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Sample records for surgical wound infection

  1. PREPARATIVE SKIN PREPARATION AND SURGICAL WOUND INFECTION

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    Anjanappa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: It is an established fact now that the normal skin of healthy human beings harbours a rich bacterial fl ora. Normally considered non - pathogenic , these organisms way be a potential source of infection of the surgical wound. Approximately 20% of the resident flora is beyond the reach of surgical scrubs and antiseptics. The goal of surgical preparation of the skin with antiseptics is to remove transient and pathogenic microorganisms on the skin surface and to reduce the resident flora to a low level. Povidone iodine (I odophors and chlorhexidine are most often used antiseptics for pre - operative skin preparation. OBJECTIVES : To evaluate the efficacy of povidone iodine alone and in combination with antiseptic agent containing alcoholic chlorhexidine in preoperative skin p reparation by taking swab culture. (2 To compare the rate of postoperative wound infection in both the groups. METHODS: One hundred patients (fifty in each group undergoing clean elective surgery with no focus of infection on the body were included in th e study. The pre - operative skin preparation in each group is done with the respective antiseptic regimen. In both the groups after application of antiseptics , sterile saline swab culture was taken immediately from site of incision. In cases which showed gr owth of organisms , the bacteria isolated were identified by their morphological and cultural characteristics. Grams staining , coagulase test and antibiotic sensitivity test were done wherever necessary and difference in colonization rates was determined as a measure of efficacy of antiseptic regimen. RESULTS: The results of the study showed that when compared to povidone iodine alone , using a combination of povidone iodine and alcoholic solution of chlorhexidine , the colonization rates of the site of incisi on were reduced significantly. As for the rate of post - operative wound infection , it is also proven that wound infections are also

  2. Mycobacterium fortuitum causing surgical site wound infection

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    Kaleem, F.; Usman, J.; Omair, M.; Din, R.U.; Hassan, A.

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium fortuitum, a rapidly growing mycobacterium, is ubiquitous in nature. The organism was considered to be a harmless saprophyte but now there have been several reports from different parts of the world wherein it has been incriminated in a variety of human infections. We report a culture positive case of surgical site infection caused by Mycobacterium fortuitum, who responded well to the treatment. (author)

  3. Disposable surgical face masks for preventing surgical wound infection in clean surgery

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    Allyson Lipp

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Surgical face masks were originally developed to contain and filter droplets containing microorganisms expelled from the mouth and nasopharynx of healthcare workers during surgery, thereby providing protection for the patient. However, there are several ways in which surgical face masks could potentially contribute to contamination of the surgical wound, e.g. by incorrect wear or by leaking air from the side of the mask due to poor string tension. OBJECTIVES: To determine whether disposable surgical face masks worn by the surgical team during clean surgery prevent postoperative surgical wound infection. SEARCH METHODS: We searched The Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register (searched 14 September 2011; The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 3; Ovid MEDLINE (2008 to August Week 5 2011; Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process &Other Non-Indexed Citations September 13, 2011; Ovid EMBASE (2008 to 2011 Week 35; and EBSCO CINAHL (2008 to 9 September 2011. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs and quasi-randomized controlled trials comparing the use of disposable surgical masks with the use of no mask. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors extracted data independently. MAIN RESULTS: Three trials were included, involving a total of 2113 participants. There was no statistically significant difference in infection rates between the masked and unmasked group in any of the trials. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: From the limited results it is unclear whether the wearing of surgical face masks by members of the surgical team has any impact on surgical wound infection rates for patients undergoing clean surgery.

  4. A STUDY ON THE POST SURGICAL WOUND INFECTIONS IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL IN KANCHIPURAM

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    Sivasankari; Thenmozhi Valli Pitchai; Anitha; Senthamarai; Venugopal

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Surgical site infections are the infections that occur within thirty days after the operative procedure (Except in case of added implants). Surgical site infections are the 3rd most commonly reported nosocomial infections accounting for a quarter of all such infections. A wide range of organisms are known to infect wounds like gram positive cocci, gram negative bacilli, spore formers, aerobes and anaerobes. Despite the advances in operative technique and better unde...

  5. Bacteriology of post–operative wound infections in the surgical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of 248 swab specimens from post-operative wounds suspected to be infected were bacteriologically evaluated. Of these, bacterial growth was recorded in 204 specimens (82.3%) while 44 specimens (17.7%) yielded no growth. The bacteria isolated from the samples in decreasing order of prevalence were: ...

  6. Prevention of surgical wound infection in obese women undergoing cesarean section

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldig, Nana; Vinter, Christina Anne; Kruse, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Obese women undergoing caesarean section are at increased risk of surgical wound infection, which may lead to reduced quality of life, and increased health care cost. The aim is to evaluate the effect of incisional Negative Pressure Wound Therapy applied prophylactically in obese women under......: The study is on-going. We expect to find a 50% reduction of wound infection when using iNPWT compared to standard dressings in this high-risk subpopulation....

  7. [Preoperative preparation, antibiotic prophylaxis and surgical wound infection in breast surgery].

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    Rodríguez-Caravaca, Gil; de las Casas-Cámara, Gonzalo; Pita-López, María José; Robustillo-Rodela, Ana; Díaz-Agero, Cristina; Monge-Jodrá, Vicente; Fereres, José

    2011-01-01

    The impact of surgical wound infection on public health justifies its surveillance and prevention. Our objectives were to estimate the incidence of surgical wound infection in breast procedures and assess its protocol of antibiotic prophylaxis and preoperative preparation. Observational multicentre prospective cohort study of incidence of surgical wound infection. Incidence was evaluated, stratified by National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance (NNIS) risk index and we calculated the standardized incidence ratio (SIR). The SIR was compared with Spanish rates and U.S. rates. The compliance and performance of the antibiotic prophylaxis and preoperative preparation protocol were assessed and their influence in the incidence of infection with the relative risk. Ten hospitals from the Comunidad de Madrid were included, providing 592 procedures. The cumulative incidence of surgical wound infection was 3.89% (95% CI: 2.3-5.5). The SIR was 1.82 on the Spanish rate and 2.16 on the American. Antibiotic prophylaxis was applied in 97.81% of cases, when indicated. The overall performance of antibiotic prophylaxis was 75%, and 53% for preoperative preparation. No association was found between infection and performance of prophylaxis or preoperative preparation (P>.05). Our incidence is within those seen in the literature although it is somewhat higher than the national surveillance programs. The performance of prophylaxis antibiotic must be improved, as well as the recording of preoperative preparation data. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  8. Antibiotic prophylaxis adequacy in knee arthroplasty and surgical wound infection: Prospective cohort study.

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    Del-Moral-Luque, J A; Checa-García, A; López-Hualda, Á; Villar-Del-Campo, M C; Martínez-Martín, J; Moreno-Coronas, F J; Montejo-Sancho, J; Rodríguez-Caravaca, G

    Antibiotic prophylaxis is the most suitable tool for preventing surgical wound infection. This study evaluated adequacy of antibiotic prophylaxis in surgery for knee arthroplasty and its effect on surgical site infection. Prospective cohort study. We assessed the degree of adequacy of antibiotic prophylaxis, the causes of non-adequacy, and the effect of non-adequacy on surgical site infection. Incidence of surgical site infection was studied after a maximum incubation period of a year. To assess the effect of prophylaxis non-adequacy on surgical site infection we used the relative risk adjusted with the aid of a logistic regression model. The study covered a total of 1749 patients. Antibiotic prophylaxis was indicated in all patients and administered in 99.8% of cases, with an overall protocol adequacy of 77.6%. The principal cause of non-compliance was the duration of prescription of the antibiotics (46.5%). Cumulative incidence of surgical site infection was 1.43%. No relationship was found between prophylaxis adequacy and surgical infection (RR=1.15; 95% CI: .31-2.99) (P>.05). Surveillance and infection control programs enable risk factors of infection and improvement measures to be assessed. Monitoring infection rates enables us to reduce their incidence. Adequacy of antibiotic prophylaxis was high but could be improved. We did not find a relationship between prophylaxis adequacy and surgical site infection rate. Copyright © 2017 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Is sternal rewiring mandatory in surgical treatment of deep sternal wound infections?

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    Rashed, Aref; Gombocz, Karoly; Alotti, Nasri; Verzar, Zsofia

    2018-04-01

    Deep sternal wound infections (DSWIs) are a rare but serious complication after median sternotomy, and treatment success depends mainly on surgical experience. We compared treatment outcomes after conventional sternal rewiring and reconstruction with no sternal rewiring in patients with a sternal wound infection. We retrospectively enrolled patients who developed a DSWI after an open-heart procedure with median sternotomy at the Department of Cardiac Surgery, at the St. Rafael Hospital, Zalaegerszeg, Hungary, between 2012 and 2016. All patients received negative pressure wound and antibiotic therapy before surgical reconstruction. Patients were divided into groups determined by the reconstruction technique and compared. Subjects were followed up for 12 months, and the primary end-points were readmission and 90-day mortality. Among 3,177 median sternotomy cases, 60 patients developed a DSWI, 4 of whom died of sepsis before surgical treatment. Fifty-six patients underwent surgical reconstruction with conventional sternal rewiring (23 cases, 41%) or another interventions with no sternal refixation (33 cases, 59%). Eighty-one percent of sternal wound infections followed coronary bypass surgery (alone or combinated with another procedures), and 60% were diagnosed after hospital discharge. Staphylococcus aureus was cultured in 30% of all wounds and, 56.5% of cases reconstructed by sternal rewiring vs. 26.5% with no sternal rewiring, (P=0.022). Hospital readmission occurred in 63.6% of the sternal rewiring group vs. 14.7% of the no sternal rewiring group. The rate of death before wound healing or the 90 th postoperative day was 21.7% in the sternal rewiring group vs. 0% in the no sternal rewiring group. The median hospital stay was longer in the sternal rewiring group than in the other group (51 vs. 30 days, P=0.006). Sternal rewiring may be associated with a higher rate of treatment failure than other forms of treatment for sternal wound infections.

  10. Comparison of primary and delayed primary closure in dirty abdominal wounds in terms of frequency of surgical site infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aziz, O.B.A.; Ahmed, N.; Butt, M.W.U.D.; Saleem, M.R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Objective of this study was to compare primary and delayed primary wound closure for dirty abdominal wounds in terms of frequency of surgical site infection. Study Design: Randomized Controlled Trial. Place and Duration of Study: Combined Military Hospital, Multan. From 16 Sep 2010 to 15 Mar 2011. Patients and Methods: A total of 110 patients were randomly divided into two groups of 55 patients each using random numbers table. Abdominal wounds of one group were closed primarily and of other group were subjected to delayed primary wound closure. The wounds were then checked for surgical site infection for seven post operative days. Results: A higher frequency of surgical site infection was observed in primary closure group (27.3%) as compared to delayed primary closure group (9.1%) which was statistically significant (p=0.013). Conclusion: Delayed primary closure is superior to primary closure in dirty abdominal wounds in terms of frequency of surgical site infection. (author)

  11. Wound management with vacuum assisted closure in surgical site infection after ankle surgery.

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    Zhou, Zhen-Yu; Liu, Ya-Ke; Chen, Hong-Lin; Liu, Fan

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of vacuum assisted closure (VAC) with standard moist wound care (SMWC) in surgical site infection after ankle surgery. A prospective cohort was performed among patients with surgical site infection after ankle surgery between 2012 and 2013. The follow-up period was three month, and the efficacy end point was complete wound closure rate. Ninety-four patients were analyzed, with 61 patients in the VAC group and 33 in the SMWC group. The complete wound closure rate in the VAC group was higher than that in the SMWC group at 3 month follow up (90.2% Vs. 72.7%, p = 0.028). The median time to complete wound closure was 31 days (95% CI 20.2-41.8) for VAC, and 63 days (95% CI 46.9-79.1) for SMWC (χ(2) = 4.023, p = 0.045). In the superficial infection subgroup, the median times to complete wound closure were 20 days (95% CI 14.2-35.1) in the VAC group and 42 days (95% CI 35.4-69.4) in SMWC group (χ(2) = 4.331, p = 0.041). In the deep subgroup, the median times to complete wound closure were 46 days (95% CI 28.2-65.9) in the VAC group and 75 days (95% CI 43.2-79.6) in SMWC group (χ(2) = 6.475, p = 0.026). Our result showed that vacuum assisted closure was more effective than standard moist wound care in surgical site infection after ankle surgery. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Vacuum-assisted closure versus closure without vacuum assistance for preventing surgical site infections and infections of chronic wounds: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

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    Tansarli, Giannoula S; Vardakas, Konstantinos Z; Stratoulias, Constantinos; Peppas, George; Kapaskelis, Anastasios; Falagas, Matthew E

    2014-08-01

    We sought to examine whether vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) is associated with fewer surgical site infections (SSIs) or infections of chronic wounds than other management procedures for surgical wounds. The PubMed and Scopus databases were searched systematically. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the development of SSIs or infections of chronic wounds between patients treated with VAC for acute or chronic wounds and those whose wounds were treated without VAC were considered eligible for inclusion in the study. Eight RCTs met the inclusion criteria for the study. Four of the studies included chronic or diabetic lower extremity wounds and four included fractures. In three of four studies reporting on fractures, the wounds were not closed post-operatively, whereas in one study primary closure of the wound was performed. With regard to wounds left open after the stabilization of fractures, patients whose wounds were treated with VAC developed fewer SSIs than those whose wounds were treated without VAC ([367 patients (196 with VAC; 171 without VAC) relative risk [RR], 0.47; 95% CI 0.28-0.81]). On the contrary, no difference in the development of SSIs occurred among patients with chronic or diabetic lower-extremity wounds treated with VAC and those whose wounds were treated without VAC ([638 patients (320 with VAC; 318 without VAC) RR 1.67; 95% CI: 0.71-3.94]). The available evidence suggests that the development of infections in wounds treated with VAC depends on the type of wound being treated.

  13. Intracavity lavage and wound irrigation for prevention of surgical site infection

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    Norman, Gill; Atkinson, Ross A; Smith, Tanya A; Rowlands, Ceri; Rithalia, Amber D; Crosbie, Emma J; Dumville, Jo C

    2017-01-01

    Background Surgical site infections (SSIs) are wound infections that occur after an operative procedure. A preventable complication, they are costly and associated with poorer patient outcomes, increased mortality, morbidity and reoperation rates. Surgical wound irrigation is an intraoperative technique, which may reduce the rate of SSIs through removal of dead or damaged tissue, metabolic waste, and wound exudate. Irrigation can be undertaken prior to wound closure or postoperatively. Intracavity lavage is a similar technique used in operations that expose a bodily cavity; such as procedures on the abdominal cavity and during joint replacement surgery. Objectives To assess the effects of wound irrigation and intracavity lavage on the prevention of surgical site infection (SSI). Search methods In February 2017 we searched the Cochrane Wounds Specialised Register; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); Ovid MEDLINE; Ovid Embase and EBSCO CINAHL Plus. We also searched three clinical trials registries and references of included studies and relevant systematic reviews. There were no restrictions on language, date of publication or study setting. Selection criteria We included all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of participants undergoing surgical procedures in which the use of a particular type of intraoperative washout (irrigation or lavage) was the only systematic difference between groups, and in which wounds underwent primary closure. The primary outcomes were SSI and wound dehiscence. Secondary outcomes were mortality, use of systemic antibiotics, antibiotic resistance, adverse events, re-intervention, length of hospital stay, and readmissions. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed studies for inclusion at each stage. Two review authors also undertook data extraction, assessment of risk of bias and GRADE assessment. We calculated risk ratios or differences in means with 95% confidence intervals where

  14. Surgical wound infection rates in Spain: data summary, January 1997 through June 2012.

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    Díaz-Agero Pérez, Cristina; Robustillo Rodela, Ana; Pita López, María José; López Fresneña, Nieves; Monge Jodrá, Vicente

    2014-05-01

    The Indicadores Clínicos de Mejora Continua de la Calidad (INCLIMECC) program was established in Spain in 1997. INCLIMECC is a prospective system of health care-associated infection (HAI) surveillance that collects incidence data in surgical and intensive care unit patients. The protocol is based on the National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) surveillance system, formerly known as the National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance (NNIS) system, and uses standard infection definitions from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Each hospital takes part voluntarily and selects the units and surgical procedures to be surveyed. This report is a summary of the data collected between January 1997 and June 2012. A total of 370,015 patients were included, and the overall incidence of surgical wound infection (SWI) was 4.51%. SWI rates are provided by NHSN operating procedure category and NNIS risk index category. More than 27% of the patients received inadequate antibiotic prophylaxis, the main reason being unsuitable duration (57.05% of cases). Today, the INCLIMECC network includes 64 Spanish hospitals. We believe that an HAI surveillance system with trained personnel external to the surveyed unit is a key component not only in infection control and prevention, but also in a quality improvement system. Copyright © 2014. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  15. Reduction in Surgical Wound Infection Rates Associated with Reporting Data to Surgeons

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    GD Taylor

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have shown that wound infection (surgical site infection [ ssi ] rates fall when surgeons are provided with data on their performance. Since 1987, the authors have been performing concurrent surveillance of surgical patients and confidentially reporting surgeon-specific ssi rates to individual surgeons and their clinical directors, and providing surgeons with the mean rates of their peers. The program has been gradually refined and expanded. Data are now collected on wound infection risk and report risk adjusted rates compared with the mean for hospitals in the United States National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance (nnis data bank. Since inception through to December 1993, ssi rates have fallen 68% in clean contaminated general surgery cases (relative risk [rr] 0.36, 95% ci 0.2 to 0.6, P=0.0001, 64% in clean plastic surgery cases (rr 0.35, 95% ci 0.06 to 1.8, 72% in caesarean section cases (rr 0.23, 95% ci 0.03 to 1.96 and 42% in clean cardiovascular surgery cases (rr 0.59, 95% ci 0.34 to 1.0. In clean orthopedic surgery the ssi rate remained stable from 1987 through 1992. In 1993 a marked increase was experienced. Reasons for this are being explored. Overall there was a 32% decrease in ssi rate between the index year and 1993 or, in percentage terms, 2.8% to 1.9% (rr 0.65, 95% ci 0.51 to 0.86, P=0.002. ssi surveillance should become standard in Canadian hospitals interested in improving the quality of surgical care and reducing the clinical impact and cost associated with nosocomial infection.

  16. Methods for identifying surgical wound infection after discharge from hospital: a systematic review

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    Moore Peter J

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wound infections are a common complication of surgery that add significantly to the morbidity of patients and costs of treatment. The global trend towards reducing length of hospital stay post-surgery and the increase in day case surgery means that surgical site infections (SSI will increasingly occur after hospital discharge. Surveillance of SSIs is important because rates of SSI are viewed as a measure of hospital performance, however accurate detection of SSIs post-hospital discharge is not straightforward. Methods We conducted a systematic review of methods of post discharge surveillance for surgical wound infection and undertook a national audit of methods of post-discharge surveillance for surgical site infection currently used within United Kingdom NHS Trusts. Results Seven reports of six comparative studies which examined the validity of post-discharge surveillance methods were located; these involved different comparisons and some had methodological limitations, making it difficult to identify an optimal method. Several studies evaluated automated screening of electronic records and found this to be a useful strategy for the identification of SSIs that occurred post discharge. The audit identified a wide range of relevant post-discharge surveillance programmes in England, Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; however, these programmes used varying approaches for which there is little supporting evidence of validity and/or reliability. Conclusion In order to establish robust methods of surveillance for those surgical site infections that occur post discharge, there is a need to develop a method of case ascertainment that is valid and reliable post discharge. Existing research has not identified a valid and reliable method. A standardised definition of wound infection (e.g. that of the Centres for Disease Control should be used as a basis for developing a feasible, valid and reliable approach to defining post

  17. Biobased silver nanocolloid coating on silk fibers for prevention of post-surgical wound infections

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    Dhas SP

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Sindhu Priya Dhas, Suruthi Anbarasan, Amitava Mukherjee, Natarajan Chandrasekaran Center for Nanobiotechnology, VIT University, Vellore, India Abstract: Bombyx mori silk fibers are an important biomaterial and are used in surgical sutures due to their remarkable biocompatibility. The major drawback to the application of biomaterials is the risk of bacterial invasion, leading to clinical complications. We have developed an easy and cost-effective method for fabrication of antibacterial silk fibers loaded with silver nanoparticles (AgNPs by an in situ and ex situ process using an aqueous extract of Rhizophora apiculata leaf. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that well dispersed nanoparticles impregnated the silk fibers both in situ and ex situ. The crystalline nature of the AgNPs in the silk fibers was demonstrated by X-ray diffraction. The thermal and mechanical properties of the silk fibers were enhanced after they were impregnated with AgNPs. The silver-coated silk fibers fabricated by the in situ and ex situ method exhibited more than 90% inhibition against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Silk fibers doped with AgNPs were found to be biocompatible with 3T3 fibroblasts. The results obtained represent an important advance towards the clinical application of biocompatible AgNP-loaded silk fibers for prevention of surgical wound infections. Keywords: silk fibers, silver nanoparticles, antibacterial activity, wound infections, cytotoxicity, 3T3 fibroblast cells

  18. ‘This wound has spoilt everything’: emotional capital and the experience of surgical site infections

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    Brown, Brian; Tanner, Judith; Padley, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    In this article we explore the experience of suffering from a surgical site infection, a common complication of surgery affecting around 5 per cent of surgical patients, via an interview study of 17 patients in the Midlands in the UK. Despite their prevalence, the experience of surgical site infections has received little attention so far. In spite of the impairment resulting from these iatrogenic problems, participants expressed considerable stoicism and we interpret this via the notion of emotional capital. This idea derives from the work of Pierre Bourdieu, Helga Nowotny and Diane Reay and helps us conceptualise the emotional resources accumulated and expended in managing illness and in gaining the most from healthcare services. Participants were frequently at pains not to blame healthcare personnel or hospitals, often discounting the infection's severity, and attributing it to chance, to ‘germs’ or to their own failure to buy and apply wound care products. The participants' stoicism was thus partly afforded by their refusal to blame healthcare institutions or personnel. Where anger was described, this was either defused or expressed on behalf of another person. Emotional capital is associated with deflecting the possibility of complaint and sustaining a deferential and grateful position in relation to the healthcare system. PMID:25470322

  19. 'This wound has spoilt everything': emotional capital and the experience of surgical site infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Brian; Tanner, Judith; Padley, Wendy

    2014-11-01

    In this article we explore the experience of suffering from a surgical site infection, a common complication of surgery affecting around 5 per cent of surgical patients, via an interview study of 17 patients in the Midlands in the UK. Despite their prevalence, the experience of surgical site infections has received little attention so far. In spite of the impairment resulting from these iatrogenic problems, participants expressed considerable stoicism and we interpret this via the notion of emotional capital. This idea derives from the work of Pierre Bourdieu, Helga Nowotny and Diane Reay and helps us conceptualise the emotional resources accumulated and expended in managing illness and in gaining the most from healthcare services. Participants were frequently at pains not to blame healthcare personnel or hospitals, often discounting the infection's severity, and attributing it to chance, to 'germs' or to their own failure to buy and apply wound care products. The participants' stoicism was thus partly afforded by their refusal to blame healthcare institutions or personnel. Where anger was described, this was either defused or expressed on behalf of another person. Emotional capital is associated with deflecting the possibility of complaint and sustaining a deferential and grateful position in relation to the healthcare system. © 2014 The Authors. Sociology of Health & Illness © 2014 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness/John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Efficacy of Negative Pressure Wound Treatment in Preventing Surgical Site Infections after Whipple Procedures.

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    Gupta, Ryan; Darby, Geoffrey C; Imagawa, David K

    2017-10-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) occur at an average rate of 21.1 per cent after Whipple procedures per NSQIP data. In the setting of adherence to standard National Surgery Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) Hepatopancreatobiliary recommendations including wound protector use and glove change before closing, this study seeks to evaluate the efficacy of using negative pressure wound treatment (NPWT) over closed incision sites after a Whipple procedure to prevent SSI formation. We retrospectively examined consecutive patients from January 2014 to July 2016 who met criteria of completing Whipple procedures with full primary incision closure performed by a single surgeon at a single institution. Sixty-one patients were included in the study between two cohorts: traditional dressing (TD) (n = 36) and NPWT dressing (n = 25). There was a statistically significant difference (P = 0.01) in SSI formation between the TD cohort (n = 15, SSI rate = 0.41) and the NPWT cohort (n = 3, SSI rate = 0.12). The adjusted odds ratio (OR) of SSI formation was significant for NPWT use [OR = 0.15, P = 0.036] and for hospital length of stay [OR = 1.21, P = 0.024]. Operative length, operative blood loss, units of perioperative blood transfusion, intraoperative gastrojejunal tube placement, preoperative stent placement, and postoperative antibiotic duration did not significantly impact SSI formation (P > 0.05).

  1. Clinical relevance and effect of surgical wound classification in appendicitis: Retrospective evaluation of wound classification discrepancies between surgeons, Swissnoso-trained infection control nurse, and histology as well as surgical site infection rates by wound class.

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    Wang-Chan, Anastasija; Gingert, Christian; Angst, Eliane; Hetzer, Franc Heinrich

    2017-07-01

    Surgical wound classification (SWC) is used for risk stratification of surgical site infection (SSI) and serves as the basis for measuring quality of care. The objective was to examine the accuracy and reliability of SWC. This study was purposed to evaluate the discrepancies in SWC as assessed by three groups: surgeons, an infection control nurse, and histopathologic evaluation. The secondary aim was to compare the risk-stratified SSI rates using the different SWC methods for 30 d postoperatively. An analysis was performed of the appendectomies from January 2013 to June 2014 in the Cantonal Hospital of Schaffhausen. SWC was assigned by the operating surgeon at the end of the procedure and retrospectively reviewed by a Swissnoso-trained infection control nurse after reading the operative and pathology report. The level of agreement among the three different SWC assessment groups was determined using kappa statistic. SSI rates were analyzed using a chi-square test. In 246 evaluated cases, the kappa scores for interrater reliability among the SWC assessments across the three groups ranged from 0.05 to 0.2 signifying slight agreement between the groups. SSIs were more frequently associated with trained infection control nurse-assigned SWC than with surgeons based SWC. Our study demonstrated a considerable discordance in the SWC assessments performed by the three groups. Unfortunately, the currently practiced SWC system suffers from ambiguity in definition and/or implementation of these definitions is not clearly stated. This lack of reliability is problematic and may lead to inappropriate comparisons within and between hospitals and surgeons. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Wound edge protectors in open abdominal surgery to reduce surgical site infections: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André L Mihaljevic

    Full Text Available Surgical site infections remain one of the most frequent complications following abdominal surgery and cause substantial costs, morbidity and mortality.To assess the effectiveness of wound edge protectors in open abdominal surgery in reducing surgical site infections.A systematic literature search was conducted according to a prespecified review protocol in a variety of data-bases combined with hand-searches for randomized controlled trials on wound edge protectors in patients undergoing laparotomy. A qualitative and quantitative analysis of included trials was conducted.We identified 16 randomized controlled trials including 3695 patients investigating wound edge protectors published between 1972 and 2014. Critical appraisal uncovered a number of methodological flaws, predominantly in the older trials. Wound edge protectors significantly reduced the rate of surgical site infections (risk ratio 0.65; 95%CI, 0.51-0.83; p = 0.0007; I2 = 52%. The results were robust in a number of sensitivity analyses. A similar effect size was found in the subgroup of patients undergoing colorectal surgery (risk ratio 0.65; 95%CI, 0.44-0.97; p = 0.04; I2 = 56%. Of the two common types of wound protectors double ring devices were found to exhibit a greater protective effect (risk ratio 0.29; 95%CI, 0.15-0.55 than single-ring devices (risk ratio 0.71; 95%CI, 0.54-0.92, but this might largely be due to the lower quality of available data for double-ring devices. Exploratory subgroup analyses for the degree of contamination showed a larger protective effect in contaminated cases (0.44; 95%CI, 0.28-0.67; p = 0.0002, I2 = 23% than in clean-contaminated surgeries (0.72, 95%CI, 0.57-0.91; p = 0.005; I2 = 46% and a strong effect on the reduction of superficial surgical site infections (risk ratio 0.45; 95%CI, 0.24-0.82; p = 0.001; I2 = 72%.Wound edge protectors significantly reduce the rate of surgical site infections in open abdominal surgery. Further trials are needed to

  3. Comparison of hydrocolloid with conventional gauze dressing in prevention of wound infection after clean surgical procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalique, M.S.; Shukr, I.; Khalique, A.B.

    2014-01-01

    To compare hydrocolloid with conventional gauze dressing in prevention of infections after clean surgical procedures. Study Design: Randomized controlled trial. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Surgery, CMH Rawalpindi from 22 Jan 2010 to 22 Aug 2010. Patients and Methods: A total of 400 patients undergoing clean surgical procedures were randomly allocated in two equal groups, A and B by lottery method. In group A. simple gauze dressing was applied after clean surgical procedures while in group B hydrocolloid dressing was used. On 7th post operative day, patients were observed for presence of infection. Results: Mean age of sample was 42.08 +-11.112 years. In group A out of 200 Patients, 14 (7.0%) while in group B 10 (5%) developed infection postoperatively (p=0.709). Conclusion: There is no difference in the rate of infection when using a gauze dressing or a hydrocolloid dressing after clean surgical procedure. (author)

  4. Prophylactic Antibiotics and Wound Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Elbur, Abubaker Ibrahim; M.A., Yousif; El-Sayed, Ahmed S.A.; Abdel-Rahman, Manar E.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Surgical site infections account for 14%-25% of all nosocomial infections. The main aims of this study were to audit the use of prophylactic antibiotic, to quantify the rate of post-operative wound infection, and to identify risk factors for its occurrence in general surgery.

  5. Determination of Pathogens in Postoperative Wound Infection After Surgically Reduced Calcaneal Fractures and Implications for Prophylaxis and Treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Backes, Manouk; Spijkerman, Ingrid J.; de Muinck-Keizer, Robert-Jan O.; Goslings, J. Carel; Schepers, Tim

    2018-01-01

    High rates of postoperative wound infection (POWI) have been reported after surgery for calcaneal fractures. This is a retrospective cohort study to determine the causative pathogens of these infections and subsequent treatment strategies. In addition, microbacterial growth from superficial wound

  6. Prospective Randomized Evaluation of Intraoperative Application of Autologous Platelet-Rich Plasma on Surgical Site Infection or Delayed Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SanGiovanni, Thomas P; Kiebzak, Gary M

    2016-05-01

    Prevention of surgical site infections and the reduction of wound-related complication rates have become increasingly emphasized by hospital task groups and government agencies given the degree of economic burden it places on the health care system. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) contains growth factors and other biomolecules that promote endogenous microbicidal activity. We hypothesized that PRP would help prevent postoperative infection and delayed wound healing (DWH). We randomized patients having foot or ankle surgery to the treatment group receiving intraoperative PRP (applied to operative field) and platelet-poor plasma at closing (PPP, on the sutured skin) or the control group (no PRP/PPP). The incidence of deep surgical site infection and DWH (collectively called endpoints) was compared between groups (n = 250/group). PRP had a mean 5.3-fold platelet concentration compared to whole blood, with concentrated white blood cells. Mean age (±SD) of patients was 52 years (±15), 65% were women. Minor and major operative procedures were included. Patients were followed for 60 days. Seventy controls had PRP prepared for assay of growth factors. Procedure mix, ASA scores, mean operative times, and comorbidity mix were similar between groups. The primary result was no difference in number of endpoints between groups: 19 patients in the PRP group (7.6%) versus 18 controls (7.2%). Endpoints were deep surgical site infections in 2 PRP/PPP patients and 1 control, and DWH in 17 PRP/PPP patients and 17 controls. Analysis of PRP samples revealed a large variation in growth factor concentrations between patients. Intraoperative application of PRP/PPP did not reduce the incidence of postoperative infection or DWH. Growth factor profiles varied greatly between patients, suggesting that the potentially therapeutic treatment delivered was not consistent from patient-to-patient. Level I, prospective randomized trial. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Evaluating Prophylactic Intra-Operative Wound Irrigation for the Prevention of Surgical Site Infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jonge, Stijn W.; Boldingh, Quirine J. J.; Solomkin, Joseph S.; Allegranzi, Benedetta; Egger, Matthias; Dellinger, E. Patchen; Boermeester, Marja A.

    2017-01-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are one of the most common hospital-acquired infections. To reduce SSIs, prophylactic intra-operative wound irrigation (pIOWI) has been advocated, although the results to date are equivocal. To develop recommendations for the new World Health Organization (WHO) SSI

  8. Antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of bacterial isolates from surgical wound infections in Tertiary Care Hospital in Allahabad, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A K Kapoor

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of present study to analyze the occurrence and in-vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of bacterial pathogens isolated from surgical wound infections. Specimens from a total of 129 patients undergoing either emergency or elective surgery were collected from infected sites or stitch lines and inoculated onto appropriate media. The bacterial cultures were identified utilizing standard microbiological and biochemical methods. Isolates were tested for susceptibility to antimicrobials using the Kirby Bauer disk diffusion method. Statistical analysis was performed using the chi-square test. Of 129 patients investigated (62 emergency and 67 elective surgery cases, bacterial isolates were isolated with almost equal frequency both from emergency and elective surgery cases. Of 108 (83.72% culture positive samples, 62 (57.41% were Gram negative, 39 (36.11% Gram positive, and 7 (6.48% showed multiple organisms. Of total 115 bacteria isolated (101 single and 7 double organisms culture positive, 33 (28.69% were Escherichia coli and were also the commonest; followed by Staphylococcus aureus, 30 (26.09% cases. S. aureus and Streptococcus spp. showed maximum susceptibility (100% to linezolid and vancomycin. Maximum susceptibility of E. coli was observed to ciprofloxacin (75.7%, followed by gentamicin (54.5%; of Klebsiella spp. to ceftriaxone and gentamicin (66.6% each, of Proteus spp. to gentamicin (70% followed by ciprofloxacin (60%, and of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to piperacillin (100% and tobramycin (71.4%. E. coli and S. aureus were the most common and Salmonella spp. and Acinetobacter spp. were the least common organism causing surgical site infections. The definitive therapy included ciprofloxacin and gentamicin for E. coli; linezolid and vancomycin for S. aureus and Streptococcus spp; ceftriaxone and ciprofloxacin for Klebsiella spp., Citrobacter spp., acinetobacter spp and Salmonella spp.

  9. Does Fine Needle Aspiration Microbiology Offer Any Benefit Over Wound Swab in Detecting the Causative Organisms in Surgical Site Infections?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudharsanan, Sundaramurthi; Gs, Sreenath; Sureshkumar, Sathasivam; Vijayakumar, Chellappa; Sujatha, Sistla; Kate, Vikram

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the role of ne needle aspiration microbiology (FNAM) in detecting the causative organisms of postoperative surgical site infections (SSIs) in comparison with the standard technique of surface swabbing. Ma- terials and Methods. In this study, 150 patients with SSIs following elective and emergency operations were included. In all patients, FNAM was performed along with conventional surface swabbing to identify the causative microorganism. Sensitivity of surface swab and FNAM was calculated as the number of samples collected from the diagnosed case of SSI. A total of 115 positive cultures were obtained from the 150 patients with SSIs; surface swab was positive in 110 cases and FNAM was positive in 94 cases. The mean number of organisms isolated by surface swab, and FNAM was 0.95 and 0.8, respectively. The sensitivity of surface swab was 94.3% in elective cases and 96.25% in emergency cases. The sensitivity of FNAM was 82.8% in elective cases and 82.5% in emergency cases. The sensitivity and negative predictive value of FNAM and surface swab did not signi cantly differ in clean elective cases. The overall sensitivity of surface swab and FNAM was 95.65% and 81.7%, respectively. Comparing the antibiotic suscep- tibility pattern, no difference was observed when the same organ- ism was isolated by both methods, indicating that FNAM does not offer bene t over the conventional wound surface swab in detecting microorganisms in SSI in both elective and emergency surgeries. In certain cases with unexplained wound infections, FNAM can be used as an investigation to identify speci c pathogens not detected by conventional surface swab.

  10. Intra-operative wound irrigation to reduce surgical site infections after abdominal surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Tara C; Loos, Martin; Haller, Bernhard; Mihaljevic, André L; Nitsche, Ulrich; Wilhelm, Dirk; Friess, Helmut; Kleeff, Jörg; Bader, Franz G

    2015-02-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) remains to be one of the most frequent infectious complications following abdominal surgery. Prophylactic intra-operative wound irrigation (IOWI) before skin closure has been proposed to reduce bacterial wound contamination and the risk of SSI. However, current recommendations on its use are conflicting especially concerning antibiotic and antiseptic solutions because of their potential tissue toxicity and enhancement of bacterial drug resistances. To analyze the existing evidence for the effect of IOWI with topical antibiotics, povidone-iodine (PVP-I) solutions or saline on the incidence of SSI following open abdominal surgery, a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was carried out according to the recommendations of the Cochrane Collaboration. Forty-one RCTs reporting primary data of over 9000 patients were analyzed. Meta-analysis on the effect of IOWI with any solution compared to no irrigation revealed a significant benefit in the reduction of SSI rates (OR = 0.54, 95 % confidence Interval (CI) [0.42; 0.69], p < 0.0001). Subgroup analyses showed that this effect was strongest in colorectal surgery and that IOWI with antibiotic solutions had a stronger effect than irrigation with PVP-I or saline. However, all of the included trials were at considerable risk of bias according to the quality assessment. These results suggest that IOWI before skin closure represents a pragmatic and economical approach to reduce postoperative SSI after abdominal surgery and that antibiotic solutions seem to be more effective than PVP-I solutions or simple saline, and it might be worth to re-evaluate their use for specific indications.

  11. Wound Infections PSA (:30)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-10-25

    This 30 second public service announcement is about how to avoid a wound infection after a disaster.  Created: 10/25/2017 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 10/25/2017.

  12. Fungal Wound Infection

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-01-28

    Dr. David Tribble, acting director of the infectious disease clinical research program at Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, discusses fungal wound infections after combat trauma.  Created: 1/28/2016 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 1/28/2016.

  13. The application of the modified surgical wound dressing in wound care after tracheotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Mei

    2017-01-01

    Discussion: The design of the herein-described modified surgical wound dressing is based on a butterfly shaped adhesive and mirrors the advantages of a modern surgical wound dressing. Its shape is suitable for the physiological structure of the neck, making it more comfortable to use. Aseptic packaging and a high degree of adhesiveness guarantee continuous fixation and pulling. At the same time, the design of the dressing decreases the chance of infection.

  14. Using vacuum in the treatment of surgical wounds complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drašković Miroljub

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Using vacuum in medicine has been known from long ago, however, it has not been used for the treatment of wounds. The first experiments in this field were performed by Wagner Fleischmann, University of Ulm, Ulm, West Germany, in 1993. The aim of this study was to present our clinical experience with the treatment of surgical wounds complications in vascular patients by the use of controled vacuum. Method. In a period October 2006 - December 2009 a total of 18 patients with infection and surgical wound dehiscence were treated by the use of vacuum. Vacuum was applied to wounds by placing a polyurethane sponge on them and by fixing a polyurethane foil and a sponge to the surrounding healthy skin so to completely airtight wounds. Over a foil vacuum of - 150 mmHg was applied for a 5-day period, and on the day 6 a foil and a sponge were removed. Results. In all the 18 wounds treated by the use of vacuum secondary wound closing was achieved with no complications and with a significantly shortened time period treatment. Wound infections were healed using this method and only in 2 patients antibiotics were used at the same time. Conclusion. The use of vacuum in the treatment of operative wounds complications is an easy and reliable method contributing significantly to wounds better healing.

  15. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Evaluating Prophylactic Intra-Operative Wound Irrigation for the Prevention of Surgical Site Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jonge, Stijn W; Boldingh, Quirine J J; Solomkin, Joseph S; Allegranzi, Benedetta; Egger, Matthias; Dellinger, E Patchen; Boermeester, Marja A

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are one of the most common hospital-acquired infections. To reduce SSIs, prophylactic intra-operative wound irrigation (pIOWI) has been advocated, although the results to date are equivocal. To develop recommendations for the new World Health Organization (WHO) SSI prevention guidelines, a systematic literature review and a meta-analysis were conducted on the effectiveness of pIOWI using different agents as a means of reducing SSI. The PUBMED, Embase, CENTRAL, CINAHL, and WHO databases were searched. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing either pIOWI with no pIOWI or with pIOWI using different solutions and techniques were retrieved with SSI as the primary outcome. Meta-analyses were performed, and odds ratios (OR) and the mean difference with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were extracted and pooled with a random effects model. Twenty-one studies were suitable for analysis, and a distinction was made between intra-peritoneal, mediastinal, and incisional wound irrigation. A low quality of evidence demonstrated a statistically significant benefit for incisional wound irrigation with an aqueous povidone-iodine (PVP-I) solution in clean and clean contaminated wounds (OR 0.31; 95% CI 0.13-0.73; p = 0.007); 50 fewer SSIs per 1,000 procedures (from 19 fewer to 64 fewer)). Antibiotic irrigation had no significant effect in reducing SSIs (OR 1.16; 95% CI 0.64-2.12; p = 0.63). Low-quality evidence suggests considering the use of prophylactic incisional wound irrigation to prevent SSI with an aqueous povidone-iodine solution. Antibiotic irrigation does not show a benefit and therefore is discouraged.

  16. Standard abdominal wound edge protection with surgical dressings vs coverage with a sterile circular polyethylene drape for prevention of surgical site infections (BaFO: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaljevic André L

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Postoperative surgical site infections cause substantial morbidity, prolonged hospitalization, costs and even mortality and remain one of the most frequent surgical complications. Approximately 14% to 30% of all patients undergoing elective open abdominal surgery are affected and methods to reduce surgical site infection rates warrant further investigation and evaluation in randomized controlled trials. Methods/design To investigate whether the application of a circular plastic wound protector reduces the rate of surgical site infections in general and visceral surgical patients that undergo midline or transverse laparotomy by 50%. BaFO is a randomized, controlled, patient-blinded and observer-blinded multicenter clinical trial with two parallel surgical groups. The primary outcome measure will be the rate of surgical site infections within 45 days postoperative assessed according to the definition of the Center for Disease Control. Statistical analysis of the primary endpoint will be based on the intention-to-treat population. The global level of significance is set at 5% (2 sided and sample size (n = 258 per group is determined to assure a power of 80% with a planned interim analysis for the primary endpoint after the inclusion of 340 patients. Discussion The BaFO trial will explore if the rate of surgical site infections can be reduced by a single, simple, inexpensive intervention in patients undergoing open elective abdominal surgery. Its pragmatic design guarantees high external validity and clinical relevance. Trial registration http://www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT01181206. Date of registration: 11 August 2010; date of first patient randomized: 8 September 2010

  17. Trends in Surgical Wound Healing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottrup, F.

    2008-01-01

    The understanding of acute and chronic wound pathophysiology has progressed considerably over the past decades. Unfortunately, improvement in clinical practice has not followed suit, although new trends and developments have improved the outcome of wound treatment in many ways. This review focuse...

  18. Sternal wound infection revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liberatore, M.; Fiore, V.; D'Agostini, A.; Prosperi, D.; Iurilli, A.P.; Santini, C.; Baiocchi, P.; Galie, M.; Di Nucci, G.D.; Sinatra, R.

    2000-01-01

    Sternal wound infections (SWIs) can be subdivided into two types, superficial or deep, that require different treatments. The clinical diagnosis of superficial SWI is normally easy to perform, whereas the involvement of deep tissues is frequently difficult to detect. Therefore, there is a need for an imaging study that permits the assessment of SWIs and is able to distinguish between superficial and deep SWI. The present work was a prospective study aiming to evaluate the role of technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime ( 99m Tc-HMPAO) labelled leucocyte scan in SWI management. Twenty-eight patients with suspected SWIs were included in the study. On the basis of clinical examination they were subdivided into three groups: patients with signs of superficial SWI (group 1), patients with signs of superficial SWI and suspected deep infection (group 2) and patients with suspected deep SWI without superficial involvement (group 3). Ten patients previously submitted to median sternotomy, but without suspected SWI, were also included in the study as a control group (group 4). All patients with suspected SWI had bacteriological examinations of wound secretion, if present. In addition 99m Tc-HMPAO labelled leucocyte scan was performed in all patients. The patients of groups 1, 2 and 3 were treated on the basis of the clinical signs and microbiological findings, independently of the scintigraphic results. The patients of group 4 did not receive treatment. The final assessment of infection was based on histological and microbiological findings or on long-term clinical follow-up. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and positive and negative predictive values for scintigraphic and non-scintigraphic results were calculated. In the diagnosis of superficial and deep SWI, clinical and microbiological examination (combined) yielded, respectively, a sensitivity of 68.7% and 100%, a specificity of 77.3% and 80.8%, an accuracy of 73.7% and 86.8%, a positive predictive value of 68

  19. Delayed wound healing and postoperative surgical site infections in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with or without biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Masahiro; Inui, Kentaro; Sugioka, Yuko; Mamoto, Kenji; Okano, Tadashi; Kinoshita, Takuya; Hidaka, Noriaki; Koike, Tatsuya

    2016-06-01

    Biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (bDMARDs) have become more popular for treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Whether or not bDMARDs increase the postoperative risk of surgical site infection (SSI) has remained controversial. We aimed to clarify the effects of bDMARDs on the outcomes of elective orthopedic surgery. We used multivariate logistic regression analysis to analyze risk factors for SSI and delayed wound healing among 227 patients with RA (mean age, 65.0 years; disease duration, 16.9 years) after 332 elective orthopedic surgeries. We also attempted to evaluate the effects of individual medications on infection. Rates of bDMARD and conventional synthetic DMARD (csDMARD) administration were 30.4 and 91.0 %, respectively. Risk factors for SSI were advanced age (odds ratio [OR], 1.11; P = 0.045), prolonged surgery (OR, 1.02; P = 0.03), and preoperative white blood cell count >10,000/μL (OR, 3.66; P = 0.003). Those for delayed wound healing were advanced age (OR, 1.16; P = 0.001), prolonged surgery (OR, 1.02; P = 0.007), preoperative white blood cell count >10,000/μL (OR, 4.56; P = 0.02), and foot surgery (OR, 6.60; P = 0.001). Risk factors for SSI and medications did not significantly differ. No DMARDs were risk factors for any outcome examined. Biological DMARDs were not risk factors for postoperative SSI. Foot surgery was a risk factor for delayed wound healing.

  20. Wound infection secondary to snakebite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Wagener

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background. Snakebites can produce severe local and systemic septic complications as well as being associated with significant overall morbidity and even mortality. Objective. A prospective audit was undertaken to determine the bacterial causation of wound infection secondary to snakebite, and attempt to quantify the burden of disease. Methods. The audit was undertaken at Ngwelezane Hospital, which provides both regional and tertiary services for north-eastern KwaZulu-Natal Province, South Africa, over a 4-month period. Records of patients who required surgical debridement for extensive skin and soft-tissue necrosis were analysed. At the time of debridement, tissue samples of necrotic or infected tissue were sent for bacteriological analysis as standard of care. Microbiology results were analysed. Results. A total of 164 patients were admitted to hospital for management of snakebite, of whom 57 required surgical debridement and 42 were included in the final microbiological analysis. Children were found to be the most frequent victims of snakebite; 57.8% of patients in this study were aged ≤10 years and 73.7% ≤15 years. Culture showed a single organism in 32/42 cases, two organisms in 8 and no growth in 2. Eight different types of organisms were cultured, five of them more than once. Thirty-five specimens (83.3% grew Gram-negative Enterobacteriaceae, the most frequent being Morganella morganii and Proteus species. Thirteen specimens (31.0% grew Enterococcus faecalis. Gram-negative Enterobacteriaceae showed 31.4% sensitivity to ampicillin, 40.0% sensitivity to amoxicillin plus clavulanic acid, 34.3% sensitivity to cefuroxime, 97.1% sensitivity to ceftriaxone, and 100% sensitivity to ciprofloxacin, gentamicin and amikacin. E. faecalis was 92.3% sensitive to amoxicillin, 92.3% sensitive to amoxicillin plus clavulanic acid, 100% sensitive to ciprofloxacin, 92.3% resistant to erythromycin and 100% resistant to ceftriaxone. Conclusion. Children are

  1. Wound infection secondary to snakebite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagener, M; Naidoo, M; Aldous, C

    2017-03-29

    Snakebites can produce severe local and systemic septic complications as well as being associated with significant overall morbidity and even mortality. A prospective audit was undertaken to determine the bacterial causation of wound infection secondary to snakebite, and attempt to quantify the burden of disease. The audit was undertaken at Ngwelezane Hospital, which provides both regional and tertiary services for north-eastern KwaZulu-Natal Province, South Africa, over a 4-month period. Records of patients who required surgical debridement for extensive skin and soft-tissue necrosis were analysed. At the time of debridement, tissue samples of necrotic or infected tissue were sent for bacteriological analysis as standard of care. Microbiology results were analysed. A total of 164 patients were admitted to hospital for management of snakebite, of whom 57 required surgical debridement and 42 were included in the final microbiological analysis. Children were found to be the most frequent victims of snakebite; 57.8% of patients in this study were aged ≤10 years and 73.7% ≤15 years. Culture showed a single organism in 32/42 cases, two organisms in 8 and no growth in 2. Eight different types of organisms were cultured, five of them more than once. Thirty-five specimens (83.3%) grew Gram-negative Enterobacteriaceae, the most frequent being Morganella morganii and Proteus species. Thirteen specimens (31.0%) grew Enterococcus faecalis. Gram-negative Enterobacteriaceae showed 31.4% sensitivity to ampicillin, 40.0% sensitivity to amoxicillin plus clavulanic acid, 34.3% sensitivity to cefuroxime, 97.1% sensitivity to ceftriaxone, and 100% sensitivity to ciprofloxacin, gentamicin and amikacin. E. faecalis was 92.3% sensitive to amoxicillin, 92.3% sensitive to amoxicillin plus clavulanic acid, 100% sensitive to ciprofloxacin, 92.3% resistant to erythromycin and 100% resistant to ceftriaxone. Children are particularly vulnerable to snakebite, and the consequences can be

  2. Current issues in burn wound infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, D; Stutman, H R

    1991-01-01

    As we have emphasized, the diagnosis of burn wound infections in the high-risk burned child can be difficult and depends on a very high degree of suspicion and daily clinical evaluation of the burn wound site by consistent observers. Appropriate precautions include meticulous hand-washing and the use of gloves when handling the wound site and prophylactic application of a topical antibacterial agent such as SSD cream. Wound therapy should include routine vigorous surgical débridement. Surveillance wound cultures should be done weekly to determine the emergency of colonization and aid in the selection of empiric antimicrobial regimens when these are appropriate. Wound biopsy for histological examination and quantitative culture is highly recommended in the severely ill child with an unclear etiology or site of infection. If, despite these measures, sepsis ensues, then systemic antibiotics must be started empirically as an adjuctive therapy to surgical débridement. Knowledge of the organisms colonizing a wound will prove useful in choosing an antibiotic regimen while awaiting definitive results of blood and wound biopsy cultures. Without this information, early burn sepsis therapy should focus on gram-positive organisms, while infection later in the course should raise suspicion of nosocomial pathogens such as P. aeruginosa, other enteric bacilli, and C. albicans. An initial regimen might include nafcillin plus ceftazidime or an aminoglycoside, with anaerobic coverage depending on considerations noted previously. Once the causative agent is identified, therapy must be modified accordingly. Amphotericin B and acyclovir use should be guided by positive cultures from the burn wound site along with systemic evidence of dissemination. Available studies do not yet make clear the role of empiric immunotherapy with intravenous gamma globulin in the burned child. Therefore, its use cannot be recommended at the present time, although the development of specific

  3. Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Post-operative Wound Infections in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The occurrence of post-operative wound infections was studied over a period of five months in the University College Hospital, Ibadan between February to July, 2003. Two hundred Surgical wounds were collected and routinely processed by Gram staining and culture in the Microbiology Laboratory. Of the 200 samples ...

  4. Fungal Burn Wound Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    Aspergillus), Blasto- T he use of effective topical chemotherapeutic agents to myces (Candida), and Zygomycetes ( Mucor , Rhizopus).6 reduce...species, 18%; Mucor species and Rhizopus species, acetate in the morning and silver sulfadiazine in the evening. Prophy- 9.1%; and Microspora species and...sensitivity reports, and the patient’s sue, including one patient who required a hip disarticulation response. to control an invasive Mucor burn wound

  5. A rapid and systematic review of the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of debriding agents in treating surgical wounds healing by secondary intention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lewis, R.; Whiting, P.; ter Riet, G.; O'Meara, S.; Glanville, J.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Most surgically sutured wounds heal without any complication. However, in some cases wound healing can be delayed due to the presence of infection or wound breakdown. This can result in the wounds becoming cavity wounds and thus necessitate healing by secondary intention. Other surgical

  6. Lower limb revascularisation preceding surgical wound coverage - an interdisciplinary algorithm for chronic wound closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aust, M C; Spies, M; Guggenheim, M; Gohritz, A; Kall, S; Rosenthal, H; Pichlmaier, M; Oehlert, G; Vogt, P M

    2008-08-01

    intervention. Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy was applied in 15 cases. Postoperatively, three cases of impaired wound healing and one infection occurred. Arterial insufficiency can be diagnosed safely by simple clinical examination. All clinically pathological results were successfully confirmed by angiography, allowing for a targeted peripheral vessel reopening to improve wound perfusion before surgery. This straightforward algorithm helped to improve the success of surgical therapy of chronic lower extremity wounds.

  7. Surgical site infections

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Decrease the inflammatory response Vasodilatation leads to better perfusion and ... Must NOT be allowed to come in contact with brain, meninges, eyes or .... project (SCIP): Evolution of National Quality Measure. Surgical. Infection 2008 ...

  8. Surgical site infections

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are a worldwide problem that has ... deep tissue is found on clinical examination, re-opening, histopathological or radiological investigation ..... Esposito S, Immune system and SSI, Journal of Chemotherapy, 2001.

  9. Surgical infections with Mycoplasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levi-Mazloum, Niels Donald; Prag, Jørgen Brorson; Jensen, J S

    1997-01-01

    Mycoplasma hominis and Ureaplasma urealyticum are common inhabitants of the human genital tract. Evidence for an aetiological role in pyelonephritis, pelvic inflammatory disease, post-abortion and post-partum fever has been presented. There are sporadic reports of Mycoplasma causing serious...... extragenital infection such as septicemia, septic arthritis, neonatal meningitis and encephalitis. We review 38 cases of surgical infections with Mycoplasma....

  10. Daptomycin as a possible new treatment option for surgical management of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus sternal wound infection after cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmert Alexander

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present a case of a 77-year old female who had undergone a coronary artery bypass grafting with an aortic valve replacement and developed three month later a Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA sternal wound infection which was successful treated with Daptomycin combined with vacuum-assisted closure (VAC.

  11. SURGICAL SITE INFECTION: REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. H. M. Bonai

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Nosocomial infection or nosocomial infection (NI is one of the factors that increase the cost of maintaining patients in the health system, even in processes that should safely occur, such as hospital patients and performing simple and routine surgical procedures surgical centers and clinics leading to complications resulting from these infections that prolong hospital stay and promote pain and suffering to the patient, resulting in the defense of the quality of services and influencing negatively the hospitals. Therefore, the aim of this study was to review the factors that result in surgical site infection, with the purpose of better understanding of the subject and the possibility of preventive actions to better treatment outcome of the patient.

  12. knowledge and practice of post-operative wound infection

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    honey

    2014-03-31

    Mar 31, 2014 ... International Journal of Basic, Applied and Innovative Research ... AMONG NURSES IN THE SURGICAL UNIT OF A TEACHING ... 3Nursing Science, Faculty ... study suggest that nurses had poor knowledge and attitude of infection ... wound infection and evaluate their practice regarding postoperative.

  13. Surgical infections: a microbiological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Saini

    Full Text Available Surgical infections are mostly polymicrobial, involving both aerobes and anaerobes. One hundred seventeen cases comprised of abscesses (n=51, secondary peritonitis (n=25, necrotizing fascitis (n=22 and wounds with devitalized tissues (n=19 were studied. The number of microorganisms isolated per lesion was highest in secondary peritonitis (2.32. The aerobe/ anaerobe ratio was 0.81 in secondary peritonitis and 1.8 in necrotizing fascitis. Most secondary peritonitis (80%, necrotizing fascitis (75% and wounds with devitalized tissues (66.7% were polymicrobial. Common microorganisms isolated in our study were E. coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacteroides fragilis and Peptostreptococcus spp. The most effective antibiotics for S. aureus were clindamycin (79.1% and cefuroxime (70.8%. For Gram-negatives (Klebsiella spp., E. coli and Proteus spp., the most effective antibiotics were cefotaxime, ceftizoxime, amikacin and ciprofloxacin. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was maximally sensitive to amikacin (35.2% and ciprofloxacin (35.2%. The greatest degree of multidrug resistance to all the drugs was found in P. aeruginosa (52.9%, followed by Klebsiella spp. (33.3%, Proteus spp. (33.3%, E. coli (22.2%, and S. aureus (12.5%. All the anaerobes that we isolated were 100% sensitive to metronidazole and chloramphenicol, followed by clindamycin (95% to 100%. Apart from antibiotic therapy, non-antimicrobial methods, such as hyperbaric oxygen therapy and debridement also play an important role in the treatment of surgical infections.

  14. Negative pressure wound therapy for the treatment of infected wounds with exposed knee joint after patellar fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Yang; Niikura, Takahiro; Miwa, Masahiko; Sakai, Yoshitada; Oe, Keisuke; Fukazawa, Takahiro; Kawakami, Yohei; Kurosaka, Masahiro

    2011-06-14

    Treatment of soft tissue defects with exposed bones and joints, resulting from trauma, infection, and surgical complications, represents a major challenge. The introduction of negative pressure wound therapy has changed many wound management practices. Negative pressure wound therapy has recently been used in the orthopedic field for management of traumatic or open wounds with exposed bone, nerve, tendon, and orthopedic implants. This article describes a case of a patient with a large soft tissue defect and exposed knee joint, in which negative pressure wound therapy markedly improved wound healing. A 50-year-old man presented with an ulceration of his left knee with exposed joint, caused by severe wound infections after open reduction and internal fixation of a patellar fracture. After 20 days of negative pressure wound therapy, a granulated wound bed covered the exposed bones and joint.To our knowledge, this is the first report of negative pressure wound therapy used in a patient with a large soft tissue defect with exposed knee joint. Despite the chronic wound secondary to infection, healing was achieved through the use of the negative pressure wound therapy, thus promoting granulation tissue formation and closing the joint. We suggest negative pressure wound therapy as an alternative option for patients with lower limb wounds containing exposed bones and joints when free flap transfer is contraindicated. Our result added to the growing evidence that negative pressure wound therapy is a useful adjunctive treatment for open wounds around the knee joint. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. Topical silver for preventing wound infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Storm-Versloot, Marja N.; Vos, Cornelis G.; Ubbink, Dirk T.; Vermeulen, Hester

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Silver-containing treatments are popular and used in wound treatments to combat a broad spectrum of pathogens, but evidence of their effectiveness in preventing wound infection or promoting healing is lacking. OBJECTIVES: To establish the effects of silver-containing wound dressings and

  16. Healing incisional surgical wounds using Rose Hip oil in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lainy Carollyne da Costa Cavalcante

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate incisional surgical wound healing in rats by using Rose Hip (Rosa rubiginosa L. oil. Methods: Twenty-one days after the oophorectomy procedure, twenty-seven female, adult, Wistar rats were distributed into three groups: Control group (wound treatment with distilled water; Collagenase group (treatment with collagenase ointment; and Rose Hip group (wound treatment with Rose Hip oil. Each group was distributed according to the date of euthanasia: 7, 14 and 21 days. The wound was evaluated considering the macroscopic and microscopic parameters. Results: The results indicated differences in the healing of incisional wounds between treatments when compared to control group. Accelerated wound healing was observed in the group treated with Rose Hip oil in comparison to the control and collagenase, especially after the 14th day. Morphometric data confirmed the structural findings. Conclusion: There was significant effect in topical application of Rose Hip oil on incisional surgical wound healing.

  17. Study of Bacteriology of Post-Operative Wound Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelam Abdulrauf Bagwan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: While many patients are admitted to hospital for treatment of infections, some acquire infection during their stay in the hospital. These infections are called as nosocomial infections. Surgical site infection or post operative wound infection is one of them. It is defined as infection of previously sterile tissue incised to gain exposure for operating deeper spaces operatively exposed or organs manipulated by a surgeon. It is one of the feared complications of surgery as it increases morbidity as well as cost of medical care. Aims and Objectives: Study was conducted to find out incidence of surgical site infection rate in surgical ward, evaluate various factors contributing to infection and to identify causative pathogens and their antibiogram patterns. Material and Methods: All clean and clean contaminated operative cases admitted in surgery ward in study period of 18 months were included. Preoperative, operative and postoperative management protocols of the cases were recorded in detail. Results: A total of 1082 operated cases were studied among which 59 infected cases were found. Surgical Site Infection (SSI rate was 5.45%. E. coli and Staphylococcus aureus were the commonest pathogen isolated from the infected wound. 50 % were Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA among them and 50% of rd Enterobacteriaceae group were resistant to 3 generation Cephalosporins. Conclusion: Surgical site infection rate of a hospital can be reduced easily by following proper pre-operative protocol for the patients. Those patients with surgical site infection can be treated effectively by following the antibiotic policy as provided by the Department of Microbiology.

  18. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy in Infected Wound following Posterior Spinal Instrumentation using Simple Self-assembled System: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CW Chang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative wound infection in an instrumented spine patient is often disastrous. Management includes implant removal leading to spine instability. Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT applied to the spine surgical wound is one of the wound care technique with successful results. We report a case of a man who sustained Chance fracture of Lumbar 1 (L1 vertebra treated with long segment posterior instrumentation, who unfortunately developed Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL positive E. coli infection one month after the operation. After careful debridement of the wound, the implant became exposed. Three cycles of NPWT were applied and the wound healed with granulation tissue completely covering the implant, and thus negating the need to remove the implant. In conclusion, the NPWT is a good alternative in postoperative wound management especially in an instrumented spine patient.

  19. Healing incisional surgical wounds using Rose Hip oil in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Lainy Carollyne da Costa Cavalcante; Thyago Cezar Prado Pessôa; Rubens Fernando Gonçalves Ribeiro Júnior; Edson Yuzur Yasojima; Rosa Helena de Figueiredo Chaves Soares; Marcus Vinicius Henriques Brito; Eduardo Henrique Herbster Gouveia; Lucas Nascimento Galvão; Suzana Rodrigues Ramos; Adan Kristian Almeida Carneiro; Yuri Aarão Amaral Serruya; Mateus Malta de Moraes

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate incisional surgical wound healing in rats by using Rose Hip (Rosa rubiginosa L.) oil. Methods: Twenty-one days after the oophorectomy procedure, twenty-seven female, adult, Wistar rats were distributed into three groups: Control group (wound treatment with distilled water); Collagenase group (treatment with collagenase ointment); and Rose Hip group (wound treatment with Rose Hip oil). Each group was distributed according to the date of euthanasia: 7, 14 and 21 days. ...

  20. AEROBIC BACTERIAL ISOLATES FROM INFECTED WOUNDS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    boaz

    most frequently reported as the cause of delay wound healing (6-9, 3). ... All isolates were resistant to Ampicillin, Amoxicillin- clavulanate and .... Ulcer bed infection. Report of a case of enlarging venous leg ulcer colonized by ... Ann. Burns Fire.

  1. Traffic in the operating room: a review of factors influencing air flow and surgical wound contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokrywka, Marian; Byers, Karin

    2013-06-01

    Surgical wound contamination leading to surgical site infection can result from disruption of the intended airflow in the operating room (OR). When personnel enter and exit the OR, or create unnecessary movement and traffic during the procedure, the intended airflow in the vicinity of the open wound becomes disrupted and does not adequately remove airborne contaminants from the sterile field. An increase in the bacterial counts of airborne microorganisms is noted during increased activity levels within the OR. Researchers have studied OR traffic and door openings as a determinant of air contamination. During a surgical procedure the door to the operating room may be open as long as 20 minutes out of each surgical hour during critical procedures involving implants. Interventions into limiting excessive movement and traffic in the OR may lead to reductions in surgical site infections in select populations.

  2. Therapy of spinal wound infections using vacuum-assisted wound closure: risk factors leading to resistance to treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploumis, Avraam; Mehbod, Amir A; Dressel, Thomas D; Dykes, Daryll C; Transfeldt, Ensor E; Lonstein, John E

    2008-07-01

    This study retrospectively reviewed spine surgical procedures complicated by wound infection and managed by a protocol including the use of vacuum-assisted wound closure (VAC). To define factors influencing the number of debridements needed before the final wound closure by applying VAC for patients with postoperative spinal wound infections. VAC has been suggested as a safe and probably effective method for the treatment of spinal wound infections. The risk factors for infection resistance and need for debridement revisions after VAC placement are unknown. Seventy-three consecutive patients with 79 wound infections after undergoing spine surgery were studied (6 of them had recurrence of infection). All patients were taken to the operating room for irrigation and debridement under general anesthesia followed by placement of the VAC with subsequent delayed closure of the wound. Linear regression and t test were used to identify if the following variables were risk factors for the resistance of infection to VAC treatment: timing of clinical appearance of infection, depth of infection (deep or superficial), presence of instrumentation, positive culture for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) or more than 1 microorganism, age of the patient, and presence of other comorbidities. There were 34 males and 39 females with an average age of 58.4 years (21 to 82). Once the VAC was initiated, there was an average of 1.4 procedures until and including closure of the wound. The wound was closed an average of 7 days (range 5 to 14) after the placement of the initial VAC on the wound. The average follow-up was 14 months (range 12 to 28). All of the patients but 2 achieved a clean, closed wound without removal of instrumentation at a minimum follow-up of 1 year. Sixty patients had implants (instrumentation or allograft) within the site of wound infection. Thirteen patients had a decompression with exposed dura. Sixty-four infections (81%) presented with a draining

  3. Evolving issues in the prevention of surgical site infections.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quinn, A

    2009-06-01

    Surgical site infection is one of the more common causes of post-operative morbidity. Such infections contribute to prolonged recovery, delayed discharge and increasing costs to both patients and the health service. In the current climate increased emphasis is being placed on minimising the risks of acquiring or transmitting these nosocomial infections. This article reviews the current literature obtained from a Pubmed database search in relation to three specific aspects of surgical site infection: compliance with prophylactic antibiotics, post-discharge surveillance and novel methods for preventing surgical site infections. These topics represent areas where many institutions will find room for improvement in the prevention of surgical site infections. Tight adherence to prophylactic antibiotic guidelines, close followup of surgical wounds during and after hospital discharge, and attention to oxygenation status and the body temperature of patients may all prove to be useful adjuncts in significantly decreasing surgical site infections.

