such an aspect and identifying disruption in anatomical proportions could improve early diagnosis of mitral alterations, and allows a more standardized follow-up and help surgeons to plan a repair strategy, particularly quantifying the needed surgical modifications. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. The value of supplementary anatomy workshops for improving ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of anatomy workshops on undergraduate anatomy grade performance. Methods: From 2012 to 2014, mean anatomy and physiology scores of medical students who attended anatomy workshops were compared to those who did not attend. Furthermore, mean scores in ...

  18. Arterial anatomy of the thumb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ames, E L; Bissonnette, M; Acland, R; Lister, G; Firrell, J

    1993-08-01

    The anatomical literature has indicated that the arterial supply to the thumb comes from the princeps pollicis artery. However, this simplified description does not often correlate with intraoperative findings. The purpose of this study was to investigate and clarify this important area of anatomy by dissection of fresh cadaver hands. 40 dissections were completed on 35 intravascularly injected and five non-injected hands. Five patterns were identified. The most common pattern showed both a superficial and deep vessel to the first web space in 54% of specimens. Dominant vessels included the superficial palmar branch of the radial artery in 8%, first palmar metacarpal artery in 18% and dorsal metacarpal artery in 8%. Only three specimens correlated with the textbook description. We conclude that the term "princeps pollicis" is actually a misnomer.

  19. LEARNING ANATOMY WITH AUGMENTED REALITY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Cita; Dyhrberg O'Neill, Lotte; Nielsen, Kurt Gammelgaard

    An Augmented Reality (AR) app for Hololens glasses was developed to help students learn the anatomy of the human body mediastinum. In this research project, we wanted to evaluate whether AR: strengthened the students’ self-efficacy and motivation, helped students to improve learning, and provided...... students with a good learning experience. During class students circulated between different learning stations of 35 minutes duration each. The students at the mediastinum station were randomly divided into three groups. One group received traditional teaching with PowerPoint presentation of CT scans......’ scores on the mediastinum questions in the exam 2 month later were collected to examine the long-term memory of content. Internal consistency was estimated for all measures. Correlations between measures were examined with a correlation matrix, and group differences were examined with one-way analysis...

  20. Anterior ethmoid anatomy facilitates dacryocystorhinostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaylock, W K; Moore, C A; Linberg, J V

    1990-12-01

    The ethmoid air cell labyrinth lies adjacent to the medial orbital wall, extending even beyond the sutures of the ethmoid bone. Its anatomic relationship to the lacrimal sac fossa is important in lacrimal surgery. We evaluated computed tomographic scans of 190 orbits with normal ethmoid anatomy to define the anatomic relationship of anterior ethmoid air cells to the lacrimal sac fossa. In 93% of the orbits, the cells extended anterior to the posterior lacrimal crest, with 40% entering the frontal process of the maxilla. This anatomic relationship may be used to facilitate the osteotomy during dacryocystorhinostomy. During a 10-year period (310 cases), one of us routinely entered the anterior ethmoid air cells to initiate the osteotomy during dacryocystorhinostomy. This technique has helped to avoid lacerations of the nasal mucosa.

  1. Anatomy of the skull base and the cranial nerves in slice imaging; Anatomie der Schaedelbasis und Hirnnerven in der Schnittbildgebung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bink, A.; Berkefeld, J.; Zanella, F. [Klinikum der Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt, Institut fuer Neuroradiologie, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2009-07-15

    Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are suitable methods for examination of the skull base. Whereas CT is used to evaluate mainly bone destruction e.g. for planning surgical therapy, MRI is used to show pathologies in the soft tissue and bone invasion. High resolution and thin slice thickness are indispensible for both modalities of skull base imaging. Detailed anatomical knowledge is necessary even for correct planning of the examination procedures. This knowledge is a requirement to be able to recognize and interpret pathologies. MRI is the method of choice for examining the cranial nerves. The total path of a cranial nerve can be visualized by choosing different sequences taking into account the tissue surrounding this cranial nerve. This article summarizes examination methods of the skull base in CT and MRI, gives a detailed description of the anatomy and illustrates it with image examples. (orig.) [German] Zur Untersuchung der Schaedelbasis sind sowohl die Computertomographie (CT) als auch Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) geeignet. Waehrend mittels CT vorzugsweise die exakte knoecherne Ausbreitung von Pathologien z. B. zur operativen Therapieplanung erfasst werden, dient die MRT sowohl der Darstellung von Pathologien bzgl. ihrer Ausbreitung im Weichteilgewebe als auch dem Nachweis knoecherner Infiltration. Bei der Untersuchung der Schaedelbasis wird eine hochaufloesende Darstellung mit geringer Schichtdicke fuer beide Modalitaeten angestrebt. Die genaue Kenntnis der Anatomie ist bereits bei der Untersuchungsplanung notwendig. Sie ist zudem Voraussetzung fuer das Erkennen und die korrekte Interpretation von Pathologien. Die MRT ist die bildgebende Methode der Wahl zur Abklaerung von Pathologien der Hirnnerven. Dabei ist es durch gezielte Sequenzauswahl, die sich nach den die Hirnnerven umgebenen Strukturen richtet, moeglich, den gesamten Verlauf der Hirnnerven zu beurteilen. Dieser Artikel beschreibt die Untersuchung der Schaedelbasis

  2. Anatomy of the Platysma Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Kun; Kim, Ji Yeon; Lim, Jae Hyun

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this paper was to review the anatomy the platysma systematically.The term "platysma AND anatomy" was used to search PubMed and Scopus, producing 394 and 214 papers, respectively. After excluding 95 duplicate titles, 513 abstracts and 98 full papers were reviewed. Among these 98 papers, 83 were excluded and 5 were added. Ultimately, 20 papers were analyzed.The most common aging-related change of the platysma was shortening (70.7%), followed by thinning (25.2%). The platysma most commonly originated from the upper portion of thorax anterior to clavicle (67.7%), followed by the subcutaneous tissue of the subclavicular and acromial regions (22.6%) and pectoralis (9.7%). The platysma ascended upward and medially (68.5%) or ascended from the clavicle to the face (31.5%). The platysma most commonly inserted on the cheek skin (57.5%), followed by the cutaneous muscles around the mouth (18.6%), the mandibulocutaneous ligament or zygoma (18.6%), and the parotid fascia or periosteum of the mandible (5.3%). The platysma was most commonly innervated by the cervical branch of the facial nerve (38.2%) or the cervical branch and mandibular branch of the facial nerve (60.5%), followed by the cervical plexus (0.6%), the cervical motor nucleus (0.6%), and the glossopharyngeal nerve (0.1%). The most common action of the platysma was drawing the lips inferiorly (83.3%) or posteriorly (12.9%). Four papers classified the platysma into subtypes; however, these classification strategies used arbitrary standards.Further studies will be necessary to establish the thickness of the platysma and to characterize age-related changes of the platysma.

  3. High precision anatomy for MEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troebinger, Luzia; López, José David; Lutti, Antoine; Bradbury, David; Bestmann, Sven; Barnes, Gareth

    2014-02-01

    Precise MEG estimates of neuronal current flow are undermined by uncertain knowledge of the head location with respect to the MEG sensors. This is either due to head movements within the scanning session or systematic errors in co-registration to anatomy. Here we show how such errors can be minimized using subject-specific head-casts produced using 3D printing technology. The casts fit the scalp of the subject internally and the inside of the MEG dewar externally, reducing within session and between session head movements. Systematic errors in matching to MRI coordinate system are also reduced through the use of MRI-visible fiducial markers placed on the same cast. Bootstrap estimates of absolute co-registration error were of the order of 1mm. Estimates of relative co-registration error were <1.5mm between sessions. We corroborated these scalp based estimates by looking at the MEG data recorded over a 6month period. We found that the between session sensor variability of the subject's evoked response was of the order of the within session noise, showing no appreciable noise due to between-session movement. Simulations suggest that the between-session sensor level amplitude SNR improved by a factor of 5 over conventional strategies. We show that at this level of coregistration accuracy there is strong evidence for anatomical models based on the individual rather than canonical anatomy; but that this advantage disappears for errors of greater than 5mm. This work paves the way for source reconstruction methods which can exploit very high SNR signals and accurate anatomical models; and also significantly increases the sensitivity of longitudinal studies with MEG. © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. High precision anatomy for MEG☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troebinger, Luzia; López, José David; Lutti, Antoine; Bradbury, David; Bestmann, Sven; Barnes, Gareth

    2014-01-01

    Precise MEG estimates of neuronal current flow are undermined by uncertain knowledge of the head location with respect to the MEG sensors. This is either due to head movements within the scanning session or systematic errors in co-registration to anatomy. Here we show how such errors can be minimized using subject-specific head-casts produced using 3D printing technology. The casts fit the scalp of the subject internally and the inside of the MEG dewar externally, reducing within session and between session head movements. Systematic errors in matching to MRI coordinate system are also reduced through the use of MRI-visible fiducial markers placed on the same cast. Bootstrap estimates of absolute co-registration error were of the order of 1 mm. Estimates of relative co-registration error were < 1.5 mm between sessions. We corroborated these scalp based estimates by looking at the MEG data recorded over a 6 month period. We found that the between session sensor variability of the subject's evoked response was of the order of the within session noise, showing no appreciable noise due to between-session movement. Simulations suggest that the between-session sensor level amplitude SNR improved by a factor of 5 over conventional strategies. We show that at this level of coregistration accuracy there is strong evidence for anatomical models based on the individual rather than canonical anatomy; but that this advantage disappears for errors of greater than 5 mm. This work paves the way for source reconstruction methods which can exploit very high SNR signals and accurate anatomical models; and also significantly increases the sensitivity of longitudinal studies with MEG. PMID:23911673

  5. The forearm complex: anatomy, biomechanics and clinical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaStayo, Paul C; Lee, Michael J

    2006-01-01

    The forearm complex is comprised of the proximal radioulnar joint, middle radioulnar joint/interosseous membrane, and the distal radioulnar joint. These three areas function in a coordinated manner to rotate the hand in space and allow performance of functional tasks. If a structure or structures in one of these three areas is disrupted, this can adversely affect the function at any of the other two remaining areas. Surgical intervention focuses on restoring anatomical alignment to preserve the function of the forearm complex. Rehabilitation is guided by the relationships between the three areas of the forearm complex and the awareness of clinical signs, symptoms, and complications. The purposes of this paper are to 1) describe the anatomy and biomechanical function of the forearm complex and 2) discuss clinical correlates pertaining to select forearm injuries (excluding peripheral nerve injuries) that may affect forearm function.

  6. Detailed anatomy of a left accessory aberrant colic artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusu, M C; Vlad, M; Voinea, L M; Curcă, G C; Sişu, A M

    2008-10-01

    In an aged human female cadaver a left accessory aberrant colic artery (LAACA) was observed and studied. It originated from the superior mesenteric artery at 3 cm proximal to the middle colic artery, at the inferior border of pancreas, passing over Treitz's muscle and continued covered by the superior duodenal fold where it crossed the inferior mesenteric vein. Further, it continued with a satellite vein anterior to the left renal vein and the anterior branch of the renal artery. The LAACA divided into an ascending branch and a descending one, anastomosed with the middle colic and proper left colic arteries; between its two primary branches and the splenic flexure of colon, a hypovascular area was observed. The surgical relevance of the LAACA detailed anatomy mainly relates to specific procedures performed in left colectomies and nephrectomies.

  7. Acute ankle sprain: conservative or surgical approach?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mohrej, Omar A.; Al-Kenani, Nader S.

    2016-01-01

    Ankle sprains fall into two main categories: acute ankle sprains and chronic ankle instability, which are among the most common recurrent injuries during occupational activities, athletic events, training and army service. Acute ankle sprain is usually managed conservatively and functional rehabilitation failure by conservative treatment leads to development of chronic ankle instability, which most often requires surgical intervention. Enhancing the in-depth knowledge of the ankle anatomy, biomechanics and pathology helps greatly in deciding the management options. Cite this article: Al-Mohrej OA, Al-Kenani NS. Acute ankle sprain: conservative or surgical approach? EFORT Open Rev 2016;1:34-44. DOI: 10.1302/2058-5241.1.000010. PMID:28461926

  8. The anatomy of the ACL and its importance in ACL reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markatos, K; Kaseta, M K; Lallos, S N; Korres, D S; Efstathopoulos, N

    2013-10-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) anatomy is very significant if a reconstruction is attempted after its rupture. An anatomic study should have to address, its biomechanical properties, its kinematics, its position and anatomic correlation and its functional properties. In this review, an attempt is made to summarize the most recent and authoritative tendencies as far as the anatomy of the ACL, and its surgical application in its reconstruction are concerned. Also, it is significant to take into account the anatomy as far as the rehabilitation protocol is concerned. Separate placement in the femoral side is known to give better results from transtibial approach. The medial tibial eminence and the intermeniscal ligament may be used as landmarks to guide the correct tunnel placement in anatomic ACL reconstruction. The anatomic centrum of the ACL femoral footprint is 43 % of the proximal-to-distal length of lateral, femoral intercondylar notch wall and femoral socket radius plus 2.5 mm anterior to the posterior articular margin. Some important factors affecting the surgical outcome of ACL reconstruction include graft selection, tunnel placement, initial graft tension, graft fixation, graft tunnel motion and healing. The rehabilitation protocol should come in phases in order to increase range of motion, muscle strength and leg balance, it should protect the graft and weightbearing should come in stages. The cornerstones of such a protocol remain bracing, controlling edema, pain and range of motion. This should be useful and valuable information in achieving full range of motion and stability of the knee postoperatively. In the end, all these advancements will contribute to better patient outcome. Recommendations point toward further experimental work with in vivo and in vitro studies, in order to assist in the development of new surgical procedures that could possibly replicate more closely the natural ACL anatomy and prevent future knee pathology.

  9. VINSIA: visual navigator for surgical information access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Lingyun; Rowbottom, James; Craker, John; Xu, Rong; Zhang, Guo-Qiang

    2013-07-01

    Information access at the point of care presents a different set of requirements than those for traditional search engines. Critical care in remote (e.g., battle field) and rural settings not only requires access to clinical guidelines and medical libraries with surgical precision but also with minimal user effort and time. Our development of a graphical, anatomy-driven navigator called Visual Navigator for Surgical Information Access (VINSIA) fulfills the goal for providing evidence-based clinical decision support, specifically in perioperative and critical care settings, to allow rapid and precise information access through a portable stand-alone system. It comes with a set of unique characteristics: (a) a high precision, interactive visual interface driven by human anatomy; (b) direct linkage of anatomical structures to associated content such as clinical guidelines, literature, and medical libraries; and (c) an administrative content management interface allowing only an accredited, expert-level curator to edit and update the clinical content to ensure accuracy and currency. We believe that the deployment of VINSIA will improve quality, safety, and evidence-based standardization of patient care. Reprint & Copyright © 2013 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  10. Anatomy of a Cancer Treatment Scam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a Cancer Treatment Scam Anatomy of a Cancer Treatment Scam January 19, 2012 Curious about a product ... and should not stop or delay their conventional treatment. Category: Scam Watch Health Download File Related Videos ...

  11. Anatomy and physiology of chronic scrotal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Abhishek P

    2017-05-01

    This article reviews the anatomy and physiology of the scrotum and its contents as it pertains to chronic scrotal pain. Physiology of chronic pain is reviewed, as well as the pathophysiology involved in the development of chronic pain.

  12. Anatomy and arthrography of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaye, J.K.

    1987-01-01

    The pertinent anatomy of the knee and the use of double-contrast knee arthrography is presented. Various types of meniscal lesions as well as extrameniscal abnormalities such as ligamentous abnormalities, synovial diseases, and abnormalities of articular cartilage are illustrated

  13. Anatomy of a Cancer Treatment Scam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of a Cancer Treatment Scam Anatomy of a Cancer Treatment Scam January 19, 2012 Curious about a product that claims to treat or cure cancer? According to the Federal Trade Commission, consumers should ...

  14. CPR Instruction in a Human Anatomy Class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutton, Lewis M.

    1978-01-01

    Describes how cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) instruction can be included in a college anatomy and physiology course. Equipment and instructors are provided locally by the Red Cross or American Heart Association. (MA)

  15. Cochlear anatomy: CT and MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Manuel; Bruno, Claudio; Martin, Eduardo; Canale, Nancy; De Luca, Laura; Spina, Juan C. h

    2002-01-01

    The authors present a brief overview of the normal cochlear anatomy with CT and MR images in order to allow a more complete identification of the pathological findings in patients with perceptive hipoacusia. (author)

  16. Understanding Colds: Anatomy of the Nose

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Complications Special Features References Common Cold Understanding Colds Anatomy of the Nose The nose contains shelf-like ... in the noses of humans and not in animals except chimpanzees and other higher primates. (4) How ...

  17. Bone Conduction: Anatomy, Physiology, and Communication

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Henry, Paula; Letowski, Tomasz R

    2007-01-01

    .... This report combines results of an extensive literature review of the anatomy and physiology of human hearing, theories behind the mechanisms of bone conduction transmission, devices for use in bone...

  18. Computed tomography of the calcaneus: normal anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heger, L.; Wulff, K.

    1985-01-01

    The normal sectional anatomy of the calcaneus was studied as the background for interpretation of computed tomography (CT) of fractures. Multiplanar CT examination of the normal calcaneus was obtained, and sections were matched with a simplified anatomic model. Sectional anatomy in the four most important planes is described. This facilitates three-dimensional understanding of the calcaneus from sections and interpretation of CT sections obtained in any atypical plane

  19. DESIGNING A CONTEMPORARY ANATOMY MUSEUM: ANATOMISTS’ PERSPECTIVE

    OpenAIRE

    Venkatesh. G. Kamath; Biswabina. Ray; Shakuntala R. Pai; Ramakrishna Avadhani

    2015-01-01

    Background: A research study was conducted in sixteen anatomy museums across India. Aim: The aim of the study is to have an integrated approach while designing a museum. Objective: The objective is to stress on the need to have a holistic approach while designing a museum so that that the museum is well planned and organised and has a huge sectional diversity that spans all aspects related to anatomy. Materials and Methods: All the museums were studied using a planned proforma that...

  20. Medical student participation in surface anatomy classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, R; Brough, H; Ellis, H

    2006-10-01

    Surface anatomy is an integral part of medical education and enables medical students to learn skills for future medical practice. In the past decade, there has been a decline in the teaching of anatomy in the medical curriculum, and this study seeks to assess the attitudes of medical students to participation in surface anatomy classes. Consequently, all first year medical students at the Guy's, King's and St Thomas's Medical School, London, were asked to fill in an anonymous questionnaire at the end of their last surface anatomy session of the year. A total of 290 medical students completed the questionnaires, resulting in an 81.6% response rate. The students had a mean age of 19.6 years (range 18-32) and 104 (35.9%) of them were male. Seventy-six students (26.2%) were subjects in surface anatomy tutorials (60.5% male). Students generally volunteered because no one else did. Of the volunteers, 38.2% would rather not have been subjects, because of embarrassment, inability to make notes, or to see clearly the material being taught. Female medical students from ethnic minority groups were especially reluctant to volunteer to be subjects. Single-sex classes improved the volunteer rate to some extent, but not dramatically. Students appreciate the importance of surface anatomy to cadaveric study and to future clinical practice. Computer models, lectures, and videos are complementary but cannot be a substitute for peer group models, artists' models being the only alternative. Copyright 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Repeated Exposure to Dissection Does Not Influence Students' Attitudes towards Human Body Donation for Anatomy Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwachaka, Philip Maseghe; Mandela, Pamela; Saidi, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    The use of unclaimed bodies for anatomical dissection has been the main method of instruction at our institution. There is however a shortage of cadavers for dissection given the increase in the number of medical schools as well as in the number of students enrolling in these schools. This shortage could be mitigated by having voluntary human body donation programs. This study aimed at assessing the attitudes of medical students and surgical residents towards body donation for anatomy learning. We conducted an online survey involving 72 first-year medical students and 41 surgical residents at University of Nairobi who had completed one year of anatomy dissection. For the medical students, this was their first dissection experience while it was the second exposure for the surgery trainees. Most of the surgical trainees (70.7%) and medical students (68.1%) were opposed to self-body donation. This was mainly due to cultural (37%) and religious (20%) barriers. Surprisingly, of those not willing to donate themselves, 67.9% (82.8% surgical trainees, 59.2% medical students) would recommend the practice to other people. Exposure to repeated dissection does not change the perceptions towards body donation. It is noteworthy that culture and religion rank high as clear barriers amongst this “highly informed” group of potential donors. PMID:27190650

  2. Repeated Exposure to Dissection Does Not Influence Students' Attitudes towards Human Body Donation for Anatomy Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwachaka, Philip Maseghe; Mandela, Pamela; Saidi, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    The use of unclaimed bodies for anatomical dissection has been the main method of instruction at our institution. There is however a shortage of cadavers for dissection given the increase in the number of medical schools as well as in the number of students enrolling in these schools. This shortage could be mitigated by having voluntary human body donation programs. This study aimed at assessing the attitudes of medical students and surgical residents towards body donation for anatomy learning. We conducted an online survey involving 72 first-year medical students and 41 surgical residents at University of Nairobi who had completed one year of anatomy dissection. For the medical students, this was their first dissection experience while it was the second exposure for the surgery trainees. Most of the surgical trainees (70.7%) and medical students (68.1%) were opposed to self-body donation. This was mainly due to cultural (37%) and religious (20%) barriers. Surprisingly, of those not willing to donate themselves, 67.9% (82.8% surgical trainees, 59.2% medical students) would recommend the practice to other people. Exposure to repeated dissection does not change the perceptions towards body donation. It is noteworthy that culture and religion rank high as clear barriers amongst this "highly informed" group of potential donors.