  4. Assessment of Severe Extremity Wound Bioburden at the Time of Definitive Wound Closure or Coverage: Correlation With Subsequent Postclosure Deep Wound Infection (Bioburden Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosse, Michael J; Murray, Clinton K; Carlini, Anthony R; Firoozabadi, Reza; Manson, Theodore; Scharfstein, Daniel O; Wenke, Joseph C; Zadnik, Mary; Castillo, Renan C

    2017-04-01

    Infection remains the most common and significant complication after high-energy fractures. The Bioburden Study is a multicenter, prospective, observational cohort study of wound bacterial bioburden and antibiotic care in severe open lower extremity fractures. The aims of this study are to (1) characterize the contemporary extremity wound "bioburden" at the time of definitive wound closure; (2) determine the concordance between polymerase chain reaction results and hospital microbiology; (3) determine, among those who develop deep infections, the concordance between the pathogens at wound closure and at deep infection; and (4) compare the probability of deep infection between those who did and did not receive an appropriate course of antibiotics based on bioburden at the time of wound closure. To address these aims, sites collected tissue samples from severe lower extremity injuries at the time of wound closure and at first surgery for treatment of a deep infection, nonunion, flap failure, amputation, or other complications (because these surgeries may be due to undetected infection). Otherwise, if no further surgical treatment occurred, participants were followed for 12 months. The study was conducted at 38 US trauma centers and has enrolled 655 participants aged 18-64 years. This is the first large multi-institutional study evaluating the wound bioburden of severe open tibia fractures and correlating this bioburden with the risk of wound complications after definitive soft tissue closure.

  5. Superficial herpes simplex virus wound infection following lung transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karolak, Wojtek; Wojarski, Jacek; Zegleń, Sławomir; Ochman, Marek; Urlik, Maciej; Hudzik, Bartosz; Wozniak-Grygiel, Elzbieta; Maruszewski, Marcin

    2017-08-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are infections of tissues, organs, or spaces exposed by surgeons during performance of an invasive procedure. SSIs are classified into superficial, which are limited to skin and subcutaneous tissues, and deep. The incidence of deep SSIs in lung transplant (LTx) patients is estimated at 5%. No reports have been published as to the incidence of superficial SSIs specifically in LTx patients. Common sense would dictate that the majority of superficial SSIs would be bacterial. Uncommonly, fungal SSIs may occur, and we believe that no reports exist as to the incidence of viral wound infections in LTx patients, or in any solid organ transplant patients. We report a de novo superficial wound infection with herpes simplex virus following lung transplantation, its possible source, treatment, and resolution. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Effect of antiseptic irrigation on infection rates of traumatic soft tissue wounds: a longitudinal cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, B; Neuenschwander, R; Brill, F; Wurmitzer, F; Wegner, C; Assadian, O; Kramer, A

    2017-03-02

    Acute traumatic wounds are contaminated with bacteria and therefore an infection risk. Antiseptic wound irrigation before surgical intervention is routinely performed for contaminated wounds. However, a broad variety of different irrigation solutions are in use. The aim of this retrospective, non-randomised, controlled longitudinal cohort study was to assess the preventive effect of four different irrigation solutions before surgical treatment, on wound infection in traumatic soft tissue wounds. Over a period of three decades, the prophylactic application of wound irrigation was studied in patients with contaminated traumatic wounds requiring surgical treatment, with or without primary wound closure. The main outcome measure was development of wound infection. From 1974-1983, either 0.04 % polihexanide (PHMB), 1 % povidone-iodine (PVP-I), 4 % hydrogen peroxide, or undiluted Ringer's solution were concurrently in use. From 1984-1996, only 0.04 % PHMB or 1 % PVP-I were applied. From 1997, 0.04 % PHMB was used until the end of the study period in 2005. The combined rate for superficial and deep wound infection was 1.7 % in the 0.04 % PHMB group (n=3264), 4.8 % in the 1 % PVP-I group (n=2552), 5.9 % in the Ringer's group (n=645), and 11.7 % in the 4 % hydrogen peroxide group (n=643). Compared with all other treatment arms, PHMB showed the highest efficacy in preventing infection in traumatic soft tissue wounds (p<0.001). However, compared with PVP-I, the difference was only significant for superficial infections. The large patient numbers in this study demonstrated a robust superiority of 0.04 % PHMB to prevent infection in traumatic soft tissue wounds. These retrospective results may further provide important information as the basis for power calculations for the urgently needed prospective clinical trials in the evolving field of wound antisepsis.

  7. Distinction of infected and non-infected post-surgical incisions with In-111-WBC scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Nabi, H.; Hinkle, G.H.; Olsen, J.O.

    1985-01-01

    To determine if In-111-WBCs scintigraphy can distinguish between healing and infection in post-surgical wounds, a prospective study was performed in patients with 3-14 day old surgical incisions. Eighteen patients (11 males and 7 females) were scanned 24 hrs after injection of 0.5 mCi of In-111 labeled autologous leukocytes. The scan findings were correlated with blood and/wound cultures results and diagnosis at time of discharge. Incisional uptake of In-111-WBCs was noted in 9 patients with infected surgical wounds and was absent in those 9 patients with non-infected surgical wounds. The results of the authors' study show that In-111-WBCs do not accumulate in non-infected surgical incisions. This confirms their previous findings in rats. The high specificity of In-111 leukocytes imaging makes it a valuable study in the evaluation of post-operative patients with suspected surgical wound infections. In-111 WBCs scintigraphy can distinguish between normal healing and infection at the site of recent (3-14 days) surgical incisions

  8. A Neutrophil Proteomic Signature in Surgical Trauma Wounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sander Bekeschus

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Non-healing wounds continue to be a clinical challenge for patients and medical staff. These wounds have a heterogeneous etiology, including diabetes and surgical trauma wounds. It is therefore important to decipher molecular signatures that reflect the macroscopic process of wound healing. To this end, we collected wound sponge dressings routinely used in vacuum assisted therapy after surgical trauma to generate wound-derived protein profiles via global mass spectrometry. We confidently identified 311 proteins in exudates. Among them were expected targets belonging to the immunoglobulin superfamily, complement, and skin-derived proteins, such as keratins. Next to several S100 proteins, chaperones, heat shock proteins, and immune modulators, the exudates presented a number of redox proteins as well as a discrete neutrophil proteomic signature, including for example cathepsin G, elastase, myeloperoxidase, CD66c, and lipocalin 2. We mapped over 200 post-translational modifications (PTMs; cysteine/methionine oxidation, tyrosine nitration, cysteine trioxidation to the proteomic profile, for example, in peroxiredoxin 1. Investigating manually collected exudates, we confirmed presence of neutrophils and their products, such as microparticles and fragments containing myeloperoxidase and DNA. These data confirmed known and identified less known wound proteins and their PTMs, which may serve as resource for future studies on human wound healing.

  9. Microbiology of Animal Bite Wound Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamian, Fredrick M.; Goldstein, Ellie J. C.

    2011-01-01

    Summary: The microbiology of animal bite wound infections in humans is often polymicrobial, with a broad mixture of aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms. Bacteria recovered from infected bite wounds are most often reflective of the oral flora of the biting animal, which can also be influenced by the microbiome of their ingested prey and other foods. Bacteria may also originate from the victim's own skin or the physical environment at the time of injury. Our review has focused on bite wound infections in humans from dogs, cats, and a variety of other animals such as monkeys, bears, pigs, ferrets, horses, sheep, Tasmanian devils, snakes, Komodo dragons, monitor lizards, iguanas, alligators/crocodiles, rats, guinea pigs, hamsters, prairie dogs, swans, and sharks. The medical literature in this area has been made up mostly of small case series or case reports. Very few studies have been systematic and are often limited to dog or cat bite injuries. Limitations of studies include a lack of established or inconsistent criteria for an infected wound and a failure to utilize optimal techniques in pathogen isolation, especially for anaerobic organisms. There is also a lack of an understanding of the pathogenic significance of all cultured organisms. Gathering information and conducting research in a more systematic and methodical fashion through an organized research network, including zoos, veterinary practices, and rural clinics and hospitals, are needed to better define the microbiology of animal bite wound infections in humans. PMID:21482724

  10. Surgical wound dehiscence in an Australian community nursing service: time and cost to healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandy-Hodgetts, K; Leslie, G D; Lewin, G; Hendrie, D; Carville, K

    2016-07-02

    Surgical wound dehiscence (SWD) increases the length of hospital stay and impacts on patient wellbeing and health-care costs. Globally, the health-care costs associated with SWD are poorly reported and those reported are frequently associated with surgical site infection (SSI), rather than dehiscence of non-microbial cause. This retrospective study describes and reports on the costs and time to healing associated with a number of surgical patients who were referred to a community nursing service for treatment of an SWD following discharge from a metropolitan hospital, in Perth, Western Australia. Descriptive statistical analysis was carried out to describe the patient, wound and treatment characteristics. A costing analysis was conducted to investigate the cost of healing these wounds. Among the 70 patients referred with a SWD, 55% were treated for an infected wound dehiscence which was a significant factor (p=0.001). Overall, the cost of treating the 70 patients with a SWD in a community nursing service was in excess of $56,000 Australian dollars (AUD) (£28,705) and did not include organisational overheads or travel costs for nurse visits. The management of infection contributed to 67% of the overall cost. SWD remains an unquantified aspect of wound care from a prevalence and fiscal point of view. Further work needs to be done in the identification of SWD and which patients may be 'at risk'. The authors declare they have no competing interests.

  11. Management of wound infection after lumbar arthrodesis maintaining the instrumentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asdrubal Falavigna

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determinate whether a surgical protocol with immediate extensive debridement, closed irrigation system and antibiotic therapy would be effective to achieve healing of deep wound infection without removing the instrumentation.METHODS: Prospective cohort study with 19 patients presenting degenerative spinal stenosis or degenerative spondylolisthesis, who developed infection after posterior lumbar arthrodesis. The diagnosis was confirmed by a microbial culture from subfascial lumbar fluid and/or blood. Patients were treated with a protocol of wound exploration, extensive flushing and debridement, placement of a closed irrigation system that was maintained for five days and intravenous antibiotics. The instrumentation system was not removed.RESULTS: Mean age was 59.31 (±13.17 years old and most patients were female (94.7%; 18/19. The mean period for the identification of the infection was 2 weeks and 57.9% underwent a single wound exploration. White blood count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein showed a significant decrease post-treatment when compared to pre-treatment values. A significant reduction of erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein was also observed at the final evaluation. No laboratory test was useful to predict the need for more than one debridement.CONCLUSION: Patients with wound infection after instrumentation can be treated without removal of the instrumentation through wound exploration, extensive flushing, debridement of necrotic tissue, closed irrigation system during 5 days and proper antibiotic therapy. The blood tests were not useful to predict surgical re-interventions.

  12. First case of Chlorella wound infection in a human in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Hart

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A 30-year-old man developed an infected knee wound 2 days after jumping his bicycle into a freshwater dam. He required repeated debridement and tissue grew bright green colonies typical of the alga Chlorella plus Aeromonas hydrophila. This, and one previously reported case, responded to surgical debridement and careful wound management.

  13. Peripheral surgical wounding and age-dependent neuroinflammation in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhipeng Xu

    Full Text Available Post-operative cognitive dysfunction is associated with morbidity and mortality. However, its neuropathogenesis remains largely to be determined. Neuroinflammation and accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ have been reported to contribute to cognitive dysfunction in humans and cognitive impairment in animals. Our recent studies have established a pre-clinical model in mice, and have found that the peripheral surgical wounding without the influence of general anesthesia induces an age-dependent Aβ accumulation and cognitive impairment in mice. We therefore set out to assess the effects of peripheral surgical wounding, in the absence of general anesthesia, on neuroinflammation in mice with different ages. Abdominal surgery under local anesthesia was established in 9 and 18 month-old mice. The levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, interleukin-6 (IL-6, Iba1 positive cells (the marker of microglia activation, CD33, and cognitive function in mice were determined. The peripheral surgical wounding increased the levels of TNF-α, IL-6, and Iba1 positive cells in the hippocampus of both 9 and 18 month-old mice, and age potentiated these effects. The peripheral surgical wounding increased the levels of CD33 in the hippocampus of 18, but not 9, month-old mice. Finally, anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen ameliorated the peripheral surgical wounding-induced cognitive impairment in 18 month-old mice. These data suggested that the peripheral surgical wounding could induce an age-dependent neuroinflammation and elevation of CD33 levels in the hippocampus of mice, which could lead to cognitive impairment in aged mice. Pending further studies, anti-inflammatory therapies may reduce the risk of postoperative cognitive dysfunction in elderly patients.

  14. Characterization of wound infections among patients injured during the 2011 Libyan conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dau, A A; Tloba, S; Daw, M A

    2013-04-01

    Few studies have analysed the bacterial pathogenesis of infections associated with war-wound in the Eastern Mediterranean region. We analysed surgical wound infections of 1200 patients injured during the Libyan conflict in 2011 and admitted to the emergency services at Tripoli medical centre. Culture swabs or surgical wound debridement samples were collected and cultures were identified and tested for antimicrobial resistance. Of the 1200 patients studied, 498 (42%) were infected with at least 1 pathogen and 57 with >2 pathogens. The most common species were Acinetobacter spp. (isolated from 144 patients), coagulase-negative staphylococci (122), Escherichia coli (107), Pseudomnonas aeruginosa (92) and Klebsiella spp. (86). A high level of resistance to the antibiotics tested was found, especially among Acinetobacter spp. Multi-drug-resistant Gram-negative bacilli were an important complicating factor in wound infections associated with war injuries among injured patients in Libya. Effective policies are needed to control and treat such infections particularly in trauma and emergency services.

  15. Aquatically acquired Aeromonas hydrophila wound infection A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The occurrence of Aeromonas hydrophila wound infections in healthy hosts after water-associated injury is being reported more frequently. This paper reports our experience with 3 such cases and outlines the importance of recognising the association between a water-related injury and, this organism.

  16. Dressings and topical agents for surgical wounds healing by secondary intention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, H.; Ubbink, D.; Goossens, A.; de Vos, R.; Legemate, D.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many different wound dressings and topical applications are used to cover surgical wounds healing by secondary intention. It is not known whether these dressings heal wounds at different rates. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness of dressings and topical agents on surgical wounds

  17. Treating infected diabetic wounds with superoxidized water as anti-septic agent: a preliminary experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadi, S.F.; Khaliq, T.; Zubair, M.; Saaiq, M.; Sikandar, I.

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of superoxidized water (MicrocynTM) in diabetic patients with different wounds. One hundred known diabetic patients were enrolled. Half were randomized to the intervention group (those whose wounds were managed with superoxidized water) and half to the control group (whose wounds were treated with normal saline) using a table of random numbers. The two groups were matched for age, gender, duration of diabetes and category of wound. All patients received appropriate surgical treatment for their wounds as required. Local wound treatment was carried out daily using superoxidized water soaked gauzes on twice daily basis in the intervention group and normal saline in the control group. The treatment was continued until wound healing. The main outcome measures were duration of hospital stay, downgrading of the wound category, wound healing time and need for interventions such as amputation. Statistically significant differences were found in favour of the superoxidized water group with respect to duration of hospital stay, downgrading of the wound category and wound healing time. Although the initial results of employing superoxidized water for the management of infected diabetic wounds are encouraging, further multicentre clinical trials are warranted before this antiseptic is recommended for general use. It may offer an economical alternative to other expensive antiseptics with positive impact on the prevailing infection rates, patient outcomes and patient satisfaction. (author)

  18. Honey and wound dehiscence: A study of surgical wounds in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There was no significant demographic difference about age (P = 0.44) and gender (P = 0.38) between the two groups. The smaller the initial circumference of the surgical wound, the shorter the duration of healing and this was significant (P = 0.001) in either of the treatment groups. Numerically, more healing was completed ...

  19. Evaluation of two surveillance methods for surgical site infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Haji Abdolbaghi

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Surgical wound infection surveillance is an important facet of hospital infection control processes. There are several surveillance methods for surgical site infections. The objective of this study is to evaluate the accuracy of two different surgical site infection surveillance methods. Methods: In this prospective cross sectional study 3020 undergoing surgey in general surgical wards of Imam Khomeini hospital were included. Surveillance methods consisted of review of medical records for postoperative fever and review of nursing daily note for prescription of antibiotics postoperatively and during patient’s discharge. Review of patient’s history and daily records and interview with patient’s surgeon and the head-nurse of the ward considered as a gold standard for surveillance. Results: The postoperative antibiotic consumption especially when considering its duration is a proper method for surgical wound infection surveillance. Accomplishments of a prospective study with postdischarge follow up until 30 days after surgery is recommended. Conclusion: The result of this study showed that postoperative antibiotic surveillance method specially with consideration of the antibiotic usage duration is a proper method for surgical site infection surveillance in general surgery wards. Accomplishments of a prospective study with post discharge follow up until 30 days after surgery is recommended.

  20. Early and late surgical site infections in ear surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastier, P L; Leroyer, C; Lashéras, A; Rogues, A-M; Darrouzet, V; Franco-Vidal, V

    2016-04-01

    A retroauricular approach is routinely used for treating chronic otitis media. The incidence of surgical site infections after ear surgery is around 10% in contaminated or dirty procedures. This observational prospective study describes surgical site infections after chronic otitis media surgery with the retroauricular approach and investigated their potential predictive factors. This observational prospective study included patients suffering from chronic otitis media and eligible for therapeutic surgery with a retroauricular approach. During follow-up, surgical site infections were defined as "early" if occurring within 30 days after surgery or as "late" if occurring thereafter. The data of 102 patients were analysed. Concerning early surgical site infections, four cases were diagnosed (3.9%) and a significant association was found with preoperative antibiotic therapy, wet ear at pre-operative examination, class III (contaminated) in the surgical wound classification, NNIS (National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance) index > 1, and oral post-operative antibiotic use. Seven late surgical site infections were diagnosed (7.1%) between 90 and 160 days after surgery and were significantly correlated to otorrhoea during the 6 months before surgery, surgery duration ≤60 minutes, canal wall down technique and use of fibrin glue. Surgical site infections after chronic otitis media surgery seem to be associated with factors related to the inflammatory state of the middle ear at the time of surgery in early infections and with chronic inflammation in late infections. © Copyright by Società Italiana di Otorinolaringologia e Chirurgia Cervico-Facciale, Rome, Italy.

  1. Evaluation of Cosmetic Results of Surgical Wound Closure in Dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Williams

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the correlation between wound cosmesis and pet owner satisfaction, to determine the agreement among vet surgeons, and pet owners evaluating a surgical wound with a visual assessment score (VAS, and to determine the agreement between the VAS, a semi-quantitative score of wound inflammation, and wound width.Background: Perception of post-surgical cosmesis by human patients has been found to influence their satisfaction and perceived adequacy of vet surgeons. Due to the trend of owners anthropomorphising pets, this logic can be extended to veterinary patients. Also, there is a lack of consistent, reliable methods to evaluate cosmesis have been developed, creating the need for a scoring system that is accurate and reproducible.Evidentiary value: This was a prospective cohort study with one hundred and seven patients. This study may not change day-to-day practices, but it will bring to light for practitioners the discordance between pet owners and vet surgeons concerning attractiveness of an incision as well as overall satisfaction with a procedure.Methods: Photographs of surgical wounds were taken immediately, 2 weeks, and 8 weeks after surgery in dogs. Owners were asked to evaluate satisfaction with the procedure and attractiveness of the incision using the VAS. Photos were evaluated for cosmetic outcome by pet owner and vet surgeon evaluators with different scoring systems. The reliability of the scoring systems was evaluated using intraclass correlations and kappa statistics as appropriate.Results:  Owners’ evaluation of cosmetic outcome correlated with their overall satisfaction. (r2=0.37, where r2 is the coefficient of determination, and can be used to determine what proportion of variance in one variable is predictable from the other variableThere was generally poor reliability of the subjective scoring between both vet surgeons and pet owners, and the less subjective scoring systems.Conclusion: The cosmetic outcome

  2. The efficacy of normal saline irrigation to prevent surgical site infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashraf, V.; Awan, A.S.

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of normal saline irrigation to prevent surgical site Infection The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of normal saline irrigations to prevent surgical site infection (SSI). Study Design: A comparative study. Place and Duration of Study: The study was conducted at surgery and gynecology Dept CMH Chunian from 1st Jan 2012 to 1st Nov 2012. Patients and Methods: Two hundred clean surgical and gynecological cases were included in the study. Hundred cases which were randomly selected had their wound washed with warm normal saline for 60 sec and then mopped dry with clean swabs. Subcuticular Stitches were applied to all the 200 cases. The surgical wounds were examined on 3rd post operative day and then finally on 15th post operative day. Patients with wound infection developed pain at the operation site and fever on third post operative day. Wounds were examined for swelling, redness, discharge and stitch abscess. Routine investigations were done as per protocol. Wound swabs were taken for culture and sensitivity. Results: The study was carried out on 200 clean cases (general and gynecological). They were 130 females and 70 males. The 100 cases whose wounds were washed with normal saline only 1 patient developed wound infection while in the other group who did not had saline irrigations 8 patients out of 100 developed wound infection. The commonest infective organisms were staphylococcus aureus and the other organisms were streptococcus pyogenes, proteus, Klaebsiella, E coli and pseudomonas. No MRSA was detected. Conclusion: In our study washing the wound with warm normal saline for 60 seconds resulted in the wound being infection free. Wound infection is associated with delayed wound healing, prolonged hospital stay and increased economic pressure on the patient and on the state. (author)

  3. Patients' perceptions and experiences of living with a surgical wound healing by secondary intention: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaughan, Dorothy; Sheard, Laura; Cullum, Nicky; Dumville, Jo; Chetter, Ian

    2018-01-01

    Most surgical wounds heal by primary intention, that is to say, the edges of the wound are brought together with sutures, staples, adhesive glue or clips. However, some wounds may be left open to heal (if there is a risk of infection, or if there has been significant tissue loss), and are known as 'surgical wounds healing by secondary intention'. They are estimated to comprise approximately 28% of all surgical wounds and are frequently complex to manage. However, they are under researched and little is known of their impact on patients' lives. To explore patients' views and experiences of living with a surgical wound healing by secondary intention. A qualitative, descriptive approach. Participants were recruited from acute and community nursing services in two locations in the North of England characterised by high levels of deprivation and diverse populations. Participants were aged 18 years or older and had at least one surgical wound healing by secondary intention, which was slow to heal. Purposeful sampling was used to include patients of different gender, age, wound duration and type of surgery (general, vascular and orthopaedic). Twenty people were interviewed between January and July 2012. Semi-structured interviews were conducted, guided by use of a topic guide developed with input from patient advisors. Data were thematically analysed using steps integral to the 'Framework' approach to analysis, including familiarisation with data; development of a coding scheme; coding, charting and cross comparison of data; interpretation of identified themes. Alarm, shock and disbelief were frequently expressed initial reactions, particularly to "unexpected" surgical wounds healing by secondary intention. Wound associated factors almost universally had a profound negative impact on daily life, physical and psychosocial functioning, and wellbeing. Feelings of frustration, powerlessness and guilt were common and debilitating. Patients' hopes for healing were often

  4. Effects of prophylactic antibiotics on wound infection in elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy

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    Hamid Reza Hemati

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Wound infection is one of the most common complications of surgical procedures.At present, different procedures are used to reduce wound infection including prophylactic antibiotics.Since laparoscopy controls the most sources of wound infection such as mechanical factors, the role ofprophylactic antibiotic therapy may be in doubt. In this study, we evaluated the antibiotic effects inprevention of wound infection in laparoscopic cholecystectomy.Methods and Materials: In this double-blind clinical trial study, patients who were candidate forlaparoscopic cholecystectomy were divided randomly into two groups: antibiotic receivers (38patients and placebo (Normal Saline receivers (32 patients group. The patients were visited in 24hours, 4-7, 10-15 and 30 days after surgery for wound infection and then 2 groups compared.Results: The study showed that there were no significant differences between two groups withrespect to age, body mass index and smoking. In addition, no wound infection was observed in first 24hours, 4-7, 10-15 and 30 days after operation in both groups.Conclusion: The findings showed that prophylactic antibiotic therapy in laparoscopiccholecystectomy has no effect on the incidence of wound infection. Therefore, it is suggested thatprophylactic antibiotic therapy does not use in laparoscopic cholecystectomy because of producingantibiotic resistance, unnecessary complications and also reducing economical costs.

  5. Early versus delayed dressing removal after primary closure of clean and clean-contaminated surgical wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toon, Clare D; Lusuku, Charnelle; Ramamoorthy, Rajarajan; Davidson, Brian R; Gurusamy, Kurinchi Selvan

    2015-09-03

    Most surgical procedures involve a cut in the skin that allows the surgeon to gain access to the deeper tissues or organs. Most surgical wounds are closed fully at the end of the procedure (primary closure). The surgeon covers the closed surgical wound with either a dressing or adhesive tape. The dressing can act as a physical barrier to protect the wound until the continuity of the skin is restored (within about 48 hours) and to absorb exudate from the wound, keeping it dry and clean, and preventing bacterial contamination from the external environment. Some studies have found that the moist environment created by some dressings accelerates wound healing, although others believe that the moist environment can be a disadvantage, as excessive exudate can cause maceration (softening and deterioration) of the wound and the surrounding healthy tissue. The utility of dressing surgical wounds beyond 48 hours of surgery is, therefore, controversial. To evaluate the benefits and risks of removing a dressing covering a closed surgical incision site within 48 hours permanently (early dressing removal) or beyond 48 hours of surgery permanently with interim dressing changes allowed (delayed dressing removal), on surgical site infection. In March 2015 we searched the following electronic databases: The Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register; The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library); Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE) (The Cochrane Library); Ovid MEDLINE; Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations); Ovid EMBASE; and EBSCO CINAHL. We also searched the references of included trials to identify further potentially-relevant trials. Two review authors independently identified studies for inclusion. We included all randomised clinical trials (RCTs) conducted with people of any age and sex, undergoing a surgical procedure, who had their wound closed and a dressing applied. We included only trials that compared

  6. The use of negative pressure wound therapy in the treatment of infected wounds. Case studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel de Alcântara Jones

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the results and benefits obtained from the topical use of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT in patients with infected wounds. METHODS: This was a retrospective study of 20 patients (17 males and three females, mean age 42 years with infected wounds treated using NPWT. The infected wounds were caused by trauma. The treatment system used was VAC.(r (Vacuum Assisted Closure, KCI, San Antonio, United States applied to the wound in continuous mode from 100 to 125 mmHg. The parameters related to the wounds (location, number of VAC changes, the size of the defects in the soft parts, and the evolution of the state of the wound, length of hospital stay, length of intravenous antibiotic therapy, and complications related to the use of this therapy were evaluated. RESULTS: The mean length of the hospital stay, use of NPWT, and antibacterial therapy were 41 days, 22.5 days, and 20 days respectively. The use of the VAC led to a mean reduction of 29% in the wound area (95.65-68.1 cm2; p < 0.05. Only one patient did not show any improvement in the final appearance of the wound with complete eradication of the infection. No complication directly caused by NPWT was observed. CONCLUSION: NPWT stimulates infection-free scar tissue formation in a short time, and is a quick and comfortable alternative to conventional infected wounds treatment methods.

  7. Wound healing in plastic surgery: does age matter? An American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamanos, Efstathios; Osgood, Geoff; Siddiqui, Aamir; Rubinfeld, Ilan

    2015-03-01

    Increasing age has traditionally been associated with impairment in wound healing after operative interventions. This is based mostly on hearsay and anecdotal information. This idea fits with the authors’ understanding of biology in older organisms. This dictum has not been rigorously tested in clinical practice. The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database was retrospectively queried for all patients undergoing plastic surgery from 2005 to 2010. Variables extracted included basic demographics, comorbidities, previous steroid and tobacco use, wound classification at the end of the surgery, and development of postoperative surgical-site infections. Multivariate analyses were used to investigate the impact of aging in wound dehiscence. A total of 25,967 patients were identified. Overall, the incidence of wound dehiscence was 0.75 percent (n = 196). When patients younger than 30 years were compared to older patient groups, no difference in the probability of developing wound dehiscence was noted. Specifically, the groups of patients aged 61 to 70 years and older than 70 years did not have statistically significant wound healing deficiencies [adjusted OR, 0.63 (95 percent CI, 0.11 to 3.63), adjusted p = 0.609; 2.79 (0.55 to 14.18), adjusted p = 0.217, for 61 to 70 years and older than 70 years, respectively]. Factors independently associated with wound dehiscence included postoperative abscess development, paraplegia, quadriplegia, steroid and tobacco use, deep surgical-site infection development, increasing body mass index, and wound classification at the end of surgery. In patients undergoing plastic surgery, wound dehiscence is a rare complication (0.75 percent). Aging is not associated with an increased incidence of wound dehiscence. Risk, III.

  8. Antibiotic therapy for the treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in non surgical wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurusamy, Kurinchi Selvan; Koti, Rahul; Toon, Clare D; Wilson, Peter; Davidson, Brian R

    2013-11-18

    Non surgical wounds include chronic ulcers (pressure or decubitus ulcers, venous ulcers, diabetic ulcers, ischaemic ulcers), burns and traumatic wounds. The prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonisation (i.e. presence of MRSA in the absence of clinical features of infection such as redness or pus discharge) or infection in chronic ulcers varies between 7% and 30%. MRSA colonisation or infection of non surgical wounds can result in MRSA bacteraemia (infection of the blood) which is associated with a 30-day mortality of about 28% to 38% and a one-year mortality of about 55%. People with non surgical wounds colonised or infected with MRSA may be reservoirs of MRSA, so it is important to treat them, however, we do not know the optimal antibiotic regimen to use in these cases. To compare the benefits (such as decreased mortality and improved quality of life) and harms (such as adverse events related to antibiotic use) of all antibiotic treatments in people with non surgical wounds with established colonisation or infection caused by MRSA. We searched the following databases: The Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register (searched 13 March 2013); The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (Issue 2); Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (2013, Issue 2); NHS Economic Evaluation Database (2013, Issue 2); Ovid MEDLINE (1946 to February Week 4 2013); Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, March 12, 2013); Ovid EMBASE (1974 to 2013 Week 10); EBSCO CINAHL (1982 to 8 March 2013). We included only randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing antibiotic treatment with no antibiotic treatment or with another antibiotic regimen for the treatment of MRSA-infected non surgical wounds. We included all relevant RCTs in the analysis, irrespective of language, publication status, publication year, or sample size. Two review authors independently identified the trials, and extracted data from the trial reports. We

  9. Incidence and risk factors for caesarean wound infection in Lagos Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gab-Okafor Chidinma V

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Post caesarean wound infection is not only a leading cause of prolonged hospital stay but a major cause of the widespread aversion to caesarean delivery in developing countries. In order to control and prevent post caesarean wound infection in our environment there is the need to access the relative contribution of each aetiologic factor. Though some studies in our environment have identified factors associated with post caesarean wound infection, none was specifically designed to address these issues prospectively or assess the relative contribution of each of the risk factors. Findings Prospective multicentre study over a period of 56 months in Lagos Nigeria. All consecutive and consenting women scheduled for caesarean section and meeting the inclusion criteria were enrolled into the study. Cases were all subjects with post caesarean wound infection. Those without wound infection served as controls. Data entry and analysis were performed using EPI-Info programme version 6 and SPSS for windows version 10.0. Eight hundred and seventeen women were enrolled into the study. Seventy six (9.3% of these cases were complicated with wound infection. The proportion of subjects with body mass index greater than 25 was significantly higher among the subjects with wound infection (51.3% than in the subjects without wound infection (33.9% p = 0.011. There were also significantly higher proportions of subjects with prolonged rupture of membrane (p = 0.02, prolonged operation time (p = 0.001, anaemia (p = 0.031 and multiple vaginal examinations during labour (0.021 among the women that had wound infection compared to the women that did not have wound infection. After adjustment for confounders only prolonged rupture of membrane (OR = 4.45, prolonged operation time (OR = 2.87 and body max index > 25 (2.34 retained their association with post caesarean wound infection. Conclusion Effort should be geared towards the prevention of prolonged

  10. Deep sternal wound infection after coronary artery bypass surgery: management and risk factor analysis for mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yumun, Gunduz; Erdolu, Burak; Toktas, Faruk; Eris, Cuneyt; Ay, Derih; Turk, Tamer; As, Ahmet Kagan

    2014-08-01

    Deep sternal wound infection is a life-threatening complication after cardiac surgery. The aim of this study was to investigate the factors leading to mortality, and to explore wound management techniques on deep sternal wound infection after coronary artery bypass surgery. Between 2008 and 2013, 58 patients with deep sternal wound infection were analyzed. Risk factors for mortality and morbidity including age, gender, body mass index, smoking status, chronic renal failure, hypertension, diabetes, and treatment choice were investigated. In this study, 19 patients (32.7%) were treated by primary surgical closure (PSC), and 39 patients (67.3%) were treated by delayed surgical closure following a vacuum-assisted closure system (VAC). Preoperative patient characteristics were similar between the groups. Fourteen patients (24.1%) died in the postoperative first month. The mortality rate and mean duration of hospitalization in the PSC group was higher than in the VAC group (P = .026, P = .034). Significant risk factors for mortality were additional operation, diabetes mellitus, and a high level of EuroSCORE. Delayed surgical closure following VAC therapy may be associated with shorter hospitalization and lower mortality in patients with deep sternal wound infection. Additional operation, diabetes mellitus, and a high level of EuroSCORE were associated with mortality.

  11. Profiling wound healing with wound effluent: Raman spectroscopic indicators of infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Nicole J.; Elster, Eric A.

    2012-01-01

    The care of modern traumatic war wounds remains a significant challenge for clinicians. Many of the extremity wounds inflicted during Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom are colonized or infected with multi-drug resistant organisms, particularly Acinetobacter baumannii. Biofilm formation and resistance to current treatments can significantly confound the wound healing process. Accurate strain identification and targeted drug administration for the treatment of wound bioburden has become a priority for combat casualty care. In this study, we use vibrational spectroscopy to examine wound exudates for bacterial load. Inherent chemical differences in different bacterial species and strains make possible the high specificity of vibrational spectroscopy.

  12. Vacuum-assisted closure in the treatment of sternal wound infection after cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simek, Martin; Nemec, Petr; Zalesak, Bohumil; Kalab, Martin; Hajek, Roman; Jecminkova, Lenka; Kolar, Milan

    2007-12-01

    Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) was primarily designed for the treatment of pressure ulcers or chronic, debilitating wounds. Recently, VAC has become an encouraging treatment modality for sternal wound infection after cardiac surgery, providing superior results to conventional treatment strategies. From November 2004 to September 2006, 34 patients, undergoing VAC therapy for sternal wound infection following cardiac surgery, were prospectively evaluated. Ten patients (29 %) were treated for superficial sternal wound infection and 24 (71 %) for deep sternal wound infection. The median age was 69.9 years (range 48 to 82) and the median BMI was 33.4 kg/m(2) (range 28 to 41). Twenty patients (59 %) were women and 19 patients (59 %) were diabetics. Owing to sternal wound infection complications, 16 patients (47 %) were readmitted to the department. VAC was used following the previous failure of the conventional treatment strategy in 7 patients (21 %). Thirty-three patients (97 %) were treated successfully. One patient (3 %) died of multiple organ failure. The overall length of hospitalization was 34.6 days (range 9 to 62). The median number of dressing changes was 4.6 (range 3 to 10). The median VAC treatment time until surgical closure was 9.2 days (range 6 to 21 days). VAC therapy was solely used as a bridge to definite wound closure. Three patients (9 %) with chronic fistula were re-admitted 1 to 6 months after VAC therapy. VAC therapy is a safe and reliable option in the treatment of sternal wound infection in cardiac surgery. VAC therapy should be considered an effective adjunct to conventional treatment modalities for the treatment of extensive and life-threatening wound infections following cardiac surgery, particularly in the presence of risk factors.

  13. Wound management with vacuum-assisted closure in postoperative infections after surgery for spinal stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karaaslan F

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Fatih Karaaslan,1 Şevki Erdem,2 Musa Ugur Mermerkaya11Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Bozok University Medical School, Yozgat, Turkey; 2Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Haydarpasa Numune Training Hospital, Istanbul, TurkeyObjective: To evaluate the results of negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT in the treatment of surgical spinal site infections.Materials and methods: The use of NPWT in postoperative infections after dorsal spinal surgery (transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion plus posterior instrumentation was studied retrospectively. From February 2011 to January 2012, six patients (females out of 317 (209 females; 108 males were readmitted to our clinic with surgical site infections on postoperative day 14 (range 9–19 and were treated with debridement, NPWT, and antibiotics. We evaluated the clinical and laboratory data, including the ability to retain the spinal hardware and recurrent infections.Results: The incidence of deep postoperative surgical site infection was six (1.89% patients (females out of 317 patients (209 females; 108 males at 1 year. All patients completed their wound NPWT regimen successfully. An average of 5.1 (range 3–8 irrigation and debridement sessions was performed before definitive wound closure. The mean follow-up period was 13 (range 12–16 months. No patient had a persistent infection requiring partial or total hardware removal. The hospital stay infection parameters normalized within an average of 4.6 weeks.Conclusion: The study illustrates the usefulness of NPWT as an effective adjuvant treatment option for managing complicated deep spinal surgical wound infections.Keywords: surgical infection, NPWT, VAC, TLIF

  14. Wound infections following open reduction and internal fixation of calcaneal fractures with an extended lateral approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Backes, Manouk; Schepers, Tim; Beerekamp, M. Suzan H.; Luitse, Jan S. K.; Goslings, J. Carel; Schep, Niels W. L.

    2014-01-01

    Post-operative wound infections (PWI) following calcaneal fracture surgery can lead to prolonged hospital stay and additional treatment with antibiotics, surgical debridement or implant removal. Our aim was to determine the incidence of superficial and deep PWI and to identify risk factors (RF).

  15. A CLINICAL STUDY ON POSTOPERATIVE WOUND INFECTIONS IN RIMS, KADAPA- 3 YEARS EXPERIENCE

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    J. Ramanaiah

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Surgical wound infections continue to consume a considerable portion of healthcare finance. Even though, the complete elimination of wound infections is not possible, a reduction of the observed wound infection rate to a minimum level could have marked benefits in terms of both patient comfort and resources used. 1 MATERIALS AND METHODS The clinical study of postoperative wound infection conducted at RIMS General Hospital, Kadapa, during the period of 2013 to 2016. RESULTS In this clinical study, 150 patients were clinically diagnosed of having SSIs out of 925 patients who underwent major surgeries in Department of General Surgery, an incidence of 16.2%. Dirty type of surgeries have high incidence of SSI at 63.6%. SSI occurred more in patients who didn’t receive preoperative antibiotic within 2 hrs. prior to surgery, i.e. 32.1%. Most of the patients presented with discharge through the wound (81.3%. The most common type of discharge was purulent (52.5%. CONCLUSION Preoperative preparation <24 hrs., preoperative bathing and preoperative antibiotic within 2 hrs. before surgery help in reducing surgical site infections. Early diagnosis of SSI and prompt management by isolation of organism causing SSI using sensitive antibiotics and regular dressing help in reducing morbidity for the patients.

  16. Civilian duodenal gunshot wounds: surgical management made simpler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talving, Peep; Nicol, Andrew J; Navsaria, Pradeep H

    2006-04-01

    Low-velocity gunshot wounds cause most civilian duodenal injuries. The objective of this study was to describe a simplified surgical algorithm currently in use in a South African civilian trauma center and to verify its validity by measuring morbidity and mortality. A retrospective chart review of patients with duodenal gunshot injuries during the study period January 1999 to December 2003 was performed. Data points accrued included patient demographics, admission hemodynamic status and resuscitative measures, laparotomy damage control procedures, methods of surgical repair of the duodenal injury, associated injuries, length of intensive care and hospital stays, complications, and mortality. A total of 75 consecutive patients with gunshot injuries to the duodenum were reviewed. Primary repair was performed in 54 patients (87%), resection and reanastomosis in 7 (11%), and pancreatoduodenectomy in 1 (2%) during the initial phases. The overall morbidity and mortality were 58% and 28%, respectively. Duodenum-related complications were recorded in nine (15%) patients: two duodenal fistulas, one duodenal obstruction, and six cases of suture-line dehiscence. Overall and duodenum-related morbidity rates in patients with combined pancreatoduodenal injuries were 83% and 17%, respectively. Duodenum-related mortality occurred in three (4.8%) patients. Most civilian low-velocity duodenal gunshot injuries treated with simple primary repair result in overall morbidity, mortality, and duodenum-related complication rates comparable to those in reports where more complex surgical procedures were employed. Primary repair is also applicable for most combined pancreatic and duodenal gunshot injuries.

  17. Innate Defense Regulator Peptide 1018 in Wound Healing and Wound Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinstraesser, Lars; Hirsch, Tobias; Schulte, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    -37 or HB-107. Furthermore, administration of IDR-1018 resulted in a dose-dependent increase in fibroblast cellular respiration. In vivo, IDR-1018 demonstrated significantly accelerated wound healing in S. aureus infected porcine and non-diabetic but not in diabetic murine wounds. However...

  18. A phase II trial of a surgical protocol to decrease the incidence of wound complications in obese gynecologic oncology patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novetsky, Akiva P; Zighelboim, Israel; Guntupalli, Saketh R; Ioffe, Yevgeniya J M; Kizer, Nora T; Hagemann, Andrea R; Powell, Matthew A; Thaker, Premal H; Mutch, David G; Massad, L Stewart

    2014-08-01

    Obese women have a high incidence of wound separation after gynecologic surgery. We explored the effect of a prospective care pathway on the incidence of wound complications. Women with a body mass index (BMI) ≥30 kg/m(2) undergoing a gynecologic procedure by a gynecologic oncologist via a vertical abdominal incision were eligible. The surgical protocol required: skin and subcutaneous tissues to be incised using a scalpel or cutting electrocautery, fascial closure using #1 polydioxanone suture, placement of a 7 mm Jackson-Pratt drain below Camper's fascia, closure of Camper's fascia with 3-0 plain catgut suture and skin closure with staples. Wound complication was defined as the presence of either a wound infection or any separation. Demographic and perioperative data were analyzed using contingency tables. Univariable and multivariable regression models were used to identify predictors of wound complications. Patients were compared using a multivariable model to a historical group of obese patients to assess the efficacy of the care pathway. 105 women were enrolled with a median BMI of 38.1. Overall, 39 (37%) had a wound complication. Women with a BMI of 30-39.9 kg/m(2) had a significantly lower risk of wound complication as compared to those with a BMI >40 kg/m(2) (23% vs 59%, pcontrolling for factors associated with wound complications the prospective care pathway was associated with a significantly decreased wound complication rate in women with BMI <40 kg/m(2) (OR 0.40, 95% C.I.: 0.18-0.89). This surgical protocol leads to a decreased rate of wound complications among women with a BMI of 30-39.9 kg/m(2). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Prophylactic Groin Wound Vacuum-assisted Therapy in Vascular Surgery Patients at Enhanced Risk for Postoperative Wound Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesonen, Luke O; Halloran, Brian G; Aziz, Abdulhameed

    2018-01-01

    Vascular groin wounds have higher than expected surgical site infection (SSI) rates and some patients are at enhanced risk. The Wiseman et al. paper suggests an objective scoring system that identifies patients at enhanced risk of postdischarge SSI. We hypothesize that prophylactic groin wound vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy in enhanced risk patients will decrease SSI and readmission and the Wiseman model provides potential evidence that enhanced risk patients can be objectively identified. A single institution, retrospective analysis was conducted from January 2013 to September 2016 utilizing procedure codes to identify patients with wound VACs placed in the operating room. Two distinct groups were identified. The first was a wound complication patient group with 15 limbs (13 patients) with a groin wound VAC placed within 45 days postoperatively for groin wound complications. Eleven of these limbs had the VAC placed at readmission. The second group was a prophylactic patient group that included 8 limbs (7 patients) who received a VAC prophylactically placed in the enhanced risk wounds. These wounds were determined to be enhanced risk based on clinical criteria judged by the operating surgeon such as a large overhanging panniculus and/or one of several ongoing medical issues. We calculated a Wiseman score for all patients, determined total cost of the readmissions, and determined 30-day postsurgical SSI incidence for the prophylactic VAC group. Per the Wiseman scores, 9 limbs with postoperative complications were high risk and 3 limbs were moderate/high risk. Eleven limbs had a VAC placed at readmission with an average readmission cost of $8876.77. For the prophylactic group, 8 limbs were high risk with no observed postdischarge SSI in the first 30 days from surgery. The Wiseman scores showed close correlation between the retrospective high and moderate/high risk groups versus the prophylactic VAC group (31.5 ± 7.3 vs. 32 ± 5.5, P = 0.87). The Wiseman

  20. Surgical wound dehiscence: a conceptual framework for patient assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandy-Hodgetts, Kylie; Carville, Keryln; Leslie, Gavin D

    2018-03-02

    This paper presents a conceptual framework which outlines the risk factors associated with surgical wound dehiscence (SWD) as identified in the literature. The purpose for the development of the conceptual framework was to derive an evidence-based, informed understanding of factors associated with SWD, in order to inform a programme of research on the aetiology and potential risk factors of SWD. Incorporated within the patient-centric conceptual framework are patient related comorbidities, intraoperative and postoperative risk factors related to SWD. These are categorised as either 'mechanical' or 'physiological mechanisms' posited to influence these relationships. The use of the conceptual model for assessment of patients has particular clinical relevance for identification of risk and the management of patients in the pre-, intra- and postoperative period.

  1. Preventing surgical site infections: a surgeon's perspective.

    OpenAIRE

    Nichols, R. L.

    2001-01-01

    Wound site infections are a major source of postoperative illness, accounting for approximately a quarter of all nosocomial infections. National studies have defined the patients at highest risk for infection in general and in many specific operative procedures. Advances in risk assessment comparison may involve use of the standardized infection ratio, procedure-specific risk factor collection, and logistic regression models. Adherence to recommendations in the 1999 Centers for Disease Contro...

  2. Surgical pathology to describe the clinical margin of debridement of chronic wounds using a wound electronic medical record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golinko, Michael S; Joffe, Renata; de Vinck, David; Chandrasekaran, Eashwar; Stojadinovic, Olivera; Barrientos, Stephan; Vukelic, Sasa; Tomic-Canic, Marjana; Brem, Harold

    2009-08-01

    Chronic wounds, including diabetic foot ulcers (DFU), pressure ulcers (PU), and venous ulcers (VU) result from multiple physiologic impairments. Operative debridement is a mainstay of treatment to remove nonviable tissue and to stimulate wound healing. Unlike tumor resection, however, operative wound specimens are not routinely sent for pathology. The objective of this study was to describe the pathology present in chronic wounds. Pathology reports of the skin edge and wound base from 397 initial debridements in 336 consecutive patients with chronic wounds were retrospectively reviewed. All data were entered and stored in a Wound Electronic Medical Record. Pathology data were extracted from the Wound Electronic Medical Record, coded, and quantified. Up to 15 distinct histopathologic findings across 7 tissue types were observed after review of pathology reports from chronic wounds. Specifically, the pathology of epidermis revealed hyperkeratosis: 66% in DFUs, 31% in PUs, and 29% in VUs. Dermal pathology revealed fibrosis in 49% of DFUs, 30% of PUs, and 15% of VUs. Wound bed pathology revealed necrosis in the subcutaneous tissue in 67% of DFUs, 55% of PUs, and 19% of VUs. Fibrosis was reported in between 19% and 52% of all wound types. Acute osteomyelitis was present in 39% of DFUs, 33% of PUs, and 29% of VUs. This observational study of the histopathology of initial surgical debridement of chronic wounds revealed a wide range of findings across multiple tissue levels. Although certain findings such as osteomyelitis and gangrene have been shown to directly relate to impaired wound healing and amputation, other findings require additional investigation. To rigorously define a margin of debridement, a prospective study relating histopathology and clinical outcomes such as healing rates and amputation is needed.

  3. Fighting surgical site infections in small animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verwilghen, Denis; Singh, Ameet

    2015-01-01

    A diverse array of pathogen-related, patient-related, and caretaker-related issues influence risk and prevention of surgical site infections (SSIs). The entire surgical team involved in health care settings in which surgical procedures are performed play a pivotal role in the prevention of SSIs. ...

  4. Wound infection after median sternotomy during the war in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelić, I; Anić, D; Alfirević, I; Kalinić, S; Ugljen, R; Letica, D; Ante Korda, Z; Vucemilo, I; Bulat, C; Predrijevac, M; Corić, V; Husar, J; Jelic, M; Hulina, D; Depina, I; Dadić, D

    1996-12-01

    From 1990 to 1994 at Clinical Hospital Center, Zagreb, 1904 median sternotomies were performed for cardiac operations. Patients shared the same intensive care unit (ICU) with the wounded persons, admitted to the hospital from battlefield. Infection developed in 124 patients, an incidence of 6.51%. Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was isolated from 90, methicillin resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE) from 19, and gram negative bacilli (GNB) from 56 patients, Pseudomonas aeruginosa in 2, and Clostridium pneumoniae in 1 case. Ninety-six patients (5.04%) developed superficial localized infection of subcutaneous tissues and they were treated with frequent dressing changes with antibiotic-soaked gauze in combination with systemic antibiotics. Twenty-eight patients (1.47%) developed mediastinitis and sternal dehiscence. They were treated by operative debridement followed by reclosure of the sternum with continuous antibiotic irrigation. We obtained satisfactory results with our method of closure of sternum which is a modification of Robicsek's technique. Nine of them required further operation. In seven cases we performed muscle flaps and in two omentoplasty. One hundred and twenty patients were discharged in satisfactory condition. The uncontrolled mediastinal sepsis caused death in 4 patients. Higher infection rate after median sternotomy during 1991 and 1992 could be possibly explained with the war circumstances in Croatia, and especially with MRSA strain becoming endemic in surgical ICU.

  5. Surgical site infection among patients undergone orthopaedic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Surgical site infection among patients undergone orthopaedic surgery at Muhimbili Orthopaedic Institute, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. ... of surgical site infection at Muhimbili Orthopedic Institute was high. This was associated with more than 2 hours length of surgery, lack of prophylaxis use, and pre-operative hospital stay.

  6. Intraoperative contamination influences wound discharge and periprosthetic infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knobben, Bas A. S.; Engelsma, Yde; Neut, Danielle

    Intraoperative bacterial contamination increases risk for postoperative wound-healing problems and periprosthetic infection, but to what extent remains unclear. We asked whether bacterial contamination of the instruments and bone during primary prosthesis insertion was associated with prolonged

  7. Intraoperative contamination influences wound discharge and periprosthetic infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knobben, Bas A. S.; Engelsma, Yde; Neut, Danielle

    2006-01-01

    Intraoperative bacterial contamination increases risk for postoperative wound-healing problems and periprosthetic infection, but to what extent remains unclear. We asked whether bacterial contamination of the instruments and bone during primary prosthesis insertion was associated with prolonged

  8. Wound healing and infection in surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lars Tue

    2012-01-01

    : The aim was to clarify how smoking and nicotine affects wound healing processes and to establish if smoking cessation and nicotine replacement therapy reverse the mechanisms involved.......: The aim was to clarify how smoking and nicotine affects wound healing processes and to establish if smoking cessation and nicotine replacement therapy reverse the mechanisms involved....

  9. Bioactive Antimicrobial Peptides as Therapeutics for Corneal Wounds and Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Gina L; Kasus-Jacobi, Anne; Pereira, H Anne

    2017-06-01

    Significance: More than 2 million eye injuries and infections occur each year in the United States that leave civilians and military members with reduced or complete vision loss due to the lack of effective therapeutics. Severe ocular injuries and infections occur in varied settings including the home, workplace, and battlefields. In this review, we discuss the potential of developing antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) as therapeutics for the treatment of corneal wounds and infections for which the current treatment options are inadequate. Recent Advances: Standard-of-care employs the use of fluorescein dye for the diagnosis of ocular defects and is followed by the use of antibiotics and/or steroids to treat the infection and reduce inflammation. Recent advances for treating corneal wounds include the development of amniotic membrane therapies, wound chambers, and drug-loaded hydrogels. In this review, we will discuss an innovative approach using AMPs with the dual effect of promoting corneal wound healing and clearing infections. Critical Issues: An important aspect of treating ocular injuries is that treatments need to be effective and administered expeditiously. This is especially important for injuries that occur during combat and in individuals who demonstrate delayed wound healing. To overcome gaps in current treatment modalities, bioactive peptides based on naturally occurring cationic antimicrobial proteins are being investigated as new therapeutics. Future Directions: The development of new therapeutics that can treat ocular infections and promote corneal wound healing, including the healing of persistent corneal epithelial defects, would be of great clinical benefit.

  10. e of the Surgical Glove in Modified Vacuum-Assisted Wound Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar Ram Hemmanur

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Vacuum-assisted wound healing has been proven to be more efficacious than conventionaldressings. Vacuum dressing has been frequently modified given the restrictions in resourcesavailable. Here we present a modified method of vacuum dressing by using surgical orgynaecological gloves for lower and upper limb wounds. Vacuum dressing was applied withparts of a surgical or gynaecological glove and Opsite with T-tailing of the suction outlet.Vacuum-assisted wound healing using the surgical gloves showed relatively good woundhealing in the amputation stump, finger, arm, and leg in the cases studied.

  11. Vacuum-assisted wound closure versus alginate for the treatment of deep perivascular wound infections in the groin after vascular surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsen, Christina; Wann-Hansson, Christine; Wictorsson, Catharina; Acosta, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Vacuum-assisted wound closure (VAC) therapy may heal wounds faster than conventional dressings after surgical debridement of perivascular groin infections after vascular surgery. Patients with deep infected wounds (Szilagyi grade III) were surgically revised and left open for secondary healing, then randomized to either VAC or alginate (Sorbalgon) therapy, between February 2007 and November 2011. To test the hypothesis, it was calculated that 42 patients needed to be included (90% power, 5% level of significance). It was decided to perform an interim analysis after inclusion of 20 patients. Among 66 patients undergoing groin revision, 20 patients were included in this study. Patients were randomized to VAC (n = 10) or alginate (n = 10). The two groups were comparable in patient and wound characteristics. Time to full skin epithelialization was significantly shorter in the VAC group (median, 57 days) compared with the alginate group (median, 104 days; P = .026). The number of positive wound cultures of bacteria and C-reactive protein values decreased equally in both groups between surgical revision and day 21. One femur amputation was performed in each group as a consequence of the groin infection, one patient died during the in-hospital stay in the alginate group, and none died in the VAC group. VAC achieves faster healing than alginate therapy after wound debridement for deep perivascular wound infections in the groin after vascular surgery. This finding does not allow further inclusion of patients from an ethical point of view, and this study was, therefore, stopped prematurely. Copyright © 2014 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Innate defense regulator peptide 1018 in wound healing and wound infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Steinstraesser

    Full Text Available Innate defense regulators (IDRs are synthetic immunomodulatory versions of natural host defense peptides (HDP. IDRs mediate protection against bacterial challenge in the absence of direct antimicrobial activity, representing a novel approach to anti-infective and anti-inflammatory therapy. Previously, we reported that IDR-1018 selectively induced chemokine responses and suppressed pro-inflammatory responses. As there has been an increasing appreciation for the ability of HDPs to modulate complex immune processes, including wound healing, we characterized the wound healing activities of IDR-1018 in vitro. Further, we investigated the efficacy of IDR-1018 in diabetic and non-diabetic wound healing models. In all experiments, IDR-1018 was compared to the human HDP LL-37 and HDP-derived wound healing peptide HB-107. IDR-1018 was significantly less cytotoxic in vitro as compared to either LL-37 or HB-107. Furthermore, administration of IDR-1018 resulted in a dose-dependent increase in fibroblast cellular respiration. In vivo, IDR-1018 demonstrated significantly accelerated wound healing in S. aureus infected porcine and non-diabetic but not in diabetic murine wounds. However, no significant differences in bacterial colonization were observed. Our investigation demonstrates that in addition to previously reported immunomodulatory activities IDR-1018 promotes wound healing independent of direct antibacterial activity. Interestingly, these effects were not observed in diabetic wounds. It is anticipated that the wound healing activities of IDR-1018 can be attributed to modulation of host immune pathways that are suppressed in diabetic wounds and provide further evidence of the multiple immunomodulatory activities of IDR-1018.

  13. [Vacuum sealing drainage for infection wound in earthquake].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Dengbin; Ning, Ning; Liu, Xiaoyan; Gan, Chunlan

    2009-10-01

    To investigate the effect of vacuum sealing drainage (VSD) technology on prevention and treatment of infection wound and to repair the infectious fracture wound in earthquake. Twenty-two patients with limb fractures and open infection wound received VSD from May 12, 2008 to June 19, 2008 in West China Hospital of Sichuan University. Before the VSD, we debrided all wounds and gave effective systemic antibiotics. A -18 ~ -14 kPa pressure was exerted to the wound, and the VSD was used for 8-10 days. We took a germiculture regularly. The capacity, color, and nature of negative pressure drainage, the regression of limb swelling, and systemic inflammatory responses were observed. There was no active bleeding wound or transparent film off in all patients. Three patients had drainage clogging, and were kept flowing freely using the sterile saline pipe to remove the blockage of necrotic tissues. During the VSD, granulation tissues grew well in the 13 patients with bone exposure of the wounded. Two patients whose symptom of inflammatory was not obviously eased had another debridement to completely remove the necrosis, and the symptom was relieved. After 3-5 days of VSD, swelling and fever in the other 20 patients significantly subsided. VSD can alleviate the wound inflammation, facilitate the growth of the fresh granulation tissue from the surrounding to the center, and reduce the flap transfer area for the Stage II coverage of the exposed bone.

  14. The Use of Collatamp G, Local Gentamicin-Collagen Sponge, in Reducing Wound Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Chia, Clement L. K.; Shelat, Vishal G.; Low, Wilson; George, Sheena; Rao, Jaideepraj

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a retrospective study to examine the role of Collatamp G in reducing postoperative surgical site infection (SSI) in patients with different wound classes. Ninety-two patients (62 men and 30 women; mean age, 58 years; range, 29–88 years) who had undergone surgery between December 2009 and November 2011 in Tan Tock Seng Hospital and who had application of Collatamp G in their wound before closure were included in the study. The primary endpoint was the development of any superficia...

  15. Closed Incision Negative Pressure Therapy Versus Standard of Care Surgical Dressing in Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-06-07

    Surgical Wound; Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty; Wounds and Injuries; Joint Disease; Musculoskeletal Disease; Prosthesis-Related Infections; Infection; Postoperative Complications; Pathologic Processes

  16. Surgical site infection in posterior spine surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-03-20

    Mar 20, 2016 ... Methodology: All consecutive patients who had posterior spine surgeries between January 2012 ... However, spinal instrumentation, surgery on cervical region and wound inspection on or ... While advances have been made in infection control ... costs, due to loss of productivity, patient dissatisfaction and.

  17. Treatment of Early Post-Op Wound Infection after Internal Fixation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and...and challenging complications faced by orthopaedic surgeons and patients in both the military and civilian populations. The wounds are contaminated...or colonized at the time of injury, during the course of therapy, or both. Infection is always a possibility with any surgical intervention

  18. Role of Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy in Deep Sternal Wound Infection After Open Heart Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cemalettin Aydın

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Mediastinitis is a devastating complication in open heart surgery. The most common treatments after debridement are rewiring with antibiotic irrigation. Vacuum assisted closure therapy is a recently introduced technique that promotes the healing of difficult wounds, including post-sternotomy mediastinitis.Patients and Methods: Forty one patients with deep sternal wound infection were divided into two groups based on the treatment method used. Twenty two patients with post-cardio to my deep sternal wound infection were treated primarily by vacuum assisted closure method (group A and 19 patients with deep sternal wound infection who received closed mediastinal irrigation were treated with antibiotics (group B between January 2006 and January 2010.Results: The two groups were compared. Three patients died during treatment in group B. The median healing time was significantly shorter in group A (mean, 13.5 ± 3.2 days compared to 18 days (mean, 21.2 ± 16.4 days in group B (p< 0.001. Deep sternal wound infection showed no recurrences after the vacuum treatment, while 7 (24% patients in group B suffered recurrences. Hospital stay was significantly shorter in group A (median, 30.5 days; mean, 32.2 ± 11.3 days vs. median, 45 days; mean, 49.2 ± 19.3 days (p= 0.001.Conclusion: A significantly shorter healing time was confirmed with vacuum assisted closure. Hospital stay remained significantly shorter in group A (35 vs. 46 days.

  19. Impact of using prophylactic antibiotic on prevention of wound infection in inguinal herniorrhaphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhtar, K.; Khan, Z.; Bhatti, A.M.; Mahmood, K.

    2015-01-01

    To compare the effect of antibiotic prophylaxis with placebo in prevention of wound infection amongst patients undergoing clean open inguinal herniorrhaphy (without mesh). Study Design: Randomized Controlled Trial. Place and Duration of Study: Pakistan Air Force Hospital, Faisal Base Karachi from October 2009 to November 2011. Material and Methods: One hundred and fifty patients undergoing inguinal herniorrhaphy were included and randomly assigned to one of the two groups using random numbers table. Group A patients were given intravenous antibiotic while those in Group B were given equal volume of normal saline just before the induction of anaesthesia. Patients from both groups were observed for the presence of wound infection. Results: Total seven cases (4.7%) of surgical site infection were detected; two cases (2.7%) occurred in group A whereas five cases (6.7%) occurred in group B. The low frequency of post-operative wound infection was seen in group A as compared to group B but the difference was statistically insignificant. Conclusion: Antibiotic prophylaxis has no significant effect on prevention of wound infection in inguinal herniorrhaphy. (author)

  20. Moist wound healing compared with standard care of treatment of primary closed vascular surgical wounds: a prospective randomized controlled study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogt, Katja C; Uhlyarik, M; Schroeder, Torben V

    2007-01-01

    This study was a randomized-controlled trial comparing the standard type of dry dressing, Mepore, with moist wound healing, using a hydrofiber dressing, Aquacel, in primary closed wounds after vascular surgery. The endpoints were patient comfort, cost-effectiveness, infections, wound complications......, and length of hospital stay. One hundred and sixty patients were randomized to receive either Mepore or Aquacel dressing. There was no significant difference in patient comfort between the two groups, but a higher cost in the Aquacel group despite significantly fewer changes of dressings in these patients...

  1. Surgical Site Infection among Patients Undergone Orthopaedic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADMIN

    with surgical site infection at Muhimbili Orthopedic Institute. ... Determination of the relationship between outcome and exposure variables ... determined by more than 2 hours length of surgical procedure (AOR= 1.4; 95%CI 1.14-6.69; ... hospital, those with metastatic fractures, back, spine were not included as they fall under.

  2. Graft infections after surgical aortic reconstructions

    OpenAIRE

    Berger, P.

    2015-01-01

    Prosthetic vascular grafts are frequently used to reconstruct (part) of the aorta. Every surgical procedure caries a certain risk for infection and when a prosthetic aortic graft is implanted, this may lead to an aortic graft infection (AGI). Endovascular techniques have gradually replaced open surgical reconstructions as first line of treatment for aorto-iliac diseases. Nowadays, open reconstructions are primarily reserved for patients unsuitable for endovascular reconstructions or for redo ...

  3. [Vacuum-assisted closure as a treatment modality for surgical site infection in cardiac surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simek, M; Nemec, P; Zálesák, B; Hájek, R; Kaláb, M; Fluger, I; Kolár, M; Jecmínková, L; Gráfová, P

    2007-08-01

    The vacuum-asssited closure has represented an encouraging treatment modality in treatment of surgical site infection in cardiac surgery, providing superior results compared with conventional treatment strategies, particularly in the treatment of deep sternal wound infection. From November 2004 to January 2007, 40 patients, undergoing VAC therapy (VAC system, KCI, Austria, Hartmann-Rico Inc., Czech Republic) for surgical site infection following cardiac surgery, were prospectively evaluated. Four patients (10%) were treated for extensive leg-wound infection, 10 (25%) were treated for superficial sternal wound infection and 26 (65%) for deep sternal wound infection. The median age was 69.9 +/- 9.7 years and the median BMI was 33.2 +/- 5.0 kg/m2. Twenty-three patients (57%) were women and diabetes was present in 22 patients (55%). The VAC was employed after the previous failure of the conventional treatment strategy in 7 patients (18%). Thirty-eight patients (95%) were successfully healed. Two patients (5%) died, both of deep sternal infetion consequences. The overall length of hospitalization was 36.4 +/- 22.6 days. The median number of dressing changes was 4.6 +/- 1.8. The median VAC treatment time until surgical closure was 9.7 +/- 3.9 days. The VAC therapy was solely used as a bridge to the definite wound closure. Four patients (10%) with a chronic fistula were re-admitted with the range of 1 to 12 months after the VAC therapy. The VAC therapy is a safe and reliable option in the treatment of surgical site infection in the field of cardiac surgery. The VAC therapy can be considered as an effective adjunct to convetional treatment modalities for the therapy of extensive and life-threatening wound infection following cardiac surgery, particurlarly in the group of high-risk patients.

  4. Application of VitaVallis dressing for infected wounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirilova, N. V.; Fomenko, A. N.; Korovin, M. S.

    2015-01-01

    Today there is a growing demand for safe and efficient antimicrobial dressings for infected wound treatment. The antimicrobial sorption material for VitaVallis dressings was produced by one-stage oxidation of aluminum nanopowder in water in the presence of fibrous acetylcellulose matrix. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the material is made up of fibers of diameter 1.5–3.0 µm with adhered agglomerated alumina nanosheets. An antimicrobial study revealed a high inhibitory effect of VitaVallis against the growth of gram-negative (E.coli, P. aeruginosa) and gram-positive (S. aureus) strains. The antimicrobial activity of the dressing against microbial pathogens on the wound surface was demonstrated in in vivo experiments on male rats. The dressing was also tested on volunteer patients. The testing showed reduction of the wound healing period, accelerated cleaning of the infected wound and enhanced tissue regeneration in the wound. The results demonstrate that the VitaVallis dressing can be used for the treatment of deep infected wounds

  5. Application of VitaVallis dressing for infected wounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirilova, N. V., E-mail: n.kirilova@vitavallis.com; Fomenko, A. N., E-mail: alserova@ispms.tsc.ru; Korovin, M. S., E-mail: msk@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, 2/4 Akademicheskii pr., Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-17

    Today there is a growing demand for safe and efficient antimicrobial dressings for infected wound treatment. The antimicrobial sorption material for VitaVallis dressings was produced by one-stage oxidation of aluminum nanopowder in water in the presence of fibrous acetylcellulose matrix. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the material is made up of fibers of diameter 1.5–3.0 µm with adhered agglomerated alumina nanosheets. An antimicrobial study revealed a high inhibitory effect of VitaVallis against the growth of gram-negative (E.coli, P. aeruginosa) and gram-positive (S. aureus) strains. The antimicrobial activity of the dressing against microbial pathogens on the wound surface was demonstrated in in vivo experiments on male rats. The dressing was also tested on volunteer patients. The testing showed reduction of the wound healing period, accelerated cleaning of the infected wound and enhanced tissue regeneration in the wound. The results demonstrate that the VitaVallis dressing can be used for the treatment of deep infected wounds.

  6. ANTIMICROBIAL SUSCEPTIBILITY PATTERN OF ORGANISMS CAUSING SURGICAL SITE INFECTIONS (SSI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohini Murlidhar Gajbhiye

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND CDC defines surgical site infection as ‘Infections related to operative procedure that occurs at or near surgical incision within 30 days of operative procedure or within one year if the implant is left in situ’. Surgical site infection (SSI is 3 rd most frequently reported nosocomial infection (12%-16% as per National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance (NNIS. The aim of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of organisms causing SSI. MATERIALS AND METHODS During a two year study period in a tertiary care hospital, 19,127 patients underwent surgeries in various surgical departments. Of these 517 (2.7% developed surgical site infection. The surgical wounds were classified by CDC & NNIS criteria into 4 classes. Two wound swabs were taken and processed by standard microbiological techniques. Antimicrobial susceptibility along with testing of ESBLs, MBLs, AmpCβ lactamases was done for all isolates causing SSI. RESULTS Among 19,127 patients, 517 (2.7% developed SSI. It was highest in patients of perforation peritonitis (11.99%.Among 517 specimens, 340 (65.76% showed growth and 177 (34.23% were culture negative. E.coli (23.33% was the commonest organism isolated followed by Acinetobacter spp. (16%, Klebsiella spp. (15.66%, Pseudomonas spp. (15.33%, S. aureus (10.33%, S. epidermidis(7.3%, Proteus spp. (6.00% and Citrobacter spp. (2.66%.Staphylococcus spp. were 100 % sensitive to Vancomycin & Linezolid. (27.5% S. aureus were MRSA and (17.5% were Inducible Clindamycin resistant (ICR. Enterobacteriaceae isolates showed maximum sensitivity towards Imipenem, Piperacillin-Tazobactam and Amikacin. Klebsiella spp. (40.62%, E.coli (35.89%, Citrobacter spp. (33.33%, Proteus spp. (26.08% were ESBL producers. Klebsiella spp. (17.18%, E.coli (10.25%, Proteus spp. (11.11% and Citrobacter spp. (8.69% were AmpC producers. Acinetobacter spp. (28.57% was commonest MBL producer followed by Klebsiella spp. (20

  7. Considering a new domain for antimicrobial stewardship: Topical antibiotics in the open surgical wound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmiston, Charles E; Leaper, David; Spencer, Maureen; Truitt, Karen; Litz Fauerbach, Loretta; Graham, Denise; Johnson, Helen Boehm

    2017-11-01

    The global push to combat the problem of antimicrobial resistance has led to the development of antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs), which were recently mandated by The Joint Commission and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. However, the use of topical antibiotics in the open surgical wound is often not monitored by these programs nor is it subject to any evidence-based standardization of care. Survey results indicate that the practice of using topical antibiotics intraoperatively, in both irrigation fluids and powders, is widespread. Given the risks inherent in their use and the lack of evidence supporting it, the practice should be monitored as a core part of ASPs, and alternative agents, such as antiseptics, should be considered. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [Qualified and emergency specialized surgical care for those with wounds to the extremities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iurkevich, V V; Fidarov, E Z; Bauér, V A

    1997-06-01

    Experience of organization of the surgical care in the military hospital to 438 wounded in extremities during armed conflict in Republic of Chechnya is generalized. Maximum reduction of stages of medical evacuation of the wounded in extremities, approaching of the qualified and urgent specialized surgical care directly to the region of battle actions, use of opportunities for it one-moment rendering corresponded to principles of the modern military-medical doctrine. Due to realization of the requirements of the doctrine life of many wounded ++ was saved, terms of treatment, medical and social rehabilitation are reduced. Besides lethality, treatment cost and numbers of transferring to the reserve from the Armed Forces were reduced.

  9. VAC therapy to promote wound healing after surgical revascularisation for critical lower limb ischaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Caridi, Giovanni; Massara, Mafalda; Greco, Michele; Pipitò, Narayana; Spinelli, Francesco; Grande, Raffaele; Butrico, Lucia; de Franciscis, Stefano; Serra, Raffaele

    2016-06-01

    Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy is a new emerging non-invasive system in wound care, which speeds up wound healing by causing vacuum, improving tissue perfusion and suctioning the exudates, and facilitating the removal of bacteria from the wound. The application of sub-atmospheric pressure on the lesions seems to alter the cytoskeleton of the cells on the wound bed, triggering a cascade of intracellular signals that increase the rate of cell division and subsequent formation of granulation tissue. The aim of this study is to analyse the results of VAC therapy used as an adjuvant therapy for the treatment of foot wounds in patients affected by critical limb ischaemia (CLI) (Rutherford 6 class) after distal surgical revascularisation, to promote and accelerate the healing of ulcers. Twenty-nine patients (20 males, 9 females; mean age 68·4) affected by CLI of Rutherford 6 class, after surgical revascularisation of the lower limb, underwent VAC therapy in order to speed up wound healing. Complete wound healing was achieved in 19 patients (65·51%), in an average period of 45·4 ± 25·6 days. VAC therapy is a valid aid, after surgical revascularisation, to achieve rapid healing of foot lesions in patients with CLI. © 2014 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2014 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Bioactive Antimicrobial Peptides as Therapeutics for Corneal Wounds and Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Griffith, Gina L.; Kasus-Jacobi, Anne; Pereira, H. Anne

    2017-01-01

    Significance: More than 2 million eye injuries and infections occur each year in the United States that leave civilians and military members with reduced or complete vision loss due to the lack of effective therapeutics. Severe ocular injuries and infections occur in varied settings including the home, workplace, and battlefields. In this review, we discuss the potential of developing antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) as therapeutics for the treatment of corneal wounds and infections for which th...

  11. A comparison of obsidian and surgical steel scalpel wound healing in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disa, J J; Vossoughi, J; Goldberg, N H

    1993-10-01

    There are several anecdotal clinical articles claiming wound healing and scar superiority using obsidian (volcanic glass) scalpels. In order to determine if skin incisions made with obsidian were superior to those made with standard surgical steel, wound tensile strength, scar width, and histology were assessed in 40 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Each rat received two parallel 8-cm dorsal skin incisions, one with an obsidian scalpel and the other with a surgical steel scalpel (no. 15 blade). Data were analyzed by ANOVA. Tensile strength of the two wound types was not different at 7, 14, 21, and 42 days. Scar width, however, was significantly less in the obsidian wounds at 7, 10, and 14 days (p obsidian wounds contained fewer inflammatory cells and less granulation tissue at 7 days.

  12. Wound Healing and Infection in Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lars Tue

    2012-01-01

    To clarify the evidence on smoking and postoperative healing complications across surgical specialties and to determine the impact of perioperative smoking cessation intervention.......To clarify the evidence on smoking and postoperative healing complications across surgical specialties and to determine the impact of perioperative smoking cessation intervention....

  13. Prevalence of Post-operative Wound Infections in Rural area of Latur District

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikram Rajput

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Surgical site infection (SSI continues to be a major source of morbidity following operative procedures. The modern surgeon cannot escape the responsibility of dealing with infections, having the knowledge for the appropriate use of aseptic and antiseptic technique, proper use of prophylactic and therapeutic antibiotics, and adequate monitoring and support with novel surgical and pharmacologic as well as nonpharmacologic aids. Objective: To study the most common organisms encountered in postoperative wound infections and to find out the most effective Antibiotics in case of Post Operative Wound Infections. Methodology: It is an Observational study done on 50 operated cases of post operative wounds. Results: Most common microorganism encountered in present series was E. coli in 13 cases (26%. Least common micro organism was Proteus (2%. E. coli was also encountered in mixed culture with Kleibsiella, Pseudomonas and Citrobacter. Most effective antibiotic in present series was Imipenem. Other common effective antibiotics were Amikacin, Netillin, Piperacillin, Tetracycline and Gentamycin. Least effective antibiotics were Penicillin, Cefotaxime, Cefuroxime and Cefoxitin. Conclusion: E. coli was the most common organism cultured. Imipenem and Amikacin were the most effective antibiotics.

  14. [Surgical site infections: antibiotic prophylaxis in surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asensio, Angel

    2014-01-01

    Surgical site infections (SSI) are very common, and represent more than 20% of all hospital-acquired infections. SSIs are associated with a higher mortality, as well as to an extended hospital stay and costs, depending on the surgical procedure and type of SSI. Advances in control practices for these infections include improvement in operating room ventilation, sterilization methods, barriers, and surgical techniques, as well as in surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis. For the latter, the antimicrobial agent should: be active against the most common pathogens, be administered in an appropriate dosage and in a time frame to ensure serum and tissue concentrations over the period of potential contamination, be safe, and be administered over the shortest effective time period to minimize adverse events, development of resistances, and cost. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  15. Platelet-rich plasma: a biomimetic approach to enhancement of surgical wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Moure, Joseph S; Van Eps, Jeffrey L; Cabrera, Fernando J; Barbosa, Zonia; Medrano Del Rosal, Guillermo; Weiner, Bradley K; Ellsworth, Warren A; Tasciotti, Ennio

    2017-01-01

    Platelets are small anucleate cytoplasmic cell bodies released by megakaryocytes in response to various physiologic triggers. Traditionally thought to be solely involved in the mechanisms of hemostasis, platelets have gained much attention due to their involvement wound healing, immunomodulation, and antiseptic properties. As the field of surgery continues to evolve so does the need for therapies to aid in treating the increasingly complex patients seen. With over 14 million obstetric, musculoskeletal, and urological and gastrointestinal surgeries performed annually, the healing of surgical wounds continues to be of upmost importance to the surgeon and patient. Platelet-rich plasma, or platelet concentrate, has emerged as a possible adjuvant therapy to aid in the healing of surgical wounds and injuries. In this review, we will discuss the wound healing properties of platelet-rich plasma and various surgical applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Graft infections after surgical aortic reconstructions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berger, P.

    2015-01-01

    Prosthetic vascular grafts are frequently used to reconstruct (part) of the aorta. Every surgical procedure caries a certain risk for infection and when a prosthetic aortic graft is implanted, this may lead to an aortic graft infection (AGI). Endovascular techniques have gradually replaced open

  17. Quality improvement initiative: Preventative Surgical Site Infection Protocol in Vascular Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parizh, David; Ascher, Enrico; Raza Rizvi, Syed Ali; Hingorani, Anil; Amaturo, Michael; Johnson, Eric

    2018-02-01

    Objective A quality improvement initiative was employed to decrease single institution surgical site infection rate in open lower extremity revascularization procedures. In an attempt to lower patient morbidity, we developed and implemented the Preventative Surgical Site Infection Protocol in Vascular Surgery. Surgical site infections lead to prolonged hospital stays, adjunctive procedure, and additive costs. We employed targeted interventions to address the common risk factors that predispose patients to post-operative complications. Methods Retrospective review was performed between 2012 and 2016 for all surgical site infections after revascularization procedures of the lower extremity. A quality improvement protocol was initiated in January 2015. Primary outcome was the assessment of surgical site infection rate reduction in the pre-protocol vs. post-protocol era. Secondary outcomes evaluated patient demographics, closure method, perioperative antibiotic coverage, and management outcomes. Results Implementation of the protocol decreased the surgical site infection rate from 6.4% to 1.6% p = 0.0137). Patient demographics and comorbidities were assessed and failed to demonstrate a statistically significant difference among the infection and no-infection groups. Wound closure with monocryl suture vs. staple proved to be associated with decreased surgical site infection rate ( p site infections in the vascular surgery population are effective and necessary. Our data suggest that there may be benefit in the incorporation of MRSA and Gram-negative coverage as part of the Surgical Care Improvement Project perioperative guidelines.

  18. Double gloving to reduce surgical cross-infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, J; Parkinson, H

    2006-07-19

    The invasive nature of surgery, with its increased exposure to blood, means that during surgery there is a high risk of transfer of pathogens. Pathogens can be transferred through contact between surgical patients and the surgical team, resulting in post-operative or blood borne infections in patients or blood borne infections in the surgical team. Both patients and the surgical team need to be protected from this risk. This risk can be reduced by implementing protective barriers such as wearing surgical gloves. Wearing two pairs of surgical gloves, triple gloves, glove liners or cloth outer gloves, as opposed to one pair, is considered to provide an additional barrier and further reduce the risk of contamination. The primary objective of this review was to determine if additional glove protection reduces the number of surgical site or blood borne infections in patients or the surgical team. The secondary objective was to determine if additional glove protection reduces the number of perforations to the innermost pair of surgical gloves. The innermost gloves (next to skin) compared with the outermost gloves are considered to be the last barrier between the patient and the surgical team. We searched the Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register (January 2006), and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL)(The Cochrane Library Issue 4, 2005). We also contacted glove manufacturing companies and professional organisations. Randomised controlled trials involving: single gloving, double gloving, triple gloving, glove liners, knitted outer gloves, steel weave outer gloves and perforation indicator systems. Both authors independently assessed the relevance and quality of each trial. Data was extracted by one author and cross checked for accuracy by the second author. Two trials were found which addressed the primary outcome, namely, surgical site infections in patients. Both trials reported no infections. Thirty one randomised controlled trials

  19. Surgical smoke and infection control.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alp, E.; Bijl, D.; Bleichrodt, R.P.; Hansson, B.M.; Voss, A.

    2006-01-01

    Gaseous byproducts produced during electrocautery, laser surgery or the use of ultrasonic scalpels are usually referred to as 'surgical smoke'. This smoke, produced with or without a heating process, contains bio-aerosols with viable and non-viable cellular material that subsequently poses a risk of

  20. Novel protease-based diagnostic devices for detection of wound infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinzle, A.; Papen-Botterhuis, N.E.; Schiffer, D.; Schneider, K.P.; Binder, B.; Schintler, M.; Haaksman, I.K.; Lenting, H.B.; Gübitz, G.M.; Sigl, E.

    2013-01-01

    A gelatinase-based device for fast detection of wound infection was developed. Collective gelatinolytic activity in infected wounds was 23 times higher (p ≤ 0.001) than in noninfected wounds and blisters according to the clinical and microbiological description of the wounds. Enzyme activities of

  1. Surgical Site Infection Rate and Risk Factors among Obstetric Cases ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-04-01

    Among surgical patients in obstetrics, Surgical Site Infections were the most ... for delivery from April 1, 2009 to March 31, 2010 in obstetric ward of the Hospital. ... applying improved surgical techniques and improving infection prevention ...

  2. Honey ointment': a natural remedy of skin wound infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasleem, S.; Naqvi, S.B.S.; Hashimi, K.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Honey is a gift of nature, principally identified and valued to possess antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activity and has been used as a natural remedy of wounds since ancient times. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of honey against micro-organisms, to formulate a honey ointment and to evaluate the efficacy of such ointment by conducting clinical trials on skin wound infection. Methods: This experimental study was conducted at Department of Pharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Karachi and Out-patient Department of Dermatology, Fauji Foundation Hospital, Rawalpindi from November 2009 to October 2010. The antimicrobial activity of Pakistani floral sources (Trachysperm copticum, Acacia nilotica species indica, Zizyphus) honey samples was investigated by disc diffusion method against freshly isolated wound infecting bacteria (Staphylococci aureus, Staphylococci epidermidis, Streptococcus faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumonia, Escherichia coli, Proteus vulgaris and Candida albicans), and Staphylococci aureus ATCC 6538, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 9022, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Candida albican ATCC 15146. An ointment containing 20% active antimicrobial honey was formulated. The efficacy of such ointment was evaluated by passing thought clinical trials. A total number of 27 patients (23 skin wound infection, and 4 diabetic foot ulcer) were involved in the study. Thin layer of newly formulated honey ointment on gauze were applied two to three times per day till complete healing. Results: In microbiological assay the honey samples were found to exhibit a very promising antimicrobial activity against all the micro-organisms tested. In clinical trial very significant results (99.15%) healing was observed in skin wound infections cases with mean healing time of 5.86 (2-20) days, and 95% diabetic foot ulcers healed with the mean healing time of 20 (8-40) days. Conclusion: Newly formulated

  3. Risk factors for acute surgical site infections after lumbar surgery: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Qi; Song, Quanwei; Guo, Runsheng; Bi, Haidi; Liu, Xuqiang; Yu, Xiaolong; Zhu, Jianghao; Dai, Min; Zhang, Bin

    2017-07-19

    Currently, many scholars are concerned about the treatment of postoperative infection; however, few have completed multivariate analyses to determine factors that contribute to the risk of infection. Therefore, we conducted a multivariate analysis of a retrospectively collected database to analyze the risk factors for acute surgical site infection following lumbar surgery, including fracture fixation, lumbar fusion, and minimally invasive lumbar surgery. We retrospectively reviewed data from patients who underwent lumbar surgery between 2014 and 2016, including lumbar fusion, internal fracture fixation, and minimally invasive surgery in our hospital's spinal surgery unit. Patient demographics, procedures, and wound infection rates were analyzed using descriptive statistics, and risk factors were analyzed using logistic regression analyses. Twenty-six patients (2.81%) experienced acute surgical site infection following lumbar surgery in our study. The patients' mean body mass index, smoking history, operative time, blood loss, draining time, and drainage volume in the acute surgical site infection group were significantly different from those in the non-acute surgical site infection group (p operative type in the acute surgical site infection group were significantly different than those in the non-acute surgical site infection group (p operative type, operative time, blood loss, and drainage time were independent predictors of acute surgical site infection following lumbar surgery. In order to reduce the risk of infection following lumbar surgery, patients should be evaluated for the risk factors noted above.

  4. Treatment of sternal wound infection with vacuum-assisted closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezfuli, Bobby; Li, Chin-Shang; Young, J Nilas; Wong, Michael S

    2013-02-01

    Previous work has demonstrated the efficacy of vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) in the treatment of poststernotomy local wound infections, compared to historical treatment protocol. The negative pressure has been found to protect wounds against contamination, prevent wound fluid retention, increase blood flow, and increase rates of granulation tissue formation. For this study, a retrospective analysis compared patients receiving VAC as definitive treatment versus bridging to delayed flap closure. Sixteen patients developed sternal wound infections after cardiac surgeries at the authors' institution from 2006 to 2008. Data was gathered regarding patient comorbidities, treatment method, and outcome. Study objectives included assessment of risk factors that warranted secondary surgicalclosure and examination of long-term followup where VAC was thedefinitive treatment modality. Group A (n = 12) had VAC as the final treatment modality. Group B (n = 4) required myocutaneous flap closure. One patient in Group B passed away prior to flap surgery. Both groups had similar risk factors, except Group B had a higher risk of body mass index (BMI) > 35 that was near statistically significant (P = 0.085; odds ratio = 0.0, 95% CI = [0.0 - 1.21]). Group A required a shorter hospital stay on average. Long-term follow-up showed the majority of Group A had completely healed sternal wounds 2-3 years from initial cardiac surgery. Vacuum-assisted closure as definitive treatment modality is a successful, first line therapy for local superficial sternal wound infections. When deep infections occur, however, VAC as bridge-to-flap coverage is recommended over attempted secondary healing with VAC. .

  5. Improving Surveillance and Prevention of Surgical Site Infection in Pediatric Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Melissa; Hersey, Diane; Harrison, Sheilah; Joy, Brian; Naguib, Aymen; Galantowicz, Mark; Simsic, Janet

    2016-03-01

    Postoperative cardiovascular surgical site infections are preventable events that may lead to increased morbidity, mortality, and health care costs. To improve surgical wound surveillance and reduce the incidence of surgical site infections. An institutional review of surgical site infections led to implementation of 8 surveillance and process measures: appropriate preparation the night before surgery and the day of surgery, use of appropriate preparation solution in the operating room, appropriate timing of preoperative antibiotic administration, placement of a photograph of the surgical site in the patient's chart at discharge, sending a photograph of the surgical site to the patient's primary care physician, 30-day follow-up of the surgical site by an advanced nurse practitioner, and placing a photograph of the surgical site obtained on postoperative day 30 in the patient's chart. Mean overall compliance with the 8 measures from March 2013 through February 2014 was 88%. Infections occurred in 10 of 417 total operative cases (2%) in 2012, in 8 of 437 total operative cases (2%) in 2013, and in 7 of 452 total operative cases (1.5%) in 2014. Institution of the surveillance process has resulted in improved identification of suspected surgical site infections via direct rather than indirect measures, accurate identification of all surgical site infections based on definitions of the National Healthcare Safety Network, collaboration with all persons involved, and enhanced communication with patients' family members and referring physicians. ©2016 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  6. Experience with Vacuum-assisted closure of sternal wound infections following cardiac surgery and evaluation of chronic complications associated with its use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bapat, Vinayak; El-Muttardi, Naguib; Young, Christopher; Venn, Graham; Roxburgh, James

    2008-01-01

    We report our experience in use of Vacuum-assisted closure therapy (VAC) in the treatment of poststernotomy wound infection with emphasis on recurrent wound-related problems after use of VAC and their treatment. Between July 2000 and June 2003, 2706 patients underwent various cardiac procedures via median sternotomy. Forty-nine patients with postoperative sternal wound infection (1.9%) were managed with VAC. Wounds were classified as either superficial sternal wound infection (28 patients) or deep sternal wound infection (21 patients). In the superficial sternal wound infection group, 23 patients had VAC as definitive treatment (GroupA), while five patients (Group B) had VAC followed by surgical closure. Similarly, in the deep sternal wound infection group, 12 patients had VAC as definitive treatment (Group C), while nine patients had VAC followed by surgical closure (Group D). Patients were discharged after satisfactory wound closure. Upon discharge patients were followed up at interval of three to six months. Recurrent sternal problems when identified were investigated and additional surgical procedures were carried out when necessary. There were nine deaths, all due to unrelated causes except in one patient who died of right ventricular rupture (Group C). Nine patients in Group A had recurrent wound problems of which six had VAC system for > 21 days. Three patients underwent extensive debridement due to sternal osteomyelitis. All eight patients in Group B presented with chronic wound-related problems and underwent multiple debridements. Four patients had laparoscopic omental flaps. In contrast 14 patients (Group B and D) who were treated with shorter duration of VAC followed by either a flap or direct surgical closure, did not present with recurrent problems. VAC therapy is a safe and reliable option in the treatment of sternal wound infection. However, prolonged use of VAC system as a replacement for surgical closure of sternal wound appears to be associated

  7. Occurrence of pseudomonas aeruginosa in post-operative wound infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oguntibeju, O.O.; Nwobu, R.A.U.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in post-operative wound infection. Results: Out of the 60 bacterial isolates found in post-operative wound infection, 20 (33.3%) were Pseudomonas aeruginosa, followed by Staphylococcus aureus 13(21.7%), Klebsiella species 10(16.7%), Escherichia coli 7(11.7%), Atypical coliform 4(6.7%), Proteus species 4(6.7%), Streptococcus pyogenes 1(1.7%) and Enterococcus faecalis 1(1.7%) in the order. Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections was higher in female than male, ratio 3:2 and was found more among young and elderly debilitated patients. The in vitro sensitivity pattern of 20 isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa showed colistin (100%), gentamicin (75%), streptomycin (30%), and tetracycline (10%). Conclusion: The role of Pseudomonas aeruginosa as an agent of nosocomial infection is re-emphasised. (author)

  8. Prevention and treatment of surgical site infection in HIV-infected patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Lei

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surgical site infection (SSI are the third most frequently reported nosocomial infection, and the most common on surgical wards. HIV-infected patients may increase the possibility of developing SSI after surgery. There are few reported date on incidence and the preventive measures of SSI in HIV-infected patients. This study was to determine the incidence and the associated risk factors for SSI in HIV-infected patients. And we also explored the preventive measures. Methods A retrospective study of SSI was conducted in 242 HIV-infected patients including 17 patients who combined with hemophilia from October 2008 to September 2011 in Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center. SSI were classified according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC criteria and identified by bedside surveillance and post-discharge follow-up. Data were analyzed using SPSS 16.0 statistical software (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL. Results The SSI incidence rate was 47.5% (115 of 242; 38.4% incisional SSIs, 5.4% deep incisional SSIs and 3.7% organ/space SSIs. The SSI incidence rate was 37.9% in HIV-infected patients undergoing abdominal operation. Patients undergoing abdominal surgery with lower preoperative CD4 counts were more likely to develop SSIs. The incidence increased from 2.6% in clean wounds to 100% in dirty wounds. In the HIV-infected patients combined with hemophilia, the mean preoperative albumin and postoperative hemoglobin were found significantly lower than those in no-SSIs group (P Conclusions SSI is frequent in HIV-infected patients. And suitable perioperative management may decrease the SSIs incidence rate of HIV-infected patients.

  9. Risk Factors For Wound Infections After Implant Surgery | Onche ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OBJECTIVE: Post-operative wound infection (POWI) rates for implant surgery are in the range of 0.08 to 13% in spite of the many advances in surgery in the past decades. It is therefore imperative that we develop a system of predicting the occurrence of POWI as a key to effective prevention. One approach is for each ...

  10. Drug resistance patterns of bacterial isolates from infected wounds ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    unhcc

    The resistance rate of S. aureus for penicillin was at 69.7%. Conclusions: High ... January 2013 to 30 December 2015 was conducted. BRHRLC is one of ... Wound infection, bacterial isolates, culture and antimicrobial susceptibility 113. Ethiop. J. Health ... Socio-demographic characteristic of patients and types of bacterial ...

  11. The laparoscopically harvested omental flap for deep sternal wound infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wingerden, Jan J.; Coret, Matijn E. H.; van Nieuwenhoven, Christianne A.; Totté, Eric R.

    2010-01-01

    To report our experience with the laparoscopically harvested omental flap in the treatment of deep sternal wound infection, and to present a modification and introduce two supportive techniques in the perioperative management. Between June 2005 and September 2007, six patients with grade IV (El

  12. a profile of wound infections in national hospital abuja

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    boaz

    The current spread of multi -drug resistant bacteria has further heightened the need for regular bacteriological review of infected woundsand regular antibiotics ... Aim: To determine the distributionof theisolates from wound specimens submitted to the medical microbiology laboratory of National. Hospital Abuja for ...

  13. The Surgical Site Infection Risk Score (SSIRS: A Model to Predict the Risk of Surgical Site Infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl van Walraven

    Full Text Available Surgical site infections (SSI are an important cause of peri-surgical morbidity with risks that vary extensively between patients and surgeries. Quantifying SSI risk would help identify candidates most likely to benefit from interventions to decrease the risk of SSI.We randomly divided all surgeries recorded in the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program from 2010 into a derivation and validation population. We used multivariate logistic regression to determine the independent association of patient and surgical covariates with the risk of any SSI (including superficial, deep, and organ space SSI within 30 days of surgery. To capture factors particular to specific surgeries, we developed a surgical risk score specific to all surgeries having a common first 3 numbers of their CPT code.Derivation (n = 181 894 and validation (n = 181 146 patients were similar for all demographics, past medical history, and surgical factors. Overall SSI risk was 3.9%. The SSI Risk Score (SSIRS found that risk increased with patient factors (smoking, increased body mass index, certain comorbidities (peripheral vascular disease, metastatic cancer, chronic steroid use, recent sepsis, and operative characteristics (surgical urgency; increased ASA class; longer operation duration; infected wounds; general anaesthesia; performance of more than one procedure; and CPT score. In the validation population, the SSIRS had good discrimination (c-statistic 0.800, 95% CI 0.795-0.805 and calibration.SSIRS can be calculated using patient and surgery information to estimate individual risk of SSI for a broad range of surgery types.

  14. NOSOCOMIAL WOUND INFECTION AMONGST POST OPERATIVE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: In addition to the economic burden for antibiotic treatment, such infections for multi-resistant organisms are a serious threat to our ... résistance aux antibiotiques de germes associés aux infections nosocomiales devient aussi un défi thérapeutique majeur pour .... fascia and muscle layer) of the incision, (c) Organ.

  15. Targeted treatment of invasive fungal infections accelerates healing of foot wounds in patients with Type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chellan, G; Neethu, K; Varma, A K; Mangalanandan, T S; Shashikala, S; Dinesh, K R; Sundaram, K R; Varma, N; Jayakumar, R V; Bal, A; Kumar, H

    2012-09-01

    To test the hypothesis that fluconazole plus standard care is superior to the standard care for diabetic foot wounds infected with deep-seated fungal infections. We carried out a randomized, controlled, open-label, parallel-arm study in 75 patients with both fungal and bacterial infections in deep tissues of diabetic foot wounds. Thirty-seven patients (control group) were given standard care (surgical debridement + culture-specific antibiotics + offloading + glycaemic control) and 38 patients (treatment group) were given fluconazole 150 mg daily plus standard care. Wound surface area was measured every 2 weeks until the endpoints (complete epithelialization or skin grafting) were met. By week 4, the mean wound surface area reduced to 27.3 from 111.5 cm(2) in the treatment group, as opposed to 67.1 from 87.3 cm(2) in the control group. Subsequently, the mean wound surface areas were remarkably smaller in the treatment group compared with the control group, and statistically significant differences (P ≤ 0.05) in mean wound surface area were observed between the treatment group and the control group at week 6. However, no statistically significant (P ≤ 0.47) difference in complete healing was observed between the treatment group and the control group, 20 vs. 24. The mean wound healing time for the treatment group was 7.3 weeks, whereas for the control group it was 11.3 weeks (P ≤ 0.022). Similarly, the probability of wound healing in the treatment group was 50 vs. 20% in the control group at week 10. Fluconazole plus standard care was superior to standard care alone in accelerating wound reduction among patients with diabetes with deep-seated fungal infections in diabetic foot wounds. Those in the treatment group who did heal, healed more quickly (P ≤ 0.022), but overall healing was not different. © 2012 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2012 Diabetes UK.

  16. Use of antibiotics in the management of postirradiation wound infection and sepsis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brook, I.

    1988-01-01

    Ionizing gamma irradiation depresses the host defenses and enhances the susceptibility of the immunocompromised host to local and systemic infection due to endogenous or exogenous microorganisms. Trauma and wounding act synergistically and decrease the survival after exposure to irradiation. The current antimicrobial agents suitable for controlling serious infections and their use in post irradiation local and systemic infection with and without trauma are discussed. The experience gained in managing immunocompromised patients following chemotherapy is reviewed. Empiric single agent or combination agent therapy should be directed at the eradication of potential gram-negative as well as gram-positive pathogens. The most important organisms known to cause these infections are Pseudomonas sp. and Enterobacteriaceae. Management of intra-abdominal infections following trauma should include early surgical correlation and antimicrobials directed against the Bacteroides fragilis group and Enterobacteriaceae. Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes cause most skin and soft tissue infections following trauma. Chemoprophylaxis of enteric sources of systemic infection can be achieved by antimicrobials that selectively inhibit the Enterobacteriaceae sp. and preserve the anaerobic flora. The management of infection in the injured and irradiated host includes supportive and restorative therapy. Supportive therapy includes debridement and cleansing of wounds, fluids, immunoglobulin, and antimicrobials. Restorative therapy includes definite surgery repair and replenishment of the immune system by use of immunomodulators, growth factors, and bone marrow transplantation. Further studies are needed to examine the usefulness of presently available drugs and experimental agents in the irradiated and traumatized host. 111 references

  17. Use of antibiotics in the management of postirradiation wound infection and sepsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brook, I.

    1988-07-01

    Ionizing gamma irradiation depresses the host defenses and enhances the susceptibility of the immunocompromised host to local and systemic infection due to endogenous or exogenous microorganisms. Trauma and wounding act synergistically and decrease the survival after exposure to irradiation. The current antimicrobial agents suitable for controlling serious infections and their use in post irradiation local and systemic infection with and without trauma are discussed. The experience gained in managing immunocompromised patients following chemotherapy is reviewed. Empiric single agent or combination agent therapy should be directed at the eradication of potential gram-negative as well as gram-positive pathogens. The most important organisms known to cause these infections are Pseudomonas sp. and Enterobacteriaceae. Management of intra-abdominal infections following trauma should include early surgical correlation and antimicrobials directed against the Bacteroides fragilis group and Enterobacteriaceae. Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes cause most skin and soft tissue infections following trauma. Chemoprophylaxis of enteric sources of systemic infection can be achieved by antimicrobials that selectively inhibit the Enterobacteriaceae sp. and preserve the anaerobic flora. The management of infection in the injured and irradiated host includes supportive and restorative therapy. Supportive therapy includes debridement and cleansing of wounds, fluids, immunoglobulin, and antimicrobials. Restorative therapy includes definite surgery repair and replenishment of the immune system by use of immunomodulators, growth factors, and bone marrow transplantation. Further studies are needed to examine the usefulness of presently available drugs and experimental agents in the irradiated and traumatized host. 111 references.

  18. Gram-Negative Bacterial Wound Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Bovine Tuberculosis in Cattle Farms in Zaria and Kaduna and Possible Transmission Through Milk P. N. Mbianga, V. J. Umoh, A. I. 0, K. C. A; Ahmadu...Pathogenic Escherichia coli R. M. Ramirez, M-X. Haro, P. Miranda, S-H. Sanchez, L-E. Vidales; Univ. Aut6noma de Zacatecas, Zacatecas, Mexico 517...isolates. Subsequently, five representative isolates were tested in murine pulmonary and Galleria mellonella models of infection. Infections with one strain

  19. Chasing zero: the drive to eliminate surgical site infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Kristine M; Oldenburg, W Andrew; Deschamps, Claude; Rupp, William C; Smith, C Daniel

    2011-09-01

    It is estimated that healthcare associated infections (HAI) account for 1.7 million infections and 99,000 associated deaths each year, with annual direct medical costs of up to $45 billion. Surgical Site Infections (SSI) account for 17% of HAIs, an estimated annual cost of $3.5 to 10 billion for our country alone. This project was designed to pursue elimination of SSIs and document results. Starting in 2009 a program to eliminate SSIs was undertaken at a nationally recognized academic health center. Interventions already outlined by CMS and IHI were utilized, along with additional interventions based on literature showing relationships with SSI reduction and best practices. Rapid deployment of multiple interventions (SSI Bundle) was undertaken. Tactics included standardized order sets, a centralized preoperative evaluation (POE) clinic, high compliance with intraoperative interventions, and widespread monthly reporting of compliance and results. Data from 2008 to 2010 were collected and analyzed. Between May 1, 2008 and June 30, 2010, all patients with Class I and Class II wounds were tracked for SSIs. Baseline data (May-June 2008) was obtained showing a Class I surgical site infection rate of 1.78%, Class II of 2.82% (total surgical volume: 4160 cases). As of the second quarter 2010, those rates have dropped to 0.51% and 1.44%, respectively (P cost savings of nearly $1 million during the study period. Committed leadership, aggressive assurance of high compliance with multiple known interventions (SSI Bundle), transparency to achieve high levels of staff engagement, and centralization of critical surgical activities result in significant declines in SSIs with resulting substantial cost savings.

  20. Surgical sutures filled with adipose-derived stem cells promote wound healing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Katharin Reckhenrich

    Full Text Available Delayed wound healing and scar formation are among the most frequent complications after surgical interventions. Although biodegradable surgical sutures present an excellent drug delivery opportunity, their primary function is tissue fixation. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC act as trophic mediators and are successful in activating biomaterials. Here biodegradable sutures were filled with adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASC to provide a pro-regenerative environment at the injured site. Results showed that after filling, ASCs attach to the suture material, distribute equally throughout the filaments, and remain viable in the suture. Among a broad panel of cytokines, cell-filled sutures constantly release vascular endothelial growth factor to supernatants. Such conditioned media was evaluated in an in vitro wound healing assay and showed a significant decrease in the open wound area compared to controls. After suturing in an ex vivo wound model, cells remained in the suture and maintained their metabolic activity. Furthermore, cell-filled sutures can be cryopreserved without losing their viability. This study presents an innovative approach to equip surgical sutures with pro-regenerative features and allows the treatment and fixation of wounds in one step, therefore representing a promising tool to promote wound healing after injury.

  1. Treatment of gram-positive deep sternal wound infections in cardiac surgery -experiences with daptomycin-

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coskun Kasim O

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The reported incidence of deep sternal wound infection (DSWI after cardiac surgery is 0.4-5% with Staphylococcus aureus being the most common pathogen isolated from infected wound sternotomies and bacteraemic blood cultures. This infection is associated with a higher morbidity and mortality than other known aetiologies. Little is reported about the optimal antibiotic management. The aim of the study is to quantify the application of daptomycin treatment of DSWI due to gram-positive organisms post cardiac surgery. We performed an observational analysis in 23 cases of post sternotomy DSWI with gram-positive organisms February 2009 and September 2010. When the wound appeared viable and the microbiological cultures were negative, the technique of chest closure was individualised to the patient. The incidence of DSWI was 1.46%. The mean dose of daptomycin application was 4.4 ± 0.9 mg/kg/d and the average duration of the daptomycin application was 14.47 ± 7.33 days. In 89% of the patients VAC therapy was used. The duration from daptomycin application to sternal closure was 18 ± 13.9 days. The parameters of infection including, fibrinogen (p = 0.03, white blood cell count (p = 0.001 and C-reactive protein (p = 0.0001 were significantly reduced after daptomycin application. We had no mortality and wound healing was successfully achieved in all patients. Treatment of DSWI due to gram-positive organisms with a daptomycin-containing antibiotic regimen is safe, effective and promotes immediate improvement of local wound conditions. Based on these observations, daptomycin may offer a new treatment option for expediting surgical management of DSWI after cardiac surgery.

  2. Pelvic Surgical Site Infections in Gynecologic Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark P. Lachiewicz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of surgical site infection (SSI remains the most common complication of gynecologic surgical procedures and results in significant patient morbidity. Gynecologic procedures pose a unique challenge in that potential pathogenic microorganisms from the skin or vagina and endocervix may migrate to operative sites and can result in vaginal cuff cellulitis, pelvic cellulitis, and pelvic abscesses. Multiple host and surgical risk factors have been identified as risks that increase infectious sequelae after pelvic surgery. This paper will review these risk factors as many are modifiable and care should be taken to address such factors in order to decrease the chance of infection. We will also review the definitions, microbiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management of pelvic SSIs after gynecologic surgery.

  3. [Infections after bite wounds : For example rat bite fever due to Streptobacillus moniliformis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hof, Herbert; Binder, Rudolf; Schäfer, Christian; Stuber, Madeleine; Licht, Andreas; Bozenhardt-Stavrakidis, Iris; Bode, Konrad

    2018-04-11

    Rat bite fever due to Streptobacillus moniliformis induces typical but not pathognomonic clinical signs, such as local purulent wound infection followed by maculopapular exanthema, myalgia as well as purulent joint infections. Severe complications, such as osteomyelitis and endocarditis are possible. it seems that this infection is rarely diagnosed but this infection could be much more common because the final diagnostic proof is difficult to achieve. Firstly, the culture of these bacteria is critical because the bacteria are fastidious and secondly the exact differentiation of the isolates is hardly possible by standard laboratory methods. Modern techniques such as mass spectroscopy (MALDI-TOF) and molecular biology allow a precise clarification. Surgical cleansing of infection sites in combination with a rational antibiotic therapy, for example with beta-lactam antibiotics, are generally able to cure the infection if treatment is started early enough. In addition, vaccinations, for example against tetanus and rabies have to be considered in this situation as for all other bite wound infections.

  4. Mouse Model of Burn Wound and Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calum, Henrik; Høiby, Niels; Moser, Claus

    2017-01-01

    The immunosuppression induced by thermal injury renders the burned victim susceptible to infection. A mouse model was developed to examine the immunosuppression, which was possible to induce even at a minor thermal insult of 6% total body surface area. After induction of the burn (48 hr) a depres......The immunosuppression induced by thermal injury renders the burned victim susceptible to infection. A mouse model was developed to examine the immunosuppression, which was possible to induce even at a minor thermal insult of 6% total body surface area. After induction of the burn (48 hr...

  5. Ultraviolet C Light for Acinetobacter baumannii Wound Infections in Mice: Potential Use for Battlefield Wound Decontamination?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    al. Fiber optic microneedles for transdermal light delivery : ex vivo porcine skin penetration experiments. J Biomech Eng. 2010;132:091014. 24...critically ill patients often with limited treatment options because of drug resistance.1Y3 Since the beginning of the Middle East conflicts, the outbreak...of A. baumannii infections has been a threat to the health of wounded US soldiers.4Y7 The primary measures used in the military evacuation system to

  6. Secondary omental and pectoralis major double flap reconstruction following aggressive sternectomy for deep sternal wound infections after cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirasawa Bungo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deep sternal wound infection after cardiac surgery carries high morbidity and mortality. Our strategy for deep sternal wound infection is aggressive strenal debridement followed by vacuum-assisted closure (VAC therapy and omental-muscle flap reconstrucion. We describe this strategy and examine the outcome and long-term quality of life (QOL it achieves. Methods We retrospectively examined 16 patients treated for deep sternal wound infection between 2001 and 2007. The most recent nine patients were treated with total sternal resection followed by VAC therapy and secondary closure with omental-muscle flap reconstruction (recent group; whereas the former seven patients were treated with sternal preservation if possible, without VAC therapy, and four of these patients underwent primary closure (former group. We assessed long-term quality of life after DSWI by using the Short Form 36-Item Health Survey, Version 2 (SF36v2. Results One patient died and four required further surgery for recurrence of deep sternal wound infection in the former group. The duration of treatment for deep sternal wound infection in the recent group was significantly shorter than that in previous group (63.4 ± 54.1 days vs. 120.0 ± 31.8 days, respectively; p = 0.039. Despite aggressive sternal resection, the QOL of patients treated for DSWI was only minimally compromised compared with age-, sex-, surgical procedures-matched patients without deep sternal wound infection. Conclusions Aggressive sternal debridement followed by VAC therapy and secondary closure with an omental-muscle flap is effective for deep sternal wound infection. In this series, it resulted in a lower incidence of recurrent infection, shorter hospitalization, and it did not compromise long-term QOL greatly.

  7. Aquatically acquired Aeromonas hydrophila wound infection

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1990-09-15

    Sep 15, 1990 ... in 2 cases of mixed infection associated with swimming acci- dents.l Recently focal ... with split-skin grafting was undertaken on the 8th day after the injury with a ... fermentative Gram-negative bacilli, excluded from the family.

  8. Early wound infection identification using the WIRE tool in community health care settings: An audit report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siaw-Sakyi, Vincent

    2017-12-01

    Wound infection is proving to be a challenge for health care professionals. The associated complications and cost of wound infection is immense and can lead to death in extreme cases. Current management of wound infection is largely subjective and relies on the knowledge of the health care professional to identify and initiate treatment. In response, we have developed an infection prediction and assessment tool. The Wound Infection Risk-Assessment and Evaluation tool (WIRE) and its management strategy is a tool with the aim to bring objectivity to infection prediction, assessment and management. A local audit carried out indicated a high infection prediction rate. More work is being done to improve its effectiveness.

  9. Can Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Silently Travel From the Gut to the Wound and Cause Postoperative Infection? Modeling the "Trojan Horse Hypothesis".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krezalek, Monika A; Hyoju, Sanjiv; Zaborin, Alexander; Okafor, Emeka; Chandrasekar, Laxmi; Bindokas, Vitas; Guyton, Kristina; Montgomery, Christopher P; Daum, Robert S; Zaborina, Olga; Boyle-Vavra, Susan; Alverdy, John C

    2018-04-01

    To determine whether intestinal colonization with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) can be the source of surgical site infections (SSIs). We hypothesized that gut-derived MRSA may cause SSIs via mechanisms in which circulating immune cells scavenge MRSA from the gut, home to surgical wounds, and cause infection (Trojan Horse Hypothesis). MRSA gut colonization was achieved by disrupting the microbiota with antibiotics, imposing a period of starvation and introducing MRSA via gavage. Next, mice were subjected to a surgical injury (30% hepatectomy) and rectus muscle injury and ischemia before skin closure. All wounds were cultured before skin closure. To control for postoperative wound contamination, reiterative experiments were performed in mice in which the closed wound was painted with live MRSA for 2 consecutive postoperative days. To rule out extracellular bacteremia as a cause of wound infection, MRSA was injected intravenously in mice subjected to rectus muscle ischemia and injury. All wound cultures were negative before skin closure, ruling out intraoperative contamination. Out of 40 mice, 4 (10%) developed visible abscesses. Nine mice (22.5%) had MRSA positive cultures of the rectus muscle without visible abscesses. No SSIs were observed in mice injected intravenously with MRSA. Wounds painted with MRSA after closure did not develop infections. Circulating neutrophils from mice captured by flow cytometry demonstrated MRSA in their cytoplasm. Immune cells as Trojan horses carrying gut-derived MRSA may be a plausible mechanism of SSIs in the absence of direct contamination.

  10. Effects of Aloe Vera and Chitosan Nanoparticle Thin-Film Membranes on Wound Healing in Full Thickness Infected Wounds with Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbar, Reza; Yousefi, Alireza

    2018-01-01

    To assess effect of Aleo vera with chitosan nanoparticle biofilm on wound healing in full thickness infected wounds with antibiotic resistant gram positive bacteria. Thirty rats were randomized into five groups of six rats each. Group I: Animals with uninfected wounds treated with 0.9% saline solution. Group II: Animals with infected wounds treated with saline. Group III: Animals with infected wounds were dressed with chitosan nanoparticle thin-film membranes. Group IV: Animals with infected wounds were treated topically with Aloe vera and Group V: Animals with infected wounds were treated topically with Aloe vera and dressed with chitosan nanoparticle thin-film membranes. Wound size was measured on 6, 9, 12, 15, 18 and 21days after surgery. Microbiology, reduction in wound area and hydroxyproline contents indicated that there was significant difference ( p vera with chitosan nanoparticle thin-film membranes had a reproducible wound healing potential and hereby justified its use in practice.

  11. Meta-analysis of negative-pressure wound therapy for closed surgical incisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldig, N; Birke-Sorensen, H; Kruse, M

    2016-01-01

    . RESULTS: Ten studies met the inclusion criteria, reporting on 1311 incisions in 1089 patients. NPWT was associated with a significant reduction in wound infection (relative risk (RR) 0·54, 95 per cent c.i. 0·33 to 0·89) and seroma formation (RR 0·48, 0·27 to 0·84) compared with standard care....... The reduction in wound dehiscence was not significant. The numbers needed to treat were three (seroma), 17 (dehiscence) and 25 (infection). Methodological heterogeneity across studies led to downgrading of the quality of evidence to moderate for infection and seroma, and low for dehiscence. CONCLUSION: Compared...

  12. Komodo dragon-inspired synthetic peptide DRGN-1 promotes wound-healing of a mixed-biofilm infected wound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M C Chung, Ezra; Dean, Scott N; Propst, Crystal N; Bishop, Barney M; van Hoek, Monique L

    2017-01-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides are multifunctional molecules that have a high potential as therapeutic agents. We have identified a histone H1-derived peptide from the Komodo dragon ( Varanus komodoensis) , called VK25. Using this peptide as inspiration, we designed a synthetic peptide called DRGN-1. We evaluated the antimicrobial and anti-biofilm activity of both peptides against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus . DRGN-1, more than VK25, exhibited potent antimicrobial and anti-biofilm activity, and permeabilized bacterial membranes. Wound healing was significantly enhanced by DRGN-1 in both uninfected and mixed biofilm ( Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus )-infected murine wounds. In a scratch wound closure assay used to elucidate the wound healing mechanism, the peptide promoted the migration of HEKa keratinocyte cells, which was inhibited by mitomycin C (proliferation inhibitor) and AG1478 (epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor). DRGN-1 also activated the EGFR-STAT1/3 pathway. Thus, DRGN-1 is a candidate for use as a topical wound treatment. Wound infections are a major concern; made increasingly complicated by the emerging, rapid spread of bacterial resistance. The novel synthetic peptide DRGN-1 (inspired by a peptide identified from Komodo dragon) exhibits pathogen-directed and host-directed activities in promoting the clearance and healing of polymicrobial ( Pseudomonas aeruginosa & Staphylococcus aureus ) biofilm infected wounds. The effectiveness of this peptide cannot be attributed solely to its ability to act upon the bacteria and disrupt the biofilm, but also reflects the peptide's ability to promsote keratinocyte migration. When applied in a murine model, infected wounds treated with DRGN-1 healed significantly faster than did untreated wounds, or wounds treated with other peptides. The host-directed mechanism of action was determined to be via the EGFR-STAT1/3 pathway. The pathogen-directed mechanism of action was

  13. Risk factors for surgical site infections following clean orthopaedic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Risk factors for surgical site infections following clean orthopaedic operations. ... the host and environmental risk factors for surgical site infections following clean ... Materials and Methods: Consecutive patients who satisfied the inclusion ...

  14. Antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of Acinetobacter species isolated from infected wounds at a tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosić Ivana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria of the genus Acinetobacter, especially species Acinetobacter baumanii, is one of the most important causes of infection in immunocompromised patients in hospital. The aim of this study was to determine susceptibility of Acinetobacter species isolated from swabs of inflamed wounds to antibiotics. The study was conducted in several departments of the Clinical Centre 'Kragujevac' through retrospective analysis of 220 Acinetobacter species isolates from surgical wounds in 2011. The isolates of Acinetobaster species were mostly sensitive to ampicillin-sulbactam, colistin and tigecycline in all hospital departments that were surveyed. Only minority of the isolated Acinetobacter species were susceptible to cotrimoxazole, amikacin, imipenem and/or meropenem. Antibiotics with the highest in vitro efficacy against Acinetobacter species were ampicillinsulbactam, colistin and tigecycline. Highly resistant Acinetobacter species were more frequently isolated from patients in Intensive Care Unit.

  15. Major bleeding during negative pressure wound/VAC (R) - therapy for postsurgical deep sternal wound infection - a critical appraisal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wingerden, J.J.; Segers, P.; Jekel, L.

    2011-01-01

    Negative-pressure wound therapy, commercially known as vacuum-assisted closure (V.A.C.(R)) therapy, has become one of the most popular (and efficacious) interim (prior to flap reconstruction) or definite methods of managing deep sternal wound infection. Complications such as profuse bleeding, which

  16. Determinants of wound infections for breast procedures: assessment of the risk of wound infection posed by an invasive procedure for subsequent operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, M; Biswas, J; Gupta, S; Alam, N

    2009-12-01

    Wound infection remains a major source of postoperative morbidity leading to prolonged hospital stays and increased total cost, including indirect expenses related to the wound infection. We examined whether there is any higher risk of wound infection in patients undergo a reoperation after an initial operation or excision/incision biopsy. A retrospective review of medical charts of patients with breast operations between January 1990 and July 2008 was carried out. The overall incidence of wound infection was 18.2% (231/1267). The rate of wound infection was (32%) when reoperation was done after previous modified radical mastectomy, 18.9% and 16.8% when the previous operations were lumpectomy/segmenectomy with axillary dissection and simple mastectomy without axillary dissection, respectively and (10.8%) when reoperation was performed after previous biopsy. Reoperation involving axillary dissection was associated with significantly higher rates of wound infection (pprocedure affects the risk of wound infection in subsequent operation in patients with breast cancer. Significantly higher risks of wound infection are seen in those patients who had undergone axillary dissection or modified radical mastectomy.

  17. Growth factor-enriched autologous plasma improves wound healing after surgical debridement in odontogenic necrotizing fasciitis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinez-Fong Daniel

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Odontogenic necrotizing fasciitis of the neck is a fulminant infection of odontogenic origin that quickly spreads along the fascial planes and results in necrosis of the affected tissues. It is usually polymicrobial, occurs frequently in immunocompromised patients, and has a high mortality rate. Case presentation A 69-year old Mexican male had a pain in the maxillar right-canine region and a swelling of the submental and submandibular regions. Our examination revealed local pain, tachycardia, hyperthermia (39°C, and the swelling of bilateral submental and submandibular regions, which also were erythematous, hyperthermic, crepitant, and with a positive Godet sign. Mobility and third-degree caries were seen in the right mandibular canine. Bacteriological cultures isolated streptococcus pyogenes and staphylococcus aureus. The histopathological diagnosis was odontogenic necrotizing fasciitis of the submental and submandibular regions. The initial treatment was surgical debridement and the administration of antibiotics. After cultures were negative, the surgical wound was treated with a growth factor-enriched autologous plasma eight times every third day until complete healing occurred. Conclusions The treatment with a growth factor-enriched autologous plasma caused a rapid healing of an extensive surgical wound in a patient with odontogenic necrotizing fasciitis. The benefits were rapid tissue regeneration, an aesthetic and a functional scar, and the avoidance of further surgery and possible complications.

  18. Efficacy of silver coated surgical sutures on bacterial contamination, cellular response and wound healing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallo, Anna Lucia; Paladini, Federica; Romano, Alessandro; Verri, Tiziano; Quattrini, Angelo; Sannino, Alessandro; Pollini, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    The resistance demonstrated by many microorganisms towards conventional antibiotics has stimulated the interest in alternative antimicrobial agents and in novel approaches for prevention of infections. Silver, a natural braod-spectrum antimicrobial agent known since antiquity, has been widely employed in biomedical field due to its recognized antibacterial, antifungal and antiviral properties. In this work, antibacterial silver coatings were deposited on absorbable surgical sutures through the in situ photo-chemical deposition of silver clusters. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) were performed in order to investigate the presence and distribution of the silver clusters on the substrate. The amounts of silver deposited and released by the silver treated sutures were calculated through Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS), and the results were related to the biodegradation of the material. The microbiological properties and the potential cytotoxicity of the silver-treated sutures were investigated in relation with hydrolysis experiments, in order to determine the effect of the degradation on antibacterial properties and biocompatibility. - Highlights: • The in situ photo-deposition of silver nano-coatings was used to develop silver treated PGLA sutures. • The silver particles deposited had good distribution and strong adhesion to the substrate. • The silver treated sutures demonstrated good biocompatibility and antibacterial capability. • The presence of silver promoted cell migration and proliferation in the wound area.

  19. Efficacy of silver coated surgical sutures on bacterial contamination, cellular response and wound healing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallo, Anna Lucia [Department of Engineering for Innovation, University of Salento, Via Monteroni, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Paladini, Federica, E-mail: federica.paladini@unisalento.it [Department of Engineering for Innovation, University of Salento, Via Monteroni, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Romano, Alessandro [Neuropathology Unit, Institute of Experimental Neurology and Division of Neuroscience, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, via Olgettina 60, 20132 Milan (Italy); Verri, Tiziano [Di.S.Te.B.A., University of Salento, Via per Monteroni, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Quattrini, Angelo [Neuropathology Unit, Institute of Experimental Neurology and Division of Neuroscience, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, via Olgettina 60, 20132 Milan (Italy); Sannino, Alessandro; Pollini, Mauro [Department of Engineering for Innovation, University of Salento, Via Monteroni, 73100 Lecce (Italy)

    2016-12-01

    The resistance demonstrated by many microorganisms towards conventional antibiotics has stimulated the interest in alternative antimicrobial agents and in novel approaches for prevention of infections. Silver, a natural braod-spectrum antimicrobial agent known since antiquity, has been widely employed in biomedical field due to its recognized antibacterial, antifungal and antiviral properties. In this work, antibacterial silver coatings were deposited on absorbable surgical sutures through the in situ photo-chemical deposition of silver clusters. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) were performed in order to investigate the presence and distribution of the silver clusters on the substrate. The amounts of silver deposited and released by the silver treated sutures were calculated through Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS), and the results were related to the biodegradation of the material. The microbiological properties and the potential cytotoxicity of the silver-treated sutures were investigated in relation with hydrolysis experiments, in order to determine the effect of the degradation on antibacterial properties and biocompatibility. - Highlights: • The in situ photo-deposition of silver nano-coatings was used to develop silver treated PGLA sutures. • The silver particles deposited had good distribution and strong adhesion to the substrate. • The silver treated sutures demonstrated good biocompatibility and antibacterial capability. • The presence of silver promoted cell migration and proliferation in the wound area.

  20. Antiseptic wick: does it reduce the incidence of wound infection following appendectomy?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGreal, Gerald T

    2012-02-03

    The role of prophylactic antibiotics is well established for contaminated wounds, but the use of antiseptic wound wicks is controversial. The aim of this work was to study the potential use of wound wicks to reduce the rate of infection following appendectomy. This prospective randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted at a university hospital in the department of surgery. The subjects were patients undergoing appendectomy for definite acute appendicitis. They were randomized by computer to primary subcuticular wound closure or use of an antiseptic wound wick. For the latter, ribbon gauze soaked in povidone-iodine was placed between interrupted nylon skin sutures. Wicks were soaked daily and removed on the fourth postoperative day. All patients received antibiotic prophylaxis. They were reviewed while in hospital and 4 weeks following operation for evidence of wound infection. The main outcome measures were wound infection, wound discomfort, and cosmetic result. The overall wound infection rate was 8.6% (15\\/174). In patients with wound wicks it was 11.6% (10\\/86) compared to 5.6% (5\\/88) in those whose wounds were closed by subcuticular sutures (p = NS). We concluded that the use of wound wicks was not associated with decreased wound infection rates following appendectomy. Subcuticular closure is therefore appropriate in view of its greater convenience and safety.

  1. Executive Summary of the American College of Surgeons/Surgical Infection Society Surgical Site Infection Guidelines-2016 Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Kristen A; Minei, Joseph P; Laronga, Christine; Harbrecht, Brian G; Jensen, Eric H; Fry, Donald E; Itani, Kamal M F; Dellinger, E Patchen; Ko, Clifford Y; Duane, Therese M

    Guidelines regarding the prevention, detection, and management of surgical site infections (SSIs) have been published previously by a variety of organizations. The American College of Surgeons (ACS)/Surgical Infection Society (SIS) Surgical Site Infection (SSI) Guidelines 2016 Update is intended to update these guidelines based on the current literature and to provide a concise summary of relevant topics.

  2. [The results of delivering surgical care to the wounded and sick in military medical establishments and impending tasks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briusov, P G; Efimenko, N A

    1997-07-01

    In article results of activity of the military surgeons on rendering of the surgical care to wounded and sick in 1996 are analyzed. During combat actions in Chechnya despite of severe forms of wounds and significant increase of combined battle traumas lethality among heavy wounded was reduced in 2 times. At common lethality rate in 1.3%, in hospitals from wounds 1.5% of wounded died, from traumas--0.7%, burns--2.9%, frostbitten--0.5%. As to peace time surgery, the analysis of main parameters of surgical work in military medical establishments, structure of diseases of servicemen, surgical activity, average terms of treatment, lethality after operations, defects in rendering of the surgical care is given. In conclusions the authors say about problems, that the military surgeons have today.

  3. Comparison of Systemic and Topical Hypericum Perforatum on Diabetic Surgical Wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altıparmak, Mehmet; Eskitaşçıoğlu, Teoman

    2018-02-01

    Surgical wounds in diabetic patients still remain a problem till the present day. As a common plant found around the world, Hypericum perforatum L. (Hypericaceae) is traditionally prepared as an oily extract and used as a folk remedy for various diseases such as wounds, burns, cuts, etc. This study aims to evaluate the effect of St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum) on problematic wounds while comparing oral and topical applications. Incisional and excisional wound models were made on the dorsal regions of 54 diabetic Spraque-Dawley rats. The rats were divided into the following six groups (n = 9): Group 1: control, Group 2: diabetic, Group 3: diabetic oral Hypericum perforatum, Group 4: diabetic topical Hypericum perforatum, Group 5: diabetic oral olive oil, and Group 6: diabetic topical olive oil. Groups 3 and 4 had significantly higher tensile strength, tissue hydroxyproline concentration, and collagen density compared with Group 2. Inflammatory cell density and collagen density on day 3 were significantly higher in Groups 3 and 6 compared with Group 2. On day 21, Groups 3 and 6 had significantly higher fibroblastic activity compared with Group 2. This study has proved that oral St. John's wort has more positive effects on problematic wounds compared with topical St. John's wort and olive oil, which is a vehicle. Hypericum perforatum results with faster inflammatory response and better healing. These results could be an addition to literature about the clinical usage of Hypericum perforatum on diabetic wounds.

  4. Treatment of surgical wounds on the uterus after laparoscopic myomectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedlar Srđan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The advantages of laparoscopic removal of a myoma over classical surgical technique are shorter hospital stay, rapid recovery and less pain after surgery, as well as a lower frequency of ileus and thromboembolic complications. The surgical technique of laparoscopic removal of myoma involves four basic stages: incision on the wall of the uterus, separation of the myoma from the healthy uterine tissue, to stop bleeding and removal of the myoma from the abdomen. Apart from these four basic stages, it is also necessary to establish a new integrity of the uterine wall, especially in women planning pregnancy. Objective. The aim of the paper is to present the procedures used in the treatment of uterine wall defect during the laparoscopic removal of the myoma. Methods. We analyzed 96 patients who were indicated for laparoscopic myomectomy. All patients were divided into four groups according to the type of the technique of haemostasis and treatment of the defect on the uterine wall: electrocoagulation, electrocoagulation with application of argon plasma, a single suture and extended suture. Results. In order to stop bleeding, we most often used electrocoagulation by monopolar electricity, i.e. in 39.6% of the patients. To stop bleeding and treat the defect of the uterine wall, we used a single suture in 21.9% and in 11.4% patients we used the extended suture. The manner of uterine wall treatment did not have a statistically significant influence on the results of haematological parameters (p>0.05, consumption of carbon dioxide (p>0.05 and the duration of surgical procedure (p>0.05. The increased use of antibiotics (p<0.05 in the group of patients in whom we treated the defect by sutures on the uterus, the length of postsurgical hospitalization and absence from work (p<0.01 was statistically significant. Conclusion. To achieve a better reconstruction of the uterus, it is recommended to use sutures with laparoscopic removal of myoma.

  5. [Rendering surgical care to wounded with neck wounds in an armed conflict].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samokhvalov, I M; Zavrazhnov, A A; Fakhrutdinov, A M; Sychev, M I

    2001-10-01

    The results of rendering of the medical care (the first aid, qualified and specialized) obtained in 172 servicemen with neck injuries who stayed in Republic of Chechnya during the period from 09.08.1999 to 28.07.2000 were analyzed. Basing on the results of analysis and experience of casualties' treatment the authors discuss the problems of sequence and volume of surgical care in this group of casualties with reference to available medical evacuation system, surgical tactics at the stage of specialized care. They also consider the peculiarities of operative treatment of the casualties with neck injuries.

  6. Incidence of Surgical Site Infections and Microbial Pattern at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The ANNALS of AFRICAN SURGERY. January ... morbidity and death. ... Four patients had culture negative results. ... contaminated and dirty wounds had infection rates of ... In the United States of America (USA) ... wounds from day three post operative. ... (Breast cancer, teratoma, lipoma, mandibular tumors excisions).

  7. Preventing surgical site infection. Where now?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Humphreys, H

    2009-12-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is increasingly recognised as a measure of the quality of patient care by surgeons, infection control practitioners, health planners and the public. There is increasing pressure to compare SSI rates between surgeons, institutions and countries. For this to be meaningful, data must be standardised and must include post-discharge surveillance (PDS) as many superficial SSIs do not present to the original institution. Further work is required to determine the best method of conducting PDS. In 2008 two important documents on SSI were published from the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America\\/The Infectious Disease Society of America and the National Institute for Health and Clincal Excellence, UK. Both emphasise key aspects during the preoperative, operative and postoperative phases of patient care. In addition to effective interventions known to be important for some time, e.g. not shaving the surgical site until the day of the procedure, there is increasing emphasis on physiological parameters, e.g. blood glucose concentrations, oxygen tensions and body temperature. Laparoscopic procedures are increasingly associated with reduced SSI rates, and the screening and decontamination of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus carriers is effective for certain surgical procedures but has to be balanced by cost and the risk of mupirocin resistance. Finally, there is a need to convert theory into practice by the rigorous application of SSI healthcare bundles. Recent studies suggest that, with a multidisciplinary approach, simple measures can be effective in reducing SSI rates.

  8. Effect of a baking soda-peroxide dentifrice on post-surgical wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dentino, A R; Ciancio, S G; Bessinger, M; Mather, M A; Cancro, L; Fischman, S

    1995-06-01

    To investigate the effect of a baking soda-hydrogen peroxide (0.75%) dentifrice on wound healing, plaque formation, gingival inflammation, patient comfort, probing depth, and clinical attachment level following gingival flap surgery. A randomized, double-blind crossover study involving 25 patients requiring bilateral maxillary gingival flap surgery was completed. The effects of twice daily brushing with a baking soda-hydrogen peroxide dentifrice (Mentadent) or a placebo dentifrice (Crest) were observed over a 28-day post-surgical period. Gingival Index (GI), plaque index (PI), probing depth (PD), clinical attachment level (CAL) and gingival bleeding index (BI) were recorded pre-surgically and at day 28 for each surgical sextant. At days 7 and 14, soft tissue appearance/wound healing (STA) was assessed based on color and edema, PIs were determined and patient comfort was ascertained by report. Post-surgical wound healing was statistically significantly improved at day 7 with the trend continuing to day 14 when Mentadent dentifrice was used as compared to Crest dentifrice. However, there was no statistical difference in the PI values between the test and control dentifrice throughout the study. Use of Mentadent may be an effective aid in the early phase of healing following gingival flap surgery.

  9. Vacuum-assisted closure therapy for infected perineal wounds after abdominoperineal resection. A retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walma, M S; Burbach, J P M; Verheijen, P M; Pronk, A; van Grevenstein, W M U

    2016-02-01

    Perineal wound complications are a main problem after abdominoperineal resection (APR). There is little evidence concerning perineal wound management. This study describes and evaluates the role of vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy in wound management strategies of perineal wound infections after APR. Patients undergoing APR for malignant disease between January 2007 and January 2013 were identified retrospectively. Data regarding occurrence and management of perineal wound complications were collected. Perineal wound infections were classified into minor or major complications and time to wound healing was measured. Time to wound healing was compared between patients receiving routine care or with additional VAC therapy. Of 171 included patients, 76 (44.4%) had minor and 36 (21.1%) major perineal wound infections. Management of major infected perineal wounds consisted of drainage (n = 16), debridement (n = 4), drainage combined with debridement (n = 4), VAC therapy alone (n = 5), or VAC therapy combined with other treatments (n = 7). Median duration of perineal wound healing in major infected wounds was 141 days (range 17-739). Median time to wound healing was not different in patients treated with (172 days, range 23-368) or without VAC therapy (131 days, range 17-739). In this study, VAC therapy did not shorten time to wound healing. However, prospective studies are required to investigate the role of VAC therapy in management of infected perineal wounds after APR. Up to then, wound management will remain to be based on clinical perception and 'gut-feeling'. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Wound Infection following Caesarean Section in a University ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Caesarean section is a common operation in obstetric practice, but there is a general aversion to caesarean section amongst Nigerian women due to a myriad of reasons amongst which are its associated morbidity and mortality. Surgical site infection following caesarean section is both a major cause of ...