  3. Normal anatomy and variations in the confluence of sinuses using digital subtraction angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yaqin; Li, William A; Fan, Xingjuan; Li, Xiaohua; Chen, Jian; Wu, Yan; Meng, Ran; Ji, Xunming

    2017-06-01

    The configuration of the confluence of sinuses differs not only between individuals, but also between the two brain hemispheres, making the anatomical classification of this region difficult. In this study, we evaluated the anatomy of the confluence of sinuses and ascertained the accuracy and usefulness of digital subtraction angiography (DSA) in the evaluation of cerebral veins. Bilateral carotid and vertebral artery angiographies were performed in 500 adult patients to evaluate the anatomy of the confluence of sinuses and contributory venous sinuses. We appraised the anatomy of the sinuses adjacent to the confluence, the lateralization of venous draining into the transverse sinuses (TSs), the communications between the TSs, and the presentation of the occipital sinus (OS). Based on the anatomical descriptions of Osborn's Brain (Diagnostic Cerebral Angiography, 2nd edition), we delineated 10 different configurations of the confluence of sinuses that showed connections among the superior sagittal sinus, the straight sinus, and the left and right TSs. Right side dominant transverse sinus accounted for 49% of the cases. Direct communication between the TSs accounted for 46.4% of the cases. Indirect communication accounted for 51.6% of the case, and absence of communication between the left and the right TS accounted for 2%. Lastly, the presence of OS was observed in 6% of the cases. DSA promises to be an effective technique for studying the anatomy and normal variations of the confluence of sinuses, providing useful information for the diagnosis of cerebral venous diseases, and ensuring safer surgical procedures.

  4. Micro-surgical endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliyas, S; Vere, J; Ali, Z; Harris, I

    2014-02-01

    Non-surgical endodontic retreatment is the treatment of choice for endodontically treated teeth with recurrent or residual disease in the majority of cases. In some cases, surgical endodontic treatment is indicated. Successful micro-surgical endodontic treatment depends on the accuracy of diagnosis, appropriate case selection, the quality of the surgical skills, and the application of the most appropriate haemostatic agents and biomaterials. This article describes the armamentarium and technical procedures involved in performing micro-surgical endodontics to a high standard.

  5. A preliminary discussion of angiographic anatomy and variations of rabbit hepatic vessels and catheterization methods of hepatic artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Diaodong; Yang Renjie; Zhang Hongzhi; Sun Hongliang

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the normal angiographic anatomy and variations of rabbit hepatic vessels, and explore the optimal method for hepatic artery catheterization. Methods: 30 rabbits were divided into two groups randomly. Modified surgical method and interventional method were used to catheterize hepatic artery respectively, and followed by angiography to demonstrate the normal anatomy and variations of rabbit celiac artery, hepatic artery and portal vein. Results: The route and distribution of rabbit celiac artery and hepatic artery were very different from human's. The commonly seen variation showed the differences in branching bifurcation of hepatic-gastric artery, with the incidence of 13.3%. The rates of successfully hepatic artery catheterization with surgical and interventional methods were 86.6%(13/15) and 80%(12/15) respectively (P>0.05). The surgical method will not be successful, whenever there's variation. Conclusion: The normal anatomy and variation of rabbit celiac artery and hepatic artery are quite different from human's. Both surgical and interventional catheterizations could be rather successful but possessing advantages and disadvantages of each its own. (authors)

  6. Differences between the sexes in the anatomy of the anterior condyle of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehring, Thomas K; Odum, Susan M; Hughes, Josh; Springer, Bryan D; Beaver, Walter B

    2009-10-01

    anterior condylar anatomy is highly variable regardless of sex. We believe that implants as well as surgical techniques should be designed with the variability of anterior condylar anatomy taken into account and with an attempt to reproduce such anatomy regardless of sex.

  7. Molecular Anatomy of Palate Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew S Potter

    Full Text Available The NIH FACEBASE consortium was established in part to create a central resource for craniofacial researchers. One purpose is to provide a molecular anatomy of craniofacial development. To this end we have used a combination of laser capture microdissection and RNA-Seq to define the gene expression programs driving development of the murine palate. We focused on the E14.5 palate, soon after medial fusion of the two palatal shelves. The palate was divided into multiple compartments, including both medial and lateral, as well as oral and nasal, for both the anterior and posterior domains. A total of 25 RNA-Seq datasets were generated. The results provide a comprehensive view of the region specific expression of all transcription factors, growth factors and receptors. Paracrine interactions can be inferred from flanking compartment growth factor/receptor expression patterns. The results are validated primarily through very high concordance with extensive previously published gene expression data for the developing palate. In addition selected immunostain validations were carried out. In conclusion, this report provides an RNA-Seq based atlas of gene expression patterns driving palate development at microanatomic resolution. This FACEBASE resource is designed to promote discovery by the craniofacial research community.

  8. Anatomy Education Environment Measurement Inventory: A Valid Tool to Measure the Anatomy Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadie, Siti Nurma Hanim; Hassan, Asma'; Ismail, Zul Izhar Mohd; Asari, Mohd Asnizam; Khan, Aaijaz Ahmed; Kasim, Fazlina; Yusof, Nurul Aiman Mohd; Manan@Sulong, Husnaida Abdul; Tg Muda, Tg Fatimah Murniwati; Arifin, Wan Nor; Yusoff, Muhamad Saiful Bahri

    2017-01-01

    Students' perceptions of the education environment influence their learning. Ever since the major medical curriculum reform, anatomy education has undergone several changes in terms of its curriculum, teaching modalities, learning resources, and assessment methods. By measuring students' perceptions concerning anatomy education environment,…

  9. The Open Anatomy Browser: A Collaborative Web-Based Viewer for Interoperable Anatomy Atlases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halle, Michael; Demeusy, Valentin; Kikinis, Ron

    2017-01-01

    The Open Anatomy Browser (OABrowser) is an open source, web-based, zero-installation anatomy atlas viewer based on current web browser technologies and evolving anatomy atlas interoperability standards. OABrowser displays three-dimensional anatomical models, image cross-sections of labeled structures and source radiological imaging, and a text-based hierarchy of structures. The viewer includes novel collaborative tools: users can save bookmarks of atlas views for later access and exchange those bookmarks with other users, and dynamic shared views allow groups of users can participate in a collaborative interactive atlas viewing session. We have published several anatomy atlases (an MRI-derived brain atlas and atlases of other parts of the anatomy) to demonstrate OABrowser's functionality. The atlas source data, processing tools, and the source for OABrowser are freely available through GitHub and are distributed under a liberal open source license.

  10. Insertional footprint anatomy of the pectoralis major tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Paul; Owens, Brett D

    2010-01-01

    Correct anatomical repair of pectoralis major tendon injuries requires accurate identification of the humeral insertion site. In the absence of residual fibers at the insertion, proper placement requires knowledge of the anatomic relationships in the proximal humerus. This anatomic study attempts to measure these relationships and the dimensions of the insertional footprint to assist in surgical repair and reconstruction. Six matched pairs of cadaver proximal humeri were examined. All specimens were found to be in good condition and none were excluded. The proximal to distal length and maximum width of the pectoralis major tendon were measured at the humeral insertion with a digital caliper. The distance from the superomedial corner of the greater tuberosity to the superior aspect of the tendon insertion was also measured. The mean proximal to distal dimension of the pectoralis major insertion was 72.3+/-12.3 mm. The mean maximal thickness at the humeral insertion was 1.4+/-.2 mm. The distance from the superomedial corner of the greater tuberosity to the bony tendon insertion was 42.2+/-8.5 mm. The anatomic location of the humeral insertion of the pectoralis major tendon can be located in repair of pectoralis tendon injuries by referencing the superomedial corner of the greater tuberosity and the lateral lip of the bicipital groove. Findings in the present study will improve knowledge of the surgical anatomy relevant to repair and reconstruction of the pectoralis major tendon. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Art and the teaching of pathological anatomy at the University of Florence since the nineteenth century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesi, Gabriella; Santi, Raffaella; Taddei, Gian Luigi

    2009-07-01

    In 1840, the University of Florence was the first university in Italy to confer a Professorship in Pathological Anatomy. The origin of this teaching post is linked to the history of the Pathology Museum founded in 1824 by the Florentine Accademia Medico-Fisica. The Museum houses anatomical specimens and waxworks depicting pathological conditions in the nineteenth century. Both the need to instruct medical students in pathology without resorting to corpse dissection and the difficulty of the lengthy preservation of anatomical preparations made it necessary to produce life-sized wax duplicates of diseased parts of the body. Through the history of the Pathology Museum of Florence, we describe how pathology developed and, in particular, how pathologists from a literary circle laid the foundations of modern surgical pathology in Italy. Museum visits for the medical students guided by lecturers are still today a component of the course of Pathological Anatomy.

  12. Endoscopic anatomy of the approaches to the sellar area and planum sphenoidale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Henrique Faria; Monteiro, Tatiana Alves; Pinheiro Neto, Carlos Diógenes; Mariani, Pedro Paulo; Fortes, Felipe Sartor Guimarães; Sennes, Luiz Ubirajara

    2011-04-01

    The productive work between otolaryngologists and neurosurgeons has resulted in the emergence of endoscopic endonasal skull base surgery. The goal of the present study is to describe the endoscopic anatomy of the endonasal approach to the sellar region and planum sphenoidale, highlighting the key points of the surgical approach and the neurovascular landmarks. Descriptive study of the endoscopic endonasal dissection of 9 fresh cadavers with exposure of the anatomic structures. The endoscopic endonasal ethmoidectomy and sphenoidotomy allows an expanded access to the sellar area and planum sphenoidale. The surface anatomy of the sphenoid sinus is easily identifiable and provides safe landmarks, guiding the intracranial dissection. The endoscopic endonasal approach to the skull base by the ENT and neurosurgeon is feasible, but it requires adequate anatomical knowledge and endoscopic skills for its realization, which can be obtained by practicing in cadavers.

  13. Endoscopic anatomy of the approaches to the sellar area and planum sphenoidale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique Faria Ramos

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The productive work between otolaryngologists and neurosurgeons has resulted in the emergence of endoscopic endonasal skull base surgery. The goal of the present study is to describe the endoscopic anatomy of the endonasal approach to the sellar region and planum sphenoidale, highlighting the key points of the surgical approach and the neurovascular landmarks. METHOD: Descriptive study of the endoscopic endonasal dissection of 9 fresh cadavers with exposure of the anatomic structures. RESULTS: The endoscopic endonasal ethmoidectomy and sphenoidotomy allows an expanded access to the sellar area and planum sphenoidale. The surface anatomy of the sphenoid sinus is easily identifiable and provides safe landmarks, guiding the intracranial dissection. CONCLUSION: The endoscopic endonasal approach to the skull base by the ENT and neurosurgeon is feasible, but it requires adequate anatomical knowledge and endoscopic skills for its realization, which can be obtained by practicing in cadavers.

  14. Surgical handicraft: teaching and learning surgical skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, R W

    1987-05-01

    Surgeons choose their profession with a strong desire to excel at manual therapeutic skills. Although we mime our mentors, we have often received the torch of technique in the absence of a systematic program to optimally develop our manual dexterity. The operating room is the ultimate arena to refine one's technical ability, but a surgical skills laboratory should assume increasing importance in introducing the trainee to the many nuances of the fine manual motor skills necessary for optimal surgical technique. Surgical educators should address the science of surgical handicraft in a manner similar to the science of preoperative and postoperative surgical principles that have been espoused over the past 40 years. Although it has been euphemistically said that "you can teach a monkey to operate," few of us have broken the process down into the basic elements to accomplish such a goal. In view of the increasing complexity of operations and equipment, the constraints on animal laboratories and teaching caseloads, and the mounting economic and medico-legal pressures, the development of optimal surgical skills should be a major objective of every surgical training program. By developing novel programs and scientifically evaluating the results of such endeavors, surgical faculties may find increased academic rewards for being a good teacher.

  15. Constructive, collaborative, contextual, and self-directed learning in surface anatomy education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergman-de Bres, E.M.; Sieben, J.M.; Smailbegovic, I.; Bruin, A. de; Scherpbier, A.J.J.A.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2013-01-01

    Anatomy education often consists of a combination of lectures and laboratory sessions, the latter frequently including surface anatomy. Studying surface anatomy enables students to elaborate on their knowledge of the cadaver's static anatomy by enabling the visualization of structures, especially

  16. Anatomy of the ward round.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Hare, James A

    2008-07-01

    The ward round has been a central activity of hospital life for hundreds of years. It is hardly mentioned in textbooks. The ward round is a parade through the hospital of professionals where most decision making concerning patient care is made. However the traditional format may be intimidating for patients and inadequate for communication. The round provides an opportunity for the multi-disciplinary team to listen to the patient\\'s narrative and jointly interpret his concerns. From this unfolds diagnosis, management plans, prognosis formation and the opportunity to explore social, psychological, rehabilitation and placement issues. Physical examination of the patient at the bedside still remains important. It has been a tradition to discuss the patient at the bedside but sensitive matters especially of uncertainty may better be discussed elsewhere. The senior doctor as round leader must seek the input of nursing whose observations may be under-appreciated due to traditional professional hierarchy. Reductions in the working hours of junior doctors and shortened length of stay have reduced continuity of patient care. This increases the importance of senior staff in ensuring continuity of care and the need for the joint round as the focus of optimal decision making. The traditional round incorporates teaching but patient\\'s right to privacy and their preferences must be respected. The quality and form of the clinical note is underreported but the electronic record is slow to being accepted. The traditional multi-disciplinary round is disappearing in some centres. This may be regrettable. The anatomy and optimal functioning of the ward round deserves scientific scrutiny and experimentation.

  17. Alterations in HbA1c following minimal or enhanced non-surgical, non-antibiotic treatment of gingivitis or mild periodontitis in type 2 diabetic patients: a pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Theresa E; Herriges, Brock; Boyd, Linda D; Laughlin, Gayle; Chiodo, Gary; Rosenstein, David

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to determine and compare the effects of two protocols aimed at reducing periodontal inflammation, upon the metabolic control of the diabetic condition in subjects with elevated baseline glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c). Forty-two non-smoking type 2 diabetes subjects with mildly elevated HbA1c (>7 but 9%) were randomized to one of two non-surgical periodontal therapy protocols. Patients in the "minimal therapy" (MT) group received scaling, root planning, and oral hygiene instructions on two occasions six months apart. Participants randomized to the "frequent therapy" (FT) protocol received scaling, root planing, and oral hygiene instructions at two-month intervals and were provided a 0.12% chlorhexidine rinse for home use twice daily. Neither systemic nor local antibiotics were provided to either group. Subjects were asked to report any changes in diabetic medications, nutrition, and physical activity. Data analyses (ANOVA, t-test, Mann-Whitney) grouped subjects according to baseline HbA1c (>7 and 9%), treatment protocol (minimal or frequent), and +/- medication change. In both MT and FT groups the clinical attachment level (CAL) remained unchanged but the other measures [gingival index (GI) and pocket dept (PD)] of periodontal health improved. Mean reductions in plaque showed improvement but calculus was worse in the FT group, likely due to the use of chlorhexidine. At six months, the largest reduction of HbA1c was 3.7; experienced by a subject receiving FT but no changes in diabetic medication. Among the MT and no medication change subjects, the maximum reduction was 1.6. Overall mean reduction in HbA1c of 27 subjects with baseline HbA1c >9.0 and no medication change was 0.6 with no statistical difference between the MT and FT groups. Among the medication-change subjects with baseline HbA1c >9.0, mean reduction of 1.38 was seen with FT compared to 1.10 with MT. Overall, modest improvements in HbA1c were detected with a trend

  18. Exploring relationships between personality and anatomy performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Gabrielle M; Walker, Simon J; Carter, Madeline; Cox, David R; Hewitson, Ruth; Smith, Claire F

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing recognition in medicine of the importance of noncognitive factors, including personality, for performance, and for good medical practice. The personality domain of conscientiousness is a well-established predictor of performance in workplace and academic settings. This study investigates the relationships between the "Big Five" personality domains, the facets of conscientiousness and performance in a practical anatomy examination. First- and second-year undergraduate medical students (n = 85) completed a paper-based questionnaire, which included a 50-item measure of the Big Five personality domains (neuroticism, extraversion, openness to experience, agreeableness, and conscientiousness) and a 60-item measure of the six conscientiousness facets (orderliness, dutifulness, achievement-striving, self-discipline, self-efficacy, and cautiousness) from the International Personality Item Pool (IPIP). In addition, routinely-collected academic performance scores from the end of semester anatomy practical examinations (spotters) were obtained. Anatomy examination performance correlated moderately with conscientiousness (r = 0.24, P = 0.03). Of the six facets of conscientiousness, a positive relationship was observed between anatomy examination performance and achievement striving (r = 0.22, P = 0.05). In conclusion, this study found that performance in an anatomy examination was related to higher levels of conscientiousness and, more specifically, to higher levels of achievement striving. The results have implications for selection and assessment in medicine. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists.

  19. From cadavers to clinical practice: the anatomy of lifelong learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Alison; Khan, Khurram; Madurska, Marta; Riddell, Alexis; Saldanha, James

    2015-11-01

    Much has been postulated about the perceived deterioration of anatomy knowledge amongst graduates. Little is known about levels of confidence in, and educational needs concerning, clinical anatomy knowledge amongst foundation year doctors. To establish foundation year doctors' perceptions of anatomy related to: importance to career, confidence in anatomy knowledge and its application, preferred methods of teaching. Secondarily, to determine impact of an integrated clinical approach to anatomy teaching on foundation year doctors' level of knowledge and confidence in its clinical application of anatomy. A course teaching anatomy through common surgeries and related radiology was delivered to foundation year doctors. A pre- and post-course assessment based on anatomy competence score assessed holistic knowledge acquisition. Foundation year doctors' perceptions of anatomy and course satisfaction were measured through questionnaire. Confidence in applying anatomy knowledge was low. The average pre- and post-course assessment score increased from 55% to 81%; 92.86% felt an integrated clinical approach to anatomy teaching improved their confidence on the subject and 58.62% felt it improved their clinical skills. This study identified a need for ongoing educational support for foundation year doctors regarding anatomy teaching. An integrated clinical approach to teaching anatomy proved both highly relevant and popular, as well as an effective teaching approach. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Inaccurate preoperative imaging assessment on biliary anatomy not increases biliary complications after living donor liver transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Xiao; Wei Xuyong; Ling Qi; Wang Kai; Bao Haiwei; Xie Haiyang; Zhou Lin; Zheng Shusen

    2012-01-01

    Backgrounds and aims: Accurate assessment of graft bile duct is important to plan surgical procedure. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) has become an important diagnostic procedure in evaluation of pancreaticobiliary ductal abnormalities and has been reported as highly accurate. We aim to estimate the efficacy of preoperative MRCP on depicting biliary anatomy in living donor liver transplantation (LDLT), and to determine whether inaccurate preoperative imaging assessment would increase the biliary complications after LDLT. Methods: The data of 118 cases LDLT were recorded. Information from preoperative MRCP was assessed using intraoperative cholangiography (IOC) as the gold standard. The possible risk factors of recipient biliary complications were analyzed. Results: Of 118 donors, 84 had normal anatomy (type A) and 34 had anatomic variants (19 cases of type B, 9 cases of type C, 1 case of type E, 2 cases of type F and 3 cases of type I) confirmed by IOC. MRCP correctly predicted all 84 normal cases and 17 of 34 variant cases, and showed an accuracy of 85.6% (101/118). The incidence of biliary complications was comparable between cases with accurate and inaccurate classification of biliary tree from MRCP, and between cases with normal and variant anatomy of bile duct. While cases with graft duct opening ≤5 mm showed a significant higher incidence of total biliary complications (21.1% vs. 6.6%, P = 0.028) and biliary stricture (10.5% vs. 1.6%, P = 0.041) compared with cases with large duct opening >5 mm. Conclusion: MRCP could correctly predict normal but not variant biliary anatomy. Inaccurate assessment of biliary anatomy from MRCP not increases the rate of biliary complications, while small-sized graft duct may cause an increase in biliary complications particularly biliary stricture after LDLT.