  11. Prevention of perioperative wound infections | Buteera | East and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aiming at short preoperative stay in hospital, and pre-washing of the area concerned before cleaning with antiseptic are also imperative in reducing SSI. Preoperative skin preparation is an important element in prevention of infection, but removes only up to 80% of skin flora. Standard surgical antisepsis is an accepted ...

  12. Surgical Site Infections and Associated Operative Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waltz, Paul K; Zuckerbraun, Brian S

    Surgical site infection (SSI) contributes significantly to surgical morbidity. Patient factors and operative factors contribute to the risk of development of SSI. This review focuses on understanding operative characteristics that are associated with an increased risk of SSI. Much attention has been given to protocol care to reduce SSI, such as hair removal, skin preparation, and pre-operative antibiotic agents. Even with this, the appropriate antibiotic and re-dosing regimens often remain a challenge. Other operative factors such as blood loss/transfusion, emergency/urgent cases, duration of the operation, type of anesthesia, and resident involvement are also potentially modifiable to reduce the risk of SSI. Data are reviewed to highlight the increased risk associated with such factors. Strategies to reduce risk, such as operative care bundles, have significant promise to reduce the incidence of SSI for any given procedure.

  13. Risk analysis and outcome of mediastinal wound and deep mediastinal wound infections with specific emphasis to omental transposition

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Parissis, Haralabos

    2011-09-19

    Abstract Background To report our experience, with Deep mediastinal wound infections (DMWI). Emphasis was given to the management of deep infections with omental flaps Methods From February 2000 to October 2007, out of 3896 cardiac surgery patients (prospective data collection) 120 pts (3.02%) developed sternal wound infections. There were 104 males & 16 females; (73.7%) CABG, (13.5%) Valves & (9.32%) CABG and Valve. Results Superficial sternal wound infection detected in 68 patients (1.75%) and fifty-two patients (1.34%) developed DMWI. The incremental risk factors for development of DMWI were: Diabetes (OR = 3.62, CI = 1.2-10.98), Pre Op Creatinine > 200 μmol\\/l (OR = 3.33, CI = 1.14-9.7) and Prolong ventilation (OR = 4.16, CI = 1.73-9.98). Overall mortality for the DMWI was 9.3% and the specific mortality of the omental flap group was 8.3%. 19% of the "DMWI group", developed complications: hematoma 6%, partial flap loss 3.0%, wound dehiscence 5.3%. Mean Hospital Stay: 59 ± 21.5 days. Conclusion Post cardiac surgery sternal wound complications remain challenging. The role of multidisciplinary approach is fundamental, as is the importance of an aggressive early wound exploration especially for deep sternal infections.

  14. REVERSIBLE CORTICAL BLINDNESS FOLLOWING SUCCESSFUL SURGICAL REPAIR OF TWO STAB WOUNDS IN THE HEART

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaiton A

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This report describes a case of cortical blindness that followed successful surgical repair of two stab wounds in the heart in a 29-year old Libyan man. The patient presented in a state of pre cardiac arrest (shock and low cardiac output status, following multiple chest stab wounds. Chest tube was immediately inserted. Surgery was urgently performed suturing the two wounds; in the root of the aorta and in the left ventricle, and haemostasis was secured. Cardiac arrest was successfully prevented. The patient recovered smoothly, but 24 hours later he declared total blindness. Ophtalmic and neurological examinations and investigations that included fundoscopy, Electroencephalograms (EEGs and Computed Tomography Scans revealed no abnormalities, apart from absence of alpha waves in the EEGs. We diagnosed the case as cortical blindness and continued caring for the patient conservatively. Three days later, the patient regained his vision gradually and was discharged on the 7th postoperative day without any remarks.

  15. Impact of Mucorales and Other Invasive Molds on Clinical Outcomes of Polymicrobial Traumatic Wound Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warkentien, Tyler E; Shaikh, Faraz; Weintrob, Amy C; Rodriguez, Carlos J; Murray, Clinton K; Lloyd, Bradley A; Ganesan, Anuradha; Aggarwal, Deepak; Carson, M Leigh; Tribble, David R

    2015-07-01

    Combat trauma wounds with invasive fungal infections (IFIs) are often polymicrobial with fungal and bacterial growth, but the impact of the wound microbiology on clinical outcomes is uncertain. Our objectives were to compare the microbiological features between IFI and non-IFI wounds and evaluate whether clinical outcomes differed among IFI wounds based upon mold type. Data from U.S. military personnel injured in Afghanistan with IFI wounds were examined. Controls were matched by the pattern/severity of injury, including blood transfusion requirements. Wound closure timing was compared between IFI and non-IFI control wounds (with/without bacterial infections). IFI wound closure was also assessed according to mold species isolation. Eighty-two IFI wounds and 136 non-IFI wounds (63 with skin and soft tissue infections [SSTIs] and 73 without) were examined. The time to wound closure was longer for the IFI wounds (median, 16 days) than for the non-IFI controls with/without SSTIs (medians, 12 and 9 days, respectively; P Mucorales growth than for wounds with non-Mucorales growth (median, 17 days versus 13 days; P Mucorales and Aspergillus spp. growth were compared, there was no significant difference in wound closure timing. Trauma wounds with SSTIs were often polymicrobial, yet the presence of invasive molds (predominant types: order Mucorales, Aspergillus spp., and Fusarium spp.) significantly prolonged the time to wound closure. Overall, the times to wound closure were longest for the IFI wounds with Mucorales growth. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Accuracy of surgical wound drainage measurements: an analysis and comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Brian; Nizzero, Danielle; Zhang, Chunxiao; van Zyl, Natasha; Ting, Jeannette

    2015-05-01

    Surgical drain tube readings can influence the clinical management of the post-operative patient. The accuracy of these readings has not been documented in the current literature and this experimental study aims to address this paucity. Aliquots (10, 25, 40 and 90 mL) of black tea solution prepared to mimic haemoserous fluid were injected into UnoVac, RedoVac and Jackson-Pratt drain tubes. Nursing and medical staff from a tertiary hospital were asked to estimate drain volumes by direct observation; analysis of variance was performed on the results and significance level was set at 0.05. Doctors and nurses are equally accurate in estimating drain tube volumes. Jackson-Pratt systems were found to be the most accurate for intermediate volumes of 25 and 40 mL. For extreme of volumes (both high and low), all drainage systems were inaccurate. This study suggests that for intermediate volumes (25 and 40 mL), Jackson-Pratt is the drainage system of choice. The accuracy of volume measurement is diminished at the extremes of drain volumes; emptying of drainage systems is recommended to avoid overfilling of drainage systems. © 2014 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  17. Incisional Negative Pressure Wound Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldig, Nana

    the rate of surgical wound infection and wound exudate post-caesarean and that wound infection had a negative impact on quality of life one month after surgery. Alongside the clinical trial, a trial-based cost-effectiveness analysis demonstrated that the treatment is cost-effective in a high......Women with a pre-gestational body mass index (BMI) above 30 kg/m2 giving birth by caesarean section are at high risk of surgical wound infection compared with women with a BMI below 30 kg/m2. Incisional Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (iNPWT) is one strategy to reduce the rate of surgical wound...... a randomised controlled trial in two tertiary and three teaching hospitals in three regions of Denmark, the Happy Belly Study, investigating the effectiveness of iNPWT in a population of obese women after caesarean section. The Happy Belly Study has demonstrated that prophylactic iNPWT significantly reduced...

  18. Wound-Healing Peptides for Treatment of Chronic Diabetic Foot Ulcers and Other Infected Skin Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Gomes

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available As the incidence of diabetes continues to increase in the western world, the prevalence of chronic wounds related to this condition continues to be a major focus of wound care research. Additionally, over 50% of chronic wounds exhibit signs and symptoms that are consistent with localized bacterial biofilms underlying severe infections that contribute to tissue destruction, delayed wound-healing and other serious complications. Most current biomedical approaches for advanced wound care aim at providing antimicrobial protection to the open wound together with a matrix scaffold (often collagen-based to boost reestablishment of the skin tissue. Therefore, the present review is focused on the efforts that have been made over the past years to find peptides possessing wound-healing properties, towards the development of new and effective wound care treatments for diabetic foot ulcers and other skin and soft tissue infections.

  19. Wound-Healing Peptides for Treatment of Chronic Diabetic Foot Ulcers and Other Infected Skin Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Ana; Teixeira, Cátia; Ferraz, Ricardo; Prudêncio, Cristina; Gomes, Paula

    2017-10-18

    As the incidence of diabetes continues to increase in the western world, the prevalence of chronic wounds related to this condition continues to be a major focus of wound care research. Additionally, over 50% of chronic wounds exhibit signs and symptoms that are consistent with localized bacterial biofilms underlying severe infections that contribute to tissue destruction, delayed wound-healing and other serious complications. Most current biomedical approaches for advanced wound care aim at providing antimicrobial protection to the open wound together with a matrix scaffold (often collagen-based) to boost reestablishment of the skin tissue. Therefore, the present review is focused on the efforts that have been made over the past years to find peptides possessing wound-healing properties, towards the development of new and effective wound care treatments for diabetic foot ulcers and other skin and soft tissue infections.

  20. Peripheral surgical wounding may induce cognitive impairment through interlukin-6-dependent mechanisms in aged mice

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Yuanlin; Xu, Zhipeng; Huang, Lining; Zhang, Yiying; Xie, Zhongcong

    2016-01-01

    Post-operative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) is associated with morbidity, mortality and increased cost of medical care. However, the neuropathogenesis and targeted interventions of POCD remain largely to be determined. We have found that the peripheral surgical wounding induces an age-dependent A? accumulation, neuroinflammation and cognitive impairment in aged mice. Pro-inflammatory cytokine interlukin-6 (IL-6) has been reported to be associated with cognitive impairment in rodents and human...

  1. Intraoperative technique as a factor in the prevention of surgical site infection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McHugh, S M

    2012-02-01

    Approximately five percent of patients who undergo surgery develop surgical site infections (SSIs) which are associated with an extra seven days as an inpatient and with increased postoperative mortality. The competence and technique of the surgeon is considered important in preventing SSI. We have reviewed the evidence on different aspects of surgical technique and its role in preventing SSI. The most recent guidelines from the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence in the UK recommend avoiding diathermy for skin incision even though this reduces incision time and blood loss, both associated with lower infection rates. Studies comparing different closure techniques, i.e. continuous versus interrupted sutures, have not found a statistically significant difference in the SSI rate, but using continuous sutures is quicker. For contaminated wounds, the surgical site should be left open for four days to allow for treatment of local infection before subsequent healing by primary intention. Surgical drains should be placed through separate incisions, closed suction drains are preferable to open drains, and all drains should be removed as soon as possible. There are relatively few large studies on the impact of surgical techniques on SSI rates. Larger multicentre prospective studies are required to define what aspects of surgical technique impact on SSI, to better inform surgical practice and support education programmes for surgical trainees.

  2. Intraoperative technique as a factor in the prevention of surgical site infection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McHugh, S M

    2011-02-28

    Approximately five percent of patients who undergo surgery develop surgical site infections (SSIs) which are associated with an extra seven days as an inpatient and with increased postoperative mortality. The competence and technique of the surgeon is considered important in preventing SSI. We have reviewed the evidence on different aspects of surgical technique and its role in preventing SSI. The most recent guidelines from the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence in the UK recommend avoiding diathermy for skin incision even though this reduces incision time and blood loss, both associated with lower infection rates. Studies comparing different closure techniques, i.e. continuous versus interrupted sutures, have not found a statistically significant difference in the SSI rate, but using continuous sutures is quicker. For contaminated wounds, the surgical site should be left open for four days to allow for treatment of local infection before subsequent healing by primary intention. Surgical drains should be placed through separate incisions, closed suction drains are preferable to open drains, and all drains should be removed as soon as possible. There are relatively few large studies on the impact of surgical techniques on SSI rates. Larger multicentre prospective studies are required to define what aspects of surgical technique impact on SSI, to better inform surgical practice and support education programmes for surgical trainees.

  3. Terbinafine-loaded wound dressing for chronic superficial fungal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paskiabi, Farnoush Asghari; Bonakdar, Shahin; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Imani, Mohammad; Jahanshiri, Zahra; Shams-Ghahfarokhi, Masoomeh; Razzaghi-Abyaneh, Mehdi

    2017-04-01

    In spite of developing new drugs and modern formulations, the treatments of chronic fungal infections are still challenging. Fibrous wound dressings are new suggestions for the treatment of chronic superficial infections. In the present study, we formulated an antifungal agent, terbinafine hydrochloride (TFH), which is a hydrophobic drug, in wound dressings prepared by electrospun polycaprolactone, polycaprolactone/gelatin (50:50 w/w) and gelatin. To obtain more water-stable meshes, the preparations were treated by glutaraldehyde and their properties were determined before and after treatment. The morphology of fibrous meshes was observed by scanning electron microscopy. Drug loading efficiency and release rate were measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and the release rate was monitored for 144h. Antifungal tests were performed on Trichophyton mentagrophytes, Aspergillus fumigatus and Candida albicans cultured on Muller-Hinton agar. The toxicity of the meshes was measured after 24h and 14days by MTT assay. Terbinafine loading of polycaprolactone/gelatin (50:50) was 100% and it released the highest amount of TFH too. In antifungal tests, all samples were able to hinderT. mentagrophytes and A. fumigatus but not C. albicans growth among them, polycaprolactone fibers made the largest inhibition zone. In MTT assay, none of prepared samples showed toxicity against L929 cells. Teken together, the prepared TFH-loaded PCL/gelatin electrospun meshes were able to release TFH slowly and in a steady state in time. With respect to no obvious cytotoxicity in MTT assay and stong antifungal activity toward T. mentagrophytesin vitro, these TFH-based meshes could be considered as potential candidates in clinical application as wound dressing for treatment of chronic dermatophytosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. STUDY ON SURGICAL SITE INFECTIONS CAUSED BY ESBL PRODUCING GRAM NEGATIVE BACTERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rambabu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Surgical site infections have been a major problem, because of the emergence of drug resistant bacteria, in particular B - lactamase producing bacteria. Extended spectrum beta lactamase producing gram negative organisms pose a great challenge in treatment o f SSI present study is aimed at determining multiple drug resistance in gram negative bacteria & to find out ESBL producers, in correlation with treatment outcome. A total of 120 wound infected cases were studied. Staphylococcus aureus was predominant bact erium - 20.Among gram negative bacteria, Pseudomonas species is predominant (14 followed by Escherichia coli (13 , Klebsiella species (12 , Proteus (9 Citrobacter (4 Providencia (2 & Acinetobacter species (2 . Out of 56 gramnegative bacteria isolated, 20 were i dentified as ESBL producers, which was statistically significant. Delay in wound healing correlated with infection by ESBL producers, which alarms the need of abstinence from antibiotic abuse

  5. Acetic acid dressings: Finding the Holy Grail for infected wound management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapil S Agrawal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Wounds have since long, contributed majorly to the health-care burden. Infected long-standing non-healing wounds place many demands on the treating surgeon and are devastating for the patients physically, nutritionally, vocationally, financially, psychologically and socially. Acetic acid has long been included among agents used in the treatment of infected wounds. In this study, we have evaluated the use of acetic acid for topical application in the treatment of infected wounds. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 patients with infected wounds were treated with topical application of 1% acetic acid as dressing material after appropriate cleaning. A specimen of wound swab was collected before first application and further on days 3, 7, 10 and 14. Daily dressings of wounds were done similarly. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of acetic acid against various organisms isolated was determined. Results: The patients treated ranged between 9 and 60 years, with the mean age 33 years. Nearly 70% of patients were male. Aetiologies of wounds: infective 35, diabetic 25, trauma 20, burns 10, venous ulcers 5 and infected graft donor site 5. Various microorganisms isolated include Pseudomonas aeruginosa (40%, Staphylococcus aureus (2%, Acinetobacter (12%, Escherichia Coli (5%, Proteus mirabilis (3%, Klebsiella (18%, methicillin-resistant S. aureus (10%, Streptococcus (2% and Enterococcus (1%, Citrobacter (1%. Few wounds (6% also isolated fungi. About 28%, 64% and 8% of patients isolated no growth on culture after 7, 14 and 21 days, respectively. MIC of all isolated organisms was ≤0.5%. Conclusion: pH of the wound environment plays a pivotal role in wound healing. Acetic acid with concentration of 1% has shown to be efficacious against wide range of bacteria as well as fungi, simultaneously accelerating wound healing. Acetic acid is non-toxic, inexpensive, easily available and efficient topical agent for effective elimination of wound

  6. Surgical exploration of hand wounds in the emergency room: Preliminary study of 80 personal injury claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouton, J; Houdre, H; Beccari, R; Tarissi, N; Autran, M; Auquit-Auckbur, I

    2016-12-01

    The SHAM Insurance Company in Lyon, France, estimated that inadequate hand wound exploration in the emergency room (ER) accounted for 10% of all ER-related personal injury claims in 2013. The objective of this study was to conduct a critical analysis of 80 claims that were related to hand wound management in the ER and led to compensation by SHAM. Eighty claims filed between 2007 and 2010 were anonymised then included into the study. To be eligible, claims had to be filed with SHAM, related to the ER management of a hand wound in an adult, and closed at the time of the study. Claims related to surgery were excluded. For each claim, we recorded 104 items (e.g., epidemiology, treatments offered, and impact on social and occupational activities) and analysed. Of the 70 patients, 60% were manual workers. The advice of a surgeon was sought in 16% of cases. The most common wound sites were the thumb (33%) and index finger (17%). Among the missed lesions, most involved tendons (74%) or nerves (29%). Many patients had more than one reason for filing a claim. The main reasons were inadequate wound exploration (97%), stiffness (49%), and dysaesthesia (41%). One third of patients were unable to return to their previous job. Mean sick-leave duration was 148 days and mean time from discharge to best outcome was 4.19%. Most claims (79%) were settled directly with the insurance company, 16% after involvement of a public mediator, and 12% in court. The mean compensatory damages award was 4595Euros. Inadequate surgical exploration of hand wounds is common in the ER, carries a risk of lasting and sometimes severe residual impairment, and generates considerable societal costs. IV. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  7. Surgical site infection following hernia repair in the day care setting of a developing country: a retrospective review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardhan, A.; Mazahir, S.; Alvi, A.R.; Murtaza, G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the incidence proportion of surgical site infection following hernia repair in a daycare setting at a tertiary care hospital of a low-income country. Methods: The retrospective audit was done at the Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, from June 1, 2008 to May 30, 2009. Patients with age >15 years who underwent Lichenstein's open mesh repair in daycare were included. Surgical Site Infection was labelled if the records revealed any of the following: opening of the wound by the primary surgeon; pain, tenderness and raised temperature of skin; purulent discharge from the wound; if the surgeon had documented it as a surgical site infection. SPSS 16 was used for data analysis. Results: After reviewing the retrieved files, 104 patients were found eligible. Of them, 102 (98%) were males. Overall wound-related complications were found in 13 (12.5%), whereas surgical site infection was found in 8 (7.7%) patients. The mean age of those with infections was 38.7+-18 year, while that of those with no surgical site infection was 47.8+-18 years. Smoking was found significantly associated with surgical site infection with 5.8 times higher incidence as compared to the non-smokers (OR with 95% CI: 5.6 (1.2, 25.3)). Conclusions: The incidence of surgical site infection after hernia repair with mesh in a daycare setting at a tertiary care hospital of a low-income country was higher than internationally reported incidence. Smoking was found to be a significant risk factor. (author)

  8. Wound and soft tissue infections of Serratia marcescens in patients receiving wound care: A health care-associated outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Us, Ebru; Kutlu, Huseyin H; Tekeli, Alper; Ocal, Duygu; Cirpan, Sevilay; Memikoglu, Kemal O

    2017-04-01

    We described a health care-associated Serratia marcescens outbreak of wound and soft tissue infection lasting approximately 11 months at Ankara University Ibni Sina Hospital. After identification of S marcescens strains from the clinical and environmental samples, and their susceptibility testing to antimicrobial agents, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was performed to detect molecular epidemiologic relationships among these isolates. The strains which were isolated from the saline bottles used for wound cleansing in the wound care unit were found to be 100% interrelated by PFGE to the strains from the samples of the outbreak patients. Reuse of the emptied bottles has no longer been allowed since the outbreak occurred. Besides, more efficient and frequent infection control training for hospital staff has been conducted. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The Incidence of Infection After Early Closure of Evulsive Facial Wounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosseini-e- Todashki H

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of postoperative wound dehiscence and"ninfection after early closure of evulsive facial wounds. This treatment was conducted on 28 male patients"nwith evulsive facial wounds. The formation of these evulsive wounds was due to the rupture of"ntemporary cavitation caused by high and extra high velocity messiles. All patients with average age of 18"nyears old were treated 24-48 hrs afire accidents at base hospitals (1988-1990."nPrimary healing was achieved in 24 subjects from 7 tO 15 days after the standard operation. Wound"ndehiscences and bacterial infections were observed in 4 subjects."nThe conclusion can be made from the results is that the early closure of evulsive facial wounds may"nreduce the rate of wound dehiscence and infection because of high vascularity in this area.

  10. Repair of surgical wounds in rats using a 10% unripe Musa sapientum peel gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Atzingen, Dênia Amélia Novato Castelli; Mendonça, Adriana Rodrigues dos Anjos; Mesquita Filho, Marcos; Alvarenga, Vinícius Alves; Assis, Vinícius Almeida; Penazzo, Afonso Esteves; Muzetti, Julio Henrique; Rezende, Thaisa Sousa

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the efficacy of a 10% gel of unripe banana (Musa sapientum) peel in treating surgical wounds in rats. A longitudinal, prospective, randomized triple-blind study was conducted with 60 Wistar rats (Rattus norvegicus albinus) weighing approximately 400g. The animals were randomly divided into: control group (treated with gel containing no active ingredient) and study group (treated with 10% gel of unripe banana peel). The gel was applied every three days to a 4x4-cm surgical wound created on the back of each animal (day 0) in both groups. Tissue samples were collected for histological analysis on days 14, 21 and 28. On day 14, more extensive vascular proliferation (p=0.023), presence of mononuclear cells (p=0.000), fibroblast proliferation (p=0.012), re-epithelialization (p=0.000), and decreased presence of polymorphonuclear cells (p=0.010) were observed in the study group than in controls. No significant between-group difference in the presence of polymorphonuclear cells was found on day 21. Fibroblast proliferation was significantly greater (p=0.006) in the study group than in the control group on day 28. The 10% gel of unripe banana peel showed anti-inflammatory activity and stimulated wound healing in rat skin when compared with a gel containing no active ingredient.

  11. Biofilm Production in Carbapenem Resistant Isolates from Chronic Wound Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swarna SR

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms are communities of microorganisms covered with extracellular polymeric substances. Such biofilm phenotype makes the microorganism resistant to antibiotics and plays a role in wound chronicity. This results in prolonged hospital stays in ICU, greater cost, and increased mortality. Methods: Pus swabs (59 were collected from a tertiary care hospital near Chennai were processed and identified using standard procedure followed by antibiotic susceptibility testing and identification of carbapenem resistance by Modified Hodge test as per CLSI guidelines. The biofilm formation was tested using plastic microtiter plate method. Results: Out of 59 pus swabs, 51 yielded growth with 69 isolates and 8 yielded no growth. Among the 69 isolates, 51 were GNB and 18 were GPC. Biofilm detection was noted in 84.31% (43/51 GNB isolates with 0.1% crystal violet whereas 100% (51/51 showed biofilm positive with 0.1% safranin. About 74.50% (38/51 isolates of GNB were carbapenem resistant by screening with disk diffusion method. Only 24% (6/25 of GNB isolates among Enterobacteriaceae were positive by Modified Hodge test method. Conclusion: The result shows the association of biofilm production among carbapenem resistant isolates obtained from chronic wound infections.

  12. [Vacuum-assisted closure therapy for the treatment of sternal wound infection after cardiac surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, K; Nakamura, Y; Harada, S; Saiki, M; Marumoto, A; Kanaoka, Y; Nishimura, M

    2009-11-01

    Sternal wound infection is still one of the critical and challenging complications after cardiac surgery. Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy is a unique and simple system that helps promote wound healing. We report 3 cases with the sternal wound infection after cardiac surgery, in which VAC therapy was applied between January, 2005 and April, 2007. Two of them had good response to VAC therapy and had their wound healed after 3 and 5 weeks, respectively. However, the remaining case, in which bilateral internal thoracic artery had been taken down for coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) and osteomyelitis of the sternum was not well controlled, did not respond to VAC therapy. Our results suggested that VAC might facilitate wound healing of the patients with sternal wound infection only after abscess was drained and opened, while it might not be useful for the patents with osteomyelitis.

  13. Randomized clinical trial of intestinal ostomy takedown comparing pursestring wound closure vs conventional closure to eliminate the risk of wound infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho-Mauries, Daniel; Rodriguez-Díaz, José Luis; Salgado-Nesme, Noel; González, Quintín H; Vergara-Fernández, Omar

    2013-02-01

    The use of temporary stomas has been demonstrated to reduce septic complications, especially in high-risk anastomosis; therefore, it is necessary to reduce the number of complications secondary to ostomy takedowns, namely wound infection, anastomotic leaks, and intestinal obstruction. To compare the rates of superficial wound infection and patient satisfaction after pursestring closure of ostomy wound vs conventional linear closure. Patients undergoing colostomy or ileostomy closure between January 2010 and February 2011 were randomly assigned to linear closure (n = 30) or pursestring closure (n = 31) of their ostomy wound. Wound infection within 30 days of surgery was defined as the presence of purulent discharge, pain, erythema, warmth, or positive culture for bacteria. Patient satisfaction, healing time, difficulty managing the wound, and limitation of activities were analyzed with the Likert questionnaire. The infection rate for the control group was 36.6% (n = 11) vs 0% in the pursestring closure group (p ostomy wound closure (shorter healing time and improved patient satisfaction).

  14. Terbinafine-loaded wound dressing for chronic superficial fungal infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paskiabi, Farnoush Asghari; Bonakdar, Shahin; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Imani, Mohammad; Jahanshiri, Zahra; Shams-Ghahfarokhi, Masoomeh; Razzaghi-Abyaneh, Mehdi

    2017-01-01

    In spite of developing new drugs and modern formulations, the treatments of chronic fungal infections are still challenging. Fibrous wound dressings are new suggestions for the treatment of chronic superficial infections. In the present study, we formulated an antifungal agent, terbinafine hydrochloride (TFH), which is a hydrophobic drug, in wound dressings prepared by electrospun polycaprolactone, polycaprolactone/gelatin (50:50 w/w) and gelatin. To obtain more water-stable meshes, the preparations were treated by glutaraldehyde and their properties were determined before and after treatment. The morphology of fibrous meshes was observed by scanning electron microscopy. Drug loading efficiency and release rate were measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and the release rate was monitored for 144 h. Antifungal tests were performed on Trichophyton mentagrophytes, Aspergillus fumigatus and Candida albicans cultured on Muller-Hinton agar. The toxicity of the meshes was measured after 24 h and 14 days by MTT assay. Terbinafine loading of polycaprolactone/gelatin (50:50) was 100% and it released the highest amount of TFH too. In antifungal tests, all samples were able to hinderT. mentagrophytes and A. fumigatus but not C. albicans growth among them, polycaprolactone fibers made the largest inhibition zone. In MTT assay, none of prepared samples showed toxicity against L929 cells. Teken together, the prepared TFH-loaded PCL/gelatin electrospun meshes were able to release TFH slowly and in a steady state in time. With respect to no obvious cytotoxicity in MTT assay and stong antifungal activity toward T. mentagrophytesin vitro, these TFH-based meshes could be considered as potential candidates in clinical application as wound dressing for treatment of chronic dermatophytosis. - Highlights: • Terbinafine (TFH)-loaded PCL/gelatin electrospun fibers were successfully fabricated. • TFH-loaded PCL/gelatin electrospun fibers showed a slow drug release

  15. Terbinafine-loaded wound dressing for chronic superficial fungal infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paskiabi, Farnoush Asghari [Department of Mycology, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran 13164. Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Microbiology Research Center, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran 13164. Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bonakdar, Shahin; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali [National Cell Bank Department, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran 13164 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Imani, Mohammad [Department of Novel Drug Delivery Systems, Iran Polymer and Petrochemical Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jahanshiri, Zahra [Department of Mycology, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran 13164. Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shams-Ghahfarokhi, Masoomeh [Department of Mycology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Razzaghi-Abyaneh, Mehdi, E-mail: mrab442@yahoo.com [Department of Mycology, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran 13164. Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Microbiology Research Center, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran 13164. Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-04-01

    In spite of developing new drugs and modern formulations, the treatments of chronic fungal infections are still challenging. Fibrous wound dressings are new suggestions for the treatment of chronic superficial infections. In the present study, we formulated an antifungal agent, terbinafine hydrochloride (TFH), which is a hydrophobic drug, in wound dressings prepared by electrospun polycaprolactone, polycaprolactone/gelatin (50:50 w/w) and gelatin. To obtain more water-stable meshes, the preparations were treated by glutaraldehyde and their properties were determined before and after treatment. The morphology of fibrous meshes was observed by scanning electron microscopy. Drug loading efficiency and release rate were measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and the release rate was monitored for 144 h. Antifungal tests were performed on Trichophyton mentagrophytes, Aspergillus fumigatus and Candida albicans cultured on Muller-Hinton agar. The toxicity of the meshes was measured after 24 h and 14 days by MTT assay. Terbinafine loading of polycaprolactone/gelatin (50:50) was 100% and it released the highest amount of TFH too. In antifungal tests, all samples were able to hinderT. mentagrophytes and A. fumigatus but not C. albicans growth among them, polycaprolactone fibers made the largest inhibition zone. In MTT assay, none of prepared samples showed toxicity against L929 cells. Teken together, the prepared TFH-loaded PCL/gelatin electrospun meshes were able to release TFH slowly and in a steady state in time. With respect to no obvious cytotoxicity in MTT assay and stong antifungal activity toward T. mentagrophytesin vitro, these TFH-based meshes could be considered as potential candidates in clinical application as wound dressing for treatment of chronic dermatophytosis. - Highlights: • Terbinafine (TFH)-loaded PCL/gelatin electrospun fibers were successfully fabricated. • TFH-loaded PCL/gelatin electrospun fibers showed a slow drug release

  16. Tilapia Piscidin 4 (TP4 Stimulates Cell Proliferation and Wound Closure in MRSA-Infected Wounds in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hang-Ning Huang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are endogenous antibiotics that directly affect microorganisms, and also have a variety of receptor-mediated functions. One such AMP, Tilapia piscidin 4 (TP4, was isolated from Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus; TP4 has antibacterial effects and regulates the innate immune system. The aim of the present study was to characterize the role of TP4 in the regulation of wound closure in mice and proliferation of a keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT and fibroblast cell line (Hs-68. In vitro, TP4 stimulated cell proliferation and activated collagen I, collagen III, and keratinocyte growth factor (KGF gene expression in Hs-68 cells, which induces keratin production by HaCaT cells. This effect was detectable at TP4 concentrations of 6.25 µg/mL in both cell lines. In vivo, TP4 was found to be highly effective at combating peritonitis and wound infection caused by MRSA in mouse models, without inducing adverse behavioral effects or liver or kidney toxicity. Taken together, our results indicate that TP4 enhances the survival rate of mice infected with the bacterial pathogen MRSA through both antimicrobial and wound closure activities mediated by epidermal growth factor (EGF, transforming growth factor (TGF, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF. The peptide is likely involved in antibacterial processes and regulation of tissue homeostasis in infected wounds in mice. Overall, these results suggest that TP4 may be suitable for development as a novel topical agent for wound dressing.

  17. Surgical Site Infection Following Fixation of Acetabular Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Faizan; Younus, Sajid; Asmatullah; Zia, Osama Bin; Khan, Naveed

    2017-09-01

    Acetabular fractures are mainly caused by high energy trauma. Surgical fixation of these fractures requires extensive surgical exposure which increases the length of operation and blood loss as well. This may increase the risk of surgical site infection. Our aim is to evaluate the prevalence of surgical site infections and the risk factors associated with it so as to minimize its chances. A total of 261 patients who underwent acetabular fracture surgery were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were divided into 2 groups, with or without surgical site infection. Factors examined include patients' gender, age, body mass index (BMI), time between injury and surgery, operative time, estimated blood loss, number of packed red blood cell transfused, length of total intensive care unit (ICU) stay, fracture type, surgical approach, smoking status, patients' comorbids and associated injuries. Fourteen patients (5.4%) developed surgical site infection. Out of 14 infections, 4 were superficial and 10 were deep. The factors that were found to be associated with surgical site infection following acetabular fracture fixation were prolonged operation time, increased BMI, prolonged ICU stay, larger amount of packed red blood cell transfused and associated genitourinary and abdominal trauma. In our study, we conclude that measures should be undertaken to attenuate the chances of surgical site infection in this major surgery by considering the risk factors significantly associated with it.

  18. The role of early surgical intervention in civilian gunshot wounds to the head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helling, T S; McNabney, W K; Whittaker, C K; Schultz, C C; Watkins, M

    1992-03-01

    Surgical management of gunshot wounds of the head has remained a controversial issue in the care of civilian patients. In an attempt to determine who might benefit from aggressive surgical intervention, we examined 89 patients over a 3-year period who had suffered cranial gunshot wounds and had at least one computed tomographic scan of the head after admission. Patients were divided into those receiving early (less than 24 hours) surgical intervention (ES, n = 27), late (greater than 24 hours) surgical intervention (LS, n = 6) or no surgical intervention (NS, n = 56). Overall mortality was 63%. Ten of 27 patients (37%) in the ES group died compared with 46 of 56 patients (82%) in the NS group (p less than 0.0001). Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores in the ES group averaged 7.86 +/- 4.72 and in the NS group 5.59 +/- 4.42 (p less than 0.05). The GCS scores in the LS group (all of whom survived) were significantly higher than those of the other two groups, 12.17 +/- 4.10. The number of patients with GCS scores of 3 or 4 on admission was significantly less in the ES (41%) than in the NS group (66%, p = 0.035) and survival was better with surgery (36%) than without (3%, p = 0.007). Patients with mass lesions (clot, ventricular blood) were more often found in the ES group (17/27) than in the NS group (18/56) (p = 0.008). Patients with bihemispheric injuries fared better with surgery (7 of 14 survivors) than without (2 of 33 survivors, p = 0.0003). Only one infectious complication (brain abscess) was encountered in the LS group. No delayed intracranial complications in survivors in the NS group were seen.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Wound care centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressure ulcer - wound care center; Decubitus ulcer - wound care center; Diabetic ulcer - wound care center; Surgical wound - wound ... Common types of non-healing wounds include: Pressure sores Surgical ... flow, or swollen legs Certain wounds may not heal well due to: ...

  20. Most common surgical mistakes with treatment of prosthetic joint infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boštjan Kocjančič

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of infections of orthopedic implants is often difficult and complex, although the chances of successful treatment with properly selected diagnostics, surgical and antibiotic treatment protocol have recently increased significantly. Surgical treatment is a key stone factor in the treatment of infections of orthopedic implants and any errors in it often lead to worse clinical outcomes. The most important and frequent surgical errors include: conservative treatment of periprothetic infections with antibiotics only, to-late surgical revision, insufficient debridement during surgical revision, inadequate intraoperative samples for bacteriological and histological analysis. It is important to have and to follow proper treatment algorithm for periprosthetic joint infection. In this work we present the listed surgical and most illustrative key errors.

  1. Antibacterial properties and healing effects of Melipona scutellaris honey in MRSA-infected wounds of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Vanessa de Fátima Lima Paiva; Azevedo, Ítalo Medeiros; Rêgo, Amália Cínthia Meneses; Egito, Eryvaldo Sócrates Tabosa do; Araújo-Filho, Irami; Medeiros, Aldo Cunha

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the antimicrobial, immunological and healing effects of Melipona scutellaris honey on infected wounds of rat skin. Twenty four Wistar rats were distributed in four groups (6-each). The uninfected skin wounds of group I rats were treated daily with saline for 7 days. Uninfected wounds (group II) rats were treated with honey. In group III (treated with saline) and group IV (treated with honey) wounds were inoculated with MRSA ATTC43300. The first bacterial culture was performed 24 hours later. In the 7th day new culture was done, and wound biopsies were used for cytokines dosage and histopathology. In group I and III rats the CFU/g count of S. aureus in wounds was zero. In group II rats the CFU/g counts in the wound tissue were significantly higher than in wounds of group IV rats. The density histopathological parameters and the expression of TNF-α, IL1-β, Il-6 were significantly higher on wounds of group IV then in the other groups. Honey of Melipona scutellaris was effective in the management of infected wounds, by significant bacterial growth inhibition, enhancement of cytokine expression, and positively influenced the wound repair.

  2. The surgical care improvement project and prevention of post-operative infection, including surgical site infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberger, Laura H; Politano, Amani D; Sawyer, Robert G

    2011-06-01

    In response to inconsistent compliance with infection prevention measures, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services collaborated with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on the Surgical Infection Prevention (SIP) project, introduced in 2002. Quality improvement measures were developed to standardize processes to increase compliance. In 2006, the Surgical Care Improvement Project (SCIP) developed out of the SIP project and its process measures. These initiatives, published in the Specifications Manual for National Inpatient Quality Measures, outline process and outcome measures. This continually evolving manual is intended to provide standard quality measures to unify documentation and track standards of care. Seven of the SCIP initiatives apply to the peri-operative period: Prophylactic antibiotics should be received within 1 h prior to surgical incision (1), be selected for activity against the most probable antimicrobial contaminants (2), and be discontinued within 24 h after the surgery end-time (3); (4) euglycemia should be maintained, with well-controlled morning blood glucose concentrations on the first two post-operative days, especially in cardiac surgery patients; (6) hair at the surgical site should be removed with clippers or by depilatory methods, not with a blade; (9) urinary catheters are to be removed within the first two post-operative days; and (10) normothermia should be maintained peri-operatively. There is strong evidence that implementation of protocols that standardize practices reduce the risk of surgical infection. The SCIP initiative targets complications that account for a significant portion of preventable morbidity as well as cost. One of the goals of the SCIP guidelines was a 25% reduction in the incidence of surgical site infections from implementation through 2010. Process measures are becoming routine, and as we practice more evidence-based medicine, it falls to us, the surgeons and scientists, to be active

  3. Gram negative wound infection in hospitalised adult burn patients--systematic review and metanalysis-.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzopardi, Ernest A; Azzopardi, Elayne; Camilleri, Liberato; Villapalos, Jorge; Boyce, Dean E; Dziewulski, Peter; Dickson, William A; Whitaker, Iain S

    2014-01-01

    Gram negative infection is a major determinant of morbidity and survival. Traditional teaching suggests that burn wound infections in different centres are caused by differing sets of causative organisms. This study established whether Gram-negative burn wound isolates associated to clinical wound infection differ between burn centres. Studies investigating adult hospitalised patients (2000-2010) were critically appraised and qualified to a levels of evidence hierarchy. The contribution of bacterial pathogen type, and burn centre to the variance in standardised incidence of Gram-negative burn wound infection was analysed using two-way analysis of variance. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumanni, Enterobacter spp., Proteus spp. and Escherichia coli emerged as the commonest Gram-negative burn wound pathogens. Individual pathogens' incidence did not differ significantly between burn centres (F (4, 20) = 1.1, p = 0.3797; r2 = 9.84). Gram-negative infections predominate in burn surgery. This study is the first to establish that burn wound infections do not differ significantly between burn centres. It is the first study to report the pathogens responsible for the majority of Gram-negative infections in these patients. Whilst burn wound infection is not exclusive to these bacteria, it is hoped that reporting the presence of this group of common Gram-negative "target organisms" facilitate clinical practice and target research towards a defined clinical demand.

  4. Gram negative wound infection in hospitalised adult burn patients--systematic review and metanalysis-.

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    Ernest A Azzopardi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gram negative infection is a major determinant of morbidity and survival. Traditional teaching suggests that burn wound infections in different centres are caused by differing sets of causative organisms. This study established whether Gram-negative burn wound isolates associated to clinical wound infection differ between burn centres. METHODS: Studies investigating adult hospitalised patients (2000-2010 were critically appraised and qualified to a levels of evidence hierarchy. The contribution of bacterial pathogen type, and burn centre to the variance in standardised incidence of Gram-negative burn wound infection was analysed using two-way analysis of variance. PRIMARY FINDINGS: Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumanni, Enterobacter spp., Proteus spp. and Escherichia coli emerged as the commonest Gram-negative burn wound pathogens. Individual pathogens' incidence did not differ significantly between burn centres (F (4, 20 = 1.1, p = 0.3797; r2 = 9.84. INTERPRETATION: Gram-negative infections predominate in burn surgery. This study is the first to establish that burn wound infections do not differ significantly between burn centres. It is the first study to report the pathogens responsible for the majority of Gram-negative infections in these patients. Whilst burn wound infection is not exclusive to these bacteria, it is hoped that reporting the presence of this group of common Gram-negative "target organisms" facilitate clinical practice and target research towards a defined clinical demand.

  5. Frequency of wound infection in non-perforated appendicitis with use of single dose perforative antibiotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, K.; Latif, H.; Ahmad, S.

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotics are used both pre and post-operatively in acute appendicitis for preventing wound infection. It has been observed that the routine use of post-operative antibiotics is not necessary in cases of non-perforated appendicitis as only prophylactic antibiotics are sufficient to prevent wound infection. The aim of this study was to see the frequency of wound infection in non-perforated appendicitis with single dose preoperative antibiotics only. Method: This observational study was conducted at the Department of Surgery, Ayub Medical College, Abbottabad from May to November 2014. A total of 121 patients with non-perforated appendicitis were included in the study. Only single dose preoperative antibiotics were used. The patients were followed for wound infection till 8th post-operative day. Results: 121 patients, 56(46.28%) male and 65(53.72%) female were included in the study. The mean age of patients was 27.41 ± 7.12 years with an age range of 18 to 45 years. In the entire series, 7(5.78%) patients developed wound infection. The infection was minor which settled with conservative therapy. Prophylactic antibiotics were found efficacious in 114(94.21%) patients. There was no significant association between wound infection and age and gender. Conclusion: Single dose preoperative antibiotics were found effective in controlling post-operative wound infection without the need of extending the antibiotics to post-operative period in cases of non-perforated appendicitis. (author)

  6. Surgical site infection rates following laparoscopic urological procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Arvin K; Srinivasan, Arun K; Cho, Jane; Sadek, Mostafa A; Kavoussi, Louis R

    2011-04-01

    Surgical site infections have been categorized by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services as "never events". The incidence of surgical site infection following laparoscopic urological surgery and its risk factors are poorly defined. We evaluated surgical site infection following urological laparoscopic surgery and identified possible factors that may influence occurrence. Patients who underwent transperitoneal laparoscopic procedures during a 4-year period by a single laparoscopic surgeon were retrospectively reviewed. Surgical site infections were identified postoperatively and defined using the Centers for Disease Control criteria. Clinical parameters, comorbidities, smoking history, preoperative urinalysis and culture results as well as operative data were analyzed. Nonparametric testing using the Mann-Whitney U test, multivariable logistic regression and Spearman's rank correlation coefficient were used for data analysis. In 556 patients undergoing urological laparoscopic procedures 14 surgical site infections (2.5%) were identified at mean postoperative day 21.5. Of the 14 surgical site infections 10 (71.4%) were located at a specimen extraction site. Operative time, procedure type and increasing body mass index were significantly associated with the occurrence of surgical site infections (p = 0.007, p = 0.019, p = 0.038, respectively), whereas history of diabetes mellitus (p = 0.071) and intraoperative transfusion (p = 0.053) were found to trend toward significance. Age, gender, positive urine culture, steroid use, procedure type and smoking history were not significantly associated with surgical site infection. Body mass index and operative time remained significant predictors of surgical site infection on multivariate logistic regression analysis. Surgical site infection is an infrequent complication following laparoscopic surgery with the majority occurring at the specimen extraction site. Infection is associated with prolonged operative time and

  7. Risk Factors for Surgical Site Infections in Dermatological Surgery

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    Xiaomeng Liu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Current literature on risk factors for surgical site infection (SSI in dermatological surgery in the absence of antibiotic prophylaxis is limited. The aim of this study was to retrospectively evaluate patients presenting for dermatological surgery. A total of 1,977 procedures were reviewed. SSI was clinically suspected in 79 (4.0% patients and confirmed by culture in 38 (1.9%. Using the strictest definition of SSI (clinical symptoms with positive culture significantly higher risk of SSI was found for location on the ear (odds ratio (OR 6.03, 95% confidence interval (95% CI 2.12–17.15, larger defects (OR 1.08 per cm2 increase, 95% CI 1.03–1.14, closure with flaps (OR 6.35, 95% CI 1.33–30.28 and secondary intention (OR 3.01, 95% CI 1.11–8.13. These characteristics were also associated with higher risk of clinically suspected SSI regardless of culture results with slightly lower ORs. In conclusion, the risk of acquiring a SSI is increased in surgeries performed on the ear, in larger wounds and in defects closed with flaps or healed by secondary intention.

  8. Healing of surgical castration wounds: a description and an evaluation of flunixin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintline, E M; Varga, A; Banuelos, J; Walker, K A; Hoar, B; Drake, Daniel; Weary, D M; Coetzee, J F; Stock, M L; Tucker, C B

    2014-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that surgical castration wounds take between 10 and 61 d to heal. The objectives of this work were to describe healing, inflammation, lying behavior, and serum concentration of substance P after surgical castration in beef calves and to evaluate the effect of a possible intervention, a single injection of flunixin meglumine (1.1 mg/kg IV, a NSAID), on the healing process. Calves (mean±SE: 25±2.0 d of age; 54±1.4 kg BW) were surgically castrated with or without an injection of flunixin immediately before the procedure (n=24/treatment). Healing was measured with a 5-point scale (1=fresh wound, 5=no visible incision or inflammation) as well as weight gain, scrotal size, and scrotal surface temperature, on d 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, 49, and 63 after castration. Serum concentration of substance P was recorded on all d, including d 0, but not d 63. Lying behavior was recorded with loggers from 2 d before to 29 d after castration. Inflammation, as measured by scrotal size, peaked on d 2 and 3 after the procedure (e.g., 51±1.0 mm on d 2 versus 28±1.3 mm before castration) and then declined with time (Pcastration (41±1.2 pg/mL), possibly because the sample was collected after the lidocaine ring block was administered, which was likely painful, and because of separation from the dam and restraint. Values began to drop by d 3 (34±1.2 pg/mL) and leveled out by d 21 (30±1.2 pg/mL; Pcastration caused inflammation in the days that followed, and the wounds required a minimum of 4 wk to heal. Provision of an NSAID had no effect on these outcomes.

  9. Active prospective surveillance study with post-discharge surveillance of surgical site infections in Cambodia

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    José Guerra

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Barriers to the implementation of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC guidelines for surgical site infection (SSI surveillance have been described in resource-limited settings. This study aimed to estimate the SSI incidence rate in a Cambodian hospital and to compare different modalities of SSI surveillance. We performed an active prospective study with post-discharge surveillance. During the hospital stay, trained surveyors collected the CDC criteria to identify SSI by direct examination of the surgical site. After discharge, a card was given to each included patient to be presented to all practitioners examining the surgical site. Among 167 patients, direct examination of the surgical site identified a cumulative incidence rate of 14 infections per 100 patients. An independent review of medical charts presented a sensitivity of 16%. The sensitivity of the purulent drainage criterion to detect SSIs was 83%. After hospital discharge, 87% of the patients provided follow-up data, and nine purulent drainages were reported by a practitioner (cumulative incidence rate: 20%. Overall, the incidence rate was dependent on the surveillance modalities. The review of medical charts to identify SSIs during hospitalization was not effective; the use of a follow-up card with phone calls for post-discharge surveillance was effective. Keywords: Surgical wound infection, Cambodia, Infection control, Developing countries, Follow-up studies, Feasibility studies

  10. Development, standardization and testing of a bacterial wound infection model based on ex vivo human skin.

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    Christoph Schaudinn

    Full Text Available Current research on wound infections is primarily conducted on animal models, which limits direct transferability of these studies to humans. Some of these limitations can be overcome by using-otherwise discarded-skin from cosmetic surgeries. Superficial wounds are induced in fresh ex vivo skin, followed by intradermal injection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa under the wound. Subsequently, the infected skin is incubated for 20 hours at 37°C and the CFU/wound are determined. Within 20 hours, the bacteria count increased from 107 to 109 bacteria per wound, while microscopy revealed a dense bacterial community in the collagen network of the upper wound layers as well as numerous bacteria scattered in the dermis. At the same time, IL-1alpha and IL-1beta amounts increased in all infected wounds, while-due to bacteria-induced cell lysis-the IL-6 and IL-8 concentrations rose only in the uninfected samples. High-dosage ciprofloxacin treatment resulted in a decisive decrease in bacteria, but consistently failed to eradicate all bacteria. The main benefits of the ex vivo wound model are the use of healthy human skin, a quantifiable bacterial infection, a measureable donor-dependent immune response and a good repeatability of the results. These properties turn the ex vivo wound model into a valuable tool to examine the mechanisms of host-pathogen interactions and to test antimicrobial agents.

  11. Risk of surgical site infection in paediatric herniotomies without any prophylactic antibiotics: A preliminary experience

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    Dhananjay Vaze

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Different studies underline the use of pre-operative antibiotic prophylaxis in clean surgeries like herniotomy and inguinal orchiopexy. But, the meta-analyses do not recommend nor discard the use of prophylactic pre-operative antibiotics. The scarcity of controlled clinical trials in paediatric population further vitiates the matter. This study assessed the difference in the rate of early post-operative wound infection cases in children who received single dose of pre-operative antibiotics and children who did not receive antibiotics after inguinal herniotomy and orchiopexy. Materials and Methods: This randomised prospective study was conducted in Paediatric Surgery department of PGIMER Chandigarh. Out of 251 patients, 112 patients were randomised to the case group and 139 were ascribed to the control group. The patients in control group were given a standard regimen of single dose of intravenous antibiotic at the time of induction followed by 3-4 days of oral antibiotic. Case group patients underwent the surgical procedure in similar manner with no antibiotic either at the time of induction or post-operatively. Results: The incidence of surgical site infection in case group was 3.73 % and that in control group was 2.22%. The observed difference in the incidence of surgical site infection was statistically insignificant (P value = 0.7027. The overall infection rate in case and control group was 2.89%. Conclusions: Our preliminary experience suggests that there is no statistically significant difference in the proportion of early post-operative wound infection between the patients who received single dose of pre-operative antibiotics and the patients who received no antibiotics after inguinal herniotomy and orchiopexy. The risk of surgical site infection in paediatric heriotomies does not increase even if the child′s weight is less than his/her expected weight for age.

  12. Effect of age and surgical approach on perioperative wound complication following ovariohysterectomy in shelter-housed cats in Australia

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    Madeleine L Roberts

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of age and/or surgical approach on perioperative wound complication following ovariohysterectomy (OHE. Methods A retrospective search of perioperative monitoring records from a shelter desexing program was conducted to identify cats that underwent OHE between 1 June 2010 and 31 December 2012 inclusive. A wound complication was defined as gross observation of inflammation or wound dehiscence at the surgical site in the 5 day postoperative period. Cases were grouped according to age (≤12 weeks or >12 weeks and surgical approach (flank or midline. Stratified analyses were conducted to evaluate the association between surgical approach and wound complications, after adjusting for age. Mantel–Haenszel adjusted risk ratio, Cochran–Mantel–Haenszel test statistic and their 95% confidence intervals were presented. Results A total of 312 cases met the study criteria. The overall wound complication risk was low (6.09% and was not related to age. A midline approach was associated with a 4.59-times increased risk of wound complication, compared with a flank approach in cats up to 12 weeks of age ( P = 0.015 but not in older cats. Conclusions and relevance These findings support the practice of prepubertal desexing for cats.

  13. Reduction of wound infections in laparoscopic-assisted colorectal resections by plastic wound ring drapes (REDWIL)?--A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauscher, J C; Grittner, F; Stroux, A; Zimmermann, M; le Claire, M; Buhr, H J; Ritz, J P

    2012-10-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are frequent complications in colorectal surgery and may lead to burst abdomen, incisional hernia, and increased perioperative costs. Plastic wound ring drapes (RD) were introduced some decades ago to protect the abdominal wound from bacteria and reduce SSIs. There have been no controlled trials examining the benefit of RD in laparoscopic colorectal surgery. The Reduction of wound infections in laparoscopic assisted colorectal resections by plastic wound ring drapes (REDWIL) trial was thus designed to assess their effectiveness in preventing SSIs after elective laparoscopic colorectal resections. REDWIL is a randomized controlled monocenter trial with two parallel groups (experimental group with RD and control group without RD). Patients undergoing elective laparoscopic colorectal resection were included. The primary endpoint was SSIs. Secondary outcomes were colonization of the abdominal wall with bacteria, reoperations/readmissions, early/late postoperative complications, and cost of hospital stay. The duration of follow-up was 6 months. Between January 2008 and October 2010, 109 patients were randomly assigned to the experimental or control group (with or without RD). Forty-six patients in the RD group and 47 patients in the control group completed follow-up. SSIs developed in ten patients with RD (21.7 %) and six patients without RD (12.8 %) (p = 0.28). An intraoperative swab taken from the abdominal wall was positive in 66.7 % of patients with RD and 57.5 % without RD (p = 0.46). The number of species cultured within one swab was significantly higher in those without RD (p = 0.03). The median total inpatient costs including emergency readmissions were 3,402 ± 4,038 in the RD group and 3,563 ± 1,735 in the control group (p = 0.869). RD do not reduce the rate of SSIs in laparoscopic colorectal surgery. The inpatient costs are similar with and without RD.

  14. A review of current strategies to reduce intraoperative bacterial contamination of surgical wounds

    OpenAIRE

    Dohmen, Pascal M.; Konertz, Wolfgang

    2007-01-01

    Surgical site infections are a mean topic in cardiac surgery, leading to a prolonged hospitalization, and substantially increased morbidity and mortality. One source of pathogens is the endogenous flora of the patient?s skin, which can contaminate the surgical site. A number of preoperative skin care strategies are performed to reduce bacterial contamination like preoperative antiseptic showering, hair removal, antisepsis of the skin, adhesive barrier drapes, and antimicrobial prophylaxis. Fu...

  15. Surgical site infection and timing of prophylactic antibiotics for appendectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wan-Ting; Tai, Feng-Chuan; Wang, Pa-Chun; Tsai, Ming-Lin

    2014-12-01

    Pre-operative prophylactic antibiotics may decrease the frequency of surgical site infection after appendectomy. However, the optimal timing for administration of pre-operative prophylactic antibiotics is unknown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of timing of prophylactic antibiotics on the frequency of surgical site infection after appendectomy. Medical records were reviewed retrospectively for 577 consecutive patients who had appendectomy for acute appendicitis from 2006 to 2009. Quality assurance guidelines for timing of prophylactic antibiotics before the skin incision were changed from 0 to 30 min before the skin incision (before June 2008) to 30 to 60 min before the skin incision (after June 2008). Surgical site infection occurred in 28 patients (4.9%). There was no difference in frequency of surgical site infection with different timing of pre-operative prophylactic antibiotic (pre-operative time 0 to 30 min: 9 infections [3.6%]; 31 to 60 min: 13 infections [5.4%]; 61 to 120 min: 5 infections [7.0%]; >120 min: 1 infection [6.6%]). Multivariable analysis showed that surgical site infection was associated significantly with medical comorbidity but not perforated appendicitis. The frequency of surgical site infection was independent of timing of preoperative prophylactic antibiotics but was associated with the presence of medical comorbidity.

  16. Risk Factors and Predictive Model Development of Thirty-Day Post-Operative Surgical Site Infection in the Veterans Administration Surgical Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinli; Nylander, William; Smith, Tracy; Han, Soonhee; Gunnar, William

    2018-04-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) complicates approximately 2% of surgeries in the Veterans Affairs (VA) hospitals. Surgical site infections are responsible for increased morbidity, length of hospital stay, cost, and mortality. Surgical site infection can be minimized by modifying risk factors. In this study, we identified risk factors and developed accurate predictive surgical specialty-specific SSI risk prediction models for the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) surgery population. In a retrospective observation study, surgical patients who underwent surgery from October 2013 to September 2016 from 136 VA hospitals were included. The Veteran Affairs Surgical Quality Improvement Program (VASQIP) database was used for the pre-operative demographic and clinical characteristics, intra-operative characteristics, and 30-day post-operative outcomes. The study population represents 11 surgical specialties: neurosurgery, urology, podiatry, otolaryngology, general, orthopedic, plastic, thoracic, vascular, cardiac coronary artery bypass graft (CABG), and cardiac valve/other surgery. Multivariable logistic regression models were developed for the 30-day post-operative SSIs. Among 354,528 surgical procedures, 6,538 (1.8%) had SSIs within 30 days. Surgical site infection rates varied among surgical specialty (0.7%-3.0%). Surgical site infection rates were higher in emergency procedures, procedures with long operative duration, greater complexity, and higher relative value units. Other factors associated with increased SSI risk were high level of American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) classification (level 4 and 5), dyspnea, open wound/infection, wound classification, ascites, bleeding disorder, chemotherapy, smoking, history of severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), radiotherapy, steroid use for chronic conditions, and weight loss. Each surgical specialty had a distinct combination of risk factors. Accurate SSI risk-predictive surgery specialty

  17. Predictors of Multidrug Resistant Acinetobacter Baumannii Infections in Surgical Intensive Care Patients: A Retrospective Analysis

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    Aynur Camkıran

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MRAB is an important cause of hospital acquired infection and leads to an increasing morbidity and mortality in intensive care units (ICU. The aim of this study was to investigate the predictors of MRAB infection in surgical ICU patients. Material and Method: The charts of the patients who were admitted to the ICU between January 2008 and August 2010 were reviewed to identify patients with MRAB infection. Recorded data were as follows: age, sex, medical history, underlying surgical pathology, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score (APACHE II and Glasgow Coma Score on ICU admission,presence of invasive procedures (intubation, arterial, central venous lines, urinary catheters, and renal replacement therapy, days in ICU and white blood cells (WBC and lactate count on infection day, infection site, complications (such as organ/system failure, length of stay (LOS in the ICU and hospital, and final outcome. Results: During the study period 25 patients with MRAB infection were identified. When compared with their matched control group (n=25, patients with MRAB infection had a significantly higher mean APACHE II score (p=0.001 and more frequently had an open wound (p=0.002 or required mechanical ventilation (p=0.005, with respiratory system disease (p=0.03, arterial catheterization (p=0.006, and central venous catheterization (p=0.004. Multivariate logistic regression revealed that APACHE II score (OR,1.155; CI, 1.008-1.324; p= 0.038 and open wound (OR, 27.77; CI, 2.020-333.333; p=0.018 were predictors of MRAB infection in these patients. Compared to their controls, patients with MRAB infection hand a longer LOS in ICU (36.44±30.44 days vs 7.80±8.13 days, p<0.000 and hospital (55.12±40.81 days vs 19.04±13.44 days, p<0.000. In hospital mortality rates for patients with MRAB infection and their controls were 56% and 32%, respectively (p=0.154. Conclusion: Our results indicate

  18. Bacteriophage Therapy for Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm-Infected Wounds: A New Approach to Chronic Wound Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    lidocaine and 1:100,000 epineph- rine at the planned wound sites. Six full-thickness dermal wounds, 6 mm in diameter, were created on the ventral ear...action were ineffective against S. aureus biofilm, as was seen with P. aeruginosa biofilm.22 Given the durability of biofilm in the face of a harsh

  19. Role of wound instillation with bupivacaine through surgical drains for postoperative analgesia in modified radical mastectomy

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    Nirmala Jonnavithula

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Modified Radical Mastectomy (MRM is the commonly used surgical procedure for operable breast cancer, which involves extensive tissue dissection. Therefore, wound instillation with local anaesthetic may provide better postoperative analgesia than infiltration along the line of incision. We hypothesised that instillation of bupivacaine through chest and axillary drains into the wound may provide postoperative analgesia. Methods: In this prospective randomised controlled study 60 patients aged 45-60 years were divided into three groups. All patients were administered general anaesthesia. At the end of the surgical procedure, axillary and chest wall drains were placed before closure. Group C was the control with no instillation; Group S received 40 ml normal saline, 20 ml through each drain; and Group B received 40 ml of 0.25% bupivacaine and the drains were clamped for 10 min. After extubation, pain score for both static and dynamic pain was evaluated using visual analog scale and then 4 th hourly till 24 h. Rescue analgesia was injection tramadol, if the pain score exceeds 4. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS version 13. Results : There was a significant difference in the cumulative analgesic requirement and the number of analgesic demands between the groups (P: 0.000. The mean duration of analgesia in the bupivacaine group was 14.6 h, 10.3 in the saline group and 4.3 h in the control group. Conclusion : Wound instillation with local anaesthetics is a simple and effective means of providing good analgesia without any major side-effects.

  20. Liposome Entrapment of Bacteriophages Improves Wound Healing in a Diabetic Mouse MRSA Infection

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    Sanjay Chhibber

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic populations are more prone to developing wound infections which results in poor and delayed wound healing. Infection with drug resistant organisms further worsen the situation, driving searches for alternative treatment approaches such as phage therapy. Major drawback of phage therapy, however, is low phage persistence in situ, suggesting further refinement of the approach. In the present work we address this issue by employing liposomes as delivery vehicles. A liposome entrapped phage cocktail was evaluated for its ability to resolve a Staphylococcus aureus-induced diabetic excission wound infection. Two characterized S. aureus specific lytic phages, MR-5 and MR-10 alone, in combination (cocktail, or entrapped in liposomes (versus as free phages were assesed for their therapeutic efficacy in resolving diabetic wound infection. Mice treated with free phage cocktail showed significant reduction in wound bioburden, greater wound contraction and faster tissue healing than with free monophage therapy. However, to further enhance the availability of viable phages the encapsulation of phage cocktail in the liposomes was done. Results of in vitro stability studies and in vivo phage titer determination, suggests that liposomal entrapment of phage cocktail can lead to better phage persistence at the wound site. A 2 log increase in phage titre, however, was observed at the wound site with liposome entrapped as compared to the free phage cocktail, and this was associaed with increased rates of infection resolution and wound healing. Entrapment of phage cocktails within liposomes thus could represent an attractive approach for treatment of bacterial infections, not responding to antibiotis as increased phage persistence in vitro and in vivo at the wound site was observed.

  1. Photobiomodulation of surgical wound dehiscence in a diabetic individual by low-level laser therapy following median sternotomy

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    Snehil Dixit

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this single case study, we attempt to outline the possible effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT on delayed wound healing and pain in chronic dehiscent sternotomy of a diabetic individual. The methods that were employed to evaluate changes pre and post irradiation were wound photography, wound area measurement, pressure ulcer scale of healing (PUSH, and visual analogue scale (VAS for pain. After irradiation, proliferation of healthy granulation tissue was observed with decrease in scores of PUSH for sternal dehiscence and VAS for bilateral shoulders and sternal dehiscence. We found that LLLT irradiation could be a novel method of treatment for chronic sternal dehiscence following coronary artery bypass grafting, as it augments wound healing with an early closure of the wound deficit. Hence, this might be translated into an early functional rehabilitation and decreased pain perception of an individual following surgical complication.

  2. Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection alters the macrophage phenotype switching process during wound healing in diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sinuo; Li, Renren; Cheng, Chun; Xu, Jing-Ying; Jin, Caixia; Gao, Furong; Wang, Juan; Zhang, Jieping; Zhang, Jingfa; Wang, Hong; Lu, Lixia; Xu, Guo-Tong; Tian, Haibin

    2018-03-07

    Macrophages play critical roles in wound healing process. They switch from "classically activated" (M1) phenotype in the early inflammatory phase to "alternatively activated" (M2) phenotype in the later healing phase. However, the dynamic process of macrophage phenotype switching in diabetic wounds burdened with bacteria is unclear. In this report, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, frequently detected in diabetic foot ulcers, was inoculated into cutaneous wounds of db/db diabetic mice to mimic bacterium-infected diabetic wound healing. We observed that P. aeruginosa infection impaired diabetic wound healing and quickly promoted the expression of pro-inflammatory genes (M1 macrophage markers) tumor necrosis factor-α (tnf-α), interleukin-1β (il-1β) and il-6 in wounds. The expression of markers of M2 macrophages, including il-10, arginase-1, and ym1 were also upregulated. In addition, similar gene expression patterns were observed in macrophages isolated directly from wounds. Immunostaining showed that P. aeruginosa infection increased both the ratios of M1 and M2 macrophages in wounds compared with that in control groups, which was further confirmed by in vitro culturing macrophages with P. aeruginosa and skin fibroblast conditioned medium. However, the ratios of the expression levels of pro-inflammatory genes to anti-inflammatory gene il-10 was increased markedly in P. aeruginosa infected wounds and macrophages compared with that in control groups, and P. aeruginosa prolonged the presence of M1 macrophages in the wounds. These data demonstrated that P. aeruginosa in diabetic wounds activates a mixed M1/M2 macrophage phenotype with an excessive activation of M1 phenotype or relatively inadequate activation of M2 phenotype. © 2018 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  3. Surgical site infections following transcatheter apical aortic valve implantation: incidence and management

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    Baillot Richard

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective The present study was undertaken to examine the incidence and management of surgical site infection (SSI in patients submitted to transapical transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TA-TAVI. Methods From April 2007 to December 2011, 154 patients underwent TA-TAVI with an Edwards Sapien bioprosthesis (ES at the Institut Universitaire de Cardiologie et Pneumologie de Québec (IUCPQ as part of a multidisciplinary program to prospectively evaluate percutaneous aortic valve implantation. Patient demographics, perioperative variables, and postoperative complications were recorded in a prospective registry. Results Five (3.2% patients in the cohort presented with an SSI during the study period. The infections were all hospital-acquired (HAI and were considered as organ/space SSI’s based on Center for Disease Control criteria (CDC. Within the first few weeks of the initial procedure, these patients presented with an abscess or chronic draining sinus in the left thoracotomy incision and were re-operated. The infection spread to the apex of the left ventricle in all cases where pledgeted mattress sutures could be seen during debridement. Patients received multiple antibiotic regimens without success until the wound was surgically debrided and covered with viable tissue. The greater omentum was used in three patients and the pectoralis major muscle in the other two. None of the patients died or had a recurrent infection. Three of the patients were infected with Staphylococcus epidermidis, one with Staphylococcus aureus, and one with Enterobacter cloacae. Patients with surgical site infections were significantly more obese with higher BMI (31.4±3.1 vs 26.2±4.4 p=0.0099 than the other patients in the cohort. Conclusions While TA-TAVI is a minimally invasive technique, SSIs, which are associated with obesity, remain a concern. Debridement and rib resection followed by wound coverage with the greater omentum and/or the pectoralis major

  4. Surgical site infections following transcatheter apical aortic valve implantation: incidence and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillot, Richard; Fréchette, Éric; Cloutier, Daniel; Rodès-Cabau, Josep; Doyle, Daniel; Charbonneau, Éric; Mohammadi, Siamak; Dumont, Éric

    2012-11-13

    The present study was undertaken to examine the incidence and management of surgical site infection (SSI) in patients submitted to transapical transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TA-TAVI). From April 2007 to December 2011, 154 patients underwent TA-TAVI with an Edwards Sapien bioprosthesis (ES) at the Institut Universitaire de Cardiologie et Pneumologie de Québec (IUCPQ) as part of a multidisciplinary program to prospectively evaluate percutaneous aortic valve implantation. Patient demographics, perioperative variables, and postoperative complications were recorded in a prospective registry. Five (3.2%) patients in the cohort presented with an SSI during the study period. The infections were all hospital-acquired (HAI) and were considered as organ/space SSI's based on Center for Disease Control criteria (CDC). Within the first few weeks of the initial procedure, these patients presented with an abscess or chronic draining sinus in the left thoracotomy incision and were re-operated. The infection spread to the apex of the left ventricle in all cases where pledgeted mattress sutures could be seen during debridement. Patients received multiple antibiotic regimens without success until the wound was surgically debrided and covered with viable tissue. The greater omentum was used in three patients and the pectoralis major muscle in the other two. None of the patients died or had a recurrent infection. Three of the patients were infected with Staphylococcus epidermidis, one with Staphylococcus aureus, and one with Enterobacter cloacae. Patients with surgical site infections were significantly more obese with higher BMI (31.4±3.1 vs 26.2±4.4 p=0.0099) than the other patients in the cohort. While TA-TAVI is a minimally invasive technique, SSIs, which are associated with obesity, remain a concern. Debridement and rib resection followed by wound coverage with the greater omentum and/or the pectoralis major muscle were used successfully in these patients.

  5. year surveillance of wound infections at a rural tertiary hospital in ...

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    EB

    Conclusions: Staphylococcus aureus was the most predominant etiologic agent of wound infection among in and out patients. ... methicillin – resistant Staphylococus aureus (MRSA) and ... Northeast local government area of Edo State,.

  6. Negative pressure wound therapy in the management of late deep infections after open reconstruction of achilles tendon rupture.

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    Mosser, Philipp; Kelm, Jens; Anagnostakos, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Infection is a major complication after open reconstruction of Achilles tendon ruptures. We report on the use of vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy in the treatment of late deep infections after open Achilles tendon reconstruction. Six patients (5 males [83.33%], 1 female [16.67%]; mean age, 52.8 [range 37 to 66] years) were been treated using an identical protocol. Surgical management consisted of debridement, lavage, and necrectomy of infected tendon parts. The VAC therapy was used for local wound preconditioning and infection management. A continuous negative pressure of 125 mm Hg was applied on each wound. For final wound closure, a split-thickness skin graft was performed. The skin graft healing process was also supported by VAC therapy during the first 5 days. The VAC dressings were changed a mean average of 3 (range 1 to 4) times until split-thickness skin grafting could be performed. The mean total duration of the VAC therapy was 13.6 ± 5.9 days. The mean hospital stay was 31.2 ± 15.9 days. No complications with regard to bleeding, seroma, or hematoma formation beneath the skin graft were observed. At a mean follow-up duration of 29.9 (range 4 to 65) months, no re-infection or infection persistence was observed. The VAC device seems to be a valuable tool in the treatment of infected tendons. The generalization of these conclusions should await the results of future studies with larger patient series. Copyright © 2015 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Implementation of surgical quality improvement: auditing tool for surgical site infection prevention practices.

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    Hechenbleikner, Elizabeth M; Hobson, Deborah B; Bennett, Jennifer L; Wick, Elizabeth C

    2015-01-01

    Surgical site infections are a potentially preventable patient harm. Emerging evidence suggests that the implementation of evidence-based process measures for infection reduction is highly variable. The purpose of this work was to develop an auditing tool to assess compliance with infection-related process measures and establish a system for identifying and addressing defects in measure implementation. This was a retrospective cohort study using electronic medical records. We used the auditing tool to assess compliance with 10 process measures in a sample of colorectal surgery patients with and without postoperative infections at an academic medical center (January 2012 to March 2013). We investigated 59 patients with surgical site infections and 49 patients without surgical site infections. First, overall compliance rates for the 10 process measures were compared between patients with infection vs patients without infection to assess if compliance was lower among patients with surgical site infections. Then, because of the burden of data collection, the tool was used exclusively to evaluate quarterly compliance rates among patients with infection. The results were reviewed, and the key factors contributing to noncompliance were identified and addressed. Ninety percent of process measures had lower compliance rates among patients with infection. Detailed review of infection cases identified many defects that improved following the implementation of system-level changes: correct cefotetan redosing (education of anesthesia personnel), temperature at surgical incision >36.0°C (flags used to identify patients for preoperative warming), and the use of preoperative mechanical bowel preparation with oral antibiotics (laxative solutions and antibiotics distributed in clinic before surgery). Quarterly compliance improved for 80% of process measures by the end of the study period. This study was conducted on a small surgical cohort within a select subspecialty. The

  8. Omental Herniation: A Rare Complication of Vacuum-Assisted Closure of Infected Sternotomy Wound

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    Philemon Gukop

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC has recently been adopted as an acceptable modality for management of sternotomy wound infections. Although generally efficacious, the use of negative pressure devices has been associated with complications such as bleeding, retention of sponge, and empyema. We report the first case of greater omental hernia as a rare complication of vacuum-assisted closure of sternal wound infection following coronary artery bypass grafting.

  9. Local antimicrobial administration for prophylaxis of surgical site infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huiras, Paul; Logan, Jill K; Papadopoulos, Stella; Whitney, Dana

    2012-11-01

    Despite a lack of consensus guidelines, local antibiotic administration for prophylaxis of surgical site infections is used during many surgical procedures. The rationale behind this practice is to provide high antibiotic concentrations at the site of surgery while minimizing systemic exposure and adverse effects. Local antibiotic administration for surgical site prophylaxis has inherent limitations in that antibiotics are applied after the incision is made, rather than the current standard for surgical site prophylaxis that recommends providing adequate antibiotic concentrations at the site before the incision. The efficacy and safety of local application of antibiotics for surgical site prophylaxis have been assessed in different types of surgery with a variety of antibiotic agents and methods of application. We identified 22 prospective, randomized, controlled trials that evaluated local application of antibiotics for surgical site prophylaxis. These trials were subsequently divided and analyzed based on the type of surgical procedure: dermatologic, orthopedic, abdominal, colorectal, and cardiothoracic. Methods of local application analyzed included irrigations, powders, ointments, pastes, beads, sponges, and fleeces. Overall, there is a significant lack of level I evidence supporting this practice for any of the surgical genres evaluated. In addition, the literature spans several decades, and changes in surgical procedures, systemic antibiotic prophylaxis, and microbial flora make conclusions difficult to determine. Based on available data, the efficacy of local antibiotic administration for the prophylaxis of surgical site infections remains uncertain, and recommendations supporting this practice for surgical site prophylaxis cannot be made. © 2012 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  10. Antibiotic Susceptibility Pattern of Aerobic and Anaerobic Bacteria Isolated From Surgical Site Infection of Hospitalized Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhi, Mohammad Taghi; Ghotaslou, Reza; Beheshtirouy, Samad; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad; Pirzadeh, Tahereh; Asghari, Babak; Alizadeh, Naser; Toloue Ostadgavahi, Ali; Sorayaei Somesaraei, Vida; Memar, Mohammad Yousef

    2015-07-01

    Surgical Site Infections (SSIs) are infections of incision or deep tissue at operation sites. These infections prolong hospitalization, delay wound healing, and increase the overall cost and morbidity. This study aimed to investigate anaerobic and aerobic bacteria prevalence in surgical site infections and determinate antibiotic susceptibility pattern in these isolates. One hundred SSIs specimens were obtained by needle aspiration from purulent material in depth of infected site. These specimens were cultured and incubated in both aerobic and anaerobic condition. For detection of antibiotic susceptibility pattern in aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, we used disk diffusion, agar dilution, and E-test methods. A total of 194 bacterial strains were isolated from 100 samples of surgical sites. Predominant aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria isolated from these specimens were the members of Enterobacteriaceae family (66, 34.03%) followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (26, 13.4%), Staphylococcus aureus (24, 12.37%), Acinetobacter spp. (18, 9.28%), Enterococcus spp. (16, 8.24%), coagulase negative Staphylococcus spp. (14, 7.22%) and nonhemolytic streptococci (2, 1.03%). Bacteroides fragilis (26, 13.4%), and Clostridium perfringens (2, 1.03%) were isolated as anaerobic bacteria. The most resistant bacteria among anaerobic isolates were B. fragilis. All Gram-positive isolates were susceptible to vancomycin and linezolid while most of Enterobacteriaceae showed sensitivity to imipenem. Most SSIs specimens were polymicrobial and predominant anaerobic isolate was B. fragilis. Isolated aerobic and anaerobic strains showed high level of resistance to antibiotics.

  11. Vancomycin Powder Regimen for Prevention of Surgical Site Infection in Complex Spine Surgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hal, Michael; Lee, Joon; Laudermilch, Dann; Nwasike, Chinedu; Kang, James

    2017-10-01

    In total, 496 patients of a single surgeon cohort examining the surgical-site infection (SSI) rates with the addition of vancomycin powder in both diabetic and revision spine surgery cases. A historical control group of 652 patients were compared from the same surgeon over an earlier time period before the inception of using vancomycin powder prophylaxis. The objective of this study was to describe and compare the rates of infection in high-risk patient populations while using vancomycin powder. Vancomycin powder may not decrease an already low rate of infection. Therefore, use of vancomycin powder in high-risk patients with a higher rate of infection would potentially show benefit of vancomycin powder. In total, 496 patient charts were collected from a database of cases. Patients were included in the cohort if they had revision spinal operation or if they were diabetic. Patients in the time period July 2010 to August 2013 were included in the vancomycin protocol where 1 g of vancomycin powder was added to the wound before wound closure. Cases were considered positive if there was a positive culture or if there was sufficient clinical suspicion to treat. As a control to this cohort, 692 charts were reviewed from a earlier time period of the same surgeon and institution. In total, 28 patients of 496 (5.6%) patients in the cohort returned to the operating room for seroma, hematoma, draining wound, or infection. Sixteen of these patients (16/496, 3.2%) had a culture positive infection or were treated as an infection. This rate was significantly lower than the historical rate before the protocol. Although vancomycin does seem to be useful in decreasing SSIs, it is not a panacea. SSIs in high-risk patients were not completely eliminated by the vancomycin protocol.

  12. Interactions of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus USA300 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in polymicrobial wound infection.

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    Irena Pastar

    Full Text Available Understanding the pathology resulting from Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa polymicrobial wound infections is of great importance due to their ubiquitous nature, increasing prevalence, growing resistance to antimicrobial agents, and ability to delay healing. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus USA300 is the leading cause of community-associated bacterial infections resulting in increased morbidity and mortality. We utilized a well-established porcine partial thickness wound healing model to study the synergistic effects of USA300 and P. aeruginosa on wound healing. Wound re-epithelialization was significantly delayed by mixed-species biofilms through suppression of keratinocyte growth factor 1. Pseudomonas showed an inhibitory effect on USA300 growth in vitro while both species co-existed in cutaneous wounds in vivo. Polymicrobial wound infection in the presence of P. aeruginosa resulted in induced expression of USA300 virulence factors Panton-Valentine leukocidin and α-hemolysin. These results provide evidence for the interaction of bacterial species within mixed-species biofilms in vivo and for the first time, the contribution of virulence factors to the severity of polymicrobial wound infections.

  13. Morbidity associated with 30-day surgical site infection following nonshunt pediatric neurosurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrod, Brandon A.; Rocque, Brandon G.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Morbidity associated with surgical site infection (SSI) following nonshunt pediatric neurosurgical procedures is poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to analyze acute morbidity and mortality associated with SSI after nonshunt pediatric neurosurgery using a nationwide cohort. Methods The authors reviewed data from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Pediatric (NSQIP-P) 2012–2014 database, including all neurosurgical procedures performed on pediatric patients. Procedures were categorized by Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes. CSF shunts were excluded. Deep and superficial SSIs occurring within 30 days of an index procedure were identified. Deep SSIs included deep wound infections, intracranial abscesses, meningitis, osteomyelitis, and ventriculitis. The following outcomes occurring within 30 days of an index procedure were analyzed, along with postoperative time to complication development: sepsis, wound disruption, length of postoperative stay, readmission, reoperation, and death. Results A total of 251 procedures associated with a 30-day SSI were identified (2.7% of 9296 procedures). Superficial SSIs were more common than deep SSIs (57.4% versus 42.6%). Deep SSIs occurred more frequently after epilepsy or intracranial tumor procedures. Superficial SSIs occurred more frequently after skin lesion, spine, Chiari decompression, craniofacial, and myelomeningocele closure procedures. The mean (± SD) postoperative length of stay for patients with any SSI was 9.6 ± 14.8 days (median 4 days). Post-SSI outcomes significantly associated with previous SSI included wound disruption (12.4%), sepsis (15.5%), readmission (36.7%), and reoperation (43.4%) (p neurosurgery. Rates of SSI-associated complications are significantly lower in patients with superficial infection than in those with deep infection. There were no cases of SSI-related mortality within 30 days of the index procedure. PMID:28186474

  14. Frequently Asked Questions about Surgical Site Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... follow CDC infection prevention guidelines including: Clean their hands and arms up to their elbows with an antiseptic agent ... Resistance Antibiotic Prescribing and Use Blood Safety Dialysis Safety Hand Hygiene HICPAC Injection Safety Infection Control Medication Safety ...

  15. Comparison of homecare costs of local wound care in surgical patients randomized between occlusive and gauze dressings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ubbink, Dirk Th; Vermeulen, Hester; van Hattem, Jarne

    2008-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To study the material and nursing costs and outcome of wound care at home comparing two dressing groups (occlusive vs. gauze-based) in surgical patients after hospital dismissal. BACKGROUND: The large variety in dressing materials and lack of convincing evidence make the choice

  16. Evaluation of Histopathological and Histomorphological Effects of Kombucha Extract (Camellia sinenesis on Stomach Surgical Wound Healing in Adult Male Rat

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    Fariborz Moayer

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Wounds healing especially as to surgical wounds is considered clinical problem. Kombucha is used as a food and adminstarted for wound healing. The aim of this study was to assess histopathological and histomorphometrical effect of Kombucha on surgical wound healing process in stomach of rat. Methods: Thirty adult male Wistar rats with 10-week-old and weighted between 200-250 g were randomly divided into two groups (Control and Experimenral. After anesthesia, rats’ stomach was removed and a gastrotomy incision with the length of 1 cm was made in greater curvature, thereafter, sutured in 2 layers. Experimental group received Kombucha extract (1 ml/100gbw and control group received normal saline (1 ml/100gbw daily for 14 days through the gavage. In 3, 7 and 14 days after operation, five rats of each group were euthanized and stomach tissue specimens were collected for histopatholocical study by H&E and Masson's trichrome staining. Histopathological and histomorphometrical studies of wound healing among the groups were carried out considering more effective agents on wound healing including proliferation of fibroblasts, angiogenesis, re-epithelialization and collagen organization in healing tissue. Results: The numbers of fibroblasts, capillary buds and organized collagen content in healing site of experimental group were significantly more than control group (p<0.05. The size of epithelial gap in experimental group was significantly lesser than control group (p<0.05. Conclusion: Based on the results, Kombucha extract possesses beneficial effects on healing of stomach surgical wounds in rats.

  17. The Wound Healing and Antibacterial Activity of Five Ethnomedical Calophyllum inophyllum Oils: An Alternative Therapeutic Strategy to Treat Infected Wounds.

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    Teddy Léguillier

    Full Text Available Calophyllum inophyllum L. (Calophyllaceae is an evergreen tree ethno-medically used along the seashores and islands of the Indian and Pacific Oceans, especially in Polynesia. Oil extracted from the seeds is traditionally used topically to treat a wide range of skin injuries from burn, scar and infected wounds to skin diseases such as dermatosis, urticaria and eczema. However, very few scientific studies reported and quantified the therapeutic properties of Calophyllum inophyllum oil (CIO. In this work, five CIO from Indonesia (CIO1, Tahiti (CIO2, 3, Fiji islands (CIO4 and New Caledonia (CIO5 were studied and their cytotoxic, wound healing, and antibacterial properties were presented in order to provide a scientific support to their traditional use and verify their safety.The safety of the five CIO was ascertained using the Alamar blue assay on human keratinocyte cells. CIO wound healing properties were determined using the scratch test assay on human keratinocyte cells. CIO-stimulated antibacterial innate immune response was evaluated using ELISA by measuring β defensin-2 release in human derivative macrophage cells. CIO antibacterial activity was tested using oilogramme against twenty aerobic Gram- bacteria species, twenty aerobic Gram+ bacteria species, including a multi-drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain and two anaerobic Gram+ bacteria species e.g. Propionibacterium acnes and Propionibacterium granulosum. To detect polarity profile of the components responsible of the antibacterial activity, we performed bioautography against a Staphylococcus aureus strain.Based on Alamar Blue assay, we showed that CIO can be safely used on keratinocyte cells between 2.7% and 11.2% depending on CIO origin. Concerning the healing activity, all the CIO tested accelerated in vitro wound closure, the healing factor being 1.3 to 2.1 higher compared to control when keratinocytes were incubated after scratch with CIO at 0.1%. Furthermore, our results

  18. Effect of bag extraction to prevent wound infection on umbilical port site wound on elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy: a prospective randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comajuncosas, Jordi; Hermoso, Judit; Jimeno, Jaime; Gris, Pere; Orbeal, Rolando; Cruz, Antonio; Parés, David

    2017-01-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is the gold standard treatment for gallbladder stones. Complications due to laparoscopic procedure are rare, but rate of wound infection in some studies is about 8 %. From January 2007 to December 2008, 320 laparoscopic cholecystectomies were performed at our hospital, and in 4.7 % of them, wound infection of the umbilical trocar was identified. We believe that this infection rate could be lower and that it is necessary to implement a new technique to reduce the wound infection. The aim of the study was to evaluate the benefits of bag extraction of gallbladder to prevent the wound infection. Two-arm, parallel, 1:1, randomised controlled trial (ISRCTN38095251). All patients suffering from symptomatic gallbladder stones of low risk were enrolled for this study and were divided into two groups in basics gallbladder extraction: with (80 patients) or, as usually, without bag (76 patients). All patients with cholecystitis or accidental gallbladder perforation were excluded. We compared all the results to establish whether meaningful differences were found. The final sample analysed (156 patients) consisted of 121 women and 35 men; there were 80 in the control group and 76 in the study group. There were 15 (9.6 %) diagnosed wound infections, eight cases in the study group and seven in the control group. There were no statistically significant differences. The determinant of wound infection in elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy is not the direct contact of the gallbladder with the wound; therefore, bag extraction is not necessary.

  19. Incidence of surgical-site infections and the validity of the National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System risk index in a general surgical ward in Santa Cruz, Bolivia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleto, Lorena; Pirard, Marianne; Boelaert, Marleen; Peredo, Remberto; Vargas, Reinerio; Gianella, Alberto; Van der Stuyft, Patrick

    2003-01-01

    To estimate the frequency of and risk factors for surgical-site infections (SSIs) in Bolivia, and to study the performance of the National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance (NNIS) System risk index in a developing country. A prospective study with patient follow-up until the 30th postoperative day. A general surgical ward of a public hospital in Santa Cruz, Bolivia. Patients admitted to the ward between July 1998 and June 1999 on whom surgical procedures were performed. Follow-up was complete for 91.5% of 376 surgical procedures. The overall SSI rate was 12%. Thirty-four (75.6%) of the 45 SSIs were culture positive. A logistic regression model retained an American Society of Anesthesiologists score of more than 1 (odds ratio [OR], 1.87), a not-clean wound class (OR, 2.28), a procedure duration of more than 1 hour (OR, 1.81), and drain (OR, 1.98) as independent risk factors for SSI. There was no significant association between the NNIS System risk index and SSI rates. However, a "local" risk index constructed with the above cutoff points showed a linear trend with SSI (P < .001) and a relative risk of 3.18 for risk class 3 versus a class of less than 3. SSIs cause considerable morbidity in Santa Cruz. Appropriate nosocomial infection surveillance and control should be introduced. The NNIS System risk index did not discriminate between patients at low and high risk for SSI in this hospital setting, but a risk score based on local cutoff points performed substantially better.

  20. Clinical outcome and microvascular blood flow in VAC® - and Sorbalgon® -treated peri-vascular infected wounds in the groin after vascular surgery - an early interim analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Stefan; Monsen, Christina; Dencker, Magnus

    2013-08-01

    Vacuum-assisted wound closure (VAC(®)) therapy is considered to be superior to conventional dressings in the treatment of peri-vascular groin infections after vascular surgery at our department. Therefore, we performed an early interim analysis of the clinical outcomes in these seriously ill patients at risk of amputation and death. Patients were randomised to either VAC(®) (n = 5) or Sorbalgon(®) (n = 5; best alternative treatment) therapy after surgical debridement. Non-invasive, laser Doppler perfusion imaging (LDPI) studies of the skin adjacent to the undressed wound were performed after 14 days of wound treatment. There was no difference in LDPI values in VAC(®) versus Sorbalgon(®) treated patients (P = 0·46). One patient in the VAC(®) group suffered from two re-bleeding episodes, leading to vascular resection and transfemoral amputation and in the Sorbalgon(®) group two had a complete wound healing time of more than 4 months and one had a visible interposition bypass graft in the groin after 1 month of treatment. No patient died of the groin infection. Although not statistically proven, fewer wound treatment failures were recorded in the VAC(®) group, justifying this early interim analysis. LDPI studies were feasible. © 2012 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Medicalhelplines.com Inc.

  1. The vacuum-assisted closure (V.A.C®) system for surgical site infection with involved vascular grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saziye, Karaca; Afksendiyos, Kalangos

    2015-04-01

    In vascular surgery, surgical site infection is the most common postoperative morbidity, occurring in 5-10% of vascular patients. The optimal management of surgical site infection with involved lower limb vascular grafts remains controversial. We present our 6-year results of using the V.A.C.® system in surgical site infection with involved vascular grafts. A retrospective 6-year review of patient who underwent a VAC® therapy for postoperative surgical site infection in lower limb with involved vascular grafts in our department between January 2006 and December 2011. V.A.C therapy was used in 40 patients. All patients underwent surgical wound revision with VAC® therapy and antibiotics. The mean time of use of the V.A.C. system was 14.2 days. After mean of 12 days in 34 of 40 patients, in whom the use of VAC® therapy resulted in delayed primary closure or healing by secondary intention. The mean postoperative follow-up time was 61.67 months, during which 3 patients died. We showed that the V.A.C.® system is valuable for managing specifically surgical site infection with involved vascular grafts. Using the V.A.C.® system, reoperation rates are reduced; 85% of patients avoided graft replacement. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  2. Evaluation of antibiotic susceptibility in wound infections: A pilot study from Bangladesh [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    OpenAIRE

    Sushmita Roy; Mejbah Uddin Ahmed; Bhuiyan Mohammad Mahtab Uddin; Zubair Ahmed Ratan; Monali Rajawat; Varshil Mehta; Sojib Bin Zaman

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Infections due to antibiotic resistant bacteria have increased alarmingly in both developed and developing countries. Unrestrained and rapidly spreading bacterial growth has turned the management of wound infections into a serious challenge. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of different bacterial pathogens and their antibiotic susceptibility in various types of wound infections. Methods:  A cross-sectional study was conducted to collect 105 wound swabs. All isolated ...

  3. Human skin equivalents to study the prevention and treatment of wound infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haisma, I.

    2018-01-01

    Infection of burn wounds remains the leading cause of death in burn patients. Topical treatment of such infections with conventional antibiotics is often unsuccessful due to the presence of drug-resistant bacteria and/or to the formation of bacterial biofilms. Taken together there is a clear

  4. Comparison between primary closure with karydakis's technique versus open procedure in treatment of pilonidal sinus in terms of frequency of postoperative wound infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nafees, A.U.A.; Ahmed, M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to compare between primary closure with Karydakis's technique versus open procedure in treatment of pilonidal sinus in terms of frequency of postoperative wound infection. Study Design: Randomized Clinical Trials (RCT). Place and Duration of Study: This study was carried out at Department of Surgery, CMH, Kharian over a period of 2 years from Sept 2010 to Oct 2012. Patients and Methods: Sixty patients were selected out of which 30 patients underwent open excision and secondary healing and 30 patients underwent Karydakis procedure. Post operatively these patients were observed for wound infection on date of discharge and weeks 1, 2 and 3. Results of both groups were compared for wound infection by applying chi-square test. Results: There was no statistically significant difference in the frequency of infection between the two groups when calculated during the complete course of study. Conclusion: Primary closure with Karydakis's technique and open procedure are satisfactory surgical procedures for pilonidal sinus disease in terms of post-operative wound infection. (author)

  5. Major bleeding during negative pressure wound/V.A.C.®--therapy for postsurgical deep sternal wound infection--a critical appraisal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wingerden, Jan J.; Segers, Patrique; Jekel, Lilian

    2011-01-01

    Negative-pressure wound therapy, commercially known as vacuum-assisted closure (V.A.C.®) therapy, has become one of the most popular (and efficacious) interim (prior to flap reconstruction) or definite methods of managing deep sternal wound infection. Complications such as profuse bleeding, which

  6. Late presentation of a deep sternal wound infection and left breast abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, A; Carr, C; Alkhafagi, S; Mughal, N; Omer, M; Alkhulaifi, A

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, we present a case review of a 58-year-old female who presented to our emergency department with pyrexia, dyspnoea, dehydration and pain in her left breast six months following coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Although her sternotomy wound had healed well, examination revealed fluctuance of the whole precordium and left breast. She underwent antibiotic treatment and subsequent surgical debridement, followed by the application of vacuum-assisted dressings. Surgical reconstruction was deemed unsuitable and therefore the patient continued to be managed with vacuum dressings followed by routine dressings to allow the wound to heal by secondary intention. The patient was discharged three months after initial presentation in a good condition. The wound had completely healed four months later.

  7. Effects of irrigation with different solution on Incidence of Wound Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Zamani

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Management of acute and chronic wounds has significantly altered in the last decade but little attention has been paid to the solution used for cleansing the wounds. Therefore, the present study aimed to compare the effects of tap water, distilled water, and normal saline for wound cleansing in emergency department. Methods: This is a double-blind randomized clinical trial with a 10-day follow up. Patients who had superficial wounds were randomly divided into 3 treatment groups: normal saline, distilled water, and tap water. The wounds were cleansed using a 20 - 60 milliliter syringe with an 18 gauge needle. All the patients were discharged with the same antibiotic and were followed 48 hours and 10-day to determine the presence or absence of infection symptoms. The evaluated outcomes were infection incidence in the first 48 hours and 10 days after being discharged. Results: 1200 patients were included in the present study (57% male, average age 25.5 ± 11.0 years. 43 (3.5% patients showed infection symptoms in the first 48 hours. Ten (2.5% patients were in normal saline treated group, 15 (3.7% patients were in distilled water group, and 18 (4.4% patients were in tap water treated group (p=0.32. 13 (3.2% patients in normal saline group, 20 (4.9% patients in distilled water group and 23 (5.6% in the tap water group did not take their antibiotics. Prevalence of infection were higher in patients who did not take antibiotics (p < 0.001. The 10-day follow-up revealed that all the patients were recovered and showed no infection symptoms. Conclusion: The results of the present study showed that the prevalence of infection in using the 3 agents (normal saline, distilled water and tap water for cleansing wounds was similar. Therefore, drinking water could be considered as an alternative for cleansing wounds.

  8. [Risk factors related to surgical site infection in elective surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeles-Garay, Ulises; Morales-Márquez, Lucy Isabel; Sandoval-Balanzarios, Miguel Antonio; Velázquez-García, José Arturo; Maldonado-Torres, Lulia; Méndez-Cano, Andrea Fernanda

    2014-01-01

    The risk factors for surgical site infections in surgery should be measured and monitored from admission to 30 days after the surgical procedure, because 30% of Surgical Site Infection is detected when the patient was discharged. Calculate the Relative Risk of associated factors to surgical site infections in adult with elective surgery. Patients were classified according to the surgery contamination degree; patient with surgery clean was defined as no exposed and patient with clean-contaminated or contaminated surgery was defined exposed. Risk factors for infection were classified as: inherent to the patient, pre-operative, intra-operative and post-operative. Statistical analysis; we realized Student t or Mann-Whitney U, chi square for Relative Risk (RR) and multivariate analysis by Cox proportional hazards. Were monitored up to 30 days after surgery 403 patients (59.8% women), 35 (8.7%) developed surgical site infections. The factors associated in multivariate analysis were: smoking, RR of 3.21, underweight 3.4 hand washing unsuitable techniques 4.61, transfusion during the procedure 3.22, contaminated surgery 60, and intensive care stay 8 to 14 days 11.64, permanence of 1 to 3 days 2.4 and use of catheter 1 to 3 days 2.27. To avoid all risk factors is almost impossible; therefore close monitoring of elective surgery patients can prevent infectious complications.

  9. Treatment of inherently unstable open or infected fractures by open wound management and external skeletal fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness, M G

    2006-02-01

    To assess the use of external skeletal fixation with open wound management for the treatment of inherently unstable open or infected fractures in dogs. A retrospective review of 10 cases. Fracture stabilisation and wound management required only a single anaesthetic, and despite the challenging nature of these injuries, the final outcome was acceptable or good in every case. However, minor complications associated with the fixator pins were quite common, and two dogs developed complications which required additional surgery. Open management of wounds, even when bone was exposed, proved to be an effective technique, and external skeletal fixators were usually effective at maintaining stability throughout an inevitably extended fracture healing period.

  10. Surgical Site Infections Following Spine Surgery: Eliminating the Controversies in the Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jad eChahoud

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Surgical site infection (SSI following spine surgery is a dreaded complication with significant morbidity and economic burden. SSIs following spine surgery can be superficial, characterized by obvious wound drainage, or deep-seated with a healed wound. Staphylococcus aureus remains the principal causal agent. There are certain pre-operative risk factors that increase the risk of SSI, mainly diabetes, smoking, steroids, and peri-operative transfusions. Additionally, intra-operative risk factors include surgical invasiveness, type of fusion, implant use, and traditional instead of minimally invasive approach. A high level of suspicion is crucial to attaining an early definitive diagnosis and initiating appropriate management. The most common presenting symptom is back pain, usually manifesting 2 to 4 weeks and up to 3 months after a spinal procedure. Scheduling a follow-up visit between weeks 2 to 4 after surgery is therefore necessary for early detection. Inflammatory markers are important diagnostic tools, and comparing pre-operative with post-operative levels should be done when suspecting SSIs following spine surgery. Particularly, Serum Amyloid A (SAA is a novel inflammatory marker that can expedite the diagnosis of SSIs. Magnetic resonance imaging remains the diagnostic modality of choice when suspecting a SSI following spine surgery. While 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography is not widely used, it may be useful in challenging cases. Despite their low yield, blood cultures should be collected before initiating antibiotic therapy. Samples from wound drainage should be sent for Gram stain and cultures. When there is a high clinical suspicion of SSI and in the absence of superficial wound drainage, CT guided aspiration of paraspinal collections is warranted. Unless the patient is hemodynamically compromised, antibiotics should be deferred until proper specimens for culture are secured.

  11. Surveillance, Auditing, and Feedback Can Reduce Surgical Site Infection Dramatically: Toward Zero Surgical Site Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manivannan, Bhavani; Gowda, Deepak; Bulagonda, Pradeep; Rao, Abhishek; Raman, Sai Suguna; Natarajan, Shanmuga Vadivoo

    2018-04-01

    We evaluated the Surveillance of Surgical Site Infection (SSI), Auditing, and Feedback (SAF) effect on the rate of compliance with an SSI care bundle and measured its effectiveness in reducing the SSI rate. A prospective cohort study from January 2014 to December 2016 was classified into three phases: pre-SAF, early-SAF, and late-SAF. Pre-operative baseline characteristics of 24,677 patients who underwent orthopedic, cardiovascular thoracic surgery (CTVS) or urologic operations were recorded. Univariable analyses of the SSI rates in the pre-SAF and post-SAF phases were performed. Percentage compliance and non-compliance with each care component were calculated. Correlation between reduction in the SSI rate and increase in compliance with the pre-operative, peri-operative, and post-operative care-bundle components was performed using the Spearman test. There was a significant decrease in the SSI rate in orthopedic procedures that involved surgical implantation and in mitral valve/aortic valve (MVR/AVR) cardiac operations, with a relative risk (RR) ratio of 0.19 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.12-0.31) and 0.08 (95% CI 0.03-0.22), respectively. The SSI rate was inversely correlated with the rate of compliance with pre-operative (r = -0.738; p = 0.037), peri-operative (r = - 0.802; p = 0.017), and post-operative (r = -0.762; p = 0.028) care bundles. Implementation of the Surveillance of SSI, Auditing, and Feedback bundle had a profound beneficial effect on the SSI rate, thereby reducing healthcare costs and improving patient quality of life.

  12. Modelling the cost implications of using carboxymethylcellulose dressing compared with gauze in the management of surgical wounds healing by secondary intention in the US and UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guest, Julian F; Ruiz, Francis J

    2005-02-01

    To estimate the costs of using carboxymethyl cellulose dressing (CMCD; Aquacel* Hydrofiber) compared to gauze in managing surgical wounds healing by secondary intention in the US and UK. This was a modelling study performed from the perspective of payers (i.e. the hospital and community sector in the US and the National Health Service (NHS) in the UK). Clinical outcomes attributable to managing surgical wounds healing by secondary intention with gauze were obtained from the published literature in the English language. There were no published studies on wounds healing by secondary intention with CMCD. Hence, the analysis conservatively assumed that wound healing rates associated with gauze would be the same for CMCD. These data were combined with resource utilisation estimates derived from a panel of clinicians enabling us to perform decision modelling. The models were used to determine the expected direct healthcare costs eight weeks after the surgical wounds were dressed by CMCD or gauze and left to heal by secondary intention in the US and UK. All wounds are expected to heal within eight weeks, irrespective of dressing. Managing abscesses and other surgical wounds with CMCD instead of gauze in the US is expected to reduce costs by 4% in both wound types (i.e. $247 and $507 respectively) per patient over eight weeks. In the UK, managing abscesses and other surgical wounds with CMCD instead of gauze is expected to reduce costs by 30% (574 pounds) and 12% (581 pounds) respectively per patient over eight weeks. The lower cost of managing CMCD-treated patients is due to decreased nursing costs associated with a lower frequency of CMCD changes compared to gauze dressing changes. Dressing surgical wounds healing by secondary intention with CMCD instead of gauze is expected to lead to a reduction in healthcare costs in both the US and UK. Hence, the purchase price of a dressing is not indicative of the cost effectiveness of a given method of surgical wound care.

  13. [Plastic surgery of the thoracic wall as a method of thoracic wall reconstruction after complete surgical wound disintegration after sternotomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hájek, T; Jirásek, K; Urban, M; Straka, Z

    1998-12-01

    During the period between January 1996 and July 1998 in our department 1920 patients were operated on account of heart disease from median sternotomy. In 17 patients, i.e. in 0.9% during the early postoperative period the surgical wound disintegrated incl. dehiscence of the sternum and the development of postoperative mediastinitis. In 14 of these patients the authors reconstructed the defect of the thoracic wall by their own modification of Jurkiewicz plastic operation using the pectoral muscles. One patient from this group died, in the remaining 13 patients the wound healed without deformity of the chest and without signs of instability, without restriction of movement and function.

  14. Infected primary knee arthroplasty: Risk factors for surgical treatment failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joao Gabriel Duarte Paes Pradella

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To present epidemiological data and risk factors associated with surgical out-comes favorable or unfavorable for the treatment of infection in infected total knee arthroplasty. METHODS: We reviewed medical records of 48 patients who underwent treatment of primary total knee arthroplasty for infection between January 1994 and December 2008, in the Orthopedics and Traumatology Department of the Santa Casa de Misericórdia de São Paulo. The variables associated with favorable outcome of surgical treatment (debridement and retention or exchange arthroplasty in two days or unfavorable (arthrodesis or death infection. RESULTS: A total of 39 cases of infection after primary total knee arthroplasty, 22 progressed to 17 for a favorable outcome and unfavorable outcome. Early infections (OR: 14.0, 95% CI 1.5-133.2, p = 0.016 and diabetes (OR: 11.3, 95% CI 1.4-89.3, p = 0.032 were associated with arthrodesis joint and death respectively. CONCLUSION: Patients with early infection had a higher risk of developing surgical procedure with unfavorable outcome (arthrodesis and diabetics had higher odds of death after infection of primary knee arthroplasties.

  15. Post-operative Salmonella surgical site infection in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Marc; Boozer, Lindsay; Glass, Eric N; Sanchez, Susan; Platt, Simon R; Freeman, Lisa M

    2017-09-01

    Following decompressive surgery for degenerative lumbosacral stenosis, a 6-year-old German shepherd dog developed a subcutaneous infection at the surgical site and discospondylitis at the lumbosacral intervertebral disc. Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica, serotype Dublin was recovered from the surgical site. Salmonella of a different serovar was isolated from a sample of the raw meat-based diet that the owner fed the dog.

  16. Post-operative Wound Site Infection Caused by Nocardia species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunayana M. Jangla

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A61 year old diabetic female who was a known case of breast carcinoma and had undergone mastectomy was admitted with discharge from the post-operative wound site. Nocardia species was isolated from the discharge. She responded to treatment with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole.

  17. Isolates from wound infections at federal medical centre, bida ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of 589 wound swabs from 334 patients in Federal Medical Centre, Bida were studied. Samples were collected between Jan 2002 to Dec. 2003. Swabs were plated within one hour after collection unto blood, chocolate and Mac Conkey after plate, and incubated aerobically for 24hrs. The chocolate plated swabs were ...

  18. Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy in the management of wound infection following renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, B M; Nathan, V C; Delbridge, M C; Parker, K; Throssell, D; McKane, W S; Karim, M S; Raftery, A T

    2007-01-01

    Wound infection in the setting of immunosuppressed state such as renal transplantation (RT) causes significant morbidity from sepsis, prolongs hospital stay and is expensive. Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy is a new technique of management of wound based on the principle of application of controlled negative pressure. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of VAC therapy in the management of wound infection following RT. This is a prospective study of a cohort of 180 consecutive RTs performed over a period of 4 years, where the data were retrieved from a prospectively maintained computerised database and case-notes. 9 of 180 (5%) patients developed wound infection following RT which led to cavitations and dehiscence with copious discharge, and refused to heal with conventional treatment. All 9 cases were treated with VAC therapy. The VAC system was removed after a median of 9 (range 3-30) days when discharge from the wound ceased. Four patients were discharged home with portable VAC device and managed on an outpatient basis, where the system was removed after a median 5.5 (range 3-7) days. The median hospital stay after initiation of VAC therapy was significantly shorter (5, range 2-12 days) than on conventional treatment prior to VAC therapy (11, range, 5-20 days) (p=0.003). Complete healing was achieved in all cases. The use of VAC therapy is an effective and safe adjunct to conventional and established treatment modalities for the management of wound infection and dehiscence following RT. Key words: Renal transplantation, wound infection, vacuum-assisted closure therapy.

  19. Timing of surgical site infection and pulmonary complications after laparotomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gundel, Ossian; Gundersen, Sofie Kirchhoff; Dahl, Rikke Maria

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Surgical site infection (SSI) and other postoperative complications are associated with high costs, morbidity, secondary surgery, and mortality. Many studies have identified factors that may prevent SSI and pulmonary complications, but it is important to know when they in fact occur....... The aim of this study was to investigate the diagnostic timing of surgical site infections and pulmonary complications after laparotomy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This is a secondary analysis of the PROXI trial which was a randomized clinical trial conducted in 1400 patients undergoing elective or emergent...... laparotomy. Patients were randomly allocated to either 80% or 30% perioperative inspiratory oxygen fraction. RESULTS: SSI or pulmonary complications were diagnosed in 24.2% (95% CI: 22.0%-26.5%) of the patients at a median of 9 days [IQR: 5-15] after surgery. Most common was surgical site infection (19...

  20. Surveillance and epidemiology of surgical site infections after cardiothoracic surgery in The Netherlands, 2002-2007

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manniën, Judith; Wille, Jan C.; Kloek, Jaap J.; van Benthem, Birgit H. B.

    2011-01-01

    Surgical site infections after cardiothoracic surgery substantially increase the risk for illness, mortality, and costs. Surveillance of surgical site infections might assist in the prevention of these infections. This study describes the Dutch surveillance methods and results of data collected

  1. A case of deep infection after instrumentation in dorsal spinal surgery: the management with antibiotics and negative wound pressure without removal of fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobran, Mauro; Mancini, Fabrizio; Nasi, Davide; Scerrati, Massimo

    2017-07-28

    Until today the role of spinal instrumentation in the presence of a wound infection has been widely discussed and recently many authors leave the hardware in place with appropriate antibiotic therapy. This is a case of a 65-year-old woman suffering from degenerative scoliosis and osteoporotic multiple vertebral collapses treated with posterior dorsolumbar stabilisation with screws and rods. Four months later, skin necrosis and infection appeared in the cranial wound with exposure of the rods. A surgical procedure of debridement of the infected tissue and package with a myocutaneous trapezius muscle flap was performed. One week after surgery, negative pressure wound therapy was started on the residual skin defect. The wound healed after 2 months. The aim of this case report is to focus on the utility of this method even in the case of hardware exposure and infection. This may help avoid removing instrumentation and creating instability. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  2. AQUACEL® Ag Surgical Dressing Reduces Surgical Site Infection and Improves Patient Satisfaction in Minimally Invasive Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Prospective, Randomized, Controlled Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Chih Kuo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of modern surgical dressings to prevent wound complications and surgical site infection (SSI after minimally invasive total knee arthroplasty (MIS-TKA is lacking. In a prospective, randomized, controlled study, 240 patients were randomized to receive either AQUACEL Ag Surgical dressing (study group or a standard dressing (control group after MIS-TKA. The primary outcome was wound complication (SSI and blister. The secondary outcomes were wear time and number of dressing changes in the hospital and patient satisfaction (pain, comfort, and ease of use. In the intention-to-treat analysis, there was a significant reduction in the incidence of superficial SSI (0.8%, 95% CI∶ 0.00–2.48 in the study group compared to 8.3% (95% CI∶ 3.32–13.3 in the control group (p=0.01. There were no differences in blister and deep/organ-space SSIs between the two groups. Multivariate analysis revealed that AQUACEL Ag Surgical dressing was an independent risk factor for reduction of SSI (odds ratio: 0.07, 95% CI: 0.01–0.58, p=0.01. The study group had longer wear time (5.2±0.7 versus 1.7±0.4 days, p<0.0001 and lower number of dressing changes (1.0±0.2 versus 3.6±1.3 times, p<0.0001. Increased patient satisfaction (p<0.0001 was also noted in the study group. AQUACEL Ag Surgical dressing is an ideal dressing to provide wound care efficacy, patient satisfaction, reduction of SSI, and cost-effectiveness following MIS-TKA.

  3. Wound Disruption Following Colorectal Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadamyeghaneh, Zhobin; Hanna, Mark H; Carmichael, Joseph C; Mills, Steven; Pigazzi, Alessio; Nguyen, Ninh T; Stamos, Michael J

    2015-12-01

    Postoperative wound disruption is associated with high morbidity and mortality. We sought to identify the risk factors and outcomes of wound disruption following colorectal resection. The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) database was used to examine the clinical data of patients who underwent colorectal resection from 2005 to 2013. Multivariate regression analysis was performed to identify risk factors of wound disruption. We sampled a total of 164,297 patients who underwent colorectal resection. Of these, 2073 (1.3 %) had wound disruption. Patients with wound disruption had significantly higher mortality (5.1 vs. 1.9 %, AOR: 1.46, P = 0.01). The highest risk of wound disruption was seen in patients with wound infection (4.8 vs. 0.9 %, AOR: 4.11, P disruption such as chronic steroid use (AOR: 1.71, P disruption compared to open surgery (AOR: 0.61, P disruption occurs in 1.3 % of colorectal resections, and it correlates with mortality of patients. Wound infection is the strongest predictor of wound disruption. Chronic steroid use, obesity, severe COPD, prolonged operation, non-elective admission, and serum albumin level are strongly associated with wound disruption. Utilization of the laparoscopic approach may decrease the risk of wound disruption when possible.

  4. Pseudomonas aeruginosa burn wound infection in a dedicated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection is a major cause of morbidity in burns patients. There is a paucity of publications dealing with this infection in the paediatric population. We describe the incidence, microbiology and impact of P. aeruginosa infection in a dedicated paediatric burns unit. Methods.

  5. Surgical Skills Beyond Scientific Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitfield, Nicholas

    2015-07-01

    During the Great War, the French surgeon Alexis Carrel, in collaboration with the English chemist Henry Dakin, devised an antiseptic treatment for infected wounds. This paper focuses on Carrel's attempt to standardise knowledge of infected wounds and their treatment, and looks closely at the vision of surgical skill he espoused and its difference from those associated with the doctrines of scientific management. Examining contemporary claims that the Carrel-Dakin method increased rather than diminished demands on surgical work, this paper further shows how debates about antiseptic wound treatment opened up a critical space for considering the nature of skill as a vital dynamic in surgical innovation and practice.

  6. Surgical site infections following instrumented stabilization of the spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dapunt U

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Ulrike Dapunt,1 Caroline Bürkle,1 Frank Günther,2 Wojciech Pepke,1 Stefan Hemmer,1 Michael Akbar1 1Clinic for Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery, Center for Orthopedics, Trauma Surgery and Spinal Cord Injury, Heidelberg University Hospital, 2Department for Infectious Diseases, Medical Microbiology and Hygiene, Heidelberg University, Heidelberg, Germany Background: Implant-associated infections are still a feared complication in the field of orthopedics. Bacteria attach to the implant surface and form so-called biofilm colonies that are often difficult to diagnose and treat. Since the majority of studies focus on prosthetic joint infections (PJIs of the hip and knee, current treatment options (eg, antibiotic prophylaxis of implant-associated infections have mostly been adapted according to these results. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate patients with surgical site infections following instrumented stabilization of the spine with regard to detected bacteria species and the course of the disease. Patients and methods: We performed a retrospective single-center analysis of implant-associated infections of the spine from 2010 to 2014. A total of 138 patients were included in the study. The following parameters were evaluated: C-reactive protein serum concentration, microbiological evaluation of tissue samples, the time course of the disease, indication for instrumented stabilization of the spine, localization of the infection, and the number of revision surgeries required until cessation of symptoms. Results: Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp. were most commonly detected (n=69, 50%, followed by fecal bacteria (n=46, 33.3%. In 23.2% of cases, no bacteria were detected despite clinical suspicion of an infection. Most patients suffered from degenerative spine disorders (44.9%, followed by spinal fractures (23.9%, non-degenerative scoliosis (20.3%, and spinal tumors (10.1%. Surgical site infections occurred predominantly within 3

  7. Risk control of surgical site infection after cardiothoracic surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Segers, P.; de Jong, A. P.; Kloek, J. J.; Spanjaard, L.; de Mol, B. A. J. M.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to investigate whether a risk control programme based on risk assessment, new treatment modalities and the presence of a surveillance programme reduces the incidence of surgical site infections (SSI). Between January 2001 and December 2003, 167 patients were

  8. Surgical-site Infection Following Cesarean Section in Kano, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence, risk factors and common bacterial pathogens for surgical site infection (SSI), following cesarean section (CS). Materials and Methods: A retrospective case-control study of patients delivered by CS in Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, Kano, Nigeria. The cases were the patients whose ...

  9. Teamwork and Collaboration for Prevention of Surgical Site Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellinger, E Patchen

    2016-04-01

    The surgeon has been regarded as the "captain of the ship" in the operating room (OR) for many years, but cannot accomplish successful operative intervention without the rest of the team. Review of the pertinent English-language literature. Many reports demonstrate very different impressions of teamwork and communication in the OR held by different members of the surgical team. Objective measures of teamwork and communication demonstrate a reduction in complications including surgical site infections with improved teamwork and communication, with fewer distractions such as noise, and with effective use of checklists. Efforts to improve teamwork and communication and promote the effective use of checklists promote patient safety and improved outcomes for patients with reduction in surgical site infections.

  10. A Targeted E-Learning Program for Surgical Trainees to Enhance Patient Safety in Preventing Surgical Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, Seamus Mark; Corrigan, Mark; Dimitrov, Borislav; Cowman, Seamus; Tierney, Sean; Humphreys, Hilary; Hill, Arnold

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Surgical site infection accounts for 20% of all health care-associated infections (HCAIs); however, a program incorporating the education of surgeons has yet to be established across the specialty. Methods: An audit of surgical practice in infection prevention was carried out in Beaumont Hospital from July to November 2009. An…

  11. Prospective cohort study on surgical wounds comparing a polyhexanide-containing biocellulose dressing with a dialkyl-carbamoyl-chloride-containing hydrophobic dressing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anna Marie; Andriessen, Anneke

    2012-01-01

    Postsurgery dressing changes in diabetic foot amputation wounds and surgical wounds healing by secondary intention are often conducted in the operating room under general anesthesia. A prospective comparative cohort study was performed in 60 patients (n = 60: n = 30/n = 30) with secondary...

  12. Fast Blue RR—Siloxane Derivatized Materials Indicate Wound Infection Due to a Deep Blue Color Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doris Schiffer

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available There is a strong need for simple and fast methods for wound infection determination. Myeloperoxidase, an immune system-derived enzyme was found to be a suitable biomarker for wound infection. Hence, alkoxysilane-derivatized Fast Blue RR was immobilized via simple hydrolytic polymerization. The resulting enzyme-responsive siloxane layers were incubated with myeloperoxidase, wound fluid or hemoglobin. The reaction was monitored via HPLC measurements and the color development quantified spectrophotometrically. Myeloperoxidase was indeed able to oxidize immobilized Fast Blue RR leading to a blue colored product. No conversion was detected in non-infected wound fluids. The visible color changes of these novel materials towards blue enable an easy distinction between infected and non-infected wound fluids.

  13. Wound infection prophylaxis in pediatric acute appendicitis: a 26-year prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ein, Sigmund H; Sandler, Anthony

    2006-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the best wound infection prophylaxis in pediatric acute appendicitis. From 1969 to 1995 inclusive, 453 consecutive pediatric patients at the same children's hospital had an appendix with acute inflammation (acute appendicitis) removed by the same staff surgeon and his resident. The stump was not inverted, and chromic catgut was used throughout. No intraperitoneal antibiotics, irrigation, or drains were used, and the skin closure was with silk sutures initially and then with staples since 1986. The infants and children were divided into 6 consecutive groups of 52 to 96 patients, with each group lasting 2 to 5 years. The wound treatment groups were as follows: no treatment, drain or pack, drain or pack plus antibiotic powder, antibiotic powder, preoperative intravenous antibiotic plus antibiotic powder, and preoperative intravenous antibiotic. The wound Penrose drain, one half-inch gauze pack, and/or antibiotic powder (ampicillin, 1977-1981; cefoxitin, 1982-1995) were all placed in the subcutaneous space. There were a total of 50 (11%) wound infections (pus) that occurred between 4 and 40 days when no antibiotic powder was used and 2 to 14 days with antibiotic powder. In all 6 groups of patients, no organism was grown in most (80%) infections and Escherichia coli was the second commonest (12%). The serous ooze, which occurred only with the use of antibiotic powder (8%), was seen between 6 and 18 days, and no organism was ever cultured. The patients with preoperative (or intraoperative) intravenous antibiotics (cefoxitin) plus wound antibiotic powder (cefoxitin) had the lowest infection rate (2.5%). When this group was compared with the baseline group 1 (no treatment), it was the only group in which wound treatment made a significant difference (P = .003).

  14. Surgical site infections due to rapidly growing mycobacteria in puducherry, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannaiyan, Kavitha; Ragunathan, Latha; Sakthivel, Sulochana; Sasidar, A R; Muralidaran; Venkatachalam, G K

    2015-03-01

    Rapidly growing Mycobacteria are increasingly recognized, nowadays as an important pathogen that can cause wide range of clinical syndromes in humans. We herein describe unrelated cases of surgical site infection caused by Rapidly growing Mycobacteria (RGM), seen during a period of 12 months. Nineteen patients underwent operations by different surgical teams located in diverse sections of Tamil Nadu, Pondicherry, Karnataka, India. All patients presented with painful, draining subcutaneous nodules at the infection sites. Purulent material specimens were sent to the microbiology laboratory. Gram stain and Ziehl-Neelsen staining methods were used for direct examination. Culture media included blood agar, chocolate agar, MacConkey agar, Sabourauds agar and Lowenstein-Jensen medium for Mycobacteria. Isolated microorganisms were identified and further tested for antimicrobial susceptibility by standard microbiologic procedures. Mycobacterium fortuitum and M.chelonae were isolated from the purulent drainage obtained from wounds by routine microbiological techniques from all the specimens. All isolates analyzed for antimicrobial susceptibility pattern were sensitive to clarithromycin, linezolid and amikacin but were variable to ciprofloxacin, rifampicin and tobramycin. Our case series highlights that a high level of clinical suspicion should be maintained for patients presenting with protracted soft tissue lesions with a history of trauma or surgery as these infections not only cause physical but also emotional distress that affects both the patients and the surgeon.

  15. Deep Sternal Wound Infection after Open-Heart Surgery: A 13-Year Single Institution Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhl, Alexander Andersen; Hody, Sofie; Videbaek, Tina Senholt; Damsgaard, Tine Engberg; Nielsen, Per Hostrup

    2017-04-20

    The present study aimed to compare the clinical outcome for patients with or without muscle flap reconstruction after deep sternal wound infection due to open-heart surgery. The study was a retrospective cohort study, including patients who developed deep sternal wound infection after open-heart surgery in the Western Denmark Region from 1999 to 2011. Journals of included patients were reviewed for clinical data regarding the treatment of their sternal defect. Patients were divided into two groups depending on whether they received a muscle-flap-based sternal reconstruction or traditional rewiring of the sternum. A total of 130 patients developed deep sternal wound infection in the study period. In all, 12 patients died before being discharged, leaving a total of 118 patients for analysis. Of these, 50 (42%) patients received muscle flap reconstruction. Muscle flap recipients had significantly longer total hospital stays (p <0.001). However, after receiving muscle flap reconstruction, patients were discharged after a median of 14 days, with 74% not needing additional surgery. It is difficult to predict which patients eventually require muscle flap reconstruction after deep sternal wound infection. Although patients receiving muscle flap reconstructions have longer hospital stays, they are quickly discharged after the reconstruction.

  16. Surgical site infection in lumbar surgeries, pre and postoperative antibiotics and length of stay: a case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, I.U.; Janjua, M.B.; Hasan, S.; Shah, S.

    2009-01-01

    Postoperative wound infection also called as surgical site infection (SSI), is a trouble some complication of lumbar spine surgeries and they can be associated with serious morbidities, mortalities and increase resource utilization. With the improvement in diagnostic modalities, proper surgical techniques, antibiotic therapy and postoperative care, infectious complications can result in various compromises afterwards. The objective was to study the relation of surgical site infection in clean lumbar surgeries with the doses of antibiotics. This Retrospective study was conducted at Shifa International Hospital, from January 2006 to March 2008. Methods: Hundred post operated cases of lumber disc prolapse, lumbar stenosis or both studied retrospectively by tracing their operated data from hospital record section for the development of surgical site infection (SSI). The patients were divided into three groups depending upon whether they received single, three or more than three doses of antibiotics respectively. Complete data analyses and cross tabulation done with SPSS version 16. Result: Of 100 cases, only 6% had superficial surgical site infection; only 1 case with co morbidity of hypertension was detected. Twenty-one cases had single dose of antibiotic (Group-I), 59 cases had 3 doses (Group-II) and 20 cases received multiple doses (Group-III). There was no infection in Group-I. Only one patient in Group-II and 5 patients in Group-III developed superficial SSI. While 4 in Group-II, 3 in Group-III, and none of Group-I had >6 days length of stay (LOS). Conclusion The dose of antibiotic directly correlates with the surgical site infection in clean lumbar surgeries. When compared with multiple doses of antibiotics a single preoperative shot of antibiotic is equally effective for patients with SSI. (author)

  17. Risk factors for deep surgical site infection following operative treatment of ankle fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovaska, Mikko T; Mäkinen, Tatu J; Madanat, Rami; Huotari, Kaisa; Vahlberg, Tero; Hirvensalo, Eero; Lindahl, Jan

    2013-02-20

    Surgical site infection is one of the most common complications following ankle fracture surgery. These infections are associated with substantial morbidity and lead to increased resource utilization. Identification of risk factors is crucial for developing strategies to prevent these complications. We performed an age and sex-matched case-control study to identify patient and surgery-related risk factors for deep surgical site infection following operative ankle fracture treatment. We identified 1923 ankle fracture operations performed in 1915 patients from 2006 through 2009. A total of 131 patients with deep infection were identified and compared with an equal number of uninfected control patients. Risk factors for infection were determined with use of conditional logistic regression analysis. The incidence of deep infection was 6.8%. Univariate analysis showed diabetes (odds ratio [OR] = 2.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.0, 4.9), alcohol abuse (OR = 3.8, 95% CI = 1.6, 9.4), fracture-dislocation (OR = 2.0, 95% CI = 1.2, 3.5), and soft-tissue injury (a Tscherne grade of ≥1) (OR = 2.6, 95% CI = 1.3, 5.3) to be significant patient-related risk factors for infection. Surgery-related risk factors were suboptimal timing of prophylactic antibiotics (OR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.0, 3.4), difficulties encountered during surgery, (OR = 2.1, 95% CI = 1.1, 4.0), wound complications (OR = 4.8, 95% CI = 1.6, 14.0), and fracture malreduction (OR = 3.4, 95% CI = 1.3, 9.2). Independent risk factors for infection identified by multivariable analyses were tobacco use (OR = 3.7, 95% CI = 1.6, 8.5) and a duration of surgery of more than ninety minutes (OR = 2.5, 95% CI = 1.1, 5.7). Cast application in the operating room was independently associated with a decreased infection rate (OR = 0.4, 95% CI = 0.2, 0.8). We identified several modifiable risk factors for deep surgical site infection following operative treatment of ankle fractures.

  18. The Society for Vascular Surgery Wound, Ischemia, and foot Infection (WIfI) classification independently predicts wound healing in diabetic foot ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Caitlin W; Canner, Joseph K; Mathioudakis, Nestoras; Sherman, Ronald; Malas, Mahmoud B; Black, James H; Abularrage, Christopher J

    2018-04-02

    Previous studies have reported correlation between the Wound, Ischemia, and foot Infection (WIfI) classification system and wound healing time on unadjusted analyses. However, in the only multivariable analysis to date, WIfI stage was not predictive of wound healing. Our aim was to examine the association between WIfI classification and wound healing after risk adjustment in patients with diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) treated in a multidisciplinary setting. All patients presenting to our multidisciplinary DFU clinic from June 2012 to July 2017 were enrolled in a prospective database. A Cox proportional hazards model accounting for patients' sociodemographics, comorbidities, medication profiles, and wound characteristics was used to assess the association between WIfI classification and likelihood of wound healing at 1 year. There were 310 DFU patients enrolled (mean age, 59.0 ± 0.7 years; 60.3% male; 60.0% black) with 709 wounds, including 32.4% WIfI stage 1, 19.9% stage 2, 25.2% stage 3, and 22.4% stage 4. Mean wound healing time increased with increasing WIfI stage (stage 1, 96.9 ± 8.3 days; stage 4, 195.1 ± 10.6 days; P healing at 1 year was 94.1% ± 2.0% for stage 1 wounds vs 67.4% ± 4.4% for stage 4 (P healing (stage 4 vs stage 1: hazard ratio, [HR] 0.44; 95% confidence interval, 0.33-0.59). Peripheral artery disease (HR, 0.73), increasing wound area (HR, 0.99 per square centimeter), and longer time from wound onset to first assessment (HR, 0.97 per month) also decreased the likelihood of wound healing, whereas use of clopidogrel was protective (HR, 1.39; all, P ≤ .04). The top three predictors of poor wound healing were WIfI stage 4 (z score, -5.40), increasing wound area (z score, -3.14), and WIfI stage 3 (z score, -3.11), respectively. Among patients with DFU, the WIfI classification system predicts wound healing at 1 year in both crude and risk-adjusted analyses. This is the first study to validate the WIfI score as an independent

  19. Evaluation of adherence to measures for the prevention of surgical site infections by the surgical team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Cristina de Oliveira

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available AbstractOBJECTIVEEvaluate pre- and intraoperative practices adopted by medical and nursing teams for the prevention of surgical infections.METHODA prospective study carried out in the period of April to May 2013, in a surgical center of a university hospital in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais.RESULTS18 surgeries were followed and 214 surgical gloves were analyzed, of which 23 (10.7% had postoperative glove perforation detected, with 52.2% being perceived by users. Hair removal was performed on 27.7% of patients in the operating room, with the use of blades in 80% of the cases. Antibiotic prophylaxis was administered to 81.8% of patients up to 60 minutes prior to surgical incision. An average of nine professionals were present during surgery and the surgery room door remained open in 94.4% of the procedures.CONCLUSIONPartial adhesion to the recommended measures was identified, reaffirming a need for greater attention to these critical steps/actions in order to prevent surgical site infection.

  20. [BASIC PRINCIPLES OF SURGICAL TREATMENT OF CHRONIC WOUNDS – SHARP DEBRIDEMENT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinović, M; Fumić, N; Laginja, S; Smokrović, E; Bakota, B; Bekić, M; Čoklo, M

    2016-01-01

    The ever improving health standards in terms of quality and more efficient health care result in an increase in life expectancy, thus increasing the number of elderly people in the population. A higher level of activity in elderly population leads to greater incidence of injuries, and on the other hand, there is an increasing number of comorbidities. Circulatory disorders, diabetes mellitus, metabolic imbalances, etc. and a reduced biological potential of tissue regeneration result in an increased number of chronic wounds that pose a significant health, social and economic burden on the society. These conditions require significant involvement of medical and non-medical staff in pre-hospital institutions. Significant material and other health care resources are allocated for the treatment of chronic wounds. These conditions result in a lower quality of life of patients and their families and caregivers. Debridement is a crucial medical procedure for the treatment of acute and chronic wounds. The result of debridement is removal of all barriers within and around the wound that obstruct physiological processes of wound healing. Debridement is a repeating process when indicated. There are several types of debridement, each with its advantages and disadvantages. The method of debridement should be determined by the physician or other professional trained person on the basis of wound characteristics and in accordance with their expertise and capabilities. In the same wound, we can combine different types of debridement, all with the goal of faster and better wound healing.

  1. Ascorbic acid deficiency impairs wound healing in surgical patients: Four case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bikker

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: AA deficiency is not uncommon in the hospital population, especially in those at risk. Treating deficient patients with AA leads to swift improvement of the wound healing process post-surgery, thereby reducing the costs of extensive wound treatment and extended stay in hospital.

  2. Surgical site infection in orthopedic implants and its common bacteria with their sensitivities to antibiotics, in open reduction internal fixation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, M.Q.; Zardad, M.S.; Khan, A.; Ahmed, S.; Awan, A. S.; Mohammad, T.

    2017-01-01

    Surgical site infection in orthopaedic implants is a major problem, causing long hospital stay, cost to the patient and is a burden on health care facilities. It increases rate of non-union, osteomyelitis, implant failure, sepsis, multiorgan dysfunction and even death. Surgical site infection is defined as pain, erythema, swelling and discharge from wound site. Surgical site infection in orthopaedic implants is more challenging to the treating orthopaedic surgeon as the causative organism is protected by a biofilm over the implant's surface. Antibiotics cannot cross this film to reach the bacteria's, causing infection. Method: This descriptive case series study includes 132 patients of both genders with ages between 13 years to 60 years conducted at Orthopaedic Unit, Ayub Medical College, Abbottabad from 1st October 2015 to 31st March 2016. Patients with close fractures of long bones were included in the study to determine the frequency of surgical site infection in orthopaedic implants and the type of bacteria involved and their sensitivity to various antibiotics. All implants were of stainless steel. The implants used were Dynamic hip screws, Dynamic compression screws, plates, k-wires, Interlocking nails, SIGN nails, Austin Moore prosthesis and tension band wires. Pre-op and post-op antibiotics used were combination of Sulbactum and Cefoperazone which was given 1 hour before surgery and continued for 72 hours after surgery. Patients were followed up to 4 weeks. Pus was taken on culture stick, from those who developed infection. Results were entered in the pro forma. Results: A total of 132 patients of long bone fractures, who were treated with open reduction and internal fixation, were studied. Only 7 patients developed infection. Staphylococcus Aureus was isolated from all 7 patients. Staphylococcus aureus was sensitive to Linezolid, Fusidic Acid, and vancomycin. Cotrimoxazole, tetracycline, Gentamycin and Clindamycin were partially effective. Conclusion

  3. Risk Factors for Complications after Reconstructive Surgery for Sternal Wound Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ichiro Hashimoto

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Although the utility of flaps for the treatment of sternal wound infections following median sternotomy has been reported for 30 years, there have been few reports on the risk factors for complications after reconstruction. The objective of this investigation was to identify factors related to complications after the reconstruction of sternal wound infections. Methods A retrospective analysis of 74 patients with reconstructive surgery after sternal wound infection over a 5-year period was performed. Clinical data including age, sex, body mass index (BMI, comorbidities, bacterial culture, previous cardiac surgery, wound depth, mortality rate, type of reconstructive procedure, and complication rate were collected. Results The patients' BMI ranged from 15.2 to 33.6 kg/m2 (mean, 23.1±3.74 kg/m2. Wound closure complications after reconstructive surgery were observed in 36.5% of the cases. The mortality rate was 2.7%. Diabetes mellitus significantly affected the rate of wound closure complications (P=0.041. A significant difference in the number of complications was seen between Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus and coagulase-negative Staphylococci (P=0.011. There was a correlation between harvesting of the internal thoracic artery and postoperative complications (P=0.048. The complication rates of the pectoralis major flap, rectus abdominis flap, omentum flap, a combination of pectoralis major flap and rectus abdominis flap, and direct closure were 23.3%, 33.3%, 100%, 37.5%, and 35.7%, respectively. Conclusions Diabetes mellitus, S. aureus, harvesting of the internal thoracic artery, and omentum flap were significant factors for complications after reconstruction. The omentum flap volume may be related to the complications associated with the omentum flap transfer in the present study.