  1. Abortion - surgical - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000658.htm Abortion - surgical - aftercare To use the sharing features on ... please enable JavaScript. You have had a surgical abortion. This is a procedure that ends pregnancy by ...

  2. Optimizing surgical f

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabry Mohamed Amin

    2016-07-01

    Conclusions: In our study both dexmedetomidine and esmolol were effective in reducing MABP, and lowering the heart rate providing dry surgical field and ensured good surgical condition during cochlear implant surgery in pediatric patients.

  3. American Pediatric Surgical Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Pediatric Surgical Association Search for: Login Resources + For Members For Professionals For Training Program Directors For Media For ... Surgical Outcomes Surveys & Results Publications Continuing Education + ExPERT Pediatric Surgery NaT Annual Meeting CME MOC Requirements Residents / ...

  4. Anatomy and histology of the sacroiliac joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egund, Niels; Jurik, Anne Grethe

    2014-07-01

    The anatomy of joints provides an important basis for understanding the nature and imaging of pathologic lesions and their imaging appearance. This applies especially to the sacroiliac (SI) joints, which play a major role in the diagnosis of spondyloarthritis. They are composed of two different joint portions, a cartilage-covered portion ventrally and a ligamentous portion dorsally, and thus rather complex anatomically. Knowledge of anatomy and the corresponding normal imaging findings are important in the imaging diagnosis of sacroiliitis, especially by MR imaging. A certain distinction between the two joint portions by MR imaging is only obtainable by axial slice orientation. Together with a perpendicular coronal slice orientation, it provides adequate anatomical information and thereby a possibility for detecting the anatomical site of disease-specific characteristics and normal variants simulating disease. This overview describes current knowledge about the normal macroscopic and microscopic anatomy of the SI joints. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  5. Ontology-enriched Visualization of Human Anatomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pouchard, LC

    2005-12-20

    The project focuses on the problem of presenting a human anatomical 3D model associated with other types of human systemic information ranging from physiological to anatomical information while navigating the 3D model. We propose a solution that integrates a visual 3D interface and navigation features with the display of structured information contained in an ontology of anatomy where the structures of the human body are formally and semantically linked. The displayed and annotated anatomy serves as a visual entry point into a patient's anatomy, medical indicators and other information. The ontology of medical information provides labeling to the highlighted anatomical parts in the 3D display. Because of the logical organization and links between anatomical objects found in the ontology and associated 3D model, the analysis of a structure by a physician is greatly enhanced. Navigation within the 3D visualization and between this visualization and objects representing anatomical concepts within the model is also featured.

  6. Rotational profile alterations after anatomic posterolateral corner reconstructions in multiligament injured knees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardy, Nicolas; Mouton, Caroline; Boisrenoult, Philippe; Theisen, Daniel; Beaufils, Philippe; Seil, Romain

    2014-09-01

    Injuries of the posterolateral corner (PLC) are rare and severe knee injuries, resulting in posterolateral rotatory instability and an increase in external rotation. Surgical reconstruction techniques reproducing the normal anatomy showed promising results. In vivo evaluations of static rotational knee laxity at 30° of knee flexion have not been reported so far. The purpose of this study was to evaluate static rotational knee laxity after anatomic PLC reconstructions. This is a retrospective clinical cohort study. Twenty patients with PLC reconstructions with an average follow-up time of 39 ± 22 months and no history of knee trauma or surgery of the contralateral knee were included in the study. They underwent a routine clinical examination and static rotational laxity measurements at 30° of knee flexion in the prone position. Side-to-side differences were recorded and compared to a group of matched controls. The postoperative IKDC score was graded A for 8 patients, B for 16, C for 6 and D for one patient. The primary goal of the surgical procedure which consists in reducing excessive external tibiofemoral rotation could be reached in 18 of the 20 patients (90%). Anatomic PLC reconstructions yielded a comparable rotational profile in operated and healthy knees in 7 patients (35%). Thirteen patients (65%) presented a significantly altered rotational profile in comparison with a healthy control group. Unexpected increases in internal rotation were found in 8 patients (40%). Anatomic PLC reconstructions reduced excessive external tibiofemoral rotation in a vast majority of patients. Static rotational laxity measurements allowed for a determination of the patients' individual rotational profile after PLC reconstructions. This profile was normalised in only one-third of the patients. The understanding of this finding needs further investigation as well as the clinical impact of rotational profile alterations on knee function. Diagnostic studies, Level III.

  7. Systematic Reviews in Surgical Decision Making: Unpacking the Data

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The practice of surgery has always involved a process of trying to understand the pathophysiology of surgical conditions and introducing interventions to alter their course. With time, numerous interventions have become available and contemporary surgical practice warrants that surgeons possess skills in utilizing the best ...

  8. Genesis & the Human Ribcage: An Opportunity to Correct a Misconception & Introduce an Evolution Lesson into the Anatomy Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senter, Phil

    2013-01-01

    Many anatomy students begin the course with a misconception that human males and females do not have the same number of ribs. At the root of that misconception is Genesis 2:21-22, in which God removes a rib from Adam to make Eve. Removal of a body part is a surgical procedure, and one does not pass on the results of surgery to one's offspring. The…

  9. Anatomy of Meckel's cave and the trigeminal ganglion: anatomical landmarks for a safer approach to them.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Mehmet; Deda, Haluk; Avci, Emel; Elhan, Alaittin; Tekdemir, Ibrahim; Tubbs, R Shane; Silav, Gokalp; Yilmaz, Erdal; Baskaya, Mustafa Kemal

    2012-01-01

    Surgical approaches to Meckel's cave (MC) are often technically difficult and sometimes associated with postoperative morbidity. The relationship of surgical landmarks to relevant anatomy is important. Therefore, we attempted to delineate quantitatively their anatomy and the relationships between MC and surrounding structures. With the aid of a surgical microscope, MC and its contents were studied in 15 formalin-fixed cadaver head specimens. Measurements were made and their relationships were observed. The distance from the zygomatic arch and the lateral end of the petrous ridge to MC was 26.5 and 34.4 mm, respectively. The distance from the arcuate eminence, the facial nerve hiatus, and the foramen spinosum to MC was 16.6, 12.8 and 7.46 mm respectively. The TG lay 5.81 mm posterior to the foramen ovale. The distance from the abducens, trochlear and oculomotor nerves to the trigeminal ganglion was 1.87, 5.53 and 6.57 mm respectively. The distance from the posterior and the anterior walls of the sigmoid sinus to the trigeminal porus was 43.6 and 33.1 mm respectively. The trigeminal porus was on average 7.19 mm from the anterior wall of the internal acoustic meatus. The anatomical landmarks as presented herein regarding MC may be used for a safer skull base approach to the region.

  10. The anatomy of free fibula osteoseptocutaneous flap in neophalloplasty in transgender surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaheer, Usman; Granger, Andre; Ortiz, Angelica; Terrell, Mark; Loukas, Marios; Schober, Justine

    2018-03-01

    The Free Fibula Osteoseptocutaneous flap is a reliable option when used in neophalloplastic procedures. It possesses intrinsic rigidity that is sufficient for penetrative intercourse, and satisfactory sensation. We review the pros and cons of this procedure, as well the anatomy and surgical steps involved. Surgical text descriptions were enhanced by the creation of new anatomic illustrations. Anatomy of the donor and recipient sites, as well as the surgical technique leading to creation of the neophallus are demonstrated in detail with new relevant illustrations. The free fibula osteoseptocutaneous flap provides the neophallus with many desirable characteristics. Its thick subcutaneous and fascial layer, along with the thicker fibula (compared to the radius), allows for a neophallus of greater diameter. Skin marking, flap lifting, and transfer to the perineum with all relevant neurovascular anastomosis; fibular artery is anastomosed with the femoral artery, while the fibular veins are anastomosed to branches of the saphenous vein, as well as neurorrhaphy of the dorsal nerves of the clitoris and the LSCN are demonstrated. The osteomatized fibula is fixed to the periosteum of the pubic symphysis as shown. Anatomical traits of the Free Fibula Osteoseptocutaneous flap allow intercourse without prosthesis. The donor-site scar in this procedure can be covered by a long sock, and donor site morbidity is acceptable. Clin. Anat. 31:169-174, 2018. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Constructionist Learning in Anatomy Education: What Anatomy Students Can Learn through Serious Games Development

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Minhua; Bale, Kim; Rea, Paul

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we describe the use of 3D games technology in human\\ud anatomy education based on our MSc in Medical Visualisation and Human\\ud Anatomy teaching practice, i.e. students design and develop serious games for anatomy education using the Unity 3D game engine. Students are engaged in this process not only as consumers of serious games, but as authors and creators. The benefits of this constructionist learning approach are discussed. Five domains of learning are identified, in terms o...

  12. Beyond the traditional approach to teaching anatomy for yoga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner-Shires, Alison Marie

    2015-01-01

    The traditional approach to teaching anatomy for yoga, while systematic, is often ineffective. A unique approach to teaching anatomy for a Yoga Teacher Training seminar is presented, founded on the principles of Thomas Myers' Anatomy Trains. Lab activities are detailed and Bloom's Taxonomy is applied to ensure students are engaged in higher level thinking and application. Going beyond the traditional approach to teaching anatomy for yoga can be extremely rewarding for students and teachers alike.

  13. Beyond the traditional approach to teaching anatomy for yoga

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Marie Gardiner-Shires

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The traditional approach to teaching anatomy for yoga, while systematic, is often ineffective. Methods: A unique approach to teaching anatomy for a Yoga Teacher Training seminar is presented, founded on the principles of Thomas Myers′ Anatomy Trains. Lab activities are detailed and Bloom′s Taxonomy is applied to ensure students are engaged in higher level thinking and application. Conclusion: Going beyond the traditional approach to teaching anatomy for yoga can be extremely rewarding for students and teachers alike.

  14. Porcine Tricuspid Valve Anatomy and Human Compatibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waziri, Farhad; Lyager Nielsen, Sten; Hasenkam, J. Michael

    2016-01-01

    before clinical use. The study aim was to evaluate and compare the tricuspid valve anatomy of porcine and human hearts. METHODS: The anatomy of the tricuspid valve and the surrounding structures that affect the valve during a cardiac cycle were examined in detail in 100 fresh and 19 formalin...... varied greatly (range: 5.2-40.3 mm) and was significantly different in pigs and in humans (12.2 ± 3.2 mm versus 19.2 mm; p animal studies, despite various anatomic differences being noted between porcine...

  15. [Topographic anatomy of the asterion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, F; Laxague, A; Vida, L; Prinzo, H; Sgarbi, N; Soria, V R; Bianchi, C

    2005-10-01

    In the surgical approaches to the posterior fossa, the accurate location of the transverse-sigmoid sinus (TS-SS) complex is of great importance. The asterion is a referral landmark to the transverse sinus location. Twenty-five skulls of adult cadavers were studied. We seek for the relationships of the asterion with: TS location, mastoid emissary vein, suprametal crest and inion. The asterion was found in 49 cases. In the great majority of cases (87.8%) the asterion was over the TS (72.2% over the sinus proper, 27.8% over the TS-SS transition). The mastoid emissary vein was present in 46 cases, and in 36% we found two veins. The burr hole for posterolateral approaches to the posterior fossa must be located below and behind the asterion.

  16. [Evaluation of a face model for surgical education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, G; Voigt, S; Rettinger, G

    2011-09-01

    The complex anatomy of the human face requires a high degree of experience and skills in surgical dressing of facial soft tissue defects. The previous education contains literature studies and supervision during surgery, according to surgical spectrum of the educating hospital. A structured education including a training of different surgical methods on a model and slow increase of complexity could improve considerably the following education related to the patient.During a cooperative project, the 3 di GmbH and the Department of Otolaryngology at the Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena developed a face model for surgical education that allows the training of surgical interventions in the face. The model was used during the 6th and 8th Jena Workshop for Functional and Aesthetic Surgery as well as a workshop for surgical suturation, and tested and evaluated by the attendees.The attendees mostly rated the work-ability of the models and the possibility to practice on a realistic face model with artificial skin very well and beneficial. This model allows a repeatable and structured education of surgical standards, and is very helpful in preparation for operating facial defects of a patient. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. Smectite alteration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, D.M.

    1984-11-01

    This report contains the proceedings of a second workshop in Washington DC December 8-9, 1983 on the alteration of smectites intended for use as buffer materials in the long-term containment of nuclear wastes. It includes extended summaries of all presentations and a transcript of the detailed scientific discussion. The discussions centered on three main questions: What is the prerequisite for and what is the precise mechanism by which smectite clays may be altered to illite. What are likly sources of potassium with respect to the KBS project. Is it likely that the conversion of smectite to illite will be of importance in the 10 5 to the 10 6 year time frame. The workshop was convened to review considerations and conclusions in connection to these questions and also to broaden the discussion to consider the use of smectite clays as buffer materials for similar applications in different geographical and geological settings. SKBF/KBS technical report 83-03 contains the proceedings from the first workshop on these matters that was held at the State University of New York, Buffalo May 26-27, 1982. (Author)

  18. Guidelines for Standard Photography in Gross and Clinical Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barut, Cagatay; Ertilav, Hakan

    2011-01-01

    Photography has a widespread usage in medicine and anatomy. In this review, authors focused on the usage of photography in gross and clinical anatomy. Photography in gross and clinical anatomy is not only essential for accurate documentation of morphological findings but also important in sharing knowledge and experience. Photographs of cadavers…

  19. Vegetative anatomy and taxonomy of Berberidopsis and Streptpthamnus (Flacourtiaceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baas, P.

    1984-01-01

    The leaf and twig anatomy of Berberidopsis and Streptothamnus are described in detail. The two genera are very similar in most aspects of their vegetative anatomy and together take a very isolated position in the Flacourtiaceae on account of their xylem anatomy and stomatal type. Differences in

  20. Spatial Abilities and Anatomy Knowledge Assessment: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlois, Jean; Bellemare, Christian; Toulouse, Josée; Wells, George A.

    2017-01-01

    Anatomy knowledge has been found to include both spatial and non-spatial components. However, no systematic evaluation of studies relating spatial abilities and anatomy knowledge has been undertaken. The objective of this study was to conduct a systematic review of the relationship between spatial abilities test and anatomy knowledge assessment. A…

  1. Learning of Cross-Sectional Anatomy Using Clay Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Chang-Seok; Kim, Ji-Young; Choe, Yeon Hyeon

    2009-01-01

    We incorporated clay modeling into gross anatomy and neuro-anatomy courses to help students understand cross-sectional anatomy. By making clay models, cutting them and comparing cut surfaces to CT and MR images, students learned how cross-sectional two-dimensional images were created from three-dimensional structure of human organs. Most students…

  2. Multidetector computed tomography angiography of the celiac trunk and hepatic arterial system: normal anatomy and main variants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo-Neto, Severino Aires; Mello-Junior, Carlos Fernando de; Franca, Henrique Almeida; Duarte, Claudia Martina Araujo; Borges, Rafael Farias; Magalhaes, Ana Guardiana Ximenes de, E-mail: severinoaires@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil)

    2016-01-15

    Although digital angiography remains as the gold standard for imaging the celiac arterial trunk and hepatic arteries, multidetector computed tomography in association with digital images processing by software resources represents a useful tool particularly attractive for its non invasiveness. Knowledge of normal anatomy as well as of its variations is helpful in images interpretation and to address surgical planning on a case-by-case basis. The present essay illustrates several types of anatomical variations of celiac trunk, hepatic artery and its main branches, by means of digitally reconstructed computed tomography images, correlating their prevalence in the population with surgical implications. (author)

  3. Anatomy of a pressure group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budiansky, S

    Budiansky reports on the past and present activities of environmental activist Jeremy Rifkin and his campaign to restrict genetic engineering research. Rifkin, whose recent suit halted a University of California field test involving genetically altered bacteria, is often able to produce affidavits signed by well-known scientists to support his position. Other researchers are concerned that Rifkin's actions, such as his June 1983 petition calling for a ban on engineering of human germ cells and an accompanying letter signed by prominent clergy, will politicize the issues and hamper sensible regulation.

  4. Acute surgical management of hand burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Winston T; Vergara, Edward; Dalaly, Dawood G; Coady-Fariborzian, Loretta; Mozingo, David W

    2014-10-01

    A hand represents 3% of the total body surface area. The hands are involved in close to 80% of all burns. The potential morbidity associated with hand burns can be substantial. Imagine a patient carrying a pan of flaming cooking oil to the doorway or someone lighting a room-sized pile of leaves and branches doused with gasoline. It is clear how the hands are at risk in these common scenarios. Not all burn injuries will require surgical intervention. Recognizing the need for surgery is paramount to achieving good functional outcomes for the burned hand. The gray area between second- and third-degree burns tests the skill and experience of every burn/hand surgeon. Skin anatomy and the size of injury dictate the surgical technique used to close the burn wound. In addition to meticulous surgical technique, preoperative and postoperative hand therapy for the burned hand is essential for a good functional outcome. Recognizing the burn depth is paramount to developing the appropriate treatment plan for any burn injury. This skill requires experience and practice. In this article, we present an approach to second- and third-degree hand burns. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Surgical therapy of lithiasis in horseshoe kidney].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmero, J L; Amoros, A; Ramírez, M; Pastor, J C; Benedicto, A

    2012-01-01

    To present our centre's experience in the surgical treatment of lithiasis in patients with horseshoe kidney. From October 2007 to March 2011 we treated 10 patients with renal lithiasis in their horseshoe kidneys. Retrospectively, we reviewed the symptoms, medical and surgical history, the characteristics of the stones (size, location, composition) and treatments that were carried out. In all the cases, the study was carried out by CT, with volume reconstruction and with an angiographic study. A percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) or an endoscopic retrograde intrarrenal surgery (RIRS) was carried out, depending on the size and location of the stone. Three percutaneous nephrolithotomies were carried out (2 on staghorn lithiasis stones, 1 pseudocoraliform stone) with a combined rigid and flexible single-access nephroscopy. In one case there was haemorrhage that required treatment by selective embolization. In the rest, RIRS was carried out, all with stones lithiasis in horseshoe kidneys is complex, given their peculiar anatomy. The usual surgical techniques can be reproduced in these cases with good results. We opt for PCNL in complete staghorn stone and pseudocoraiform stones, whereas RIRS is a valid option in cases with stones < 3 cm. Copyright © 2011 AEU. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  6. Cervical chordoma managed with multidisciplinary surgical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahsan, Farhan; Inglis, Tom; Allison, Robert; Inglis, Grahame S

    2011-05-01

    This paper describes the interdisciplinary management of a 62-year-old man who presented with a cervical chordoma of C2/3. This is a rare neoplasm of the axial skeleton which is usually treated surgically. This is technically challenging due to the surrounding anatomy and requirement for wide exposure. A number of surgical approaches have been described to access the clivus and upper cervical spine. This case involved both the Orthopaedic and Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery departments. Trotter's surgical technique was used to gain access for excision of the cervical chordoma and there was collaboration with an Orthopaedic Biotechnology Company in which a bio-model of the spine was created and a corpectomy cage specific to the patient developed. This approach allowed excellent visualisation of the tumour and the unique cage and plate achieved immediate stability and long term fusion. An interdisciplinary approach should be used in the management of upper cervical chordomas to facilitate tumour resection and reduce the potential for recurrence. © 2010 The Authors. ANZ Journal of Surgery © 2010 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  7. An Anatomy Pre-Course Predicts Student Performance in a Professional Veterinary Anatomy Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNulty, Margaret A; Lazarus, Michelle D

    2018-01-18

    Little to no correlation has been identified between previous related undergraduate coursework or outcomes on standardized tests and performance in a veterinary curriculum, including anatomy coursework. Therefore, a relatively simplistic method to predict student performance before entrance would be advantageous to many. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether there is a correlation between performance in a veterinary anatomy pre-course and subsequent performance within a professional anatomy curriculum. Incoming first-year veterinary students at the Louisiana State University School of Veterinary Medicine were asked to participate in a free weeklong pre-course, before the start of the semester. The pre-course covered the musculoskeletal anatomy of the canine thoracic limb using dissection-based methods. Student performance, as evaluated by test grades in the pre-course, did indeed correlate with test grades in professional veterinary anatomy courses. A significant and positive correlation was identified between pre-course final exam performance and performance on examinations in each of 3 professional anatomy courses. Qualitative analyses of student comments pertaining to their experience within the pre-course indicated differences in the perceived benefits of the pre-course between high-, middle-, and low-performing students. These varied perceptions may provide predictive feedback as well as guidance for supporting lower performing students. Together, these results indicate that performance in a weeklong pre-course covering only a small portion of canine anatomy is a strong predictor of performance within a professional anatomy curriculum. In addition, the pre-course differentially affected student perceptions of their learning experience.

  8. Modelling vocal anatomy's significant effect on speech

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, B.

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates the effect of larynx position on the articulatory abilities of a humanlike vocal tract. Previous work has investigated models that were built to resemble the anatomy of existing species or fossil ancestors. This has led to conflicting conclusions about the relation between

  9. Children's Fantasy Literature: Toward an Anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooderham, David

    1995-01-01

    States that finding a critical language in which to speak about children's fantasy texts is not as straightforward as might first appear. Discusses ideas held by T. Todorov and J.R.R. Tolkien. Argues that fantasy is a metaphorical mode, and details an anatomy of children's fantasy. Concludes that children's fantasy can be described as a body of…

  10. Anatomy of a Cancer Treatment Scam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Competition Matters Tech@FTC Comment Policy Contests IoT Home Inspector Challenge Robocalls: Humanity Strikes Back DetectaRobo Zapping ... File Documents in Adjudicative Proceedings You are here Home » News & Events » Audio/Video » Anatomy of a Cancer ...

  11. Comparative leaf anatomy of Heisteria (Olacaceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baas, P.; Kool, R.

    1983-01-01

    The leaf anatomy of all 33 species of Heisteria is described, based on a study of 143 specimens. There is a considerable amount of diversity in stomatal type (anisocytic, anomocytic, cyclocytic, laterocytic or paracytic), in occurrence and type of mesophyll sclereids, and of fibre bundles along the

  12. Comparative leaf anatomy of the Asiatic Myristicaceae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, J.; Baas, P.

    1981-01-01

    The leaf anatomy of c. 60 species of the four Asiatic genera of the Myristicaceae (Gymnacranthera, Horsfieldia, Knema and Myristica) is described in detail. Myristicaceae have characteristic, uniseriate hairs, the cells of which have arms. The number of arms per cell and the relative length of the

  13. Anatomy teaching: Flexnerian model to contextualized vertical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abraham Flexner in 1910 established the fundamental model where the subjects of anatomy, physiology, pharmacology, pathology and bacteriology are mastered before the clinical phase of medical training (1). He was clear that this mastery was best achieved by active student learning in the laboratory guided by clinical.

  14. Fostering Improved Anatomy and Physiology Instructor Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattheis, Allison; Jensen, Murray

    2014-01-01

    Despite widespread calls for reform in undergraduate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education, effecting lasting change in instructor practice is challenging to achieve. This article describes the results of a 2-yr research study that involved efforts to develop the pedagogical expertise of a group of anatomy and physiology…

  15. A Syllabus for Biol 242--Human Anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Willis H.

    This document is the fall and spring semester course syllabus of Biology 242--Human Anatomy at Southern University (Louisiana). Sections include: (1) Descriptive Information; (2) Specification of Course Goals and Objectives; (3) Readings; (4) Description of Instructional Procedures; (5) Course Requirements; (6) Course Schedule; (7) Evaluation of…

  16. Anatomy, Medical Education, and Human Ancestral Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strkalj, Goran; Spocter, Muhammad A.; Wilkinson, A. Tracey

    2011-01-01

    It is argued in this article that the human body both in health and disease cannot be fully understood without adequately accounting for the different levels of human variation. The article focuses on variation due to ancestry, arguing that the inclusion of information pertaining to ancestry in human anatomy teaching materials and courses should…

  17. Testing to Enhance Retention in Human Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Jessica M.; Thompson, Andrew J.; Marshak, David W.

    2011-01-01

    Recent work in cognitive psychology has shown that repeatedly testing one's knowledge is a powerful learning aid and provides substantial benefits for retention of the material. To apply this in a human anatomy course for medical students, 39 fill-in-the-blank quizzes of about 50 questions each, one for each region of the body, and four about the…

  18. Wood anatomy of the Blakeeae (Melastomataceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koek-Noorman, J.; Hogeweg, P.; Maanen, van W.H.M.; Welle, ter B.J.H.

    1979-01-01

    The present paper deals with the wood anatomy of the Blakeeae (Melastomataceae). Generic descriptions of the secondary xylem of Blakea, Topobea, and Huilaea are given and compared with data on 16 genera of the Miconieae. Numerical pattern detection was undertaken. The results confirm our preliminary

  19. Systematic wood anatomy of the Rosaceae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Shu-Yin

    1992-01-01

    The wood anatomy of the Rosaceae is surveyed and analysed, based on the study of 280 species (c. 500 specimens) belonging to 62 genera from different parts of the world. Eighteen wood anatomical characters have been used for a phenetic and phylogenetic classification. In the phenetic classification,

  20. Ecological anatomy of some hydrophytes in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-07-20

    Jul 20, 2009 ... Ecological anatomy of some hydrophytes in Nigeria. Adeniyi A. Jayeola1* and Ezekiel A. Folorunso2. 1Department of Botany and Microbiology, University of Ibadan, Nigeria. 2Department of Botany, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile Ife, Nigeria. Accepted 23 January, 2009. Structural features were studied in ...

  1. Journal of Experimental and Clinical Anatomy: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect Of Variations In The Material Dietary Fatty Acid Composition On The Neurodevelopment Of Rat Pups. Journal of Applied Sciences 2: 1002 _1010. Textbooks: More L (1992). Clinical Oriented Anatomy. Third Edition. Williams and Wilkins, Baltimore. 917pp. Chapter in Books: Bank M (1999). Stroke And Subarachnoid ...

  2. Anatomy of a Cancer Treatment Scam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... at the FTC Apply to the FTC Testimonials News & Events Press Releases Commission Actions Media Resources Consumer ... Documents in Adjudicative Proceedings You are here Home » News & Events » Audio/Video » Anatomy of a Cancer Treatment ...

  3. Anatomy and physiology of genital organs - women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziottin, Alessandra; Gambini, Dania

    2015-01-01

    "Anatomy is destiny": Sigmund Freud viewed human anatomy as a necessary, although not a sufficient, condition for understanding the complexity of human sexual function with a solid biologic basis. The aim of the chapter is to describe women's genital anatomy and physiology, focusing on women's sexual function with a clinically oriented vision. Key points include: embryology, stressing that the "female" is the anatomic "default" program, differentiated into "male" only in the presence of androgens at physiologic levels for the gestational age; sex determination and sex differentiation, describing the interplay between anatomic and endocrine factors; the "clitoral-urethral-vaginal" complex, the most recent anatomy reading of the corpora cavernosa pattern in women; the controversial G spot; the role of the pelvic floor muscles in modulating vaginal receptivity and intercourse feelings, with hyperactivity leading to introital dyspareunia and contributing to provoked vestibulodynia and recurrent postcoital cystitis, whilst lesions during delivery reduce vaginal sensations, genital arousability, and orgasm; innervation, vessels, bones, ligaments; and the physiology of women's sexual response. Attention to physiologic aging focuses on "low-grade inflammation," genital and systemic, with its impact on women sexual function, especially after the menopause, if the woman does not or cannot use hormone replacement therapy. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Mandatory anatomy dissection, effect on examination performance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Regular class attendance is evidence of professionalism. This has led to mandatory class attendance in many disciplines including anatomy. However, there is paucity of data on the effect of mandatory class attendance on student performance in resource-limited settings. The objective of this study was to determine the ...

  5. Neuromodulators: available agents, physiology, and anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettar, Kartik; Maas, Corey

    2011-12-01

    Neuromodulators have risen to the forefront of aesthetic medicine. By reversibly relaxing target muscles, neuromodulators exhibit their effect by softening hyperfunctional lines. An understanding of their physiology, relevant facial anatomy, and current agents is imperative for a successful aesthetic practice. © Thieme Medical Publishers.

  6. Anatomy and Physiology of the Small Bowel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volk, Neil; Lacy, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Comprehension of small intestine physiology and function provides a framework for the understanding of several important disease pathways of the gastrointestinal system. This article reviews the development, anatomy and histology of the small bowel in addition to physiology and digestion of key nutrients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Thoracic radiographic anatomy in goats | Makungu | Tanzania ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . The aorta was not clearly visible on lateral views. The mean ratio of the CVC diameter to the height of the fourth thoracic vertebral body (T4) was 1.08 ± 0.07. Speciesspecific differences exist in the normal radiographic anatomy of the thorax.

  8. Augmented and virtual reality in surgery—the digital surgical environment: applications, limitations and legal pitfalls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Benjamin; Amin, Kavit; Chan, Adrian; Patel, Ketan; Wong, Jason

    2016-01-01

    The continuing enhancement of the surgical environment in the digital age has led to a number of innovations being highlighted as potential disruptive technologies in the surgical workplace. Augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) are rapidly becoming increasingly available, accessible and importantly affordable, hence their application into healthcare to enhance the medical use of data is certain. Whether it relates to anatomy, intraoperative surgery, or post-operative rehabilitation, applications are already being investigated for their role in the surgeons armamentarium. Here we provide an introduction to the technology and the potential areas of development in the surgical arena. PMID:28090510

  9. Augmented and virtual reality in surgery-the digital surgical environment: applications, limitations and legal pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khor, Wee Sim; Baker, Benjamin; Amin, Kavit; Chan, Adrian; Patel, Ketan; Wong, Jason

    2016-12-01

    The continuing enhancement of the surgical environment in the digital age has led to a number of innovations being highlighted as potential disruptive technologies in the surgical workplace. Augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) are rapidly becoming increasingly available, accessible and importantly affordable, hence their application into healthcare to enhance the medical use of data is certain. Whether it relates to anatomy, intraoperative surgery, or post-operative rehabilitation, applications are already being investigated for their role in the surgeons armamentarium. Here we provide an introduction to the technology and the potential areas of development in the surgical arena.

  10. Management of a Type III dens invaginatus using a combination surgical and non-surgical endodontic therapy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Mithra N; Shetty, Aditya; Sagar, Rekha

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this report is to present a case of Type III dens invaginatus in a maxillary lateral incisor with a periapical lesion and its successful treatment using a combination of surgical and non-surgical therapy. The morphology of the root canal system is unique for individual teeth. A precise understanding of the morphology is very important for a successful root canal treatment. Dens invaginatus is a rare dental anomaly that can give rise to many complex anatomical forms. The complete removal of the diseased pulp tissue can be a challenge for clinicians due to the complexity of internal canal anatomy and may require either non-surgical endodontic therapy alone or that therapy may have to be combined with surgical endodontics to achieve an adequate sealing of the root canal system. A 22-year-old male presented for evaluation of a recurrent painless sinus tract in the attached gingiva adjacent to the maxillary right lateral incisor. The tooth responded negatively to vitality tests while the right central incisor responded normally. Clinically an anatomical malformation in the crown was detected in the form of an abnormal bulbous contour of the tooth in the palatal region above the cingulum. Radiograph evaluation confirmed the presence of dens invaginatus and a periapical radiolucent lesion. The patient received combined non-surgical and surgical endodontic therapy to achieve a favorable outcome. Complications presented by Type III dens invaginatus and acute periapical abscess necessitated the use of combined non-surgical and surgical endodontic therapy to attain a favorable seal of the root canal. The prognosis at a six-month post-treatment evaluation appeared to be good. Dens invaginatus requires an early diagnosis and treatment. It may result in radicular and periapical pathosis requiring a combined non-surgical and surgical endodontic approach to treatment.

  11. [The dorsal nerve of the clitoris: surgical applications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaya, V; Aubin, A; Rogez, J-M; Douard, R; Delmas, V

    2014-03-01

    To describe the course of the dorsal nerve of the clitoris (DNC) to better define its anatomy in the human adult and to help surgeons to avoid iatrogenic injury during surgical procedures. An extensive review of the current literature was done on Medline via PubMed by using the following keywords: "anatomie du clitoris", "anatomy of clitoris", "nerf dorsal du clitoris", "dorsal nerve of clitoris", "réparation clitoridienne", "transposition clitoridienne", "surgery of the clitoris", "clitoridoplasty". This review analyzed dissection, magnetic resonance imaging, 3-dimensional sectional anatomy reconstruction and immuno-histochemical studies. The DNC comes from the pudendal nerve. He travels from under the inferior pubis ramus to the posterosuperior edge of the clitoral crus. The DNC reappears under the pubic symphysis and enters the deep component of the suspensory ligament. He runs on the dorsal face of the clitoral body at 11 and 1 o'clock. Distally, he gives many nervous ramifications, runs along the tunica and enters the glans. The NDC might be surgically injured (i) under the pubic symphysis, at the union of the two crus of clitoris and (ii) on the dorsal surface of the clitoral body. The pathway of the DNC on the dorsal face of the clitoris permits to approach the ventral face of the clitoris without risk of iatrogenic injuries. The distance between the pubic symphysis and the DNC implies that the incision should be done just under the pubic symphysis. Distally, the dissection of the DNC next the glands appears as dangerous and impossible, considering that the DNC is too close to the glandular tissues. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. [Clinical research progress of direct surgical repair of lumbar spondylolysis in young patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haichao; Qian, Jixian

    2013-01-01

    To review and summarize the surgical techniques and their outcomes for the treatment of lumbar spondylolysis in young patients by direct surgical repair. Both home and abroad literature on the surgical techniques and their outcomes respectively for the treatment of lumbar spondylolysis in young patients by direct surgical repair was reviewed extensively and summarized. Direct surgical repair of lumbar spondylolysis can offer a simple reduction and fixation for the injured vertebra, which is also in accord with normal anatomy and physiology. In this way, normal anatomy of vertebra can be sustained. As reported surgical techniques of direct repair, such as single lag screw, hook screw, cerclage wire, pedicle screw cable, pedicle screw rod, and pedicle screw hook system, they all can provide acceptable results for lumbar spondylolysis in young patients. Furthermore, to comply strictly with the inclusion criteria of surgical management and select the appropriate internal fixation can also contribute to a good effectiveness. Within the various methods of internal fixation, pedicle screw hook system has been widely recognized. Pedicle screw hook system fixation is simple and safe clinically. With the gradual improvement of this method and the development of minimally invasive technologies, it will have broad application prospects.

  13. Relation between lower extremity alignment and proximal femur anatomy. Parameters during total hip arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollivier, M; Parratte, S; Lecoz, L; Flecher, X; Argenson, J-N

    2013-09-01

    Lower extremity alignment correlates with native femoral offset. Eventual impact of the change in femoral offset induced by total hip arthroplasty (THA) on lower extremity alignment has not been documented. THA significantly changes lower extremity alignment, and the change correlates with the change in femoral offset. We conducted a prospective study of 200 patients with primary hip osteoarthritis or avascular femoral head necrosis who underwent cementless THA. Pre-operative computed-tomography templating was performed and the femoral component was then custom-manufactured to replicate the native femoral anatomy. Mean age was 58 years (range, 28-83 years). Before and at least two years after THA, two observers who were not involved in the surgical procedures used standing antero-posterior long-leg radiographs to determine the mechanical axis of the lower-limb (hip-knee-ankle [HKA] angle), femoral offset, neck-shaft angle (NSA), and lower-limb length discrepancy (LLLD). Mean values pre-operatively and at last follow-up were as follows: HKA angle, 179.2° ± 3.9° (range, 170.5° to 190.5°) and 177.7° ± 3.5°(range, 173° to 187°); LLLD, -0.7 mm (range, -30 mm to +25 mm) and +5.1 mm (range, -7 mm to +21 mm); NSA, 134° ± 7.5° (range, 100° to 124°) and 135° ± 4.2° (range, 124° to 146°); and femoral offset, 42 ± 7.8 mm (range, 24 mm to 68 mm) and 49 ± 7.5 mm (range, 33 mm to 70 mm). Although THA significantly altered lower-limb alignment, univariate and multivariate analyses showed no significant association between the change in HKA angle and the change in femoral offset. Lower-limb alignment was significantly affected by THA, although the HKA angle changes were small. The small impact of THA on HKA angle values may be ascribable to efforts aimed at replicating the native femoral offset during arthroplasty, as well as to the limited sample size and to potential measurement errors related to the small size of the changes. Our results suggest that

  14. Surgical resident perspective on deceased donor organ procurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osband, Adena J; Laskow, David A

    2015-06-01

    Deceased donor organ procurement provides unparalleled opportunity for surgical residents with extensive surgical exposure. We hypothesize that surgical residents regard organ donation positively and organ procurement enhances their education. We conducted an institutional review board approved anonymous national survey to evaluate organ procurement experiences and attitudes of general surgical residents. Three hundred ninety-seven residents representing all postgraduate years responded, with 97% completion rate. Organ procurement increased with training level (92% seniors vs. 53% interns). Over 85% agree organ procurement is a good educational and operative experience, and 73% believe that it will benefit their future surgical career. About 68% agree that organ procurement provided knowledge of anatomy and exposures; under 10% felt organ procurement could be duplicated with simulation. Presence of transplant program did not affect attitudes or experience. Eighty-eight percent women versus77% men plan to donate their own organs. Results indicate that surgical residents value organ procurement, and it remains an essential encounter that applies to general surgery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The history of anatomy in Persia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoja, Mohammadali M; Tubbs, R Shane

    2007-01-01

    The study of human anatomy can be found throughout the rich history of Persia. For thousands of years, morphological descriptions derived from this part of the world have contributed to and have helped form our current anatomical knowledge base. In this article we review the major influential Persian periods and the individuals who have contributed to the development of anatomy. We have divided the history of Persia into five eras: (1) the period of the Elamites, Medes, early Persians and Babylonians (10th millennium to 6th century BC); (2) following the establishment of the Persian Empire (6th century BC) to the 7th century AD; (3) after the Islamic conquest of Persia to the ascendency of Baghdad (7th to 13th century AD); (4) from the Mongol invasion of Persia to the foundations of modern anatomy (13th to 18th century AD); and (5) modern Persia/Iran (18th century AD to present). Evidence indicates that human dissection was commonplace in the first era, which led to a disciplined practice of surgery in the centuries leading to the foundation of the Persian Empire. By the emergence of Zoroastrianism in the Persian Empire, the microcosm theory was widely used to understand internal anatomy in relation to the external universe. The world's first cosmopolitan university and hospital were built in Gondishapur, south-western Persia, in the third century AD. Greek and Syriac knowledge influenced the second era. With the gradual ruin of Gondishapur and the foundation of Baghdad following the Islamic conquest of Persia (637–651 AD), a great movement took place, which led to the flourishing of the so-called Middle Age or Islamic Golden Age. Of the influential anatomists of this period, Mesue (777–857 AD), Tabbari (838–870 AD), Rhazes (865–925 AD), Joveini (?−983 AD), Ali ibn Abbas (930–994 AD), Avicenna (980–1037 AD) and Jorjani (1042–1137 AD) all hailed from Persia. There is evidence in the Persian literature as to the direct involvement of these scholars in

  16. The history of anatomy in Persia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoja, Mohammadali M; Tubbs, R Shane

    2007-04-01

    The study of human anatomy can be found throughout the rich history of Persia. For thousands of years, morphological descriptions derived from this part of the world have contributed to and have helped form our current anatomical knowledge base. In this article we review the major influential Persian periods and the individuals who have contributed to the development of anatomy. We have divided the history of Persia into five eras: (1) the period of the Elamites, Medes, early Persians and Babylonians (10th millennium to 6th century BC); (2) following the establishment of the Persian Empire (6th century BC) to the 7th century AD; (3) after the Islamic conquest of Persia to the ascendency of Baghdad (7th to 13th century AD); (4) from the Mongol invasion of Persia to the foundations of modern anatomy (13th to 18th century AD); and (5) modern Persia/Iran (18th century AD to present). Evidence indicates that human dissection was commonplace in the first era, which led to a disciplined practice of surgery in the centuries leading to the foundation of the Persian Empire. By the emergence of Zoroastrianism in the Persian Empire, the microcosm theory was widely used to understand internal anatomy in relation to the external universe. The world's first cosmopolitan university and hospital were built in Gondishapur, south-western Persia, in the third century AD. Greek and Syriac knowledge influenced the second era. With the gradual ruin of Gondishapur and the foundation of Baghdad following the Islamic conquest of Persia (637-651 AD), a great movement took place, which led to the flourishing of the so-called Middle Age or Islamic Golden Age. Of the influential anatomists of this period, Mesue (777-857 AD), Tabbari (838-870 AD), Rhazes (865-925 AD), Joveini (?-983 AD), Ali ibn Abbas (930-994 AD), Avicenna (980-1037 AD) and Jorjani (1042-1137 AD) all hailed from Persia. There is evidence in the Persian literature as to the direct involvement of these scholars in human

  17. Anatomy and variations of palmaris longus in fetuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albay, S; Kastamoni, Yadigar; Sakalli, Büşra; Tunali, S

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the absence of the palmaris longus, the proportion of the lengths of tendon and muscle belly, the development of the tendon and the belly during the fetal period, look for any difference between sides and gender. Fifty-eight spontaneously aborted human fetuses (26 female, 32 male, 116 upper extremities) were studied. The presence or absence of the palmaris longus was determined. The lengths of the belly and tendon were measured, and belly/tendon length ratio was calculated. Correlation with gestational age, body side and gender were studied. The muscle was absent in 44 forearms (37.93%; 20 right side, 34.48%; 24 left side, 41.38%); being bilateral in 19 of 58 fetuses (32.76%) and unilateral in six (10.34%). The unilateral absence rate was higher on the left side with a statistically significant difference. The absence of palmaris longus was more common in females, and the difference was statistically significant. The belly/tendon length ratio was 1.04 ± 0.35 on the right side and 1.09 ± 0.3 on the left. It did not show any difference according the fetal age. A sound knowledge on the anatomy and variations of palmaris longus is of great importance during surgical interventions; because it is the first choice for tendon grafts, by the virtue of its structure and function. Thus, this study is of academic interest for anatomists and hand surgeons alike.