  4. Antimicrobial Peptides and Their Therapeutic Potential for Bacterial Skin Infections and Wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfalzgraff, Anja; Brandenburg, Klaus; Weindl, Günther

    2018-01-01

    Alarming data about increasing resistance to conventional antibiotics are reported, while at the same time the development of new antibiotics is stagnating. Skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) are mainly caused by the so called ESKAPE pathogens (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter species) which belong to the most recalcitrant bacteria and are resistant to almost all common antibiotics. S. aureus and P. aeruginosa are the most frequent pathogens isolated from chronic wounds and increasing resistance to topical antibiotics has become a major issue. Therefore, new treatment options are urgently needed. In recent years, research focused on the development of synthetic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) with lower toxicity and improved activity compared to their endogenous counterparts. AMPs appear to be promising therapeutic options for the treatment of SSTIs and wounds as they show a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity, low resistance rates and display pivotal immunomodulatory as well as wound healing promoting activities such as induction of cell migration and proliferation and angiogenesis. In this review, we evaluate the potential of AMPs for the treatment of bacterial SSTIs and wounds and provide an overview of the mechanisms of actions of AMPs that contribute to combat skin infections and to improve wound healing. Bacteria growing in biofilms are more resistant to conventional antibiotics than their planktonic counterparts due to limited biofilm penetration and distinct metabolic and physiological functions, and often result in chronification of infections and wounds. Thus, we further discuss the feasibility of AMPs as anti-biofilm agents. Finally, we highlight perspectives for future therapies and which issues remain to bring AMPs successfully to the market. PMID:29643807

  5. Nanomedicine and advanced technologies for burns: Preventing infection and facilitating wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mofazzal Jahromi, Mirza Ali; Sahandi Zangabad, Parham; Moosavi Basri, Seyed Masoud; Sahandi Zangabad, Keyvan; Ghamarypour, Ameneh; Aref, Amir R; Karimi, Mahdi; Hamblin, Michael R

    2018-01-01

    According to the latest report from the World Health Organization, an estimated 265,000 deaths still occur every year as a direct result of burn injuries. A widespread range of these deaths induced by burn wound happens in low- and middle-income countries, where survivors face a lifetime of morbidity. Most of the deaths occur due to infections when a high percentage of the external regions of the body area is affected. Microbial nutrient availability, skin barrier disruption, and vascular supply destruction in burn injuries as well as systemic immunosuppression are important parameters that cause burns to be susceptible to infections. Topical antimicrobials and dressings are generally employed to inhibit burn infections followed by a burn wound therapy, because systemic antibiotics have problems in reaching the infected site, coupled with increasing microbial drug resistance. Nanotechnology has provided a range of molecular designed nanostructures (NS) that can be used in both therapeutic and diagnostic applications in burns. These NSs can be divided into organic and non-organic (such as polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) and silver NPs, respectively), and many have been designed to display multifunctional activity. The present review covers the physiology of skin, burn classification, burn wound pathogenesis, animal models of burn wound infection, and various topical therapeutic approaches designed to combat infection and stimulate healing. These include biological based approaches (e.g. immune-based antimicrobial molecules, therapeutic microorganisms, antimicrobial agents, etc.), antimicrobial photo- and ultrasound-therapy, as well as nanotechnology-based wound healing approaches as a revolutionizing area. Thus, we focus on organic and non-organic NSs designed to deliver growth factors to burned skin, and scaffolds, dressings, etc. for exogenous stem cells to aid skin regeneration. Eventually, recent breakthroughs and technologies with substantial potentials in tissue

  6. Post-surgical infections and perioperative antibiotics usage in pediatric genitourinary procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellett, Justin; Prasad, Michaella M; Purves, J Todd; Stec, Andrew A

    2015-12-01

    Post-surgical infections (PSIs) are a source of preventable perioperative morbidity. No guidelines exist for the use of perioperative antibiotics in pediatric urologic procedures. This study reports the rate of PSIs in non-endoscopic pediatric genitourinary procedures at our institution. Secondary aims evaluate the association of PSI with other perioperative variables, including wound class (WC) and perioperative antibiotic administration. Data from consecutive non-endoscopic pediatric urologic procedures performed between August 2011 and April 2014 were examined retrospectively. The primary outcome was the rate of PSIs. PSIs were classified as superficial skin (SS) and deep/organ site (D/OS) according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines, and urinary tract infection (UTI). PSIs were further stratified by WC1 and WC2 and perioperative antibiotic usage. A relative risk and chi-square analysis compared PSI rates between WC1 and WC2 procedures. A total of 1185 unique patients with 1384 surgical sites were reviewed; 1192 surgical sites had follow-up for inclusion into the study. Ten total PSIs were identified, for an overall infection rate of 0.83%. Of these, six were SS, one was D/OS, and three were UTIs. The PSI rate for WC1 (885 sites) and WC2 (307 sites) procedures was 0.34% and 2.28%, respectively, p antibiotics (0.35% vs. 0.33%). All WC2 procedures received antibiotics. Post-surgical infections are associated with significant perioperative morbidity. In some studies, PSI can double hospital costs, and contribute to hospital length of stay, admission to intensive care units, and impact patient mortality. Our study demonstrates that the rate of PSI in WC1 operations is low, irrespective of whether the patient received perioperative antibiotics (0.35%) or no antibiotics (0.33%). WC2 operations were the larger source of morbidity with an infection rate of 2.28% and a 6.7 fold higher increase in relative risk. WC1 procedures have a rate of

  7. Surgical site infections in an abdominal surgical ward at Kosovo Teaching Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raka, Lul; Krasniqi, Avdyl; Hoxha, Faton; Musa, Ruustem; Mulliqi, Gjyle; Krasniqi, Selvete; Kurti, Arsim; Dervishaj, Antigona; Nuhiu, Beqir; Kelmendi, Baton; Limani, Dalip; Tolaj, Ilir

    2008-01-01

    Abdominal surgical site infections (SSI) cause substantial morbidity and mortality for patients undergoing operative procedures. We determined the incidence of and risk factors for SSI after abdominal surgery in the Department of Abdominal Surgery at the University Clinical Centre of Kosovo (UCCK). Prospective surveillance of patients undergoing abdominal surgery was performed between December 2005 and June 2006. CDC definitions were followed to detect SSI and study forms were based on Europe Link for Infection Control through Surveillance (HELICS) protocol. A total of 253 surgical interventions in 225 patients were evaluated. The median age of patients was 42 years and 55.1% of them were male. The overall incidence rate of SSI was 12%. Follow-up was achieved for 84.1% of the procedures. For patients with an SSI, the median duration of hospitalization was 9 days compared with 4 days for those without an SSI (p 2, use of antibiotic prophylaxis and NNIS class of > 2 were all significant at p < .001. The SSI rates for the NNIS System risk classes 0, 1 and 2-3 were 4.2%, 46.7% and 100%, respectively. SSI caused considerable morbidity among surgical patients in UCCK. Appropriate active surveillance and infection control measures should be introduced during preoperative, intra-operative, and postoperative care to reduce infection rates.

  8. Effect of the Lectin of Bauhinia variegata and Its Recombinant Isoform on Surgically Induced Skin Wounds in a Murine Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Bainy Leal

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Lectins are a structurally heterogeneous group of highly specific carbohydrate-binding proteins. Due to their great biotechnological potential, lectins are widely used in biomedical research. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the healing potential of the lectin of Bauhinia variegata (nBVL and its recombinant isoform (rBVL-1. Following surgical creation of dorsal skin wounds, seven groups of mice were submitted to topical treatment for 12 days with lectin, D-galactose, BSA and saline. The animals were anesthetized and euthanized on POD 2, 7 and 12 in order to evaluate the healing potential of each treatment. The parameters considered included wound size, contraction rate, epithelialization rate and histopathological findings. Wound closure was fastest in animals treated with rBVL-1 (POD 7. nBVL was more effective than the controls. All skin layers were reconstructed and keratin deposition increased. Our findings indicate that the lectin of Bauhinia variegata possesses pro-healing properties and may be employed in the treatment of acute skin wounds.

  9. Effect of the lectin of Bauhinia variegata and its recombinant isoform on surgically induced skin wounds in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neto, Luiz Gonzaga do Nascimento; Pinto, Luciano da Silva; Bastos, Rafaela Mesquita; Evaristo, Francisco Flávio Vasconcelos; Vasconcelos, Mayron Alves de; Carneiro, Victor Alves; Arruda, Francisco Vassiliepe Sousa; Porto, Ana Lúcia Figueiredo; Leal, Rodrigo Bainy; Júnior, Valdemiro Amaro da Silva; Cavada, Benildo Sousa; Teixeira, Edson Holanda

    2011-11-07

    Lectins are a structurally heterogeneous group of highly specific carbohydrate-binding proteins. Due to their great biotechnological potential, lectins are widely used in biomedical research. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the healing potential of the lectin of Bauhinia variegata (nBVL) and its recombinant isoform (rBVL-1). Following surgical creation of dorsal skin wounds, seven groups of mice were submitted to topical treatment for 12 days with lectin, D-galactose, BSA and saline. The animals were anesthetized and euthanized on POD 2, 7 and 12 in order to evaluate the healing potential of each treatment. The parameters considered included wound size, contraction rate, epithelialization rate and histopathological findings. Wound closure was fastest in animals treated with rBVL-1 (POD 7). nBVL was more effective than the controls. All skin layers were reconstructed and keratin deposition increased. Our findings indicate that the lectin of Bauhinia variegata possesses pro-healing properties and may be employed in the treatment of acute skin wounds.

  10. Wound infection following stoma takedown: primary skin closure versus subcuticular purse-string suture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquez, Thao T; Christoforidis, Dimitrios; Abraham, Anasooya; Madoff, Robert D; Rothenberger, David A

    2010-12-01

    Stoma closure has been associated with a high rate of surgical site infection (SSI) and the ideal stoma-site skin closure technique is still debated. The aim of this study was to compare the rate of SSI following primary skin closure (PC) versus a skin-approximating, subcuticular purse-string closure (APS). All consecutive patients undergoing stoma closure between 2002 and 2007 by two surgeons at a single tertiary-care institution were retrospectively assessed. Patients who had a new stoma created at the same site or those without wound closure were excluded. The end point was SSI, determined according to current CDC guidelines, at the stoma closure site and/or the midline laparotomy incision. There were 61 patients in the PC group (surgeon A: 58 of 61) and 17 in the APS group (surgeon B: 16 of 17). The two groups were similar in baseline and intraoperative characteristics, except that patients in the PC group were more often diagnosed with benign disease (p = 0.0156) and more often had a stapled anastomosis (p = 0.002). The overall SSI rate was 14 of 78 (18%). All SSIs occurred in the PC group (14 of 61 vs. 0 of 17, p = 0.03). Our study suggests that a skin-approximating closure with a subcuticular purse-string of the stoma site leads to less SSI than a primary closure. Randomized studies are needed to confirm our findings and assess additional end points such as healing time, cost, and patient satisfaction.

  11. [ALEA study. Treatment of chronic wounds infected by the application of silver dressings nanocrystalline combined with dressings hydrocellular].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdú Soriano, José; Nolasco Bonmati, Andreu

    2010-10-01

    This study was conducted with the objective to assess, in real clinical conditions in primary care and geriatric centers, application and utility of nanocrystalline silver dressings dressings combined with hydrocellular in relation to the development during 20 shifts dressing or complete healing of the characteristics of the lesions included in the study Prospective observational multicenter open, repeated measures. It could include injuries of different etiologies (pressure ulcers stage 11-111, lower limb and traumatic wounds or surgical origin), with clinical signs of local infection (at least three of the following: redness, purulent discharge, heat, edema and pain). Only one wound was included per patient. An analysis of effectiveness by intention to treat all lesions included. We recruited 103 patients who met the inclusion criteria but were collected in which 77 patients were used for nanocrystalline silver dressings in some phase of the study, They had a median of 80 years of age and 58.4% were women. By type of injury: 53.2% pressure ulcers, 31.2% lower extremity ulcers and 14.3% traumatic or surgical wounds. Over 50% of the lesions was older than eight months and a larger area of 22.75 cm2. At first, 70.1% had redness, purulent discharge 64.9%, 37.7% heat edema 42.9% and 65.8% pain. Remained in the study a median of 42.5 days at a rate of change of dressing every 2.5. During this time in 96.1% of the lesions were removed for clinical signs of local infection in a statistically significant (p < or = 0.001). 27.3% healed from injuries and those not healed, 92.9% experienced improvement, and its healing curves were statistically significant (p < 0.05). 92.2% of clinicians assessed treatment with these products as good or excellent. The use of the products used in this study consistent with the concept and PLH TIME, has proved useful in this type of injury reducing the clinical signs of infection, promoting granulation tissue and necrotic removing the burden

  12. Thermal injury induces impaired function in polymorphonuclear neutrophil granulocytes and reduced control of burn wound infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calum, H.; Moser, C.; Jensen, P. O.

    2009-01-01

    Severe thermal injury induces immunosuppression, involving all parts of the immune system, especially when large fractions of the total body surface area are affected. An animal model was established to characterize the burn-induced immunosuppression. In our novel mouse model a 6% third-degree burn...... injury was induced in mice with a hot-air blower. The third-degree burn was confirmed histologically. The mice were allocated into five groups: control, shave, burn, infection and burn infection group. At 48 h, a decline in the concentration of peripheral blood leucocytes was observed in the group...... of mice with burn wound. The reduction was ascribed to the decline in concentration of polymorphonuclear neutrophil leucocytes and monocytes. When infecting the skin with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a dissemination of bacteria was observed only in the burn wound group. Histological characterization...

  13. Adjacent segment infection after surgical treatment of spondylodiscitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siam, Ahmed Ezzat; El Saghir, Hesham; Boehm, Heinrich

    2016-03-01

    This is the first case series to describe adjacent segment infection (ASI) after surgical treatment of spondylodiscitis (SD). Patients with SD, spondylitis who were surgically treated between 1994 and 2012 were included. Out of 1187 cases, 23 (1.94 %) returned to our institution (Zentralklinik Bad Berka) with ASI: 10 males, 13 females, with a mean age of 65.1 years and a mean follow-up of 69 months. ASI most commonly involved L3-4 (seven patients), T12-L1 (five) and L2-3 (four). The mean interval between operations of primary infection and ASI was 36.9 months. All cases needed surgical intervention, debridement, reconstruction and fusion with longer instrumentation, with culture and sensitivity-based postoperative antimicrobial therapy. At last follow-up, six patients (26.1 %) were mobilized in a wheelchair with a varying degree of paraplegia (three had pre-existing paralysis). Three patients died within 2 months after the ASI operation (13 %). Excellent outcomes were achieved in five patients, and good in eight. Adjacent segment infection after surgical treatment of spondylodiscitis is a rare complication (1.94 %). It is associated with multimorbidity and shows a high mortality rate and a high neurological affection rate. Possible explanations are: haematomas of repeated micro-fractures around screw loosening, haematogenous spread, direct inoculation or a combination of these factors. ASI may also lead to proximal junctional kyphosis, as found in this series. We suggest early surgical intervention with anterior debridement, reconstruction and fusion with posterior instrumentation, followed by antimicrobial therapy for 12 weeks. Level IV retrospective uncontrolled case series.

  14. [Evaluation of several immunologic indices in suppurative surgical infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barashkov, V G; Shemerovskaia, T G; Iusupov, Iu N; Vinogradov, O T

    1984-02-01

    The clinical course of the disease was correlated with the indices characterizing the activity of different components of the immune system in 47 patients with a purulent surgical infection. The investigation has shown the clinical value of immunological tests studied to be not identical. The determination of the concentration of the circulating immune complexes and the migration activity of macrophages is proposed for the prognostic assessment of the course of the disease.

  15. Surgical site infections in paediatric otolaryngology operative procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifeacho, S N; Bajaj, Y; Jephson, C G; Albert, D M

    2012-07-01

    An assessment of the rate of surgical site infections associated with elective paediatric otolaryngology surgical procedures. Prospective data was collected for a 3-week period for all children undergoing surgery where either mucosa or skin was breached. The parents of the children were requested to complete a questionnaire at 30 days after the operation. Data was collected on 80 consecutive cases. The majority of cases were admitted on the day of the procedure. The procedures included adenotonsillectomy (24), grommets (12), cochlear implantation (6), bone-anchored hearing aid (2), submandibular gland excision (1), branchial sinus excision (1), cystic hygroma excision (3), nasal glioma excision (1), microlaryngobronchoscopy (13), tracheostomy (3) and other procedures (14). Nearly half the cases had more than one operation done at the same time. 26/80 (32.5%) patients had a temporary or permanent implant inserted at the time of operation (grommet, bone-anchored hearing aid, cochlear implant). 25/80 (31%) operative fields were classed as clean and 55/80 (68.7%) as clean contaminated operations. The duration of the operation varied from 6 min to 142 min. Hospital antibiotic protocol was adhered to in 69/80 (86.3%) cases but not in 11/80 cases. In our series, 3/80 (3.7%) patients had an infection in the postoperative period. Surgical site infections do occur at an appreciable rate in paediatric otolaryngology. With the potential for serious consequences, reduction in the risk of surgical site infections is important. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Hospital costs associated with surgical site infections in general and vascular surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boltz, Melissa M; Hollenbeak, Christopher S; Julian, Kathleen G; Ortenzi, Gail; Dillon, Peter W

    2011-11-01

    Although much has been written about excess cost and duration of stay (DOS) associated with surgical site infections (SSIs) after cardiothoracic surgery, less has been reported after vascular and general surgery. We used data from the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) to estimate the total cost and DOS associated with SSIs in patients undergoing general and vascular surgery. Using standard NSQIP practices, data were collected on patients undergoing general and vascular surgery at a single academic center between 2007 and 2009 and were merged with fully loaded operating costs obtained from the hospital accounting database. Logistic regression was used to determine which patient and preoperative variables influenced the occurrence of SSIs. After adjusting for patient characteristics, costs and DOS were fit to linear regression models to determine the effect of SSIs. Of the 2,250 general and vascular surgery patients sampled, SSIs were observed in 186 inpatients. Predisposing factors of SSIs were male sex, insulin-dependent diabetes, steroid use, wound classification, and operative time (P surgery. Although the excess costs and DOS associated with SSIs after general and vascular surgery are somewhat less, they still represent substantial financial and opportunity costs to hospitals and suggest, along with the implications for patient care, a continuing need for cost-effective quality improvement and programs of infection prevention. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Human Wound Infection with Mannheimia glucosida following Lamb Bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Jillian S Y; Omaleki, Lida; Turni, Conny; Barber, Stuart Richard; Browning, Glenn Francis; Francis, Michelle J; Graham, Maryza; Korman, Tony M

    2015-10-01

    Mannheimia spp. are veterinary pathogens that can cause mastitis and pneumonia in domestic cattle and sheep. While Mannheimia glucosida can be found as normal flora in oral and respiratory mucosa in sheep, there have been no reported cases of human infection with this organism. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Fulminant infection by uncommon organisms in animal bite wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, J K

    1998-10-01

    In 1995 and 1996, 215 patients exposed to different species of animals were treated at the Amarnath Polyclinic, Balasore, in India. Among them were two children infected by uncommon organisms, i.e., Capnocytophaga canimorsus and Pasteurella multocida; the patients recovered with appropriate antibiotic therapy.

  19. Fulminant infection by uncommon organisms in animal bite wounds.

    OpenAIRE

    Dutta, J. K.

    1998-01-01

    In 1995 and 1996, 215 patients exposed to different species of animals were treated at the Amarnath Polyclinic, Balasore, in India. Among them were two children infected by uncommon organisms, i.e., Capnocytophaga canimorsus and Pasteurella multocida; the patients recovered with appropriate antibiotic therapy.

  20. [Treatment of the infected wound with exposed silver-ring vascular graft and delayed Thiersch method of skin transplant covering ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenezić, Dragoslav; Pandaitan, Simon; Ilijevski, Nenad; Matić, Predrag; Gajin, Predag; Radak, Dorde

    2005-01-01

    Although the incidence of prosthetic infection is low (1%-6%), the consequences (limb loss or death) are dramatic for a patient, with high mortality rate (25%-75%) and limb loss in 40%-75% of cases. In case of Szilagyi's grade III infection, standard procedure consists of the excision of prosthesis and wound debridement. Alternative method is medical treatment. This is a case report of a patient with prosthetic infection of Silver-ring graft, used for femoropopliteal reconstruction, in whom an extreme skin necrosis developed in early postoperative period. This complication was successfully treated medically. After repeated debridement and wound-packing, the wound was covered using Thiersch skin graft.

  1. Association of Safety Culture with Surgical Site Infection Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Caleb J; Pawlik, Timothy M; Daniels, Tania; Vernon, Nora; Banks, Katie; Westby, Peggy; Wick, Elizabeth C; Sexton, J Bryan; Makary, Martin A

    2016-02-01

    Hospital workplace culture may have an impact on surgical outcomes; however, this association has not been established. We designed a study to evaluate the association between safety culture and surgical site infection (SSI). Using the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture and National Healthcare Safety Network definitions, we measured 12 dimensions of safety culture and colon SSI rates, respectively, in the surgical units of Minnesota community hospitals. A Pearson's r correlation was calculated for each of 12 dimensions of surgical unit safety culture and SSI rate and then adjusted for surgical volume and American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) classification. Seven hospitals participated in the study, with a mean survey response rate of 43%. The SSI rates ranged from 0% to 30%, and surgical unit safety culture scores ranged from 16 to 92 on a scale of 0 to 100. Ten dimensions of surgical unit safety culture were associated with colon SSI rates: teamwork across units (r = -0.96; 95% CI [-0.76, -0.99]), organizational learning (r = -0.95; 95% CI [-0.71, -0.99]), feedback and communication about error (r = -0.92; 95% CI [-0.56, -0.99]), overall perceptions of safety (r = -0.90; 95% CI [-0.45, -0.99]), management support for patient safety (r = -0.90; 95% CI [-0.44, -0.98]), teamwork within units (r = -0.88; 95% CI [-0.38, -0.98]), communication openness (r = -0.85; 95% CI [-0.26, -0.98]), supervisor/manager expectations and actions promoting safety (r = -0.85; 95% CI [-0.25, -0.98]), non-punitive response to error (r = -0.78; 95% CI [-0.07, -0.97]), and frequency of events reported (r = -0.76; 95% CI [-0.01, -0.96]). After adjusting for surgical volume and ASA classification, 9 of 12 dimensions of surgical unit safety culture were significantly associated with lower colon SSI rates. These data suggest an important role for positive safety and teamwork culture and engaged hospital management in producing high-quality surgical

  2. Platelet-rich fibrin versus albumin in surgical wound repair: a randomized trial with paired design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Patricia L; Ågren, Sven Per Magnus; Jørgensen, Lars Nannestad

    2010-01-01

    To study the effects of autologous platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) versus human albumin on incisional wound breaking strength and subcutaneous collagen deposition in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a randomized trial.......To study the effects of autologous platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) versus human albumin on incisional wound breaking strength and subcutaneous collagen deposition in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a randomized trial....

  3. The use of liposomal solutions of antibiotics in treatment of infected and festering wounds in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Олег Владимирович Спахи

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim of research. To study the use of liposomal solutions of antibiotics in the complex treatment of infected and festering wounds in children.Materials and methods of research: The results of clinical and laboratory examinations of 77 children 3-18 years old with infected and festering wounds were analyzed. All children were distributed into groups of observation by the character of the treatment: in 37 sick children (the main group liposomal preparations were used in the complex treatment. Patients of the control group (40 children get the generally accepted complex treatment. The groups of comparison were statistically similar by the character and localization of pathological process, age, prescription of disease. In the main group an antibacterial-liposomal mixture was injected into the wound alongside with the generally accepted methods. The dynamics of the clinical, laboratory, cytological, bacteriological and morphological indicators was defined using the generally accepted technics. The general condition of patient’s organism was assessed with a help of laboratory methods of research (general clinical and biochemical analyses.Results. In the main group it was observed a persistent tendency to normalization of leukocytal formula and of the number of leukocytes in peripheral blood that reached normal values (p < 0,05 on 7th day. In 36 patients of the control group leukocytosis remained for 7 days. Evident differences of indicators of leukocytal index of intoxication and of an index of the shift of leukocytal formula in the main and the control groups were observed on 3-4th day. In addition its decrease was combined with diminution of an intensity of clinical symptoms and with decrease of manifestations of the local pathological process.Bacteriological examination of the nidus of inflammation in patients of examined groups revealed that in the main group the diminution of the degree of infectious contamination passed faster (p<0,05 – on

  4. Evaluation of antibiotic susceptibility in wound infections: A pilot study from Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Sushmita; Ahmed, Mejbah Uddin; Uddin, Bhuiyan Mohammad Mahtab; Ratan, Zubair Ahmed; Rajawat, Monali; Mehta, Varshil; Zaman, Sojib Bin

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Infections due to antibiotic resistant bacteria have increased alarmingly in both developed and developing countries. Unrestrained and rapidly spreading bacterial growth has turned the management of wound infections into a serious challenge. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of different bacterial pathogens and their antibiotic susceptibility in various types of wound infections. Methods:  A cross-sectional study was conducted to collect 105 wound swabs. All isolated bacteria were identified based on colony characteristics, gram stain and standard biochemical tests, and antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST) with the disc diffusion method. Descriptive statistics were used to present the study findings, and all analyses were performed using Stata Version 13. Results:  The rate of isolation of bacteria was 92.3%. Staphylococcus aureus was found to be the most frequent isolate (55.7%), followed by Escherichia coli (23.7%), Pseudomonas spp. (8.2%), and Streptococcus pyogenes (7.2%). Gram-positive bacteria were mostly (60%) found sensitive to vancomycin, azithromycin, gentamicin, imipenem, cefixime, and ceftriaxone in this study. Among the Gram-negative bacteria, Escherichia coli (>60%) showed sensitivity to cefixime, azithromycin, cefuroxime, ceftriaxone, cefotaxime, gentamycin, and ceftazidime. Conclusions: The diversity of isolated bacteria and their susceptibility patterns signify a need to implement a proper infection control strategy, which can be achieved by carrying out antibiotic sensitivity tests of the isolates. PMID:29527295

  5. Effect of hBD2 genetically modified dermal multipotent stem cells on repair of infected irradiated wounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zong Zhaowen; Li Nan; Xiao Taoyuan

    2010-01-01

    Deficiencies in repair cells and infection are two of the main factors that can hinder the process of wound healing. In the present study, we investigated the ability of human beta-defensin-2 (hBD2) genetically modified dermal multipotent stem cells (dMSCs) to accelerate the healing irradiated wounds complicated by infections. An hBD2 adenovirus expression vector (Adv-hBD2) was firstly constructed and used to infect dMSCs. The antibacterial activity of the supernatant was determined by Kirby-Bauer method and macrodilution broth assay. Time to complete wound healing, residual percentage of wound area, and the number of bacteria under the scar were measured to assess the effects of Adv-hBD2-infected dMSC transplantation on the healing of irradiated wounds complicated by Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. Results showed that the supernatant from Adv-hBD2-infected dMSCs had obvious antibacterial effects. Transplantation of Adv-hBD2-infected dMSCs killed bacteria in the wound. The complete wound healing time was 19.8±0.45 days, which was significantly shorter than in the control groups (P<0.05). From 14 days after transplantation, the residual wound area was smaller in the experimental group than in the control groups (P<0.05). In conculsion, we found that transplantation of hBD2 genetically modified dMSCs accelerated the healing of wounds complicated by P. aeruginosa infection in whole body irradiated rats. (author)

  6. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy With Instillation (NPWTi) Better Reduces Post-debridement Bioburden in Chronically Infected Lower Extremity Wounds Than NPWT Alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goss, S G; Schwartz, J A; Facchin, F; Avdagic, E; Gendics, C; Lantis, J C

    2012-12-01

    An overabundance of bacteria in the chronic wound plays a significant role in the decreased ability for primary closure. One means of decreasing the bioburden in a wound is to operatively debride the wound for wound bed optimization prior to application of other therapy, such as Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT). We undertook a prospective pilot study to assess the efficacy of wound bed preparation for a standard algorithm (sharp surgical debridement followed by NPWT) versus one employing sharp surgical debridement followed by Negative Pressure Wound Therapy with Instillation (NPWTi). Thirteen patients, corresponding to 16 chronic lower leg and foot wounds were taken to the operating room for debridement. The patients were sequentially enrolled in 2 treatment groups: the first receiving treatment with operative debridement followed by 1 week of NPWT with the instillation of quarter strength bleach solution; the other receiving a standard algorithm consisting of operative debridement and 1 week of NPWT. Quantitative cultures were taken pre-operatively after sterile preparation and draping of the wound site (POD # 0, pre-op), post-operatively once debridement was completed (POD # 0, post-op), and on post-operative day 7 after operative debridement (POD # 7, post-op). After operative debridement (post-operative day 0) there was a mean of 3 (±1) types of bacteria per wound. The mean CFU/gram tissue culture was statistically greater - 3.7 × 10(6) (±4 × 10(6)) in the NPWTi group, while in the standard group (NPWT) the mean was 1.8 × 10(6) (±2.36 × 10(6)) CFU/gram tissue culture (p = 0.016); at the end of therapy there was no statistical difference between the two groups (p = 0.44). Wounds treated with NPWTi had a mean of 2.6 × 10(5) (±3 × 10(5)) CFU/gram of tissue culture while wounds treated with NPWT had a mean of 2.79 × 10(6) (±3.18 × 10(6)) CFU/gram of tissue culture (p = 0.43). The mean absolute reduction in bacteria for the

  7. Major bleeding during negative pressure wound/V.A.C.® - therapy for postsurgical deep sternal wound infection - a critical appraisal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Segers Patrique

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Negative-pressure wound therapy, commercially known as vacuum-assisted closure (V.A.C.® therapy, has become one of the most popular (and efficacious interim (prior to flap reconstruction or definite methods of managing deep sternal wound infection. Complications such as profuse bleeding, which may occur during negative-pressure therapy but not necessarily due to it, are often attributed to a single factor and reported as such. However, despite the wealth of clinical experience internationally available, information regarding certain simple considerations is still lacking. Garnering information on all the factors that could possibly influence the outcome has become more difficult due to a (fortunate decrease in the incidence of deep sternal wound infection. If more insight is to be gained from fewer clinical cases, then various potentially confounding factors should be fully disclosed before complications can be attributed to the technique itself or improvements to negative-pressure wound therapy for deep sternal wound infection can be accepted as evidence-based and the guidelines for its use adapted. The authors propose the adoption of a simple checklist in such cases.

  8. Healing Potentials of Oral Moringa Oleifera Leaves Extract and Tetracycline on Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Infected Wounds of Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyarefe, Oghenemega D; Idowu, Aderayo; Afolabi, Jeremiah M

    2015-12-20

    The effects of oral dose of aqueous extract of Moringa oleifera and tetracycline antibiotics on cutaneous wounds infected with Staphylococcus aureus were studied in eighteen adult wistar rats (159±31.5g) randomized into three groups: Group A, n = 6, Moringa oleifera-(300 mg/kg). Group B, n = 6, tetracycline (9.4 mg/kg) and Group C, n = 6, Sterile water (control). Six millimetres diameter nape wound, created on each rat under 2% xylazine (5 mg/kg) and 5% ketamine (35 mg/kg), was contaminated with Staphylococcus aureus (108 Colony Forming Unit (CFU). Following infection, treatment was commenced with daily oral dose of test preparations and the wounds were evaluated every other day i.e., day 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13 and 15 for wetness (wound exudation), wound edge oedema, hyperaemia, granulation tissues and contraction (diameter). Severe wound exudation existed in all the groups between days 0-3 (p = 1.00). A significantly less wound exudation was observed at days 3-5 (p = 0.000) and 5-9 (p = 0.003) (ControlMoringa). Wound edge oedema was significantly less on days 5-9 (p = 0.000) and 9-15 (p = 0.001) (ControlMoringaMoringa Moringa> Tetracycline). Differences in wound diameter was not significant except at days 5-9 (p = 0.013) (Control> Moringa >Tetracycline). Oral doses of Moringa oleifera extract (300mg/kg) and tetracycline (9.4mg/kg) are not effective as antimicrobial or immune-boosting agents to enhance healing of wounds infected with Staphylococcus aureus and hence not recommended for rapid clearance of Staphylococcus aureus infected wounds.

  9. Gel from unripe Musa sapientum peel to repair surgical wounds in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atzingen, Dênia Amélia Novato Castelli Von; Gragnani, Alfredo; Veiga, Daniela Francescato; Abla, Luis Eduardo Felipe; Mendonça, Adriana Rodrigues dos Anjos; Paula, Clayton Aparecido de; Juliano, Yara; Correa, José Carlos; Faria, Marcio Raimundo de; Ferreira, Lydia Masako

    2011-10-01

    To determine the optimum concentration of a gel obtained from unripe banana (Musa sapientum) peel for wound treatment in rats. A randomized triple blind study was conducted with 40 Wistar rats, which were divided into 4 groups: CG, control group; G2%, 2% gel concentration group; G4%, 4% gel concentration group; and G10%, 10 % gel concentration group. The banana peel gel was applied daily, for 7 days, to a 4-cm(2) wound created on the back of each animal of all groups. After this period, the wounds were biopsied. Statistical analysis was carried out using the Kruskal-Wallis test complemented by the Student-Newman-Keuls test. Macroscopic examination revealed that partial epithelialization occurred in all groups. Wound contraction was also observed in all groups and ranged from 1.38 to 1.57 mm in the study groups, and from 1.03 to 1.10 mm in the control group, with significant differences (p banana peel (G4%) resulted in better epithelialization of wounds healed by secondary intention compared with other gel concentrations.

  10. Treatment of Early Post-Op Wound Infection after Internal Fixation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Obremskey, M.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Vanderbilt University Medical Center Nashville TN 37203 REPORT DATE: October 2016 TYPE OF REPORT: Annual...NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) October 2016 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 15Sep2015...effect of treatment of post-op wound infection in long bones after fracture fixation or joint fusion and either: (Group 1) operative debridement and

  11. Calmodulin Gene Expression in Response to Mechanical Wounding and Botrytis cinerea Infection in Tomato Fruit

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Hui; Yang, Tianbao; Jurick, Wayne M.

    2014-01-01

    Calmodulin, a ubiquitous calcium sensor, plays an important role in decoding stress-triggered intracellular calcium changes and regulates the functions of numerous target proteins involved in various plant physiological responses. To determine the functions of calmodulin in fleshy fruit, expression studies were performed on a family of six calmodulin genes (SlCaMs) in mature-green stage tomato fruit in response to mechanical injury and Botrytis cinerea infection. Both wounding and pathogen in...

  12. Wound infections after median sternotomy treated by VAC therapy, summary of results, and risk factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulman, M; Bezak, B; Artemiou, P; Cikrai, R

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to summarize results and analyze risk factors for the development of wound infection in heart surgery patients after median sternotomy. In this retrospective analysis with assessment of multiple risk factors, we examined 143 patients with infection after median sternotomy treated with VAC therapy from total of 4,650 patients operated in our department from 2012 to 2015. Total of 143 patients developed significant SSI treated by VAC therapy following cardiac surgery. Of these, only 14 patients developed DSWI and one patient was diagnosed with suspected osteomyelitis. BMI, female gender, and use of BIMA proved to be statistically significant risk factors in our study (p infection (p infection proved to be a significant prognostic factor for patients' outcome (p infection (Tab. 3, Ref. 30).

  13. A systematic review and meta-analysis on the use of prophylactic topical antibiotics for the prevention of uncomplicated wound infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Q

    2018-03-01

    difference: −3.1% [95% CI: −5.8% to −0.34%]; p=0.03. Compared to antiseptics, topical antibiotics demonstrated statistically significant relative risk reduction (pooled risk ratio: 0.56 [95% CI: 0.23 to 0.91]; p=0.02, while there was no significant absolute risk reduction (pooled risk difference: −3.7% [95% CI: −7.9% to +0.6%]; p=0.09. Conclusion: Topical antibiotics are effective in reducing wound infections after surgical procedures, but the absolute benefit is small. Given the global emergence of antimicrobial resistance, judicious use of antibiotics is encouraged and use of antiseptics should be considered as a reasonable alternative to topical antibiotics. Keywords: topical antibiotics, prevention, wound infections

  14. Evaluation of biocontrol agents for grapevine pruning wound protection against trunk pathogen infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charl KOTZE

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Trunk diseases of grapevine are caused by numerous pathogens, including Eutypa lata, Phaeomoniella chlamydospora, and species of Botryosphaeriaceae (incl. Botryosphaeria and aggregate genera, Phomopsis and Phaeoacremonium. Since infections occur mainly through pruning wounds, that have been shown by previous research to stay susceptible for up to 16 weeks after pruning, long-term pruning wound protection is required for prevention of infection. This study evaluated several biocontrol agents against a range of trunk disease pathogens in dual plate laboratory trials to determine macroscopic and microscopic interactions. The biocontrol agents had a substantial effect on all the pathogens, with a wide range of macroscopic and microscopic interactions observed. The best performing biocontrol agents were tested in two field trials. Fresh pruning wounds were treated with benomyl, Trichoderma products (Biotricho®, Vinevax® and ECO 77® and isolates (USPP-T1 and -T2, identified as T. atroviride and Bacillus subtilis. Seven days after treatment the pruning wounds were inoculated by spraying with spore suspensions of Neofusicoccum australe, N. parvum, Diplodia seriata, Lasiodiplodia theobromae, Eutypa lata, Phaeomoniella chlamydospora or Phomopsis viticola. Eight months after inoculation, the treatments were evaluated by isolation onto potato dextrose agar. The efficacy of the biocontrol agents was in most cases similar or superior to that observed for benomyl. Isolate USPP-T1, in particular, was very effective, reducing incidence of Ph. viticola, E. lata, Pa. chlamydospora, N. australe, N. parvum, D. seriata and L. theobromae by 69, 76, 77, 78, 80, 85 and 92%, respectively. This is the first report of biological protection of grapevine pruning wounds against this group of grapevine trunk disease pathogens.

  15. Abdominal surgical site infections: incidence and risk factors at an Iranian teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabouri Kashani Ahmad

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abdominal surgical site infections are among the most common complications of inpatient admissions and have serious consequences for outcomes and costs. Different risk factors may be involved, including age, sex, nutrition and immunity, prophylactic antibiotics, operation type and duration, type of shaving, and secondary infections. This study aimed to determine the risk factors affecting abdominal surgical site infections and their incidence at Imam Khomeini, a major referral teaching hospital in Iran. Methods Patients (n = 802 who had undergone abdominal surgery were studied and the relationships among variables were analyzed by Student's t and Chi-square tests. The subjects were followed for 30 days and by a 20-item questionnaire. Data were collected through pre- and post-operative examinations and telephone follow-ups. Results Of the 802 patients, 139 suffered from SSI (17.4%. In 40.8% of the cases, the wound was dirty infected. The average age for the patients was 46.7 years. The operations were elective in 75.7% of the cases and 24.7% were urgent. The average duration of the operation was 2.24 hours, the average duration of pre-operative hospital stay 4.31 days and the average length of (pre- and post-operation hospital stay 11.2 days. Three quarters of the cases were shaved 12 hours before the operation. The increased operation time, increased bed stay, electivity of the operation, septicity of the wound, type of incision, the administration of prophylactic antibiotic, type of operation, background disease, and the increased time lapse between shaving and operation all significantly associated with SSI with a p-value less than 0.001. Conclusion In view of the high rate of SSI reported here (17.4% compared with the 14% quoted in literature, this study suggests that by reducing the average operation time to less than 2 hours, the average preoperative stay to 4 days and the overall stay to less than 11 days, and

  16. Prophylaxis of surgical site infection in adult spine surgery: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Reina; Tan, Terence; Tee, Jin Wee; Street, John

    2018-06-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) remains a significant source of morbidity in spine surgery, with reported rates varying from 0.7 to 16%. To systematically review and evaluate the evidence for strategies for prophylaxis of SSI in adult spine surgery in the last twenty years. Two independent systematic searches were conducted, at two international spine centers, encompassing PubMed, ClinicalTrials.gov, Cochrane Database, EBSCO Medline, ScienceDirect, Ovid Medline, EMBASE (Ovid), and MEDLINE. References were combined and screened, then distilled to 69 independent studies for final review. 11 randomized controlled trials (RCTs), 51 case-controlled studies (CCS), and 7 case series were identified. Wide variation exists in surgical indications, approaches, procedures, and even definitions of SSI. Intra-wound vancomycin powder was the most widely studied intervention (19 studies, 1 RCT). Multiple studies examined perioperative antibiotic protocols, closed-suction drainage, povidone-iodine solution irrigation, and 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate skin closure. 18 interventions were examined by a single study only. There is limited evidence for the efficacy of intra-wound vancomycin. There is strong evidence that closed-suction drainage does not affect SSI rates, while there is moderate evidence for the efficacy of povidone-iodine irrigation and that single-dose preoperative antibiotics is as effective as multiple doses. Few conclusions can be drawn about other interventions given the paucity and poor quality of studies. While a small body of evidence underscores a select few interventions for SSI prophylaxis in adult spine surgery, most proposed measures have not been investigated beyond a single study. Further high level evidence is required to justify SSI preventative treatments. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The modified Pirogoff's amputation in treating diabetic foot infections: surgical technique and case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz Nather

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: This paper describes the surgical technique of a modified Pirogoff's amputation performed by the senior author and reports the results of this operation in a single surgeon case series for patients with diabetic foot infections. Methods: Six patients with diabetic foot infections were operated on by the National University Hospital (NUH diabetic foot team in Singapore between November 2011 and January 2012. All patients underwent a modified Pirogoff's amputation for diabetic foot infections. Inclusion criteria included the presence of a palpable posterior tibial pulse, ankle brachial index (ABI of more than 0.7, and distal infections not extending proximally beyond the midfoot level. Clinical parameters such as presence of pulses and ABI were recorded. Preoperative blood tests performed included a glycated hemoglobin level, hemoglobin, total white blood cell count, C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, albumin, and creatinine levels. All patients were subjected to 14 sessions of hyperbaric oxygen therapy postoperatively and were followed up for a minimum of 10 months. Results: All six patients had good wound healing. Tibio-calcaneal arthrodesis of the stump was achieved in all cases by 6 months postoperatively. All patients were able to walk with the prosthesis. Conclusions: The modified Pirogoff's amputation has been found to show good results in carefully selected patients with diabetic foot infections. The selection criteria included a palpable posterior tibial pulse, distal infections not extending proximally beyond the midfoot level, ABI of more than 0.7, hemoglobin level of more than 10 g/dL, and serum albumin level of more than 30 g/L.

  18. War Wounded and Victims of Traffic Accidents in a Surgical Hospital in Africa: An Observation on Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Martin

    2015-12-01

    Weapon injuries in armed conflict are likely to receive medical attention. Other types of injuries, like traffic accidents, continue to occur during armed conflict. Injuries caused by weapons and by traffic accidents require treatment, but reports and figures to help in prioritizing care are scarce. In a prospective observational study, all emergency patients admitted to the surgical ward in a public hospital of the Central African Republic were evaluated for the cause of their main injury. The proportion of patients injured by weapons and by traffic accidents was analyzed with respect to the level of violence. Seventy-eight patients were included in this study. Weapon injuries accounted for 50 (64%) admissions and traffic accidents for 28 (36%). These proportions varied significantly according to the weekly level of violence (χ(2)=46.8; Ptraffic accidents are an important, but overlooked, drain on surgical resources in low-income countries with armed conflict. Their proportion in relation to weapon wounded fluctuates with the level of violence. Humanitarian medical organizations might prepare themselves not only for weapon injuries, but also for wounds caused by traffic accidents.

  19. Pattern of pathogens and their sensitivity isolated from superficial surgical site infections in a tertiary care hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, S.A.; Tahir, S.M.; Shaikh, N.A.

    2009-01-01

    Infection is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in surgical patients. Rapidly emerging nosocomial pathogens and the problem of multi-drug resistance necessitates periodic review of isolation patterns and sensitivity in surgical practice. Surgical site infections (SSI) are defined as an infections that occurs at the incision site within thirty days after surgery. Objectives of the study were to determine the pattern of pathogens involved and their antibiotic sensitivity isolated from superficial surgical site infections in a teaching hospital. This observational study was conducted for 1 year from January 2008 to December 2008 in all 4 surgical units of Liaquat University Hospital Hyderabad which caters to patients from low socioeconomic status. Pus culture and sensitivity reports were collected prospectively from hospitalised patients who developed postoperative wound infection. The patients who developed fecal/biliary/urinary fistula or operated for malignancies, and with negative cultures were excluded from the study. Analysis was carried out using SPSS 10. During the study period 112 pus culture and sensitivity reports were analyzed. E. coli 68 (60.7%) was the most common organism isolated followed by Klebsiella 23 (20.5%). The least frequent organism was staph. Epidermidis 1 (0.9%). All isolates were sensitive to penicillin derivatives and carbapenem. Quinolones, Aminoglycosides and Monobactum were also showing some promise in our study. However, Cephalosporins were ineffective against most of the important isolates in our study. E. coli and klebsiella were the most important isolates form SSI in our study, and penicillin derivatives and carbapenem were showing 100% antibiotic sensitivity to all of the isolates. (author)

  20. Vacuum-assisted closure for open perineal wound after abdominoperineal resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujino, Shiki; Miyoshi, Norikatsu; Ohue, Masayuki; Noura, Shingo; Fujiwara, Yoshiyuki; Yano, Masahiko; Higashiyama, Masahiko; Sakon, Masato

    2015-01-01

    In colorectal cancer surgery, surgical site infection (SSI) is a common complication, and especially, perineal wound complications after abdominoperineal resection (APR) remain to be serious clinical problems. Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy was first reported in another surgical field in 1997, and it is useful for treating complex wounds because it promotes granulation. VAC therapy has been recently used for open abdominal wounds. We introduced VAC for treating open perineal wound of APR and report the usefulness of it. We treated four patients. Firstly, in cases 1 and 2, we introduced VAC therapy to the management of SSI of the perineal wound after APR, and it was useful to control postoperative perineal wound infection. And also, in cases 3 and 4, we introduced VAC therapy to prevent perineal wound infection. Perineal wound infection did not happen. A vertical rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap has been reported to decrease perineal wound complications including pelvic abscess and open perineal wound; however it results in significant operative blood loss, increased operative time, and additional surgical complications. In our cases, there were no complications relating to VAC therapy and it promoted rapid wound healing. Our results suggested that it is an effective treatment for APR in a high-risk case of an open perineal wound. VAC therapy is a less invasive method and a useful treatment for open perineal wound of APR. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Infected hardware after surgical stabilization of rib fractures: Outcomes and management experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiels, Cornelius A; Aho, Johnathon M; Naik, Nimesh D; Zielinski, Martin D; Schiller, Henry J; Morris, David S; Kim, Brian D

    2016-05-01

    Surgical stabilization of rib fracture (SSRF) is increasingly used for treatment of rib fractures. There are few data on the incidence, risk factors, outcomes, and optimal management strategy for hardware infection in these patients. We aimed to develop and propose a management algorithm to help others treat this potentially morbid complication. We retrospectively searched a prospectively collected rib fracture database for the records of all patients who underwent SSRF from August 2009 through March 2014 at our institution. We then analyzed for the subsequent development of hardware infection among these patients. Standard descriptive analyses were performed. Among 122 patients who underwent SSRF, most (73%) were men; the mean (SD) age was 59.5 (16.4) years, and median (interquartile range [IQR]) Injury Severity Score was 17 (13-22). The median number of rib fractures was 7 (5-9) and 48% of the patients had flail chest. Mortality at 30 days was 0.8%. Five patients (4.1%) had a hardware infection on mean (SD) postoperative day 12.0 (6.6). Median Injury Severity Score (17 [range, 13-42]) and hospital length of stay (9 days [6-37 days]) in these patients were similar to the values for those without infection (17 days [range, 13-22 days] and 9 days [6-12 days], respectively). Patients with infection underwent a median (IQR) of 2 (range, 2-3) additional operations, which included wound debridement (n = 5), negative-pressure wound therapy (n = 3), and antibiotic beads (n = 4). Hardware was removed in 3 patients at 140, 190, and 192 days after index operation. Cultures grew only gram-positive organisms. No patients required reintervention after hardware removal, and all achieved bony union and were taking no narcotics or antibiotics at the latest follow-up. Although uncommon, hardware infection after SSRF carries considerable morbidity. With the use of an aggressive multimodal management strategy, however, bony union and favorable long-term outcomes can be achieved

  2. Wound complications and surgical events in de novo heart transplant patients treated with everolimus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rashidi, Mitra; Esmaily, Sorosh; Fiane, Arnt E

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The use of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors have been limited by adverse events (AE), including delayed wound healing. We retrospectively reviewed all AE and serious AE (SAE) in The Scandinavian heart transplant (HTx) everolimus (EVE) de novo trial with early calcineurin...

  3. Predicting surgical site infection after spine surgery: a validated model using a prospective surgical registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Michael J; Cizik, Amy M; Hamilton, Deven; Chapman, Jens R

    2014-09-01

    The impact of surgical site infection (SSI) is substantial. Although previous study has determined relative risk and odds ratio (OR) values to quantify risk factors, these values may be difficult to translate to the patient during counseling of surgical options. Ideally, a model that predicts absolute risk of SSI, rather than relative risk or OR values, would greatly enhance the discussion of safety of spine surgery. To date, there is no risk stratification model that specifically predicts the risk of medical complication. The purpose of this study was to create and validate a predictive model for the risk of SSI after spine surgery. This study performs a multivariate analysis of SSI after spine surgery using a large prospective surgical registry. Using the results of this analysis, this study will then create and validate a predictive model for SSI after spine surgery. The patient sample is from a high-quality surgical registry from our two institutions with prospectively collected, detailed demographic, comorbidity, and complication data. An SSI that required return to the operating room for surgical debridement. Using a prospectively collected surgical registry of more than 1,532 patients with extensive demographic, comorbidity, surgical, and complication details recorded for 2 years after the surgery, we identified several risk factors for SSI after multivariate analysis. Using the beta coefficients from those regression analyses, we created a model to predict the occurrence of SSI after spine surgery. We split our data into two subsets for internal and cross-validation of our model. We created a predictive model based on our beta coefficients from our multivariate analysis. The final predictive model for SSI had a receiver-operator curve characteristic of 0.72, considered to be a fair measure. The final model has been uploaded for use on SpineSage.com. We present a validated model for predicting SSI after spine surgery. The value in this model is that it gives

  4. Prospective Analysis of Surgical Bone Margins After Partial Foot Amputation in Diabetic Patients Admitted With Moderate to Severe Foot Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Brian M; McHugh, Jonathan B; Patel, Rajiv M; Wrobel, James S

    2018-04-01

    Osteomyelitis is common in diabetic foot infections and medical management can lead to poor outcomes. Surgical management involves sending histopathologic and microbiologic specimens which guides future intervention. We examined the effect of obtainment of surgical margins in patients undergoing forefoot amputations to identify patient characteristics associated with outcomes. Secondary aims included evaluating interobserver reliability of histopathologic data at both the distal-to and proximal-to surgical bone margin. Data were prospectively collected on 72 individuals and was pooled for analysis. Standardized method to retrieve intraoperative bone margins was established. A univariate analysis was performed. Negative outcomes, including major lower extremity amputation, wound dehiscence, reulceration, reamputation, or death were recorded. Viable proximal margins were obtained in 63 out of 72 cases (87.5%). Strong interobserver reliability of histopathology was recorded. Univariate analysis demonstrated preoperative platelets, albumin, probe-to-bone testing, absolute toe pressures, smaller wound surface area were associated with obtaining viable margins. Residual osteomyelitis resulted in readmission 2.6 times more often and more postoperative complications. Certain patients were significantly different in the viable margin group versus dirty margin group. High interobserver reliability was demonstrated. Obtainment of viable margins resulted in reduced rates of readmission and negative outcomes. Prognostic, Level I: Prospective.

  5. Patients at High-Risk for Surgical Site Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueck, Krislynn M; Kao, Lillian S

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are a significant healthcare quality issue, resulting in increased morbidity, disability, length of stay, resource utilization, and costs. Identification of high-risk patients may improve pre-operative counseling, inform resource utilization, and allow modifications in peri-operative management to optimize outcomes. Review of the pertinent English-language literature. High-risk surgical patients may be identified on the basis of individual risk factors or combinations of factors. In particular, statistical models and risk calculators may be useful in predicting infectious risks, both in general and for SSIs. These models differ in the number of variables; inclusion of pre-operative, intra-operative, or post-operative variables; ease of calculation; and specificity for particular procedures. Furthermore, the models differ in their accuracy in stratifying risk. Biomarkers may be a promising way to identify patients at high risk of infectious complications. Although multiple strategies exist for identifying surgical patients at high risk for SSIs, no one strategy is superior for all patients. Further efforts are necessary to determine if risk stratification in combination with risk modification can reduce SSIs in these patient populations.

  6. Pre-operative antibiotic use reduces surgical site infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toor, Asad Ali; Farooka, Muhammad Waris; Ayyaz, Mahmood; Sarwar, Hassan; Malik, Awais Amjad; Shabbir, Faisal

    2015-07-01

    To assess the efficacy of World Health Organisation Surgical Safety Checklist as a simple, reliable and effective tool to ensure appropriate administration of intravenous antibiotics. The prospective interventional study was conducted in three phases at Mayo Hospital, Lahore, from May 2011 to January 2012. The first phase comprised baseline data collection, followed by implementation of World Health Organisation Surgical Safety Checklist, and finally post-implementation data collection. The duration of each phase was 3 months. Primary end points were discharge from hospital, 30 days or death of the patient. Of the 613 patients in the study, 303(49.4%) were in the pre-implementation phase and 310(50.5%) in post-implementation phase. Adherence of optimal administration of antibiotic increased from 114(37.6%) to 282(91%) (poperative infection fell from 99(32.7%) to 47(15.2%) (psite infection by more than half. Hospital stay was shortened by 1.3 days on average which results in considerable reduction in morbidity, mortality and costs.

  7. Isolation and in vitro evaluation of bacteriophages against MDR-bacterial isolates from septic wound infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roja Rani Pallavali

    Full Text Available Multi-drug resistance has become a major problem for the treatment of pathogenic bacterial infections. The use of bacteriophages is an attractive approach to overcome the problem of drug resistance in several pathogens that cause fatal diseases. Our study aimed to isolate multi drug resistant bacteria from patients with septic wounds and then isolate and apply bacteriophages in vitro as alternative therapeutic agents. Pus samples were aseptically collected from Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Medical Science (RIMS, Kadapa, A.P., and samples were analyzed by gram staining, evaluating morphological characteristics, and biochemical methods. MDR-bacterial strains were collected using the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method against a variety of antibiotics. Bacteriophages were collected and tested in vitro for lytic activity against MDR-bacterial isolates. Analysis of the pus swab samples revealed that the most of the isolates detected had Pseudomonas aeruginosa as the predominant bacterium, followed by Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli. Our results suggested that gram-negative bacteria were more predominant than gram-positive bacteria in septic wounds; most of these isolates were resistant to ampicillin, amoxicillin, penicillin, vancomycin and tetracycline. All the gram-positive isolates (100% were multi-drug resistant, whereas 86% of the gram-negative isolates had a drug resistant nature. Further bacteriophages isolated from sewage demonstrated perfect lytic activity against the multi-drug resistant bacteria causing septic wounds. In vitro analysis of the isolated bacteriophages demonstrated perfect lysis against the corresponding MDR-bacteria, and these isolated phages may be promising as a first choice for prophylaxis against wound sepsis, Moreover, phage therapy does not enhance multi-drug resistance in bacteria and could work simultaneously on a wide variety of MDR-bacteria when used in a bacteriophage cocktail. Hence

  8. Non-observance of guidelines for surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis and surgical-site infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lallemand, S; Thouverez, M; Bailly, P; Bertrand, X; Talon, D

    2002-06-01

    A prospective multicentre study was conducted to assess major aspects of surgical prophylaxis and to determine whether inappropriate antimicrobial prophylaxis was a factor associated (risk or protective factor) with surgical site infection (SSI). Surgical prophylaxis practices were assessed by analysing four variables: indication, antimicrobial agent, timing and duration. Univariate and multivariate analyses were carried out to identify predictors of SSI among patient-specific, operation-specific and antimicrobial prophylaxis-specific factors. The frequency of SSI was 2.7% (13 SSI in 474 observations). Total compliance of the prescription with guidelines was observed in 41.1% of cases (195 prescriptions). Of the 139 patients who received an inappropriate drug, 126 (90.6%) received a drug with a broader spectrum than the recommended drug. Prophylaxis was prolonged in 71 (87.7%) of the 81 patients who received prophylaxis for inappropriate lengths of time and 43 (61.4%) of the 70 patients who did not receive prophylaxis at the optimal moment were treated too late. Multivariate analysis clearly demonstrated that SSI was associated with multiple procedures (relative risk 8.5), short duration of prophylaxis (relative risk 12.7) and long-term therapy with antimicrobial agents during the previous year (relative risk 8.8). The ecological risk of the emergence of resistance associated with the frequent use of broad-spectrum antibiotics and prophylaxis for longer periods was not offset by individual benefit to the patients who received inappropriate prophylaxis.

  9. Risk factors for intracranial infection secondary to penetrating craniocerebral gunshot wounds in civilian practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Carlos Mario; Polo, Jonathan; España, Julian Andres

    2013-01-01

    To determine risk factors for intracranial infection secondary to penetrating craniocerebral gunshot wounds (PCGWs) in civilian practice, in patients who underwent surgery with removal of bullet fragments, wound debridement, and watertight dural closure. An observational, analytical, prospective, cohort-type study was conducted with follow-up in a group of patients with PCGWs caused by a low-velocity projectile admitted between January 2000 and November 2010. There were 160 patients, 59 of whom were administered prophylactic antibiotics based on the decision of the treating neurosurgeon. Average follow-up time was 39 months (range, 3-92 months). Infection occurred in 40 patients (25%); 20 patients received antibiotics (20 of 59 [33.9%]), and 20 patients did not receive antibiotics (20 of 101 [19.8%]). Three variables were independent risk factors for infection: (i) persistence of parenchymal osseous or metallic fragments after surgery (P projectile trajectory through a natural cavity with contaminating flora (P = 0.03, RR 2.84); and (iii) prolonged hospitalization time (P Projectile trajectory through potentially contaminating cavities, persistence of intraparenchymal osseous or metallic fragments after surgery, and prolonged hospital stay were independent risk factors for intracranial infection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Implementation of an Evidence-Based Protocol for Surgical Infection Prophylaxis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Savino, John A; Smeland, Jane; Flink, Ellen L; Ruperto, Angelo; Hines, Amanda; Sullivan, Thomas; Galvin, Kerri; Risucci, Donald A

    2005-01-01

    An evidence-based surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis (AMP) protocol was implemented in multiple facilities to determine if compliance led to a decrease in New York State reportable surgical site infections (SSIs...

  11. The Current State of Screening and Decolonization for the Prevention of Staphylococcus aureus Surgical Site Infection After Total Hip and Knee Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiser, Mitchell C; Moucha, Calin S

    2015-09-02

    The most common pathogens in surgical site infections after total hip and knee arthroplasty are methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA), methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), and coagulase-negative staphylococci. Patients colonized with MSSA or MRSA have an increased risk for a staphylococcal infection at the site of a total hip or knee arthroplasty. Most colonized individuals who develop a staphylococcal infection at the site of a total hip or total knee arthroplasty have molecularly identical S. aureus isolates in their nares and wounds. Screening and nasal decolonization of S. aureus can potentially reduce the rates of staphylococcal surgical site infection after total hip and total knee arthroplasty. Copyright © 2015 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated.

  12. Treatment of hardware infection after osteosynthesis of lower leg using negative pressure wound therapy and transforming powder dressing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinović, Marin; Ivandcić, Aldo; Spanjol, Josip; Pina, Maja; Bakota, Bore; Bandalović, Ante; Cukeljs, Fabijan

    2014-12-01

    Fractures of the distal part of the lower leg are more common in everyday practice and traumatology. In young and active patients these injuries are mainly caused by high energy trauma. They are treated with external fixator in first step, and in second step, after sanation of the soft tissue, with open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF). It is very safe and effective method of treatment. Treatment of the infections that occur in the early postoperative period after open reduction and internal fixation represents a great problem and challenge for surgeons. It is widely accepted that the presence of deep infection can't be cured in the presence of hardware. However, removal of hardware in the presence of unhealed fractures significantly complicates sanation of infection and fracture itself We have decided to present a 35-years-old patient with a hardware infection with present chronic wound with hardware exposed eight months after the first operation and six months after second operation. The wound measured one centimeter in diameter with cell detritus and bad granulations tissue inside the wound. Hardwre was exposed in the depth of the wound.The secretion was minimal. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT) was applicated after debridemet and lavage performed in ambulatory conditions. The starting therapy was continuously -125 mm Hg of vacuum. After five days of NPWT the defect was partially filled with granula- tion tissue. For another five days we continue with NPWT with the same values of-125 mm Hg pressure but in the inter- mitent mode. After that period we used transforming powder dressing for covering and protection of the wound with was filled with granulation tissue. Five days later, wound was completely healed with epithelisation. After four months of patient follow-up, we found the wound is completely repaired. The patient denies pain and has continued orderly flow of fracture healing, with no signs of infection.

  13. Biliary bacteria, antibiotic use, and wound infection in surgery of the gallbladder and common bile duct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, R T; Goodall, R G; Marien, B; Park, M; Lloyd-Smith, W; Wiegand, F M

    1987-01-01

    That clinical risk groups predict postoperative infection in biliary operations has recently been challenged. To reevaluate the risk of infection, we studied 215 patients stratified by clinical risk factors. Of 100 patients having simple "low-risk" cholecystectomy, 11 had positive bile cultures (90% pure), and one with sterile bile got a staphylococcal wound infection (WI). Among 92 "high-risk" patients with acute cholecystitis, obstructive jaundice, or choledochal stones, 42 had positive bile cultures (44% pure, 12% anaerobes). One of 52 patients who received preoperative cefazolin got a staphylococcal WI, but ten of 40 patients without antibiotic therapy developed WIs, nine caused by organisms that also grew from the bile. Of 23 patients with obstructive cholangitis, 22 had positive bile cultures (88% mixed, 23% anaerobes). Despite antibiotic therapy, four developed WIs caused by these organisms. The concept of clinical risk factors is validated.

  14. Open-to-Air Is a Viable Option for Initial Wound Care in Necrotizing Soft Tissue Infection that Allows Early Detection of Recurrence without Need for Painful Dressing Changes or Return to Operating Room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Derek; Davies, April; Burge, Bailey; Watkins, Phillip; Dissanaike, Sharmila

    2018-01-01

    The standard treatment of necrotizing soft tissue infection (NSTI) includes extensive surgical debridement. Care of these debridements is challenging because of the size of the wound and associated pain. A potential solution is to leave the wounds open-to-air in the period after the initial debridement, allowing for regular inspection at bedside while reducing pain associated with frequent dressing changes. We evaluated the feasibility of this approach from a pain control standpoint. An audit of wound care modalities used on adult patients with NSTI admitted to a regional burn center between January 2009 and May 2014 was performed. Patients with at least one operation were included. Those opting for palliative care were excluded. Wound care was divided into four categories: open-to-air (OTA), negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT), packing, and ointment. Wound care, pain score, pain medication use, and number of operations were collected for the first seven days after initial debridement. Pain management was assessed by pain scores. Analgesic use was measured and compared using conversion to morphine milligram equivalents (MME). Ninety-six patients were included; 67% were men with average age of 50 years, resulting in a total of 672 days of wound care evaluated: 69 days of OTA, 127 days of NPWT, 200 days of packing, and 126 days of ointment (150 days were undocumented). Average daily pain score from all wound care modalities was 2.00. Negative pressure wound therapy had the highest reported daily pain score (2.18, p = 0.034), whereas OTA had the lowest pain score (1.63, p < 0.05). Mortality was lower in the OTA cohort but was not statistically significant; there were no other differences in long-term outcome. Leaving wounds OTA is a safe and viable option in the immediate post-debridement period of NSTI to reduce pain, while permitting frequent re-evaluation for quick recognition of disease progression and repeat operative debridement if necessary.

  15. Wound infection caused by Lichtheimia ramosa due to a car accident

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bibashi, Evangelia; de Hoog, G Sybren; Pavlidis, Theodoros E; Symeonidis, Nikolaos; Sakantamis, Athanasios; Walther, Grit

    2012-01-01

    A 32-year-old immunocompetent man sustained severe traumas contaminated with organic material due to a car accident. An infection caused by Lichtheimia ramosa at the site of contamination was early diagnosed and cured by multiple surgical debridement and daily cleansing with antiseptic solution

  16. Wound infection caused by Lichtheimia ramosa due to a car accident

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bibashi, E.; de Hoog, G.S.; Pavlidis, T.E.; Symeonidis, N.; Sakantamis, A.; Walther, G.

    2013-01-01

    A 32-year-old immunocompetent man sustained severe traumas contaminated with organic material due to a car accident. An infection caused by Lichtheimia ramosa at the site of contamination was early diagnosed and cured by multiple surgical debridement and daily cleansing with antiseptic solution

  17. Perioperative hyperoxygenation and wound site infection following surgery for acute appendicitis: a randomized, prospective, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickel, Amitai; Gurevits, Michael; Vamos, Ronny; Ivry, Simon; Eitan, Arieh

    2011-04-01

    To assess the influence of hyperoxygenation on surgical site infection by using the most homogeneous study population. A randomized, prospective, controlled trial. Department of surgery in a government hospital. A total of 210 patients who underwent open surgery for acute appendicitis. In the study group, patients received 80% oxygen during anesthesia, followed by high-flow oxygen for 2 hours in the recovery room. The control group received 30% oxygen, as usual. Open appendectomy via incision in the right lower quadrant of the abdomen. Surgical site infection, mainly assessed by the ASEPSIS (additional treatment, serous discharge, erythema, purulent discharge, separation of deep tissues, isolation of bacteria, and stay in hospital prolonged >14 days) system score. Surgical site infections were recorded in 6 of 107 patients (5.6%) in the study group vs 14 of 103 patients (13.6%) in the control group (P = .04). Significant differences in the ASEPSIS score were also found. The mean hospital stay was longer in the control group (2.92 days) compared with the study group (2.51 days) (P = .01). The use of supplemental oxygen is advantageous in operations for acute appendicitis by reducing surgical site infection rate and hospital stay. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01002365.