  18. [Anatomy and embriology of double outlet right ventricle (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelini, P; Leachman, R D

    1978-01-01

    After formulating the definition of double outlet right ventricle (DORV) as the persistence origin of the trunco-conal structures from the right ventricle, 64 autopsy cases meeting this definition were reviewed. A wide spectrum of anatomic variations of DORV were found. A classification is proposed based upon the type of relationship between the great vessels and upon the presence and type of ventricular septal defect. Twenty-five cases had normally crossed great arteries (13 of which had pulmonic stenosis), nine cases had transposed vessels and 23 cases had a double muscular conus and a side-by-side arrangement of the great vessels in the frontal view, a relationship called "partial distortion" or atypical transposition. Seven cases had absent trunco-conal septum (common truncus). Only one case had intact ventricular septum. Anterior ventricular septal defect was found only in cases with partial distortion or common truncus. Angiographic and surgical correlations are presented. Because of their great heterogeneity, the need for detailed description of the anatomy of the individual case of DORV is emphasized.

  19. Posterior cruciate ligament's tibial insertions: topographic anatomy and morphometric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Cesar Gali

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To provide anatomical and morphometric basis of the posterior cruciate ligament's tibial insertions in order to assist the creation of anatomical tibial tunnels, in the ligament surgical reconstruction. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The topographic anatomy and morphometry of the posterior cruciate ligament's anterolateral and posteromedial bundles' tibial insertions were analyzed in 24 anatomical knee pieces. The pieces were photographed by a digital camera and the images obtained were studied by the software ImageJ, where the bundles' insertion areas were measured in square millimeters, and the length of structures and the distances between significant points were measured in millimeters. RESULTS: In 54.2% of the knees the insertion' shape was concave; in most pieces (41.6% the form of insertion was oval. The average posterior cruciate ligament's tibial insertion total area was 88.33 ± 21.66 mm2; the average anterolateral bundle's tibial insertion area was 46.79 ± 14.10 mm2 and it was 41.54 ± 9.75 mm2 for the posteromedial bundle. CONCLUSIONS: The anterolateral bundle has a tibial insertion area larger than the posteromedial bundle; the insertion areas of those bundles in our study, were smaller than the ones found in the literature. The variations in the posterior cruciate ligament's tibial insertion area suggest that there should be an indication for anatomical reconstructions of this ligament using single or double tibial tunnels according to individual characteristics.

  20. [New pedagogic methods in anatomy: experience at Cambridge University].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluchova, D

    2000-01-01

    The expansion of knowledge in basic medical sciences is not linked to the time assigned for the teaching of anatomy to medical undergraduates. The question of "basic knowledge" in teaching anatomy during medical training arises as a need for education of future clinical doctors. Nowadays, two extreme views in teaching anatomy can be recognized: one adopted some pure anatomists who feel their existence threatened even by the idea of any reduction in their field, and one by some morphologists exclusively interested in cellular biology, who consider that classical anatomy is of no interest, since it has been exhausted as a field for research. An intermediate position is taken by some clinicians, who maintain that anatomy is indispensable but seek a severe reduction in the content to what they consider to be necessary. The above mentioned need for clinicians was reflected in recommendations of Education Committee of the General Medical Council (GMC) which in short, could be characterized by: the substantial reduction of factual information, the increase of student learning and the emphasis of clinically applied anatomy with its integration to the general medical education. GMC delegated the Department of Anatomy at the University of Cambridge by the developing of the new anatomy course. This new course was for the first time introduced in school year 1998-1999. In this study are presented ways and methods of undergraduate anatomy teaching at the University of Cambridge. These educational principles could serve as a model for teaching anatomy during its transformation in other medical faculties.

  1. Designing anatomy program in modern medical curriculum: matter of balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grković, Ivica; Marinović Guić, Maja; Kosta, Vana; Poljicanin, Ana; Carić, Ana; Vilović, Katarina

    2009-02-01

    To evaluate the structure of the anatomy program in the first year medical curriculum of University of Split School of Medicine by comparing it with the recommendations by the Educational Affairs Committee of the American Association of Clinical Anatomists (AACA) and the Terminologia Anatomica (TA); we also quantitatively evaluated the organization of teaching material in contemporary topographical anatomy textbooks and matched them with the AACA recommendations, TA, and the curriculum of the anatomy course taught at Medical School in Split, Croatia. TA, official recommendations of the AACA, 6 contemporary anatomy textbooks, and the structure of the anatomy course were analyzed for the proportion of the terms or text devoted to standard topographical regions of the body. The findings were correlated using Spearman rho test. The curriculum outline correlated both with the AACA recommendations (Spearman rho=0.83, P=0.015) and TA (Spearman rho=0.73, P=0.046). Textbooks contained 8 distinct sections, 7 allocated to topographic anatomy regions and 1 to general anatomy concepts and principles. The structure of all textbooks correlated significantly with the course curriculum. However, 4 out of 6 textbooks did not correlate with TA and only a single textbook showed significant correlation with the AACA recommendations. Anatomy textbooks vary in the amount of text dedicated to different parts of topographical anatomy and are not quite concordant with curriculum recommendations and standard anatomical terminology. Planning the structure of an anatomy course should not be based on a single book or recommendation but on evidence.

  2. Estudo anatômico da cóclea para confecção de instrumental para a cirurgia de implante coclear com 2 feixes de eletrodos em cócleas ossificadas Cochlear anatomy study used to design surgical instruments for cochlear implants with two bundles of electrodes in ossified cochleas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Bogar

    2008-04-01

    distances between cochleostomies and ICA in cadaver temporal bones. 2 Design an instrument that can be used in cochlear implant surgery to introduce an implant with two bundles of electrodes. STUDY DESIGN: Experimental prospective. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In 21 temporal bones from cadavers we performed: 1 canal wall down mastoidectomy; 2 cochleostomy in the cochlear basal and middle turns; 3 ICA identification; 4 Length determination between the cochleostomies and the artery. RESULTS: the average distance ± standard deviation obtained for the upper tunnel was of 8.2 ± 1.1 mm and for the lower tunnel it was of 8.1± 1.3 mm. The shortest distance found was of 6.5 mm for the upper tunnel and 6.0 mm for the lower tunnel. CONCLUSION: Despite the values calculated, we concluded that the best value to be considered in creating a surgical instrument are the minimum lengths obtained for each one of the cochlear turns, because this is the safest way to avoid damaging the ICA, that can be fatal.

  3. Deriving DICOM surgical extensions from surgical workflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgert, O.; Neumuth, T.; Gessat, M.; Jacobs, S.; Lemke, H. U.

    2007-03-01

    The generation, storage, transfer, and representation of image data in radiology are standardized by DICOM. To cover the needs of image guided surgery or computer assisted surgery in general one needs to handle patient information besides image data. A large number of objects must be defined in DICOM to address the needs of surgery. We propose an analysis process based on Surgical Workflows that helps to identify these objects together with use cases and requirements motivating for their specification. As the first result we confirmed the need for the specification of representation and transfer of geometric models. The analysis of Surgical Workflows has shown that geometric models are widely used to represent planned procedure steps, surgical tools, anatomical structures, or prosthesis in the context of surgical planning, image guided surgery, augmented reality, and simulation. By now, the models are stored and transferred in several file formats bare of contextual information. The standardization of data types including contextual information and specifications for handling of geometric models allows a broader usage of such models. This paper explains the specification process leading to Geometry Mesh Service Object Pair classes. This process can be a template for the definition of further DICOM classes.

  4. Cochlear implantation in Pendred syndrome and non-syndromic enlarged vestibular aqueduct – clinical challenges, surgical results, and complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mey, Kristianna; Bille, Michael; Cayé-Thomasen, Per

    2016-01-01

    or on populations with mixed cochlear malformations. PS/NSEVA accounts for up to 10% of congenital SNHL, rendering this a large group of cochlear implant candidates. The abnormal inner ear anatomy of these patients may be associated with a lower surgical success rate and a higher rate of complications. STUDY DESIGN...

  5. The anatomical substrate for a difference in surgical approach to rectal cancer in male and female patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschueren, RCJ; Mulder, NH; VanLoon, AJ; DeRuiter, AJ; Szabo, BG

    1997-01-01

    This review emphasizes gender related anatomical differences warranting a difference in surgical approach to the problem of rectal cancer in men and women. Differences in the anatomy of the bony pelvis, the pelvic viscera and the lymphatics of the rectum, inspired the authors to extend the margins

  6. Acetabular reduction osteotomy using surgical dislocation of the hip joint for treatment of a malunited acetabular fracture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haverkamp, D.; Luitse, J. S. K.; Eijer, H.

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Acetabular fractures remain a challenge for the orthopedic and trauma surgeon, with frequently poor outcome in terms of pain and lack of motion and high rate of posttraumatic arthritis especially in badly reconstructed fractures where the anatomy was not restored. Surgical treatment of

  7. Pocket atlas of MRI body anatomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berquist, T.H.; Ehman, R.L.; May, G.R.

    1987-01-01

    This book is a guide to the anatomy of extracranial organs as seen in magnetic resonance images. This collection of 96 magnetic resonance images, accompanied by explanatory line drawings, covers all the major organs of the body- shoulder and humerus; elbow and forearm; hand and wrist; chest; abdomen; pelvis; thigh; knee; calf; and ankle. The images are displayed in the axial, coronal, and sagittal planes, enabling radiologists to quickly review coronal and sagittal anatomy as it applies to routine MRI practice. Special emphasis is placed on the extremities, where spatial resolution, coronal and sagittal planes, and soft tissue contrast provide important anatomic detail. Each MRI image is carefully labeled - using numbers with legends at the top of the page - to highlight key anatomic features. Where applicable, special parameters and positioning are noted below the images. Accompanying each image is a line drawing demonstrating the level and plane of the image.

  8. Leaf anatomy of a late Palaeozoic cycad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Yong; Guo, Yun; Wei, Hai-Bo

    2017-01-01

    Today, cycads are a small group of gymnospermous plants with a limited distribution in the (sub)tropics, but they were major constituents of Mesozoic floras. Fossil leaves sporadically found in latest Carboniferous and Permian floras have putatively been ascribed to cycads. However, their true affinity remains unclear due to the lack of anatomical evidence. Virtually all modern cycads have pinnate leaves, but this type of leaf morphology is by no means unique for cycads. Pinnate leaves of Plagiozamites oblongifolius Halle 1927 with well-preserved cuticles showing the epidermal anatomy are here described from the upper Permian Xuanwei Formation of Yunnan Province, Southwest China. The cuticles show a clear differentiation into costal and intercostal zones; stomata are confined to the intercostal zones on both the upper and lower leaf surfaces. The external morphology and the epidermal anatomy of these fossil leaves are closely comparable with those of extant cycads, particularly members of the family Zamiaceae. PMID:29093177

  9. [Surgery and anatomy in the Renaissance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-y Huesca, Andrés; Ramírez-Bollas, Julio; Ponce-Landín, Francisco Javier; Moreno-Rojas, Juan Carlos; Soto-Miranda, Miguel Angel

    2005-01-01

    The interest in the physical perfection and the corporal forms brings as a result the creation of new anatomical studies. The anatomical knowledge progressed in the second half of the XV century, conceiving the knowledge of the human body as a basic reality of Medicine. One of the greater contributions of the Italian Universities to medicine was the teaching of anatomy. The Universities of Padua, Bologna, and Pisa educated in their classrooms great physicians like Andres Vesalio, Gabriel Fallopio, Realdo Colombo, Mondino de Luzzi, Julio Ceasar Aranzio, and Gaspare Tagliacozzi, among others. The teaching of anatomy during the Renaissance was characterized by the development of dissection techniques and autopsy practice, which was recognized as an extremely valuable skill for anatomical study. The dissections were made in circular amphitheatres in the following way: a Medicine professor read the text book, another one made the dissection, and a third one indicated the structures referred.

  10. Leaf anatomy of a late Palaeozoic cycad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhuo; Lv, Yong; Guo, Yun; Wei, Hai-Bo; Kerp, Hans

    2017-11-01

    Today, cycads are a small group of gymnospermous plants with a limited distribution in the (sub)tropics, but they were major constituents of Mesozoic floras. Fossil leaves sporadically found in latest Carboniferous and Permian floras have putatively been ascribed to cycads. However, their true affinity remains unclear due to the lack of anatomical evidence. Virtually all modern cycads have pinnate leaves, but this type of leaf morphology is by no means unique for cycads. Pinnate leaves of Plagiozamites oblongifolius Halle 1927 with well-preserved cuticles showing the epidermal anatomy are here described from the upper Permian Xuanwei Formation of Yunnan Province, Southwest China. The cuticles show a clear differentiation into costal and intercostal zones; stomata are confined to the intercostal zones on both the upper and lower leaf surfaces. The external morphology and the epidermal anatomy of these fossil leaves are closely comparable with those of extant cycads, particularly members of the family Zamiaceae. © 2017 The Authors.

  11. Fetal anatomy revealed with fast MR sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, D; Hatabu, H; Gaa, J; Atkinson, M W; Edelman, R R

    1996-10-01

    Although all the imaging studies in this pictorial essay were done for maternal rather than fetal indications, fetal anatomy was well visualized. However, when scans are undertaken for fetal indications, fetal motion in between scout views and imaging sequences may make specific image planes difficult to obtain. Of the different techniques described in this review, we preferred the HASTE technique and use it almost exclusively for scanning pregnant patients. The T2-weighting is ideal for delineating fetal organs. Also, the HASTE technique allows images to be obtained in 430 msec, limiting artifacts arising from maternal and fetal motion. MR imaging should play a more important role in evaluating equivocal sonographic cases as fast scanning techniques are more widely used. Obstetric MR imaging no longer will be limited by fetal motion artifacts. When complex anatomy requires definition in a complicated pregnant patient, MR imaging should be considered as a useful adjunct to sonography.

  12. Posterior Approach to Kidney Dissection: An Old Surgical Approach for Integrated Medical Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Frank J.; Bolender, David L.; Jain, Deepali; Uyeda, Sheryl; Hoagland, Todd M.

    2015-01-01

    Integrated medical curricular changes are altering the historical regional anatomy approach to abdominal dissection. The renal system is linked physiologically and biochemically to the cardiovascular and respiratory systems; yet, anatomists often approach the urinary system as part of the abdomen and pelvic regions. As part of an integrated…

  13. Complementing anatomy education using three-dimensional anatomy mobile software applications on tablet computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, T L; Burnett, B; Tunstall, R G; Abrahams, P H

    2014-04-01

    Anatomy has traditionally been a cornerstone of medical education, which has been taught via dissection and didactic lectures. The rising prevalence of mobile tablet technology means medical software applications ("apps") play an increasingly important role in medical education. The applications highlighted in this article will aid anatomical educators to identify which are the most useful in clinical, academic, and educational environments. These have been systematically identified by downloading all applications with keywords related to anatomy and then carrying out qualitative assessment. Novel anatomy applications from developers such as Visible Body, 3D4Medical, and Pocket Anatomy allow students to visualize and manipulate complex anatomical structures using detailed 3D models. They often contain additional content including clinical correlations and a range of media from instructional videos to interactive quiz functions. The strength of tablet technology lies in its ability to consolidate and present anatomical information to the user in the most appropriate manner for their learning style. The only question mark remains over the level of detail and accuracy of these applications. Innovative medical educators who embrace tablet technology will find that anatomy applications serve as a useful learning tool when used in conjunction with existing teaching setups. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Surgical medical record

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bulow, S.

    2008-01-01

    A medical record is presented on the basis of selected linguistic pearls collected over the years from surgical case records Udgivelsesdato: 2008/12/15......A medical record is presented on the basis of selected linguistic pearls collected over the years from surgical case records Udgivelsesdato: 2008/12/15...

  15. Recognizing surgical patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouarfa, L.

    2012-01-01

    In the Netherlands, each year over 1700 patients die from preventable surgical errors. Numerous initiatives to improve surgical practice have had some impact, but problems persist. Despite the introduction of checklists and protocols, patient safety in surgery remains a continuing challenge. This is

  16. Surgical management of pain

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the spinal cord.[4] In this article, the reader is referred back to this illustration to understand the surgical techniques used to manage pain. Pain is caused by ... Injured dorsal root neurons discharge at higher frequencies and more spontaneously than normally. Surgical techniques. The physician should ensure that treat-.

  17. Surgical site infections

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the development of SSI. Complications associated with surgical site infections7. • Longer hospital stay with risk of acquiring other hospital acquired infections like pneumonia. • Require more surgical procedures. • Risk for development of resistance to antibiotics. • Risk for development of necrotizing fasciitis with skin loss.

  18. Multidetector computed tomography angiography of the renal arteries: normal anatomy and its variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Fernando de Mello Júnior

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Conventional angiography is still considered the gold standard for the study of the anatomy and of vascular diseases of the abdomen. However, the advent of multidetector computed tomography and techniques of digital image reconstruction has provided an alternative means of performing angiography, without the risks inherent to invasive angiographic examinations. Therefore, within the field of radiology, there is an ever-increasing demand for deeper knowledge of the anatomy of the regional vasculature and its variations. Variations in the renal vascular system are relatively prevalent in the venous and arterial vessels. For various conditions in which surgical planning is crucial to the success of the procedure, knowledge of this topic is important. The aim of this study was to familiarize the general radiologist with variations in the renal vascular system. To that end, we prepared a pictorial essay comprising multidetector computed tomography images obtained in a series of cases. We show patterns representative of the most common anatomical variations in the arterial blood supply to the kidneys, calling attention to the nomenclature, as well as to the clinical and surgical implications of such variations.

  19. Multidetector computed tomography angiography of the renal arteries: normal anatomy and its variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mello Junior, Carlos Fernando de; Araujo Neto, Severino Aires; Carvalho Junior, Arlindo Monteiro de; Negromonte, Gustavo Ramalho Pessoa; Oliveira, Carollyne Dantas de [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Reboucas, Rafael Batista, E-mail: severinoaires@hotmail.com [Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas da Paraiba, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil)

    2016-05-15

    Conventional angiography is still considered the gold standard for the study of the anatomy and of vascular diseases of the abdomen. However, the advent of multidetector computed tomography and techniques of digital image reconstruction has provided an alternative means of performing angiography, without the risks inherent to invasive angiographic examinations. Therefore, within the field of radiology, there is an ever-increasing demand for deeper knowledge of the anatomy of the regional vasculature and its variations. Variations in the renal vascular system are relatively prevalent in the venous and arterial vessels. For various conditions in which surgical planning is crucial to the success of the procedure, knowledge of this topic is important. The aim of this study was to familiarize the general radiologist with variations in the renal vascular system. To that end, we prepared a pictorial essay comprising multidetector computed tomography images obtained in a series of cases. We show patterns representative of the most common anatomical variations in the arterial blood supply to the kidneys, calling attention to the nomenclature, as well as to the clinical and surgical implications of such variations. (author)

  20. A virtual reality model of the clivus and surgical simulation via transoral or transnasal route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shou-Sen; Li, Jun-Feng; Zhang, Shang-Ming; Jing, Jun-Jie; Xue, Liang

    2014-01-01

    Neurosurgery in areas with restricted space and complicated anatomy can be greatly aided by the virtual reality (VR) technique. The clivus represents one of such challenging surgical areas, but its VR has not been established. The present study aimed to document a VR model of clival anatomy that may be useful in clival surgery. High resolution CT angiography and MRI were used. The study included a total of 20 patients who did not have any obvious abnormalities detected in the oral, nasal, and clival areas. The images were fused with a Dextroscope. In the VR model, the key structures such as the clival bone, basilar artery, brainstem, pituitary gland, and paranasal sinuses were clearly observed. The morphology of the clivus and its spatial relationships with the neighboring structures were also illustrated. Visualization of the clival model can be made flexible from various planes, angles, or orientations. In addition, surgical access to the clivus via the transoral route or transnasal route was simulated in detail. The simulation of the VR model offers a straightforward, three-dimensional, interactive understanding of the size and shape of the clivus, and its relationships with the surrounding blood vessels and bones. It also demonstrates simulated operational procedures such as opening the surgical window, measuring the exposure distance and angles, and determining the critical boundaries in relation to key structures such as the brainstem and arteries. Digitalized VR modeling appears to be helpful for understanding the anatomy of the clivus and its surgical approaches.

  1. The functional anatomy of forearm rotation

    OpenAIRE

    Lees, Vivien C.

    2009-01-01

    The elbow, forearm and wrist act as a unified structure to provide a stable, strong and highly mobile strut for positioning the hand in space and for conducting load-bearing tasks. An understanding of the relevant anatomy and biomechanics is important for the surgeon assessing and treating disorders of forearm function. This paper is concerned with illuminating the principles and concepts governing forearm rotation and load-bearing functions.

  2. Anatomy, biogenesis, and regeneration of salivary glands

    OpenAIRE

    Holmberg, Kyle V.; Hoffman, Matthew P.

    2014-01-01

    An overview of the anatomy and biogenesis of salivary glands is important in order to understand the physiology, functions and disorders associated with saliva. A major disorder of salivary glands is salivary hypofunction and resulting xerostomia, or dry mouth, which affects hundreds of thousands of patients per year who suffer from salivary gland diseases or undergo head and neck cancer treatment. There is currently no curative therapy for these patients. To improve these patients’ quality o...

  3. Latin and Greek in gross anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sean B; Carmichael, Stephen W; Pawlina, Wojciech; Spinner, Robert J

    2007-04-01

    Medical students and practitioners learn and use a vocabulary originating almost entirely from classical Latin and Greek languages. Previous generations required Latin or Greek prior to medical school, but the current generation does not have such requirements. Anecdotal evidence suggests that understanding Latin or Greek helps students to learn and practitioners to recall otherwise foreign terminology. This study evaluated students' familiarity with Latin and Greek etymologies before and after a gross anatomy course that incorporated etymologies into its curriculum. First-year medical students at Mayo Clinic College of Medicine were taught Latin and Greek etymologies through lectures and handouts during their gross anatomy course. They took a pretest and a posttest before and after the course to assess their understanding of etymologies. In addition, students from all four years of medical school, residents, and staff physicians also took a general etymology quiz to assess their understanding of etymologies. After their gross anatomy course emphasizing etymologies, first-year students scored higher on the posttest than they did on the pretest. First-year students also reported that learning etymologies enhanced anatomy learning, made the experience more enjoyable, and proved to be less difficult than they thought it would be prior to the course. Medical students, residents, and staff physicians scored almost equally on the general etymology quiz and almost equally reported that etymologies enhanced learning and recalling terminology. Medical students, residents, and staff physicians almost equally endorsed incorporating etymologies into medical education. This study provides novel scientific evidence that a basic understanding of Latin and Greek etymologies enhances performance and comfort when learning and using medical terminology.

  4. Greek anatomist herophilus: the father of anatomy

    OpenAIRE

    Bay, Noel Si-Yang; Bay, Boon-Huat

    2010-01-01

    One of the most stirring controversies in the history of Anatomy is that Herophilus, an ancient Greek anatomist and his younger contemporary, Erasistratus, were accused of performing vivisections of living humans. However, this does not detract from the fact that Herophilus has made phenomenal anatomical observations of the human body which have contributed significantly towards the understanding of the brain, eye, liver, reproductive organs and nervous system. It is notable that he was the f...

  5. Surgical Management of Metabolic Syndrome Related to Morbid Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehrig, Scott T

    2016-03-01

    Current treatment approaches in morbid obesity are multimodal in nature. Combination therapies include increases in moderate-intensity aerobic and resistance exercise; behavioral lifestyle changes to increase compliance with diet and activity recommendations; medical nutrition therapy; intensive medical therapy; and metabolic surgical procedures, such as gastric bypass and vertical sleeve gastrectomy. This article focuses on the preoperative evaluation and proper patient selection for metabolic surgery. The procedures are discussed relative to their anatomy, metabolic mechanism of action, and common adverse effects. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. A radiographic study of pediatric ulnar anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cravino, Mattia; Oni, Julius K; Sala, Debra A; Chu, Alice

    2014-01-01

    The adult ulna has a unique bony architecture that has been described in the literature, but, to the best of our knowledge, the ulnar anatomy in children has not been described. We examined 75 anteroposterior (AP) and 64 lateral radiographs (29 were bilateral) of 50, 0.5- to 11-year-old, healthy children's forearms. On AP radiographs, the total ulnar length, the ulnar proximal angle, the ulnar distal angle, and the distance between each angle from the tip of the triceps insertion; and, on lateral radiographs, the ulnar length and bow deviation were measured. The correlation between age and radiographic measurements, differences based on sex, differences compared with adults' measurements, and interobserver/intraobserver reliability were assessed. Age had a very strong/strong positive correlation with length/distance measurements on both AP and lateral radiographs. Only AP ulnar distal angle was significantly different between sexes (females > males). Compared with the adult ulnar studies, the AP proximal angle in children is significantly smaller and the location of this angle is significantly more distal. Interobserver and intraobserver reliability were very good for length/distance measurements on AP and lateral radiographs. The knowledge of pediatric ulnar anatomy could be helpful in the treatment of forearm deformities due to multiple hereditary exostosis and osteogenesis imperfecta, and in the treatment of ulnar fractures, particularly in Monteggia variants, where restoration of the correct forearm anatomy is essential to obtain good clinical and functional results. Study of diagnostic test, Level II.

  7. Evaluation of an innovative hands-on anatomy-centered ultrasound curriculum to supplement graduate gross anatomy education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, Danielle F; Kessler, Ross; Stowell, Jeffrey R

    2017-07-01

    Ultrasound (US) can enhance anatomy education, yet is incorporated into few non-medical anatomy programs. This study is the first to evaluate the impact of US training in gross anatomy for non-medical students in the United States. All 32 master's students enrolled in gross anatomy with the anatomy-centered ultrasound (ACUS) curriculum were recruited. Mean Likert ratings on pre- and post-course surveys (100% response rates) were compared to evaluate the effectiveness of the ACUS curriculum in developing US confidence, and gauge its impact on views of US. Post-course, students reported significantly higher (P curriculum in students with limited prior experience. Views on the value of US to anatomy education and to students' future careers remained positive after the course. End-of-semester quiz performance (91% response rate) provided data on educational outcomes. The average score was 79%, with a 90% average on questions about distinguishing tissues/artifacts, demonstrating positive learning outcomes and retention. The anatomy-centered ultrasound curriculum significantly increased confidence with and knowledge of US among non-medical anatomy students with limited prior training. Non-medical students greatly value the contributions that US makes to anatomy education and to their future careers. It is feasible to enhance anatomy education outside of medical training by incorporating US. Anat Sci Educ 10: 348-362. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists.

  8. Kant on anatomy and the status of the life sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Michael J

    2016-08-01

    This paper contributes to recent interest in Kant's engagement with the life sciences by focusing on one corner of those sciences that has received comparatively little attention: physical and comparative anatomy. By attending to remarks spread across Kant's writings, we gain some insight into Kant's understanding of the disciplinary limitations but also the methodological sophistication of the study of anatomy and physiology. Insofar as Kant highlights anatomy as a paradigmatic science guided by the principle of teleology in the Critique of the Power of Judgment, a more careful study of Kant's discussions of anatomy promises to illuminate some of the obscurities of that text and of his understanding of the life sciences more generally. In the end, it is argued, Kant's ambivalence with regard to anatomy gives way to a pessimistic conclusion about the possibility that anatomy, natural history, and, by extension, the life sciences more generally might one day become true natural sciences. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Michelangelo: anatomy and its implication in his art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilloowala, Rumy

    2009-06-01

    Michelangelo's major interest was the Life of the Soul as expressed in the beautiful structure and movement of the human body, which he often called the "mortal veil" of the divine intentions. This study ascertains Michelangelo's interest in and acquisition of the knowledge of human anatomy, the use of small anatomical models to crystallize his concepts into reality and the application of anatomy to his art. Relatively little is known of this interaction between anatomy and art in Michelangelo's life and work.

  10. Innovative strategies for teaching anatomy to dental students

    OpenAIRE

    Lone, Mutahira

    2018-01-01

    Anatomy education is an integral component of the undergraduate and postgraduate dental curriculum. A detailed understanding of anatomy is a pre-requisite before examination, diagnosis and clinical treatment of patients in all aspects of the healthcare systems. Anatomy teaching is undergoing pioneering changes. Traditional Vesalius’ dissection-based teaching has evolved to include didactic lectures and nowadays incorporates digital teaching, e-learning and a wide range of 3D images and models...

  11. Lecture Classes in Human Anatomy: The Students’ Perceptions

    OpenAIRE

    Kar, Maitreyee; Roy, Hironmoy; Ghosh, Anasuya; Tapadar, Arunabha; Chowdhury, Subhramoy; Mukherjee, Pranab; Jana, Tapan Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The human anatomy, or in brief, the body structure has fascinated man for ages. Due to the information explosion and the increase in specializations, this knowledge is available in a very sketchy manner in high school biology courses. The first comprehensive course on the human anatomy is taught to the first year medical students in medical colleges. This is in keeping with the regulations of the Medical Council of India. The anatomy lecture classes occupy a considerable time of...

  12. Stereopsis, Visuospatial Ability, and Virtual Reality in Anatomy Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Luursema, Jan-Maarten; Vorstenbosch, Marc; Kooloos, Jan

    2017-01-01

    A new wave of virtual reality headsets has become available. A potential benefit for the study of human anatomy is the reintroduction of stereopsis and absolute size. We report a randomized controlled trial to assess the contribution of stereopsis to anatomy learning, for students of different visuospatial ability. Sixty-three participants engaged in a one-hour session including a study phase and posttest. One group studied 3D models of the anatomy of the deep neck in full stereoptic virtual ...

  13. Tattoo preservation during surgical procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tenna S

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Stefania Tenna, Pietro Francesco Delle Femmine, Alfonso Luca Pendolino, Beniamino Brunetti, Paolo Persichetti Plastic Surgery Unit, University Campus Bio-Medico of Rome, University of Rome, Rome, Italy Abstract: In recent years, the number of people getting tattoos has continued to increase. Tattoos are much more than cultural fads and cosmetic complements, and nowadays often represent events that express the patient's personality without words. The presence of a tattoo in the surgical field may be a problem for both the patient and the surgeon. However, the relevant literature is mostly based on complications related to application of tattoos or methods used to remove them. To date, few reports have focused on the importance of preserving a tattoo during a surgical procedure, and no organized studies could be found. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the range of solutions that surgeons can use to preserve tattoos during surgery. A PubMed database search was done to assess other surgeons' experience. The terms "tattoo" in combination with "incision", "surgery", "surgical", or "operative" were used as key words. Following a review of the literature, photographs of patients presenting with a tattoo in the last 5 years at University Campus Bio-Medico of Rome were identified in order to determine the frequency of patients presenting with tattoos in our department. The patients were classified according to sex, age, type of surgery, number of tattoos, and tattoo location. Specific requests to preserve tattoos were recorded. Finally, an algorithm of treatment according to tattoo dimension and location is proposed. Knowledge of all the strategies available for saving tattoos is important for plastic and cosmetic surgeons. If a tattooed area needs to be operated on, surgeons should attempt, when possible, to avoid altering the tattoo in order to maximize the final cosmetic result. Keywords: tattoo incision, body contouring, surgery

  14. Surgical ethics: surgical virtue and more.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercler, Christian J

    2015-01-01

    The encounter between a patient and her surgeon is unique for several reasons. The surgeon inflicts pain upon a patient for the patient's own good. An operative intervention is irreducibly personal, such that the decisions about and performance of operations are inseparable from the idiosyncrasies of the individual surgeon. Furthermore, there is a chasm of knowledge between the patient and surgeon that is difficult to cross. Hence, training in the discipline of surgery includes the inculcation of certain virtues and practices to safeguard against abuses of this relationship and to make sure that the best interests of the patient are prioritized. The stories in this issue are evidence that in contemporary practice this is not quite enough, as surgeons reflect on instances they felt were ethically challenging. Common themes include the difficulty in communicating surgical uncertainty, patient-surgeon relationships, ethical issues in surgical training, and the impact of the technological imperative on caring for dying patients.

  15. Online learning resources in anatomy: What do students think?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, I P; Palmer, E; Burton, J; Brockhouse, M

    2013-07-01

    An interventional cohort comparison study with pretesting and post-testing in semesters 1 and 2 was undertaken of 159 medical students in year 3 of the MMBS course at the University of Adelaide in 2010. The intervention comprised the provision of a number of additional online resources in semester 2. Students' views on online anatomy were also sought by a questionnaire delivered at the end of semesters 1 and 2 and via a small focus group at the end of the study. Anatomy assessment results after the introduction of online anatomy were compared with a total of three control semesters in 2009 and 2010. There was >90% broad agreement before the intervention that wet specimens, tutors and discussions with other students helped students learn anatomy. After the intervention, these views remained, but there was additionally >90% broad agreement that text books helped them learn anatomy, that they had good access to anatomical specimens, and there was less agreement that lectures helped. The intervention left students' views on online anatomy largely unchanged and made no significant difference to summative assessment scores. Focus group discussions revealed that students want anatomy tutors to help direct them to reputable and relevant sites. The provision of more online resources in anatomy did not affect student views or learning outcomes. While students may need help from tutors in selecting appropriate online resources, wet specimens, textbooks, and discussions with tutors and other students remain the preferred means of learning anatomy. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Teaching medical anatomy: what is the role of imaging today?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grignon, Bruno; Oldrini, Guillaume; Walter, Frédéric

    2016-03-01

    Medical anatomy instruction has been an important issue of debate for many years and imaging anatomy has become an increasingly important component in the field, the role of which has not yet been clearly defined. The aim of the paper was to assess the current deployment of medical imaging in the teaching of anatomy by means of a review of the literature. A systematic search was performed using the electronic database PubMed, ScienceDirect and various publisher databases, with combinations of the relevant MeSH terms. A manual research was added. In most academic curricula, imaging anatomy has been integrated as a part of anatomical education, taught using a very wide variety of strategies. Considerable variation in the time allocation, content and delivery of medical imaging in teaching human anatomy was identified. Given this considerable variation, an objective assessment remains quite difficult. In most publications, students' perceptions regarding anatomical courses including imaging anatomy were investigated by means of questionnaires and, regardless of the method of teaching, it was globally concluded that imaging anatomy enhanced the quality and efficiency of instruction in human anatomy. More objective evaluation based on an increase in students' performance on course examinations or on specific tests performed before and after teaching sessions showed positive results in numerous cases, while mixed results were also indicated by other studies. A relative standardization could be useful in improving the teaching of imaging anatomy, to facilitate its assessment and reinforce its effectiveness.

  17. Simple and surgical exodontia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBowes, Linda J

    2005-07-01

    Preemptive and postoperative pain management is part of patient care when performing extractions. Simple extractions can become complicated when tooth roots are fractured. Adequate lighting,magnification, and surgical techniques are important when per-forming surgical (complicated) extractions. Radiographs should be taken before extractions and also during the procedure to assist with difficult extractions. Adequate flap design and bone removal are necessary when performing surgical extractions. Complications, including ocular trauma, jaw fracture, and soft tissue trauma, are avoided or minimized with proper patient selection and technique.

  18. Systematic review comparing endoscopic, percutaneous and surgical pancreatic pseudocyst drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teoh, Anthony Yuen Bun; Dhir, Vinay; Jin, Zhen-Dong; Kida, Mitsuhiro; Seo, Dong Wan; Ho, Khek Yu

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To perform a systematic review comparing the outcomes of endoscopic, percutaneous and surgical pancreatic pseudocyst drainage. METHODS: Comparative studies published between January 1980 and May 2014 were identified on PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane controlled trials register and assessed for suitability of inclusion. The primary outcome was the treatment success rate. Secondary outcomes included were the recurrence rates, re-interventions, length of hospital stay, adverse events and mortalities. RESULTS: Ten comparative studies were identified and 3 were randomized controlled trials. Four studies reported on the outcomes of percutaneous and surgical drainage. Based on a large-scale national study, surgical drainage appeared to reduce mortality and adverse events rate as compared to the percutaneous approach. Three studies reported on the outcomes of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and surgical drainage. Clinical success and adverse events rates appeared to be comparable but the EUS approach reduced hospital stay, cost and improved quality of life. Three other studies compared EUS and esophagogastroduodenoscopy-guided drainage. Both approaches were feasible for pseudocyst drainage but the success rate of the EUS approach was better for non-bulging cyst and the approach conferred additional safety benefits. CONCLUSION: In patients with unfavorable anatomy, surgical cystojejunostomy or percutaneous drainage could be considered. Large randomized studies with current definitions of pseudocysts and longer-term follow-up are needed to assess the efficacy of the various modalities. PMID:27014427

  19. Ambulatory Surgical Measures - Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Ambulatory Surgical Center Quality Reporting (ASCQR) Program seeks to make care safer and more efficient through quality reporting. ASCs eligible for this...

  20. Ambulatory Surgical Measures - State

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Ambulatory Surgical Center Quality Reporting (ASCQR) Program seeks to make care safer and more efficient through quality reporting. ASCs eligible for this...

  1. Surgical Treatments for Fibroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NICHD Research Information Find a Study More Information Preeclampsia and Eclampsia About NICHD Research Information Find a ... Treatments Share Facebook Twitter Pinterest Email Print Surgical Treatments for Fibroids If you have moderate or severe ...

  2. Ambulatory Surgical Measures - National

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Ambulatory Surgical Center Quality Reporting (ASCQR) Program seeks to make care safer and more efficient through quality reporting. ASCs eligible for this...

  3. [Surgical treatment of ulcer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungeheuer, E; Schröder, D; Lüders, K

    1978-04-27

    The standard of today in surgical treatment of the duodenal and gastric ulcer in Germany is shown. Positive and negative aspects of the different methods are discussed. Special technics are recommended for the different types of gastroduodenal ulcera.

  4. Disruptive visions: surgical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satava, R M

    2004-05-01

    Technological change, decreased financial support for medical education, and social oversight (in the form of the "To Err Is Human" report, HIPPA, and reduced work hours) are forcing a rethinking of the traditional model of surgical education to improve patient safety. New approaches to evaluating surgical competence, such as objective assessment, in combination with new technologies, such as the Internet and surgical simulators, provide the tools to effect a revolution in surgical education and training. Competency based upon quantifiable criteria measures must replace the traditional subjective assessment. The implementation requires accurately defining the elements of training, establishing new quantifiable metrics, stringently measuring performance against criterion, and reporting outcomes throughout the career of a surgeon.

  5. Surgical Critical Care Initiative

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Surgical Critical Care Initiative (SC2i) is a USU research program established in October 2013 to develop, translate, and validate biology-driven critical care....

  6. Laparoscopic adrenalectomy: Surgical techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Mellon

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Since its first description in 1992, laparoscopic adrenalectomy has become the gold standard for the surgical treatment of most adrenal conditions. The benefits of a minimally invasive approach to adrenal resection such as decreased hospital stay, shorter recovery time and improved patient satisfaction are widely accepted. However, as this procedure becomes more widespread, critical steps of the operation must be maintained to ensure expected outcomes and success. This article reviews the surgical techniques for the laparoscopic adrenalectomy.