  18. Manejo quirúrgico urgente de heridas faciales por mordedura humana Urgent surgical management of facial human bite wounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fernández García

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Las heridas por mordedura pueden generar algunas dificultades quirúrgicas en su manejo inicial debido a su especial predisposición a las complicaciones sépticas y la importante destrucción tisular frecuentemente asociada. Sin embargo, es importante su reparación inmediata, especialmente en el caso de amputaciones y colgajos por avulsión. Las mordeduras humanas se hallan envueltas además en consideraciones psicológicas que incrementan la dificultad del tratamiento debido a las espectativas estéticas de los pacientes que las sufren. Este trabajo analiza 7 casos de mordedura facial humana desde los puntos de vista epidemiológico y clínico. Presentamos y discutimos el uso de los tejidos amputados como fuente de injertos de piel, injertos condrales y el papel de los colgajos locales en dos tiempos en la cirugía de urgencia de estas lesiones.Bite wounds can create several surgical difficulties in their initial management due to the special facility for infectious complications and the frequent association with extensive tissue damage. However, the immediate repair its desirable, mainly in amputations and flap avulsions. The human bite wounds are also involved by psychological considerations that increase the difficulty of the treatment due to patient´s aesthetic expectations. This article analyzes 7 cases of facial human bites under the epidemiological and clinical points of view. The use of the amputated tissues to obtain skin grafts, condral grafts, and the role of local two stage flaps in the emergency surgery of these wounds are exposed and discussed.

  19. Anatomic and histological study of the rabbit mandible as an experimental model for wound healing and surgical therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campillo, V-E; Langonnet, S; Pierrefeu, A; Chaux-Bodard, A-G

    2014-10-01

    The rabbit is one of the most widely used models for studying bone remodeling or dental implant osseointegration but very few data are available about the rabbit's mandible. The aim of this work was to describe the anatomy of the rabbit mandible and to estimate the available bone volume for experimental studies. First, with a dissection, the morphology of the mandible was described and the mental foramen, the position of the main salivary glands and muscular insertions were located. Then, by X-ray imaging, the position of the inferior alveolar canal, the dental root courses and volume and bone density were described. Finally, with frontal sections of the mandible body, the rabbit's dental and alveolar bone histological structure were assessed. Thus, the relevance of the rabbit mandible as an experimental model for wound healing or surgical therapies was discussed. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  20. Factors associated with the healing of complex surgical wounds in the breast and abdomen: retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Eline Lima; Pires, José Ferreira; Abreu, Mery Natali Silva; Lima, Vera Lúcia de Araújo; Silva, Patrícia Aparecida Barbosa; Soares, Sônia Maria

    2016-10-10

    to estimate the healing rate of complex surgical wounds and its associated factors. retrospective cohort study from 2003 to 2014 with 160 outpatients of a Brazilian university hospital. Data were obtained through consultation of the medical records. Survival function was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression model to estimate the likelihood of the occurrence of healing. the complex surgical wound healing rate was 67.8% (95% CI: 60.8-74.9). Factors associated with a higher likelihood of wound healing were segmentectomy/quadrantectomy surgery, consumption of more than 20 grams/day of alcohol, wound extent of less that 17.3 cm2 and the length of existence of the wound prior to outpatient treatment of less than 15 days, while the use of hydrocolloid covering and Marlex mesh were associated with a lower likelihood of healing. the wound healing rate was considered high and was associated with the type of surgical intervention, alcohol consumption, type of covering, extent and length of wound existence. Preventive measures can be implemented during the monitoring of the evolution of the complex surgical wound closure, with possibilities of intervention in the modifiable risk factors. estimar a taxa de cicatrização de ferida cirúrgica complexa e seus fatores associados. coorte retrospectiva de 2003 a 2014 com 160 pacientes ambulatoriais de um hospital universitário brasileiro. Os dados foram obtidos por meio de consulta aos prontuários médicos. Função de sobrevida foi estimada pelo método de Kaplan-Meier e modelo de regressão de Cox para estimação do risco de ocorrência da cicatrização. a taxa de cicatrização da ferida cirúrgica complexa foi 67,8% (IC 95%: 60,8-74,9). Os fatores associados a um maior risco de cicatrização da ferida foram cirurgia de setorectomia / quadrantectomia, consumo de mais de 20 gramas/dia de etanol, extensão da ferida menor que 17,3 cm2 e tempo de existência da ferida pré-tratamento ambulatorial inferior

  1. Prevention of abdominal wound infection (PROUD trial, DRKS00000390: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

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    Heger Ulrike

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wound infection affects a considerable portion of patients after abdominal operations, increasing health care costs and postoperative morbidity and affecting quality of life. Antibacterial coating has been suggested as an effective measure to decrease postoperative wound infections after laparotomies. The INLINE metaanalysis has recently shown the superiority of a slowly absorbable continuous suture for abdominal closure; with PDS plus® such a suture has now been made available with triclosan antibacterial coating. Methods/Design The PROUD trial is designed as a randomised, controlled, observer, surgeon and patient blinded multicenter superiority trial with two parallel groups and a primary endpoint of wound infection during 30 days after surgery. The intervention group will receive triclosan coated polydioxanone sutures, whereas the control group will receive the standard polydioxanone sutures; abdominal closure will otherwise be standardized in both groups. Statistical analysis is based on intention-to-treat population via binary logistic regression analysis, the total sample size of n = 750 is sufficient to ensure alpha = 5% and power = 80%, an interim analysis will be carried out after data of 375 patients are available. Discussion The PROUD trial will yield robust data to determine the effectiveness of antibacterial coating in one of the standard sutures for abdominal closure and potentially lead to amendment of current guidelines. The exploration of clinically objective parameters as well as quality of life holds immediate relevance for clinical management and the pragmatic trial design ensures high external validity. Trial Registration The trial protocol has been registered with the German Clinical Trials Register (DRKS00000390.

  2. Development of a surgical site infection (SSI) surveillance system, calculation of SSI rates and specification of important factors affecting SSI in a digestive organ surgical department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Koji; Sawa, Akihiro; Akagi, Shinji; Kihira, Kenji

    2007-06-01

    We have developed an original system to conduct surgical site infection (SSI) surveillance. This system accumulates SSI surveillance information based on the National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance (NNIS) System and the Japanese Nosocomial Infections Surveillance (JNIS) System. The features of this system are as follows: easy input of data, high generality, data accuracy, SSI rate by operative procedure and risk index category (RIC) can be promptly calculated and compared with the current NNIS SSI rate, and the SSI rates and accumulated data can be exported electronically. Using this system, we monitored 798 patients in 24 operative procedure categories in the Digestive Organs Surgery Department of Mazda Hospital, Mazda Motor Corporation, from January 2004 through December 2005. The total number and rate of SSI were 47 and 5.89%, respectively. The SSI rates of 777 patients were calculated based on 15 operative procedure categories and Risk Index Categories (RIC). The highest SSI rate was observed in the rectum surgery of RIC 1 (30%), followed by the colon surgery of RIC3 (28.57%). About 30% of the isolated infecting bacteria were Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Escherichia coli. Using quantification theory type 2, the American Society of Anesthesiology score (4.531), volume of hemorrhage under operation (3.075), wound classification (1.76), operation time (1.352), and history of diabetes (0.989) increased to higher ranks as factors for SSI. Therefore, we evaluated this system as a useful tool in safety control for operative procedures.

  3. Métodos alternativos para el tratamiento de pacientes con heridas infectadas Alternative methods for treating patients with infected wounds

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    Rafael Rodríguez Ramírez

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Se revisó la bibliografía médica disponible sobre el uso de algunas sustancias de origen natural, utilizadas desde la antigüedad para tratar a personas lesionadas, inicialmente por traumatismos. Con el transcurso del tiempo, los conocimientos trasmitidos de una generación a otra condujeron a emplearlas para desinfectar heridas quirúrgicas y curar o cicatrizar úlceras, escaras y quemaduras, entre otras lesiones. La miel, el azúcar y los peloides, específicamente el limo, han devenido eficaces medicamentos para eliminar infecciones y reparar heridas, con mejores resultados que los derivados de productos industriales y otros métodos alternativos, puesto que además de ser menos costosos y de fácil aplicación, ejercen su acción beneficiosa sin tener que combinarse con antibióticos o compuestos cicatrizantes.The available literature on the use of some natural substances that were used since ancient times for treating injured people due to initial traumatisms was reviewed. Eventually, knowledge transmitted from one generation to another led to the employ of them in order to disinfect surgical wounds and cure or heal up ulcers, sloughs, and burns, among other injuries. Honey, sugar, and peloids, specifically mud, have become an effective therapy to avoid infections and restore wounds, achieving better results than those derived from using industrial products and other alternative methods, since they are less expensive and easy to apply, they provide a beneficial action without combining them with antibiotics or healing compounds.

  4. Peri-operative glycaemic control regimens for preventing surgical site infections in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Lillian S; Meeks, Derek; Moyer, Virginia A; Lally, Kevin P

    2009-07-08

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and resource utilization and are potentially preventable. Peri-operative hyperglycaemia has been associated with increased SSIs and previous recommendations have been to treat glucose levels above 200 mg/dL. However, recent studies have questioned the optimal glycaemic control regimen to prevent SSIs. Whether the benefits of strict or intensive glycaemic control with insulin infusion as compared to conventional management outweigh the risks remains controversial. To summarise the evidence for the impact of glycaemic control in the peri-operative period on the incidence of surgical site infections, hypoglycaemia, level of glycaemic control, all-cause and infection-related mortality, and hospital length of stay and to investigate for differences of effect between different levels of glycaemic control. A search strategy was developed to search the following databases: Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register (searched 25 March 2009), The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, The Cochrane Library 2009, Issue 1; Ovid MEDLINE (1950 to March Week 2 2009); Ovid EMBASE (1980 to 2009 Week 12) and EBSCO CINAHL (1982 to March Week 3 2009). The search was not limited by language or publication status. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) were eligible for inclusion if they evaluated two (or more) glycaemic control regimens in the peri-operative period (within one week pre-, intra-, and/or post-operative) and reported surgical site infections as an outcome. The standard method for conducting a systematic review in accordance with the Cochrane Wounds Group was used. Two review authors independently reviewed the results from the database searches and identified relevant studies. Two review authors extracted study data and outcomes from each study and reviewed each study for methodological quality. Any disagreement was resolved by discussion or by referral to a third review author. Five

  5. Dermal Wound Transcriptomic Responses to Infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa versus Klebsiella pneumoniae in a Rabbit Ear Wound Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-02

    intradermally with 1% lidocaine /1:100,000 epinephrine at the wound sites. A total of 18 rabbits were used. Four, 6-mm diameter, full-thickness dermal wounds...based on literature compiled in the Ingenuity® Knowledge Base, to include: ‘adhesion of immune cells’, ‘ synthesis of reactive oxygen species... synthesis of specific transcription factors and their target genes that support recovery from the stress (e.g., ER chaperones, oxidoreductases, and ERAD

  6. Diabetic foot wounds: the value of negative pressure wound therapy with instillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalla Paola, Luca

    2013-12-01

    Chronic wounds such as diabetic foot wounds are a tremendous burden to the health care system and often require a multidisciplinary approach to prevent amputations. Advanced technologies such as negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) and bioengineered tissues have been successfully used in the treatment of these types of complex wounds. However, the introduction of NPWT with instillation (NPWTi) has provided an alternative treatment for treating complex and difficult-to-heal wounds. This article provides an overview of NPWT and the new NPWTi system and describes preliminary experience using NPWTi on patients with complicated infected diabetic foot wounds after surgical debridement and in a multidisciplinary setting. © 2013 The Author. International Wound Journal © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Medicalhelplines.com Inc.

  7. Parallel pocket incision: Less invasive surgical intervention for the treatment of intractable pressure ulcer with wound edge undermining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Takumi; Yoshimatsu, Hidehiko; Hayashi, Akitatsu; Koshima, Isao

    2015-10-01

    The treatment of deep pressure ulcer with a wide wound edge undermining (pocket) is challenging, especially when conservative treatments are ineffective. As most patients with a pressure ulcer suffer from systemic comorbidities, invasive surgery cannot be performed on all patients, and less invasive treatment is required. Less invasive surgical intervention to a deep pressure ulcer, parallel pocket incision (PPI), was performed on 10 patients with intractable pressure ulcers with a pocket formation. In PPI procedures, two parallel skin incisions were made to open up the deepest fold of the pocket and to preserve the skin overlying the pocket lesion; through the created incisions, the necrotic tissues around the deepest fold of the undermining could be easily removed, which facilitated spontaneous wound healing. Postoperative results and complications were evaluated. All PPI procedures were safely performed under local infiltration anesthesia without major postoperative complication; minor bleeding was seen intraoperatively in three patients, which could be easily controlled with electric cautery coagulation. Nine of 10 ulcers were cured after PPI, and one could not be followed up due to the patient's death non-related to the pressure ulcer. For the nine cured patients, the average time for cure was 14.9 weeks, and no recurrence was observed at postoperative 6 months. PPI is a simple, technically easy, and less invasive surgical intervention to an intractable pressure ulcer with a pocket, which can be safely performed under local infiltration anesthesia even on a patient with severe systemic comorbidities. Copyright © 2015 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Does intraoperative low arterial partial pressure of oxygen increase the risk of surgical site infection following emergency exploratory laparotomy in horses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa-Farré, Cristina; Prades, Marta; Ribera, Thaïs; Valero, Oliver; Taurà, Pilar

    2014-04-01

    Decreased tissue oxygenation is a critical factor in the development of wound infection as neutrophil mediated oxidative killing is an essential mechanism against surgical pathogens. The objective of this prospective case series was to assess the impact of intraoperative arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2) on surgical site infection (SSI) in horses undergoing emergency exploratory laparotomy for acute gastrointestinal disease. The anaesthetic and antibiotic protocol was standardised. Demographic data, surgical potential risk factors and PaO2, obtained 1h after induction of anaesthesia were recorded. Surgical wounds were assessed daily for infection during hospitalisation and follow up information was obtained after discharge. A total of 84 adult horses were included. SSI developed in 34 (40.4%) horses. Multivariate logistic regression showed that PaO2, anaesthetic time and subcutaneous suture material were predictors of SSI (AUC=0.76, sensitivity=71%, specificity=65%). The use of polyglycolic acid sutures increased the risk and horses with a PaO2 value 2h had the highest risk of developing SSI (OR=9.01; 95% CI 2.28-35.64). The results of this study confirm the hypothesis that low intraoperative PaO2 contributes to the development of SSI following colic surgery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Operative Duration and Risk of Surgical Site Infection in Neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekelis, Kimon; Coy, Shannon; Simmons, Nathan

    2016-10-01

    The association of surgical duration with the risk of surgical site infection (SSI) has not been quantified in neurosurgery. We investigated the association of operative duration in neurosurgical procedures with the incidence of SSI. We performed a retrospective cohort study involving patients who underwent neurosurgical procedures from 2005 to 2012 and were registered in the American College of Surgeons National Quality Improvement Project registry. To control for confounding, we used multivariable regression models and propensity score conditioning. During the study period there were 94,744 patients who underwent a neurosurgical procedure and met the inclusion criteria. Of these patients, 4.1% developed a postoperative SSI within 30 days. Multivariable logistic regression showed an association between longer operative duration with higher incidence of SSI (odds ratio [OR], 1.18; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.16-1.20). Compared with procedures of moderate duration (third quintile, 40th-60th percentile), patients undergoing the longest procedures (>80th percentile) had higher odds (OR, 2.07; 95% CI, 1.86-2.31) of developing SSI. The shortest procedures (operative duration was associated with increased incidence of SSI for neurosurgical procedures. These results can be used by neurosurgeons to inform operative management and to stratify patients with regard to SSI risk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The 'French Fry' VAC technique: hybridisation of traditional open wound NPWT with closed incision NPWT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Karan; Tadisina, Kashyap K; Singh, Devinder P

    2016-04-01

    Surgical site occurrences (SSO), specifically surgical site infections represent a significant burden in the US health care system. It has been hypothesised that postoperative dressing can help drive down SSO. We describe the successful use of a novel technique combining both closed incision and open negative pressure wound therapy in the management of a high-risk wound associated with lymphoedema of obesity. © 2014 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2014 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Clinical identification of bacteria in human chronic wound infections: culturing vs. 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing

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    Rhoads Daniel D

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic wounds affect millions of people and cost billions of dollars in the United States each year. These wounds harbor polymicrobial biofilm communities, which can be difficult to elucidate using culturing methods. Clinical molecular microbiological methods are increasingly being employed to investigate the microbiota of chronic infections, including wounds, as part of standard patient care. However, molecular testing is more sensitive than culturing, which results in markedly different results being reported to clinicians. This study compares the results of aerobic culturing and molecular testing (culture-free 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing, and it examines the relative abundance score that is generated by the molecular test and the usefulness of the relative abundance score in predicting the likelihood that the same organism would be detected by culture. Methods Parallel samples from 51 chronic wounds were studied using aerobic culturing and 16S DNA sequencing for the identification of bacteria. Results One hundred forty-five (145 unique genera were identified using molecular methods, and 68 of these genera were aerotolerant. Fourteen (14 unique genera were identified using aerobic culture methods. One-third (31/92 of the cultures were determined to be Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterococcus faecalis with higher relative abundance scores were more likely to be detected by culture as demonstrated with regression modeling. Conclusion Discordance between molecular and culture testing is often observed. However, culture-free 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing and its relative abundance score can provide clinicians with insight into which bacteria are most abundant in a sample and which are most likely to be detected by culture.

  12. Antibacterial and Antifungal Potential of Himalayan Medicinal Plants for Treating Wound Infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habiba, U.; Ahmad, M.; Shinwari, S.; Sultana, S.; Zafar, M.; Shinwari, Z. K.

    2016-01-01

    Many bacterial and fungal strains are involved in wound infectious diseases as most of these strains become resistant to the most commonly used synthetic drugs in Himalayan region. Plant based natural products seem to be an alternative to this problem. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the In vitro antibacterial and antifungal activities of 30 medicinal plants used in folk recipes by Himalayan people to treat wound infections against multi-drug resistant pathogens. In total of six medically important Myco-bacterial strains Streptococcus pyogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Candida albicans and Aspergillus niger were tested against methanolic plant extracts at 5 mg/ml concentration using agar disc well diffusion method to determined Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs). The plant extracts showed varied levels of MICs against test microorganisms. The strongest antibacterial activity was reported in methanolic extract of Cynadon dactylon (L.) Pers. against Klebsiella pneumoniae with 20.67±1.36 mm MICs, while Candida albicans was considered to be the most resistant pathogen with MICs 9.6±0.57 mm. The findings were compared with results obtained using standard antibiotics, aminooxanilic, ciprofloxacin, cefotaxime, fluconazole and itraconazole at conc. 5mg/ ml. The results provide an evidence of folk medicinal uses of plants among the Himalayan communities to treat wounds. Further research needs to be carried out to identify the active molecules and evaluate the in vivo antibacterial and antifungal activities as well as toxicity level with clinical trials to use full potential of these plants for drug discovery development to control wounds globally. (author)

  13. Operative videothoracoscopy in the surgical treatment of penetrating firearms wounds of the chest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusov, P G; Kuritsyn, A N; Urazovsky, N Y; Tariverdiev, M L

    1998-09-01

    We prospectively analyzed our experience with operative videothoracoscopy (OVT) performed in a field military hospital in cases of penetrating firearms wounds of the thorax (PFAWT) sustained in Chechnya. From February to April 1996, we treated 206 wounded patients, of whom 37 (18.0%) had sustained chest injuries. PFAWT were present in 23 soldiers, accounting for 62.2% of all chest injuries. Twelve injuries were confined to the thorax, eight patients had associated injuries, and three soldiers had thoracoabdominal injuries. Nineteen patients had pleural drainage performed during medical evacuation. The thoracic injuries were right-sided (17), involved bullets or shell splinters (23); were through and through (16), represented solitary wounds (19), and were associated with internal organ injuries (21). Fifteen patients had indications for OVT when they were delivered from the battle-field 1.5 to 22 hours after injury. All patients manifested signs of hemorrhagic shock and hemodynamic instability. Indications for OVT were ongoing intrapleural bleeding (6), clotted hemothorax (6), or marked air leakage (3) preventing lung inflation with the OP-02 apparatus (field modification). OVT revealed 12 lung wounds, nine of which were multiple wounds, pleural bleeding in 6 patients, clotted hemothorax in 11 patients, and foreign bodies in 5 patients. Two patients underwent thoracotomy, one for suspicion of heart injury and the second because we could not adequately visualize and control bleeding revealed at OVT to be from the intercostal artery in the left costovertebral angle. Eight of 23 patients had no indication for operative videothoracoscopy and were managed with continued pleural aspiration and drug therapy. Wedge resection of the lung using an Endo-GIA-30 stapler was necessary in two patients because of parenchymal destruction and bleeding. Evacuation of clotted blood by fragmentation and aspiration was satisfactory in all cases. Satisfactory manual suturing of selected

  14. A Clinicoepidemiological Profile of Chronic Wounds in Wound Healing Department in Shanghai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaofang; Ni, Pengwen; Wu, Minjie; Huang, Yao; Ye, Junna; Xie, Ting

    2017-03-01

    The aim of the study was to update the clinical database of chronic wounds in order to derive an evidence based understanding of the condition and hence to guide future clinical management in China. A total of 241 patients from January 1, 2011 to April 30, 2016 with chronic wounds of more than 2 weeks' duration were studied in wound healing department in Shanghai. Results revealed that among all the patients the mean age was 52.5 ± 20.2 years (range 2-92 years). The mean initial area of wounds was 30.3 ± 63.0 cm 2 (range 0.25-468 cm 2 ). The mean duration of wounds was 68.5 ± 175.2 months (range 0.5-840 months). The previously reported causes of chronic wounds were traumatic or surgical wounds (n = 82, 34.0%), followed by pressure ulcers (n = 59, 24.5%). To study the effects of age, patients were divided into 2 groups: less than 60 years (wounds etiology between the 2 age groups was analyzed, and there was significant statistical difference ( P wounds, chi-square test was used. There were significant differences in the factor of wound infection. ( P = .035, 95% CI = 0.031-0.038) Regarding therapies, 72.6% (n = 175) of the patients were treated with negative pressure wound therapy. Among all the patients, 29.9% (n = 72) of them were completely healed when discharged while 62.7% (n = 150) of them improved. The mean treatment cost was 12055.4 ± 9206.3 Chinese Yuan (range 891-63626 Chinese Yuan). In conclusion, traumatic or surgical wounds have recently become the leading cause of chronic wounds in Shanghai, China. Etiology of the 2 age groups was different. Infection could significantly influence the wound outcome.

  15. Uso del agente antimicrobiano PHMB para prevenir la infección de heridas The use of the antimicrobial agent PHMB to prevent wounds infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith Moore

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available La infección de heridas postoperatorias puede provocar una cicatrización tardía, una estancia prolongada en el hospital y mayores costes. El aumento de bacterias resistentes a los antibióticos es un factor en contra del uso profiláctico de los antibióticos. Una alternativa eficaz es el uso de antisépticos, que presentan menos probabilidades de generar resistencia. Los apósitos AMD TM usan polihexametileno biguanida (PHMB, que tiene una baja toxicidad para las células de las heridas y es eficaz para acabar con las bacterias resistentes a los antibióticos. En este artículo, se revisan las pruebas de la eficacia y rentabilidad de los apósitos AMD en la prevención de las infecciones en la herida quirúrgica si se usan de forma rutinaria en los protocolos estándar para el cuidado de heridas.Post-operative wound infections may result in delayed healing, extended hospital stay and increased costs. The increase in antibiotic-resistant bacteria mitigates against the prophylactic use of antibiotics. An effective alternative is the use of antiseptics that are less likely to generate resistance. AMD TM wound dressings use polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB which has a low toxicity for wound cells and is effective in killing antibiotic-resistant bacteria. This paper reviews the evidence for the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of AMD dressings in the prevention of surgical site infections when routinely used in standard wound care protocols.

  16. Novel application of vacuum sealing drainage with continuous irrigation of potassium permanganate for managing infective wounds of gas gangrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ning; Wu, Xing-Huo; Liu, Rong; Yang, Shu-Hua; Huang, Wei; Jiang, Dian-Ming; Wu, Qiang; Xia, Tian; Shao, Zeng-Wu; Ye, Zhe-Wei

    2015-08-01

    Traumatic gas gangrene is a fatal infection mainly caused by Clostridium perfringens. It is a challenge to manage gas gangrene in open wounds and control infection after debridement or amputation. The aim of the present study was to use vacuum sealing drainage (VSD) with continuous irrigation of potassium permanganate to manage infective wounds of gas gangrene and observe its clinical efficacy. A total of 48 patients with open traumatic gas gangrene infection were included in this study. Amputations were done for 27 patients, and limb salvage procedures were performed for the others. After amputation or aggressive debridement, the VSD system, including polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) foam dressing and polyurethane (PU) film, with continuous irrigation of 1:5000 potassium permanganate solutions, was applied to the wounds. During the follow-up, all the patients healed without recurrence within 8-18 months. There were four complications. Cardiac arrest during amputation surgery occurred in one patient who suffered from severe septic shock. Emergent resuscitation was performed and the patient returned to stable condition. One patient suffered from mixed infection of Staphylococcal aureus, and a second-stage debridement was performed. One patient suffered from severe pain of the limb after the debridement. Exploratory operation was done and the possible reason was trauma of a local peripheral nerve. Three cases of crush syndrome had dialysis treatment for concomitant renal failure. In conclusion, VSD can convert open wound to closed wound, and evacuate necrotic tissues. Furthermore, potassium permanganate solutions help eliminate anaerobic microenvironment and achieve good therapeutic effect on gas gangrene and mixed infection. VSD with continuous irrigation of potassium permanganate is a novel, simple and feasible alternative for severe traumatic open wounds with gas gangrene infection.

  17. Toward the rational use of standardized infection ratios to benchmark surgical site infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Haruhisa; Morikane, Keita; Kuroki, Manabu; Taniguchi, Shinichiro; Shinzato, Takashi; Sakamoto, Fumie; Okada, Kunihiko; Matsukawa, Hiroshi; Ieiri, Yuko; Hayashi, Kouji; Kawai, Shin

    2013-09-01

    The National Healthcare Safety Network transitioned from surgical site infection (SSI) rates to the standardized infection ratio (SIR) calculated by statistical models that included perioperative factors (surgical approach and surgery duration). Rationally, however, only patient-related variables should be included in the SIR model. Logistic regression was performed to predict expected SSI rate in 2 models that included or excluded perioperative factors. Observed and expected SSI rates were used to calculate the SIR for each participating hospital. The difference of SIR in each model was then evaluated. Surveillance data were collected from a total of 1,530 colon surgery patients and 185 SSIs. C-index in the model with perioperative factors was statistically greater than that in the model including patient-related factors only (0.701 vs 0.621, respectively, P operative process or the competence of surgical teams, these factors should not be considered predictive variables. Copyright © 2013 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Preoperative oral antibiotics reduce surgical site infection following elective colorectal resections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Jamie A; Altom, Laura K; Deierhoi, Rhiannon J; Morris, Melanie; Richman, Joshua S; Vick, Catherine C; Itani, Kamal M F; Hawn, Mary T

    2012-11-01

    Surgical site infection is a major cause of morbidity after colorectal resections. Despite evidence that preoperative oral antibiotics with mechanical bowel preparation reduce surgical site infection rates, the use of oral antibiotics is decreasing. Currently, the administration of oral antibiotics is controversial and considered ineffective without mechanical bowel preparation. The aim of this study is to examine the use of mechanical bowel preparation and oral antibiotics and their relationship to surgical site infection rates in a colorectal Surgical Care Improvement Project cohort. This retrospective study used Veterans Affairs Surgical Quality Improvement Program preoperative risk and surgical site infection outcome data linked to Veterans Affairs Surgical Care Improvement Project and Pharmacy Benefits Management data. Univariate and multivariable models were performed to identify factors associated with surgical site infection within 30 days of surgery. This study was conducted in 112 Veterans Affairs hospitals. Included were 9940 patients who underwent elective colorectal resections from 2005 to 2009. The primary outcome measured was the incidence of surgical site infection. Patients receiving oral antibiotics had significantly lower surgical site infection rates. Those receiving no bowel preparation had similar surgical site infection rates to those who had mechanical bowel preparation only (18.1% vs 20%). Those receiving oral antibiotics alone had an surgical site infection rate of 8.3%, and those receiving oral antibiotics plus mechanical bowel preparation had a rate of 9.2%. In adjusted analysis, the use of oral antibiotics alone was associated with a 67% decrease in surgical site infection occurrence (OR=0.33, 95% CI 0.21-0.50). Oral antibiotics plus mechanical bowel preparation was associated with a 57% decrease in surgical site infection occurrence (OR=0.43, 95% CI 0.34-0.55). Timely administration of parenteral antibiotics (Surgical Care Improvement

  19. Impact of vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy on clinical outcomes of patients with sternal wound infections: a meta-analysis of non-randomized studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falagas, Matthew E; Tansarli, Giannoula S; Kapaskelis, Anastasios; Vardakas, Konstantinos Z

    2013-01-01

    To examine the impact of VAC therapy on mortality of patients with sternal wound infections after cardiothoracic surgery. Controversial results regarding mortality of patients with sternal wound infections were published. We performed a systematic search in PubMed and Scopus. Mortality was the primary outcome of the meta-analysis. Recurrences, complications and length of stay were secondary outcomes. Twenty-two retrospective studies including 2467 patients were eligible for inclusion. Patients treated with VAC had significantly lower mortality compared to those treated without VAC [2233 patients, RR = 0.40, (95% CI 0.28, 0.57)]. This finding was consistent regardless of the study design, the exclusion of studies with positive findings, the criteria for establishment of the compared groups, the time of mortality assessment or the type of infections under study, provided that adequate data was available. VAC therapy was associated with fewer recurrences (RR = 0.34, 95% CI: 0.19-0.59). The meta-analysis did not show any difference in the length of stay (RR = -2.25, 95% CI: -7.52-3.02). VAC therapy was associated with lower mortality than other surgical techniques in retrospective cohorts of patients with DSWIs following cardiothoracic surgery.

  20. Wound healing of osteotomy defects prepared with piezo or conventional surgical instruments: a pilot study in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li; Mattheos, Nikos; Sun, Yan; Liu, Xi Ling; Yip Chui, Ying; Lang, Niklaus Peter

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate and compare the wound-healing process following osteotomies performed with either conventional rotary burs or piezoelectric surgery in a rabbit model. Two types of osteotomy window defects of the nasal cavities were prepared on the nasal bone of 16 adult New Zealand white rabbits with either a conventional rotary bur or piezo surgery. The defects were covered with a resorbable membrane. Four animals were killed at 1, 2, 3, and 5 weeks after the surgical procedure, respectively. Histological and morphometric evaluations were performed to assess the volumetric density of various tissue components: the blood clot, vascularized structures, provisional matrix, osteoid, mineralized bone, bone debris, residual tissue, and old bone. Significantly more bone debris was found at 1 week in the conventionally-prepared defects compared to the piezo surgically-prepared defects. At 2 and 3 weeks, a newly-formed hard tissue bridge, mainly composed of woven bone, was seen; however, no statistically-significant differences were observed. At 5 weeks, the defects were completely filled with newly-formed bone. The defects prepared by piezo surgery showed a significantly decreased proportion of bone debris at 1 week, compared to conventional rotary bur defect. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  1. The effect of clary sage oil on staphylococci responsible for wound infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sienkiewicz, Monika; Głowacka, Anna; Poznańska-Kurowska, Katarzyna; Kaszuba, Andrzej; Urbaniak, Anna; Kowalczyk, Edward

    2015-02-01

    The spreading of bacterial antibiotic resistance among clinical strains of pathogenic bacteria has made investigators to search for other active antibacterial agents which could provide a valuable complement to the existing therapies. To determine the antibacterial activity of clary sage oil (Salvia sclarea L.) against Staphylococcus clinical strains which were isolated from patients with wound infections. A comprehensive evaluation of Staphylococcus clinical strain resistance to antibiotics was performed. The constituents of clary sage oil were assayed by GC-FID-MS analysis. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the tested essential oil against staphylococci by the micro-dilution broth method was determined. The clary sage oil was active against Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis and S. xylosus with MIC values ranging from 3.75 to 7.00 µl/ml. The results of the in vitro tests encourage to use formulations containing sage oil as the active natural antimicrobial agent. Because of its antimicrobial properties clary sage oil may be applied to treat wounds and skin infections.

  2. Synergistic interaction of Helichrysum pedunculatum leaf extracts with antibiotics against wound infection associated bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OLAYINKA A AIYEGORO

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of combinations of the crude methanolic extract of the leaves of Helichrysum pedunculatum and eight first-line antibiotics were investigated by time kill assays against a panel of bacterial strains that have been implicated in wound infections. The plant extract showed appreciable antibacterial activities against the test bacteria with zones of inhibition ranging between 18 and 27 mm, and minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs varying between 0.1 and 5.0 mg/ml. The MICs of the test antibiotics range between 0.001 and 0.412 mg/ml, and combination of the plant extract and the antibiotics resulted in reduction of bacterial counts by between 0 and 6.63 Log10 cfu/ml. At V2 MIC, 56.81% synergy; 43.19% indifference and no antagonism were observed, and at MIC levels, 55.68% synergy; 44.32% indifference and no antagonism were observed when the extracts were combined with eight different antibiotics. In all, 60% of the interactions were synergistic. All combination regimes on Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538 yielded no synergy, neither was antagonism detected in any of the assays. We propose that extracts of the leaves of Helichrysum pedunculatum could be of relevance in combination therapy and as a source of resistance modifying principies that could be useful as treatment options for persistent wound infections.

  3. Synergistic interaction of Helichrysum pedunculatum leaf extracts with antibiotics against wound infection associated bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiyegoro, Olayinka A; Afolayan, Anthony J; Okoh, Anthony I

    2009-01-01

    The effect of combinations of the crude methanolic extract of the leaves of Helichrysum pedunculatum and eight first-line antibiotics were investigated by time kill assays against a panel of bacterial strains that have been implicated in wound infections. The plant extract showed appreciable antibacterial activities against the test bacteria with zones of inhibition ranging between 18 and 27 mm, and minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) varying between 0.1 and 5.0 mg/ml. The MICs of the test antibiotics range between 0.001 and 0.412 mg/ml, and combination of the plant extract and the antibiotics resulted in reduction of bacterial counts by between 0 and 6.63 Log10 cfu/ml. At V2 MIC, 56.81% synergy; 43.19% indifference and no antagonism were observed, and at MIC levels, 55.68% synergy; 44.32% indifference and no antagonism were observed when the extracts were combined with eight different antibiotics. In all, 60% of the interactions were synergistic. All combination regimes on Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538 yielded no synergy, neither was antagonism detected in any of the assays. We propose that extracts of the leaves of Helichrysum pedunculatum could be of relevance in combination therapy and as a source of resistance modifying principies that could be useful as treatment options for persistent wound infections.

  4. Evaluation of fungicides to protect pruning wounds from Botryosphaeriaceae species infections on almond trees

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    Diego OLMO

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In vitro efficacy of ten fungicides was evaluated against four Botryosphaeriaceae spp. (Diplodia seriata, Neofusicoccum luteum, N. mediterraneum and N. parvum associated with branch cankers on almond trees. Cyproconazole, pyraclostrobin, tebuconazole, and thiophanate-methyl were effective for the inhibition of mycelial growth of most of these fungi. An experiment on 3-year-old almond trees evaluated boscalid, mancozeb, thiophanate-methyl, pyraclostrobin and tebuconazole for preventative ability against infections caused by the four pathogens. Five months after pruning and fungicide application, lesion length measurements and isolation percentages showed no significant differences among the four pathogens after they were inoculated onto the trees, and also between the two inoculation times tested (1 or 7 d after fungicide application. Thiophanate-methyl was the most effective fungicide, resulting in the shortest lesion lengths and the lowest isolation percentages from artificially inoculated pruning wounds. This chemical is therefore a candidate for inclusion in integrated disease management, to protect pruning wounds from infections caused by species of Botryosphaeriaceae. This study represents the first approach to development of chemical control strategies for the management of canker diseases caused by Botryosphaeriaceae fungi on almond trees. 

  5. Incidence of and risk factors for surgical site infections in women undergoing hysterectomy for endometrial carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuomi, Taru; Pasanen, Annukka; Leminen, Arto; Bützow, Ralf; Loukovaara, Mikko

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of, and risk factors for, surgical site infections in a contemporary cohort of women with endometrial carcinoma. We retrospectively studied 1164 women treated for endometrial carcinoma by hysterectomy at a single institution in 2007-2013. In all, 912 women (78.4%) had minimally invasive hysterectomy. Data on surgical site infections were collected from medical records. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to identify risk factors for incisional and organ/space infections. Ninety-four women (8.1%) were diagnosed with a surgical site infection. Twenty women (1.7%) had an incisional infection and 74 (6.4%) had an organ/space infection. The associations of 17 clinico-pathologic and surgical variables were tested by univariate analyses. Those variables that were identified as potential risk factors in univariate analyses (p infections as dependent variables. Obesity (body mass index ≥ 30 kg/m(2)), diabetes, and long operative time (>80th centile) were independently associated with a higher risk of incisional infection, whereas minimally invasive surgery was associated with a smaller risk. Smoking, conversion to laparotomy, and lymphadenectomy were associated with a higher risk of organ/space infection. Organ/space infections comprised the majority of surgical site infections. Risk factors for incisional and organ/space infections differed. Minimally invasive hysterectomy was associated with a smaller risk of incisional infections but not of organ/space infections. © 2015 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  6. Comparison of post-operative wound infection after inguinal hernia repair with polypropylene mesh and polyester mesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mughal, M.A.; Ahmed, M.; Sajid, M.T.; Mustafa, Q.U.A.; Shukr, I.; Ahsan, J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare post operative wound infection frequency after inguinal hernia repair with polypropylene and polyester mesh using standard Lichtenstein hernioplasty technique. Study Design: Randomized controlled trial. Place and Duration: This study was conducted at general surgery department CMH/MH Rawalpindi from 8th April 2007 to 1st Jan 2008 over a period of 09 months. Patients and Materials: Sixty patients received through outpatient department with diagnosis of inguinal hernia satisfying inclusion/exclusion criteria were included. Patients were divided into two groups randomly. Group 1 included those patients in whom polypropylene mesh was used while group II patients were implanted with polyester mesh. Demographic as well as data concerning post operative wound infection was collected and analyzed. Results: Fifty seven patients (95%) were males while remaining (05%) were females. Mean age in group I was 41.17+-9.99 years while in group II was 41.47+-9.79 years (p=0.907). One patient (3.3%) in each group developed wound infection diagnosed by clinical evidence of pain at wound site, redness, induration and purulent discharge. Conclusion: There is no difference in post operative wound infection rate after inguinal Lichtenstein hernioplasty using either polypropylene or polyester mesh. (author)

  7. Role of Antibiotics on Surgical Site Infection in Cases of Open and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Surgical site infection (SSI) comes as third most common healthcare related infection which produces morbidity and deaths at large.[1] There are evidence of postoperative morbidity due to SSI. So it is needed to improve the outcome of surgical procedures and hence advised to give antibiotic prophylaxis. The incidence.

  8. Buried chip skin grafting in neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers following vacuum-assisted wound bed preparation: enhancing a classic surgical tool with novel technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Jürgen; Kneser, Ulrich; Bach, Alexander D; Horch, Raymund E

    2004-09-01

    In patients with diabetes mellitus, complications such as polyneuropathy and peripheral angiopathy inevitably lead to diabetic foot complications including foot ulcers, gangrene, and osteoarthropathy. These conditions necessitate minor or major amputation as part of treatment. In patients with Charcot's arthropathy and predominant neuropathy, recurrent foot ulcers are common in areas of high pressure. Such high pressure is caused by the degrading of the architecture of the foot and inadequate footwear. These patients are a clinical challenge. A select group of such patients may benefit from free surgical tissue transfer, though free or local flap surgery is often difficult or even impossible owing to an impaired arterial circulation. In such wounds, surgical debridement followed by skin grafts often fail due to bacterial burden in the wounds. To circumvent these problems, the authors developed a therapeutic approach using buried chip skin grafting to close granulation wound beds in diabetic feet. Locally applied vacuum therapy (VAC) for wound bed preparation of chronic, nonresponsive foot ulcers and subsequent grafting using the burying technique with a minute fraction of skin was used. Firm closure was achieved. The closed wound was resistant to mechanical irritation.

  9. Surgical site infection in patients submitted to heart transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Jussara Aparecida Souza do Nascimento; Ferretti-Rebustini, Renata Eloah de Lucena; Poveda, Vanessa de Brito

    2016-08-29

    to analyze the occurrence and predisposing factors for surgical site infection in patients submitted to heart transplantation, evaluating the relationship between cases of infections and the variables related to the patient and the surgical procedure. retrospective cohort study, with review of the medical records of patients older than 18 years submitted to heart transplantation. The correlation between variables was evaluated by using Fisher's exact test and Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon test. the sample consisted of 86 patients, predominantly men, with severe systemic disease, submitted to extensive preoperative hospitalizations. Signs of surgical site infection were observed in 9.3% of transplanted patients, with five (62.5%) superficial incisional, two (25%) deep and one (12.5%) case of organ/space infection. There was no statistically significant association between the variables related to the patient and the surgery. there was no association between the studied variables and the cases of surgical site infection, possibly due to the small number of cases of infection observed in the sample investigated. analisar a ocorrência e os fatores predisponentes para infecção de sítio cirúrgico em pacientes submetidos a transplante cardíaco e verificar a relação entre os casos de infecção e as variáveis referentes ao paciente e ao procedimento cirúrgico. estudo de coorte retrospectivo, com exame dos prontuários médicos de pacientes maiores de 18 anos, submetidos a transplante cardíaco. A correlação entre variáveis foi realizada por meio dos testes exato de Fischer e de Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon. a amostra foi constituída por 86 pacientes, predominantemente homens, com doença sistêmica grave, submetidos a internações pré-operatórias extensas. Apresentaram sinais de infecção do sítio cirúrgico 9,3% dos transplantados, sendo cinco (62,5%) incisionais superficiais, duas (25%) profundas e um (12,5%) caso de infecção de órgão/espaço. Não houve associa

  10. Postoperative Surgical Site Infections: Understanding the Discordance Between Surveillance Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali-Mucheru, Mariam N; Seville, Maria T; Miller, Vickie; Sampathkumar, Priya; Etzioni, David A

    2018-04-18

    To characterize agreement in the ascertainment of surgical site infections (SSIs) between the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP), National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN), and administrative data. The NSQIP, NHSN, and administrative data are the primary systems used to monitor and report SSIs for the purpose of quality control and benchmarking of hospitals and surgeons. These systems have different methods for identifying SSIs. We queried the NHSN, NSQIP, and administrative data systems for patients who had an operation at 1 of 4 hospitals within a single health system between January 2013 and September 2015. The detection of an SSI during a postoperative hospitalization was the outcome of analysis. Any SSI detected by one (or more) of these systems was analyzed by 2 reviewers to determine the presence of discrete elements of documentation constituting evidence of SSI. Concordance between the 3 systems (NHSN, NSQIP, and administrative data) was analyzed using Cohen's kappa. After application of appropriate exclusion criteria, a cohort of 9447 inpatient operations was analyzed. In total, 130 SSIs were detected by 1 or more of the 3 systems, with reported SSI rates of 0.5% (NHSN), 0.7% (administrative data), and 1.0% (NSQIP). Of these 130 SSIs, only 17 SSIs were reported by all 3 systems. The concordance between these 3 systems was moderate (kappa values NSQIP-NHSN = 0.50 [0.40-0.60], administrative-NHSN = 0.36 [0.24-0.47], and administrative-NSQIP = 0.47 [0.38-0.57]). Chart review found that reasons for discordance were related to issues of different criteria as well as inaccuracies. There is significant discordance in the determination of SSIs reported by the NHSN, NSQIP, and administrative data. The differences and limitations of each of these systems have to be recognized, especially when using these data for quality reports and pay for performance.

  11. Changes in levels of cytokines in the treatment of infected wounds and festering in children

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    O. V. Spakhi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Informative and prognostic significance of cytokines in assessing the effectiveness of treatment tactics no doubt. The aim was to study the levels of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in the dynamics of the treatment of infected wounds and purulent (IWP in children using the proposed optimized local treatment compared with standard procedure. Materials and methods. 45 children with IWP who were treated in the department of purulent surgery of Zaporozhye Regional Children's Hospital during the period of 2015-2016 years were divided into main (n = 26 and control groups (n = 19 depending on the tactics of treatment. The therapy of the main group patients were added by optimized integrated local treatment, which included a combination of magnetic therapy, antibacterial drug liposomal solutions and hirudotherapy. Efficacy of treatment was assessed by clinical characteristics and serum levels of IL-1β and IL-10 on the 1st and the 7th day of treatment. Results. The highest levels of pro-inflammatory IL-1β were defined in children with lymphadenitis on the first day of treatment. Common trends in the dynamics of cytokines content changes on the 7th day were in the line with generally accepted: decreased in IL-1β and increased in IL-10 levels. The level of IL-1β was not statistically different on the 7th day only in children with phlegmon. The most significant changes in IL-10 were observed in children with abscesses and lymphadenitis than in children with infected wound and phlegmon. Changes in markers of inflammation conform to positive changes in the clinical course of wound healing in children at the study. Generally, there was a lag dynamics of cytokines changes in the children who received standard therapy compared with the children who received the proposed optimized local treatment. Conclusions. The use of proposed IWP complex treatment in children showed the most significant effect on the anti-inflammatory IL-10 level in children with

  12. Vacuum-assisted closure therapy for infected perineal wounds after abdominoperineal resection. A retrospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walma, M S; Burbach, J P M; Verheijen, P M; Pronk, A; van Grevenstein, W M U

    INTRODUCTION: Perineal wound complications are a main problem after abdominoperineal resection (APR). There is little evidence concerning perineal wound management. This study describes and evaluates the role of vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy in wound management strategies of perineal wound

  13. [Effects of malnutrition on infective morbidity in the surgical treatment of portal hypertension (prospective evaluation)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, M F; Hoyos, C; Prado, E; Orozco, H

    1991-01-01

    With the aim of investigating the preoperative frequency of undernutrition and its impact on the infectious morbidity in patients without malignant disease, we studied prospectively 41 patients operated because of portal hypertension between 1987 and 1989 at the Instituto Nacional de la Nutrición. All patients were evaluated through anthropometric analysis and biochemical markers one week before the surgical procedure. A standard scheme of antibiotic profilaxis was used during surgery and the preoperative complications were registered up to discharge from the hospital. Undernutrition was considered when the serum albumin was less than 3 mg/dL or the total lymphocyte count was under 900, associated with a 10% weight loss in six months and reduction of one or more anthropometric parameters below the 30th percentile of the normal value. The group consisted of 17 males and 24 females with a mean age of 48 +/- 14 years old. 35 were Child A, four Child B and two Child C. Ten patients had a distal splenorenal shunt, seven esophageal devascularization and 24 gastric desvascularization with splenectomy. Twenty eight patients were well nourished and 13 undernourished. The two groups were comparable in all parameters except for the nutritional status. In the first group seven patients developed 10 complications and in the undernourished group eight patients had 14 complications (p less than 0.05 chi 2). There was no significant difference in the mortality rate. Infections occurred more frequently in: urinary tract, surgical wound, lung and pleura, and esophageal fistulae was an additional complication. The univariate analysis of the anthropometric parameters did not show significant differences between both groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Pattern of Bacterial Pathogens and Their Susceptibility Isolated from Surgical Site Infections at Selected Referral Hospitals, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

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    Walelign Dessie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The emergence of multidrug resistant bacterial pathogens in hospitals is becoming a challenge for surgeons to treat hospital acquired infections. Objective. To determine bacterial pathogens and drug susceptibility isolated from surgical site infections at St. Paul Specialized Hospital Millennium Medical College and Yekatit 12 Referral Hospital Medical College, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted between October 2013 and March 2014 on 107 surgical site infected patients. Wound specimens were collected using sterile cotton swab and processed as per standard operative procedures in appropriate culture media; and susceptibility testing was done using Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion technique. The data were analyzed by using SPSS version 20. Result. From a total of 107 swabs collected, 90 (84.1% were culture positive and 104 organisms were isolated. E. coli (24 (23.1% was the most common organism isolated followed by multidrug resistant Acinetobacter species (23 (22.1%. More than 58 (75% of the Gram negative isolates showed multiple antibiotic resistance (resistance ≥ 5 drugs. Pan-antibiotic resistance was noted among 8 (34.8% Acinetobacter species and 3 (12.5% E. coli. This calls for abstinence from antibiotic abuse. Conclusion. Gram negative bacteria were the most important isolates accounting for 76 (73.1%. Ampicillin, amoxicillin, penicillin, cephazoline, and tetracycline showed resistance while gentamicin and ciprofloxacin were relatively effective antimicrobials.

  15. Predictors of surgical site infection in laparoscopic and open ventral incisional herniorrhaphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaafarani, Haytham M A; Kaufman, Derrick; Reda, Domenic; Itani, Kamal M F

    2010-10-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) after ventral incisional hernia repair (VIH) can result in serious consequences. We sought to identify patient, procedure, and/or hernia characteristics that are associated with SSI in VIH. Between 2004 and 2006, patients were randomized in four Veteran Affairs (VA) hospitals to undergo laparoscopic or open VIH. Patients who developed SSI within eight weeks postoperatively were compared to those who did not. A bivariate analysis for each factor and a multiple logistic regression analysis were performed to determine factors associated with SSI. The variables studied included patient characteristics and co-morbidities (e.g., age, gender, race, ethnicity, body mass index, ASA classification, diabetes, steroid use), hernia characteristics (e.g., size, duration, number of previous incisions), procedure characteristics (e.g., open versus laparoscopic, blood loss, use of postoperative drains, operating room temperature) and surgeons' experience (resident training level, number of open VIH previously performed by the attending surgeon). Antibiotic prophylaxis, anticoagulation protocols, preparation of the skin, draping of the wound, body temperature control, and closure of the surgical site were all standardized and monitored throughout the study period. Out of 145 patients who underwent VIH, 21 developed a SSI (14.5%). Patients who underwent open VIH had significantly more SSIs than those who underwent laparoscopic VIH (22.1% versus 3.4%; P = 0.002). Among patients who underwent open VIH, those who developed SSI had a recorded intraoperative blood loss greater than 25 mL (68.4% versus 40.3%; P = 0.030), were more likely to have a drain placed (79.0% versus 49.3%; P = 0.021) and were more likey to be operated on by surgeons with less than 75 open VIH case experience (52.6% versus 28.4%; P = 0.048). Patient and hernia characteristics were similar between the two groups. In a multiple logistic regression analysis, the open surgical technique was

  16. [Analysis of surgical treatment with pectoralis major muscle flap for deep sternal infection after cardiac surgery: a case series of 189 patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dong; Wang, Wenzhang; Cai, Aibing; Han, Zhiyi; Li, Xiyuan; Ma, Jiagui

    2015-03-01

    To analyze and summarize the clinical features and experience in surgical treatment of deep sternal infection (DSWI). This was a retrospective study. From January 2008 to December 2013, 189 patients with secondary DSWI after cardiac surgery underwent the pectoralis major muscle flap transposition in our department. There were 116 male and 73 female patients. The mean age was (54 ± 21) years, the body mass index was (26. 1 ± 1. 3) kg/m2. The incidence of postoperation DSWI were after isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) in 93 patients, after other heart surgery plus CABG in 13 patients, after valve surgery in 47 patients, after thoracic aortic surgery in 16 patients, after congenital heart disease in 18 patients, and after cardiac injury in 2 patients. Clean patients' wound and extract secretions, clear the infection thoroughly by surgery and select antibiotics based on susceptibility results, and then repair the wound with appropriate muscle flap, place drain tube with negative pressure. Of all the 189 patients, 184 used isolate pectoralis, 1 used isolate rectus, and 4 used pectoralis plus rectus. The operative wounds of 179 patients were primary healing (94. 7%). Hospital discharge was postponed by 1 week for 7 patients, due to subcutaneous wound infection. Subcutaneous wound infection occurred again in 8 patients 1 week after hospital discharge, and their wounds healed after wound dressing. Nine patients (4. 7%) did not recover, due to residue of the sequestrum and costal chondritis, whom were later cured by undergoing a second treatment of debridement and pectoralis major muscle flap transposition. Eight patients died, in which 2 died of respiratory failure, 2 died of bacterial endocarditis with septicemia, 2 died of renal failure, 1 died of intraoperative bleeding leading to brain death and the 1 died of heart failure. The mortality rate was 4. 2% . The average length of postoperative hospital stay was (14 ± 5) days. The longest postoperative

  17. Evaluation of Carbohydrate-Derived Fulvic Acid (CHD-FA) as a Topical Broad-Spectrum Antimicrobial for Drug-Resistant Wound Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    the newly formulated CHD-FA-Zn. Our initial results demonstrated that CHD-FA-Zn reduced microbial burdens of susceptible and drug- resistant planktonic...wound-associated drug resistant bacteria and fungi. Rat models of wound infection (open, and burn model) will be established with healthy animals ...Establish MIC90s for CHD-FA with clinical isolates of major drug resistant pathogens Assess CHD-FA in animal models of wound infection for major

  18. Patient Self-Assessment of Surgical Site Infection is Inaccurate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Vered; Cohen, Matan J; Benenson, Shmuel; Almogy, Gideon; Brezis, Mayer

    2017-08-01

    Availability of surgical site infection (SSI) surveillance rates challenges clinicians, healthcare administrators and leaders and the public. The purpose of this report is to demonstrate the consequences patient self-assessment strategies have on SSI reporting rates. We performed SSI surveillance among patients undergoing general surgery procedures, including telephone follow-up 30 days after surgery. Additionally we undertook a separate validation study in which we compared patient self-assessments of SSI with surgeon assessment. Finally, we performed a meta-analysis of similar validation studies of patient self-assessment strategies. There were 22/266 in-hospital SSIs diagnosed (8.3%), and additional 16 cases were detected through the 30-day follow-up. In total, the SSI rate was 16.8% (95% CI 10.1-18.5). In the validation survey, we found patient telephone surveillance to have a sensitivity of 66% (95% CI 40-93%) and a specificity of 90% (95% CI 86-94%). The meta-analysis included five additional studies. The overall sensitivity was 83.3% (95% CI 79-88%), and the overall specificity was 97.4% (95% CI 97-98%). Simulation of the meta-analysis results divulged that when the true infection rate is 1%, reported rates would be 4%; a true rate of 50%, the reported rates would be 43%. Patient self-assessment strategies in order to fulfill 30-day SSI surveillance misestimate SSI rates and lead to an erroneous overall appreciation of inter-institutional variation. Self-assessment strategies overestimate SSIs rate of institutions with high-quality performance and underestimate rates of poor performance. We propose such strategies be abandoned. Alternative strategies of patient follow-up strategies should be evaluated in order to provide valid and reliable information regarding institutional performance in preventing patient harm.

  19. Reconstruction of Abdominal Wall of a Chronically Infected Postoperative Wound with a Rectus Abdominis Myofascial Splitting Flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Kyu Bae

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundIf a chronically infected abdominal wound develops, complications such as peritonitis and an abdominal wall defect could occur. This could prolong the patient's hospital stay and increase the possibility of re-operation or another infection as well. For this reason, a solution for infection control is necessary. In this study, surgery using a rectus abdominis muscle myofascial splitting flap was performed on an abdominal wall defect.MethodsFrom 2009 to 2012, 5 patients who underwent surgery due to ovarian rupture, cesarean section, or uterine myoma were chosen. In each case, during the first week after operation, the wound showed signs of infection. Surgery was chosen because the wounds did not resolve with dressing. Debridement was performed along the previous operation wound and dissection of the skin was performed to separate the skin and subcutaneous tissue from the attenuated rectus muscle and Scarpa's fascial layers. Once the anterior rectus sheath and muscle were adequately mobilized, the fascia and muscle flap were advanced medially so that the skin defect could be covered for reconstruction.ResultsUpon 3-week follow-up after a rectus abdominis myofascial splitting flap operation, no major complication occurred. In addition, all of the patients showed satisfaction in terms of function and esthetics at 3 to 6 months post-surgery.ConclusionsUsing a rectus abdominis myofascial splitting flap has many esthetic and functional benefits over previous methods of abdominal defect treatment, and notably, it enabled infection control by reconstruction using muscle.

  20. Preclinical advantages of intramuscularly administered peptide A3-APO over existing therapies in Acinetobacter baumannii wound infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostorhazi, Eszter; Rozgonyi, Ferenc; Sztodola, Andras; Harmos, Ferenc; Kovalszky, Ilona; Szabo, Dora; Knappe, Daniel; Hoffmann, Ralf; Cassone, Marco; Wade, John D; Bonomo, Robert A; Otvos, Laszlo

    2010-11-01

    The designer antibacterial peptide A3-APO is efficacious in mouse models of Escherichia coli and Acinetobacter baumannii systemic infections. Here we compare the efficacy of the peptide with that of imipenem and colistin in A. baumannii wound infections after burn injury. CD-1 mice were inflicted with burn wounds and different inocula of A. baumannii, isolated from an injured soldier, were placed into the wound sites. The antibiotics were given intramuscularly (im) one to five times. Available free peptide in the blood and the systemic toxicity of colistin and A3-APO were studied in healthy mice. While toxicity of colistin was observed at 25 mg/kg bolus drug administration, the lowest toxic dose of A3-APO was 75 mg/kg. In the A. baumannii blast injury models, 5 mg/kg A3-APO improved survival and reduced bacterial counts in the blood as well as in the wounds and improved wound appearance significantly better than any other antibiotic treatment. The free peptide concentration in the blood did not reach 1 µg/mL. Peptide A3-APO, with an intramuscular therapeutic index of 15, is more efficacious and less toxic than any existing burn injury infection therapy modality against multidrug-resistant Gram-negative pathogens. A3-APO administered by the im route probably binds to a biopolymer that promotes the peptide's biodistribution.

  1. A systematic review of maggot debridement therapy for chronically infected wounds and ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xinjuan; Jiang, Kechun; Chen, Jingan; Wu, Liang; Lu, Hui; Wang, Aiping; Wang, Jianming

    2014-08-01

    This study aimed to systematically evaluate maggot debridement therapy (MDT) in the treatment of chronically infected wounds and ulcers. We performed a meta-analysis referring to the PRISMA statement (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses). We searched for published articles in the following databases: PubMed, Web of Science, Embase, Wanfang (Chinese), and the China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI). The latest search was updated on March 14, 2014. For dichotomous outcomes, the effects of MDT were expressed as the relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). For continuous outcomes with different measurement scales, we calculated the standardized mean difference (SMD). The pooled effects were estimated using a fixed effect model or random effect model based on the heterogeneity test. Subgroup analyses were performed according to the types of wounds or ulcers. MDT had a significantly increased positive effect on wound healing compared with conventional therapies, with a pooled RR of 1.80 (95% CI 1.24-2.60). The subgroup analysis revealed that the combined RRs were 1.79 (95% CI 0.95-3.38) for patients with diabetic foot ulcers (DFU) and 1.70 (95% CI 1.28-2.27) for patients with other types of ulcers. The time to healing of the ulcers was significantly shorter among patients treated with MDT, with a pooled SMD of -0.95 (95% CI -1.24, -0.65). For patients with DFU, the SMD was -0.79 (95% CI -1.18, -0.41), and for patients with other types of ulcers, the SMD was -1.16 (95% CI -1.63, -0.69). MDT not only shortened the healing time but also improved the healing rate of chronic ulcers. Therefore, MDT may be a feasible alternative in the treatment of chronic ulcers. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Advance pre-operative chlorhexidine reduces the incidence of surgical site infections in knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zywiel, Michael G; Daley, Jacqueline A; Delanois, Ronald E; Naziri, Qais; Johnson, Aaron J; Mont, Michael A

    2011-07-01

    Surgical site infections following elective knee arthroplasties occur most commonly as a result of colonisation by the patient's native skin flora. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the incidence of deep surgical site infections in knee arthroplasty patients who used an advance cutaneous disinfection protocol and who were compared to patients who had peri-operative preparation only. All adult reconstruction surgeons at a single institution were approached to voluntarily provide patients with chlorhexidine gluconate-impregnated cloths and a printed sheet instructing their use the night before and morning of surgery. Records for all knee arthroplasties performed between January 2007 and December 2008 were reviewed to determine the incidence of deep incisional and periprosthetic surgical site infections. Overall, the advance pre-operative protocol was used in 136 of 912 total knee arthroplasties (15%). A lower incidence of surgical site infection was found in patients who used the advance cutaneous preparation protocol as compared to patients who used the in-hospital protocol alone. These findings were maintained when patients were stratified by surgical infection risk category. No surgical site infections occurred in the 136 patients who completed the protocol as compared to 21 infections in 711 procedures (3.0%) performed in patients who did not. Patient-directed skin disinfection using chlorhexidine gluconate-impregnated cloths the evening before, and the morning of, elective knee arthroplasty appeared to effectively reduce the incidence of surgical site infection when compared to patients who underwent in-hospital skin preparation only.

  3. Surgical site infection after open reduction and internal fixation of tibial plateau fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shishui; Mauffrey, Cyril; Hammerberg, E Mark; Stahel, Philip F; Hak, David J

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to identify risk factors for surgical site infections and to quantify the contribution of independent risk factors to the probability of developing infection after definitive fixation of tibial plateau fractures in adult patients. A retrospective analysis was performed at a level I trauma center between January 2004 and December 2010. Data were collected from a review of the patient's electronic medical records. A total of 251 consecutive patients (256 cases) were divided into two groups, those with surgical site infections and those without surgical site infections. Preoperative and perioperative variables were compared between these groups, and risk factors were determined by univariate analyses and multivariate logistic regression. Variables analyzed included age, gender, smoking history, diabetes, presence of an open fracture, presence of compartment syndrome, Schatzker classification, polytrauma status, ICU stay, time from injury to surgery, use of temporary external fixation, surgical approach, surgical fixation, operative time, and use of a drain. The overall rate of surgical site infection after ORIF of tibial plateau fractures during the 7 years of this study was 7.8% (20 of 256). The most common causative pathogens was Staphylococcus aureus (n=15, 75%). Independent predictors of surgical site infection identified by multivariate analyses were open tibial plateau fracture (odds ratio=3.9; 95% CI=1.3-11.6; p=0.015) and operative time (odds ratio=2.7; 95% CI=1.6-4.4; psite infection. Both open fracture and operative time are independent risks factors for postoperative infection.

  4. Risk factors for surgical site infection and urinary tract infection after spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tominaga, Hiroyuki; Setoguchi, Takao; Ishidou, Yasuhiro; Nagano, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Takuya; Komiya, Setsuro

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to identify and compare risk factors for surgical site infection (SSI) and non-surgical site infections (non-SSIs), particularly urinary tract infection (UTI), after spine surgery. We retrospectively reviewed 825 patients (median age 59.0 years (range 33-70 years); 442 males) who underwent spine surgery at Kagoshima University Hospital from January 2009 to December 2014. Patient parameters were compared using the Mann-Whitney U and Fisher's exact tests. Risk factors associated with SSI and UTI were analyzed via the multiple logistic regression analysis. P operation time (P = 0.0019 and 0.0162, respectively) and ASA classification 3 (P = 0.0132 and 0.0356, respectively). The 1 week post-operative C-reactive protein (CRP) level was a risk factor for UTI (P = 0.0299), but not for SSI (P = 0.4996). There was no relationship between SSI and symptomatic UTI after spine surgery. Risk factors for post-operative SSI and UTI were operative time and ASA classification 3; 1 week post-operative CRP was a risk factor for UTI only.

  5. Multicenter Quality Improvement Project to Prevent Sternal Wound Infections in Pediatric Cardiac Surgery Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Cathy; Taylor, Richard; Son, Minnette; Taeed, Roozbeh; Jacobs, Marshall L; Kane, Lauren; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Husain, S Adil

    2017-07-01

    Children undergoing cardiac surgery are at risk for sternal wound infections (SWIs) leading to increased morbidity and mortality. Single-center quality improvement (QI) initiatives have demonstrated decreased infection rates utilizing a bundled approach. This multicenter project was designed to assess the efficacy of a protocolized approach to decrease SWI. Pediatric cardiac programs joined a collaborative effort to prevent SWI. Programs implemented the protocol, collected compliance data, and provided data points from local clinical registries using Society of Thoracic Surgery Congenital Heart Surgery Database harvest-compliant software or from other registries. Nine programs prospectively collected compliance data on 4,198 children. Days between infections were extended from 68.2 days (range: 25-82) to 130 days (range: 43-412). Protocol compliance increased from 76.7% (first quarter) to 91.3% (final quarter). Ninety (1.9%) children developed an SWI preprotocol and 64 (1.5%) postprotocol, P = .18. The 657 (15%) delayed sternal closure patients had a 5% infection rate with 18 (5.7%) in year 1 and 14 (4.3%) in year 2 P = .43. Delayed sternal closure patients demonstrated a trend toward increased risk for SWI of 1.046 for each day the sternum remained open, P = .067. Children who received appropriately timed preop antibiotics developed less infections than those who did not, 1.9% versus 4.1%, P = .007. A multicenter QI project to reduce pediatric SWIs demonstrated an extension of days between infections and a decrease in SWIs. Patients who received preop antibiotics on time had lower SWI rates than those who did not.

  6. Bacterial isolates from burn wound infections and their antibiograms: A eight-year study

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    Mehta Manjula

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infection is an important cause of mortality in burns. Rapidly emerging nosocomial pathogens and the problem of multi-drug resistance necessitates periodic review of isolation patterns and antibiogram in the burn ward. Aim: Keeping this in mind, the present retrospective study from wounds of patients admitted to burns unit was undertaken to determine the bacteriological profile and the resistance pattern from the burn ward over a period of three years (June 2002 to May 2005 and was compared with the results obtained during the previous five years (June 1997-May 2002, to ascertain any change in the bacteriological profile and antimicrobial resistance pattern. Materials and Methods: Bacterial isolates from 268 wound swabs taken from burn patients were identified by conventional biochemical methods and antimicrobial susceptibility was performed. Statistical comparison of bacterial isolates and their resistance pattern with previous five years data was done using c2 test. Results and Conclusions: During the period from 2002 to 2005 Pseudomonas species was the commonest pathogen isolated (51.5% followed by Acinetobacter species (14.28%, Staph. aureus (11.15%, Klebsiella species (9.23% and Proteus species (2.3%. When compared with the results of the previous five years i.e., 1997 to 2002, Pseudomonas species was still the commonest pathogen in the burns unit. However, the isolation of this organism and other gram-negative organisms had decreased in comparison to previous years. Newer drugs were found to be effective.

  7. Outbreak of hepatitis C virus infection associated with narcotics diversion by an hepatitis C virus-infected surgical technician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Amy E; Schaefer, Melissa K; Patel, Priti R; Drobeniuc, Jan; Xia, Guoliang; Lin, Yulin; Khudyakov, Yury; Vonderwahl, Candace W; Miller, Lisa; Thompson, Nicola D

    2015-01-01

    Drug diversion by health care personnel poses a risk for serious patient harm. Public health identified 2 patients diagnosed with acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection who shared a common link with a hospital. Further investigation implicated a drug-diverting, HCV-infected surgical technician who was subsequently employed at an ambulatory surgical center. Patients at the 2 facilities were offered testing for HCV infection if they were potentially exposed. Serum from the surgical technician and patients testing positive for HCV but without evidence of infection before their surgical procedure was further tested to determine HCV genotype and quasi-species sequences. Parenteral medication handling practices at the 2 facilities were evaluated. The 2 facilities notified 5970 patients of their possible exposure to HCV, 88% of whom were tested and had results reported to the state public health departments. Eighteen patients had HCV highly related to the surgical technician's virus. The surgical technician gained unauthorized access to fentanyl owing to limitations in procedures for securing controlled substances. Public health surveillance identified an outbreak of HCV infection due to an infected health care provider engaged in diversion of injectable narcotics. The investigation highlights the value of public health surveillance in identifying HCV outbreaks and uncovering a method of drug diversion and its impacts on patients. Copyright © 2015 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A bioactive molecule in a complex wound healing process: platelet-derived growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltalioglu, Kaan; Coskun-Cevher, Sule

    2015-08-01

    Wound healing is considered to be particularly important after surgical procedures, and the most important wounds related to surgical procedures are incisional, excisional, and punch wounds. Research is ongoing to identify methods to heal non-closed wounds or to accelerate wound healing; however, wound healing is a complex process that includes many biological and physiological events, and it is affected by various local and systemic factors, including diabetes mellitus, infection, ischemia, and aging. Different cell types (such as platelets, macrophages, and neutrophils) release growth factors during the healing process, and platelet-derived growth factor is a particularly important mediator in most stages of wound healing. This review explores the relationship between platelet-derived growth factor and wound healing. © 2014 The International Society of Dermatology.

  9. Predictors of surgical site infections among patients undergoing major surgery at Bugando Medical Centre in Northwestern Tanzania

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    Imirzalioglu Can

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surgical site infection (SSI continues to be a major source of morbidity and mortality in developing countries despite recent advances in aseptic techniques. There is no baseline information regarding SSI in our setting therefore it was necessary to conduct this study to establish the prevalence, pattern and predictors of surgical site infection at Bugando Medical Centre Mwanza (BMC, Tanzania. Methods This was a cross-sectional prospective study involving all patients who underwent major surgery in surgical wards between July 2009 and March 2010. After informed written consent for the study and HIV testing, all patients who met inclusion criteria were consecutively enrolled into the study. Pre-operative, intra-operative and post operative data were collected using standardized data collection form. Wound specimens were collected and processed as per standard operative procedures; and susceptibility testing was done using disc diffusion technique. Data were analyzed using SPSS software version 15 and STATA. Results Surgical site infection (SSI was detected in 65 (26.0% patients, of whom 56 (86.2% and 9 (13.8% had superficial and deep SSI respectively. Among 65 patients with clinical SSI, 56(86.2% had positive aerobic culture. Staphylococcus aureus was the predominant organism 16/56 (28.6%; of which 3/16 (18.8% were MRSA. This was followed by Escherichia coli 14/56 (25% and Klebsiella pneumoniae 10/56 (17.9%. Among the Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates 9(64.3% and 8(80% were ESBL producers respectively. A total of 37/250 (14.8% patients were HIV positive with a mean CD4 count of 296 cells/ml. Using multivariate logistic regression analysis, presence of pre-morbid illness (OR = 6.1, use of drain (OR = 15.3, use of iodine alone in skin preparation (OR = 17.6, duration of operation ≥ 3 hours (OR = 3.2 and cigarette smoking (OR = 9.6 significantly predicted surgical site infection (SSI Conclusion SSI is common

  10. Management of small fragment wounds in war: current research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowyer, G W; Cooper, G J; Rice, P

    1995-03-01

    The majority of war wounds are caused by antipersonnel fragments from munitions such as mortars and bomblets. Modern munitions aim to incapacitate soldiers with multiple wounds from very small fragments of low available kinetic energy. Many of these fragments may be stopped by helmets and body armour and this has led to a predominance of multiple wounds to limbs in those casualties requiring surgery. The development of an appropriate management strategy for these multiple wounds requires knowledge of the contamination and extent of soft tissue injury; conservative management may be appropriate. The extent of skin and muscle damage associated with a small fragment wound, the way in which these wounds may progress without intervention and their colonisation by bacteria has been determined in an experimental animal model. Results from 12 animals are presented. There was a very small (approximately 1 mm) margin of nonviable skin around the entrance wound. The amount of devitalised muscle in the wound tract was a few hundred milligrams. Some muscles peripheral to the wound track also showed signs of damage 1 h after wounding, but this improved over 24 h; the proportion of fragmented muscle fibres in the tissue around the track decreased as time went on. There was no clinical sign or bacteriological evidence of the track becoming infected up to 24 h after wounding. This preliminary work suggests that, in the absence of infection, the amount of muscle damage caused by small fragment wounds begins to resolve in the first 24 h after injury, even without surgical intervention.

  11. Effectiveness of local vancomycin powder to decrease surgical site infections: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Hsiu-Yin; Herwaldt, Loreen A; Blevins, Amy E; Cho, Edward; Schweizer, Marin L

    2014-03-01

    Some surgeons use systemic vancomycin to prevent surgical site infections (SSIs), but patients who do not carry methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus have an increased risk of SSIs when given vancomycin alone for intravenous prophylaxis. Applying vancomycin powder to the wound before closure could increase the local tissue vancomycin level without significant systemic levels. However, the effectiveness of local vancomycin powder application for preventing SSIs has not been established. Our objective was to systematically review and evaluate studies on the effectiveness of local vancomycin powder for decreasing SSIs. Meta-analysis. We included observational studies, quasi-experimental studies, and randomized controlled trials of patients undergoing surgical procedures that involved vancomycin powder application to surgical wounds, reported SSI rates, and had a comparison group that did not use local vancomycin powder. The primary outcome was postoperative SSIs. The secondary outcomes included deep incisional SSIs and S. aureus SSIs. We performed systematic literature searches in PubMed, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials via Wiley, Scopus (including EMBASE abstracts), Web of Science, ClinicalTrials.gov, BMC Proceedings, ProQuest Dissertation, and Thesis in Health and Medicine, and conference abstracts from IDWeek, the Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America, and the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons annual meetings, and also the Scoliosis Research Society Annual Meeting and Course. We ran the searches from inception on May 9, 2013 with no limits on date or language. After reviewing 373 titles or abstracts and 22 articles in detail, we included 10 independent studies and used a random-effects model when pooling risk estimates to assess the effectiveness of local

  12. Prophylactic Antibiotic Choice and Risk of Surgical Site Infection After Hysterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppal, Shitanshu; Harris, John; Al-Niaimi, Ahmed; Swenson, Carolyn W; Pearlman, Mark D; Reynolds, R Kevin; Kamdar, Neil; Bazzi, Ali; Campbell, Darrell A; Morgan, Daniel M

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate associations between prophylactic preoperative antibiotic choice and surgical site infection rates after hysterectomy. A retrospective cohort study was performed of patients in the Michigan Surgical Quality Collaborative undergoing hysterectomy from July 2012 to February 2015. The primary outcome was a composite outcome of any surgical site infection (superficial surgical site infections or combined deep organ space surgical site infections). Preoperative antibiotics were categorized based on the recommendations set forth by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the Surgical Care Improvement Project. Patients receiving a recommended antibiotic regimen were categorized into those receiving β-lactam antibiotics and those receiving alternatives to β-lactam antibiotics. Patients receiving nonrecommended antibiotics were categorized into those receiving overtreatment (excluded from further analysis) and those receiving nonstandard antibiotics. Multivariable logistic regression models were developed to estimate the independent effect of antibiotic choice. Propensity score matching analysis was performed to validate the results. The study included 21,358 hysterectomies. The overall rate of any surgical site infection was 2.06% (n=441). Unadjusted rates of "any surgical site infection" were 1.8%, 3.1%, and 3.7% for β-lactam, β-lactam alternatives, and nonstandard groups, respectively. After adjusting for patient and operative factors within clusters of hospitals, compared with the β-lactam antibiotics (reference group), the risk of "any surgical site infection" was higher for the group receiving β-lactam alternatives (odds ratio [OR] 1.7, confidence interval [CI] 1.27-2.07) or the nonstandard antibiotics (OR 2.0, CI 1.31-3.1). Compared with women receiving β-lactam antibiotic regimens, there is a higher risk of surgical site infection after hysterectomy among those receiving a recommended β-lactam alternative or nonstandard regimen.

  13. Porous CS based membranes with improved antimicrobial properties for the treatment of infected wound in veterinary applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonda-Turo, C.; Ruini, F.; Argentati, M.; Di Girolamo, N.; Robino, P.; Nebbia, P.; Ciardelli, G.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, much attention has been given to the use of innovative solution for the treatment of infected wounds in animals. Current applied treatments are often un-effective leading to infection propagation and animal death. Novel engineered membranes based on chitosan (CS) can be prepared to combine local antimicrobial effect, high flexibility and easy manipulation. In this work, CS crosslinked porous membranes with improved antimicrobial properties were prepared via freeze-drying technique to promote wound healing and to reduce the bacterial proliferation in infected injuries. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and gentamicin sulfate (GS) were incorporated into the CS matrices to impart antibacterial properties on a wild range of strains. CS based porous membranes were tested for their physicochemical, thermal, mechanical as well as swelling and degradation behavior at physiological condition. Additionally, GS release profile was investigated, showing a moderate burst effect in the first days followed by a decreasing release rate which it was maintained for at least 56 days. Moreover, porous membranes loaded with GS or AgNPs showed good bactericidal activity against both of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The bacterial strains used in this work were collected in chelonians after carapace injuries to better mimic the environment after trauma. - Highlights: • Innovative scaffolds for wound healing in veterinary applications • Novel engineered membranes based on chitosan with improved antibacterial properties • Highly flexible and versatile membranes for infected wounds

  14. Porous CS based membranes with improved antimicrobial properties for the treatment of infected wound in veterinary applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonda-Turo, C., E-mail: chiara.tondaturo@polito.it [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129, Turin (Italy); Ruini, F. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129, Turin (Italy); Argentati, M. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129, Turin (Italy); Clinic for Exotic Animals, CVS, Via Sandro Giovannini 53, 00137 Rome (Italy); Di Girolamo, N. [Clinic for Exotic Animals, CVS, Via Sandro Giovannini 53, 00137 Rome (Italy); Robino, P.; Nebbia, P. [Department of Veterinary Sciences, University of Turin, Largo Braccini 2, 10095 Grugliasco, Turin (Italy); Ciardelli, G. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129, Turin (Italy)

    2016-03-01

    Recently, much attention has been given to the use of innovative solution for the treatment of infected wounds in animals. Current applied treatments are often un-effective leading to infection propagation and animal death. Novel engineered membranes based on chitosan (CS) can be prepared to combine local antimicrobial effect, high flexibility and easy manipulation. In this work, CS crosslinked porous membranes with improved antimicrobial properties were prepared via freeze-drying technique to promote wound healing and to reduce the bacterial proliferation in infected injuries. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and gentamicin sulfate (GS) were incorporated into the CS matrices to impart antibacterial properties on a wild range of strains. CS based porous membranes were tested for their physicochemical, thermal, mechanical as well as swelling and degradation behavior at physiological condition. Additionally, GS release profile was investigated, showing a moderate burst effect in the first days followed by a decreasing release rate which it was maintained for at least 56 days. Moreover, porous membranes loaded with GS or AgNPs showed good bactericidal activity against both of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The bacterial strains used in this work were collected in chelonians after carapace injuries to better mimic the environment after trauma. - Highlights: • Innovative scaffolds for wound healing in veterinary applications • Novel engineered membranes based on chitosan with improved antibacterial properties • Highly flexible and versatile membranes for infected wounds.

  15. In vitro results of flexible light-emitting antimicrobial bandage designed for prevention of surgical site infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Mitchell; Sharan, Riti; Galbadage, Thushara; Sule, Preeti; Smith, Robert; Lovelady, April; Cirillo, Jeffrey D.; Glowczwski, Alan; Maitland, Kristen C.

    2018-02-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality and a significant expense to the healthcare system and hospitals. The majority of these infections are preventable; however, increasing bacterial resistance, biofilm persistence, and human error contribute to the occurrence of these healthcare-associated infections. We present a flexible antimicrobial blue-light emitting bandage designed for use on postoperative incisions and wounds. The photonic device is designed to inactivate bacteria present on the skin and prevent bacterial colonization of the site, thus reducing the occurrence of SSIs. This antimicrobial light emitting bandage uses blue light's proven abilities to inactivate a wide range of clinical pathogens regardless of their resistance to antibiotics, inactivate bacteria without harming mammalian cells, improve wound healing, and inactivate bacteria in biofilms. The antimicrobial bandage consists of a thin 2"x2" silicone sheet with an array of 77 LEDs embedded in multiple layers of the material for thermal management. The 405 nm center wavelength LED array is designed to be a wearable device that integrates with standard hospital infection prevention protocols. The device was characterized for irradiance of 44.5 mW/cm2. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus seeded in a petri dish was used to evaluate bacterial inactivation in vitro. Starting with a concentration of 2.16 x 107 colony forming units (CFU)/mL, 45% of the bacteria was inactivated within 15 minutes, 65% had been inactivated by 30 minutes, 99% was inactivated by 60 minutes, and a 7 log reduction and complete sterilization was achieved within 120 minutes.

  16. Surgical wound healing in radio-tagged adult Pacific lamprey Entosphenus tridentatus held on different substrata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesa, M.G.; Magie, R.J.; Copeland, E.S.; Christiansen, H.E.

    2011-01-01

    Radio-tagged adult Pacific lamprey Entosphenus tridentatus held in a raceway with Plexiglas-lined walls and bottom healed more slowly and retained sutures longer than fish held in an all-concrete raceway or one with Plexiglas walls and a cobble-lined bottom. On all substrata, healing depended on when sutures were lost, and fish that lost their sutures in healed faster than those that kept sutures longer. Long-term suture retention led to tissue trauma, infection and poor survival.

  17. A retrospective analysis of surgical site infections after chlorhexidine-alcohol versus iodine-alcohol for pre-operative antisepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charehbili, Ayoub; Swijnenburg, Rutger-Jan; van de Velde, Cornelis; van den Bremer, Jephta; van Gijn, Willem

    2014-06-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is the most common hospital-acquired infection in the Netherlands. There is little evidence in regard to differences in the efficacy of pre-operative topical antisepsis with iodine-alcohol as compared with chlorhexidine-alcohol for preventing SSI. We conducted a retrospective analysis at a single center, involving all patients who underwent breast, colon, or vascular surgery in 2010 and 2011, in which pre-operative disinfection of the skin was done with iodine-alcohol in 2010 and with chlorhexidine-alcohol in 2011. Demographic characteristics, surgical parameters, and rates of SSI were compared in the two groups of patients. Subgroup analyses were done for wound classification, wound type, and type of surgery performed. Associations of patient characteristics with SSI were also investigated. Data were analyzed with χ(2) tests, Student t-tests, and logistic regression analysis. No statistically significant difference was found in the rates of SSI in the two study groups, at 6.1% for the patients who underwent antisepsis with iodine-alcohol and 3.8% for those who underwent disinfection with chlorhexidine-alcohol (p=0.20). After multivariable analysis, an odds ratio (OR) of 0.68 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.30-1.47) in favor of chlorhexidine-alcohol was found. Male gender, acute surgery, absence of antibiotic prophylaxis, and longer hospital length of stay (LOS) were all associated with SSI after pre-operative topical antisepsis. In this single-center study conducted over a course of one year with each of the preparations investigated, no difference in the rate of SSI was found after an instantaneous protocol change from iodine-alcohol to chlorhexidine-alcohol for pre-operative topical antisepsis.

  18. A journey to zero: reduction of post-operative cesarean surgical site infections over a five-year period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickson, Evelyn; Harris, Jeanette; Brett, David

    2015-04-01

    Surgical site infections (SSI) are a substantial concern for cesarean deliveries in which a surgical site complication is most unwelcome for a mother with a new infant. Steps taken pre- and post-operatively to reduce the number of complications may be of substantial benefit clinically, economically, and psychologically. A risk-based approach to incision management was developed and implemented for all cesarean deliveries at our institution. A number of incremental interventions for low-risk and high-risk patients including pre-operative skin preparations, standardized pre- and post-operative protocols, post-operative nanocrystalline silver anti-microbial barrier dressings, and incisional negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) were implemented sequentially over a 5-y period. A systematic clinical chart review of 4,942 patients spanning all cesarean deliveries between 2007-2012 was performed to determine what effects the interventions had on the rate of SSI for cesarean deliveries. The percentage of SSI was reduced from 2.13% (2007) to 0.10% (2012) (poperative SSIs were avoided: A total cost saving of nearly $5,000,000. Applying a clinical algorithm for assessing the risk of surgical site complication and making recommendations on pre-operative and post-operative incision management can result in a substantial and sustainable reduction in cesarean SSI.

  19. Outbreak of hepatitis C virus infection associated with narcotics diversion by an hepatitis C virus–infected surgical technician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Amy E.; Schaefer, Melissa K.; Patel, Priti R.; Drobeniuc, Jan; Xia, Guoliang; Lin, Yulin; Khudyakov, Yury; Vonderwahl, Candace W.; Miller, Lisa; Thompson, Nicola D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Drug diversion by health care personnel poses a risk for serious patient harm. Public health identified 2 patients diagnosed with acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection who shared a common link with a hospital. Further investigation implicated a drug-diverting, HCV-infected surgical technician who was subsequently employed at an ambulatory surgical center. Methods Patients at the 2 facilities were offered testing for HCV infection if they were potentially exposed. Serum from the surgical technician and patients testing positive for HCV but without evidence of infection before their surgical procedure was further tested to determine HCV genotype and quasi-species sequences. Parenteral medication handling practices at the 2 facilities were evaluated. Results The 2 facilities notified 5970 patients of their possible exposure to HCV, 88% of whom were tested and had results reported to the state public health departments. Eighteen patients had HCV highly related to the surgical technician’s virus. The surgical technician gained unauthorized access to fentanyl owing to limitations in procedures for securing controlled substances. Conclusions Public health surveillance identified an outbreak of HCV infection due to an infected health care provider engaged in diversion of injectable narcotics. The investigation highlights the value of public health surveillance in identifying HCV outbreaks and uncovering a method of drug diversion and its impacts on patients. PMID:25442395

  20. ROLE OF VACUUM ASSISTED CLOSURE (VAC - IN WOUND HEALING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Lokanadha Rao

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Large, complicated wounds pose a significant surgical problem. Negative pressure wound therapy is one of several methods enabling to obtain better treatment results in case of open infected wounds.1,2 The use of negative pressure therapy enables to obtain a reduction in the number of bacteria which significantly reduces the number of complications.3,4,5 AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To review the Role of VAC in wound healing in Orthopaedics. MATERIALS AND METHODS The cases presented in this study are those who were admitted in King George Hospital in the time period from January 2014 to August 2015. This is a prospective interventional study. In this study, 15 patients were assigned to the study group (Negative Pressure Wound Therapy- NPWT based on their willingness for undergoing treatment. OBSERVATIONS AND RESULTS 12 males and 3 females are involved in the study. There is decrease in the mean wound area from 64 cm2 to 38 cm2 . There is decrease in the duration of hospital stay. Finally, wound is closed by SSG or secondary suturing. DISCUSSION NPWT is known to reduce bacterial counts, although they remain colonised with organisms. Wounds covered with NPW dressing are completely isolated from the environment, thereby reduces cross infection. In our series, we had 73.3% (11 cases excellent results and 26.7% (4 cases good results and no poor results. As interpretation with results, VAC therapy is effective mode of adjuvant therapy for the management of infected wounds. CONCLUSION VAC has been proven to be a reliable method of treating a variety of infected wounds. It greatly increases the rate of granulation tissue formation and lowers bacterial counts to accelerate wound healing. It can be used as a temporary dressing to prepare wounds optimally prior to closure or as a definitive treatment for nonsurgical and surgical wounds. VAC is now being used in a multitude of clinical settings, including the treatment of surgical wounds, infected wounds

  1. Surgical and Antimicrobial Treatment of Prosthetic Vascular Graft Infections at Different Surgical Sites: A Retrospective Study of Treatment Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elzi, Luigia; Gurke, Lorenz; Battegay, Manuel; Widmer, Andreas F.; Weisser, Maja

    2014-01-01

    Objective Little is known about optimal management of prosthetic vascular graft infections, which are a rare but serious complication associated with graft implants. The goal of this study was to compare and characterize these infections with respect to the location of the graft and to identify factors associated with outcome. Methods This was a retrospective study over more than a decade at a tertiary care university hospital that has an established multidisciplinary approach to treating graft infections. Cases of possible prosthetic vascular graft infection were identified from the hospital's infectious diseases database and evaluated against strict diagnostic criteria. Patients were divided into groups according to the locations of their grafts: thoracic-aortic, abdominal-aortic, or peripheral-arterial. Statistical analyses included evaluation of patient and infection characteristics, time to treatment failure, and factors associated specifically with cure rates in aortic graft infections. The primary endpoint was cure at one year after diagnosis of the infection. Results Characterization of graft infections according to the graft location did show that these infections differ in terms of their characteristics and that the prognosis for treatment seems to be influenced by the location of the infection. Cure rate and all-cause mortality at one year were 87.5% and 12.5% in 24 patients with thoracic-aortic graft infections, 37.0% and 55.6% in 27 patients with abdominal-aortic graft infections, and 70.0% and 30.0% in 10 patients with peripheral-arterial graft infections. In uni- and multivariate analysis, the type of surgical intervention used in managing infections (graft retention versus graft replacement) did not affect primary outcome, whereas a rifampicin-based antimicrobial regimen was associated with a higher cure rate. Conclusions We recommend that future prospective studies differentiate prosthetic vascular graft infections according to the location of the

  2. Elements affecting wound healing time: An evidence based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Hanan; Cullen, Marianne; Chambers, Helen; Carroll, Matthew; Walker, Judi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the predominant client factors and comorbidities that affected the time taken for wounds to heal. A prospective study design used the Mobile Wound Care (MWC) database to capture and collate detailed medical histories, comorbidities, healing times and consumable costs for clients with wounds in Gippsland, Victoria. There were 3,726 wounds documented from 2,350 clients, so an average of 1.6 wounds per client. Half (49.6%) of all clients were females, indicating that there were no gender differences in terms of wound prevalence. The clients were primarily older people, with an average age of 64.3 years (ranging between 0.7 and 102.9 years). The majority of the wounds (56%) were acute and described as surgical, crush and trauma. The MWC database categorized the elements that influenced wound healing into 3 groups--factors affecting healing (FAH), comorbidities, and medications known to affect wound healing. While there were a multitude of significant associations, multiple linear regression identified the following key elements: age over 65 years, obesity, nonadherence to treatment plan, peripheral vascular disease, specific wounds associated with pressure/friction/shear, confirmed infection, and cerebrovascular accident (stroke). Wound healing is a complex process that requires a thorough understanding of influencing elements to improve healing times.© 2015 by the Wound Healing Society. © 2015 by the Wound Healing Society.

  3. Improved results of the vacuum assisted closure and Nitinol clips sternal closure after postoperative deep sternal wound infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tocco, Maria Pia; Costantino, Alberto; Ballardini, Milva; D'Andrea, Claudio; Masala, Marcello; Merico, Eusebio; Mosillo, Luigi; Sordini, Paolo

    2009-05-01

    Postoperative deep sternal wound infection is a severe complication of cardiac surgery, with a high mortality rate and a high morbidity rate. The objective of this prospective study is to report our experience with the vacuum assisted closure (VAC) system for the management of deep wound infection. We also devised an innovative closure technique post VAC therapy using thermo reactive clips. The advantage of this technique is that the posterior face of the sternum does not have to be separated from the mediastinal structures thus minimising the risk of damage. From October 2006 to October 2008, we prospectively evaluated 21 patients affected by mediastinitis after sternotomy. Nineteen patients had sternotomy for coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), one patient for aortic valve replacement (AVR) and another one for ascending aortic replacement (AAR). All patients were treated with the VAC system at the time of infection diagnosis. When the wound tissue appeared viable and the microbiological cultures were negative, the chest was closed using the most suitable procedure for the patient in question; nine patients were closed using pectoralis flaps, nine patients using Nitinol clips, one patient with a combined technique (use of Nitinol clips and muscle flap), one patient with a direct wound closure and another patient, who needed AAR with a homograft performed in another institution, was closed using sternal wires. We had no mortality; wound healing was successfully achieved in all patients. In more than 50% of the patients, the VAC therapy allowed direct sternal resynthesis. The average duration of the vacuum therapy was 26 days (range 14-37 days). VAC is a safe and effective option in the treatment of post-sternotomy mediastinitis, with excellent survival and immediate improvement of local wound conditions; furthermore, the use of Nitinol clips after VAC therapy demonstrated to be a safe and non-invasive option for sternal resynthesis. After VAC therapy, a

  4. Disinfecting wounds with radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuttler, J.M.

    2002-01-01

    Infection with clostridium bacteria, which live in the soil, is most often associated with war wounds, car accidents, complicated abortions, etc. The incidence is highest in areas with poor access to proper wound care. Such infections lead to gas gangrene, a deadly disease that spreads very quickly in the body and causes rapid death. Present-day treatment consists of administering antibiotics and surgical removal of dead, damaged and infected tissue. Amputation is usually necessary to control the spread of the infection, which can advance at the rate of six inches per hour. Before the 1940s, this disease was treated successfully with low doses (50 rad) of radiation (X-rays) in the area of infection. A review of 364 cases treated in this manner, from 1928 until 1940, indicated that patient mortality would be reduced from 50 percent (or higher) to ∼5 percent if patients were treated reasonably early and with the correct technique. X-ray therapy stopped the infection without the need for amputation to control its spread. Low-dose irradiation (LDI) therapy, given immediately, acted as a prophylaxis to prevent the onset of gas gangrene. This is but one example of the extensive use of radiation treatment of many types of infections, before the advent of antibiotics. Low doses are inadequate to kill invading bacteria directly, however, they will stimulate our defences to destroy the infection. The observed beneficial effects are consistent with the large amount of scientific evidence of radiation hormesis - the stimulation of an organism's own defences by low doses of radiation (to destroy invaders and heal wounds). In view of the ineffectiveness of antibiotics in many cases and the evolution of antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria, physicians should start to use LDI therapies again. Many patients would benefit greatly. (author)

  5. Reconstruction of Abdominal Wall of a Chronically Infected Postoperative Wound with a Rectus Abdominis Myofascial Splitting Flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Kyu Bae

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background If a chronically infected abdominal wound develops, complications such asperitonitis and an abdominal wall defect could occur. This could prolong the patient’s hospitalstay and increase the possibility of re-operation or another infection as well. For this reason,a solution for infection control is necessary. In this study, surgery using a rectus abdominismuscle myofascial splitting flap was performed on an abdominal wall defect.Methods From 2009 to 2012, 5 patients who underwent surgery due to ovarian rupture,cesarean section, or uterine myoma were chosen. In each case, during the first week afteroperation, the wound showed signs of infection. Surgery was chosen because the wounds didnot resolve with dressing. Debridement was performed along the previous operation woundand dissection of the skin was performed to separate the skin and subcutaneous tissue fromthe attenuated rectus muscle and Scarpa’s fascial layers. Once the anterior rectus sheath andmuscle were adequately mobilized, the fascia and muscle flap were advanced medially sothat the skin defect could be covered for reconstruction.Results Upon 3-week follow-up after a rectus abdominis myofascial splitting flap operation,no major complication occurred. In addition, all of the patients showed satisfaction in termsof function and esthetics at 3 to 6 months post-surgery.Conclusions Using a rectus abdominis myofascial splitting flap has many esthetic andfunctional benefits over previous methods of abdominal defect treatment, and notably, itenabled infection control by reconstruction using muscle.

  6. Role of Daptomycin on Burn Wound Healing in an Animal Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infection Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonetti, Oriana; Lucarini, Guendalina; Orlando, Fiorenza; Pierpaoli, Elisa; Ghiselli, Roberto; Provinciali, Mauro; Castelli, Pamela; Guerrieri, Mario; Di Primio, Roberto; Offidani, Annamaria; Giacometti, Andrea; Cirioni, Oscar

    2017-09-01

    Prolonged hospitalization and antibiotic therapy are risk factors for the development of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections in thermal burn patients. We used a rat model to study the in vivo efficacy of daptomycin in the treatment of burn wound infections by S. aureus , and we evaluated the wound healing process through morphological and immunohistochemical analysis. A copper bar heated in boiling water was applied on a paraspinal site of each rat, resulting in two full-thickness burns. A small gauze was placed over each burn and inoculated with 5 × 10 7 CFU of S. aureus ATCC 43300. The study included two uninfected control groups with and without daptomycin treatment, an infected control group that did not receive any treatment, and two infected groups treated, respectively, with intraperitoneal daptomycin and teicoplanin. The main outcome measures were quantitative culture, histological evaluation of tissue repair, and immunohistochemical expression of wound healing markers: epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2). The highest inhibition of infection was achieved in the group that received daptomycin, which reduced the bacterial load from 10 7 CFU/ml to about 10 3 CFU/g ( P repair by possibly reducing hypertrophic burn scar formation. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  7. A prospective randomised trial of isolated pathogens of surgical site infections (SSI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Alexiou

    2017-09-01

    Conclusions: In conclusion, surgical site infections are important complications affecting the healthcare services, the cost of hospitalization and the patient himself. Future thorough studies are expected to reveal much more data, regarding predisposing and precautionary patient and hospital characteristics.

  8. The presentation, incidence, etiology, and treatment of surgical site infections after spinal surgery.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pull ter Gunne, A.F.; Mohamed, A.S.; Skolasky, R.L.; Laarhoven, C.J.H.M. van; Cohen, D.B.

    2010-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Descriptive, retrospective cohort analysis. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the presentation, etiology, and treatment of surgical site infections (SSI) after spinal surgery. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: SSI after spine surgery is frequently seen. Small case control studies have been published

  9. PRE-OPERATIVE HAIR REMOVAL WITH TRIMMERS AND RAZORS AND ITS IMPACT ON SURGICAL SITE INFECTIONS IN ELECTIVE INGUINAL HERNIA REPAIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John S. Kurien

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Despite major advances in infection control interventions, health care-associated infections (HAI remain a major public health problem and patient safety threat worldwide. The global data suggests that the SSI incidence rate varies from 0.5 to 20% depending upon the type of operation and underlying patient status. Several factors preoperative, intraoperative & postoperative, determine the occurrence of surgical site infections, Preoperative hair removal is considered as a risk for the development of surgical site infections. The objective of the study is to find out the difference in the incidence of surgical site infections in patients undergoing pre-operative hair removal by shaving with Razor blades and hair trimmers prior to elective inguinal hernia surgery. MATERIALS AND METHODS Written informed consent from 160 patients with no significant comorbidities planning to undergo elective inguinal hernia surgery at the general surgery wards in Government Medical College Kottayam and who were willing to participate in the study were to be obtained. 80 of them to undergo pre-operative hair removal with hair trimmers and 80 to undergo preoperative hair removal by shaving with razor blades on the day prior to the surgery randomised into two groups. During their stay in the postoperative ward the surgical wounds of the patients were examined daily for the development of erythema, pain, discharge, induration and gaping of the wound. The daily findings were noted down till the patient was discharged from the ward. The patients were again reassessed 2 weeks later, when they came for review in the Surgery OPD after their discharge from the ward; finally the patients were examined on the 30th day post-surgery to look for the clinical features of surgical site infections. RESULTS Out of the total 160 patients who were studied, 29 (18.1% of them had post-operative infection within 30 days, in the form of erythema, induration, discharge and gaping

  10. Surgical site infections in Italian Hospitals: a prospective multicenter study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ippolito Giuseppe

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surgical site infections (SSI remain a major clinical problem in terms of morbidity, mortality, and hospital costs. Nearly 60% of SSI diagnosis occur in the postdischarge period. However, literature provides little information on risk factors associated to in-hospital and postdischarge SSI occurrence. A national prospective multicenter study was conducted with the aim of assessing the incidence of both in-hospital and postdisharge SSI, and the associated risk factors. Methods In 2002, a one-month, prospective national multicenter surveillance study was conducted in General and Gynecological units of 48 Italian hospitals. Case ascertainment of SSI was carried out using standardized surveillance methodology. To assess potential risk factors for SSI we used a conditional logistic regression model. We also reported the odds ratios of in-hospital and postdischarge SSI. Results SSI occurred in 241 (5.2% of 4,665 patients, of which 148 (61.4% during in-hospital, and 93 (38.6% during postdischarge period. Of 93 postdischarge SSI, sixty-two (66.7% and 31 (33.3% were detected through telephone interview and questionnaire survey, respectively. Higher SSI incidence rates were observed in colon surgery (18.9%, gastric surgery (13.6%, and appendectomy (8.6%. If considering risk factors for SSI, at multivariate analysis we found that emergency interventions, NNIS risk score, pre-operative hospital stay, and use of drains were significantly associated with SSI occurrence. Moreover, risk factors for total SSI were also associated to in-hospital SSI. Additionally, only NNIS, pre-operative hospital stay, use of drains, and antibiotic prophylaxis were associated with postdischarge SSI. Conclusion Our study provided information on risk factors for SSI in a large population in general surgery setting in Italy. Standardized postdischarge surveillance detected 38.6% of all SSI. We also compared risk factors for in-hospital and postdischarge SSI

  11. A Prognostic Scoring Tool for Cesarean Organ/Space Surgical Site Infections: Derivation and Internal Validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assawapalanggool, Srisuda; Kasatpibal, Nongyao; Sirichotiyakul, Supatra; Arora, Rajin; Suntornlimsiri, Watcharin

    Organ/space surgical site infections (SSIs) are serious complications after cesarean delivery. However, no scoring tool to predict these complications has yet been developed. This study sought to develop and validate a prognostic scoring tool for cesarean organ/space SSIs. Data for case and non-case of cesarean organ/space SSI between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2012 from a tertiary care hospital in Thailand were analyzed. Stepwise multivariable logistic regression was used to select the best predictor combination and their coefficients were transformed to a risk scoring tool. The likelihood ratio of positive for each risk category and the area under receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curves were analyzed on total scores. Internal validation using bootstrap re-sampling was tested for reproducibility. The predictors of 243 organ/space SSIs from 4,988 eligible cesarean delivery cases comprised the presence of foul-smelling amniotic fluid (four points), vaginal examination five or more times before incision (two points), wound class III or greater (two points), being referred from local setting (two points), hemoglobin less than 11 g/dL (one point), and ethnic minorities (one point). The likelihood ratio of cesarean organ/space SSIs with 95% confidence interval among low (total score of 0-1 point), medium (total score of 2-5 points), and high risk (total score of ≥6 points) categories were 0.11 (0.07-0.19), 1.03 (0.89-1.18), and 13.25 (10.87-16.14), respectively. Both AUROCs of the derivation and validation data were comparable (87.57% versus 86.08%; p = 0.418). This scoring tool showed a high predictive ability regarding cesarean organ/space SSIs on the derivation data and reproducibility was demonstrated on internal validation. It could assist practitioners prioritize patient care and management depending on risk category and decrease SSI rates in cesarean deliveries.

  12. Viable adhered Staphylococcus aureus highly reduced on novel antimicrobial sutures using chlorhexidine and octenidine to avoid surgical site infection (SSI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Jochen; Harrasser, Norbert; Tübel, Jutta; Mühlhofer, Heinrich; Pförringer, Dominik; von Deimling, Constantin; Foehr, Peter; Kiefel, Barbara; Krämer, Christina; Stemberger, Axel; Schieker, Matthias

    2018-01-01

    Background Surgical sutures can promote migration of bacteria and thus start infections. Antiseptic coating of sutures may inhibit proliferation of adhered bacteria and avoid such complications. Objectives This study investigated the inhibition of viable adhering bacteria on novel antimicrobially coated surgical sutures using chlorhexidine or octenidine, a critical factor for proliferation at the onset of local infections. The medical need, a rapid eradication of bacteria in wounds, can be fulfilled by a high antimicrobial efficacy during the first days after wound closure. Methods As a pretesting on antibacterial efficacy against relevant bacterial pathogens a zone of inhibition assay was conducted with middle ranged concentrated suture coatings (22 μg/cm). For further investigation of adhering bacteria in detail the most clinically relevant Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC®49230™) was used. Absorbable braided sutures were coated with chlorhexidine-laurate, chlorhexidine-palmitate, octenidine-laurate, and octenidine-palmitate. Each coating type resulted in 11, 22, or 33 μg/cm drug content on sutures. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was performed once to inspect the coating quality and twice to investigate if bacteria have colonized on sutures. Adhesion experiments were assessed by exposing coated sutures to S. aureus suspensions for 3 h at 37°C. Subsequently, sutures were sonicated and the number of viable bacteria released from the suture surface was determined. Furthermore, the number of viable planktonic bacteria was measured in suspensions containing antimicrobial sutures. Commercially available sutures without drugs (Vicryl®, PGA Resorba®, and Gunze PGA), as well as triclosan-containing Vicryl® Plus were used as control groups. Results Zone of inhibition assay documented a multispecies efficacy of novel coated sutures against tested bacterial strains, comparable to most relevant S. aureus over 48 hours. SEM pictures demonstrated uniform layers on

  13. Surgical Measures to Reduce Infection in Open Colorectal Surgery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Post-operative infection is an important complication of colorectal surgery and continued efforts are needed to minimize the risk of infection. A better understanding about susceptibility to infections will explain why a patient with minimal bacterial contamination at surgery may develop a pelvic abscess whereas another ...

  14. Bacterial Contribution in Chronicity of Wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim, Kashif; Saleha, Shamim; Zhu, Xudong; Huo, Liang; Basit, Abdul; Franco, Octavio Luiz

    2017-04-01

    A wound is damage of a tissue usually caused by laceration of a membrane, generally the skin. Wound healing is accomplished in three stages in healthy individuals, including inflammatory, proliferative, and remodeling stages. Healing of wounds normally starts from the inflammatory phase and ends up in the remodeling phase, but chronic wounds remain in an inflammatory stage and do not show progression due to some specific reasons. Chronic wounds are classified in different categories, such as diabetic foot ulcer (DFU), venous leg ulcers (VLU) and pressure ulcer (PU), surgical site infection (SSI), abscess, or trauma ulcers. Globally, the incidence rate of DFU is 1-4 % and prevalence rate is 5.3-10.5 %. However, colonization of pathogenic bacteria at the wound site is associated with wound chronicity. Most chronic wounds contain more than one bacterial species and produce a synergetic effect that results in previously non-virulent bacterial species becoming virulent and causing damage to the host. While investigating bacterial diversity in chronic wounds, Staphylococcus, Pseudomonas, Peptoniphilus, Enterobacter, Stenotrophomonas, Finegoldia, and Serratia were found most frequently in chronic wounds. Recently, it has been observed that bacteria in chronic wounds develop biofilms that contribute to a delay in healing. In a mature biofilm, bacteria grow slowly due to deficiency of nutrients that results in the resistance of bacteria to antibiotics. The present review reflects the reasons why acute wounds become chronic. Interesting findings include the bacterial load, which forms biofilms and shows high-level resistance toward antibiotics, which is a threat to human health in general and particularly to some patients who have acute wounds.

  15. Real-time monitoring of bacterial infection in vivo: development of bioluminescent staphylococcal foreign-body and deep-thigh-wound mouse infection models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuklin, Nelly A; Pancari, Gregory D; Tobery, Timothy W; Cope, Leslie; Jackson, Jesse; Gill, Charles; Overbye, Karen; Francis, Kevin P; Yu, Jun; Montgomery, Donna; Anderson, Annaliesa S; McClements, William; Jansen, Kathrin U

    2003-09-01

    Staphylococcal infections associated with catheter and prosthetic implants are difficult to eradicate and often lead to chronic infections. Development of novel antibacterial therapies requires simple, reliable, and relevant models for infection. Using bioluminescent Staphylococcus aureus, we have adapted the existing foreign-body and deep-wound mouse models of staphylococcal infection to allow real-time monitoring of the bacterial colonization of catheters or tissues. This approach also enables kinetic measurements of bacterial growth and clearance in each infected animal. Persistence of infection was observed throughout the course of the study until termination of the experiment at day 16 in a deep-wound model and day 21 in the foreign-body model, providing sufficient time to test the effects of antibacterial compounds. The usefulness of both animal models was assessed by using linezolid as a test compound and comparing bioluminescent measurements to bacterial counts. In the foreign-body model, a three-dose antibiotic regimen (2, 5, and 24 h after infection) resulted in a decrease in both luminescence and bacterial counts recovered from the implant compared to those of the mock-treated infected mice. In addition, linezolid treatment prevented the formation of subcutaneous abscesses, although it did not completely resolve the infection. In the thigh model, the same treatment regimen resulted in complete resolution of the luminescent signal, which correlated with clearance of the bacteria from the thighs.

  16. Current Microbiology of Surgical Site Infections in Patients with Cancer: A Retrospective Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolston, Kenneth V I; Nesher, Lior; Tarrand, Jeffrey T

    2014-12-01

    Patients with solid tumors frequently undergo surgical procedures and develop procedure-related infections. We sought to describe the current microbiologic spectrum of infections at various sites following common surgical procedures. This was a retrospective review of microbiologic data between January 2011 and February 2012. The sites studied were those associated with breast cancer surgery, thoracotomy, craniotomy, percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube insertion, and abdominal/pelvic surgery. Only patients with solid tumors were included. A total of 368 surgical site infections (SSIs) were identified (68 breast cancer related; 91 thoracotomy related; 45 craniotomy related; 75 PEG-tube insertion related; and 89 abdominal/pelvic surgery related). Of these, 58% were monomicrobial and 42% were polymicrobial. Overall, 85% of the 215 monomicrobial infections were caused by Gram-positive organisms and 13% by Gram-negative bacilli (GNB). Staphylococcus aureus was the predominant pathogen in monomicrobial infections (150 of 215, 70%). Sixty (40%) of these staphylococcal isolates were methicillin resistant (MRSA), and 65% had a vancomycin minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) ≥1.0 µg/ml. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the predominant GNB pathogen (19 of 27, 70%). Staphylococci were also the predominant pathogens in polymicrobial infections, while P. aeruginosa and Escherichia coli were the predominant GNB. Overall, 35% of isolates from polymicrobial infections were GNB. Cephalosporins (e.g., cefazolin) or amoxicillin/clavulanate was used most often for surgical prophylaxis, and 47% of organisms from monomicrobial infections (MRSA, P. aeruginosa) were resistant to them. A similar resistance pattern was observed in polymicrobial infections. Staphylococcus species were isolated most often from the sites studied. Polymicrobial infections (42%) and GNB monomicrobial infections (13%) were relatively frequent causes of SSIs. Many of these infections were caused by

  17. Evaluation of antibiotic susceptibility in wound infections: A pilot study from Bangladesh [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushmita Roy

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Infections due to antibiotic resistant bacteria have increased alarmingly in both developed and developing countries. Unrestrained and rapidly spreading bacterial growth has turned the management of wound infections into a serious challenge. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of different bacterial pathogens and their antibiotic susceptibility in various types of wound infections. Methods:  A cross-sectional study was conducted to collect 105 wound swabs. All isolated bacteria were identified based on colony characteristics, gram stain and standard biochemical tests, and antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST with the disc diffusion method. Descriptive statistics were used to present the study findings, and all analyses were performed using Stata Version 13. Results:  The rate of isolation of bacteria was 92.3%. Staphylococcus aureus was found to be the most frequent isolate (55.7%, followed by Escherichia coli (23.7%, Pseudomonas spp. (8.2%, and Streptococcus pyogenes (7.2%. Gram-positive bacteria were mostly (60% found sensitive to vancomycin, azithromycin, gentamicin, imipenem, cefixime, and ceftriaxone in this study. Among the Gram-negative bacteria, Escherichia coli (>60% showed sensitivity to cefixime, azithromycin, cefuroxime, ceftriaxone, cefotaxime, gentamycin, and ceftazidime. Conclusions: The diversity of isolated bacteria and their susceptibility patterns signify a need to implement a proper infection control strategy, which can be achieved by carrying out antibiotic sensitivity tests of the isolates.

  18. Reduced risk of surgical site infections through surveillance in a network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geubbels, Eveline L. P. E.; Nagelkerke, Nico J. D.; Mintjes-de Groot, A. Joke; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M. J. E.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; de Boer, Annette S.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the effect of multicentre surveillance for nosocomial infections on patients' risk of surgical site infection (SSI). DESIGN: Prospective multi-centre cohort study, from January 1996 to December 2000. SETTING: Acute care hospitals in The Netherlands. STUDY PARTICIPANTS: All 50

  19. Surgical Complications of Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) Infection in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Surgical Complications of Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) Infection in HIV infected children. J Karpelowsky, A Alexander, SD Peek, A Millar, H Rode. Abstract. Aim. Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) immunisation is well established as part of the South African national expanded programme for immunisation (EPI). The World ...

  20. What Factors are Associated With a Surgical Site Infection After Operative Treatment of an Elbow Fracture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claessen, Femke M A P; Braun, Yvonne; van Leeuwen, Wouter F; Dyer, George S; van den Bekerom, Michel P J; Ring, David

    2016-02-01

    Surgical site infections are one of the more common major complications of elbow fracture surgery and can contribute to other adverse outcomes, prolonged hospital stays, and increased healthcare costs. We asked: (1) What are the factors associated with a surgical site infection after elbow fracture surgery? (2) When taking the subset of closed elbow fractures only, what are the factors associated with a surgical site infection? (3) What are the common organisms isolated from an elbow infection after open treatment? One thousand three hundred twenty adult patients underwent surgery for an elbow fracture between January 2002 and July 2014 and were included in our study. Forty-eight of 1320 patients (4%) had a surgical site infection develop. Thirty-four of 1113 patients with a closed fracture (3%) had a surgical site infection develop. For all elbow fractures, use of plate and screw fixation (adjusted odds ratio [OR]= 2.2; 95% CI, 1.0-4.5; p = 0.041) and use of external fixation before surgery (adjusted OR = 4.7; 95% CI, 1.1-21; p = 0.035) were associated with higher infection rates. When subset analysis was performed for closed fractures, only smoking (adjusted OR = 2.2; 95% CI, 1.1-4.5; p = 0.023) was associated with higher infection rates. Staphylococcus aureus was the most common bacteria cultured (59%). The only modifiable risk factor for a surgical site infection after open reduction and internal fixation was cigarette smoking. Plate fixation and temporary external fixation are likely surrogates for more complex injuries, therefore no recommendations should be inferred from this association. Surgeons should counsel patients who smoke. Level IV, prognostic study.

  1. Calmodulin Gene Expression in Response to Mechanical Wounding and Botrytis cinerea Infection in Tomato Fruit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Peng

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Calmodulin, a ubiquitous calcium sensor, plays an important role in decoding stress-triggered intracellular calcium changes and regulates the functions of numerous target proteins involved in various plant physiological responses. To determine the functions of calmodulin in fleshy fruit, expression studies were performed on a family of six calmodulin genes (SlCaMs in mature-green stage tomato fruit in response to mechanical injury and Botrytis cinerea infection. Both wounding and pathogen inoculation triggered expression of all those genes, with SlCaM2 being the most responsive one to both treatments. Furthermore, all calmodulin genes were upregulated by salicylic acid and methyl jasmonate, two signaling molecules involved in plant immunity. In addition to SlCaM2, SlCaM1 was highly responsive to salicylic acid and methyl jasmonate. However, SlCaM2 exhibited a more rapid and stronger response than SlCaM1. Overexpression of SlCaM2 in tomato fruit enhanced resistance to Botrytis-induced decay, whereas reducing its expression resulted in increased lesion development. These results indicate that calmodulin is a positive regulator of plant defense in fruit by activating defense pathways including salicylate- and jasmonate-signaling pathways, and SlCaM2 is the major calmodulin gene responsible for this event.

  2. Surgical wound care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... replacement Anti-reflux surgery Bladder exstrophy repair Breast augmentation surgery Breast lump removal Bunion removal Carotid artery ... Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated: ...

  3. CLINICAL STUDY OF POST LAPAROTOMY WOUND DEHISCENCE

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    Chanda Ramanachalam

    2017-04-01

    undergone secondary suturings, 10 patients had undergone complete wound dehiscence, i.e. tension suturing. CONCLUSION Surgical factors like midline incisions, improper suture technique and improper aseptic precautions may lead to wound infection and then wound dehiscence.

  4. Update and validation of the Society for Vascular Surgery wound, ischemia, and foot infection threatened limb classification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Joseph L

    2014-03-01

    The diagnosis of critical limb ischemia, first defined in 1982, was intended to delineate a patient cohort with a threatened limb and at risk for amputation due to severe peripheral arterial disease. The influence of diabetes and its associated neuropathy on the pathogenesis-threatened limb was an excluded comorbidity, despite its known contribution to amputation risk. The Fontaine and Rutherford classifications of limb ischemia severity have also been used to predict amputation risk and the likelihood of tissue healing. The dramatic increase in the prevalence of diabetes mellitus and the expanding techniques of arterial revascularization has prompted modification of peripheral arterial disease classification schemes to improve outcomes analysis for patients with threatened limbs. The diabetic patient with foot ulceration and infection is at risk for limb loss, with abnormal arterial perfusion as only one determinant of outcome. The wound extent and severity of infection also impact the likelihood of limb loss. To better predict amputation risk, the Society for Vascular Surgery Lower Extremity Guidelines Committee developed a classification of the threatened lower extremity that reflects these important clinical considerations. Risk stratification is based on three major factors that impact amputation risk and clinical management: wound, ischemia, and foot infection. This classification scheme is relevant to the patient with critical limb ischemia because many are also diabetic. Implementation of the wound, ischemia, and foot infection classification system in critical limb ischemia patients is recommended and should assist the clinician in more meaningful analysis of outcomes for various forms of wound and arterial revascularizations procedures required in this challenging, patient population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infection impairs murine S100A8/A9 and neutrophil effector cytokines—implications for delayed wound closure?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trøstrup, Hannah; Lerche, Christian Johann; Christophersen, Lars Jackie

    2017-01-01

    The impact of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infections in chronic wounds and clinical implication for healing is receiving increased attention. However, the pathophysiology of host/pathogen interplay is not fully understood. By further revealing the mechanisms, necessary new treatment strategies...

  6. A Genetic Approach to the Development of New Therapeutic Phages to Fight Pseudomonas Aeruginosa in Wound Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Pleteneva

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a frequent participant in wound infections. Emergence of multiple antibiotic resistant strains has created significant problems in the treatment of infected wounds. Phage therapy (PT has been proposed as a possible alternative approach. Infected wounds are the perfect place for PT applications, since the basic condition for PT is ensured; namely, the direct contact of bacteria and their viruses. Plenty of virulent (“lytic” and temperate (“lysogenic” bacteriophages are known in P. aeruginosa. However, the number of virulent phage species acceptable for PT and their mutability are limited. Besides, there are different deviations in the behavior of virulent (and temperate phages from their expected canonical models of development. We consider some examples of non-canonical phage-bacterium interactions and the possibility of their use in PT. In addition, some optimal approaches to the development of phage therapy will be discussed from the point of view of a biologist, considering the danger of phage-assisted horizontal gene transfer (HGT, and from the point of view of a surgeon who has accepted the Hippocrates Oath to cure patients by all possible means. It is also time now to discuss the possible approaches in international cooperation for the development of PT. We think it would be advantageous to make phage therapy a kind of personalized medicine.

  7. [Surgical treatment for incisions fat colliquation or infections at early stage after operation of lumbar disc herniation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Ting-Jin; Zheng, Liang-Guo; Sun, Peng; Li, Xing-Xue

    2014-05-01

    To explore the reason, key diagnosic point and therapeutic method of the incisions fat colliquation or infections at early stage after operation of lumbar disc herniation. From July 2007 to May 2012, clinical data of 11 patients with incision fat liquefaction or early infection after lumbar discectomy were retrospectively analyzed. There were 5 males and 6 females with an average age of 43.1 years, and the mean time of incisions fat colliquation or infection was 5 days and a half after operation. The main clinical features included local wound pain aggravating, fervescence, fresh seepage in the wound, and blood inflammatory index increased, etc. The wound could heal at the first treatment stage or not was an evaluation standard of curative effect. All patients were followed up with an average period of 21 months. The wounds of 10 cases healed at the first stage without recurrence and complications. In 1 case infected by staphylococcus aureus, distal part of the wound present local red, swelling and with wave motion at 2 months after operation, staphylococcus aureus infection was confirmed after puncture and bacterial culture, and 1 thrum was found after local incision. The wound healed after change dressings for 1 week, without recurrence after followed up for 13 months. Preventing the risk factors before operation, minimizing invasive technique during operation reasonable antibiotics application for the lumbar operation reguiring placement objects, and correctly handling with wound after operation could prevent and reduce the incidence of incisions fat liquefaction or infection after operation of lumbar disc herniation. For incision fat liquefaction or infection, early diagnosis, debridement, VSD negative pressure irrigation and drainage, to choosing sensitive antibiotics according to the results of drug sensitivity, may contribute to wound early healing and decrease complication.

  8. Infection of a ventricular aneurysm and cardiac mural thrombus. Survival after surgical resection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venezio, F.R.; Thompson, J.E.; Sullivan, H.; Subramanian, R.; Ritzman, P.; Gunnar, R.M.

    1984-01-01

    Infections of cardiac mural thrombi are rare, and because antemortem diagnosis is difficult and antibiotic therapy alone ineffective, the associated mortality has been significant. A patient with gram-negative bacillary infection of a mural thrombus is described. Gallium 67 citrate isotope scanning and two-dimensional echocardiography were helpful adjuncts in establishing the diagnosis. Surgical resection of the infected myocardial tissue and prolonged antimicrobial therapy were necessary for cure

  9. Methylene Blue-Loaded Dissolving Microneedles: Potential Use in Photodynamic Antimicrobial Chemotherapy of Infected Wounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ester Caffarel-Salvador

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy involves delivery of a photosensitising drug that is activated by light of a specific wavelength, resulting in generation of highly reactive radicals. This activated species can cause destruction of targeted cells. Application of this process for treatment of microbial infections has been termed “photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy” (PACT. In the treatment of chronic wounds, the delivery of photosensitising agents is often impeded by the presence of a thick hyperkeratotic/necrotic tissue layer, reducing their therapeutic efficacy. Microneedles (MNs are an emerging drug delivery technology that have been demonstrated to successfully penetrate the outer layers of the skin, whilst minimising damage to skin barrier function. Delivering photosensitising drugs using this platform has been demonstrated to have several advantages over conventional photodynamic therapy, such as, painless application, reduced erythema, enhanced cosmetic results and improved intradermal delivery. The aim of this study was to physically characterise dissolving MNs loaded with the photosensitising agent, methylene blue and assess their photodynamic antimicrobial activity. Dissolving MNs were fabricated from aqueous blends of Gantrez® AN-139 co-polymer containing varying loadings of methylene blue. A height reduction of 29.8% was observed for MNs prepared from blends containing 0.5% w/w methylene blue following application of a total force of 70.56 N/array. A previously validated insertion test was used to assess the effect of drug loading on MN insertion into a wound model. Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Candida albicans biofilms were incubated with various methylene blue concentrations within the range delivered by MNs in vitro (0.1–2.5 mg/mL and either irradiated at 635 nm using a Paterson Lamp or subjected to a dark period. Microbial susceptibility to PACT was determined by assessing the total viable count. Kill rates of >96

  10. PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA BIOFILM INFECTION SUPPRESSES LOCAL HOST RESPONSE IN BURN WOUNDS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trostrup, H.; Lerche, C. J.; Christophersen, L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Non-invasive monitoring of wound healing is warranted. Opticalcoherence tomography (OCT) enables instant visualization of the epidermis andupper dermis. We have studied the healing of uniform epidermal wounds inhumans using OCT. Methods: Thirty-two, 16 females and 16 males, non-smok...

  11. Noncontact, Low Frequency Ultrasound as an Effective Therapy against Pseudomonas aeruginosa-infected Biofilm Wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Ears were shaved, sterilized with 70% ethanol, and intradermally injected with a 1% lidocaine /1 : 100,000 epinephrine solution at the planned wound...model.41 With an ineffective EPS, host inflammatory cells may be able to effectively penetrate the wound biofilm to eliminate resident bacteria

  12. Original Paper Detecting Nosocomial Intrinsic Infections through ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-04-20

    Apr 20, 2011 ... surgical procedures as precursory to intrinsic infections and that bacterial pathogens found on wounds and endogenous ... University Teaching Hospital, Idi Araba, Lagos, ..... confirm reason for selective decontamination of the.

  13. Development of Topical Treatment for Pseudomonas aeruginosa Wound Infections by Quorum-Sensing Inhibitors Mediated by Poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) Dendrimers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    dendrimers would provide added benefits as a delivery vehicle of QSI compounds to inhibit PA biofilms, by both increasing the transport of QSI as drug...Pseudomonas aeruginosa Wound Infections by Quorum-Sensing Inhibitors Mediated by Poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) Dendrimers PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...Development of Topical Treatment for Pseudomonas aeruginosa Wound Infections by Quorum-Sensing Inhibitors Mediated by Poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) Dendrimers

  14. Fluid Overload and Cumulative Thoracostomy Output Are Associated With Surgical Site Infection After Pediatric Cardiothoracic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sochet, Anthony A; Nyhan, Aoibhinn; Spaeder, Michael C; Cartron, Alexander M; Song, Xiaoyan; Klugman, Darren; Brown, Anna T

    2017-08-01

    To determine the impact of cumulative, postoperative thoracostomy output, amount of bolus IV fluids and peak fluid overload on the incidence and odds of developing a deep surgical site infection following pediatric cardiothoracic surgery. A single-center, nested, retrospective, matched case-control study. A 26-bed cardiac ICU in a 303-bed tertiary care pediatric hospital. Cases with deep surgical site infection following cardiothoracic surgery were identified retrospectively from January 2010 through December 2013 and individually matched to controls at a ratio of 1:2 by age, gender, Risk Adjustment for Congenital Heart Surgery score, Society of Thoracic Surgeons-European Association for Cardiothoracic Surgery category, primary cardiac diagnosis, and procedure. None. Twelve cases with deep surgical site infection were identified and matched to 24 controls without detectable differences in perioperative clinical characteristics. Deep surgical site infection cases had larger thoracostomy output and bolus IV fluid volumes at 6, 24, and 48 hours postoperatively compared with controls. For every 1 mL/kg of thoracostomy output, the odds of developing a deep surgical site infection increase by 13%. By receiver operative characteristic curve analysis, a cutoff of 49 mL/kg of thoracostomy output at 48 hours best discriminates the development of deep surgical site infection (sensitivity 83%, specificity 83%). Peak fluid overload was greater in cases than matched controls (12.5% vs 6%; p operative characteristic curve analysis, a threshold value of 10% peak fluid overload was observed to identify deep surgical site infection (sensitivity 67%, specificity 79%). Conditional logistic regression of peak fluid overload greater than 10% on the development of deep surgical site infection yielded an odds ratio of 9.4 (95% CI, 2-46.2). Increased postoperative peak fluid overload and cumulative thoracostomy output were associated with deep surgical site infection after pediatric

  15. Surgical Measures to Reduce Infection in Open Colorectal Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dell

    efforts are needed to minimize the risk of infection. ... and Ireland, and the Scottish intercollegiate Guidelines Network (2001), surgeons should audit the .... Early detection of a leaking colorectal anastomosis is essential to prevent mortality and ...

  16. Intra-cardiac pacemaker infection: Surgical management and outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameh Elameen

    2016-05-01

    Conclusion: Explantation of the complete pacemaker system has proved a reliable method to eradicate infection. Complications were rare, except in patients who present lately in a critically ill condition and septic shock.

  17. Antimicrobial activity of ceftaroline and other anti-infective agents against microbial pathogens recovered from the surgical intensive care patient population: a prevalence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmiston, Charles E; Krepel, Candace J; Leaper, David; Ledeboer, Nathan A; Mackey, Tami-Lea; Graham, Mary Beth; Lee, Cheong; Rossi, Peter J; Brown, Kellie R; Lewis, Brian D; Seabrook, Gary R

    2014-12-01

    Ceftaroline is a new parenteral cephalosporin agent with excellent activity against methicillin-sensitive (MSSA) and resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Critically ill surgical patients are susceptible to infection, often by multi-drug-resistant pathogens. The activity of ceftaroline against such pathogens has not been described. Three hundred thirty-five consecutive microbial isolates were collected from surgical wounds or abscesses, respiratory, urine, and blood cultures from patients in the surgical intensive care unit (SICU) of a major tertiary medical center. Using Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) standard methodology and published breakpoints, all aerobic, facultative anaerobic isolates were tested against ceftaroline and selected comparative antimicrobial agents. All staphylococcal isolates were susceptible to ceftaroline at a breakpoint of ≤1.0 mcg/mL. In addition, ceftaroline exhibited excellent activity against all streptococcal clinical isolates and non-ESBL-producing strains of Enterobacteriaceae (93.5%) recovered from SICU patients. Ceftaroline was inactive against ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, vancomycin-resistant enterococci, and selective gram-negative anaerobic bacteria. At present, ceftaroline is the only cephalosporin agent that is active against community and healthcare-associated MRSA. Further studies are needed to validate the benefit of this novel broad-spectrum anti-infective agent for the treatment of susceptible serious infections in the SICU patient population.

  18. Antibacterial activity of extracts from five medicinal plants and their formula against bacteria that cause chronic wound infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temrangsee, Pornthep; Kondo, Sumalee; Itharat, Arunporn

    2011-12-01

    Chronic wound is caused by various factors such as chemotherapy, gene damage, treatment with steroids, diabetes mellitus, renal failure, blood pressure, infection and nutritional factors. One of the most common causes is bacterial infection. Antibacterial activity of several herbal plants has been reported. Thai medicinal plants which possess biological activities are potential to develop an alternative treatment of bacterial infection. To study efficiency of extracts from medicinal plants and their formula against bacteria that cause chronic wound infection. Extraction of Thai medicinal plants including Curcuma longa Linn, Rhinacanthus nasutus Linn, Garcinia mangostana Linn, Caesalpinia sappan Linn and Centellia asiatica Linn was performed by maceration with 95% ethanol and decoction followed by freeze dry. Formulation was conducted by varying the ratio of each components. Antibacterial activity were determined disk diffusion and broth dilution against Staphylococcus aureus, Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumanii, Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Ethanolic extracts exhibited better antibacterial activity against tested strains than water extracts. Antibacterial activity of Caesalpinia sappan Linn. against S. aureus and MRSA showed the most effective with MIC value of 0.625 mg/ml. One of the five different formulas which contained two times proportion of C. sappan revealed that this formula was able to inhibit all tested strains with the MIC ranging between 0.156 mg/ml and 10 mg/ml. C. sappan is the most effective herbal plant. The formula with two times proportion of C. sappan is potentially best formula for development of medicinal product of chronic wound infection. The potential active compound of C. sappan is suggested for further investigation of antimicrobial activity and other biological properties.

  19. Evaluation of Novel Antimicrobial Peptides as Topical Anti-Infectives with Broad Spectrum Activity Against Combat-Related Bacterial and Fungal Wound Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Inc. Vallejo, CA 94592 REPORT DATE: October 2016 TYPE OF REPORT: Annual PREPARED FOR: U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command Fort...2016 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 30 Sep 2015 - 29 Sep 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Evaluation of Novel Antimicrobial Peptides as Topical...antibiotics and early debridement has been associated with a large reduction in burn wound infections. Current topical antibiotics include

  20. Outcome and treatment of postoperative spine surgical site infections: predictors of treatment success and failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruo, Keishi; Berven, Sigurd H

    2014-05-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is an important complication after spine surgery. The management of SSI is characterized by significant variability, and there is little guidance regarding an evidence-based approach. The objective of this study was to identify risk factors associated with treatment failure of SSI after spine surgery. A total of 225 consecutive patients with SSI after spine surgery between July 2005 and July 2010 were studied retrospectively. Patients were treated with aggressive surgical debridement and prolonged antibiotic therapy. Outcome and risk factors were analyzed in 197 patients having 1 year of follow-up. Treatment success was defined as resolution within 90 days. A total of 126 (76 %) cases were treated with retention of implants. Forty-three (22 %) cases had treatment failure with five (2.5 %) cases resulting in death. Lower rates of treatment success were observed with late infection (38 %), fusion with fixation to the ilium (67 %), Propionibacterium acnes (43 %), poly microbial infection (68 %), >6 operated spinal levels (67 %), and instrumented cases (73 %). Higher rates of early resolution were observed with superficial infection (93 %), methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (95 %), and failure. Superficial infection and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus were predictors of early resolution. Postoperative spine infections were treated with aggressive surgical debridement and antibiotic therapy. High rates of treatment failure occurred in cases with late infection, long instrumented fusions, polymicrobial infections, and Propionibacterium acnes. Removal of implants and direct or staged re-implantation may be a useful strategy in cases with high risk of treatment failure.

  1. An in vitro model of bacterial infections in wounds and other soft tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werthen, M.; Henriksson, L.; Jensen, P.O.

    2010-01-01

    There is growing evidence that bacteria play a crucial role in the persistence of chronic wounds. These bacteria are most probably present in polymer-embedded aggregates that represent the biofilm mode of growth. Much work has been carried out to study the development of biofilms in vitro......, with bacteria growing as biofilm aggregates in a collagen gel matrix with serum protein mimicking the wound bed of chronic wounds. The model was verified to comprise important hallmarks of biofilms such as the bacterial embedment in a matrix and increased antibiotic tolerance. Furthermore, we have verified...

  2. The relationship of hospital charges and volume to surgical site infection after total hip replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boas, Rebecca; Ensor, Kelsey; Qian, Edward; Hutzler, Lorraine; Slover, James; Bosco, Joseph

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the effect of hospital volume and charges on the rate of surgical site infections for total hip replacements (THRs) in New York State (NYS). In NYS, higher volume hospitals have higher charges after THR. The study team analyzed 93,620 hip replacements performed in NYS between 2008 and 2011. Hospital charges increased significantly from $43,713 in 2008 to $50,652 in 2011 (P<.01). Compared with lower volume hospitals, patients who underwent THR at the highest volume hospitals had significantly lower surgical site infection rates (P=.003) and higher total hospital charges (P<.0001). The study team found that in the highest volume hospitals, preventing one surgical site infection was associated with $1.6 million dollars in increased charges. © 2014 by the American College of Medical Quality.