  7. A novel phased-concept course for the delivery of anatomy and orthopedics training in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klima, Stefan; Hepp, Pierre; Löffler, Sabine; Cornwall, Jon; Hammer, Niels

    2017-07-01

    Integration of anatomy and clinical teaching is a theoretical ideal, yet there is a worldwide paucity of such amalgamation. These teaching models provide support for medical trainees, an important element in Germany where orthopedic intern numbers have declined and anecdotal evidence suggests disinterest in orthopedics. The aim of the study was to develop an integrated anatomy-surgical course for undergraduate medical training, assess the model developed, and explore how medical students perceive orthopedics as a career. The course was to deliver medical anatomy and clinical orthopedic training, focusing on interdisciplinary teaching and learning, vertical integration of clinical knowledge and skills, and professional interaction. Survey evaluation of the course and students' perceptions of orthopedic careers was performed, including Likert-type responses rating variables of interest. A phased-concept program of five courses, each optional and under one-week in duration, was developed parallel to the undergraduate medical program. Delivered by anatomists and surgeons, courses included biomechanics, advanced dissection, surgical approaches, casts and implants, and sports medicine. Course data indicate positive support for course format, stimulation of interest, and high clinical relevance. Students are generally interested in surgery, and identify hierarchy, lawsuits, bureaucracy and physical stress as barriers to orthopedic careers. This novel phased-concept successfully delivers combined anatomy and surgery training in a vertically-integrated format while addressing students' clinical and professional skills. The format facilitates an appreciation of potential career options in orthopedics, while fostering professional skills during medical training. Barriers to careers in orthopedics can now be addressed in future courses. Anat Sci Educ 10: 372-382. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists.

  8. "Anatomy lesson of Frederik Ruysch" of 1670: a tribute to Ruysch's contributions to lymphatic anatomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ijpma, Frank F. A.; van Gulik, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    Frederick Ruysch was one of the most prominent Dutch physicians of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. For more than 65 years, he was the Praelector Anatomiae (Lecturer of Anatomy) of the Amsterdam Guild of Surgeons. During his career, he conducted many dissections at the guild's theatre to

  9. "Anatomy lesson of Frederik Ruysch" of 1670: a tribute to Ruysch's contributions to lymphatic anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijpma, Frank F A; van Gulik, Thomas M

    2013-08-01

    Frederick Ruysch was one of the most prominent Dutch physicians of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. For more than 65 years, he was the Praelector Anatomiae (Lecturer of Anatomy) of the Amsterdam Guild of Surgeons. During his career, he conducted many dissections at the guild's theatre to teach anatomy. Ruysch was internationally renowned for his great dissection skills and his innovative techniques for preserving anatomical specimens. The "Anatomy Lesson of Dr. Frederik Ruysch" painted in 1670, is thought to be a group portrait undertaken to commemorate the officials of the Guild of Surgeons. Ruysch was portrayed performing an anatomical dissection of inguinal lymph nodes on the corpse of an executed criminal. This portrait is one of the earliest paintings focusing on the "lymphatic system." We investigated the medical background of the painting by revisiting Ruysch's original work from the mid-seventeenth century. His contributions to the early history of "lymphatic anatomy" are assessed and interpreted from the perspective of the renewed interest in "lymphatic imaging" today. Frederik Ruysch should be considered one of the pioneers contributing to the early knowledge of the lymphatic system. He succeeded in dissecting the lymphatic vessels and valves with the aid of his innovative dissection and preservation techniques. The famous group portrait of the Amsterdam Guild of Surgeons with Ruysch demonstrating the lymph nodes pays tribute to his work on which we still rely today.

  10. The caecocolonic junction in humans has a sphincteric anatomy and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faussone Pellegrini, M S; Manneschi, L I; Manneschi, L

    1995-01-01

    Sphincteric anatomy and function are present at the caecocolonic junction in several mammals. In humans, radiologists and endoscopists have respectively reported a circumferential contraction and a prominent ileocaecal fold at the border area between the caecum and the ascending colon. Anatomical findings on necropsy material failed to confirm its presence. Microscopic studies on surgical specimens showed the existence of muscular and innervational patterns different from those of adjacent areas. The aim of this work was to confirm the existence of a specialised fold at the caecocolonic junction in humans and to ascertain its role by carrying out a study of functional anatomy. Pancolonoscopies were performed on 100 patients and ileocaecal fold behaviour was observed before and after mechanical stimulation. Isolated ileocaecocolonic regions, surgically obtained, were filled with a fixative solution to study their macro and microscopic morphology after stimulation. Endoscopically, the ileocaecal fold was semilunar or circular in shape and spontaneous or evoked spasms occurred in 52 patients. A prominent circular fold could be seen in surgical specimens after stimulation. The entire muscle coat deeply penetrated this fold, showing the features characteristic of the ileocaecal junction. In particular, the inner portion of the circular muscle showed a peculiar arrangement and was thicker than elsewhere. These results show that in humans the caecocolonic junction is provided with a sphincter morphology and function. Little is known about its physiological relevance in ileal flow accommodation and caecal filling and emptying but it should not be underestimated with regard to some colonic motility disorders. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:7489934

  11. Virtual reality: new method of teaching anorectal and pelvic floor anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Howard D; Pearl, Russell K; Orsay, Charles P; Rasmussen, Mary; Evenhouse, Ray; Ai, Zhuming; Blew, Gregory; Dech, Fred; Edison, Marcia I; Silverstein, Jonathan C; Abcarian, Herand

    2003-03-01

    A clear understanding of the intricate spatial relationships among the structures of the pelvic floor, rectum, and anal canal is essential for the treatment of numerous pathologic conditions. Virtual-reality technology allows improved visualization of three-dimensional structures over conventional media because it supports stereoscopic-vision, viewer-centered perspective, large angles of view, and interactivity. We describe a novel virtual reality-based model designed to teach anorectal and pelvic floor anatomy, pathology, and surgery. A static physical model depicting the pelvic floor and anorectum was created and digitized at 1-mm intervals in a CT scanner. Multiple software programs were used along with endoscopic images to generate a realistic interactive computer model, which was designed to be viewed on a networked, interactive, virtual-reality display (CAVE or ImmersaDesk). A standard examination of ten basic anorectal and pelvic floor anatomy questions was administered to third-year (n = 6) and fourth-year (n = 7) surgical residents. A workshop using the Virtual Pelvic Floor Model was then given, and the standard examination was readministered so that it was possible to evaluate the effectiveness of the Digital Pelvic Floor Model as an educational instrument. Training on the Virtual Pelvic Floor Model produced substantial improvements in the overall average test scores for the two groups, with an overall increase of 41 percent (P = 0.001) and 21 percent (P = 0.0007) for third-year and fourth-year residents, respectively. Resident evaluations after the workshop also confirmed the effectiveness of understanding pelvic anatomy using the Virtual Pelvic Floor Model. This model provides an innovative interactive educational framework that allows educators to overcome some of the barriers to teaching surgical and endoscopic principles based on understanding highly complex three-dimensional anatomy. Using this collaborative, shared virtual-reality environment

  12. What shapes the anatomy of inventors?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skytt-Larsen, Christine Benna

    2016-01-01

    which they themselves believe have formed their inventive capacities. The main findings of the article are that the sociocultural milieus of early childhood, especially the educational backgrounds or skills of parents and grandparents, play an important role in shaping the anatomy of inventors. Further......, the social milieu of an inventor’s final education, whether elementary school or university, is a seminal factor in the development of inventive creativity, given the importance of dedicated teachers, co-students and supervisors. Finally, egalitarian organizational structures in the workplace and a solid...

  13. Vascular anatomy of strictured small bowel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansard, Magnus Jayaraj; Rao, Upender; Pradeep, R; Sekaran, Anuradha; Rao, G V; Reddy, D N

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the role of ischemia in the pathogenesis of small bowel strictures. Vascular anatomy of 39 small bowel strictures was studied using modified Spalteholtz method. Ten normal small bowel segments were studied as controls. 71.8% of small bowel strictures showed block in the mesenteric vessels (p=0.008). Subset analysis of tuberculous strictures showed block in the mesenteric vessels in 70.8% of strictures (p=0.0098). Ischemia plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of small bowel strictures. Mesenteric vasculopathy has a significant association with tuberculous strictures of the intestine.

  14. The subscapularis: anatomy, injury, and imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morag, Yoav; Jamadar, David A.; Dong, Qian; Jacobson, Jon A. [University of Michigan, Department of Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Miller, Bruce [University of Michigan, Department of Orthopaedics, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2011-03-15

    The subscapularis is the largest and most powerful of the rotator cuff muscles and fulfills an important role in glenohumeral movement and stability. The spectrum and implications of subscapularis muscle or tendon injury differ from injury to other rotator cuff components because of its unique structure and function. Diagnosing subscapularis injury is clinically difficult and assessment of subscapularis integrity may be limited during arthroscopy or open surgery. Diagnostic imaging plays an important part in diagnosing and evaluating the extent of subscapularis injury. The radiologist should be aware of the anatomy of the subscapularis, the variations in muscle or tendon injury, and the potential implications for treatment and prognosis. (orig.)

  15. Anatomy and Physiology of the Pelvic Floor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eickmeyer, Sarah M

    2017-08-01

    Understanding the anatomic relationship of the pelvic floor muscles with the pelvic girdle, spine, and hips aids the rehabilitation provider in diagnosis, management, and appropriate referrals. The bony anatomy of the pelvic girdle consists of 3 bones and 3 joints. The pelvic floor muscles are comprised mainly of the levator ani muscles with somatic innervation from the lumbosacral plexus. The bony and muscular pelvis is highly interconnected to the hip and gluteal musculature, which together provide support to the internal organs and core muscles. Pelvic floor physiology is centered on bladder and bowel control, sexual functioning, and pregnancy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Dorsal forearm muscles: US anatomy Pictorial Essay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Precerutti, M.; Garioni, E.; Ferrozzi, G.

    2010-01-01

    The dorsal compartment of the forearm contains nine muscles: four belong to the superficial group (extensor digitorum communis, extensor digiti minimi, extensor carpi ulnaris and anconeus) and five to the deep group (supinator, abductor longus, extensor pollicis brevis, extensor pollicis longus, and extensor indices). Of these nine muscles the following details are considered: origin, course, distal insertion and their anatomical connection with those structures which are most often affected by pathologies. The radiologist must have a thorough knowledge of this complex topographic anatomy in order to perform ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations and correctly interpret the images. PMID:23396199

  17. The history and anatomy of urologic lymphadenectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewinshtein, Daniel J; Porter, Christopher R

    2011-11-01

    The history of urologic lymphadenectomy is rich and diverse. Our current understanding of its use and benefits is a product of the hard work of numerous physicians and scientists from many nations. Standard dissection templates for the various urologic malignancies are based on a complete understanding of the anatomy of the lymphatic system, which has developed immensely since Hippocrates first described the white blood of the lymphatic system while performing an axillary dissection. It is hoped that the next 100 years will bring even greater comprehension of its value and utility. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Modeling of Craniofacial Anatomy, Variation, and Growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorup, Signe Strann

    the two images. To elaborate further: a computational atlas of the average anatomy was constructed. Using non-rigid registration, image data from a subject is automatically transformed into the coordinate space of the atlas. In this process, all knowledge built into the atlas is transferred to the subject......-subject variation etc. Besides image registration, a volumetric segmentation method using graph cuts was developed and applied for intracranial volume estimation. Graph cut is a fast method for segmentation utilizing a suitable graph. Three different craniofacial anomalies were examined in this thesis: Cleft lip...

  19. Anatomy and biomechanics of psoas major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogduk, N; Pearcy, M; Hadfield, G

    1992-05-01

    The fascicular anatomy of the psoas major was determined by dissection in three cadavers. Its actions on the lumbar spine in the sagittal plane were modelled on erect, flexion, and extension radiographs of ten adult males. Calculations revealed that psoas exerts only very small moments that tend to extend the upper lumbar spine and to flex the lower lumbar spine, but at maximum contraction the psoas exerts severe compression forces on the lumbar segments, and large shear forces. Copyright © 1992. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Interactive videodisk atlas of knee anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEnery, K.W.; Woods, J.W.; Glenn, W.F.; Rauschning, W.

    1987-01-01

    An interactive, computer-assisted atlas of knee anatomy has been developed. MR and CT images from normal volunteers and cryomicrotomed anatomic images were recorded on a laser viodeodisk. Computer software allows movement through the knee and correlation of radiographic images in the coronal, axial, and sagittal planes. Computer graphics are superimposed on the videodisk images. A high-resolution color graphics, touch-screen monitor is included in the computer system. Learning modules allow for rapid identification of specific structure by touching their location on the screen. Computer-created testing modules are available that provide for self-assessment

  1. Thomas Batholin, teologisk anatomi i 1600-tallet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mønster-Kjær, Inge

    2009-01-01

    It is commonly accepted that the reformation heavily influenced scientific thinking in Europs. But in many historical accounts this effect is presented as a fundamental break in the beginning of the 16th century with previous ideas and methods. In the view scientists turned their back...... as a theologian. For him anatomy was merely a tool, and so it had been for for scientists all over Europe from its gradual evovlement as a field from Antiquity to the Renaissance. It had been a tool to illustrate the greatness and perfection of God's creation in artistic ways, a tool to prove sactity, a tool...

  2. [Functional and mechanical anatomy of arm elevation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagey, O; Bonfait, H; Gillot, C; Mazas, F

    1988-01-01

    Experimental work on the functional anatomy of the shoulder has involved a study of the conditions involved in elevation of the arm. Movements of the upper limb are organised round a very special alignment of the scapulo-humeral joint whose geometric features and exact position have been determined. The ligaments of the joint play a major role in the controlling the attainment of this alignment. The value of this alignment in the physiology of the shoulder is demonstrated. A new terminology of shoulder movement is suggested.

  3. 3D Anatomy Models and Impact on Learning: A Review of the Quality of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Azer, Samy A.; Azer, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aims of this study were to identify studies exploring three-dimensional (3D) anatomy models and their impact on learning, and to assess the quality of research in this area. Methods: PubMed, EMBASE, and the Web of Knowledge databases were searched using the following keywords "3D anatomy", "three dimensional anatomy," "3D virtual reality anatomy," "3D VR anatomy," "3D anatomy model, “3D anatomy teaching", and “anatomy learning VR” . Three evaluators independently assessed t...

  4. Non-Surgical Root Canal Treatment of Dens Invaginatus 3 in a Maxillary Lateral Incisor

    OpenAIRE

    Moradi, Saeed; Donyavi, Zakyeh; Esmaealzade, Mohammad

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this case report was to describe the clinical management of an unusual dens invaginatus type 3. A case of dens invaginatus in a maxillary lateral incisor with a periapical lesion is reported. The patient presented with pain and localized swelling. Despite the complex anatomy and diagnosis of dens invaginatus, non-surgical root canal treatment was performed successfully. Key Learning Points: - Dens invaginatus may be presented in different forms, and the etiology of this phenomenon ...

  5. Clinical anatomy and significance of the thoracic intervertebral foramen: A cadaveric study and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkasdaris, Grigorios; Tripsianis, Grigorios; Kotopoulos, Konstantinos; Kapetanakis, Stylianos

    2016-01-01

    The literature is lacking information on the anatomy and the osseous dimensions of the thoracic intervertebral foramen (IVF). We describe the anatomy of the broader area, and we proceed with morphometric data of the vertebrae and the foramina. Depiction of these features is provided with imaging and illustrations. The purpose of this paper is to survey and present the anatomy of the foramen as a whole and provide baseline statistical data. We review relevant literature, and we present data obtained from skeletal samples of known population and sex. One hundred and nineteen thoracic vertebrae of ten cadaveric spines from the prefecture of Eastern Macedonia and Thrace, Greece, were selected. Statistical analysis measuring the vertical height and the foraminal width of each vertebra was made in accordance with sex. No statistically important differences referring to the descriptive data of both sexes were found. However, statistically, important positive correlation between the vertebral height and the foraminal width was observed, especially for men. The components of the foramen including arteries and veins passing through or neighboring it, and the spinal nerves and roots are described and depicted. The osseous thoracic IVF reveals a glimpse of the in vivo structure and alterations of its width may be present in back pain and other degenerative diseases. Although it is crucial for surgeries and other interventional procedures of the thoracic spine, little is known about the precise anatomy and dimensions of this anatomical landmark.

  6. Clinical anatomy and significance of the thoracic intervertebral foramen: A cadaveric study and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigorios Gkasdaris

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The literature is lacking information on the anatomy and the osseous dimensions of the thoracic intervertebral foramen (IVF. We describe the anatomy of the broader area, and we proceed with morphometric data of the vertebrae and the foramina. Depiction of these features is provided with imaging and illustrations. The purpose of this paper is to survey and present the anatomy of the foramen as a whole and provide baseline statistical data. Materials and Methods: We review relevant literature, and we present data obtained from skeletal samples of known population and sex. One hundred and nineteen thoracic vertebrae of ten cadaveric spines from the prefecture of Eastern Macedonia and Thrace, Greece, were selected. Statistical analysis measuring the vertical height and the foraminal width of each vertebra was made in accordance with sex. Results: No statistically important differences referring to the descriptive data of both sexes were found. However, statistically, important positive correlation between the vertebral height and the foraminal width was observed, especially for men. The components of the foramen including arteries and veins passing through or neighboring it, and the spinal nerves and roots are described and depicted. Conclusions: The osseous thoracic IVF reveals a glimpse of the in vivo structure and alterations of its width may be present in back pain and other degenerative diseases. Although it is crucial for surgeries and other interventional procedures of the thoracic spine, little is known about the precise anatomy and dimensions of this anatomical landmark.

  7. Post surgical complications from students' large animal surgical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A retrospective study of post surgical complications was conducted on records of students' Large Animal Surgical Laboratories in the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine (F.V.M.), Ahmadu Bello University (A.B.U), Zaria from 1989 to 1993. Three hundred and eleven surgical complications were recorded from five surgical ...

  8. A virtual surgical simulator for the lower limbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanich, L; Cruz-Neira, C

    1999-01-01

    As the body of knowledge concerning human anatomy and physiology continues to grow, new techniques must emerge to convey it more efficiently to future health care professionals. Computer simulation, interaction and visualization technologies are now being used in the development of virtual training environments. This paper presents a real-time virtual surgical simulator that integrates scientific visualization tools into a surround-screen projection-based (SSPB) immersive environment. This environment focuses on procedures for the lower limbs; however, the techniques described can be applied to other portions of the body. The research consists of three phases: environment modeling, volume visualization and immersive surgical simulation. Environment modeling involved modeling an operating room with all of the relevant elements. The volume visualization phase required the application of marching cubes and decimation techniques to the Visible Human Project (VHP) dataset to generate models of the lower limbs. The simulator integrated modeling and volume visualization to facilitate the rehearsal of medical procedures and interaction with medical information. Interactive cutting, suturing and X-Ray CT placement over the virtual patient's legs were used to probe underlying structures. The simulator is intended to aid medical students in learning anatomy, physiology and radiological analysis without jeopardizing patient care.

  9. Anatomy Education for the YouTube Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Denis S.; Marzouk, Fadi; Chulak-Oglu, Kyrylo; Bennett, Deirdre; Tierney, Paul; O'Keeffe, Gerard W.

    2016-01-01

    Anatomy remains a cornerstone of medical education despite challenges that have seen a significant reduction in contact hours over recent decades; however, the rise of the "YouTube Generation" or "Generation Connected" (Gen C), offers new possibilities for anatomy education. Gen C, which consists of 80% Millennials, actively…

  10. The art of human anatomy: Renaissance to 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hee, Robrecht; Wells, F C; Ballestriero, Roberta; Richardson, Ruth; Mazzarello, Paolo; Cani, Valentina; Catani, Marco

    2014-01-01

    This session examines the relationship between the art and science of anatomy from the time of Vesalius to the present with particular emphasis on the role of the medical artist and the changing nature of anatomical illustration over the last five centuries. Pivotal changes in the art of anatomy will be examined including the evolution of media and brain imaging from Golgi to Geschwind.

  11. Anatomy in Occupational Therapy Program Curriculum: Practitioners' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Katherine Anne

    2014-01-01

    Anatomy education is undergoing significant transformation. It is unknown whether changes are in accordance with occupational therapy (OT) practice needs. The purpose of this pilot study was to survey OT clinicians to determine their perspectives on the value of anatomy in OT curricula, and anatomical knowledge required for practice. In addition…

  12. User Acceptance of a Haptic Interface for Learning Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Soonja; Choi-Lundberg, Derek; Fluck, Andrew; Sale, Arthur

    2013-01-01

    Visualizing the structure and relationships in three dimensions (3D) of organs is a challenge for students of anatomy. To provide an alternative way of learning anatomy engaging multiple senses, we are developing a force-feedback (haptic) interface for manipulation of 3D virtual organs, using design research methodology, with iterations of system…

  13. Teaching Anatomy in the XXI Century: New Aspects and Pitfalls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Papa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Anatomy has historically been a cornerstone in medical education regardless of nation, racial background, or medical school system. By learning gross anatomy, medical students get a first “impression” about the structure of the human body which is the basis for understanding pathologic and clinical problems. Although the importance of teaching anatomy to both undergraduate and postgraduate students remains undisputed, there is currently a relevant debate concerning methods of anatomy teaching. In the past century, dissection and lectures were its sole pedagogy worldwide. Recently, the time allocated for anatomy teaching was dramatically reduced to such an extent that some suggest that it has fallen below an adequate standard. Traditional anatomy education based on topographical structural anatomy taught in lectures and gross dissection classes has been replaced by a multiple range of study modules, including problem-based learning, plastic models or computer-assisted learning, and curricula integration. “Does the anatomical theatre still have a place in medical education?” And “what is the problem with anatomic specimens?” We endeavor to answer both of these questions and to contribute to the debate on the current situation in undergraduate and graduate anatomy education.

  14. Medical Student Perceptions of Radiology Use in Anatomy Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kevin P.; Crush, Lee; O'Malley, Eoin; Daly, Fergus E.; Twomey, Maria; O'Tuathaigh, Colm M. P.; Maher, Michael M.; Cryan, John F.; O'Connor, Owen J.

    2015-01-01

    The use of radiology in the teaching of anatomy to medical students is gaining in popularity; however, there is wide variation in how and when radiology is introduced into the curriculum. The authors sought to investigate students' perceptions regarding methods used to depict and teach anatomy and effects of integrated radiology instruction on…

  15. Anatomy Education in Namibia: Balancing Facility Design and Curriculum Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessels, Quenton; Vorster, Willie; Jacobson, Christian

    2012-01-01

    The anatomy curriculum at Namibia's first, and currently only, medical school is clinically oriented, outcome-based, and includes all of the components of modern anatomical sciences i.e., histology, embryology, neuroanatomy, gross, and clinical anatomy. The design of the facilities and the equipment incorporated into these facilities were directed…

  16. The Anatomy Lecture Then and Now: A Foucauldian Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Norm; Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2014-01-01

    Although there are many points of continuity, there are also a number of changes in the pedagogical form of the anatomy lecture over the longue durée, over centuries of epistemic change, rather than over years or decades. The article begins with an analysis of the physical and technical arrangements of the early modern anatomy lecture, showing how…

  17. Is cadaveric dissection vital in anatomy education? Perceptions of 1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The use of innovative ways of teaching anatomy as well as shortage of cadavers for dissection have raised questions as to whether dissection should continue to be used in teaching anatomy. This study aimed to assess the views of medical and dental students on the importance of dissection in learning gross ...

  18. Should Reproductive Anatomy Be Taught in University Health Courses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Brent; Fletcher, J. Sue

    2013-01-01

    There has been little research on undergraduate reproductive anatomy education. This pilot study explores knowledge of anatomical reproductive anatomy among university students in a lower division and upper division health course. Using a Qualtrics survey program, a convenience sample of 120 lower division and 157 upper division students for a…

  19. YouTube: An Emerging Tool in Anatomy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffar, Akram Abood

    2012-01-01

    The use of online social networks in medical education can remodel and enhance anatomy teaching and learning; one such network is the video-sharing site YouTube. Limited research in the literature exists on the use of YouTube as a platform for anatomy education. The aim of this study is to assess student's perceptions and patterns of usage of this…

  20. Human Anatomy: Let the Students Tell Us How to Teach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Christopher R.; Bates, Anthony S.; Ellis, Harold; Roberts, Alice M.

    2014-01-01

    Anatomy teaching methods have evolved as the medical undergraduate curriculum has modernized. Traditional teaching methods of dissection, prosection, tutorials and lectures are now supplemented by anatomical models and e-learning. Despite these changes, the preferences of medical students and anatomy faculty towards both traditional and…

  1. Øvelse i sammenlignende anatomi og evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindow, Bent Erik Kramer

    2014-01-01

    I denne øvelse skal der arbejdes med sammenlignende anatomi. Formålet er at undersøge anatomiske ændringer og evolution over tid.......I denne øvelse skal der arbejdes med sammenlignende anatomi. Formålet er at undersøge anatomiske ændringer og evolution over tid....

  2. Comparative leaf anatomy of Kokoona and Lophopetalum (Celastraceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, W.T.; Baas, P.

    1973-01-01

    The leaf anatomy of Kokoona and Lophopetalum is described in detail. Separation of the two genera as effectuated by Hou (1963) is supported by differences in vascular anatomy of the distal end of the petiole, which is invariably more complex in Lophopetalum than in Kokoona. Other differential

  3. Taxonomic significance of leaf epidermal anatomy of selected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-06-21

    Jun 21, 2010 ... Taxonomic significance of leaf epidermal anatomy of selected Persicaria Mill. species of family ... characters are comparable over a wide taxonomic range and quite reliable. Comprehensive foliar anatomy .... characteristics of the plants growing in humid conditions. (Stace, 1965; Ayodele and Olwokudejo, ...

  4. Systematic wood anatomy of the tribe Guettardeae (Rubiaceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welle, ter B.J.H.; Loureiro, A.A.; Lisboa, P.L.B.; Koek-Noorman, J.

    1983-01-01

    Systematic wood anatomy of the tribe Guettardeae (Rubiaceae). The wood anatomy of nearly all genera of the Guettardeae (Rubiaceae, Guettardoideae) has been examined, and in this respect the tribe is heterogeneous. Suggestions are made for a delimitation of the tribe. Guettarda, Bobea, Antirhea,

  5. Uberon: towards a comprehensive multi-species anatomy ontology

    OpenAIRE

    Melissa A. Haendel; Georgios G. Gkoutos; Suzanna E. Lewis; Chris Mungall

    2009-01-01

    The lack of a single unified species-neutral ontology covering the anatomy of a variety of metazoans is a hindrance to translating model organism research to human health. We have developed an Uber-anatomy ontology to fill this need, filling the gap between the CARO upper-level ontology and species-specific anatomical ontologies.

  6. Value of vaginal cervical position in estimating uterine anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidan, Ulaş; Keskin, Uğur; Ulubay, Mustafa; Öztürk, Mustafa; Bodur, Serkan

    2017-04-01

    The anatomy of the uterus is defined with the angles of the vagina, cervix and uterine corpus. Hereunder there are angles of version and flexion. The cervical position observed during the vaginal speculum examination, may give information about the uterine anatomy. In this study, we investigated the place of the cervical position in the estimation of the uterine anatomy observed during the cervical examination. We enrolled 240 patients in our study, who applied to our routine gynecology outpatient clinic with various complaints. We divided these patients into two groups according to the cervical position (anterior cervical position and posterior cervical position) observed during the speculum examination. We recorded the uterine anatomy also with the transvaginal ultrasonography. During the speculum examination, we determined that 90% of the cases with posterior fornix position were anteverted and 10% retroverted; 64.2% of the cases with anterior fornix position were anteverted and 35.8% retroverted. According to these findings, cervical position observed during the speculum examination might be useful in the estimation of the uterine anatomy regarding the angles of the version. However, the ultrasonographic examination is essential for a definitive determination of the uterine anatomy. Clin. Anat. 30:404-408, 2017. © 2017 The Authors. Clinical Anatomy published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Clinical Anatomists. © 2017 The Authors. Clinical Anatomy published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Clinical Anatomists.

  7. Stereopsis, Visuospatial Ability, and Virtual Reality in Anatomy Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luursema, J.M.; Vorstenbosch, M.A.; Kooloos, J.G.M.

    2017-01-01

    A new wave of virtual reality headsets has become available. A potential benefit for the study of human anatomy is the reintroduction of stereopsis and absolute size. We report a randomized controlled trial to assess the contribution of stereopsis to anatomy learning, for students of different

  8. Student Perspectives of Imaging Anatomy in Undergraduate Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Jorge Americo Dinis; Barbosa, Joselina Maria Pinto; Ferreira, Maria Amelia Duarte

    2013-01-01

    Radiological imaging is gaining relevance in the acquisition of competencies in clinical anatomy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the perceptions of medical students on teaching/learning of imaging anatomy as an integrated part of anatomical education. A questionnaire was designed to evaluate the perceptions of second-year students…

  9. Anatomy of the female reproductive system of Rusa deer ( Rusa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study aims to present baseline data on the reproductive anatomy of a poorly known tropical deer species, Rusa deer (Rusa timorensis). The anatomy of female reproductive system is described using seven uniparous hinds, aged between four and eight years. The various reproductive structures were studied via ...

  10. Student Perceptions to Teaching Undergraduate Anatomy in Health Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderton, Ryan S.; Chiu, Li Shan; Aulfrey, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Anatomy and physiology teaching has undergone significant changes to keep up with advances in technology and to cater for a wide array of student specific learning approaches. This paper examines perceptions towards a variety of teaching instruments, techniques, and innovations used in the delivery and teaching of anatomy and physiology for health…

  11. New Directions in 3D Medical Modeling: 3D-Printing Anatomy and Functions in Neurosurgical Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Gargiulo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper illustrates the feasibility and utility of combining cranial anatomy and brain function on the same 3D-printed model, as evidenced by a neurosurgical planning case study of a 29-year-old female patient with a low-grade frontal-lobe glioma. We herein report the rapid prototyping methodology utilized in conjunction with surgical navigation to prepare and plan a complex neurosurgery. The method introduced here combines CT and MRI images with DTI tractography, while using various image segmentation protocols to 3D model the skull base, tumor, and five eloquent fiber tracts. This 3D model is rapid-prototyped and coregistered with patient images and a reported surgical navigation system, establishing a clear link between the printed model and surgical navigation. This methodology highlights the potential for advanced neurosurgical preparation, which can begin before the patient enters the operation theatre. Moreover, the work presented here demonstrates the workflow developed at the National University Hospital of Iceland, Landspitali, focusing on the processes of anatomy segmentation, fiber tract extrapolation, MRI/CT registration, and 3D printing. Furthermore, we present a qualitative and quantitative assessment for fiber tract generation in a case study where these processes are applied in the preparation of brain tumor resection surgery.

  12. New Directions in 3D Medical Modeling: 3D-Printing Anatomy and Functions in Neurosurgical Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargiulo, Paola; Árnadóttir, Iris; Gíslason, Magnús; Edmunds, Kyle; Ólafsson, Ingvar

    2017-01-01

    This paper illustrates the feasibility and utility of combining cranial anatomy and brain function on the same 3D-printed model, as evidenced by a neurosurgical planning case study of a 29-year-old female patient with a low-grade frontal-lobe glioma. We herein report the rapid prototyping methodology utilized in conjunction with surgical navigation to prepare and plan a complex neurosurgery. The method introduced here combines CT and MRI images with DTI tractography, while using various image segmentation protocols to 3D model the skull base, tumor, and five eloquent fiber tracts. This 3D model is rapid-prototyped and coregistered with patient images and a reported surgical navigation system, establishing a clear link between the printed model and surgical navigation. This methodology highlights the potential for advanced neurosurgical preparation, which can begin before the patient enters the operation theatre. Moreover, the work presented here demonstrates the workflow developed at the National University Hospital of Iceland, Landspitali, focusing on the processes of anatomy segmentation, fiber tract extrapolation, MRI/CT registration, and 3D printing. Furthermore, we present a qualitative and quantitative assessment for fiber tract generation in a case study where these processes are applied in the preparation of brain tumor resection surgery. © 2017 Paolo Gargiulo et al.

  13. Microsurgical anatomy of the central core of the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribas, Eduardo Carvalhal; Yağmurlu, Kaan; de Oliveira, Evandro; Ribas, Guilherme Carvalhal; Rhoton, Albert

    2017-12-22

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to describe in detail the cortical and subcortical anatomy of the central core of the brain, defining its limits, with particular attention to the topography and relationships of the thalamus, basal ganglia, and related white matter pathways and vessels. METHODS The authors studied 19 cerebral hemispheres. The vascular systems of all of the specimens were injected with colored silicone, and the specimens were then frozen for at least 1 month to facilitate identification of individual fiber tracts. The dissections were performed in a stepwise manner, locating each gray matter nucleus and white matter pathway at different depths inside the central core. The course of fiber pathways was also noted in relation to the insular limiting sulci. RESULTS The insular surface is the most superficial aspect of the central core and is divided by a central sulcus into an anterior portion, usually containing 3 short gyri, and a posterior portion, with 2 long gyri. It is bounded by the anterior limiting sulcus, the superior limiting sulcus, and the inferior limiting sulcus. The extreme capsule is directly underneath the insular surface and is composed of short association fibers that extend toward all the opercula. The claustrum lies deep to the extreme capsule, and the external capsule is found medial to it. Three fiber pathways contribute to form both the extreme and external capsules, and they lie in a sequential anteroposterior disposition: the uncinate fascicle, the inferior fronto-occipital fascicle, and claustrocortical fibers. The putamen and the globus pallidus are between the external capsule, laterally, and the internal capsule, medially. The internal capsule is present medial to almost all insular limiting sulci and most of the insular surface, but not to their most anteroinferior portions. This anteroinferior portion of the central core has a more complex anatomy and is distinguished in this paper as the "anterior perforated

  14. Non-surgical root canal treatment of dens invaginatus 3 in a maxillary lateral incisor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Saeed; Donyavi, Zakyeh; Esmaealzade, Mohammad

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this case report was to describe the clinical management of an unusual dens invaginatus type 3. A case of dens invaginatus in a maxillary lateral incisor with a periapical lesion is reported. The patient presented with pain and localized swelling. Despite the complex anatomy and diagnosis of dens invaginatus, non-surgical root canal treatment was performed successfully. - Dens invaginatus may be presented in different forms, and the etiology of this phenomenon is not fully understood. - Due to abnormal anatomical configuration, dens invaginatus presents technical difficulties in its clinical management. - Non-surgical root canal treatment can be performed successfully.

  15. The Anatomy of a Weight Recidivism and Revision Bariatric Surgical Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. de Gara

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Weight recidivism in bariatric surgery failure is multifactorial. It ranges from inappropriate patient selection for primary surgery to technical/anatomic issues related to the original surgery. Most bariatric surgeons and centers focus on primary bariatric surgery while weight recidivism and its complications are very much secondary concerns. Methods. We report on our initial experience having established a dedicated weight recidivism and revisional bariatric surgery clinic. A single surgeon, dedicated nursing, dieticians, and psychologist developed care maps, goals of care, nonsurgical candidate rules, and discharge planning strategies. Results. A single year audit (2012 of clinical activity revealed 137 patients, with a mean age 49 ± 10.1 years (6 years older on average than in our primary clinic, 75% of whom were women with BMI 47 ± 11.5. Over three quarters had undergone a vertical band gastroplasty while 15% had had a laparoscopic adjustable gastric band. Only 27% of those attending clinic required further surgery. As for primary surgery, the role of the obesity expert clinical psychologist was a key component to achieving successful revision outcomes. Conclusion. With an exponential rise in obesity and a concomitant major increase in bariatric surgery, an inevitable increase in revisional surgery is becoming a reality. Anticipating this increase in activity, Alberta Health Services, Alberta, Canada, has established a unique and dedicated clinic whose early results are promising.

  16. Virtual reality surgical anatomy of the sphenoid sinus and adjacent structures by the transnasal approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shou-Sen; Xue, Liang; Jing, Jun-Jie; Wang, Ru-Mi

    2012-09-01

    To examine the three-dimensional virtual anatomical features of the sphenoid sinus and adjacent structures during virtual surgery and explore their relevance to actual transsphenoidal surgery. CT images of the sphenoid sinus and surrounding structures from 28 Chinese adult patients were measured using a 16-slice helical CT scanner. Image analysis was performed using the volume-rendering method. Two experienced neurosurgeons wearing stereoscopic glasses performed virtual transsphenoidal surgery by the transnasal approach. The virtual anatomical features of the sphenoid sinus and the adjacent structures during virtual surgery were described. The distance from the sphenopalatine foramen to the left and right sphenoid ostium was 10.1 ± 2.7 mm and 10.5 ± 3.2 mm, respectively, to the left and right sphenoidal crest 12.9 ± 2.0 mm and 12.8 ± 2.2 mm, respectively, and to the left and right uncinate process 24.0 ± 1.9 mm and 23.9 ± 2.0 mm, respectively. The distance from the uncinate process to the medial and lateral edge of the most prominent part of the anterior bend of the cavernous internal carotid artery (ICA) was 33.7 ± 3.7 mm and 34.8 ± 3.7 mm, respectively, and the angle between the two lines was 9.7 ± 1.9°. The study provides virtual anatomical information about the sphenoid sinus and important surrounding structures that is essential for successful real life transsphenoidal surgery. Copyright © 2011 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Clinical anatomy and surgical repair of prepubic hernia in dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beittenmiller, Menolly R; Mann, F A; Constantinescu, Gheorghe M; Luther, Jill K

    2009-01-01

    Prepubic hernia is a traumatic hernia in small animals, most often associated with severe trauma to the caudal abdomen. Common causes include vehicular trauma, dog fights, and kicks by large animals. Rupture of the prepubic tendon in dogs and of its equivalent in cats results in a ventral abdominal hernia. Due to the traumatic nature of the injury, concurrent injuries are frequently seen. Clinical signs of herniation are often nonspecific, and the resultant hernia may not be readily apparent during routine physical examination. This being so, diagnosis is often based on a thorough physical examination in conjunction with abdominal radiography and, possibly, abdominal ultrasonography. Multiple methods of repair of prepubic hernia have been reported, and survival rates are quite good if concurrent injuries are not severe.

  18. The Anatomy of a Weight Recidivism and Revision Bariatric Surgical Clinic

    OpenAIRE

    de Gara, C. J.; Karmali, S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Weight recidivism in bariatric surgery failure is multifactorial. It ranges from inappropriate patient selection for primary surgery to technical/anatomic issues related to the original surgery. Most bariatric surgeons and centers focus on primary bariatric surgery while weight recidivism and its complications are very much secondary concerns. Methods. We report on our initial experience having established a dedicated weight recidivism and revisional bariatric surgery clinic. A sing...

  19. Surgical anatomy of the aortic root: Implication for valve-sparing reimplantation and aortic valve annuloplasty

    OpenAIRE

    de Kerchove, Laurent; Jashari, Ramadan; Boodhwani, Munir; Duy, Khanh Tran; Lengelé, Benoit; Gianello, Pierre; Nezhad, Zahra Mozala; Astarci, Parla; Noirhomme, Philippe; El Khoury, Gebrine

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To enhance the reproducibility of aortic valve-sparing reimplantation and annuloplasty, we analyzed the topographic relationship between the ventriculoaortic junction (VAJ), basal ring (BR), and sinotubular junction (STJ). The root base thickness is also quantified. METHOD: Fifty-eight fresh human aortic valves were analyzed. The root was dissected to the limit where the aortic wall terminates into the cardiac structures (VAJ). Root height was measured externally from the STJ t...

  20. Personalized augmented reality for anatomy education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Meng; Fallavollita, Pascal; Seelbach, Ina; Von Der Heide, Anna Maria; Euler, Ekkehard; Waschke, Jens; Navab, Nassir

    2016-05-01

    Anatomy education is a challenging but vital element in forming future medical professionals. In this work, a personalized and interactive augmented reality system is developed to facilitate education. This system behaves as a "magic mirror" which allows personalized in-situ visualization of anatomy on the user's body. Real-time volume visualization of a CT dataset creates the illusion that the user can look inside their body. The system comprises a RGB-D sensor as a real-time tracking device to detect the user moving in front of a display. In addition, the magic mirror system shows text information, medical images, and 3D models of organs that the user can interact with. Through the participation of 7 clinicians and 72 students, two user studies were designed to respectively assess the precision and acceptability of the magic mirror system for education. The results of the first study demonstrated that the average precision of the augmented reality overlay on the user body was 0.96 cm, while the results of the second study indicate 86.1% approval for the educational value of the magic mirror, and 91.7% approval for the augmented reality capability of displaying organs in three dimensions. The usefulness of this unique type of personalized augmented reality technology has been demonstrated in this paper. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.